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Sample records for heterocapsa triquetra ehrenb

  1. Plate pattern clarification of the marine dinophyte Heterocapsa triquetra sensu Stein (Dinophyceae) collected at the Kiel Fjord (Germany).

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    Tillmann, Urban; Hoppenrath, Mona; Gottschling, Marc; Kusber, Wolf-Henning; Elbrächter, Malte

    2017-12-01

    One of the most common marine dinophytes is a species known as Heterocapsa triquetra. When Stein introduced the taxon Heterocapsa, he formally based the type species H. triquetra on the basionym Glenodinium triquetrum. The latter was described by Ehrenberg and is most likely a species of Kryptoperidinium. In addition to that currently unresolved nomenclatural situation, the thecal plate composition of H. triquetra sensu Stein (1883) was controversial in the past. To clarify the debate, we collected material and established the strain UTKG7 from the Baltic Sea off Kiel (Germany, the same locality as Stein had studied), which was investigated using light and electron microscopy, and whose systematic position was inferred using molecular phylogenetics. The small motile cells (18-26 μm in length) had a biconical through fusiform shape and typically were characterized by a short asymmetrically shaped, horn-like protuberance at the antapex. A large spherical nucleus was located in the episome, whereas a single pyrenoid laid in the lower cingular plane. The predominant plate pattern was identified as apical pore complex (Po, cp?, X), 4', 2a, 6'', 6c, 5s, 5''', 2''''. The triradiate body scales were 254-306 nm in diameter, had 6 ridges radiating from a central spine, 9 peripheral and 3 radiating spines, and 12 peripheral bars as well as a central depression in the basal plate. Our work provides a clarification of morphological characters and a new, validly published name for this important but yet formally undescribed species of Heterocapsa: H. steinii sp. nov. © 2017 Phycological Society of America.

  2. mRNA EDITING AND SPLICED-LEADER RNA TRANS-SPLICING GROUPS OXYRRHIS, NOCTILUCA, HETEROCAPSA, AND AMPHIDINIUM AS BASAL LINEAGES OF DINOFLAGELLATES(1).

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    Zhang, Huan; Lin, Senjie

    2008-06-01

    Identification of novel dinoflagellate taxa through molecular analysis is hindered by lack of well-defined basal lineages. To address this issue, we attempted to reassess the phylogenetic status of Oxyrrhis marina Dujard. as well as other potentially basal taxa. The analysis was based on two newly established premises: (1) editing density of mitochondrial cob and cox1 mRNA increases from basal to later diverging lineages; (2) nuclear-encoded mRNA in dinoflagellates is trans-spliced to receive a 22 bp spliced leader (SL) at the 5'-end. We analyzed these two genetic traits in O. marina, Noctiluca scintillans (Macartney) Kof. et Swezy, Heterocapsa triquetra (Ehrenb.) F. Stein, H. rotundata (Lohmann) Ge. Hansen, Amphidinium carterae Hulburt, and A. operculatum Clap. et J. Lachm. Surprisingly, no editing was detected in cob and cox1 mRNAs in these lineages, except for a small number of editing events in Amphidinium. However, nuclear-encoded mRNAs in these species contained the SL sequence at the 5'-end, indicative of SL RNA trans-splicing. These findings, together with the recent cob-cox1-18S rRNA three-gene phylogeny, suggest the following: (1) O. marina is a basal dinoflagellate; (2) Heterocapsa, Amphidinium, and Noctiluca likely are also early diverging lineages of dinoflagellates, and the position of Heterocapsa is inconsistent with literature and needs further investigation; and (3) the presence of the 22 bp SL and mitochondrial (mt) mRNA editing can be considered a landmark of dinoflagellate splits. © 2008 Phycological Society of America.

  3. Glucosinolate Profile of Croatian Stenoendemic Plant Fibigia triquetra (DC. Boiss. ex Prantl.

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    Ivica Blažević

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available As part of our ongoing investigation of the stenoendemic plants belonging to the Brassicaceae family, we report on the chemistry of Fibigia triquetra (DC. Boiss. ex Prantl for the first time. Different plant parts (flower, leaf, stem, and seed of F. triquetra were characterized and quantified for glucosinolates (GLs according to the ISO 9167-1 EU official method based on the HPLC analysis of desulfo-GLs. A taxonomic screening showed that F. triquetra contained relatively high levels of C-4 GLs, namely but-3-enyl GL (gluconapin, 1a, 4-methylsulfanylbutyl GL (glucoerucin, 3a, and 4-methylsulfinylbutyl GL (glucoraphanin, 5a. GC-MS analysis of the volatile fractions obtained after enzyme hydrolysis and/or HPLC-ESI-MS of intact GLs confirmed the GL profile. Four minor GLs, namely isopropyl GL (glucoputranjivin, 6a, sec-butyl GL (glucocochlearin, 7a, pent-4-enyl GL (glucobrassicanapin, 2a, and 5-methylsulfanylpentyl GL (glucoberteroin, 4a were also identified and quantified while 4-methylpentyl GL, 5-methylhexyl GL, and n-heptyl GL, were tentatively identified by GC-MS of their degradation products. Based on the major, as well as the minor GLs, this study shows differences in chemotaxonomy between F. triquetra and the related Degenia velebitica (Degen Hayek as well as other investigated species of the genus Fibigia.

  4. Anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and antifungal furanosesquiterpenoids isolated from Commiphora erythraea (Ehrenb.) Engl. resin.

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    Fraternale, Daniele; Sosa, Silvio; Ricci, Donata; Genovese, Salvatore; Messina, Federica; Tomasini, Sabrina; Montanari, Francesca; Marcotullio, Maria Carla

    2011-06-01

    The topical anti-inflammatory, free radical scavenging and antifungal activities of essential oils and extracts of Commiphora erythraea (Ehrenb.) Engl. resin were investigated. The hexane extract significantly inhibited oedema when applied topically in Croton oil-induced ear oedema assay in mice. The same extract showed antioxidant activity in DPPH radical scavenging assay. A bioguided separation of the hexane extract led to the isolation of furanosesquiterpenoids 1 and 2 that showed a weak antifungal activity, while compounds 3-5 resulted to be antioxidant (EC(50) 4.28, 2.56 and 1.08 mg/mL, respectively) and anti-inflammatory (30, 26 and 32% oedema reduction, respectively). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Berberis libanotica Ehrenb extract shows anti-neoplastic effects on prostate cancer stem/progenitor cells.

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    El-Merahbi, Rabih; Liu, Yen-Nien; Eid, Assaad; Daoud, Georges; Hosry, Leina; Monzer, Alissar; Mouhieddine, Tarek H; Hamade, Aline; Najjar, Fadia; Abou-Kheir, Wassim

    2014-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), including those of advanced prostate cancer, are a suggested reason for tumor resistance toward conventional tumor therapy. Therefore, new therapeutic agents are urgently needed for targeting CSCs. Despite the minimal understanding of their modes of action, natural products and herbal therapies have been commonly used in the prevention and treatment of many cancers. Berberis libanotica Ehrenb (BLE) is a plant rich in alkaloids which may possess anti-cancer activity and a high potential for eliminating CSCs. We tested the effect of BLE on prostate cancer cells and our data indicated that this extract induced significant reduction in cell viability and inhibited the proliferation of human prostate cancer cell lines (DU145, PC3 and 22Rv1) in a dose- and time-dependent manner. BLE extract induced a perturbation of the cell cycle, leading to a G0-G1 arrest. Furthermore, we noted 50% cell death, characterized by the production of high levels of reactive oxidative species (ROS). Inhibition of cellular migration and invasion was also achieved upon treatment with BLE extract, suggesting a role in inhibiting metastasis. Interestingly, BLE extract had a major effect on CSCs. Cells were grown in a 3D sphere-formation assay to enrich for a population of cancer stem/progenitor cells. Our results showed a significant reduction in sphere formation ability. Three rounds of treatment with BLE extract were sufficient to eradicate the self-renewal ability of highly resistant CSCs. In conclusion, our results suggest a high therapeutic potential of BLE extract in targeting prostate cancer and its CSCs.

  6. Berberis libanotica Ehrenb extract shows anti-neoplastic effects on prostate cancer stem/progenitor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabih El-Merahbi

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSCs, including those of advanced prostate cancer, are a suggested reason for tumor resistance toward conventional tumor therapy. Therefore, new therapeutic agents are urgently needed for targeting CSCs. Despite the minimal understanding of their modes of action, natural products and herbal therapies have been commonly used in the prevention and treatment of many cancers. Berberis libanotica Ehrenb (BLE is a plant rich in alkaloids which may possess anti-cancer activity and a high potential for eliminating CSCs. We tested the effect of BLE on prostate cancer cells and our data indicated that this extract induced significant reduction in cell viability and inhibited the proliferation of human prostate cancer cell lines (DU145, PC3 and 22Rv1 in a dose- and time-dependent manner. BLE extract induced a perturbation of the cell cycle, leading to a G0-G1 arrest. Furthermore, we noted 50% cell death, characterized by the production of high levels of reactive oxidative species (ROS. Inhibition of cellular migration and invasion was also achieved upon treatment with BLE extract, suggesting a role in inhibiting metastasis. Interestingly, BLE extract had a major effect on CSCs. Cells were grown in a 3D sphere-formation assay to enrich for a population of cancer stem/progenitor cells. Our results showed a significant reduction in sphere formation ability. Three rounds of treatment with BLE extract were sufficient to eradicate the self-renewal ability of highly resistant CSCs. In conclusion, our results suggest a high therapeutic potential of BLE extract in targeting prostate cancer and its CSCs.

  7. Investigations of body scales in twelve Heterocapsa species (Peridiniales, Dinophyceae), including a new species H. pseudotriquetra sp. nov

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    Iwataki, M.; Hansen, Gert; Sawaguchi, T.

    2004-01-01

    The body scales of 12 Heterocapsa species including a new species, H. pseudotriquetra Iwataki, Gert Hansen & Fukuyo, sp. nov. were investigated by transmission electron microscopy to clarify ultrastructural differences. All species had scales with a body-scale structure consisting of a triradiate...

  8. Three-dimensional reconstruction of Heterocapsa circularisquama RNA virus by electron cryo-microscopy.

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    Miller, Jennifer L; Woodward, Jeremy; Chen, Shaoxia; Jaffer, Mohammed; Weber, Brandon; Nagasaki, Keizo; Tomaru, Yuji; Wepf, Roger; Roseman, Alan; Varsani, Arvind; Sewell, Trevor

    2011-08-01

    Heterocapsa circularisquama RNA virus is a non-enveloped icosahedral ssRNA virus infectious to the harmful bloom-forming dinoflagellate, H. circularisquama, and which is assumed to be the major natural agent controlling the host population. The viral capsid is constructed from a single gene product. Electron cryo-microscopy revealed that the virus has a diameter of 34 nm and T = 3 symmetry. The 180 quasi-equivalent monomers have an unusual arrangement in that each monomer contributes to a 'bump' on the surface of the protein. Though the capsid protein probably has the classic 'jelly roll' β-sandwich fold, this is a new packing arrangement and is distantly related to the other positive-sense ssRNA virus capsid proteins. The handedness of the structure has been determined by a novel method involving high resolution scanning electron microscopy of the negatively stained viruses and secondary electron detection.

  9. Photosensitizing hemolytic toxin in Heterocapsa circularisquama, a newly identified harmful red tide dinoflagellate.

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    Sato, Yoji; Oda, Tatsuya; Muramatsu, Tsuyoshi; Matsuyama, Yukihiko; Honjo, Tsuneo

    2002-02-01

    Red tides of Heterocapsa circularisquama (H. circularisquama), recently identified as a novel species of dinoflagellate, have frequently caused mass mortality of several species of bivalves in Japan, while no harmful effects of this flagellate on fish have been reported so far. We found that the cell-free ethanol extract prepared from H. circularisquama caused hemolysis of rabbit erythrocytes and demonstrated cytotoxic effects in HeLa cells and on the microzooplankton rotifer (B. plicatilis) in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Interestingly, the hemolytic activity and cytotoxic effects of the extract were completely dependent on the presence of light. When the experiments were conducted in the dark, no hemolysis was observed even at very high concentration of the extract. These results suggest that H. circularisquama has photosensitizing hemolytic toxin which can be easily extracted into ethanol. This may be the first report documenting the occurrence of photosensitizing hemolytic toxin in marine phytoplankton species.

  10. Mixotrophy in the Winter Bloom-forming Heterocapsa rotundata: Quantifying Grazing Rates Using Two Methodologies

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    Aceves, A.; Pierson, J. J.; Millette, N.

    2016-02-01

    Mixotrophic plankton are capable of obtaining their energy through photosynthesis and phagocytosis, and have been observed to be common among marine and freshwater dinoflagellates. The role of mixotrophic dinoflagellates in the `microbial loop' has received little attention. Organisms that were only thought to introduce new carbon into the loop through photosynthesis may also consume fixed carbon by ingesting bacteria, making the `microbial loop' more complex that originally conceived. The nanodinoflagellate Heterocapsa rotundata was cultured under various light and nutrient regimes to investigate the role of phototrophy and phagotrophy during winter conditions in the Chesapeake Bay. We quantified grazing rates of H. rotundata on bacteria using two feeding methods, ingestion of polycarbonate microspheres and prey removal experiments. Ingestion of fluorescent microspheres by H. rotundata revealed their ability to phagocytize particles. Using flow cytometry we calculated grazing rates of H. rotundata on bacteria under various light intensities and ammonium concentrations and found that H. rotundata increased phagotrophy at lower light intensities and ammonium was positively correlated with the grazing rates of H. rotundata. We conclude that H. rotundata uses mixotrophy as a primary source for obtaining carbon during the winter when there is limited light and lower temperatures.

  11. Anti-tumor activity of exopolysaccharide from Rhizopus nigricans Ehrenb on S180 tumor-bearing mice.

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    Cao, Jianfeng; Hou, Dong; Lu, Jingbo; Zhu, Lei; Zhang, Pengying; Zhou, Nan; Chen, Kaoshan

    2016-04-15

    In this study, the effect of antitumor and immune activities of extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) from Rhizopus nigricans Ehrenb were investigated using S180 bearing mice. The results revealed that EPS in the concentration range 50-1000 μg/mL can inhibited S180 cell proliferation in a dose dependent manner. EPS at the highest dose of 1000 μg/mL showed significantly antitumor activity against S180 with inhibition rate of 47.53%. However, EPS significantly simulated spleen lymphocytes in the concentration of 500 μg/mL, and the increase proliferation ability showed a dose-dependent effect with EPS at the dose of 50-500 μg/mL. In comparison with the control groups, the weights of tumor were declined and the inhibition rates of tumor were remarkably decreased in the treated groups. Pretreatment with EPS at the dose of 75 mg/kg/day, the inhibition rate was decreased by 44.38% (Pcontrol group were very obvious. Meanwhile, the prophylactic administration of EPS could more efficiently inhibit the growth of S180 tumor than direct administration of EPS. EPS could prolong the survival period of S180 tumor bearing mice, and the doses 75 mg/kg/day of EPS and combined with cyclophosphamide (20 mg/kg/day) were 43.36% and 36.28% respectively compared to control groups (P<0.05). The results suggested EPS confirmed in vivo anti-tumor effects observed in vitro, and the mechanism of anti-tumor effect of EPS may be at least in part mediated by increased immune activity in host. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Dynamics of Heterocapsa sp. and the associated attached and free-living bacteria under the influence of dispersed and undispersed crude oil.

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    Severin, T; Bacosa, H P; Sato, A; Erdner, D L

    2016-12-01

    While many studies have examined the impact of oil on phytoplankton or bacteria, very few considered the effects on the biological complex formed by phytoplankton and their associated phytoplankton-attached (PA) and free-living (FL) bacteria. However, associated bacteria can affect the physiology of phytoplankton and influence their stress responses. In this study, we monitored the growth of Heterocapsa sp., an armoured dinoflagellate, exposed to crude oil, Corexit dispersant, or both. Growth of Heterocapsa sp. is unaffected by crude oil up to 25 ppm, a concentration similar to the lower range measured on Florida beaches after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. The PA bacteria community was resistant to exposure, whereas the FL community shifted towards oil degraders; both responses could contribute to Heterocapsa sp. oil resistance. The growth rate of Heterocapsa sp. decreased significantly only when exposed to dispersed oil at 25 ppm, indicating a synergistic effect of dispersant on oil toxicity in this organism. For the first time, we demonstrated the decoupling of the responses of the PA and FL bacteria communities after exposure to an environmental stress, in this case oil and dispersant. Our findings suggest new directions to explore in the understanding of interactions between unicellular eukaryotes and prokaryotes. In the environment, oil spills have the capacity to modify phytoplankton communities, with important consequences on the food web and the carbon cycle. We are just beginning to understand the oil resistance of phytoplankton species, making it difficult to predict community response. In this study we highlighted the strong resistance of Heterocapsa sp. to oil, which could be associated with its resilient attached bacteria and oil degradation by the free-living bacteria. This finding suggests new directions to explore in the understanding of oil impacts and interactions between eukaryotic and prokaryotic microbes. © 2016 The Society for Applied

  13. Evidence for the presence of cell-surface-bound and intracellular bactericidal toxins in the dinoflagellate Heterocapsa circularisquama.

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    Cho, Kichul; Wencheng, Li; Takeshita, Satoshi; Seo, Jung-Kil; Chung, Young-Ho; Kim, Daekyung; Oda, Tatsuya

    2017-08-01

    Heterocapsa circularisquama, a harmful dinoflagellate, has multiple haemolytic toxins that are considered to be involved in the toxic mechanism against shellfish and certain species of zooplankton. To evaluate the further nature of the toxins of H. circularisquama, we investigated its effects on several species of bacteria. By colony formation assay, we found that H. circularisquama had antibacterial activity toward the marine bacterium Vibrio alginolyticus in a cell density-dependent manner. When the inoculated bacterial cells were co-cultured with H. circularisquama under dinoflagellate cell culture conditions, the bacterial growth was significantly suppressed, whereas the number of live bacterial cells increased when cultured in the medium alone. Since the cell-free culture supernatant and the ruptured dinoflagellate cell suspension showed no toxic effects on V. alginolyticus, it is speculated that direct cell-to-cell contact mediated by the live dinoflagellate cells may be the major toxic mechanism. The decrease in bactericidal activity of theca-removed dinoflagellate cells may further support this speculation. H. circularisquama also showed bactericidal activities towards Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. In the dinoflagellate/bacteria co-culture system, the number of live bacterial cells declined with increasing incubation time. Light-dependent antibacterial activity of the ruptured dinoflagellate cells against S. aureus was observed, whereas no such activity was detected against E. coli. These results suggest that intracellular photosensitising bactericidal toxins, which were previously found to be porphyrin derivatives, may have specificity towards gram-positive bacteria. Based on these results together with previous studies, it is obvious that H. circularisquama possesses antibacterial activity, which may be mediated through toxins located on its cell surface. It is likely that such toxins play a role in the defence mechanism against predators

  14. Prevalence and intensity of pathologies induced by the toxic dinoflagellate, Heterocapsa circularisquama, in the Mediterranean mussel, Mytilus galloprovincialis.

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    Basti, Leila; Endo, Makoto; Segawa, Susumu; Shumway, Sandra E; Tanaka, Yuji; Nagai, Satoshi

    2015-06-01

    The harmful dinoflagellate, Heterocapsa circularisquama, has been causing mass mortalities of bivalve molluscs in Japan, at relatively low cell densities. Although several studies have been conducted to determine the toxicity mechanisms, the specific cause of death is still unclear. In a previous study, in our laboratory, it was shown that H. circularisquama (10(3) cells ml(-1)) caused extensive cytotoxicity in the gills of short-neck clams, Ruditapes philippinarum. In the present study, Mediterranean mussels, Mytilus galloprovincialis, were exposed to H. circularisquama at four cell densities (5, 50, 500, 10(3) cells ml(-1)), three temperatures (15, 20, and 25°C), and three exposure durations (3, 24, and 48 h), and the pathologies in nine organs (gills, labial palps, mantle, hepatopancreas, stomach, intestines, exhalant siphon, adductor muscles, and foot) were assessed. Foot, adductor muscles, and exhalent siphons of mussels were not affected; however, 16 inflammatory (hemocytic infiltration and aggregation, diapedesis, hyperplasia, hypertrophy, edema, melanization, and firbrosis) and degenerative (thrombus, thrombosed edema, cilia matting and exfoliation, epithelial desquamation, atrophy, and necrosis) pathologies were identified in the gills, labial palps, mantle, hepatopancreas, stomach, and intestines. The total prevalence and total intensity of pathology in each individual mussel, and the prevalence and intensity of pathology in each organ increased significantly with increased cell density, exposure duration, and temperature. The prevalence of pathology was the highest in gills, followed by the prevalence in labial palps, mantle, stomach, and intestines. Pathology was least prevalent in the hepatopancreas. The intensity of pathology was the highest in the gills, followed by the labial palps and mantle, the stomach and intestines, and the hepatopancreas. This detailed quantitative histopathological study demonstrates that exposure to H. circularisquama

  15. Intracellular haemolytic agents of Heterocapsa circularisquama exhibit toxic effects on H. circularisquama cells themselves and suppress both cell-mediated haemolytic activity and toxicity to rotifers (Brachionus plicatilis).

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    Nishiguchi, Tomoki; Cho, Kichul; Yasutomi, Masumi; Ueno, Mikinori; Yamaguchi, Kenichi; Basti, Leila; Yamasaki, Yasuhiro; Takeshita, Satoshi; Kim, Daekyung; Oda, Tatsuya

    2016-10-01

    A harmful dinoflagellate, Heterocapsa circularisquama, is highly toxic to shellfish and the zooplankton rotifer Brachionus plicatilis. A previous study found that H. circularisquama has both light-dependent and -independent haemolytic agents, which might be responsible for its toxicity. Detailed analysis of the haemolytic activity of H. circularisquama suggested that light-independent haemolytic activity was mediated mainly through intact cells, whereas light-dependent haemolytic activity was mediated by intracellular agents which can be discharged from ruptured cells. Because H. circularisquama showed similar toxicity to rotifers regardless of the light conditions, and because ultrasonic ruptured H. circularisquama cells showed no significant toxicity to rotifers, it was suggested that live cell-mediated light-independent haemolytic activity is a major factor responsible for the observed toxicity to rotifers. Interestingly, the ultrasonic-ruptured cells of H. circularisquama suppressed their own lethal effect on the rotifers. Analysis of samples of the cell contents (supernatant) and cell fragments (precipitate) prepared from the ruptured H. circularisquama cells indicated that the cell contents contain inhibitors for the light-independent cell-mediated haemolytic activity, toxins affecting H. circularisquama cells themselves, as well as light-dependent haemolytic agents. Ethanol extract prepared from H. circularisquama, which is supposed to contain a porphyrin derivative that displays photosensitising haemolytic activity, showed potent toxicity to Chattonella marina, Chattonella antiqua, and Karenia mikimotoi, as well as to H. circularisquama at the concentration range at which no significant toxicity to rotifers was observed. Analysis on a column of Sephadex LH-20 revealed that light-dependent haemolytic activity and inhibitory activity on cell-mediated light-independent haemolytic activity existed in two separate fractions (f-2 and f-3), suggesting that both

  16. High interaction variability of the bivalve-killing dinoflagellate Heterocapsa circularisquama strains and their single-stranded RNA virus HcRNAV isolates.

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    Nakayama, Natsuko; Fujimoto, Akihiro; Kawami, Hisae; Tomaru, Yuji; Hata, Naotsugu; Nagasaki, Keizo

    2013-01-01

    HcRNAV is a single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) virus that specifically infects the bivalve-killing dinoflagellate, Heterocapsa circularisquama. HcRNAV strains are grouped into 2 types (UA and CY), based on intra-species host specificity and the amino acid sequence of the major capsid protein (MCP). In the present study, we report the isolation of novel HcRNAV clones (n=51) lytic to the H. circularisquama strains, HU9433-P, HCLG-1, 05HC05 and 05HC06. HcRNAV34, HcRNAV109, HcRNAV641, and HcRNAV659, which displayed lytic activity against the strains, HU9433-P, HCLG-1, 05HC05, and 05HC06, respectively, were selected as typical virus clones and were intensively examined. The infection intensity of each host-virus combination was analyzed by examining the algicidal activity, detecting the intracellular replication of the viral RNA as well as the appearance of host cells with a morphologically abnormal nucleus post-infection. Interestingly, the strains, 05HC05 and 05HC06, were markedly sensitive to HcRNAV641 and HcRNAV659, respectively. Tertiary structural modeling predicted 4 unique amino acid (aa) substitutions in HcRNAV659-MCP to be exposed to an ambient water environment, which contributed towards determining its infection specificity. Neighbor-joining analysis of MCP aa sequences from HcRNAV clones revealed 3 clades, namely, the CY type and the UA1 and UA2 subtypes. The HcRNAV clones lytic to HCLG-1 (ex. HcRNAV109), HU9433-P and 05HC05 (ex. HcRNAV34), and 05HC06 (ex. HcRNAV659) were categorized into CY type, UA1 and UA2 subtypes, respectively. The present study highlights the complexity of the H. circularisquama-HcRNAV host-virus system, i.e., clonal variation, microbial control, and ecology in a natural algal population.

  17. Neuroenzymatic activity and physiological energetics in Manila clam, Ruditapes philippinarum, during short-term sublethal exposure to harmful alga, Heterocapsa circularisquama.

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    Basti, Leila; Nagai, Satoshi; Watanabe, Satoshi; Oda, Tatsuya; Tanaka, Yuji

    2016-07-01

    The harmful alga, Heterocapsa circularisquama, causes recurrent mortalities of bivalve molluscs in Japan, with demonstrated hemolysis and cytotoxicity in rabbit erythrocytes, HeLa cells, and bivalve tissues. Nonetheless, the effects of exposure to sublethal cell densities on the physiological energetics of bivalves have not been investigated, nor the potential involvement of neurotoxicity. In the present study, two sets of experiments were conducted with adult clams, Ruditapes philippinarum. In the first set, the clearance rate (CR), respiration rate (RR), absorption efficiency (AE), ingestion rate (IR), and absorption rate (AR) were examined in clams exposed to H. circularisquama to quantify the scope for growth (SFG) as an indicative of the bioenergetic status of clams (5, 50, 2.5×10(2), and 5×10(2)cellsml(-1); under 15°C and 20°C). In the second set, the activity of the biomarker of neurotoxic exposure, acetylcholinesterase (AChE), was monitored following 3, 6, 24, and 48h of exposure (5, 50, 5×10(2), and 10(3)cellsml(-1), at 20°C) in gills of R. philippinarum, and compared to that in Mediterranean mussels, Mytilus galloprovincialis; a species also affected by H. circualrisquama and in which AChE activity was more extensively studied. At 15°C, CR, IR, and AR were decreased for exposures to 50-5×10(2) cells ml(-1) resulting in a significant decrease in the absorbed energy (A), and a significant decrease in SFG at 5×10(2)cellsml(-1). At 20°C, AE was null for exposures to 2.5×10(2) and 5×10(2)cellsml(-1). RR was decreased at 2.5×10(2) and 5×10(2)cellsml(-1), CR, IR, and AR were decreased at 5-5×10(2)cellsml(-1), and the AE was null for 2.5×10(2)-5×10(2)cellsml(-1) resulting in a significant decrease in the respired energy (R), but mainly in (A) especially at 2.5×10(2) and 5×10(2)cellsml(-1) decreasing the SFG over the entire range of cell density with negative values for 2.5×10(2) and 5×10(2)cellsml(-1). The activity of AChE in both clams and

  18. Does irradiance influence the tolerance of marine phytoplankton to high pH?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lasse T; Lundholm, Nina; Hansen, Per Juel

    2007-01-01

    The effect of irradiance on the tolerance to high pH of the two marine protists Heterocapsa triquetra and Nitzschia navis-varingica were investigated by conducting a series of pH drift experiments. In order to select appropriate levels of irradiance for the pH drift experiments, the photosyntheti...

  19. Diatom production in the marine environment : implications for larval fish growth and condition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    St. John, Michael; Clemmesen, C.; Lund, T.

    2001-01-01

    ) the dinoflagellate Heterocapsa triquetra (c) the flagellate Rhodomonas baltica: (d) a diet composed of both Skeletonema and Heterocapsa food chains (1: 1), and (e) a starvation group. These algae were fed to cultures of adult Acartia tonsa. Copepod eggs were collected, hatched. and the NI nauplii (2001(-1)) were fed...... to post-yolk-sac larval cod. Results indicate that larval growth rates are significantly influenced by the content of essential fatty acids of the algal food source: growth rates were positively correlated with the content of DHA (C22:6 omega0) and negatively with EPA (C20:5 omega3). The ratio of omega3...

  20. Lipid biomarkers : Linking the utilization of frontal plankton biomass to enhanced condition of juvenile North Sea cod

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    St. John, Michael; Lund, T.

    1996-01-01

    - specific fatty acid content to trace the phytoplankton group and mixing regime contributing to the condition of individual juvenile North Sea cod. In order to establish a relationship between lipid tracer content and algal utilization, post yolk- sac larval North Sea cod were reared in the laboratory...... on food chains based on monocultures of either the diatom Skeletonema costatum or the dinoflagellate Heterocapsa triquetra (algae dominating in the mixed and stratified regions of the North Sea). In the laboratory, these algae were fed to cultures of adult Acartia tonsa, the copepod eggs were collected......, hatched and the N1 nauplii from these different feeding regimes fed to post yolk-sac larval North Sea cod. Post yolk-sac larval cod required 8 d on either a Heterocapsa- or Skeletonema-based food chain before tracer Lipid signals (the ratio of the lipids 16:1 omega 7 to 16:0) in the larvae began to change...

  1. A winter dinoflagellate bloom drives high rates of primary production in a Patagonian fjord ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero, P.; Pérez-Santos, I.; Daneri, G.; Gutiérrez, M. H.; Igor, G.; Seguel, R.; Purdie, D.; Crawford, D. W.

    2017-12-01

    A dense winter bloom of the dinoflagellate Heterocapsa triquetra was observed at a fixed station (44°35.3‧S; 72°43.6‧W) in the Puyuhuapi Fjord in Chilean Patagonia during July 2015. H. triquetra dominated the phytoplankton community in the surface waters between 2 and 15 m (13-58 × 109 cell m-2), with abundances some 3 to 15 times higher than the total abundance of the diatom assemblage, which was dominated by Skeletonema spp. The high abundance of dinoflagellates was reflected in high rates of gross primary production (GPP; 0.6-1.6 g C m-2 d-1) and chlorophyll-a concentration (Chl-a; 70-199.2 mg m-2) that are comparable to levels reported in spring diatom blooms in similar Patagonian fjords. We identify the main forcing factors behind a pulse of organic matter production during the non-productive winter season, and test the hypothesis that low irradiance levels are a key factor limiting phytoplankton blooms and subsequent productivity during winter. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) indicated that GPP rates were significantly correlated (r = -0.8, p temperature and the presence of the Heterocapsa bloom. The bloom occurred under low surface irradiance levels characteristic of austral winter and was accompanied by strong northern winds, associated with the passage of a low-pressure system, and a water column dominated by double diffusive layering. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a dense dinoflagellate bloom during deep austral winter in a Patagonian fjord, and our data challenge the paradigm of light limitation as a factor controlling phytoplankton blooms in this region in winter.

  2. Can crude oil toxicity on phytoplankton be predicted based on toxicity data on benzo(a)pyrene and naphthalene?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozhan, Koray; Bargu, Sibel

    2014-02-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which are major components of crude oil, are responsible in large part for the toxicity of crude oil to phytoplankton. This study addressed the following question. Can reliable predictions of the aquatic toxicity of crude oil, a multi-component mixture, be described from toxicity data on individual PAH compounds? Naphthalene, the most abundant PAH compound, and benzo(a)pyrene, a highly toxic PAH compound, were selected as model compounds to quantify toxicity of crude oil on two phytoplankton species, Ditylum brightwellii and Heterocapsa triquetra, by analyzing the effects of different concentrations of these PAHs on growth rate. EC50 values suggested that the diatom D. brightwellii was more vulnerable to both toxicants than the dinoflagellate H. triquetra. However, a previous study, which investigated the impact of crude oil on the same two species, had opposite results. The differences in response from these phytoplankton species to naphthalene and benzo(a)pyrene toxicity compared to their response to crude oil suggest that they may not be solely used as surrogates to assess crude oil toxicity on phytoplankton.

  3. Interactions between polystyrene microplastics and marine phytoplankton lead to species-specific hetero-aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Marc; Paul-Pont, Ika; Hégaret, Hélène; Moriceau, Brivaela; Lambert, Christophe; Huvet, Arnaud; Soudant, Philippe

    2017-09-01

    To understand the fate and impacts of microplastics (MP) in the marine ecosystems, it is essential to investigate their interactions with phytoplankton as these may affect MP bioavailability to marine organisms as well as their fate in the water column. However, the behaviour of MP with marine phytoplanktonic cells remains little studied and thus unpredictable. The present study assessed the potential for phytoplankton cells to form hetero-aggregates with small micro-polystyrene (micro-PS) particles depending on microalgal species and physiological status. A prymnesiophycea, Tisochrysis lutea, a dinoflagellate, Heterocapsa triquetra, and a diatom, Chaetoceros neogracile, were exposed to micro-PS (2 μm diameter; 3.96 μg L -1 ) during their growth culture cycles. Micro-PS were quantified using an innovative flow-cytometry approach, which allowed the monitoring of the micro-PS repartition in microalgal cultures and the distinction between free suspended micro-PS and hetero-aggregates of micro-PS and microalgae. Hetero-aggregation was observed for C. neogracile during the stationary growth phase. The highest levels of micro-PS were "lost" from solution, sticking to flasks, with T. lutea and H. triquetra cultures. This loss of micro-PS sticking to the flask walls increased with the age of the culture for both species. No effects of micro-PS were observed on microalgal physiology in terms of growth and chlorophyll fluorescence. Overall, these results highlight the potential for single phytoplankton cells and residual organic matter to interact with microplastics, and thus potentially influence their distribution and bioavailability in experimental systems and the water column. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Induction of reactive oxygen species in marine phytoplankton under crude oil exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozhan, Koray; Zahraeifard, Sara; Smith, Aaron P; Bargu, Sibel

    2015-12-01

    Exposure of phytoplankton to the water-accommodated fraction of crude oil can elicit a number of stress responses, but the mechanisms that drive these responses are unclear. South Louisiana crude oil was selected to investigate its effects on population growth, chlorophyll a (Chl a) content, antioxidative defense, and lipid peroxidation, for the marine diatom, Ditylum brightwellii, and the dinoflagellate, Heterocapsa triquetra, in laboratory-based microcosm experiments. The transcript levels of several possible stress-responsive genes in D. brightwellii were also measured. The microalgae were exposed to crude oil for up to 96 h, and Chl a content, superoxide dismutase (SOD), the glutathione pool (GSH and GSSG), and lipid peroxidation content were analyzed. The cell growth of both phytoplankton species was inhibited with increasing crude oil concentrations. Crude oil exposure did not affect Chl a content significantly in cells. SOD activities showed similar responses in both species, being enhanced at 4- and 8-mg/L crude oil exposure. Only H. triquetra demonstrated enhanced activity in GSSG pool and lipid peroxidation at 8-mg/L crude oil exposure, suggesting that phytoplankton species have distinct physiological responses and tolerance levels to crude oil exposure. This study indicated the activation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in phytoplankton under crude oil exposure; however, the progressive damage in cells is still unknown. Thus, ROS-related damage in nucleic acid, lipids, proteins, and DNA, due to crude oil exposure could be a worthwhile subject of study to better understand crude oil toxicity at the base of the food web.

  5. Trojan Horse Strategy for Non-invasive Interference of Clock Gene in the Oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payton, Laura; Perrigault, Mickael; Bourdineaud, Jean-Paul; Marcel, Anjara; Massabuau, Jean-Charles; Tran, Damien

    2017-08-01

    RNA interference is a powerful method to inhibit specific gene expression. Recently, silencing target genes by feeding has been successfully carried out in nematodes, insects, and small aquatic organisms. A non-invasive feeding-based RNA interference is reported here for the first time in a mollusk bivalve, the pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. In this Trojan horse strategy, the unicellular alga Heterocapsa triquetra is the food supply used as a vector to feed oysters with Escherichia coli strain HT115 engineered to express the double-stranded RNA targeting gene. To test the efficacy of the method, the Clock gene, a central gene of the circadian clock, was targeted for knockout. Results demonstrated specific and systemic efficiency of the Trojan horse strategy in reducing Clock mRNA abundance. Consequences of Clock disruption were observed in Clock-related genes (Bmal, Tim1, Per, Cry1, Cry2, Rev.-erb, and Ror) and triploid oysters were more sensitive than diploid to the interference. This non-invasive approach shows an involvement of the circadian clock in oyster bioaccumulation of toxins produced by the harmful alga Alexandrium minutum.

  6. Alexandrium minutum growth controlled by phosphorus . An applied model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapelle, A.; Labry, C.; Sourisseau, M.; Lebreton, C.; Youenou, A.; Crassous, M. P.

    2010-11-01

    Toxic algae are a worldwide problem threatening aquaculture, public health and tourism. Alexandrium, a toxic dinoflagellate proliferates in Northwest France estuaries (i.e. the Penzé estuary) causing Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning events. Vegetative growth, and in particular the role of nutrient uptake and growth rate, are crucial parameters to understand toxic blooms. With the goal of modelling in situ Alexandrium blooms related to environmental parameters, we first try to calibrate a zero-dimensional box model of Alexandrium growth. This work focuses on phosphorus nutrition. Our objective is to calibrate Alexandrium minutum as well as Heterocapsa triquetra (a non-toxic dinoflagellate) growth under different rates of phosphorus supply, other factors being optimal and constant. Laboratory experiments are used to calibrate two growth models and three uptake models for each species. Models are then used to simulate monospecific batch and semi-continuous experiments as well as competition between the two algae (mixed cultures). Results show that the Droop growth model together with linear uptake versus quota can represent most of our observations, although a power law uptake function can more accurately simulate our phosphorus uptake data. We note that such models have limitations in non steady-state situations and cell quotas can depend on a variety of factors, so care must be taken in extrapolating these results beyond the specific conditions studied.

  7. Mitochondrial Genes of Dinoflagellates Are Transcribed by a Nuclear-Encoded Single-Subunit RNA Polymerase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Ying Teng

    Full Text Available Dinoflagellates are a large group of algae that contribute significantly to marine productivity and are essential photosynthetic symbionts of corals. Although these algae have fully-functioning mitochondria and chloroplasts, both their organelle genomes have been highly reduced and the genes fragmented and rearranged, with many aberrant transcripts. However, nothing is known about their RNA polymerases. We cloned and sequenced the gene for the nuclear-encoded mitochondrial polymerase (RpoTm of the dinoflagellate Heterocapsa triquetra and showed that the protein presequence targeted a GFP construct into yeast mitochondria. The gene belongs to a small gene family, which includes a variety of 3'-truncated copies that may have originated by retroposition. The catalytic C-terminal domain of the protein shares nine conserved sequence blocks with other single-subunit polymerases and is predicted to have the same fold as the human enzyme. However, the N-terminal (promoter binding/transcription initiation domain is not well-conserved. In conjunction with the degenerate nature of the mitochondrial genome, this suggests a requirement for novel accessory factors to ensure the accurate production of functional mRNAs.

  8. Effect of filtration rate on coal-sand dual-media filter performances for microalgae removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabiri, Nour-Eddine; Monnier, Elodie; Raimbault, Virginie; Massé, Anthony; Séchet, Véronique; Jaouen, Pascal

    2017-02-01

    This study tested the efficiency of granular filtration using a bilayer sand filter for microalgae removal from culture dilutions ranging from 10,000 to 17,000 cells/mL. The objective is to evaluate the removal capacity of the filter without chemical coagulation. Two filter media, sand and anthracite, with mean grain sizes of 0.395 and 1.2 mm, respectively, were used in constant-flow-rate experiments (down-flow mode) with suspensions containing Heterocapsa triquetra microalga. The conventional rapid filtration which usually operates at a constant rate of approximately 5 m3/m2 h is compared to high-rate filtration. Two filtration velocities (5 and 10 m/h) were investigated with bed depth of 1100 mm. Average microalgal cell removal rates were 90% at 5 m/h and 68% at 10 m/h. Turbidity removal was more than 71% at 5 m/h but just 57% at 10 m/h. Head losses did not increase significantly, and values measured at process end were 32 mbar at 5 m/h and 78 mbar at 10 m/h. Retention probabilities were calculated from experimental data. A theoretical model was used to evaluate the contributions of the different drivers of microalgae removal. Hypotheses are developed on the understanding of change in the mechanisms of retention as a function of filtration velocity.

  9. Mixotrophy in the phototrophic dinoflagellate Takayama helix (family Kareniaceae): Predator of diverse toxic and harmful dinoflagellates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Hae Jin; Ok, Jin Hee; Lim, An Suk; Kwon, Ji Eun; Kim, So Jin; Lee, Sung Yeon

    2016-12-01

    Takayama spp. are phototrophic dinoflagellates belonging to the family Kareniaceae and have caused fish kills in several countries. Understanding their trophic mode and interactions with co-occurring phytoplankton species are critical steps in comprehending their ecological roles in marine ecosystems, bloom dynamics, and dinoflagellate evolution. To investigate the trophic mode and interactions of Takayama spp., the ability of Takayama helix to feed on diverse algal species was examined, and the mechanisms of prey ingestion were determined. Furthermore, growth and ingestion rates of T. helix feeding on the dinoflagellates Alexandrium lusitanicum and Alexandrium tamarense, which are two optimal prey items, were determined as a function of prey concentration. T. helix ingested large dinoflagellates ≥15μm in size, except for the dinoflagellates Karenia mikimotoi, Akashiwo sanguinea, and Prorocentrum micans (i.e., it fed on Alexandrium minutum, A. lusitanicum, A. tamarense, A. pacificum, A. insuetum, Cochlodinium polykrikoides, Coolia canariensis, Coolia malayensis, Gambierdiscus caribaeus, Gymnodinium aureolum, Gymnodinium catenatum, Gymnodinium instriatum, Heterocapsa triquetra, Lingulodinium polyedrum, and Scrippsiella trochoidea). All these edible prey items are dinoflagellates that have diverse eco-physiology such as toxic and non-toxic, single and chain forming, and planktonic and benthic forms. However, T. helix did not feed on small flagellates and dinoflagellates toxic species and, thus, its mixotrophic ability should be considered when studying red tide dynamics, food webs, and dinoflagellate evolution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Putative monofunctional type I polyketide synthase units: a dinoflagellate-specific feature?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karsten Eichholz

    Full Text Available Marine dinoflagellates (alveolata are microalgae of which some cause harmful algal blooms and produce a broad variety of most likely polyketide synthesis derived phycotoxins. Recently, novel polyketide synthesase (PKS transcripts have been described from the Florida red tide dinoflagellate Karenia brevis (gymnodiniales which are evolutionarily related to Type I PKS but were apparently expressed as monofunctional proteins, a feature typical of Type II PKS. Here, we investigated expression units of PKS I-like sequences in Alexandrium ostenfeldii (gonyaulacales and Heterocapsa triquetra (peridiniales at the transcript and protein level. The five full length transcripts we obtained were all characterized by polyadenylation, a 3' UTR and the dinoflagellate specific spliced leader sequence at the 5'end. Each of the five transcripts encoded a single ketoacylsynthase (KS domain showing high similarity to K. brevis KS sequences. The monofunctional structure was also confirmed using dinoflagellate specific KS antibodies in Western Blots. In a maximum likelihood phylogenetic analysis of KS domains from diverse PKSs, dinoflagellate KSs formed a clade placed well within the protist Type I PKS clade between apicomplexa, haptophytes and chlorophytes. These findings indicate that the atypical PKS I structure, i.e., expression as putative monofunctional units, might be a dinoflagellate specific feature. In addition, the sequenced transcripts harbored a previously unknown, apparently dinoflagellate specific conserved N-terminal domain. We discuss the implications of this novel region with regard to the putative monofunctional organization of Type I PKS in dinoflagellates.

  11. Newly discovered role of the heterotrophic nanoflagellate Katablepharis japonica, a predator of toxic or harmful dinoflagellates and raphidophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Ji Eun; Jeong, Hae Jin; Kim, So Jin; Jang, Se Hyeon; Lee, Kyung Ha; Seong, Kyeong Ah

    2017-09-01

    Heterotrophic nanoflagellates are ubiquitous and known to be major predators of bacteria. The feeding of free-living heterotrophic nanoflagellates on phytoplankton is poorly understood, although these two components usually co-exist. To investigate the feeding and ecological roles of major heterotrophic nanoflagellates Katablepharis spp., the feeding ability of Katablepharis japonica on bacteria and phytoplankton species and the type of the prey that K. japonica can feed on were explored. Furthermore, the growth and ingestion rates of K. japonica on the dinoflagellate Akashiwo sanguinea-a suitable algal prey item-heterotrophic bacteria, and the cyanobacteria Synechococcus sp., as a function of prey concentration were determined. Among the prey tested, K. japonica ingested heterotrophic bacteria, Synechococcus sp., the prasinophyte Pyramimonas sp., the cryptophytes Rhodomonas salina and Teleaulax sp., the raphidophytes Heterosigma akashiwo and Chattonella ovata, the dinoflagellates Heterocapsa rotundata, Amphidinium carterae, Prorocentrum donghaiense, Alexandrium minutum, Cochlodinium polykrikoides, Gymnodinium catenatum, A. sanguinea, Coolia malayensis, and the ciliate Mesodinium rubrum, however, it did not feed on the dinoflagellates Alexandrium catenella, Gambierdiscus caribaeus, Heterocapsa triquetra, Lingulodinium polyedra, Prorocentrum cordatum, P. micans, and Scrippsiella acuminata and the diatom Skeletonema costatum. Many K. japonica cells attacked and ingested a prey cell together after pecking and rupturing the surface of the prey cell and then uptaking the materials that emerged from the ruptured cell surface. Cells of A. sanguinea supported positive growth of K. japonica, but neither heterotrophic bacteria nor Synechococcus sp. supported growth. The maximum specific growth rate of K. japonica on A. sanguinea was 1.01 d(-1). In addition, the maximum ingestion rate of K. japonica for A. sanguinea was 0.13ngC predator(-1)d(-1) (0.06 cells predator(-1)d(-1

  12. Short-Term Behavioural Responses of the Great Scallop Pecten maximus Exposed to the Toxic Alga Alexandrium minutum Measured by Accelerometry and Passive Acoustics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coquereau, Laura; Jolivet, Aurélie; Hégaret, Hélène; Chauvaud, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Harmful algal blooms produced by toxic dinoflagellates have increased worldwide, impacting human health, the environment, and fisheries. Due to their potential sensitivity (e.g., environmental changes), bivalves through their valve movements can be monitored to detect harmful algal blooms. Methods that measure valve activity require bivalve-attached sensors and usually connected cables to data transfers, leading to stress animals and limit the use to sessile species. As a non-intrusive and continuously deployable tool, passive acoustics could be an effective approach to detecting harmful algal blooms in real time based on animal sound production. This study aimed to detect reaction changes in the valve movements of adult Pecten maximus exposed to the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium minutum using both accelerometry and passive acoustic methods. Scallops were experimentally exposed to three ecologically relevant concentrations of A. minutum for 2 hours. The number of each type of valve movement and their sound intensity, opening duration, and valve-opening amplitude were measured. Four behaviours were identified: closures, expulsion, displacement, and swimming. The response of P. maximus to A. minutum occurred rapidly at a high concentration. The valve activity of P. maximus was different when exposed to high concentrations (500 000 cells L-1) of A. minutum compared to the non-toxic dinoflagellate Heterocapsa triquetra; the number of valve movements increased, especially closure and expulsion, which were detected acoustically. Thus, this study demonstrates the potential for acoustics and sound production changes in the detection of harmful algal blooms. However, field trials and longer duration experiments are required to provide further evidence for the use of acoustics as a monitoring tool in the natural environment where several factors may interfere with valve behaviours.

  13. Inorganic carbon acquisition in red tide dinoflagellates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rost, Björn; Richter, Klaus-Uwe; Riebesell, Ulf; Hansen, Per Juel

    2006-05-01

    Carbon acquisition was investigated in three marine bloom-forming dinollagellates-Prorocentrum minimum, Heterocapsa triquetra and Ceratium lineatum. In vivo activities of extracellular and intracellular carbonic anhydrase (CA), photosynthetic O2 evolution, CO2 and HCO3- uptake rates were measured by membrane inlet mass spectrometry (MIMS) in cells acclimated to low pH (8.0) and high pH (8.5 or 9.1). A second approach used short-term 14C-disequilibrium incubations to estimate the carbon source utilized by the cells. All three species showed negligible extracellular CA (eCA) activity in cells acclimated to low pH and only slightly higher activity when acclimated to high pH. Intracellular CA (iCA) activity was present in all three species, but it increased only in P. minimum with increasing pH. Half-saturation concentrations (K1/2) for photosynthetic O2 evolution were low compared to ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) kinetics. Moreover, apparent affinities for inorganic carbon (Ci) increased with increasing pH in the acclimation, indicating the operation of an efficient CO2 concentration mechanism (CCM) in these dinoflagellates. Rates of CO2 uptake were comparably low and could not support the observed rates of photosynthesis. Consequently, rates of HCO3- uptake were high in the investigated species, contributing more than 80% of the photosynthetic carbon fixation. The affinity for HCO3- and maximum uptake rates increased under higher pH. The strong preference for HCO3- was also confirmed by the 14C-disequilibrium technique. Modes of carbon acquisition were consistent with the 13C-fractionation pattern observed and indicated a strong species-specific difference in leakage. These results suggest that photosynthesis in marine dinoflagellates is not limited by Ci even at high pH, which may occur during red tides in coastal waters.

  14. Phytoplankton blooms in estuarine and coastal waters: Seasonal patterns and key species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carstensen, Jacob; Klais, Riina; Cloern, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Phytoplankton blooms are dynamic phenomena of great importance to the functioning of estuarine and coastal ecosystems. We analysed a unique (large) collection of phytoplankton monitoring data covering 86 coastal sites distributed over eight regions in North America and Europe, with the aim of investigating common patterns in the seasonal timing and species composition of the blooms. The spring bloom was the most common seasonal pattern across all regions, typically occurring early (February–March) at lower latitudes and later (April–May) at higher latitudes. Bloom frequency, defined as the probability of unusually high biomass, ranged from 5 to 35% between sites and followed no consistent patterns across gradients of latitude, temperature, salinity, water depth, stratification, tidal amplitude or nutrient concentrations. Blooms were mostly dominated by a single species, typically diatoms (58% of the blooms) and dinoflagellates (19%). Diatom-dominated spring blooms were a common feature in most systems, although dinoflagellate spring blooms were also observed in the Baltic Sea. Blooms dominated by chlorophytes and cyanobacteria were only common in low salinity waters and occurred mostly at higher temperatures. Key bloom species across the eight regions included the diatoms Cerataulina pelagica and Dactyliosolen fragilissimus and dinoflagellates Heterocapsa triquetra and Prorocentrum cordatum. Other frequent bloom-forming taxa were diatom genera Chaetoceros, Coscinodiscus, Skeletonema, and Thalassiosira. Our meta-analysis shows that these 86 estuarine-coastal sites function as diatom-producing systems, the timing of that production varies widely, and that bloom frequency is not associated with environmental factors measured in monitoring programs. We end with a perspective on the limitations of conclusions derived from meta-analyses of phytoplankton time series, and the grand challenges remaining to understand the wide range of bloom patterns and

  15. Short-Term Behavioural Responses of the Great Scallop Pecten maximus Exposed to the Toxic Alga Alexandrium minutum Measured by Accelerometry and Passive Acoustics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Coquereau

    Full Text Available Harmful algal blooms produced by toxic dinoflagellates have increased worldwide, impacting human health, the environment, and fisheries. Due to their potential sensitivity (e.g., environmental changes, bivalves through their valve movements can be monitored to detect harmful algal blooms. Methods that measure valve activity require bivalve-attached sensors and usually connected cables to data transfers, leading to stress animals and limit the use to sessile species. As a non-intrusive and continuously deployable tool, passive acoustics could be an effective approach to detecting harmful algal blooms in real time based on animal sound production. This study aimed to detect reaction changes in the valve movements of adult Pecten maximus exposed to the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium minutum using both accelerometry and passive acoustic methods. Scallops were experimentally exposed to three ecologically relevant concentrations of A. minutum for 2 hours. The number of each type of valve movement and their sound intensity, opening duration, and valve-opening amplitude were measured. Four behaviours were identified: closures, expulsion, displacement, and swimming. The response of P. maximus to A. minutum occurred rapidly at a high concentration. The valve activity of P. maximus was different when exposed to high concentrations (500 000 cells L-1 of A. minutum compared to the non-toxic dinoflagellate Heterocapsa triquetra; the number of valve movements increased, especially closure and expulsion, which were detected acoustically. Thus, this study demonstrates the potential for acoustics and sound production changes in the detection of harmful algal blooms. However, field trials and longer duration experiments are required to provide further evidence for the use of acoustics as a monitoring tool in the natural environment where several factors may interfere with valve behaviours.

  16. Porphyrobacter algicida sp. nov., an algalytic bacterium isolated from seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristyanto, Sylvia; Lee, Sang Don; Kim, Jaisoo

    2017-11-01

    A novel Gram-stain-negative, yellow-pigmented, catalase- and oxidase-positive, non-endospore-forming, flagellated bacterium, designated strain Yeonmyeong 2-22 T , was isolated from surface seawater of Geoje Island, Republic of Korea. Strain Yeonmyeong 2-22 T showed algalytic activity against the seven strains tested: Cochlodinium polykrikoides, Chattonella marina, Heterosigma akashiwo, Scrippsiella trochoidea, Heterocapsa triquetra, Prorocentrum minimum and Skeletonema costatum. A taxonomic study was carried out based on a polyphasic approach to characterize the exact taxonomic position of strain Yeonmyeong 2-22 T . The bacterium was able to grow at 10-40 °C, at salinities from 0 to 9 %, at pH from 4.0 to 9.0 and was not able to degrade gelatin or casein. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that strain Yeonmyeong 2-22 T was considered to represent a novel species of the genus Porphyrobacter, which belongs to the family Erythrobacteraceae, and was related most closely to Porphyrobacter dokdonensis DSW-74 T with 97.23 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity. The dominant cellular fatty acids of strain Yeonmyeong 2-22 T were C18 : 1ω7c (49.7 %), C16 : 0 (12.0 %) and 11-methyl C18 : 1ω7c (11.5 %), and ubiquinone-10 (Q-10) was the predominant respiratory lipoquinone. The genomic DNA G+C content of strain Yeonmyeong 2-22 T was calculated to be 63.0 mol%. Phenotypic characteristics of the novel strain also differed from other members of the genus Porphyrobacter. On the basis of polyphasic taxonomic data, strain Yeonmyeong 2-22 T represents as a novel species of the genus Porphyrobacter, for which the name of Porphyrobacter algicida sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is Yeonmyeong 2-22 T (=KEMB 9005-328 T =JCM 31499 T ).

  17. Noves dades sobre briòfits semifòssils de la Garrotxa

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez-Obiol, Ramón; Casas i Sicart, Creu

    1989-01-01

    Hom ha estudiat els briòfits semifòssils dels diferents nivells torbosos de quatre columnes sedimentàries extretes de dipòsits quaternaris de la zona volcànica de la Garrotxa. Hom ha determinat 5 taxons: Drepanocladus aduncus, Leptodyctium riparium, Eurhynchium schleicheri, Homalothecium sp. i Meesia triquetra. M. triquetra no s'havia trobat mai a Catalunya i només se'n coneixen dues citacions a tota la península Ibèrica, ambdues del segle passat. Hom discuteix l'origen sedimentari de les ...

  18. Chemical composition of the essential oil of Commiphora erythraea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcotullio, Maria Carla; Santi, Claudio; Mwankie, Gildas Norbert Oball-Mond; Curini, Massimo

    2009-12-01

    The essential oil composition of Commiphora erythraea (Ehrenb) Engl. is reported for the first time. The oil is rich in sesquiterpenes, particularly furanosesquiterpenes (50.3%). GC-MS analysis of the oil permitted differentiation between C. erythraea and C. kataf, two often confused species.

  19. Fungal species associated with Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aspergillus niger Van Tieghem, Botryodiplodia theobromae (Pat) Novel, Fusarium oxysporum Schlecht and Rhizopus stolonifer Ehrenb ex Link were isolated from both blotter and agar methods. Botryodiplodia theobromae had the highest mean occurrence (42.37%) followed by Fusarium oxysporum (30.02%), Aspergillus ...

  20. Typification of the Linnaean names Plantago serraria and P. subulata (Plantago subgenus Coronopus, Plantaginaceae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassemer, Gustavo; Iamonico, Duilio; Rønsted, Nina

    2017-01-01

    Plantago subg. Coronopus is a mainly Mediterranean group of plantains whose taxonomy is very complex. Two Linnaean names within this subgenus still remain untypified: P. serraria and P. subulata. We here discuss the possible types for these names, and designate lectotypes for both....... For nomenclatural purposes, the names P. triquetra and P. pungens are also included in the treatment of P. subulata....

  1. Spatial and temporal variations in percentage cover of two common seagrasses at Sirinart National Park, Phuket; and a first step for marine base

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anchana Prathep

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Percentage cover and distribution of two common seagrasses, Thalassia hemprichii (Ehrenb. Aschers. and Cymodocea rotundata Ehrenb. Et Hempr. Ex Aschers., were studied in the dry and wet seasons. The study was carried out at three levels on sheltered, moderately exposed and very exposed sites on the coastline of Sirinart National Park, Thailand. One hundred and twenty samplings were investigated and recorded. Analysis of variance (ANOVA revealed that there were significant differences in the percentage cover of C. rotundata among different degrees of wave exposure (P<0.01; and T. hemprichii was significantly influenced by interactions between seasons, shore levels and degrees of wave exposure (P<0.05. High sediment disturbance on the very exposed site was likely to influence the percentage cover and distribution of both seagrasses. This study provided baseline data for further work on ecological study and long term monitoring; and a first step to building up a ‘marine base’.

  2. Colacium Minimum (Euglenophyta, A New Epiphytic Species For Asia

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    Wołowski Konrad

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Colacium minimum Fott & Komárek, known so far from a few localities in Central Europe (Czech Republic, is reported here for the first time from Asia (Thailand. This epiphytic species was found growing on eight taxa of loricated euglenoids. The process of surface colonization of Trachelomonas Ehrenb. and Strombomonas Deflandre taxa by C. minimum in natural populations is briefly discussed and originally documented using LM and SEM.

  3. A combination of heat treatment and Pichia guilliermondii prevents cherry tomato spoilage by fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan; Tu, Kang; Tu, Sicong; Liu, Ming; Su, Jing; Hou, Yue-Peng

    2010-01-31

    This study investigated the effectiveness of heat treatment and Pichia guilliermondii, either alone or in combination, to combat postharvest fungal spoilage in cherry tomato fruit. In vitro experiments demonstrated that heat treatment at 38 degrees C significantly inhibited mycelial growth of three different pathogens (Botrytis cinerea, Alternaria alternata and Rhizopus stolonifer Ehrenb). In vivo experiments unveiled that either heat treatment or P. guilliermondii reduced decay caused by these pathogens. Furthermore, a combination of heat treatment followed by the application of P. guilliermondii (H+P) provided the best efficacy in prevention of cherry tomato from fungal spoilage. Following, H+P treatment, electronic nose detected a reduction of volatility in cherry tomato fruit odor, an indicator of preserving fruit's freshness. Scanning electron microscopy unveiled that heat treatment at 38 degrees C for 24h inhibited hyphae growth and spore germination of R. stolonifer Ehrenb while P. guilliermondii multiplied rapidly on fruit wounds, and its cells had a strong capability of adhesion to the hyphae of R. stolonifer Ehrenb. However, heat treatment also seriously injured P. guilliermondii, therefore P. guilliermondii should be applied after heat treatment. A combination of heat treatment and P. guilliermondii is one of the most effective techniques at controlling postharvest fungal spoilage in cherry tomato fruit. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Solide Handwerksarbeit als Vorlage für Frauen- und Geschlechterforschung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilona Scheidle

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Die Universitätsbibliothek Heidelberg veröffentlichte das „Nachlaßverzeichnis Dr. Marie Baum” (1874–1964, Ehrenbürgerin der alma mater. Das Repertorium dokumentiert die Zeugnisse ihres Lebens: als Pionierin der modernen Sozialarbeit, Vertreterin der bürgerlichen Frauenbewegung, Abgeordnete der Nationalversammlung und des Reichstages, als Wissenschaftlerin, Politikerin, Publizistin und als Ricarda Huchs Freundin. Das Findbuch ist ein Katalog zum Identifizieren und zum Auffinden einzelner Dokumente und zugleich ein Beitrag zur Biographie der Nachlaßgeberin.

  5. Tamarix duezenlii (Tamaricaceae - a species new to science from southern Turkey

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    Halil Çakan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Tamarix duezenlii, belonging to Tamarix L. ser. Leptostachyae (Bunge Baum, is described as a species new to science. It is related to T. hispida Willd. and T. arborea (Sieber ex Ehrenb. Bunge. From the former species it differs by its dense inflorescences, white petals and paralophic disc; from the latter by a shrubby habit, elliptic petals and calyx abruptly narrowed at the base. The species occurs in saline areas of the Cukurova Deltas at the mouths of the Seyhan and Ceyhan rivers in southern Turkey.

  6. Wetland Plants of Specialized Habitats in the Arid West

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    NO NI UPL* Cardaria pubescens (C.A. Mey.) Jarmolenko UPL UPL UPL UPL UPL Carex barbarae Dewey NO NO NO FAC+ FACW Carex praegracilis W. Boott...FACW FACW+ FACW FACW FACW- Carex spissa Bailey NO NI NO NO FAC* Carex triquetra Boott UPL UPL UPL UPL UPL 14 ERDC/CRREL TR-07-8 Table 3...UPL UPL UPL UPL Pseudoclappia arenaria Rydb. UPL UPL UPL UPL UPL Pteridium aquilinum (L.) Kuhn FAC- FACU FACU FACU FACU Quercus agrifolia Née

  7. Diatom diversity and water quality of a suburban stream: a case study of the Rzeszów city in SE Poland

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    Noga Teresa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to investigate the diversity of diatom assemblages developed in the Przyrwa stream, to assess water quality based on benthic diatoms and to make an attempt at the identification of physicochemical factors having the greatest impact on the differentiation of diatom assemblages. Studies were conducted in 2011-2012 on the Przyrwa stream, a left-side tributary of the Wisłok River flowing through the city of Rzeszów and with its spring section located on the borders of the city. A total of 259 diatom taxa were identified in the Przyrwa stream during three studied seasons. At all investigated sites, the most abundant population consisted of Ulnaria ulna (Nitzsch Compère, Cocconeis pediculus Ehrenb., Achnanthidium minutissimum (Kütz. Czarnecki var. minutissimum, Navicula gregaria Donkin, Planothidium frequentissimum (Lange-Bert. Lange-Bert., P. lanceolatum (Brébisson Lange-Bert., Navicula lanceolata (C. Agardh Ehrenb., Amphora pediculus (Kütz. Grunow, Eolimna minima, (Grunow Lange-Bert., Melosira varians C. Agardh and Cyclotella meneghiniana Kütz. Based on IPS (Specific Pollution Sensitivity Index and GDI (Generic Diatom Index indices, the ecological status of the Przyrwa stream was assessed as moderate to poor (mostly III-IV class of water quality, while the TDI (Trophic Diatom Index index indicated a poor to bad ecological status (mainly IV-V class of water quality.

  8. Polar Business Design

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    Sébastien Caisse

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Polar business design aims to enable entrepreneurs, managers, consultants, researchers, and business students to better tackle model-based analysis, creation, and transformation of businesses, ventures, and, more generically, collective endeavors of any size and purpose. It is based on a systems-thinking approach that builds on a few interrelated core concepts to create holistic visual frameworks. These core concepts act as poles linked by meaningful dyads, flows, and faces arranged in geometric shapes. The article presents two such polar frameworks as key findings in an ongoing analytic autoethnography: the three-pole Value−Activity−Stakeholder (VAS triquetra and the four-pole Offer−Creation−Character−Stakeholder (OCCS tetrahedron. The VAS triquetra is a more aggregated model of collective endeavors. The OCCS tetrahedron makes a trade-off between a steeper learning curve and deeper, richer representation potential. This article discusses how to use these two frameworks as well as their limits, and explores the potential that polar business design offers for future research.

  9. Loss of reproductive output caused by an invasive species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Maude E M; Morris, Todd J; Ackerman, Josef D

    2016-04-01

    We investigated whether Neogobius melanostomus, an invader of biodiversity 'hot-spots' in the Laurentian Great Lakes region, facilitates or inhibits unionid mussel recruitment by serving as a host or sink for their parasitic larvae (glochidia). Infestation and metamorphosis rates of four mussel species with at-risk (conservation) status (Epioblasma torulosa rangiana, Epioblasma triquetra, Lampsilis fasciola and Villosa iris) and one common species (Actinonaias ligamentina) on N. melanostomus were compared with rates on known primary and marginal hosts in the laboratory. All species successfully infested N. melanostomus, but only E. triquetra, V. iris and A. ligamentina successfully metamorphosed into juveniles, albeit at very low rates well below those seen on even the marginal hosts. Neogobius melanostomus collected from areas of unionid occurrence in the Grand and Sydenham rivers (Ontario, Canada) exhibited glochidial infection rates of 39.4% and 5.1%, respectively, with up to 30 glochidia representing as many as six unionid species per fish. A mathematical model suggests that N. melanostomus serve more as a sink for glochidia than as a host for unionids, thereby limiting recruitment success. This represents a novel method by which an invasive species affects a native species.

  10. Feeding behaviour of the nauplii of the marine calanoid copepod Paracartia grani Sars: Functional response, prey size spectrum, and effects of the presence of alternative prey.

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    Laura K Helenius

    Full Text Available Laboratory feeding experiments were conducted to study the functional response and prey size spectrum of the young naupliar stages of the calanoid copepod Paracartia grani Sars. Experiments were conducted on a range of microalgal prey of varying sizes and motility patterns. Significant feeding was found in all prey of a size range of 4.5-19.8 μm, with Holling type III functional responses observed for most prey types. The highest clearance rates occurred when nauplii fed on the dinoflagellate Heterocapsa sp. and the diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii (respectively, 0.61 and 0.70 mL ind-1 d-1, suggesting an optimal prey:predator ratio of 0.09. Additional experiments were conducted to examine the effects of the presence of alternative prey (either Heterocapsa sp. or Gymnodinium litoralis on the functional response to the haptophyte Isochrysis galbana. In the bialgal mixtures, clearance and ingestion rates of I. galbana along the range of the functional response were significantly reduced as a result of selectivity towards the larger, alternative prey. Paradoxically, relatively large prey trigger a perception response in the nauplii, but most likely such prey cannot be completely ingested and a certain degree of sloppy feeding may occur. Our results are further evidence of the complex prey-specific feeding interactions that are likely to occur in natural assemblages with several available prey types.

  11. Tamarix arborea var. arborea and Tamarix parviflora: Two species valued for their adaptability to stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisafi, Francesca; Oddo, Elisabetta; Gargano, Maria Letizia; Inzerillo, Simone; Russo, Gianni; Venturella, Giuseppe

    2016-03-01

    The choice of stress resistant and highly adaptable species is a fundamental step for landscaping and ornamental purposes in arid and coastal environments such as those in the Mediterranean basin. The genus Tamarix L. includes about 90 species with a high endurance of adversity. We investigated the water relations and photosynthetic response of Tamarix arborea (Sieb. ex Ehrenb.) Bge. var. arborea and T. parviflora DC. growing in an urban environment. Both species showed no evidence of drought or salt stress in summer, and appeared to follow two strategies with T. arborea var. arborea investing in high carbon gain at the beginning of the summer, and then reducing photosynthetic activity at the end of the season, and T. parviflora showing lower but constant levels of photosynthetic activity throughout the vegetative season. For landscaping and ornamental purposes, we suggest T. arborea var. arborea when a fast-growing, high-cover species is necessary, and T. parviflora when less-invasive species are required.

  12. Tortum Gölü'nün (Erzurum Bentik Alg Florasının Mevsimsel Değişimi.

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    Ersin Kıvrak

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Mart 2002-Şubat 2003 tarihleri arasında Tortum Gölü’nün bentik alglerinin kompozisyonu, yoğunluğu ve mevsimsel değişimleri incelenmiştir. Elde edilen veriler 21 yıl önce yapılan araştırmanın sonuçlarıyla karşılaştırılmıştır. Bu araştırmada Navicula capitata var. hungarica (Grunow Ross, Navicula cryptocephala Kütz., Cymbella affinis Kütz., Amphora ovalis (Kütz. Kütz., Cocconeis placentula var. euglypta (Ehrenb. Grunow, Nitzschia sublinearis Hust, Cyclotella krammeri Håk., Merismopedia elegans A. Braun epipelik alg florasında dominant taksonlar olmuştur. Yaz başında ve sonbaharda epipelik florada artış gözlenmiştir. Cymbella affinis, Cymbella lanceolata (Ehrenb. Kirchner, Fragilaria capucina var. rumpens (Kütz. Lange-Bert., Cocconeis placentula var. euglypta, Cyclotella krammeri epilitik alg florasında bol ve yaygın bulunan taksonlardır. Spirogyra aequinoctialis G. S. West ise sadece yaz aylarında epilitik florada çok bol olarak bulunmuştur. Bentik alg florasının, gölün organik maddelerle kirlenmesinden etkilendiği sonucuna varılmıştır

  13. Selective toxic effects of polyunsaturated fatty acids derived from Ulva fasciata on red tide phyotoplankter species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamsjah, Mochammad Amin; Ishibe, Keiko; Kim, Daekyung; Yamaguchi, Kenichi; Ishibashi, Fumito; Fujita, Yuji; Oda, Tatsuya

    2007-01-01

    Alpha-linolenic acid and linoleic acid isolated from Ulva fasciata showed toxic effects on red tide phytoplankters in a concentration-dependent manner. Among six species tested, raphidophycean flagellate Heterosigma akashiwo was the most susceptible to these fatty acids, and 50% lethal concentrations (LC50) of alpha-linolenic acid and linoleic acid were estimated to be 0.58 and 1.91 microg/ml respectively, whereas dinoflagellate Gymnodinium impudicum and Heterocapsa circularisquama were highly resistant and no significant toxic effects were observed up to 1,000 microg/ml. Both fatty acids were less toxic to fish (devil stinger), zooplankters (brine shrimp and rotifer), and mammalian cell lines (U937, HeLa, Vero, and CHO cells) than H. akashiwo.

  14. Ultrastructural study of ectomycorrhizas on Pinus caribaea Morelet. var. hondurensis Barr. & Golf. seedlings Estudo ultraestrutural de ectomicorrizas em plântulas de Pinus caribaea Morelet. var. hondurensis Barr. & Golf.

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    Eduardo Gross

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available The ultrastructure of ectomycorrhizas formed between Pinus caribaea var. hondurensis inoculated with Pisolithus tinctorius (Pers. Coker & Couch and Telephora terrestris (Ehrenb. Fr. was analyzed just before the transplant of these seedlings to the field to ascertain if fungi are established in the roots. Ectomycorrhizal fungi formed a well-developed compact mantle in lateral roots. Vacuoles, nuclei and dolipore septa were observed in mantle hyphae and numerous nuclei, endoplasmatic reticulum and polymorphic mitochondria were frequently located in the cytoplasm of Hartig net hyphae adjacent to plant cortical cells. Highly vacuolated cortical cells contained droplets of electron-dense material, nucleus and some organelles were observed in a narrow region of peripheral cytoplasm. The ectomycorrhizas of P. caribaea var. hondurensis exhibited typical ultrastructural characteristics of a compatible and physiological active association.A ultraestrutura das ectomicorrizas formadas por Pinus caribaea var. hondurensis inoculado com Pisolithus tinctorius (Pers. Coker & Couch e Telephora terrestris (Ehrenb. Fr. foi analisada antes do transplantio dessas mudas para o campo, com o intuito de verificar se o fungo estava estabelecido nas raízes. Os fungos ectomicorrízicos inoculados formaram um manto compacto e bem desenvolvido nas raízes laterais. Nas hifas desse manto foram observados vacúolos, núcleos e septos dolipóricos, enquanto que no citoplasma das hifas da rede de Hartig, que ficam adjacentes às células corticais, foram freqüentemente observados vários núcleos, retículo endoplasmático e mitocôndrias polimórficas. Células corticais altamente vacuolizadas, contendo gotículas de material elétron-denso, apresentaram núcleo e algumas organelas na sua estreita região citoplasmática periférica. As ectomicorrizas de P. caribaea var. hondurensis apresentaram características ultraestruturais de uma associação compatível e

  15. Novas ocorrências de desmídias filamentosas (Desmidiaceae, Zygnematophyceae para o estado da Bahia, Brasil New records of filamentous desmids (Desmidiaceae, Zygnematophyceae from Bahia state, Brazil

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    Ivania Batista de Oliveira

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available As desmídias de hábito filamentos são constituídas por filamentos de células relativamente curtos, que se dissociam com certa facilidade. O conhecimento destas algas no estado da Bahia é bastante escasso, até o momento, estando restrito a 13 táxons. O presente trabalho teve por objetivo realizar o inventário taxonômico dos gêneros filamentosos da família Desmidiaceae (Zygnematophyceae, de duas áreas de proteção ambiental, APA Rio Capivara e APA Lagoas de Guarajuba, município de Camaçari, a fim de ampliar o conhecimento destes na Bahia. Foram analisadas 33 amostras coletadas de acordo com os métodos usuais empregados nos estudos de taxonomia de microalgas continentais. Foram identificados 15 táxons distribuídos em sete gêneros (Bambusina Kütz. ex Kütz, Desmidium C.Agardh ex Ralfs, Groenbladia Teiling, Hyalotheca Ehrenb. ex Ralfs, Onychonema Wallich, Spondylosium Bréb. ex Kütz. e Teilingia Bourr., dos quais nove táxons constituem-se adições à flora de algas continentais da Bahia, aumentando o total de espécies conhecidas para 22.The filamentous desmids are composed of relatively short filaments of cells that dissociate rather easily. These algae are poorly known today in the state of Bahia, being restricted to 13 taxa. This study aimed to do a taxonomic inventory of filamentous genera of the family Desmidiaceae (Zygnematophyceae from two environmental protection areas, Rio Capivara and Lagoas de Guarajuba, Camaçari municipality, to increase our knowledge of these organisms in Bahia. We analyzed 33 samples collected according to the methods employed in studies of continental microalgae taxonomy. 15 taxa were recorded, distributed in seven genera: Bambusina Kütz. ex Kütz, Desmidium C.Agardh ex Ralfs, Groenbladia Teiling, Hyalotheca Ehrenb. ex Ralfs, Onychonema Wallich, Spondylosium Bréb. ex Kütz. and Teilingia Bourr. Of these, nine are additions to the algal flora of continental Bahia, increasing the total to 22

  16. Fungos conidiais na Caatinga: espécies lignícolas Conidial fungi from Caatinga: lignicolous species

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    Alisson Cardoso Rodrigues da Cruz

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Um inventário de fungos conidiais foi realizado em seis áreas de extrema importância biológica do bioma Caatinga. Foram identificadas 41 espécies, com Dactylaria cazorlii Mercado, Gené & Guarro e Thozetella queenslandica Paulus, P.Gadek & K.D. Hyde descritas pela segunda vez para a ciência. Ellisembia bambusae (M.B. Ellis W.P. Wu, Gonytrichum mirabile Hol.-Jech., Uberispora tropicalis Bhat & W.B. Kendr. constituem novas ocorrências para o continente americano; Acrophragmis coronata Kiffer & Reisinger, Bactrodesmium linderi (J.L. Crane & Shearer M.E. Palm & E.L. Stewart, Piricauda cochinensis (Subram. M.B. Ellis e Taeniolella alta (Ehrenb. S. Hughes novas ocorrências para a América do Sul; Sporoschisma saccardoi E.W. Mason & S. Hughes e Stachylidium bicolor var. bicolor Link novas ocorrências para o Brasil e Paraceratocladium bacilliformis Calduch, Stchigel, Gene & Guarro nova citação para o semi-árido brasileiro. As novas ocorrências são descritas, ilustradas e comentadas e é incluída uma lista com as demais espécies encontradas.An inventory of the conidial fungi was carried in six areas of extreme biological importance of the Caatinga biome. Forty one species were identified: Dactylaria cazorlii Mercado, Gené & Guarro and Thozetella queenslandica Paulus, P.Gadek & K.D. Hyde are described the second time for science; Ellisembia bambusae (M.B. Ellis W.P. Wu, Gonytrichum mirabile Hol.-Jech., Uberispora tropicalis Bhat & W.B. Kendr. constitute new records for the American continent; Acrophragmis coronata Kiffer & Reisinger, Bactrodesmium linderi (J.L. Crane & Shearer M.E. Palm & E.L. Stewart, Piricauda cochinensis (Subram. M.B. Ellis, Taeniolella alta (Ehrenb. S. Hughes are new records for South America; Sporoschisma saccardoi E.W. Mason & S. Hughes and Stachylidium bicolor var. bicolor Link are new records for Brasil and Paraceratocladium bacilliformis Calduch, Stchigel, Gene & Guarro is a new record for the Brazilian semi

  17. River flooding as a driver of polygon dynamics: modern vegetation data and a millennial peat record from the Anabar River lowlands (Arctic Siberia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zibulski, R.; Herzschuh, U.; Pestryakova, L. A.; Wolter, J.; Müller, S.; Schilling, N.; Wetterich, S.; Schirrmeister, L.; Tian, F.

    2013-08-01

    The spatial and temporal variability of a low-centred polygon on the eastern floodplain area of the lower Anabar River (72.070° N, 113.921° E; northern Yakutia, Siberia) has been investigated using a multi-method approach. The present-day vegetation in each square metre was analysed, revealing a community of Larix, shrubby Betula, and Salix on the polygon rim, a dominance of Carex and Andromeda polifolia in the rim-to-pond transition zone, and a predominantly monospecific Scorpidium scorpioides coverage within the pond. The total organic carbon (TOC) content, TOC / TN (total nitrogen) ratio, grain size, vascular plant macrofossils, moss remains, diatoms, and pollen were analysed for two vertical sections and a sediment core from a transect across the polygon. Radiocarbon dating indicates that the formation of the polygon started at least 1500 yr ago; the general positions of the pond and rim have not changed since that time. Two types of pond vegetation were identified, indicating two contrasting development stages of the polygon. The first was a well-established moss association, dominated by submerged or floating Scorpidium scorpioides and/or Drepanocladus spp. and overgrown by epiphytic diatoms such as Tabellaria flocculosa and Eunotia taxa. This stage coincides temporally with a period in which the polygon was only drained by lateral subsurface water flow, as indicated by mixed grain sizes. A different moss association occurred during times of repeated river flooding (indicated by homogeneous medium-grained sand that probably accumulated during the annual spring snowmelt), characterized by an abundance of Meesia triquetra and a dominance of benthic diatoms (e.g. Navicula vulpina), indicative of a relatively high pH and a high tolerance of disturbance. A comparison of the local polygon vegetation (inferred from moss and macrofossil spectra) with the regional vegetation (inferred from pollen spectra) indicated that the moss association with Scorpidium

  18. River flooding as a driver of polygon dynamics: modern vegetation data and a millennial peat record from the Anabar River lowlands (Arctic Siberia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Zibulski

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The spatial and temporal variability of a low-centred polygon on the eastern floodplain area of the lower Anabar River (72.070° N, 113.921° E; northern Yakutia, Siberia has been investigated using a multi-method approach. The present-day vegetation in each square metre was analysed, revealing a community of Larix, shrubby Betula, and Salix on the polygon rim, a dominance of Carex and Andromeda polifolia in the rim-to-pond transition zone, and a predominantly monospecific Scorpidium scorpioides coverage within the pond. The total organic carbon (TOC content, TOC / TN (total nitrogen ratio, grain size, vascular plant macrofossils, moss remains, diatoms, and pollen were analysed for two vertical sections and a sediment core from a transect across the polygon. Radiocarbon dating indicates that the formation of the polygon started at least 1500 yr ago; the general positions of the pond and rim have not changed since that time. Two types of pond vegetation were identified, indicating two contrasting development stages of the polygon. The first was a well-established moss association, dominated by submerged or floating Scorpidium scorpioides and/or Drepanocladus spp. and overgrown by epiphytic diatoms such as Tabellaria flocculosa and Eunotia taxa. This stage coincides temporally with a period in which the polygon was only drained by lateral subsurface water flow, as indicated by mixed grain sizes. A different moss association occurred during times of repeated river flooding (indicated by homogeneous medium-grained sand that probably accumulated during the annual spring snowmelt, characterized by an abundance of Meesia triquetra and a dominance of benthic diatoms (e.g. Navicula vulpina, indicative of a relatively high pH and a high tolerance of disturbance. A comparison of the local polygon vegetation (inferred from moss and macrofossil spectra with the regional vegetation (inferred from pollen spectra indicated that the moss association with

  19. Solide Handwerksarbeit als Vorlage für Frauen- und Geschlechterforschung Creating a Mould for Women’s Studies and Gender Studies: Dr. Marie Baum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilona Scheidle

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Die Universitätsbibliothek Heidelberg veröffentlichte das „Nachlaßverzeichnis Dr. Marie Baum” (1874–1964, Ehrenbürgerin der alma mater. Das Repertorium dokumentiert die Zeugnisse ihres Lebens: als Pionierin der modernen Sozialarbeit, Vertreterin der bürgerlichen Frauenbewegung, Abgeordnete der Nationalversammlung und des Reichstages, als Wissenschaftlerin, Politikerin, Publizistin und als Ricarda Huchs Freundin. Das Findbuch ist ein Katalog zum Identifizieren und zum Auffinden einzelner Dokumente und zugleich ein Beitrag zur Biographie der Nachlaßgeberin.The university library at Heidelberg University published a “Catalogue of the Estate of Dr. Marie Baum” (1874–1964. This collection documents her life as pioneer of modern social work, as a leader of the women’s movement, as a politician during the Weimar Republic, a scientist, author and lifelong friend of Ricarda Huch. This catalogue is useful for identifying and finding select documents as well as a contribution to the biographie of Marie Baum.

  20. Unraveling the protein network of tomato fruit in response to necrotrophic phytopathogenic Rhizopus nigricans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiaoqi; Zhu, Benzhong; Luo, Yunbo; Fu, Daqi

    2013-01-01

    Plants are endowed with a sophisticated defense mechanism that gives signals to plant cells about the immediate danger from surroundings and protects them from pathogen invasion. In the search for the particular proteins involved in fruit defense responses, we report here a comparative analysis of tomato fruit (Solanum lycopersicum cv. Ailsa Craig) infected by Rhizopus nigricans Ehrenb, which is a significant contributor to postharvest rot disease in fresh tomato fruits. In total, four hundred forty-five tomato proteins were detected in common between the non-infected group and infected tomato fruit of mature green. Forty-nine differentially expressed spots in 2-D gels were identified, and were sorted into fifteen functional groups. Most of these proteins participate directly in the stress response process, while others were found to be involved in several equally important biological processes: protein metabolic process, carbohydrate metabolic process, ethylene biosynthesis, and cell death and so on. These responses occur in different cellular components, both intra- and extracellular spaces. The differentially expressed proteins were integrated into several pathways to show the regulation style existing in tomato fruit host. The composition of the collected proteins populations and the putative functions of the identified proteins argue for their roles in pathogen-plant interactions. Collectively results provide evidence that several regulatory pathways contribute to the resistance of tomato fruit to pathogen.

  1. Unraveling the Protein Network of Tomato Fruit in Response to Necrotrophic Phytopathogenic Rhizopus nigricans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiaoqi; Zhu, Benzhong; Luo, Yunbo; Fu, Daqi

    2013-01-01

    Plants are endowed with a sophisticated defense mechanism that gives signals to plant cells about the immediate danger from surroundings and protects them from pathogen invasion. In the search for the particular proteins involved in fruit defense responses, we report here a comparative analysis of tomato fruit (Solanum lycopersicum cv. Ailsa Craig) infected by Rhizopus nigricans Ehrenb, which is a significant contributor to postharvest rot disease in fresh tomato fruits. In total, four hundred forty-five tomato proteins were detected in common between the non-infected group and infected tomato fruit of mature green. Forty-nine differentially expressed spots in 2-D gels were identified, and were sorted into fifteen functional groups. Most of these proteins participate directly in the stress response process, while others were found to be involved in several equally important biological processes: protein metabolic process, carbohydrate metabolic process, ethylene biosynthesis, and cell death and so on. These responses occur in different cellular components, both intra- and extracellular spaces. The differentially expressed proteins were integrated into several pathways to show the regulation style existing in tomato fruit host. The composition of the collected proteins populations and the putative functions of the identified proteins argue for their roles in pathogen-plant interactions. Collectively results provide evidence that several regulatory pathways contribute to the resistance of tomato fruit to pathogen. PMID:24023804

  2. Unraveling the protein network of tomato fruit in response to necrotrophic phytopathogenic Rhizopus nigricans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqi Pan

    Full Text Available Plants are endowed with a sophisticated defense mechanism that gives signals to plant cells about the immediate danger from surroundings and protects them from pathogen invasion. In the search for the particular proteins involved in fruit defense responses, we report here a comparative analysis of tomato fruit (Solanum lycopersicum cv. Ailsa Craig infected by Rhizopus nigricans Ehrenb, which is a significant contributor to postharvest rot disease in fresh tomato fruits. In total, four hundred forty-five tomato proteins were detected in common between the non-infected group and infected tomato fruit of mature green. Forty-nine differentially expressed spots in 2-D gels were identified, and were sorted into fifteen functional groups. Most of these proteins participate directly in the stress response process, while others were found to be involved in several equally important biological processes: protein metabolic process, carbohydrate metabolic process, ethylene biosynthesis, and cell death and so on. These responses occur in different cellular components, both intra- and extracellular spaces. The differentially expressed proteins were integrated into several pathways to show the regulation style existing in tomato fruit host. The composition of the collected proteins populations and the putative functions of the identified proteins argue for their roles in pathogen-plant interactions. Collectively results provide evidence that several regulatory pathways contribute to the resistance of tomato fruit to pathogen.

  3. LIGHT-INDUCED MOTILE RESPONSES OF THE ESTUARINE BENTHIC DIATOMS NAVICULA PERMINUTA AND CYLINDROTHECA CLOSTERIUM (BACILLARIOPHYCEAE)(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLachlan, Deirdre H; Brownlee, Colin; Taylor, Alison R; Geider, Richard J; Underwood, Graham J C

    2009-06-01

    Motility of estuarine epipelic (mud-inhabiting) diatoms is an important adaptation to living in biofilms present within fine sediments. Motility allows cells to migrate within the photic zone in response to a wide range of environmental stimuli. The motile responses of two species of benthic diatoms to photon fluence rates and spectral quality were investigated. Cultures of Navicula perminuta (Grunow) in van Heurck and Cylindrotheca closterium (Ehrenb.) J. C. Lewin et Reimann both exhibited photoaccumulation at ∼200 μmol · m(-2)  · s(-1) and photodispersal from photon flux densities (PFDs) of ∼15 μmol · m(-2)  · s(-1) . Photokinesis (changing cell speed) contributed toward photodispersal for both species, and red light (λ = 681-691 nm) was most effective at inducing this process. N. perminuta showed a phototactic (directional) response, with active movement in response to a light gradient. Although this response was exhibited in white light, these directional responses were only elicited by wavelengths from 430 to 510 nm. In contrast, C. closterium did not exhibit phototaxis under any light conditions used in this study. Motile benthic diatoms thus exhibit complex and sophisticated responses to light quantity and quality, involving combinations of photokinesis and phototaxis, which can contribute toward explaining the patterns of large-scale cell movements observed in natural estuarine biofilms. © 2009 Phycological Society of America.

  4. A comparative analysis of the hominin triquetrum (SKX 3498 from Swartkrans, South Africa

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    Tracy L. Kivell

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The SKX 3498 triquetrum from Member 2 at Swartkrans Cave, South Africa is the only hominin triquetrum uncovered (and published thus far from the early Pleistocene hominin fossil record. Although SKX 3498 was found over two decades ago, its morphology has not been formally described or analysed, apart from the initial description. Furthermore, the taxonomic attribution of this fossil remains ambiguous as both Paranthropus and early Homo have been identified at Swartkrans. This analysis provides the first quantitative analysis of the SKX 3498 triquetrum, in comparison to those of extant hominids (humans and other great apes and other fossil hominins. Although the initial description of the SKX 3498 triquetrum summarised the morphology as generally human-like, this analysis reveals that quantitatively it is often similar to the triquetra of all hominine taxa and not necessarily humans in particular. Shared hominid-like morphology between SKX 3498 and Neanderthals suggests that both may retain the symplesiomorphic hominin form, but that functional differences compared to modern humans may be subtle. Without knowledge of triquetrum morphology typical of earlier Pliocene hominins, the taxonomic affiliation of SKX 3498 remains unclear.

  5. A PCR-Based Assay Targeting the Major Capsid Protein Gene of a Dinorna-Like ssRNA Virus That Infects Coral Photosymbionts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montalvo-Proaño, Jose; Buerger, Patrick; Weynberg, Karen D; van Oppen, Madeleine J H

    2017-01-01

    The coral-Symbiodinium association is a critical component of coral reefs as it is the main primary producer and builds the reef's 3-dimensional structure. A breakdown of this endosymbiosis causes a loss of the dinoflagellate photosymbiont, Symbiodinium, and/or its photosynthetic pigments from the coral tissues (i.e., coral bleaching), and can lead to coral mortality. Coral bleaching has mostly been attributed to environmental stressors, and in some cases to bacterial infection. Viral lysis of Symbiodinium has been proposed as another possible cause of some instances of coral bleaching, but this hypothesis has not yet been experimentally confirmed. In this study, we used coral virome data to develop a novel PCR-based assay for examining the presence and diversity of a single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) virus by targeting its major capsid protein (MCP) gene. Illumina sequence analysis of amplicons obtained with novel primers showed 99.8% of the reads had the closest taxonomic affinity with the MCP gene of the virus, Heterocapsa circularisquama RNA virus (HcRNAV) known to infect dinoflagellates, indicating that dinorna-like viruses are commonly associated with corals on the Great Barrier Reef. A phylogenetic analysis of MCP gene sequences revealed strong coral species specificity of viral operational taxon units (OTUs). This assay allows a relatively easy and rapid evaluation of the presence and diversity of this particular viral group and will assist in enhancing our understanding of the role of viral lysis in coral bleaching.

  6. Construction of target-specific virus-like particles for the delivery of algicidal compounds to harmful algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Beom Sik; Eom, Chi-Yong; Kim, Wonduck; Kim, Pyoung Il; Ju, Sun Yi; Ryu, Jaewon; Han, Gui Hwan; Oh, Jeong-Il; Cho, Hoon; Baek, Seung Ho; Kim, Gueeda; Kim, Minju; Hyun, Jaekyung; Jin, EonSeon; Kim, Si Wouk

    2015-04-01

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) can lead to substantial socio-economic losses and extensive damage to aquatic ecosystems, drinking water sources and human health. Common algicidal techniques, including ozonation, ultrasonic treatment and dispersion of algae-killing chemicals, are unsatisfactory both economically and ecologically. This study therefore presents a novel alternative strategy for the efficient control of deleterious algae via the use of host-specific virus-like particles (VLPs) combined with chemically synthesized algicidal compounds. The capsid protein of HcRNAV34, a single-stranded RNA virus that infects the toxic dinoflagellate, Heterocapsa circularisquama, was expressed in and purified from Escherichia coli and then self-assembled into VLPs in vitro. Next, the algicidal compound, thiazolidinedione 49 (TD49), was encapsidated into HcRNAV34 VLPs for specific delivery to H. circularisquama. Consequently, HcRNAV34 VLPs demonstrated the same host selectivity as naturally occurring HcRNAV34 virions, while TD49-encapsidated VLPs showed a more potent target-specific algicidal effect than TD49 alone. These results indicate that target-specific VLPs for the delivery of cytotoxic compounds to nuisance algae might provide a safe, environmentally friendly approach for the management of HABs in aquatic ecosystems. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. A PCR-Based Assay Targeting the Major Capsid Protein Gene of a Dinorna-Like ssRNA Virus That Infects Coral Photosymbionts

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    Jose Montalvo-Proaño

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The coral-Symbiodinium association is a critical component of coral reefs as it is the main primary producer and builds the reef's 3-dimensional structure. A breakdown of this endosymbiosis causes a loss of the dinoflagellate photosymbiont, Symbiodinium, and/or its photosynthetic pigments from the coral tissues (i.e., coral bleaching, and can lead to coral mortality. Coral bleaching has mostly been attributed to environmental stressors, and in some cases to bacterial infection. Viral lysis of Symbiodinium has been proposed as another possible cause of some instances of coral bleaching, but this hypothesis has not yet been experimentally confirmed. In this study, we used coral virome data to develop a novel PCR-based assay for examining the presence and diversity of a single-stranded RNA (ssRNA virus by targeting its major capsid protein (MCP gene. Illumina sequence analysis of amplicons obtained with novel primers showed 99.8% of the reads had the closest taxonomic affinity with the MCP gene of the virus, Heterocapsa circularisquama RNA virus (HcRNAV known to infect dinoflagellates, indicating that dinorna-like viruses are commonly associated with corals on the Great Barrier Reef. A phylogenetic analysis of MCP gene sequences revealed strong coral species specificity of viral operational taxon units (OTUs. This assay allows a relatively easy and rapid evaluation of the presence and diversity of this particular viral group and will assist in enhancing our understanding of the role of viral lysis in coral bleaching.

  8. Polyuridylylation and processing of transcripts from multiple gene minicircles in chloroplasts of the dinoflagellate Amphidinium carterae

    KAUST Repository

    Barbrook, Adrian C.

    2012-05-05

    Although transcription and transcript processing in the chloroplasts of plants have been extensively characterised, the RNA metabolism of other chloroplast lineages across the eukaryotes remains poorly understood. In this paper, we use RT-PCR to study transcription and transcript processing in the chloroplasts of Amphidinium carterae, a model peridinin-containing dinoflagellate. These organisms have a highly unusual chloroplast genome, with genes located on multiple small \\'minicircle\\' elements, and a number of idiosyncratic features of RNA metabolism including transcription via a rolling circle mechanism, and 3′ terminal polyuridylylation of transcripts. We demonstrate that transcription occurs in A. carterae via a rolling circle mechanism, as previously shown in the dinoflagellate Heterocapsa, and present evidence for the production of both polycistronic and monocistronic transcripts from A. carterae minicircles, including several regions containing ORFs previously not known to be expressed. We demonstrate the presence of both polyuridylylated and non-polyuridylylated transcripts in A. carterae, and show that polycistronic transcripts can be terminally polyuridylylated. We present a model for RNA metabolism in dinoflagellate chloroplasts where long polycistronic precursors are processed to form mature transcripts. Terminal polyuridylylation may mark transcripts with the correct 3′ end. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  9. Phylogenetic analysis of microalgae based on highly abundant proteins using mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hae-Won; Roh, Seong Woon; Cho, Kichul; Kim, Kil-Nam; Cha, In-Tae; Yim, Kyung June; Song, Hye Seon; Nam, Young-Do; Oda, Tatsuya; Chung, Young-Ho; Kim, Soo Jung; Choi, Jong-Soon; Kim, Daekyung

    2015-01-01

    The blooms of toxic phototrophic microorganisms, such as microalgae and cyanobacteria, which are typically found in freshwater and marine environments, are becoming more frequent and problematic in aquatic systems. Due to accumulation of toxic algae, harmful algal blooms (HABs) exert negative effects on aquatic systems. Therefore, rapid detection of harmful microalgae is important for monitoring the occurrence of HABs. Mass spectrometry-based methods have become sensitive, specific techniques for the identification and characterization of microorganisms. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) with time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) allows us to measure a unique molecular fingerprint of highly abundant proteins in a microorganism and has been used for the rapid, accurate identification of bacteria and fungi in clinical microbiology. Here, we tested the specificity of MALDI-TOF MS using microalgal strains (Heterocapsa, Alexandrium, Nannochloropsis, Chaetoceros, Chlorella, and Dunaliella spp.). Our research suggested that this method was comparable in terms of the rapid identification of microalgea to conventional methods based on genetic information and morphology. Thus, this efficient mass spectrometry-based technique may have applications in the rapid identification of harmful microorganisms from aquatic environmental samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Caracterización cultural y morfológica e identificación de 12 aislamientos fungosos de semillas de Leucaena leucocephala cv. Perú Cultural and morphological characterization and identification of 12 fungal isolations in seeds of Leucaena leucocephala cv. Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C Lezcano

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available La presente investigación tuvo como objetivo identificar los agentes fungosos asociados a las semillas de Leucaena leucocephala cv. Perú almacenadas al ambiente, a partir de la caracterización cultural y morfológica de 12 aislamientos puros; estos se obtuvieron de la siembra de las estructuras fúngicas (vegetativas y/o reproductivas, en placas Petri (9 cm de diámetro que contenían Agar Papa Dextrosa (APD y Agar Malta (AM. Las placas se incubaron durante 10 días a 25ºC, con alternancia de 8 h luz/16 h oscuridad o a oscuridad constante, según los requerimientos de cada organismo. Se identificaron siete agentes fungosos asociados a las semillas, los cuales se clasificaron teniendo en cuenta los caracteres culturales y morfológicos, y se corroboraron con las claves taxonómicas. Ello permitió agrupar: Penicillium expansum Link, Rhizopus stolonifer Ehrenb. ex Fr., Cladosporium sphaerospermum Penz., Chaetomium indicum Corda, Alternaria alternata (Fr Keissl., Pestalotia sp. y Trichoderma sp. Dichos caracteres constituyen una herramienta importante para la identificación de los hongos hasta el nivel de especie, por lo que se recomienda realizar nuevos estudios con los aislamientos #9 y #11 con vista a completar la identificación hasta la especie en el caso de los géneros Trichoderma y Pestalotia; así como identificar las especies fungosas del resto de los aislamientos.The objective of this study was to identify the fungal agents associated to seeds of Leucaena leucocephala cv. Peru stored under ambient conditions, from the cultural and morphological characterization of 12 pure isolations; they were obtained from planting the fungal structures (vegetative and/or reproductive, in Petri dishes (9 cm diameter which contained Potato Dextrose Agar (PDA and Malt Agar (MA. The dishes were incubated for 10 days at 25ºC, alternating 8 h light/16 h darkness or at constant darkness, according to the requirements of each organism. Seven fungal

  11. Furanodien-6-one from Commiphora erythraea inhibits the NF-κB signalling and attenuates LPS-induced neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellezza, Ilaria; Mierla, Annalisa; Grottelli, Silvia; Marcotullio, Maria Carla; Messina, Federica; Roscini, Luca; Cardinali, Gianluigi; Curini, Massimo; Minelli, Alba

    2013-07-01

    We investigated the in vitro anti-inflammatory activity of 1(10),4-furanodien-6-one, one the most active compounds of the hexane extract of Commiphora erythraea (Ehrenb.) Engl., by exposing microglial BV-2 cells to lipopolysaccharide. We showed that furanodien-6-one pre-treatment restored cell viability and ROS to control levels while halving NO generation. Production of pro-inflammatory IL-6, IL-23, IL-17, TGF-β, and INF-γ, significantly induced by LPS, was also markedly reduced by furanodien-6-one treatment. We further showed that furanodien-6-one protects primary neuronal cultures against the inflammatory/toxic insults of LPS-treated BV-2 conditioned media, indicating that furanodien-6-one exerts anti-inflammatory/cytoprotective effects in neuronal cells. We then investigated whether furanodien-6-one exerts anti-inflammatory properties in an in vivo model of microglial activation. In adult mice ip-injected with LPS we found that furanodien-6-one had strong cerebral anti-inflammatory properties by inhibiting liver and brain TNFα as well as IL-1β expression. Results were not unexpected since FTIR-metabolomic analyses showed that furanodien-6-one-treated mice had a reduced dissimilarity to control animals and that the response to LPS treatment was markedly modified by furanodien-6-one. In conclusion our data provide strong evidence of the anti-inflammatory properties of furanodien-6-one that could be exploited to counteract degenerative pathologies based on neuroinflammation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A comparison of morphological and molecular-based surveys to estimate the species richness of Chaetoceros and Thalassiosira (bacillariophyta, in the Bay of Fundy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah E Hamsher

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to compare the ability of morphology and molecular-based surveys to estimate species richness for two species-rich diatom genera, Chaetoceros Ehrenb. and Thalassiosira Cleve, in the Bay of Fundy. Phytoplankton tows were collected from two sites at intervals over two years and subsampled for morphology-based surveys (2010, 2011, a culture-based DNA reference library (DRL; 2010, and a molecular-based survey (2011. The DRL and molecular-based survey utilized the 3' end of the RUBISCO large subunit (rbcL-3P to identify genetic species groups (based on 0.1% divergence in rbcL-3P, which were subsequently identified morphologically to allow comparisons to the morphology-based survey. Comparisons were compiled for the year (2011 by site (n = 2 and by season (n = 3. Of the 34 taxa included in the comparisons, 50% of taxa were common to both methods, 35% were unique to the molecular-based survey, and 12% were unique to the morphology-based survey, while the remaining 3% of taxa were unidentified genetic species groups. The morphology-based survey excelled at identifying rare taxa in individual tow subsamples, which were occasionally missed with the molecular approach used here, while the molecular methods (the DRL and molecular-based survey, uncovered nine cryptic species pairs and four previously overlooked species. The last mentioned were typically difficult to identify and were generically assigned to Thalassiosira spp. during the morphology-based survey. Therefore, for now we suggest a combined approach encompassing routine morphology-based surveys accompanied by periodic molecular-based surveys to monitor for cryptic and difficult to identify taxa. As sequencing technologies improve, molecular-based surveys should become routine, leading to a more accurate representation of species composition and richness in monitoring programs.

  13. Spatial and temporal trends of freshwater mussel assemblages in the Meramec River Basin, Missouri, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinck, Jo Ellen; McMurray, Stephen E.; Roberts, Andrew D.; Barnhart, M. Christopher; Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Wang, Ning; Augspurger, Tom

    2012-01-01

    The Meramec River basin in east-central Missouri has one of the most diverse unionoid mussel faunas in the central United States with >40 species identified. Data were analyzed from historical surveys to test whether diversity and abundance of mussels in the Meramec River basin (Big, Bourbeuse, and Meramec rivers, representing >400 river miles) decreased between 1978 and 1997. We found that over 20y, species richness and diversity decreased significantly in the Bourbeuse and Meramec rivers but not in the Big River. Most species were found at fewer sites and in lower numbers in 1997 than in 1978. Federally endangered species and Missouri Species of Conservation Concern with the most severe temporal declines were Alasmidonta viridis, Arcidens confragosus, Elliptio crassidens, Epioblasma triquetra, Fusconaia ebena, Lampsilis abrupta, Lampsilis brittsi, and Simpsonaias ambigua. Averaged across all species, mussels were generally being extirpated from historical sampling sites more rapidly than colonization was occurring. An exception was one reach of the Meramec River between river miles 28.4 and 59.5, where mussel abundance and diversity were greater than in other reaches and where colonization of Margaritiferidae, Lampsilini, and Quadrulini exceeded extirpation. The exact reasons mussel diversity and abundance have remained robust in this 30- mile reach is uncertain, but the reach is associated with increased gradients, few long pools, and vertical rock faces, all of which are preferable for mussels. Complete loss of mussel communities at eight sites (16%) with relatively diverse historical assemblages was attributed to physical habitat changes including bank erosion, unstable substrate, and sedimentation. Mussel conservation efforts, including restoring and protecting riparian habitats, limiting the effects of in-stream sand and gravel mining, monitoring and controlling invasive species, and protecting water quality, may be warranted in the Meramec River basin.

  14. Coral-associated viral communities show high levels of diversity and host auxiliary functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen D. Weynberg

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Stony corals (Scleractinia are marine invertebrates that form the foundation and framework upon which tropical reefs are built. The coral animal associates with a diverse microbiome comprised of dinoflagellate algae and other protists, bacteria, archaea, fungi and viruses. Using a metagenomics approach, we analysed the DNA and RNA viral assemblages of seven coral species from the central Great Barrier Reef (GBR, demonstrating that tailed bacteriophages of the Caudovirales dominate across all species examined, and ssDNA viruses, notably the Microviridae, are also prevalent. Most sequences with matches to eukaryotic viruses were assigned to six viral families, including four Nucleocytoplasmic Large DNA Viruses (NCLDVs families: Iridoviridae, Phycodnaviridae, Mimiviridae, and Poxviridae, as well as Retroviridae and Polydnaviridae. Contrary to previous findings, Herpesvirales were rare in these GBR corals. Sequences of a ssRNA virus with similarities to the dinornavirus, Heterocapsa circularisquama ssRNA virus of the Alvernaviridae that infects free-living dinoflagellates, were observed in three coral species. We also detected viruses previously undescribed from the coral holobiont, including a virus that targets fungi associated with the coral species Acropora tenuis. Functional analysis of the assembled contigs indicated a high prevalence of latency-associated genes in the coral-associated viral assemblages, several host-derived auxiliary metabolic genes (AMGs for photosynthesis (psbA, psbD genes encoding the photosystem II D1 and D2 proteins respectively, as well as potential nematocyst toxins and antioxidants (genes encoding green fluorescent-like chromoprotein. This study expands the currently limited knowledge on coral-associated viruses by characterising viral composition and function across seven GBR coral species.

  15. Remarkable sequence similarity between the dinoflagellate-infecting marine girus and the terrestrial pathogen African swine fever virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claverie Jean-Michel

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Heterocapsa circularisquama DNA virus (HcDNAV; previously designated as HcV is a giant virus (girus with a ~356-kbp double-stranded DNA (dsDNA genome. HcDNAV lytically infects the bivalve-killing marine dinoflagellate H. circularisquama, and currently represents the sole DNA virus isolated from dinoflagellates, one of the most abundant protists in marine ecosystems. Its morphological features, genome type, and host range previously suggested that HcDNAV might be a member of the family Phycodnaviridae of Nucleo-Cytoplasmic Large DNA Viruses (NCLDVs, though no supporting sequence data was available. NCLDVs currently include two families found in aquatic environments (Phycodnaviridae, Mimiviridae, one mostly infecting terrestrial animals (Poxviridae, another isolated from fish, amphibians and insects (Iridoviridae, and the last one (Asfarviridae exclusively represented by the animal pathogen African swine fever virus (ASFV, the agent of a fatal hemorrhagic disease in domestic swine. In this study, we determined the complete sequence of the type B DNA polymerase (PolB gene of HcDNAV. The viral PolB was transcribed at least from 6 h post inoculation (hpi, suggesting its crucial function for viral replication. Most unexpectedly, the HcDNAV PolB sequence was found to be closely related to the PolB sequence of ASFV. In addition, the amino acid sequence of HcDNAV PolB showed a rare amino acid substitution within a motif containing highly conserved motif: YSDTDS was found in HcDNAV PolB instead of YGDTDS in most dsDNA viruses. Together with the previous observation of ASFV-like sequences in the Sorcerer II Global Ocean Sampling metagenomic datasets, our results further reinforce the ideas that the terrestrial ASFV has its evolutionary origin in marine environments.

  16. Assessment of phytoplankton and environmental variables for water quality and trophic state classification in the Gemlik Gulf, Marmara Sea (Turkey).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balci, Muharrem; Balkis, Neslihan

    2017-02-15

    Phytoplankton assemblages related to environmental factors and ecological status of the Gemlik Gulf were investigated between June 2010 and May 2011. A total 155 phytoplankton species were detected and 6 taxa (Amphisolenia laticincta, Archaeperidinium minutum, Cochlodinium sp., Gynogonadinium aequatoriale, Heterocapsa rotundata and Metaphalacroma sp.) were new records for the Turkish Seas. The lowest and highest total phytoplankton abundance among the sampling units (depths) was recorded in April 2011 (7.4×103cellsL-1) and July 2010 (251.8×103cellsL-1). Local small patches of visible red tide events were detected especially in the gulf, although a phytoplankton bloom was not observed. The water column was well stratified in the early autumn and well mixed in the early spring according to stratification index values. Surface nutrient concentrations increased especially at stations located inside of the gulf. The limiting effect of silicate was observed in early, mid-summer and early winter periods while the nitrogen was the limiting nutrient in the gulf during the whole sampling period. In the Gulf, low water quality-high mesotrophic and bad water quality-eutrophic status, high quality and low trophic level were generally detected according to Chl a, dissolved oxygen and trophic index. However, indices developed to determine the trophic level and water quality of the Mediterranean Sea can give unexpected results about the current environmental quality status when it is applied to the Marmara Sea which has limited photic zone by the halocline-pycnocline and thermocline. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of Nitrogen Availability and Form on Phytoplankton Growth in a Eutrophied Estuary (Neuse River Estuary, NC, USA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily K Cira

    Full Text Available Nitrogen availability and form are important controls on estuarine phytoplankton growth. This study experimentally determined the influence of urea and nitrate additions on phytoplankton growth throughout the growing season (March 2012, June 2011, August 2011 in a temperate, eutrophied estuary (Neuse River Estuary, North Carolina, USA. Photopigments (chlorophyll a and diagnostic photopigments: peridinin, fucoxanthin, alloxanthin, zeaxanthin, chlorophyll b and microscopy-based cell counts were used as indicators of phytoplankton growth. In March, the phytoplankton community was dominated by Gyrodinium instriatum and only fucoxanthin-based growth rates were stimulated by nitrogen addition. The limited response to nitrogen suggests other factors may control phytoplankton growth and community composition in early spring. In June, inorganic nitrogen concentrations were low and stimulatory effects of both nitrogen forms were observed for chlorophyll a- and diagnostic photopigment-based growth rates. In contrast, cell counts showed that only cryptophyte and dinoflagellate (Heterocapsa rotundata growth were stimulated. Responses of other photopigments may have been due to an increase in pigment per cell or growth of plankton too small to be counted with the microscopic methods used. Despite high nitrate concentrations in August, growth rates were elevated in response to urea and/or nitrate addition for all photopigments except peridinin. However, this response was not observed in cell counts, again suggesting that pigment-based growth responses may not always be indicative of a true community and/or taxa-specific growth response. This highlights the need to employ targeted microscopy-based cell enumeration concurrent with pigment-based technology to facilitate a more complete understanding of phytoplankton dynamics in estuarine systems. These results are consistent with previous studies showing the seasonal importance of nitrogen availability in

  18. Coral-associated viral communities show high levels of diversity and host auxiliary functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weynberg, Karen D; Laffy, Patrick W; Wood-Charlson, Elisha M; Turaev, Dmitrij; Rattei, Thomas; Webster, Nicole S; van Oppen, Madeleine J H

    2017-01-01

    Stony corals (Scleractinia) are marine invertebrates that form the foundation and framework upon which tropical reefs are built. The coral animal associates with a diverse microbiome comprised of dinoflagellate algae and other protists, bacteria, archaea, fungi and viruses. Using a metagenomics approach, we analysed the DNA and RNA viral assemblages of seven coral species from the central Great Barrier Reef (GBR), demonstrating that tailed bacteriophages of the Caudovirales dominate across all species examined, and ssDNA viruses, notably the Microviridae, are also prevalent. Most sequences with matches to eukaryotic viruses were assigned to six viral families, including four Nucleocytoplasmic Large DNA Viruses (NCLDVs) families: Iridoviridae, Phycodnaviridae, Mimiviridae, and Poxviridae, as well as Retroviridae and Polydnaviridae. Contrary to previous findings, Herpesvirales were rare in these GBR corals. Sequences of a ssRNA virus with similarities to the dinornavirus, Heterocapsa circularisquama ssRNA virus of the Alvernaviridae that infects free-living dinoflagellates, were observed in three coral species. We also detected viruses previously undescribed from the coral holobiont, including a virus that targets fungi associated with the coral species Acropora tenuis. Functional analysis of the assembled contigs indicated a high prevalence of latency-associated genes in the coral-associated viral assemblages, several host-derived auxiliary metabolic genes (AMGs) for photosynthesis (psbA, psbD genes encoding the photosystem II D1 and D2 proteins respectively), as well as potential nematocyst toxins and antioxidants (genes encoding green fluorescent-like chromoprotein). This study expands the currently limited knowledge on coral-associated viruses by characterising viral composition and function across seven GBR coral species.

  19. Effects of Nitrogen Availability and Form on Phytoplankton Growth in a Eutrophied Estuary (Neuse River Estuary, NC, USA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cira, Emily K; Paerl, Hans W; Wetz, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen availability and form are important controls on estuarine phytoplankton growth. This study experimentally determined the influence of urea and nitrate additions on phytoplankton growth throughout the growing season (March 2012, June 2011, August 2011) in a temperate, eutrophied estuary (Neuse River Estuary, North Carolina, USA). Photopigments (chlorophyll a and diagnostic photopigments: peridinin, fucoxanthin, alloxanthin, zeaxanthin, chlorophyll b) and microscopy-based cell counts were used as indicators of phytoplankton growth. In March, the phytoplankton community was dominated by Gyrodinium instriatum and only fucoxanthin-based growth rates were stimulated by nitrogen addition. The limited response to nitrogen suggests other factors may control phytoplankton growth and community composition in early spring. In June, inorganic nitrogen concentrations were low and stimulatory effects of both nitrogen forms were observed for chlorophyll a- and diagnostic photopigment-based growth rates. In contrast, cell counts showed that only cryptophyte and dinoflagellate (Heterocapsa rotundata) growth were stimulated. Responses of other photopigments may have been due to an increase in pigment per cell or growth of plankton too small to be counted with the microscopic methods used. Despite high nitrate concentrations in August, growth rates were elevated in response to urea and/or nitrate addition for all photopigments except peridinin. However, this response was not observed in cell counts, again suggesting that pigment-based growth responses may not always be indicative of a true community and/or taxa-specific growth response. This highlights the need to employ targeted microscopy-based cell enumeration concurrent with pigment-based technology to facilitate a more complete understanding of phytoplankton dynamics in estuarine systems. These results are consistent with previous studies showing the seasonal importance of nitrogen availability in estuaries, and also

  20. Contrasting responses of DMS and DMSP to ocean acidification in Arctic waters

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    S. D. Archer

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Increasing atmospheric CO2 is decreasing ocean pH most rapidly in colder regions such as the Arctic. As a component of the EPOCA (European Project on Ocean Acidification pelagic mesocosm experiment off Spitzbergen in 2010, we examined the consequences of decreased pH and increased pCO2 on the concentrations of dimethylsulphide (DMS. DMS is an important reactant and contributor to aerosol formation and growth in the Arctic troposphere. In the nine mesocosms with initial pHT 8.3 to 7.5, equivalent to pCO2 of 180 to 1420 μatm, highly significant but inverse responses to acidity (hydrogen ion concentration [H+] occurred following nutrient addition. Compared to ambient [H+], average concentrations of DMS during the mid-phase of the 30 d experiment, when the influence of altered acidity was unambiguous, were reduced by approximately 60% at the highest [H+] and by 35% at [H+] equivalent to 750 μatm pCO2, as projected for 2100. In contrast, concentrations of dimethylsulphoniopropionate (DMSP, the precursor of DMS, were elevated by approximately 50% at the highest [H+] and by 30% at [H+] corresponding to 750 μatm pCO2. Measurements of the specific rate of synthesis of DMSP by phytoplankton indicate increased production at high [H+], in parallel to rates of inorganic carbon fixation. The elevated DMSP production at high [H+] was largely a consequence of increased dinoflagellate biomass and in particular, the increased abundance of the species Heterocapsa rotundata. We discuss both phytoplankton and bacterial processes that may explain the reduced ratios of DMS:DMSPt (total dimethylsulphoniopropionate at higher [H+]. The experimental design of eight treatment levels provides comparatively robust empirical relationships of DMS and DMSP concentration, DMSP production and dinoflagellate biomass versus [H+] in Arctic waters.

  1. Physicochemical Properties of Silt Loamy Soil and Diversity of Diatom Species Under Winter Wheat and Oats

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    Jadwiga Stanek-Tarkowska

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research was to investigate the soil properties and the species diversity of diatoms growing in different agricultural fields with silt loamy soil. The field experiment was conducted in 2014 in Kosina, near Łańcut (SE Poland, at three sites (indicated as fields K1, K2, K3 with different soil environmental conditions and plants. The growth of winter wheat Triticum aestivum (cv. Bogatka in fields K1 and K2 and oats Avena Sativa (cv. Haker in field K3 under different soil management were studied. The soil samples were collected from the top layers (0-5 cm depth each month, from April to December. Certain physical and chemical parameters of soil were measured. The pH of soil was acidic and slightly acidic in fields K1 (5.0-5.4, K2 (4.9-5.9 and K3 (4.5-5.1. The soil in field K3 had a significantly greater content of organic matter (1.06-1.30% and water content (12.9–33.8%, v/v than fields K1 and K2. A total of 91 diatom taxa were found. The diversity was greatest in field K2 (71 taxa, lower in K1 (54 taxa and K3 (24 taxa. In K1, the most numerous species were Luticola D.G. Mann cf. mutica, Mayamaea atomus var. permitis (Hust. Lange-Bertalot, and Stauroneis thermicola (Petersen Lund, with more than a 20% share in the assemblage. In K2, very abundant assemblages were formed by Mayamaea atomus (Kütz. Lange-Bertalot, Mayamaea atomus var. permitis (Hust. Lange-Bertalot, and Stauroneis thermicola (Petersen Lund with a 25 to 50% share in the total diatom community. In K3, with oat cultivation, a different diatom species structure was found. Here, the most abundant were Halamphora montana (Krasske Levkov, Hantzchia amphioxys (Ehrenb. Grunow, Mayamaea atomus (Kütz. Lange-Bertalot, and Nitzschia pusilla Grunow, which attained a share in the assemblage exceeding than 20%. The effects of different soil management regimes under different plants on the physical and chemical properties of the soil, and on the diversity of diatoms, were

  2. Biological Ice Nuclei: They are Everywhere, What are Their Roles? (Invited)

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    Schnell, R. C.

    2009-12-01

    Biological ice nuclei active at temperatures warmer than -2C were first observed in the late 1960s associated with decaying grass and tree leaves; discovered more by accident than in a planned experiment. The active component of the decaying leaves was subsequently found to be produced by a few living bacteria, the two most ubiquitous being strains of P. syringae and E. herbicola. The active bacterial ice nuclei are easily deactivated by anaerobic, chemical and heat stresses. The same grass and tree leaves, when well decayed, generally contain less active ice nuclei (threshold temperatures of -5C to - 6C) in the 0.1 micron diameter range compared to the larger (1 micron) bacteria associated ice nuclei. The well decayed leaf litter ice nuclei are stable over a wide range of stresses and time; some samples of leaf derived nuclei stored at room temperature have exhibited the same ice nucleus concentration for over 30 years. Fungi also have active ice nuclei that are stable over many decades. Active ice nuclei are found in marine waters associated with plankton, and are produced by at least one marine dinoflagellate (Heterocapsa niei) that expresses ice nucleus activity almost as warm as terrestrial bacteria ice nuclei. Living ice nucleus bacteria have been found in marine fogs far at sea, in precipitation in Antarctica as well as over many continental areas, in air in the high Arctic, on vegetation around the world, on remote ice bound islands, and growing on and inside water storing vegetation on isolated tropical mountain peaks. But why? What is the evolutionary advantage for the ice nucleus gene to be expressed in such a wide range of environments, by greatly different species? There is an energy cost for bacteria and fungi to support the ice gene, so it probably is not a genetic anomaly. Possibly the ice nuclei play many roles? These could include damaging plants to acquire a food source, an aid in survival and dispersal in clouds, initiation of precipitation to

  3. Possible importance of algal toxins in the Salton Sea, California

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    Reifel, K.M.; McCoy, M.P.; Rocke, T.E.; Tiffany, M.A.; Hurlbert, S.H.; Faulkner, D.J.

    2002-01-01

    In response to wildlife mortality including unexplained eared grebe (Podiceps nigricollis) die-off events in 1992 and 1994 and other mortality events including large fish kills, a survey was conducted for the presence of algal toxins in the Salton Sea. Goals of this survey were to determine if and when algal toxins are present in the Salton Sea and to describe the phytoplankton composition during those times. A total of 29 samples was collected for toxicity analysis from both nearshore and midlake sites visited biweekly from January to December 1999. Dinoflagellates and diatoms dominated most samples, but some were dominated by a prymnesiophyte (Pleurochrysis pseudoroscoffensis) or a raphidophyte (Chattonella marina). Several types of blooms were observed and sampled. The dinoflagellate Gyrodinium uncatenum formed an extensive, dense (up to 310 000 cells ml-1) and long-lasting bloom during the winter in 1999. A coccolithophorid, Pleurochrysis pseudoroscoffensis, occurred at high densities in surface films and nearshore areas during the spring and summer of 1999. These surface films also contained high densities of one or two other species (an unidentified scrippsielloid, Heterocapsa niei, Chattonella marina). Localized blooms were also observed in the Salton Sea. An unknown small dinoflagellate reached high densities (110 000 cells ml-1) inside Varner Harbor, and an unidentified species of Gymnodinium formed a dense (270 000 cells ml-1) band along part of the southern shoreline during the summer. Three species known to produce toxins in other systems were found. Protoceratium reticulatum (=Gonyaulax grindleyi) and Chattonella marina were found in several samples taken during summer months, and Prorocentrum minimum was found in low densities in several samples. Extracts of most samples, including those containing known toxic species, showed a low level (brine shrimp lethality assay and were not considered toxic. All sample extracts tested in the mouse bioassay

  4. Evaluating the Ability of some Medicinal Plants for Controlling Rhizopus (Rhizopu snigricans and Black Spot Rot (Alternaria alternate as Postharvest Diseases in Tomato Produced under Conventional and Organic Cropping Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M Seyyedi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction After crops harvesting, conditions and durations of storage are considered as the most crucial factors formaintaining the nutritional value and quality of agro-horticultural products such as tomato (Lycopersicom esculentum Mill. and its waste reduction. However, the rhizopus rot (Rhizopus stolonifer and black spot rot (Alternaria alternate are the most important postharvest diseases in tomato during storage. In other word, among the factors reducing quality of the postharvest tomato, Rhizopus nigricans Ehrenb. (Rhizopus stolonifer and Alternaria alternate (Fr.:Fr. Keissl. f. sp. lycopersici paly a special role in the contaminated tomato fruits that can affect its taste, firmness and stiffness. In recent years, due to the problems and threats arising from the use of chemical fungicides in agricultural systems, principled management of alternative biological approaches for reducing the postharvest contamination in tomato, especially during storage, is emphasized more than ever. Considering these conditions, the current study was aimed to investigate the effects of some medicinal plants including thyme (Thymus vulgaris L., pennyroyal (Mentha pulegium L., peppermint (Mentha piperita L., eucalyptus (Eucalyptus globules L., caster bean (Ricinus communis L. and tomato in their ability to control the rhizopus (Rhizopus nigricans and black spot rot (Alternaria alternate in tomato production under conventional and organic cropping systems. Materials and methods The experiment was conducted at Faculty of Agriculture, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Iran, during theyear of 2010. A completely randomized design was used based on factorial arrangement with three replications and 14 treatments. Two cropping production systems (conventional and organic and seven medicinal plants (thyme, pennyroyal, peppermint, eucalyptus, caster bean, tomato and control were the first and the second experimental factors, respectively. After collecting plant samples