WorldWideScience

Sample records for heterogeneous environmental information

  1. Information and Heterogeneous Beliefs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Peter Ove; Qin, Zhenjiang

    2014-01-01

    In an incomplete market with heterogeneous prior beliefs, we show public information can have a substantial impact on the ex ante cost of capital, trading volume, and investor welfare. The Pareto effcient public information system is the system enjoying the maximum ex ante cost of capital...... ante risk premium is unaffected by the informativeness of the public information system. Similar results are obtained in a production economy, but the impact on the ex ante cost of capital is dampened compared to the exchange economy due to welfare improving reductions in real investments to smooth...... and the maximum expected abnormal trading volume. Imperfect public information increases the gains-to-trade based on heterogeneously updated posterior beliefs. In an exchange economy, this leads to higher growth in the investors' certainty equivalents and, thus, a higher equilibrium interest rate, whereas the ex...

  2. D Web Visualization of Environmental Information - Integration of Heterogeneous Data Sources when Providing Navigation and Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, L.; Řezník, T.

    2015-08-01

    3D information is essential for a number of applications used daily in various domains such as crisis management, energy management, urban planning, and cultural heritage, as well as pollution and noise mapping, etc. This paper is devoted to the issue of 3D modelling from the levels of buildings to cities. The theoretical sections comprise an analysis of cartographic principles for the 3D visualization of spatial data as well as a review of technologies and data formats used in the visualization of 3D models. Emphasis was placed on the verification of available web technologies; for example, X3DOM library was chosen for the implementation of a proof-of-concept web application. The created web application displays a 3D model of the city district of Nový Lískovec in Brno, the Czech Republic. The developed 3D visualization shows a terrain model, 3D buildings, noise pollution, and other related information. Attention was paid to the areas important for handling heterogeneous input data, the design of interactive functionality, and navigation assistants. The advantages, limitations, and future development of the proposed concept are discussed in the conclusions.

  3. 3D WEB VISUALIZATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL INFORMATION – INTEGRATION OF HETEROGENEOUS DATA SOURCES WHEN PROVIDING NAVIGATION AND INTERACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Herman

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available 3D information is essential for a number of applications used daily in various domains such as crisis management, energy management, urban planning, and cultural heritage, as well as pollution and noise mapping, etc. This paper is devoted to the issue of 3D modelling from the levels of buildings to cities. The theoretical sections comprise an analysis of cartographic principles for the 3D visualization of spatial data as well as a review of technologies and data formats used in the visualization of 3D models. Emphasis was placed on the verification of available web technologies; for example, X3DOM library was chosen for the implementation of a proof-of-concept web application. The created web application displays a 3D model of the city district of Nový Lískovec in Brno, the Czech Republic. The developed 3D visualization shows a terrain model, 3D buildings, noise pollution, and other related information. Attention was paid to the areas important for handling heterogeneous input data, the design of interactive functionality, and navigation assistants. The advantages, limitations, and future development of the proposed concept are discussed in the conclusions.

  4. Harvesting Information from Heterogeneous Sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    The abundance of information regarding any topic makes the Internet a very good resource. Even though searching the Internet is very easy, what remains difficult is to automate the process of information extraction from the available online information due to the lack of structure and the diversity...

  5. Information flow in heterogeneously interacting systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguti, Yutaka; Tsuda, Ichiro; Takahashi, Yoichiro

    2014-02-01

    Motivated by studies on the dynamics of heterogeneously interacting systems in neocortical neural networks, we studied heterogeneously-coupled chaotic systems. We used information-theoretic measures to investigate directions of information flow in heterogeneously coupled Rössler systems, which we selected as a typical chaotic system. In bi-directionally coupled systems, spontaneous and irregular switchings of the phase difference between two chaotic oscillators were observed. The direction of information transmission spontaneously switched in an intermittent manner, depending on the phase difference between the two systems. When two further oscillatory inputs are added to the coupled systems, this system dynamically selects one of the two inputs by synchronizing, selection depending on the internal phase differences between the two systems. These results indicate that the effective direction of information transmission dynamically changes, induced by a switching of phase differences between the two systems.

  6. The Influence of Human Heterogeneity to Information Spreading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhi-Qiang; Liu, Chuan-Jian; Wu, Jian-Liang; Xu, Jin; Liu, Bin

    2014-03-01

    Humans are an integral part of the wide world and material areas, and morphological difference is widespread. In this paper, we propose a model to emphasize the influence of human heterogeneity to information spreading on social networks, and the properties including memory effects, social reinforcement, non-redundancy and human heterogeneity are taken into account. Simulation results indicate that the small-world networks generate the most effective spreading for the stronger human heterogeneity; however, for the weaker human heterogeneity, the regular networks will be more effective. In addition, for a given BA scale-free network, the stronger human heterogeneity will be more conducive to information spreading.

  7. Using environmental heterogeneity to plan for sea-level rise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Elizabeth A; Nibbelink, Nathan P

    2017-12-01

    Environmental heterogeneity is increasingly being used to select conservation areas that will provide for future biodiversity under a variety of climate scenarios. This approach, termed conserving nature's stage (CNS), assumes environmental features respond to climate change more slowly than biological communities, but will CNS be effective if the stage were to change as rapidly as the climate? We tested the effectiveness of using CNS to select sites in salt marshes for conservation in coastal Georgia (U.S.A.), where environmental features will change rapidly as sea level rises. We calculated species diversity based on distributions of 7 bird species with a variety of niches in Georgia salt marshes. Environmental heterogeneity was assessed across six landscape gradients (e.g., elevation, salinity, and patch area). We used 2 approaches to select sites with high environmental heterogeneity: site complementarity (environmental diversity [ED]) and local environmental heterogeneity (environmental richness [ER]). Sites selected based on ER predicted present-day species diversity better than randomly selected sites (up to an 8.1% improvement), were resilient to areal loss from SLR (1.0% average areal loss by 2050 compared with 0.9% loss of randomly selected sites), and provided habitat to a threatened species (0.63 average occupancy compared with 0.6 average occupancy of randomly selected sites). Sites selected based on ED predicted species diversity no better or worse than random and were not resilient to SLR (2.9% average areal loss by 2050). Despite the discrepancy between the 2 approaches, CNS is a viable strategy for conservation site selection in salt marshes because the ER approach was successful. It has potential for application in other coastal areas where SLR will affect environmental features, but its performance may depend on the magnitude of geological changes caused by SLR. Our results indicate that conservation planners that had heretofore excluded low

  8. Reactor operation environmental information document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, L.R.; Hayes, D.W.; Hunter, C.H.; Marter, W.L.; Moyer, R.A.

    1989-12-01

    This volume is a reactor operation environmental information document for the Savannah River Plant. Topics include meteorology, surface hydrology, transport, environmental impacts, and radiation effects. 48 figs., 56 tabs. (KD)

  9. Prediction of Breeding Values and Selection Responses With Genetic Heterogeneity of Environmental Variance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, H. A.; Bijma, P.; Hill, W. G.

    2007-01-01

    There is empirical evidence that genotypes differ not only in mean, but also in environmental variance of the traits they affect. Genetic heterogeneity of environmental variance may indicate genetic differences in environmental sensitivity. The aim of this study was to develop a general framework for prediction of breeding values and selection responses in mean and environmental variance with genetic heterogeneity of environmental variance. Both means and environmental variances were treated as heritable traits. Breeding values and selection responses were predicted with little bias using linear, quadratic, and cubic regression on individual phenotype or using linear regression on the mean and within-family variance of a group of relatives. A measure of heritability was proposed for environmental variance to standardize results in the literature and to facilitate comparisons to “conventional” traits. Genetic heterogeneity of environmental variance can be considered as a trait with a low heritability. Although a large amount of information is necessary to accurately estimate breeding values for environmental variance, response in environmental variance can be substantial, even with mass selection. The methods developed allow use of the well-known selection index framework to evaluate breeding strategies and effects of natural selection that simultaneously change the mean and the variance. PMID:17277375

  10. Heterogeneous Beliefs, Public Information, and Option Markets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qin, Zhenjiang

    rate in the investors’ certainty equivalents and, thus, a higher equilibrium interest rate. The public infor- mation system facilitates improved dynamic trading opportunities in option markets based on the heterogeneously updated posterior beliefs. With an intermediate signal precision and the option...... with intermediate strike price, the highest efficiency of side-betting is achieved, re‡ected by a unique maximum point of the ex ante equilibrium interest rate. The public signal precision affects ex ante equilibrium risk premium only via its relationship with option....

  11. Information, Interests, and Environmental Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winter, Søren; May, Peter J.

    2002-01-01

    This study contributes to the understanding of informational approaches to bringing about compliance with environmental regulations with particular attention to differences in the influence of information provided by different information sources. Based on theorizing from a combination of informa......This study contributes to the understanding of informational approaches to bringing about compliance with environmental regulations with particular attention to differences in the influence of information provided by different information sources. Based on theorizing from a combination...... of information processing and interest group literatures, we develop hypotheses about regulatees' reliance upon and the influence of different sources of information. We test these hypotheses for Danish farmers’ compliance with agro-environmental rules. Our findings show that information plays a role in bringing...

  12. Bird diversity and environmental heterogeneity in North America: A test of the area-heterogeneity trade-off

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachel Chocron; Curtis H. Flather; Ronen Kadmon

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Deterministic niche theory predicts that increasing environmental heterogeneity increases species richness. In contrast, a recent stochastic model suggests that heterogeneity has a unimodal effect on species richness since high levels of heterogeneity reduce the effective area available per species, thereby increasing the likelihood of stochastic...

  13. Heterogeneous Nucleation and Growth of Nanoparticles at Environmental Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Young-Shin; Kim, Doyoon; Neil, Chelsea W

    2016-09-20

    Mineral nucleation is a phase transformation of aqueous components to solids with an accompanying creation of new surfaces. In this evolutional, yet elusive, process, nuclei often form at environmental interfaces, which provide remarkably reactive sites for heterogeneous nucleation and growth. Naturally occurring nucleation processes significantly contribute to the biogeochemical cycles of important components in the Earth's crust, such as iron and manganese oxide minerals and calcium carbonate. However, in recent decades, these cycles have been significantly altered by anthropogenic activities, which affect the aqueous chemistry and equilibrium of both surface and subsurface systems. These alterations can trigger the dissolution of existing minerals and formation of new nanoparticles (i.e., nucleation and growth) and consequently change the porosity and permeability of geomedia in subsurface environments. Newly formed nanoparticles can also actively interact with components in natural and engineered aquatic systems, including those posing a significant hazard such as arsenic. These interactions can bilaterally influence the fate and transport of both newly formed nanoparticles and aqueous components. Due to their importance in natural and engineered processes, heterogeneous nucleation at environmental interfaces has started to receive more attention. However, a lack of time-resolved in situ analyses makes the evaluation of heterogeneous nucleation challenging because the physicochemical properties of both the nuclei and surfaces significantly and dynamically change with time and aqueous chemistry. This Account reviews our in situ kinetic studies of the heterogeneous nucleation and growth behaviors of iron(III) (hydr)oxide, calcium carbonate, and manganese (hydr)oxide minerals in aqueous systems. In particular, we utilized simultaneous small-angle and grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS/GISAXS) to investigate in situ and in real-time the effects of

  14. Environmental Information Disclosure in China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, L.; Mol, A.P.J.; Yang, Shuai

    2017-01-01

    The past decade has seen remarkable progress made in the field of environmental information disclosure in China. While the overall institutional changes and the motivation/willingness of the government to open up information are important conditions, China’s encounter with revolutionary Information

  15. Quantifying spatiotemporal drivers of environmental heterogeneity in Kruger National Park, South Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Macfadyen, S.; Hui, C.; Verburg, P.H.; van Teeffelen, A.J.A.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Environmental heterogeneity is considered an important mechanism of biodiversity. How environmental heterogeneity is characterised by the compositional, structural and functional variation of biotic and abiotic components is a central research theme in conservation. Objectives: We explore

  16. Heterogeneous information network model for equipment-standard system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Liang; Shi, Li-Chen; Zhao, Jun-Yan; Du, Song-Yang; Xie, Wen-Bo; Yuan, Fei; Chen, Duan-Bing

    2018-01-01

    Entity information network is used to describe structural relationships between entities. Taking advantage of its extension and heterogeneity, entity information network is more and more widely applied to relationship modeling. Recent years, lots of researches about entity information network modeling have been proposed, while seldom of them concentrate on equipment-standard system with properties of multi-layer, multi-dimension and multi-scale. In order to efficiently deal with some complex issues in equipment-standard system such as standard revising, standard controlling, and production designing, a heterogeneous information network model for equipment-standard system is proposed in this paper. Three types of entities and six types of relationships are considered in the proposed model. Correspondingly, several different similarity-measuring methods are used in the modeling process. The experiments show that the heterogeneous information network model established in this paper can reflect relationships between entities accurately. Meanwhile, the modeling process has a good performance on time consumption.

  17. The effect of environmental heterogeneity on species richness depends on community position along the environmental gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhiyong; Liu, Xueqi; Zhou, Mohua; Ai, Dexiecuo; Wang, Gang; Wang, Youshi; Chu, Chengjin; Lundholm, Jeremy T.

    2015-01-01

    Environmental heterogeneity is among the most important factors governing community structure. Besides the widespread evidence supporting positive relationships between richness and environmental heterogeneity, negative and unimodal relationships have also been reported. However, few studies have attempted to test the role of the heterogeneity on species richness after removing the confounding effect of resource availability or environmental severity. Here we constructed an individual-based spatially explicit model incorporating a long-recognized tradeoff between competitive ability and stress-tolerance ability of species. We explored the impact of the level of resource availability (i.e. the position of the community along a gradient of environmental severity) on the heterogeneity-diversity relationship (HDR). The results indicate that the shape of HDR depends on the community position along the environmental gradient: at either end of the gradient of environmental severity, a positive HDR occurred, whereas at the intermediate levels of the gradient, a unimodal HDR emerged. Our exploration demonstrates that resource availability/environmental severity should be considered as a potential factor influencing the shape of the HDR. Our theoretical predictions represent hypotheses in need of further empirical study. PMID:26508413

  18. Graph embedding with rich information through heterogeneous graph

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Guolei

    2017-11-12

    Graph embedding, aiming to learn low-dimensional representations for nodes in graphs, has attracted increasing attention due to its critical application including node classification, link prediction and clustering in social network analysis. Most existing algorithms for graph embedding only rely on the topology information and fail to use the copious information in nodes as well as edges. As a result, their performance for many tasks may not be satisfactory. In this thesis, we proposed a novel and general framework for graph embedding with rich text information (GERI) through constructing a heterogeneous network, in which we integrate node and edge content information with graph topology. Specially, we designed a novel biased random walk to explore the constructed heterogeneous network with the notion of flexible neighborhood. Our sampling strategy can compromise between BFS and DFS local search on heterogeneous graph. To further improve our algorithm, we proposed semi-supervised GERI (SGERI), which learns graph embedding in an discriminative manner through heterogeneous network with label information. The efficacy of our method is demonstrated by extensive comparison experiments with 9 baselines over multi-label and multi-class classification on various datasets including Citeseer, Cora, DBLP and Wiki. It shows that GERI improves the Micro-F1 and Macro-F1 of node classification up to 10%, and SGERI improves GERI by 5% in Wiki.

  19. Heterogeneity, learning and information stickiness in inflation expectations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfajfar, Damjan; Santoro, Emiliano

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we propose novel techniques for the empirical analysis of adaptive learning and sticky information in inflation expectations. These methodologies are applied to the distribution of households’ inflation expectations collected by the University of Michigan Survey Research Center....... To account for the evolution of the cross-section of inflation forecasts over time and measure the degree of heterogeneity in private agents’ forecasts, we explore time series of percentiles from the empirical distribution. Our results show that heterogeneity is pervasive in the process of inflation...

  20. Environmental effects on vertebrate species richness: testing the energy, environmental stability and habitat heterogeneity hypotheses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenhua Luo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Explaining species richness patterns is a central issue in biogeography and macroecology. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the mechanisms driving biodiversity patterns, but the causes of species richness gradients remain unclear. In this study, we aimed to explain the impacts of energy, environmental stability, and habitat heterogeneity factors on variation of vertebrate species richness (VSR, based on the VSR pattern in China, so as to test the energy hypothesis, the environmental stability hypothesis, and the habitat heterogeneity hypothesis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A dataset was compiled containing the distributions of 2,665 vertebrate species and eleven ecogeographic predictive variables in China. We grouped these variables into categories of energy, environmental stability, and habitat heterogeneity and transformed the data into 100 × 100 km quadrat systems. To test the three hypotheses, AIC-based model selection was carried out between VSR and the variables in each group and correlation analyses were conducted. There was a decreasing VSR gradient from the southeast to the northwest of China. Our results showed that energy explained 67.6% of the VSR variation, with the annual mean temperature as the main factor, which was followed by annual precipitation and NDVI. Environmental stability factors explained 69.1% of the VSR variation and both temperature annual range and precipitation seasonality had important contributions. By contrast, habitat heterogeneity variables explained only 26.3% of the VSR variation. Significantly positive correlations were detected among VSR, annual mean temperature, annual precipitation, and NDVI, whereas the relationship of VSR and temperature annual range was strongly negative. In addition, other variables showed moderate or ambiguous relations to VSR. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The energy hypothesis and the environmental stability hypothesis were supported, whereas little

  1. Environmental effects on vertebrate species richness: testing the energy, environmental stability and habitat heterogeneity hypotheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhenhua; Tang, Songhua; Li, Chunwang; Fang, Hongxia; Hu, Huijian; Yang, Ji; Ding, Jingjing; Jiang, Zhigang

    2012-01-01

    Explaining species richness patterns is a central issue in biogeography and macroecology. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the mechanisms driving biodiversity patterns, but the causes of species richness gradients remain unclear. In this study, we aimed to explain the impacts of energy, environmental stability, and habitat heterogeneity factors on variation of vertebrate species richness (VSR), based on the VSR pattern in China, so as to test the energy hypothesis, the environmental stability hypothesis, and the habitat heterogeneity hypothesis. A dataset was compiled containing the distributions of 2,665 vertebrate species and eleven ecogeographic predictive variables in China. We grouped these variables into categories of energy, environmental stability, and habitat heterogeneity and transformed the data into 100 × 100 km quadrat systems. To test the three hypotheses, AIC-based model selection was carried out between VSR and the variables in each group and correlation analyses were conducted. There was a decreasing VSR gradient from the southeast to the northwest of China. Our results showed that energy explained 67.6% of the VSR variation, with the annual mean temperature as the main factor, which was followed by annual precipitation and NDVI. Environmental stability factors explained 69.1% of the VSR variation and both temperature annual range and precipitation seasonality had important contributions. By contrast, habitat heterogeneity variables explained only 26.3% of the VSR variation. Significantly positive correlations were detected among VSR, annual mean temperature, annual precipitation, and NDVI, whereas the relationship of VSR and temperature annual range was strongly negative. In addition, other variables showed moderate or ambiguous relations to VSR. The energy hypothesis and the environmental stability hypothesis were supported, whereas little support was found for the habitat heterogeneity hypothesis.

  2. Query-Based Outlier Detection in Heterogeneous Information Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuck, Jonathan; Zhuang, Honglei; Yan, Xifeng; Cam, Hasan; Han, Jiawei

    2015-01-01

    Outlier or anomaly detection in large data sets is a fundamental task in data science, with broad applications. However, in real data sets with high-dimensional space, most outliers are hidden in certain dimensional combinations and are relative to a user’s search space and interest. It is often more effective to give power to users and allow them to specify outlier queries flexibly, and the system will then process such mining queries efficiently. In this study, we introduce the concept of query-based outlier in heterogeneous information networks, design a query language to facilitate users to specify such queries flexibly, define a good outlier measure in heterogeneous networks, and study how to process outlier queries efficiently in large data sets. Our experiments on real data sets show that following such a methodology, interesting outliers can be defined and uncovered flexibly and effectively in large heterogeneous networks. PMID:27064397

  3. heteroHarvest: Harvesting Information from Heterogeneous Sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qureshi, Pir Abdul Rasool; Memon, Nasrullah; Wiil, Uffe Kock

    2011-01-01

    The abundance of information regarding any topic makes the Internet a very good resource. Even though searching the Internet is very easy, what remains difficult is to automate the process of information extraction from the available online information due to the lack of structure and the diversity...... in the sharing methods. Most of the times, information is stored in different proprietary formats, complying with different standards and protocols which makes tasks like data mining and information harvesting very difficult. In this paper, an information harvesting tool (heteroHarvest) is presented...... with objectives to address these problems by filtering the useful information and then normalizing the information in a singular non hypertext format. Finally we describe the results of experimental evaluation. The results are found promising with an overall error rate equal to 6.5% across heterogeneous formats....

  4. Heterogeneous information sharing of sensor information in contested environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wampler, Jason A.; Hsieh, Chien; Toth, Andrew; Sheatsley, Ryan

    2017-05-01

    The inherent nature of unattended sensors makes these devices most vulnerable to detection, exploitation, and denial in contested environments. Physical access is often cited as the easiest way to compromise any device or network. A new mechanism for mitigating these types of attacks developed under the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering, ASD(R and E) project, "Smoke Screen in Cyberspace", was demonstrated in a live, over-the-air experiment. Smoke Screen encrypts, slices up, and disburses redundant fragments of files throughout the network. Recovery is only possible after recovering all fragments and attacking/denying one or more nodes does not limit the availability of other fragment copies in the network. This experiment proved the feasibility of redundant file fragmentation, and is the foundation for developing sophisticated methods to blacklist compromised nodes, move data fragments from risks of compromise, and forward stored data fragments closer to the anticipated retrieval point. This paper outlines initial results in scalability of node members, fragment size, file size, and performance in a heterogeneous network consisting of the Wireless Network after Next (WNaN) radio and Common Sensor Radio (CSR).

  5. Environmental information for military planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Victoria; Croft, Darryl; Knight, Ashley

    2013-07-01

    A study was conducted to consider the implications of presenting Environmental Information (EI; information on current environmental features including weather, topography and visibility maps) for military planning to the growing audience of non-technical users; to provide guidance for ensuring usability and for development of a suitable EI interface, and to produce an EI concept interface mock-up to demonstrate initial design ideas. Knowledge was elicited from current EI users and providers regarding anticipated use of EI by non-specialists. This was combined with human factors and cognition expertise to produce guidance for data usability and development of an EI interface. A simple mock-up of an EI concept interface was developed. Recommendations for further development were made including application of the guidance derived, identification of a user test-bed and development of business processes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  6. Environmental heterogeneity generates fluctuating selection on a secondary sexual trait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Matthew R; Pilkington, Jill G; Clutton-Brock, Tim H; Pemberton, Josephine M; Kruuk, Loeske E B

    2008-05-20

    In any population in which resources are limiting, the allocation of resources toward increased reproductive success may generate costs to survival [1-8]. The relationship between a sexually selected trait and fitness will therefore represent a balance between its relative associations with fecundity versus viability [3, 6, 7]. Because the risk of mortality in a population is likely to be heavily determined by ecological conditions, survival costs may vary as a function of the prevailing environment [7]. As a result, for populations experiencing heterogeneous ecological conditions, there may not be a single optimal level of allocation toward reproduction versus survival [9]. Here, we show that early viability and fecundity selection act in opposing directions on a secondary sexual trait and that their relative magnitude depends upon ecological conditions, generating fluctuating selection. In a wild population of Soay sheep (Ovis aries), phenotypic and genetic associations between male horn growth and lifetime reproductive success were positive under good environmental conditions (because of increased breeding success) and negative under poor environmental conditions (because of reduced survival). In an unpredictable environment, high allocation to early horn growth is a gamble that will only pay off if ensuing conditions are favorable. Such fluctuating selection may play an important role in preventing the erosion of genetic variance in secondary sexual traits.

  7. Genetic and environmental heterogeneity of residual variance of weight traits in Nellore beef cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neves Haroldo HR

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many studies have provided evidence of the existence of genetic heterogeneity of environmental variance, suggesting that it could be exploited to improve robustness and uniformity of livestock by selection. However, little is known about the perspectives of such a selection strategy in beef cattle. Methods A two-step approach was applied to study the genetic heterogeneity of residual variance of weight gain from birth to weaning and long-yearling weight in a Nellore beef cattle population. First, an animal model was fitted to the data and second, the influence of additive and environmental effects on the residual variance of these traits was investigated with different models, in which the log squared estimated residuals for each phenotypic record were analyzed using the restricted maximum likelihood method. Monte Carlo simulation was performed to assess the reliability of variance component estimates from the second step and the accuracy of estimated breeding values for residual variation. Results The results suggest that both genetic and environmental factors have an effect on the residual variance of weight gain from birth to weaning and long-yearling in Nellore beef cattle and that uniformity of these traits could be improved by selecting for lower residual variance, when considering a large amount of information to predict genetic merit for this criterion. Simulations suggested that using the two-step approach would lead to biased estimates of variance components, such that more adequate methods are needed to study the genetic heterogeneity of residual variance in beef cattle.

  8. SRS ECOLOGY ENVIRONMENTAL INFORMATION DOCUMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wike, L; Doug Martin, D; Eric Nelson, E; Nancy Halverson, N; John Mayer, J; Michael Paller, M; Rodney Riley, R; Michael Serrato, M

    2006-03-01

    The SRS Ecology Environmental Information Document (EEID) provides a source of information on the ecology of Savannah River Site (SRS). The SRS is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)--owned property on the upper Atlantic Coastal Plain of South Carolina, centered approximately 40 kilometers (25 miles) southeast of Augusta, Georgia. The entire site was designated a National Environmental Research Park in 1972 by the Atomic Energy Commission, the predecessor of DOE. This document summarizes and synthesizes ecological research and monitoring conducted on the three main types of ecosystems found at SRS: terrestrial, wetland and aquatic. It also summarizes the available information on the threatened and endangered species found on the Savannah River Site. SRS is located along the Savannah River and encompasses an area of 80,267 hectares (310 square miles) in three South Carolina counties. It contains diverse habitats, flora, and fauna. Habitats include upland terrestrial areas, wetlands, streams, reservoirs, and the adjacent Savannah River. These diverse habitats support a variety of plants and animals, including many commercially or recreationally valuable species and several rare, threatened, or endangered species. Soils are the basic terrestrial resource, influencing the development of terrestrial biological communities. Many different soils exist on the SRS, from hydric to well-drained, and from sand to clay. In general, SRS soils are predominantly well-drained loamy sands.

  9. New quantitative detection of pathogens in heterogeneous environmental samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun-Hee; Wang, Xiaofang; Mitchell, Kristi; Chae, Seon-Ha; Son, Ahjeong

    2015-04-01

    Quantum dots and magnetic beads based genomic assay (NanoGene assay) has been developed for sensitive and inhibition resistant gene quantification to achieve in-situ bacteria monitoring in environmental samples. In this study, eaeA gene of pathogenic E. coli O157:H7 was quantified. The result demonstrated the excellent sensitivity (i.e., limit of detection: 87 gene copies for dsDNA and 890 zeptomolar for ssDNA) in the presence of nonspecific microbial populations (Kim et al., 2010; 2011a). The feasibility of the developed gene quantification for non-laboratory environment usage (in-situ use) was investigated. Therefore, DNA hybridization was achieved at ambient temperature and minimum agitation, and the analysis was completed within hours. Most importantly, the NanoGene assay demonstrated the resistance to the presence of naturally occurring inhibitors (humic acids, cations) and residual reagents (surfactants, alcohols) from DNA extraction (Kim et al., 2011b). The assay was also applied to humic acids laden soils (7 types of soils with various amount of organic matters) and successfully quantified 105 to 108 CFU of E. coli O157:H7 per gram soil (R2 = 0.99). The results indicate that the presented NanoGene assay is suitable for further development as an in-situ bacteria monitoring method for working with heterogeneous environmental samples (Wang et al., 2013). Another aspect of the method is to transform the NanoGene assay into a portable device that can be used as a pathogenic bacteria detector in environment. The project consisted of the first inline fluidic components development and characterization as well as the first integration effort on a briefcase platform for the in-situ pathogen detection system (IPDS) (Mitchell et al., 2014). Our long term vision is to further miniaturize the briefcase platform implementation of the IPDS and to commercialize the handheld version of the IPDS.

  10. Environmental dynamics of metal oxide nanoparticles in heterogeneous systems: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Sung Hee, E-mail: s.joo1@miami.edu [Department of Civil, Architectural, and Environmental Engineering, University of Miami, 1251 Memorial Dr. McArthur Engineering Building, Coral Gables, FL 33146-0630 (United States); Zhao, Dongye [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 238 Harbert Engineering Center, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849 (United States)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Influence of contaminants on the mobility of metal oxide nanoparticles (MNPs). • Synergistic effects of MNPs in the presence of contaminants. • Effect of environmental factors on the transformed MNPs. • Research direction on the toxicity modeling assessment of heterogeneous systems. - Abstract: Metal oxide nanoparticles (MNPs) have been used for many purposes including water treatment, health, cosmetics, electronics, food packaging, and even food products. As their applications continue to expand, concerns have been mounting about the environmental fate and potential health risks of the nanoparticles in the environment. Based on the latest information, this review provides an overview of the factors that affect the fate, transformation and toxicity of MNPs. Emphasis is placed on the effects of various aquatic contaminants under various environmental conditions on the transformation of metal oxides and their transport kinetics – both in homogeneous and heterogeneous systems – and the effects of contaminants on the toxicity of MNPs. The presence of existing contaminants decreases bioavailability through hetero-aggregation, sorption, and/or complexation upon an interaction with MNPs. Contaminants also influence the fate and transport of MNPs and exhibit their synergistic toxic effects that contribute to the extent of the toxicity. This review will help regulators, engineers, and scientists in this field to understand the latest development on MNPs, their interactions with aquatic contaminants as well as the environmental dynamics of their fate and transformation. The knowledge gap and future research needs are also identified, and the challenges in assessing the environmental fate and transport of nanoparticles in heterogeneous systems are discussed.

  11. A study of heterogeneity of environmental variance for slaughter weight in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibánez-Escriche, N; Varona, L; Sorensen, D

    2008-01-01

    This work presents an analysis of heterogeneity of environmental variance for slaughter weight (175 days) in pigs. This heterogeneity is associated with systematic and additive genetic effects. The model also postulates the presence of additive genetic effects affecting the mean and environmental...

  12. Environmental dynamics of metal oxide nanoparticles in heterogeneous systems: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Sung Hee; Zhao, Dongye

    2017-01-15

    Metal oxide nanoparticles (MNPs) have been used for many purposes including water treatment, health, cosmetics, electronics, food packaging, and even food products. As their applications continue to expand, concerns have been mounting about the environmental fate and potential health risks of the nanoparticles in the environment. Based on the latest information, this review provides an overview of the factors that affect the fate, transformation and toxicity of MNPs. Emphasis is placed on the effects of various aquatic contaminants under various environmental conditions on the transformation of metal oxides and their transport kinetics - both in homogeneous and heterogeneous systems - and the effects of contaminants on the toxicity of MNPs. The presence of existing contaminants decreases bioavailability through hetero-aggregation, sorption, and/or complexation upon an interaction with MNPs. Contaminants also influence the fate and transport of MNPs and exhibit their synergistic toxic effects that contribute to the extent of the toxicity. This review will help regulators, engineers, and scientists in this field to understand the latest development on MNPs, their interactions with aquatic contaminants as well as the environmental dynamics of their fate and transformation. The knowledge gap and future research needs are also identified, and the challenges in assessing the environmental fate and transport of nanoparticles in heterogeneous systems are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Prediction of breeding values and selection responses with genetic heterogeneity of environmental variance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, H.A.; Bijma, P.; Hill, W.G.

    2007-01-01

    There is empirical evidence that genotypes differ not only in mean, but also in environmental variance of the traits they affect. Genetic heterogeneity of environmental variance may indicate genetic differences in environmental sensitivity. The aim of this study was to develop a general framework

  14. Phenotypic heterogeneity is a selected trait in natural yeast populations subject to environmental stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Sara L; Reader, Tom; Dyer, Paul S; Avery, Simon V

    2014-01-01

    Populations of genetically uniform microorganisms exhibit phenotypic heterogeneity, where individual cells have varying phenotypes. Such phenotypes include fitness-determining traits. Phenotypic heterogeneity has been linked to increased population-level fitness in laboratory studies, but its adaptive significance for wild microorganisms in the natural environment is unknown. Here, we addressed this by testing heterogeneity in yeast isolates from diverse environmental sites, each polluted with a different principal contaminant, as well as from corresponding control locations. We found that cell-to-cell heterogeneity (in resistance to the appropriate principal pollutant) was prevalent in the wild yeast isolates. Moreover, isolates with the highest heterogeneity were consistently observed in the polluted environments, indicating that heterogeneity is positively related to survival in adverse conditions in the wild. This relationship with survival was stronger than for the property of mean resistance (IC50) of an isolate. Therefore, heterogeneity could be the major determinant of microbial survival in adverse conditions. Indeed, growth assays indicated that isolates with high heterogeneities had a significant competitive advantage during stress. Analysis of yeasts after cultivation for ≥ 500 generations additionally showed that high heterogeneity evolved as a heritable trait during stress. The results showed that environmental stress selects for wild microorganisms with high levels of phenotypic heterogeneity. PMID:24000788

  15. Digital Crust: Information architecture for heterogeneous data integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, S. M.; Zaslavsky, I.; Fan, Y.; Bristol, S.; Peters, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    The Digital Crust EarthCube Building block is addressing the issue of multiple, heterogeneous but related datasets characteristic of field and sample based research using a 'loose-schema' approach, with linked entity and attribute definitions in an information model (ontology) registry (IMR). Various data entities (RDA 'data types') are defined by mapping entity and attribute definitions to definitions in the IMR. Inclusion (loading) of new data at the simplest level can bring in entities that are not registered, but these will not be 'integratable' with other data until someone does the schema matching into the IMR. New datasets can be designed using registered entity and attributes that will from the beginning be integrated into the system (similar to the approach used by the National Information Exchange Model). The fundamental abstract components in this system are 1) a data repository that allows storage of key-value structured data objects; and 2) a registry that documents information models-- the base data types, attributes and entities -- and mappings from the registered types in the datastore to the registered items. This constitutes the data repository subsystem. Data access is enabled by caching views of aggregated data from the datastore (aggregated based on the semantics of the registered items in the IMR) and creating indexes based on the registered items in the IMR. Contributing data to this system will be greatly facilitated by using existing, documented information models. It can accept datasets that are not 'standardized' as well, but the consequence is that those data will not be integratable with other existing data until the work is done to document the entities and attributes in the data and to map those into existing registered types.

  16. Economic valuation of informal care: conjoint analysis applied in a heterogeneous population of informal caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, Bernard; Al, Maiwenn; van Exel, Job; Koopmanschap, Marc; Brouwer, Werner

    2008-12-01

    This article reports the results of the application of conjoint analysis (CA) to derive a monetary value of informal care. Compared with normally recommended valuation methods such as the opportunity cost method and proxy good method, a valuation elicited through a CA might be more sensitive to the heterogeneity and dynamics of informal care. We developed a questionnaire and conducted a survey in which informal caregivers were asked to rate four different hypothetical informal caregiving situations (reflecting different combinations of care hours, care tasks, and monetary compensation). They were also asked to rate their current informal care situation compared with the four hypothetical situations. Data were obtained from postal questionnaires. These questionnaires were sent through regional support centres for informal caregivers of care recipients with various health problems. A total of 865 informal caregivers from this heterogeneous population returned a completed survey. Informal caregivers require an increase of 81% in their hourly compensation for providing 21 instead of 7 hours informal care per week. This implies a compensation of Euro 12.36 per hour at a mean hypothetical compensation in the presented scenarios. We also found that an informal caregiver's current caregiving situation and other background characteristics were associated with the scenario ratings. We conclude that a CA is a promising alternative for existing methods to determine a monetary value of informal care and encourage more experiments in this area.

  17. Corporate environmental management and information technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rikhardsson, Pall M.

    2001-01-01

    Information technology has changed, is changing and will continue to change the face of business as we further enter the Information Society. Today it would be difficult for a company to function effectively without the aid of various information technologies such as accounting software, production...... software, the Internet, computer networks, telecommunications devices, etc. Information technology also has an impact on how companies perform environmental management. This paper looks at the relations between corporate environmental management and information technology. First it presents a framework...... for mapping information technology. Using this framework it focuses on the use of information technology in corporate environmental management, describes the market for standard environmental management information systems and implementation experiences from one large international company....

  18. Environmental remediation and waste management information systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrington, M.W.; Harlan, C.P.

    1993-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is to document a few of the many environmental information systems that currently exist worldwide. The paper is not meant to be a comprehensive list; merely a discussion of a few of the more technical environmental database systems that are available. Regulatory databases such as US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) RODS (Records of Decision System) database [EPA, 1993] and cost databases such as EPA`s CORA (Cost of Remedial Action) database [EPA, 1993] are not included in this paper. Section 2 describes several US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) information systems and databases. Section 3 discusses several US EPA information systems on waste sites and technologies. Section 4 summarizes a few of the European Community environmental information systems, networks, and clearinghouses. And finally, Section 5 provides a brief overview of Geographical Information Systems. Section 6 contains the references, and the Appendices contain supporting information.

  19. SRS Geology/Hydrogeology Environmental Information Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denham, M.E.

    1999-08-31

    The purpose of the Savannah River Site Geology and Hydrogeology Environmental Information Document (EID) is to provide geologic and hydrogeologic information to serve as a baseline to evaluate potential environmental impacts. This EID is based on a summary of knowledge accumulated from research conducted at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and surrounding areas.

  20. Corporate Environmental Management and Information Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rikhardsson, Pall M.

    2000-01-01

    Information technology has changed, is changing and will continue to change the face of business as we further enter the Information Society. Today it would be difficult for a company to function effectively without the aid of various information technologies such as accounting software, production...... software, the internet, computer networks, telecommunications devices, etc. Information technology also has an impact on how companies perform environmental management. This paper explores the relations between environmental management and information technology in general terms. It offers a classification...... framework for the use of information technology in corporate environmental management (CEM), describes the market for standard environmental management information systems solutions, what main functionalities are available and what main trends are visible....

  1. Information Sharing and Environmental Policies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikos Tsakiris

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Based on the assumption that in a standard eco-dumping model governments are uncertain about future product demand and allowing governments to obtain information from firms, we examine governments’ and firms’ incentives to share information. We show that when governments regulate polluting firms through emission standards, then governments and firms will reach an agreement concerning information sharing. The opposite holds when governments regulate pollution through emission taxes.

  2. SRS ecology: Environmental information document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wike, L.D.; Shipley, R.W.; Bowers, J.A. [and others

    1993-09-01

    The purpose of this Document is to provide a source of ecological information based on the exiting knowledge gained from research conducted at the Savannah River Site. This document provides a summary and synthesis of ecological research in the three main ecosystem types found at SRS and information on the threatened and endangered species residing there.

  3. Information Fusion Issues in the UK Environmental Science Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, J. R.

    2010-12-01

    The Earth is a complex, interacting system which cannot be neatly divided by discipline boundaries. To gain an holistic understanding of even a component of an Earth System requires researchers to draw information from multiple disciplines and integrate these to develop a broader understanding. But the barriers to achieving this are formidable. Research funders attempting to encourage the integration of information across disciplines need to take into account culture issues, the impact of intrusion of projects on existing information systems, ontologies and semantics, scale issues, heterogeneity and the uncertainties associated with combining information from diverse sources. Culture - There is a cultural dualism in the environmental sciences were information sharing is both rewarded and discouraged. Researchers who share information both gain new opportunities and risk reducing their chances of being first author in an high-impact journal. The culture of the environmental science community has to be managed to ensure that information fusion activities are encouraged. Intrusion - Existing information systems have an inertia of there own because of the intellectual and financial capital invested within them. Information fusion activities must recognise and seek to minimise the potential impact of their projects on existing systems. Low intrusion information fusions systems such as OGC web-service and the OpenMI Standard are to be preferred to whole-sale replacement of existing systems. Ontology and Semantics - Linking information across disciplines requires a clear understanding of the concepts deployed in the vocabulary used to describe them. Such work is a critical first step to creating routine information fusion. It is essential that national bodies, such as geological surveys organisations, document and publish their ontologies, semantics, etc. Scale - Environmental processes operate at scales ranging from microns to the scale of the Solar System and

  4. Investigating Comparative Advantages of Advance Demand Information in Presence of Heterogeneous Demand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Bisheng; Larsen, Christian

    The paper studies aspects of advance demand information and heterogeneous demand in a mathematical model of an inventory system. The concept advance demand information is that customers ahead in time of actual demand place their orders. The concept heterogeneous demand refers to that there are di......The paper studies aspects of advance demand information and heterogeneous demand in a mathematical model of an inventory system. The concept advance demand information is that customers ahead in time of actual demand place their orders. The concept heterogeneous demand refers...

  5. Differences in environmental heterogeneity promote the nestedness of Chironomidae metacommunity in Neotropical floodplain lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele Daiane Pinha

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aim: Gradients of environmental heterogeneity perform a strong influence on the distribution of organisms and determine differences in composition, where more physically complex habitats harbor greater species richness than those simpler. We took as assumptions that differences in environmental requirements of taxa promote distinct distribution patterns which are carried through to community nestedness. Therefore, we hypothesized that more heterogeneous sites hold more nested, richer and abundant communities than those less heterogeneous ones. Methods We analyzed Chironomidae occurrence of 29 floodplain lakes, through one-year-surveys. Analyses of variance were performed to test differences among data. To test our hypothesis, we calculated correlations between the gradients of environmental heterogeneity and Chironomidae metacommunity. Results Highest values in all Chironomidae attributes were recorded in general to the floodplain lakes from Paraná System, mainly in September. Positive correlation between all Chironomidae attributes (i.e, richness, density, Biodiversity score and NODF index both with PCA scores and variation coefficient values supported our initial hypothesis about the importance of environmental heterogeneity in metacommunity assembly. Conclusions We have demonstrated how differences in environmental heterogeneity promote the nestedness in floodplain lakes and the importance of more heterogeneous places in supporting richer and more abundant communities in species. Such results contribute to future studies on composition and richness of Chironomidae community in other kind of environments. Nested distribution suggests that, despite the existence of floodplain lakes including most of the Chironomidae richness, considering the dispersal ability of species and environmental requirements, there is a strong interaction between all environments of the area. Therefore, areas that have locations with different patterns of

  6. Reactor operation environmental information document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haselow, J.S.; Price, V.; Stephenson, D.E.; Bledsoe, H.W.; Looney, B.B.

    1989-12-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) produces nuclear materials, primarily plutonium and tritium, to meet the requirements of the Department of Defense. These products have been formed in nuclear reactors that were built during 1950--1955 at the SRS. K, L, and P reactors are three of five reactors that have been used in the past to produce the nuclear materials. All three of these reactors discontinued operation in 1988. Currently, intense efforts are being extended to prepare these three reactors for restart in a manner that protects human health and the environment. To document that restarting the reactors will have minimal impacts to human health and the environment, a three-volume Reactor Operations Environmental Impact Document has been prepared. The document focuses on the impacts of restarting the K, L, and P reactors on both the SRS and surrounding areas. This volume discusses the geology, seismology, and subsurface hydrology. 195 refs., 101 figs., 16 tabs.

  7. Uncertainty-Sensitive Heterogeneous Information Fusion: Assessing Threat with Soft, Uncertain, and Conflicting Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Karray, and Saiedeh N. Razavib (2013), “ Multisensor Data Fusion : A Review of the State-of-the-Art,” Information Fusion , Vol. 14, No. 1. Klein, Gary, B...humans lie). The problem, then, is how to fuse the heterogeneous data . This report summarizes our research on heterogeneous fusion methods. The context...investigation of heterogeneous information fusion that would be analyst-centric with flexible man-machine investigation to supplement more automated and data

  8. Informative advertising by an environmental group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijnen, Pim

    Consuming a product does not (necessarily) reveal the environmental damage it may cause. In terms of environmental damage, most goods are credence goods. Therefore, advertising and pricing rarely can transmit such information effectively to consumers. This article considers the scope with which an

  9. Informative advertising by an environmental group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijnen, P.

    2007-01-01

    Consuming a product does not (necessarily) reveal the environmental damage of the good. In terms of environmental damage, most goods are credence goods. Therefore, through advertising and pricing the firm will not be able to transmit this information to the consumers. I examine the scope for an

  10. Disentangling the environmental-heterogeneity--species-diversity relationship along a gradient of human footprint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiferling, Ian; Proulx, Raphaël; Wirth, Christian

    2014-08-01

    Decades of study have attempted to define a generalized environmental-heterogeneity-biodiversity (EH-BD) relationship, with the traditional MacArthurian niche-based hypothesis remaining as the dominant reference point; i.e., increasing heterogeneity promotes biodiversity by increasing resource opportunities. However, studies have frequently reported negative or nonsignificant relationships. In a vast majority of them, environmental heterogeneity was defined along a gradient of increasing randomness, toward complete disorder. A new conceptual framework could help to reconcile the array of observed relationships. Using an extensive literature review, we test a conceptual framework proposing that the direction of environmental-heterogeneity-biodiversity relationships is contingent on the level of human footprint to which an ecosystem is subjected (the anthropocline). The results reveal that highly modified and seminatural ecosystems are characterized by a dominance of positive and negative EH-BD relationships, respectively, whereas natural ecosystems show mixed responses. Out of this novel framework arises the revised perspective that natural ecosystems are typified, not by maximal or minimal, but by intermediate levels of environmental heterogeneity.

  11. Transportation Technical Environmental Information Center index

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidson, C.A.; Foley, J.T.

    1982-06-01

    In an effort to determine the environmental intensities to which energy materials in transit may be exposed, a Data Center of technical environmental information has been established by Sandia National Laboratories, Division 5523, for the DOE Office of Transportation Fuel Storage. This document is an index which can be used to request data of interest. Access to the information held is not limited to Sandia personnel.

  12. Information Personality Development in Activity: Environmental Component

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A V Gagarin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The research is focused on the environmental component of the information personality development, the basic foundation for defining the content of the process (Personality — Environment — Activity System; the Internet as an environmental phenomenon for the man and as an information and educational environment. In their theoretical argumentation the authors arrive at the essential structural and functional characteristics of a hypothetical construct, i. e. information personality . The authors also give the key theoretical grounds reflecting the aspects of the development of the information personality in the Internet environment and discuss the outcomes of their theoretical and empirical studies of the phenomenon.

  13. Spatial environmental heterogeneity affects plant growth and thermal performance on a green roof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckland-Nicks, Michael; Heim, Amy; Lundholm, Jeremy, E-mail: jlundholm@smu.ca

    2016-05-15

    Green roofs provide ecosystem services, including stormwater retention and reductions in heat transfer through the roof. Microclimates, as well as designed features of green roofs, such as substrate and vegetation, affect the magnitude of these services. Many green roofs are partially shaded by surrounding buildings, but the effects of this within-roof spatial environmental heterogeneity on thermal performance and other ecosystem services have not been examined. We quantified the effects of spatial heterogeneity in solar radiation, substrate depth and other variables affected by these drivers on vegetation and ecosystem services in an extensive green roof. Spatial heterogeneity in substrate depth and insolation were correlated with differential growth, survival and flowering in two focal plant species. These effects were likely driven by the resulting spatial heterogeneity in substrate temperature and moisture content. Thermal performance (indicated by heat flux and substrate temperature) was influenced by spatial heterogeneity in vegetation cover and substrate depth. Areas with less insolation were cooler in summer and had greater substrate moisture, leading to more favorable conditions for plant growth and survival. Spatial variation in substrate moisture (7%–26% volumetric moisture content) and temperature (21 °C–36 °C) during hot sunny conditions in summer could cause large differences in stormwater retention and heat flux within a single green roof. Shaded areas promote smaller heat fluxes through the roof, leading to energy savings, but lower evapotranspiration in these areas should reduce stormwater retention capacity. Spatial heterogeneity can thus result in trade-offs between different ecosystem services. The effects of these spatial heterogeneities are likely widespread in green roofs. Structures that provide shelter from sun and wind may be productively utilized to design higher functioning green roofs and increase biodiversity by providing habitat

  14. Transportation Technical Environmental Information Center index

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidson, C. A.; Foley, J. T.

    1980-10-01

    In an effort to determine the environmental intensities to which energy materials in transit may be exposed, a Data Center of technical environmental information has been established by Sandia National Laboratories, Division 5523, for the DOE Office of Transportation Fuel Storage. This document is an index which can be used to request data of interest. Access to the information held is not limited to Sandia personnel. The purpose of the Transportation Technical Environmental Information Center is to collect, analyze, store, and make available descriptions of the environment of transportation expressed in engineering terms. The data stored in the Center are expected to be useful in a variety of transportation related analyses. Formulations of environmental criteria for shipment of cargo, risk assessments, and detailed structural analyses of shipping containers are examples where these data have been applied. For purposes of indexing and data retrieval, the data are catalogued under two major headings: Normal and Abnormal Environments.

  15. Analytic Hierarchy Process for Personalising Environmental Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabassi, Katerina

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents how a Geographical Information System (GIS) can be incorporated in an intelligent learning software system for environmental matters. The system is called ALGIS and incorporates the GIS in order to present effectively information about the physical and anthropogenic environment of Greece in a more interactive way. The system…

  16. A rhetorical approach to environmental information sharing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolf, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    `Faceted search' has recently been widely adopted as a powerful information discovery framework, enabling users to navigate a complex landscape of information by successive refinement along key dimensions. The compelling user experience that results has seen adoption of faceted search by online retailers, media outlets, and encyclopedic publishers. A key challenge with faceted browse is the choice of suitable search dimensions, or facets. Conventional facet analysis adopts principles of exclusivity and exhaustiveness; identifying facets on their relevance to the subject and discrimination ability (Spiteri, 1998). The rhetoricians of ancient Greece defined seven dimensions (`circumstances') of analytical enquiry: who, what, when, where, why, in what way, by what means. These provide a broadly applicable framework that may be seen in Ranganathan's classic (`PMEST') scheme for facet analysis. The utility of the `Five Ws' is also manifest through their adoption in daily discourse and pedagogical frameworks. If we apply the `Five Ws' to environmental information, we arrive at a model very close to the `O&M' (ISO 19156) conceptual model for standardised exchange of environmental observation and measurements data: * who: metadata * what: observed property * when: time of observation * where: feature of interest * why: metadata * how: procedure Thus, we adopt an approach for distributed environmental information sharing which factors the architecture into components aligned with the `Five Ws' (or O&M). We give an overview of this architecture and its information classes, components, interfaces and standards. We also describe how it extends the classic SDI architecture to provide additional specific benefit for environmental information. Finally, we offer a perspective on the architecture which may be seen as a `brokering' overlay to environmental information resources, enabling an O&M-conformant view. The approach to be presented is being adopted by the Australian Bureau

  17. Federated access to heterogeneous information resources in the Neuroscience Information Framework (NIF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Amarnath; Bug, William; Marenco, Luis; Qian, Xufei; Condit, Christopher; Rangarajan, Arun; Müller, Hans Michael; Miller, Perry L; Sanders, Brian; Grethe, Jeffrey S; Astakhov, Vadim; Shepherd, Gordon; Sternberg, Paul W; Martone, Maryann E

    2008-09-01

    The overarching goal of the NIF (Neuroscience Information Framework) project is to be a one-stop-shop for Neuroscience. This paper provides a technical overview of how the system is designed. The technical goal of the first version of the NIF system was to develop an information system that a neuroscientist can use to locate relevant information from a wide variety of information sources by simple keyword queries. Although the user would provide only keywords to retrieve information, the NIF system is designed to treat them as concepts whose meanings are interpreted by the system. Thus, a search for term should find a record containing synonyms of the term. The system is targeted to find information from web pages, publications, databases, web sites built upon databases, XML documents and any other modality in which such information may be published. We have designed a system to achieve this functionality. A central element in the system is an ontology called NIFSTD (for NIF Standard) constructed by amalgamating a number of known and newly developed ontologies. NIFSTD is used by our ontology management module, called OntoQuest to perform ontology-based search over data sources. The NIF architecture currently provides three different mechanisms for searching heterogeneous data sources including relational databases, web sites, XML documents and full text of publications. Version 1.0 of the NIF system is currently in beta test and may be accessed through http://nif.nih.gov.

  18. Environmental public health tracking: driving environmental health information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charleston, Alex E; Wilson, Holly R; Edwards, Peter O; David, Felicita; Dewitt, Shannon

    2015-01-01

    Historically, public health professionals lacked the capacity to evaluate and conduct key investigations into the health of their environment. By bringing together environmental and health effects data from a variety of data sources, the National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network (Tracking) allows users to easily analyze and research the relationships between human health and the environment. As the Tracking Network has matured, its information has been used to guide public health actions, generate hypothesis, and demonstrate relationships between environment and health outcomes. The Tracking Network is composed of state, local, and national environment and public health partners. The Environmental Public Health Tracking Network is part of the National Center for Environmental Health at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Tracking standardizes existing data from diverse sources while leveraging technologies and applying sound communication practices to provide a user-friendly interface for the data system by all types of users.

  19. Environmental Information Document: L-reactor reactivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackey, H.E. Jr. (comp.)

    1982-04-01

    Purpose of this Environmental Information Document is to provide background for assessing environmental impacts associated with the renovation, restartup, and operation of L Reactor at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). SRP is a major US Department of Energy installation for the production of nuclear materials for national defense. The purpose of the restart of L Reactor is to increase the production of nuclear weapons materials, such as plutonium and tritium, to meet projected needs in the nuclear weapons program.

  20. Methods to optimize livestock breeding programs with genotype by environment interaction and genetic heterogeneity of environmental variance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, H.A.

    2007-01-01

    Genotype by environment interaction (G × E) and genetic heterogeneity of environmental variance are both related to genetic variation in environmental sensitivity. Both phenomena can have consequences for livestock breeding programs. This thesis focuses on developing methods to optimize livestock

  1. Spatial environmental heterogeneity affects plant growth and thermal performance on a green roof.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckland-Nicks, Michael; Heim, Amy; Lundholm, Jeremy

    2016-05-15

    Green roofs provide ecosystem services, including stormwater retention and reductions in heat transfer through the roof. Microclimates, as well as designed features of green roofs, such as substrate and vegetation, affect the magnitude of these services. Many green roofs are partially shaded by surrounding buildings, but the effects of this within-roof spatial environmental heterogeneity on thermal performance and other ecosystem services have not been examined. We quantified the effects of spatial heterogeneity in solar radiation, substrate depth and other variables affected by these drivers on vegetation and ecosystem services in an extensive green roof. Spatial heterogeneity in substrate depth and insolation were correlated with differential growth, survival and flowering in two focal plant species. These effects were likely driven by the resulting spatial heterogeneity in substrate temperature and moisture content. Thermal performance (indicated by heat flux and substrate temperature) was influenced by spatial heterogeneity in vegetation cover and substrate depth. Areas with less insolation were cooler in summer and had greater substrate moisture, leading to more favorable conditions for plant growth and survival. Spatial variation in substrate moisture (7%-26% volumetric moisture content) and temperature (21°C-36°C) during hot sunny conditions in summer could cause large differences in stormwater retention and heat flux within a single green roof. Shaded areas promote smaller heat fluxes through the roof, leading to energy savings, but lower evapotranspiration in these areas should reduce stormwater retention capacity. Spatial heterogeneity can thus result in trade-offs between different ecosystem services. The effects of these spatial heterogeneities are likely widespread in green roofs. Structures that provide shelter from sun and wind may be productively utilized to design higher functioning green roofs and increase biodiversity by providing habitat

  2. Scaling impacts on environmental controls and spatial heterogeneity of soil organic carbon stocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, U.; Riley, W. J.

    2015-07-01

    The spatial heterogeneity of land surfaces affects energy, moisture, and greenhouse gas exchanges with the atmosphere. However, representing the heterogeneity of terrestrial hydrological and biogeochemical processes in Earth system models (ESMs) remains a critical scientific challenge. We report the impact of spatial scaling on environmental controls, spatial structure, and statistical properties of soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks across the US state of Alaska. We used soil profile observations and environmental factors such as topography, climate, land cover types, and surficial geology to predict the SOC stocks at a 50 m spatial scale. These spatially heterogeneous estimates provide a data set with reasonable fidelity to the observations at a sufficiently high resolution to examine the environmental controls on the spatial structure of SOC stocks. We upscaled both the predicted SOC stocks and environmental variables from finer to coarser spatial scales (s = 100, 200, and 500 m and 1, 2, 5, and 10 km) and generated various statistical properties of SOC stock estimates. We found different environmental factors to be statistically significant predictors at different spatial scales. Only elevation, temperature, potential evapotranspiration, and scrub land cover types were significant predictors at all scales. The strengths of control (the median value of geographically weighted regression coefficients) of these four environmental variables on SOC stocks decreased with increasing scale and were accurately represented using mathematical functions (R2 = 0.83-0.97). The spatial structure of SOC stocks across Alaska changed with spatial scale. Although the variance (sill) and unstructured variability (nugget) of the calculated variograms of SOC stocks decreased exponentially with scale, the correlation length (range) remained relatively constant across scale. The variance of predicted SOC stocks decreased with spatial scale over the range of 50 m to ~ 500 m, and remained

  3. Radioactive Waste Burial Grounds. Environmental Information Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaegge, W.J.; Kolb, N.L.; Looney, B.B.; Marine, I.W.; Towler, O.A.; Cook, J.R.

    1987-03-01

    This document provides environmental information on postulated closure options for the Radioactive Waste Burial Grounds at the Savannah River Plant and was developed as background technical documentation for the Department of Energy`s proposed Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) on waste management activities for groundwater protection at the plant. The results of groundwater and atmospheric pathway analyses, accident analysis, and other environmental assessments discussed in this document are based upon a conservative analysis of all foreseeable scenarios as defined by the National Environmental Policy Act (CFR, 1986). The scenarios do not necessarily represent actual environmental conditions. This document is not meant to be used as a closure plan or other regulatory document to comply with required federal or state environmental regulations. The closure options considered for the Radioactive Waste Burial Grounds are waste removal and closure, no waste removal and closure, and no action. The predominant pathways for human exposure to chemical and/or radioactive constituents are through surface, subsurface, and atmospheric transport. Modeling calculations were made to determine the risks to human population via these general pathways for the three postulated closure options. An ecological assessment was conducted to predict the environmental impacts on aquatic and terrestrial biota. The relative costs for each of the closure options were estimated.

  4. Opinion Dynamics with Heterogeneous Interactions and Information Assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir Tabatabaei, Seydeh Anahita

    2013-01-01

    In any modern society, individuals interact to form opinions on various topics, including economic, political, and social aspects. Opinions evolve as the result of the continuous exchange of information among individuals and of the assimilation of information distributed by media. The impact of individuals' opinions on each other forms a network,…

  5. 15 CFR 950.6 - Environmental Science Information Center (ESIC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Environmental Science Information... REGULATIONS OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA AND INFORMATION § 950.6 Environmental Science...-NOAA publication series. (b) Queries should be addressed to: Environmental Science Information Center...

  6. Environmental Restoration Information Resource Management Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    The Environmental Restoration Information Resources Management (ER IRM) Program Plan defines program requirements, organizational structures and responsibilities, and work breakdown structure and to establish an approved baseline against which overall progress of the program as well as the effectiveness of its management will be measured. This plan will guide ER IRM Program execution and define the program`s essential elements. This plan will be routinely updated to incorporate key decisions and programmatic changes and will serve as the project baseline document. Environmental Restoration Waste Management Program intersite procedures and work instructions will be developed to facilitate the implementation of this plan.

  7. Environmental heterogeneity explains the genetic structure of Continental and Mediterranean populations of Fraxinus angustifolia Vahl.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Temunović

    Full Text Available Tree species with wide distributions often exhibit different levels of genetic structuring correlated to their environment. However, understanding how environmental heterogeneity influences genetic variation is difficult because the effects of gene flow, drift and selection are confounded. We investigated the genetic variation and its ecological correlates in a wind-pollinated Mediterranean tree species, Fraxinus angustifolia Vahl, within a recognised glacial refugium in Croatia. We sampled 11 populations from environmentally divergent habitats within the Continental and Mediterranean biogeographical regions. We combined genetic data analyses based on nuclear microsatellite loci, multivariate statistics on environmental data and ecological niche modelling (ENM. We identified a geographic structure with a high genetic diversity and low differentiation in the Continental region, which contrasted with the significantly lower genetic diversity and higher population divergence in the Mediterranean region. The positive and significant correlation between environmental and genetic distances after controlling for geographic distance suggests an important influence of ecological divergence of the sites in shaping genetic variation. The ENM provided support for niche differentiation between the populations from the Continental and Mediterranean regions, suggesting that contemporary populations may represent two divergent ecotypes. Ecotype differentiation was also supported by multivariate environmental and genetic distance analyses. Our results suggest that despite extensive gene flow in continental areas, long-term stability of heterogeneous environments have likely promoted genetic divergence of ashes in this region and can explain the present-day genetic variation patterns of these ancient populations.

  8. Information technologies for global resources management and environmental assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, A.P.; Wang, Hua

    1992-09-01

    Recent advances in computer and communications technologies offer unprecedented opportunities to develop sophisticated information resources management systems for global resources management and environment assessment in an efficient, effective, and systematic manner. In this paper, the emerging global energy and environmental issues are identified. Since satellite-based remote sensing systems are becoming increasingly available and produce massive data collections, the utilization of imaging processing techniques and their applications for regional and global resources management and environmental studies are described. Interoperability and interconnectivity among heterogeneous computer systems are major issues in designing a totally integrated, multimedia-based, information resources management system that operates in a networking environment. Discussions of the future technology trends are focused on a number of emerging information management technologies and communications standards which will aid in achieving seamless system integration and offer user-friendly operations. It can be foreseen that advances in computer and communications technologies, increasingly sophisticated image processing techniques and Geographical Information Systems (GIS), and the development of globally comprehensive data bases will bring ``global visualization`` onto multimedia desktop computers before the end of this decade.

  9. Information technologies for global resources management and environmental assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, A.P.; Wang, Hua.

    1992-01-01

    Recent advances in computer and communications technologies offer unprecedented opportunities to develop sophisticated information resources management systems for global resources management and environment assessment in an efficient, effective, and systematic manner. In this paper, the emerging global energy and environmental issues are identified. Since satellite-based remote sensing systems are becoming increasingly available and produce massive data collections, the utilization of imaging processing techniques and their applications for regional and global resources management and environmental studies are described. Interoperability and interconnectivity among heterogeneous computer systems are major issues in designing a totally integrated, multimedia-based, information resources management system that operates in a networking environment. Discussions of the future technology trends are focused on a number of emerging information management technologies and communications standards which will aid in achieving seamless system integration and offer user-friendly operations. It can be foreseen that advances in computer and communications technologies, increasingly sophisticated image processing techniques and Geographical Information Systems (GIS), and the development of globally comprehensive data bases will bring global visualization'' onto multimedia desktop computers before the end of this decade.

  10. Reprint of: environmental information for military planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Victoria; Croft, Darryl; Knight, Ashley

    2013-11-01

    A study was conducted to consider the implications of presenting Environmental Information (EI; information on current environmental features including weather, topography and visibility maps) for military planning to the growing audience of non-technical users; to provide guidance for ensuring usability and for development of a suitable EI interface, and to produce an EI concept interface mock-up to demonstrate initial design ideas. Knowledge was elicited from current EI users and providers regarding anticipated use of EI by non-specialists. This was combined with human factors and cognition expertise to produce guidance for data usability and development of an EI interface. A simple mock-up of an EI concept interface was developed. Recommendations for further development were made including application of the guidance derived, identification of a user test-bed and development of business processes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  11. Information Systems Solutions for Environmental Sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gholami, Roya; Watson, Richard T.; Hasan, Helen

    2016-01-01

    themselves in creating solutions for environmental problems. Moreover, information is a perquisite for assessing the state of the environment and making appropriate decisions to ameliorate identified problems. Indeed, the IS scholarly community needs to help create a sustainable society. While......We contend that too few information systems (IS) academics engage in impactful research that offers solutions to global warming despite the fact that climate change is one of the most critical challenges facing this generation. Climate change is a major threat to global sustainability in the 21st...... century. Unfortunately, from submissions of our call for papers presenting IS solutions for environmental sustainability, we found only one paper worthy of publication. Given that IS have been the major force for productivity increases in the last half-century, we suggest that IS scholars should immerse...

  12. Energy and environmental management information systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, P.K. (Energy Auditing Agency Ltd., Milton Keynes (United Kingdom))

    1993-01-01

    The threat of global warming, environmental instability and the possible use of green or carbon taxes on fossil fuels has increased the need for energy efficiency. Energy Conservation is now recognised as one of the easiest and most cost-effective ways of limiting or reducing CO[sub 2] emissions. Large UK companies are now assessing how much CO[sub 2] they dissipate to the environment and reviewing strategies to reduce this either in response to consumer demand or as a corporate policy decision. Computer-based information systems already exist to monitor and report on fluctuations in energy consumption. These are called Monitoring and Targeting (M and T) systems. This paper explains what M and T systems are and how they are being extended to cover reporting on corporate fuel-based CO[sub 2] emissions to help provide an integrated energy and environmental-management information system. (author).

  13. Effect of the heterogeneous neuron and information transmission delay on stochastic resonance of neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qingyun; Zhang, Honghui; Chen, Guanrong

    2012-12-01

    We study the effect of heterogeneous neuron and information transmission delay on stochastic resonance of scale-free neuronal networks. For this purpose, we introduce the heterogeneity to the specified neuron with the highest degree. It is shown that in the absence of delay, an intermediate noise level can optimally assist spike firings of collective neurons so as to achieve stochastic resonance on scale-free neuronal networks for small and intermediate α(h), which plays a heterogeneous role. Maxima of stochastic resonance measure are enhanced as α(h) increases, which implies that the heterogeneity can improve stochastic resonance. However, as α(h) is beyond a certain large value, no obvious stochastic resonance can be observed. If the information transmission delay is introduced to neuronal networks, stochastic resonance is dramatically affected. In particular, the tuned information transmission delay can induce multiple stochastic resonance, which can be manifested as well-expressed maximum in the measure for stochastic resonance, appearing every multiple of one half of the subthreshold stimulus period. Furthermore, we can observe that stochastic resonance at odd multiple of one half of the subthreshold stimulus period is subharmonic, as opposed to the case of even multiple of one half of the subthreshold stimulus period. More interestingly, multiple stochastic resonance can also be improved by the suitable heterogeneous neuron. Presented results can provide good insights into the understanding of the heterogeneous neuron and information transmission delay on realistic neuronal networks.

  14. Management information systems for environmental compliance activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-04-23

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is subject to Federal and state laws designed to protect against threats to public health and the environment. The purpose of this audit was to determine whether the Department had developed adequate information systems for tracking and reporting on the status of its compliance with these laws. Systems used for prioritizing and budgeting for environmental activities are being addressed in a separate review.

  15. Environmental regulation, asymmetric information and foreign ownership

    OpenAIRE

    Vislie,J.

    2001-01-01

    Regulating an export firm (or a homogeneous industry) with private information about emission technology is analysed, when the firm, owned partly by foreigners, has an option to bypass domestic regulation through costly relocation. If the firm chooses to relocate, it will set up a new plant in a region practicing environmental dumping, at a cost that is correlated with emission efficiency, so as to make the firm’s reservation utility type-dependent. We characterise the set of optimal contract...

  16. Native herbivores and environmental heterogeneity as mediators of an exotic grass invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ender, Cody L; Christian, Caroline E; Cushman, J Hall

    2017-03-01

    Given that many exotic plant species throughout the world are having large ecological and economic effects, it is vital to understand the forces that mediate their success in novel landscapes. Both native herbivores and recipient ecosystems can have substantial effects on the performance of exotic plant species, and may interact with each other or vary in their effects over time. Unfortunately, few studies have evaluated the importance of these kinds of context-dependent effects. Here, we use a 17-year-old exclosure experiment stratified across a coastal grassland in northern California to address the relative importance of a reintroduced mammalian herbivore, tule elk (Cervus canadensis nannodes), and environmental heterogeneity in mediating the growth, abundance, and recruitment of a problematic grass invader, Holcus lanatus. We found that elk reduced Holcus abundance, aboveground biomass, percent cover, frequency, and seedling recruitment, but that these effects often varied among habitat types, with effects being greater in open grasslands than shrub-dominated grasslands. The performance of Holcus populations also varied significantly among habitat types, with the invader usually having the greatest success in Baccharis-dominated grasslands. Our results suggest that environmental heterogeneity had much greater influence on Holcus success than elk, and that these effects were due largely to soil pH and moisture. The negative effects of elk on Holcus appeared after 4 years and did not intensify after an additional 13 years. Furthermore, despite their negative effects, these prominent herbivores did not prevent the spread of Holcus into previously uninvaded areas. Our research highlights the importance of assessing the individual and interactive effects of native herbivores and environmental heterogeneity on the success of invasive, exotic plant species. It emphasizes the reality that the negative effects of herbivores on exotic plant species will often vary

  17. Gaseous Heterogeneous Catalytic Reactions over Mn-Based Oxides for Environmental Applications: A Critical Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Haomiao; Yan, Naiqiang; Qu, Zan; Liu, Wei; Mei, Jian; Huang, Wenjun; Zhao, Songjian

    2017-08-15

    Manganese oxide has been recognized as one of the most promising gaseous heterogeneous catalysts due to its low cost, environmental friendliness, and high catalytic oxidation performance. Mn-based oxides can be classified into four types: (1) single manganese oxide (MnOx), (2) supported manganese oxide (MnOx/support), (3) composite manganese oxides (MnOx-X), and (4) special crystalline manganese oxides (S-MnOx). These Mn-based oxides have been widely used as catalysts for the elimination of gaseous pollutants. This review aims to describe the environmental applications of these manganese oxides and provide perspectives. It gives detailed descriptions of environmental applications of the selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH3, the catalytic combustion of volatile organic compounds, Hg0 oxidation and adsorption, and soot oxidation, in addition to some other environmental applications. Furthermore, this review mainly focuses on the effects of structure, morphology, and modified elements and on the role of catalyst supports in gaseous heterogeneous catalytic reactions. Finally, future research directions for developing manganese oxide catalysts are proposed.

  18. Microbial functional diversity covaries with permafrost thaw-induced environmental heterogeneity in tundra soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Mengting M; Zhang, Jin; Xue, Kai; Wu, Liyou; Deng, Ye; Deng, Jie; Hale, Lauren; Zhou, Xishu; He, Zhili; Yang, Yunfeng; Van Nostrand, Joy D; Schuur, Edward A G; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T; Penton, Christopher R; Cole, James R; Tiedje, James M; Luo, Yiqi; Zhou, Jizhong

    2018-01-01

    Permafrost soil in high latitude tundra is one of the largest terrestrial carbon (C) stocks and is highly sensitive to climate warming. Understanding microbial responses to warming-induced environmental changes is critical to evaluating their influences on soil biogeochemical cycles. In this study, a functional gene array (i.e., geochip 4.2) was used to analyze the functional capacities of soil microbial communities collected from a naturally degrading permafrost region in Central Alaska. Varied thaw history was reported to be the main driver of soil and plant differences across a gradient of minimally, moderately, and extensively thawed sites. Compared with the minimally thawed site, the number of detected functional gene probes across the 15-65 cm depth profile at the moderately and extensively thawed sites decreased by 25% and 5%, while the community functional gene β-diversity increased by 34% and 45%, respectively, revealing decreased functional gene richness but increased community heterogeneity along the thaw progression. Particularly, the moderately thawed site contained microbial communities with the highest abundances of many genes involved in prokaryotic C degradation, ammonification, and nitrification processes, but lower abundances of fungal C decomposition and anaerobic-related genes. Significant correlations were observed between functional gene abundance and vascular plant primary productivity, suggesting that plant growth and species composition could be co-evolving traits together with microbial community composition. Altogether, this study reveals the complex responses of microbial functional potentials to thaw-related soil and plant changes and provides information on potential microbially mediated biogeochemical cycles in tundra ecosystems. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Environmental heterogeneity and the evolution of plant-virus interactions: Viruses in wild pepper populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraile, Aurora; McLeish, Michael J; Pagán, Israel; González-Jara, Pablo; Piñero, Daniel; García-Arenal, Fernando

    2017-09-15

    Understanding host-pathogen interactions requires analyses to address the multiplicity of scales in heterogeneous landscapes. Anthropogenic influence on plant communities, especially cultivation, is a major cause of environmental heterogeneity. We have approached the analysis of how environmental heterogeneity determines plant-virus interactions by studying virus infection in a wild plant currently undergoing incipient domestication, the wild pepper or chiltepin, across its geographical range in Mexico. We have shown previously that anthropogenic disturbance is associated with higher infection and disease risk, and with disrupted patterns of host and virus genetic spatial structure. We now show that anthropogenic factors, species richness, host genetic diversity and density in communities supporting chiltepin differentially affect infection risk according to the virus analysed. We also show that in addition to these factors, a broad range of abiotic and biotic variables meaningful to continental scales, have an important role on the risk of infection depending on the virus. Last, we show that natural virus infection of chiltepin plants in wild communities results in decreased survival and fecundity, hence negatively affecting fitness. This important finding paves the way for future studies on plant-virus co-evolution. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Advancing an Information Model for Environmental Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsburgh, J. S.; Aufdenkampe, A. K.; Hooper, R. P.; Lehnert, K. A.; Schreuders, K.; Tarboton, D. G.; Valentine, D. W.; Zaslavsky, I.

    2011-12-01

    have been modified to support data management for the Critical Zone Observatories (CZOs). This paper will present limitations of the existing information model used by the CUAHSI HIS that have been uncovered through its deployment and use, as well as new advances to the information model, including: better representation of both in situ observations from field sensors and observations derived from environmental samples, extensibility in attributes used to describe observations, and observation provenance. These advances have been developed by the HIS team and the broader scientific community and will enable the information model to accommodate and better describe wider classes of environmental observations and to better meet the needs of the hydrologic science and CZO communities.

  1. Continuation of the genetic divergence of ecological speciation by spatial environmental heterogeneity in island endemic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bing-Hong; Huang, Chih-Wei; Huang, Chia-Lung; Liao, Pei-Chun

    2017-07-14

    Divergent selection plays a critical role not only as a speciation driver but also in maintaining post-speciation divergence. In the absence of direct evidence, ancestral interspecific gene flow between incipient species can reflect ancient selective pressure for ecological speciation. In the present study, two late-Pleistocene diverged species endemic to Taiwan, Scutellaria playfairii and S. tashiroi, were spatially and ecologically partitioned with partial overlap. Multilocus genome-scan analyses and in silico evaluation revealed ancestral interspecific gene flow but distinct genetic compositions, implying that adaptive divergence contributed to their speciation. Ecological niche modeling and principal component analysis suggested incomplete divergent niches between the two species; the species distribution is therefore consistent with Hutchinson's metaphor of multidimensional hypervolume niches rather than attributable to a single factor. Constraint ordination analysis supported this inference of a combination of variables explaining the genetic structure. The rare occurrence of hybrids in the sympatric population suggested hybrid breakdown, providing further evidence of divergent selection blocking gene flow. The correlation of environmental variables with integrated genetic components demonstrated that environmental heterogeneity maintains the species and population differentiation. This study highlights the importance of environmental heterogeneity and divergent selection for the rapid speciation and recent diversification of island plants.

  2. Heterogeneity among informal microenterprises in Mexico: empirical evidence and some policy implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Rivera Huerta

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Unlike traditional theories of development, new schools of thinking consider nonfarm informal micro-enterprises as a dynamic sector. Nevertheless, social researchers from both streams recognize the necessity of policies to formalize and increase the productivity of such kind of enterprises. Using Mexican data from 2008 and cluster analysis techniques, this work proposes that informal micro-enterprises constitute a very heterogeneous group and that such heterogeneity deserves a diversified strategy of development: while some entrepreneurs would benefit from productivity policies, some others would require an assistance approach.

  3. AI and model management: FAW research in environmental information systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radermacher, F.J.

    1990-05-28

    The paper gives a short overview of work done at the Research Institute for Application-Oriented Knowledge Processing (FAW) in Ulm, with particular emphasis on applications in the field of environmental information systems. The basic research approach followed at the FAW is one that views intelligent systems as model-oriented and model-driven. Integrating models and using operators in models is seen as the dominate paradigm for competent systems in general. The paper briefly describes the structure of the FAW, discusses to some extent the connection between artificial intelligence and modelling and, finally, describes some of the projects that the institute, together with the State of Baden-Wuerttemberg and some industrial partners, is developing for use within the Baden-Wuerttemberg environmental information system. These projects deal with fundamental questions in building such systems, with knowledge extraction from sensor images, with water analysis, the natural-language access to databases and, finally, the knowledge-based access to distributed, heterogeneous databases. (orig.).

  4. Examining Decision-Making Regarding Environmental Information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marble, Julie Lynne; Medema, Heather Dawne; Hill, Susan Gardiner

    2001-10-01

    Eight participants were asked to view a computer-based multimedia presentation on an environmental phenomenon. Participants were asked to play a role as a senior aide to a national legislator. In this role, they were told that the legislator had asked them to review a multimedia presentation regarding the hypoxic zone phenomenon in the Gulf of Mexico. Their task in assuming the role of a senior aide was to decide how important a problem this issue was to the United States as a whole, and the proportion of the legislator’s research budget that should be devoted to study of the problem. The presentation was divided into 7 segments, each containing some new information not contained in the previous segments. After viewing each segment, participants were asked to indicate how close they were to making a decision and how certain they were that their current opinion would be their final decision. After indicating their current state of decision-making, participants were interviewed regarding the factors affecting their decision-making. Of interest was the process by which participants moved toward a decision. This experiment revealed a number of possible directions for future research. There appeared to be two approaches to decision-making: Some decision-makers moved steadily toward a decision, and occasionally reversed decisions after viewing information, while others abruptly reached a decision after a certain time period spent reviewing the information. Although the difference in estimates of distance to decisions did not differ statistically for these two groups, that difference was reflected in the participants’ estimates of confidence that their current opinion would be their final decision. The interviews revealed that the primary difference between these two groups was in their trade-offs between willingness to spend time in information search and the acquisition of new information. Participants who were less confident about their final decision, tended to be

  5. Does Formal Environmental Knowledge Inform the Everyday ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    environmental literacy is essentially the capacity to perceive and interpret the relative health of environmental systems and ..... Copenhagen: Research Centre for Environmental and Health Education. Jensen, B. & Schnack, K. (1997). The action competence approach in Environmental Education. Environmental Education ...

  6. Pointwise mutual information quantifies intratumor heterogeneity in tissue sections labeled with multiple fluorescent biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel M Spagnolo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Measures of spatial intratumor heterogeneity are potentially important diagnostic biomarkers for cancer progression, proliferation, and response to therapy. Spatial relationships among cells including cancer and stromal cells in the tumor microenvironment (TME are key contributors to heterogeneity. Methods: We demonstrate how to quantify spatial heterogeneity from immunofluorescence pathology samples, using a set of 3 basic breast cancer biomarkers as a test case. We learn a set of dominant biomarker intensity patterns and map the spatial distribution of the biomarker patterns with a network. We then describe the pairwise association statistics for each pattern within the network using pointwise mutual information (PMI and visually represent heterogeneity with a two-dimensional map. Results: We found a salient set of 8 biomarker patterns to describe cellular phenotypes from a tissue microarray cohort containing 4 different breast cancer subtypes. After computing PMI for each pair of biomarker patterns in each patient and tumor replicate, we visualize the interactions that contribute to the resulting association statistics. Then, we demonstrate the potential for using PMI as a diagnostic biomarker, by comparing PMI maps and heterogeneity scores from patients across the 4 different cancer subtypes. Estrogen receptor positive invasive lobular carcinoma patient, AL13-6, exhibited the highest heterogeneity score among those tested, while estrogen receptor negative invasive ductal carcinoma patient, AL13-14, exhibited the lowest heterogeneity score. Conclusions: This paper presents an approach for describing intratumor heterogeneity, in a quantitative fashion (via PMI, which departs from the purely qualitative approaches currently used in the clinic. PMI is generalizable to highly multiplexed/hyperplexed immunofluorescence images, as well as spatial data from complementary in situ methods including FISSEQ and CyTOF, sampling many different

  7. Linking environmental heterogeneity and reproductive success at single-cell resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remus-Emsermann, Mitja N P; Leveau, Johan H J

    2010-02-01

    Individual-based microbial ecology (IBME) is a developing field of study in need of experimental tools to quantify the individual experience and performance of microorganisms in their natural habitats. We describe here the conception and application of a single-cell bioreporter approach with broad utility in IBME. It is based on the dilution of stable green fluorescent protein (GFP) in dividing bacteria. In the absence of de novo synthesis, GFP fluorescence of a daughter cell approximates half of that of its mother, from which follows that the fluorescence of a progeny cell is a quantitative measure for the reproductive success of its ancestor. To test this concept, we exposed GFP-filled bacteria to different degrees of environmental heterogeneity and assessed how this affected individual cells by the analysis of GFP content in their progeny. Reporter bacteria growing in rich medium in a shaking flask showed no variation in reproductive success, confirming that life in a broth is experienced much the same from one bacterium to the next. In contrast, when reporter bacteria were released onto plant leaf surfaces, representing a microscopically heterogeneous environment, clear intrapopulation differences in reproductive success were observed. Such variation suggests that individual cells in the founding population experienced different growth-permitting conditions, resulting in unequal contributions of individual bacteria to future offspring and population sizes. Being able to assess population changes bottom-up rather than top-down, the bioreporter offers opportunities to quantify single-cell competitive and facilitative interactions, assess the role of chance events in individual survivorship and reveal causes that underlie individual-based environmental heterogeneity.

  8. FctClus: A Fast Clustering Algorithm for Heterogeneous Information Networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Yang

    Full Text Available It is important to cluster heterogeneous information networks. A fast clustering algorithm based on an approximate commute time embedding for heterogeneous information networks with a star network schema is proposed in this paper by utilizing the sparsity of heterogeneous information networks. First, a heterogeneous information network is transformed into multiple compatible bipartite graphs from the compatible point of view. Second, the approximate commute time embedding of each bipartite graph is computed using random mapping and a linear time solver. All of the indicator subsets in each embedding simultaneously determine the target dataset. Finally, a general model is formulated by these indicator subsets, and a fast algorithm is derived by simultaneously clustering all of the indicator subsets using the sum of the weighted distances for all indicators for an identical target object. The proposed fast algorithm, FctClus, is shown to be efficient and generalizable and exhibits high clustering accuracy and fast computation speed based on a theoretic analysis and experimental verification.

  9. Stennis Space Center Environmental Geographic Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovely, Janette; Cohan, Tyrus

    2000-01-01

    As NASA's lead center for rocket propulsion testing, the John C. Stennis Space Center (SSC) monitors and assesses the off-site impacts of such testing through its Environmental Office (SSC-EO) using acoustical models and ancillary data. The SSC-EO has developed a geographical database, called the SSC Environmental Geographic Information System (SSC-EGIS), that covers an eight-county area bordering the NASA facility. Through the SSC-EGIS, the Enivronmental Office inventories, assesses, and manages the nearly 139,000 acres that comprise Stennis Space Center and its surrounding acoustical buffer zone. The SSC-EGIS contains in-house data as well as a wide range of data obtained from outside sources, including private agencies and local, county, state, and U.S. government agencies. The database comprises cadastral/geodetic, hydrology, infrastructure, geo-political, physical geography, and socio-economic vector and raster layers. The imagery contained in the database is varied, including low-resolution imagery, such as Landsat TM and SPOT; high-resolution imagery, such as IKONOS and AVIRIS; and aerial photographs. The SSC-EGIS has been an integral part of several major projects and the model upon which similar EGIS's will be developed for other NASA facilities. The Corps of Engineers utilized the SSC-EGIS in a plan to establish wetland mitigation sites within the SSC buffer zone. Mississippi State University employed the SSC-EGIS in a preliminary study to evaluate public access points within the buffer zone. The SSC-EO has also expressly used the SSC-EGIS to assess noise pollution modeling, land management/wetland mitigation assessment, environmental hazards mapping, and protected areas mapping for archaeological sites and for threatened and endangered species habitats. The SSC-EO has several active and planned projects that will also make use of the SSC-EGIS during this and the coming fiscal year.

  10. Information and Heterogeneous Beliefs: Cost of Capital, Trading Volume, and Investor Welfare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Peter Ove; Qin, Zhenjiang

    In an incomplete market setting with heterogeneous prior beliefs, we show that public information can have a substantial impact on the ex ante cost of capital, trading volume, and investor welfare. In a model with exponential utility investors and an asset with a normally distributed dividend......, the Pareto efficient public information system is the system which enjoys the maximum ex ante cost of capital, and the maximum expected abnormal trading volume. The public information system facilitates improved dynamic trading opportunities based on heterogeneously updated posterior beliefs in order to take...... information system. In an effectively complete market setting, in which investors do not need to trade dynamically in order to take full advantage of their differences in beliefs, the ex ante cost of capital and the investor welfare are both higher than in the incomplete market setting...

  11. Social influence, agent heterogeneity and the emergence of the urban informal sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Díaz, César; Moreno-Monroy, Ana I.

    2012-02-01

    We develop an agent-based computational model in which the urban informal sector acts as a buffer where rural migrants can earn some income while queuing for higher paying modern-sector jobs. In the model, the informal sector emerges as a result of rural-urban migration decisions of heterogeneous agents subject to social influence in the form of neighboring effects of varying strengths. Besides using a multinomial logit choice model that allows for agent idiosyncrasy, explicit agent heterogeneity is introduced in the form of socio-demographic characteristics preferred by modern-sector employers. We find that different combinations of the strength of social influence and the socio-economic composition of the workforce lead to very different urbanization and urban informal sector shares. In particular, moderate levels of social influence and a large proportion of rural inhabitants with preferred socio-demographic characteristics are conducive to a higher urbanization rate and a larger informal sector.

  12. Environmental safety of the global information space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В’ячеслав Степанович Волошин

    2015-03-01

    Databases of full-text publications – journals, articles, monographs- are surely a means of salvation for science. There already exist a large number of such portals. Besides, advantages and disadvantages of electronic subscriptions to periodicals should certainly be considered. The former include the following most evident ones: aggregation of large data arrays, saving money on a subscription, an opportunity to work with relevant publications, thematic collections of materials, availability of records, simultaneous access of an unlimited number of users and others. Nevertheless, there are many disadvantages that make it difficult to work with full-text publications. They are the following: selective representativeness of publication numbers, complexity of keyword search, occasional presence of obsolete text formats, printed versions, possible psychological barrier, physiological incompatibility with computer equipment, fatigue caused by prolonged work on the computer. The Internet was followed by the appearance of global control networks, their aims ranging from control of a human life support to a unified control of humanity. So, the formed global information space promises the man to get access to almost any information source. Meanwhile, environmental safety of the man, his/her objective biological psyche and abilities in harmonious development are at serious risk

  13. Transparency and information disclosure in China's environmental governance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, L.; Mol, A.P.J.; He, G.

    2016-01-01

    Given its past as a so-called information-poor and authoritarian country, China has recently made remarkable progress in information disclosure and environmental transparency. Since enacting the Open Government Information Regulations and the Environmental Information Disclosure Measures in 2008,

  14. Local environmental context conditions the impact of Russian olive in a heterogeneous riparian ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, Graham M.; Katz, Gabrielle L.; Friedman, Jonathan M.; Norton, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    Local abiotic and biotic conditions can alter the strength of exotic species impacts. To better understand the effects of exotic species on invaded ecosystems and to prioritize management efforts, it is important that exotic species impacts are put in local environmental context. We studied how differences in plant community composition, photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), and available soil N associated with Russian olive presence are conditioned by local environmental variation within a western U.S. riparian ecosystem. In four sites along the South Fork of the Republican River in Colorado, we established 200 pairs of plots (underneath and apart from Russian olive) to measure the effects of invasion across the ecosystem. We used a series of a priori mixed models to identify environmental variables that altered the effects of Russian olive. For all response variables, models that included the interaction of environmental characteristics, such as presence/absence of an existing cottonwood canopy, with the presence/absence of Russian olive canopy were stronger candidate models than those that just included Russian olive canopy presence as a factor. Compared with reference plots outside of Russian olive canopy, plots underneath Russian olive had higher relative exotic cover (exotic/total cover), lower perennial C4 grass cover, and higher perennial forb cover. These effects were reduced, however, in the presence of a cottonwood canopy. As expected, Russian olive was associated with reduced PAR and increased N, but these effects were reduced under cottonwood canopy. Our results demonstrate that local abiotic and biotic environmental factors condition the effects of Russian olive within a heterogeneous riparian ecosystem and suggest that management efforts should be focused in open areas where Russian olive impacts are strongest.

  15. A Parallel Strategy for Convolutional Neural Network Based on Heterogeneous Cluster for Mobile Information System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jilin Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With the development of the mobile systems, we gain a lot of benefits and convenience by leveraging mobile devices; at the same time, the information gathered by smartphones, such as location and environment, is also valuable for business to provide more intelligent services for customers. More and more machine learning methods have been used in the field of mobile information systems to study user behavior and classify usage patterns, especially convolutional neural network. With the increasing of model training parameters and data scale, the traditional single machine training method cannot meet the requirements of time complexity in practical application scenarios. The current training framework often uses simple data parallel or model parallel method to speed up the training process, which is why heterogeneous computing resources have not been fully utilized. To solve these problems, our paper proposes a delay synchronization convolutional neural network parallel strategy, which leverages the heterogeneous system. The strategy is based on both synchronous parallel and asynchronous parallel approaches; the model training process can reduce the dependence on the heterogeneous architecture in the premise of ensuring the model convergence, so the convolution neural network framework is more adaptive to different heterogeneous system environments. The experimental results show that the proposed delay synchronization strategy can achieve at least three times the speedup compared to the traditional data parallelism.

  16. The effect of heterogeneous dynamics of online users on information filtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Bo-Lun [Department of Computer Science, Yangzhou University of China, Yangzhou 225127 (China); Department of Computer Science, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics of China, Nanjing 210016 (China); Department of Physics, University of Fribourg, Chemin du Musee 3, CH-1700 Fribourg (Switzerland); Zeng, An, E-mail: anzeng@bnu.edu.cn [School of Systems Science, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Chen, Ling [Department of Computer Science, Yangzhou University of China, Yangzhou 225127 (China); Department of Computer Science, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics of China, Nanjing 210016 (China)

    2015-11-06

    The rapid expansion of the Internet requires effective information filtering techniques to extract the most essential and relevant information for online users. Many recommendation algorithms have been proposed to predict the future items that a given user might be interested in. However, there is an important issue that has always been ignored so far in related works, namely the heterogeneous dynamics of online users. The interest of active users changes more often than that of less active users, which asks for different update frequency of their recommendation lists. In this paper, we develop a framework to study the effect of heterogeneous dynamics of users on the recommendation performance. We find that the personalized application of recommendation algorithms results in remarkable improvement in the recommendation accuracy and diversity. Our findings may help online retailers make better use of the existing recommendation methods. - Highlights: • We study the effect of heterogeneous dynamics of users on recommendation. • Due to the user heterogeneity, their amount of links in the probe set is different. • The personalized algorithm implementation improves the recommendation performance. • Our results suggest different update frequency for users – recommendation list.

  17. The effect of environmental information on investment allocation decisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rikhardsson, Pall M.; Holm, Claus

    2008-01-01

    This paper focuses on the use of environmental information in investment decision making. The research approach employed is based on an experiment where three groups of final year finance students were asked to allocate investment funds between two companies based on financial accounts...... and information material from these companies in which environmental information was included in varying degrees. The overall conclusion is that the qualitative environmental information affects short term allocation decisions, hence indicating a risk reduction potential of environmental information comparable...... to the classic interpretation of financial information. The quantitative environmental information included in the experiment seems to mitigate rather than extend the directional effect of more environmental information. The evidence also seems to indicate that decision makers are not always aware which...

  18. 31 CFR 26.5 - Upgrades and additional environmental information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... than a full-fledged environmental impact assessment as defined by that MDB's own procedures, the... studies or environmental data sheets) which contains this environmental analysis. The MDB Office will... information is insufficient to provide an adequate basis for analyzing the environmental impact of the...

  19. Use of positioning information for performance enhancement of uncoordinated heterogeneous network deployment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Semov, Plamen T.; Mihovska, Albena D.; Prasad, Ramjee

    2013-01-01

    with information but the locations of the mobile users and neighboring cells to solve the problem of dynamic physical resource assignment in uncoordinated scenario while accounting for improved allocation and scheduling. The results are compared to the performance when known scheduling algorithms are employed......This paper proposes a novel algorithm for dynamic physical resource allocation based on the use of positioning information during carrier aggregation (CA) in a semi-and uncoordinated deployment of heterogeneous networks (HetNet). The algorithm uses the known Q-learning method enhanced...... and show increased cell throughput, while maintaining an adequate user throughput when employing Q-learning with positioning information....

  20. Multimedia environmental chemical partitioning from molecular information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Izacar; Grifoll, Jordi; Giralt, Francesc; Rallo, Robert

    2010-12-15

    The prospect of assessing the environmental distribution of chemicals directly from their molecular information was analyzed. Multimedia chemical partitioning of 455 chemicals, expressed in dimensionless compartmental mass ratios, was predicted by SimpleBox 3, a Level III Fugacity model, together with the propagation of reported uncertainty for key physicochemical and transport properties, and degradation rates. Chemicals, some registered in priority lists, were selected according to the availability of experimental property data to minimize the influence of predicted information in model development. Chemicals were emitted in air or water in a fixed geographical scenario representing the Netherlands and characterized by five compartments (air, water, sediments, soil and vegetation). Quantitative structure-fate relationship (QSFR) models to predict mass ratios in different compartments were developed with support vector regression algorithms. A set of molecular descriptors, including the molecular weight and 38 counts of molecular constituents were adopted to characterize the chemical space. Out of the 455 chemicals, 375 were used for training and testing the QSFR models, while 80 were excluded from model development and were used as an external validation set. Training and test chemicals were selected and the domain of applicability (DOA) of the QSFRs established by means of self-organizing maps according to structural similarity. Best results were obtained with QSFR models developed for chemicals belonging to either the class [C] and [C; O], or the class with at least one heteroatom different than oxygen in the structure. These two class-specific models, with respectively 146 and 229 chemicals, showed a predictive squared coefficient of q(2) ≥ 0.90 both for air and water, which respectively dropped to q(2)≈ 0.70 and 0.40 for outlying chemicals. Prediction errors were of the same order of magnitude as the deviations associated to the uncertainty of the

  1. A Ranking Approach on Large-Scale Graph With Multidimensional Heterogeneous Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Gao, Bin; Liu, Tie-Yan; Wang, Taifeng; Li, Guohui; Li, Hang

    2016-04-01

    Graph-based ranking has been extensively studied and frequently applied in many applications, such as webpage ranking. It aims at mining potentially valuable information from the raw graph-structured data. Recently, with the proliferation of rich heterogeneous information (e.g., node/edge features and prior knowledge) available in many real-world graphs, how to effectively and efficiently leverage all information to improve the ranking performance becomes a new challenging problem. Previous methods only utilize part of such information and attempt to rank graph nodes according to link-based methods, of which the ranking performances are severely affected by several well-known issues, e.g., over-fitting or high computational complexity, especially when the scale of graph is very large. In this paper, we address the large-scale graph-based ranking problem and focus on how to effectively exploit rich heterogeneous information of the graph to improve the ranking performance. Specifically, we propose an innovative and effective semi-supervised PageRank (SSP) approach to parameterize the derived information within a unified semi-supervised learning framework (SSLF-GR), then simultaneously optimize the parameters and the ranking scores of graph nodes. Experiments on the real-world large-scale graphs demonstrate that our method significantly outperforms the algorithms that consider such graph information only partially.

  2. Federating distributed and heterogeneous information sources in neuroimaging: the NeuroBase Project.

    OpenAIRE

    Barillot, Christian; Benali, Habib; Dojat, Michel; Gaignard, Alban; Gibaud, Bernard; Kinkingnéhun, Serge; Matsumoto, Jean-Pierre; Pélégrini-Issac, Mélanie; Simon, Eric; Temal, Lynda

    2006-01-01

    The NeuroBase project aims at studying the requirements for federating, through the Internet, information sources in neuroimaging. These sources are distributed in different experimental sites, hospitals or research centers in cognitive neurosciences, and contain heterogeneous data and image processing programs. More precisely, this project consists in creating of a shared ontology, suitable for supporting various neuroimaging applications, and a computer architecture for accessing and sharin...

  3. [Development of a Web-based laboratory data browser integrated with heterogeneous clinical information].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujikawa, Jun

    2009-02-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of a Web-based laboratory data browser integrated with heterogeneous clinical information in a hospital setting. A Java-based web application was developed in-house, using free open-source software. The server side manages queries to heterogeneous hospital databases containing patient data. Order entry information including laboratory test results, drug prescriptions, injection orders, physiological test orders and, imaging test orders, was retrieved from a replication database, and integrated with nursing data from a nursing system database. The result was visualized in a time-series table format, and accessed by web browsers on computers connected to the hospital intranet. The laboratory data browser system achieved practical response times over huge databases (> 90 million records). The medical personnel accepted the system well, and applied the system to various clinical situations. Integrating heterogeneous data from hospital databases in a Web-based laboratory data browser is a practical approach. Presenting relevant medical information simultaneously added value to the laboratory data, and may promote better medical management.

  4. Developing Verification Systems for Building Information Models of Heritage Buildings with Heterogeneous Datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, L.; Fai, S.

    2017-08-01

    The digitization and abstraction of existing buildings into building information models requires the translation of heterogeneous datasets that may include CAD, technical reports, historic texts, archival drawings, terrestrial laser scanning, and photogrammetry into model elements. In this paper, we discuss a project undertaken by the Carleton Immersive Media Studio (CIMS) that explored the synthesis of heterogeneous datasets for the development of a building information model (BIM) for one of Canada's most significant heritage assets - the Centre Block of the Parliament Hill National Historic Site. The scope of the project included the development of an as-found model of the century-old, six-story building in anticipation of specific model uses for an extensive rehabilitation program. The as-found Centre Block model was developed in Revit using primarily point cloud data from terrestrial laser scanning. The data was captured by CIMS in partnership with Heritage Conservation Services (HCS), Public Services and Procurement Canada (PSPC), using a Leica C10 and P40 (exterior and large interior spaces) and a Faro Focus (small to mid-sized interior spaces). Secondary sources such as archival drawings, photographs, and technical reports were referenced in cases where point cloud data was not available. As a result of working with heterogeneous data sets, a verification system was introduced in order to communicate to model users/viewers the source of information for each building element within the model.

  5. Heterogeneous Multi-Robot System for Mapping Environmental Variables of Greenhouses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Jesús Roldán

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The productivity of greenhouses highly depends on the environmental conditions of crops, such as temperature and humidity. The control and monitoring might need large sensor networks, and as a consequence, mobile sensory systems might be a more suitable solution. This paper describes the application of a heterogeneous robot team to monitor environmental variables of greenhouses. The multi-robot system includes both ground and aerial vehicles, looking to provide flexibility and improve performance. The multi-robot sensory system measures the temperature, humidity, luminosity and carbon dioxide concentration in the ground and at different heights. Nevertheless, these measurements can be complemented with other ones (e.g., the concentration of various gases or images of crops without a considerable effort. Additionally, this work addresses some relevant challenges of multi-robot sensory systems, such as the mission planning and task allocation, the guidance, navigation and control of robots in greenhouses and the coordination among ground and aerial vehicles. This work has an eminently practical approach, and therefore, the system has been extensively tested both in simulations and field experiments.

  6. Heterogeneous Multi-Robot System for Mapping Environmental Variables of Greenhouses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldán, Juan Jesús; Garcia-Aunon, Pablo; Garzón, Mario; de León, Jorge; Del Cerro, Jaime; Barrientos, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    The productivity of greenhouses highly depends on the environmental conditions of crops, such as temperature and humidity. The control and monitoring might need large sensor networks, and as a consequence, mobile sensory systems might be a more suitable solution. This paper describes the application of a heterogeneous robot team to monitor environmental variables of greenhouses. The multi-robot system includes both ground and aerial vehicles, looking to provide flexibility and improve performance. The multi-robot sensory system measures the temperature, humidity, luminosity and carbon dioxide concentration in the ground and at different heights. Nevertheless, these measurements can be complemented with other ones (e.g., the concentration of various gases or images of crops) without a considerable effort. Additionally, this work addresses some relevant challenges of multi-robot sensory systems, such as the mission planning and task allocation, the guidance, navigation and control of robots in greenhouses and the coordination among ground and aerial vehicles. This work has an eminently practical approach, and therefore, the system has been extensively tested both in simulations and field experiments.

  7. Application of High Resolution Satellite Imagery to Characterize Individual-Based Environmental Heterogeneity in a Wild Blue Tit Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Szulkin

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Environmental heterogeneity in space and time plays a key role in influencing trait variability in animals, and can be particularly relevant to animal phenology. Until recently, the use of remotely sensed imagery in understanding animal variation was limited to analyses at the population level, largely because of a lack of high-resolution data that would allow inference at the individual level. We evaluated the potential of SPOT 4 (Take 5 satellite imagery data (with observations every fifth day at 20 m resolution and equivalent to acquisition parameters of Sentinel-2 in animal ecology research. We focused on blue tit Cyanistes caeruleus reproduction in a study site containing 227 nestboxes scattered in a Mediterranean forest dominated by deciduous downy oaks Quercus pubescens with a secondary cover of evergreen holm oaks Quercus ilex. We observed high congruence between ground data collected in a 50 m radius around each nestbox and NDVI values averaged across a 5 by 5 pixel grid centered around each nestbox of the study site. The number of deciduous and evergreen oaks around nestboxes explained up to 66% of variance in nestbox-centered, SPOT-derived NDVI values. We also found highly equivalent patterns of spatial autocorrelation for both ground- and satellite-derived indexes of environmental heterogeneity. For deciduous and evergreen oaks, the derived NDVI signal was highly distinctive in winter and early spring. June NDVI values for deciduous and evergreen oaks were higher by 58% and 8% relative to February values, respectively. The number of evergreen oaks was positively associated with later timing of breeding in blue tits. SPOT-derived, Sentinel-2 like imagery thus provided highly reliable, ground-validated information on habitat heterogeneity of direct relevance to a long-term field study of a free-living passerine bird. Given that the logistical demands of gathering ground data often limit our understanding of variation in animal

  8. Implementation of integrated heterogeneous electronic electrocardiography data into Maharaj Nakorn Chiang Mai Hospital Information System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khumrin, Piyapong; Chumpoo, Pitupoom

    2016-03-01

    Electrocardiography is one of the most important non-invasive diagnostic tools for diagnosing coronary heart disease. The electrocardiography information system in Maharaj Nakorn Chiang Mai Hospital required a massive manual labor effort. In this article, we propose an approach toward the integration of heterogeneous electrocardiography data and the implementation of an integrated electrocardiography information system into the existing Hospital Information System. The system integrates different electrocardiography formats into a consistent electrocardiography rendering by using Java software. The interface acts as middleware to seamlessly integrate different electrocardiography formats. Instead of using a common electrocardiography protocol, we applied a central format based on Java classes for mapping different electrocardiography formats which contains a specific parser for each electrocardiography format to acquire the same information. Our observations showed that the new system improved the effectiveness of data management, work flow, and data quality; increased the availability of information; and finally improved quality of care. © The Author(s) 2014.

  9. 10 CFR 51.67 - Environmental information concerning geologic repositories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Environmental information concerning geologic repositories. 51.67 Section 51.67 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... law, the Department of Energy may be required to supplement its final environmental impact statement...

  10. Environmental heterogeneity predicts species richness of freshwater mollusks in sub-Saharan Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauffe, T.; Schultheiß, R.; Van Bocxlaer, B.; Prömmel, K.; Albrecht, C.

    2016-09-01

    environmental heterogeneity is a principal driver of freshwater mollusk richness on a continental scale.

  11. TOXNET: A computerized collection of toxicological and environmental health information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonger, G C; Stroup, D; Thomas, P L; Wexler, P

    2000-01-01

    The Toxicology and Environmental Health Information Program, managed by the National Library of Medicine's Division of Specialized Information Services, provides access to a number of online bibliographic and factual computer files concerned with the toxicology, safety and handling, and environmental fate of chemicals, along with other files that cover genetic toxicology, developmental and reproductive toxicology, mutagenesis, carcinogenesis and toxic chemical releases.

  12. Social niche specialization under constraints: personality, social interactions and environmental heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montiglio, Pierre-Olivier; Ferrari, Caterina; Réale, Denis

    2013-05-19

    Several personality traits are mainly expressed in a social context, and others, which are not restricted to a social context, can be affected by the social interactions with conspecifics. In this paper, we focus on the recently proposed hypothesis that social niche specialization (i.e. individuals in a population occupy different social roles) can explain the maintenance of individual differences in personality. We first present ecological and social niche specialization hypotheses. In particular, we show how niche specialization can be quantified and highlight the link between personality differences and social niche specialization. We then review some ecological factors (e.g. competition and environmental heterogeneity) and the social mechanisms (e.g. frequency-dependent, state-dependent and social awareness) that may be associated with the evolution of social niche specialization and personality differences. Finally, we present a conceptual model and methods to quantify the contribution of ecological factors and social mechanisms to the dynamics between personality and social roles. In doing so, we suggest a series of research objectives to help empirical advances in this research area. Throughout this paper, we highlight empirical studies of social niche specialization in mammals, where available.

  13. Quantifying environmental heterogeneity : habitat size necessary for successful development of cod Gadus morhua eggs in the Baltic Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    MacKenzie, Brian; Hinrichsen, H.H.; Plikshs, M.

    2000-01-01

    Spatial and temporal variability in environmental factors can exert major influences on survival and growth of living organisms. However, in many key areas of fisheries science (e.g. growth, survival and recruitment determination), environmental heterogeneity is usually ignored because of insuffi......Spatial and temporal variability in environmental factors can exert major influences on survival and growth of living organisms. However, in many key areas of fisheries science (e.g. growth, survival and recruitment determination), environmental heterogeneity is usually ignored because...... of insufficient environmental or fisheries data or lack of evidence that such heterogeneity impacts response variables. For the eastern Baltic Sea (ICES Subdivisions 25 to 32), we evaluated spatial and temporal differences in conditions affecting the survival of cod Gadus morhua L, eggs at survival on four...... distinct spawning sites within the assessment area. We intercalibrated ways of quantifying the volume of water ('reproductive volume') at each site where salinity, oxygen and temperature conditions permitted successful egg development. We have developed and compared a time series (1952 to 1996...

  14. Does Formal Environmental Knowledge Inform the Everyday ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Data was collected through questionnaires, followed by focus group interviews with learners. The findings suggest that learners have sound theoretical knowledge and awareness of environmental problems, but are not action competent with regard to such problems. In the context of this study, formal knowledge therefore ...

  15. Distributed Input and State Estimation Using Local Information in Heterogeneous Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dzung Tran

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A new distributed input and state estimation architecture is introduced and analyzed for heterogeneous sensor networks. Specifically, nodes of a given sensor network are allowed to have heterogeneous information roles in the sense that a subset of nodes can be active (that is, subject to observations of a process of interest and the rest can be passive (that is, subject to no observation. Both fixed and varying active and passive roles of sensor nodes in the network are investigated. In addition, these nodes are allowed to have non-identical sensor modalities under the common underlying assumption that they have complimentary properties distributed over the sensor network to achieve collective observability. The key feature of our framework is that it utilizes local information not only during the execution of the proposed distributed input and state estimation architecture but also in its design in that global uniform ultimate boundedness of error dynamics is guaranteed once each node satisfies given local stability conditions independent from the graph topology and neighboring information of these nodes. As a special case (e.g., when all nodes are active and a positive real condition is satisfied, the asymptotic stability can be achieved with our algorithm. Several illustrative numerical examples are further provided to demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed architecture.

  16. A Methodology for Developing Environmental Information Systems with Software Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasiadis, Ioannis N.; Mitkas, Pericles A.

    This article presents a unifying methodology for developing environmental information systems with software agents. Based on the experience reported in recent literature, we abstract common requirements of environmental information systems into agent types, combine state-of-the-art tools from computer science, service-oriented software engineering and artificial intelligence domains, as software agents and machine learning, and illustrate their potential for solving real-world problems. Specifically, two generic agent types are specified that behave as information carriers and decision makers, which provide an appropriate abstraction for deployment of added-value services in environmental information systems.

  17. Environmental governance in the Information Age: the emergence of informational governance

    OpenAIRE

    Arthur P. J. Mol

    2006-01-01

    Castells’s influential work on the Information Age has hardly impacted on the environmental social sciences; and where it has, it has been mainly in terms of intrusions of global flows and networks in fragile environments. This paper explores to what extent and how environmental governance is changing under the conditions of the Information Age. On the waves of information and communication technologies and globalisation processes, a new informational mode of environmental governance—or infor...

  18. A cooperative, natural language environmental information system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, R. [IBM Deutschland GmbH, Heidelberg (Germany). Inst. for Knowledge Based Systems (IKBS); Kuepper, D.; Roesner, D. [Ulm Univ. (Germany). Forschungsinstitut fuer Anwendungsorientierte Wissensverarbeitung (FAW); Strobel, M. [IBM Deutschland GmbH, Heidelberg (Germany). Inst. for Knowledge Based Systems (IKBS)]|[Ulm Univ. (Germany). Forschungsinstitut fuer Anwendungsorientierte Wissensverarbeitung (FAW)

    1992-04-01

    This paper describes the extension of a natural language interface to relational databases with respect to its cooperative behavior. We argue that cooperative behavior is especially important for a complex domain such as environmental protection. In order to enrich traditional database reports our system- provides dialog-oriented features such as over-answering and handling of presupposition failure, as well as presentation-oriented features such as natural language responses and geographical maps. (orig.).

  19. Environmental heterogeneity generates opposite gene-by-environment interactions for two fitness-related traits within a population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culumber, Zachary W; Schumer, Molly; Monks, Scott; Tobler, Michael

    2015-02-01

    Theory predicts that environmental heterogeneity offers a potential solution to the maintenance of genetic variation within populations, but empirical evidence remains sparse. The live-bearing fish Xiphophorus variatus exhibits polymorphism at a single locus, with different alleles resulting in up to five distinct melanistic "tailspot" patterns within populations. We investigated the effects of heterogeneity in two ubiquitous environmental variables (temperature and food availability) on two fitness-related traits (upper thermal limits and body condition) in two different tailspot types (wild-type and upper cut crescent). We found gene-by-environment (G × E) interactions between tailspot type and food level affecting upper thermal limits (UTL), as well as between tailspot type and thermal environment affecting body condition. Exploring mechanistic bases underlying these G × E patterns, we found no differences between tailspot types in hsp70 gene expression despite significant overall increases in expression under both thermal and food stress. Similarly, there was no difference in routine metabolic rates between the tailspot types. The reversal of relative performance of the two tailspot types under different environmental conditions revealed a mechanism by which environmental heterogeneity can balance polymorphism within populations through selection on different fitness-related traits. © 2014 The Author(s). Evolution © 2014 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  20. Convergence to consensus in heterogeneous groups and the emergence of informal leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrilets, Sergey; Auerbach, Jeremy; van Vugt, Mark

    2016-07-14

    When group cohesion is essential, groups must have efficient strategies in place for consensus decision-making. Recent theoretical work suggests that shared decision-making is often the most efficient way for dealing with both information uncertainty and individual variation in preferences. However, some animal and most human groups make collective decisions through particular individuals, leaders, that have a disproportionate influence on group decision-making. To address this discrepancy between theory and data, we study a simple, but general, model that explicitly focuses on the dynamics of consensus building in groups composed by individuals who are heterogeneous in preferences, certain personality traits (agreeability and persuasiveness), reputation, and social networks. We show that within-group heterogeneity can significantly delay democratic consensus building as well as give rise to the emergence of informal leaders, i.e. individuals with a disproportionately large impact on group decisions. Our results thus imply strong benefits of leadership particularly when groups experience time pressure and significant conflict of interest between members (due to various between-individual differences). Overall, our models shed light on why leadership and decision-making hierarchies are widespread, especially in human groups.

  1. Environmental Decision Making and Information Technology: Issues Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barg, S.; Fletcher, T.; Mechling, J.; Tonn, B.; Turner, R.

    1999-05-01

    This report presents a summary of the Information Technology and Environmental Decision Making Workshop that was held at Harvard University, October 1-3, 1998. Over sixty participants from across the US took part in discussions that focused on the current practice of using information technology to support environmental decision making and on future considerations of information technology development, information policies, and data quality issues in this area. Current practice is focusing on geographic information systems and visualization tools, Internet applications, and data warehousing. In addition, numerous organizations are developing environmental enterprise systems to integrate environmental information resources. Plaguing these efforts are issues of data quality (and public trust), system design, and organizational change. In the future, much effort needs to focus on building community-based environmental decision-making systems and processes, which will be a challenge given that exactly what needs to be developed is largely unknown and that environmental decision making in this arena has been characterized by a high level of conflict. Experimentation and evaluation are needed to contribute to efficient and effective learning about how best to use information technology to improve environmental decision making.

  2. Heterogeneity in externalizing problems at age 3: Association with age 15 biological and environmental outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanti, Kostas A; Kimonis, Eva

    2017-07-01

    Investigating heterogeneity in antisocial behavior early in life is essential for understanding the etiology, development, prognosis, and treatment of these problems. Data from the longitudinal National Institute of Child Health and Development (NICHD) study of Early Child Care were used to identify homogeneous groups of young antisocial children differentiated on externalizing problems, internalizing problems, and callous-unemotional (CU) traits using latent profile analysis (LPA). We examined how identified subgroups were differentiated on adolescent social, biological, cognitive, and environmental outcomes, controlling for dispositional and contextual antecedents during the first 2 years of life. The sample consisted of 1,167 children (52% male) followed from toddlerhood to adolescence. LPA identified a large "low problems" group (n = 795; 49.9% male) as well as 3 antisocial groups at age 3: the first scored high on internalizing and externalizing problems but low on CU traits (Ext/Int, n = 125), the second scored high on CU traits and externalizing problems but low on internalizing problems (primary CU variant, n = 135), and the third scored high on CU traits, internalizing, and externalizing problems (secondary CU variant, n = 112), and these differences persisted into adolescence. Primary and secondary CU variants were further differentiated from one another on adolescent measures of aggression (reactive and relational), biological indices (cortisol, heart rate), cognitive abilities, and parental psychopathology, after controlling for early life risk factors (i.e., maternal sensitivity, difficult temperament, and maternal depression). We discuss implications of our findings for research, theory, and practice on early childhood externalizing problems. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Informing versus nudging in environmental policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ölander, Folke; Thøgersen, John

    2014-01-01

    Information has not been proven a very successful means to promote voluntary behaviour change to protect the environment. On this backcloth, there is currently increasing interest in recommendations from behavioural economics focusing on making the choice architecture more facilitating for the de...

  4. Informed Consent For Ablative Operations: Environmental Peculiarities

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Consenting for ablative surgery in our environment is very difficult. The fact that the concept of informed consent is based on patient's autonomy makes it even more frustrating in this environment. BODY: In this paper we have presented five patients in whom obtaining consent was particularly frustrating for ...

  5. An implementation assessment of China's Environmental Information Disclosure Decree

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, L.; Mol, A.P.J.; He, G.; Lu, Y.

    2010-01-01

    China's 2007 Open Government Information Regulations is widely considered as a milestone in the country's information policy history and is praised as a “sunshine program”. The Environmental Information Disclosure Decree was the first to operationalize these general regulations into a sectoral

  6. relative effect of environmental factors, information literacy, course of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Relative effect of environmental factors, information literacy, course of study and resources availability to Students use of University .... and it is gaining more prominence nowadays that the nature of information in the libraries is ... information and communication technology (ICT) facilities available in most university libraries ...

  7. A centralized information management system for environmental science and technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Namboodiri, K. [Martin Marietta Technical Services, Inc., Bay City, MI (United States)

    1995-12-31

    During the past few decades there have been several serious initiatives focusing on the applications of computational technology towards understanding the diverse fields of environmental research such as environmental monitoring, pollution prevention, and hazardous chemical mitigation. Recently, due to the widespread application of high performance computer technology and the renewed interest of the industrial community in environmental protection, we are witnessing an era of environmental information explosion. In light of these large-scale computer-driven developments, the author identifies a highly desirable initiative for this field, which is solely devoted to a centralized environmental database and information management system. This talk will focus on some design aspects of such an information management system.

  8. Integrating heterogeneous sequence information for transcriptome-wide microarray design; a Zebrafish example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Leeuw Wim C

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A complete gene-expression microarray should preferably detect all genomic sequences that can be expressed as RNA in an organism, i.e. the transcriptome. However, our knowledge of a transcriptome of any organism still is incomplete and transcriptome information is continuously being updated. Here, we present a strategy to integrate heterogeneous sequence information that can be used as input for an up-to-date microarray design. Findings Our algorithm consists of four steps. In the first step transcripts from different resources are grouped into Transcription Clusters (TCs by looking at the similarity of all transcripts. TCs are groups of transcripts with a similar length. If a transcript is much smaller than a TC to which it is highly similar, it will be annotated as a subsequence of that TC and is used for probe design only if the probe designed for the TC does not query the subsequence. Secondly, all TCs are mapped to a genome assembly and gene information is added to the design. Thirdly TC members are ranked according to their trustworthiness and the most reliable sequence is used for the probe design. The last step is the actual array design. We have used this strategy to build an up-to-date zebrafish microarray. Conclusions With our strategy and the software developed, it is possible to use a set of heterogeneous transcript resources for microarray design, reduce the number of candidate target sequences on which the design is based and reduce redundancy. By changing the parameters in the procedure it is possible to control the similarity within the TCs and thus the amount of candidate sequences for the design. The annotation of the microarray is carried out simultaneously with the design.

  9. Spatial information in public consultation within environmental impact assessments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mwenda, A.N.

    2015-01-01

    Thesis Summary Spatial information in public consultation within Environmental Impact Assessments Angela N. Mwenda Established in the United States of America in 1970, Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) is an interdisciplinary approach that considers the anticipated impacts of

  10. Equilibria, information and frustration in heterogeneous network games with conflicting preferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoli, M.; Sánchez, A.

    2017-11-01

    Interactions between people are the basis on which the structure of our society arises as a complex system and, at the same time, are the starting point of any physical description of it. In the last few years, much theoretical research has addressed this issue by combining the physics of complex networks with a description of interactions in terms of evolutionary game theory. We here take this research a step further by introducing a most salient societal factor such as the individuals’ preferences, a characteristic that is key to understanding much of the social phenomenology these days. We consider a heterogeneous, agent-based model in which agents interact strategically with their neighbors, but their preferences and payoffs for the possible actions differ. We study how such a heterogeneous network behaves under evolutionary dynamics and different strategic interactions, namely coordination games and best shot games. With this model we study the emergence of the equilibria predicted analytically in random graphs under best response dynamics, and we extend this test to unexplored contexts like proportional imitation and scale free networks. We show that some theoretically predicted equilibria do not arise in simulations with incomplete information, and we demonstrate the importance of the graph topology and the payoff function parameters for some games. Finally, we discuss our results with the available experimental evidence on coordination games, showing that our model agrees better with the experiment than standard economic theories, and draw hints as to how to maximize social efficiency in situations of conflicting preferences.

  11. An Optimal Joint User Association and Power Allocation Algorithm for Secrecy Information Transmission in Heterogeneous Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Chai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, heterogeneous radio access technologies have experienced rapid development and gradually achieved effective coordination and integration, resulting in heterogeneous networks (HetNets. In this paper, we consider the downlink secure transmission of HetNets where the information transmission from base stations (BSs to legitimate users is subject to the interception of eavesdroppers. In particular, we stress the problem of joint user association and power allocation of the BSs. To achieve data transmission in a secure and energy efficient manner, we introduce the concept of secrecy energy efficiency which is defined as the ratio of the secrecy transmission rate and power consumption of the BSs and formulate the problem of joint user association and power allocation as an optimization problem which maximizes the joint secrecy energy efficiency of all the BSs under the power constraint of the BSs and the minimum data rate constraint of user equipment (UE. By equivalently transforming the optimization problem into two subproblems, that is, power allocation subproblem and user association subproblem of the BSs, and applying iterative method and Kuhn-Munkres (K-M algorithm to solve the two subproblems, respectively, the optimal user association and power allocation strategies can be obtained. Numerical results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm outperforms previously proposed algorithms.

  12. TNX Burying Ground: Environmental information document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunaway, J.K.W.; Johnson, W.F.; Kingley, L.E.; Simmons, R.V.; Bledsoe, H.W.

    1987-03-01

    The TNX Burying Ground, located within the TNX Area of the Savannah River Plant (SRP), was originally built to dispose of debris from an experimental evaporator explosion at TNX in 1953. This evaporator contained approximately 590 kg of uranyl nitrate. From 1980 to 1984, much of the waste material buried at TNX was excavated and sent to the SRP Radioactive Waste Burial Grounds for reburial. An estimated 27 kg of uranyl nitrate remains buried at TNX. The TNX Burying Ground consists of three sites known to contain waste and one site suspected of containing waste material. All four sites are located within the TNX security fenceline. Groundwater at the TNX Burying Ground was not evaluated because there are no groundwater monitoring wells installed in the immediate vicinity of this waste site. The closure options considered for the TNX Burying Ground are waste removal and closure, no waste removal and closure, and no action. The predominant pathways for human exposure to chemical and/or radioactive constituents are through surface, subsurface, and atmospheric transport. Modeling calculations were made to determine the risks to human population via these general pathways for the three postulated closure options. An ecological assessment was conducted to predict the environmental impacts on aquatic and terrestrial biota. The relative costs for each of the closure options were estimated.

  13. Consumer Preferences, Ecolabels, and the Effects of Negative Environmental Information

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Xianwen; Alfnes, Frode; Rickertsen, Kyrre

    2014-01-01

    Consumers prefer ecolabeled products. However, little is known about the effects of ecolabels when consumers are simultaneously exposed to negative environmental information. We conducted a stated choice experiment in France with eight fish products that were either ecolabeled or unlabeled. Four types of negative information concerning the potential negative environmental consequences of catching wild fish or producing farmed fish were randomly administered to the participants. The data were ...

  14. Contrasting effects of spatial heterogeneity and environmental stochasticity on population dynamics of a perennial wildflower

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Crone, Elizabeth E; Griffith, Alden

    2016-01-01

    ... (spatial heterogeneity) are less clearly defined. I evaluated the effects of spatial and temporal variation on the population dynamics of Pulsatilla patens , pasqueflower, a perennial prairie forb. I conducted a 10...

  15. Explaining heterogeneity in disability with major depressive disorder : Effects of personal and environmental characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verboom, C.E.; Sentse, M.; Sijtsema, J.J.; Nolen, W.A.; Ormel, J.; Penninx, B.W.

    Background: Major depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with disability, yet some patients function surprisingly well. The reason for this heterogeneity between patients is unclear. Building on the International Classification of Functioning (ICE) model, this study aims to examine effects of

  16. Environmental scanning as information seeking and organizational learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental scanning is the acquisition and use of information about events, trends, and relationships in an organization's external environment, the knowledge of which would assist management in planning the organization's future course of action. Depending on the organization's beliefs about environmental analyzability and the extent that it intrudes into the environment to understand it, four modes of scanning may be differentiated: undirected viewing, conditioned viewing, enacting, and searching. We analyze each mode of scanning by examining its characteristic information needs, information seeking, and information use behaviours. In addition, we analyze organizational learning processes by considering the sensemaking, knowledge creating and decision making processes at work in each mode.

  17. Influence of neighbourhood information on 'Local Climate Zone' mapping in heterogeneous cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdonck, Marie-Leen; Okujeni, Akpona; van der Linden, Sebastian; Demuzere, Matthias; De Wulf, Robert; Van Coillie, Frieke

    2017-10-01

    Local climate zone (LCZ) mapping is an emerging field in urban climate research. LCZs potentially provide an objective framework to assess urban form and function worldwide. The scheme is currently being used to globally map LCZs as a part of the World Urban Database and Access Portal Tools (WUDAPT) initiative. So far, most of the LCZ maps lack proper quantitative assessment, challenging the generic character of the WUDAPT workflow. Using the standard method introduced by the WUDAPT community difficulties arose concerning the built zones due to high levels of heterogeneity. To overcome this problem a contextual classifier is adopted in the mapping process. This paper quantitatively assesses the influence of neighbourhood information on the LCZ mapping result of three cities in Belgium: Antwerp, Brussels and Ghent. Overall accuracies for the maps were respectively 85.7 ± 0.5, 79.6 ± 0.9, 90.2 ± 0.4%. The approach presented here results in overall accuracies of 93.6 ± 0.2, 92.6 ± 0.3 and 95.6 ± 0.3% for Antwerp, Brussels and Ghent. The results thus indicate a positive influence of neighbourhood information for all study areas with an increase in overall accuracies of 7.9, 13.0 and 5.4%. This paper reaches two main conclusions. Firstly, evidence was introduced on the relevance of a quantitative accuracy assessment in LCZ mapping, showing that the accuracies reported in previous papers are not easily achieved. Secondly, the method presented in this paper proves to be highly effective in Belgian cities, and given its open character shows promise for application in other heterogeneous cities worldwide.

  18. A Semantic Registry Method Using Sensor Metadata Ontology to Manage Heterogeneous Sensor Information in the Geospatial Sensor Web

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changjiang Xiao

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Efficient information management and precise discovery of heterogeneous sensors in the Geospatial Sensor Web (GSW are a major challenge. Intelligent sensor management requires a registry service to store and process sensor information efficiently. In this paper, we propose a Sensor Metadata Ontology (SMO to achieve a unified semantic description for heterogeneous sensors that is used to express sensor semantics. Through mapping between the sensor registry information model and the SMO, the sensor metadata could be stored with semantic information for the registry. The framework of a Sensor Semantic Registry Service (SSRS has been successfully implemented for the registration and discovery of heterogeneous sensors. The results of GEOSENSOR-SSRS experiments show that the proposed semantic registry method can be used to enable sharing in an open distributed sensor network as well as to promote accuracy and efficiency of discovery.

  19. Environmental Cost Accounting Information and Strategic Business Decision in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebipanipre Gabriel Mieseigha

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at examining environmental cost accounting information and strategic business decision in Nigeria. The general assumption that conventional cost accounting does not have the ability to provide absolute information for evaluating the environmental behaviour of an organization and its economic consequences has motivated this study. Towards achieving this, secondary data was employed and a linear model was specified. Findings indicated that environmental cost accounting information as it relates to strategic business decision is valuerelevant. It was on this note that we recommended firms to constantly reposition their accounting system in order to provide information on environmental costs so that the true costs in an organization can be ascertained and properly allocated. Also, due attention should be paid to waste management costs, employee health costs, investment financing costs, compliance and environmental costs and all environmental related costs by manufacturing concerns since they influence strategic decision. Our study is one of those that have explored the issue of environmental cost accounting relevance in strategic business decision in the Nigerian context.

  20. Environmental Cost Accounting Information and Strategic Business Decision in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebipanipre Gabriel Mieseigha

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at examining environmental cost accounting information and strategic business decision in Nigeria. The general assumption that conventional cost accounting does not have the ability to provide absolute information for evaluating the environmental behaviour of an organization and its economic consequences has motivated this study. Towards achieving this, secondary data was employed and a linear model was specified. Findings indicated that environmental cost accounting information as it relates to strategic business decision is valuerelevant. It was on this note that we recommended firms to constantly reposition their accounting system in order to provide information on environmental costs so that the true costs in an organization can be ascertained and properly allocated. Also, due attention should be paid to waste management costs, employee health costs, investment financing costs, compliance and environmental costs and all environmental related costs by manufacturing concerns since they influence strategic decision. Our study is one of those that have explored the issue of environmental cost accounting relevance in strategic business decision in the Nigerian context.

  1. Integrating Environmental and Information Systems Management: An Enterprise Architecture Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noran, Ovidiu

    Environmental responsibility is fast becoming an important aspect of strategic management as the reality of climate change settles in and relevant regulations are expected to tighten significantly in the near future. Many businesses react to this challenge by implementing environmental reporting and management systems. However, the environmental initiative is often not properly integrated in the overall business strategy and its information system (IS) and as a result the management does not have timely access to (appropriately aggregated) environmental information. This chapter argues for the benefit of integrating the environmental management (EM) project into the ongoing enterprise architecture (EA) initiative present in all successful companies. This is done by demonstrating how a reference architecture framework and a meta-methodology using EA artefacts can be used to co-design the EM system, the organisation and its IS in order to achieve a much needed synergy.

  2. Homeland situation awareness through mining and fusing heterogeneous information from intelligence databases and field sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digioia, Giusj; Panzieri, Stefano

    2012-06-01

    One of the most felt issues in the defence domain is that of having huge quantities of data stored in databases and acquired from field sensors, without being able to infer information from them. Usually databases are continuously updated with observations, and are related to heterogeneous data. Deep and continuous analysis on data could mine useful correlations, explain relations existing among data and cue searches for further evidences. The solution to the problem addressed before seems to deal both with the domain of Data Mining and with the domain of high level Data Fusion, that is Situation Assessment, Threat Assessment and Process Refinement, also synthesised as Situation Awareness. The focus of this paper is the definition of an architecture for a system adopting data mining techniques to adaptively discover clusters of information and relation among them, to classify observations acquired and to use the model of knowledge and the classification derived in order to assess situations, threats and refine the search for evidences. Sources of information taken into account are those related to the intelligence domain, as IMINT, HUMINT, ELINT, COMINT and other non-conventional sources. The algorithms applied refer to not supervised and supervised classification for rule exploitation, and adaptively built Hidden Markov Model for situation and threat assessment.

  3. Environmental information document: Savannah River Laboratory Seepage Basins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, B.F.; Looney, B.B.; Simmons, R.V.; Bledsoe, H.W.

    1987-03-01

    This document provides environmental information on postulated closure options for the Savannah River Laboratory Seepage Basins at the Savannah River Plant and was developed as background technical documentation for the Department of Energy`s proposed Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) on waste management activities for groundwater protection at the plant. The results of groundwater and atmospheric pathway analyses, accident analysis, and other environmental assessments discussed in this document are based upon a conservative analysis of all foreseeable scenarios as defined by the National Environmental Policy Act (CFR, 1986). The scenarios do not necessarily represent actual environmental conditions. This document is not meant to be used as a closure plan or other regulatory document to comply with required federal or state environmental regulations.

  4. The Value Relevance of Environmental Responsibility Information Disclosure in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Chiedu Oba

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Nigeria firms are facing the challenge of discharging sound environmental practices anddisclosing environmental information in order to meet upwith public concerns regarding these issues.This study basically investigates the association between environmental responsibility informationdisclosure and financial performance. To achieve the objective of this study, eighteen listed firmswere randomly selected from four environmentally sensitive industries for the year 2005–2009.Using the ordinary least square and logistic regression to test the research proposition, the studyobserved that there is a positive significant association between environmental responsibility andfinancial performance and vice versa. Additionally, foreign directors were found to play significantroles in these interactions. The paper therefore calls for an embrace of sound environmental policiesand disclosure practices by Nigerian firms and also recommends further research into associatedexplanatory factors and disclosure practices.

  5. Heterogeneity in the development of proactive and reactive aggression in childhood: Common and specific genetic - environmental factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquin, Stéphane; Lacourse, Eric; Brendgen, Mara; Vitaro, Frank; Dionne, Ginette; Tremblay, Richard Ernest; Boivin, Michel

    2017-01-01

    Few studies are grounded in a developmental framework to study proactive and reactive aggression. Furthermore, although distinctive correlates, predictors and outcomes have been highlighted, proactive and reactive aggression are substantially correlated. To our knowledge, no empirical study has examined the communality of genetic and environmental underpinning of the development of both subtypes of aggression. The current study investigated the communality and specificity of genetic-environmental factors related to heterogeneity in proactive and reactive aggression's development throughout childhood. Participants were 223 monozygotic and 332 dizygotic pairs. Teacher reports of aggression were obtained at 6, 7, 9, 10 and 12 years of age. Joint development of both phenotypes were analyzed through a multivariate latent growth curve model. Set point, differentiation, and genetic maturation/environmental modulation hypotheses were tested using a biometric decomposition of intercepts and slopes. Common genetic factors accounted for 64% of the total variation of proactive and reactive aggression's intercepts. Two other sets of uncorrelated genetic factors accounted for reactive aggression's intercept (17%) on the one hand, and for proactive (43%) and reactive (13%) aggression's slopes on the other. Common shared environmental factors were associated with proactive aggression's intercept (21%) and slope (26%) and uncorrelated shared environmental factors were also associated with reactive aggression's slope (14%). Common nonshared environmental factors explained most of the remaining variability of proactive and reactive aggression slopes. A genetic differentiation hypothesis common to both phenotypes was supported by common genetic factors associated with the developmental heterogeneity of proactive and reactive aggression in childhood. A genetic maturation hypothesis common to both phenotypes, albeit stronger for proactive aggression, was supported by common genetic

  6. Heterogeneity in the development of proactive and reactive aggression in childhood: Common and specific genetic - environmental factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Paquin

    Full Text Available Few studies are grounded in a developmental framework to study proactive and reactive aggression. Furthermore, although distinctive correlates, predictors and outcomes have been highlighted, proactive and reactive aggression are substantially correlated. To our knowledge, no empirical study has examined the communality of genetic and environmental underpinning of the development of both subtypes of aggression. The current study investigated the communality and specificity of genetic-environmental factors related to heterogeneity in proactive and reactive aggression's development throughout childhood.Participants were 223 monozygotic and 332 dizygotic pairs. Teacher reports of aggression were obtained at 6, 7, 9, 10 and 12 years of age. Joint development of both phenotypes were analyzed through a multivariate latent growth curve model. Set point, differentiation, and genetic maturation/environmental modulation hypotheses were tested using a biometric decomposition of intercepts and slopes.Common genetic factors accounted for 64% of the total variation of proactive and reactive aggression's intercepts. Two other sets of uncorrelated genetic factors accounted for reactive aggression's intercept (17% on the one hand, and for proactive (43% and reactive (13% aggression's slopes on the other. Common shared environmental factors were associated with proactive aggression's intercept (21% and slope (26% and uncorrelated shared environmental factors were also associated with reactive aggression's slope (14%. Common nonshared environmental factors explained most of the remaining variability of proactive and reactive aggression slopes.A genetic differentiation hypothesis common to both phenotypes was supported by common genetic factors associated with the developmental heterogeneity of proactive and reactive aggression in childhood. A genetic maturation hypothesis common to both phenotypes, albeit stronger for proactive aggression, was supported by common

  7. Effects of environmental information dissemination and use on food ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of environmental information dissemination and use on food security in Gwagwalada area council of federal capital territory (FCT) Abuja Nigeria. ... The major challenges are funding, poor access road and illiteracy on the part of the people of the area for whom the information is meant. Key words: Environment ...

  8. The Spatial Heterogeneity between Japanese Encephalitis Incidence Distribution and Environmental Variables in Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Impoinvil, Daniel E.; Solomon, Tom; Schluter, W. William; Rayamajhi, Ajit; Bichha, Ram Padarath; Shakya, Geeta; Caminade, Cyril; Baylis, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Background To identify potential environmental drivers of Japanese Encephalitis virus (JE) transmission in Nepal, we conducted an ecological study to determine the spatial association between 2005 Nepal JE incidence, and climate, agricultural, and land-cover variables at district level. Methods District-level data on JE cases were examined using Local Indicators of Spatial Association (LISA) analysis to identify spatial clusters from 2004 to 2008 and 2005 data was used to fit a spatial lag regression model with climate, agriculture and land-cover variables. Results Prior to 2006, there was a single large cluster of JE cases located in the Far-West and Mid-West terai regions of Nepal. After 2005, the distribution of JE cases in Nepal shifted with clusters found in the central hill areas. JE incidence during the 2005 epidemic had a stronger association with May mean monthly temperature and April mean monthly total precipitation compared to mean annual temperature and precipitation. A parsimonious spatial lag regression model revealed, 1) a significant negative relationship between JE incidence and April precipitation, 2) a significant positive relationship between JE incidence and percentage of irrigated land 3) a non-significant negative relationship between JE incidence and percentage of grassland cover, and 4) a unimodal non-significant relationship between JE Incidence and pig-to-human ratio. Conclusion JE cases clustered in the terai prior to 2006 where it seemed to shift to the Kathmandu region in subsequent years. The spatial pattern of JE cases during the 2005 epidemic in Nepal was significantly associated with low precipitation and the percentage of irrigated land. Despite the availability of an effective vaccine, it is still important to understand environmental drivers of JEV transmission since the enzootic cycle of JEV transmission is not likely to be totally interrupted. Understanding the spatial dynamics of JE risk factors may be useful in providing

  9. The spatial heterogeneity between Japanese encephalitis incidence distribution and environmental variables in Nepal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel E Impoinvil

    Full Text Available To identify potential environmental drivers of Japanese Encephalitis virus (JE transmission in Nepal, we conducted an ecological study to determine the spatial association between 2005 Nepal JE incidence, and climate, agricultural, and land-cover variables at district level.District-level data on JE cases were examined using Local Indicators of Spatial Association (LISA analysis to identify spatial clusters from 2004 to 2008 and 2005 data was used to fit a spatial lag regression model with climate, agriculture and land-cover variables.Prior to 2006, there was a single large cluster of JE cases located in the Far-West and Mid-West terai regions of Nepal. After 2005, the distribution of JE cases in Nepal shifted with clusters found in the central hill areas. JE incidence during the 2005 epidemic had a stronger association with May mean monthly temperature and April mean monthly total precipitation compared to mean annual temperature and precipitation. A parsimonious spatial lag regression model revealed, 1 a significant negative relationship between JE incidence and April precipitation, 2 a significant positive relationship between JE incidence and percentage of irrigated land 3 a non-significant negative relationship between JE incidence and percentage of grassland cover, and 4 a unimodal non-significant relationship between JE Incidence and pig-to-human ratio.JE cases clustered in the terai prior to 2006 where it seemed to shift to the Kathmandu region in subsequent years. The spatial pattern of JE cases during the 2005 epidemic in Nepal was significantly associated with low precipitation and the percentage of irrigated land. Despite the availability of an effective vaccine, it is still important to understand environmental drivers of JEV transmission since the enzootic cycle of JEV transmission is not likely to be totally interrupted. Understanding the spatial dynamics of JE risk factors may be useful in providing important information to the

  10. The Use of Coumarins as Environmentally-Sensitive Fluorescent Probes of Heterogeneous Inclusion Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian D. Wagner

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Coumarins, as a family of molecules, exhibit a wide range of fluorescence emission properties. In many cases, this fluorescence is extremely sensitive to the local environment of the molecule, especially the local polarity and microviscosity. In addition, coumarins show a wide range of size, shape, and hydrophobicity. These properties make them especially useful as fluorescent probes of heterogeneous environments, such as supramolecular host cavities, micelles, polymers and solids. This article will review the use of coumarins to probe such heterogeneous systems using fluorescence spectroscopy.

  11. Implementing informative priors for heterogeneity in meta-analysis using meta-regression and pseudo data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Kirsty M; Turner, Rebecca M; White, Ian R; Jackson, Dan; Spiegelhalter, David J; Higgins, Julian P T

    2016-12-20

    Many meta-analyses combine results from only a small number of studies, a situation in which the between-study variance is imprecisely estimated when standard methods are applied. Bayesian meta-analysis allows incorporation of external evidence on heterogeneity, providing the potential for more robust inference on the effect size of interest. We present a method for performing Bayesian meta-analysis using data augmentation, in which we represent an informative conjugate prior for between-study variance by pseudo data and use meta-regression for estimation. To assist in this, we derive predictive inverse-gamma distributions for the between-study variance expected in future meta-analyses. These may serve as priors for heterogeneity in new meta-analyses. In a simulation study, we compare approximate Bayesian methods using meta-regression and pseudo data against fully Bayesian approaches based on importance sampling techniques and Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC). We compare the frequentist properties of these Bayesian methods with those of the commonly used frequentist DerSimonian and Laird procedure. The method is implemented in standard statistical software and provides a less complex alternative to standard MCMC approaches. An importance sampling approach produces almost identical results to standard MCMC approaches, and results obtained through meta-regression and pseudo data are very similar. On average, data augmentation provides closer results to MCMC, if implemented using restricted maximum likelihood estimation rather than DerSimonian and Laird or maximum likelihood estimation. The methods are applied to real datasets, and an extension to network meta-analysis is described. The proposed method facilitates Bayesian meta-analysis in a way that is accessible to applied researchers. © 2016 The Authors. Statistics in Medicine Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. © 2016 The Authors. Statistics in Medicine Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. How strategic environmental assessment can inform lenders about potential environmental risks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banhalmi-Zakar, Zsuzsa; Larsen, Sanne Vammen

    2015-01-01

    -makers, planners, government authorities and environmental practitioners in improving developmental outcomes, aiming to facilitate the transition to sustainable development. We propose that SEA may also be a valuable tool for banks because it has the capacity to provide information about environmental risks...

  13. Heterogeneity in Externalizing Problems at Age 3: Association with Age 15 Biological and Environmental Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanti, Kostas A.; Kimonis, Eva

    2017-01-01

    Investigating heterogeneity in antisocial behavior early in life is essential for understanding the etiology, development, prognosis, and treatment of these problems. Data from the longitudinal National Institute of Child Health and Development (NICHD) study of Early Child Care were used to identify homogeneous groups of young antisocial children…

  14. Highly diverse and spatially heterogeneous mycorrhizal symbiosis in a rare epiphyte is unrelated to broad biogeographic or environmental features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartzinel, Tyler R; Trapnell, Dorset W; Shefferson, Richard P

    2013-12-01

    Symbiotic interactions are common in nature. In dynamic or degraded environments, the ability to associate with multiple partners (i.e. broad specificity) may enable species to persist through fluctuations in the availability of any particular partner. Understanding how species interactions vary across landscapes is necessary to anticipate direct and indirect consequences of environmental degradation on species conservation. We asked whether mycorrhizal symbiosis by populations of a rare epiphytic orchid (Epidendrum firmum) is related to geographic or environmental heterogeneity. The latter would suggest that interactions are governed by environmental conditions rather than historic isolation of populations and/or mycorrhizal fungi. We used DNA-based methods to identify mycorrhizal fungi from eleven E. firmum populations in Costa Rica. We used molecular and phylogenetic analyses to compare associations. Epidendrum firmum exhibited broad specificity, associating with diverse mycorrhizal fungi, including six Tulasnellaceae molecular operational taxonomic units (MOTUs), five Sebacinales MOTUs and others. Notably, diverse mycorrhizal symbioses formed in disturbed pasture and roadside habitats. Mycorrhizal fungi exhibited significant similarity within populations (spatial and phylogenetic autocorrelation) and significant differences among populations (phylogenetic community dissimilarity). However, mycorrhizal symbioses were not significantly associated with biogeographic or environmental features. Such unexpected heterogeneity among populations may result from complex combinations of fine-scale environmental factors and macro-evolutionary patterns of change in mycorrhizal specificity. Thus, E. firmum exhibits broad specificity and the potential for opportunistic associations with diverse fungi. We suggest that these characteristics could confer symbiotic assurance when mycorrhizal fungi are stochastically available, which may be crucial in dynamic or disturbed

  15. Spectroscopy in heterogenous media and applications for bioprocess and environmental monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Frank Schael; Oliver Reich; Sonja Engelhard

    2002-01-01

    Diffuse reflectance measurements and photon migration studies with near infrared (NIR) diode lasers were employed to elucidate experimental methods for determining absorption and scattering coefficients and species concentrations in heterogenous media. Measurements were performed at a number of wavelengths utilizing several laser sources some of which were widely tunable. In order to establish the applicability of simple photon migration models derived from radiation transport theory and to c...

  16. Fuselets: an agent based architecture for fusion of heterogeneous information and data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyerer, Jürgen; Heizmann, Michael; Sander, Jennifer

    2006-04-01

    A new architecture for fusing information and data from heterogeneous sources is proposed. The approach takes criminalistics as a model. In analogy to the work of detectives, who attempt to investigate crimes, software agents are initiated that pursue clues and try to consolidate or to dismiss hypotheses. Like their human pendants, they can, if questions beyond their competences arise, consult expert agents. Within the context of a certain task, region, and time interval, specialized operations are applied to each relevant information source, e.g. IMINT, SIGINT, ACINT,..., HUMINT, data bases etc. in order to establish hit lists of first clues. Each clue is described by its pertaining facts, uncertainties, and dependencies in form of a local degree-of-belief (DoB) distribution in a Bayesian sense. For each clue an agent is initiated which cooperates with other agents and experts. Expert agents support to make use of different information sources. Consultations of experts, capable to access certain information sources, result in changes of the DoB of the pertaining clue. According to the significance of concentration of their DoB distribution clues are abandoned or pursued further to formulate task specific hypotheses. Communications between the agents serve to find out whether different clues belong to the same cause and thus can be put together. At the end of the investigation process, the different hypotheses are evaluated by a jury and a final report is created that constitutes the fusion result. The approach proposed avoids calculating global DoB distributions by adopting a local Bayesian approximation and thus reduces the complexity of the exact problem essentially. Different information sources are transformed into DoB distributions using the maximum entropy paradigm and considering known facts as constraints. Nominal, ordinal and cardinal quantities can be treated within this framework equally. The architecture is scalable by tailoring the number of agents

  17. Citizen Participation, Access to Environmental Information and Education in Uruguayan Environmental Law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo Iglesias Rossini

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Our country has followed a clear trend towards the recognition of various mechanisms of citizen participation and access to public information regarding environmental issues A few years ago, if, for instance, a person or group of people, concerned about the potential environmental impact caused by the establishment of a factory in their neighborhood, requested information from the Authorities, such request would have most likely been rejected. At present, there is a clear law-making policy towards acknowledging the possibility for a diversity of social players to be involved at different levels. In a State structured under a social rule of law, both community participation and civil society access to information in possession of the State, regarding issues that may affect the environment, are fundamental rights. Both concepts, information and participation, must go hand in hand, as the first operates as a condition to exercise the second. Civil society involvement in an environmental issue could never occur if, for instance, information held by the Government is not made available. In addition to protecting fundamental human rights, these concepts are enshrined in participatory democracy. They also enable civil society to be involved in environmental pollution issues. This paper is intended to provide a detailed research on the different instruments enshrining citizen participation and access to public information about environmental issues.

  18. Environmental stress induced by the tumor bed effect leads to subpopulation exclusion within heterogeneous neoplasms: modeling studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelson, S.; Leith, J.T.

    1988-09-01

    Three nested mathematical models were used to describe the compositional stability of subpopulations within artificial heterogeneous neoplasms in a stressed environment. The first models a microecology in which each subpopulation grows independently and no competition for resources occurs. In the second model, subpopulations compete for common resources, while in the third, the subpopulations compete for resources, and an additional dynamic term describes the emergence of the second population from the first. Environmental stress is a consequence of ionizing radiation damage to the normal tissue in which the tumor grows (the tumor bed effect, TBE). Compositional data observed as a function of time from experimental assays of artificial heterogeneous colon adenocarcinoma xenografts were used for this theoretical analysis. The results show that in the stressed environment, tumor subpopulations do compete for common resources, and that the weight of competition (i.e., the rate at which competition can retard total growth) is significantly enhanced. In contrast to unperturbed artificial heterogeneous tumors which exhibit stable composition as a function of time, TBE stress leads to selection of the majority neoplastic population.

  19. Effective Information Extraction Framework for Heterogeneous Clinical Reports Using Online Machine Learning and Controlled Vocabularies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Shuai; Lu, James J; Ghasemzadeh, Nima; Hayek, Salim S; Quyyumi, Arshed A; Wang, Fusheng

    2017-05-09

    Extracting structured data from narrated medical reports is challenged by the complexity of heterogeneous structures and vocabularies and often requires significant manual effort. Traditional machine-based approaches lack the capability to take user feedbacks for improving the extraction algorithm in real time. Our goal was to provide a generic information extraction framework that can support diverse clinical reports and enables a dynamic interaction between a human and a machine that produces highly accurate results. A clinical information extraction system IDEAL-X has been built on top of online machine learning. It processes one document at a time, and user interactions are recorded as feedbacks to update the learning model in real time. The updated model is used to predict values for extraction in subsequent documents. Once prediction accuracy reaches a user-acceptable threshold, the remaining documents may be batch processed. A customizable controlled vocabulary may be used to support extraction. Three datasets were used for experiments based on report styles: 100 cardiac catheterization procedure reports, 100 coronary angiographic reports, and 100 integrated reports-each combines history and physical report, discharge summary, outpatient clinic notes, outpatient clinic letter, and inpatient discharge medication report. Data extraction was performed by 3 methods: online machine learning, controlled vocabularies, and a combination of these. The system delivers results with F1 scores greater than 95%. IDEAL-X adopts a unique online machine learning-based approach combined with controlled vocabularies to support data extraction for clinical reports. The system can quickly learn and improve, thus it is highly adaptable.

  20. Environmental governance in the Information Age: the emergence of informational governance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mol, A.P.J.

    2006-01-01

    Castells's influential work on the Information Age has hardly impacted on the environmental social sciences; and where it has, it has been mainly in terms of intrusions of global flows and networks in fragile environments. This paper explores to what extent and how environmental governance is

  1. Environmental Quality Information Analysis Center (EQIAC) operating procedures handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, T.E. (Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL (United States)); Das, S. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1992-08-01

    The Operating Procedures Handbook of the Environmental Quality Information Analysis Center (EQIAC) is intended to be kept current as EQIAC develops and evolves. Its purpose is to provide a comprehensive guide to the mission, infrastructure, functions, and operational procedures of EQIAC. The handbook is a training tool for new personnel and a reference manual for existing personnel. The handbook will be distributed throughout EQIAC and maintained in binders containing current dated editions of the individual sections. The handbook will be revised at least annually to reflect the current structure and operational procedures of EQIAC. The EQIAC provides information on environmental issues such as compliance, restoration, and environmental monitoring do the Air Force and DOD contractors.

  2. The"minimum information about an environmental sequence" (MIENS) specification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilmaz, P.; Kottmann, R.; Field, D.; Knight, R.; Cole, J.R.; Amaral-Zettler, L.; Gilbert, J.A.; Karsch-Mizrachi, I.; Johnston, A.; Cochrane, G.; Vaughan, R.; Hunter, C.; Park, J.; Morrison, N.; Rocca-Serra, P.; Sterk, P.; Arumugam, M.; Baumgartner, L.; Birren, B.W.; Blaser, M.J.; Bonazzi, V.; Bork, P.; Buttigieg, P. L.; Chain, P.; Costello, E.K.; Huot-Creasy, H.; Dawyndt, P.; DeSantis, T.; Fierer, N.; Fuhrman, J.; Gallery, R.E.; Gibbs, R.A.; Giglio, M.G.; Gil, I. San; Gonzalez, A.; Gordon, J.I.; Guralnick, R.; Hankeln, W.; Highlander, S.; Hugenholtz, P.; Jansson, J.; Kennedy, J.; Knights, D.; Koren, O.; Kuczynski, J.; Kyrpides, N.; Larsen, R.; Lauber, C.L.; Legg, T.; Ley, R.E.; Lozupone, C.A.; Ludwig, W.; Lyons, D.; Maguire, E.; Methe, B.A.; Meyer, F.; Nakieny, S.; Nelson, K.E.; Nemergut, D.; Neufeld, J.D.; Pace, N.R.; Palanisamy, G.; Peplies, J.; Peterson, J.; Petrosino, J.; Proctor, L.; Raes, J.; Ratnasingham, S.; Ravel, J.; Relman, D.A.; Assunta-Sansone, S.; Schriml, L.; Sodergren, E.; Spor, A.; Stombaugh, J.; Tiedje, J.M.; Ward, D.V.; Weinstock, G.M.; Wendel, D.; White, O.; Wikle, A.; Wortman, J.R.; Glockner, F.O.; Bushman, F.D.; Charlson, E.; Gevers, D.; Kelley, S.T.; Neubold, L.K.; Oliver, A.E.; Pruesse, E.; Quast, C.; Schloss, P.D.; Sinha, R.; Whitely, A.

    2010-10-15

    We present the Genomic Standards Consortium's (GSC) 'Minimum Information about an ENvironmental Sequence' (MIENS) standard for describing marker genes. Adoption of MIENS will enhance our ability to analyze natural genetic diversity across the Tree of Life as it is currently being documented by massive DNA sequencing efforts from myriad ecosystems in our ever-changing biosphere.

  3. Investors in need of social, ethical, and environmental information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hummels, H.G.J.A.; Timmer, D.

    2004-01-01

    In this contribution we will briefly discuss the shareholders' need for social, ethical and environmental information and the efforts of corporations to address this need. Looking at three cases, we will raise some doubt with regard to the adequacy of corporate SEE reporting to meet the needs of

  4. The impact of environmental heterogeneity and life stage on the hindgut microbiota of Holotrichia parallela larvae (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengwei Huang

    Full Text Available Gut microbiota has diverse ecological and evolutionary effects on its hosts. However, the ways in which it responds to environmental heterogeneity and host physiology remain poorly understood. To this end, we surveyed intestinal microbiota of Holotrichia parallela larvae at different instars and from different geographic regions. Bacterial 16S rRNA gene clone libraries were constructed and clones were subsequently screened by DGGE and sequenced. Firmicutes and Proteobacteria were the major phyla, and bacteria belonging to Ruminococcaceae, Lachnospiraceae, Enterobacteriaceae, Desulfovibrionaceae and Rhodocyclaceae families were commonly found in all natural populations. However, bacterial diversity (Chao1 and Shannon indices and community structure varied across host populations, and the observed variation can be explained by soil pH, organic carbon and total nitrogen, and the climate factors (e.g., mean annual temperature of the locations where the populations were sampled. Furthermore, increases in the species richness and diversity of gut microbiota were observed during larval growth. Bacteroidetes comprised the dominant group in the first instar; however, Firmicutes composed the majority of the hindgut microbiota during the second and third instars. Our results suggest that the gut's bacterial community changes in response to environmental heterogeneity and host's physiology, possibly to meet the host's ecological needs or physiological demands.

  5. Environmental scanning: allied health leaders' selection of strategic information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layman, Elizabeth; Bamberg, Richard; Campbell, Carol; Wark, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    In environmental scanning, deans and directors of allied health units face the task of making sense of volumes of information from their internal and external environments. A study was conducted to detail the information processing of 108 allied health deans and directors of institutional members of the Association of Schools of Allied Health Professions. The study was a survey that included basic demographic questions and two scenarios, each representing a strategic situation. Respondents (n = 56, 52%) rated their general perceptions of the two strategic situations and their projected use of eight types of information cues to clarify the situations. Results indicated that deans and directors had high use of all types of information cues in both strategic situations. The results for the strategic situation based on a scenario about program closure showed that use of negative information cues was associated with proportionally greater use of internal, external, and formal information cues (Pearson correlation coefficients r = 0.72, 0.80, and 0.77, respectively, all with p < 0.005). Some differences were found in types of information used by respondents in academic health centers versus non-academic health centers. The results of this study provide insights on how allied health deans and directors process information in environmental scanning.

  6. Environmental regulation with incomplete information and imperfect monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, G.M.

    1992-01-01

    Environmental protection agencies issue regulations without complete information about the economic cost of pollution abatement. The lack of information limits the ability of environmental protection agencies to restore economic efficiency when regulating firms generating pollution. In the three papers of this dissertation, optimal environmental regulations are derived in the presence of asymmetric information about pollution abatement costs. In the regulatory equilibria analyzed in Chapter 1, firms are induced to reveal the information they possess concerning abatement costs through the judicious use of abatement standard-subsidy combinations. The incentive compatible environmental regulations are superior to uniform standard-subsidy schemes. The maintained assumption is that firms automatically comply with the pollution abatement standards adopted by the regulator. In the models of Chapters 2 and 3, it is recognized that compliance may have to be induced through appropriate monitoring and enforcement measures. In the model of Chapter 2, the regulator precommits to monitoring of compliance with the incentive compatible environmental regulations, and asymmetric information characterizes the interaction between the firm and regulator. The probabilities of monitoring, abatement standards, and corresponding subsides are chosen to ensure firm compliance. Enforcement considerations distort downward the pollution abatement requirements mandated for firms. In the analysis of Chapter 3, the regulator is unable to credibly precommit to a monitoring strategy. In the Nash equilibrium to the enforcement subgame, monitoring must be a best response on the part of the regulator to the level of firm noncompliance and vice versa. Without precommitment to monitoring, the pollution abatement standards supporting a separating equilibrium are independent of monitoring costs. The inability to precommit to monitoring increases the expected level of noncompliance and decrease welfare.

  7. Incorporating temporal heterogeneity in environmental conditions into a somatic growth model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzul, Maria C.; Yackulic, Charles B.; Korman, Josh; Yard, Michael D.; Muehlbauer, Jeffrey D.

    2017-01-01

    Evaluating environmental effects on fish growth can be challenging because environmental conditions may vary at relatively fine temporal scales compared to sampling occasions. Here we develop a Bayesian state-space growth model to evaluate effects of monthly environmental data on growth of fish that are observed less frequently (e.g., from mark-recapture data where time between captures can range from months to years). We assess effects of temperature, turbidity duration, food availability, flow variability, and trout abundance on subadult humpback chub (Gila cypha) growth in two rivers, the Colorado River (CR) and the Little Colorado River (LCR), and we use out-of-sample prediction to rank competing models. Environmental covariates explained a high proportion of the variation in growth in both rivers; however, the best growth models were river-specific and included either positive temperature and turbidity duration effects (CR) or positive temperature and food availability effects (LCR). Our approach to analyzing environmental controls on growth should be applicable in other systems where environmental data vary over relatively short time scales compared to animal observations.

  8. Integrated computational and conceptual solutions for complex environmental information management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rückemann, Claus-Peter

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the recent results of the integration of computational and conceptual solutions for the complex case of environmental information management. The solution for the major goal of creating and developing long-term multi-disciplinary knowledge resources and conceptual and computational support was achieved by implementing and integrating key components. The key components are long-term knowledge resources providing required structures for universal knowledge creation, documentation, and preservation, universal multi-disciplinary and multi-lingual conceptual knowledge and classification, especially, references to Universal Decimal Classification (UDC), sustainable workflows for environmental information management, and computational support for dynamical use, processing, and advanced scientific computing with Integrated Information and Computing System (IICS) components and High End Computing (HEC) resources.

  9. HETEROGENEOUS INTEGRATION TECHNOLOGY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-24

    the “product component” is a result of technology push only, it struggles to fit into a conservative system environment . If the “product component...makes the categorization difficult. In a technology push environment , the evolution of technology is easier to track since it starts evolving from a... environmental information. The role of the heterogeneous integration technology for reducing the size and the power consumption of small sensors was studied

  10. Storytelling and environmental information: connecting schoolchildren and herpetofauna in Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanini, Lucia; Fahd, Soumia

    2009-06-01

    Northwestern Morocco is undergoing a sudden change in the level of infrastructure growth and pressure on the environment from increased tourism. The ongoing changes are raising questions about how the ecosystem will react, and the relevant drivers of these changes. The Oued Laou valley in north-west Morocco hosts high landscape, species and human cultural diversity. The Talassemtane National Park has been established to preserve the environment in this region; however, what information tools are available to children regarding this environment? The ecosystem is illustrated here using three components: herpetofauna (representing ecosystem components), problems related to water quantity and quality (representing interactions within ecosystem components) and Talassemtane National Park (representing a case of ecosystem management). A children's book was written on this topic, and when the book was delivered to pupils, a questionnaire was included, aimed at determining their sources of environmental information. The results identified major changes in the sources of information utilized by children in this part of Morocco, a clear role of schools in explaining ecosystem components, and an increasing role of TV in environmental information supply. The role of the family was found to be less important than TV or school. Another major source of pupils' environmental knowledge is personal observation and hands-on experience, both for rural and urban children. Children are willing to discover and understand complex systems, and researchers should be encouraged to supply children with correct and up-to-date information on environmental systems, focusing at first on the local environment, as a background for sustainable development. © 2009 ISZS, Blackwell Publishing and IOZ/CAS.

  11. Governance through information: environmental monitoring from a citizen-consumer perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burg, van den S.W.K.

    2006-01-01

    The function of environmental monitoring and information in governing the environment has changed considerably in recent times. Traditionally, environmental monitoring was geared towards governments and producers; it provided them with the information required to formulate environmental policies and

  12. Oak Ridge Environmental Information System (ORIES) site workstation information packet for OREIS V1.2. Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voorhees, L.D.; McCord, R.A.; Durfee, R.C.; Land, M.L.; Olson, R.J.; Palmer, M.R.; Thomas, J.K.; Tinnel, E.P.; Zygmunt, B.C.

    1993-02-01

    The OREIS site workstation information packet was developed to accompany the OREIS site workstations, which are being delivered to the Environmental Restoration programs at the five DOE-OR sites. The packet is written specifically for the Site ER program staff at each of the five Sites who have been designated the OREIS contact by their ER program manager, and is not intended for general distribution. The packet provides an overview of the components of OREIS, points to more detailed information provided in the accompanying vendor and OREIS developed manuals, and includes information on training opportunities and user support.

  13. Environmental metabarcoding reveals heterogeneous drivers of microbial eukaryote diversity in contrasting estuarine ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lallias, Delphine; Hiddink, Jan G; Fonseca, Vera G; Gaspar, John M; Sung, Way; Neill, Simon P; Barnes, Natalie; Ferrero, Tim; Hall, Neil; Lambshead, P John D; Packer, Margaret; Thomas, W Kelley; Creer, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Assessing how natural environmental drivers affect biodiversity underpins our understanding of the relationships between complex biotic and ecological factors in natural ecosystems. Of all ecosystems, anthropogenically important estuaries represent a ‘melting pot' of environmental stressors, typified by extreme salinity variations and associated biological complexity. Although existing models attempt to predict macroorganismal diversity over estuarine salinity gradients, attempts to model microbial biodiversity are limited for eukaryotes. Although diatoms commonly feature as bioindicator species, additional microbial eukaryotes represent a huge resource for assessing ecosystem health. Of these, meiofaunal communities may represent the optimal compromise between functional diversity that can be assessed using morphology and phenotype–environment interactions as compared with smaller life fractions. Here, using 454 Roche sequencing of the 18S nSSU barcode we investigate which of the local natural drivers are most strongly associated with microbial metazoan and sampled protist diversity across the full salinity gradient of the estuarine ecosystem. In order to investigate potential variation at the ecosystem scale, we compare two geographically proximate estuaries (Thames and Mersey, UK) with contrasting histories of anthropogenic stress. The data show that although community turnover is likely to be predictable, taxa are likely to respond to different environmental drivers and, in particular, hydrodynamics, salinity range and granulometry, according to varied life-history characteristics. At the ecosystem level, communities exhibited patterns of estuary-specific similarity within different salinity range habitats, highlighting the environmental sequencing biomonitoring potential of meiofauna, dispersal effects or both. PMID:25423027

  14. Educating Young People about Environmental Health for Informed Social Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keselman, Alla; Levin, Daniel M; Kramer, Judy F; Matzkin, Karen; Dutcher, Gale

    2011-01-01

    Whereas environmental health education is rapidly becoming a global priority, it still receives little attention in schools. This paper describes a U.S. National Library of Medicine program, aiming to support environmental health education in grades 6-12 in U.S. schools. The program has four components: (1) developing reliable online resources that provide quality environmental health information; (2) creating lesson plans that integrate our resources into the classroom and extracurricular activities; (3) engaging teachers by inviting collaborations and promoting our resources and activities; and (4) conducting educational research that provides a foundation for the other components. The paper describes specific educational resources and activities and grounds them in learning theories from the fields of cognitive psychology and science education.

  15. Modelling heterogeneity variances in multiple treatment comparison meta-analysis ��� Are informative priors the better solution?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorlund Kristian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple treatment comparison (MTC meta-analyses are commonly modeled in a Bayesian framework, and weakly informative priors are typically preferred to mirror familiar data driven frequentist approaches. Random-effects MTCs have commonly modeled heterogeneity under the assumption that the between-trial variance for all involved treatment comparisons are equal (i.e., the ‘common variance’ assumption. This approach ‘borrows strength’ for heterogeneity estimation across treatment comparisons, and thus, ads valuable precision when data is sparse. The homogeneous variance assumption, however, is unrealistic and can severely bias variance estimates. Consequently 95% credible intervals may not retain nominal coverage, and treatment rank probabilities may become distorted. Relaxing the homogeneous variance assumption may be equally problematic due to reduced precision. To regain good precision, moderately informative variance priors or additional mathematical assumptions may be necessary. Methods In this paper we describe four novel approaches to modeling heterogeneity variance - two novel model structures, and two approaches for use of moderately informative variance priors. We examine the relative performance of all approaches in two illustrative MTC data sets. We particularly compare between-study heterogeneity estimates and model fits, treatment effect estimates and 95% credible intervals, and treatment rank probabilities. Results In both data sets, use of moderately informative variance priors constructed from the pair wise meta-analysis data yielded the best model fit and narrower credible intervals. Imposing consistency equations on variance estimates, assuming variances to be exchangeable, or using empirically informed variance priors also yielded good model fits and narrow credible intervals. The homogeneous variance model yielded high precision at all times, but overall inadequate estimates of between

  16. How Darwinian models inform therapeutic failure initiated by clonal heterogeneity in cancer medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlinger, M; Swanton, C

    2010-01-01

    Carcinogenesis is an evolutionary process that establishes the ‘hallmarks of cancer' by natural selection of cell clones that have acquired advantageous heritable characteristics. Evolutionary adaptation has also been proposed as a mechanism that promotes drug resistance during systemic cancer therapy. This review summarises the evidence for the evolution of resistance to cytotoxic and targeted anti-cancer drugs according to Darwinian models and highlights the roles of genomic instability and high intra-tumour genetic heterogeneity as major accelerators of this evolutionary process. Clinical implications and strategies that may prevent the evolution of resistance or target the origins of genetic heterogeneity are discussed. New technologies to measure intra-tumour heterogeneity and translational research on serial biopsies of cancer lesions during and after therapeutic intervention are identified as key areas to further the understanding of determinants and mechanisms of the evolution of drug resistance. PMID:20877357

  17. SpaceTime Environmental Image Information for Scene Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Analysis and Machine Intel. 2011;33(12):2341–2353. 31. Song Y, Luo H, Hui B, Chang Z. An improved image dehazing and enhancing method using dark...help the end user (Soldier) develop improved course of action strategies based on scene understanding ( algorithms and analysis) incorporating...environmental image information in the data measurement process will lead to 1) improved autonomous intelligent systems supporting Army missions in complex

  18. Environmental Quality Information Analysis Center multi-year plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera, R.G. (RDG, Inc. (United States)); Das, S. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Walsh, T.E. (Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL (United States))

    1992-09-01

    An information analysis center (IAC) is a federal resource that provides technical information for a specific technology field. An IAC links an expert technical staff with an experienced information specialist group, supported by in-house or external data bases to provide technical information and maintain a corporate knowledge in a technical area. An IAC promotes the rapid transfer of technology among its users and provides assistance in adopting new technology and predicting and assessing emerging technology. This document outlines the concept, requirements, and proposed development of an Environmental Quality IAC (EQIAC). An EQIAC network is composed of several nodes, each of which has specific technology capabilities. This document outlines strategic and operational objectives for the phased development of one such node of an EQIAC network.

  19. Environmental indivisibilities and information costs: fanaticism, agnosticism, and intellectual progress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, M.

    1982-05-01

    This analysis suggests several distinctive policy recommendations about environmental problems. One is that some of the alarms about ecological catastrophes cannot simply be dismissed, even when some of those who sound the alarms seem almost fanatic. The information needed to be sure one way or another is simply lacking, and may not be attainable at reasonable cost for a long time. We are therefore left with inevitable risk. Ecological systems could also be incomparably more robust than the alarmists claim, so we might also be worrying needlessly. The implication for environmental and ecological research is that we should not exprect that it will produce conclusive information, but should fund a lot of it anyhow. If previous research has produced few compelling results, valid information about these problems is scarce and therefore more valuable. The harvest of research in the areas characterized by indivisibilities is then poor but precious knowledge. If it is important to be able to change behavior quickly, when and if we finally get the information that the ecosystem can't take any more, then it is important that we have the open-mindedness needed to change our views and policies the moment decisive information arrives. Those who shout wolf too often, and those who are sure there are no wolves around, could be our undoing.

  20. Informational factors in identifying environmental sounds in natural auditory scenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leech, Robert; Gygi, Brian; Aydelott, Jennifer; Dick, Frederic

    2009-12-01

    In a non-linguistic analog of the "cocktail-party" scenario, informational and contextual factors were found to affect the recognition of everyday environmental sounds embedded in naturalistic auditory scenes. Short environmental sound targets were presented in a dichotic background scene composed of either a single stereo background scene or a composite background scene created by playing different background scenes to the different ears. The side of presentation, time of onset, and number of target sounds were varied across trials to increase the uncertainty for the participant. Half the sounds were contextually congruent with the background sound (i.e., consistent with the meaningful real-world sound environment represented in the auditory scene) and half were incongruent. The presence of a single competing background scene decreased identification accuracy, suggesting an informational masking effect. In tandem, there was a contextual pop-out effect, with contextually incongruent sounds identified more accurately. However, when targets were incongruent with the real-world context of the background scene, informational masking was reduced. Acoustic analyses suggested that this contextual pop-out effect was driven by a mixture of perceptual differences between the target and background, as well as by higher-level cognitive factors. These findings indicate that identification of environmental sounds in naturalistic backgrounds is an active process that requires integrating perceptual, attentional, and cognitive resources.

  1. Environmentally benign heterogeneous nano-particle catalysts: synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity of 4-nitrophenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugan, Eagambaram; Jebaranjitham, J Nimita

    2011-02-01

    Pollution free catalyst is an attractive area of current interest. The p-Aminophenol is one of the most significant catalyst, because it involves the manufacture of various pharmaceuticals. Crosslinked poly(styrene)-co-poly(4-vinylimidazole) (PSPVIM) was prepared by varying the crosslinked monomer ratio as 2% and 10% respectively. The 2 (w%) of DVB, 25 (w%) of N-VIm as functional monomer and 73 (w%) of styrene as support monomer as organic phase and gelatin, boric acid and polyvinyl alcohol as aqueous phase was used to prepare cross-linked poly(styrene)-co-poly(N-vinyl imidazole) (PVIM) beads (Type-I). Similarly, Type II beads were also prepared by fixing the 10% as a cross linking ratio (DVB). The immobilization of Ag NPs onto the PS-VIm polymer matrix was performed using AgNO3 as a metal precursor solution. The k(obs) determined from UV-Vis results, reveals that the degree of reduction of 4-nitrophenol using Type-I catalysts is more effective than Type-II catalyst due to lower immobilization of AgNPs at higher cross-linked bead matrix. It was found that on increasing the amount of catalyst i.e., type-I PS-PVIm-AgNPs, the rate constant also increases. Therefore, PS-PVIm-AgNPs (Type-I) heterogeneous catalyst is superior for the reduction of 4-NP.

  2. Colonization of abandoned land by Juniperus thurifera is mediated by the interaction of a diverse dispersal assemblage and environmental heterogeneity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gema Escribano-Avila

    Full Text Available Land abandonment is one of the most powerful global change drivers in developed countries where recent rural exodus has been the norm. Abandonment of traditional land use practices has permitted the colonization of these areas by shrub and tree species. For fleshy fruited species the colonization of new areas is determined by the dispersal assemblage composition and abundance. In this study we showed how the relative contribution to the dispersal process by each animal species is modulated by the environmental heterogeneity and ecosystem structure. This complex interaction caused differential patterns on the seed dispersal in both, landscape patches in which the process of colonization is acting nowadays and mature woodlands of Juniperus thurifera, a relict tree distributed in the western Mediterranean Basin. Thrushes (Turdus spp and carnivores (red fox and stone marten dispersed a high amount of seeds while rabbits and sheeps only a tiny fraction. Thrushes dispersed a significant amount of seeds in new colonization areas, however they were limited by the presence of high perches with big crop size. While carnivores dispersed seeds to all studied habitats, even in those patches where no trees of J. thurifera were present, turning out to be critical for primary colonization. The presence of Pinus and Quercus was related to a reduced consumption of J. thurifera seeds while the presence of fleshy fruited shrubs was related with higher content of J. thurifera seeds in dispersers' faeces. Therefore environmental heterogeneity and ecosystem structure had a great influence on dispersers feeding behaviour, and should be considered in order to accurately describe the role of seed dispersal in ecological process, such as regeneration and colonization. J. thurifera expansion is not seed limited thanks to its diverse dispersal community, hence the conservation of all dispersers in an ecosystem enhance ecosystems services and resilience.

  3. A distributed approach to gas detection and source localization using heterogeneous information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pavlin, G.; Groen, F.; de Oude, P.; Kamermans, M.; Babuška, R.; Groen, F.C.A.

    2010-01-01

    This chapter introduces a system for early detection of gaseous substances and coarse source localization by using heterogeneous sensor measurements and human reports. The system is based on Distributed Perception Networks, a Multi-agent system framework implementing distributed Bayesian reasoning.

  4. Network‐Informed Gene Ranking Tackles Genetic Heterogeneity in Exome‐Sequencing Studies of Monogenic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Reiner; Weale, Michael E.; Southgate, Laura; Oakey, Rebecca J.; Simpson, Michael A.; Schlitt, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Genetic heterogeneity presents a significant challenge for the identification of monogenic disease genes. Whole‐exome sequencing generates a large number of candidate disease‐causing variants and typical analyses rely on deleterious variants being observed in the same gene across several unrelated affected individuals. This is less likely to occur for genetically heterogeneous diseases, making more advanced analysis methods necessary. To address this need, we present HetRank, a flexible gene‐ranking method that incorporates interaction network data. We first show that different genes underlying the same monogenic disease are frequently connected in protein interaction networks. This motivates the central premise of HetRank: those genes carrying potentially pathogenic variants and whose network neighbors do so in other affected individuals are strong candidates for follow‐up study. By simulating 1,000 exome sequencing studies (20,000 exomes in total), we model varying degrees of genetic heterogeneity and show that HetRank consistently prioritizes more disease‐causing genes than existing analysis methods. We also demonstrate a proof‐of‐principle application of the method to prioritize genes causing Adams‐Oliver syndrome, a genetically heterogeneous rare disease. An implementation of HetRank in R is available via the Website http://sourceforge.net/p/hetrank/. PMID:26394720

  5. Network-Informed Gene Ranking Tackles Genetic Heterogeneity in Exome-Sequencing Studies of Monogenic Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dand, Nick; Schulz, Reiner; Weale, Michael E; Southgate, Laura; Oakey, Rebecca J; Simpson, Michael A; Schlitt, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    Genetic heterogeneity presents a significant challenge for the identification of monogenic disease genes. Whole-exome sequencing generates a large number of candidate disease-causing variants and typical analyses rely on deleterious variants being observed in the same gene across several unrelated affected individuals. This is less likely to occur for genetically heterogeneous diseases, making more advanced analysis methods necessary. To address this need, we present HetRank, a flexible gene-ranking method that incorporates interaction network data. We first show that different genes underlying the same monogenic disease are frequently connected in protein interaction networks. This motivates the central premise of HetRank: those genes carrying potentially pathogenic variants and whose network neighbors do so in other affected individuals are strong candidates for follow-up study. By simulating 1,000 exome sequencing studies (20,000 exomes in total), we model varying degrees of genetic heterogeneity and show that HetRank consistently prioritizes more disease-causing genes than existing analysis methods. We also demonstrate a proof-of-principle application of the method to prioritize genes causing Adams-Oliver syndrome, a genetically heterogeneous rare disease. An implementation of HetRank in R is available via the Website http://sourceforge.net/p/hetrank/. © 2015 The Authors. **Human Mutation published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Multiple Equilibria and Minimum Wages in Labor Markets with Informational Frictions and Heterogeneous Production Technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.J. van den Berg (Gerard)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractIt is often argued that a mandatory minimum wage is binding only if the wage density displays a spike at it. In this paper we analyze a model with wage setting, search frictions, and heterogeneous production technologies, in which imposition of a minimum wage affects wages even though,

  7. Distinct neuropsychological subgroups in typically developing youth inform heterogeneity in children with ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fair, Damien A; Bathula, Deepti; Nikolas, Molly A; Nigg, Joel T

    2012-04-24

    Research and clinical investigations in psychiatry largely rely on the de facto assumption that the diagnostic categories identified in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) represent homogeneous syndromes. However, the mechanistic heterogeneity that potentially underlies the existing classification scheme might limit discovery of etiology for most developmental psychiatric disorders. Another, perhaps less palpable, reality may also be interfering with progress-heterogeneity in typically developing populations. In this report we attempt to clarify neuropsychological heterogeneity in a large dataset of typically developing youth and youth with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), using graph theory and community detection. We sought to determine whether data-driven neuropsychological subtypes could be discerned in children with and without the disorder. Because individual classification is the sine qua non for eventual clinical translation, we also apply support vector machine-based multivariate pattern analysis to identify how well ADHD status in individual children can be identified as defined by the community detection delineated subtypes. The analysis yielded several unique, but similar subtypes across both populations. Just as importantly, comparing typically developing children with ADHD children within each of these distinct subgroups increased diagnostic accuracy. Two important principles were identified that have the potential to advance our understanding of typical development and developmental neuropsychiatric disorders. The first tenet suggests that typically developing children can be classified into distinct neuropsychological subgroups with high precision. The second tenet proposes that some of the heterogeneity in individuals with ADHD might be "nested" in this normal variation.

  8. Information Mining from Heterogeneous Data Sources: A Case Study on Drought Predictions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Getachew B. Demisse

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to develop information mining methodology for drought modeling and predictions using historical records of climate, satellite, environmental, and oceanic data. The classification and regression tree (CART approach was used for extracting drought episodes at different time-lag prediction intervals. Using the CART approach, a number of successful model trees were constructed, which can easily be interpreted and used by decision makers in their drought management decisions. The regression rules produced by CART were found to have correlation coefficients from 0.71–0.95 in rules-alone modeling. The accuracies of the models were found to be higher in the instance and rules model (0.77–0.96 compared to the rules-alone model. From the experimental analysis, it was concluded that different combinations of the nearest neighbor and committee models significantly increase the performances of CART drought models. For more robust results from the developed methodology, it is recommended that future research focus on selecting relevant attributes for slow-onset drought episode identification and prediction.

  9. Environmental factors and health information technology management strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menachemi, Nir; Shin, Dong Yeong; Ford, Eric W; Yu, Feliciano

    2011-01-01

    : Previous studies have provided theoretical and empirical evidence that environmental forces influence hospital strategy. : Rooted in resource dependence theory and the information uncertainty perspective, this study examined the relationship between environmental market characteristics and hospitals' selection of a health information technology (HIT) management strategy. : A cross-sectional design is used to analyze secondary data from the American Hospital Association Annual Survey, the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society Analytics Database, and the Area Resource File. Univariate and multinomial logistic regression analyses are used. : Overall, 3,221 hospitals were studied, of which 60.9% pursed a single-vendor HIT management strategy, 28.9% pursued a best-of-suite strategy, and 10.2% used a best-of-breed strategy. Multivariate analyses controlling for hospital characteristics found that measures of environmental factors representing munificence, dynamism, and/or complexity were systematically associated with various hospital HIT management strategy use. Specifically, the number of generalist physicians per capita was positively associated with the single-vendor strategy (B = -5.64, p = .10). Hospitals in urban markets were more likely to pursue the best-of-suite strategy (B = 0.622, p < .001). Dynamism, measured as the number of managed care contracts for a given hospital, was negatively associated with the single-vendor strategy (B = 0.004, p = .049). Lastly, complexity, measured as market competition, was positively associated with the best-of-breed strategy (B = 0.623, p = .042). : By and large, environmental factors are associated with hospital HIT management strategies in mostly theoretically supported ways. Hospital leaders and policy makers interested in influencing the adoption of hospital HIT should consider how market conditions influence HIT management decisions as part of programs to promote meaningful use.

  10. Integrated information management systems; A solid basis for environmental compliance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Case, D.M.; Gay, J.L.; Stallard, G.S. (Black and Veatch, Kansas City, MO (United States))

    1992-01-01

    With the wide-ranging impacts of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, effective management of environmental issues-particularly SO{sub 2} emissions - will require not only long range planning, but daily evaluations and decisions. To produce power in the most cost-effective manner, environmental concerns and operational and economic issues must be considered. Costs, performance, and emissions must be effectively monitored and controlled, and the resulting information must be integrated to provide a comprehensive basis for a variety of decisions. Achieving such broad-base integration must be integrated to provide a comprehensive basis for a variety of decisions. Achieving such broad-base integration is not a simple task. A continuous flow of new data must be collected and analyzed; current conditions must be carefully evaluated to support day-to-day decisions and long-term power production and emissions strategies must be developed and reviewed. This paper describes the main design concepts of an integrated information system, and provides examples of how its capabilities can be applied to environmental decisions.

  11. Should I Change or Should I Go? Phenotypic Plasticity and Matching Habitat Choice in the Adaptation to Environmental Heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelaar, Pim; Jovani, Roger; Gomez-Mestre, Ivan

    2017-10-01

    It can be challenging for organisms to achieve a good match between their phenotypic characteristics and environmental requirements that vary in space and time. The evolution of adaptive phenotypes can result from genetic differentiation at the population level. Individuals, however, could also change their phenotype (adaptive plasticity) or select an environment because it matches with their phenotype (matching habitat choice). It is poorly known under which conditions these different solutions to environmental heterogeneity evolve and whether they operate together. Using an individual-based simulation model, we assessed which solutions evolved depending on degree of temporal variation, costs of multiple underlying traits, and order of dispersal and development. Population genetic divergence was superseded by plasticity or matching habitat choice as temporal variation increased. Plasticity and matching habitat choice were limited by their trait costs, even when this involved only a part of the underlying traits. Independent of the order of dispersal and development, plasticity evolved more commonly than matching habitat choice, in part because the match a phenotype can achieve by matching habitat choice is limited by the types of environments available. Our results explain the apparent relative rarity of matching habitat choice in nature. At the same time, our results can be used to look for matching habitat choice in those biological systems where the conditions for other solutions seem unfavorable.

  12. A Marine Information System for Environmental Monitoring: ARGO-MIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Pieri

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Sea shipping routes have become very crowded and this, coupled with an always increasing demand of oil based products, contributes to the increase in maritime traffic density, as a consequence pollution risks have increased. Therefore, it is important to have information systems capable of detecting and monitoring environmental endangering situations like oil spills at sea. In this paper, a Marine Information System, acting as an integrated and inter-operable monitoring tool is proposed and discussed. The discussion focuses on a system that is able to integrate different data acquired from various electronic sensors, and that is inter-operable among marine operators and ship traffic authorities. The available data on the system are all geo-referenced, and flows seamlessly through the system, where they are integrated in a consistent and usable manner. An important result of this integration is the capability to produce a collection of proactive services such as Decision Support ones, which can be used to improve the functionalities and facilities concerned in an intervention operation. Through the implementation of these services, we aim to demonstrate how an efficient environmental management system could benefit from being supported by a Marine Information System that can provide the dynamic links between different data, models and actors.

  13. A network integration approach for drug-target interaction prediction and computational drug repositioning from heterogeneous information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yunan; Zhao, Xinbin; Zhou, Jingtian; Yang, Jinglin; Zhang, Yanqing; Kuang, Wenhua; Peng, Jian; Chen, Ligong; Zeng, Jianyang

    2017-09-18

    The emergence of large-scale genomic, chemical and pharmacological data provides new opportunities for drug discovery and repositioning. In this work, we develop a computational pipeline, called DTINet, to predict novel drug-target interactions from a constructed heterogeneous network, which integrates diverse drug-related information. DTINet focuses on learning a low-dimensional vector representation of features, which accurately explains the topological properties of individual nodes in the heterogeneous network, and then makes prediction based on these representations via a vector space projection scheme. DTINet achieves substantial performance improvement over other state-of-the-art methods for drug-target interaction prediction. Moreover, we experimentally validate the novel interactions between three drugs and the cyclooxygenase proteins predicted by DTINet, and demonstrate the new potential applications of these identified cyclooxygenase inhibitors in preventing inflammatory diseases. These results indicate that DTINet can provide a practically useful tool for integrating heterogeneous information to predict new drug-target interactions and repurpose existing drugs.Network-based data integration for drug-target prediction is a promising avenue for drug repositioning, but performance is wanting. Here, the authors introduce DTINet, whose performance is enhanced in the face of noisy, incomplete and high-dimensional biological data by learning low-dimensional vector representations.

  14. GENESIS: GPS Environmental and Earth Science Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajj, George

    1999-01-01

    This presentation reviews the GPS ENvironmental and Earth Science Information System (GENESIS). The objectives of GENESIS are outlined (1) Data Archiving, searching and distribution for science data products derived from Space borne TurboRogue Space Receivers for GPS science and other ground based GPS receivers, (2) Data browsing using integrated visualization tools, (3) Interactive web/java-based data search and retrieval, (4) Data subscription service, (5) Data migration from existing GPS archived data, (6) On-line help and documentation, and (7) participation in the WP-ESIP federation. The presentation reviews the products and services of Genesis, and the technology behind the system.

  15. Oak Ridge Environmental Information System (ORIES) site workstation information packet for OREIS V1. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voorhees, L.D.; McCord, R.A.; Durfee, R.C.; Land, M.L.; Olson, R.J.; Palmer, M.R.; Thomas, J.K.; Tinnel, E.P.; Zygmunt, B.C.

    1993-02-01

    The OREIS site workstation information packet was developed to accompany the OREIS site workstations, which are being delivered to the Environmental Restoration programs at the five DOE-OR sites. The packet is written specifically for the Site ER program staff at each of the five Sites who have been designated the OREIS contact by their ER program manager, and is not intended for general distribution. The packet provides an overview of the components of OREIS, points to more detailed information provided in the accompanying vendor and OREIS developed manuals, and includes information on training opportunities and user support.

  16. The Fit Between the UK Environmental Information Regulations and the Freedom of Information Act

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Pelton

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The Natural Environment Research Council (NERC is one of seven UK Research Councils. It delivers independent research, survey, training and knowledge transfer in the environmental sciences. All the UK Research Councils are public bodies falling under the Freedom of Information Act 2000 and the Environmental Information Regulations 2004. This open access legislation came into force on January 1, 2005 and since then the authors have built up substantial experience in managing NERC’s data and information under both the Act and the Regulations. This article aims to explain how to manage the, often blurred, boundary between these two pieces of legislation, and the overlap between data management and the legislation.

  17. The environmental public sector information. The present path to increasing transparency and democracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pillmann, Werner [International Society for Environmental Protection (ISEP), Vienna (Austria); Legat, Rudolf [Umweltbundesamt Wien, Vienna (Austria); Hrebicek, Jiri [Masaryk Univ., Brno (Czech Republic). Inst. of Biostatistics and Analyses

    2013-07-01

    This paper intends to provide insight in current political decisions and administrative requirements for production, processing and dissemination of environmental information. It should stimulate the discussion between the demand for exchange of environmental knowledge and some leading-edge experiences of ICT applications in the Environmental Informatics network. It is demonstrated, that environmental informatics provides currently a substantial toolbox with eEnvironment services for information integration in a Shared Environmental Information System (SEIS) with ecologic and economic relevance within the Digital Agenda 2020. In the paper a sketch of a European environmental information production is given and conclusions are drawn for further research in the area of Environmental Informatics. (orig.)

  18. Utilizing gnotobiotic models to inform the role of the microbiome in vaccine response heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cram, Jacob A; Hager, Kevin W; Kublin, James G

    2018-01-01

    Gnotobiotic models have the potential to provide substantial insight into how the microbiome shapes its host's response to vaccines. This review aims to summarize literature about the role of the microbiome in shaping the immune system and vaccine response heterogeneity, summarize gnotobiotic and other murine models that help us understand the immune system and vaccine response, and suggest novel ways that these models could be used to further understand vaccine response heterogeneity. Clinical data have suggested that numerous vaccines' effectiveness are regulated by the microbiome and often correlate with the abundance of specific taxa. Gnotobiotic and other animal models are beginning to illuminate the complex effects induced by the presence of particular microbial groups and communities. Such models have identified microbial groups that improve vaccine response to rotavirus vaccine and identified pathways by which the microbiome influences response to influenza and other vaccines. By applying a range of vaccines across gnotobiotic mouse models, researchers may be able to identify the effects of single microorganisms as well as interacting communities of microorganisms on the immune response.

  19. Waste management, informal recycling, environmental pollution and public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hong; Ma, Mingguo; Thompson, Julian R; Flower, Roger J

    2017-12-08

    With rapid population growth, especially in low-income and middle-income countries, the generation of waste is increasing at an unprecedented rate. For example, annual global waste arising from waste electrical and electronic equipment alone will have increased from 33.8 to 49.8 million tonnes between 2010 and 2018. Despite incineration and other waste treatment techniques, landfill still dominates waste disposal in low-income and middle-income countries. There is usually insufficient funding for adequate waste management in these countries and uptake of more advanced waste treatment technologies is poor. Without proper management, many landfills represent serious hazards as typified by the landslide in Shenzhen, China on 20 December 2015. In addition to formal waste recycling systems, approximately 15 million people around the world are involved in informal waste recycling, mainly for plastics, metals, glass and paper. This review examines emerging public health challenges, in particular within low-income and middle-income countries, associated with the informal sector. While informal recyclers contribute to waste recycling and reuse, the relatively primitive techniques they employ, combined with improper management of secondary pollutants, exacerbate environmental pollution of air, soil and water. Even worse, insufficient occupational health measures expose informal waste workers to a range of pollutants, injuries, respiratory and dermatological problems, infections and other serious health issues that contribute to low life expectancy. Integration of the informal sector with its formal counterparts could improve waste management while addressing these serious health and livelihood issues. Progress in this direction has already been made notably in several Latin American countries where integrating the informal and formal sectors has had a positive influence on both waste management and poverty alleviation. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless

  20. Spatial genetic and morphologic structure of wolves and coyotes in relation to environmental heterogeneity in a Canis hybrid zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, John F; Patterson, Brent R; Wheeldon, Tyler J

    2012-12-01

    Eastern wolves have hybridized extensively with coyotes and gray wolves and are listed as a 'species of special concern' in Canada. However, a distinct population of eastern wolves has been identified in Algonquin Provincial Park (APP) in Ontario. Previous studies of the diverse Canis hybrid zone adjacent to APP have not linked genetic analysis with field data to investigate genotype-specific morphology or determine how resident animals of different ancestry are distributed across the landscape in relation to heterogeneous environmental conditions. Accordingly, we studied resident wolves and coyotes in and adjacent to APP to identify distinct Canis types, clarify the extent of the APP eastern wolf population beyond the park boundaries and investigate fine-scale spatial genetic structure and landscape-genotype associations in the hybrid zone. We documented three genetically distinct Canis types within the APP region that also differed morphologically, corresponding to putative gray wolves, eastern wolves and coyotes. We also documented a substantial number of hybrid individuals (36%) that were admixed between 2 or 3 of the Canis types. Breeding eastern wolves were less common outside of APP, but occurred in some unprotected areas where they were sympatric with a diverse combination of coyotes, gray wolves and hybrids. We found significant spatial genetic structure and identified a steep cline extending west from APP where the dominant genotype shifted abruptly from eastern wolves to coyotes and hybrids. The genotypic pattern to the south and northwest was a more complex mosaic of alternating genotypes. We modelled genetic ancestry in response to prey availability and human disturbance and found that individuals with greater wolf ancestry occupied areas of higher moose density and fewer roads. Our results clarify the structure of the Canis hybrid zone adjacent to APP and provide unique insight into environmental conditions influencing hybridization dynamics between

  1. A novel game theoretic approach for modeling competitive information diffusion in social networks with heterogeneous nodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agha Mohammad Ali Kermani, Mehrdad; Fatemi Ardestani, Seyed Farshad; Aliahmadi, Alireza; Barzinpour, Farnaz

    2017-01-01

    Influence maximization deals with identification of the most influential nodes in a social network given an influence model. In this paper, a game theoretic framework is developed that models a competitive influence maximization problem. A novel competitive influence model is additionally proposed that incorporates user heterogeneity, message content, and network structure. The proposed game-theoretic model is solved using Nash Equilibrium in a real-world dataset. It is shown that none of the well-known strategies are stable and at least one player has the incentive to deviate from the proposed strategy. Moreover, violation of Nash equilibrium strategy by each player leads to their reduced payoff. Contrary to previous works, our results demonstrate that graph topology, as well as the nodes' sociability and initial tendency measures have an effect on the determination of the influential node in the network.

  2. NEON: Transforming Environmental Data into Free, Open Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, B.

    2010-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) will collect data across the United States on the impacts of climate change, land use change and invasive species on natural resources and biodiversity. NEON is a project of the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF), with many other U.S. agencies and NGOs cooperating. The Observatory’s construction plans call for 60 sites distributed across 20 ecoclimatic Domains. Data will be collected from strategically selected sites within each Domain and synthesized into information products that can be used to describe changes in the nation’s ecosystem through space and time. Sites are arrayed across different land-use types in order to understand large-scale environmental drivers affect biodiversity, ecohydrology, biogeochemistry, and disease ecology across the US continent. NEON is an instrument that listens to the pulse of the US continental ecosystem: infrastructure deployed at these sites will collect an average of over 500 primary measurements at each site, including annual high-resolution airborne LiDAR and hyperspectral data. These primary measurements will be transformed by a state-of-the-art cyberinfrastruture into over 100 higher-order data products. All measurements, data products, algorithms used to compute the data products, and protocols used to collect the primary measurements will be freely available to the public and assessable over the internet. The information products, including selected socio-economic datasets from cooperating Federal agencies, will be served in standard formats, grid-sizes, and geographical projections. This type of information is anticipated to have a wide range of uses, including ecological forecasting, education, public engagement, socio-economic analyses, decision support for climate-change adaptation and mitigation, resource management, and environmental risk management. Open data, interoperability, an open and integrated observation infrastructure, public engagement, and a

  3. Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility: Environmental Information Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haagenstad, H.T.; Gonzales, G.; Suazo, I.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1993-11-01

    At Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the treatment of radioactive liquid waste is an integral function of the LANL mission: to assure U.S. military deterrence capability through nuclear weapons technology. As part of this mission, LANL conducts nuclear materials research and development (R&D) activities. These activities generate radioactive liquid waste that must be handled in a manner to ensure protection of workers, the public, and the environment. Radioactive liquid waste currently generated at LANL is treated at the Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLWTF), located at Technical Area (TA)-50. The RLWTF is 30 years old and nearing the end of its useful design life. The facility was designed at a time when environmental requirements, as well as more effective treatment technologies, were not inherent in engineering design criteria. The evolution of engineering design criteria has resulted in the older technology becoming less effective in treating radioactive liquid wastestreams in accordance with current National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) and Department of Energy (DOE) regulatory requirements. Therefore, to support ongoing R&D programs pertinent to its mission, LANL is in need of capabilities to efficiently treat radioactive liquid waste onsite or to transport the waste off site for treatment and/or disposal. The purpose of the EID is to provide the technical baseline information for subsequent preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the RLWTF. This EID addresses the proposed action and alternatives for meeting the purpose and need for agency action.

  4. Comparison of information-theoretic to statistical methods for gene-gene interactions in the presence of genetic heterogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sucheston Lara

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multifactorial diseases such as cancer and cardiovascular diseases are caused by the complex interplay between genes and environment. The detection of these interactions remains challenging due to computational limitations. Information theoretic approaches use computationally efficient directed search strategies and thus provide a feasible solution to this problem. However, the power of information theoretic methods for interaction analysis has not been systematically evaluated. In this work, we compare power and Type I error of an information-theoretic approach to existing interaction analysis methods. Methods The k-way interaction information (KWII metric for identifying variable combinations involved in gene-gene interactions (GGI was assessed using several simulated data sets under models of genetic heterogeneity driven by susceptibility increasing loci with varying allele frequency, penetrance values and heritability. The power and proportion of false positives of the KWII was compared to multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR, restricted partitioning method (RPM and logistic regression. Results The power of the KWII was considerably greater than MDR on all six simulation models examined. For a given disease prevalence at high values of heritability, the power of both RPM and KWII was greater than 95%. For models with low heritability and/or genetic heterogeneity, the power of the KWII was consistently greater than RPM; the improvements in power for the KWII over RPM ranged from 4.7% to 14.2% at for α = 0.001 in the three models at the lowest heritability values examined. KWII performed similar to logistic regression. Conclusions Information theoretic models are flexible and have excellent power to detect GGI under a variety of conditions that characterize complex diseases.

  5. Comparison of information-theoretic to statistical methods for gene-gene interactions in the presence of genetic heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Multifactorial diseases such as cancer and cardiovascular diseases are caused by the complex interplay between genes and environment. The detection of these interactions remains challenging due to computational limitations. Information theoretic approaches use computationally efficient directed search strategies and thus provide a feasible solution to this problem. However, the power of information theoretic methods for interaction analysis has not been systematically evaluated. In this work, we compare power and Type I error of an information-theoretic approach to existing interaction analysis methods. Methods The k-way interaction information (KWII) metric for identifying variable combinations involved in gene-gene interactions (GGI) was assessed using several simulated data sets under models of genetic heterogeneity driven by susceptibility increasing loci with varying allele frequency, penetrance values and heritability. The power and proportion of false positives of the KWII was compared to multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR), restricted partitioning method (RPM) and logistic regression. Results The power of the KWII was considerably greater than MDR on all six simulation models examined. For a given disease prevalence at high values of heritability, the power of both RPM and KWII was greater than 95%. For models with low heritability and/or genetic heterogeneity, the power of the KWII was consistently greater than RPM; the improvements in power for the KWII over RPM ranged from 4.7% to 14.2% at for α = 0.001 in the three models at the lowest heritability values examined. KWII performed similar to logistic regression. Conclusions Information theoretic models are flexible and have excellent power to detect GGI under a variety of conditions that characterize complex diseases. PMID:20815886

  6. Technology-based management of environmental organizations using an Environmental Management Information System (EMIS): Design and development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouziokas, Georgios N.

    2016-01-01

    The adoption of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) in environmental management has become a significant demand nowadays with the rapid growth of environmental information. This paper presents a prototype Environmental Management Information System (EMIS) that was developed to provide a systematic way of managing environmental data and human resources of an environmental organization. The system was designed using programming languages, a Database Management System (DBMS) and other technologies and programming tools and combines information from the relational database in order to achieve the principal goals of the environmental organization. The developed application can be used to store and elaborate information regarding: human resources data, environmental projects, observations, reports, data about the protected species, environmental measurements of pollutant factors or other kinds of analytical measurements and also the financial data of the organization. Furthermore, the system supports the visualization of spatial data structures by using geographic information systems (GIS) and web mapping technologies. This paper describes this prototype software application, its structure, its functions and how this system can be utilized to facilitate technology-based environmental management and decision-making process.

  7. Security of Heterogeneous Content in Cloud Based Library Information Systems Using an Ontology Based Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai DOINEA

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As in any domain that involves the use of software, the library information systems take advantages of cloud computing. The paper highlights the main aspect of cloud based systems, describing some public solutions provided by the most important players on the market. Topics related to content security in cloud based services are tackled in order to emphasize the requirements that must be met by these types of systems. A cloud based implementation of an Information Library System is presented and some adjacent tools that are used together with it to provide digital content and metadata links are described. In a cloud based Information Library System security is approached by means of ontologies. Aspects such as content security in terms of digital rights are presented and a methodology for security optimization is proposed.

  8. MULTIDISCIPLINARY INFORMATION SYSTEM OF ASSYRIAN CUNEIFORM TABLETS ENHANCING NEW RESEARCH POSSIBILITIES VIA HETEROGENEOUS DATA IN RECORDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Valach

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper outlines recently started project dedicated to creation and development of information system for cuneiform tablets. The contribution deals with the architecture of a virtual collection of cuneiform tablets, conceived as a complex system combining and integrating several domains of information obtained from various types of analyses. The research team includes experts from the field of collection conservation with philologists and researchers in the 3D scanning and physical measurement. Multidisciplinary databases like the one described, represent a new tool in digital humanities and help to improve accessibility of collections to public and researchers.

  9. Multidisciplinary Information System of Assyrian Cuneiform Tablets Enhancing New Research Possibilities via Heterogeneous Data in Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valach, J.; Štefcová, P.; Bruna, R.; Zemánek, P.

    2017-08-01

    This paper outlines recently started project dedicated to creation and development of information system for cuneiform tablets. The contribution deals with the architecture of a virtual collection of cuneiform tablets, conceived as a complex system combining and integrating several domains of information obtained from various types of analyses. The research team includes experts from the field of collection conservation with philologists and researchers in the 3D scanning and physical measurement. Multidisciplinary databases like the one described, represent a new tool in digital humanities and help to improve accessibility of collections to public and researchers.

  10. Environmental Geographic Information Systems (EGIS) at Stennis Space Center (SSC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Hugh; Smoot, James; Parikh, Joy

    2004-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation includes: 1) Background of SSC Environmental GIS (EGIS); 2) Principal Center Activities; 3) SSC's GIS Applications: a) Environmental Emergency Response Tool, b) CERCLA, c) Facilities Master Planning, d) Natural Resource Management and Site Assessment.

  11. A resilient and efficient CFD framework: Statistical learning tools for multi-fidelity and heterogeneous information fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seungjoon; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G.; Karniadakis, George Em

    2017-09-01

    Exascale-level simulations require fault-resilient algorithms that are robust against repeated and expected software and/or hardware failures during computations, which may render the simulation results unsatisfactory. If each processor can share some global information about the simulation from a coarse, limited accuracy but relatively costless auxiliary simulator we can effectively fill-in the missing spatial data at the required times by a statistical learning technique - multi-level Gaussian process regression, on the fly; this has been demonstrated in previous work [1]. Based on the previous work, we also employ another (nonlinear) statistical learning technique, Diffusion Maps, that detects computational redundancy in time and hence accelerate the simulation by projective time integration, giving the overall computation a "patch dynamics" flavor. Furthermore, we are now able to perform information fusion with multi-fidelity and heterogeneous data (including stochastic data). Finally, we set the foundations of a new framework in CFD, called patch simulation, that combines information fusion techniques from, in principle, multiple fidelity and resolution simulations (and even experiments) with a new adaptive timestep refinement technique. We present two benchmark problems (the heat equation and the Navier-Stokes equations) to demonstrate the new capability that statistical learning tools can bring to traditional scientific computing algorithms. For each problem, we rely on heterogeneous and multi-fidelity data, either from a coarse simulation of the same equation or from a stochastic, particle-based, more "microscopic" simulation. We consider, as such "auxiliary" models, a Monte Carlo random walk for the heat equation and a dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) model for the Navier-Stokes equations. More broadly, in this paper we demonstrate the symbiotic and synergistic combination of statistical learning, domain decomposition, and scientific computing in

  12. Information and Heterogeneous Beliefs: Cost of Capital, Trading Volume, and Investor Welfare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Peter Ove; Qin, Zhenjiang

    advantage of the disagreements and the differences in confidence among investors. This leads to a higher growth in the investors' certainty equivalents and, thus, a higher equilibrium interest rate, whereas the ex ante risk premium on the risky asset is unaffected by the informativeness of the public...

  13. Traveller Information System for Heterogeneous Traffic Condition: A Case Study in Thiruvananthapuram City, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satyakumar, M.; Anil, R.; Sreeja, G. S.

    2017-12-01

    Traffic in Kerala has been growing at a rate of 10-11% every year, resulting severe congestion especially in urban areas. Because of the limitation of spaces it is not always possible to construct new roads. Road users rely on travel time information for journey planning and route choice decisions, while road system managers are increasingly viewing travel time as an important network performance indicator. More recently Advanced Traveler Information Systems (ATIS) are being developed to provide real-time information to roadway users. For ATIS various methodologies have been developed for dynamic travel time prediction. For this work the Kalman Filter Algorithm was selected for dynamic travel time prediction of different modes. The travel time data collected using handheld GPS device were used for prediction. Congestion Index were calculated and Range of CI values were determined according to the percentage speed drop. After prediction using Kalman Filter, the predicted values along with the GPS data was integrated to GIS and using Network Analysis of ArcGIS the offline route navigation guide was prepared. Using this database a program for route navigation based on travel time was developed. This system will help the travelers with pre-trip information.

  14. Indoor air quality environmental information handbook: Combustion sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-06-01

    This environmental information handbook was prepared to assist both the non-technical reader (i.e., homeowner) and technical persons (such as researchers, policy analysts, and builders/designers) in understanding the current state of knowledge regarding combustion sources of indoor air pollution. Quantitative and descriptive data addressing the emissions, indoor concentrations, factors influencing indoor concentrations, and health effects of combustion-generated pollutants are provided. In addition, a review of the models, controls, and standards applicable to indoor air pollution from combustion sources is presented. The emphasis is on the residential environment. The data presented here have been compiled from government and privately-funded research results, conference proceedings, technical journals, and recent publications. It is intended to provide the technical reader with a comprehensive overview and reference source on the major indoor air quality aspects relating to indoor combustion activities, including tobacco smoking. In addition, techniques for determining potential concentrations of pollutants in residential settings are presented. This is an update of a 1985 study documenting the state of knowledge of combustion-generated pollutants in the indoor environment. 191 refs., 51 figs., 71 tabs.

  15. Benchmarking of hospital information systems: Monitoring of discharge letters and scheduling can reveal heterogeneities and time trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugas, Martin; Eckholt, Markus; Bunzemeier, Holger

    2008-01-01

    Background Monitoring of hospital information system (HIS) usage can provide insights into best practices within a hospital and help to assess time trends. In terms of effort and cost of benchmarking, figures derived automatically from the routine HIS system are preferable to manual methods like surveys, in particular for repeated analysis. Methods Due to relevance for quality management and efficient resource utilization we focused on time-to-completion of discharge letters (assessed by CT-plots) and usage of patient scheduling. We analyzed these parameters monthly during one year at a major university hospital in Germany. Results We found several distinct patterns of discharge letter documentation indicating a large heterogeneity of HIS usage between different specialties (completeness 51 – 99%, delays 0 – 90 days). Overall usage of scheduling increased during the observation period by 62%, but again showed a considerable variation between departments. Conclusion Regular monitoring of HIS key figures can contribute to a continuous HIS improvement process. PMID:18423046

  16. Objective sampling design in a highly heterogeneous landscape - characterizing environmental determinants of malaria vector distribution in French Guiana, in the Amazonian region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, Emmanuel; Gaborit, Pascal; Romaña, Christine A; Girod, Romain; Dessay, Nadine; Dusfour, Isabelle

    2013-12-01

    Sampling design is a key issue when establishing species inventories and characterizing habitats within highly heterogeneous landscapes. Sampling efforts in such environments may be constrained and many field studies only rely on subjective and/or qualitative approaches to design collection strategy. The region of Cacao, in French Guiana, provides an excellent study site to understand the presence and abundance of Anopheles mosquitoes, their species dynamics and the transmission risk of malaria across various environments. We propose an objective methodology to define a stratified sampling design. Following thorough environmental characterization, a factorial analysis of mixed groups allows the data to be reduced and non-collinear principal components to be identified while balancing the influences of the different environmental factors. Such components defined new variables which could then be used in a robust k-means clustering procedure. Then, we identified five clusters that corresponded to our sampling strata and selected sampling sites in each stratum. We validated our method by comparing the species overlap of entomological collections from selected sites and the environmental similarities of the same sites. The Morisita index was significantly correlated (Pearson linear correlation) with environmental similarity based on i) the balanced environmental variable groups considered jointly (p = 0.001) and ii) land cover/use (p-value sampling approach. Land cover/use maps (based on high spatial resolution satellite images) were shown to be particularly useful when studying the presence, density and diversity of Anopheles mosquitoes at local scales and in very heterogeneous landscapes.

  17. 75 FR 12496 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; DOC National Environmental Policy Act...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Office of the Secretary Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; DOC National Environmental Policy Act Environmental Questionnaire and Checklist AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, Office of...

  18. Structuring heterogeneous biological information using fuzzy clustering of k-partite graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theis Fabian J

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extensive and automated data integration in bioinformatics facilitates the construction of large, complex biological networks. However, the challenge lies in the interpretation of these networks. While most research focuses on the unipartite or bipartite case, we address the more general but common situation of k-partite graphs. These graphs contain k different node types and links are only allowed between nodes of different types. In order to reveal their structural organization and describe the contained information in a more coarse-grained fashion, we ask how to detect clusters within each node type. Results Since entities in biological networks regularly have more than one function and hence participate in more than one cluster, we developed a k-partite graph partitioning algorithm that allows for overlapping (fuzzy clusters. It determines for each node a degree of membership to each cluster. Moreover, the algorithm estimates a weighted k-partite graph that connects the extracted clusters. Our method is fast and efficient, mimicking the multiplicative update rules commonly employed in algorithms for non-negative matrix factorization. It facilitates the decomposition of networks on a chosen scale and therefore allows for analysis and interpretation of structures on various resolution levels. Applying our algorithm to a tripartite disease-gene-protein complex network, we were able to structure this graph on a large scale into clusters that are functionally correlated and biologically meaningful. Locally, smaller clusters enabled reclassification or annotation of the clusters' elements. We exemplified this for the transcription factor MECP2. Conclusions In order to cope with the overwhelming amount of information available from biomedical literature, we need to tackle the challenge of finding structures in large networks with nodes of multiple types. To this end, we presented a novel fuzzy k-partite graph partitioning

  19. Heterogeneous Gossip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Davide; Guerraoui, Rachid; Kermarrec, Anne-Marie; Koldehofe, Boris; Mogensen, Martin; Monod, Maxime; Quéma, Vivien

    Gossip-based information dissemination protocols are considered easy to deploy, scalable and resilient to network dynamics. Load-balancing is inherent in these protocols as the dissemination work is evenly spread among all nodes. Yet, large-scale distributed systems are usually heterogeneous with respect to network capabilities such as bandwidth. In practice, a blind load-balancing strategy might significantly hamper the performance of the gossip dissemination.

  20. Identification of incomplete information games with multiple equilibria and unobserved heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ruli

    Amorphous polymers exhibit a wide range of complex temperature-dependent and time-dependent behaviors, from elastic and rubbery to viscoplastic and glassy. At high temperatures, the polymer structure has high mobility and is in the equilibrium rubbery state. The mobility decreases with temperature, and cooling drives the initially rubbery material out of equilibrium and induces the glass transition. The glass transition mechanism can be exploited to achieve the shape memory behaviors. The programmed shape of amorphous shape memory polymers can be stored by the tremendous decrease in chain mobility and recovered to an original shape in response to an environmental trigger, such as heat and solvent, which increases the chain mobility. Modeling the shape memory effect of amorphous polymers requires modeling the temperature-dependent and time-dependent behaviors of the glass transition. Simultaneously, the investigation on shape memory behaviors of amorphous polymers can also enrich the understanding the glass transition. In this work, we started with exploiting the glass transition to model the thermally-activated shape memory behaviors. The model adopted multiple discrete relaxation processes to describe the distribution of relaxation times for stress relaxation, structural relaxation, and stress-activated viscous flow. Experimental methods were also developed to obtain the stress and structural relaxation spectra, and viscoplastic parameters. The model was applied to study the deformation temperature and physical aging influence on the partially constrained recovery and fixed-strain recovery responses. The model was able to capture the main features of the shape memory recovery response observed in experiments. We further extended this model to describe the influence of solvent on the thermomechanical properties and shape memory behavior of amorphous polymers. The solvent increases the chain mobility, decreases the relaxation time and the glass transition

  1. Spatial information in environmental impact assessments: Experiences in Kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mwenda, A.N.; Bregt, A.K.; Ligtenberg, A.; Kibutu, T.N.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) has been widely recognized as being beneficial to various stakeholders during the development of a variety of projects. In Kenya, the legal framework for EIA was set out in 1999 following enactment of the Environmental Management and Coordination Act (EMCA), and

  2. Influence of environmental heterogeneity on the distribution and persistence of a subterranean rodent in a highly unstable landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Fernández, María Jimena; Boston, Emma S M; Gaggiotti, Oscar E; Kittlein, Marcelo J; Mirol, Patricia M

    2016-12-01

    In this study we combine information from landscape characteristics, demographic inference and species distribution modelling to identify environmental factors that shape the genetic distribution of the fossorial rodent Ctenomys. We sequenced the mtDNA control region and amplified 12 microsatellites from 27 populations distributed across the Iberá wetland ecosystem. Hierarchical Bayesian modelling was used to construct phylogenies and estimate divergence times. We developed species distribution models to determine what climatic variables and soil parameters predicted species presence by comparing the current to the historic and predicted future distribution of the species. Finally, we explore the impact of environmental variables on the genetic structure of Ctenomys based on current and past species distributions. The variables that consistently correlated with the predicted distribution of the species and explained the observed genetic differentiation among populations included the distribution of well-drained sandy soils and temperature seasonality. A core region of stable suitable habitat was identified from the Last Interglacial, which is projected to remain stable into the future. This region is also the most genetically diverse and is currently under strong anthropogenic pressure. Results reveal complex demographic dynamics, which have been in constant change in both time and space, and are likely linked to the evolution of the Paraná River. We suggest that any alteration of soil properties (climatic or anthropic) may significantly impact the availability of suitable habitat and consequently the ability of individuals to disperse. The protection of this core stable habitat is of prime importance given the increasing levels of human disturbance across this wetland system and the threat of climate change.

  3. Storage and retrieval of chemical mutagenesis information. [Operation of the Environmental Mutagen Information Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wassom, J.S.

    1979-01-01

    The imminent risks to human health which may result from exposure to environmental agents add urgency to the task of providing access to the genetic toxicology literature. Through the efforts at EMIC during the last ten years, workers in the field of genetic toxicology have an excellent means of acquiring needed information. In this regard, researchers in this field have an edge over their colleagues in other branches of toxicology. This paper has addressed the current state of the genetic toxicology literature and has reviewed several of the techniques employed by EMIC to control the literature in this area. Procedures for the development of a program to make this file more readily available in all countries where there is research in genetic toxicology are proposed.

  4. Marine environmental geographic information system (MEGIS) development for Japan

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Morita, I; Sasagawa, A; Oka, K; Maxwell, G

    1997-01-01

    ...) under the supervision of the Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI) of Japan. The 5-year program, which is designed to minimize environmental damage in the event of an oil spill, commenced in 1992...

  5. Additive interaction between heterogeneous environmental quality domains (air, water, land, sociodemographic and built environment) on preterm birth

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND Environmental exposures often occur in tandem; however, epidemiological research often focuses on singular exposures. Statistical interactions among broad, well-characterized environmental domains have not yet been evaluated in association with health. We address this ...

  6. Architectural and Functional Design of an Environmental Information Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-04-30

    Environmental Protection Agency. GDM - Global Data Manager of MULTIBASE. This module performs 4 decomposition and recomposition of a query. Any query in...Force is subject, in most instances, to the same federal, state, and local environmental regulations that apply to other governing bodies (e.g., cities...terms of identifying an appropriate receiving water model include (1) applicable 0 receiving water body , (2) water body characteristics, (3) time

  7. An investigation of environmental racism claims: testing environmental management approaches with a geographic information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macey, G P; Her, X; Reibling, E T; Ericson, J

    2001-06-01

    The purpose of this research was to explore the concept of an environmental racism claim through the use of several environmental management tools. The EPAs Toxics Release Inventory, Cumulative Exposure Project, and the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services' Hot Zone Census Tract Assessment were combined with racial and socioeconomic data to test claims that minorities in South Central Los Angeles are disproportionately exposed to environmental lead. Multivariate analysis indicated that race is strongly associated with the number of cases of elevated blood lead levels in South Central, irrespective of poverty status. Proximity to point sources, a common focal point for studies of environmental racism, was not a contributing factor to health outcomes. Proximity to transportation corridors was consistently the strongest indicator of environmental lead exposure, while median home values were significantly and positively related to elevated blood lead levels. Implications for environmental justice advocates and social and environmental scientists are discussed.

  8. 30 CFR 250.227 - What environmental impact analysis (EIA) information must accompany the EP?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What environmental impact analysis (EIA... and Information Contents of Exploration Plans (ep) § 250.227 What environmental impact analysis (EIA... requirements. Your EIA must: (1) Assess the potential environmental impacts of your proposed exploration...

  9. Information Technology Use in the Secondary Classroom: Implications for Participatory Environmental Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasubramanian, Laxmi; Logie, June

    1999-01-01

    Discusses environmental education in New Zealand and the role of technology in environmental education. Examines the role of participatory research in environmental education, suggesting that participatory research can be enhanced through the use of information technologies (IT). Describes two studies and identifies six themes to consider when…

  10. 78 FR 67140 - Office of Environmental Information; Pause the Development of the Draft Quality Standard for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Office of Environmental Information; Pause the Development of the Draft Quality Standard for Environmental Data Collection, Production, and Use by Non-EPA (External) Organizations and Two Associated QA...

  11. Spatially heterogeneous environmental selection strengthens evolution of reproductively isolated populations in a Dobzhansky-Muller system of hybrid incompatability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel A Cushman

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Within-species hybrid incompatibility can arise when combinations of alleles at more than one locus have low fitness but where possession of one of those alleles has little or no fitness consequence for the carriers. Limited dispersal with small numbers of mate potentials alone can lead to the evolution of clusters of reproductively isolated genotypes despite the absence of any geographical barriers or heterogeneous selection. In this paper, we explore how adding heterogeneous natural selection on the genotypes (e.g., gene environment associations that are involved in reproductive incompatibility affects the frequency, size and duration of evolution of reproductively isolated clusters. We conducted a simulation experiment that varied landscape heterogeneity, dispersal ability and strength of selection in a continuously distributed population. In our simulations involving spatially heterogeneous selection, strong patterns of adjacency of mutually incompatible genotypes emerged such that these clusters were truly reproductively isolated from each other, with no reproductively compatible bridge individuals in the intervening landscape to allow gene flow between the clusters. This pattern was strong across levels of gene flow and strength of selection, suggesting that even relatively weak selection acting in the context of strong gene flow may produce reproductively isolated clusters that are large and persistent, enabling incipient speciation in a continuous population without geographic isolation.

  12. Environmental Information Provision in Nigeria: The Case Study of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The main information sources used by respondents in meeting their information needs were town criers /community leaders (82.7%), radio (77.7%) and personal contact/visits (71.9%.). Libraries were rarely used as a source of information as only 1.2% of the respondents indicated the use of libraries as a source of ...

  13. 78 FR 78998 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: HUD Environmental Review Online System (HEROS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-27

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: HUD Environmental Review Online... parties on the proposed collection of information. The purpose of this notice is to allow for 60 days of.... 24 CFR Part 50, ``Protection and Enhancement of Environmental Quality,'' implements procedures for...

  14. Influence of statistical estimators of mutual information and data heterogeneity on the inference of gene regulatory networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo de Matos Simoes

    Full Text Available The inference of gene regulatory networks from gene expression data is a difficult problem because the performance of the inference algorithms depends on a multitude of different factors. In this paper we study two of these. First, we investigate the influence of discrete mutual information (MI estimators on the global and local network inference performance of the C3NET algorithm. More precisely, we study 4 different MI estimators (Empirical, Miller-Madow, Shrink and Schürmann-Grassberger in combination with 3 discretization methods (equal frequency, equal width and global equal width discretization. We observe the best global and local inference performance of C3NET for the Miller-Madow estimator with an equal width discretization. Second, our numerical analysis can be considered as a systems approach because we simulate gene expression data from an underlying gene regulatory network, instead of making a distributional assumption to sample thereof. We demonstrate that despite the popularity of the latter approach, which is the traditional way of studying MI estimators, this is in fact not supported by simulated and biological expression data because of their heterogeneity. Hence, our study provides guidance for an efficient design of a simulation study in the context of network inference, supporting a systems approach.

  15. Environmental impacts of products: Policy relevant information and data challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tukker, A.; Eder, P.; Suh, S.

    2006-01-01

    The research and analysis presented in this special issue shows that the same limited number of consumption categories are consistently revealed to be responsible for the largest share of environmental impact: mobility (automobile and air transport), food (meat, poultry, fish, and dairy followed by

  16. INFORMATION GAP: DEMAND SUPPLY ENVIRONMENTAL DISCLOSURE DI INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djoko Suhardjanto

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The purposes of this study were to invest igate informat ion gap of environmentaldisclosure in Indonesian and to examine relat ionship between company characterist ics andits environmental disclosures. Company characterist ics were ident if ied as size, prof itability,leverage, prof ile, and company’s operat ion territory. This study also examined proport ion ofindependent commissioner and the educat ional background of commissioner president ascont rol variable. Primary and secondary data were used in this research. Interview and questionnaire to 50 respondents as broader stakeholders were used as primary data. On average,there was high demand f rom respondents on environmental disclosure (score of 3.95 within5 Likert scale. Under purposive sampling, 100 annual reports of companies in BEI were selectedas secondary data. There was 44% of those disclosed environmental informat ion. Underweighted index, the level of disclosure was 4.84%. High demand f rom broader stakeholdersto disclose environmental informat ion does not supply properly by Indonesian companies.Thus, there was informat ion gap in environmetal disclosure. Result of logist ic regressionshowed that the determinants for Indonesian companies to disclosure environmentalinformat ion were Prof itabilit y; Leverage and Proport ion of Independent Commissioner. Inaddit ion, the signif icant predictors for the level of disclosure were Leverage; Proport ion ofIndependent Commissioner and the Educat ional Background of Commissioner President .

  17. Environmental laws regulating chemicals: Uses of information in decision making under environmental statutes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaba, J.M. [Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States)

    1990-12-31

    Three areas are addressed in this paper: generic issues that arise simply in the process of decision-making under environmental statutes; different decision-making standards under various environmental statutes; and efforts to legislate a {open_quotes}safe{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}acceptable{close_quotes} risk from exposure to carcinogenic chemicals.

  18. 47 CFR 1.1311 - Environmental information to be included in the environmental assessment (EA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Procedures Implementing the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 § 1.1311... determinations (if any) made by zoning, planning, environmental or other local, state or Federal authorities on..., natural migration paths for birds and other wildlife, and sites of historic, architectural, or...

  19. Environmental governance and new ICTs : the impact of new information and communication technologies on global environmental governance

    OpenAIRE

    Duberry, Jérôme

    2015-01-01

    The doctoral dissertation deals with the impact of the use of new information and communication technologies (ICTs) on global environmental governance. The objective of the research is to analyze the influence of these technologies on the legitimacy of global governance tools and on the competences of global non-state actors –as part of global civil society– involved in processes of environmental politics. After defining the context in which new ICTs emerge, the thesis develops two case studi...

  20. Environmental dose rate heterogeneity of beta radiation and its implications for luminescence dating: Monte Carlo modelling and experimental validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nathan, R.P.; Thomas, P.J.; Jain, M.

    2003-01-01

    The recent development of rapid single sand-sized grain analyses in luminescence dating has necessitated the accurate interpretation of D-e distributions to recover a representative D-e acquired since the last bleaching event. Beta heterogeneity may adversely affect the variance and symmetry of D...... and identify the likely size of these effects on D-e distributions. The study employs the MCNP 4C Monte Carlo electron/photon transport model, supported by an experimental validation of the code in several case studies. We find good agreement between the experimental measurements and the Monte Carlo......-e distributions and it is important to characterise this effect, both to ensure that dose distributions are not misinterpreted, and that an accurate beta dose rate is employed in dating calculations. In this study, we make a first attempt providing a description of potential problems in heterogeneous environments...

  1. An integrated information system for the acquisition, management and sharing of environmental data aimed to decision making

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Loggia, Goffredo; Arnone, Elisa; Ciraolo, Giuseppe; Maltese, Antonino; Noto, Leonardo; Pernice, Umberto

    2012-09-01

    This paper reports the first results of the Project SESAMO - SistEma informativo integrato per l'acquisizione, geStione e condivisione di dati AMbientali per il supportO alle decisioni (Integrated Information System for the acquisition, management and sharing of environmental data aimed to decision making). The main aim of the project is to design and develop an integrated environmental information platform able to provide monitoring services for decision support, integrating data from different environmental monitoring systems (including WSN). This ICT platform, based on a service-oriented architecture (SOA), will be developed to coordinate a wide variety of data acquisition systems, based on heterogeneous technologies and communication protocols, providing different sort of environmental monitoring services. The implementation and validation of the SESAMO platform and its services will involve three specific environmental domains: 1) Urban water losses; 2) Early warning system for rainfall-induced landslides; 3) Precision irrigation planning. Services in the first domain are enabled by a low cost sensors network collecting and transmitting data, in order to allow the pipeline network managers to analyze pressure, velocity and discharge data for reducing water losses in an urban contest. This paper outlines the SESAMO functional and technological structure and then gives a concise description of the service design and development process for the second and third domain. Services in the second domain are enabled by a prototypal early warning system able to identify in near-real time high-risk zones of rainfall-induced landslides. Services in the third domain are aimed to optimize irrigation planning of vineyards depending on plant water stress.

  2. Potential of Geographic Information Systems to Create a Municipal Environmental Model

    OpenAIRE

    Adrian Juan Espinosa

    2016-01-01

    Geographic information systems are used internationally to acquire information about the characteristics of the global surface and digitalize it to facilitate georeferencing, statistical analysis, virtual scenarios and mitigation of disasters. In Cuba, they are inserted in the design of Environmental Models, along with other applications. The aim of this paper was to demonstrate the potential offered by Geographic Information Systems to establish an Environmental Model in the municipality of ...

  3. The use of geographic information systems for environmental management of the Minto/Chipman coalfield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, R. [University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, NB (Canada). Department of Civil Engineering

    1995-11-01

    An environmental management tool for evaluating reclamation plans and environmental assessments and for monitoring strip mining in the Minto/Chipman coal field in New Brunswick is described. The environmental management or geographic information system (GIS) is used to monitor two strip mining operations. The GIS stores and integrates data sets describing mine plans, maps, geology, environmental management information, ground water chemistry, reclamation plans, topography, and LANDSAT TM images. The GIS provides a way to compare mine and reclamation plans and to verify adherence to them. 21 refs., 7 figs., 18 tabs., 2 apps.

  4. Controlled reduction of red mud waste to produce active systems for environmental applications: heterogeneous Fenton reaction and reduction of Cr(VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Regina C C; Moura, Flávia C C; Oliveira, Patrícia E F; Magalhães, Fabiano; Ardisson, José D; Lago, Rochel M

    2010-02-01

    In this work, controlled reduction of red mud with H(2) was used to produce active systems for two different environmental applications, i.e. the heterogeneous Fenton reaction and the reduction of Cr(VI). Mössbauer, powder X-ray diffraction, thermal analyses and scanning electron microscopy analyses showed that at different temperatures, i.e. 300, 400, 500 and 600 degrees C, H(2) reduces red mud to different phases, mainly Fe(3)O(4), Fe(0)/Fe(3)O(4) and Fe(0). These Fe phases are dispersed on Al, Si and Ti oxides present in the red mud and show high reactivity towards two environmental applications, i.e. the heterogeneous Fenton reaction and the reduction of Cr(VI). Reduction with H(2) at 400 degrees C showed the best results for the oxidation of the model dye methylene blue with H(2)O(2) at neutral pH due to the presence of the composite Fe(0)/Fe(3)O(4). The reduced red mud at 500-600 degrees C produced Fe(0) highly active for the reduction of Cr(VI) in aqueous medium. Another feature of these red mud based system is that after deactivation due to extensive use they can be completely regenerated by simple treatment with H(2). Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Environmental information volume: Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH{trademark}) project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this project is to demonstrate the commercial viability of the Liquid Phase Methanol Process using coal-derived synthesis gas, a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. This report describes the proposed actions, alternative to the proposed action, the existing environment at the coal gasification plant at Kingsport, Tennessee, environmental impacts, regulatory requirements, offsite fuel testing, and DME addition to methanol production. Appendices include the air permit application, solid waste permits, water permit, existing air permits, agency correspondence, and Eastman and Air Products literature.

  6. Digital Environmental Governance in China: Information Disclosure, Pollution Control, and Environmental Activism in the Yellow River Delta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaxin Tan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The Chinese water bureaucracy increasingly utilises information and communications technology (ICT in order to strengthen interaction with the population, which is severely affected by industrial pollution. Government webpages, mailboxes, and online interviews with officers have become prevalent tools for environmental governance, including information disclosure, and a virtual communication forum between the state and its citizens. The present study employs a mixed methods approach with a qualitative emphasis to explore the process of communication and interaction between government agencies and local residents in Dongying, Shandong Province. The results show that information disclosure of pollution data remains far from being transparent, despite the fact that the local government has implemented digital environmental governance, as encouraged by the central Chinese state. Internet technologies empower resource-poor environmental activists in Dongying to strengthen their social network and build communication with the authorities. The application of bureaucratic techniques, however, is key for them to enter the communication interface with government agencies in order to influence political decisions. Results suggest that local cadres tend to send mixed signals to activists and display wariness towards them. They also tend to take preventive measures to keep the situation under control when environmental disputes arise. The proposed communication interface approach sheds a clearer light on the complexity among the emergent ICTs, environmental activism, and digital governance.

  7. Energy technologies and the environment: Environmental information handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-10-01

    This revision of Energy Technologies and the Environment reflects the changes in energy supply and demand, focus of environmental concern, and emphasis of energy research and development that have occurred since publication of the earlier edition in 1980. The increase in availability of oil and natural gas, at least for the near term, is responsible in part for a reduced emphasis on development of replacement fuels and technologies. Trends in energy development also have been influenced by an increased reliance on private industry initiatives, and a correspondingly reduced government involvement, in demonstrating more developed technologies. Environmental concerns related to acid rain and waste management continue to increase the demand for development of innovative energy systems. The basic criteria for including a technology in this report are that (1) the technology is a major current or potential future energy supply and (2) significant changes in employing or understanding the technology have occurred since publication of the 1980 edition. Coal is seen to be a continuing major source of energy supply, and thus chapters pertaining to the principal coal technologies have been revised from the 1980 edition (those on coal mining and preparation, conventional coal-fired power plants, fluidized-bed combustion, coal gasification, and coal liquefaction) or added as necessary to include emerging technologies (those on oil shale, combined-cycle power plants, coal-liquid mixtures, and fuel cells).

  8. Developing an Environmental Performance Index (EPI: a focus on impacts of information and communication technology use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Mbohwa

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing need for environmental performance measures that can be used by all stakeholders like surrounding communities, customers, suppliers and shareholders to gauge the environmental performance of organizations. The environmental performance measures that are used worldwide are normally not suitable for benchmarking organizations. This paper develops an environmental performance index using indicator and weight matrices of the full life cycle phases of an organization’s energy use for environmental management system activities. This work is transdisciplinary in nature and applies mathematical matrices and environmental productivity approaches, and borrows from the development of quality indices to consider a variety of impacts that cut across various phases of a product life cycle and different functions within an organization. The focus is on information and communication technology use in these systems. The model is applied to the Japanese automotive industry and the findings show that it is feasible and effective for comparing the environmental performance of companies in the same sector using the same weight matrices and indicators agreed to. The work informs decision making on the development of environmental performance measures that have worldwide applications, across many disciplines, in situations where suitable data are recorded. It also contributes to efforts on economic and social sustainability. Research efforts in similar areas in Southern Africa can benefit from the development and improvement of the proposed methodology. Keywords: Environmental performance index, indicator and weight matrices, benchmarking Disciplines: Information and Communications Technology Studies (ICT, Environmental Studies, Economics, Sustainability Studies

  9. Experimental methods and modeling techniques for description of cell population heterogeneity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandes, R. Lencastre; Nierychlo, M.; Lundin, L.; Pedersen, A. E.; Puentes Téllez, Pilar; Dutta, A.; Carlquist, M.; Bolic, A.; Schapper, D.; Brunetti, A. C.; Helmark, S.; Heins, A. -L; Jensen, A. D.; Nopens, I.; Rottwitt, K.; Szita, N.; van Elsas, J. D.; Nielsen, P. H.; Martinussen, J.; Sorensen, S. J.; Lantz, A. E.; Gernaey, K. V.

    2011-01-01

    With the continuous development, in the last decades, of analytical techniques providing complex information at single cell level, the study of cell heterogeneity has been the focus of several research projects within analytical biotechnology. Nonetheless, the complex interplay between environmental

  10. Environmental settings for selected US Department of Energy installations - support information for the programmatic environmental impact statement and the baseline environmental management report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holdren, G.R.; Glantz, C.S.; Berg, L.K.; Delinger, K.; Fosmire, C.J.; Goodwin, S.M.; Rustad, J.R.; Schalla, R.; Schramke, J.A.

    1995-05-01

    This report contains the environmental setting information developed for 25 U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) installations in support of the DOE`s Programmatic Environmental Impact Study (PEIS) and the Baseline Environmental Management Report (BEMR). The common objective of the PEIS and the BEMR is to provide the public with information about the environmental contamination problems associated with major DOE facilities across the country, and to assess the relative risks that radiological and hazardous contaminants pose to the public, onsite workers, and the environment. Environmental setting information consists of the site-specific data required to model (using the Multimedia Environmental Pollutant Assessment System) the atmospheric, groundwater, and surface water transport of contaminants within and near the boundaries of the installations. The environmental settings data describes the climate, atmospheric dispersion, hydrogeology, and surface water characteristics of the installations. The number of discrete environmental settings established for each installation was governed by two competing requirements: (1) the risks posed by contaminants released from numerous waste sites were to be modeled as accurately as possible, and (2) the modeling required for numerous release sites and a large number of contaminants had to be completed within the limits imposed by the PEIS and BEMR schedule. The final product is the result of attempts to balance these competing concerns in a way that minimizes the number of settings per installation in order to meet the project schedule while at the same, time providing adequate, if sometimes highly simplified, representations of the different areas within an installation. Environmental settings were developed in conjunction with installation experts in the fields of meteorology, geology, hydrology, and geochemistry.

  11. Partitioning the effects of environmental and spatial heterogeneity on distribution of plant diversity in the Yellow River Estuary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xiu; Ma, Keming; Wang, De

    2012-06-01

    For successful conservation and restoration of biodiversity, it is important to understand how diversity is regulated. In the ecological research community, a current topic of interest is how much of the variation in plant species richness and composition is explained by environmental variation (niche-based model), relative to spatial processes (neutral theory). The Yellow River Estuary (YRE) is a newly formed and fragile wetland ecosystem influenced by both the Yellow River and Bohai Bay. Here, we applied variance partitioning techniques to assess the relative effects of spatial and environmental variables on species richness and composition in the YRE. We also conducted a species indicator analysis to identify characteristic species for three subestuaries within the YRE. Partial redundancy analysis showed that the variations in species richness and composition were explained by both environmental and spatial factors. The majority of explained variation in species richness and composition was attributable to local environmental factors. Among the environmental variables, soil salinity made the greatest contribution to species abundance and composition. Soil salinity was the most important factor in the Diaokou subestuary, while soil moisture was the most important factor influencing species richness in the Qingshui and Chahe subestuaries. The combined effects of soil salinity and moisture determined species richness and composition in the wetlands. These results increase our understanding of the organization and assembly of estuarine plant communities.

  12. Dealing with heterogeneous landslide information for landslide susceptibility assessment: comparing a pixel-based and slope unit-based approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Liesbet; Kervyn, Matthieu; Poesen, Jean; Reichenbach, Paola; Rossi, Mauro; Marchesini, Ivan; Alvioli, Massimiliano; Dewitte, Olivier

    2017-04-01

    In the Rwenzori Mountains, various multi-disciplinary data collection initiatives have resulted in a heterogeneous database counting 247 fully characterized landslides with known size and shape (polygon dataset) and 307 landslides represented as single points taken at an unknown location within the landslide body (point dataset). While the polygon dataset covers only 9% of the inhabited highlands, the point dataset extends the total inventoried area to 18% of the entire inhabited highland region. A regional susceptibility model for the total area should therefore include both information from polygon- as well as point datasets. This involves two distinct methodological challenges with regard to the use of points and polygons respectively. Firstly, the point dataset, where the location of the point within the landslide body is unknown, may not be fully representative for the spatial conditions under which the landslides occurred. Here we aim to identify a robust approach, to limit this uncertainty and maximize the point location representativeness. For this purpose, a pixel-based approach is tested and compared to a slope unit-based approach. To mimic the uncertainty related to the localization of the points, 50 random samplings of single points within each landslide were performed and then fed into a logistic regression model. The model was thus run 50 times using both the slope unit-based and the pixel-based approach. The results show that the slope unit-based alternative has an overall better performance than the pixel-based with comparable stability over the runs. Based on these results, the slope unit seems a more appropriate mapping unit for a susceptibility model based on point-data. A second significant methodological issue, when using polygon-based models, concerns the decision on when a slope unit is considered to be landslide-prone. A threshold representing the fraction of the slope unit affected by landslides above which a slope unit is assigned to be

  13. Environmental information systems a challenge to meet corporate environmental strategy in the South African mining industry

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    M.Sc. South Africa is a country with huge developmental challenges. In Africa, it is one of the few countries that have really incorporated the concepts of the information society into the fundamental reconstruction and development process. Appropriate political commitment, policy frameworks and legislation have largely been established to provide the environment in which effective information management can develop and information can be made widely available for democratic management of ...

  14. Additive interaction between heterogeneous environmental quality domains (air, water, land, sociodemographic and built environment on preterm birth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon Grabich

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Environmental exposures often occur in tandem; however, epidemiological research often focuses on singular exposures. Statistical interactions among broad, well-characterized environmental domains have not yet been evaluated in association with health. We address this gap by conducting a county-level cross-sectional analysis of interactions between Environmental Quality Index (EQI domain indices on preterm birth in the Unites States from 2000-2005.METHODS: The EQI, a county-level index constructed for the 2000-2005 time period, was constructed from five domain-specific indices (air, water, land, built and sociodemographic using principal component analyses. County-level preterm birth rates (n=3141 were estimated using live births from the National Center for Health Statistics. Linear regression was used to estimate prevalence differences (PD and 95% confidence intervals (CI comparing worse environmental quality to the better quality for each model for a each individual domain main effect b the interaction contrast and c the two main effects plus interaction effect (i.e., the net effect to show departure from additivity for the all U.S counties. Analyses were also performed for subgroupings by four urban/rural strata. RESULTS: We found the suggestion of antagonistic interactions but no synergism, along with several purely additive (i.e., no interaction associations. In the non-stratified model, we observed antagonistic interactions, between the sociodemographic/air domains (net effect (i.e. the association including main effects and interaction effects PD: -0.004 (95% CI:-0.007, 0.000, interaction contrast: -0.013 (95% CI:-0.020, -0.007 and built/air domains (net effect PD: 0.008 (95% CI 0.004, 0.011, interaction contrast: -0.008 (95% CI:-0.015, -0.002. Most interactions were between the air domain and other respective domains. Interactions differed by urbanicity, with more interactions observed in non-metropolitan regions

  15. Reducing Environmental Risks by Information Disclosure: Evidence in Residential Lead Paint Disclosure Rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Hyunhoe

    2012-01-01

    Recently, there has been a surge in environmental regulations that require information disclosure. However, existing empirical evidence is limited to certain applications and has yet to generalize the effectiveness of this approach as a policy strategy to reduce environmental risks. This study evaluates the disclosure rule of the residential lead…

  16. Values determine the (ineffectiveness of informational interventions in promoting pro-environmental behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Willem Bolderdijk

    Full Text Available Informational interventions (e.g., awareness campaigns, carbon footprint calculators are built on the assumption that informing the public about the environmental consequences of their actions should result in increased pro-environmental intentions and behavior. However, empirical support for this reasoning is mixed. In this paper, we argue that informational interventions may succeed in improving people's knowledge about the negative environmental consequences of one's actions, but this knowledge will not gain motivational force if people do not consider protecting the environment an important personal value. In an experiment, we measured individual differences in value priorities, and either presented participants a movie clip that portrayed the negative environmental consequences of using bottled water, or a control movie. As predicted, we found that the environmental movie improved recipients' knowledge of the negative environmental impact of bottled water, but this knowledge only resulted in concomitant changes in intentions and acceptability of related policies among participants who strongly endorsed biospheric (i.e. environmental values, while having no effect on those who care less about the environment. Interestingly, the results suggest that although informational interventions are perhaps not always successful in directly affecting less environmentally-conscious recipients, they could still have beneficial effects, because they make those who strongly care about the environment more inclined to act on their values.

  17. Hazardous substances data bank (HSDB) as a source of environmental fate information on chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonger, G C

    1995-11-30

    The Hazardous Substances Data Bank (HSDB), a factual data bank on the National Library of Medicine's (NLM) TOXNET (Toxicology Data Network) online system, provides information in areas such as chemical substance identification, chemical and physical properties, safety and handling, toxicology, pharmacology, environmental fate and transformation, regulations, and analytical methodology. This article discusses how environmental fate data is handled in HSDB.

  18. Basic Information for EPA's Selected Analytical Methods for Environmental Remediation and Recovery (SAM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contains basic information on the role and origins of the Selected Analytical Methods including the formation of the Homeland Security Laboratory Capacity Work Group and the Environmental Evaluation Analytical Process Roadmap for Homeland Security Events

  19. 78 FR 50079 - Information Collection Activities: Safety and Environmental Management Systems (SEMS); Proposed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-16

    ...: 134E1700D2 EEEE500000 ET1SF0000.DAQ000] Information Collection Activities: Safety and Environmental Management Systems (SEMS); Proposed Collection; Comment Request Correction In notice document 2013-19416...

  20. 78 FR 76810 - Information Collection; Environmental Justice and the Urban Forest in Atlanta, GA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-19

    ... day, 7 days a week, including holidays. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Environmental Justice and...: December 11, 2013. Daina D. Apple, Senior Staff to the Deputy Chief, U. S. Forest Service Research and...

  1. Environmental Virtual Observatories (EVOs): prospects for knowledge co-creation and resilience in the Information Age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karpouzoglou, T.D.; Zulkafli, Z.; Grainger, S.; Dewulf, A.R.P.J.; Buytaert, W.; Hannah, D.M.

    2016-01-01

    Developments in technologies are shaping information access globally. This presents opportunities and challenges for understanding the role of new technologies in sustainability research. This article focuses on a suite of technologies termed Environmental Virtual Observatories (EVOs) developed for

  2. Archive of Geosample Data and Information from the NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL).

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL) contributed information...

  3. Robust Priority for Strategic Environmental Assessment with Incomplete Information Using Multi-Criteria Decision Making Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Daeryong Park; Yeonjoo Kim; Myoung-Jin Um; Sung-Uk Choi

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates how the priority rankings for dam construction sites vary with multi-criteria decision making (MCDM) techniques and generation approaches for incomplete information. Strategic environmental assessment (SEA) seeks to recommend sustainable dam construction sites based on their environmental and ecological impacts in a long-term plan for dam construction (LPDC) in South Korea. However, if specific information is missing, the SEA is less useful for choosing a dam construct...

  4. Uncertainty reduction in environmental data with conflicting information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Alberto; Rallo, Robert; Giralt, Francesc

    2009-07-01

    The assessment of ecotoxicological effects of chemicals for regulatory purposes requires large amounts of experimental data which are expensive to obtain and eventually might entail exhaustive animal testing. The required decision-making processes in this regulatory context, must often be carried out with limited or even contradictory sources of information. To benefit from all sources of information without compromising the quality of the decision process, uncertainty management and reduction techniques, such as the Dempster-Shafer theory of evidence, have to be applied. This theory was applied to both experimental and in silico biodegradation data sources to assess chemical persistence. Uncertainties of the initially lass uncertain estimates for biodegradation rates in water were reduced by as much as 20-60%. The analysis showed that conflicting evidence can be detected, quantified, and redistributed proportionally among all the feasible subsets of hypotheses. The advantages of the Dempster-Shafer theory over Bayesian approaches to represent evidence concerning hypotheses by assigning probabilities were also analyzed.

  5. Extension of the Fermi–Eyges most-likely path in heterogeneous medium with prior knowledge information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins-Fekete, Charles-Antoine; Bär, Esther; Volz, Lennart; Bouchard, Hugo; Beaulieu, Luc; Seco, Joao

    2017-12-01

    Particle imaging suffers from poor spatial resolution due to the multiple Coulomb scattering deflections undergone by the particles throughout their path. To account for these deflections, a most-likely path (MLP) formalism was developed based on a Bayesian adaption of the Fermi–Eyges theory. Previous work calculated the MLP formalism in a homogeneous water medium as an initial estimate. However, this potentially reduces the accuracy of the MLP estimate as well as the achievable resolution of the subsequent tomographic reconstruction. This work investigates the potential gain of introducing prior-knowledge on the medium composition and density to improve the MLP accuracy. To do so, a Monte Carlo (MC) Geant4 algorithm was used to simulate protons (n=106 ) crossing three different anthropomorphic phantoms representing the lung, abdomen, and head. The prior-knowledge information is gathered from (1) the MC simulation for ground-truth (MLP-GT), or from (2) a recent DECT material decomposition technique (MLP-DECT). The reconstructed path accuracy using prior-knowledge methods is compared with (3) the path reconstructed in homogeneous water (MLP-Water) and (4) a path reconstruction method where the proton path is projected onto a Hull at the boundary of the phantom with a subsequent MLP-Water calculation (MLP-Hull). For each path reconstruction method, the maximal root-mean-square error (RMSmax) is compared between the reconstructed and the MC path. In every phantom, the RMSmax is decreased between the MLP-Water and the three other path algorithms that take into account heterogeneities (-33% for the lung, -38% for the abdomen and -81% for the head), with no significant differences between each (MLP-DECT, MLP-GT and MLP-Hull). In conclusion, the introduction of prior-knowledge in the MLP formalism decreases the RMS uncertainty to the MC path, but no further than the use of a simpler Hull contour algorithm. The use of this Hull algorithm is suggested for future particle

  6. Information Management of Web Application Based Environmental Performance Management in Concentrating Division of PTFI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanto Arif

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The changes of environmental management system standards into the latest version, i.e. ISO 14001:2015, may cause a change on a data and information need in decision making and achieving the objectives in the organization coverage. Information management is the organization’s responsibility to ensure that effectiveness and efficiency start from its creating, storing, processing and distribution processes to support operations and effective decision making activity in environmental performance management. The objective of this research was to set up an information management program and to adopt the technology as the supporting component of the program which was done by PTFI Concentrating Division so that it could be in line with the desirable organization objective in environmental management based on ISO 14001:2015 environmental management system standards. Materials and methods used covered technical aspects in information management, i.e. with web-based application development by using usage centered design. The result of this research showed that the use of Single Sign On gave ease to its user to interact further on the use of the environmental management system. Developing a web-based through creating entity relationship diagram (ERD and information extraction by conducting information extraction which focuses on attributes, keys, determination of constraints. While creating ERD is obtained from relational database scheme from a number of database from environmental performances in Concentrating Division.

  7. EPD--environmental product declarations for wood products : an application of life cycle information about forest products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard Bergman; Adam Taylor

    2011-01-01

    Transparent and credible environmental labeling of products is vital for a sustainable future. Ecolabeling shows information on the environmental performance of products, processes, and services. This article focuses on one type of ecolabeling referred to as environmental product declarations (EPDs) that provide environmental impact information based on life cycle...

  8. Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Environmental Information Document - Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BAYLISS, LINDA S.; GUERRERO, JOSEPH V.; JOHNS, WILLIAM H.; KUZIO, KENNETH A.; BAILEY-WHITE, BRENDA E.

    1999-09-01

    This Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Environmental Information Document (EID) compiles information on the existing environment, or environmental baseline, for SNUNM. Much of the information is drawn from existing reports and databases supplemented by new research and data. The SNL/NM EID, together with the Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Facilities and Safety Information Document, provide a basis for assessing the environment, safety, and health aspects of operating selected facilities at SNL/NM. The environmental baseline provides a record of the existing physical, biological, and socioeconomic environment at SNL/NLM prior to being altered (beneficially or adversely) by proposed programs or projects. More specifically, the EID provides information on the following topics: Geology; Land Use; Hydrology and Water Resources; Air Quality and Meteorology; Ecology; Noise and Vibration; Cultural Resources; Visual Resources; Socioeconomic and Community Services; Transportation; Material Management; Waste Management; and Regulatory Requirements.

  9. Quantifying how fine-grained environmental heterogeneity and genetic variation affect demography in an annual plant population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latimer, Andrew M; Jacobs, Brooke S

    2012-11-01

    The ability of plant species to colonize new habitats and persist in changing environments depends on their ability to respond plastically to environmental variation and on the presence of genetic variation, thus allowing adaptation to new conditions. For invasive species in particular, the relationship between phenotypic trait expression, demography, and the quantitative genetic variation that is available to respond to selection are likely to be important determinants of the successful establishment and persistence of populations. However, the magnitude and sources of individual demographic variation in exotic plant populations remain poorly understood. How important is plasticity versus adaptability in populations of invasive species? Among environmental factors, is temperature, soil nutrients, or competition most influential, and at what scales and life stages do they affect the plants? To investigate these questions we planted seeds of the exotic annual plant Erodium brachycarpum into typical pasture habitat in a spatially nested design. Seeds were drawn from 30 inbred lines to enable quantification of genetic effects. Despite a positive population growth rate, a few plants (0.1 %) produced >50 % of the seeds, suggesting a low effective population size. Emergence and early growth varied by genotype, but as in previous studies on native plants, environmental effects greatly exceeded genetic effects, and survival was unrelated to genotype. Environmental influences shifted from microscale soil compaction and litter depth at emergence through to larger-scale soil nutrient gradients during growth and to competition during later survival and seed production. Temperature had no effect. Most demographic rates were positively correlated, but emergence was negatively correlated with other rates.

  10. Influence of relative humidity on heterogeneous reactions of O3 and O3/SO2 with soot particles: Potential for environmental and health effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiang; Pang, Shufeng; Ma, Jiabi; Zhang, Yunhong

    2017-09-01

    The heterogeneous reactions of soot particles with O3 and the mixture of O3 and SO2 were studied as a function of relative humidities (RHs). The reactions were followed in real time using microscopic Fourier transform infrared (micro-FTIR) spectrometer to obtain kinetic data. The results show that the ketone (Cdbnd O) group is the main product of the O3/soot reaction, and the sulfate is identified on the surface of soot particles in the presence of O3/SO2. Both reactions are sensitive to RHs and surrounding water significantly promotes the proceeding of the heterogeneous reactions. For the O3/soot reaction, the pseudo-first-order rate constant increases from 3.2 × 10-4 s-1 to 7.1 × 10-4 s-1 with increasing RH in the range of 1%-82%. When O3 and SO2 exist simultaneously during the reaction, the reaction rate and uptake coefficient are all enhanced by about an order of magnitude as the RH increases from 1% to 83%. The high productions of the ketone and sulfate on soot surface are of highly hydrophilic, which play a key role in environmental effect under humid environment. The possible reaction mechanism speculates that products of aromatic carbonyls and dihydrofuran species on soot particles will be more harmful to human health.

  11. Environmental Toxicology: A Guide to Information Sources. Volume 7 in the "Man and the Environment Information Guide" Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudd, Robert L.

    This annotated bibliography on environmental toxicology brings together a diverse set of information sources from the physical, social, and natural sciences. These sources include periodical literature, government documents, scientific journals, and teaching materials. The volume is divided into sixteen sections organized into four parts: (1)…

  12. Information literacy and environmental sustainability correlation in using and communicating information

    OpenAIRE

    Repanovici, Angela; Landøy, Ane

    2015-01-01

    Information literacy is the discipline that shapes the informational behavior of young students, Master and PhD students. The skills acquired by attending this course can decisively influence thinking and may generate critical thinking for analyzing information. Extending the module designed for achieving Information Literacy standards, we present a module on green practices, green libraries and the implications of using electronic resources on carbon emissions and consumption of electricity....

  13. Environmental and social responsibility reporting. Do Macedonian companies disclose those information and how?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrsik Jadranka

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Incorporating environmental impact into financial reports is becoming standard practice in the 21st Century. Investors are aware of the need for environmentally correct operations since failures in this domain lower the price of shares. However, in terms of regulation, in most of the countries, environmental reporting remains voluntary. Institutions dealing with development and promotion of the modern accounting and financial reporting standards encourage companies to concurrently report for their environmental activities. The only question is how. Accounting may include information on the environmental impact only if it is quantitative and monetary. Since many nuances of the issues remain difficult to quantify, corporations opt to separately report on their environmental practices. The aim of this paper is to examine the accounting and stock market regulations and the practice of reporting for environmental impact of the operations of the leading Macedonian companies. We selected ten companies that make the Macedonian Stock Exchange Index and additional five companies with significant environmental impact. We reviewed their annual reports and interviewed their financial officers. The results show that the environmental and social responsibility reporting is left to the companies and their management and its perception of the need for keeping posted the major stakeholders and the most appropriate way to do it. As a consequence, many large Macedonian companies do not refer to these issues in their annual addressing to the stakeholders. The findings of this paper can motivate the regulatory body and the government to require more transparency and disclosure of the sustainability information.

  14. Environmental Information Systems. Integrative data management - Examples from the environmental monitoring; Umweltinformationssysteme. Integratives Datenmanagement - Beispiele aus der Umweltbeobachtung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knetsch, Gerlinde; Jessen, Karin (comps.) [Umweltbundesamt, Dessau-Rosslau (Germany). Fachgebiet IV 2.1 Informationssysteme Chemikaliensicherheit

    2010-02-15

    Within the workshop ''Environmental databases / Environmental Information Systems'' of the German Federal Environment Agency (Dessau-Rosslau, Federal Republic of Germany) at 4th to 5th May, 2009, in Hof (Federal Republic of Germany), the following lectures were held: (1) The German Environmental Specimen Base in the Internet (Maria Ruether); (2) REACH IT tools and workflows for the European implementation of chemicals (Gerlinde Knetsch); (3) Design of a European portal for soil information in the scope of the eContentplus project GS soil as a component for SEIS based on the PortaIU {sup registered} technology (Martin Klenke, Stefanie Konstantinidis, Fred Kruse); (4) Introduction of SOS services for the exchange and presentation of numeric data in PortalU {sup registered} (Carsten Heidmann, Wassili Kazakos, Martin Klenke, Siegbert Kunz); (5) Internet portals of waste management in Schleswig-Holstein (Friedhelm Hosenfeld, Wolfgang Thiel, Johannes Bublitz); (6) FIS waters - an international specialized and information technological cooperation (Wolfgang Ballin).

  15. Estuary Data Mapper: A coastal information system to propel emerging science and inform environmental management decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Estuary Data Mapper (EDM) is a free, interactive virtual gateway to coastal data aimed to promote research and aid in environmental management. The graphical user interface allows users to custom select and subset data based on their spatial and temporal interests giving them...

  16. Biotic diversity of benthic macroinvertebrates at contrasting glacier-fed systems in Patagonia Mountains: The role of environmental heterogeneity facing global warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miserendino, María Laura; Brand, Cecilia; Epele, Luis B; Di Prinzio, Cecilia Y; Omad, Guillermo H; Archangelsky, Miguel; Martínez, Oscar; Kutschker, Adriana M

    2018-05-01

    Patagonia is by far the largest glacierized area in South America. However, little is known about ecology, functioning and biodiversity of glacier-fed streams facing global warming. We investigated changes in environmental features and macroinvertebrate communities along a longitudinal gradient of glacier influence of two Patagonian systems that differ in glacier cover magnitude and the spatial sequence of lotic and lentic phases. Both glaciers, Torrecillas (~5.5km 2 , Torrecillas system) and Cónico (~0.44km 2 , Baggilt system), are retreating. Longitudinal distribution of benthic invertebrates partially fitted to predictions for glacierized temperate systems, with Diamesinae spp. dominating at closest sites to the Cónico, and Orthocladiinae increasing downstream, but patterns were unclear at Torrecillas. Generalized Linear Model identified chlorophyll a and conductivity as having significant effect on richness and density respectively at Torrecillas; detritus biomass and gravel influenced species richness, and boulder percentage and water temperature affected density, at Baggilt. Canonical Correspondence Analyses integrating benthic biota and environmental variables revealed that a higher environmental heterogeneity at Baggilt, related with spatial dimension (unshaded/shaded reaches, wetland reaches), local resources (detritus, bryophytes) and temperature, probably explained the unexpected high richness in benthic assemblages (67 taxa). Environmental conditions imposed by the lake outlet (proglacial) at Torrecillas resulted in a less diverse community (31 taxa). Finally our results suggest that these isolated, small glacier-fed streams typical of the Patagonian landscape appear highly vulnerable to global warming. Endemic elements could disappear at upper segments being replaced by other species common at rhithral environments, which might increase local diversity (alfa diversity) but decrease regional diversity (gamma diversity). From an ecosystem perspective

  17. Potential of Geographic Information Systems to Create a Municipal Environmental Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Juan Espinosa

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Geographic information systems are used internationally to acquire information about the characteristics of the global surface and digitalize it to facilitate georeferencing, statistical analysis, virtual scenarios and mitigation of disasters. In Cuba, they are inserted in the design of Environmental Models, along with other applications. The aim of this paper was to demonstrate the potential offered by Geographic Information Systems to establish an Environmental Model in the municipality of Camaguey, based on previous studies made in other municipalities of Cuba. Moreover, the main elements supporting this study were defined. This paper also deals with the different stages of Environmental Modeling, and how the Geographic Information Systems are included, based on the views from different researchers and specialists.

  18. Wisconsin’s Environmental Public Health Tracking Network: Information Systems Design for Childhood Cancer Surveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanrahan, Lawrence P.; Anderson, Henry A.; Busby, Brian; Bekkedal, Marni; Sieger, Thomas; Stephenson, Laura; Knobeloch, Lynda; Werner, Mark; Imm, Pamela; Olson, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    In this article we describe the development of an information system for environmental childhood cancer surveillance. The Wisconsin Cancer Registry annually receives more than 25,000 incident case reports. Approximately 269 cases per year involve children. Over time, there has been considerable community interest in understanding the role the environment plays as a cause of these cancer cases. Wisconsin’s Public Health Information Network (WI-PHIN) is a robust web portal integrating both Health Alert Network and National Electronic Disease Surveillance System components. WI-PHIN is the information technology platform for all public health surveillance programs. Functions include the secure, automated exchange of cancer case data between public health–based and hospital-based cancer registrars; web-based supplemental data entry for environmental exposure confirmation and hypothesis testing; automated data analysis, visualization, and exposure–outcome record linkage; directories of public health and clinical personnel for role-based access control of sensitive surveillance information; public health information dissemination and alerting; and information technology security and critical infrastructure protection. For hypothesis generation, cancer case data are sent electronically to WI-PHIN and populate the integrated data repository. Environmental data are linked and the exposure–disease relationships are explored using statistical tools for ecologic exposure risk assessment. For hypothesis testing, case–control interviews collect exposure histories, including parental employment and residential histories. This information technology approach can thus serve as the basis for building a comprehensive system to assess environmental cancer etiology. PMID:15471739

  19. Use of reconnaissance level information for environmental assessment. [Information available from existing sources that satisfies information needs of siting and operational aspects of NPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster, R.F.; Rickard, W.H.; Strand, J.A.; Warner, M.L.

    1979-11-01

    Reconnaissance level information (RLI) sufficient for comparing the environmental and socio-economic features of candidate sites for nuclear power stations and for guiding plant design, baseline surveys, and operational practices is usually available from published reports, public records, and knowledgeable individuals. Environmental concerns of special importance for site evaluation include: aquatic ecology, terrestrial ecology, land and water use, socio-economics, and institutional constraints. A scheme is suggested for using RLI to assign classifications to candidate sites based on the potential level of concern associated with the different environmental features.

  20. Toxicological and environmental health information from the National Library of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonger, G C

    1996-01-01

    The National Library of Medicine's Toxicology and Environmental Health Information Program is the outgrowth of a 1966 document on "Handling of Toxicological Information," prepared by the Presidents Science Advisory Committee (National Library of Medicine, 1995). The Toxicology and Environmental Health Program is responsible for the creation and deployment of both bibliographic and factual files concerned with toxicology, carcinogenesis, developmental and reproductive effects of chemical substances, toxic chemical releases, and the medical and environmental behavior of chemical substances. The two main computer systems that provide bibliographic and factual data banks are Toxicology Data Network (TOXNET) and ELHILL. A number of the files found in the TOXNET system are built and maintained by other federal agencies such as the National Cancer Institute, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.

  1. Supply Chain Information in Environmental Management Accounting – the case of a Vietnamese Coffee Exporter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Viere

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This case study discusses Environmental Management Accounting (EMA which are illustrated with the case example of Neumann Gruppe Vietnam Ltd., a medium-sized coffee refining and exporting enterprise in Southern Vietnam. It examines the relevance of environment-related supply chain information for corporate environmental and financial decision making and reveals possibilities for improving eco-efficiency at the site level and for its supply chain.

  2. [Tumor genetic heterogeneity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi-Ling; Chu, Jia-You; Wang, Ming-Rong

    2013-01-01

    Although the majority of spontaneous tumors derive from a single cell, people have come to realize intra-tumor heterogeneity of individual tumors. Human cancers frequently display substantial difference in phenotypic features, such as the degree of differentiation, cell proliferation rate, invasion and metastatic potential, response to therapy and many other aspects. Molecular biology studies have confirmed the occurrence of new mutations during the process of tumor progression, which provide more powerful evidences to show the existence of intra-tumor genetic heterogeneity. This re-view will focus on recent major advances in the study of tumor genetic heterogeneity. Considering that genetic heterogene-ity analysis can provide important information to indicate how long normal cells transform into tumor cells and how to spread and migrate, we firstly describe experimental evidences of intra-tumor genetic heterogeneity. Then we discuss the research value of genetic diversity in the evolutionary history of human individual tumor, introduce the two modes of the genetic heterogeneity - cancer stem cell model and the clonal evolution model, and summarize the implications of in-tra-tumor heterogeneity studies in metastasis and therapy. In addition, the article presents the research methods of genetic heterogeneity, including specific gene and genome-wide level, pointing out their strengths and limitations.

  3. Information management systems for integrating the technical data and regulatory requirements of environmental restoration activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geffen, C.A.; Garrett, B.A.; Walter, M.B.

    1990-03-01

    Current environmental regulations require that comprehensive planning be conducted before remediating a hazardous waste site to characterize the nature and extent of site contamination, calculate the risk to the public, and assess the effectiveness of various remediation technologies. Remediation of Department of Energy (DOE) sites contaminated with hazardous or mixed wastes will require the effective integration of scientific and engineering data with regulatory and institutional requirements. The information management challenge presented by waste site cleanup activities goes beyond merely dealing with the large quantity of data that will be generated. The information must be stored, managed, and presented in a way that provides some consistency in approach across sites, avoids duplication of effort, and facilitates responses to requests for information from the regulators and the public. This paper provides background information on the regulatory requirements for data gathering and analysis for environmental restoration activities, and outlines the data and information management requirements for completing the pre-remediation phases of an environmental restoration project. Information management systems for integrating the regulatory and institutional requirements of the environmental restoration process with the technical data and analysis requirements are also described. 7 refs.

  4. Applications of Geographic Information Systems technology for environmental planning and management in North Carolina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagy, Z.; Wiele-Evans, C. Van Der (North Carolina Center for Geographic Information and Analysis, Raleigh, NC (United States))

    1993-01-01

    The State of North Carolina is developing a multipurpose geographic information systems (GIS) database for widespread use. The database currently consists of more than fifty categories of information state wide. In addition to basic planimetric information, the data include many categories of environmental significance. Much of the database has proven useful to planners, managers, and consultants involved with environmental policy-making and protection. The database is being used to augment activities in regulatory programs, research programs and in a variety of siting applications. The North Carolina Center for Geographic Information and Analysis (NCCGIA) has operated the State's GIS since 1977 and is the lead coordinating agency for geographic information in the state. NCCGIA is able to develop and maintain the corporate database through partnerships with other state, federal, regional, and local government agencies and private organizations. Users access the database at NCCGIA for the production of maps and statistics, to spontaneously generate displays of a project area, to acquire data, and to conduct special studies. This paper describes some of the activities associated with environmental planning and management applications at the North Carolina Center for Geographic Information and Analysis. Specifically, it illustrates the following: the conceptual framework for development and maintenance of the corporate database; the contents of the database; several environmental planning documents and applications developed at NCCGIA; and methods of data access.

  5. Framework for Informed Policy Making Using Data from National Environmental Observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, B.; Taylor, J. R.; Poinsatte, J.

    2012-12-01

    Large-scale environmental changes pose challenges that straddle environmental, economic, and social boundaries. As we design and implement climate adaptation strategies at the Federal, state, local, and tribal levels, accessible and usable data are essential for implementing actions that are informed by the best available information. Data-intensive science has been heralded as an enabler for scientific breakthroughs powered by advanced computing capabilities and interoperable data systems. Those same capabilities can be applied to data and information systems that facilitate the transformation of data into highly processed products. At the interface of scientifically informed public policy and data intensive science lies the potential for producers of credible, integrated, multi-scalar environmental data like the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) and its partners to capitalize on data and informatics interoperability initiatives that enable the integration of environmental data from across credible data sources. NSF's large-scale environmental observatories such as NEON and the Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI) are designed to provide high-quality, long-term environmental data for research. These data are also meant to be repurposed for operational needs that like risk management, vulnerability assessments, resource management, and others. The proposed USDA Agriculture Research Service (ARS) Long Term Agro-ecosystem Research (LTAR) network is another example of such an environmental observatory that will produce credible data for environmental / agricultural forecasting and informing policy. To facilitate data fusion across observatories, there is a growing call for observation systems to more closely coordinate and standardize how variables are measured. Together with observation standards, cyberinfrastructure standards enable the proliferation of an ecosystem of applications that utilize diverse, high-quality, credible data. Interoperability

  6. Building Data and Information Capacity in Environmental Public Health: A Best-Worst Scaling Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallar, Lauren E; Sargeant, Jan M; McEwen, Scott A; Mercer, Nicola J; Papadopoulos, Andrew

    2017-06-16

    Environmental public health practitioners rely on information technology (IT) to maintain and improve environmental health. However, current systems have limited capacity. A better understanding of the importance of IT features is needed to enhance data and information capacity. (1) Rank IT features according to the percentage of respondents who rated them as essential to an information management system and (2) quantify the relative importance of a subset of these features using best-worst scaling. Information technology features were initially identified from a previously published systematic review of software evaluation criteria and a list of software options from a private corporation specializing in inspection software. Duplicates and features unrelated to environmental public health were removed. The condensed list was refined by a working group of environmental public health management to a final list of 57 IT features. The essentialness of features was electronically rated by environmental public health managers. Features where 50% to 80% of respondents rated them as essential (n = 26) were subsequently evaluated using best-worst scaling. Ontario, Canada. Environmental public health professionals in local public health. Importance scores of IT features. The majority of IT features (47/57) were considered essential to an information management system by at least half of the respondents (n = 52). The highest-rated features were delivery to printer, software encryption capability, and software maintenance services. Of the 26 features evaluated in the best-worst scaling exercise, the most important features were orientation to all practice areas, off-line capability, and ability to view past inspection reports and results. The development of a single, unified environmental public health information management system that fulfills the reporting and functionality needs of system users is recommended. This system should be implemented by all public health units

  7. The effect of environmental performance and accounting characteristics to earnings informativeness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herawaty, V.

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this empirical study is to analyze the influence of environmental performance and company’s accounting characteristics to earnings informativeness proxied by earnings response coefficient (ERC) on manufacturing companies listed on Indonesia Stock Exchange and consistently follow the PROPER assessment in 2010–2014. One of the company’s considerations is to create the green environment reflecting its environmental measures, drawing investors to respond to the company’s environmental performance. The data were obtained from Indonesian Capital Market Directory (ICMD), the Indonesia Stock Exchange homepage, the company’s annual reports, the decree of the Minister of Environment. The samples used in this research are 27 go public manufacturing companies listed on Indonesia Stock Exchange that consistently follow the PROPER in 2010–2014. The sampling technique used was the purposive method. This research uses multiple regression analysis. The results show that the environmental performance and profitability have a positive influence to earnings informativeness, while leverage has a negative influence to earnings informativeness. Growth opportunities as a control variable has a positive effect on earnings informativeness. This research has proved that the environmental performance is crucial through observing the investors’ reaction in the capital market.

  8. Delineation of the corporate use of Environmental Information Systems (EIS: Selected cases of the Corporate Organizations in Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felichesmi Selestine Lyakurwa

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Environmental information systems are essential platforms for the provision of adequate and relevant information necessary for the planning and decision making for greener production. Corporate use of Environmental Information Systems gained several benefits in the global and local markets. Nevertheless, there was no documentation to explain the extent to which corporate organizations utilize available Environmental Information Systems in Tanzania. This study used purposive sampling with informants being workers from the strategic, tactical and control functions of the corporate organization. Moreover, data collection involved survey of 50 corporate organizations in Dar es Salaam, Arusha, Moshi and Morogoro councils, with 71 respondents. The collected data includes exploration of the extent to which corporate management functions utilize available Environmental Information Systems in Tanzania. The study identified various corporate environmental management functions performed at all levels of the corporate organization, in which workers spends less than one hour on the environmental information systems available. The results also revealed that, there is adequate utilization of available Environmental Information Systems for environmental management. Therefore, the research outcomes provides inputs to corporate organization unit managers, corporate owners and other environmental stakeholders on the extent of the systems’ use as well as sharing experience on different environmental management systems used worldwide. Keywords: Environmental information system, corporate organization, Tanzania, management

  9. Investigations on an environmental technology transfer information network; Kankyo gijutsu iten joho network chosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    With developing countries (APEC countries) as the main objects, investigations were carried out to issue environmental technology transfer information that Japan has accumulated, and advance exchanges of technical information with persons related inside and outside Japan. As a result of the investigations, it was found that the environmental technology information that serves more effectively for the developing countries is the technical information that has been developed by repeating improvements, has provided actual results in work sites, and is actually used, rather than the state-of-art technologies. Based on this result, business entities having factories and operation centers located in Mie Prefecture and the city of Yokkaichi were asked to provide data for the actually used environmental technologies. Out of 51 items provided by 17 companies, nine items were selected to be used as prototype database materials for an information network. The objects of information sources will be expanded to a nationwide scale in the future to improve the contents of the database. Problems of handling information copyrights and technical know-hows were presented in the course of data collection, urging the necessity of due considerations on the matter. Necessity was indicated on maintenance and management of data base as well as its quantitative expansion. 1 ref., 4 figs.

  10. Engaging All Americans: Innovative Strategies for Reaching the Public with Climate and Environmental Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, S.

    2014-12-01

    From extensive drought and heat waves to floods, tornadoes and Superstorm Sandy, extreme weather and climate events provide teachable moments to help communities prepare for and respond to related environmental, economic and health impacts. The National Environmental Education Foundation (www.neefusa.org) works with the American Meteorological Society, the media and other trusted messengers to provide weather, climate and environmental information to the public in accessible and widely used formats, whether via TV, radio or social media. NEEF will provide an overview of innovative partnerships and projects that are engaging Americans in understanding and using climate and environmental information to make the best choices in their daily lives and improve the health of their communities, including: Assessing knowledge, attitudes and behaviors: NEEF will share results from its national survey research and targeted focus groups on current attitudes and practices relating to our nation's environment. Simplifying and amplifying key messages: NEEF provides a national network of more than 350 meteorologists, radio broadcasters and journalists with the science-based information and resources they need to present climate and environmental topics to their viewers on-air, online and in community outreach. Engaging television viewers in citizen science: Eyes on Central PA, a pilot project of NEEF, Project Noah and WTAJ-TV, harnesses Project Noah's citizen science platform to collect and display photos of wildlife from WTAJ-TV viewers. NEEF and WTAJ provide regular blogs and on-air stories that highlight viewers' photos and link them to local weather conditions and climate trends. Expanding the conversation: NEEF's multimedia strategy in the Mid-Atlantic U.S. is reaching Spanish-speaking audiences with climate and environmental information through regular radio and television broadcasts. We are also exploring ways to reach other non-traditional audiences, including faith

  11. Japan introduces a SPEEDI response to emergencies. [System for Prediction of Environmental Emergency Dose Information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuyama, Shigeru (Nuclear Safety Technology Center, Tokyo (Japan))

    1993-01-01

    The system for Prediction of Environmental Emergency Dose Information (SPEEDI), has been under development since 1980 by the Science and Technology Agency of Japan (STA), JAERI, and the Japan Meteorological Research Institute. SPEEDI provides realistic dose assessments and estimates of radiation concentrations they may result from an atmospheric release of radioactive materials, using advanced computer-based data communications and processing systems to calculate atmospheric dispersion for radiation consequence assessments. These assessments include applicable meteorological data and source term information. (Author).

  12. Ensemble learning for spatial interpolation of soil potassium content based on environmental information.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Liu

    Full Text Available One important method to obtain the continuous surfaces of soil properties from point samples is spatial interpolation. In this paper, we propose a method that combines ensemble learning with ancillary environmental information for improved interpolation of soil properties (hereafter, EL-SP. First, we calculated the trend value for soil potassium contents at the Qinghai Lake region in China based on measured values. Then, based on soil types, geology types, land use types, and slope data, the remaining residual was simulated with the ensemble learning model. Next, the EL-SP method was applied to interpolate soil potassium contents at the study site. To evaluate the utility of the EL-SP method, we compared its performance with other interpolation methods including universal kriging, inverse distance weighting, ordinary kriging, and ordinary kriging combined geographic information. Results show that EL-SP had a lower mean absolute error and root mean square error than the data produced by the other models tested in this paper. Notably, the EL-SP maps can describe more locally detailed information and more accurate spatial patterns for soil potassium content than the other methods because of the combined use of different types of environmental information; these maps are capable of showing abrupt boundary information for soil potassium content. Furthermore, the EL-SP method not only reduces prediction errors, but it also compliments other environmental information, which makes the spatial interpolation of soil potassium content more reasonable and useful.

  13. Ensemble learning for spatial interpolation of soil potassium content based on environmental information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Du, Peijun; Wang, Dongchen

    2015-01-01

    One important method to obtain the continuous surfaces of soil properties from point samples is spatial interpolation. In this paper, we propose a method that combines ensemble learning with ancillary environmental information for improved interpolation of soil properties (hereafter, EL-SP). First, we calculated the trend value for soil potassium contents at the Qinghai Lake region in China based on measured values. Then, based on soil types, geology types, land use types, and slope data, the remaining residual was simulated with the ensemble learning model. Next, the EL-SP method was applied to interpolate soil potassium contents at the study site. To evaluate the utility of the EL-SP method, we compared its performance with other interpolation methods including universal kriging, inverse distance weighting, ordinary kriging, and ordinary kriging combined geographic information. Results show that EL-SP had a lower mean absolute error and root mean square error than the data produced by the other models tested in this paper. Notably, the EL-SP maps can describe more locally detailed information and more accurate spatial patterns for soil potassium content than the other methods because of the combined use of different types of environmental information; these maps are capable of showing abrupt boundary information for soil potassium content. Furthermore, the EL-SP method not only reduces prediction errors, but it also compliments other environmental information, which makes the spatial interpolation of soil potassium content more reasonable and useful.

  14. Westinghouse Savannah River Site Supplier Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Information Exchange Forum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sturm, H.F. Jr.; Hottel, R.E.; Christoper, N. [and others

    1994-06-01

    The Savannah River Site conducted its first Supplier Information Exchange in September 1993. The intent of the conference was to inform potential suppliers of the Savannah River Sites mission and research and development program objectives in the areas of environmental restoration and waste management, and to solicit proposals for innovative research in those areas. Major areas addressed were Solid Waste, Environmental Restoration, Environmental Monitoring, Transition/Decontamination and Decommissioning, and the Savannah River Technology Center. A total of 1062 proposals were received addressing the 89 abstracts presented. This paper will describe the forum the process for solicitation, the process for proposal review and selection, and review the overall results and benefits to Savannah River.

  15. Relationship between determinant factors of disclosure of information on environmental impacts of Brazilian companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara Vogt

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at analyzing the relationship between determinant factors of disclosure of information on environmental impacts of Brazilian companies. A descriptive, documental and quantitative research was conducted through a sample of 97 Brazilian companies. In the Sustainability Reports and in the Annual Reports information, five environmental aspects were collected: emissions, effluents, wastes, products and services; and transport, which were used to measure the degree of environmental disclosure. This concludes that there is a relationship between the variables investigated in all analyzed years. The size, audit and Global Reporting Initiative (GRI are associated with disclosure and the Corporate Sustainability Index (CSI, Pollution Potential (POTEN, governance, stocks, Return on Assets (ROA and Return on Equity (ROE are not.

  16. INFORMATION EXTRACTION AND DEPENDENCY ON OPEN GOVERNMENT DATA (OGD FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Abdulmuttalib

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Environmental monitoring practices support decision makers of different government / private institutions, besides environmentalists and planners among others. This support helps them act towards the sustainability of our environment, and also take efficient measures for protecting human beings in general, but it is difficult to explore useful information from 'OGD' and assure its quality for the purpose. On the other hand, Monitoring itself comprises detecting changes as happens, or within the mitigation period range, which means that any source of data, that is to be used for monitoring, should replicate the information related to the period of environmental monitoring, or otherwise it's considered almost useless or history. In this paper the assessment of information extraction and structuring from Open Government Data 'OGD', that can be useful to environmental monitoring is performed, looking into availability, usefulness to environmental monitoring of a certain type, checking its repetition period and dependences. The particular assessment is being performed on a small sample selected from OGD, bearing in mind the type of the environmental change monitored, such as the increase and concentrations of built up areas, and reduction of green areas, or monitoring the change of temperature in a specific area. The World Bank mentioned in its blog that Data is open if it satisfies both conditions of, being technically open, and legally open. The use of Open Data thus, is regulated by published terms of use, or an agreement which implies some conditions without violating the above mentioned two conditions. Within the scope of the paper I wish to share the experience of using some OGD for supporting an environmental monitoring work, that is performed to mitigate the production of carbon dioxide, by regulating energy consumption, and by properly designing the test area's landscapes, thus using Geodesign tactics, meanwhile wish to add to the results

  17. Information Extraction and Dependency on Open Government Data (ogd) for Environmental Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulmuttalib, Hussein

    2016-06-01

    Environmental monitoring practices support decision makers of different government / private institutions, besides environmentalists and planners among others. This support helps them act towards the sustainability of our environment, and also take efficient measures for protecting human beings in general, but it is difficult to explore useful information from 'OGD' and assure its quality for the purpose. On the other hand, Monitoring itself comprises detecting changes as happens, or within the mitigation period range, which means that any source of data, that is to be used for monitoring, should replicate the information related to the period of environmental monitoring, or otherwise it's considered almost useless or history. In this paper the assessment of information extraction and structuring from Open Government Data 'OGD', that can be useful to environmental monitoring is performed, looking into availability, usefulness to environmental monitoring of a certain type, checking its repetition period and dependences. The particular assessment is being performed on a small sample selected from OGD, bearing in mind the type of the environmental change monitored, such as the increase and concentrations of built up areas, and reduction of green areas, or monitoring the change of temperature in a specific area. The World Bank mentioned in its blog that Data is open if it satisfies both conditions of, being technically open, and legally open. The use of Open Data thus, is regulated by published terms of use, or an agreement which implies some conditions without violating the above mentioned two conditions. Within the scope of the paper I wish to share the experience of using some OGD for supporting an environmental monitoring work, that is performed to mitigate the production of carbon dioxide, by regulating energy consumption, and by properly designing the test area's landscapes, thus using Geodesign tactics, meanwhile wish to add to the results achieved by many

  18. Indicators for the Evaluation of Environmental Education, Interpretation and Information in Protected Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sureda, Jaume; Oliver, Miquel F.; Castells, Margalida

    2004-01-01

    By petition of the regional government of the Balearic Islands (Spain), the authors of this article evaluated activities of environmental education, interpretation, and information carried out in the most important protected areas of these islands. The following is a presentation of the model of the evaluation that was developed. Based on the…

  19. 76 FR 11751 - Notice of Request for Extension of Approval of an Information Collection; Environmental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-03

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Notice of Request for Extension of Approval of an Information Collection; Environmental Monitoring Form AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health... agency #0;statements of organization and functions are examples of documents #0;appearing in this section...

  20. Spatial information during public participation within environmental impact assessment in Kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mwenda, A.N.; Bregt, A.K.; Ligtenberg, A.

    2013-01-01

    This study set out to evaluate the use of spatial information during public participation within Environmental Impact Assessment (EAI) in Kenya, through a case study. A conceptual framework developed for this study considered four key elements: the stages of EIA in Kenya (EIA study stage), public

  1. Technical background information for the environmental and safety report, Volume 4: White Oak Lake and Dam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oakes, T.W.; Kelly, B.A.; Ohnesorge, W.F.; Eldridge, J.S.; Bird, J.C.; Shank, K.E.; Tsakeres, F.S.

    1982-03-01

    This report has been prepared to provide background information on White Oak Lake for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Environmental and Safety Report. The paper presents the history of White Oak Dam and Lake and describes the hydrological conditions of the White Oak Creek watershed. Past and present sediment and water data are included; pathway analyses are described in detail.

  2. Providing Consumers with Web-Based Information on the Environmental Effects of Automobiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saulsbury, J.W.

    2003-08-25

    The Department of Energy (DOE) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) provide consumers with web-based information on the environmental effects of automobiles so that individuals can make informed choices about the vehicles they use or may purchase. DOE and EPA maintain a web site (www.fueleconomy.gov) that provides users with information about fuel economy [as well as greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and air pollution emissions] for the cars and trucks they use or may consider purchasing. EPA also maintains a separate web site (www.epa.gov/greenvehicles) that offers similar information, with the focus on air pollution emissions rather than fuel economy. The American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE) (www.greenercars.com) and the California Air Resources Board (CARB) (www.arb.ca.gov/msprog/ccbg/ccbg.htm) also maintain web sites that provide consumers with information on the environmental effects of automobiles. Through the National Transportation Research Center (NTRC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, DOE has supported some initial qualitative research with people who are interested in purchasing a new or used vehicle and whose actions identify them as at least somewhat concerned about the environment. The purpose of this research was to explore and understand how these people respond to the different ratings and measurements of environmental effects provided by the four web sites. The goal of the research is to optimize the communication of information provided on the DOE/EPA web site (www.fueleconomy.gov). Working with a private marketing research firm (The Looking Glass Group of Knoxville, Tennessee), NTRC staff initiated this research by meeting with two focus groups in Knoxville on February 27, 2001. To obtain information for comparison, staff from the NTRC and the Looking Glass Group also met with two focus groups in Los Angeles, California, on August 13, 2001.

  3. Heterogeneity in recombinant protein production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schalén, Martin; Johanson, Ted; Lundin, Luisa

    2012-01-01

    contribute to make a population in a fermenter heterogeneous, resulting in cell-to-cell variation in physiological parameters of the microbial culture. Our study aims at investigating how population heterogeneity and recombinant protein production is affected by environmental gradients in bioreactors...... are simulated in small bioreactors and the population heterogeneity can be visualised by analysing single cells with flow cytometry. This can give new insights to cell physiology and recombinant protein production at the industrial scale....

  4. Connecting Knowledge, Belief, Values and Action: Informing Climate Literacy by Using Autobiographies to Articulate Environmental Worldviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, M. A.

    2011-12-01

    human beings above nature. The creation stories of Genesis have been used both implicitly and explicitly to justify domination and exploitation of the earth and its resources. Autobiographies may be used as a reflective pedagogical tool to help students to identify various components of their respective environmental worldviews that may influence their overall environmental and climate literacy. Narrative responses to guiding questions prompt students to reflect on beliefs, trust, and values. This research will inform the development of culturally relevant and scientifically sound approaches to climate change education.

  5. Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS). Volume 3, Subject Area reference manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreck, R.I.

    1994-01-14

    The Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS) Subject Area manuals are designed as reference guides, that is, each chapter provides the information needed to make best use of each subject area, its tables, and reporting capabilities. Each subject area is documented in a chapter in one of the subject area manuals. Because these are reference manuals, most of the information is also available in the online help system as well. See Section 5.4.2 of the HEIS User`s Guide (DOE-RL 1994a) for a detailed description of the online help.

  6. Teaching Environmental Health Science for Informed Citizenship in the Science Classroom and Afterschool Clubs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keselman, Alla; Levin, Daniel M.; Hundal, Savreen; Kramer, Judy F.; Matzkin, Karen; Dutcher, Gale

    2013-01-01

    In the era of growing concerns about human-induced climate change and sustainable development, it is important for the schools to prepare students for meaningful engagement with environmental policies that will determine the future of our society. To do this, educators need to face a number of challenges. These include deciding on the science knowledge and skills needed for informed citizenship, identifying teaching practices for fostering such knowledge and skills, and finding ways to implement new practices into the tightly packed existing curriculum. This paper describes two collaborative efforts between the U.S. National Library of Medicine (NLM) and University of Maryland College of Education that attempt to meet these challenges. The focus of both projects is on helping students develop information seeking and evaluation and argumentation skills, and applying them to complex socio-scientific issues that have bearing on students’ daily lives. The first effort involves co-designing an afterschool environmental health club curriculum with an interdisciplinary team of middle school teachers. The second effort is the development and implementation of a week-long school drinking water quality debate activity in a high school environmental science classroom. Both projects center on Tox Town, an NLM web resource that introduces students to environmental health issues in everyday environments. The paper describes successes and challenges of environmental health curriculum development, including teachers’ and researchers’ perception of contextual constraints in the club and classroom setting, tensions inherent in co-design, and students’ experience with socio-scientific argumentation. PMID:24382985

  7. Environmental security: a geographic information system analysis approach--the case of Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocchi, Stefano; Disperati, Stefano Peppino; Rossi, Simone

    2006-02-01

    Studies into the relationships between environmental factors and violence or conflicts constitute a very debated research field called environmental security. Several authors think that environmental scarcity, which is scarcity of renewable resources, can contribute to generate violence or social unrest, particularly within states scarcely endowed with technical know-how and social structures, such as developing countries. In this work, we referred to the theoretical model developed by the Environmental Change and Acute Conflict Project. Our goal was to use easily available spatial databases to map the various sources of environmental scarcity through geographic information systems, in order to locate the areas apparently most at risk of suffering negative social effects and their consequences in terms of internal security. The analysis was carried out at a subnational level and applied to the case of Kenya. A first phase of the work included a careful selection of databases relative to renewable resources. Spatial operations among these data allowed us to obtain new information on the availability of renewable resources (cropland, forests, water), on the present and foreseen demographic pressure, as well as on the social and technical ingenuity. The results made it possible to identify areas suffering from scarcity of one or more renewable resources, indicating different levels of gravity. Accounts from Kenya seem to confirm our results, reporting clashes between tribal groups over the access to scarce resources in areas that our work showed to be at high risk.

  8. Gulf-Wide Information System, Environmental Sensitivity Index Seagrass, Geographic NAD83, LDWF (2001) [esi_seagrass_LDWF_2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This data set contains Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) seagrass data of coastal Louisiana. The ESI is a classification and ranking system, which characterizes...

  9. Gulf-Wide Information System, Environmental Sensitivity Index Polygons, Geographic NAD83, LDWF (2001) [esip_LDWF_2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This data set contains polygons representing the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) classification of coastal Louisiana. The ESI is a classification and ranking...

  10. Gulf-Wide Information System, Environmental Sensitivity Index Swamps, Geographic NAD83, LDWF (2001) [esi_swamp_LDWF_2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This data set contains Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) swamps data of coastal Louisiana. The ESI is a classification and ranking system, which characterizes...

  11. Gulf-Wide Information System, Environmental Sensitivity Index Salinity, Geographic NAD83, LDWF (2001) [esi_salinity_LDWF_2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This data set contains Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) salinity data of coastal Louisiana. The ESI is a classification and ranking system, which characterizes...

  12. Gulf-Wide Information System, Environmental Sensitivity Index Marsh, Geographic NAD83, LDWF (2001) [esi_fresh_marsh_LDWF_2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This data set contains Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) fresh marsh data of coastal Louisiana. The ESI is a classification and ranking system, which...

  13. Can data science inform environmental justice and community risk screening for type 2 diabetes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J Allen; Burgoon, Lyle D

    2015-01-01

    Having the ability to scan the entire country for potential "hotspots" with increased risk of developing chronic diseases due to various environmental, demographic, and genetic susceptibility factors may inform risk management decisions and enable better environmental public health policies. Develop an approach for community-level risk screening focused on identifying potential genetic susceptibility hotpots. Our approach combines analyses of phenotype-genotype data, genetic prevalence of single nucleotide polymorphisms, and census/geographic information to estimate census tract-level population attributable risks among various ethnicities and total population for the state of California. We estimate that the rs13266634 single nucleotide polymorphism, a type 2 diabetes susceptibility genotype, has a genetic prevalence of 56.3%, 47.4% and 37.0% in Mexican Mestizo, Caucasian, and Asian populations. Looking at the top quintile for total population attributable risk, 16 California counties have greater than 25% of their population living in hotspots of genetic susceptibility for developing type 2 diabetes due to this single genotypic susceptibility factor. This study identified counties in California where large portions of the population may bear additional type 2 diabetes risk due to increased genetic prevalence of a susceptibility genotype. This type of screening can easily be extended to include information on environmental contaminants of interest and other related diseases, and potentially enables the rapid identification of potential environmental justice communities. Other potential uses of this approach include problem formulation in support of risk assessments, land use planning, and prioritization of site cleanup and remediation actions.

  14. Information for energy-related environmental policy: the role of disaggregated dynamic energy demand modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fouquet, R.

    1997-01-01

    Public concern about energy-related environmental damage has put pressure on governments to enhance abatement policies. This has in turn led to increasing demands for information about and analysis of expected and optimal levels of environmental quality, and the means of influencing these levels. Energy demand modelling can act as a valuable tool in the production of this information, particularly where it relates to future levels of environmental quality and to how policy intervention can alter constraints facing consumers in order to achieve desired levels. The thesis focuses on two features of energy demand analysis. First, major developments in dynamic econometrics, and in particular the cointegration approach, have enabled energy demand modellers to incorporate long run equilibrating relationships between energy use and its main determinants, such as economic activity and relative prices, within a dynamic framework. Second, the existence of a diverse market for energy both in terms of the fuels used and the users suggests that energy demand should be analysed at a disaggregated level. The purpose of this thesis is to examine whether disaggregated dynamic energy demand modelling can provide additional valuable information for the formulation of environmental policy. (author)

  15. Overcoming Information Limitations for the Prescription of an Environmental Flow Regime for a Central American River

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter C. Esselman

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Hydropower dam construction is expanding rapidly in Central America because of the increasing demand for electricity. Although hydropower can provide a low-carbon source of energy, dams can also degrade socially valued riverine and riparian ecosystems and the services they provide. Such degradation can be partially mitigated by the release of environmental flows below dams. However, environmental flows have been applied infrequently to dams in Central America, partly because of the lack of information on the ecological, social, and economic aspects of rivers. This paper presents a case study of how resource and information limitations were addressed in the development of environmental flow recommendations for the Patuca River in Honduras below a proposed hydroelectric dam. To develop flow recommendations, we applied a multistep process that included hydrological analysis and modeling, the collection of traditional ecological knowledge (TEK during field trips, expert consultation, and environmental flow workshops for scientists, water managers, and community members. The final environmental flow recommendation specifies flow ranges for different components of river hydrology, including low flows for each month, high-flow pulses, and floods, in dry, normal, and wet years. The TEK collected from local and indigenous riverine communities was particularly important for forming hypotheses about flow-dependent ecological and social factors that may be vulnerable to disruption from dam-modified river flows. We show that our recommended environmental flows would have a minimal impact on the dam's potential to generate electricity. In light of rapid hydropower development in Central America, we suggest that environmental flows are important at the local scale, but that an integrated landscape perspective is ultimately needed to pursue hydropower development in a manner that is as ecologically sustainable as possible.

  16. Heterogeneous Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, R.

    1989-01-01

    Described is a heterogeneous catalysis course which has elements of materials processing embedded in the classical format of catalytic mechanisms and surface chemistry. A course outline and list of examples of recent review papers written by students are provided. (MVL)

  17. Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS) Operator`s Manual. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreck, R.I.

    1991-10-01

    The Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS) is a consolidated set of automated resources that effectively manage the data gathered during environmental monitoring and restoration of the Hanford Site. The HEIS includes an integrated database that provides consistent and current data to all users and promotes sharing of data by the entire user community. This manual describes the facilities available to the operational user who is responsible for data entry, processing, scheduling, reporting, and quality assurance. A companion manual, the HEIS User`s Manual, describes the facilities available-to the scientist, engineer, or manager who uses the system for environmental monitoring, assessment, and restoration planning; and to the regulator who is responsible for reviewing Hanford Site operations against regulatory requirements and guidelines.

  18. Geospatial Information Systems Analysis of Regional Environmental Change along the Savannah River Basin of Georgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmund C. Merem

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper uses remote sensing and geographic information systems (GIS; and descriptive statistics in the assessment of environmental change along the Savannah River Basin of Georgia. Results of the study show that Savannah River basin side of Georgia has been experiencing environmental change due to several decades of relentless pressure induced by anthropocentric activities and host of other socio-economic factors. Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI analysis of the area also shows a decline in vegetation cover. The pace of ecological change showed some variations across time and space. Generally, the results point to a decline in water bodies, vegetation, and increase in population, loss of harvested cropland, farms and increasing threats to the environmental systems of the region.

  19. Do as you say - Say as you do: Measuring the actual use of environmental information in investment decisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rikhardsson, Pall M.; Holm, Claus

    2005-01-01

    This paper focuses on the use of environmental information in investment decision making. The research approach employed was based on an experiment where three groups were asked to allocate investment funds between two companies based on financial accounts and information material from...... these companies. The overall conclusion of the paper is that even though environmental information is not enough in itself to shift decision preferences, it seems to have some impact on decision making. However, there seems to be a discrepancy between what decision makers say they do and what they actually do....... First, environmental information apparently has greater impact on decision making in the short run than the long run despite decision makers saying that they value environmental information more regarding long-run investments. Second, decision makers downplay the value of environmental information...

  20. UIS BW environmental information system Baden-Wuerttemberg. R+D project INOVUM. Innovative environmental information systems. Phase I 2014/16; UIS BW Umweltinformationssystem Baden-Wuerttemberg. F+E-Vorhaben INOVUM. Innovative Umweltinformationssysteme. Phase I 2014/16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weissenbach, Kurt [Ministerium fuer Umwelt, Klima und Energiewirtschaft Baden-Wuerttemberg, Stuttgart (Germany); Schillinger, Wolfgang [Landesanstalt fuer Umwelt, Messungen und Naturschutz Baden-Wuerttemberg (LUBW), Karlsruhe (Germany); Weidemann, Rainer (ed.) [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (Germany). Inst. fuer Angewandte Informatik

    2016-07-01

    The R and D project INOVUM of the Ministry for the Environment, Climate and Energy Baden-Wuerttemberg relies on a wide cooperation with partners from government, science and industry to jointly develop governmental environmental information systems. In the focus of this project phase were, e.g. a revision of the framework concept for the Environmental Information System Baden-Wuerttemberg, service-based applications, the development of environmental portals, mobile applications and map services.

  1. Using the Fish Larvae and Egg Exposure System (FLEES) to Generate Effects Data for Informing Environmental Windows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Generate Effects Data for Informing Environmental Windows by Justin L. Wilkens and Burton C. Suedel PURPOSE: The Fish Larvae and Egg Exposure...response data for dredging projects where environmental windows (EW) severely restrict dredging operations (Lutz et al. 2012). This technical note...sediments from dredging activities on aquatic resources (Suedel et al. 2008). Environmental windows are most commonly established to protect

  2. A Standard-Driven Data Dictionary for Data Harmonization of Heterogeneous Datasets in Urban Geological Information Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, G.; Wu, C.; Li, X.; Song, P.

    2013-12-01

    The 3D urban geological information system has been a major part of the national urban geological survey project of China Geological Survey in recent years. Large amount of multi-source and multi-subject data are to be stored in the urban geological databases. There are various models and vocabularies drafted and applied by industrial companies in urban geological data. The issues such as duplicate and ambiguous definition of terms and different coding structure increase the difficulty of information sharing and data integration. To solve this problem, we proposed a national standard-driven information classification and coding method to effectively store and integrate urban geological data, and we applied the data dictionary technology to achieve structural and standard data storage. The overall purpose of this work is to set up a common data platform to provide information sharing service. Research progresses are as follows: (1) A unified classification and coding method for multi-source data based on national standards. Underlying national standards include GB 9649-88 for geology and GB/T 13923-2006 for geography. Current industrial models are compared with national standards to build a mapping table. The attributes of various urban geological data entity models are reduced to several categories according to their application phases and domains. Then a logical data model is set up as a standard format to design data file structures for a relational database. (2) A multi-level data dictionary for data standardization constraint. Three levels of data dictionary are designed: model data dictionary is used to manage system database files and enhance maintenance of the whole database system; attribute dictionary organizes fields used in database tables; term and code dictionary is applied to provide a standard for urban information system by adopting appropriate classification and coding methods; comprehensive data dictionary manages system operation and security. (3

  3. Population expanding with the phalanx model and lineages split by environmental heterogeneity: a case study of Primula obconica in subtropical China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Fei Yan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Current and historical events have both affected the current distribution patterns and intraspecific divergence of plants. While numerous studies have focused on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (QTP, the impacts of such events on the flora of subtropical China remain poorly understood. Subtropical China is famous for its highly complex topography and the limited impact from glaciation during the Pleistocene; this may have resulted in a different genetic legacy for species in this region compared to fully glaciated areas. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used plastid and nuclear DNA sequence data and distribution modeling to analyze the divergence patterns and demographic history of Primula obconica Hance, a widespread herbaceous montane species in subtropical China. The phylogenetic analysis revealed two major lineages (lineage A and lineage B, representing a west-east split into the Yunnan and Eastern groups, and the Sichuan and Central groups, respectively. The Eastern and Central groups comprised relatively new derived haplotypes. Nested Clade Analysis and Bayesian Skyline Plot analyses both indicated that P. obconica mainly experienced a gradual expansion of populations. In addition, the simulated distribution of P. obconica during the Last Glacial Maximum was slightly larger than its present-day distribution. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results are the first to identify a west-east migration of P. obconica. The gradual expansion pattern and a larger potential distribution range in cold periods detected for P. obconica indicate that the population expansion of this species is consistent with the phalanx model. In addition, the current patterns of genetic differentiation have persisted as a result of the extensive environmental heterogeneity that exists in subtropical China.

  4. Environmental

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawsan M. Aboul Ezz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rotifers are one of the most common, abundant components of plankton in the coastal waters of the Mediterranean Sea, which means that they can be used as bio-indicators and provide useful information on the long-term dynamics of the El-Mex Bay ecosystem. Rotifera species were quantitatively and qualitatively assessed in the El-Mex Bay, west of Alexandria at eight stations to study spatial, temporal, dominance, and abundance of the rotifer community and their relation with changes in environmental conditions. Samples were collected seasonally from autumn 2011 to autumn 2012. Ecological parameters were determined and correlated with total rotifers abundance to gain information about the forces that structure the rotifer community in this dynamic environment. A total of 38 rotifer species were identified belonging to 16 genera within 12 families and 3 orders under one class and contributed about 12.1% of the total zooplankton in the study area with an average of 1077 specimens/m3. Maximum density was observed in summer 2012 with an average of 1445 specimens/m3. During autumn 2011 rotifers appeared in low density (434 specimens/m3. The predominant species Ascomorpha saltans, Brachionus urceolaris, Synchaeta oblonga, Synchaeta okai, Synchaeta pectinata and Synchaeta tremula were recorded in all study stations of the bay. Salinity, temperature, depth, and chlorophyll-a concentration were the most important environmental factors co-related with the abundance of rotifers in the El-Mex Bay. A significant positive correlation between the total rotifer abundance and chlorophyll-a was observed during winter 2012 and summer 2012 (r = 0.763 and r = 0.694, respectively, at p ⩽ 0.05.

  5. An Environmental Information System for Hypoxia in Corpus Christi Bay: A WATERS Network Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minsker, B.; Maidment, D.; Hodges, B.; Montagna, P.; Bonner, J.

    2006-12-01

    This project is creating and demonstrating a prototype Environmental Information System (EIS) that couples sensor measurements with end-to-end cyberinfrastructure to improve understanding of hypoxia in Corpus Christi Bay (CC Bay), Texas. Hypoxia is a common estuarine phenomenon that occurs when dissolved oxygen concentrations fall below 2 mg/L, and has resulted in about a ten-fold reduction in benthic standing stock and diversity in CC Bay. The hypoxia in CC Bay is correlated with salinity-induced stratification of the bay, but the causes of the stratification and the spatial and temporal patterns of the hypoxia remain uncertain. In this project, an interdisciplinary team of hydrologists, environmental engineers, and biologists are collaborating to improve understanding of hypoxia by: (1) creating an Environmental Data Access System for CC Bay data archives, leveraging CUAHSI Hydrologic Information System (HIS) Web service developments to create data services that automatically ingest observed data in both national and local remote data archives; (2) developing an Environmental Modeling System for CC Bay hypoxia, combining numerical hydrodynamic, dissolved oxygen, and oxygen demand models with data mining using hierarchical machine learning algorithms; and (3) demonstrating the effectiveness of the EIS for supporting adaptive hypoxia sampling and collaborative research using the CyberCollaboratory. This paper will summarize current progress and plans for the project.

  6. Enhancing Earth Science And IT Literacy Through Environmental Science Information Technology Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuff, K. E.; Molinaro, M.

    2004-12-01

    The Environmental Science Information Technology Activities (ESITA) program provides grades 9 and 10 students with under-represented minority backgrounds in the East San Francisco Bay Area with real-world opportunities to learn about and apply information technologies through a series of project-based activities related to environmental science. Supported by the NSF Information Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers (ITEST) program, ESITA activities engage students in the use of newly acquired information technology (IT) skills and understandings while performing air and water quality research investigations. One project that ESITA students have become involved in relates to the currently relevant issue of elevated levels of lead found in drinking waters in Washington, D.C. Students based in the Bay Area have initiated and maintained E-mail correspondence with children who attend elementary schools in the D.C. area. After receiving a thorough explanation of required sampling procedures devised by the Bay Area students, the elementary school children have sent 500 ml water samples from their homes and schools to Berkeley along with information about the locations from which the water samples were collected. These samples were then prepared for lead analysis at Lawrence Hall of Science by ESITA students, who used resulting data to perform a preliminary assessment of the geospatial distribution of lead trouble spots throughout Washington, DC. Later, ESITA student scientists will work with students from the UC Berkeley School of Public Health to develop surveys and questionnaires that generate high quality information useful with regard to assessing the impact of the current lead crisis on younger children in the Washington, D.C. area. Through the application of new understandings to current, real-world environmental problems and issues such as that related to lead, positive changes in students' attitudes towards IT and science have occurred, which accompany

  7. A risk-informed decision framework for setting environmental windows for dredging projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suedel, Burton C; Kim, Jongbum; Clarke, Douglas G; Linkov, Igor

    2008-09-15

    Sediment dredging is necessary to sustain navigation infrastructure in ports and harbor areas. In the United States alone between 250 and 300 million cubic yards of sediment are dredged annually. Dredging activities may cause stress on aquatic biota by locally increasing turbidity and suspended sediment concentrations, physically disturbing habitat by elevated sedimentation rates, interfering in migratory behaviors, and hydraulically entraining bottom dwelling organisms. Environmental windows are a management practice used to alleviate such stresses on resident and transient biota by placing temporal restrictions on the conduct of dredging operations. Adherence to environmental windows can significantly inflate costs for project sponsors and local stakeholders. Since their inception following passage of NEPA in 1969 the process for setting environmental windows has not followed structured procedures and represents an example of the difficulty inherent in achieving a balance between biological resource protection and cost-effective construction and maintenance of navigation infrastructure. Recent developments in the fields of risk assessment for non-chemical stressors as well as experience in implementing structured risk-informed decision-making tools for sediment and natural resource management are summarized in this paper in relation to setting environmental windows. Combining risk assessment and multi-criteria decision analysis allows development of a framework for an objective process consistent with recommendations by the National Academy of Sciences for setting environmental windows. A hypothetical application of the framework for protection of Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii) in San Francisco Bay is discussed.

  8. Data Tethers: Preventing Information Leakage by Enforcing Environmental Data Access Policies

    OpenAIRE

    Fleming, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Protecting data from accidental loss or theft is crucial in today's world ofmobile computing. Data Tethers provides environmental policy control of information at the data level, rather than the file level. Data Tethers uses dynamic recompilation to add label tracking instructions to existing applications in the OpenSolaris operating system, allowing fine-grain data flow tracking in legacy applications without the need to recompile from source. We demonstrate the system's feasibility with mi...

  9. Customer Use Cases and Analytics for Climate Data at NOAA's National Centers forEnvironmental Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, T.; Brewer, M.; Hollingshead, A.; Dissen, J.

    2016-12-01

    NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) is the world's largest repository of climate data. Millions of individuals and companies around the world use NCEI's use-inspired data and information to make decisions and to build and deliver products and services. The impact of NCEI data to the global economy is enormous. Recently, NCEI has undertaken a concerted effort to understand the uses of its data, the benefit the data provides to customers, and who exactly those customers are. Highlights from use case studies, customer analytics, and unique success stories will be provided showing the value and breadth of NCEI data uses and users.

  10. Robust Priority for Strategic Environmental Assessment with Incomplete Information Using Multi-Criteria Decision Making Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daeryong Park

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates how the priority rankings for dam construction sites vary with multi-criteria decision making (MCDM techniques and generation approaches for incomplete information. Strategic environmental assessment (SEA seeks to recommend sustainable dam construction sites based on their environmental and ecological impacts in a long-term plan for dam construction (LPDC in South Korea. However, if specific information is missing, the SEA is less useful for choosing a dam construction site. In this study, we applied AHP, ELECTRE III, PROMETHEE II and Compromise Programming as MCDM techniques, and used binomial and uniform distributions to generate missing information. We considered five dam site selection situations and compared the results as they depended on both MCDM techniques and information generation methods. The binomial generation method showed the most obvious priorities. All MCDM techniques showed similar priorities in the dam site selection results except for ELECTREE III. The results demonstrate that selecting an appropriate MCDM technique is more important than the data generation method. However, using binomial distribution to generate missing information is more effective in providing a robust priority than uniform distribution, which is a commonly used technique.

  11. Formation of Rationally Heterogeneous Expectations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pfajfar, D.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: This paper models expectation formation by taking into account that agents produce heterogeneous expectations due to model uncertainty, informational frictions and different capacities for processing information. We show that there are two general classes of steady states within this

  12. Green heterogeneous wireless networks

    CERN Document Server

    Ismail, Muhammad; Nee, Hans-Peter; Qaraqe, Khalid A; Serpedin, Erchin

    2016-01-01

    This book focuses on the emerging research topic "green (energy efficient) wireless networks" which has drawn huge attention recently from both academia and industry. This topic is highly motivated due to important environmental, financial, and quality-of-experience (QoE) considerations. Specifically, the high energy consumption of the wireless networks manifests in approximately 2% of all CO2 emissions worldwide. This book presents the authors’ visions and solutions for deployment of energy efficient (green) heterogeneous wireless communication networks. The book consists of three major parts. The first part provides an introduction to the "green networks" concept, the second part targets the green multi-homing resource allocation problem, and the third chapter presents a novel deployment of device-to-device (D2D) communications and its successful integration in Heterogeneous Networks (HetNets). The book is novel in that it specifically targets green networking in a heterogeneous wireless medium, which re...

  13. The U.S. National Library of Medicine's Toxicology and Environmental Health Information Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wexler, Philip

    2004-05-20

    For nearly 40 years, the National Library of Medicine's (NLM) Toxicology and Environmental Health Information Program (TEHIP) has been a significant leader in organizing and providing public access to an extensive storehouse of toxicological information through its online databases. With the advent of the Internet, TEHIP has expanded its role to also serve as a pre-eminent portal to toxicological information worldwide. Its primary databases reside within the web-based TOXNET system, and include the scientifically peer-reviewed Hazardous Substances Data Bank (HSDB), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) and Toxics Release Inventory, the National Cancer Institute's Chemical Carcinogenesis Research Information System (CCRIS) and the TOXLINE file of over 3 million bibliographic references. TEHIP's ChemIDplus is an extensive chemical dictionary that extends beyond simple nomenclature to offer displays of molecular structures and links from particular chemicals to other databases containing more information. Specialty files in occupational safety and health, and household products have recently been added to TEHIP's suite of resources. Additional databases in risk assessment, drugs, toxicology education, and global resources, are under development. "Special Topics" pages lead users to structured summaries and links in areas such as arsenic, chemical warfare agents, biological warfare, and West Nile Virus. A database on alternatives to the use of live animals, a three-module toxicology tutor, and a glossary of terms in toxicology are among TEHIP's other information aids, as well an increasing commitment to serving consumers, as witnessed by the animated ToxTown program. Outside the sphere of TEHIP, NLM offers additional databases, such as PubMed, of significant value to toxicology researchers.

  14. Can data science inform environmental justice and community risk screening for type 2 diabetes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Allen Davis

    Full Text Available Having the ability to scan the entire country for potential "hotspots" with increased risk of developing chronic diseases due to various environmental, demographic, and genetic susceptibility factors may inform risk management decisions and enable better environmental public health policies.Develop an approach for community-level risk screening focused on identifying potential genetic susceptibility hotpots.Our approach combines analyses of phenotype-genotype data, genetic prevalence of single nucleotide polymorphisms, and census/geographic information to estimate census tract-level population attributable risks among various ethnicities and total population for the state of California.We estimate that the rs13266634 single nucleotide polymorphism, a type 2 diabetes susceptibility genotype, has a genetic prevalence of 56.3%, 47.4% and 37.0% in Mexican Mestizo, Caucasian, and Asian populations. Looking at the top quintile for total population attributable risk, 16 California counties have greater than 25% of their population living in hotspots of genetic susceptibility for developing type 2 diabetes due to this single genotypic susceptibility factor.This study identified counties in California where large portions of the population may bear additional type 2 diabetes risk due to increased genetic prevalence of a susceptibility genotype. This type of screening can easily be extended to include information on environmental contaminants of interest and other related diseases, and potentially enables the rapid identification of potential environmental justice communities. Other potential uses of this approach include problem formulation in support of risk assessments, land use planning, and prioritization of site cleanup and remediation actions.

  15. On Improving the Quality and Interpretation of Environmental Assessments using Statistical Analysis and Geographic Information Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karuppiah, R.; Faldi, A.; Laurenzi, I.; Usadi, A.; Venkatesh, A.

    2014-12-01

    An increasing number of studies are focused on assessing the environmental footprint of different products and processes, especially using life cycle assessment (LCA). This work shows how combining statistical methods and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) with environmental analyses can help improve the quality of results and their interpretation. Most environmental assessments in literature yield single numbers that characterize the environmental impact of a process/product - typically global or country averages, often unchanging in time. In this work, we show how statistical analysis and GIS can help address these limitations. For example, we demonstrate a method to separately quantify uncertainty and variability in the result of LCA models using a power generation case study. This is important for rigorous comparisons between the impacts of different processes. Another challenge is lack of data that can affect the rigor of LCAs. We have developed an approach to estimate environmental impacts of incompletely characterized processes using predictive statistical models. This method is applied to estimate unreported coal power plant emissions in several world regions. There is also a general lack of spatio-temporal characterization of the results in environmental analyses. For instance, studies that focus on water usage do not put in context where and when water is withdrawn. Through the use of hydrological modeling combined with GIS, we quantify water stress on a regional and seasonal basis to understand water supply and demand risks for multiple users. Another example where it is important to consider regional dependency of impacts is when characterizing how agricultural land occupation affects biodiversity in a region. We developed a data-driven methodology used in conjuction with GIS to determine if there is a statistically significant difference between the impacts of growing different crops on different species in various biomes of the world.

  16. River Basin Information System: Open Environmental Data Management for Research and Decision Making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska Zander

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available An open, standardized data management and related service infrastructure is a crucial requirement for a seamless storage and exchange of data and information within research projects, for the dissemination of project results and for their application in decision making processes. However, typical project databases often refer to only one research project and are limited to specific purposes. Once implemented, those systems are often not further maintained and updated, rendering the stored information useless once the system stops operating. The River Basin Information System (RBIS presented here is designed to fit not only the requirements of one research project, but focuses on generic functions, extensibility and standards compliance typically found in interdisciplinary environmental research. Developed throughout more than 10 years of research cooperation worldwide, RBIS is designed to manage different types of environmental data with and without spatial context together with a rich set of metadata. Beside data management and storage, RBIS provides functions for the visualization, linking, analysis and processing of different types of data to support research, decision making, result dissemination and information discovery for all kinds of users. The focus of this paper is on the description of the technical implementation and the presentation of functions. This will be complemented by an overview of example applications and experiences during RBIS development and operation.

  17. Resolving Heterogeneity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hölzenspies, Jurriaan; Dela Cruz, Gelo Victoriano; M Brickman, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    sets of pluripotency and differentiation markers. It has become increasingly apparent that this transcriptional heterogeneity is an important characteristic of ESC culture. By sorting for specific populations of ESCs it is possible to enrich for cells with a capacity to colonize the embryo proper...

  18. Explaining the Variation in Adoption Rates of the Information Content of Environmental Disclosure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fallan, Even

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: - Corporate management decides what types of environmental information content to disclose/adopt. It is explored whether internal context - decision-makers’ perception of characteristics of the information content - might predict the variation in adoption rates of different types...... or changing internal and general contexts, and should be applicable to other settings, even though the particular predictions for adoption rates in this paper may not be applied as such. Originality/value: - The level of analysis is changed from the company level, which dominates previous research...... of content, and whether innovation adoption theory might represent important factors of this decision-making process. Design/methodology/approach: - Actual adoption rates of 13 information content categories are computed using content analysis of annual reports for 62 listed companies. Each content category...

  19. Towards a personalized environmental health information service using low-cost sensors and crowdsourcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castell, Nuria; Liu, Hai-Ying; Schneider, Philipp; Cole-Hunter, Tom; Lahoz, William; Bartonova, Alena

    2015-04-01

    Most European cities exceed the air quality guidelines established by the WHO to protect human health. As such, citizens are exposed to potentially harmful pollutant levels. Some cities have services (e.g., web pages, mobile apps, etc.) which provide timely air quality information to the public. However, air quality data at individual level is currently scarce or non-existent. Making this information directly useful to individuals poses a challenge. For instance, if a user is informed that the air quality is "poor", what does that mean for him/her, and how can this information be acted upon? Despite individuals having a unique relationship with their environment, the information on the state of atmospheric components and related hazards is currently mostly generic, and seldom personally relevant. This undermines citizens' interest in their environment, and consequently limits their ability to recognize and change both their contribution and their exposure to air pollution. In Oslo, two EU founded projects, CITI-SENSE (Engelken-Jorge et al., 2014) and Citi-Sense-MOB (Castell et al., 2014), are trying to establish a dialogue with citizens by providing them with the possibility of getting personalized air quality information on their smartphones. The users are able to check the air quality in their immediate surroundings and track their individual exposure while moving through the urban environment (Castell et al., 2014). In this way, they may be able to reduce their exposure such as by changing transport modes or routes, for example by selecting less polluted streets to walk or cycle through. Using a smartphone application, citizens are engaged in collecting and sharing environmental data generated by low-cost air quality sensors, and in reporting their individual perception (turning citizens into sensors themselves). The highly spatially resolved data on air quality and perception is geo-located. This allows for simultaneous visualization of both kinds of the sensor

  20. Contribution of auxiliary information for the estimation of grades in heterogeneous media: example in soil pollution; Apport d'informations qualitatives pour l'estimation des teneurs en milieux heterogenes: cas d'une pollution de sols par des hydrocarbures aromatique polycycliques (HAP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeannee, N.; Fouquet, Ch. de [Ecole des Mines de Paris, Centre de Geostatistique, 77 - Fontainebleau (France); Jeannee, N. [Centre National de Recherche sur les Sites et Sols Pollues - CNRSSP, 59 - Douai (France)

    2003-05-01

    Grade estimates are often of weak precision in the case of heterogeneous media, due to their high variability, even at small scale. Qualitative information is then useful to improve the quality of the estimates, without prohibitive additional costs. How can we sample such variables, and detect the ones that are of interest for the estimation of grades? The general methodology is presented and then illustrated for the estimation of the benzo(a)pyrene (a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, PAH) concentration in soils, sampled on a former coking plant. (authors)

  1. PHENOPSIS DB: an Information System for Arabidopsis thaliana phenotypic data in an environmental context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massonnet Catherine

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Renewed interest in plant × environment interactions has risen in the post-genomic era. In this context, high-throughput phenotyping platforms have been developed to create reproducible environmental scenarios in which the phenotypic responses of multiple genotypes can be analysed in a reproducible way. These platforms benefit hugely from the development of suitable databases for storage, sharing and analysis of the large amount of data collected. In the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, most databases available to the scientific community contain data related to genetic and molecular biology and are characterised by an inadequacy in the description of plant developmental stages and experimental metadata such as environmental conditions. Our goal was to develop a comprehensive information system for sharing of the data collected in PHENOPSIS, an automated platform for Arabidopsis thaliana phenotyping, with the scientific community. Description PHENOPSIS DB is a publicly available (URL: http://bioweb.supagro.inra.fr/phenopsis/ information system developed for storage, browsing and sharing of online data generated by the PHENOPSIS platform and offline data collected by experimenters and experimental metadata. It provides modules coupled to a Web interface for (i the visualisation of environmental data of an experiment, (ii the visualisation and statistical analysis of phenotypic data, and (iii the analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana plant images. Conclusions Firstly, data stored in the PHENOPSIS DB are of interest to the Arabidopsis thaliana community, particularly in allowing phenotypic meta-analyses directly linked to environmental conditions on which publications are still scarce. Secondly, data or image analysis modules can be downloaded from the Web interface for direct usage or as the basis for modifications according to new requirements. Finally, the structure of PHENOPSIS DB provides a useful template for the development

  2. Effective information channels for reducing costs of environmentally- friendly technologies: evidence from residential PV markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Varun; Robinson, Scott A.

    2013-03-01

    Realizing the environmental benefits of solar photovoltaics (PV) will require reducing costs associated with perception, informational gaps and technological uncertainties. To identify opportunities to decrease costs associated with residential PV adoption, in this letter we use multivariate regression models to analyze a unique, household-level dataset of PV adopters in Texas (USA) to systematically quantify the effect of different information channels on aspiring PV adopters’ decision-making. We find that the length of the decision period depends on the business model, such as whether the system was bought or leased, and on special opportunities to learn, such as the influence of other PV owners in the neighborhood. This influence accrues passively through merely witnessing PV systems in the neighborhood, increasing confidence and motivation, as well as actively through peer-to-peer communications. Using these insights we propose a new framework to provide public information on PV that could drastically reduce barriers to PV adoption, thereby accelerating its market penetration and environmental benefits. This framework could also serve as a model for other distributed generation technologies.

  3. Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS). Volume 1, User`s guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-14

    The Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS) is a consolidated set of automated resources that effectively manage the data gathered during environmental monitoring and restoration of the Hanford Site. HEIS includes an integrated database that provides consistent and current data to all users and promotes sharing of data by the entire user community. HEIS is an information system with an inclusive database. Although the database is the nucleus of the system, HEIS also provides user access software: query-by-form data entry, extraction, and browsing facilities; menu-driven reporting facilities; an ad hoc query facility; and a geographic information system (GIS). These features, with the exception of the GIS, are described in this manual set. Because HEIS contains data from the entire Hanford Site, many varieties of data are included and have.been divided into subject areas. Related subject areas comprise several volumes of the manual set. The manual set includes a data dictionary that lists all of the fields in the HEIS database, with their definitions and a cross reference of their locations in the database; definitions of data qualifiers for analytical results; and a mapping between the HEIS software functions and the keyboard keys for each of the supported terminals or terminal emulators.

  4. Study on data acquisition system for living environmental information for biofication of living spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoyama, Norihisa; Mita, Akira

    2008-03-01

    In Japan's rapidly aging society, the number of elderly people living alone increases every year. Theses elderly people require more and more to maintain as independent a life as possible in their own homes. It is necessary to make living spaces that assist in providing safe and comfortable lives. "Biofication of Living Spaces" is proposed with the concept of creating save and pleasant living environments. It implies learning from biological systems, and applying to living spaces features such as high adaptability and excellent tolerance to environmental changes. As a first step towards realizing "Biofied Spaces", a system for acquisition and storing information must be developed. This system is similar to the five human senses. The information acquired includes environmental information such as temperature, human behavior, psychological state and location of furniture. This study addresses human behavior as it is the most important factor in design of a living space. In the present study, pyroelectric infrared sensors were chosen for human behavior recognition. The pyroelectric infrared sensor is advantageous in that it has no limitation on the number of sensors put in a single space because sensors do not interfere with each other. Wavelet analysis was applied to the output time histories of the pyroelectric infrared sensors. The system successfully classified walking patterns with 99.5% accuracy of walking direction (from right or left) and 85.7% accuracy of distance for 440 patterns pre-learned and an accuracy of over 80% accuracy of walking direction for 720 non-learned patterns.

  5. The potential of spatial information in human biomonitoring by example of two German environmental epidemiology studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Gunther; Pesch, Roland; Schröder, Winfried; Conrad, André; Kolossa-Gehring, Marike; Feigenspan, Stefan; Dobler, Lorenz; Wiesmüller, Gerhard A; Birke, Manfred; Utermann, Jens

    2011-08-01

    This study aimed at statistically investigating the association between the internal exposure of children and young adults to uranium (U) and epidemiologically relevant external determinants of exposure. The investigation was performed with data from two studies within the framework of the German health-related environmental monitoring program: The German Environmental Survey for Children (GerES IV) conducted by the Federal Environment Agency (Umweltbundesamt) with data on 1,780 children 3-14 years of age and their home environment and the German Environmental Specimen Bank (ESB, section: human specimens) with data on 2,253 students 20-29 years of age. Both studies provided data on the U levels in human urine for all probands. GerES IV furthermore provided an extensive environmental and demographic database on, e.g., U levels in drinking water. The data from GerES IV and ESB were linked by GIS to spatially relevant exposure information, including background values of U in stream sediments and in upper and lower soils, U levels in mosses and particulate matter in the lower atmosphere, precipitation and elevation as well as forest density. Bivariate correlation analysis and two decision tree models showed moderate but significant associations between U in human urine and U levels in drinking water, stream sediments and upper and lower soils. Future investigations considering additional epidemiologically relevant data sets may differentiate the results. Furthermore, the sample design of future environmental epidemiology studies should take the spatial evaluation of the data into greater account.

  6. Heterogeneity and Scaling in Geologic Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory N. Boitnott; Gilles Y. Bussod; Paul N. Hagin; Stephen R. Brown

    2005-04-18

    The accurate characterization and remediation of contaminated subsurface environments requires the detailed knowledge of subsurface structures and flow paths. Enormous resources are invested in scoping and characterizing sites using core sampling, 3-D geophysical surveys, well tests, etc.... Unfortunately, much of the information acquired is lost to compromises and simplifications made in constructing numerical grids for the simulators used to predict flow and transport from the contaminated area to the accessible environment. In rocks and soils, the bulk geophysical and transport properties of the matrix and of fracture systems are determined by the juxtaposition of geometric features at many length scales. In the interest of computational efficiency, recognized heterogeneities are simplified, averaged out, or entirely ignored in spite of recent studies that recognize that: (1) Structural and lithologic heterogeneities exist on all scales in rocks. (2) Small heterogeneities influence, and can control the physical and chemical properties of rocks. In this work we propose a physically based approach for the description and treatment of heterogeneities, that highlights the use of laboratory equipment designed to measure the effect on physical properties of fine scale heterogeneities observed in rocks and soils. We then discuss the development of an integration methodology that uses these measurements to develop and upscale flow and transport models. Predictive simulations are 'calibrated' to the measured heterogeneity data, and subsequently upscaled in a way that is consistent with the transport physics and the efficient use of environmental geophysics. This methodology provides a more accurate interpretation and representation of the subsurface for both environmental engineering and remediation. We show through examples, (i) the important influence of even subtle heterogeneity in the interpreting of geophysical data, and (ii) how physically based upscaling

  7. Measuring the impact of informal science education in zoos on environmental knowledge, attitudes and behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Christopher David

    Despite the emphasis in modern zoos and aquaria on conservation and environmental education, we know very little about what people learn in these settings, and even less about how they learn it. Research on informal learning in settings such as zoos has suffered from a lack of theory, with few connections being made to theories of learning in formal settings, or to theories regarding the nature of the educational goals. This dissertation consists of three parts: the development and analysis of a test instrument designed to measure constructs of environmental learning in zoos; the application of the test instrument along with qualitative data collection in an evaluation designed to measure the effectiveness of a zoo's education programs; and the analysis of individually matched pre- and post-test data to examine how environmental learning takes place, with respect to the constructivist view of learning, as well as theories of environmental learning and the barriers to pro-environmental behavior. The test instrument consisted of 40 items split into four scales: environmental knowledge, attitudes toward the environment, support for conservation, and environmentally responsible behavior. A model-driven approach was used to develop the instrument, which was analyzed using Item Response Theory and the Rasch dichotomous measurement model. After removal of two items with extremely high difficulty, the instrument was found to be unidimensional and sufficiently reliable. The results of the IRT analyses are interpreted with respect to a modern validity framework. The evaluation portion of this study applied this test instrument to measuring the impact of zoo education programs on 750 fourth through seventh grade students. Qualitative data was collected from program observations and teacher surveys, and a comparison was also made between programs that took place at the zoo, and those that took place in the school classroom, thereby asking questions regarding the role of

  8. Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS). Volume 2, Operator`s guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-14

    This report discusses the procedures that establish the configuration control processes for the Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS) software. The procedures also provide the charter and function of the HEIS Configuration Control Board (CCB) for maintaining software. The software configuration control items covered under these procedures include the HEIS software and database structure. The configuration control processes include both administrative and audit functions. The administrative role includes maintaining the overall change schedule, ensuring consistency of proposed changes, negotiating change plan adjustments, setting priorities, and tracking the status of changes. The configuration control process audits to ensure that changes are performed to applicable standards.

  9. Techniques of the environmental observer: India's earth remote sensing program in the age of global information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denicola, Lane A.

    This research examines the emergence in India of earth remote sensing (ERS), a principal medium for environmental analysis, communication, and policy-making. ERS---the science and "craft" of analyzing images of terrestrial phenomena collected by aircraft or satellite---constitutes an information technology whose predominance in environmental discourse has grown continuously since first proposed for such applications by American researchers in 1962. Raising many thorny issues in information access and control, the use and popularization of ERS has intensified dramatically since the mid-1980s. In Westernized discourse (both popular and expert), space research and industry are often depicted at a double-remove from the so-called "developing world," where exotic technologies and esoteric goals are overshadowed by patent human needs and a lack of basic infrastructure. Yet advocates hail the utility of ERS in socially relevant applications, and India has amassed upwards of five decades of experience in space, with systems and products rivaled today only by those of the United States and China. A multi-sited ethnography of a nascent visual medium, the dissertation triangulates on its topic by tracing three analytical threads: (1) a diachronic analysis of Indian ERS satellites as an allegory of statehood and participation in the global present, (2) a synchronic analysis of ERS imagery as a discursive artifact and global information commodity, and (3) an analysis of interpretive practice as observed through a single class of Indian and foreign students at the Indian Institute of Remote Sensing (IIRS), considered here as an "interpretive community" of environmental experts. The dissertation is the result of four years of research with ERS students, faculty, researchers, users and administrators in the U.S., the U.K., Turkey and India. In particular, I conducted nine months of ethnographic fieldwork in India in 2002 and 2005, the latter half of which was spent in participant

  10. Specialization and Bet Hedging in Heterogeneous Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rulands, Steffen; Jahn, David; Frey, Erwin

    2014-09-01

    Phenotypic heterogeneity is a strategy commonly used by bacteria to rapidly adapt to changing environmental conditions. Here, we study the interplay between phenotypic heterogeneity and genetic diversity in spatially extended populations. By analyzing the spatiotemporal dynamics, we show that the level of mobility and the type of competition qualitatively influence the persistence of phenotypic heterogeneity. While direct competition generally promotes persistence of phenotypic heterogeneity, specialization dominates in models with indirect competition irrespective of the degree of mobility.

  11. OntoTrader: an ontological Web trading agent approach for environmental information retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iribarne, Luis; Padilla, Nicolás; Ayala, Rosa; Asensio, José A; Criado, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Modern Web-based Information Systems (WIS) are becoming increasingly necessary to provide support for users who are in different places with different types of information, by facilitating their access to the information, decision making, workgroups, and so forth. Design of these systems requires the use of standardized methods and techniques that enable a common vocabulary to be defined to represent the underlying knowledge. Thus, mediation elements such as traders enrich the interoperability of web components in open distributed systems. These traders must operate with other third-party traders and/or agents in the system, which must also use a common vocabulary for communication between them. This paper presents the OntoTrader architecture, an Ontological Web Trading agent based on the OMG ODP trading standard. It also presents the ontology needed by some system agents to communicate with the trading agent and the behavioral framework for the SOLERES OntoTrader agent, an Environmental Management Information System (EMIS). This framework implements a "Query-Searching/Recovering-Response" information retrieval model using a trading service, SPARQL notation, and the JADE platform. The paper also presents reflection, delegation and, federation mediation models and describes formalization, an experimental testing environment in three scenarios, and a tool which allows our proposal to be evaluated and validated.

  12. OntoTrader: An Ontological Web Trading Agent Approach for Environmental Information Retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Iribarne

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern Web-based Information Systems (WIS are becoming increasingly necessary to provide support for users who are in different places with different types of information, by facilitating their access to the information, decision making, workgroups, and so forth. Design of these systems requires the use of standardized methods and techniques that enable a common vocabulary to be defined to represent the underlying knowledge. Thus, mediation elements such as traders enrich the interoperability of web components in open distributed systems. These traders must operate with other third-party traders and/or agents in the system, which must also use a common vocabulary for communication between them. This paper presents the OntoTrader architecture, an Ontological Web Trading agent based on the OMG ODP trading standard. It also presents the ontology needed by some system agents to communicate with the trading agent and the behavioral framework for the SOLERES OntoTrader agent, an Environmental Management Information System (EMIS. This framework implements a “Query-Searching/Recovering-Response” information retrieval model using a trading service, SPARQL notation, and the JADE platform. The paper also presents reflection, delegation and, federation mediation models and describes formalization, an experimental testing environment in three scenarios, and a tool which allows our proposal to be evaluated and validated.

  13. Information Modeling for Virtual and Augmented Reality

    OpenAIRE

    Patti, Edoardo; Mollame, Angelo; Erba, David; Dalmasso, Daniele; Osello, Anna; Macii, Enrico; Acquaviva, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Smart Building is recent interdisciplinary research field that aims to improve the monitoring, management and maintenance of buildings. In this scenario, we present an innovative solution for combining BIM (Building Information Modelling) data with ambient information collected by heterogeneous devices deployed in the building. In order to collect environmental information, we exploit in this work a distributed software architecture. It enables the interoperability between heterogeneous data-...

  14. Query Expansion Using Heterogeneous Thesauri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandala, Rila; Tokunaga, Takenobu; Tanaka, Hozumi

    2000-01-01

    Proposes a method to improve the performance of information retrieval systems by expanding queries using heterogeneous thesauri. Experiments show that using heterogeneous thesauri with an appropriate weighting method results in better retrieval performance than using only one type of thesaurus. (Author/LRW)

  15. New Perspectives on Corporate Reporting: Social-Economic and Environmental Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camelia Iuliana Lungu

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available In recent times the demand for disclosure of listed companies has dramatically increased and the failures of large companies listed on the most important stock exchanges have placed extra pressure on listed companies and standard setters for the increase in the quality of corporate reporting (Beretta, Bozzolan, 2004, pp. 303-305. Our research aims the participation to the professional judgment construction through conducting a survey of existing studies on corporate socio-economic and environmental disclosure. We focus on fundamental research which is related to inductive accounting theory and uses scientific methods for identification of corporate reporting theoretical and practical difficulties in European and international economic entities. To accomplish our objective, we take into consideration the studies on socio-economic and environmental reporting, already conducted at European and international level, the financial reporting experience and the Romanian experience on this area. We analyze the status of development in corporate reporting and environmental reporting standards and focus on the issues requested and their implications. Also, the paper allows new approaches regarding quality information reporting and its implementation into entities financial statements, ensuring premises for future research.

  16. Implementation of AN Agricultural Environmental Information System (aeis) for the Sanjiang Plain, Ne-China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Q.; Brocks, S.; Lenz-Wiedemann, V.; Miao, Y.; Jiang, R.; Chen, X.; Zhang, F.; Bareth, G.

    2012-07-01

    The Sino-German Project between the China Agricultural University and the University of Cologne, Germany, focuses on regional agro-ecosystem modelling. One major focus of the cooperation activity is the establishment of joint rice field experiment research in Jiansanjiang, located in the Sanjiang Plain (Heilongjiang Province, north-eastern part of China), to investigate the different agricultural practices and their impact on yield and environment. An additional task is to set-up an Agricultural Environmental Information System (AEIS) for the Sanjiang Plain (SJP), which covers more than 100 000 km2. Research groups from Geography (e.g. GIS & Remote Sensing) and Plant Nutrition (e.g. Precision Agriculture) are involved in the project. The major aim of the AEIS for the SJP is to provide information about (i) agriculture in the region, (ii) the impact of agricultural practices on the environment, and (iii) simulation scenarios for sustainable strategies. Consequently, the AEIS for the SJP provides information for decision support and therefore could be regarded as a Spatial Decision Support System (SDSS), too. The investigation of agricultural and environmental issues has a spatial context, which requires the management, handling, and analysis of spatial data. The use of GIS enables the capture, storage, analysis and presentation of spatial data. Therefore, GIS is the major tool for the set-up of the AEIS for the SJP. This contribution presents the results of linking agricultural statistics with GIS to provide information about agriculture in the SJP and discusses the benefits of this method as well as the integration of methods to produce new data.

  17. How to feed environmental studies with soil information to address SDG 'Zero hunger'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, Chantal; Stoorvogel, Jetse; Claessens, Lieven

    2017-04-01

    As pledged by UN Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 2, there should be zero hunger, food security, improved food nutrition and sustainable agriculture by 2030. Environmental studies are essential to reach SDG 2. Soils play a crucial role, especially in addressing 'Zero hunger'. This study aims to discuss the connection between the supply and demand of soil data for environmental studies and how this connection can be improved illustrating different methods. As many studies are resource constrained, the options to collect new soil data are limited. Therefore, it is essential to use existing soil information, auxiliary data and collected field data efficiently. Existing soil data are criticised in literature as i) being dominantly qualitative, ii) being often outdated, iii) being not spatially exhaustive, iv) being only available at general scales, v) being inconsistent, and vi) lacking quality assessments. Additional field data can help to overcome some of these problems. Outdated maps can, for example, be improved by collecting additional soil data in areas where changes in soil properties are expected. Existing soil data can also provide insight in the expected soil variability and, as such, these data can be used for the design of sampling schemes. Existing soil data are also crucial input for studies on digital soil mapping because they give information on parent material and the relative age of soils. Digital soil mapping is commonly applied as an efficient method to quantitatively predict the spatial variation of soil properties. However, the efficiency of digital soil mapping may increase if we look at functional soil properties (e.g. nutrient availability, available water capacity) for the soil profile that vary in a two-dimensional space rather than at basic soil properties of individual soil layers (e.g. texture, organic matter content, nitrogen content) that vary in a three-dimensional space. Digital soil mapping techniques are based on statistical

  18. Exploring the Effects of Communication Framed by Environmental Concern in Informal Science Education Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yocco, Victor S.

    Informal science education (ISE) venues such as zoos, nature centers, parks, and natural history museums play a critical role in allowing the general public to learn scientific concepts (National Research Council, 2009; 2010). Most adult learning of scientific concepts takes place outside of classrooms and away from work (Rennie and Williams, 2006). It is also true that zoos and natural history museums have stated missions regarding conveying concepts related to the conservation of our natural resources (Krishtalka and Humphrey, 2000; Patrick, Mathews, Ayers, and Tunicliffe, 2007). Theoretically, the successful communication of the desired message of these ISE institutions would inspire a more informed citizenry on the use and conservation of our natural resources. Framing communication is to present a topic in a manner that promote a specific view of the information. Effectively framing information can be an avenue to achieving the goal of ISE institutions (Chong & Druckman, 2007; Nisbet, 2009). Shultz and Zelezny (2003) posit that messages framed by egoistic concerns, concerns which focus on the individual, will be better received by the general public, leading to a greater likelihood for them to become engaged. This dissertation reports on a series of descriptive mixed methods studies conducted at a zoo, a natural history museum, and a science center, exploring the framing effects of communications framed by environmental concern (Schultz, 2001). In two of the studies the researcher examined the relationship between individuals' perceptions of the overlap between their lives and nature, their levels of environmental concern, and their preferences for statements designed to align with the types of environmental concern (i.e. egoistic, social-altruistic, and biospheric). Two studies were conducted using a quasi-experimental design in which the researcher randomly assigned messages framed by environmental concern while also taking measurements of prior involvement

  19. Risk information in support of cost estimates for the Baseline Environmental Management Report (BEMR). Section 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelston, G.M.; Jarvis, M.F.; Warren, B.R. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Von Berg, R. [ICF Kaiser Engineers, Inc., Oakland, CA (United States)

    1995-06-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL)(1) effort on the overall Baseline Environmental Management Report (BEMR) project consists of four installation-specific work components performed in succession. These components include (1) development of source terms, 92) collection of data and preparation of environmental settings reports, (3) calculation of unit risk factors, and (4) utilization of the unit risk factors in Automated Remedial Action Methodology (ARAM) for computation of target concentrations and cost estimates. This report documents work completed for the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, for components 2 and 3. The product of this phase of the BEMR project is the development of unit factors (i.e., unit transport factors, unit exposure factors, and unit risk factors). Thousands of these unit factors are gene rated and fill approximately one megabyte of computer information per installation. The final unit risk factors (URF) are transmitted electronically to BEMR-Cost task personnel as input to a computer program (ARAM). Abstracted files and exhibits of the URF information are included in this report. These visual formats are intended to provide a sample of the final task deliverable (the URF files) which can be easily read without a computer.

  20. Text Mining to inform construction of Earth and Environmental Science Ontologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schildhauer, M.; Adams, B.; Rebich Hespanha, S.

    2013-12-01

    There is a clear need for better semantic representation of Earth and environmental concepts, to facilitate more effective discovery and re-use of information resources relevant to scientists doing integrative research. In order to develop general-purpose Earth and environmental science ontologies, however, it is necessary to represent concepts and relationships that span usage across multiple disciplines and scientific specialties. Traditional knowledge modeling through ontologies utilizes expert knowledge but inevitably favors the particular perspectives of the ontology engineers, as well as the domain experts who interacted with them. This often leads to ontologies that lack robust coverage of synonymy, while also missing important relationships among concepts that can be extremely useful for working scientists to be aware of. In this presentation we will discuss methods we have developed that utilize statistical topic modeling on a large corpus of Earth and environmental science articles, to expand coverage and disclose relationships among concepts in the Earth sciences. For our work we collected a corpus of over 121,000 abstracts from many of the top Earth and environmental science journals. We performed latent Dirichlet allocation topic modeling on this corpus to discover a set of latent topics, which consist of terms that commonly co-occur in abstracts. We match terms in the topics to concept labels in existing ontologies to reveal gaps, and we examine which terms are commonly associated in natural language discourse, to identify relationships that are important to formally model in ontologies. Our text mining methodology uncovers significant gaps in the content of some popular existing ontologies, and we show how, through a workflow involving human interpretation of topic models, we can bootstrap ontologies to have much better coverage and richer semantics. Because we base our methods directly on what working scientists are communicating about their

  1. Spatial characterization and prediction of Neanderthal sites based on environmental information and stochastic modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maerker, Michael; Bolus, Michael

    2014-05-01

    We present a unique spatial dataset of Neanderthal sites in Europe that was used to train a set of stochastic models to reveal the correlations between the site locations and environmental indices. In order to assess the relations between the Neanderthal sites and environmental variables as described above we applied a boosted regression tree approach (TREENET) a statistical mechanics approach (MAXENT) and support vector machines. The stochastic models employ a learning algorithm to identify a model that best fits the relationship between the attribute set (predictor variables (environmental variables) and the classified response variable which is in this case the types of Neanderthal sites. A quantitative evaluation of model performance was done by determining the suitability of the model for the geo-archaeological applications and by helping to identify those aspects of the methodology that need improvements. The models' predictive performances were assessed by constructing the Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC) curves for each Neanderthal class, both for training and test data. In a ROC curve the Sensitivity is plotted over the False Positive Rate (1-Specificity) for all possible cut-off points. The quality of a ROC curve is quantified by the measure of the parameter area under the ROC curve. The dependent variable or target variable in this study are the locations of Neanderthal sites described by latitude and longitude. The information on the site location was collected from literature and own research. All sites were checked for site accuracy using high resolution maps and google earth. The study illustrates that the models show a distinct ranking in model performance with TREENET outperforming the other approaches. Moreover Pre-Neanderthals, Early Neanderthals and Classic Neanderthals show a specific spatial distribution. However, all models show a wide correspondence in the selection of the most important predictor variables generally showing less

  2. The Relationship between Environmental Turbulence, Management Support, Organizational Collaboration, Information Technology Solution Realization, and Process Performance, in Healthcare Provider Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muglia, Victor O.

    2010-01-01

    The Problem: The purpose of this study was to investigate relationships between environmental turbulence, management support, organizational collaboration, information technology solution realization, and process performance in healthcare provider organizations. Method: A descriptive/correlational study of Hospital medical services process…

  3. Notification: Audit of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Compliance with the Federal Information Security Management Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Project #OA-FY14-0135, February 10, 2014. The Office of Inspector General plans to begin fieldwork for an audit of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's compliance with the Federal Information Security Management Act (FISMA).

  4. Summary of existing information pertinent to environmental contaminants and oil spills on breeding Atlantic Coast piping plovers

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Information regarding environmental contaminants and oil spills on breeding Atlantic Coast piping plovers (Charadrius melodus) was solicited from state and federal...

  5. Energy and Environmental Issues in Eastern Europe and Central Asia: An Annotated Guide to Information Resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gant, K.S.

    2000-10-09

    Energy and environmental problems undermine the potential for sustained economic development and contribute to political and economic instability in the strategically important region surrounding the Caspian and Black Seas. Many organizations supporting efforts to resolve problems in this region have found that consensus building--a prerequisite for action--is a difficult process. Reaching agreement on priorities for investment, technical collaboration, and policy incentives depends upon informed decision-making by governments and local stakeholders. And while vast quantities of data and numerous analyses and reports are more accessible than ever, wading through the many potential sources in search of timely and relevant data is a formidable task. To facilitate more successful data searches and retrieval, this document provides annotated references to over 200 specific information sources, and over twenty primary search engines and data retrieval services, that provide relevant and timely information related to the environment, energy, and economic development around the Caspian and Black Seas. This document is an advance copy of the content that Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) plans to transfer to the web in HTML format to facilitate interactive search and retrieval of information using standard web-browser software.

  6. Environmental scanning: how developed is information acquisition in Western European companies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Benczur

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of theoretical works focus on the potential revolutionary impact of the Internet and other Information and Communication Technologies (ICT upon Competitive Intelligence, but only a few empirical research papers can be found on it. Is the real impact still unknown, or is it too insignificant to talk about? The present paper searches for the answers to this question both in literature and on the field, focusing on the point where the impact is expected to be the greatest: Information Gathering. Important empirical essays in academic literature are overviewed, including extensive American and also French surveys. These works did not report any major development of Environmental Scanning Systems throughout the years or significant changes due to the Internet. Based on literature the authors establish 7 groups of hypotheses with respect to the influence of external environment, internal structure and development of IT on the Information Gathering activities of firms. These hypotheses are then investigated by quantitative methodologies applied to a large sample: a survey of more than 500 firms over two consecutive years. Internal structure shows only partial influence, but for IT and external environment, the correlation was high. On the other hand, firms are still underdeveloped. The presented results provide better understanding of the level of development of Information Gathering in firms and of the factors influencing it, and suggest new ways for further research in order to understand why firms are still underdeveloped.

  7. Measuring Heterogeneous Reaction Rates with ATR-FTIR Spectroscopy to Evaluate Chemical Fates in an Atmospheric Environment: A Physical Chemistry and Environmental Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Jason E.; Zeng, Guang; Maron, Marta K.; Mach, Mindy; Dwebi, Iman; Liu, Yong

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports an undergraduate laboratory experiment to measure heterogeneous liquid/gas reaction kinetics (ozone-oleic acid and ozone-phenothrin) using a flow reactor coupled to an attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectrometer. The experiment is specially designed for an upper-level undergraduate Physical…

  8. Taming Prebiotic Chemistry: The Role of Heterogeneous and Interfacial Catalysis in the Emergence of a Prebiotic Catalytic/Information Polymer System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnard, Pierre-Alain

    2016-11-04

    Cellular life is based on interacting polymer networks that serve as catalysts, genetic information and structural molecules. The complexity of the DNA, RNA and protein biochemistry suggests that it must have been preceded by simpler systems. The RNA world hypothesis proposes RNA as the prime candidate for such a primal system. Even though this proposition has gained currency, its investigations have highlighted several challenges with respect to bulk aqueous media: (1) the synthesis of RNA monomers is difficult; (2) efficient pathways for monomer polymerization into functional RNAs and their subsequent, sequence-specific replication remain elusive; and (3) the evolution of the RNA function towards cellular metabolism in isolation is questionable in view of the chemical mixtures expected on the early Earth. This review will address the question of the possible roles of heterogeneous media and catalysis as drivers for the emergence of RNA-based polymer networks. We will show that this approach to non-enzymatic polymerizations of RNA from monomers and RNA evolution cannot only solve some issues encountered during reactions in bulk aqueous solutions, but may also explain the co-emergence of the various polymers indispensable for life in complex mixtures and their organization into primitive networks.

  9. Consumers' environmental and ethical consciousness and the use of the related food products information: The role of perceived consumer effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghvanidze, Sophie; Velikova, Natalia; Dodd, Tim H; Oldewage-Theron, Wilna

    2016-12-01

    Consumers can be important active contributors to a sustainable society by selecting food choices that are both healthy and produced respecting environmental and socially ethical standards. The current study investigates five consumer behavioural factors - namely, perceived consumer effectiveness (PCE); environmental conscious behaviour; concerns for ethical food production; health conscious lifestyle; and healthy dietary patterns. The key interest of the study lies in exploring the moderating role of PCE - the extent to which the consumer believes that his/her own efforts can make a difference - in these interrelationships. The empirical analysis was conducted through an online survey of food consumers implemented in three markets - the US, the UK and Germany. Findings indicate that for individuals with higher levels of PCE, who are environmental conscious and ethically concerned, information on food labels relating to environmental and social issues represents value by itself. Interestingly, health and nutrition information on food labels was not perceived valuable by consumers with high PCE. The predictive effects of various socio-demographic variables on PCE, consumer environmental and health consciousness are discussed. Cross-cultural differences are also outlined. The results of this research may contribute to the development of environmental policies and communication strategies of the food industry to enhance perceived consumer effectiveness among consumers. Improved PCE, in turn, may catalyze consumers' environmental behaviour and ethical concerns in relation to consumption of food products with environmental and social information. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Environmental Scanning in Acquisition and Use of Information by the Managers of Private Publishers in Tehran City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahimeh Babalhavaeji

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was the investigation of managers of private publishers of Tehran (MPPT in using at information source to acquire information about their organization's external environment and to use it on decision-making. Research methods were analytical survey and statistic population 260 managers for research was selected by random sampling methods from Morgan table. Questionnaires were used as an instrument for data collecting and sent to publishers by email. In this study, environmental scanning, information source, information source accessibility selected as dependent variable, and measured with MPPT as independent variable. Binomial test and Pearson correlation analysis test were used for analyzing questions and hypothesis. The investigation results showed that findings from research questions results indicated significant relationship among independent variables (MPPT with the dependent variables- environmental scanning, information sources, source accessibility of information. In the external environment, the sectors of economic, customers and competitors were the most important environmental sectors, and information sources were also available under subordinate staff, internal memoranda, circulars were most important source of information and television and radio, government publications and periodicals periodic rate also have been used less. There was relationship between the source accessibility of information and the frequency of its use in environmental scanning statistically significant between levels of less than (P based on Pearson’s correlation analysis.

  11. 15 CFR 950.2 - Environmental Data and Information Service (EDIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... environmental fluctuations on food production, energy production and consumption, environmental quality, and... publication and library activities. In addition, EDIS operates related World Data Center-A subcenters and...

  12. Modeling of environmental and genetic interactions with AMBROSIA, an information-theoretic model synthesis method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanda, P; Zhang, A; Ramanathan, M

    2011-10-01

    To develop a model synthesis method for parsimoniously modeling gene-environmental interactions (GEI) associated with clinical outcomes and phenotypes. The AMBROSIA model synthesis approach utilizes the k-way interaction information (KWII), an information-theoretic metric capable of identifying variable combinations associated with GEI. For model synthesis, AMBROSIA considers relevance of combinations to the phenotype, it precludes entry of combinations with redundant information, and penalizes for unjustifiable complexity; each step is KWII based. The performance and power of AMBROSIA were evaluated with simulations and Genetic Association Workshop 15 (GAW15) data sets of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). AMBROSIA identified parsimonious models in data sets containing multiple interactions with linkage disequilibrium present. For the GAW15 data set containing 9187 single-nucleotide polymorphisms, the parsimonious AMBROSIA model identified nine RA-associated combinations with power >90%. AMBROSIA was compared with multifactor dimensionality reduction across several diverse models and had satisfactory power. Software source code is available from http://www.cse.buffalo.edu/DBGROUP/bioinformatics/resources.html. AMBROSIA is a promising method for GEI model synthesis.

  13. Media Choice in Environmental Information Dissemination for Solid Waste Management among Policy Formulators and Implementors: A Case Study of Oyo State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akintola, B. A.; Temowo, O. O.; Ajiboye, J. O.

    2009-01-01

    Environmental information has been described as central to the issues of solid waste management and disposal. This study investigated the availability and accessibility of environmental information to the solid waste policy formulators and implementors with regard to the media/channels used for disseminating environmental information to the…

  14. Work Smarter Not Harder: Utilizing an Environmental Management Information System to Meet Regulatory Compliance and Reporting Requirements for a Major Source Title V Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-10

    Environmental Management Information System to Meet Regulatory Compliance and Reporting Requirements for a Major Source Title V Facility. Tannis Danley...AND SUBTITLE Work Smarter Not Harder: Utilizing an Environmental Management Information System to Meet Regulatory Compliance and Reporting...Carson) – EMS (Hawaii Garrison, West Virginia National Guard) Environmental Management Information System (EMIS) National Defense Center for Energy and

  15. Research on environmental bioecosensing technology using ecological information; Seitaikei joho ni yoru kankyo bio eco sensing gijutsu ni kansuru chosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    The bioecosensing technology was studied which detects and identifies feeble signals generated by biosystem communication in wide biological environment. The following were reported as current notable environmental biosensing technologies: a quick measurement method of environmental contaminants using immunological measurement method, analysis method of ecological state of microorganism using DNA probes, observation of ecosystem by bioluminescent system, measurement method of environmental changes and contaminants using higher animals and plants, and detection method of chemical contaminants using chemotaxis of microorganism. As a result, the new bioecosensing/monitoring technology in molecular level was suggested for identifying comprehensive environmental changes which could not be measured by previous physical and chemical methods, as changes in ecosystem corresponding to environmental changes. As the wide area remote sensing technology of environmental ecological information, sensing technology on the earth, aircraft and satellite was also discussed. 247 refs., 55 figs., 17 tabs.

  16. Media information review, January--June 1992. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harvey, G.L.

    1992-07-01

    The media information review, requested by the Communications Subcommittee of the Technical Steering Panel (TSP), provides a general indication of the media`s areas of interests with regard to the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. This review briefly assesses 14 newspaper articles/advertisements collected between January and June 1992 by Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories (BNW). Articles that mention the project, activities closely associated with it, or members of the Panel were included in the analysis. The sources of the articles and announcements include most newspapers in the Northwest (dailies and weeklies) as collected and distributed to the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Hanford contractors by Westinghouse Hanford Company, Communications. National and international media coverage was provided during the review period by Burrelle`s Press Clipping Service, New York, and A.T.P., New Jersey. The articles and advertisements represent those collected and judged applicable to issues and activities associated with the Technical Steering Panel and the Hanford Environmental dose Reconstruction Project. The collection is not considered inclusive of every written account of the subject, but as good a representative collection as reasonable. This review is unscientific and is not meant to display a technical analysis of the materials.

  17. Geographic information systems (GIS) based model of dairy manure transportation and application with environmental quality consideration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paudel, Krishna P; Bhattarai, Keshav; Gauthier, Wayne M; Hall, Larry M

    2009-05-01

    Survey information was used to develop a minimum cost spatial dairy manure transportation model where environmental quality and crop nutrient requirements were treated as constraints. The GIS model incorporated land use types, exact locations of dairy farms and farmlands, road networks, and distances from each dairy farm to receiving farmlands to identify dairy manure transportation routes that minimized costs relative to environmental and other constraints. Our analyses indicated that the characteristics of dairy manure, its bulk and relatively low primary N, P(2)O(5) and K(2)O nutrient levels limit the distribution areas or distances between the farms and the land over which the manure can be economically spread. Physical properties of the land limit the quantities of nutrients that can be applied because of excess nutrient buildup in soil and potential to harm nearby waterbodies and downstream people and places. Longer distances between dairy and farmland favor the use of commercial fertilizers due to the high cost of manure transportation. At $0.08 per ton per km transportation cost, the optimal cut-off distances for dairy manure application is 30km for N and 15km each for P(2)O(5) and K(2)O consistent rules. An analysis of dairy manure application to different crop types suggest that, on average, 1ha of land requires 61 tons of dairy manure to meet the recommended N, P(2)O(5) and K(2)O needs.

  18. Access to information on the state of the environment: Harmonization of legislation of the Republic of Serbia with the European directive on environmental information from 2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salma Marija

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article the author provides analysis of the provisions of the European Directive on Environmental Information from 2003 presently in force, and provisions for their implementation in the legislation of the Republic of Serbia, in particular the current Environmental Protection Law from 2009. Attention has been paid to the relevant rules of the Aarhus Convention on Environmental Information ratified into law of the Republic of Serbia in 2009. The author finds that majority of provisions of the European Directive on Environmental Information have been implemented into the legislation of the Republic of Serbia, however the author notes that instead of restrictive interpretation of the refusal to provide access to information on the state of the environment, as envisaged by the European Directive, the law of the Republic of Serbia provides for a wide range of reasons for refusing access to information regarding the environment. Further, the article offers analysis of procedures for providing legal protection, especially before the court (state courts or arbitral tribunals in cases of wrongful refusal to provide access to requested information by the competent state organ, both at national and regional level. The author also notes that, contrary to the European Directive which does not require a need to demonstrate legal interest in order to obtain information on the state of the environment, the law of the Republic of Serbia imposes such requirement. Truth be told, the Aarhus Convention on Access to Information in Environmental Matters that has been ratified by the Republic of Serbia, requires applicants to prove or to state the existence of the legal interest.

  19. Regional Information Group (RIG). Energy, environmental, and socioeconomic data bases and associated software at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loebl, A.S.; Malthouse, N.S.; Shonka, D.B.; Ogle, M.C.; Johnson, M.L.

    1976-10-01

    A machine readable data base has been created by the Regional Information Group, Regional and Urban Studies Section, Energy Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, to provide documentation for the energy, environmental, and socioeconomic data bases and associated software maintained at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This document is produced yearly by the Regional Information Group to describe the contents and organization of this data base.

  20. Trends and determinants of social and environmental information disclosure in Lithuanian companies: Literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Rudžionienė

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the findings of a literature review of the empirical studies on the social and environmental information (SEI disclosure that were carried out in Lithuanian companies in 2000–2015 with the aim to identify determinants of the phenomenon and trends of its development. Having reviewed 14 papers included in the national database of scientific journals, Lituanistika, the authors identify both qualitative and quantitative studies which present the results of content analysis of SEI or corporate social responsibility (CSR reports. Content-wise they tend to explore the relationship between SEI disclosure and company profile such as industry sector, company size, financial leverage, profitability, and pollution. The findings are of a mixed character except for the industry sector, which is an unambiguous determinant of SEI disclosure in Lithuanian companies. Disclosed information by Lithuanian companies is less numerous and includes fewer stakeholders (i.e. employees, society and environment compared to the reports of multinational companies or enterprises operating in advanced economies. As Lithuania is a post-Soviet society with a long tradition of presenting a better reality in reports, the contents of SEI could be analysed through the integrity perspective which would inevitably draw researchers’ attention not only to the text in annual or CSR reports, company websites or press releases, but also to the practices as perceived by the companies’ stakeholders.

  1. Coupled-Double-Quantum-Dot Environmental Information Engines: A Numerical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Katsuaki

    2016-06-01

    We conduct numerical simulations for an autonomous information engine comprising a set of coupled double quantum dots using a simple model. The steady-state entropy production rate in each component, heat and electron transfer rates are calculated via the probability distribution of the four electronic states from the master transition-rate equations. We define an information-engine efficiency based on the entropy change of the reservoir, implicating power generators that employ the environmental order as a new energy resource. We acquire device-design principles, toward the realization of corresponding practical energy converters, including that (1) higher energy levels of the detector-side reservoir than those of the detector dot provide significantly higher work production rates by faster states' circulation, (2) the efficiency is strongly dependent on the relative temperatures of the detector and system sides and becomes high in a particular Coulomb-interaction strength region between the quantum dots, and (3) the efficiency depends little on the system dot's energy level relative to its reservoir but largely on the antisymmetric relative amplitudes of the electronic tunneling rates.

  2. Media Coverage of Toxic Risks: A Content Analysis of Pediatric Environmental Health Information Available to New and Expecting Mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Mass media play a central role in providing environmental health information to the public. Despite several decades of environmental and health communication research, the nature of environmental health information available to one of the most vulnerable populations--new and expecting mothers--has received limited attention. To address this gap, this study poses two questions: (1) How prevalent is information related to prenatal and pediatric environmental health (PPEH) in the media, and (2) how much coverage do the most concerning chemical threats to PPEH receive? A content analysis of 2,543 texts in popular media sources (i.e., the Associated Press [AP], parenting magazines, and parenting websites) from September 2012 to February 2013 revealed that roughly three pieces of PPEH information were made available to mothers daily. Prior research has shown that media coverage of environmental health issues has decreased over the years; however, these results suggest that at-risk populations are likely to encounter this type of information in the media. Also, while certain chemicals received ample coverage (i.e., pesticides, cigarette smoke, mercury), other issues deemed concerning by federal agencies did not (i.e., lead, phthalates). This study also introduces a novel method for harvesting online content encountered incidentally. Implications of these findings for communication research and practice are discussed.

  3. Environmental information system and odour monitoring based on citizen and technology innovative sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ledent, Philippe [SPACEBEL S.A., Angleur (Belgium); Stevenot, Bernard [APS Technology, Namur (Belgium); Delva, Julien [ODOMETRIC SA, Meix-Devant-Virton (Belgium); and others

    2013-07-01

    The challenge is the integration of citizens as ''community-based'' observation providers, giving the odour perception and discomfort and getting feed-back in real time from a learning monitoring system. The level of annoyance depends on how odours are emitted and in what intensity, their dispersion under ambient atmospheric conditions and finally on citizens' exposure and perception. The Environmental Information System and Odour Monitoring developed in the project OMNISCIENTIS funded by the EU brings together state of the art technologies and open communication capabilities in order to mitigate odour annoyance. The project allows for citizen feedback, deepens knowledge on odour measurement and management and aims to support harmonised legislation at EU level. Moreover the project results can provide savings to industries. The core is an information system allowing inhabitants to serve as human sensors, acting according to sociological patterns, which influence odour perception, discomfort and nuisance. It provides a dedicated tool to consider odour acceptability, based on a community-based opinion. Due to the subjective nature of odour perception, odour monitoring and fast modelling is used to assist and adjust the information citizens provide via Smartphone and obtained by e-nose and modelling. Innovative in-situ sensors are improved to monitor ambient odour exposures. A specific odour dispersion model system is developed to obtain interrelated spatial odour exposure levels. This fast and innovative model system helps us to evaluate the performance of measures taken at the very moment odours are emitted and with respect to the way in which these occur. The Living Lab approach ensures stakeholder involvement, citizens' participation in decision-making and supports dissemination activities. The results are conveyed to stakeholders and general public. (orig.)

  4. Environmental Noise and Decision Making Possible Implications of Increases in Anthropogenic Noise for Information Processing in Marine Mammals

    OpenAIRE

    Bateson, Melissa

    2007-01-01

    Recent increases in anthropogenic noise in the marine environment are a source of concern for the current welfare and future fitness of many marine mammal species. In this article I explore the specific question of how environmental noise could affect information processing. I also discuss the possible changes in behavior that would result, and how these changes could negatively impact the welfare and fitness of marine mammals. I identify two ways in which environmental noise could affect dec...

  5. Political ecology and environmental justice analysis of information and communication technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Wang-Jin

    There has been rapid growth in Information and Communication Technology (ICT) development during the last decades. Worldwide PC numbers will rise to 2 billion by 2015, with more than 1 billion in use by the end of 2008. Over 4 billion subscribers use mobile cellular telephones, translating into a worldwide penetration rate of 61 percent by the end of 2008. Analyses have shown evidence that ICT has significantly contributed to capitalist growth economy. Regarding the environmental impacts of ICT, optimists hail a rosy future of a weightless knowledge economy, critics, however, point out that ICT also threatens environment through reinforcing capitalist growth economy and accelerating commodification of nature. Although some case studies have shown the potential environmental benefits through ICT application, these approaches need to be balanced against a range of countervailing effects, including negative direct impacts of ICT manufacture, use, and disposal, effects of incomplete substitution of ICT for existing services, and rebound effects. In addition, the migration of ICT, which includes not only manufacturing facilities of ICT devices, but electronic wastes, coincides with the distribution of environmental and social problems of high technology. Examples of how ICT reinforces economic growth, and at the same time, results in environmental problems are evident in a Korean context. Since the middle of the 1990s, the ICT industry has been a new growth driver in the Korean economy, and has played a critical role in restoring economic activity after the financial crisis in 1997. Due to the rapid diffusion of ICT products and a market trend that makes the life span of the products become shorter, the amount of e-waste has drastically increased in Korea. However, society's concern over environmental problems caused by ICT is at a rudimentary stage in Korea. Although Korea has established the EPR program to manage the e-waste problem, limited scope of e-waste items for

  6. Information and dialogue process on the safety and environmental compatibility of the fracking technology; Informations- und Dialogprozess zur Sicherheit und Umweltvertraeglichkeit der Fracking-Technologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borchardt, Dietrich [Helmholtz-Zentrum fuer Umweltforschung - UFZ, Magdeburg (Germany); Ewen, Christoph [team ewen, Darmstadt (Germany); Richter, Sandra [sconas GbR, Ahnatal (Germany); Hammerbacher, Ruth [hammerbacher gmbh - beratung und projekte, Osnabrueck (Germany)

    2012-11-01

    Due to the reservations from the public among the production of natural gas from unconventional deposits (shale gas, coal gas) The ''Information and dialogue process on the safety and environmental compatibility of the fracking technology'' was initiated. The authors of the contribution report on the modus operandi and the summary recommendations of the neutral expert panel.

  7. Information for Government Agencies about Specific Environmental Health Issues in Child-Care Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    research on child care environmental health issues, identify key state and regional healthy child care organizations for partnerships, and see how other states are addressing child care environmental health issues.

  8. Carbon emission analysis and evaluation of industrial departments in China: An improved environmental DEA cross model based on information entropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yongming; Long, Chang; Geng, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Keyu

    2018-01-01

    Environmental protection and carbon emission reduction play a crucial role in the sustainable development procedure. However, the environmental efficiency analysis and evaluation based on the traditional data envelopment analysis (DEA) cross model is subjective and inaccurate, because all elements in a column or a row of the cross evaluation matrix (CEM) in the traditional DEA cross model are given the same weight. Therefore, this paper proposes an improved environmental DEA cross model based on the information entropy to analyze and evaluate the carbon emission of industrial departments in China. The information entropy is applied to build the entropy distance based on the turbulence of the whole system, and calculate the weights in the CEM of the environmental DEA cross model in a dynamic way. The theoretical results show that the new weight constructed based on the information entropy is unique and optimal globally by using the Monte Carlo simulation. Finally, compared with the traditional environmental DEA and DEA cross model, the improved environmental DEA cross model has a better efficiency discrimination ability based on the data of industrial departments in China. Moreover, the proposed model can obtain the potential of carbon emission reduction of industrial departments to improve the energy efficiency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Remote sensing and geographic information systems: Advanced technologies for environmental monitoring and management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehlers, M. [Univ. of Vechta (Germany)

    1996-12-31

    This paper addresses the potential of remote sensing and GIS technologies for environmental monitoring and management. It reports on the efforts at the University of Vechta to establish a new University program in environmental monitoring and management. This program is placed in an interdisciplinary environment and integrates advanced spatial technologies such as remote sensing and GIS with ecological science and environmental planning. First results of a new graduate level course in Environmental Monitoring will be presented.

  10. Environmental perceptions and objective walking trail audits inform a community-based participatory research walking intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoellner Jamie

    2012-01-01

    , the odds for meeting walking recommendations increased 1.27 times, and the odds for meeting PA recommendation increased 3.54 times. Perceived and objective audit variables did not predict meeting physical activity recommendations. Conclusions To improve physical activity levels, intervention efforts are needed to maximize the use of existing trails, as well as improve residents' perceptions related to incivilities, safety, conditions of trail, and amenities of the walking trails. This study provides important insights for informing development of the CBPR walking intervention and informing local recreational and environmental policies in this southern community.

  11. Environmental perceptions and objective walking trail audits inform a community-based participatory research walking intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    recommendations increased 1.27 times, and the odds for meeting PA recommendation increased 3.54 times. Perceived and objective audit variables did not predict meeting physical activity recommendations. Conclusions To improve physical activity levels, intervention efforts are needed to maximize the use of existing trails, as well as improve residents' perceptions related to incivilities, safety, conditions of trail, and amenities of the walking trails. This study provides important insights for informing development of the CBPR walking intervention and informing local recreational and environmental policies in this southern community. PMID:22289653

  12. Application of environmental DNA analysis to inform invasive fish eradication operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, Phillip I.; Copp, Gordon H.; Créach, Véronique; Vilizzi, Lorenzo; Britton, J. R.

    2017-04-01

    Environmental DNA (eDNA) detection of non-native species has considerable potential to inform management decisions, including identifying the need for population control and/or eradication. An invasive species of European concern is the Asian cyprinid fish, topmouth gudgeon ( Pseudorasbora parva) . Here, eDNA analyses were applied at a commercial angling venue in southern England to inform operations aiming to eradicate P. parva, which had only ever been observed in one of the venue's seven unconnected angling ponds. Eradication of P. parva was initially attempted by repeated depletion of the population using fish traps (crayfish traps fitted with 5 mm mesh netting) and the introduction of native predators over a 4-year period. The very low number of P. parva captured following these eradication efforts suggested a possible population crash. Conventional PCR analysis of water samples using species-specific primers was applied to all seven ponds to confirm that P. parva was present in only one pond, that the eradication attempt had indeed failed and that the species' distribution in the pond appeared to be restricted to three bankside locations. The continued presence of P. parva at these locations was confirmed by subsequent trapping. Water samples from an adjacent, unconnected stream were also analysed using the eDNA methodology, but no DNA of P. parva was detected. The results suggest that further management action to eradicate P. parva be focused on the pond shown to contain the isolated P. parva population and thereby eliminate the risk of further dispersal. This study is the first to apply eDNA analysis to assess the efficacy of an eradication attempt and to provide evidence that the species was unlikely to be present in the other ponds, thus reducing the resources needed to control the species.

  13. System of forest insect pheromone communication: stability of «information» molecules to environmental factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Soukhovolsky

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Features of external environmental factors (such as electromagnetic radiation in certain spectral bands influencing pheromone molecules, which are carriers of information for forest insects in the search of the opposite sex, were examined. Stability of pheromone molecules for external influences has been studied for siberian moth Dendrolimus superans sibiricus Tschetv., pine moth Dendrilimus pini L., gypsy moth Lymantria dispar L., for xylophages Ips typographus L., Monochamus urussovi Fish. and Monochamus galloprovincialis Oliv. Properties of pheromone molecules were evaluated by calculations using quantum-chemical method B3LYP. Existing methods of quantum-chemical calculations are useful for analyzing the properties of quite small and uncomplicated molecules of forest insect pheromones. The calculations showed that the molecules of insect pheromones are able to absorb light in the ultraviolet range and move into an excited state. The values of dipole moments, the wavelengths of the absorption, atomic and molecular electronic properties of pheromones in the ground and excited states were calculated. The calculations showed that for the reaction of pheromones with oxygen an energy barrier is somewhat higher than for reactions of pheromones with water vapor. The worst reaction of pheromones with water molecules likely to pheromones such molecules whose dipole moment is comparable to the dipole moment of water. Quantum-chemical characteristics of the pheromone molecules can be linked to specific behavior of the insects.

  14. Integration of Cloud Technologies for Data Stewardship at the NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, K. S.; Hausman, S. A.

    2016-02-01

    In the last year, the NOAA National Oceanographic Data Center (NODC) and its siblings, the National Climatic Data Center and National Geophysical Data Center, were merged into one organization, the NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI). Combining its expertise under one management has helped NCEI accelerate its efforts to embrace and integrate private, public, and hybrid cloud environments into its range of data stewardship services. These services span a range of tiers, from basic, long-term preservation and access, through enhanced access and scientific quality control, to authoritative product development and international-level services. Throughout these tiers of stewardship, partnerships and pilot projects have been launched to identify technological and policy-oriented challenges, to establish solutions to these problems, and to highlight success stories for emulation during operational integration of the cloud into NCEI's data stewardship activities. Some of these pilot activities including data storage, access, and reprocessing in Amazon Web Services, the OneStop data discovery and access framework project, and a set of Cooperative Research and Development Agreements under the Big Data Project with Amazon, Google, IBM, Microsoft, and the Open Cloud Consortium. Progress in these efforts will be highlighted along with a future vision of how NCEI could leverage hybrid cloud deployments and federated systems across NOAA to enable effective data stewardship for its oceanographic, atmospheric, climatic, and geophysical Big Data.

  15. Discussing the Potential of Information and Communication Technologies’ Innovation for Environmental Problems in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura-Diana Radu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to identify the role and place of information and communication technology in Romania (ICT, the interest for innovation expressed in this field and the extent to which it relates to environment protection. The concern for the state of the ecosystem is growing, nevertheless it requires the active involvement in the innovation process so as to find solutions for the replacement of the old production techniques with new ones, environmentally friendly. ICTs in their spectacular evolution play a major role in this case. Frequently, they are present in all the production stages, from design to distribution of the final product. Starting from the above mentioned facts, the introduction of this paper presents the concept of green ICT and their implication in the economic and social development, as well as statistics data elaborated by international companies which are meant to increase their importance. In this section we include the objectives and prior work. We continued our research by presenting the way in which Romania gets involved in ICT innovation and environment technology, as green ICT stands at the junction between the two fields. The main conclusions and results are drawn in the end of the article. The value and implications of our research is in the area of green ICT innovation.

  16. Investigating genetic and environmental contributions to adolescent externalizing behavior in a collectivistic culture: a multi-informant twin study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J; Yu, J; Zhang, J; Li, X; McGue, M

    2015-07-01

    Little is known about the etiology of adolescents' externalizing behavior (Ext) in collectivistic cultures. We aimed to fill this gap by investigating the genetic and environmental influences on Ext in Chinese adolescents. The etiological heterogeneity of aggression (AGG) and rule breaking (RB) was also examined. The study sample included 908 pairs of same-sex twins aged from 10 to 18 years (mean = 13.53 years, s.d. = 2.26). Adolescents' Ext were assessed with the Achenbach System of Empirically Based Assessment including Child Behavior Checklist, Teacher Report Form, and Youth Self-Report. Univariate genetic analyses showed that genetic influences on all measures were moderate ranging from 34% to 50%, non-shared environmental effects ranged from 23% to 52%, and shared environmental effects were significant in parent- and teacher-reported measures ranging from 29% to 43%. Bivariate genetic analyses indicated that AGG and RB shared large genetic influences (r g = 0.64-0.79) but moderate non-shared environmental factors (r e = 0.34-0.52). Chinese adolescents' Ext was moderately influenced by genetic factors. AGG and RB had moderate independent genetic and non-shared environmental influences, and thus constitute etiologically distinct dimensions within Ext in Chinese adolescents. The heritability of AGG, in particular, was smaller in Chinese adolescents than suggested by previous data obtained on Western peers. This study suggests that the collectivistic cultural values and Confucianism philosophy may attenuate genetic potential in Ext, especially AGG.

  17. Using geographical information systems in planning NLLP decommissioning and environmental restoration activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGregor, R.; Turner, W. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    The Nuclear Legacy Liabilities Program (NLLP) manages Canada's nuclear legacy liabilities at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) sites and is funded by the Government of Canada through Natural Resources Canada (NRCan). Through the first five years of the Program these two organizations have worked collaboratively to bring numerous projects to completion. In addition to the diversity of facilities and waste dealt with under the NLLP, the Program involves seven sites in three different provinces. The breadth of the Program encompasses over 20 different projects at AECL's Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) site alone, with new projects evolving as work continues. Nuclear legacy liabilities are the result of over 60 years of nuclear research and development conducted by the National Research Council of Canada (1944 to 1952) and AECL (1952 to 2006) on behalf of the Government of Canada. The liabilities consist of outdated and unused research facilities and buildings, a wide variety of buried and stored radioactive waste, and affected lands. Since 1952, AECL has safely and cost effectively managed Canada's nuclear research facilities and the waste generated by their operation. During this time AECL improved waste management technologies and developed expertise in best practices. All projects undertaken by the NLLP contain a spatial, or geographically referenced, component that can be captured in a geographic information system (GIS). From the decommissioning of a single building within the plant itself (e.g. the building location itself or spaces within the building) to the process of locating a new facility within the CRL site (e.g. location within the CRL property in three dimensions and adjacency to other communities) all these projects contain spatially referenced information. This spatial information can be captured, organized and used by the GIS software to analyze and model any number of questions. The paper will discuss projects that address a

  18. Information and dialogue process on safety and environmental effects of the hydraulic fracturing technology; Der Informations- und Dialogprozess zur Sicherheit und Umweltvertraeglichkeit der Fracking-Technologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borchardt, Dietrich; Richter, Sandra [Helmholtz-Zentrum fuer Umweltforschung - UFZ, Magdeburg (Germany); Ewen, Christoph [team ewen, Darmstadt (Germany); Hammerbacher, Ruth [hammerbacher gmbh - beratung und projekte, Osnabrueck (Germany)

    2012-10-15

    After the big success of hydraulic fracturing in the USA, natural gas utilities are now planning natural gas production from nonconventional deposits (shale gas, coal seam gas) by hydraulic fracturing also in Germany. In order to calm public fears, an 'information and dialogue process on safety and environmental effects of the hydraulic fracturing technology' was initiated. A risk study carried out by a team of neutral experts gives recommendations for a well-founded, careful and realistic discussion of the environmental compatibility of hydraulic fracturing.

  19. Development of Energy Models for Production Systems and Processes to Inform Environmentally Benign Decision-Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Elsayed, Nancy

    Between 2008 and 2035 global energy demand is expected to grow by 53%. While most industry-level analyses of manufacturing in the United States (U.S.) have traditionally focused on high energy consumers such as the petroleum, chemical, paper, primary metal, and food sectors, the remaining sectors account for the majority of establishments in the U.S. Specifically, of the establishments participating in the Energy Information Administration's Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey in 2006, the non-energy intensive" sectors still consumed 4*109 GJ of energy, i.e., one-quarter of the energy consumed by the manufacturing sectors, which is enough to power 98 million homes for a year. The increasing use of renewable energy sources and the introduction of energy-efficient technologies in manufacturing operations support the advancement towards a cleaner future, but having a good understanding of how the systems and processes function can reduce the environmental burden even further. To facilitate this, methods are developed to model the energy of manufacturing across three hierarchical levels: production equipment, factory operations, and industry; these methods are used to accurately assess the current state and provide effective recommendations to further reduce energy consumption. First, the energy consumption of production equipment is characterized to provide machine operators and product designers with viable methods to estimate the environmental impact of the manufacturing phase of a product. The energy model of production equipment is tested and found to have an average accuracy of 97% for a product requiring machining with a variable material removal rate profile. However, changing the use of production equipment alone will not result in an optimal solution since machines are part of a larger system. Which machines to use, how to schedule production runs while accounting for idle time, the design of the factory layout to facilitate production, and even the

  20. Genetically controlled environmental variance for sternopleural bristles in Drosophila melanogaster - an experimental test of a heterogeneous variance model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Anders Christian; Kristensen, Torsten Nygård; Loeschcke, Volker

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that the environmental variance of sternopleural bristle number in Drosophila melanogaster is partly under genetic control. We used data from 20 inbred lines and 10 control lines to test this hypothesis. Two models were used: a standard quant...

  1. The role of business information management in advanced integrated environmental management systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulhøi, John Parm

    2000-01-01

    investments in the individual company. Secondly, based on the above, to calculate and assess some typical quantifiable savings, e.g. on energy and raw materials, over a period of four years (after the implementation of the integrated environmental management system). In line with other similar investigations......, the study shows that the implementation of systematic and integrated environmental management systems results in significant savings. This supports the general, albeit rarely tested, hypothesis that it pays to be an environmentally responsible enterprise....

  2. A GIS-BASED ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH INFORMATION SOURCE FOR MALAYSIAN CONTEXT

    OpenAIRE

    Lau Tiu Chung; Lau Bee Theng; Henry Lee Seldon

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a GIS-based system for collection and targeted distribution of latest alerts and real-time environmental factors to the Malaysian population. We call it the Environmental Health Management System (EHMS). This GIS-based system is designed to facilitate and encourage research into environmental health quality issues by providing a comprehensive tracking and monitoring tool. This GIS-based system is embedded with Google Maps API and Geocoding API services to visualize t...

  3. Energy Facility Siting by Means of Environmental Modelling with LANDSAT, Thematic Mapper and Geographic Information System (GIS) Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    Currently based on ground and aerial surveys, the land cover data base of the Pennsylvania Power and Light Company is routinely used for modelling the effects of alternative generating plant and transmission line sites on the local and regional environment. The development of a satellite-based geographic information system would facilitate both the preparation of environmental impact statements by power companies and assessment of the data by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. A cooperative project is planned to demonstrate the methodology for integrating satellite data into an existing geographic information system, d to further evaluate the ability of satellite data in modeling environmental conditions that would be applied in the preparation and assessment of environmental impact statements.

  4. Informal E-waste recycling in developing countries: review of metal(loid)s pollution, environmental impacts and transport pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackah, Michael

    2017-11-01

    Crude or primitive recycling practices are often adopted in material resource recovery from E-waste in developing nations. Significant human health and environmental impacts may occur because of such practices. Literature on metal(loid)s pollution during E-waste processing is fragmented. Here, I review the health and environmental impacts of E-waste recycling operations and transport pathways of metal(loid)s, dispersed during operations. This paper is organised into five sections. Section 1 relates to the background of global E-waste generation and legal/illegal trade, citing specific cases from Ghana and other developing nations. Section 2 provides a brief information on sources of metal(loid)s in E-waste. Section 3 describes characteristics of informal E-waste recycling operations in developing nations. Section 4 examines the health and environmental impacts in E-waste recycling while section 5 evaluates major transport pathways of metal(loid)s contaminants.

  5. 33 CFR Appendix C to Part 273 - Information Requirements for Aquatic Plant Control Program Environmental Impact Statements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Aquatic Plant Control Program Environmental Impact Statements C Appendix C to Part 273 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE AQUATIC PLANT CONTROL Pt. 273, App. C Appendix C to Part 273—Information Requirements for Aquatic Plant Control Program...

  6. Military Base Realignments and Closures: DOD has Improved Environmental Cleanup Reporting but Should Obtain and Share More Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    30The Environmental Protection Agency develops health advisories to provide information on contaminants that can cause ...human health effects and are known or anticipated to occur in drinking water . Health advisories are nonenforceable and nonregulatory and provide...associated with drinking water contamination . Page 21 GAO-17-151 Military Base Realignments and Closures Protection Agency health advisories

  7. Beyond compliance using environmental, health and safety management information systems (EMISs) to provide quantified competitive advantages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, J.V.; Mayer, G.

    1999-07-01

    In the last 20 years, federal, state and local regulations have provided regulatory incentives for industry to better manage environmental, health and safety (EHS) practices. In order for voluntary EHS management practices to move beyond compliance and continue improving, specific, quantifiable benefits must result. That is, companies must achieve some competitive advantage from implementing EHS improvements that are considered voluntary. Recently, many private companies and public agencies have been giving significant consideration toward the implementation of an EHS management information system (EMIS). Currently considered voluntary, the automation of EHS data collection, storage, retrieval and reporting is subject to the same benefit expectations that other EHS improvements are subject to. The benefits resulting from an EMIS typically result from a reduction in either direct or indirect costs. Direct costs, consisting primarily of labor hours, permit fees, disposal costs, etc., are definable and easily to quantify. Indirect costs, which are comprised of reduced risks and liabilities, are less easily quantifiable. In fact, many have abandoned hope of ever quantifying expected benefits from indirect costs, and simply lump all indirect benefits into a qualitative, catch-all category called intangible benefits. However, by statistically analyzing individual risk events over an expected project life, anticipated benefits can be objectively and accurately quantified. Through the use of a case study, this paper will describe the process of quantifying direct and indirect benefits resulting from the implementation of an EMIS. The paper will describe the application of a statistical model to estimate indirect benefits and will demonstrate how the results of the benefit quantification can be used to make sound, business based decisions based on a required rate of return/return on investment.

  8. Spatial gradients of OCPs in European butter--integrating environmental and exposure information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Jana; Müller, Anne; Vives, Ingrid; Mariani, Giulio; Umlauf, Gunther

    2013-05-01

    The Stockholm Convention and the Global Monitoring Plan encourage the production of monitoring data to effectively evaluate the presence of the persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in all regions, in order to identify changes in levels over time, as well as to provide information on their regional and global environmental transport. Here, we report the first step of two to investigate whether butter is a feasible matrix to screen with the purpose to reflect regional ambient atmospheric air levels of POPs. The first step described here is to generate monitoring data; the second is to investigate the relationship between the two matrixes, i.e., POP concentrations in air and butter, which will be reported in another article published in this journal. Here, the 27 organochlorine pesticides listed under the Stockholm Convention have been analyzed in 75 butter samples from Europe. The general conclusions were as follows: Total organochlorine pesticide concentration is lower in butter from northern and central Europe. The spatial gradient of 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-di(4-chlorophenyl)ethane and hexachlorocyclohexane is increasing in the eastern region of Europe (Romania, Bulgaria, and Ukraine), dieldrin towards France, and endosulfan levels were elevated on the Azores Island in the Atlantic Ocean. One butter sample from Romania exceeded the European Maximum Residue Limit value for lindane, but the other butter pesticide levels were all below the limit values. The dataset reported here can be used for the calibration of the air-grass-dairy products model, which would support the feasibility to use butter as biomonitor for measuring POP levels in ambient air.

  9. Using agricultural practices information for multiscale environmental assessment of phosphorus risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos Moreira, Mariana; Lemercier, Blandine; Michot, Didier; Dupas, Rémi; Gascuel-Odoux, Chantal

    2015-04-01

    Phosphorus (P) is an essential nutrient for plant growth. In intensively farmed areas, excessive applications of animal manure and mineral P fertilizers to soils have raised both economic and ecological concerns. P accumulation in agricultural soils leads to increased P losses to surface waterbodies contributing to eutrophication. Increasing soil P content over time in agricultural soils is often correlated with agricultural practices; in Brittany (NW France), an intensive livestock farming region, soil P content is well correlated with animal density (Lemercier et al.,2008). Thus, a better understanding of the factors controlling P distribution is required to enable environmental assessment of P risk. The aim of this study was to understand spatial distribution of extractable (Olsen method) and total P contents and its controlling factors at the catchment scale in order to predict P contents at regional scale (Brittany). Data on soil morphology, soil tests (including P status, particles size, organic carbon…) for 198 punctual positions, crops succession since 20 years, agricultural systems, field and animal manure management were obtained on a well-characterized catchment (ORE Agrhys, 10 km²). A multivariate analysis with mixed quantitative variables and factors and a digital soil mapping approach were performed to identify variables playing a significant role in soil total and extractable P contents and distribution. Spatial analysis was performed by means of the Cubist model, a decision tree-based algorithm. Different scenarios were assessed, considering various panels of predictive variables: soil data, terrain attributes derived from digital elevation model, gamma-ray spectrometry (from airborne geophysical survey) and agricultural practices information. In the research catchment, mean extractable and total P content were 140.0 ± 63.4 mg/kg and 2862.7 ± 773.0 mg/kg, respectively. Organic and mineral P inputs, P balance, soil pH, and Al contents were

  10. Information Management Architecture for an Integrated Computing Environment for the Environmental Restoration Program. Volume 2, Interim business systems guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    As part of the Environmental Restoration Program at Martin Marietta, IEM (Information Engineering Methodology) was developed as part of a complete and integrated approach to the progressive development and subsequent maintenance of automated data sharing systems. This approach is centered around the organization`s objectives, inherent data relationships, and business practices. IEM provides the Information Systems community with a tool kit of disciplined techniques supported by automated tools. It includes seven stages: Information Strategy Planning; Business Area Analysis; Business System Design; Technical Design; Construction; Transition; Production. This document focuses on the Business Systems Architecture.

  11. Environmental vulnerability: Problem of an adequate spatial information unit as disclosed by the project ONIX-GPOV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleš Mlakar

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Spatial units carrying information on land vulnerability are methodologically an important issue. These units should, in the first place, enable the environmental assessments of an intervention. The problem was very much emphasized since the Slovenian legislation has prescribed preparation of vulnerability studies based on ecosystems division of land. The paper suggests that the information on environmental vulnerability should be represented as a “continuous field” data type. It could be derived from different information sources based on different data types. However, the data type should enable further processing based on raster data. Within the Project ONIX-GPOV the specific data base and the specific software have been developed to meet these requirements. Only some basic ideas are described in the article.

  12. Gulf-Wide Information System, Environmental Sensitivity Index Oyster Leases, Geographic NAD83, LDWF (2001) [esi_oyster_lease_LDWF_2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This data set contains Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) oyster leases data of coastal Louisiana. The ESI is a classification and ranking system, which...

  13. Gulf-Wide Information System, Environmental Sensitivity Index Brackish Marsh, Geographic NAD83, LDWF (2001) [esi_brackish_marsh_LDWF_2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This data set contains Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) brackish marshes data of coastal Louisiana. The ESI is a classification and ranking system, which...

  14. Gulf-Wide Information System, Environmental Sensitivity Index Intermediate Marsh, Geographic NAD83, LDWF (2001) [esi_intermediate_marsh_LDWF_2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This data set contains Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) intermediate marshes data of coastal Louisiana. The ESI is a classification and ranking system, which...

  15. Risk perception and access to environmental information in four areas in Italy affected by natural or anthropogenic pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coi, A; Minichilli, F; Bustaffa, E; Carone, S; Santoro, M; Bianchi, F; Cori, L

    2016-10-01

    A human biomonitoring (HBM) survey in four areas affected by natural or anthropogenic arsenic pollution was conducted in Italy within the framework of the SEpiAs project. A questionnaire, including the exploration of risk perception (RP) regarding environmental hazards and access to and trust in information, was administered to 282 subjects stratified by area, gender and age. The survey was designed to investigate how populations living in polluted areas could adopt prevention-oriented habits, fostered by the awareness of existing risks and, in addition, how increased knowledge of RP and information flows could support researchers in identifying recommendations, and presenting and disseminating HBM results. This study characterizes the four areas in terms of RP and access to and trust in environmental information, and provides insights into the influence of RP and environmental information on food consumption. For the data analysis, a combined random forest (RF) and logistic regression approach was carried out. RF was applied to the variables derived from the questionnaire in order to identify the most important in terms of the aims defined. Associations were then tested using Fisher's exact test and assessed with logistic regression in order to adjust for confounders. Results showed that the perception of and personal exposure to atmospheric and water pollution, hazardous industries and waste, hazardous material transportation and waste was higher in geographical areas characterized by anthropogenic pollution. Citizens living in industrial areas appeared to be aware of environmental risks and had more confidence in environmental non-governmental organizations (NGOs) than in public authorities. In addition, they reported an insufficient circulation of information. Concerning the influence of RP and environmental information on food consumption, a high perception of personal exposure to atmospheric pollution and hazardous industries was associated with a lower

  16. Investigation of Heterogeneous Atmospheric Chlorine Chemistry: Modeling and Environmental Chamber Studies Authors: Cameron B. Faxon, Lea Hildebrandt Ruiz, and David Allen University of Texas at Austin, McKetta Department of Chemical Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faxon, C. B.; Hildebrandt Ruiz, L.; Allen, D.

    2013-12-01

    Previous work has shown that gas phase atomic chlorine radicals (Cl*) can influence tropospheric photochemistry, including concentrations of volatile organic compound (VOC) and ozone. These radicals are produced through both gas phase and heterogeneous pathways. This work presents computational and experimental investigation into the heterogeneous reactions of chloride aerosols. An overview of a sensitivity analysis of the physical parameters involved in the heterogeneous production of nitryl chloride (ClNO2) (R1-R5) will comprise the computational work presented. NO2(g) + NO3(g) ↔ N2O5(g) (R1) N2O5(aq) ↔ N2O5(aq) (R2) N2O5(aq) ↔ NO2+(aq) + NO3-(aq) (R3) NO2+(aq) + H2O(aq) → H3O+(aq) + HNO3(aq) (R4a) NO2+(aq) + Cl- → ClNO2 + H2O(aq) (R4b) NO3-(aq) + H+ ↔ HNO3+(aq) (R5) Relative parameters include the reactive uptake coefficient, ClNO2 yield, particle surface area, and gas phase concentrations of VOCs and NOx. The sensitivity analysis results were generated through photochemical box modeling and focus on the production of ClNO2 and impacts to ozone production. Results were compared to a base case scenario in which all heterogeneous reactions were absent. Parameter values reaching the upper limits reported in the literature were tested, and results indicate that ClNO2 chemistry can potentially change peak O3 concentrations by -10.5% to 27%. NOx availability was also found to play an important role. Experimental results of the heterogeneous reaction between OH* and particulate chloride (R6-R7) will also be discussed. The mechanism is shown below, and OH***Cl- represents an intermediate species forming at the particle surface. OH(g) + Cl-(aq) → OH***Cl-(aq) (R6) 2OH***Cl-(aq) → Cl2,g + 2OH-(aq) (R7) Environmental chamber experiments involving the exposure of NaCl aerosol particles to typical atmospheric conditions (HOx, NOx, O3 and UV radiation) were performed. A 10 cubic meter teflon reaction chamber equipped with UV lights was used to contain the

  17. Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) Atlas: Cook Inlet, Alaska, maps and geographic information systems (NODC Accession 0046027)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data for Cook Inlet and Kenai Peninsula, Alaska. ESI data characterize estuarine environments and...

  18. Communicating Environmental Information to the Public: A New Water Quality Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, David J.; Janardan, Konanur G.

    1977-01-01

    A water quality index developed by the authors and used by the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency is described. It compares biological and chemical assessments of water quality. Sampling procedures and use of the index are described. (BT)

  19. Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) Atlas: Louisiana maps and geographic information systems data (NODC Accession 0013802)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) maps for the shoreline of Louisiana. ESI data characterize estuarine environments and wildlife by...

  20. Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) Atlas: West Florida, maps and geographic information systems data (NODC Accession 0006249)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) maps in Portable Document Format (.PDF) for the shoreline of West Florida (to encompass the coastal...

  1. Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) Atlas: New Hampshire, maps and Geographic Information Systems data (NODC Accession 0014789)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data for the New Hampshire coast from 2003 to 2004. ESI data characterize estuarine environments...

  2. Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) Atlas: Mississippi, maps and geographic information systems data (NODC Accession 0013801)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) maps for the shoreline of Mississippi. ESI data characterize coastal environments and wildlife by...

  3. Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) Atlas: Columbia River, maps and geographic information systems data (NODC Accession 0013951)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data for the Columbia River from 1979 to 2004. ESI data characterize estuarine environments and...

  4. Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) Atlas: Virginia, maps and geographic information systems data (NODC Accession 0014794)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data for Virginia from 1998 to 2004 (vs. 2 GDB). ESI data characterize estuarine environments and...

  5. Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) Atlas: Alabama, maps and geographic information systems data (NODC Accession 0013800)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) maps for the shoreline of Alabama. ESI data characterize coastal environments and wildlife by their...

  6. Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) Atlas: Southern California, maps and geographic information systems data (NODC Accession 0013225)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) maps for the shoreline of southern California. ESI data characterize coastal environments and...

  7. Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) Atlas: Kodiak, maps and geographic information systems data (NODC Accession 0026418)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) maps for the shoreline of Kodiak Island and Shelikof Strait, Alaska. ESI data characterize...

  8. Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) Atlas: Hawaii - 2001, maps and geographic information systems data (NODC Accession 0033632)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The most widely used approach to sensitive environment mapping in the U.S. is NOAA's Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI). This approach systematically complies...

  9. Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) Atlas: Guam - 2005 maps and geographic information systems data (NODC Accession 0033616)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The most widely used approach to sensitive environment mapping in the U.S. is NOAA's Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI). This approach systematically complies...

  10. Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) Atlas: Hudson River, maps and geographic information systems data (NODC Accession 0014791)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data for the Hudson River from 1942 to 2005. ESI data characterize estuarine environments and...

  11. A GIS-BASED ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH INFORMATION SOURCE FOR MALAYSIAN CONTEXT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lau Tiu Chung

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a GIS-based system for collection and targeted distribution of latest alerts and real-time environmental factors to the Malaysian population. We call it the Environmental Health Management System (EHMS. This GIS-based system is designed to facilitate and encourage research into environmental health quality issues by providing a comprehensive tracking and monitoring tool. This GIS-based system is embedded with Google Maps API and Geocoding API services to visualize the location and environmental health reports from the aggregated online newspaper and social media news feeds. We introduce the design and implementation of EHMS, including the web frontend, backend, ontology, database, data acquisition, classification engine, and the standard news feeds.

  12. Secrecy vs. the need for ecological information: challenges to environmental activism in Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandl, T

    1998-01-01

    This article identifies the lessons learned from the Nikitin case study in Russia. The Nikitin case involves the analysis of sources of radioactive contamination in several Russian counties and in the Russian Northern Fleet. Norway was interested in the issue due to proximity to the storage sites. The issue involved national security and environmental protection. It was learned that mixing national security issues with environmental issues offers dangerous and multiple challenges. Environmental groups must build relationships with a wide audience. International security policy must include the issues of globalization of trade and the spread of environmental problems into the global commons (oceans and atmosphere). The risk of an environmentally dangerous accident as a consequence of Cold War activities is greater than the risk of nuclear war. Secrecy in military affairs is not justified when there is inadequate storage of nuclear weapons and contaminated materials. In Russia, the concern is great due to their economic transition and shortages of funds for even the most basic needs, which excludes nuclear waste clean up. The Bellona Foundation studied the extent of nuclear pollution from military nuclear reactors in the Kola peninsula of northwest Russia, in 1994 and 1996. Russian security police arrested one of the report authors for alleged national security violations. A valuable lesson learned was that local Russian environmental groups needed international support. The military nuclear complex poses an enormous hazard. Limiting inspections is an unacceptable national security risk. The new Russian law on state secrets is too broad.

  13. A Study on Environmental Research Trends Using Text-Mining Method - Focus on Spatial information and ICT -

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M. J.; Oh, K. Y.; Joung-ho, L.

    2016-12-01

    Recently there are many research about analysing the interaction between entities by text-mining analysis in various fields. In this paper, we aimed to quantitatively analyse research-trends in the area of environmental research relating either spatial information or ICT (Information and Communications Technology) by Text-mining analysis. To do this, we applied low-dimensional embedding method, clustering analysis, and association rule to find meaningful associative patterns of key words frequently appeared in the articles. As the authors suppose that KCI (Korea Citation Index) articles reflect academic demands, total 1228 KCI articles that have been published from 1996 to 2015 were reviewed and analysed by Text-mining method. First, we derived KCI articles from NDSL(National Discovery for Science Leaders) site. And then we pre-processed their key-words elected from abstract and then classified those in separable sectors. We investigated the appearance rates and association rule of key-words for articles in the two fields: spatial-information and ICT. In order to detect historic trends, analysis was conducted separately for the four periods: 1996-2000, 2001-2005, 2006-2010, 2011-2015. These analysis were conducted with the usage of R-software. As a result, we conformed that environmental research relating spatial information mainly focused upon such fields as `GIS(35%)', `Remote-Sensing(25%)', `environmental theme map(15.7%)'. Next, `ICT technology(23.6%)', `ICT service(5.4%)', `mobile(24%)', `big data(10%)', `AI(7%)' are primarily emerging from environmental research relating ICT. Thus, from the analysis results, this paper asserts that research trends and academic progresses are well-structured to review recent spatial information and ICT technology and the outcomes of the analysis can be an adequate guidelines to establish environment policies and strategies. KEY WORDS: Big data, Test-mining, Environmental research, Spatial-information, ICT Acknowledgements: The

  14. Information management architecture for an integrated computing environment for the Environmental Restoration Program. Environmental Restoration Program, Volume 3, Interim technical architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    This third volume of the Information Management Architecture for an Integrated Computing Environment for the Environmental Restoration Program--the Interim Technical Architecture (TA) (referred to throughout the remainder of this document as the ER TA)--represents a key milestone in establishing a coordinated information management environment in which information initiatives can be pursued with the confidence that redundancy and inconsistencies will be held to a minimum. This architecture is intended to be used as a reference by anyone whose responsibilities include the acquisition or development of information technology for use by the ER Program. The interim ER TA provides technical guidance at three levels. At the highest level, the technical architecture provides an overall computing philosophy or direction. At this level, the guidance does not address specific technologies or products but addresses more general concepts, such as the use of open systems, modular architectures, graphical user interfaces, and architecture-based development. At the next level, the technical architecture provides specific information technology recommendations regarding a wide variety of specific technologies. These technologies include computing hardware, operating systems, communications software, database management software, application development software, and personal productivity software, among others. These recommendations range from the adoption of specific industry or Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) standards to the specification of individual products. At the third level, the architecture provides guidance regarding implementation strategies for the recommended technologies that can be applied to individual projects and to the ER Program as a whole.

  15. Restoring Detailed Geomagnetic and Environmental Information from Continuous Sediment Paleomagnetic Measurement through Optimised Deconvolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, C.; Oda, H.

    2013-12-01

    in UDECON is achieved by searching for the minimum ABIC while shifting the sensor response (to account for possible mispositioning of the sample on the tray) and a smoothness parameter in ranges defined by user. Comparison of deconvolution results using sensor response estimated from integrated point source measurements and other methods suggest that the integrated point source estimate yields better results (smaller ABIC). The noise characteristics of magnetometer measurements and the reliability of the UDECON algorithm were tested using repeated (a total of 400 times) natural remanence measurement of a u-channel sample before and after stepwise alternating field demagnetizations. Using a series of synthetic data constructed based on real paleomagnetic record, we demonstrate that optimized deconvolution using UDECON can greatly help revealing detailed paleomagnetic information such as excursions that may be smoothed out during pass-through measurement. Application of UDECON to the vast amount of existing and future pass-through paleomagnetic and rock magnetic measurements on sediments recovered especially through ocean drilling programs will contribute to our understanding of the geodynamo and paleo-environment by providing more detailed records of geomagnetic and environmental changes.

  16. Using climate information to understand the spatio-temporal heterogeneity of a chikungunya outbreak in the presence of widespread asymptomatic infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dommar, C. J.; Lowe, R.; Robinson, M.; Rodó, X.

    2013-12-01

    The emergence and persistence of human pathogens in the environment represents a constant threat to society, with global implications for human health, economies and ecosystems. Of particular concern are vector-borne diseases, such as dengue, malaria and chikungunya, which are increasing across their traditional ranges and continuing to infiltrate new regions. This unprecedented situation has been partly attributed to the increase in global temperatures in recent decades which has allowed non-native mosquito species to invade and successfully colonise previously inhospitable environments The spatio-temporal evolution of these diseases is determined by the interaction of the host and vector, which is strongly dependent on social structures and mobility patterns. In turn, vector populations are thought to be driven by external environmental variables, such as precipitation and temperature. Furthermore, the ability of asymptomatic individuals to successfully transmit the infection and evade control measures can undermine public health interventions. We employed a stochastic model, which explicitly included asymptomatic and undocumented laboratory confirmed cases, and applied it to a documented outbreak in Cambodia in 2012 (Trapeang Roka village, Kampong Speu Province). The resulting estimate of the reproduction number was considerably higher than values obtained for previous outbreaks and highlights the importance of asymptomatic transmission. Subsequently, we develop an agent-based model (ABM), in which each individual is explicitly represented and vector populations are linked to precipitation estimates in a tropical setting. The model is implemented on both scale-free and regular networks. The spatio-temporal transmission of chikungunya is analysed and the presence of asymptomatic silent spreaders within the population is investigated in the context of implementing travel restrictions during an outbreak. Preventing the movement of symptomatic individuals alone is

  17. Assimilating near-real-time fisheries and environmental data into an advanced fisheries management information system

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brown, W.S; Bub, F.L; Rothschild, B; Sundermeyer, M; Gangopadhyay, A; Lane, R; Robinson, A.R; Haley, P

    2001-01-01

    Working under the hypothesis that more frequent information would help to imporve fisheries science and management practice, we have built a prototype operational advanced fisheries management information system (AFMIS...

  18. Safeguarding National Security Through Public Release of Environmental Information: Moving the Debate to the Next Level

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jacobson, Joseph

    2002-01-01

    ..., and the Chemical Safety Information, Site Security and Fuels Regulatory Relief Act The article then focuses on the current state of the law regarding release or withholding of chemical-hazard information...

  19. Implementation of a laboratory information management system for environmental regulatory analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, W.A.; Aiken, H.B.; Spatz, T.L.; Miles, W.F.; Griffin, J.C.

    1993-09-07

    The Savannah River Technology Center created a second instance of its ORACLE based PEN LIMS to support site Environmental Restoration projects. The first instance of the database had been optimized for R&D support and did not implement rigorous sample tracking, verification, and holding times needed to support regulatory commitments. Much of the R&D instance was transferable such as the work control functions for backlog reports, work assignment sheets, and hazard communication support. A major enhancement of the regulatory LIMS was the addition of features to support a {open_quotes}standardized{close_quotes} electronic data format for environmental data reporting. The electronic format, called {open_quotes}AN92{close_quotes}, was developed by the site environmental monitoring organization and applies to both onsite and offsite environmental analytical contracts. This format incorporates EPA CLP data validation codes as well as details holding time and analytical result reporting requirements. The authors support this format by using special SQL queries to the database. The data is then automatically transferred to the environmental databases for trending and geological mapping.

  20. 77 FR 54610 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comments Requested: Environmental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-05

    ... collection of information is necessary for the proper performance of the functions of the agency, including... Collection The information will help ATF identify any waste product(s) generated as a result of the operations by the applicant and the disposal of the products. The information will help determine if there is...

  1. Sexual harassment induces a temporary fitness cost but does not constrain the acquisition of environmental information in fruit flies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teseo, Serafino; Veerus, Liisa; Moreno, Céline; Mery, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Across animals, sexual harassment induces fitness costs for females and males. However, little is known about the cognitive costs involved, i.e. whether it constrains learning processes, which could ultimately affect an individual's fitness. Here we evaluate the acquisition of environmental information in groups of fruit flies challenged with various levels of male sexual harassment. We show that, although high sexual harassment induces a temporary fitness cost for females, all fly groups of both sexes exhibit similar levels of learning. This suggests that, in fruit flies, the fitness benefits of acquiring environmental information are not affected by the fitness costs of sexual harassment, and that selection may favour cognition even in unfavourable social contexts. Our study provides novel insights into the relationship between sexual conflicts and cognition and the evolution of female counterstrategies against male sexual harassment. © 2016 The Author(s).

  2. Considerations on the Integration of Environmental Information in the Entity's Financial Accounting System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Munteanu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Starting with the ’70, environmental accounting was prone to debates within the scientific community. During the different stages in the environment accounting evolution, the development of this concept took place around the 90’s as an answer to the limitations of traditional accounting, like the lack of an adequate treatment for the internalization of environment externalities and poor allocation of environment protection costs. All these have led to accounting evolution through integration of social and environmental dimensions in the financial system and management of an enterprise. Instruments of environmental management accounting developed by practitioners and theorists in the field, are, for most an adaptation of the traditional methods used by management accounting. These instruments cover cost control, financial analysis and performance evaluation.

  3. Environmental Product Development Combining the Life Cycle Perspective with Chemical Hazard Information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Askham, Cecilia

    Concerns regarding the short- and long-term detrimental effects of chemicals on human health and ecosystems have made the minimisation of chemical hazards a vitally important issue. If sustainable development is to be achieved, environmental efficient products (and product life cycles...... for the life cycle of products meant that systems theory and systems engineering principles were important in this work. Life cycle assessment methodology was important for assessing environmental impacts for case products. The new European regulation for chemicals (REACH) provided the main driver......) are essential. Many life cycle assessments of product systems are performed without the inclusion of toxicity data and indicators. Ecodesign processes for products are often based upon just one, or very few, environmental indicators. Regulatory issues are sometimes addressed in an ad hoc fashion, often late...

  4. Green Template for Life Cycle Assessment of Buildings Based on Building Information Modeling: Focus on Embodied Environmental Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungwoo Lee

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The increased popularity of building information modeling (BIM for application in the construction of eco-friendly green buildings has given rise to techniques for evaluating green buildings constructed using BIM features. Existing BIM-based green building evaluation techniques mostly rely on externally provided evaluation tools, which pose problems associated with interoperability, including a lack of data compatibility and the amount of time required for format conversion. To overcome these problems, this study sets out to develop a template (the “green template” for evaluating the embodied environmental impact of using a BIM design tool as part of BIM-based building life-cycle assessment (LCA technology development. Firstly, the BIM level of detail (LOD was determined to evaluate the embodied environmental impact, and constructed a database of the impact factors of the embodied environmental impact of the major building materials, thereby adopting an LCA-based approach. The libraries of major building elements were developed by using the established databases and compiled evaluation table of the embodied environmental impact of the building materials. Finally, the green template was developed as an embodied environmental impact evaluation tool and a case study was performed to test its applicability. The results of the green template-based embodied environmental impact evaluation of a test building were validated against those of its actual quantity takeoff (2D takeoff, and its reliability was confirmed by an effective error rate of ≤5%. This study aims to develop a system for assessing the impact of the substances discharged from concrete production process on six environmental impact categories, i.e., global warming (GWP, acidification (AP, eutrophication (EP, abiotic depletion (ADP, ozone depletion (ODP, and photochemical oxidant creation (POCP, using the life a cycle assessment (LCA method. To achieve this, we proposed an LCA method

  5. Informal e-waste recycling: environmental risk assessment of heavy metal contamination in Mandoli industrial area, Delhi, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Jatindra Kumar; Kumar, Sudhir

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, e-waste is a major source of environmental problems and opportunities due to presence of hazardous elements and precious metals. This study was aimed to evaluate the pollution risk of heavy metal contamination by informal recycling of e-waste. Environmental risk assessment was determined using multivariate statistical analysis, index of geoaccumulation, enrichment factor, contamination factor, degree of contamination and pollution load index by analysing heavy metals in surface soils, plants and groundwater samples collected from and around informal recycling workshops in Mandoli industrial area, Delhi, India. Concentrations of heavy metals like As (17.08 mg/kg), Cd (1.29 mg/kg), Cu (115.50 mg/kg), Pb (2,645.31 mg/kg), Se (12.67 mg/kg) and Zn (776.84 mg/kg) were higher in surface soils of e-waste recycling areas compared to those in reference site. Level exceeded the values suggested by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). High accumulations of heavy metals were also observed in the native plant samples (Cynodon dactylon) of e-waste recycling areas. The groundwater samples collected form recycling area had high heavy metal concentrations as compared to permissible limit of Indian Standards and maximum allowable limit of WHO guidelines for drinking water. Multivariate analysis and risk assessment studies based on total metal content explains the clear-cut differences among sampling sites and a strong evidence of heavy metal pollution because of informal recycling of e-waste. This study put forward that prolonged informal recycling of e-waste may accumulate high concentration of heavy metals in surface soils, plants and groundwater, which will be a matter of concern for both environmental and occupational hazards. This warrants an immediate need of remedial measures to reduce the heavy metal contamination of e-waste recycling sites.

  6. Green auctions and reduction of information rents in payments for environmental services: an experimental investigation in Sunan County, northwestern China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohong Deng

    Full Text Available Reducing information rents is an important task for government agencies wishing to purchase maximal environmental services with limited budgets. This paper reports on several green auction options for reducing information rents and improving the performance of the "Grain for Green" Payments for environmental services (PES program implemented in northwestern China. In r experimental auctions and investigations, door-to-door interviews were conducted and bidding envelopes and survey questionnaires were used to determine the offers and the foregone profits of the participants. Three scenarios are analyzed in this paper: a uniform price auction, a discriminatory price auction, and an opportunity-cost system. The results show that compared to the uniform price auction system, the other auction systems can increase the cost-effectiveness of conservation contracting. Competitive bidding can reveal true opportunity costs and can reduce information rents extracted from the government by farmers using private information. The demographics and average bids of these auction types were also analyzed. "Perfect information" in the opportunity-cost offer system has the best performance but is very hard to implement in reality. The results of this research show that the auction is a valuable tool for purchasing conservation contracts in northwestern China, but that in the future, the performance of these auctions should be studied with relaxed model assumptions.

  7. Green auctions and reduction of information rents in payments for environmental services: an experimental investigation in Sunan County, northwestern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xiaohong; Xu, Zhongmin

    2015-01-01

    Reducing information rents is an important task for government agencies wishing to purchase maximal environmental services with limited budgets. This paper reports on several green auction options for reducing information rents and improving the performance of the "Grain for Green" Payments for environmental services (PES) program implemented in northwestern China. In r experimental auctions and investigations, door-to-door interviews were conducted and bidding envelopes and survey questionnaires were used to determine the offers and the foregone profits of the participants. Three scenarios are analyzed in this paper: a uniform price auction, a discriminatory price auction, and an opportunity-cost system. The results show that compared to the uniform price auction system, the other auction systems can increase the cost-effectiveness of conservation contracting. Competitive bidding can reveal true opportunity costs and can reduce information rents extracted from the government by farmers using private information. The demographics and average bids of these auction types were also analyzed. "Perfect information" in the opportunity-cost offer system has the best performance but is very hard to implement in reality. The results of this research show that the auction is a valuable tool for purchasing conservation contracts in northwestern China, but that in the future, the performance of these auctions should be studied with relaxed model assumptions.

  8. Virtual Oregon: A Proof-of-Concept for Seamless Access to Distributed Environmental Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keon, D.; Pancake, C.; Wright, D. J.; Walsh, K.

    2002-12-01

    Virtual Oregon is a new data coordination center established at Oregon State University in order to: (1) archive environmental and other place-based data on Oregon and associated areas; (2) make those data accessible to a broad spectrum of agencies and individuals via innovative web interfaces; (3) identify key data sets that are not yet available and encourage their collection and dissemination; and (4) facilitate development of statewide standards for archiving, documenting, and disseminating data. Rather than co-locating researchers and data in a physical center, Virtual Oregon employs a distributed architecture that occupies multiple locations while users are presented with the illusion of a single, centralized facility. This approach was selected not just to maximize the impact on campus students, faculty, and staff but also to service broader interactions with extension agents and other members of Oregon State's statewide community. Virtual Oregon builds on regional GIS centers and databanks in a wide range of disciplines, providing decades of research data on topics as varied as coastal processes, climate, biodiversity, land ownership, water quality, wildfire, and agricultural production. There are four distributed nodes, each serving as a center and clearinghouse for distinct types of information and services: - Department of Geosciences (College of Science): geospatial coverages, digital aerial and ortho imagery and associated base data - Forestry Sciences Laboratory (USDA Forest Service and Oregon State's College of Forestry): ecological and resource management databases; data analyses; data from computational simulations - Northwest Alliance for Computational Science and Engineering (NACSE): databases based on specimen collections, field observation, images, or analysis of historical documents; user interface design - Valley Library: published maps, books and archival publications, gray literature, photographs and video Data are harvested from a variety

  9. [Review on landscape heterogeneity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yutao; Yu, Xinxiao; Guang, Wenbin

    2002-04-01

    On the base of precedent studies, the occurring mechanism, classification, measurement methods, and the important role of landscape heterogeneity in landscape ecology were reviewed. The inner and outer uncertain factors result in landscape heterogeneity. Landscape heterogeneity has close relations with landscape stability, landscape design, architecture, management and disturbance, scale and ecological diversity in ecology. Complexity of landscape heterogeneity research, non-system of measurement indices and methods, difficulties and limitations of landscape heterogeneity modelling were all discussed respectively. In addition, it is suggested that the theory and methods of ecological complexity should be used to improve landscape heterogeneity research.

  10. Informed multi-objective decision-making in environmental management using Pareto optimality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maureen C. Kennedy; E. David Ford; Peter Singleton; Mark Finney; James K. Agee

    2008-01-01

    Effective decisionmaking in environmental management requires the consideration of multiple objectives that may conflict. Common optimization methods use weights on the multiple objectives to aggregate them into a single value, neglecting valuable insight into the relationships among the objectives in the management problem.

  11. 75 FR 78225 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Building for Environmental and Economic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-15

    ..., energy consumption, waste, and environmental releases will be collected using an electronic, MS Excel... tool reduces complex, science-based technical content (e.g., over 500 material and energy flows from... for Testing and Materials standard lifecycle cost method, which covers the costs of initial investment...

  12. Information resources used in health risk assessment by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Post, G.B.; Baratta, M.; Wolfson, S.; McGeorge, L. [New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, Trenton (United States)

    1990-12-31

    The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection`s responsibilities related to health-based risk assessment are described, including its research projects and its development of health based compound specific standards and guidance levels. The resources used by the agency to support health risk assessment work are outlined.

  13. The Genetic and Environmental Contributions to Oppositional Defiant Behavior: A Multi-informant Twin Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudziak, James J.; Derks, Eske M.; Althoff, Robert R.; Copeland, William; Boomsma, Dorret I.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To estimate the genetic and environmental contributions to oppositional defiant behavior (ODB) from mother, father, and teacher report using the Conners Revised Short Forms in a large twin sample. Method: ODB data were collected from 1,595 mothers, 1,114 fathers, and 793 teachers of 7-year-old twin pairs from the Netherlands Twin…

  14. The application of land morphology and lithology information optimizes remote sensing badland mapping using Landsat 8 and Sentinel 2 imagery in a heterogeneous regional setting, the upper Llobregat basin (Catalan Pyrenees)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno de las Heras, Mariano; Gallart, Francesc

    2017-04-01

    Badlands are highly erosive landforms carved in soft bedrock (e.g. mudstones, marls and shales) with little or no vegetation. Despite representing, in general, minor catchment fractions, badlands can contribute much of the total sediment transported within the river networks, largely affecting channel and floodplain dynamics, as well as freshwater ecosystems. Basin management in areas affected by these erosion hotspots requires accurate badland identification and mapping on the broad regional scale. Supervised classification of land features using remotely sensed imagery can provide satisfactory results for screening and quantitative analysis of barely covered, eroded areas. However, badland detection applying remote-sensing classification can be affected by the low separability of their spectral signatures in heterogeneous landscapes. We tested the accuracy of badland identification using remote sensing spectral information (from Landsat 8 OLI and Sentinel 2 instruments) and complimentary land morphology and bedrock lithology data over the upper Llobregat basin (Catalan Pyrenees, NE Spain), a 500 km2 mountain region spotted by (less than 1% of the terrain) mudstone and marly badlands. Maximum likelihood (supervised) classification of badlands using Sentinel 2 spectral information (10 bands, 10-20 m resolution) improved the results obtained by applying Landsat 8 OLI imagery (7 bands, 15-30 m resolution). The use of spectral information alone, however, resulted in poor results due to the low signature separation for badlands and other barely covered areas. The use of complimentary information on landscape morphology (i.e. slope gradient and surface roughness maps derived from a 2-m LiDAR digital elevation model) increased the separability of badlands, riverbeds and degraded areas without badland morphology, while the use of lithology masks derived from digital information of the regional geological setting optimized the discrimination of badlands and hard rock

  15. The economic and environmental impact of trade in forest reserve obligations: a simulation analysis of options for dealing with habitat heterogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth M. Chomitz

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available A tradeable development rights (TDR program focusing on biodiversity conservation faces a crucial problem: defining which areas of habitat should be considered equivalent. Restricting the trading scope to a narrow area could boost the range of biodiversity conserved but could increase the opportunity cost of conservation. The issue is relevant to Brazil, where TDR-like policies are emerging. Long-standing laws require each rural property to maintain a legal forest reserve (reserva legal of at least 20%, but emerging policies allow some tradeability of this obligation. This paper uses a simple, spatially explicit model to simulate a hypothetical state-level program. We find that wider trading scopes drastically reduce landholder costs of complying with this regulation and result in environmentally preferable landscapes.Programas que tenham por objetivo desenvolver um mercado de Direitos Especiais de Propriedade (DEP enfrentam um problema fundamental, qual seja a definição de áreas de preservação equivalentes. Caso a definição seja por um conceito muito restritivo, poderá ocorrer uma maior conservação da biodiversidade, porém com um aumento do custo de oportunidade da preservação ambiental. O assunto é relevante para o Brasil onde programas semelhantes aos DEP estão surgindo. A legislação exige que cada propriedade rural mantenha pelo menos 20% de sua área na forma de florestas (reserva legal, porém algumas políticas nascentes já permitem tipo de negociação de Direitos. Este trabalho usa um modelo espacial simples para simular o efeito de um programa hipotético implantado em um estado. O principal resultado é que uma política menos restritiva para a comercialização dos DEP reduz de forma expressiva, para os produtores rurais, os custos de cumprir a legislação e leva a soluções preferíveis sob o ponto de vista ambiental.

  16. Sources of information on water issues used by local elected policymakers: What role do environmental professionals play?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markee, N.L.; Berry, K.A.; Stewart, M.J.; Giewat, G.R. [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)

    1995-12-01

    At all levels of government, the means through which policymakers acquire information about water issues is instrumental to their construction of policy. Sources of education and information shape the scientific, political, economic and social context within which water policy develops. Both the general direction and the specific construction of policy are influenced by the availability, source and perceived reliability of information on water issues. This study examines local policymakers` formal and informal education and use and perception of information sources on water issues. A mail survey was used. Respondents were county commissioners and city council members in select rural, mixed, and urban counties in Arizona, Nevada, and Utah. Sources of information examined included private technical and legal experts, local county and city government staff and managers, federal and state agency personnel, colleges and universities, local utilities, private industry, constituents, concerned citizens groups and nonprofit organizations, and print and broadcast media. Respondents were asked about the frequency with which they utilized each source to (1) obtain general information on water issues and (2) assist in making policy decisions. Sources were evaluated in terms of availability, relevancy (useful and timely) and reliability (authoritative and credible). Respondents were also asked to provide information on educational attainment and coursework taken pertaining to water and natural resource policy, law, and management. The results of the survey are used to compare the sources of information most frequently utilized by policymakers coming from differing geographic locales and to identify those information sources perceived to be most available and of the highest quality. The relationship between perceived quality and frequency of use is examined. The role of environmental professionals as sources of information to be used in the policymaking arena is discussed.

  17. Link-Heterogeneity vs. Node-Heterogeneity in Clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Beaumont, Olivier; Rosenberg, Arnold

    2010-01-01

    International audience; Heterogeneity in resources pervades all modern computing platforms. How do the effects of heterogeneity depend on which resources differ among computers in a platform? Some answers are derived within a formal framework, by comparing heterogeneity in computing power (node-heterogeneity) with heterogeneity in communication speed (link-heterogeneity). The former genre of heterogeneity seems much easier to understand than the latter.

  18. Environmental Approach to the Study of the Modern Stage of Information Society Development: Research Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivlev, Vitali Yu.; Barkova, Eleonora V.; Ivleva, Marina I.; Buzskaya, Olga M.

    2016-01-01

    The paper analyses modern information society in terms of an information ecology approach. Its aim is to determine the place of the human being in the human-society-ecosystem relations system and to study the prospects of a humanistic approach to the understanding of the essence of subject-object relationships in the communication space of…

  19. Environmental Complexity Related Information for the Assessment of Country Logistics Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kinra, Aseem

    2015-01-01

    by using a content analysis approach. We demonstrate the immensity and nature of this information, are able to confirm the changing spatial transaction cost structures, and to reflect upon the overall conditions of information-related complexity and globalisation in the environment. Besides making......With on-going fragmentation and distribution of production and consumption across geographical space, information about national logistics systems is becoming increasingly important to decision makers in internationally operating firms and organisations. While continuing research on country...... logistics assessment generates some of this information, its relevance for the decision makers, and relationship to their unpredictability from foreign national logistics systems remains indefinite. This paper identifies and categorises the relevant, available information on country logistics environments...

  20. Biological markers in animals can provide information on exposure and bioavailability of environmental contaminants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shugart, L.R.; Adams, S.M.; Jimenez, B.D.; Talmage, S.S.; McCarthy, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies of agents present in the environment seek to identify the extent to which they contribute to the causation of a specific toxic, clinical, or pathological endpoint. The multifactorial nature of disease etiology, long latency periods and the complexity of exposure, all contribute to the difficulty of establishing associations and casual relationships between a specific exposure and an adverse outcome. These barriers to studies of exposures and subsequent risk assessment cannot generally be changed. However, the appropriate use of biological markers in animal species living in a contaminated habitat can provide a measure of potential damage from that exposure and, in some instances, act as a surrogate for human environmental exposures. Quantitative predictivity of the effect of exposure to environmental pollutants is being approached by employing an appropriate array of biological end points. 34 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

  1. Functional Heterogeneity and Senior Management Team Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoliel, Pascale; Somech, Anit

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: There has been an increasing trend toward the creation of senior management teams (SMTs) which are characterized by a high degree of functional heterogeneity. Although such teams may create better linkages to information, along with the benefits of functional heterogeneity comes the potential for conflicts that stem from the value…

  2. Volunteered Geographic Information (vgi) and Environmental Monitoring, a New Approach in Developing Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manouchehri, M.; Kiavarz Moghaddam, M.

    2017-09-01

    Increasing world population and unprecedented expansion of urbanization in the world has caused many environmental problems. The relationship between man and the environment is bidirectional one that have great short-term and long-term impacts on the cities and regions. The best way to deal with it is the participation of the people themselves. The use of new technologies has now become one of the most important methods for monitoring the environment that can increase the participation of citizens, improving environmental problems to provide the cheapest and the most accessible form. Developing countries such as Iran, which faces enormous environmental problems are suitable for the development of technological methods of monitoring. Large population and citizens' participation feasibility using VGI can have a positive effect on developing countries. Finally, by using F-VGI that ensures the validity and accuracy of data we can access an appropriate platform that leads us to suitable model for environment monitoring in the form of the application.

  3. Poseidon: A marine environmental monitoring, forecasting and information system for the Greek seas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.H. SOUKISSIAN

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available The scope of this work is twofold: i to discuss and analyze some principles, issues and problems related to the development and advancement of Operational Oceanography in Greece and ii to present a real-time monitoring and forecasting system for the Aegean Sea, which is currently under implementation. Operational Oceanography in Greece has become a necessity today, since it can provide aid to find solutions on problems related to societal, economic, environmental and scientific issues. Most of the Greek coastal regions are under pressure, susceptible to damages due to the increasing tendency of the population to move from the inland to the coast, marine environmental pollution, competitive development of the coastal market sector, etc. Moreover, the complex geomorphology of the coastal areas and the interdependence between natural processes and human activities causes significant alterations in this delicate environment. A rational treatment of these problems can be based on integrated coastal zone management (ICZM. An absolutely necessary means for establishing ICZM is the operation of marine moni- toring systems. Such a system ("POSEIDON system" is under implementation by the National Centre for Marine Research. POSEIDON is a comprehensive marine monitoring and forecasting system, that aims to improve environmental surveillance and facilitate sea transport, rescue and safety of life at sea, fishing and aquaculture, protection of the marine ecosystem, etc. POSEIDON is expected to enhance considerably the capabilities to manage, protect and develop the marine resources of the Greek Seas and to promote Greek Operational Oceanography.

  4. Analyzing Patterns of Community Interest at a Legacy Mining Waste Site to Assess and Inform Environmental Health Literacy Efforts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Andreotta, Monica D; Lothrop, Nathan; Wilkinson, Sarah T; Root, Robert A; Artiola, Janick F; Klimecki, Walter; Loh, Miranda

    2016-09-01

    Understanding a community's concerns and informational needs is crucial to conducting and improving environmental health research and literacy initiatives. We hypothesized that analysis of community inquiries over time at a legacy mining site would be an effective method for assessing environmental health literacy efforts and determining whether community concerns were thoroughly addressed. Through a qualitative analysis, we determined community concerns at the time of being listed as a Superfund site. We analyzed how community concerns changed from this starting point over the subsequent years, and whether: 1) communication materials produced by the USEPA and other media were aligned with community concerns; and 2) these changes demonstrated a progression of the community's understanding resulting from community involvement and engaged research efforts. We observed that when the Superfund site was first listed, community members were most concerned with USEPA management, remediation, site-specific issues, health effects, and environmental monitoring efforts related to air/dust and water. Over the next five years, community inquiries shifted significantly to include exposure assessment and reduction methods and issues unrelated to the site, particularly the local public water supply and home water treatment systems. Such documentation of community inquiries over time at contaminated sites is a novel method to assess environmental health literacy efforts and determine whether community concerns were thoroughly addressed.

  5. A uniformidade na evidenciação das informações ambientais The uniformity when disclosing environmental information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Simão da Costa

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo tem como objetivo verificar a uniformidade das informações ambientais entre os relatórios disponibilizados pelas empresas do setor de papel e celulose através do site da BOVESPA e de seus sites oficiais. Faz, primeiramente, um embasamento teórico sobre a Contabilidade Ambiental, realizando uma comparação entre as suas definições e as utilizadas pela Contabilidade Financeira. Também aborda as normas e legislações sobre a evidenciação das informações ambientais. Verifica, ainda, quais as demonstrações e relatórios utilizados pelas empresas para demonstrarem o seu comprometimento com o meio ambiente. Ao final, realiza uma análise comparando as informações ambientais dos relatórios disponibilizados no site da BOVESPA com as disponibilizadas pelas empresas em seus sites oficiais. A conclusão é de que há grande dificuldade em analisar informações ambientais, devido à falta de uniformidade na estrutura dos relatórios disponibilizados pelas empresas.The objective of this article is to verify the degree of uniformity when companies disclose environmental information. The sample was selected among the reports made available by the paper industry included in the site of BOVESPA and in the companies’ own sites. Disclosures usually start with statements about the theory behind - environmental accounting, - related definitions and - those coming from the financial accounting field. They also deals with the standards and regulations applicable to the disclosure of environmental information. The research looked after and verifies which reports are being used by the companies to state their commitments towards environment protection. At the end, an analysis compares the environmental information of the researched reports at the site of BOVESPA with those in the companies’ sites. The conclusion reveals extreme difficulty in analyzing environmental information due to the absence of uniformity in the structure of the

  6. GIS environmental information analysis of the Darro River basin as the key for the management and hydrological forest restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Paz; Delgado, Expectación; Lopez-Alonso, Mónica; Poyatos, José Manuel

    2018-02-01

    This article presents analyses of soil and environmental information for the Darro River basin (Granada-Spain) preliminary to its hydrological and forestry restoration. These analyses were carried out using a geographical information system (GIS) and employing a new procedure that adapts hydrological forest-restoration methods. The complete analysis encompasses morphological conditions, soil and climate characteristics as well as vegetation and land use. The study investigates soil erosion in the basin by using Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) and by mapping erosion fragility units. The results are presented in a set of maps and their analysis, providing the starting point for river basin management and the hydrological and forestry-restoration project that was approved at the end of 2015. The presence of soft substrates (e.g. gravel and sand) indicates that the area is susceptible to erosion, particularly the areas that are dominated by human activity and have little soil protection. Finally, land use and vegetation cover were identified as key factors in the soil erosion in the basin. According to the results, river authorities have included several measures in the restoration project aimed at reducing the erosion and helping to recover the environmental value of this river basin and to include it in recreation possibilities for the community of Granada. The presented analytical approach, designed by the authors, would be useful as a tool for environmental restoration in other small Mediterranean river basins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Heterogeneous network architectures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Henrik Lehrmann

    2006-01-01

    Future networks will be heterogeneous! Due to the sheer size of networks (e.g., the Internet) upgrades cannot be instantaneous and thus heterogeneity appears. This means that instead of trying to find the olution, networks hould be designed as being heterogeneous. One of the key equirements here...

  8. How to measure genetic heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Ryo

    2009-12-01

    Genetic information of organisms is coded as a string of four letters, A, T, G and C, a sequence in macromolecules called deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). DNA sequence offers blueprint of organisms and its heterogeneity determines identity and variation of species. The quantitation of this genetic heterogeneity is fundamental to understand biology. We compared previously-reported three measures, covariance matrix expression of list of loci (pair-wise r2), the most popular index in genetics, and its multi-dimensional form, Ψ, and entropy-based index, epsilon. Thereafter we proposed two methods so that we could handle the diplotypic heterogeneity and quantitate the conditions where the number of DNA sequence samples is much smaller than the number of possible variants.

  9. How to measure genetic heterogeneity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Ryo, E-mail: ryamada@genome.med.kyoto-u.ac.j [Unit of Statistical Genetics, Center for Genomic Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Konoe-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-0815 (Japan)

    2009-12-01

    Genetic information of organisms is coded as a string of four letters, A, T, G and C, a sequence in macromolecules called deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). DNA sequence offers blueprint of organisms and its heterogeneity determines identity and variation of species. The quantitation of this genetic heterogeneity is fundamental to understand biology. We compared previously-reported three measures, covariance matrix expression of list of loci (pair-wise r{sup 2}), the most popular index in genetics, and its multi-dimensional form, {Psi}, and entropy-based index, {epsilon}. Thereafter we proposed two methods so that we could handle the diplotypic heterogeneity and quantitate the conditions where the number of DNA sequence samples is much smaller than the number of possible variants.

  10. Fuel-cycle facilities: preliminary safety and environmental information document. Volume VII

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    Information is presented concerning the mining and milling of uranium and thorium; uranium hexafluoride conversion; enrichment; fuel fabrication; reprocessing; storage options; waste disposal options; transportation; heavy-water-production facilities; and international fuel service centers.

  11. Project to promote exchange of international information on environmental technologies; Kankyo gijutsu kokusai joho koryu sokushin jigyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    Mutual information exchange at international levels is important for practical application of global environment preservation technologies, whereas the APEC Virtual Center was established in fiscal 1997. Fiscal 1998 has discussed the future functions of the Virtual Center, and carried out the following matters to improve the functions and achieve its stable operation. Discussions were given on common use with the centers of other countries and regions of the specifications of classification systems for information areas and provided information that are provided by the Virtual Center. Visits were made to sub-managing countries and regions for smooth operation of the study groups, and opinions were exchanged. Visits were made to coordinators and contact points established in each country and region when the Center was founded in fiscal 1997. A visit was made to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to exchange opinions on coordination measures with the Cleaner Production Strategy of the U.S.A. being a project similar to the subject project. In order to strengthen the Japan's Center, attempts were made to expand the linking information to wider scope. Special pages publishing concentratedly the items of information that the users are interested were prepared as part of the information provision. (NEDO)

  12. Reaction Selectivity in Heterogeneous Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somorjai, Gabor A.; Kliewer, Christopher J.

    2009-02-02

    The understanding of selectivity in heterogeneous catalysis is of paramount importance to our society today. In this review we outline the current state of the art in research on selectivity in heterogeneous catalysis. Current in-situ surface science techniques have revealed several important features of catalytic selectivity. Sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy has shown us the importance of understanding the reaction intermediates and mechanism of a heterogeneous reaction, and can readily yield information as to the effect of temperature, pressure, catalyst geometry, surface promoters, and catalyst composition on the reaction mechanism. DFT calculations are quickly approaching the ability to assist in the interpretation of observed surface spectra, thereby making surface spectroscopy an even more powerful tool. HP-STM has revealed three vitally important parameters in heterogeneous selectivity: adsorbate mobility, catalyst mobility, and selective site-blocking. The development of size controlled nanoparticles from 0.8 to 10 nm, of controlled shape, and of controlled bimetallic composition has revealed several important variables for catalytic selectivity. Lastly, DFT calculations may be paving the way to guiding the composition choice for multi-metallic heterogeneous catalysis for the intelligent design of catalysts incorporating the many factors of selectivity we have learned.

  13. Methods of evaluating environmental-monitoring information systems in densely populated areas; Bewertungsansatz von Umweltmonitoring-Informationssystemen in Ballungsraeumen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voigt, K.; Welzl, G. [GSF - Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit GmbH, Neuherberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Biomathematik und Biometrie; Brueggemann, R. [Institut fuer Gewaesseroekologie und Binnenfischerei im Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V. (Germany). Abt. Oekohydrologie; Pudenz, S. [Stefan Pudenz, Criterion - Bewertung und Informationsmanagement, Berlin (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    Comprehensive data on environmental monitoring programs concerned with air pollutants like ozone (O{sub 3}), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxide (NO), carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) und carbon monoxide (CO), and occassionally suspended dust, benzene and other environmental chemicals, are available on the free Internet. As different monitoring information systems exist in most states or big cities of the Federal Republic of Germany, a comparison of these systems with their pros and cons is of great interest to the public. Environmental air pollutant monitoring systems in 16 states of Germany are listed and evaluated by applying 5 evaluation criteria for the differentiation of these systems. Different data-analysis methods will be applied, the Hasse diagram technique, a method derived from discrete mathematics and the partially ordered scalogram analysis with coordinates (POSAC) method, a multivariate statistical approach. The important objects, the so-called maximal or minimal objects, are detected in both methods. The Internet-based environmental monitoring systems of the states of Berlin, Bremen, Saxony-Anhalt, Baden-Wurttemberg are rated good in the evaluation approaches, whereas the information systems of the states of Brandenburg, North Rhine-Westphalia, Saxony received a rather poor ranking. The attributes of DA, way of data presentation on the Internet, and ME, type and length of measurements, were pointed out in the data-analysis methods. Multivariate explorative statistical methods offer a comprehensive tool for the graphical analysis of data-matrices. The ranking of objects is given in an effective and graphically comprehensible manner using the Hasse diagram technique. The choice and preference of the methods is problem-driven. A combination of these different methods is envisaged in the authors' future research. (orig.)

  14. Societal response to chronic environmental change: The role of evolving scientific and technical information in state coastal erosion management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meo, Mark; James, Thomas E.; Deyle, Robert E.

    1992-06-01

    Natural hazards, such as acute storm events, often exacerbate chronic change processes and heighten public awareness of overt and latent risks to society. This paper reports the results of a study of the development of coastal erosion management policies from 1960 to 1990 in Florida, Massachusetts, and North Carolina, all of which have been subject to marked chronic and acute environmental changes. The case studies were guided by a conceptual framework that links acute and chronic environmental changes with state and federal policity initiatives as well as the scientific community. We traced the evolution of policies and programs and the policy innovation process in these states that were designed to mitigate the risks associated with coastal erosion, and documented the role that scientific and technical information played. From information drawn from published and unpublished literature as well as personal interviews, the case studies reveal a wide variation in policy responses to coastal erosion phenomena and exhibit differing degrees of program success. Although the case studies preclude broad generalizations, they illustrate clearly the importance of institution to enable policy enterpreneurs and other key individuals a base for acquiring and using scientific and technical information for policy development and implementation.

  15. Genetic and environmental contributions to anxiety among Chinese children and adolescents--a multi-informant twin study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jie; Yu, Jing; Li, Xinying; Zhang, Jianxin

    2015-05-01

    Child and adolescent anxiety has become a major public health concern in China, but little was known about the etiology of anxiety in Chinese children and adolescents. The present study aimed to investigate genetic and environmental influences on trait anxiety among Chinese children and adolescents. Rater, sex, and age differences on these estimates were also examined. Self-reported and parent-reported child's trait anxiety was collected from 1,104 pairs of same-sex twins aged 9-18 years. Genetic models were fitted to data from each informant to determine the genetic (A), shared (C), and non-shared environmental (E) influences on trait anxiety. The parameter estimates and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of A, C, E on self-reported trait anxiety were 50% [30%, 60%], 5% [0%, 24%], 45% [40%, 49%]. For parent-reported data, the corresponding parameter estimates were 63% [47%, 78%], 13% [1%, 28%], and 24% [22%, 27%], respectively. The heritability of anxiety was higher in girls for self-reported data, but higher in boys for parent-reported data. There was no significant age difference in genetic and environmental contributions for self-reported data, but a significant increase of heritability with age for parent-reported data. The trait anxiety in Chinese children and adolescents was highly heritable. Non-shared environmental factors also played an important role. The estimates of genetic and environmental effects differed by rater, sex and age. Our findings largely suggest the cross-cultural generalizability of the etiological model of child and adolescent anxiety. © 2014 Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.

  16. Environmental risk prioritization and management of petroleum retail facilities using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and rapid field investigation techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drake, J.T.; Thomas, C.A.; Molloy, K.P. [Camp Dresser & McKee Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)] [and others

    1997-12-31

    Environmental risk prioritization is a method of estimating the probability and severity of an environmental impact related to a petroleum facility. The risk analysis is directed at prioritizing environmental risks associated with each facility and so that capital expenditures can be directed toward mitigation at high risk sites and monitoring or stewardship at low risk locations. The expenditures or investments may include facility upgrades, waste disposal or containment, soil and water remediation, or facility monitoring activities. The risk analyses and petroleum retail facilities prioritization system presented in this paper includes a geographic information systems (GIS) and rapid field investigation techniques. This system was recently used in the prioritization of 150 petroleum facilities in Caracas, Venezuela and is currently being expanded to include additional facilities. The prioritization system used GIS and a data management system to quantify the Potential Impact Factors (PIF) and the Leak Likelihood Factors (LLF) associated with each facility. The PIF analysis used GIS to perform a proximity analysis; a radial search was performed for each site identifying proximal receptors including sensitive environmental receptors, water supply well locations, protected open spaces, water supply watersheds, areas of critical environmental concern, and residential populations. The LLF analysis assessed risk based on the age of the underground storage tanks, presence of leak protection devices, soils and groundwater conditions, tank and piping characteristics, sales volume and proximity to sources of high voltage. Prioritization weighting was placed on each of the LLF factors based on the risk associated with each. After the initial GIS site rankings, rapid site audits were completed selected the high risk sites. These audits included compilation of spill histories and soil vapor analyses using gas chromatography.

  17. Informing optimal environmental influenza interventions: how the host, agent, and environment alter dominant routes of transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian H Spicknall

    Full Text Available Influenza can be transmitted through respirable (small airborne particles, inspirable (intermediate size, direct-droplet-spray, and contact modes. How these modes are affected by features of the virus strain (infectivity, survivability, transferability, or shedding profiles, host population (behavior, susceptibility, or shedding profiles, and environment (host density, surface area to volume ratios, or host movement patterns have only recently come under investigation. A discrete-event, continuous-time, stochastic transmission model was constructed to analyze the environmental processes through which a virus passes from one person to another via different transmission modes, and explore which factors increase or decrease different modes of transmission. With the exception of the inspiratory route, each route on its own can cause high transmission in isolation of other modes. Mode-specific transmission was highly sensitive to parameter values. For example, droplet and respirable transmission usually required high host density, while the contact route had no such requirement. Depending on the specific context, one or more modes may be sufficient to cause high transmission, while in other contexts no transmission may result. Because of this, when making intervention decisions that involve blocking environmental pathways, generic recommendations applied indiscriminately may be ineffective; instead intervention choice should be contextualized, depending on the specific features of people, virus strain, or venue in question.

  18. Using Information on Uncertainty to Improve Environmental Fate Modeling: A Case Study on DDT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schenker, Urs; Scheringer, Martin; Sohn, Michael D.; Maddalena, Randy L.; McKone, Thomas E.; Hungerbuhler, Konrad

    2008-10-01

    Present and future concentrations of DDT in the environment are calculated with the global multi-media model CliMoChem. Monte Carlo simulations are used to assess the importance of uncertainties in substance property data, emission rates, and environmental parameters for model results. Uncertainties in the model results, expressed as 95percent confidence intervals of DDT concentrations in various environmental media, in different geographical locations, and at different points in time are typically between one and two orders of magnitude. An analysis of rank correlations between model inputs and predicted DDT concentrations indicates that emission estimates and degradation rate constants, in particular in the atmosphere, are the most influential model inputs. For DDT levels in the Arctic, temperature dependencies of substance properties are also influential parameters. A Bayesian Monte Carlo approach is used to update uncertain model inputs based on measurements of DDT in the field. The updating procedure suggests a lower value for half-life in air and a reduced range of uncertainty for KOW of DDT. As could be expected, the Bayesian updating yields model results that are closer to observations, and model uncertainties have decreased. The combined sensitivity analysis and Bayesian Monte Carlo approach provide new insight into important processes that govern the global fate and persistence of DDT in the environment.

  19. Annual Site Environmental Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holden, Gene

    1999-09-23

    This report provides information about environmental programs and compliance with environmental regulations in calendar year 1998 (CY98) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The most significant information in this report is summarized in the following sections: (1) Environmental Compliance--Section 2 contains the complete Environmental Compliance information; (2) Environmental Non-Radiological Program--Section 3 contains the complete Environmental Non-Radiological information; and (3) Environmental Radiological Program--Section 4 contains the complete Environmental Radiological information.

  20. Heterogeneity and Microeconometrics Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Browning, Martin; Carro, Jesus

    Presented at the 2005 Econometric Society World Congress Plenary Session on "Modelling Heterogeneity". We survey the treatment of heterogeneity in applied microeconometrics analyses. There are three themes. First, there is usually much more heterogeneity than empirical researchers allow for. Second......, the inappropriate treatment of heterogeneity can lead to serious error when estimating outcomes of interest. Finally, once we move away from the traditional linear model with a single 'fixed effect', it is very difficult to account for heterogeneity and fit the data and maintain coherence with theory structures....... The latter task is one for economists: "heterogeneity is too important to be left to the statisticians". The paper concludes with a report of our own research on dynamic discrete choice models that allow for maximal heterogeneity...

  1. Heterogeneity in the WTP for recreational access

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campbell, Danny; Vedel, Suzanne Elizabeth; Thorsen, Bo Jellesmark

    2014-01-01

    In this study we have addressed appropriate modelling of heterogeneity in willingness to pay (WTP) for environmental goods, and have demonstrated its importance using a case of forest access in Denmark. We compared WTP distributions for four models: (1) a multinomial logit model, (2) a mixed logit...... was negative. However, models accounting for preference heterogeneity found a positive mean WTP, but a large sub-group with negative WTP. Accounting for preference heterogeneity can alter overall conclusions, which highlights the importance of this for policy recommendations....

  2. Evaluation of environmental information for the Unimak Pass Area, Alaska. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truett, J.C.; Craig, P.C.

    1986-12-01

    This report identifies and describes the important biological resources of the marine environment of the eastern Aleutian Island, Alaska, between 164 and 170/sup 0/W, and discusses the physical and chemical processes and components that support these resources. It evaluates the potential effects of oil and gas activities on the biota and identifies information needs. It is based solely on a review and analysis of existing information. The eastern Aleutian Islands passes are a major migration corridor between the North Pacific Ocean and the Bering Sea for marine mammals, birds, and some fishes. Plankton is transported into the Bering Sea via island passes.

  3. Evaluation of environmental information for the Unimak Pass Area, Alaska. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truett, J.C.; Craig, P.C.

    1986-12-01

    This report identifies and describes the important biological resources of the marine environment of the eastern Aleutian Islands, Alaska, between 164 and 170/degree/ W (herein called study area), and discusses the physical and chemical processes and components that support these resources. It evaluates the potential effects of oil and gas activities on the biota and identifies information needs. It is based solely on a review and analysis of existing information. Major points follow under the headings History of Investigation, Marine Mammals, Birds, Fish, Invertebrates, Primary Production, Physicochemical Processes, and Regional Comparisons and Potential Impacts.

  4. Research project science transfer, environmental information for journalists. Duration : November 93 to February 96; Forschungsprojekt Wissenstransfer, Umweltinformation fuer Journalisten. Laufzeit: November 1993 bis Februar 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The aim of the project was to pass science results on to multiplicators with a view to enhancing journalist reporting on environmental subjects. This was achieved for one thing via the telephone information service, which established contacts to experts in the environmental research sector or provided literature on environmental subjects. For another, the information service compiled background information on topical subjects and mailed it to target groups. A further point of emphasis was to enhance communication between science and the public. Seminars for scientists aimed to familiarize scientists with the function and methods of working of the media. (orig.)

  5. Environmental chemicals and breast cancer: An updated review of epidemiological literature informed by biological mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Kathryn M; Udesky, Julia O; Rudel, Ruthann A; Brody, Julia Green

    2017-10-06

    Many common environmental chemicals are mammary gland carcinogens in animal studies, activate relevant hormonal pathways, or enhance mammary gland susceptibility to carcinogenesis. Breast cancer's long latency and multifactorial etiology make evaluation of these chemicals in humans challenging. For chemicals previously identified as mammary gland toxicants, we evaluated epidemiologic studies published since our 2007 review. We assessed whether study designs captured relevant exposures and disease features suggested by toxicological and biological evidence of genotoxicity, endocrine disruption, tumor promotion, or disruption of mammary gland development. We systematically searched the PubMed database for articles with breast cancer outcomes published in 2006-2016 using terms for 134 environmental chemicals, sources, or biomarkers of exposure. We critically reviewed the articles. We identified 158 articles. Consistent with experimental evidence, a few key studies suggested higher risk for exposures during breast development to dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), dioxins, perfluorooctane-sulfonamide (PFOSA), and air pollution (risk estimates ranged from 2.14 to 5.0), and for occupational exposure to solvents and other mammary carcinogens, such as gasoline components (risk estimates ranged from 1.42 to 3.31). Notably, one 50-year cohort study captured exposure to DDT during several critical windows for breast development (in utero, adolescence, pregnancy) and when this chemical was still in use. Most other studies did not assess exposure during a biologically relevant window or specify the timing of exposure. Few studies considered genetic variation, but the Long Island Breast Cancer Study Project reported higher breast cancer risk for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in women with certain genetic variations, especially in DNA repair genes. New studies that targeted toxicologically relevant chemicals and captured biological hypotheses about genetic variants

  6. 18 CFR 380.3 - Environmental information to be supplied by an applicant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... information required for specific project applications under part 4 or 16 of this chapter. (2) Natural gas projects. (i) For any application filed under the Natural Gas Act for any proposed action identified in... regulations of the Council, NEPA and other Federal laws such as the Endangered Species Act, the National...

  7. 77 FR 59619 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Environmental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-28

    ... on information provided by the pharmaceutical industry, FDA estimates that it takes sponsors or..., and 170.100, food additive petitions, color additive petitions, requests from exemption from regulation as a food additive, and submission of a food contact notification for a food contact substance...

  8. Environmental Scanning: How Developed Is Information Acquisition in Western European Companies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benczúr, David

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: A number of theoretical works focus on the potential revolutionary impact of the Internet and other Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) upon Competitive Intelligence, but only a few empirical research papers can be found on it. Is the real impact still unknown, or is it too insignificant to talk about? The present paper…

  9. Fuels planning: science synthesis and integration; environmental consequences fact sheet 01: Fire Effects Information System (FEIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steve Sutherland

    2004-01-01

    The Fire Effects Information System (FEIS) provides accessible, up-to-date fire effects summaries, taken from current English-language literature, for almost 900 plant species, about 100 animal species, and 16 Kuchler plant communities found on the North American continent. This fact sheet discusses the development of FEIS and what is contained in the species summary....

  10. Evaluation of information indices as indicators of environmental stress in terrestrial soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tobor-Kaplon, M.A.; Holtkamp, R.; Scharler, U.M.; Doroszuk, A.; Kuenen, F.J.A.; Bloem, J.; Ruiter, de P.C.

    2007-01-01

    Information indices from Ecosystem Network Analysis (ENA) can be used to quantify the development of an ecosystem in terms of its size and organization. There are two types of indices, i.e. absolute indices that describe both the size and organization of ecosystem (Total System Throughput

  11. TOXNET: an evolving web resource for toxicology and environmental health information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wexler, P

    2001-01-12

    TOXNET, developed by the National Library of Medicine (NLM), is a web-based system of databases providing information on toxicology, hazardous chemicals, and the environment. Databases fall under the general headings of Toxicology Data, Toxicology Literature, Toxic Releases, and Chemical Identification/Nomenclature. Among TOXNET's pre-eminent databases are the Hazardous Substances Data Bank (HSDB) and the TOXLINE file of bibliographic references.

  12. 78 FR 57847 - Proposed Information Collection Request; Comment Request; Environmental Impact Assessment of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-20

    ...'' (EPA ICR No. 1808.07, OMB Control No. 2020-0007) to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for...) enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; and (iv) minimize the burden... Nongovernmental Activities in Antarctica (Rule), were promulgated pursuant to the Antarctic Science, Tourism, and...

  13. NMR analysis of compositional heterogeneity in polysaccharides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many copolysaccharides are compositionally heterogeneous, and the composition determined by the usual analytical or spectroscopic methods provides only an average value. For some polysaccharides, the NMR data contain copolymer sequence information, such as diad, triad, and tetrad sequence intensiti...

  14. Heterogeneous agents and decison making within firms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hung, Chung-yu

    2015-01-01

    This dissertation explores the implications of agents’ heterogeneity in decision making within situations where information is not completely contractible. Specifically, the study applies empirical methods across three chapters to examine the role of employees’ traits and their mutual relationships

  15. The Influence of Social and Environmental Labels on Purchasing: An Information and Systematic-heuristic Processing Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Redondo Palomo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at exploring how social and environmental (SE labels influence purchasing. By drawing on the information processing and the systematic-heuristic models, this study tests the process followed by consumers when purchasing SE labeled-products. Information was gathered through a structured questionnaire in personal interviews with 400 consumers responsible for household shopping of Fast-moving Consumer Goods (FMCG, who were randomly approached at shopping malls in four areas of Madrid, Spain. They were asked about recognition, knowledge, credibility, perceived utility and purchases on 12 different labels; the influence of these variables on purchase is modeled and tested by path analysis. This study suggests that a systematic-heuristic information processing occurs when consumers buy SE-labeled FMCG products, as the purchase of this type of goods depends on the recognition of a label, knowledge of the issue/issuer, as well as the credibility and the perceived utility of SE labels. Motivation for being informed influences the process, being an antecedent of awareness, comprehension and perceived utility. This model shows a dual processing mode: systematic and heuristic, where the lack of cognitive capacity could explain why these two processing modes co-occur. This paper adds value to existing literature on SE labels and consumption by applying the information processing model, which has not been used before in the field of responsible consumption, in addition to open a promising avenue for research, by offering complementary theories to the existing ones, based on attitudes.

  16. The Drupal Environmental Information Management System Provides Standardization, Flexibility and a Platform for Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gries, C.; Vanderbilt, K.; Reid, D.; Melendez-Colom, E.; San Gil, I.

    2013-12-01

    Over the last five years several Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) sites have collaboratively developed a standardized yet flexible approach to ecological information management based on the open source Drupal content management system. These LTER sites adopted a common data model for basic metadata necessary to describe data sets, but also used for site management and web presence. Drupal core functionality provides web forms for easy management of information stored in this data model. Custom Drupal extensions were developed to generate XML files conforming to the Ecological Metadata Language (EML) for contribution to the LTER Network Information System (NIS) and other data archives. Each LTER site then took advantage of the flexibility Drupal provides to develop its unique web presence, choosing different themes and adding additional content to the websites. By nature, information presented is highly interlinked which can easily be modeled in Drupal entities and is further supported by a sophisticated tagging system (Fig. 1). Therefore, it is possible to provide the visitor with many different entry points to the site specific information presented. For example, publications and datasets may be grouped for each scientist, for each research project, for each major research theme at the site, making the information presented more accessible for different visitors. Experience gained during the early years was recently used to launch a complete re-write for upgrading to Drupal 7. LTER sites from multiple academic institutions pooled resources in order to partner with professional Drupal developers. Highlights of the new developments are streamlined data entry, improved EML output and integrity, support of IM workflows, a faceted data set search, a highly configurable data exploration tool with intelligent filtering and data download, and, for the mobile age, a responsive web design theme. Seven custom modules and a specific installation profile were developed

  17. System aspect course of creation of information and analytical system of environmental monitoring and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshnyak, V. I.; Sokolov, S. S.; Chernyi, S. G.; Storchak, T. V.; Tihomirov, Ya N.

    2017-10-01

    Objects of oil production have significantly changed natural landscapes of the district, breakouts of oil pipelines cause irreparable harm to the nature. Due to rather strong anthropogenous loading it was necessary to take measures for control of negative impact on the environment. Resolution No. 485-p of December 23, 2011, was accepted in 2011 at the level of the district Government. According to this resolution the local environmental monitoring has to be carried out in Yugra in the territory of areas of oil production. The monitoring purpose on the license areas of oil production is control of a condition and tracing of change tendencies in the environment. The monitoring is carried out by sampling, sample analysis in a chemical laboratory and presentation of results. The final results of the monitoring have to stimulate nature users to improve their own and use newer technologies, which will promote improvement of the environment condition.

  18. Information diffusion system for encouraging small and medium-size companies to improve their environmental performances; Systeme de diffusion d'information pour encourager les PME-PMI a ameliorer leurs performances environnementales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gondran, N.

    2001-11-01

    Small and Medium-sized Enterprises (SMEs) are the cornerstone of the French economy and job creation. However, due to financial and resource constraints, they are not inclined to look for environmental information autonomously. As a result, they often consider environmental issues as a constraint rather than a potential benefit. SMEs generally invest neither time nor money in order to reduce the environmental impacts of their activities and thus remain in an 'inactivity cycle'. Their global environmental impact cannot be neglected which makes their interested parties more and more concerned. The aim of this study is to analyse the environmental information system of SMEs in order to identify scope for potential improvements. The first hypothesis of this study is that SMEs do not have the knowledge that is necessary in order to implement a 'rational' pollution prevention policy. It is also assumed that access to environmental information is necessary for the SME to reduce the environmental impact of its activities. In order to validate these hypotheses and to identify which information channels contribute to the reduction of environmental impacts, a method is proposed to simultaneously evaluate the environmental policies of the SME and its ability to access to environmental information. This approach has been used to survey 47 SMEs. In addition, more than 300 pieces of information that were given to companies by two industrial associations were analysed. These data were analysed using principal component analysis, multiple correspondence analysis and chi square tests on contingency tables. The survey shows that SMEs favour direct contact with various organisations. The more a company is open to partners, the more it prevents pollution. Each SME has a different 'partnership profile' according to the area where it is situated, its level of independence, its status according to environmental legislation and its situation with respect to

  19. The Upper Midwest Aerospace Consortium Environmental Information Network: Building ‘Learning Communities’ in the Northern Great Plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welling, Leigh; Seielstad, George; McClurg, Pat; Fagre, Daniel B.

    2000-01-01

    In the last two decades alone, the U.S. and large portions of the world have witnessed what can be aptly be described as an explosion of scientific information and technological innovations that has permeated almost every aspect of our lives. Given these trends, it is clear that science and the understanding of science are becoming increasingly more relevant and essential to decision-makers and the decision-making process. Every environmental issue confronting society has an undisputed scientific underpinning. Understanding the implications of the science underpinning issues of particular importance to the health and well being of society constitutes the basis for making more informed and enlightened decisions. However obvious this linkage may be, many factors continue to serve as impediments to the broader understanding and incorporation of science into policy- and decision-making processes, as perhaps is best exemplified by the case of climate science.

  20. Conflict on the coast: using geographic information systems to map potential environmental disputes in Matagorda Bay, Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brody, Samuel D; Highfield, Wes; Arlikatti, Sudha; Bierling, David H; Ismailova, Roubabah M; Lee, Lai; Butzler, Rachel

    2004-07-01

    The sustainable management of coastal natural resources inevitably involves identifying stakeholder conflicts and developing planning processes that prevent these conflicts from becoming intractable disputes. This study links environmental conflict to specific areas within a large ecological system. Specifically, we use Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to map potentially competing stakeholder values associated with establishing protected areas in Matagorda Bay, Texas. By overlaying multiple values associated with a range of stakeholders across space, we are able to identify hotspots of potential conflict as well as areas of opportunity for maximizing joint gains. Mapping stakeholder conflict is an approach to proactively locate potential controversy in response to a specific environmental management proposal and guide decision makers in crafting planning processes that mitigate the possibility of intractable disputes and facilitate the implementation of sustainable coastal policies. Results indicate that under different management scenarios, protected area proposals will generate more conflict in specific areas. Most notably, regulated uses would produce the greatest degree of conflict on or near shore, particularly at the mouth of the Colorado River. Additionally, of all the management scenarios evaluated, the prohibition of coastal structural development would generate the overall highest level of conflict within the Bay. Based on the results, we discuss the policy implications for environmental managers and provide guidance for future research on location-based conflict management within the coastal margin.