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Sample records for heterogeneous mutually inhibited

  1. Mutual information model for link prediction in heterogeneous complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakibian, Hadi; Moghadam Charkari, Nasrollah

    2017-01-01

    Recently, a number of meta-path based similarity indices like PathSim, HeteSim, and random walk have been proposed for link prediction in heterogeneous complex networks. However, these indices suffer from two major drawbacks. Firstly, they are primarily dependent on the connectivity degrees of node pairs without considering the further information provided by the given meta-path. Secondly, most of them are required to use a single and usually symmetric meta-path in advance. Hence, employing a set of different meta-paths is not straightforward. To tackle with these problems, we propose a mutual information model for link prediction in heterogeneous complex networks. The proposed model, called as Meta-path based Mutual Information Index (MMI), introduces meta-path based link entropy to estimate the link likelihood and could be carried on a set of available meta-paths. This estimation measures the amount of information through the paths instead of measuring the amount of connectivity between the node pairs. The experimental results on a Bibliography network show that the MMI obtains high prediction accuracy compared with other popular similarity indices. PMID:28344326

  2. Ungulate saliva inhibits a grass-endophyte mutualism.

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    Tanentzap, Andrew J; Vicari, Mark; Bazely, Dawn R

    2014-07-01

    Fungal endophytes modify plant-herbivore interactions by producing toxic alkaloids that deter herbivory. However, studies have neglected the direct effects herbivores may have on endophytes. Antifungal properties and signalling effectors in herbivore saliva suggest that evolutionary pressures may select for animals that mitigate the effects of endophyte-produced alkaloids. Here, we tested whether saliva of moose (Alces alces) and European reindeer (Rangifer tarandus) reduced hyphal elongation and production of ergot alkaloids by the foliar endophyte Epichloë festucae associated with the globally distributed red fescue Festuca rubra. Both moose and reindeer saliva reduced the growth of isolated endophyte hyphae when compared with a treatment of distilled water. Induction of the highly toxic alkaloid ergovaline was also inhibited in plants from the core of F. rubra's distribution when treated with moose saliva following simulated grazing. In genotypes from the southern limit of the species' distribution, ergovaline was constitutively expressed, as predicted where growth is environmentally limited. Our results now present the first evidence, to our knowledge, that ungulate saliva can combat plant defences produced by a grass-endophyte mutualism.

  3. An Efficient and Adaptive Mutual Authentication Framework for Heterogeneous Wireless Sensor Network-Based Applications

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    Pardeep Kumar

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Robust security is highly coveted in real wireless sensor network (WSN applications since wireless sensors’ sense critical data from the application environment. This article presents an efficient and adaptive mutual authentication framework that suits real heterogeneous WSN-based applications (such as smart homes, industrial environments, smart grids, and healthcare monitoring. The proposed framework offers: (i key initialization; (ii secure network (cluster formation (i.e., mutual authentication and dynamic key establishment; (iii key revocation; and (iv new node addition into the network. The correctness of the proposed scheme is formally verified. An extensive analysis shows the proposed scheme coupled with message confidentiality, mutual authentication and dynamic session key establishment, node privacy, and message freshness. Moreover, the preliminary study also reveals the proposed framework is secure against popular types of attacks, such as impersonation attacks, man-in-the-middle attacks, replay attacks, and information-leakage attacks. As a result, we believe the proposed framework achieves efficiency at reasonable computation and communication costs and it can be a safeguard to real heterogeneous WSN applications.

  4. An efficient and adaptive mutual authentication framework for heterogeneous wireless sensor network-based applications.

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    Kumar, Pardeep; Ylianttila, Mika; Gurtov, Andrei; Lee, Sang-Gon; Lee, Hoon-Jae

    2014-02-11

    Robust security is highly coveted in real wireless sensor network (WSN) applications since wireless sensors' sense critical data from the application environment. This article presents an efficient and adaptive mutual authentication framework that suits real heterogeneous WSN-based applications (such as smart homes, industrial environments, smart grids, and healthcare monitoring). The proposed framework offers: (i) key initialization; (ii) secure network (cluster) formation (i.e., mutual authentication and dynamic key establishment); (iii) key revocation; and (iv) new node addition into the network. The correctness of the proposed scheme is formally verified. An extensive analysis shows the proposed scheme coupled with message confidentiality, mutual authentication and dynamic session key establishment, node privacy, and message freshness. Moreover, the preliminary study also reveals the proposed framework is secure against popular types of attacks, such as impersonation attacks, man-in-the-middle attacks, replay attacks, and information-leakage attacks. As a result, we believe the proposed framework achieves efficiency at reasonable computation and communication costs and it can be a safeguard to real heterogeneous WSN applications.

  5. Pointwise mutual information quantifies intratumor heterogeneity in tissue sections labeled with multiple fluorescent biomarkers

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    Daniel M Spagnolo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Measures of spatial intratumor heterogeneity are potentially important diagnostic biomarkers for cancer progression, proliferation, and response to therapy. Spatial relationships among cells including cancer and stromal cells in the tumor microenvironment (TME are key contributors to heterogeneity. Methods: We demonstrate how to quantify spatial heterogeneity from immunofluorescence pathology samples, using a set of 3 basic breast cancer biomarkers as a test case. We learn a set of dominant biomarker intensity patterns and map the spatial distribution of the biomarker patterns with a network. We then describe the pairwise association statistics for each pattern within the network using pointwise mutual information (PMI and visually represent heterogeneity with a two-dimensional map. Results: We found a salient set of 8 biomarker patterns to describe cellular phenotypes from a tissue microarray cohort containing 4 different breast cancer subtypes. After computing PMI for each pair of biomarker patterns in each patient and tumor replicate, we visualize the interactions that contribute to the resulting association statistics. Then, we demonstrate the potential for using PMI as a diagnostic biomarker, by comparing PMI maps and heterogeneity scores from patients across the 4 different cancer subtypes. Estrogen receptor positive invasive lobular carcinoma patient, AL13-6, exhibited the highest heterogeneity score among those tested, while estrogen receptor negative invasive ductal carcinoma patient, AL13-14, exhibited the lowest heterogeneity score. Conclusions: This paper presents an approach for describing intratumor heterogeneity, in a quantitative fashion (via PMI, which departs from the purely qualitative approaches currently used in the clinic. PMI is generalizable to highly multiplexed/hyperplexed immunofluorescence images, as well as spatial data from complementary in situ methods including FISSEQ and CyTOF, sampling many different

  6. Clustering Heterogeneous Data with k-Means by Mutual Information-Based Unsupervised Feature Transformation

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    Min Wei

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Traditional centroid-based clustering algorithms for heterogeneous data with numerical and non-numerical features result in different levels of inaccurate clustering. This is because the Hamming distance used for dissimilarity measurement of non-numerical values does not provide optimal distances between different values, and problems arise from attempts to combine the Euclidean distance and Hamming distance. In this study, the mutual information (MI-based unsupervised feature transformation (UFT, which can transform non-numerical features into numerical features without information loss, was utilized with the conventional k-means algorithm for heterogeneous data clustering. For the original non-numerical features, UFT can provide numerical values which preserve the structure of the original non-numerical features and have the property of continuous values at the same time. Experiments and analysis of real-world datasets showed that, the integrated UFT-k-means clustering algorithm outperformed others for heterogeneous data with both numerical and non-numerical features.

  7. Network of mutually repressive metastasis regulators can promote cell heterogeneity and metastatic transitions

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    Balazsi, Gabor; Kim, Eun-Jin; Rosner, Marsha

    2014-03-01

    The sources and consequences of nongenetic variability in metastatic progression are largely unknown. To address these questions, we characterize the transcriptional regulatory network around the metastasis suppressor Raf Kinase Inhibitory Protein (RKIP). It was previously shown that RKIP negatively regulates the transcription factor BACH1, which promotes breast cancer metastasis. Here we demonstrate that BACH1 acts in a double negative (overall positive) feedback loop to inhibit RKIP transcription in breast cancer cells. BACH1 also negatively regulates its own transcription. Analysis of the RKIP-BACH1 network reveals the existence of an inverse relationship between BACH1 and RKIP involving both monostable and bistable transitions between ``low BACH1, high RKIP'' and ``high BACH1, low RKIP'' cellular states that can potentially give rise to nongenetic variability. Single cell analysis confirmed the antagonistic relationship between RKIP and BACH1, and showed cell line-dependent signatures consistent with bistable behavior. Together, our results suggest that the mutually repressive relationship between metastatic regulators such as RKIP and BACH1 can play a key role in determining metastatic progression in cancer. This work was supported by NIH/NIGMS grant R01GM106027.

  8. Mutualism and adaptive divergence: co-invasion of a heterogeneous grassland by an exotic legume-rhizobium symbiosis.

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    Stephanie S Porter

    Full Text Available Species interactions play a critical role in biological invasions. For example, exotic plant and microbe mutualists can facilitate each other's spread as they co-invade novel ranges. Environmental context may influence the effect of mutualisms on invasions in heterogeneous environments, however these effects are poorly understood. We examined the mutualism between the legume, Medicago polymorpha, and the rhizobium, Ensifer medicae, which have both invaded California grasslands. Many of these invaded grasslands are composed of a patchwork of harsh serpentine and relatively benign non-serpentine soils. We grew legume genotypes collected from serpentine or non-serpentine soil in both types of soil in combination with rhizobium genotypes from serpentine or non-serpentine soils and in the absence of rhizobia. Legumes invested more strongly in the mutualism in the home soil type and trends in fitness suggested that this ecotypic divergence was adaptive. Serpentine legumes had greater allocation to symbiotic root nodules in serpentine soil than did non-serpentine legumes and non-serpentine legumes had greater allocation to nodules in non-serpentine soil than did serpentine legumes. Therefore, this invasive legume has undergone the rapid evolution of divergence for soil-specific investment in the mutualism. Contrary to theoretical expectations, the mutualism was less beneficial for legumes grown on the stressful serpentine soil than on the non-serpentine soil, possibly due to the inhibitory effects of serpentine on the benefits derived from the interaction. The soil-specific ability to allocate to a robust microbial mutualism may be a critical, and previously overlooked, adaptation for plants adapting to heterogeneous environments during invasion.

  9. Mutual Inclusivity of the Critical Path and its Partial Schedule on Heterogeneous Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Vasudevan, Aravind; Gregg, David

    2017-01-01

    The critical path of a group of tasks is an important measure that is commonly used to guide task allocation and scheduling on parallel computers. The critical path is the longest chain of dependencies in an acyclic task dependence graph. A problem arises on heterogeneous parallel machines where computation and communication costs can vary between different types of processor. Existing solutions for heterogeneous machines attempt to estimate the critical path using average values of computati...

  10. Prediction of drug-target interaction by label propagation with mutual interaction information derived from heterogeneous network.

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    Yan, Xiao-Ying; Zhang, Shao-Wu; Zhang, Song-Yao

    2016-02-01

    The identification of potential drug-target interaction pairs is very important, which is useful not only for providing greater understanding of protein function, but also for enhancing drug research, especially for drug function repositioning. Recently, numerous machine learning-based algorithms (e.g. kernel-based, matrix factorization-based and network-based inference methods) have been developed for predicting drug-target interactions. All these methods implicitly utilize the assumption that similar drugs tend to target similar proteins and yield better results for predicting interactions between drugs and target proteins. To further improve the accuracy of prediction, a new method of network-based label propagation with mutual interaction information derived from heterogeneous networks, namely LPMIHN, is proposed to infer the potential drug-target interactions. LPMIHN separately performs label propagation on drug and target similarity networks, but the initial label information of the target (or drug) network comes from the drug (or target) label network and the known drug-target interaction bipartite network. The independent label propagation on each similarity network explores the cluster structure in its network, and the label information from the other network is used to capture mutual interactions (bicluster structures) between the nodes in each pair of the similarity networks. As compared to other recent state-of-the-art methods on the four popular benchmark datasets of binary drug-target interactions and two quantitative kinase bioactivity datasets, LPMIHN achieves the best results in terms of AUC and AUPR. In addition, many of the promising drug-target pairs predicted from LPMIHN are also confirmed on the latest publicly available drug-target databases such as ChEMBL, KEGG, SuperTarget and Drugbank. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of our LPMIHN method, indicating that LPMIHN has a great potential for predicting drug-target interactions.

  11. Influence of statistical estimators of mutual information and data heterogeneity on the inference of gene regulatory networks.

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    Ricardo de Matos Simoes

    Full Text Available The inference of gene regulatory networks from gene expression data is a difficult problem because the performance of the inference algorithms depends on a multitude of different factors. In this paper we study two of these. First, we investigate the influence of discrete mutual information (MI estimators on the global and local network inference performance of the C3NET algorithm. More precisely, we study 4 different MI estimators (Empirical, Miller-Madow, Shrink and Schürmann-Grassberger in combination with 3 discretization methods (equal frequency, equal width and global equal width discretization. We observe the best global and local inference performance of C3NET for the Miller-Madow estimator with an equal width discretization. Second, our numerical analysis can be considered as a systems approach because we simulate gene expression data from an underlying gene regulatory network, instead of making a distributional assumption to sample thereof. We demonstrate that despite the popularity of the latter approach, which is the traditional way of studying MI estimators, this is in fact not supported by simulated and biological expression data because of their heterogeneity. Hence, our study provides guidance for an efficient design of a simulation study in the context of network inference, supporting a systems approach.

  12. Influence of statistical estimators of mutual information and data heterogeneity on the inference of gene regulatory networks.

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    de Matos Simoes, Ricardo; Emmert-Streib, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The inference of gene regulatory networks from gene expression data is a difficult problem because the performance of the inference algorithms depends on a multitude of different factors. In this paper we study two of these. First, we investigate the influence of discrete mutual information (MI) estimators on the global and local network inference performance of the C3NET algorithm. More precisely, we study 4 different MI estimators (Empirical, Miller-Madow, Shrink and Schürmann-Grassberger) in combination with 3 discretization methods (equal frequency, equal width and global equal width discretization). We observe the best global and local inference performance of C3NET for the Miller-Madow estimator with an equal width discretization. Second, our numerical analysis can be considered as a systems approach because we simulate gene expression data from an underlying gene regulatory network, instead of making a distributional assumption to sample thereof. We demonstrate that despite the popularity of the latter approach, which is the traditional way of studying MI estimators, this is in fact not supported by simulated and biological expression data because of their heterogeneity. Hence, our study provides guidance for an efficient design of a simulation study in the context of network inference, supporting a systems approach.

  13. Mathematical models for sleep-wake dynamics: comparison of the two-process model and a mutual inhibition neuronal model.

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    Anne C Skeldon

    Full Text Available Sleep is essential for the maintenance of the brain and the body, yet many features of sleep are poorly understood and mathematical models are an important tool for probing proposed biological mechanisms. The most well-known mathematical model of sleep regulation, the two-process model, models the sleep-wake cycle by two oscillators: a circadian oscillator and a homeostatic oscillator. An alternative, more recent, model considers the mutual inhibition of sleep promoting neurons and the ascending arousal system regulated by homeostatic and circadian processes. Here we show there are fundamental similarities between these two models. The implications are illustrated with two important sleep-wake phenomena. Firstly, we show that in the two-process model, transitions between different numbers of daily sleep episodes can be classified as grazing bifurcations. This provides the theoretical underpinning for numerical results showing that the sleep patterns of many mammals can be explained by the mutual inhibition model. Secondly, we show that when sleep deprivation disrupts the sleep-wake cycle, ostensibly different measures of sleepiness in the two models are closely related. The demonstration of the mathematical similarities of the two models is valuable because not only does it allow some features of the two-process model to be interpreted physiologically but it also means that knowledge gained from study of the two-process model can be used to inform understanding of the behaviour of the mutual inhibition model. This is important because the mutual inhibition model and its extensions are increasingly being used as a tool to understand a diverse range of sleep-wake phenomena such as the design of optimal shift-patterns, yet the values it uses for parameters associated with the circadian and homeostatic processes are very different from those that have been experimentally measured in the context of the two-process model.

  14. Mathematical models for sleep-wake dynamics: comparison of the two-process model and a mutual inhibition neuronal model.

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    Skeldon, Anne C; Dijk, Derk-Jan; Derks, Gianne

    2014-01-01

    Sleep is essential for the maintenance of the brain and the body, yet many features of sleep are poorly understood and mathematical models are an important tool for probing proposed biological mechanisms. The most well-known mathematical model of sleep regulation, the two-process model, models the sleep-wake cycle by two oscillators: a circadian oscillator and a homeostatic oscillator. An alternative, more recent, model considers the mutual inhibition of sleep promoting neurons and the ascending arousal system regulated by homeostatic and circadian processes. Here we show there are fundamental similarities between these two models. The implications are illustrated with two important sleep-wake phenomena. Firstly, we show that in the two-process model, transitions between different numbers of daily sleep episodes can be classified as grazing bifurcations. This provides the theoretical underpinning for numerical results showing that the sleep patterns of many mammals can be explained by the mutual inhibition model. Secondly, we show that when sleep deprivation disrupts the sleep-wake cycle, ostensibly different measures of sleepiness in the two models are closely related. The demonstration of the mathematical similarities of the two models is valuable because not only does it allow some features of the two-process model to be interpreted physiologically but it also means that knowledge gained from study of the two-process model can be used to inform understanding of the behaviour of the mutual inhibition model. This is important because the mutual inhibition model and its extensions are increasingly being used as a tool to understand a diverse range of sleep-wake phenomena such as the design of optimal shift-patterns, yet the values it uses for parameters associated with the circadian and homeostatic processes are very different from those that have been experimentally measured in the context of the two-process model.

  15. Reliable Attention Network Scores and Mutually Inhibited Inter-network Relationships Revealed by Mixed Design and Non-orthogonal Method.

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    Wang, Yi-Feng; Jing, Xiu-Juan; Liu, Feng; Li, Mei-Ling; Long, Zhi-Liang; Yan, Jin H; Chen, Hua-Fu

    2015-05-21

    The attention system can be divided into alerting, orienting, and executive control networks. The efficiency and independence of attention networks have been widely tested with the attention network test (ANT) and its revised versions. However, many studies have failed to find effects of attention network scores (ANSs) and inter-network relationships (INRs). Moreover, the low reliability of ANSs can not meet the demands of theoretical and empirical investigations. Two methodological factors (the inter-trial influence in the event-related design and the inter-network interference in orthogonal contrast) may be responsible for the unreliability of ANT. In this study, we combined the mixed design and non-orthogonal method to explore ANSs and directional INRs. With a small number of trials, we obtained reliable and independent ANSs (split-half reliability of alerting: 0.684; orienting: 0.588; and executive control: 0.616), suggesting an individual and specific attention system. Furthermore, mutual inhibition was observed when two networks were operated simultaneously, indicating a differentiated but integrated attention system. Overall, the reliable and individual specific ANSs and mutually inhibited INRs provide novel insight into the understanding of the developmental, physiological and pathological mechanisms of attention networks, and can benefit future experimental and clinical investigations of attention using ANT.

  16. Mutual inhibition and capacity sharing during parallel preparation of serial eye movements.

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    Ray, Supriya; Bhutani, Neha; Murthy, Aditya

    2012-03-20

    Many common activities, like reading, scanning scenes, or searching for an inconspicuous item in a cluttered environment, entail serial movements of the eyes that shift the gaze from one object to another. Previous studies have shown that the primate brain is capable of programming sequential saccadic eye movements in parallel. Given that the onset of saccades directed to a target are unpredictable in individual trials, what prevents a saccade during parallel programming from being executed in the direction of the second target before execution of another saccade in the direction of the first target remains unclear. Using a computational model, here we demonstrate that sequential saccades inhibit each other and share the brain's limited processing resources (capacity) so that the planning of a saccade in the direction of the first target always finishes first. In this framework, the latency of a saccade increases linearly with the fraction of capacity allocated to the other saccade in the sequence, and exponentially with the duration of capacity sharing. Our study establishes a link between the dual-task paradigm and the ramp-to-threshold model of response time to identify a physiologically viable mechanism that preserves the serial order of saccades without compromising the speed of performance.

  17. The Impact of Structural Heterogeneity on Excitation-Inhibition Balance in Cortical Networks.

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    Landau, Itamar D; Egger, Robert; Dercksen, Vincent J; Oberlaender, Marcel; Sompolinsky, Haim

    2016-12-07

    Models of cortical dynamics often assume a homogeneous connectivity structure. However, we show that heterogeneous input connectivity can prevent the dynamic balance between excitation and inhibition, a hallmark of cortical dynamics, and yield unrealistically sparse and temporally regular firing. Anatomically based estimates of the connectivity of layer 4 (L4) rat barrel cortex and numerical simulations of this circuit indicate that the local network possesses substantial heterogeneity in input connectivity, sufficient to disrupt excitation-inhibition balance. We show that homeostatic plasticity in inhibitory synapses can align the functional connectivity to compensate for structural heterogeneity. Alternatively, spike-frequency adaptation can give rise to a novel state in which local firing rates adjust dynamically so that adaptation currents and synaptic inputs are balanced. This theory is supported by simulations of L4 barrel cortex during spontaneous and stimulus-evoked conditions. Our study shows how synaptic and cellular mechanisms yield fluctuation-driven dynamics despite structural heterogeneity in cortical circuits.

  18. Substrate inhibition in the heterogeneous catalyzed aldol condensation: A mechanistic study of supported organocatalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandel, Kapil; Althaus, Stacey M.; Peeraphatdit, Chorthip; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Trewyn, Brian G.; Pruski, Marek; Slowing, Igor I.

    2012-05-23

    In this study, we demonstrate how materials science can be combined with the established methods of organic chemistry to find mechanistic bottlenecks and redesign heterogeneous catalysts for improved performance. By using solid-state NMR, infrared spectroscopy, surface and kinetic analysis, we prove the existence of a substrate inhibition in the aldol condensation catalyzed by heterogeneous amines. We show that modifying the structure of the supported amines according to the proposed mechanism dramatically enhances the activity of the heterogeneous catalyst. We also provide evidence that the reaction benefits significantly from the surface chemistry of the silica support, which plays the role of a co-catalyst, giving activities up to two orders of magnitude larger than those of homogeneous amines. This study confirms that the optimization of a heterogeneous catalyst depends as much on obtaining organic mechanistic information as it does on controlling the structure of the support.

  19. Computational analysis of an autophagy/translation switch based on mutual inhibition of MTORC1 and ULK1.

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    Paulina Szymańska

    Full Text Available We constructed a mechanistic, computational model for regulation of (macroautophagy and protein synthesis (at the level of translation. The model was formulated to study the system-level consequences of interactions among the following proteins: two key components of MTOR complex 1 (MTORC1, namely the protein kinase MTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin and the scaffold protein RPTOR; the autophagy-initiating protein kinase ULK1; and the multimeric energy-sensing AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK. Inputs of the model include intrinsic AMPK kinase activity, which is taken as an adjustable surrogate parameter for cellular energy level or AMP:ATP ratio, and rapamycin dose, which controls MTORC1 activity. Outputs of the model include the phosphorylation level of the translational repressor EIF4EBP1, a substrate of MTORC1, and the phosphorylation level of AMBRA1 (activating molecule in BECN1-regulated autophagy, a substrate of ULK1 critical for autophagosome formation. The model incorporates reciprocal regulation of mTORC1 and ULK1 by AMPK, mutual inhibition of MTORC1 and ULK1, and ULK1-mediated negative feedback regulation of AMPK. Through analysis of the model, we find that these processes may be responsible, depending on conditions, for graded responses to stress inputs, for bistable switching between autophagy and protein synthesis, or relaxation oscillations, comprising alternating periods of autophagy and protein synthesis. A sensitivity analysis indicates that the prediction of oscillatory behavior is robust to changes of the parameter values of the model. The model provides testable predictions about the behavior of the AMPK-MTORC1-ULK1 network, which plays a central role in maintaining cellular energy and nutrient homeostasis.

  20. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K inhibits heat shock-induced transcriptional activity of heat shock factor 1.

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    Kim, Hee-Jung; Lee, Jae-Jin; Cho, Jin-Hwan; Jeong, Jaeho; Park, A Young; Kang, Wonmo; Lee, Kong-Joo

    2017-08-04

    When cells are exposed to heat shock and various other stresses, heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) is activated, and the heat shock response (HSR) is elicited. To better understand the molecular regulation of the HSR, we used 2D-PAGE-based proteome analysis to screen for heat shock-induced post-translationally modified cellular proteins. Our analysis revealed that two protein spots typically present on 2D-PAGE gels and containing heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) with trioxidized Cys(132) disappeared after the heat shock treatment and reappeared during recovery, but the total amount of hnRNP K protein remained unchanged. We next tested whether hnRNP K plays a role in HSR by regulating HSF1 and found that hnRNP K inhibits HSF1 activity, resulting in reduced expression of hsp70 and hsp27 mRNAs. hnRNP K also reduced binding affinity of HSF1 to the heat shock element by directly interacting with HSF1 but did not affect HSF1 phosphorylation-dependent activation or nuclear localization. hnRNP K lost its ability to induce these effects when its Cys(132) was substituted with Ser, Asp, or Glu. These findings suggest that hnRNP K inhibits transcriptional activity of HSF1 by inhibiting its binding to heat shock element and that the oxidation status of Cys(132) in hnRNP K is critical for this inhibition. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. HIV-1 exploits CCR5 conformational heterogeneity to escape inhibition by chemokines.

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    Colin, Philippe; Bénureau, Yann; Staropoli, Isabelle; Wang, Yongjin; Gonzalez, Nuria; Alcami, Jose; Hartley, Oliver; Brelot, Anne; Arenzana-Seisdedos, Fernando; Lagane, Bernard

    2013-06-04

    CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is a receptor for chemokines and the coreceptor for R5 HIV-1 entry into CD4(+) T lymphocytes. Chemokines exert anti-HIV-1 activity in vitro, both by displacing the viral envelope glycoprotein gp120 from binding to CCR5 and by promoting CCR5 endocytosis, suggesting that they play a protective role in HIV infection. However, we showed here that different CCR5 conformations at the cell surface are differentially engaged by chemokines and gp120, making chemokines weaker inhibitors of HIV infection than would be expected from their binding affinity constants for CCR5. These distinct CCR5 conformations rely on CCR5 coupling to nucleotide-free G proteins ((NF)G proteins). Whereas native CCR5 chemokines bind with subnanomolar affinity to (NF)G protein-coupled CCR5, gp120/HIV-1 does not discriminate between (NF)G protein-coupled and uncoupled CCR5. Interestingly, the antiviral activity of chemokines is G protein independent, suggesting that "low-chemokine affinity" (NF)G protein-uncoupled conformations of CCR5 represent a portal for viral entry. Furthermore, chemokines are weak inducers of CCR5 endocytosis, as is revealed by EC50 values for chemokine-mediated endocytosis reflecting their low-affinity constant value for (NF)G protein-uncoupled CCR5. Abolishing CCR5 interaction with (NF)G proteins eliminates high-affinity binding of CCR5 chemokines but preserves receptor endocytosis, indicating that chemokines preferentially endocytose low-affinity receptors. Finally, we evidenced that chemokine analogs achieve highly potent HIV-1 inhibition due to high-affinity interactions with internalizing and/or gp120-binding receptors. These data are consistent with HIV-1 evading chemokine inhibition by exploiting CCR5 conformational heterogeneity, shed light into the inhibitory mechanisms of anti-HIV-1 chemokine analogs, and provide insights for the development of unique anti-HIV molecules.

  2. Empirical study on mutual fund objective classification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金雪军; 杨晓兰

    2004-01-01

    Mutual funds are usually classified on the basis of their objectives. If the activities of mutual funds are consistent with their stated objectives, investors may look at the latter as signals of their risks and incomes. This work analyzes mutual fund objective classification in China by statistical methods of distance analysis and discriminant analysis; and examines whether the stated investment objectives of mutual funds adequately represent their attributes to investors. That is, if mutual funds adhere to their stated objectives, attributes must be heterogeneous between investment objective groups and homogeneous within them. Our conclusion is to some degree, the group of optimized exponential funds is heterogeneous to other groups. As a whole, there exist no significant differences between different objective groups; and 50% of mutual funds are not consistent with their objective groups.

  3. Tumor heterogeneity and plasticity as elusive drivers for resistance to MAPK pathway inhibition in melanoma.

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    Roesch, A

    2015-06-04

    Despite the recent success of MAPK signaling-targeted drugs in melanoma, the majority of patients with metastatic melanoma still undergo disease progression after initial tumor shrinkage indicating gradually developing therapy resistance. This review will give an overview on currently suggested concepts of resistance to MAPK pathway inhibitors in melanoma with particular focus on inter- and intraindividual as well as intratumor heterogeneity. The high plasticity of melanoma cells promotes both the clonal evolution of genetic resistance, for example, because of mutations in the MAPK or PI3K/AKT/PTEN pathways, and the emergence of cell phenotypes that functionally and metabolically overcome MAPK inhibition. Like a 'moving target', melanoma cells are shifting between different metabolic, cell cycle and differentiation states reflecting a highly dynamic potential to adapt to exogenous stressors including drugs. The introduction of MAPK inhibitors into the clinics has tremendously pushed the field of melanoma research not just because of the historic therapeutic success but also by providing a new tool to study human melanoma in its natural microenvironment.

  4. Association between prepulse inhibition of the startle response and latent inhibition of two-way avoidance acquisition: A study with heterogeneous NIH-HS rats.

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    Sánchez-González, Ana; Esnal, Aitor; Río-Álamos, Cristóbal; Oliveras, Ignasi; Cañete, Toni; Blázquez, Gloria; Tobeña, Adolf; Fernández-Teruel, Alberto

    2016-03-01

    This study presents the first evaluation of the associations between responses in two paradigms related to schizophrenia in the genetically heterogeneous NIH-HS rat stock. NIH-HS rats are a stock of genetically heterogeneous animals that have been derived from eight different inbred strains. A rotational breeding schedule has been followed for more than eighty generations, leading to a high level of genetic recombination that makes the NIH-HS rats a unique tool for studying the genetic basis of (biological, behavioral, disease-related) complex traits. Previous work has dealt with the characterization of coping styles, cognitive and anxiety/fear-related profiles of NIH-HS rats. In the present study we have completed their characterization in two behavioral models, prepulse inhibition (PPI) and latent inhibition (LI) of the two-way active avoidance response, that appear to be related to schizophrenia or to schizophrenia-relevant symptoms. We have found that these rats display PPI for each of the four prepulse intensities tested, allowing their stratification in high, medium and low PPI subgroups. When testing these three subgroups for LI of two-way active avoidance acquisition it has been observed that the LowPPI and MediumPPI subgroups present impaired LI, which, along with the fact that the HighPPI group presents significant LI, allows us to hypothesize that responses in these two paradigms are somehow related and that selection of NIH-HS rats for Low vs HighPPI could make a promising animal model for the study of clusters of schizophrenia-relevant symptoms and their underlying neurobiological mechanisms.

  5. TetraMabs: simultaneous targeting of four oncogenic receptor tyrosine kinases for tumor growth inhibition in heterogeneous tumor cell populations

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    Castoldi, Raffaella; Schanzer, Jürgen; Panke, Christian; Jucknischke, Ute; Neubert, Natalie J.; Croasdale, Rebecca; Scheuer, Werner; Auer, Johannes; Klein, Christian; Niederfellner, Gerhard; Kobold, Sebastian; Sustmann, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody-based targeted tumor therapy has greatly improved treatment options for patients. Antibodies against oncogenic receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), especially the ErbB receptor family, are prominent examples. However, long-term efficacy of such antibodies is limited by resistance mechanisms. Tumor evasion by a priori or acquired activation of other kinases is often causative for this phenomenon. These findings led to an increasing number of combination approaches either within a protein family, e.g. the ErbB family or by targeting RTKs of different phylogenetic origin like HER1 and cMet or HER1 and IGF1R. Progress in antibody engineering technology enabled generation of clinical grade bispecific antibodies (BsAbs) to design drugs inherently addressing such resistance mechanisms. Limited data are available on multi-specific antibodies targeting three or more RTKs. In the present study, we have evaluated the cloning, eukaryotic expression and purification of tetraspecific, tetravalent Fc-containing antibodies targeting HER3, cMet, HER1 and IGF1R. The antibodies are based on the combination of single-chain Fab and Fv fragments in an IgG1 antibody format enhanced by the knob-into-hole technology. They are non-agonistic and inhibit tumor cell growth comparable to the combination of four parental antibodies. Importantly, TetraMabs show improved apoptosis induction and tumor growth inhibition over individual monospecific or BsAbs in cellular assays. In addition, a mimicry assay to reflect heterogeneous expression of antigens in a tumor mass was established. With this novel in vitro assay, we can demonstrate the superiority of a tetraspecific antibody to bispecific tumor antigen-binding antibodies in early pre-clinical development. PMID:27578890

  6. Implications of cortical balanced excitation and inhibition, functional heterogeneity, and sparseness of neuronal activity in fMRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiansong

    2015-01-01

    Blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies often report inconsistent findings, probably due to brain properties such as balanced excitation and inhibition and functional heterogeneity. These properties indicate that different neurons in the same voxels may show variable activities including concurrent activation and deactivation, that the relationships between BOLD signal and neural activity (i.e., neurovascular coupling) are complex, and that increased BOLD signal may reflect reduced deactivation, increased activation, or both. The traditional general-linear-model-based-analysis (GLM-BA) is a univariate approach, cannot separate different components of BOLD signal mixtures from the same voxels, and may contribute to inconsistent findings of fMRI. Spatial independent component analysis (sICA) is a multivariate approach, can separate the BOLD signal mixture from each voxel into different source signals and measure each separately, and thus may reconcile previous conflicting findings generated by GLM-BA. We propose that methods capable of separating mixed signals such as sICA should be regularly used for more accurately and completely extracting information embedded in fMRI datasets. PMID:26341939

  7. Evolution of mutualism between species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Post, W.M.; Travis, C.C.; DeAngelis, D.L.

    1980-01-01

    Recent theoretical work on mutualism, the interaction between species populations that is mutually beneficial, is reviewed. Several ecological facts that should be addressed in the construction of dynamic models for mutualism are examined. Basic terminology is clarified. (PSB)

  8. Harmonization versus Mutual Recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jan Guldager; Schröder, Philipp

    The present paper examines trade liberalization driven by the coordination of product standards. For oligopolistic firms situated in separate markets that are initially sheltered by national standards, mutual recognition of standards implies entry and reduced profits at home paired......, harmonized standards may fail to harvest the full pro-competitive effects from trade liberalization compared to mutual recognition; moreover, the issue is most pronounced in markets featuring price competition....

  9. On mutually unbiased bases

    CERN Document Server

    Durt, Thomas; Bengtsson, Ingemar; Zyczkowski, Karol \\

    2010-01-01

    Mutually unbiased bases for quantum degrees of freedom are central to all theoretical investigations and practical exploitations of complementary properties. Much is known about mutually unbiased bases, but there are also a fair number of important questions that have not been answered in full as yet. In particular, one can find maximal sets of ${N+1}$ mutually unbiased bases in Hilbert spaces of prime-power dimension ${N=p^\\m}$, with $p$ prime and $\\m$ a positive integer, and there is a continuum of mutually unbiased bases for a continuous degree of freedom, such as motion along a line. But not a single example of a maximal set is known if the dimension is another composite number ($N=6,10,12,...$). In this review, we present a unified approach in which the basis states are labeled by numbers ${0,1,2,...,N-1}$ that are both elements of a Galois field and ordinary integers. This dual nature permits a compact systematic construction of maximal sets of mutually unbiased bases when they are known to exist but th...

  10. Danish mutual fund performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This article provides the first independent performance analysis of Danish mutual funds. We analyse selectivity and market timing abilities for 71 mutual funds that have been in operation from 2001 to 2010. The results show great fund performance diversity. Half the funds have performed neutrally......, whereas 42% of the funds have shown significantly negative performance and only 7% of the funds have over-performed their benchmark. Furthermore, 14% of the funds analysed possess market timing abilities, but for 8 out of 10 funds, their market timing ability has been unsuccessful....

  11. Partner manipulation stabilises a horizontally transmitted mutualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heil, Martin; Barajas-Barron, Alejandro; Orona-Tamayo, Domancar; Wielsch, Natalie; Svatos, Ales

    2014-02-01

    Mutualisms require protection from non-reciprocating exploiters. Pseudomyrmex workers that engage in an obligate defensive mutualism with Acacia hosts feed exclusively on the sucrose-free extrafloral nectar (EFN) that is secreted by their hosts, a behaviour linking ant energy supply directly to host performance and thus favouring reciprocating behaviour. We tested the hypothesis that Acacia hosts manipulate this digestive specialisation of their ant mutualists. Invertase (sucrose hydrolytic) activity in the ant midguts was inhibited by chitinase, a dominant EFN protein. The inhibition occurred quickly in cell-free gut liquids and in native gels and thus likely results from an enzyme-enzyme interaction. Once a freshly eclosed worker ingests EFN as the first diet available, her invertase becomes inhibited and she, thus, continues feeding on host-derived EFN. Partner manipulation acts at the phenotypic level and means that one partner actively controls the phenotype of the other partner to enhance its dependency on host-derived rewards.

  12. Activity-Based Proteomics Reveals Heterogeneous Kinome and ATP-Binding Proteome Responses to MEK Inhibition in KRAS Mutant Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Young; Stewart, Paul A; Borne, Adam L; Fang, Bin; Welsh, Eric A; Chen, Yian Ann; Eschrich, Steven A; Koomen, John M; Haura, Eric B

    2016-06-01

    One way cancer cells can escape from targeted agents is through their ability to evade drug effects by rapidly rewiring signaling networks. Many protein classes, such as kinases and metabolic enzymes, are regulated by ATP binding and hydrolysis. We hypothesized that a system-level profiling of drug-induced alterations in ATP-binding proteomes could offer novel insights into adaptive responses. Here, we mapped global ATP-binding proteomes perturbed by two clinical MEK inhibitors, AZD6244 and MEK162, in KRAS mutant lung cancer cells as a model system harnessing a desthiobiotin-ATP probe coupled with LC-MS/MS. We observed strikingly unique ATP-binding proteome responses to MEK inhibition, which revealed heterogeneous drug-induced pathway signatures in each cell line. We also identified diverse kinome responses, indicating each cell adapts to MEK inhibition in unique ways. Despite the heterogeneity of kinome responses, decreased probe labeling of mitotic kinases and an increase of kinases linked to autophagy were identified to be common responses. Taken together, our study revealed a diversity of adaptive ATP-binding proteome and kinome responses to MEK inhibition in KRAS mutant lung cancer cells, and our study further demonstrated the utility of our approach to identify potential candidates of targetable ATP-binding enzymes involved in adaptive resistance and to develop rational drug combinations.

  13. Activity-Based Proteomics Reveals Heterogeneous Kinome and ATP-Binding Proteome Responses to MEK Inhibition in KRAS Mutant Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Young Kim

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available One way cancer cells can escape from targeted agents is through their ability to evade drug effects by rapidly rewiring signaling networks. Many protein classes, such as kinases and metabolic enzymes, are regulated by ATP binding and hydrolysis. We hypothesized that a system-level profiling of drug-induced alterations in ATP-binding proteomes could offer novel insights into adaptive responses. Here, we mapped global ATP-binding proteomes perturbed by two clinical MEK inhibitors, AZD6244 and MEK162, in KRAS mutant lung cancer cells as a model system harnessing a desthiobiotin-ATP probe coupled with LC-MS/MS. We observed strikingly unique ATP-binding proteome responses to MEK inhibition, which revealed heterogeneous drug-induced pathway signatures in each cell line. We also identified diverse kinome responses, indicating each cell adapts to MEK inhibition in unique ways. Despite the heterogeneity of kinome responses, decreased probe labeling of mitotic kinases and an increase of kinases linked to autophagy were identified to be common responses. Taken together, our study revealed a diversity of adaptive ATP-binding proteome and kinome responses to MEK inhibition in KRAS mutant lung cancer cells, and our study further demonstrated the utility of our approach to identify potential candidates of targetable ATP-binding enzymes involved in adaptive resistance and to develop rational drug combinations.

  14. Mutually unbiased bases

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Chaturvedi

    2002-08-01

    After a brief review of the notion of a full set of mutually unbiased bases in an -dimensional Hilbert space, we summarize the work of Wootters and Fields (W K Wootters and B C Fields, Ann. Phys. 191, 363 (1989)) which gives an explicit construction for such bases for the case = r, where is a prime. Further, we show how, by exploiting certain freedom in the Wootters–Fields construction, the task of explicitly writing down such bases can be simplified for the case when is an odd prime. In particular, we express the results entirely in terms of the character vectors of the cyclic group of order . We also analyse the connection between mutually unbiased bases and the representations of .

  15. Quantifying synergistic mutual information

    CERN Document Server

    Griffith, Virgil

    2012-01-01

    Quantifying cooperation among random variables in predicting a single target random variable is an important problem in many biological systems with 10s to 1000s of co-dependent variables. We review the prior literature of information theoretical measures of synergy and introduce a novel synergy measure, entitled *synergistic mutual information* and compare it against the three existing measures of cooperation. We apply all four measures against a suite of binary circuits to demonstrate our measure alone quantifies the intuitive concept of synergy across all examples.

  16. CDC25 Inhibition in Acute Myeloid Leukemia–A Study of Patient Heterogeneity and the Effects of Different Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette K. Brenner

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Cell division cycle 25 (CDC25 protein phosphatases regulate cell cycle progression through the activation of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs, but they are also involved in chromatin modulation and transcriptional regulation. CDC25 inhibition is regarded as a possible therapeutic strategy for the treatment of human malignancies, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML. We investigated the in vitro effects of CDC25 inhibitors on primary human AML cells derived from 79 unselected patients in suspension cultures. Both the previously well-characterized CDC25 inhibitor NSC95397, as well as five other inhibitors (BN82002 and the novel small molecular compounds ALX1, ALX2, ALX3, and ALX4, only exhibited antiproliferative effects for a subset of patients when tested alone. These antiproliferative effects showed associations with differences in genetic abnormalities and/or AML cell differentiation. However, the responders to CDC25 inhibition could be identified by analysis of global gene expression profiles. The differentially expressed genes were associated with the cytoskeleton, microtubules, and cell signaling. The constitutive release of 28 soluble mediators showed a wide variation among patients and this variation was maintained in the presence of CDC25 inhibition. Finally, NSC95397 had no or only minimal effects on AML cell viability. In conclusion, CDC25 inhibition has antiproliferative effects on primary human AML cells for a subset of patients, and these patients can be identified by gene expression profiling.

  17. Cheaters in mutualism networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genini, Julieta; Morellato, L Patrícia C; Guimarães, Paulo R; Olesen, Jens M

    2010-08-23

    Mutualism-network studies assume that all interacting species are mutualistic partners and consider that all links are of one kind. However, the influence of different types of links, such as cheating links, on network organization remains unexplored. We studied two flower-visitation networks (Malpighiaceae and Bignoniaceae and their flower visitors), and divide the types of link into cheaters (i.e. robbers and thieves of flower rewards) and effective pollinators. We investigated if there were topological differences among networks with and without cheaters, especially with respect to nestedness and modularity. The Malpighiaceae network was nested, but not modular, and it was dominated by pollinators and had much fewer cheater species than Bignoniaceae network (28% versus 75%). The Bignoniaceae network was mainly a plant-cheater network, being modular because of the presence of pollen robbers and showing no nestedness. In the Malpighiaceae network, removal of cheaters had no major consequences for topology. In contrast, removal of cheaters broke down the modularity of the Bignoniaceae network. As cheaters are ubiquitous in all mutualisms, the results presented here show that they have a strong impact upon network topology.

  18. The heterogeneity of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms and conduct problems: Cognitive inhibition, emotion regulation, emotionality, and disorganized attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forslund, Tommie; Brocki, Karin C; Bohlin, Gunilla; Granqvist, Pehr; Eninger, Lilianne

    2016-09-01

    This study examined the contributions of several important domains of functioning to attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms and conduct problems. Specifically, we investigated whether cognitive inhibition, emotion regulation, emotionality, and disorganized attachment made independent and specific contributions to these externalizing behaviour problems from a multiple pathways perspective. The study included laboratory measures of cognitive inhibition and disorganized attachment in 184 typically developing children (M age = 6 years, 10 months, SD = 1.7). Parental ratings provided measures of emotion regulation, emotionality, and externalizing behaviour problems. Results revealed that cognitive inhibition, regulation of positive emotion, and positive emotionality were independently and specifically related to ADHD symptoms. Disorganized attachment and negative emotionality formed independent and specific relations to conduct problems. Our findings support the multiple pathways perspective on ADHD, with poor regulation of positive emotion and high positive emotionality making distinct contributions to ADHD symptoms. More specifically, our results support the proposal of a temperamentally based pathway to ADHD symptoms. The findings also indicate that disorganized attachment and negative emotionality constitute pathways specific to conduct problems rather than to ADHD symptoms.

  19. Heterogeneous inhibition processes involved in different facets of self-reported impulsivity: evidence from a community sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, Philippe; Rochat, Lucien; Billieux, Joël; d'Acremont, Mathieu; Van der Linden, Martial

    2008-11-01

    Whiteside and Lynam (Whiteside, S. P., & Lynam, D. R. (2001). The Five Factor Model and impulsivity: Using a structural model of personality to understand impulsivity. Personality and Individual Differences, 30, 669-689) clarified the multifaceted nature of impulsivity by identifying four distinct facets of self-reported impulsive behaviors: urgency, (lack of) premeditation, (lack of) perseverance, and sensation seeking. Building on work by Bechara and Van der Linden (Bechara, A., & Van der Linden, M. (2005). Decision-making and impulse control after frontal lobe injuries. Current Opinion in Neurology, 18, 734-739), the main objective of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that perseverance and urgency map onto the two distinct inhibitory functions distinguished by Friedman and Miyake (Friedman, N. P., & Miyake, A. (2004). The relations among inhibition and interference control functions: A latent-variable analysis. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 133, 101-135): prepotent response inhibition and resistance to proactive interference. Participants (N=126) completed the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale and three tasks: a recent-negatives task to assess proactive interference in working memory, and two Go/No-Go tasks at different paces, the slower of which also assessed task-unrelated thoughts (TUTs). Consistent with the hypothesis, TUTs were positively correlated with lack of perseverance, and multiple regressions revealed that urgency was specifically related to errors in prepotent response inhibition, and lack of perseverance to errors due to difficulties overcoming proactive interference.

  20. Antagonists in Mutual Antipathies: A Person-Oriented Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guroglu, Berna; Haselager, Gerbert J. T.; van Lieshout, Cornelis F. M.; Scholte, Ron H. J.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the heterogeneity of mutual antipathy relationships. Separate cluster analyses of peer interactions of early adolescents (mean age 11 years) and adolescents (mean age of 14) yielded 3 "types of individuals" in each age group, namely Prosocial, Antisocial, and Withdrawn. Prevalence analysis of the 6 possible combinations of…

  1. Heterogeneous agents and decison making within firms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hung, Chung-yu

    2015-01-01

    This dissertation explores the implications of agents’ heterogeneity in decision making within situations where information is not completely contractible. Specifically, the study applies empirical methods across three chapters to examine the role of employees’ traits and their mutual relationships

  2. Mutual aid fund commission

    CERN Document Server

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    The composition of the Board of the Mutual Aid Fund for 2011 is as follows: President: Pascal Droux Vice-president: Connie Potter Treasurer: Louis Pereira Deputy treasurer: Barbara Brugger Secretary: Sonia Casenove Deputy secretary: Isabelle Mardirossian Members: Christopher David Thomas   Jean-Claude Vialis (GAC member)   Marie-Luce Falipou   Gunilla Santiard (Jean-Claude Vialis’s alternate) The role of the Fund is to provide financial help to members of personnel and beneficiaries of the Pension Fund who are in need of exceptional financial assistance. All requests are treated in the strictest confidence. Should you wish to apply for aid from the Fund, kindly contact any member of the Board as given above or Social Services, tel.74479 – 73867.

  3. Rating mutual funds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bechmann, Ken L.; Rangvid, Jesper

    obtained an annual risk-adjusted excess return that is approximately 3-4 percentage points higher per annum than if the funds with the highest costs had been invested in. We compare the atpRating with the Morningstar Rating. We show that one reason why the atpRating and the Morningstar Rating contain...... different information is that the returns Morningstar uses as inputs when rating funds are highly volatile whereas the costs the atpRating uses as inputs when rating funds are highly persistent. In other words, a fund that has low costs one year will most likely also have low costs the following year......, whereas the return of a fund in a certain year generally contains only little information about the future return that the fund will generate. Finally, we have information on the investments in different mutual funds made by a small subgroup of investors known to have been exposed to both the atpRating...

  4. Rating mutual funds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bechmann, Ken L.; Rangvid, Jesper

    2007-01-01

    obtained a risk-adjusted excess return that is approximately 3-4 percentage points higher per annum than if the funds with the highest costs had been invested in. We compare the atpRating with the Morningstar Rating. We show that one reason why the atpRating and the Morningstar Rating contain different...... information is that the returns Morningstar uses as inputs when rating funds are highly volatile whereas the costs the atpRating uses as inputs when rating funds are highly persistent. In other words, a fund that has low costs one year will most likely also have low costs the following year, whereas...... the return of a fund in a certain year generally contains only little information about the future return that the fund will generate. Finally, we have information on the investments in different mutual funds made by a small subgroup of investors known to have been exposed to both the atpRating...

  5. Periodically-modulated inhibition of living pacemaker neurons--III. The heterogeneity of the postsynaptic spike trains, and how control parameters affect it.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segundo, J P; Vibert, J F; Stiber, M

    1998-11-01

    Codings involving spike trains at synapses with inhibitory postsynaptic potentials on pacemakers were examined in crayfish stretch receptor organs by modulating presynaptic instantaneous rates periodically (triangles or sines; frequencies, slopes and depths under, respectively, 5.0 Hz, 40.0/s/s and 25.0/s). Timings were described by interspike and cross-intervals ("phases"); patterns (dispersions, sequences) and forms (timing classes) were identified using pooled graphs (instant along the cycle when a spike occurs vs preceding interval) and return maps (plots of successive intervals). A remarkable heterogeneity of postsynaptic intervals and phases characterizes each modulation. All cycles separate into the same portions: each contains a particular form and switches abruptly to the next. Forms differ in irregularity and predictability: they are (see text) "p:q alternations", "intermittent", "phase walk-throughs", "messy erratic" and "messy stammering". Postsynaptic cycles are asymmetric (hysteresis). This contrasts with the presynaptic homogeneity, smoothness and symmetry. All control parameters are, individually and jointly, strongly influential. Presynaptic slopes, say, act through a postsynaptic sensitivity to their magnitude and sign; when increasing, hysteresis augments and forms change or disappear. Appropriate noise attenuates between-train contrasts, providing modulations are under 0.5 Hz. Postsynaptic natural intervals impose critical time bases, separating presynaptic intervals (around, above or below them) with dissimilar consequences. Coding rules are numerous and have restricted domains; generalizations are misleading. Modulation-driven forms are trendy pacemaker-driven forms. However, dissimilarities, slight when patterns are almost pacemaker, increase as inhibition departs from pacemaker and incorporate unpredictable features. Physiological significance-(1) Pacemaker-driven forms, simple and ubiquitous, appear to be elementary building blocks of

  6. Maximum mutual information regularized classification

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jim Jing-Yan

    2014-09-07

    In this paper, a novel pattern classification approach is proposed by regularizing the classifier learning to maximize mutual information between the classification response and the true class label. We argue that, with the learned classifier, the uncertainty of the true class label of a data sample should be reduced by knowing its classification response as much as possible. The reduced uncertainty is measured by the mutual information between the classification response and the true class label. To this end, when learning a linear classifier, we propose to maximize the mutual information between classification responses and true class labels of training samples, besides minimizing the classification error and reducing the classifier complexity. An objective function is constructed by modeling mutual information with entropy estimation, and it is optimized by a gradient descend method in an iterative algorithm. Experiments on two real world pattern classification problems show the significant improvements achieved by maximum mutual information regularization.

  7. 26 CFR 1.831-3 - Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, mutual...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, mutual fire insurance companies issuing perpetual policies...-3 Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies,...

  8. [Biological mutualism, concepts and models].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perru, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Mutualism is a biological association for a mutual benefit between two different species. In this paper, firstly, we examine the history and signification of mutualism in relation to symbiosis. Then, we consider the link between concepts and models of mutualism. Models of mutualism depend on different concepts we use: If mutualism is situated at populations' level, it will be expressed by Lotka-Volterra models, concerning exclusively populations' size. If mutualism is considered as a resources' exchange or a biological market increasing the fitness of these organisms, it will be described at an individual level by a cost-benefit model. Our analysis will be limited to the history and epistemology of Lotka-Volterra models and we hypothesize that these models are adapted at first to translate dynamic evolutions of mutualism. They render stability or variations of size and assume that there are clear distinctions and a state of equilibrium between populations of different species. Italian mathematician Vito Volterra demonstrated that biological associations consist in a constant relation between some species. In 1931 and 1935, Volterra described the general form of antagonistic or mutualistic biological associations by the same differential equations. We recognize that these equations have been more used to model competition or prey-predator interactions, but a simple sign change allows describing mutualism. The epistemological problem is the following: Volterra's equations help us to conceptualize a global phenomenon. However, mutualistic interactions may have stronger effects away from equilibrium and these effects may be better understood at individual level. We conclude that, between 1985 and 2000, some researchers carried on working and converting Lotka-Volterra models but this description appeared as insufficient. So, other researchers adopted an economical viewpoint, considering mutualism as a biological market.

  9. Uncertainty relation for mutual information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneeloch, James; Broadbent, Curtis J.; Howell, John C.

    2014-12-01

    We postulate the existence of a universal uncertainty relation between the quantum and classical mutual informations between pairs of quantum systems. Specifically, we propose that the sum of the classical mutual information, determined by two mutually unbiased pairs of observables, never exceeds the quantum mutual information. We call this the complementary-quantum correlation (CQC) relation and prove its validity for pure states, for states with one maximally mixed subsystem, and for all states when one measurement is minimally disturbing. We provide results of a Monte Carlo simulation suggesting that the CQC relation is generally valid. Importantly, we also show that the CQC relation represents an improvement to an entropic uncertainty principle in the presence of a quantum memory, and that it can be used to verify an achievable secret key rate in the quantum one-time pad cryptographic protocol.

  10. Mutual Mobile Membranes with Timers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Ciobanu

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available A feature of current membrane systems is the fact that objects and membranes are persistent. However, this is not true in the real world. In fact, cells and intracellular proteins have a well-defined lifetime. Inspired from these biological facts, we define a model of systems of mobile membranes in which each membrane and each object has a timer representing their lifetime. We show that systems of mutual mobile membranes with and without timers have the same computational power. An encoding of timed safe mobile ambients into systems of mutual mobile membranes with timers offers a relationship between two formalisms used in describing biological systems.

  11. Parasitism and mutualism in Wolbachia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bordenstein, Seth R; Paraskevopoulos, Charalampos; Dunning Hotopp, Julie C;

    2009-01-01

    Ecological and evolutionary theories predict that parasitism and mutualism are not fixed endpoints of the symbiotic spectrum. Rather, parasitism and mutualism may be host or environment dependent, induced by the same genetic machinery, and shifted due to selection. These models presume the existe......Ecological and evolutionary theories predict that parasitism and mutualism are not fixed endpoints of the symbiotic spectrum. Rather, parasitism and mutualism may be host or environment dependent, induced by the same genetic machinery, and shifted due to selection. These models presume...... the existence of genetic or environmental variation that can spur incipient changes in symbiotic lifestyle. However, for obligate intracellular bacteria whose genomes are highly reduced, studies specify that discrete symbiotic associations can be evolutionarily stable for hundreds of millions of years...... in symbiotic lifestyle with a comprehensive, phylogenomic analysis. Contrary to previous claims, we show unequivocally that the transition in lifestyle cannot be reconstructed with current methods due to long-branch attraction (LBA) artifacts of the distant Anaplasma and Ehrlichia outgroups. Despite the use...

  12. Mutual Respect and Civic Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Colin

    2010-01-01

    Contemporary theories of civic education frequently appeal to an ideal of mutual respect in the context of ethical, ethical and religious disagreement. This paper critically examines two recently popular criticisms of this ideal. The first, coming from a postmodern direction, charges that the ideal is hypocritical in its effort to be maximally…

  13. Hospital mutual aid evacuation plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, R

    1997-02-01

    Health care facilities need to be prepared for disasters such as floods, tornadoes and earthquakes. Rochester, NY, and its surrounding communities devised a hospital mutual aid evacuation plan in the event a disaster occurs and also to comply with the Joint Commission. This document discusses the plan's development process and also provides the end result.

  14. The Ethical and Non Ethical Mutual Funds Comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Adamo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: One of the astonishing new developments in the financial community is the rise of ethical investments during the last decade. Particularly, the recent financial crisis has determined a major attention towards an ethically oriented finance based on social investments and environmental benefits that can create greater corporate crisis prevention. Because of the sheer size and importance of the ethical mutual funds, we thought to compare the ethical and non ethical mutual funds. Approach: The aim of this study was to describe the ethical and non ethical mutual funds under Italian and foreign law highlighting how some factors, such as performance, typology (equity, balanced, fixed income, geographic location, management fees, characterize these funds in different way. Results: The analysis has been carried out collecting a data set of 219 mutual funds published on www.morningstar.com. The data set is subdivided in 109 ethical mutual funds and 110 non ethical mutual funds. The study uses a multi-disciplinary approach and it is led by a Multiple Correspondence Analysis (MCA which puts in evidence the principal characteristics of the mutual funds by their projection on a factorial plane. Later the multivariate analysis carries out typologies of mutual funds clusters with particular characteristics by a Cluster Analysis. The study confirmed the existence of different characteristics with reference to the ethical and non ethical mutual funds. Particularly, it puts in evidence three groups of funds which are inside homogeneous but heterogeneous between them by the characteristics considered. The first groups, defined “negative ethical performance”, is composed of 152 funds. The second groups, named “positive non ethical performance”, is characterized by non ethical fund (50.23% of them is present in this group. The third cluster is called “young funds” and it is composed of funds born in the period 2005

  15. Mutuality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnould, E. J.; Rose, A. S.

    2016-01-01

    The recently introduced construct of consumer sharing is represented as a nonreciprocal, pro-social distribution of resources given without expectation of reciprocity (Belk, 2010, ‘Sharing’, Journal of Consumer Research 36: 715–34). The approach adopted rests on shaky ontological and epistemologi......The recently introduced construct of consumer sharing is represented as a nonreciprocal, pro-social distribution of resources given without expectation of reciprocity (Belk, 2010, ‘Sharing’, Journal of Consumer Research 36: 715–34). The approach adopted rests on shaky ontological...

  16. Pluto-charon mutual events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binzel, R.P. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (USA))

    1989-11-01

    Since 1985, planetary astronomers have been working to take advantage of a once-per-century apparent alignment between Pluto and its satellite, Charon, which has allowed mutual occultation and transit events to be observed. There events, which will cease in 1990, have permitted the first precise determinations of their individual radii, densities, and surface compositions. In addition, information on their surface albedo distributions can be obtained.

  17. Mutual information challenges entropy bounds

    CERN Document Server

    Casini, H

    2006-01-01

    We consider some formulations of the entropy bounds at the semiclassical level. The entropy S(V) localized in a region V is divergent in quantum field theory (QFT). Instead of it we focus on the mutual information I(V,W)=S(V)+S(W)-S(V U W) between two different non-intersecting sets V and W. This is a low energy quantity, independent of the regularization scheme. In addition, the mutual information is bounded above by twice the entropy corresponding to the sets involved. Calculations of I(V,W) in QFT show that the entropy in empty space cannot be renormalized to zero, and must be actually very large. We find that this entropy due to the vacuum fluctuations violates the FMW bound in Minkowski space. The mutual information also gives a precise, cutoff independent meaning to the statement that the number of degrees of freedom increases with the volume in QFT. If the holographic bound holds, this points to the essential non locality of the physical cutoff. Violations of the Bousso bound would require conformal th...

  18. 76 FR 36625 - Mutual Holding Company

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-22

    ... Office of Thrift Supervision Mutual Holding Company AGENCY: Office of Thrift Supervision (OTS), Treasury... collection. Title of Proposal: Mutual Holding Company. OMB Number: 1550-0072. Form Numbers: MHC-1 (OTS Form... whether the applicant meets the statutory and regulatory criteria to form a mutual holding company...

  19. 76 FR 20458 - Mutual Holding Company

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-12

    ... Office of Thrift Supervision Mutual Holding Company AGENCY: Office of Thrift Supervision (OTS), Treasury... collection. Title of Proposal: Mutual Holding Company. OMB Number: 1550-0072. Form Numbers: MHC-1 (OTS Form... whether the applicant meets the statutory and regulatory criteria to form a mutual holding company...

  20. Simulation Research in Mutualism Behavior ofAutomobile Industry Cluster

    OpenAIRE

    Chen Zhang; Guangle Yan

    2011-01-01

    This paper adopts the concept and mechanism of mathematical ecology theory, researches the revolutionary of automobile industry chain by setting up mutualism model of two species. Results of simulation show that automakers are more sensitive to the change of environmental resource. Automakers depending on suppliers excessively will increase the structural risk of the industry. Suppliers must make efficient utilization of the system resources; otherwise they inhibit the growth of automakers.

  1. Waveguide mutually pumped phase conjugators

    OpenAIRE

    James, S. W.; Youden, K.E.; Jeffrey, P. M.; EASON, R. W.; Chandler, P.J.; Zhang, L.; Townsend, P.D.

    1993-01-01

    The operation of the Bridge Mutually Pumped Phase Conjugator is reported in a planar waveguide structure in photorefractive BaTiO3. The waveguide was fabricated by the technique of ion implantation. using 1.5 MeV H+ at a dose of 10^16 ions/cm^2. An order of magnitude decrease in response time is observed in the waveguide as compared to typical values obtained in bulk crystals, probably resulting from a combination of the optical confinement within the waveguide, and possibly modification of t...

  2. Mutual Coupling Compensation for Direction-of-Arrival Estimations Using the Receiving-Mutual-Impedance Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoi Shun Lui

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A short review of the receiving-mutual-impedance method (RMIM for mutual coupling compensation in direction finding applications using linear array is conducted. The differences between the conventional-mutual-impedance method (CMIM and RMIM, as well as the three different determination methods for receiving mutual impedance (RMI, will be discussed in details. As an example, direction finding with better accuracies is used for demonstrating the superiority of mutual coupling compensation using RMIM.

  3. Inhibition of Inflammation and Bone Erosion by RNA Interference-Mediated Silencing of Heterogeneous Nuclear RNP A2/B1 in Two Experimental Models of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herman, S.; Fischer, A.; Presumey, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Koenders, M.I.; Escriou, V.; Apparailly, F.; Steiner, G.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The nuclear protein heterogeneous nuclear RNP A2/B1 (hnRNP A2/B1) is involved in posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression. It is constitutively expressed in lymphoid organs and highly up-regulated in the synovial tissue of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), who may also gen

  4. Explore the Action Patterns and Mechanisms of Traditional Chinese Medicine Incompatibility of Qi-Qing Antagonism and Mutual Inhibition/Restraint based on Drug Interaction%基于药物相互作用探讨中药七情合和相反/相恶/相畏配伍禁忌作用模式与机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段金廒; 宿树兰; 范欣生; 钱大玮; 唐于平; 尚尔鑫; 郭建明; 刘培

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposed three kinds of action patterns of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) incompatibility based on the cognitions for theories of seven ways of compatibility and drug interaction. These are toxication and potentiation toxicity action pattern embodied the characteristic of antagonism, efficiency reduction and decrease effect action pattern reflected the characteristic of mutual inhibition/restraint, and toxic-effect multiple action pattern embodied the complex characteristics of antagonism and mutual inhibition/restraint. In addition, we exploringly put forward eight possible mechanisms of TCM incompatibility. They are potentiation toxicity by promoting the release of toxic substances, potentiation toxicity by producing new toxic components, potentiation toxicity because of increased toxic components resulted from mutual transformation of chemical constituents, efficiency reduction through inhibiting the dissolving of active components, efficiency reduction through inactivating the active components, toxication resulted by toxic metabolite generated in vivo based on drug interaction, adverse effects caused by affecting the physiological disposition of incompatibility combinations, and adverse effects caused by regulating and controlling the drug metabolic enzymes. Furthermore, the authors discussed the correlations between the different action patterns and mechanisms and relationships of seven ways of compatibility. These opinions would be providing references for understanding and researching the essences of TCM incompatibility.%本文通过对中药七情合和配伍理论与药物相互作用理论学习认知,以及对中药配伍禁忌研究成果进行较为系统的梳理分析基础上,提出中药配伍禁忌的3类作用模式:表征相反配伍特征的致毒增毒作用模式;表征相恶/相畏配伍特征的降效减效作用模式;表征相反/相恶/相畏多元配伍特征的毒效复合作用模式.探索性地提

  5. Defense mutualisms enhance plant diversification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Marjorie G; Agrawal, Anurag A

    2014-11-18

    The ability of plants to form mutualistic relationships with animal defenders has long been suspected to influence their evolutionary success, both by decreasing extinction risk and by increasing opportunity for speciation through an expanded realized niche. Nonetheless, the hypothesis that defense mutualisms consistently enhance plant diversification across lineages has not been well tested due to a lack of phenotypic and phylogenetic information. Using a global analysis, we show that the >100 vascular plant families in which species have evolved extrafloral nectaries (EFNs), sugar-secreting organs that recruit arthropod mutualists, have twofold higher diversification rates than families that lack species with EFNs. Zooming in on six distantly related plant clades, trait-dependent diversification models confirmed the tendency for lineages with EFNs to display increased rates of diversification. These results were consistent across methodological approaches. Inference using reversible-jump Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) to model the placement and number of rate shifts revealed that high net diversification rates in EFN clades were driven by an increased number of positive rate shifts following EFN evolution compared with sister clades, suggesting that EFNs may be indirect facilitators of diversification. Our replicated analysis indicates that defense mutualisms put lineages on a path toward increased diversification rates within and between clades, and is concordant with the hypothesis that mutualistic interactions with animals can have an impact on deep macroevolutionary patterns and enhance plant diversity.

  6. Using time-delayed mutual information to discover and interpret temporal correlation structure in complex populations

    CERN Document Server

    Albers, D J

    2011-01-01

    This paper addresses how to calculate and interpret the time-delayed mutual information for a complex, diversely and sparsely measured, possibly non-stationary population of time-series of unknown composition and origin. The primary vehicle used for this analysis is a comparison between the time-delayed mutual information averaged over the population and the time-delayed mutual information of an aggregated population (here aggregation implies the population is conjoined before any statistical estimates are implemented). Through the use of information theoretic tools, a sequence of practically implementable calculations are detailed that allow for the average and aggregate time-delayed mutual information to be interpreted. Moreover, these calculations can be also be used to understand the degree of homo- or heterogeneity present in the population. To demonstrate that the proposed methods can be used in nearly any situation, the methods are applied and demonstrated on the time series of glucose measurements fro...

  7. Holographic Mutual Information is Monogamous

    CERN Document Server

    Hayden, Patrick; Maloney, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    We identify a special information-theoretic property of quantum field theories with holographic duals: the mutual informations among arbitrary disjoint spatial regions A,B,C obey the inequality I(A:BC) >= I(A:B)+I(A:C), provided entanglement entropies are given by the Ryu-Takayanagi formula. Inequalities of this type are known as monogamy relations and are characteristic of measures of quantum entanglement. This suggests that correlations in holographic theories arise primarily from entanglement rather than classical correlations. We also show that the Ryu-Takayanagi formula is consistent with all known general inequalities obeyed by the entanglement entropy, including an infinite set recently discovered by Cadney, Linden, and Winter; this constitutes strong evidence in favour of its validity.

  8. Holographic mutual information is monogamous

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Patrick; Headrick, Matthew; Maloney, Alexander

    2013-02-01

    We identify a special information-theoretic property of quantum field theories with holographic duals: the mutual informations among arbitrary disjoint spatial regions A, B, C obey the inequality I(A∶B∪C)≥I(A∶B)+I(A∶C), provided entanglement entropies are given by the Ryu-Takayanagi formula. Inequalities of this type are known as monogamy relations and are characteristic of measures of quantum entanglement. This suggests that correlations in holographic theories arise primarily from entanglement rather than classical correlations. We also show that the Ryu-Takayanagi formula is consistent with all known general inequalities obeyed by the entanglement entropy, including an infinite set recently discovered by Cadney et al.; this constitutes strong evidence in favor of its validity.

  9. Adaptive peer-to-peer streaming with MutualCast

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Cheng; CHOU Philip A.; LI Jin; ZHANG Cha

    2006-01-01

    Application Layer Multicast (ALM) can greatly reduce the load of a server by leveraging the outgoing bandwidth of the participating nodes. However, most proposed ALM schemes become quite complicated and lose bandwidth efficiency if they try to deal with networks that are significantly heterogeneous or time-varying. In earlier work, we proposed MutualCast, an ALM scheme with fully connected mesh that quickly adapts to the time-varying networks, while achieving provably optimal throughput performance. In this paper, we study how MutualCast can be paired with adaptive rate control for streaming media. Specifically,we combine Optimal Rate Control (ORC), our earlier control-theoretical framework for quality adaptation, with the MutualCast delivery scheme. Using multiple bit rate video content, we show that the proposed system can gracefully adjust the common quality received at all the nodes while maintaining a continuous streaming experience at each, even when the network undergoes severe, uncorrelated bandwidth fluctuations at different peer nodes.

  10. Role of mutual punishment in the snowdrift game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Han-Xin; Wang, Zhen

    2015-09-01

    The effects of punishment on cooperation have drawn increasing attention. In this paper, we propose a new mechanism of punishment, in which an individual will punish each neighbor if their strategies are different, and vice versa. We incorporate the mutual punishment into the snowdrift game. Results for well-mixed and structured populations have shown that, for no punishment or small values of punishment fine, the fraction of cooperators continuously decreases with the temptation to defect. However, for large values of punishment fine, there exists an abrupt transition point, at which the fraction of cooperators suddenly drops from 1 to 0. Compared to no punishment, mutual punishment promotes cooperation when the temptation to defect is small but inhibits cooperation when the temptation to defect is large. For weak (strong) temptation to defect, the cooperation level increases (decreases) with the punishment fine. For moderate temptation to defect, there exists an optimal value of the punishment fine that leads to the highest cooperation level.

  11. On the Mutual Information in Hawking Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Iizuka, Norihiro

    2013-01-01

    We compute the mutual information of two Hawking particles emitted consecutively by an evaporating black hole. Following Page, we find that the mutual information is of order exp(-S) where S is the entropy of the black hole. We speculate on implications for black hole unitarity, in particular on a possible failure of locality at large distances.

  12. Mutual Influence Between Culture And Science

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周晓敏

    2016-01-01

    Science and culture are different concepts or areas, although they have different ways of development, but they have a complex relationship. Culture and science mutual influence and mutual restrict. The development of science has caused the change of culture, and promotes the development of human culture. At the same time, culture also influences the development of science in a certain extent.

  13. The Competitive Strategy of Mutual Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelner, Stephen P.; Slavin, Lois

    1998-01-01

    Defines and discusses mutual learning in organizations. Suggests that the idea of people and companies sharing knowledge is becoming a competitive strategy because mutual learning enables executives and employees to increase their capacity to work together, accelerate organizational learning, and avoid mistakes. (JOW)

  14. Bright Lights and Questions: Using Mutual Interrogation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Aishikin; Alangui, Willy; Barton, Bill

    2010-01-01

    Mutual Interrogation is a research methodology for ethnomathematics proposed by Alangui in 2006 in an attempt to avoid the potential inequality set up when a restricted cultural practice is viewed through the lens of the near-universal and highly developed research domain of mathematics. Using three significant examples of mutual interrogation in…

  15. Economic contract theory tests models of mutualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyl, E Glen; Frederickson, Megan E; Yu, Douglas W; Pierce, Naomi E

    2010-09-01

    Although mutualisms are common in all ecological communities and have played key roles in the diversification of life, our current understanding of the evolution of cooperation applies mostly to social behavior within a species. A central question is whether mutualisms persist because hosts have evolved costly punishment of cheaters. Here, we use the economic theory of employment contracts to formulate and distinguish between two mechanisms that have been proposed to prevent cheating in host-symbiont mutualisms, partner fidelity feedback (PFF) and host sanctions (HS). Under PFF, positive feedback between host fitness and symbiont fitness is sufficient to prevent cheating; in contrast, HS posits the necessity of costly punishment to maintain mutualism. A coevolutionary model of mutualism finds that HS are unlikely to evolve de novo, and published data on legume-rhizobia and yucca-moth mutualisms are consistent with PFF and not with HS. Thus, in systems considered to be textbook cases of HS, we find poor support for the theory that hosts have evolved to punish cheating symbionts; instead, we show that even horizontally transmitted mutualisms can be stabilized via PFF. PFF theory may place previously underappreciated constraints on the evolution of mutualism and explain why punishment is far from ubiquitous in nature.

  16. Strategy as Mutually Contingent Choice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Martin

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Thomas Schelling’s The Strategy of Conflict carries significant behavioral implications which have been overlooked by economic readers. I argue that these implications are central to Schelling’s vision of game theory, that they fit well with recent advances in experimental psychology and behavioral economics, and provide a comprehensive framework that can inform research on strategy. In my view, Schelling develops a non-mathematical approach to strategy which anticipates on Gigerenzer and Selten’s “ecological rationality” program. This approach maps the processes involved in strategic reasoning and highlights their reliance on the particular information structure of interactive social environments. Building on this approach, I model strategy as a heuristic form of reasoning that governs the way in which individuals search for and provide cues in situations of mutually contingent choice. I conclude by examining how the reference to ecological rationality can help clarify Schelling’s contribution to game theory and outline potential avenues of research into strategic reasoning and interaction.

  17. [Maintaining solidarity: is mutuality the solution?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevers, J K M; Ploem, M C

    2013-01-01

    Solidarity is essentially the willingness to contribute to the community and its demands, which may even involve contributing more than one is expecting to receive. Another principle is mutuality: this refers to a balance between rights and obligations or between mutual obligations. In its advisory document 'The importance of mutuality......solidarity takes work!', The Dutch Council for Public Health and Health Care underlines the importance of ensuring solidarity within the Dutch health care system, e.g. by encouraging patients to take responsibility for their own health, possibly by introducing elements of mutuality. In our contribution, we comment on the Council's advice. Although we fully agree with the overall conclusion that solidarity should be maintained within the system, we do not see how the introduction of increased mutuality will contribute to this goal.

  18. Heterogeneous Catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dakka, J.; Sheldon, R.A.; Sanderson, W.A.

    1997-01-01

    Abstract of GB 2309655 (A) Heterogeneous catalysts comprising one or more metal compounds selected from the group consisting of tin, molybdenum, tungsten, zirconium and selenium compounds deposited on the surface of a silicalite are provided. Preferably Sn(IV) and/or Mo(VI) are employed. The cat

  19. Prepulse inhibition predicts spatial working memory performance in the inbred Roman high- and low-avoidance rats and in genetically heterogeneous NIH-HS rats: relevance for studying pre-attentive and cognitive anomalies in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignasi eOliveras

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Animal models of schizophrenia-relevant symptoms are increasingly important for progress in our understanding of the neurobiological basis of the disorder and for discovering novel and more specific treatments. Prepulse inhibition (PPI and working memory, which are impaired in schizophrenic patients, are among the symptoms/processes modeled in those animal analogues. We have evaluated whether a genetically-selected rat model, the Roman high-avoidance inbred strain (RHA-I, displays PPI deficits as compared with its Roman low-avoidance (RLA-I counterpart and the genetically heterogeneous NIH-HS rat stock. We have investigated whether PPI deficits predict spatial working memory impairments (in the Morris water maze; MWM in these three rat types (Experiment 1, as well as in a separate sample of NIH-HS rats stratified according to their extreme (High, Medium, Low PPI scores (Experiment 2. The results from Exp. 1 show that RHA-I rats display PPI and spatial working memory deficits compared to both RLA-I and NIH-HS rats. Likewise, in Exp. 2, Low-PPI NIH-HS rats present significantly impaired working memory with respect to Medium-PPI and High-PPI NIH-HS subgroups. Further support to these results comes from correlational, factorial and multiple regression analyses, which reveal that PPI is positively associated with spatial working memory performance. Conversely, cued learning in the MWM was not associated with PPI. Thus, using genetically-selected and genetically heterogeneous rats, the present study shows, for the first time, that PPI is a positive predictor of performance in a spatial working memory task. These results may have translational value for schizophrenia symptom research in humans, as they suggest that either by psychogenetic selection or by focusing on extreme PPI scores from a genetically heterogeneous rat stock, it is possible to detect a useful (perhaps at risk phenotype to study cognitive anomalies linked to schizophrenia.

  20. Prepulse inhibition predicts spatial working memory performance in the inbred Roman high- and low-avoidance rats and in genetically heterogeneous NIH-HS rats: relevance for studying pre-attentive and cognitive anomalies in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveras, Ignasi; Río-Álamos, Cristóbal; Cañete, Toni; Blázquez, Gloria; Martínez-Membrives, Esther; Giorgi, Osvaldo; Corda, Maria G; Tobeña, Adolf; Fernández-Teruel, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Animal models of schizophrenia-relevant symptoms are increasingly important for progress in our understanding of the neurobiological basis of the disorder and for discovering novel and more specific treatments. Prepulse inhibition (PPI) and working memory, which are impaired in schizophrenic patients, are among the symptoms/processes modeled in those animal analogs. We have evaluated whether a genetically-selected rat model, the Roman high-avoidance inbred strain (RHA-I), displays PPI deficits as compared with its Roman low-avoidance (RLA-I) counterpart and the genetically heterogeneous NIH-HS rat stock. We have investigated whether PPI deficits predict spatial working memory impairments (in the Morris water maze; MWM) in these three rat types (Experiment 1), as well as in a separate sample of NIH-HS rats stratified according to their extreme (High, Medium, Low) PPI scores (Experiment 2). The results from Experiment 1 show that RHA-I rats display PPI and spatial working memory deficits compared to both RLA-I and NIH-HS rats. Likewise, in Experiment 2, "Low-PPI" NIH-HS rats present significantly impaired working memory with respect to "Medium-PPI" and "High-PPI" NIH-HS subgroups. Further support to these results comes from correlational, factorial, and multiple regression analyses, which reveal that PPI is positively associated with spatial working memory performance. Conversely, cued learning in the MWM was not associated with PPI. Thus, using genetically-selected and genetically heterogeneous rats, the present study shows, for the first time, that PPI is a positive predictor of performance in a spatial working memory task. These results may have translational value for schizophrenia symptom research in humans, as they suggest that either by psychogenetic selection or by focusing on extreme PPI scores from a genetically heterogeneous rat stock, it is possible to detect a useful (perhaps "at risk") phenotype to study cognitive anomalies linked to schizophrenia.

  1. Mutual Exclusion Principle for Multithreaded Web Crawlers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kartik Kumar Perisetla

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes mutual exclusion principle for multithreaded web crawlers. The existing web crawlers use data structures to hold frontier set in local address space. This space could be used to run more crawler threads for faster operation. All crawler threads fetch the URL to crawl from the centralized frontier. The mutual exclusion principle is used to provide access to frontier for each crawler thread in synchronized manner to avoid deadlock. The approach to utilize the waiting time on mutual exclusion lock in efficient manner has been discussed in detail.

  2. Recapitulation of tumor heterogeneity and molecular signatures in a 3D brain cancer model with decreased sensitivity to histone deacetylase inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart J Smith

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Physiologically relevant pre-clinical ex vivo models recapitulating CNS tumor micro-environmental complexity will aid development of biologically-targeted agents. We present comprehensive characterization of tumor aggregates generated using the 3D Rotary Cell Culture System (RCCS. METHODS: CNS cancer cell lines were grown in conventional 2D cultures and the RCCS and comparison with a cohort of 53 pediatric high grade gliomas conducted by genome wide gene expression and microRNA arrays, coupled with immunohistochemistry, ex vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy and drug sensitivity evaluation using the histone deacetylase inhibitor, Vorinostat. RESULTS: Macroscopic RCCS aggregates recapitulated the heterogeneous morphology of brain tumors with a distinct proliferating rim, necrotic core and oxygen tension gradient. Gene expression and microRNA analyses revealed significant differences with 3D expression intermediate to 2D cultures and primary brain tumors. Metabolic profiling revealed differential profiles, with an increase in tumor specific metabolites in 3D. To evaluate the potential of the RCCS as a drug testing tool, we determined the efficacy of Vorinostat against aggregates of U87 and KNS42 glioblastoma cells. Both lines demonstrated markedly reduced sensitivity when assaying in 3D culture conditions compared to classical 2D drug screen approaches. CONCLUSIONS: Our comprehensive characterization demonstrates that 3D RCCS culture of high grade brain tumor cells has profound effects on the genetic, epigenetic and metabolic profiles of cultured cells, with these cells residing as an intermediate phenotype between that of 2D cultures and primary tumors. There is a discrepancy between 2D culture and tumor molecular profiles, and RCCS partially re-capitulates tissue specific features, allowing drug testing in a more relevant ex vivo system.

  3. Manager-Investor Conflicts in Mutual Funds

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mahoney, Paul G

    2004-01-01

    .... After providing some basic institutional details, it focuses on the cash flows from mutual fund investors to fund managers, brokers, and other third parties and the associated conflicts of interest...

  4. Mycorrhiza: A Common Form of Mutualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medve, Richard J.

    1978-01-01

    Mycorrhizae are among the most common examples of mutualism. This article discusses their structure, symbolic relationship, factors affecting formation and applying research. Questions are posed and answers suggested. (MA)

  5. Comparing network covers using mutual information

    CERN Document Server

    Esquivel, Alcides Viamontes

    2012-01-01

    In network science, researchers often use mutual information to understand the difference between network partitions produced by community detection methods. Here we extend the use of mutual information to covers, that is, the cases where a node can belong to more than one module. In our proposed solution, the underlying stochastic process used to compare partitions is extended to deal with covers, and the random variables of the new process are simply fed into the usual definition of mutual information. With partitions, our extended process behaves exactly as the conventional approach for partitions, and thus, the mutual information values obtained are the same. We also describe how to perform sampling and do error estimation for our extended process, as both are necessary steps for a practical application of this measure. The stochastic process that we define here is not only applicable to networks, but can also be used to compare more general set-to-set binary relations.

  6. Mycorrhiza: A Common Form of Mutualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medve, Richard J.

    1978-01-01

    Mycorrhizae are among the most common examples of mutualism. This article discusses their structure, symbolic relationship, factors affecting formation and applying research. Questions are posed and answers suggested. (MA)

  7. Band Control of Mutual Proportional Reinsurance

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, John; Yuan, Jiguang

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the optimization of mutual proportional reinsurance --- a mutual reserve system that is intended for the collective reinsurance needs of homogeneous mutual members, such as P&I Clubs in marine mutual insurance and reserve banks in the U.S. Federal Reserve. Compared to general (non-mutual) insurance models, which involve one-sided impulse control (i.e., either downside or upside impulse) of the underlying insurance reserve process that is required to be positive, a mutual insurance differs in allowing two-sided impulse control (i.e., both downside and upside impulse), coupled with the classical proportional control of reinsurance. We prove that a special band-type impulse control $(a,A,B,b)$ with $a=0$ and $a

  8. The Analysis of Mutual Fund Performance: Evidence from U.S. Equity Mutual Funds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.P. Budiono (Diana)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractWe study the mutual fund performance for about 45 years. There are several key points that we can withdraw from this dissertation. First, to study the persistence of mutual fund performance, it is important to consider time-varying exposures because when they are ignored, the persistence

  9. Holographic Mutual Information for Singular Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Mozaffar, M Reza Mohammadi; Omidi, Farzad

    2015-01-01

    We study corner contributions to holographic mutual information for entangling regions composed of a set of disjoint sectors of a single infinite circle in three-dimensional conformal field theories. In spite of the UV divergence of holographic mutual information, it exhibits a first order phase transition. We show that tripartite information is also divergent for disjoint sectors, which is in contrast with the well-known feature of tripartite information being finite even when entangling regions share boundaries. We also verify the locality of corner effects by studying mutual information between regions separated by a sharp annular region. Possible extensions to higher dimensions and hyperscaling violating geometries is also considered for disjoint sectors.

  10. Mutual Information Rate and Bounds for It

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, Murilo S.; Rubinger, Rero M.; Viana, Emilson R.; Sartorelli, José C.; Parlitz, Ulrich; Grebogi, Celso

    2012-01-01

    The amount of information exchanged per unit of time between two nodes in a dynamical network or between two data sets is a powerful concept for analysing complex systems. This quantity, known as the mutual information rate (MIR), is calculated from the mutual information, which is rigorously defined only for random systems. Moreover, the definition of mutual information is based on probabilities of significant events. This work offers a simple alternative way to calculate the MIR in dynamical (deterministic) networks or between two time series (not fully deterministic), and to calculate its upper and lower bounds without having to calculate probabilities, but rather in terms of well known and well defined quantities in dynamical systems. As possible applications of our bounds, we study the relationship between synchronisation and the exchange of information in a system of two coupled maps and in experimental networks of coupled oscillators. PMID:23112809

  11. Mutual information rate and bounds for it.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murilo S Baptista

    Full Text Available The amount of information exchanged per unit of time between two nodes in a dynamical network or between two data sets is a powerful concept for analysing complex systems. This quantity, known as the mutual information rate (MIR, is calculated from the mutual information, which is rigorously defined only for random systems. Moreover, the definition of mutual information is based on probabilities of significant events. This work offers a simple alternative way to calculate the MIR in dynamical (deterministic networks or between two time series (not fully deterministic, and to calculate its upper and lower bounds without having to calculate probabilities, but rather in terms of well known and well defined quantities in dynamical systems. As possible applications of our bounds, we study the relationship between synchronisation and the exchange of information in a system of two coupled maps and in experimental networks of coupled oscillators.

  12. Mutual information rate and bounds for it.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, Murilo S; Rubinger, Rero M; Viana, Emilson R; Sartorelli, José C; Parlitz, Ulrich; Grebogi, Celso

    2012-01-01

    The amount of information exchanged per unit of time between two nodes in a dynamical network or between two data sets is a powerful concept for analysing complex systems. This quantity, known as the mutual information rate (MIR), is calculated from the mutual information, which is rigorously defined only for random systems. Moreover, the definition of mutual information is based on probabilities of significant events. This work offers a simple alternative way to calculate the MIR in dynamical (deterministic) networks or between two time series (not fully deterministic), and to calculate its upper and lower bounds without having to calculate probabilities, but rather in terms of well known and well defined quantities in dynamical systems. As possible applications of our bounds, we study the relationship between synchronisation and the exchange of information in a system of two coupled maps and in experimental networks of coupled oscillators.

  13. Integrating plant carbon dynamics with mutualism ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pringle, Elizabeth G

    2016-04-01

    Plants reward microbial and animal mutualists with carbohydrates to obtain nutrients, defense, pollination, and dispersal. Under a fixed carbon budget, plants must allocate carbon to their mutualists at the expense of allocation to growth, reproduction, or storage. Such carbon trade-offs are indirectly expressed when a plant exhibits reduced growth or fecundity in the presence of its mutualist. Because carbon regulates the costs of all plant mutualisms, carbon dynamics are a common platform for integrating these costs in the face of ecological complexity and context dependence. The ecophysiology of whole-plant carbon allocation could thus elucidate the ecology and evolution of plant mutualisms. If mutualisms are costly to plants, then they must be important but frequently underestimated sinks in the terrestrial carbon cycle.

  14. Mutual Fund Flight-to-Liquidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rzeznik, Aleksandra

    of their portfolio towards more liquid assets in order to meet potential redemptions. This causal chain is consistent with Vayanos (2004), who argues that fund managers are investors with time-varying liquidity preferences due to threat of withdrawal. Aggregated over funds, the effect is substantial: a one standard......This paper examines the liquidity choices of mutual funds during times of market uncertainty. I find that when markets are uncertain, mutual funds actively increase the liquidity of their portfolio { often referred to as a `flight-to-liquidity.' In aggregate, mutual fund behaviour has implications...... for the market; the market driven flight-toliquidity places upward pressure on the liquidity premium. I examine the underlying mechanisms driving fund behaviour. I show that market volatility is associated with lower fund performance and withdrawals, which causes funds to adjust the composition...

  15. MISTIC: mutual information server to infer coevolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonetti, Franco L.; Teppa, Elin; Chernomoretz, Ariel

    2013-01-01

    MISTIC (mutual information server to infer coevolution) is a web server for graphical representation of the information contained within a MSA (multiple sequence alignment) and a complete analysis tool for Mutual Information networks in protein families. The server outputs a graphical visualization...... of several information-related quantities using a circos representation. This provides an integrated view of the MSA in terms of (i) the mutual information (MI) between residue pairs, (ii) sequence conservation and (iii) the residue cumulative and proximity MI scores. Further, an interactive interface...... containing all results can be downloaded. The server is available at http://mistic.leloir.org.ar. In summary, MISTIC allows for a comprehensive, compact, visually rich view of the information contained within an MSA in a manner unique to any other publicly available web server. In particular, the use...

  16. Elections to the Mutual Aid Fund

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Every two years, according to Article 6 of the Regulations of the Mutual Aid Fund, the Committee of the Mutual Aid Fund must renew one third of its membership. This year three members are outgoing. Of these three, two will stand again and one will not.   Candidates should be ready to give approximately two hours a month during working time to the Fund whose aim is to assist colleagues in financial difficulties. We invite applications from CERN Staff who wish to stand for election as a member of the CERN Mutual Aid Fund to send in their application before 17 June 2016, by email to the Fund’s President, Connie Potter (connie.potter@cern.ch).

  17. Indian mutual fund industry: Opportunities and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayant R. Kale

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an overview of the mutual fund industry in India and the reasons for its poor penetration, which includes lack of objective research. It benchmarks the industry globally, and raises key issues regarding the ownership and performance of mutual funds, the sensitivity of fund flows to performance, and the importance of regulation to its growth, all of which have been largely under researched in India. It then captures the views of leading practitioners on these and other issues, including the challenges posed by poor financial literacy, the equity culture in the country, and the weakly supportive regulatory environment.

  18. Ranking mutual funds using Sortino method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khosro Faghani Makrani

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available One of the primary concerns on most business activities is to determine an efficient method for ranking mutual funds. This paper performs an empirical investigation to rank 42 mutual funds listed on Tehran Stock Exchange using Sortino method over the period 2011-2012. The results of survey have been compared with market return and the results have confirmed that there were some positive and meaningful relationships between Sortino return and market return. In addition, there were some positive and meaningful relationship between two Sortino methods.

  19. Functional Network Overlap as Revealed by fMRI Using sICA and Its Potential Relationships with Functional Heterogeneity, Balanced Excitation and Inhibition, and Sparseness of Neuron Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiansong; Calhoun, Vince D.; Worhunsky, Patrick D.; Xiang, Hui; Li, Jian; Wall, John T.; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Potenza, Marc N.

    2015-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies traditionally use general linear model-based analysis (GLM-BA) and regularly report task-related activation, deactivation, or no change in activation in separate brain regions. However, several recent fMRI studies using spatial independent component analysis (sICA) find extensive overlap of functional networks (FNs), each exhibiting different task-related modulation (e.g., activation vs. deactivation), different from the dominant findings of GLM-BA. This study used sICA to assess overlap of FNs extracted from four datasets, each related to a different cognitive task. FNs extracted from each dataset overlapped with each other extensively across most or all brain regions and showed task-related concurrent increases, decreases, or no changes in activity. These findings indicate that neural substrates showing task-related concurrent but different modulations in activity intermix with each other and distribute across most of the brain. Furthermore, spatial correlation analyses found that most FNs were highly consistent in spatial patterns across different datasets. This finding indicates that these FNs probably reflect large-scale patterns of task-related brain activity. We hypothesize that FN overlaps as revealed by sICA might relate to functional heterogeneity, balanced excitation and inhibition, and population sparseness of neuron activity, three fundamental properties of the brain. These possibilities deserve further investigation. PMID:25714362

  20. Functional network overlap as revealed by fMRI using sICA and its potential relationships with functional heterogeneity, balanced excitation and inhibition, and sparseness of neuron activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiansong; Calhoun, Vince D; Worhunsky, Patrick D; Xiang, Hui; Li, Jian; Wall, John T; Pearlson, Godfrey D; Potenza, Marc N

    2015-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies traditionally use general linear model-based analysis (GLM-BA) and regularly report task-related activation, deactivation, or no change in activation in separate brain regions. However, several recent fMRI studies using spatial independent component analysis (sICA) find extensive overlap of functional networks (FNs), each exhibiting different task-related modulation (e.g., activation vs. deactivation), different from the dominant findings of GLM-BA. This study used sICA to assess overlap of FNs extracted from four datasets, each related to a different cognitive task. FNs extracted from each dataset overlapped with each other extensively across most or all brain regions and showed task-related concurrent increases, decreases, or no changes in activity. These findings indicate that neural substrates showing task-related concurrent but different modulations in activity intermix with each other and distribute across most of the brain. Furthermore, spatial correlation analyses found that most FNs were highly consistent in spatial patterns across different datasets. This finding indicates that these FNs probably reflect large-scale patterns of task-related brain activity. We hypothesize that FN overlaps as revealed by sICA might relate to functional heterogeneity, balanced excitation and inhibition, and population sparseness of neuron activity, three fundamental properties of the brain. These possibilities deserve further investigation.

  1. 26 CFR 1.831-1 - Tax on insurance companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... companies (other than life or mutual), mutual marine insurance companies, and mutual fire insurance companies issuing perpetual policies. (a) All insurance companies, other than life or mutual or foreign... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tax on insurance companies (other than life...

  2. Mutually cooperative epidemics on power-law networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Peng-Bi; Colaiori, Francesca; Castellano, Claudio

    2017-08-01

    The spread of an infectious disease can, in some cases, promote the propagation of other pathogens favoring violent outbreaks, which cause a discontinuous transition to an endemic state. The topology of the contact network plays a crucial role in these cooperative dynamics. We consider a susceptible-infected-removed-type model with two mutually cooperative pathogens: An individual already infected with one disease has an increased probability of getting infected by the other. We present a heterogeneous mean-field theoretical approach to the coinfection dynamics on generic uncorrelated power-law degree-distributed networks and validate its results by means of numerical simulations. We show that, when the second moment of the degree distribution is finite, the epidemic transition is continuous for low cooperativity, while it is discontinuous when cooperativity is sufficiently high. For scale-free networks, i.e., topologies with diverging second moment, the transition is instead always continuous. In this way we clarify the effect of heterogeneity and system size on the nature of the transition, and we validate the physical interpretation about the origin of the discontinuity.

  3. Starvation-free mutual exclusion with semaphores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hesselink, Wim H.; IJbema, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The standard implementation of mutual exclusion by means of a semaphore allows starvation of processes. Between 1979 and 1986, three algorithms were proposed that preclude starvation. These algorithms use a special kind of semaphore. We model this so-called buffered semaphore rigorously and provide

  4. The Genogram: From Diagnostics to Mutual Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Adriana Balaguer; Levitt, Mary Michael

    2000-01-01

    Presents the need for integration of mutual client-therapist collaboration into the process of genogram construction and demonstrates through case examples how such integration enhances the therapeutic power of the genogram. Suggests possible changes in the training of marriage and family therapists in order for such integration to become more…

  5. Mutual Excitation in Eurozone Sovereign CDS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aït-Sahalia, Y.; Laeven, R.J.A.; Pelizzon, L.

    2013-01-01

    We study self- and cross-excitation of shocks in the sovereign CDS market, on the basis of a large database of Eurozone sovereign CDS spreads. We adopt a multivariate setting with credit default intensities driven by mutually exciting jump processes, to capture the salient features observed in the d

  6. Management of mutual health organizations in Ghana.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baltussen, R.M.P.M.; Bruce, E.; Rhodes, G.; Narh-Bana, S.A.; Agyepong, I.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Mutual Health Organizations (MHO) emerged in Ghana in the mid-1990s. The organizational structure and financial management of private and public MHO hold important lessons for the development of national health insurance in Ghana, but there is little evidence to date on their features. Th

  7. Canonical analysis based on mutual information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Vestergaard, Jacob Schack

    2015-01-01

    combinations with the information theoretical measure mutual information (MI). We term this type of analysis canonical information analysis (CIA). MI allows for the actual joint distribution of the variables involved and not just second order statistics. While CCA is ideal for Gaussian data, CIA facilitates...

  8. Management of mutual health organizations in Ghana.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baltussen, R.M.P.M.; Bruce, E.; Rhodes, G.; Narh-Bana, S.A.; Agyepong, I.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Mutual Health Organizations (MHO) emerged in Ghana in the mid-1990s. The organizational structure and financial management of private and public MHO hold important lessons for the development of national health insurance in Ghana, but there is little evidence to date on their features.

  9. Mutual Group Hypnosis: A Social Interaction Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Shirley

    Mutual Group Hypnosis is discussed in terms of its similarity to group dynamics in general and in terms of its similarity to a social interaction program (Role Modeling) designed to foster the expression of warmth and acceptance among group members. Hypnosis also fosters a regression to prelogical thought processes in the service of the ego. Group…

  10. Deadlocks and dihomotopy in mutual exclusion models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin

    2005-01-01

    spaces, the directed ($d$-spaces) of M.Grandis and the flows of P. Gaucher. All models invite to use or modify ideas from algebraic topology, notably homotopy. In specific semaphore models for mutual exclusion, we have developed methods and algorithms that can detect deadlocks and unsafe regions and give...

  11. The ECJ and the Mutual Assistance Directive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.J.C. Hemels (Sigrid)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: In 1977 the European Council adopted the ‘Directive Concerning Mutual Assistance by the competent Authorities of the Member States in the Field of Direct Taxation’.3 The implementation deadline of this Directive was 1 January 1979. On 6 December 1979 the Council adopted an

  12. Management of mutual health organizations in Ghana.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baltussen, R.M.P.M.; Bruce, E.; Rhodes, G.; Narh-Bana, S.A.; Agyepong, I.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Mutual Health Organizations (MHO) emerged in Ghana in the mid-1990s. The organizational structure and financial management of private and public MHO hold important lessons for the development of national health insurance in Ghana, but there is little evidence to date on their features. Th

  13. Mutual excitation in Eurozone sovereign CDS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aït-Sahalia, Y.; Laeven, R.J.A.; Pelizzon, L.

    2014-01-01

    We study self- and cross-excitation of shocks in the Eurozone sovereign CDS market. We adopt a multivariate setting with credit default intensities driven by mutually exciting jump processes, to capture the salient features observed in the data, in particular, the clustering of high default probabil

  14. Do Mutual Children Cement Bonds in Stepfamilies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganong, Lawrence H.; Coleman, Marilyn

    1988-01-01

    Interviewed 105 midwestern stepfamilies, 39 of whom had reproduced together. Found no significant differences between families with mutual children and those without in terms of marital adjustment, stepparent- and parent-child relationships, and stepfamily affect. It was not possible to predict which families were most likely to reproduce together…

  15. Information Content of Mutual Fund Portfolio Disclosure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Wang (Yu)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAcademic financial economists have been keenly interested in the value of active portfolio management since the seminal paper of Jensen (1968). This book examines the information advantages that active mutual fund managers attain in financial markets through an analysis of disclosed fund

  16. The ECJ and the Mutual Assistance Directive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.J.C. Hemels (Sigrid)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: In 1977 the European Council adopted the ‘Directive Concerning Mutual Assistance by the competent Authorities of the Member States in the Field of Direct Taxation’.3 The implementation deadline of this Directive was 1 January 1979. On 6 December 1979 the Council adopted an

  17. Mutual Group Hypnosis: A Social Interaction Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Shirley

    Mutual Group Hypnosis is discussed in terms of its similarity to group dynamics in general and in terms of its similarity to a social interaction program (Role Modeling) designed to foster the expression of warmth and acceptance among group members. Hypnosis also fosters a regression to prelogical thought processes in the service of the ego. Group…

  18. Do Mutual Children Cement Bonds in Stepfamilies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganong, Lawrence H.; Coleman, Marilyn

    1988-01-01

    Interviewed 105 midwestern stepfamilies, 39 of whom had reproduced together. Found no significant differences between families with mutual children and those without in terms of marital adjustment, stepparent- and parent-child relationships, and stepfamily affect. It was not possible to predict which families were most likely to reproduce together…

  19. Plant invasions--the role of mutualisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, D M; Allsopp, N; D'Antonio, C M; Milton, S J; Rejmánek, M

    2000-02-01

    Many introduced plant species rely on mutualisms in their new habitats to overcome barriers to establishment and to become naturalized and, in some cases, invasive. Mutualisms involving animal-mediated pollination and seed dispersal, and symbioses between plant roots and microbiota often facilitate invasions. The spread of many alien plants, particularly woody ones, depends on pollinator mutualisms. Most alien plants are well served by generalist pollinators (insects and birds), and pollinator limitation does not appear to be a major barrier for the spread of introduced plants (special conditions relating to Ficus and orchids are described). Seeds of many of the most notorious plant invaders are dispersed by animals, mainly birds and mammals. Our review supports the view that tightly coevolved, plant-vertebrate seed dispersal systems are extremely rare. Vertebrate-dispersed plants are generally not limited reproductively by the lack of dispersers. Most mycorrhizal plants form associations with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi which, because of their low specificity, do not seem to play a major role in facilitating or hindering plant invasions (except possibly on remote islands such as the Galapagos which are poor in arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi). The lack of symbionts has, however, been a major barrier for many ectomycorrhizal plants, notably for Pinus spp. in parts of the southern hemisphere. The roles of nitrogen-fixing associations between legumes and rhizobia and between actinorhizal plants and Frankia spp. in promoting or hindering invasions have been virtually ignored in the invasions literature. Symbionts required to induce nitrogen fixation in many plants are extremely widespread, but intentional introductions of symbionts have altered the invasibility of many, if not most, systems. Some of the world's worst invasive alien species only invaded after the introduction of symbionts. Mutualisms in the new environment sometimes re-unite the same species that form

  20. Heterogeneity and Microeconometrics Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Browning, Martin; Carro, Jesus

    Presented at the 2005 Econometric Society World Congress Plenary Session on "Modelling Heterogeneity". We survey the treatment of heterogeneity in applied microeconometrics analyses. There are three themes. First, there is usually much more heterogeneity than empirical researchers allow for. Seco...

  1. A mutualism-parasitism system modeling host and parasite with mutualism at low density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuanshi; Deangelis, Donald L

    2012-04-01

    A mutualism-parasitism system of two species is considered, where mutualism is the dominant interaction when the predators (parasites) are at low density while parasitism is dominant when the predators are at high density. Our aim is to show that mutualism at low density promotes coexistence of the species and leads to high production of the prey (host). The mutualism-parasitism system presented here is a combination of the Lotka-Volterra cooperative model and Lotka-Volterra predator-prey model. By comparing dynamics of this system with those of the Lotka-Volterra predator-prey model, we present the mechanisms by which the mutualism improves the coexistence of the species and production of the prey. Then the parameter space is divided into six regions, which correspond to the four outcomes of mutualism, commensalism, predation/parasitism and neutralism, respectively. When the parameters are varied continuously among the six regions, it is shown that the interaction outcomes of the system transition smoothly among the four outcomes. By comparing the dynamics of the specific system with those of the Lotka-Volterra cooperative model, we show that the parasitism at high density promotes stability of the system. A novel aspect of this paper is the simplicity of the model, which allows rigorous and thorough analysis and transparency of the results.

  2. Estimating Mutual Information by Local Gaussian Approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Shuyang; Galstyan, Aram

    2015-01-01

    Estimating mutual information (MI) from samples is a fundamental problem in statistics, machine learning, and data analysis. Recently it was shown that a popular class of non-parametric MI estimators perform very poorly for strongly dependent variables and have sample complexity that scales exponentially with the true MI. This undesired behavior was attributed to the reliance of those estimators on local uniformity of the underlying (and unknown) probability density function. Here we present a novel semi-parametric estimator of mutual information, where at each sample point, densities are {\\em locally} approximated by a Gaussians distribution. We demonstrate that the estimator is asymptotically unbiased. We also show that the proposed estimator has a superior performance compared to several baselines, and is able to accurately measure relationship strengths over many orders of magnitude.

  3. Hardware device binding and mutual authentication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamlet, Jason R; Pierson, Lyndon G

    2014-03-04

    Detection and deterrence of device tampering and subversion by substitution may be achieved by including a cryptographic unit within a computing device for binding multiple hardware devices and mutually authenticating the devices. The cryptographic unit includes a physically unclonable function ("PUF") circuit disposed in or on the hardware device, which generates a binding PUF value. The cryptographic unit uses the binding PUF value during an enrollment phase and subsequent authentication phases. During a subsequent authentication phase, the cryptographic unit uses the binding PUF values of the multiple hardware devices to generate a challenge to send to the other device, and to verify a challenge received from the other device to mutually authenticate the hardware devices.

  4. Mutual Learning in the European Employment Strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nedergaard, Peter

    in the European employment strategy have been either determined by the sender's interests or have underestimated how mutual learning between countries takes place. In stead the article develops a constructivist approach to learning and uses it to generate some concrete hypothesis about when learning in committees...... is most likely to take place. Afterwards, this constructivist approach is used to analyse the institutional framework surrounding the European employment strategy in order to evaluate whether the potential for learning is optimal. Finally, the article concludes that even though some basic premises......Mutual learning among the Member States is the primary purpose of the employment policy of the European Union. The two most important questions in this regard are how learning occurs and how much learning takes place. In this article I argue that the existing analyses of the effects of learning...

  5. Automotive radar - investigation of mutual interference mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goppelt, M.; Blöcher, H.-L.; Menzel, W.

    2010-09-01

    In the past mutual interference between automotive radar sensors has not been regarded as a major problem. With an increasing number of such systems, however, this topic is receiving more and more attention. The investigation of mutual interference and countermeasures is therefore one topic of the joint project "Radar on Chip for Cars" (RoCC) funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF). RoCC's goal is to pave the way for the development of high-performance, low-cost 79 GHz radar sensors based on Silicon-Germanium (SiGe) Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuits (MMICs). This paper will present some generic interference scenarios and report on the current status of the analysis of interference mechanisms.

  6. Mutual authentication in electronic commerce transactions.

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Electronic commerce is a large and ever growing industry. Online transactions are returning ever-growing revenues to electronic merchants. The e-commerce industry is still facing a range of problems concerning the process of completion of online transactions. Such problems are connected to consumer fears dealing with the identity of online merchants, their security pre- cautions and methods for accepting online payments. This thesis develops and presents a Mutual Authentication Model (MAM), w...

  7. Evaluating and Investing in Equity Mutual Funds

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    Our framework for evaluating and investing in mutual funds combines observed returns on funds and passive assets with prior beliefs that distinguish pricing-model inaccuracy from managerial skill. A fund's alpha' is defined using passive benchmarks. We show that returns on non-benchmark passive assets help estimate that alpha more precisely for most funds. The resulting estimates generally vary less than standard estimates across alternative benchmark specifications. Optimal portfolios constr...

  8. Mutual information in the Tangled Nature Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Dominic; Jeldtoft Jensen, Henrik; Sibani, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    We consider the concept of mutual information in ecological networks, and use this idea to analyse the Tangled Nature model of co-evolution. We show that this measure of correlation has two distinct behaviours depending on how we define the network in question: if we consider only the network...... of viable species this measure increases, whereas for the whole system it decreases. It is suggested that these are complimentary behaviours that show how ecosystems can become both more stable and better adapted....

  9. Combating isolation: Building mutual mentoring networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Anne J.

    2015-12-01

    Women physicists can often feel isolated at work. Support from a grant through the ADVANCE program of the National Science Foundation (U.S. government funding) created mutual mentoring networks aimed at combating isolation specifically for women faculty at undergraduate-only institutions. This paper will discuss the organization of one such network, what contributed to its success, some of the outcomes, and how it might be implemented in other contexts.

  10. Tourism versus spatial order: mutual relations

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, Beata

    2012-01-01

    The relation between tourism and the spatial environment is characterized by mutual interaction. The proliferation of tourism and massive tourism development intensifies its impact on the spatial environment, yet the focus is usually placed on environmental degradation and the resulting distortion of spatial order. Concurrently, the significance of the spatial environment, and spatial order in particular, as one of the determinants of tourism development is understated. On a theoretical plane...

  11. 47 CFR 90.165 - Procedures for mutually exclusive applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Applications and Authorizations Special Rules Governing Facilities Used to Provide Commercial Mobile Radio Services § 90.165 Procedures for mutually exclusive applications. Mutually exclusive commercial mobile radio service applications are processed...

  12. Implant positioning system using mutual inductance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, You; O'Driscoll, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Surgical placement of implantable medical devices (IMDs) has limited precision and post-implantation the device can move over time. Accurate knowledge of the position of IMDs allows better interpretation of data gathered by the devices and may allow wireless power to be focused on the IMD thereby increasing power transfer efficiency. Existing positioning methods require device sizes and/or power consumptions which exceed the limits of in-vivo mm-sized IMDs applications. This paper describes a novel implant positioning system which replaces the external transmitting (TX) coil of a wireless power transfer link by an array of smaller coils, measures the mutual inductance between each coil in the TX array and the implanted receiving (RX) coil, and uses the spatial variation in those mutual inductances to estimate the location of the implanted device. This method does not increase the hardware or power consumption in the IMD. Mathematical analysis and electromagnetic simulations are presented which explain the theory underlying this scheme and show its feasibility. A particle swarm based algorithm is used to estimate the position of the RX coil from the measured mutual inductance values. MATLAB simulations show the positioning estimation accuracy on the order of 1 mm.

  13. Trading public goods stabilizes interspecific mutualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archetti, Marco; Scheuring, István

    2013-02-07

    The existence of cooperation between species raises a fundamental problem for evolutionary theory. Why provide costly services to another species if the feedback of this provision also happens to benefit intra-specific competitors that provide no service? Rewarding cooperators and punishing defectors can help maintain mutualism; this is not possible, however, when one can only respond to the collective action of one's partners, which is likely to be the case in many common symbioses. We show how the theory of public goods can explain the stability of mutualism when discrimination between cooperators and defectors is not possible: if two groups of individuals trade goods that are non-linear, increasing functions of the number of contributions, their mutualistic interaction is maintained by the exchange of these public goods, even when it is not possible to punish defectors, which can persist at relatively high frequencies. This provides a theoretical justification and testable predictions for the evolution of mutualism in the absence of discrimination mechanisms.

  14. Observations of Pluto-Charon mutual events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanco, C.; Di Martino, M.; Ferreri, W. (Catania Universita (Italy); Osservatorio Astronomico, Turin (Italy))

    1989-07-01

    As part of the planned 'Pluto-Charon Mutual Eclipse Season Campaign', one mutual event was observed at the ESO Observatory on July 10, 1986 and seven mutual events were observed at the Serra La Nave stellar station of Catania Astrophysical Observatory from April 29 to July 21, 1987. At ESO the measurements were performed at the 61-cm Bochum telescope equipped with a photon-counting system and U, B, V, filters; at Serra La Nave the Cassegrain focus of the 91-cm reflector was equipped with a photon-counting system and B and V filters. The observed light losses and contact times do not show relevant systematic deviations from the predicted ones. An examination of the behavior of the B and V light curves gives slight indications of a different slope of the B and V light loss of the same event for a superior or an inferior event, and shows that the superior events are shallower at wavelengths longer than B. 6 refs.

  15. Performance Evaluation of Investment (Mutual Funds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Povilas Vyšniauskas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of an investment fund is one of the main components in evaluating the performance of the fund. This study seeks for introducing and comparing risk and performance evaluation ratios. The paper is aimed at testing the worked out ratios and at distinguishing between the best ones for the purpose of evaluating the performance of Lithuanian mutual funds. Scientific studies show that a standard deviation, alpha, beta, Sharpe and Treynor ratios are mostly employed for identifying the performance of mutual funds that are also compared with their benchmark index to establish if these funds are outperformed and if is it worth paying management fees to investment banks for managing mutual funds. Historical data were selected for the period from 2012-01-02 to 2013-10-15 analysing the prices of monthly funds. The paper points out the areas of a practical application of the proposed model for investment fund valuation, which may not only provide valuable outcomes for practitioners but also may inspire further research on this article.

  16. Dependence of Mutual Information of Big Protein Sequence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi Feng; Huang Jing; Li Yuan- xiang; Zhou Huai-bei

    2003-01-01

    The mutual information function is used to describe the auto-correlation of amino acids in protein. We find two interesting phenomenon: (1) for any given big protein,the mutual information function I(k) is almost a const, wherek is the length of gap. (2) for any two sequence similar proteins, the mutual information are nearly the same. As a consequent, we may use mutual information of protein as a character for sequences comparison.

  17. 26 CFR 1.1502-42 - Mutual savings banks, etc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 12 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mutual savings banks, etc. 1.1502-42 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Special Taxes and Taxpayers § 1.1502-42 Mutual savings banks, etc. (a) In general. This section applies to mutual s avings banks and other institutions described in section 593(a)....

  18. The Spanish Version of the Mutuality Scale: evidence for the cultural equivalence of mutuality in Mexican American families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crist, Janice D; Escandón, Socorro; Stewart, Barbara J; Archbold, Patricia G

    2008-10-01

    Mutuality, the positive quality of the relationship between the family caregiver and care receiver, is an important variable in family care for frail older adults. It has been shown to be associated with lower levels of caregiver strain and higher levels of caregiving rewards. However, the concept and measure of mutuality were developed with non-Hispanic White samples. The purpose of this article is to describe the development of an instrument-the Spanish Version of the Mutuality Scale. We determined for Mexican American families: (a) the functional equivalence of mutuality, (b) a comparative descriptive framework for mutuality, and (c) the language equivalence of the Mutuality Scale and the Spanish Version of the Mutuality Scale. Evaluating mutuality levels for Mexican American older adults and caregivers, especially in view of their strong cultural norm of familism, is essential.

  19. Comparative Study of Mutual Exclusion Algorithms in Distributed Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jijnasa Patil

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Mutual Exclusion is an important phenomenon in distributed systems. In this paper, we analyze and compare various mutual exclusion algorithms in distributed systems. In permission based mutual exclusion process waits for permission from other processes to enter into a critical section. In token based mutual exclusion, a special message called token is passed over the system and process holding the token can enter into the critical section. We present a comparative study of quorum based, token ring token asking and multiple token algorithms for mutual exclusion in distributed systems.

  20. THE COOPERATIVE CREDIT MUTUAL IN BRAZIL.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laércio Baptista da Silva

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study presents an analysis of the reality of credit unions in Brazil, in view of the singular importance of credit unions for the whole society as an alternative to private resources in favor of members of the community where they are located. It confirms that, in Brazil, the mutual credit unions, besides being presented as one of the viable options within the financial system, are also seen as an alternative by which some sectors of society promote the humanization of the financial system by offering credit and return on capital with fairer interest rates.

  1. Creating a culture of mutual respect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Kathryn; Mestel, Pamela; Feldman, David L

    2010-04-01

    The Joint Commission mandates that hospitals seeking accreditation have a process to define and address disruptive behavior. Leaders at Maimonides Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York, took the initiative to create a code of mutual respect that not only requires respectful behavior, but also encourages sensitivity and awareness to the causes of frustration that often lead to inappropriate behavior. Steps to implementing the code included selecting code advocates, setting up a system for mediating disputes, tracking and addressing operational system issues, providing training for personnel, developing a formal accountability process, and measuring the results.

  2. Deadlocks and dihomotopy in mutual exclusion models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Parallel processes in concurrency theory can be modelled in a geometric framework. A convenient model are the Higher Dimensional Automata of V. Pratt and E. Goubault with cubical complexes as their mathematical description. More abstract models are given by (locally) partially ordered topological...... spaces, the directed ($d$-spaces) of M.Grandis and the flows of P. Gaucher. All models invite to use or modify ideas from algebraic topology, notably homotopy. In specific semaphore models for mutual exclusion, we have developed methods and algorithms that can detect deadlocks and unsafe regions and give...

  3. Mutual best friendship involvement, best friends' rejection sensitivity, and psychological maladaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowker, Julie C; Thomas, Katelyn K; Norman, Kelly E; Spencer, Sarah V

    2011-05-01

    Rejection sensitivity (RS) refers to the tendency to anxiously expect, readily perceive, and overreact to experiences of possible rejection. RS is a clear risk factor for psychological maladaptation during early adolescence. However, there is growing evidence of significant heterogeneity in the psychological correlates of RS. To investigate when RS poses the greatest psychological risk during early adolescence, this study examines mutual best friendship involvement (or lack thereof) and the best friends' RS as potential moderators of the associations between RS and psychological difficulties. Participants were 150 7th grade students (58 boys; M age = 13.05 years) who nominated their best friends, and reported on their RS, social anxiety, and self-esteem. Results from a series of hierarchical multiple regression analyses indicated that mutual best friendship involvement and best friends' RS were both significant moderators when fear of negative evaluation (a type of social anxiety) served as the dependent variable. The association between RS and fear of negative evaluation was stronger for adolescents without mutual best friends than adolescents with mutual best friends. In addition, the association between RS and fear of negative evaluation was the strongest for adolescents whose best friends were highly rejection sensitive (relative to adolescents whose best friends were moderately or low in RS). Findings highlight the importance of considering best friendships in studies of RS and strongly suggest that, although having mutual best friendships may be protective for rejection sensitive adolescents, having a rejection sensitive best friend may exacerbate difficulties. The significance of friends in the lives of rejection sensitive adolescents is discussed as well as possible applied implications of the findings and study limitations.

  4. Influence of inhomogeneities on holographic mutual information and butterfly effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Rong-Gen; Zeng, Xiao-Xiong; Zhang, Hai-Qing

    2017-07-01

    We study the effect of inhomogeneity, which is induced by the graviton mass in massive gravity, on the mutual information and the chaotic behavior of a 2+1-dimensional field theory from the gauge/gravity duality. When the system is near-homogeneous, the mutual information increases as the graviton mass grows. However, when the system is far from homogeneity, the mutual information decreases as the graviton mass increases. By adding the perturbations of energy into the system, we investigate the dynamical mutual information in the shock wave geometry. We find that the greater perturbations disrupt the mutual information more rapidly, which resembles the butterfly effect in chaos theory. Besides, the greater inhomogeneity reduces the dynamical mutual information more quickly just as in the static case.

  5. Market timing and selectivity performance of mutual funds in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abubakar Musah

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The growing interest in mutual funds in Ghana has been tremendous over the last decade as evidenced by the continuous increases in number and total funds under management. However, no empirical work has been done on the selectivity and timing ability of the mutual fund managers. Using monthly returns data hand-collected from the reports of the mutual fund managers for the period January 2007-December 2012, this paper examines the market timing and selectivity ability of mutual fund managers in Ghana using the classic Treynor-Mazuy (1966 model and Henriksson- Merton (1981 model. The results suggest that, in general mutual fund managers in Ghana are not able to effectively select stocks and also are not able to predict both the magnitude and direction of future market returns. More specifically, all of the sample mutual fund managers attain significant negative selectivity coefficients and also most of them attain insignificant negative timing coefficients.

  6. The macroecology of marine cleaning mutualisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floeter, Sergio R; Vázquez, Diego P; Grutter, Alexandra S

    2007-01-01

    1. Marine cleaning mutualisms generally involve small fish or shrimps removing ectoparasites and other material from cooperating 'client' fish. We evaluate the role of fish abundance, body size and behaviour as determinants of interactions with cleaning mutualists. 2. Data come from eight reef locations in Brazil, the Caribbean, the Mediterranean and Australia. 3. We conducted a meta-analysis of client-cleaner interactions involving 11 cleaner and 221 client species. 4. There was a strong, positive effect of client abundance on cleaning frequency, but only a weak, negative effect of client body size. These effects were modulated by client trophic group and social behaviour. 5. This study adds to a growing body of evidence suggesting a central role of species abundance in structuring species interactions.

  7. Mutual information-based facial expression recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazar, Mliki; Hammami, Mohamed; Hanêne, Ben-Abdallah

    2013-12-01

    This paper introduces a novel low-computation discriminative regions representation for expression analysis task. The proposed approach relies on interesting studies in psychology which show that most of the descriptive and responsible regions for facial expression are located around some face parts. The contributions of this work lie in the proposition of new approach which supports automatic facial expression recognition based on automatic regions selection. The regions selection step aims to select the descriptive regions responsible or facial expression and was performed using Mutual Information (MI) technique. For facial feature extraction, we have applied Local Binary Patterns Pattern (LBP) on Gradient image to encode salient micro-patterns of facial expressions. Experimental studies have shown that using discriminative regions provide better results than using the whole face regions whilst reducing features vector dimension.

  8. Quantum Mutual Information Along Unitary Orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Jevtic, Sania; Rudolph, Terry

    2011-01-01

    Motivated by thermodynamic considerations, we analyse the variation of the quantum mutual information on a unitary orbit of a bipartite system state, with and without global constraints such as energy conservation. We solve the full optimisation problem for the smallest system of two qubits, and explore thoroughly the effect of unitary operations on the space of reduced-state spectra. We then provide applications of these ideas to physical processes within closed quantum systems, such as a generalized collision model approach to thermal equilibrium and a global Maxwell demon playing tricks on local observers. For higher dimensions, the maximization of correlations is relatively straightforward, however the minimisation of correlations displays non-trivial structures. We characterise a set of separable states in which the minimally correlated state resides, and find a collection of classically correlated states admitting a particular "Young tableau" form. Furthermore, a partial order exists on this set with re...

  9. Mutually-antagonistic interactions in baseball networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saavedra, Serguei; Powers, Scott; McCotter, Trent; Porter, Mason A.; Mucha, Peter J.

    2010-03-01

    We formulate the head-to-head matchups between Major League Baseball pitchers and batters from 1954 to 2008 as a bipartite network of mutually-antagonistic interactions. We consider both the full network and single-season networks, which exhibit structural changes over time. We find interesting structure in the networks and examine their sensitivity to baseball’s rule changes. We then study a biased random walk on the matchup networks as a simple and transparent way to (1) compare the performance of players who competed under different conditions and (2) include information about which particular players a given player has faced. We find that a player’s position in the network does not correlate with his placement in the random walker ranking. However, network position does have a substantial effect on the robustness of ranking placement to changes in head-to-head matchups.

  10. Pseudomyrmex nigropilosa: A Parasite of a Mutualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janzen, D H

    1975-05-30

    Pseudomyrmex nigropilosa is a parasite ofthe ant-acacia mutualism in Central America in that it harvests the resources of swollen-thorn acacias but does not protect the acacias. In the process, it also lowers the rate of occupation by the obligate acacia-ants, species of ants that do protect swollen-thorn acacias. Tenancy ofan acacia by P. nigropilosa must be temporary, since the unoccupied plant is shortly killed by herbivores or competing plants, or is taken over by obligate acacia-ants. As expected of a species of short-lived ant, a P. nigropilosa colony produces reproductives earlier in the life of the colony and maintains fewer grams of workers per gram of brood than does a colony of the long-lived obligate acacia-ants.

  11. Document summarization using positive pointwise mutual information

    CERN Document Server

    S, Aji

    2012-01-01

    The degree of success in document summarization processes depends on the performance of the method used in identifying significant sentences in the documents. The collection of unique words characterizes the major signature of the document, and forms the basis for Term-Sentence-Matrix (TSM). The Positive Pointwise Mutual Information, which works well for measuring semantic similarity in the Term-Sentence-Matrix, is used in our method to assign weights for each entry in the Term-Sentence-Matrix. The Sentence-Rank-Matrix generated from this weighted TSM, is then used to extract a summary from the document. Our experiments show that such a method would outperform most of the existing methods in producing summaries from large documents.

  12. Mutually-Antagonistic Interactions in Baseball Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Saavedra, Serguei; McCotter, Trent; Porter, Mason A; Mucha, Peter J

    2009-01-01

    We formulate the head-to-head matchups between Major League Baseball pitchers and batters from 1954 to 2008 as a bipartite network of mutually-antagonistic interactions. We consider both the full network and single-season networks, which exhibit interesting structural changes over time. We also find that these networks exhibit a significant network structure that is sensitive to baseball's rule changes. We then study a biased random walk on the matchup networks as a simple and transparent way to compare the performance of players who competed under different conditions. We find that a player's position in the network does not correlate with his success in the random walker ranking but instead has a substantial effect on its sensitivity to changes in his own aggregate performance.

  13. Mutual Contextualization in Tripartite Graphs of Folksonomies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Ching-Man Au; Gibbins, Nicholas; Shadbolt, Nigel

    The use of tags to describe Web resources in a collaborative manner has experienced rising popularity among Web users in recent years. The product of such activity is given the name folksonomy, which can be considered as a scheme of organizing information in the users' own way. This research work attempts to analyze tripartite graphs - graphs involving users, tags and resources - of folksonomies and discuss how these elements acquire their semantics through their associations with other elements, a process we call mutual contextualization. By studying such process, we try to identify solutions to problems such as tag disambiguation, retrieving documents of similar topics and discovering communities of users. This paper describes the basis of the research work, mentions work done so far and outlines future plans.

  14. Balancing former opposites as mutual preconditions?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmström, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    structurally determined (in)sensitivity to life and nature reaches a critical mass, it provokes new ideals of balancing society’s logics on the one hand with considerations of life and nature on the other, as in the triple bottom line concept (Luhmann 1989). Third, the increasing diversity and speciali......). An intersubjective and a social systemic public relations paradigm. Journal of Com-munications Management, 2(1), 24–39. Holmström, S. (2002). Public relations reconstructed as part of society’s evolutionary learning processes. In D. Vercic, B. van Ruler, I. Jensen, D. Moss, & J. White (Eds.), The status of public......Focus of this chapter is society’s megatrends as they transform the frames for organisational legitimacy in a way which implies that decision-making paradoxically should balance as mutual preconditions what was formerly seen as opposites. Society’s turbulence strikes in organisations. As society...

  15. Speech Intelligibility Prediction Based on Mutual Information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper; Taal, Cees H.

    2014-01-01

    to the mutual information between critical-band amplitude envelopes of the clean signal and the corresponding noisy/processed signal. The resulting intelligibility predictor turns out to be a simple function of the mean-square error (mse) that arises when estimating a clean critical-band amplitude using......This paper deals with the problem of predicting the average intelligibility of noisy and potentially processed speech signals, as observed by a group of normal hearing listeners. We propose a model which performs this prediction based on the hypothesis that intelligibility is monotonically related...... the intelligibility of speech signals contaminated by additive noise and potentially non-linearly processed using time-frequency weighting....

  16. Reciprocity and mutual impedance formulas within lossy cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Gronwald

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the validity of reciprocity and mutual impedance formulas within lossy cavities. Mutual impedance formulas are well-known from antenna theory and useful to describe the electromagnetic coupling between electromagnetic interference sources and victims. As an example the mutual impedance between two dipole antennas within a lossy rectangular cavity is calculated from a system of coupled Hallén's equations that efficiently is solved by the method of moments.

  17. Periodic Solutions of Multispecies Mutualism System with Infinite Delays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenbo Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied the delayed periodic mutualism system with Gilpin-Ayala effect. Some new and interesting sufficient conditions are obtained to guarantee the existence of periodic solution for the multispecies mutualism system with infinite delays. Our method is based on Mawhin's coincidence degree. To the best knowledge of the authors, there is no paper considering the existence of periodic solutions for n-species mutualism system with infinite delays.

  18. Modeling the Substrate Skin Effects in Mutual RL Characteristics.,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. de Roest

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this work was to model the influence of the substrateskin effects on the distributed mutual impedance per unit lengthparameters of multiple coupled on-chip interconnects. The proposedanalytic model is based on the frequency-dependent distribution of thecurrent in the silicon substrate and the closed form integrationapproach. It is shown that the calculated frequency-dependentdistributed mutual inductance and the associated mutual resistance arein good agreement with the results obtained from CAD-oriented circuitmodeling technique.

  19. Rapid evolution of stability and productivity at the origin of a microbial mutualism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hillesland, Kristina L.; Stahl, David A.

    2009-12-01

    Mutualistic interactions are taxonomically and functionally diverse. Despite their ubiquity, the basic ecological and evolutionary processes underlying their origin and maintenance are poorly understood. A major reason for this has been the lack of an experimentally tractable model system. We examine the evolution of an experimentally imposed obligate mutualism between sulfate-reducing and methanogenic microorganisms that have no known history of prior interaction. Twenty-four independent pairings (cocultures) of the bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris and the archaeon Methanococcus maripaludis were established and followed for 300 community doublings in two environments, one allowing for the development of a heterogeneous distribution of resources and the other not. Evolved cocultures grew up to 80percent faster and were up to 30percent more productive (biomass yield per mole substrate) than the ancestors. The evolutionary process was marked by periods of significant instability leading to extinction of two of the cocultures, but resulted in more stable, efficient, and productive mutualisms for most replicated pairings. Comparisons of evolved cocultures with those assembled from one evolved and one ancestral mutualist showed that evolution of both species contributed to improved productivity. Surprisingly, however, overall improvements in growth rate and yield were less than the sum of individual contributions, suggesting antagonistic interactions between mutations from the coevolved populations. Physical constraints on the transfer of metabolites in the evolution environment affected the evolution of M. maripaludis but not D. vulgaris. Together, these results show that challenges can imperil nascent obligate mutualisms and demonstrate the evolutionary responses that enable their persistence and future evolution.

  20. Effect of mutual inductance coupling on superconducting flux qubit decoherence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanyan Jiang; Hualan Xu; Yinghua Ji

    2009-01-01

    In the Born-Markov approximation and two-level approximation, and using the Bloch-Redfield equation, the decoherence property of superconducting quantum circuit with a flux qubit is investigated. The influence on decoherence of the mutual inductance coupling between the circuit components is complicated. The mutual inductance coupling between different loops will decrease the decoherence time. However, the mutual inductance coupling of the same loop, in a certain interval, will increase the decoherence time. Therefore, we can control the decoherence time by changing the mutual inductance parameters such as the strength and direction of coupling.

  1. Mutual couling reduction using a lumped LC circuit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thaysen, Jesper; Jakobsen, Kaj Bjarne

    2004-01-01

    A technique to reduce the mutual coupling between two Planar Inverted F Antennas (PIFA) is presented in this paper. By the use of a parallel LC circuit it is possible to reduce the mutual coupling between two antennas. This results in a 16 % improvement in the radiation efficiency.......A technique to reduce the mutual coupling between two Planar Inverted F Antennas (PIFA) is presented in this paper. By the use of a parallel LC circuit it is possible to reduce the mutual coupling between two antennas. This results in a 16 % improvement in the radiation efficiency....

  2. Mutualism exploitation: predatory drosophilid larvae sugar-trap ants and jeopardize facultative ant-plant mutualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Mayra C; Sendoya, Sebastian F; Oliveira, Paulo S

    2016-07-01

    An open question in the evolutionary ecology of ant-plant facultative mutualism is how other members of the associated community can affect the interaction to a point where reciprocal benefits are disrupted. While visiting Qualea grandiflora shrubs to collect sugary rewards at extrafloral nectaries, tropical savanna ants deter herbivores and reduce leaf damage. Here we show that larvae of the fly Rhinoleucophenga myrmecophaga, which develop on extrafloral nectaries, lure potentially mutualistic, nectar-feeding ants and prey on them. Foraging ants spend less time on fly-infested foliage. Field experiments showed that predation (or the threat of predation) on ants by fly larvae produces cascading effects through three trophic levels, resulting in fewer protective ants on leaves, increased numbers of chewing herbivores, and greater leaf damage. These results reveal an undocumented mode of mutualism exploitation by an opportunistic predator at a plant-provided food source, jeopardizing ant-derived protection services to the plant. Our study documents a rather unusual case of predation of adult ants by a dipteran species and demonstrates a top-down trophic cascade within a generalized ant-plant mutualism. © 2016 by the Ecological Society of America.

  3. The Development of Mutuality in Natural Small Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Paul Morgan

    1983-01-01

    Describes factors affecting the development of mutuality of attraction in natural small groups, and tests the hypothesis of the acquaintance process in 41 female residents of three floors of a university dormitory over the course of a year. Two floors showed definite increases in dyadic mutuality over time. (JAC)

  4. Style Analysis and Performance Evaluation of Dutch Mutual Funds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ter Horst, J.R.; Nijman, T.E.; de Roon, F.A.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we show how style analysis of mutual funds can be used to circumvent the problem of self-reported investment styles, and to improve relative performance evaluation. Subsequently, we relate style analysis to performance evaluation and present results on the performance of Dutch mutual f

  5. Verifying Mutual Exclusion and Liveness Properties with Split Preconditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Awadhesh Kumar Singh; Anup Kumar Bandyopadhyay

    2004-01-01

    This work is focused on presenting a split precondition approach for the modeling and proving the correctness of distributed algorithms. Formal specification and precise analysis of Peterson's distributed mutual exclusion algorithm for two process has been considered. The proof of properties like, mutual exclusion, liveness, and lockout-freedom have also been presented.

  6. Mutually singular functions and computation of the lengths of curves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dovgoshei, A A [Institute of Applied Mathematics and Mechanics of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Donetsk (Ukraine); Martio, O [Department of Mathematics, University of Helsinki (Finland)

    2006-08-31

    We study rectifiable curves given by mutually singular coordinate functions in finite-dimensional normed spaces. We describe these curves in terms of the behaviour of approximative tangents and find a simple formula for their lengths. We deduce from these results new necessary and sufficient conditions for the mutual singularity of finitely many functions of bounded variation.

  7. A Unified Mutual Coupling Model for Multiple Antenna Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Yu-jiang; NIE Zai-ping

    2006-01-01

    A unified mutual coupling model for multiple antenna communication systems based on moment methods is proposed. This model combines antenna coupling and RF front-end circuit coupling, thus providing a more accurate and complete analysis of the mutual coupling effect on multiple antenna systems.

  8. The Mutual Impact of Global Strategy and Organizational Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hotho, Jasper J.; Lyles, Marjorie A.; Easterby-Smith, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Despite the interest in issues of knowing and learning in the global strategy field, there has been limited mutual engagement and interaction between the fields of global strategy and organizational learning. The purpose of our article is to reflect on and articulate how the mutual exchange...

  9. Economic game theory for mutualism and cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archetti, Marco; Scheuring, István; Hoffman, Moshe; Frederickson, Megan E; Pierce, Naomi E; Yu, Douglas W

    2011-12-01

    We review recent work at the interface of economic game theory and evolutionary biology that provides new insights into the evolution of partner choice, host sanctions, partner fidelity feedback and public goods. (1) The theory of games with asymmetrical information shows that the right incentives allow hosts to screen-out parasites and screen-in mutualists, explaining successful partner choice in the absence of signalling. Applications range from ant-plants to microbiomes. (2) Contract theory distinguishes two longstanding but weakly differentiated explanations of host response to defectors: host sanctions and partner fidelity feedback. Host traits that selectively punish misbehaving symbionts are parsimoniously interpreted as pre-adaptations. Yucca-moth and legume-rhizobia mutualisms are argued to be examples of partner fidelity feedback. (3) The theory of public goods shows that cooperation in multi-player interactions can evolve in the absence of assortment, in one-shot social dilemmas among non-kin. Applications include alarm calls in vertebrates and exoenzymes in microbes.

  10. Partial order similarity based on mutual information

    CERN Document Server

    Tibély, Gergely; Palla, Gergely

    2016-01-01

    Comparing the ranking of candidates by different voters is an important topic in social and information science with a high relevance from the point of view of practical applications. In general, ties and pairs of incomparable candidates may occur, thus, the alternative rankings are described by partial orders. Various distance measures between partial orders have already been introduced, where zero distance is corresponding to a perfect match between a pair of partial orders, and larger values signal greater differences. Here we take a different approach and propose a similarity measure based on adjusted mutual information. In general, the similarity value of unity is corresponding to exactly matching partial orders, while a low similarity is associated to a pair of independent partial orders. The time complexity of the computation of this similarity measure is $\\mathcal{O}(\\left|{\\mathcal C}\\right|^3)$ in the worst case, and $\\mathcal{O}(\\left|{\\mathcal C}\\right|^2\\ln \\left|{\\mathcal C}\\right|)$ in the typi...

  11. Mutualism between tree shrews and pitcher plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Jonathan A; Chin, Lijin

    2010-01-01

    Three species of Nepenthes pitcher plants from Borneo engage in a mutualistic interaction with mountain tree shrews, the basis of which is the exchange of nutritional resources. The plants produce modified “toilet pitchers” that produce copious amounts of exudates, the latter serving as a food source for tree shrews. The exudates are only accessible to the tree shrews when they position their hindquarters over the pitcher orifice. Tree shrews mark valuable resources with feces and regularly defecate into the pitchers when they visit them to feed. Feces represent a valuable source of nitrogen for these Nepenthes species, but there are many facets of the mutualism that are yet to be investigated. These include, but are not limited to, seasonal variation in exudate production rates by the plants, behavioral ecology of visiting tree shrews and the mechanism by which the plants signal to tree shrews that their pitchers represent a food source. Further research into this extraordinary animal-plant interaction is required to gain a better understanding of the benefits to the participating species. PMID:20861680

  12. DOA estimation and mutual coupling calibration with the SAGE algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiong Kunlai; Liu Zhangmeng; Liu Zheng; Jiang Wenli

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a novel algorithm is presented for direction of arrival (DOA) estimation and array self-calibration in the presence of unknown mutual coupling. In order to highlight the relationship between the array output and mutual coupling coefficients, we present a novel model of the array output with the unknown mutual coupling coefficients. Based on this model, we use the space alternating generalized expectation-maximization (SAGE) algorithm to jointly estimate the DOA parameters and the mutual coupling coefficients. Unlike many existing counterparts, our method requires neither calibration sources nor initial calibration information. At the same time, our proposed method inherits the characteristics of good convergence and high estimation precision of the SAGE algorithm. By numerical experiments we demonstrate that our proposed method outperforms the existing method for DOA estimation and mutual coupling calibration.

  13. DOA estimation and mutual coupling calibration with the SAGE algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiong Kunlai

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a novel algorithm is presented for direction of arrival (DOA estimation and array self-calibration in the presence of unknown mutual coupling. In order to highlight the relationship between the array output and mutual coupling coefficients, we present a novel model of the array output with the unknown mutual coupling coefficients. Based on this model, we use the space alternating generalized expectation-maximization (SAGE algorithm to jointly estimate the DOA parameters and the mutual coupling coefficients. Unlike many existing counterparts, our method requires neither calibration sources nor initial calibration information. At the same time, our proposed method inherits the characteristics of good convergence and high estimation precision of the SAGE algorithm. By numerical experiments we demonstrate that our proposed method outperforms the existing method for DOA estimation and mutual coupling calibration.

  14. Reducing Deviance Through Youths' Mutual Aid Group Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Chau-kiu; Ngai, Steven Sek-yum

    2016-01-01

    The mutual aid group, as supported by the social worker, emerges to play a vital role in helping group members reduce their deviance or behavioral problem. However, how the collaboration of the group and social worker accomplishes the reduction has remained uncharted. Based on social capital theory, mutual aid and cohesion within the group and social workers' specific aid for the group are likely responsible for the reduction. The test of such hypotheses relies on a two-wave panel survey of the members of 60 mutual aid groups who had deviant behavioral problems, located in Hong Kong, China. These groups had 241 youths completing both initial and 1-year follow-up surveys. Results manifested the direct or unconditional contributions of mutual aid, group cohesion, and social workers' specific aid to reducing deviance. Hence, social workers can enhance the effectiveness of the mutual aid group in reducing youths' deviance.

  15. The modified Poynting theorem and the concept of mutual energy

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Shuang-ren; Yang, Kang; Yang, Xingang; Yang, Xintie

    2015-01-01

    The Poynting theorem is generalized to the modified Poynting theorem. In the modified Poynting theorem the electromagnetic field is superimposition of different electromagnetic fields including the field of retarded potential and advanced potential. The media epsilon (permittivity) and mu (permeability) can also be different in the different fields. The concept of mutual energy is introduced which is the difference between the total energy and self-energy. Using the modified Poynting theorem with the concept of the mutual energy the modified mutual energy theorem is derived. Applying time-offset transform and time integral to the modified mutual energy theorem, the time-correlation modified mutual energy theorem is obtained. Assume there are only two fields which are retarded potential, and there is only one media, the modified time-correlation energy theorem becomes the time-correlation energy theorem, which is also referred as the time-correlation reciprocity theorem. Assume there are two electromagnetic fi...

  16. The Tradeoff Between Mutual Fund and Direct Stock Investments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marekwica, Marcel; Steininger, Bertram I.

    2014-01-01

    We study the tradeoff between direct and indirect stock investments through equity mutual funds for a utility-maximizing investor. Whereas direct investments impose higher transaction costs on the formation of a well-diversified portfolio, mutual funds charge fees for their services. Our results...... show that the fee levels that make private investors indifferent between direct and indirect stock investments vary heavily according to risk aversion, the amounts invested, correlations between assets, transaction costs, and the length of investment horizon. In particular, our results suggest...... that for a wide range of actively managed mutual funds, the fees charged are too high for these mutual funds to appeal to a wide range of informed investors. However, accounting for search costs, such as costs for financial advice, can facilitate an understanding of the levels of management fees charged by mutual...

  17. Mutual recombination in slow Si+ + H- collisions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jian-Guo; Liu Chun-Lei; Janev R. K.; Yan Jun; Shi Jian-Rong

    2006-01-01

    This paper studies the process of mutual neutralization of Si+ and H- ions in slow collisions within the multichannel Landau-Zener model. All important ionic-covalent couplings in this collision system are included in the collision dynamics. The cross sections for population of specific final states of product Si atom are calculated in the CM energy range 0.05 eV/u-5 keV/u. Both singlet and triplet states are considered. At collision energies below ~10 eV/u, the most populated singlet state is Si(3p4p, 1S0), while for energies above ~150eV/u it is the Si(3p, 4p, 1P1) state. In the case of triplet states, the mixed 3p4p(3 S1 +3P0) states are the most populated in the entire collision energy range investigated. The total cross section exhibits a broad maximum around 200-300 eV/u and for ECM ≤ 10eV/u it monotonically increases with decreasing the collision energy, reaching a value of 8 × 10-13 cm2 at ECM = 0.05 eV/u. The ion-pair formation process in Si(3p2 3PJ)+H(1s) collisions has also been considered and its cross section in the considered energy range is very small (smaller than 10-20 cm2 in the energy region below 1 keV/u).

  18. The Determinants of Cash Flows in Greek Bond Mutual Funds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos Grose

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the factors that affect inflows – outflows of capital in bond mutual funds that operated in the Greek market during the period 1997-2005. Investors in bond mutual funds do not seek for high gross returns in order to determine their investment decisions incontrast with investors in the stock market. The risk weighted returns however represent a crucial factor in investment decision making. Bond mutual funds that invest primarily in government bonds, appear to be more affected by commissions charged by mutual fundmanagers, since investors avoid mutual funds charging high commissions, while on the other hand investors that prefer corporate bonds show reduced sensitivity in the commissions charged by mutual funds. Investors in government bonds increase their investment positions when stock markets experience small or negative returns, a clue that shows they seek for safe heavens for their investments. This phenomenon is more evident when investors face a temporary period of low stock market returns and is not as strong when low returns in the stock markets are extended to a period of years. In these cases investment positions in bond mutual funds appear to be part of a more permanent investment policy where bond investments are considered to be an integral part of a diversified portfolio.

  19. Suppression of maize plantlets growth under mutual action of chromium and nickel

    OpenAIRE

    О. М. Piskova; O. M. Vinnychenko; V. М. Grishko

    2008-01-01

    Mutual toxicity of chromium and nickel sulphates for growth and development of maize plantlets was studied. Its combined action at low concentrations (10 –5 M) results to significant suppression of growth of both above-ground and root systems of maize. At the beginning of growth the greater negative effect of the salts mixture at high concentration (10 –4 M) was observed for the plantlets’ roots. Then, on the sixth day, the growth of above-ground and root system was inhibited equally. Applica...

  20. Heterogeneous network architectures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Henrik Lehrmann

    2006-01-01

    Future networks will be heterogeneous! Due to the sheer size of networks (e.g., the Internet) upgrades cannot be instantaneous and thus heterogeneity appears. This means that instead of trying to find the olution, networks hould be designed as being heterogeneous. One of the key equirements here...... is flexibility. This thesis investigates such heterogeneous network architectures and how to make them flexible. A survey of algorithms for network design is presented, and it is described how using heuristics can increase the speed. A hierarchical, MPLS based network architecture is described...... and it is discussed that it is advantageous to heterogeneous networks and illustrated by a number of examples. Modeling and simulation is a well-known way of doing performance evaluation. An approach to event-driven simulation of communication networks is presented and mixed complexity modeling, which can simplify...

  1. Mutual Entropy in Quantum Information and Information Genetics

    CERN Document Server

    Ohya, M

    2004-01-01

    After Shannon, entropy becomes a fundamental quantity to describe not only uncertainity or chaos of a system but also information carried by the system. Shannon's important discovery is to give a mathematical expression of the mutual entropy (information), information transmitted from an input system to an output system, by which communication processes could be analyzed on the stage of mathematical science. In this paper, first we review the quantum mutual entropy and discuss its uses in quantum information theory, and secondly we show how the classical mutual entropy can be used to analyze genomes, in particular, those of HIV.

  2. Mutually orthogonal Latin squares from the inner products of vectors in mutually unbiased bases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Joanne L; Rao, Asha [School of Mathematical and Geospatial Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne 3001 (Australia)], E-mail: joanne.hall@rmit.edu.au, E-mail: asha@rmit.edu.au

    2010-04-02

    Mutually unbiased bases (MUBs) are important in quantum information theory. While constructions of complete sets of d + 1 MUBs in C{sup d} are known when d is a prime power, it is unknown if such complete sets exist in non-prime power dimensions. It has been conjectured that complete sets of MUBs only exist in C{sup d} if a maximal set of mutually orthogonal Latin squares (MOLS) of side length d also exists. There are several constructions (Roy and Scott 2007 J. Math. Phys. 48 072110; Paterek, Dakic and Brukner 2009 Phys. Rev. A 79 012109) of complete sets of MUBs from specific types of MOLS, which use Galois fields to construct the vectors of the MUBs. In this paper, two known constructions of MUBs (Alltop 1980 IEEE Trans. Inf. Theory 26 350-354; Wootters and Fields 1989 Ann. Phys. 191 363-381), both of which use polynomials over a Galois field, are used to construct complete sets of MOLS in the odd prime case. The MOLS come from the inner products of pairs of vectors in the MUBs.

  3. Mutual coupling in MIMO antennas with transceiver separation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pelosi, Mauro; Knudsen, Miakel B.; Pedersen, Gert Frølund

    2011-01-01

    In multiple antenna systems mutual coupling needs to be minimized. We propose an alternative novel decoupling technique, investigating several multiple antenna configurations for small handsets through measurements and numerical simulations. The influence of different novel designs on performance...

  4. Constructing an inclusive speech community from two mutually ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Constructing an inclusive speech community from two mutually excluding ones: The third ... which meaningfully includes all its speakers as members, referred to as a “speech community”. ... EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT

  5. Generalized Mutual Synchronization between Two Controlled Interdependent Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper mainly focuses on the generalized mutual synchronization between two controlled interdependent networks. First, we propose the general model of controlled interdependent networks A and B with time-varying internetwork delays coupling. Then, by constructing Lyapunov functions and utilizing adaptive control technique, some sufficient conditions are established to ensure that the mutual synchronization errors between the state variables of networks A and B can asymptotically converge to zero. Finally, two numerical examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the theoretical results and to explore potential application in future smart grid. The simulation results also show how interdependent topologies and internetwork coupling delays influence the mutual synchronizability, which help to design interdependent networks with optimal mutual synchronizability.

  6. Information asymmetry, mutual funds and earnings management: Evidence from China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunhao Dai

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates how information asymmetry and mutual fund ownership affect listed companies’ earnings management. We show that (1 reducing information asymmetry improves firms’ earnings management behavior; (2 relative to short-term mutual funds, long-term mutual funds promote earnings quality by adopting a monitoring role; and (3 by dividing firms into high/low information asymmetry groups, we find that the information environment significantly increases the effect of long-term mutual funds on firms’ earnings management. In this paper, we provide new evidence for the role that institutional investors play in a typical emerging capital market. Our results have clear policy implications: to increase earnings quality, it is essential to improve information transparency and develop long-term institutional investors.

  7. Quantum correlation in degenerate optical parametric oscillators with mutual injections

    CERN Document Server

    Takata, Kenta

    2015-01-01

    We theoretically and numerically study the quantum dynamics of two degenerate optical parametric oscillators with mutual injections. The cavity mode in the optical coupling path between the two oscillator facets is explicitly considered. Stochastic equations for the oscillators and mutual injection path based on the positive $P$ representation are derived. The system of two gradually pumped oscillators with out-of-phase mutual injections are simulated, and their quantum states are investigated. When the incoherent loss of the oscillators other than the mutual injections is small, the squeezed quadratic amplitudes $\\hat{p}$ in the oscillators are positively correlated near the oscillation threshold. It indicates finite quantum correlation, and the entanglement between the intracavity subharmonic fields. When with a small loss of the injection path, each oscillator around the phase transition point forms macroscopic superposition for a small pump noise. It suggests that the low-loss injection path works as a sq...

  8. Spatial Information Based Medical Image Registration using Mutual Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benzheng Wei

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Image registration is a valuable technique for medical diagnosis and treatment. Due to the inferiority of image registration using maximum mutual information, a new hybrid method of multimodality medical image registration based on mutual information of spatial information is proposed. The new measure that combines mutual information, spatial information and feature characteristics, is proposed. Edge points are used as features, obtained from a morphology gradient detector. Feature characteristics like location, edge strength and orientation are taken into account to compute a joint probability distribution of corresponding edge points in two images. Mutual information based on this function is minimized to find the best alignment parameters. Finally, the translation parameters are calculated by using a modified Particle Swarm Optimization (MPSO algorithm. The experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed registration scheme.

  9. Information asymmetry, mutual funds and earnings management: Evidence from China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yunhao; Dai; Dongmin; Kong; Li; Wang

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates how information asymmetry and mutual fund ownership affect listed companies’ earnings management. We show that(1) reducing information asymmetry improves firms’ earnings management behavior;(2)relative to short-term mutual funds, long-term mutual funds promote earnings quality by adopting a monitoring role; and(3) by dividing firms into high/low information asymmetry groups, we find that the information environment significantly increases the effect of long-term mutual funds on firms’ earnings management. In this paper, we provide new evidence for the role that institutional investors play in a typical emerging capital market. Our results have clear policy implications: to increase earnings quality, it is essential to improve information transparency and develop long-term institutional investors.

  10. Overcoming tumor heterogeneity in the molecular diagnosis of urological cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Michael J; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos

    2014-11-01

    Our understanding of tumor heterogeneity and impact on treatment response is still in its infancy, presenting significant challenges to the molecular pathologist, treating physician and ultimately for the patient. Given that tumor recurrence due to treatment resistance is the most common cause of cancer death, there remains a critical unmet need to change the current paradigm. The mechanisms which underlie tumor heterogeneity can be broadly divided into genomic instability and non-mutational processes, including stochastic variations in cellular responses, modulation by tumor microenvironment and or phenotypic/ functional plasticity relating to cancer stem cells. We believe that these biological mechanisms are not mutually exclusive and emphasize the need for more suitable methodologies to exploit the spatiotemporal patterns of intratumoral heterogeneity using novel approaches such as quantitative tissue-based biomarker assessment and systemic fluid analytics. Generating a comprehensive patient-centric phenotypic disease profile should generate a 'codex' which can be employed to change the current treatment decision process.

  11. Viscosity and mutual diffusion in strongly asymmetric binary ionic mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Bastea, S

    2005-01-01

    We present molecular dynamics simulation results for the viscosity and mutual diffusion constant of a strongly asymmetric binary ionic mixture (BIM). We compare the results with available theoretical models previously tested for much smaller asymmetries. For the case of viscosity we propose a new predictive framework based on the linear mixing rule, while for mutual diffusion we discuss some consistency problems of widely used Boltzmann equation based models.

  12. Retrofitting mutual authentication to GSM using RAND hijacking

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Mohammed Shafiul Alam; MITCHELL, CHRIS J.

    2016-01-01

    As has been widely discussed, the GSM mobile telephony system only offers unilateral authentication of the mobile phone to the network; this limitation permits a range of attacks. While adding support for mutual authentication would be highly beneficial, changing the way GSM serving networks operate is not practical. This paper proposes a novel modification to the relationship between a Subscriber Identity Module (SIM) and its home network which allows mutual authentication without changing a...

  13. Liquidity risk and the performance of UK mutual funds

    OpenAIRE

    Foran, Jason; O'Sullivan, Niall

    2014-01-01

    We examine the role of liquidity risk, both as a stock characteristic as well as systematic liquidity risk, in UK mutual fund performance for the first time. Using four alternative measures of stock liquidity we extract principal components across stocks in order to construct systematic or market liquidity factors. We find that on average UK mutual funds are tilted towards liquid stocks (except for small stock funds as might be expected) but that, counter-intuitively, liquidity as a stock cha...

  14. Mutual Interference Models for CDMA Mobile Communication Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Hrudkay, K.; Wieser, V.

    2002-01-01

    Nowadays we are witnesses of a huge development one of the most progressive communication technology - mobile networks. The main problem in these networks is an elimination of the mutual interference, which, mainly in non-orthogonal CDMA networks, is the principal obstacle for reaching high transmission rates The aim of this contribution is to give simplified view to mutual interference models for orthogonal and non-orthogonal CDMA networks. The contribution is intended mainly for PhD. studen...

  15. Team Reasoning and Intentional Cooperation for Mutual Benefit

    OpenAIRE

    Sugden Robert

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a concept of intentional cooperation for mutual benefit. This concept uses a form of team reasoning in which team members aim to achieve common interests, rather than maximising a common utility function, and in which team reasoners can coordinate their behaviour by following pre-existing practices. I argue that a market transaction can express intentions for mutually beneficial cooperation even if, extensionally, participation in the transaction promotes each party’s self...

  16. Input impedance and mutual coupling of rectangular microstrip antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozar, D. M.

    1982-01-01

    A moment method solution to the problem of input impedance and mutual coupling of rectangular microstrip antenna elements is presented. The formulation uses the grounded dielectric slab Green's function to account rigorously for the presence of the substrate and surface waves. Both entire basis (EB) and piecewise sinusoidal (PWS) expansion modes are used, and their relative advantages are noted. Calculations of input impedance and mutual coupling are compared with measured data and other calculations.

  17. Portfolio Optimization of Equity Mutual Funds—Malaysian Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    Adem Kılıçman; Jaisree Sivalingam

    2010-01-01

    We focus on the equity mutual funds offered by three Malaysian banks, namely Public Bank Berhad, CIMB, and Malayan Banking Berhad. The equity mutual funds or equity trust is grouped into four clusters based on their characteristics and categorized as inferior, stable, good performing, and aggressive funds based on their return rates, variance and treynor index. Based on the cluster analysis, the return rates and variance of clusters are represented as triangular fuzzy numbers in order to refl...

  18. Mutual Exclusion in a Token Ring in CC++

    OpenAIRE

    Binau, Ulla

    1992-01-01

    This report describes a first attempt at using UNITY to verify reactive Compositional C++ (CC++) programs. We propose a distributed solution to the mutual exclusion problem using partially synchronous communication channels. The solution is described as a CC++ program, from which a small set of "basic" properties is derived. Using UNITY, we proof mutual exclusion and progress of the solution based on the set of properties derived from the code.

  19. Automotive radar – investigation of mutual interference mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    In the past mutual interference between automotive radar sensors has not been regarded as a major problem. With an increasing number of such systems, however, this topic is receiving more and more attention. The investigation of mutual interference and countermeasures is therefore one topic of the joint project "Radar on Chip for Cars" (RoCC) funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF). RoCC's goal is to pave the way for the development of high-per...

  20. Viscosity and mutual diffusion in strongly asymmetric plasma mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastea, S

    2004-09-07

    The authors present molecular dynamics simulation results for the viscosity and mutual diffusion constant of a strongly asymmetric two-component plasma (TCP). They compare the results with available theoretical models previously tested for much smaller asymmetries. for the case of viscosity they propose a new predictive framework based on the linear mixing rule, while for mutual diffusion they point out some consistency problems of widely used Boltzmann equation based models.

  1. Heterogeneous cellular networks

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Rose Qingyang

    2013-01-01

    A timely publication providing coverage of radio resource management, mobility management and standardization in heterogeneous cellular networks The topic of heterogeneous cellular networks has gained momentum in industry and the research community, attracting the attention of standardization bodies such as 3GPP LTE and IEEE 802.16j, whose objectives are looking into increasing the capacity and coverage of the cellular networks. This book focuses on recent progresses,  covering the related topics including scenarios of heterogeneous network deployment, interference management i

  2. Hierarchical Group Based Mutual Authentication and Key Agreement for Machine Type Communication in LTE and Future 5G Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Probidita Roychoudhury

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In view of the exponential growth in the volume of wireless data communication among heterogeneous devices ranging from smart phones to tiny sensors across a wide range of applications, 3GPP LTE-A has standardized Machine Type Communication (MTC which allows communication between entities without any human intervention. The future 5G cellular networks also envisage massive deployment of MTC Devices (MTCDs which will increase the total number of connected devices hundredfold. This poses a huge challenge to the traditional cellular system processes, especially the traditional Mutual Authentication and Key Agreement (AKA mechanism currently used in LTE systems, as the signaling load caused by the increasingly large number of devices may have an adverse effect on the regular Human to Human (H2H traffic. A solution in the literature has been the use of group based architecture which, while addressing the authentication traffic, has their share of issues. This paper introduces Hierarchical Group based Mutual Authentication and Key Agreement (HGMAKA protocol to address those issues and also enables the small cell heterogeneous architecture in line with 5G networks to support MTC services. The aggregate Message Authentication Code based approach has been shown to be lightweight and significantly efficient in terms of resource usage compared to the existing protocols, while being robust to authentication message failures, and scalable to heterogeneous network architectures.

  3. Spectral image analysis of mutual illumination between florescent objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tominaga, Shoji; Kato, Keiji; Hirai, Keita; Horiuchi, Takahiko

    2016-08-01

    This paper proposes a method for modeling and component estimation of the spectral images of the mutual illumination phenomenon between two fluorescent objects. First, we briefly describe the bispectral characteristics of a single fluorescent object, which are summarized as a Donaldson matrix. We suppose that two fluorescent objects with different bispectral characteristics are located close together under a uniform illumination. Second, we model the mutual illumination between two objects. It is shown that the spectral composition of the mutual illumination is summarized with four components: (1) diffuse reflection, (2) diffuse-diffuse interreflection, (3) fluorescent self-luminescence, and (4) interreflection by mutual fluorescent illumination. Third, we develop algorithms for estimating the spectral image components from the observed images influenced by the mutual illumination. When the exact Donaldson matrices caused by the mutual illumination influence are unknown, we have to solve a non-linear estimation problem to estimate both the spectral functions and the location weights. An iterative algorithm is then proposed to solve the problem based on the alternate estimation of the spectral functions and the location weights. In our experiments, the feasibility of the proposed method is shown in three cases: the known Donaldson matrices, weak interreflection, and strong interreflection.

  4. Non-rigid registration using higher-order mutual information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueckert, D.; Clarkson, M. J.; Hill, D. L. G.; Hawkes, D. J.

    2000-03-01

    Non-rigid registration of multi-modality images is an important tool for assessing temporal and structural changesbetween images. For rigid registration, voxel similarity measures like mutual information have been shown to alignimages from different modalities accurately and robustly. For non-rigid registration, mutual information can besensitive to local variations of intensity which in MR images may be caused by RF inhomogeneity. The reasonfor the sensitivity of mutual information towards intensity variations stems from the fact that mutual informationignores any spatial information. In this paper we propose an extension of the mutual information framework whichincorporates spatial information about higher-order image structure into the registration process and has the potentialto improve the accuracy and robustness of non-rigid registration in the presence of intensity variations. We haveapplied the non-rigid registration algorithm to a number of simulated MR brain images of a digital phantom whichhave been degraded by a simulated intensity shading and a known deformation. In addition, we have applied thealgorithm for the non-rigid registration of eight pre- and post-operative brain MR images which were acquired withan interventional MR scanner and therefore have substantial intensity shading due to RF field inhomogeneities. Inall cases the second-order estimate of mutual information leads to robust and accurate registration.

  5. Teaching Heterogeneous Classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millrood, Radislav

    2002-01-01

    Discusses an approach to teaching heterogeneous English-as-a-Second/Foreign-Language classes. Draws on classroom research data to describe the features of a success-building lesson context. (Author/VWL)

  6. Spatially heterogeneous drought analysis theory and future trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şen, Zekâi

    2014-11-01

    Most often drought analysis methodologies are based on point-wise time series record assessments with very specific local conclusions, but their areal, regional and in general spatial properties are examined to a lesser extent. This paper will provide general description of droughts in addition to the regional methodological approaches with rather simple but innovative manner. The study area is thought as composed of a set of sub-areas each with different dry (wet) period probabilities. In general, heterogeneous region has different probability of dry(wet) spell occurrence at each sub-area. In fact, whenever the probability at each sub-area is not equal to any other sub-area, it corresponds to heterogeneous region. The areal cover probability (ACP) of the region is derived by considering the point-wise probabilities on the assumptions that the occurrences of dry (wet) spells are mutually exclusive, independent with heterogeneous probability patterns. Additionally extreme value probabilities of areal drought coverage are derived for heterogeneous sub-area probabilities. All of the heterogeneous drought probability expressions reduce down to homogeneous case provided that sub-areal probabilities are equal to each other. The methodology presented in this paper paves ways for more realistic drought phenomenon spatial probability of occurrences when the sub-areal dry spell probabilities are dependent on each other but heterogeneous.

  7. An erbium-based bifuctional heterogeneous catalyst: a cooperative route towards C-C bond formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliverio, Manuela; Costanzo, Paola; Macario, Anastasia; De Luca, Giuseppina; Nardi, Monica; Procopio, Antonio

    2014-07-15

    Heterogeneous bifuctional catalysts are multifunctional synthetic catalysts enabling efficient organic transformations by exploiting two opposite functionalities without mutual destruction. In this paper we report the first Er(III)-based metallorganic heterogeneous catalyst, synthesized by post-calcination MW-assisted grafting and modification of the natural aminoacid L-cysteine. The natural acid-base distance between sites was maintained to assure the cooperation. The applicability of this new bifunctional heterogeneous catalyst to C-C bond formation and the supposed mechanisms of action are discussed as well.

  8. An Erbium-Based Bifuctional Heterogeneous Catalyst: A Cooperative Route Towards C-C Bond Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Oliverio

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Heterogeneous bifuctional catalysts are multifunctional synthetic catalysts enabling efficient organic transformations by exploiting two opposite functionalities without mutual destruction. In this paper we report the first Er(III-based metallorganic heterogeneous catalyst, synthesized by post-calcination MW-assisted grafting and modification of the natural aminoacid L-cysteine. The natural acid–base distance between sites was maintained to assure the cooperation. The applicability of this new bifunctional heterogeneous catalyst to C-C bond formation and the supposed mechanisms of action are discussed as well.

  9. Mutualism Disruption Threatens Global Plant Biodiversity: A Systematic Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare E Aslan

    Full Text Available As global environmental change accelerates, biodiversity losses can disrupt interspecific interactions. Extinctions of mutualist partners can create "widow" species, which may face reduced ecological fitness. Hypothetically, such mutualism disruptions could have cascading effects on biodiversity by causing additional species coextinctions. However, the scope of this problem - the magnitude of biodiversity that may lose mutualist partners and the consequences of these losses - remains unknown.We conducted a systematic review and synthesis of data from a broad range of sources to estimate the threat posed by vertebrate extinctions to the global biodiversity of vertebrate-dispersed and -pollinated plants. Though enormous research gaps persist, our analysis identified Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, and global oceanic islands as geographic regions at particular risk of disruption of these mutualisms; within these regions, percentages of plant species likely affected range from 2.1-4.5%. Widowed plants are likely to experience reproductive declines of 40-58%, potentially threatening their persistence in the context of other global change stresses.Our systematic approach demonstrates that thousands of species may be impacted by disruption in one class of mutualisms, but extinctions will likely disrupt other mutualisms, as well. Although uncertainty is high, there is evidence that mutualism disruption directly threatens significant biodiversity in some geographic regions. Conservation measures with explicit focus on mutualistic functions could be necessary to bolster populations of widowed species and maintain ecosystem functions.

  10. Persistence of pollination mutualisms in the presence of ants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuanshi; Wang, Shikun

    2015-01-01

    This paper considers plant-pollinator-ant systems in which the plant-pollinator interaction is mutualistic but ants have both positive and negative effects on plants. The ants also interfere with pollinators by preventing them from accessing plants. While a Beddington-DeAngelis (BD) formula can describe the plant-pollinator interaction, the formula is extended in this paper to characterize the pollination mutualism under the ant interference. Then, a plant-pollinator-ant system with the extended BD functional response is discussed, and global dynamics of the model demonstrate the mechanisms by which pollination mutualism can persist in the presence of ants. When the ant interference is strong, it can result in extinction of pollinators. Moreover, if the ants depend on pollination mutualism for survival, the strong interference could drive pollinators into extinction, which consequently lead to extinction of the ants themselves. When the ant interference is weak, a cooperation between plant-ant and plant-pollinator mutualisms could occur, which promotes survival of both ants and pollinators, especially in the case that ants (respectively, pollinators) cannot survive in the absence of pollinators (respectively, ants). Even when the level of ant interference remains invariant, varying ants' negative effect on plants can result in survival/extinction of both ants and pollinators. Therefore, our results provide an explanation for the persistence of pollination mutualism when there exist ants.

  11. Population dynamics and mutualism: Functional responses of benefits and costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, J. Nathaniel; DeAngelis, Donald L.; Bronstein, Judith L.

    2002-01-01

    We develop an approach for studying population dynamics resulting from mutualism by employing functional responses based on density‐dependent benefits and costs. These functional responses express how the population growth rate of a mutualist is modified by the density of its partner. We present several possible dependencies of gross benefits and costs, and hence net effects, to a mutualist as functions of the density of its partner. Net effects to mutualists are likely a monotonically saturating or unimodal function of the density of their partner. We show that fundamental differences in the growth, limitation, and dynamics of a population can occur when net effects to that population change linearly, unimodally, or in a saturating fashion. We use the mutualism between senita cactus and its pollinating seed‐eating moth as an example to show the influence of different benefit and cost functional responses on population dynamics and stability of mutualisms. We investigated two mechanisms that may alter this mutualism's functional responses: distribution of eggs among flowers and fruit abortion. Differences in how benefits and costs vary with density can alter the stability of this mutualism. In particular, fruit abortion may allow for a stable equilibrium where none could otherwise exist.

  12. Phytophagous insect-microbe mutualisms and adaptive evolutionary diversification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janson, Eric M; Stireman, John O; Singer, Michael S; Abbot, Patrick

    2008-05-01

    Adaptive diversification is a process intrinsically tied to species interactions. Yet, the influence of most types of interspecific interactions on adaptive evolutionary diversification remains poorly understood. In particular, the role of mutualistic interactions in shaping adaptive radiations has been largely unexplored, despite the ubiquity of mutualisms and increasing evidence of their ecological and evolutionary importance. Our aim here is to encourage empirical inquiry into the relationship between mutualism and evolutionary diversification, using herbivorous insects and their microbial mutualists as exemplars. Phytophagous insects have long been used to test theories of evolutionary diversification; moreover, the diversification of a number of phytophagous insect lineages has been linked to mutualisms with microbes. In this perspective, we examine microbial mutualist mediation of ecological opportunity and ecologically based divergent natural selection for their insect hosts. We also explore the conditions and mechanisms by which microbial mutualists may either facilitate or impede adaptive evolutionary diversification. These include effects on the availability of novel host plants or adaptive zones, modifying host-associated fitness trade-offs during host shifts, creating or reducing enemy-free space, and, overall, shaping the evolution of ecological (host plant) specialization. Although the conceptual framework presented here is built on phytophagous insect-microbe mutualisms, many of the processes and predictions are broadly applicable to other mutualisms in which host ecology is altered by mutualistic interactions.

  13. On the mutual information in conformal field theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bin; Chen, Lin; Hao, Peng-xiang; Long, Jiang

    2017-06-01

    In this work, we study the universal behaviors in the mutual information of two disjoint spheres in a conformal field theory (CFT). By using the operator product expansion of the spherical twist operator in terms of the conformal family, we show that the large distance expansion of the mutual information can be cast in terms of the conformal blocks. We develop the 1 /n prescription to compute the coefficients before the conformal blocks. For a single conformal family, the leading nonvanishing contribution to the mutual information comes from the bilinear operators. We show that the coefficients of these operators take universal forms and such universal behavior persists in the bilinear operators with derivatives as well. Consequently the first few leading order contributions to the mutual information in CFT take universal forms. To illustrate our framework, we discuss the free scalars and free fermions in various dimensions. For the free scalars, we compute the mutual information to the next-to-leading order and find good agreement with the improved numerical lattice result. For the free fermion, we compute the leading order result, which is of universal form, and find the good match with the numerical study. Our formalism could be applied to any CFT potentially.

  14. Zen and the Brain: Mutually Illuminating Topics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James H Austin

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Zen Buddhist meditative practices emphasize the long-term, mindful training of attention and awareness during one’s ordinary daily-life activities, the shedding of egocentric behaviors, and the skillful application of one’s innate compassionate resources of insight-wisdom toward others and oneself.This review focuses on how such a comprehensive approach to training the brain could relate to a distinctive flavor of Zen: its emphasis on direct experience, with special reference to those major acute states of awakening that create deep transformations of consciousness and behavior. In Japanese, these advanced states are called kensho and satori.Ten key concepts are reviewed. They begin by distinguishing between the concentrative and receptive forms of meditation, noticing the complementary ways that they each train our normal ‘top-down’ and ‘bottom-up’ modes of attentive processing. Additional concepts distinguish between our two major processing pathways. The self-centered, egocentric frame of reference processes information in relation to our body (our soma or to our mental functions (our psyche. The other-centered frame of reference processes information anonymously. Its prefix, allo- simply means ‘other’ in Greek. Subsequent concepts consider how these useful Greek words --- ego/allo, soma/psyche --- correlate with the normal functional anatomy of important thalamo↔cortical connections. A plausible model then envisions how a triggering stimulus that captures attention could prompt the reticular nucleus to release GABA; how its selective inhibition of the dorsal thalamus could then block both our higher somatic and psychic cortical functions; so as to: a delete the maladaptive aspects of selfhood, while also b releasing the direct, all-inclusive, globally-unified experience of other.Two final concepts consider how the long-term meditative training of intuitive functions relates to certain kinds of word-free spatial tasks that

  15. Heterogeneity in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyak, Kornelia

    2011-10-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease. There is a high degree of diversity between and within tumors as well as among cancer-bearing individuals, and all of these factors together determine the risk of disease progression and therapeutic resistance. Advances in technologies such as whole-genome sequencing and functional viability screens now allow us to analyze tumors at unprecedented depths. However, translating this increasing knowledge into clinical practice remains a challenge in part due to tumor evolution driven by the diversity of cancer cell populations and their microenvironment. The articles in this Review series discuss recent advances in our understanding of breast tumor heterogeneity, therapies tailored based on this knowledge, and future ways of assessing and treating heterogeneous tumors.

  16. Green heterogeneous wireless networks

    CERN Document Server

    Ismail, Muhammad; Nee, Hans-Peter; Qaraqe, Khalid A; Serpedin, Erchin

    2016-01-01

    This book focuses on the emerging research topic "green (energy efficient) wireless networks" which has drawn huge attention recently from both academia and industry. This topic is highly motivated due to important environmental, financial, and quality-of-experience (QoE) considerations. Specifically, the high energy consumption of the wireless networks manifests in approximately 2% of all CO2 emissions worldwide. This book presents the authors’ visions and solutions for deployment of energy efficient (green) heterogeneous wireless communication networks. The book consists of three major parts. The first part provides an introduction to the "green networks" concept, the second part targets the green multi-homing resource allocation problem, and the third chapter presents a novel deployment of device-to-device (D2D) communications and its successful integration in Heterogeneous Networks (HetNets). The book is novel in that it specifically targets green networking in a heterogeneous wireless medium, which re...

  17. Subsumption Checking between Concept Queries in Different Ontologies Based on Mutual Instances

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    This paper proposes a checking method based on mutual instances and discusses three key problems in the method: how to deal with mistakes in the mutual instances and how to deal with too many or too few mutual instances. It provides the checking based on the weighted mutual instances considering fault tolerance, gives a way to partition the large-scale mutual instances, and proposes a process greatly reducing the manual annotation work to get more mutual instances. Intension annotation that improves the checking method is also discussed. The method is practical and effective to check subsumption relations between concept queries in different ontologies based on mutual instances.

  18. Last-passage Monte Carlo algorithm for mutual capacitance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Chi-Ok; Given, James A

    2006-08-01

    We develop and test the last-passage diffusion algorithm, a charge-based Monte Carlo algorithm, for the mutual capacitance of a system of conductors. The first-passage algorithm is highly efficient because it is charge based and incorporates importance sampling; it averages over the properties of Brownian paths that initiate outside the conductor and terminate on its surface. However, this algorithm does not seem to generalize to mutual capacitance problems. The last-passage algorithm, in a sense, is the time reversal of the first-passage algorithm; it involves averages over particles that initiate on an absorbing surface, leave that surface, and diffuse away to infinity. To validate this algorithm, we calculate the mutual capacitance matrix of the circular-disk parallel-plate capacitor and compare with the known numerical results. Good agreement is obtained.

  19. Solving Reality Problems by Using Mutual Information Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Ju Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cross-mutual information (CMI can calculate to time series for thousands of sampled points from corticocortical connection among different functional states of brain in Alzheimer’s disease (AD patients. The aim of this study was to use mutual information analysis in the multichannel EEG to predict the probability of AD disease. Considering the correlation between AD disease and ageing effect, the participants were 9 AD patients and 45 normal cases involving teenagers, young people and elders. This data revealed that both right frontal and temporo-parietal are differences between normal and AD participants. Besides, this study found the theta band is the main frequency to separate AD patients from all participants. Furthermore, this study suggested a higher distinguishable method by mutual information to predict the possibility AD patients.

  20. Occurrence and characteristics of mutual interference between LIDAR scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gunzung; Eom, Jeongsook; Park, Seonghyeon; Park, Yongwan

    2015-05-01

    The LIDAR scanner is at the heart of object detection of the self-driving car. Mutual interference between LIDAR scanners has not been regarded as a problem because the percentage of vehicles equipped with LIDAR scanners was very rare. With the growing number of autonomous vehicle equipped with LIDAR scanner operated close to each other at the same time, the LIDAR scanner may receive laser pulses from other LIDAR scanners. In this paper, three types of experiments and their results are shown, according to the arrangement of two LIDAR scanners. We will show the probability that any LIDAR scanner will interfere mutually by considering spatial and temporal overlaps. It will present some typical mutual interference scenario and report an analysis of the interference mechanism.

  1. Sparse Bayesian learning for DOA estimation with mutual coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jisheng; Hu, Nan; Xu, Weichao; Chang, Chunqi

    2015-10-16

    Sparse Bayesian learning (SBL) has given renewed interest to the problem of direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation. It is generally assumed that the measurement matrix in SBL is precisely known. Unfortunately, this assumption may be invalid in practice due to the imperfect manifold caused by unknown or misspecified mutual coupling. This paper describes a modified SBL method for joint estimation of DOAs and mutual coupling coefficients with uniform linear arrays (ULAs). Unlike the existing method that only uses stationary priors, our new approach utilizes a hierarchical form of the Student t prior to enforce the sparsity of the unknown signal more heavily. We also provide a distinct Bayesian inference for the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm, which can update the mutual coupling coefficients more efficiently. Another difference is that our method uses an additional singular value decomposition (SVD) to reduce the computational complexity of the signal reconstruction process and the sensitivity to the measurement noise.

  2. Thermalization of Mutual Information in Hyperscaling Violating Backgrounds

    CERN Document Server

    Tanhayi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    We study certain features of scaling behaviors of the mutual information during a process of thermalization, more precisely we extend the time scaling behavior of mutual information which has been discussed in \\cite{Alishahiha:2014jxa} to time-dependent hyperscaling violating geometries. We use the holographic description for entanglement entropy for two disjoint system consisting of two parallel strips whose widths are much larger than the separation between them. We find that in hyperscaling violating backgrounds the dynamical exponent plays a crucial rule in reading the general time scaling behavior (\\emph{e.g.,} at the pre-local-equilibration regime) of the mutual information during the thermalization process. While the scaling violating parameter appears in redefinition of the dimension of the theory.

  3. Production rate of the system-bath mutual information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sheng-Wen

    2017-07-01

    When an open system comes into contact with several thermal baths, the entropy produced by the irreversible processes (d Si=d S -∑α đQα/Tα ) keeps increasing, and this entropy production rate is always non-negative. However, when the system comes into contact with nonthermal baths containing quantum coherence or squeezing, this entropy production formula does not apply. In this paper, we study the increasing rate of mutual information between an open system and its environment. In the case of canonical thermal baths, we prove that this mutual information production rate could return exactly to the previous entropy production rate. Furthermore, we study an example of a single boson mode that comes into contact with multiple squeezed thermal baths, where the conventional entropy production rate does not apply, and we find that this mutual information production rate remains non-negative, which indicates a monotonic increase in the correlation between the system and its environment.

  4. Homosexual mutuality: variation on a theme by Erik Erikson.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohier, R

    The exploratory descriptive study described here was conducted in order to produce the initial empirical evidence to support reformulation of the theoretical construct of heterosexual mutuality (Erikson, 1975). Six persons were interviewed in depth on tape in order to locate them on one of four identity statuses constructed by Marcia (1964, 1966, 1973). The tool was modified and extended to meet the purposes of the study. The questions are directed toward illumination of conflictual moments in the life cycle when the ability to make appropriate decisions engenders character growth, and supports the personality integration of adulthood. An ability to make decisions results in personality integration. The small study provides evidence that there exists a homosexual mutuality (contrary to Erikson's position) which is no less valuable than heterosexual mutuality, and forms an equal basis for adult personality integration.

  5. MUTUAL COUPLING REDUCTION BETWEEN MICROSTRIP ANTENNAS USING ELECTROMAGNETIC BANDGAP STRUCTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.N. Gaikwad

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available When the number of antenna elements is placed in forming the arrays, mutual coupling between the antenna elements is a critical issue. This is particularly concern in phase array antennas. Mutual coupling is a potential source of performance degradation in the form of deviation of the radiation pattern from the desired one, gain reduction due to excitation of surface wave, increased side lobe levels etc. EBG (Electromagnetic Band Gap structure (also called as Photonic Bandgap Structure PBG not only enhances the performance of the patch antennas but also provides greater amount of isolation when placed between the microstrip arrays. This greatly reduces the mutual coupling between the antenna elements. The radiation efficiency, gain, antenna efficiency, VSWR, frequency, directivity etc greatly improves over the conventional patch antennas using EBG. The EBG structure and normal patch antenna is simulated using IE3D antenna simulation software.

  6. Mutual information after a local quench in conformal field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Asplund, Curtis T

    2013-01-01

    We compute the entanglement entropy and mutual information for two disjoint intervals in two-dimensional conformal field theories as a function of time after a local quench, using the replica trick and boundary conformal field theory. We obtain explicit formulae for the universal contributions, which are leading in the regimes of, for example, close or well-separated intervals of fixed length. The results are largely consistent with the quasiparticle picture, in which entanglement above that present in the ground state is carried by pairs of entangled, freely propagating excitations. We also calculate the mutual information for two disjoint intervals in a proposed holographic local quench, whose holographic energy-momentum tensor matches the conformal field theory one. We find that the holographic mutual information shows qualitative differences from the conformal field theory results and we discuss possible interpretations of this.

  7. Measuring causality by taking the directional symbolic mutual information approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Gui; Xie Lei; Chu Jian

    2013-01-01

    We propose a novel measure to assess causality through the comparison of symbolic mutual information between the future of one random quantity and the past of the other.This provides a new perspective that is different from the conventional conceptions.Based on this point of view,a new causality index is derived that uses the definition of directional symbolic mutual information.This measure presents properties that are different from the time delayed mutual information since the symbolization captures the dynamic features of the analyzed time series.In addition to characterizing the direction and the amplitude of the information flow,it can also detect coupling delays.This method has the property of robustness,conceptual simplicity,and fast computational speed.

  8. Mutual Information of Pauli Channels with Correlated Noise

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Li-zhen; FANG Mao-Fa

    2007-01-01

    A general formula for the mutual information of the Pauli channels with memory modelled by correlated noise is derived.It is shown that the mutual information depends on the channel shrinking factor,the input state parameter and the channel memory coefficient.The analyses based on the general formula reveal that the entanglement is always a useful resource to enhance the mutual information of some.Pauli channels,such as the bit flip channel and the bit-phase flip channel.Our analyses also show that the entanglement is not advantageous to the reliable transmission of classical information for Borne Pauli channels at any time,such as the phase flip channel and the phase damping channel.

  9. Sparse Bayesian Learning for DOA Estimation with Mutual Coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jisheng Dai

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Sparse Bayesian learning (SBL has given renewed interest to the problem of direction-of-arrival (DOA estimation. It is generally assumed that the measurement matrix in SBL is precisely known. Unfortunately, this assumption may be invalid in practice due to the imperfect manifold caused by unknown or misspecified mutual coupling. This paper describes a modified SBL method for joint estimation of DOAs and mutual coupling coefficients with uniform linear arrays (ULAs. Unlike the existing method that only uses stationary priors, our new approach utilizes a hierarchical form of the Student t prior to enforce the sparsity of the unknown signal more heavily. We also provide a distinct Bayesian inference for the expectation-maximization (EM algorithm, which can update the mutual coupling coefficients more efficiently. Another difference is that our method uses an additional singular value decomposition (SVD to reduce the computational complexity of the signal reconstruction process and the sensitivity to the measurement noise.

  10. Isotopes in heterogeneous catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Hargreaves, Justin SJ

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this book is to review the current, state-of-the-art application of isotopic methods to the field of heterogeneous catalysis. Isotopic studies are arguably the ultimate technique in in situ methods for heterogeneous catalysis. In this review volume, chapters have been contributed by experts in the field and the coverage includes both the application of specific isotopes - Deuterium, Tritium, Carbon-14, Sulfur-35 and Oxygen-18 - as well as isotopic techniques - determination of surface mobility, steady state transient isotope kinetic analysis, and positron emission profiling.

  11. The mutuality metaphor: understanding healthcare provision in NHS Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howieson, Brian

    2016-06-20

    Purpose - Better Health, Better Care Action Plan (Scottish Government, 2007) sets out how the Scottish Government intends to strengthen public ownership of the National Health Service in Scotland. The purpose of this paper is to advance extant knowledge by understanding how a state-led mutual health policy may be interpreted, and importantly, communicated. Design/methodology/approach - The definitional problem of mutuality will be discussed and analysed in terms of how it is (or perhaps should be) communicated? will be offered. Findings - It actually may be more instructive to think of, and communicate, mutuality as a metaphor to aid understanding of the openness and fluidity found in NHS Scotland. Research limitations/implications - The existence of paradox and ambiguity does not, however, negate the usefulness of the term "mutuality". Quite the opposite in fact: it is precisely by examining healthcare and its delivery through the lens of mutuality (rather than rejecting its complexity as a failure) that this amorphousness can be better appreciated. Practical implications - There is a need for more public, professional, and academic debate to explore and clarify its implementation, and how it is to be led. This must be provided whilst recognising the daily imperatives that NHS leaders must face. This would suggest, therefore, that a dual development path may help. Originality/value - Although Better Health, Better Care Action Plan was published in 2007, some eight years on there is still confusion and misunderstanding as to what mutuality in healthcare is, not only in policy and theory, but also in practice. It is hoped that this analysis will help address, in part, some of this confusion and misunderstanding.

  12. Rényi generalizations of the conditional quantum mutual information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berta, Mario [Institute for Quantum Information and Matter, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Seshadreesan, Kaushik P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Hearne Institute for Theoretical Physics, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States); Wilde, Mark M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Hearne Institute for Theoretical Physics, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States); Center for Computation and Technology, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    The conditional quantum mutual information I(A; B|C) of a tripartite state ρ{sub ABC} is an information quantity which lies at the center of many problems in quantum information theory. Three of its main properties are that it is non-negative for any tripartite state, that it decreases under local operations applied to systems A and B, and that it obeys the duality relation I(A; B|C) = I(A; B|D) for a four-party pure state on systems ABCD. The conditional mutual information also underlies the squashed entanglement, an entanglement measure that satisfies all of the axioms desired for an entanglement measure. As such, it has been an open question to find Rényi generalizations of the conditional mutual information, that would allow for a deeper understanding of the original quantity and find applications beyond the traditional memoryless setting of quantum information theory. The present paper addresses this question, by defining different α-Rényi generalizations I{sub α}(A; B|C) of the conditional mutual information, some of which we can prove converge to the conditional mutual information in the limit α → 1. Furthermore, we prove that many of these generalizations satisfy non-negativity, duality, and monotonicity with respect to local operations on one of the systems A or B (with it being left as an open question to prove that monotonicity holds with respect to local operations on both systems). The quantities defined here should find applications in quantum information theory and perhaps even in other areas of physics, but we leave this for future work. We also state a conjecture regarding the monotonicity of the Rényi conditional mutual informations defined here with respect to the Rényi parameter α. We prove that this conjecture is true in some special cases and when α is in a neighborhood of one.

  13. Use of the mutual exclusivity assumption by young word learners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markman, Ellen M.; Wasow, Judith L.; Hansen, Mikkel

    2003-01-01

    A critical question about early word learning is whether word learning constraints such as mutual exclusivity exist and foster early language acquisition. It is well established that children will map a novel label to a novel rather than a familiar object. Evidence for the role of mutual...... exclusivity in such indirect word learning has been questioned because: (1) it comes mostly from 2 and 3-year-olds and (2) the findings might be accounted for, not by children avoiding second labels, but by the novel object which creates a lexical gap children are motivated to fill. Three studies addressed...

  14. Biochemical Machines for the Interconversion of Mutual Information and Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Thomas; Jones, Nick S.; ten Wolde, Pieter Rein; Ouldridge, Thomas E.

    2017-01-01

    We propose a physically realizable information-driven device consisting of an enzyme in a chemical bath, interacting with pairs of molecules prepared in correlated states. These correlations persist without direct interaction and thus store free energy equal to the mutual information. The enzyme can harness this free energy, and that stored in the individual molecular states, to do chemical work. Alternatively, the enzyme can use the chemical driving to create mutual information. A modified system can function without external intervention, approaching biological systems more closely.

  15. Evaluating Selection and Timing Ability of a Mutual Fund

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duguleană L.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the methodology and a case study to evaluate the performance of a mutual fund by taking a look at the timing and selection abilities of a portfolio manager. Separating the timing and selection abilities of the fund manager is taken into consideration by two major models. The data about the mutual fund chosen for study is the German blue chip fund “DWS Deutsche Aktien Typ O”, which includes most of the DAX 30 companies. The data consists of 117 monthly observations of the fund returns from January 1999 to September 2008. We used EViews to analyse the data.

  16. Mutual Interference Models for CDMA Mobile Communication Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Hrudkay

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays we are witnesses of a huge development one of the mostprogressive communication technology - mobile networks. The mainproblem in these networks is an elimination of the mutual interference,which, mainly in non-orthogonal CDMA networks, is the principalobstacle for reaching high transmission rates The aim of thiscontribution is to give simplified view to mutual interference modelsfor orthogonal and non-orthogonal CDMA networks. The contribution isintended mainly for PhD. students to help them to obtain an orientationin such a complicated areas, as the interference models for CDMAnetworks are.

  17. Dimensionality Reduction by Mutual Information for Text Classification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Li-zhen; SONG Han-tao; LU Yu-chang

    2005-01-01

    The frame of text classification system was presented. The high dimensionality in feature space for text classification was studied. The mutual information is a widely used information theoretic measure, in a descriptive way, to measure the stochastic dependency of discrete random variables. The measure method was used as a criterion to reduce high dimensionality of feature vectors in text classification on Web. Feature selections or conversions were performed by using maximum mutual information including linear and non-linear feature conversions. Entropy was used and extended to find right features commendably in pattern recognition systems. Favorable foundation would be established for text classification mining.

  18. External Monitoring and Dynamic Behavior in Mutual Funds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the impact of external monitoring on the behavior in mutual funds. Specifically, we investigate how and why external monitoring can alleviate contracting inefficiency caused by information asymmetry between investors and the manager. It is shown that efficiency loss emerges when investors contract with the manager just relying on her investment return history. The establishment of external monitoring that provides investors more information about the manager’s ability can improve contracting efficiency, which converges to first-best as external monitoring strengthens. These results provide strong support for tightening supervision in mutual fund industry.

  19. Mutual Impact of Diabetes Mellitus and Tuberculosis in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jun; Zhang, Hui; Zhao, Yan Lin; Wang, Li Xia; Chen, Ming Ting

    2017-05-01

    China has a double burden of diabetes mellitus and tuberculosis, and many studies have been carried out on the mutual impact of these two diseases. This paper systematically reviewed studies conducted in China covering the mutual impact of epidemics of diabetes and tuberculosis, the impact of diabetes on multi-drug resistant tuberculosis and on the tuberculosis clinical manifestation and treatment outcome, the yields of bi-directional screening, and economic evaluation for tuberculosis screening among diabetes patients. Copyright © 2017 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  20. Investor Attrition and Fund Flows in Mutual Funds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Susan E. K.; Xu, Haoyu

    2017-01-01

    We explore the properties of equity mutual funds that experience a loss of assets after poor performance. We document that both inflows and outflows are less sensitive to performance, because performance-sensitive investors leave or decide not to invest after bad performance. Consistent with the ......We explore the properties of equity mutual funds that experience a loss of assets after poor performance. We document that both inflows and outflows are less sensitive to performance, because performance-sensitive investors leave or decide not to invest after bad performance. Consistent......–performance sensitivity when attrition arises after good performance or investors invest for nonperformance reasons....

  1. Signal-to-noise-optimal scaling of heterogenous population codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibold, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Similarity measures for neuronal population responses that are based on scalar products can be little informative if the neurons have different firing statistics. Based on signal-to-noise optimality, this paper derives positive weighting factors for the individual neurons' response rates in a heterogeneous neuronal population. The weights only depend on empirical statistics. If firing follows Poisson statistics, the weights can be interpreted as mutual information per spike. The scaling is shown to improve linear separability and clustering as compared to unscaled inputs.

  2. Supporting parent-child interactions: music therapy as an intervention for promoting mutually responsive orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasiali, Varvara

    2012-01-01

    Music therapists working with families address relationship and interpersonal communication issues. Few controlled studies exist in the literature but a growing body of documented practice is emerging. This study makes a contribution by documenting how music therapy supports mutuality and reciprocity in parent-child interactions. This study investigated mutually responsive orientation (MRO) behaviors of young children (aged 3-5) and their family members during music therapy. Participants were 4 families with low income and history of maternal depression as common risk factors. Data were collected by videotaping sessions, creating field notes and analytic memos, conducting parent interviews and reviewing parent journals. A cross-case analysis using MRO theory as a conceptualizing framework was used for the purpose of data reduction. Greeting and farewell rituals, and the flexibility of music-based therapeutic applications facilitated development of coordinated routines. Therapist's actions (e.g., encouraging and modeling musical interactions) and bidirectional parent-child actions (e.g., joint attention, turn-taking, being playful) facilitated harmonious communication. Behaviors promoting mutual cooperation were evident when adults attempted to scaffold a child's participation or when children sought comfort from parents, engaged in social referencing and made requests that shaped the direction of the session. The novelty of musical tasks captivated attention, increasing impulse inhibition. Parent actions (e.g., finding delight in watching their child participate, acting silly) and parent-child interactions (e.g., play exploration, shared excitement, cuddling) contributed to positive emotional ambiance. Music therapy assisted development of MRO within parent-child dyads by providing opportunities to rehearse adaptive ways of connecting with each other. Results of this study may serve as an archetypal model guiding clinical treatment planning.

  3. Heterogeneous Uncertainty Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-08

    probabilistic ( HTP ) agents, the concept of probabilistic version of XML and RDF, and probabilistic methods to reason about collections of moving objects. S...heterogeneous temporal probabilistic ( HTP ) agents, the concept of probabilistic version of XML and RDF, and probabilistic methods to reason about...temporal probabilistic ( HTP ) agent. HTP agents can build temporal probabilistic reasoning capabilities on top of multiple databases and software

  4. Heterogeneous Computing in Economics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dziubinski, M.P.; Grassi, S.

    2014-01-01

    This paper shows the potential of heterogeneous computing in solving dynamic equilibrium models in economics. We illustrate the power and simplicity of C++ Accelerated Massive Parallelism (C++ AMP) recently introduced by Microsoft. Starting from the same exercise as Aldrich et al. (J Econ Dyn...

  5. Heterogeneity of Intellectual Assets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlgren, Johan Henrich; Lund Jensen, Rasmus; Valentin, Finn

    2004-01-01

    This paper deals with methodological issues of assessing the composition and level ofheterogeneity of firms' intellectual assets. It develops an original metric - referred to asthe H-index - for measuring heterogeneity using data extracted from patent documents.The main purpose is to improve...

  6. Heterogeneous chromium catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to a heterogeneous chromium catalyst system for the polymerisation of ethylene and/or alpha olefins prepared by the steps of: (a) providing a silica-containing support, (b) treating the silica-containing support with a chromium compound to form a chromium-based silica-c

  7. Information and Heterogeneous Beliefs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Peter Ove; Qin, Zhenjiang

    2014-01-01

    In an incomplete market with heterogeneous prior beliefs, we show public information can have a substantial impact on the ex ante cost of capital, trading volume, and investor welfare. The Pareto effcient public information system is the system enjoying the maximum ex ante cost of capital and the...

  8. Heterogeneity of Dutch rainfall

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witter, J.V.

    1984-01-01

    Rainfall data for the Netherlands have been used in this study to investigate aspects of heterogeneity of rainfall, in particular local differences in rainfall levels, time trends in rainfall, and local differences in rainfall trend. The possible effect of urbanization and industrialization on the

  9. Receiver Heterogeneity Helps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovács, Erika R.; Pedersen, Morten Videbæk; Roetter, Daniel Enrique Lucani;

    2014-01-01

    Heterogeneity amongst devices and desired service are commonly seen as a source of additional challenges for setting up an efficient multi-layer multicast service. In particular, devices requiring only the base layer can become a key bottleneck to the performance for other devices. This paper...

  10. Evolution of Cooperation in Evolutionary Games for Heterogeneous Interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱晓岚; 杨俊忠

    2012-01-01

    When a population structure is modelled as a square lattice,the cooperation may be improved for an evolutionary prisoner dilemma game or be inhibited for an evolutionary snowdrift game.In this work,we investigate cooperation in a population on a square lattice where the interaction among players contains both prisoner dilemma game and snowdrift game.The heterogeneity in interaction is introduced to the population in two different ways:the heterogenous character of interaction assigned to every player(HCP) or the heterogenous character of interaction assigned to every link between any two players(HCL).The resonant enhancement of cooperation in the case of HCP is observed while the resonant inhibition of cooperation in the case of HCL is prominent.The explanations on the enhancement or inhibition of cooperation are presented for these two cases.

  11. Modeling financial contagion using mutually exciting jump processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aït-Sahalia, Y.; Cacho-Diaz, J.; Laeven, R.J.A.

    2013-01-01

    We propose a model designed to capture the dynamics of asset returns, with periods of crises that are characterized by contagion. In the model, a jump in one region of the world increases the intensity of jumps both in the same region (self-excitation) as well as in other regions (mutual

  12. On the Empirical Evidence of Mutual Fund Strategic Risk Taking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goriaev, A.P.; Nijman, T.E.; Werker, B.J.M.

    2001-01-01

    We reexamine empirical evidence on strategic risk-taking behavior by mutual fund managers.Several studies suggest that fund performance in the first semester of a year influences risk-taking in the second semester.However, we show that previous empirical studies implicitly assume that idiosyncratic

  13. Gene Regulatory Network Reconstruction Using Conditional Mutual Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Wang

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The inference of gene regulatory network from expression data is an important area of research that provides insight to the inner workings of a biological system. The relevance-network-based approaches provide a simple and easily-scalable solution to the understanding of interaction between genes. Up until now, most works based on relevance network focus on the discovery of direct regulation using correlation coefficient or mutual information. However, some of the more complicated interactions such as interactive regulation and coregulation are not easily detected. In this work, we propose a relevance network model for gene regulatory network inference which employs both mutual information and conditional mutual information to determine the interactions between genes. For this purpose, we propose a conditional mutual information estimator based on adaptive partitioning which allows us to condition on both discrete and continuous random variables. We provide experimental results that demonstrate that the proposed regulatory network inference algorithm can provide better performance when the target network contains coregulated and interactively regulated genes.

  14. 12 CFR 544.5 - Federal mutual savings association bylaws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... by the association. (3) Corporate governance procedures. A Federal mutual association may elect to follow the corporate governance procedures of the laws of the state where the main office of the... corporate governance procedures, and shall file a copy of such bylaws, which are effective upon...

  15. Market timing: A decomposition of mutual fund returns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.A.P. Swinkels (Laurens); P.J. van der Sluis; M.J.C.M. Verbeek (Marno)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractWe decompose the conditional expected mutual fund return in five parts. Two parts, selectivity and expert market timing, can be attributed to manager skill, and three to variation in market exposure that can be achieved by private investors as well. The dynamic model that we use to estim

  16. Mutual Intercultural Relations among University Students in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Yongxia; Safdar, Saba; Berry, John

    2016-01-01

    The current study examies the views of both international and domestic students in Canada using the conceptual and empirical framework from the MIRIPS (Mutual Intercultural Relations in Plural Societies) project (http://www.victoria.ac.nz/cacr/research/mirips). Two hypotheses were examined. First is the "multiculturalism hypothesis"…

  17. Synchronization in a ring of mutually coupled electromechanical devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yolong, V Y Taffoti [Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Strada Costiera 11, 34100 Trieste (Italy); Woafo, P [Laboratory of Mechanics, Faculty of Sciences, P O Box 812, Yaounde (Cameroon)

    2006-11-15

    We study the synchronization in a ring of mutually coupled electromechanical devices. Each device consists of an electrical Duffing oscillator coupled magnetically with a linear mechanical oscillator. By varying the coupling coefficient, we find the ranges for cluster and complete synchronization, either in the regular state or in the chaotic one. Effects of this coupling parameter show various types of bifurcation sequences.

  18. Plant-carnivore mutualism through herbivore-induced carnivore attractants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takabayashi, J.; Dicke, M.

    1996-01-01

    Plants and carnivorous arthropods can interact mutualistically. A recent discovery is that such mutualisms can be mediated by volatile compounds — produced by plants in response to herbivore damage — that attract carnivores. However, after emission of these attractants, the plant has no control over

  19. Institutionalized Mutuality in Canada-China Management Education Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Shuguang; Liu, Xianjun

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the Canada-China Management Education Program (CCMEP, 1983-1996) between the University of Toronto (UT) and Huazhong University of Science and Technology (HUST). In this paper, we create a "Three Levels/Four Parameters" analytical framework, based on the concept of mutuality from Johan Galtung (1980) and the concept…

  20. Mutual Radiation Impedance of Uncollapsed CMUT Cells with Different Radii

    CERN Document Server

    Ozgurluk, Alper; Atalar, Abdullah; Koymen, Hayrettin

    2015-01-01

    A polynomial approximation is proposed for the mutual acoustic impedance between uncollapsed capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) cells with different radii in an infinite rigid baffle. The resulting approximation is employed in simulating CMUTs with a circuit model. A very good agreement is obtained with the corresponding finite element simulation (FEM) result.

  1. Mutual information area laws for thermal free fermions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernigau, H.; Kastoryano, M. J.; Eisert, J.

    2015-02-01

    We provide a rigorous and asymptotically exact expression of the mutual information of translationally invariant free fermionic lattice systems in a Gibbs state. In order to arrive at this result, we introduce a novel framework for computing determinants of Töplitz operators with smooth symbols, and for treating Töplitz matrices with system size dependent entries. The asymptotically exact mutual information for a partition of the 1D lattice satisfies an area law, with a prefactor which we compute explicitly. As examples, we discuss the fermionic XX model in one dimension and free fermionic models on the torus in higher dimensions in detail. Special emphasis is put on the discussion of the temperature dependence of the mutual information, scaling like the logarithm of the inverse temperature, hence confirming an expression suggested by conformal field theory. We also comment on the applicability of the formalism to treat open systems driven by quantum noise. In the appendix, we derive useful bounds to the mutual information in terms of purities. Finally, we provide a detailed error analysis for finite system sizes. This analysis is valuable in its own right for the abstract theory of Töplitz determinants.

  2. Renyi generalizations of the conditional quantum mutual information

    CERN Document Server

    Berta, Mario; Wilde, Mark M

    2014-01-01

    The conditional quantum mutual information $I(A;B|C)$ of a tripartite state $\\rho_{ABC}$ is an information quantity which lies at the center of many problems in quantum information theory. Three of its main properties are that it is non-negative for any tripartite state, that it decreases under local operations applied to systems $A$ and $B$, and that it obeys the duality relation $I(A;B|C)=I(A;B|D)$ for a four-party pure state on systems $ABCD$. It has been an open question to find Renyi generalizations of the conditional mutual information, that would allow for a deeper understanding of the original quantity and find applications beyond the traditional memoryless setting of quantum information theory. The present paper addresses this question, by defining different $\\alpha$-Renyi generalizations $I_{\\alpha}(A;B|C)$ of the conditional mutual information that all converge to the conditional mutual information in the limit $\\alpha \\to 1$. Furthermore, we prove that many of these generalizations satisfy the afo...

  3. Mutual recognition and the right to damages for criminal investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang Fuglsang Madsen Sørensen, Henning

    2015-01-01

    This article considers how the citizen who has been surrendered on an EAW in a case ending with acquittal or non-prosecution may achieve compensation for the loss of freedom and the surrender to another Member State. The analysis shows how the EAW and the principle of mutual recognition have been...

  4. Evolutionary dynamics of fluctuating populations with strong mutualism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chotibut, Thiparat; Nelson, David

    2013-03-01

    Evolutionary game theory with finite interacting populations is receiving increased attention, including subtle phenomena associated with number fluctuations, i.e., ``genetic drift.'' Models of cooperation and competition often utilize a simplified Moran model, with a strictly fixed total population size. We explore a more general evolutionary model with independent fluctuations in the numbers of two distinct species, in a regime characterized by ``strong mutualism.'' The model has two absorbing states, each corresponding to fixation of one of the two species, and allows exploration of the interplay between growth, competition, and mutualism. When mutualism is favored, number fluctuations eventually drive the system away from a stable fixed point, characterized by cooperation, to one of the absorbing states. Well-mixed populations will thus be taken over by a single species in a finite time, despite the bias towards cooperation. We calculate both the fixation probability and the mean fixation time as a function of the initial conditions and carrying capacities in the strong mutualism regime, using the method of matched asymptotic expansions. Our results are compared to computer simulations.

  5. On the behavior of mutual fund investors and managers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goriaev, A.P.

    2002-01-01

    This thesis investigates empirically and theoretically the behavior of mutual fund investors and managers. These two aspects are closely related to each other. Investors try to select funds that follow an optimal investment policy from their point of view, while fund managers are typically intereste

  6. Mutual Coupling Compensation Applied to a Uniform Circular Array

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belfiori, F.; Stefania, M.; Rossum, W.L. van

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, two approaches for compensation of mutual coupling and phase shifts in a passive radar system based on a circular array are compared. The first method is based on the measurement of the antenna scattering parameters and of further relative phase and amplitude variations between the ch

  7. The Development Of Mutual Trust In British Workplaces Through ?Partnership?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.R. Dietz (Graham)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThis article examines the alleged links between 'partnership' forms of managing workplace relationships in Britain, and the development of intra-organisational 'trust'. The potential for mutually complementary linkages between the two are clear, in theory at least: partnership, as define

  8. The Development Of Mutual Trust In British Workplaces Through ?Partnership?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.R. Dietz (Graham)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThis article examines the alleged links between 'partnership' forms of managing workplace relationships in Britain, and the development of intra-organisational 'trust'. The potential for mutually complementary linkages between the two are clear, in theory at least: partnership, as

  9. The Development Of Mutual Trust In British Workplaces Through ?Partnership?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.R. Dietz (Graham)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThis article examines the alleged links between 'partnership' forms of managing workplace relationships in Britain, and the development of intra-organisational 'trust'. The potential for mutually complementary linkages between the two are clear, in theory at least: partnership, as define

  10. Mutual information in a dilute, asymmetric neural network model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfield, Elliot

    We study the computational properties of a neural network consisting of binary neurons with dilute asymmetric synaptic connections. This simple model allows us to simulate large networks which can reflect more of the architecture and dynamics of real neural networks. Our main goal is to determine the dynamical behavior that maximizes the network's ability to perform computations. To this end, we apply information theory, measuring the average mutual information between pairs of pre- and post-synaptic neurons. Communication of information between neurons is an essential requirement for collective computation. Previous workers have demonstrated that neural networks with asymmetric connections undergo a transition from ordered to chaotic behavior as certain network parameters, such as the connectivity, are changed. We find that the average mutual information has a peak near the order-chaos transition, implying that the network can most efficiently communicate information between cells in this region. The mutual information peak becomes increasingly pronounced when the basic model is extended to incorporate more biologically realistic features, such as a variable threshold and nonlinear summation of inputs. We find that the peak in mutual information near the phase transition is a robust feature of the system for a wide range of assumptions about post-synaptic integration.

  11. On the Empirical Evidence of Mutual Fund Strategic Risk Taking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goriaev, A.P.; Nijman, T.E.; Werker, B.J.M.

    2001-01-01

    We reexamine empirical evidence on strategic risk-taking behavior by mutual fund managers.Several studies suggest that fund performance in the first semester of a year influences risk-taking in the second semester.However, we show that previous empirical studies implicitly assume that idiosyncratic

  12. Institutionalized Mutuality in Canada-China Management Education Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Shuguang; Liu, Xianjun

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the Canada-China Management Education Program (CCMEP, 1983-1996) between the University of Toronto (UT) and Huazhong University of Science and Technology (HUST). In this paper, we create a "Three Levels/Four Parameters" analytical framework, based on the concept of mutuality from Johan Galtung (1980) and the concept…

  13. The Ethical Mutual Fund Performance Debate: New Evidence from Canada

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Bauer (Rob); J. Derwall (Jeroen); R. Otten (Roger)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractAlthough the academic interest in ethical mutual fund performance has developed steadily, the evidence to date is mainly sample-specific. To tackle this critique, new research should extend to unexplored countries. Using this as a motivation, we examine the performance and risk sensitivi

  14. Market Timing : A Decomposition of Mutual Fund Returns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swinkels, L.A.P.; van der Sluis, P.J.; Verbeek, M.J.C.M.

    2003-01-01

    We decompose the conditional expected mutual fund return in ve parts.Two parts, selectivity and expert market timing, can be attributed to manager skill, and three to variation in market exposure that can be achieved by private investors as well.The dynamic model that we use to estimate the relative

  15. Danish Mutual Fund Performance - Selectivity, Market Timing and Persistence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Michael

    applying a single index model and a multi-factor model, respectively. Furthermore, we analyse the timing ability of the Danish mutual funds pursuing both the quadratic regressions of Treynor and Mazuy (1966) and the option approach suggested by Henriksson and Merton (1981). Finally, we analyse performance...

  16. Danish Mutual Fund Performance - Selectivity, Market Timing and Persistence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Michael

    applying a single index model and a multi-factor model, respectively. Furthermore, we analyse the timing ability of the Danish mutual funds pursuing both the quadratic regressions of Treynor and Mazuy (1966) and the option approach suggested by Henriksson and Merton (1981). Finally, we analyse performance...

  17. Dynamics of chaotic oscillations in mutually coupled microchip lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Uchida, A; Kinugawa, S; Yoshimori, S

    2003-01-01

    We have numerically and experimentally investigated the dynamics of mutually coupled microchip lasers. Chaotic oscillations are observed in the vicinity of the boundary of the injection-locking range when the coupling strength and the difference of the optical frequencies are varied. Synchronization of chaos is always achieved under the condition to generate chaos.

  18. Mutual Exclusivity in Autism Spectrum Disorders: Testing the Pragmatic Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Marchena, Ashley; Eigsti, Inge-Marie; Worek, Amanda; Ono, Kim Emiko; Snedeker, Jesse

    2011-01-01

    While there is ample evidence that children treat words as mutually exclusive, the cognitive basis of this bias is widely debated. We focus on the distinction between pragmatic and lexical constraints accounts. High-functioning children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) offer a unique perspective on this debate, as they acquire substantial…

  19. Application of Joint Error Maximal Mutual Compensation to hexapod robots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veryha, Yauheni; Petersen, Henrik Gordon

    2008-01-01

    A good practice to ensure high-positioning accuracy in industrial robots is to use joint error maximum mutual compensation (JEMMC). This paper presents an application of JEMMC for positioning of hexapod robots to improve end-effector positioning accuracy. We developed an algorithm and simulation ...

  20. Mutual Coupling Between Identical Planar Inverted-F Antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thaysen, Jesper; Jakobsen, Kaj Bjarne

    2007-01-01

    Mutual coupling between two identical planar inverted-F antennas (PIFA) located on an infinite ground plane is studied numerically. Several arrangements of side-by-side, collinear, parallel-in-echelon, and orthogonal PIFA antennas with element spacing varying from 0.06λ to 1.20λ are investigated...

  1. Mutual Intercultural Relations among University Students in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Yongxia; Safdar, Saba; Berry, John

    2016-01-01

    The current study examies the views of both international and domestic students in Canada using the conceptual and empirical framework from the MIRIPS (Mutual Intercultural Relations in Plural Societies) project (http://www.victoria.ac.nz/cacr/research/mirips). Two hypotheses were examined. First is the "multiculturalism hypothesis"…

  2. Ecological genomics of mutualism decline in nitrogen-fixing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinger, Christie R; Lau, Jennifer A; Heath, Katy D

    2016-03-16

    Anthropogenic changes can influence mutualism evolution; however, the genomic regions underpinning mutualism that are most affected by environmental change are generally unknown, even in well-studied model mutualisms like the interaction between legumes and their nitrogen (N)-fixing rhizobia. Such genomic information can shed light on the agents and targets of selection maintaining cooperation in nature. We recently demonstrated that N-fertilization has caused an evolutionary decline in mutualistic partner quality in the rhizobia that form symbiosis with clover. Here, population genomic analyses of N-fertilized versus control rhizobium populations indicate that evolutionary differentiation at a key symbiosis gene region on the symbiotic plasmid (pSym) contributes to partner quality decline. Moreover, patterns of genetic variation at selected loci were consistent with recent positive selection within N-fertilized environments, suggesting that N-rich environments might select for less beneficial rhizobia. By studying the molecular population genomics of a natural bacterial population within a long-term ecological field experiment, we find that: (i) the N environment is indeed a potent selective force mediating mutualism evolution in this symbiosis, (ii) natural variation in rhizobium partner quality is mediated in part by key symbiosis genes on the symbiotic plasmid, and (iii) differentiation at selected genes occurred in the context of otherwise recombining genomes, resembling eukaryotic models of adaptation.

  3. Problem decomposition by mutual information and force-based clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, Richard Edward

    The scale of engineering problems has sharply increased over the last twenty years. Larger coupled systems, increasing complexity, and limited resources create a need for methods that automatically decompose problems into manageable sub-problems by discovering and leveraging problem structure. The ability to learn the coupling (inter-dependence) structure and reorganize the original problem could lead to large reductions in the time to analyze complex problems. Such decomposition methods could also provide engineering insight on the fundamental physics driving problem solution. This work forwards the current state of the art in engineering decomposition through the application of techniques originally developed within computer science and information theory. The work describes the current state of automatic problem decomposition in engineering and utilizes several promising ideas to advance the state of the practice. Mutual information is a novel metric for data dependence and works on both continuous and discrete data. Mutual information can measure both the linear and non-linear dependence between variables without the limitations of linear dependence measured through covariance. Mutual information is also able to handle data that does not have derivative information, unlike other metrics that require it. The value of mutual information to engineering design work is demonstrated on a planetary entry problem. This study utilizes a novel tool developed in this work for planetary entry system synthesis. A graphical method, force-based clustering, is used to discover related sub-graph structure as a function of problem structure and links ranked by their mutual information. This method does not require the stochastic use of neural networks and could be used with any link ranking method currently utilized in the field. Application of this method is demonstrated on a large, coupled low-thrust trajectory problem. Mutual information also serves as the basis for an

  4. Evolutionary origin of insect-Wolbachia nutritional mutualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikoh, Naruo; Hosokawa, Takahiro; Moriyama, Minoru; Oshima, Kenshiro; Hattori, Masahira; Fukatsu, Takema

    2014-07-15

    Obligate insect-bacterium nutritional mutualism is among the most sophisticated forms of symbiosis, wherein the host and the symbiont are integrated into a coherent biological entity and unable to survive without the partnership. Originally, however, such obligate symbiotic bacteria must have been derived from free-living bacteria. How highly specialized obligate mutualisms have arisen from less specialized associations is of interest. Here we address this evolutionary issue by focusing on an exceptional insect-Wolbachia nutritional mutualism. Although Wolbachia endosymbionts are ubiquitously found in diverse insects and generally regarded as facultative/parasitic associates for their insect hosts, a Wolbachia strain associated with the bedbug Cimex lectularius, designated as wCle, was shown to be essential for host's growth and reproduction via provisioning of B vitamins. We determined the 1,250,060-bp genome of wCle, which was generally similar to the genomes of insect-associated facultative Wolbachia strains, except for the presence of an operon encoding the complete biotin synthetic pathway that was acquired via lateral gene transfer presumably from a coinfecting endosymbiont Cardinium or Rickettsia. Nutritional and physiological experiments, in which wCle-infected and wCle-cured bedbugs of the same genetic background were fed on B-vitamin-manipulated blood meals via an artificial feeding system, demonstrated that wCle certainly synthesizes biotin, and the wCle-provisioned biotin significantly contributes to the host fitness. These findings strongly suggest that acquisition of a single gene cluster consisting of biotin synthesis genes underlies the bedbug-Wolbachia nutritional mutualism, uncovering an evolutionary transition from facultative symbiosis to obligate mutualism facilitated by lateral gene transfer in an endosymbiont lineage.

  5. Heterogeneous Voter Models

    CERN Document Server

    Masuda, Naoki; Redner, S

    2010-01-01

    We introduce the heterogeneous voter model (HVM), in which each agent has its own intrinsic rate to change state, reflective of the heterogeneity of real people, and the partisan voter model (PVM), in which each agent has an innate and fixed preference for one of two possible opinion states. For the HVM, the time until consensus is reached is much longer than in the classic voter model. For the PVM in the mean-field limit, a population evolves to a "selfish" state, where each agent tends to be aligned with its internal preference. For finite populations, discrete fluctuations ultimately lead to consensus being reached in a time that scales exponentially with population size.

  6. Information and Heterogeneous Beliefs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Peter Ove; Qin, Zhenjiang

    2014-01-01

    In an incomplete market with heterogeneous prior beliefs, we show public information can have a substantial impact on the ex ante cost of capital, trading volume, and investor welfare. The Pareto effcient public information system is the system enjoying the maximum ex ante cost of capital...... ante risk premium is unaffected by the informativeness of the public information system. Similar results are obtained in a production economy, but the impact on the ex ante cost of capital is dampened compared to the exchange economy due to welfare improving reductions in real investments to smooth...... and the maximum expected abnormal trading volume. Imperfect public information increases the gains-to-trade based on heterogeneously updated posterior beliefs. In an exchange economy, this leads to higher growth in the investors' certainty equivalents and, thus, a higher equilibrium interest rate, whereas the ex...

  7. Heterogeneity of monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongcheng; Gaza-Bulseco, Georgeen; Faldu, Dinesh; Chumsae, Chris; Sun, Joanne

    2008-07-01

    Heterogeneity of monoclonal antibodies is common due to the various modifications introduced over the lifespan of the molecules from the point of synthesis to the point of complete clearance from the subjects. The vast number of modifications presents great challenge to the thorough characterization of the molecules. This article reviews the current knowledge of enzymatic and nonenzymatic modifications of monoclonal antibodies including the common ones such as incomplete disulfide bond formation, glycosylation, N-terminal pyroglutamine cyclization, C-terminal lysine processing, deamidation, isomerization, and oxidation, and less common ones such as modification of the N-terminal amino acids by maleuric acid and amidation of the C-terminal amino acid. In addition, noncovalent associations with other molecules, conformational diversity and aggregation of monoclonal antibodies are also discussed. Through a complete understanding of the heterogeneity of monoclonal antibodies, strategies can be employed to better identify the potential modifications and thoroughly characterize the molecules.

  8. Micromechanics of heterogeneous materials

    CERN Document Server

    Buryachenko, Valeriy

    2007-01-01

    Here is an accurate and timely account of micromechanics, which spans materials science, mechanical engineering, applied mathematics, technical physics, geophysics, and biology. The book features rigorous and unified theoretical methods of applied mathematics and statistical physics in the material science of microheterogeneous media. Uniquely, it offers a useful demonstration of the systematic and fundamental research of the microstructure of the wide class of heterogeneous materials of natural and synthetic nature.

  9. Electrokinetics of heterogeneous interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zembala, Maria

    2004-12-31

    The influence of surface heterogeneity of various types on electrokinetic parameters is reviewed. The scope of the paper covers classical electrokinetic phenomena characterized by linear dependence of electrokinetic parameters vs. related driving forces. Neither non-linear effects nor the effects of non-equilibrium electric double layer are considered. A historical description of hydrodynamic aspect of electrokinetic phenomena exploiting the slip plane idea is briefly outlined. Attempts to estimate the slip plane location by comparing the diffuse layer and zeta potential values for some model systems are presented. The surface heterogeneity was divided into three categories. Heterogeneity of the first type was related to geometrical morphology of an interfacial region characterized by a considerable surface development producing a three-dimensional interfacial region. The effects of solid roughness, hairy surface, dense polymer layers and gel-like layers are discussed here. The very high surface conductivity detected for such interfaces seems to be a good indicator of the presence of structured layers of this type. Heterogeneous interfaces of the second class cover systems exhibiting non-uniform distribution of surface charge. The non-uniform surface charge distribution can be either of a molecular (discrete charges) or of a microscale (two-dimensional micropatches or three-dimensional structures formed by polyelectrolyte multilayers). The last class of systems examined includes interfaces composed of charged substrate covered by charged bulky objects (particles). In comparison to the homogeneous surfaces, adsorbed charged particles modify both hydrodynamic flow and the electrostatic field significantly altering the electrokinetic parameters. The new description of electrokinetics of composed interfaces presented here takes into account both hydrodynamic and electric field modification and is free of the previously assumed slip plane shift caused by adsorbed

  10. Suppression of maize plantlets growth under mutual action of chromium and nickel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О. М. Piskova

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Mutual toxicity of chromium and nickel sulphates for growth and development of maize plantlets was studied. Its combined action at low concentrations (10–5 M results to significant suppression of growth of both above-ground and root systems of maize. At the beginning of growth the greater negative effect of the salts mixture at high concentration (10–4 M was observed for the plantlets’ roots. Then, on the sixth day, the growth of above-ground and root system was inhibited equally. Application of high nickel concentration and low chrome concentration, in contrast to high chromium and low nickel levels, depresses the biomass gain. Meanwhile the length of roots and leaves was affected by both variants of concentrations identically.

  11. Dynamic heterogeneity in life histories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuljapurkar, Shripad; Steiner, Uli; Orzack, Steven Hecht

    2009-01-01

    generate dynamic heterogeneity: life-history differences produced by stochastic stratum dynamics. We characterize dynamic heterogeneity in a range of species across taxa by properties of the Markov chain: the entropy, which describes the extent of heterogeneity, and the subdominant eigenvalue, which...... distributions of lifetime reproductive success. Dynamic heterogeneity contrasts with fixed heterogeneity: unobserved differences that generate variation between life histories. We show by an example that observed distributions of lifetime reproductive success are often consistent with the claim that little...... or no fixed heterogeneity influences this trait. We propose that dynamic heterogeneity provides a 'neutral' model for assessing the possible role of unobserved 'quality' differences between individuals. We discuss fitness for dynamic life histories, and the implications of dynamic heterogeneity...

  12. The Relationship between Substance Abuse Performance Measures and Mutual Help Group Participation after Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickler, Gail K; Reif, Sharon; Horgan, Constance M; Acevedo, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    We examined the relationship between treatment quality, using during-treatment process measures, and mutual help group (e.g., Alcoholics Anonymous) attendance after outpatient substance use disorder (SUD) treatment for 739 clients in the Alcohol and Drug Services Study. Logistic regression models estimated any and regular mutual help attendance after treatment. Clients referred to mutual help groups were significantly more likely to attend any mutual help after treatment. Results were mixed for facility offered mutual help groups; treatment engagement and retention were not significant. These findings offer treatment providers further evidence of the importance of referring clients to post-treatment mutual help groups, an effective, low-cost option.

  13. Identifying and quantifying heterogeneity in high content analysis: application of heterogeneity indices to drug discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert H Gough

    Full Text Available One of the greatest challenges in biomedical research, drug discovery and diagnostics is understanding how seemingly identical cells can respond differently to perturbagens including drugs for disease treatment. Although heterogeneity has become an accepted characteristic of a population of cells, in drug discovery it is not routinely evaluated or reported. The standard practice for cell-based, high content assays has been to assume a normal distribution and to report a well-to-well average value with a standard deviation. To address this important issue we sought to define a method that could be readily implemented to identify, quantify and characterize heterogeneity in cellular and small organism assays to guide decisions during drug discovery and experimental cell/tissue profiling. Our study revealed that heterogeneity can be effectively identified and quantified with three indices that indicate diversity, non-normality and percent outliers. The indices were evaluated using the induction and inhibition of STAT3 activation in five cell lines where the systems response including sample preparation and instrument performance were well characterized and controlled. These heterogeneity indices provide a standardized method that can easily be integrated into small and large scale screening or profiling projects to guide interpretation of the biology, as well as the development of therapeutics and diagnostics. Understanding the heterogeneity in the response to perturbagens will become a critical factor in designing strategies for the development of therapeutics including targeted polypharmacology.

  14. Large epidemic thresholds emerge in heterogeneous networks of heterogeneous nodes

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Hui; Gross, Thilo

    2015-01-01

    One of the famous results of network science states that networks with heterogeneous connectivity are more susceptible to epidemic spreading than their more homogeneous counterparts. In particular, in networks of identical nodes it has been shown that heterogeneity can lower the epidemic threshold at which epidemics can invade the system. Network heterogeneity can thus allow diseases with lower transmission probabilities to persist and spread. Here, we point out that for real world applications, this result should not be regarded independently of the intra-individual heterogeneity between people. Our results show that, if heterogeneity among people is taken into account, networks that are more heterogeneous in connectivity can be more resistant to epidemic spreading. We study a susceptible-infected-susceptible model with adaptive disease avoidance. Results from this model suggest that this reversal of the effect of network heterogeneity is likely to occur in populations in which the individuals are aware of t...

  15. Least Dependent Component Analysis Based on Mutual Information

    CERN Document Server

    Stögbauer, H; Astakhov, S A; Grassberger, P; St\\"ogbauer, Harald; Kraskov, Alexander; Astakhov, Sergey A.; Grassberger, Peter

    2004-01-01

    We propose to use precise estimators of mutual information (MI) to find least dependent components in a linearly mixed signal. On the one hand this seems to lead to better blind source separation than with any other presently available algorithm. On the other hand it has the advantage, compared to other implementations of `independent' component analysis (ICA) some of which are based on crude approximations for MI, that the numerical values of the MI can be used for: (i) estimating residual dependencies between the output components; (ii) estimating the reliability of the output, by comparing the pairwise MIs with those of re-mixed components; (iii) clustering the output according to the residual interdependencies. For the MI estimator we use a recently proposed k-nearest neighbor based algorithm. For time sequences we combine this with delay embedding, in order to take into account non-trivial time correlations. After several tests with artificial data, we apply the resulting MILCA (Mutual Information based ...

  16. Portfolio Optimization of Equity Mutual Funds—Malaysian Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adem Kılıçman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We focus on the equity mutual funds offered by three Malaysian banks, namely Public Bank Berhad, CIMB, and Malayan Banking Berhad. The equity mutual funds or equity trust is grouped into four clusters based on their characteristics and categorized as inferior, stable, good performing, and aggressive funds based on their return rates, variance and treynor index. Based on the cluster analysis, the return rates and variance of clusters are represented as triangular fuzzy numbers in order to reflect the uncertainty of financial market. To find the optimal asset allocation in each cluster we develop a hybrid model of optimization and fuzzy based on return rates, variance. This was done by maximizing the fuzzy return for a tolerable fuzzy risk and minimizing the fuzzy risk for a desirable fuzzy return separately at different confidence levels.

  17. Approximated mutual information training for speech recognition using myoelectric signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hua J; Chan, A D C

    2006-01-01

    A new training algorithm called the approximated maximum mutual information (AMMI) is proposed to improve the accuracy of myoelectric speech recognition using hidden Markov models (HMMs). Previous studies have demonstrated that automatic speech recognition can be performed using myoelectric signals from articulatory muscles of the face. Classification of facial myoelectric signals can be performed using HMMs that are trained using the maximum likelihood (ML) algorithm; however, this algorithm maximizes the likelihood of the observations in the training sequence, which is not directly associated with optimal classification accuracy. The AMMI training algorithm attempts to maximize the mutual information, thereby training the HMMs to optimize their parameters for discrimination. Our results show that AMMI training consistently reduces the error rates compared to these by the ML training, increasing the accuracy by approximately 3% on average.

  18. Complete chaotic synchronization in mutually coupled time-delay systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landsman, Alexandra S; Schwartz, Ira B

    2007-02-01

    Complete chaotic synchronization of end lasers has been observed in a line of mutually coupled, time-delayed system of three lasers, with no direct communication between the end lasers. The present paper uses ideas from generalized synchronization to explain the complete synchronization in the presence of long coupling delays, applied to a model of mutually coupled semiconductor lasers in a line. These ideas significantly simplify the analysis by casting the stability in terms of the local dynamics of each laser. The variational equations near the synchronization manifold are analyzed, and used to derive the synchronization condition that is a function of parameters. The results explain and predict the dependence of synchronization on various parameters, such as time delays, strength of coupling and dissipation. The ideas can be applied to understand complete synchronization in other chaotic systems with coupling delays and no direct communication between synchronized subsystems.

  19. Refining and Mutual Separation of Rare Earths Using Biomass Wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Katsutoshi; Alam, Shafiq

    2013-10-01

    Two different types of adsorption gels were prepared from biomass wastes. The first gel was produced from astringent persimmon peel rich in persimmon tannin, a polyphenol compound, which was prepared by means of simple dehydration condensation reaction using concentrated sulfuric acid for crosslinking. This adsorption gel was intended to be employed for the removal of radioactive elements, uranium (U(VI)) and thorium (Th(IV)), from rare earths. The second gel was prepared from chitosan, a basic polysaccharide, produced from shells of crustaceans such as crabs, shrimps, prawns, and other biomass wastes generated in marine product industry, by immobilizing functional groups of complexanes such as ethylendiaminetetraacetic acid and diethylentriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA). This gel was developed for the mutual separation of rare earths. Of the two adsorption gels evaluated, the DTPA immobilized chitosan exhibited the most effective mutual separation among light rare earths.

  20. Breakdown and delayed cospeciation in the arbuscular mycorrhizal mutualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merckx, Vincent; Bidartondo, Martin I

    2008-05-01

    The ancient arbuscular mycorrhizal association between the vast majority of plants and the fungal phylum Glomeromycota is a dominant nutritional mutualism worldwide. In the mycorrhizal mutualism, plants exchange photosynthesized carbohydrates for mineral nutrients acquired by fungi from the soil. This widespread cooperative arrangement is broken by 'cheater' plant species that lack the ability to photosynthesize and thus become dependent upon three-partite linkages (cheater-fungus-photosynthetic plant). Using the first fine-level coevolutionary analysis of mycorrhizas, we show that extreme fidelity towards fungi has led cheater plants to lengthy evolutionary codiversification. Remarkably, the plants' evolutionary history closely mirrors that of their considerably older mycorrhizal fungi. This demonstrates that one of the most diffuse mutualistic networks is vulnerable to the emergence, persistence and speciation of highly specific cheaters.

  1. Self-mixing interferometry with mutual independent orthogonal polarized light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shaohui; Zhang, Shulian; Tan, Yidong; Sun, Liqun

    2016-02-15

    A self-mixing interferometry with mutual independent orthogonal polarized light is introduced. Its most important feature is that two mutual independent orthogonal lights are used as measuring and reference light. Frequency shifting and polarization multiplexing technologies are used in the proposed optical system. Phase variation of the two orthogonal polarized beams is simultaneously measured through heterodyne demodulation with a lock-in amplifier. The phase difference of the orthogonal polarized light accurately reflects the target displacement. The target in this system is a non-cooperative object which is different from a traditional Michelson interferometer. The primary experimental results show that this kind of self-mixing interferometry is very feasible. Under typical room conditions, the system's short-term resolution is better than 2 nm.

  2. Series expansions for the mutual coupling in microstrip patch arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, David R.; Richards, William F.; Ali-Khan, Ajaz

    1989-03-01

    A dominant-mode mutual coupling theory is developed for an array of microstrip patches. One of the key features of the formulation is that only values for isolated self- and mutual impedance are needed in the formulation, making the method suitable for either a cavity model or spectral-domain analysis, or compatible with experimental measurements. The formulation is equivalent with Pozar's (1982) moment-method formulation. A series expansion of the solution is derived, allowing for approximate formulas accurate to any specified order. These formulas do not require matrix inversion. Formulas up to third order require less computation time than the exact solution, for single elements of the impedance, admittance, and scattering matrices. These expansions are computationally efficient for large sparse arrays.

  3. Integrated semiconductor twin-microdisk laser under mutually optical injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Ling-Xiu; Liu, Bo-Wen; Lv, Xiao-Meng; Yang, Yue-De; Xiao, Jin-Long; Huang, Yong-Zhen, E-mail: yzhuang@semi.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2015-05-11

    We experimentally study the characteristics of an integrated semiconductor twin-microdisk laser under mutually optical injection through a connected optical waveguide. Based on the lasing spectra, four-wave mixing, injection locking, and period-two oscillation states are observed due to the mutually optical injection by adjusting the injected currents applied to the two microdisks. The enhanced 3 dB bandwidth is realized for the microdisk laser at the injection locking state, and photonic microwave is obtained from the electrode of the microdisk laser under the period-two oscillation state. The plentifully dynamical states similar as semiconductor lasers subject to external optical injection are realized due to strong optical interaction between the two microdisks.

  4. Qualitative teamwork issues and strategies: coordination through mutual adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Wendy A; Long, Bonita; Bermbach, Nicole; Jordan, Sharalyn; Patterson, Kathryn

    2005-03-01

    Multidisciplinary research teams that include faculty, students, and volunteers can be challenging and enriching for all participants. Although such teams are becoming commonplace, minimal guidance is available about strategies to enhance team effectiveness. In this article, the authors highlight strategies to guide qualitative teamwork through coordination of team members and tasks based on mutual adjustment. Using a grounded theory exemplar, they focus on issues of (a) building the team, (b) developing reflexivity and theoretical sensitivity, (c) tackling analytic and methodological procedures, and (d) developing dissemination guidelines. Sharing information, articulating project goals and elements, acknowledging variation in individual goals, and engaging in reciprocity and respectful collaboration are key elements of mutual adjustment. The authors summarize conclusions about the costs and benefits of the process.

  5. Mutualism supports biodiversity when the direct competition is weak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual-García, Alberto; Bastolla, Ugo

    2017-02-01

    A key question of theoretical ecology is which properties of ecosystems favour their stability and help maintaining biodiversity. This question recently reconsidered mutualistic systems, generating intense controversy about the role of mutualistic interactions and their network architecture. Here we show analytically and verify with simulations that reducing the effective interspecific competition and the propagation of perturbations positively influences structural stability against environmental perturbations, enhancing persistence. Noteworthy, mutualism reduces the effective interspecific competition only when the direct interspecific competition is weaker than a critical value. This critical competition is in almost all cases larger in pollinator networks than in random networks with the same connectance. Highly connected mutualistic networks reduce the propagation of environmental perturbations, a mechanism reminiscent of MacArthur's proposal that ecosystem complexity enhances stability. Our analytic framework rationalizes previous contradictory results, and it gives valuable insight on the complex relationship between mutualism and biodiversity.

  6. Improving quantum state estimation with mutually unbiased bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, R B A; Steinberg, A M

    2010-07-16

    When used in quantum state estimation, projections onto mutually unbiased bases have the ability to maximize information extraction per measurement and to minimize redundancy. We present the first experimental demonstration of quantum state tomography of two-qubit polarization states to take advantage of mutually unbiased bases. We demonstrate improved state estimation as compared to standard measurement strategies and discuss how this can be understood from the structure of the measurements we use. We experimentally compared our method to the standard state estimation method for three different states and observe that the infidelity was up to 1.84 ± 0.06 times lower by using our technique than it was by using standard state estimation methods.

  7. AdS plane waves, entanglement and mutual information

    CERN Document Server

    Mukherjee, Debangshu

    2014-01-01

    $AdS$ plane wave backgrounds are dual to CFT excited states with energy momentum density $T_{++}=Q$. Building on previous work on entanglement entropy in these and nonconformal brane plane wave backgrounds, we first describe a phenomenological scaling picture for entanglement in terms of "entangling partons". We then study aspects of holographic mutual information in these backgrounds for two strip shaped subsystems, aligned parallel or orthogonal to the flux. We focus on the wide ($Ql^d\\gg 1$) and narrow ($Ql^d\\ll 1$) strip regimes. In the wide strip regime, mutual information exhibits growth with the individual strip sizes and a disentangling transition as the separation between the strips increases, whose behaviour is distinct from the ground and thermal states. In the narrow strip case, our calculations have parallels with "entanglement thermodynamics" for these $AdS$ plane wave deformations. We also discuss some numerical analysis.

  8. Networks in financial markets based on the mutual information rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedor, Paweł

    2014-05-01

    In the last few years there have been many efforts in econophysics studying how network theory can facilitate understanding of complex financial markets. These efforts consist mainly of the study of correlation-based hierarchical networks. This is somewhat surprising as the underlying assumptions of research looking at financial markets are that they are complex systems and thus behave in a nonlinear manner, which is confirmed by numerous studies, making the use of correlations which are inherently dealing with linear dependencies only baffling. In this paper we introduce a way to incorporate nonlinear dynamics and dependencies into hierarchical networks to study financial markets using mutual information and its dynamical extension: the mutual information rate. We show that this approach leads to different results than the correlation-based approach used in most studies, on the basis of 91 companies listed on the New York Stock Exchange 100 between 2003 and 2013, using minimal spanning trees and planar maximally filtered graphs.

  9. On the determination of the mutual exclusion statistics parameter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Saptarshi Mandal

    2013-09-01

    Following the generalized definition of exclusion statistics to infinite-dimensional Hilbert space [Murthy and Shankar, Phys. Rev. Lett. 72, 3629 (1994)] for a single-component anyonic system, we derive a simple relation between second mixed virial coefficient and the mutual exclusion statistics parameters using high-temperature expansion method for multicomponent anyonic system. The above result is derived without working in a specific model and is valid in any spatial dimensions.

  10. Extracting an entanglement signature from only classical mutual information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starling, David J.; Howell, John C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Broadbent, Curtis J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Rochester Theory Center, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States)

    2011-09-15

    We introduce a quantity which is formed using classical notions of mutual information and which is computed using the results of projective measurements. This quantity constitutes a sufficient condition for entanglement and represents the amount of information that can be extracted from a bipartite system for spacelike separated observers. In addition to discussion, we provide simulations as well as experimental results for the singlet and maximally correlated mixed states.

  11. Mutual Accountability and Its Influence on Team Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Rashid, Faaiza

    2015-01-01

    Many teams, especially in dynamic knowledge-intensive environments, face interdependent tasks with unscripted responsibilities. The centrality of this challenge to the team process notwithstanding, theories of how team members hold one another accountable for accomplishing interdependent work are underdeveloped. I integrate theory and research on accountability and teams to advance the construct of team mutual accountability – a reciprocally authorized behavior among team members of evaluatin...

  12. Determination of Optimal Cash Position of Mutual Fund

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈铭新; 张世英

    2003-01-01

    Cash position, held by mutual fund with purpose to satisfy investors′ redemption, will inevitably generate certain amount of cost. In this paper, the total cost caused by cash position is divided into opportunity cost and shortage cost, and a model is constructed to describe the relationship between total cost and cash position along with investors′ purchase and redemption, from which the formula of optimal cash position is deduced. Finally, the adjustment of optimal cash position in different market situations is discussed.

  13. Finite Algebraic Geometrical Structures Underlying Mutually Unbiased Quantum Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Planat, M R P; Perrine, S; Saniga, M; Planat, Michel R. P.; Rosu, Haret; Perrine, Serge; Saniga, Metod

    2004-01-01

    The basic methods of constructing the sets of mutually unbiased bases in the Hilbert space of an arbitrary finite dimension are discussed and an emerging link between them is outlined. It is shown that these methods employ a wide range of important mathematical concepts like, e.g., Fourier transforms, Galois fields and rings, finite and related projective geometries, and entanglement, to mention a few. Some applications of the theory to quantum information tasks are also mentioned.

  14. Lateral heat transfer in conducting and mutually irradiating plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnaprakas, C.K.; Badari Narayana, K. [Thermal Systems Group, ISRO Satellite Centre, Bangalore 560 017 (India)

    2004-05-01

    Lateral heat transfer effect in conducting and mutually irradiating parallel plates has been investigated. The effect of reflection in the diffuse-specular regime has been included. The governing equation of this problem is a complicated integro-differential equation, and this has been solved using the accurate Gauss-Jacobi orthogonal collocation method. The effective thermal conductivity along the lateral direction increases with decreasing conduction-radiation number, increasing emittance of the plates and increasing spacing. Specular reflection effects are insignificant. (orig.)

  15. The Development Of Mutual Trust In British Workplaces Through ?Partnership?

    OpenAIRE

    Dietz, Graham

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThis article examines the alleged links between 'partnership' forms of managing workplace relationships in Britain, and the development of intra-organisational 'trust'. The potential for mutually complementary linkages between the two are clear, in theory at least: partnership, as defined here, should produce, nurture and enhance levels of interpersonal trust inside organisations, while in turn trust, as defined here, legitimates and helps reinforce an organisation's 'partnership'...

  16. Promote Mutual Exchanges and Learning between Various Civilizations and Cultures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rabindra; Adhikari

    2014-01-01

    <正>It is an honor for me and my organization to join commemoration of international peace day and the exchange programs among NGO leaders on the invitation of Chinese Peoples’Association for Peace and Disarmament(CPAPD).The exchange forums have been always proved beneficial in terms of promoting mutual harmony and peace as it provides opportunity to understand various perspectives,history,culture

  17. Synchronization scenario of two distant mutually coupled semiconductor lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mulet, Josep; Mirasso, Claudio; Heil, Tilmann;

    2004-01-01

    We present numerical and experimental investigations of the synchronization of the coupling-induced instabilities in two distant mutually coupled semiconductor lasers. In our experiments, two similar Fabry-Perot lasers are coupled via their coherent optical fields. Our theoretical framework...... is based on a rate equation model obtained under weak coupling conditions. In both experiments and simulations, we find (achronal) synchronization of subnanosecond intensity fluctuations in concurrence with asymmetric physical roles between the lasers, even under symmetric operating conditions. We explore...

  18. Extracting an entanglement signature from only classical mutual information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starling, David J.; Broadbent, Curtis J.; Howell, John C.

    2011-09-01

    We introduce a quantity which is formed using classical notions of mutual information and which is computed using the results of projective measurements. This quantity constitutes a sufficient condition for entanglement and represents the amount of information that can be extracted from a bipartite system for spacelike separated observers. In addition to discussion, we provide simulations as well as experimental results for the singlet and maximally correlated mixed states.

  19. Night shift working mothers: mutual perceptions with adolescent children

    OpenAIRE

    Sizane, Nongazi Florinah; Van Rensburg, Esme

    2011-01-01

    The study investigated the mutual perception of relationships between mothers with day and night shift work and their teenage children. A cross-sectional survey using purposeful sampling was used. Two groups of 35 mothers and their adolescent children completed a Parent-Adolescent Relationship-Questionnaire (Robin, Koepke, Moye & Gerhardstein, 20(19). Data was analysed by means of SAS and SPSS programmes. Findings show that adolescent children of day shift working mothers perceive communicati...

  20. Resonator coupled Josephson junctions; parametric excitations and mutual locking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, H. Dalsgaard; Larsen, A.; Mygind, Jesper

    1991-01-01

    Self-pumped parametric excitations and mutual locking in systems of Josephson tunnel junctions coupled to multimode resonators are reported. For the very large values of the coupling parameter, obtained with small Nb-Al2O3-Nb junctions integrated in superconducting microstrip resonators, the DC I......-V characteristic shows an equidistant series of current steps generated by subharmonic pumping of the fundamental resonator mode. This is confirmed by measurement of frequency and linewidth of the emitted Josephson radiation...

  1. Higher-dimensional orbital-angular-momentum-based quantum key distribution with mutually unbiased bases

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mafu, M

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We present an experimental study of higher-dimensional quantum key distribution protocols based on mutually unbiased bases, implemented by means of photons carrying orbital angular momentum. We perform (d + 1) mutually unbiased measurements in a...

  2. 75 FR 28665 - Kinetics Mutual Funds, Inc., et al.; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-21

    ... COMMISSION Kinetics Mutual Funds, Inc., et al.; Notice of Application May 17, 2010. AGENCY: Securities and... the Act to invest in certain financial instruments. ] APPLICANTS: Kinetics Mutual Funds, Inc. (``Company''), Kinetics Portfolios Trust (``Trust''), Kinetics Asset Management, Inc. (``Adviser''),...

  3. Heterogeneity of Intellectual Assets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlgren, Johan Henrich; Lund Jensen, Rasmus; Valentin, Finn

    2004-01-01

    This paper deals with methodological issues of assessing the composition and level ofheterogeneity of firms' intellectual assets. It develops an original metric - referred to asthe H-index - for measuring heterogeneity using data extracted from patent documents.The main purpose is to improve...... the characterisation of research activities within firmsin the biotechnology sector. Although the H-index grew out of research on biotechfirms, the metric carries broader relevance for all patent-intensive industries. Themeasurement and calculation of the H-index is illustrated using some empiricalexamples from our...

  4. Stability of an intraguild predation system with mutual predation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuanshi; DeAngelis, Donald L.

    2016-04-01

    We examine intraguild predation (IGP), in which species both compete for resources or space and prey on each other. The IGP system is modeled here by a lattice gas model of the mean-field theory. First, we consider the IGP system of one species in which individuals of the same species cannibalize each other. The dynamical behavior of the model demonstrates a mechanism by which the intraspecific predation promotes persistence of the species. Then we consider the IGP system of two species with mutual predation. Global dynamics of the model exhibit basic properties of IGP: (i) When both species' efficiencies in converting the consumptions into fitness are large, the outcome of their interaction is mutualistic in form and the IGP promotes persistence of both species. (ii) When one species' efficiency is large but the other's is small, the interaction outcomes become parasitic in nature, in which an obligate species can survive through the mutual predation with a facultative one. (iii) When both species' efficiencies are small, the interaction outcomes are competitive in nature and the IGP leads to extinction of one of the species. A novel result of this work is that varying one parameter or population density of the species can lead to transition of interaction outcomes between mutualism, parasitism and competition. On the other hand, dynamics of the models demonstrate that over-predation or under-predation will result in extinction of one/both species, while intermediate predation is favorable under certain parameter ranges.

  5. Neotropical mutualism between Acacia and Pseudomyrmex: phylogeny and divergence times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Acevedo, Sandra; Rico-Arce, Lourdes; Delgado-Salinas, Alfonso; Magallón, Susana; Eguiarte, Luis E

    2010-07-01

    The interaction between Acacia and Pseudomyrmex is a textbook example of mutualism between ants and plants, nevertheless aspects of its evolutionary biology have not been formally explored. In this paper we analyze primarily the phylogenies of both New World Acacia and of their associated species of ants, and the geographic origin of this mutualism. Until now, there has been no molecular analysis of this relationship in terms of its origin and age. We analyzed three chloroplast markers (matK, psaB-rps14, and trnL-trnF) on a total of 70 taxa of legumes from the subfamily Mimosoideae, and two nuclear regions (long-wavelength rhodopsine and wingless) on a total of 43 taxa of ants from subfamily Pseudomyrmecinae. The monophyly of subgenus Acacia and within the New World lineages that of the myrmecophilous Acacia group was established. In addition, our results supported the monophyly of the genus Pseudomyrmex and of the associated acacia-ants P. ferrugineus group. Using Bayesian methods and calibration data, the estimated divergence times for the groups involved in the mutualism are: 5.44+/-1.93 My for the myrmecophilous acacias and 4.58+/-0.82 My for their associated ant species, implying that their relationship originated in Mesoamerica between the late Miocene to the middle Pliocene, with eventual diversification of both groups in Mexico.

  6. Equity Mutual Fund: Performances, Persistence and Fund Rankings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amporn SOONGSWANG

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on open-ended equity mutual funds in Thailand. The funds’ performances were examined whether the returns significantly and persistently out-perform the market; whether the use of different measures leads funds with similar rankings. The analyses use various metrics: the traditional fund performance evaluation measures and Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA technique; Pearson’s correlation coefficients, and cover six different investment horizons. The results suggest that open-ended equity mutual funds analyzed in this study significantly out-perform the market, and the funds’ positive performance sustains for 3-month time-period of investment, at least. The top five funds managed by the Aberdeen, Bangkok Bank and Siam Commercial Bank Asset Management Companies out-perform the bottom five funds between 0.1912 and 1.3187 for six time-periods of investment from 1-month to 5-year. Finally, it is concluded that for individual investors, the results provided by this study can be guidelines for selecting mutual funds for investment.

  7. Feature Selection for Chemical Sensor Arrays Using Mutual Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X. Rosalind; Lizier, Joseph T.; Nowotny, Thomas; Berna, Amalia Z.; Prokopenko, Mikhail; Trowell, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    We address the problem of feature selection for classifying a diverse set of chemicals using an array of metal oxide sensors. Our aim is to evaluate a filter approach to feature selection with reference to previous work, which used a wrapper approach on the same data set, and established best features and upper bounds on classification performance. We selected feature sets that exhibit the maximal mutual information with the identity of the chemicals. The selected features closely match those found to perform well in the previous study using a wrapper approach to conduct an exhaustive search of all permitted feature combinations. By comparing the classification performance of support vector machines (using features selected by mutual information) with the performance observed in the previous study, we found that while our approach does not always give the maximum possible classification performance, it always selects features that achieve classification performance approaching the optimum obtained by exhaustive search. We performed further classification using the selected feature set with some common classifiers and found that, for the selected features, Bayesian Networks gave the best performance. Finally, we compared the observed classification performances with the performance of classifiers using randomly selected features. We found that the selected features consistently outperformed randomly selected features for all tested classifiers. The mutual information filter approach is therefore a computationally efficient method for selecting near optimal features for chemical sensor arrays. PMID:24595058

  8. Comparative Analysis of Risk, Return and Diversification of Mutual Fund

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rais Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutual Funds have become a widely popular and effective way for investors to participate in financial markets in an easy, low-cost fashion, while muting risk characteristics by spreading the investment across different types of securities, also known as diversification. It can play a central role in an individual's investment strategy. With the plethora of schemes available in the Indian markets, an investors needs to evaluate and consider various factors before making an investment decision. The present investigation is aimed to examine the performance of safest investment instrument in the security market in the eyes of investors. Five mutual fund large cap scheme have been selected for this purpose. The examination is achieved by assessing various financial tests like Sharpe Ratio, Standard Deviation, Alpha, and Beta. Furthermore, in-depth analysis also has been done by considering return over the period of last five years on various basis, expenses ratio, corpus-size etc. The data has been taken from various websites of mutual fund schemes and from www.valueresearch.com. The study will be helpful for the researchers and financial analysts to analyze various securities or funds while selecting the best investment alternative out of the galaxy of investment alternatives.

  9. Part mutual information for quantifying direct associations in networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Juan; Zhou, Yiwei; Zhang, Xiujun; Chen, Luonan

    2016-05-03

    Quantitatively identifying direct dependencies between variables is an important task in data analysis, in particular for reconstructing various types of networks and causal relations in science and engineering. One of the most widely used criteria is partial correlation, but it can only measure linearly direct association and miss nonlinear associations. However, based on conditional independence, conditional mutual information (CMI) is able to quantify nonlinearly direct relationships among variables from the observed data, superior to linear measures, but suffers from a serious problem of underestimation, in particular for those variables with tight associations in a network, which severely limits its applications. In this work, we propose a new concept, "partial independence," with a new measure, "part mutual information" (PMI), which not only can overcome the problem of CMI but also retains the quantification properties of both mutual information (MI) and CMI. Specifically, we first defined PMI to measure nonlinearly direct dependencies between variables and then derived its relations with MI and CMI. Finally, we used a number of simulated data as benchmark examples to numerically demonstrate PMI features and further real gene expression data from Escherichia coli and yeast to reconstruct gene regulatory networks, which all validated the advantages of PMI for accurately quantifying nonlinearly direct associations in networks.

  10. COMPARITIVE STUDY OF SELECTED EQUITY - DIVERSIFIED MUTUAL FUND SCHEMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepika Sharma

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available With the plethora of schemes available in the Indian markets, aninvestors needs to evaluate and consider various factors beforemaking an investment decision. The present investigation is aimedto examine the performance of safest investment instrument in thesecurity market in the eyes of investors i.e., mutual funds byspecially focusing on equity-diversified schemes. Eight mutual fundschemes have been selected for this purpose. The examination isachieved by assessing various financial tests like Sharpe Ratio,Standard Deviation, Alpha, Beta (b and Coefficient ofDetermination (R2. Furthermore, in-depth analysis also has beendone by considering return over the period of last five years onvarious basis, expenses ratio, corpus-size etc. the data has beentaken from various websites of mutual fund schemes and from www.amfiindia.com. Calculated results are in the favor of RelianceRegular Savings Equity in terms of returns over the last five yearsand Birla Sun Life Dividend Yield Plus in terms of maximum returns by taking minimum risks. The study will be helpful for the researchers and financial analysts to analyze various securities orfunds while selecting the best investment alternative out of thegalaxy of investment alternatives.

  11. Synchronization in human musical rhythms and mutually interacting complex systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennig, Holger

    2014-09-09

    Though the music produced by an ensemble is influenced by multiple factors, including musical genre, musician skill, and individual interpretation, rhythmic synchronization is at the foundation of musical interaction. Here, we study the statistical nature of the mutual interaction between two humans synchronizing rhythms. We find that the interbeat intervals of both laypeople and professional musicians exhibit scale-free (power law) cross-correlations. Surprisingly, the next beat to be played by one person is dependent on the entire history of the other person's interbeat intervals on timescales up to several minutes. To understand this finding, we propose a general stochastic model for mutually interacting complex systems, which suggests a physiologically motivated explanation for the occurrence of scale-free cross-correlations. We show that the observed long-term memory phenomenon in rhythmic synchronization can be imitated by fractal coupling of separately recorded or synthesized audio tracks and thus applied in electronic music. Though this study provides an understanding of fundamental characteristics of timing and synchronization at the interbrain level, the mutually interacting complex systems model may also be applied to study the dynamics of other complex systems where scale-free cross-correlations have been observed, including econophysics, physiological time series, and collective behavior of animal flocks.

  12. Scaling of cluster heterogeneity in the two-dimensional Potts model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Jian-Ping; Yang, Xianqing; Deng, Youjin

    2012-08-01

    Cluster heterogeneity, the number of clusters of mutually distinct sizes, has been recently studied for explosive percolation and standard percolation [H. K. Lee et al., Phys. Rev. E 84, 020101(R) (2011); J. D. Noh et al., Phys. Rev. E 84, 010101(R) (2011)]. In this work we study the scaling of various quantities related with cluster heterogeneity in a broader context of two-dimensional q-state Potts model. We predict, via an analytic approach, the critical exponents for most of the measured quantities, and confirm these predications for various q values using extensive Monte Carlo simulations.

  13. Heterogeneous photonic integrated circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Alexander W.; Fish, Gregory; Hall, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Photonic Integrated Circuits (PICs) have been dichotomized into circuits with high passive content (silica and silicon PLCs) and high active content (InP tunable lasers and transceivers) due to the trade-off in material characteristics used within these two classes. This has led to restrictions in the adoption of PICs to systems in which only one of the two classes of circuits are required to be made on a singular chip. Much work has been done to create convergence in these two classes by either engineering the materials to achieve the functionality of both device types on a single platform, or in epitaxial growth techniques to transfer one material to the next, but have yet to demonstrate performance equal to that of components fabricated in their native substrates. Advances in waferbonding techniques have led to a new class of heterogeneously integrated photonic circuits that allow for the concurrent use of active and passive materials within a photonic circuit, realizing components on a transferred substrate that have equivalent performance as their native substrate. In this talk, we review and compare advances made in heterogeneous integration along with demonstrations of components and circuits enabled by this technology.

  14. 31 CFR 103.131 - Customer identification programs for mutual funds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... mutual funds. 103.131 Section 103.131 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and... a mutual fund acquires through any acquisition, merger, purchase of assets, or assumption of..., a mutual fund may use the following sample language to provide notice to its customers: IMPORTANT...

  15. 24 CFR 203.420 - Nature of Mutual Mortgage Insurance Fund.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nature of Mutual Mortgage Insurance Fund. 203.420 Section 203.420 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban... and Distributive Shares § 203.420 Nature of Mutual Mortgage Insurance Fund. The Mutual...

  16. Disordered hyperuniform heterogeneous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torquato, Salvatore

    2016-10-01

    Disordered hyperuniform many-body systems are distinguishable states of matter that lie between a crystal and liquid: they are like perfect crystals in the way they suppress large-scale density fluctuations and yet are like liquids or glasses in that they are statistically isotropic with no Bragg peaks. These systems play a vital role in a number of fundamental and applied problems: glass formation, jamming, rigidity, photonic and electronic band structure, localization of waves and excitations, self-organization, fluid dynamics, quantum systems, and pure mathematics. Much of what we know theoretically about disordered hyperuniform states of matter involves many-particle systems. In this paper, we derive new rigorous criteria that disordered hyperuniform two-phase heterogeneous materials must obey and explore their consequences. Two-phase heterogeneous media are ubiquitous; examples include composites and porous media, biological media, foams, polymer blends, granular media, cellular solids, and colloids. We begin by obtaining some results that apply to hyperuniform two-phase media in which one phase is a sphere packing in d-dimensional Euclidean space {{{R}}d} . Among other results, we rigorously establish the requirements for packings of spheres of different sizes to be ‘multihyperuniform’. We then consider hyperuniformity for general two-phase media in {{{R}}d} . Here we apply realizability conditions for an autocovariance function and its associated spectral density of a two-phase medium, and then incorporate hyperuniformity as a constraint in order to derive new conditions. We show that some functional forms can immediately be eliminated from consideration and identify other forms that are allowable. Specific examples and counterexamples are described. Contact is made with well-known microstructural models (e.g. overlapping spheres and checkerboards) as well as irregular phase-separation and Turing-type patterns. We also ascertain a family of

  17. Heterogenous networks and services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Su-En

    the existing generation of technology and presents new technological performance breakthroughs. It is difficult to predict which radical technologies or innovations will result in a market disruption early on in their life cycles. Based on Clayton Christensen’s (Christensen 1997) definition of a disruptive...... of the market. If mainstream technology firms do not address the disruption, it is likely they will fail and the new disruptive firm will grow in size and importance in the industry. As we move to 3G (3rd Generation Mobile Services) and beyond 3G, one of the biggest challenges is to bridge network heterogeneity...... products and services. Schumpeter described the motor of development as the innovation itself. However, business and financial aspects must also be considered as they provide the bottom line for firms in the industry. Standardisation is increasingly required due to the number of different technologies...

  18. Heterogeneous logics of competition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mossin, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the article is to demonstrate that in order to understand competition as a socially organizing phenomenon, we should not examine competition in isolation, but as constellations of heterogeneous logics. More precisely, the article is based on two main theoretical points: (1) Logics...... of competition are only realized as particular forms of social organization by virtue of interplaying with other kinds of logics, like legal logics. (2) Competition logics enjoy a peculiar status in-between constructedness and givenness; although competition depends on laws and mechanisms of socialization, we...... still experience competition as an expression of spontaneous human activities. On the basis of these perspectives, a study of fundamental rights of EU law, springing from the principle of ‘free movement of people’, is conducted. The first part of the empirical analysis seeks to detect the presence...

  19. Heterogeneous logics of competition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mossin, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the article is to demonstrate that in order to understand competition as a socially organizing phenomenon, we should not examine competition in isolation, but as constellations of heterogeneous logics. More precisely, the article is based on two main theoretical points: (1) Logics...... still experience competition as an expression of spontaneous human activities. On the basis of these perspectives, a study of fundamental rights of EU law, springing from the principle of ‘free movement of people’, is conducted. The first part of the empirical analysis seeks to detect the presence...... of a presumed logic of competition within EU law, whereas the second part focuses on particular legal logics. In this respect, the so-called ‘real link criterion’ (determining the access to transnational social rights for certain groups of unemployed people) is given special attention. What is particularly...

  20. Noise and Neuronal Heterogeneity

    CERN Document Server

    Barber, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    We consider signal transaction in a simple neuronal model featuring intrinsic noise. The presence of noise limits the precision of neural responses and impacts the quality of neural signal transduction. We assess the signal transduction quality in relation to the level of noise, and show it to be maximized by a non-zero level of noise, analogous to the stochastic resonance effect. The quality enhancement occurs for a finite range of stimuli to a single neuron; we show how to construct networks of neurons that extend the range. The range increases more rapidly with network size when we make use of heterogeneous populations of neurons with a variety of thresholds, rather than homogeneous populations of neurons all with the same threshold. The limited precision of neural responses thus can have a direct effect on the optimal network structure, with diverse functional properties of the constituent neurons supporting an economical information processing strategy that reduces the metabolic costs of handling a broad...

  1. Mutually Exclusive Roles of SHARPIN in Integrin Inactivation and NF-κB Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Franceschi, Nicola; Peuhu, Emilia; Parsons, Maddy; Rissanen, Sami; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Salmi, Marko

    2015-01-01

    SHANK-associated RH domain interactor (SHARPIN) inhibits integrins through interaction with the integrin α-subunit. In addition, SHARPIN enhances nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) activity as a component of the linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex (LUBAC). However, it is currently unclear how regulation of these seemingly different roles is coordinated. Here, we show that SHARPIN binds integrin and LUBAC in a mutually exclusive manner. We map the integrin binding site on SHARPIN to the ubiquitin-like (UBL) domain, the same domain implicated in SHARPIN interaction with LUBAC component RNF31 (ring finger protein 31), and identify two SHARPIN residues (V267, L276) required for both integrin and RNF31 regulation. Accordingly, the integrin α-tail is capable of competing with RNF31 for SHARPIN binding in vitro. Importantly, the full SHARPIN RNF31-binding site contains residues (F263A/I272A) that are dispensable for SHARPIN-integrin interaction. Importantly, disrupting SHARPIN interaction with integrin or RNF31 abolishes SHARPIN-mediated regulation of integrin or NF-κB activity, respectively. Altogether these data suggest that the roles of SHARPIN in inhibiting integrin activity and supporting linear ubiquitination are (molecularly) distinct. PMID:26600301

  2. Mutual Balance between Vasohibin-1 and Soluble VEGFR-1 in Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasufumi Sato

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Vasohibin-1 (VASH1 is a VEGF-inducible gene of endothelial cells (ECs that acts as a negative feedback regulator of angiogenesis. To further characterize the function of VASH1, we transfected human VASH1 gene into the mouse EC line MS1, established stable VASH1 expressing clones, and determined gene alteration by cDNA microarray analysis. Among the various angiogenesis-related genes, vascular endothelial growth factor type 1 receptor (VEGFR-1 and its alternative spliced form, soluble VEGFR1 (sVEGFR-1, were found to be the most significantly down-regulated genes. Transient overexpression of VASH1 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells confirmed the down-regulation of VEGFR-1 and sVEGFR-1. sVEGFR-1 is a decoy receptor for VEGF and inhibits angiogenesis. Interestingly, when sVEGFR-1 was overexpressed in ECs, it inhibited the expression of VASH1 in turn. These results suggest that VASH1 and sVEGFR-1, two angiogenesis inhibitors, mutually balance their expressions in ECs.

  3. β-Adrenergic stimulation and rapid pacing mutually promote heterogeneous electrical failure and ventricular fibrillation in the globally ischemic heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Vivek; Taylor, Tyson; Warren, Mark; Venable, Paul; Sciuto, Katie; Shibayama, Junko; Zaitsev, Alexey

    2015-05-01

    Global ischemia, catecholamine surge, and rapid heart rhythm (RHR) due to ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation (VF) are the three major factors of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). Loss of excitability culminating in global electrical failure (asystole) is the major adverse outcome of SCA with increasing prevalence worldwide. The roles of catecholamines and RHR in the electrical failure during SCA remain unclear. We hypothesized that both β-adrenergic stimulation (βAS) and RHR accelerate electrical failure in the globally ischemic heart. We performed optical mapping of the action potential (OAP) in the right ventricular (RV) and left (LV) ventricular epicardium of isolated rabbit hearts subjected to 30-min global ischemia. Hearts were paced at a cycle length of either 300 or 200 ms, and either in the presence or in the absence of β-agonist isoproterenol (30 nM). 2,3-Butanedione monoxime (20 mM) was used to reduce motion artifact. We found that RHR and βAS synergistically accelerated the decline of the OAP upstroke velocity and the progressive expansion of inexcitable regions. Under all conditions, inexcitability developed faster in the LV than in the RV. At the same time, both RHR and βAS shortened the time to VF (TVF) during ischemia. Moreover, the time at which 10% of the mapped LV area became inexcitable strongly correlated with TVF (R(2) = 0 .72, P < 0.0001). We conclude that both βAS and RHR are major factors of electrical depression and failure in the globally ischemic heart and may contribute to adverse outcomes of SCA such as asystole and recurrent/persistent VF.

  4. Heterogeneity in recombinant protein production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schalén, Martin; Johanson, Ted; Lundin, Luisa;

    2012-01-01

    contribute to make a population in a fermenter heterogeneous, resulting in cell-to-cell variation in physiological parameters of the microbial culture. Our study aims at investigating how population heterogeneity and recombinant protein production is affected by environmental gradients in bioreactors...... are simulated in small bioreactors and the population heterogeneity can be visualised by analysing single cells with flow cytometry. This can give new insights to cell physiology and recombinant protein production at the industrial scale....

  5. Mutual Authentication Scheme in Secure Internet of Things Technology for Comfortable Lifestyle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Namje; Kang, Namhi

    2015-12-24

    The Internet of Things (IoT), which can be regarded as an enhanced version of machine-to-machine communication technology, was proposed to realize intelligent thing-to-thing communications by utilizing the Internet connectivity. In the IoT, "things" are generally heterogeneous and resource constrained. In addition, such things are connected to each other over low-power and lossy networks. In this paper, we propose an inter-device authentication and session-key distribution system for devices with only encryption modules. In the proposed system, unlike existing sensor-network environments where the key distribution center distributes the key, each sensor node is involved with the generation of session keys. In addition, in the proposed scheme, the performance is improved so that the authenticated device can calculate the session key in advance. The proposed mutual authentication and session-key distribution system can withstand replay attacks, man-in-the-middle attacks, and wiretapped secret-key attacks.

  6. Mutual Authentication Scheme in Secure Internet of Things Technology for Comfortable Lifestyle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namje Park

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Internet of Things (IoT, which can be regarded as an enhanced version of machine-to-machine communication technology, was proposed to realize intelligent thing-to-thing communications by utilizing the Internet connectivity. In the IoT, “things” are generally heterogeneous and resource constrained. In addition, such things are connected to each other over low-power and lossy networks. In this paper, we propose an inter-device authentication and session-key distribution system for devices with only encryption modules. In the proposed system, unlike existing sensor-network environments where the key distribution center distributes the key, each sensor node is involved with the generation of session keys. In addition, in the proposed scheme, the performance is improved so that the authenticated device can calculate the session key in advance. The proposed mutual authentication and session-key distribution system can withstand replay attacks, man-in-the-middle attacks, and wiretapped secret-key attacks.

  7. Space Qualified Heterogeneous Processing Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Space Micro proposes to develop a radiation hardened, monolithic, heterogeneous processor for space imaging and radar systems. High performance processors are needed...

  8. Reconsolidation and extinction are dissociable and mutually exclusive processes: behavioral and molecular evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlo, Emiliano; Milton, Amy L; Goozée, Zara Y; Theobald, David E; Everitt, Barry J

    2014-02-12

    Memory persistence is critically influenced by retrieval. In rats, a single presentation of a conditioned fear stimulus induces memory reconsolidation and fear memory persistence, while repeated fear cue presentations result in loss of fear through extinction. These two opposite behavioral outcomes are operationally linked by the number of cue presentations at memory retrieval. However, the behavioral properties and mechanistic determinants of the transition have not yet been explored; in particular, whether reconsolidation and extinction processes coexist or are mutually exclusive, depending on the exposure to non-reinforced retrieval events. We characterized both behaviorally and molecularly the transition from reconsolidation to extinction of conditioned fear and showed that an increase in calcineurin (CaN) in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) supports the shift from fear maintenance to fear inhibition. Gradually increasing the extent of retrieval induces a gradual decrease in freezing responses to the conditioned stimulus and a gradual increase in amygdala CaN level. This newly synthesized CaN is required for the extinction, but not the reconsolidation, of conditioned fear. During the transition from reconsolidation to extinction, we have revealed an insensitive state of the fear memory where NMDA-type glutamate receptor agonist and antagonist drugs are unable either to modulate CaN levels in the BLA or alter the reconsolidation or extinction processes. Together, our data indicate both that reconsolidation and extinction are mutually exclusive processes and also reveal the presence of a transitional, or "limbo," state of the original memory between these two alternative outcomes of fear memory retrieval, when neither process is engaged.

  9. Excess mutual catalysis is required for effective evolvability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markovitch, Omer; Lancet, Doron

    2012-01-01

    It is widely accepted that autocatalysis constitutes a crucial facet of effective replication and evolution (e.g., in Eigen's hypercycle model). Other models for early evolution (e.g., by Dyson, Gánti, Varela, and Kauffman) invoke catalytic networks, where cross-catalysis is more apparent. A key question is how the balance between auto- (self-) and cross- (mutual) catalysis shapes the behavior of model evolving systems. This is investigated using the graded autocatalysis replication domain (GARD) model, previously shown to capture essential features of reproduction, mutation, and evolution in compositional molecular assemblies. We have performed numerical simulations of an ensemble of GARD networks, each with a different set of lognormally distributed catalytic values. We asked what is the influence of the catalytic content of such networks on beneficial evolution. Importantly, a clear trend was observed, wherein only networks with high mutual catalysis propensity (p(mc)) allowed for an augmented diversity of composomes, quasi-stationary compositions that exhibit high replication fidelity. We have reexamined a recent analysis that showed meager selection in a single GARD instance and for a few nonstationary target compositions. In contrast, when we focused here on compotypes (clusters of composomes) as targets for selection in populations of compositional assemblies, appreciable selection response was observed for a large portion of the networks simulated. Further, stronger selection response was seen for high p(mc) values. Our simulations thus demonstrate that GARD can help analyze important facets of evolving systems, and indicate that excess mutual catalysis over self-catalysis is likely to be important for the emergence of molecular systems capable of evolutionlike behavior.

  10. MUTUAL IMAGE TRANSFORMATION ALGORITHMS FOR VISUAL INFORMATION PROCESSING AND RETRIEVAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Kukharev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Research. The paper deals with methods and algorithms for mutual transformation of related pairs of images in order to enhance the capabilities of cross-modal multimedia retrieval (CMMR technologies. We have thoroughly studied the problem of mutual transformation of face images of various kinds (e.g. photos and drawn pictures. This problem is widely represented in practice. Research is this area is based on existing datasets. The algorithms we have proposed in this paper can be applied to arbitrary pairs of related images due to the unified mathematical specification. Method. We have presented three image transformation algorithms. The first one is based on principal component analysis and Karhunen-Loève transform (1DPCA/1DKLT. Unlike the existing solution, it does not use the training set during the transformation process. The second algorithm assumes generation of an image population. The third algorithm performs the transformation based on two-dimensional principal component analysis and Karhunen-Loève transform (2DPCA/2DKLT. Main Results. The experiments on image transformation and population generation have revealed the main features of each algorithm. The first algorithm allows construction of an accurate and stable model of transition between two given sets of images. The second algorithm can be used to add new images to existing bases and the third algorithm is capable of performing the transformation outside the training dataset. Practical Relevance. Taking into account the qualities of the proposed algorithms, we have provided recommendations concerning their application. Possible scenarios include construction of a transition model for related pairs of images, mutual transformation of the images inside and outside the dataset as well as population generation in order to increase representativeness of existing datasets. Thus, the proposed algorithms can be used to improve reliability of face recognition performed on images

  11. Synchronization and basin bifurcations in mutually coupled oscillators

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    U E Vincent; A N Njah; O Akinlade

    2007-05-01

    Synchronization behaviour of two mutually coupled double-well Duffig oscillators exhibiting cross-well chaos is examined. Synchronization of the subsystems was observed for coupling strength > 0.4. It is found that when the oscillators are operated in the regime for which two attractors coexist in phase space, basin bifurcation sequences occur leading to + 1, ≥ 2 basins as the coupling is varied – a signature of Wada structure and final-state sensitivity. However, in the region of complete synchronization, the basins structure is identical with that of the single oscillators and retains its essential features including fractal basin boundaries.

  12. Paul Drude's prediction of nonreciprocal mutual inductance for Tesla transformers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bart McGuyer

    Full Text Available Inductors, transmission lines, and Tesla transformers have been modeled with lumped-element equivalent circuits for over a century. In a well-known paper from 1904, Paul Drude predicts that the mutual inductance for an unloaded Tesla transformer should be nonreciprocal. This historical curiosity is mostly forgotten today, perhaps because it appears incorrect. However, Drude's prediction is shown to be correct for the conditions treated, demonstrating the importance of constraints in deriving equivalent circuits for distributed systems. The predicted nonreciprocity is not fundamental, but instead is an artifact of the misrepresentation of energy by an equivalent circuit. The application to modern equivalent circuits is discussed.

  13. Stochastic mutualism model with Lévy jumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qun; Jiang, Daqing; Shi, Ningzhong; Hayat, Tasawar; Alsaedi, Ahmed

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we consider a stochastic mutualism model with Lévy jumps. First of all, we show that the positive solution of the system is stochastically ultimate bounded. Then under a simple assumption, we establish sufficient and necessary conditions for the stochastic permanence and extinction of the system. The results show an important property of the Lévy jumps: they are unfavorable for the permanence of the species. Moreover, when there are no Lévy jumps, we show that there is a unique ergodic stationary distribution of the corresponding system under certain conditions. Some numerical simulations are introduced to validate the theoretical results.

  14. Critical teaching as mutual learning through collective social design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chimirri, Niklas Alexander; Dupret, Katia

    sustainable impact by including an increasing diversity of stakeholder perspectives, the concrete problem and thereby the collective design framework changes according to what the collaborators and students deem relevant. Furthermore, both problem and design framework remain open to further renegotiations...... – not understood as a unidirectional way of communicating solutions to complex societal problems. Instead, it is clarified and continuously discussed that purposeful teaching in the field of social design builds on and fosters mutual learning processes on problems and preliminary solutions. We thus suggest...

  15. Paul Drude's prediction of nonreciprocal mutual inductance for Tesla transformers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuyer, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Inductors, transmission lines, and Tesla transformers have been modeled with lumped-element equivalent circuits for over a century. In a well-known paper from 1904, Paul Drude predicts that the mutual inductance for an unloaded Tesla transformer should be nonreciprocal. This historical curiosity is mostly forgotten today, perhaps because it appears incorrect. However, Drude's prediction is shown to be correct for the conditions treated, demonstrating the importance of constraints in deriving equivalent circuits for distributed systems. The predicted nonreciprocity is not fundamental, but instead is an artifact of the misrepresentation of energy by an equivalent circuit. The application to modern equivalent circuits is discussed.

  16. Paul Drude's Prediction of Nonreciprocal Mutual Inductance for Tesla Transformers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuyer, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Inductors, transmission lines, and Tesla transformers have been modeled with lumped-element equivalent circuits for over a century. In a well-known paper from 1904, Paul Drude predicts that the mutual inductance for an unloaded Tesla transformer should be nonreciprocal. This historical curiosity is mostly forgotten today, perhaps because it appears incorrect. However, Drude's prediction is shown to be correct for the conditions treated, demonstrating the importance of constraints in deriving equivalent circuits for distributed systems. The predicted nonreciprocity is not fundamental, but instead is an artifact of the misrepresentation of energy by an equivalent circuit. The application to modern equivalent circuits is discussed. PMID:25542040

  17. A Measurement of $R_b$ using Mutually Exclusive Tags

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Pietrzyk, B; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Comas, P; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Orteu, S; Padilla, C; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Alemany, R; Becker, U; Bazarko, A O; Bright-Thomas, P G; Cattaneo, M; Cerutti, F; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Lutters, G; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Moneta, L; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rensing, P E; Rizzo, G; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Ferdi, C; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Daskalakis, G; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Blondel, A; Bonneaud, G R; Brient, J C; Bourdon, P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Verderi, M; Videau, H L; Candlin, D J; Parsons, M I; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Zachariadou, K; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Thomson, F; Turnbull, R M; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Girone, M; Goodsir, S M; Martin, E B; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Dissertori, G; Ghete, V M; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Sloan, Terence; Williams, M I; Galla, A; Giehl, I; Greene, A M; Hoffmann, C; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Coyle, P; Diaconu, C A; Etienne, F; Konstantinidis, N P; Leroy, O; Motsch, F; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Ragusa, F; Berlich, R; Blum, Walter; Brown, D; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Dydak, Friedrich; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Chen, S; Choi, Y; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Tournefier, E; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Foà, L; Forti, F; Giassi, A; Giorgi, M A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Vannini, C; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Chambers, J T; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Kelly, M S; Lehto, M H; Newton, W M; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Grupen, Claus; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Armstrong, S R; Charles, E; Elmer, P; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y S; González, S; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; Jin, S; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Nielsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, J; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zobernig, G

    1997-01-01

    A measurement of $R_b$ using five mutually exclusive hemisphere tags has been pe rformed by ALEPH using the full LEP1 statistics. Three tags are designed to sele ct the decay of the $Z^0$ to $b$ quarks, while the remaining two select $Z^0$ decays to $c$ and light quarks, and are used to measure the tagging efficiencies. The result, {$R_b~=~0.2159~\\pm~0.0009\\mbox{(stat)}~\\pm 0.0011\\mbox{(syst)}$}, is in agreement with the electroweak theory prediction of $0.2158 \\pm 0.0003$.

  18. Asymmetric Mutualism in Two- and Three-Dimensional Range Expansions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrentovich, Maxim O.; Nelson, David R.

    2014-04-01

    Genetic drift at the frontiers of two-dimensional range expansions of microorganisms can frustrate local cooperation between different genetic variants, demixing the population into distinct sectors. In a biological context, mutualistic or antagonistic interactions will typically be asymmetric between variants. By taking into account both the asymmetry and the interaction strength, we show that the much weaker demixing in three dimensions allows for a mutualistic phase over a much wider range of asymmetric cooperative benefits, with mutualism prevailing for any positive, symmetric benefit. We also demonstrate that expansions with undulating fronts roughen dramatically at the boundaries of the mutualistic phase, with severe consequences for the population genetics along the transition lines.

  19. Use of the mutual exclusivity assumption by young word learners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markman, Ellen M.; Wasow, Judith L.; Hansen, Mikkel

    2003-01-01

    an obvious location to search. On the whole, babies at both ages resisted second labels for objects and, with some qualifications, tended to search for a better referent for the novel label. Thus mutual exclusivity is in place before the onset of the naming explosion. The findings demonstrate that lexical...... constraints enable babies to learn words even under non-optimal conditions-when speakers are not clear and referents are not visible. The results are discussed in relation to an alternative social-pragmatic account. © 2003 Elsevier (USA). All rights reserved....

  20. Giant Mutual Proximity Effects in Ferromagnetic/Superconducting Nanostructures

    OpenAIRE

    Petrashov, Victor; Sosnin, I. A.; Cox, I.; Parsons, A.; Troadec, C.

    1999-01-01

    A strong mutual influence of superconductors (S) and ferromagnetic (F) conductors in hybrid F/S (Ni/Al) nanostructures is observed. The proximity-induced conductance on the F side, Delta G, is 2 orders of magnitude larger than that predicted by theory. A crossover from positive to negative Delta G takes place upon an increase in the F/S interface barrier resistance. Reentrance of the superconductors to the normal state reciprocated by changes on the F side has been found in low applied magnet...

  1. Complement and platelets: Mutual interference in the immune network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speth, Cornelia; Rambach, Günter; Würzner, Reinhard; Lass-Flörl, Cornelia; Kozarcanin, Huda; Hamad, Osama A; Nilsson, Bo; Ekdahl, Kristina N

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, the view of platelets has changed from mere elements of hemostasis to immunological multitaskers. They are connected in manifold ways to other cellular and humoral components of the immune network, one of which is the complement system, a potent player in soluble innate immunity. Our article reviews the crucial and complex interplay between platelets and complement, focusing on mutual regulation of these two interaction partners by their respective molecular mechanisms. Furthermore, the putative relevance of these processes to infectious diseases, inflammatory conditions, and autoimmune disorders, as well as the treatment of patients with biomaterials is highlighted.

  2. Proposal for a mutual insurance pool for transplant organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwindt, R; Vining, A

    1998-10-01

    Over the past decade there have been numerous proposals to use market system incentives to attenuate the persistent shortage of transplantable human organs. While shortages have grown, opposition to market-based solutions has remained adamant. Much of the opposition has focused on monetary incentives. This article explores an alternative--a mutual insurance pool to increase the supply of organs. In the process, criticisms of earlier proposals (specifically the future delivery scheme) are addressed, the operation of an insurance pool is described, and problems associated with insurance markets are identified and addressed. The article concludes that an insurance pool could overcome public and political resistance to more explicit market-based solutions.

  3. Characteristic properties of Fibonacci-based mutually unbiased bases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seyfarth, Ulrich; Alber, Gernot [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Ranade, Kedar [Institut fuer Quantenphysik, Universitaet Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, 89069 Ulm (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    Complete sets of mutually unbiased bases (MUBs) offer interesting applications in quantum information processing ranging from quantum cryptography to quantum state tomography. Different construction schemes provide different perspectives on these bases which are typically also deeply connected to various mathematical research areas. In this talk we discuss characteristic properties resulting from a recently established connection between construction methods for cyclic MUBs and Fibonacci polynomials. As a remarkable fact this connection leads to construction methods which do not involve any relations to mathematical properties of finite fields.

  4. Quantised vortices and mutual friction in relativistic superfluids

    CERN Document Server

    Andersson, N; Vickers, J A

    2016-01-01

    We consider the detailed dynamics of an array of quantised superfluid vortices in the framework of general relativity, as required for quantitative modelling of realistic neutron star cores. Our model builds on the variational approach to relativistic (multi-) fluid dynamics, where the vorticity plays a central role. The description provides a natural extension of, and as it happens a better insight into, existing Newtonian models. In particular, we account for the mutual friction associated with scattering of a second "normal" component in the mixture off of the superfluid vortices.

  5. A robust cloud access scheme with mutual authentication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Chin-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the progress of network technology, we can access some information through remote servers, and we also can save and access lots of personal data in remote servers. Therefore, to protect these data and resist unauthorized access is an important issue. Some researchers proposed authentication scheme, but there still exist some security weaknesses. This article is based on the concept of HDFS (Hadoop Distributed File System, and offers a robust authentication scheme. The proposed scheme achieves mutual authentication, prevents re-play attack, solves asynchronous issue, and prevents offline password guessing attack.

  6. Allosteric regulation by cooperative conformational changes of actin filaments drives mutually exclusive binding with cofilin and myosin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Kien Xuan; Umeki, Nobuhisa; Kijima, Saku T; Kodera, Noriyuki; Ueno, Hiroaki; Furutani-Umezu, Nozomi; Nakajima, Jun; Noguchi, Taro Q P; Nagasaki, Akira; Tokuraku, Kiyotaka; Uyeda, Taro Q P

    2016-10-20

    Heavy meromyosin (HMM) of myosin II and cofilin each binds to actin filaments cooperatively and forms clusters along the filaments, but it is unknown whether the two cooperative bindings are correlated and what physiological roles they have. Fluorescence microscopy demonstrated that HMM-GFP and cofilin-mCherry each bound cooperatively to different parts of actin filaments when they were added simultaneously in 0.2 μM ATP, indicating that the two cooperative bindings are mutually exclusive. In 0.1 mM ATP, the motor domain of myosin (S1) strongly inhibited the formation of cofilin clusters along actin filaments. Under this condition, most actin protomers were unoccupied by S1 at any given moment, suggesting that transiently bound S1 alters the structure of actin filaments cooperatively and/or persistently to inhibit cofilin binding. Consistently, cosedimentation experiments using copolymers of actin and actin-S1 fusion protein demonstrated that the fusion protein affects the neighboring actin protomers, reducing their affinity for cofilin. In reciprocal experiments, cofilin-actin fusion protein reduced the affinity of neighboring actin protomers for S1. Thus, allosteric regulation by cooperative conformational changes of actin filaments contributes to mutually exclusive cooperative binding of myosin II and cofilin to actin filaments, and presumably to the differential localization of both proteins in cells.

  7. DYNAMICS OF MUTUAL FUNDS IN RELATION TO STOCK MARKET: A VECTOR AUTOREGRESSIVE CAUSALITY ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Shahadath Hossain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In Bangladesh, primary and secondary mutual fund markets behave in a completely different way, where initial public offering (IPO investors of mutual funds earn more than 250 percent rerun, whereas secondary market investors cannot even manage to cover the opportunity cost of their investment. There are few other abnormalities present in this market – unlike everywhere in the world, most of the mutual funds are closed-end (92 percent and closed-end mutual funds are barred to issue bonus or right shares. A total of 714 day’s observations, from January 2008 to December 2010, of four variables– DSE (Dhaka Stock Exchange general index return, DSE general index turnover, mutual funds’ return and mutual funds’ turnover– are utilized. Stationarity of the variables are tested with Augmented Dickey-Fuller (ADF unit root test and found that variables are in different order of integration. Long-term equilibrium relationships among the variables are tested with Johansen cointegration and it is found that DSE general index return and mutual funds’ return are cointegrated. Toda-Yamamoto (TY version of granger non-causality test is employed and bidirectional causality is found moving from DSE (Dhaka Stock Exchange general index turnover to DSE general index return, whereas unidirectional causality is found moving from mutual fund’s return to DSE general index return, mutual funds’ return to mutual funds turnover, and DSE general index turnover to mutual funds turnover. This finding helps to conclude that equity shares’ demand drives the mutual funds demand but even higher demand of mutual funds fails to raise its own price unless underlying value of the mutual funds changes.

  8. Between the Dance Studio and the Social Dance Floor: On Solidarity and Practices of Mutuality in Swing Dance Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boštjan Kravanja

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the dynamics of actualization of solidarity and hierarchical relations in contemporary swing dance communities. It shows how these communities are based on a specific solidarity ideology, at least it terms of dealing with processes of their institutionalization, commercialization and establishing of formal dance hierarchies. However, when we take into view the swing dancers themselves, diverse practices of mutuality become evident. In contrast to the formal solidarity discourses and practices, the latter are much more heterogeneous and as such more interesting for anthropological discussion, for they establish solidarity and hierarchical relations apart from wider mobilization movements of the swing dance industry, and many of them implicitly resist institutionalization. The thesis arising from this case study is that the practices of mutuality are not always in complementary relation with discourses of solidarity. On the contrary, they often bypass the major solidarity flows and, paradoxically, contribute most efficiently to the actual solidarity of vital parts of the swing communities. The author discusses the subject on the basis of six years of active participation in different Slovene swing dance scenes and occasional presence at international swing dance events in different European cities.

  9. The Interaction Between Mutual Trust, Mutual Recognition and Fundamental Rights in Private International Law in Relation to the EU’s Aspirations Relating to Contractual Relations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emaus, J.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314838635

    2017-01-01

    This contribution aims to provide an analysis of the interrelationship between the principles of mutual trust, mutual recognition and fundamental rights in the field of private international law and to consider the interaction between these principles in relation to the European Union’s aspirations

  10. Water stress strengthens mutualism among ants, trees, and scale insects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth G Pringle

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Abiotic environmental variables strongly affect the outcomes of species interactions. For example, mutualistic interactions between species are often stronger when resources are limited. The effect might be indirect: water stress on plants can lead to carbon stress, which could alter carbon-mediated plant mutualisms. In mutualistic ant-plant symbioses, plants host ant colonies that defend them against herbivores. Here we show that the partners' investments in a widespread ant-plant symbiosis increase with water stress across 26 sites along a Mesoamerican precipitation gradient. At lower precipitation levels, Cordia alliodora trees invest more carbon in Azteca ants via phloem-feeding scale insects that provide the ants with sugars, and the ants provide better defense of the carbon-producing leaves. Under water stress, the trees have smaller carbon pools. A model of the carbon trade-offs for the mutualistic partners shows that the observed strategies can arise from the carbon costs of rare but extreme events of herbivory in the rainy season. Thus, water limitation, together with the risk of herbivory, increases the strength of a carbon-based mutualism.

  11. Gaining (Mutual) Information about Quark/Gluon Discrimination

    CERN Document Server

    Larkoski, Andrew J; Waalewijn, Wouter J

    2014-01-01

    Discriminating quark jets from gluon jets is an important but challenging problem in jet substructure. In this paper, we use the concept of mutual information to illuminate the physics of quark/gluon tagging. Ideal quark/gluon separation requires only one bit of truth information, so even if two discriminant variables are largely uncorrelated, they can still share the same "truth overlap". Mutual information can be used to diagnose such situations, and thus determine which discriminant variables are redundant and which can be combined to improve performance. Using both parton showers and analytic resummation, we study a two-parameter family of generalized angularities, which includes familiar infrared and collinear (IRC) safe observables like thrust and broadening, as well as IRC unsafe variants like $p_T^D$ and hadron multiplicity. At leading-logarithmic (LL) order, the bulk of these variables exhibit Casimir scaling, such that their truth overlap is a universal function of the color factor ratio $C_A/C_F$. ...

  12. An invasive slug exploits an ant-seed dispersal mutualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadley Dunphy, Shannon A; Prior, Kirsten M; Frederickson, Megan E

    2016-05-01

    Plant-animal mutualisms, such as seed dispersal, are often vulnerable to disruption by invasive species. Here, we show for the first time how a non-ant invasive species negatively affects seed dispersal by ants. We examined the effects of several animal species that co-occur in a temperate deciduous forest-including native and invasive seed-dispersing ants (Aphaenogaster rudis and Myrmica rubra, respectively), an invasive slug (Arion subfuscus), and native rodents-on a native myrmecochorous plant, Asarum canadense. We experimentally manipulated ant, slug, and rodent access to seed depots and measured seed removal. We also video-recorded depots to determine which other taxa interact with seeds. We found that A. rudis was the main disperser of seeds and that A. subfuscus consumed elaiosomes without dispersing seeds. Rodent visitation was rare, and rodent exclusion had no significant effect on seed or elaiosome removal. We then used data obtained from laboratory and field mesocosm experiments to determine how elaiosome robbing by A. subfuscus affects seed dispersal by A. rudis and M. rubra. We found that elaiosome robbing by slugs reduced seed dispersal by ants, especially in mesocosms with A. rudis, which picks up seeds more slowly than M. rubra. Taken together, our results show that elaiosome robbing by an invasive slug reduces seed dispersal by ants, suggesting that invasive slugs can have profound negative effects on seed dispersal mutualisms.

  13. Mutual influences of pain and emotional face processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias J Wieser

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The perception of unpleasant stimuli enhances whereas the perception of pleasant stimuli decreases pain perception. In contrast, the effects of pain on the processing of emotional stimuli are much less known. Especially given the recent interest in facial expressions of pain as a special category of emotional stimuli, a main topic in this research line is the mutual influence of pain and facial expression processing. Therefore, in this mini-review we selectively summarize research on the effects of emotional stimuli on pain, but more extensively turn to the opposite direction namely how pain influences concurrent processing of affective stimuli such as facial expressions. Based on the motivational priming theory one may hypothesize that the perception of pain enhances the processing of unpleasant stimuli and decreases the processing of pleasant stimuli. This review reveals that the literature is only partly consistent with this assumption: Pain reduces the processing of pleasant pictures and happy facial expressions, but does not - or only partly - affect processing of unpleasant pictures. However, it was demonstrated that pain selectively enhances the processing of facial expressions if these are pain-related (i.e. facial expressions of pain. Extending a mere affective modulation theory, the latter results suggest pain-specific effects which may be explained by the perception-action model of empathy. Together, these results underscore the important mutual influence of pain and emotional face processing.

  14. Mutual influences of pain and emotional face processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieser, Matthias J; Gerdes, Antje B M; Reicherts, Philipp; Pauli, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The perception of unpleasant stimuli enhances whereas the perception of pleasant stimuli decreases pain perception. In contrast, the effects of pain on the processing of emotional stimuli are much less known. Especially given the recent interest in facial expressions of pain as a special category of emotional stimuli, a main topic in this research line is the mutual influence of pain and facial expression processing. Therefore, in this mini-review we selectively summarize research on the effects of emotional stimuli on pain, but more extensively turn to the opposite direction namely how pain influences concurrent processing of affective stimuli such as facial expressions. Based on the motivational priming theory one may hypothesize that the perception of pain enhances the processing of unpleasant stimuli and decreases the processing of pleasant stimuli. This review reveals that the literature is only partly consistent with this assumption: pain reduces the processing of pleasant pictures and happy facial expressions, but does not - or only partly - affect processing of unpleasant pictures. However, it was demonstrated that pain selectively enhances the processing of facial expressions if these are pain-related (i.e., facial expressions of pain). Extending a mere affective modulation theory, the latter results suggest pain-specific effects which may be explained by the perception-action model of empathy. Together, these results underscore the important mutual influence of pain and emotional face processing.

  15. Interaction of Mutually Perpendicular Magnetic Fields in HTSC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasilyev Aleksandr Fedorovich

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this article a problem of interaction of the crossed magnetic fields in superconductors is considered. Superconducting materials have nonlinear magnetic properties. It allows using a non-linear magnetic susceptibility for measurement of feeble magnetic fields. We place a wire of superconducting material in a constant parallel uniform magnetic field. Then we let through a wire the alternating current leak. Interaction of mutual and perpendicular variation magnetic fields, with adequate accuracy is described by Ginzburg-Landau's equations. Approximate solution of the written equations is received. The component of a magnetic field parallel to a wire contains a variable component. Frequency of a variable component of the magnetic field is equal to the doubled current frequency. Amplitude of the variable component of the magnetic field is proportional to strength of the constant magnetic field. The experimental installation for research of interaction of mutually perpendicular magnetic fields is created. The cylinder from HTSC of ceramics of the YBa2Cu3O7-x was used as a sensor. Dependence of amplitude of the second harmonica of a variation magnetic field on strength of a constant magnetic field is received.

  16. Characterization of Predictive Behavior of a Retina by Mutual Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Sean Chen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Probing a bullfrog retina with spatially uniform light pulses of correlated stochastic intervals, we calculate the mutual information between the spiking output at the ganglion cells measured with multi-electrode array (MEA and the interval of the stimulus at a time shift later. The time-integrated information from the output about the future stimulus is maximized when the mean interval of the stimulus is within the dynamic range of the well-established anticipative phenomena of omitted-stimulus responses for the retina. The peak position of the mutual information as a function of the time shift is typically negative considering the processing delay of the retina. However, the peak position can become positive for long enough correlation time of the stimulus when the pulse intervals are generated by a Hidden Markovian model (HMM. This is indicative of a predictive behavior of the retina which is possible only when the hidden variable of the HMM can be recovered from the history of the stimulus for a prediction of its future. We verify that stochastic intervals of the same mean, variance, and correlation time do not result in the same predictive behavior of the retina when they are generated by an Ornstein–Uhlenbeck (OU process, which is strictly Markovian.

  17. Inflammation and colorectal cancer, when microbiota-host mutualism breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candela, Marco; Turroni, Silvia; Biagi, Elena; Carbonero, Franck; Rampelli, Simone; Fiorentini, Carla; Brigidi, Patrizia

    2014-01-28

    Structural changes in the gut microbial community have been shown to accompany the progressive development of colorectal cancer. In this review we discuss recent hypotheses on the mechanisms involved in the bacteria-mediated carcinogenesis, as well as the triggering factors favoring the shift of the gut microbiota from a mutualistic to a pro-carcinogenic configuration. The possible role of inflammation, bacterial toxins and toxic microbiota metabolites in colorectal cancer onset is specifically discussed. On the other hand, the strategic role of inflammation as the keystone factor in driving microbiota to become carcinogenic is suggested. As a common outcome of different environmental and endogenous triggers, such as diet, aging, pathogen infection or genetic predisposition, inflammation can compromise the microbiota-host mutualism, forcing the increase of pathobionts at the expense of health-promoting groups, and allowing the microbiota to acquire an overall pro-inflammatory configuration. Consolidating inflammation in the gut, and favoring the bloom of toxigenic bacterial drivers, these changes in the gut microbial ecosystem have been suggested as pivotal in promoting carcinogenesis. In this context, it will become of primary importance to implement dietary or probiotics-based interventions aimed at preserving the microbiota-host mutualism along aging, counteracting deviations that favor a pro-carcinogenic microbiota asset.

  18. Markov Chain Order estimation with Conditional Mutual Information

    CERN Document Server

    Papapetrou, Maria; 10.1016/j.physa.2012.12.017.

    2013-01-01

    We introduce the Conditional Mutual Information (CMI) for the estimation of the Markov chain order. For a Markov chain of $K$ symbols, we define CMI of order $m$, $I_c(m)$, as the mutual information of two variables in the chain being $m$ time steps apart, conditioning on the intermediate variables of the chain. We find approximate analytic significance limits based on the estimation bias of CMI and develop a randomization significance test of $I_c(m)$, where the randomized symbol sequences are formed by random permutation of the components of the original symbol sequence. The significance test is applied for increasing $m$ and the Markov chain order is estimated by the last order for which the null hypothesis is rejected. We present the appropriateness of CMI-testing on Monte Carlo simulations and compare it to the Akaike and Bayesian information criteria, the maximal fluctuation method (Peres-Shields estimator) and a likelihood ratio test for increasing orders using $\\phi$-divergence. The order criterion of...

  19. Markov chain order estimation with conditional mutual information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papapetrou, M.; Kugiumtzis, D.

    2013-04-01

    We introduce the Conditional Mutual Information (CMI) for the estimation of the Markov chain order. For a Markov chain of K symbols, we define CMI of order m, Ic(m), as the mutual information of two variables in the chain being m time steps apart, conditioning on the intermediate variables of the chain. We find approximate analytic significance limits based on the estimation bias of CMI and develop a randomization significance test of Ic(m), where the randomized symbol sequences are formed by random permutation of the components of the original symbol sequence. The significance test is applied for increasing m and the Markov chain order is estimated by the last order for which the null hypothesis is rejected. We present the appropriateness of CMI-testing on Monte Carlo simulations and compare it to the Akaike and Bayesian information criteria, the maximal fluctuation method (Peres-Shields estimator) and a likelihood ratio test for increasing orders using ϕ-divergence. The order criterion of CMI-testing turns out to be superior for orders larger than one, but its effectiveness for large orders depends on data availability. In view of the results from the simulations, we interpret the estimated orders by the CMI-testing and the other criteria on genes and intergenic regions of DNA chains.

  20. In which Financial Markets do Mutual Fund Theorems hold true?

    CERN Document Server

    Schachermayer, Walter; Taflin, Erik

    2007-01-01

    The Mutual Fund Theorem (MFT) is considered in a general semimartingale financial market S with a finite time horizon T, where agents maximize expected utility of terminal wealth. It is established that: 1) Let N be the wealth process of the num\\'eraire portfolio (i.e. the optimal portfolio for the log utility). If any path-independent option with maturity T written on the num\\'eraire portfolio can be replicated by trading \\emph{only} in N, then the (MFT) holds true for general utility functions, and the num\\'eraire portfolio may serve as mutual fund. This generalizes Merton's classical result on Black-Scholes markets. Conversely, under a supplementary weak completeness assumption, we show that the validity of the (MFT) for general utility functions implies the same replicability property for options on the num\\'eraire portfolio described above. 2) If for a given class of utility functions (i.e. investors) the (MFT) holds true in all complete Brownian financial markets S, then all investors use the same utili...

  1. Water stress strengthens mutualism among ants, trees, and scale insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pringle, Elizabeth G; Akçay, Erol; Raab, Ted K; Dirzo, Rodolfo; Gordon, Deborah M

    2013-11-01

    Abiotic environmental variables strongly affect the outcomes of species interactions. For example, mutualistic interactions between species are often stronger when resources are limited. The effect might be indirect: water stress on plants can lead to carbon stress, which could alter carbon-mediated plant mutualisms. In mutualistic ant-plant symbioses, plants host ant colonies that defend them against herbivores. Here we show that the partners' investments in a widespread ant-plant symbiosis increase with water stress across 26 sites along a Mesoamerican precipitation gradient. At lower precipitation levels, Cordia alliodora trees invest more carbon in Azteca ants via phloem-feeding scale insects that provide the ants with sugars, and the ants provide better defense of the carbon-producing leaves. Under water stress, the trees have smaller carbon pools. A model of the carbon trade-offs for the mutualistic partners shows that the observed strategies can arise from the carbon costs of rare but extreme events of herbivory in the rainy season. Thus, water limitation, together with the risk of herbivory, increases the strength of a carbon-based mutualism.

  2. In silico comparison of bacterial strains using mutual information

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D Swati

    2007-09-01

    Fast-sequencing throughput methods have increased the number of completely sequenced bacterial genomes to about 400 by December 2006, with the number increasing rapidly. These include several strains. In silico methods of comparative genomics are of use in categorizing and phylogenetically sorting these bacteria. Various word-based tools have been used for quantifying the similarities and differences between entire genomes. The simple di-nucleotide frequency comparison, codon specificity and k-mer repeat detection are among some of the well-known methods. In this paper, we show that the Mutual Information function, which is a measure of correlations and a concept from Information Theory, is very effective in determining the similarities and differences among genome sequences of various strains of bacteria such as the plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa, marine Cyanobacteria Prochlorococcus marinus or animal and human pathogens such as species of Ehrlichia and Legionella. The short-range three-base periodicity, small sequence repeats and long-range correlations taken together constitute a genome signature that can be used as a technique for identifying new bacterial strains with the help of strains already catalogued in the database. There have been several applications of using the Mutual Information function as a measure of correlations in genomics but this is the first whole genome analysis done to detect strain similarities and differences.

  3. MODELING OF DISTRIBUTED MUTUAL EXCLUSION SYSTEM USING EVENT-B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghuraj Suryavanshi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The problem of mutual exclusion arises in distributed systems whenever shared resources are concurrently accessed by several sites. For correctness, it is required that shared resource must be accessed by a single site at a time. To decide, which site execute the critical section next, each site communicate with a set of other sites. A systematic approach is essential to formulate an accurate speciation. Formal methods are mathematical techniques that provide systematic approach for building and verification of model. We have used Event-B as a formal technique for construction of our model. Event-B is event driven approach which is used to develop formal models of distributed systems .It supports generation and discharge of proof obligations arising due to consistency checking. In this paper, we outline a formal construction of model of Lamport's mutual exclusion algorithm for distributed system using Event-B. We have considered vector clock instead of using Lam-port's scalar clock for the purpose of message's time stamping.

  4. Query Expansion Using Heterogeneous Thesauri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandala, Rila; Tokunaga, Takenobu; Tanaka, Hozumi

    2000-01-01

    Proposes a method to improve the performance of information retrieval systems by expanding queries using heterogeneous thesauri. Experiments show that using heterogeneous thesauri with an appropriate weighting method results in better retrieval performance than using only one type of thesaurus. (Author/LRW)

  5. Fiscal Consolidations and Heterogeneous Expectations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Hommes; J. Lustenhouwer; K. Mavromatis

    2015-01-01

    We analyze fiscal consolidations using a New Keynesian model where agents have heterogeneous expectations and are uncertain about the composition of consoidations. Heterogeneity in expectations may amplify expansions, stabilizing thus the debt-to-GDP ratio faster under tax based consolidations, in t

  6. Coordination Frictions and Job Heterogeneity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kennes, John; le Maire, Christian Daniel

    This paper develops and extends a dynamic, discrete time, job to worker matching model in which jobs are heterogeneous in equilibrium. The key assumptions of this economic environment are (i) matching is directed and (ii) coordination frictions lead to heterogeneous local labor markets. We de- rive...

  7. Query Expansion Using Heterogeneous Thesauri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandala, Rila; Tokunaga, Takenobu; Tanaka, Hozumi

    2000-01-01

    Proposes a method to improve the performance of information retrieval systems by expanding queries using heterogeneous thesauri. Experiments show that using heterogeneous thesauri with an appropriate weighting method results in better retrieval performance than using only one type of thesaurus. (Author/LRW)

  8. Representing Topological Relationships Among Heterogeneous Geometry-Collection Features

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Nong Zhong; Ning Jing; Luo Chen; Qiu-Yun Wu

    2004-01-01

    Topological relationships between two spatial features represent important knowledge in Geographical Information Systems (GIS). In the last few years, many models that represent topological relationships have been proposed. But these models cannot represent the topological relationships between heterogeneous geometrycollection features, which are composed of different dimensional geometries. In this paper, the formal definition of regular heterogeneous geometrycollection and regularization rules are given. Based on the spatial model, two methods for representing topological relationships between these complex features are proposed. The first method is Dimensionally Extended Nine-Intersection Model Based on Components (DE-9IMBC) that extends Dimensionally Extended Nine-Intersection Model (DE-9IM) and takes into account the topological relationships between components of these complex features. The advantage of DE-9IMBC is that a large number of different topological relationships can be checked. The second method extends the definitions of topological relationships in Open Geodata Interoperability Specification (OpenGIS), and redefines the seven named topological relationships:{Disjoint, Touches, Within, Crosses, Overlaps, Contains and Equal}, to represent the topological relationships between heterogeneous geometrycollection features. It is proven that the seven extended topological relationships are complete and mutually exclusive, and they are suitable for being embedded in spatial query languages.

  9. Representing Topological Relationships Among Heterogeneous Geometry-Collection Features

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-NongZhong[; NingJing; LuoChen; Qiu-YunWu

    2004-01-01

    Topological relationships between two spatial features represent important knowledge in Geographical Information Systems (GIS). In the last few years, many models that represent topological relationships have been proposed. But these models cannot represent the topological relationships between heterogeneous geometrycollection features, which are composed of different dimensional geometries. In this paper, the formal definition of regular heterogeneous geometrycollection and regularization rules are given. Based on the spatial model, two methods for representing topological relationships between these complex features are proposed. The first method is Dimensionally Extended Nine-Intersection Model Based on Components (DE-9IMBC) that extends Dimensionally Extended Nine-Intersection Model (DE-9IM) and takes into account the topological relationships between components of these complex features. The advantage of DE-9IMBC is that a large number of different topological relationships can be checked. The second method extends the definitions of topological relationships in Open Geodata Interoperability Specification (OpenGIS), and redefines the seven named topological relationships: {Disjoint, Touches, Within, Crosses, Overlaps, Contains and Equal}, to represent the topological relationships between heterogeneous geometrycollection features. It is proven that the seven extended topological relationships are complete and mutually exclusive, and they are suitable for being embedded in spatial query languages.

  10. Heterogeneity: multilingualism and democracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Jürgen Krumm

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Linguistic diversity and multilingualism on the part of individuals are aprerequisite and a constitutive condition of enabling people to live togetherin a world of growing heterogeneity. Foreign language teaching plays animportant part in democratic education because it can be seen as a trainingin respecting otherness and developing an intercultural, non-ethnocentricperception and attitude. This is all the more important because of the neces-sity of integrating children from migrant families into school life.My article argues that language education policy has to take this per-spective into account, i.e., of establishing a planned diversification so thatpupils (and their parents will not feel satisfied with learning English only,but also become motivated to learn languages of their own neighbourhood,such as migrant and minority languages. However, in order to make use ofthe linguistic resources in the classroom, relating it to the democratic impetusof foreign language education, it is necessary to revise existing languagepolicies and to develop a multilingual perspective for all educational institutions.

  11. Heterogeneous recording media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhanov, Vitaly I.

    1991-02-01

    The paper summarizes the results of investigations performed to obtain deep 3-D holograms with 102 i0 mkm physical thickness allowing the postexposure amplification and the a posteriori changing of the grating parameters. This aim has been achieved by developing heterogeneous systems on the basis of porous glass with light-sensitive compositions introduced into it. 1. INTRODUCTION. LIGHT-SENSITIVE MEDIA FOR 3-D HOLOGRAMS RECORDING. The 3-D holograms have many useful properties: very high diffraction efficiency angular and spectral selectivity but low level of noise. It shoud be noted that in this case deep 3-D holograms are dealt with whose physical thickness is as high as 102 -i mkm. Such hologram recording is usually done using homogeneous light-sensitive media for example dyed acid-halide and electrooptical crystals photochrome glass photostructurized polimer compositions and so on. The nature of photophisical and photochemical processes responsible for the light sensitivity of these materials exclude the possibility of post-exposure treatment. This does not allow to enhance the recorded holograms and considerably hampers their fixing or makes it practically impossible. The object of our work is to create the media which are quite suitable for two-stage processes of the deep hologram formation with post-exposure processing. Such material must satisfy the following requirements: a)they must have high permeability for the developing substances in order to make the development duration suitable for practical applications b)they must be shrinkproof to prevent deformation of the

  12. Parsing Heterogeneous Striatal Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kae Nakamura

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The striatum is an input channel of the basal ganglia and is well known to be involved in reward-based decision making and learning. At the macroscopic level, the striatum has been postulated to contain parallel functional modules, each of which includes neurons that perform similar computations to support selection of appropriate actions for different task contexts. At the single-neuron level, however, recent studies in monkeys and rodents have revealed heterogeneity in neuronal activity even within restricted modules of the striatum. Looking for generality in the complex striatal activity patterns, here we briefly survey several types of striatal activity, focusing on their usefulness for mediating behaviors. In particular, we focus on two types of behavioral tasks: reward-based tasks that use salient sensory cues and manipulate outcomes associated with the cues; and perceptual decision tasks that manipulate the quality of noisy sensory cues and associate all correct decisions with the same outcome. Guided by previous insights on the modular organization and general selection-related functions of the basal ganglia, we relate striatal activity patterns on these tasks to two types of computations: implementation of selection and evaluation. We suggest that a parsing with the selection/evaluation categories encourages a focus on the functional commonalities revealed by studies with different animal models and behavioral tasks, instead of a focus on aspects of striatal activity that may be specific to a particular task setting. We then highlight several questions in the selection-evaluation framework for future explorations.

  13. 5 CFR 2640.201 - Exemptions for interests in mutual funds, unit investment trusts, and employee benefit plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... plans. (a) Diversified mutual funds and unit investment trusts. An employee may participate in any particular matter affecting one or more holdings of a diversified mutual fund or a diversified unit... in several mutual funds whose portfolios contain stock in a small computer company. Each mutual fund...

  14. Cointegration and causality analysis of dynamic linkage between stock market and equity mutual funds in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasipa Pojanavatee

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The existing literature finds conflicting results on the magnitude of price linkages between equity mutual funds and the stock market. The study contends that in an optimal lagged model, the expectations of future prices using knowledge of past price behaviour in a particular equity mutual fund category will improve forecasts of prices of other equity mutual fund categories and the stock market index. The evidence shows that the long-run pricing of equity mutual funds is cointegrated with the stock market index. In the short run, the results indicate that some equity mutual fund categories possess both long-run and short-run exogeneity with the stock market. Therefore, the short-run dynamic indicates short-run Granger causal links running between different equity mutual fund categories.

  15. Efficient Estimation of Mutual Information for Strongly Dependent Variables

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Shuyang; Galstyan, Aram

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate that a popular class of nonparametric mutual information (MI) estimators based on k-nearest-neighbor graphs requires number of samples that scales exponentially with the true MI. Consequently, accurate estimation of MI between two strongly dependent variables is possible only for prohibitively large sample size. This important yet overlooked shortcoming of the existing estimators is due to their implicit reliance on local uniformity of the underlying joint distribution. We introduce a new estimator that is robust to local non-uniformity, works well with limited data, and is able to capture relationship strengths over many orders of magnitude. We demonstrate the superior performance of the proposed estimator on both synthetic and real-world data.

  16. Cooperative Routing for Wireless Networks using Mutual-Information Accumulation

    CERN Document Server

    Draper, Stark C; Molisch, Andreas F; Yedidia, Jonathan S

    2009-01-01

    Cooperation between the nodes of wireless multihop networks can increase communication reliability, reduce energy consumption, and decrease latency. The possible improvements are even greater when nodes perform mutual information accumulation using rateless codes. In this paper, we investigate routing problems in such networks. Given a network, a source, and a destination, our objective is to minimize end-to-end transmission delay under energy and bandwidth constraints. We provide an algorithm that determines which nodes should participate in forwarding the message and what resources (time, energy, bandwidth) should be allocated to each. Our approach factors into two sub-problems, each of which can be solved efficiently. For any transmission order we show that solving for the optimum resource allocation can be formulated as a linear programming problem. We then show that the transmission order can be improved systematically by swapping nodes based on the solution of the linear program. Solving a sequence of l...

  17. A method of waveform design based on mutual information

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo JIU; Hongwei LIU; Liya LI; Shunjun WU

    2009-01-01

    A novel method called the general waterfilling, which is suitable when clutter is not negligible, is proposed to solve the waveform design problem of broadband radar for the recognition of multiple extended targets. The uncertainty of the target's radar signatures is decreased via maximizing the mutual information between a random extended target and the received signal. Then, the general water-filling method is employed to the waveform design problem for multiple extended targets identification to increase the separability of multiple targets. Experimental results evaluated the efficiency of the proposed method. Compared to chirp signal and water-filling signal,our method improves the classification rates and even performs better at low signal-to-interference-plus-noise ratio (SINR).

  18. Peer pressure: enhancement of cooperation through mutual punishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Han-Xin; Wu, Zhi-Xi; Rong, Zhihai; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2015-02-01

    An open problem in evolutionary game dynamics is to understand the effect of peer pressure on cooperation in a quantitative manner. Peer pressure can be modeled by punishment, which has been proved to be an effective mechanism to sustain cooperation among selfish individuals. We investigate a symmetric punishment strategy, in which an individual will punish each neighbor if their strategies are different, and vice versa. Because of the symmetry in imposing the punishment, one might intuitively expect the strategy to have little effect on cooperation. Utilizing the prisoner's dilemma game as a prototypical model of interactions at the individual level, we find, through simulation and theoretical analysis, that proper punishment, when even symmetrically imposed on individuals, can enhance cooperation. Also, we find that the initial density of cooperators plays an important role in the evolution of cooperation driven by mutual punishment.

  19. Performance evaluation and ranking of mutual investment funds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behzad Zamanian Samarin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to compare performance of active investment funds in Tehran Stock Exchange based on Sorting ratio considered as one of the post-modern ratios of portfolio evaluation. For this purpose, relevant data to 24 active investment funds in Iran during 2011-2013 were studied. First, parameters of return on portfolio return on investor authority, semi-variance of fund toward authority return was calculated, and ranking was conducted using mentioned ratio. At the end, significance of hypotheses was studied using Durbin-Watson test. According to the obtained results, it was determined that Sina Mutual Investment Fund had the highest rank among 24 funds and Omit Investment Fund had the lowest rank based on Sorting ratio.

  20. Longtime Behavior for Mutually Catalytic Branching with Negative Correlations

    CERN Document Server

    Doering, Leif

    2011-01-01

    In several examples, dualities for interacting diffusion and particle systems permit the study of the longtime behavior of solutions. A particularly difficult model in which many techniques collapse is a two-type model with mutually catalytic interaction introduced by Dawson/Perkins for which they proved under some assumptions a dichotomy between extinction and coexistence directly from the defining equations. In the present article we show how to prove a precise dichotomy for a related model with negatively correlated noises. The proof combines a self-duality to ensure uniform integrability via moment bounds on exit-times of correlated Brownian motions from the first quadrant and explicit second moment calculations. Since the uniform integrability bound is independent of the branching rate our proof can be extended to infinite branching rate processes.

  1. Cross Correlation versus Mutual Information for Image Mosaicing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherin Ghannam

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the concept of image mosaicing and presents a comparison between two of the most common image mosaicing techniques. The first technique is based on normalized cross correlation (NCC for registering overlapping 2D images of a 3D scene. The second is based on mutual information (MI. The experimental results demonstrate that the two techniques have a similar performance in most cases but there are some interesting differences. The choice of a distinctive template is critical when working with NCC. On the other hand, when using MI, the registration procedure was able to provide acceptable performance even without distinctive templates. But generally the performance when using MI with large rotation angles was not accurate as with NCC.

  2. Mutual construction and reconstruction in client-consultant interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Irene Skovgaard

    struggles over position, power and control. In the context of client-consultant interaction, it is thus not only ideas and solutions that are contested but also the power to define. Attention is paid to how ideas are brought into play and negotiated in the interaction between actors. The empirical material......Based on preliminary interviews with client representatives and a pilot case study, the pa-per explores collaboration and mutual construction in client-consultant relationships. Both consultants and client actors take part in an active construction and reconstruction of knowledge that involve...... presented in the paper illustrates how consultancy projects evolve through processes of negotiation over whose interpretation should count and who should be in control. In the process, client actors with different posi-tions and interests play an active role in creating what become valid and what ideas...

  3. Peer pressure: enhancement of cooperation through mutual punishment

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Han-Xin; Rong, Zhihai; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    An open problem in evolutionary game dynamics is to understand the effect of peer pressure on cooperation in a quantitative manner. Peer pressure can be modeled by punishment, which has been proved to be an effective mechanism to sustain cooperation among selfish individuals. We investigate a symmetric punishment strategy, in which an individual will punish each neighbor if their strategies are different, and vice versa. Because of the symmetry in imposing the punishment, one might expect intuitively the strategy to have little effect on cooperation. Utilizing the prisoner's dilemma game as a prototypical model of interactions at the individual level, we find, through simulation and theoretical analysis, that proper punishment, when even symmetrically imposed on individuals, can enhance cooperation. Besides, we find that the initial density of cooperators plays an important role in the evolution of cooperation driven by mutual punishment.

  4. Modeling mutual feedback between users and recommender systems

    CERN Document Server

    Zeng, An; Medo, Matus; Zhang, Yi-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Recommender systems daily influence our decisions on the Internet. While considerable attention has been given to issues such as recommendation accuracy and user privacy, the long-term mutual feedback between a recommender system and the decisions of its users has been neglected so far. We propose here a model of network evolution which allows us to study the complex dynamics induced by this feedback, including the hysteresis effect which is typical for systems with non-linear dynamics. Despite the popular belief that recommendation helps users to discover new things, we find that the long-term use of recommendation can contribute to the rise of extremely popular items and thus ultimately narrow the user choice. These results are supported by measurements of the time evolution of item popularity inequality in real systems. We show that this adverse effect of recommendation can be tamed by sacrificing part of short-term recommendation accuracy.

  5. PAKE-based mutual HTTP authentication for preventing phishing attacks

    CERN Document Server

    Oiwa, Yutaka; Takagi, Hiromitsu

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a new password-based mutual authentication protocol for Web systems which prevents various kinds of phishing attacks. This protocol provides a protection of user's passwords against any phishers even if dictionary attack is employed, and prevents phishers from imitating a false sense of successful authentication to users. The protocol is designed considering interoperability with many recent Web applications which requires many features which current HTTP authentication does not provide. The protocol is proposed as an Internet Draft submitted to IETF, and implemented in both server side (as an Apache extension) and client side (as a Mozilla-based browser and an IE-based one). The paper also proposes a new user-interface for this protocol which is always distinguishable from fake dialogs provided by phishers.

  6. Mutual Inductance in the Bird-Cage Resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tropp

    1997-05-01

    Formulas are derived to account for the effect of the mutual inductances, between all meshes, upon the electrical resonance spectra bird-cage resonators, and similar structures such as the TEM resonator of P. K. H. Roschmann (United States Patent 4,746,866) and J. T. Vaughan et al. (Magn. Reson. Med. 32, 206, 1994). The equations are parameterized in terms of isolated mesh frequencies and coupling coefficients, and ought therefore apply not only to simple magnetic couplings used in the derivation, but to electromagnetic couplings as well. A method for measuring the coupling coefficients-applicable to shielded as well as unshielded resonators-is described, based upon the splitting of frequencies in pairs of coupled resonators; and detailed comparisons are given between calculated and measured resonance spectra: for bird-cage resonators, with and without shields, and for the TEM resonator.

  7. An analytic function approach to weak mutually unbiased bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olupitan, T.; Lei, C.; Vourdas, A.

    2016-08-01

    Quantum systems with variables in Z(d) are considered, and three different structures are studied. The first is weak mutually unbiased bases, for which the absolute value of the overlap of any two vectors in two different bases is 1 /√{ k } (where k | d) or 0. The second is maximal lines through the origin in the Z(d) × Z(d) phase space. The third is an analytic representation in the complex plane based on Theta functions, and their zeros. It is shown that there is a correspondence (triality) that links strongly these three apparently different structures. For simplicity, the case where d =p1 ×p2, where p1 ,p2 are odd prime numbers different from each other, is considered.

  8. A Distributed Mutual Exclusion Algorithm for Mobile Ad Hoc Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orhan Dagdeviren

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We propose a distributed mutual exclusion algorithm for mobile ad hoc networks. This algorithm requires a ring of cluster coordinators as the underlying topology. The topology is built by first providing clusters of mobile nodes in the first step and then forming a backbone consisting of the cluster heads in a ring as the second step. The modified version of the Ricart-Agrawala Algorithm on top of this topologyprovides analytically and experimentally an order of decrease in message complexity with respect to the original algorithm. We analyze the algorithm, provide performance results of the implementation, discuss the fault tolerance and the other algorithmic extensions, and show that this architecture can be used for other middleware functions in mobile networks.

  9. Mutual goals as essential for the results of team coaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Louise Møller

    2015-01-01

    . Team Y solved 72% of the coaching tasks and started an additional 15%. Six out of seven success criteria for the intervention were fulfilled and the last criteria partly fulfilled. In team X, the equivalent results were 45% safety tasks completed and 25% started. Here, two success criteria were...... fulfilled, four partly fulfilled and one not fulfilled. Due to organizational changes, team Z was excluded from the project half-way through the intervention. Lessons learned and possible solutions: Mutual goals among the team members are identified as important for the success of team coaching. Moreover......Background: Facilitated by an external coach, team coaching has been introduced as a method to increase team competency, effectiveness, and learning mainly at the middle manager level (named coachees). However, team coaching also has some pitfalls which will be explored in this chapter...

  10. Word Sense Disambiguation Based on Mutual Information and Syntactic Patterns

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandez-Amoros, David

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a hybrid system for WSD, presented to the English all-words and lexical-sample tasks, that relies on two different unsupervised approaches. The first one selects the senses according to mutual information proximity between a context word a variant of the sense. The second heuristic analyzes the examples of use in the glosses of the senses so that simple syntactic patterns are inferred. This patterns are matched against the disambiguation contexts. We show that the first heuristic obtains a precision and recall of .58 and .35 respectively in the all words task while the second obtains .80 and .25. The high precision obtained recommends deeper research of the techniques. Results for the lexical sample task are also provided.

  11. Election to the Board of the Mutual Aid Fund

    CERN Multimedia

    Mutual Aid Fund

    2013-01-01

    Every two years, the Board of the Mutual Aid Fund has to replace a proportion of its members. In accordance with article 6 of the Fund’s General Regulations, three members must leave and have to be replaced. These three members may apply again. All members of the CERN staff are eligible. If you are prepared to devote about two hours a month during working hours to assist your colleagues with financial problems, do not hesitate to join this self-governing board. Candidates must announce their intention to stand for election by 31 January 2014. Fill in the present form and return it to P. Droux/FP (72265)  who will also be pleased to provide further information. Name, First Name: ................................................................. Department: .................................... Tel.: ..............................

  12. Election to the Board of the Mutual Aid Fund

    CERN Multimedia

    Mutual Aid Fund

    2013-01-01

    Every two years, the Board of the Mutual Aid Fund has to replace a proportion of its members. In accordance with article 6 of the Fund’s General Regulations, three members must leave and have to be replaced. These three members may subscribe again. All members of the CERN staff are eligible. If you are prepared to devote about two hours a month during working hours to assist your colleagues with financial problems, do not hesitate to join this self-governing Board. Candidates must announce their intention to stand for election by 31st January 2014. Fill in the present form and return it to P. Droux/FP (72265) who will also be pleased to provide further information. Name, First Name ................................................................. Department .................................... Tel .............................

  13. Mutual Inductance in the Bird-Cage Resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tropp, James

    1997-05-01

    Formulas are derived to account for the effect of the mutual inductances, between all meshes, upon the electrical resonance spectra bird-cage resonators, and similar structures such as the TEM resonator of P. K. H. Röschmann (United States Patent 4,746,866) and J. T. Vaughanet al.(Magn. Reson. Med.32,206, 1994). The equations are parameterized in terms of isolated mesh frequencies and coupling coefficients, and ought therefore apply not only to simple magnetic couplings used in the derivation, but to electromagnetic couplings as well. A method for measuring the coupling coefficients-applicable to shielded as well as unshielded resonators-is described, based upon the splitting of frequencies in pairs of coupled resonators; and detailed comparisons are given between calculated and measured resonance spectra: for bird-cage resonators, with and without shields, and for the TEM resonator.

  14. Mutually independent cascades in anisotropic soap-film turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chien-Chia; Gioia, Gustavo; Chakraborty, Pinaki

    2015-03-01

    Computational, experimental and field data amassed to date indicate that in 2D turbulence the spectrum of longitudinal velocity fluctuations, E11 (k1) , and the spectrum of transverse velocity fluctuations, E22 (k1) , correspond always to the same cascade, consistent with isotropy, so that E11 (k1) ~k-α and E22 (k1) ~k-α , where the ``spectral exponent'' α is either 5/3 (for the inverse-energy cascade) or 3 (for the enstrophy cascade). Here, we carry out experiments on turbulent 2D soap-film flows in which E11 (k1) ~k - 5 / 3 and E22 (k1) ~k-3 , as if two mutually independent cascades were concurrently active within the same flow. To our knowledge, this species of spectrum has never been observed or predicted theoretically. Our finding might open up new vistas in the understanding of turbulence.

  15. Mutual Dynamics of Swimming Microorganisms and Their Fluid Habitat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, John O.; Burnett, G. David; Remick, Katherine E.

    "Organisms alter their material environment, and their environment constrains and naturally selects organisms." Lenton's [17] statement applies especially well to populations of swimming micro-organisms. The mutual dynamic of themselves and their fluid habitat orders and constrains them, generates concentration-convection patterns [12], [15], enhances transport of metabolites and, at all scales, guides many of their interactions. Our objective is to describe mathematical models sufficient for reaching insights that can further guide theory and experiment. These models necessarily include nonlinear and stochastic features. To illustrate self-organization and the type of experimental statistical inputs available, we present some rather astonishing data concerning the motile bacteria Bacillus subtilis and hydrodynamics associated with their activity. The inescapable interdependence of physics and biology emerges from the analysis.

  16. A Mixed Mechanism Mutual Authentication Protocol for TETRA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hui; YANG Yi-xian

    2005-01-01

    The mutual authentication between the MS and Switching and Management Infrastructure (SwMI) in the TErrestrial Trunked RAdio (TETRA) system are analysed in this paper and theoretical analysis shows that some drawbacks exist when using the shared secrets in the Challenge-Response protocol: (1) It's difficult to store and maintain large amount of MS's authentication key in the SwMI when the network is large. (2) It's hard to support non-renouncement services when using the symmetrical cryptography. An authentication protocol for TETRA using Identity-based Public Keys for the SwMI to authenticate the MSs and an authentication protocol based on hash chain for the MSs to authenticate the SwMI are presented, which can effectively compensate the above-mentioned drawbacks.

  17. Identifying statistical dependence in genomic sequences via mutual information estimates

    CERN Document Server

    Aktulga, H M; Lyznik, L A; Szpankowski, L; Grama, A Y; Szpankowski, W

    2007-01-01

    Questions of understanding and quantifying the representation and amount of information in organisms have become a central part of biological research, as they potentially hold the key to fundamental advances. In this paper, we demonstrate the use of information-theoretic tools for the task of identifying segments of biomolecules (DNA or RNA) that are statistically correlated. We develop a precise and reliable methodology, based on the notion of mutual information, for finding and extracting statistical as well as structural dependencies. A simple threshold function is defined, and its use in quantifying the level of significance of dependencies between biological segments is explored. These tools are used in two specific applications. First, for the identification of correlations between different parts of the maize zmSRp32 gene. There, we find significant dependencies between the 5' untranslated region in zmSRp32 and its alternatively spliced exons. This observation may indicate the presence of as-yet unkno...

  18. Eavesdropping on cooperative communication within an ant-butterfly mutualism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgar, Mark A.; Nash, David R.; Pierce, Naomi E.

    2016-10-01

    Signalling is necessary for the maintenance of interspecific mutualisms but is vulnerable to exploitation by eavesdropping. While eavesdropping of intraspecific signals has been studied extensively, such exploitation of interspecific signals has not been widely documented. The juvenile stages of the Australian lycaenid butterfly, Jalmenus evagoras, form an obligate association with several species of attendant ants, including Iridomyrmex mayri. Ants protect the caterpillars and pupae, and in return are rewarded with nutritious secretions. Female and male adult butterflies use ants as signals for oviposition and mate searching, respectively. Our experiments reveal that two natural enemies of J. evagoras, araneid spiders and braconid parasitoid wasps, exploit ant signals as cues for increasing their foraging and oviposition success, respectively. Intriguingly, selection through eavesdropping is unlikely to modify the ant signal.

  19. Election to the Board of the Mutual Aid Fund

    CERN Multimedia

    Mutual Aid Fund

    2011-01-01

    Every year, the Board of the Mutual Aid Fund has to replace a proportion of its members. In accordance with article 6 of the Fund’s General Regulations, three members must leave and have to be replaced. These three members may subscribe again. All members of the CERN staff are eligible. If you are prepared to devote about two hours a month during working hours to assist your colleagues with financial problems, do not hesitate to join this self-governing Board. Candidates must announce their intention to stand for election by 1st Mars 2011. Fill in the present form and return it to P. Droux/FP (72265) or C. Potter/PH (74279) who will also be pleased to provide further information. Name, First Name ................................................................. Department .................................... Tel .............................

  20. Election to the Board of the Mutual Aid Fund

    CERN Multimedia

    Fonds d'Entraide

    2011-01-01

    Every year, the Board of the Mutual Aid Fund has to replace a proportion of its members. In accordance with article 6 of the Fund’s General Regulations, three members must leave and have to be replaced. These three members may subscribe again. All members of the CERN staff are eligible. If you are prepared to devote about two hours a month during working hours to assist your colleagues with financial problems, do not hesitate to join this self-governing Board. Candidates must announce their intention to stand for election by 1st Mars 2011. Fill in the present form and return it to P. Droux/FP (72265) or C. Potter/PH (74279) who will also be pleased to provide further information. Name, First Name Department Tel  

  1. Peer pressure: Enhancement of cooperation through mutual punishment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Han-Xin; Wu, Zhi-Xi; Rong, Zhihai; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2015-02-01

    An open problem in evolutionary game dynamics is to understand the effect of peer pressure on cooperation in a quantitative manner. Peer pressure can be modeled by punishment, which has been proved to be an effective mechanism to sustain cooperation among selfish individuals. We investigate a symmetric punishment strategy, in which an individual will punish each neighbor if their strategies are different, and vice versa. Because of the symmetry in imposing the punishment, one might intuitively expect the strategy to have little effect on cooperation. Utilizing the prisoner's dilemma game as a prototypical model of interactions at the individual level, we find, through simulation and theoretical analysis, that proper punishment, when even symmetrically imposed on individuals, can enhance cooperation. Also, we find that the initial density of cooperators plays an important role in the evolution of cooperation driven by mutual punishment.

  2. Lightweight Mutual Authentication Protocol for Low Cost RFID Tags

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmed, Eslam Gamal; Hashem, Mohamed; 10.5121/ijnsa.2010.2203

    2010-01-01

    Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology one of the most promising technologies in the field of ubiquitous computing. Indeed, RFID technology may well replace barcode technology. Although it offers many advantages over other identification systems, there are also associated security risks that are not easy to be addressed. When designing a real lightweight authentication protocol for low cost RFID tags, a number of challenges arise due to the extremely limited computational, storage and communication abilities of Low-cost RFID tags. This paper proposes a real mutual authentication protocol for low cost RFID tags. The proposed protocol prevents passive attacks as active attacks are discounted when designing a protocol to meet the requirements of low cost RFID tags. However the implementation of the protocol meets the limited abilities of low cost RFID tags.

  3. Entanglement and mutual information in 2d nonrelativistic field theories

    CERN Document Server

    Hosseini, Seyed Morteza

    2015-01-01

    We carry out a systematic study of entanglement entropy in nonrelativistic conformal field theories via holographic techniques. After a discussion of recent results concerning Galilean conformal field theories, we deduce a novel expression for the entanglement entropy of (1+1)-dimensional Lifshitz field theories --- this is done both at zero and finite temperature. Based on these results, we pose a conjecture for the anomaly coefficient of a Lifshitz field theory dual to new massive gravity. It is found that the Lifshitz entanglement entropy at finite temperature displays a striking similarity with that corresponding to a flat space cosmology in three dimensions. We claim that this structure is an inherent feature of the entanglement entropy for nonrelativistic conformal field theories. We finish by exploring the behavior of the mutual information for such theories.

  4. Wireless power transmission applied the mutual coupling between coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuta, Kenta; Baba, Ryouichi; Shun, Endo; Nunokawa, Kazuki; Takahashi, Wataru; Maruyama, Tamami

    2017-07-01

    Recently, the studies of wireless power transfer (WPT) to electric vehicles in motion on the snow-piled road have been reported. In WPT by magnetic field resonance method, transmission coefficient S21, which is one of the scattering parameters, from transmission coil to received coil are degraded because of misalignment of transmitting and receiving coil, the distance between these coils, and the effects of the ice and snow. This paper adopts parasitic coil as a solution to improve the reception power in which the parasitic coil is inserted between transmitting and receiving coils. Analysis and experimental results show that parasitic coil could improve the value of S21 by 15 dB using mutual coupling. LED could be light by this solution when the distance between transmitting and receiving coils are 150 mm.

  5. Mutual Value Co-Creation in Practitioner-Academia Collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rikke Kristine

    2012-01-01

    process. The map includes three territories and methodological in-roads for doing research in close collaboration with practitioners with a view to mutual value creation and co-construction: Doing research, in/with(in), for and in-between organizations. The methodological reflections in the map...... is carved out. Based on the challenges and potential pitfalls inherent in this research position, researcher competencies for successfully handling the research management of the in-between and bridging the academia-practitioner gap in research practice are discussed. Further, competency requirements...... of both academia and practice as main stakeholders in an industrial Ph.D. project or other projects with the ambition to create value in both camps simultaneously are debated based on the methodological map presented....

  6. Mutual neutralization at low collision energies: the power of imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassantachart, April K.; Romano, Shalynn L.; Martin, Merl F.; Andrianarijaona, Vola M.; O'Connor, Aodh; Urbain, Xavier

    2014-05-01

    Mutual neutralization studies are generally limited to energies above a few eV, and do not specify the electronic state of the products, merely indicating a band of principal quantum numbers based on time-of-flight intervals. We upgraded our merged beam set-up to reach meV collision energies, and incorporated three-dimensional product imaging. Besides providing clear coincidence signals, this technique gives unambiguous identification of the electronic states of the products. Knowing their angular distribution at the different collision energies allows absolute cross sections to be retrieved. Results for the H+/H-andHe+/H- systems will be presented, providing detailed branching ratios for non-degenerate channels. This research is supported by the Fund for Scientific Research - FNRS through IISN Grant No. 4.4504.10, and the National Science Foundation through Grant No. PHY-106887.

  7. The mutual impact of organizational culture and structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janićijević Nebojša

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the relationship between the structure and culture of an organization. The starting assumption is that organizational structure and organizational culture impact each other, and that there is a causal relationship due to which the agreement of the two components of organization leads to better performance. First, the mechanism through which organizational culture impacts the design of organizational structures and the manner in which organizational structure affects the maintenance, strengthening, or changing of organizational culture is explained at the conceptual level. Then, based on the known classifications of organizational structure and culture, they are put into a relationship of direct mutual interdependence. This is done by generating hypotheses about the agreement of particular types of organizational culture and particular types of organizational structure.

  8. Extending the scope of holographic mutual information and chaotic behavior

    CERN Document Server

    Sircar, Nilanjan; Tangarife, Walter

    2016-01-01

    We extend the use of holography to investigate the scrambling properties of various physical systems. Specifically, we consider: (i) non-conformal backgrounds of black $Dp$ branes, (ii) asymptotically Lifshitz black holes, and (iii) black $AdS$ solutions of Gauss-Bonnet gravity. We use the disruption of the entanglement entropy as a probe of the chaotic features of such systems. Our analysis shows that these theories share the same type of behavior as conformal theories as they undergo chaos; however, in the case of Gauss-Bonnet gravity, we find a stark difference in the evolution of the mutual information for negative Gauss-Bonnet coupling. This may signal an inconsistency of the latter.

  9. Evolutionary dynamics with fluctuating population sizes and strong mutualism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chotibut, Thiparat; Nelson, David R.

    2015-08-01

    Game theory ideas provide a useful framework for studying evolutionary dynamics in a well-mixed environment. This approach, however, typically enforces a strictly fixed overall population size, deemphasizing natural growth processes. We study a competitive Lotka-Volterra model, with number fluctuations, that accounts for natural population growth and encompasses interaction scenarios typical of evolutionary games. We show that, in an appropriate limit, the model describes standard evolutionary games with both genetic drift and overall population size fluctuations. However, there are also regimes where a varying population size can strongly influence the evolutionary dynamics. We focus on the strong mutualism scenario and demonstrate that standard evolutionary game theory fails to describe our simulation results. We then analytically and numerically determine fixation probabilities as well as mean fixation times using matched asymptotic expansions, taking into account the population size degree of freedom. These results elucidate the interplay between population dynamics and evolutionary dynamics in well-mixed systems.

  10. Registering multiple medical images using the shared chain mutual information

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Jin; Qiang Wang; Yi Shen

    2007-01-01

    @@ A new approach to the simultaneous registration of multiple medical images is proposed using shared chain mutual information (SCMI) as the matching measure. The presented method applies SCMI to measure the shared information between the multiple images. Registration is achieved by adjusting the relative position of the floating image until the SCMI between all the images is maximized. Using this measure, we registered three and four simulated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images using downhill simplex optimization to search for the optimal transformation parameters. Accuracy and validity of the proposed method for multiple-image registration are testified by comparing the results with that of twoimage registration. Furthermore, the performance of the proposed method is validated by registering the real ultrasonic image sequence.

  11. Normalized Mutual Information to evaluate overlapping community finding algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    McDaid, Aaron F; Hurley, Neil

    2011-01-01

    Given the increasing popularity of algorithms for overlapping clustering, in particular in social network analysis, quantitative measures are needed to measure the accuracy of a method. Given a set of true clusters, and the set of clusters found by an algorithm, these sets of clusters must be compared to see how similar or different the sets are. A normalized measure is desirable in many contexts, for example assigning a value of 0 where the two sets are totally dissimilar, and 1 where they are identical. A measure based on normalized mutual information, [1], has recently become popular. We demonstrate unintuitive behaviour of this measure, and show how this can be corrected by using a more conventional normalization. We compare the results to that of other measures, such as the Omega index [2].

  12. Machine Learning with Squared-Loss Mutual Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masashi Sugiyama

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Mutual information (MI is useful for detecting statistical independence between random variables, and it has been successfully applied to solving various machine learning problems. Recently, an alternative to MI called squared-loss MI (SMI was introduced. While ordinary MI is the Kullback–Leibler divergence from the joint distribution to the product of the marginal distributions, SMI is its Pearson divergence variant. Because both the divergences belong to the ƒ-divergence family, they share similar theoretical properties. However, a notable advantage of SMI is that it can be approximated from data in a computationally more efficient and numerically more stable way than ordinary MI. In this article, we review recent development in SMI approximation based on direct density-ratio estimation and SMI-based machine learning techniques such as independence testing, dimensionality reduction, canonical dependency analysis, independent component analysis, object matching, clustering, and causal inference.

  13. Lactobacilli-Host mutualism: "learning on the fly".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, Renata C; Leulier, François

    2014-08-29

    Metazoans establish with microorganisms complex interactions for their mutual benefits. Drosophila, which has already proven useful host model to study several aspects of innate immunity and host-bacteria pathogenic associations has become a powerful model to dissect the mechanisms behind mutualistic host-microbe interactions. Drosophila microbiota is composed of simple and aerotolerant bacterial communities mostly composed of Lactobacillaceae and Acetobactereaceae. Drosophila mono- or poly-associated with lactobacilli strains constitutes a powerful model to dissect the complex interplay between lactobacilli and host biologic traits. Thanks to the genetic tractability of both Drosophila and lactobacilli this association model offers a great opportunity to reveal the underlying molecular mechanisms. Here, we review our current knowledge about how the Drosophila model is helping our understanding of how lactobacilli shapes host biology.

  14. Maximum MIMO System Mutual Information with Antenna Selection and Interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rick S. Blum

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Maximum system mutual information is considered for a group of interfering users employing single user detection and antenna selection of multiple transmit and receive antennas for flat Rayleigh fading channels with independent fading coefficients for each path. In the case considered, the only feedback of channel state information to the transmitter is that required for antenna selection, but channel state information is assumed at the receiver. The focus is on extreme cases with very weak interference or very strong interference. It is shown that the optimum signaling covariance matrix is sometimes different from the standard scaled identity matrix. In fact, this is true even for cases without interference if SNR is sufficiently weak. Further, the scaled identity matrix is actually that covariance matrix that yields worst performance if the interference is sufficiently strong.

  15. Extending the scope of holographic mutual information and chaotic behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sircar, Nilanjan; Sonnenschein, Jacob; Tangarife, Walter

    2016-05-01

    We extend the use of holography to investigate the scrambling properties of various physical systems. Specifically, we consider: (i) non-conformal backgrounds of black Dp branes, (ii) asymptotically Lifshitz black holes, and (iii) black AdS solutions of Gauss-Bonnet gravity. We use the disruption of the entanglement entropy as a probe of the chaotic features of such systems. Our analysis shows that these theories share the same type of behavior as conformal theories as they undergo chaos; however, in the case of Gauss-Bonnet gravity, we find a stark difference in the evolution of the mutual information for negative Gauss-Bonnet coupling. This may signal an inconsistency of the latter.

  16. A novel plant-fungal mutualism associated with fire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baynes, Melissa; Newcombe, George; Dixon, Linley; Castlebury, Lisa; O'Donnell, Kerry

    2012-01-01

    Bromus tectorum, or cheatgrass, is native to Eurasia and widely invasive in western North America. By late spring, this annual plant has dispersed its seed and died; its aboveground biomass then becomes fine fuel that burns as frequently as once every 3-5 y in its invaded range. Cheatgrass has proven to be better adapted to fire there than many competing plants, but the contribution of its fungal symbionts to this adaptation had not previously been studied. In sampling cheatgrass endophytes, many fire-associated fungi were found, including Morchella in three western states (New Mexico, Idaho, and Washington). In greenhouse experiments, a New Mexico isolate of Morchella increased both the biomass and fecundity of its local cheatgrass population, thus simultaneously increasing both the probability of fire and survival of that event, via more fuel and a greater, belowground seed bank, respectively. Re-isolation efforts proved that Morchella could infect cheatgrass roots in a non-mycorrhizal manner and then grow up into aboveground tissues. The same Morchella isolate also increased survival of seed exposed to heat typical of that which develops in the seed bank during a cheatgrass fire. Phylogenetic analysis of Eurasian and North American Morchella revealed that this fire-associated mutualism was evolutionarily novel, in that cheatgrass isolates belonged to two phylogenetically distinct species, or phylotypes, designated Mel-6 and Mel-12 whose evolutionary origin appears to be within western North America. Mutualisms with fire-associated fungi may be contributing to the cheatgrass invasion of western North America. Copyright © 2011 British Mycological Society. All rights reserved.

  17. MIDER: network inference with mutual information distance and entropy reduction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro F Villaverde

    Full Text Available The prediction of links among variables from a given dataset is a task referred to as network inference or reverse engineering. It is an open problem in bioinformatics and systems biology, as well as in other areas of science. Information theory, which uses concepts such as mutual information, provides a rigorous framework for addressing it. While a number of information-theoretic methods are already available, most of them focus on a particular type of problem, introducing assumptions that limit their generality. Furthermore, many of these methods lack a publicly available implementation. Here we present MIDER, a method for inferring network structures with information theoretic concepts. It consists of two steps: first, it provides a representation of the network in which the distance among nodes indicates their statistical closeness. Second, it refines the prediction of the existing links to distinguish between direct and indirect interactions and to assign directionality. The method accepts as input time-series data related to some quantitative features of the network nodes (such as e.g. concentrations, if the nodes are chemical species. It takes into account time delays between variables, and allows choosing among several definitions and normalizations of mutual information. It is general purpose: it may be applied to any type of network, cellular or otherwise. A Matlab implementation including source code and data is freely available (http://www.iim.csic.es/~gingproc/mider.html. The performance of MIDER has been evaluated on seven different benchmark problems that cover the main types of cellular networks, including metabolic, gene regulatory, and signaling. Comparisons with state of the art information-theoretic methods have demonstrated the competitive performance of MIDER, as well as its versatility. Its use does not demand any a priori knowledge from the user; the default settings and the adaptive nature of the method provide good

  18. Solvation of polymers as mutual association. I. General theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudowicz, Jacek; Freed, Karl F.; Douglas, Jack F.

    2013-04-01

    A Flory-Huggins (FH) type lattice theory of self-assembly is generalized to describe the equilibrium solvation of long polymer chains B by small solvent molecules A. Solvation is modeled as a thermally reversible mutual association between the polymer and a relatively low molar mass solvent. The FH Helmholtz free energy F is derived for a mixture composed of the A and B species and the various possible mutual association complexes AiB, and F is then used to generate expressions for basic thermodynamic properties of solvated polymer solutions, including the size distribution of the solvated clusters, the fraction of solvent molecules contained in solvated states (an order parameter for solvation), the specific heat (which exhibits a maximum at the solvation transition), the second and the third osmotic virial coefficients, and the boundaries for phase stability of the mixture. Special attention is devoted to the analysis of the "entropic" contribution χs to the FH interaction parameter χ of polymer solutions, both with and without associative interactions. The entropic χs parameter arises from correlations associated with polymer chain connectivity and disparities in molecular structure between the components of the mixture. Our analysis provides the first explanation of the longstanding enigma of why χs for polymer solutions significantly exceeds χs for binary polymer blends. Our calculations also reveal that χs becomes temperature dependent when interactions are strong, in sharp contrast to models currently being used for fitting thermodynamic data of associating polymer-solvent mixtures, where χs is simply assumed to be an adjustable constant based on experience with solutions of homopolymers in nonassociating solvents.

  19. Trade-offs in an ant-plant-fungus mutualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orivel, Jérôme; Malé, Pierre-Jean; Lauth, Jérémie; Roux, Olivier; Petitclerc, Frédéric; Dejean, Alain; Leroy, Céline

    2017-03-15

    Species engaged in multiple, simultaneous mutualisms are subject to trade-offs in their mutualistic investment if the traits involved in each interaction are overlapping, which can lead to conflicts and affect the longevity of these associations. We investigate this issue via a tripartite mutualism involving an ant plant, two competing ant species and a fungus the ants cultivate to build galleries under the stems of their host plant to capture insect prey. The use of the galleries represents an innovative prey capture strategy compared with the more typical strategy of foraging on leaves. However, because of a limited worker force in their colonies, the prey capture behaviour of the ants results in a trade-off between plant protection (i.e. the ants patrol the foliage and attack intruders including herbivores) and ambushing prey in the galleries, which has a cascading effect on the fitness of all of the partners. The quantification of partners' traits and effects showed that the two ant species differed in their mutualistic investment. Less investment in the galleries (i.e. in fungal cultivation) translated into more benefits for the plant in terms of less herbivory and higher growth rates and vice versa. However, the greater vegetative growth of the plants did not produce a positive fitness effect for the better mutualistic ant species in terms of colony size and production of sexuals nor was the mutualist compensated by the wider dispersal of its queens. As a consequence, although the better ant mutualist is the one that provides more benefits to its host plant, its lower host-plant exploitation does not give this ant species a competitive advantage. The local coexistence of the ant species is thus fleeting and should eventually lead to the exclusion of the less competitive species. © 2017 The Author(s).

  20. The bonobo-dialium positive interactions: seed dispersal mutualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaune, David; Bretagnolle, François; Bollache, Loïc; Hohmann, Gottfried; Surbeck, Martin; Bourson, Chloé; Fruth, Barbara

    2013-04-01

    A positive interaction is any interaction between individuals of the same or different species (mutualism) that provides a benefit to both partners such as increased fitness. Here we focus on seed dispersal mutualism between an animal (bonobo, Pan paniscus) and a plant (velvet tamarind trees, Dialium spp.). In the LuiKotale rainforest southwest of Salonga National Park, Democratic Republic of Congo, seven species of the genus Dialium account for 29.3% of all trees. Dialium is thus the dominant genus in this forest. Dialium fruits make up a large proportion of the diet of a habituated bonobo community in this forest. During the 6 months of the fruiting season, more than half of the bonobos' feeding time is devoted to Dialium fruits. Furthermore, Dialium fruits contribute a considerable proportion of sugar and protein to bonobos' dietary intake, being among the richest fruits for these nutrients. Bonobos in turn ingest fruits with seeds that are disseminated in their feces (endozoochory) at considerable distances (average: 1.25 km after 24 hr of average transit time). Endozoochory through the gut causes loss of the cuticle protection and tegumentary dormancy, as well as an increase in size by water uptake. Thus, after gut passage, seeds are better able to germinate. We consider other primate species as a potential seed disperser and conclude that Dialium germination is dependent on passage through bonobo guts. This plant-animal interaction highlights positive effects between two major organisms of the Congo basin rainforest, and establishes the role of the bonobo as an efficient disperser of Dialium seeds. Periodicals, Inc.

  1. MIDER: network inference with mutual information distance and entropy reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaverde, Alejandro F; Ross, John; Morán, Federico; Banga, Julio R

    2014-01-01

    The prediction of links among variables from a given dataset is a task referred to as network inference or reverse engineering. It is an open problem in bioinformatics and systems biology, as well as in other areas of science. Information theory, which uses concepts such as mutual information, provides a rigorous framework for addressing it. While a number of information-theoretic methods are already available, most of them focus on a particular type of problem, introducing assumptions that limit their generality. Furthermore, many of these methods lack a publicly available implementation. Here we present MIDER, a method for inferring network structures with information theoretic concepts. It consists of two steps: first, it provides a representation of the network in which the distance among nodes indicates their statistical closeness. Second, it refines the prediction of the existing links to distinguish between direct and indirect interactions and to assign directionality. The method accepts as input time-series data related to some quantitative features of the network nodes (such as e.g. concentrations, if the nodes are chemical species). It takes into account time delays between variables, and allows choosing among several definitions and normalizations of mutual information. It is general purpose: it may be applied to any type of network, cellular or otherwise. A Matlab implementation including source code and data is freely available (http://www.iim.csic.es/~gingproc/mider.html). The performance of MIDER has been evaluated on seven different benchmark problems that cover the main types of cellular networks, including metabolic, gene regulatory, and signaling. Comparisons with state of the art information-theoretic methods have demonstrated the competitive performance of MIDER, as well as its versatility. Its use does not demand any a priori knowledge from the user; the default settings and the adaptive nature of the method provide good results for a wide

  2. Feature selection based on mutual information and redundancy-synergy coefficient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨胜; 顾钧

    2004-01-01

    Mutual information is an important information measure for feature subset. In this paper, a hashing mechanism is proposed to calculate the mutual information on the feature subset. Redundancy-synergy coefficient, a novel redundancy and synergy measure of features to express the class feature, is defined by mutual information. The information maximization rule was applied to derive the heuristic feature subset selection method based on mutual information and redundancy-synergy coefficient. Our experiment results showed the good performance of the new feature selection method.

  3. A bidirectional feature selection method based on mutual information and redundancy-synergy coefficient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Sheng; ZHANG Zhi; SHI Peng-fei

    2006-01-01

    Feature subset selection is a fundamental problem of data mining. The mutual information of feature subset is a measure for feature subset containing class feature information. A hashing mechanism is proposed to calculate the mutual information of feature subset. The feature relevancy is defined by mutual information. Redundancy-synergy coefficient, a novel redundancy and synergy measure for features to describe the class feature, is defined. In terms of information maximization rule, a bidirectional heuristic feature subset selection method based on mutual information and redundancy-synergy coefficient is presented. This study' s experiments show the good performance of the new method.

  4. Token Ring Algorithm To Achieve Mutual Exclusion In Distributed System - A Centralized Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandipan Basu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an algorithm for achieving mutual exclusion in Distributed System. The proposed algorithm is a betterment of the already existing Token Ring Algorithm, used to handle mutual exclusion in Distributed system. In the already existing algorithm, there are few problems, which, if occur during process execution, then the distributed system will not be able to ensure mutual exclusion among the processes and consequently unwanted situations may arise. The proposed algorithm will overcome all the problems in the existing algorithm, and ensures mutual exclusion among the processes, when they want to execute in their critical section of code.

  5. The Tobacco Farmers’ Mutual Assistance and Cooperation Pattern in Modern Tobacco Agriculture in Mountainous Areas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Guo-sheng; GUO Xiang; LIU Chang-hua; YUAN Jian-hua

    2012-01-01

    This article introduces the basic situation of Yanziqian Tobacco Farmers’ Mutual Assistance and Cooperation Association in Jiamachi Town of Xianfeng County.It analyzes the operating mode of tobacco farmers’ mutual assistance and cooperation association,and conducts a comparative analysis of tobacco farmers’ costs and benefits before and after participating in mutual assistance and cooperation.Studies show that the mode of tobacco farmers’ mutual assistance and cooperation,is conducive to reducing labor in curing link,promoting the quality of tobacco,increasing tobacco farmers’ income,which is worthy of promotion.

  6. Homogeneous, Heterogeneous, and Enzymatic Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, S. Ted; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses three areas of catalysis: homegeneous, heterogeneous, and enzymatic. Explains fundamentals and economic impact of catalysis. Lists and discusses common industrial catalysts. Provides a list of 107 references. (MVL)

  7. Selective heterogeneity in exoprotease production by Bacillus subtilis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fordyce A Davidson

    Full Text Available Bacteria have elaborate signalling mechanisms to ensure a behavioural response that is most likely to enhance survival in a changing environment. It is becoming increasingly apparent that as part of this response, bacteria are capable of cell differentiation and can generate multiple, mutually exclusive co-existing cell states. These cell states are often associated with multicellular processes that bring benefit to the community as a whole but which may be, paradoxically, disadvantageous to an individual subpopulation. How this process of cell differentiation is controlled is intriguing and remains a largely open question. In this paper, we consider an important aspect of cell differentiation that is known to occur in the gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis: we investigate the role of two master regulators DegU and Spo0A in the control of extra-cellular protease production. Recent work in this area focussed the on role of DegU in this process and suggested that transient effects in protein production were the drivers of cell-response heterogeneity. Here, using a combination of mathematical modelling, analysis and stochastic simulations, we provide a complementary analysis of this regulatory system that investigates the roles of both DegU and Spo0A in extra-cellular protease production. In doing so, we present a mechanism for bimodality, or system heterogeneity, without the need for a bistable switch in the underlying regulatory network. Moreover, our analysis leads us to conclude that this heterogeneity is in fact a persistent, stable feature. Our results suggest that system response is divided into three zones: low and high signal levels induce a unimodal or undifferentiated response from the cell population with all cells OFF and ON, respectively for exoprotease production. However, for intermediate levels of signal, a heterogeneous response is predicted with a spread of activity levels, representing typical "bet-hedging" behaviour.

  8. Heterogeneity, correlations and financial contagion

    OpenAIRE

    FABIO CACCIOLI; Thomas A. Catanach; J Doyne Farmer

    2011-01-01

    We consider a model of contagion in financial networks recently introduced in Gai, P. and Kapadia, S. [Contagion in financial networks, Proc. R. Soc. A 466(2120) (2010) 2401–2423], and we characterize the effect of a few features empirically observed in real networks on the stability of the system. Notably, we consider the effect of heterogeneous degree distributions, heterogeneous balance sheet size and degree correlations between banks. We study the probability of contagion conditional on t...

  9. A REVIEW on EFFICIENT MUTUAL AUTHENTICATION RFID SYSTEM SECURITY ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.Vijay Anand

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the technical fundamentals of RFID systems and the associated standards. Specifically, it addresses the security and privacy aspects of this relatively new and heterogeneous Radio Technology. It relates the security requirements, threats and the implemented mechanisms. Then the current security and privacy proposals and their enhancements are presented. This paper would be a useful reference article for beginners as well as experts.

  10. Pseudomyrmex ants and Acacia host plants join efforts to protect their mutualism from microbial threats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Teuber, Marcia; Heil, Martin

    2010-07-01

    Plants express numerous 'pathogenesis-related' (PR) proteins to defend themselves against pathogen infection. We recently discovered that PR-proteins such as chitinases, glucanases, peroxidases and thaumatin-like proteins are also functioning in the protection of extrafloral nectar (EFN) of Mexican Acacia myrmecophytes. These plants produce EFN, cellular food bodies and nesting space to house defending ant species of the genus Pseudomyrmex. More than 50 PR-proteins were discovered in this EFN and bioassays demonstrated that they actively can inhibit the growth of fungi and other phytopathogens. Although the plants can, thus, express PR-proteins and secrete them into the nectar, the leaves of these plants exhibit reduced activities of chitinases as compared to non-myrmecophytic plants and their antimicrobial protection depends on the mutualistic ants. When we deprived plants of their resident ants we observed higher microbial loads in the leaves and even in the tissue of the nectaries, as compared to plants that were inhabited by ants. The indirect defence that is achieved through an ant-plant mutualism can protect plants also from infections. Future studies will have to investigate the chemical nature of this mechanism in order to understand why plants depend on ants for their antimicrobial defence.

  11. Mutual interactions of Pleurotus ostreatus with bacteria of activated sludge in solid-bed bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svobodová, Kateřina; Petráčková, Denisa; Kozická, Barbora; Halada, Petr; Novotný, Čeněk

    2016-06-01

    White rot fungi are well known for their ability to degrade xenobiotics in pure cultures but few studies focus on their performance under bacterial stress in real wastewaters. This study investigated mutual interactions in co-cultures of Pleurotus ostreatus and activated sludge microbes in batch reactors and different culture media. Under the bacterial stress an increase in the dye decolorization efficiency (95 vs. 77.1 %) and a 2-fold elevated laccase activity (156.7 vs. 78.4 Ul(-1)) were observed in fungal-bacterial cultures compared to pure P. ostreatus despite a limited growth of bacteria in mixed cultures. According to 16S-rDNA analyses, P. ostreatus was able to alter the structure of bacterial communities. In malt extract-glucose medium the fungus inhibited growth of planktonic bacteria and prevented shifts in bacterial utilization of potential C-sources. A model bacterium, Rhodococcus erythropolis responded to fungal metabolites by down regulation of uridylate kinase and acetyl-CoA synthetase.

  12. Dealing with spatial heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsily, Gh.; Delay, F.; Gonçalvès, J.; Renard, Ph.; Teles, V.; Violette, S.

    2005-03-01

    Heterogeneity can be dealt with by defining homogeneous equivalent properties, known as averaging, or by trying to describe the spatial variability of the rock properties from geologic observations and local measurements. The techniques available for these descriptions are mostly continuous Geostatistical models, or discontinuous facies models such as the Boolean, Indicator or Gaussian-Threshold models and the Markov chain model. These facies models are better suited to treating issues of rock strata connectivity, e.g. buried high permeability channels or low permeability barriers, which greatly affect flow and, above all, transport in aquifers. Genetic models provide new ways to incorporate more geology into the facies description, an approach that has been well developed in the oil industry, but not enough in hydrogeology. The conclusion is that future work should be focused on improving the facies models, comparing them, and designing new in situ testing procedures (including geophysics) that would help identify the facies geometry and properties. A world-wide catalog of aquifer facies geometry and properties, which could combine site genesis and description with methods used to assess the system, would be of great value for practical applications. On peut aborder le problème de l'hétérogénéité en s'efforçant de définir une perméabilité équivalente homogène, par prise de moyenne, ou au contraire en décrivant la variation dans l'espace des propriétés des roches à partir des observations géologiques et des mesures locales. Les techniques disponibles pour une telle description sont soit continues, comme l'approche Géostatistique, soit discontinues, comme les modèles de faciès, Booléens, ou bien par Indicatrices ou Gaussiennes Seuillées, ou enfin Markoviens. Ces modèles de faciès sont mieux capables de prendre en compte la connectivité des strates géologiques, telles que les chenaux enfouis à forte perméabilité, ou au contraire les faci

  13. 78 FR 77175 - Catalyst Capital Advisors LLC and Mutual Fund Series Trust; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-20

    ... COMMISSION Catalyst Capital Advisors LLC and Mutual Fund Series Trust; Notice of Application December 16... agreements without shareholder approval. APPLICANTS: Catalyst Capital Advisors LLC (``CCA'' or the ``Adviser'') and Mutual Fund Series Trust (formerly Catalyst Funds) (the ``Trust''). DATES: Filing Dates:...

  14. 77 FR 8956 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Grange Mutual Casualty Company

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-15

    ... Supplement No. 7 to the Treasury Department Circular 570, 2011 Revision, published July 1, 2011, at 76 FR... Fiscal Service Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Grange Mutual Casualty Company AGENCY.... 9305 to the following company: Grange Mutual Casualty Company (NAIC 14060). Business Address: 671...

  15. Strangers and Orphans: Knowledge and Mutuality in Mary Shelley's "Frankenstein"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Claudia Rozas

    2013-01-01

    Paulo Freire consistently upheld humanization and mutuality as educational ideals. This article argues that conceptualizations of knowledge and how knowledge is sought and produced play a role in fostering humanization and mutuality in educational contexts. Drawing on Mary Shelley's novel "Frankenstein," this article focuses on the…

  16. 78 FR 53175 - The Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Company, et al.;

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-28

    ... COMMISSION The Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Company, et al.; Notice of Application Agency: Securities... Section 17(b) of the Act from Section 17(a) of the Act. Applicants: The Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance...''), under each of the variable annuity contracts and variable life insurance policies issued by the...

  17. 47 CFR 101.1317 - Competitive bidding procedures for mutually exclusive MAS EA applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... exclusive MAS EA applications. 101.1317 Section 101.1317 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION... License Requirements § 101.1317 Competitive bidding procedures for mutually exclusive MAS EA applications. Mutually exclusive initial applications for licenses in the portions of the MAS bands licensed on a...

  18. Mutual information, bit error rate and security in W\\'{o}jcik's scheme

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Z

    2004-01-01

    In this paper the correct calculations of the mutual information of the whole transmission, the quantum bit error rate (QBER) are presented. Mistakes of the general conclusions relative to the mutual information, the quantum bit error rate (QBER) and the security in W\\'{o}jcik's paper [Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf 90}, 157901(2003)] have been pointed out and corrected.

  19. 26 CFR 1.581-2 - Mutual savings banks, building and loan associations, and cooperative banks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Mutual savings banks, building and loan associations, and cooperative banks. 1.581-2 Section 1.581-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... § 1.581-2 Mutual savings banks, building and loan associations, and cooperative banks. (a) While...

  20. Spitzer Observations of Mutual Events in the Binary System (617) Patroclus-Menoetius

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mueller, Michael; Marchis, F.; Emery, J. P.; Berthier, J.; Hestroffer, D.; Harris, A.; Descamps, P.; Vachier, F.; Mottola, S.

    2007-01-01

    We report Spitzer observations of the binary Trojan system (617) Patroclus-Menoetius during two mutual events, when respectively one component shadowed and occulted the other. Observing the thermal response to mutual shadowing with spectral ( 8--33 µm) and temporal resolution allowed us to determine

  1. Encoding mutually unbiased bases in orbital angular momentum for quantum key distribution

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dudley, Angela L

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available demonstrate how (d+1)-mutually unbiased measurements can be made in both a classical prepare-and measure scheme and on a pair of entangled photons. In the entanglement-based scheme we perform mutual unbiased measurements for dimensions ranging from d = 2 to 5...

  2. Measuring the influence of a mutual support educational intervention within a nursing team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renée Bridges

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: The study demonstrates that education can have an impact on perceptions and awareness of mutual support among nursing team members. The survey instrument can be used effectively to inform leadership areas for improvement and staff development in the effort to improve team coordination and mutual support.

  3. Exposure to socially responsible investing of mutual funds in the Euronext stock markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plantinga, Auke; Scholtens, Bert; Brunia, Nanne

    2002-01-01

    This paper analyses fund management and exposure on the Euronext stock exchanges. Especially, we investigate to what extent mutual funds are engaged in socially responsible investing (SRI). In order to accomplish this goal, we use regression analysis to measure the exposure of mutual funds to stock

  4. Von Neumann entropy, mutual information and total correlations of Gaussian states

    CERN Document Server

    Serafini, A; De Siena, S; Serafini, Alessio; Illuminati, Fabrizio; Siena, Silvio De

    2004-01-01

    We determine the Von Neumann entropy and the mutual information of an arbitrary bipartite Gaussian state. A comparison between mutual information and entanglement of formation for symmetric states is considered, remarking the crucial role of the symplectic eigenvalues in qualifying and quantifying correlations.

  5. Mutuality in Cambodian International University Partnerships: Looking beyond the Global Discourse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Phirom

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the mutuality issue in international partnership programs between Cambodian universities and universities in France, the USA, Japan and South Korea. It adopts Galtung's and Held's four aspects of mutuality as its conceptual framework and follows a qualitative case study research design. The study finds that most partnership…

  6. Strangers and Orphans: Knowledge and Mutuality in Mary Shelley's "Frankenstein"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Claudia Rozas

    2013-01-01

    Paulo Freire consistently upheld humanization and mutuality as educational ideals. This article argues that conceptualizations of knowledge and how knowledge is sought and produced play a role in fostering humanization and mutuality in educational contexts. Drawing on Mary Shelley's novel "Frankenstein," this article focuses on the…

  7. Mutual Alignment Comparison Facilitates Abstraction and Transfer of a Complex Scientific Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orton, Judy M.; Anggoro, Florencia K.; Jee, Benjamin D.

    2012-01-01

    Learning about a scientific concept often occurs in the context of unfamiliar examples. Mutual alignment analogy--a type of analogical comparison in which the analogues are only partially understood--has been shown to facilitate learning from unfamiliar examples . In the present study, we examined the role of mutual alignment analogy in the…

  8. Mutual phase locking of a coupled laser diode-Gunn diode pair

    OpenAIRE

    Izadpanah, S.H; Rav-Noy, Z.; Mukai, S.; Margalit, S.; Yariv, Amnon

    1984-01-01

    Mutual phase locking has been achieved through series connection of a semiconductor laser and a Gunn diode oscillator. Experimental results obtained demonstrate a mutual interaction between the two oscillators which results in a short term Gunn diode oscillator stability and improved spectral purity of its output. We also observe a narrowing of laser pulses and an improvement in regularity.

  9. Utilizing Mutual Aid in Reducing Adolescent Substance Use and Developing Group Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogro-Wilson, Cristina; Letendre, Joan; Toi, Hiroki; Bryan, Janelle

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study assessed the effectiveness of mutual aid groups for high school students. Methods: A quasi-experimental design was applied to 242 adolescents, where every other adolescent was assigned to the intervention or the control condition. The study evaluated the influence of implementing mutual aid groups in decreasing perceived risk…

  10. Mutually Unbiased Maximally Entangled Bases for the Bipartite System Cd⊗ C^{dk}

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, Hua; Tao, Yuan-Hong; Wang, Tian-Jiao; Zhang, Jun

    2016-10-01

    The construction of maximally entangled bases for the bipartite system Cd⊗ Cd is discussed firstly, and some mutually unbiased bases with maximally entangled bases are given, where 2≤ d≤5. Moreover, we study a systematic way of constructing mutually unbiased maximally entangled bases for the bipartite system Cd⊗ C^{dk}.

  11. 31 CFR 103.15 - Reports by mutual funds of suspicious transactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... suspected terrorist financing or ongoing money laundering schemes, a mutual fund shall immediately notify by... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reports by mutual funds of suspicious transactions. 103.15 Section 103.15 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and...

  12. 47 CFR 90.720 - Channels available for public safety/mutual aid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Channels available for public safety/mutual aid. 90.720 Section 90.720 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND... Frequencies in the 220-222 MHz Band § 90.720 Channels available for public safety/mutual aid. (a) Part...

  13. Mathematical Model of Linear Switched Reluctance Motor with Mutual Inductance Consideration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay Grebennikov

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents developing an mathematical model for linear switched reluctance motor (LSRM with account of the mutual inductance between the phases. Mutual interaction between the phases of LSRM gives the positive effect, as a rule the power of the machine is increased by 5-15%.

  14. Entity of the mutual settlements in context of economic security of enterprise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruzhytskiy I. V.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The article defined the list of conceptual issues that must decide the management of enterprise in the organization of the mutual settlements in context of economic security. Developed the system of agency relationship that forms the essence of mutual settlements and identifying the most common payment distribution of enterprise with other members of agency relations.

  15. Organizational heterogeneity of vertebrate genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Frenkel

    Full Text Available Genomes of higher eukaryotes are mosaics of segments with various structural, functional, and evolutionary properties. The availability of whole-genome sequences allows the investigation of their structure as "texts" using different statistical and computational methods. One such method, referred to as Compositional Spectra (CS analysis, is based on scoring the occurrences of fixed-length oligonucleotides (k-mers in the target DNA sequence. CS analysis allows generating species- or region-specific characteristics of the genome, regardless of their length and the presence of coding DNA. In this study, we consider the heterogeneity of vertebrate genomes as a joint effect of regional variation in sequence organization superimposed on the differences in nucleotide composition. We estimated compositional and organizational heterogeneity of genome and chromosome sequences separately and found that both heterogeneity types vary widely among genomes as well as among chromosomes in all investigated taxonomic groups. The high correspondence of heterogeneity scores obtained on three genome fractions, coding, repetitive, and the remaining part of the noncoding DNA (the genome dark matter--GDM allows the assumption that CS-heterogeneity may have functional relevance to genome regulation. Of special interest for such interpretation is the fact that natural GDM sequences display the highest deviation from the corresponding reshuffled sequences.

  16. Organizational heterogeneity of vertebrate genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenkel, Svetlana; Kirzhner, Valery; Korol, Abraham

    2012-01-01

    Genomes of higher eukaryotes are mosaics of segments with various structural, functional, and evolutionary properties. The availability of whole-genome sequences allows the investigation of their structure as "texts" using different statistical and computational methods. One such method, referred to as Compositional Spectra (CS) analysis, is based on scoring the occurrences of fixed-length oligonucleotides (k-mers) in the target DNA sequence. CS analysis allows generating species- or region-specific characteristics of the genome, regardless of their length and the presence of coding DNA. In this study, we consider the heterogeneity of vertebrate genomes as a joint effect of regional variation in sequence organization superimposed on the differences in nucleotide composition. We estimated compositional and organizational heterogeneity of genome and chromosome sequences separately and found that both heterogeneity types vary widely among genomes as well as among chromosomes in all investigated taxonomic groups. The high correspondence of heterogeneity scores obtained on three genome fractions, coding, repetitive, and the remaining part of the noncoding DNA (the genome dark matter--GDM) allows the assumption that CS-heterogeneity may have functional relevance to genome regulation. Of special interest for such interpretation is the fact that natural GDM sequences display the highest deviation from the corresponding reshuffled sequences.

  17. Reaction Selectivity in Heterogeneous Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somorjai, Gabor A.; Kliewer, Christopher J.

    2009-02-02

    The understanding of selectivity in heterogeneous catalysis is of paramount importance to our society today. In this review we outline the current state of the art in research on selectivity in heterogeneous catalysis. Current in-situ surface science techniques have revealed several important features of catalytic selectivity. Sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy has shown us the importance of understanding the reaction intermediates and mechanism of a heterogeneous reaction, and can readily yield information as to the effect of temperature, pressure, catalyst geometry, surface promoters, and catalyst composition on the reaction mechanism. DFT calculations are quickly approaching the ability to assist in the interpretation of observed surface spectra, thereby making surface spectroscopy an even more powerful tool. HP-STM has revealed three vitally important parameters in heterogeneous selectivity: adsorbate mobility, catalyst mobility, and selective site-blocking. The development of size controlled nanoparticles from 0.8 to 10 nm, of controlled shape, and of controlled bimetallic composition has revealed several important variables for catalytic selectivity. Lastly, DFT calculations may be paving the way to guiding the composition choice for multi-metallic heterogeneous catalysis for the intelligent design of catalysts incorporating the many factors of selectivity we have learned.

  18. Detecting mutually exclusive interactions in protein-protein interaction maps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Sánchez Claros

    Full Text Available Comprehensive protein interaction maps can complement genetic and biochemical experiments and allow the formulation of new hypotheses to be tested in the system of interest. The computational analysis of the maps may help to focus on interesting cases and thereby to appropriately prioritize the validation experiments. We show here that, by automatically comparing and analyzing structurally similar regions of proteins of known structure interacting with a common partner, it is possible to identify mutually exclusive interactions present in the maps with a sensitivity of 70% and a specificity higher than 85% and that, in about three fourth of the correctly identified complexes, we also correctly recognize at least one residue (five on average belonging to the interaction interface. Given the present and continuously increasing number of proteins of known structure, the requirement of the knowledge of the structure of the interacting proteins does not substantially impact on the coverage of our strategy that can be estimated to be around 25%. We also introduce here the Estrella server that embodies this strategy, is designed for users interested in validating specific hypotheses about the functional role of a protein-protein interaction and it also allows access to pre-computed data for seven organisms.

  19. MUTUAL INFLUENCE OF PAINTING, THEATRE AND EVERYDAY LIFE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. G. Suvorova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Basing on the works of Yu.M. Lotman, the author examines the process of interaction between painting and theater, and their mutual influence on the routine. The emphasis is on identifying the peculiarities of the interaction of theatre and painting in the period from the late XVIII – early XIX century. Theatre using expressive means of painting, created new forms of performing arts. The scenery becomes actors, not serving as a background for the actors. Acting technique was also being changed, the dynamics of the movements was changed into the static of dynamic postures. The identification of the scene and the picture led to the emergence of a new genre of "living paintings". Not only the art of painting influenced a theatre, creating new forms, but the theatre influenced painting too, creating a portrait typifying a model in accordance with the traditional theatrical characters. Gradually the boundary between art and commonplace had been crumbling, the theatre entered the life. It turned out that the theatricality of everyday life became the logical result of the considered process. Real life started to be considered as a performance that opened not only new possibilities in the prescribed range of permitted conduct, but also went beyond and was the legislator of individual behaviors, filled everyday reality with events, and thus, made a person free from the control of custom.

  20. Fast registration algorithm using a variational principle for mutual information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Murray E.; Summers, Randy

    2003-05-01

    A method is proposed for cross-modal image registration based on mutual information (MI) matching criteria. Both conventional and "normalized" MI are considered. MI may be expressed as a functional of a general image displacement field u. The variational principle for MI provides a field equation for u. The method employs a set of "registration points" consisting of a prescribed number of strongest edge points of the reference image, and minimizes an objective function D defined as the sum of the square residuals of the field equation for u at these points, where u is expressed as a sum over a set of basis functions (the affine model is presented here). D has a global minimum when the images are aligned, with a "basin of attraction" typically of width ~0.3 pixels. By pre-filtering with a low-pass filter, and using a multiresolution image pyramid, the basin may be significantly widened. The Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm is used to minimize D. Tests using randomly distributed misalignments of image pairs show that registration accuracy of 0.02 - 0.07 pixels is achieved, when using cubic B-splines for image representation, interpolation, and Parzen window estimation.

  1. SYNTHESIS AND EVALUATION OF MUTUAL PRODRUG OF ASPIRIN AND CHLORZOXAZONE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Walsangikar

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Aspirin chlorzoxazone ester linked mutual prodrug was synthesized with the aim of improving the therapeutic index through prevention of gastrointestinal irritation and bleeding. The structure of the synthesized ester prodrug was confirmed by IR and 1H NMR spectroscopy and their purity was established by elemental analysis, HPLC and TLC. The release of ASP as well as CZX, from the ester prodrug was studied. A validated analytical HPLC method for the estimation of the ASP, and the prodrug was developed. The kinetics of ester hydrolysis was studied in four different non-enzymatic buffer solutions, at pH 3, 4, 5 and 7.4 as well as in experimental plasma. Study of skeletal muscle relaxant and anti-inflammatory properties in comparison with the reference compounds has shown that both skeletal muscle relaxant and anti-inflammatory activities were present at the same doses of the investigated compounds. The ester was found to be less irritating to gastric mucosal membrane than the parent drugs. These results suggest that the synthesized prodrug is characterized by better therapeutic index than the parent drugs.

  2. Finding Mutual Exclusion Invariants in Temporal Planning Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardini, Sara; Smith, David E.

    2011-01-01

    We present a technique for automatically extracting temporal mutual exclusion invariants from PDDL2.2 planning instances. We first identify a set of invariant candidates by inspecting the domain and then check these candidates against properties that assure invariance. If these properties are violated, we show that it is sometimes possible to refine a candidate by adding additional propositions and turn it into a real invariant. Our technique builds on other approaches to invariant synthesis presented in the literature, but departs from their limited focus on instantaneous discrete actions by addressing temporal and numeric domains. To deal with time, we formulate invariance conditions that account for both the entire structure of the operators (including the conditions, rather than just the effects) and the possible interactions between operators. As a result, we construct a technique that is not only capable of identifying invariants for temporal domains, but is also able to find a broader set of invariants for non-temporal domains than the previous techniques.

  3. The mutual shaping of life insurance and medicine in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauho, Mikko

    2015-08-01

    This article examines the mutual shaping of medicine and private life insurance in Finland before the Second World War. Based on historical texts and archival material, it shows the important effects that the involvement of medicine in client selection for life insurance companies had on medical knowledge and practice. The analysis focuses on the tensions between the main actors in life insurance underwriting--candidates, insurance agents, examining physicians and the central office--as well as the medical examination as the key site of these tensions. The article shows how the introduction of a set of procedural and technical innovations reshaped the medical examination and helped to stabilize the fraught network of life insurance underwriting. These innovations re-scripted medical work. They stressed objective measurable knowledge over the personal skill and clinical acumen of the examining physician, propagated the physical examination and the use of diagnostic technologies and vital standards, multiplied medicine's administrative tasks, and contributed to the introduction of a risk factor approach to medicine. Moreover, the social organization of life insurance promoted the spread of these objects, practices and tasks to other fields of medicine. The case displays how medical innovations are developed through the situated interplay of multiple actors that cuts across the science-society boundary.

  4. Identifying Statistical Dependence in Genomic Sequences via Mutual Information Estimates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Szpankowski

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Questions of understanding and quantifying the representation and amount of information in organisms have become a central part of biological research, as they potentially hold the key to fundamental advances. In this paper, we demonstrate the use of information-theoretic tools for the task of identifying segments of biomolecules (DNA or RNA that are statistically correlated. We develop a precise and reliable methodology, based on the notion of mutual information, for finding and extracting statistical as well as structural dependencies. A simple threshold function is defined, and its use in quantifying the level of significance of dependencies between biological segments is explored. These tools are used in two specific applications. First, they are used for the identification of correlations between different parts of the maize zmSRp32 gene. There, we find significant dependencies between the 5′ untranslated region in zmSRp32 and its alternatively spliced exons. This observation may indicate the presence of as-yet unknown alternative splicing mechanisms or structural scaffolds. Second, using data from the FBI's combined DNA index system (CODIS, we demonstrate that our approach is particularly well suited for the problem of discovering short tandem repeats—an application of importance in genetic profiling.

  5. Detecting mutually exclusive interactions in protein-protein interaction maps.

    KAUST Repository

    Sánchez Claros, Carmen

    2012-06-08

    Comprehensive protein interaction maps can complement genetic and biochemical experiments and allow the formulation of new hypotheses to be tested in the system of interest. The computational analysis of the maps may help to focus on interesting cases and thereby to appropriately prioritize the validation experiments. We show here that, by automatically comparing and analyzing structurally similar regions of proteins of known structure interacting with a common partner, it is possible to identify mutually exclusive interactions present in the maps with a sensitivity of 70% and a specificity higher than 85% and that, in about three fourth of the correctly identified complexes, we also correctly recognize at least one residue (five on average) belonging to the interaction interface. Given the present and continuously increasing number of proteins of known structure, the requirement of the knowledge of the structure of the interacting proteins does not substantially impact on the coverage of our strategy that can be estimated to be around 25%. We also introduce here the Estrella server that embodies this strategy, is designed for users interested in validating specific hypotheses about the functional role of a protein-protein interaction and it also allows access to pre-computed data for seven organisms.

  6. Study of Systemic Risk Involved in Mutual Funds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Kishore C.; Dash, Monika

    Systemic risk, may be defined as the risk that contaminates to the whole system, consisting of many interacting agents that fail one after another. These agents, in an economic context, could be firms, banks, funds, or other financial institutions. Systemic risk is a macroscopic property of a system which emerges due to the nonlinear interaction of agents on a microscopic level. A stock market itself is a system in which there are many sub-systems, like Dowjones, Nifty, Sensex, Nasdaq, Nikkei and other market indices in global perspective. In Indian market, subsystems may be like Sensex, Nifty, BSE200, Bankex, smallcap index, midcap index, S&P CNX 500 and many others. Similarly there are many mutual funds, which have their own portfolio of different stocks, bonds etc. We have attempted to study the systemic risk involved in a fund as a macroscopic object with regard to its microscopic components as different stocks in its portfolio. It is observed that fund managers do manage to reduce the systemic risk just like we take precautions to control the spread of an epidemic.

  7. Indirect defense in a highly specific ant-plant mutualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grangier, Julien; Dejean, Alain; Malé, Pierre-Jean G; Orivel, Jérôme

    2008-10-01

    Although associations between myrmecophytes and their plant ants are recognized as a particularly effective form of protective mutualism, their functioning remains incompletely understood. This field study examined the ant-plant Hirtella physophora and its obligate ant associate Allomerus decemarticulatus. We formulated two hypotheses on the highly specific nature of this association: (1) Ant presence should be correlated with a marked reduction in the amount of herbivory on the plant foliage; (2) ant activity should be consistent with the "optimal defense" theory predicting that the most vulnerable and valuable parts of the plant are the best defended. We validated the first hypothesis by demonstrating that for ant-excluded plants, expanding leaves, but also newly matured ones in the long term, suffered significantly more herbivore damage than ant-inhabited plants. We showed that A. decemarticulatus workers represent both constitutive and inducible defenses for their host, by patrolling its foliage and rapidly recruiting nestmates to foliar wounds. On examining how these activities change according to the leaves' developmental stage, we found that the number of patrolling ants dramatically decreased as the leaves matured, while leaf wounds induced ant recruitment regardless of the leaf's age. The resulting level of these indirect defenses was roughly proportional to leaf vulnerability and value during its development, thus validating our second hypothesis predicting optimal protection. This led us to discuss the factors influencing ant activity on the plant's surface. Our study emphasizes the importance of studying both the constitutive and inducible components of indirect defense when evaluating its efficacy and optimality.

  8. Real estate mutual funds in Spain. Performance and persistence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Maside Sanfiz

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present paper is to study the performance and persistence of the returns of the spanish real estate mutual funds universe from the beginning of their activity, late 1994 until august 2012. We adopt the Jensen's alpha model, Sharpe's ratio and Carhart's (1997 methodology. In terms of efficiency, Sharpe's ratio shows negative values in the first three years of activity of each fund and very low or even negative values in the last three or four years. Jensen's indicator shows that the overall funds have underperformed the market, which has been approximated by the housing profitability and a half of the profitability of all real estate funds. Benchmarks portfolios that reflect the behavior of the bond or equity markets, did not turn out to be significant variables. There is evidence of persistence for one, two, three and four years, for the universe of funds. The evidence obtained in our work for the real estate funds in Spain, efficiency lower than that of the market and persistence in performance, allows us to confirm the difficult situation that has gone through and which continues to suffer this type of collective investment, highlighting the need and the urgency of driving measures to boost their activity.

  9. A Synchronous Mutual Position Control for Vertical Pneumatic Servo System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Satoru; Yamamoto, Tomonori; Jindai, Mitsuru

    Synchronous control of mutual position for two vertical-type pneumatic servo systems is discussed for practical use in this study. In the proposed control system, a fuzzy controller is used in each pneumatic servo system so that the output of each plant can follow the reference input. A PD controller is introduced to realize the synchronization of both pneumatic servo systems, in which the outputs from this controller are the inputs for revision to both plants. A fuzzy virtual reference generator that can adjust the reference input to both fuzzy controllers adaptively by fuzzy rules is constructed to improve the transient performances of both axes. In addition, the adjustment controller produces a representative value of both cylinder outputs, which is used to synthesize the inputs to the fuzzy virtual reference generator, in order to reach a compromise between the follow-up ability to the reference input in each axis and synchronization of both axes. The applicability of the proposed method is confirmed by experiments using two existent vertical-type pneumatic servo systems.

  10. Sex roles and mutual mate choice matter during mate sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myhre, Lise Cats; de Jong, Karen; Forsgren, Elisabet; Amundsen, Trond

    2012-06-01

    The roles of females and males in mating competition and mate choice have lately proven more variable, between and within species, than previously thought. In nature, mating competition occurs during mate search and is expected to be regulated by the numbers of potential mates and same-sex competitors. Here, we present the first study to test how a temporal change in sex roles affects mating competition and mate choice during mate sampling. Our model system (the marine fish Gobiusculus flavescens) is uniquely suitable because of its change in sex roles, from conventional to reversed, over the breeding season. As predicted from sex role theory, courtship was typically initiated by males and terminated by females early in the breeding season. The opposite pattern was observed late in the season, at which time several females often simultaneously courted the same male. Mate-searching females visited more males early than late in the breeding season. Our study shows that mutual mate choice and mating competition can have profound effects on female and male behavior. Future work needs to consider the dynamic nature of mating competition and mate choice if we aim to fully understand sexual selection in the wild.

  11. AUTOMATIC REGISTRATION OF MULTI-SOURCE DATA USING MUTUAL INFORMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. G. Parmehr

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Automatic image registration is a basic step in multi-sensor data integration in remote sensing and photogrammetric applications such as data fusion. The effectiveness of Mutual Information (MI as a technique for automated multi-sensor image registration has previously been demonstrated for medical and remote sensing applications. In this paper, a new General Weighted MI (GWMI approach that improves the robustness of MI to local maxima, particularly in the case of registering optical imagery and 3D point clouds, is presented. Two different methods including a Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM and Kernel Density Estimation have been used to define the weight function of joint probability, regardless of the modality of the data being registered. The Expectation Maximizing method is then used to estimate parameters of GMM, and in order to reduce the cost of computation, a multi-resolution strategy has been used. The performance of the proposed GWMI method for the registration of aerial orthotoimagery and LiDAR range and intensity information has been experimentally evaluated and the results obtained are presented.

  12. Global Attractivity of an Integrodifferential Model of Mutualism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangdong Xie

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sufficient conditions are obtained for the global attractivity of the following integrodifferential model of mutualism: dN1(t/dt=r1N1(t[((K1+α1∫0∞J2(sN2(t-sds‍/(1+∫0∞J2(sN2(t-sds‍-N1(t], dN2(t/dt=r2N2(t[((K2+α2∫0∞J1(sN1(t-sds‍/(1+∫0∞J1(sN1(t-sds‍-N2(t], where ri,Ki, and αi, i=1,2, are all positive constants. Consider αi>Ki, i=1,2. Consider   Ji∈C([0,+∞,[0,+∞ and ∫0∞‍Ji(sds=1, i=1,2. Our result shows that conditions which ensure the permanence of the system are enough to ensure the global stability of the system. The result not only improves but also complements some existing ones.

  13. Conditional Mutual Information of Bipartite Unitaries and Scrambling

    CERN Document Server

    Ding, Dawei; Walter, Michael

    2016-01-01

    One way to diagnose chaos in bipartite unitary channels is via the negativity of the tripartite information of the corresponding Choi state, which for certain choices of the subsystems reduces to the negative conditional mutual information (CMI). We study this quantity from a quantum information-theoretic perspective to clarify its role in diagnosing scrambling. When the CMI is zero, we find that the channel has a special normal form consisting of local channels between individual inputs and outputs. However, we find that arbitrarily low CMI does not imply arbitrary proximity to a channel of this form, although it does imply a type of approximate recoverability of one of the inputs. When the CMI is maximal, we find that the residual channel from an individual input to an individual output is completely depolarizing when the other inputs are maximally mixed. However, we again find that this result is not robust. We also extend some of these results to the multipartite case and to the case of Haar-random pure i...

  14. Evolution of resource competition between mutually dependent digital organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Tyler J; Wilke, Claus O

    2004-01-01

    We study the emergence and dynamics of competing strains of digital organisms in a world with two depletable resources. Consumption of one resource produces the other resource as a by-product, and vice versa. As a consequence, two types of mutually dependent organisms emerge that each prey on the waste product of the other. In the absence of mutations, that is, in a purely ecological setting, the abundances of the two types of organisms display a wide range of different types of oscillations, from regular oscillations with large amplitude to irregular oscillations with amplitudes ranging from small to large. In this regime, time-averaged abundance levels seem to be controlled by the relative fitness of the organisms in the absence of resources. Under mutational pressure, on the other hand, populations evolve that seem to avoid the oscillations of intermediate to large amplitudes. In this case, the relative fitness of the organisms in the presence of resources plays an important role in the time-averaged abundance levels as well.

  15. Mutual information-based feature selection for radiomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oubel, Estanislao; Beaumont, Hubert; Iannessi, Antoine

    2016-03-01

    Background The extraction and analysis of image features (radiomics) is a promising field in the precision medicine era, with applications to prognosis, prediction, and response to treatment quantification. In this work, we present a mutual information - based method for quantifying reproducibility of features, a necessary step for qualification before their inclusion in big data systems. Materials and Methods Ten patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) lesions were followed over time (7 time points in average) with Computed Tomography (CT). Five observers segmented lesions by using a semi-automatic method and 27 features describing shape and intensity distribution were extracted. Inter-observer reproducibility was assessed by computing the multi-information (MI) of feature changes over time, and the variability of global extrema. Results The highest MI values were obtained for volume-based features (VBF). The lesion mass (M), surface to volume ratio (SVR) and volume (V) presented statistically significant higher values of MI than the rest of features. Within the same VBF group, SVR showed also the lowest variability of extrema. The correlation coefficient (CC) of feature values was unable to make a difference between features. Conclusions MI allowed to discriminate three features (M, SVR, and V) from the rest in a statistically significant manner. This result is consistent with the order obtained when sorting features by increasing values of extrema variability. MI is a promising alternative for selecting features to be considered as surrogate biomarkers in a precision medicine context.

  16. Identifying Statistical Dependence in Genomic Sequences via Mutual Information Estimates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kontoyiannis Ioannis

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Questions of understanding and quantifying the representation and amount of information in organisms have become a central part of biological research, as they potentially hold the key to fundamental advances. In this paper, we demonstrate the use of information-theoretic tools for the task of identifying segments of biomolecules (DNA or RNA that are statistically correlated. We develop a precise and reliable methodology, based on the notion of mutual information, for finding and extracting statistical as well as structural dependencies. A simple threshold function is defined, and its use in quantifying the level of significance of dependencies between biological segments is explored. These tools are used in two specific applications. First, they are used for the identification of correlations between different parts of the maize zmSRp32 gene. There, we find significant dependencies between the untranslated region in zmSRp32 and its alternatively spliced exons. This observation may indicate the presence of as-yet unknown alternative splicing mechanisms or structural scaffolds. Second, using data from the FBI's combined DNA index system (CODIS, we demonstrate that our approach is particularly well suited for the problem of discovering short tandem repeats—an application of importance in genetic profiling.

  17. Mutual Coupling Between Meteorological Parameters and Secondary Microseisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karel Holub

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The basic scientific question of this study was: do other mechanisms exist for excitation of secondary microseisms aside from the widely accepted mechanism by non-linear interactions of respective ocean waves. Here we use continuous broadband data from secondary microseisms recorded at the Ostrava-Krásné Pole, Czech Republic (OKC seismic station to create a massive seismological database. Except for seismological data, various meteorological features and their mutual relations were analysed: temperature, the so called ¡§shifted¡¨ temperature, air density, changes of atmospheric pressure, and synoptic situations. These analyses prove that maximum amplitudes of microseisms were observed during winter, while minimum amplitudes occured in summer months. The annual variations of microseisms amplitudes could not be explained by annual variations of storm activity above the North Atlantic. In addition, current analyses also aim at quantitative and quantitative evaluation of synoptic situations for triggering individual microseismic anomalies. Some of the meteorological features, namely the distribution of low pressures above northern Europe and high-pressure areas in Central Europe make it easy to explain most of the microseismic extremes. Here we pay special attention to the influence of large earthquakes, which usually induce slow deformation waves. We conclude that at least three mechanisms of microseism generation are possible: (1 the function of atmospheric pressure at sea level in the North Atlantic, (2 the effects of spreading of thermoelastic waves in the rock mass and (3 deformation waves induced by large earthquakes.

  18. A syndrome of mutualism reinforces the lifestyle of a sloth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauli, Jonathan N; Mendoza, Jorge E; Steffan, Shawn A; Carey, Cayelan C; Weimer, Paul J; Peery, M Zachariah

    2014-03-07

    Arboreal herbivory is rare among mammals. The few species with this lifestyle possess unique adaptions to overcome size-related constraints on nutritional energetics. Sloths are folivores that spend most of their time resting or eating in the forest canopy. A three-toed sloth will, however, descend its tree weekly to defecate, which is risky, energetically costly and, until now, inexplicable. We hypothesized that this behaviour sustains an ecosystem in the fur of sloths, which confers cryptic nutritional benefits to sloths. We found that the more specialized three-toed sloths harboured more phoretic moths, greater concentrations of inorganic nitrogen and higher algal biomass than the generalist two-toed sloths. Moth density was positively related to inorganic nitrogen concentration and algal biomass in the fur. We discovered that sloths consumed algae from their fur, which was highly digestible and lipid-rich. By descending a tree to defecate, sloths transport moths to their oviposition sites in sloth dung, which facilitates moth colonization of sloth fur. Moths are portals for nutrients, increasing nitrogen levels in sloth fur, which fuels algal growth. Sloths consume these algae-gardens, presumably to augment their limited diet. These linked mutualisms between moths, sloths and algae appear to aid the sloth in overcoming a highly constrained lifestyle.

  19. Mutual interaction between iron homeostasis and obesity pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikonorov, Alexandr A; Skalnaya, Margarita G; Tinkov, Alexey A; Skalny, Anatoly V

    2015-04-01

    Obesity is identified as an important medical problem. One of the pathologic conditions observed in obesity is systemic iron deficiency and hypoferremia. Along with a large number of studies indicating disturbed iron homeostasis in obesity, recent data indicate a cause-effect relationship between iron status and obesity-related pathologies. The primary objective of the article is to consider two aspects of the iron-obesity interplay: (1) the mechanisms leading to impaired iron balance, and (2) the pathways of iron participation in obesity-related pathogenesis. While considering disturbance of iron homeostasis in obesity, a number of potential mechanisms of hypoferremia are proposed. At the same time, the inflammation of obesity and obesity-related hepcidin and lipocalin 2 hyperproduction seem to be the most probable reasons of obesity-related hypoferremia. Oversecretion of these proteins leads to iron sequestration in reticuloendothelial system cells. The latter also leads to increased adipose tissue iron content, thus producing preconditions for adverse effects of local iron overload. Being a redox-active metal, iron is capable of inducing oxidative stress as well as endoplasmic reticulum stress, inflammation and adipose tissue endocrine dysfunction. Iron-mediated mechanisms of toxicity may influence aspects of obesity pathogenesis possibly even leading to obesity aggravation. Thus, a mutual interaction between disturbance in iron homeostasis and obesity pathogenesis is proposed. All sides of this interaction should be considered to design new therapeutic approaches to the treatment of disturbed iron homeostasis in obesity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Low Noise Second Harmonic Oscillator Using Mutually Synchronized Gunn Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Kengo; Tanaka, Takayuki; Aikawa, Masayoshi

    This paper represents a low noise second harmonic oscillator using mutually synchronized Gunn diodes. A multi-layer MIC technology is adopted to reduce the circuit size of the oscillator. The oscillator consists of Gunn diodes, slot line resonators and strip lines. By embedding Gunn diodes in the slot line resonators, a harmonic RF signal can be generated very easily. The strip lines are used for the power combining output circuit. The shape of slot line resonator is square in order to achieve the low phase noise and the suppression of undesired harmonics. The second harmonic oscillator is designed and fabricated in K band. The output power is +8.89dBm at the design frequency of 18.75GHz (2f0) with the phase noise of -116.2dBc/Hz at the offset frequency of 1MHz. Excellent suppression of the undesired fundamental frequency signal (f0) of -33dBc is achieved. Also, the circuit size is reduced by three-tenths relative to that of the previously proposed circuit.