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Sample records for heterogeneous clinical syndrome

  1. Heterogeneity in Waardenburg syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hageman, M J; Delleman, J W

    1977-01-01

    Heterogeneity of Waardenburg syndrome is demonstrated in a review of 1,285 patients from the literature and 34 previously unreported patients in five families in the Netherlands. The syndrome seems to consist of two genetically distinct entities that can be differentiated clinically: type I, Waardenburg syndrome with dystopia canthorum; and type II, Waardenburg syndrome without dystopia canthorum. Both types have an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. The incidence of bilateral deafness in the two types of the syndrome was found in one-fourth with type I and about half of the patients with type II. This difference has important consequences for genetic counseling. Images Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 PMID:331943

  2. Locus heterogeneity for Waardenburg syndrome is predictive of clinical subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrer, L A; Arnos, K S; Asher, J H; Baldwin, C T; Diehl, S R; Friedman, T B; Greenberg, J; Grundfast, K M; Hoth, C; Lalwani, A K

    1994-10-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a dominantly inherited and clinically variable syndrome of deafness, pigmentary changes, and distinctive facial features. Clinically, WS type I (WS1) is differentiated from WS type II (WS2) by the high frequency of dystopia canthorum in the family. In some families, WS is caused by mutations in the PAX3 gene on chromosome 2q. We have typed microsatellite markers within and flanking PAX3 in 41 WS1 kindreds and 26 WS2 kindreds in order to estimate the proportion of families with probable mutations in PAX3 and to study the relationship between phenotypic and genotypic heterogeneity. Evaluation of heterogeneity in location scores obtained by multilocus analysis indicated that WS is linked to PAX3 in 60% of all WS families and in 100% of WS1 families. None of the WS2 families were linked. In those families in which equivocal lod scores (between -2 and +1) were found, PAX3 mutations have been identified in 5 of the 15 WS1 families but in none of the 4 WS2 families. Although preliminary studies do not suggest any association between the phenotype and the molecular pathology in 20 families with known PAX3 mutations and in four patients with chromosomal abnormalities in the vicinity of PAX3, the presence of dystopia in multiple family members is a reliable indicator for identifying families likely to have a defect in PAX3.

  3. Acral peeling skin syndrome: a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlovic, Sasha; Krunic, Aleksandar L; Bulj, Tanja K; Medenica, Maria M; Fong, Kenneth; Arita, Ken; McGrath, John A

    2012-01-01

    Acral peeling skin syndrome (APSS) is a rare, autosomal, recessive genodermatosis characterized by painless spontaneous exfoliation of the skin of the hands and feet at a subcorneal or intracorneal level. It usually presents at birth or appears later in childhood or early adulthood. Some cases result from mutations in the TGM5 gene that encodes transglutaminase 5, which has an important role in cross-linking cornified cell envelope proteins. We report a new APSS pedigree from Jordan that contains at least 10 affected family members, although sequencing of the TGM5 gene failed to disclose any pathogenic mutation(s). On the basis of probable consanguinity, we performed homozygosity mapping and identified areas of homozygosity on chromosomes 1, 6, 10, 13, and 16, although none of the intervals contained genes of clear relevance to cornification. APSS is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder, and this Jordanian pedigree underscores the likelihood of still further heterogeneity. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Heterogeneity in chronic fatigue syndrome - empirically defined subgroups from the PACE trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, T E; Chalder, T; Sharpe, M; White, P D

    2017-06-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome is likely to be a heterogeneous condition. Previous studies have empirically defined subgroups using combinations of clinical and biological variables. We aimed to explore the heterogeneity of chronic fatigue syndrome. We used baseline data from the PACE trial, which included 640 participants with chronic fatigue syndrome. Variable reduction, using a combination of clinical knowledge and principal component analyses, produced a final dataset of 26 variables for 541 patients. Latent class analysis was then used to empirically define subgroups. The most statistically significant and clinically recognizable model comprised five subgroups. The largest, 'core' subgroup (33% of participants), had relatively low scores across all domains and good self-efficacy. A further three subgroups were defined by: the presence of mood disorders (21%); the presence of features of other functional somatic syndromes (such as fibromyalgia or irritable bowel syndrome) (21%); or by many symptoms - a group which combined features of both of the above (14%). The smallest 'avoidant-inactive' subgroup was characterized by physical inactivity, belief that symptoms were entirely physical in nature, and fear that they indicated harm (11%). Differences in the severity of fatigue and disability provided some discriminative validation of the subgroups. In addition to providing further evidence for the heterogeneity of chronic fatigue syndrome, the subgroups identified may aid future research into the important aetiological factors of specific subtypes of chronic fatigue syndrome and the development of more personalized treatment approaches.

  5. Clinical spectrum of silver - Russell syndrome

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    Sapna N.K. Varma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Silver - Russell syndrome is a clinically and genetically heterogenous condition characterized by severe intrauterine and postnatal growth retardation, craniofacial disproportion and normal intelligence downward curvature of the corner of the mouth, syndactyly and webbed fingers. Diagnosis of Silver - Russell syndrome remains clinical; no definite etiology or specific tests have been established. In the recent years, it has been shown that more than 38% of patients have hypomethylation in the imprinting control region 1 of 11p15 and one-tenth of patients carry a maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome seven. The pathophysiological mechanisms resulting in the Silver - Russell phenotype remain unknown despite the recent progress in deciphering the molecular defects associated with this condition. This case report describes the clinical features of Silver - Russell syndrome in a father and daughter.

  6. BETA-THALASSEMIA SYNDROMES, CLINICAL AND LABORATORY APPROACH

    OpenAIRE

    Türkkan, Emine; Berrak, Su Gülsün; Canpolat, Cengiz

    2016-01-01

    The Beta ((3) thalassemia syndromes are a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders. The frequency of thalassemia is dependent on the ethnic origins of the patient population. Turkey is located in a geographic area of the world where thalassemia syndromes are common. The incidence rate of (3-thalassemia carriers was stated to be 2 per cent in Turkey. Clinical manifestations are diverse and range from asymptomatic hypochromia and microcytosis to profound anemia leading to death in early childho...

  7. Clinical and molecular phenotype of Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rice, Gillian; Patrick, Teresa; Parmar, Rekha; Taylor, Claire F.; Aeby, Alec; Aicardi, Jean; Artuch, Rafael; Montalto, Simon Attard; Bacino, Carlos A.; Barroso, Bruno; Baxter, Peter; Benko, Willam S.; Bergmann, Carsten; Bertini, Enrico; Biancheri, Roberta; Blair, Edward M.; Blau, Nenad; Bonthron, David T.; Briggs, Tracy; Brueton, Louise A.; Brunner, Han G.; Burke, Christopher J.; Carr, Ian M.; Carvalho, Daniel R.; Chandler, Kate E.; Christen, Hans-Jurgen; Corry, Peter C.; Cowan, Frances M.; Cox, Helen; D'Arrigo, Stefano; Dean, John; de Laet, Corinne; de Praeter, Claudine; Dery, Catherine; Ferrie, Colin D.; Flintoff, Kim; Frints, Suzanna G. M.; Garcia-Cazorla, Angels; Gener, Blanca; Goizet, Cyril; Goutieres, Francoise; Green, Andrew J.; Guet, Agnes; Hamel, Ben C. J.; Hayward, Bruce E.; Heiberg, Arvid; Hennekam, Raoul C.; Husson, Marie; Jackson, Andrew P.; Jayatunga, Rasieka; Jiang, Yong-Hui; Kant, Sarina G.; Kao, Amy; King, Mary D.; Kingston, Helen M.; Klepper, Joerg; van der Knaap, Marjo S.; Kornberg, Andrew J.; Kotzot, Dieter; Kratzer, Wilfried; Lacombe, Didier; Lagae, Lieven; Landrieu, Pierre Georges; Lanzi, Giovanni; Leitch, Andrea; Lim, Ming J.; Livingston, John H.; Lourenco, Charles M.; Lyall, E. G. Hermione; Lynch, Sally A.; Lyons, Michael J.; Marom, Daphna; McClure, John P.; McWilliam, Robert; Melancon, Serge B.; Mewasingh, Leena D.; Moutard, Marie-Laure; Nischal, Ken K.; Ostergaard, John R.; Prendiville, Julie; Rasmussen, Magnhild; Rogers, R. Curtis; Roland, Dominique; Rosser, Elisabeth M.; Rostasy, Kevin; Roubertie, Agathe; Sanchis, Amparo; Schiffmann, Raphael; Scholl-Burgi, Sabine; Seal, Sunita; Shalev, Stavit A.; Corcoles, C. Sierra; Sinha, Gyan P.; Soler, Doriette; Spiegel, Ronen; Stephenson, John B. P.; Tacke, Uta; Tan, Tiong Yang; Till, Marianne; Tolmie, John L.; Tomlin, Pam; Vagnarelli, Federica; Valente, Enza Maria; van Coster, Rudy N. A.; van der Aa, Nathalie; Vanderver, Adeline; Vles, Johannes S. H.; Voit, Thomas; Wassmer, Evangeline; Weschke, Bernhard; Whiteford, Margo L.; Willemsen, Michel A. A.; Zankl, Andreas; Zuberi, Sameer M.; Orcesi, Simona; Fazzi, Elisa; Lebon, Pierre; Crow, Yanick J.

    2007-01-01

    Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome (AGS) is a genetic encephalopathy whose clinical features mimic those of acquired in utero viral infection. AGS exhibits locus heterogeneity, with mutations identified in genes encoding the 3'-->5' exonuclease TREX1 and the three subunits of the RNASEH2 endonuclease

  8. Clinical Heterogeneity in Patients with the Hypermobility Type of Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Wandele, Inge; Rombaut, Lies; Malfait, Fransiska; De Backer, Tine; De Paepe, Anne; Calders, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    EDS-HT is a connective tissue disorder characterized by large inter-individual differences in the clinical presentation, complicating diagnosis and treatment. We aim to describe the clinical heterogeneity and to investigate whether differences in the symptom profile are also reflected as disparity in functional impairment and pain experience. In…

  9. The biology of myelodysplastic syndromes: unity despite heterogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azra Raza

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS traditionally have been grouped together as a disease entity based on clinical phenomena seen in association. Despite the similarities, there is great heterogeneity among the syndromes. Recent insights have shown, however, that there exists a biologically cohesive theme that unifies and thereby validates the conceptual interconnectedness. The first suggestion that such a relationship existed where biology could directly explain the observed cytopenias was the finding of excessive premature apoptosis of hematopoietic cells in MDS marrows. This apoptosis was mediated by paracrine as well as autocrine factors implicating both the seed and the soil in the pathology of the disease. Pro-inflammatory cytokines in the marrow microenvironment were mainly the paracrine mediators of apoptosis, but how the clonal cells committed suicide because of autocrine stimulation had remained a mystery for more than a decade. It has been shown now that deregulation of ribosome biogenesis can initiate a stress response in the cell through the p53 signaling pathway. Congenital anemias had been associated with mutations in ribosomal protein genes. The surprise came with the investigation of 5q- syndrome patients where haplo-insufficiency of the ribosomal protein gene RPS14 was found to be the cause of this MDS subtype. Similar ribosomal deregulation was shown to be present in all varieties of MDS patients, serving as another unifying characteristic. In addition to these findings, there are other DNA-related abnormalities such as uniparental disomy, mutations in the TET2 gene, and epigenetic phenomena that are associated with and occur across all types of MDS. This paper summarizes the themes unifying this heterogeneous group of diseases.

  10. Noonan syndrome and clinically related disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartaglia, Marco; Gelb, Bruce D.; Zenker, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Noonan syndrome is a relatively common, clinically variable developmental disorder. Cardinal features include postnatally reduced growth, distinctive facial dysmorphism, congenital heart defects and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, variable cognitive deficit and skeletal, ectodermal and hematologic anomalies. Noonan syndrome is transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait, and is genetically heterogeneous. So far, heterozygous mutations in nine genes (PTPN11, SOS1, KRAS, NRAS, RAF1, BRAF, SHOC2, MEK1 and CBL) have been documented to underlie this disorder or clinically related phenotypes. Based on these recent discoveries, the diagnosis can now be confirmed molecularly in approximately 75% of affected individuals. Affected genes encode for proteins participating in the RAS-mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) signal transduction pathway, which is implicated in several developmental processes controlling morphology determination, organogenesis, synaptic plasticity and growth. Here, we provide an overview of clinical aspects of this disorder and closely related conditions, the molecular mechanisms underlying pathogenesis, and major genotype-phenotype correlations. PMID:21396583

  11. [Usher syndrome: clinical features, diagnostic options, and therapeutic prospects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeliger, M W; Fischer, M D; Pfister, M

    2009-06-01

    Usher syndrome denotes a clinically and genetically heterogeneous combination of retinitis pigmentosa and sensorineural deafness. The division into subtypes I, II, and III is based on the degree of hearing loss: Type I is characterized by deafness from birth together with ataxia and retarded motor development, type II by a stationary deafness of a moderate degree, and type III by a progressive deafness with adult onset. In Germany, Usher syndrome currently bears particular relevance because in January 2009 a new compulsory screening of auditory function in newborn infants was introduced. Consequently, it can be expected that a higher number of patients with Usher syndrome will be identified in early childhood and referred to ophthalmologists. The focus of this work is to introduce the typical clinical picture of Usher syndrome, summarize diagnostic options, and give an overview of therapeutic strategies.

  12. Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder: The road from similarities and clinical heterogeneity to neurobiological types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacquino, Claudia; De Rossi, Pietro; Spalletta, Gianfranco

    2015-09-20

    Although diagnosis is a central issue in medical care, in psychiatry its value is still controversial. The function of diagnosis is to indicate treatments and to help clinicians take better care of patients. The fundamental role of diagnosis is to predict outcome and prognosis. To date serious concern persists regarding the clinical utility and predictive validity of the diagnosis system in psychiatry, which is at the most syndromal. Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, which nosologists consider two distinct disorders, are the most discussed psychiatric illnesses. Recent findings in different fields of psychiatric research, such as neuroimaging, neuropathology, neuroimmunology, neuropsychology and genetics, have led to other conceptualizations. Individuals with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder vary greatly with regard to symptoms, illness course, treatment response, cognitive and functional impairment and biological correlates. In fact, it is possible to find heterogeneous correlates even within the same syndrome, i.e., from one stage of the disorder to another. Thus, it is possible to identify different subsyndromes, which share some clinical and neurobiological characteristics. The main goal of modern psychiatry is to ovethrow these barriers and to obtain a better understanding of the biological profiles underlying heterogeneous clinical features and thus reduce the variance and lead to a homogeneous definition. The translational research model, which connects the basic neuroscience research field with clinical experience in psychiatry, aims to investigate different neurobiological features of syndromes and of the shared neurobiological features between two syndromes. In fact, this approach should help us to better understand the neurobiological pathways underlying clinical entities, and even to distinguish different, more homogeneous, diagnostic subtypes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The Many Faces of Primary Aldosteronism and Cushing Syndrome: A Reflection of Adrenocortical Tumor Heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mete, Ozgur; Duan, Kai

    2018-01-01

    Adrenal cortical tumors constitute a heterogeneous group of neoplasms with distinct clinical, morphological, and molecular features. Recent discoveries of specific genotype-phenotype correlations in adrenal cortical adenomas have transformed our understanding of their respective endocrine syndromes. Indeed, a proportion of patients with primary aldosteronism are now known to harbor adrenal cortical adenomas with heterogeneous molecular alterations ( KCNJ5, ATP1A1, ATP2B3 , and CACNA1D ) involving the calcium/calmodulin kinase signaling pathway. Several lines of evidence suggest that KCNJ5 -mutant aldosterone-producing adenomas have distinct clinicopathological phenotype compared to those harboring ATP1A1, ATP2B3 , and CACNA1D mutations. Benign adrenal cortical tumors presenting with Cushing syndrome often have diverse mutations ( PRKACA, PRKAR1A, GNAS, PDE11A , and PDE8B ) involving the cyclic AMP signaling pathway. In addition to cortisol-producing adenomas, bilateral micronodular adrenocortical disease and primary bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia (PBMAH) have also expanded the spectrum of benign neoplasms causing adrenal Cushing disease. The recent discovery of inactivating ARMC5 germline mutations in PBMAH has challenged the old belief that this disorder is mainly a sporadic disease. Emerging evidence suggests that PBMAH harbors multiple distinct clonal proliferations, reflecting the heterogeneous genomic landscape of this disease. Although most solitary adrenal cortical tumors are sporadic, there is an increasing recognition that inherited susceptibility syndromes may also play a role in their pathogenesis. This review highlights the molecular and morphological heterogeneity of benign adrenal cortical neoplasms, reflected in the diverse presentations of primary aldosteronism and adrenal Cushing syndrome.

  14. Three cases of Wolfram syndrome with different clinical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çamtosun, Emine; Şıklar, Zeynep; Kocaay, Pınar; Ceylaner, Serdar; Flanagan, Sarah E; Ellard, Sian; Berberoğlu, Merih

    2015-03-01

    Wolfram syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the WFS1 gene. Clinical heterogeneity has been reported both within and between families with WFS1 mutations. The first case was diagnosed with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus with positive for pancreatic autoantibodies and had a ketoacidotic attack in the follow-up period. The second case presented initially with optic atrophy and was diagnosed with behavioral and psychiatric problems at an early age. The third case had early onset insulin-dependent diabetes with multiple anomalies and congenital hypothyroidism. Many of these features have not been reported previously in patients with Wolfram syndrome. In all three patients homozygous mutations in WFS1 were identified. Wolfram syndrome is a disease where the characteristic features may present at different times. A diagnosis of Wolfram syndrome should therefore be considered even in the absence of the full spectrum of clinical features.

  15. Dysmorphic disorders: clinical and nosological heterogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. E. Medvedev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical picture of dysmorphophobia (DMP (dysmorphia, DM has been inadequately investigated; its descriptions are contradictory.Objective: to study the clinical structure of DMP (DM on a sample of plastic or cosmetic surgery patients.Patients and methods. An examination was made in of 103 patients, including 81 (78.6% women (mean age, 35.8±4.9 years and 22 (21.4% men (mean age, 30.9±5.7 years, who had gone to a clinic of cosmetic or plastic surgery with complaints of objectively unverified appearance defects and DM signs and given consent to take part in the investigation. All the patients underwent clinical and psychopathological examination; in so doing the follow-up data in the past 1-3 tears were borne in mind. Their somatic condition was analyzed on the basis of the data available in the medical documents and the results of laboratory, clinical, and instrumental studies.Results. The dysmorphic syndrome has been found to have overvalued, hypochondriacal, obsessive-compulsive, depressive, and delusional forms. It has been established that DM can manifest within schizophrenia, personality disorders, affective disorders, and organic mental diseases. Differential diagnostic criteria for different types of DM in heterogeneous psychopathological disorders are given.

  16. Phenotypic and genotypic heterogeneity of Lynch syndrome: a complex diagnostic challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Henry T; Lanspa, Stephen; Shaw, Trudy; Casey, Murray Joseph; Rendell, Marc; Stacey, Mark; Townley, Theresa; Snyder, Carrie; Hitchins, Megan; Bailey-Wilson, Joan

    2018-07-01

    Lynch syndrome is the hereditary disorder that most frequently predisposes to colorectal cancer as well as predisposing to a number of extracolonic cancers, most prominently endometrial cancer. It is caused by germline mutations in the mismatch repair genes. Both its phenotype and genotype show marked heterogeneity. This review gives a historical overview of the syndrome, its heterogeneity, its genomic landscape, and its implications for complex diagnosis, genetic counseling and putative implications for immunotherapy.

  17. The Many Faces of Primary Aldosteronism and Cushing Syndrome: A Reflection of Adrenocortical Tumor Heterogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozgur Mete

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Adrenal cortical tumors constitute a heterogeneous group of neoplasms with distinct clinical, morphological, and molecular features. Recent discoveries of specific genotype–phenotype correlations in adrenal cortical adenomas have transformed our understanding of their respective endocrine syndromes. Indeed, a proportion of patients with primary aldosteronism are now known to harbor adrenal cortical adenomas with heterogeneous molecular alterations (KCNJ5, ATP1A1, ATP2B3, and CACNA1D involving the calcium/calmodulin kinase signaling pathway. Several lines of evidence suggest that KCNJ5-mutant aldosterone-producing adenomas have distinct clinicopathological phenotype compared to those harboring ATP1A1, ATP2B3, and CACNA1D mutations. Benign adrenal cortical tumors presenting with Cushing syndrome often have diverse mutations (PRKACA, PRKAR1A, GNAS, PDE11A, and PDE8B involving the cyclic AMP signaling pathway. In addition to cortisol-producing adenomas, bilateral micronodular adrenocortical disease and primary bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia (PBMAH have also expanded the spectrum of benign neoplasms causing adrenal Cushing disease. The recent discovery of inactivating ARMC5 germline mutations in PBMAH has challenged the old belief that this disorder is mainly a sporadic disease. Emerging evidence suggests that PBMAH harbors multiple distinct clonal proliferations, reflecting the heterogeneous genomic landscape of this disease. Although most solitary adrenal cortical tumors are sporadic, there is an increasing recognition that inherited susceptibility syndromes may also play a role in their pathogenesis. This review highlights the molecular and morphological heterogeneity of benign adrenal cortical neoplasms, reflected in the diverse presentations of primary aldosteronism and adrenal Cushing syndrome.

  18. Searching for Tourette’s syndrome gene. Part 1. Heterogeneity of clinical phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kowalska

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The French neuropsychiatrist Georges Gilles de la Tourette described in 1885 the “Maladie des Tics” which later was named after him, as Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS. Gilles de la Tourette syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by simple and complex motor and vocal tics with multiple neuropsychiatric comorbidities. GTS is often concurrent with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. There are several clinical GTS subtypes: GTS only, GTS OCD, and GTS OCD ADHD. Additional clinical aspects of the disorder include occurrence of anger episodes, anxiety and mood disorders, and learning and sleeping disturbances. The genetics of GTS is complex and remains unclear. So far, no causative candidate genes have been identified. However, segregation studies in families and twins with GTS provide strong evidence for the existence of a genetic background associated with a multifactorial mode of inheritance. Progress in studies on genome variability among patients with GTS is necessary to improve pharmacotherapeutic strategies of the disorder.

  19. [Clinical implications of polycystic ovary syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dravecká, Ingrid

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a heterogeneous and complex endocrine disease which among the female population belongs to the most widespread endocrinopathies and it is the most frequent cause of hyperthyroidism, anticoagulation and infertility. Insulin resistance is one of the important diabetology factors impacting hyperglycaemia in a majority of women with PCOS (60-80 %). Clinical expressions of PCOS include reproduction disorders, metabolic characteristics and psychological implications. Reproduction disorders include hyperthyroidism, menstruation cycle disorders, infertility and pregnancy complications as well as early abortions, gestational diabetes and pregnancy induced hypertension. Long-term metabolic risks of PCOS include type 2 diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, arterial hypertension and endothelial dysfunction. The available data confirms higher incidence of cardiovascular diseases in women with PCOS. In particular among obese women PCOS is more frequently associated with non-alcoholic hepatic steatosis, sleep apnoea syndrome and endometrial cancer. The literature includes some controversial data about the relationship between PCOS and autoimmunity. Women with PCOS are more prone to suffer from insufficient confidence with higher incidence of anxiety, depression, bipolar disorder and eating disorders. autoimmunity - diabetes mellitus - pregnancy - insulin resistance - metabolic syndrome - menstrual disorders - polycystic ovary syndrome.

  20. Evidence of genetic heterogeneity in Alberta Hutterites with Usher syndrome type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qi; Lenger, Chaeli; Smith, Richard; Kimberling, William J; Ye, Ming; Lehmann, Ordan; MacDonald, Ian

    2012-01-01

    To identify the genetic defect in a Hutterite population from northern Alberta with Usher syndrome type I. Complete ophthalmic examinations were conducted on two boys and two girls from two related Hutterite families diagnosed with Usher syndrome type I. DNA from patients and their parents was first evaluated for a mutation in exon 10 of the protocadherin-related 15 (PCDH15) gene (c.1471delG), previously reported in southern Alberta Hutterite patients with Usher syndrome (USH1F). Single nucleotide polymorphic linkage analysis was then used to confirm another locus, and DNA was analyzed with the Usher Chip v4.0 platform. Severe hearing impairment, unintelligible speech, and retinitis pigmentosa with varying degrees of visual acuity and visual field loss established a clinical diagnosis of Usher syndrome type I. The patients did not carry the exon 10 mutation in the PCDH15 gene; however, with microarray analysis, a previously reported mutation (c.52C>T; p.Q18X) in the myosin VIIA (MYO7A) gene was found in the homozygous state in the affected siblings. The finding of a MYO7A mutation in two related Hutterite families from northern Alberta provides evidence of genetic heterogeneity in Hutterites affected by Usher syndrome type I.

  1. Mesothelioma and anti-Ma paraneoplastic syndrome; heterogeneity in immunogenic tumours increases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Hilary Anne; Panopoulou, Aikaterini; Bhatt, Nidhi; Edey, Anthony James; Giffin, Nicola Jane

    2014-02-01

    We present a patient with opsoclonus and diffuse cerebellar signs who had an anti-Ma2 antibody-associated paraneoplastic syndrome secondary to a sarcomatoid mesothelioma. This case highlights the importance of early tumour detection, instigation of therapeutic measures, and the heterogeneity of underlying malignancies in neurological paraneoplastic syndromes.

  2. Noonan syndrome: clinical features, diagnosis, and management guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Alicia A; Allanson, Judith E; Dahlgren, Jovanna; Gelb, Bruce D; Hall, Bryan; Pierpont, Mary Ella; Roberts, Amy E; Robinson, Wanda; Takemoto, Clifford M; Noonan, Jacqueline A

    2010-10-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) is a common, clinically and genetically heterogeneous condition characterized by distinctive facial features, short stature, chest deformity, congenital heart disease, and other comorbidities. Gene mutations identified in individuals with the NS phenotype are involved in the Ras/MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) signal transduction pathway and currently explain ∼61% of NS cases. Thus, NS frequently remains a clinical diagnosis. Because of the variability in presentation and the need for multidisciplinary care, it is essential that the condition be identified and managed comprehensively. The Noonan Syndrome Support Group (NSSG) is a nonprofit organization committed to providing support, current information, and understanding to those affected by NS. The NSSG convened a conference of health care providers, all involved in various aspects of NS, to develop these guidelines for use by pediatricians in the diagnosis and management of individuals with NS and to provide updated genetic findings.

  3. Reframing autism as a behavioral syndrome and not a specific mental disorder: Implications of genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tordjman, S; Cohen, D; Coulon, N; Anderson, G M; Botbol, M; Canitano, R; Roubertoux, P L

    2017-01-30

    Clinical and molecular genetics have advanced current knowledge on genetic disorders associated with autism. A review of diverse genetic disorders associated with autism is presented and for the first time discussed extensively with regard to possible common underlying mechanisms leading to a similar cognitive-behavioral phenotype of autism. The possible role of interactions between genetic and environmental factors, including epigenetic mechanisms, is in particular examined. Finally, the pertinence of distinguishing non-syndromic autism (isolated autism) from syndromic autism (autism associated with genetic disorders) will be reconsidered. Given the high genetic and etiological heterogeneity of autism, autism can be viewed as a behavioral syndrome related to known genetic disorders (syndromic autism) or currently unknown disorders (apparent non-syndromic autism), rather than a specific categorical mental disorder. It highlights the need to study autism phenotype and developmental trajectory through a multidimensional, non-categorical approach with multivariate analyses within autism spectrum disorder but also across mental disorders, and to conduct systematically clinical genetic examination searching for genetic disorders in all individuals (children but also adults) with autism. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Differential Diagnoses of Overgrowth Syndromes: The Most Important Clinical and Radiological Disease Manifestations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacerda, L.S.; Alves, U.D.; Zanier, J.F.C.; Machado, D.C.; Camilo, G.B.; Machado, D.C.; Camilo, G.B.; Lopes, A.J.

    2014-01-01

    Overgrowth syndromes comprise a heterogeneous group of diseases that are characterized by excessive tissue development. Some of these syndromes may be associated with dysfunction in the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK)/PI3K/AKT pathway, which results in an increased expression of the insulin receptor. In the current review, four overgrowth syndromes were characterized (Proteus syndrome, Klippel-Trenaunay-Weber syndrome, Made lung’s disease, and neurofibromatosis type I) and illustrated using cases from our institution. Because these syndromes have overlapping clinical manifestations and have no established genetic tests for their diagnosis, radiological methods are important contributors to the diagnosis of many of these syndromes. The correlation of genetic discoveries and molecular pathways that may contribute to the phenotypic expression is also of interest, as this may lead to potential therapeutic interventions

  5. Neurofibromatosis-Noonan syndrome or LEOPARD Syndrome? A clinical dilemma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tullu M

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available Neurofibromatosis (NF, Noonan syndrome (NS, and LEOPARD syndrome are all autosomal dominant conditions, each being a distinct clinical entity by itself. Rarely, one encounters cases with features of NF and NS and is termed as the ′Neurofibromatosis-Noonan syndrome′ (NF-NS. The authors report a clinical dilemma with major clinical features of the NF-NS syndrome and LEOPARD syndrome co-existing in the same patient. Also, features of Noonan syndrome and LEOPARD syndrome are compared with the case reported.

  6. Clinical heterogeneity in Fabry disease

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    G. N. Salogub

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fabry disease is an X-linked, lysosomal storage disease (OMIM: 301500, caused by α-galactosidase A deficiency, resulting in accumulation of its substrates, glycosphingolipids, primarily – globotriaosylceramide, in the lysosomes of multiple cell types with multi-system clinical manifestations, even within the same family, including abnormalities of the central and peripheral nervous system, kidneys, heart, gastrointestinal tract, lungs, organ of vision. Clinical heterogeneity is often the reason of the delayed diagnosis. Nowadays enzyme replacement therapy has proved its efficiency in the treatment of Fabry disease. Including Fabry disease in the differential diagnosis of a large range of disorders is important because of its wide clinical heterogeneity and the possibility of an earlier intervention with a beneficial treatment.

  7. Genetic heterogeneity in Usher syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keats, Bronya J B; Savas, Sevtap

    2004-09-15

    Mutations in seven different genes have been associated with Usher syndrome, and an additional four loci have been mapped. The identified genes encode myosin VIIa, harmonin (a PDZ-domain protein), cadherin 23, protocadherin 15, sans (a scaffold-like protein), usherin and clarin. Three clinical types of Usher syndrome have been described: USH1 patients have severe to profound congenital hearing loss, vestibular dysfunction, and retinal degeneration beginning in childhood, those with USH2 have moderate to severe congenital hearing loss, normal vestibular function, and later onset of retinitis pigmentosa, and USH3 patients have progressive hearing loss, which distinguishes them from the other two types. The shaker-1, waltzer, Ames waltzer, and Jackson shaker mice provide murine models for four of the genetic forms of Usher syndrome. Ongoing studies are enabling early diagnosis of Usher syndrome in children who present with hearing loss, thus providing time to prepare for the onset of visual loss. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Heterogeneity in Phenotype of Usher-Congenital Hyperinsulinism Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al Mutair, Angham N; Brusgaard, Klaus; Bin-Abbas, Bassam

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVETo evaluate the phenotype of 15 children with congenital hyperinsulinism (CHI) and profound hearing loss, known as homozygous 11p15-p14 deletion syndrome (MIM #606528).METHODSProspective clinical follow-up and genetic analysis by direct sequencing, Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Ampl.......CONCLUSIONSThe phenotype of homozygous 11p15-p14 deletion syndrome, or Usher-CHI syndrome, includes any severity of neonatal-onset CHI and severe, sensorineural hearing loss. Retinitis pigmentosa and nonautoimmune diabetes may occur in adolescence.......OBJECTIVETo evaluate the phenotype of 15 children with congenital hyperinsulinism (CHI) and profound hearing loss, known as homozygous 11p15-p14 deletion syndrome (MIM #606528).METHODSProspective clinical follow-up and genetic analysis by direct sequencing, Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe...

  9. Repint of "Reframing autism as a behavioral syndrome and not a specific mental disorder: Implications of genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tordjman, S; Cohen, D; Anderson, G M; Botbol, M; Canitano, R; Coulon, N; Roubertoux, P L

    2018-06-01

    Clinical and molecular genetics have advanced current knowledge on genetic disorders associated with autism. A review of diverse genetic disorders associated with autism is presented and for the first time discussed extensively with regard to possible common underlying mechanisms leading to a similar cognitive-behavioral phenotype of autism. The possible role of interactions between genetic and environmental factors, including epigenetic mechanisms, is in particular examined. Finally, the pertinence of distinguishing non-syndromic autism (isolated autism) from syndromic autism (autism associated with genetic disorders) will be reconsidered. Given the high genetic and etiological heterogeneity of autism, autism can be viewed as a behavioral syndrome related to known genetic disorders (syndromic autism) or currently unknown disorders (apparent non-syndromic autism), rather than a specific categorical mental disorder. It highlights the need to study autism phenotype and developmental trajectory through a multidimensional, non-categorical approach with multivariate analyses within autism spectrum disorder but also across mental disorders, and to conduct systematically clinical genetic examination searching for genetic disorders in all individuals (children but also adults) with autism. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Applicable or non-applicable: investigations of clinical heterogeneity in systematic reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura E. Chess

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical heterogeneity can be defined as differences in participant characteristics, types or timing of outcome measurements and intervention characteristics. Clinical heterogeneity in systematic reviews has the possibility to significantly affect statistical heterogeneity leading to inaccurate conclusions and misled decision making. The aim of this study is to identify to what extent investigators are assessing clinical heterogeneity in both Cochrane and non-Cochrane systematic reviews. Methods The most recent 100 systematic reviews from the top five journals in medicine—JAMA, Archives of Internal Medicine, British Medical Journal, The Lancet, and PLOS Medicine—and the 100 most recently published and/or updated systematic reviews from Cochrane were collected. Various defined items of clinical heterogeneity were extracted from the included reviews. Investigators used chi-squared tests, logarithmic modeling and linear regressions to determine if the presence of such items served as a predictor for clinical heterogeneity when comparing Cochrane to non-Cochrane reviews. Extracted variables include number of studies, number of participants, presence of quantitative synthesis, exploration of clinical heterogeneity, heterogeneous characteristics explored, basis and methods used for investigating clinical heterogeneity, plotting/visual aids, author contact, inferences from clinical heterogeneity investigation, reporting assessment, and the presence of a priori or post-hoc analysis. Results A total of 317 systematic reviews were considered, of which 199 were in the final analysis. A total of 81 % of Cochrane reviews and 90 % of non-Cochrane reviews explored characteristics that are considered aspects of clinical heterogeneity and also described the methods they planned to use to investigate the influence of those characteristics. Only 1 % of non-Cochrane reviews and 8 % of Cochrane reviews explored the clinical

  11. Truncating mutation in the NHS gene: phenotypic heterogeneity of Nance-Horan syndrome in an asian Indian family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramprasad, Vedam Lakshmi; Thool, Alka; Murugan, Sakthivel; Nancarrow, Derek; Vyas, Prateep; Rao, Srinivas Kamalakar; Vidhya, Authiappan; Ravishankar, Krishnamoorthy; Kumaramanickavel, Govindasamy

    2005-01-01

    A four-generation family containing eight affected males who inherited X-linked developmental lens opacity and microcornea was studied. Some members in the family had mild to moderate nonocular clinical features suggestive of Nance-Horan syndrome. The purpose of the study was to map genetically the gene in the large 57-live-member Asian-Indian pedigree. PCR-based genotyping was performed on the X-chromosome, by using fluorescent microsatellite markers (10-cM intervals). Parametric linkage analysis was performed by using two disease models, assuming either recessive or dominant X-linked transmission by the MLINK/ILINK and FASTLINK (version 4.1P) programs (http:www.hgmp.mrc.ac.uk/; provided in the public domain by the Human Genome Mapping Project Resources Centre, Cambridge, UK). The NHS gene at the linked region was screened for mutation. By fine mapping, the disease gene was localized to Xp22.13. Multipoint analysis placed the peak LOD of 4.46 at DSX987. The NHS gene mapped to this region. Mutational screening in all the affected males and carrier females (heterozygous form) revealed a truncating mutation 115C-->T in exon 1, resulting in conversion of glutamine to stop codon (Q39X), but was not observed in unaffected individuals and control subjects. conclusions. A family with X-linked Nance-Horan syndrome had severe ocular, but mild to moderate nonocular, features. The clinical phenotype of the truncating mutation (Q39X) in the NHS gene suggests allelic heterogeneity at the NHS locus or the presence of modifier genes. X-linked families with cataract should be carefully examined for both ocular and nonocular features, to exclude Nance-Horan syndrome. RT-PCR analysis did not suggest nonsense-mediated mRNA decay as the possible mechanism for clinical heterogeneity.

  12. Bardet-Biedl syndrome and Usher syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Rainer

    2003-01-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) and Usher syndrome (USH) are the most prevalent syndromic forms of retinitis pigmentosa (RP), together they make up almost a quarter of the patients with RP. BBS is defined by the association of retinopathy, obesity, hypogonadism, renal dysfunction, postaxial polydactyly and mental retardation. This clinically complex syndrome is genetically heterogeneous with linkage to more than 6 loci, and 4 genes have been cloned so far. Recent molecular data present evidence that, in some instances, the clinical manifestation of BBS requires recessive mutations in 1 of the 6 BBS loci plus one or two additional mutations in a second BBS locus (tri- or tetra-allelic inheritance). USH is characterized by the combination of congenital or early-onset sensorineural deafness, RP, and variable degrees of vestibular dysfunction. Each of the three clinical types is genetically heterogeneous: 7 loci have been mapped for type 1, three loci for type 2, and two loci for type 3. Currently, 6 USH genes (MYO7A, USH1C, CDH23, PCDH15, USH2A, USH3) have been identified. Pathogenetically, mutations of the USH1 genes seem to result in defects of auditory and retinal sensory cells, the USH 2 phenotype is caused by defects of extracellular matrix or cell surface receptor proteins, and USH3 may be due to synaptic disturbances. The considerable contribution of syndromic forms of RP requires interdisciplinary approaches to the clinical and diagnostic management of RP patients.

  13. Cognitive and behavioral heterogeneity in genetic syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz F.L. Pegoraro

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: this study aimed to investigate the cognitive and behavioral profiles, as well as the psychiatric symptoms and disorders in children with three different genetic syndromes with similar sociocultural and socioeconomic backgrounds. METHODS: thirty-four children aged 6 to 16 years, with Williams-Beuren syndrome (n = 10, Prader-Willi syndrome (n = 11, and Fragile X syndrome (n = 13 from the outpatient clinics of Child Psychiatry and Medical Genetics Department were cognitively assessed through the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC-III. Afterwards, a full-scale intelligence quotient (IQ, verbal IQ, performance IQ, standard subtest scores, as well as frequency of psychiatric symptoms and disorders were compared among the three syndromes. RESULTS: significant differences were found among the syndromes concerning verbal IQ and verbal and performance subtests. Post-hoc analysis demonstrated that vocabulary and comprehension subtest scores were significantly higher in Williams-Beuren syndrome in comparison with Prader-Willi and Fragile X syndromes, and block design and object assembly scores were significantly higher in Prader-Willi syndrome compared with Williams-Beuren and Fragile X syndromes. Additionally, there were significant differences between the syndromes concerning behavioral features and psychiatric symptoms. The Prader-Willi syndrome group presented a higher frequency of hyperphagia and self-injurious behaviors. The Fragile X syndrome group showed a higher frequency of social interaction deficits; such difference nearly reached statistical significance. CONCLUSION: the three genetic syndromes exhibited distinctive cognitive, behavioral, and psychiatric patterns.

  14. Genetic heterogeneity of Usher syndrome type II.

    OpenAIRE

    Pieke Dahl, S; Kimberling, WJ; Gorin, MB; Weston, MD; Furman, JM; Pikus, A; Moller, C

    1993-01-01

    Usher syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterised by retinitis pigmentosa and congenital sensorineural hearing loss. A gene for Usher syndrome type II (USH2) has been localised to chromosome 1q32-q41. DNA from a family with four of seven sibs affected with clinical characteristics of Usher syndrome type II was genotyped using markers spanning the 1q32-1q41 region. These included D1S70 and D1S81, which are believed to flank USH2. Genotypic results and subsequent linkage analysis ...

  15. The changing face of Usher syndrome: clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Mazal; Bitner-Glindzicz, Maria; Luxon, Linda

    2007-02-01

    Usher syndrome is both genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous. Traditionally, the condition has been classified into three clinical types, differentiated by the severity and progression of the hearing impairment and by the presence or absence of vestibular symptoms. Recent advances in molecular genetics have enabled researchers to study the phenotypic expression in confirmed molecular groups of Usher. In response to the expansion of clinical and genetic information on Usher, we report an up to date review of the different clinical forms of Usher in known molecular groups and use the emerging evidence to appraise the diagnostic utility of the traditional classification of Usher. Our findings undermine the traditional view that the clinical types of Usher have distinct genetic causes. The pleiotropic effects of some of the major causes of Usher lead to considerable overlap between the different clinical types, with very little evidence for phenotypic-genotypic correlations. The novel synthesis emerging from this review suggests more productive approaches to the diagnosis of Usher in hearing-impaired children which would provide more accurate prognostic information to families.

  16. Stiff Person Syndrome: A Rare Neurological Disorder, Heterogeneous in Clinical Presentation and Not Easy to Treat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Buechner

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Stiff person syndrome (SPS is a rare neurological disorder characterized by progressive rigidity of axial and limb muscles associated with painful spasms. SPS can be classified into classic SPS, paraneoplastic SPS, and SPS variants. Its underlying pathogenesis is probably autoimmune, as in most cases antibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD are observed. Similarly, paraneoplastic SPS is usually linked to anti-amphiphysin antibodies. Treatment is based on drugs enhancing gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA transmission and immunomodulatory agents. Case Series. Patient 1 is a 45-year-old male affected by the classic SPS, Patient 2 is a 73-year-old male affected by paraneoplastic SPS, and Patient 3 is a 68-year-old male affected by the stiff limb syndrome, a SPS variant where symptoms are confined to the limbs. Symptoms, diagnostic findings, and clinical course were extremely variable in the three patients, and treatment was often unsatisfactory and not well tolerated, thus reducing patient compliance. Clinical manifestations also included some unusual features such as recurrent vomiting and progressive dysarthria. Conclusions. SPS is a rare disorder that causes significant disability. Because of its extensive clinical variability, a multitask and personalized treatment is indicated. A clearer understanding of uncommon clinical features and better-tolerated therapeutic strategies are still needed.

  17. Bicuspid aortic valve syndrome and fibrillinopathies: potential impact on clinical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosina De Cario

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV is a common heterogeneous disorder whose natural history is determined by hemodynamic valvular impairment and/or increased prevalence of aortic abnormalities ranging from dilatation to aneurysm and dissection. BAV-related aortopathy is frequently associated with relevant aortic pathologic changes leading to structural alterations, characteristic degenerative lesions and histological changes of the aorta very similar to those identified and described in patients with Marfan syndrome (MFS, an inherited connective tissue disorder associated with mutations in fibrillin 1 (FBN1 gene in more than 90% of patients. Recently, a 4-fold increase in the prevalence of BAV in MFS patients has been reported. Subsequently, pathogenetic FBN1 mutations in patients with BAV and aortic dilatation/aneurysm in whom MFS and other more severe type 1 fibrillinopathies were clinically excluded have been identified. In this review we discuss how this evidence, together with that of the wide heterogeneity in pathogenetic mechanisms of BAV-related aortopathy, may impact the clinical management of BAV.

  18. Heterogeneous response to X-ray and ultraviolet light irradiations of cultured skin fibroblasts in two families with Gardner's Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinsella, T.J.; Little, J.B.; Nove, J.; Weichselbaum, R.R.; Li, F.P.; Meyer, R.J.; Marchetto, D.J.; Patterson, W.B.

    1982-01-01

    A heterogeneous response to X-ray and far UV (254 nm) light irradiations was found in cultured skin fibroblast lines from 2 separate families with Gardner's syndrome. When compared to 2 normal control cultures and cultures from 2 patients with nonfamilial colon cancer, cultures from 4 clinically affected members of family 1 showed increased sensitivity to the lethal effects of both X-ray and UV light irradiations. These cells also showed a delayed pattern of X-ray potentially lethal damage repair (PLDR) and absent UV PLDR. In contrast, cultures from 3 members of family 2 (2 of whom were clinically affected) showed a normal response of survival and PLDR to both X-ray and UV light irradiations. Thus increased sensitivity of cultured skin fibroblasts to X-ray and UV light irradiations was not a consistent in vitro finding in patients with Gardner's syndrome. However, in families with Gardner's syndrome who demonstrate in vitro radiosensitivity, additional studies are needed to assess the usefulness of these techniques in detecting affected individuals prior to the development of colon carcinoma and other manifestations

  19. [Gene mutation and clinical phenotype analysis of patients with Noonan syndrome and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X H; Ding, W W; Han, L; Liu, X R; Xiao, Y Y; Yang, J; Mo, Y

    2017-10-02

    Objective: To analyze the gene mutations and clinical features of patients with Noonan syndrome and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Method: Determined the mutation domain in five cases diagnosed with Noonan syndrome and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and identified the relationship between the mutant domain and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy by searching relevant articles in pubmed database. Result: Three mutant genes (PTPN11 gene in chromosome 12, RIT1 gene in chromosome 1 and RAF1 gene in chromosome 3) in five cases all had been reported to be related to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The reported hypertrophic cardiomyopathy relevant genes MYPN, MYH6 and MYBP3 had also been found in case 1 and 2. Patients with same gene mutation had different clinical manifestations. Both case 4 and 5 had RAF1 mutation (c.770C>T). However, case 4 had special face, low IQ, mild pulmonary artery stenosis, and only mild ventricular hypertrophy. Conclusion: Noonan syndrome is a genetic heterogeneity disease. Our study identified specific gene mutations that could result in Noonan syndrome with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy through molecular biology methods. The results emphasize the importance of gene detection in the management of Noonan syndrome.

  20. Relationship of renal insufficiency and clinical features or comorbidities with clinical outcome in patients hospitalised for acute heart failure syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajimoto, Katsuya; Sato, Naoki; Takano, Teruo

    2017-12-01

    Renal insufficiency is a well-known predictor of adverse events in patients with acute heart failure syndromes (AHFS). However, it remains unclear whether there are subgroups of AHFS patients in whom renal insufficiency is related to a higher risk of adverse events because of the heterogeneity of this patient population. Therefore, we investigated the relationship between renal insufficiency, clinical features or comorbidities, and the risk of adverse events in patients with AHFS. Of 4842 patients enrolled in the Acute Decompensated Heart Failure Syndromes (ATTEND) registry, 4628 patients (95.6%) were evaluated in the present study in order to assess the relationship of renal insufficiency and clinical features or comorbidities with all-cause mortality after admission. Renal insufficiency was defined as an estimated creatinine clearance of ⩽40 mL/min (calculated by the Cockcroft-Gault formula) at admission. The median follow-up period after admission was 524 (391-789) days. The all-cause mortality rate after admission was significantly higher in patients with renal insufficiency (36.7%) than in patients without renal insufficiency (14.4%). Stratified analysis was performed in order to explore the heterogeneity of the influence of renal insufficiency on all-cause mortality. This analysis revealed that an ischaemic aetiology and a history of diabetes, atrial fibrillation, serum sodium, and anaemia at admission had significant influences on the relationship between renal insufficiency and all-cause mortality. The present study demonstrated that the relationship between renal insufficiency and all-cause mortality of AHFS patients varies markedly with clinical features or comorbidities and the mode of presentation due to the heterogeneity of this patient population.

  1. Usher syndrome in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shzeena, Dad; Rendtorff, Nanna Dahl; Tranebjærg, Lisbeth

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Usher syndrome (USH) is a genetically heterogeneous deafness-blindness syndrome, divided into three clinical subtypes: USH1, USH2 and USH3. METHODS: Mutations in 21 out of 26 investigated Danish unrelated individuals with USH were identified, using a combination of molecular diagnostic...

  2. Molecular and clinical characterization of cardio-facio-cutaneous (CFC) syndrome: overlapping clinical manifestations with Costello syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Narumi, Yoko; Aoki, Yoko; Niihori, Tetsuya; Neri, Giovanni; Cave, Helene; Verloes, Alain; Nava, Caroline; Kavamura, Maria Ines; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Kurosawa, Kenji; Hennekam, Raoul C. M.; Wilson, Louise C.; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Lapunzina, Pablo; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Makita, Yoshio; Kondo, Ikuko; Tsuchiya, Shigeru; Ito, Etsuro; Sameshima, Kiyoko; Kato, Kumi; Kure, Shigeo; Matsubara, Yokhi

    2007-01-01

    Cardio-facio-cutaneous (CFC) syndrome is a multiple congenital anomaly/mental retardation syndrome characterized by heart defects, a distinctive facial appearance, ectodermal abnormalities and mental retardation. Clinically, it overlaps with both Noonan syndrome and Costello syndrome, which are

  3. Usher syndrome clinical types I and II: could ocular symptoms and signs differentiate between the two types?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsilou, Ekaterini T; Rubin, Benjamin I; Caruso, Rafael C; Reed, George F; Pikus, Anita; Hejtmancik, James F; Iwata, Fumino; Redman, Joy B; Kaiser-Kupfer, Muriel I

    2002-04-01

    Usher syndrome types I and II are clinical syndromes with substantial genetic and clinical heterogeneity. We undertook the current study in order to identify ocular symptoms and signs that could differentiate between the two types. Sixty-seven patients with Usher syndrome were evaluated. Based on audiologic and vestibular findings, patients were classified as either Usher type I or II. The severity of the ocular signs and symptoms present in each type were compared. Visual acuity, visual field area, electroretinographic amplitude, incidence of cataract and macular lesions were not significantly different between Usher types I and II. However, the ages when night blindness was perceived and retinitis pigmentosa was diagnosed differed significantly between the two types. There seems to be some overlap between types I and II of Usher syndrome in regard to the ophthalmologic findings. However, night blindness appears earlier in Usher type I (although the difference in age of appearance appears to be less dramatic than previously assumed). Molecular elucidation of Usher syndrome may serve as a key to understanding these differences and, perhaps, provide a better tool for use in clinical diagnosis, prognosis and genetic counseling.

  4. Clinical Heterogeneity in two patients with Noonan-like Syndrome associated with the same SHOC2 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capalbo, Donatella; Scala, Maria Giuseppa; Melis, Daniela; Minopoli, Giorgia; Improda, Nicola; Palamaro, Loredana; Pignata, Claudio; Salerno, Mariacarolina

    2012-09-20

    Noonan-like syndrome with loose anagen hair (NS/LAH; OMIM #607721) has been recently related to the invariant c.4A > G missense change in SHOC2. It is characterized by features reminiscent of Noonan syndrome. Ectodermal involvement, short stature associated to growth hormone (GH) deficiency (GHD), and cognitive deficits are common features. We compare in two patients with molecularly confirmed NS/LAH diagnosis, the clinical phenotype and pathogenetic mechanism underlying short stature. In particular, while both the patients exhibited a severe short stature, GH/IGFI axis functional evaluation revealed a different pathogenetic alteration, suggesting in one patient an upstream alteration (typical GHD) and in the other one a peripheral GH insensitivity.

  5. Intra-tumor heterogeneity in head and neck cancer and its clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmund A. Mroz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The presence of heritable differences among cancer cells within a tumor, called intra-tumor genetic heterogeneity, has long been suspected of playing a role in poor responses to therapy. Research over the past decade has documented the existence of such heterogeneity within tumors of individual patients and documented its potential clinical significance. The research methods for identifying this heterogeneity were not, however, readily adaptable to widespread clinical application. After a brief review of this background, we describe the development of a measure of intra-tumor genetic heterogeneity, based on whole-exome sequencing of individual tumor samples, that could be applied to biopsy specimens in a clinical setting. This measure has now been used in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC to document, for the first time, a relation of high intra-tumor genetic heterogeneity to shorter overall survival in a large, multi-institutional study. The implications of heterogeneity for research and clinical care thus now need to be addressed. Keywords: Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, Intra-tumor genetic heterogeneity, Next-generation sequencing, Targeted therapy

  6. Clinical and electromyographic criteria for the diagnosis of hereditary myotonic syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Fedotov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary myotonic syndromes (HMS are a group of genetically heterogeneous diseases of the chlorine and sodium ion channels (channelopathies with evident clinical polymorphism and high prevalence in the population. The differential diagnosis of early‑stage NMS poses a challenge to clinicians to this day. The investigation has attempted to elaborate informative differentiating criteria on the basis of a clinical and electromyographic study of 2 groups of patients with hereditary Thomsen or Becker myotonia (n = 45 and myotonic dystrophy type 1 (n = 39 verified by DNA analysis of the CLCN1 and DMPK genes. Along with the clinical symptoms, there may be the value of M‑response amplitude decrement in rhythmic stimulation of the n. ulnaris and the duration of myotonic discharges at pin electromyography of the m. tibialis anterior.

  7. [The Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: hystory of a clinical hendiadys].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazzaventre, Cristina; Celletti, Claudia; Gobattoni, Paolo; Santilli, Valter; Camerota, Filippo

    2013-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of inherited connective tissue disorders characterized by joint hypermobility, skin hyperextensibility and tissue fragility, which results in easy bruising and abnormal scarring. The condition shows a phenotypic variance from milder to serious presentations. Complaints related to activity (hypermobility, dislocations, impaired balance), to pain (general pain, headache, jaw and tooth pain) and to skin (bruises, fragility, impaired wound healing) are frequent. It was first noted by Hippocrates in 400 BC in his writing 'Airs Water and Places' that the nomads Scythians had lax joints and multiple scars. Whereas the additional flexibility can give benefits in term of mobility and agility, adverse effects of tissue laxity and fragility can give rise to clinical consequences. We recognize that it is important that, in those hypermobility patients, who develop potentially debilitating symptoms of chronicfatigue or widespread pain, there should be prompt an appropriate intervention.

  8. Cerebro-fronto-facial syndrome type 3 with polymicrogyria: a clinical presentation of Baraitser-Winter syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eker, Hatice Koçak; Derinkuyu, Betül Emine; Ünal, Sevim; Masliah-Planchon, Julien; Drunat, Séverine; Verloes, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Baraitser-Winter syndrome (BRWS) is a rare condition affecting the development of the brain and the face. The most common characteristics are unusual facial appearance including hypertelorism and ptosis, ocular colobomas, hearing loss, impaired neuronal migration and intellectual disability. BRWS is caused by mutations in the ACTB and ACTG1 genes. Cerebro-fronto-facial syndrome (CFFS) is a clinically heterogeneous condition with distinct facial dysmorphism, and brain abnormalities. Three subtypes are identified. We report a female infant with striking facial features and brain anomalies (included polymicrogyria) that fit into the spectrum of the CFFS type 3 (CFFS3). She also had minor anomalies on her hands and feet, heart and kidney malformations, and recurrent infections. DNA investigations revealed c.586C>T mutation (p.Arg196Cys) in ACTB. This mutation places this patient in the spectrum of BRWS. The same mutation has been detected in a polymicrogyric patient reported previously in literature. We expand the malformation spectrum of BRWS/CFFS3, and present preliminary findings for phenotype-genotype correlation in this spectrum. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Waardenburg syndrome: A report of three cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghosh Sudip

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Waardenburg syndrome (WS is a rare autosomally inherited and genetically heterogeneous disorder of neural crest cell development with distinct cutaneous manifestations. Based on the clinical presentations, four subtypes of the disease are recognized. A careful clinical evaluation is required to differentiate various types of WS and other associated auditory-pigmentary syndromes. We describe a case series of WS to highlight the wide spectrum of manifestations of the syndrome including a rare association.

  10. Delirium followed by neuroleptic malignant syndrome in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Delirium and neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) are two uncommon syndromes that are often unrecognized or misdiagnosed by the primary physicians as functional psychiatric disorders. The infrequency and the heterogeneity of clinical manifestation, progression and outcome with which those diagnoses are ...

  11. Sjögren Syndrome Which Simulates Relapsing Remitting Multiple Sclerosis Clinical Features: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haluk Gümüş

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Sjögren syndrome (SS is a chronic, inflammatory, autoimmune disease. It emerges as a dry mouth and eyes (sicca symptoms because, it fundamentally affects exocrine glands, frequently, salivary gland and lachrymal gland. Neurological involvement in Sjögren syndrome is observed in the approximately 20-25% of cases. 87% of the neurological involvements are peripheral nervous system involvement and around 13% of the neurological involvements are central nervous system involvement. Cerebral involvement represents heterogeneous features in terms of both localization (focal or diffuse and progress of the statement (acute, progressive or reversible. Affected central nervous system can show clinical and radiological signs similar to Multiple sclerosis (MS. In this paper, the case, which has a complaint of difficulty in walking and instability and MS like lesions in brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and is diagnosed as Sjögren syndrome by further research, is discussed

  12. Clinical and Genetic Spectrum of Bartter Syndrome Type 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seys, Elsa; Andrini, Olga; Keck, Mathilde; Mansour-Hendili, Lamisse; Courand, Pierre-Yves; Simian, Christophe; Deschenes, Georges; Kwon, Theresa; Bertholet-Thomas, Aurélia; Bobrie, Guillaume; Borde, Jean Sébastien; Bourdat-Michel, Guylhène; Decramer, Stéphane; Cailliez, Mathilde; Krug, Pauline; Cozette, Paul; Delbet, Jean Daniel; Dubourg, Laurence; Chaveau, Dominique; Fila, Marc; Jourde-Chiche, Noémie; Knebelmann, Bertrand; Lavocat, Marie-Pierre; Lemoine, Sandrine; Djeddi, Djamal; Llanas, Brigitte; Louillet, Ferielle; Merieau, Elodie; Mileva, Maria; Mota-Vieira, Luisa; Mousson, Christiane; Nobili, François; Novo, Robert; Roussey-Kesler, Gwenaëlle; Vrillon, Isabelle; Walsh, Stephen B; Teulon, Jacques; Blanchard, Anne; Vargas-Poussou, Rosa

    2017-08-01

    Bartter syndrome type 3 is a clinically heterogeneous hereditary salt-losing tubulopathy caused by mutations of the chloride voltage-gated channel Kb gene ( CLCNKB ), which encodes the ClC-Kb chloride channel involved in NaCl reabsorption in the renal tubule. To study phenotype/genotype correlations, we performed genetic analyses by direct sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and retrospectively analyzed medical charts for 115 patients with CLCNKB mutations. Functional analyses were performed in Xenopus laevis oocytes for eight missense and two nonsense mutations. We detected 60 mutations, including 27 previously unreported mutations. Among patients, 29.5% had a phenotype of ante/neonatal Bartter syndrome (polyhydramnios or diagnosis in the first month of life), 44.5% had classic Bartter syndrome (diagnosis during childhood, hypercalciuria, and/or polyuria), and 26.0% had Gitelman-like syndrome (fortuitous discovery of hypokalemia with hypomagnesemia and/or hypocalciuria in childhood or adulthood). Nine of the ten mutations expressed in vitro decreased or abolished chloride conductance. Severe (large deletions, frameshift, nonsense, and essential splicing) and missense mutations resulting in poor residual conductance were associated with younger age at diagnosis. Electrolyte supplements and indomethacin were used frequently to induce catch-up growth, with few adverse effects. After a median follow-up of 8 (range, 1-41) years in 77 patients, chronic renal failure was detected in 19 patients (25%): one required hemodialysis and four underwent renal transplant. In summary, we report a genotype/phenotype correlation for Bartter syndrome type 3: complete loss-of-function mutations associated with younger age at diagnosis, and CKD was observed in all phenotypes. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  13. The heterogeneity of craniofacial morphology in Prader-Willi patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belengeanu, D; Bratu, Cristina; Stoian, Monica; Motoc, A; Ormerod, Eli; Podariu, Angela Codruţa; Farcaş, Simona; Andreescu, Nicoleta

    2012-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome is a complex genetic disorder with narrow spectrum of facial phenotypic signs, which make the clinical diagnosis difficult in some cases. There are several reports describing the craniofacial appearance of Prader-Willi patients, but there are only a few cephalometric studies for these patients. In this study were included 18 patients with Prader-Willi syndrome and a control group of 18 subjects of both sexes selected based on specific criteria. The cephalometric radiographs of the patients were taken using the standardized technique with centric teeth in occlusion and lips in relaxed position. Angular, horizontal and linear measurements were analyzed for the study group and for the control group. We established that in Prader-Willi patients, there is a decrease of the majority of parameters but the degree of this reduction varies widely between patients and clinically typical facies not always have smaller measurements which can be found in an unusual facies. Facial dysmorphism in Prader-Willi patients varies a group ranging from miss proportions that do not alter the facial architecture as regard of facial typology, skeletal class and pattern of development to a severe disturbance of those. There is a degree of clinical heterogeneity between subjects with Prader-Willi syndrome on clinical evaluation and cephalometric study confirms the heterogeneity for this patients. Because the identification of smaller dimensions for majority of parameters in children and adults, the possibility of developmental delay or growth retardation delay can be excluded. These findings are important for the orthodontist for optimum timing of orthodontic management of patients with Prader-Willi syndrome.

  14. Noonan syndrome - a new survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafazoli, Alireza; Eshraghi, Peyman; Koleti, Zahra Kamel; Abbaszadegan, Mohammadreza

    2017-02-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) is an autosomal dominant disorder with vast heterogeneity in clinical and genetic features. Various symptoms have been reported for this abnormality such as short stature, unusual facial characteristics, congenital heart abnormalities, developmental complications, and an elevated tumor incidence rate. Noonan syndrome shares clinical features with other rare conditions, including LEOPARD syndrome, cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome, Noonan-like syndrome with loose anagen hair, and Costello syndrome. Germline mutations in the RAS-MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) signal transduction pathway are responsible for NS and other related disorders. Noonan syndrome diagnosis is primarily based on clinical features, but molecular testing should be performed to confirm it in patients. Due to the high number of genes associated with NS and other RASopathy disorders, next-generation sequencing is the best choice for diagnostic testing. Patients with NS also have higher risk for leukemia and specific solid tumors. Age-specific guidelines for the management of NS are available.

  15. Clinical heterogeneity in newly diagnosed Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, Bart; Speelman, Johannes D.; de Haan, Rob J.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine clinical heterogeneity in newly diagnosed Parkinson's disease using cluster analysis and to describe the subgroups in terms of impairment, disability, perceived quality of life, and use of dopaminergic therapy. METHODS: We conducted a k-means cluster analysis in a prospective

  16. Overview on Clinical Relevance of Intra-Tumor Heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanta, Giorgio; Bonin, Serena

    2018-01-01

    Today, clinical evaluation of tumor heterogeneity is an emergent issue to improve clinical oncology. In particular, intra-tumor heterogeneity (ITH) is closely related to cancer progression, resistance to therapy, and recurrences. It is interconnected with complex molecular mechanisms including spatial and temporal phenomena, which are often peculiar for every single patient. This review tries to describe all the types of ITH including morphohistological ITH, and at the molecular level clonal ITH derived from genomic instability and nonclonal ITH derived from microenvironment interaction. It is important to consider the different types of ITH as a whole for any patient to investigate on cancer progression, prognosis, and treatment opportunities. From a practical point of view, analytical methods that are widely accessible today, or will be in the near future, are evaluated to investigate the complex pattern of ITH in a reproducible way for a clinical application.

  17. Overview on Clinical Relevance of Intra-Tumor Heterogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Stanta

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Today, clinical evaluation of tumor heterogeneity is an emergent issue to improve clinical oncology. In particular, intra-tumor heterogeneity (ITH is closely related to cancer progression, resistance to therapy, and recurrences. It is interconnected with complex molecular mechanisms including spatial and temporal phenomena, which are often peculiar for every single patient. This review tries to describe all the types of ITH including morphohistological ITH, and at the molecular level clonal ITH derived from genomic instability and nonclonal ITH derived from microenvironment interaction. It is important to consider the different types of ITH as a whole for any patient to investigate on cancer progression, prognosis, and treatment opportunities. From a practical point of view, analytical methods that are widely accessible today, or will be in the near future, are evaluated to investigate the complex pattern of ITH in a reproducible way for a clinical application.

  18. Phelan-McDermid syndrome data network: Integrating patient reported outcomes with clinical notes and curated genetic reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothari, Cartik; Wack, Maxime; Hassen-Khodja, Claire; Finan, Sean; Savova, Guergana; O'Boyle, Megan; Bliss, Geraldine; Cornell, Andria; Horn, Elizabeth J; Davis, Rebecca; Jacobs, Jacquelyn; Kohane, Isaac; Avillach, Paul

    2017-09-01

    The heterogeneity of patient phenotype data are an impediment to the research into the origins and progression of neuropsychiatric disorders. This difficulty is compounded in the case of rare disorders such as Phelan-McDermid Syndrome (PMS) by the paucity of patient clinical data. PMS is a rare syndromic genetic cause of autism and intellectual deficiency. In this paper, we describe the Phelan-McDermid Syndrome Data Network (PMS_DN), a platform that facilitates research into phenotype-genotype correlation and progression of PMS by: a) integrating knowledge of patient phenotypes extracted from Patient Reported Outcomes (PRO) data and clinical notes-two heterogeneous, underutilized sources of knowledge about patient phenotypes-with curated genetic information from the same patient cohort and b) making this integrated knowledge, along with a suite of statistical tools, available free of charge to authorized investigators on a Web portal https://pmsdn.hms.harvard.edu. PMS_DN is a Patient Centric Outcomes Research Initiative (PCORI) where patients and their families are involved in all aspects of the management of patient data in driving research into PMS. To foster collaborative research, PMS_DN also makes patient aggregates from this knowledge available to authorized investigators using distributed research networks such as the PCORnet PopMedNet. PMS_DN is hosted on a scalable cloud based environment and complies with all patient data privacy regulations. As of October 31, 2016, PMS_DN integrates high-quality knowledge extracted from the clinical notes of 112 patients and curated genetic reports of 176 patients with preprocessed PRO data from 415 patients. © 2017 The Authors. American Journal of Medical Genetics Part B: Neuropsychiatric Genetics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. CLINICAL CASE OF PARKES-WEBER-RUBASHOV SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhdonec S. V.

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A clinical case of one variant of congenital venous angiodysplasia – Parkes Weber-Rubashov syndrome of the right lower extremity is presented in the article. The features of its clinical presentation and diagnosis difficulties are described. The analysis of the scientific data and own clinical observation showed that Parkes Weber-Rubashov syndrome belongs to the rare congenital disease of the vascular system, in some cases with the absence of typical clinical manifestations and combination with other disorders of the venous system. The best method for diagnosing the syndrome is radiopaque arteriography. The separation of the patent’s arteriovenous fistulas is justified as a radical method of its surgical treatment.

  20. Horner syndrome: clinical perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanagalingam, Sivashakthi; Miller, Neil R

    2015-01-01

    Horner syndrome consists of unilateral ptosis, an ipsilateral miotic but normally reactive pupil, and in some cases, ipsilateral facial anhidrosis, all resulting from damage to the ipsilateral oculosympathetic pathway. Herein, we review the clinical signs and symptoms that can aid in the diagnosis and localization of a Horner syndrome as well as the causes of the condition. We emphasize that pharmacologic testing can confirm its presence and direct further testing and management. PMID:28539793

  1. Clinical update on metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Diego Hernández-Camacho

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome has been defined as a global issue since it affects a lot of people. Numerous factors are involved in metabolic syndrome development. It has been described that metabolic syndrome has negative consequences on health. Consequently, a lot of treatments have been proposed to palliate it such as drugs, surgery or life style changes where nutritional habits have shown to be an important point in its management. The current study reviews the literature existing about the actual epidemiology of metabolic syndrome, the components involucrate in its appearance and progression, the clinical consequences of metabolic syndrome and the nutritional strategies reported in its remission. A bibliographic search in PubMed and Medline was performed to identify eligible studies. Authors obtained that metabolic syndrome is present in population from developed and undeveloped areas in a huge scale. Environmental and genetic elements are involucrate in metabolic syndrome development. Metabolic syndrome exponentially increased risk of cardiovascular disease, some types of cancers, diabetes mellitus type 2, sleep disturbances, etc. Nutritional treatments play a crucial role in metabolic syndrome prevention, treatment and recovery.

  2. Clinical features and pathophysiology of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome – current state of the art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinus, Johan; Moseley, G. Lorimer; Birklein, Frank; Baron, Ralf; Maihöfner, Christian; Kingery, Wade S.; van Hilten, Jacobus J.

    2017-01-01

    That a minor injury can trigger a complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) - multiple system dysfunction, severe and often chronic pain and disability - has fascinated scientists and perplexed clinicians for decades. However, substantial advances across several medical disciplines have recently increased our understanding of CRPS. Compelling evidence implicates biological pathways that underlie aberrant inflammation, vasomotor dysfunction, and maladaptive neuroplasticity in the clinical features of CRPS. Collectively, the evidence points to CRPS being a multifactorial disorder that is associated with an aberrant host response to tissue injury. Varying susceptibility to perturbed regulation of any of the underlying biological pathways probably accounts for the clinical heterogeneity of CRPS. PMID:21683929

  3. Marfan Syndrome: A Clinical Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitterman, Adam D; Sponseller, Paul D

    2017-09-01

    Marfan syndrome is a connective tissue disorder that can affect many organ systems. Affected patients present with orthopaedic manifestations of the syndrome during all phases of life. Pain caused by musculoskeletal abnormalities often requires definitive orthopaedic treatment. Orthopaedic surgeons must understand the phenotypes of Marfan syndrome so they can recognize when screening is warranted and can appropriately address the skeletal manifestations. Through medical advancements, patients with Marfan syndrome are living longer and more active lives. Knowledge of the latest diagnostic criteria for the disorder, as well as of advances in understanding the skeletal phenotype, clinical trials of medication therapy, and lifestyle considerations is important for orthopaedic surgeons who treat these patients because these clinicians often are the first to suspect Marfan syndrome and recommend screening.

  4. Relationship between Fatigue and Gait Abnormality in Joint Hypermobility Syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Hypermobility Type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celletti, Claudia; Galli, Manuela; Cimolin, Veronica; Castori, Marco; Albertini, Giorgio; Camerota, Filippo

    2012-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of inherited connective tissue disorders characterised by joint hypermobility, skin hyperextensibility and tissue fragility. It has recently been shown that muscle weakness occurs frequently in EDS, and that fatigue is a common and clinically important symptom. The…

  5. POLG1 mutations and stroke like episodes: a distinct clinical entity rather than an atypical MELAS syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheldi, Antonella; Ronchi, Dario; Bordoni, Andreina; Bordo, Bianca; Lanfranconi, Silvia; Bellotti, Maria Grazia; Corti, Stefania; Lucchini, Valeria; Sciacco, Monica; Moggio, Maurizio; Baron, Pierluigi; Comi, Giacomo Pietro; Colombo, Antonio; Bersano, Anna

    2013-01-15

    POLG1 mutations have been associated with MELAS-like phenotypes. However given several clinical differences it is unknown whether POLG1 mutations are possible causes of MELAS or give raise to a distinct clinical and genetic entity, named POLG1-associated encephalopathy. We describe a 74 years old man carrying POLG1 mutations presenting with strokes, myopathy and ragged red fibers with some atypical aspects for MELAS such as late onset, lack of cerebral calcification and presence of frontal and occipital MRI lesions better consistent with the POLG associated-encephalopathy spectrum. The lack of available data hampers a definite diagnosis in our patient as well as makes it difficult to compare MELAS, which is a clearly defined clinical syndrome, with POLG1-associated encephalopathy, which is so far a purely molecularly defined syndrome with a quite heterogeneous clinical picture. However, the present report contributes to expand the phenotypic spectrum of POLG1 mutations underlining the importance of searching POLG1 mutations in patients with mitochondrial signs and MELAS like phenotypes but negative for common mtDNA mutations.

  6. Noonan syndrome – a new survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafazoli, Alireza; Eshraghi, Peyman; Koleti, Zahra Kamel

    2016-01-01

    Noonan syndrome (NS) is an autosomal dominant disorder with vast heterogeneity in clinical and genetic features. Various symptoms have been reported for this abnormality such as short stature, unusual facial characteristics, congenital heart abnormalities, developmental complications, and an elevated tumor incidence rate. Noonan syndrome shares clinical features with other rare conditions, including LEOPARD syndrome, cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome, Noonan-like syndrome with loose anagen hair, and Costello syndrome. Germline mutations in the RAS-MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) signal transduction pathway are responsible for NS and other related disorders. Noonan syndrome diagnosis is primarily based on clinical features, but molecular testing should be performed to confirm it in patients. Due to the high number of genes associated with NS and other RASopathy disorders, next-generation sequencing is the best choice for diagnostic testing. Patients with NS also have higher risk for leukemia and specific solid tumors. Age-specific guidelines for the management of NS are available. PMID:28144274

  7. Clinical and molecular phenotype of Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Gillian; Patrick, Teresa; Parmar, Rekha; Taylor, Claire F; Aeby, Alec; Aicardi, Jean; Artuch, Rafael; Montalto, Simon Attard; Bacino, Carlos A; Barroso, Bruno; Baxter, Peter; Benko, Willam S; Bergmann, Carsten; Bertini, Enrico; Biancheri, Roberta; Blair, Edward M; Blau, Nenad; Bonthron, David T; Briggs, Tracy; Brueton, Louise A; Brunner, Han G; Burke, Christopher J; Carr, Ian M; Carvalho, Daniel R; Chandler, Kate E; Christen, Hans-Jurgen; Corry, Peter C; Cowan, Frances M; Cox, Helen; D'Arrigo, Stefano; Dean, John; De Laet, Corinne; De Praeter, Claudine; Dery, Catherine; Ferrie, Colin D; Flintoff, Kim; Frints, Suzanna G M; Garcia-Cazorla, Angels; Gener, Blanca; Goizet, Cyril; Goutieres, Francoise; Green, Andrew J; Guet, Agnes; Hamel, Ben C J; Hayward, Bruce E; Heiberg, Arvid; Hennekam, Raoul C; Husson, Marie; Jackson, Andrew P; Jayatunga, Rasieka; Jiang, Yong-Hui; Kant, Sarina G; Kao, Amy; King, Mary D; Kingston, Helen M; Klepper, Joerg; van der Knaap, Marjo S; Kornberg, Andrew J; Kotzot, Dieter; Kratzer, Wilfried; Lacombe, Didier; Lagae, Lieven; Landrieu, Pierre Georges; Lanzi, Giovanni; Leitch, Andrea; Lim, Ming J; Livingston, John H; Lourenco, Charles M; Lyall, E G Hermione; Lynch, Sally A; Lyons, Michael J; Marom, Daphna; McClure, John P; McWilliam, Robert; Melancon, Serge B; Mewasingh, Leena D; Moutard, Marie-Laure; Nischal, Ken K; Ostergaard, John R; Prendiville, Julie; Rasmussen, Magnhild; Rogers, R Curtis; Roland, Dominique; Rosser, Elisabeth M; Rostasy, Kevin; Roubertie, Agathe; Sanchis, Amparo; Schiffmann, Raphael; Scholl-Burgi, Sabine; Seal, Sunita; Shalev, Stavit A; Corcoles, C Sierra; Sinha, Gyan P; Soler, Doriette; Spiegel, Ronen; Stephenson, John B P; Tacke, Uta; Tan, Tiong Yang; Till, Marianne; Tolmie, John L; Tomlin, Pam; Vagnarelli, Federica; Valente, Enza Maria; Van Coster, Rudy N A; Van der Aa, Nathalie; Vanderver, Adeline; Vles, Johannes S H; Voit, Thomas; Wassmer, Evangeline; Weschke, Bernhard; Whiteford, Margo L; Willemsen, Michel A A; Zankl, Andreas; Zuberi, Sameer M; Orcesi, Simona; Fazzi, Elisa; Lebon, Pierre; Crow, Yanick J

    2007-10-01

    Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome (AGS) is a genetic encephalopathy whose clinical features mimic those of acquired in utero viral infection. AGS exhibits locus heterogeneity, with mutations identified in genes encoding the 3'-->5' exonuclease TREX1 and the three subunits of the RNASEH2 endonuclease complex. To define the molecular spectrum of AGS, we performed mutation screening in patients, from 127 pedigrees, with a clinical diagnosis of the disease. Biallelic mutations in TREX1, RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, and RNASEH2C were observed in 31, 3, 47, and 18 families, respectively. In five families, we identified an RNASEH2A or RNASEH2B mutation on one allele only. In one child, the disease occurred because of a de novo heterozygous TREX1 mutation. In 22 families, no mutations were found. Null mutations were common in TREX1, although a specific missense mutation was observed frequently in patients from northern Europe. Almost all mutations in RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, and RNASEH2C were missense. We identified an RNASEH2C founder mutation in 13 Pakistani families. We also collected clinical data from 123 mutation-positive patients. Two clinical presentations could be delineated: an early-onset neonatal form, highly reminiscent of congenital infection seen particularly with TREX1 mutations, and a later-onset presentation, sometimes occurring after several months of normal development and occasionally associated with remarkably preserved neurological function, most frequently due to RNASEH2B mutations. Mortality was correlated with genotype; 34.3% of patients with TREX1, RNASEH2A, and RNASEH2C mutations versus 8.0% RNASEH2B mutation-positive patients were known to have died (P=.001). Our analysis defines the phenotypic spectrum of AGS and suggests a coherent mutation-screening strategy in this heterogeneous disorder. Additionally, our data indicate that at least one further AGS-causing gene remains to be identified.

  8. Marfan Syndrome: Clinical, Surgical, and Anesthetic Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellano, José M; Silvay, George; Castillo, Javier G

    2014-09-01

    Marfan syndrome is a multisystem connective tissue disorder, with primary involvement of the cardiovascular, ocular, and skeletal systems. This autosomal heritable disease is mainly attributable to a defect in the FBN1 gene. Clinical diagnosis of Marfan syndrome has been based on the Ghent criteria since 1996. In 2010, these criteria were updated, and the revised guidelines place more emphasis on aortic root dilation, ectopia lentis, and FBN1 mutation testing in the diagnostic assessment of Marfan syndrome. Among its many different clinical manifestations, cardiovascular involvement deserves special consideration, owing to its impact on prognosis. Recent molecular, surgical, and clinical research has yielded profound new insights into the pathological mechanisms that ultimately lead to tissue degradation and weakening of the aortic wall, which has led to exciting new treatment strategies. Furthermore, with the increasing life expectancy of patients with Marfan syndrome, there has been a subtle shift in the spectrum of medical problems. Consequently, this article focuses on recent advances to highlight their potential impact on future concepts of patient care from a clinical, surgical, and anesthetic perspective. © The Author(s) 2013.

  9. IMAGe syndrome: clinical and genetic implications based on investigations in three Japanese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Fumiko; Hamajima, Takashi; Hasegawa, Tomonobu; Amano, Naoko; Horikawa, Reiko; Nishimura, Gen; Nakashima, Shinichi; Fuke, Tomoko; Sano, Shinichirou; Fukami, Maki; Ogata, Tsutomu

    2014-05-01

    Arboleda et al. have recently shown that IMAGe (intra-uterine growth restriction, metaphyseal dysplasia, adrenal hypoplasia congenita and genital abnormalities) syndrome is caused by gain-of-function mutations of maternally expressed gene CDKN1C on chromosome 11p15.5. However, there is no other report describing clinical findings in patients with molecularly studied IMAGe syndrome. Here, we report clinical and molecular findings in Japanese patients. We studied a 46,XX patient aged 8·5 years (case 1) and two 46,XY patients aged 16·5 and 15·0 years (cases 2 and 3). Clinical studies revealed not only IMAGe syndrome-compatible phenotypes in cases 1-3, but also hitherto undescribed findings including relative macrocephaly and apparently normal pituitary-gonadal endocrine function in cases 1-3, familial glucocorticoid deficiency (FGD)-like adrenal phenotype and the history of oligohydramnios in case 2, and arachnodactyly in case 3. Sequence analysis of CDKN1C, pyrosequencing-based methylation analysis of KvDMR1 and high-density oligonucleotide array comparative genome hybridization analysis for chromosome 11p15.5 were performed, showing an identical de novo and maternally inherited CDKN1C gain-of-function mutation (p.Asp274Asn) in cases 1 and 2, respectively, and no demonstrable abnormality in case 3. The results of cases 1 and 2 with CDKN1C mutation would argue the following: [1] relative macrocephaly is consistent with maternal expression of CDKN1C in most tissues and biparental expression of CDKN1C in the foetal brain; [2] FGD-like phenotype can result from CDKN1C mutation; and [3] genital abnormalities may primarily be ascribed to placental dysfunction. Furthermore, lack of CDKN1C mutation in case 3 implies genetic heterogeneity in IMAGe syndrome. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Cognitive and behavioral heterogeneity in genetic syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz F.L. Pegoraro

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: this study aimed to investigate the cognitive and behavioral profiles, as well as the psychiatric symptoms and disorders in children with three different genetic syndromes with similar sociocultural and socioeconomic backgrounds. Methods: thirty-four children aged 6 to 16 years, with Williams-Beuren syndrome (n = 10, Prader-Willi syndrome (n = 11, and Fragile X syndrome (n = 13 from the outpatient clinics of Child Psychiatry and Medical Genetics Department were cognitively assessed through the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC-III. Afterwards, a full-scale intelligence quotient (IQ, verbal IQ, performance IQ, standard subtest scores, as well as frequency of psychiatric symptoms and disorders were compared among the three syndromes. Results: significant differences were found among the syndromes concerning verbal IQ and verbal and performance subtests. Post-hoc analysis demonstrated that vocabulary and comprehension subtest scores were significantly higher in Williams-Beuren syndrome in comparison with Prader-Willi and Fragile X syndromes, and block design and object assembly scores were significantly higher in Prader-Willi syndrome compared with Williams-Beuren and Fragile X syndromes. Additionally, there were significant differences between the syndromes concerning behavioral features and psychiatric symptoms. The Prader-Willi syndrome group presented a higher frequency of hyperphagia and self-injurious behaviors. The Fragile X syndrome group showed a higher frequency of social interaction deficits; such difference nearly reached statistical significance. Conclusion: the three genetic syndromes exhibited distinctive cognitive, behavioral, and psychiatric patterns. Resumo: Objetivo: investigar o perfil cognitivo e comportamental, sintomas e transtornos psiquiátricos em crianças com três diferentes síndromes genéticas, com antecedentes socioculturais e socioeconômicos semelhantes. Métodos: trinta e quatro

  11. The Marfan syndrome genetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galina Pungerčič

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Marfan syndrome is an autosomal dominant heritable disorder of connective tissue. It is caused by mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene encoding glycoprotein fibrillin-1, a component of microfibrils of extracellular matrix. Patients with Marfan syndrome show wide spectra of clinical signs, primarily on skeletal, cardiovascular and ocular organ systems. Cardiovascular complications (especially aortic aneurysm and aortic dissection are the most common cause of mortality of Marfan syndrome patients. Discovering genotype-phenotype correlations is complicated because of the large number of mutations reported as well as clinical heterogeneity among individuals with the same mutation. Despite the progress in the knowledge of the molecular nature of Marfan syndrome the diagnosis is still based mainly on the clinical features in the different body systems.Conclusions: Early identification of patient with Marfan syndrome is of considerable importance because of appropriate treatment that can greatly improve life expectancy. Unfortunately, despite the improvement of diagnostic methods, medical and surgical therapy, the mortality due to undiagnosed Marfan syndrome is still high. The present article reviews the molecular genetic studies of Marfan syndrome since the discovery of the mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene.

  12. On heterogeneity of treatment effects and clinical freedom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacristán, J A; Avendaño-Solá, C

    2015-01-01

    Three decades ago, John R Hampton announced the death of clinical freedom. Since then, evidence-based medicine has been the predominant paradigm in clinical research. By applying a population-based approach, the randomised controlled trial has become the cornerstone for demonstrating the overall effect of a treatment and for developing guidelines. The new patient-centred medicine movement is rediscovering the important implications of heterogeneity of treatment effects for clinical practice and that a better understanding of such variability can contribute to improve health outcomes for individual patients through practicing a science-based clinical freedom. © 2015 The Authors. International Journal of Clinical Practice Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Genome-Wide Association Analysis Reveals Genetic Heterogeneity of Sjögren's Syndrome According to Ancestry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taylor, Kimberly E; Wong, Quenna; Levine, David M

    2017-01-01

    common protocol-directed methods. The aim of this study was to examine the genetic etiology of Sjögren's syndrome (SS) across ancestry and disease subsets. METHODS: We performed genome-wide association study analyses using SICCA subjects and external controls obtained from dbGaP data sets, one using all......OBJECTIVE: The Sjögren's International Collaborative Clinical Alliance (SICCA) is an international data registry and biorepository derived from a multisite observational study of participants in whom genotyping was performed on the Omni2.5M platform and who had undergone deep phenotyping using...... subphenotype distributions differ by ethnicity, and whether this contributes to the heterogeneity of genetic associations. RESULTS: We observed significant associations in established regions of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), IRF5, and STAT4 (P = 3 × 10(-42) , P = 3 × 10(-14) , and P = 9 × 10...

  14. A realistic closed-form radiobiological model of clinical tumor-control data incorporating intertumor heterogeneity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, Stephen A.; Hendry, Jolyon H.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the role of intertumor heterogeneity in clinical tumor control datasets and the relationship to in vitro measurements of tumor biopsy samples. Specifically, to develop a modified linear-quadratic (LQ) model incorporating such heterogeneity that it is practical to fit to clinical tumor-control datasets. Methods and Materials: We developed a modified version of the linear-quadratic (LQ) model for tumor control, incorporating a (lagged) time factor to allow for tumor cell repopulation. We explicitly took into account the interpatient heterogeneity in clonogen number, radiosensitivity, and repopulation rate. Using this model, we could generate realistic TCP curves using parameter estimates consistent with those reported from in vitro studies, subject to the inclusion of a radiosensitivity (or dose)-modifying factor. We then demonstrated that the model was dominated by the heterogeneity in α (tumor radiosensitivity) and derived an approximate simplified model incorporating this heterogeneity. This simplified model is expressible in a compact closed form, which it is practical to fit to clinical datasets. Using two previously analysed datasets, we fit the model using direct maximum-likelihood techniques and obtained parameter estimates that were, again, consistent with the experimental data on the radiosensitivity of primary human tumor cells. This heterogeneity model includes the same number of adjustable parameters as the standard LQ model. Results: The modified model provides parameter estimates that can easily be reconciled with the in vitro measurements. The simplified (approximate) form of the heterogeneity model is a compact, closed-form probit function that can readily be fitted to clinical series by conventional maximum-likelihood methodology. This heterogeneity model provides a slightly better fit to the datasets than the conventional LQ model, with the same numbers of fitted parameters. The parameter estimates of the clinically

  15. Joubert syndrome: Clinical manifestations and magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seung Cheol; Kim, In One; Yoon, Yong Kyu; Yeon, Kyung Mo; Kim, Woo Sun; Song, Jong Gi; Hwang, Yong Seung

    1994-01-01

    Joubert syndrome presents neonatal respiratory abnormalities and other clinical manifestations. Pathologically the patients show hypoplasia or agenesis of cerebellar vermis and other intracranial anomalies. Our purpose is to evaluate the clinical manifestations and MR findings of Joubert syndrome. Among the patient presenting with clinical stigmata of Joubert syndrome and agenesis of vermis on MR imaging, eight patients who did not satisfied the criteria of Dandy-Walker malformation, tectocerebellar dysraphia and rhombencephalosynapsis were selected. MR findings and clinical manifestation were analyzed. On MR imaging, agenesis of the cerebellar vermis (all cases), hypoplasia of the cerebellar peduncle (6 cases), fourth ventricular contour deformity (6 cases), tentorial elevation (4 caes), deformity of the lateral ventricles (4 cases), dysgenesis of the straight sinus (3 cases) were demonstrated. Other findings were abnormalities of corpus callosum (3 cases), falx anomalies (3 case), occipital encephalomeningocele (2 cases) and fluid collection in posterior cranial fossa (2 cases). Clinical manifestations were developmental delay (5 cases), abnormal eyeball movement (3 cases), hypotonia (2 cases), neonatal respiratory abnormality (2 cases), etc. Joubert syndrome showed various clinical manifestations and intracranial anomalies. MR imaging is an useful modality in detection of the cerebellar vermian agenesis and other anomalies of the patients

  16. DOORS syndrome: phenotype, genotype and comparison with Coffin-Siris syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campeau, Philippe M; Hennekam, Raoul C

    2014-09-01

    DOORS syndrome (Deafness, Onychodystrophy, Osteodystrophy, mental Retardation, Seizures) is characterized mainly by sensorineural deafness, shortened terminal phalanges with small nails of hands and feet, intellectual deficiency, and seizures. Half of the patients with all clinical features have mutations in TBC1D24. We review here the manifestations of patients clinically diagnosed with DOORS syndrome. In this cohort of 32 families (36 patients) we detected 13 individuals from 10 families with TBC1D24 mutations. Subsequent whole exome sequencing in the cohort showed the same de novoSMARCB1 mutation (c.1130G>A), known to cause Coffin-Siris syndrome, in two patients. Distinguishing features include retinal anomalies, Dandy-Walker malformation, scoliosis, rocker bottom feet, respiratory difficulties and absence of seizures, and 2-oxoglutaric aciduria in the patients with the SMARCB1 mutation. We briefly discuss the heterogeneity of the DOORS syndrome phenotype and the differential diagnosis of this condition. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Parkinsonian syndroms: Clinical phenotype, differential diagnosis and disease progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storch, A.

    2002-01-01

    Parkinsonian syndromes include idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD), other neurodegenerative diseases with parkinsonism, the so-called atypical parkinsonian syndromes, and symptomatic parkinsonian syndromes, such as Wilson's disease. IPD is the most frequent disease with parkinsonism as the main clinical feature and is responsible for approx. 80% of all parkinsonian syndromes. Atypical parkinsonian syndromes are the most important differential diagnoses of IPD. The two most frequent types are multiple system atrophy (MSA) and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). For clinical diagnosis it is essential to take a careful medical history and to examine the patients physically in regular intervals. However, various clinico-pathological studies have shown that approx. 25% of patients with clinical diagnosis of IPD may have other causes of parkinsonism. Selected technical investigations, in particular functional imaging of the central dopaminergic system using PET or SPECT, may help to make clinical diagnosis more secure. This paper reviews the clinical features and diagnostic findings in diseases with parkinsonism and summarises the difficulties in establishing early and differential diagnoses. (orig.) [de

  18. Development of a genotyping microarray for Usher syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cremers, F.P.M.; Kimberling, W.J.; Kulm, M.; Brouwer, A.P.M. de; Wijk, E. van; Brinke, H. te; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Hoefsloot, L.H.; Banfi, S.; Simonelli, F.; Fleischhauer, J.C.; Berger, W.; Kelley, P.M.; Haralambous, E.; Bitner-Glindzicz, M.; Webster, A.R.; Saihan, Z.; Baere, E. de; Leroy, B.P.; Silvestri, G.; McKay, G.J.; Koenekoop, R.K.; Millan, J.M.; Rosenberg, T.; Joensuu, T.; Sankila, E.M.; Weil, D.; Weston, M.D.; Wissinger, B.; Kremer, H.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Usher syndrome, a combination of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and sensorineural hearing loss with or without vestibular dysfunction, displays a high degree of clinical and genetic heterogeneity. Three clinical subtypes can be distinguished, based on the age of onset and severity of the

  19. Clinical Variability in a Family with an Ectodermal Dysplasia Syndrome and a Nonsense Mutation in the TP63 Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenkraft, Arik; Pode-Shakked, Ben; Goldstein, Nurit; Shpirer, Zvi; van Bokhoven, Hans; Anikster, Yair

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the TP63 gene have been associated with a variety of ectodermal dysplasia syndromes, among which the clinically overlapping Ankyloblepharon-Ectodermal defects-Cleft lip/palate (AEC) and the Rapp-Hodgkin syndromes. We report a multiplex nonconsanguineous family of Ashkenazi-Jewish descent, in which the index patient presented with a persistent scalp skin lesion, dystrophic nails and light thin hair. Further evaluation revealed over 10 affected individuals in the kindred, over four generations, exhibiting varying degrees of ectodermal involvement. Analysis of the TP63 gene from four of the patients and from two healthy individuals of the same family was performed. Gene sequencing of the patients revealed a nonsense mutation leading to a premature termination codon (PTC) (p.Gln16X). The same mutation was found in all tested affected individuals in the family, but gave rise to marked phenotypic variability with minor clinical manifestations in some individuals, underscoring the clinical heterogeneity associated with the recently described PTC-causing mutations.

  20. Development of a genotyping microarray for Usher syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Cremers, Frans P M; Kimberling, William J; Külm, Maigi; de Brouwer, Arjan P; van Wijk, Erwin; te Brinke, Heleen; Cremers, Cor W R J; Hoefsloot, Lies H; Banfi, Sandro; Simonelli, Francesca; Fleischhauer, Johannes C; Berger, Wolfgang; Kelley, Phil M; Haralambous, Elene; Bitner‐Glindzicz, Maria

    2006-01-01

    Background: Usher syndrome, a combination of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and sensorineural hearing loss with or without vestibular dysfunction, displays a high degree of clinical and genetic heterogeneity. Three clinical subtypes can be distinguished, based on the age of onset and severity of the hearing impairment, and the presence or absence of vestibular abnormalities. Thus far, eight genes have been implicated in the syndrome, together comprising 347 protein-coding exons. Methods: To im...

  1. Development of a genotyping microarray for Usher syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Cremers, F P M; et al; Fleischhauer, J C; Berger, W

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Usher syndrome, a combination of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and sensorineural hearing loss with or without vestibular dysfunction, displays a high degree of clinical and genetic heterogeneity. Three clinical subtypes can be distinguished, based on the age of onset and severity of the hearing impairment, and the presence or absence of vestibular abnormalities. Thus far, eight genes have been implicated in the syndrome, together comprising 347 protein-coding exons. METHODS: To improv...

  2. Cortical Thinning and Clinical Heterogeneity in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Mezzapesa, Domenico Maria; D?Errico, Eustachio; Tortelli, Rosanna; Distaso, Eugenio; Cortese, Rosa; Tursi, Marianna; Federico, Francesco; Zoccolella, Stefano; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Dicuonzo, Franca; Simone, Isabella Laura

    2013-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) has heterogeneous clinical features that could be translated into specific patterns of brain atrophy. In the current study we have evaluated the relationship between different clinical expressions of classical ALS and measurements of brain cortical thickness. Cortical thickness analysis was conducted from 3D-MRI using FreeSurfer software in 29 ALS patients and 20 healthy controls. We explored three clinical traits of the disease, subdividing the patients in...

  3. Silver-Russell syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shohela Akhter

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Silver-Russell syndrome is clinically and genetically a heterogeneous disorder. In most of the cases, etiology is unknown, only in 10% cases defect in chromosome 7 is identified. It bas distinctive facial features and asymmetric limbs. Most predominant symptom is growth failure. A case of Silver-Russell syndrome reported here who presented with growth failure, hemihypertrophy ofleft side oftbe body, dysmorphic facial profile and difficulty in speech. Counseling was done with the parents regarding the etiology, progression and outcome of the disease.

  4. Usher syndrome: molecular links of pathogenesis, proteins and pathways.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kremer, H.; Wijk, E. van; Marker, T.; Wolfrum, U.; Roepman, R.

    2006-01-01

    Usher syndrome is the most common form of deaf-blindness. The syndrome is both clinically and genetically heterogeneous, and to date, eight causative genes have been identified. The proteins encoded by these genes are part of a dynamic protein complex that is present in hair cells of the inner ear

  5. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome(s) mimicking child abuse: Is there an impact on clinical practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castori, Marco

    2015-12-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is a heterogeneous group of heritable connective tissue disorders characterized by increased fragility of various non-ossified tissues. It is usually ascertained due to abnormal skin texture, scarring complications, vascular fragility, or chronic symptoms, such as fatigue and musculoskeletal pain. Sometimes, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome remains undetected until the patient, usually in the pediatric age, shows extensive or severe mucocutaneous injuries after only minor traumas. In this scenario, the misdiagnosis of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome with child abuse is a possibility, as occasionally reported in the literature. Recently, more attention was posed by lay people between the possible association of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and bone fragility. Literature and personal experience show a strong association between Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, generalized joint hypermobility and reduced bone mass density in older children and adults, especially fertile women. The existence of a true increased risk of fracture in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is still a matter of debate in children and adults with little and conflicting evidence. In case of suspected child abuse, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is certainly on the differential for bruising, especially in EDS types with marked cutaneous and capillary involvement. In suspected child abuse cases, careful examination of the index case and her/his extended family is routine, as well as exclusion of other disorders such as osteogenesis imperfecta. The hypothesis of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome as an alternative explanation for infantile fractures remains speculative. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Perinatal clinical and imaging features of CLOVES syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Pineda, Israel [Virgen del Rocio Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Surgery, Seville (Spain); Fajardo, Manuel [Virgen del Rocio Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Seville (Spain); Chaudry, Gulraiz; Alomari, Ahmad I. [Children' s Hospital Boston and Harvard Medical School, Division of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2010-08-15

    We report a neonate with antenatal imaging features suggestive of CLOVES syndrome. Postnatal clinical and imaging findings confirmed the diagnosis, with the constellation of truncal overgrowth, cutaneous capillary malformation, lymphatic and musculoskeletal anomalies. The clinical, radiological and histopathological findings noted in this particular phenotype help differentiate it from other overgrowth syndromes with complex vascular anomalies. (orig.)

  7. Marfan syndrome: clinical diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, John C S

    2007-07-01

    Marfan syndrome is a multisystem connective tissue disorder usually associated with mutation in fibrillin, and occasionally with mutation in TGFBR1 or 2. The clinical diagnosis is made using the Ghent nosology, which will unequivocally diagnose or exclude Marfan syndrome in 86% of cases. Use of a care pathway can help implementation of the nosology in the clinic. The penetrance of some features is age dependent, so the nosology must be used with caution in children. Molecular testing may be helpful in this context. The nosology cannot be used in families with isolated aortic dissection, or with related conditions such as Loeys-Dietz syndrome, although it may help identify families for further diagnostic evaluation because they do not fulfill the nosology, despite a history of aneurysm. Prophylactic medical (eg beta-blockade) and surgical intervention is important in reducing the cardiovascular complications of Marfan syndrome. Musculoskeletal symptoms are common, although the pathophysiology is less clear--for example, the correlation between dural ectasia and back pain is uncertain. Symptoms in other systems require specialist review such as ophthalmology assessment of refractive errors and ectopia lentis. Pregnancy is a time of increased cardiovascular risk for women with Marfan syndrome, particularly if the aortic root exceeds 4 cm at the start of pregnancy. High-intensity static exercise should be discouraged although low-moderate intensity dynamic exercise may be beneficial. The diagnosis and management of Marfan syndrome requires a multidisciplinary team approach, in view of its multisystem effects and phenotypic variability.

  8. Clinical aspects of lower leg compartment syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, Johan Gerard Henric van den

    2004-01-01

    A compartment syndrome is a condition in which increased pressure within a limited space compromises the circulation and function of tissues within that space. Although pathofysiology is roughly similar in chronic exertional and acute compartment syndrome of the lower leg, the clinical

  9. Heterogeneity in Phenotype of Usher-Congenital Hyperinsulinism Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Mutair, Angham N.; Brusgaard, Klaus; Bin-Abbas, Bassam; Hussain, Khalid; Felimban, Naila; Al Shaikh, Adnan; Christesen, Henrik T.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the phenotype of 15 children with congenital hyperinsulinism (CHI) and profound hearing loss, known as Homozygous 11p15-p14 Deletion syndrome (MIM #606528). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Prospective clinical follow-up and genetic analysis by direct sequencing, multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification, and microsatellite markers. RESULTS Genetic testing identified the previous described homozygous deletion in 11p15, USH1C:c.(90+592)_ABCC8:c.(2694–528)del. Fourteen patients had severe CHI demanding near-total pancreatectomy. In one patient with mild, transient neonatal hypoglycemia and nonautoimmune diabetes at age 11 years, no additional mutations were found in HNF1A, HNF4A, GCK, INS, and INSR. Retinitis pigmentosa was found in two patients aged 9 and 13 years. No patients had enteropathy or renal tubular defects. Neuromotor development ranged from normal to severe delay with epilepsy. CONCLUSIONS The phenotype of Homozygous 11p15-p14 Deletion syndrome, or Usher-CHI syndrome, includes any severity of neonatal-onset CHI and severe, sensorineural hearing loss. Retinitis pigmentosa and nonautoimmune diabetes may occur in adolescence. PMID:23150283

  10. Clinical characteristics in Taiwanese women with polycystic ovary syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common hormonal endocrine disorders in women of reproductive age. It consists of a heterogeneous collection of signs and symptoms that together form a disorder spectrum. The diagnosis of PCOS is principally based on clinical and physical findings. The extent of metabolic abnormalities in women with PCOS varies with phenotype, body weight, age, and ethnicity. For general population, the prevalence of hyperandrogenism and oligomenorrhea decreases with age, while complications such as insulin resistance and other metabolic disturbances increase with age. Obese women with PCOS have a higher risk of developing oligomenorrhea, amenorrhea, hyperandrogenemia, insulin resistance, and lower luteinizing hormone (LH) to follicle stimulation hormone (FSH) ratios than non-obese women with PCOS. The LH to FSH ratio is a valuable diagnostic tool in evaluating Taiwanese women with PCOS, especially in the diagnosis of oligomenorrhea. Overweight/obesity is the major determinant of cardiovascular and metabolic disturbances in women of reproductive age. PMID:26473107

  11. Polycystic ovary syndrome and metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Aus Tariq

    2015-08-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a heterogeneous disorder, where the main clinical features include menstrual irregularities, sub-fertility, hyperandrogenism, and hirsutism. The prevalence of PCOS depends on ethnicity, environmental and genetic factors, as well as the criteria used to define it. On the other hand, metabolic syndrome is a constellation of metabolic disorders which include mainly abdominal obesity, insulin resistance, impaired glucose metabolism, hypertension and dyslipidaemia. These associated disorders directly increase the risk of Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DMT2), coronary heart disease (CHD), cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and endometrial cancer. Many patients with PCOS have features of metabolic syndrome such as visceral obesity, hyperinsulinaemia and insulin resistance. These place patients with PCOS under high risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD), Type 2 diabetes (DMT2) and gynecological cancer, in particular, endometrial cancer. Metabolic syndrome is also increased in infertile women with PCOS. The aim of this review is to provide clear and up to date information about PCOS and its relationship with metabolic syndrome, and the possible interaction between different metabolic disorders.

  12. Metabolic syndrome pathophysiology and clinical presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handelsman, Yehuda

    2009-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a relatively new definition, designed to help the health care practitioner to easily identify people at risk for the development of cardiovascular disease and diabetes. With the obesity epidemic, we are witnessing an epidemic of multiple-risk patients. Insulin resistance is the perceived pathophysiology of metabolic syndrome and defines its clinical presentation. Hypertension, dyslipedemia, polycystic ovarian syndrome, fatty liver disease, pre-diabetes, sleep and breathing disorder, certain cancers, and cognitive impairment are many of the presentations of the syndrome; patients with any of these conditions are at a high risk of developing cardiovascular disease and diabetes. The metabolic syndrome helps identify people at risk to allow early intervention for prevention. Lifestyle modification is the most important part of the management of people with the syndrome. Lately medications--though none approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)--have been recommended by major medical societies when lifestyle modification is not enough or when it fails.

  13. Acquired von Willebrand syndrome: A rare disorder of heterogeneous etiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Kasatkar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Acquired von Willebrand syndrome (AVWS is a rare bleeding disorder that mimics the inherited form of von Willebrand disease (VWD in terms of laboratory findings and clinical presentation. Aims: To study the etiology of acquired VWD. Settings and Design: The patients referred from various hospitals in and out of Mumbai were included in the study. Materials and Methods: Six patients with AVWS diagnosed at this center over the last 10 years were analyzed against 171 patients with inherited VWD. The differential diagnosis of AVWS was made based on reduced levels of von Willebrand antigen and von Willebrand ristocetin cofactor, decrease in ristocetin induced platelet aggregation, absence of correction in mixing studies with no prior history of bleeding problems and a negative family history for bleeding disorders. Results: In three patients, the disease was associated with systematic lupus erythematosus, out of which one was also associated with Kikuchi lymphadenitis and second with autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Fourth case was associated with hypothyroidism and fifth was a case of dermatitis and vitiligo. The last patient was a case of hemophilia A with Burkitts lymphoma, who developed autoantibodies to von Willebrand factor. Except two patients, all other patients responded to immune suppressive therapy with corticosteroids, while the patient with hypothyroidism responded to oral thyroxine. Conclusion: AVWS is a rare condition and may often be missed or diagnosed as inherited disease associated with heterogeneous disease conditions.

  14. Clinical expression of Menkes syndrome in females

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerdes, A.-M.; Toennesen, T.; Horn, N.; Guettler, F. (The John F. Kennedy Institute, Glostrup (Denmark)); Grisar, T. (Hauptgesundheitsamt, Humangenetische Beratungsstelle, Zentralkrankenhaus, Bremen (Germany, F.R.)); Marg, W.; Mueller, A. (Prof. Hess Kinderklinik, Zentralkrankenhaus, Bremen (Germany, F.R.)); Reinsch, R. (Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kaiser Permanente, San Diego, California (USA)); Barton, N.W. (Developmental and Metabolic Neurology Branch, IRP, NINCDS, NIH Bethesda, Maryland (USA)); Guiraud, P.; Richard, M.J. (Laboratoire de Biochimie C, CHRU Albert Michallon, Grenoble (France)); Joannard, A. (Clinique Medicale Infantile, CHRU Albert Michallon, Grenoble (France))

    1990-01-01

    Three female patients with Menkes syndrome are described. Clinically, they have typical Menkes syndrome. Biochemically, they have significantly increased {sup 64}Cu-uptake in cultured fibroblasts. The chromosomal analysis was normal for two of the patients and abnormal for one patient (45X/46XX mosaicism). (author).

  15. Clinical expression of Menkes syndrome in females

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerdes, A.-M.; Toennesen, T.; Horn, N.; Guettler, F.; Grisar, T.; Marg, W.; Mueller, A.; Reinsch, R.; Barton, N.W.; Guiraud, P.; Richard, M.J.; Joannard, A.

    1990-01-01

    Three female patients with Menkes syndrome are described. Clinically, they have typical Menkes syndrome. Biochemically, they have significantly increased 64 Cu-uptake in cultured fibroblasts. The chromosomal analysis was normal for two of the patients and abnormal for one patient (45X/46XX mosaicism). (author)

  16. Cockayne's syndrome: correlation of clinical features with cellular sensitivity of RNA synthesis to UV irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmann, A.R.; Thompson, A.F.; Harcourt, S.A.

    1993-01-01

    Cockayne's syndrome (CS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder with dwarfism, mental retardation, and otherwise clinically heterogeneous features. In cultured CS fibroblasts, the failure of RNA synthesis to recover to normal rates after UV-C irradiation provides a useful and relatively simple diagnostic test. We have measured post-UV-C RNA synthesis in 52 patients for whom a clinical diagnosis of CS was considered a possibility. Twenty-nine patients showed the defect characteristic of CS cells, and 23 had a normal response. We have attempted to correlate the cellular diagnosis with the different clinical features of the disorder. Clinical details of the patients were obtained from referring clinicians in the form of a questionnaire. Our results show that, apart from the cardinal features of dwarfism and mental retardation, sun sensitivity correlated best with a positive cellular diagnosis. Pigmentary retinopathy, gait defects, and dental caries were also good positive indicators, although several patients with a positive cellular diagnosis did not have these features. (Author)

  17. An oral clinical approach to Gorlin-Goltz syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Lucas Guimaraes; Paiva, Saul Martins; Pretti, Henrique; Bastos Lages, Elizabeth Maria; Castro, Wagner Henriques

    2015-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is a rare hereditary disease that can have negative effects on one's quality of life. The main clinical features are multiple nevoid basal cell carcinomas, odontogenic keratocysts, congenital skeletal abnormalities, calcification of the falx cerebri, facial dysmorphism, and skin depressions (pits) on the palms and soles. Diagnosis is based on major and minor clinical and radiological criteria and can be confirmed by DNA analysis. This article describes the case of a child with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome and outlines the clinical manifestations of the disease.

  18. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wakhloo Tulika

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous inherited connective tissue disorders with widespread manifestations. The prevalence of this syndrome is 1:5000 worldwide without gender, racial or ethnic associations. This syndrome is characterized by joint hypermobility, dermal hyperelasticity and tissue fragility caused by mutations in genes encoding collagen type I, III, V and enzymes involved in the posttranslational modifications of collagen. The oral manifestations include increased mucosal fragility, delayed wound healing, early onset generalized periodontitis and temporomandibular joint hypermobility. Children presenting with this syndrome are often misdiagnosed for hematological problem as they present with bruising, malignancy and/or child abuse. A thorough assessment of the patient is, therefore, essential for early diagnosis and patient referral. This paper reviews current literature, oral manifestations, diagnostic investigations and effective dental management.

  19. Clinical and Molecular Phenotype of Aicardi-Goutières Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Gillian ; Patrick, Teresa ; Parmar, Rekha ; Taylor, Claire F. ; Aeby, Alec ; Aicardi, Jean ; Artuch, Rafael ; Montalto, Simon Attard ; Bacino, Carlos A. ; Barroso, Bruno ; Baxter, Peter ; Benko, Willam S. ; Bergmann, Carsten ; Bertini, Enrico ; Biancheri, Roberta ; Blair, Edward M. ; Blau, Nenad ; Bonthron, David T. ; Briggs, Tracy ; Brueton, Louise A. ; Brunner, Han G. ; Burke, Christopher J. ; Carr, Ian M. ; Carvalho, Daniel R. ; Chandler, Kate E. ; Christen, Hans-Jürgen ; Corry, Peter C. ; Cowan, Frances M. ; Cox, Helen ; D’Arrigo, Stefano ; Dean, John ; De Laet, Corinne ; De Praeter, Claudine ; Déry, Catherine ; Ferrie, Colin D. ; Flintoff, Kim ; Frints, Suzanna G. M. ; Garcia-Cazorla, Angels ; Gener, Blanca ; Goizet, Cyril ; Goutières, Françoise ; Green, Andrew J. ; Guët, Agnès ; Hamel, Ben C. J. ; Hayward, Bruce E. ; Heiberg, Arvid ; Hennekam, Raoul C. ; Husson, Marie ; Jackson, Andrew P. ; Jayatunga, Rasieka ; Jiang, Yong-Hui ; Kant, Sarina G. ; Kao, Amy ; King, Mary D. ; Kingston, Helen M. ; Klepper, Joerg ; van der Knaap, Marjo S. ; Kornberg, Andrew J. ; Kotzot, Dieter ; Kratzer, Wilfried ; Lacombe, Didier ; Lagae, Lieven ; Landrieu, Pierre Georges ; Lanzi, Giovanni ; Leitch, Andrea ; Lim, Ming J. ; Livingston, John H. ; Lourenco, Charles M. ; Lyall, E. G. Hermione ; Lynch, Sally A. ; Lyons, Michael J. ; Marom, Daphna ; McClure, John P. ; McWilliam, Robert ; Melancon, Serge B. ; Mewasingh, Leena D. ; Moutard, Marie-Laure ; Nischal, Ken K. ; Østergaard, John R. ; Prendiville, Julie ; Rasmussen, Magnhild ; Rogers, R. Curtis ; Roland, Dominique ; Rosser, Elisabeth M. ; Rostasy, Kevin ; Roubertie, Agathe ; Sanchis, Amparo ; Schiffmann, Raphael ; Scholl-Bürgi, Sabine ; Seal, Sunita ; Shalev, Stavit A. ; Corcoles, C. Sierra ; Sinha, Gyan P. ; Soler, Doriette ; Spiegel, Ronen ; Stephenson, John B. P. ; Tacke, Uta ; Tan, Tiong Yang ; Till, Marianne ; Tolmie, John L. ; Tomlin, Pam ; Vagnarelli, Federica ; Valente, Enza Maria ; Van Coster, Rudy N. A. ; Van der Aa, Nathalie ; Vanderver, Adeline ; Vles, Johannes S. H. ; Voit, Thomas ; Wassmer, Evangeline ; Weschke, Bernhard ; Whiteford, Margo L. ; Willemsen, Michel A. A. ; Zankl, Andreas ; Zuberi, Sameer M. ; Orcesi, Simona ; Fazzi, Elisa ; Lebon, Pierre ; Crow, Yanick J. 

    2007-01-01

    Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) is a genetic encephalopathy whose clinical features mimic those of acquired in utero viral infection. AGS exhibits locus heterogeneity, with mutations identified in genes encoding the 3′→5′ exonuclease TREX1 and the three subunits of the RNASEH2 endonuclease complex. To define the molecular spectrum of AGS, we performed mutation screening in patients, from 127 pedigrees, with a clinical diagnosis of the disease. Biallelic mutations in TREX1, RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, and RNASEH2C were observed in 31, 3, 47, and 18 families, respectively. In five families, we identified an RNASEH2A or RNASEH2B mutation on one allele only. In one child, the disease occurred because of a de novo heterozygous TREX1 mutation. In 22 families, no mutations were found. Null mutations were common in TREX1, although a specific missense mutation was observed frequently in patients from northern Europe. Almost all mutations in RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, and RNASEH2C were missense. We identified an RNASEH2C founder mutation in 13 Pakistani families. We also collected clinical data from 123 mutation-positive patients. Two clinical presentations could be delineated: an early-onset neonatal form, highly reminiscent of congenital infection seen particularly with TREX1 mutations, and a later-onset presentation, sometimes occurring after several months of normal development and occasionally associated with remarkably preserved neurological function, most frequently due to RNASEH2B mutations. Mortality was correlated with genotype; 34.3% of patients with TREX1, RNASEH2A, and RNASEH2C mutations versus 8.0% RNASEH2B mutation–positive patients were known to have died (P=.001). Our analysis defines the phenotypic spectrum of AGS and suggests a coherent mutation-screening strategy in this heterogeneous disorder. Additionally, our data indicate that at least one further AGS-causing gene remains to be identified. PMID:17846997

  20. A Practical Approach to Tumor Heterogeneity in Clinical Research and Diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanta, Giorgio; Bonin, Serena

    2018-01-01

    This Pathobiology issue tries to better define the complex phenomenon of intratumor heterogeneity (ITH), mostly from a practical point of view. This topic has been chosen because ITH is a central issue in tumor development and has to be investigated directly in patient tissue and immediately applied in the treatment of the presenting patient. Different types of ITH should be considered: clonal genetic and epigenetic evolution, morphological heterogeneity, and tumor sampling, heterogeneity resulting from microenvironmental autocrine and paracrine interaction, and stochastic plasticity related to different functional cell efficiencies. For a higher level of reproducibility in clinical research and diagnostics, it is necessary to establish standardized analytical methods, including microdissection. In situ techniques can be pivotal to explore tumor microenvironment and can be improved with associated digital analysis. Liquid biopsies for plasma DNA analysis are at present the best method to study recurrent tumors with treatment adaptation, and widespread clinical use could be beneficial. The different types of tumor genomic instabilities could have pragmatic applications to rank ITH for clinical applications: treatment approaches differ in patients with a high nucleotide mutation rate and patients with high copy number alterations. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. [Clinical analysis of 6 cases of Bartter syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Fang-mei; Zheng, Fang-qiu; Zhang, Xin; Wu, Mei-jun; Wei, Hong-yan; Ma, Zhong-shu; Lu, Biao; Qiu, Ming-cai

    2011-03-01

    To summarize the clinical characteristics of Bartter syndrome and investigate its pathogenesis. The clinical data of 6 cases of Bartter syndrome at our hospital from November 2006 to May 2010 were analyzed retrospectively. The onset age of Bartter syndrome was 13-35 years old. The main symptoms included weakness (6/6), paralysis (1/6), numbness (5/6) and tetany (4/6). All patients had normal blood pressure. The biochemical tests showed persistent hypokalemia, metabolic alkalosis (6/6) and hyperreninemia. The pathological examination of deltoid muscle biopsy showed the swelling, degeneration and necrosis of myocytes and the deposition of immunocomplex in myolemma. And the pathological examination of renal biopsy showed the hyperplasia of juxtaglomerular apparatus (5/6) and the deposition of immunocomplex. All symptoms were relieved after a therapy of potassium supplementation or a combination of indomethacin, spironolactone and immunosuppressant. When such clinical features as weakness, paralysis, tetany, hypokalemic alkalosis and normotension are encountered, Bartter syndrome should be suspected. Serum electrolytes, blood gas analysis and activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system should be examined for a definite diagnosis. The treatment of choice includes potassium and magnesium supplementation or in combination with prostaglandin synthetase inhibitor, aldosterone antagonist and immunosuppressant. Immunologic mechanism may participate in the course of Bartter syndrome.

  2. Acute flaccid paraparesis (cauda equina syndrome) in a patient with Bardet–Biedl syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Vibhu Krishnan; Kanna, Rishi Mugesh; Shetty, Ajoy Prasad; Rajasekaran, S

    2017-01-01

    Bardet–Biedl syndrome (BBS) is a rare, autosomal-recessive, debilitating genetic disorder, which can present with multitudinous systemic clinical features including rod-cone dystrophy, polydactyly, Frohlich-like central obesity, mental retardation, hypogonadism, and renal anomalies. Diverse neuromuscular manifestations in patients afflicted by this heterogeneous disorder include ataxia, cervical, and thoracic canal stenoses, presenting as spastic quadriparesis and other gait disturbances. We report a young patient with BBS, who had presented with acute flaccid paraparesis due to severe primary lumbar canal stenosis. She underwent immediate lumbar decompression and discectomy following which she recovered significantly. Acute cauda equina syndrome due to primary lumbar canal stenosis has not been reported as a clinical feature of BBS previously. PMID:28566787

  3. Clinical implications of heterogeneity of tumor response to radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suit, H.; Skates, S.; Taghian, A.; Okunieff, P.; Efird, J.T.

    1992-01-01

    Heterogeneity of response of tumor tissue to radiation clearly exists. Major parameters include histopathologic type, size (number of tumor rescue units (TRUs)), hemoglobin concentration, cell proliferation kinetics and immune rejection reaction by host. Further, normal and presumably tumor tissue response is altered in certain genetic diseases, e.g. ataxia telangiectasia. Any assessment of response of tumor tissue to a new treatment method or the testing of a new clinical response predictor is optimally based upon a narrow strata, viz., uniform with respect to known parameters of response, e.g. size, histological type. Even among tumors of such a clinical defined narrow strata, there will be residual heterogeneity with respect to inherent cellular radiation sensitivity, distributions of pO 2 , (SH), cell proliferation, etc. (author). 39 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs

  4. Syndromic classification of rickettsioses: an approach for clinical practice

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    Álvaro A. Faccini-Martínez

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Rickettsioses share common clinical manifestations, such as fever, malaise, exanthema, the presence or absence of an inoculation eschar, and lymphadenopathy. Some of these manifestations can be suggestive of certain species of Rickettsia infection. Nevertheless none of these manifestations are pathognomonic, and direct diagnostic methods to confirm the involved species are always required. A syndrome is a set of signs and symptoms that characterizes a disease with many etiologies or causes. This situation is applicable to rickettsioses, where different species can cause similar clinical presentations. We propose a syndromic classification for these diseases: exanthematic rickettsiosis syndrome with a low probability of inoculation eschar and rickettsiosis syndrome with a probability of inoculation eschar and their variants. In doing so, we take into account the clinical manifestations, the geographic origin, and the possible vector involved, in order to provide a guide for physicians of the most probable etiological agent.

  5. [Waardenburg syndrome. A heterogenic disorder with variable penetrance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apaydin, F; Bereketoglu, M; Turan, O; Hribar, K; Maassen, M M; Günhan, O; Zenner, H-P; Pfister, M

    2004-06-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterised by pigmentary anomalies of the skin, hairs, eyes and various defects of other neural crest derived tissues. It accounts for over 2% of congenital hearing impairment. At least four types are recognized on the basis of clinical and genetic criteria. Based on a screening of congenitally hearing impaired children, 12 families with WS type II were detected. Of special interest was the phenotype of these families, in particular the reduced penetrance of hearing impairment within the families. In all cases a high variability of the disease phenotype was detected and the penetrance of the clinical traits varied accordingly. Therefore, it is not possible to predict the clinical phenotype even in a single family. Based on these studies, we plan to identify the pathogenetic cause of the disease in order to perform a detailed genotype/phenotype analysis.

  6. Frank-ter Haar syndrome with unusual clinical features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dundar, Munis; Saatci, Cetin; Tasdemir, Sener; Akcakus, Mustafa; Caglayan, Ahmet Okay; Ozkul, Yusuf

    2009-01-01

    Frank-ter Haar syndrome first recognized by Frank et al. [Y. Frank, M. Ziprkowski, A. Romano, R. Stein, M.B. Katznelson, B. Cohen, R.M. Goodman, Megalocornea associated with multiple skeletal anomalies: a new genetic syndrome?, J. Genet. Hum. 21 (1973) 67-72.] and subsequently confirmed by ter Haar et al. [B. Ter Haar, B. Hamel, J. Hendriks, J. de Jager, Melnick-Needles syndrome: indication for an autosomal recessive form, Am. J. Med. Genet. 13 (1982) 469-477.]. The main clinical features of the syndrome are brachycephaly, wide fontanels, prominent forehead, hypertelorism, prominent eyes, macro cornea with or without glaucoma, full cheeks, small chin, bowing of the long bones, and flexion deformity of the fingers [S.M. Maas, H. Kayserili, J. Lam, M.Y. Apak, R.C. Hennekam, Further delineation of Frank-ter Haar syndrome, Am. J. Med. Genet. 131 (2004) 127-133.]. We report a child with Frank-ter Haar syndrome presenting unusual clinical features. Hypopigmented areas in hair, bilateral adducted thumb, bilateral contractures in elbows and pelvic limb, atrial septal defect have not been described previously in the literature. Our patient also had double-outlet right ventricle.

  7. Blepharophimosis-mental retardation (BMR) syndromes: A proposed clinical classification of the so-called Ohdo syndrome, and delineation of two new BMR syndromes, one X-linked and one autosomal recessive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verloes, Alain; Bremond-Gignac, Dominique; Isidor, Bertrand; David, Albert; Baumann, Clarisse; Leroy, Marie-Anne; Stevens, René; Gillerot, Yves; Héron, Delphine; Héron, Bénédicte; Benzacken, Brigitte; Lacombe, Didier; Brunner, Han; Bitoun, Pierre

    2006-06-15

    We report on 11 patients from 8 families with a blepharophimosis and mental retardation syndrome (BMRS) phenotype. Using current nosology, five sporadic patients have Ohdo syndrome, associated with congenital hypothyroidism in two of them (thus also compatible with a diagnosis of Young-Simpson syndrome). In two affected sibs with milder phenotype, compensated hypothyroidism was demonstrated. In another family, an affected boy was born to the unaffected sister of a previously reported patient. Finally, in the last sibship, two affected boys in addition had severe microcephaly and neurological anomalies. A definitive clinical and etiologic classification of BMRS is lacking, but closer phenotypic analysis should lead to a more useful appraisal of the BMRS phenotype. We suggest discontinuing the systematic use of the term "Ohdo syndrome" when referring to patients with BMRS. We propose a classification of BMRS into five groups: (1) del(3p) syndrome, (possibly overlooked in older reports); (2) BMRS, Ohdo type, limited to the original patients of Ohdo; (3) BMRS SBBYS (Say-Barber/Biesecker/Young-Simpson) type, with distinctive dysmorphic features and inconstant anomalies including heart defect, optic atrophy, deafness, hypoplastic teeth, cleft palate, joint limitations, and hypothyroidism. BMRS type SBBYS is probably an etiologically heterogeneous phenotype, as AD and apparently AR forms exist; (4) BMRS, MKB (Maat-Kievit-Brunner) type, with coarse, triangular face, which is probably sex-linked; (5) BMRS V (Verloes) type, a probable new type with severe microcephaly, hypsarrhythmia, adducted thumbs, cleft palate, and abnormal genitalia, which is likely autosomal recessive. Types MKB and V are newly described here. Copyright 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Clinical Heterogeneity of Guillain-Barré Syndrome in the Emergency Department: Impact on Clinical Outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Athanasios Papathanasiou; Ioannis Markakis

    2016-01-01

    Guillain-Barr? syndrome (GBS) is mainly classified into acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP) and acute motor axonal neuropathy (AMAN). Although diagnosis of GBS requires progressive weakness and universal areflexia or hyporeflexia, cases of GBS with preserved or increased deep tendon reflexes (DTRs) have been increasingly recognized. We report three cases of GBS, presenting at a single unit in six months. Our first case presented with pure sensory symptoms. The second case h...

  9. Clinical Manifestations of the Opiate Withdrawal Syndrome

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    Faniya Shigakova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Currently, substance abuse is one of the most serious problems facing our society. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical manifestations of the opiate withdrawal syndrome (OWS. The study included 112 patients (57 women and 55 men aged from 18 to 64 years with opium addiction according to the DSM-IV. To study the clinical manifestation of OWS, the special 25-score scale with four sections to assess severity of sleep disorders, pain syndrome, autonomic disorders, and affective symptoms was used. Given the diversity of the OWS symptoms, attention was focused on three clinical variants, affective, algic and mixed. The OWS affective variant was registered more frequently in women, while the mixed type of OWS was more typical of men.

  10. Temporomandibular joint dysfunction syndrome. A clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passero, P L; Wyman, B S; Bell, J W; Hirschey, S A; Schlosser, W S

    1985-08-01

    We have presented two clinical case reports of patients with TMJ dysfunction syndrome as an example of coordinated treatments between dentists and physical therapists. The clinical profiles of these patients with craniocervical pain were compiled from comprehensive physical therapy and dental-orthopedic evaluations. The significance of the relationship between the rest position of the mandible and forward head posture has been shown by the changes observed after correction of the postural deviations and vertical resting dimensions by dental treatments and physical therapy. Additional research is necessary to determine long-term effects of this combined approach in TMJ dysfunction syndrome.

  11. Neuromuscular involvement in various types of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voermans, N.C.; Alfen, N. van; Pillen, S.; Lammens, M.M.Y.; Schalkwijk, J.; Zwarts, M.J.; Rooij, I.A.L.M. van; Hamel, B.C.J.; Engelen, B.G.M. van

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of heritable connective tissue disorders characterized by joint hypermobility, skin hyperextensibility, and tissue fragility. Muscle involvement is plausible based on recently discovered interactions between

  12. Antiphospholipid Syndrome Clinical Research Task Force Report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erkan, D.; Derksen, R.; Levy, R.; Machin, S.; Ortel, T.; Pierangeli, S.; Roubey, R.; Lockshin, M.

    The Antiphospholipid Syndrome (APS) Clinical Research Task Force (CRTF) was one of six Task Forces developed by the 13(th) International Congress on Antiphospholipid Antibodies (aPL) organization committee with the purpose of: a) evaluating the limitations of APS clinical research and developing

  13. Targeted pharmacological treatment of autism spectrum disorders: fragile X and Rett syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansen eWang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs are genetically and clinically heterogeneous and lack effective medications to treat their core symptoms. Studies of syndromic ASDs caused by single gene mutations have provided insights into the pathophysiology of autism. Fragile X and Rett syndromes belong to the syndromic ASDs in which preclinical studies have identified rational targets for drug therapies focused on correcting underlying neural dysfunction. These preclinical discoveries are increasingly translating into exciting human clinical trials. Since there are significant molecular and neurobiological overlaps among ASDs, targeted treatments developed for fragile X and Rett syndromes may be helpful for autism of different etiologies. Here, we review the targeted pharmacological treatment of fragile X and Rett syndromes and discuss related issues in both preclinical studies and clinical trials of potential therapies for the diseases.

  14. Targeted pharmacological treatment of autism spectrum disorders: fragile X and Rett syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hansen; Pati, Sandipan; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas; Doering, Laurie C.

    2015-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are genetically and clinically heterogeneous and lack effective medications to treat their core symptoms. Studies of syndromic ASDs caused by single gene mutations have provided insights into the pathophysiology of autism. Fragile X and Rett syndromes belong to the syndromic ASDs in which preclinical studies have identified rational targets for drug therapies focused on correcting underlying neural dysfunction. These preclinical discoveries are increasingly translating into exciting human clinical trials. Since there are significant molecular and neurobiological overlaps among ASDs, targeted treatments developed for fragile X and Rett syndromes may be helpful for autism of different etiologies. Here, we review the targeted pharmacological treatment of fragile X and Rett syndromes and discuss related issues in both preclinical studies and clinical trials of potential therapies for the diseases. PMID:25767435

  15. Rapidly Progressive Corticobasal Degeneration Syndrome

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    Ana Herrero Valverde

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Corticobasal syndrome (CBS has a heterogeneous clinical presentation with no specific pathologic substratum. Its accurate diagnosis is a challenge for neurologists; in order to establish CBS definitively, postmortem confirmation is required. Some clinical and radiological features can help to distinguish it from other neurodegenerative conditions, such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD. Clinical Case: A 74-year-old woman presented with language impairment, difficulty in walking and poor attentiveness that had begun 10 days before. Other symptoms, such as asymmetrical extra-pyramidal dysfunction, limb dystonia and ‘alien limb’ phenomena, were established over the next 2 months, with rapid progression. Death occurred 3 months after symptom onset. Laboratory results were normal. Initially, imaging only showed restricted diffusion with bilateral parieto-occipital gyri involvement on DWI-MRI, with unspecific EEG changes. An autopsy was performed. Brain neuropathology confirmed sporadic CJD (sCJD. Conclusions: CBS is a heterogeneous clinical syndrome whose differential diagnosis is extensive. CJD can occasionally present with clinical characteristics resembling CBS. MRI detection of abnormalities in some sequences (FLAIR, DWI, as previously reported, has high diagnostic utility for sCJD diagnosis – especially in early stages – when other tests can still appear normal. Abnormalities on DWI sequencing may not correlate with neuropathological findings, suggesting a functional basis to explain the changes found.

  16. KohlschutterTonz Syndrome : Mutations in ROGDI and Evidence of Genetic Heterogeneity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tucci, Arianna; Kara, Eleanna; Schossig, Anna; Wolf, Nicole I.; Plagnol, Vincent; Fawcett, Katherine; Paisan-Ruiz, Coro; Moore, Matthew; Hernandez, Dena; Musumeci, Sebastiano; Tennison, Michael; Hennekam, Raoul; Palmeri, Silvia; Malandrini, Alessandro; Raskin, Salmo; Donnai, Dian; Hennig, Corina; Tzschach, Andreas; Hordijk, Roel; Bast, Thomas; Wimmer, Katharina; Lo, Chien-Ning; Shorvon, Simon; Mefford, Heather; Eichler, Evan E.; Hall, Roger; Hayes, Ian; Hardy, John; Singleton, Andrew; Zschocke, Johannes; Houlden, Henry

    KohlschutterTonz syndrome (KTS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by amelogenesis imperfecta, psychomotor delay or regression and seizures starting early in childhood. KTS was established as a distinct clinical entity after the first report by Kohlschutter in 1974, and to date,

  17. Cognitive impairment, clinical severity and MRI changes in MELAS syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraya, Torsten; Neumann, Lena; Paelecke-Habermann, Yvonne; Deschauer, Marcus; Stoevesandt, Dietrich; Zierz, Stephan; Watzke, Stefan

    2017-12-29

    To examine clinical severity, cognitive impairment, and MRI changes in patients with MELAS syndrome. Cognitive-mnestic functions, brain MRI (lesion load, cella media index) and clinical severity of ten patients with MELAS syndrome were examined. All patients carried the m.3243A>G mutation. The detailed neuropsychological assessment revealed cognitive deficits in attention, executive function, visuoperception, and -construction. There were significant correlations between these cognitive changes, lesion load in MRI, disturbances in everyday life (clinical scale), and high scores in NMDAS. Patients with MELAS syndrome showed no global neuropsychological deficit, but rather distinct cognitive deficits. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. All rights reserved.

  18. Pathophysiology and Japanese clinical characteristics in Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Daishi; Takeda, Norifumi; Imai, Yasushi; Inuzuka, Ryo; Komuro, Issei; Hirata, Yasunobu

    2014-08-01

    Marfan syndrome is an autosomal dominant heritable disorder of the connective tissue, caused by mutations of the gene FBN1, which encodes fibrillin-1, a major component of the microfibrils of the extracellular matrix. Fibrillin-1 interacts with transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), and dysregulated TGF-β signaling plays a major role in the development of connective tissue disease and familial aortic aneurysm and dissection, including Marfan syndrome. Losartan, an angiotensin II blocker, has the potential to reduce TGF-β signaling and is expected to be an additional therapeutic option. Clinical diagnosis is made using the Ghent nosology, which requires comprehensive patient assessment and has been proven to work well, but evaluation of some of the diagnostic criteria by a single physician is difficult and time-consuming. A Marfan clinic was established at the University of Tokyo Hospital in 2005, together with cardiologists, cardiac surgeons, pediatricians, orthopedists, and ophthalmologists in one place, for the purpose of speedy and accurate evaluation and diagnosis of Marfan syndrome. In this review, we discuss the recent progress in diagnosis and treatment of Marfan syndrome, and the characteristics of Japanese patients with Marfan syndrome. © 2014 Japan Pediatric Society.

  19. Bing-Neel Syndrome: Illustrative Cases and Comprehensive Review of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Varettoni, Marzia; Defrancesco, Irene; Diamanti, Luca; Marchioni, Enrico; Farina, Lisa Maria; Pichiecchio, Anna

    2017-01-01

    The Bing-Neel syndrome is a rare neurological complication of Waldenström’s Macroglobulinemia which results from a direct involvement of central nervous system by malignant lymphoplasmacytic cells. The clinical suspicion of Bing-Neel syndrome may be difficult because neurologic symptoms are heterogeneous, non specific and sometimes underhand. A definitive diagnosis of Bing-Neel syndrome can be confidently made using brain and spinal cord magnetic resonance imaging as well as histopathology an...

  20. Clinical heterogeneity in a family with DKC1 mutation, dyskeratosis congenita and Hoyeraal-Hreidarsson syndrome in first cousins

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    Cristina Olivieri

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Dyskeratosis congenita (DC is an inherited bone marrow failure disorder characterized by mucocutaneous features (skin pigmentation, nail dystrophy and oral leukoplakia, pulmonary fibrosis, hematologic and solid malignancies. Its severe form, recognized as Hoyeraal-Hreidarsson syndrome (HHS, also includes cerebellar hypoplasia, microcephaly, developmental delay and prenatal growth retardation. In literature phenotypic variability among DC patients sharing the same mutation is wellknown. To our knowledge this report describes for the first time a family of DC patients, characterized by a member with features of classic DC and another one with some features of HHS, both with the same mutation in DKC1. Our family confirms again that one mutation can be associated with different phenotypes and different hematological manifestations. It’s possible to speculate that there are likely to be patients who do not clinically fit neatly into either classical DC or HHS, but whose clinical features are due to mutations in DKC1 or in genes responsible for autosomal DC/HHS.

  1. Heterogeneity in recent-onset type 1 diabetes - a clinical trial perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollyky, Jennifer B; Xu, Ping; Butte, Atul J; Wilson, Darrell M; Beam, Craig A; Greenbaum, Carla J

    2015-09-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) TrialNet is a National Institutes of Health-sponsored clinical trial network aimed at altering the disease course of T1D. The purpose of this study is to evaluate age-dependent heterogeneity in clinical, metabolic and immunologic characteristics of individuals with recent-onset T1D, to identify cohorts of interest and to aid in planning of future studies. Eight hundred eighty-three individuals with recent-onset T1D involved in five TrialNet studies were categorized by age as follows: ≥18 years, 12-17 years, 8-12 years and TrialNet studies, including C-peptide >0.2 pmol/mL, varies by age. Lower C-peptide level requirements for younger participants and other aspects of heterogeneity of recent-onset T1D patients, such as white blood cell count abnormalities and body mass index should be considered in the design of future clinical studies. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Cockayne's syndrome: correlation of clinical features with cellular sensitivity of RNA synthesis to UV irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmann, A.R.; Thompson, A.F.; Harcourt, S.A. (Medical Research Council, Brighton (United Kingdom). Cell Mutation Unit); Stefanini, Miria (Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Pavia (Italy). Ist. di Genetica Biochimica ed Evoluzionistica); Norris, P.G. (Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom))

    1993-08-01

    Cockayne's syndrome (CS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder with dwarfism, mental retardation, and otherwise clinically heterogeneous features. In cultured CS fibroblasts, the failure of RNA synthesis to recover to normal rates after UV-C irradiation provides a useful and relatively simple diagnostic test. We have measured post-UV-C RNA synthesis in 52 patients for whom a clinical diagnosis of CS was considered a possibility. Twenty-nine patients showed the defect characteristic of CS cells, and 23 had a normal response. We have attempted to correlate the cellular diagnosis with the different clinical features of the disorder. Clinical details of the patients were obtained from referring clinicians in the form of a questionnaire. Our results show that, apart from the cardinal features of dwarfism and mental retardation, sun sensitivity correlated best with a positive cellular diagnosis. Pigmentary retinopathy, gait defects, and dental caries were also good positive indicators, although several patients with a positive cellular diagnosis did not have these features. (Author).

  3. [Clinical features of a Chinese pedigree with Waardenburg syndrome type 2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shu-zhi; Yuan, Hui-jun; Bai, Lin-na; Cao, Ju-yang; Xu, Ye; Shen, Wei-dong; Ji, Fei; Yang, Wei-yan

    2005-10-12

    To investigate detailed clinical features of a Chinese pedigree with Waardenburg syndrome type 2. Members of this pedigree were interviewed to identify personal or family medical histories of hearing loss, the use of aminoglycosides, and other clinical abnormalities by filling questionnaire. The audiological and other clinical evaluations of the proband and other members of this family were conducted, including pure-tone audiometry, immittance and auditory brain-stem response and ophthalmological, dermatologic, hair, temporal bone CT examinations. This family is categorized as Waardenburg syndrome type 2 according to its clinical features. It's an autosomal dominant disorder with incomplete penetrance. The clinical features varied greatly among family members and characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, heterochromia irides, freckle on the face and premature gray hair. Hearing loss can be unilateral or bilateral, congenital or late onset in this family. This Chinese family has some unique clinical features comparing with the international diagnostic criteria for Waardenburg syndrome. This study may provide some evidences to amend the diagnostic criteria for Waardenburg syndrome in Chinese population.

  4. Further Delineation of the Clinical Phenotype of Cerebellar Ataxia, Mental Retardation, and Disequilibrium Syndrome Type 4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saud Alsahli

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cerebellar ataxia, mental retardation, and disequilibrium syndrome (CAMRQ is a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders that have been grouped by shared clinical features; all of these features are transmitted via an autosomal recessive mechanism. Four variants of this syndrome have been identified so far, and each one differs in terms of both clinical and genotypical features. CAMRQ4 is a rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, ataxia or an inability to walk, dysarthria and, in some patients, quadrupedal gait. Methods: We investigated three Saudi families with CAMRQ4. Blood samples were collected from the affected patients, their parents, and healthy siblings. DNA was extracted from whole blood, and whole-exome sequencing was performed. Findings were confirmed by segregation analysis, which was performed on other family members. Results: Thus far, 17 patients have been affected by CAMRQ4. Genetic analysis of all patients, including our current patients, showed a mutation in the aminophospholipid transporter, class I, type 8A, member 2 gene ( ATP8A2 . A series of common phenotypical features have been reported in these patients, with few exceptions. Ataxia, mental retardation, and hypotonia were present in all patients, consanguinity in 90% and abnormal movements in 50%. Moreover, 40% achieved ambulation at least once in their lifetime, 40% had microcephaly, whereas 30% were mute. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the brain was normal in 60% of patients. Conclusions: We described the largest cohort of patients with CAMRQ4 syndrome and identified three novel mutations. CAMRQ4 syndrome should be suspected in patients presenting with ataxia, intellectual disability, hypotonia, microcephaly, choreoathetoid movements, ophthalmoplegia, and global developmental delay, even if brain MRI appears normal.

  5. Further Delineation of the Clinical Phenotype of Cerebellar Ataxia, Mental Retardation, and Disequilibrium Syndrome Type 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsahli, Saud; Alrifai, Muhammad Talal; Al Tala, Saeed; Mutairi, Fuad Al; Alfadhel, Majid

    2018-01-01

    Cerebellar ataxia, mental retardation, and disequilibrium syndrome (CAMRQ) is a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders that have been grouped by shared clinical features; all of these features are transmitted via an autosomal recessive mechanism. Four variants of this syndrome have been identified so far, and each one differs in terms of both clinical and genotypical features. CAMRQ4 is a rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, ataxia or an inability to walk, dysarthria and, in some patients, quadrupedal gait. We investigated three Saudi families with CAMRQ4. Blood samples were collected from the affected patients, their parents, and healthy siblings. DNA was extracted from whole blood, and whole-exome sequencing was performed. Findings were confirmed by segregation analysis, which was performed on other family members. Thus far, 17 patients have been affected by CAMRQ4. Genetic analysis of all patients, including our current patients, showed a mutation in the aminophospholipid transporter, class I, type 8A, member 2 gene ( ATP8A2 ). A series of common phenotypical features have been reported in these patients, with few exceptions. Ataxia, mental retardation, and hypotonia were present in all patients, consanguinity in 90% and abnormal movements in 50%. Moreover, 40% achieved ambulation at least once in their lifetime, 40% had microcephaly, whereas 30% were mute. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain was normal in 60% of patients. We described the largest cohort of patients with CAMRQ4 syndrome and identified three novel mutations. CAMRQ4 syndrome should be suspected in patients presenting with ataxia, intellectual disability, hypotonia, microcephaly, choreoathetoid movements, ophthalmoplegia, and global developmental delay, even if brain MRI appears normal.

  6. Clinical response to long term enzyme replacement treatment in children, adolescent and adult patients with Hunter syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalmau Serra, Jaime; Vitoria Miñana, Isidro; Calderón Fernández, Rafael; Cortell Aznar, Isidoro

    2015-11-06

    Since enzyme replacement treatment (ERT) with idursulfase is available for Hunter syndrome (HS; mucopolysaccharidosis type II), for the first time, disease progression can be limited and organ damage reduced or prevented. We described retrospectively the clinical evolution of eight HS males, treated with ERT and followed in routine clinical practice in Hospital Infantil La Fe (Valencia, Spain). We studied three children, three adolescents and two adults. Time from diagnosis to ERT ranged from 13.7 to 0.2 years, and duration of ERT ranged from 24 to 77.1 months. From the start of ERT, weight and height increased in children and adolescents and remained stable in adults. Glycosaminoglycans (GAG) decreased in all patients; in patient 5 (aged 23 years), we observed the highest reduction (86%) with recovery of carpal tunnel syndrome, splenomegaly and a decrease in nocturnal oxygen dependence. Our results show that ERT improve respiratory impairment and organomegalies and decrease GAGs levels in all patients including children, adolescent and adults. While cardiac manifestations and facial features stabilized, responses in other parameters were heterogeneous. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Prediction of polycystic ovarian syndrome based on ultrasound findings and clinical parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschos, Elysia; Twickler, Diane M

    2015-03-01

    To determine the accuracy of sonographic-diagnosed polycystic ovaries and clinical parameters in predicting polycystic ovarian syndrome. Medical records and ultrasounds of 151 women with sonographically diagnosed polycystic ovaries were reviewed. Sonographic criteria for polycystic ovaries were based on 2003 Rotterdam European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology/American Society for Reproductive Medicine guidelines: at least one ovary with 12 or more follicles measuring 2-9 mm and/or increased ovarian volume >10 cm(3) . Clinical variables of age, gravidity, ethnicity, body mass index, and sonographic indication were collected. One hundred thirty-five patients had final outcomes (presence/absence of polycystic ovarian syndrome). Polycystic ovarian syndrome was diagnosed if a patient had at least one other of the following two criteria: oligo/chronic anovulation and/or clinical/biochemical hyperandrogenism. A logistic regression model was constructed using stepwise selection to identify variables significantly associated with polycystic ovarian syndrome (p polycystic ovaries and 115 (89.8%) had polycystic ovarian syndrome (p = .009). Lower gravidity, abnormal bleeding, and body mass index >33 were significant in predicting polycystic ovarian syndrome (receiver operating characteristics curve, c = 0.86). Pain decreased the likelihood of polycystic ovarian syndrome. Polycystic ovaries on ultrasound were sensitive in predicting polycystic ovarian syndrome. Ultrasound, combined with clinical parameters, can be used to generate a predictive index for polycystic ovarian syndrome. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Stendhal syndrome: a clinical and historical overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios-Sánchez, Leonardo; Botero-Meneses, Juan Sebastián; Pachón, Rocío Plazas; Hernández, Laura Bibiana Pineros; Triana-Melo, Juanita Del Pilar; Ramírez-Rodríguez, Santiago

    2018-02-01

    It could be argued that one of the few unifying qualities all human beings share is the ability to appreciate beauty. While the object of beauty may change from one person to another, the awe and the thrill experienced by an enthralled beholder remains the same. Sometimes, this experience can be so overwhelming it can bring someone to the edge of existence. A very rare condition, known as aesthetic syndrome and, more commonly, Stendhal syndrome, entails a clinical phenomenon in which the presence of a beautiful piece of work or architecture causes dysautonomic symptoms such as tachycardia, diaphoresis, chest pains and loss of consciousness. We present an historical and clinical review of this condition.

  9. Moyamoya disease and syndromes: from genetics to clinical management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guey S

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Stéphanie Guey,1,3 Elisabeth Tournier-Lasserve,1,2 Dominique Hervé,1,3 Manoelle Kossorotoff4 1Inserm UMR-S1161, Université Paris 7 Denis Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France; 2AP-HP, Groupe hospitalier Lariboisière-Saint-Louis, Service de génétique neurovasculaire, Paris, France; 3Service de Neurologie, Centre de Référence des maladies Vasculaires Rares du Cerveau et de l'Œil (CERVCO, Groupe Hospitalier Saint-Louis Lariboisière-Fernand Widal, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Paris, France; 4Pediatric Neurology Department, French Center for Pediatric Stroke, University Hospital Necker-Enfants Malades, AP-HP Assistance publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Paris, France Abstract: Moyamoya angiopathy is characterized by a progressive stenosis of the terminal portion of the internal carotid arteries and the development of a network of abnormal collateral vessels. This chronic cerebral angiopathy is observed in children and adults. It mainly leads to brain ischemic events in children, and to ischemic and hemorrhagic events in adults. This is a rare condition, with a marked prevalence gradient between Asian countries and Western countries. Two main nosological entities are identified. On the one hand, moyamoya disease corresponds to isolated moyamoya angiopathy, defined as being “idiopathic” according to the Guidelines of the Research Committee on the Pathology and Treatment of Spontaneous Occlusion of the Circle of Willis. This entity is probably multifactorial and polygenic in most patients. On the other hand, moyamoya syndrome is a moyamoya angiopathy associated with an underlying condition and forms a very heterogeneous group with various clinical presentations, various modes of inheritance, and a variable penetrance of the cerebrovascular phenotype. Diagnostic and evaluation techniques rely on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, magnetic resonance angiography (MRA conventional angiography, and cerebral hemodynamics measurements

  10. KohlschutterTonz Syndrome: Mutations in ROGDI and Evidence of Genetic Heterogeneity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tucci, A.; Kara, E.; Schossig, A.; Wolf, N.I.; Plagnol, V.; Fawcett, K.; Paisan-Ruiz, C.; Moore, M.; Hernandez, D.; Musumeci, S.; Tennison, M.; Hennekam, R.; Palmeri, S.; Malandrini, A.; Raskin, S.; Donnai, D.; Hennig, C.; Tzschach, A.; Hordijk, R.; Bast, T.; Wimmer, K.; Lo, C.N.; Shorvon, S.; Mefford, H.; Eichler, E.E.; Hall, R.; Hayes, I.; Hardy, J.; Singleton, A.; Zschocke, J.; Houlden, H.

    2013-01-01

    Kohlschütter-Tönz syndrome (KTS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by amelogenesis imperfecta, psychomotor delay or regression and seizures starting early in childhood. KTS was established as a distinct clinical entity after the first report by Kohlschütter in 1974, and to date,

  11. Usher syndrome in Denmark: mutation spectrum and some clinical observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dad, Shzeena; Rendtorff, Nanna Dahl; Tranebjærg, Lisbeth; Grønskov, Karen; Karstensen, Helena Gásdal; Brox, Vigdis; Nilssen, Øivind; Roux, Anne-Françoise; Rosenberg, Thomas; Jensen, Hanne; Møller, Lisbeth Birk

    2016-09-01

    Usher syndrome (USH) is a genetically heterogeneous deafness-blindness syndrome, divided into three clinical subtypes: USH1, USH2 and USH3. Mutations in 21 out of 26 investigated Danish unrelated individuals with USH were identified, using a combination of molecular diagnostic methods. Before Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) became available mutations in nine individuals (1 USH1, 7 USH2, 1 USH3) were identified by Sanger sequencing of USH1C , USH2A or CLRN1 or by Arrayed Primer EXtension (APEX) method. Mutations in 12 individuals (7 USH1, 5 USH2) were found by targeted NGS of ten known USH genes. Five novel pathogenic variants were identified. We combined our data with previously published, and obtained an overview of the USH mutation spectrum in Denmark, including 100 unrelated individuals; 32 with USH1, 67 with USH2, and 1 with USH3. Macular edema was observed in 44 of 117 individuals. Olfactory function was tested in 12 individuals and found to be within normal range in all. Mutations that lead to USH1 were predominantly identified in MYO7A (75%), whereas all mutations in USH2 cases were identified in USH2A . The MYO7A mutation c.93C>A, p.(Cys31*) accounted for 33% of all USH1 mutations and the USH2A c.2299delG, p.(Glu767Serfs*21) variant accounted for 45% of all USH2 mutations in the Danish cohort.

  12. [Evidence-based therapy of polycystic ovarian syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gődény, Sándor; Csenteri, Orsolya Karola

    2015-11-08

    Polycystic ovary syndrome is recognized as the most common hormonal and metabolic disorder likely to affect women. The heterogeneous endocrinopathy is characterized by clinical and/or biochemical hyperandrogenism, oligo- or amenorrhoea, anovulatory infertility, and polycystic ovarian morphology. The syndrome is often associated with obesity, hyperinsulinemia and adversely affects endocrine, metabolic, and cardiovascular health. The symptoms and complaint of the patients vary with age. To maximise health gain of the syndrome, adequate, evidence based effective, efficient and safe treatment is necessary. This article summarises the highest available evidence provided by studies, meta-analysis and systematic reviews about the therapeutical possibilities for treating obesity, hyperandrogenism, menstrual abnormalities, infertility and psychological problems related to polycystic ovary syndrome.

  13. Clinical predictors of lacunar syndrome not due to lacunar infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Comes Emili

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Lacunar syndrome not due to lacunar infarct is poorly characterised. This single centre, retrospective study was conducted to describe the clinical characteristics of patients with lacunar syndrome not due to lacunar infarct and to identify clinical predictors of this variant of lacunar stroke. Methods A total of 146 patients with lacunar syndrome not due to lacunar infarction were included in the "Sagrat Cor Hospital of Barcelona Stroke Registry" during a period of 19 years (1986-2004. Data from stroke patients are entered in the stroke registry following a standardized protocol with 161 items regarding demographics, risk factors, clinical features, laboratory and neuroimaging data, complications and outcome. The characteristics of these 146 patients with lacunar syndrome not due to lacunar infarct were compared with those of the 733 patients with lacunar infarction. Results Lacunar syndrome not due to lacunar infarct accounted for 16.6% (146/879 of all cases of lacunar stroke. Subtypes of lacunar syndromes included pure motor stroke in 63 patients, sensorimotor stroke in 51, pure sensory stroke in 14, atypical lacunar syndrome in 9, ataxic hemiparesis in 5 and dysarthria-clumsy hand in 4. Valvular heart disease, atrial fibrillation, sudden onset, limb weakness and sensory symptoms were significantly more frequent among patients with lacunar syndrome not due to lacunar infarct than in those with lacunar infarction, whereas diabetes was less frequent. In the multivariate analysis, atrial fibrillation (OR = 4.62, sensorimotor stroke (OR = 4.05, limb weakness (OR = 2.09, sudden onset (OR = 2.06 and age (OR = 0.96 were independent predictors of lacunar syndrome not due to lacunar infarct. Conclusions Although lacunar syndromes are highly suggestive of small deep cerebral infarctions, lacunar syndromes not due to lacunar infarcts are found in 16.6% of cases. The presence of sensorimotor stroke, limb weakness and sudden onset in a patient

  14. Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome: a review of evaluation and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polackwich, A S; Shoskes, D A

    2016-06-01

    Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS), also known as NIH Category III Prostatitis is a highly prevalent syndrome with significant impact on quality of life. As a heterogeneous syndrome, there exists no 'one size fits all' therapy with level 1 evidence to guide therapy. This often leads to a nihilistic approach to patients and clinical outcomes are poor. In this review, we examine the evidence for CP/CPPS therapies and discuss our technique of clinical phenotyping combined with multimodal therapy. Review of Medline articles with terms 'non-bacterial prostatitis', 'abacterial prostatitis' and 'chronic pelvic pain syndrome'. Many individual therapies have been evaluated in the treatment of CP/CPPS; antibiotics, anti-inflammatory medications (including bioflavonoids), neuromodulators, alpha blockers, pelvic floor physical therapy and cognitive behavior therapy. Each of these has been found to have varying success in alleviating symptoms. UPOINT is a system of clinical phenotyping for CP/CPPS patients that has 6 defined domains, which guide multimodal therapy. It has been validated to correlate with symptom burden and therapy guided by UPOINT leads to significant symptom improvement in 75-84% of patients based on three independent studies. CP/CPPS is a heterogeneous condition and, much like with prostate cancer, optimal therapy can only be achieved by classifying patients into clinically meaningful phenotypic groups (much like TNM) and letting the phenotype drive therapy.

  15. Presentation and clinical course of Wolfram (DIDMOAD) syndrome from North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganie, M A; Laway, B A; Nisar, S; Wani, M M; Khurana, M L; Ahmad, F; Ahmed, S; Gupta, P; Ali, I; Shabir, I; Shadan, A; Ahmed, A; Tufail, S

    2011-11-01

    Wolfram syndrome, also known as DIDMOAD, is a relatively rare inherited neurodegenerative disorder, first evident in childhood as an association of juvenile-onset diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy, followed by diabetes insipidus and deafness. The aim of the study was to examine the clinical profile of patients with DIDMOAD syndrome presenting to a tertiary care hospital in north India. Clinical presentation of juvenile-onset diabetes mellitus fulfilling the diagnosis of Wolfram syndrome was studied using a prepared standardized form. Subjects with juvenile-onset non-autoimmune diabetes mellitus attending the diabetic clinic at a tertiary care centre in north India were followed for 10 years and a diagnosis of fully developed Wolfram syndrome was confirmed in seven individuals. The series consisted of five male and two female patients with a mean age of 17.5 ±7.34 years. Two subjects had consanguinity and none had any other family member affected. Optic atrophy was present in all, sensorineural hearing loss in 4/7, central diabetes insipidus in 4/7 and nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in 2/7 subjects. The new associations found were: spastic myoclonus, short stature with pancreatic malabsorption, nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, cyanotic heart disease and choledocholithiasis with cholangitis. Genetic analysis revealed mutation in exon 8 of the WFS1 gene in all the cases studied. The present clinical series of Wolfram syndrome reveals a varied clinical presentation of the syndrome and some new associations. © 2011 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2011 Diabetes UK.

  16. Secondary Hemophagocytic Syndrome: The Importance of Clinical Suspicion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemophagocytic syndrome is a rare and potentially fatal disorder characterized by pathological immune activation associated with a primary familial disorder, genetic mutations, or occurring as a sporadic condition. The latter can be secondary to infections, malignancies, or autoimmune diseases. Clinically, patients present signs of severe inflammation, with unremitting fever, cytopenias, spleen enlargement, phagocytosis of bone marrow elements, hypertriglyceridemia, and hypofibrinogenemia. Increased suspicion is determinant to timely initiate treatment in an attempt to alter the natural history. The authors present three clinical cases of this syndrome, with a brief review of the diagnostic criteria and treatment.

  17. A clinical study of Gilles de la Tourette syndrome in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, A J; Robertson, M; Trimble, M R; Murray, N M

    1984-01-01

    The clinical features of 53 British-born patients with Gilles de la Tourette syndrome are described. The mean age at onset of body tics was seven years and for vocalisations 11 years. Coprolalia was present in 39%, copropraxia in 21%, echolalia in 46% and echopraxia in 21%. Complicated antics and mannerisms were also common, often involving the compulsive touching of objects or self-injurious behaviour. Forty-six per cent of cases had a family history of tics in a single close relative and in two individuals a further member of the family had Gilles de la Tourette syndrome. Focal dystonia was present in four patients who had never received neuroleptics drugs and chorea was seen in two other untreated patients. In three patients acoustic startle consistently induced brief eye blink followed by a whole body jerk or jump. Rapid repetitive movements of the hands increased the frequency and severity of tics in 13 patients, but the performance of mental arithmetic under time pressure had a much more unpredictable effect. Electroencephalographic abnormalities occurred in eight (13%) but no definite CT brain scan abnormalities were detected. The incidence of left handedness did not differ from that in the general population and no evidence to suggest organic impairment was found on neuropsychological testing. This study provides no support for the notion that Gilles de la Tourette syndrome is a degenerative disorder of the central nervous system but provides some evidence for heterogeneity. PMID:6582230

  18. [Molecular updates on Usher syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, A-F

    2005-01-01

    Usher syndrome (USH) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the association of sensorineural hearing loss and retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Usher syndrome is both clinically and genetically heterogeneous. Three clinical subtypes are defined with respect to vestibular dysfunction and the degree of hearing loss. Type I (USH1) patients have profound hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction from birth. Type II (USH2) is the most frequent and patients tend to have less severe hearing impairment and normal vestibular response. Type III (USH3) is characterized by a progressive loss of hearing and is found more frequently among Finnish patients. Recently, major breakthroughs have been made in the molecular genetics of Usher syndrome as a number of chromosomal loci and causative genes have been identified in each clinical subtype. Twelve loci are known and the corresponding genes have been cloned for six of them. Although their functions are not always clearly established, a common role is emerging for the proteins identified within each subtype. As a result, each subtype could emanate from defects affecting distinct cellular mechanisms.

  19. Neurophysiology and neurochemistry of corticobasal syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murgai, Aditya A; Jog, Mandar S

    2018-01-06

    Corticobasal syndrome is a rare neurodegenerative disorder, which presents with a progressive, asymmetrical, akinetic rigid syndrome and early cortical signs. However, clinical, pathological, and electrophysiological heterogeneity makes the understanding of this syndrome challenging. Corticobasal syndrome can have various pathological substrates including corticobasal degeneration, Alzheimer's disease, Fronto-temporal degeneration with TDP inclusions, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). Furthermore, tools such as transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and functional neuroimaging techniques like PET and SPECT have not been adequately used to supplement the clinico-pathological heterogeneity. TMS studies in CBS have revealed changes in cortical excitability and transcortical inhibition. Despite the availability of more than 2 decades, its potential in CBS has not been fully utilized in studying the cortical plasticity and effect of Levodopa on central neurophysiology. PET and SPECT studies in CBS have shown abnormalities in regional glucose metabolism, asymmetrical involvement of presynaptic dopaminergic system, and ascending cholinergic connections to the cortex. While most studies have shown normal D2 receptor-binding activity in striatum of CBS cases, the results have not been unanimous. Functional neuroimaging and TMS studies in CBS have shown the involvement of GABAergic, muscarinic, and dopaminergic systems. In this review, we aim to provide the current state of understanding of central neurophysiology and neurochemistry of CBS using TMS and functional neuroimaging techniques. We also highlight the heterogeneous nature of this disorder and the existing knowledge gaps.

  20. Clinical and Molecular Heterogeneity of RTEL1 Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin W. Wlodarski

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Typical features of dyskeratosis congenita (DC resulting from excessive telomere shortening include bone marrow failure (BMF, mucosal fragility, and pulmonary or liver fibrosis. In more severe cases, immune deficiency and recurring infections can add to disease severity. RTEL1 deficiency has recently been described as a major genetic etiology, but the molecular basis and clinical consequences of RTEL1-associated DC are incompletely characterized. We report our observations in a cohort of six patients: five with novel biallelic RTEL1 mutations p.Trp456Cys, p.Ile425Thr, p.Cys1244ProfsX17, p.Pro884_Gln885ins53X13, and one with novel heterozygous mutation p.Val796AlafsX4. The most unifying features were hypocellular BMF in 6/6 and B-/NK-cell lymphopenia in 5/6 patients. In addition, three patients with homozygous mutations p.Trp456Cys or p.Ile425Thr also suffered from immunodeficiency, cerebellar hypoplasia, and enteropathy, consistent with Hoyeraal-Hreidarsson syndrome. Chromosomal breakage resembling a homologous recombination defect was detected in patient-derived fibroblasts but not in hematopoietic compartment. Notably, in both cellular compartments, differential expression of 1243aa and 1219/1300aa RTEL1 isoforms was observed. In fibroblasts, response to ionizing irradiation and non-homologous end joining were not impaired. Telomeric circles did not accumulate in patient-derived primary cells and lymphoblastoid cell lines, implying alternative pathomechanisms for telomeric loss. Overall, RTEL1-deficient cells exhibited a phenotype of replicative exhaustion, spontaneous apoptosis and senescence. Specifically, CD34+ cells failed to expand in vitro, B-cell development was compromised, and T-cells did not proliferate in long-term culture. Finally, we report on the natural history and outcome of our patients. While two patients died from infections, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT resulted in sustained engraftment in two patients

  1. Clinical and Molecular Heterogeneity of RTEL1 Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speckmann, Carsten; Sahoo, Sushree Sangita; Rizzi, Marta; Hirabayashi, Shinsuke; Karow, Axel; Serwas, Nina Kathrin; Hoemberg, Marc; Damatova, Natalja; Schindler, Detlev; Vannier, Jean-Baptiste; Boulton, Simon J; Pannicke, Ulrich; Göhring, Gudrun; Thomay, Kathrin; Verdu-Amoros, J J; Hauch, Holger; Woessmann, Wilhelm; Escherich, Gabriele; Laack, Eckart; Rindle, Liliana; Seidl, Maximilian; Rensing-Ehl, Anne; Lausch, Ekkehart; Jandrasits, Christine; Strahm, Brigitte; Schwarz, Klaus; Ehl, Stephan R; Niemeyer, Charlotte; Boztug, Kaan; Wlodarski, Marcin W

    2017-01-01

    Typical features of dyskeratosis congenita (DC) resulting from excessive telomere shortening include bone marrow failure (BMF), mucosal fragility, and pulmonary or liver fibrosis. In more severe cases, immune deficiency and recurring infections can add to disease severity. RTEL1 deficiency has recently been described as a major genetic etiology, but the molecular basis and clinical consequences of RTEL1-associated DC are incompletely characterized. We report our observations in a cohort of six patients: five with novel biallelic RTEL1 mutations p.Trp456Cys, p.Ile425Thr, p.Cys1244ProfsX17, p.Pro884_Gln885ins53X13, and one with novel heterozygous mutation p.Val796AlafsX4. The most unifying features were hypocellular BMF in 6/6 and B-/NK-cell lymphopenia in 5/6 patients. In addition, three patients with homozygous mutations p.Trp456Cys or p.Ile425Thr also suffered from immunodeficiency, cerebellar hypoplasia, and enteropathy, consistent with Hoyeraal-Hreidarsson syndrome. Chromosomal breakage resembling a homologous recombination defect was detected in patient-derived fibroblasts but not in hematopoietic compartment. Notably, in both cellular compartments, differential expression of 1243aa and 1219/1300aa RTEL1 isoforms was observed. In fibroblasts, response to ionizing irradiation and non-homologous end joining were not impaired. Telomeric circles did not accumulate in patient-derived primary cells and lymphoblastoid cell lines, implying alternative pathomechanisms for telomeric loss. Overall, RTEL1-deficient cells exhibited a phenotype of replicative exhaustion, spontaneous apoptosis and senescence. Specifically, CD34 + cells failed to expand in vitro , B-cell development was compromised, and T-cells did not proliferate in long-term culture. Finally, we report on the natural history and outcome of our patients. While two patients died from infections, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) resulted in sustained engraftment in two patients. Whether

  2. Noonan syndrome: a clinical and genetic study of 31 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertola Débora Romeo

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Noonan syndrome is a multiple congenital anomaly syndrome, inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern. We studied 31 patients (18 males and 13 females affected by this disorder regarding their clinical and genetic characteristics. The most frequent clinical findings were short stature (71%; craniofacial dysmorphisms, especially hypertelorism, ptosis, downslanting of the palpebral fissures; short or webbed neck (87%; cardiac anomalies (65%, and fetal pads in fingers and toes (70%. After studying the probands' first-degree relatives, we made the diagnosis of Noonan syndrome in more than one family member in three families. Therefore, the majority of our cases were sporadic.

  3. Antecedent infections and anti-ganglioside antibodies in Guillain-Barré syndrome : their role in pathogenesis and heterogeneity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.C. Jacobs (Bart)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractThe Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) is the most common form of acute neuromuscular paralysis in developed countries, but the pathogenesis is still largely unknown. The major clinical features of the syndrome were first united by J-B.O. Landry in 1859 (1). The syndrome was named after G.

  4. Primary CNS lymphoma as a cause of Korsakoff syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Cory; Voll, Chris; Macaulay, Robert

    2002-01-01

    Korsakoff syndrome presents with memory dysfunction with retrograde amnesia, anterograde amnesia, limited insight into dysfunction, and confabulation. The most common etiology of Korsakoff syndrome is thiamine deficiency secondary to alcoholism. There are limited case reports of structural lesions causing Korsakoff syndrome. A 46-year-old male with a long history of alcoholism presented with a history of confusion, amnesia, and confabulation with no localizing features on neurological examination. The patient showed no clinical change with intravenous thiamine. Computed tomography of the brain revealed a heterogenous, enhancing mass lesion centered within the third ventricle, with other lesions found throughout cortical and subcortical regions. The patient was given dexamethasone i.v. without noticeable clinical improvement but with marked radiological improvement with mass reduction. Stereotactic biopsy revealed a diagnosis of primary central nervous system (CNS) lymphoma. Most patients presenting with Korsakoff syndrome have thiamine deficiency; however, mass lesions can produce an identical clinical picture. This is the first case report of a patient with primary CNS lymphoma presenting as Korsakoff syndrome.

  5. [Convenience clinic redefine polycystic ovary syndrome (Stein-Leventhal)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zárate-Treviño, Arturo; Hernández-Valencia, Marcelino; Morán, Carlos; Manuel, Leticia; Saucedo, Renata

    2014-04-01

    In 1935 during a medical meeting behalf in New Orleans was presents a study that included seven cases of women that suffered menstrual dysfunctions, hirsutism and sterility, for laparotomy the description of the ovaries had a pearly white color and it was hypertrophic, the cuneiform resection in both ovaries resulted in correction of the menstrual dysfunction and two of them got pregnancy later on, receiving the name of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). The technological advance facilitates the hormonal analyses demonstrating the hyperandrogenism existence and the mechanism of the anovulation, the PCOS showed to be heterogeneous, reason why it was hindered to define it, this advanced the current trend to question the existence of the PCOS and to accept the convenience, either to change the name or to redefine it, leaving it as a simple syndrome with several phenotypes. The endocrine component includes abnormal secretion of insulin and consequently outlying resistance to this hormone, likewise is hyperandrogenism, dislipoproteinemia and obesity. The hormonal exams are unnecessary for the diagnostic and treatment; it is convenient to demonstrate for sonography the ovarian growth. Other dysfunctions like the congenital suprarenal hyperplasia, hyperprolactinemia and hypotiroidism should be discarded. The treatment should be individualized with relationship to the reason of the consultation and the patients age. It has not been demonstrated that the sensibilitizers use to the insulin avoids long term cardiovascular illness and diabetes. Therefore, the phenotype is heterogeneous with a fickle metabolic component and for it has arisen the restlessness of a better definition of the SPO.

  6. Spontaneous esophageal rupture - Boerhaave's syndrome: Clinical symptoms and radiographic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaa, J.; Deininger, H.K.

    1989-01-01

    Spontaneous transmural rupture of the esophagus (Boerhaave's syndrome) is a life-threatening emergency. Prompt diagnosis is essential to a better prognosis, successful operative outcome and patient survival. The chest roentgenogram and the contrast esophagograms to follow are the most helpful diagnostic tests. The clinical manifestations are variable and may be misleading and thus delay accurate recognition. In our case report the major clinical features and radiological signs of Boerhaave's syndrome are described. The pathogenesis, characteristic clinical symptoms and the signs and radiological evaluation are reviewed. (orig.) [de

  7. The varied clinical presentations of major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rush, A John

    2007-01-01

    DSM-IV major depressive disorder (MDD) is a clinical syndrome notable for heterogeneity of its clinical presentation, genetics, neurobiology, clinical course, and treatment responsiveness. In an attempt to make sense of this heterogeneity, clinicians and researchers have proposed a number of MDD "subtypes" based on differences in characteristic symptoms (e.g., atypical, melancholic, psychotic), onset (e.g., early vs. late, post-partum, seasonal), course of illness (e.g., single vs. recurrent, chronic, double), and severity. This article provides a brief review of the status of several of the most common subtypes in terms of their clinical features, biological correlates, course of illness, and treatment implications.

  8. Clinical and Molecular Genetic Analysis in Three Children with Wolfram Syndrome: A Novel WFS1 Mutation (c.2534T>A).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelmeli, Gamze; Türkkahraman, Doğa; Çürek, Yusuf; Houghton, Jayne; Akçurin, Sema; Bircan, İffet

    2017-03-01

    Wolfram syndrome (WS) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in WFS1 gene. The clinical features include diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus (DM), optic atrophy, deafness, and other variable clinical manifestations. In this paper, we present the clinical and genetic characteristics of 3 WS patients from 3 unrelated Turkish families. Clinical characteristics of the patients and the age of onset of symptoms were quite different in each pedigree. The first two cases developed all symptoms of the disease in their first decade of life. The heterozygous father of case 2 was symptomatic with bilateral deafness. The first ocular finding of one patient (patient 3) was bilateral cataract which was accompanying DM as a first feature of the syndrome. In this patient's family, there were two members with features suggestive of WS. Previously known homozygous mutations, c.460+1G>A in intron 4 and c.1885C>T in exon 8, were identified in these cases. A novel homozygous c.2534T>A mutation was also detected in the exon 8 of WFS1 gene. Because of the rarity and heterogeneity of WS, detection of specific and nonspecific clinical signs including ocular findings and family history in non-autoimmune, insulinopenic diabetes cases should lead to a tentative diagnosis of WS. Genetic testing is required to confirm the diagnosis.

  9. [Clinical and genetic aspects of albinism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arveiler, Benoit; Lasseaux, Eulalie; Morice-Picard, Fanny

    Albinism is a genetic disease affecting 1/17,000 person worldwide. It constitutes the second cause of congenital loss of visual acuity after optic atrophy. Albinism is heterogeneous both at the clinical and genetic levels. It is characterized by ocular development anomalies and by a variable degree of hypopigmentation. Clinically, three forms of the disease are described: oculocutaneous, ocular and syndromic (Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome, Chediak-Higashi syndrome). Nineteen genes involved in the different types of albinism have been described so far. The broad phenotypic variability between the different forms but also within a particular form renders the establishment of phenotype-genotype correlations impossible. A genetic test exploring all 19 genes is necessary to establish the diagnosis and to distinguish between syndromic and non-syndromic forms. We present the creation of an albinism-dedicated Day Hospital at the University Hospital of Bordeaux. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Clinical Syndromes Associated with Cardiovascular Diseases: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Sheng Yang, MD, PhD, FACC, FAHA

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In clinical practice, a variety of syndromes are associated with cardiovascular disease and have characteristic findings. Most of them are an autosomal dominant genetic disorder and have different types of cardiovascular abnormalities, including electrocardiographic conduction defects, arrhythmias, cardiomyopathy, vascular and valvular diseases, cardiac septal defects, and pulmonary problems. There is a growing need for physicians to pay more attention to these syndromes.

  11. Quantifying Heterogeneous Malaria Exposure and Clinical Protection in a Cohort of Ugandan Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Barraquer, Isabel; Arinaitwe, Emmanuel; Jagannathan, Prasanna; Boyle, Michelle J.; Tappero, Jordan; Muhindo, Mary; Kamya, Moses R.; Dorsey, Grant; Drakeley, Chris; Ssewanyana, Isaac; Smith, David L.; Greenhouse, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    Background. Plasmodium falciparum malaria remains a leading cause of childhood morbidity and mortality. There are important gaps in our understanding of the factors driving the development of antimalaria immunity as a function of age and exposure. Methods. We used data from a cohort of 93 children participating in a clinical trial in Tororo, Uganda, an area of very high exposure to P. falciparum. We jointly quantified individual heterogeneity in the risk of infection and the development of immunity against infection and clinical disease. Results. Results showed significant heterogeneity in the hazard of infection and independent effects of age and cumulative number of infections on the risk of infection and disease. The risk of developing clinical malaria upon infection decreased on average by 6% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0%–12%) for each additional year of age and by 2% (95% CI, 1%–3%) for each additional prior infection. Children randomly assigned to receive dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine for treatment appeared to develop immunity more slowly than those receiving artemether-lumefantrine. Conclusions. Heterogeneity in P. falciparum exposure and immunity can be independently evaluated using detailed longitudinal studies. Improved understanding of the factors driving immunity will provide key information to anticipate the impact of malaria-control interventions and to understand the mechanisms of clinical immunity. PMID:27481862

  12. Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifi, M; Walter, M A

    2018-06-01

    Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome (ARS) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of developmental disorders affecting primarily the anterior segment of the eye, often leading to secondary glaucoma. Patients with ARS may also present with systemic changes, including dental defects, mild craniofacial dysmorphism, and umbilical anomalies. ARS is inherited in an autosomal-dominant fashion; the underlying defect in 40% of patients is mutations in PITX2 or FOXC1. Here, an overview of the clinical spectrum of ARS is provided. As well, the known underlying genetic defects, clinical diagnostic possibilities, genetic counseling and treatments of ARS are discussed in detail. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Clinical outcome and risk stratification in Brugada syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadashi Wada, MD

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Since the first report on Brugada syndrome, various risk markers for the prediction of ventricular fibrillation (VF in patients with Brugada syndrome have been reported. Multicenter trials reported spontaneous type 1 electrocardiogram (ECG and disease symptoms as prognostic predictors. VF induction by programmed electrical stimulation is still controversial, and most of the studies have failed to prove its significance for the prediction of spontaneous VF episodes. In Japan, although most multicenter studies have shown that patients with type 1 ECG were at high risk, it is difficult to determine the indication for implantation of an implantable cardioverter defibrillator only based on the ECG type. Recent studies have added new risk markers, such as inferolateral early repolarization, fragmented QRS, and shorter effective refractory periods of the ventricle, in addition to type 1 ECG and symptoms. Here, we review the clinical outcome and indices reported as reliable prognostic factors of Brugada syndrome with a focus on the clinical and ECG markers for risk stratification.

  14. Meier-Gorlin syndrome Clinical genetics and genomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. de Munnik (Sonja); E.H. Hoefsloot (Lies); J. Roukema (Jolt); J. Schoots (Jeroen); N.V.A.M. Knoers (Nine); H.G. Brunner; A.P. Jackson (Andrew); E. Bongers (Ernie)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractMeier-Gorlin syndrome (MGS) is a rare autosomal recessive primordial dwarfism disorder, characterized by microtia, patellar applasia/hypoplasia, and a proportionate short stature. Associated clinical features encompass feeding problems, congenital pulmonary emphysema, mammary hypoplasia

  15. Cardiovascular and Metabolic Heterogeneity of Obesity: Clinical Challenges and Implications for Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neeland, Ian J; Poirier, Paul; Després, Jean-Pierre

    2018-03-27

    The prevalence of obesity has increased globally over the last 2 decades. Although the body mass index has been a convenient and simple index of obesity at the population level, studies have shown that obesity defined by body mass index alone is a remarkably heterogeneous condition with varying cardiovascular and metabolic manifestations across individuals. Adipose tissue is an exquisitely active metabolic organ engaged in cross-talk between various systems; perturbation of adipose tissue results in a pathological response to positive caloric balance in susceptible individuals that directly and indirectly contributes to cardiovascular and metabolic disease. Inadequate subcutaneous adipose tissue expansion in the face of dietary triglycerides leads to visceral and ectopic fat deposition, inflammatory/adipokine dysregulation, and insulin resistance. Conversely, preferential fat storage in the lower body depot may act as a metabolic buffer and protect other tissues from lipotoxicity caused by lipid overflow and ectopic fat. Translational, epidemiological, and clinical studies over the past 30 years have clearly demonstrated a strong link between visceral and ectopic fat and the development of a clinical syndrome characterized by atherogenic dyslipidemia, hyperinsulinemia/glucose intolerance, hypertension, atherosclerosis, and adverse cardiac remodeling/heart failure. This relationship is even more nuanced when clinical entities such as metabolically healthy obesity phenotype and the obesity paradox are considered. Although it is clear that the accumulation of visceral/ectopic fat is a major contributor to cardiovascular and metabolic risk above and beyond the body mass index, implementation of fat distribution assessment into clinical practice remains a challenge. Anthropometric indexes of obesity are easily implemented, but newer imaging-based methods offer improved sensitivity and specificity for measuring specific depots. Lifestyle, pharmacological, and surgical

  16. Catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome: a clinical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayer, Ali; Ortega, Luis M

    2014-01-01

    Catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (CAPS) is a rare life-threatening autoimmune disease characterized by disseminated intravascular thrombosis resulting in multiorgan failure. Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), Google Scholar, PubMed (NLM), LISTA (EBSCO) and Web of Science have been searched. CAPS is due to antiphospholipid antibodies directed against a heterogeneous group of proteins that are associated with phospholipids. These autoantibodies activate endothelial cells, platelets, and immune cells, thereby promoting a proinflammatory and prothrombotic phenotype. Furthermore, antiphospholipid antibodies inhibit anticoagulants, impair fibrinolysis, and activate complements. Although CAPS can affect a variety of organs and tissues, the kidneys, lungs, central nervous system, heart, skin, liver, and gastrointestinal tract are most commonly affected. The systemic inflammatory response syndrome, likely to extensive tissue damage, accompanies CAPS. The most frequent renal manifestations are hypertension, proteinuria, hematuria, and acute renal failure.In the majority of patients with CAPS, a precipitating factor such as infection, surgery, or medication can be identified. Antiphospholipid antibodies such as lupus anticoagulant and antibodies against cardiolipin, β2-glycoprotein I, and prothrombin are serological hallmark of CAPS. Laboratory tests often reveal antinuclear antibodies, thrombocytopenia, and anemia. Despite widespread intravascular coagulation, blood films reveal only a small number of schistocytes. In addition, severe thrombocytopenia is uncommon. Histologically, CAPS is characterized by acute thrombotic microangiopathy. CAPS must be distinguished from other forms of thrombotic microangiopathies such as hemolytic-uremic syndrome, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, disseminated intravascular coagulation, and heparin-induced thrombocyt openia. CAPS is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Therefore, an aggressive multidisciplinary

  17. ANKRD11 variants cause variable clinical features associated with KBG syndrome and Coffin–Siris-like syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyatake, Satoko; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Stark, Zornitza; Nabetani, Makoto; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Nakashima, Mitsuko; Miyake, Noriko; Mizuguchi, Takeshi; Ohtake, Akira; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2017-01-01

    KBG syndrome (KBGS) is an autosomal dominant multiple congenital anomaly-intellectual disability syndrome, characterized by developmental delay with neurological involvements, macrodontia of the upper central incisors, characteristic facial dysmorphism and skeletal anomalies. Variants in ANKRD11 cause KBGS. We present five individuals from four families with ANKRD11 variants identified by whole-exome sequencing. Four of the five were clinically affected, and their diagnoses were varied. One was typical KBGS, two were Coffin–Siris syndrome-like (CSS), and one was intellectual disability with infantile spasms. One individual showed extremely mild phenotype. All individuals fulfilled the proposed diagnostic criteria for KBGS. Phenotypic features overlap between KBGS and CSS to some extent, and characteristic dental and fifth finger/toe findings can indicate differential diagnosis. These findings indicate that patients with ANKRD11 variants occupy a wide spectrum of intellectual disability, including clinically normal individuals. This is the first report highlighting the clinical overlap between KBGS and CSS and supporting the recently proposed clinical concept, in which transcriptional machineries are disrupted. PMID:28250421

  18. ANKRD11 variants cause variable clinical features associated with KBG syndrome and Coffin-Siris-like syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyatake, Satoko; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Stark, Zornitza; Nabetani, Makoto; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Nakashima, Mitsuko; Miyake, Noriko; Mizuguchi, Takeshi; Ohtake, Akira; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2017-08-01

    KBG syndrome (KBGS) is an autosomal dominant multiple congenital anomaly-intellectual disability syndrome, characterized by developmental delay with neurological involvements, macrodontia of the upper central incisors, characteristic facial dysmorphism and skeletal anomalies. Variants in ANKRD11 cause KBGS. We present five individuals from four families with ANKRD11 variants identified by whole-exome sequencing. Four of the five were clinically affected, and their diagnoses were varied. One was typical KBGS, two were Coffin-Siris syndrome-like (CSS), and one was intellectual disability with infantile spasms. One individual showed extremely mild phenotype. All individuals fulfilled the proposed diagnostic criteria for KBGS. Phenotypic features overlap between KBGS and CSS to some extent, and characteristic dental and fifth finger/toe findings can indicate differential diagnosis. These findings indicate that patients with ANKRD11 variants occupy a wide spectrum of intellectual disability, including clinically normal individuals. This is the first report highlighting the clinical overlap between KBGS and CSS and supporting the recently proposed clinical concept, in which transcriptional machineries are disrupted.

  19. Meier-Gorlin syndrome Clinical genetics and genomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Munnik, Sonja A.; Hoefsloot, Elisabeth H.; Roukema, Jolt; Schoots, Jeroen; Knoers, Nine Vam; Brunner, Han G.; Jackson, Andrew P.; Bongers, Ernie Mhf

    2015-01-01

    Meier-Gorlin syndrome (MGS) is a rare autosomal recessive primordial dwarfism disorder, characterized by microtia, patellar applasia/hypoplasia, and a proportionate short stature. Associated clinical features encompass feeding problems, congenital pulmonary emphysema, mammary hypoplasia in females

  20. Chronic pain in hypermobility syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (hypermobility type): it is a challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheper, Mark C; de Vries, Janneke E; Verbunt, Jeanine; Engelbert, Raoul Hh

    2015-01-01

    Generalized joint hypermobility (GJH) is highly prevalent among patients diagnosed with chronic pain. When GJH is accompanied by pain in ≥4 joints over a period ≥3 months in the absence of other conditions that cause chronic pain, the hypermobility syndrome (HMS) may be diagnosed. In addition, GJH is also a clinical sign that is frequently present in hereditary diseases of the connective tissue, such as the Marfan syndrome, osteogenesis imperfecta, and the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. However, within the Ehlers-Danlos spectrum, a similar subcategory of patients having similar clinical features as HMS but lacking a specific genetic profile was identified: Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (EDS-HT). Researchers and clinicians have struggled for decades with the highly diverse clinical presentation within the HMS and EDS-HT phenotypes (Challenge 1) and the lack of understanding of the pathological mechanisms that underlie the development of pain and its persistence (Challenge 2). In addition, within the HMS/EDS-HT phenotype, there is a high prevalence of psychosocial factors, which again presents a difficult issue that needs to be addressed (Challenge 3). Despite recent scientific advances, many obstacles for clinical care and research still remain. To gain further insight into the phenotype of HMS/EDS-HT and its mechanisms, clearer descriptions of these populations should be made available. Future research and clinical care should revise and create consensus on the diagnostic criteria for HMS/EDS-HT (Solution 1), account for clinical heterogeneity by the classification of subtypes within the HMS/EDS-HT spectrum (Solution 2), and create a clinical core set (Solution 3).

  1. Identifying treatment effect heterogeneity in clinical trials using subpopulations of events: STEPP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Ann A; Bonetti, Marco; Cole, Bernard F; Yip, Wai-Ki; Gelber, Richard D

    2016-04-01

    Investigators conducting randomized clinical trials often explore treatment effect heterogeneity to assess whether treatment efficacy varies according to patient characteristics. Identifying heterogeneity is central to making informed personalized healthcare decisions. Treatment effect heterogeneity can be investigated using subpopulation treatment effect pattern plot (STEPP), a non-parametric graphical approach that constructs overlapping patient subpopulations with varying values of a characteristic. Procedures for statistical testing using subpopulation treatment effect pattern plot when the endpoint of interest is survival remain an area of active investigation. A STEPP analysis was used to explore patterns of absolute and relative treatment effects for varying levels of a breast cancer biomarker, Ki-67, in the phase III Breast International Group 1-98 randomized clinical trial, comparing letrozole to tamoxifen as adjuvant therapy for postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. Absolute treatment effects were measured by differences in 4-year cumulative incidence of breast cancer recurrence, while relative effects were measured by the subdistribution hazard ratio in the presence of competing risks using O-E (observed-minus-expected) methodology, an intuitive non-parametric method. While estimation of hazard ratio values based on O-E methodology has been shown, a similar development for the subdistribution hazard ratio has not. Furthermore, we observed that the subpopulation treatment effect pattern plot analysis may not produce results, even with 100 patients within each subpopulation. After further investigation through simulation studies, we observed inflation of the type I error rate of the traditional test statistic and sometimes singular variance-covariance matrix estimates that may lead to results not being produced. This is due to the lack of sufficient number of events within the subpopulations, which we refer to as instability of

  2. Usher syndrome: an effective sequencing approach to establish a genetic and clinical diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenarduzzi, S; Vozzi, D; Morgan, A; Rubinato, E; D'Eustacchio, A; Osland, T M; Rossi, C; Graziano, C; Castorina, P; Ambrosetti, U; Morgutti, M; Girotto, G

    2015-02-01

    Usher syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by retinitis pigmentosa, sensorineural hearing loss and, in some cases, vestibular dysfunction. The disorder is clinically and genetically heterogeneous and, to date, mutations in 11 genes have been described. This finding makes difficult to get a precise molecular diagnosis and offer patients accurate genetic counselling. To overcome this problem and to increase our knowledge of the molecular basis of Usher syndrome, we designed a targeted resequencing custom panel. In a first validation step a series of 16 Italian patients with known molecular diagnosis were analysed and 31 out of 32 alleles were detected (97% of accuracy). After this step, 31 patients without a molecular diagnosis were enrolled in the study. Three out of them with an uncertain Usher diagnosis were excluded. One causative allele was detected in 24 out 28 patients (86%) while the presence of both causative alleles characterized 19 patients out 28 (68%). Sixteen novel and 27 known alleles were found in the following genes: USH2A (50%), MYO7A (7%), CDH23 (11%), PCDH15 (7%) and USH1G (2%). Overall, on the 44 patients the protocol was able to characterize 74 alleles out of 88 (84%). These results suggest that our panel is an effective approach for the genetic diagnosis of Usher syndrome leading to: 1) an accurate molecular diagnosis, 2) better genetic counselling, 3) more precise molecular epidemiology data fundamental for future interventional plans. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Understanding the Executive Functioning Heterogeneity in Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffard, Stephane; Bayard, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    Schizophrenia is characterized by heterogeneous brain abnormalities involving cerebral regions implied in the executive functioning. The dysexecutive syndrome is one of the most prominent and functionally cognitive features of schizophrenia. Nevertheless, it is not clear to what extend executive deficits are heterogeneous in schizophrenia…

  4. Arteriohepatic Dysplasia (Alagille Syndrome in a Child (Clinical Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye.V. Omelchenko

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a clinical case of a child with a rare nosology — Alagille syndrome. Among the causes of neonatal cholestasis, Alagille syndrome is ranked second, it occurs with an incidence of 1 per 70,000 of newborns. This syndrome is characterized by an insufficient number or by a small dia­meter of intrahepatic bile ducts, which carry bile from the liver. Alagille syndrome includes a combination of at least three of the five main symptoms: chronic cholestasis, cardiovascular defects, abnormalities of the spine, eye defects, typical craniofacial signs. The only definitive therapy with the formation of liver cirrhosis and without gross defects is liver transplantation.

  5. Cortical thinning and clinical heterogeneity in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzapesa, Domenico Maria; D'Errico, Eustachio; Tortelli, Rosanna; Distaso, Eugenio; Cortese, Rosa; Tursi, Marianna; Federico, Francesco; Zoccolella, Stefano; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Dicuonzo, Franca; Simone, Isabella Laura

    2013-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) has heterogeneous clinical features that could be translated into specific patterns of brain atrophy. In the current study we have evaluated the relationship between different clinical expressions of classical ALS and measurements of brain cortical thickness. Cortical thickness analysis was conducted from 3D-MRI using FreeSurfer software in 29 ALS patients and 20 healthy controls. We explored three clinical traits of the disease, subdividing the patients into two groups for each of them: the bulbar or spinal onset, the higher or lower upper motor neuron burden, the faster or slower disease progression. We used both a whole brain vertex-wise analysis and a ROI analysis on primary motor areas. ALS patients showed cortical thinning in bilateral precentral gyrus, bilateral middle frontal gyrus, right superior temporal gyrus and right occipital cortex. ALS patients with higher upper motor neuron burden showed a significant cortical thinning in the right precentral gyrus and in other frontal extra-motor areas, compared to healthy controls. ALS patients with spinal onset showed a significant cortical thinning in the right precentral gyrus and paracentral lobule, compared to healthy controls. ALS patients with faster progressive disease showed a significant cortical thinning in widespread bilateral frontal and temporal areas, including the bilateral precentral gyrus, compared to healthy controls. Focusing on the primary motor areas, the ROI analysis revealed that the mean cortical thickness values were significantly reduced in ALS patients with higher upper motor neuron burden, spinal onset and faster disease progression related to healthy controls. In conclusion, the thickness of primary motor cortex could be a useful surrogate marker of upper motor neuron involvement in ALS; also our results suggest that cortical thinning in motor and non motor areas seem to reflect the clinical heterogeneity of the disease.

  6. Cortical thinning and clinical heterogeneity in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Maria Mezzapesa

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS has heterogeneous clinical features that could be translated into specific patterns of brain atrophy. In the current study we have evaluated the relationship between different clinical expressions of classical ALS and measurements of brain cortical thickness. Cortical thickness analysis was conducted from 3D-MRI using FreeSurfer software in 29 ALS patients and 20 healthy controls. We explored three clinical traits of the disease, subdividing the patients into two groups for each of them: the bulbar or spinal onset, the higher or lower upper motor neuron burden, the faster or slower disease progression. We used both a whole brain vertex-wise analysis and a ROI analysis on primary motor areas. ALS patients showed cortical thinning in bilateral precentral gyrus, bilateral middle frontal gyrus, right superior temporal gyrus and right occipital cortex. ALS patients with higher upper motor neuron burden showed a significant cortical thinning in the right precentral gyrus and in other frontal extra-motor areas, compared to healthy controls. ALS patients with spinal onset showed a significant cortical thinning in the right precentral gyrus and paracentral lobule, compared to healthy controls. ALS patients with faster progressive disease showed a significant cortical thinning in widespread bilateral frontal and temporal areas, including the bilateral precentral gyrus, compared to healthy controls. Focusing on the primary motor areas, the ROI analysis revealed that the mean cortical thickness values were significantly reduced in ALS patients with higher upper motor neuron burden, spinal onset and faster disease progression related to healthy controls. In conclusion, the thickness of primary motor cortex could be a useful surrogate marker of upper motor neuron involvement in ALS; also our results suggest that cortical thinning in motor and non motor areas seem to reflect the clinical heterogeneity of the disease.

  7. Brain Malformations Associated with Knobloch Syndrome – Review of Literature, Expanding Clinical Spectrum and Identification of Novel Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caglayan, Ahmet Okay; Baranoski, Jacob F.; Aktar, Fesih; Han, Wengi; Tuysuz, Beyhan; Guzel, Aslan; Guclu, Bulent; Kaymakcalan, Hande; Aktekin, Berrin; Akgumus, Gozde Tugce; Murray, Phillip B.; Omay, E. Zeynep Erson; Caglar, Caner; Bakircioglu, Mehmet; Sakalar, Yildirim Bayezit; Guzel, Ebru; Demir, Nihat; Tuncer, Oguz; Senturk, Senem; Ekici, Baris; Minja, Frank J.; Šestan, Nenad; Yasuno, Katsuhito; Bilguvar, Kaya; Caksen, Huseyin; Gunel, Murat

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Knobloch syndrome is a rare, autosomal recessive, developmental disorder characterized by stereotyped ocular abnormalities with or without occipital skull deformities (encephalocele, bone defects, cutis aplasia). Although there is clear heterogeneity in clinical presentation, central nervous system malformations, aside from the characteristic encephalocele, have not typically been considered a component of the disease phenotype. METHODS Four patients originally presented for genetic evaluation of symptomatic structural brain malformations. Whole-genome genotyping, whole-exome sequencing, and confirmatory Sanger sequencing were performed. Using immunohistochemical analysis, we investigated the protein expression pattern of COL18A1 in the mid-fetal and adult human cerebral cortex and then analyzed the spatial and temporal changes in the expression pattern of COL18A1 during human cortical development using the Human Brain Transcriptome database. RESULTS We identified two novel homozygous deleterious frame-shift mutations in the COL18A1 gene. Upon further investigation of these patients and their families, we found that many exhibited certain characteristics of Knobloch syndrome, including pronounced ocular defects. Our data strongly support an important role for COL18A1 in brain development and this report contributes to an enhanced characterization of the brain malformations that can result from deficiencies of collagen XVIII. CONCLUSIONS This case series highlights the diagnostic power and clinical utility of whole-exome sequencing technology – allowing clinicians and physician scientists to better understand the pathophysiology and presentations of rare diseases. We suggest that patients who are clinically diagnosed with Knobloch syndrome and/or found to have COL18A1 mutations via genetic screening should be investigated for potential structural brain abnormalities even in the absence of encephaloceles. PMID:25456301

  8. Late whiplash syndrome: a clinical and magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonuccelli, U; Pavese, N; Lucetti, C; Renna, M R; Gambaccini, G; Bernardini, S; Canapicchi, R; Carrozzi, L; Murri, L

    1999-01-01

    Cervical hyperextension injuries are common and are associated with significant morbidity. Clinically two syndromes are described: "acute" whiplash syndrome and "late" whiplash syndrome (in which the patients are still symptomatic after six months despite normal physical and radiological examination). In order to clarify the pathology of the persistent pain in late whiplash syndrome we performed a cervical spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 33 consecutive patients suffering from this condition. Twenty-six patients (78.8%) showed MRI abnormalities, the most common MRI finding (57.6%) was pre-existent spondylosis. Indeed, the group of patients with spondylosis and other MRI changes had higher clinical scores than those without MRI abnormalities as measured by a three-point grading system based upon the symptoms and signs shown. Several MRI changes, most of them already demonstrable by standard X-ray were seen among 33 patients suffering from late whiplash syndrome. Although no one of these findings appears to be specific and certainly related to the previous neck injury, they could represent a risk factor for a longer pain duration.

  9. Clinical Characteristics of Dry Eye Patients With Chronic Pain Syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vehof, Jelle; Smitt-Kamminga, Nicole Sillevis; Kozareva, Diana; Nibourg, Simone A.; Hammond, Christopher J.

    PURPOSE: To investigate clinical characteristics of dry eye disease (DED) patients with a chronic pain syndrome. DESIGN: Cross-sectional. study. METHODS: Four hundred twenty-five patients of a tertiary care DED patient cohort in the Netherlands were included. Chronic pain syndromes irritable bowel

  10. Clinical, radiological and imunogenectical study in patients with Reiter's Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza Meirelles, E. de.

    1987-01-01

    This study puspose was to investigate the clinical, radiological and immunogenetical parameters from a brazilian Reiter's Syndrome population. Twenty Reiter's Syndrome patients from ''Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo'' were prospectivelly studied in their demographical (sex, race, age at study, age at disease onset and disease duration), epidemiological (family history), clinical (general, articular, mucocutaneous, genitourinary, ocular and intestinal manifestations besides functional capacity at study), radiological (sacro-iliitis, spondylitis and calcaneal spur) and immunogenetical (HLA loci A, B and DR typing). The technique employed in the 61 aloantigens from loci HLA A (17), B (34) and DR (10) typing was Terasaki microlymphocitotoxicity modified by Danilovs, had being performed in the ''Laboratorio de Imunogenetica da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo''. We concluded that the clinical, radiological and immunogenetical Reiter's Syndrome expression in the brazilian population is similar to the others north american or european already studied populations and that the probability of one brazilian HLA B27 positie individual to develop Reiter's Syndrome is 19 fold larger when compared to one brazilian HLA B27 negative individual. (author) [pt

  11. Corpus callosum and neglect syndrome: Clinical findings after meningioma removal and anatomical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Gomes

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Two types of neglect are described: hemispatial and motivational neglect syndromes. Neglect syndrome is a neurophysiologic condition characterized by a malfunction in one hemisphere of the brain, resulting in contralateral hemispatial neglect in the absence of sensory loss and the right parietal lobe lesion being the most common anatomical site leading to it. In motivational neglect, the less emotional input is considered from the neglected side where anterior cingulate cortex harbors the most frequent lesions. Nevertheless, there are reports of injuries in the corpus callosum (CC causing hemispatial neglect syndrome, particularly located in the splenium. It is essential for a neurosurgeon to recognize this clinical syndrome as it can be either a primary manifestation of neurosurgical pathology (tumor, vascular lesion or as a postoperative iatrogenic clinical finding. The authors report a postoperative hemispatial neglect syndrome after a falcotentorial meningioma removal that recovered 10 months after surgery and performs a clinical, anatomical, and histological review centered in CC as key agent in neglect syndrome.

  12. Automated syndrome detection in a set of clinical facial photographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehringer, Stefan; Guenther, Manuel; Sinigerova, Stella; Wurtz, Rolf P; Horsthemke, Bernhard; Wieczorek, Dagmar

    2011-09-01

    Computer systems play an important role in clinical genetics and are a routine part of finding clinical diagnoses but make it difficult to fully exploit information derived from facial appearance. So far, automated syndrome diagnosis based on digital, facial photographs has been demonstrated under study conditions but has not been applied in clinical practice. We have therefore investigated how well statistical classifiers trained on study data comprising 202 individuals affected by one of 14 syndromes could classify a set of 91 patients for whom pictures were taken under regular, less controlled conditions in clinical practice. We found a classification accuracy of 21% percent in the clinical sample representing a ratio of 3.0 over a random choice. This contrasts with a 60% accuracy or 8.5 ratio in the training data. Producing average images in both groups from sets of pictures for each syndrome demonstrates that the groups exhibit large phenotypic differences explaining discrepancies in accuracy. A broadening of the data set is suggested in order to improve accuracy in clinical practice. In order to further this goal, a software package is made available that allows application of the procedures and contributions toward an improved data set. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Cugini's syndrome: its clinical history and diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Gasbarrone

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: This article deals with the description and diagnosis of a new nosographic syndrome, which received the eponym of "Cugini's syndrome" by the name of the Author who discovered its clinical picture. This syndrome is characterized by the binomial: "minimal target organ damage associated to monitoring prehypertension". CLINICAL HISTORY AND DIAGNOSIS: Between the years 1997 and 2002, the Author published a series of investigations regarding some office normotensives who inexplicably showed incipient signs of target organ damage (TOD. Investigated via ambulatory (A blood (B pressure (P monitoring (M, these subjects were surprisingly found not to be hypertensive. Neverthless, the office normotensives with TOD exibited the daily mean level of their systolic (S and diastolic (D BP (DML SBP/DBP significantly more elevated as compared to true normotensives. Because of these ABPM findings, the Author realized that the investigated subjects were false normotensives whose TOD was associated with a monitoring prehypertension (ABPM-diagnosable prehypertension alias monitoring prehypertension alias masked prehypertension. The year after the last Cugini's investigation, the INC-7 Reports introduced the term: "prehypertension" in its classification of arterial hypertension, as an office sphygmomanometric condition in between office normotension and office hypertension. The ABPM cut-off upper limits for a differential diagnosis between monitoring normotension, prehypertension and hypertension are reported, as calculated by the Author in its collection of ABPMs. The eponym of "Cugini's syndrome" was assigned in 2007 and confirmed in 2009. CONCLUSIVE REMARKS: The monitoring prehypertension is a further condition of discrepancy between office sphygmomanometry and ABPM, as per a masked prehypertension, whose diagnosis has to be immediately diagnosed, for preventing the onset of a TOD. There are reported the present investigations dealing with the possible

  14. Personality Disorders and Clinical Syndromes in ADHD Prisoners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudjonsson, Gisli H.; Wells, June; Young, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The main objective of this article is to investigate the type of personality disorders and clinical syndromes (CSs) that were best related to ADHD symptoms among prisoners. Method: The authors screened for childhood and adult ADHD symptoms and administered the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III (MCMI-III) to 196 serving prisoners.…

  15. An Update on the Genetics of Usher Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    José M. Millán; Elena Aller; Teresa Jaijo; Fiona Blanco-Kelly; Ascensión Gimenez-Pardo; Carmen Ayuso

    2011-01-01

    Usher syndrome (USH) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by hearing loss, retinitis pigmentosa (RP), and, in some cases, vestibular dysfunction. It is clinically and genetically heterogeneous and is the most common cause underlying deafness and blindness of genetic origin. Clinically, USH is divided into three types. Usher type I (USH1) is the most severe form and is characterized by severe to profound congenital deafness, vestibular areflexia, and prepubertal onset of progressive...

  16. Clinical and anatomical heterogeneity in autistic spectrum disorder: a structural MRI study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Toal, F

    2010-07-01

    Autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) is characterized by stereotyped\\/obsessional behaviours and social and communicative deficits. However, there is significant variability in the clinical phenotype; for example, people with autism exhibit language delay whereas those with Asperger syndrome do not. It remains unclear whether localized differences in brain anatomy are associated with variation in the clinical phenotype.

  17. Burning mouth syndrome: Clinical dilemma?

    OpenAIRE

    Kanchan R Patil; R S Sathawane

    2008-01-01

    Burning Mouth Syndrome (BMS) is a chronic orofacial burning pain condition usually in the absence of clinical and laboratory findings that affects many adults worldwide, yet its etiology and treatment remain poorly understood. Though it has been associated with numerous oral and systemic conditions, there has been no clear consensus on its etiology, pathogenesis and treatment. As a result, patients with inexplicable oral complaints are often referred from one health care professional to anoth...

  18. Mounier-Kuhn syndrome: radiological findings and clinical presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastos, Andrea de Lima [Hospital Julia Kubitschek-FHEMIG, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Unidade de Diagnostico por Imagem; Brito, Isabela Lage Alves, E-mail: andblima@yahoo.com.b [Hospital Julia Kubitschek-FHEMIG, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Pneumologia

    2011-05-15

    Mounier-Kuhn syndrome is a rare disease clinically characterized by recurrent respiratory infections. The present report describes a case of this disease with analysis of chest radiography and high resolution computed tomography showing increased caliber of the trachea, main bronchi and central bronchiectasis. Such changes, in association with clinical data, suggest the diagnosis. (author)

  19. [Rectal mucosal prolapse syndrome: study of cases. Hospital Daniel A Carrion, Lima, Peru, 2010-2013].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arévalo Suarez, Fernando; Cárdenas Vela, Irene; Rodríguez Rodríguez, Kriss; Pérez Narrea, María Teresa; Rodríguez Vargas, Omar; Montes Teves, Pedro; Monge Salgado, Eduardo

    2014-04-01

    to describe the clinical, endoscopic, and histological characteristics of rectal mucosal prolapse syndrome, formerly known as Solitary rectal ulcer, in patients from a general hospital. All patient diagnosed as rectal mucosal prolapse syndrome during 2010-2013 was selected; the medical history war reviewed and the histological slides were reevaluated by two pathologists. 17 cases of rectal mucosal prolapse syndrome were selected, the majority were males under 50 years, the most common clinical findings were rectal bleeding (82%) and constipation (65%), the endocopic findings were heterogeneous,: erythema (41%), ulcers (35%) and elevated lesions (29%). All cases presented fibromuscularhyperplasia in lamina propia and crypt distortion in the microscopic evaluation. In our study of rectal mucosal prolapse syndrome. The most common clinical findings were rectal bleeding and constipation. Erythematous mucosa was the most common endoscopic finding.

  20. Heterogeneous Optimization Framework: Reproducible Preprocessing of Multi-Spectral Clinical MRI for Neuro-Oncology Imaging Research

    OpenAIRE

    Milchenko, Mikhail; Snyder, Abraham Z.; LaMontagne, Pamela; Shimony, Joshua S; Benzinger, Tammie L.; Fouke, Sarah Jost; Marcus, Daniel S.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroimaging research often relies on clinically acquired magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) datasets that can originate from multiple institutions. Such datasets are characterized by high heterogeneity of modalities and variability of sequence parameters. This heterogeneity complicates the automation of image processing tasks such as spatial co-registration and physiological or functional image analysis.

  1. Outcome Measures for Clinical Trials in Down Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esbensen, Anna J; Hooper, Stephen R; Fidler, Deborah; Hartley, Sigan L; Edgin, Jamie; d'Ardhuy, Xavier Liogier; Capone, George; Conners, Frances A; Mervis, Carolyn B; Abbeduto, Leonard; Rafii, Michael; Krinsky-McHale, Sharon J; Urv, Tiina

    2017-05-01

    Increasingly individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities, including Down syndrome, are being targeted for clinical trials. However, a challenge exists in effectively evaluating the outcomes of these new pharmacological interventions. Few empirically evaluated, psychometrically sound outcome measures appropriate for use in clinical trials with individuals with Down syndrome have been identified. To address this challenge, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) assembled leading clinicians and scientists to review existing measures and identify those that currently are appropriate for trials; those that may be appropriate after expansion of age range addition of easier items, and/or downward extension of psychometric norms; and areas where new measures need to be developed. This article focuses on measures in the areas of cognition and behavior.

  2. The clinical aspects of the acute facet syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hestbaek, Lise; Kongsted, Alice; Jensen, Tue Secher

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The term 'acute facet syndrome' is widely used and accepted amongst chiropractors, but poorly described in the literature, as most of the present literature relates to chronic facet joint pain. Therefore, research into the degree of consensus on the subject amongst a large g...... from the facet joints has been described in the literature. Furthermore, the acute, uncomplicated facet syndrome was considered to have an uncomplicated clinical course, responding quickly to spinal manipulative therapy....

  3. Pseudoexfoliation syndrome at a Singapore eye clinic

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    Lee JK

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Jason Kian Seng Lee, Elizabeth Poh Ying Wong, Su Ling HoNational Healthcare Group Eye Institute, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore Background: The purpose of this study was to investigate the demographics of pseudoexfoliation syndrome (PXF and pseudoexfoliative glaucoma (PXG in a Singapore hospital eye outpatient clinic.Methods: A retrospective study of 93 consecutive patients (146 eyes with PXF was undertaken by a single ophthalmologist over a period of 37 months (July 1, 2006, to July 31, 2009.Results: Ninety-three (2.8% of 3,297 patients seen during the study period were diagnosed with PXF. Forty-three (46.2% of the 93 PXF patients were male. Indians were 5.04 times more likely to develop PXF than Chinese (P<0.001, 95% confidence interval 3.05–8.33, while Malays were 2.22 times more likely to develop PXF as compared with Chinese (P=0.029, 95% CI 1.08–4.55. Twenty-two (23.7% of the 93 PXF patients had PXG at the time of diagnosis. There was no statistically significant difference in mean age between PXF and PXG patients. There was a larger proportion of males with PXG than females (P<0.001.Conclusion: PXF is not infrequent in elderly Singapore eye clinic patients, and is more likely to occur in Indians than in Chinese. In the Singapore eye clinic setting, males may be more likely to develop PXG, although larger studies will be required to confirm this.Keywords: exfoliation syndrome, pseudoexfoliation syndrome, exfoliation glaucoma, glaucoma capsulare

  4. Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer and Cancer Syndromes: Recent Basic and Clinical Discoveries

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    Erbao Chen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Approximately one-third of individuals diagnosed with colorectal cancer have a family history of cancer, suggesting that CRCs may result from a heritable component. Despite the availability of current gene-identification techniques, only 5% of all CRCs emerge from well-identifiable inherited causes for predisposition, including polyposis and nonpolyposis syndromes. Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer represents a large proportion of cases, and robustly affected patients are at increased risk for early onset, synchronous, and metachronous colorectal malignancies and extracolonic malignancies. HNPCC encompasses several cancer syndromes, such as Lynch syndrome, Lynch-like syndrome, and familial colorectal cancer type X, which have remarkable clinical presentations and overlapping genetic profiles that make clinical diagnosis a challenging task. Therefore, distinguishing between the HNPCC disorders is crucial for physicians as an approach to tailor different recommendations for patients and their at-risk family members according to the risks for colonic and extracolonic cancer associated with each syndrome. Identification of these potential patients through epidemiological characteristics and new genetic testing can estimate the individual risk, which informs appropriate cancer screening, surveillance, and/or treatment strategies. In the past three years, many appealing and important advances have been made in our understanding of the relationship between HNPCC and CRC-associated syndromes. The knowledge from the genetic profile of cancer syndromes and unique genotype-phenotype profiles in the different syndromes has changed our cognition. Therefore, this review presents and discusses HNPCC and several common nonpolyposis syndromes with respect to molecular phenotype, histopathologic features, and clinical presentation.

  5. Prevalence of burnout syndrome in clinical nurses at a hospital of excellence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Vivian F; Filho, Celso Ferreira; Valenti, Vitor E; Ferreira, Marcelo; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos; de Carvalho, Tatiana Dias; Xavier, Valdelias; de Oliveira Filho, JapyAngeli; Gregory, Pedro; Leão, Eliseth Ribeiro; Francisco, Natascha G; Ferreira, Celso

    2014-01-01

    Burnout syndrome can be defined as long-term work stress resulting from the interaction between constant emotional pressure associated with intense interpersonal involvement for long periods of time and personal characteristics. We investigated the prevalence/propensity of Burnout syndrome in clinical nurses, and the factors related to Burnout syndrome-associated such as socio-demographic characteristics, work load, social and family life, leisure activities, extra work activities, physical activities, and work-related health problems. We conducted a cross-sectional, quantitative, prospective epidemiological study with 188 surgical clinic nurses. We used the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), which is a socio-demographic questionnaire and the most widely used instrument to assess Burnout syndrome (three basic dimensions: emotional exhaustion, despersonalization and professional underachievement). The socio-demographic profile questionnaire wascomposed of questions regarding identification, training, time at work, work characteristics and personal circumstances. The prevalence of Burnout syndrome was higher (10.1%) and 55, 4% of subjects had a propensity to develop this syndrome. The analysis of the socio-demographic profile of the nurse sample studied showed that most nurses were childless married women, over 35 years of age, working the day shift for 36 hours weekly on average, with 2-6 years of post-graduation experience, and without extra employments. Factors such as marital status, work load, emotion and work related stress aggravated the onset of the syndrome. The prevalence and propensity of Burnout syndrome were high. Some factors identified can be useful for the adoption of preventive actions in order to decrease the prevalence of the clinical nurses Burnout syndrome.

  6. A novel COL11A1 mutation affecting splicing in a patient with Stickler syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohmoto, Tomohiro; Naruto, Takuya; Kobayashi, Haruka; Watanabe, Miki; Okamoto, Nana; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Imoto, Issei; Okamoto, Nobuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Stickler syndrome is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous collagenopathy characterized by ocular, auditory, skeletal and orofacial abnormalities, commonly occurring as an autosomal dominant trait. We conducted target resequencing to analyze candidate genes associated with known clinical phenotypes from a 4-year-old girl with Stickler syndrome. We detected a novel heterozygous intronic mutation (NM_001854.3:c.3168+5G>A) in COL11A1 that may impair splicing, which was suggested by in silico prediction and a minigene assay.

  7. Clinical aspects of the fragile X syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, W Ted

    2012-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome patients express a wide array of cognitive and other gender-specific phenotypic features. These manifestations result not only from molecular mechanisms that are altered as a result of the expansion of a CGG-repeat region in the FMR1 promoter, but also genetic factors such as founder effects and mosaicism. In this chapter, I will summarize the many and varied features of fragile X syndrome as they present themselves in a clinical setting and describe the procedures that are used to diagnose patients. Finally, I will briefly touch on recent developments that will affect patient screening in the future.

  8. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding caused by severe esophagitis: a unique clinical syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guntipalli, Prathima; Chason, Rebecca; Elliott, Alan; Rockey, Don C

    2014-12-01

    We have recognized a unique clinical syndrome in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding who are found to have severe esophagitis. We aimed to more clearly describe the clinical entity of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with severe esophagitis. We conducted a retrospective matched case-control study designed to investigate clinical features in patients with carefully defined upper gastrointestinal bleeding and severe esophagitis. Patient data were captured prospectively via a Gastrointestinal Bleeding Healthcare Registry, which collects data on all patients admitted with gastrointestinal bleeding. Patients with endoscopically documented esophagitis (cases) were matched with randomly selected controls that had upper gastrointestinal bleeding caused by other lesions. Epidemiologic features in patients with esophagitis were similar to those with other causes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. However, hematemesis was more common in patients with esophagitis 86% (102/119) than in controls 55% (196/357) (p bleeding than those without cirrhosis. We have described a unique clinical syndrome in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding who have erosive esophagitis. This syndrome is manifest by typical clinical features and is associated with favorable outcomes.

  9. Fatigue is associated with muscle weakness in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: an explorative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voermans, N.C.; Knoop, H.; Bleijenberg, G.; Engelen, B.G.M. van

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of inherited connective tissue disorders characterised by joint hypermobility, skin hyperextensibility and tissue fragility. It has recently been shown that muscle weakness occurs frequently in EDS, and that

  10. Syndromes and constitutional chromosomal abnormalities associated with Wilms tumour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, R H; Stiller, C A; Walker, L; Rahman, N

    2006-01-01

    Wilms tumour has been reported in association with over 50 different clinical conditions and several abnormal constitutional karyotypes. Conclusive evidence of an increased risk of Wilms tumour exists for only a minority of these conditions, including WT1 associated syndromes, familial Wilms tumour, and certain overgrowth conditions such as Beckwith‐Wiedemann syndrome. In many reported conditions the rare co‐occurrence of Wilms tumour is probably due to chance. However, for several conditions the available evidence cannot either confirm or exclude an increased risk, usually because of the rarity of the syndrome. In addition, emerging evidence suggests that an increased risk of Wilms tumour occurs only in a subset of individuals for some syndromes. The complex clinical and molecular heterogeneity of disorders associated with Wilms tumour, together with the apparent absence of functional links between most of the known predisposition genes, suggests that abrogation of a variety of pathways can promote Wilms tumorigenesis. PMID:16690728

  11. Refeeding syndrome: clinical and nutritional relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, Larissa de Andrade; Burgos, Maria Goretti Pessoa de Araújo; Silva, Rafaella de Andrade

    2012-01-01

    Feedback syndrome is characterized clinically by neurological alterations, respiratory symptoms, arrhythmias and heart failure few days after refeeding. It happens due to severe electrolyte changes, such as hypophosphatemia, hypomagnesemia and hypokalemia associated with metabolic abnormalities that may occur as a result of nutritional support (oral, enteral or parenteral) in severely malnourished patients. To evaluate its causes and the preventive dietary measures aiming to reduce the morbimortality. Was conducted literature review in SciELO, LILACS, Medline / PUBMED, Cochrane Library and government websites in Portuguese, English and Spanish. The survey was about the last 15 years, selecting the headings: refeeding syndrome, malnutrition, hypophosphatemia, hypokalemia, hypomagnesemia. The monitoring of metabolic parameters and electrolyte levels before starting nutritional support and periodically during feeding should be based on protocols and the duration of therapy. Patients at high risk and other metabolic complications should be followed closely, and depletion of minerals and electrolytes should be replaced before starting the diet. A multidisciplinary team of nutrition therapy can guide and educate other health professionals in prevention, diagnosis and treatment of the syndrome.

  12. [Clinical manifestation and cytogenetic analysis of 607 patients with Turner syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jiemei; Liu, Zhiying; Xia, Pei; Lai, Yi; Wei, Yangjun; Liu, Yanyan; Chen, Jiurong; Qin, Li; Xie, Liangyu; Wang, He

    2017-02-10

    To explore the correlation between cytogenetic findings and clinical manifestations of Turner syndrome. 607 cases of cytogenetically diagnosed Turner syndrome, including those with a major manifestation of Turner syndrome, were analyzed with conventional G-banding. Correlation between the karyotypes and clinical features were analyzed. Among the 607 cases, there were 154 cases with monosomy X (25.37%). Mosaicism monosomy X was found in 240 patients (39.54%), which included 194 (80.83%) with a low proportion of 45,X (3 ≤ the number of 45, X ≤5, while the normal cells ≥ 30). Structural X chromosome abnormalities were found in 173 patients (28.50%). A supernumerary marker chromosome was found in 40 cases (6.59%). Most patients with typical manifestations of Turner syndrome were under 11 years of age and whose karyotypes were mainly 45,X. The karyotype of patients between 11 and 18 years old was mainly 45,X, 46,X,i(X)(q10) and mos45,X/46,X,i(X)(q10), which all had primary amenorrhea in addition to the typical clinical manifestations. The karyotype of patients over 18 years of age were mainly mosaicism with a low proportion of 45,X, whom all had primary infertility. 53 patients had a history of pregnancy, which included 48 with non-structural abnormalities of X chromosome and 5 with abnormal structure of X chromosome. Generally, the higher proportion of cells with an abnormal karyotype, the more severe were the clinical symptoms and the earlier clinical recognition. Karyotyping analysis can provide guidance for the early diagnosis of Turner syndrome, especially those with a low proportion of 45,X.

  13. Single and multiple clinical syndromes in incarcerated offenders : Associations with dissociative experiences and emotionality.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garofalo, C.; Velotti, P.; Crocamo, Cristina; Carrá, Giuseppe

    2018-01-01

    The present study examined the prevalence and correlates of clinical syndromes in a large group (N = 438) of incarcerated violent offenders, looking at differences between inmates with one and those with more than one clinical syndromes. More than a half of the sample (57%) reported clinically

  14. Cytogenetics findings at Turner Syndrome and their correlation with clinical findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amra Ćatović

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Turner Syndrome is a genetic condition in females that results from an abnormal chromosome. One of the X chromosomes is missing or misshapen in the most cells of the body. Three classics clinical symptoms of the syndrome are: incomplete sexual maturation, short stature and pterygium colli. Turner Syndrome is diagnosed by karyotyping. In the retrospective study for a twelve years period (1991-2002 correlation between clinical and cytogenetics findings was established in our Center among 47 examinees from all parts of Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina, who had suspect clinical diagnosis of Turner Syndrome. The syndrome was demonstrated by cytogeneticsexaminations in 30(63,8% examinees and excluded in 17 (36,2% examinees. The most frequent karyotype is monosomy of X chromosome (45,X found at 63,3%, than isochromosome of Xq (46,XisoXq found at 16,7%, mosaic form (46,XX/45,X and deletion of Xp (46,XdelXp both at 6,7%, than deletion of Xq (46,XdelXq and ring of Xp (46,XX/46,XringXp both at 3,3%. Our results suggest that promptly and exactly diagnosis of Turner syndrome is very important due to introducing growth hormone therapy and estrogen therapy at a very young age.

  15. The effects of clinical and statistical heterogeneity on the predictive values of results from meta-analyses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melsen, W G; Rovers, M M; Bonten, M J M; Bootsma, M C J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304830305

    Variance between studies in a meta-analysis will exist. This heterogeneity may be of clinical, methodological or statistical origin. The last of these is quantified by the I(2) -statistic. We investigated, using simulated studies, the accuracy of I(2) in the assessment of heterogeneity and the

  16. A new course in the clinical pathways for metabolic syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kageyama, Shoko; Wada, Yumi; Nakamura, Rie

    2006-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is consisted with multiple risk factors such as diabetes, dyslipidemia, and hypertension based on visceral fat accumulation, for the development of arteriosclerosis. We present, here, a clinical pathway for education of patients with metabolic syndrome. The program contains an adequate explanation of the high risk for arteriosclerosis to the patients, the measurement of visceral fat content by computed tomography, and several clinical examinations for the evaluation of arteriosclerotic lesions. We have presented this program on the ward of diabetes center in our hospital for patients diagnosed as having metabolic syndrome. Because the focus of education is to clarify understanding of the harmful effects of visceral fat and the benefits of its reduction, it might be a valuable tool to motivate and empower the patient and improve the patient's lifestyle. (author)

  17. A new course in the clinical pathways for metabolic syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kageyama, Shoko; Wada, Yumi; Nakamura, Rie [Sumitomo Hospital, Osaka, Osaka (Japan)

    2006-07-15

    Metabolic syndrome is consisted with multiple risk factors such as diabetes, dyslipidemia, and hypertension based on visceral fat accumulation, for the development of arteriosclerosis. We present, here, a clinical pathway for education of patients with metabolic syndrome. The program contains an adequate explanation of the high risk for arteriosclerosis to the patients, the measurement of visceral fat content by computed tomography, and several clinical examinations for the evaluation of arteriosclerotic lesions. We have presented this program on the ward of diabetes center in our hospital for patients diagnosed as having metabolic syndrome. Because the focus of education is to clarify understanding of the harmful effects of visceral fat and the benefits of its reduction, it might be a valuable tool to motivate and empower the patient and improve the patient's lifestyle. (author)

  18. Study the Prevalence of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome in Women with Type 2 Diabetes Referring to Kerman Diabetes Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Mirzaie

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is a heterogeneous disorder that affects 5-10% of women of reproductive age patients with this syndrome one of the high risk groups for type 2 diabetes mellitus in future. This study was carried out to determine the prevalence of PCOS in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Materials & Methods: One hundred women under 45 years with type 2 diabetes treating with diet or hypoglycemic drugs, referred to Kerman diabetic center in 2005 were identified. Women with galactorrhea or history of thyroid dysfunction were excluded from the study. Data were collected through interview and then data of 92 women were analyzed using t-test and x2. Results: Ninety two women enrolled in the study and 18 cases (19.5% had clinical symptoms of PCOS. The mean of age was 38 years (38.76±5.92 years. The mean age of women with PCOS was 34.89±3.96 and that of normal women was 39.7±5.96 years (P0.05. Conclusion: This study indicated women with type 2 diabetes mellitus had a higher prevalence of polycystic syndrome. Android obesity is associated with the increased risk of type 2 diabetes in women with PCOS.

  19. Study the Prevalence of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome in Women with Type 2 Diabetes Referring to Kerman Diabetes Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Mirzaie

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is a heterogeneous disorder that affects 5-10% of women of reproductive age patients with this syndrome one of the high risk groups for type 2 diabetes mellitus in future. This study was carried out to determine the prevalence of PCOS in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Materials & Methods: One hundred women under 45 years with type 2 diabetes treating with diet or hypoglycemic drugs, referred to Kerman diabetic center in 2005 were identified. Women with galactorrhea or history of thyroid dysfunction were excluded from the study. Data were collected through interview and then data of 92 women were analyzed using t-test and x2. Results: Ninety two women enrolled in the study and 18 cases (19.5% had clinical symptoms of PCOS. The mean of age was 38 years (38.76±5.92 years. The mean age of women with PCOS was 34 and that of normal women was 39 years (P0.05. Conclusion: This study indicated women with type 2 diabetes mellitus had a higher prevalence of polycystic syndrome. Android obesity is associated with the increased risk of type 2 diabetes in women with PCOS.

  20. The Rare Painful Phenomena - Chronic Paroxysmal Hemicrania-tic Syndrome as a Clinically Isolated Syndrome of the Central Nervous System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljubisavljevic, Srdjan; Prazic, Ana; Lazarevic, Miodrag; Stojanov, Dragan; Savic, Dejan; Vojinovic, Slobadan

    2017-02-01

    The association of paroxysmal hemicrania with trigeminal neuralgia (TN) has been described and called paroxysmal hemicrania-tic syndrome (PH-tic). We report the case of a patient diagnosed as having chronic PH-tic (CPH-tic) syndrome as a clinically isolated syndrome of the central nervous system (CNS) (CIS).A forty year old woman was admitted to our hospital suffering from right facial pain for the last 2 years. The attacks were paroxysmal, neuralgiform, consisting of throb-like sensations, which developed spontaneously or were triggered by different stimuli in right facial (maxilar and mandibular) areas. Parallel with those, she felt a throbbing orbital and frontal pain with homolateral autonomic symptoms such as conjunctival injection, lacrimation, and the feeling that the ear on the same side was full. This pain lasted most often between 15 and 20 minutes. Beyond hemifacial hypoesthesia in the region of right maxilar and mandibular nerve, the other neurological finding was normal. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study showed a T2-weighted multiple hyperintense paraventricular lesion and hyperintense lesion in the right trigeminal main sensory nucleus and root inlet, all of them being hypointense on T1-weighted image. All of these lesions were hypointense in gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted images. Neurophysiological studies of trigeminal nerve (somatosensory evoked potentials and blink reflex) correlated with MRI described lesions. The patient's pain bouts were improved immediately after treatment with indomethacin, and were completely relieved with lamotrigine for a longer period. According to the actual McDonald's criteria, clinical state was defined as CIS which was clinically presented by CPH-tic syndrome.Even though it is a clinical rarity and its etiology is usually idiopathic, CPH-tic syndrome can also be symptomatic. When dealing with symptomatic cases, like the one described here, when causal therapy is not possible due to the nature of the primary

  1. Ectodermal dysplasia (ED) syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, Siew-Yin; Wanga, Chung-Hsing; Lina, Wei-De; Tsaia, Fuu-Jen

    2014-01-01

    Ectodermal dysplasia (ED) syndrome comprises a large, heterogeneous group of inherited disorders that are defined by primary defects in the development of 2 or more tissues derived from the embryonic ectoderm. The tissues primarily involved are the skin and its appendages (including hair follicles, eccrine glands, sebaceous glands, nails) and teeth. The clinical features include sparse hair, abnormal or missing teeth, and an inability to sweat due to lack of sweat glands. One such case report of ectodermal dysplasia is presented here.

  2. Current aspects of polycystic ovary syndrome: A literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VICTOR HUGO LOPES DE ANDRADE

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is a heterogeneous endocrine disorder with variable prevalence, affecting about one in every 15 women worldwide. The diagnosis of polycystic ovary syndrome requires at least two of the following criteria: oligoovulation and/or anovulation, clinical and/or biochemical evidence of hyperandrogenism and morphology of polycystic ovaries. Women with PCOS appear to have a higher risk of developing metabolic disorders, hypertension and cardiovascular disorders. The aim of this article was to present a review of the literature by searching the databases Pubmed and Scielo, focusing on publications related to polycystic ovaries, including its pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, diagnosis and therapeutic aspects, as well as its association with cardiovascular and arterial hypertensive disorders.

  3. The Korsakoff syndrome: clinical aspects, psychology and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopelman, Michael D; Thomson, Allan D; Guerrini, Irene; Marshall, E Jane

    2009-01-01

    The Korsakoff syndrome is a preventable memory disorder that usually emerges (although not always) in the aftermath of an episode of Wernicke's encephalopathy. The present paper reviews the clinical and scientific literature on this disorder. A systematic review of the clinical and scientific literature on Wernicke's encephalopathy and the alcoholic Korsakoff syndrome. The Korsakoff syndrome is most commonly associated with chronic alcohol misuse, and some heavy drinkers may have a genetic predisposition to developing the syndrome. The characteristic neuropathology includes neuronal loss, micro-haemorrhages and gliosis in the paraventricular and peri-aqueductal grey matter. Lesions in the mammillary bodies, the mammillo-thalamic tract and the anterior thalamus may be more important to memory dysfunction than lesions in the medial dorsal nucleus of the thalamus. Episodic memory is severely affected in the Korsakoff syndrome, and the learning of new semantic memories is variably affected. 'Implicit' aspects of memory are preserved. These patients are often first encountered in general hospital settings where they can occupy acute medical beds for lengthy periods. Abstinence is the cornerstone of any rehabilitation programme. Korsakoff patients are capable of new learning, particularly if they live in a calm and well-structured environment and if new information is cued. There are few long-term follow-up studies, but these patients are reported to have a normal life expectancy if they remain abstinent from alcohol. Although we now have substantial knowledge about the nature of this disorder, scientific questions (e.g. regarding the underlying genetics) remain. More particularly, there is a dearth of appropriate long-term care facilities for these patients, given that empirical research has shown that good practice has beneficial effects.

  4. [From gene to disease; genetic causes of hearing loss and visual impairment sometimes accompanied by vestibular problems (Usher syndrome)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pennings, R.J.E.; Kremer, J.M.J.; Deutman, A.F.; Kimberling, W.J.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.

    2002-01-01

    Usher syndrome is an autosomal recessively inherited disease, characterised by sensorineural hearing loss, tapetoretinal degeneration and in some cases vestibular problems. Based on the clinical heterogeneity, the disease can be classified into three clinical types (I, II and III), which have their

  5. Numerical Magnitude Processing Impairments in Genetic Syndromes: A Cross-Syndrome Comparison of Turner and 22Q11.2 Deletion Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brankaer, Carmen; Ghesquière, Pol; De Wel, Anke; Swillen, Ann; De Smedt, Bert

    2017-01-01

    Cross-syndrome comparisons offer an important window onto understanding heterogeneity in mathematical learning disabilities or dyscalculia. The present study therefore investigated symbolic numerical magnitude processing in two genetic syndromes that are both characterized by mathematical learning disabilities: Turner syndrome and 22q11.2 deletion…

  6. Clinical features and endocrine profile of Laron syndrome in Indian children

    OpenAIRE

    Supriya R Phanse-Gupte; Vaman V Khadilkar; Anuradha V Khadilkar

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Patients with growth hormone (GH) insensitivity (also known as Laron syndome) have been reported from the Mediterranean region and Southern Eucador, with few case reports from India. We present here the clinical and endocrine profile of 9 children with Laron syndrome from India. Material and Methods: Nine children diagnosed with Laron syndrome based on clinical features of GH deficiency and biochemical profile suggestive of GH resistance were studied over a period of 5 years fro...

  7. Exome analysis in clinical practice: expanding the phenotype of Bartsocas-Papas syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gripp, Karen W; Ennis, Sara; Napoli, Joseph

    2013-05-01

    Exome analysis has had a dramatic impact on genetic research. We present the application of such newly generated information to patient care. The patient was a female, born with normal growth parameters to nonconsanguineous parents after an uneventful pregnancy. She had bilateral cleft lip/palate and ankyloblepharon. Sparse hair, dysplastic nails and hypohidrosis were subsequently noted. With exception of speech related issues, her development was normal. A clinical diagnosis of ankyloblepharon-ectodermal defects-cleft lip/palate or Hay-Wells syndrome resulted in TP63 sequence analysis. TP63 sequence and deletion/duplication analysis of all coding exons had a normal result, as did chromosome and SNP array analysis. Diagnostic exome analysis revealed a heterozygous nonsense mutation in KRT83 categorized as deleterious and associated with monilethrix. In addition, a homozygous missense variant of unknown clinical significance was reported in RIPK4. Using research based exome analysis, RIPK4 had just a few months prior been identified as pathogenic for Bartsocas-Papas syndrome. While the clinical diagnostic report implied the KRT83 mutation as a more likely cause for the patient's phenotype, clinical correlation, literature review and use of computerized mutation analysis programs allowed us to identify the homozygous RIPK4 (c.488G > A; p.Gly163Asp) mutation as the underlying pathogenic change. Consequently, we expand the phenotype of Bartsocas-Papas syndrome to an attenuated presentation resembling Hay-Wells syndrome, lacking lethality and pterygia. In contrast to the autosomal dominant Hay-Wells syndrome, Bartsocas-Papas syndrome is autosomal recessive, implying a 25% recurrence risk. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Atypical presentation of HELLP syndrome: clinical case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Manuel Tobar Parra

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe a case of HELLP syndrome with atypical presentation form. Background: HELLP syndrome is a complication of preeclampsia, characterized by: haemolysis, elevation of liver enzymes and thrombocytopenia; Can present atypical, without hypertension or proteinuria, 10-20% of the cases. Case report: 38 year old female patient, with a pregnancy of 38.5 weeks of gestation, treated at the Hospital Universitario San José de Popayán (Colombia. Atypical HELLP syndrome is diagnosed in a pregnant woman with thrombocytopenia, impaired liver enzymes, but no evidence of proteinuria or hypertension. Gestation is terminated by cesarean section and magnesium sulfate is given for 24 hours, with adequate post-surgical evolution, clinical improvement of the symptomatology presented, normalization of liver enzymes and platelet elevation. Conclusion: Knowledge of this syndrome, although of rare occurrence, allows a fast action, an effective diagnosis and treatment, to avoid morbidity and greater maternal fetal mortality.

  9. Metabolic syndrome: frequency and gender differences at an out-patient clinic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahan, F.; Qureshi, R.; Borhany, T.; Hamza, H.B.

    2007-01-01

    To determine the frequency of metabolic syndrome among patients attending an out-patient clinic of a teaching hospital and to compare the clinical features regarding metabolic syndrome among males and females. All adults, above 25 years, attending the clinics for an executive check-up and giving informed consent were included in the study. Data was collected through a structured questionnaire administered to those eligible to participate. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to ATP-III guidelines. There were 250 participants in this study. Mean age of study participants was 48.94 (SD10.62) years, while approximately two-thirds, 157 (62.8%), were male. Metabolic syndrome (those who had 3 or more risk factors) was present in 35.2% of adults. Fasting blood sugar level was raised in 36.4% of study participants while significant number of participants (78.8%) had a Body Mass Index (BMI) Z 25 (p = 0.02). Frequency of metabolic syndrome was significantly high in this study with preponderance of males and prevalence similar to that observed in developed countries. Majority of patients had obesity and high fasting blood sugar levels. Males demonstrated higher levels of triglycerides and low levels of High-density lipoprotein (HDL) compared to females while blood pressure reading was observed to be the same in both males and females. (author)

  10. Toxigenic and metabolic causes of ketosis and ketoacidotic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, Martina M; Hajja, Waddah; Al-Khatib, Sofian; Hazeghazam, Maryam; Sreedhar, Dharmashree; Li, Rebecca Na; Wong-McKinstry, Edna; Carlson, Richard W

    2012-10-01

    Ketoacidotic syndromes are frequently encountered in acute care medicine. This article focuses on ketosis and ketoacidotic syndromes associated with intoxications, alcohol abuse, starvation, and certain dietary supplements as well as inborn errors of metabolism. Although all of these various processes are characterized by the accumulation of ketone bodies and metabolic acidosis, there are differences in the mechanisms, clinical presentations, and principles of therapy for these heterogeneous disorders. Pathophysiologic mechanisms that account for these disorders are presented, as well as guidance regarding identification and management. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Molecular and clinical characterization of the myopathic form of mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome caused by mutations in the thymidine kinase (TK2) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanprasert, Sirisak; Wang, Jing; Weng, Shao-Wen; Enns, Gregory M; Boué, Daniel R; Wong, Brenda L; Mendell, Jerry R; Perry, Deborah A; Sahenk, Zarife; Craigen, William J; Alcala, Francisco J Climent; Pascual, Juan M; Melancon, Serge; Zhang, Victor Wei; Scaglia, Fernando; Wong, Lee-Jun C

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion syndromes (MDSs) are a clinically and molecularly heterogeneous group of mitochondrial cytopathies characterized by severe mtDNA copy number reduction in affected tissues. Clinically, MDSs are mainly categorized as myopathic, encephalomyopathic, hepatocerebral, or multi-systemic forms. To date, the myopathic form of MDS is mainly caused by mutations in the TK2 gene, which encodes thymidine kinase 2, the first and rate limiting step enzyme in the phosphorylation of pyrimidine nucleosides. We analyzed 9 unrelated families with 11 affected subjects exhibiting the myopathic form of MDS, by sequencing the TK2 gene. Twelve mutations including 4 novel mutations were detected in 9 families. Skeletal muscle specimens were available from 7 out of 11 subjects. Respiratory chain enzymatic activities in skeletal muscle were measured in 6 subjects, and enzymatic activities were reduced in 3 subjects. Quantitative analysis of mtDNA content in skeletal muscle was performed in 5 subjects, and marked mtDNA content reduction was observed in each. In addition, we outline the molecular and clinical characteristics of this syndrome in a total of 52 patients including those previously reported, and a total of 36 TK2 mutations are summarized. Clinically, hypotonia and proximal muscle weakness are the major phenotypes present in all subjects. In summary, our study expands the molecular and clinical spectrum associated with TK2 deficiency. © 2013.

  12. Clinical Experience of the Klippel-Trenaunay Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung Min Sung

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome (KTS is characterized by three clinical features, namely cutaneous capillary malformations, venous malformations, and soft tissue and/or bony hypertrophy of the extremities. The varied manifestations are attributed to the unpredictable clinical nature and prognosis of the syndrome. To elucidate the clinical characteristics of this disease, we reviewed a relatively large number of KTS patients who presented to our vascular anomalies center.MethodsWe conducted a retrospective study with 19 patients who were diagnosed with KTS and treated in our vascular anomalies clinic between 2003 and 2014, and examined their demographic characteristics, their clinical features, and the treatments administered.ResultsThe sex distribution was balanced, with 9 (47% males and 10 (53% females. The mean follow-up period was 4.1 years (range, 7 months-9 years. Most of the patients received conservative treatments such as medication or physiotherapy. Compression therapies such as wearing of elastic garments/bandages were also administered, and surgical interventions were considered only when the patients became excessively symptomatic. Other treatments included laser therapy and sclerotherapy, and all the treatments were adjusted according to each case, tailored to the conditions of the individual patients.ConclusionsKTS is an extremely rare, multifactorial disorder that induces widely varied symptoms. Because of this unique feature, plastic surgeons, when not careful, tend to attach a one-sided importance to typical symptoms such as limb hypertrophy or capillary malformation and thus overlook other symptoms and clinical features. KTS can be suspected in all infants who show capillary malformations or limb hypertrophy and require a multi-disciplinary approach for comprehensive management.

  13. WOLFF–PARKINSON–WHITE SYNDROME IN CHILDREN: CLINICAL COURSE, DIAGNOSTICS, TREATMENT

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    T.K. Kruchina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Wolff–Parkinson–White (WPW syndrome — is the most common cause of tachycardia in children. The clinical significance of WPW udden cardiac death. Data are presented on the principles of diagnosis of various types of WPW syndrome and characteristics of various types of tachycardia occurring in this disease. At present there is a radical method of treatment of the WPW syndrome — radiofrequency ablation of atrioventricular additional connections. Antiarhythmic therapy remains relevant in arresting attacks of tachycardia, as well as in the treatment of young children who have the age limits for radiofrequency ablation. The principles of choice of treatment and relief of the attack algorithm tachycardia syndrome WPW are described. Key words: Wolff–Parkinson–White syndrome, paroxysmal atrioventricular reciprocal tachycardia, children. (Pediatric Pharmacology. — 2011; 8 (5: 49–53.

  14. Clinical practice guidelines for the management of acute limb compartment syndrome following trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Christopher J; Lynch, Joan; Harris, Ian A; Richardson, Martin D; Brand, Caroline; Lowe, Adrian J; Sugrue, Michael

    2010-03-01

    Acute compartment syndrome is a serious and not uncommon complication of limb trauma. The condition is a surgical emergency, and is associated with significant morbidity if not managed appropriately. There is variation in management of acute limb compartment syndrome in Australia. Clinical practice guidelines for the management of acute limb compartment syndrome following trauma were developed in accordance with Australian National Health and Medical Research Council recommendations. The guidelines were based on critically appraised literature evidence and the consensus opinion of a multidisciplinary team involved in trauma management who met in a nominal panel process. Recommendations were developed for key decision nodes in the patient care pathway, including methods of diagnosis in alert and unconscious patients, appropriate assessment of compartment pressure, timing and technique of fasciotomy, fasciotomy wound management, and prevention of compartment syndrome in patients with limb injuries. The recommendations were largely consensus based in the absence of well-designed clinical trial evidence. Clinical practice guidelines for the management of acute limb compartment syndrome following trauma have been developed that will support consistency in management and optimize patient health outcomes.

  15. Recent Clinical Drug Trials Evidence in Marfan Syndrome and Clinical Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Michael N; Lacro, Ronald V

    2016-01-01

    Marfan syndrome is a genetic disorder of connective tissue with principal manifestations in the cardiovascular, ocular, and skeletal systems. Cardiovascular disease, mainly progressive aortic root dilation and aortic dissection, is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality. The primary aims of this report were to examine the evidence related to medical therapy for Marfan syndrome, including recently completed randomized clinical trials on the efficacy of β-blockers and angiotensin II receptor blockers for the prophylactic treatment of aortic enlargement in Marfan syndrome, and to provide recommendations for medical therapy on the basis of available evidence. Medical therapy for Marfan syndrome should be individualized according to patient tolerance and risk factors such as age, aortic size, and family history of aortic dissection. The Pediatric Heart Network trial showed that atenolol and losartan each reduced the rate of aortic dilation. All patients with known or suspected Marfan syndrome and aortic root dilation should receive medical therapy with adequate doses of either β-blocker or angiotensin receptor blocker. The Pediatric Heart Network trial also showed that atenolol and losartan are more effective at reduction of aortic root z score in younger subjects, which suggests that medical therapy should be prescribed even in the youngest children with aortic dilation. For patients with Marfan syndrome without aortic dilation, the available evidence is less clear. If aortic dilation is severe and/or progressive, therapy with a combination of β-blocker and angiotensin receptor blocker should be considered, although trial results are mixed with respect to the efficacy of combination therapy vs monotherapy. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A framework for integrating heterogeneous clinical data for a disease area into a central data warehouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmen, Christian; Ganzinger, Matthias; Kohl, Christian D; Firnkorn, Daniel; Knaup-Gregori, Petra

    2014-01-01

    Structured collection of clinical facts is a common approach in clinical research. Especially in the analysis of rare diseases it is often necessary to aggregate study data from several sites in order to achieve a statistically significant cohort size. In this paper we describe a framework how to approach an integration of heterogeneous clinical data into a central register. This enables site-spanning queries for the occurrence of specific clinical facts and thus supports clinical research. The framework consists of three sequential steps, starting from a formal data harmonization process, to the data transformation methods and finally the integration into a proper data warehouse. We implemented reusable software templates that are based on our best practices in several projects in integrating heterogeneous clinical data. Our methods potentially increase the efficiency and quality for future data integration projects by reducing the implementation effort as well as the project management effort by usage of our approaches as a guideline.

  17. [Clinical study of 12 cases with obstetric mirror syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lin-lin; Wang, Chen-hong; Li, Zhi-quan

    2012-03-01

    To discuss the clinical features, management, pregnancy outcome and prognosis of obstetric mirror syndrome. The clinical data of 12 cases with obstetric mirror syndrome at Shenzhen Maternity and Child Healthcare Hospital from April 2008 to December 2010 were collected to retrospectively analyze the clinical features, management, pregnancy outcome and prognosis. (1) ETIOLOGY: 12 cases with obstetric mirror syndrome included 9 cases of Bart's hydrops fetalis, 2 cases with fetal complicated congenital cardiac anomalies, and 1 case of unknown etiology. (2) Gestational age at diagnosis and at delivery: gestational age at diagnosis ranged from 28 to 36 weeks [mean (31.5 ± 4.7) weeks], and gestational age at delivery ranged from 28(+3) to 38 weeks [mean (32.9 ± 2.9) weeks]. There were no significant differences between the gestational age at diagnosis and at delivery in consistence with severe preeclampsia group and mild preeclampsia group [(31.8 ± 2.3) weeks vs. (30.9 ± 7.2) weeks, (32.5 ± 2.3) weeks vs. (33.5 ± 3.9) weeks, P > 0.05]. (3) The patients with obstetric mirror syndrome can present a preeclampsia-like syndrome: maternal extremity edema in 12 cases, headache and visual disturbance in 1 case, proteinuria in 11 cases, elevated blood pressure in 5 cases, elevated uric acid in 9 cases, hypoproteinemia in 12 cases, elevated creatinine in 3 case, elevated liver enzyme in 1 case, thrombocytopenia in 2 cases. The major complications included 1 case of HELLP syndrome, acute pulmonary edema, placental abruption, amnionic fluid embolism, DIC respectively, 3 cases of acute kidney failure and 6 cases of postpartum hemorrhage. (4) Sonographic findings: 1) Hydrops fetalis: fetal ultrasound revealed pleural fluid, fetal ascites, skin edema, scalp edema, encephalocolele enlargement, hydropericardium and increased cardio-chest ratio. 2) Placenta megaly: the placental pathological examination revealed edematous and large in 12 cases. Placental thickness was beyond 4 cm in

  18. Differential diagnosis of Bartter syndrome, Gitelman syndrome, and pseudo-Bartter/Gitelman syndrome based on clinical characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunoshita, Natsuki; Nozu, Kandai; Shono, Akemi; Nozu, Yoshimi; Fu, Xue Jun; Morisada, Naoya; Kamiyoshi, Naohiro; Ohtsubo, Hiromi; Ninchoji, Takeshi; Minamikawa, Shogo; Yamamura, Tomohiko; Nakanishi, Koichi; Yoshikawa, Norishige; Shima, Yuko; Kaito, Hiroshi; Iijima, Kazumoto

    2016-02-01

    Phenotypic overlap exists among type III Bartter syndrome (BS), Gitelman syndrome (GS), and pseudo-BS/GS (p-BS/GS), which are clinically difficult to distinguish. We aimed to clarify the differences between these diseases, allowing accurate diagnosis based on their clinical features. A total of 163 patients with genetically defined type III BS (n = 30), GS (n = 90), and p-BS/GS (n = 43) were included. Age at diagnosis, sex, body mass index, estimated glomerular filtration rate, and serum and urine electrolyte concentrations were determined. Patients with p-BS/GS were significantly older at diagnosis than those with type III BS and GS. Patients with p-BS/GS included a significantly higher percentage of women and had a lower body mass index and estimated glomerular filtration rate than did patients with GS. Although hypomagnesemia and hypocalciuria were predominant biochemical findings in patients with GS, 17 and 23% of patients with type III BS and p-BS/GS, respectively, also showed these abnormalities. Of patients with type III BS, GS, and p-BS/GS, 40, 12, and 63%, respectively, presented with chronic kidney disease. This study clarified the clinical differences between BS, GS, and p-BS/GS for the first time, which will help clinicians establish differential diagnoses for these three conditions.

  19. [Noonan syndrome can be diagnosed clinically and through molecular genetic analyses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henningsen, Marie Krab; Jelsig, Anne Marie; Andersen, Helle; Brusgaard, Klaus; Ousager, Lilian Bomme; Hertz, Jens Michael

    2015-08-03

    Noonan syndrome is part of the group of RASopathies caused by germ line mutations in genes involved in the RAS/MAPK pathway. There is substantial phenotypic overlap among the RASopathies. Diagnosis of Noonan syndrome is often based on clinical features including dysmorphic facial features, short stature and congenital heart disease. Rapid advances in sequencing technology have made molecular genetic analyses a helpful tool in diagnosing and distinguishing Noonan syndrome from other RASopathies.

  20. Clinical Study on 1 Case of Klippel-Trenaunay-Weber Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Kil, Yoo

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective : This study was performed to evaluate the treatment of Acupuncture therapy including Herbal Acupuncture theraphy and Korean Bee Venom Theraphy in Klippel-Trenaunay-Weber Syndrome. Methods : We treated 1 case of Klippel-Trenaunay-Weber Syndrome patient with mainly Korean Bee Venom Theraphy, and herbal Acupuncture, acupuncture theraphy from 27th August, 2001 to February, 2003. Results : After 3 weeks of Korean Bee Venom Theraphy, and herbal Acupuncture, acupuncture theraphy, a remarkable improvement was made for Klippel-Trenaunay-Weber Syndrome. Conclusions : Korean Bee Venom Theraphy and other acupuncture therapies were effective in reducing the symptoms. We think that it need the further study and clinical trial for Klippel-Trenaunay-Weber Syndrome.

  1. [Cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome, a Noonan syndrome related disorder: clinical and molecular findings in 11 patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcavilla, Atilano; García-Miñaúr, Sixto; Pérez-Aytés, Antonio; Vendrell, Teresa; Pinto, Isabel; Guillén-Navarro, Encarna; González-Meneses, Antonio; Aoki, Yoko; Grinberg, Daniel; Ezquieta, Begoña

    2015-01-20

    To describe 11 patients with cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome (CFC) and compare them with 130 patients with other RAS-MAPK syndromes (111 Noonan syndrome patients [NS] and 19 patients with LEOPARD syndrome). Clinical data from patients submitted for genetic analysis were collected. Bidirectional sequencing analysis of PTPN11, SOS1, RAF1, BRAF, and MAP2K1 focused on exons carrying recurrent mutations, and of all KRAS exons were performed. Six different mutations in BRAF were identified in 9 patients, as well as 2 MAP2K1 mutations. Short stature, developmental delay, language difficulties and ectodermal anomalies were more frequent in CFC patients when compared with other neuro-cardio-faciocutaneous syndromes (P<.05). In at least 2 cases molecular testing helped reconsider the diagnosis. CFC patients showed a rather severe phenotype but at least one patient with BRAF mutation showed no developmental delay, which illustrates the variability of the phenotypic spectrum caused by BRAF mutations. Molecular genetic testing is a valuable tool for differential diagnosis of CFC and NS related disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Metabolic syndrome and its characteristics among obese patients attending an obesity clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Termizy, H M; Mafauzy, M

    2009-04-01

    The increased prevalence of metabolic syndrome worldwide is closely related to the rising obesity epidemic. The objectives of the study were to determine the prevalence and identify the associated and prognostic factors that influence the risk of metabolic syndrome among obese patients attending the Obesity Clinic at Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia. A study was conducted involving 102 obese persons who attended the Obesity Clinic from January 1 to December 31, 2005. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to the International Diabetes Federation criteria. The overall prevalence of metabolic syndrome among obese patients was 40.2 percent. The prevalence was higher in females (43.7 percent) than in males (32.3 percent). The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was noted to increase with increasing body mass index class, from class 1 to class 2. However, the prevalence was lower in obesity class 3. The prevalence of metabolic comorbidities of raised blood pressure, reduced high density lipoprotein, high triglyceride and raised fasting blood glucose was 42, 40, 36 and 17 percent, respectively. A quarter of obese patients in this study had no other comorbidity. Based on logistic regression multivariable analysis, age was the only significant associated factor that influenced the risk of having metabolic syndrome. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was high and the highest comorbidity was high blood pressure. Age was the only significant risk factor of having this syndrome.

  3. Demyelinating syndrome in SLE: review of different disease subtypes and report of a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Chessa

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Demyelinating syndrome (DS is a rare manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE (1% with high clinical heterogeneity and potentially severe prognosis. It can represent a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge for clinicians. A recent study described 5 different patterns of demyelinating disease presentation, characterised by specific clinical, laboratory and brain and spine magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities: 1 neuromyelitis optica; 2 neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders; 3 DS prevalently involving the brain; 4 DS prevalently involving the brainstem; 5 clinically isolated syndrome. In this review we briefly discuss typical characteristics of each DS presentation in SLE and we describe 5 illustrative clinical cases, one for each subset of DS, considering both diagnostic and therapeutic options.

  4. Expanding the mutation and clinical spectrum of Roberts syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afifi, Hanan H; Abdel-Salam, Ghada M H; Eid, Maha M; Tosson, Angie M S; Shousha, Wafaa Gh; Abdel Azeem, Amira A; Farag, Mona K; Mehrez, Mennat I; Gaber, Khaled R

    2016-07-01

    Roberts syndrome and SC phocomelia syndrome are rare autosomal recessive genetic disorders representing the extremes of the spectrum of severity of the same condition, caused by mutations in ESCO2 gene. We report three new patients with Roberts syndrome from three unrelated consanguineous Egyptian families. All patients presented with growth retardation, mesomelic shortening of the limbs more in the upper than in the lower limbs and microcephaly. Patients were subjected to clinical, cytogenetic and radiologic examinations. Cytogenetic analysis showed the characteristic premature separation of centromeres and puffing of heterochromatic regions. Further, sequencing of the ESCO2 gene identified a novel mutation c.244_245dupCT (p.T83Pfs*20) in one family besides two previously reported mutations c.760_761insA (p.T254Nfs*27) and c.764_765delTT (p.F255Cfs*25). All mutations were in homozygous state, in exon 3. The severity of the mesomelic shortening of the limbs and craniofacial anomalies showed variability among patients. Interestingly, patient 1 had abnormal skin hypopigmentation. Serial fetal ultrasound examinations and measurements of long bones diagnosed two affected fetuses in two of the studied families. A literature review and case comparison was performed. In conclusion, we report a novel ESCO2 mutation and expand the clinical spectrum of Roberts syndrome. © 2015 Japanese Teratology Society.

  5. Hypermobile Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (a.k.a. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome Type III and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type): Clinical description and natural history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinkle, Brad; Castori, Marco; Berglund, Britta; Cohen, Helen; Grahame, Rodney; Kazkaz, Hanadi; Levy, Howard

    2017-03-01

    The hypermobile type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (hEDS) is likely the most common hereditary disorder of connective tissue. It has been described largely in those with musculoskeletal complaints including joint hypermobility, joint subluxations/dislocations, as well as skin and soft tissue manifestations. Many patients report activity-related pain and some go on to have daily pain. Two undifferentiated syndromes have been used to describe these manifestations-joint hypermobility syndrome and hEDS. Both are clinical diagnoses in the absence of other causation. Current medical literature further complicates differentiation and describes multiple associated symptoms and disorders. The current EDS nosology combines these two entities into the hypermobile type of EDS. Herein, we review and summarize the literature as a better clinical description of this type of connective tissue disorder. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Extracting relations from traditional Chinese medicine literature via heterogeneous entity networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Huaiyu; Moens, Marie-Francine; Luyten, Walter; Zhou, Xuezhong; Mei, Qiaozhu; Liu, Lu; Tang, Jie

    2016-03-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is a unique and complex medical system that has developed over thousands of years. This article studies the problem of automatically extracting meaningful relations of entities from TCM literature, for the purposes of assisting clinical treatment or poly-pharmacology research and promoting the understanding of TCM in Western countries. Instead of separately extracting each relation from a single sentence or document, we propose to collectively and globally extract multiple types of relations (eg, herb-syndrome, herb-disease, formula-syndrome, formula-disease, and syndrome-disease relations) from the entire corpus of TCM literature, from the perspective of network mining. In our analysis, we first constructed heterogeneous entity networks from the TCM literature, in which each edge is a candidate relation, then used a heterogeneous factor graph model (HFGM) to simultaneously infer the existence of all the edges. We also employed a semi-supervised learning algorithm estimate the model's parameters. We performed our method to extract relations from a large dataset consisting of more than 100,000 TCM article abstracts. Our results show that the performance of the HFGM at extracting all types of relations from TCM literature was significantly better than a traditional support vector machine (SVM) classifier (increasing the average precision by 11.09%, the recall by 13.83%, and the F1-measure by 12.47% for different types of relations, compared with a traditional SVM classifier). This study exploits the power of collective inference and proposes an HFGM based on heterogeneous entity networks, which significantly improved our ability to extract relations from TCM literature. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. COMPLEX REGIONAL PAIN SYNDROME: AN UPDATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patta

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Complex Regional Pain Syndrome or CRPS is a chronic disabling heterogenous pain disorder due to trauma, resulting in sensory changes, motor function impairment, psychological changes. Diagnosis is based on clinical features and investigations. The patho - physiology is not clearly known. There is no single drug therapy, only combinations work. Treatment is multidisplinary involving medical, psychological and rehabi li tation. Newer modes of spinal cord stimulations, neuraxial mode of analgesics and newe r drugs are promising

  8. Clinical features and respiratory complications in Myhre syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McGowan, Ruth; Gulati, Ramkumar; McHenry, Pamela; Cooke, Alexander; Butler, Sandra; Keng, Wee Teik; Murday, Victoria; Whiteford, Margo; Dikkers, Frederik G.; Sikkema-Raddatz, Brigit; van Essen, Ton; Tolmie, John

    2011-01-01

    We describe the clinical characteristics of 4 singleton cases, 3 males and 1 female, with Myhre Syndrome (OMIM 139210), who were born to non-consanguineous parents. Three cases had no family history of similarly affected individuals but 1 male's mother had short stature, some facial features

  9. Expanded clinical spectrum of enhanced S-cone syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yzer, Suzanne; Barbazetto, Irene; Allikmets, Rando; van Schooneveld, Mary J.; Bergen, Arthur; Tsang, Stephen H.; Jacobson, Samuel G.; Yannuzzi, Lawrence A.

    2013-01-01

    New funduscopic findings in patients with enhanced S-cone syndrome (ESCS) may help clinicians in diagnosing this rare autosomal recessive retinal dystrophy. To expand the clinical spectrum of ESCS due to mutations in the NR2E3 gene. Retrospective, noncomparative case series of 31 patients examined

  10. Clinical picture and treatment implication in a child with Capgras syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzone, Luigi; Armando, Marco; De Crescenzo, Franco; Demaria, Francesco; Valeri, Giovanni; Vicari, Stefano

    2012-11-27

    Capgras syndrome is a delusional misidentification syndrome characterized by the patient's belief that his or her relatives have been replaced by impostors. Here we describe the clinical picture and the therapeutic approach to an 11-year-old Caucasian girl with Capgras syndrome. A complete psychopathological assessment was conducted during the acute phase, at one month, two months and six months since diagnosis. Subsequent follow-up evaluations in this patient allowed us to detect improvements in the psychotic symptoms following treatment with risperidone and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, suggesting that this combined therapy may significantly improve the clinical outcome in patients who have Capgras syndrome.

  11. Meier-Gorlin syndrome Clinical genetics and genomics

    OpenAIRE

    Munnik, Sonja; Hoefsloot, Lies; Roukema, Jolt; Schoots, Jeroen; Knoers, Nine; Brunner, H.G.; Jackson, Andrew; Bongers, Ernie

    2015-01-01

    textabstractMeier-Gorlin syndrome (MGS) is a rare autosomal recessive primordial dwarfism disorder, characterized by microtia, patellar applasia/hypoplasia, and a proportionate short stature. Associated clinical features encompass feeding problems, congenital pulmonary emphysema, mammary hypoplasia in females and urogenital anomalies, such as cryptorchidism and hypoplastic labia minora and majora. Typical facial characteristics during childhood comprise a small mouth with full lips and micro-...

  12. A Case of Bardet-Biedl Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    katayon Etemadi

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Etemadi K1, Khazaii MR2 1. MSC of Human Genetic, Molecular Medicine and Genetic department, Medical school, Hamadan University of medical sciences. 2. Assistant professor of Pediatric Urology Abstract Background: The Bardet Biedl syndrome is a heterogenous and autosomal recessive disorder. Primary features are: retinitis pigmentosa, obesity, polydactyly, mental retardation, renal abnormalities and hypogonadism. Renal failure is the major cause of death in homozygote patients, with chronic glomerolopathy that cause chronic renal disease. Secondary features are: speech disorder delay, developmental delay, polyuria, diabetes mellitus and hypertension. The diagnosis of Bardet- Biedl syndrome is established by clinical findings. Twelve genes are known to be associated with Bardet Biedl syndromes: BBS1, BBS2… BBS12. Case presentation: In this article we report a four and half year old boy that have Bardet Biedl syndrome as a result of a consanguine marriage (third degree. Conclusion: A monogenic syndrome such as Bardet Biedl has a lot of symptoms. These symptoms are out put of a mutation in locus of a recessive allel. Therefore people like to marry consanguinly have to do genetic counseling before marriage. Because analysis of family history will reduced the risk of such syndromes.

  13. Gorlin-Goltz syndrome in a child: case report and clinical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snoeckx, A; Vanhoenacker, F M; Verhaert, K; Chappelle, K; Parizel, P M

    2008-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disorder that involves multiple organ systems, including the skin, skeleton and jaws. We report the case of a mild mentally retarded 7-year-old boy who was referred with a swelling of his left mandible. Imaging studies showed a unilocular well-defined lytic mandibular lesion, calcifications of the falx, bifid ribs and fusion anomalies of the ribs. The mandibular lesion was treated with surgical decompression and proved to represent a keratocyst on histological examination. Further clinical examination revealed cutaneous lesions, Sprengel deformity, pectus excavatum and facial dysmorphism. Based on the combination of imaging and clinical findings the diagnosis of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome was made. This was confirmed by genetic tests. During three-year follow-up the boy presented with recurrent and multiple odontogenic keratocysts. The occurrence of multiple and recurrent keratocysts at young age, should alert the radiologist to the potential diagnosis of an underlying Gorlin-Goltz syndrome. This paper reviews the imaging findings in Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, with emphasis on maxillofacial imaging.

  14. Clinical Profiles, Occurrence, and Management of Adolescent Patients with HAIR-AN Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatim A. Omar

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The syndrome of hyperandrogenism, insulin resistance, and acanthosis nigricans (HAIR-AN is a subphenotype of the polycystic ovary syndrome. It is one of the most common causes of menstrual problems, hyperandrogenic symptoms, and insulin resistance among young women. Review of clinical data in an outpatient adolescent clinic showed that of the 1,002 young women (ages 10—21 years attending the clinic over a 2-year period, 50 (5% were diagnosed with HAIR-AN syndrome. Mean age of the patients was 15.5, initial mean weight at diagnosis was 94.5 kg, and the mean BMI was 33.33 kg/m2. Patients were treated with a weight-stabilization and -reduction program, oral contraceptive pills, and in most cases metformin. Of the patients, 80% were compliant with the follow-up and treatment regimen, 60% maintained or reduced their weight, 95% had regular menstrual cycles, and in most patients, the acne and/or hirsutism were the same or better than at the start of treatment. We conclude that HAIR-AN syndrome is a common disease in young women and multifaceted, aggressive treatment appears to be effective in reducing the severity of symptoms and preventing further consequences.

  15. Gingival fibromatosis with hypertrichosis syndrome: Case series of rare syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preetha Balaji

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gingival fibromatosis with hypertrichosis syndrome is an extremely rare genetic condition characterized by profound overgrowth of hair and gums, as well as other variable features. Gingival fibromatosis is characterized by a large increase in the gingival dimension which extends above the dental crowns, covering them partially or completely. They were found to have a genetic origin, may also occur in isolation or be part of a syndrome, or acquired origin, due to specific drugs administered systemically. Congenital generalized hypertrichosis is a heterogeneous group of diseases with continuing excessive growth of terminal hair without androgenic stimulation. It has informally been called werewolf syndrome because the appearance is similar to that of a werewolf. Various syndromes have been associated with these features such as epilepsy, mental retardation, cardiomegaly, or osteochondrodysplasia. As so far very few cases have been reported in literature, we are reporting a series of three cases with management of the same. The excess gingival tissues, in these cases, were removed by conventional gingivectomy under general anesthesia. The postoperative result was uneventful and the patient's appearance improved significantly. Good esthetic result was achieved to allow patient to practice oral hygiene measures. Though this is not a serious condition clinically, psychosocial trauma cannot be neglected owing to the cosmetic disfigurement it produces.

  16. Development of a genotyping microarray for Usher syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremers, Frans P M; Kimberling, William J; Külm, Maigi; de Brouwer, Arjan P; van Wijk, Erwin; te Brinke, Heleen; Cremers, Cor W R J; Hoefsloot, Lies H; Banfi, Sandro; Simonelli, Francesca; Fleischhauer, Johannes C; Berger, Wolfgang; Kelley, Phil M; Haralambous, Elene; Bitner-Glindzicz, Maria; Webster, Andrew R; Saihan, Zubin; De Baere, Elfride; Leroy, Bart P; Silvestri, Giuliana; McKay, Gareth J; Koenekoop, Robert K; Millan, Jose M; Rosenberg, Thomas; Joensuu, Tarja; Sankila, Eeva-Marja; Weil, Dominique; Weston, Mike D; Wissinger, Bernd; Kremer, Hannie

    2007-02-01

    Usher syndrome, a combination of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and sensorineural hearing loss with or without vestibular dysfunction, displays a high degree of clinical and genetic heterogeneity. Three clinical subtypes can be distinguished, based on the age of onset and severity of the hearing impairment, and the presence or absence of vestibular abnormalities. Thus far, eight genes have been implicated in the syndrome, together comprising 347 protein-coding exons. To improve DNA diagnostics for patients with Usher syndrome, we developed a genotyping microarray based on the arrayed primer extension (APEX) method. Allele-specific oligonucleotides corresponding to all 298 Usher syndrome-associated sequence variants known to date, 76 of which are novel, were arrayed. Approximately half of these variants were validated using original patient DNAs, which yielded an accuracy of >98%. The efficiency of the Usher genotyping microarray was tested using DNAs from 370 unrelated European and American patients with Usher syndrome. Sequence variants were identified in 64/140 (46%) patients with Usher syndrome type I, 45/189 (24%) patients with Usher syndrome type II, 6/21 (29%) patients with Usher syndrome type III and 6/20 (30%) patients with atypical Usher syndrome. The chip also identified two novel sequence variants, c.400C>T (p.R134X) in PCDH15 and c.1606T>C (p.C536S) in USH2A. The Usher genotyping microarray is a versatile and affordable screening tool for Usher syndrome. Its efficiency will improve with the addition of novel sequence variants with minimal extra costs, making it a very useful first-pass screening tool.

  17. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome in a young woman with anorexia nervosa and complex somatic symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Michelle; Strand, Mattias

    2018-03-01

    The Ehler-Danlos syndromes (EDS) are a group of clinically heterogeneous connective tissue disorders characterized by joint hypermobility, hyperextensibility of the skin, and a general connective tissue fragility that can induce symptoms from multiple organ systems. We present a case of comorbid anorexia nervosa and EDS in a 23-year old woman with a multitude of somatic symptoms that were initially attributed to the eating disorder but that were likely caused by the underlying EDS. Various EDS symptoms, such as gastrointestinal complaints, smell and taste abnormalities, and altered somatosensory awareness may resemble or mask an underlying eating disorder, and vice versa. Because of the large clinical heterogeneity, correctly identifying symptoms of EDS presents a challenge for clinicians, who should be aware of this group of underdiagnosed and potentially serious syndromes. The Beighton Hypermobility Score is an easily applicable screening instrument in assessing potential EDS in patients with joint hypermobility. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Clinical and radiological findings in a case of non-syndromic oligodontia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez Carrillo, Francisco J.

    2002-01-01

    A case of congenital absence of eleven dental pieces without association to syndromes is presented. An integral clinical examination of the patient's dental pieces has determined a case of oligodontia. Congenital absence of all permanent teeth described in the clinical examination are presented by orthopantomography radiography. Impressions with irreversible hydrocolloid are realized to complete the diagnostic. The case described of oligodontia has developed without presenting relation to some syndrome as Down syndrome or ectodermal dysplasia. Genes have played a very important role in the etiology of dental anomalies, according to the existing evidence. Mutation has been identified as the cause of dental defects in some of the genes in humans. The maxillary teeth developed in the marginal areas of the dental lamina have pretended to be the dental pieces more susceptible to be without form [es

  19. Clinical and pathological heterogeneity of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah P Yang

    Full Text Available Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3 (CIN3, the immediate cervical cancer precursor, is a target of cervical cancer prevention. However, less than half of CIN3s will progress to cancer. Routine treatment of all CIN3s and the majority of CIN2s may lead to overtreatment of many lesions that would not progress. To improve our understanding of CIN3 natural history, we performed a detailed characterization of CIN3 heterogeneity in a large referral population in the US.We examined 309 CIN3 cases in the SUCCEED, a large population-based study of women with abnormal cervical cancer screening results. Histology information for 12 individual loop electrosurgical excision procedure (LEEP segments was evaluated for each woman. We performed case-case comparisons of CIN3s to analyze determinants of heterogeneity and screening test performance.CIN3 cases varied substantially by size (1-10 LEEP segments and by presentation with concomitant CIN2 and CIN1. All grades of CINs were equally distributed over the cervical surface. In half of the women, CIN3 lesions were found as multiple distinct lesions on the cervix. Women with large and solitary CIN3 lesions were more likely to be older, have longer sexual activity span, and have fewer multiple high risk HPV infections. Screening frequency, but not HPV16 positivity, was an important predictor of CIN3 size. Large CIN3 lesions were also characterized by high-grade clinical test results.We demonstrate substantial heterogeneity in clinical and pathological presentation of CIN3 in a US population. Time since sexual debut and participation in screening were predictors of CIN3 size. We did not observe a preferential site of CIN3 on the cervical surface that could serve as a target for cervical biopsy. Cervical cancer screening procedures were more likely to detect larger CIN3s, suggesting that CIN3s detected by multiple independent diagnostic tests may represent cases with increased risk of invasion.

  20. Guillain-Barré Syndrome after Thrombolysis with Streptokinase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ertugrul Okuyan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS is an eponym for a heterogeneous group of immune-mediated peripheral neuropathies. We describe a case of GBS in a patient who recieved intravenous streptokinase therapy for acute anterior myocardial infarction. Clinical symptoms are thought to result from streptokinase-antibody complex mediated damage to the local blood-nerve barrier. Patient was treated with 5-days course of intravenous gammaglobulin and his outcome was good.

  1. Update on clinically isolated syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thouvenot, Éric

    2015-04-01

    Optic neuritis, myelitis and brainstem syndrome accompanied by a symptomatic MRI T2 or FLAIR hyperintensity and T1 hypointensity are highly suggestive of multiple sclerosis (MS) in young adults. They are called "clinically isolated syndrome" (CIS) and correspond to the typical first multiple sclerosis (MS) episode, especially when associated with other asymptomatic demyelinating lesions, without clinical, radiological and immunological sign of differential diagnosis. After a CIS, the delay of apparition of a relapse, which corresponds to the conversion to clinically definite MS (CDMS), varies from several months to more than 10 years (10-15% of cases, generally called benign RRMS). This delay is generally associated with the number and location of demyelinating lesions of the brain and spinal cord and the results of CSF analysis. Several studies comparing different MRI criteria for dissemination in space and dissemination in time of demyelinating lesions, two hallmarks of MS, provided enough substantial data to update diagnostic criteria for MS after a CIS. In the last revision of the McDonald's criteria in 2010, diagnostic criteria were simplified and now the diagnosis can be made by a single initial scan that proves the presence of active asymptomatic lesions (with gadolinium enhancement) and of unenhanced lesions. However, time to conversion remains highly unpredictable for a given patient and CIS can remain isolated, especially for idiopathic unilateral optic neuritis or myelitis. Univariate analyses of clinical, radiological, biological or electrophysiological characteristics of CIS patients in small series identified numerous risk factors of rapid conversion to MS. However, large series of CIS patients analyzing several characteristics of CIS patients and the influence of disease modifying therapies brought important information about the risk of CDMS or RRMS over up to 20 years of follow-up. They confirmed the importance of the initial MRI pattern of

  2. [Wolfram syndrome: clinical features, molecular genetics of WFS1 gene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Katsuya; Matsunaga, Kimie; Hatanaka, Masayuki; Akiyama, Masaru; Tanizawa, Yukio

    2015-02-01

    Wolfram syndrome(WFS: OMIM 222300) is a rare recessive neuro-endocrine degenerative disorder, known as DIDMOAD(Diabetes Insipidus, early-onset Diabetes Mellitus, Optic Atrophy and Deafness) syndrome. Most affected individuals carry recessive mutations in the Wolfram syndrome 1 gene(WFS1). The WFS1 protein is an endoplasmic reticulum(ER) embedded protein, which functions in ER calcium homeostasis and unfolded protein responses. Dysregulation of these cellular processes results in the development of ER stress, leading to apoptosis. In addition, abundantly present WFS1 protein in insulin secretory granules plays a role in the intra-granular acidification. However, the phenotypic pleiomorphism and molecular complexity of this disease limit the understanding of WFS. Here we review clinical features, molecular mechanisms and mutations of WFS1 gene that relate to this syndrome.

  3. Genetic heterogeneity of Usher syndrome: analysis of 151 families with Usher type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astuto, L M; Weston, M D; Carney, C A; Hoover, D M; Cremers, C W; Wagenaar, M; Moller, C; Smith, R J; Pieke-Dahl, S; Greenberg, J; Ramesar, R; Jacobson, S G; Ayuso, C; Heckenlively, J R; Tamayo, M; Gorin, M B; Reardon, W; Kimberling, W J

    2000-12-01

    Usher syndrome type I is an autosomal recessive disorder marked by hearing loss, vestibular areflexia, and retinitis pigmentosa. Six Usher I genetic subtypes at loci USH1A-USH1F have been reported. The MYO7A gene is responsible for USH1B, the most common subtype. In our analysis, 151 families with Usher I were screened by linkage and mutation analysis. MYO7A mutations were identified in 64 families with Usher I. Of the remaining 87 families, who were negative for MYO7A mutations, 54 were informative for linkage analysis and were screened with the remaining USH1 loci markers. Results of linkage and heterogeneity analyses showed no evidence of Usher types Ia or Ie. However, one maximum LOD score was observed lying within the USH1D region. Two lesser peak LOD scores were observed outside and between the putative regions for USH1D and USH1F, on chromosome 10. A HOMOG chi(2)((1)) plot shows evidence of heterogeneity across the USH1D, USH1F, and intervening regions. These results provide conclusive evidence that the second-most-common subtype of Usher I is due to genes on chromosome 10, and they confirm the existence of one Usher I gene in the previously defined USH1D region, as well as providing evidence for a second, and possibly a third, gene in the 10p/q region.

  4. Clinical presentation of Churg-Strauss syndrome in children: A 12-year-old-boy with ANCA-negative Churg-Strauss syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razenberg, Femke G E M; Heynens, Jan W C M; Jan de Vries, Geeuwke; Duijts, Liesbeth; de Jongste, Johan C; de Blic, Jacques; Rosias, Philippe P R

    2012-01-01

    Churg-Strauss syndrome is an uncommon multisystem disorder characterized by asthma, eosinophilia and vasculitis. We report on a 12-year-old boy with asthma and deterioration of his general condition, who was eventually diagnosed with an ANCA-negative Churg-Strauss syndrome. The propositus included, 50 cases of childhood Churg-Strauss syndrome have been reported. The patient characteristics and clinical characteristics of these children are summarized. The respiratory tract is most frequently involved with pulmonary infiltrates, asthma and sinusitis. Early recognition of childhood Churg-Strauss syndrome is important as delayed diagnosis can lead to severe organ involvement, and possible fatal outcome.

  5. 'Refeeding syndrome' in a Kuwaiti child: clinical diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Sharkawy, Ibrahim; Ramadan, Dina; El-Tantawy, Amira

    2010-01-01

    To report a case of refeeding syndrome in a Kuwaiti child, its clinical presentation and management. A 13-month-old Kuwaiti boy presented with acute severe malnutrition in the form of marasmic kwashiorkor. On admission, blood sugar and serum electrolytes were normal but on the 3rd day he developed typical biochemical features of refeeding syndrome in the form of hyperglycemia, severe hypophosphatemia, hypokalemia, hypocalcemia and hypomagnesemia. The child then received treatment appropriate for refeeding syndrome in the form of lower calorie intake with gradual increase, as well as supplementation of electrolytes, thiamine and vitamins and he eventually made a safe recovery. This case showed that during rehabilitation of a malnourished child, a severe potentially lethal electrolyte disturbance (refeeding syndrome) can occur. Careful monitoring of electrolytes before and during the refeeding phase was needed and helped to detect this syndrome early. We suggest that slow and gradual calorie increase in the 'at-risk' patient can help prevent its occurrence. Copyright (c) 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Early Onset Marfan Syndrome: Atypical Clinical Presentation of Two Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozyurt Abdullah

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Early onset Marfan Syndrome (eoMFS is a rare, severe form of Marfan Syndrome (MFS. The disease has a poor prognosis and most patients present with resistance to heart failure treatment during the newborn period. This report presents two cases of eoMFS with similar clinical features diagnosed in the newborn period and who died at an early age due to the complications related to the involvement of the cardiovascular system.

  7. Reclassification of clinical sleep disorders using traditional models of syndromic, neuroanatomic, pathophysiological and etiological diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzer, A Robert

    2014-09-01

    Existing classifications of central nervous system sleep disorders do not often provide tools to diagnose the majority of patients complaining of sleep-related symptoms, nor always guide effective treatment. I present a novel classification system that completely separates clinical syndromes from anatomical localization, pathophysiology, and etiology. The clinical syndrome I present can describe the majority of patients, but can be fractionated into individual subgroups for further study. By then separating the anatomy and physiology from the symptoms, an avenue of research becomes available to study the different possible structures that regulate sleep, that may be damaged and cause syndromes of sleep dysfunction. Some of these may produce symptoms that overlap with narcolepsy and some may be distinct. Because the clinical syndrome should be distinguished from anatomy or physiology, I have proposed the term narcoleptiform syndrome for the clinical syndrome. The model also clearly separates etiology from anatomy in a classical neurological manner. This allows etiology, localization and symptoms to be studied separately. It is likely that different etiologies may produce damage in areas that produce similar syndromes. For example, in this model, different causes of damage to the orexin nucleus would result in the same clinical syndrome. This reinforces the concept of studying anatomy, symptoms and etiology separately. By studying the relationship of syndromes or symptoms to anatomic localization and pathophysiology, it should be possible to test novel approaches to treatment based on different underlying structure or function. For example, patients with lesions in the ventrolateral preoptic nucleus or the thalamic intralaminar nuclei may both present with insomnia symptoms but need different treatment; or they might present with symptoms overlapping narcolepsy (a narcoleptiform syndrome) yet need different treatment. In some cases, a single treatment may cross over

  8. Differences in manifestations of Marfan syndrome, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, and Loeys-Dietz syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meester, Josephina A N; Verstraeten, Aline; Schepers, Dorien; Alaerts, Maaike; Van Laer, Lut; Loeys, Bart L

    2017-11-01

    Many different heritable connective tissue disorders (HCTD) have been described over the past decades. These syndromes often affect the connective tissue of various organ systems, including heart, blood vessels, skin, joints, bone, eyes, and lungs. The discovery of these HCTD was followed by the identification of mutations in a wide range of genes encoding structural proteins, modifying enzymes, or components of the TGFβ-signaling pathway. Three typical examples of HCTD are Marfan syndrome (MFS), Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS), and Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS). These syndromes show some degree of phenotypical overlap of cardiovascular, skeletal, and cutaneous features. MFS is typically characterized by cardiovascular, ocular, and skeletal manifestations and is caused by heterozygous mutations in FBN1 , coding for the extracellular matrix (ECM) protein fibrillin-1. The most common cardiovascular phenotype involves aortic aneurysm and dissection at the sinuses of Valsalva. LDS is caused by mutations in TGBR1/2 , SMAD2/3 , or TGFB2/3 , all coding for components of the TGFβ-signaling pathway. LDS can be distinguished from MFS by the unique presence of hypertelorism, bifid uvula or cleft palate, and widespread aortic and arterial aneurysm and tortuosity. Compared to MFS, LDS cardiovascular manifestations tend to be more severe. In contrast, no association is reported between LDS and the presence of ectopia lentis, a key distinguishing feature of MFS. Overlapping features between MFS and LDS include scoliosis, pes planus, anterior chest deformity, spontaneous pneumothorax, and dural ectasia. EDS refers to a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous connective tissue disorders and all subtypes are characterized by variable abnormalities of skin, ligaments and joints, blood vessels, and internal organs. Typical presenting features include joint hypermobility, skin hyperextensibility, and tissue fragility. Up to one quarter of the EDS patients show aortic aneurysmal

  9. Differences in manifestations of Marfan syndrome, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, and Loeys-Dietz syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meester, Josephina A. N.; Verstraeten, Aline; Schepers, Dorien; Alaerts, Maaike; Van Laer, Lut

    2017-01-01

    Many different heritable connective tissue disorders (HCTD) have been described over the past decades. These syndromes often affect the connective tissue of various organ systems, including heart, blood vessels, skin, joints, bone, eyes, and lungs. The discovery of these HCTD was followed by the identification of mutations in a wide range of genes encoding structural proteins, modifying enzymes, or components of the TGFβ-signaling pathway. Three typical examples of HCTD are Marfan syndrome (MFS), Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS), and Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS). These syndromes show some degree of phenotypical overlap of cardiovascular, skeletal, and cutaneous features. MFS is typically characterized by cardiovascular, ocular, and skeletal manifestations and is caused by heterozygous mutations in FBN1, coding for the extracellular matrix (ECM) protein fibrillin-1. The most common cardiovascular phenotype involves aortic aneurysm and dissection at the sinuses of Valsalva. LDS is caused by mutations in TGBR1/2, SMAD2/3, or TGFB2/3, all coding for components of the TGFβ-signaling pathway. LDS can be distinguished from MFS by the unique presence of hypertelorism, bifid uvula or cleft palate, and widespread aortic and arterial aneurysm and tortuosity. Compared to MFS, LDS cardiovascular manifestations tend to be more severe. In contrast, no association is reported between LDS and the presence of ectopia lentis, a key distinguishing feature of MFS. Overlapping features between MFS and LDS include scoliosis, pes planus, anterior chest deformity, spontaneous pneumothorax, and dural ectasia. EDS refers to a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous connective tissue disorders and all subtypes are characterized by variable abnormalities of skin, ligaments and joints, blood vessels, and internal organs. Typical presenting features include joint hypermobility, skin hyperextensibility, and tissue fragility. Up to one quarter of the EDS patients show aortic aneurysmal

  10. Epidemiological and clinical characteristics of Reiter's syndrome in Jordanian patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Mrayat, Z.; Abdallat, S.; Marabha, T.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the epidemiological and clinical features of Reiter's syndrome in patients who visited the rheumatology clinic in King Hussein Medical Centre (KHMC), Jordan. Methods: A prospective study, including 43 patients with the diagnosis of Reiter's syndrome was done. Patients were assessed by taking complete history, physical examination and appropriate investigations including urinalysis and culture, stool examination and culture, synovial fluid analysis, complement fixation test for Chlamydia trachomatis, complete blood count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, rheumatoid factor, antinuclear antibodies. HLA-B27 and radiological study. Results: All patients in this study were white men, with mean age of 26.3 years. HLA-B27 was positive in 37 patients (86%). Most cases were post venereal (32 patients, 74%) while the rest were dysenteric. The clinical manifestations were arthritis in all patients (100%), urethritis in 21 patients (48%), ocular involvement in 20 patients (46%), diarrhea in 12 patients (28%), painless oral ulcers in 11 patients (26%), skin lesions in 5 patients (12%) and constitutional symptoms in 7 patients (16%). Arthritis was mostly oligoarticular (25 patients, 58%) with asymmetrical pattern in 34 patients (78%). Large joints of lower extremity were most involved (29 patients, 68%). Rheumatoid factor and antinuclear antibodies were negative in all patients. Relapses occurred in 7 patients (16%) after a mean period of 6.2 months. Conclusion: It is concluded that the epidemiological and clinical features of Reiter's syndrome in Jordan are not different from those in the literature. (author)

  11. Goltz syndrome: A newborn with ectrodactyly and skin lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shatanik Sarkar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Goltz syndrome or Focal Dermal Hypoplasia is a rare multisystem disorder, involving all the three germ cell layers. The disease is thought to be inherited in X-linked dominant fashion with heterogeneous mutations of the PORCN gene at Xp11.23 locus. Majority of the cases are sporadic, mainly due to postzygotic somatic mutations. The clinical spectrum includes characteristic cutaneous manifestations, multiple skeletal anomalies, and involvement of the eyes, hair, nails, kidneys, and so on. Considerable variability is noted in the clinical expression of the disease probably due to genomic mosaicism. Around 300 cases of Goltz syndrome have been reported in the literature. Here, we report such a case with characteristic skin lesions, multiple bony defects, distinctive facial features, coloboma of iris, and bilateral hydronephrosis. The diagnosis was evident immediately after birth due to the characteristic clinical picture of the baby.

  12. [Seronegative antiphospholipid syndrome, catastrophic syndrome, new anticoagulants: learning from a difficult case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joalland, F; de Boysson, H; Darnige, L; Johnson, A; Jeanjean, C; Cheze, S; Augustin, A; Auzary, C; Geffray, L

    2014-11-01

    The diagnosis of the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is based on clinical and biological criteria including the persistent presence of antiphospholipid antibodies and thrombotic events or pregnancy morbidity. Heparins relayed by vitamin K antagonists (VKA) are the gold standard treatment for thrombosis. We report a 17-year-old man who presented with an initially seronegative antiphospholipid syndrome, in whom the diagnosis was late, only obtained after anticoagulation withdrawing, when a catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (CAPS) with cutaneous lesions and disseminated intravascular coagulation syndrome occurred. For personal convenience, this patient was initially treated with fondaparinux followed by a new oral anticoagulant (rivaroxaban) before to return to the conventional VKA treatment. The "seronegative" APS is a controversial concept reflecting the heterogeneity of antigenic targets for aPL. This diagnosis may be considered after a rigorous work-up, with the help of haemostasis laboratories testing new emerging aPL assays. In APS, the new anticoagulants represent an attractive option needing nevertheless prospective studies to evaluate their safety and efficacy. Lupus anticoagulant detection in patients treated by new oral anticoagulants is not easy by usually recommended coagulation tests. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  13. Alstr?m Syndrome: Genetics and Clinical Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Marshall, Jan D; Maffei, Pietro; Collin, Gayle B; Naggert, J?rgen K

    2011-01-01

    Alstr?m syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive genetic disorder characterized by cone-rod dystrophy, hearing loss, childhood truncal obesity, insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia, type 2 diabetes, hypertriglyceridemia, short stature in adulthood, cardiomyopathy, and progressive pulmonary, hepatic, and renal dysfunction. Symptoms first appear in infancy and progressive development of multi-organ pathology leads to a reduced life expectancy. Variability in age of onset and severity of clinic...

  14. [Network clusters of symptoms as elementary syndromes of psychopathology: implications for clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goekoop, R; Goekoop, J G

    2016-01-01

    In a recent publication we reported the existence of around 11 (to 15) 'elementary syndromes' that may combine in various ways, rather like 'building blocks', to explain the wide range of psychiatric symptoms. 'Bridge symptoms' seem to be responsible both for combining large sets of symptoms into elementary syndromes and for combining the various elementary syndromes to form one globally connected network structure. To discuss the implication of these findings for clinical practice. We performed a network analysis of symptom scores. Elementary syndromes provide a massive simplification of the description of psychiatric disease. Instead of the more than 300 categories in DSM-5, we now need to consider only a handful of elementary syndromes and personality domains. This modular representation of psychiatric illnesses allows us to make a complete, systematic and efficient assessment of patients and a systematic review of treatment options. Clinicians, patients, managerial staff and insurance companies can verify whether symptom reduction is taking place in the most important domains of psychopathology. Unlike classic multidimensional methods of disease description, network models of psychopathology can be used to explain comorbidity patterns, predict the clinical course of psychopathology and to designate primary targets for therapeutic interventions. A network view on psychopathology could significantly improve everyday clinical practice.

  15. Psychosocial Factors and Central Sensitivity Syndromes

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, Leah M.; Turk, Dennis C.

    2015-01-01

    Central sensitivity syndromes (CSSs) represent a heterogeneous group of disorders (e.g., fibromyalgia [FM], irritable bowel syndrome [IBS], chronic headache, temporomandibular disorders [TMDs], pelvic pain syndromes) that share common symptoms, with persistent pain being the most prominent feature.

  16. The startle syndromes : Physiology and treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dreissen, Yasmine E. M.; Tijssen, Marina A. J.

    2012-01-01

    Startle syndromes are paroxysmal and show stimulus sensitivity, placing them in the differential diagnosis of epileptic seizures. Startle syndromes form a heterogeneous group of disorders with three categories: hyperekplexia (HPX), stimulus-induced disorders, and neuropsychiatric syndromes. HPX is

  17. The startle syndromes: Physiology and treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dreissen, Yasmine E. M.; Tijssen, Marina A. J.

    2012-01-01

    Startle syndromes are paroxysmal and show stimulus sensitivity, placing them in the differential diagnosis of epileptic seizures. Startle syndromes form a heterogeneous group of disorders with three categories: hyperekplexia (HPX), stimulus-induced disorders, and neuropsychiatric syndromes. HPX is

  18. Frequency and clinical, hormonal and ultrasonographic characteristics suggestive of polycystic ovarian syndrome in a group of females with metabolic syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ovies Carballo, Gisel; Dominguez Alonso, Emma; Verdeja Varela, Olga L; Zamora Recinos, Hugo

    2008-01-01

    The polycystic ovarian syndrome is the most frequent endocrine affection in females at reproductive age. Nowadays, it is known that insulin resistance and consequent hyperinsulinism seem to be the basis of the disorders characterizing it. That's why, it is not erroneous to think that in females with metabolic syndrome, whose physiopathological bases are insulin resistance and hyperinsulinism, there may appear clinical, humoral and ultrasonographic elements of the polycystic ovarian syndrome

  19. Clinical Investigation of Adrenal Incidentalomas in Japanese Patients of the Fukuoka Region with Updated Diagnostic Criteria for Sub-clinical Cushing's Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Ichiro; Sugimoto, Kaoru; Miyajima, Tetsumasa; Ide, Tomoko; Minezaki, Midori; Takeshita, Kaori; Takahara, Saori; Nakagawa, Midori; Fujimura, Yuki; Kudo, Tadachika; Miyajima, Shigero; Taira, Hiroshi; Ohe, Kenji; Ishii, Tatsu; Yanase, Toshihiko; Kobayashi, Kunihisa

    2018-04-27

    Objectives We retrospectively investigated the clinical and endocrinological characteristics of adrenal incidentalomas. Methods We studied 61 patients who had been diagnosed with adrenal incidentalomas and had undergone detailed clinical and endocrinological evaluations while hospitalized. We used common criteria to diagnose the functional tumors, but for sub-clinical Cushing's syndrome, we used an updated set of diagnosis criteria: serum cortisol ≥1.8 μg/dL after a positive response to a 1-mg dexamethasone suppression test if the patient has a low morning ACTH level (Cushing's syndrome and sub-clinical Cushing's syndrome), and 25 (41.0%) had non-functional tumors. Compared with the non-functional tumor group, the primary aldosteronism group and the cortisol-secreting adenoma group were significantly younger and had significantly lower rates of hypokalemia, whereas the pheochromocytoma group had significantly larger tumors and a significantly lower body mass index. Conclusion Our study found a larger percentage of functional tumors among adrenal incidentalomas than past reports, partly because we used a lower serum cortisol level after a dexamethasone suppression test to diagnose sub-clinical Cushing's syndrome and because all of the patients were hospitalized and could therefore receive more detailed examinations. Young patients with hypokalemia or lean patients with large adrenal tumors warrant particularly careful investigation.

  20. A de novo frameshift in HNRNPK causing a Kabuki-like syndrome with nodular heterotopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, L; Pagnamenta, A T; Lise, S; Clasper, S; Stewart, H; Akha, E S; Quaghebeur, G; Knight, S J L; Keays, D A; Taylor, J C; Kini, U

    2016-09-01

    Kabuki syndrome is a heterogeneous condition characterized by distinctive facial features, intellectual disability, growth retardation, skeletal abnormalities and a range of organ malformations. Although at least two major causative genes have been identified, these do not explain all cases. Here we describe a patient with a complex Kabuki-like syndrome that included nodular heterotopia, in whom testing for several single-gene disorders had proved negative. Exome sequencing uncovered a de novo c.931_932insTT variant in HNRNPK (heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K). Although this variant was identified in March 2012, its clinical relevance could only be confirmed following the August 2015 publication of two cases with HNRNPK mutations and an overlapping phenotype that included intellectual disability, distinctive facial dysmorphism and skeletal/connective tissue abnormalities. Whilst we had attempted (unsuccessfully) to identify additional cases through existing collaborators, the two published cases were 'matched' using GeneMatcher, a web-based tool for connecting researchers and clinicians working on identical genes. Our report therefore exemplifies the importance of such online tools in clinical genetics research and the benefits of periodically reviewing cases with variants of unproven significance. Our study also suggests that loss of function variants in HNRNPK should be considered as a molecular basis for patients with Kabuki-like syndrome. © 2016 The Authors. Clinical Genetics published by John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Chronic pain in hypermobility syndrome and Ehlers–Danlos syndrome (hypermobility type: it is a challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scheper MC

    2015-08-01

    diagnostic criteria for HMS/EDS-HT (Solution 1, account for clinical heterogeneity by the classification of subtypes within the HMS/EDS-HT spectrum (Solution 2, and create a clinical core set (Solution 3. Keywords: chronic musculoskeletal pain, generalized joint hypermobility, hypermobility syndrome, Ehlers–Danlos hypermobility type

  2. Cytokine profiles show heterogeneity of interferon-β response in multiple sclerosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hegen, Harald; Adrianto, Indra; Lessard, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate serum cytokine profiles for their utility to determine the heterogeneous responses to interferon (IFN)-β treatment in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). METHODS: Patients with relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) or clinically isolated syndrome receiving de novo IFN-β treatment...... were included in this prospective, observational study. Number of relapses and changes in disability were assessed 2 years prior to and 2 years after initiation of treatment. Sera were collected at baseline and after 3 months on therapy. Cytokine levels in sera were assessed by Luminex multiplex assays...

  3. Clinical features and endocrine profile of Laron syndrome in Indian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phanse-Gupte, Supriya R; Khadilkar, Vaman V; Khadilkar, Anuradha V

    2014-11-01

    Patients with growth hormone (GH) insensitivity (also known as Laron syndome) have been reported from the Mediterranean region and Southern Eucador, with few case reports from India. We present here the clinical and endocrine profile of 9 children with Laron syndrome from India. Nine children diagnosed with Laron syndrome based on clinical features of GH deficiency and biochemical profile suggestive of GH resistance were studied over a period of 5 years from January 2008 to January 2013. Age of presentation was between 2.5-11.5 years. All children were considerably short on contemporary Indian charts with mean (SD) height Z score -5.2 (1.6). However, they were within ± 2 SD on Laron charts. No child was overweight [mean (SD) BMI Z score 0.92 (1.1)]. All children had characteristic facies of GH deficiency with an added feature of prominent eyes. Three boys had micropenis and 1 had unilateral undescended testis. All children had low IGF-1 (Laron syndrome should be suspected in children with clinical features of GH deficiency, high GH levels and low IGF-1/IGFBP-3. These children are in a state of GH resistance and need IGF-1 therapy.

  4. A CLINICAL STUDY OF HELLP SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irrinki Vasundhara Jyothi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND HELLP syndrome is an acronym for Haemolysis (H, Elevated Liver Enzymes (EL and Low Platelet (LP. This is a rare complication of preeclampsia (10-15%. HELLP syndrome may develop even without hypertension. This syndrome is manifested by nausea, vomiting, epigastric or right upper quadrant pain along with haematological changes. Parenchymal necrosis of liver causes elevation in hepatic enzymes (AST and ALT >70 IU/L, LDH >600 IU/L and bilirubin (>1.2 mg/dL. There may be subcapsular haematoma formation (which is diagnosed by CT scanning and abnormal peripheral blood smear. Eventually, liver may rupture to cause sudden hypotension due to haemoperitoneum. Periportal haemorrhagic necrosis of the liver occurs due to thrombosis of the arterioles. The necrosis is seen at the periphery of the lobule. There may be subcapsular haemorrhage. Hepatic insufficiency seldom occurs because of the capacity and regenerative ability of liver cells. Liver function tests are especially abnormal in women with HELLP syndrome. A sincere effort has been put to study the HELLP syndrome incidence and its clinical prognosis and to understand its outcome. MATERIALS AND METHODS Forty patients were selected whose BP was recorded more than 140/80 mmHg after twenty weeks of gestation. Peripheral smear were taken to check for haemolysis or elevated indirect bilirubin or elevated LDH levels were checked, elevated liver enzymes and decreased platelet count <1,00,000/cumm was noted. Incidence of HELLP syndrome was found and various clinical features presented and the complications faced by the patients were recorded. Prompt treatment was given and the outcome of the disease was noted. All the statistical analysis was done using the latest SPSS software 2015 (California. RESULTS The mean age of the study group was found to be 26.72 years with a standard deviation of 5.62 years. In our study, the mean haemoglobin level was found to be 6.41 gm%, which is very low compared to the

  5. Hyperinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia in Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) due to defects in the function of pancreatic ß-cell ATP-sensitive K+ channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hussain, K; Cosgrove, K E; Shepherd, R M

    2005-01-01

    Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) is a congenital overgrowth syndrome that is clinically and genetically heterogeneous. Hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia occurs in about 50% of children with BWS and, in the majority of infants, it resolves spontaneously. However, in a small group of patients...... the hypoglycemia can be persistent and may require pancreatectomy. The mechanism of persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia in this group of patients is unclear....

  6. A pragmatic evidence-based clinical management algorithm for burning mouth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yohanan; Yoo, Timothy; Han, Peter; Liu, Yuan; Inman, Jared C

    2018-04-01

    Burning mouth syndrome is a poorly understood disease process with no current standard of treatment. The goal of this article is to provide an evidence-based, practical, clinical algorithm as a guideline for the treatment of burning mouth syndrome. Using available evidence and clinical experience, a multi-step management algorithm was developed. A retrospective cohort study was then performed, following STROBE statement guidelines, comparing outcomes of patients who were managed using the algorithm and those who were managed without. Forty-seven patients were included in the study, with 21 (45%) managed using the algorithm and 26 (55%) managed without. The mean age overall was 60.4 ±16.5 years, and most patients (39, 83%) were female. Cohorts showed no statistical difference in age, sex, overall follow-up time, dysgeusia, geographic tongue, or psychiatric disorder; xerostomia, however, was significantly different, skewed toward the algorithm group. Significantly more non-algorithm patients did not continue care (69% vs. 29%, p =0.001). The odds ratio of not continuing care for the non-algorithm group compared to the algorithm group was 5.6 [1.6, 19.8]. Improvement in pain was significantly more likely in the algorithm group ( p =0.001), with an odds ratio of 27.5 [3.1, 242.0]. We present a basic clinical management algorithm for burning mouth syndrome which may increase the likelihood of pain improvement and patient follow-up. Key words: Burning mouth syndrome, burning tongue, glossodynia, oral pain, oral burning, therapy, treatment.

  7. Epidemiology, diagnosis, and management of polycystic ovary syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Sirmans SM; Pate KA

    2013-01-01

    Susan M Sirmans, Kristen A PateDepartment of Clinical and Administrative Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of Louisiana at Monroe, Monroe, LA, USAAbstract: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common heterogeneous endocrine disorder characterized by irregular menses, hyperandrogenism, and polycystic ovaries. The prevalence of PCOS varies depending on which criteria are used to make the diagnosis, but is as high as 15%–20% when the European Society for Human Reproduction and...

  8. Animal models of polycystic ovary syndrome: a focused review of rodent models in relationship to clinical phenotypes and cardiometabolic risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Danni; Vine, Donna F

    2012-07-01

    To review rodent animal models of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), with a focus on those associated with the metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease risk factors. Review. Rodent models of PCOS. Description and comparison of animal models. Comparison of animal models to clinical phenotypes of PCOS. Animals used to study PCOS include rodents, mice, rhesus monkeys, and ewes. Major methods to induce PCOS in these models include subcutaneous injection or implantation of androgens, estrogens, antiprogesterone, letrozole, prenatal exposure to excess androgens, and exposure to constant light. In addition, transgenic mice models and spontaneous PCOS-like rodent models have also been developed. Rodents are the most economical and widely used animals to study PCOS and ovarian dysfunction. The model chosen to study the development of PCOS and other metabolic parameters remains dependent on the specific etiologic hypotheses being investigated. Rodent models have been shown to demonstrate changes in insulin metabolism, with or without induction of hyperandrogenemia, and limited studies have investigated cardiometabolic risk factors for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Given the clinical heterogeneity of PCOS, the utilization of different animal models may be the best approach to further our understanding of the pathophysiologic mechanisms associated with the early etiology of PCOS and cardiometabolic risk. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Clinical Characteristics, Management, and Outcomes of Suspected Poststroke Acute Coronary Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Biso, Sylvia Marie; Lu, Marvin; De Venecia, Toni Anne; Wongrakpanich, Supakanya; Rodriguez-Ziccardi, Mary; Yadlapati, Sujani; Kishlyansky, Marina; Rammohan, Harish Seetha; Figueredo, Vincent M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) can complicate acute ischemic stroke, causing significant morbidity and mortality. To date, literatures that describe poststroke acute coronary syndrome and its morbidity and mortality burden are lacking. Methods This is a single center, retrospective study where clinical characteristics, cardiac evaluation, and management of patients with suspected poststroke ACS were compared and analyzed for their association with inpatient mortality and 1-year all-...

  10. Intergenerational Associations of Chronic Disease and Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Davies, Michael J.; Marino, Jennifer L.; Willson, Kristyn J.; March, Wendy A.; Moore, Vivienne M.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common female endocrine disorder of heterogeneous clinical presentation, high disease burden, and unknown aetiology. The disease and associated conditions cluster in families, suggesting that PCOS may be the reproductive consequence of underlying chronic disease susceptibility. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether parents of young women with PCOS were more likely to have a history of diabetes or cardiovascular disease in later adult life. DESIGN, S...

  11. Revisiting Cotard’s Syndrome: Illustration of Two Psychiatric Clinical Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lídia Sousa

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cotard’s Syndrome (CS is a rare and severe neuropsychiatric condition in which the central feature is the existence of nihilistic delusions. Controversy has ensued about the precise clinical picture Jules Cotard meant to describe and attempts have been made, more recently, not only to clarify the terminology, but also to define different types of this syndrome and explore its biological basis. Aims: We intend to briefly review the terminology, etiology, epidemiology and differential diagnosis of this syndrome, based on two clinical cases. Methods: Bibliographic search conducted through the electronic databases Medline and Gallica (French National Library, consultation of clinical records and direct interviews with the patients. Results and Conclusions: Typically the patients diagnosed with CS manifest the delusional idea that they are dying or already dead. However, it is also possible that they deny the existence of only some parts of their own body, or the functioning of some organs, and they may even sometimes deny the existence of the external world. We illustrate the case of a 66-year-old woman, diagnosed with bipolar affective disorder, admitted in the context of a severe depressive episode with psychotic symptoms, compatible with CS type II and the case of a young male aged 22, admitted due to a first  psychotic episode with schizophrenia like characteristics, presenting with nihilistic delusions compatible with CS type I.

  12. Dhat syndrome: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udina, Marc; Foulon, Hubert; Valdés, Manuel; Bhattacharyya, Sagnik; Martín-Santos, Rocío

    2013-01-01

    Dhat syndrome is a widely recognized clinical condition often seen on the Indian subcontinent that is characterized by a preoccupation with semen loss in urine and other symptoms such as fatigue or depressed mood. Although it has been considered to be a culture-bound syndrome, it may also be regarded as a distinct manifestation of depression or another medical illness. The purpose of this paper was to carry out a systematic review on Dhat syndrome. A review of the literature published up until February 2012 was conducted using the key words [Dhat syndrome] or [semen-loss anxiety] or [semen-loss syndrome]. We included only original studies. The majority of studies reported patients from the Indian subcontinent. There was a high degree of heterogeneity among the studies. Dhat was a common condition in young people from certain cultures and origins. Depressive and anxiety symptoms were common, including fatigue, sleepiness, and sexual dysfunction. Good clinical engagement, social support, and sexual education were useful in some cases. Given the high rate of comorbid depressive symptoms, antidepressant has been used. In an increasingly globalized world, clinicians must be able to properly diagnose and treat patients from other cultures, who may report symptoms that are influenced by their beliefs, culture, or place of origin. Dhat may be a common manifestation of a depressive or anxiety disorder in certain cultures. Further research is needed to improve our understanding of this condition, to clarify its nosologic status, and to offer appropriate treatment to affected individuals. Copyright © 2013 The Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Diagnostic imaging of high-grade astrocytoma: heterogeneity of clinical manifestation, image characteristics, and histopathological findings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okajima, Kaoru; Ohta, Yoshio

    2012-10-01

    Recent developments in diagnostic radiology, which have enabled accurate differential diagnoses of brain tumors, have been well described in the last three decades. MR and PET imaging can also provide information to predict histological grades and prognoses that might influence treatment strategies. However, high-grade astrocytomas consist of many different subtypes that are associated with different imaging and histological characteristics. Hemorrhage and necrosis results in a variety of imaging features, and infiltrative tumor growth entrapping normal neurons may cause different clinical manifestations. We reviewed patients with high-grade astrocytomas that showed various imaging characteristics, with special emphasis on initial symptoms and histological features. Clinicopathological characteristics of astrocytomas were also compared with other malignant tumors. Neurological deficits were not notable in patients with grade 3-4 astrocytomas when they showed infiltrative tumor growth, while brain metastases with compact cellular proliferation caused more neurological symptoms. Infiltrative tumors did not show any enhancing masses on MR imaging, but these tumors may show intratumor heterogeneity. Seizures were reported to be more frequent in low-grade glioma and in secondary glioblastoma. Tumor heterogeneity was also reported in molecular genetic profile, and investigators identified some subsets of astrocytomas. They investigated IHD1/2 mutation, EGFR amplification, TP53 mutation, Ki-67 index, etc. In summary, high-grade astrocytomas are not homogenous groups of tumors, and this is associated with the heterogeneity of clinical manifestation, image characteristics, and histopathological findings. Molecular studies may explain the tumor heterogeneity in the near future.

  14. Late whiplash syndrome: a clinical science approach to evidence-based diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorbaugh, Keith; Brismée, Jean-Michel; Phelps, Valerie; Sizer, Phillip S

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to narrow the gap that exists in the clinical application of scientific research and empiric evidence for the evaluation and management of late whiplash. Considering that 14% to 42% of patients are left with chronic symptoms following whiplash injury, it is unlikely that only minor self-limiting injuries result from the typical rear-end impact. As psychosocial issues play a role in the development of persistent whiplash symptoms, discerning the organic conditions from the biopsychosocial factors remains a challenge to clinicians. The term "whiplash" represents the multiple factors associated with the event, injury, and clinical syndrome that are the end-result of a sudden acceleration-deceleration trauma to the head and neck. However, contentions surround the nature of soft-tissue injuries that occur with most motor vehicle accidents and whether these injuries are significant enough to result in chronic pain and limitations. The stark contrast in litigation for whiplash that exists among industrialized nations and less developed countries suggests another factor that could influence one's interpretation of symptoms' chronicity associated with Late Whiplash Syndrome. There are no gold standard tests or imaging techniques that can objectify whiplash-associated disorders. A lack of supporting evidence and disparity in medico-legal issues have created distinct camps in the scientific interpretations and clinical management of late whiplash. It is likely that efforts in research and/or clinical practice will begin to explain the disparity between acute and chronic whiplash syndrome. Recent evidence suggests that Late Whiplash Syndrome should be considered from a different context. The purpose of this article is to expound on several of the significant findings in the literature and offer clinical applications for evaluation and management of Late Whiplash Syndrome.

  15. Clinical aspects and prognosis of Brugada syndrome in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Probst, Vincent; Denjoy, Isabelle; Meregalli, Paola G.; Amirault, Jean-Christophe; Sacher, Frederic; Mansourati, Jacques; Babuty, Dominique; Villain, Elisabeth; Victor, Jacques; Schott, Jean-Jacques; Lupoglazoff, Jean-Marc; Mabo, Philippe; Veltmann, Christian; Jesel, Laurence; Chevalier, Philippe; Clur, Sally-Ann B.; Haissaguerre, Michel; Wolpert, Christian; Le Marec, Herve; Wilde, Arthur A. M.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Brugada syndrome is an arrhythmogenic disease characterized by an ECG pattern of ST-segment elevation in the right precordial leads and augmented risk of sudden cardiac death. Little is known about the clinical presentation and prognosis of this disease in children. METHODS AND RESULTS:

  16. [Clinical Results of Endoscopic Treatment of Greater Trochanteric Pain Syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeman, P; Rafi, M; Skala, P; Zeman, J; Matějka, J; Pavelka, T

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY This retrospective study aims to present short-term clinical outcomes of endoscopic treatment of patients with greater trochanteric pain syndrome (GTPS). MATERIAL AND METHODS The evaluated study population was composed of a total of 19 patients (16 women, 3 men) with the mean age of 47 years (19-63 years). In twelve cases the right hip joint was affected, in the remaining seven cases it was the left side. The retrospective evaluation was carried out only in patients with greater trochanteric pain syndrome caused by independent chronic trochanteric bursitis without the presence of m. gluteus medius tear not responding to at least 3 months of conservative treatment. In patients from the followed-up study population, endoscopic trochanteric bursectomy was performed alone or in combination with iliotibial band release. The clinical results were evaluated preoperatively and with a minimum follow-up period of 1 year after the surgery (mean 16 months). The Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for assessment of pain and WOMAC (Western Ontario MacMaster) score were used. In both the evaluated criteria (VAS and WOMAC score) preoperative and postoperative results were compared. Moreover, duration of surgery and presence of postoperative complications were assessed. Statistical evaluation of clinical results was carried out by an independent statistician. In order to compare the parameter of WOMAC score and VAS pre- and post-operatively the Mann-Whitney Exact Test was used. The statistical significance was set at 0.05. RESULTS The preoperative VAS score ranged 5-9 (mean 7.6) and the postoperative VAS ranged 0-5 (mean 2.3). The WOMAC score ranged 56.3-69.7 (mean 64.2) preoperatively and 79.8-98.3 (mean 89.7) postoperatively. When both the evaluated parameters of VAS and WOMAC score were compared in time, a statistically significant improvement (ppain syndrome yields statistically significant improvement of clinical results with the concurrent minimum incidence of

  17. McCune-Albright Syndrome: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moein Mobini

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS is a rare, heterogenous, clinical condition caused by a rare genetic mutation. The disorder is more common in females and is characterized by a triad of cutaneous, bone and endocrine abnormalities.  We describe a girl patient with MAS having precocious puberty and multiple cafe-au-lait macules and deforming polyostotic fibrous dysplasia of bone. Clinical presentation and X-ray finding were strongly diagnostic for MAS, Patients with McCune-Albright syndrome reach the adult age with a significant burden of the disease that continuously reduces their quality of life. Skeletal deformities, fractures, hyperthyroidism, and hyperestrogenism are just few of the many challenges in the management of these patients. These disorders with close observation and early detection can be controlled.

  18. Systematization of clinical trials related to treatment of metabolic syndrome, 1980-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona Velásquez, Santiago; Guzmán Vivares, Laura; Cardona-Arias, Jaiberth Antonio

    2017-02-01

    Despite the clinical, epidemiological, and economic significance of metabolic syndrome, the profile of clinical trials on this disease is unknown. To characterize the clinical trials related to treatment of metabolic syndrome during the 1980-2015 period. Systematic review of the literature using an ex ante search protocol which followed the phases of the guide Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses in four multidisciplinary databases with seven search strategies. Reproducibility and methodological quality of the studies were assessed. One hundred and six trials were included, most from the United States, Italy, and Spain, of which 63.2% evaluated interventions effective for several components of the syndrome such as diet (40.6%) or physical activity (22.6%). Other studies assessed drugs for a single factor such as hypertension (7.5%), hypertriglyceridemia (11.3%), or hyperglycemia (9.4%). Placebo was used as control in 54.7% of trials, and outcome measures included triglycerides (52.8%), HDL (48.1%), glucose (29.2%), BMI (33.0%), blood pressure (27.4%), waist circumference (26.4%), glycated hemoglobin (11.3%), and hip circumference (7.5%). It was shown that studies ob efficacy of treatment for metabolic syndrome are scarce and have mainly been conducted in the last five years and in high-income countries. Trials on interventions that affect three or more factors and assess several outcome measures are few, and lifestyle interventions (diet and physical activity) are highlighted as most important to impact on this multifactorial syndrome. Copyright © 2017 SEEN. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. An innovative strategy for the molecular diagnosis of Usher syndrome identifies causal biallelic mutations in 93% of European patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnet, Crystel; Riahi, Zied; Chantot-Bastaraud, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Usher syndrome (USH), the most prevalent cause of hereditary deafness-blindness, is an autosomal recessive and genetically heterogeneous disorder. Three clinical subtypes (USH1-3) are distinguishable based on the severity of the sensorineural hearing impairment, the presence or absence...

  20. Overlap of PIV syndrome, VACTERL and Pallister-Hall syndrome: clinical and molecular analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killoran, C E; Abbott, M; McKusick, V A; Biesecker, L G

    2000-07-01

    The polydactyly, imperforate anus, vertebral anomalies syndrome (PIV, OMIM 174100) was determined as a distinct syndrome by Say and Gerald in 1968 (Say B, Gerald PS. Lancet 1968: 2: 688). We noted that the features of PIV overlap with the VATER association and Pallister-Hall syndrome (PHS, OMIM 146510), which includes polydactyly, (central or postaxial), shortened fingers, hypoplastic nails, renal anomalies, imperforate anus, and hypothalamic hamartoma. Truncation mutations in GL13, a zinc finger transcription factor gene, have been shown to cause PHS. We performed a molecular evaluation on a patient diagnosed with PIV, whose mother, grandfather, and maternal aunt had similar malformations. We sequenced the GLI3 gene in the patient to determine if she had a mutation. The patient was found to have a deletion in nucleotides 2188-2207 causing a frameshift mutation that predicts a truncated protein product of the gene. Later clinical studies demonstrated that the patient also has a hypothalamic hamartoma, a finding in PHS. We concluded that this family had atypical PHS and not PIV. This result has prompted us to re-evaluate the PIV literature to see if PIV is a valid entity. Based on these data and our examination of the literature, we conclude that PIV is not a valid diagnostic entity. We conclude that patients diagnosed with PIV should be reclassified as having VACTERL, or PHS, or another syndrome with overlapping malformations.

  1. Beals syndrome (congenital contractural arachnodactyly in children: Clinical symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Semyachkina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with a rare monogenic connective tissue disease from a group of fibrillinopathies with autosomal dominant inheritance — Beals syndrome caused by a mutation in the FBN2 gene. Attention is drawn to the high phenotypic similarity of this disease and Marfan syndrome (FBN1 gene mutation, which is associated with the almost complete identity of two proteins: fibrillin 1 and fibrillin 2.The paper describes a clinical case of a child with Beals syndrome and the typical manifestations of the disease: asthenic constitution, arachnodactyly of the hands and feet, congenital contractures of the large and small joints, chest deformity, kyphoscoliosis, talpes, and crushed ears. The investigators made a differential diagnosis with other connective tissue diseases, such as Marfan syndrome, Stickler syndrome, Ehlers–Danlos syndrome, homocystenuria, and arthrogryposis. DNA diagnosis verified the Beals syndrome in the proband. Exon 28 in the FBN2 gene showed the previously undescribed missense mutation of c.3719G>A, resulting in the amino acid substitution of cysteine for tyrosine (p.Cys1240Tyr in the structure of the protein fibrillin 2. A de novo mutation occurred. There is evidence for its pathogenicity in the development of the clinical symptoms of the disease. The problems of effective medical genetic counseling in this family are discussed. 

  2. [Gorlin-Goltz syndrome: review of the neuroradiological and maxillofacial features illustrated with two clinical cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safronova, Marta Maia; Arantes, Mavilde; Lima, Iva; Domingues, Sara; Almeida, Marta; Moniz, Pedro

    2010-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome or nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome is a rare hereditary autosomal-dominant disorder characterized by multiple basal cell carcinomas in young patients, odontogenic keratocysts, palmar or plantar pits, calcification of the falx cerebri and skeletal malformations. This syndrome is due to mutations in PTCH1 (patched homolog 1 da Drosophila), a tumor suppressor gene. Diagnostic criteria were defined by Evans, revised by Kimonis and include major and minor criteria. The authors review in particular the neuroradiological and maxillofacial characteristics of the syndrome. The authors describe the clinical presentation of two children with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome without affected first degree relatives. In both the clinical suspicion of the syndrome is raised by the presence of multiple odontogenic cysts surgically removed. Histopathological exam revealed keratocysts. None of the patients has basal cell carcinomas but both present with skeletal anomalies, namely marked pectus deformity. The absence of major diagnostic criteria like basal cell carcinomas or palmar or plantar pits in young patients delay the early diagnosis and the correct screening for medulloblastoma, basal cell carcinomas and cardiac fibromas. Odontogenic keratocysts are the most consistent clinical finding in Gorlin-Goltz syndrome in the first one or two decades of life. These patients are very sensitive to ionizing radiation, being able to develop basal cell carcinomas and meningiomas. Treatment should accomplish the complete resection of the tumors.

  3. Clinical characteristics of abnormal savda syndrome type in human immunodeficiency virus infection and acquired immune deficiency syndrome patients: A cross-sectional investigation in Xinjiang, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peierdun, Mi-ji-ti; Liu, Wen-xian; Renaguli, Ai-ze-zi; Nurmuhammat, Amat; Li, Xiao-chun; Gulibaier, Ka-ha-er; Ainivaer, Wu-la-mu; Halmurat, Upur

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the distribution of abnormal hilit syndromes in traditional Uighur medicine (TUM) among human immunodeficiency virus infection and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) patients, and to find out the clinical characteristics of abnormal savda syndrome type HIV/AIDS patients. Between June and July in 2012, 307 eligible HIV/AIDS patients from in-patient department and out-patient clinics of Xinjiang Uighur Autonomous Region the Sixth People's Hospital in Urumqi were investigated. TUM syndrome differentiation was performed by a senior TUM physician. Each participant completed a Sign and Symptom Check-List for Persons Living with HIV/AIDS (SSC-HIV) questionnaire. Depression was evaluated by using Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression Questionnaire. Blood specimen was collected from each participant to test the levels of blood chemicals. Of 307 HIV/AIDS patients, 189 (61.6%) were abnormal savda syndrome type, 118 (38.4%) were non-abnormal-savda syndrome type. Mean CD4 counts of abnormal savda syndrome type patients was (227.61±192.93) cells/µL, and the prevalence of anemia, thrombocytopenia, and elevated cystatin C were 49.7%, 28.6%, and 44.7%, which were significantly higher than those in the non-abnormal-savda syndrome type patients (26.3%, 16.0% and 25.0%,PHIV/AIDS-related symptoms such as fatigue (42.3%), back aches (40.7%), lack of appetite (33.9%), night sweats (31.7%) were more common among abnormal savda syndrome patients (PHIV/AIDS patients, and they present a more sever clinical manifestation.

  4. [Two cases of rehabilitation in Ehler-Danlos syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Tallec, H; Lassalle, A; Khenioui, H; Durufle, A; Plassat, R; Gallien, P

    2006-03-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is rare and little known. It comprises a heterogeneous group of heritable connective tissue disorders characterized by articular hypermobility, skin extensibility and tissue fragility. Diagnosis may be difficult and often delayed. Here we describe 2 cases of women with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. The first had scoliosis with back pain and joint hypermobility. The second presented with hypermobility and joint dislocation, which increased during pregnancy. In these 2 cases, rehabilitation management produced clinical improvement. Orthopaedic complications such joint pain, joint swelling, joint dislocation, back pain, with walking and hand function disability are the main problems in Ehlers-Danos syndrome. Surgery may be necessary to correct dislocated joints but is often not sufficient to resolve the handicap, and physical therapy has an important place in management. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is an evolving disease that can lead to great impairment. Thus, physicians must be aware of this syndrome to offer the best management, with the appropriate use of orthotic devices, specific strengthening routines, education in proper body mechanics and assistive devices, to prevent joint dislocation and subluxations responsible for pain and handicap.

  5. Genetic Mapping in Papillon-Lefèvre Syndrome: A Report of Two Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaustubh Suresh Thakare

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Papillon-Lefevre syndrome (PLS is a rare autosomal recessive heterogeneous trait which is characterized by erythematous palmoplantar hyperkeratosis, early-onset periodontitis, and associated calcification of dura mater. The etiology of PLS is multifactorial with genetic, immunological, and microbial factors playing a role in etiopathogenesis. Recently identified genetic defect in PLS has been mapped to chromosome 11q14–q21, which involves mutations of cathepsin C. This paper presents a report of 2 cases of Papillon-lefevre syndrome in which diagnosis is based on clinical presentation and genetic mapping.

  6. Genetic heterogeneity in patients with Bartter syndrome type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mingran; Ning, Jing; Xu, Weihong; Zhang, Han; Zhao, Kaishu; Li, Wenfu; Li, Guiying; Li, Shibo

    2017-02-01

    Bartter syndrome (BS) type 1 is an autosomal recessive kidney disorder caused by loss‑of‑function mutations in the solute carrier family 12 member 1 (SLC12A1) gene. To date, 72 BS type 1 patients harboring SLC12A1 mutations have been documented. Of these 144 alleles studied, 68 different disease‑causing mutations have been detected in 129 alleles, and no mutation was detected in the remaining 15 alleles. The mutation types included missense/nonsense mutations, splicing mutations and small insertions and deletions ranging from 1 to 4 nucleotides. A large deletion encompassing a whole exon in the SLC12A1 gene has not yet been reported. The current study initially identified an undocumented homozygous frameshift mutation (c.1833delT) by Sanger sequencing analysis of a single infant with BS type 1. However, in a subsequent analysis, the mutation was detected only in the father's DNA. Upon further investigation using a next‑generation sequencing approach, a deletion in exons 14 and 15 in both the patient and patient's mother was detected. The deletion was subsequently confirmed by use of a long‑range polymerase chain reaction and was determined to be 3.16 kb in size based on sequencing of the junction fragment. The results of the present study demonstrated that pathogenic variants of SLC12A1 are heterogeneous. Large deletions appear to serve an etiological role in BS type 1, and may be more prevalent than previously thought.

  7. Development of a genotyping microarray for Usher syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremers, Frans P M; Kimberling, William J; Külm, Maigi; de Brouwer, Arjan P; van Wijk, Erwin; te Brinke, Heleen; Cremers, Cor W R J; Hoefsloot, Lies H; Banfi, Sandro; Simonelli, Francesca; Fleischhauer, Johannes C; Berger, Wolfgang; Kelley, Phil M; Haralambous, Elene; Bitner‐Glindzicz, Maria; Webster, Andrew R; Saihan, Zubin; De Baere, Elfride; Leroy, Bart P; Silvestri, Giuliana; McKay, Gareth J; Koenekoop, Robert K; Millan, Jose M; Rosenberg, Thomas; Joensuu, Tarja; Sankila, Eeva‐Marja; Weil, Dominique; Weston, Mike D; Wissinger, Bernd; Kremer, Hannie

    2007-01-01

    Background Usher syndrome, a combination of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and sensorineural hearing loss with or without vestibular dysfunction, displays a high degree of clinical and genetic heterogeneity. Three clinical subtypes can be distinguished, based on the age of onset and severity of the hearing impairment, and the presence or absence of vestibular abnormalities. Thus far, eight genes have been implicated in the syndrome, together comprising 347 protein‐coding exons. Methods: To improve DNA diagnostics for patients with Usher syndrome, we developed a genotyping microarray based on the arrayed primer extension (APEX) method. Allele‐specific oligonucleotides corresponding to all 298 Usher syndrome‐associated sequence variants known to date, 76 of which are novel, were arrayed. Results Approximately half of these variants were validated using original patient DNAs, which yielded an accuracy of >98%. The efficiency of the Usher genotyping microarray was tested using DNAs from 370 unrelated European and American patients with Usher syndrome. Sequence variants were identified in 64/140 (46%) patients with Usher syndrome type I, 45/189 (24%) patients with Usher syndrome type II, 6/21 (29%) patients with Usher syndrome type III and 6/20 (30%) patients with atypical Usher syndrome. The chip also identified two novel sequence variants, c.400C>T (p.R134X) in PCDH15 and c.1606T>C (p.C536S) in USH2A. Conclusion The Usher genotyping microarray is a versatile and affordable screening tool for Usher syndrome. Its efficiency will improve with the addition of novel sequence variants with minimal extra costs, making it a very useful first‐pass screening tool. PMID:16963483

  8. [Constitutional syndrome: clinical entity or a mixed bag].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-Ortega, Saturnino; Puente-Fernández, Alicia; Santana-Baez, Sergio; Godoy-Díaz, Davinia; Serrano-Fuentes, Miriam; Sanz-Peláez, Oscar

    2013-01-01

    Fatigue, anorexia and involuntary weight loss have been included under the term constitutional syndrome. These manifestations accompany many diseases in which the diagnosis is made by specific symptoms and signs. However, these events are generally the main reason for consultation and the patient does not report other specific data. This forces us to rigorously investigate the possible causes of the disorder. Usually, three manifestations coexist: asthenia, anorexia and weight loss, but sometimes the patient has only one or two of them. The causes of constitutional symptoms are varied and can be divided into three groups: psychiatric diseases, neoplasms and non-neoplastic diseases. The etiological identification is usually done with a simple protocol, which rules out malignancy; the rest of the cases of uncertain etiology are subject to evolution. The constitutional syndrome correlates well with good prognosis or medical functional processes. Although no clinical guidelines have been developed, score scales may help for the etiological assessment. Given the myriad of different causes of the constitutional syndrome, the treatment of this illness depends primarily on the etiology.

  9. Acute traumatic central cord syndrome: analysis of clinical and radiological correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, P; Gomez, P; Alday, R

    2008-12-01

    In patients with traumatic spinal cord injury, several studies correlate neurological impairment and radiological findings. However, little information is available about this correspondence in the particular group of acute traumatic central cord syndrome. The object of the present work was to describe the clinical and radiological features of a series of patients presenting with acute traumatic central cord syndrome and to analyze clinical and radiological correlations on admission and at last follow-up. Retrospective review of 15 patients diagnosed of acute traumatic central cord syndrome between 1995 and 2005. Global motor score and motor score in upper extremities were determined on admission and at last follow-up (6 months-4 years, mean 16 months). Plain films, cervical computed tomography and magnetic resonance (MR) were performed in every patient and retrieved for the study. In seven patients, serial MR studies were performed during follow-up. Clinical and radiological correlations were statistically analyzed with non-parametric tests. Cervical spondylosis appeared associated with older age, falls, and absence of fracture. Spinal cord edema was the most common finding in MR studies but hemorrhage was also observed. The length of spinal cord edema significantly correlated with initial motor score. The decrease in T2-weighted hyperintensity in serial MR studies correlated with the gain of motor power in upper limbs at last follow-up. Elderly patients with more degenerated cervical spines commonly develop acute traumatic central cord syndrome after incidental falls. Length of spinal cord edema correlates with neurological impairment on admission and may provide significant prognostic information.

  10. Machine Learning Methods Improve Prognostication, Identify Clinically Distinct Phenotypes, and Detect Heterogeneity in Response to Therapy in a Large Cohort of Heart Failure Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Tariq; Lund, Lars H; Rao, Pooja; Ghosh, Rohit; Warier, Prashant; Vaccaro, Benjamin; Dahlström, Ulf; O'Connor, Christopher M; Felker, G Michael; Desai, Nihar R

    2018-04-12

    Whereas heart failure (HF) is a complex clinical syndrome, conventional approaches to its management have treated it as a singular disease, leading to inadequate patient care and inefficient clinical trials. We hypothesized that applying advanced analytics to a large cohort of HF patients would improve prognostication of outcomes, identify distinct patient phenotypes, and detect heterogeneity in treatment response. The Swedish Heart Failure Registry is a nationwide registry collecting detailed demographic, clinical, laboratory, and medication data and linked to databases with outcome information. We applied random forest modeling to identify predictors of 1-year survival. Cluster analysis was performed and validated using serial bootstrapping. Association between clusters and survival was assessed with Cox proportional hazards modeling and interaction testing was performed to assess for heterogeneity in response to HF pharmacotherapy across propensity-matched clusters. Our study included 44 886 HF patients enrolled in the Swedish Heart Failure Registry between 2000 and 2012. Random forest modeling demonstrated excellent calibration and discrimination for survival (C-statistic=0.83) whereas left ventricular ejection fraction did not (C-statistic=0.52): there were no meaningful differences per strata of left ventricular ejection fraction (1-year survival: 80%, 81%, 83%, and 84%). Cluster analysis using the 8 highest predictive variables identified 4 clinically relevant subgroups of HF with marked differences in 1-year survival. There were significant interactions between propensity-matched clusters (across age, sex, and left ventricular ejection fraction and the following medications: diuretics, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, β-blockers, and nitrates, P <0.001, all). Machine learning algorithms accurately predicted outcomes in a large data set of HF patients. Cluster analysis identified 4 distinct phenotypes that differed significantly in outcomes and in

  11. [Clinical characteristics of Rett Syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbes, Zeineb; Bouden, Asma; Halayem, Soumaya; Othman, Sami; Bechir Halayem, Mohamed

    2011-10-01

    Rett Syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder, one of the least commonly occurring autism spectrum disorders (ASD),affecting mainly females. To describe features and molecular specificities of Rett syndrome. To identify articles for this review, a Pubmed search was conducted using the following keywords: Rett syndrome, regression,mutation, stereotypes. This syndrome is characterized by cognitive impairment,communication dysfunction, stereotypic movement disorder, and growth failure. It is generally caused by mutations in the MECP2 gene. Rett Syndrome has a prevalence ranging from 10-20 000 females. Specific treatment is not available, but patients need a careful planning for long-term care, with multidisciplinary approaches.

  12. A Clinical Case of Louis-Bar Syndrome Associated with Epilepsy in an Adolescent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.I. Ilchenko

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a case of our own long-term clinical observation of Louis-Bar syndrome (congenital ataxia-telangiectasia associated with epilepsy in 15-year-old girl. Peculiarities of the course and manifestation of clinical signs of Louis-Bar syndrome, a combination with epilepsy and multi-organ involvement in this patient were determined. This case demonstrates the complexity of early diagnosis of primary immunodeficiencies in children in combination with nervous system pathology. An early verification of the diagnosis requires a careful analysis of clinical and anamnestic data in conjunction with a differential search for the causes of recurrent infectious diseases in children with neurological disorders.

  13. Clinical and inheritance profiles of Kallmann syndrome in Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shegem Nadima S

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proper management of patients with Kallmann syndrome (KS allows them to attain a normal reproductive health. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the presentation modalities, phenotypes and the modes of inheritance among 32 patients with Kallmann syndrome in Jordan. Recognition of the syndrome allows for prompt proper management and provision of genetic counselling. Subjects Over a period of five years (1999–2004, the clinical and inheritance profiles of 26 male and 6 female patients with Kallmann syndrome from 12 families were evaluated at the National Center for Diabetes, Endocrinology and Genetics in Jordan. Results The patients belonged to twelve Jordanian and Palestinian families and their age at presentation ranged from 4 – 46 years. Nine boys aged 4–14 years presented with cryptorchidism and microphallus, all other males presented with delayed puberty, hypogonadism and/or infertility. The main presentation among six female patients was primary amenorrhea. Intrafamilial variability in clinical phenotype was specifically evident for renal abnormalities and sensorineural hearing impairment. Familial KS was diagnosed in 27 patients belonging to five families with the X-linked mode of inheritance and two families with the autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. Conclusions (1 the majority of cases in this study represented the X-linked form of KS, which might point to a high prevalence of Kal 1 gene in the population. (2 Genetic counselling helps these families to reach a diagnosis at an early age and to decide about their reproductive options. (3 Children presenting with cryptorchidism and microphallus in our population should be investigated for KS.

  14. Diagnosis of antenatal Bartter syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, R; Peres, M; Kesby, G

    2016-01-01

    Bartter syndrome is a rare heterogeneous group of autosomal-recessive salt-losing renal tubular disorders that can present in fetal life (antenatal Bartter syndrome; ABS) as "unexplained" early-onset polyhydramnios, often associated with growth restriction. Prenatal diagnosis of the condition involves assessment of amniotic fluid biochemistry in a setting of polyuric polyhydramnios; with elevated chloride levels considered a consistent and diagnostic finding. Other amniotic fluid biochemical markers have been described, notably increased aldosterone levels, and low total protein levels. NOVEL INSIGHT: Antenatal Bartter syndrome is a heterogeneous group of renal disorders. While certain biochemical features in amniotic fluid might heighten suspicion, final diagnosis can only be made in the postnatal setting. In the setting of unexplained severe polyhydramnios, clinicians should continue to entertain the diagnosis of antenatal Bartter Syndrome and maintain neonatal surveillance, even if amniotic fluid markers do not support the diagnosis.

  15. Comparative Clinical Profile of Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Patients With and Without Joint Hypermobility Syndrome

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    Blair P Grubb

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Autonomic dysfunction is common in patients with the joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS. However, there is a paucity of reported data on clinical features of Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS in patients suffering from JHS.Methods: This retrospective study was approved by our local Institutional Review Board (IRB. Over a period of 10 years, 26 patients of POTS were identified for inclusion in this study. All these patients had features of Joint Hypermobility Syndrome (by Brighton criterion. A comparison group of 39 patients with other forms of POTS were also followed in the autonomic clinic during the same time. We present a descriptive report on the comparative clinical profile of the clinical features of Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia patients with and without Joint Hypermobility syndrome. The data is presented as a mean±SD and percentages wherever applicable.Results: Out of 65 patients, 26 patients (all females, 20 Caucasians had POTS and JHS. The mean age at presentation of POTS was 24±13 (range 10-53 years vs 41±12 (range 19-65 years, P=0.0001, Migraine was a common co morbidity 73 vs 29% p=0,001. In two patients POTS was precipitated by pregnancy, and in three by surgery, urinary tract infection and a viral syndrome respectively. The common clinical features were fatigue (58%, orthostatic palpitations (54%, presyncope (58%, and syncope (62%.Conclusion: Patients with POTS and JHS appear to become symptomatic at an earlier age compared to POTS patients without JHS. In addition patients with JHS had a greater incidence of migraine and syncope than their non JHS counterparts.

  16. Anatomical, Clinical and Electrical Observations in Piriformis Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assoum Hani A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We provided clinical and electrical descriptions of the piriformis syndrome, contributing to better understanding of the pathogenesis and further diagnostic criteria. Methods Between 3550 patients complaining of sciatica, we concluded 26 cases of piriformis syndrome, 15 females, 11 males, mean age 35.37 year-old. We operated 9 patients, 2 to 19 years after the onset of symptoms, 5 had piriformis steroids injection. A dorsolumbar MRI were performed in all cases and a pelvic MRI in 7 patients. The electro-diagnostic test was performed in 13 cases, between them the H reflex of the peroneal nerve was tested 7 times. Results After a followup 1 to 11 years, for the 17 non operated patients, 3 patients responded to conservative treatment. 6 of the operated had an excellent result, 2 residual minor pain and one failed. 3 new anatomical observations were described with atypical compression of the sciatic nerve by the piriformis muscle. Conclusion While the H reflex test of the tibial nerve did not give common satisfaction in the literature for diagnosis, the H reflex of the peroneal nerve should be given more importance, because it demonstrated in our study more specific sign, with six clinical criteria it contributed to improve the method of diagnosis. The cause of this particular syndrome does not only depend on the relation sciatic nerve-piriformis muscle, but the environmental conditions should be considered with the series of the anatomical anomalies to explain the real cause of this pain.

  17. Usher syndrome in the city of Birmingham—prevalence and clinical classification

    OpenAIRE

    Hope, C; Bundey, S; Proops, D; Fielder, A

    1997-01-01

    AIMS—To estimate the prevalence of Usher syndrome in the city of Birmingham, and to establish a database of patients who have been classified into different clinical subtypes essential for future gene mutation analysis.
METHODS—Symptomatic cases of Usher syndrome (US) resident in the city of Birmingham in June 1994 were ascertained through multiple sources. Ophthalmic and audiological reassessment together with examination of medical records and patient questionnaires allowed classification o...

  18. Clinical diagnostic criteria for typical and atypical variants of Rett syndrome in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ya. Volgina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Rett Syndrome is one of the most socially significant neuropsychiatric hereditary diseases in children. This syndrome is mainly found in girls: its frequency is 1:10000–15000. Currently mutations in X-linked gene MESR2 considered as the main cause of the syndrome. Diagnosis of typical and atypical variants of the syndrome is based on the use of clinical criteria, determining gene mutations МЕСР2, CDKL5 and FOXG1. In 2010, the Expert Consortium for Rett syndrome have revised the existing diagnostic criteria for the syndrome and come to a new consensus. If there is a regression of mental development for the diagnosis of Rett syndrome exemplary embodiment only four basic criteria for the diagnosis of atypical variant — two of the four main criteria, and five of the eleven additional criteria. 

  19. Bayesian Modeling for Genetic Anticipation in Presence of Mutational Heterogeneity: A Case Study in Lynch Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boonstra, Philip S; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Taylor, Jeremy M G

    2011-01-01

    to cause hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, also called Lynch syndrome (LS). We find evidence for a decrease in AOO between generations in this article. Our model predicts family-level anticipation effects that are potentially useful in genetic counseling clinics for high-risk families....

  20. Different Paths to Core Pathology: The Equifinal Model of the Schizophrenia Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Isobel W; Glausier, Jill R

    2016-05-01

    Schizophrenia is a clinically heterogeneous disorder that is perhaps more accurately characterized as "the schizophrenia syndrome." This clinical heterogeneity is reflected in the heterogeneous neurobiological presentations associated with the illness. Moreover, even highly specific neural aberrations that are associated with distinct symptoms of schizophrenia are linked to a wide range of risk factors. As such, any individual with schizophrenia likely has a particular set of risk factors that interact and converge to cross the disease threshold, forming a particular etiology that ultimately generates a core pathophysiology. This core pathophysiology may then produce 1 or more symptoms of schizophrenia, leading to common symptoms across individuals in spite of disparate etiologies. As such, the schizophrenia syndrome can be considered as anequifinalentity: a state of dysfunction that can arise from different upstream etiologies. Moreover, schizophrenia etiologies are multifactorial and can involve the interactive effects of a broad range of genetic, environmental, and developmental risk factors. Through a consideration of how disparate etiologies, caused by different sets of risk factors, converge on the same net dysfunction, this paper aims to model the equifinal nature of schizophrenia symptoms. To demonstrate the equifinal model, we discuss how maternal infection and adolescent cannabis use, 2 recognized schizophrenia risk factors, may interact with other genetic, environmental, and/or developmental risk factors to cause the conserved clinical presentation of impaired working memory. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Clinical Characteristics of Dysphagia in Children with Down Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Arwen; Maybee, Jennifer; Moran, Maura K; Wolter-Warmerdam, Kristine; Hickey, Francis

    2016-10-01

    Aspiration is an often unrecognized comorbidity in children with Down syndrome with serious medical consequences. This retrospective chart review of swallow study reports characterizes oral and pharyngeal phase dysphagia and diet modifications on videofluoroscopic swallow studies (VFSS) in a large cohort of children with Down syndrome. A total of 158 pediatric patients (male = 95; female = 63; mean age 2.10 years, SD 3.17 years) received an initial VFSS at a pediatric teaching hospital as part of their medical care. A total of 56.3 % (n = 89) children had pharyngeal phase dysphagia with aspiration and deep laryngeal penetration occurring most frequently. Of the 61 patients who aspirated, 90.2 % (n = 55) did so silently with no cough or overt clinical symptoms. In 76.7 % of cases of pharyngeal phase dysphagia, a functional feeding plan, with use of thickened liquids or change in feeding system to control flow rate and/or bolus size, was able to be established, which allowed children to continue eating by mouth. Thickened liquids (76.7 %, n = 46) were the most effective adaptation, with change in feeding system alone effective in only 8.3 % (n = 5) cases. Oral phase dysphagia was reported in the majority of patients (63.8 %, n = 88/138); however, this was not predictive of pharyngeal phase dysphagia. Age, sex, and reason for referral, including prior clinical symptoms, did not have a statistically significant impact on the presence of dysphagia. This comprehensive review has application to clinical understanding and management of dysphagia in children with Down syndrome.

  2. MR diagnosis and clinical management of whiplash injury syndrome of spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Shixu; Lin Daiying; Wu Xianheng; Zeng Xianting

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the MR manifestations of whiplash injury syndrome of spinal cord. Methods: MR images of 21 cases diagnosed as whiplash injury syndrome were retrospectively studied. Those images included transverse and sagittal views and coronal scan had been performed in some cases. Results: MRI inspection safely and objectively reveals the extent of the spinal injury, and helps the anticipation of the prognosis. Conclusion: MRI is the first choice of the imaging modalities assessing the whiplash injury syndrome of the spinal cord. An early diagnosis is valuable to clinical management and rehabilitation

  3. Abdominal obesity and the metabolic syndrome: A surgeon’s perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Mathieu, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Over the past decade, a major shift in the clinical risk factors in the population undergoing a cardiac surgery has been observed. In the general population, an increasing prevalence of obesity has largely contributed to the development of cardiovascular disorders. Obesity is a heterogeneous condition in which body fat distribution largely determines metabolic perturbations. Consequently, individuals characterized by increased abdominal fat deposition and the so-called metabolic syndrome (Met...

  4. Rothmund-Thomson Syndrome: Insights from New Patients on the Genetic Variability Underpinning Clinical Presentation and Cancer Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa A. Colombo

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Biallelic mutations in RECQL4 gene, a caretaker of the genome, cause Rothmund-Thomson type-II syndrome (RTS-II and confer increased cancer risk if they damage the helicase domain. We describe five families exemplifying clinical and allelic heterogeneity of RTS-II, and report the effect of pathogenic RECQL4 variants by in silico predictions and transcripts analyses. Complete phenotype of patients #39 and #42 whose affected siblings developed osteosarcoma correlates with their c.[1048_1049del], c.[1878+32_1878+55del] and c.[1568G>C;1573delT], c.[3021_3022del] variants which damage the helicase domain. Literature survey highlights enrichment of these variants affecting the helicase domain in patients with cancer outcome raising the issue of strict oncological surveillance. Conversely, patients #29 and #19 have a mild phenotype and carry, respectively, the unreported homozygous c.3265G>T and c.3054A>G variants, both sparing the helicase domain. Finally, despite matching several criteria for RTS clinical diagnosis, patient #38 is heterozygous for c.2412_2414del; no pathogenic CNVs out of those evidenced by high-resolution CGH-array, emerged as contributors to her phenotype.

  5. Direct interaction of the Usher syndrome 1G protein SANS and myomegalin in the retina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overlack, N.; Kilic, D.; Bauss, K.; Marker, T.; Kremer, J.M.J.; Wijk, E. van; Wolfrum, U.

    2011-01-01

    The human Usher syndrome (USH) is the most frequent cause of combined hereditary deaf-blindness. USH is genetically heterogeneous with at least 11 chromosomal loci assigned to 3 clinical types, USH1-3. We have previously demonstrated that all USH1 and 2 proteins in the eye and the inner ear are

  6. Clinical Research on Treatment of Hyperkinetic Syndrome of Childhood by Electroacupuncture plus Acupoint Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Yao-chi; KUAI Le

    2003-01-01

    Objective To observe the clinical therapeu tic effect of hyperkinetic syndrome of childhood treated by electroacupuncture plus acupoint application. Method Sixty-five cases with hyperkinetic syndrome of childhood were treated by electroacupuncture plus acupoint application (electroacupuncture group); 53 cases were treated by acupuncture (acupuncture group) and 53 cases were treated by Ritalin (west drug group). The above three groups were compared with each other in therapeutic effect. Results The effective rate of treating hyperkinetic syndrome of childhood by electroacupuncture plus acupoint application was 87.7%; the effective rate in west drug group was 86.8% and in acupuncture group was 77.4%. A comparison among the three groups showed there was no significant difference in clinical ther apeutic effect ( P > 0.05 ). Conclusion Electroacupuncture plus acupoint application was an effective therapy of hyperkinetic syndrome of childhood.

  7. Cauda equina syndrome as the initial presenting clinical feature of medulloblastoma: a case report

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    Al-Otaibi Faisal

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Medulloblastoma is one of the most common pediatric brain malignancies. The usual presenting clinical features are related to posterior fossa syndrome or/and hydrocephalus. Cauda equina syndrome is a very rare presentation for this disease. Case presentation We describe the case of a three-year-old boy with cauda equina syndrome as the initial presenting clinical feature for medulloblastoma. He was initially diagnosed as having a spinal tumor by magnetic resonance imaging scan. Subsequently, a cranial magnetic resonance imaging scan revealed a posterior fossa tumor with features of dissemination. He had substantial improvement after treatment. This case report is complemented by a literature review related to this unusual presentation. Conclusions Medulloblastoma primarily presenting with cauda equina syndrome is very rare. However, spinal drop metastasis should be considered in the pediatric age group to avoid suboptimal management.

  8. The clinical phenotype of Lynch syndrome due to germline PMS2 mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senter, Leigha; Clendenning, Mark; Sotamaa, Kaisa; Hampel, Heather; Green, Jane; Potter, John D.; Lindblom, Annika; Lagerstedt, Kristina; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Young, Joanne; Winship, Ingrid; Dowty, James G.; White, Darren M.; Hopper, John L.; Baglietto, Laura; Jenkins, Mark A.; de la Chapelle, Albert

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Although the clinical phenotype of Lynch syndrome (also known as Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer) has been well described, little is known about disease in PMS2 mutation carriers. Now that mutation detection methods can discern mutations in PMS2 from mutations in its pseudogenes, more mutation carriers have been identified. Information about the clinical significance of PMS2 mutations is crucial for appropriate counseling. Here, we report the clinical characteristics of a large series of PMS2 mutation carriers. Methods We performed PMS2 mutation analysis using long range PCR and MLPA for 99 probands diagnosed with Lynch syndrome-associated tumors showing isolated loss of PMS2 by immunohistochemistry. Penetrance was calculated using a modified segregation analysis adjusting for ascertainment. Results Germline PMS2 mutations were detected in 62% of probands (n = 55 monoallelic; 6 biallelic). Among families with monoallelic PMS2 mutations, 65.5% met revised Bethesda guidelines. Compared with the general population, in mutation carriers, the incidence of colorectal cancer was 5.2 fold higher and the incidence of endometrial cancer was 7.5 fold higher. In North America, this translates to a cumulative cancer risk to age 70 of 15–20% for colorectal cancer, 15% for endometrial cancer, and 25–32% for any Lynch syndrome-associated cancer. No elevated risk for non-Lynch syndrome-associated cancers was observed. Conclusions PMS2 mutations contribute significantly to Lynch syndrome but the penetrance for monoallelic mutation carriers appears to be lower than that for the other mismatch repair genes. Modified counseling and cancer surveillance guidelines for PMS2 mutation carriers are proposed. PMID:18602922

  9. Wolfram syndrome in the Japanese population; molecular analysis of WFS1 gene and characterization of clinical features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Kimie; Tanabe, Katsuya; Inoue, Hiroshi; Okuya, Shigeru; Ohta, Yasuharu; Akiyama, Masaru; Taguchi, Akihiko; Kora, Yukari; Okayama, Naoko; Yamada, Yuichiro; Wada, Yasuhiko; Amemiya, Shin; Sugihara, Shigetaka; Nakao, Yuzo; Oka, Yoshitomo; Tanizawa, Yukio

    2014-01-01

    Wolfram syndrome (WFS) is a recessive neurologic and endocrinologic degenerative disorder, and is also known as DIDMOAD (Diabetes Insipidus, early-onset Diabetes Mellitus, progressive Optic Atrophy and Deafness) syndrome. Most affected individuals carry recessive mutations in the Wolfram syndrome 1 gene (WFS1). However, the phenotypic pleiomorphism, rarity and molecular complexity of this disease complicate our efforts to understand WFS. To address this limitation, we aimed to describe complications and to elucidate the contributions of WFS1 mutations to clinical manifestations in Japanese patients with WFS. The minimal ascertainment criterion for diagnosing WFS was having both early onset diabetes mellitus and bilateral optic atrophy. Genetic analysis for WFS1 was performed by direct sequencing. Sixty-seven patients were identified nationally for a prevalence of one per 710,000, with 33 patients (49%) having all 4 components of DIDMOAD. In 40 subjects who agreed to participate in this investigation from 30 unrelated families, the earliest manifestation was DM at a median age of 8.7 years, followed by OA at a median age of 15.8 years. However, either OA or DI was the first diagnosed feature in 6 subjects. In 10, features other than DM predated OA. Twenty-seven patients (67.5%) had a broad spectrum of recessive mutations in WFS1. Two patients had mutations in only one allele. Eleven patients (27.5%) had intact WFS1 alleles. Ages at onset of both DM and OA in patients with recessive WFS1 mutations were indistinguishable from those in patients without WFS1 mutations. In the patients with predicted complete loss-of-function mutations, ages at the onsets of both DM and OA were significantly earlier than those in patients with predicted partial-loss-of function mutations. This study emphasizes the clinical and genetic heterogeneity in patients with WFS. Genotype-phenotype correlations may exist in patients with WFS1 mutations, as demonstrated by the disease onset.

  10. Wolfram syndrome in the Japanese population; molecular analysis of WFS1 gene and characterization of clinical features.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimie Matsunaga

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Wolfram syndrome (WFS is a recessive neurologic and endocrinologic degenerative disorder, and is also known as DIDMOAD (Diabetes Insipidus, early-onset Diabetes Mellitus, progressive Optic Atrophy and Deafness syndrome. Most affected individuals carry recessive mutations in the Wolfram syndrome 1 gene (WFS1. However, the phenotypic pleiomorphism, rarity and molecular complexity of this disease complicate our efforts to understand WFS. To address this limitation, we aimed to describe complications and to elucidate the contributions of WFS1 mutations to clinical manifestations in Japanese patients with WFS. METHODOLOGY: The minimal ascertainment criterion for diagnosing WFS was having both early onset diabetes mellitus and bilateral optic atrophy. Genetic analysis for WFS1 was performed by direct sequencing. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Sixty-seven patients were identified nationally for a prevalence of one per 710,000, with 33 patients (49% having all 4 components of DIDMOAD. In 40 subjects who agreed to participate in this investigation from 30 unrelated families, the earliest manifestation was DM at a median age of 8.7 years, followed by OA at a median age of 15.8 years. However, either OA or DI was the first diagnosed feature in 6 subjects. In 10, features other than DM predated OA. Twenty-seven patients (67.5% had a broad spectrum of recessive mutations in WFS1. Two patients had mutations in only one allele. Eleven patients (27.5% had intact WFS1 alleles. Ages at onset of both DM and OA in patients with recessive WFS1 mutations were indistinguishable from those in patients without WFS1 mutations. In the patients with predicted complete loss-of-function mutations, ages at the onsets of both DM and OA were significantly earlier than those in patients with predicted partial-loss-of function mutations. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This study emphasizes the clinical and genetic heterogeneity in patients with WFS. Genotype-phenotype correlations may

  11. Controversies concerning the antiphospholipid syndrome in obstetrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarena Cabrera, Dulce María Albertina; Rodriguez-Jaimes, Claudia; Acevedo-Gallegos, Sandra; Gallardo-Gaona, Juan Manuel; Velazquez-Torres, Berenice; Ramírez-Calvo, José Antonio

    Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome is a non-inflammatory autoimmune disease characterized by recurrent thrombotic events and/or obstetric complications associated with the presence of circulating antiphospholipid antibodies (anticardiolipin antibodies, anti-β 2 glycoprotein-i antibodies, and/or lupus anticoagulant. Antiphospholipid antibodies are a heterogeneous group of autoantibodies associated with recurrent miscarriage, stillbirth, fetal growth restriction and premature birth. The diversity of the features of the proposed placental antiphospholipid antibodies fingerprint suggests that several disease processes may occur in the placentae of women with antiphospholipid antibody syndrome in the form of immune responses: inflammatory events, complement activation, angiogenic imbalance and, less commonly, thrombosis and infarction. Because of the disparity between clinical and laboratory criteria, and the impact on perinatal outcome in patients starting treatment, we reviewed the aspects of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome related to obstetric complications and seronegative antiphospholipid antibody syndrome, and their treatment in obstetrics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  12. Churg-Strauss vasculitis and idiopathic hypereosinophyl syndrome: role of molecular biology in the differential diagnosis of hypereosinophyl syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. d'Ascanio

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Hypereosinophilic syndromes are a heterogeneous group of uncommon disorders characterized by the presence of marked peripheral blood eosinophilia, tissue eosinophilia, or both, resulting in a wide variety of clinical manifestations, often without an identifiable cause. Churg-Strauss syndrome is a systemic vasculitis characterized by prominent peripheral eosinophilia, asthma and systemic involvement. The presence of mild to severe eosinophilia and systemic involvement raise the search of many trigger factor that need to be ruled out. Distinguishing CSS from idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome may be particularly challenging, especially in ANCA negative patients. Methods: The aim of the present study was to present a small case series of patients referred to a Rheumatology Unit for mild to severe eosinophilia and signs and symptoms of systemic involvement and to outline the clinical significance of molecular biology in the work-up of hypereosinophilia. Results: Eleven patients with moderate to severe peripheral eosinophylia, were referred to our Unit from 1996 to 2007. Female to male ratio was 7/4, mean age 40.54 (range 22-75. Three out of eleven patients resulted positive for molecular biology. The diagnosis of idiopathic hypereosinophylia was confirmed in one out of three on the basis of the clinical picture and bone marrow biopsy. Conclusions: Molecular biology may be useful in the screening and in the follow-up of a new hypereosinophylic patient.

  13. Metabolic syndrome in patients with hypertension attending a family practice clinic in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasein, N; Ahmad, M; Matrook, F; Nasir, L; Froelicher, E S

    2010-04-01

    Metabolic syndrome is being reported more frequently in the Eastern Mediterranean region. Patients with hypertension attending family practice clinics in the University of Jordan Hospital between February and July 2006 were assessed for the frequency of metabolic syndrome and its individual components. Of 345 patients studied, 65% had metabolic syndrome. Females were more likely to meet Adult Treatment Panel-III criteria for the diagnosis. Diabetes mellitus was the most frequent component of metabolic syndrome in males, while low serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and high waist circumference ranked first and second in females. Primary care providers should be alert to the importance of screening patients with hypertension for metabolic syndrome to prevent and manage these combined conditions.

  14. Clinical and genetic aspects of Marfan syndrome and familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilhorst-Hofstee, Yvonne

    2013-01-01

    This thesis concerns the clinical and genetic aspects of familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections, in particular in Marfan syndrome. It includes the Dutch multidisciplinary guidelines for diagnosis and management of Marfan syndrome. These guidelines contain practical directions for

  15. Multi-Site Clinical Assessment of Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (MCAM): Design and Implementation of a Prospective/Retrospective Rolling Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, Elizabeth R; Lin, Jin-Mann S; Tian, Hao; Natelson, Benjamin H; Lange, Gudrun; Vu, Diana; Blate, Michelle; Klimas, Nancy G; Balbin, Elizabeth G; Bateman, Lucinda; Allen, Ali; Lapp, Charles W; Springs, Wendy; Kogelnik, Andreas M; Phan, Catrina C; Danver, Joan; Podell, Richard N; Fitzpatrick, Trisha; Peterson, Daniel L; Gottschalk, C Gunnar; Rajeevan, Mangalathu S

    2017-04-15

    In the Multi-Site Clinical Assessment of Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (MCAM), we relied on expert clinician diagnoses to enroll patients from 7 specialty clinics in the United States in order to perform a systematic collection of data on measures of myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME)/chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). Healthy persons and those with other illnesses that share some features with ME/CFS were enrolled in comparison groups. The major objectives were to: 1) use standardized questionnaires to measure illness domains of ME/CFS and to evaluate patient heterogeneity overall and between clinics; 2) describe the course of illness, identify the measures that best correlate with meaningful clinical differences, and assess the performances of questionnaires as patient/person-reported outcome measures; 3) describe prescribed medications, orders for laboratory and other tests, and management tools used by expert clinicians to care for persons with ME/CFS; 4) collect biospecimens for future hypothesis testing and for evaluation of morning cortisol profiles; and 5) identify measures that best distinguish persons with ME/CFS from those in the comparison groups and detect subgroups of persons with ME/CFS who may have different underlying causes. Enrollment began in 2012 and is planned to continue in multiple stages through 2017. We present the MCAM methods in detail, along with an initial description of the 471 patients with ME/CFS who were enrolled in stage 1. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  16. A Rare Cause of Pheochromocytoma; Neurofibromatosis Type 1-Noonan Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazhar Müslüm Tuna

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Neurofibromatosis (NF Type 1 (NF-1 is an autosomal dominant disease with a prevalence of about 1/3000. NF-1 is a neurocutaneous syndrome characterized by cafe au lait macules, neurofibroma, optic glioma, lisch nodules, and symptoms involving other systems. Noonan syndrome (NS is a clinically heterogeneous disorder predominantly characterized by dysmorphic facial features, congenital heart disease, proportionate post-natal short stature, neck abnormalities, and chest deformities. NF-NS is a very rare overlapping syndrome sharing many features of both syndromes. Coexistence of pheochromocytoma, which can be life-threatening if not treated properly, is also a very rare complication of this disorder. Here, we report a patient who was admitted with a mass in the right upper quadrant and was diagnosed with pheochromocytoma and NFNS. (The Me­di­cal Bul­le­tin of Ha­se­ki 2014; 52: 227-31

  17. Agrin mutations lead to a congenital myasthenic syndrome with distal muscle weakness and atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicole, Sophie; Chaouch, Amina; Torbergsen, Torberg; Bauché, Stéphanie; de Bruyckere, Elodie; Fontenille, Marie-Joséphine; Horn, Morten A; van Ghelue, Marijke; Løseth, Sissel; Issop, Yasmin; Cox, Daniel; Müller, Juliane S; Evangelista, Teresinha; Stålberg, Erik; Ioos, Christine; Barois, Annie; Brochier, Guy; Sternberg, Damien; Fournier, Emmanuel; Hantaï, Daniel; Abicht, Angela; Dusl, Marina; Laval, Steven H; Griffin, Helen; Eymard, Bruno; Lochmüller, Hanns

    2014-09-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of rare diseases resulting from impaired neuromuscular transmission. Their clinical hallmark is fatigable muscle weakness associated with a decremental muscle response to repetitive nerve stimulation and frequently related to postsynaptic defects. Distal myopathies form another clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of primary muscle disorders where weakness and atrophy are restricted to distal muscles, at least initially. In both congenital myasthenic syndromes and distal myopathies, a significant number of patients remain genetically undiagnosed. Here, we report five patients from three unrelated families with a strikingly homogenous clinical entity combining congenital myasthenia with distal muscle weakness and atrophy reminiscent of a distal myopathy. MRI and neurophysiological studies were compatible with mild myopathy restricted to distal limb muscles, but decrement (up to 72%) in response to 3 Hz repetitive nerve stimulation pointed towards a neuromuscular transmission defect. Post-exercise increment (up to 285%) was observed in the distal limb muscles in all cases suggesting presynaptic congenital myasthenic syndrome. Immunofluorescence and ultrastructural analyses of muscle end-plate regions showed synaptic remodelling with denervation-reinnervation events. We performed whole-exome sequencing in two kinships and Sanger sequencing in one isolated case and identified five new recessive mutations in the gene encoding agrin. This synaptic proteoglycan with critical function at the neuromuscular junction was previously found mutated in more typical forms of congenital myasthenic syndrome. In our patients, we found two missense mutations residing in the N-terminal agrin domain, which reduced acetylcholine receptors clustering activity of agrin in vitro. Our findings expand the spectrum of congenital myasthenic syndromes due to agrin mutations and show an unexpected

  18. Unexpected allelic heterogeneity and spectrum of mutations in Fowler syndrome revealed by next-generation exome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalonde, Emilie; Albrecht, Steffen; Ha, Kevin C H; Jacob, Karine; Bolduc, Nathalie; Polychronakos, Constantin; Dechelotte, Pierre; Majewski, Jacek; Jabado, Nada

    2010-08-01

    Protein coding genes constitute approximately 1% of the human genome but harbor 85% of the mutations with large effects on disease-related traits. Therefore, efficient strategies for selectively sequencing complete coding regions (i.e., "whole exome") have the potential to contribute our understanding of human diseases. We used a method for whole-exome sequencing coupling Agilent whole-exome capture to the Illumina DNA-sequencing platform, and investigated two unrelated fetuses from nonconsanguineous families with Fowler Syndrome (FS), a stereotyped phenotype lethal disease. We report novel germline mutations in feline leukemia virus subgroup C cellular-receptor-family member 2, FLVCR2, which has recently been shown to cause FS. Using this technology, we identified three types of genetic abnormalities: point-mutations, insertions-deletions, and intronic splice-site changes (first pathogenic report using this technology), in the fetuses who both were compound heterozygotes for the disease. Although revealing a high level of allelic heterogeneity and mutational spectrum in FS, this study further illustrates the successful application of whole-exome sequencing to uncover genetic defects in rare Mendelian disorders. Of importance, we show that we can identify genes underlying rare, monogenic and recessive diseases using a limited number of patients (n=2), in the absence of shared genetic heritage and in the presence of allelic heterogeneity.

  19. Comprehensive sequence analysis of nine Usher syndrome genes in the UK National Collaborative Usher Study

    OpenAIRE

    Le Quesne Stabej, Polona; Saihan, Zubin; Rangesh, Nell; Steele-Stallard, Heather B; Ambrose, John; Coffey, Alison; Emmerson, Jenny; Haralambous, Elene; Hughes, Yasmin; Steel, Karen P; Luxon, Linda M; Webster, Andrew R; Bitner-Glindzicz, Maria

    2011-01-01

    Background Usher syndrome (USH) is an autosomal recessive disorder comprising retinitis pigmentosa, hearing loss and, in some cases, vestibular dysfunction. It is clinically and genetically heterogeneous with three distinctive clinical types (I?III) and nine Usher genes identified. This study is a comprehensive clinical and genetic analysis of 172 Usher patients and evaluates the contribution of digenic inheritance. Methods The genes MYO7A, USH1C, CDH23, PCDH15, USH1G, USH2A, GPR98, WHRN, CLR...

  20. A novel Noonan syndrome RAF1 mutation: lethal course in a preterm infant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Ratola

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Noonan syndrome is a relatively common and heterogeneous genetic disorder, associated with congenital heart defect in about 50% of the cases. If the defect is not severe, life expectancy is normal. We report a case of Noonan syndrome in a preterm infant with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and lethal outcome associated to acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by Adenovirus pneumonia. A novel mutation in the RAF1 gene was identified: c.782C>G (p.Pro261Arg in heterozygosity, not described previously in the literature. Consequently, the common clinical course in this mutation and its respective contribution to the early fatal outcome is unknown. No conclusion can be established regarding genotype/phenotype correlation.

  1. INHERITED PATHOLOGY OF β2-LAMININ (PIERSON SYNDROME: CLINICAL AND GENETIC ASPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Yu. Kagan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available For the last decade a great successes were attained in the study of molecular bases of glomerular diseases. It was certain that the most frequent reasons of congenital and infantile nephrotic syndrome are mutations in the genes of NPHS1, NPHS2, and WT1. Nevertheless, until now, a number of patients, having combination of early nephrotic syndrome with inherent pathology of other organs, which etiology remains un known. These cases continue to be intensively probed. One of the most important recent achievements in understanding of molecular mechanisms of early nephrotic syndrome is the discovery of mutations of gene of LAMB2, encoding β2 laminin, as the cause of Pearson syndrome (OMIM#609049. In this article the author presents the basic genetic and clinical descriptions of this recently identified pathology. Key words: Pearson syndrome, congenital nephrotic syndrome, β2 laminin, malformation of organ of vision. (Pediatric Pharmacology. – 2010; 7(3:114-117

  2. Rett Syndrome: Crossing the Threshold to Clinical Translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, David M.; Bird, Adrian; Coenraads, Monica; Gray, Steven J.; Menon, Debashish U.; Philpot, Benjamin D.; Tarquinio, Daniel C.

    2016-01-01

    Lying at the intersection between neurobiology and epigenetics, Rett syndrome (RTT) has garnered intense interest in recent years, not only from a broad range of academic scientists, but also from the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries. In addition to the critical need for treatments for this devastating disorder, optimism for developing RTT treatments derives from a unique convergence of factors, including a known monogenic cause, reversibility of symptoms in preclinical models, a strong clinical research infrastructure highlighted by an NIH-funded natural history study and well-established clinics with significant patient populations. Here, we review recent advances in understanding the biology of RTT, particularly promising preclinical findings, lessons from past clinical trials, and critical elements of trial design for rare disorders. PMID:26830113

  3. Clinical aspects of Usher syndrome and the USH2A gene in a cohort of 433 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco-Kelly, Fiona; Jaijo, Teresa; Aller, Elena; Avila-Fernandez, Almudena; López-Molina, María Isabel; Giménez, Ascensión; García-Sandoval, Blanca; Millán, José M; Ayuso, Carmen

    2015-02-01

    A new statistical approach is needed to describe the clinical differences between type I and type II Usher syndrome and between the 2 most frequent mutations in the USH2A gene. To describe the primary phenotypic characteristics and differences between type I and type II Usher syndrome and to establish a phenotype-genotype correlation for the 2 most frequent mutations in the USH2A gene. Cross-sectional study at a genetics department, in which clinical evaluations were performed for 433 patients (297 unrelated families) who were classified as having type I, II, III, atypical, or unclassified Usher syndrome according to their clinical history, pedigree data, results from ophthalmological studies, and audiological, neurophysiological, and vestibular test results. Molecular studies were performed for 304 patients (256 unrelated families). The Mann-Whitney U test or the χ2 test was used for calculating the differences between mean values for the analyzed parameters. Age at diagnosis; age at onset of night blindness, visual field loss, visual acuity loss, and cataracts; and severity and age at diagnosis of hearing loss. The comparison between patients with type I Usher syndrome and those with type II Usher syndrome revealed P Usher syndrome and between the 2 most frequent mutations in the USH2A gene. Detailed genotype-phenotype correlations, as presented in our study, allow for a better correlation of clinical signs with a known genotype and can improve the clinical management, genetic counseling, and risk assessment of patients with Usher syndrome because an estimated prognosis of their disease can be made.

  4. Burning mouth syndrome: Clinical description, pathophysiological approach, and a new therapeutic option.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárcamo Fonfría, A; Gómez-Vicente, L; Pedraza, M I; Cuadrado-Pérez, M L; Guerrero Peral, A L; Porta-Etessam, J

    2017-05-01

    Burning mouth syndrome is defined as scorching sensation in the mouth in the absence of any local lesions or systemic disease that would explain that complaint. The condition responds poorly to commonly used treatments and it may become very disabling. We prospectively analysed the clinical and demographic characteristics and response to treatment in 6 cases of burning mouth syndrome, diagnosed at 2 tertiary hospital headache units. Six female patients between the ages of 34 and 82 years reported symptoms compatible with burning mouth syndrome. In 5 of them, burning worsened at the end of the day; 4 reported symptom relief with tongue movements. Neurological examinations and laboratory findings were normal in all patients and their dental examinations revealed no buccal lesions. Each patient had previously received conventional treatments without amelioration. Pramipexol was initiated in doses between 0.36mg and 1.05mg per day, resulting in clear improvement of symptoms in all cases, a situation which continues after a 4-year follow up period. Burning mouth syndrome is a condition of unknown aetiology that shares certain clinical patterns and treatment responses with restless leg syndrome. Dopamine agonists should be regarded as first line treatment for this entity. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. The metabolic syndrome: validity and utility of clinical definitions for cardiovascular disease and diabetes risk prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Adrian

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of clinical definitions of the metabolic syndrome is frequently misunderstood. While the metabolic syndrome as a physiological process describes a clustering of numerous age-related metabolic abnormalities that together increase the risk for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes, clinical definitions include obesity which is thought to be a cause rather than a consequence of metabolic disturbance, and several elements that are routinely measured in clinical practice, including high blood pressure, high blood glucose and dyslipidaemia. Obesity is frequently a central player in the development of the metabolic syndrome and should be considered a key component of clinical definitions. Previous clinical definitions have differed in the priority given to obesity. Perhaps more importantly than its role in a clinical definition, however, is obesity in isolation before the hallmarks of metabolic dysfunction that typify the syndrome have developed. This should be treated seriously as an opportunity to prevent the consequences of the global diabetes epidemic now apparent. Clinical definitions were designed to identify a population at high lifetime CVD and type 2 diabetes risk, but in the absence of several major risk factors for each condition, are not optimal risk prediction devices for either. Despite this, the metabolic syndrome has several properties that make it a useful construct, in conjunction with short-term risk prediction algorithms and sound clinical judgement, for the identification of those at high lifetime risk of CVD and diabetes. A recently published consensus definition provides some much needed clarity about what a clinical definition entails. Even this, however, remains a work in progress until more evidence becomes available, particularly in the area of ethnicity-specific waist cut-points. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. HIV-associated Lipodystrophy Syndrome: A Review of Clinical Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Guy Baril

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Approximately two years after the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy for the treatment of HIV infection, body shape changes and metabolic abnormalities were increasingly observed. Initially, these were ascribed to protease inhibitors, but it is now clear that nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors also contribute to lipodystrophy syndrome. The syndrome groups together clinical conditions describing changes in body fat distribution that include lipoatrophy, lipoaccumulation or both. However, there does not appear to be a direct link between lipoatrophy and lipoaccumulation that would support a single mechanism for the redistribution of body fat. Currently, there is no clear definition of lipodystrophy, which explains the difficulty in determining its prevalence and etiology. There are no current guidelines for the treatment of fat distribution abnormalities that occur in the absence of other metabolic complications. The present article reviews the current state of knowledge of the definition, symptoms, risk factors, pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of the morphological changes associated with lipodystrophy syndrome.

  7. HIV-associated lipodystrophy syndrome: A review of clinical aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baril, Jean-Guy; Junod, Patrice; LeBlanc, Roger; Dion, Harold; Therrien, Rachel; Laplante, François; Falutz, Julian; Côté, Pierre; Hébert, Marie-Nicole; Lalonde, Richard; Lapointe, Normand; Lévesque, Dominic; Pinault, Lyse; Rouleau, Danielle; Tremblay, Cécile; Trottier, Benoît; Trottier, Sylvie; Tsoukas, Chris; Weiss, Karl

    2005-01-01

    Approximately two years after the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy for the treatment of HIV infection, body shape changes and metabolic abnormalities were increasingly observed. Initially, these were ascribed to protease inhibitors, but it is now clear that nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors also contribute to lipodystrophy syndrome. The syndrome groups together clinical conditions describing changes in body fat distribution that include lipoatrophy, lipoaccumulation or both. However, there does not appear to be a direct link between lipoatrophy and lipoaccumulation that would support a single mechanism for the redistribution of body fat. Currently, there is no clear definition of lipodystrophy, which explains the difficulty in determining its prevalence and etiology. There are no current guidelines for the treatment of fat distribution abnormalities that occur in the absence of other metabolic complications. The present article reviews the current state of knowledge of the definition, symptoms, risk factors, pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of the morphological changes associated with lipodystrophy syndrome. PMID:18159551

  8. Clinical Management of a Child with Prader-Willi Syndrome from Maternal Uniparental Disomy (UPD) Genetic Inheritance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellon-Harn, Monica L.

    2005-01-01

    Prader-Willi Syndrome (PWS) is reported in 1 in 10,000-15,000 individuals. Unfortunately, many cases are missed due to clinicians' lack of familiarity with the syndrome as well as clinical and laboratory diagnostic criteria. Although common clinical characteristics are reported, variety exists in the nature and severity of dysfunction associated…

  9. The prevalence and clinical impact of obesity in adults with Marfan syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yetman, Anji T; McCrindle, Brian W

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with Marfan syndrome characteristically have an asthenic body habitus and are considered to be exempt from the obesity epidemic. OBJECTIVE: To examine the prevalence and clinical impact of obesity in a cohort of adults with Marfan syndrome. METHODS: Fifty outpatients (30 female) with a mean (± SD) age of 38±13 years were studied. Demographic variables including previously identified risk factors for aortic dissection were recorded. Body mass index (BMI) was determined and patients were classified as normal (BMI less than 25 kg/m2), overweight (BMI 25 kg/m2 to 29.9 kg/m2) or obese (BMI 30 kg/m2 or greater). Other cardiovascular risk factors were examined. An adverse clinical outcome was defined as either the attainment of surgical criteria for aortic root replacement or the presence of aortic dissection. RESULTS: A family history of aortic dissection was present in 13 (26%) patients. In 23 (46%) patients, there was no known family history of Marfan syndrome. Mean BMI was 25.4±7.4 kg/m2, with 18 (36%) patients having an elevated BMI. Positive smoking status was present in 15 (30%), hypertension in 13 (26%) and hyperlipidemia in 19 (38%) patients. Adverse clinical outcome was present in 27 (54%) patients. Logistic regression analysis revealed only index case (OR 44; PMarfan syndrome and is associated with an increased risk of aortic complications. PMID:20386774

  10. Bartter and Gitelman syndromes: Spectrum of clinical manifestations caused by different mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Shibli, Amar; Narchi, Hassib

    2015-01-01

    Bartter and Gitelman syndromes (BS and GS) are inherited disorders resulting in defects in renal tubular handling of sodium, potassium and chloride. Previously considered as genotypic and phenotypic heterogeneous diseases, recent evidence suggests that they constitute a spectrum of disease caused by different genetic mutations with the molecular defects of chloride reabsorption originating at different sites of the nephron in each condition. Although they share some characteristic metabolic abnormalities such as hypokalemia, metabolic alkalosis, hyperplasia of the juxtaglomerular apparatus with hyperreninemia, hyperaldosteronism, the clinical and laboratory manifestations may not always allow distinction between them. Diuretics tests, measuring the changes in urinary fractional excretion of chloride from baseline after administration of either hydrochlorothiazide or furosemide show very little change (< 2.3%) in the fractional excretion of chloride from baseline in GS when compared with BS, except when BS is associated with KCNJ1 mutations where a good response to both diuretics exists. The diuretic test is not recommended for infants or young children with suspected BS because of a higher risk of volume depletion in such children. Clinical symptoms and biochemical markers of GS and classic form of BS (type III) may overlap and thus genetic analysis may specify the real cause of symptoms. However, although genetic analysis is available, its use remains limited because of limited availability, large gene dimensions, lack of hot-spot mutations, heavy workup time and costs involved. Furthermore, considerable overlap exists between the different genotypes and phenotypes. Although BS and GS usually have distinct presentations and are associated with specific gene mutations, there remains considerable overlap between their phenotypes and genotypes. Thus, they are better described as a spectrum of clinical manifestations caused by different gene mutations. PMID:26140272

  11. Prader-Willi syndrome in South African patients clinical and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prader-Willi syndrome in. South African patients clinical and molecular diagnosis. A L Christianson, 0 L Viljoen, W S Winship,. M de la Rey, E J van Rensburg. Study objective. ... This probe detects a parent-of-origin-specific methylation imprint at locus ... These studies were undertaken in the Molecular Genetic. Laboratory of ...

  12. Clinical presentation of Griscelli syndrome type 2 and spectrum of RAB27A mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meeths, Marie; Bryceson, Yenan T; Rudd, Eva

    2010-01-01

    Griscelli syndrome type 2 (GS2) is an autosomal-recessive immunodeficiency caused by mutations in RAB27A, clinically characterized by partial albinism and haemophagocytic lymphohistocytosis (HLH). We evaluated the frequency of RAB27A mutations in 21 unrelated patients with haemophagocytic syndromes...

  13. Joubert syndrome: Clinical and radiological characteristics of nine patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Farag Elhassanien

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Joubert Syndrome (JS is a rare genetic developmental disorder, first identified in 1969. In patients with JS, certain regions of the brain (mainly cerebellar vermis and brainstem are underdeveloped or malformed. This can lead to impaired attention, visual, spatial, motor, language and social functional skills. JS is characterized by a host of features, many of which do not occur in every patient. Aim of the Study: To spotlight and increase awareness of clinical profile and neuroimaging findings of children with Joubert syndrome. Methods: This is a retrospective case series study of patients with JS who attended the Pediatric Neurology Clinic in Aladan and Alfarawanya Hospitals in Kuwait, from September 2007 to September 2012. Clinical and radiological data were obtained from the patient medical records. Results: Cerebellar vermis hypoplasia/aplasia and apnea were present in all patients, polydactly in 3 of 16, renal problems with cysts in 5 patients and 11 of 16 had abnormal electroretinograms (ERGs. Blood investigations of organic acids, amino acids and very-long-chain fatty acid, were normal in the all the nine patients. Conclusion: JS is a rare genetic brain malformation with association of retinal dystrophy and renal abnormalities. The retinal dystrophy may be progressive. The prognosis of patients depends mainly on the degree of brain malformation.

  14. Widening the clinical spectrum of Pitt-Rogers-Danks/Wolf-Hirschhorn syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana F. Mazzeu

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal rearrangements involving partial deletion of the short arm of chromosome 4 and partial duplication of the short arm of chromosome 8 have been described both in Pitt-Rogers-Danks syndrome (PRDS and Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS, the former being considered a milder phenotype of the latter. We describe a patient with partial deletion of chromosome 4 and partial duplication of chromosome 8 documented by array-comparative genomic hybridization (Array-CGH. In addition to the typical features of PRDS, the patient exhibited some clinical signs (genital hypoplasia, radioulnar synostosis and mesomelic limb shortness infrequently, or never previously, reported in PRDS. These findings broaden the spectrum of anomalies generally associated with these syndromes.

  15. Silent angels the genetic and clinical aspects of Rett syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dziwota Ewelina

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Rett syndrome is a neurodevelopmental genetic disorder and, because of some behavioral characteristics, individuals affected by the disease are known as silent angels. Girls with Rett syndrome perform stereotyped movements, they have learning difficulties, their reaction time is prolonged, and they seem alienated in the environment. These children require constant pediatric, neurological and orthopedic care. In the treatment of Rett syndrome physical therapy, music therapy, hydrotherapy, hippotherapy, behavioral methods, speech therapy and diet, are also used. In turn, psychological therapy of the syndrome is based on the sensory integration method, using two or more senses simultaneously. In 80% of cases, the syndrome is related to mutations of the MECP2 gene, located on chromosome X. The pathogenesis of Rett syndrome is caused by the occurrence of a non-functional MeCP2 protein, which is a transcription factor of many genes, i.e. Bdnf, mef2c, Sgk1, Uqcrc1. Abnormal expression of these genes reveals a characteristic disease phenotype. Clinical symptoms relate mainly to the nervous, respiratory, skeletal and gastrointestinal systems. Currently causal treatment is not possible. However, researchers are developing methods by which, perhaps in the near future, it will be possible to eliminate the mutations in the MECP2 gene, and this will give a chance to the patient for normal functioning.

  16. Correlation of MRI findings with clinical findings of trochanteric pain syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blankenbaker, Donna G.; Ullrick, Steven R.; Davis, Kirkland W.; De Smet, Arthur A. [University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); Haaland, Ben; Fine, Jason P. [University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Departments of Biostatistics and Medical Informatics and Statistics, Madison, WI (United States)

    2008-10-15

    Greater trochanter pain syndrome due to tendinopathy or bursitis is a common cause of hip pain. The previously reported magnetic resonance (MR) findings of trochanteric tendinopathy and bursitis are peritrochanteric fluid and abductor tendon abnormality. We have often noted peritrochanteric high T2 signal in patients without trochanteric symptoms. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the MR findings of peritrochanteric fluid or hip abductor tendon pathology correlate with trochanteric pain. We retrospectively reviewed 131 consecutive MR examinations of the pelvis (256 hips) for T2 peritrochanteric signal and abductor tendon abnormalities without knowledge of the clinical symptoms. Any T2 peritrochanteric abnormality was characterized by size as tiny, small, medium, or large; by morphology as feathery, crescentic, or round; and by location as bursal or intratendinous. The clinical symptoms of hip pain and trochanteric pain were compared to the MR findings on coronal, sagittal, and axial T2 sequences using chi-square or Fisher's exact test with significance assigned as p<0.05. Clinical symptoms of trochanteric pain syndrome were present in only 16 of the 256 hips. All 16 hips with trochanteric pain and 212 (88%) of 240 without trochanteric pain had peritrochanteric abnormalities (p=0.15). Eighty-eight percent of hips with trochanteric symptoms had gluteus tendinopathy while 50% of those without symptoms had such findings (p=0.004). Other than tendinopathy, there was no statistically significant difference between hips with or without trochanteric symptoms and the presence of peritrochanteric T2 abnormality, its size or shape, and the presence of gluteus medius or minimus partial thickness tears. Patients with trochanteric pain syndrome always have peritrochanteric T2 abnormalities and are significantly more likely to have abductor tendinopathy on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, although the absence of peritrochanteric T2 MR abnormalities

  17. Correlation of MRI findings with clinical findings of trochanteric pain syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blankenbaker, Donna G.; Ullrick, Steven R.; Davis, Kirkland W.; De Smet, Arthur A.; Haaland, Ben; Fine, Jason P.

    2008-01-01

    Greater trochanter pain syndrome due to tendinopathy or bursitis is a common cause of hip pain. The previously reported magnetic resonance (MR) findings of trochanteric tendinopathy and bursitis are peritrochanteric fluid and abductor tendon abnormality. We have often noted peritrochanteric high T2 signal in patients without trochanteric symptoms. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the MR findings of peritrochanteric fluid or hip abductor tendon pathology correlate with trochanteric pain. We retrospectively reviewed 131 consecutive MR examinations of the pelvis (256 hips) for T2 peritrochanteric signal and abductor tendon abnormalities without knowledge of the clinical symptoms. Any T2 peritrochanteric abnormality was characterized by size as tiny, small, medium, or large; by morphology as feathery, crescentic, or round; and by location as bursal or intratendinous. The clinical symptoms of hip pain and trochanteric pain were compared to the MR findings on coronal, sagittal, and axial T2 sequences using chi-square or Fisher's exact test with significance assigned as p<0.05. Clinical symptoms of trochanteric pain syndrome were present in only 16 of the 256 hips. All 16 hips with trochanteric pain and 212 (88%) of 240 without trochanteric pain had peritrochanteric abnormalities (p=0.15). Eighty-eight percent of hips with trochanteric symptoms had gluteus tendinopathy while 50% of those without symptoms had such findings (p=0.004). Other than tendinopathy, there was no statistically significant difference between hips with or without trochanteric symptoms and the presence of peritrochanteric T2 abnormality, its size or shape, and the presence of gluteus medius or minimus partial thickness tears. Patients with trochanteric pain syndrome always have peritrochanteric T2 abnormalities and are significantly more likely to have abductor tendinopathy on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, although the absence of peritrochanteric T2 MR abnormalities

  18. Reliability of Diagnosing Clinical Hypothyroidism in Adults with Down Syndrome. Brief Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasher, V. P.

    1995-01-01

    The accuracy of diagnosing hypothyroidism in 160 adults with Down syndrome was examined. A significant association between a clinical diagnosis of hypothyroidism and increasing age was found but no significant association was found between a clinical and a biochemical diagnosis. Regular biochemical screening is recommended. (Author/SW)

  19. Clinical characterisation of the multiple maternal hypomethylation syndrome in siblings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boonen, Susanne E; Pörksen, Sven; Mackay, Deborah Jg

    2008-01-01

    We present the first clinical report of sibs with the multiple maternal hypomethylation syndrome. Both sisters presented with transient neonatal diabetes mellitus (TNDM). By methylation-specific PCR of bisulphite-treated DNA, we found a mosaic spectrum of hypomethylation at the following maternal...

  20. THE PREVALENCE AND CLINICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF PRIMARY HEADACHE IN IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME: a subgroup of the functional somatic syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa LS SOARES

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Context The irritable bowel syndrome and primary headache are two chronic diseases characterized by symptoms of recurring pain and affect approximately 10%-20% of the general population. Objectives To study the prevalence of primary headache in volunteers with irritable bowel syndrome in a Brazilian urban community. Methods It was evaluated the prevalence of primary headache associated with irritable bowel syndrome in adult volunteers 330 no patients.The protocol included the Rome III criteria, international classification of Headaches, later divided into four groups: I- Irritable bowel syndrome (n = 52, II- Primary headache (n = 45, III-Irritable bowel syndrome (n = 26 and headache, and IV- Controls (207. Results We not found significant difference in the average age of the four groups and the diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome, primary headache and their association was more frequent in females. The frequent use of analgesics was greater in groups II and III. Conclusion Our results suggest that irritable bowel syndrome and primary headache are also common in third world countries. The frequency in use of analgesics in association between the two entities was relevant. The identification of irritable bowel syndrome patients with different clinical sub-types could improve the therapeutics options and the prevention strategies.

  1. Usher syndrome in four siblings from a consanguineous family of Pakistani origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trop, I; Schloss, M D; Polomeno, R; Der Kaloustian, V

    1995-04-01

    Usher syndrome is a heterogeneous group of disorders of autosomal recessive inheritance characterized by retinitis pigmentosa and congenital sensorineural hearing loss. Two types are accepted clinically: type I is associated with profound congenital deafness with progressive pigmentary retinopathy and total loss of vestibular function. Type II is a milder form, with moderate-to-profound hearing loss and a milder form of retinitis pigmentosa. Vestibular function is preserved. A total of five loci have been identified as accounting for the two distinct phenotypic presentations. We describe a consanguineous family of Pakistani origin whose four children all are affected with Usher syndrome type I. DNA analysis showed non-linkage to any of the loci already identified as tightly linked to the Usher syndrome type I.

  2. [DIFFERENCE IN THE PREVALENCE OF BURNOUT SYNDROME IN PRECLINICAL AND CLINICAL TEACHING DOCTORS OF MOSTAR SCHOOL OF MEDICINE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukojevič, Mladenka; Antunovič, Andelka; Petrov, Božo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the difference in the prevalence of burnout syndrome in preclinical and clinical teaching doctors of Mostar School of Medicine in the academic year 2011/2012. Special attention was also focused on finding out the possible difference between the syndrome incidence that was correlated to gender and years of service. The main hypothesis was that the probability of burnout syndrome incidence was higher in the group of female clinical teaching doctors having more years of service. The study involved 62 people with high academic education employed at Mostar School of Medicine who were surveyed during a randomly selected consecutive 3-month period (February to May) of the academic year 2011/2012. The data were prospectively collected through a standardized questionnaire survey. The studied parameters were gender, years of work experience and the engagement in preclinical or clinical departments of the Medical School. The survey showed that 43 out of 62 (69.4%) respondents did not suffer the burnout syndrome, while moderate syndrome was recodred in 19 (30.6%) of them. No person had serious symptoms of the syndrome. The difference between the respondents who suffered the syndrome and those who did not was not statistically significant (P=0.002). Considering the gender of respondents, statistically significant differences were not confirmed (P=0.444). Considering the years of service, the highest incidence of the syndrome was found in people with more work experience (in the group of 21-25 years), but the difference between the groups was not statistically significant (P=0.271). Observing the work in preclinical and clinical departments, because of the limited number of patients we could not confirm the hypothesis. The syndrome had affected 13 (21%) clinical teaching doctors and 6 (9,7%) preclinical doctors, while the differenece between them was not statistically significant (P=0.054). Considering the results of this research, it has

  3. Cardiorenal Syndrome in Acute Heart Failure: Revisiting Paradigms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, Julio; Miñana, Gema; Santas, Enrique; Bertomeu-González, Vicente

    2015-05-01

    Cardiorenal syndrome has been defined as the simultaneous dysfunction of both the heart and the kidney. Worsening renal function that occurs in patients with acute heart failure has been classified as cardiorenal syndrome type 1. In this setting, worsening renal function is a common finding and is due to complex, multifactorial, and not fully understood processes involving hemodynamic (renal arterial hypoperfusion and renal venous congestion) and nonhemodynamic factors. Traditionally, worsening renal function has been associated with worse outcomes, but recent findings have revealed mixed and heterogeneous results, perhaps suggesting that the same phenotype represents a diversity of pathophysiological and clinical situations. Interpreting the magnitude and chronology of renal changes together with baseline renal function, fluid overload status, and clinical response to therapy might help clinicians to unravel the clinical meaning of renal function changes that occur during an episode of heart failure decompensation. In this article, we critically review the contemporary evidence on the pathophysiology and clinical aspects of worsening renal function in acute heart failure. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. A rare case report of simultaneous presentation of myopathy, Addison's disease, primary hypoparathyroidism, and Fanconi syndrome in a child diagnosed with Kearns-Sayre syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzoufi, Meropi; Makis, Alexandros; Chaliasos, Nikolaos; Nakou, Iliada; Siomou, Ekaterini; Tsatsoulis, Agathoklis; Zikou, Anastasia; Argyropoulou, Maria; Bonnefont, Jean Paul; Siamopoulou, Antigone

    2013-04-01

    Kearns-Sayre syndrome (KSS) is a rare mitochondrial DNA deletion syndrome defined as the presence of ophthalmoplegia, pigmentary retinopathy, onset less than age 20 years, and one of the following: cardiac conduction defects, cerebellar syndrome, or cerebrospinal fluid protein above 100 mg/dl. KSS may affect many organ systems causing endocrinopathies, encephalomyopathy, sensorineural hearing loss, and renal tubulopathy. Clinical presentation at diagnosis is quite heterogeneous and, usually, few organs are affected with progression to generalized disease early in adulthood. We present the case of a boy with KSS presenting at the age of 5 years with myopathy, Addison's disease, primary hypoparathyroidism, and Fanconi syndrome. The proper replacement treatment along with the administration of mitochondrial metabolism-improving agents had a brief ameliorating effect, but gradual severe multisystemic deterioration was inevitable over the next 5 years. This report highlights the fact that in case of simultaneous presentation of polyendocrinopathies and renal disease early in childhood, KSS should be considered.

  5. Catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome and pregnancy. Clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khizroeva, J; Bitsadze, V; Makatsariya, A

    2018-01-08

    We have observed the development of a catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (CAPS) in a pregnant woman hospitalized at 28 weeks of gestation with a severe preeclampsia. On the same day, an eclampsia attack developed, and an emergency surgical delivery was performed. On the third day, multiorgan failure developed. Examination showed a persistent circulation of lupus anticoagulant, high level of antibodies to cardiolipin, b2-glycoprotein I, and prothrombin. The usual diagnosis of the severe preeclampsia masked a catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome, exacerbated by the coincident presence of several types of antiphospholipid antibodies. The first pregnancy resulted in a premature birth at 25 weeks, possibly also due to the circulation of antiphospholipid antibodies. The trigger of the catastrophic form development was the pregnancy itself, surgical intervention, and hyperhomocysteinemia. CAPS is the most severe form of antiphospholipid syndrome, manifested in multiple microthrombosis of microcirculation of vital organs and in the development of multiorgan failure against the background of the high level of antiphospholipid antibodies. CAPS is characterized by renal, cerebral, gastrointestinal, adrenal, ovarian, skin, and other forms of microthrombosis. Thrombosis recurrence is typical. Thrombotic microvasculopathy lies at the heart of multiorgan failure and manifests clinically in central nervous system lesions, adrenal insufficiency, and ARDS development. CAPS is a life-threatening condition, therefore, requires an urgent treatment. Optimal treatment of CAPS is not developed. CAPS represent a general medical multidisciplinary problem.

  6. X-linked Acrogigantism (X-LAG) Syndrome: Clinical Profile and Therapeutic Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Beckers, Albert; Lodish, Maya Beth; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Rostomyan, Liliya; Lee, Misu; Faucz, Fabio R; Yuan, Bo; Choong, Catherine S; Caberg, Jean-Hubert; Verrua, Elisa; Naves, Luciana Ansaneli; Cheetham, Tim D; Young, Jacques; Lysy, Philippe A; Petrossians, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    X-linked acro-gigantism (X-LAG) is a new syndrome of pituitary gigantism, caused by microduplications on chromosome Xq26.3, encompassing the gene GPR101, which is highly upregulated in pituitary tumors. We conducted this study to explore the clinical, radiological and hormonal phenotype and responses to therapy in patients with X-LAG syndrome. The study included 18 patients (13 sporadic) with X-LAG and a microduplication in chromosome Xq26.3. All sporadic cases had unique duplications and the...

  7. Clinical characteristics of polycystic ovary syndrome in Indian women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunita J Ramanand

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is common diagnosis in women presenting with infertility. All the dimensions of PCOS have not been completely explored. Many studies have tried to characterize the exact presentation of the disease. In this study we studied clinical features of PCOS in Indian women to characterize different phenotypes of this syndrome. Prevalence of acanthosis nigricans (AN as surrogate marker of insulin resistance, obesity, hirsutism and hypothyroidism in PCOS women have been simultaneously studied. Materials and Methods: Present work is a non comparative cross-sectional open label study carried out over a period of 18 months in an endocrinology hospital in western Maharashtra, India. Results and Conclusion: Authors conclude that PCOS occurs both in obese and non-obese women; AN and hirsutism occur in equal proportion of patients. AN is correlated with obesity. Hormonal dysfunctions in PCOS manifested together or independently. PCOS women can be sub grouped based on clinical features suggestive of endocrinological malfunctions and can be investigated accordingly for selection of appropriate treatment modalities.

  8. Neural activity in relation to clinically derived personality syndromes in depression using a psychodynamic fMRI paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svenja eTaubner

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The heterogeneity between patients with depression cannot be captured adequately with existing descriptive systems of diagnosis and neurobiological models of depression. Furthermore, considering the highly individual nature of depression, the application of general stimuli in past research efforts may not capture the essence of the disorder. This study aims to identify subtypes of depression by using empirically-derived personality-syndromes, and to explore neural correlates of the derived personality syndromes.Method: In the present exploratory study an individually tailored and psychodynamically based fMRI paradigm using dysfunctional relationship patterns was presented to 20 chronically depressed patients. Results from the Shedler-Westen-Assessment-Procedure (SWAP-200 were analyzed by Q-factor analysis to identify clinically relevant subgroups of depression and related brain activation.Results: The principle component analysis of SWAP-200 items from all 20 patients lead to a 2-factor solution: Depressive Personality and Emotional-Hostile-Externalizing Personality. Both factors were used in a whole-brain correlational analysis but only the second factor yielded significant positive correlations in four regions: A large cluster in the right orbitofrontal cortex (OFC, the left ventral striatum, a small cluster in the left temporal pole and another small cluster in the right middle frontal gyrus. Discussion: The degree to which patients with depression score high on the factor Emotional-Hostile-Externalizing Personality correlated with relatively higher activity in three key areas involved in emotion processing, evaluation of reward/punishment, negative cognitions, depressive pathology and social knowledge (OFC, ventral striatum, temporal pole. Results may contribute to an alternative description of neural correlates of depression showing differential brain activation dependent on the extent of specific personality syndromes in

  9. Clinical neurogenetics: fragile x-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Deborah A; O'Keefe, Joan A

    2013-11-01

    This article summarizes the clinical findings, genetics, pathophysiology, and treatment of fragile X-associated tremor ataxia syndrome. The disorder occurs from a CGG repeat (55-200) expansion in the fragile X mental retardation 1 gene. It manifests clinically in kinetic tremor, gait ataxia, and executive dysfunction, usually in older men who carry the genetic abnormality. The disorder has distinct radiographic and pathologic findings. Symptomatic treatment is beneficial in some patients. The inheritance is X-linked and family members may be at risk for other fragile X-associated disorders. This information is useful to neurologists, general practitioners, and geneticists. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Clinical Aspects of Type 3 Long-QT Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilde, Arthur A M; Moss, Arthur J; Kaufman, Elizabeth S

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: -Risk stratification in patients with type 3 long QT syndrome (LQT3) by clinical and genetic characteristics and effectiveness of ß-blocker therapy have not been studied previously in a large LQT3 population. METHODS: -The study population included 406 LQT3 patients with 51 different......-blocker therapy reduces this risk in females, but efficacy in males could not be conclusively determined due to low number of events....

  11. Marfan syndrome--a diagnostic challenge caused by phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, C; Mátyás, G; Steinmann, B; Baumgartner, D

    2005-01-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is an autosomal dominant inherited connective tissue disorder caused by mutations in the fibrillin-1 (FBN1) gene with variable clinical manifestations in the cardiovascular, musculoskeletal and ocular systems. Data of moleculor genetic analysis and a catalogue of clinical manifestations including aortic elastic parameters were mined in order to (i) assess aortic abnormality before and during medical treatment, and to (ii) identify novel correlations between the genotype and phenotype of the disease using hierarchical cluster analysis and logistic regression analysis. A score measure describing the similarity between a patient's clinical symptoms and a characteristic phenotype class was introduced. A probabilistic model for monitoring the loss of aortic elasticity was built on merely aortic parameters of 34 patients with classic MFS and 43 control subjects showing a sensitivity of 82% and a specificity of 96%. The clinical phenotypes of 100 individuals with classical or suspected MFS were clustered yielding four different phenotypic expressions. The highest correlation was found between FBN1 missense mutations, which manifested as ectopia lentis, skeletal major and skin minor criteria, and two out of four clustered phenotypes. The probability of the presence of a missense mutation in both phenotype classes is approximately 70%. Monitoring of aortic elastic properties during medical treatment may serve as additional criterion to indicate elective surgical interventions. Genotype-phenotype correlation may contribute to anticipate the clinical consequences of specific FBN1 mutations more comprehensively and may be helpful to identify MFS patients at risk at on early stage of disease.

  12. Utility of MLH1 methylation analysis in the clinical evaluation of Lynch Syndrome in women with endometrial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruegl, Amanda S; Djordjevic, Bojana; Urbauer, Diana L; Westin, Shannon N; Soliman, Pamela T; Lu, Karen H; Luthra, Rajyalakshmi; Broaddus, Russell R

    2014-01-01

    Clinical screening criteria, such as young age of endometrial cancer diagnosis and family history of signature cancers, have traditionally been used to identify women with Lynch Syndrome, which is caused by mutation of a DNA mismatch repair gene. Immunohistochemistry and microsatellite instability analysis have evolved as important screening tools to evaluate endometrial cancer patients for Lynch Syndrome. A complicating factor is that 15-20% of sporadic endometrial cancers have immunohistochemical loss of the DNA mismatch repair protein MLH1 and high levels of microsatellite instability due to methylation of MLH1. The PCR-based MLH1 methylation assay potentially resolves this issue, yet many clinical laboratories do not perform this assay. The objective of this study was to determine if clinical and pathologic features help to distinguish sporadic endometrial carcinomas with MLH1 loss secondary to MLH1 methylation from Lynch Syndrome-associated endometrial carcinomas with MLH1 loss and absence of MLH1 methylation. Of 337 endometrial carcinomas examined, 54 had immunohistochemical loss of MLH1. 40/54 had MLH1 methylation and were designated as sporadic, while 14/54 lacked MLH1 methylation and were designated as Lynch Syndrome. Diabetes and deep myometrial invasion were associated with Lynch Syndrome; no other clinical or pathological variable distinguished the 2 groups. Combining Society of Gynecologic Oncology screening criteria with these 2 features accurately captured all Lynch Syndrome cases, but with low specificity. In summary, no single clinical/pathologic feature or screening criteria tool accurately identified all Lynch Syndrome-associated endometrial carcinomas, highlighting the importance of the MLH1 methylation assay in the clinical evaluation of these patients.

  13. Clinical and genetic characterization of chanarin-dorfman syndrome patients: first report of large deletions in the ABHD5 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prati Daniele

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chanarin-Dorfman syndrome (CDS is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by nonbullous congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma (NCIE and an intracellular accumulation of triacylglycerol (TG droplets in most tissues. The clinical phenotype involves multiple organs and systems, including liver, eyes, ears, skeletal muscle and central nervous system (CNS. Mutations in ABHD5/CGI58 gene are associated with CDS. Methods Eight CDS patients belonging to six different families from Mediterranean countries were enrolled for genetic study. Molecular analysis of the ABHD5 gene included the sequencing of the 7 coding exons and of the putative 5' regulatory regions, as well as reverse transcript-polymerase chain reaction analysis and sequencing of normal and aberrant ABHD5 cDNAs. Results Five different mutations were identified, four of which were novel, including two splice-site mutations (c.47+1G>A and c.960+5G>A and two large deletions (c.898_*320del and c.662-1330_773+46del. All the reported mutations are predicted to be pathogenic because they lead to an early stop codon or a frameshift producing a premature termination of translation. While nonsense, missense, frameshift and splice-site mutations have been identified in CDS patients, large genomic deletions have not previously been described. Conclusions These results emphasize the need for an efficient approach for genomic deletion screening to ensure an accurate molecular diagnosis of CDS. Moreover, in spite of intensive molecular screening, no mutations were identified in one patient with a confirmed clinical diagnosis of CDS, appointing to genetic heterogeneity of the syndrome.

  14. Genome-Wide Association Analysis Reveals Genetic Heterogeneity of Sjögren's Syndrome According to Ancestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Kimberly E; Wong, Quenna; Levine, David M; McHugh, Caitlin; Laurie, Cathy; Doheny, Kimberly; Lam, Mi Y; Baer, Alan N; Challacombe, Stephen; Lanfranchi, Hector; Schiødt, Morten; Srinivasan, M; Umehara, Hisanori; Vivino, Frederick B; Zhao, Yan; Shiboski, Stephen C; Daniels, Troy E; Greenspan, John S; Shiboski, Caroline H; Criswell, Lindsey A

    2017-06-01

    The Sjögren's International Collaborative Clinical Alliance (SICCA) is an international data registry and biorepository derived from a multisite observational study of participants in whom genotyping was performed on the Omni2.5M platform and who had undergone deep phenotyping using common protocol-directed methods. The aim of this study was to examine the genetic etiology of Sjögren's syndrome (SS) across ancestry and disease subsets. We performed genome-wide association study analyses using SICCA subjects and external controls obtained from dbGaP data sets, one using all participants (1,405 cases, 1,622 SICCA controls, and 3,125 external controls), one using European participants (585, 966, and 580, respectively), and one using Asian participants (460, 224, and 901, respectively) with ancestry adjustments via principal components analyses. We also investigated whether subphenotype distributions differ by ethnicity, and whether this contributes to the heterogeneity of genetic associations. We observed significant associations in established regions of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), IRF5, and STAT4 (P = 3 × 10 -42 , P = 3 × 10 -14 , and P = 9 × 10 -10 , respectively), and several novel suggestive regions (those with 2 or more associations at P ancestry (P = 4 × 10 -15 and P = 4 × 10 -5 , respectively), but that subphenotype differences did not explain most of the ancestry differences in genetic associations. Genetic associations with SS differ markedly according to ancestry; however, this is not explained by differences in subphenotypes. © 2017, The Authors. Arthritis & Rheumatology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American College of Rheumatology.

  15. Clinical picture and treatment implication in a child with Capgras syndrome: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Mazzone, Luigi; Armando, Marco; De Crescenzo, Franco; Demaria, Francesco; Valeri, Giovanni; Vicari, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Capgras syndrome is a delusional misidentification syndrome characterized by the patient’s belief that his or her relatives have been replaced by impostors. Case presentation Here we describe the clinical picture and the therapeutic approach to an 11-year-old Caucasian girl with Capgras syndrome. A complete psychopathological assessment was conducted during the acute phase, at one month, two months and six months since diagnosis. Conclusion Subsequent follow-up evaluatio...

  16. Clinical and Biochemical Characteristics of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome among Women in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, S; Pathan, F; Ahmed, T

    2015-04-01

    Clinical and Biochemical characteristics age, central obesity, Glucose intolerance, lipid abnormality, thyroid function, prolactin level, clinical signs & symptoms and ultrasonographic ovarian feature of 70 women were studied and prevalence of hyper-prolactinemia, hypothyroidism and Metabolic syndrome were calculated in the Endocrine OPD of BIRDEM during November 2010 to May 2011.Age of the PCOS population was 23.02±7.04 year, central obesity in 81.4%, abnormal glucose tolerance in 47.1%, dyslipidemia in 45.7%, hypertension in 24.3%, hirsutism in 88.6%, acanthosis nigricans in 50%, polycystic ovaries by ultrasound (87%) cases. One third of the PCOS cases i.e.; 33% were without hyperprolactinemia or hypothyroidism or Metabolic Syndrome. And the rest 47 cases had one, two or all the 3 with them. The distribution was PCOS with hyperprolactinemia 18.6%, PCOS with hypothyroidism 11.4%, PCOS with Metabolic Syndrome 15.3%, PCOS with hyperprolactinemia with MS 8.6%, PCOS with hypothyrodism with MS 5.6%, PCOS with hypothyrodism with hyperprolactinemia 4.3% and rest 4.3% had all the 4 in combination. Blood glucose levels during OGTT and TSH levels of the group without Hypothyrid, hyperprolactinoma or Metabolic Syndrome were significantly lower (p≤0.008). Significant proportion of Bangladeshi women with PCOS has hypothyroidsm with or without high prolactin and also have higher incidence of metabolic syndrome. So, all PCOS patients should also be screened for hypothyroidsm and hyperprolactinemia.

  17. CLINICAL AND ENCEPHALOGRAPHIC CHANGES AT LENNOX–GASTAUT SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Yu. Mukhin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Lennox–Gastaut syndrome (LGS is an epileptic encephalopathy, starting in childhood and showing in often polymorphic seizures (including tonic axial ones, severe cognitive deficite, slow activity of the acute–slow wave in the interictal period at the electroencephalography (EEG, runs of fast activity of 10–20 Hz, often associated with tonic seizures, as well as with the resistance to therapy. According ILAE Classification of epilepsy syndromes and epilepsies 1989 LGS was referred to generalized cryptogenic or symptomatic forms of the epilepsy. According to Proposed Diagnostic Scheme for People with Epileptic Seizures and with Epilepsy (2001 LGS is a classic representative of the group of childhood epileptic encephalopathies. LGS is a rather rare form of the epilepsy. The syndrome frequency makes from 1–4 to 6.6 % among all forms of the childhood epilepsy. LGS is subdivided into the cryptogenic and the symptomatic variants. From our point of view the latter it will be more correct to refer to the symptomatic focal epilepsy with the secondary bilateral synchrony phenomena at EEG. The LGS can be caused by cortical development defects, by perinatal encephalopathies, by brain tumors, by inherited metabolism diseases, by chromosomal anomalies, as well as by other factors. In case of the classic cryptogenic variant the ethiology of the LGS remains unknown. The disease onset is at the age of 2–8 y. o. In 20–40 % of cases LGS is transformed from the West syndrome. The LGS attribute is the polymorphism of seizures. The syndrome structure can combine tonic seizures, epileptic drop seizures, atypical absences, generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Focal seizures at LGS are a matter of argument. The article gives details on the clinical EEG criteria of LGS, the semiology of epileptic seizures in the syndrome structure, diagnostic and treatment approaches. The main accent is made on EEG peculiarities of the disease. The author presents the

  18. The Capgras syndrome in paranoid schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, J A; Leong, G B

    1992-01-01

    Capgras syndrome is characterized by a delusion of impostors who are thought to be physically similar but psychologically distinct from the misidentified person. This syndrome is generally thought to be relatively rare. Most of our knowledge about Capgras syndrome derives from single case studies and small series of cases usually from diagnostically heterogeneous groups. In this article, a series of 31 patients suffering from both paranoid schizophrenia and Capgras syndrome is described. Issues pertaining to the phenomenology of Capgras syndrome, the possible relation between Capgras syndrome and other delusional misidentification syndromes, and a neurobiological hypothesis aimed at explaining Capgras syndrome are discussed.

  19. Association of glucocorticoid receptor polymorphisms with clinical and metabolic profiles in polycystic ovary syndrome

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    Gustavo A.Rosa Maciel

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: We aimed to investigate whether glucocorticoid receptor gene polymorphisms are associated with clinical and metabolic profiles in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome. Polycystic ovary syndrome is a complex endocrine disease that affects 5-8% of women and may be associated with metabolic syndrome, which is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Cortisol action and dysregulation account for metabolic syndrome development in the general population. As glucocorticoid receptor gene (NR3C1 polymorphisms regulate cortisol sensitivity, we hypothesized that variants of this gene may be involved in the adverse metabolic profiles of patients with polycystic ovary syndrome. METHOD: Clinical, metabolic and hormonal profiles were evaluated in 97 patients with polycystic ovary syndrome who were diagnosed according to the Rotterdam criteria. The alleles of the glucocorticoid gene were genotyped. Association analyses were performed using the appropriate statistical tests. RESULTS: Obesity and metabolic syndrome were observed in 42.3% and 26.8% of patients, respectively. Body mass index was positively correlated with blood pressure, triglyceride, LDL-c, total cholesterol, glucose and insulin levels as well as HOMA-IR values and inversely correlated with HDL-c and SHBG levels. The BclI and A3669G variants were found in 24.7% and 13.4% of alleles, respectively. BclI carriers presented a lower frequency of insulin resistance compared with wild-type subjects. CONCLUSION: The BclI variant is associated with a lower frequency of insulin resistance in women with polycystic ovary syndrome. Glucocorticoid gene polymorphism screening during treatment of the syndrome may be useful for identifying subgroups of at-risk patients who would benefit the most from personalized treatment.

  20. Clinical features, diagnostic criteria, and management of Coffin-Siris syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergano, Samantha S; Deardorff, Matthew A

    2014-09-01

    Coffin-Siris syndrome (OMIM#135900) is a multiple congenital anomaly syndrome classically characterized by hypo- or aplasia of the fifth digit nails or phalanges, as well as coarse facial features, sparse scalp hair, and moderate to severe cognitive and/or developmental delay. The recent identification of molecular etiologies has served to effectively characterize a large set of patients who have been described with Coffin-Siris between the time of its initial description and the present. However, despite recent advances, a number of patients who traditionally fit the diagnosis have yet to have identified causes. This could be due to patients who lie outside the defined phenotype, or alternatively, to additional as yet unidentified genes which may play roles. Here we outline the range of clinical features described in the broader diagnostic category, review the continuing phenotypic challenges and note those subsets of patients for whom molecular causes have yet to be clarified. Finally, we discuss recommendations for clinical management of these individuals. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Incidence of refeeding syndrome in internal medicine patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraaijenbrink, B V C; Lambers, W M; Mathus-Vliegen, E M H; Siegert, C E H

    2016-03-01

    Refeeding syndrome is a potentially fatal shift of fluids and electrolytes that may occur after reintroducing nutrition in a malnourished patient. Its incidence in internal medicine patients is not known. We aimed at determining the incidence in a heterogeneous group of patients acutely admitted to a department of internal medicine. All patients acutely admitted to the department of internal medicine of a teaching community hospital in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, between 22 February 2011 and 29 April 2011, were included. We applied the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) criteria for determining people at risk of refeeding syndrome and took hypophosphataemia as the main indicator for the presence of this syndrome. Of 178 patients included in the study, 97 (54%) were considered to be at risk of developing refeeding syndrome and 14 patients actually developed the syndrome (14% of patients at risk and 8% of study population). Patients with a malignancy or previous malignancy were at increased risk of developing refeeding syndrome (p refeeding syndrome. The Short Nutritional Assessment Questionnaire score had a positive and negative predictive value of 13% and 95% respectively. The incidence of refeeding syndrome was relatively high in patients acutely admitted to the department of internal medicine. Oncology patients are at increased risk of developing refeeding syndrome. When taking the occurrence of hypophosphataemia as a hallmark, no other single clinical or composite parameter could be identified that accurately predicts the development of refeeding syndrome.

  2. [Clinical demonstrations: Heart rupture in acute myocardial infarct. Infectious endocarditis. Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nager, F

    1984-12-08

    This clinical demonstration includes three topics of clinical cardiology: myocardial rupture in acute myocardial infarction, infective endocarditis, and WPW-syndrome with paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia. In the first part three cases with septal perforation or papillary muscle rupture are demonstrated. Our experience with myocardial rupture (free wall, septum, papillary muscle) during the last six years is summarized with special reference to the significance and the differential diagnosis of systolic regurgitant murmurs after myocardial infarction. Special features of acute mitral incompetence (papillary muscle dysfunction) in myocardial infarction are outlined and diagnostic guidelines for differentiation between septal perforation and papillary muscle rupture are discussed. In the second part two patients with aortic (e.g. mitral) valve rupture in the course of infective endocarditis are presented. The synoptic comparison of these two patients is related to the results of our own clinical studies on the changing pattern of infective endocarditis (epidemiologically, clinically) during the last three decades. The clinical picture of acute aortic valve rupture is outlined and the bedside signs indicating catastrophic complications of infective endocarditis are summarized. In the third part the odyssey of a patient with WPW-syndrome and consecutive paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia is described. Progress in electrophysiological analysis of the re-entry circles in preexcitation syndromes is outlined.

  3. Gastric tumours in hereditary cancer syndromes: clinical features, molecular biology and strategies for prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sereno, María; Aguayo, Cristina; Guillén Ponce, Carmen; Gómez-Raposo, César; Zambrana, Francisco; Gómez-López, Miriam; Casado, Enrique

    2011-09-01

    Gastric cancer is the major cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. The majority of them are classified as sporadic, whereas the remaining 10% exhibit familial clustering. Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) syndrome is the most important condition that leads to hereditary gastric cancer. However, other hereditary cancer syndromes, such as hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, familial adenomatous polyposis, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, Li-Fraumeni syndrome and hereditary breast and ovarian cancer, entail a higher risk compared to the general population for developing this kind of neoplasia. In this review, we describe briefly the most important aspects related to clinical features, molecular biology and strategies for prevention in hereditary gastric associated to different cancer syndromes.

  4. Clinical Observation of a Child with KID (Keratitis-Ichthyosis-Deafness Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Klymenko

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A clinical case of keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness (KID syndrome in an infant is described. The article familia-rizes pediatricians and family doctors with difficulties in the diagnosis of this rare genetic disease in infants.

  5. The clinical phenotype of Lynch syndrome due to germ-line PMS2 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senter, Leigha; Clendenning, Mark; Sotamaa, Kaisa; Hampel, Heather; Green, Jane; Potter, John D; Lindblom, Annika; Lagerstedt, Kristina; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Lindor, Noralane M; Young, Joanne; Winship, Ingrid; Dowty, James G; White, Darren M; Hopper, John L; Baglietto, Laura; Jenkins, Mark A; de la Chapelle, Albert

    2008-08-01

    Although the clinical phenotype of Lynch syndrome (also known as hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer) has been well described, little is known about disease in PMS2 mutation carriers. Now that mutation detection methods can discern mutations in PMS2 from mutations in its pseudogenes, more mutation carriers have been identified. Information about the clinical significance of PMS2 mutations is crucial for appropriate counseling. Here, we report the clinical characteristics of a large series of PMS2 mutation carriers. We performed PMS2 mutation analysis using long-range polymerase chain reaction and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification for 99 probands diagnosed with Lynch syndrome-associated tumors showing isolated loss of PMS2 by immunohistochemistry. Penetrance was calculated using a modified segregation analysis adjusting for ascertainment. Germ-line PMS2 mutations were detected in 62% of probands (n = 55 monoallelic; 6 biallelic). Among families with monoallelic PMS2 mutations, 65.5% met revised Bethesda guidelines. Compared with the general population, in mutation carriers, the incidence of colorectal cancer was 5.2-fold higher, and the incidence of endometrial cancer was 7.5-fold higher. In North America, this translates to a cumulative cancer risk to age 70 years of 15%-20% for colorectal cancer, 15% for endometrial cancer, and 25%-32% for any Lynch syndrome-associated cancer. No elevated risk for non-Lynch syndrome-associated cancers was observed. PMS2 mutations contribute significantly to Lynch syndrome, but the penetrance for monoallelic mutation carriers appears to be lower than that for the other mismatch repair genes. Modified counseling and cancer surveillance guidelines for PMS2 mutation carriers are proposed.

  6. BING-NEEL SYNDROME: ILLUSTRATIVE CASES AND COMPREHENSIVE REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzia Varettoni

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The Bing-Neel syndrome is a rare neurological complication of Waldenström’s Macroglobulinemia which results from a direct involvement of central nervous system by malignant lymphoplasmacytic cells. The clinical suspicion of Bing-Neel syndrome may be difficult because neurologic symptoms are heterogeneous, non specific and sometimes underhand. A definitive diagnosis of Bing-Neel syndrome can be confidently made using brain and spinal cord magnetic resonance imaging as well as histopathology and/or cerebrospinal fluid analysis to confirm the neoplastic infiltration of central nervous system. The detection in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with Bing-Neel syndrome of the MYD88 (L265P somatic mutation, which is highly recurrent in Waldenström’s Macroglobulinemia, revealed useful for the diagnosis and monitoring of central nervous system involvement. Despite recommendations recently published, there is still no clear consensus on treatment of Bing-Neel syndrome, which includes systemic immunochemotherapy, intrathecal chemotherapy and brain irradiation as possible options. Ibrutinib, a Bruton kinase inhibitor highly active in patients with Waldenström’s Macroglobulinemia, has been recently added to the therapeutic armamentarium of Bing-Neel syndrome due to its ability to pass the blood-brain barrier. However, prospective clinical trials are eagerly awaited with the aim to define the optimal treatment strategy.  Here we describe four illustrative cases of Bing-Neel syndrome diagnosed and treated at our Institution and review the literature on this topic.

  7. [Psychiatric disturbances in five patients with MELAS syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magner, Martin; Honzik, Tomas; Tesarova, Marketa; Dvorakova, Veronika; Hansiková, Hana; Raboch, Jiři; Zeman, Jiři

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial disorders of energetic metabolism (MD) represent a heterogeneous group of diseases manifesting at any age with a broad spectrum of clinical symptoms, including psychiatric disorders. The aim of the study was to characterize psychiatric symptoms and diagnoses in five patients with MELAS syndrome between the ages of 17 and 53 years. Four of MELAS patients them harbored the prevalent mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutation 3243A>G, and one patient had the mtDNA mutation 12706T>C. Three patients had positive family histories for MELAS syndrome. In one patient, depression was diagnosedas the first symptom ofMELAS syndrome. Depression also preceded a stroke-like episode in one patient. Four patients had disturbed cognitive functions, confusional states occurred in three patients. One patient manifested psychotic (schizophrenia-like) symptoms. Mitochondrial disorders deserve consideration as part of the differential diagnosis, especially, if there is suspected involvement of other organ groups or positive family history of MD.

  8. Tourette's syndrome and associated disorders: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara R. Ferreira

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compile data on Tourette's syndrome (TS, tics and associated disorders.Methods: A systematic review of the literature was conducted using the 5S levels of organization of healthcare research evidence (systems, summaries, synopses, syntheses, studies, based on the model described by Haynes. The search keywords were Tourette, tics and comorbidity, which were cross-referenced. Studies provided by publishers and articles being processed on July 31, 2013, were also included.Results: Of all studies retrieved during the search, 64 were selected because they analyzed the epidemiology, clinical features and etiopathogenesis of TS and its comorbidities. TS is classified as a hyperkinetic movement disorder, and at least 90% of the patients have neuropsychiatric comorbidities, of which attention deficit hyperactivity and obsessive-compulsive disorders are the most common. The syndrome is clinically heterogeneous and has been associated with a dysfunction of cortico-striatal-thalamic-cortical circuits involving various neurotransmitters. Although its genetic etiology has been widely studied, other factors may be important to understand this syndrome and its associated disorders.Conclusions: TS is a neurodevelopmental disorder that results from the impact of stress factors on a vulnerable biological substrate during the critical periods of neurodevelopment. The study of TS and its comorbidities may contribute, at different levels, to the understanding of several neuropsychiatric disorders of clinical and therapeutic relevance.

  9. Prevention of infectious diseases in patients with Good syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multani, Ashrit; Gomez, Carlos A; Montoya, José G

    2018-08-01

    Good syndrome is a profoundly immunocompromising condition with heterogeneous immune deficits characterized by the presence of thymoma, low-to-absent B-lymphocyte counts, hypogammaglobulinemia, and impaired cell-mediated immunity. Opportunistic infectious diseases associated with Good syndrome represent a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge, given their protean clinical manifestations. Although these infectious complications have been reviewed in prior publications, recommendations regarding their prevention have been lacking. Good syndrome usually occurs in adult patients between the ages of 40 and 70 years. Immunologically, it is characterized by low or absent peripheral blood B lymphocytes, hypogammaglobulinemia, and variable defects in cell-mediated immunity including low CD4 T counts, inverted CD4:CD8 T-lymphocyte ratio, and reduced T-lymphocyte mitogen proliferative responses. Patients with Good syndrome are susceptible to a variety of infectious diseases, of which the most common are recurrent bacterial sinopulmonary infections, mucocutaneous candidiasis, and CMV tissue-invasive disease. Preventive guidelines including targeted antimicrobial prophylaxis and vaccination strategies can mitigate infectious complications in patients with Good syndrome. Immunological deficits and infectious complications in Good syndrome have been described for over 60 years. Further research is needed to elucidate its exact pathogenesis and define the mechanistic relationship between thymoma and hypogammaglobulinemia. However, tailored prophylactic strategies can be recommended for patients with Good syndrome.

  10. Acute respiratory distress syndrome 40 years later: time to revisit its definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phua, Jason; Stewart, Thomas E; Ferguson, Niall D

    2008-10-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome is a common disorder associated with significant mortality and morbidity. The aim of this article is to critically evaluate the definition of acute respiratory distress syndrome and examine the impact the definition has on clinical practice and research. Articles from a MEDLINE search (1950 to August 2007) using the Medical Subject Heading respiratory distress syndrome, adult, diagnosis, limited to the English language and human subjects, their relevant bibliographies, and personal collections, were reviewed. The definition of acute respiratory distress syndrome is important to researchers, clinicians, and administrators alike. It has evolved significantly over the last 40 years, culminating in the American-European Consensus Conference definition, which was published in 1994. Although the American-European Consensus Conference definition is widely used, it has some important limitations that may impact on the conduct of clinical research, on resource allocation, and ultimately on the bedside management of such patients. These limitations stem partially from the fact that as defined, acute respiratory distress syndrome is a heterogeneous entity and also involve the reliability and validity of the criteria used in the definition. This article critically evaluates the American-European Consensus Conference definition and its limitations. Importantly, it highlights how these limitations may contribute to clinical trials that have failed to detect a potential true treatment effect. Finally, recommendations are made that could be considered in future definition modifications with an emphasis on the significance of accurately identifying the target population in future trials and subsequently in clinical care. How acute respiratory distress syndrome is defined has a significant impact on the results of randomized, controlled trials and epidemiologic studies. Changes to the current American-European Consensus Conference definition are

  11. Usher syndrome: Hearing loss, retinal degeneration and associated abnormalities

    OpenAIRE

    Mathur, Pranav; Yang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Usher syndrome (USH), clinically and genetically heterogeneous, is the leading genetic cause of combined hearing and vision loss. USH is classified into three types, based on the hearing and vestibular symptoms observed in patients. Sixteen loci have been reported to be involved in the occurrence of USH and atypical USH. Among them, twelve have been identified as causative genes and one as a modifier gene. Studies on the proteins encoded by these USH genes suggest that USH proteins interact a...

  12. The epigenomics of polycystic ovarian syndrome: from pathogenesis to clinical manifestations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Shuxia; Zhu, Dongyi; Duan, Hongmei

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is a complex condition of ovarian dysfunction and metabolic abnormalities with widely varying clinical manifestations resulting from interference of the genome and the environment through integrative biological mechanisms with the emerging field of epigenetics...

  13. Polycystic ovarian syndrome: clinical and biological diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachelot, Anne

    2016-12-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common ovarian disorder associated with androgen excess in women, which justifies the growing interest of endocrinologists. This syndrome leads to clinical hyperandrogenism and/or a biological dysovulation and infertility. Its diagnosis is based on consensual diagnostic criteria, but which are likely to change in the near future with the rise of the interest of new markers such as AMH. Diagnostic tools of PCOS are also discussed, with emphasis on the laboratory evaluation of androgens and other potential biomarkers of ovarian and metabolic dysfunctions. The exact etiology of PCOS is unknown and is likely multifactorial. Many studies indicate that PCOS results from originally ovarian abnormalities. In some patients, secondary hyperinsulinemia with insulin resistance plays a role in the pathophysiology. In addition, the relevant impact of metabolic issues, specifically insulin resistance and obesity, on the pathogenesis of PCOS, and the susceptibility to develop earlier than expected glucose intolerance states, including type 2 diabetes, has supported the notion that these aspects should be considered when defining the PCOS phenotype and planning potential therapeutic strategies in an affected subject.

  14. [Clinical case of management of a patient with Guillain-Barre syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, A V; Babak, C I; Murashko, N K

    2012-01-01

    Syndrome of Giyena-Barre can arise up in any age, in different regions, for men more frequent, than for women. There are descriptions of clinical supervisions of syndrome in domestic literature, combining with the defeat of the nervous system as a result of different pathogens which are procatarxiss in the start of mechanisms of immune attack on the albumens of mielina. However this disease continues to remain one of most heavy, requiring neyroreanimacionnykh measures, that causes the necessity of development of new methods of treatment in same queue.

  15. X-linked acrogigantism syndrome: clinical profile and therapeutic responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckers, Albert; Lodish, Maya Beth; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Rostomyan, Liliya; Lee, Misu; Faucz, Fabio R; Yuan, Bo; Choong, Catherine S; Caberg, Jean-Hubert; Verrua, Elisa; Naves, Luciana Ansaneli; Cheetham, Tim D; Young, Jacques; Lysy, Philippe A; Petrossians, Patrick; Cotterill, Andrew; Shah, Nalini Samir; Metzger, Daniel; Castermans, Emilie; Ambrosio, Maria Rosaria; Villa, Chiara; Strebkova, Natalia; Mazerkina, Nadia; Gaillard, Stéphan; Barra, Gustavo Barcelos; Casulari, Luis Augusto; Neggers, Sebastian J; Salvatori, Roberto; Jaffrain-Rea, Marie-Lise; Zacharin, Margaret; Santamaria, Beatriz Lecumberri; Zacharieva, Sabina; Lim, Ee Mun; Mantovani, Giovanna; Zatelli, Maria Chaira; Collins, Michael T; Bonneville, Jean-François; Quezado, Martha; Chittiboina, Prashant; Oldfield, Edward H; Bours, Vincent; Liu, Pengfei; W de Herder, Wouter; Pellegata, Natalia; Lupski, James R; Daly, Adrian F; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2015-06-01

    X-linked acrogigantism (X-LAG) is a new syndrome of pituitary gigantism, caused by microduplications on chromosome Xq26.3, encompassing the gene GPR101, which is highly upregulated in pituitary tumors. We conducted this study to explore the clinical, radiological, and hormonal phenotype and responses to therapy in patients with X-LAG syndrome. The study included 18 patients (13 sporadic) with X-LAG and microduplication of chromosome Xq26.3. All sporadic cases had unique duplications and the inheritance pattern in two families was dominant, with all Xq26.3 duplication carriers being affected. Patients began to grow rapidly as early as 2-3 months of age (median 12 months). At diagnosis (median delay 27 months), patients had a median height and weight standard deviation scores (SDS) of >+3.9 SDS. Apart from the increased overall body size, the children had acromegalic symptoms including acral enlargement and facial coarsening. More than a third of cases had increased appetite. Patients had marked hypersecretion of GH/IGF1 and usually prolactin, due to a pituitary macroadenoma or hyperplasia. Primary neurosurgical control was achieved with extensive anterior pituitary resection, but postoperative hypopituitarism was frequent. Control with somatostatin analogs was not readily achieved despite moderate to high levels of expression of somatostatin receptor subtype-2 in tumor tissue. Postoperative use of adjuvant pegvisomant resulted in control of IGF1 in all five cases where it was employed. X-LAG is a new infant-onset gigantism syndrome that has a severe clinical phenotype leading to challenging disease management. © 2015 Society for Endocrinology.

  16. Scaffold protein harmonin (USH1C) provides molecular links between Usher syndrome type 1 and type 2.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reiners, J.; Wijk, E. van; Marker, T.; Zimmermann, U.; Jurgens, K.; Brinke, H. te; Overlack, N.; Roepman, R.; Knipper, M.; Kremer, J.M.J.; Wolfrum, U.

    2005-01-01

    Usher syndrome (USH) is the most frequent cause of combined deaf-blindness in man. USH is clinically and genetically heterogeneous with at least 11 chromosomal loci assigned to the three USH types (USH1A-G, USH2A-C, USH3A). Although the different USH types exhibit almost the same phenotype in human,

  17. Wells syndrome and its relationship to Churg-Strauss syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratzinger, Gudrun; Zankl, Julia; Zelger, Bernhard

    2013-08-01

      Wells syndrome has been described as an inflammatory disorder based on typical clinical appearance combined with the histopathological presence of eosinophilic infiltrates and flame figures in the absence of vasculitis. Churg-Strauss syndrome, on the other hand, is primarily a diffuse, necrotizing vasculitis but is also typically displaying eosinophils and flame figures. Despite several parallels, the present understanding of these two diseases excludes any pathogenetic relationship.   We describe the clinical course and histopathological appearance of three patients who had initially been diagnosed with Wells syndrome that developed into Churg-Strauss syndrome during the course of their disease.   The clinical presentation of all three patients led to the diagnosis of Wells syndrome by independent specialists. Histopathology showed an eosinophilic infiltrate and flame figures next to features of leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Detailed examination revealed asthma bronchiale and additional symptoms indicating Churg-Strauss syndrome. The initial diagnosis of Wells syndrome had to be revised to Churg-Strauss syndrome.   We conclude that Wells syndrome could be the starting point of a pathogenetic process that might reach its maximum in Churg-Strauss syndrome. As a clinical consequence, patients with Wells syndrome should be evaluated and followed for Churg-Strauss syndrome. © 2013 The International Society of Dermatology.

  18. Clinical characteristics of two probable cases of Angelman syndrome in the Hospital Nacional de Ninos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Midence-Cerda, Marvin; Brian-Gago, Roberto

    2004-01-01

    Angelman Syndrome is a severe neurological disorder. No other case has been reported in our country until now. There are two children reported with the clinical suspicion of Angelman Syndrome. They were treated at the Departamento de Neurologia del Hospital Nacional de Ninos. The information was taken from their medical records. The two patients present the four cardinal clinical features, including severe developmental delay, profound speech impairment, ataxia and a happy, sociable disposition. In addition, the patients displayed other characteristics: seizures associated with a typical spike and slow wave activity on EEG an love for water. The clinical diagnosis is difficult because other disorders can mimic the features of Angelman Syndrome. Nonetheless, at an early age, the behavioral phenotype of happy disposition and hyperexcitability is the most important manifestation and appears to be decisive in the differential diagnosis of patients with psychomotor and language delay. (author) [es

  19. Spectrum of pathogenic mutations and associated polymorphisms in a cohort of 44 unrelated patients with long QT syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millat, G; Chevalier, P; Restier-Miron, L; Da Costa, A; Bouvagnet, P; Kugener, B; Fayol, L; Gonzàlez Armengod, C; Oddou, B; Chanavat, V; Froidefond, E; Perraudin, R; Rousson, R; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, C

    2006-09-01

    Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a rare and clinically heterogeneous inherited disorder characterized by a long QT interval on the electrocardiogram, increased risk of syncope and sudden death caused by arrhythmias. This syndrome is mostly caused by mutations in genes encoding various cardiac ion channels. The clinical heterogeneity is usually attributed to variable penetrance. One of the reasons for this variability in expression could be the coexistence of common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on LQTS-causing genes and/or unknown genes. Some synonymous and nonsynonymous exonic SNPs identified in LQTS-causing genes may have an effect on the cardiac repolarization process and modulate the clinical expression of a latent LQTS pathogenic mutation. We report the molecular pattern of 44 unrelated patients with LQTS using denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography analysis of the KCNQ1, KCNH2, SCN5A, KCNE1 and KCNE2 genes. Forty-five disease-causing mutations (including 24 novel ones) were identified in this cohort. Most of our patients (84%) showed complex molecular pattern with one mutation (and even two for four patients) associated with several SNPs located in several LQTS genes.

  20. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome in Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witchel, Selma Feldman; Roumimper, Hailey; Oberfield, Sharon

    2016-06-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a familial heterogeneous disorder affecting 6% to 10% of reproductive-age women. The use of criteria developed for adult women is problematic for the adolescent girl because the clinical features associated with PCOS are normal pubertal events. The recent consensus statement on PCOS in adolescents stated that hyperandrogenism and oligomenorrhea need to persist for at least 2 years to consider the diagnosis of PCOS. Although insulin resistance, hyperinsulinism, and obesity are often associated with PCOS, these features are not considered valid diagnostic criteria. Recent genomewide association studies implicate genetic loci involved in the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A rare presentation of atypical demyelination: tumefactive multiple sclerosis causing Gerstmann’s syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Tumefactive demyelinating lesions are a rare manifestation of multiple sclerosis (MS). Differential diagnosis of such space occupying lesions may not be straightforward and sometimes necessitate brain biopsy. Impaired cognition is the second most common clinical manifestation of tumefactive MS; however complex cognitive syndromes are unusual. Case presentation We report the case of a 30 year old woman who presented with Gerstmann’s syndrome. MRI revealed a large heterogeneous contrast enhancing lesion in the left cerebral hemisphere. Intravenous corticosteroids did not stop disease progression. A tumour or cerebral lymphoma was suspected, however brain biopsy confirmed inflammatory demyelination. Following diagnosis of tumefactive MS treatment with natalizumab effectively suppressed disease activity. Conclusions The case highlights the need for clinicians, radiologists and surgeons to appreciate the heterogeneous presentation of tumefactive MS. Early brain biopsy facilitates rapid diagnosis and management. Treatment with natalizumab may be useful in cases of tumefactive demyelination where additional evidence supports a diagnosis of relapsing MS. PMID:24694183

  2. Refeeding syndrome: a clinical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormerod, Clare; Farrer, Kirstine; Harper, Lindsay; Lal, Simon

    2010-12-01

    Refeeding syndrome can result in a wide variety of complications and may be life threatening. Although well described in hospital practice, refeeding syndrome is often under-recognized and inadequately treated.

  3. Foot orthoses and physiotherapy in the treatment of patellofemoral pain syndrome: A randomised clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicenzino, Bill; Collins, Natalie; Crossley, Kay; Beller, Elaine; Darnell, Ross; McPoil, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Background Patellofemoral pain syndrome is a highly prevalent musculoskeletal overuse condition that has a significant impact on participation in daily and physical activities. A recent systematic review highlighted the lack of high quality evidence from randomised controlled trials for the conservative management of patellofemoral pain syndrome. Although foot orthoses are a commonly used intervention for patellofemoral pain syndrome, only two pilot studies with short term follow up have been conducted into their clinical efficacy. Methods/design A randomised single-blinded clinical trial will be conducted to investigate the clinical efficacy and cost effectiveness of foot orthoses in the management of patellofemoral pain syndrome. One hundred and seventy-six participants aged 18–40 with anterior or retropatellar knee pain of non-traumatic origin and at least six weeks duration will be recruited from the greater Brisbane area in Queensland, Australia through print, radio and television advertising. Suitable participants will be randomly allocated to receive either foot orthoses, flat insoles, physiotherapy or a combined intervention of foot orthoses and physiotherapy, and will attend six visits with a physiotherapist over a 6 week period. Outcome will be measured at 6, 12 and 52 weeks using primary outcome measures of usual and worst pain visual analogue scale, patient perceived treatment effect, perceived global effect, the Functional Index Questionnaire, and the Anterior Knee Pain Scale. Secondary outcome measures will include the Lower Extremity Functional Scale, McGill Pain Questionnaire, 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Patient-Specific Functional Scale, Physical Activity Level in the Previous Week, pressure pain threshold and physical measures of step and squat tests. Cost-effectiveness analysis will be based on treatment effectiveness against resource usage recorded in treatment logs and self-reported diaries

  4. Foot orthoses and physiotherapy in the treatment of patellofemoral pain syndrome: A randomised clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darnell Ross

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patellofemoral pain syndrome is a highly prevalent musculoskeletal overuse condition that has a significant impact on participation in daily and physical activities. A recent systematic review highlighted the lack of high quality evidence from randomised controlled trials for the conservative management of patellofemoral pain syndrome. Although foot orthoses are a commonly used intervention for patellofemoral pain syndrome, only two pilot studies with short term follow up have been conducted into their clinical efficacy. Methods/design A randomised single-blinded clinical trial will be conducted to investigate the clinical efficacy and cost effectiveness of foot orthoses in the management of patellofemoral pain syndrome. One hundred and seventy-six participants aged 18–40 with anterior or retropatellar knee pain of non-traumatic origin and at least six weeks duration will be recruited from the greater Brisbane area in Queensland, Australia through print, radio and television advertising. Suitable participants will be randomly allocated to receive either foot orthoses, flat insoles, physiotherapy or a combined intervention of foot orthoses and physiotherapy, and will attend six visits with a physiotherapist over a 6 week period. Outcome will be measured at 6, 12 and 52 weeks using primary outcome measures of usual and worst pain visual analogue scale, patient perceived treatment effect, perceived global effect, the Functional Index Questionnaire, and the Anterior Knee Pain Scale. Secondary outcome measures will include the Lower Extremity Functional Scale, McGill Pain Questionnaire, 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Patient-Specific Functional Scale, Physical Activity Level in the Previous Week, pressure pain threshold and physical measures of step and squat tests. Cost-effectiveness analysis will be based on treatment effectiveness against resource usage recorded in treatment logs and

  5. Genetic variation in the Cytb gene of human cerebral Taenia solium cysticerci recovered from clinically and radiologically heterogeneous patients with neurocysticercosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hector Palafox-Fonseca

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Neurocysticercosis (NC is a clinically and radiologically heterogeneous parasitic disease caused by the establishment of larval Taenia solium in the human central nervous system. Host and/or parasite variations may be related to this observed heterogeneity. Genetic differences between pig and human-derived T. solium cysticerci have been reported previously. In this study, 28 cysticerci were surgically removed from 12 human NC patients, the mitochondrial gene that encodes cytochrome b was amplified from the cysticerci and genetic variations that may be related to NC heterogeneity were characterised. Nine different haplotypes (Ht, which were clustered in four haplogroups (Hg, were identified. Hg 3 and 4 exhibited a tendency to associate with age and gender, respectively. However, no significant associations were found between NC heterogeneity and the different T. solium cysticerci Ht or Hg. Parasite variants obtained from patients with similar NC clinical or radiological features were genetically closer than those found in groups of patients with a different NC profile when using the Mantel test. Overall, this study establishes the presence of genetic differences in the Cytb gene of T. solium isolated from human cysticerci and suggests that parasite variation could contribute to NC heterogeneity.

  6. Update on oral-facial-digital syndromes (OFDS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Brunella; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel

    2016-01-01

    Oral-facial-digital syndromes (OFDS) represent a heterogeneous group of rare developmental disorders affecting the mouth, the face and the digits. Additional signs may involve brain, kidneys and other organs thus better defining the different clinical subtypes. With the exception of OFD types I and VIII, which are X-linked, the majority of OFDS is transmitted as an autosomal recessive syndrome. A number of genes have already found to be mutated in OFDS and most of the encoded proteins are predicted or proven to be involved in primary cilia/basal body function. Preliminary data indicate a physical interaction among some of those proteins and future studies will clarify whether all OFDS proteins are part of a network functionally connected to cilia. Mutations in some of the genes can also lead to other types of ciliopathies with partially overlapping phenotypes, such as Joubert syndrome (JS) and Meckel syndrome (MKS), supporting the concept that cilia-related diseases might be a continuous spectrum of the same phenotype with different degrees of severity. To date, seven of the described OFDS still await a molecular definition and two unclassified forms need further clinical and molecular validation. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) approaches are expected to shed light on how many OFDS geneticists should consider while evaluating oral-facial-digital cases. Functional studies will establish whether the non-ciliary functions of the transcripts mutated in OFDS might contribute to any of the phenotypic abnormalities observed in OFDS.

  7. Dystonia in complex regional pain syndrome : clinical, pathophysiological and therapeutic aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijn, Monica Adriana van

    2010-01-01

    The clinical characteristics of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) are defined by pain and various combinations of sensory disturbances, autonomic features, and sudomotor and trophic changes. Furthermore, patients with CRPS may suffer from movement disorders, of which dystonia is the most

  8. [A phenotypic description of 26 patients with Ritscher-Schinzel syndrome (cranio-cerebello-cardiac dysplasia or 3C syndrome)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pira-Paredes, S M; Montoya-Villada, J H; Franco-Restrepo, J L; Moncada-Velez, M; Cornejo, J W

    2017-06-01

    Ritscher-Schinzel syndrome (also known as cranio-cerebello-cardiac dysplasia or 3C syndrome) is a rare genetic syndrome that is mainly characterised by the association of cardiac and craniofacial anomalies together with others affecting the posterior fossa. We report on 26 patients with Ritscher-Schinzel syndrome at a hospital in Medellin, in the Department of Antioquia, Colombia. Males account for 69% of this cohort. The mean age of the cohort was 30 months, and 42% were under the age of one year at the time of diagnosis. All of them presented ocular disorders, and megalocornea was the most frequent ocular manifestation (69%), whereas low-set ears (80.7%) and septal heart defects (68.7%) were the most common facial and cardiac malformations, respectively. The most frequent malformations of the posterior fossa were megacisterna magna (31.8%) and Dandy-Walker malformation (27%). 84% of the cases had delayed neurodevelopment or intellectual disability. Skeletal manifestations were frequent: the group consisting of camptodactyly, single palmar crease, overlapping fingers, vertical talus and nail hypoplasia were found in hands and feet in 96% of the cases. Ritscher-Schinzel syndrome is a heterogeneous syndrome from the genetic and clinical point of view. These results suggest that the skeletal and ocular abnormalities that were observed can facilitate the phenotypic diagnosis. However, it is necessary to conduct further studies that allow us to gain a deeper knowledge of its prevalence and help identify other genes involved in this syndrome.

  9. Clinical Study on Five Cases of Carpal tunnel syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Il Hwan

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Objections : The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of treating the carpal tunnel syndrome by using both the Herbal Acupuncture and herbal medicine therapy on five cases. Methods : For the Herbal Acupuncture, Jungseonguhhyl No. 1 and Hwanglyunhaedoktang were used. For the herbal medicine, Dangguihwalhyul-tang was used. The patients were treated once in every two days; the result was evaluated after ten treatments. Patients' conditions were monitored through their testimony, phalen's test, nerve conduction study and electromyography. Results : In all five cases, the patients showed improvement; in four cases, the patients no longer had most of the clinical symptoms. Based on the result of the nerve conduction study, for the four cases in which the patients no longer displayed most of the clinical symptoms, their nerve conduction rate improved; for the remaining one case, the patient's nerve conduction rate deteriorated. Conclusions : The results of this study demonstrate that combining the Herbal Acupuncture and herbal medicine therapy can have noticeable effects in treating the carpal tunnel syndrome; developing more variety of the herbal acupuncture would lead to even better treatment results.

  10. [Carpal tunnel syndrome in children. About 10 clinical cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leduc, A; Perrot, P; Truffandier, M V; Bellier-Waast, F; Duteille, F

    2014-06-01

    The carpal tunnel syndrome is a common peripheral neuropathy in adults but is rare in children. We report a series of 10 carpal tunnel syndromes in children. We have supported five children, two males and three females, with a bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome. We studied the clinical history (history, symptoms, stage of disease), therapeutic management and remote development. Three children were diagnosed with a mucopolysaccharidosis, the fourth with VATER association. For the last child, it was a form considered idiopathic. Two children were referred for night pains, the others for under-utilization of their first three fingers, two of which had a thenar atrophy. Four children underwent an electromyogram for diagnostic confirmation. We realized open surgical treatment at one time, by section of the carpal ligament. The average age of our patients was 4years. The average decline in the surgical study was 19 months. Postoperatively, we noted, in all patients, complete regression of the painful symptoms, a sensory improvement and recovery of the opposition of the thumb. The scarcity of carpal tunnel syndrome in children and the atypical symptoms may cause diagnostic delay, with serious consequences. We keep vigilant and ready to access to additional tests (electromyogram). For our team, the therapeutic approach is a systematic open surgical treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Clinical management of the hypereosinophilic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogan, Elie; Roufosse, Florence

    2012-06-01

    Hypereosinophilic syndromes (HESs) are rare disorders characterized by marked hypereosinophilia that is directly responsible for organ damage or dysfunction. Different pathogenic mechanisms have been discovered in patient subgroups leading to the characterization of myeloproliferative and lymphocytic disease variants. In the updated terminology, idiopathic HES is now restricted to patients with HES of undetermined etiology. The practical clinical approach of patients with the different HES variants is reviewed herein, focusing on specific diagnostic tools and therapeutic options. Corticosteroids, hydroxyurea and IFN-α remain the classical agents for treatment of most patients with HESs. The specific role of therapeutic compounds that have become available more recently, namely, tyrosine kinase inhibitors and IL-5 antagonists, is discussed.

  12. Secondary Diabetes Mellitus in Patients with Endogenous Cushing’s Syndrome - Clinical Characteristics at Diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Căpăţînă Cristina; Baciu Ionela; Greere Daniela; Caragheorgheopol Andra; Poiană Cătălina

    2018-01-01

    Background and aims. Endogenous Cushing’s syndrome is a rare disease associated with severe morbidity and increased mortality if untreated. Diabetes mellitus is a frequent initial complaint of these patients. Our aim was to investigate the clinical characteristics at the time of diagnosis in a cohort of patients with endogenous Cushing’s syndrome (CS).

  13. Gene variants of unknown clinical significance in Lynch syndrome. An introduction for clinicians

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijmons, Rolf H.; Greenblatt, Marc S.; Genuardi, Maurizio

    Clinicians referring patients for genetic testing for Lynch syndrome will sooner or later receive results for DNA Mismatch Repair (MMR) genes reporting DNA changes that are unclear from a clinical point of view. These changes are referred to as variants of unknown, or unclear, clinical significance

  14. A Giant Heart Tumor in Neonate with Clinical Signs of Pierre - Robin Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejiqi, Ramush; Retkoceri, Ragip; Xhema-Bejiqi, Hana; Bejiqi, Rinor; Maloku, Arlinda

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Pierre Robin syndrome is a congenital condition of facial abnormalities in humans. The three main features are: cleft palate, retrognathia and glossoptosis. Rarely heart tumors are associated with syndromes, mostly are isolated. Case report: In this presentation we describe a 3-weeks-old girl with Pierre-Robin syndrome and giant left ventricle tumor, diagnosed initially by transthoracic echocardiography. The purpose of this report is to review the literature on the fetuses and neonates with cardiac tumors in an attempt to determine the various ways which cardiac tumors differ clinically and morphologically in this age group. PMID:28790548

  15. Lipid storage myopathy with clinical markers of Marfan syndrome: A rare association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subasree Ramakrishnan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Disorders of lipid metabolism can cause variable clinical presentations, often involving skeletal muscle, alone or together with other tissues. A 19-year-old boy presented with a 2-year history of muscle pain, cramps, exercise intolerance and progressive weakness of proximal lower limbs. Examination revealed skeletal markers of Marfan syndrome in the form of increased arm span compared with height, Kyphoscoliois, moderate pectus excavatum, high arched palate and wrist sign. He also had mild neck flexor weakness and proximal lower limb weakness with areflexia. Pathologic findings revealed lipid-laden fine vacuoles in the muscle fibers. Possibility of carnitine deficiency myopathy was considered and the patient was started on carnitine and Co Q. The patient made remarkable clinical improvement over the next 2 months. This case is reported for rarity of the association of clinical markers of Marfan syndrome and lipid storage myopathy and sparse literature on lipid storage myopathy in the Indian context.

  16. [The post-discectomy syndrome: clinical and electroneuromyographic characteristics and methods of treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musaev, A V; Guseĭnova, S G; Musaeva, I R

    2008-01-01

    The data of the Azerbaijan Neurosurgical Center, including 2618 case-reports of patients operated on for low back discal hernia between 1997 and 2002, have been analyzed. The retrospective analysis of the data reveals that 26,4% of patients need further restorative treatment due to the presence of various neurological disturbances: pain syndromes of different intensity, motor deficits (pareses), sensory disorders and functional disorders of pelvic organs. The retrospective analysis of the data reveals that 26,4% of patients need further restorative treatment due to the presence of various neurological disturbances: pain syndromes of different intensity, motor deficits (pareses), sensory disorders and functional disorders of pelvic organs. Along with these data, the results of our own clinical and neurophysiological study of 110 patients have been summarized as well. Along with these data, the results of our own clinical and neurophysiological study of 110 patients have been summarized as well. A high effectiveness of electrostimulation and naphthalan therapy alone and in combination with massage and medical gymnastics has been revealed. A high effectiveness of electrostimulation and naphthalan therapy alone and in combination with massage and medical gymnastics has been revealed. Electroneuromyographic data revealing the positive dynamics as a result of the treatment of patients with the post-discectomy syndrome are presented. Electroneuromyographic data revealing the positive dynamics as a result of the treatment of patients with the post-discectomy syndrome are presented.

  17. Metabolic Syndrome in Patients attending the Staff Clinic of a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background/objective: Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is characterised by a clustering of cardiometabolic risk factors. It contributes to morbidity and mortality in adults. The objective of the study was to identify new cases and associated factors of MetS in patients attending a tertiary hospital staff clinic. Materials and methods: The ...

  18. Cancer heterogeneity and imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, James P B

    2017-04-01

    There is interest in identifying and quantifying tumor heterogeneity at the genomic, tissue pathology and clinical imaging scales, as this may help better understand tumor biology and may yield useful biomarkers for guiding therapy-based decision making. This review focuses on the role and value of using x-ray, CT, MRI and PET based imaging methods that identify, measure and map tumor heterogeneity. In particular we highlight the potential value of these techniques and the key challenges required to validate and qualify these biomarkers for clinical use. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald-McGinn, Donna M.; Sullivan, Kathleen E.; Marino, Bruno; Philip, Nicole; Swillen, Ann; Vorstman, Jacob A. S.; Zackai, Elaine H.; Emanuel, Beverly S.; Vermeesch, Joris R.; Morrow, Bernice E.; Scambler, Peter J.; Bassett, Anne S.

    2016-01-01

    22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) is the most common chromosomal microdeletion disorder, estimated to result mainly from de novo non-homologous meiotic recombination events occurring in approximately 1 in every 1,000 fetuses. The first description in the English language of the constellation of findings now known to be due to this chromosomal difference was made in the 1960s in children with DiGeorge syndrome, who presented with the clinical triad of immunodeficiency, hypoparathyroidism and congenital heart disease. The syndrome is now known to have a heterogeneous presentation that includes multiple additional congenital anomalies and later-onset conditions, such as palatal, gastrointestinal and renal abnormalities, autoimmune disease, variable cognitive delays, behavioural phenotypes and psychiatric illness — all far extending the original description of DiGeorge syndrome. Management requires a multidisciplinary approach involving paediatrics, general medicine, surgery, psychiatry, psychology, interventional therapies (physical, occupational, speech, language and behavioural) and genetic counselling. Although common, lack of recognition of the condition and/or lack of familiarity with genetic testing methods, together with the wide variability of clinical presentation, delays diagnosis. Early diagnosis, preferably prenatally or neonatally, could improve outcomes, thus stressing the importance of universal screening. Equally important, 22q11.2DS has become a model for understanding rare and frequent congenital anomalies, medical conditions, psychiatric and developmental disorders, and may provide a platform to better understand these disorders while affording opportunities for translational strategies across the lifespan for both patients with 22q11.2DS and those with these associated features in the general population. PMID:27189754

  20. Understanding Bartter syndrome and Gitelman syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fremont, Oliver T; Chan, James C M

    2012-02-01

    We aim to review the clinical features of two renal tubular disorders characterized by sodium and potassium wasting: Bartter syndrome and Gitelman syndrome. Selected key references concerning these syndromes were analyzed, together with a PubMed search of the literature from 2000 to 2011. The clinical features common to both conditions and those which are distinct to each syndrome were presented. The new findings on the genetics of the five types of Bartter syndrome and the discrete mutations in Gitelman syndrome were reviewed, together with the diagnostic workup and treatment for each condition. Patients with Bartter syndrome types 1, 2 and 4 present at a younger age than classic Bartter syndrome type 3. They present with symptoms, often quite severe in the neonatal period. Patients with classic Bartter syndrome type 3 present later in life and may be sporadically asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic. The severe, steady-state hypokalemia in Bartter syndrome and Gitelman syndrome may abruptly become life-threatening under certain aggravating conditions. Clinicians need to be cognizant of such renal tubular disorders, and promptly treat at-risk patients.

  1. Pain perception in people with Down syndrome: a synthesis of clinical and experimental research

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Brian E.; Defrin, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    People with an intellectual disability experience both acute and chronic pain with at least the same frequency as the general population. However, considerably less is known about the pain perception of people with Down syndrome. In this review paper, we evaluated the available clinical and experimental evidence. Some experimental studies of acute pain have indicated that pain threshold was higher than normal but only when using a reaction time method to measure pain sensitivity. However, when reaction time is not part of the calculation of the pain threshold, pain sensitivity in people with Down syndrome is in fact lower than normal (more sensitive to pain). Clinical studies of chronic pain have shown that people with an intellectual disability experience chronic pain and within that population, people with Down syndrome also experience chronic pain, but the precise prevalence of chronic pain in Down syndrome has yet to be established. Taken together, the literature suggests that people with Down syndrome experience pain, both acute and chronic, with at least the same frequency as the rest of the population. Furthermore, the evidence suggests that although acute pain expression appears to be delayed, once pain is registered, there appears to be a magnified pain response. We conclude by proposing an agenda for future research in this area. PMID:26283936

  2. Clinical characteristics of mirror syndrome: a comparison of 10 cases of mirror syndrome with non-mirror syndrome fetal hydrops cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Go; Aoki, Shigeru; Sakamaki, Kentaro; Takahashi, Tsuneo; Hirahara, Fumiki; Ishikawa, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    To investigate clinical features of mirror syndrome. We retrospectively reviewed 71 cases of fetal hydrops with or without mirror syndrome, and compared with respect to maternal age, the body mass index, the primipara rate, the gestational age at delivery, the timing of fetal hydrops onset, the severity of fetal edema, placental swelling, the laboratory data and the fetal mortality. The data are expressed as the medians. Mirror syndrome developed in 29% (10/35) of the cases with fetal hydrops. In mirror group, the onset time of fetal hydrops was significantly earlier (29 weeks versus 31 weeks, p = 0.011), and the severity of fetal hydrops (fetal edema/biparietal diameter) was significantly higher than non-mirror group (0.23 versus 0.16, p < 0.001). There was significantly higher serum human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) (453,000 IU/L versus 80,000 IU/L, p < 0.001) and lower hemoglobin (8.9 g/dL versus 10.1 g/dL, p =0.002), hypoalbuminemia (2.3 mg/dL versus 2.7 mg/dL, p = 0.007), hyperuricemia (6.4 mg/dL versus 5.0 mg/dL, p = 0.043) in mirror group. Mirror syndrome is occurred frequently in early and severe fetal hydrops and cause hemodilution and elevation of serum hCG.

  3. Clinical Characteristics, Management, and Outcomes of Suspected Poststroke Acute Coronary Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Marie Biso

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Acute coronary syndrome (ACS can complicate acute ischemic stroke, causing significant morbidity and mortality. To date, literatures that describe poststroke acute coronary syndrome and its morbidity and mortality burden are lacking. Methods. This is a single center, retrospective study where clinical characteristics, cardiac evaluation, and management of patients with suspected poststroke ACS were compared and analyzed for their association with inpatient mortality and 1-year all-cause mortality. Results. Of the 82 patients, 32% had chest pain and 88% had ischemic ECG changes; mean peak troponin level was 18, and mean ejection fraction was 40%. The medical management group had older individuals (73 versus 67 years, p<0.05, lower mean peak troponin levels (12 versus 49, p<0.05, and lower mean length of stay (12 versus 25 days, p<0.05 compared to those who underwent stent or CABG. Troponin levels were significantly associated with 1-year all-cause mortality. Conclusion. Age and troponin level appear to play a role in the current clinical decision making for patient with suspected poststroke ACS. Troponin level appears to significantly correlate with 1-year all-cause mortality. In the management of poststroke acute coronary syndrome, optimal medical therapy had similar inpatient and all-cause mortality compared to PCI and/or CABG.

  4. Clinical Characteristics, Management, and Outcomes of Suspected Poststroke Acute Coronary Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Venecia, Toni Anne; Wongrakpanich, Supakanya; Rodriguez-Ziccardi, Mary; Yadlapati, Sujani; Kishlyansky, Marina; Rammohan, Harish Seetha; Figueredo, Vincent M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) can complicate acute ischemic stroke, causing significant morbidity and mortality. To date, literatures that describe poststroke acute coronary syndrome and its morbidity and mortality burden are lacking. Methods This is a single center, retrospective study where clinical characteristics, cardiac evaluation, and management of patients with suspected poststroke ACS were compared and analyzed for their association with inpatient mortality and 1-year all-cause mortality. Results Of the 82 patients, 32% had chest pain and 88% had ischemic ECG changes; mean peak troponin level was 18, and mean ejection fraction was 40%. The medical management group had older individuals (73 versus 67 years, p < 0.05), lower mean peak troponin levels (12 versus 49, p < 0.05), and lower mean length of stay (12 versus 25 days, p < 0.05) compared to those who underwent stent or CABG. Troponin levels were significantly associated with 1-year all-cause mortality. Conclusion Age and troponin level appear to play a role in the current clinical decision making for patient with suspected poststroke ACS. Troponin level appears to significantly correlate with 1-year all-cause mortality. In the management of poststroke acute coronary syndrome, optimal medical therapy had similar inpatient and all-cause mortality compared to PCI and/or CABG. PMID:29130017

  5. [Professor ZHENG Kuishan's experience in the clinical treatment of bi syndrome with acupuncture and moxibustion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Baohu; Zheng, Jiatai; Guo, Yongming

    2015-06-01

    Professor ZHENG Kuishan has been engaged in the education and clinical practice of acupuncture and moxibustion for over 60 years. Professor ZHENG is strict in scholarly research and exquisite in medical techniques and he is good at treatment of bi syndrome induced by invasion of wind, cold and damp with warming and, promoting therapy. He emphasizes on syndrome differentiation and acupoint combination and selects the accurate manipulations. Not only are the symptoms relieved apparently, but also the body state is improved. As a result, the primary and secondary are treated simultaneously. In the paper, professor ZHENG's experience is introduced in the treatment of bi syndrome in the aspects of theory, method, formula, acupoint and technique. And his clinical therapeutic approaches have been deeply analyzed.

  6. PURA syndrome: clinical delineation and genotype-phenotype study in 32 individuals with review of published literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reijnders, Margot R F; Janowski, Robert; Alvi, Mohsan; Self, Jay E; van Essen, Ton J; Vreeburg, Maaike; Rouhl, Rob P W; Stevens, Servi J C; Stegmann, Alexander P A; Schieving, Jolanda; Pfundt, Rolph; van Dijk, Katinke; Smeets, Eric; Stumpel, Connie T R M; Bok, Levinus A; Cobben, Jan Maarten; Engelen, Marc; Mansour, Sahar; Whiteford, Margo; Chandler, Kate E; Douzgou, Sofia; Cooper, Nicola S; Tan, Ene-Choo; Foo, Roger; Lai, Angeline H M; Rankin, Julia; Green, Andrew; Lönnqvist, Tuula; Isohanni, Pirjo; Williams, Shelley; Ruhoy, Ilene; Carvalho, Karen S; Dowling, James J; Lev, Dorit L; Sterbova, Katalin; Lassuthova, Petra; Neupauerová, Jana; Waugh, Jeff L; Keros, Sotirios; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Smithson, Sarah F; Brunner, Han G; van Hoeckel, Ceciel; Anderson, Mel; Clowes, Virginia E; Siu, Victoria Mok; DDD study, The; Selber, Paulo; Leventer, Richard J; Nellaker, Christoffer; Niessing, Dierk; Hunt, David; Baralle, Diana

    2018-01-01

    Background De novo mutations in PURA have recently been described to cause PURA syndrome, a neurodevelopmental disorder characterised by severe intellectual disability (ID), epilepsy, feeding difficulties and neonatal hypotonia. Objectives To delineate the clinical spectrum of PURA syndrome and study genotype-phenotype correlations. Methods Diagnostic or research-based exome or Sanger sequencing was performed in individuals with ID. We systematically collected clinical and mutation data on newly ascertained PURA syndrome individuals, evaluated data of previously reported individuals and performed a computational analysis of photographs. We classified mutations based on predicted effect using 3D in silico models of crystal structures of Drosophila-derived Pur-alpha homologues. Finally, we explored genotype-phenotype correlations by analysis of both recurrent mutations as well as mutation classes. Results We report mutations in PURA (purine-rich element binding protein A) in 32 individuals, the largest cohort described so far. Evaluation of clinical data, including 22 previously published cases, revealed that all have moderate to severe ID and neonatal-onset symptoms, including hypotonia (96%), respiratory problems (57%), feeding difficulties (77%), exaggerated startle response (44%), hypersomnolence (66%) and hypothermia (35%). Epilepsy (54%) and gastrointestinal (69%), ophthalmological (51%) and endocrine problems (42%) were observed frequently. Computational analysis of facial photographs showed subtle facial dysmorphism. No strong genotype-phenotype correlation was identified by subgrouping mutations into functional classes. Conclusion We delineate the clinical spectrum of PURA syndrome with the identification of 32 additional individuals. The identification of one individual through targeted Sanger sequencing points towards the clinical recognisability of the syndrome. Genotype-phenotype analysis showed no significant correlation between mutation classes and

  7. Differential DNA methylation patterns of polycystic ovarian syndrome in whole blood of Chinese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuxia; Zhu, Dongyi; Duan, Hongmei; Ren, Anran; Glintborg, Dorte; Andersen, Marianne; Skov, Vibe; Thomassen, Mads; Kruse, Torben; Tan, Qihua

    2017-03-28

    As a universally common endocrinopathy in women of reproductive age, the polycystic ovarian syndrome is characterized by composite clinical phenotypes reflecting the contributions of reproductive impact of ovarian dysfunction and metabolic abnormalities with widely varying symptoms resulting from interference of the genome with the environment through integrative biological mechanisms including epigenetics. We have performed a genome-wide DNA methylation analysis on polycystic ovarian syndrome and identified a substantial number of genomic sites differentially methylated in the whole blood of PCOS patients and healthy controls (52 sites, false discovery rate ovarian tissue under PCOS condition. Most importantly, our genome-wide profiling focusing on PCOS patients revealed a large number of DNA methylation sites and their enriched functional pathways significantly associated with diverse clinical features (levels of prolactin, estradiol, progesterone and menstrual cycle) that could serve as novel molecular basis of the clinical heterogeneity observed in PCOS women.

  8. Quantification of heterogeneity observed in medical images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, Frank J; Grigsby, Perry W

    2013-01-01

    There has been much recent interest in the quantification of visually evident heterogeneity within functional grayscale medical images, such as those obtained via magnetic resonance or positron emission tomography. In the case of images of cancerous tumors, variations in grayscale intensity imply variations in crucial tumor biology. Despite these considerable clinical implications, there is as yet no standardized method for measuring the heterogeneity observed via these imaging modalities. In this work, we motivate and derive a statistical measure of image heterogeneity. This statistic measures the distance-dependent average deviation from the smoothest intensity gradation feasible. We show how this statistic may be used to automatically rank images of in vivo human tumors in order of increasing heterogeneity. We test this method against the current practice of ranking images via expert visual inspection. We find that this statistic provides a means of heterogeneity quantification beyond that given by other statistics traditionally used for the same purpose. We demonstrate the effect of tumor shape upon our ranking method and find the method applicable to a wide variety of clinically relevant tumor images. We find that the automated heterogeneity rankings agree very closely with those performed visually by experts. These results indicate that our automated method may be used reliably to rank, in order of increasing heterogeneity, tumor images whether or not object shape is considered to contribute to that heterogeneity. Automated heterogeneity ranking yields objective results which are more consistent than visual rankings. Reducing variability in image interpretation will enable more researchers to better study potential clinical implications of observed tumor heterogeneity

  9. Quantification of heterogeneity observed in medical images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Frank J; Grigsby, Perry W

    2013-03-02

    There has been much recent interest in the quantification of visually evident heterogeneity within functional grayscale medical images, such as those obtained via magnetic resonance or positron emission tomography. In the case of images of cancerous tumors, variations in grayscale intensity imply variations in crucial tumor biology. Despite these considerable clinical implications, there is as yet no standardized method for measuring the heterogeneity observed via these imaging modalities. In this work, we motivate and derive a statistical measure of image heterogeneity. This statistic measures the distance-dependent average deviation from the smoothest intensity gradation feasible. We show how this statistic may be used to automatically rank images of in vivo human tumors in order of increasing heterogeneity. We test this method against the current practice of ranking images via expert visual inspection. We find that this statistic provides a means of heterogeneity quantification beyond that given by other statistics traditionally used for the same purpose. We demonstrate the effect of tumor shape upon our ranking method and find the method applicable to a wide variety of clinically relevant tumor images. We find that the automated heterogeneity rankings agree very closely with those performed visually by experts. These results indicate that our automated method may be used reliably to rank, in order of increasing heterogeneity, tumor images whether or not object shape is considered to contribute to that heterogeneity. Automated heterogeneity ranking yields objective results which are more consistent than visual rankings. Reducing variability in image interpretation will enable more researchers to better study potential clinical implications of observed tumor heterogeneity.

  10. Identification and Characterization of Prodromal Risk Syndromes in Young Adolescents in the Community: A Population-Based Clinical Interview Study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-02-01

    While a great deal of research has been conducted on prodromal risk syndromes in relation to help-seeking individuals who present to the clinic, there is a lack of research on prodromal risk syndromes in the general population. The current study aimed first to establish whether prodromal risk syndromes could be detected in non-help-seeking community-based adolescents and secondly to characterize this group in terms of Axis-1 psychopathology and general functioning. We conducted in-depth clinical interviews with a population sample of 212 school-going adolescents in order to assess for prodromal risk syndromes, Axis-1 psychopathology, and global (social\\/occupational) functioning. Between 0.9% and 8% of the community sample met criteria for a risk syndrome, depending on varying disability criteria. The risk syndrome group had a higher prevalence of co-occurring nonpsychotic Axis-1 psychiatric disorders (OR = 4.77, 95% CI = 1.81-12.52; P < .01) and poorer global functioning (F = 24.5, df = 1, P < .0001) compared with controls. Individuals in the community who fulfill criteria for prodromal risk syndromes demonstrate strong similarities with clinically presenting risk syndrome patients not just in terms of psychotic symptom criteria but also in terms of co-occurring psychopathology and global functioning.

  11. Differential regional cerebral glucose metabolism in clinical syndromes of frontotemporal lobar degeneration: a study with FDG PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J. M.; Cho, S. S.; Na, D. L.; Lee, K. H.; Choi, Y.; Choe, Y. S.; Kim, B. T.; Kim, S. E.

    2001-01-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration( FTLD) is the third most common dementia, following Alzheimer's disease and Lewy body disease. Four prototypic neurobehavioral syndromes can be produced by FTLD: frontotemporal dementia (FTD), frontotemporal dementia with motor neuron disease (MND), semantic dementia (SD), and progressive aphasia (PA). We investigated patterns of metabolic impairment in patient with FTLD presented with four different clinical syndromes. We analysed glucose metabolic patterns on FDG PET images obtained from 34 patients with a clinical diagnosis of FTLD (19 FTD, 6 MND, 6 SD, and 3 PA, according to a consensus criteria for clinical syndromes associated with FTLD) and 7 age-matched healthy controls using SPM99. Patients with FTD had metabolic deficit in the left frontal cortex and bilateral anterior temporal cortex. Hypometabolism in the bilateral premotor are was shown in patients with MND. Patients with SD had metabolic deficit in the left posterior temporal cortex including Wernicke's area, while hypometabolism in the bilateral inferior frontal gyrus including Broca's area and left angular gyrus was seen in patients with PA. These metabolic patterns were well correlated with clinical features of FTLD syndromes. These data provide a biochemical basis of clinical classification of FTLD. FDG PET may help evaluate and classify patients with FTLD

  12. Differential regional cerebral glucose metabolism in clinical syndromes of frontotemporal lobar degeneration: a study with FDG PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J. M.; Cho, S. S.; Na, D. L.; Lee, K. H.; Choi, Y.; Choe, Y. S.; Kim, B. T.; Kim, S. E. [College of Medicine, Sungkyunkwan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-07-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration( FTLD) is the third most common dementia, following Alzheimer's disease and Lewy body disease. Four prototypic neurobehavioral syndromes can be produced by FTLD: frontotemporal dementia (FTD), frontotemporal dementia with motor neuron disease (MND), semantic dementia (SD), and progressive aphasia (PA). We investigated patterns of metabolic impairment in patient with FTLD presented with four different clinical syndromes. We analysed glucose metabolic patterns on FDG PET images obtained from 34 patients with a clinical diagnosis of FTLD (19 FTD, 6 MND, 6 SD, and 3 PA, according to a consensus criteria for clinical syndromes associated with FTLD) and 7 age-matched healthy controls using SPM99. Patients with FTD had metabolic deficit in the left frontal cortex and bilateral anterior temporal cortex. Hypometabolism in the bilateral premotor are was shown in patients with MND. Patients with SD had metabolic deficit in the left posterior temporal cortex including Wernicke's area, while hypometabolism in the bilateral inferior frontal gyrus including Broca's area and left angular gyrus was seen in patients with PA. These metabolic patterns were well correlated with clinical features of FTLD syndromes. These data provide a biochemical basis of clinical classification of FTLD. FDG PET may help evaluate and classify patients with FTLD.

  13. Clinical features and endocrine profile of Laron syndrome in Indian children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supriya R Phanse-Gupte

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patients with growth hormone (GH insensitivity (also known as Laron syndome have been reported from the Mediterranean region and Southern Eucador, with few case reports from India. We present here the clinical and endocrine profile of 9 children with Laron syndrome from India. Material and Methods: Nine children diagnosed with Laron syndrome based on clinical features of GH deficiency and biochemical profile suggestive of GH resistance were studied over a period of 5 years from January 2008 to January 2013. Results and Discussion: Age of presentation was between 2.5-11.5 years. All children were considerably short on contemporary Indian charts with mean (SD height Z score -5.2 (1.6. However, they were within ± 2 SD on Laron charts. No child was overweight [mean (SD BMI Z score 0.92 (1.1]. All children had characteristic facies of GH deficiency with an added feature of prominent eyes. Three boys had micropenis and 1 had unilateral undescended testis. All children had low IGF-1 (<5 percentile and IGFP-3 (<0.1 percentile with high basal and stimulated GH [Basal GH mean (SD = 13.78 (12.75 ng/ml, 1-h stimulated GH mean (SD = 46.29 (25.68 ng/ml]. All children showed poor response to IGF generation test. Conclusion: Laron syndrome should be suspected in children with clinical features of GH deficiency, high GH levels and low IGF-1/IGFBP-3. These children are in a state of GH resistance and need IGF-1 therapy.

  14. Dominant de novo DSP mutations cause erythrokeratodermia-cardiomyopathy syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyden, Lynn M; Kam, Chen Y; Hernández-Martín, Angela; Zhou, Jing; Craiglow, Brittany G; Sidbury, Robert; Mathes, Erin F; Maguiness, Sheilagh M; Crumrine, Debra A; Williams, Mary L; Hu, Ronghua; Lifton, Richard P; Elias, Peter M; Green, Kathleen J; Choate, Keith A

    2016-01-15

    Disorders of keratinization (DOK) show marked genotypic and phenotypic heterogeneity. In most cases, disease is primarily cutaneous, and further clinical evaluation is therefore rarely pursued. We have identified subjects with a novel DOK featuring erythrokeratodermia and initially-asymptomatic, progressive, potentially fatal cardiomyopathy, a finding not previously associated with erythrokeratodermia. We show that de novo missense mutations clustered tightly within a single spectrin repeat of DSP cause this novel cardio-cutaneous disorder, which we term erythrokeratodermia-cardiomyopathy (EKC) syndrome. We demonstrate that DSP mutations in our EKC syndrome subjects affect localization of desmosomal proteins and connexin 43 in the skin, and result in desmosome aggregation, widening of intercellular spaces, and lipid secretory defects. DSP encodes desmoplakin, a primary component of desmosomes, intercellular adhesion junctions most abundant in the epidermis and heart. Though mutations in DSP are known to cause other disorders, our cohort features the unique clinical finding of severe whole-body erythrokeratodermia, with distinct effects on localization of desmosomal proteins and connexin 43. These findings add a severe, previously undescribed syndrome featuring erythrokeratodermia and cardiomyopathy to the spectrum of disease caused by mutation in DSP, and identify a specific region of the protein critical to the pathobiology of EKC syndrome and to DSP function in the heart and skin. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Early diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis mimic syndromes: pros and cons of current clinical diagnostic criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Vicente, Elena; Pradas, Jesús; Marín-Lahoz, Juan; De Luna, Noemi; Clarimón, Jordi; Turon-Sans, Janina; Gelpí, Ellen; Díaz-Manera, Jordi; Illa, Isabel; Rojas-Garcia, Ricard

    2017-08-01

    To describe the frequency and clinical characteristics of patients referred to a tertiary neuromuscular clinic as having amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) but who were re-diagnosed as having an ALS mimic syndrome, and to identify the reasons that led to the revision of the diagnosis. We reviewed the final diagnosis of all patients prospectively registered in the Sant Pau-MND register from 1 January 2004 to 31 December 2015. A detailed clinical evaluation and a clinically-guided electrophysiological study were performed at first evaluation. Twenty of 314 (6.4%) patients included were re-diagnosed as having a condition other than ALS, in 18 cases already at first evaluation. An alternative specific diagnosis was identified in 17 of those 20, consisting of a wide range of conditions. The main finding leading to an alternative diagnosis was the result of the electrophysiological study. Fifty per cent did not fulfil the El Escorial revised criteria (EECr) for ALS. The most common clinical phenotype at onset in patients with ALS mimic syndromes was progressive muscular atrophy (PMA). Misdiagnosing ALS is still a common problem. Early identification of ALS mimic syndromes is possible based on atypical clinical features and a clinically-guided electrophysiological study. Patients should be attended in specialised centres. The application of EECr helps to identify ALS misdiagnoses.

  16. TAFRO syndrome: New subtype of idiopathic multicentric Castleman disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordan Srkalovic

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Castleman disease (CD describes a group of three rare and poorly understood lymphoproliferative disorders that have heterogeneous clinical symptoms and common lymph node histopathological features. Unicentric CD (UCD involves a single region of enlarged nodes. Multicentric CD (MCD involves multiple regions of enlarged lymph nodes, constitutional symptoms, and organ dysfunction due to a cytokine storm often including interleukin 6. MCD is further divided into Human Herpes Virus-8 (HHV-8-associated MCD, which occurs in immunocompromised individuals, and HHV-8-negative/idiopathic MCD (iMCD. Recently, iMCD has been further sub-divided into patients with TAFRO syndrome, which involves thrombocytopenia (T, anasarca (A, fevers (F, reticulin myelofibrosis (R, organomegaly (O, and normal or only slightly elevated immunoglobulin levels, and those who do not have TAFRO syndrome. Non-TAFRO iMCD patients typically have thrombocytosis, less severe fluid accumulation, and hypergammaglobulinemia. iMCD patients with TAFRO syndrome may have a worse prognosis, but more research is needed.

  17. Analysis of clinic and osteal change in Turner syndrome (report of 15 cases)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Zhiqiu; Guo Qinglu; Feng Changzheng; Wei Beiyang; Xiao Wei; Liu Yongxi; Zhang Yan

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To research the clinical and osteal radiology imaging features in Turner's syndrome. Methods: Analyzed the clinical and osteal radiology imaging features of 15 Turner's syndrome. Results: 15 patients were Karyotyped into 3 groups I, 45, X, n=8; II, 46, XX, n=5; III, 46, XX/45, X, n = 2. Radiology imaging features: osteo-porosis, n=14; metacarpal sign, n=8; phahanx, n=9; cubitus valgus, n=10; vertebra steodystrophia, n=5; brachy-dactylya, n=9; basilar impression malformation, n=11. Conclusion: The terminal heights of Turner' s patients were marked lower than normal growth, hormone was deficiency, learning ability declined and the sex gland was hypoplastic. The typical imaging feature do main reference value to diagnosis. (authors)

  18. Clinical variability of Waardenburg-Shah syndrome in patients with proximal 13q deletion syndrome including the endothelin-B receptor locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tüysüz, Beyhan; Collin, Anna; Arapoğlu, Müjde; Suyugül, Nezir

    2009-10-01

    Waardenburg-Shah syndrome (Waardenburg syndrome type IV-WS4) is an auditory-pigmentary disorder that combines clinical features of pigmentary abnormalities of the skin, hair and irides, sensorineural hearing loss, and Hirschsprung disease (HSCR). Mutations in the endothelin-B receptor (EDNRB) gene on 13q22 have been found to cause this syndrome. Mutations in both alleles cause the full phenotype, while heterozygous mutations cause isolated HSCR or HSCR with minor pigmentary anomalies and/or sensorineural deafness. We investigated the status of the EDNRB gene, by FISH analysis, in three patients with de novo proximal 13q deletions detected at cytogenetic analysis and examined the clinical variability of WS4 among these patients. Chromosome 13q was screened with locus specific FISH probes and breakpoints were determined at 13q22.1q31.3 in Patients 1 and 3, and at 13q21.1q31.3 in Patient 2. An EDNRB specific FISH probe was deleted in all three patients. All patients had common facial features seen in proximal 13q deletion syndrome and mild mental retardation. However, findings related to WS4 were variable; Patient 1 had hypopigmentation of the irides and HSCR, Patient 2 had prominent bicolored irides and mild bilateral hearing loss, and Patient 3 had only mild unilateral hearing loss. These data contribute new insights into the pathogenesis of WS4.

  19. A novel representation of inter-site tumour heterogeneity from pre-treatment computed tomography textures classifies ovarian cancers by clinical outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas, Hebert Alberto; Micco, Maura; Lakhman, Yulia; Meier, Andreas A.; Sosa, Ramon; Hricak, Hedvig; Sala, Evis [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Veeraraghavan, Harini; Deasy, Joseph [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medical Physics, New York, NY (United States); Nougaret, Stephanie [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Service de Radiologie, Institut Regional du Cancer de Montpellier, Montpellier (France); INSERM, U1194, Institut de Recherche en Cancerologie de Montpellier (IRCM), Montpellier (France); Soslow, Robert A.; Weigelt, Britta [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Pathology, New York, NY (United States); Levine, Douglas A. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Surgery, New York, NY (United States); Aghajanian, Carol; Snyder, Alexandra [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medicine, New York, NY (United States)

    2017-09-15

    To evaluate the associations between clinical outcomes and radiomics-derived inter-site spatial heterogeneity metrics across multiple metastatic lesions on CT in patients with high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC). IRB-approved retrospective study of 38 HGSOC patients. All sites of suspected HGSOC involvement on preoperative CT were manually segmented. Gray-level correlation matrix-based textures were computed from each tumour site, and grouped into five clusters using a Gaussian Mixture Model. Pairwise inter-site similarities were computed, generating an inter-site similarity matrix (ISM). Inter-site texture heterogeneity metrics were computed from the ISM and compared to clinical outcomes. Of the 12 inter-site texture heterogeneity metrics evaluated, those capturing the differences in texture similarities across sites were associated with shorter overall survival (inter-site similarity entropy, similarity level cluster shade, and inter-site similarity level cluster prominence; p ≤ 0.05) and incomplete surgical resection (similarity level cluster shade, inter-site similarity level cluster prominence and inter-site cluster variance; p ≤ 0.05). Neither the total number of disease sites per patient nor the overall tumour volume per patient was associated with overall survival. Amplification of 19q12 involving cyclin E1 gene (CCNE1) predominantly occurred in patients with more heterogeneous inter-site textures. Quantitative metrics non-invasively capturing spatial inter-site heterogeneity may predict outcomes in patients with HGSOC. (orig.)

  20. Multisite Semiautomated Clinical Data Repository for Duplication 15q Syndrome: Study Protocol and Early Uses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajayi, Oluwaseun Jessica; Smith, Ebony Jeannae; Viangteeravat, Teeradache; Huang, Eunice Y; Nagisetty, Naga Satya V Rao; Urraca, Nora; Lusk, Laina; Finucane, Brenda; Arkilo, Dimitrios; Young, Jennifer; Jeste, Shafali; Thibert, Ronald; Reiter, Lawrence T

    2017-10-18

    Chromosome 15q11.2-q13.1 duplication syndrome (Dup15q syndrome) is a rare disorder caused by duplications of chromosome 15q11.2-q13.1, resulting in a wide range of developmental disabilities in affected individuals. The Dup15q Alliance is an organization that provides family support and promotes research to improve the quality of life of patients living with Dup15q syndrome. Because of the low prevalence of this condition, the establishment of a single research repository would have been difficult and more time consuming without collaboration across multiple institutions. The goal of this project is to establish a national deidentified database with clinical and survey information on individuals diagnosed with Dup15q syndrome. The development of a multiclinic site repository for clinical and survey data on individuals with Dup15q syndrome was initiated and supported by the Dup15q Alliance. Using collaborative workflows, communication protocols, and stakeholder engagement tools, a comprehensive database of patient-centered information was built. We successfully established a self-report populating, centralized repository for Dup15q syndrome research. This repository also resulted in the development of standardized instruments that can be used for other studies relating to developmental disorders. By standardizing the data collection instruments, it allows us integrate our data with other national databases, such as the National Database for Autism Research. A substantial portion of the data collected from the questionnaires was facilitated through direct engagement of participants and their families. This allowed for a more complete set of information to be collected with a minimal turnaround time. We developed a repository that can efficiently be mined for shared clinical phenotypes observed at multiple clinic sites and used as a springboard for future clinical and basic research studies. ©Oluwaseun Jessica Ajayi, Ebony Jeannae Smith, Teeradache Viangteeravat

  1. Clinical consequences and economic costs of untreated obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Knauert

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To provide an overview of the healthcare and societal consequences and costs of untreated obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Data sources: PubMed database for English-language studies with no start date restrictions and with an end date of September 2014. Methods: A comprehensive literature review was performed to identify all studies that discussed the physiologic, clinical and societal consequences of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome as well as the costs associated with these consequences. There were 106 studies that formed the basis of this analysis. Conclusions: Undiagnosed and untreated obstructive sleep apnea syndrome can lead to abnormal physiology that can have serious implications including increased cardiovascular disease, stroke, metabolic disease, excessive daytime sleepiness, work-place errors, traffic accidents and death. These consequences result in significant economic burden. Both, the health and societal consequences and their costs can be decreased with identification and treatment of sleep apnea. Implications for practice: Treatment of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, despite its consequences, is limited by lack of diagnosis, poor patient acceptance, lack of access to effective therapies, and lack of a variety of effective therapies. Newer modes of therapy that are effective, cost efficient and more accepted by patients need to be developed. Keywords: Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, Cost, Continuous positive airway pressure, Mandibular advancement device

  2. Waardenburg syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tagra Sunita

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Waardenburg syndrome is a rare inherited and genetically heterogenous disorder of neural crest cell development. Four distinct subtypes showing marked interfamilial and intrafamilial variability have been described. We report a girl showing constellation of congenital hearing impairment with 110 dB and 105 dB loss in right and left ear respectively, hypoplastic blue iridis, white forelock, dystopia canthorum and broad nasal root. Other affected relatives of the family, with variable features of the syndrome, have been depicted in the pedigree.

  3. PURA syndrome: clinical delineation and genotype-phenotype study in 32 individuals with review of published literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijnders, Margot R. F.; Janowski, Robert; Alvi, Mohsan; Self, Jay E.; van Essen, Ton J.; Vreeburg, Maaike; Rouhl, Rob P. W.; Stevens, Servi J. C.; Stegmann, Alexander P. A.; Schieving, Jolanda; Pfundt, Rolph; van Dijk, Katinke; Smeets, Eric; Stumpel, Connie T. R. M.; Bok, Levinus A.; Cobben, Jan Maarten; Engelen, Marc; Mansour, Sahar; Whiteford, Margo; Chandler, Kate E.; Douzgou, Sofia; Cooper, Nicola S.; Tan, Ene-Choo; Foo, Roger; Lai, Angeline H. M.; Rankin, Julia; Green, Andrew; Lönnqvist, Tuula; Isohanni, Pirjo; Williams, Shelley; Ruhoy, Ilene; Carvalho, Karen S.; Dowling, James J.; Lev, Dorit L.; Sterbova, Katalin; Lassuthova, Petra; Neupauerová, Jana; Waugh, Jeff L.; Keros, Sotirios; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Smithson, Sarah F.; Brunner, Han G.; van Hoeckel, Ceciel; Anderson, Mel; Clowes, Virginia E.; Siu, Victoria Mok; Selber, Paulo; Leventer, Richard J.; Nellaker, Christoffer; Niessing, Dierk; Hunt, David; Baralle, Diana

    2018-01-01

    Background De novo mutations in PURA have recently been described to cause PURA syndrome, a neurodevelopmental disorder characterised by severe intellectual disability (ID), epilepsy, feeding difficulties and neonatal hypotonia. Objectives T o delineate the clinical spectrum of PURA syndrome and

  4. Anti-PIT-1 antibody syndrome; a novel clinical entity leading to hypopituitarism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bando, Hironori; Iguchi, Genzo; Yamamoto, Masaaki; Hidaka-Takeno, Ryoko; Takahashi, Yutaka

    2015-03-01

    Various hypothalamic-pituitary diseases cause hypopituitarism. Inflammation related to autoimmunity also causes hypopituitarism. Hypophysitis is a representative disease caused by autoimmunity. Generally, anterior pituitary hormones are non-specifically impaired in this condition, but specific hormone defects have been reported in some cases. Anti-PIT-1 (pituitary-specific transcription factor 1) antibody syndrome is a novel clinical entity that presents an acquired combined pituitary hormone deficiency characterized by a specific defect in growth hormone, prolactin, and thyroid-stimulating hormone. Circulating anti-PIT-1 antibody along with various autoantibodies are detected with multiple endocrine organopathy, meeting the definition of autoimmune polyglandular syndrome. Mechanistically, cytotoxic T lymphocytes that specifically react with PIT-1 protein play an important role in the development of this syndrome.

  5. Prolapse of all cardiac valves in Noonan syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Otikunta, Adikesava Naidu; Subbareddy, Y V; Polamuri, Praneeth; Thakkar, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Noonan syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder with genetically heterogeneous inheritance. The incidence of cardiac abnormalities is higher in patients with Noonan syndrome and approximately 80% patients with Noonan syndrome are reported to have cardiac abnormalities during their lifetimes. However, polyvalvular disease in Noonan syndrome is rare. In this case-report, we describe a case of a young man whose features were strongly suggestive of Noonan syndrome and who was diagnosed with pro...

  6. Mutations in RIT1 cause Noonan syndrome - additional functional evidence and expanding the clinical phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenighofer, M; Hung, C Y; McCauley, J L; Dallman, J; Back, E J; Mihalek, I; Gripp, K W; Sol-Church, K; Rusconi, P; Zhang, Z; Shi, G-X; Andres, D A; Bodamer, O A

    2016-03-01

    RASopathies are a clinically heterogeneous group of conditions caused by mutations in 1 of 16 proteins in the RAS-mitogen activated protein kinase (RAS-MAPK) pathway. Recently, mutations in RIT1 were identified as a novel cause for Noonan syndrome. Here we provide additional functional evidence for a causal role of RIT1 mutations and expand the associated phenotypic spectrum. We identified two de novo missense variants p.Met90Ile and p.Ala57Gly. Both variants resulted in increased MEK-ERK signaling compared to wild-type, underscoring gain-of-function as the primary functional mechanism. Introduction of p.Met90Ile and p.Ala57Gly into zebrafish embryos reproduced not only aspects of the human phenotype but also revealed abnormalities of eye development, emphasizing the importance of RIT1 for spatial and temporal organization of the growing organism. In addition, we observed severe lymphedema of the lower extremity and genitalia in one patient. We provide additional evidence for a causal relationship between pathogenic mutations in RIT1, increased RAS-MAPK/MEK-ERK signaling and the clinical phenotype. The mutant RIT1 protein may possess reduced GTPase activity or a diminished ability to interact with cellular GTPase activating proteins; however the precise mechanism remains unknown. The phenotypic spectrum is likely to expand and includes lymphedema of the lower extremities in addition to nuchal hygroma. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity in Chinese patients with Waardenburg syndrome type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuzhi; Dai, Pu; Liu, Xin; Kang, Dongyang; Zhang, Xin; Yang, Weiyan; Zhou, Chengyong; Yang, Shiming; Yuan, Huijun

    2013-01-01

    Waardenburg Syndrome (WS) is an autosomal-dominant disorder characterized by sensorineural hearing loss and pigmentary abnormalities of the eyes, hair, and skin. Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) gene mutations account for about 15% of WS type II (WS2) cases. To date, fewer than 40 different MITF gene mutations have been identified in human WS2 patients, and few of these were of Chinese descent. In this study, we report clinical findings and mutation identification in the MITF gene of 20 Chinese WS2 patients from 14 families. A high level of clinical variability was identified. Sensorineural hearing loss (17/20, 85.0%) and heterochromia iridum (20/20, 100.0%) were the most commonly observed clinical features in Chinese WS2 patients. Five affected individuals (5/20, 25.0%) had numerous brown freckles on the face, trunk, and limb extremities. Mutation screening of the MITF gene identified five mutations: c.20A>G, c.332C>T, c.647_649delGAA, c.649A>G, and c.763C>T. The total mutational frequency of the MITF gene was 21.4% (3/14), which is significantly higher than the 15.0% observed in the fair-skinned WS2 population. Our results indicate that MITF mutations are relatively common among Chinese WS2 patients.

  8. Intra-Genomic Internal Transcribed Spacer Region Sequence Heterogeneity and Molecular Diagnosis in Clinical Microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ying; Tsang, Chi-Ching; Xiao, Meng; Cheng, Jingwei; Xu, Yingchun; Lau, Susanna K P; Woo, Patrick C Y

    2015-10-22

    Internal transcribed spacer region (ITS) sequencing is the most extensively used technology for accurate molecular identification of fungal pathogens in clinical microbiology laboratories. Intra-genomic ITS sequence heterogeneity, which makes fungal identification based on direct sequencing of PCR products difficult, has rarely been reported in pathogenic fungi. During the process of performing ITS sequencing on 71 yeast strains isolated from various clinical specimens, direct sequencing of the PCR products showed ambiguous sequences in six of them. After cloning the PCR products into plasmids for sequencing, interpretable sequencing electropherograms could be obtained. For each of the six isolates, 10-49 clones were selected for sequencing and two to seven intra-genomic ITS copies were detected. The identities of these six isolates were confirmed to be Candida glabrata (n=2), Pichia (Candida) norvegensis (n=2), Candida tropicalis (n=1) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (n=1). Multiple sequence alignment revealed that one to four intra-genomic ITS polymorphic sites were present in the six isolates, and all these polymorphic sites were located in the ITS1 and/or ITS2 regions. We report and describe the first evidence of intra-genomic ITS sequence heterogeneity in four different pathogenic yeasts, which occurred exclusively in the ITS1 and ITS2 spacer regions for the six isolates in this study.

  9. Clinical outcome after unilateral oophorectomy in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaaijk, E. M.; Hamerlynck, J. V.; Beek, J. F.; van der Veen, F.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this study is to report retrospectively on the clinical outcome of unilateral oophorectomy in 14 women with polycystic ovary syndrome who had undergone this treatment 14-18 years ago in our hospital for clomiphene citrate-resistant anovulation and long standing infertility or for

  10. Case of clinical Reye syndrome presenting characteristic CT changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hino, Tamaki; Sai, Hoshun; Morikawa, Yuji; Mizuta, Ryuzo [Kyoto Second Red Cross Hospital (Japan); Okuno, Takehiko

    1984-05-01

    A 9-month-old male infant was admitted to our hospital on the second day of cold like syndrome because of high fever, convulsion, coma, and decerebrate rigidity. Serum GOT, GPT, LDH, and CPK were markedly elevated. Serum ammonia was slightly increased, and hypoglycemia was present. The cerebrospinal fluid showed no pleocytosis, normal sugar content, but increased protein. Thus we made a diagnosis of clinical Reye syndrome according to the criteria by Yamashita, et al. A CT on the day of admission showed symmetrical low-density areas in the posterior fossa and the regions of thalamus. Ringed enhancements were seen around the areas of low density in the thalamus on the twenty-second hospital day. We consider that these lesions may represent the infarction due to obstruction of the thalamoperforant arteries caused by cerebral edema in the early stage of the disease.

  11. SIL1 mutations and clinical spectrum in patients with Marinesco-Sjogren syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Michael; Roos, Andreas; Stendel, Claudia; Claeys, Kristl G; Sonmez, Fatma Mujgan; Baudis, Michael; Bauer, Peter; Bornemann, Antje; de Goede, Christian; Dufke, Andreas; Finkel, Richard S; Goebel, Hans H; Häussler, Martin; Kingston, Helen; Kirschner, Janbernd; Medne, Livija; Muschke, Petra; Rivier, François; Rudnik-Schöneborn, Sabine; Spengler, Sabrina; Inzana, Francesca; Stanzial, Franco; Benedicenti, Francesco; Synofzik, Matthis; Lia Taratuto, Ana; Pirra, Laura; Tay, Stacey Kiat-Hong; Topaloglu, Haluk; Uyanik, Gökhan; Wand, Dorothea; Williams, Denise; Zerres, Klaus; Weis, Joachim; Senderek, Jan

    2013-12-01

    missing in young children. As cognitive impairment is not obligatory, patients without intellectual disability but a Marinesco-Sjögren syndrome-compatible phenotype should receive SIL1 mutation analysis. Despite allelic heterogeneity and many families with private mutations, the phenotype related to SIL1 mutations is relatively homogenous. Based on SIL1 expression studies we speculate that this may arise from a uniform effect of different mutations on protein expression.

  12. [Neuropsychological subtypes of the inattention and hyperactivity syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etchepareborda, M C

    1999-02-01

    One of the commonest neurological development disorders is the syndrome of inattention with hyperactivity, ADHD. The complex neurobiological network which intervenes in paying attention permits us to maintain a basal state of alertness, to focalize and maintain attention for long periods, select the stimulus-signal required and analyze its components, and also to simultaneously carry out processes of input-output and performance (tutorial, controlling). Damage to the various systems participating in 'paying attention' leads to a syndrome of inattention, with or without hyperactivity. The distinction into clinical sub-types (combined, mainly lacking attention or mainly hyperactive and impulsive) gives a primary differentiation of the syndrome. However, from the neuropsychological point of view, some degree of heterogeneity within the groups which defines academic behaviour and conduct may also be recognized. This type of study permits a more specific neuro-cognitive and pharmacological approach. Some clinical characteristics of the syndrome of inattention improve with different drugs, such as the state of alterness (methylphenidate), impulsivity (pipamperone) and selective attention (tiapride). However, this treatment is symptomatic and in most cases is useful to accompany the ultimate biological development of the neocortical control mechanisms. A neuro-cognitive approach which permits acquisition of habits of control, functional strategies, sequential planning of activities and per- and post-functional surveillance is fundamental. The EFE programme for training executive functions is directed towards working with the damaged processing mechanisms in each neuropsychological subtype.

  13. A clinical study of mentally retarded children with fragile X syndrome inSaudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Husain, M.; Salih, Mustafa A.M.; Zaki, Osama K.; Al-Othman, L.; Al-Nasser, Mohammed N.

    2000-01-01

    Studies on fragile X syndrome are scarce in Saudi Arabia and othercountries of the Arabian Peninsula. The few studies previously done haveeither been in the form of case reports or those performed oninstitutionalized mentally retarded patients. The aim of this study was todetermine the prevalence of fragile X syndrome among cases with mentalretardation who have been referred to the pediatric neurology clinics of KingKhalid University Hospital (KKUH) in Riyadh. Cytogenetic studies wereperformed in 94 cases that were referred to the pediatric neurology clinicsof KKUH because of mental retardation and/or delayed milestones ofdevelopment, from July 1995 to December 1997. Six male probands (6.4%) showedthe classic fragile X chromosome and another six (including a four year oldgirl) were detected, following extension of the cytogenetic studies to all 32first-degree relatives. Affection of more than one sibling was ascertained infour families. One family had four brothers with fragile X syndrome, whereasanother formed part of a large kindred with twelve males and five females whowere mentally retarded. A clinical, physical and psychological screeningchecklist was applied to the eleven affected males. Large testicular size,long face and short attention span were the most frequent features and eachwas detected in nine patients (82%). Pes planus and history of delayed speechwere found in eight patients (73%). The study showed that the fragile Xsyndrome clinical screening checklist has been applied in other populationsmight equally valuable and applicable among the population of Saudi Arabia.However, the presence of pale blue eyes can be excluded and more weight givento positive family history of mental to the most common clinical diagnosticfeatures of fragile X syndrome. (author)

  14. Clinical characteristics of three patients with UVs syndrome, a photosensitive disorder with defective DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, T.; Yamaizumi, M.; Hiro-oka, M.; Matsui, T.; Matsuno, M.; Ono, T.; Ichihashi, M.

    1996-01-01

    Recently, we established a new category of photosensitive disorder termed UVsup(s) syndrome. Cells from patients with UVsup(s) syndrome have a similar UV sensitivity as xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) cells, but have a normal level of unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) unlike XP. UVsup(s) syndrome is distinct from Cockayne syndrome (CS) or XP including XP variant (XP-V) as determined by studies of genetic factors using cell fusion, microinjection, and postreplication repair assays. In this study, we identified three japanese patients with UVsup(s) syndrome: an 11-year-old girl, a 17 year old male, and an 8-year-old boy. The first two patients were siblings, while the third was a case from a different family. All of these patients exhibited acute recurrent sunburn. Common clinical manifestations of the patients were slight erythema and dryness, a number of freckles on sun-exposed areas, and slight telangiectasia only seen on the cheek and nose. Patient 3 showed a lowered minimal erythema dose between 280 and 300 nm. The patients' fibroblasts showed similar characteristics to those in CS, such as UV sensitivity, and a failure of RNA synthesis (RRS) after UV irradiation, despite a normal level of UDS. Thus, UVsup(s) syndrome is a new hereditary photosensitive disorder with clinical manifestations similar to a mild form of Xp but showing the cellular characteristics of CS. (Author)

  15. [From gene to disease; genetic causes of hearing loss and visual impairment sometimes accompanied by vestibular problems (Usher syndrome)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennings, R J E; Kremer, H; Deutman, A F; Kimberling, W J; Cremers, C W R J

    2002-12-07

    Usher syndrome is an autosomal recessively inherited disease, characterised by sensorineural hearing loss, tapetoretinal degeneration and in some cases vestibular problems. Based on the clinical heterogeneity, the disease can be classified into three clinical types (I, II and III), which have their own genetic subtypes (Usher 1A-Usher IG, Usher 2A-Usher 2C and Usher 3). The majority of the Usher type I cases are caused by mutations in the MYO7A gene (Usher 1B) while mutations in the USH2A gene (Usher 2A) are the cause of most cases of type II. Usher syndrome type III, caused by mutations in the USH3 gene, is frequently seen only in Finland.

  16. Bowel Endometriosis Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riiskjær, M; Egekvist, A G; Hartwell, D

    2017-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: Is it possible to develop a validated score that can identify women with Bowel Endometriosis Syndrome (BENS) and be used to monitor the effect of medical and surgical treatment? SUMMARY ANSWER: The BENS score can be used to identify women with BENS and to monitor the effect...... of medical and surgical treatment of women suffering from bowel endometriosis. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY: Endometriosis is a heterogeneous disease with extensive variation in anatomical and clinical presentation, and symptoms do not always correspond to the disease burden. Current endometriosis scoring systems...... are mainly based on anatomical and surgical findings. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION: The score was developed and validated from a cohort of 525 women with medically or surgically treated bowel endometriosis from Aarhus and Copenhagen University Hospitals, Denmark. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING AND METHODS...

  17. [Syndromic hereditary deafness. Usher's syndrome. Oto-neurologic and genetic factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinós, C; Pérez-Garrigues, H; Beneyto, M; Vilela, C; Rodrigo, O; Nájera, C

    1999-01-01

    Usher syndrome (USH) is an autosomal recessive hereditary disorder characterized by congenital bilateral sensorineural hearing loss and progressive loss of vision due to retinitis pigmentosa (RP). The prevalence of Usher syndrome is estimated to be 3-4.4 cases per 100.000 people. Several clinical types have been distinguished by age at onset, rate of progression, and severity of symptoms. Type I (USH1) is characterized by a congenital, severe-to-profound deafness and absent vestibular function. Type II (USH2) shows a congenital and moderate-to-severe hearing loss and normal vestibular response. It is also suggested a third type (USH3), clinically similar to USH2, but with progressive hearing loss. Genetic heterogeneity of USH is quite extensive. Up to now, seven different loci responsible for the defect are known: 14q, 11q, 11p, 10q and 21q for USH1; 1q for USH2 and 3q for USH3. Moreover, there are USH1 and USH2 families that fail to show linkage to these candidate regions demonstrating that should exist other loci causing USH, although their ubications are unknown. To date, only two genes involved in the USH pathology are known, although together they are responsibles of about the 80% of total USH cases: myosin VIIA, an unconventional myosin, involved in the USH1b phenotype and a protein similar to the laminina, responsible for the USH2a phenotype.

  18. Adrenal incidentaloma: A case of pheochromocytoma with sub-clinical Cushing′s syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashutosh Goyal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Adrenal incidentalomas (AIs are a cluster of different pathologies, but AIs with dual functional aspects are very rare. We report a case of AI with the evidence of both pheochromocytoma and sub-clinical Cushing′s syndrome. A 42-year-old female patient presented with the history of abdominal pain. Abdominal computed tomography revealed right adrenal mass suggestive of pheochromocytoma. On endocrine evaluation, she admitted history of intermittent headache and palpitations for 4 years and was on treatment for hypertension and diabetes. There were no signs and symptoms suggestive of Cushing′s syndrome. The laboratory data demonstrated 10 times raised 24-h urinary fractionated metanephrines with non-suppressible serum cortisol after 2-day low-dose dexamethasone suppression test. She underwent right-sided adrenalectomy with subsequent resolution of both pheochromocytoma and hypercortisolism. Patient was discharged in good clinical condition.

  19. Serum vitamin D and the metabolic syndrome among osteoporotic postmenopausal female patients of a family practice clinic in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasein, Nada; Shroukh, Wejdan; Hijjawi, Razan

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency and the metabolic syndrome are two common health issues worldwide. The association between these two health problems is subject to debate. This study aims to investigate the association between vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency and the metabolic syndrome in a sample of osteoporotic postmenopausal women attending a family practice clinic in Amman-Jordan. This was an observational cross sectional study. It was carried out in the family practice clinic in Jordan University Hospital. The study included all postmenopausal osteoporotic women attending the clinic between June 2011 and May 2012, yielding a total of 326 subjects. The association between metabolic syndrome and serum vitamin D levels was investigated. Waist circumference, body mass index, triglycerides and fasting blood sugar were significantly higher among postmenopausal women with metabolic syndrome, but HDL cholesterol was significantly lower (pmetabolic syndrome among all study participants was 42.9%. Triglycerides and LDL cholesterol were significantly higher among women deficiency or insufficiency (pmetabolic syndrome, the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency was 50.7%. Findings of the current study suggest a lack of relationship between serum vitamin D and metabolic syndrome. However, a significant inverse relationship was found between serum vitamin D levels and both serum triglycerides and LDL levels.

  20. Clinical manifestations and management of prune-belly syndrome in a large contemporary pediatric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Natan E; Arlen, Angela M; Smith, Edwin A; Kirsch, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    To review the clinical manifestations and operative management of a large contemporary pediatric cohort of patients with prune-belly syndrome (PBS). PBS patients aged <21 years followed up in our pediatric urology clinic were identified by the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision code (756.71). Demographics, concomitant diagnoses, surgical history, imaging studies, and renal or bladder function were evaluated. Data were available for 46 pediatric patients (44 boys and 2 girls). Mean age was 7.6 ± 4.7 years (range, 0.9-20 years). Average length of clinical follow-up was 6.8 ± 5 years. Forty-five children (97.8%) had hydroureteronephrosis, and 36 of them (78.3%) had vesicoureteral reflux. Five patients (10.9%) had significant pulmonary insufficiency, and 2 patients (4.3%) were oxygen dependent. Eighteen children (39.1%) had other congenital malformations, including cardiac in 4 patients (8.7%) and musculoskeletal anomalies in 10 patients (21.7%). Orchidopexy was the most common surgery, with all boys aged ≥3 years having undergone the procedure. Twenty-two patients (47.8%) had a history of ureteral surgery, 22 (47.8%) had bladder surgery, 11 (23.9%) had renal surgery, and 6 (13%) had urethral procedures. Nineteen patients (41.3%) underwent abdominoplasty. Eighteen children (39.1%) had documented chronic kidney disease, and 8 children (17.4%) underwent renal transplantation. Average age at transplantation was 5.1 ± 2.9 years. The mean nadir creatinine level for patients with end-stage renal disease was 1.4 mg/dL compared with 0.4 mg/dL for those not requiring transplantation (P <.001). Children with PBS have significant comorbidities and require frequent operative intervention, with disease heterogeneity necessitating an individualized management approach. Early end-stage renal disease is prevalent, with approximately 15% of children requiring kidney transplantation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Association of a de novo 16q copy number variant with a phenotype that overlaps with Lenz microphthalmia and Townes-Brocks syndromes

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    Johnston Jennifer J

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anophthalmia and microphthalmia are etiologically and clinically heterogeneous. Lenz microphthalmia is a syndromic form that is typically inherited in an X-linked pattern, though the causative gene mutation is unknown. Townes-Brocks syndrome manifests thumb anomalies, imperforate anus, and ear anomalies. We present a 13-year-old boy with a syndromic microphthalmia phenotype and a clinical diagnosis of Lenz microphthalmia syndrome. Case Presentation The patient was subjected to clinical and molecular evaluation, including array CGH analysis. The clinical features included left clinical anophthalmia, right microphthalmia, anteriorly placed anus with fistula, chordee, ventriculoseptal defect, patent ductus arteriosus, posteriorly rotated ears, hypotonia, growth retardation with delayed bone age, and mental retardation. The patient was found to have an approximately 5.6 Mb deletion of 16q11.2q12.1 by microarray based-comparative genomic hybridization, which includes the SALL1 gene, which causes Townes-Brocks syndrome. Conclusions Deletions of 16q11.2q12.2 have been reported in several individuals, although those prior reports did not note microphthalmia or anophthalmia. This region includes SALL1, which causes Townes-Brocks syndrome. In retrospect, this child has a number of features that can be explained by the SALL1 deletion, although it is not clear if the microphthalmia is a rare feature of Townes-Brocks syndrome or caused by other mechanisms. These data suggest that rare copy number changes may be a cause of syndromic microphthalmia allowing a personalized genomic medicine approach to the care of patients with these aberrations.

  2. Wolfram syndrome (diabetes insipidus, diabetes, optic atrophy, and deafness): clinical and genetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Annunzio, Giuseppe; Minuto, Nicola; D'Amato, Elena; de Toni, Teresa; Lombardo, Fortunato; Pasquali, Lorenzo; Lorini, Renata

    2008-09-01

    Wolfram syndrome is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by diabetes insipidus, diabetes (nonautoimmune), optic atrophy, and deafness (a set of conditions referred to as DIDMOAD). The WFS1 gene is located on the short arm of chromosome 4. Wolfram syndrome prevalence is 1 in 770,000 live births, with a 1 in 354 carrier frequency. We evaluated six Italian children from five unrelated families. Genetic analysis for Wolfram syndrome was performed by PCR amplification and direct sequencing. Mutation screening revealed five distinct variants, one novel mutation (c.1346C>T; p.T449I) and four previously described, all located in exon 8. Phenotype-genotype correlation is difficult, and the same mutation gives very different phenotypes. Severely inactivating mutations result in a more severe phenotype than mildly inactivating ones. Clinical follow-up showed the progressive syndrome's seriousness.

  3. Clinical characteristics of a novel subgroup of chronic fatigue syndrome patients with postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, I; Pairman, J; Spickett, G; Newton, J L

    2013-05-01

    A significant proportion of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) also have postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS). We aimed to characterize these patients and differentiate them from CFS patients without POTS in terms of clinical and autonomic features. A total of 179 patients with CFS (1994 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria) attending one of the largest Department of Health-funded CFS clinical services were included in this study. Outcome measures were as follows: (i) symptom assessment tools including the fatigue impact scale, Chalder fatigue scale, Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS), orthostatic grading scale (OGS) and hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS-A and -D, respectively), (ii) autonomic function analysis including heart rate variability and (iii) haemodynamic responses including left ventricular ejection time and systolic blood pressure drop upon standing. CFS patients with POTS (13%, n = 24) were younger (29 ± 12 vs. 42 ± 13 years, P fatigued (Chalder fatigue scale, 8 ± 4 vs. 10 ± 2, P = 0.002), less depressed (HADS-D, 6 ± 4 vs. 9 ± 4, P = 0.01) and had reduced daytime hypersomnolence (ESS, 7 ± 6 vs. 10 ± 5, P = 0.02), compared with patients without POTS. In addition, they exhibited greater orthostatic intolerance (OGS, 11 ± 5; P < 0.0001) and autonomic dysfunction. A combined clinical assessment tool of ESS ≤9 and OGS ≥9 identifies accurately CFS patients with POTS with 100% positive and negative predictive values. The presence of POTS marks a distinct clinical group of CFS patents, with phenotypic features differentiating them from those without POTS. A combination of validated clinical assessment tools can determine which CFS patients have POTS with a high degree of accuracy, and thus potentially identify those who require further investigation and consideration for therapy to control heart rate. © 2013 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  4. Can We Predict Psychosis Outside the Clinical High-Risk State? A Systematic Review of Non-Psychotic Risk Syndromes for Mental Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tae Young; Lee, Junhee; Kim, Minah; Choe, Eugenie

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Recent evidence has suggested that psychosis could develop not only in people at clinical high risk for psychosis (CHR-P) but also in those with clinical risk syndromes for emergent nonpsychotic mental disorders. The proportion of people with these clinical risk syndromes who will develop psychosis rather than to other nonpsychotic mental disorders is undetermined. Electronic databases were searched for studies reporting on clinical risk syndromes for the development of emergent nonpsychotic mental disorders. Incidence of emerging psychotic and nonpsychotic mental disorders defined on the ICD or DSM. Of a total of 9 studies relating to 3006 nonpsychotic at-risk individuals were included. Within prospective studies (n = 4, sample = 1051), the pooled incidence of new psychotic disorders across these clinical risk syndromes was of 12.9 per 1000 person-years (95% CI: 4.3 to 38.6) and that of nonpsychotic disorders (n = 3, sample = 538) was of 43.5 per 1000 person-years (95% CI: 30.9 to 61.3). Psychotic disorders may emerge outside the CHR-P paradigm, from clinical risk syndromes for incident nonpsychotic disorders, albeit at lower rates than in the CHR-P group. The clinical risk syndromes for emerging nonpsychotic disorders may exhibit a pluripotential risk of developing several types of mental disorders compared with CHR-P. If substantiated by future research, the current findings suggest that it may be useful to move beyond the current strategy of identifying individuals meeting CHR-P criteria only. PMID:29438561

  5. Heterogeneity of Monosymptomatic Resting Tremor in a Prospective Study: Clinical Features, Electrophysiological Test, and Dopamine Transporter Positron Emission Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua-Guang Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: mRT is heterogeneous in presynaptic nigrostriatal dopaminergic degeneration, which can be determined by DAT-PET brain imaging. Clinical and electrophysiological features may provide clues to distinguish PD from SWEDDs.

  6. Clinical variability in hereditary optic neuropathies: Two novel mutations in two patients with dominant optic atrophy and Wolfram syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvez-Ruiz, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Dominant optic atrophy (DOA) and Wolfram syndrome share a great deal of clinical variability, including an association with hearing loss and the presence of optic atrophy at similar ages. The objective of this paper was to discuss the phenotypic variability of these syndromes with respect to the presentation of two clinical cases. We present two patients, each with either DOA or Wolfram syndrome, and contribute to the research literature through our findings of two novel mutations. The overlapping of several clinical characteristics in hereditary optic neuropathies can complicate the differential diagnosis. Future studies are needed to better determine the genotype-phenotype correlation for these diseases.

  7. Demographics and co-occurring conditions in a clinic-based cohort with Down syndrome in the United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corder, Jennifer Price; Al Ahbabi, Fatima Jaber Sehmi; Al Dhaheri, Hind Saif; Chedid, Fares

    2017-09-01

    The majority of studies describing demographics and co-occurring conditions in cohorts with Down syndrome come from regions outside of the Middle East, mainly from Europe and North America. This paper describes demographics and co-occurring conditions in a hospital-based cohort of individuals with Down syndrome living in the Middle Eastern country of the United Arab Emirates (UAE). The first dedicated Down syndrome clinic in the UAE was established in 2012 at Tawam Hospital in Al Ain. This paper describes a clinic-based cohort of 221 participants over 4 years from the Gulf Down Syndrome Registry, a new Down syndrome database and contact registry created at Tawam Hospital. Key demographic findings include mean maternal age of 37 years, among the highest described in the literature. Sixty-two percent of mothers are >35 years. Over 90% of mothers received post-natal diagnosis of Down syndrome. High sex ratio, parental consanguinity, and large family size also characterize the group. The spectrum of many co-occurring conditions mirrors that of previously described populations, with some notable differences. Cardiovascular malformations are well represented, however, atrioventricular canal is not the most common. Genitourinary conditions are common, as evidenced by 12% of males with hypospadias and 15% with undescended testes. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency, alpha thalassemia trait, hypovitaminosis D, and dental caries are common in our cohort. This study describes a large hospital-based group with Down syndrome presenting to a new dedicated Down syndrome clinic in the UAE, highlighting unique demographic and co-occurring conditions found in that population. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Genetic counseling for a three-generation Chinese family with Waardenburg syndrome type II associated with a rare SOX10 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kaitian; Zong, Ling; Zhan, Yuan; Wu, Xuan; Liu, Min; Jiang, Hongyan

    2015-05-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is clinically and genetically heterogeneous. The SOX10 mutation related with Waardenburg syndrome type II is rare in Chinese. This study aimed to uncover the genetic causes of Waardenburg syndrome type II in a three-generation family to improve genetic counseling. Complete clinical and molecular evaluations were conducted in a three-generation Han Chinese family with Waardenburg syndrome type II. Targeted genetic counseling was provided to this family. We identified a rare heterozygous dominant mutation c.621C>A (p.Y207X) in SOX10 gene in this family. The premature termination codon occurs in exon 4, 27 residues downstream of the carboxyl end of the high mobility group box. Bioinformatics prediction suggested this variant to be disease-causing, probably due to nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. Useful genetic counseling was given to the family for prenatal guidance. Identification of a rare dominant heterozygous SOX10 mutation c.621C>A in this family provided an efficient way to understand the causes of Waardenburg syndrome type II and improved genetic counseling. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Domain analyses of Usher syndrome causing Clarin-1 and GPR98 protein models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sehrish Haider; Javed, Muhammad Rizwan; Qasim, Muhammad; Shahzadi, Samar; Jalil, Asma; Rehman, Shahid Ur

    2014-01-01

    Usher syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder that causes hearing loss, Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) and vestibular dysfunction. It is clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder which is clinically divided into three types i.e. type I, type II and type III. To date, there are about twelve loci and ten identified genes which are associated with Usher syndrome. A mutation in any of these genes e.g. CDH23, CLRN1, GPR98, MYO7A, PCDH15, USH1C, USH1G, USH2A and DFNB31 can result in Usher syndrome or non-syndromic deafness. These genes provide instructions for making proteins that play important roles in normal hearing, balance and vision. Studies have shown that protein structures of only seven genes have been determined experimentally and there are still three genes whose structures are unavailable. These genes are Clarin-1, GPR98 and Usherin. In the absence of an experimentally determined structure, homology modeling and threading often provide a useful 3D model of a protein. Therefore in the current study Clarin-1 and GPR98 proteins have been analyzed for signal peptide, domains and motifs. Clarin-1 protein was found to be without any signal peptide and consists of prokar lipoprotein domain. Clarin-1 is classified within claudin 2 super family and consists of twelve motifs. Whereas, GPR98 has a 29 amino acids long signal peptide and classified within GPCR family 2 having Concanavalin A-like lectin/glucanase superfamily. It was found to be consists of GPS and G protein receptor F2 domains and twenty nine motifs. Their 3D structures have been predicted using I-TASSER server. The model of Clarin-1 showed only α-helix but no beta sheets while model of GPR98 showed both α-helix and β sheets. The predicted structures were then evaluated and validated by MolProbity and Ramachandran plot. The evaluation of the predicted structures showed 78.9% residues of Clarin-1 and 78.9% residues of GPR98 within favored regions. The findings of present study has resulted in the

  10. Clinical profile and outcomes of acute cardiorenal syndrome type-5 in sepsis: An eight-year cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallabhajosyula, Saraschandra; Sakhuja, Ankit; Geske, Jeffrey B; Kumar, Mukesh; Kashyap, Rahul; Kashani, Kianoush; Jentzer, Jacob C

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical features and outcomes of acute cardiorenal syndrome type-5 in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. Historical cohort study of all adult patients with severe sepsis and septic shock admitted to the intensive care units (ICU) at Mayo Clinic Rochester from January 1, 2007 through December 31, 2014. Patients with prior renal or cardiac dysfunction were excluded. Patients were divided into groups with and without cardiorenal syndrome type-5. Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) was defined by both serum creatinine and urine output criteria of the AKI Network and the cardiac injury was determined by troponin-T levels. Outcomes included in-hospital mortality, ICU and hospital length of stay, and one-year survival. Of 602 patients meeting the study inclusion criteria, 430 (71.4%) met criteria for acute cardiorenal syndrome type-5. Patients with cardiorenal syndrome type-5 had higher severity of illness, greater vasopressor and mechanical ventilation use. Cardiorenal syndrome type-5 was associated higher unadjusted in-hospital mortality, ICU and hospital lengths of stay, and lower one-year survival. When adjusted for age, gender, severity of illness and mechanical ventilation, cardiorenal syndrome type-5 was independently associated with 1.7-times greater odds of in-hospital mortality (p = .03), but did not predict one-year survival (p = .06) compared to patients without cardiorenal syndrome. In sepsis, acute cardiorenal syndrome type-5 is associated with worse in-hospital mortality compared to patients without cardiorenal syndrome.

  11. Sjogren-Larsson Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Or In Memory Of Obituaries Contact Us Donate Sjogren-Larsson Syndrome What causes SLS? SLS is caused by mutations ... methods of diagnosing SLS. Other Clinical Names for Sjogren-Larsson Syndrome Other clinical names of Sjogren-Larsson Syndrome include: ...

  12. Etiologic heterogeneity of the psychoses: is there a dopamine psychosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garver, D L; Steinberg, J L; McDermott, B E; Yao, J K; Ramberg, J E; Lewis, S; Kingsbury, S J

    1997-03-01

    The distribution of drug-free plasma homovanillic acid (pHVA) concentrations was studied in a sample of psychotic patients, some of whom were selected for good prognostic features. Baseline pHVA was bimodally distributed, suggesting two different patient populations. The high-pHVA patients showed periods of better functioning and/or fewer symptoms 5 years before admission (p pHVA psychotics. High-pHVA psychotics did not differ in other aspects of demographics or clinical presentation from lower-pHVA psychotics. Compared to the general population, there were more psychotics in the families of high-pHVA patients (p pHVA psychotics is consistent with blockade of the effects of excess synaptic dopamine at D2 receptors for these patients. Results are discussed in the context of the syndromic heterogeneity of the psychoses.

  13. Contemporary Management of Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magistro, Giuseppe; Wagenlehner, Florian M E; Grabe, Magnus; Weidner, Wolfgang; Stief, Christian G; Nickel, J Curtis

    2016-02-01

    Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) is a common condition that causes severe symptoms, bother, and quality-of-life impact in the 8.2% of men who are believed to be affected. Research suggests a complex pathophysiology underlying this syndrome that is mirrored by its heterogeneous clinical presentation. Management of patients diagnosed with CP/CPPS has always been a formidable task in clinical practice. Due to its enigmatic etiology, a plethora of clinical trials failed to identify an efficient monotherapy. A comprehensive review of published randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the treatment of CP/CPPS and practical best evidence recommendations for management. Medline and the Cochrane database were screened for RCTs on the treatment of CP/CPPS from 1998 to December 2014, using the National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index as an objective outcome measure. Published data in concert with expert opinion were used to formulate a practical best evidence statement for the management of CP/CPPS. Twenty-eight RCTs identified were eligible for this review and presented. Trials evaluating antibiotics, α-blockers, anti-inflammatory and immune-modulating substances, hormonal agents, phytotherapeutics, neuromodulatory drugs, agents that modify bladder function, and physical treatment options failed to reveal a clear therapeutic benefit. With its multifactorial pathophysiology and its various clinical presentations, the management of CP/CPPS demands a phenotypic-directed approach addressing the individual clinical profile of each patient. Different categorization algorithms have been proposed. First studies applying the UPOINTs classification system provided promising results. Introducing three index patients with CP/CPPS, we present practical best evidence recommendations for management. Our current understanding of the pathophysiology underlying CP/CPPS resulting in this highly variable syndrome does not speak in favor of a

  14. FROM FAMILIES SYNDROMES TO GENES… THE FIRST CLINICAL AND GENETIC CHARACTERIZATIONS OF HEREDITARY SYNDROMES PREDISPOSING TO CANCER: WHAT WAS THE BEGINNING?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charité Ricker, MS, LCGC

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Assessment for hereditary susceptibility to cancer is considered standard of care, as it impacts not only a clinician's understanding of cancer causation but also options for prevention and treatment. The roots of our current knowledge about hereditary cancer syndromes can be traced to early reports of families with striking cancer histories. The purpose of this article is to review the historical timeline of the two most commonly assessed hereditary cancer syndromes, hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC and Lynch syndrome (LS. While many individuals identified with these syndromes today come from families similar to those seen in the early historical reports, our understanding of these syndromes, their expression and penetrance, has evolved over the years. In addition, the increased utilization of broad multi-gene panels continues to add to the complexity of defining associated phenotypes. These findings can lead to challenges with translating results to clinical management for patients and families, but also provide an opportunity to continue to gain understanding of the genetic underpinnings of cancer etiology.

  15. Clinical and ultrasound features in patients with intersection syndrome or de Quervain's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, J; Ishii, Y; Noguchi, H

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the demographic characteristics of patients who were diagnosed with intersection syndrome and also investigated the dominance of the affected hand, duration of symptoms and any precipitating factor for pain of the wrist. These features were compared with patients who had de Quervain's disease. Ultrasonography was used to confirm the clinical diagnosis. Intersection syndrome occurred more frequently in men and in the dominant hand than de Quervain's disease when all the patients were compared and when peripartum women were excluded. It occurred at a younger age than de Quervain's disease only when the comparison excluded peripartum women. Patients with intersection syndrome presented with a much shorter duration of symptoms. These results were consistent with previous reports about occupational factors in intersection syndrome, and might be helpful in the understanding of epidemiological difference between the two conditions. Level 3. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. CLINICAL-EVALUATION OF PAIN TREATMENT WITH ELECTROSTIMULATION - A STUDY OF TENS IN PATIENTS WITH DIFFERENT PAIN SYNDROMES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MEYLER, WJ; DEJONGSTE, MJL; ROLF, CAM

    Objective: We evaluated the clinical efficacy and the unwanted side effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) in a consecutive group of patients with intractable pain due to different pain syndromes. Methods: Two hundred eleven patients with different pain syndromes, coded

  17. Genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity in Chinese patients with Waardenburg syndrome type II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuzhi Yang

    Full Text Available Waardenburg Syndrome (WS is an autosomal-dominant disorder characterized by sensorineural hearing loss and pigmentary abnormalities of the eyes, hair, and skin. Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF gene mutations account for about 15% of WS type II (WS2 cases. To date, fewer than 40 different MITF gene mutations have been identified in human WS2 patients, and few of these were of Chinese descent. In this study, we report clinical findings and mutation identification in the MITF gene of 20 Chinese WS2 patients from 14 families. A high level of clinical variability was identified. Sensorineural hearing loss (17/20, 85.0% and heterochromia iridum (20/20, 100.0% were the most commonly observed clinical features in Chinese WS2 patients. Five affected individuals (5/20, 25.0% had numerous brown freckles on the face, trunk, and limb extremities. Mutation screening of the MITF gene identified five mutations: c.20A>G, c.332C>T, c.647_649delGAA, c.649A>G, and c.763C>T. The total mutational frequency of the MITF gene was 21.4% (3/14, which is significantly higher than the 15.0% observed in the fair-skinned WS2 population. Our results indicate that MITF mutations are relatively common among Chinese WS2 patients.

  18. Genetic and Phenotypic Heterogeneity in Chinese Patients with Waardenburg Syndrome Type II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuzhi; Dai, Pu; Liu, Xin; Kang, Dongyang; Zhang, Xin; Yang, Weiyan; Zhou, Chengyong; Yang, Shiming; Yuan, Huijun

    2013-01-01

    Waardenburg Syndrome (WS) is an autosomal-dominant disorder characterized by sensorineural hearing loss and pigmentary abnormalities of the eyes, hair, and skin. Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) gene mutations account for about 15% of WS type II (WS2) cases. To date, fewer than 40 different MITF gene mutations have been identified in human WS2 patients, and few of these were of Chinese descent. In this study, we report clinical findings and mutation identification in the MITF gene of 20 Chinese WS2 patients from 14 families. A high level of clinical variability was identified. Sensorineural hearing loss (17/20, 85.0%) and heterochromia iridum (20/20, 100.0%) were the most commonly observed clinical features in Chinese WS2 patients. Five affected individuals (5/20, 25.0%) had numerous brown freckles on the face, trunk, and limb extremities. Mutation screening of the MITF gene identified five mutations: c.20A>G, c.332C>T, c.647_649delGAA, c.649A>G, and c.763C>T. The total mutational frequency of the MITF gene was 21.4% (3/14), which is significantly higher than the 15.0% observed in the fair-skinned WS2 population. Our results indicate that MITF mutations are relatively common among Chinese WS2 patients. PMID:24194866

  19. Tic symptom dimensions and their heritabilities in Tourette's syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haan, Marcel J; Delucchi, Kevin L; Mathews, Carol M; Cath, Danielle C

    INTRODUCTION: Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome (TS) is both genotypically and phenotypically heterogeneous. Gene-finding strategies have had limited success, possibly because of symptom heterogeneity. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed at specifically investigating heritabilities of tic symptom factors in

  20. Clinical, Electrophysiological, and Serological Evaluation of Patients with Cramp-Fasciculation Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poyraz, Mürüvvet; Matur, Zeliha; Aysal, Fikret; Tüzün, Erdem; Hanoğlu, Lütfü; Öge, A Emre

    2017-06-01

    Cramp-fasciculation syndrome (CFS) is a rare peripheral nerve hyperexcitability syndrome. There are only a few reports on clinical and serological profile of a CFS cohort that was followed up by a single outpatient clinic. Clinical, electrophysiological, and serological features of 6 CFS patients (5 men, 1 woman; 27-65 years old) were investigated. All patients presented with cramps, fasciculations, muscle pain, and autonomic symptoms, and 2 also reported numbness and burning sensation in limbs, suggestive of neuropathic pain. Antibodies to uncharacterized voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC)-complex proteins were found in 2 patients and to contactin-associated protein-like 2 (CASPR2) in 1 patient. None of the patients had a tumor. Most of the patients revealed prolonged after-discharges following tibial nerve stimulation. Nerve conduction studies and R-R interval variability tests were normal, whereas sympathetic skin responses were increased in amplitude in 3 seronegative patients. Five patients showed favorable response to carbamazepine or pregabalin treatment, whereas 1 VGKC-antibody-positive patient was resistant to carbamazepine and immunosuppressant treatment. Neuropathic pain and VGKC-complex antibodies may be encountered in CFS patients. Although autonomic symptoms are commonly found in CFS, routine autonomic system tests which are done in electrophysiology laboratories might yield normal results.

  1. [Clinical application of "categorization by analogy" in acupuncture for pain syndromes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaojun

    2018-03-12

    The"categorization by analogy"is one of the most primitive thinking methods for ancient people to explore the world, which has exerted far-reaching impact on the origin and development of TCM. With examples of Sanjian (LI 3) for neck pain, Chize (LU 5) for low back pain and Chengshan (BL 57) for dysmenorrhea, the clinical application of"categorization by analogy"in acupuncture for pain syndromes was discussed, hoping more acupuncturists will pay attention to the guiding role of"categorization by analogy"in acupuncture clinical treatment.

  2. Usher syndrome protein network functions in the retina and their relation to other retinal ciliopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorusch, Nasrin; Wunderlich, Kirsten; Bauss, Katharina; Nagel-Wolfrum, Kerstin; Wolfrum, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    The human Usher syndrome (USH) is the most frequent cause of combined hereditary deaf-blindness. USH is genetically and clinically heterogeneous: 15 chromosomal loci assigned to 3 clinical types, USH1-3. All USH1 and 2 proteins are organized into protein networks by the scaffold proteins harmonin (USH1C), whirlin (USH2D) and SANS (USH1G). This has contributed essentially to our current understanding of the USH protein function in the eye and the ear and explains why defects in proteins of different families cause very similar phenotypes. Ongoing in depth analyses of USH protein networks in the eye indicated cytoskeletal functions as well as roles in molecular transport processes and ciliary cargo delivery in photoreceptor cells. The analysis of USH protein networks revealed molecular links of USH to other ciliopathies, including non-syndromic inner ear defects and isolated retinal dystrophies but also to kidney diseases and syndromes like the Bardet-Biedl syndrome. These findings provide emerging evidence that USH is a ciliopathy molecularly related to other ciliopathies, which opens an avenue for common therapy strategies to treat these diseases.

  3. Present status of understanding on the genetic etiology of polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, S; Reddy, B Mohan

    2008-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrinopathy in women of reproductive age with a prevalence of approximately 7-10% worldwide. PCOS reflects multiple potential aetiologies and variable clinical manifestations. This syndrome is characterized by serious health implications such as diabetes, coronary heart diseases and cancer and also leads to infertility. PCOS can be viewed as a heterogeneous androgen excess disorder with varying degrees of reproductive and metabolic abnormalities determined by the interaction of multiple genetic and environmental factors. In this paper, we have attempted a comprehensive review of primarily molecular genetic studies done so far on PCOS. We have also covered the studies focusing on the environmental factors and impact of ethnicity on the presentation of this syndrome. A large number of studies have been attempted to understand the aetiological mechanisms behind PCOS both at the clinical and molecular genetic levels. In the Indian context, majority of the PCOS studies have been confined to the clinical dimensions. However, a concrete genetic mechanism behind the manifestation of PCOS is yet to be ascertained. Understanding of this complex disorder requires comprehensive studies incorporating relatively larger homogenous samples for genetic analysis and taking into account the ethnicity and the environmental conditions of the population/cohort under study. Research focused on these aspects may provide better understanding on the genetic etiology and the interaction between genes and environment, which may help develop new treatment methods and possible prevention of the syndrome.

  4. Present status of understanding on the genetic etiology of polycystic ovary syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dasgupta S

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is the most common endocrinopathy in women of reproductive age with a prevalence of approximately 7-10% worldwide. PCOS reflects multiple potential aetiologies and variable clinical manifestations. This syndrome is characterized by serious health implications such as diabetes, coronary heart diseases and cancer and also leads to infertility. PCOS can be viewed as a heterogeneous androgen excess disorder with varying degrees of reproductive and metabolic abnormalities determined by the interaction of multiple genetic and environmental factors. In this paper, we have attempted a comprehensive review of primarily molecular genetic studies done so far on PCOS. We have also covered the studies focusing on the environmental factors and impact of ethnicity on the presentation of this syndrome. A large number of studies have been attempted to understand the aetiological mechanisms behind PCOS both at the clinical and molecular genetic levels. In the Indian context, majority of the PCOS studies have been confined to the clinical dimensions. However, a concrete genetic mechanism behind the manifestation of PCOS is yet to be ascertained. Understanding of this complex disorder requires comprehensive studies incorporating relatively larger homogenous samples for genetic analysis and taking into account the ethnicity and the environmental conditions of the population/cohort under study. Research focused on these aspects may provide better understanding on the genetic etiology and the interaction between genes and environment, which may help develop new treatment methods and possible prevention of the syndrome.

  5. Revisiting of etiology, clinical picture and diagnosis of the Kleine-Levin syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulyanova О.V.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to draw the attention to the Kleine - Levin syndrome (SKL, a rare, poorly understood disease, not only in Russia but throughout the world. We analyzed the case of the 23-year old patient M, with the Kleine — Levin syndrome. SKL belongs to the group of recurrent hypersomnia and is characterized by long bouts of sleep lasting an average of 10-14 days, beginning with the imperative and difficulty awakening. During bouts of sleep observed unusual behavior of patients: hyperphagia; hypersexuality in males; irritability, restlessness, impaired mental activity; aggression; feeling of unreality of it all; confusion, hallucinatory episodes and depression in females. During wakefulness, marked dyspho-ria, emotional stupefaction, loss of memory. The syndrome develops in 4 times more often in men than in women, aged 12-25 years. Etiological factors: brain tumor, head trauma, metabolic disorders, acute infectious diseases with fever. Often the development of the syndrome is preceded by hyperemia and hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction. The article discussed the etiology, diagnosis, and possible combinations of clinical manifestations in SKL.

  6. Heterogeneity in Recent Onset Type 1 Diabetes – A Clinical Trial Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollyky, Jennifer B.; Xu, Ping; Butte, Atul J.; Wilson, Darrell M.; Beam, Craig A.; Greenbaum, Carla J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Type 1 Diabetes TrialNet is an NIH-sponsored clinical trial network aimed at altering the disease course of type 1 diabetes. The purpose of this study is to evaluate age-dependent heterogeneity in clinical, metabolic, and immunologic characteristics of individuals with recent-onset type 1 diabetes (T1D), to identify cohorts of interest and to aid in planning of future studies. Methods 883 individuals with recent onset T1D involved in five TrialNet studies were categorized by age as: ≥ 18, age 12-17, ages 8-12, and age TrialNet studies, including C-peptide >0.2 pmol/ml, varies by age. Lower C-peptide level requirements for younger participants should be considered in the design of future trials. These data also highlight subgroups of type 1 diabetes patients, such as those with abnormal WBC or who are overweight, which allow for targeted studies of etiopathology and interventions. PMID:25689602

  7. Reward circuitry dysfunction in psychiatric and neurodevelopmental disorders and genetic syndromes: animal models and clinical findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dichter, Gabriel S; Damiano, Cara A; Allen, John A

    2012-07-06

    This review summarizes evidence of dysregulated reward circuitry function in a range of neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders and genetic syndromes. First, the contribution of identifying a core mechanistic process across disparate disorders to disease classification is discussed, followed by a review of the neurobiology of reward circuitry. We next consider preclinical animal models and clinical evidence of reward-pathway dysfunction in a range of disorders, including psychiatric disorders (i.e., substance-use disorders, affective disorders, eating disorders, and obsessive compulsive disorders), neurodevelopmental disorders (i.e., schizophrenia, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, autism spectrum disorders, Tourette's syndrome, conduct disorder/oppositional defiant disorder), and genetic syndromes (i.e., Fragile X syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, Williams syndrome, Angelman syndrome, and Rett syndrome). We also provide brief overviews of effective psychopharmacologic agents that have an effect on the dopamine system in these disorders. This review concludes with methodological considerations for future research designed to more clearly probe reward-circuitry dysfunction, with the ultimate goal of improved intervention strategies.

  8. Positron emission tomography in the Rett syndrome; Clinical, biochemical and pathologicl correlates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naidu, S [Kennedy Institute, Baltimore, MD (United States); Wong, D F; Kitt, C; Wenk, G; Moser, H W

    1992-05-01

    A consistent constellation of clinical signs and symptoms define the Rett syndrome, the most prominent of which are disorders of movement and tone. Preliminary pathologic and neurochemical data indicate predominant involvement of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathways and the cholinergic system of the basal forebrain region. The age of onset differentiates the Rett syndrome from Alzheimer and Parkinson disease with similar lesions. PET scanning makes it possible to relate the chemistry of the brain to function by measuring the number and affinity of neuroreceptors, metabolism in specific brain regions, and provide important determinants of the underlying mechanisms in disease states. (author).

  9. Clinical and mutational spectrum of hypoparathyroidism, deafness and renal dysplasia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belge, Hendrica; Dahan, Karin; Cambier, Jean-François; Benoit, Valérie; Morelle, Johann; Bloch, Julie; Vanhille, Philippe; Pirson, Yves; Demoulin, Nathalie

    2017-05-01

    Hypoparathyroidism, deafness and renal dysplasia (HDR) syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disorder, secondary to mutations in the GATA-3 gene. Due to its wide range of penetrance and expressivity, the disease may not always be recognized. We herein describe clinical and genetic features of patients with HDR syndrome, highlighting diagnostic clues. Medical records of eight patients from five unrelated families exhibiting GATA-3 mutations were reviewed retrospectively, in conjunction with all previously reported cases. HDR syndrome was diagnosed in eight patients between the ages of 18 and 60 years. Sensorineural deafness was consistently diagnosed, ranging from clinical hearing loss since infancy in seven patients to deafness detected only by audiometry in adulthood in one single patient. Hypoparathyroidism was present in six patients (with hypocalcaemia and inaugural seizures in two out of six). Renal abnormalities observed in six patients were diverse and of dysplastic nature. Three patients displayed nephrotic-range proteinuria and reached end-stage renal disease (ESRD) between the ages of 19 and 61 years, whilst lesions of focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis were histologically demonstrated in one of them. Interestingly, phenotype severity differed significantly between a mother and son within one family. Five new mutations of GATA-3 were identified, including three missense mutations affecting zinc finger motifs [NM_001002295.1: c.856A>G (p.N286D) and c.1017C>G (p.C339W)] or the conserved linker region [c.896G>A (p.R299G)], and two splicing mutations (c.924+4_924+19del and c.1051-2A>G). Review of 115 previously reported cases of GATA-3 mutations showed hypoparathyroidism and deafness in 95% of patients, and renal abnormalities in only 60%. Overall, 10% of patients had reached ESRD. We herein expand the clinical and mutational spectrum of HDR syndrome, illustrating considerable inter- and intrafamilial phenotypic variability. Diagnosis of HDR should be

  10. The mitochondrial ND1 m.3337G>A mutation associated to multiple mitochondrial DNA deletions in a patient with Wolfram syndrome and cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezghani, Najla; Mnif, Mouna; Mkaouar-Rebai, Emna; Kallel, Nozha; Salem, Ikhlass Haj; Charfi, Nadia; Abid, Mohamed; Fakhfakh, Faiza

    2011-07-29

    Wolfram syndrome (WFS) is a rare hereditary disorder also known as DIDMOAD (diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and deafness). It is a heterogeneous disease and full characterization of all clinical and biological features of this disorder is difficult. The wide spectrum of clinical expression, affecting several organs and tissues, and the similarity in phenotype between patients with Wolfram syndrome and those with certain types of respiratory chain diseases suggests mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) involvement in Wolfram syndrome patients. We report a Tunisian patient with clinical features of moderate Wolfram syndrome including diabetes, dilated cardiomyopathy and neurological complications. The results showed the presence of the mitochondrial ND1 m.3337G>A mutation in almost homoplasmic form in 3 tested tissues of the proband (blood leukocytes, buccal mucosa and skeletal muscle). In addition, the long-range PCR amplifications revealed the presence of multiple deletions of the mitochondrial DNA extracted from the patient's skeletal muscle removing several tRNA and protein-coding genes. Our study reported a Tunisian patient with clinical features of moderate Wolfram syndrome associated with cardiomyopathy, in whom we detected the ND1 m.3337G>A mutation with mitochondrial multiple deletions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Molekulargenetische Charakterisierung einer Familie mit Usher-Syndrom

    OpenAIRE

    Zimmer, AJ; Arndt, S; Aschendorff, A; Birkenhäger, R

    2009-01-01

    Einleitung: Das Usher-Syndrom definiert eine genetisch und klinisch heterogene autosomal rezessiv vererbte Erkrankung mit dem gleichzeitigen Auftreten von Innenohrschwerhörigkeit bis hin zur Taubheit, teilweise Vestibularisausfall und Netzhautdegeneration (Retinitis Pigmentosa). Bisher wird das Usher-Syndrom in drei verschiedene Hauptgruppen (USH1-3) mit unterschiedlicher phänotypischer Ausprägung eingeteilt. Für das Usher-Syndrom sind 12 Genorte bekannt, für die bereits acht Gene identifizi...

  12. Seckel syndrome: A report of a case

    OpenAIRE

    K Ramalingam; S D Kaliyamurthy; M Govindarajan; S Swathi

    2012-01-01

    Seckel syndrome, first defined by Seckel in 1960, is a rare (incidence 1:10,000), genetically heterogeneous autosomal recessive disorder presenting at birth. This syndrome is characterized by a proportionate dwarfism of prenatal onset, a severe microcephaly with a "bird-headed" like appearance (beaked nose, receding forehead, prominent eyes, and micrognathia), and mental retardation. The significance of dental alterations in this syndrome resides in the defect, hypoplastic enamel, being limit...

  13. Duration of dual antiplatelet therapy in acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Simon John; Newby, David E; Dawson, Dana; Irving, John; Berry, Colin

    2017-04-01

    Despite a large volume of evidence supporting the use of dual antiplatelet therapy in patients with acute coronary syndrome, there remains major uncertainty regarding the optimal duration of therapy. Clinical trials have varied markedly in the duration of therapy, both across and within trials. Recent systematic reviews and meta-analyses suggest that shorter durations of dual antiplatelet therapy are superior because the avoidance of atherothrombotic events is counterbalanced by the greater risks of excess major bleeding with apparent increases in all-cause mortality with longer durations. These findings did not show significant heterogeneity according to whether patients had stable or unstable coronary heart disease. Moreover, the potential hazards and benefits may differ when applied to the general broad population of patients encountered in everyday clinical practice who have markedly higher bleeding and atherothrombotic event rates. Clinicians lack definitive information regarding the duration of therapy in patients with acute coronary syndrome and risk scores do not appear to be sufficiently robust to address these concerns. We believe that there is a pressing need to undertake a broad inclusive safety trial of shorter durations of therapy in real world populations of patients with acute coronary syndrome. The clinical evidence would further inform future research into strategies for personalised medicine. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  14. The lumbar facet arthrosis syndrome. Clinical presentation and articular surface changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenstein, S M; Parry, C R

    1987-01-01

    We describe a lumbar facet syndrome in which disabling symptoms are associated with normal or near-normal plain radiographs. Local spinal fusion relieved symptoms in 12 patients; the excised facet joint surfaces showed some of the histological changes seen in chondromalacia patellae and in osteoarthritis of other large joints. The most frequent change was focal full-thickness cartilage necrosis or loss of cartilage with exposure of subchondral bone, but osteophyte formation was remarkably absent in all specimens. We suggest that there are both clinical and histological similarities between the facet arthrosis syndrome and chondromalacia patellae. Facet arthrosis may be a relatively important cause of intractable back pain in young and middle-aged adults.

  15. Genomic DNA Methylation Signatures Enable Concurrent Diagnosis and Clinical Genetic Variant Classification in Neurodevelopmental Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aref-Eshghi, Erfan; Rodenhiser, David I; Schenkel, Laila C; Lin, Hanxin; Skinner, Cindy; Ainsworth, Peter; Paré, Guillaume; Hood, Rebecca L; Bulman, Dennis E; Kernohan, Kristin D; Boycott, Kym M; Campeau, Philippe M; Schwartz, Charles; Sadikovic, Bekim

    2018-01-04

    Pediatric developmental syndromes present with systemic, complex, and often overlapping clinical features that are not infrequently a consequence of Mendelian inheritance of mutations in genes involved in DNA methylation, establishment of histone modifications, and chromatin remodeling (the "epigenetic machinery"). The mechanistic cross-talk between histone modification and DNA methylation suggests that these syndromes might be expected to display specific DNA methylation signatures that are a reflection of those primary errors associated with chromatin dysregulation. Given the interrelated functions of these chromatin regulatory proteins, we sought to identify DNA methylation epi-signatures that could provide syndrome-specific biomarkers to complement standard clinical diagnostics. In the present study, we examined peripheral blood samples from a large cohort of individuals encompassing 14 Mendelian disorders displaying mutations in the genes encoding proteins of the epigenetic machinery. We demonstrated that specific but partially overlapping DNA methylation signatures are associated with many of these conditions. The degree of overlap among these epi-signatures is minimal, further suggesting that, consistent with the initial event, the downstream changes are unique to every syndrome. In addition, by combining these epi-signatures, we have demonstrated that a machine learning tool can be built to concurrently screen for multiple syndromes with high sensitivity and specificity, and we highlight the utility of this tool in solving ambiguous case subjects presenting with variants of unknown significance, along with its ability to generate accurate predictions for subjects presenting with the overlapping clinical and molecular features associated with the disruption of the epigenetic machinery. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Morvan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maskery, Mark; Chhetri, Suresh K.; Dayanandan, Rejith; Gall, Claire

    2016-01-01

    A 74-year-old gentleman was admitted to the regional neurosciences center with encephalopathy, myokymia, and dysautonomia. Chest imaging had previously identified an incidental mass in the anterior mediastinum, consistent with a primary thymic tumor. Antivoltage-gated potassium channel (anti-VGKC) antibodies were positive (titer 1273 pmol/L) and he was hypokalemic. Electromyogram and nerve conduction studies were in keeping with peripheral nerve hyperexcitability syndrome, and an electroencephalogram was consistent with encephalopathy. A diagnosis of Morvan syndrome was made, for which he was initially treated with high-dose steroids, followed by a 5-day course of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy. He also underwent thymectomy, followed by a postexcision flare of his symptoms requiring intensive care management. Further steroids, plasmapheresis, and IVIG achieved stabilization of his clinical condition, enabling transfer for inpatient neurorehabilitation. He was commenced on azathioprine and a prolonged oral steroid taper. A subsequent presumed incipient relapse responded well to further IVIG treatment. This case report documents a thymoma-associated presentation of anti-VGKC-positive Morvan syndrome supplemented by patient and carer narrative and video, both of which provide valuable further insights into this rare disorder. There are a limited number of publications surrounding this rare condition available in the English literature. This, combined with the heterogenous presentation, association with underlying malignancy, response to treatment, and prognosis, provides a diagnostic challenge. However, the association with anti-VGKC antibody-associated complexes and 2 recent case series have provided some scope for both accurate diagnosis and management. PMID:26740856

  17. Revisiting ovarian hyper stimulation syndrome: Towards OHSS free clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Banker

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A rapid development and application of assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs and ovulation-induction drugs may lead to ovarian hyper stimulation syndrome (OHSS. Young age, low body mass index (BMI, polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS, previous OHSS, high follicle count, and elevated serum estradiol (E2 are the certain factors that predispose women to OHSS. Many strategies have been used to reduce or avoid OHSS. Use of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG increases ovarian vascular permeability and is responsible for activating the vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF pathway and thus the entire cascade, leading to symptomatic OHSS. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH agonists are used as a replacement for hCG for final oocyte maturation in antagonist cycles. Reducing or eliminating the use of hCG and use of GnRH agonist triggered GnRH antagonist cycles and cryopreservation of oocytes or embryos is the most promising approach in making OHSS free clinic a reality.

  18. Mixed Bartter-Gitelman syndrome: an inbred family with a heterogeneous phenotype expression of a novel variant in the CLCNKB gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shibli, Amar; Yusuf, Madinah; Abounajab, Issam; Willems, Patrick J

    2014-01-01

    Patients with renal diseases associated with salt-losing tubulopathies categorized as Gitelman and classic form of Bartter syndrome have undergone genetic screening for possible mutation capture in two different genes: SLC12A3 and CLCNKB. Clinical symptoms of these two diseases may overlap. Bartter syndrome and Gitelman syndrome are autosomal recessive salt-losing tubulopathies with hypokalemia, metabolic alkalosis, hyperreninemia, hyperplasia of the juxtaglomerular apparatus, hyperaldosteronism, and, in some patients, hypomagnesemia. Here we describe four patients from an inbred family with a novel missense variant in the CLCNKB gene. All of patients are asymptomatic; yet they have the typical metabolic abnormality of salt losing tubulopathies. One of those patients had hypomagnesaemia while others not. Clinical and laboratory data of all patients was described. All 4 patients have a homozygous c.490G > T missense variant in exon 5 of the CLCNKB gene. This variant alters a glycine into a cysteine on amino acid position 164 of the resulting protein (p.Gly164Cys). The c.490G > T variant is a novel variant not previously described in other patients nor controls. Polyphen analysis predicts the variation to be possibly damaging. Analysis of SLC12A3 was normal. Here in we are describing a novel homozygous c.490G > T missense variation was identified in exon 5 of the CLCNKB gene was identified in an Emirati patients with a mild manifestation of Bartter - Gitelman syndrome.

  19. Mapping recessive ophthalmic diseases: linkage of the locus for Usher syndrome type II to a DNA marker on chromosome 1q.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, R A; Otterud, B; Stauffer, D; Lalouel, J M; Leppert, M

    1990-06-01

    Usher syndrome is a heterogeneous group of autosomal recessive disorders that combines variably severe congenital neurosensory hearing impairment with progressive night-blindness and visual loss similar to that in retinitis pigmentosa. Usher syndrome type I is distinguished by profound congenital (preverbal) deafness and retinal disease with onset in the first decade of life. Usher syndrome type II is characterized by partial hearing impairment and retinal dystrophy that occurs in late adolescence or early adulthood. The chromosomal assignment and the regional localization of the genetic mutation(s) causing the Usher syndromes are unknown. We analyzed a panel of polymorphic genomic markers for linkage to the disease gene among six families with Usher syndrome type I and 22 families with Usher syndrome type II. Significant linkage was established between Usher syndrome type II and the DNA marker locus THH33 (D1S81), which maps to chromosome 1q. The most likely location of the disease gene is at a map distance of 9 cM from THH33 (lod score 6.5). The same marker failed to show linkage in families segregating an allele for Usher syndrome type I. These data confirm the provisional assignment of the locus for Usher syndrome type II to the distal end of chromosome 1q and demonstrate that the clinical heterogeneity between Usher types I and II is caused by mutational events at different genetic loci. Regional localization has the potential to improve carrier detection and to provide antenatal diagnosis in families at risk for the disease.

  20. Sensorineural deafness, distinctive facial features, and abnormal cranial bones: a new variant of Waardenburg syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gad, Alona; Laurino, Mercy; Maravilla, Kenneth R; Matsushita, Mark; Raskind, Wendy H

    2008-07-15

    The Waardenburg syndromes (WS) account for approximately 2% of congenital sensorineural deafness. This heterogeneous group of diseases currently can be categorized into four major subtypes (WS types 1-4) on the basis of characteristic clinical features. Multiple genes have been implicated in WS, and mutations in some genes can cause more than one WS subtype. In addition to eye, hair, and skin pigmentary abnormalities, dystopia canthorum and broad nasal bridge are seen in WS type 1. Mutations in the PAX3 gene are responsible for the condition in the majority of these patients. In addition, mutations in PAX3 have been found in WS type 3 that is distinguished by musculoskeletal abnormalities, and in a family with a rare subtype of WS, craniofacial-deafness-hand syndrome (CDHS), characterized by dysmorphic facial features, hand abnormalities, and absent or hypoplastic nasal and wrist bones. Here we describe a woman who shares some, but not all features of WS type 3 and CDHS, and who also has abnormal cranial bones. All sinuses were hypoplastic, and the cochlea were small. No sequence alteration in PAX3 was found. These observations broaden the clinical range of WS and suggest there may be genetic heterogeneity even within the CDHS subtype. 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Muscle-Eye-Brain Disease; a Rare Form of Syndromic Congenital Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gosal Gurinder S

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by muscular hypotonia since birth and the histologic features of muscular dystrophy. Syndromic congenital muscular dystrophies are clinically similar autosomal recessive disorders characterized by congenital muscular dystrophy, lissencephaly, and eye anomalies. We present a case of a rare form of syndromic congenital muscular dystrophy in an eight year old girl, born of first- degree consanguinity. She had: global developmental delay; a seizure disorder; hypotonia; progressive muscle contractures including bilateral symmetrical flexion contractures of hips, knees, equinus contracture and thoracolumbar scoliosis; diminished deep tendon reflexes: bilateral premature cataract; pseudophakia; and nystagmus. The patient was also highly myopic. Based on clinical features, muscle biopsy and MRI of the brain, a diagnosis of muscle- eye- brain disease was made. Identification of these patients may help to prevent this crippling disorder in the future siblings of probands by utilizing genetic counselling and mutation analysis.

  2. Osteomalacia in a Case of Adult-Onset Bartter Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashid Naseem Khan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Bartter syndrome is a rare heterogeneous disease characterised by a deficiency in sodium and chloride absorption. Gain-of-function mutations in the CASR gene have been described in some patients with Bartter syndrome associated with hypocalcaemia and hypercalciuria. We describe a case of adult-onset Bartter syndrome with hypocalcaemia severe enough to cause osteomalacia.

  3. Clinical features and imaging findings in a case of Capgras syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luca, Maria; Bordone, Andrea; Luca, Antonina; Patti, Andrea; Sortino, Giuseppe; Calandra, Carmela

    2013-01-01

    Capgras syndrome consists of the delusional belief that a person or persons have been replaced by doubles or impostors. It can occur in the context of both psychiatric and organic illness, and seems to be related to lesions of the bifrontal and right limbic and temporal regions. Indeed, magnetic resonance imaging has revealed brain lesions in patients suffering from Capgras syndrome. This case study reports the findings of a thorough diagnostic evaluation in a woman suffering from Capgras syndrome and presenting with the following clinical peculiarities: obsessive modality of presentation of the delusional ideation, intrusiveness of such ideation (that even disturbed her sleep), as well as a sense of alienation and utter disgust towards the double. These characteristics bring to mind the typical aspects of obsessive-compulsive disorder. Neuroanatomic investigation, through magnetic resonance imaging, performed on this patient showed alteration of the bilateral semioval centers, which are brain regions associated with the emotion of disgust and often show alterations in subjects suffering from obsessive-compulsive disorder. Hence, neuroimaging allows researchers to put forward the hypothesis of a common neuroanatomic basis for Capgras syndrome and obsessive-compulsive disorder, at least for cases in which the delusional ideation is associated with deep feelings of disgust and presents with a certain pervasiveness.

  4. Clinical features and imaging findings in a case of Capgras syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luca, Maria; Bordone, Andrea; Luca, Antonina; Patti, Andrea; Sortino, Giuseppe; Calandra, Carmela

    2013-01-01

    Capgras syndrome consists of the delusional belief that a person or persons have been replaced by doubles or impostors. It can occur in the context of both psychiatric and organic illness, and seems to be related to lesions of the bifrontal and right limbic and temporal regions. Indeed, magnetic resonance imaging has revealed brain lesions in patients suffering from Capgras syndrome. This case study reports the findings of a thorough diagnostic evaluation in a woman suffering from Capgras syndrome and presenting with the following clinical peculiarities: obsessive modality of presentation of the delusional ideation, intrusiveness of such ideation (that even disturbed her sleep), as well as a sense of alienation and utter disgust towards the double. These characteristics bring to mind the typical aspects of obsessive-compulsive disorder. Neuroanatomic investigation, through magnetic resonance imaging, performed on this patient showed alteration of the bilateral semioval centers, which are brain regions associated with the emotion of disgust and often show alterations in subjects suffering from obsessive-compulsive disorder. Hence, neuroimaging allows researchers to put forward the hypothesis of a common neuroanatomic basis for Capgras syndrome and obsessive-compulsive disorder, at least for cases in which the delusional ideation is associated with deep feelings of disgust and presents with a certain pervasiveness. PMID:23950650

  5. Targets to treat androgen excess in polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque-Ramírez, Manuel; Escobar-Morreale, Héctor Francisco

    2015-01-01

    The polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common androgen disorder in reproductive-aged women. Excessive biosynthesis and secretion of androgens by steroidogenic tissues is its central pathogenetic mechanism. The authors review the potential targets and new drugs to treat androgen excess in PCOS. Besides our lab's experience, a systematic search (MEDLINE, Cochrane library, ClinicalTriasl.gov, EU Clinical Trials Register and hand-searching) regarding observational studies, randomized clinical trials, systematic reviews, meta-analyses and patents about this topic was performed. PCOS has a heterogeneous clinical presentation. It is unlikely that a single drug would cover all its possible manifestations. Available treatments for androgen excess are not free of side effects that are of particular concern in these women who suffer from cardiometabolic risk even without treatment. A precise characterization of the source of androgen excess must tailor antiandrogenic management in each woman, avoiding undesirable side effects.

  6. The Role of Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in the Treatment of Patients with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: A Clinical Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. García de Acilu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is defined as the acute onset of noncardiogenic edema and subsequent gas-exchange impairment due to a severe inflammatory process. Recent report on the prognostic value of eicosanoids in patients with ARDS suggests that modulating the inflammatory response through the use of polyunsaturated fatty acids may be a useful strategy for ARDS treatment. The use of enteral diets enriched with eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and gamma-linolenic acid (GLA has reported promising results, showing an improvement in respiratory variables and haemodynamics. However, the interpretation of the studies is limited by their heterogeneity and methodology and the effect of ω-3 fatty acid-enriched lipid emulsion or enteral diets on patients with ARDS remains unclear. Therefore, the routine use of ω-3 fatty acid-enriched nutrition cannot be recommended and further large, homogeneous, and high-quality clinical trials need to be conducted to clarify the effectiveness of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids.

  7. KANSL1 gene disruption associated with the full clinical spectrum of 17q21.31 microdeletion syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Moreno-Igoa, María; Hernández-Charro, Blanca; Bengoa-Alonso, Amaya; Pérez-Juana-del-Casal, Aranzazu; Romero-Ibarra, Carlos; Nieva-Echebarria, Beatriz; Ramos-Arroyo, María Antonia

    2015-01-01

    Background Chromosome 17q21.31 microdeletion syndrome is a multisystem genomic disorder caused by a recurrent 600-kb-long deletion, or haploinsufficiency of the chromatin modifier gene KANSL1, which maps to that region. Patients with KANSL1 intragenic mutations have been reported to display the major clinical features of 17q21.31 microdeletion syndrome. However, they did not exhibit the full clinical spectrum of this disorder, which might indicate that an additional gene or genes, located in ...

  8. Executive dysfunctions as part of the behavioural phenotype of Aarskog-Scott syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Egger, J.I.M.; Verhoeven, W.M.A.; Janssen, G.T.L.; Aken, L. van; Hoogeboom, A.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Aarskog syndrome (AAS) also called Aarskog-Scott syndrome faciodigitogenital syndrome or faciogenital dysplasia is a genetically heterogeneous developmental disorder, first described in 1970 by the Norwegian pediatrician Dagfin A