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Sample records for heterogeneous nuclear rna

  1. A chicken mRNA similar to heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein H1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozdziak, Paul E; Giamario, Carol; Dibner, Julia J; McCoy, Darell W

    2004-01-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins are predominantly nuclear RNA-binding proteins that function in a variety of cellular activities. The objective of these experiments was to clone a cDNA for a chicken protein similar to other previously reported heterogeneous ribonucleoproteins for other species. The 5' and 3' ends of the chicken mRNA were cloned using Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE). Subsequently, the expression of the mRNA sequence was confirmed via Northern analysis. The deduced amino acid sequence was approximately 86% identical to corresponding regions of human, mouse, or zebrafish proteins similar to heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein H1. The expression data confirmed the size of the predicted mRNA sequence. The newly identified sequence may be employed in future studies aimed at understanding the role of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins in avian species.

  2. Yeast nuclear RNA processing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jade; Bernstein; Eric; A; Toth

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear RNA processing requires dynamic and intricately regulated machinery composed of multiple enzymes and their cofactors.In this review,we summarize recent experiments using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system that have yielded important insights regarding the conversion of pre-RNAs to functional RNAs,and the elimination of aberrant RNAs and unneeded intermediates from the nuclear RNA pool.Much progress has been made recently in describing the 3D structure of many elements of the nuclear degradation machinery and its cofactors.Similarly,the regulatory mechanisms that govern RNA processing are gradually coming into focus.Such advances invariably generate many new questions,which we highlight in this review.

  3. Inhibition of Inflammation and Bone Erosion by RNA Interference-Mediated Silencing of Heterogeneous Nuclear RNP A2/B1 in Two Experimental Models of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herman, S.; Fischer, A.; Presumey, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Koenders, M.I.; Escriou, V.; Apparailly, F.; Steiner, G.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The nuclear protein heterogeneous nuclear RNP A2/B1 (hnRNP A2/B1) is involved in posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression. It is constitutively expressed in lymphoid organs and highly up-regulated in the synovial tissue of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), who may also gen

  4. (1)H, (13)C and (15)N resonance assignment of the first N-terminal RNA recognition motif (RRM) of the human heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein H (hnRNP H).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabal, Stéphanie; van Heijenoort, Carine; Guittet, Eric

    2007-12-01

    Human heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein H (hnRNP H) regulates alternative splicing of HIV-1 Tat pre-mRNA. The structure of the first N-terminal domain (residues 1-104) of hnRNP H was solved and its binding to an exonic splicing silencer (pESS2) studied. For this, all backbone and 85% of side-chain resonance frequencies were assigned.

  5. Targeting the nuclear RNA exosome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meola, Nicola; Jensen, Torben Heick

    2017-01-01

    Centrally positioned in nuclear RNA metabolism, the exosome deals with virtually all transcript types. This 3'-5' exo- and endo-nucleolytic degradation machine is guided to its RNA targets by adaptor proteins that enable substrate recognition. Recently, the discovery of the 'Poly(A) tail exosome...

  6. Nuclear Export of Messenger RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katahira, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Transport of messenger RNA (mRNA) from the nucleus to the cytoplasm is an essential step of eukaryotic gene expression. In the cell nucleus, a precursor mRNA undergoes a series of processing steps, including capping at the 5' ends, splicing and cleavage/polyadenylation at the 3' ends. During this process, the mRNA associates with a wide variety of proteins, forming a messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) particle. Association with factors involved in nuclear export also occurs during transcription and processing, and thus nuclear export is fully integrated into mRNA maturation. The coupling between mRNA maturation and nuclear export is an important mechanism for providing only fully functional and competent mRNA to the cytoplasmic translational machinery, thereby ensuring accuracy and swiftness of gene expression. This review describes the molecular mechanism of nuclear mRNA export mediated by the principal transport factors, including Tap-p15 and the TREX complex. PMID:25836925

  7. Purification and characterization of a simple ribonucleoprotein particle containing small nucleoplasmic RNAs (snRNP) as a subset of RNP containing heterogenous nuclear RNA (hnRNP) from HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunel, C; Widada, J S; Lelay, M N; Jeanteur, P; Liautard, J P

    1981-02-25

    A ribonucleoprotein complex whose RNA complement consists exclusively of small nuclear RNA species (snRNA) has been purified from particles containing heterogenous nuclear RNA (hnRNP) from HeLa cells. This was accomplished by taking advantage of their ability to band at a density of about 1.43 g/cm3 in plain cesium chloride as well as in cesium chloride gradients containing 0.5% sarkosyl without prior aldehyde fixation. After these two steps of equilibrium density centrifugation, these snRNPs were still largely contaminated by free proteins (and especially phosphoproteins). A final step of purification by velocity sedimentation in a sucrose gradient containing 0.5 M cesium chloride and 0.5% sarkosyl was efficient in completely eliminating all free proteins. U1, U2, U4, U5 and U6 species according to the nomenclature of Lerner et al. (Nature, (1980) 283, 220-224) were found in these purified snRNPs, while a significant part of U6 and a small amount of U2 were found in the bottom fraction. 5S species behaved entirely as free RNA and is presumably a contaminant of cytoplasmic origin. Electrophoresis of proteins from snRNP labeled in vivo with (35S) methionine, revealed four bands with migrations corresponding to molecular weights ranging between 10,000 and 14,000 daltons.

  8. Synthesis of RNA oligomers on heterogeneous templates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertem, G.; Ferris, J. P.

    1996-01-01

    The concept of an RNA world in the chemical origin of life is appealing, as nucleic acids are capable of both information storage and acting as templates that catalyse the synthesis of complementary molecules. Template-directed synthesis has been demonstrated for homogeneous oligonucleotides that, like natural nucleic acids, have 3',5' linkages between the nucleotide monomers. But it seems likely that prebiotic routes to RNA-like molecules would have produced heterogeneous molecules with various kinds of phosphodiester linkages and both linear and cyclic nucleotide chains. Here we show that such heterogeneity need be no obstacle to the templating of complementary molecules. Specifically, we show that heterogeneous oligocytidylates, formed by the montmorillonite clay-catalysed condensation of actuated monomers, can serve as templates for the synthesis of oligoguanylates. Furthermore, we show that oligocytidylates that are exclusively 2',5'-linked can also direct synthesis of oligoguanylates. Such heterogeneous templating reactions could have increased the diversity of the pool of protonucleic acids from which life ultimately emerged.

  9. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein D/AUF1 interacts with heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein L

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hong-Gyu Park; Ji-Young Yoon; Mieyoung Choi

    2007-12-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein L (hnRNP L) is one of the principal pre-mRNA-binding proteins found in human cells. The hnRNP L protein is fairly abundant. However, it is not restricted to the nucleus, and instead shuttles between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. It is composed of 558 amino acid residues and harbours four loosely conserved RNP-consensus RNA-binding domains. In an attempt to characterize the interaction occurring between cellular proteins and hnRNP L, yeast two-hybrid screening was conducted using a HeLa cDNA library. Some of the cDNA clones were found to harbour a partial human hnRNP D/AUF1 cDNA (GeneBank accession number NM_031369). In this study, we determined that hnRNP L interacts specifically with the hnRNP D/AUF1 in the yeast two-hybrid system. This interaction was verified via an in vitro pull-down assay.

  10. Intratumoral heterogeneity of microRNA expression in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raychaudhuri, Mithu; Schuster, Tibor; Buchner, Theresa; Malinowsky, Katharina; Bronger, Holger; Schwarz-Boeger, Ulrike; Höfler, Heinz; Avril, Stefanie

    2012-07-01

    Profiling studies have identified specific microRNA (miRNA) signatures in malignant tumors including breast cancer. Our aim was to assess intratumoral heterogeneity in miRNA expression levels within primary breast cancers and between axillary lymph node metastases from the same patient. Specimens of 16 primary breast cancers were sampled in 8-10 distinct locations including the peripheral, intermediate, and central tumor zones, as well as two to five axillary lymph node metastases (n = 9). Total RNA was extracted from 132 paraffin-embedded samples, and the expression of miR-10b, miR-210, miR-31, and miR-335 was assessed as well as the reproducibility of RNA extraction and miRNA analysis by quantitative RT-PCR. Considerable intratumoral heterogeneity existed for all four miRNAs within primary breast cancers (CV 40%). No significant differences within (CV 34%) or between different tumor zones (CV 33%) were found. A similar variation in miRNA expression was observed between corresponding lymph node metastases (mean CV 40%). In comparison, the variation among different patients showed a CV of 80% for primary tumors and 103% for lymph node metastases. Both miRNA extraction procedures and quantitative RT-PCR showed high reproducibility (CV ≤ 2%). Thus, the intratumoral heterogeneity of miRNA expression in breast cancers can lead to significant sampling bias. Assessment of breast cancer miRNA profiles may require sampling at several different tumor locations and of several tumor-involved lymph nodes when deriving miRNA expression profiles of metastases.

  11. Intratumoral Heterogeneity of MicroRNA Expression in Rectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Anne Haahr Mellergaard; Andersen, Rikke Fredslund; Nielsen, Boye Schnack

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: An increasing number of studies have investigated microRNAs (miRNAs) as potential markers of diagnosis, treatment and prognosis. So far, agreement between studies has been minimal, which may in part be explained by intratumoral heterogeneity of miRNA expression. The aim of the present...... study was to assess the heterogeneity of a panel of selected miRNAs in rectal cancer, using two different technical approaches. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The expression of the investigated miRNAs was analysed by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and in situ hybridization (ISH...... using Spearman's correlation. RESULTS: ICCsingle (one sample from each patient) was higher than 50% for miRNA-21 and miRNA-31. For miRNA-125b, miRNA-145, and miRNA-630, ICCsingle was lower than 50%. The ICCmean (mean of three samples from each patient) was higher than 50% for miRNA-21(RT-qPCR and ISH...

  12. Persistent nuclear actin filaments inhibit transcription by RNA polymerase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serebryannyy, Leonid A; Parilla, Megan; Annibale, Paolo; Cruz, Christina M; Laster, Kyle; Gratton, Enrico; Kudryashov, Dmitri; Kosak, Steven T; Gottardi, Cara J; de Lanerolle, Primal

    2016-09-15

    Actin is abundant in the nucleus and it is clear that nuclear actin has important functions. However, mystery surrounds the absence of classical actin filaments in the nucleus. To address this question, we investigated how polymerizing nuclear actin into persistent nuclear actin filaments affected transcription by RNA polymerase II. Nuclear filaments impaired nuclear actin dynamics by polymerizing and sequestering nuclear actin. Polymerizing actin into stable nuclear filaments disrupted the interaction of actin with RNA polymerase II and correlated with impaired RNA polymerase II localization, dynamics, gene recruitment, and reduced global transcription and cell proliferation. Polymerizing and crosslinking nuclear actin in vitro similarly disrupted the actin-RNA-polymerase-II interaction and inhibited transcription. These data rationalize the general absence of stable actin filaments in mammalian somatic nuclei. They also suggest a dynamic pool of nuclear actin is required for the proper localization and activity of RNA polymerase II.

  13. [Polyadenylated RNA and mRNA export factors in extrachromosomal nuclear domains of vitellogenic oocytes of the insect Tenebrio molitor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogoliubov, D S; Kiselev, A M; Shabel'nikov, S V; Parfenov, V N

    2012-01-01

    The nucleus ofvitellogenic oocytes of the yellow mealworm, Tenebrio molitor, contains a karyosphere that consists of the condensed chromatin embedded in an extrachromosomal fibrogranular material. Numerous nuclear bodies located freely in the nucleoplasm are also observed. Amongst these bodies, counterparts of nuclear speckles (= interchromatin granule clusters, IGCs) can be identified by the presence of the marker protein SC35. Microinjections of fluorescently tagged methyloligoribonucleotide probes 2'-O-Me(U)22, complementary to poly(A) tails of RNAs, revealed poly(A)+ RNA in the vast majority of IGCs. We found that all T. molitor oocyte IGCs contain heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) core protein Al that localizes to IGCs in an RNA-dependent manner. The extrachromosomal material of the karyosphere and a part of nucleoplasmic IGCs also contain the adapter protein Aly that is known to provide a link between pre-mRNA splicing and mRNA export. The essential mRNA export factor/receptor NXF1 was observed to colocalize with Aly. In nucleoplasmic IGCs, NXF1 was found to localize in an RNA-dependent manner whereas it is RNA-independently located in the extrachromosomal material of the karyosphere. We believe our data suggest on a role of the nucleoplasmic IGCs in mRNA biogenesis and retention in a road to nuclear export.

  14. Functional Significance of the Interaction between the mRNA-binding Protein, Nab2, and the Nuclear Pore-associated Protein, Mlp1, in mRNA Export* S⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Fasken, Milo B.; Stewart, Murray; Corbett, Anita H.

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear export of mRNA requires several key mRNA-binding proteins that recognize and remodel the mRNA and target it for export via interactions with the nuclear pore complex. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the shuttling heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein, Nab2, which is essential for mRNA export, specifically recognizes poly(A) RNA and binds to the nuclear pore-associated protein, myosin-like protein 1 (Mlp1), which functions in mRNA export and quality control. Specifically, the N-terminal...

  15. Cloning and Characterization of a Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein Homolog from Pearl Oyster, Pinctada fucata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xunhao XIONG; Qiaoli FENG; Liping XIE; Rongqing ZHANG

    2007-01-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs) have fundamental roles in the posttranscriptional control of gene expression. Here, a cDNA encoding a presumed full-length RNA-binding protein was isolated from pearl oyster (Pinctadafucata) using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction with degenerate primers, and rapid amplification of cDNA ends. The full-length cDNA consists of 2737 bp with an open reading frame encoding a protein of 624 amino acids with a Predicted molecular weight of 69 kDa and isoelectric point of 8.7. The putative pearl oyster RNA-binding protein presents a molecular organization close to the hnRNPs, namely an acidic N-terminal followed by three RNA-recognition motifs and a Cterminal that contains RG/RGG repeated motifs. When transfected HeLa cells, the Pf-HRPH (Pinctada fucata hnRNP homolog) gene expression product was found only in nuclei, revealing that it is a nuclear protein. The expression pattern was also investigated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction,indicating that Pf-HRPH mRNA was abundantly expressed in gonad, gill, and viscera. As far as we know,the putative Pf-HRPH is the first hnRNP homolog cloned in mollusks. These data are significant for further study of the multiple functions of RNA-binding protein.

  16. RNA Nuclear Export: From Neurological Disorders to Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hautbergue, Guillaume M

    2017-01-01

    The presence of a nuclear envelope, also known as nuclear membrane, defines the structural framework of all eukaryotic cells by separating the nucleus, which contains the genetic material, from the cytoplasm where the synthesis of proteins takes place. Translation of proteins in Eukaryotes is thus dependent on the active transport of DNA-encoded RNA molecules through pores embedded within the nuclear membrane. Several mechanisms are involved in this process generally referred to as RNA nuclear export or nucleocytoplasmic transport of RNA. The regulated expression of genes requires the nuclear export of protein-coding messenger RNA molecules (mRNAs) as well as non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) together with proteins and pre-assembled ribosomal subunits. The nuclear export of mRNAs is intrinsically linked to the co-transcriptional processing of nascent transcripts synthesized by the RNA polymerase II. This functional coupling is essential for the survival of cells allowing for timely nuclear export of fully processed transcripts, which could otherwise cause the translation of abnormal proteins such as the polymeric repeat proteins produced in some neurodegenerative diseases. Alterations of the mRNA nuclear export pathways can also lead to genome instability and to various forms of cancer. This chapter will describe the molecular mechanisms driving the nuclear export of RNAs with a particular emphasis on mRNAs. It will also review their known alterations in neurological disorders and cancer, and the recent opportunities they offer for the potential development of novel therapeutic strategies.

  17. Efflux of RNA from resealed nuclear envelope ghosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochnow, D; Thomson, M; Schröder, H C; Müller, W E; Agutter, P S

    1994-08-01

    mRNA translocation across the nuclear envelope and the appropriate signal-receptor interactions have been studied using resealed rat liver nuclear envelope ghosts (RNEG). We compared export kinetics of nonadenylated (tRNAs, histone-2 poly(A)- mRNA), and adenylated RNAs (poly(A)+ tRNAs, synthetic histone-2 poly(A) +mRNA, albumin mRNA, beta-globin poly(A) +mRNA and a total poly(A) + mRNA extract from rat liver cells). ATP-dependent export of mRNAs and of total poly(A)+ RNA was prevented by inhibitors of a nuclear envelope NTPase. All adenylated RNA species competed with each other for export, but nonadenylated RNAs did not. This indicates the existence of different translocation mechanisms for different RNA species with their appropriate nuclear envelope associated RNA receptors involved in export. The attachment of a poly(A)250 sequence at the 3'-end of tRNA or histone messenger masks the intrinsic RNA export signal of nonadenylated RNAs and results in efflux comparable to that of beta-globin poly(A)+ mRNA. The attachment on oligo(A)5 does not have any comparable effect of nonadenylated RNA translocation. Export of all polyadenylated RNAs from RNEGs is blocked by a monoclonal antibody, which is directed against an intranuclear envelope poly(A) binding protein. The results suggest that the pore complexes do not select RNAs for export to the cytoplasm and are therefore not responsible for nuclear restriction of mRNA precursors.

  18. Nuclear RNA sequencing of the mouse erythroid cell transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Jennifer A; Clay, Ieuan; Umlauf, David; Chen, Chih-Yu; Moir, Catherine A; Eskiw, Christopher H; Schoenfelder, Stefan; Chakalova, Lyubomira; Nagano, Takashi; Fraser, Peter

    2012-01-01

    In addition to protein coding genes a substantial proportion of mammalian genomes are transcribed. However, most transcriptome studies investigate steady-state mRNA levels, ignoring a considerable fraction of the transcribed genome. In addition, steady-state mRNA levels are influenced by both transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms, and thus do not provide a clear picture of transcriptional output. Here, using deep sequencing of nuclear RNAs (nucRNA-Seq) in parallel with chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-Seq) of active RNA polymerase II, we compared the nuclear transcriptome of mouse anemic spleen erythroid cells with polymerase occupancy on a genome-wide scale. We demonstrate that unspliced transcripts quantified by nucRNA-seq correlate with primary transcript frequencies measured by RNA FISH, but differ from steady-state mRNA levels measured by poly(A)-enriched RNA-seq. Highly expressed protein coding genes showed good correlation between RNAPII occupancy and transcriptional output; however, genome-wide we observed a poor correlation between transcriptional output and RNAPII association. This poor correlation is due to intergenic regions associated with RNAPII which correspond with transcription factor bound regulatory regions and a group of stable, nuclear-retained long non-coding transcripts. In conclusion, sequencing the nuclear transcriptome provides an opportunity to investigate the transcriptional landscape in a given cell type through quantification of unspliced primary transcripts and the identification of nuclear-retained long non-coding RNAs.

  19. Nuclear RNA sequencing of the mouse erythroid cell transcriptome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A Mitchell

    Full Text Available In addition to protein coding genes a substantial proportion of mammalian genomes are transcribed. However, most transcriptome studies investigate steady-state mRNA levels, ignoring a considerable fraction of the transcribed genome. In addition, steady-state mRNA levels are influenced by both transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms, and thus do not provide a clear picture of transcriptional output. Here, using deep sequencing of nuclear RNAs (nucRNA-Seq in parallel with chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-Seq of active RNA polymerase II, we compared the nuclear transcriptome of mouse anemic spleen erythroid cells with polymerase occupancy on a genome-wide scale. We demonstrate that unspliced transcripts quantified by nucRNA-seq correlate with primary transcript frequencies measured by RNA FISH, but differ from steady-state mRNA levels measured by poly(A-enriched RNA-seq. Highly expressed protein coding genes showed good correlation between RNAPII occupancy and transcriptional output; however, genome-wide we observed a poor correlation between transcriptional output and RNAPII association. This poor correlation is due to intergenic regions associated with RNAPII which correspond with transcription factor bound regulatory regions and a group of stable, nuclear-retained long non-coding transcripts. In conclusion, sequencing the nuclear transcriptome provides an opportunity to investigate the transcriptional landscape in a given cell type through quantification of unspliced primary transcripts and the identification of nuclear-retained long non-coding RNAs.

  20. Heterogeneous Nuclear Reactor Models for Optimal Xenon Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondal, Ishtiaq Ahmad

    Nuclear reactors are generally modeled as homogeneous mixtures of fuel, control, and other materials while in reality they are heterogeneous-homogeneous configurations comprised of fuel and control rods along with other materials. Similarly, for space-time studies of a nuclear reactor, homogeneous, usually one-group diffusion theory, models are used, and the system equations are solved by either nodal or modal expansion approximations. Study of xenon-induced problems has also been carried out using similar models and with the help of dynamic programming or classical calculus of variations or the minimum principle. In this study a thermal nuclear reactor is modeled as a two-dimensional lattice of fuel and control rods placed in an infinite-moderator in plane geometry. The two-group diffusion theory approximation is used for neutron transport. Space -time neutron balance equations are written for two groups and reduced to one space-time algebraic equation by using the two-dimensional Fourier transform. This equation is written at all fuel and control rod locations. Iodine -xenon and promethium-samarium dynamic equations are also written at fuel rod locations only. These equations are then linearized about an equilibrium point which is determined from the steady-state form of the original nonlinear system equations. After studying poisonless criticality, with and without control, and the stability of the open-loop system and after checking its controllability, a performance criterion is defined for the xenon-induced spatial flux oscillation problem in the form of a functional to be minimized. Linear -quadratic optimal control theory is then applied to solve the problem. To perform a variety of different additional useful studies, this formulation has potential for various extensions and variations; for example, different geometry of the problem, with possible extension to three dimensions, heterogeneous -homogeneous formulation to include, for example, homogeneously

  1. Nuclear imprisonment: viral strategies to arrest host mRNA nuclear export.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuss, Sharon K; Mata, Miguel A; Zhang, Liang; Fontoura, Beatriz M A

    2013-07-01

    Viruses possess many strategies to impair host cellular responses to infection. Nuclear export of host messenger RNAs (mRNA) that encode antiviral factors is critical for antiviral protein production and control of viral infections. Several viruses have evolved sophisticated strategies to inhibit nuclear export of host mRNAs, including targeting mRNA export factors and nucleoporins to compromise their roles in nucleo-cytoplasmic trafficking of cellular mRNA. Here, we present a review of research focused on suppression of host mRNA nuclear export by viruses, including influenza A virus and vesicular stomatitis virus, and the impact of this viral suppression on host antiviral responses.

  2. Nuclear Imprisonment: Viral Strategies to Arrest Host mRNA Nuclear Export

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuss, Sharon K.; Mata, Miguel A.; Zhang, Liang; Fontoura, Beatriz M. A.

    2013-01-01

    Viruses possess many strategies to impair host cellular responses to infection. Nuclear export of host messenger RNAs (mRNA) that encode antiviral factors is critical for antiviral protein production and control of viral infections. Several viruses have evolved sophisticated strategies to inhibit nuclear export of host mRNAs, including targeting mRNA export factors and nucleoporins to compromise their roles in nucleo-cytoplasmic trafficking of cellular mRNA. Here, we present a review of research focused on suppression of host mRNA nuclear export by viruses, including influenza A virus and vesicular stomatitis virus, and the impact of this viral suppression on host antiviral responses. PMID:23872491

  3. Nuclear proteins hijacked by mammalian cytoplasmic plus strand RNA viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lloyd, Richard E., E-mail: rlloyd@bcm.edu

    2015-05-15

    Plus strand RNA viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm face challenges in supporting the numerous biosynthetic functions required for replication and propagation. Most of these viruses are genetically simple and rely heavily on co-opting cellular proteins, particularly cellular RNA-binding proteins, into new roles for support of virus infection at the level of virus-specific translation, and building RNA replication complexes. In the course of infectious cycles many nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling proteins of mostly nuclear distribution are detained in the cytoplasm by viruses and re-purposed for their own gain. Many mammalian viruses hijack a common group of the same factors. This review summarizes recent gains in our knowledge of how cytoplasmic RNA viruses use these co-opted host nuclear factors in new functional roles supporting virus translation and virus RNA replication and common themes employed between different virus groups. - Highlights: • Nuclear shuttling host proteins are commonly hijacked by RNA viruses to support replication. • A limited group of ubiquitous RNA binding proteins are commonly hijacked by a broad range of viruses. • Key virus proteins alter roles of RNA binding proteins in different stages of virus replication.

  4. Monoclonal antibody that recognizes a domain on heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K and PTB-associated splicing factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Jurado, Gema; Llanes, Diego; Moreno, Angela; Soria, Bernat; Tejedo, Juan R

    2011-02-01

    hnRNP K protein is a member of the heterogeneous nuclear protein (hnRNP) complex that, besides its function as a translational regulator of human mRNA, is also considered to be a transcription factor involved in tumorigenesis. PSF is a protein part of the human spliceosome and essential in RNA splicing. Here we report the generation of one monoclonal antibody GG6H9.1C3 that recognized both hnRNP K and PSF proteins using Western blot analysis, flow cytometry, and immunocytochemistry.

  5. [Comparative study of nuclear RNA and polysomal mRNA in sunflower seedlings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntsevich, V I; Tishchenko, E N; Lobov, V P; Zhil'ko, T D

    1994-01-01

    A comparative study of nRNA and polysomal mRNA complexity in the sunflower seedlings by molecular DNA:RNA hybridization method was carried out. It is established that nRNA complexity 4 times exceeds that of mRNA and is equal to 4.85.10(8) bp. Thus the nuclear RNA is expressed from at least 50.47% of single-copy DNA or 10.40% of genome. This data allow the presence of regulation of sunflower genome expression on the posttranscriptional level to be assumed.

  6. Nuclear RNA surveillance: role of TRAMP in controlling exosome specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Karyn; Butler, J Scott

    2013-01-01

    The advent of high-throughput sequencing technologies has revealed that pervasive transcription generates RNAs from nearly all regions of eukaryotic genomes. Normally, these transcripts undergo rapid degradation by a nuclear RNA surveillance system primarily featuring the RNA exosome. This multimeric protein complex plays a critical role in the efficient turnover and processing of a vast array of RNAs in the nucleus. Despite its initial discovery over a decade ago, important questions remain concerning the mechanisms that recruit and activate the nuclear exosome. Specificity and modulation of exosome activity requires additional protein cofactors, including the conserved TRAMP polyadenylation complex. Recent studies suggest that helicase and RNA-binding subunits of TRAMP direct RNA substrates for polyadenylation, which enhances their degradation by Dis3/Rrp44 and Rrp6, the two exosome-associated ribonucleases. These findings indicate that the exosome and TRAMP have evolved highly flexible functions that allow recognition of a wide range of RNA substrates. This flexibility provides the nuclear RNA surveillance system with the ability to regulate the levels of a broad range of coding and noncoding RNAs, which results in profound effects on gene expression, cellular development, gene silencing, and heterochromatin formation. This review summarizes recent findings on the nuclear RNA surveillance complexes, and speculates upon possible mechanisms for TRAMP-mediated substrate recognition and exosome activation.

  7. Exportin-5 mediates nuclear export of SRP RNA in vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeiwa, Toshihiko; Taniguchi, Ichiro; Ohno, Mutsuhito

    2015-04-01

    The signal recognition particle is a ribonucleoprotein complex that is essential for the translocation of nascent proteins into the endoplasmic reticulum. It has been shown that the RNA component (SRP RNA) is exported from the nucleus by CRM1 in the budding yeast. However, how SRP RNA is exported in higher species has been elusive. Here, we show that SRP RNA does not use the CRM1 pathway in Xenopus oocytes. Instead, SRP RNA uses the same export pathway as pre-miRNA and tRNA as showed by cross-competition experiments. Consistently, the recombinant Exportin-5 protein specifically stimulated export of SRP RNA as well as of pre-miRNA and tRNA, whereas an antibody raised against Exportin-5 specifically inhibited export of the same RNA species. Moreover, biotinylated SRP RNA can pull down Exportin-5 but not CRM1 from HeLa cell nuclear extracts in a RanGTP-dependent manner. These results, taken together, strongly suggest that the principal export receptor for SRP RNA in vertebrates is Exportin-5 unlike in the budding yeast.

  8. Nuclear export of RNA: Different sizes, shapes and functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Tobias; Ngo, Linh H; Wickramasinghe, Vihandha O

    2017-09-01

    Export of protein-coding and non-coding RNA molecules from the nucleus to the cytoplasm is critical for gene expression. This necessitates the continuous transport of RNA species of different size, shape and function through nuclear pore complexes via export receptors and adaptor proteins. Here, we provide an overview of the major RNA export pathways in humans, highlighting the similarities and differences between each. Its importance is underscored by the growing appreciation that deregulation of RNA export pathways is associated with human diseases like cancer. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Influenza virus mRNA trafficking through host nuclear speckles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mor, Amir; White, Alexander; Zhang, Ke; Thompson, Matthew; Esparza, Matthew; Muñoz-Moreno, Raquel; Koide, Kazunori; Lynch, Kristen W; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Fontoura, Beatriz M A

    2016-05-27

    Influenza A virus is a human pathogen with a genome composed of eight viral RNA segments that replicate in the nucleus. Two viral mRNAs are alternatively spliced. The unspliced M1 mRNA is translated into the matrix M1 protein, while the ion channel M2 protein is generated after alternative splicing. These proteins are critical mediators of viral trafficking and budding. We show that the influenza virus uses nuclear speckles to promote post-transcriptional splicing of its M1 mRNA. We assign previously unknown roles for the viral NS1 protein and cellular factors to an intranuclear trafficking pathway that targets the viral M1 mRNA to nuclear speckles, mediates splicing at these nuclear bodies and exports the spliced M2 mRNA from the nucleus. Given that nuclear speckles are storage sites for splicing factors, which leave these sites to splice cellular pre-mRNAs at transcribing genes, we reveal a functional subversion of nuclear speckles to promote viral gene expression.

  10. Functions of Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoproteins in Stem Cell Potency and Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qishan Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells possess huge importance in developmental biology, disease modelling, cell replacement therapy, and tissue engineering in regenerative medicine because they have the remarkable potential for self-renewal and to differentiate into almost all the cell types in the human body. Elucidation of molecular mechanisms regulating stem cell potency and differentiation is essential and critical for extensive application. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs are modular proteins consisting of RNA-binding motifs and auxiliary domains characterized by extensive and divergent functions in nucleic acid metabolism. Multiple roles of hnRNPs in transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation enable them to be effective gene expression regulators. More recent findings show that hnRNP proteins are crucial factors implicated in maintenance of stem cell self-renewal and pluripotency and cell differentiation. The hnRNPs interact with certain sequences in target gene promoter regions to initiate transcription. In addition, they recognize 3′UTR or 5′UTR of specific gene mRNA forming mRNP complex to regulate mRNA stability and translation. Both of these regulatory pathways lead to modulation of gene expression that is associated with stem cell proliferation, cell cycle control, pluripotency, and committed differentiation.

  11. Transcription elongation. Heterogeneous tracking of RNA polymerase and its biological implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imashimizu, Masahiko; Shimamoto, Nobuo; Oshima, Taku; Kashlev, Mikhail

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of transcription elongation via pausing of RNA polymerase has multiple physiological roles. The pausing mechanism depends on the sequence heterogeneity of the DNA being transcribed, as well as on certain interactions of polymerase with specific DNA sequences. In order to describe the mechanism of regulation, we introduce the concept of heterogeneity into the previously proposed alternative models of elongation, power stroke and Brownian ratchet. We also discuss molecular origins and physiological significances of the heterogeneity.

  12. Assessing the 5S ribosomal RNA heterogeneity in Arabidopsis thaliana using short RNA next generation sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymanski, Maciej; Karlowski, Wojciech M

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotes, ribosomal 5S rRNAs are products of multigene families organized within clusters of tandemly repeated units. Accumulation of genomic data obtained from a variety of organisms demonstrated that the potential 5S rRNA coding sequences show a large number of variants, often incompatible with folding into a correct secondary structure. Here, we present results of an analysis of a large set of short RNA sequences generated by the next generation sequencing techniques, to address the problem of heterogeneity of the 5S rRNA transcripts in Arabidopsis and identification of potentially functional rRNA-derived fragments.

  13. Nuclear RNA Surveillance: Role of TRAMP in Controlling Exosome Specificity

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, Karyn; Butler, J. Scott

    2013-01-01

    The advent of high throughput sequencing technologies has revealed that pervasive transcription generates RNAs from nearly all regions of eukaryotic genomes. Normally these transcripts undergo rapid degradation by a nuclear RNA surveillance system primarily featuring the RNA exosome. This multimeric protein complex plays a critical role in the efficient turnover and processing of a vast array of RNAs in the nucleus. Despite its initial discovery over a decade ago, important questions remain c...

  14. Characterizing RNA-protein interaction using cross-linking and metabolite supplemented nuclear RNA-immunoprecipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Phil Chi Khang; Helliwell, Chris; Wang, Ming-Bo

    2014-05-01

    RNA-immunoprecipitation (RNA-IP) is a method used to isolate and identify RNA molecules specifically associated with an RNA-binding protein. Non-coding RNAs are emerging as key regulators of many biological and developmental pathways and RNA-IP has become an important tool in studying their function(s). While RNA-IP is successfully used to determine protein-RNA interaction, specific details regarding the level of this association and the metabolic requirement of this interaction which can influence the success of RNA-IP remain unclear. Here, we investigate the conditions required for efficient nuclear RNA-IP using Arabidopsis AGO4 (Argonaute 4) and siRNA binding as the study model. We showed that formaldehyde cross-linking, but not UV cross-linking, allowed for efficient pull-down of 24-nt siRNAs, suggesting that AGO4-siRNA interaction involves other protein(s). We also showed that, while formaldehyde cross-linking could also be performed on purified nuclei, ATP supplementation to the nuclei isolation buffer was needed to efficiently pull down 24-nt siRNAs. This result indicates that ATP is required for efficient siRNA loading onto AGO4. As most of the known RNA-mediated regulatory processes occur in the nucleus, our findings on cross-linking conditions and metabolite requirement for successful AGO4 nuclear RNA-IP provide a valuable insight and future consideration when studying the function of protein-RNA interactions in plants.

  15. Nuclear Imprisonment: Viral Strategies to Arrest Host mRNA Nuclear Export

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz M. A. Fontoura

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Viruses possess many strategies to impair host cellular responses to infection. Nuclear export of host messenger RNAs (mRNA that encode antiviral factors is critical for antiviral protein production and control of viral infections. Several viruses have evolved sophisticated strategies to inhibit nuclear export of host mRNAs, including targeting mRNA export factors and nucleoporins to compromise their roles in nucleo-cytoplasmic trafficking of cellular mRNA. Here, we present a review of research focused on suppression of host mRNA nuclear export by viruses, including influenza A virus and vesicular stomatitis virus, and the impact of this viral suppression on host antiviral responses.

  16. A novel RNA motif mediates the strict nuclear localization of a long noncoding RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bing; Gunawardane, Lalith; Niazi, Farshad; Jahanbani, Fereshteh; Chen, Xin; Valadkhan, Saba

    2014-06-01

    The ubiquitous presence of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) in eukaryotes points to the importance of understanding how their sequences impact function. As many lncRNAs regulate nuclear events and thus must localize to nuclei, we analyzed the sequence requirements for nuclear localization in an intergenic lncRNA named BORG (BMP2-OP1-responsive gene), which is both spliced and polyadenylated but is strictly localized in nuclei. Subcellular localization of BORG was not dependent on the context or level of its expression or decay but rather depended on the sequence of the mature, spliced transcript. Mutational analyses indicated that nuclear localization of BORG was mediated through a novel RNA motif consisting of the pentamer sequence AGCCC with sequence restrictions at positions -8 (T or A) and -3 (G or C) relative to the first nucleotide of the pentamer. Mutation of the motif to a scrambled sequence resulted in complete loss of nuclear localization, while addition of even a single copy of the motif to a cytoplasmically localized RNA was sufficient to impart nuclear localization. Further, the presence of this motif in other cellular RNAs showed a direct correlation with nuclear localization, suggesting that the motif may act as a general nuclear localization signal for cellular RNAs. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Heterokaryotic nuclear conditions and a heterogeneous nuclear population are observed by flow cytometry in Phytophthora infestans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catal, Mursel; King, Louis; Tumbalam, Pavani; Wiriyajitsomboon, Prissana; Kirk, William W; Adams, Gerard C

    2010-08-01

    A simple and reliable method for preparation of whole nuclei of a common oomycete, Phytophthora infestans, is described for laser flow cytometry. The ease of preparation, the absence of detectable debris and aggregates, and the precision in determinations of DNA content per nucleus improve interpretation and understanding of the genetics of the organism. Phytophthora infestans is the pathogen that causes potato and tomato late blight. The genetic flexibility of P. infestans and other oomycete pathogens has complicated understanding of the mechanisms of variation contributing to shifts in race structure and virulence profiles on important agricultural crops. Significant phenotypic and genotypic changes are being reported in the apparent absence of sexual recombination in the field. Laser flow cytometry with propidium iodide is useful in investigating the nuclear condition of the somatic colony of field strains of P. infestans. The majority of the studied strains contain a single population of nuclei in nonreplicated diplophase. However, mean DNA content per nucleus varies considerably among isolates confirming the heterogeneity of the nuclear population in regard to C-value, for field isolates. Nuclear DNA content varies from 1.75x to 0.75x that of nuclei in a standard strain from central Mexico. Some strains contain two to three populations of nuclei with differing DNA contents in the mycelium and are heterokaryons. Such a range in DNA content suggests DNA-aneuploidy, but direct confirmation of aneuploidy will require microscopy of chromosomes. Heterokaryosis and populations of nuclei of differing DNA content necessarily confound standardized assays used worldwide in crop breeding programs for determination of race profiles and virulence phenotypes of this important pathogen.

  18. Requirement of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein C for BRCA gene expression and homologous recombination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel W Anantha

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein C1/C2 (hnRNP C is a core component of 40S ribonucleoprotein particles that bind pre-mRNAs and influence their processing, stability and export. Breast cancer tumor suppressors BRCA1, BRCA2 and PALB2 form a complex and play key roles in homologous recombination (HR, DNA double strand break (DSB repair and cell cycle regulation following DNA damage. METHODS: PALB2 nucleoprotein complexes were isolated using tandem affinity purification from nuclease-solubilized nuclear fraction. Immunofluorescence was used for localization studies of proteins. siRNA-mediated gene silencing and flow cytometry were used for studying DNA repair efficiency and cell cycle distribution/checkpoints. The effect of hnRNP C on mRNA abundance was assayed using quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR. RESULTS AND SIGNIFICANCE: We identified hnRNP C as a component of a nucleoprotein complex containing breast cancer suppressor proteins PALB2, BRCA2 and BRCA1. Notably, other components of the 40S ribonucleoprotein particle were not present in the complex. hnRNP C was found to undergo significant changes of sub-nuclear localization after ionizing radiation (IR and to partially localize to DNA damage sites. Depletion of hnRNP C substantially altered the normal balance of repair mechanisms following DSB induction, reducing HR usage in particular, and impaired S phase progression after IR. Moreover, loss of hnRNP C strongly reduced the abundance of key HR proteins BRCA1, BRCA2, RAD51 and BRIP1, which can be attributed, at least in part, to the downregulation of their mRNAs due to aberrant splicing. Our results establish hnRNP C as a key regulator of BRCA gene expression and HR-based DNA repair. They also suggest the existence of an RNA regulatory program at sites of DNA damage, which involves a unique function of hnRNP C that is independent of the 40S ribonucleoprotein particles and most other hnRNP proteins.

  19. Altered Micro-RNA Degradation Promotes Tumor Heterogeneity: A Result from Boolean Network Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yunyi; Krueger, Gerhard R F; Wang, Guanyu

    2016-02-01

    Cancer heterogeneity may reflect differential dynamical outcomes of the regulatory network encompassing biomolecules at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. In other words, differential gene-expression profiles may correspond to different stable steady states of a mathematical model for simulation of biomolecular networks. To test this hypothesis, we simplified a regulatory network that is important for soft-tissue sarcoma metastasis and heterogeneity, comprising of transcription factors, micro-RNAs, and signaling components of the NOTCH pathway. We then used a Boolean network model to simulate the dynamics of this network, and particularly investigated the consequences of differential miRNA degradation modes. We found that efficient miRNA degradation is crucial for sustaining a homogenous and healthy phenotype, while defective miRNA degradation may lead to multiple stable steady states and ultimately to carcinogenesis and heterogeneity. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  20. Nuclear pre-mRNA processing in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, A.S.N. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Biology and Program in Molecular Plant Biology; Golovkin, M. (eds.) [Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Microbiology

    2008-07-01

    This volume of CTMI, entitled Nuclear premRNA Processing in Plants, with 16 chapters from leading scientists in this area, summarizes recent advances in nuclear pre-mRNA processing and its role in plant growth and development. It provides researchers in the field, as well as those in related areas, with an up-to-date and comprehensive, yet concise, overview of the current status and future potential of this research in understanding plant biology. The first four chapters focus on spliceosome composition, genome-wide alternative splicing, and splice site requirements for U1 and U12 introns using computational and empirical approaches. Analysis of sequenced plant genomes has revealed that 80% of all protein-coding nuclear genes contain one or more introns. The lack of an in vitro plant splicing system has made it difficult to identify general and plant-specific components of splicing machinery in plants. The next three chapters focus on serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins, a family of highly conserved proteins, which are known to play key roles in constitutive and regulated splicing of pre-mRNA and other aspects of RNA metabolism in metazoans. These proteins engage both in RNA binding and protein.protein interactions and function as splicing regulators at multiple stages of spliceosome assembly. This family of proteins has expanded considerably in plants with several plant-specific SR proteins. Several serendipitous discoveries made using forward genetics are indicating that RNA metabolism (alternative splicing, alternative polyadenylation, mRNA transport) plays an important role in many aspects of plant growth and development and in plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. The next seven chapters focus on these aspects of RNA metabolism. The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) regulates a number of physiological processes during plant growth and development. The next chapter or A.B. Rose discusses the ways introns affect gene expression both positively and

  1. Small regulatory RNA-induced growth rate heterogeneity of Bacillus subtilis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruben A T Mars

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Isogenic bacterial populations can consist of cells displaying heterogeneous physiological traits. Small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs could affect this heterogeneity since they act by fine-tuning mRNA or protein levels to coordinate the appropriate cellular behavior. Here we show that the sRNA RnaC/S1022 from the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis can suppress exponential growth by modulation of the transcriptional regulator AbrB. Specifically, the post-transcriptional abrB-RnaC/S1022 interaction allows B. subtilis to increase the cell-to-cell variation in AbrB protein levels, despite strong negative autoregulation of the abrB promoter. This behavior is consistent with existing mathematical models of sRNA action, thus suggesting that induction of protein expression noise could be a new general aspect of sRNA regulation. Importantly, we show that the sRNA-induced diversity in AbrB levels generates heterogeneity in growth rates during the exponential growth phase. Based on these findings, we hypothesize that the resulting subpopulations of fast- and slow-growing B. subtilis cells reflect a bet-hedging strategy for enhanced survival of unfavorable conditions.

  2. Conformational heterogeneity of the protein-free human spliceosomal U2-U6 snRNA complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Caijie; Bachu, Ravichandra; Popovic, Milena; Devany, Matthew; Brenowitz, Michael; Schlatterer, Jörg C; Greenbaum, Nancy L

    2013-04-01

    The complex formed between the U2 and U6 small nuclear (sn)RNA molecules of the eukaryotic spliceosome plays a critical role in the catalysis of precursor mRNA splicing. Here, we have used enzymatic structure probing, (19)F NMR, and analytical ultracentrifugation techniques to characterize the fold of a protein-free biophysically tractable paired construct representing the human U2-U6 snRNA complex. Results from enzymatic probing and (19)F NMR for the complex in the absence of Mg(2+) are consistent with formation of a four-helix junction structure as a predominant conformation. However, (19)F NMR data also identify a lesser fraction (up to 14% at 25°C) of a three-helix conformation. Based upon this distribution, the calculated ΔG for inter-conversion to the four-helix structure from the three-helix structure is approximately -4.6 kJ/mol. In the presence of 5 mM Mg(2+), the fraction of the three-helix conformation increased to ∼17% and the Stokes radius, measured by analytical ultracentrifugation, decreased by 2%, suggesting a slight shift to an alternative conformation. NMR measurements demonstrated that addition of an intron fragment to the U2-U6 snRNA complex results in displacement of U6 snRNA from the region of Helix III immediately 5' of the ACAGAGA sequence of U6 snRNA, which may facilitate binding of the segment of the intron adjacent to the 5' splice site to the ACAGAGA sequence. Taken together, these observations indicate conformational heterogeneity in the protein-free human U2-U6 snRNA complex consistent with a model in which the RNA has sufficient conformational flexibility to facilitate inter-conversion between steps of splicing in situ.

  3. Bubble Effect in Heterogeneous Nuclear Fuel Solution System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU; Xiao-ping; LUO; Huang-da; ZHANG; Wei; ZHU; Qing-fu

    2013-01-01

    Bubble effect means system reactivity changes due to the bubble induced solution volume,neutron leakage and absorption properties,neutron energy spectrum change in the nuclear fuel solution system.In the spent fuel dissolver,during uranium element shearing,the oxygen will be inlet to accelerate the

  4. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K is overexpressed and associated with poor prognosis in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ruirui; Zeng, Ying; Xu, Haifan; Chen, Zhuo; Xiang, Mengqin; Fu, Yun; Yin, Yufang; Zhong, Jing; Zeng, Min; Wang, Peihua; You, Qin; Zeng, Xi

    2016-08-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) is one of the major pre-mRNA-binding proteins, that is involved in translational modifications. In our previous studies, we found that hnRNP K is associated with human gastric cancer. The protein levels of hnRNP K were detected in cell lines and tissue microarrays. The correlation between hnRNP K expression and patient survival rate was evaluated by Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. In addition, we also detected hnRNP K expression in preoperative and postoperative serum samples from patients with gastric cancer, and serum samples from healthy volunteers. We found that hnRNP K was overexpressed in the gastric cancer cell lines. The levels of hnRNP K were significantly elevated in the gastric cancer tissues compared with that noted in the tumor-adjacent gastric mucosal and normal gastric mucosal sampes, and hnRNP K expression was found to correlate with tumor stage and lymph node metastasis. However, the level of serum hnRNP K did not differ significantly between gastric cancer patients and healthy volunteers. We also found that patients whose tumors showed elevated expression of hnRNP K had poor survival. The present study suggests that hnRNP K is a promising tissue biomarker for diagnosing gastric cancer and is a prognostic indicator for patients with gastric cancer.

  5. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein k interacts with Abi-1 at postsynaptic sites and modulates dendritic spine morphology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Proepper

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Abelson-interacting protein 1 (Abi-1 plays an important role for dendritic branching and synapse formation in the central nervous system. It is localized at the postsynaptic density (PSD and rapidly translocates to the nucleus upon synaptic stimulation. At PSDs Abi-1 is in a complex with several other proteins including WASP/WAVE or cortactin thereby regulating the actin cytoskeleton via the Arp 2/3 complex. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We identified heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNPK, a 65 kDa ssDNA/RNA-binding-protein that is involved in multiple intracellular signaling cascades, as a binding partner of Abi-1 at postsynaptic sites. The interaction with the Abi-1 SH3 domain is mediated by the hnRNPK-interaction (KI domain. We further show that during brain development, hnRNPK expression becomes more and more restricted to granule cells of the cerebellum and hippocampal neurons where it localizes in the cell nucleus as well as in the spine/dendritic compartment. The downregulation of hnRNPK in cultured hippocampal neurons by RNAi results in an enlarged dendritic tree and a significant increase in filopodia formation. This is accompanied by a decrease in the number of mature synapses. Both effects therefore mimic the neuronal morphology after downregulation of Abi-1 mRNA in neurons. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings demonstrate a novel interplay between hnRNPK and Abi-1 in the nucleus and at synaptic sites and show obvious similarities regarding both protein knockdown phenotypes. This indicates that hnRNPK and Abi-1 act synergistic in a multiprotein complex that regulates the crucial balance between filopodia formation and synaptic maturation in neurons.

  6. Characterisation of several heterogeneous species of defective RNAs derived from RNA 3 of cucumber mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, C; Aramburu, J; Galipienso, L; Nuez, F

    2007-01-01

    Preparations of double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) extracted from Nicotiana tabacum cv Xanthi plants infected with a subgroup IB isolate of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) were found to contain a heterogeneous population of defective RNAs (D-RNAs) derived from RNA 3. Characterised D-RNAs ranged in size from 1.5 to 1.9 kb and were derived either by a single in-frame deletion within the 3a or 3b genes or by means of double in-frame deletions within both genes. Also, northern blot hybridisation showed two other types of RNA derived from RNA 3: (a) RNA species of ca. 0.7 kb containing the 3'-terminus but lacking the 5'-terminus, which could be 3'-coterminal subgenomic of D-RNAs derived from the 3b gene and (b) RNA species of unknown origin of ca. 0.8 kb containing the 5'-terminus but lacking the 3'-terminus.

  7. Dissecting mechanisms of nuclear mRNA surveillance in THO/sub2 complex mutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rougemaille, Mathieu; Gudipati, Rajani K; Olesen, Jens Raabjerg

    2007-01-01

    The nuclear exosome is involved in numerous RNA metabolic processes. Exosome degradation of rRNA, snoRNA, snRNA and tRNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is activated by TRAMP complexes, containing either the Trf4p or Trf5p poly(A) polymerase. These enzymes are presumed to facilitate exosome access...

  8. Heterogeneous world model and collaborative scenarios of transition to globally sustainable nuclear energy systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuznetsov Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The International Atomic Energy Agency's International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO is to help ensure that nuclear energy is available to contribute to meeting global energy needs of the 21st century in a sustainable manner. The INPRO task titled “Global scenarios” is to develop global and regional nuclear energy scenarios that lead to a global vision of sustainable nuclear energy in the 21st century. Results of multiple studies show that the criteria for developing sustainable nuclear energy cannot be met without innovations in reactor and nuclear fuel cycle technologies. Combining different reactor types and associated fuel chains creates a multiplicity of nuclear energy system arrangements potentially contributing to global sustainability of nuclear energy. In this, cooperation among countries having different policy regarding fuel cycle back end would be essential to bring sustainability benefits from innovations in technology to all interested users. INPRO has developed heterogeneous global model to capture countries’ different policies regarding the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle in regional and global scenarios of nuclear energy evolution and applied in a number of studies performed by participants of the project. This paper will highlight the model and major conclusions obtained in the studies.

  9. Dissecting mechanisms of nuclear mRNA surveillance in THO/sub2 complex mutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rougemaille, Mathieu; Gudipati, Rajani Kanth; Olesen, Jens Raabjerg

    2007-01-01

    The nuclear exosome is involved in numerous RNA metabolic processes. Exosome degradation of rRNA, snoRNA, snRNA and tRNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is activated by TRAMP complexes, containing either the Trf4p or Trf5p poly(A) polymerase. These enzymes are presumed to facilitate exosome access...... by appending oligo(A)-tails onto structured substrates. Another role of the nuclear exosome is that of mRNA surveillance. In strains harboring a mutated THO/Sub2p system, involved in messenger ribonucleoprotein particle biogenesis and nuclear export, the exosome-associated 3' 5' exonuclease Rrp6p is required...

  10. Pumping RNA: nuclear bodybuilding along the RNP pipeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matera, A Gregory; Shpargel, Karl B

    2006-06-01

    Cajal bodies (CBs) are nuclear subdomains involved in the biogenesis of several classes of small ribonucleoproteins (RNPs). A number of recent advances highlight progress in the understanding of the organization and dynamics of CB components. For example, a class of small Cajal body-specific (sca) RNPs has been discovered. Localization of scaRNPs to CBs was shown to depend on a conserved RNA motif. Intriguingly, this motif is also present in mammalian telomerase RNA and the evidence suggests that assembly of the active form of telomerase RNP occurs in and around CBs during S phase. Important steps in the assembly and modification of spliceosomal RNPs have also been shown to take place in CBs. Additional experiments have revealed the existence of kinetically distinct subclasses of CB components. Finally, the recent identification of novel markers for CBs in both Drosophila and Arabidopsis not only lays to rest questions about the evolutionary conservation of these nuclear suborganelles, but also should enable forward genetic screens for the identification of new components and pathways involved in their assembly, maintenance and function.

  11. Nuclear Export Signal Masking Regulates HIV-1 Rev Trafficking and Viral RNA Nuclear Export.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Ryan T; Aligeti, Mounavya; Pocock, Ginger M; Higgins, Christina A; Sherer, Nathan M

    2017-02-01

    HIV-1's Rev protein forms a homo-oligomeric adaptor complex linking viral RNAs to the cellular CRM1/Ran-GTP nuclear export machinery through the activity of Rev's prototypical leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES). In this study, we used a functional fluorescently tagged Rev fusion protein as a platform to study the effects of modulating Rev NES identity, number, position, or strength on Rev subcellular trafficking, viral RNA nuclear export, and infectious virion production. We found that Rev activity was remarkably tolerant of diverse NES sequences, including supraphysiological NES (SNES) peptides that otherwise arrest CRM1 transport complexes at nuclear pores. Rev's ability to tolerate a SNES was both position and multimerization dependent, an observation consistent with a model wherein Rev self-association acts to transiently mask the NES peptide(s), thereby biasing Rev's trafficking into the nucleus. Combined imaging and functional assays also indicated that NES masking underpins Rev's well-known tendency to accumulate at the nucleolus, as well as Rev's capacity to activate optimal levels of late viral gene expression. We propose that Rev multimerization and NES masking regulates Rev's trafficking to and retention within the nucleus even prior to RNA binding.

  12. Measuring intratumor heterogeneity by network entropy using RNA-seq data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Youngjune; Lim, Sangsoo; Nam, Jin-Wu; Kim, Sun

    2016-11-24

    Intratumor heterogeneity (ITH) is observed at different stages of tumor progression, metastasis and reouccurence, which can be important for clinical applications. We used RNA-sequencing data from tumor samples, and measured the level of ITH in terms of biological network states. To model complex relationships among genes, we used a protein interaction network to consider gene-gene dependency. ITH was measured by using an entropy-based distance metric between two networks, nJSD, with Jensen-Shannon Divergence (JSD). With nJSD, we defined transcriptome-based ITH (tITH). The effectiveness of tITH was extensively tested for the issues related with ITH using real biological data sets. Human cancer cell line data and single-cell sequencing data were investigated to verify our approach. Then, we analyzed TCGA pan-cancer 6,320 patients. Our result was in agreement with widely used genome-based ITH inference methods, while showed better performance at survival analysis. Analysis of mouse clonal evolution data further confirmed that our transcriptome-based ITH was consistent with genetic heterogeneity at different clonal evolution stages. Additionally, we found that cell cycle related pathways have significant contribution to increasing heterogeneity on the network during clonal evolution. We believe that the proposed transcriptome-based ITH is useful to characterize heterogeneity of a tumor sample at RNA level.

  13. Stress-induced Nuclear Bodies Are Sites of Accumulation of Pre-mRNA Processing Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denegri, Marco; Chiodi, Ilaria; Corioni, Margherita; Cobianchi, Fabio; Riva, Silvano; Biamonti, Giuseppe

    2001-01-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) HAP (hnRNP A1 interacting protein) is a multifunctional protein with roles in RNA metabolism, transcription, and nuclear structure. After stress treatments, HAP is recruited to a small number of nuclear bodies, usually adjacent to the nucleoli, which consist of clusters of perichromatin granules and are depots of transcripts synthesized before stress. In this article we show that HAP bodies are sites of accumulation for a subset of RNA processing factors and are related to Sam68 nuclear bodies (SNBs) detectable in unstressed cells. Indeed, HAP and Sam68 are both present in SNBs and in HAP bodies, that we rename “stress-induced SNBs.” The determinants required for the redistribution of HAP lie between residue 580 and 788. Different portions of this region direct the recruitment of the green fluorescent protein to stress-induced SNBs, suggesting an interaction of HAP with different components of the bodies. With the use of the 580–725 region as bait in a two-hybrid screening, we have selected SRp30c and 9G8, two members of the SR family of splicing factors. Splicing factors are differentially affected by heat shock: SRp30c and SF2/ASF are efficiently recruited to stress-induced SNBs, whereas the distribution of SC35 is not perturbed. We propose that the differential sequestration of splicing factors could affect processing of specific transcripts. Accordingly, the formation of stress-induced SNBs is accompanied by a change in the splicing pattern of the adenovirus E1A transcripts. PMID:11694584

  14. Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein F Stimulates Sirtuin-1 Gene Expression and Attenuates Nephropathy Progression in Diabetic Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Chao-Sheng; Shi, Yixuan; Chenier, Isabelle; Ghosh, Anindya; Wu, Chin-Han; Cailhier, Jean-Francois; Ethier, Jean; Lattouf, Jean-Baptiste; Filep, Janos G; Ingelfinger, Julie R; Zhang, Shao-Ling; Chan, John S D

    2017-07-01

    We investigated the mechanism of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein F (hnRNP F) renoprotective action in a type 2 diabetes (T2D) mouse model (db/db). Immortalized rat renal proximal tubular cells (IRPTCs) and kidneys from humans with T2D were also studied. The db/db mice developed hyperglycemia, oxidative stress, and nephropathy at age 20 weeks compared with their db/m littermates. These abnormalities, with the exception of hyperglycemia, were attenuated in db/dbhnRNP F-transgenic (Tg) mice specifically overexpressing hnRNP F in their RPTCs. Sirtuin-1, Foxo3α, and catalase expression were significantly decreased in RPTCs from db/db mice and normalized in db/dbhnRNP F-Tg mice. In vitro, hnRNP F overexpression stimulated Sirtuin-1 and Foxo3α with downregulation of acetylated p53 expression and prevented downregulation of Sirtuin-1 and Foxo3α expression in IRPTCs by high glucose plus palmitate. Transfection of Sirtuin-1 small interfering RNA prevented hnRNP F stimulation of Foxo3α and downregulation of acetylated p53 expression. hnRNP F stimulated Sirtuin-1 transcription via hnRNP F-responsive element in the Sirtuin-1 promoter. Human T2D kidneys exhibited more RPTC apoptosis and lower expression of hnRNP F, SIRTUIN-1, and FOXO3α than nondiabetic kidneys. Our results demonstrate that hnRNP F protects kidneys against oxidative stress and nephropathy via stimulation of Sirtuin-1 expression and signaling in diabetes. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  15. Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein R Cooperates with Mediator to Facilitate Transcription Reinitiation on the c-Fos Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Aya; Shimada, Miho; Nakadai, Tomoyoshi; Nishimura, Ken; Hisatake, Koji

    2013-01-01

    The c-fos gene responds to extracellular stimuli and undergoes robust but transient transcriptional activation. Here we show that heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein R (hnRNP R) facilitates transcription reinitiation of the c-fos promoter in vitro in cooperation with Mediator. Consistently, hnRNP R interacts with the Scaffold components (Mediator, TBP, and TFIIH) as well as TFIIB, which recruits RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and TFIIF to Scaffold. The cooperative action of hnRNP R and Mediator is diminished by the cyclin-dependent kinase 8 (CDK8) module, which is comprised of CDK8, Cyclin C, MED12 and MED13 of the Mediator subunits. Interestingly, we find that the length of the G-free cassettes, and thereby their transcripts, influences the hnRNP R-mediated facilitation of reinitiation. Indeed, indicative of a possible role of the transcript in facilitating transcription reinitiation, the RNA transcript produced from the G-free cassette interacts with hnRNP R through its RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) and arginine-glycine-glycine (RGG) domain. Mutational analyses of hnRNP R indicate that facilitation of initiation and reinitiation requires distinct domains of hnRNP R. Knockdown of hnRNP R in mouse cells compromised rapid induction of the c-fos gene but did not affect transcription of constitutive genes. Together, these results suggest an important role for hnRNP R in regulating robust response of the c-fos gene. PMID:23967313

  16. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein R cooperates with mediator to facilitate transcription reinitiation on the c-Fos gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aya Fukuda

    Full Text Available The c-fos gene responds to extracellular stimuli and undergoes robust but transient transcriptional activation. Here we show that heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein R (hnRNP R facilitates transcription reinitiation of the c-fos promoter in vitro in cooperation with Mediator. Consistently, hnRNP R interacts with the Scaffold components (Mediator, TBP, and TFIIH as well as TFIIB, which recruits RNA polymerase II (Pol II and TFIIF to Scaffold. The cooperative action of hnRNP R and Mediator is diminished by the cyclin-dependent kinase 8 (CDK8 module, which is comprised of CDK8, Cyclin C, MED12 and MED13 of the Mediator subunits. Interestingly, we find that the length of the G-free cassettes, and thereby their transcripts, influences the hnRNP R-mediated facilitation of reinitiation. Indeed, indicative of a possible role of the transcript in facilitating transcription reinitiation, the RNA transcript produced from the G-free cassette interacts with hnRNP R through its RNA recognition motifs (RRMs and arginine-glycine-glycine (RGG domain. Mutational analyses of hnRNP R indicate that facilitation of initiation and reinitiation requires distinct domains of hnRNP R. Knockdown of hnRNP R in mouse cells compromised rapid induction of the c-fos gene but did not affect transcription of constitutive genes. Together, these results suggest an important role for hnRNP R in regulating robust response of the c-fos gene.

  17. Unified nuclear core activity map reconstruction using heterogeneous instruments with data assimilation

    CERN Document Server

    Bouriquet, Bertrand; Erhard, Patrick; Ponçot, Angélique

    2011-01-01

    Evaluating the neutronic state of the whole nuclear core is a very important topic that have strong implication for nuclear core management and for security monitoring. The core state is evaluated using measurements. Usually, part of the measurements are used, and only one kind of instruments are taken into account. However, the core state evaluation should be more accurate when more measurements are collected in the core. But using information from heterogeneous sources is at glance a difficult task. This difficulty can be overcome by Data Assimilation techniques. Such a method allows to combine in a coherent framework the information coming from model and the one coming from various type of observations. Beyond the inner advantage to use heterogeneous instruments, this leads to obtain a significant increasing of the quality of neutronic global state reconstruction with respect to individual use of measures. In order to present this approach, we will introduce here the basic principles of data assimilation f...

  18. The heterogeneity of human CD127(+) innate lymphoid cells revealed by single-cell RNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björklund, Åsa K; Forkel, Marianne; Picelli, Simone; Konya, Viktoria; Theorell, Jakob; Friberg, Danielle; Sandberg, Rickard; Mjösberg, Jenny

    2016-04-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are increasingly appreciated as important participants in homeostasis and inflammation. Substantial plasticity and heterogeneity among ILC populations have been reported. Here we have delineated the heterogeneity of human ILCs through single-cell RNA sequencing of several hundreds of individual tonsil CD127(+) ILCs and natural killer (NK) cells. Unbiased transcriptional clustering revealed four distinct populations, corresponding to ILC1 cells, ILC2 cells, ILC3 cells and NK cells, with their respective transcriptomes recapitulating known as well as unknown transcriptional profiles. The single-cell resolution additionally divulged three transcriptionally and functionally diverse subpopulations of ILC3 cells. Our systematic comparison of single-cell transcriptional variation within and between ILC populations provides new insight into ILC biology during homeostasis, with additional implications for dysregulation of the immune system.

  19. Heat transfer analysis of fuel assemblies in a heterogeneous gas core nuclear rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Yoichi; Appelbaum, Jacob; Diaz, Nils; Maya, Isaac

    1991-01-01

    Heat transfer problems of a heterogeneous gaseous core nuclear rocket were studied. The reactor core consists of 1.5-m long hexagonal fuel assemblies filled with pressurized uranium tetrafluoride (UF4) gas. The fuel gas temperature ranges from 3500 to 7000 K at a nominal operating condition of 40 atm. Each fuel assembly has seven coolant tubes, through which hydrogen propellant flows. The propellant temperature is not constrained by the fuel temperature but by the maximum temperature of the graphite coolant tube. For a core achieving a fission power density of 1000 MW/cu m, the propellant core exit temperature can be as high as 3200 K. The physical size of a 1250 MW gaseous core nuclear rocket is comparable with that of a NERVA-type solid core nuclear rocket. The engine can deliver a specific impulse of 1020 seconds and a thrust of 330 kN.

  20. Crystal structure of the human heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein A18 RNA-recognition motif

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coburn, Katherine; Melville, Zephan; Aligholizadeh, Ehson; Roth, Braden M.; Varney, Kristen M.; Carrier, France; Pozharski, Edwin; Weber, David J.

    2017-03-22

    The heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein A18 (hnRNP A18) is upregulated in hypoxic regions of various solid tumors and promotes tumor growthviathe coordination of mRNA transcripts associated with pro-survival genes. Thus, hnRNP A18 represents an important therapeutic target in tumor cells. Presented here is the first X-ray crystal structure to be reported for the RNA-recognition motif of hnRNP A18. By comparing this structure with those of homologous RNA-binding proteins (i.e.hnRNP A1), three residues on one face of an antiparallel β-sheet (Arg48, Phe50 and Phe52) and one residue in an unstructured loop (Arg41) were identified as likely to be involved in protein–nucleic acid interactions. This structure helps to serve as a foundation for biophysical studies of this RNA-binding protein and structure-based drug-design efforts for targeting hnRNP A18 in cancer, such as malignant melanoma, where hnRNP A18 levels are elevated and contribute to disease progression.

  1. Detecting heterogeneity in single-cell RNA-Seq data by non-negative matrix factorization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xun; Ching, Travers; Pan, Xinghua; Weissman, Sherman M.

    2017-01-01

    Single-cell RNA-Sequencing (scRNA-Seq) is a fast-evolving technology that enables the understanding of biological processes at an unprecedentedly high resolution. However, well-suited bioinformatics tools to analyze the data generated from this new technology are still lacking. Here we investigate the performance of non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) method to analyze a wide variety of scRNA-Seq datasets, ranging from mouse hematopoietic stem cells to human glioblastoma data. In comparison to other unsupervised clustering methods including K-means and hierarchical clustering, NMF has higher accuracy in separating similar groups in various datasets. We ranked genes by their importance scores (D-scores) in separating these groups, and discovered that NMF uniquely identifies genes expressed at intermediate levels as top-ranked genes. Finally, we show that in conjugation with the modularity detection method FEM, NMF reveals meaningful protein-protein interaction modules. In summary, we propose that NMF is a desirable method to analyze heterogeneous single-cell RNA-Seq data. The NMF based subpopulation detection package is available at: https://github.com/lanagarmire/NMFEM. PMID:28133571

  2. Intra-tumor heterogeneity of microRNA-92a, microRNA-375 and microRNA-424 in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Rikke Karlin; Novotny, Guy Wayne; Klarskov, Louise Laurberg

    2016-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Various microRNAs (miRNAs) have been investigated in order to improve diagnostics and risk assessment in colorectal cancer (CRC). To clarify the potential of miRNA profiling in CRC, knowledge of intra-tumor heterogeneity in expression levels is crucial. The study aim was to estimate...... the intra-tumor variance of three selected miRNAs: miR-92a, miR-375 and miR-424 in CRC tissue. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A retrospective study on archived formalin-fixed paraffin embedded tissue from 9 patients with CRC. miRNA tissue expression levels were analyzed by qRT-PCR on tissue representing luminal...

  3. Targeted identification of short interspersed nuclear element families shows their widespread existence and extreme heterogeneity in plant genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenke, Torsten; Döbel, Thomas; Sörensen, Thomas Rosleff; Junghans, Holger; Weisshaar, Bernd; Schmidt, Thomas

    2011-09-01

    Short interspersed nuclear elements (SINEs) are non-long terminal repeat retrotransposons that are highly abundant, heterogeneous, and mostly not annotated in eukaryotic genomes. We developed a tool designated SINE-Finder for the targeted discovery of tRNA-derived SINEs. We analyzed sequence data of 16 plant genomes, including 13 angiosperms and three gymnosperms and identified 17,829 full-length and truncated SINEs falling into 31 families showing the widespread occurrence of SINEs in higher plants. The investigation focused on potato (Solanum tuberosum), resulting in the detection of seven different SolS SINE families consisting of 1489 full-length and 870 5' truncated copies. Consensus sequences of full-length members range in size from 106 to 244 bp depending on the SINE family. SolS SINEs populated related species and evolved separately, which led to some distinct subfamilies. Solanaceae SINEs are dispersed along chromosomes and distributed without clustering but with preferred integration into short A-rich motifs. They emerged more than 23 million years ago and were species specifically amplified during the radiation of potato, tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). We show that tobacco TS retrotransposons are composite SINEs consisting of the 3' end of a long interspersed nuclear element integrated downstream of a nonhomologous SINE family followed by successfully colonization of the genome. We propose an evolutionary scenario for the formation of TS as a spontaneous event, which could be typical for the emergence of SINE families.

  4. Targeted Identification of Short Interspersed Nuclear Element Families Shows Their Widespread Existence and Extreme Heterogeneity in Plant Genomes[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenke, Torsten; Döbel, Thomas; Sörensen, Thomas Rosleff; Junghans, Holger; Weisshaar, Bernd; Schmidt, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Short interspersed nuclear elements (SINEs) are non-long terminal repeat retrotransposons that are highly abundant, heterogeneous, and mostly not annotated in eukaryotic genomes. We developed a tool designated SINE-Finder for the targeted discovery of tRNA-derived SINEs. We analyzed sequence data of 16 plant genomes, including 13 angiosperms and three gymnosperms and identified 17,829 full-length and truncated SINEs falling into 31 families showing the widespread occurrence of SINEs in higher plants. The investigation focused on potato (Solanum tuberosum), resulting in the detection of seven different SolS SINE families consisting of 1489 full-length and 870 5′ truncated copies. Consensus sequences of full-length members range in size from 106 to 244 bp depending on the SINE family. SolS SINEs populated related species and evolved separately, which led to some distinct subfamilies. Solanaceae SINEs are dispersed along chromosomes and distributed without clustering but with preferred integration into short A-rich motifs. They emerged more than 23 million years ago and were species specifically amplified during the radiation of potato, tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). We show that tobacco TS retrotransposons are composite SINEs consisting of the 3′ end of a long interspersed nuclear element integrated downstream of a nonhomologous SINE family followed by successfully colonization of the genome. We propose an evolutionary scenario for the formation of TS as a spontaneous event, which could be typical for the emergence of SINE families. PMID:21908723

  5. The presence of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins in frontotemporal lobar degeneration with FUS-positive inclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gami-Patel, Priya; Bandopadhyay, Rina; Brelstaff, Jack; Revesz, Tamas; Lashley, Tammaryn

    2016-10-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration with fused in sarcoma-positive inclusions (FTLD-FUS) is a disease with unknown cause. Transportin 1 is abundantly found in FUS-positive inclusions and responsible for the nuclear import of the FET proteins of which FUS is a member. The presence of all FET proteins in pathological inclusions suggests a disturbance of transportin 1-mediated nuclear import. FUS also belongs to the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) protein family. We investigated whether hnRNP proteins are associated with FUS pathology implicating dysfunctional nuclear export in the pathogenesis of FTLD-FUS. hnRNP proteins were investigated in affected brain regions in FTLD-FUS using immunohistochemistry, biochemical analysis, and the expression analysis. We demonstrated the presence of several hnRNP proteins in pathological inclusions including neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions and dystrophic neurites. The biochemical analysis revealed a shift in the location of hnRNP A1 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. The expression analysis revealed an increase in several hnRNP proteins in FTLD-FUS. These results implicate a wider dysregulation of movement between intracellular compartments, than mechanisms only affecting the nuclear import of FUS proteins.

  6. Dissecting mechanisms of nuclear mRNA surveillance in THO/sub2 complex mutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rougemaille, Mathieu; Gudipati, Rajani Kanth; Olesen, Jens Raabjerg

    2007-01-01

    The nuclear exosome is involved in numerous RNA metabolic processes. Exosome degradation of rRNA, snoRNA, snRNA and tRNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is activated by TRAMP complexes, containing either the Trf4p or Trf5p poly(A) polymerase. These enzymes are presumed to facilitate exosome access...... for both retention and degradation of nuclear restricted mRNAs. We show here that Trf4p, in the context of TRAMP, is an mRNA surveillance factor. However, unlike Rrp6p, Trf4p only partakes in RNA degradation and not in transcript retention. Surprisingly, a polyadenylation-defective Trf4p protein is fully...... active, suggesting polyadenylation-independent mRNA degradation. Transcription pulse–chase experiments show that HSP104 molecules undergoing quality control in THO/sub2 mutant strains fall into two distinct populations: One that is quickly degraded after transcription induction and another that escapes...

  7. Dissecting mechanisms of nuclear mRNA surveillance in THO/sub2 complex mutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rougemaille, Mathieu; Gudipati, Rajani K; Olesen, Jens Raabjerg

    2007-01-01

    The nuclear exosome is involved in numerous RNA metabolic processes. Exosome degradation of rRNA, snoRNA, snRNA and tRNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is activated by TRAMP complexes, containing either the Trf4p or Trf5p poly(A) polymerase. These enzymes are presumed to facilitate exosome access...... is required for both retention and degradation of nuclear restricted mRNAs. We show here that Trf4p, in the context of TRAMP, is an mRNA surveillance factor. However, unlike Rrp6p, Trf4p only partakes in RNA degradation and not in transcript retention. Surprisingly, a polyadenylation-defective Trf4p protein...... is fully active, suggesting polyadenylation-independent mRNA degradation. Transcription pulse-chase experiments show that HSP104 molecules undergoing quality control in THO/sub2 mutant strains fall into two distinct populations: One that is quickly degraded after transcription induction and another...

  8. Partial methylation at Am100 in 18S rRNA of baker's yeast reveals ribosome heterogeneity on the level of eukaryotic rRNA modification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Buchhaupt

    Full Text Available Ribosome heterogeneity is of increasing biological significance and several examples have been described for multicellular and single cells organisms. In here we show for the first time a variation in ribose methylation within the 18S rRNA of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using RNA-cleaving DNAzymes, we could specifically demonstrate that a significant amount of S. cerevisiae ribosomes are not methylated at 2'-O-ribose of A100 residue in the 18S rRNA. Furthermore, using LC-UV-MS/MS of a respective 18S rRNA fragment, we could not only corroborate the partial methylation at A100, but could also quantify the methylated versus non-methylated A100 residue. Here, we exhibit that only 68% of A100 in the 18S rRNA of S.cerevisiae are methylated at 2'-O ribose sugar. Polysomes also contain a similar heterogeneity for methylated Am100, which shows that 40S ribosome subunits with and without Am100 participate in translation. Introduction of a multicopy plasmid containing the corresponding methylation guide snoRNA gene SNR51 led to an increased A100 methylation, suggesting the cellular snR51 level to limit the extent of this modification. Partial rRNA modification demonstrates a new level of ribosome heterogeneity in eukaryotic cells that might have substantial impact on regulation and fine-tuning of the translation process.

  9. Partial methylation at Am100 in 18S rRNA of baker's yeast reveals ribosome heterogeneity on the level of eukaryotic rRNA modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchhaupt, Markus; Sharma, Sunny; Kellner, Stefanie; Oswald, Stefanie; Paetzold, Melanie; Peifer, Christian; Watzinger, Peter; Schrader, Jens; Helm, Mark; Entian, Karl-Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Ribosome heterogeneity is of increasing biological significance and several examples have been described for multicellular and single cells organisms. In here we show for the first time a variation in ribose methylation within the 18S rRNA of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using RNA-cleaving DNAzymes, we could specifically demonstrate that a significant amount of S. cerevisiae ribosomes are not methylated at 2'-O-ribose of A100 residue in the 18S rRNA. Furthermore, using LC-UV-MS/MS of a respective 18S rRNA fragment, we could not only corroborate the partial methylation at A100, but could also quantify the methylated versus non-methylated A100 residue. Here, we exhibit that only 68% of A100 in the 18S rRNA of S.cerevisiae are methylated at 2'-O ribose sugar. Polysomes also contain a similar heterogeneity for methylated Am100, which shows that 40S ribosome subunits with and without Am100 participate in translation. Introduction of a multicopy plasmid containing the corresponding methylation guide snoRNA gene SNR51 led to an increased A100 methylation, suggesting the cellular snR51 level to limit the extent of this modification. Partial rRNA modification demonstrates a new level of ribosome heterogeneity in eukaryotic cells that might have substantial impact on regulation and fine-tuning of the translation process.

  10. Viral factors reveal a role for REF/Aly in nuclear RNA stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, Sarah H; Hunter, Olga V; Hoover, Ashley; Conrad, Nicholas K

    2012-04-01

    TREX is a conserved multiprotein complex that is necessary for efficient mRNA export to the cytoplasm. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the TREX complex is additionally implicated in RNA quality control pathways, but it is unclear whether this function is conserved in mammalian cells. The Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) ORF57 protein binds and recruits the TREX component REF/Aly to viral mRNAs. Here, we demonstrate that REF/Aly is recruited to the KSHV noncoding polyadenylated nuclear (PAN) RNA by ORF57. This recruitment correlates with ORF57-mediated stabilization of PAN RNA, suggesting that REF/Aly promotes nuclear RNA stability. Further supporting this idea, tethering REF/Aly to PAN RNA is sufficient to increase the nuclear abundance and half-life of PAN RNA but is not sufficient to promote its export. Interestingly, REF/Aly appears to protect the poly(A) tail from deadenylation, and REF/Aly-stabilized transcripts are further adenylated over time, consistent with previous reports linking poly(A) tail length with nuclear RNA surveillance. These studies show that REF/Aly can stabilize nuclear RNAs independently of their export and support a broader conservation of RNA quality control mechanisms from yeast to humans.

  11. Assessing mRNA nuclear export in mammalian cells by microinjection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eliza S; Palazzo, Alexander F

    2017-08-15

    The nuclear export of mRNAs is an important yet little understood part of eukaryotic gene expression. One of the easiest methods for monitoring mRNA export in mammalian tissue culture cells is through the microinjection of DNA plasmids into the nucleus and monitoring the distribution of the transcribed product over time. Here we describe how to setup a microscope equipped with a micromanipulator used in cell microinjections, and we explain how to perform a nuclear mRNA export assay and obtain the nuclear export rate for any given mRNA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The human nuclear poly(a-binding protein promotes RNA hyperadenylation and decay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan M Bresson

    Full Text Available Control of nuclear RNA stability is essential for proper gene expression, but the mechanisms governing RNA degradation in mammalian nuclei are poorly defined. In this study, we uncover a mammalian RNA decay pathway that depends on the nuclear poly(A-binding protein (PABPN1, the poly(A polymerases (PAPs, PAPα and PAPγ, and the exosome subunits RRP6 and DIS3. Using a targeted knockdown approach and nuclear RNA reporters, we show that PABPN1 and PAPα, redundantly with PAPγ, generate hyperadenylated decay substrates that are recognized by the exosome and degraded. Poly(A tail extension appears to be necessary for decay, as cordycepin treatment or point mutations in the PAP-stimulating domain of PABPN1 leads to the accumulation of stable transcripts with shorter poly(A tails than controls. Mechanistically, these data suggest that PABPN1-dependent promotion of PAP activity can stimulate nuclear RNA decay. Importantly, efficiently exported RNAs are unaffected by this decay pathway, supporting an mRNA quality control function for this pathway. Finally, analyses of both bulk poly(A tails and specific endogenous transcripts reveals that a subset of nuclear RNAs are hyperadenylated in a PABPN1-dependent fashion, and this hyperadenylation can be either uncoupled or coupled with decay. Our results highlight a complex relationship between PABPN1, PAPα/γ, and nuclear RNA decay, and we suggest that these activities may play broader roles in the regulation of human gene expression.

  13. Influenza polymerase encoding mRNAs utilize atypical mRNA nuclear export.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Sean; Bui, Steven; Perez, Veronica; Mohammad, Adeba; Medina-Ramirez, Hilario; Newcomb, Laura L

    2014-08-28

    Influenza is a segmented negative strand RNA virus. Each RNA segment is encapsulated by influenza nucleoprotein and bound by the viral RNA dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) to form viral ribonucleoproteins responsible for RNA synthesis in the nucleus of the host cell. Influenza transcription results in spliced mRNAs (M2 and NS2), intron-containing mRNAs (M1 and NS1), and intron-less mRNAs (HA, NA, NP, PB1, PB2, and PA), all of which undergo nuclear export into the cytoplasm for translation. Most cellular mRNA nuclear export is Nxf1-mediated, while select mRNAs utilize Crm1. Here we inhibited Nxf1 and Crm1 nuclear export prior to infection with influenza A/Udorn/307/1972(H3N2) virus and analyzed influenza intron-less mRNAs using cellular fractionation and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). We examined direct interaction between Nxf1 and influenza intron-less mRNAs using immuno purification of Nxf1 and RT-PCR of associated RNA. Inhibition of Nxf1 resulted in less influenza intron-less mRNA export into the cytoplasm for HA and NA influenza mRNAs in both human embryonic kidney cell line (293 T) and human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cell line (A549). However, in 293 T cells no change was observed for mRNAs encoding the components of the viral ribonucleoproteins; NP, PA, PB1, and PB2, while in A549 cells, only PA, PB1, and PB2 mRNAs, encoding the RdRP, remained unaffected; NP mRNA was reduced in the cytoplasm. In A549 cells NP, NA, HA, mRNAs were found associated with Nxf1 but PA, PB1, and PB2 mRNAs were not. Crm1 inhibition also resulted in no significant difference in PA, PB1, and PB2 mRNA nuclear export. These results further confirm Nxf1-mediated nuclear export is functional during the influenza life cycle and hijacked for select influenza mRNA nuclear export. We reveal a cell type difference for Nxf1-mediated nuclear export of influenza NP mRNA, a reminder that cell type can influence molecular mechanisms. Importantly, we

  14. The Nuclear PolyA-Binding Protein Nab2p Is Essential for mRNA Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Manfred; Olszewski, Pawel; Pelechano, Vicent; Gupta, Ishaan; Steinmetz, Lars M; Jensen, Torben Heick

    2015-07-07

    Polyadenylation of mRNA is a key step in eukaryotic gene expression. However, despite the major impact of poly(A) tails on mRNA metabolism, the precise roles of poly(A)-binding proteins (PABPs) in nuclear mRNA biogenesis remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate that rapid nuclear depletion of the S. cerevisiae PABP Nab2p leads to a global loss of cellular mRNA, but not of RNA lacking poly(A) tails. Disappearance of mRNA is a nuclear event, but not due to decreased transcription. Instead, the absence of Nab2p results in robust nuclear mRNA decay by the ribonucleolytic RNA exosome in a polyadenylation-dependent process. We conclude that Nab2p is required to protect early mRNA and therefore constitutes a crucial nuclear mRNA biogenesis factor. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The Nuclear PolyA-Binding Protein Nab2p Is Essential for mRNA Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmid, Manfred; Olszewski, Pawel; Pelechano, Vicent;

    2015-01-01

    Polyadenylation of mRNA is a key step in eukaryotic gene expression. However, despite the major impact of poly(A) tails on mRNA metabolism, the precise roles of poly(A)-binding proteins (PABPs) in nuclear mRNA biogenesis remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate that rapid nuclear depletion of the S....... cerevisiae PABP Nab2p leads to a global loss of cellular mRNA, but not of RNA lacking poly(A) tails. Disappearance of mRNA is a nuclear event, but not due to decreased transcription. Instead, the absence of Nab2p results in robust nuclear mRNA decay by the ribonucleolytic RNA exosome in a polyadenylation......-dependent process. We conclude that Nab2p is required to protect early mRNA and therefore constitutes a crucial nuclear mRNA biogenesis factor....

  16. Current perspectives on the role of TRAMP in nuclear RNA surveillance and quality control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan K

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Kewu Pan, Zhe Huang, Jimmy Tsz Hang Lee, Chi-Ming Wong State Key Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, Department of Medicine, Shenzhen Institute of Research and Innovation, the University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong Abstract: The TRAMP complex assists the nuclear exosome to degrade a broad range of ribonucleic acid (RNA substrates by increasing both exoribonucleolytic activity and substrate specificity. However, how the interactions between the TRAMP subunits and the components of the nuclear exosome regulate their functions in RNA degradation and substrate specificity remain unclear. This review aims to provide a summary of the recent findings on the role of the TRAMP complex in nuclear RNA degradation. The new insights from recent structural biological studies are discussed. Keywords: TRAMP, nuclear exosome, NEXT, RNA surveillance

  17. Spliceosomal small nuclear RNAs of Tetrahymena thermophila and some possible snRNA-snRNA base-pairing interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orum, H; Nielsen, Henrik; Engberg, J

    1991-01-01

    We have identified and characterized the full set of spliceosomal small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs; U1, U2, U4, U5 and U6) from the ciliated protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila. With the exception of U4 snRNA, the sizes of the T. thermophila snRNAs are closely similar to their metazoan homologues. The T...

  18. AAGAG repeat RNA is an essential component of nuclear matrix in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Rashmi U; Mamillapalli, Anitha; Rangaraj, Nandini; Kumar, Ram P; Vasanthi, Dasari; Mishra, Krishnaveni; Mishra, Rakesh K

    2013-04-01

    Eukaryotic nucleus is functionally as well as spatially compartmentalized and maintains dynamic organization of sub-nuclear bodies. This organization is supported by a non-chromatin nuclear structure called the nuclear matrix. Although the precise molecular composition and ultra-structure of the nuclear matrix is not known, proteins and RNA molecules are its major components and several nuclear matrix proteins have been identified. However, the nature of its RNA component is unknown. Here we show that in Drosophila melanogaster, transcripts from AAGAG repeats of several hundred nucleotide in length are critical constituents of the nuclear matrix. While both the strands of this repeat are transcribed and are nuclear matrix associated, the polypurine strand is predominantly detected in situ. We also show that AAGAG RNA is essential for viability. Our results reveal the molecular identity of a critical RNA component of the nuclear architecture and point to one of the utilities of the repetitive part of the genome that has accumulated in higher eukaryotes.

  19. Efficient and dynamic nuclear localization of green fluorescent protein via RNA binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitamura, Akira; Nakayama, Yusaku; Kinjo, Masataka, E-mail: kinjo@sci.hokudai.ac.jp

    2015-07-31

    Classical nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequences have been used for artificial localization of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the nucleus as a positioning marker or for measurement of the nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling rate in living cells. However, the detailed mechanism of nuclear retention of GFP-NLS remains unclear. Here, we show that a candidate mechanism for the strong nuclear retention of GFP-NLS is via the RNA-binding ability of the NLS sequence. GFP tagged with a classical NLS derived from Simian virus 40 (GFP-NLS{sup SV40}) localized not only in the nucleoplasm, but also to the nucleolus, the nuclear subdomain in which ribosome biogenesis takes place. GFP-NLS{sup SV40} in the nucleolus was mobile, and intriguingly, the diffusion coefficient, which indicates the speed of diffusing molecules, was 1.5-fold slower than in the nucleoplasm. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) analysis showed that GFP-NLS{sup SV40} formed oligomers via RNA binding, the estimated molecular weight of which was larger than the limit for passive nuclear export into the cytoplasm. These findings suggest that the nuclear localization of GFP-NLS{sup SV40} likely results from oligomerization mediated via RNA binding. The analytical technique used here can be applied for elucidating the details of other nuclear localization mechanisms, including those of several types of nuclear proteins. In addition, GFP-NLS{sup SV40} can be used as an excellent marker for studying both the nucleoplasm and nucleolus in living cells. - Highlights: • Nuclear localization signal-tagged GFP (GFP-NLS) showed clear nuclear localization. • The GFP-NLS dynamically localized not only in the nucleoplasm, but also to the nucleolus. • The nuclear localization of GFP-NLS results from transient oligomerization mediated via RNA binding. • Our NLS-tagging procedure is ideal for use in artificial sequestration of proteins in the nucleus.

  20. Cloning and characterization of a novel deletion mutant of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein M4 from human dendritic cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄欣; 赵忠良; 袁正隆; 张明徽; 朱学军; 陈国友; 曹雪涛

    2000-01-01

    To identify differentially expressed genes from antigen-stimulated human dendritic cells (DC), subtractive cloning was adopted and more than ten novel genes differentially expressed were cloned. One is a deletion mutant of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) M4 in which the residues from 159 to 197 of hnRNP M4 have been absent. The deletion mutant was shown to- be co-expressed with hnRNP M4 in cell lines. The mutant was expressed in antigen-stimulated DC but not in normal DC. Northern blot analysis revealed the presence of a major hnRNP M4 deletion mutant mRNA transcript of 2.4 kilobase with the highest levels in peripheral lymphocytes, lung, liver and spleen. It was also expressed in bone marrow-derived stromal cells (BMSC), BMSC treated with several cytokines but not in BMSC treated with TNF-a. The results revealed a new member of hnRNP family and suggested that hnRNP would participate in antigen process and presentation.

  1. Cloning and characterization of a novel deletion mutant of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein M4 from human dendritic cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    To identify differentially expressed genes from antigen-stimulated human dendritic cells (DC), subtractive cloning was adopted and more than ten novel genes differentially expressed were cloned. One is a deletion mutant of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) M4 in which the residues from 159 to 197 of hnRNP M4 have been absent. The deletion mutant was shown to be co-expressed with hnRNP M4 in cell lines. The mutant was expressed in antigen-stimulated DC but not in normal DC. Northern blot analysis revealed the presence of a major hnRNP M4 deletion mutant mRNA transcript of 2.4 kilobase with the highest levels in peripheral lymphocytes, lung, liver and spleen. It was also expressed in bone marrow-derived stromal cells (BMSC), BMSC treated with several cytokines but not in BMSC treated with TNF-a. The results revealed a new member of hnRNP family and suggested that hnRNP would participate in antigen process and presentation.

  2. An empirical likelihood ratio test robust to individual heterogeneity for differential expression analysis of RNA-seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Maoqi; Chen, Liang

    2016-10-21

    The individual sample heterogeneity is one of the biggest obstacles in biomarker identification for complex diseases such as cancers. Current statistical models to identify differentially expressed genes between disease and control groups often overlook the substantial human sample heterogeneity. Meanwhile, traditional nonparametric tests lose detailed data information and sacrifice the analysis power, although they are distribution free and robust to heterogeneity. Here, we propose an empirical likelihood ratio test with a mean-variance relationship constraint (ELTSeq) for the differential expression analysis of RNA sequencing (RNA-seq). As a distribution-free nonparametric model, ELTSeq handles individual heterogeneity by estimating an empirical probability for each observation without making any assumption about read-count distribution. It also incorporates a constraint for the read-count overdispersion, which is widely observed in RNA-seq data. ELTSeq demonstrates a significant improvement over existing methods such as edgeR, DESeq, t-tests, Wilcoxon tests and the classic empirical likelihood-ratio test when handling heterogeneous groups. It will significantly advance the transcriptomics studies of cancers and other complex disease.

  3. Effect of colchicine on mammalian liver nuclear envelope and on nucleo-cytoplasmic RNA transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agutter, P S; Suckling, K E

    1982-09-27

    The binding of colchicine to nuclear envelopes was studied in order to elucidate the mechanism whereby this compound inhibits nucleocytoplasmic RNA transport. The results suggest that a single class of colchicine-binding site (dissociation constant=approx. 0.7 mM, concentration=approx. 330 nmol colchicine/mg protein) is localised in the nuclear periphery (pore-lamina) and that binding to these sites effects a constriction of the pore-complexes with concomitant inhibition of RNA egress and disordering of the nuclear membrane phospholipid bilayers.

  4. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K upregulates the kinetochore complex component NUF2 and promotes the tumorigenicity of colon cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimasa, Hironobu; Taniue, Kenzui [Laboratory of Molecular and Genetic Information, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1, Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-0032 (Japan); Kurimoto, Akiko [Laboratory of Molecular and Genetic Information, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1, Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-0032 (Japan); Oncology Research Laboratories, Daiichi Sankyo Co., Ltd, 1-2-58, Hiromachi, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo, 140-8710 (Japan); Takeda, Yasuko; Kawasaki, Yoshihiro [Laboratory of Molecular and Genetic Information, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1, Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-0032 (Japan); Akiyama, Tetsu, E-mail: akiyama@iam.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Laboratory of Molecular and Genetic Information, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1, Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-0032 (Japan)

    2015-03-27

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) is a multi-functional protein involved in transcription, mRNA splicing, mRNA stabilization and translation. Although hnRNP K has been suggested to play a role in the development of many cancers, its molecular function in colorectal cancer has remained elusive. Here we show that hnRNP K plays an important role in the mitotic process in HCT116 colon cancer cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that hnRNP K directly transactivates the NUF2 gene, the product of which is a component of the NDC80 kinetochore complex and which is known to be critical for a stable spindle microtubule-kinetochore attachment. In addition, knockdown of both hnRNP K and NUF2 caused failure in metaphase chromosome alignment and drastic decrease in the growth of colon cancer cells. These results suggest that the hnRNP K-NUF2 axis is important for the mitotic process and proliferation of colon cancer cells and that this axis could be a target for the therapy of colon cancer. - Highlights: • hnRNP K is required for the tumorigenicity of colon cancer cells. • hnRNP K binds to the promoter region of NUF2 and activates its transcription. • NUF2 expression is correlated with hnRNP K expression in colorectal cancer tissue. • hnRNP K and NUF2 are required for metaphase chromosome alignment. • The hnRNP K-NUF2 axis is important for the proliferation of colon cancer cells.

  5. Protein Kinase C-{delta} mediates down-regulation of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K protein: involvement in apoptosis induction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Feng-Hou [NO.3 People' s Hospital affiliated to Shanghai Jiao-Tong University School of Medicine (SJTU-SM), Shanghai 201900 (China); The Department of Pathophysiology, Key Laboratory of Cell Differentiation and Apoptosis of National Ministry of Education, Shanghai Jiao-Tong University School of Medicine (SJTU-SM), Shanghai 200025 (China); Wu, Ying-Li [The Department of Pathophysiology, Key Laboratory of Cell Differentiation and Apoptosis of National Ministry of Education, Shanghai Jiao-Tong University School of Medicine (SJTU-SM), Shanghai 200025 (China); Zhao, Meng [Institute of Health Science, SJTU-SM/Shanghai Institutes for Biological Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China); Liu, Chuan-Xu; Wang, Li-Shun [The Department of Pathophysiology, Key Laboratory of Cell Differentiation and Apoptosis of National Ministry of Education, Shanghai Jiao-Tong University School of Medicine (SJTU-SM), Shanghai 200025 (China); Chen, Guo-Qiang, E-mail: chengq@shsmu.edu.cn [The Department of Pathophysiology, Key Laboratory of Cell Differentiation and Apoptosis of National Ministry of Education, Shanghai Jiao-Tong University School of Medicine (SJTU-SM), Shanghai 200025 (China); Institute of Health Science, SJTU-SM/Shanghai Institutes for Biological Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China)

    2009-11-15

    We reported previously that NSC606985, a camptothecin analogue, induces apoptosis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells through proteolytic activation of protein kinase C delta ({Delta}PKC-{delta}). By subcellular proteome analysis, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) was identified as being significantly down-regulated in NSC606985-treated leukemic NB4 cells. HnRNP K, a docking protein for DNA, RNA, and transcriptional or translational molecules, is implicated in a host of processes involving the regulation of gene expression. However, the molecular mechanisms of hnRNP K reduction and its roles during apoptosis are still not understood. In the present study, we found that, following the appearance of the {Delta}PKC-{delta}, hnRNP K protein was significantly down-regulated in NSC606985, doxorubicin, arsenic trioxide and ultraviolet-induced apoptosis. We further provided evidence that {Delta}PKC-{delta} mediated the down-regulation of hnRNP K protein during apoptosis: PKC-{delta} inhibitor could rescue the reduction of hnRNP K; hnRNP K failed to be decreased in PKC-{delta}-deficient apoptotic KG1a cells; conditional induction of {Delta}PKC-{delta} in U937T cells directly down-regulated hnRNP K protein. Moreover, the proteasome inhibitor also inhibited the down-regulation of hnRNP K protein by apoptosis inducer and the conditional expression of {Delta}PKC-{delta}. More intriguingly, the suppression of hnRNP K with siRNA transfection significantly induced apoptosis. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that proteolytically activated PKC-{delta} down-regulates hnRNP K protein in a proteasome-dependent manner, which plays an important role in apoptosis induction.

  6. A Herpesvirus Protein Selectively Inhibits Cellular mRNA Nuclear Export.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Danyang; Kim, Yong Hoon; Xiao, Yuchen; Du, Yushen; Xie, Yafang; Lee, Kevin K; Feng, Jun; Farhat, Nisar; Zhao, Dawei; Shu, Sara; Dai, Xinghong; Chanda, Sumit K; Rana, Tariq M; Krogan, Nevan J; Sun, Ren; Wu, Ting-Ting

    2016-11-09

    Nuclear mRNA export is highly regulated to ensure accurate cellular gene expression. Viral inhibition of cellular mRNA export can enhance viral access to the cellular translation machinery and prevent anti-viral protein production but is generally thought to be nonselective. We report that ORF10 of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), a nuclear DNA virus, inhibits mRNA export in a transcript-selective manner to control cellular gene expression. Nuclear export inhibition by ORF10 requires an interaction with an RNA export factor, Rae1. Genome-wide analysis reveals a subset of cellular mRNAs whose nuclear export is blocked by ORF10 with the 3' UTRs of ORF10-targeted transcripts conferring sensitivity to export inhibition. The ORF10-Rae1 interaction is important for the virus to express viral genes and produce infectious virions. These results suggest that a nuclear DNA virus can selectively interfere with RNA export to restrict host gene expression for optimal replication. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Three-Dimensional Mapping of mRNA Export through the Nuclear Pore Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven J. Schnell

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The locations of transcription and translation of mRNA in eukaryotic cells are spatially separated by the nuclear envelope (NE. Plenty of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs embedded in the NE function as the major gateway for the export of transcribed mRNAs from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Whereas the NPC, perhaps one of the largest protein complexes, provides a relatively large channel for macromolecules to selectively pass through it in inherently three-dimensional (3D movements, this channel is nonetheless below the diffraction limit of conventional light microscopy. A full understanding of the mRNA export mechanism urgently requires real-time mapping of the 3D dynamics of mRNA in the NPC of live cells with innovative imaging techniques breaking the diffraction limit of conventional light microscopy. Recently, super-resolution fluorescence microscopy and single-particle tracking (SPT techniques have been applied to the study of nuclear export of mRNA in live cells. In this review, we emphasize the necessity of 3D mapping techniques in the study of mRNA export, briefly summarize the feasibility of current 3D imaging approaches, and highlight the new features of mRNA nuclear export elucidated with a newly developed 3D imaging approach combining SPT-based super-resolution imaging and 2D-to-3D deconvolution algorithms.

  8. Heterogeneity of miRNA expression in localized prostate cancer with clinicopathological correlations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zedan, Ahmed Hussein; Blavnsfeldt, Søren Garm; Hansen, Torben Frøstrup

    2017-01-01

    curatively intended surgery for localized PCa, were investigated with a panel of 6 miRNAs (miRNA-21, miRNA-34a, miRNA-125b, miRNA-126, miRNA-143, and miRNA-145) using tissue micro-array (TMA) and in situ hybridization (ISH). Inter- and intra-patient variation was assessed using intra-class correlation (ICC...

  9. mRNA Transcriptomics of Galectins Unveils Heterogeneous Organization in Mouse and Human Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian John

    2016-12-01

    preserved across both these species, however, galectin-9 showed maximal preservation only in the cerebral cortex.Conclusions: It is for the first time that a comprehensive description of galectins’ mRNA expression profile in brain is presented. Results suggests that spatial transcriptome changes in galectins may contribute to differential brain functions and evolution across species that highlights galectins as novel signatures of brain heterogeneity and functions, which if disturbed, can promote several brain disorders.

  10. CMSA: a heterogeneous CPU/GPU computing system for multiple similar RNA/DNA sequence alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Wang, Chen; Tang, Shanjiang; Yu, Ce; Zou, Quan

    2017-06-24

    The multiple sequence alignment (MSA) is a classic and powerful technique for sequence analysis in bioinformatics. With the rapid growth of biological datasets, MSA parallelization becomes necessary to keep its running time in an acceptable level. Although there are a lot of work on MSA problems, their approaches are either insufficient or contain some implicit assumptions that limit the generality of usage. First, the information of users' sequences, including the sizes of datasets and the lengths of sequences, can be of arbitrary values and are generally unknown before submitted, which are unfortunately ignored by previous work. Second, the center star strategy is suited for aligning similar sequences. But its first stage, center sequence selection, is highly time-consuming and requires further optimization. Moreover, given the heterogeneous CPU/GPU platform, prior studies consider the MSA parallelization on GPU devices only, making the CPUs idle during the computation. Co-run computation, however, can maximize the utilization of the computing resources by enabling the workload computation on both CPU and GPU simultaneously. This paper presents CMSA, a robust and efficient MSA system for large-scale datasets on the heterogeneous CPU/GPU platform. It performs and optimizes multiple sequence alignment automatically for users' submitted sequences without any assumptions. CMSA adopts the co-run computation model so that both CPU and GPU devices are fully utilized. Moreover, CMSA proposes an improved center star strategy that reduces the time complexity of its center sequence selection process from O(mn (2)) to O(mn). The experimental results show that CMSA achieves an up to 11× speedup and outperforms the state-of-the-art software. CMSA focuses on the multiple similar RNA/DNA sequence alignment and proposes a novel bitmap based algorithm to improve the center star strategy. We can conclude that harvesting the high performance of modern GPU is a promising approach to

  11. The Nuclear PolyA-Binding Protein Nab2p Is Essential for mRNA Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmid, Manfred; Olszewski, Pawel; Pelechano, Vicent

    2015-01-01

    Polyadenylation of mRNA is a key step in eukaryotic gene expression. However, despite the major impact of poly(A) tails on mRNA metabolism, the precise roles of poly(A)-binding proteins (PABPs) in nuclear mRNA biogenesis remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate that rapid nuclear depletion of the S....... cerevisiae PABP Nab2p leads to a global loss of cellular mRNA, but not of RNA lacking poly(A) tails. Disappearance of mRNA is a nuclear event, but not due to decreased transcription. Instead, the absence of Nab2p results in robust nuclear mRNA decay by the ribonucleolytic RNA exosome in a polyadenylation...

  12. Identification of a chemical inhibitor for nuclear speckle formation: Implications for the function of nuclear speckles in regulation of alternative pre-mRNA splicing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurogi, Yutaro; Matsuo, Yota; Mihara, Yuki; Yagi, Hiroaki; Shigaki-Miyamoto, Kaya; Toyota, Syukichi; Azuma, Yuko [Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, Chuo-ku, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Igarashi, Masayuki [Laboratory of Disease Biology, Institute of Microbial Chemistry, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 141-0021 (Japan); Tani, Tokio, E-mail: ttani@sci.kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, Chuo-ku, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan)

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • We identified tubercidin as a compound inducing aberrant formation of the speckles. • Tubercidin causes delocalization of poly (A){sup +}RNAs from nuclear speckles. • Tubercidin induces dispersion of splicing factors from nuclear speckles. • Tubercidin affects alternative pre-mRNA splicing. • Nuclear speckles play a role in regulation of alternative pre-mRNA splicing. - Abstract: Nuclear speckles are subnuclear structures enriched with RNA processing factors and poly (A){sup +} RNAs comprising mRNAs and poly (A){sup +} non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). Nuclear speckles are thought to be involved in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression, such as pre-mRNA splicing. By screening 3585 culture extracts of actinomycetes with in situ hybridization using an oligo dT probe, we identified tubercidin, an analogue of adenosine, as an inhibitor of speckle formation, which induces the delocalization of poly (A){sup +} RNA and dispersion of splicing factor SRSF1/SF2 from nuclear speckles in HeLa cells. Treatment with tubercidin also decreased steady-state MALAT1 long ncRNA, thought to be involved in the retention of SRSF1/SF2 in nuclear speckles. In addition, we found that tubercidin treatment promoted exon skipping in the alternative splicing of Clk1 pre-mRNA. These results suggest that nuclear speckles play a role in modulating the concentration of splicing factors in the nucleoplasm to regulate alternative pre-mRNA splicing.

  13. Postage for the messenger: Designating routes for Nuclear mRNA Export

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natalizio, Barbara J.; Wente, Susan R.

    2013-01-01

    Transcription of messenger(m) RNA occurs in the nucleus, making the translocation of mRNA across the nuclear envelope (NE) boundary a critical determinant of proper gene expression and cell survival. A major mRNA export route occurs via the NXF1-dependent pathway through the nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) embedded in the NE. However, recent findings have discovered new evidence supporting the existence of multiple mechanisms for crossing the NE, including both NPC-mediated and NE budding-mediated pathways. An analysis of the trans-acting factors and cis components that define these pathways reveals shared elements as well as mechanistic differences. We review here the current understanding of the mechanisms that characterize each pathway and highlight the determinants that influence mRNA transport fate. PMID:23583578

  14. DNA sequencing reveals limited heterogeneity in the 16S rRNA gene from the rrnB operon among five Mycoplasma hominis isolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mygind, T; Birkelund, Svend; Christiansen, Gunna

    1998-01-01

    To investigate the intraspecies heterogeneity within the 16S rRNA gene of Mycoplasma hominis, five isolates with diverse antigenic profiles, variable/identical P120 hypervariable domains, and different 16S rRNA gene RFLP patterns were analysed. The 16S rRNA gene from the rrnB operon was amplified...

  15. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K inhibits heat shock-induced transcriptional activity of heat shock factor 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee-Jung; Lee, Jae-Jin; Cho, Jin-Hwan; Jeong, Jaeho; Park, A Young; Kang, Wonmo; Lee, Kong-Joo

    2017-08-04

    When cells are exposed to heat shock and various other stresses, heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) is activated, and the heat shock response (HSR) is elicited. To better understand the molecular regulation of the HSR, we used 2D-PAGE-based proteome analysis to screen for heat shock-induced post-translationally modified cellular proteins. Our analysis revealed that two protein spots typically present on 2D-PAGE gels and containing heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) with trioxidized Cys(132) disappeared after the heat shock treatment and reappeared during recovery, but the total amount of hnRNP K protein remained unchanged. We next tested whether hnRNP K plays a role in HSR by regulating HSF1 and found that hnRNP K inhibits HSF1 activity, resulting in reduced expression of hsp70 and hsp27 mRNAs. hnRNP K also reduced binding affinity of HSF1 to the heat shock element by directly interacting with HSF1 but did not affect HSF1 phosphorylation-dependent activation or nuclear localization. hnRNP K lost its ability to induce these effects when its Cys(132) was substituted with Ser, Asp, or Glu. These findings suggest that hnRNP K inhibits transcriptional activity of HSF1 by inhibiting its binding to heat shock element and that the oxidation status of Cys(132) in hnRNP K is critical for this inhibition. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. The sperm nucleus: chromatin, RNA and the nuclear matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Graham D.; Lalancette, Claudia; Linnemann, Amelia K.; Leduc, Frédéric; Boissonneault, Guylain; Krawetz, Stephen A.

    2017-01-01

    Within the sperm nucleus the paternal genome remains functionally inert and protected following protamination. This is marked by a structural morphogenesis that is heralded by a striking reduction in nuclear volume. Despite these changes, both human and mouse spermatozoa maintain low levels of nucleosomes that appear non-randomly distributed throughout the genome. These regions may be necessary for organizing higher order genomic structure through interactions with the nuclear matrix. The promoters of this transcriptionally quiescent genome are differentially marked by modified histones that may poise downstream epigenetic effects. This notion is supported by increasing evidence that the embryo inherits these differing levels of chromatin organization. In concert with the suite of RNAs retained in the mature sperm they may synergistically interact to direct early embryonic gene expression. Irrespective, these features reflect the transcriptional history of spermatogenic differentiation. As such they may soon be utilized as clinical markers of male fertility. In this review we explore and discuss how this may be orchestrated. PMID:20876223

  17. hnRNP A2/B1 interacts with influenza A viral protein NS1 and inhibits virus replication potentially through suppressing NS1 RNA/protein levels and NS1 mRNA nuclear export

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yimeng; Zhou, Jianhong; Du, Yuchun, E-mail: ydu@uark.edu

    2014-01-20

    The NS1 protein of influenza viruses is a major virulence factor and exerts its function through interacting with viral/cellular RNAs and proteins. In this study, we identified heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A2/B1 (hnRNP A2/B1) as an interacting partner of NS1 proteins by a proteomic method. Knockdown of hnRNP A2/B1 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) resulted in higher levels of NS vRNA, NS1 mRNA, and NS1 protein in the virus-infected cells. In addition, we demonstrated that hnRNP A2/B1 proteins are associated with NS1 and NS2 mRNAs and that knockdown of hnRNP A2/B1 promotes transport of NS1 mRNA from the nucleus to the cytoplasm in the infected cells. Lastly, we showed that knockdown of hnRNP A2/B1 leads to enhanced virus replication. Our results suggest that hnRNP A2/B1 plays an inhibitory role in the replication of influenza A virus in host cells potentially through suppressing NS1 RNA/protein levels and NS1 mRNA nucleocytoplasmic translocation. - Highlights: • Cellular protein hnRNP A2/B1 interacts with influenza viral protein NS1. • hnRNP A2/B1 suppresses the levels of NS1 protein, vRNA and mRNA in infected cells. • hnRNP A2/B1 protein is associated with NS1 and NS2 mRNAs. • hnRNP A2/B1 inhibits the nuclear export of NS1 mRNAs. • hnRNP A2/B1 inhibits influenza virus replication.

  18. Expression and localization of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K in mouse ovaries and preimplantation embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ping [The International Peace Maternity and Child Health Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Wang, Ningling [Department of Assisted Reproduction, Shanghai Ninth People' s Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Lin, Xianhua; Jin, Li [The International Peace Maternity and Child Health Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Xu, Hong, E-mail: xuhong1168@126.com [The International Peace Maternity and Child Health Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Li, Rong [The International Peace Maternity and Child Health Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Huang, Hefeng, E-mail: huanghefg@hotmail.com [The International Peace Maternity and Child Health Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China)

    2016-02-26

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K), an evolutionarily conserved protein, is involved in several important cellular processes that are relevant to cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and cancer development. However, details of hnRNP K expression during mammalian oogenesis and preimplantation embryo development are lacking. The present study investigates the expression and cellular localization of K protein in the mouse ovaries and preimplantation embryos using immunostaining. We demonstrate, for the first time, that hnRNP K is abundantly expressed in the nuclei of mouse oocytes in primordial, primary and secondary follicles. In germ vesicle (GV)-stage oocytes, hnRNP K accumulates in the germinal vesicle in a spot distribution manner. After germinal vesicle breakdown, speckled hnRNP K is diffusely distributed in the cytoplasm. However, after fertilization, the K protein relocates into the female and male pronucleus and persists in the blastomere nuclei. Localization of K protein in the human ovary and ovarian granulosa cell tumor (GCT) was also investigated. Overall, this study provides important morphological evidence to better understand the possible roles of hnRNP K in mammalian oogenesis and early embryo development. - Highlights: • HnRNP K localizes in the nucleus of GV-stage oocyte in a punctate distribution. • HnRNP K strongly accumulates in zygotic pronuclei as condensed spots. • The localization of hnRNP K during oogenesis and embryogenesis is characteristic. • HnRNP K might have an important role in oogenesis and embryonic development.

  19. Intragenomic heterogeneity in the 16S rRNA genes of Flavobacterium columnare and standard protocol for genomovar assignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaFrentz, B R; Waldbieser, G C; Welch, T J; Shoemaker, C A

    2014-07-01

    Genetic variability in 16S rRNA gene sequences has been demonstrated among isolates of Flavobacterium columnare, and a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) assay is available for genetic typing of this important fish pathogen. Interpretation of restriction patterns can be difficult due to the lack of a formal description of the expected number and sizes of DNA fragments generated for each of the described genomovars. In this study, partial 16S rRNA gene sequences (ca. 1250-bp fragment) from isolates representing each described genomovar and isolates generating unique restriction patterns were cloned and sequenced. The results demonstrated that some isolates contained up to three different 16S rRNA genes whose sequences generate different RFLP patterns due to intragenomic heterogeneity within HaeIII restriction sites. The occurrence of HaeIII restriction sites within the portion of the 16S rRNA gene used for typing the F. columnare isolates and intragenomic heterogeneity within these sites explained the restriction patterns observed following RFLP analyses. This research provides a standard protocol for typing isolates of F. columnare by RFLP and a formal description of the expected restriction patterns for the previously described genomovars I, II, II-B and III. Additionally, we describe a new genomovar, I/II.

  20. Modelling of heterogenous neutron leakages in a nuclear reactor; Modelisation des fuites heterogenes de neutrons dans un reacteur nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohleber, X

    1997-11-17

    The TIBERE Model is a neutron leakage method based on B{sub 1} heterogeneous transport equation resolution. In this work, we have studied the influence of the reflection mode at the boundary of the assembly. In particular the White boundary condition has been implemented in the APOLLO2 neutron transport code. We have compared the two TIBERE kinds of boundary conditions (specular and white) with the classical B{sub 1} homogeneous leakage method in the modelling of some reactors. We have remarked the better capability of the TIBERE Model to compute voided assemblies. The white boundary condition is also able to compute a completely voided assembly and, besides, wins a factor 10 in CPU time in comparison with the specular boundary condition. These two heterogenous leakage formalisms have been tested on a partially voided experiment and have shown that the TIBERE Model can compute this kind of situation with a greater precision than the classical B{sub 1} homogeneous leakage method, and with a shorter computational time. (author)

  1. Modelling of heterogenous neutron leakages in a nuclear reactor; Modelisation des fuites heterogenes de neutrons dans un reacteur nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohleber, X

    1997-11-17

    The TIBERE Model is a neutron leakage method based on B{sub 1} heterogeneous transport equation resolution. In this work, we have studied the influence of the reflection mode at the boundary of the assembly. In particular the White boundary condition has been implemented in the APOLLO2 neutron transport code. We have compared the two TIBERE kinds of boundary conditions (specular and white) with the classical B{sub 1} homogeneous leakage method in the modelling of some reactors. We have remarked the better capability of the TIBERE Model to compute voided assemblies. The white boundary condition is also able to compute a completely voided assembly and, besides, wins a factor 10 in CPU time in comparison with the specular boundary condition. These two heterogenous leakage formalisms have been tested on a partially voided experiment and have shown that the TIBERE Model can compute this kind of situation with a greater precision than the classical B{sub 1} homogeneous leakage method, and with a shorter computational time. (author)

  2. hnRNP A2/B1 interacts with influenza A viral protein NS1 and inhibits virus replication potentially through suppressing NS1 RNA/protein levels and NS1 mRNA nuclear export.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yimeng; Zhou, Jianhong; Du, Yuchun

    2014-01-20

    The NS1 protein of influenza viruses is a major virulence factor and exerts its function through interacting with viral/cellular RNAs and proteins. In this study, we identified heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A2/B1 (hnRNP A2/B1) as an interacting partner of NS1 proteins by a proteomic method. Knockdown of hnRNP A2/B1 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) resulted in higher levels of NS vRNA, NS1 mRNA, and NS1 protein in the virus-infected cells. In addition, we demonstrated that hnRNP A2/B1 proteins are associated with NS1 and NS2 mRNAs and that knockdown of hnRNP A2/B1 promotes transport of NS1 mRNA from the nucleus to the cytoplasm in the infected cells. Lastly, we showed that knockdown of hnRNP A2/B1 leads to enhanced virus replication. Our results suggest that hnRNP A2/B1 plays an inhibitory role in the replication of influenza A virus in host cells potentially through suppressing NS1 RNA/protein levels and NS1 mRNA nucleocytoplasmic translocation.

  3. Chromatin remodeling complexes in the assembly of long noncoding RNA-dependent nuclear bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Tetsuya; Hirose, Tetsuro

    2015-01-01

    Paraspeckles are subnuclear structures that assemble on nuclear paraspeckle assembly transcript 1 (NEAT1) long noncoding (lnc)RNA. Paraspeckle formation requires appropriate NEAT1 biogenesis and subsequent assembly with multiple prion-like domain (PLD) containing RNA-binding proteins. We found that SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complexes function as paraspeckle components that interact with paraspeckle proteins (PSPs) and NEAT1. SWI/SNF complexes play an essential role in paraspeckle formation that does not require their ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling activity. Instead, SWI/SNF complexes facilitate organization of the PSP interaction network required for intact paraspeckle assembly. SWI/SNF complexes may collectively bind multiple PSPs to recruit them onto NEAT1. SWI/SNF complexes are also required for Sat III (Satellite III) lncRNA-dependent formation of nuclear stress bodies under heat shock conditions. Organization of the lncRNA-dependent omega speckle in Drosophila also depends on the chromatin remodeling complex. These findings raise the possibility that a common mechanism controls the formation of lncRNA-dependent nuclear body architecture.

  4. The actin binding cytoskeletal protein Moesin is involved in nuclear mRNA export.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristó, Ildikó; Bajusz, Csaba; Borsos, Barbara N; Pankotai, Tibor; Dopie, Joseph; Jankovics, Ferenc; Vartiainen, Maria K; Erdélyi, Miklós; Vilmos, Péter

    2017-10-01

    Current models imply that the evolutionarily conserved, actin-binding Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin (ERM) proteins perform their activities at the plasma membrane by anchoring membrane proteins to the cortical actin network. Here we show that beside its cytoplasmic functions, the single ERM protein of Drosophila, Moesin, has a novel role in the nucleus. The activation of transcription by heat shock or hormonal treatment increases the amount of nuclear Moesin, indicating biological function for the protein in the nucleus. The distribution of Moesin in the nucleus suggests a function in transcription and the depletion of mRNA export factors Nup98 or its interacting partner, Rae1, leads to the nuclear accumulation of Moesin, suggesting that the nuclear function of the protein is linked to mRNA export. Moesin localizes to mRNP particles through the interaction with the mRNA export factor PCID2 and knock down of Moesin leads to the accumulation of mRNA in the nucleus. Based on our results we propose that, beyond its well-known, manifold functions in the cytoplasm, the ERM protein of Drosophila is a new, functional component of the nucleus where it participates in mRNA export. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The plant host can affect the encapsidation of brome mosaic virus (BMV) RNA: BMV virions are surprisingly heterogeneous.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Peng; Vaughan, Robert C; Tragesser, Brady; Hoover, Haley; Kao, C Cheng

    2014-03-01

    Brome mosaic virus (BMV) packages its genomic and subgenomic RNAs into three separate viral particles. BMV purified from barley, wheat, and tobacco have distinct relative abundances of the encapsidated RNAs. We seek to identify the basis for the host-dependent differences in viral RNA encapsidation. Sequencing of the viral RNAs revealed recombination events in the 3' untranslated region of RNA1 of BMV purified from barley and wheat, but not from tobacco. However, the relative amounts of the BMV RNAs that accumulated in barley and wheat are similar and RNA accumulation is not sufficient to account for the difference in RNA encapsidation. Virions purified from barley and wheat were found to differ in their isoelectric points, resistance to proteolysis, and contacts between the capsid residues and the RNA. Mass spectrometric analyses revealed that virions from the three hosts had different post-translational modifications that should impact the physiochemical properties of the virions. Another major source of variation in RNA encapsidation was due to the purification of BMV particles to homogeneity. Highly enriched BMV present in lysates had a surprising range of sizes, buoyant densities, and distinct relative amounts of encapsidated RNAs. These results show that the encapsidated BMV RNAs reflect a combination of host effects on the physiochemical properties of the viral capsids and the enrichment of a subset of virions. The previously unexpected heterogeneity in BMV should influence the timing of the infection and also the host innate immune responses.

  6. HRP-2, the Caenorhabditis elegans homolog of mammalian heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins Q and R, is an alternative splicing factor that binds to UCUAUC splicing regulatory elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabat, Jennifer L; Barberan-Soler, Sergio; Zahler, Alan M

    2009-10-16

    Alternative splicing is regulated by cis sequences in the pre-mRNA that serve as binding sites for trans-acting alternative splicing factors. In a previous study, we used bioinformatics and molecular biology to identify and confirm that the intronic hexamer sequence UCUAUC is a nematode alternative splicing regulatory element. In this study, we used RNA affinity chromatography to identify trans factors that bind to this sequence. HRP-2, the Caenorhabditis elegans homolog of human heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins Q and R, binds to UCUAUC in the context of unc-52 intronic regulatory sequences as well as to RNAs containing tandem repeats of this sequence. The three Us in the hexamer are the most important determinants of this binding specificity. We demonstrate, using RNA interference, that HRP-2 regulates the alternative splicing of two genes, unc-52 and lin-10, both of which have cassette exons flanked by an intronic UCUAUC motif. We propose that HRP-2 is a protein responsible for regulating alternative splicing through binding interactions with the UCUAUC sequence.

  7. Nuclear energy consumption and economic growth in OECD countries: Cross-sectionally dependent heterogeneous panel causality analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazlioglu, Saban, E-mail: snazlioglu@pau.edu.tr [Department of Econometrics, Pamukkale University, Denizli (Turkey); Lebe, Fuat, E-mail: fuat.lebe@bozok.edu.tr [Department of Economics, Bozok University, Yozgat (Turkey); Kayhan, Selim, E-mail: selim.kayhan@bozok.edu.tr [Department of Economics, Bozok University, Yozgat (Turkey)

    2011-10-15

    The purpose of this study is to determine the direction causality between nuclear energy consumption and economic growth in OECD countries. The empirical model that includes capital and labor force as the control variables is estimated for the panel of fourteen OECD countries during the period 1980-2007. Apart from the previous studies in the nuclear energy consumption and economic growth relationship, this study utilizes the novel panel causality approach, which allows both cross-sectional dependency and heterogeneity across countries. The findings show that there is no causality between nuclear energy consumption and economic growth in eleven out of fourteen cases, supporting the neutrality hypothesis. As a sensitivity analysis, we also conduct Toda-Yamamoto time series causality method and find out that the results from the panel causality analysis are slightly different than those from the time-series causality analysis. Thereby, we can conclude that the choice of statistical tools in analyzing the nature of causality between nuclear energy consumption and economic growth may play a key role for policy implications. - Highlights: > Causality between nuclear energy consumption and economic growth is examined for OECD countries. > Panel causality method, which allows cross-sectional dependency and heterogeneity, is utilized. > The neutrality hypothesis is supported.

  8. Genetic characterization of clinical acanthamoeba isolates from Japan using nuclear and mitochondrial small subunit ribosomal RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md Moshiur; Yagita, Kenji; Kobayashi, Akira; Oikawa, Yosaburo; Hussein, Amjad I A; Matsumura, Takahiro; Tokoro, Masaharu

    2013-08-01

    Because of an increased number of Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) along with associated disease burdens, medical professionals have become more aware of this pathogen in recent years. In this study, by analyzing both the nuclear 18S small subunit ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA) and mitochondrial 16S rRNA gene loci, 27 clinical Acanthamoeba strains that caused AK in Japan were classified into 3 genotypes, T3 (3 strains), T4 (23 strains), and T5 (one strain). Most haplotypes were identical to the reference haplotypes reported from all over the world, and thus no specificity of the haplotype distribution in Japan was found. The T4 sub-genotype analysis using the 16S rRNA gene locus also revealed a clear sub-conformation within the T4 cluster, and lead to the recognition of a new sub-genotype T4i, in addition to the previously reported sub-genotypes T4a-T4h. Furthermore, 9 out of 23 strains in the T4 genotype were identified to a specific haplotype (AF479533), which seems to be a causal haplotype of AK. While heterozygous nuclear haplotypes were observed from 2 strains, the mitochondrial haplotypes were homozygous as T4 genotype in the both strains, and suggested a possibility of nuclear hybridization (mating reproduction) between different strains in Acanthamoeba. The nuclear 18S rRNA gene and mitochondrial 16S rRNA gene loci of Acanthamoeba spp. possess different unique characteristics usable for the genotyping analyses, and those specific features could contribute to the establishment of molecular taxonomy for the species complex of Acanthamoeba.

  9. Intra-Genomic Heterogeneity in 16S rRNA Genes in Strictly Anaerobic Clinical Isolates from Periodontal Abscesses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiazhen Chen

    Full Text Available Members of the genera Prevotella, Veillonella and Fusobacterium are the predominant culturable obligate anaerobic bacteria isolated from periodontal abscesses. When determining the cumulative number of clinical anaerobic isolates from periodontal abscesses, ambiguous or overlapping signals were frequently encountered in 16S rRNA gene sequencing chromatograms, resulting in ambiguous identifications. With the exception of the genus Veillonella, the high intra-chromosomal heterogeneity of rrs genes has not been reported.The 16S rRNA genes of 138 clinical, strictly anaerobic isolates and one reference strain were directly sequenced, and the chromatograms were carefully examined. Gene cloning was performed for 22 typical isolates with doublet sequencing signals for the 16S rRNA genes, and four copies of the rrs-ITS genes of 9 Prevotella intermedia isolates were separately amplified by PCR, sequenced and compared. Five conserved housekeeping genes, hsp60, recA, dnaJ, gyrB1 and rpoB from 89 clinical isolates of Prevotella were also amplified by PCR and sequenced for identification and phylogenetic analysis along with 18 Prevotella reference strains.Heterogeneity of 16S rRNA genes was apparent in clinical, strictly anaerobic oral bacteria, particularly in the genera Prevotella and Veillonella. One hundred out of 138 anaerobic strains (72% had intragenomic nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in multiple locations, and 13 strains (9.4% had intragenomic insertions or deletions in the 16S rRNA gene. In the genera Prevotella and Veillonella, 75% (67/89 and 100% (19/19 of the strains had SNPs in the 16S rRNA gene, respectively. Gene cloning and separate amplifications of four copies of the rrs-ITS genes confirmed that 2 to 4 heterogeneous 16S rRNA copies existed.Sequence alignment of five housekeeping genes revealed that intra-species nucleotide similarities were very high in the genera Prevotella, ranging from 94.3-100%. However, the inter-species similarities

  10. Intra-Genomic Heterogeneity in 16S rRNA Genes in Strictly Anaerobic Clinical Isolates from Periodontal Abscesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiazhen; Miao, Xinyu; Xu, Meng; He, Junlin; Xie, Yi; Wu, Xingwen; Chen, Gang; Yu, Liying; Zhang, Wenhong

    2015-01-01

    Background Members of the genera Prevotella, Veillonella and Fusobacterium are the predominant culturable obligate anaerobic bacteria isolated from periodontal abscesses. When determining the cumulative number of clinical anaerobic isolates from periodontal abscesses, ambiguous or overlapping signals were frequently encountered in 16S rRNA gene sequencing chromatograms, resulting in ambiguous identifications. With the exception of the genus Veillonella, the high intra-chromosomal heterogeneity of rrs genes has not been reported. Methods The 16S rRNA genes of 138 clinical, strictly anaerobic isolates and one reference strain were directly sequenced, and the chromatograms were carefully examined. Gene cloning was performed for 22 typical isolates with doublet sequencing signals for the 16S rRNA genes, and four copies of the rrs-ITS genes of 9 Prevotella intermedia isolates were separately amplified by PCR, sequenced and compared. Five conserved housekeeping genes, hsp60, recA, dnaJ, gyrB1 and rpoB from 89 clinical isolates of Prevotella were also amplified by PCR and sequenced for identification and phylogenetic analysis along with 18 Prevotella reference strains. Results Heterogeneity of 16S rRNA genes was apparent in clinical, strictly anaerobic oral bacteria, particularly in the genera Prevotella and Veillonella. One hundred out of 138 anaerobic strains (72%) had intragenomic nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in multiple locations, and 13 strains (9.4%) had intragenomic insertions or deletions in the 16S rRNA gene. In the genera Prevotella and Veillonella, 75% (67/89) and 100% (19/19) of the strains had SNPs in the 16S rRNA gene, respectively. Gene cloning and separate amplifications of four copies of the rrs-ITS genes confirmed that 2 to 4 heterogeneous 16S rRNA copies existed. Conclusion Sequence alignment of five housekeeping genes revealed that intra-species nucleotide similarities were very high in the genera Prevotella, ranging from 94.3–100%. However, the

  11. Functional significance for a heterogenous ribonucleoprotein A18 signature RNA motif in the 3'-untranslated region of ataxia telangiectasia mutated and Rad3-related (ATR) transcript.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ruiqing; Zhan, Ming; Nalabothula, Narasimha Rao; Yang, Qingyuan; Indig, Fred E; Carrier, France

    2010-03-19

    The predominantly nuclear heterogenous ribonucleoprotein A18 (hnRNP A18) translocates to the cytosol in response to cellular stress and increases translation by specifically binding to the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of several mRNA transcripts and the eukaryotic initiation factor 4G. Here, we identified a 51-nucleotide motif that is present 11.49 times more often in the 3'-UTR of hnRNP A18 mRNA targets than in the UniGene data base. This motif was identified by computational analysis of primary sequences and secondary structures of hnRNP A18 mRNA targets against the unaligned sequences. Band shift analyses indicate that the motif is sufficient to confer binding to hnRNP A18. A search of the entire UniGene data base indicates that the hnRNP A18 motif is also present in the 3'-UTR of the ataxia telangiectasia mutated and Rad3-related (ATR) mRNA. Validation of the predicted hnRNP A18 motif is provided by amplification of endogenous ATR transcript on polysomal fractions immunoprecipitated with hnRNP A18. Moreover, overexpression of hnRNP A18 results in increased ATR protein levels and increased phosphorylation of Chk1, a preferred ATR substrate, in response to UV radiation. In addition, our data indicate that inhibition of casein kinase II or GSK3beta significantly reduced hnRNP A18 cytosolic translocation in response to UV radiation. To our knowledge, this constitutes the first demonstration of a post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism for ATR activity. hnRNP A18 could thus become a new target to trigger ATR activity as back-up stress response mechanisms to functionally compensate for absent or defective responders.

  12. 7SK small nuclear RNA inhibits cancer cell proliferation through apoptosis induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keramati, Farid; Seyedjafari, Ehsan; Fallah, Parviz; Soleimani, Masoud; Ghanbarian, Hossein

    2015-04-01

    7SK small nuclear RNA (snRNA) is a 331-333-bp non-coding RNA, which recruits HEXIM 1/2 protein to inhibit positive elongation factor b (P-TEFb) activity. P-TEFb is an essential factor in alleviating promoter-proximal paused RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and initiating the productive elongation phase of gene transcription. Without this protein, Pol II will remain in its hypophosphorylated state, and no transcription occurs. In this study, we inhibited P-TEFb activity by over-expressing 7SK snRNA in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293T cancer cell line. This inhibition led to a significant decrease in cell viability, which can be due to the transcription inhibition. Moreover, 7SK snRNA over-expression promoted apoptosis in cancerous cells. Our results suggest 7SK snRNA as a potential endogenous anti-cancer agent, and to the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that uses a long non-coding RNA's over-expression against cancer cell growth and proliferation.

  13. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein M associates with mTORC2 and regulates muscle differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Yen; Lin, Chia-Lung; Chuang, Jen-Hua; Chiu, Fu-Yu; Sun, Yun-Ya; Liang, Mei-Chih; Lin, Yenshou

    2017-01-20

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) plays a range of crucial roles in cell survival, growth, proliferation, metabolism, and morphology. However, mTOR forms two distinct complexes, mTOR complex 1 and mTOR complex 2 (mTORC1 and mTORC2), via association with a series of different components; this allows the complexes to execute their wide range of functions. This study explores further the composition of the mTORC2 complex. Utilizing Rictor knock-out cells, immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry, a novel Rictor associated protein, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein M (hnRNP M), was identified. The association between hnRNP M and Rictor was verified using recombinant and endogenous protein and the binding site was found to be within aa 1~532 of hnRNP M. The presence of hnRNP M significantly affects phosphorylation of SGK1 S422, but not of Akt S473, PKCα S657 and PKCζ T560. Furthermore, hnRNP M also plays a critical role in muscle differentiation because knock-down of either hnRNP M or Rictor in C2C12 myoblasts reduced differentiation. This decrease is able to be rescued by overexpression SGK S422D in hnRNP M knockdown C2C12 myoblasts. Taken together, we have identified a novel Rictor/mTOR binding molecule, hnRNP M, that allows mTORC2 signaling to phosphorylate SGK1 thus regulating muscle differentiation.

  14. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein M associates with mTORC2 and regulates muscle differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Yen; Lin, Chia-Lung; Chuang, Jen-Hua; Chiu, Fu-Yu; Sun, Yun-Ya; Liang, Mei-Chih; Lin, Yenshou

    2017-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) plays a range of crucial roles in cell survival, growth, proliferation, metabolism, and morphology. However, mTOR forms two distinct complexes, mTOR complex 1 and mTOR complex 2 (mTORC1 and mTORC2), via association with a series of different components; this allows the complexes to execute their wide range of functions. This study explores further the composition of the mTORC2 complex. Utilizing Rictor knock-out cells, immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry, a novel Rictor associated protein, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein M (hnRNP M), was identified. The association between hnRNP M and Rictor was verified using recombinant and endogenous protein and the binding site was found to be within aa 1~532 of hnRNP M. The presence of hnRNP M significantly affects phosphorylation of SGK1 S422, but not of Akt S473, PKCα S657 and PKCζ T560. Furthermore, hnRNP M also plays a critical role in muscle differentiation because knock-down of either hnRNP M or Rictor in C2C12 myoblasts reduced differentiation. This decrease is able to be rescued by overexpression SGK S422D in hnRNP M knockdown C2C12 myoblasts. Taken together, we have identified a novel Rictor/mTOR binding molecule, hnRNP M, that allows mTORC2 signaling to phosphorylate SGK1 thus regulating muscle differentiation. PMID:28106162

  15. Muscle developmental defects in heterogeneous nuclear Ribonucleoprotein A1 knockout mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ting-Yuan; Chen, Yu-Chia; Jong, Yuh-Jyh; Tsai, Huai-Jen; Lee, Chien-Chin; Chang, Ya-Sian; Chang, Jan-Gowth

    2017-01-01

    Heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNP A1) is crucial for regulating alternative splicing. Its integrated function within an organism has not, however, been identified. We generated hnRNP A1 knockout mice to study the role of hnRNP A1 in vivo. The knockout mice, hnRNP A1−/−, showed embryonic lethality because of muscle developmental defects. The blood pressure and heart rate of the heterozygous mice were higher than those of the wild-type mice, indicating heart function defects. We performed mouse exon arrays to study the muscle development mechanism. The processes regulated by hnRNP A1 included cell adhesion and muscle contraction. The expression levels of muscle development-related genes in hnRNP A1+/− mice were significantly different from those in wild-type mice, as detected using qRT-PCR. We further confirmed the alternative splicing patterns of muscle development-related genes including mef2c, lrrfip1, usp28 and abcc9. Alternative mRNA isoforms of these genes were increased in hnRNP A1+/− mice compared with wild-type mice. Furthermore, we revealed that the functionally similar hnRNP A2/B1 did not compensate for the expression of hnRNP A1 in organisms. In summary, our study demonstrated that hnRNP A1 plays a critical and irreplaceable role in embryonic muscle development by regulating the expression and alternative splicing of muscle-related genes. PMID:28077597

  16. "Dot COM", a nuclear transit center for the primary piRNA pathway in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Cynthia; Zanni, Vanessa; Brasset, Emilie; Eymery, Angeline; Zhang, Liang; Mteirek, Rana; Jensen, Silke; Rong, Yikang S; Vaury, Chantal

    2013-01-01

    The piRNA pathway protects genomes by silencing mobile elements. Despite advances in understanding the processing events that generate piRNAs for silencing, little is known about how primary transcripts are transported from their genomic clusters to their processing centers. Using a model of the Drosophila COM/flamenco locus in ovarian somatic cells, we identified a prominent nuclear structure called Dot COM, which is enriched in long transcripts from piRNA clusters but located far from their transcription sites. Remarkably, transcripts from multiple clusters accumulate at Dot COM, which is often juxtaposed with Yb-bodies, the cytoplasmic processing centers for cluster transcripts. Genetic evidence suggests that the accumulation of precursor transcripts at Dot COM represents one of the most upstream events in the piRNA pathway. Our results provide new insights into the initial steps of the piRNA pathway, and open up a new research area important for a complete understanding of this conserved pathway.

  17. Dark Matter RNA: an Intelligent Scaffold for the Dynamic Regulation of the Nuclear Information Landscape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georges eSt. Laurent

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Perhaps no other topic in contemporary genomics has inspired such diverse viewpoints as the 95+% of the genome, previously known as junk DNA, that does not code for proteins. Here, we present a theory in which dark matter RNA plays a role in the generation of a landscape of spatial micro-domains coupled to the information signaling matrix of the nuclear landscape. Within and between these microdomains, dark matter RNAs additionally function to tether RNA interacting proteins and complexes of many different types, and by doing so, allow for a higher performance of the various processes requiring them at ultra-fast rates. This improves signal to noise characteristics of RNA processing, trafficking, and epigenetic signaling, where competition and differential RNA binding among proteins drives the computational decisions inherent in regulatory events.

  18. Nuclear receptor/microRNA circuitry links muscle fiber type to energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Zhenji; Rumsey, John; Hazen, Bethany C; Lai, Ling; Leone, Teresa C; Vega, Rick B; Xie, Hui; Conley, Kevin E; Auwerx, Johan; Smith, Steven R; Olson, Eric N; Kralli, Anastasia; Kelly, Daniel P

    2013-06-01

    The mechanisms involved in the coordinate regulation of the metabolic and structural programs controlling muscle fitness and endurance are unknown. Recently, the nuclear receptor PPARβ/δ was shown to activate muscle endurance programs in transgenic mice. In contrast, muscle-specific transgenic overexpression of the related nuclear receptor, PPARα, results in reduced capacity for endurance exercise. We took advantage of the divergent actions of PPARβ/δ and PPARα to explore the downstream regulatory circuitry that orchestrates the programs linking muscle fiber type with energy metabolism. Our results indicate that, in addition to the well-established role in transcriptional control of muscle metabolic genes, PPARβ/δ and PPARα participate in programs that exert opposing actions upon the type I fiber program through a distinct muscle microRNA (miRNA) network, dependent on the actions of another nuclear receptor, estrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ). Gain-of-function and loss-of-function strategies in mice, together with assessment of muscle biopsies from humans, demonstrated that type I muscle fiber proportion is increased via the stimulatory actions of ERRγ on the expression of miR-499 and miR-208b. This nuclear receptor/miRNA regulatory circuit shows promise for the identification of therapeutic targets aimed at maintaining muscle fitness in a variety of chronic disease states, such as obesity, skeletal myopathies, and heart failure.

  19. Nuclearly encoded splicing factors implicated in RNA splicing in higher plant organelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Longevialle, Andéol Falcon; Small, Ian D; Lurin, Claire

    2010-07-01

    Plant organelles arose from two independent endosymbiosis events. Throughout evolutionary history, tight control of chloroplasts and mitochondria has been gained by the nucleus, which regulates most steps of organelle genome expression and metabolism. In particular, RNA maturation, including RNA splicing, is highly dependent on nuclearly encoded splicing factors. Most introns in organelles are group II introns, whose catalytic mechanism closely resembles that of the nuclear spliceosome. Plant group II introns have lost the ability to self-splice in vivo and require nuclearly encoded proteins as cofactors. Since the first splicing factor was identified in chloroplasts more than 10 years ago, many other proteins have been shown to be involved in splicing of one or more introns in chloroplasts or mitochondria. These new proteins belong to a variety of different families of RNA binding proteins and provide new insights into ribonucleo-protein complexes and RNA splicing machineries in organelles. In this review, we describe how splicing factors, encoded by the nucleus and targeted to the organelles, take part in post-transcriptional steps in higher plant organelle gene expression. We go on to discuss the potential for these factors to regulate organelle gene expression.

  20. Specificity of recognition of mRNA 5' cap by human nuclear cap-binding complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worch, Remigiusz; Niedzwiecka, Anna; Stepinski, Janusz; Mazza, Catherine; Jankowska-Anyszka, Marzena; Darzynkiewicz, Edward; Cusack, Stephen; Stolarski, Ryszard

    2005-09-01

    The heterodimeric nuclear cap-binding complex (CBC) binds to the mono-methylated 5' cap of eukaryotic RNA polymerase II transcripts such as mRNA and U snRNA. The binding is important for nuclear maturation of mRNAs and possibly in the first round of translation and nonsense-mediated decay. It is also essential for nuclear export of U snRNAs in metazoans. We report characterization by fluorescence spectroscopy of the recognition of 5' capped RNA by human CBC. The association constants (K(as)) for 17 mono- and dinucleotide cap analogs as well as for the oligomer m7GpppA(m2') pU(m2')pA(m2') cover the range from 1.8 x 10(6) M(-1) to 2.3 x 10(8) M(-1). Higher affinity for CBC is observed for the dinucleotide compared with mononucleotide analogs, especially for those containing a purine nucleoside next to m7G. The mRNA tetramer associates with CBC as tightly as the dinucleotide analogs. Replacement of Tyr138 by alanine in the CBP20 subunit of CBC reduces the cap affinity except for the mononucleotide analogs, consistent with the crystallographic observation of the second base stacking on this residue. Our spectroscopic studies showed that contrary to the other known cap-binding proteins, the first two nucleotides of a capped-RNA are indispensable for its specific recognition by CBC. Differences in the cap binding of CBC compared with the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) are analyzed and discussed regarding replacement of CBC by eIF4E.

  1. piRNA-mediated nuclear accumulation of retrotransposon transcripts in the Drosophila female germline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambeyron, Séverine; Popkova, Anna; Payen-Groschêne, Geneviève; Brun, Christine; Laouini, Dorsaf; Pelisson, Alain; Bucheton, Alain

    2008-09-30

    Germline silencing of transposable elements is essential for the maintenance of genome integrity. Recent results indicate that this repression is largely achieved through a RNA silencing pathway that involves Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs). However the repressive mechanisms are not well understood. To address this question, we used the possibility to disrupt the repression of the Drosophila I element retrotransposon by hybrid dysgenesis. We show here that the repression of the functional I elements that are located in euchromatin requires proteins of the piRNA pathway, and that the amount of ovarian I element piRNAs correlates with the strength of the repression in the female germline. Antisense RNAs, which are likely used to produce antisense piRNAs, are transcribed by heterochromatic defective I elements, but efficient production of these antisense small RNAs requires the presence in the genome of euchromatic functional I elements. Finally, we demonstrate that the piRNA-induced silencing of the functional I elements is at least partially posttranscriptional. In a repressive background, these elements are still transcribed, but some of their sense transcripts are kept in nurse cell nuclear foci together with those of the Doc retrotransposon. In the absence of I element piRNAs, either in dysgenic females or in mutants of the piRNA silencing pathway, sense I element transcripts are transported toward the oocyte where retrotransposition occurs. Our results indicate that piRNAs are involved in a posttranscriptional gene-silencing mechanism resulting in RNA nuclear accumulation.

  2. Heterogeneous world model and collaborative scenarios of transition to globally sustainable nuclear energy systems

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency's International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) is to help ensure that nuclear energy is available to contribute to meeting global energy needs of the 21st century in a sustainable manner. The INPRO task titled “Global scenarios” is to develop global and regional nuclear energy scenarios that lead to a global vision of sustainable nuclear energy in the 21st century. Results of multiple studies show that the criteria for dev...

  3. Multiple Functions of Nuclear DNA Helicase Ⅱ (RNA helicase A) in Nucleic Acid Metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suisheng ZHANG; Frank GROSSE

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear DNA helicase Ⅱ(NDH Ⅱ),or RNA helicase A(RHA),was initially discovered in mammals by conventional protein purification methods.Molecular cloning identified apparent sequence homologies between NDH Ⅱ and a Drosophila protein named maleless(MLE),the latter being essential for the Drosophila X-chromosome dosage compensation.Increasing amounts of evidence suggest that NDH Ⅱ is involved in multiple aspects of cellular and viral DNA and RNA metabolism.Moreover the functions of NDH Ⅱ may have potential clinical implications related to viral infection,autoimmune diseases,or even tumorigenesis.

  4. Intralesional and metastatic heterogeneity in malignant melanomas demonstrated by stereologic estimates of nuclear volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Erlandsen, M

    1990-01-01

    Regional variability of nuclear 3-dimensional size can be estimated objectively using point-sampled intercepts obtained from different, defined zones within individual neoplasms. In the present study, stereologic estimates of the volume-weighted mean nuclear volume, nuclear vv, within peripheral...

  5. Homogenized moment tensor and the effect of near-field heterogeneities on nonisotropic radiation in nuclear explosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgos, Gaël.; Capdeville, Yann; Guillot, Laurent

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the effect of small-scale heterogeneities close to a seismic explosive source, at intermediate periods (20-50 s), with an emphasis on the resulting nonisotropic far-field radiation. First, using a direct numerical approach, we show that small-scale elastic heterogeneities located in the near-field of an explosive source, generate unexpected phases (i.e., long period S waves). We then demonstrate that the nonperiodic homogenization theory applied to 2-D and 3-D elastic models, with various pattern of small-scale heterogeneities near the source, leads to accurate waveforms at a reduced computational cost compared to direct modeling. Further, it gives an interpretation of how nearby small-scale features interact with the source at low frequencies, through an explicit correction to the seismic moment tensor. In 2-D simulations, we find a deviatoric contribution to the moment tensor, as high as 21% for near-source heterogeneities showing a 25% contrast of elastic values (relative to a homogeneous background medium). In 3-D this nonisotropic contribution reaches 27%. Second, we analyze intermediate-periods regional seismic waveforms associated with some underground nuclear explosions conducted at the Nevada National Security Site and invert for the full moment tensor, in order to quantify the relative contribution of the isotropic and deviatoric components of the tensor. The average value of the deviatoric part is about 35%. We conclude that the interactions between an explosive source and small-scale local heterogeneities of moderate amplitude may lead to a deviatoric contribution to the seismic moment, close to what is observed using regional data from nuclear test explosions.

  6. Oil prices, nuclear energy consumption, and economic growth: New evidence using a heterogeneous panel analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chien-Chiang, E-mail: cclee@cm.nsysu.edu.t [Department of Finance, National Sun Yat-sen University Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Chiu, Yi-Bin [Department of Finance, National Sun Yat-sen University Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)

    2011-04-15

    This paper applies panel data analysis to examine the short-run dynamics and long-run equilibrium relationships among nuclear energy consumption, oil prices, oil consumption, and economic growth for developed countries covering the period 1971-2006. The panel cointegration results show that in the long run, oil prices have a positive impact on nuclear energy consumption, suggesting the existence of the substitution relationship between nuclear energy and oil. The long-run elasticity of nuclear energy with respect to real income is approximately 0.89, and real income has a greater impact on nuclear energy than do oil prices in the long run. Furthermore, the panel causality results find evidence of unidirectional causality running from oil prices and economic growth to nuclear energy consumption in the long run, while there is no causality between nuclear energy consumption and economic growth in the short run. - Research highlights: {yields} We examine the relationship among nuclear energy consumption, oil prices, oil consumption, and economic growth for developed countries. {yields} The existence of the substitution relationship between nuclear energy and oil. {yields} Real income has a greater impact on nuclear energy than do oil prices in the long run. {yields} An unidirectional causality running from oil prices and economic growth to nuclear energy consumption in the long run.

  7. Novel way of capping mRNA trimer and studies of its interaction with human nuclear cap-binding complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worch, Remigiusz; Stepinski, Janusz; Niedzwiecka, Anna; Jankowska-Anyszka, Marzena; Mazza, Catherine; Cusack, Stephen; Stolarski, Ryszard; Darzynkiewicz, Edward

    2005-01-01

    Binding of mRNA 5' cap by the nuclear cap-binding complex (CBC) is crucial for a wide variety of mRNA metabolic events. The interaction involving the CBP20 subunit of CBC is mediated by numerous hydrogen bonds and by stacking of the tyrosine sidechains with two first bases of the capped mRNA. To examine a possible role of a longer mRNA chain in the CBC-cap recognition, we have synthesized an mRNA tetramer using a novel way of capping an RNA trimer and determined its affinity for CBC by fluorescence titration.

  8. Regulation of alternative splicing of the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) through G-rich cis-elements and heterogenous nuclear ribonucleoprotein H.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohe, Kazuyo; Watanabe, Takuo; Harada, Shin-ichi; Munesue, Seiichi; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko; Yonekura, Hideto; Yamamoto, Hiroshi

    2010-05-01

    Receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) is a cell-surface receptor. The binding of ligands to membrane-bound RAGE (mRAGE) evokes cellular responses involved in various pathological processes. Previously, we identified a novel soluble form, endogenous secretory RAGE (esRAGE) generated by alternative 5' splice site selection in intron 9 that leads to extension of exon 9 (exon 9B). Because esRAGE works as an antagonistic decoy receptor, the elucidation of regulatory mechanism of the alternative splicing is important to understand RAGE-related pathological processes. Here, we identified G-rich cis-elements within exon 9B for regulation of the alternative splicing using a RAGE minigene. Mutagenesis of the G-rich cis-elements caused a drastic increase in the esRAGE/mRAGE ratio in the minigene-transfected cells and in loss of binding of the RNA motif to heterogenous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) H. On the other hand, the artificial introduction of a G-stretch in exon 9B caused a drastic decrease in the esRAGE/mRAGE ratio accompanied by the binding of hnRNP H to the RNA motif. Thus, the G-stretches within exon 9B regulate RAGE alternative splicing via interaction with hnRNP H. The findings should provide a molecular basis for the development of medicines for RAGE-related disorders that could modulate esRAGE/mRAGE ratio.

  9. Interactions between mRNA export commitment, 3'-end quality control, and nuclear degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Libri, Domenico; Dower, Ken; Boulay, Jocelyne;

    2002-01-01

    elongation. Indeed, we find that a pool of heat shock HSP104 transcripts are 3'-end truncated in THO complex mutant as well as sub2 mutant backgrounds. Surprisingly, however, this defect can be suppressed by deletion of the 3'-5' exonuclease Rrp6p. This indicates that incomplete RNAs result from nuclear...... that the failure to retain and/or degrade defective mRNAs is deleterious. mRNAs produced in the 3'-end processing mutants rna14-3 and rna15-2, as well as an RNA harboring a 3' end generated by a self-cleaving hammerhead ribozyme, are also retained in Rrp6p-dependent transcription site foci. Taken together, our...

  10. Cytoplasmic and nuclear quality control and turnover of single-stranded RNA modulate post-transcriptional gene silencing in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Ana Beatriz; Martínez de Alba, Angel Emilio; Bardou, Florian; Crespi, Martin D.; Vaucheret, Hervé; Maizel, Alexis; Mallory, Allison C.

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic RNA quality control (RQC) uses both endonucleolytic and exonucleolytic degradation to eliminate dysfunctional RNAs. In addition, endogenous and exogenous RNAs are degraded through post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS), which is triggered by the production of double-stranded (ds)RNAs and proceeds through short-interfering (si)RNA-directed ARGONAUTE-mediated endonucleolytic cleavage. Compromising cytoplasmic or nuclear 5′–3′ exoribonuclease function enhances sense-transgene (S)-PTGS in Arabidopsis, suggesting that these pathways compete for similar RNA substrates. Here, we show that impairing nonsense-mediated decay, deadenylation or exosome activity enhanced S-PTGS, which requires host RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 6 (RDR6/SGS2/SDE1) and SUPPRESSOR OF GENE SILENCING 3 (SGS3) for the transformation of single-stranded RNA into dsRNA to trigger PTGS. However, these RQC mutations had no effect on inverted-repeat–PTGS, which directly produces hairpin dsRNA through transcription. Moreover, we show that these RQC factors are nuclear and cytoplasmic and are found in two RNA degradation foci in the cytoplasm: siRNA-bodies and processing-bodies. We propose a model of single-stranded RNA tug-of-war between RQC and S-PTGS that ensures the correct partitioning of RNA substrates among these RNA degradation pathways. PMID:23482394

  11. Ancient Origin of the U2 Small Nuclear RNA Gene-Targeting Non-LTR Retrotransposons Utopia: e0140084

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kenji K Kojima; Jerzy Jurka[dagger

    2015-01-01

    .... Utopia is found in three supergroups of eukaryotes: Amoebozoa, SAR, and Opisthokonta. Utopia is inserted into a specific site of U2 small nuclear RNA genes with different strength of specificity for each family...

  12. MicroRNA expression profiling in relation to the genetic heterogeneity of acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Jongen-Lavrencic (Mojca); S.M. Sun; M.K. Dijkstra; P.J.M. Valk (Peter); B. Löwenberg (Bob)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractAcute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a highly diverse disease characterized by various cytogenetic and molecular abnormalities. MicroRNAs are small noncoding RNAs that show variable expression during myeloid differentiation. MicroRNA expression in marrow blasts in 215 cases of newly diagnosed

  13. Intragenomic heterogeneity of the 16S rRNA-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer among Pseudomonas syringae and Pseudomonas fluorescens strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milyutina, Irina A; Bobrova, Vera K; Matveeva, Eugenia V; Schaad, Norman W; Troitsky, Alexey V

    2004-10-01

    The 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS1) from 14 strains of Pseudomonas syringae and P. fluorescens were sequenced. ITS1 exhibited significant sequence variability among different operons within a single genome. From 1 to 4 types of ITS1 were found in individual genomes of the P. syringae and P. fluorescens strains. A total of eight ITS1 types were identified among strains studied. The ITS1 nucleotide sequences consisted of conserved blocks including, among others, a stem-forming region of box B, tRNAIle and tRNAAla genes and several variable blocks. The differences in the variable regions were mostly due to insertions and/or deletions of nucleotide blocks. The intragenomic heterogeneity of ITS1 was brought about by different combinations of variable blocks, which possibly have resulted from recombination and horizontal transfer.

  14. MARs Wars: heterogeneity and clustering of DNA-binding domains in the nuclear matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioudinkova E. S.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. CO326 is a chicken nuclear scaffold/matrix attachment region (MAR associated with the nuclear matrix in several types of chicken cells. It contains a binding site for a sequence-specific DNA-binding protein, F326. We have studied its interaction with the nuclear matrix. Methods. We have used an in vitro MAR assay with isolated matrices from chicken HD3 cells. Results. We have found that an oligonucleotide binding site for the F326 inhibits binding of the CO326 to the nuclear matrix. At the same time, the binding of heterologous MARs is enhanced. Conclusions. Taken together, these data suggest that there exist several classes of MARs and MAR-binding domains and that the MAR-binding proteins may be clustered in the nuclear matrix.

  15. The export receptor Crm1 forms a dimer to promote nuclear export of HIV RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, David S; Cheng, Yifan; Frankel, Alan D

    2014-12-08

    The HIV Rev protein routes viral RNAs containing the Rev Response Element (RRE) through the Crm1 nuclear export pathway to the cytoplasm where viral proteins are expressed and genomic RNA is delivered to assembling virions. The RRE assembles a Rev oligomer that displays nuclear export sequences (NESs) for recognition by the Crm1-Ran(GTP) nuclear receptor complex. Here we provide the first view of an assembled HIV-host nuclear export complex using single-particle electron microscopy. Unexpectedly, Crm1 forms a dimer with an extensive interface that enhances association with Rev-RRE and poises NES binding sites to interact with a Rev oligomer. The interface between Crm1 monomers explains differences between Crm1 orthologs that alter nuclear export and determine cellular tropism for viral replication. The arrangement of the export complex identifies a novel binding surface to possibly target an HIV inhibitor and may point to a broader role for Crm1 dimerization in regulating host gene expression.

  16. Influenza virus targets the mRNA export machinery and the nuclear pore complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satterly, Neal; Tsai, Pei-Ling; van Deursen, Jan; Nussenzveig, Daniel R; Wang, Yaming; Faria, Paula A; Levay, Agata; Levy, David E; Fontoura, Beatriz M A

    2007-02-01

    The NS1 protein of influenza A virus is a major virulence factor that is essential for pathogenesis. NS1 functions to impair innate and adaptive immunity by inhibiting host signal transduction and gene expression, but its mechanisms of action remain to be fully elucidated. We show here that NS1 forms an inhibitory complex with NXF1/TAP, p15/NXT, Rae1/mrnp41, and E1B-AP5, which are key constituents of the mRNA export machinery that interact with both mRNAs and nucleoporins to direct mRNAs through the nuclear pore complex. Increased levels of NXF1, p15, or Rae1 revert the mRNA export blockage induced by NS1. Furthermore, influenza virus down-regulates Nup98, a nucleoporin that is a docking site for mRNA export factors. Reduced expression of these mRNA export factors renders cells highly permissive to influenza virus replication, demonstrating that proper levels of key constituents of the mRNA export machinery protect against influenza virus replication. Because Nup98 and Rae1 are induced by interferons, down-regulation of this pathway is likely a viral strategy to promote viral replication. These findings demonstrate previously undescribed influenza-mediated viral-host interactions and provide insights into potential molecular therapies that may interfere with influenza infection.

  17. RNA-guided assembly of Rev-RRE nuclear export complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yun; Tambe, Akshay; Zhou, Kaihong; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2014-08-27

    HIV replication requires nuclear export of unspliced and singly spliced viral transcripts. Although a unique RNA structure has been proposed for the Rev-response element (RRE) responsible for viral mRNA export, how it recruits multiple HIV Rev proteins to form an export complex has been unclear. We show here that initial binding of Rev to the RRE triggers RNA tertiary structural changes, enabling further Rev binding and the rapid formation of a viral export complex. Analysis of the Rev-RRE assembly pathway using SHAPE-Seq and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) reveals two major steps of Rev-RRE complex formation, beginning with rapid Rev binding to a pre-organized region presenting multiple Rev binding sites. This step induces long-range remodeling of the RNA to expose a cryptic Rev binding site, enabling rapid assembly of additional Rev proteins into the RNA export complex. This kinetic pathway may help maintain the balance between viral replication and maturation.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03656.001.

  18. Cytoplasmic utilization of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 genomic RNA is not dependent on a nuclear interaction with gag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grewe, Bastian; Hoffmann, Bianca; Ohs, Inga; Blissenbach, Maik; Brandt, Sabine; Tippler, Bettina; Grunwald, Thomas; Uberla, Klaus

    2012-03-01

    In some retroviruses, such as Rous sarcoma virus and prototype foamy virus, Gag proteins are known to shuttle between the nucleus and the cytoplasm and are implicated in nuclear export of the viral genomic unspliced RNA (gRNA) for subsequent encapsidation. A similar function has been proposed for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag based on the identification of nuclear localization and export signals. However, the ability of HIV-1 Gag to transit through the nucleus has never been confirmed. In addition, the lentiviral Rev protein promotes efficient nuclear gRNA export, and previous reports indicate a cytoplasmic interaction between Gag and gRNA. Therefore, functional effects of HIV-1 Gag on gRNA and its usage were explored. Expression of gag in the absence of Rev was not able to increase cytoplasmic gRNA levels of subgenomic, proviral, or lentiviral vector constructs, and gene expression from genomic reporter plasmids could not be induced by Gag provided in trans. Furthermore, Gag lacking the reported nuclear localization and export signals was still able to mediate an efficient packaging process. Although small amounts of Gag were detectable in the nuclei of transfected cells, a Crm1-dependent nuclear export signal in Gag could not be confirmed. Thus, our study does not provide any evidence for a nuclear function of HIV-1 Gag. The encapsidation process of HIV-1 therefore clearly differs from that of Rous sarcoma virus and prototype foamy virus.

  19. The signal sequence coding region promotes nuclear export of mRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazzo, Alexander F; Springer, Michael; Shibata, Yoko; Lee, Chung-Sheng; Dias, Anusha P; Rapoport, Tom A

    2007-12-01

    In eukaryotic cells, most mRNAs are exported from the nucleus by the transcription export (TREX) complex, which is loaded onto mRNAs after their splicing and capping. We have studied in mammalian cells the nuclear export of mRNAs that code for secretory proteins, which are targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum membrane by hydrophobic signal sequences. The mRNAs were injected into the nucleus or synthesized from injected or transfected DNA, and their export was followed by fluorescent in situ hybridization. We made the surprising observation that the signal sequence coding region (SSCR) can serve as a nuclear export signal of an mRNA that lacks an intron or functional cap. Even the export of an intron-containing natural mRNA was enhanced by its SSCR. Like conventional export, the SSCR-dependent pathway required the factor TAP, but depletion of the TREX components had only moderate effects. The SSCR export signal appears to be characterized in vertebrates by a low content of adenines, as demonstrated by genome-wide sequence analysis and by the inhibitory effect of silent adenine mutations in SSCRs. The discovery of an SSCR-mediated pathway explains the previously noted amino acid bias in signal sequences and suggests a link between nuclear export and membrane targeting of mRNAs.

  20. Human GTPases associate with RNA polymerase II to mediate its nuclear import.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carré, Clément; Shiekhattar, Ramin

    2011-10-01

    Small GTPases share a biochemical mechanism and act as binary molecular switches. One important function of small GTPases in the cell is nucleocytoplasmic transport of both proteins and RNA. Here, we show the stable association of human GPN1 and GPN3, small GTPases related to Ran, with RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) isolated from either the cytoplasmic or nuclear fraction. GPN1 and GPN3 directly interact with RNAPII subunit 7 (RPB7)/RPB4 and the C-terminal domain (CTD) of RNAPII. Depletion of GPN1 or GPN3 using small interfering RNAs led to decreased RNAPII levels in the nucleus and an accumulation of this enzyme in the cytoplasm of human cells. Furthermore, isolation of a GPN1/GPN3/RNAPII complex from stable cell lines expressing a dominant negative GPN1 harboring mutations in the GTP-binding pocket demonstrated a role for these proteins in nuclear import of RNAPII. Thus, GPN1/GPN3 define a new family of small GTPases that are specialized for the transport of RNA polymerase II into the nucleus.

  1. HIV-1 and M-PMV RNA Nuclear Export Elements Program Viral Genomes for Distinct Cytoplasmic Trafficking Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pocock, Ginger M; Becker, Jordan T; Swanson, Chad M; Ahlquist, Paul; Sherer, Nathan M

    2016-04-01

    Retroviruses encode cis-acting RNA nuclear export elements that override nuclear retention of intron-containing viral mRNAs including the full-length, unspliced genomic RNAs (gRNAs) packaged into assembling virions. The HIV-1 Rev-response element (RRE) recruits the cellular nuclear export receptor CRM1 (also known as exportin-1/XPO1) using the viral protein Rev, while simple retroviruses encode constitutive transport elements (CTEs) that directly recruit components of the NXF1(Tap)/NXT1(p15) mRNA nuclear export machinery. How gRNA nuclear export is linked to trafficking machineries in the cytoplasm upstream of virus particle assembly is unknown. Here we used long-term (>24 h), multicolor live cell imaging to directly visualize HIV-1 gRNA nuclear export, translation, cytoplasmic trafficking, and virus particle production in single cells. We show that the HIV-1 RRE regulates unique, en masse, Rev- and CRM1-dependent "burst-like" transitions of mRNAs from the nucleus to flood the cytoplasm in a non-localized fashion. By contrast, the CTE derived from Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (M-PMV) links gRNAs to microtubules in the cytoplasm, driving them to cluster markedly to the centrosome that forms the pericentriolar core of the microtubule-organizing center (MTOC). Adding each export element to selected heterologous mRNAs was sufficient to confer each distinct export behavior, as was directing Rev/CRM1 or NXF1/NXT1 transport modules to mRNAs using a site-specific RNA tethering strategy. Moreover, multiple CTEs per transcript enhanced MTOC targeting, suggesting that a cooperative mechanism links NXF1/NXT1 to microtubules. Combined, these results reveal striking, unexpected features of retroviral gRNA nucleocytoplasmic transport and demonstrate roles for mRNA export elements that extend beyond nuclear pores to impact gRNA distribution in the cytoplasm.

  2. "Cryptic" group-I introns in the nuclear SSU-rRNA gene of Verticillium dahliae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaioannou, Ioannis A; Dimopoulou, Chrysoula D; Typas, Milton A

    2014-08-01

    Group-I introns are widespread--though irregularly distributed--in eukaryotic organisms, and they have been extensively used for discrimination and phylogenetic analyses. Within the Verticillium genus, which comprises important phytopathogenic fungi, a group-I intron was previously identified in the SSU-rRNA (18S) gene of only V. longisporum. In this work, we aimed at elucidating the SSU-located intron distribution in V. dahliae and other Verticillium species, and the assessment of heterogeneity regarding intron content among rDNA repeats of fungal strains. Using conserved PCR primers for the amplification of the SSU gene, a structurally similar novel intron (sub-group IC1) was detected in only a few V. dahliae isolates. However, when intron-specific primers were used for the screening of a diverse collection of Verticillium isolates that originally failed to produce intron-containing SSU amplicons, most were found to contain one or both intron types, at variable rDNA repeat numbers. This marked heterogeneity was confirmed with qRT-PCR by testing rDNA copy numbers (varying from 39 to 70 copies per haploid genome) and intron copy ratios in selected isolates. Our results demonstrate that (a) IC1 group-I introns are not specific to V. longisporum within the Verticillium genus, (b) V. dahliae isolates of vegetative compatibility groups (VCGs) 4A and 6, which bear the novel intron at most of their rDNA repeats, are closely related, and (c) there is considerable intra-genomic heterogeneity for the presence or absence of introns among the ribosomal repeats. These findings underline that distributions of introns in the highly heterogeneous repetitive rDNA complex should always be verified with sensitive methods to avoid misleading conclusions for the phylogeny of fungi and other organisms.

  3. RNA recognition motif 2 directs the recruitment of SF2/ASF to nuclear stress bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiodi, Ilaria; Corioni, Margherita; Giordano, Manuela; Valgardsdottir, Rut; Ghigna, Claudia; Cobianchi, Fabio; Xu, Rui-Ming; Riva, Silvano; Biamonti, Giuseppe

    2004-01-01

    Heat shock induces the transcriptional activation of large heterochromatic regions of the human genome composed of arrays of satellite III DNA repeats. A number of RNA-processing factors, among them splicing factor SF2/ASF, associate with these transcription factors giving rise to nuclear stress bodies (nSBs). Here, we show that the recruitment of SF2/ASF to these structures is mediated by its second RNA recognition motif. Amino acid substitutions in the first α-helix of this domain, but not in the β-strand regions, abrogate the association with nSBs. The same mutations drastically affect the in vivo activity of SF2/ASF in the alternative splicing of adenoviral E1A transcripts. Sequence analysis identifies four putative high-affinity binding sites for SF2/ASF in the transcribed strand of the satellite III DNA. We have verified by gel mobility shift assays that the second RNA-binding domain of SF2/ASF binds at least one of these sites. Our analysis suggests that the recruitment of SF2/ASF to nSBs is mediated by a direct interaction with satellite III transcripts and points to the second RNA-binding domain of the protein as the major determinant of this interaction. PMID:15302913

  4. Stress-induced nuclear RNA degradation pathways regulate yeast bromodomain factor 2 to promote cell survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Roy

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Bromodomain proteins are key regulators of gene expression. How the levels of these factors are regulated in specific environmental conditions is unknown. Previous work has established that expression of yeast Bromodomain factor 2 (BDF2 is limited by spliceosome-mediated decay (SMD. Here we show that BDF2 is subject to an additional layer of post-transcriptional control through RNase III-mediated decay (RMD. We found that the yeast RNase III Rnt1p cleaves a stem-loop structure within the BDF2 mRNA to down-regulate its expression. However, these two nuclear RNA degradation pathways play distinct roles in the regulation of BDF2 expression, as we show that the RMD and SMD pathways of the BDF2 mRNA are differentially activated or repressed in specific environmental conditions. RMD is hyper-activated by salt stress and repressed by hydroxyurea-induced DNA damage while SMD is inactivated by salt stress and predominates during DNA damage. Mutations of cis-acting signals that control SMD and RMD rescue numerous growth defects of cells lacking Bdf1p, and show that SMD plays an important role in the DNA damage response. These results demonstrate that specific environmental conditions modulate nuclear RNA degradation pathways to control BDF2 expression and Bdf2p-mediated gene regulation. Moreover, these results show that precise dosage of Bromodomain factors is essential for cell survival in specific environmental conditions, emphasizing their importance for controlling chromatin structure and gene expression in response to environmental stress.

  5. [Nuclear heterogeneity and proliferative capacity of human adipose derived MSC-like cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrov, A V; Smirnichina, S A

    2010-01-01

    Adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs) are MSC-like cells which could be easily used for regenerative medicine. Here, the morphology and proliferative capacity of human ADSCs is discribed. ADSCs were analyzed after one month of cultivation at a density of 10 cells/cm2. 21 colonies were counted. Few atypical cells (huge nuclei and cytoplasm) were found in 9 out of 17 colonies analyzed. ANOVA demonstrated that colonies also differed (P = 0.0025) in nuclei dimensions and scatter in the dimensions in each colony. Nuclei dimensions and cell density logarithms correlated in reverse proportion (-0.7; P = 0.002). Thus, ADSCs were heterogeneous and represented two types of cells: small highly proliferative and large low proliferative cells. Cell heterogeneity observed in some colonies might be due to cells registered at different cell cycle phases. Stable and typical morphology, colony-formation capability and high proliferative capacity of cells indicate visceral adipose tissue as a rich source of ADSCs.

  6. Nuclear design manual for generation of cross section and heterogeneous formfunction for CASMO-3/MASTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chang Ho; Cho, Byung Oh; Song, Jae Seong; Lee, Chung Chan

    1996-12-01

    A three-dimensional reactor core simulation code, MASTER, has been developed as a part of the ADONIS project in KAERI. CASMO-3 prepares various two-group cross sections for the constituents of a reactor core such as fuel assembly, radial and axial reflectors, control rod and detector for MASTER. This report includes the standard design procedure for generation of two-group cross sections and heterogeneous formfunction by CASMO-3/FORM for MASTER. (author). 16 refs., 16 tabs., 12 figs.

  7. Heterogeneity of chicken slow skeletal muscle troponin T mRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonemura, I; Hirabayashi, T; Miyazaki, J

    2000-02-01

    The troponin T (TnT) transcripts in chicken slow skeletal muscle were characterized by S1 nuclease mapping and nucleotide sequencing of cDNA produced by RT-PCR and 5'-RACE. We found two kinds of transcripts in the 5'-region, one having the codon for alanine (position 135-137), C (258), and A (262) and the other lacking the codon and having T (258) and G (262) instead of C and A. In the 3'-region, we found four single base substitutions at 703 (T or C), 774 or T), 797 or T), and 827 (G or A). Four of the six substitutions lead to amino acid changes in chicken sTnT isoforms. We determined the genomic structure of the 3'-region of the chicken sTnT gene. The region includes 7 exons corresponding to position 249-891 of the chicken sTnT cDNA and no alternative exon, showing that the 3'-heterogeneity in sTnT transcripts was due to allelic variation. J. Exp. Zool. 286:149-156, 2000. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Heterogeneity in mitochondrial morphology and membrane potential is independent of the nuclear division cycle in multinucleate fungal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerstenberger, John P; Occhipinti, Patricia; Gladfelter, Amy S

    2012-03-01

    In the multinucleate filamentous fungus Ashbya gossypii, nuclei divide asynchronously in a common cytoplasm. We hypothesize that the division cycle machinery has a limited zone of influence in the cytoplasm to promote nuclear autonomy. Mitochondria in cultured mammalian cells undergo cell cycle-specific changes in morphology and membrane potential and therefore can serve as a reporter of the cell cycle state of the cytoplasm. To evaluate if the cell cycle state of nuclei in A. gossypii can influence the adjacent cytoplasm, we tested whether local mitochondrial morphology and membrane potential in A. gossypii are associated with the division state of a nearby nucleus. We found that mitochondria exhibit substantial heterogeneity in both morphology and membrane potential within a single multinucleated cell. Notably, differences in mitochondrial morphology or potential are not associated with a specific nuclear division state. Heterokaryon mutants with a mixture of nuclei with deletions of and wild type for the mitochondrial fusion/fission genes DNM1 and FZO1 exhibit altered mitochondrial morphology and severe growth and sporulation defects. This dominant effect suggests that the gene products may be required locally near their expression site rather than diffusing widely in the cell. Our results demonstrate that mitochondrial dynamics are essential in these large syncytial cells, yet morphology and membrane potential are independent of nuclear cycle state.

  9. First description of heterogeneity in 18S rRNA genes in the haploid genome of Cryptosporidium andersoni Kawatabi type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikarashi, Makoto; Fukuda, Yasuhiro; Honma, Hajime; Kasai, Kenji; Kaneta, Yoshiyasu; Nakai, Yutaka

    2013-09-01

    The Apicomplexan Cryptosporidium andersoni, is a species of gastric Cryptosporidium, is frequently detected in older calves and adult cattle. Genotyping analyses based on 18S ribosomal RNA gene sequences have been performed on a novel C. andersoni genotype, namely the Kawatabi type, and the oocysts were classified into two distinct groups genotypically: Type A (the sequence in GenBank) and Type B (with a thymine nucleotide insertion not in Type A). This study analyzed 3775 cattle at a slaughterhouse and 310 cattle at a farm using microscopy and found 175 Cryptosporidium-positive animals: 171 from the slaughterhouse and four from the farm, and all infecting parasites were determined to be C. andersoni from 18S rRNA gene sequences determined from fecal DNA. In genotyping analyses with single isolated oocysts, about a half of analyzed ones were clearly classified into well known two genotypes (Type A and B). In addition to these two known genotypes, we have detected some oocysts showing mixed signals of Types A and B in the electropherogram from the automated sequencer (the Type C genotype). To determine the genotypic composition of sporozoites carried by the Type C oocysts, we analyzed their 18S rRNA gene sequences using a single sporozoite isolation procedure. Some sporozoites were classified as either Type A or Type B. However, more than half of the analyzed isolated sporozoites showed a mixed signal identical to that of Type C oocysts, and both the Type A and B signals were surely detectable from such sporozoites after a cloning procedure. In conclusion, C. andersoni carries two different genotypes heterogeneously in its haploid genome.

  10. Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1 RNA Crystal Structures Reveal Heterogeneous 1 × 1 Nucleotide UU Internal Loop Conformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Amit; Park, HaJeung; Fang, Pengfei; Parkesh, Raman; Guo, Min; Nettles, Kendall W.; Disney, Matthew D. (Scripps)

    2012-03-27

    RNA internal loops often display a variety of conformations in solution. Herein, we visualize conformational heterogeneity in the context of the 5'CUG/3'GUC repeat motif present in the RNA that causes myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). Specifically, two crystal structures of a model DM1 triplet repeating construct, 5'r[{und UU}GGGC(C{und U}G){sub 3}GUCC]{sub 2}, refined to 2.20 and 1.52 {angstrom} resolution are disclosed. Here, differences in the orientation of the 5' dangling UU end between the two structures induce changes in the backbone groove width, which reveals that noncanonical 1 x 1 nucleotide UU internal loops can display an ensemble of pairing conformations. In the 2.20 {angstrom} structure, CUGa, the 5' UU forms a one hydrogen-bonded pair with a 5' UU of a neighboring helix in the unit cell to form a pseudoinfinite helix. The central 1 x 1 nucleotide UU internal loop has no hydrogen bonds, while the terminal 1 x 1 nucleotide UU internal loops each form a one-hydrogen bond pair. In the 1.52 {angstrom} structure, CUGb, the 5' UU dangling end is tucked into the major groove of the duplex. While the canonically paired bases show no change in base pairing, in CUGb the terminal 1 x 1 nucleotide UU internal loops now form two hydrogen-bonded pairs. Thus, the shift in the major groove induced by the 5' UU dangling end alters noncanonical base patterns. Collectively, these structures indicate that 1 x 1 nucleotide UU internal loops in DM1 may sample multiple conformations in vivo. This observation has implications for the recognition of this RNA, and other repeating transcripts, by protein and small molecule ligands.

  11. Genetic Heterogeneity in the rRNA Gene Locus of Trichophyton tonsurans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaedigk, Andrea; Gaedigk, Roger; Abdel-Rahman, Susan M

    2003-12-01

    Trichophyton tonsurans is the major pediatric pathogen in tinea capitis, causing disparate disease presentations. Little is known about genetic variation, which may ultimately be linked to divergent disease status. This investigation was aimed at identifying genetic variants of T. tonsurans by methods that can facilitate strain discrimination in population-based studies. Ninety-two isolates were acquired from six U.S. microbiology laboratories, and genomic DNA was isolated from mature colonies. The nontranscribed spacer (NTS) was amplified by PCR, and products from isolates with various amplicon sizes were fully sequenced. Nested amplification, targeting a variable internal repeat (VIR) region, allowed assignment of variant type by fragment size. Subvariant type was assigned by a combination of PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism-based assays. Five variants differing in size (348 to 700 bp) and sequence were identified within the VIR region comprised of several large repeats (104, 140, and 194 bp) arranged in tandem. Seven single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were detected across the NTS, with five occurring in the constant regions flanking the VIR region and two occurring in the VIR region. Additionally, a 10-bp insertion and a 14-bp deletion were identified upstream of the VIR region. The combination of SNPs revealed seven haplotype patterns which were stable upon serial passage over 1 year. No sequence variations were identified within the internal transcribed spacer regions. Unique NTS sequences were utilized to develop a duplex PCR assay that discriminated T. tonsurans from other dermatophytes. Of the 92 isolates evaluated, this genotyping scheme distinguished 12 distinct strains, providing evidence of genetic heterogeneity in T. tonsurans.

  12. Sequences more than 500 base pairs upstream of the human U3 small nuclear RNA gene stimulate the synthesis of U3 RNA in frog oocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, D.; Reddy, R. (Baylor Coll. of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)); Wright, D. (Texas Medical Center, Houston (United States))

    1991-06-04

    Small nuclear RNA (snRNA) genes contain strong promoters capable of initiating transcription once every 4 s. Studies on the human U1 snRNA gene, carried out in other laboratories, showed that sequences within 400 bp of the 5' flanking region are sufficient for maximal levels of transcription both in vivo and in frog oocytes (reviewed in Dahlberg and Lund (1988)). The authors studied the expression of a human U3 snRNA gene by injecting 5' deletion mutants into frog oocytes. The results show that sequences more than 500 bp upstream of the U3 snRNA gene have a 2-3-fold stimulatory effect on the U3 snRNA synthesis. These results indicate that the human U3 snRNA gene is different from human U1 snRNA gene in containing regulatory elements more than 500 bp upstream. The U3 snRNA gene upstream sequences contain an AluI homologous sequence in the {minus}1,200 region; these AluI sequences were transcribed in vitro and in frog oocytes but were not detectable in Hela cells.

  13. Variable EBV DNA Load Distributions and Heterogeneous EBV mRNA Expression Patterns in the Circulation of Solid Organ versus Stem Cell Transplant Recipients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greijer, A. E.; Stevens, S. J.; Verkuijlen, S. A.; Juwana, H.; Fleig, S. C.; Verschuuren, E. A.; Hepkema, B. G.; Cornelissen, J. J.; Brooimans, R. A.; Verdonck, L. F.; Middeldorp, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) driven post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) is a heterogeneous and potentially life-threatening condition. Early identification of aberrant EBV activity may prevent progression to B-cell lymphoma. We measured EBV DNA load and RNA profiles in plasma and cellular

  14. Variable EBV DNA load distributions and heterogeneous EBV mRNA expression patterns in the circulation of solid organ versus stem cell transplant recipients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.E. Greijer; S.J. Stevens; S.A. Verkuijlen; H. Juwana; S.C. Fleig; E.A. Verschuuren; B.G. Hepkema (Bouke); J.J. Cornelissen (Jan); R.A. Brooimans (Rik); L.F. Verdonck (Leo); J.M. Middeldorp (Jaap)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractEpstein-Barr virus (EBV) driven post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) is a heterogeneous and potentially life-threatening condition. Early identification of aberrant EBV activity may prevent progression to B-cell lymphoma. We measured EBV DNA load and RNA profiles in plasma

  15. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins C1/C2 identified as autoantigens by biochemical and mass spectrometric methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heegaard, N H; Larsen, Martin Røssel; Muncrief, T

    2000-01-01

    The antigenic specificity of an unusual antinuclear antibody pattern in three patient sera was identified after separating HeLa-cell nuclear extracts by two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis and localizing the antigens by immunoblotting with patient serum. Protein spots were excised from the 2......-separation methods and mass-spectrometric peptide mapping in combination with database searches are powerful tools in the identification of novel autoantigen specificities....

  16. Prediction of the micro-thermo-mechanical behaviors in dispersion nuclear fuel plates with heterogeneous particle distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yijie; Wang, Qiming; Cui, Yi; Huo, Yongzhong; Ding, Shurong; Zhang, Lin; Li, Yuanming

    2011-11-01

    Dispersion nuclear fuel elements have promising prospects to be used in advanced nuclear reactors and disposal of nuclear wastes. They consist of fuel meat and cladding, and the fuel meat is a kind of composite fuel in which the fuel particles are embedded in the non-fissile matrix. Prediction of the micro-thermo-mechanical behaviors in dispersion nuclear plates is of importance to their irradiation safety and optimal design. In this study, the heterogeneity of the fuel particles along the thickness direction in the fuel meat is considered. The 3D finite element models have been developed respectively for two cases: (1) variation of fuel particle-particle (PP) distances for the particles near the mid-plane of the fuel meat; (2) variation of the particle-cladding (PC) distances for the fuel particles near the interface between the fuel meat and the cladding. The respective finite strain constitutive relations are developed for the fuel particle, metal matrix and cladding. The developed virtual temperature method is used to simulate irradiation swelling of the fuel particles and irradiation growth of the metal cladding. Effects of the heterogeneous distributions of the fuel particles on the micro temperature fields and the micro stress-strain fields are investigated. The obtained results indicate that: (1) as a whole, the maximum Mises stress, equivalent plastic strain and first principal stress at the matrix between the two closest particles increase with decreasing the particle-particle (PP) distance; existence of large first principal stresses there may be the main factor that induces the matrix failure; (2) variation of the particle-cladding (PC) distance has remarkable effects on the interfacial normal stress and shear stress at the interface between the fuel meat and the cladding; the first principal stress at the cladding near the interface increases dramatically when the fuel particle is closer and closer to the cladding. Thus, the proper distance between the

  17. Profiling of 2'-O-Me in human rRNA reveals a subset of fractionally modified positions and provides evidence for ribosome heterogeneity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Nicolai; Jansson, Martin D; Häfner, Sophia J

    2016-01-01

    Ribose methylation is one of the two most abundant modifications in human ribosomal RNA and is believed to be important for ribosome biogenesis, mRNA selectivity and translational fidelity. We have applied RiboMeth-seq to rRNA from HeLa cells for ribosome-wide, quantitative mapping of 2'-O-Me sites...... and obtained a comprehensive set of 106 sites, including two novel sites, and with plausible box C/D guide RNAs assigned to all but three sites. We find approximately two-thirds of the sites to be fully methylated and the remainder to be fractionally modified in support of ribosome heterogeneity at the level...

  18. Nuclear mRNA degradation pathway(s are implicated in Xist regulation and X chromosome inactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constance Ciaudo

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available A critical step in X-chromosome inactivation (XCI, which results in the dosage compensation of X-linked gene expression in mammals, is the coating of the presumptive inactive X chromosome by the large noncoding Xist RNA, which then leads to the recruitment of other factors essential for the heterochromatinisation of the inactive X and its transcriptional silencing. In an approach aimed at identifying genes implicated in the X-inactivation process by comparative transcriptional profiling of female and male mouse gastrula, we identified the Eif1 gene involved in translation initiation and RNA degradation. We show here that female embryonic stem cell lines, silenced by RNA interference for the Eif1 gene, are unable to form Xist RNA domains upon differentiation and fail to undergo X-inactivation. To probe further an effect involving RNA degradation pathways, the inhibition by RNA interference of Rent1, a factor essential for nonsense-mediated decay and Exosc10, a specific nuclear component of the exosome, was analysed and shown to similarly impair Xist upregulation and XCI. In Eif1-, Rent1-, and Exosc10-interfered clones, Xist spliced form(s are strongly downregulated, while the levels of unspliced form(s of Xist and the stability of Xist RNA remain comparable to that of the control cell lines. Our data suggests a role for mRNA nuclear degradation pathways in the critical regulation of spliced Xist mRNA levels and the onset of the X-inactivation process.

  19. Influenza A Virus NS1 Protein Promotes Efficient Nuclear Export of Unspliced Viral M1 mRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Carina F; Read, Eliot K C; Wise, Helen M; Amorim, Maria J; Digard, Paul

    2017-08-01

    Influenza A virus mRNAs are transcribed by the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase in the cell nucleus before being exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Segment 7 produces two major transcripts: an unspliced mRNA that encodes the M1 matrix protein and a spliced transcript that encodes the M2 ion channel. Export of both mRNAs is dependent on the cellular NXF1/TAP pathway, but it is unclear how they are recruited to the export machinery or how the intron-containing but unspliced M1 mRNA bypasses the normal quality-control checkpoints. Using fluorescent in situ hybridization to monitor segment 7 mRNA localization, we found that cytoplasmic accumulation of unspliced M1 mRNA was inefficient in the absence of NS1, both in the context of segment 7 RNPs reconstituted by plasmid transfection and in mutant virus-infected cells. This effect was independent of any major effect on steady-state levels of segment 7 mRNA or splicing but corresponded to a ∼5-fold reduction in the accumulation of M1. A similar defect in intronless hemagglutinin (HA) mRNA nuclear export was seen with an NS1 mutant virus. Efficient export of M1 mRNA required both an intact NS1 RNA-binding domain and effector domain. Furthermore, while wild-type NS1 interacted with cellular NXF1 and also increased the interaction of segment 7 mRNA with NXF1, mutant NS1 polypeptides unable to promote mRNA export did neither. Thus, we propose that NS1 facilitates late viral gene expression by acting as an adaptor between viral mRNAs and the cellular nuclear export machinery to promote their nuclear export.IMPORTANCE Influenza A virus is a major pathogen of a wide variety of mammalian and avian species that threatens public health and food security. A fuller understanding of the virus life cycle is important to aid control strategies. The virus has a small genome that encodes relatively few proteins that are often multifunctional. Here, we characterize a new function for the NS1 protein, showing that, as well as

  20. Utp22p acts in concert with Utp8p to channel aminoacyl-tRNA from the nucleolus to the nuclear tRNA export receptor Los1p but not Msn5p.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eswara, Manoja B K; Clayton, Ashley; Mangroo, Dev

    2012-12-01

    Utp8p is an essential nucleolar protein that channels aminoacyl-tRNAs from aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases in the nucleolus to the nuclear tRNA export receptors located in the nucleoplasm and nuclear pore complex in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Utp8p is also part of the U3 snoRNA-associated protein complex involved in 18S rRNA biogenesis in the nucleolus. We report that Utp22p, which is another member of the U3 snoRNA-associated protein complex, is also an intranuclear component of the nuclear tRNA export machinery. Depletion of Utp22p results in nuclear retention of mature tRNAs derived from intron-containing and intronless precursors. Moreover, Utp22p copurifies with the nuclear tRNA export receptor Los1p, the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase Tys1p and Utp8p, but not with the RanGTPase Gsp1p and the nuclear tRNA export receptor Msn5p. Utp22p interacts directly with Utp8p and Los1p in a tRNA-independent manner in vitro. Utp22p also interacts directly with Tys1p, but this binding is stimulated when Tys1p is bound to tRNA. However, Utp22p, unlike Utp8p, does not bind tRNA saturably. These data suggest that Utp22p recruits Utp8p to aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases in the nucleolus to collect aminoacyl-tRNA and then accompanies the Utp8p-tRNA complex to deliver the aminoacyl-tRNAs to Los1p but not Msn5p. It is possible that Nrap/Nol6, the mammalian orthologue of Utp22p, plays a role in channelling aminoacyl-tRNA to the nuclear tRNA export receptor exportin-t.

  1. Sequence heterogeneity in the 18S rRNA gene in Theileria equi from horses presented in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qin; Meli, Marina L; Zhang, Yi; Meili, Theres; Stirn, Martina; Riond, Barbara; Weibel, Beatrice; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina

    2016-05-15

    A reverse line blot (RLB) hybridization assay was adapted and applied for equine blood samples collected at the animal hospital of the University of Zurich to determine the presence of piroplasms in horses in Switzerland. A total of 100 equine blood samples were included in the study. The V4 hypervariable region of the 18S rRNA gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction and analyzed using the RLB assay. Samples from seven horses hybridized to a Theileria/Babesia genus-specific and a Theileria genus-specific probe. Of these, two hybridized also to the Theileria equi-specific probe. The other five positive samples did not hybridize to any of the species-specific probes, suggesting the presence of unrecognized Theileria variants or genotypes. The 18S rRNA gene of the latter five samples were sequenced and found to be closely related to T. equi isolated from horses in Spain (AY534822) and China (KF559357) (≥98.4% identity). Four of the seven horses that tested positive had a documented travel history (France, Italy, and Spain) or lived abroad (Hungary). The present study adds new insight into the presence and sequence heterogeneity of T. equi in Switzerland. The results prompt that species-specific probes must be designed in regions of the gene unique to T. equi. Of note, none of the seven positive horses were suspected of having Theileria infection at the time of presentation to the clinic. Clinicians should be aware of the possibility of equine piroplasma infections outside of endemic areas and in horses without signs of piroplasmosis.

  2. Heterogeneity within the gram-positive anaerobic cocci demonstrated by analysis of 16S-23S intergenic ribosomal RNA polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, K E; Davies, C E; Wilson, M J; Stephens, P; Lewis, M A O; Hall, V; Brazier, J; Thomas, D W

    2002-11-01

    Peptostreptococci are gram-positive, strictly anaerobic bacteria which, although regarded as members of the commensal human microflora, are also frequently isolated from sites of clinical infection. The study of this diverse group of opportunist pathogens has been hindered by an inadequate taxonomy and the lack of a valid identification scheme. Recent re-classification of the Peptostreptococcus family into five distinct genus groups has helped to clarify the situation. However, this has been on the basis of 16S rRNA sequence determinations, which are both time-consuming and expensive. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the use of PCR-amplified ribosomal DNA spacer polymorphisms for the rapid differentiation of the currently recognised taxa within the group of anaerobic gram-positive cocci. A collection comprising 19 reference strains with representatives of each of the 15 species, two close relatives and two of the well-characterised groups, together with 38 test strains was studied. All strains were identified to species group level by phenotypic means. Amplification of the 16S-23S intergenic spacer region (ISR) with universal primers produced distinct banding patterns for all the 19 reference strains and the patterns could be differentiated easily visually. However, of the 38 test strains, less than half could be speciated from ISR analysis alone. Only five groups produced correlating banding patterns for all members tested (Peptoniphilus lacrimalis, P. ivorii, Anaerococcus octavius, Peptostreptococcus anaerobius and Micromonas micros). For other species, either the type strain differed significantly from other species members (e.g., A. hydrogenalis) or there appeared to be considerable intra-species variation (e.g., A. vaginalis). Partial 16S rRNA gene sequences for the 'trisimilis' and 'betaGAL' groups showed that both are most closely related to the Anaerococcus group. This work highlights the heterogeneous nature of a number of Peptostreptococcus

  3. An essential nuclear protein in trypanosomes is a component of mRNA transcription/export pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Serpeloni

    Full Text Available In eukaryotic cells, different RNA species are exported from the nucleus via specialized pathways. The mRNA export machinery is highly integrated with mRNA processing, and includes a different set of nuclear transport adaptors as well as other mRNA binding proteins, RNA helicases, and NPC-associated proteins. The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of Chagas disease, a widespread and neglected human disease which is endemic to Latin America. Gene expression in Trypanosoma has unique characteristics, such as constitutive polycistronic transcription of protein-encoding genes and mRNA processing by trans-splicing. In general, post-transcriptional events are the major points for regulation of gene expression in these parasites. However, the export pathway of mRNA from the nucleus is poorly understood. The present study investigated the function of TcSub2, which is a highly conserved protein ortholog to Sub2/ UAP56, a component of the Transcription/Export (TREX multiprotein complex connecting transcription with mRNA export in yeast/human. Similar to its orthologs, TcSub2 is a nuclear protein, localized in dispersed foci all over the nuclei -except the fibrillar center of nucleolus- and at the interface between dense and non-dense chromatin areas, proposing the association of TcSub2 with transcription/processing sites. These findings were analyzed further by BrUTP incorporation assays and confirmed that TcSub2 is physically associated with active RNA polymerase II (RNA pol II, but not RNA polymerase I (RNA pol I or Spliced Leader (SL transcription, demonstrating participation particularly in nuclear mRNA metabolism in T. cruzi. The double knockout of the TcSub2 gene is lethal in T. cruzi, suggesting it has an essential function. Alternatively, RNA interference assays were performed in Trypanosoma brucei. It allowed demonstrating that besides being an essential protein, its knockdown causes mRNA accumulation in the nucleus and

  4. An investigation into heterogeneity in a single vein-type uranium ore deposit: Implications for nuclear forensics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keatley, A C; Scott, T B; Davis, S; Jones, C P; Turner, P

    2015-12-01

    Minor element composition and rare earth element (REE) concentrations in nuclear materials are important as they are used within the field of nuclear forensics as an indicator of sample origin. However recent studies into uranium ores and uranium ore concentrates (UOCs) have shown significant elemental and isotopic heterogeneity from a single mine site such that some sites have shown higher variation within the mine site than that seen between multiple sites. The elemental composition of both uranium and gangue minerals within ore samples taken along a single mineral vein in South West England have been measured and reported here. The analysis of the samples was undertaken to determine the extent of the localised variation in key elements. Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) was used to analyse the gangue mineralogy and measure major element composition. Minor element composition and rare earth element (REE) concentrations were measured by Electron Probe Microanalysis (EPMA). The results confirm that a number of key elements, REE concentrations and patterns used for origin location do show significant variation within mine. Furthermore significant variation is also visible on a meter scale. In addition three separate uranium phases were identified within the vein which indicates multiple uranium mineralisation events. In light of these localised elemental variations it is recommended that representative sampling for an area is undertaken prior to establishing the REE pattern that may be used to identify the originating mine for an unknown ore sample and prior to investigating impact of ore processing on any arising REE patterns.

  5. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K represses the production of pro-apoptotic Bcl-xS splice isoform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revil, Timothée; Pelletier, Jordan; Toutant, Johanne; Cloutier, Alexandre; Chabot, Benoit

    2009-08-01

    The Bcl-x pre-mRNA is alternatively spliced to produce the anti-apoptotic Bcl-x(L) and the pro-apoptotic Bcl-x(S) isoforms. By performing deletion mutagenesis on a human Bcl-x minigene, we have identified a novel exonic element that controls the use of the 5' splice site of Bcl-x(S). The proximal portion of this element acts as a repressor and is located downstream of an enhancer. Further mutational analysis provided a detailed topological map of the regulatory activities revealing a sharp transition between enhancer and repressor sequences. Portions of the enhancer can function when transplanted in another alternative splicing unit. Chromatography and immunoprecipitation assays indicate that the silencer element interacts with heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein particle (hnRNP) K, consistent with the presence of putative high affinity sites for this protein. Finally, down-regulation of hnRNP K by RNA interference enhanced splicing to Bcl-x(S), an effect seen only when the sequences bound by hnRNP K are present. Our results therefore document a clear role for hnRNP K in preventing the production of the pro-apoptotic Bcl-x(S) splice isoform.

  6. Selective nuclear export of specific classes of mRNA from mammalian nuclei is promoted by GANP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickramasinghe, Vihandha O; Andrews, Robert; Ellis, Peter; Langford, Cordelia; Gurdon, John B; Stewart, Murray; Venkitaraman, Ashok R; Laskey, Ronald A

    2014-04-01

    The nuclear phase of the gene expression pathway culminates in the export of mature messenger RNAs (mRNAs) to the cytoplasm through nuclear pore complexes. GANP (germinal- centre associated nuclear protein) promotes the transfer of mRNAs bound to the transport factor NXF1 to nuclear pore complexes. Here, we demonstrate that GANP, subunit of the TRanscription-EXport-2 (TREX-2) mRNA export complex, promotes selective nuclear export of a specific subset of mRNAs whose transport depends on NXF1. Genome-wide gene expression profiling showed that half of the transcripts whose nuclear export was impaired following NXF1 depletion also showed reduced export when GANP was depleted. GANP-dependent transcripts were highly expressed, yet short-lived, and were highly enriched in those encoding central components of the gene expression machinery such as RNA synthesis and processing factors. After injection into Xenopus oocyte nuclei, representative GANP-dependent transcripts showed faster nuclear export kinetics than representative transcripts that were not influenced by GANP depletion. We propose that GANP promotes the nuclear export of specific classes of mRNAs that may facilitate rapid changes in gene expression.

  7. Characterization of the HIV-1 RNA associated proteome identifies Matrin 3 as a nuclear cofactor of Rev function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myers Michael P

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Central to the fully competent replication cycle of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 is the nuclear export of unspliced and partially spliced RNAs mediated by the Rev posttranscriptional activator and the Rev response element (RRE. Results Here, we introduce a novel method to explore the proteome associated with the nuclear HIV-1 RNAs. At the core of the method is the generation of cell lines harboring an integrated provirus carrying RNA binding sites for the MS2 bacteriophage protein. Flag-tagged MS2 is then used for affinity purification of the viral RNA. By this approach we found that the viral RNA is associated with the host nuclear matrix component MATR3 (Matrin 3 and that its modulation affected Rev activity. Knockdown of MATR3 suppressed Rev/RRE function in the export of unspliced HIV-1 RNAs. However, MATR3 was able to associate with Rev only through the presence of RRE-containing viral RNA. Conclusions In this work, we exploited a novel proteomic method to identify MATR3 as a cellular cofactor of Rev activity. MATR3 binds viral RNA and is required for the Rev/RRE mediated nuclear export of unspliced HIV-1 RNAs.

  8. Rift Valley fever virus NS{sub S} gene expression correlates with a defect in nuclear mRNA export

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copeland, Anna Maria; Van Deusen, Nicole M.; Schmaljohn, Connie S., E-mail: Connie.s.schmaljohn.civ@mail.mil

    2015-12-15

    We investigated the localization of host mRNA during Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) infection. Fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed that infection with RVFV altered the localization of host mRNA. mRNA accumulated in the nuclei of RVFV-infected but not mock-infected cells. Further, overexpression of the NS{sub S} gene, but not the N, G{sub N} or NS{sub M} genes correlated with mRNA nuclear accumulation. Nuclear accumulation of host mRNA was not observed in cells infected with a strain of RVFV lacking the gene encoding NS{sub S}, confirming that expression of NS{sub S} is likely responsible for this phenomenon. - Highlights: • Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) infection alters the localization of host mRNA. • mRNA accumulates in the nuclei of RVFV-infected but not mock-infected cells. • NS{sub S} is likely responsible for mRNA relocalization to the nucleus.

  9. Escaping the nuclear confines: signal-dependent pre-mRNA splicing in anucleate platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis, Melvin M; Tolley, Neal D; Bunting, Michaeline; Schwertz, Hansjörg; Jiang, Huimiao; Lindemann, Stephan; Yost, Christian C; Rubner, Frederick J; Albertine, Kurt H; Swoboda, Kathryn J; Fratto, Carolyn M; Tolley, Emilysa; Kraiss, Larry W; McIntyre, Thomas M; Zimmerman, Guy A; Weyrich, Andrew S

    2005-08-12

    Platelets are specialized hemostatic cells that circulate in the blood as anucleate cytoplasts. We report that platelets unexpectedly possess a functional spliceosome, a complex that processes pre-mRNAs in the nuclei of other cell types. Spliceosome components are present in the cytoplasm of human megakaryocytes and in proplatelets that extend from megakaryocytes. Primary human platelets also contain essential spliceosome factors including small nuclear RNAs, splicing proteins, and endogenous pre-mRNAs. In response to integrin engagement and surface receptor activation, platelets precisely excise introns from interleukin-1beta pre-mRNA, yielding a mature message that is translated into protein. Signal-dependent splicing is a novel function of platelets that demonstrates remarkable specialization in the regulatory repertoire of this anucleate cell. While this mechanism may be unique to platelets, it also suggests previously unrecognized diversity regarding the functional roles of the spliceosome in eukaryotic cells.

  10. Reconstruction of the isotope activity content of heterogeneous nuclear waste drums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krings, Thomas; Mauerhofer, Eric

    2012-07-01

    Radioactive waste must be characterized in order to verify its conformance with national regulations for intermediate storage or its disposal. Segmented gamma scanning (SGS) is a most widely applied non-destructive analytical technique for the characterization of radioactive waste drums. The isotope specific activity content is generally calculated assuming a homogeneous matrix and activity distribution for each measured drum segment. However, real radioactive waste drums exhibit non-uniform isotope and density distributions most affecting the reliability and accuracy of activities reconstruction in SGS. The presence of internal shielding structures in the waste drum contributes generally to a strong underestimation of the activity and this in particular for radioactive sources emitting low energy gamma-rays independently of their spatial distribution. In this work we present an improved method to quantify the activity of spatially concentrated gamma-emitting isotopes (point sources or hot spots) in heterogeneous waste drums with internal shielding structures. The isotope activity is reconstructed by numerical simulations and fits of the angular dependent count rate distribution recorded during the drum rotation in SGS using an analytical expression derived from a geometric model. First results of the improved method and enhancements of this method are shown and are compared to each other as well as to the conventional method which assumes a homogeneous matrix and activity distribution. It is shown that the new model improves the accuracy and the reliability of the activity reconstruction in SGS and that the presented algorithm is suitable with respect to the framework requirement of industrial application.

  11. Embryonic stem cell as nuclear donor could promote in vitro development of the heterogeneous reconstructed embryo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The nucleus of a somatic cell could be dedifferentiated and reprogrammed in an enucleated heterogeneous oocyte. Some reconstructed oocytes could develop into blastocysts in vitro, and a few could develop into term normally after transferred into foster mothers, but most of cloning embryos fail to develop to term. In order to evaluate the efficacy of embryonic stem cell as nucleus donor in interspecific animal cloning, we reconstructed enucleated rabbit oocytes with nuclei from mouse ES cells, and analyzed the developmental ability of reconstructed embryos in vitro. Two kinds of fibroblast cells were used as donor control, one derived from ear skin of an adult Kunming albino mouse, and the other derived from a mouse fetus. Three types of cells were transferred into perivitelline space under zona pellucida of rabbit oocytes respectively. The reconstructed oocytes were fused and activated by electric pulses, and cultured in vitro. The developmental rate of reconstructed oocytes derived from embryonic stem cells was 16.1%, which was significantly higher than that of both the adult mouse fibroblast cells (0%-3.1%, P < 0.05) and fetus mouse fibroblast cells (2.1%-3.7%, P < 0.05). Chromosome analysis confirmed that blastocyst cells were derived from ES donor cell. These observations show that reprogramming is easier in interspecific embryos reconstructed with ES cells than that reconstructed with somatic cells, and that ES cells have the higher ability to direct the reconstructed embryos development normally than fibroblast cells.

  12. Heterogeneous nuclear expression of the promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein in normal and neoplastic human tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambacorta, M.; Flenghi, L.; Fagioli, M.; Pileri, S.; Leoncini, L.; Bigerna, B.; Pacini, R.; Tanci, L. N.; Pasqualucci, L.; Ascani, S.; Mencarelli, A.; Liso, A.; Pelicci, P. G.; Falini, B.

    1996-01-01

    The RING-finger promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein is the product of the PML gene that fuses with the retinoic acid receptor-alpha gene in the t(15; 17) translocation of acute promyelocytic leukemia. Wild-type PML localizes in the nucleus with a typical speckled pattern that is a consequence of the concentration of the protein within discrete subnuclear domains known as nuclear bodies. Delocalization of PML from nuclear bodies has been documented in acute promyelocytic leukemia cells and suggested to contribute to leukemogenesis. In an attempt to get new insights into the function of the wild-type PML protein and to investigate whether it displays an altered expression pattern in neoplasms other than acute promyelocytic leukemia, we stained a large number of normal and neoplastic human tissues with a new murine monoclonal antibody (PG-M3) directed against the amino-terminal region of PML. As the PG-M3 epitope is partially resistant to fixatives, only cells that overexpress PML are detected by the antibody in microwave-heated paraffin sections. Among normal tissues, PML was characteristically up-regulated in activated epithelioid histiocytes and fibroblasts in a variety of pathological conditions, columnar epithelium in small active thyroid follicles, well differentiated foamy cells in the center of sebaceous glands, and hypersecretory endometria (Arias-Stella). Interferons, the PML of which is a primary target gene, and estrogens are likely to represent some of the cytokines and/or hormones that may be involved in the up-regulation of PML under these circumstances. In keeping with this concept, we found that PML is frequently overexpressed in Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells of Hodgkin's disease, a tumor of cytokine-producing cells. Among solid tumors, overexpression of PML was frequently found in carcinomas of larynx and thyroid (papillary), epithelial thymomas, and Kaposi's sarcoma, whereas carcinomas of the lung, thyroid (follicular), breast, and colon were

  13. Structural Basis for the Function of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Gfd1 Protein in mRNA Nuclear Export* ♦

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Chao; Fasken, Milo B.; Marshall, Neil J.; Brockmann, Christoph; Rubinson, Max E.; Wente, Susan R.; Corbett, Anita H.; Stewart, Murray

    2010-01-01

    Following transcription, mRNA is processed, packaged into messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) particles, and transported through nuclear pores (NPCs) to the cytoplasm. At the NPC cytoplasmic face, Dbp5 mediates mRNP remodeling and mRNA export factor dissociation, releasing transcripts for translation. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the conserved poly(A) RNA-binding protein, Nab2, facilitates NPC targeting of transcripts and also modulates poly(A) tail length. Dbp5 removes Nab2 from mRNPs at the ...

  14. Processing of nuclear viroids in vivo: an interplay between RNA conformations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María-Eugenia Gas

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Replication of viroids, small non-protein-coding plant pathogenic RNAs, entails reiterative transcription of their incoming single-stranded circular genomes, to which the (+ polarity is arbitrarily assigned, cleavage of the oligomeric strands of one or both polarities to unit-length, and ligation to circular RNAs. While cleavage in chloroplastic viroids (family Avsunviroidae is mediated by hammerhead ribozymes, where and how cleavage of oligomeric (+ RNAs of nuclear viroids (family Pospiviroidae occurs in vivo remains controversial. Previous in vitro data indicated that a hairpin capped by a GAAA tetraloop is the RNA motif directing cleavage and a loop E motif ligation. Here we have re-examined this question in vivo, taking advantage of earlier findings showing that dimeric viroid (+ RNAs of the family Pospiviroidae transgenically expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana are processed correctly. Using this methodology, we have mapped the processing site of three members of this family at equivalent positions of the hairpin I/double-stranded structure that the upper strand and flanking nucleotides of the central conserved region (CCR can form. More specifically, from the effects of 16 mutations on Citrus exocortis viroid expressed transgenically in A. thaliana, we conclude that the substrate for in vivo cleavage is the conserved double-stranded structure, with hairpin I potentially facilitating the adoption of this structure, whereas ligation is determined by loop E and flanking nucleotides of the two CCR strands. These results have deep implications on the underlying mechanism of both processing reactions, which are most likely catalyzed by enzymes different from those generally assumed: cleavage by a member of the RNase III family, and ligation by an RNA ligase distinct from the only one characterized so far in plants, thus predicting the existence of at least a second plant RNA ligase.

  15. The function of the inner nuclear envelope protein SUN1 in mRNA export is regulated by phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ping; Stumpf, Maria; Müller, Rolf; Eichinger, Ludwig; Glöckner, Gernot; Noegel, Angelika A

    2017-08-22

    SUN1, a component of the LINC (Linker of Nucleoskeleton and Cytoskeleton) complex, functions in mammalian mRNA export through the NXF1-dependent pathway. It associates with mRNP complexes by direct interaction with NXF1. It also binds to the NPC through association with the nuclear pore component Nup153, which is involved in mRNA export. The SUN1-NXF1 association is at least partly regulated by a protein kinase C (PKC) which phosphorylates serine 113 (S113) in the N-terminal domain leading to reduced interaction. The phosphorylation appears to be important for the SUN1 function in nuclear mRNA export since GFP-SUN1 carrying a S113A mutation was less efficient in restoring mRNA export after SUN1 knockdown as compared to the wild type protein. By contrast, GFP-SUN1-S113D resembling the phosphorylated state allowed very efficient export of poly(A)+RNA. Furthermore, probing a possible role of the LINC complex component Nesprin-2 in this process we observed impaired mRNA export in Nesprin-2 knockdown cells. This effect might be independent of SUN1 as expression of a GFP tagged SUN-domain deficient SUN1, which no longer can interact with Nesprin-2, did not affect mRNA export.

  16. Diverse role of three tyrosines in binding of the RNA 5' cap to the human nuclear cap binding complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worch, Remigiusz; Jankowska-Anyszka, Marzena; Niedzwiecka, Anna; Stepinski, Janusz; Mazza, Catherine; Darzynkiewicz, Edward; Cusack, Stephen; Stolarski, Ryszard

    2009-01-16

    The heterodimeric nuclear cap-binding complex (CBC) specifically recognizes the monomethylguanosine 5' cap structure of the eukaryotic RNA polymerase II transcripts such as mRNA and U snRNA. The binding is essential for nuclear maturation of mRNA, for nuclear export of U snRNA in metazoans, and for nonsense-mediated decay of mRNA and the pioneer round of translation. We analysed the recognition of the cap by native human CBC and mutants in which each tyrosine that stacks with the 7-methylguanosine moiety was replaced by phenylalanine or alanine and both tyrosines were replaced by phenylalanines. The equilibrium association constants (K(as)) for two selected cap analogues, P(1)-7-methylguanosine-5' P(3)-guanosine-5' triphosphate and 7-methylguanosine triphosphate, were determined by two independent methods, fluorescence titration and surface plasmon resonance. We could distinguish two tyrosines, Y43 and Y20, in stabilization of the cap inside the CBC-binding pocket. In particular, lack of Y20 in CBC leads to a greater affinity of the mono- than the dinucleotide cap analogue, in contrast to the wild-type protein. A crucial role of cation-pi stacking in the mechanism of the specific cap recognition by CBC was postulated from the comparison of the experimentally derived Gibbs free binding energy (DeltaG degrees) with the stacking energy (DeltaE) of the 7-methylguanosine/Y binary and ternary complexes calculated by the Møller-Plesset second-order perturbation method. The resulting kinetic model of the association between the capped RNA and CBC, based on the experimental data and quantum calculations, is discussed with respect to the "CBC-to-eukaryotic initiation factor 4E handoff" of mRNA.

  17. Ocean dynamic processes causing spatially heterogeneous distribution of sedimentary caesium-137 massively released from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, H.; Morino, Y.; Furuichi, N.; Ohara, T.

    2015-12-01

    Massive amounts of anthropogenic radiocaesium 137Cs that were released into the environment by the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident in March 2011 are widely known to have extensively migrated to Pacific Ocean sediment off of eastern Japan. Several recent reports have stated that the sedimentary 137Cs is now stable with a remarkably heterogeneous distribution. The present study elucidates ocean dynamic processes causing this heterogeneous sedimentary 137Cs distribution in and around the shelf off Fukushima and adjacent prefectures. We performed a numerical simulation of oceanic 137Cs behaviour for about 10 months after the accident, using a comprehensive dynamic model involving advection-diffusion transport in seawater, adsorption and desorption to and from particulate matter, sedimentation and suspension on and from the bottom, and vertical diffusion transport in the sediment. A notable simulated result was that the sedimentary 137Cs significantly accumulated in a swath just offshore of the shelf break (along the 50-100 m isobath) as in recent observations, although the seabed in the entire simulation domain was assumed to have ideal properties such as identical bulk density, uniform porosity, and aggregation of particles with a single grain diameter. This result indicated that the heterogeneous sedimentary 137Cs distribution was not necessarily a result of the spatial distribution of 137Cs sediment adsorptivity. The present simulation suggests that the shape of the swath is mainly associated with spatiotemporal variation between bottom shear stress in the shallow shelf (< 50 m depths) and that offshore of the shelf break. In a large part of the shallow shelf, the simulation indicated that strong bottom friction suspending particulate matter from the seabed frequently occurred via a periodic spring tide about every 2 weeks and via occasional strong wind. The sedimentary 137Cs thereby could hardly stay on the surface of the seabed with the result that

  18. Design of a heterogeneous subcritical nuclear reactor with molten salts based on thorium; Diseno de un reactor nuclear subcritico heterogeneo con sales fundidas a base de torio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medina C, D.; Hernandez A, P.; Letechipia de L, C.; Vega C, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Sajo B, L., E-mail: dmedina_c@hotmail.com [Universidad Simon Bolivar, Laboratorio de Fisica Nuclear, Apdo. Postal 89000, Caracas 1080-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    This paper presents the design of a heterogeneous subcritical nuclear reactor with molten salts based on thorium, with graphite moderator and a {sup 252}Cf source, whose dose levels at the periphery allows its use in teaching and research activities. The design was realized by the Monte Carlo method, where the geometry, dimensions and the fuel was varied in order to obtain the best design. The result was a cubic reactor of 110 cm of side, with graphite moderator and reflector. In the central part having 9 ducts of 3 cm in diameter, eight of them are 110 cm long, which were placed on the Y axis; the separation between each duct is 10 cm. The central duct has 60 cm in length and this contains the {sup 252}Cf source, also there are two irradiation channels and the other six contain a molten salt ({sup 7}LiF - BeF{sub 2} - ThF{sub 4} - UF{sub 4}) as fuel. For the design the k{sub eff} was calculated, neutron spectra and ambient dose equivalent. In the first instance the above was calculated for a virgin fuel, was called case 1; then a percentage of {sup 233}U was used and the percentage of Th was decreased and was called case 2. This with the purpose of comparing two different fuels operating within the reactor. For the two irradiation ducts three positions are used: center, back and front, in each duct in order to have different flows. (Author)

  19. Variable EBV DNA Load Distributions and Heterogeneous EBV mRNA Expression Patterns in the Circulation of Solid Organ versus Stem Cell Transplant Recipients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Greijer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV driven post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD is a heterogeneous and potentially life-threatening condition. Early identification of aberrant EBV activity may prevent progression to B-cell lymphoma. We measured EBV DNA load and RNA profiles in plasma and cellular blood compartments of stem cell transplant (SCT; n=5, solid organ transplant recipients (SOT; n=15, and SOT having chronic elevated EBV-DNA load (n=12. In SCT, EBV DNA was heterogeneously distributed, either in plasma or leukocytes or both. In SOT, EBV DNA load was always cell associated, predominantly in B cells, but occasionally in T cells (CD4 and CD8 or monocytes. All SCT with cell-associated EBV DNA showed BARTs and EBNA1 expression, while LMP1 and LMP2 mRNA was found in 1 and 3 cases, respectively. In SOT, expression of BARTs was detected in all leukocyte samples. LMP2 and EBNA1 mRNA was found in 5/15 and 2/15, respectively, but LMP1 mRNA in only 1, coinciding with severe PTLD and high EBV DNA. Conclusion: EBV DNA is differently distributed between white cells and plasma in SOT versus SCT. EBV RNA profiling in blood is feasible and may have added value for understanding pathogenic virus activity in patients with elevated EBV-DNA.

  20. The fluidity of the nuclear envelope lipid does not affect the rate of nucleocytoplasmic RNA transport in mammalian liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agutter, P S; Suckling, K E

    1982-03-29

    The effects of in vitro and in vivo modifications of nuclear envelope lipid on DNa leakage and on ATP-stimulated RNA release from isolated rat liver nuclei were investigated. The modifications included corn-oil feeding of the animals to alter the fatty acid composition of the lipids, phospholipase treatment of the isolated nuclei, and extraction of the total lipid with Triton X-100. Significant changes in lipid composition and approximate order parameter values of the spin-label 5-doxylstearate resulted, but there was no significant effect on RNA transport rate. It was concluded that the nuclear envelope lipid does not play any important part in nucleocytoplasmic RNA transport in mammalian liver.

  1. The heterodimeric structure of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein C1/C2 dictates 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D-directed transcriptional events in osteoblasts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thomas S.Lisse; Kanagasabai Vadivel; S.Paul Bajaj; Rui Zhou; Rene F.Chun; Martin Hewison; John S.Adams

    2014-01-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) C plays a key role in RNA processing but also exerts a dominant negative effect on responses to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D) by functioning as a vitamin D response element-binding protein (VDRE-BP). hnRNPC acts a tetramer of hnRNPC1 (huC1) and hnRNPC2 (huC2), and organization of these subunits is critical to in vivo nucleic acid-binding. Overexpression of either huC1 or huC2 in human osteoblasts is sufficient to confer VDRE-BP suppression of 1,25(OH)2D-mediated transcription. However, huC1 or huC2 alone did not suppress 1,25(OH)2D-induced transcription in mouse osteoblastic cells. By contrast, overexpression of huC1 and huC2 in combination or transfection with a bone-specific polycistronic vector using a‘‘self-cleaving’’ 2A peptide to co-express huC1/C2 suppressed 1,25D-mediated induction of osteoblast target gene expression. Structural diversity of hnRNPC between human/NWPs and mouse/rat/rabbit/dog was investigated by analysis of sequence variations within the hnRNP CLZ domain. The predicted loss of distal helical function in hnRNPC from lower species provides an explanation for the altered interaction between huC1/C2 and their mouse counterparts. These data provide new evidence of a role for hnRNPC1/C2 in 1,25(OH)2D-driven gene expression, and further suggest that species-specific tetramerization is a crucial determinant of its actions as a regulator of VDR-directed transactivation.

  2. Proteins from rat liver cytosol which stimulate mRNA transport. Purification and interactions with the nuclear envelope mRNA translocation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, H C; Rottmann, M; Bachmann, M; Müller, W E; McDonald, A R; Agutter, P S

    1986-08-15

    Two polysome-associated proteins with particular affinities for poly(A) have been purified from rat liver. These proteins stimulate the efflux of mRNA from isolated nuclei in conditions under which such efflux closely stimulates mRNA transport in vivo, and they are therefore considered as mRNA-transport-stimulatory proteins. Their interaction with the mRNA-translocation system in isolated nuclear envelopes has been studied. The results are generally consistent with the most recently proposed kinetic model of mRNA translocation. One protein, P58, has not been described previously. It inhibits the protein kinase that down-regulates the NTPase, it enhances the NTPase activity in both the presence and the absence of poly(A) and it seems to increase poly(A) binding in unphosphorylated, but not in phosphorylated, envelopes. The other protein, P31, which probably corresponds to the 35,000-Mr factor described by Webb and his colleagues, enhances the binding of poly(A) to the mRNA-binding site in the envelope, thus stimulating the phosphoprotein phosphatase and, in consequence, the NTPase. The possible physiological significance of these two proteins is discussed.

  3. Protein kinase C α regulates nuclear pri-microRNA 15a release as part of endothelin signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Brandenstein, Melanie; Depping, Reinhard; Schäfer, Ekaterine; Dienes, Hans-Peter; Fries, Jochen W U

    2011-10-01

    Endothelin-1 induced signaling is characterized by an early induction of a nuclear factor-kappa B p65/mitogen-activated phosphokinase p38 transcription complex via its A-receptor versus a late induction via diacylglycerol, and protein kinase C. A possible interaction between these two pathways and a potential function for protein kinase C in this context has not previously been elucidated. Here we report that in Caki-1 tumor cells, protein kinase C α is a part of the transcription complex. With importin α4 and α5 as chaperones, the transcription complex transmigrates into the nucleus. Protein kinase C α blocks the nuclear release of pri-microRNA 15a by direct binding shown by electrophoretic mobility shift assay and Duolink immune histology. The expression levels of miRNA 15a can be further manipulated by transfection of si-protein kinase C α, or an expression vector containing protein kinase C α or miRNA 15. The miRNA 15a regulation by protein kinase C α is detectable in different malignant human tumor cell lines (renal cell carcinoma, breast carcinoma, and melanoma). Furthermore, all three cell lines harbor both endothelin receptors (ETAR/ETBR). Specific blockage of each receptor leads to major reduction of miRNA 15a expression due to increased nuclear protein kinase C α translocation. We conclude that the nuclear binding of pri-microRNA 15a is a novel function of protein kinase C α, which plays an important role in endothelin-1 mediated signaling. Since several endothelin-sensitive, malignant tumor cell lines harbor this regulation, it could indicate a more general role in tumor biology.

  4. Cloning and characterization of a novel deletion mutant of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein M4 from human dendritic cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    To identify differentially expressed genes from antigen-stimulated human dendritic cells (DC), subtractive cloning was adopted and more than ten novel genes differentially expressed were cloned. One is a deletion mutant of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) M4 in which the residues from 159 to 197 of hnRNP M4 have been absent. The deletion mutant was shown to be co-expressed with hnRNP M4 in cell lines. The mutant was expressed in antigen-stimulated DC but not in normal DC. Northern blot analysis revealed the presence of a major hnRNP M4 deletion mutant Mrna transcript of 2.4 kilobase with the highest levels in peripheral lymphocytes, lung, liver and spleen. It was also expressed in bone marrow-derived stromal cells (BMSC), BMSC treated with several cytokines but not in BMSC treated with TNF-a. The results revealed a new member of hnRNP family and suggested that hnRNP would participate in antigen process and presentation.

  5. Caenorhabditis elegans pseudouridine synthase 1 activity in vivo: tRNA is a substrate, but not U2 small nuclear RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Jeffrey R; Padgett, Richard W

    2003-06-01

    The formation of pseudouridine (Psi) from uridine is post-transcriptional and catalysed by pseudouridine synthases, several of which have been characterized from eukaryotes. Pseudouridine synthase 1 (Pus1p) has been well characterized from yeast and mice. In yeast, Pus1p has been shown to have dual substrate specificity, modifying uridines in tRNAs and at position 44 in U2 small nuclear RNA (U2 snRNA). In order to study the in vivo activity of a metazoan Pus1p, a knockout of the gene coding for the homologue of Pus1p in Caenorhabditis elegans was obtained. The deletion encompasses the first two putative exons and includes the essential aspartate that is required for activity in truA pseudouridine synthases. The locations of most modified nucleotides on small RNAs in C. elegans are not known, and the positions of Psi were determined on four tRNAs and U2 snRNA. The uridine at position 27 of tRNA(Val) (AAC), a putative Pus1p-modification site, was converted into Psi in the wild-type worms, but the tRNA(Val) (AAC) from mutant worms lacked the modification. Psi formation at positions 13, 32, 38 and 39, all of which should be modified by other pseudouridine synthases, was not affected by the loss of Pus1p. The absence of Pus1p in C. elegans had no effect on the modification of U2 snRNA in vivo, even though worm U2 snRNA has a Psi at position 45 (the equivalent of yeast U2 snRNA position 44) and at four other positions. This result was unexpected, given the known dual specificity of yeast Pus1p.

  6. Increased level of circulating U2 small nuclear RNA fragments indicates metastasis in melanoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlmann, Jan Dominik; Wimberger, Pauline; Wilsch, Katja; Fluck, Michael; Suter, Ludwig; Brunner, Georg

    2015-03-01

    Background: Melanoma is the most aggressive skin cancer and, despite recent advances in therapy, about 20% of the patients die of their disease. Early relapse detection and monitoring of therapy response are crucial for efficient treatment of advanced melanoma. Thus, there is a need for blood-based biomarkers in melanoma management. Serum-derived U2 small nuclear RNA fragments (RNU2-1f) were previously shown to be blood-based biomarkers for gastrointestinal and gynecologic malignancies. Here we examined whether RNU2-1f may also serve as diagnostic biomarker in advanced melanoma. Circulating RNU2-1f levels were quantified by comparative reverse transcription PCR in a training cohort of patients with metastatic melanoma (n=33, thereof regionally metastasized to skin and lymph nodes, n=23, and distantly metastasized, n=10) vs. patients with benign naevi (n=16) vs. healthy controls (n=39). RESULTS were validated in an independent patient cohort with distant metastasis (n=16) vs. controls (n=18). Circulating RNU2-1f levels in the training cohort were significantly increased in serum of regionally and distantly metastatic patients, compared with patients with benign naevi or healthy controls (p<0.0001) and allowed accurate detection of regional (AUC 0.80) as well as distant (AUC 0.84) metastasis. In the validation cohort, increased RNU2-1f levels were confirmed and enabled highly specific detection of distant metastasis (sensitivity 81%, specificity 100%, AUC 0.94). This is the first report to suggest a blood-based snRNA serving as a diagnostic biomarker for melanoma metastasis. Our data provide a rationale for further defining clinical utility of circulating RNU2-1f in metastasis detection in the management of melanoma patients at risk of relapse and/or with advanced disease.

  7. Using a nano-flare probe to detect RNA in live donor cells prior to somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Bo; Ren, Liang; Liu, Di; Ma, Jian-Zhang; An, Tie-Zhu; Yang, Xiu-Qin; Ma, Hong; Guo, Zhen-Hua; Zhu, Meng; Bai, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Many transgenes are silenced in mammalian cells (donor cells used for somatic cell nuclear transfer [SCNT]). Silencing correlated with a repressed chromatin structure or suppressed promoter, and it impeded the production of transgenic animals. Gene transcription studies in live cells are challenging because of the drawbacks of reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Nano-flare probes provide an effective approach to detect RNA in living cells. We used 18S RNA, a housekeeping gene, as a reference gene. This study aimed to establish a platform to detect RNA in single living donor cells using a Nano-flare probe prior to SCNT and to verify the safety and validity of the Nano-flare probe in order to provide a technical foundation for rescuing silenced transgenes in transgenic cloned embryos. We investigated cytotoxic effect of the 18S RNA-Nano-flare probe on porcine fetal fibroblasts, characterized the distribution of the 18S RNA-Nano-flare probe in living cells and investigated the effect of the 18S RNA-Nano-flare probe on the development of cloned embryos after SCNT. The cytotoxic effect of the 18S RNA-Nano-flare probe on porcine fetal fibroblasts was dose-dependent, and 18S RNA was detected using the 18S RNA-Nano-flare probe. In addition, treating donor cells with 500 pM 18S RNA-Nano-flare probe did not have adverse effects on the development of SCNT embryos at the pre-implantation stage. In conclusion, we established a preliminary platform to detect RNA in live donor cells using a Nano-flare probe prior to SCNT.

  8. Activation of ribosomal RNA genes in porcine embryos produced in vitro or by somatic cell nuclear transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Bolette; Pedersen, Hanne Gervi; Jakobsen, Anne Sørig

    2007-01-01

    The onset of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) synthesis occurs during the second half of the third cell cycle, that is, at the four-cell stage, in porcine embryos developed in vivo. In the present study the onset of rRNA synthesis was investigated in porcine embryos produced in vitro (IVP) or by somatic cell...... nuclear transfer (SCNT) using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with an rDNA probe and subsequent visualization of the nucleolar proteins by silver staining. In the 205 IVP embryos investigated, all two-cell embryos (n = 34) were categorized as transcriptionally inactive. At the late four......-cell stage (n = 45), 38% of the embryos contained 1-3 nuclei with signs of rRNA transcription, indicating an asynchronous transcription initiation. This pattern continued in the following stages, as 78% (n = 47), 47% (n = 42) and 83% (n = 37) of the embryos revealed a mixture of transcriptionally inactive...

  9. A circular RNA promotes tumorigenesis by inducing c-myc nuclear translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qi; Du, William W; Wu, Nan; Yang, Weining; Awan, Faryal Mehwish; Fang, Ling; Ma, Jian; Li, Xiangmin; Zeng, Yan; Yang, Zhenguo; Dong, Jun; Khorshidi, Azam; Yang, Burton B

    2017-09-01

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) are a subclass of noncoding RNAs widely expressed in mammalian cells. We report here the tumorigenic capacity of a circRNA derived from angiomotin-like1 (circ-Amotl1). Circ-Amotl1 is highly expressed in patient tumor samples and cancer cell lines. Single-cell inoculations using circ-Amotl1-transfected tumor cells showed a 30-fold increase in proliferative capacity relative to control. Agarose colony-formation assays similarly revealed a 142-fold increase. Tumor-take rate in nude mouse xenografts using 6-day (219 cells) and 3-day (9 cells) colonies were 100%, suggesting tumor-forming potential of every cell. Subcutaneous single-cell injections led to the formation of palpable tumors in 41% of mice, with tumor sizes >1 cm(3) in 1 month. We further found that this potent tumorigenicity was triggered through interactions between circ-Amotl1 and c-myc. A putative binding site was identified in silico and tested experimentally. Ectopic expression of circ-Amotl1 increased retention of nuclear c-myc, appearing to promote c-myc stability and upregulate c-myc targets. Expression of circ-Amotl1 also increased the affinity of c-myc binding to a number of promoters. Our study therefore reveals a novel function of circRNAs in tumorigenesis, and this subclass of noncoding RNAs may represent a potential target in cancer therapy.

  10. MicroRNA29a regulates the expression of the nuclear oncogene Ski.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichler, Sabine; Illmer, Thomas; Roemhild, Josephine; Ovcharenko, Dmitriy; Stiewe, Thorsten; Neubauer, Andreas

    2011-08-18

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, noncoding RNA molecules that regulate growth and differentiation. miRNAs are frequently located at cancer-specific fragile sites in the human genome, such as chromosome 7q. The nuclear oncogene SKI is up-regulated in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with -7/del7q. Here we asked whether loss of miRNAs on chromosome 7q may explain this up-regulation. miR-29a expression was found to be down-regulated in AML with -7/del7q. Forced expression of miR-29a down-regulated Ski and its target gene, Nr-CAM, whereas miR-29a inhibition induced Ski expression. Luciferase assays validated a functional binding site for miR-29a in the 3' untranslated region of SKI. Finally, in samples of AML patients, we observed an inverse correlation of Ski and miR-29a expression, respectively. In conclusion, up-regulation of Ski in AML with -7/del7q is caused by loss of miR-29a. miR-29a may therefore function as an important tumor suppressor in AML by restraining expression of the SKI oncogene.

  11. The contribution of DNA slippage to eukaryotic nuclear 18S rRNA evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, J M

    1995-06-01

    Six of 204 eukaryotic nuclear small-subunit ribosomal RNA sequences analyzed show a highly significant degree of clustering of short sequence motifs that indicates the fixation of products of replication slippage within them in their recent evolutionary history. A further 72 sequences show weaker indications of sequence repetition. Repetitive sequences in SSU rRNAs are preferentially located in variable regions and in particular in V4 and V7. The conserved region immediately 5' to V7 (C7) is also consistently repetitive. Whereas variable regions vary in length and appear to have evolved by the fixation of slippage products, C7 shows no indication of length variation. Repetition within C7 is therefore either not a consequence of slippage or reflects very ancient slippage events. The phylogenetic distribution of sequence simplicity in small-subunit rRNAs is patchy, being largely confined to the Mammalia, Apicomplexa, Tetrahymenidae, and Trypanosomatidae. The regions of the molecule associated with sequence simplicity vary with taxonomic grouping as do the sequence motifs undergoing slippage. Comparison of rates of insertion and substitution in a lineage within the genus Plasmodium confirms that both rates are higher in variable regions than in conserved regions. The insertion rate in variable regions is substantially lower than the substitution rate, suggesting that selection acts more strongly on slippage products than on point mutations in these regions. Patterns of coevolution between variable regions may reflect the consequences of selection acting on the incorporation of slippage-derived sequences across the gene.

  12. Dinoflagellate nuclear SSU rRNA phylogeny suggests multiple plastid losses and replacements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldarriaga, J F; Taylor, F J; Keeling, P J; Cavalier-Smith, T

    2001-09-01

    Dinoflagellates are a trophically diverse group of protists with photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic members that appears to incorporate and lose endosymbionts relatively easily. To trace the gain and loss of plastids in dinoflagellates, we have sequenced the nuclear small subunit rRNA gene of 28 photosynthetic and four non-photosynthetic species, and produced phylogenetic trees with a total of 81 dinoflagellate sequences. Patterns of plastid gain, loss, and replacement were plotted onto this phylogeny. With the exception of the apparently early-diverging Syndiniales and Noctilucales, all non-photosynthetic dinoflagellates are very likely to have had photosynthetic ancestors with peridinin-containing plastids. The same is true for all dinoflagellates with plastids other than the peridinin-containing plastid: their ancestors have replaced one type of plastid for another, in some cases most likely through a non-photosynthetic intermediate. Eight independent instances of plastid loss and three of replacement can be inferred from existing data, but as more non-photosynthetic lineages are characterized these numbers will surely grow.

  13. Circulating U2 small nuclear RNA fragments as a novel diagnostic biomarker for pancreatic and colorectal adenocarcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baraniskin, Alexander; Nöpel-Dünnebacke, Stefanie; Ahrens, Maike

    2013-01-01

    2 small nuclear RNA (RNU2-1). Importantly, we found that the assay signal discriminating tumor from controls was derived from U2 small nuclear RNA (snRNA) fragments (RNU2-1f) and not from miR-1246. In addition, we observed a remarkable stability of RNU2-1f in serum and provide experimental evidence...... and specificity of 97.7% [95% CI = (87.7, 99.9)] and 90.6% [95% CI = (80.7, 96.5)], respectively [area under the ROC curve 0.972]. Of note, patients with CRC were detected with our assay as early as UICC Stage II with a sensitivity of 81%. In conclusion, this is the first report showing that fragments of U2 sn...... with primary human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), we identified 15 diagnostic microRNA candidates. Of those miR-1246 was selected based on its high abundance in serum of tumor carrying mice. Subsequently, we noted a cross reactivity of the established miR-1246 assays with RNA fragments derived from U...

  14. Circulating U2 small nuclear RNA fragments as a novel diagnostic tool for patients with epithelial ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlmann, Jan Dominik; Baraniskin, Alexander; Hahn, Stephan A; Mosel, Frank; Bredemeier, Maren; Wimberger, Pauline; Kimmig, Rainer; Kasimir-Bauer, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death among malignancies in women. Despite advances in treatment, >50% of patients relapse. For disease monitoring, the identification of a blood-based biomarker would be of prime interest. In this regard, noncoding RNAs, such as microRNA (miRNA) or small nuclear RNA (snRNA), have been suggested as biomarkers for noninvasive cancer diagnosis. In the present study, we sought to identify differentially expressed miRNA/snRNA in sera of ovarian cancer patients and investigate their potential to aid in therapy monitoring. miRNA/snRNA abundance was investigated in serum (n = 10) by microarray analysis and validated in an extended serum set (n = 119) by reverse-transcription quantitative PCR. Abundance of U2-1 snRNA fragment (RNU2-1f) was significantly increased in sera of ovarian cancer patients (P < 0.0001) and paralleled International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage as well as residual tumor burden after surgery (P < 0.0001 and P = 0.011, respectively). Moreover, for patients with suboptimal debulking, preoperative RNU2-1f concentration was associated with radiographic response after chemotherapy and with platinum resistance (P = 0.0088 and P = 0.0015, respectively). Interestingly, according to the RNU2-1f abundance dynamics, persistent RNU2-1f positivity before surgery and after chemotherapy identified a subgroup of patients with high risk of recurrence and poor prognosis. This is the first report to suggest that a circulating snRNA can serve as an auxiliary diagnostic tool for monitoring tumor dynamics in ovarian cancer. Our results provide a rationale to further investigate whether this high-risk patient group may benefit from additional therapies that are directly applied after chemotherapy.

  15. p54nrb/NonO and PSF promote U snRNA nuclear export by accelerating its export complex assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Hiroto; McCloskey, Asako; Shinmyozu, Kaori; Ohno, Mutsuhito

    2014-04-01

    The assembly of spliceosomal U snRNPs in metazoans requires nuclear export of U snRNA precursors. Four factors, nuclear cap-binding complex (CBC), phosphorylated adaptor for RNA export (PHAX), the export receptor CRM1 and RanGTP, gather at the m(7)G-cap-proximal region and form the U snRNA export complex. Here we show that the multifunctional RNA-binding proteins p54nrb/NonO and PSF are U snRNA export stimulatory factors. These proteins, likely as a heterodimer, accelerate the recruitment of PHAX, and subsequently CRM1 and Ran onto the RNA substrates in vitro, which mediates efficient U snRNA export in vivo. Our results reveal a new layer of regulation for U snRNA export and, hence, spliceosomal U snRNP biogenesis.

  16. Circulating U2 small nuclear RNA fragments as a novel diagnostic biomarker for pancreatic and colorectal adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraniskin, Alexander; Nöpel-Dünnebacke, Stefanie; Ahrens, Maike; Jensen, Steffen Grann; Zöllner, Hannah; Maghnouj, Abdelouahid; Wos, Alexandra; Mayerle, Julia; Munding, Johanna; Kost, Dennis; Reinacher-Schick, Anke; Liffers, Sven; Schroers, Roland; Chromik, Ansgar M; Meyer, Helmut E; Uhl, Waldemar; Klein-Scory, Susanne; Weiss, Frank U; Stephan, Christian; Schwarte-Waldhoff, Irmgard; Lerch, Markus M; Tannapfel, Andrea; Schmiegel, Wolff; Andersen, Claus Lindbjerg; Hahn, Stephan A

    2013-01-15

    Improved non-invasive strategies for early cancer detection are urgently needed to reduce morbidity and mortality. Non-coding RNAs, such as microRNAs and small nucleolar RNAs, have been proposed as biomarkers for non-invasive cancer diagnosis. Analyzing serum derived from nude mice implanted with primary human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), we identified 15 diagnostic microRNA candidates. Of those miR-1246 was selected based on its high abundance in serum of tumor carrying mice. Subsequently, we noted a cross reactivity of the established miR-1246 assays with RNA fragments derived from U2 small nuclear RNA (RNU2-1). Importantly, we found that the assay signal discriminating tumor from controls was derived from U2 small nuclear RNA (snRNA) fragments (RNU2-1f) and not from miR-1246. In addition, we observed a remarkable stability of RNU2-1f in serum and provide experimental evidence that hsa-miR-1246 is likely a pseudo microRNA. In a next step, RNU2-1f was measured by qRT-PCR and normalized to cel-54 in 191 serum/plasma samples from PDAC and colorectal carcinoma (CRC) patients. In comparison to 129 controls, we were able to classify samples as cancerous with a sensitivity and specificity of 97.7% [95% CI = (87.7, 99.9)] and 90.6% [95% CI = (80.7, 96.5)], respectively [area under the ROC curve 0.972]. Of note, patients with CRC were detected with our assay as early as UICC Stage II with a sensitivity of 81%. In conclusion, this is the first report showing that fragments of U2 snRNA are highly stable in serum and plasma and may serve as novel diagnostic biomarker for PDAC and CRC for future prospective screening studies. Copyright © 2012 UICC.

  17. The nuclear 18S ribosomal RNA gene as a source of phylogenetic information in the genus Taenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hongbin; Lou, Zhongzi; Li, Li; Ni, Xingwei; Guo, Aijiang; Li, Hongmin; Zheng, Yadong; Dyachenko, Viktor; Jia, Wanzhong

    2013-03-01

    Most species of the genus Taenia are of considerable medical and veterinary significance. In this study, complete nuclear 18S rRNA gene sequences were obtained from seven members of genus Taenia [Taenia multiceps, Taenia saginata, Taenia asiatica, Taenia solium, Taenia pisiformis, Taenia hydatigena, and Taenia taeniaeformis] and a phylogeny inferred using these sequences. Most of the variable sites fall within the variable regions, V1-V5. We show that sequences from the nuclear 18S ribosomal RNA gene have considerable promise as sources of phylogenetic information within the genus Taenia. Furthermore, given that almost all the variable sites lie within defined variable portions of that gene, it will be appropriate and economical to sequence only those regions for additional species of Taenia.

  18. The 28S-18S rDNA intergenic spacer from Crithidia fasciculata: repeated sequences, length heterogeneity, putative processing sites and potential interactions between U3 small nucleolar RNA and the ribosomal RNA precursor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnare, M N; Collings, J C; Spencer, D F; Gray, M W

    2000-09-15

    In Crithidia fasciculata, the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene repeats range in size from approximately 11 to 12 kb. This length heterogeneity is localized to a region of the intergenic spacer (IGS) that contains tandemly repeated copies of a 19mer sequence. The IGS also contains four copies of an approximately 55 nt repeat that has an internal inverted repeat and is also present in the IGS of Leishmania species. We have mapped the C.fasciculata transcription initiation site as well as two other reverse transcriptase stop sites that may be analogous to the A0 and A' pre-rRNA processing sites within the 5' external transcribed spacer (ETS) of other eukaryotes. Features that could influence processing at these sites include two stretches of conserved primary sequence and three secondary structure elements present in the 5' ETS. We also characterized the C.fasciculata U3 snoRNA, which has the potential for base-pairing with pre-rRNA sequences. Finally, we demonstrate that biosynthesis of large subunit rRNA in both C. fasciculata and Trypanosoma brucei involves 3'-terminal addition of three A residues that are not present in the corresponding DNA sequences.

  19. Suppression of RNA Silencing by a Geminivirus Nuclear Protein, AC2, Correlates with Transactivation of Host Genes†

    OpenAIRE

    Trinks, Daniela; R Rajeswaran; Shivaprasad, P. V.; Akbergenov, Rashid; Edward J Oakeley; Veluthambi, K; Hohn, Thomas; Pooggin, Mikhail M.

    2005-01-01

    Bipartite geminiviruses encode a small protein, AC2, that functions as a transactivator of viral transcription and a suppressor of RNA silencing. A relationship between these two functions had not been investigated before. We characterized both of these functions for AC2 from Mungbean yellow mosaic virus-Vigna (MYMV). When transiently expressed in plant protoplasts, MYMV AC2 strongly transactivated the viral promoter; AC2 was detected in the nucleus, and a split nuclear localization signal (N...

  20. MMCT-mediated chromosome engineering technique applicable to functional analysis of lncRNA and nuclear dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meguro-Horike, Makiko; Horike, Shin-Ichi

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence implicated several long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) in gene expression in cis or trans through regulating the local chromosomal architecture. However, the mechanisms underlying the lncRNA mediated silencing of multiple genes remain unknown. We believe that Microcell Mediated Chromosome Transfer (MMCT) is a suitable approach for functional analysis of lncRNAs and nuclear dynamics. MMCT is a unique research technique that can be generally used to transfer a single chromosome from one mammalian cell to another. Transferred chromosomes can be stably maintained as functioning in the recipient cells. Since there is no size limit to introducing genomic locus, an approach using the chromosome transfer technique is suitable for functional analysis of a large chromosomal domain. Here we describe a general strategy of MMCT, applications of which have potential to be an alternative tool of existing gene delivery system.

  1. Nuclear Factor 90, a cellular dsRNA binding protein inhibits the HIV Rev-export function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    St-Laurent Georges

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The HIV Rev protein is known to facilitate export of incompletely spliced and unspliced viral transcripts to the cytoplasm, a necessary step in virus life cycle. The Rev-mediated nucleo-cytoplasmic transport of nascent viral transcripts, dependents on interaction of Rev with the RRE RNA structural element present in the target RNAs. The C-terminal variant of dsRNA-binding nuclear protein 90 (NF90ctv has been shown to markedly attenuate viral replication in stably transduced HIV-1 target cell line. Here we examined a mechanism of interference of viral life cycle involving Rev-NF90ctv interaction. Results Since Rev:RRE complex formations depend on protein:RNA and protein:protein interactions, we investigated whether the expression of NF90ctv might interfere with Rev-mediated export of RRE-containing transcripts. When HeLa cells expressed both NF90ctv and Rev protein, we observed that NF90ctv inhibited the Rev-mediated RNA transport. In particular, three regions of NF90ctv protein are involved in blocking Rev function. Moreover, interaction of NF90ctv with the RRE RNA resulted in the expression of a reporter protein coding sequences linked to the RRE structure. Moreover, Rev influenced the subcellular localization of NF90ctv, and this process is leptomycin B sensitive. Conclusion The dsRNA binding protein, NF90ctv competes with HIV Rev function at two levels, by competitive protein:protein interaction involving Rev binding to specific domains of NF90ctv, as well as by its binding to the RRE-RNA structure. Our results are consistent with a model of Rev-mediated HIV-1 RNA export that envisions Rev-multimerization, a process interrupted by NF90ctv.

  2. Significance of the antigenic epitopes in heterogenous nuclear ribonucleoproteins- Ⅰ for the diagnosis and prognosis of systematic sclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JING XUE; ZHONG QIANG YAO; YANG GAO; MENG XUE YU; LI PING ZHU

    2006-01-01

    To assess the presence of autoantibodies against epitopes of heterogenous nuclear ribonucleoprotein-Ⅰ (hnRNP-Ⅰ ) in systematic sclerosis (SSc) and to analyze their clinical significance, polypeptides of hnRNP-Ⅰ were designed by biological technical software and analyzed with both the Wonderful Biology Information System and DNA Star-Protean Analysis Software at the same time. In these ways, two polypeptides of hnRNP-Ⅰ were obtained based on their amino acid sequences, folding features, hydrophilic, curl style, dough kneading sensation and the possibility on the surface of proteins. They are named as hnRNP-Ⅰ-1 (NVKYNNDKSRDYTRPDLPSGDSQPSLDQT, 264-292 aa) and hnRNP-Ⅰ-2(QLP4REGQEDQGLTKDYGNSOL, 441-461 aa), simply designated as Ⅰ-1 and Ⅰ-2. The autoantibodies against hnRNPs were detected by means of ELISA using the synthetic epitopes polypeptides as antigen. It was found that the positive rate of detection for anti-Ⅰ-1 and anti-Ⅰ-2 autoantibodies were rather higher in SSc patients than that in other CTDs and the sensitivities and specificities of the testing with ELISA for anti-Ⅰ-1 and anti-Ⅰ-2 antibodies in SSc patients were 47.62%/93.43% and 38.1%/91.08%, without any significant difference between these two groups of testings. Also, there was no significant difference in the clinical features and laboratory findings, such as age, involvements in digestive and respiratory tracts and erythrocyte sedimentation rate etc., between the anti-Ⅰ-1-positive and -negative groups in SSc patients. However, the hnRNP-Ⅰ-autoantibody-positive group of patients had obviously shorter duration of disease course compared with that of the autoantibody-negative group. Anti-Ⅰ-1and anti-Ⅰ-2 autoantibodies also had no association with antinuclear antibody, anti-Sc170 and anti-centromere antibody (ACA) in SSc patients. So, it is apparent that the autoantibodies related with SSc may act through different pathways in the pathogenesis of SSc, and the hn

  3. Dual RNA Processing Roles of Pat1b via Cytoplasmic Lsm1-7 and Nuclear Lsm2-8 Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Vindry

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Pat1 RNA-binding proteins, enriched in processing bodies (P bodies, are key players in cytoplasmic 5′ to 3′ mRNA decay, activating decapping of mRNA in complex with the Lsm1-7 heptamer. Using co-immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence approaches coupled with RNAi, we provide evidence for a nuclear complex of Pat1b with the Lsm2-8 heptamer, which binds to the spliceosomal U6 small nuclear RNA (snRNA. Furthermore, we establish the set of interactions connecting Pat1b/Lsm2-8/U6 snRNA/SART3 and additional U4/U6.U5 tri-small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle (tri-snRNP components in Cajal bodies, the site of snRNP biogenesis. RNA sequencing following Pat1b depletion revealed the preferential upregulation of mRNAs normally found in P bodies and enriched in 3′ UTR AU-rich elements. Changes in >180 alternative splicing events were also observed, characterized by skipping of regulated exons with weak donor sites. Our data demonstrate the dual role of a decapping enhancer in pre-mRNA processing as well as in mRNA decay via distinct nuclear and cytoplasmic Lsm complexes.

  4. Nuclear phosphoproteomics analysis reveals that CDK1/2 are involved in EGF-regulated constitutive pre-mRNA splicing in MDA-MB-468 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xianwei; Guo, Dan; Zhu, Yinghui; Xian, Feng; Liu, Siqi; Wu, Lin; Lou, Xiaomin

    2016-06-01

    The epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR) pathway is one of the most dysregulated and extensively investigated signaling pathways in human cancers and plays important roles in the regulation of nuclear functions through both cytoplasmic and nuclear EGFR pathways. However, the current understanding of the nuclear phosphorylation responses to activated EGFR pathways remains limited. In the present study, phosphoproteomics analysis revealed the increased phosphorylation of 90 nuclear proteins, primarily involved in RNA processing, pre-mRNA splicing and cell cycle regulation, upon EGF stimulation in MDA-MB-468 cells. Cellular splicing assays of the β-globin (HBB) minigene confirmed that EGF induced constitutive pre-mRNA splicing. Further analysis of phosphoproteomics data identified multiple CDK1/2 substrates in pre-mRNA splicing-related proteins, and both CDK1/2 inhibitors and CDK1/2 knockdowns reduced EGF-regulated pre-mRNA splicing. In conclusion, the results of the present study provide evidence that CDK1/2 participate in the regulation of constitutive pre-mRNA splicing by EGF stimulation in MDA-MB-468 cells. In this study, we successfully carried out a survey of nuclear phosphorylation changes in response to EGF stimulation. The results from the functional category analysis and pre-mRNA splicing assay strongly indicated that EGFR activation increased constitutive pre-mRNA splicing in MDA-MB-468 cells, revealing additional role of EGFR on regulation of mRNA maturation beyond alternative pre-mRNA splicing reported by previous studies. Furthermore, we found that CDK1/2 participated in constitutive pre-mRNA splicing regulation by EGF in MDA-MB-468 cells. Our study provides new knowledge for understanding the regulation of constitutive pre-mRNA splicing by EGF stimulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. RNA-binding proteins of the NXF (nuclear export factor) family and their connection with the cytoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamon, L A; Ginanova, V R; Kliver, S F; Yakimova, A O; Atsapkina, A A; Golubkova, E V

    2017-04-01

    The mutual relationship between mRNA and the cytoskeleton can be seen from two points of view. On the one hand, the cytoskeleton is necessary for mRNA trafficking and anchoring to subcellular domains. On the other hand, cytoskeletal growth and rearrangement require the translation of mRNAs that are connected to the cytoskeleton. β-actin mRNA localization may influence dynamic changes in the actin cytoskeleton. In the cytoplasm, long-lived mRNAs exist in the form of RNP (ribonucleoprotein) complexes, where they interact with RNA-binding proteins, including NXF (Nuclear eXport Factor). Dm NXF1 is an evolutionarily conserved protein in Drosophila melanogaster that has orthologs in different animals. The universal function of nxf1 genes is the nuclear export of different mRNAs in various organisms. In this mini-review, we briefly discuss the evidence demonstrating that Dm NXF1 fulfils not only universal but also specialized cytoplasmic functions. This protein is detected not only in the nucleus but also in the cytoplasm. It is a component of neuronal granules. Dm NXF1 marks nuclear division spindles during early embryogenesis and the dense body on one side of the elongated spermatid nuclei. The characteristic features of sbr mutants (sbr(10) and sbr(5) ) are impairment of chromosome segregation and spindle formation anomalies during female meiosis. sbr(12) mutant sterile males with immobile spermatozoa exhibit disturbances in the axoneme, mitochondrial derivatives and cytokinesis. These data allow us to propose that the Dm NXF1 proteins transport certain mRNAs in neurites and interact with localized mRNAs that are necessary for dynamic changes of the cytoskeleton. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Multi-parameter Evaluation of the Heterogeneity of Circulating Tumor Cells Using Integrated RNA in situ Hybridization and Immunocytochemical Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongqi Wu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cells (CTCs are routinely identified as cytokeratin (CK positive, epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM positive and CD45 negative, and are enriched based on EpCAM. However, there are a number of methodological challenges regarding both isolation and characterization of these rare CTCs including: downregulation or absence of EpCAM in a variety of solid tumors leading to the omission of subpopulations of CTCs; difficulties in analyzing RNA and protein targets in CTCs due to the rarity of these cells, low levels of targets and technological limitations of visualizing the targets of interest on each individual cell. Building on our previous CTC research on CD45-based negative magnetic separation and four-color fluorescent immunocytochemical (ICC staining, RNA in situ hybridization (ISH was applied to fluorescently target mRNA sequences corresponding to tumor-related genes at the single CTC level. Multiple categories of markers are targeted including cytokeratin (CK, human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER family markers, Hedgehog pathway markers, human papillomavirus (HPV markers and protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5. In addition, an integrated method of RNA ISH and fluorescent ICC staining was developed to visualize CTCs on both mRNA and protein levels. The robustness of the integrated co-ICC and RNA ISH staining was demonstrated by a series of tests on representative tumor markers of different categories. The integrated staining can incorporate the advantages of both RNA ISH and fluorescent ICC staining and provide more intense signals and more specific bindings. With this integrated staining methodology, distinct staining patterns were applied in this report to facilitate the searching and characterization of rare subgroups of CTCs. These results support the existence of diverse groups of CTCs at both protein and mRNA transcript levels and provide an analytical tool for the research on CTCs of rare subgroups.

  7. Human genes for U2 small nuclear RNA map to a major adenovirus 12 modification site on chromosome 17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, V; Ares, M; Weiner, A M; Francke, U

    U2 RNA is one of the abundant, highly conserved species of small nuclear RNA (snRNA) molecules implicated in RNA processing. As is typical of mammalian snRNAs, human U1 and U2 are each encoded by a multigene family. In the human genome, defective copies of the genes (pseudogenes) far outnumber the authentic genes. The majority or all of the 35 to 100 bona fide U1 genes have at least 20 kilobases (kb) of nearly perfect 5' and 3' flanking homology in common with each other; these U1 genes are clustered loosely in chromosome band 1p36 (refs 5, 7) with intergenic distances exceeding 44 kb. In contrast, the 10 to 20 U2 genes are clustered tightly in a virtually perfect tandem array which has a strict 6-kb repeating unit. We report here the assignment, by in situ hybridization, of the U2 gene cluster to chromosome 17, bands q21-q22. Surprisingly, this region is one of three major adenovirus 12 modification sites which undergo chromosome decondensation ('uncoiling') in permissive human cells infected by highly oncogenic strains of adenovirus. The two other major modification sites, 1p36 and 1q21, coincide with the locations of U1 genes and class I U1 pseudogenes, respectively. We suggest that snRNA genes are the major targets of viral chromosome modification.

  8. The human cap-binding complex is functionally connected to the nuclear RNA exosome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter Refsing; Domanski, Michal; Kristiansen, Maiken S

    2013-01-01

    of combinatorial depletion of CBCN and exosome components underscore the functional relevance of CBC-exosome bridging at the level of target RNA. Specifically, CBCA suppresses read-through products of several RNA families by promoting their transcriptional termination. We suggest that the RNP 5' cap links...

  9. Premature translation of protamine 1 mRNA causes precocious nuclear condensation and arrests spermatid differentiation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K; Haugen, H S; Clegg, C H; Braun, R E

    1995-01-01

    Translational control is a major form of regulating gene expression during gametogenesis and early development in many organisms. We sought to determine whether the translational repression of the protamine 1 (Prm1) mRNA is necessary for normal spermatid differentiation in mice. To accomplish this we generated transgenic animals that carry a Prm1 transgene lacking its normal 3' untranslated region. Premature translation of Prm1 mRNA caused precocious condensation of spermatid nuclear DNA, abnormal head morphogenesis, and incomplete processing of Prm2 protein. Premature accumulation of Prm1 within syncytial spermatids in mice hemizygous for the transgene caused dominant male sterility, which in some cases was accompanied by a complete arrest in spermatid differentiation. These results demonstrate that correct temporal synthesis of Prm1 is necessary for the transition from nucleohistones to nucleoprotamines. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8618919

  10. Importance of introns in the growth regulation of mRNA levels of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen gene.

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    The steady-state mRNA levels of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) gene are growth regulated. We have begun to identify the elements in the human PCNA gene that participate in its growth regulation by transfecting appropriate constructs in BALB/c3T3 cells. The results can be summarized as follows. (i) The 400 base pairs of the 5'-flanking sequence of the human PCNA gene upstream of the preferred cap site are sufficient for directing expression of a heterologous cDNA (S. Travali, D....

  11. “Dot COM”, a Nuclear Transit Center for the Primary piRNA Pathway in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasset, Emilie; Eymery, Angeline; Zhang, Liang; Mteirek, Rana; Jensen, Silke; Rong, Yikang S.; Vaury, Chantal

    2013-01-01

    The piRNA pathway protects genomes by silencing mobile elements. Despite advances in understanding the processing events that generate piRNAs for silencing, little is known about how primary transcripts are transported from their genomic clusters to their processing centers. Using a model of the Drosophila COM/flamenco locus in ovarian somatic cells, we identified a prominent nuclear structure called Dot COM, which is enriched in long transcripts from piRNA clusters but located far from their transcription sites. Remarkably, transcripts from multiple clusters accumulate at Dot COM, which is often juxtaposed with Yb-bodies, the cytoplasmic processing centers for cluster transcripts. Genetic evidence suggests that the accumulation of precursor transcripts at Dot COM represents one of the most upstream events in the piRNA pathway. Our results provide new insights into the initial steps of the piRNA pathway, and open up a new research area important for a complete understanding of this conserved pathway. PMID:24039799

  12. Gene suppression via U1 small nuclear RNA interference (U1i) machinery using oligonucleotides containing 2'-modified-4'-thionucleosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Yusaku; Yamazaki, Naoshi; Tarashima, Noriko; Furukawa, Kazuhiro; Takiguchi, Yoshiharu; Itoh, Kohji; Minakawa, Noriaki

    2013-09-01

    Gene suppression via U1 small nuclear RNA interference (U1i) is considered to be one of the most attractive approaches, and takes the place of general antisense, RNA interference (RNAi), and anti-micro RNA machineries. Since the U1i can be induced by short oligonucleotides (ONs), namely U1 adaptors consisting of a 'target domain' and a 'U1 domain', we prepared adaptor ONs using 2'-modified-4'-thionucleosides developed by our group, and evaluated their U1i activity. As a result, the desired gene suppression via U1i was observed in ONs prepared as a combination of 2'-fluoro-4'-thionucleoside and 2'-fluoronucleoside units as well as only 2'-fluoronucleoside units, while those prepared as combination of 2'-OMe nucleoside/2'-OMe-4'-thionucleoside and 2'-fluoronucleoside units did not show significant activity. Measurement of Tm values indicated that a higher hybridization ability of adaptor ONs with complementary RNA is one of the important factors to show potent U1i activity.

  13. Intragenomic heterogeneity in the 16S rRNA genes of Flavobacterium columnare and relevance to genomovar assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flavobacterium columnare is the causative agent of columnaris disease which severely impacts channel catfish production in the USA and may be emerging as an important pathogen in the rainbow trout industry. The 16S rRNA gene is a housekeeping gene commonly used for bacterial taxonomy and genotyping...

  14. Intragenomic heterogeneity in the 16S rRNA genes of Flavobacterium columnare and standard protocol for genomovar assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetic variability in 16S rRNA gene sequences has been demonstrated among isolates of Flavobacterium columnare and a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) assay is available for genetic typing this important fish pathogen. Interpretation of restriction patterns can be difficult due to th...

  15. Intragenomic heterogeneity in the 16S rRNA genes of Flavobacterium columnare and relevance to genomovar assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetic variability in 16S rRNA gene sequences has been demonstrated among isolates of Flavobacterium columnare and a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) assay is available for genetic typing this important fish pathogen. Interpretation of restriction patterns can be difficult due to th...

  16. Nuclear sequestration of COL1A1 mRNA transcript associated with type I osteogenesis imperfecta (OI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Primorac, D.; Stover, M.L.; McKinstry, M.B. [and others

    1994-09-01

    Previously we identified an OI type I patient with a splice donor mutation that resulted in intron 26 retention instead of exon skipping and sequestration of normal levels of the mutant transcript in the nuclear compartment. Intron retention was consistent with the exon definition hypothesis for splice site selection since the size of the exon-intron-exon unit was less than 300 bp. Furthermore, the retained intron contained in-frame stop codons which is thought to cause the mutant RNA to remain within the nucleus rather than appearing in the cytoplasm. To test these hypotheses, genomic fragments containing the normal sequence or the donor mutation were cloned into a collagen minigene and expressed in stably tansfected NIH 3T3 cells. None of the modifications to the normal intron altered the level of RNA that accumulated in the cytoplasm, as expected. However none of the modifications to the mutant intron allowed accumulation of normal levels of mRNA in the cytoplasm. Moreover, in contrast to our findings in the patient`s cells only low levels of mutant transcript were found in the nucleus; a fraction of the transcript did appear in the cytoplasm which had spliced the mutant donor site correctly. Nuclear run-on experiments demonstrated equal levels of transcription from each transgene. Expression of another donor mutation known to cause in-frame exon skipping in OI type IV was accurately reproduced in the minigene in transfected 3T3 cells. Our experience suggests that either mechanism can lead to formation of a null allele possibly related to the type of splicing events surrounding the potential stop codons. Understanding the rules governing inactivation of a collagen RNA transcript may be important in designing a strategy to inactivate a dominate negative mutation associated with the more severe forms of OI.

  17. Effect of epidermal growth factor on the labeling of the various RNA species and of nuclear proteins in primary rat astroglial cell cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avola, R.; Condorelli, D.F.; Turpeenoja, L.; Ingrao, F.; Reale, S.; Ragusa, N.; Giuffrida Stella, A.M.

    1988-05-01

    This study investigated the effects of epidermal growth factor (EGF) on the labeling of various RNA species and of nuclear proteins in primary rat astroglial cell cultures. After 12 hours of EGF treatment in serum-free medium or chemically defined medium, significant increase in RNA labeling, and also in acid-soluble radioactivity and RNA content, was observed. The ratio RNA/DNA was significantly higher in EGF-treated cultures compared with controls. Ribosomal RNAs (28S and 18S), polyadenylated, and nonpolyadenylated RNAs showed a higher specific radioactivity in EGF-treated cultures. Among the nuclear proteins, the labeling of basic proteins was enhanced by EGF treatment, whereas that of total nuclear acidic protein (NHPs) was less modified, except for some NHPs separated by gel electrophoresis with a molecular weight (MW) approximately 95-83 and 44 kd, which were significantly more labeled in EGF-treated cultures.

  18. Nuclear transfer protocol affects messenger RNA expression patterns in cloned bovine blastocysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrenzycki, C; Wells, D; Herrmann, D; Miller, A; Oliver, J; Tervit, R; Niemann, H

    2001-07-01

    The successful production of embryos by nuclear transfer (NT) employing cultured somatic donor cells depends upon a variety of factors. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects 1) of two different activation protocols, 2) the use of quiescent or nonquiescent donor cells (G(0) or G(1) of the cell cycle), and 3) passage number of donor cells on the relative abundance (RA) of eight specific mRNAs (DNA methyltransferase, DNMT; mammalian achaete-scute homologue, Mash2; glucose transporter-1, Glut-1; heat shock protein 70.1, Hsp; desmocollin II, Dc II; E-cadherin, E-cad; interferon tau, IF; insulin-like growth factor 2 receptor, Igf2r) in single blastocysts employing a semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay. The results were compared with those for their in vitro (IVP)- and in vivo-generated noncloned counterparts. In experiment 1, employing either FBA (fusion before activation) or AFS (fusion and activation simultaneously) to generate NT blastocysts, Hsp mRNAs were not found in NT embryos from either protocol, whereas Hsp transcripts were detectable in IVP embryos. The relative abundance (RA) of IF transcripts was significantly increased in the AFS and IVP groups compared to the FBA treatment. In experiment 2, the use of either G(0) or G(1) donor cells to produce cloned embryos both significantly reduced the relative amount of DNMT transcripts and significantly increased the RA of Mash2 compared to the IVP embryos. In addition, IF transcript levels were significantly elevated in NT blastocysts employing G(1) donor cells for NT compared to IVP embryos and those generated using G(0) cells. In experiment 3, donor cells, either from passsage 5/6 or 8, were employed for NT. DNMT transcripts were significantly decreased, whereas Mash2 transcripts were significantly increased in both NT groups compared to their IVP counterparts. The amount of IF mRNA was significantly higher in P8-derived than in P5/6 and IVP embryos. In

  19. Functional dissection of nuclear envelope mRNA translocation system: effects of phorbol ester and a monoclonal antibody recognizing cytoskeletal structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, H C; Diehl-Seifert, B; Rottmann, M; Messer, R; Bryson, B A; Agutter, P S; Müller, W E

    1988-03-01

    Unidirectional transport of poly(A)-containing mRNA [poly(A)+ mRNA] through the nuclear envelope pore complex is thought to be an energy (ATP or GTP)-dependent process which involves a nuclear envelope nucleoside triphosphatase (NTPase). In the intact envelope, this enzyme is regulatable by poly(A) binding and by poly(A)-dependent phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of other components of the mRNA translocation system, which are as yet unidentified. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were elicited against the poly(A) binding nuclear envelope fraction isolated from rat liver. The mAbs were screened for their modulatory effects on mRNA transport in vitro. One stable clone decreased the efflux of rapidly labeled RNA and of one specific mRNA (ovalbumin) from isolated nuclei. It increased the binding of poly(A) to the envelope and increased the maximal catalytic rate of the NTPase, but it did not alter the apparent Km of the enzyme or the extent of its stimulation by poly(A). The nuclear envelope-associated protein kinase that down-regulates the NTPase was inhibited by the antibody, while other protein kinases were not affected. Because both the NTPase and mRNA efflux were inhibited by the tumor promoter, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate, the sensitive kinase is probably protein kinase C. Protein kinase C was found to be associated with the isolated nuclear envelope. The antibody reacted with both a Mr 83,000 and a Mr 65,000 nuclear envelope polypeptide from rat liver and other tissues. By immunofluorescence microscopy in CV-1 cells, the antibody localized to the nuclear envelope and, in addition, to cytoplasmic filaments which show some superposition with the microfilament network.

  20. Expression of TGF-β2 mRNA and PCNA, FN Protein in Lens Epithelial Cells in Age-related Nuclear and Cortex Cataract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    By using RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry, the expressions of transforming growth factor β2 (TGF-β2) mRNA, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and fibronection (FN) protein in lens epithelial cells (LECs) of age-related nuclear and cortex cataract were detected and compared. The results of RT-PCR revealed that the expression of TGF-β2 mRNA was higher in cortex cataract than in nuclear cataract. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that the expression of PCNA protein was lower and the expression of FN protein was higher in cortex cataract than in nuclear cataract. It was suggested that TGF-β2, PCNA and FN might take important parts in the process of age-related cataract. Cortex cataract was related to the transdifferentiation of LECs, and nuclear cataract to the proliferation of LECs.

  1. cDNA cloning, mRNA distribution and heterogeneity, chromosomal location, and RFLP analysis of human osteopontin (OPN)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Young, M F; Kerr, J M; Termine, J D

    1990-01-01

    A human osteopontin (OP) cDNA was isolated from a library made from primary cultures of human bone cells. The distribution of osteopontin mRNA in human tissues was investigated by Northern analysis and showed that the human message was predominant in cultures of bone cells and in decidua cells...... osteopontin cDNA indicated that the gene is a single copy with an approximate length of 5.4-8.2 kb....

  2. 5'-heterogeneity of glucocorticoid receptor messenger RNA is tissue specific: differential regulation of variant transcripts by early-life events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, J A; Lyons, V; Jacobson, M D; Noble, J; Diorio, J; Nyirenda, M; Weaver, S; Ester, W; Yau, J L; Meaney, M J; Seckl, J R; Chapman, K E

    2000-04-01

    Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) gene expression is regulated in a complex tissue-specific manner, notably by early-life environmental events that program tissue GR levels. We have identified and characterized several new rat GR mRNAs. All encode a common protein, but differ in their 5'-leader sequences as a consequence of alternate splicing of, potentially, 11 different exon 1 sequences. Most are located in a 3-kb CpG island, upstream of exon 2, that exhibits substantial promoter activity in transfected cells. Ribonuclease (RNase) protection analysis demonstrated significant levels of six alternate exons 1 in vivo in rat, with differences between liver, hippocampus, and thymus reflecting tissue-specific differences in promoter activity. Two of the alternate exons 1 (exons 1(6) and 1(10)) were expressed in all tissues examined, together present in 77-87% of total GR mRNA. The remaining GR transcripts contained tissue-specific alternate first exons. Importantly, tissue-specific first exon usage was altered by perinatal environmental manipulations. Postnatal handling, which permanently increases GR in the hippocampus, causing attenuation of stress responses, selectively elevated GR mRNA containing the hippocampus-specific exon 1(7). Prenatal glucocorticoid exposure, which increases hepatic GR expression and produces adult hyperglycemia, decreased the proportion of hepatic GR mRNA containing the predominant exon 1(10), suggesting an increase in a minor exon 1 variant. Such tissue specificity of promoter usage allows differential GR regulation and programming.

  3. Nuclear accumulation of CDH1 mRNA in hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghafoory, S; Mehrabi, A; Hafezi, M; Cheng, X; Breitkopf-Heinlein, K; Hick, M; Huichalaf, M; Herbel, V; Saffari, A; Wölfl, S

    2015-01-01

    Expression of E-cadherin has a central role in maintaining epithelial morphology. In solid tumors, reduction of E-cadherin results in disruption of intercellular contacts. Consequently, cells lose adhesive properties and gain more invasive mesenchymal properties. Nevertheless, the mechanism of E-cadherin regulation is not completely elucidated. Here we analyzed the distribution of E-cadherin expression at the cell level in human hepatocellular carcinoma, in which human liver paraffin blocks from 25 hepatocellular carcinoma patients were prepared from cancerous (CA) and noncancerous areas (NCA). In situ hybridization (ISH) was performed to detect E-cadherin and hypoxia-induced factor-1α (HIF1α) mRNAs and immunohistochemistry to stain E-cadherin protein. In parallel, RNA was extracted from CA and NCA, and E-cadherin and HIF1α were quantified by quantitative reverse transcription PCR. ISH revealed abundant E-cadherin mRNA in nuclei of hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HCCs), whereas immunohistochemistry showed depletion of E-cadherin protein from these areas. In sections of NCA, E-cadherin mRNA was also found in the cytosol, and E-cadherin protein was detected on the membrane of cells. Experiments in cell lines confirmed E-cadherin mRNA in nuclei of cells negative for E-cadherin protein. HIF1α expression is elevated in CAs, which is associated with a clear cytosolic staining for this mRNA. Our results demonstrate that E-caderhin mRNA is selectively retained in nuclei of HCCs, whereas other mRNAs are still exported, suggesting that translocation of E-cadherin mRNA from nuclei to cytoplasm has a role in regulating E-cadherin protein levels during epithelial mesenchymal transition. PMID:26029826

  4. Discovery of a new RNA-containing nuclear structure in UVC-induced apoptotic cells by integrated laser electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karreman, Matthia A; Agronskaia, Alexandra V; Verkleij, Arie J; Cremers, Fons F M; Gerritsen, Hans C; Humbel, Bruno M

    2009-05-01

    Treatment of cells with UVC radiation leads to the formation of DNA cross-links which, if not repaired, can lead to apoptosis. gamma-H2AX and cleaved caspase 3 are proteins formed during UVC-induced DNA damage and apoptosis respectively. The present study sets out to identify early morphological markers of apoptosis using a new method of correlative microscopy, ILEM (integrated laser electron microscopy). Cleaved caspase 3 and gamma-H2AX were immunofluorescently labelled to mark the cells of interest. These cells were subsequently searched in the fluorescence mode of the ILEM and further analysed at high resolution with TEM (transmission electron microscopy). Following the treatment of HUVECs (human umbilical vein endothelial cells) with UVC radiation, in the majority of the cells gamma-H2AX was formed, whereas only in a subset of cells caspase 3 was activated. In severely damaged cells with high levels of gamma-H2AX a round, electron-dense nuclear structure was found, which was hitherto not identified in UV-stressed cells. This structure exists only in nuclei of cells containing cleaved caspase 3 and is present during all stages of the apoptotic process. Energy-loss imaging showed that the nuclear structure accumulates phosphorus, indicating that it is rich in nucleic acids. Because the nuclear structure did not label for DNA and was not affected by regressive EDTA treatment, it is suggested that the UV-induced nuclear structure contains a high amount of RNA. Because the UV-induced nuclear structure was only found in cells labelled for cleaved caspase 3 it is proposed as an electron microscopic marker for all stages of apoptosis. Such a marker will especially facilitate the screening for early apoptotic cells, which lack the well-known hallmarks of apoptosis within a cell population. It also raises new questions on the mechanisms involved in the UV-induced apoptotic pathway.

  5. Resveratrol Decreases TXNIP mRNA and Protein Nuclear Expressions With an Arterial Function Improvement in Old Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedarida, Tatiana; Baron, Stephanie; Vibert, Françoise; Ayer, Audrey; Henrion, Daniel; Thioulouse, Elizabeth; Marchiol, Carmen; Beaudeux, Jean-Louis; Cottart, Charles-Henry; Nivet-Antoine, Valerie

    2016-06-01

    Aging leads to a high prevalence of glucose intolerance and cardiovascular diseases, with oxidative stress playing a potential role. Resveratrol has shown promising effects on glucose tolerance and tends to improve endothelial function in elderly patients. Thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) was recently proposed as a potential link connecting glucose metabolism to oxidative stress. Here, we investigated the resveratrol-induced improvement of arterial aging phenotype in old mice and the expression of aortic TXNIP. Using an in vivo model of old mice with or without 3-month resveratrol treatment, we investigated the effects of resveratrol on age-related impairments from a cardiovascular Doppler analysis, to a molecular level, by studying inflammation and oxidative stress factors. We found a dual effect of resveratrol, with a decrease of age-related glucose intolerance and oxidative stress imbalance leading to reduced matrix remodeling that forestalls arterial aging phenotype in terms of intima-media thickness and arterial distensibility. These results provide the first evidence that aortic TXNIP mRNA and protein nuclear expressions are increased in the arterial aging and decreased by resveratrol treatment. In conclusion, we demonstrated that resveratrol helped to restore several aging impaired processes in old mice, with a decrease of aortic TXNIP mRNA and protein nuclear expressions.

  6. Picornaviruses and nuclear functions: targeting a cellular compartment distinct from the replication site of a positive-strand RNA virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dylan eFlather

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The compartmentalization of DNA replication and gene transcription in the nucleus and protein production in the cytoplasm is a defining feature of eukaryotic cells. The nucleus functions to maintain the integrity of the nuclear genome of the cell and to control gene expression based on intracellular and environmental signals received through the cytoplasm. The spatial separation of the major processes that lead to the expression of protein-coding genes establishes the necessity of a transport network to allow biomolecules to translocate between these two regions of the cell. The nucleocytoplasmic transport network is therefore essential for regulating normal cellular functioning. The Picornaviridae virus family is one of many viral families that disrupt the nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of cells to promote viral replication. Picornaviruses contain positive-sense, single-stranded RNA genomes and replicate in the cytoplasm of infected cells. As a result of the limited coding capacity of these viruses, cellular proteins are required by these intracellular parasites for both translation and genomic RNA replication. Being of messenger RNA polarity, a picornavirus genome can immediately be translated upon entering the cell cytoplasm. However, the replication of viral RNA requires the activity of RNA-binding proteins, many of which function in host gene expression, and are consequently localized to the nucleus. As a result, picornaviruses disrupt nucleocytoplasmic trafficking to exploit protein functions normally localized to a different cellular compartment from which they translate their genome to facilitate efficient replication. Furthermore, picornavirus proteins are also known to enter the nucleus of infected cells to limit host-cell transcription and down-regulate innate antiviral responses. The interactions of picornavirus proteins and host-cell nuclei are extensive, required for a productive infection, and are the focus of this review.

  7. Picornaviruses and nuclear functions: targeting a cellular compartment distinct from the replication site of a positive-strand RNA virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flather, Dylan; Semler, Bert L

    2015-01-01

    The compartmentalization of DNA replication and gene transcription in the nucleus and protein production in the cytoplasm is a defining feature of eukaryotic cells. The nucleus functions to maintain the integrity of the nuclear genome of the cell and to control gene expression based on intracellular and environmental signals received through the cytoplasm. The spatial separation of the major processes that lead to the expression of protein-coding genes establishes the necessity of a transport network to allow biomolecules to translocate between these two regions of the cell. The nucleocytoplasmic transport network is therefore essential for regulating normal cellular functioning. The Picornaviridae virus family is one of many viral families that disrupt the nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of cells to promote viral replication. Picornaviruses contain positive-sense, single-stranded RNA genomes and replicate in the cytoplasm of infected cells. As a result of the limited coding capacity of these viruses, cellular proteins are required by these intracellular parasites for both translation and genomic RNA replication. Being of messenger RNA polarity, a picornavirus genome can immediately be translated upon entering the cell cytoplasm. However, the replication of viral RNA requires the activity of RNA-binding proteins, many of which function in host gene expression, and are consequently localized to the nucleus. As a result, picornaviruses disrupt nucleocytoplasmic trafficking to exploit protein functions normally localized to a different cellular compartment from which they translate their genome to facilitate efficient replication. Furthermore, picornavirus proteins are also known to enter the nucleus of infected cells to limit host-cell transcription and down-regulate innate antiviral responses. The interactions of picornavirus proteins and host-cell nuclei are extensive, required for a productive infection, and are the focus of this review.

  8. A heterogeneous population of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial mRNAs is present in the axons of primary sympathetic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschrafi, Armaz; Kar, Amar N; Gale, Jenna R; Elkahloun, Abdel G; Vargas, Jose Noberto S; Sales, Naomi; Wilson, Gabriel; Tompkins, Miranda; Gioio, Anthony E; Kaplan, Barry B

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondria are enriched in subcellular regions of high energy consumption, such as axons and pre-synaptic nerve endings. Accumulating evidence suggests that mitochondrial maintenance in these distal structural/functional domains of the neuron depends on the "in-situ" translation of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial mRNAs. In support of this notion, we recently provided evidence for the axonal targeting of several nuclear-encoded mRNAs, such as cytochrome c oxidase, subunit 4 (COXIV) and ATP synthase, H+ transporting and mitochondrial Fo complex, subunit C1 (ATP5G1). Furthermore, we showed that axonal trafficking and local translation of these mRNAs plays a critical role in the generation of axonal ATP. Using a global gene expression analysis, this study identified a highly diverse population of nuclear-encoded mRNAs that were enriched in the axon and presynaptic nerve terminals. Among this population of mRNAs, fifty seven were found to be at least two-fold more abundant in distal axons, as compared with the parental cell bodies. Gene ontology analysis of the nuclear-encoded mitochondrial mRNAs suggested functions for these gene products in molecular and biological processes, including but not limited to oxidoreductase and electron carrier activity and proton transport. Based on these results, we postulate that local translation of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial mRNAs present in the axons may play an essential role in local energy production and maintenance of mitochondrial function.

  9. Genome analysis reveals interplay between 5'UTR introns and nuclear mRNA export for secretory and mitochondrial genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Can Cenik

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In higher eukaryotes, messenger RNAs (mRNAs are exported from the nucleus to the cytoplasm via factors deposited near the 5' end of the transcript during splicing. The signal sequence coding region (SSCR can support an alternative mRNA export (ALREX pathway that does not require splicing. However, most SSCR-containing genes also have introns, so the interplay between these export mechanisms remains unclear. Here we support a model in which the furthest upstream element in a given transcript, be it an intron or an ALREX-promoting SSCR, dictates the mRNA export pathway used. We also experimentally demonstrate that nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes can use the ALREX pathway. Thus, ALREX can also be supported by nucleotide signals within mitochondrial-targeting sequence coding regions (MSCRs. Finally, we identified and experimentally verified novel motifs associated with the ALREX pathway that are shared by both SSCRs and MSCRs. Our results show strong correlation between 5' untranslated region (5'UTR intron presence/absence and sequence features at the beginning of the coding region. They also suggest that genes encoding secretory and mitochondrial proteins share a common regulatory mechanism at the level of mRNA export.

  10. Ancient Origin of the U2 Small Nuclear RNA Gene-Targeting Non-LTR Retrotransposons Utopia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji K Kojima

    Full Text Available Most non-long terminal repeat (non-LTR retrotransposons encoding a restriction-like endonuclease show target-specific integration into repetitive sequences such as ribosomal RNA genes and microsatellites. However, only a few target-specific lineages of non-LTR retrotransposons are distributed widely and no lineage is found across the eukaryotic kingdoms. Here we report the most widely distributed lineage of target sequence-specific non-LTR retrotransposons, designated Utopia. Utopia is found in three supergroups of eukaryotes: Amoebozoa, SAR, and Opisthokonta. Utopia is inserted into a specific site of U2 small nuclear RNA genes with different strength of specificity for each family. Utopia families from oomycetes and wasps show strong target specificity while only a small number of Utopia copies from reptiles are flanked with U2 snRNA genes. Oomycete Utopia families contain an "archaeal" RNase H domain upstream of reverse transcriptase (RT, which likely originated from a plant RNase H gene. Analysis of Utopia from oomycetes indicates that multiple lineages of Utopia have been maintained inside of U2 genes with few copy numbers. Phylogenetic analysis of RT suggests the monophyly of Utopia, and it likely dates back to the early evolution of eukaryotes.

  11. Ancient Origin of the U2 Small Nuclear RNA Gene-Targeting Non-LTR Retrotransposons Utopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Kenji K; Jurka, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

    Most non-long terminal repeat (non-LTR) retrotransposons encoding a restriction-like endonuclease show target-specific integration into repetitive sequences such as ribosomal RNA genes and microsatellites. However, only a few target-specific lineages of non-LTR retrotransposons are distributed widely and no lineage is found across the eukaryotic kingdoms. Here we report the most widely distributed lineage of target sequence-specific non-LTR retrotransposons, designated Utopia. Utopia is found in three supergroups of eukaryotes: Amoebozoa, SAR, and Opisthokonta. Utopia is inserted into a specific site of U2 small nuclear RNA genes with different strength of specificity for each family. Utopia families from oomycetes and wasps show strong target specificity while only a small number of Utopia copies from reptiles are flanked with U2 snRNA genes. Oomycete Utopia families contain an "archaeal" RNase H domain upstream of reverse transcriptase (RT), which likely originated from a plant RNase H gene. Analysis of Utopia from oomycetes indicates that multiple lineages of Utopia have been maintained inside of U2 genes with few copy numbers. Phylogenetic analysis of RT suggests the monophyly of Utopia, and it likely dates back to the early evolution of eukaryotes.

  12. GTP-dependent binding and nuclear transport of RNA polymerase II by Npa3 protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staresincic, Lidija; Walker, Jane; Dirac-Svejstrup, A Barbara

    2011-01-01

    transport of RNAPII. Surprisingly, we were unable to detect interactions between Npa3 and proteins in the classical importin a/ß pathway for nuclear import. Interestingly, Npa3-RNAPII binding is significantly increased by the addition of GTP or its slowly hydrolyzable analogue guanosine 5'-3-O...

  13. Genotypic heterogeneity based on 18S-rRNA gene sequences among Acanthamoeba isolates from clinical samples in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Cave, David; D' Alfonso, Rossella; Dussey Comlavi, Kodjo A; D' Orazi, Carlo; Monno, Rosa; Berrilli, Federica

    2014-11-01

    Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) is an ocular disease caused by members of a genus of free-living amoebae and it is associated predominantly with contact lens (CL) use. This study reports 55 cases of AK diagnosed in Italy. Genotype identification was carried out by PCR assay followed by sequence analysis of the 18S rRNA gene using the genus specific primers JDP1 and JDP2. Genotype assignment was based on phenetic analysis of the ASA.S1 subset of the small-subunit rRNA gene sequences. The material has been collected at the Polyclinic Tor Vergata of Rome for a total of 19 isolates and at the Polyclinic Hospital of Bari (36 isolates). Thirty-three out of the 55 genetically characterized isolates were assigned to the genotype T4. Ten isolates were identified as belonging to the genotype T15 thus confirming the first association between the genotype T15 and human amoebic keratitis previously described from the same area. We underline the occurrence of the genotype T3 and T11 identified for the first time in the country.

  14. The exosome associates cotranscriptionally with the nascent pre-mRNP through interactions with heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hessle, Viktoria; Björk, Petra; Sokolowski, Marcus

    2009-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells have evolved quality control mechanisms to degrade aberrant mRNA molecules and prevent the synthesis of defective proteins that could be deleterious for the cell. The exosome, a protein complex with ribonuclease activity, is a key player in quality control. An early quality...... checkpoint takes place cotranscriptionally but little is known about the molecular mechanisms by which the exosome is recruited to the transcribed genes. Here we study the core exosome subunit Rrp4 in two insect model systems, Chironomus and Drosophila. We show that a significant fraction of Rrp4...... is associated with the nascent pre-mRNPs and that a specific mRNA-binding protein, Hrp59/hnRNP M, interacts in vivo with multiple exosome subunits. Depletion of Hrp59 by RNA interference reduces the levels of Rrp4 at transcription sites, which suggests that Hrp59 is needed for the exosome to stably interact...

  15. msl2 mRNA is bound by free nuclear MSL complex in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Anna-Mia; Allgardsson, Anders; Stenberg, Per; Larsson, Jan

    2011-01-01

    In Drosophila, the global increase in transcription from the male X chromosome to compensate for its monosomy is mediated by the male-specific lethal (MSL) complex consisting of five proteins and two non-coding RNAs, roX1 and roX2. After an initial sequence-dependent recognition by the MSL complex of 150–300 high affinity sites, the spread to the majority of the X-linked genes depends on local MSL-complex concentration and active transcription. We have explored whether any additional RNA species are associated with the MSL complex. No additional roX RNA species were found, but a strong association was found between a spliced and poly-adenylated msl2 RNA and the MSL complex. Based on our results, we propose a model in which a non-chromatin-associated partial or complete MSL-complex titrates newly transcribed msl2 mRNA and thus regulates the amount of available MSL complex by feedback. This represents a novel mechanism in chromatin structure regulation. PMID:21551218

  16. NVL2, a nucleolar AAA-ATPase, is associated with the nuclear exosome and is involved in pre-rRNA processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikatsu, Yuki [Department of Life Systems, Institute of Technology and Science, The University of Tokushima Graduate School, Tokushima 770-8506 (Japan); Ishida, Yo-ichi; Sudo, Haruka [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, Meiji Pharmaceutical University, Kiyose, Tokyo 204-8588 (Japan); Yuasa, Keizo; Tsuji, Akihiko [Department of Life Systems, Institute of Technology and Science, The University of Tokushima Graduate School, Tokushima 770-8506 (Japan); Nagahama, Masami, E-mail: nagahama@my-pharm.ac.jp [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, Meiji Pharmaceutical University, Kiyose, Tokyo 204-8588 (Japan)

    2015-08-28

    Nuclear VCP-like 2 (NVL2) is a member of the chaperone-like AAA-ATPase family and is involved in the biosynthesis of 60S ribosomal subunits in mammalian cells. We previously showed the interaction of NVL2 with a DExD/H-box RNA helicase MTR4/DOB1, which is a known cofactor for an exoribonuclease complex, the exosome. This finding implicated NVL2 in RNA metabolic processes during ribosome biogenesis. In the present study, we found that a series of mutations within the ATPase domain of NVL2 causes a defect in pre-rRNA processing into mature 28S and 5.8S rRNAs. Co-immunoprecipitation analysis showed that NVL2 was associated with the nuclear exosome complex, which includes RRP6 as a nucleus-specific catalytic subunit. This interaction was prevented by depleting either MTR4 or RRP6, indicating their essential role in mediating this interaction with NVL2. Additionally, knockdown of MPP6, another cofactor for the nuclear exosome, also prevented the interaction by causing MTR4 to dissociate from the nuclear exosome. These results suggest that NVL2 is involved in pre-rRNA processing by associating with the nuclear exosome complex and that MPP6 is required for maintaining the integrity of this rRNA processing complex. - Highlights: • ATPase-deficient mutants of NVL2 have decreased pre-rRNA processing. • NVL2 associates with the nuclear exosome through interactions with MTR4 and RRP6. • MPP6 stabilizes MTR4-RRP6 interaction and allows NVL2 to interact with the complex.

  17. The Oncogenic Fusion Proteins SET-Nup214 and Sequestosome-1 (SQSTM1)-Nup214 Form Dynamic Nuclear Bodies and Differentially Affect Nuclear Protein and Poly(A)+ RNA Export.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Port, Sarah A; Mendes, Adélia; Valkova, Christina; Spillner, Christiane; Fahrenkrog, Birthe; Kaether, Christoph; Kehlenbach, Ralph H

    2016-10-28

    Genetic rearrangements are a hallmark of several forms of leukemia and can lead to oncogenic fusion proteins. One example of an affected chromosomal region is the gene coding for Nup214, a nucleoporin that localizes to the cytoplasmic side of the nuclear pore complex (NPC). We investigated two such fusion proteins, SET-Nup214 and SQSTM1 (sequestosome)-Nup214, both containing C-terminal portions of Nup214. SET-Nup214 nuclear bodies containing the nuclear export receptor CRM1 were observed in the leukemia cell lines LOUCY and MEGAL. Overexpression of SET-Nup214 in HeLa cells leads to the formation of similar nuclear bodies that recruit CRM1, export cargo proteins, and certain nucleoporins and concomitantly affect nuclear protein and poly(A)(+) RNA export. SQSTM1-Nup214, although mostly cytoplasmic, also forms nuclear bodies and inhibits nuclear protein but not poly(A)(+) RNA export. The interaction of the fusion proteins with CRM1 is RanGTP-dependent, as shown in co-immunoprecipitation experiments and binding assays. Further analysis revealed that the Nup214 parts mediate the inhibition of nuclear export, whereas the SET or SQSTM1 part determines the localization of the fusion protein and therefore the extent of the effect. SET-Nup214 nuclear bodies are highly mobile structures, which are in equilibrium with the nucleoplasm in interphase and disassemble during mitosis or upon treatment of cells with the CRM1-inhibitor leptomycin B. Strikingly, we found that nucleoporins can be released from nuclear bodies and reintegrated into existing NPC. Our results point to nuclear bodies as a means of preventing the formation of potentially insoluble and harmful protein aggregates that also may serve as storage compartments for nuclear transport factors.

  18. Molecular phylogenetics of the spider family Micropholcommatidae (Arachnida: Araneae) using nuclear rRNA genes (18S and 28S).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rix, Michael G; Harvey, Mark S; Roberts, J Dale

    2008-03-01

    The spider family Micropholcommatidae is an enigmatic taxon of uncertain limits and uncertain affinities. Various phylogenetic hypotheses have been proposed for the family, but these hypotheses have never been tested with a robust phylogenetic analysis. The existence of similar Australasian and New World taxa, the possibility of morphological convergence associated with extreme 'smallness', and the apparent paucity of synapomorphic morphological characters, have all clouded generic relationships in this group. We used fragments from two nuclear ribosomal RNA genes (18S and 28S) to test the monophyly and phylogenetic position of the Micropholcommatidae. The analyses incorporated 50 ingroup spider species, including 23 micropholcommatid species and representatives from 14 other spider families. Ribosomal RNA secondary structures were inferred for the V3-V5 region of the 18S rRNA gene, and Domain II of the 28S rRNA gene of Hickmania troglodytes [Higgins, E.T., Petterd, W.F., 1883. Description of a new cave-inhabiting spider, together with notes on mammalian remains from a recently discovered cave in the Chudleigh district. Pap. Proc. R. Soc. Tasman. 1882, 191-192]. These secondary structures were used to guide multiple sequence alignments, and determine the position and nature of indels in different taxa. Secondary structure information was also incorporated into a structurally partitioned rRNA analysis in MrBayes Version 3.1.2, using a doublet model of nucleotide substitution. This structurally partitioned rRNA analysis provided a less resolved but more conservative and informative estimate of phylogeny than an otherwise identical, unpartitioned rDNA analysis. With the exception of the Chilean species Teutoniella cekalovici [Platnick, N.I., Forster, R.R., 1986. On Teutoniella, an American genus of the spider family Micropholcommatidae (Araneae, Palpimanoidea). Am. Mus. Novit. 2854, 1-9], the family Micropholcommatidae was found to be monophyletic with three

  19. A general model for the evolution of nuclear pre-mRNA introns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, D A; Benkel, B F; Abukashawa, S M

    1989-03-07

    We present an overview of the evolution of eukaryotic split gene structure and pre-mRNA splicing mechanisms. We have drawn together several seemingly conflicting ideas and we show that they can all be incorporated in a single unified theory of intron evolution. The resulting model is consistent with the notion that introns, as a class, are very ancient, having originated in the "RNA world"; it also supports the concept that introns may have played a crucial role in the construction of many eukaryotic genes and it accommodates the idea that introns are related to mobile insertion elements. Our conclusion is that introns could have a profound effect on the course of eukaryotic gene evolution, but that the origin and maintenance of intron sequences depends, largely, on natural selection acting on the intron sequences themselves.

  20. eEF1A Mediates the Nuclear Export of SNAG-Containing Proteins via the Exportin5-Aminoacyl-tRNA Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Mingot

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Exportin5 mediates the nuclear export of double-stranded RNAs, including pre-microRNAs, adenoviral RNAs, and tRNAs. When tRNAs are aminoacylated, the Exportin5-aminoacyl (aa-tRNA complex recruits and coexports the translation elongation factor eEF1A. Here, we show that eEF1A binds to Snail transcription factors when bound to their main target, the E-cadherin promoter, facilitating their export to the cytoplasm in association with the aa-tRNA-Exportin5 complex. Snail binds to eEF1A through the SNAG domain, a protein nuclear export signal present in several transcription factor families, and this binding is regulated by phosphorylation. Thus, we describe a nuclear role for eEF1A and provide a mechanism for protein nuclear export that attenuates the activity of SNAG-containing transcription factors.

  1. eEF1A mediates the nuclear export of SNAG-containing proteins via the Exportin5-aminoacyl-tRNA complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingot, José Manuel; Vega, Sonia; Cano, Amparo; Portillo, Francisco; Nieto, M Angela

    2013-11-14

    Exportin5 mediates the nuclear export of double-stranded RNAs, including pre-microRNAs, adenoviral RNAs, and tRNAs. When tRNAs are aminoacylated, the Exportin5-aminoacyl (aa)-tRNA complex recruits and coexports the translation elongation factor eEF1A. Here, we show that eEF1A binds to Snail transcription factors when bound to their main target, the E-cadherin promoter, facilitating their export to the cytoplasm in association with the aa-tRNA-Exportin5 complex. Snail binds to eEF1A through the SNAG domain, a protein nuclear export signal present in several transcription factor families, and this binding is regulated by phosphorylation. Thus, we describe a nuclear role for eEF1A and provide a mechanism for protein nuclear export that attenuates the activity of SNAG-containing transcription factors.

  2. Nuclear Ribosomal RNA Small Subunit (18S rRNA) Nucleotide Sequen Nuclear Ribosomal RNA Small Subunit (18S rRNA) Nucleotide Sequen cing and Characterization of Sailonggu(Whole Bone of Myospalax baileyi Thomas)cing%塞隆骨原动物高原鼢鼠核基因18S rRNA序列测定与分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹晖; 刘玉萍; 张绍来; 周开亚

    2001-01-01

    目的:测定仓鼠科动物高原鼢鼠Myospalax b aileyi的核rDNA基因序列,为塞隆骨正品基原检定提供分子依据。方法:采用PCR直接测序技术测定高原鼢鼠18S rRNA基因核苷酸序列并作序列特征分析。[ HT5”H〗结果:高原鼢鼠的18S rRNA序列长度为1 851 bp。根据排序比较,高原鼢鼠与2种鼠科动物间的DNA序列同源性 为72.04%~72.18%。结论:通过基因序列分析,DNA测序技术可成为 塞隆骨正品基原检定的准确有效手段。%Objective: Sequencing the nuclear ribosomal RNA small subunit (18S r RNA) gene of Myospalax baileyi (Cricetidae) to develop an ultimate and defi nitive means for origin identification of genuine Sailonggu. Methods: The total DNA wa s prepared from dried tail tissues. The nuclear 18S rRNA gene region was amplifi ed by PCR using a consensus primer set and its nucleotide sequence was determine d by PCR direct sequencing. The characteristic analysis of 18S rRNA sequences wa s generated usin software program Genetyx-SV/R Version 10.1. Results: The entire 18S rRNA gene region of M. baileyi spanned 1851 bp in length. Althou gh m ultiple alignment of sequence indicates that there are only lower homology (72.0 4%~72.18%)comparing with its two alias Mus musculus (GenBank Accession numb er X 00686)and Rattus norvegicus (M11188)(Muridae), their highly conservative dom ain i s located in 1020~1509 nt. There are many variable sites from upstream of 5'-e nd , which coud provide a novel information for molecular recognition of Sailonggu. Conclusion:DNA sequencing could be a useful and reliable tool in the origin identification of genuine Sailonggu.

  3. Somatosensory neuron types identified by high-coverage single-cell RNA-sequencing and functional heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chang-Lin; Li, Kai-Cheng; Wu, Dan; Chen, Yan; Luo, Hao; Zhao, Jing-Rong; Wang, Sa-Shuang; Sun, Ming-Ming; Lu, Ying-Jin; Zhong, Yan-Qing; Hu, Xu-Ye; Hou, Rui; Zhou, Bei-Bei; Bao, Lan; Xiao, Hua-Sheng; Zhang, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Sensory neurons are distinguished by distinct signaling networks and receptive characteristics. Thus, sensory neuron types can be defined by linking transcriptome-based neuron typing with the sensory phenotypes. Here we classify somatosensory neurons of the mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) by high-coverage single-cell RNA-sequencing (10 950 ± 1 218 genes per neuron) and neuron size-based hierarchical clustering. Moreover, single DRG neurons responding to cutaneous stimuli are recorded using an in vivo whole-cell patch clamp technique and classified by neuron-type genetic markers. Small diameter DRG neurons are classified into one type of low-threshold mechanoreceptor and five types of mechanoheat nociceptors (MHNs). Each of the MHN types is further categorized into two subtypes. Large DRG neurons are categorized into four types, including neurexophilin 1-expressing MHNs and mechanical nociceptors (MNs) expressing BAI1-associated protein 2-like 1 (Baiap2l1). Mechanoreceptors expressing trafficking protein particle complex 3-like and Baiap2l1-marked MNs are subdivided into two subtypes each. These results provide a new system for cataloging somatosensory neurons and their transcriptome databases.

  4. Common and distinct clinical features in adult patients with anti-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase antibodies: heterogeneity within the syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhito Hamaguchi

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To identify similarities and differences in the clinical features of adult Japanese patients with individual anti-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase antibodies (anti-ARS Abs. METHODS: This was a retrospective analysis of 166 adult Japanese patients with anti-ARS Abs detected by immunoprecipitation assays. These patients had visited Kanazawa University Hospital or collaborating medical centers from 2003 to 2009. RESULTS: Anti-ARS Ab specificity included anti-Jo-1 (36%, anti-EJ (23%, anti-PL-7 (18%, anti-PL-12 (11%, anti-KS (8%, and anti-OJ (5%. These anti-ARS Abs were mutually exclusive, except for one serum Ab that had both anti-PL-7 and PL-12 reactivity. Myositis was closely associated with anti-Jo-1, anti-EJ, and anti-PL-7, while interstitial lung disease (ILD was correlated with all 6 anti-ARS Abs. Dermatomyositis (DM-specific skin manifestations (heliotrope rash and Gottron's sign were frequently observed in patients with anti-Jo-1, anti-EJ, anti-PL-7, and anti-PL-12. Therefore, most clinical diagnoses were polymyositis or DM for anti-Jo-1, anti-EJ, and anti-PL-7; clinically amyopathic DM or ILD for anti-PL-12; and ILD for anti-KS and anti-OJ. Patients with anti-Jo-1, anti-EJ, and anti-PL-7 developed myositis later if they had ILD alone at the time of disease onset, and most patients with anti-ARS Abs eventually developed ILD if they did not have ILD at disease onset. CONCLUSION: Patients with anti-ARS Abs are relatively homogeneous. However, the distribution and timing of myositis, ILD, and rashes differ among patients with individual anti-ARS Abs. Thus, identification of individual anti-ARS Abs is beneficial to define this rather homogeneous subset and to predict clinical outcomes within the "anti-synthetase syndrome."

  5. An engineered U1 small nuclear RNA rescues splicing-defective coagulation F7 gene expression in mice.

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    Balestra, D; Faella, A; Margaritis, P; Cavallari, N; Pagani, F; Bernardi, F; Arruda, V R; Pinotti, M

    2014-02-01

    The ability of the spliceosomal small nuclear RNA U1 (U1snRNA) to rescue pre-mRNA splicing impaired by mutations makes it an attractive therapeutic molecule. Coagulation factor deficiencies due to splicing mutations are relatively frequent and could therefore benefit from this strategy. However, the effects of U1snRNAs in vivo remain unknown. To assess the rescue of the F7 c.859+5G>A splicing mutation (FVII+5A), causing severe human factor VII (hFVII) deficiency, by the modified U1snRNA+5a (U1+5a) in a murine model. Mice expressing the human F7 c.859+5G>A mutant were generated following liver-directed expression by plasmid or recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector administration. The rescue of the splice-site defective pre-mRNA by U1+5a was monitored in liver and plasma through hFVII-specific assays. Injection of plasmids encoding the U1+5a rescued plasma hFVII levels, which increased from undetectable to ~8.5% of those obtained with the wild-type hFVII plasmid control. To assess long-term effects, mice were injected with low and high doses of two AAV vectors encoding the FVII+5A splice site mutant as template to be corrected by U1+5a. This strategy resulted in hFVII plasma levels of 3.9 ± 0.8 or 23.3 ± 5.1 ng mL(-1) in a dose-dependent manner, corresponding in patients to circulating FVII levels of ~1-4.5% of normal. Moreover, in both experimental models, we also detected correctly spliced hFVII transcripts and hFVII-positive cells in liver cells. Here we provide the first in vivo proof-of-principle of the rescue of the expression of a splicing-defective F7 mutant by U1snRNAs, thus highlighting their therapeutic potential in coagulation disorders. © 2013 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  6. An engineered U1 small nuclear RNA rescues splicing defective coagulation F7 gene expression in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestra, D; Faella, A; Margaritis, P; Cavallari, N; Pagani, F; Bernardi, F; Arruda, V R; Pinotti, M

    2014-02-01

    The ability of the spliceosomal small nuclear RNA U1 (U1snRNA) to rescue pre-mRNA splicing impaired by mutations makes it an attractive therapeutic molecule. Coagulation factor deficiencies due to splicing mutations are relatively frequent and could therefore benefit from this strategy. However, the effects of U1snRNAs in vivo remain unknown. To assess the rescue of the F7 c.859+5G>A splicing mutation (FVII+5A), causing severe human factor VII (hFVII) deficiency, by the modified U1snRNA+5a (U1+5a) in a murine model. Mice expressing the human F7 c.859+5G>A mutant were generated following liver-directed expression by plasmid or recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector administration. The rescue of the splice-site defective pre-mRNA by U1+5a was monitored in liver and plasma through hFVII-specific assays. Injection of plasmids encoding the U1+5a rescued plasma hFVII levels, which increased from undetectable to ~8.5% of those obtained with the wild-type hFVII plasmid control. To assess long-term effects, mice were injected with low and high doses of two AAV vectors encoding the FVII+5A splice site mutant as template to be corrected by U1+5a. This strategy resulted in hFVII plasma levels of 3.9 ± 0.8 or 23.3 ± 5.1 ng mL⁻¹ in a dose-dependent manner, corresponding in patients to circulating FVII levels of ~1-4.5% of normal. Moreover, in both experimental models, we also detected correctly spliced hFVII transcripts and hFVII-positive cells in liver cells. Here we provide the first in vivo proof of-principle of the rescue of the expression of a splicing-defective F7 mutant by U1snRNAs, thus highlighting their therapeutic potential in coagulation disorders.

  7. Nuclear export of human hepatitis B virus core protein and pregenomic RNA depends on the cellular NXF1-p15 machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ching-Chun; Huang, Er-Yi; Li, Hung-Cheng; Su, Pei-Yi; Shih, Chiaho

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) core protein (HBc) can shuttle between nucleus and cytoplasm. Cytoplasm-predominant HBc is clinically associated with severe liver inflammation. Previously, we found that HBc arginine-rich domain (ARD) can associate with a host factor NXF1 (TAP) by coimmunoprecipitation. It is well known that NXF1-p15 heterodimer can serve as a major export receptor of nuclear mRNA as a ribonucleoprotein complex (RNP). In the NXF1-p15 pathway, TREX (transcription/export) complex plays an important role in coupling nuclear pre-mRNA processing with mRNA export in mammalian cells. Here, we tested the hypothesis whether HBc and HBV specific RNA can be exported via the TREX and NXF1-p15 mediated pathway. We demonstrated here that HBc can physically and specifically associate with TREX components, and the NXF1-p15 export receptor by coimmunoprecipitation. Accumulation of HBc protein in the nucleus can be induced by the interference with TREX and NXF1-p15 mediated RNA export machinery. HBV transcripts encodes a non-spliced 3.5 kb pregenomic RNA (pgRNA) which can serve as a template for reverse transcription. Cytoplasmic HBV pgRNA appeared to be reduced by siRNA treatment specific for the NXF1-p15 complex by quantitative RT-qPCR and Northern blot analyses. This result suggests that the pgRNA was also exported via the NXF1-p15 machinery. We entertain the hypothesis that HBc protein can be exported as an RNP cargo via the mRNA export pathway by hijacking the TREX and NXF1-p15 complex. In our current and previous studies, HBc is not required for pgRNA accumulation in the cytoplasm. Furthermore, HBc ARD can mediate nuclear export of a chimeric protein containing HBc ARD in a pgRNA-independent manner. Taken together, it suggests that while both pgRNA and HBc protein exports are dependent on NXF1-p15, they are using the same export machinery in a manner independent of each other.

  8. Target and specificity of a nuclear gene product that participates in mRNA 3'-end formation in Chlamydomonas chloroplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, H; Kindle, K L; Stern, D B

    1999-12-10

    Chloroplast mRNA maturation is catalyzed by nucleus-encoded processing enzymes. We previously described a recessive nuclear mutation (crp3) that affects 3'-end formation of several chloroplast mRNAs in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (Levy, H., Kindle, K. L., and Stern, D. B. (1997) Plant Cell 9, 825-836). In the crp3 background, atpB mRNA lacking a 3'-inverted repeat normally required for stability accumulates as a discrete transcript. The mutation also affects the atpA gene cluster; polycistronic mRNAs with psbI or cemA 3'-ends accumulate to a lower level in the crp3 background. Here, we demonstrate that the crp3 mutation also alters 3'-end formation of psbI mRNA and cemA-containing mRNAs. A novel 3'-end is formed in monocistronic psbI transcripts, and this is the only terminus observed when the psbI 3'-untranslated region is fused to an aadA reporter gene. Accumulation of mRNAs with 3'-ends between cemA and atpH, which is immediately downstream, was reduced. However, this sequence was not recognized as a 3'-end formation element in chimeric genes. The crp3 mutation was able to confer stability to three different atpB 3'-stem-loop-disrupting mutations that lack sequence similarity, but are located at a similar distance from the translation termination codon. We propose that the wild-type CRP3 gene product is part of the general 3' --> 5' processing machinery.

  9. DEAD-box RNA helicase DDX3 connects CRM1-dependent nuclear export and translation of the HIV-1 unspliced mRNA through its N-terminal domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröhlich, Alvaro; Rojas-Araya, Bárbara; Pereira-Montecinos, Camila; Dellarossa, Alessandra; Toro-Ascuy, Daniela; Prades-Pérez, Yara; García-de-Gracia, Francisco; Garcés-Alday, Andrea; Rubilar, Paulina S; Valiente-Echeverría, Fernando; Ohlmann, Théophile; Soto-Rifo, Ricardo

    2016-05-01

    DEAD-box RNA helicase DDX3 is a host factor essential for HIV-1 replication and thus, a potential target for novel therapies aimed to overcome viral resistance. Previous studies have shown that DDX3 promotes nuclear export and translation of the HIV-1 unspliced mRNA. Although the function of DDX3 during both processes requires its catalytic activity, it is unknown whether other domains surrounding the helicase core are involved. Here, we show the involvement of the N- and C-terminal domains of DDX3 in the regulation of HIV-1 unspliced mRNA translation. Our results suggest that the intrinsically disordered N-terminal domain of DDX3 regulates its functions in translation by acting prior to the recruitment of the 43S pre-initiation complex onto the viral 5'-UTR. Interestingly, this regulation was conserved in HIV-2 and was dependent on the CRM1-dependent nuclear export pathway suggesting a role of the RNA helicase in interconnecting nuclear export with ribosome recruitment of the viral unspliced mRNA. This specific function of DDX3 during HIV gene expression could be exploited as an alternative target for pharmaceutical intervention.

  10. Inhibition of host protein synthesis by Sindbis virus: correlation with viral RNA replication and release of nuclear proteins to the cytoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, Miguel A; García-Moreno, Manuel; Carrasco, Luis

    2015-04-01

    Infection of mammalian cells by Sindbis virus (SINV) profoundly blocks cellular mRNA translation. Experimental evidence points to viral non-structural proteins (nsPs), in particular nsP2, as the mediator of this inhibition. However, individual expression of nsP1, nsP2, nsP3 or nsP1-4 does not block cellular protein synthesis in BHK cells. Trans-complementation of a defective SINV replicon lacking most of the coding region for nsPs by the co-expression of nsP1-4 propitiates viral RNA replication at low levels, and inhibition of cellular translation is not observed. Exit of nuclear proteins including T-cell intracellular antigen and polypyrimidine tract-binding protein is clearly detected in SINV-infected cells, but not upon the expression of nsPs, even when the defective replicon was complemented. Analysis of a SINV variant with a point mutation in nsP2, exhibiting defects in the shut-off of host protein synthesis, indicates that both viral RNA replication and the release of nuclear proteins to the cytoplasm are greatly inhibited. Furthermore, nucleoside analogues that inhibit cellular and viral RNA synthesis impede the blockade of host mRNA translation, in addition to the release of nuclear proteins. Prevention of the shut-off of host mRNA translation by nucleoside analogues is not due to the inhibition of eIF2α phosphorylation, as this prevention is also observed in PKR(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts that do not phosphorylate eIF2α after SINV infection. Collectively, our observations are consistent with the concept that for the inhibition of cellular protein synthesis to occur, viral RNA replication must take place at control levels, leading to the release of nuclear proteins to the cytoplasm.

  11. Ocean dynamic processes causing spatially heterogeneous distribution of sedimentary caesium-137 massively released from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant

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    H. Higashi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Massive amounts of anthropogenic radiocaesium 137Cs that was released into the environment by the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident on March 2011 are widely known to have extensively migrated to Pacific oceanic sediment off of east Japan. Several recent reports have stated that the sedimentary 137Cs is now stable with a remarkably heterogeneous distribution. The present study elucidates ocean dynamic processes causing this heterogeneous sedimentary 137Cs distribution in and around the shelf off Fukushima and adjacent prefectures. We performed a numerical simulation of oceanic 137Cs behaviour for about 10 months after the accident, using a comprehensive dynamic model involving advection–diffusion transport in seawater, adsorption and desorption to and from particulate matter, sedimentation and suspension on and from the bottom, and vertical diffusion transport in the sediment. A notable simulated result was that the sedimentary 137Cs significantly accumulated in a swath just offshore of the shelf break (along the 50–100 m isobath as in recent observations, although the seabed in the entire simulation domain was assumed to have ideal properties such as identical bulk density, uniform porosity, and aggregation of particles with a single grain diameter. This result indicated that the heterogeneous sedimentary 137Cs distribution was not necessarily a result of the spatial distribution of 137Cs sediment adsorptivity. The present simulation suggests that the shape of the swath is mainly associated with spatiotemporal variation between bottom shear stress in the shallow shelf (137Cs thereby could hardly stay on the surface of the seabed with the result that the simulated sediment-surface 137Cs activity tended to decrease steadily for a long term after the initial 137Cs migration. By contrast, in the offshore region, neither the spring tide nor the strong wind caused bottom disturbance. Hence, the particulate matter incorporated with

  12. Base-pair-resolution genome-wide mapping of active RNA polymerases using precision nuclear run-on (PRO-seq).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahat, Dig Bijay; Kwak, Hojoong; Booth, Gregory T; Jonkers, Iris H; Danko, Charles G; Patel, Ravi K; Waters, Colin T; Munson, Katie; Core, Leighton J; Lis, John T

    2016-08-01

    We provide a protocol for precision nuclear run-on sequencing (PRO-seq) and its variant, PRO-cap, which map the location of active RNA polymerases (PRO-seq) or transcription start sites (TSSs) (PRO-cap) genome-wide at high resolution. The density of RNA polymerases at a particular genomic locus directly reflects the level of nascent transcription at that region. Nuclei are isolated from cells and, under nuclear run-on conditions, transcriptionally engaged RNA polymerases incorporate one or, at most, a few biotin-labeled nucleotide triphosphates (biotin-NTPs) into the 3' end of nascent RNA. The biotin-labeled nascent RNA is used to prepare sequencing libraries, which are sequenced from the 3' end to provide high-resolution positional information for the RNA polymerases. PRO-seq provides much higher sensitivity than ChIP-seq, and it generates a much larger fraction of usable sequence reads than ChIP-seq or NET-seq (native elongating transcript sequencing). Similarly to NET-seq, PRO-seq maps the RNA polymerase at up to base-pair resolution with strand specificity, but unlike NET-seq it does not require immunoprecipitation. With the protocol provided here, PRO-seq (or PRO-cap) libraries for high-throughput sequencing can be generated in 4-5 working days. The method has been applied to human, mouse, Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans cells and, with slight modifications, to yeast.

  13. COVER FIGURE in Nucleic Acids Research (Volume 39, Issue 9) entitled "The involvement of the nuclear-encoded human 2'-phosphodiesterase in mitochondrial RNA turnover"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Jesper Buchhave

    2011-01-01

    (English) Cover: The involvement of the nuclear-encoded human 2'-phosphodiesterase (2'-PDE) in mitochondrial RNA turnover. The 2'-PDE precursor (upper left corner) gets directed into the mitochondrial matrix by an N-terminal mitochondrial signaling peptide (blue). Inside the matrix, this signalin...

  14. Localization of nucleoporin Tpr to the nuclear pore complex is essential for Tpr mediated regulation of the export of unspliced RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajanala, Kalpana; Nandicoori, Vinay Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Nucleoporin Tpr is a component of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) that localizes exclusively to intranuclear filaments. Tpr functions as a scaffolding element in the nuclear phase of the NPC and plays a role in mitotic spindle checkpoint signalling. Export of intron-containing mRNA in Mason Pfizer Monkey Virus is regulated by direct interaction of cellular proteins with the cis-acting Constitutive Transport Element (CTE). In mammalian cells, the transport of Gag/Pol-CTE reporter construct is not very efficient, suggesting a regulatory mechanism to retain this unspliced RNA. Here we report that the knockdown of Tpr in mammalian cells leads to a drastic enhancement in the levels of Gag proteins (p24) in the cytoplasm, which is rescued by siRNA resistant Tpr. Tpr's role in the retention of unspliced RNA is independent of the functions of Sam68 and Tap/Nxf1 proteins, which are reported to promote CTE dependent export. Further, we investigated the possible role for nucleoporins that are known to function in nucleocytoplasmic transport in modulating unspliced RNA export. Results show that depletion of Nup153, a nucleoporin required for NPC anchoring of Tpr, plays a role in regulating the export, while depletion of other FG repeat-containing nucleoporins did not alter the unspliced RNA export. Results suggest that Tpr and Nup153 both regulate the export of unspliced RNA and they are most likely functioning through the same pathway. Importantly, we find that localization of Tpr to the NPC is necessary for Tpr mediated regulation of unspliced RNA export. Collectively, the data indicates that perinuclear localization of Tpr at the nucleopore complex is crucial for regulating intron containing mRNA export by directly or indirectly participating in the processing and degradation of aberrant mRNA transcripts.

  15. Genome-Wide Mapping of Uncapped and Cleaved Transcripts Reveals a Role for the Nuclear mRNA Cap-Binding Complex in Cotranslational RNA Decay in Arabidopsis[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willmann, Matthew R.

    2016-01-01

    RNA turnover is necessary for controlling proper mRNA levels posttranscriptionally. In general, RNA degradation is via exoribonucleases that degrade RNA either from the 5′ end to the 3′ end, such as XRN4, or in the opposite direction by the multisubunit exosome complex. Here, we use genome-wide mapping of uncapped and cleaved transcripts to reveal the global landscape of cotranslational mRNA decay in the Arabidopsis thaliana transcriptome. We found that this process leaves a clear three nucleotide periodicity in open reading frames. This pattern of cotranslational degradation is especially evident near the ends of open reading frames, where we observe accumulation of cleavage events focused 16 to 17 nucleotides upstream of the stop codon because of ribosomal pausing during translation termination. Following treatment of Arabidopsis plants with the translation inhibitor cycloheximide, cleavage events accumulate 13 to 14 nucleotides upstream of the start codon where initiating ribosomes have been stalled with these sequences in their P site. Further analysis in xrn4 mutant plants indicates that cotranslational RNA decay is XRN4 dependent. Additionally, studies in plants lacking CAP BINDING PROTEIN80/ABA HYPERSENSITIVE1, the largest subunit of the nuclear mRNA cap binding complex, reveal a role for this protein in cotranslational decay. In total, our results demonstrate the global prevalence and features of cotranslational RNA decay in a plant transcriptome. PMID:27758893

  16. Splicing of a C. elegans myosin pre-mRNA in a human nuclear extract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogg, S.C.; Anderson, P.; Wickens, M.P. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (USA))

    1990-01-11

    Splicing of mammalian introns requires that the intron possess at least 80 nucleotides. This length requirement presumably reflects the constraints of accommodating multiple snRNPs simultaneously in the same intro. In the free-living nematode, C. elegans, introns typically are 45 to 55 nucleotides in length. In this report, the authors determine whether C. elegans introns can obviate the mammalian length requirement by virtue of their structure or sequence. They demonstrate that a 53 nucleotide intron from the unc-54 gene of C. elegans does not undergo splicing in a mammalian (HeLa) nuclear extract. However, insertion of 31 nucleotides of foreign, prokaryotic sequence into the same intron results in efficient splicing. The observed splicing proceeds by the same two-step mechanism observed with mammalian introns, and exploits the same 3{prime} and 5{prime} sites as are used in C. elegans. The branch point used lies in the inserted sequences. They conclude that C. elegans splicing components are either fewer in number or smaller than their mammalian counterparts.

  17. A biochemical framework for eIF4E-dependent mRNA export and nuclear recycling of the export machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpon, Laurent; Culjkovic-Kraljacic, Biljana; Sohn, Hye Seon; Blanchet-Cohen, Alexis; Osborne, Michael J; Borden, Katherine L B

    2017-06-01

    The eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF4E acts in the nuclear export and translation of a subset of mRNAs. Both of these functions contribute to its oncogenic potential. While the biochemical mechanisms that underlie translation are relatively well understood, the molecular basis for eIF4E's role in mRNA export remains largely unexplored. To date, over 3000 transcripts, many encoding oncoproteins, were identified as potential nuclear eIF4E export targets. These target RNAs typically contain a ∼50-nucleotide eIF4E sensitivity element (4ESE) in the 3' UTR and a 7-methylguanosine cap on the 5' end. While eIF4E associates with the cap, an unknown factor recognizes the 4ESE element. We previously identified cofactors that functionally interacted with eIF4E in mammalian cell nuclei including the leucine-rich pentatricopeptide repeat protein LRPPRC and the export receptor CRM1/XPO1. LRPPRC simultaneously interacts with both eIF4E bound to the 5' mRNA cap and the 4ESE element in the 3' UTR. In this way, LRPPRC serves as a specificity factor to recruit 4ESE-containing RNAs within the nucleus. Further, we show that CRM1 directly binds LRPPRC likely acting as the export receptor for the LRPPRC-eIF4E-4ESE RNA complex. We also found that Importin 8, the nuclear importer for cap-free eIF4E, imports RNA-free LRPPRC, potentially providing both coordinated nuclear recycling of the export machinery and an important surveillance mechanism to prevent futile export cycles. Our studies provide the first biochemical framework for the eIF4E-dependent mRNA export pathway. © 2017 Volpon et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  18. A viral nuclear noncoding RNA binds re-localized poly(A binding protein and is required for late KSHV gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumit Borah

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available During the lytic phase of infection, the gamma herpesvirus Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus (KSHV expresses a highly abundant, 1.1 kb nuclear noncoding RNA of unknown function. We observe that this polyadenylated nuclear (PAN RNA avidly binds host poly(A-binding protein C1 (PABPC1, which normally functions in the cytoplasm to bind the poly(A tails of mRNAs, regulating mRNA stability and translation efficiency. During the lytic phase of KSHV infection, PABPC1 is re-localized to the nucleus as a consequence of expression of the viral shutoff exonuclease (SOX protein; SOX also mediates the host shutoff effect in which host mRNAs are downregulated while viral mRNAs are selectively expressed. We show that whereas PAN RNA is not required for the host shutoff effect or for PABPC1 re-localization, SOX strongly upregulates the levels of PAN RNA in transient transfection experiments. This upregulation is destroyed by the same SOX mutation that ablates the host shutoff effect and PABPC1 nuclear re-localization or by removal of the poly(A tail of PAN. In cells induced into the KSHV lytic phase, depletion of PAN RNA using RNase H-targeting antisense oligonucleotides reveals that it is necessary for the production of late viral proteins from mRNAs that are themselves polyadenylated. Our results add to the repertoire of functions ascribed to long noncoding RNAs and suggest a mechanism of action for nuclear noncoding RNAs in gamma herpesvirus infection.

  19. Parallel loss of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases and mtDNA-encoded tRNAs in Cnidaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haen, Karri M; Pett, Walker; Lavrov, Dennis V

    2010-10-01

    Unlike most animal mitochondrial (mt) genomes, which encode a set of 22 transfer RNAs (tRNAs) sufficient for mt protein synthesis, those of cnidarians have only retained one or two tRNA genes. Whether the missing cnidarian mt-tRNA genes relocated outside the main mt chromosome or were lost remains unclear. It is also unknown what impact the loss of tRNA genes had on other components of the mt translational machinery. Here, we explored the nuclear genome of the cnidarian Nematostella vectensis for the presence of mt-tRNA genes and their corresponding mt aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (mt-aaRS). We detected no candidates for mt-tRNA genes and only two mt-aaRS orthologs. At the same time, we found that all but one cytosolic aaRS appear to be targeted to mitochondria. These results indicate that the loss of mt-tRNAs in Cnidaria is genuine and occurred in parallel with the loss of nuclear-encoded mt-aaRS. Our phylogenetic analyses of individual aaRS revealed that although the nearly total loss of mt-aaRS is rare, aaRS gene deletion and replacement have occurred throughout the evolution of Metazoa.

  20. Movements of HIV-1 genomic RNA-APOBEC3F complexes and PKR reveal cytoplasmic and nuclear PKR defenses and HIV-1 evasion strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Mariana; Golem, Sheetal; Kozak, Susan L; Kabat, David

    2016-02-02

    APOBEC3 cytidine deaminases and viral genomic RNA (gRNA) occur in virions, polysomes, and cytoplasmic granules, but have not been tracked together. Moreover, gRNA traffic is important, but the factors that move it into granules are unknown. Using in situ hybridization of transfected cells and protein synthesis inhibitors that drive mRNAs between locales, we observed APOBEC3F cotrafficking with gRNA without altering its movements. Whereas cells with little cytoplasmic gRNA were translationally active and accumulated Gag, suprathreshold amounts induced autophosphorylation of the cytoplasmic double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-dependent protein kinase (PKR), causing eIF2α phosphorylation, protein synthesis suppression, and gRNA sequestration in stress granules. Additionally, we confirmed recent evidence that PKR is activated by chromosome-associated cellular dsRNAs after nuclear membranes disperse in prophase. By arresting cells in G2, HIV-1 blocks this mechanism for PKR activation and eIF2α phosphorylation. However, cytopathic membrane damage in CD4- and coreceptor-positive cultures infected with laboratory-adapted fusogenic HIV-1LAI eventually enabled PKR entry and activation in interphase nuclei. These results reveal multiple stages in the PKR-HIV-1 battleground that culminate in cell death. We discuss evidence suggesting that HIV-1s evolve in vivo to prevent or delay PKR activation by all these mechanisms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Germinal Center B-Cell-Associated Nuclear Protein (GANP) Involved in RNA Metabolism for B Cell Maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, N; Maeda, K

    2016-01-01

    Germinal center B-cell-associated nuclear protein (GANP) is upregulated in germinal center B cells against T-cell-dependent antigens in mice and humans. In mice, GANP depletion in B cells impairs antibody affinity maturation. Conversely, its transgenic overexpression augments the generation of high-affinity antigen-specific B cells. GANP associates with AID in the cytoplasm, shepherds AID into the nucleus, and augments its access to the rearranged immunoglobulin (Ig) variable (V) region of the genome in B cells, thereby precipitating the somatic hypermutation of V region genes. GANP is also upregulated in human CD4(+) T cells and is associated with APOBEC3G (A3G). GANP interacts with A3G and escorts it to the virion cores to potentiate its antiretroviral activity by inactivating HIV-1 genomic cDNA. Thus, GANP is characterized as a cofactor associated with AID/APOBEC cytidine deaminase family molecules in generating diversity of the IgV region of the genome and genetic alterations of exogenously introduced viral targets. GANP, encoded by human chromosome 21, as well as its mouse equivalent on chromosome 10, contains a region homologous to Saccharomyces Sac3 that was characterized as a component of the transcription/export 2 (TREX-2) complex and was predicted to be involved in RNA export and metabolism in mammalian cells. The metabolism of RNA during its maturation, from the transcription site at the chromosome within the nucleus to the cytoplasmic translation apparatus, needs to be elaborated with regard to acquired and innate immunity. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on GANP as a component of TREX-2 in mammalian cells.

  2. [Synthesis of messenger-like RNA in plasma cels producing different clases of immunoglobulins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitin, A V; Babichev, V A

    1976-01-01

    Electrophoretic analysis of the nuclear poly A RNA cells of the MOPC 21, MOPC 406 and MOPC 41 plasmocytomas demonstrated a similarity in their distribution by the mol wt. Kinetics of the label accumulation in the nuclear poly A RNA of different plasma cells was unitypical. Individual peculiarities of the distribution of the cytoplasmic poly A RNA were expressed for each individual line of the myeloma cells. The majority of the molecules of the heterogenous RNA in the plasma cells were subjected to posttranscription polyadenylation.

  3. Phylogenetics of the brachyuran crabs (Crustacea: Decapoda): the status of Podotremata based on small subunit nuclear ribosomal RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahyong, Shane T; Lai, Joelle C Y; Sharkey, Deirdre; Colgan, Donald J; Ng, Peter K L

    2007-11-01

    The true crabs, the Brachyura, are generally divided into two major groups: Eubrachyura or 'advanced' crabs, and Podotremata or 'primitive' crabs. The status of Podotremata is one of the most controversial issues in brachyuran systematics. The podotreme crabs, best recognised by the possession of gonopores on the coxae of the pereopods, have variously been regarded as mono-, para- or polyphyletic, or even as non-brachyuran. For the first time, the phylogenetic positions of the podotreme crabs were studied by cladistic analysis of small subunit nuclear ribosomal RNA sequences. Eight of 10 podotreme families were represented along with representatives of 17 eubrachyuran families. Under both maximum parsimony and Bayesian Inference, Podotremata was found to be significantly paraphyletic, comprising three major clades: Dromiacea, Raninoida, and Cyclodorippoida. The most 'basal' is Dromiacea, followed by Raninoida and Cylodorippoida. Notably, Cyclodorippoida was identified as the sister group of the Eubrachyura. Previous hypotheses that the dromiid crab, Hypoconcha, is an anomuran were unsupported, though Dromiidae as presently composed could be paraphyletic. Topologies constrained for podotreme monophyly were found to be significantly worse (P < 0.04) than unconstrained topologies under Templeton and S-H tests. The clear pattern of podotreme paraphyly and robustness of topologies recovered indicates that Podotremata as a formal concept is untenable. Relationships among the eubrachyurans were generally equivocal, though results indicate the majoids or dorippoids were the least derived of the Eubrachyura. A new high level classification of the Brachyura is proposed.

  4. Do nuclear bodies in oocytes of Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera: Polyphaga, Tenebrionidae) contain two forms of RNA polymerase II?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogolyubov, D; Parfenov, V

    2004-02-01

    Late vitellogenic oocytes of the mealworm beetle, Tenebrio molitor, which are transcriptionally inert, contain numerous fibrogranular nuclear bodies (NBs). Previously, we have shown that these NBs contain both unphosphorylated and phosphorylated forms of RNA polymerase II (pol II) [Tissue Cell 33 (2001) 549]. The conclusion on the presence of phosphorylated pol II was based on our immunoelectron experiments with monoclonal antibody (mAb) H5 against the phosphorylated serine-2 of the carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) of pol II. Because the specificity of mAb H5 was recently questioned by demonstration of its cross-reaction with SR-proteins [J. Struct. Biol. 140 (2002) 154], we re-examined here the occurence of pol II in T. molitor oocyte NBs using other appropriate antibodies. We confirm the presence of phosphorylated pol II in NBs using the affinity-purified polyclonal antibody against the phosphorylated CTD. Using double immunogold labeling with this antibody plus mAb 8WG16 against the unphosphorylated CTD, we confirm the presence of two forms of pol II in NBs. Additionally, the presence of pol II in NBs was verified here using mAb ARNA3 against the epitope outside CTD. We suggest that at the transcriptionally inactive stage, T. molitor oocyte NBs represent storage domains for pol II disengaged from the transcription.

  5. Suppression of RNA Silencing by a Geminivirus Nuclear Protein, AC2, Correlates with Transactivation of Host Genes†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinks, Daniela; Rajeswaran, R.; Shivaprasad, P. V.; Akbergenov, Rashid; Oakeley, Edward J.; Veluthambi, K.; Hohn, Thomas; Pooggin, Mikhail M.

    2005-01-01

    Bipartite geminiviruses encode a small protein, AC2, that functions as a transactivator of viral transcription and a suppressor of RNA silencing. A relationship between these two functions had not been investigated before. We characterized both of these functions for AC2 from Mungbean yellow mosaic virus-Vigna (MYMV). When transiently expressed in plant protoplasts, MYMV AC2 strongly transactivated the viral promoter; AC2 was detected in the nucleus, and a split nuclear localization signal (NLS) was mapped. In a model Nicotiana benthamiana plant, in which silencing can be triggered biolistically, AC2 reduced local silencing and prevented its systemic spread. Mutations in the AC2 NLS or Zn finger or deletion of its activator domain abolished both these effects, suggesting that suppression of silencing by AC2 requires transactivation of host suppressor(s). In line with this, in Arabidopsis protoplasts, MYMV AC2 or its homologue from African cassava mosaic geminivirus coactivated >30 components of the plant transcriptome, as detected with Affymetrix ATH1 GeneChips. Several corresponding promoters cloned from Arabidopsis were strongly induced by both AC2 proteins. These results suggest that silencing suppression and transcription activation by AC2 are functionally connected and that some of the AC2-inducible host genes discovered here may code for components of an endogenous network that controls silencing. PMID:15681452

  6. Suppression of RNA silencing by a geminivirus nuclear protein, AC2, correlates with transactivation of host genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinks, Daniela; Rajeswaran, R; Shivaprasad, P V; Akbergenov, Rashid; Oakeley, Edward J; Veluthambi, K; Hohn, Thomas; Pooggin, Mikhail M

    2005-02-01

    Bipartite geminiviruses encode a small protein, AC2, that functions as a transactivator of viral transcription and a suppressor of RNA silencing. A relationship between these two functions had not been investigated before. We characterized both of these functions for AC2 from Mungbean yellow mosaic virus-Vigna (MYMV). When transiently expressed in plant protoplasts, MYMV AC2 strongly transactivated the viral promoter; AC2 was detected in the nucleus, and a split nuclear localization signal (NLS) was mapped. In a model Nicotiana benthamiana plant, in which silencing can be triggered biolistically, AC2 reduced local silencing and prevented its systemic spread. Mutations in the AC2 NLS or Zn finger or deletion of its activator domain abolished both these effects, suggesting that suppression of silencing by AC2 requires transactivation of host suppressor(s). In line with this, in Arabidopsis protoplasts, MYMV AC2 or its homologue from African cassava mosaic geminivirus coactivated >30 components of the plant transcriptome, as detected with Affymetrix ATH1 GeneChips. Several corresponding promoters cloned from Arabidopsis were strongly induced by both AC2 proteins. These results suggest that silencing suppression and transcription activation by AC2 are functionally connected and that some of the AC2-inducible host genes discovered here may code for components of an endogenous network that controls silencing.

  7. Trypanosoma brucei RNA binding proteins p34 and p37 mediate NOPP44/46 cellular localization via the exportin 1 nuclear export pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellman, Kristina; Prohaska, Kimberly; Williams, Noreen

    2007-12-01

    We have previously identified and characterized two novel nuclear RNA binding proteins, p34 and p37, which have been shown to interact with a family of nucleolar phosphoproteins, NOPP44/46, in Trypanosoma brucei. These proteins are nearly identical, the major difference being an 18-amino-acid insert in the N terminus of p37. In order to characterize the interaction between p34 and p37 and NOPP44/46, we have utilized an RNA interference (RNAi) cell line that specifically targets p34 and p37. Within these RNAi cells, we detected a disruption of a higher-molecular-weight complex containing NOPP44/46, as well as a dramatic increase in nuclear NOPP44/46 protein levels. We demonstrated that no change occurred in NOPP44/46 mRNA steady-state levels or stability, nor was there a change in cellular protein levels. These results led us to investigate whether p34 and p37 regulate NOPP44/46 cellular localization. Examination of the p34 and p37 amino acid sequences revealed a leucine-rich nuclear export signal, which interacts with the nuclear export factor exportin 1. Immune capture experiments demonstrated that p34, p37, and NOPP44/46 associate with exportin 1. When these experiments were performed with p34/p37 RNAi cells, NOPP44/46 no longer associated with exportin 1. Sequential immune capture experiments demonstrated that p34, p37, NOPP44/46, and exportin 1 exist in a common complex. Inhibiting exportin 1-mediated nuclear export led to an increase in nuclear NOPP44/46 proteins, indicating that they are exported from the nucleus via this pathway. Together, our results demonstrate that p34 and p37 regulate NOPP44/46 cellular localization by facilitating their association with exportin 1.

  8. Overexpression of an Arabidopsis heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein gene, AtRNP1, affects plant growth and reduces plant tolerance to drought and salt stresses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhenyu, E-mail: wzy72609@163.com [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Cell Activities and Stress Adaptations, School of Life Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730030 (China); Zhao, Xiuyang, E-mail: xiuzh@psb.vib-ugent.be [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Cell Activities and Stress Adaptations, School of Life Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730030 (China); Wang, Bing, E-mail: wangbing@ibcas.ac.cn [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Cell Activities and Stress Adaptations, School of Life Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730030 (China); Liu, Erlong, E-mail: liuel14@lzu.edu.cn [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Cell Activities and Stress Adaptations, School of Life Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730030 (China); Chen, Ni, E-mail: 63710156@qq.com [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Cell Activities and Stress Adaptations, School of Life Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730030 (China); Zhang, Wei, E-mail: wzhang1216@yahoo.com [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Bio-Energy Crops, School of Life Sciences, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Liu, Heng, E-mail: hengliu@lzu.edu.cn [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Cell Activities and Stress Adaptations, School of Life Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730030 (China)

    2016-04-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs) participate in diverse regulations of plant growth and environmental stress responses. In this work, an Arabidopsis hnRNP of unknown function, AtRNP1, was investigated. We found that AtRNP1 gene is highly expressed in rosette and cauline leaves, and slightly induced under drought, salt, osmotic and ABA stresses. AtRNP1 protein is localized to both the nucleus and cytoplasm. We performed homologous overexpression of AtRNP1 and found that the transgenic plants showed shortened root length and plant height, and accelerated flowering. In addition, the transgenic plants also showed reduced tolerance to drought, salt, osmotic and ABA stresses. Further studies revealed that under both normal and stress conditions, the proline contents in the transgenic plants are markedly decreased, associated with reduced expression levels of a proline synthase gene and several stress-responsive genes. These results suggested that the overexpression of AtRNP1 negatively affects plant growth and abiotic stress tolerance. - Highlights: • AtRNP1 is a widely expressed gene and its expression is slightly induced under abiotic stresses. • AtRNP1 protein is localized to both the nucleus and cytoplasm. • Overexpression of AtRNP1 affects plant growth. • Overexpression of AtRNP1 reduces plant tolerance to drought and salt stresses. • AtRNP1 overexpression plants show decreased proline accumulation and stress-responsive gene expressions.

  9. Ocean dynamic processes causing spatially heterogeneous distribution of sedimentary caesium-137 massively released from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, H.; Morino, Y.; Furuichi, N.; Ohara, T.

    2015-08-01

    Massive amounts of anthropogenic radiocaesium 137Cs that was released into the environment by the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident on March 2011 are widely known to have extensively migrated to Pacific oceanic sediment off of east Japan. Several recent reports have stated that the sedimentary 137Cs is now stable with a remarkably heterogeneous distribution. The present study elucidates ocean dynamic processes causing this heterogeneous sedimentary 137Cs distribution in and around the shelf off Fukushima and adjacent prefectures. We performed a numerical simulation of oceanic 137Cs behaviour for about 10 months after the accident, using a comprehensive dynamic model involving advection-diffusion transport in seawater, adsorption and desorption to and from particulate matter, sedimentation and suspension on and from the bottom, and vertical diffusion transport in the sediment. A notable simulated result was that the sedimentary 137Cs significantly accumulated in a swath just offshore of the shelf break (along the 50-100 m isobath) as in recent observations, although the seabed in the entire simulation domain was assumed to have ideal properties such as identical bulk density, uniform porosity, and aggregation of particles with a single grain diameter. This result indicated that the heterogeneous sedimentary 137Cs distribution was not necessarily a result of the spatial distribution of 137Cs sediment adsorptivity. The present simulation suggests that the shape of the swath is mainly associated with spatiotemporal variation between bottom shear stress in the shallow shelf (< 50 m depths) and that offshore of the shelf break. In a large part of the shallow shelf, the simulation indicated that strong bottom friction suspending particulate matter from the seabed frequently occurred via a periodic spring tide about every 2 weeks and via occasional strong wind. The sedimentary 137Cs thereby could hardly stay on the surface of the seabed with the result that

  10. A dominant nuclear mutation in Chlamydomonas identifies a factor controlling chloroplast mRNA stability by acting on the coding region of the atpA transcript.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drapier, Dominique; Girard-Bascou, Jacqueline; Stern, David B; Wollman, Francis-André

    2002-09-01

    We have characterized a nuclear mutation, mda1-ncc1, that affects mRNA stability for the atpA gene cluster in the chloroplast of Chlamydomonas. Unlike all nuclear mutations altering chloroplast gene expression described to date, mda1-ncc1 is a dominant mutation that still allows accumulation of detectable amounts of atpA mRNAs. At variance with the subset of these mutations that affect mRNA stability through the 5' UTR of a single chloroplast transcript, the mutated version of MDA1 acts on the coding region of the atpA message. We discuss the action of MDA1 in relation to the unusual pattern of expression of atpA that associates particularly short lived-transcripts with a very high translational efficiency.

  11. Identification of kakusei, a nuclear non-coding RNA, as an immediate early gene from the honeybee, and its application for neuroethological study

    OpenAIRE

    Taketoshi Kiya; Atsushi Ugajin; Takekazu Kunieda; Takeo Kubo

    2012-01-01

    The honeybee is a social insect that exhibits various social behaviors. To elucidate the neural basis of honeybee behavior, we detected neural activity in freely-moving honeybee workers using an immediate early gene (IEG) that is expressed in a neural activity-dependent manner. In European honeybees (Apis mellifera), we identified a novel nuclear non-coding RNA, termed kakusei, as the first insect IEG, and revealed the neural activity pattern in foragers. In addition, we isolated a homologue ...

  12. The mitochondrial atpA/atp9 co-transcript in wheat and triticale: RNA processing depends on the nuclear genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laser, B; Kück, U

    1995-12-01

    The gene region coding for subunits alpha and 9 of the mitochondrial ATP synthase exhibit an identical DNA sequence in wheat, rye, and the intergeneric hybrid triticale (xTriticosecale Wittmack). However, co-transcripts containing both genes show different sizes depending on the nuclear genotype. To investigate nuclear-mitochondrial interactions leading to this variation, we performed a comparative transcript analysis with various lines carrying defined nuclear and cytoplasmic genotypes. Northern analyses showed that all wheat lines investigated possess a single atpA/atp9 mRNA of 2.6kb, whereas in rye and five independent triticale lines an additional transcript of 2.35kb appeared. Primer-extension and RNase-protection analyses indicate that the co-transcripts of this gene have staggered 5' termini in some lines, whereas the 3' termini seem to be similar in wheat, rye, and triticale. Transcription is initiated at position -338/-339 upstream of the atpA gene in all lines investigated, giving rise to a 2.6-kb mRNA. In rye and triticale, staggered 5' termini were observed closer to the translational start. The DNA sequences upstream of these termini exhibit homology to plant mitochondrial-processing sites, therefore the proximal 5' ends are most probably generated by RNA processing. As the processing event occurs more frequently in triticale carrying the Triticum timopheevi cytoplasm, trans-acting factors from rye are likely to interact with other cytoplasmic factors resulting in the observed RNA modification. Most interestingly, the T. timopheevi cytoplasm inducing male sterility in alloplasmic wheat, fails to generate the CMS phenotype in triticale. The data support our hypothesis that nuclear factors affect mitochondrial gene expression and thus control sexual fertility in wheat and triticale.

  13. Complete mitochondrial genomes and nuclear ribosomal RNA operons of two species of Diplostomum (Platyhelminthes: Trematoda): a molecular resource for taxonomy and molecular epidemiology of important fish pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brabec, Jan; Kostadinova, Aneta; Scholz, Tomáš; Littlewood, D Timothy J

    2015-06-19

    The genus Diplostomum (Platyhelminthes: Trematoda: Diplostomidae) is a diverse group of freshwater parasites with complex life-cycles and global distribution. The larval stages are important pathogens causing eye fluke disease implicated in substantial impacts on natural fish populations and losses in aquaculture. However, the problematic species delimitation and difficulties in the identification of larval stages hamper the assessment of the distributional and host ranges of Diplostomum spp. and their transmission ecology. Total genomic DNA was isolated from adult worms and shotgun sequenced using Illumina MiSeq technology. Mitochondrial (mt) genomes and nuclear ribosomal RNA (rRNA) operons were assembled using established bioinformatic tools and fully annotated. Mt protein-coding genes and nuclear rRNA genes were subjected to phylogenetic analysis by maximum likelihood and the resulting topologies compared. We characterised novel complete mt genomes and nuclear rRNA operons of two closely related species, Diplostomum spathaceum and D. pseudospathaceum. Comparative mt genome assessment revealed that the cox1 gene and its 'barcode' region used for molecular identification are the most conserved regions; instead, nad4 and nad5 genes were identified as most promising molecular diagnostic markers. Using the novel data, we provide the first genome wide estimation of the phylogenetic relationships of the order Diplostomida, one of the two fundamental lineages of the Digenea. Analyses of the mitogenomic data invariably recovered the Diplostomidae as a sister lineage of the order Plagiorchiida rather than as a basal lineage of the Diplostomida as inferred in rDNA phylogenies; this was concordant with the mt gene order of Diplostomum spp. exhibiting closer match to the conserved gene order of the Plagiorchiida. Complete sequences of the mt genome and rRNA operon of two species of Diplostomum provide a valuable resource for novel genetic markers for species delineation and

  14. MicroRNA-19a mediates gastric carcinoma cell proliferation through the activation of nuclear factor-κB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Wang, Hongjian; Jiang, Zhenyu; Hu, Anxiang; Chu, Lisha; Sun, Yiling; Han, Junqing

    2015-10-01

    In gastric carcinoma, the nuclear factor‑κB (NF‑κB) signaling pathway is highly active, and the constitutive activation of NF‑κB prompts malignant cell proliferation. MicroRNAs are considered to be important mediators in the regulation of the NF‑κB signaling pathway. The present study predominantly focussed on the effects of microRNA (miR)‑19a on NF‑κB activation. Reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to quantify the relative levels of miR‑19a in gastric carcinoma cells. MTT assays were used to determine the effect of miR‑19a on cellular proliferation. To detect the activation of NF‑κB, western blotting was performed to measure the protein levels of NF‑κB and the products of its downstream target genes. To define the target genes, luciferase reporter assays were used. miR‑19a was found to be markedly upregulated in gastric carcinoma cells. The overexpression of miR‑19a resulted in proliferation and enhanced migratory capabilities of the MGC‑803 gastric carcinoma cell line. The results of the western blot analysis demonstrated that the protein levels of p65 increased when the MGC‑803 cells were transfected with miR‑19a mimics. In addition, the downstream target genes of miR‑19a, including intercellular adhesion molecule, vascular cell adhesion molecule and monocyte chemoattractant protein‑1, were upregulated. The results of the luciferase assay indicated that IκB‑α was the target gene of miR‑19a. Therefore, the results of the present study suggested that miR‑19a enhances malignant gastric cell proliferation by constitutively activating the NF‑κB signaling pathway.

  15. MicroRNA-200a mediates nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell proliferation through the activation of nuclear factor-κB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhuliang; Hu, Zhiqiang; Chen, Delu; Huang, Jie; Fan, Jie; Zhou, Subo; Wang, Xin; Hu, Jiandao; Huang, Fei

    2016-02-01

    In nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling pathway is highly active. The constitutive activation of NF-κB prompts malignant cell proliferation, and microRNAs are considered an important mediator in regulating the NF-κB signaling pathway. The current study investigated the effect of microRNA-200a (miR-200a) on NF-κB activation. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to quantify the relative level of miR-200a in NPC tissue samples and CNE2 cells. An MTT assay was used to investigate the effect of miR-200a on cell proliferation. To investigate the activation of NF-κB, western blotting was used to measure the protein levels of NF-κB and its downstream targets. To identify the target genes of miR-200a, a luciferase reporter assay was used. The current study demonstrated that miR-200a was upregulated in NPC tissue samples and cell lines. Overexpression of miR-200a resulted in the proliferation of CNE2 cells. Western blot analysis indicated that the protein levels of p65 increased when CNE2 cells were transfected with miR-200a mimics. Additionally, the downstream targets of miR-200a were upregulated, including vascular cell adhesion molecule, intercellular adhesion molecule and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. The luciferase assay indicated that IκBα was the target gene of miR-200a. In conclusion, miR-200a was demonstrated to enhance NPC cell proliferation by activating the NF-κB signaling pathway.

  16. MicroRNA-144 Regulates Hepatic ABCA1 and Plasma HDL Following Activation of the Nuclear Receptor FXR

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Aguiar Vallim, Thomas Q.; Tarling, Elizabeth J.; Kim, Tammy; Civelek, Mete; Baldán, Ángel; Esau, Christine; Edwards, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale The bile acid receptor Farnesoid-X-Receptor (FXR) regulates many aspects of lipid metabolism by various complex and not fully understood molecular mechanisms. We set out to investigate the molecular mechanisms for FXR-dependent regulation of lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. Objective To identify FXR-regulated microRNAs that were subsequently involved in regulating lipid metabolism. Methods and Results ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) is a major determinant of plasma High Density Lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol levels. Here we show that activation of the nuclear receptor FXR in vivo increases hepatic levels of miR-144, which in turn lower hepatic ABCA1 and plasma HDL levels. We identified two complementary sequences to miR-144 in the 3′ untranslated region (UTR) of ABCA1 mRNA that are necessary for miR-144-dependent regulation. Overexpression of miR-144 in vitro decreased both cellular ABCA1 protein and cholesterol efflux to lipid-poor apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA-I) protein, whilst overexpression in vivo reduced hepatic ABCA1 protein and plasma HDL-cholesterol. Conversely, silencing miR-144 in mice increased hepatic ABCA1 protein and HDL-cholesterol. In addition, we utilized tissue-specific FXR deficient mice to show that induction of miR-144 and FXR-dependent hypolipidemia requires hepatic, but not intestinal FXR. Finally, we identified functional FXR response elements (FXREs) upstream of the miR-144 locus, consistent with direct FXR regulation. Conclusion We have identified a novel pathway involving FXR, miR-144 and ABCA1 that together regulate plasma HDL cholesterol. PMID:23519696

  17. Circulating U2 small nuclear RNA fragments as a novel diagnostic biomarker for primary central nervous system lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraniskin, Alexander; Zaslavska, Elena; Nöpel-Dünnebacke, Stefanie; Ahle, Guido; Seidel, Sabine; Schlegel, Uwe; Schmiegel, Wolff; Hahn, Stephan; Schroers, Roland

    2016-03-01

    Primary central nervous system lymphomas (PCNSLs) are highly aggressive tumors. Chemotherapy has improved prognosis significantly; however, early diagnosis is crucial for effective treatment. Presently, the diagnosis of PCNSL depends on histopathology of tumor biopsies. We have previously demonstrated differential expression of microRNAs in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from patients with PCNSL. Based on promising findings about circulating U2 small nuclear RNA fragments (RNU2-1f) as novel blood-based biomarkers for pancreatic, colorectal, and lung cancer, we investigated RNU2-1f in the CSF of PCNSL patients. CSF was collected from patients with PCNSL (n = 72) and control patients with various neurologic disorders (n = 47). Sequential CSF samples were collected from 9 PCNSL patients. RNU2-1f levels were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Measurement of RNU2-1f levels in CSF enabled the differentiation of patients with PCNSL from controls with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.909 with a sensitivity of 68.1% and a specificity of 91.4%. The diagnostic accuracy was further improved by combined determination of RNU2-1f and miR-21, resulting in AUC of 0.987 with a sensitivity of 91.7% and a specificity of 95.7%. In consecutive measurements of RNU2-1f, which were performed in 9 patients at different stages of the disease course, RNU2-1f CSF levels paralleled the course of the disease. Our data suggest that the measurement of RNU2-1f detected in CSF can be used as a diagnostic marker and also as a possible marker for treatment monitoring. These promising results need to be evaluated within a larger patient cohort. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Phosphorylation and nuclear transit modulate the balance between normal function and terminal aggregation of the yeast RNA-binding protein Ssd1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurischko, Cornelia; Broach, James R

    2017-09-06

    Yeast Ssd1 is an RNA-binding protein that shuttles between the nucleus and cytoplasm. Ssd1 interacts with its target mRNAs initially during transcription by binding through its N-terminal prion-like domain (PLD) to the C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II. Ssd1 subsequently targets mRNAs acquired in the nucleus either to daughter cells for translation or to stress granules (SG) and P-bodies (PB) for mRNA storage or decay. Here we show that PB components assist in the nuclear export of Ssd1and subsequent targeting of Ssd1 to PB sites in the cytoplasm. In the absence of import into the nucleus, Ssd1 fails to associate with P-bodies in the cytoplasm but rather is targeted to cytosolic insoluble protein deposits (IPOD). The association of Ssd1 either with IPOD sites or with PB/SG requires the PLD, whose activity is differentially regulated by the Ndr/LATS family kinase, Cbk1: phosphorylation suppresses PB/SG association but enhances IPOD formation. This regulation likely accrues from a phosphorylation sensitive nuclear localization sequence located in the PLD. The results presented here may inform our understanding of aggregate formation by RNA-binding proteins in certain neurological diseases. © 2017 by The American Society for Cell Biology.

  19. Location of a possible miRNA processing site in SmD3/SmB nuclear bodies in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujioka, Yoichiro; Utsumi, Maki; Ohba, Yusuke; Watanabe, Yuichiro

    2007-09-01

    There has been much recent research on the contribution of microRNA (miRNA) in plant organogenesis and hormone action. In plants, it has been reported that Dicer-like 1 (DCL1), HYPONASTIC LEAVES1 (HYL1) and SERRATE (SE) are involved in the production of miRNAs. The means by which miRNAs are processed and transported is not well understood in detail, however. In this study, we investigated the intracellular localization and intermolecular interaction of these molecules using imaging techniques, including bimolecular fluorescence complementation and fluorescence resonance energy transfer techniques, making use of various enhanced fluorescent proteins. We found that DCL1, HYL1 and SE formed bodies which localized in the nuclei. We were also able to locate the miRNA primary transcript using an MS2-tagged method on these bodies. It appears very likely that the observed DCL1-HYL1-SE nuclear body is involved in miRNA production. Co-expression of SmD3 or SmB proteins revealed the localization of DCL1-HYL1-SE complexes in the SmD3/SmB nuclear bodies.

  20. The majority of total nuclear-encoded non-ribosomal RNA in a human cell is 'dark matter' un-annotated RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milos Patrice

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Discovery that the transcriptional output of the human genome is far more complex than predicted by the current set of protein-coding annotations and that most RNAs produced do not appear to encode proteins has transformed our understanding of genome complexity and suggests new paradigms of genome regulation. However, the fraction of all cellular RNA whose function we do not understand and the fraction of the genome that is utilized to produce that RNA remain controversial. This is not simply a bookkeeping issue because the degree to which this un-annotated transcription is present has important implications with respect to its biologic function and to the general architecture of genome regulation. For example, efforts to elucidate how non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs regulate genome function will be compromised if that class of RNAs is dismissed as simply 'transcriptional noise'. Results We show that the relative mass of RNA whose function and/or structure we do not understand (the so called 'dark matter' RNAs, as a proportion of all non-ribosomal, non-mitochondrial human RNA (mt-RNA, can be greater than that of protein-encoding transcripts. This observation is obscured in studies that focus only on polyA-selected RNA, a method that enriches for protein coding RNAs and at the same time discards the vast majority of RNA prior to analysis. We further show the presence of a large number of very long, abundantly-transcribed regions (100's of kb in intergenic space and further show that expression of these regions is associated with neoplastic transformation. These overlap some regions found previously in normal human embryonic tissues and raises an interesting hypothesis as to the function of these ncRNAs in both early development and neoplastic transformation. Conclusions We conclude that 'dark matter' RNA can constitute the majority of non-ribosomal, non-mitochondrial-RNA and a significant fraction arises from numerous very long

  1. Solution nuclear magnetic resonance analyses of the anticodon arms of proteinogenic and nonproteinogenic tRNA(Gly).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Andrew T; Nikonowicz, Edward P

    2012-05-01

    Although the fate of most tRNA molecules in the cell is aminoacylation and delivery to the ribosome, some tRNAs are destined to fulfill other functional roles. In addition to their central role in translation, tRNA molecules participate in processes such as regulation of gene expression, bacterial cell wall biosynthesis, viral replication, antibiotic biosynthesis, and suppression of alternative splicing. In bacteria, glycyl-tRNA molecules with anticodon sequences GCC and UCC exhibit multiple extratranslational functions, including transcriptional regulation and cell wall biosynthesis. We have determined the high-resolution structures of three glycyl-tRNA anticodon arms with anticodon sequences GCC and UCC. Two of the tRNA molecules are proteinogenic (tRNA(Gly,GCC) and tRNA(Gly,UCC)), and the third is nonproteinogenic (np-tRNA(Gly,UCC)) and participates in cell wall biosynthesis. The UV-monitored thermal melting curves show that the anticodon arm of tRNA(Gly,UCC) with a loop-closing C-A(+) base pair melts at a temperature 10 °C lower than those of tRNA(Gly,GCC) and np-tRNA(Gly,UCC). U-A and C-G pairs close the loops of the latter two molecules and enhance stem stability. Mg(2+) stabilizes the tRNA(Gly,UCC) anticodon arm and reduces the T(m) differential. The structures of the three tRNA(Gly) anticodon arms exhibit small differences among one another, but none of them form the classical U-turn motif. The anticodon loop of tRNA(Gly,GCC) becomes more dynamic and disordered in the presence of multivalent cations, whereas metal ion coordination in the anticodon loops of tRNA(Gly,UCC) and np-tRNA(Gly,UCC) establishes conformational homogeneity. The conformational similarity of the molecules is greater than their functional differences might suggest. Because aminoacylation of full-length tRNA molecules is accomplished by one tRNA synthetase, the similar structural context of the loop may facilitate efficient recognition of each of the anticodon sequences.

  2. Transcription of Leishmania major U2 small nuclear RNA gene is directed by extragenic sequences located within a tRNA-like and a tRNA-Ala gene

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rojas-Sánchez, Saúl; Figueroa-Angulo, Elisa; Moreno-Campos, Rodrigo; Florencio-Martínez, Luis E; Manning-Cela, Rebeca G; Martínez-Calvillo, Santiago

    2016-01-01

    .... Here we report the characterization of L. major U2 snRNA promoter region. All species of Leishmania possess a single U2 snRNA gene that contains a divergently-oriented tRNA-Ala gene in the upstream region...

  3. Transcription of Leishmania major U2 small nuclear RNA gene is directed by extragenic sequences located within a tRNA-like and a tRNA-Ala gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Sánchez, Saúl; Figueroa-Angulo, Elisa; Moreno-Campos, Rodrigo; Florencio-Martínez, Luis E; Manning-Cela, Rebeca G; Martínez-Calvillo, Santiago

    2016-07-19

    Leishmania and other trypanosomatid parasites possess atypical mechanisms of gene expression, including the maturation of mRNAs by trans-splicing and the involvement of RNA Polymerase III in transcription of all snRNA molecules. Since snRNAs are essential for trans-splicing, we are interested in the study of the sequences that direct their expression. Here we report the characterization of L. major U2 snRNA promoter region. All species of Leishmania possess a single U2 snRNA gene that contains a divergently-oriented tRNA-Ala gene in the upstream region. Between these two genes we found a tRNA-like sequence that possesses conserved boxes A and B. Primer extension and RT-qPCR analyses with RNA from transiently-transfected cells showed that transcription of L. major U2 snRNA is almost abolished when boxes A and B from the tRNA-like are deleted or mutated. The levels of the U2 snRNA were also highly affected when base substitutions were introduced into box B from the tRNA-Ala gene and the first nucleotides of the U2 snRNA gene itself. We also demonstrate that the tRNA-like is transcribed, generating a main transcript of around 109 bases. As pseudouridines in snRNAs are required for splicing in other organisms, we searched for this modified nucleotide in the L. major U2 snRNA. Our results show the presence of six pseudouridines in the U2 snRNA, including one in the Sm site that has not been reported in other organisms. Four different regions control the transcription of the U2 snRNA gene in L. major: boxes A and B from the neighbor tRNA-like, box B from the upstream tRNA-Ala gene and the first nucleotides of the U2 snRNA. Thus, the promoter region of L. major U2 snRNA is different from any other promoter reported for snRNAs. Pseudouridines could play important roles in L. major U2 snRNA, since they were found in functionally important regions, including the branch point recognition region and the Sm binding site.

  4. Circulating U2 small nuclear RNA fragments as a diagnostic and prognostic biomarker in lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Jens; Schuler, Martin; Gauler, Thomas Christoph; Nöpel-Dünnebacke, Stefanie; Ahrens, Maike; Hoffmann, Andreas-Claudius; Kasper, Stefan; Nensa, Felix; Gomez, Benedikt; Hahnemann, Maria; Breitenbuecher, Frank; Cheufou, Danjouma; Özkan, Filiz; Darwiche, Kaid; Hoiczyk, Mathias; Reis, Henning; Welter, Stefan; Eberhardt, Wilfried Ernst Erich; Eisenacher, Martin; Teschler, Helmut; Stamatis, Georgios; Schmiegel, Wolff; Hahn, Stephan Albrecht; Baraniskin, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Lung cancer accounts for one in five cancer deaths. Broad screening strategies for high-risk populations are unavailable, and the validation of biomarkers for early cancer detection remains a prime interest. Therefore, we investigated the value of circulating U2 small nuclear RNA fragments (RNU2-1f) as a biomarker for diagnosis, prognosis estimation and treatment monitoring in a large lung cancer cohort. We determined RNU2-1f abundance in sera of patients with treatment-naive lung cancer (n = 211, 25.6 % early stage), chronic lung disease (n = 56) and healthy controls (n = 58) by reverse transcription quantitative PCR. Initial levels and changes after one chemotherapy cycle were correlated with treatment outcomes in patient subsets. Relative serum RNU2-1f expression levels (REL) were elevated in lung cancer patients compared with patients with chronic lung disease and healthy controls (p < 0.0001). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for the complete data set (lung cancer vs. healthy) was 0.91 (95 % CI 0.87-0.95). By applying a REL of -4.505 as diagnostic cutoff (Youden's criterion), sensitivity and specificity reached 0.86 and 0.81, respectively. To determine the generalization error, in a subsampling study, sensitivity and specificity were estimated as 0.82 and 0.77 for the application to future, independent samples. High initial RNU2-1f REL were associated with shorter median survival in stage IIIB/IV disease (RNU2-1fhigh = 228 days/RNU2-1flow = 484 days; p = 0.009, log-rank test, HR1.43 95 % CI 1.23-1.66). Multivariate analysis confirmed RNU2-1f as an independent prognostic factor. Patients with subsequent RNU2-1f reduction had a trend toward better treatment outcome. Serum RNU2-1f may serve as a biomarker for lung cancer detection, prognosis prediction and treatment monitoring.

  5. Nuclear Factor-κB Signaling Pathway Constitutively Activated in Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cell Lines and Inhibition of Growth of Cells by Small Interfering RNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang TIAN; Wei-Dong ZANG; Wei-Hong HOU; Hong-Tao LIU; Le-Xun XUE

    2006-01-01

    Although constitutive nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation has been reported in many human tumors, the role of the NF-κB pathway in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) has not been known.In this study, NF-κB pathway in two ESCC cell lines was investigated using immunocytochemistry, Western blot and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The activation of NF-κB DNA binding was determined by electrophoretic mobility-shift assay. RNA interference was used to specifically inhibit the expression of p65. Growth of cells was evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay.The results showed that p50, p65, Iκ Bα, p-Iκ Bα and Iκ B kinase β were expressed and mainly localized in the cytoplasm. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction results showed the constitutive expressions of p50, p65 and Iκ Bα mRNA in the two ESCC cell lines. Furthermore, the nuclear extracts revealed that p50 and p65 translocated to the nucleus had DNA-binding activity. Finally, small interfering RNA of p65 decreased the expression of p65, and the viability of cells transfected with p65 small interfering RNA was significantly suppressed at the same concentration of 5-fluorouracil (P<0.05) compared to untransfected cells. The results of this study showed that there was the constitutively activated NF-κB signaling pathway in the ESCC cell lines. RNA interference targeting at p65 increased the sensitivity of the ESCC cell lines to 5-fluorouracil,suggesting that NF-κB might be a good target for cancer treatment.

  6. Noninvasive quantification of myocardial perfusion heterogeneity by Markovian analysis in SPECT nuclear imaging; Quantification non invasive de l'heterogeneite de la perfusion du myocarde par analyse markovienne en imageries nucleaire SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pons, G.

    2011-04-28

    Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of mortality worldwide, and third of these deaths are caused by coronary artery disease and rupture of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques. The heterogeneous alteration of the coronary microcirculation is an early phenomenon associated with many cardiovascular risk factors that can strongly predict the subsequent development of coronary artery disease, and lead to the appearance of myocardial perfusion heterogeneity. Nuclear medicine allows the study of myocardial perfusion in clinical routine through scintigraphic scans performed after injection of a radioactive tracer of coronary blood flow. Analysis of scintigraphic perfusion images currently allows the detection of myocardial ischemia, but the ability of the technique to measure the perfusion heterogeneity in apparently normally perfused areas is unknown. The first part of this thesis focuses on a retrospective clinical study to determine the feasibility of myocardial perfusion heterogeneity quantification measured by Thallium-201 single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in diabetic patients compared with healthy subjects. The clinical study has demonstrated the ability of routine thallium-201 SPECT imaging to quantify greater myocardial perfusion heterogeneity in diabetic patients compared with normal subjects. The second part of this thesis tests the hypothesis that the myocardial perfusion heterogeneity could be quantified in small animal SPECT imaging by Thallium-201 and/or Technetium-99m-MIBI in an experimental study using two animal models of diabetes, and is correlated with histological changes. The lack of difference in myocardial perfusion heterogeneity between control and diabetic animals suggests that animal models are poorly suited, or that the technology currently available does not seem satisfactory to obtain similar results as the clinical study. (author)

  7. RNA helicase MOV10 functions as a co-factor of HIV-1 Rev to facilitate Rev/RRE-dependent nuclear export of viral mRNAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Feng; Zhang, Junsong; Zhang, Yijun; Geng, Guannan; Liang, Juanran; Li, Yingniang; Chen, Jingliang [Institute of Human Virology, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Key Laboratory of Tropical Disease Control of Ministry of Education, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Liu, Chao, E-mail: liuchao9@mail.sysu.edu.cn [Institute of Human Virology, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Key Laboratory of Tropical Disease Control of Ministry of Education, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Zhang, Hui [Institute of Human Virology, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Key Laboratory of Tropical Disease Control of Ministry of Education, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China)

    2015-12-15

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) exploits multiple host factors during its replication. The REV/RRE-dependent nuclear export of unspliced/partially spliced viral transcripts needs the assistance of host proteins. Recent studies have shown that MOV10 overexpression inhibited HIV-1 replication at various steps. However, the endogenous MOV10 was required in certain step(s) of HIV-1 replication. In this report, we found that MOV10 potently enhances the nuclear export of viral mRNAs and subsequently increases the expression of Gag protein and other late products through affecting the Rev/RRE axis. The co-immunoprecipitation analysis indicated that MOV10 interacts with Rev in an RNA-independent manner. The DEAG-box of MOV10 was required for the enhancement of Rev/RRE-dependent nuclear export and the DEAG-box mutant showed a dominant-negative activity. Our data propose that HIV-1 utilizes the anti-viral factor MOV10 to function as a co-factor of Rev and demonstrate the complicated effects of MOV10 on HIV-1 life cycle. - Highlights: • MOV10 can function as a co-factor of HIV-1 Rev. • MOV10 facilitates Rev/RRE-dependent transport of viral mRNAs. • MOV10 interacts with Rev in an RNA-independent manner. • The DEAG-box of MOV10 is required for the enhancement of Rev/RRE-dependent export.

  8. Inhibition of Cd83 Cell Surface Expression during Dendritic Cell Maturation by Interference with Nuclear Export of Cd83 mRNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Monika; Rosorius, Olaf; Krätzer, Friedrich; Bevec, Dorian; Kuhnt, Christine; Steinkasserer, Alexander; Schuler, Gerold; Hauber, Joachim

    2000-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs), nature's adjuvant, must mature to sensitize T cells. However, although the maturation process is essential, it is not yet fully understood at the molecular level. In this study, we investigated the course of expression of the unique hypusine-containing protein eukaryotic initiation factor 5A (eIF-5A), which is part of a particular RNA nuclear export pathway, during in vitro generation of human DCs. We show that eIF-5A expression is significantly upregulated during DC maturation. Furthermore, an inhibitor of the hypusine modification, GC7 (N1-guanyl-1,7-diaminoheptane), prevents CD83 surface expression by apparently interfering with nucleocytoplasmic translocation of the CD83 mRNA and, importantly, significantly inhibits DC-mediated T lymphocyte activation. The data presented suggest that CD83 mRNA is transported from the nucleus to the cytoplasm via a specific nuclear export pathway and that hypusine formation appears to be essential for the maturation of functional DCs. Therefore, pharmacological interference with hypusine formation may provide a new possibility to modulate DC function. PMID:10790432

  9. DDX6 regulates sequestered nuclear CUG-expanded DMPK-mRNA in dystrophia myotonica type 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pettersson, Olof Joakim; Aagaard, Lars; Andrejeva, Diana

    2014-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is caused by CUG triplet expansions in the 3′ UTR of dystrophia myotonica protein kinase (DMPK) messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA). The etiology of this multi-systemic disease involves pre-mRNA splicing defects elicited by the ability of the CUG-expanded mRNA to ‘sp......Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is caused by CUG triplet expansions in the 3′ UTR of dystrophia myotonica protein kinase (DMPK) messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA). The etiology of this multi-systemic disease involves pre-mRNA splicing defects elicited by the ability of the CUG-expanded m...

  10. Identification of kakusei, a Nuclear Non-Coding RNA, as an Immediate Early Gene from the Honeybee, and Its Application for Neuroethological Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taketoshi Kiya

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The honeybee is a social insect that exhibits various social behaviors. To elucidate the neural basis of honeybee behavior, we detected neural activity in freely-moving honeybee workers using an immediate early gene (IEG that is expressed in a neural activity-dependent manner. In European honeybees (Apis mellifera, we identified a novel nuclear non-coding RNA, termed kakusei, as the first insect IEG, and revealed the neural activity pattern in foragers. In addition, we isolated a homologue of kakusei, termed Acks, from the Japanese honeybee (Apis cerana, and detected active neurons in workers fighting with the giant hornet.

  11. Identification of kakusei, a nuclear non-coding RNA, as an immediate early gene from the honeybee, and its application for neuroethological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiya, Taketoshi; Ugajin, Atsushi; Kunieda, Takekazu; Kubo, Takeo

    2012-11-22

    The honeybee is a social insect that exhibits various social behaviors. To elucidate the neural basis of honeybee behavior, we detected neural activity in freely-moving honeybee workers using an immediate early gene (IEG) that is expressed in a neural activity-dependent manner. In European honeybees (Apis mellifera), we identified a novel nuclear non-coding RNA, termed kakusei, as the first insect IEG, and revealed the neural activity pattern in foragers. In addition, we isolated a homologue of kakusei, termed Acks, from the Japanese honeybee (Apis cerana), and detected active neurons in workers fighting with the giant hornet.

  12. A Conserved Nuclear Cyclophilin Is Required for Both RNA Polymerase II Elongation and Co-transcriptional Splicing in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong H Ahn

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The elongation phase of transcription by RNA Polymerase II (Pol II involves numerous events that are tightly coordinated, including RNA processing, histone modification, and chromatin remodeling. RNA splicing factors are associated with elongating Pol II, and the interdependent coupling of splicing and elongation has been documented in several systems. Here we identify a conserved, multi-domain cyclophilin family member, SIG-7, as an essential factor for both normal transcription elongation and co-transcriptional splicing. In embryos depleted for SIG-7, RNA levels for over a thousand zygotically expressed genes are substantially reduced, Pol II becomes significantly reduced at the 3' end of genes, marks of transcription elongation are reduced, and unspliced mRNAs accumulate. Our findings suggest that SIG-7 plays a central role in both Pol II elongation and co-transcriptional splicing and may provide an important link for their coordination and regulation.

  13. A Conserved Nuclear Cyclophilin Is Required for Both RNA Polymerase II Elongation and Co-transcriptional Splicing in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jeong H.; Rechsteiner, Andreas; Strome, Susan; Kelly, William G.

    2016-01-01

    The elongation phase of transcription by RNA Polymerase II (Pol II) involves numerous events that are tightly coordinated, including RNA processing, histone modification, and chromatin remodeling. RNA splicing factors are associated with elongating Pol II, and the interdependent coupling of splicing and elongation has been documented in several systems. Here we identify a conserved, multi-domain cyclophilin family member, SIG-7, as an essential factor for both normal transcription elongation and co-transcriptional splicing. In embryos depleted for SIG-7, RNA levels for over a thousand zygotically expressed genes are substantially reduced, Pol II becomes significantly reduced at the 3’ end of genes, marks of transcription elongation are reduced, and unspliced mRNAs accumulate. Our findings suggest that SIG-7 plays a central role in both Pol II elongation and co-transcriptional splicing and may provide an important link for their coordination and regulation. PMID:27541139

  14. Indole-based cyanine as a nuclear RNA-selective two-photon fluorescent probe for live cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lei; Chan, Miu Shan; Xu, Di; Tam, Dick Yan; Bolze, Frédéric; Lo, Pik Kwan; Wong, Man Shing

    2015-05-15

    We have demonstrated that the subcellular targeting properties of the indole-based cyanines can be tuned by the functional substituent attached onto the indole moiety in which the first example of a highly RNA-selective and two-photon active fluorescent light-up probe for high contrast and brightness TPEF images of rRNA in the nucleolus of live cells has been developed. It is important to find that this cyanine binds much stronger toward RNA than DNA in a buffer solution as well as selectively stains and targets to rRNA in the nucleolus. Remarkably, the TPEF brightness (Φσmax) is dramatically increased with 11-fold enhancement in the presence of rRNA, leading to the record high Φσmax of 228 GM for RNA. This probe not only shows good biocompatibility and superior photostability but also offers general applicability to various live cell lines including HeLa, HepG2, MCF-7, and KB cells and excellent counterstaining compatibility with commercially available DNA or protein trackers.

  15. Simultaneous analysis of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, mRNA and miRNA from backspatter from inside parts of firearms generated by shots at "triple contrast" doped ballistic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabmüller, Melanie; Schyma, Christian; Euteneuer, Jan; Madea, Burkhard; Courts, Cornelius

    2015-09-01

    When a firearm projectile hits a biological target a spray of biological material (e.g., blood and tissue fragments) can be propelled from the entrance wound back towards the firearm. This phenomenon has become known as "backspatter" and if caused by contact shots or shots from short distances traces of backspatter may reach, consolidate on, and be recovered from, the inside surfaces of the firearm. Thus, a comprehensive investigation of firearm-related crimes must not only comprise of wound ballistic assessment but also backspatter analysis, and may even take into account potential correlations between these emergences. The aim of the present study was to evaluate and expand the applicability of the "triple contrast" method by probing its compatibility with forensic analysis of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA and the simultaneous investigation of co-extracted mRNA and miRNA from backspatter collected from internal components of different types of firearms after experimental shootings. We demonstrate that "triple contrast" stained biological samples collected from the inside surfaces of firearms are amenable to forensic co-analysis of DNA and RNA and permit sequence analysis of the entire mtDNA displacement-loop, even for "low template" DNA amounts that preclude standard short tandem repeat DNA analysis. Our findings underscore the "triple contrast" method's usefulness as a research tool in experimental forensic ballistics.

  16. Mechanistic study on the nuclear modifier gene MSS1 mutation suppressing neomycin sensitivity of the mitochondrial 15S rRNA C1477G mutation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qiyin; Wang, Wei; He, Xiangyu; Zhu, Xiaoyu; Shen, Yaoyao; Yu, Zhe; Wang, Xuexiang; Qi, Xuchen; Zhang, Xuan; Fan, Mingjie; Dai, Yu; Yang, Shuxu; Yan, Qingfeng

    2014-01-01

    The phenotypic manifestation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations can be modulated by nuclear genes and environmental factors. However, neither the interaction among these factors nor their underlying mechanisms are well understood. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae mtDNA 15S rRNA C1477G mutation (PR) corresponds to the human 12S rRNA A1555G mutation. Here we report that a nuclear modifier gene mss1 mutation suppresses the neomycin-sensitivity phenotype of a yeast C1477G mutant in fermentable YPD medium. Functional assays show that the mitochondrial function of the yeast C1477G mutant was impaired severely in YPD medium with neomycin. Moreover, the mss1 mutation led to a significant increase in the steady-state level of HAP5 (heme activated protein), which greatly up-regulated the expression of glycolytic transcription factors RAP1, GCR1, and GCR2 and thus stimulated glycolysis. Furthermore, the high expression of the key glycolytic enzyme genes HXK2, PFK1 and PYK1 indicated that enhanced glycolysis not only compensated for the ATP reduction from oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) in mitochondria, but also ensured the growth of the mss1(PR) mutant in YPD medium with neomycin. This study advances our understanding of the phenotypic manifestation of mtDNA mutations.

  17. Effect of Nuclear Factor-kappa B on Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor mRNA Expression of Human Pulmonary Artery Smooth Muscle Cells in Hypoxia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张焕萍; 徐永健; 张珍祥; 许淑云; 倪望; 陈士新

    2004-01-01

    Summary: In order to investigate the effect of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA expression of human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (HPASMCs) in hypoxia, the cultured HPASMCs in vitro were stimulated with pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), an inhibitor of NF-κB. The NF-κB p65 nuclei positive expression was detected by immunocytochemical technique. The IκBa protein expression was measured by Western blot.RT-PCR was used to detect the VEGF mRNA expression of HPASMCs. The results showed that no significant change was observed in the NF-κB p65 nuclei positive expression of cultured HPASMCs during 6 h-24 h in normoxia, but the levels of NF-κB p65 nuclei positive expression of cultured HPASMCs were significantly increased in hypoxia groups as compared with those in all normoxia groups (P<0.05). The IκBα protein expression of cultured HPASMCs showed no significant change during 6 h-24 h in normoxia, but significantly decreased in hypoxia as comapred with that in normoxia groups (P<0.05). PDTC (1 to 100 μmol/L) could inhibit the VEGF mRNA expression of HPASMCs in a concentration-dependent manner in hypoxia. In conclusion, NF-κB can be partly translocation activated from cytoplasm into nuclei in the cultured HPASMCs under hypoxia. The inhibition of NF-κB activation can decrease the VEGF mRNA expression. h is suggested that the activation of NF-κB is involved in the VEGFmRNA expression of HPASMCs under hypoxia.

  18. Vitamin D and alternative splicing of RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Rui; Chun, Rene F; Lisse, Thomas S; Garcia, Alejandro J; Xu, Jianzhong; Adams, John S; Hewison, Martin

    2015-04-01

    The active form of vitamin D (1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, 1,25(OH)2D) exerts its genomic effects via binding to a nuclear high-affinity vitamin D receptor (VDR). Recent deep sequencing analysis of VDR binding locations across the complete genome has significantly expanded our understanding of the actions of vitamin D and VDR on gene transcription. However, these studies have also promoted appreciation of the extra-transcriptional impact of vitamin D on gene expression. It is now clear that vitamin D interacts with the epigenome via effects on DNA methylation, histone acetylation, and microRNA generation to maintain normal biological functions. There is also increasing evidence that vitamin D can influence pre-mRNA constitutive splicing and alternative splicing, although the mechanism for this remains unclear. Pre-mRNA splicing has long been thought to be a post-transcription RNA processing event, but current data indicate that this occurs co-transcriptionally. Several steroid hormones have been recognized to coordinately control gene transcription and pre-mRNA splicing through the recruitment of nuclear receptor co-regulators that can both control gene transcription and splicing. The current review will discuss this concept with specific reference to vitamin D, and the potential role of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein C (hnRNPC), a nuclear factor with an established function in RNA splicing. hnRNPC, has been shown to be involved in the VDR transcriptional complex as a vitamin D-response element-binding protein (VDRE-BP), and may act as a coupling factor linking VDR-directed gene transcription with RNA splicing. In this way hnRNPC may provide an additional mechanism for the fine-tuning of vitamin D-regulated target gene expression. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled '17th Vitamin D Workshop'.

  19. Nuclear modifier MTO2 modulates the aminoglycoside-sensitivity of mitochondrial 15S rRNA C1477G mutation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangyu He

    Full Text Available The phenotypic manifestations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA mutations are modulated by mitochondrial DNA haplotypes, nuclear modifier genes and environmental factors. The yeast mitochondrial 15S rRNA C1477G (P(R or P(R 454 mutation corresponds to the human 12S rRNA C1494T and A1555G mutations, which are well known as primary factors for aminoglycoside-induced nonsyndromic deafness. Here we report that the deletion of the nuclear modifier gene MTO2 suppressed the aminoglycoside-sensitivity of mitochondrial 15S rRNA C1477G mutation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. First, the strain with a single mtDNA C1477G mutation exhibited hypersensitivity to neomycin. Functional assays indicated that the steady-state transcription level of mitochondrial DNA, the mitochondrial respiratory rate, and the membrane potential decreased significantly after neomycin treatment. The impaired mitochondria could not produce sufficient energy to maintain cell viability. Second, when the mto2 null and the mitochondrial C1477G mutations co-existed (mto2(P(R, the oxygen consumption rate in the double mutant decreased markedly compared to that of the control strains (MTO2(P(S, mto2(P(S and MTO2(P(R. The expression levels of the key glycolytic genes HXK2, PFK1 and PYK1 in the mto2(P(R strain were stimulated by neomycin and up-regulated by 89%, 112% and 55%, respectively. The enhanced glycolysis compensated for the respiratory energy deficits, and could be inhibited by the glycolytic enzyme inhibitor. Our findings in yeast will provide a new insight into the pathogenesis of human deafness.

  20. Scriptaid Treatment Decreases DNA Methyltransferase 1 Expression by Induction of MicroRNA-152 Expression in Porcine Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer Embryos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Liang

    Full Text Available Abnormal epigenetic reprogramming of donor nuclei after somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT is thought to be the main cause of low cloning efficiencies. A growing body of evidence has demonstrated a positive role of Scriptaid, a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi that belongs to an existing class of hydroxamic acid-containing HDACis, on the development competence of cloned embryos in many species. The present study investigated the effects of Scriptaid on the development of porcine SCNT embryos in vitro and its mechanism. Treatment with 300 or 500 nM Scriptaid for 20 h after activation significantly increased the percentage of SCNT embryos that developed to the blastocyst stage and the total number of cells per blastocyst and significantly decreased the percentage of apoptotic cells in blastocysts. Scriptaid treatment significantly increased the level of histone H3 acetylated at K9 and the conversion of 5-methylcytosine into 5-hydroxymethylcytosine and significantly decreased the level of histone H3 trimethylated at K9 at the pronuclear stage. As a potential mechanism for the DNA methylation changes, our results showed that the expression of DNA methyltransferase 1 was frequently down-regulated in Scriptaid-treated embryos in comparison with untreated embryos and was inversely correlated to endogenous microRNA-152 (miR-152. Taken together, these findings illustrated a crucial functional crosstalk between miR-152 and DNMT1. Meanwhile, mRNA and protein levels of POU5F1 and CDX2 were increased in Scriptaid-treated embryos. mRNA levels of Caspase3, and Bax were significantly decreased and that of Bcl-xL was significantly increased in Scriptaid-treated embryos. In conclusion, these observations would contribute to uncover the nuclear reprogramming mechanisms underlying the effects of Scriptaid on the improvement of porcine SCNT embryos.

  1. A large number of nuclear genes in the human parasite blastocystis require mRNA polyadenylation to create functional termination codons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimeš, Vladimír; Gentekaki, Eleni; Roger, Andrew J; Eliáš, Marek

    2014-07-10

    Termination codons in mRNA molecules are typically specified directly by the sequence of the corresponding gene. However, in mitochondria of a few eukaryotic groups, some mRNAs contain the termination codon UAA deriving one or both adenosines from transcript polyadenylation. Here, we show that a similar phenomenon occurs for a substantial number of nuclear genes in Blastocystis spp., divergent unicellular eukaryote gut parasites. Our analyses of published genomic data from Blastocystis sp. subtype 7 revealed that polyadenylation-mediated creation of termination codons occurs in approximately 15% of all nuclear genes. As this phenomenon has not been noticed before, the procedure previously employed to annotate the Blastocystis nuclear genome sequence failed to correctly define the structure of the 3'-ends of hundreds of genes. From sequence data we have obtained from the distantly related Blastocystis sp. subtype 1 strain, we show that this phenomenon is widespread within the Blastocystis genus. Polyadenylation in Blastocystis appears to be directed by a conserved GU-rich element located four nucleotides downstream of the polyadenylation site. Thus, the highly precise positioning of the polyadenylation in Blastocystis has allowed reduction of the 3'-untranslated regions to the point that, in many genes, only one or two nucleotides of the termination codon are left. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  2. The Transcription Bubble of the RNA Polymerase-Promoter Open Complex Exhibits Conformational Heterogeneity and Millisecond-Scale Dynamics : Implications for Transcription Start-Site Selection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robb, Nicole C.; Cordes, Thorben; Hwang, Ling Chin; Gryte, Kristofer; Duchi, Diego; Craggs, Timothy D.; Santoso, Yusdi; Weiss, Shimon; Ebright, Richard H.; Kapanidis, Achillefs N.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial transcription is initiated after RNA polymerase (RNAP) binds to promoter DNA, melts similar to 14 bp around the transcription start site and forms a single-stranded "transcription bubble" within a catalytically active RNAP-DNA open complex (RPo). There is significant flexibility in the tra

  3. Nuclear retention of the lncRNA SNHG1 by doxorubicin attenuates hnRNPC-p53 protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yuan; Liu, Shanshan; Fan, Jiao; Jin, Yinghua; Tian, Baolei; Zheng, Xiaofei; Fu, Hanjiang

    2017-03-06

    The protein p53 plays a crucial role in the regulation of cellular responses to diverse stresses. Thus, a major priority in cell biology is to define the mechanisms that regulate p53 activity in response to stresses or maintain it at basal levels under normal conditions. Moreover, further investigation is required to establish whether RNA participates in regulating p53's interaction with other proteins. Here, by conducting systematic experiments, we discovered a p53 interactor-hnRNPC-that directly binds to p53, destabilizes it, and prevents its activation under normal conditions. Upon doxorubicin treatment, the lncRNA SNHG1 is retained in the nucleus through its binding with nucleolin and it competes with p53 for hnRNPC binding, which upregulates p53 levels and promotes p53-dependent apoptosis by impairing hnRNPC regulation of p53 activity. Our results indicate that a balance between lncRNA SNHG1 and hnRNPC regulates p53 activity and p53-dependent apoptosis upon doxorubicin treatment, and further indicate that a change in lncRNA subcellular localization under specific circumstances is biologically significant.

  4. Activation of nuclear factor-kappa B and cell adhesion molecule mRNA expression in duodenal mucosa of dogs with lymphocytic-plasmacytic enteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okanishi, Hiroki; Kabeya, Hidenori; Maruyama, Soichi; Kagawa, Yumiko; Watari, Toshihiro

    2013-08-15

    Lymphocytic-plasmacytic enteritis (LPE) is the most common form of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) affecting the canine small intestine; however, the molecular basis of the pathogenesis remains unclear. It has recently been hypothesized that the primary defect is impaired innate immune function, as is the case for human IBD. Nuclear factor-kappa B (NFkappaB) plays a central role in innate immunity, and is a major transcriptional regulator of several proinflammatory cytokines, pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) such as toll-like receptors (TLRs), nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors and cell adhesion molecules (CAMs). The purpose of this study was to evaluate, in the duodenal mucosa of 21 dogs with LPE and 8 control dogs, the degree of NFkappaB activity and the mRNA expression of two selected cytokines, nucleotide oligomerization domain two (NOD2) receptor and three selected CAMs, all of which are regulated by NFkappaB, using the electrophoretic mobility shift assay and real-time reverse transcription PCR. NFkappaB binding activity was significantly higher in the inflamed duodenal mucosa of the LPE dogs as compared to healthy controls. Furthermore, expression of mRNA for intercellular cell adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and mucosal addressin cell adhesion molecule 1 (MAdCAM-1) was significantly higher and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) mRNA significantly lower in LPE dogs than in healthy controls. However, there was no significant difference in the mRNA levels for TNFα, IL1β and NOD2 between the two groups. These results suggest that NFkappaB and CAMs may play important roles in the pathogenesis of canine LPE. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Small Nuclear RNAs U11 and U12 Modulate Expression of TNR-CFTR mRNA in Mammalian Kidneys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza-Menezes, Jackson; Tukaye, Deepali N.; Novaira, Horacio Javier; Guggino, William B.; Morales, Marcelo M.

    2008-01-01

    TNR-CFTR, discovered as a splice variant of CFTR (Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane conductance Regulator), is distributed in different tissues such as human and rat kidney, trachea, lungs etc and is a functional chloride channel. In Kidneys, our findings show TNR-CFTR to have an unique distribution pattern with low levels of expression in renal cortex and high levels of expression in renal medulla. As shown by us previously, TNR-CFTR mRNA lacks 145 bp corresponding to segments of exons 13 and 14. This deletion causes a frame shift mutation leading to reading of a premature termination codon in exon 14. Premature termination of translation produces a functional half molecule of CFTR; TNR-CFTR. Our analysis of TNR mRNA has shown that the putative alternatively spliced intron has in its 5′ and 3′ conserved element CT and AC, respectively, that can be recognized by snRNAs U11 and U12. With these findings, we hypothesize that TNR-CFTR mRNA alternative splicing is probably mediate by splicing pathways utilizing U11 and U12 snRNAs. In this study, we have determined sequences of snRNAs U11 and U12 derived from rat kidney, which show significant homology to human U11 and U12 snRNAs. We show that there is significantly lower expression of U11 and U12 snRNAs in renal cortex compared to renal medulla in both humans and rats. This renal pattern of distribution of U11 and U12 snRNAs in both humans and rats closely follows distribution pattern of renal TNR-CFTR. Further, we have shown that blocking U11 and/or U12 mRNAs, by using antisense probes transfected in Immortalized Rat Proximal Tubule Cell line (IRPTC), decreases TNR-CFTR mRNA expression but not wild-type CFTR mRNA expression. Our results suggest that expression of U11 and/or U12 snRNAs is important for non-conventional alternative splicing process that gives rise to mRNA transcript coding for TNR-CFTR. PMID:18769035

  6. Impact of static and dynamic A-form heterogeneity on the determination of RNA global structural dynamics using NMR residual dipolar couplings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musselman, Catherine [University of Michigan, Department of Chemistry, Biophysics Research Division, and Program in Bioinformatics (United States); Pitt, Stephen W. [Johnson and Johnson Inc (United States); Gulati, Kush; Foster, Lesley L.; Andricioaei, Ioan; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M. [University of Michigan, Department of Chemistry, Biophysics Research Division, and Program in Bioinformatics (United States)], E-mail: hashimi@umich.edu

    2006-12-15

    We examined how static and dynamic deviations from the idealized A-form helix propagate into errors in the principal order tensor parameters determined using residual dipolar couplings (rdcs). A 20-ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of the HIV-1 transactivation response element (TAR) RNA together with a survey of spin relaxation studies of RNA dynamics reveals that pico-to-nanosecond local motions in non-terminal Watson-Crick base-pairs will uniformly attenuate base and sugar one bond rdcs by {approx}7%. Gaussian distributions were generated for base and sugar torsion angles through statistical comparison of 40 RNA X-ray structures solved to <3.0 A resolution. For a typical number ({>=}11) of one bond C-H base and sugar rdcs, these structural deviations together with rdc uncertainty (1.5 Hz) lead to average errors in the magnitude and orientation of the principal axis of order that are <9% and <4 deg., respectively. The errors decrease to <5% and <4 deg. for {>=}17 rdcs. A protocol that allows for estimation of error in A-form order tensors due to both angular deviations and rdc uncertainty (Aform-RDC) is validated using theoretical simulations and used to analyze rdcs measured previously in TAR in the free state and bound to four distinct ligands. Results confirm earlier findings that the two TAR helices undergo large changes in both their mean relative orientation and dynamics upon binding to different targets.

  7. Perturbation of MicroRNA-370/Lin-28 homolog A/nuclear factor kappa B regulatory circuit contributes to the development of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wen-Ping; Yi, Min; Li, Qian-Qian; Zhou, Wei-Ping; Cong, Wen-Ming; Yang, Yuan; Ning, Bei-Fang; Yin, Chuan; Huang, Zhao-Wei; Wang, Jian; Qian, Hui; Jiang, Cai-Feng; Chen, Yue-Xiang; Xia, Chun-Yan; Wang, Hong-Yang; Zhang, Xin; Xie, Wei-Fen

    2013-12-01

    MicroRNA 370 (miR-370) is located within the DLK1/DIO3 imprinting region on human chromosome 14, which has been identified as a cancer-associated genomic region. However, the role of miR-370 in malignances remains controversial. Here, we report that miR-370 was repressed in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tissues and hepatoma cell lines. Using gain-of-function and loss-of-function experiments, we demonstrated that miR-370 inhibited the malignant phenotype of HCC cells in vitro. Overexpression of miR-370 inhibited growth and metastasis of HCC cells in vivo. Moreover, the RNA-binding protein, LIN28A, was identified as a direct functional target of miR-370, which, in turn, blocked the biogenesis of miR-370 by binding to its precursor. LIN28A also mediated the suppressive effects of miR-370 on migration and invasion of HCC cells by post-transcriptionally regulating RelA/p65, which is an important effector of the canonical nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) pathway. Interleukin-6 (IL-6), a well-known NF-κB downstream inflammatory molecule, reduced miR-370 but increased LIN28A levels in HCC. Furthermore, miR-370 levels were inversely correlated with LIN28A and IL-6 messenger RNA (mRNA) levels, whereas LIN28A mRNA expression was positively correlated with IL-6 expression in human HCC samples. Interestingly, reduction of miR-370 expression was associated with the development of HCC in rats, as well as with aggressive tumor behavior and short survival in HCC patients. These data demonstrate the involvement of a novel regulatory circuit consisting of miR-370, LIN28A, RelA/p65 and IL-6 in HCC progression. Manipulating this feedback loop may have beneficial effect in HCC treatment. © 2013 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  8. Effects of anti-IgM suppression on polyclonally activated murine B cells: analysis of immunoglobulin mRNA, gene specific nuclear factors and cell cycle distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcuzzi, A; Van Ness, B; Rouse, T; Lafrenz, D

    1989-01-01

    Polyclonal activation of murine B cells with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and dextran sulfate (DxS) results in cell proliferation as well as increased immunoglobulin gene transcription and antibody secretion. When added to B cell cultures during mitogen activation, anti-mu antibody suppresses the rate of proliferation and immunoglobulin gene expression. Using this model system we show that co-cultures of B cells with LPS/DxS and anti-mu resulted in a decrease of both mu and kappa chain mRNA. Suppression did not prevent B cell entry into cycle nor a significant alteration in the distribution of cells in phases of cell cycle, although it did prolong the cycle transit time in a dose dependent fashion as determined by bromodeoxyuridine pulse labelling. Analysis of B cell specific nuclear binding factors, which previously have been shown to be important in regulating immunoglobulin gene transcription were examined. Results show that the kappa-specific enhancer binding activity of NF-kappa B was induced in activated as well as suppressed cultures. The lymphoid specific factor NF-A2, which recognizes the octamer sequence motif in the promoters of immunoglobulin genes, was induced by the polyclonal activation but was selectively lost in extracts from suppressed cells. Thus, specific regulation of the nuclear factor which plays a critical role in both heavy and light chain immunoglobulin gene expression may contribute to the transcriptional suppression observed in anti-mu treated B cells. Images PMID:2481271

  9. Secondary structure analyses of the nuclear rRNA internal transcribed spacers and assessment of its phylogenetic utility across the Brassicaceae (mustards.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick P Edger

    Full Text Available The internal transcribed spacers of the nuclear ribosomal RNA gene cluster, termed ITS1 and ITS2, are the most frequently used nuclear markers for phylogenetic analyses across many eukaryotic groups including most plant families. The reasons for the popularity of these markers include: 1. Ease of amplification due to high copy number of the gene clusters, 2. Available cost-effective methods and highly conserved primers, 3. Rapidly evolving markers (i.e. variable between closely related species, and 4. The assumption (and/or treatment that these sequences are non-functional, neutrally evolving phylogenetic markers. Here, our analyses of ITS1 and ITS2 for 50 species suggest that both sequences are instead under selective constraints to preserve proper secondary structure, likely to maintain complete self-splicing functions, and thus are not neutrally-evolving phylogenetic markers. Our results indicate the majority of sequence sites are co-evolving with other positions to form proper secondary structure, which has implications for phylogenetic inference. We also found that the lowest energy state and total number of possible alternate secondary structures are highly significantly different between ITS regions and random sequences with an identical overall length and Guanine-Cytosine (GC content. Lastly, we review recent evidence highlighting some additional problematic issues with using these regions as the sole markers for phylogenetic studies, and thus strongly recommend additional markers and cost-effective approaches for future studies to estimate phylogenetic relationships.

  10. Nuclear mRNA quality control in yeast is mediated by Nrd1 co-transcriptional recruitment, as revealed by the targeting of Rho-induced aberrant transcripts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honorine, Romy; Mosrin-Huaman, Christine; Hervouet-Coste, Nadège; Libri, Domenico; Rahmouni, A. Rachid

    2011-01-01

    The production of mature export-competent transcripts is under the surveillance of quality control steps where aberrant mRNP molecules resulting from inappropriate or inefficient processing and packaging reactions are subject to exosome-mediated degradation. Previously, we have shown that the heterologous expression of bacterial Rho factor in yeast interferes in normal mRNP biogenesis leading to the production of full-length yet aberrant transcripts that are degraded by the nuclear exosome with ensuing growth defect. Here, we took advantage of this new tool to investigate the molecular mechanisms by which an integrated system recognizes aberrancies at each step of mRNP biogenesis and targets the defective molecules for destruction. We show that the targeting and degradation of Rho-induced aberrant transcripts is associated with a large increase of Nrd1 recruitment to the transcription complex via its CID and RRM domains and a concomitant enrichment of exosome component Rrp6 association. The targeting and degradation of the aberrant transcripts is suppressed by the overproduction of Pcf11 or its isolated CID domain, through a competition with Nrd1 for recruitment by the transcription complex. Altogether, our results support a model in which a stimulation of Nrd1 co-transcriptional recruitment coordinates the recognition and removal of aberrant transcripts by promoting the attachment of the nuclear mRNA degradation machinery. PMID:21113025

  11. Human regulator of telomere elongation helicase 1 (RTEL1) is required for the nuclear and cytoplasmic trafficking of pre-U2 RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schertzer, Michael; Jouravleva, Karina; Perderiset, Mylene; Dingli, Florent; Loew, Damarys; Le Guen, Tangui; Bardoni, Barbara; de Villartay, Jean-Pierre; Revy, Patrick; Londoño-Vallejo, Arturo

    2015-02-18

    Hoyeraal-Hreidarsson syndrome (HHS) is a severe form of Dyskeratosis congenita characterized by developmental defects, bone marrow failure and immunodeficiency and has been associated with telomere dysfunction. Recently, mutations in Regulator of Telomere ELongation helicase 1 (RTEL1), a helicase first identified in Mus musculus as being responsible for the maintenance of long telomeres, have been identified in several HHS patients. Here we show that RTEL1 is required for the export and the correct cytoplasmic trafficking of the small nuclear (sn) RNA pre-U2, a component of the major spliceosome complex. RTEL1-HHS cells show abnormal subcellular partitioning of pre-U2, defects in the recycling of ribonucleotide proteins (RNP) in the cytoplasm and splicing defects. While most of these phenotypes can be suppressed by re-expressing the wild-type protein in RTEL1-HHS cells, expression of RTEL1 mutated variants in immortalized cells provokes cytoplasmic mislocalizations of pre-U2 and other RNP components, as well as splicing defects, thus phenocopying RTEL1-HHS cellular defects. Strikingly, expression of a cytoplasmic form of RTEL1 is sufficient to correct RNP mislocalizations both in RTEL1-HHS cells and in cells expressing nuclear mutated forms of RTEL1. This work unravels completely unanticipated roles for RTEL1 in RNP trafficking and strongly suggests that defects in RNP biogenesis pathways contribute to the pathology of HHS. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  12. ALS-linked TDP-43 mutations produce aberrant RNA splicing and adult-onset motor neuron disease without aggregation or loss of nuclear TDP-43.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Eveline S; Ling, Shuo-Chien; Huelga, Stephanie C; Lagier-Tourenne, Clotilde; Polymenidou, Magdalini; Ditsworth, Dara; Kordasiewicz, Holly B; McAlonis-Downes, Melissa; Platoshyn, Oleksandr; Parone, Philippe A; Da Cruz, Sandrine; Clutario, Kevin M; Swing, Debbie; Tessarollo, Lino; Marsala, Martin; Shaw, Christopher E; Yeo, Gene W; Cleveland, Don W

    2013-02-19

    Transactivating response region DNA binding protein (TDP-43) is the major protein component of ubiquitinated inclusions found in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) with ubiquitinated inclusions. Two ALS-causing mutants (TDP-43(Q331K) and TDP-43(M337V)), but not wild-type human TDP-43, are shown here to provoke age-dependent, mutant-dependent, progressive motor axon degeneration and motor neuron death when expressed in mice at levels and in a cell type-selective pattern similar to endogenous TDP-43. Mutant TDP-43-dependent degeneration of lower motor neurons occurs without: (i) loss of TDP-43 from the corresponding nuclei, (ii) accumulation of TDP-43 aggregates, and (iii) accumulation of insoluble TDP-43. Computational analysis using splicing-sensitive microarrays demonstrates alterations of endogenous TDP-43-dependent alternative splicing events conferred by both human wild-type and mutant TDP-43(Q331K), but with high levels of mutant TDP-43 preferentially enhancing exon exclusion of some target pre-mRNAs affecting genes involved in neurological transmission and function. Comparison with splicing alterations following TDP-43 depletion demonstrates that TDP-43(Q331K) enhances normal TDP-43 splicing function for some RNA targets but loss-of-function for others. Thus, adult-onset motor neuron disease does not require aggregation or loss of nuclear TDP-43, with ALS-linked mutants producing loss and gain of splicing function of selected RNA targets at an early disease stage.

  13. A Deoxynivalenol-Activated Methionyl-tRNA Synthetase Gene from Wheat Encodes a Nuclear Localized Protein and Protects Plants Against Fusarium Pathogens and Mycotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Dong-Yun; Yi, Shu-Yuan; Liu, Rong-Jing; Qu, Bo; Huang, Tao; He, Wei-Jie; Li, Cheng; Li, He-Ping; Liao, Yu-Cai

    2016-06-01

    Fusarium graminearum is the fungal pathogen that causes globally important diseases of cereals and produces mycotoxins such as deoxynivalenol (DON). Owing to the dearth of available sources of resistance to Fusarium pathogens, characterization of novel genes that confer resistance to mycotoxins and mycotoxin-producing fungi is vitally important for breeding resistant crop varieties. In this study, a wheat methionyl-tRNA synthetase (TaMetRS) gene was identified from suspension cell cultures treated with DON. It shares conserved aminoacylation catalytic and tRNA anticodon binding domains with human MetRS and with the only previously characterized plant MetRS, suggesting that it functions in aminoacylation in the cytoplasm. However, the TaMetRS comprises a typical nuclear localization signal and cellular localization studies with a TaMetRS::GFP fusion protein showed that TaMetRS is localized in the nucleus. Expression of TaMetRS was activated by DON treatment and by infection with a DON-producing F. graminearum strain in wheat spikes. No such activation was observed following infection with a non-DON-producing F. graminearum strain. Expression of TaMetRS in Arabidopsis plants conferred significant resistance to DON and F. graminearum. These results indicated that this DON-activated TaMetRS gene may encode a novel type of MetRS in plants that has a role in defense and detoxification.

  14. Nuclear phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C β1 controls cytoplasmic CCL2 mRNA levels in HIV-1 gp120-stimulated primary human macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Spadaro

    Full Text Available HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 induces, independently of infection, the release of CCL2 from macrophages. In turn, this chemokine acts as an autocrine factor enhancing viral replication. In this study, we show for the first time that phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC is required for the production of CCL2 triggered by gp120 in macrophages. Using a combination of confocal laser-scanner microscopy, pharmacologic inhibition, western blotting and fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis, we demonstrate that gp120 interaction with CCR5 leads to nuclear localization of the PI-PLC β1 isozyme mediated by mitogen-activated protein kinase ERK-1/2. Notably, phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC, previously reported to be required for NF-kB-mediated CCL2 production induced by gp120 in macrophages, drives both ERK1/2 activation and PI-PLC β1 nuclear localization induced by gp120. PI-PLC β1 activation through CCR5 is also triggered by the natural chemokine ligand CCL4, but independently of ERK1/2. Finally, PI-PLC inhibition neither blocks gp120-mediated NF-kB activation nor overall accumulation of CCL2 mRNA, whereas it decreases CCL2 transcript level in the cytoplasm. These results identify nuclear PI-PLC β1 as a new intermediate in the gp120-triggered PC-PLC-driven signal transduction pathway leading to CCL2 secretion in macrophages. The finding that a concerted gp120-mediated signaling involving both PC- and PI-specific PLCs is required for the expression of CCL2 in macrophages suggests that this signal transduction pathway may also be relevant for the modulation of viral replication in these cells. Thus, this study may contribute to identify novel targets for therapeutic intervention in HIV-1 infection.

  15. Analysis of a cDNA clone expressing a human autoimmune antigen: full-length sequence of the U2 small nuclear RNA-associated B antigen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habets, W.J.; Sillekens, P.T.G.; Hoet, M.H.; Schalken, J.A.; Roebroek, A.J.M.; Leunissen, J.A.M.; Van de Ven, W.J.M.; Van Venrooij, W.J.

    1987-04-01

    A U2 small nuclear RNA-associated protein, designated B'', was recently identified as the target antigen for autoimmune sera from certain patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and other rheumatic diseases. Such antibodies enabled them to isolate cDNA clone lambdaHB''-1 from a phage lambdagt11 expression library. This clone appeared to code for the B'' protein as established by in vitro translation of hybrid-selected mRNA. The identity of clone lambdaHB''-1 was further confirmed by partial peptide mapping and analysis of the reactivity of the recombinant antigen with monospecific and monoclonal antibodies. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence of the 1015-base-pair cDNA insert of clone lambdaHB''-1 revealed a large open reading frame of 800 nucleotides containing the coding sequence for a polypeptide of 25,457 daltons. In vitro transcription of the lambdaHB''-1 cDNA insert and subsequent translation resulted in a protein product with the molecular size of the B'' protein. These data demonstrate that clone lambdaHB''-1 contains the complete coding sequence of this antigen. The deduced polypeptide sequence contains three very hydrophilic regions that might constitute RNA binding sites and/or antigenic determinants. These findings might have implications both for the understanding of the pathogenesis of rheumatic diseases as well as for the elucidation of the biological function of autoimmune antigens.

  16. DTL, the Drosophila homolog of PIMT/Tgs1 nuclear receptor coactivator-interacting protein/RNA methyltransferase, has an essential role in development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komonyi, Orbán; Pápai, Gábor; Enunlu, Izzet; Muratoglu, Selen; Pankotai, Tibor; Kopitova, Darija; Maróy, Péter; Udvardy, Andor; Boros, Imre

    2005-04-01

    We describe a novel Drosophila gene, dtl (Drosophila Tat-like), which encodes a 60-kDa protein with RNA binding activity and a methyltransferase (MTase) domain. Dtl has an essential role in Drosophila development. The homologs of DTL recently described include PIMT (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-interacting protein with a methyltransferase domain), an RNA-binding protein that interacts with and enhances the nuclear receptor coactivator function, and TGS1, the methyltransferase involved in the formation of the 2,2,7-trimethylguanosine (m3G) cap of non-coding small RNAs. DTL is expressed throughout all of the developmental stages of Drosophila. The dtl mRNA has two ORFs (uORF and dORF). The product of dORF is the 60-kDa PIMT/TGS1 homolog protein that is translated from an internal AUG located 538 bp downstream from the 5' end of the message. This product of dtl is responsible for the formation of the m3G cap of small RNAs of Drosophila. Trimethylguanosine synthase activity is essential in Drosophila. The deletion in the dORF or point mutation in the putative MTase active site results in a reduced pool of m3G cap-containing RNAs and lethality in the early pupa stage. The 5' region of the dtl message also has the coding capacity (uORF) for a 178 amino acid protein. For complete rescue of the lethal phenotype of dtl mutants, the presence of the entire dtl transcription unit is required. Transgenes that carry mutations within the uORF restore the MTase activity but result in only partial rescue of the lethal phenotype. Interestingly, two transgenes bearing a mutation in uORF or dORF in trans can result in complete rescue.

  17. A Long Noncoding RNA lincRNA-EPS Acts as a Transcriptional Brake to Restrain Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atianand, Maninjay K; Hu, Wenqian; Satpathy, Ansuman T; Shen, Ying; Ricci, Emiliano P; Alvarez-Dominguez, Juan R; Bhatta, Ankit; Schattgen, Stefan A; McGowan, Jason D; Blin, Juliana; Braun, Joerg E; Gandhi, Pallavi; Moore, Melissa J; Chang, Howard Y; Lodish, Harvey F; Caffrey, Daniel R; Fitzgerald, Katherine A

    2016-06-16

    Long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs) are important regulators of gene expression. Although lincRNAs are expressed in immune cells, their functions in immunity are largely unexplored. Here, we identify an immunoregulatory lincRNA, lincRNA-EPS, that is precisely regulated in macrophages to control the expression of immune response genes (IRGs). Transcriptome analysis of macrophages from lincRNA-EPS-deficient mice, combined with gain-of-function and rescue experiments, revealed a specific role for this lincRNA in restraining IRG expression. Consistently, lincRNA-EPS-deficient mice manifest enhanced inflammation and lethality following endotoxin challenge in vivo. lincRNA-EPS localizes at regulatory regions of IRGs to control nucleosome positioning and repress transcription. Further, lincRNA-EPS mediates these effects by interacting with heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein L via a CANACA motif located in its 3' end. Together, these findings identify lincRNA-EPS as a repressor of inflammatory responses, highlighting the importance of lincRNAs in the immune system.

  18. MicroRNA-181b stimulates inflammation via the nuclear factor-κB signaling pathway in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yazhen; Mao, Genxiang; Lv, Yuandong; Huang, Qingdong; Wang, Guofu

    2015-10-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is characterized by severe lung edema and an increase in the inflammatory reaction. Considerable evidence has indicated that microRNAs (miRNAs or miRs) are involved in various human diseases; however, the expression profile and function of miRNAs in ALI have been rarely reported. The present study used miRNA microarray and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction to demonstrate that miR-181b is the one of the most significantly upregulated miRNA after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation in human bronchial epithelial cells, BEAS-2B. To elaborate the role of miR-181b in ALI, an assay was performed to investigate the overexpression of miR-181b in BEAS-2B cells, and the expression of inflammatory factors was then analyzed. The overexpression of miR-181b resulted in the induction of an increment in interleukin (IL)-6 levels. p65 was identified to be a primary component of NF-κB, since it was upregulated in the miR-181b overexpression in the BEAS-2B cells, while pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, a specific inhibitor of NF-κB, was found to be able to abrogate the upregulation of the expression of p65. In conclusion, the findings of the present study suggested that miR-181b may be involved in the process of LPS-induced inflammation in BEAS-2B cells by activating the NF-κB signaling pathway, which implies that it may serve as a potential therapeutic target for ALI.

  19. Phylogenetic analysis of subgenus vigna species using nuclear ribosomal RNA ITS: evidence of hybridization among Vigna unguiculata subspecies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijaykumar, Archana; Saini, Ajay; Jawali, Narendra

    2010-01-01

    Molecular phylogeny among species belonging to subgenus Vigna (genus Vigna) was inferred based on internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences of 18S-5.8S-26S ribosomal RNA gene unit. Analysis showed a total of 356 polymorphic sites of which approximately 80% were parsimony informative. Phylogenetic reconstruction by neighbor joining and maximum parsimony methods placed the 57 Vigna accessions (belonging to 15 species) into 5 major clades. Five species viz. Vigna heterophylla, Vigna pubigera, Vigna parkeri, Vigna laurentii, and Vigna gracilis whose position in the subgenus was previously not known were placed in the section Vigna. A single accession (Vigna unguiculata ssp. tenuis, NI 1637) harbored 2 intragenomic ITS variants, indicative of 2 different types of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) repeat units. ITS variant type-I was close to ITS from V. unguiculata ssp. pubescens, whereas type-II was close to V. unguiculata ssp. tenuis. Transcript analysis clearly demonstrates that in accession NI 1637, rDNA repeat units with only type-II ITS variants are transcriptionally active. Evidence from sequence analysis (of 5.8S, ITS1, and ITS2) and secondary structure analysis (of ITS1 and ITS2) indicates that the type-I ITS variant probably does not belong to the pseudogenic rDNA repeat units. The results from phylogenetic and transcript analysis suggest that the rDNA units with the type-I ITS may have introgressed as a result of hybridization (between ssp. tenuis and ssp. pubescens); however, it has been epigenetically silenced. The results also demonstrate differential evolution of ITS sequence among wild and cultivated forms of V. unguiculata.

  20. Heterogeneous Catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dakka, J.; Sheldon, R.A.; Sanderson, W.A.

    1997-01-01

    Abstract of GB 2309655 (A) Heterogeneous catalysts comprising one or more metal compounds selected from the group consisting of tin, molybdenum, tungsten, zirconium and selenium compounds deposited on the surface of a silicalite are provided. Preferably Sn(IV) and/or Mo(VI) are employed. The cat

  1. In vivo transfection of manganese superoxide dismutase gene or nuclear factor κB shRNA in nodose ganglia improves aortic baroreceptor function in heart failure rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongze; Liu, Jinxu; Tu, Huiyin; Muelleman, Robert L; Cornish, Kurtis G; Li, Yu-Long

    2014-01-01

    Arterial baroreflex sensitivity is attenuated in chronic heart failure (CHF) state, which is associated with cardiac arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death in patients with CHF. Our previous study showed that CHF-induced sodium channel dysfunction in the baroreceptor neurons was involved in the blunted baroreflex sensitivity in CHF rats. Mitochondria-derived superoxide overproduction decreased expression and activation of the sodium channels in the baroreceptor neurons from CHF rats. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for the sodium channel dysfunction in the baroreceptor neurons from CHF rats remain unknown. We tested the involvement of nuclear factor κB (NFκB) in the sodium channel dysfunction and evaluated the effects of in vivo transfection of manganese superoxide dismutase gene and NFκB shRNA on the baroreflex function in CHF rats. CHF was developed at 6 to 8 weeks after left coronary artery ligation in adult rats. Western blot and chromatin immunoprecipitation data showed that phosphorylated NFκB p65 and ability of NFκB p65 binding to the sodium channel promoter were increased in the nodose ganglia from CHF rats. In vivo transfection of adenoviral manganese superoxide dismutase gene or lentiviral NFκB p65 shRNA into the nodose ganglia partially reversed CHF-reduced sodium channel expression and cell excitability in the baroreceptor neurons and improved CHF-blunted arterial baroreflex sensitivity. Additionally, transfection of adenoviral manganese superoxide dismutase also inhibited the augmentation of phosphorylated NFκB p65 in the nodose neurons from CHF rats. The present study suggests that superoxide-NFκB signaling contributes to CHF-induced baroreceptor dysfunction and resultant impairment of baroreflex function.

  2. ALS-linked TDP-43 mutations produce aberrant RNA splicing and adult-onset motor neuron disease without aggregation or loss of nuclear TDP-43

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Eveline S.; Ling, Shuo-Chien; Huelga, Stephanie C.; Lagier-Tourenne, Clotilde; Polymenidou, Magdalini; Ditsworth, Dara; Kordasiewicz, Holly B.; McAlonis-Downes, Melissa; Platoshyn, Oleksandr; Parone, Philippe A.; Da Cruz, Sandrine; Clutario, Kevin M.; Swing, Debbie; Tessarollo, Lino; Marsala, Martin; Shaw, Christopher E.; Yeo, Gene W.; Cleveland, Don W.

    2013-01-01

    Transactivating response region DNA binding protein (TDP-43) is the major protein component of ubiquitinated inclusions found in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) with ubiquitinated inclusions. Two ALS-causing mutants (TDP-43Q331K and TDP-43M337V), but not wild-type human TDP-43, are shown here to provoke age-dependent, mutant-dependent, progressive motor axon degeneration and motor neuron death when expressed in mice at levels and in a cell type-selective pattern similar to endogenous TDP-43. Mutant TDP-43-dependent degeneration of lower motor neurons occurs without: (i) loss of TDP-43 from the corresponding nuclei, (ii) accumulation of TDP-43 aggregates, and (iii) accumulation of insoluble TDP-43. Computational analysis using splicing-sensitive microarrays demonstrates alterations of endogenous TDP-43–dependent alternative splicing events conferred by both human wild-type and mutant TDP-43Q331K, but with high levels of mutant TDP-43 preferentially enhancing exon exclusion of some target pre-mRNAs affecting genes involved in neurological transmission and function. Comparison with splicing alterations following TDP-43 depletion demonstrates that TDP-43Q331K enhances normal TDP-43 splicing function for some RNA targets but loss-of-function for others. Thus, adult-onset motor neuron disease does not require aggregation or loss of nuclear TDP-43, with ALS-linked mutants producing loss and gain of splicing function of selected RNA targets at an early disease stage. PMID:23382207

  3. Liquid-solid interface project in nuclear engineering. Systematization of sorption theory in heterogeneous surface and it's application to radioactive waste disposal. JAERI's nuclear research promotion program, H10-032. Contract research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Satoru [Tokyo Univ., Graduate School of Engineering, Tokyo (Japan)

    2002-03-01

    Combining of the In-Situ and Ex-situ experiments with quantum chemical calculation, we can draw the following conclusions on the sorption at heterogeneous interfaces, based on the structure of solid surfaces and the profile of charge/electron at surface: (1) Redox sensitive species Np(V) is reduced to Np(IV) by Fe(II) contained in iron oxides. (2) Interactions of ions with C-S-H gels, which is a main component of cementitious materials, consist of replacement of Ca, association with Si and ion exchange. (3) Iodate ions adsorb on the two kinds of sorption sites located on the outer surface of hydrotalcite. (4) Interaction potential between particles and solid surfaces decrease due to the microscopic roughness of solid surface and localized distribution of charge on the surface, leading to the increase in the deposition of particles. (5) Some information on the association situation of water molecules on the metal oxides are obtained. These results suggests that the microscopic heterogeneity of solid surfaces facilities the interaction of ions and particles with solid surfaces. These phenomena can not be explained by the conventional sorption theory. We have to develop the sorption theory by considering the interactions from the microscopic point of view. (author)

  4. A retroelement modifies pre-mRNA splicing: the murine Glrb(spa) allele is a splicing signal polymorphism amplified by long interspersed nuclear element insertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Kristina; Braune, Marlen; Benderska, Natalya; Buratti, Emanuele; Baralle, Francisco; Villmann, Carmen; Stamm, Stefan; Eulenburg, Volker; Becker, Cord-Michael

    2012-09-01

    The glycine receptor-deficient mutant mouse spastic carries a full-length long interspersed nuclear element (LINE1) retrotransposon in intron 6 of the glycine receptor β subunit gene, Glrb(spa). The mutation arose in the C57BL/6J strain and is associated with skipping of exon 6 or a combination of the exons 5 and 6, thus resulting in a translational frameshift within the coding regions of the GlyR β subunit. The effect of the Glrb(spa) LINE1 insertion on pre-mRNA splicing was studied using a minigene approach. Sequence comparison as well as motif prediction and mutational analysis revealed that in addition to the LINE1 insertion the inactivation of an exonic splicing enhancer (ESE) within exon 6 is required for skipping of exon 6. Reconstitution of the ESE by substitution of a single residue was sufficient to prevent exon skipping. In addition to the ESE, two regions within the 5' and 3' UTR of the LINE1 were shown to be critical determinants for exon skipping, indicating that LINE1 acts as efficient modifier of subtle endogenous splicing phenotypes. Thus, the spastic allele of the murine glycine receptor β subunit gene is a two-hit mutation, where the hypomorphic alteration in an ESE is amplified by the insertion of a LINE1 element in the adjacent intron. Conversely, the LINE1 effect on splicing may be modulated by individual polymorphisms, depending on the insertional environment within the host genome.

  5. Analysis of U2 small nuclear RNA fragments in the bile differentiates cholangiocarcinoma from primary sclerosing cholangitis and other benign biliary disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraniskin, Alexander; Nöpel-Dünnebacke, Stefanie; Schumacher, Brigitte; Gerges, Christian; Bracht, Thilo; Sitek, Barbara; Meyer, Helmut E; Gerken, Guido; Dechene, Alexander; Schlaak, Jörg F; Schroers, Roland; Pox, Christian; Schmiegel, Wolff; Hahn, Stephan A

    2014-07-01

    Up to now the diagnosis of early stage cholangiocarcinoma (CC) has remained difficult, with low sensitivities reported for current diagnostic methods. Based on recent promising findings about circulating U2 small nuclear RNA fragments (RNU2-1f) as novel blood-based biomarkers for pancreatic and colorectal adenocarcinoma, we studied the utility of RNU2-1f as a diagnostic marker of CC in bile fluid. Bile fluid was collected from patients with CC (n = 12), controls (patients with choledocholithiasis) (n = 11) and with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC; n = 11). RNU2-1f levels were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction normalized to cel-54. Measurement of RNU2-1f levels in bile fluids enabled the differentiation of patients with CC from controls in all cases. Furthermore, RNU2-1f levels in bile fluids of patients with CC were significantly higher than in patients with PSC, resulting in a receiver-operating characteristic curve area of 0.856, with sensitivity of 67 % and specificity of 91 %. Our data suggest that the measurement of RNU2-1 fragments detected in the bile fluid can be used as a diagnostic marker for CC and should be included in future prospective diagnostic studies for this disease entity.

  6. RNA-binding protein hnRNPLL as a critical regulator of lymphocyte homeostasis and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Xing

    2016-05-01

    RNA-binding proteins orchestrate posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression, such as messenger RNA (mRNA) splicing, RNA stability regulation, and translation regulation. Heterogeneous nuclear RNA-binding proteins (hnRNPs) refer to a collection of unrelated RNA-binding proteins predominantly located in the nucleus (Han et al. Biochem J 2010, 430:379-392). Although canonical functions of hnRNPs are to promote pre-mRNA splicing, they are involved in all the processes of RNA metabolism through recognizing specific cis-elements on RNA (Dreyfuss et al. Annu Rev Biochem 1993, 62:289-321; Huelga et al. Cell Rep 2012, 1:167-178; Krecic and Swanson. Curr Opin Cell Biol 1999, 11:363-371). Heterogeneous nuclear RNA-binding protein L like (hnRNPLL) is a tissue-specific hnRNP, which was identified as a regulator of CD45RA to CD45RO switching during memory T-cell development (Oberdoerffer et al. Science 2008, 321:686-691; Topp et al. RNA 2008, 14:2038-2049; Wu et al. Immunity 2008, 29:863-875). Since then, hnRNPLL has emerged as a critical regulator of lymphocyte homeostasis and terminal differentiation, controlling alternative splicing or expression of critical genes for the lymphocytes development (Wu et al. Immunity 2008, 29:863-875; Chang et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2015, 112:E1888-E1897). This review will summarize recent advances in understanding the functions of hnRNPLL, focusing on its biochemical functions and physiological roles in lymphocyte differentiation and homeostasis. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:295-302. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1335 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  7. Cellular RNA binding proteins NS1-BP and hnRNP K regulate influenza A virus RNA splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Pei-Ling; Chiou, Ni-Ting; Kuss, Sharon; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Lynch, Kristen W; Fontoura, Beatriz M A

    2013-01-01

    Influenza A virus is a major human pathogen with a genome comprised of eight single-strand, negative-sense, RNA segments. Two viral RNA segments, NS1 and M, undergo alternative splicing and yield several proteins including NS1, NS2, M1 and M2 proteins. However, the mechanisms or players involved in splicing of these viral RNA segments have not been fully studied. Here, by investigating the interacting partners and function of the cellular protein NS1-binding protein (NS1-BP), we revealed novel players in the splicing of the M1 segment. Using a proteomics approach, we identified a complex of RNA binding proteins containing NS1-BP and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs), among which are hnRNPs involved in host pre-mRNA splicing. We found that low levels of NS1-BP specifically impaired proper alternative splicing of the viral M1 mRNA segment to yield the M2 mRNA without affecting splicing of mRNA3, M4, or the NS mRNA segments. Further biochemical analysis by formaldehyde and UV cross-linking demonstrated that NS1-BP did not interact directly with viral M1 mRNA but its interacting partners, hnRNPs A1, K, L, and M, directly bound M1 mRNA. Among these hnRNPs, we identified hnRNP K as a major mediator of M1 mRNA splicing. The M1 mRNA segment generates the matrix protein M1 and the M2 ion channel, which are essential proteins involved in viral trafficking, release into the cytoplasm, and budding. Thus, reduction of NS1-BP and/or hnRNP K levels altered M2/M1 mRNA and protein ratios, decreasing M2 levels and inhibiting virus replication. Thus, NS1-BP-hnRNPK complex is a key mediator of influenza A virus gene expression.

  8. Binding of the heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K to the Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 2 (EBNA2 enhances viral LMP2A expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik Gross

    Full Text Available The Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV -encoded EBNA2 protein, which is essential for the in vitro transformation of B-lymphocytes, interferes with cellular processes by binding to proteins via conserved sequence motifs. Its Arginine-Glycine (RG repeat element contains either symmetrically or asymmetrically di-methylated arginine residues (SDMA and ADMA, respectively. EBNA2 binds via its SDMA-modified RG-repeat to the survival motor neurons protein (SMN and via the ADMA-RG-repeat to the NP9 protein of the human endogenous retrovirus K (HERV-K (HML-2 Type 1. The hypothesis of this work was that the methylated RG-repeat mimics an epitope shared with cellular proteins that is used for interaction with target structures. With monoclonal antibodies against the modified RG-repeat, we indeed identified cellular homologues that apparently have the same surface structure as methylated EBNA2. With the SDMA-specific antibodies, we precipitated the Sm protein D3 (SmD3 which, like EBNA2, binds via its SDMA-modified RG-repeat to SMN. With the ADMA-specific antibodies, we precipitated the heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K. Specific binding of the ADMA- antibody to hnRNP K was demonstrated using E. coli expressed/ADMA-methylated hnRNP K. In addition, we show that EBNA2 and hnRNP K form a complex in EBV- infected B-cells. Finally, hnRNP K, when co-expressed with EBNA2, strongly enhances viral latent membrane protein 2A (LMP2A expression by an unknown mechanism as we did not detect a direct association of hnRNP K with DNA-bound EBNA2 in gel shift experiments. Our data support the notion that the methylated surface of EBNA2 mimics the surface structure of cellular proteins to interfere with or co-opt their functional properties.

  9. Binding of the heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) to the Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 2 (EBNA2) enhances viral LMP2A expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Henrik; Hennard, Christine; Masouris, Ilias; Cassel, Christian; Barth, Stephanie; Stober-Grässer, Ute; Mamiani, Alfredo; Moritz, Bodo; Ostareck, Dirk; Ostareck-Lederer, Antje; Neuenkirchen, Nils; Fischer, Utz; Deng, Wen; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Noessner, Elfriede; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Grässer, Friedrich A

    2012-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) -encoded EBNA2 protein, which is essential for the in vitro transformation of B-lymphocytes, interferes with cellular processes by binding to proteins via conserved sequence motifs. Its Arginine-Glycine (RG) repeat element contains either symmetrically or asymmetrically di-methylated arginine residues (SDMA and ADMA, respectively). EBNA2 binds via its SDMA-modified RG-repeat to the survival motor neurons protein (SMN) and via the ADMA-RG-repeat to the NP9 protein of the human endogenous retrovirus K (HERV-K (HML-2) Type 1). The hypothesis of this work was that the methylated RG-repeat mimics an epitope shared with cellular proteins that is used for interaction with target structures. With monoclonal antibodies against the modified RG-repeat, we indeed identified cellular homologues that apparently have the same surface structure as methylated EBNA2. With the SDMA-specific antibodies, we precipitated the Sm protein D3 (SmD3) which, like EBNA2, binds via its SDMA-modified RG-repeat to SMN. With the ADMA-specific antibodies, we precipitated the heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K). Specific binding of the ADMA- antibody to hnRNP K was demonstrated using E. coli expressed/ADMA-methylated hnRNP K. In addition, we show that EBNA2 and hnRNP K form a complex in EBV- infected B-cells. Finally, hnRNP K, when co-expressed with EBNA2, strongly enhances viral latent membrane protein 2A (LMP2A) expression by an unknown mechanism as we did not detect a direct association of hnRNP K with DNA-bound EBNA2 in gel shift experiments. Our data support the notion that the methylated surface of EBNA2 mimics the surface structure of cellular proteins to interfere with or co-opt their functional properties.

  10. socs7, a target gene of microRNA-145, regulates interferon-β induction through STAT3 nuclear translocation in bladder cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, S; Yamada, N; Kumazaki, M; Yasui, Y; Iwasaki, J; Naito, S; Akao, Y

    2013-02-07

    We recently reported that microRNA (miR)-145 is downregulated and induces apoptosis in human bladder cancer cells. Also, it is suggested that the ectopic expression of miR-145 induces apoptosis with the induction of TRAIL expression in several cancer cells. Here, we demonstrated a novel mechanism of apoptosis induction by miR-145 in bladder cancer cells. Exogenous miR-145 in T24 and NKB1 cells markedly increased the expression levels of interferon (IFN)-β, 2'-5'-oligoadenylate synthetase 1, which lies upstream of 2'-5' oligoadenylates/RNase L system, and TRAIL, and induced apparent caspase-dependent apoptosis that was suppressed by cotreatment with a pan-caspase inhibitor; moreover, these expression levels were reduced by cotreatment with an miR-145 inhibitor. The apoptosis did not depend on Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) expression, because TLR3-silencing failed to inhibit IFN-β induction by miR-145. Then, we focused on the suppressor of cytokine signaling 7 (socs7), whose expression level was upregulated in bladder cancer cells compared with its level in normal human urothelial cells, as a putative target gene involved in IFN-β induction by miR-145. Expectedly, exogenous miR-145 decreased the expression level of SOCS7, and socs7-silencing enhanced IFN-β induction by transfection with a TLR3 ligand, polyinosinic acid-polycytidylic acid (PIC). The results of a luciferase reporter assay revealed that miR-145 targeted socs7. In addition, socs7-silencing significantly decreased the level of p-Akt and suppressed the growth of T24 cells. Furthermore, exogenous miR-145 or socs7-silencing promoted nuclear translocation of STAT3. In conclusion, the machinery of IFN-β induction through the regulation of SOCS7 by miR-145 was closely associated with the induction of apoptosis. Moreover, exogenous miR-145 promoted IFN-β induction by targeting socs7, which resulted in the nuclear translocation of STAT3. Additionally, our data indicate that SOCS7 functioned as an oncogene

  11. MicroRNA-125b Prevents Cardiac Dysfunction in Polymicrobial Sepsis by Targeting TRAF6-Mediated Nuclear Factor κB Activation and p53-Mediated Apoptotic Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, He; Wang, Xiaohui; Ha, Tuanzhu; Gao, Ming; Liu, Li; Wang, Ruitao; Yu, Kaijiang; Kalbfleisch, John H; Kao, Race L; Williams, David L; Li, Chuanfu

    2016-12-01

     This study examined the effect of microRNA-125b (miR-125b) on sepsis-induced cardiac dysfunction.  Mouse hearts were transfected with lentivirus expressing miR-125b (LmiR-125b) 7 days before cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced sepsis. Cardiac function was examined by echocardiography before and 6 hours after CLP (n = 6/group). Survival was monitored following CLP-induced sepsis (n = 12/group).  LmiR-125b transfection significantly attenuated cardiac dysfunction due to CLP-induced sepsis. Fractional shortening and ejection fraction values were significantly (P sepsis. Transfection of LmiR-125b into the heart significantly suppressed the expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1, decreased the accumulation of macrophages and neutrophils in the myocardium, and decreased serum levels of tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin 1β by targeting tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6)-mediated nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activation. In addition, sepsis-induced myocardial apoptosis was markedly attenuated by LmiR-125b transfection through suppression of p53, Bax, and Bak1 expression. In vitro transfection of endothelial cells with miR-125b mimics attenuate LPS-induced ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression by suppressing TRAF6 and NF-κB activation.  Increased myocardial miR-125b expression attenuates sepsis-induced cardiac dysfunction and improves survival. miR-125b may be a target for septic cardiomyopathy. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Genistein inhibits the proliferation of human multiple myeloma cells through suppression of nuclear factor-κB and upregulation of microRNA-29b.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jie; Wang, Jianchao; Zhu, Bo

    2016-02-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a malignant tumor and is the most common primary tumor of the bone marrow in the USA. Genistein is predominantly found in Leguminosae and various lines of evidence have indicated that it suppresses cell growth, induces programmed cell death and inhibits angiogenesis. As a result of these capabilities, genistein presents as a promising cancer chemopreventive agent. However, the effect of genistein on MM remains to be elucidated. The present study investigated the effect of genistein on the proliferation and apoptosis of MM cells through the regulation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and microRNA-29b (miR-29b). In the present study, cell proliferation was examined using a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. In addition, apoptosis was detected using an Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide apoptosis assay and caspase-3 activation assay. The expression of NF-κB and miR-29b was analyzed using western blotting and reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction, respectively. Finally, miR-29b and anti-miR-29b plasmids were transfected into U266 cells to determine the effect of genistein on MM. In the present study, the results demonstrated that genistein could significantly reduce cell proliferation, induce apoptosis and increase the activity of caspase-3 in U266 cells. Furthermore, it was found that genistein could suppress the protein level of NF-κB and promote the expression of miR-29b in U266 cells. The results also indicated that miR-29b could alter the expression of NF-κB in U266 cells. These findings suggest that genistein inhibits the proliferation of human MM cells by upregulating miR-29b resulting in suppression of NF-κB.

  13. MicroRNA-144 regulates hepatic ATP binding cassette transporter A1 and plasma high-density lipoprotein after activation of the nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Aguiar Vallim, Thomas Q; Tarling, Elizabeth J; Kim, Tammy; Civelek, Mete; Baldán, Ángel; Esau, Christine; Edwards, Peter A

    2013-06-07

    The bile acid receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) regulates many aspects of lipid metabolism by variouscomplex and incompletely understood molecular mechanisms. We set out to investigate the molecular mechanisms for FXR-dependent regulation of lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. To identify FXR-regulated microRNAs that were subsequently involved in regulating lipid metabolism. ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) is a major determinant of plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol levels. Here, we show that activation of the nuclear receptor FXR in vivo increases hepatic levels of miR-144, which in turn lowers hepatic ABCA1 and plasma HDL levels. We identified 2 complementary sequences to miR-144 in the 3' untranslated region of ABCA1 mRNA that are necessary for miR-144-dependent regulation. Overexpression of miR-144 in vitro decreased both cellular ABCA1 protein and cholesterol efflux to lipid-poor apolipoprotein A-I protein, whereas overexpression in vivo reduced hepatic ABCA1 protein and plasma HDL-cholesterol. Conversely, silencing miR-144 in mice increased hepatic ABCA1 protein and HDL-cholesterol. In addition, we used tissue-specific FXR-deficient mice to show that induction of miR-144 and FXR-dependent hypolipidemia requires hepatic, but not intestinal, FXR. Finally, we identified functional FXR response elements upstream of the miR-144 locus, consistent with direct FXR regulation. We have identified a novel pathway involving FXR, miR-144, and ABCA1 that together regulate plasma HDL-cholesterol.

  14. Nuclear structures in Tribolium castaneum oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogolyubov, Dmitry S; Batalova, Florina M; Kiselyov, Artyom M; Stepanova, Irina S

    2013-10-01

    The first ultrastructural and immunomorphological characteristics of the karyosphere (karyosome) and extrachromosomal nuclear bodies in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, are presented. The karyosphere forms early in the diplotene stage of meiotic prophase by the gathering of all oocyte chromosomes in a limited nuclear volume. Using the BrUTP assay, T. castaneum oocyte chromosomes united in the karyosphere maintain their transcriptional activity until the end of oocyte growth. Hyperphosphorylated RNA polymerase II and basal transcription factors (TFIID and TFIIH) were detected in the perichromatin region of the karyosphere. The T. castaneum karyosphere has an extrachromosomal capsule that separates chromosomes from the rest of the nucleoplasm. Certain structural proteins (F-actin, lamin B) were found in the capsule. Unexpectedly, the karyosphere capsule in T. castaneum oocytes was found to be enriched in TMG-capped snRNAs, which suggests that the capsule is not only a structural support for the karyosphere, but may be involved in biogenesis of snRNPs. We also identified the counterparts of 'universal' extrachromosomal nuclear domains, Cajal bodies (CBs) and interchromatin granule clusters (IGCs). Nuclear bodies containing IGC marker protein SC35 display some features unusual for typical IGCs. SC35 domains in T. castaneum oocytes are predominantly fibrillar complex bodies that do not contain trimethyl guanosine (TMG)-capped small nuclear (sn) RNAs. Microinjections of 2'-O-methyl (U)22 probes into the oocytes allowed revealing poly(A)+ RNAs in these nuclear domains. Several proteins related to mRNA export (heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein core protein A1, export adapters Y14 and Aly and export receptor NXF1) were also detected there. We believe that unusual SC35 nuclear domains of T. castaneum oocytes are possibly involved in mRNP but not snRNP biogenesis.

  15. Expression of progesterone receptor membrane component (PGRMC) 1 and 2, serpine mRNA binding protein 1 (SERBP1) and nuclear progesterone receptor (PGR) in the bovine endometrium during the estrous cycle and the first trimester of pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalik, Magdalena K; Slonina, Dominika; Rekawiecki, Robert; Kotwica, Jan

    2013-03-01

    Progesterone (P4) is involved in the regulation of essential reproductive functions affecting the target cells through both nuclear progesterone receptors (PGRs) and membrane progesterone receptors. The aim of this study was to determine the mRNA and protein expression for PGRMC1, PGRMC2, SERBP1 and PGR within the bovine endometrium during the estrous cycle and the first trimester of pregnancy. There were no changes in PGRMC1 and PGRMC2 mRNA and protein expression during the estrous cycle, however, mRNA levels of PGRMC1 and PGRMC2 were increased (P<0.001) in pregnant animals. SERBP1 mRNA expression was increased (P<0.05), while the level of this protein was decreased (P<0.05) on days 11-16 of the estrous cycle. The expression of PGR mRNA was higher (P<0.01) on days 17-20 compared to days 6-10 and 11-16 of the estrous cycle and pregnancy. PGR-A and PGR-B protein levels were elevated on days 1-5 and 17-20 of the estrous cycle as compared to other stages of the cycle and during pregnancy. In conclusion, our results indicate that P4 may influence endometrial cells through both genomic and nongenomic way. This mechanism may contribute to the regulation of the estrous cycle and provide protection during pregnancy.

  16. Calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions with fractionation and unidentified nuclear effects (FUN CAIs): II. Heterogeneities of magnesium isotopes and 26Al in the early Solar System inferred from in situ high-precision magnesium-isotope measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Changkun; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Krot, Alexander N.; Huss, Gary R.; Davis, Andrew M.; Bizzarro, Martin

    2017-03-01

    Calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions with isotopic mass fractionation effects and unidentified nuclear isotopic anomalies (FUN CAIs) have been studied for more than 40 years, but their origins remain enigmatic. Here we report in situ high precision measurements of aluminum-magnesium isotope systematics of FUN CAIs by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Individual minerals were analyzed in six FUN CAIs from the oxidized CV3 carbonaceous chondrites Axtell (compact Type A CAI Axtell 2271) and Allende (Type B CAIs C1 and EK1-4-1, and forsterite-bearing Type B CAIs BG82DH8, CG-14, and TE). Most of these CAIs show evidence for excess 26Mg due to the decay of 26Al. The inferred initial 26Al/27Al ratios [(26Al/27Al)0] and the initial magnesium isotopic compositions (δ26Mg0) calculated using an exponential law with an exponent β of 0.5128 are (3.1 ± 1.6) × 10-6 and 0.60 ± 0.10‰ (Axtell 2271), (3.7 ± 1.5) × 10-6 and -0.20 ± 0.05‰ (BG82DH8), (2.2 ± 1.1) × 10-6 and -0.18 ± 0.05‰ (C1), (2.3 ± 2.4) × 10-5 and -2.23 ± 0.37‰ (EK1-4-1), (1.5 ± 1.1) × 10-5 and -0.42 ± 0.08‰ (CG-14), and (5.3 ± 0.9) × 10-5 and -0.05 ± 0.08‰ (TE) with 2σ uncertainties. We infer that FUN CAIs recorded heterogeneities of magnesium isotopes and 26Al in the CAI-forming region(s). Comparison of 26Al-26Mg systematics, stable isotope (oxygen, magnesium, calcium, and titanium) and trace element studies of FUN and non-FUN igneous CAIs indicates that there is a continuum among these CAI types. Based on these observations and evaporation experiments on CAI-like melts, we propose a generic scenario for the origin of igneous (FUN and non-FUN) CAIs: (i) condensation of isotopically normal solids in an 16O-rich gas of approximately solar composition; (ii) formation of CAI precursors by aggregation of these solids together with variable abundances of isotopically anomalous grains-possible carriers of unidentified nuclear (UN) effects; and (iii) melt evaporation of these precursors

  17. Conformation of the RNA-binding N-terminus of the coat protein of cowpea chlorotic mottle virus : a nuclear magnetic resonance and optical spectroscopy study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaf, van der M.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the study described in this thesis was to obtain information about protein-RNA interactions in cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV). CCMV consists of RNA and a protective protein coat, composed of 180 identical coat proteins. The positively charged N-terminal arm of the

  18. Identification of Subtype Specific miRNA-mRNA Functional Regulatory Modules in Matched miRNA-mRNA Expression Data: Multiple Myeloma as a Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunpeng Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Identification of miRNA-mRNA modules is an important step to elucidate their combinatorial effect on the pathogenesis and mechanisms underlying complex diseases. Current identification methods primarily are based upon miRNA-target information and matched miRNA and mRNA expression profiles. However, for heterogeneous diseases, the miRNA-mRNA regulatory mechanisms may differ between subtypes, leading to differences in clinical behavior. In order to explore the pathogenesis of each subtype, it is important to identify subtype specific miRNA-mRNA modules. In this study, we integrated the Ping-Pong algorithm and multiobjective genetic algorithm to identify subtype specific miRNA-mRNA functional regulatory modules (MFRMs through integrative analysis of three biological data sets: GO biological processes, miRNA target information, and matched miRNA and mRNA expression data. We applied our method on a heterogeneous disease, multiple myeloma (MM, to identify MM subtype specific MFRMs. The constructed miRNA-mRNA regulatory networks provide modular outlook at subtype specific miRNA-mRNA interactions. Furthermore, clustering analysis demonstrated that heterogeneous MFRMs were able to separate corresponding MM subtypes. These subtype specific MFRMs may aid in the further elucidation of the pathogenesis of each subtype and may serve to guide MM subtype diagnosis and treatment.

  19. Nuclear domains and the nuclear matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Driel, R; Wansink, D G; van Steensel, B; Grande, M A; Schul, W; de Jong, L

    1995-01-01

    This overview describes the spatial distribution of several enzymatic machineries and functions in the interphase nucleus. Three general observations can be made. First, many components of the different nuclear machineries are distributed in the nucleus in a characteristic way for each component. They are often found concentrated in specific domains. Second, nuclear machineries for the synthesis and processing of RNA and DNA are associated with an insoluble nuclear structure, called nuclear matrix. Evidently, handling of DNA and RNA is done by immobilized enzyme systems. Finally, the nucleus seems to be divided in two major compartments. One is occupied by compact chromosomes, the other compartment is the space between the chromosomes. In the latter, transcription takes place at the surface of chromosomal domains and it houses the splicing machinery. The relevance of nuclear organization for efficient gene expression is discussed.

  20. Raman crystallography of RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Bo; Chen, Jui-Hui; Yajima, Rieko; Chen, Yuanyuan; Chase, Elaine; Chadalavada, Durga M; Golden, Barbara L; Carey, Paul R; Bevilacqua, Philip C

    2009-10-01

    Raman crystallography is the application of Raman spectroscopy to single crystals. This technique has been applied to a variety of protein molecules where it has provided unique information about biopolymer folding, substrate binding, and catalysis. Here, we describe the application of Raman crystallography to functional RNA molecules. RNA represents unique opportunities and challenges for Raman crystallography. One issue that confounds studies of RNA is its tendency to adopt multiple non-functional folds. Raman crystallography has the advantage that it isolates a single state of the RNA within the crystal and can evaluate its fold, metal ion binding properties (ligand identity, stoichiometry, and affinity), proton binding properties (identity, stoichiometry, and affinity), and catalytic potential. In particular, base-specific stretches can be identified and then associated with the binding of metal ions and protons. Because measurements are carried out in the hanging drop at ambient, rather than cryo, conditions and because RNA crystals tend to be approximately 70% solvent, RNA dynamics and conformational changes become experimentally accessible. This review focuses on experimental setup and procedures, acquisition and interpretation of Raman data, and determination of physicochemical properties of the RNA. Raman crystallographic and solution biochemical experiments on the HDV RNA enzyme are summarized and found to be in excellent agreement. Remarkably, characterization of the crystalline state has proven to help rather than hinder functional characterization of functional RNA, most likely because the tendency of RNA to fold heterogeneously is limited in a crystalline environment. Future applications of Raman crystallography to RNA are briefly discussed.

  1. Heterogeneity and Microeconometrics Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Browning, Martin; Carro, Jesus

    Presented at the 2005 Econometric Society World Congress Plenary Session on "Modelling Heterogeneity". We survey the treatment of heterogeneity in applied microeconometrics analyses. There are three themes. First, there is usually much more heterogeneity than empirical researchers allow for. Seco...

  2. The testis-specific human protein RBMY recognizes RNA through a novel mode of interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrisovska, Lenka; Bourgeois, Cyril F; Stefl, Richard; Grellscheid, Sushma-Nagaraja; Kister, Liliane; Wenter, Philipp; Elliott, David J; Stevenin, James; Allain, Frédéric H-T

    2007-04-01

    The RBMY (RNA-binding motif gene on Y chromosome) protein encoded by the human Y chromosome is important for normal sperm development. Although its precise molecular RNA targets are unknown at present, it is suggested that human RBMY (hRBMY) participates in splicing in the testis. Using systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment, we found that RNA stem-loops capped by a C(A)/(U)CAA pentaloop are high-affinity binding targets for hRBMY. Subsequent nuclear magnetic resonance structural determination of the hRBMY RNA recognition motif (RRM) in complex with a high-affinity target showed two distinct modes of RNA recognition. First, the RRM beta-sheet surface binds to the RNA loop in a sequence-specific fashion. Second, the beta2-beta3 loop of the hRBMY inserts into the major groove of the RNA stem. The first binding mode might be conserved in the paralogous protein heterogeneous nuclear RNP G, whereas the second mode of binding is found only in hRBMY. This structural difference could be at the origin of the function of RBMY in spermatogenesis.

  3. Association of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase with the nuclear matrix: the role of intermolecular disulfide bond formation, RNA retention, and cell type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, S H; Brunet, G; Talbot, B; Lamarr, D; Dumas, C; Shaper, J H; Poirier, G

    1991-02-01

    The recovery of the enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (pADPRp) in the nuclease- and 1.6 M NaCl-resistant nuclear subfraction prepared from a number of different sources was assessed by Western blotting. When rat liver nuclei were treated with DNase I and RNase A followed by 1.6 M NaCl, approximately 10% of the nuclear pADPRp was recovered in the sedimentable fraction. The proportion of pADPRp recovered with the residual fraction decreased to less than 5% of the total nuclear polymerase when nuclei were prepared in the presence of the sulfhydryl blocking reagent iodoacetamide and increased to approximately 50% of the total nuclear pADPRp when nuclei were treated with the sulfhydryl cross-linking reagent sodium tetrathionate (NaTT) prior to fractionation. To determine whether this effect of disulfide bond formation was unique to rat liver nuclei, nuclear matrix/cytoskeleton structures were prepared in situ by sequentially treating monolayers of tissue culture cells with Nonidet-P40, DNase I and RNase A, and 1.6 M NaCl (S.H. Kaufmann and J.H. Shaper (1991) Exp. Cell Res. 192, 511-523). When nuclear monolayers were prepared from HTC rat hepatoma cells, CaLu-1 human lung carcinoma cells, and CHO hamster ovary cells in the absence of NaTT, pADPRp was undetectable in the nuclease- and 1.6 M NaCl-resistant fraction. In contrast, when nuclear monolayers were isolated in the presence of NaTT, from 5% (CaLu-1) to 26% (HTC cells) of the total nuclear pADPRp was recovered with the nuclease- and salt-resistant fraction. Examination of these residual structures by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under nonreducing conditions suggested that pADPRp was present as a component of disulfide cross-linked complexes. Further analysis by immunofluorescence revealed that the pADPRp was diffusely distributed throughout the CaLu-1 or CHO nuclear matrix. In addition, when matrices were prepared in the absence of RNase A, pADPRp was also observed in the residual nucleoli. These

  4. Characteristics of the nuclear (18S, 5.8S, 28S and 5S) and mitochondrial (12S and 16S) rRNA genes of Apis mellifera (Insecta: Hymenoptera): structure, organization, and retrotransposable elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, J J; Johnston, J S; Cannone, J J; Gutell, R R

    2006-10-01

    As an accompanying manuscript to the release of the honey bee genome, we report the entire sequence of the nuclear (18S, 5.8S, 28S and 5S) and mitochondrial (12S and 16S) ribosomal RNA (rRNA)-encoding gene sequences (rDNA) and related internally and externally transcribed spacer regions of Apis mellifera (Insecta: Hymenoptera: Apocrita). Additionally, we predict secondary structures for the mature rRNA molecules based on comparative sequence analyses with other arthropod taxa and reference to recently published crystal structures of the ribosome. In general, the structures of honey bee rRNAs are in agreement with previously predicted rRNA models from other arthropods in core regions of the rRNA, with little additional expansion in non-conserved regions. Our multiple sequence alignments are made available on several public databases and provide a preliminary establishment of a global structural model of all rRNAs from the insects. Additionally, we provide conserved stretches of sequences flanking the rDNA cistrons that comprise the externally transcribed spacer regions (ETS) and part of the intergenic spacer region (IGS), including several repetitive motifs. Finally, we report the occurrence of retrotransposition in the nuclear large subunit rDNA, as R2 elements are present in the usual insertion points found in other arthropods. Interestingly, functional R1 elements usually present in the genomes of insects were not detected in the honey bee rRNA genes. The reverse transcriptase products of the R2 elements are deduced from their putative open reading frames and structurally aligned with those from another hymenopteran insect, the jewel wasp Nasonia (Pteromalidae). Stretches of conserved amino acids shared between Apis and Nasonia are illustrated and serve as potential sites for primer design, as target amplicons within these R2 elements may serve as novel phylogenetic markers for Hymenoptera. Given the impending completion of the sequencing of the Nasonia genome

  5. Heterogeneity in isogenic populations of microorganisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anne Egholm

    values for quantifiable variables are used. The reproducibility of an experiment could thus be affected by the presence of subpopulations or high levels of phenotypic variations. Ole Maaløe and colleagues did in the late 1950’ties observe that the growth rate, RNA, DNA and protein synthesis and cell...... of heterogeneity was slightly higher at intermediate inducer concentrations. Additionally, the effect of thermal stress on phenotypic heterogeneity was addressed by inflicting a heat stress to the B. subtilis GFP reporter strain. The increase in incubation temperature transient increased population heterogeneity....... Heterogeneity was investigated on a population level using a quantitative analysis of phenotypic variation in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The results obtained showed that the physiological state of the culture used for the analysis affected the phenotypic variation, as heterogeneity...

  6. FTO, RNA epigenetics and epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Several recent landmark papers describing N6-methyladenosine (m6A) RNA modifications have provided valuable new insights as to the importance of m6A in the RNA transcriptome and in furthering the understanding of RNA epigenetics. One endogenous enzyme responsible for demethylating RNA m6A, FTO, is highly expressed in the CNS and is likely involved in mRNA metabolism, splicing or other nuclear RNA processing events. microRNAs (miRNAs), a family of small, non-coding transcripts that bind to tar...

  7. Structural organization of the genes encoding the small nuclear RNAs U1 to U6 of Tetrahymena thermophila is very similar to that of plant small nuclear RNA genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orum, H; Nielsen, Henrik; Engberg, J

    1992-01-01

    We report the sequences of the genes encoding the small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) U1 to U6 of the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila. The genes of the individual snRNAs exist in two to six slightly different copies per haploid genome. Sequence analyses of the gene-flanking regions indicate that there ar......We report the sequences of the genes encoding the small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) U1 to U6 of the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila. The genes of the individual snRNAs exist in two to six slightly different copies per haploid genome. Sequence analyses of the gene-flanking regions indicate...

  8. RNA helicases

    OpenAIRE

    Owttrim, George W.

    2013-01-01

    Similar to proteins, RNA molecules must fold into the correct conformation and associate with protein complexes in order to be functional within a cell. RNA helicases rearrange RNA secondary structure and RNA-protein interactions in an ATP-dependent reaction, performing crucial functions in all aspects of RNA metabolism. In prokaryotes, RNA helicase activity is associated with roles in housekeeping functions including RNA turnover, ribosome biogenesis, translation and small RNA metabolism. In...

  9. RNA topology

    OpenAIRE

    Frank-Kamenetskii, Maxim D.

    2013-01-01

    A new variety on non-coding RNA has been discovered by several groups: circular RNA (circRNA). This discovery raises intriguing questions about the possibility of the existence of knotted RNA molecules and the existence of a new class of enzymes changing RNA topology, RNA topoisomerases.

  10. COVER FIGURE in Nucleic Acids Research (Volume 39, Issue 9) entitled "The involvement of the nuclear-encoded human 2'-phosphodiesterase in mitochondrial RNA turnover"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Jesper Buchhave

    2011-01-01

    peptide is cleaved-off (see magnification in lower left corner), and the 2'-PDE folded to generate a catalytically active protein actively degrading RNA (see magnification in upper right corner). Liberated ribonucleotide monophosphate products (A, G, C and U) are indicated by color-coded boxes...

  11. RUNX1 Permits E4orf6-Directed Nuclear Localization of the Adenovirus E1B-55K Protein and Associates with Centers of Viral DNA and RNA Synthesis▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Leslie J.; Moore, Amy C.; Ohki, Misao; Kitabayashi, Issay; Patterson, David; Ornelles, David A.

    2008-01-01

    The localization of the adenovirus E1B-55K-E4orf6 protein complex is critical for its function. Prior studies demonstrated that E4orf6 directs the nuclear localization of E1B-55K in human cells and in rodent cells that contain part of human chromosome 21. We show here that the relevant activity on chromosome 21 maps to RUNX1. RUNX1 proteins are transcription factors that serve as scaffolds for the assembly of proteins that regulate transcription and RNA processing. After transfection, the RUNX1a, RUNX1b, and RUNX1-ΔN variants allowed E4orf6-directed E1B-55K nuclear localization. The failure of RUNX1c to allow nuclear colocalization was relieved by the deletion of amino-terminal residues of this protein. In the adenovirus-infected mouse cell, RUNX1 proteins were localized to discrete structures about the periphery of viral replication centers. These sites are enriched in viral RNA and RNA-processing factors. RUNX1b and RUNX1a proteins displaced E4orf6 from these sites. The association of E1B-55K at viral replication centers was enhanced by the RUNX1a and RUNX1b proteins, but only in the absence of E4orf6. In the presence of E4orf6, E1B-55K occurred in a perinuclear cytoplasmic body resembling the aggresome and was excluded from the nucleus of the infected mouse cell. We interpret these findings to mean that a dynamic relationship exists between the E4orf6, E1B-55K, and RUNX1 proteins. In cooperation with E4orf6, RUNX1 proteins are able to modulate the localization of E1B-55K and even remodel virus-specific structures that form at late times of infection. Subsequent studies will need to determine a functional consequence of the interaction between E4orf6, E1B-55K, and RUNX1. PMID:18417565

  12. U1 and U2 small nuclear RNA genetic linkage: a novel molecular tool for identification of six sole species (Soleidae, Pleuronectiformes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchado, Manuel; Rebordinos, Laureana; Infante, Carlos

    2006-05-31

    We evaluated the usefulness of a genetic linkage between the U1 and U2 small nuclear RNAs for species identification. Six soles belonging to the genera Solea, Dicologlossa, and Microchirus were studied. A simple methodology based on two single PCRs is described. Reproducible band profiles were generated for all samples. This rapid and discriminatory molecular method is highly promising for determining the authenticity of sole fillets in the food industry.

  13. Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Parents/Teachers Resource Links for Students Glossary Nuclear Medicine What is nuclear medicine? What are radioactive ... NIBIB-funded researchers advancing nuclear medicine? What is nuclear medicine? Nuclear medicine is a medical specialty that ...

  14. Precursors of ribosomal RNA in yeast nucleus : Biosynthesis and relation to cytoplasmic ribosomal RNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sillevis Smitt, W.W.; Vlak, J.M.; Schiphof, R.; Rozijn, Th.H.

    In vivo methylated precursors of ribosomal RNA in yeast have been characterized on acrylamide gels. The initial ribosomal precursor in the yeast nucleus is a 37S RNA component, which is processed to a nuclear 28S RNA. Both the 37S and the 28S RNA components are important constituents of the yeast

  15. A telescope for the RNA universe : novel bioinformatic approaches to analyze RNA sequencing data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pulyakhina, Irina

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis I focus on the application of bioinformatics to analyze RNA. The type of experimental data of interest is sequencing data generated with various Next Generation Sequencing technique: nuclear RNA, cytoplasmic RNA, captured polyadenylated RNA fragments, etc. I highlight the necessity in

  16. Evolution of RLSB, a nuclear-encoded S1 domain RNA binding protein associated with post-transcriptional regulation of plastid-encoded rbcL mRNA in vascular plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yerramsetty, Pradeep; Stata, Matt; Siford, Rebecca; Sage, Tammy L; Sage, Rowan F; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Albert, Victor A; Berry, James O

    2016-06-29

    RLSB, an S-1 domain RNA binding protein of Arabidopsis, selectively binds rbcL mRNA and co-localizes with Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) within chloroplasts of C3 and C4 plants. Previous studies using both Arabidopsis (C3) and maize (C4) suggest RLSB homologs are post-transcriptional regulators of plastid-encoded rbcL mRNA. While RLSB accumulates in all Arabidopsis leaf chlorenchyma cells, in C4 leaves RLSB-like proteins accumulate only within Rubisco-containing bundle sheath chloroplasts of Kranz-type species, and only within central compartment chloroplasts in the single cell C4 plant Bienertia. Our recent evidence implicates this mRNA binding protein as a primary determinant of rbcL expression, cellular localization/compartmentalization, and photosynthetic function in all multicellular green plants. This study addresses the hypothesis that RLSB is a highly conserved Rubisco regulatory factor that occurs in the chloroplasts all higher plants. Phylogenetic analysis has identified RLSB orthologs and paralogs in all major plant groups, from ancient liverworts to recent angiosperms. RLSB homologs were also identified in algae of the division Charophyta, a lineage closely related to land plants. RLSB-like sequences were not identified in any other algae, suggesting that it may be specific to the evolutionary line leading to land plants. The RLSB family occurs in single copy across most angiosperms, although a few species with two copies were identified, seemingly randomly distributed throughout the various taxa, although perhaps correlating in some cases with known ancient whole genome duplications. Monocots of the order Poales (Poaceae and Cyperaceae) were found to contain two copies, designated here as RLSB-a and RLSB-b, with only RLSB-a implicated in the regulation of rbcL across the maize developmental gradient. Analysis of microsynteny in angiosperms revealed high levels of conservation across eudicot species and for both paralogs in

  17. Effect of PCB 126 on aryl hydrocarbon receptor 1 (AHR1) and AHR1 nuclear translocator 1 (ARNT1) mRNA expression and CYP1 monooxygenase activity in chicken (Gallus domesticus) ovarian follicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wójcik, Dagmara; Antos, Piotr A; Katarzyńska, Dorota; Hrabia, Anna; Sechman, Andrzej

    2015-12-03

    The aim of the experiment was to study the in vitro effect of 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 126; a coplanar PCB congener) on aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR1) and AHR1 nuclear translocator (ARNT1) mRNA expression and the activity of CYP1 family monooxygenases in chicken ovarian follicles. White (1-4 mm) and yellowish (4-8 mm) prehierarchical follicles as well as fragments of the theca and granulosa layers of the 3 largest preovulatory follicles (F3-F1) were incubated in a medium supplemented with 0 (control group), 1, 10 or 100 nM PCB 126. The incubation was carried out for 6 h or 24 h for determination of mRNA expression of AHR1 and ARNT1 genes (real-time qPCR) and CYP1 monooxygenase activity (EROD and MROD fluorometric assays), respectively. It was found that chicken ovarian follicles express mRNA of AHR1 and ARNT1 genes. A modulatory effect of PCB 126 on AHR1 and ARNT1 expression depended not only on the biphenyl concentration but also on the follicular layer and the maturational state of the follicle. EROD and MROD activities appeared predominantly in the granulosa layer of the yellow preovulatory follicles. PCB 126 induced these activities in a dose-dependent manner in all ovarian follicles. The obtained results suggest that ovarian follicles, especially the granulosa layer, are involved in the detoxification process of PCBs in the laying hen. Taking this finding into consideration it can be suggested that the granulosa layer of the yellow hierarchical follicles plays a key role in the protective mechanism which reduces the amount of transferred dioxin-like compounds into the yolk of the oocyte.

  18. MicroRNA-96 promotes the proliferation of colorectal cancer cells and targets tumor protein p53 inducible nuclear protein 1, forkhead box protein O1 (FOXO1) and FOXO3a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Feng; Wang, Wenhui

    2015-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a conserved class of small, endogenous, non protein-coding RNA molecules that are capable of regulating gene expression at post-transcriptional levels and are involved in diverse cellular processes, including cancer pathogenesis. It has previously been reported that miRNA-96 (miR-96) is overexpressed in human colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the underlying mechanism of miR-96 regulation in CRC remains to be elucidated. In the present study, miR-96 was confirmed to be upregulated in CRC tissues by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction. MTT assay, colony formation assay and cell cycle analysis revealed that miR-96 overexpression led to increased tumor cell viability, colony formation ability and cell cycle progression. By contrast, inhibition of miR-96 resulted in the suppression of cell proliferation. It was also demonstrated that miR-96 reduced the messenger RNA and protein expression levels of tumor protein p53 inducible nuclear protein 1 (TP53INP1), forkhead box protein O1 (FOXO1) and FOXO3a, which are closely associated with cell proliferation. A luciferase reporter assay indicated that miR-96 inhibited luciferase intensity controlled by the 3'UTRs of TP53INP1, FOXO1 and FOXO3a. In conclusion, the results of the present study demonstrated that miR-96 contributed to CRC cell growth and that TP53INP1, FOXO1 and FOXO3a were direct targets of miR-96, suggesting that miR-96 may have the potential to be used in the development of miRNA‑based therapies for CRC patients.

  19. The exome sequencing identified the mutation in YARS2 encoding the mitochondrial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase as a nuclear modifier for the phenotypic manifestation of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy-associated mitochondrial DNA mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Pingping; Jin, Xiaofen; Peng, Yanyan; Wang, Meng; Liu, Hao; Liu, Xiaoling; Zhang, Zengjun; Ji, Yanchun; Zhang, Juanjuan; Liang, Min; Zhao, Fuxin; Sun, Yan-Hong; Zhang, Minglian; Zhou, Xiangtian; Chen, Ye; Mo, Jun Qin; Huang, Taosheng; Qu, Jia; Guan, Min-Xin

    2016-02-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is the most common mitochondrial disorder. Nuclear modifier genes are proposed to modify the phenotypic expression of LHON-associated mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations. By using an exome sequencing approach, we identified a LHON susceptibility allele (c.572G>T, p.191Gly>Val) in YARS2 gene encoding mitochondrial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase, which interacts with m.11778G>A mutation to cause visual failure. We performed functional assays by using lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from members of Chinese families (asymptomatic individuals carrying m.11778G>A mutation, or both m.11778G>A and heterozygous p.191Gly>Val mutations and symptomatic subjects harboring m.11778G>A and homozygous p.191Gly>Val mutations) and controls lacking these mutations. The 191Gly>Val mutation reduced the YARS2 protein level in the mutant cells. The aminoacylated efficiency and steady-state level of tRNA(Tyr) were markedly decreased in the cell lines derived from patients both carrying homozygous YARS2 p.191Gly>Val and m.11778G>A mutations. The failure in tRNA(Tyr) metabolism impaired mitochondrial translation, especially for polypeptides with high content of tyrosine codon such as ND4, ND5, ND6 and COX2 in cells lines carrying homozygous YARS2 p.191Gly>Val and m.11778G>A mutations. The YARS2 p.191Gly>Val mutation worsened the respiratory phenotypes associated with m.11778G>A mutation, especially reducing activities of complexes I and IV. The respiratory deficiency altered the efficiency of mitochondrial ATP synthesis and increased the production of reactive oxygen species. Thus, mutated YARS2 aggravates mitochondrial dysfunctions associated with the m.11778G>A mutation, exceeding the threshold for the expression of blindness phenotype. Our findings provided new insights into the pathophysiology of LHON that were manifested by interaction between mtDNA mutation and mutated nuclear-modifier YARS2.

  20. Circular Dichroism and Fluorescence Spectroscopic Study of RNA-protein Folding Patterns in Human hnRNP A3 and Their Implications in Human Autoimmune Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    E.SüLEYMANO(G)LU

    2004-01-01

    In human cells, the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNP) are represented by a group of polypeptides, with various molecular properties, comprizing the most abundant constituents of the cell nucleus. Autoantibodies to hnRNPs have been reported in patients suffering from different rheumatic dieseases since 1980s. Experimental evidence indicates that hnRNP complexes undergo substantial structural changes during mRNA formation and export. However, how this contributes to disease development still has to be elucidated. Here some preliminary physicochemical features of RNA-protein folding and stability patterns of newly characterized hnRNP A3 with further functional implications in development of systemic human autoimmune states are reported.

  1. Insights into circular RNA biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbesen, Karoline K; Hansen, Thomas B; Kjems, Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) are a novel class of non-coding RNA characterized by a covalently closed-loop structure generated through a special type of alternative splicing termed backsplicing. CircRNAs are emerging as a heterogeneous class of molecules involved in modulating gene expression by regu...... and lastly, an outlook with a focus on unanswered questions regarding circRNA biology will be included....

  2. RNA Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Barbara L.; Kundrot, Craig E.

    2003-01-01

    RNA molecules may be crystallized using variations of the methods developed for protein crystallography. As the technology has become available to syntheisize and purify RNA molecules in the quantities and with the quality that is required for crystallography, the field of RNA structure has exploded. The first consideration when crystallizing an RNA is the sequence, which may be varied in a rational way to enhance crystallizability or prevent formation of alternate structures. Once a sequence has been designed, the RNA may be synthesized chemically by solid-state synthesis, or it may be produced enzymatically using RNA polymerase and an appropriate DNA template. Purification of milligram quantities of RNA can be accomplished by HPLC or gel electrophoresis. As with proteins, crystallization of RNA is usually accomplished by vapor diffusion techniques. There are several considerations that are either unique to RNA crystallization or more important for RNA crystallization. Techniques for design, synthesis, purification, and crystallization of RNAs will be reviewed here.

  3. RNA-binding protein hnRNPLL regulates mRNA splicing and stability during B-cell to plasma-cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Xing; Li, Bin; Rao, Anjana

    2015-04-14

    Posttranscriptional regulation is a major mechanism to rewire transcriptomes during differentiation. Heterogeneous nuclear RNA-binding protein LL (hnRNPLL) is specifically induced in terminally differentiated lymphocytes, including effector T cells and plasma cells. To study the molecular functions of hnRNPLL at a genome-wide level, we identified hnRNPLL RNA targets and binding sites in plasma cells through integrated Photoactivatable-Ribonucleoside-Enhanced Cross-Linking and Immunoprecipitation (PAR-CLIP) and RNA sequencing. hnRNPLL preferentially recognizes CA dinucleotide-containing sequences in introns and 3' untranslated regions (UTRs), promotes exon inclusion or exclusion in a context-dependent manner, and stabilizes mRNA when associated with 3' UTRs. During differentiation of primary B cells to plasma cells, hnRNPLL mediates a genome-wide switch of RNA processing, resulting in loss of B-cell lymphoma 6 (Bcl6) expression and increased Ig production--both hallmarks of plasma-cell maturation. Our data identify previously unknown functions of hnRNPLL in B-cell to plasma-cell differentiation and demonstrate that the RNA-binding protein hnRNPLL has a critical role in tuning transcriptomes of terminally differentiating B lymphocytes.

  4. Sphingosine kinase 1 serves as a pro-viral factor by regulating viral RNA synthesis and nuclear export of viral ribonucleoprotein complex upon influenza virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Jin Seo

    Full Text Available Influenza continues to pose a threat to humans by causing significant morbidity and mortality. Thus, it is imperative to investigate mechanisms by which influenza virus manipulates the function of host factors and cellular signal pathways. In this study, we demonstrate that influenza virus increases the expression and activation of sphingosine kinase (SK 1, which in turn regulates diverse cellular signaling pathways. Inhibition of SK suppressed virus-induced NF-κB activation and markedly reduced the synthesis of viral RNAs and proteins. Further, SK blockade interfered with activation of Ran-binding protein 3 (RanBP3, a cofactor of chromosome region maintenance 1 (CRM1, to inhibit CRM1-mediated nuclear export of the influenza viral ribonucleoprotein complex. In support of this observation, SK inhibition altered the phosphorylation of ERK, p90RSK, and AKT, which is the upstream signal of RanBP3/CRM1 activation. Collectively, these results indicate that SK is a key pro-viral factor regulating multiple cellular signal pathways triggered by influenza virus infection.

  5. Nuclear Confidence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The Fukushima nuclear accident provides valuable lessons for China national nuclear Corp.as it continues to expand its operations AS Japan’s Fukushima nuclear crisis sparks a global debate over nuclear safety,China National Nuclear Corp. (CNNC),the country’s largest nuclear plant operator, comes under the spotlight.

  6. The human NTT gene: Identification of a novel 17-kb noncoding nuclear RNA expressed in activated CD4{sup +} T cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, A.Y.; Torchia, B.S.; Migeon, B.R. [Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)] [and others

    1997-01-15

    We describe the cloning and characterization of the NTT gene (noncoding transcript in T cells), identified by differential display RT-PCR based on the differential presence of its transcript in a subset of activated, human CD4{sup +} T-cell clones. The full-length cDNA and genomic sequences were cloned and found to produce a 17-kb transcript that is polyadenylated, but is not spliced. Consistent with the transcript`s nuclear predominance, NTT has no open reading frame larger than 270 bp. It is transcribed in a select subset of CD4{sup +} T-cell clones propagated in vitro. Its transcription can also be induced in freshly isolated T cells by in vitro activation with PHA or with PMA and ionomycin. In vivo, NTT transcripts are found only in activated, but not resting, T cells. Transcripts were absent in a variety of lymphoid cell lines and transformed lines from other tissues. NTT is a new member of the small group of genes including XIST (X{sub i}-specific transcript), H19, and IPW (imprinted gene in the Prader-Willi syndrome region), which are transcribed but not translated, and may have a role in the regulation of neighboring genes. XIST, H19, and IPW exhibit monoallelic expression, but both NTT alleles are expressed in CD4{sup +} T-cell clones. Southern blot and fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses show that NTT is a single-copy gene residing in chromosome 6q23-q24, near the interferon-{gamma} receptor gene (IFN-{gamma}R). Their proximity and shared expression pattern suggest a possible functional relationship. 57 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  7. 人源核不均一核糖核蛋白E1真核表达载体在神经细胞中的表达%Expression of recombinant plasmid of homo heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein E1 in SH-SY5Y cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    霍丽蓉; 王兰英; 邹俊华; 钟南

    2014-01-01

    背景:人源核不均一核糖核蛋白E1功能广泛,可参与神经系统骨架蛋白的表达。目的:为深入研究其在神经细胞中的作用,构建其真核表达载体,观察其在神经细胞中的表达。方法:利用真核表达载体pcDNATM4/His C,通过亚克隆构建核不均一核糖核蛋白E1-pcDNATM 4/His C重组质粒,经酶切、测序鉴定,通过转染神经细胞SH-SY5Y,采用western-blot,RT-PCR鉴定核不均一核糖核蛋白E1重组质粒的表达,并观察转染细胞的生长现象。结果与结论:成功构建了核不均一核糖核蛋白 E1的真核表达载体,mRNA 和蛋白水平上均证实了该质粒可在神经细胞SH-SY5Y中正确表达。SH-SY5Y细胞在转染核不均一核糖核蛋白E1后表现为加速生长。提示该蛋白对神经细胞的生长发育具有重要的作用。该载体为进一步研究核不均一核糖核蛋白E1在神经系统中的功能提供了前提条件。%BACKGROUND:The functions of homo heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein E1 are very wide. It can participate in the expression of skeleton proteins in the nervous system. OBJECTIVE:To construct the recombinant plasmid of homo heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein E1 and observe its expression in nerve cells for further studying the functions of it in neurocytes. METHODS:Using pcDNATM4/His C, the homo heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein E1 was subcloned into recombinant plasmid E1-pcDNATM 4/His C, fol owed by enzyming and sequencing. After SH-SY5Y cells were transfected with the recombinant plasmid, western blot analysis and real time RT-PCR were used to detect the expression of homo heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein E1 in SH-SY5Y cells. And the growth of SH-SY5Y cells was observed. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:We successful y constructed the eukaryotic expressed vector of homo heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein E1. The recombinant plasmids were verified to express in SH-SY5Y cells correctly at mRNA and protein levels. And SH-SY5Y cells

  8. Down regulation of RNA binding motif, single-stranded interacting protein 3, along with up regulation of nuclear HIF1A correlates with poor prognosis in patients with gastric cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yingjie; Wang, Yuqi; Sun, Ruochuan; Yan, Qiang; Zhang, Shangxin; Lu, Mingdian; Zhang, Zhen; Lu, Daru; Li, Yongxiang

    2017-01-01

    Frequent loss of multiple regions in short arm of chromosome 3 is found in various tumors including gastric cancer (GC). RNA binding motif, single-stranded interacting protein 3 (RBMS3) is a tumor suppressor gene located in this region and mediates cancer angiogenesis. However, the role of RBMS3 in GC remains unclear. To evaluate whether RBMS3, together with HIF1A, another key regulator of angiogenesis, predicts GC prognosis, the levels of RBMS3 and HIF1A were first examined by quantitative PCR (qPCR) and western blot from 27 fresh frozen GC and paired normal gastric tissues and then tested by immunohistochemistry (IHC) from 191 GC and 46 normal controls. Moreover, uni- and multivariate analysis were employed to assess the correlations between their levels and microvessel density (MVD) and clinical prognosis. To further identify RBMS3 function in vitro, cell proliferation assay, clonogenic assay, flow cytometry analysis and endothelial cell tube formation assay were employed. We found that RBMS3 level was decreased, whereas HIF1A was elevated in GC. Furthermore, we demonstrated that RBMS3 was an independent prognostic factor and the levels of RBMS3 and HIF1A were associated with GC angiogenesis and histopathological differentiation: patients with lower RBMS3 level and higher nuclear HIF1A expression had poorer prognosis. Besides, gain- and loss-of-function study revealed RBMS3 regulation on G1/S progression, cell proliferation and the tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in vitro. These findings implicated that RBMS3 and nuclear HIF1A could act as prognostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets for GC. PMID:27902480

  9. MicroRNA-21 Promotes Proliferation of Fibroblast-Like Synoviocytes through Mediation of NF-κB Nuclear Translocation in a Rat Model of Collagen-Induced Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying; Xian, Pei-Feng; Yang, Lu; Wang, Sheng-Xu

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNA-21 (miR-21) is overexpressed in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This study was designed to investigate the effect and mechanism of miR-21 on cell proliferation in fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) of RA. FLS were primary-cultured from a rat RA model. RA-FLS and normal FLS were infected with lentivirus (anti-miR-21 or pro-miR-21) for overexpression or downregulation of miR-21, respectively. The effects of miR-21 overexpression or inhibition on nucleoprotein NF-κB levels and FLS cell proliferation were evaluated by western blotting and MTT assays. The effects of an inhibitor of NF-κB nuclear translocation (BAY 11-7082) were also evaluated. The results showed that the levels of miR-21 and nucleoprotein NF-κB were increased in FLS of RA model rats compared to the control group. Downregulation of miR-21 in RA FLS led to a significant decrease in nucleoprotein NF-κB levels and cell proliferation rates compared to the antinegative control (NC) group. However, miR-21 overexpression in normal FLS resulted in a significant increase of nucleoprotein NF-κB levels and cell proliferation rates compared to the pro-NC group. The effects of miR-21 overexpression were reversed by BAY 11-7082. We concluded that upregulated miR-21 in FLS in RA model rats may promote cell proliferation by facilitating NF-κB nuclear translocation, thus affecting the NF-κB pathway.

  10. Phylogenetic position of Linguatula arctica and Linguatula serrata (Pentastomida) as inferred from the nuclear 18S rRNA gene and the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjerde, Bjørn

    2013-10-01

    Genomic DNA was isolated from a Linguatula serrata female expelled from a dog imported to Norway from Romania and from four Linguatula arctica females collected from semi-domesticated reindeer from northern Norway and subjected to PCR amplification of the complete nuclear 18S rRNA gene and a 1,045-bp portion of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene (cox1). The two species differed at two of 1,830 nucleotide positions (99.9% identity) of the complete 18S rRNA gene sequences and at 102 of 1,045 nucleotide positions (90.2% identity) of the partial cox1 sequences. The four isolates of L. arctica showed no genetic variation in either gene. The new cox1 primers may facilitate the diagnosis of various developmental stages of L. arctica and L. serrata in their hosts. In separate phylogenetic analyses using the maximum likelihood method on sequence data from either gene, L. arctica and L. serrata clustered with members of the order Cephalobaenida rather than with members of the order Porocephalida, in which the genus Linguatula is currently placed based on morphological characters. The phylogenetic relationship of L. arctica, L. serrata and other pentastomids to other metazoan groups could not be clearly resolved, but the pentastomids did not seem to have a sister relationship to crustaceans of the subclass Branchiura as found in other studies. A more extensive taxon sampling, including molecular characterisation of more pentastomid taxa across different genera, seems to be necessary in order to estimate the true relationship of the Pentastomida to other metazoan groups.

  11. Unravelling the nuclear matrix proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrethsen, Jakob; Knol, Jaco C; Jimenez, Connie R

    2009-01-01

    The nuclear matrix (NM) model posits the presence of a protein/RNA scaffold that spans the mammalian nucleus. The NM proteins are involved in basic nuclear function and are a promising source of protein biomarkers for cancer. Importantly, the NM proteome is operationally defined as the proteins...

  12. Heterogeneous network architectures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Henrik Lehrmann

    2006-01-01

    Future networks will be heterogeneous! Due to the sheer size of networks (e.g., the Internet) upgrades cannot be instantaneous and thus heterogeneity appears. This means that instead of trying to find the olution, networks hould be designed as being heterogeneous. One of the key equirements here...... is flexibility. This thesis investigates such heterogeneous network architectures and how to make them flexible. A survey of algorithms for network design is presented, and it is described how using heuristics can increase the speed. A hierarchical, MPLS based network architecture is described...... and it is discussed that it is advantageous to heterogeneous networks and illustrated by a number of examples. Modeling and simulation is a well-known way of doing performance evaluation. An approach to event-driven simulation of communication networks is presented and mixed complexity modeling, which can simplify...

  13. RNA-DNA Chimeras in the Context of an RNA World Transition to an RNA/DNA World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavette, Jesse V; Stoop, Matthias; Hud, Nicholas V; Krishnamurthy, Ramanarayanan

    2016-10-10

    The RNA world hypothesis posits that DNA and proteins were later inventions of early life, or the chemistry that gave rise to life. Most scenarios put forth for the emergence of DNA assume a clean separation of RNA and DNA polymer, and a smooth transition between RNA and DNA. However, based on the reality of "clutter" and lack of sophisticated separation/discrimination mechanisms in a protobiological (and/or prebiological) world, heterogeneous RNA-DNA backbone containing chimeric sequences could have been common-and have not been fully considered in models transitioning from an RNA world to an RNA-DNA world. Herein we show that there is a significant decrease in Watson-Crick duplex stability of the heterogeneous backbone chimeric duplexes that would impede base-pair mediated interactions (and functions). These results point to the difficulties for the transition from one homogeneous system (RNA) to another (RNA/DNA) in an RNA world with a heterogeneous mixture of ribo- and deoxyribonucleotides and sequences, while suggesting an alternative scenario of prebiological accumulation and co-evolution of homogeneous systems (RNA and DNA).

  14. Nuclear safeguards; Salvaguardias nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zurron, O.

    2015-07-01

    Safeguards control at the Juzbado Plant is implemented through the joint IAEA/EURATOM partnership approach in force within the European Union for all nuclear facilities. this verification agreement is designed to minimize burden on the operators whilst ensuring that both inspectorate achieve the objectives related to their respective safeguards regimes. This paper outlines the safeguards approaches followed by the inspectorate and the particularities of the Juzbado Plants nuclear material accountancy and control system. (Authors)

  15. Design for Un-heterogeneous Critical Assembly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Fan; ZHOU; Qi

    2013-01-01

    In order to study the nuclear criticality issues in the dissolving process,a new critical assembly is designed by theoretical calculation to satisfy the heterogeneous critical experimental demands based on the existed YSR assembly(Fig.1).The experiment plans,geometry structure of the assembly,solution contents and fuel rods arrangements are determined.The parameters for each scheme are listed in Table 1.

  16. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor strains isolated before, during and after the O 139 outbreak based on the inter-genomic heterogeneity of the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghatak, Atreyi; Majumdar, Anasuya; Ghosh, Ranajit K

    2005-12-01

    We have cloned, sequenced and analysed all the five classes of the intergenic (16S-23S rRNA) spacer region (ISR) associated with the eight rrn operons (rrna-rrnh) of Vibrio cholerae serogroup O1 El Tor strains isolated before, during and after the O 139 outbreak. ISR classes 'a' and 'g' were found to be invariant, ISR-B (ISRb and ISRe) exhibited very little variation, whereas ISR-C (ISRc, ISRd, and ISRf) and ISRh showed the maximum variation. Phylogenetic analysis conducted with all three ISR classes (ISR-B, ISR-C and ISRh) showed that the pre-O 139 serogroup and post-O 139 serogroup O1 El Tor strains arose out of two independent clones, which was congruent with the observation made by earlier workers suggesting that analyses of ISR-C and ISR-h, instead of all five ISR classes, could be successfully used to study phylogeny in this organism.

  17. RNA Origami

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sparvath, Steffen Lynge

    2017-01-01

    for biosensorer,  der kan spore enten microRNA’er eller små molekyler, eksemplificeret ved S-adenosylmethionin (SAM). Slutteligt indikerer foreløbige resultater, at apta-FRET SAM sensoren kan udtrykkes i Escherichia coli-celler, hvilket viser, at RNA-origami arkitekturen muliggør cotransskriptionel foldning af......RNA-nanoteknologi feltet har demonstreret alsidigheden af RNA som byggemateriale, og rationelt designede RNA-nanostrukturer er blevet brugt i udviklingen af strukturelle platforme og dynamiske anordninger med anvendelser både in vitro og in vivo. Naturlige RNA-strukturer foldes cotransskriptionelt...... fra en enkelt RNA-streng, og udfører en lang række komplekse cellulære funktioner. Mange af funktionerne er blevet udnyttet til at skabe funktionelle RNA-baserede nanoapparater, men den nuværende litteratur giver kun få eksempler på cotranskriptionel produktion af RNA-nanostrukturer. I 2014...

  18. RNA granules

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Paul; Kedersha, Nancy

    2006-01-01

    Cytoplasmic RNA granules in germ cells (polar and germinal granules), somatic cells (stress granules and processing bodies), and neurons (neuronal granules) have emerged as important players in the posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression. RNA granules contain various ribosomal subunits, translation factors, decay enzymes, helicases, scaffold proteins, and RNA-binding proteins, and they control the localization, stability, and translation of their RNA cargo. We review the relationshi...

  19. iRNA-PseU: Identifying RNA pseudouridine sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As the most abundant RNA modification, pseudouridine plays important roles in many biological processes. Occurring at the uridine site and catalyzed by pseudouridine synthase, the modification has been observed in nearly all kinds of RNA, including transfer RNA, messenger RNA, small nuclear or nucleolar RNA, and ribosomal RNA. Accordingly, its importance to basic research and drug development is self-evident. Despite some experimental technologies have been developed to detect the pseudouridine sites, they are both time-consuming and expensive. Facing the explosive growth of RNA sequences in the postgenomic age, we are challenged to address the problem by computational approaches: For an uncharacterized RNA sequence, can we predict which of its uridine sites can be modified as pseudouridine and which ones cannot? Here a predictor called “iRNA-PseU” was proposed by incorporating the chemical properties of nucleotides and their occurrence frequency density distributions into the general form of pseudo nucleotide composition (PseKNC. It has been demonstrated via the rigorous jackknife test, independent dataset test, and practical genome-wide analysis that the proposed predictor remarkably outperforms its counterpart. For the convenience of most experimental scientists, the web-server for iRNA-PseU was established at http://lin.uestc.edu.cn/server/iRNA-PseU, by which users can easily get their desired results without the need to go through the mathematical details.

  20. RNA genetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domingo, E. (Instituto de Biologia Molecular, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Canto Blanco, Madrid (ES)); Holland, J.J. (California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla, CA (USA). Dept. of Biology); Ahlquist, P. (Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (USA). Dept. of Plant Pathology)

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings on RNA genetics: RNA-directed virus replication Volume 1. Topics covered include: Replication of the poliovirus genome; Influenza viral RNA transcription and replication; and Relication of the reoviridal: Information derived from gene cloning and expression.

  1. Nuclear physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sang, David (Bishop Luffa Comprehensive School, Chichester (UK))

    1990-01-01

    Nuclear Physics covers the aspects of radioactivity and nuclear physics dealt with in the syllabuses of all the A-level examination boards; in particular, it provides detailed coverage of the Joint Matriculation Board option in nuclear physics. It deals with the discovery of the atomic nucleus, the physics of nuclear processes, and nuclear technology. (author).

  2. Heterogeneous cellular networks

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Rose Qingyang

    2013-01-01

    A timely publication providing coverage of radio resource management, mobility management and standardization in heterogeneous cellular networks The topic of heterogeneous cellular networks has gained momentum in industry and the research community, attracting the attention of standardization bodies such as 3GPP LTE and IEEE 802.16j, whose objectives are looking into increasing the capacity and coverage of the cellular networks. This book focuses on recent progresses,  covering the related topics including scenarios of heterogeneous network deployment, interference management i

  3. RNA epigenetics

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Nian; Pan, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian messenger and long non-coding RNA contain tens of thousands of post-transcriptional chemical modifications. Among these, the N6-methyl-adenosine (m6A) modification is the most abundant and can be removed by specific mammalian enzymes. M6A modification is recognized by families of RNA binding proteins that affect many aspects of mRNA function. mRNA/lncRNA modification represents another layer of epigenetic regulation of gene expression, analogous to DNA methylation and histone modifi...

  4. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor strains isolated before, during and after the O139 outbreak based on the intergenomic heterogeneity of the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer regions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Atreyi Ghatak; Anasuya Majumdar; Ranajit K Ghosh

    2005-12-01

    We have cloned, sequenced and analysed all the five classes of the intergenic (16S-23S rRNA) spacer region (ISR) associated with the eight rrn operons (rrna-rrnh) of Vibrio cholerae serogroup O1 El Tor strains isolated before, during and after the O139 outbreak. ISR classes ‘a’ and ‘g’ were found to be invariant, ISR-B (ISRb and ISRe) exhibited very little variation, whereas ISR-C (ISRc, ISRd, and ISRf) and ISRh showed the maximum variation. Phylogenetic analysis conducted with all three ISR classes (ISR-B, ISR-C and ISRh) showed that the pre-O139 serogroup and post-O139 serogroup O1 El Tor strains arose out of two independent clones, which was congruent with the observation made by earlier workers suggesting that analyses of ISR-C and ISR-h, instead of all five ISR classes, could be successfully used to study phylogeny in this organism.

  5. Nuclear ventriculography

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ventriculography (RNV); Multiple gate acquisition scan (MUGA); Nuclear cardiology; Cardiomyopathy - nuclear ventriculography ... 56. Udelson JE, Dilsizian V, Bonow RO. Nuclear cardiology. In: Bonow RO, Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby ...

  6. Nuclear Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawi, Ramsey D.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the use of nuclear medicine techniques in diagnosis and therapy. Describes instrumentation in diagnostic nuclear medicine and predicts future trends in nuclear medicine imaging technology. (Author/MM)

  7. Teaching Heterogeneous Classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millrood, Radislav

    2002-01-01

    Discusses an approach to teaching heterogeneous English-as-a-Second/Foreign-Language classes. Draws on classroom research data to describe the features of a success-building lesson context. (Author/VWL)

  8. Depletion of Ribosomal RNA Sequences from Single-Cell RNA-Sequencing Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Nan; Akinci-Tolun, Rumeysa

    2016-07-01

    Recent advances in single-cell RNA sequencing technologies have revealed high heterogeneity of gene expression profiles in individual cells. However, most current single-cell RNA-seq methods use oligo-dT priming in the reverse transcription steps and detect only polyA-positive for more accuracy, since there are also polyA-positive non-coding RNAs transcripts, not other important RNA species, such as polyA-negative noncoding RNA. Reverse transcription using random oligos enables detection of not only the noncoding RNA species without polyA tails, but also ribosomal RNA (rRNA). rRNA comprises more than 90% of the total RNA and should be depleted from the RNA-seq library to ensure efficient usage of the sequencing capacity. Commonly used hybridization-based rRNA depletion methods can preserve noncoding RNA in the standard RNA-seq library. However, such rRNA depletion methods require high input amounts of total RNA and do not work at the single-cell level or with limited input DNA. This unit describes a novel procedure for RNA-seq library construction from single cells or a minimal amount of RNA. A thermostable duplex-specific nuclease is used in this method to effectively remove ribosomal RNA sequences following whole-transcriptome amplification and sequencing library construction. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  9. Polyadenylation of ribosomal RNA in human cells

    OpenAIRE

    Slomovic, Shimyn; Laufer, David; Geiger, Dan; Schuster, Gadi

    2006-01-01

    The addition of poly(A)-tails to RNA is a process common to almost all organisms. In eukaryotes, stable poly(A)-tails, important for mRNA stability and translation initiation, are added to the 3′ ends of most nuclear-encoded mRNAs, but not to rRNAs. Contrarily, in prokaryotes and organelles, polyadenylation stimulates RNA degradation. Recently, polyadenylation of nuclear-encoded transcripts in yeast was reported to promote RNA degradation, demonstrating that polyadenylation can play a double-...

  10. Focus on RNA isolation: obtaining RNA for microRNA (miRNA) expression profiling analyses of neural tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wang-Xia; Rajeev, Bernard W.; Baldwin, Donald A.; Isett, R. Benjamin; Ren, Na; Stromberg, Arnold; Nelson, Peter T.

    2008-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are present in all known plant and animal tissues and appear to be somewhat concentrated in the mammalian nervous system. Many different miRNA expression profiling platforms have been described. However, relatively little research has been published to establish the importance of ‘upstream’ variables in RNA isolation for neural miRNA expression profiling. We tested whether apparent changes in miRNA expression profiles may be associated with tissue processing, RNA isolation techniques, or different cell types in the sample. RNA isolation was performed on a single brain sample using eight different RNA isolation methods, and results were correlated using a conventional miRNA microarray and then cross-referenced to Northern blots. Differing results were seen between samples obtained using different RNA isolation techniques and between microarray and Northern blot results. Another complication of miRNA microarrays is tissue-level heterogeneity of cellular composition. To investigate this phenomenon, miRNA expression profiles were determined and compared between highly-purified primary cerebral cortical cell preparations of rat primary E15–E18 neurons versus rat primary E15–E18 astrocytes. Finally, to assess the importance of dissecting human brain gray matter from subjacent white matter in cerebral cortical studies, miRNA expression profiles were compared between gray matter and immediately contiguous white matter. The results suggest that for microarray studies, cellular composition is important, and dissecting white matter from gray matter improves the specificity of the results. Based on these data, recommendations for miRNA expression profiling in neural tissues, and considerations worthy of further study, are discussed. PMID:18316046

  11. Application of Live-Cell RNA Imaging Techniques to the Study of Retroviral RNA Trafficking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darrin V. Bann

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Retroviruses produce full-length RNA that serves both as a genomic RNA (gRNA, which is encapsidated into virus particles, and as an mRNA, which directs the synthesis of viral structural proteins. However, we are only beginning to understand the cellular and viral factors that influence trafficking of retroviral RNA and the selection of the RNA for encapsidation or translation. Live cell imaging studies of retroviral RNA trafficking have provided important insight into many aspects of the retrovirus life cycle including transcription dynamics, nuclear export of viral RNA, translational regulation, membrane targeting, and condensation of the gRNA during virion assembly. Here, we review cutting-edge techniques to visualize single RNA molecules in live cells and discuss the application of these systems to studying retroviral RNA trafficking.

  12. Nuclear Theory - Nuclear Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svenne, J. P.; Canton, L.; Kozier, K. S.

    2008-01-01

    The results from modern nuclear theory are accurate and reliable enough to be used for practical applications, in particular for scattering that involves few-nucleon systems of importance to nuclear power. Using well-established nucleon-nucleon (NN) interactions that fit well the NN scattering data, and the AGS form of the three-body theory, we have performed precise calculations of low-energy neutron-deuteron (n+d) scattering. We show that three-nucleon force effects that have impact on the low-energy vector analyzing powers have no practical effects on the angular distribution of the n+d cross-section. There appear to be problems for this scattering in the evaluated nuclear data file (ENDF) libraries, at the incident neutron energies less than 3.2 MeV. Supporting experimental data in this energy region are rather old (>25 years), sparse and often inconsistent. Our three-body results at low energies, 50 keV to 10.0 MeV, are compared to the ENDF/B-VII.0 and JENDL (Japanese Evaluated Nuclear Data Library) -3.3 evaluated angular distributions. The impact of these results on the calculated reactivity for various critical systems involving heavy water is shown.

  13. RNA oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, L. K.; Cejvanovic, V.; Henriken, T.

    2015-01-01

    in diabetes resulting from the diabetic state, a dysfunction that includes increased production of hydrogen peroxide. We suggest that the intracellular RNA oxidation is compartmentalized from the traditional biomarkers in the extracellular compartment, and therefore provides independent prognostic value...... diabetes. In agreement with our previous finding, DNA oxidation did not show any prognostic value. RNA oxidation represents oxidative stress intracellularly, presumably predominantly in the cytosol. The mechanism of RNA oxidation is not clear, but hypothesized to result from mitochondrial dysfunction...

  14. The tumor suppressive role of eIF3f and its function in translation inhibition and rRNA degradation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fushi Wen

    Full Text Available Deregulated translation plays an important role in human cancer. We previously reported decreased eukaryotic initiation factor 3 subunit f (eIF3f expression in pancreatic cancer. Whether decreased eIF3f expression can transform normal epithelial cells is not known. In our current study, we found evidence that stable knockdown of eIF3f in normal human pancreatic ductal epithelial cells increased cell size, nuclear pleomorphism, cytokinesis defects, cell proliferation, clonogenicity, apoptotic resistance, migration, and formation of 3-dimensional irregular masses. Our findings support the tumor suppressive role of eIF3f in pancreatic cancer. Mechanistically, we found that eIF3f inhibited both cap-dependent and cap-independent translation. An increase in the ribosomal RNA (rRNA level was suggested to promote the generation of cancer. The regulatory mechanism of rRNA degradation in mammals is not well understood. We demonstrated here that eIF3f promotes rRNA degradation through direct interaction with heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP K. We showed that hnRNP K is required for maintaining rRNA stability: under stress conditions, eIF3f dissociates hnRNP K from rRNA, thereby preventing it from protecting rRNA from degradation. We also demonstrated that rRNA degradation occurred in non-P body, non-stress granule cytoplasmic foci that contain eIF3f. Our findings established a new mechanism of rRNA decay regulation mediated by hnRNP K/eIF3f and suggest that the tumor suppressive function of eIF3f may link to impaired rRNA degradation and translation.

  15. Tumour Heterogeneity: The Key Advantages of Single-Cell Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellez-Gabriel, Marta; Ory, Benjamin; Lamoureux, Francois; Heymann, Marie-Francoise; Heymann, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Tumour heterogeneity refers to the fact that different tumour cells can show distinct morphological and phenotypic profiles, including cellular morphology, gene expression, metabolism, motility, proliferation and metastatic potential. This phenomenon occurs both between tumours (inter-tumour heterogeneity) and within tumours (intra-tumour heterogeneity), and it is caused by genetic and non-genetic factors. The heterogeneity of cancer cells introduces significant challenges in using molecular prognostic markers as well as for classifying patients that might benefit from specific therapies. Thus, research efforts for characterizing heterogeneity would be useful for a better understanding of the causes and progression of disease. It has been suggested that the study of heterogeneity within Circulating Tumour Cells (CTCs) could also reflect the full spectrum of mutations of the disease more accurately than a single biopsy of a primary or metastatic tumour. In previous years, many high throughput methodologies have raised for the study of heterogeneity at different levels (i.e., RNA, DNA, protein and epigenetic events). The aim of the current review is to stress clinical implications of tumour heterogeneity, as well as current available methodologies for their study, paying specific attention to those able to assess heterogeneity at the single cell level. PMID:27999407

  16. Chromosomal Distribution of the 18S-5.8S-26S rDNA Loci and Heterogeneity of Nuclear ITS Regions in Thinopyrum intermedium (Poaceae: Triticeae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIDa-Yong; RUYan-Yan; ZHANGXue-Yong

    2004-01-01

    Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to investigate the chromosomal location of 18S-5.8S-26S rDNA loci in Thinopyrum intermedium (Host) Barkworth et Dewey (2n=6x=42). In all accessions and individuals studied, 3 or 4 pairs of major loci were detected. Subsequent genomic in situhybddization (GISH) analyses revealed that one pair was located on the ends of the short arms of one pair of homologous chromosomes of the St genome, while the other 2 or 3 pairs of major loci were located in the E genomes (including the Eo and Eb). It is suggested that 2 to 3 pairs of major loci were probably lost during the evolution of this hexaploid species. The variation in rDNA positions and copy numbers between the diploid donors and Th. interrnedium, as well as the diversity among the accessions of Th. intermedium confirmed that the rDNA gene family conveyed the characters of DNA mobile elements. The internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of the rDNA in Th. intermedium were also investigated. Sequence data of seven positive clones from one individual suggested high degree of individual heterogeneity exists among ITS repeats. Phylogenetic analyses showed that there were two distinct types of ITS sequences in Th. intermedium, one with homology to that of Pseudoroegneria species (St genome) and the other to that of the E genome diploid species. This showed that the ITS paralogues in Th. intermedium have not been uniformly homogenized by concerted evolution. The limitation of using the chromosomal location of rDNA loci for phylogenetic analysis is discussed.

  17. Heterogeneity in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyak, Kornelia

    2011-10-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease. There is a high degree of diversity between and within tumors as well as among cancer-bearing individuals, and all of these factors together determine the risk of disease progression and therapeutic resistance. Advances in technologies such as whole-genome sequencing and functional viability screens now allow us to analyze tumors at unprecedented depths. However, translating this increasing knowledge into clinical practice remains a challenge in part due to tumor evolution driven by the diversity of cancer cell populations and their microenvironment. The articles in this Review series discuss recent advances in our understanding of breast tumor heterogeneity, therapies tailored based on this knowledge, and future ways of assessing and treating heterogeneous tumors.

  18. Green heterogeneous wireless networks

    CERN Document Server

    Ismail, Muhammad; Nee, Hans-Peter; Qaraqe, Khalid A; Serpedin, Erchin

    2016-01-01

    This book focuses on the emerging research topic "green (energy efficient) wireless networks" which has drawn huge attention recently from both academia and industry. This topic is highly motivated due to important environmental, financial, and quality-of-experience (QoE) considerations. Specifically, the high energy consumption of the wireless networks manifests in approximately 2% of all CO2 emissions worldwide. This book presents the authors’ visions and solutions for deployment of energy efficient (green) heterogeneous wireless communication networks. The book consists of three major parts. The first part provides an introduction to the "green networks" concept, the second part targets the green multi-homing resource allocation problem, and the third chapter presents a novel deployment of device-to-device (D2D) communications and its successful integration in Heterogeneous Networks (HetNets). The book is novel in that it specifically targets green networking in a heterogeneous wireless medium, which re...

  19. Nuclear control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Wan Kee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-02-01

    International cooperation in nuclear industries requires nuclear control as prerequisites. The concept of nuclear control is based on the Treaty on the Non-proliferation of Nuclear Weapon (NPT). The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) plays central role in implementing nuclear control. Nuclear control consists of nuclear safeguards, physical protection, and export/import control. Each member state of NPT is subject to the IAEA`s safeguards by concluding safeguards agreements with the IAEA. IAEA recommends member states to implement physical protection on nuclear materials by `The Physical Protection of Nuclear Material` and `The Convention on the Physical Protection of Nuclear Material` of IAEA. Export/Import Control is to deter development of nuclear weapons by controlling international trade on nuclear materials, nuclear equipments and technology. Current status of domestic and foreign nuclear control implementation including recent induction of national inspection system in Korea is described and functions of recently set-up Technology Center for Nuclear Control (TCNC) under the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) are also explained. 6 tabs., 11 refs. (Author).

  20. RNA. Introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Marie Z; Kruger, Robert P; Rivas, Fabiola; Smith, Orla; Szewczak, Lara

    2009-02-20

    Two scientists walk into a bar. After a pint and an exchange of pleasantries, one says to the other, "Where do you come from? Scientifically, I mean." The queried scientist responds, "Out of the RNA world." "Don't we all," the asker responds chuckling. Fifteen years ago, the joke would have been made with a nod to the notion that life arose from an RNA-based precursor, the so-called "RNA world." Yet had this conversation happened last week, the scientists would also be grinning in appreciation of the extent to which contemporary cellular biology is steeped in all things RNA. Ours is truly an RNA world.In this year's special review issue, the Cell editorial team has brought together articles focused on RNA in the modern world, providing perspectives on classical and emerging areas of inquiry. We extend our thanks to the many distinguished experts who contributed their time and effort as authors and reviewers to make the issue informative, thought-provoking, and timely. We hope that this collection of articles, written as we stand on the verge of a new wave of RNA biology, edifies and inspires by revealing the inner workings of these versatile molecules and by highlighting the next key questions that need to be addressed as we strive to understand the full functional scope of RNA in cells.

  1. Epigenetic microRNA Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiklund, Erik Digman

    2011-01-01

    and confirming transcriptional start sites can be difficult. Epigenetics, gene regulatory and DNA modification mechanisms not involving a change to the primary sequence, have been implied in the regulation of a number of miRNA loci. Both epigenetic and miRNA signatures are broadly altered in cancer......, and are thought to play essential roles in cancer etiology and progression. Here, we aimed to identify epigenetic miRNA deregulation in bladder and oral carcinoma, and to develop a robust approach to epigenetic miRNA prediction and detection. In addition, non-canonical epigenetic functions directed by a nuclear...... miRNA were investigated. In summary, we report that the miR-200 family and miR-205 are coordinately epigenetically regulated in a variety of cell lines, tumors and normal tissues. MiR-200c expression is correlated with bladder cancer disease progression, and miR-375 levels in oral rinse can...

  2. Isotopes in heterogeneous catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Hargreaves, Justin SJ

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this book is to review the current, state-of-the-art application of isotopic methods to the field of heterogeneous catalysis. Isotopic studies are arguably the ultimate technique in in situ methods for heterogeneous catalysis. In this review volume, chapters have been contributed by experts in the field and the coverage includes both the application of specific isotopes - Deuterium, Tritium, Carbon-14, Sulfur-35 and Oxygen-18 - as well as isotopic techniques - determination of surface mobility, steady state transient isotope kinetic analysis, and positron emission profiling.

  3. Heterogeneous Uncertainty Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-08

    probabilistic ( HTP ) agents, the concept of probabilistic version of XML and RDF, and probabilistic methods to reason about collections of moving objects. S...heterogeneous temporal probabilistic ( HTP ) agents, the concept of probabilistic version of XML and RDF, and probabilistic methods to reason about...temporal probabilistic ( HTP ) agent. HTP agents can build temporal probabilistic reasoning capabilities on top of multiple databases and software

  4. Heterogeneous Computing in Economics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dziubinski, M.P.; Grassi, S.

    2014-01-01

    This paper shows the potential of heterogeneous computing in solving dynamic equilibrium models in economics. We illustrate the power and simplicity of C++ Accelerated Massive Parallelism (C++ AMP) recently introduced by Microsoft. Starting from the same exercise as Aldrich et al. (J Econ Dyn...

  5. Heterogeneity of Intellectual Assets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlgren, Johan Henrich; Lund Jensen, Rasmus; Valentin, Finn

    2004-01-01

    This paper deals with methodological issues of assessing the composition and level ofheterogeneity of firms' intellectual assets. It develops an original metric - referred to asthe H-index - for measuring heterogeneity using data extracted from patent documents.The main purpose is to improve...

  6. Heterogeneous chromium catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to a heterogeneous chromium catalyst system for the polymerisation of ethylene and/or alpha olefins prepared by the steps of: (a) providing a silica-containing support, (b) treating the silica-containing support with a chromium compound to form a chromium-based silica-c

  7. Information and Heterogeneous Beliefs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Peter Ove; Qin, Zhenjiang

    2014-01-01

    In an incomplete market with heterogeneous prior beliefs, we show public information can have a substantial impact on the ex ante cost of capital, trading volume, and investor welfare. The Pareto effcient public information system is the system enjoying the maximum ex ante cost of capital and the...

  8. Heterogeneity of Dutch rainfall

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witter, J.V.

    1984-01-01

    Rainfall data for the Netherlands have been used in this study to investigate aspects of heterogeneity of rainfall, in particular local differences in rainfall levels, time trends in rainfall, and local differences in rainfall trend. The possible effect of urbanization and industrialization on the

  9. Receiver Heterogeneity Helps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovács, Erika R.; Pedersen, Morten Videbæk; Roetter, Daniel Enrique Lucani;

    2014-01-01

    Heterogeneity amongst devices and desired service are commonly seen as a source of additional challenges for setting up an efficient multi-layer multicast service. In particular, devices requiring only the base layer can become a key bottleneck to the performance for other devices. This paper...

  10. The architectural organization of nuclear metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickerson, J A; Blencowe, B J; Penman, S

    1995-01-01

    Nucleic acid metabolism is structurally organized in the nucleus. DNA replication and transcription have been localized to particular nuclear domains. Additional domains have been identified by their morphology or by their composition; for example, by their high concentration of factors involved in RNA splicing. The domain organization of the nucleus is maintained by the nuclear matrix, a nonchromatin nuclear scaffolding that holds most nuclear RNA and organizes chromatin into loops. The nuclear matrix is built on a network of highly branched core filaments that have an average diameter of 10 nm. Many of the intermediates and the regulatory and catalytic factors of nucleic acid metabolism are retained in nuclear matrix preparations, suggesting that nucleic acid synthesis and processing are structure-bound processes in cells. Tissue-specific and malignancy-induced variations in nuclear structure and metabolism may result from altered matrix architecture and composition.

  11. Nuclear Scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuclear scans use radioactive substances to see structures and functions inside your body. They use a special ... images. Most scans take 20 to 45 minutes. Nuclear scans can help doctors diagnose many conditions, including ...

  12. Nuclear Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Provides a brief review of the latest developments in nuclear chemistry. Nuclear research today is directed toward increased activity in radiopharmaceuticals and formation of new isotopes by high-energy, heavy-ion collisions. (Author/BB)

  13. Nuclear PLCs affect insulin secretion by targeting PPARγ in pancreatic β cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiume, Roberta; Ramazzotti, Giulia; Faenza, Irene; Piazzi, Manuela; Bavelloni, Alberto; Billi, Anna Maria; Cocco, Lucio

    2012-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a heterogeneous disorder caused by concomitant impairment of insulin secretion by pancreatic β cells and of insulin action in peripheral target tissues. Studies with inhibitors and agonists established a role for PLC in the regulation of insulin secretion but did not distinguish between effects due to nuclear or cytoplasmic PLC signaling pathways that act in a distinct fashion. We report that in MIN6 β cells, PLCβ1 localized in both nucleus and cytoplasm, PLCδ4 in the nucleus, and PLCγ1 in the cytoplasm. By silencing each isoform, we observed that they all affected glucose-induced insulin release both at basal and high glucose concentrations. To elucidate the molecular basis of PLC regulation, we focused on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ), a nuclear receptor transcription factor that regulates genes critical to β-cell maintenance and functions. Silencing of PLCβ1 and PLCδ4 resulted in a decrease in the PPARγ mRNA level. By means of a PPARγ-promoter-luciferase assay, the decrease could be attributed to a PLC action on the PPARγ-promoter region. The effect was specifically observed on silencing of the nuclear and not the cytoplasmic PLC. These findings highlight a novel pathway by which nuclear PLCs affect insulin secretion and identify PPARγ as a novel molecular target of nuclear PLCs.

  14. Nuclear weapons, nuclear effects, nuclear war

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bing, G.F.

    1991-08-20

    This paper provides a brief and mostly non-technical description of the militarily important features of nuclear weapons, of the physical phenomena associated with individual explosions, and of the expected or possible results of the use of many weapons in a nuclear war. Most emphasis is on the effects of so-called ``strategic exchanges.``

  15. Nuclear Ambitions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    China will begin to build the world’s first third-generation nuclear power plant at the Sanmen Nuclear Power Project in Sanmen City, coastal Zhejiang Province, in March 2009, accord-ing to the State Nuclear Power Technology Corp.

  16. Nuclear structure

    CERN Document Server

    Nazarewicz, W

    1999-01-01

    Current developments in nuclear structure are discussed from a theoretical perspective. The studies of the nuclear many-body system provide us with invaluable information about the nature of the nuclear interaction, nucleonic correlations at various energy-distance scales, and the modes of the nucleonic matter.

  17. Heterogeneous Voter Models

    CERN Document Server

    Masuda, Naoki; Redner, S

    2010-01-01

    We introduce the heterogeneous voter model (HVM), in which each agent has its own intrinsic rate to change state, reflective of the heterogeneity of real people, and the partisan voter model (PVM), in which each agent has an innate and fixed preference for one of two possible opinion states. For the HVM, the time until consensus is reached is much longer than in the classic voter model. For the PVM in the mean-field limit, a population evolves to a "selfish" state, where each agent tends to be aligned with its internal preference. For finite populations, discrete fluctuations ultimately lead to consensus being reached in a time that scales exponentially with population size.

  18. Information and Heterogeneous Beliefs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Peter Ove; Qin, Zhenjiang

    2014-01-01

    In an incomplete market with heterogeneous prior beliefs, we show public information can have a substantial impact on the ex ante cost of capital, trading volume, and investor welfare. The Pareto effcient public information system is the system enjoying the maximum ex ante cost of capital...... ante risk premium is unaffected by the informativeness of the public information system. Similar results are obtained in a production economy, but the impact on the ex ante cost of capital is dampened compared to the exchange economy due to welfare improving reductions in real investments to smooth...... and the maximum expected abnormal trading volume. Imperfect public information increases the gains-to-trade based on heterogeneously updated posterior beliefs. In an exchange economy, this leads to higher growth in the investors' certainty equivalents and, thus, a higher equilibrium interest rate, whereas the ex...

  19. Heterogeneity of monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongcheng; Gaza-Bulseco, Georgeen; Faldu, Dinesh; Chumsae, Chris; Sun, Joanne

    2008-07-01

    Heterogeneity of monoclonal antibodies is common due to the various modifications introduced over the lifespan of the molecules from the point of synthesis to the point of complete clearance from the subjects. The vast number of modifications presents great challenge to the thorough characterization of the molecules. This article reviews the current knowledge of enzymatic and nonenzymatic modifications of monoclonal antibodies including the common ones such as incomplete disulfide bond formation, glycosylation, N-terminal pyroglutamine cyclization, C-terminal lysine processing, deamidation, isomerization, and oxidation, and less common ones such as modification of the N-terminal amino acids by maleuric acid and amidation of the C-terminal amino acid. In addition, noncovalent associations with other molecules, conformational diversity and aggregation of monoclonal antibodies are also discussed. Through a complete understanding of the heterogeneity of monoclonal antibodies, strategies can be employed to better identify the potential modifications and thoroughly characterize the molecules.

  20. FTO, RNA epigenetics and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowles, Joie; Wong, Morgan; Powers, Ryan; Olsen, Mark

    2012-10-01

    Several recent landmark papers describing N(6) -methyladenosine (m(6) A) RNA modifications have provided valuable new insights as to the importance of m(6) A in the RNA transcriptome and in furthering the understanding of RNA epigenetics. One endogenous enzyme responsible for demethylating RNA m(6) A, FTO, is highly expressed in the CNS and is likely involved in mRNA metabolism, splicing or other nuclear RNA processing events. microRNAs (miRNAs), a family of small, non-coding transcripts that bind to target mRNAs and inhibit subsequent translation, are highly expressed in the CNS and are associated with several neurological disorders, including epilepsy. miRNAs frequently bind to recognition sequences in the 3'UTR, a region that is also enriched for m(6) A. Certain specific miRNAs are upregulated by neuronal activity and are coupled to epileptogenesis; these miRNAs contain a consensus m(6) A site that if methylated could possibly regulate miRNA processing or function. This commentary highlights aspects from recent papers to propose a functional association between FTO, RNA epigenetics and epilepsy.

  1. Micromechanics of heterogeneous materials

    CERN Document Server

    Buryachenko, Valeriy

    2007-01-01

    Here is an accurate and timely account of micromechanics, which spans materials science, mechanical engineering, applied mathematics, technical physics, geophysics, and biology. The book features rigorous and unified theoretical methods of applied mathematics and statistical physics in the material science of microheterogeneous media. Uniquely, it offers a useful demonstration of the systematic and fundamental research of the microstructure of the wide class of heterogeneous materials of natural and synthetic nature.

  2. Electrokinetics of heterogeneous interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zembala, Maria

    2004-12-31

    The influence of surface heterogeneity of various types on electrokinetic parameters is reviewed. The scope of the paper covers classical electrokinetic phenomena characterized by linear dependence of electrokinetic parameters vs. related driving forces. Neither non-linear effects nor the effects of non-equilibrium electric double layer are considered. A historical description of hydrodynamic aspect of electrokinetic phenomena exploiting the slip plane idea is briefly outlined. Attempts to estimate the slip plane location by comparing the diffuse layer and zeta potential values for some model systems are presented. The surface heterogeneity was divided into three categories. Heterogeneity of the first type was related to geometrical morphology of an interfacial region characterized by a considerable surface development producing a three-dimensional interfacial region. The effects of solid roughness, hairy surface, dense polymer layers and gel-like layers are discussed here. The very high surface conductivity detected for such interfaces seems to be a good indicator of the presence of structured layers of this type. Heterogeneous interfaces of the second class cover systems exhibiting non-uniform distribution of surface charge. The non-uniform surface charge distribution can be either of a molecular (discrete charges) or of a microscale (two-dimensional micropatches or three-dimensional structures formed by polyelectrolyte multilayers). The last class of systems examined includes interfaces composed of charged substrate covered by charged bulky objects (particles). In comparison to the homogeneous surfaces, adsorbed charged particles modify both hydrodynamic flow and the electrostatic field significantly altering the electrokinetic parameters. The new description of electrokinetics of composed interfaces presented here takes into account both hydrodynamic and electric field modification and is free of the previously assumed slip plane shift caused by adsorbed

  3. TDP-43 Inhibits NF-κB Activity by Blocking p65 Nuclear Translocation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingyan Zhu

    Full Text Available TDP-43 (TAR DNA binding protein 43 is a heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP that has been found to play an important role in neurodegenerative diseases. TDP-43's involvement in nuclear factor-kappaB pathways has been reported in both neurons and microglial cells. The NF-κB pathway targets hundreds of genes, many of which are involved in inflammation, immunity and cancer. p50/p65 (p50/RelA heterodimers, as the major Rel complex in the NF-κB family, are induced by diverse external physiological stimuli and modulate transcriptional activity in almost all cell types. Both p65 and TDP-43 translocation occur through the classic nuclear transportation system. In this study, we report that TDP-43 overexpression prevents TNF-α induced p65 nuclear translocation in a dose dependent manner, and that this further inhibits p65 transactivation activity. The inhibition by TDP-43 does not occur through preventing IκB degradation but probably by competing for the nuclear transporter-importin α3 (KPNA4. This competition is dependent on the presence of the nuclear localization signal (NLS in TDP-43. Silencing TDP-43 using a specific siRNA also increased p65 nuclear localization upon TNF-α stimulation, suggesting that endogenous TDP-43 may be a default suppressor of the NF-κB pathway. Our results indicate that TDP-43 may play an important role in regulating the levels of NF-κB activity by controlling the nuclear translocation of p65.

  4. Dynamic heterogeneity in life histories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuljapurkar, Shripad; Steiner, Uli; Orzack, Steven Hecht

    2009-01-01

    generate dynamic heterogeneity: life-history differences produced by stochastic stratum dynamics. We characterize dynamic heterogeneity in a range of species across taxa by properties of the Markov chain: the entropy, which describes the extent of heterogeneity, and the subdominant eigenvalue, which...... distributions of lifetime reproductive success. Dynamic heterogeneity contrasts with fixed heterogeneity: unobserved differences that generate variation between life histories. We show by an example that observed distributions of lifetime reproductive success are often consistent with the claim that little...... or no fixed heterogeneity influences this trait. We propose that dynamic heterogeneity provides a 'neutral' model for assessing the possible role of unobserved 'quality' differences between individuals. We discuss fitness for dynamic life histories, and the implications of dynamic heterogeneity...

  5. Nuclear spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Ajzenberg-Selove, Fay

    1960-01-01

    Nuclear Spectroscopy, Part B focuses on the ways in which experimental data may be analyzed to furnish information about nuclear parameters and nuclear models in terms of which the data are interpreted.This book discusses the elastic and inelastic potential scattering amplitudes, role of beta decay in nuclear physics, and general selection rules for electromagnetic transitions. The nuclear shell model, fundamental coupling procedure, vibrational spectra, and empirical determination of the complex potential are also covered. This publication is suitable for graduate students preparing for exper

  6. The Role of Nuclear Bodies in Gene Expression and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Marie; Boerkoel, Cornelius F.

    2013-01-01

    This review summarizes the current understanding of the role of nuclear bodies in regulating gene expression. The compartmentalization of cellular processes, such as ribosome biogenesis, RNA processing, cellular response to stress, transcription, modification and assembly of spliceosomal snRNPs, histone gene synthesis and nuclear RNA retention, has significant implications for gene regulation. These functional nuclear domains include the nucleolus, nuclear speckle, nuclear stress body, transcription factory, Cajal body, Gemini of Cajal body, histone locus body and paraspeckle. We herein review the roles of nuclear bodies in regulating gene expression and their relation to human health and disease. PMID:24040563

  7. The Role of Nuclear Bodies in Gene Expression and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Morimoto

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes the current understanding of the role of nuclear bodies in regulating gene expression. The compartmentalization of cellular processes, such as ribosome biogenesis, RNA processing, cellular response to stress, transcription, modification and assembly of spliceosomal snRNPs, histone gene synthesis and nuclear RNA retention, has significant implications for gene regulation. These functional nuclear domains include the nucleolus, nuclear speckle, nuclear stress body, transcription factory, Cajal body, Gemini of Cajal body, histone locus body and paraspeckle. We herein review the roles of nuclear bodies in regulating gene expression and their relation to human health and disease.

  8. Decentralization of multimedia content in a heterogeneous environment

    CERN Document Server

    Koskenvaara, Tuomo

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study has been the decentralization of multimedia content in a heterogeneous environment. The environment consisted of the research networks connecting the European Organization for Nuclear Research and the Finnish University and Research Network. The European Organization for Nuclear Research produces multimedia content which can be used as studying material all over the world. The Web University pilot in the European Organization for Nuclear Research has been developing a multimedia content delivery service for years. Delivering the multimedia content requires plenty of capacity from the network infrastructure. Different content of the material can have different demands for the network. In a heterogeneous environment, like the Internet, fulfilling all the demands can be a problem. Several methods exist to improve the situation. Decentralization of the content is one of the most popular solutions. Mirroring and caching are the main methods for decentralization. Recently developed content del...

  9. Activation of Akt is essential for the propagation of mitochondrial respiratory stress signaling and activation of the transcriptional coactivator heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein A2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Manti; Fang, Ji-Kang; Monks, Robert; Birnbaum, Morris J; Avadhani, Narayan G

    2010-10-15

    Mitochondrial respiratory stress (also called mitochondrial retrograde signaling) activates a Ca(2+)/calcineurin-mediated signal that culminates in transcription activation/repression of a large number of nuclear genes. This signal is propagated through activation of the regulatory proteins NFκB c-Rel/p50, C/EBPδ, CREB, and NFAT. Additionally, the heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein A2 (hnRNPA2) functions as a coactivator in up-regulating the transcription of Cathepsin L, RyR1, and Glut-4, the target genes of stress signaling. Activation of IGF1R, which causes a metabolic switch to glycolysis, cell invasiveness, and resistance to apoptosis, is a phenotypic hallmark of C2C12 myoblasts subjected to mitochondrial stress. In this study, we report that mitochondrial stress leads to increased expression, activation, and nuclear localization of Akt1. Mitochondrial respiratory stress also activates Akt1-gene expression, which involves hnRNPA2 as a coactivator, indicating a complex interdependency of these two factors. Using Akt1(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts and Akt1 mRNA-silenced C2C12 cells, we show that Akt1-mediated phosphorylation is crucial for the activation and recruitment of hnRNPA2 to the enhanceosome complex. Akt1 mRNA silencing in mtDNA-depleted cells resulted in reversal of the invasive phenotype, accompanied by sensitivity to apoptotic stimuli. These results show that Akt1 is an important regulator of the nuclear transcriptional response to mitochondrial stress.

  10. Paraspeckles: a novel nuclear domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fox, Archa H; Lam, Yun Wah; Leung, Anthony K L

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The cell nucleus contains distinct classes of subnuclear bodies, including nucleoli, splicing speckles, Cajal bodies, gems, and PML bodies. Many nuclear proteins are known to interact dynamically with one or other of these bodies, and disruption of the specific organization of nuclear...... relocalize quantitatively to unique cap structures at the nucleolar periphery when transcription is inhibited. CONCLUSIONS: We have identified a novel nuclear compartment, termed paraspeckles, found in both primary and transformed human cells. Paraspeckles contain at least three RNA binding proteins that all...

  11. Paraspeckles. A novel nuclear domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fox, Archa H; Lam, Yun Wah; Leung, Anthony K L

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The cell nucleus contains distinct classes of subnuclear bodies, including nucleoli, splicing speckles, Cajal bodies, gems, and PML bodies. Many nuclear proteins are known to interact dynamically with one or other of these bodies, and disruption of the specific organization of nuclear...... relocalize quantitatively to unique cap structures at the nucleolar periphery when transcription is inhibited. CONCLUSIONS: We have identified a novel nuclear compartment, termed paraspeckles, found in both primary and transformed human cells. Paraspeckles contain at least three RNA binding proteins that all...

  12. Large epidemic thresholds emerge in heterogeneous networks of heterogeneous nodes

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Hui; Gross, Thilo

    2015-01-01

    One of the famous results of network science states that networks with heterogeneous connectivity are more susceptible to epidemic spreading than their more homogeneous counterparts. In particular, in networks of identical nodes it has been shown that heterogeneity can lower the epidemic threshold at which epidemics can invade the system. Network heterogeneity can thus allow diseases with lower transmission probabilities to persist and spread. Here, we point out that for real world applications, this result should not be regarded independently of the intra-individual heterogeneity between people. Our results show that, if heterogeneity among people is taken into account, networks that are more heterogeneous in connectivity can be more resistant to epidemic spreading. We study a susceptible-infected-susceptible model with adaptive disease avoidance. Results from this model suggest that this reversal of the effect of network heterogeneity is likely to occur in populations in which the individuals are aware of t...

  13. [Age-dependent changes in mRNA transport (nucleus-cytoplasm)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, W E; Agutter, P S; Prochnow, D J; Fasold, H; Sève, A P; Tsiapalis, C M; Schröder, H C

    1993-01-01

    Transport of mRNA from nucleus to cytoplasm is an ATP-dependent process which occurs strictly vectorially. Because the mRNA is structurally bound during transport, mRNA transport is a "solid-state" process consisting of i) mRNA release from the nuclear matrix, ii) mRNA translocation through the nuclear pore, and iii) cytoskeletal binding. We identified and purified the following components involved in the translocation step: i) the nuclear envelope (NE) nucleoside triphosphatase (NTPase) which is stimulated by the 3'poly(A) tail of mRNA, ii) the poly(A)-recognizing mRNA carrier, iii) the NE protein kinase, and iv) the NE phosphatase. In addition, we found that an RNA helicase activity is present in NE, which also may be involved in RNA transport. Our results show that, besides poly(A), also double-stranded RNA structures may modulate RNA export. The amount of mRNA released from nuclei markedly decreases with age. Evidence is presented that this age-dependent change is caused by an impairment of polyadenylation of mRNA, hnRNA processing, release of mRNA from nuclear matrix, and translocations of mRNA from nuclear to cytoplasmic compartment (decrease in activities of NE NTPase, protein kinase, and phosphatase; decrease in poly(A)-binding affinity of mRNA carrier).

  14. Transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, C.D.; Ottavio, L.; Travali, S.; Lipson, K.E.; Baserga, R. (Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA (USA). School of Medicine)

    1990-07-01

    The steady-state mRNA levels of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) gene are growth regulated. In a previous paper the authors reported that introns (especially intron 4) participate in growth regulation of the PCNA gene. They have now investigated the role of the 5{prime}-flanking sequence of the human PCNA gene stably transfected into BALB/c 3T3 cells. Promoters of different lengths (from{minus}2856 to {minus}45 upstream of the cap site) were tested. All promoters except the Aatll promoter ({minus}45), including a short HpaII promoter ({minus}210), were sufficient for a response to serum, platelet-derived growth factor, and to a lesser extent epidermal growth factor. No construct responded to insulin or platelet-poor plasma. The AatII promoter had little detectable activity. Transcriptional activity was also determined in BALB/c 3T3 cells carrying various constructs of the human PCNA gene by two methods: run-on transcription and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (the latter measuring the heterogeneous nuclear RNA (hnRNA) steady-state levels).

  15. Capturing the Phylogeny of Holometabola with Mitochondrial Genome Data and Bayesian Site-Heterogeneous Mixture Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Fan; Li, Hu; Jiang, Pei; Zhou, Xuguo; Liu, Jinpeng; Sun, Changhai; Vogler, Alfried P; Cai, Wanzhi

    2016-05-22

    After decades of debate, a mostly satisfactory resolution of relationships among the 11 recognized holometabolan orders of insects has been reached based on nuclear genes, resolving one of the most substantial branches of the tree-of-life, but the relationships are still not well established with mitochondrial genome data. The main reasons have been the absence of sufficient data in several orders and lack of appropriate phylogenetic methods that avoid the systematic errors from compositional and mutational biases in insect mitochondrial genomes. In this study, we assembled the richest taxon sampling of Holometabola to date (199 species in 11 orders), and analyzed both nucleotide and amino acid data sets using several methods. We find the standard Bayesian inference and maximum-likelihood analyses were strongly affected by systematic biases, but the site-heterogeneous mixture model implemented in PhyloBayes avoided the false grouping of unrelated taxa exhibiting similar base composition and accelerated evolutionary rate. The inclusion of rRNA genes and removal of fast-evolving sites with the observed variability sorting method for identifying sites deviating from the mean rates improved the phylogenetic inferences under a site-heterogeneous model, correctly recovering most deep branches of the Holometabola phylogeny. We suggest that the use of mitochondrial genome data for resolving deep phylogenetic relationships requires an assessment of the potential impact of substitutional saturation and compositional biases through data deletion strategies and by using site-heterogeneous mixture models. Our study suggests a practical approach for how to use densely sampled mitochondrial genome data in phylogenetic analyses. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  16. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Hijacks RNA Polymerase II To Create a Viral Transcriptional Factory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Christopher Phillip; Lyu, Yuanzhi; Chuang, Frank; Nakano, Kazushi; Izumiya, Chie; Jin, Di; Campbell, Mel; Izumiya, Yoshihiro

    2017-06-01

    Locally concentrated nuclear factors ensure efficient binding to DNA templates, facilitating RNA polymerase II recruitment and frequent reutilization of stable preinitiation complexes. We have uncovered a mechanism for effective viral transcription by focal assembly of RNA polymerase II around Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) genomes in the host cell nucleus. Using immunofluorescence labeling of latent nuclear antigen (LANA) protein, together with fluorescence in situ RNA hybridization (RNA-FISH) of the intron region of immediate early transcripts, we visualized active transcription of viral genomes in naturally infected cells. At the single-cell level, we found that not all episomes were uniformly transcribed following reactivation stimuli. However, those episomes that were being transcribed would spontaneously aggregate to form transcriptional "factories," which recruited a significant fraction of cellular RNA polymerase II. Focal assembly of "viral transcriptional factories" decreased the pool of cellular RNA polymerase II available for cellular gene transcription, which consequently impaired cellular gene expression globally, with the exception of selected ones. The viral transcriptional factories localized with replicating viral genomic DNAs. The observed colocalization of viral transcriptional factories with replicating viral genomic DNA suggests that KSHV assembles an "all-in-one" factory for both gene transcription and DNA replication. We propose that the assembly of RNA polymerase II around viral episomes in the nucleus may be a previously unexplored aspect of KSHV gene regulation by confiscation of a limited supply of RNA polymerase II in infected cells.IMPORTANCE B cells infected with Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) harbor multiple copies of the KSHV genome in the form of episomes. Three-dimensional imaging of viral gene expression in the nucleus allows us to study interactions and changes in the physical distribution of

  17. Crystallographic and Computational Analyses of AUUCU Repeating RNA That Causes Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 10 (SCA10).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, HaJeung; González, Àlex L; Yildirim, Ilyas; Tran, Tuan; Lohman, Jeremy R; Fang, Pengfei; Guo, Min; Disney, Matthew D

    2015-06-23

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 10 (SCA10) is caused by a pentanucleotide repeat expansion of r(AUUCU) within intron 9 of the ATXN10 pre-mRNA. The RNA causes disease by a gain-of-function mechanism in which it inactivates proteins involved in RNA biogenesis. Spectroscopic studies showed that r(AUUCU) repeats form a hairpin structure; however, there were no high-resolution structural models prior to this work. Herein, we report the first crystal structure of model r(AUUCU) repeats refined to 2.8 Å and analysis of the structure via molecular dynamics simulations. The r(AUUCU) tracts adopt an overall A-form geometry in which 3 × 3 nucleotide (5')UCU(3')/(3')UCU(5') internal loops are closed by AU pairs. Helical parameters of the refined structure as well as the corresponding electron density map on the crystallographic model reflect dynamic features of the internal loop. The computational analyses captured dynamic motion of the loop closing pairs, which can form single-stranded conformations with relatively low energies. Overall, the results presented here suggest the possibility for r(AUUCU) repeats to form metastable A-from structures, which can rearrange into single-stranded conformations and attract proteins such as heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K). The information presented here may aid in the rational design of therapeutics targeting this RNA.

  18. Subcritical nuclear assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega C, H. R., E-mail: fermineutron@yahoo.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2014-08-15

    A Subcritical Nuclear Assembly is a device where the nuclear-fission chain reaction is initiated and maintained using an external neutron source. It is a valuable educational and research tool where in a safe way many reactor parameters can be measured. Here, we have used the Wigner-Seitz method in the six-factor formula to calculate the effective multiplication factor of a subcritical nuclear reactor Nuclear Chicago model 9000. This reactor has approximately 2500 kg of natural uranium heterogeneously distributed in slugs. The reactor uses a {sup 239}PuBe neutron source that is located in the center of an hexagonal array. Using Monte Carlo methods, with the MCNP5 code, a three-dimensional model of the subcritical reactor was designed to estimate the effective multiplication factor, the neutron spectra, the total and thermal neutron fluences along the radial and axial axis. With the neutron spectra in two locations outside the reactor the ambient dose equivalent were estimated. (Author)

  19. c-Myc co-ordinates mRNA cap methylation and ribosomal RNA production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Sianadh; Lombardi, Olivia; Cowling, Victoria H

    2017-02-01

    The mRNA cap is a structure added to RNA pol II transcripts in eukaryotes, which recruits factors involved in RNA processing, nuclear export and translation initiation. RNA guanine-7 methyltransferase (RNMT)-RNA-activating miniprotein (RAM), the mRNA cap methyltransferase complex, completes the basic functional mRNA cap structure, cap 0, by methylating the cap guanosine. Here, we report that RNMT-RAM co-ordinates mRNA processing with ribosome production. Suppression of RNMT-RAM reduces synthesis of the 45S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) precursor. RNMT-RAM is required for c-Myc expression, a major regulator of RNA pol I, which synthesises 45S rRNA. Constitutive expression of c-Myc restores rRNA synthesis when RNMT-RAM is suppressed, indicating that RNMT-RAM controls rRNA production predominantly by controlling c-Myc expression. We report that RNMT-RAM is recruited to the ribosomal DNA locus, which may contribute to rRNA synthesis in certain contexts. © 2017 The Author(s).

  20. Heterogeneity of Intellectual Assets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlgren, Johan Henrich; Lund Jensen, Rasmus; Valentin, Finn

    2004-01-01

    This paper deals with methodological issues of assessing the composition and level ofheterogeneity of firms' intellectual assets. It develops an original metric - referred to asthe H-index - for measuring heterogeneity using data extracted from patent documents.The main purpose is to improve...... the characterisation of research activities within firmsin the biotechnology sector. Although the H-index grew out of research on biotechfirms, the metric carries broader relevance for all patent-intensive industries. Themeasurement and calculation of the H-index is illustrated using some empiricalexamples from our...

  1. {sup 48}Ca HETEROGENEITY IN DIFFERENTIATED METEORITES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Hsin-Wei; Lee, Typhoon; Lee, Der-Chuen; Shen, Jason Jiun-San; Chen, Jiang-Chang, E-mail: haart@earth.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Earth Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2011-12-10

    Isotopic heterogeneities of {sup 48}Ca have been found in numerous bulk meteorites that are correlated with {sup 50}Ti and {sup 54}Cr anomalies among differentiated planetary bodies, and the results suggest that a rare subset of neutron-rich Type Ia supernova (nSN Ia) was responsible for contributing these neutron-rich iron-group isotopes into the solar system (SS). The heterogeneity of these isotopes found in differentiated meteorites indicates that the isotopic compositions of the bulk SS are not uniform, and there are significant amounts of nSNe Ia dust incompletely mixed with the rest of SS materials during planetary formation. Combined with the data of now-extinct short-lived nuclide {sup 60}Fe, which can be produced more efficiently from an nSN Ia than a Type II supernova ejecta, the observed planetary-scale isotopic heterogeneity probably reflects a late input of stellar dust grains with neutron-rich nuclear statistical equilibrium nuclides into the early SS.

  2. Rules of RNA specificity of hnRNP A1 revealed by global and quantitative analysis of its affinity distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Niyati; Lin, Hsuan-Chun; Morgan, Christopher E.; Harris, Michael E.; Tolbert, Blanton S.

    2017-01-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNP A1) is a multipurpose RNA-binding protein (RBP) involved in normal and pathological RNA metabolism. Transcriptome-wide mapping and in vitro evolution identify consensus hnRNP A1 binding motifs; however, such data do not reveal how surrounding RNA sequence and structural context modulate affinity. We determined the affinity of hnRNP A1 for all possible sequence variants (n = 16,384) of the HIV exon splicing silencer 3 (ESS3) 7-nt apical loop. Analysis of the affinity distribution identifies the optimal motif 5′-YAG-3′ and shows how its copy number, position in the loop, and loop structure modulate affinity. For a subset of ESS3 variants, we show that specificity is determined by association rate constants and that variants lacking the minimal sequence motif bind competitively with consensus RNA. Thus, the results reveal general rules of specificity of hnRNP A1 and provide a quantitative framework for understanding how it discriminates between alternative competing RNA ligands in vivo. PMID:28193894

  3. Nuclear Fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denschlag, J. O.

    This chapter first gives a survey on the history of the discovery of nuclear fission. It briefly presents the liquid-drop and shell models and their application to the fission process. The most important quantities accessible to experimental determination such as mass yields, nuclear charge distribution, prompt neutron emission, kinetic energy distribution, ternary fragment yields, angular distributions, and properties of fission isomers are presented as well as the instrumentation and techniques used for their measurement. The contribution concentrates on the fundamental aspects of nuclear fission. The practical aspects of nuclear fission are discussed in http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-0720-2_57 of Vol. 6.

  4. Nuclear Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silver, E G [ed.

    1989-01-01

    This document is a review journal that covers significant developments in the field of nuclear safety. Its scope includes the analysis and control of hazards associated with nuclear energy, operations involving fissionable materials, and the products of nuclear fission and their effects on the environment. Primary emphasis is on safety in reactor design, construction, and operation; however, the safety aspects of the entire fuel cycle, including fuel fabrication, spent-fuel processing, nuclear waste disposal, handling of radioisotopes, and environmental effects of these operations, are also treated.

  5. Heterogeneous photonic integrated circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Alexander W.; Fish, Gregory; Hall, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Photonic Integrated Circuits (PICs) have been dichotomized into circuits with high passive content (silica and silicon PLCs) and high active content (InP tunable lasers and transceivers) due to the trade-off in material characteristics used within these two classes. This has led to restrictions in the adoption of PICs to systems in which only one of the two classes of circuits are required to be made on a singular chip. Much work has been done to create convergence in these two classes by either engineering the materials to achieve the functionality of both device types on a single platform, or in epitaxial growth techniques to transfer one material to the next, but have yet to demonstrate performance equal to that of components fabricated in their native substrates. Advances in waferbonding techniques have led to a new class of heterogeneously integrated photonic circuits that allow for the concurrent use of active and passive materials within a photonic circuit, realizing components on a transferred substrate that have equivalent performance as their native substrate. In this talk, we review and compare advances made in heterogeneous integration along with demonstrations of components and circuits enabled by this technology.

  6. Nuclear envelope structural defects cause chromosomal numerical instability and aneuploidy in ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganjei-Azar Parvin

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite our substantial understanding of molecular mechanisms and gene mutations involved in cancer, the technical approaches for diagnosis and prognosis of cancer are limited. In routine clinical diagnosis of cancer, the procedure is very basic: nuclear morphology is used as a common assessment of the degree of malignancy, and hence acts as a prognostic and predictive indicator of the disease. Furthermore, though the atypical nuclear morphology of cancer cells is believed to be a consequence of oncogenic signaling, the molecular basis remains unclear. Another common characteristic of human cancer is aneuploidy, but the causes and its role in carcinogenesis are not well established. Methods We investigated the expression of the nuclear envelope proteins lamin A/C in ovarian cancer by immunohistochemistry and studied the consequence of lamin A/C suppression using siRNA in primary human ovarian surface epithelial cells in culture. We used immunofluorescence microscopy to analyze nuclear morphology, flow cytometry to analyze cellular DNA content, and fluorescence in situ hybridization to examine cell ploidy of the lamin A/C-suppressed cells. Results We found that nuclear lamina proteins lamin A/C are often absent (47% in ovarian cancer cells and tissues. Even in lamin A/C-positive ovarian cancer, the expression is heterogeneous within the population of tumor cells. In most cancer cell lines, a significant fraction of the lamin A/C-negative population was observed to intermix with the lamin A/C-positive cells. Down regulation of lamin A/C in non-cancerous primary ovarian surface epithelial cells led to morphological deformation and development of aneuploidy. The aneuploid cells became growth retarded due to a p53-dependent induction of the cell cycle inhibitor p21. Conclusions We conclude that the loss of nuclear envelope structural proteins, such as lamin A/C, may underlie two of the hallmarks of cancer - aberrations in nuclear

  7. Chemical fidelity of an RNA polymerase ribozyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Attwater, J.; Tagami, S.; Kimoto, M.

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of catalytically active RNA enzymes (ribozymes) is widely believed to have been an important transition in the origin of life. In the context of a likely heterogeneous chemical environment, substrate specificity and selectivity of these primordial enzymes would have been critical...... for function. Here we have explored the chemical fidelity, i.e. substrate selectivity and specificity for both single and multiple catalytic steps of the Z RNA polymerase ribozyme-a modern day analogue of the primordial RNA replicase. Using a wide range of nucleotide analogues and ionic conditions, we observe...

  8. Disordered hyperuniform heterogeneous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torquato, Salvatore

    2016-10-01

    Disordered hyperuniform many-body systems are distinguishable states of matter that lie between a crystal and liquid: they are like perfect crystals in the way they suppress large-scale density fluctuations and yet are like liquids or glasses in that they are statistically isotropic with no Bragg peaks. These systems play a vital role in a number of fundamental and applied problems: glass formation, jamming, rigidity, photonic and electronic band structure, localization of waves and excitations, self-organization, fluid dynamics, quantum systems, and pure mathematics. Much of what we know theoretically about disordered hyperuniform states of matter involves many-particle systems. In this paper, we derive new rigorous criteria that disordered hyperuniform two-phase heterogeneous materials must obey and explore their consequences. Two-phase heterogeneous media are ubiquitous; examples include composites and porous media, biological media, foams, polymer blends, granular media, cellular solids, and colloids. We begin by obtaining some results that apply to hyperuniform two-phase media in which one phase is a sphere packing in d-dimensional Euclidean space {{{R}}d} . Among other results, we rigorously establish the requirements for packings of spheres of different sizes to be ‘multihyperuniform’. We then consider hyperuniformity for general two-phase media in {{{R}}d} . Here we apply realizability conditions for an autocovariance function and its associated spectral density of a two-phase medium, and then incorporate hyperuniformity as a constraint in order to derive new conditions. We show that some functional forms can immediately be eliminated from consideration and identify other forms that are allowable. Specific examples and counterexamples are described. Contact is made with well-known microstructural models (e.g. overlapping spheres and checkerboards) as well as irregular phase-separation and Turing-type patterns. We also ascertain a family of

  9. Quantitative tumor heterogeneity assessment on a nuclear population basis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Anne-Sofie Wessel; Conradsen, Knut; Larsen, Rasmus

    2016-01-01

    Immunohistochemistry (IHC) Ki-67 stain is widely used for visualizing cell proliferation. The common method for scoring the proliferation is to manually select and score a hot spot. This method is time-consuming and will often not give reproducible results due to subjective selection of the hotsp...

  10. Quantitative tumor heterogeneity assessment on a nuclear population basis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Anne-Sofie Wessel; Conradsen, Knut; Larsen, Rasmus

    2016-01-01

    of the hotspots and subjective scoring. An automatic hotspot detection and proliferative index scoring would be time-saving, make the determination of the Ki-67 score easier and minimize the uncertainty of the score by introducing a more objective and standardized score. Tissue Micro Array (TMA) cores stained...

  11. Engineering Structurally Interacting RNA (sxRNA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Francis; Lapsia, Sameer; Spadaro, Salvatore; Wurz, Zachary E.; Bhaduri-McIntosh, Sumita; Tenenbaum, Scott A.

    2017-01-01

    RNA-based three-way junctions (3WJs) are naturally occurring structures found in many functional RNA molecules including rRNA, tRNA, snRNA and ribozymes. 3WJs are typically characterized as resulting from an RNA molecule folding back on itself in cis but could also form in trans when one RNA, for instance a microRNA binds to a second structured RNA, such as a mRNA. Trans-3WJs can influence the final shape of one or both of the RNA molecules and can thus provide a means for modulating the availability of regulatory motifs including potential protein or microRNA binding sites. Regulatory 3WJs generated in trans represent a newly identified regulatory category that we call structurally interacting RNA or sxRNA for convenience. Here we show that they can be rationally designed using familiar cis-3WJ examples as a guide. We demonstrate that an sxRNA “bait” sequence can be designed to interact with a specific microRNA “trigger” sequence, creating a regulatable RNA-binding protein motif that retains its functional activity. Further, we show that when placed downstream of a coding sequence, sxRNA can be used to switch “ON” translation of that sequence in the presence of the trigger microRNA and the amount of translation corresponded with the amount of microRNA present. PMID:28350000

  12. Cytoplasmic inositol hexakisphosphate production is sufficient for mediating the Gle1-mRNA export pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Aimee L; Suntharalingam, Mythili; Johnson, Sylvia L; Audhya, Anjon; Emr, Scott D; Wente, Susan R

    2004-12-03

    Production of inositol hexakisphosphate (IP6) by Ipk1, the inositol-1,3,4,5,6-pentakisphosphate 2-kinase, is required for Gle1-mediated mRNA export in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. To examine the network of interactions that require IP6 production, an analysis of fitness defects was conducted in mutants harboring both an ipk1 null allele and a mutant allele in genes encoding nucleoporins or transport factors. Enhanced lethality was observed with a specific subset of mutants, including nup42, nup116, nup159, dbp5, and gle2, all of which had been previously connected to Gle1 function. Complementation of the nup116Deltaipk1Delta and nup42Deltaipk1Delta double mutants did not require the Phe-Gly repeat domains in the respective nucleoporins, suggesting that IP6 was acting subsequent to heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein targeting to the nuclear pore complex. With Nup42 and Nup159 localized exclusively to the nuclear pore complex cytoplasmic side, we speculated that IP6 may regulate a cytoplasmic step in mRNA export. To test this prediction, the spatial requirements for the production of IP6 were investigated. Restriction of Ipk1 to the cytoplasm did not block IP6 production. Moreover, coincident sequestering of both Ipk1 and Mss4 (an enzyme required for phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate production) to the cytoplasm also did not block IP6 production. Given that the kinase required for inositol 1,3,4,5,6-pentakisphosphate production (Ipk2) is localized in the nucleus, these results indicated that soluble inositides were diffusing between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Additionally, the cytoplasmic production of IP6 by plasma membrane-anchored Ipk1 rescued a gle1-2 ipk1-4 synthetic lethal mutant. Thus, cytoplasmic IP6 production is sufficient for mediating the Gle1-mRNA export pathway.

  13. Nuclear Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drago, Alessandro

    2005-04-01

    The activity of the Italian nuclear physicists community in the field of Nuclear Astrophysics is reported. The researches here described have been performed within the project "Fisica teorica del nucleo e dei sistemi a multi corpi", supported by the Ministero dell'Istruzione, dell'Università e della Ricerca.

  14. Combination of the somatic cell nuclear transfer method and RNAi technology for the production of a prion gene-knockdown calf using plasmid vectors harboring the U6 or tRNA promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongsrikeao, Pimprapar; Sutou, Shizuyo; Kunishi, Miho; Dong, Ya Juan; Bai, Xuejin; Otoi, Takeshige

    2011-01-01

    By combining RNAi technology with SCNT method, we attempted to produce transgenic calves with knocked down bPRNP for technological assessments. The respective utilities of type II (tRNA) and type III (hU6) Pol III promoters in mediating plasmid vector-based RNAi for the production of a bPRNP-knockdown calf were compared. Plasmid harboring DNA for siRNA expression was introduced stably into the genome of primary cultured bovine cells. By inserting the transgenic cell into an enucleated bovine egg, SCNT embryos were produced. The ability for SCNT embryos to develop to blastocysts was higher in hU6 based vector groups (44-53%) than in a tRNA group (32%). In all, 30 hU6-embryos and 12 tRNA-embryos were transferred to 11 recipients. Only tRNA-embryos were able to impregnate recipients (6 out of 11 transfers), resulting in four aborted fetuses, one stillbirth, and one live-born calf. The expression of EGFP, a marker, was detected in all six. The bPRNP transcript levels in the nervous tissues (brain, cerebellum, spinal bulb, and spinal cord) from the calf, which was killed 20 days after birth, were reduced to 35% of those of the control calf on average, as determined by qRT-PCR. The PrPC levels, as estimated by western blot were reduced to 86% on average in the nervous tissues. These findings suggest that SCNT technology remains immature, that the tRNA promoter is useful, and that RNAi can significantly reduce PRNP mRNA levels, but insufficient reduction of PrPC levels exists in cattle under these conditions.

  15. Loss of A-type lamin expression compromises nuclear envelope integrity in breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Callinice D. Capo-chichi; Kathy Q. Car; Jennifer Smedberg; Parvin Ganjei-Azar; Andrew K. Godwin; Xiang-Xi Xu

    2011-01-01

    Through advances in technology, the genetic basis of cancer has been investigated at the genomic level, and many fundamental questions have begun to be addressed. Among several key unresolved questions in cancer biology, the molecular basis for the link between nuclear deformation and malignancy has not been determined. Another hallmark of human cancer is aneuploidy; however, the causes and consequences of aneuploidy are unanswered and are hotly contested topics. We found that nuclear lamina proteins lamin A/C are absent in a significant fraction (38%) of human breast cancer tissues. Even in lamin A/C-positive breast cancer, lamin A/C expression is heterogeneous or aberrant (such as nonnuclear distribution) in the population of tumor cells, as determined by immunohistology and immunofluorescence microscopy. In most breast cancer cell lines, a significant fraction of the lamin A/Cnegative population was observed. To determine the consequences of the loss of lamin A/C, we suppressed their expression by shRNA in non-cancerous primary breast epithelial cells. Down-regulation of lamin A/C in breast epithelial cells led to morphological deformation, resembling that of cancer cells, as observed by immunofluorescence microscopy. The lamin A/C-suppressed breast epithelial cells developed aneuploidy as determined by both flow cytometry and fluorescence in situ hybridization. We conclude that the loss of nuclear envelope structural proteins lamin A/C in breast cancer underlies the two hallmarks of cancer aberrations in nuclear morphology and aneuploidy.

  16. Heterogenous networks and services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Su-En

    the existing generation of technology and presents new technological performance breakthroughs. It is difficult to predict which radical technologies or innovations will result in a market disruption early on in their life cycles. Based on Clayton Christensen’s (Christensen 1997) definition of a disruptive...... of the market. If mainstream technology firms do not address the disruption, it is likely they will fail and the new disruptive firm will grow in size and importance in the industry. As we move to 3G (3rd Generation Mobile Services) and beyond 3G, one of the biggest challenges is to bridge network heterogeneity...... products and services. Schumpeter described the motor of development as the innovation itself. However, business and financial aspects must also be considered as they provide the bottom line for firms in the industry. Standardisation is increasingly required due to the number of different technologies...

  17. Heterogeneous logics of competition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mossin, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the article is to demonstrate that in order to understand competition as a socially organizing phenomenon, we should not examine competition in isolation, but as constellations of heterogeneous logics. More precisely, the article is based on two main theoretical points: (1) Logics...... of competition are only realized as particular forms of social organization by virtue of interplaying with other kinds of logics, like legal logics. (2) Competition logics enjoy a peculiar status in-between constructedness and givenness; although competition depends on laws and mechanisms of socialization, we...... still experience competition as an expression of spontaneous human activities. On the basis of these perspectives, a study of fundamental rights of EU law, springing from the principle of ‘free movement of people’, is conducted. The first part of the empirical analysis seeks to detect the presence...

  18. Heterogeneous logics of competition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mossin, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the article is to demonstrate that in order to understand competition as a socially organizing phenomenon, we should not examine competition in isolation, but as constellations of heterogeneous logics. More precisely, the article is based on two main theoretical points: (1) Logics...... still experience competition as an expression of spontaneous human activities. On the basis of these perspectives, a study of fundamental rights of EU law, springing from the principle of ‘free movement of people’, is conducted. The first part of the empirical analysis seeks to detect the presence...... of a presumed logic of competition within EU law, whereas the second part focuses on particular legal logics. In this respect, the so-called ‘real link criterion’ (determining the access to transnational social rights for certain groups of unemployed people) is given special attention. What is particularly...

  19. Noise and Neuronal Heterogeneity

    CERN Document Server

    Barber, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    We consider signal transaction in a simple neuronal model featuring intrinsic noise. The presence of noise limits the precision of neural responses and impacts the quality of neural signal transduction. We assess the signal transduction quality in relation to the level of noise, and show it to be maximized by a non-zero level of noise, analogous to the stochastic resonance effect. The quality enhancement occurs for a finite range of stimuli to a single neuron; we show how to construct networks of neurons that extend the range. The range increases more rapidly with network size when we make use of heterogeneous populations of neurons with a variety of thresholds, rather than homogeneous populations of neurons all with the same threshold. The limited precision of neural responses thus can have a direct effect on the optimal network structure, with diverse functional properties of the constituent neurons supporting an economical information processing strategy that reduces the metabolic costs of handling a broad...

  20. MicroRNA: Biogenesis, Function and Role in Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    MicroRNAs are small, highly conserved non-coding RNA molecules involved in the regulation of gene expression. MicroRNAs are transcribed by RNA polymerases II and III, generating precursors that undergo a series of cleavage events to form mature microRNA. The conventional biogenesis pathway consists of two cleavage events, one nuclear and one cytoplasmic. However, alternative biogenesis pathways exist that differ in the number of cleavage events and enzymes responsible. How microRNA precursors...

  1. Heterogeneity in recombinant protein production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schalén, Martin; Johanson, Ted; Lundin, Luisa;

    2012-01-01

    contribute to make a population in a fermenter heterogeneous, resulting in cell-to-cell variation in physiological parameters of the microbial culture. Our study aims at investigating how population heterogeneity and recombinant protein production is affected by environmental gradients in bioreactors...... are simulated in small bioreactors and the population heterogeneity can be visualised by analysing single cells with flow cytometry. This can give new insights to cell physiology and recombinant protein production at the industrial scale....

  2. RNA structure. Structure of the HIV-1 RNA packaging signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Sarah C; Heng, Xiao; Lu, Kun; Kharytonchyk, Siarhei; Ramakrishnan, Venkateswaran; Carter, Gregory; Barton, Shawn; Hosic, Azra; Florwick, Alyssa; Santos, Justin; Bolden, Nicholas C; McCowin, Sayo; Case, David A; Johnson, Bruce A; Salemi, Marco; Telesnitsky, Alice; Summers, Michael F

    2015-05-22

    The 5' leader of the HIV-1 genome contains conserved elements that direct selective packaging of the unspliced, dimeric viral RNA into assembling particles. By using a (2)H-edited nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) approach, we determined the structure of a 155-nucleotide region of the leader that is independently capable of directing packaging (core encapsidation signal; Ψ(CES)). The RNA adopts an unexpected tandem three-way junction structure, in which residues of the major splice donor and translation initiation sites are sequestered by long-range base pairing and guanosines essential for both packaging and high-affinity binding to the cognate Gag protein are exposed in helical junctions. The structure reveals how translation is attenuated, Gag binding promoted, and unspliced dimeric genomes selected, by the RNA conformer that directs packaging.

  3. Nuclear stress test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Persantine stress test; Thallium stress test; Stress test - nuclear; Adenosine stress test; Regadenoson stress test; CAD - nuclear stress; Coronary artery disease - nuclear stress; Angina - nuclear ...

  4. Space Qualified Heterogeneous Processing Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Space Micro proposes to develop a radiation hardened, monolithic, heterogeneous processor for space imaging and radar systems. High performance processors are needed...

  5. Nuclear questions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durrani, M. [Physics World (United Kingdom)

    2006-01-01

    The future of nuclear power has returned to centre stage. Freezing weather on both sides of the Atlantic and last month's climate-change talks in Montreal have helped to put energy and the future of nuclear power right back on the political agenda. The issue is particularly pressing for those countries where existing nuclear stations are reaching the end of their lives. In the UK, prime minister Tony Blair has commissioned a review of energy, with a view to deciding later this year whether to build new nuclear power plants. The review comes just four years after the Labour government published a White Paper on energy that said the country should keep the nuclear option open but did not follow this up with any concrete action. In Germany, new chancellor and former physicist Angela Merkel is a fan of nuclear energy and had said she would extend the lifetime of its nuclear plants beyond 2020, when they are due to close. However, that commitment has had to be abandoned, at least for the time being, following negotiations with her left-wing coalition partners. The arguments in favour of nuclear power will be familiar to all physicists - it emits almost no carbon dioxide and can play a vital role in maintaining a diverse energy supply. To over-rely on imported supplies of oil and gas can leave a nation hostage to fortune. The arguments against are equally easy to list - the public is scared of nuclear power, it generates dangerous waste with potentially huge clean-up costs, and it is not necessarily cheap. Nuclear plants could also be a target for terrorist attacks. Given political will, many of these problems can be resolved, or at least tackled. China certainly sees the benefits of nuclear power, as does Finland, which is building a new 1600 MW station - the world's most powerful - that is set to open in 2009. Physicists, of course, are essential to such developments. They play a vital role in ensuring the safety of such plants and developing new types of

  6. Nuclear lamins and neurobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Stephen G; Jung, Hea-Jin; Lee, John M; Fong, Loren G

    2014-08-01

    Much of the work on nuclear lamins during the past 15 years has focused on mutations in LMNA (the gene for prelamin A and lamin C) that cause particular muscular dystrophy, cardiomyopathy, partial lipodystrophy, and progeroid syndromes. These disorders, often called "laminopathies," mainly affect mesenchymal tissues (e.g., striated muscle, bone, and fibrous tissue). Recently, however, a series of papers have identified important roles for nuclear lamins in the central nervous system. Studies of knockout mice uncovered a key role for B-type lamins (lamins B1 and B2) in neuronal migration in the developing brain. Also, duplications of LMNB1 (the gene for lamin B1) have been shown to cause autosome-dominant leukodystrophy. Finally, recent studies have uncovered a peculiar pattern of nuclear lamin expression in the brain. Lamin C transcripts are present at high levels in the brain, but prelamin A expression levels are very low-due to regulation of prelamin A transcripts by microRNA 9. This form of prelamin A regulation likely explains why "prelamin A diseases" such as Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome spare the central nervous system. In this review, we summarize recent progress in elucidating links between nuclear lamins and neurobiology.

  7. Localization of nuclear retained mRNAs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Rune; Libri, Domenico; Boulay, Jocelyne

    2003-01-01

    in the rat7–1 strain colocalize predominantly with nucleolar antigens. Bulk poly(A)+ RNA, on the other hand, is localized primarily to the nuclear rim. Interestingly, the RNA binding nucleocytoplasmic shuttle protein Npl3p shows strong colocalization with bulk poly(A)+ RNA, regardless of its nuclear location...

  8. Localization of nuclear retained mRNAs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    THOMSEN, RUNE; LIBRI, DOMENICO; BOULAY, JOCELYNE; ROSBASH, MICHAEL; JENSEN, TORBEN HEICK

    2003-01-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a common conditional phenotype associated with deletion or mutation of genes encoding mRNA export factors is the rapid accumulation of mRNAs in intranuclear foci, suggested to be near transcription sites. The nuclear RNA exosome has been implicated in retaining RNAs in these foci; on deletion of the exosome component Rrp6p, the RNA is released. To determine the exact nuclear location of retained as well as released mRNAs, we have used mRNA export mutant strains to analyze the spatial relationship between newly synthesized heat shock mRNA, the chromosomal site of transcription, and known S. cerevisiae nuclear structures such as the nucleolus and the nucleolar body. Our results show that retained SSA4 RNA localizes to an area in close proximity to the SSA4 locus. On deletion of Rrp6p and release from the genomic locus, heat shock mRNAs produced in the rat7–1 strain colocalize predominantly with nucleolar antigens. Bulk poly(A)+ RNA, on the other hand, is localized primarily to the nuclear rim. Interestingly, the RNA binding nucleocytoplasmic shuttle protein Npl3p shows strong colocalization with bulk poly(A)+ RNA, regardless of its nuclear location. Taken together, our data show that retention occurs close to the gene and indicate distinct nuclear fates of different mRNAs. PMID:12923254

  9. Modification of human U4 RNA requires U6 RNA and multiple pseudouridine synthases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerby, D B; Patton, J R

    1997-12-01

    Small nuclear RNAs (snRNA), cofactors in the splicing of pre-mRNA, are highly modified. In this report the modification of human U4 RNA was studied using cell extracts and in vitro synthesized, and therefore unmodified, U4 RNA. The formation of pseudouridine (Psi) at positions 4, 72 and 79 in U4 RNA was dependent on an RNA-containing cofactor, since the activities in the extracts were micrococcal nuclease (MN) sensitive. Extracts were fractionated on glycerol gradients and there was a broad peak of reconstitution activity centered at 14 S. Reconstitution was not due to additional enzymatic activity, since the peak fraction was MN sensitive. Oligodeoxynucleotide-mediated RNase H digestion of U6 RNA in the extracts inhibited formation of Psi in U4 RNA. From glycerol gradient analysis we determined that exogenously added U4 RNA that is associated with U6 RNA (sedimentation velocity 16 S) was significantly higher in Psi content than U4 RNA not associated with U6 RNA (8 S). Competitive inhibitors of Psi synthases, 5-fluorouridine-containing (5-FU) wild-type and mutant U4 RNAs, were used to investigate formation of Psi in U4 RNA. Deletions and point mutations in these 5-FU-containing U4 RNAs affected their ability to inhibit Psi synthase in vitro. With the aid of these potent inhibitors it was determined that at least two separate activities modify the uridines at these positions.

  10. Functional characterization of the Drosophila MRP (mitochondrial RNA processing) RNA gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Mary D; Bains, Anupinder K; Rajendra, T K; Dominski, Zbigniew; Matera, A Gregory; Simmonds, Andrew J

    2010-11-01

    MRP RNA is a noncoding RNA component of RNase mitochondrial RNA processing (MRP), a multi-protein eukaryotic endoribonuclease reported to function in multiple cellular processes, including ribosomal RNA processing, mitochondrial DNA replication, and cell cycle regulation. A recent study predicted a potential Drosophila ortholog of MRP RNA (CR33682) by computer-based genome analysis. We have confirmed the expression of this gene and characterized the phenotype associated with this locus. Flies with mutations that specifically affect MRP RNA show defects in growth and development that begin in the early larval period and end in larval death during the second instar stage. We present several lines of evidence demonstrating a role for Drosophila MRP RNA in rRNA processing. The nuclear fraction of Drosophila MRP RNA localizes to the nucleolus. Further, a mutant strain shows defects in rRNA processing that include a defect in 5.8S rRNA processing, typical of MRP RNA mutants in other species, as well as defects in early stages of rRNA processing.

  11. Nuclear Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Savage, Martin J

    2016-01-01

    Lattice QCD is making good progress toward calculating the structure and properties of light nuclei and the forces between nucleons. These calculations will ultimately refine the nuclear forces, particularly in the three- and four-nucleon sector and the short-distance interactions of nucleons with electroweak currents, and allow for a reduction of uncertainties in nuclear many-body calculations of nuclei and their reactions. After highlighting their importance, particularly to the Nuclear Physics and High-Energy Physics experimental programs, I discuss the progress that has been made toward achieving these goals and the challenges that remain.

  12. Localization of interchromatin granule cluster and Cajal body components in oocyte nuclear bodies of the hemipterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogolyubov, D S; Batalova, F M; Ogorzałek, A

    2007-10-01

    An oocyte nucleus contains different extrachromosomal nuclear domains collectively called nuclear bodies (NBs). In the present work we revealed, using immunogold labeling electron microscopy, some marker components of interchromatin granule clusters (IGCs) and Cajal bodies (CBs) in morphologically heterogeneous oocyte NBs studied in three hemipteran species: Notostira elongata, Capsodes gothicus (Miridae) and Velia caprai (Veliidae). Both IGC and CB counterparts were revealed in oocyte nuclei of the studied species but morphological and biochemical criteria were found to be not sufficient to determine carefully the define type of oocyte NBs. We found that the molecular markers of the CBs (coilin and non-phosphorylated RNA polymerase II) and IGCs (SC35 protein) may be localized in the same NB. Anti-SC35 antibody may decorate not only a granular material representing "true" interchromatin granules but also masks some fibrillar parts of complex NBs. Our first observations on the hemipteran oocyte NBs confirm the high complexity and heterogeneity of insect oocyte IGCs and CBs in comparison with those in mammalian somatic cells and amphibian oocytes.

  13. Query Expansion Using Heterogeneous Thesauri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandala, Rila; Tokunaga, Takenobu; Tanaka, Hozumi

    2000-01-01

    Proposes a method to improve the performance of information retrieval systems by expanding queries using heterogeneous thesauri. Experiments show that using heterogeneous thesauri with an appropriate weighting method results in better retrieval performance than using only one type of thesaurus. (Author/LRW)

  14. Fiscal Consolidations and Heterogeneous Expectations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Hommes; J. Lustenhouwer; K. Mavromatis

    2015-01-01

    We analyze fiscal consolidations using a New Keynesian model where agents have heterogeneous expectations and are uncertain about the composition of consoidations. Heterogeneity in expectations may amplify expansions, stabilizing thus the debt-to-GDP ratio faster under tax based consolidations, in t

  15. Coordination Frictions and Job Heterogeneity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kennes, John; le Maire, Christian Daniel

    This paper develops and extends a dynamic, discrete time, job to worker matching model in which jobs are heterogeneous in equilibrium. The key assumptions of this economic environment are (i) matching is directed and (ii) coordination frictions lead to heterogeneous local labor markets. We de- rive...

  16. Query Expansion Using Heterogeneous Thesauri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandala, Rila; Tokunaga, Takenobu; Tanaka, Hozumi

    2000-01-01

    Proposes a method to improve the performance of information retrieval systems by expanding queries using heterogeneous thesauri. Experiments show that using heterogeneous thesauri with an appropriate weighting method results in better retrieval performance than using only one type of thesaurus. (Author/LRW)

  17. Nuclear reaction

    CERN Multimedia

    Penwarden, C

    2001-01-01

    At the European Research Organization for Nuclear Research, Nobel laureates delve into the mysteries of particle physics. But when they invited artists from across the continent to visit their site in Geneva, they wanted a new kind of experiment.

  18. Nuclear Disarmament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Christopher

    1982-01-01

    Material about nuclear disarmament and the arms race should be included in secondary school curricula. Teachers can present this technical, controversial, and frightening material in a balanced and comprehensible way. Resources for instructional materials are listed. (PP)

  19. Heterogeneity: multilingualism and democracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Jürgen Krumm

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Linguistic diversity and multilingualism on the part of individuals are aprerequisite and a constitutive condition of enabling people to live togetherin a world of growing heterogeneity. Foreign language teaching plays animportant part in democratic education because it can be seen as a trainingin respecting otherness and developing an intercultural, non-ethnocentricperception and attitude. This is all the more important because of the neces-sity of integrating children from migrant families into school life.My article argues that language education policy has to take this per-spective into account, i.e., of establishing a planned diversification so thatpupils (and their parents will not feel satisfied with learning English only,but also become motivated to learn languages of their own neighbourhood,such as migrant and minority languages. However, in order to make use ofthe linguistic resources in the classroom, relating it to the democratic impetusof foreign language education, it is necessary to revise existing languagepolicies and to develop a multilingual perspective for all educational institutions.

  20. Heterogeneous recording media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhanov, Vitaly I.

    1991-02-01

    The paper summarizes the results of investigations performed to obtain deep 3-D holograms with 102 i0 mkm physical thickness allowing the postexposure amplification and the a posteriori changing of the grating parameters. This aim has been achieved by developing heterogeneous systems on the basis of porous glass with light-sensitive compositions introduced into it. 1. INTRODUCTION. LIGHT-SENSITIVE MEDIA FOR 3-D HOLOGRAMS RECORDING. The 3-D holograms have many useful properties: very high diffraction efficiency angular and spectral selectivity but low level of noise. It shoud be noted that in this case deep 3-D holograms are dealt with whose physical thickness is as high as 102 -i mkm. Such hologram recording is usually done using homogeneous light-sensitive media for example dyed acid-halide and electrooptical crystals photochrome glass photostructurized polimer compositions and so on. The nature of photophisical and photochemical processes responsible for the light sensitivity of these materials exclude the possibility of post-exposure treatment. This does not allow to enhance the recorded holograms and considerably hampers their fixing or makes it practically impossible. The object of our work is to create the media which are quite suitable for two-stage processes of the deep hologram formation with post-exposure processing. Such material must satisfy the following requirements: a)they must have high permeability for the developing substances in order to make the development duration suitable for practical applications b)they must be shrinkproof to prevent deformation of the

  1. Parsing Heterogeneous Striatal Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kae Nakamura

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The striatum is an input channel of the basal ganglia and is well known to be involved in reward-based decision making and learning. At the macroscopic level, the striatum has been postulated to contain parallel functional modules, each of which includes neurons that perform similar computations to support selection of appropriate actions for different task contexts. At the single-neuron level, however, recent studies in monkeys and rodents have revealed heterogeneity in neuronal activity even within restricted modules of the striatum. Looking for generality in the complex striatal activity patterns, here we briefly survey several types of striatal activity, focusing on their usefulness for mediating behaviors. In particular, we focus on two types of behavioral tasks: reward-based tasks that use salient sensory cues and manipulate outcomes associated with the cues; and perceptual decision tasks that manipulate the quality of noisy sensory cues and associate all correct decisions with the same outcome. Guided by previous insights on the modular organization and general selection-related functions of the basal ganglia, we relate striatal activity patterns on these tasks to two types of computations: implementation of selection and evaluation. We suggest that a parsing with the selection/evaluation categories encourages a focus on the functional commonalities revealed by studies with different animal models and behavioral tasks, instead of a focus on aspects of striatal activity that may be specific to a particular task setting. We then highlight several questions in the selection-evaluation framework for future explorations.

  2. Nuclear Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Morgan C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-01-23

    PowerPoint presentation targeted for educational use. Nuclear data comes from a variety of sources and in many flavors. Understanding where the data you use comes from and what flavor it is can be essential to understand and interpret your results. This talk will discuss the nuclear data pipeline with particular emphasis on providing links to additional resources that can be used to explore the issues you will encounter.

  3. Nuclear Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargano, Angela

    2003-04-01

    An account of recent studies in the field of theoretical nuclear structure is reported. These studies concern essentially research activities performed under the Italian project "Fisica Teorica del Nucleo e dei Sistemi a Molti Corpi". Special attention is addressed to results obtained during the last two years as regards the development of new many-body techniques as well as the interpretation of new experimental aspects of nuclear structure.

  4. Nuclear astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnould, M. [Institut d' Astronomie et d' Astrophysique, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Bruxelles (Belgium); Takahashi, K. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, Garching (Germany)

    1999-03-01

    Nuclear astrophysics is that branch of astrophysics which helps understanding of the Universe, or at least some of its many faces, through the knowledge of the microcosm of the atomic nucleus. It attempts to find as many nuclear physics imprints as possible in the macrocosm, and to decipher what those messages are telling us about the varied constituent objects in the Universe at present and in the past. In the last decades much advance has been made in nuclear astrophysics thanks to the sometimes spectacular progress made in the modelling of the structure and evolution of the stars, in the quality and diversity of the astronomical observations, as well as in the experimental and theoretical understanding of the atomic nucleus and of its spontaneous or induced transformations. Developments in other subfields of physics and chemistry have also contributed to that advance. Notwithstanding the accomplishment, many long-standing problems remain to be solved, and the theoretical understanding of a large variety of observational facts needs to be put on safer grounds. In addition, new questions are continuously emerging, and new facts endangering old ideas. This review shows that astrophysics has been, and still is, highly demanding to nuclear physics in both its experimental and theoretical components. On top of the fact that large varieties of nuclei have to be dealt with, these nuclei are immersed in highly unusual environments which may have a significant impact on their static properties, the diversity of their transmutation modes, and on the probabilities of these modes. In order to have a chance of solving some of the problems nuclear astrophysics is facing, the astrophysicists and nuclear physicists are obviously bound to put their competence in common, and have sometimes to benefit from the help of other fields of physics, like particle physics, plasma physics or solid-state physics. Given the highly varied and complex aspects, we pick here some specific nuclear

  5. Nuclear astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnould, M.; Takahashi, K.

    1999-03-01

    Nuclear astrophysics is that branch of astrophysics which helps understanding of the Universe, or at least some of its many faces, through the knowledge of the microcosm of the atomic nucleus. It attempts to find as many nuclear physics imprints as possible in the macrocosm, and to decipher what those messages are telling us about the varied constituent objects in the Universe at present and in the past. In the last decades much advance has been made in nuclear astrophysics thanks to the sometimes spectacular progress made in the modelling of the structure and evolution of the stars, in the quality and diversity of the astronomical observations, as well as in the experimental and theoretical understanding of the atomic nucleus and of its spontaneous or induced transformations. Developments in other subfields of physics and chemistry have also contributed to that advance. Notwithstanding the accomplishment, many long-standing problems remain to be solved, and the theoretical understanding of a large variety of observational facts needs to be put on safer grounds. In addition, new questions are continuously emerging, and new facts endangering old ideas. This review shows that astrophysics has been, and still is, highly demanding to nuclear physics in both its experimental and theoretical components. On top of the fact that large varieties of nuclei have to be dealt with, these nuclei are immersed in highly unusual environments which may have a significant impact on their static properties, the diversity of their transmutation modes, and on the probabilities of these modes. In order to have a chance of solving some of the problems nuclear astrophysics is facing, the astrophysicists and nuclear physicists are obviously bound to put their competence in common, and have sometimes to benefit from the help of other fields of physics, like particle physics, plasma physics or solid-state physics. Given the highly varied and complex aspects, we pick here some specific nuclear

  6. Nuclear Nonproliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atkins-Duffin, C E

    2008-12-10

    With an explosion equivalent of about 20kT of TNT, the Trinity test was the first demonstration of a nuclear weapon. Conducted on July 16, 1945 in Alamogordo, NM this site is now a Registered National Historic Landmark. The concept and applicability of nuclear power was demonstrated on December 20, 1951 with the Experimental Breeder Reactor Number One (EBR-1) lit four light bulbs. This reactor is now a Registered National Historic Landmark, located near Arco, ID. From that moment forward it had been clearly demonstrated that nuclear energy has both peaceful and military applications and that the civilian and military fuel cycles can overlap. For the more than fifty years since the Atoms for Peace program, a key objective of nuclear policy has been to enable the wider peaceful use of nuclear energy while preventing the spread of nuclear weapons. Volumes have been written on the impact of these two actions on the world by advocates and critics; pundits and practioners; politicians and technologists. The nations of the world have woven together a delicate balance of treaties, agreements, frameworks and handshakes that are representative of the timeframe in which they were constructed and how they have evolved in time. Collectively these vehicles attempt to keep political will, nuclear materials and technology in check. This paper captures only the briefest abstract of the more significant aspects on the Nonproliferation Regime. Of particular relevance to this discussion is the special nonproliferation sensitivity associated with the uranium isotope separation and spent fuel reprocessing aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle.

  7. Expression of progesterone receptor membrane component 1, serpine mRNA binding protein 1 and nuclear progesterone receptor isoforms A and B in the bovine myometrium during the estrous cycle and early pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slonina, Dominika; Kowalik, Magdalena K; Kotwica, Jan

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the (1) expression of progesterone membrane component 1 (PGRMC1), serpine mRNA binding protein 1 (SERBP1) and progesterone receptor (PR) mRNA and (2) protein expression levels of PGRMC1, SERBP1 and PR isoforms A and B in the bovine myometrium during the estrous cycle and early pregnancy. Uteri from cows on days 1-5, 6-10, 11-16 and 17-21 of the estrous cycle and weeks 3-5, 6-8 and 9-12 of pregnancy were used (n=5-6 per period). There were no changes (P>0.05) in PGRMC1 mRNA expression during the estrous cycle, while expression of SERBP1 and PR mRNA was the lowest (P0.05) in SERBP1 protein expression in cycling and pregnant cows, while the highest (P<0.05) PGRMC1 protein expression was found during weeks 3-5 of pregnancy. Similar protein expression profiles for PRA and PRB were found, and protein levels were highest on days 1-5 of the estrous cycle. From day 6 of the cycle, PRA and PRB protein expression decreased and were maintained at this lower level during pregnancy. In conclusion, our study assessed mRNA and protein expression levels of PGRMC1, SERBP1 and PR in the bovine myometrium during the estrous cycle and the first trimester of pregnancy. It is possible that progesterone (P4) affects myometrial function in a genomic and nongenomic manner.

  8. RNA Export through the NPC in Eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, Masumi; Inose, Haruko; Masuda, Seiji

    2015-03-20

    In eukaryotic cells, RNAs are transcribed in the nucleus and exported to the cytoplasm through the nuclear pore complex. The RNA molecules that are exported from the nucleus into the cytoplasm include messenger RNAs (mRNAs), ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs), transfer RNAs (tRNAs), small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs), micro RNAs (miRNAs), and viral mRNAs. Each RNA is transported by a specific nuclear export receptor. It is believed that most of the mRNAs are exported by Nxf1 (Mex67 in yeast), whereas rRNAs, snRNAs, and a certain subset of mRNAs are exported in a Crm1/Xpo1-dependent manner. tRNAs and miRNAs are exported by Xpot and Xpo5. However, multiple export receptors are involved in the export of some RNAs, such as 60S ribosomal subunit. In addition to these export receptors, some adapter proteins are required to export RNAs. The RNA export system of eukaryotic cells is also used by several types of RNA virus that depend on the machineries of the host cell in the nucleus for replication of their genome, therefore this review describes the RNA export system of two representative viruses. We also discuss the NPC anchoring-dependent mRNA export factors that directly recruit specific genes to the NPC.