WorldWideScience

Sample records for heritable phenotypic change

  1. Transcriptional infidelity promotes heritable phenotypic change in a bistable gene network.

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    Alasdair J E Gordon

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Bistable epigenetic switches are fundamental for cell fate determination in unicellular and multicellular organisms. Regulatory proteins associated with bistable switches are often present in low numbers and subject to molecular noise. It is becoming clear that noise in gene expression can influence cell fate. Although the origins and consequences of noise have been studied, the stochastic and transient nature of RNA errors during transcription has not been considered in the origin or modeling of noise nor has the capacity for such transient errors in information transfer to generate heritable phenotypic change been discussed. We used a classic bistable memory module to monitor and capture transient RNA errors: the lac operon of Escherichia coli comprises an autocatalytic positive feedback loop producing a heritable all-or-none epigenetic switch that is sensitive to molecular noise. Using single-cell analysis, we show that the frequency of epigenetic switching from one expression state to the other is increased when the fidelity of RNA transcription is decreased due to error-prone RNA polymerases or to the absence of auxiliary RNA fidelity factors GreA and GreB (functional analogues of eukaryotic TFIIS. Therefore, transcription infidelity contributes to molecular noise and can effect heritable phenotypic change in genetically identical cells in the same environment. Whereas DNA errors allow genetic space to be explored, RNA errors may allow epigenetic or expression space to be sampled. Thus, RNA infidelity should also be considered in the heritable origin of altered or aberrant cell behaviour.

  2. Heritable change caused by transient transcription errors.

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    Alasdair J E Gordon

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Transmission of cellular identity relies on the faithful transfer of information from the mother to the daughter cell. This process includes accurate replication of the DNA, but also the correct propagation of regulatory programs responsible for cellular identity. Errors in DNA replication (mutations and protein conformation (prions can trigger stable phenotypic changes and cause human disease, yet the ability of transient transcriptional errors to produce heritable phenotypic change ('epimutations' remains an open question. Here, we demonstrate that transcriptional errors made specifically in the mRNA encoding a transcription factor can promote heritable phenotypic change by reprogramming a transcriptional network, without altering DNA. We have harnessed the classical bistable switch in the lac operon, a memory-module, to capture the consequences of transient transcription errors in living Escherichia coli cells. We engineered an error-prone transcription sequence (A9 run in the gene encoding the lac repressor and show that this 'slippery' sequence directly increases epigenetic switching, not mutation in the cell population. Therefore, one altered transcript within a multi-generational series of many error-free transcripts can cause long-term phenotypic consequences. Thus, like DNA mutations, transcriptional epimutations can instigate heritable changes that increase phenotypic diversity, which drives both evolution and disease.

  3. An Effective Method to Identify Heritable Components from Multivariate Phenotypes.

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    Jiangwen Sun

    Full Text Available Multivariate phenotypes may be characterized collectively by a variety of low level traits, such as in the diagnosis of a disease that relies on multiple disease indicators. Such multivariate phenotypes are often used in genetic association studies. If highly heritable components of a multivariate phenotype can be identified, it can maximize the likelihood of finding genetic associations. Existing methods for phenotype refinement perform unsupervised cluster analysis on low-level traits and hence do not assess heritability. Existing heritable component analytics either cannot utilize general pedigrees or have to estimate the entire covariance matrix of low-level traits from limited samples, which leads to inaccurate estimates and is often computationally prohibitive. It is also difficult for these methods to exclude fixed effects from other covariates such as age, sex and race, in order to identify truly heritable components. We propose to search for a combination of low-level traits and directly maximize the heritability of this combined trait. A quadratic optimization problem is thus derived where the objective function is formulated by decomposing the traditional maximum likelihood method for estimating the heritability of a quantitative trait. The proposed approach can generate linearly-combined traits of high heritability that has been corrected for the fixed effects of covariates. The effectiveness of the proposed approach is demonstrated in simulations and by a case study of cocaine dependence. Our approach was computationally efficient and derived traits of higher heritability than those by other methods. Additional association analysis with the derived cocaine-use trait identified genetic markers that were replicated in an independent sample, further confirming the utility and advantage of the proposed approach.

  4. Heritability, evolvability, phenotypic plasticity and temporal variation in sperm-competition success of Drosophila melanogaster.

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    Dobler, R; Reinhardt, K

    2016-05-01

    Sperm-competition success (SCS) is seen as centrally important for evolutionary change: superior fathers sire superior sons and thereby inherit the traits that make them superior. Additional hypotheses, that phenotypic plasticity in SCS and sperm ageing explain variation in paternity, are less considered. Even though various alleles have individually been shown to be correlated with variation in SCS, few studies have addressed the heritability, or evolvability, of overall SCS. Those studies that have addressed found low or no heritability and have not examined evolvability. They have further not excluded phenotypic plasticity, and temporal effects on SCS, despite their known dramatic effects on sperm function. In Drosophila melanogaster, we found that both standard components of sperm competition, sperm defence and sperm offence, showed nonsignificant heritability across several offspring cohorts. Instead, our analysis revealed, for the first time, the existence of phenotypic plasticity in SCS across an extreme environment (5% CO2 ), and an influence of sperm ageing. Evolvability of SCS was substantial for sperm defence but weak for sperm offence. Our results suggest that the paradigm of explaining evolution by sperm competition is more complex and will benefit from further experimental work on the heritability or evolvability of SCS, measuring phenotypic plasticity, and separating the effects of sperm competition and sperm ageing.

  5. Heritability of eleven metabolic phenotypes in Danish and Chinese twins

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    Li, Shuxia; Duan, Hongmei; Pang, Zengchang

    2013-01-01

    A twin-based comparative study on the genetic influences in metabolic endophenotypes in two populations of substantial ethnic, environmental, and cultural differences was performed. Design and Methods: Data on 11 metabolic phenotypes including anthropometric measures, blood glucose, and lipids...... levels as well as blood pressure were available from 756 pairs of Danish twins (309 monozygotic and 447 dizygotic twin pairs) with a mean age of 38 years (range: 18-67) and from 325 pairs of Chinese twins (183 monozygotic and 142 dizygotic twin pairs) with a mean age of 40.5 years (range: 18-69). Twin...... similar heritability patterns in the two samples with body weight showing only a slight difference. Higher genetic influences were estimated for fasting blood glucose level in Chinese twins, whereas the Danish twins showed more genetic regulation over most lipids phenotypes. Systolic blood pressure...

  6. Heritability of in vitro phenotypes exhibited by murine adipose-derived stromal cells.

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    Jiang, Zixuan; Harrison, David E; Parsons, Makayla E; McClatchy, Susan; Jacobs, Lawrence; Pazdro, Robert

    2016-10-01

    Adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) exhibit significant potential as therapeutic agents to promote tissue regeneration. Success of ADSC-based therapies is dependent upon efficient cell expansion in vitro as well as postinjection survival in the caustic milieu of damaged tissue. Genetic background regulates ADSC proliferative capacity and stress resistance, but the extent of the genetic effect size is not completely defined. The present study aimed to quantify phenotypic ranges and heritability of in vitro ADSC characteristics. ADSCs were isolated from mice representing 16 genetically diverse inbred mouse strains, including 12 classical inbred strains and four wild-derived strains. Cells were grown in vitro, and proliferative capacity and oxidative stress resistance were assessed. The fold change for ADSC growth ranged from 0.87 (BALB/cByJ) to 23.60 (POHN/DehJ), relative to original seeding density. The heritability of proliferative capacity was estimated to be 0.6462 (p = 9.967 × 10(-15)), and this phenotype was not associated with other ADSC traits. Cell viability following H2O2 treatment ranged from 39.81 % (CAST/EiJ) to 91.60 % (DBA/2 J), and the heritability of this phenotype was calculated as 0.6146 (p = 1.22 × 10(-12)). Relationships between cell viability and weight of the donor fat pad were also discovered. Donor genetic background is a major determinant of in vitro ADSC phenotypes. This study supports the development of forward genetics strategies to identify genes that underlie ADSC phenotypic diversity, which will inform efforts to improve cell-based therapies.

  7. Genome-wide association studies and heritability estimates of body mass index related phenotypes in Bangladeshi adults.

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    Molly Scannell Bryan

    Full Text Available Many health outcomes are influenced by a person's body mass index, as well as by the trajectory of body mass index through a lifetime. Although previous research has established that body mass index related traits are influenced by genetics, the relationship between these traits and genetics has not been well characterized in people of South Asian ancestry. To begin to characterize this relationship, we analyzed the association between common genetic variation and five phenotypes related to body mass index in a population-based sample of 5,354 Bangladeshi adults. We discovered a significant association between SNV rs347313 (intron of NOS1AP and change in body mass index in women over two years. In a linear mixed-model, the G allele was associated with an increase of 0.25 kg/m2 in body mass index over two years (p-value of 2.3·10-8. We also estimated the heritability of these phenotypes from our genotype data. We found significant estimates of heritability for all of the body mass index-related phenotypes. Our study evaluated the genetic determinants of body mass index related phenotypes for the first time in South Asians. The results suggest that these phenotypes are heritable and some of this heritability is driven by variation that differs from those previously reported. We also provide evidence that the genetic etiology of body mass index related traits may differ by ancestry, sex, and environment, and consequently that these factors should be considered when assessing the genetic determinants of the risk of body mass index-related disease.

  8. Heritability maps of human face morphology through large-scale automated three-dimensional phenotyping

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    Tsagkrasoulis, Dimosthenis; Hysi, Pirro; Spector, Tim; Montana, Giovanni

    2017-04-01

    The human face is a complex trait under strong genetic control, as evidenced by the striking visual similarity between twins. Nevertheless, heritability estimates of facial traits have often been surprisingly low or difficult to replicate. Furthermore, the construction of facial phenotypes that correspond to naturally perceived facial features remains largely a mystery. We present here a large-scale heritability study of face geometry that aims to address these issues. High-resolution, three-dimensional facial models have been acquired on a cohort of 952 twins recruited from the TwinsUK registry, and processed through a novel landmarking workflow, GESSA (Geodesic Ensemble Surface Sampling Algorithm). The algorithm places thousands of landmarks throughout the facial surface and automatically establishes point-wise correspondence across faces. These landmarks enabled us to intuitively characterize facial geometry at a fine level of detail through curvature measurements, yielding accurate heritability maps of the human face (www.heritabilitymaps.info).

  9. Heritability and correlation between selected phenotypical characters of soybean under the climatic conditions of Poland

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    Edward Warzecha

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The variability of characters connected with yield structure in soybean is much more influenced by environmental conditions than the genotype as indicated by heritability coefficients (h2, calculated on the basis of trials performed during several years under the climatic conditions of Poland. The length of the vegetation period, however, is determined predominantly by the genotype since high reproducibility of h2 values in different years was found. The heritability coefficients obtained for the agronomic characters of soybean grown in Poland were relatively similar to analogous data from the USA. Phenotypical correlations calculated for the whole group together with correlations between the length of the vegetation period and other characters calculated for individual varieties, provided information on the interrelationship between characters in soybean grown in Poland. This, together with calculated heritability coefficients could be useful for soybean breeding in Poland.

  10. Lessons from model organisms: phenotypic robustness and missing heritability in complex disease.

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    Christine Queitsch

    Full Text Available Genetically tractable model organisms from phages to mice have taught us invaluable lessons about fundamental biological processes and disease-causing mutations. Owing to technological and computational advances, human biology and the causes of human diseases have become accessible as never before. Progress in identifying genetic determinants for human diseases has been most remarkable for Mendelian traits. In contrast, identifying genetic determinants for complex diseases such as diabetes, cancer, and cardiovascular and neurological diseases has remained challenging, despite the fact that these diseases cluster in families. Hundreds of variants associated with complex diseases have been found in genome-wide association studies (GWAS, yet most of these variants explain only a modest amount of the observed heritability, a phenomenon known as "missing heritability." The missing heritability has been attributed to many factors, mainly inadequacies in genotyping and phenotyping. We argue that lessons learned about complex traits in model organisms offer an alternative explanation for missing heritability in humans. In diverse model organisms, phenotypic robustness differs among individuals, and those with decreased robustness show increased penetrance of mutations and express previously cryptic genetic variation. We propose that phenotypic robustness also differs among humans and that individuals with lower robustness will be more responsive to genetic and environmental perturbations and hence susceptible to disease. Phenotypic robustness is a quantitative trait that can be accurately measured in model organisms, but not as yet in humans. We propose feasible approaches to measure robustness in large human populations, proof-of-principle experiments for robustness markers in model organisms, and a new GWAS design that takes differences in robustness into account.

  11. Heritability of phenotypes associated with glucose homeostasis and adiposity in a rural area of Brazil.

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    Pena, Geórgia G; Dutra, Míriam Santos; Gazzinelli, Andrea; Corrêa-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Velasquez-Melendez, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to estimate the heritability and genetic correlation between glucose homeostasis and adiposity traits in a population in a rural community in Brazil. The Jequitinhonha Community Family Study cohort consists of subjects aged ≥18 years residing in rural areas in Brazil. The data on the following traits were assembled for 280 individuals (51.7% women): body mass index (BMI), body fat percentage, waist and mid-upper arm circumferences, triceps skinfold, conicity index, insulin, glucose, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLc), triglycerides and C-reactive protein. Extended pedigrees were constructed up to the third generation of individuals using the data management software PEDSYS. The heritability and genetic correlations were estimated using a variance component method. The age- and sex-adjusted heritability values estimated for insulin (h(2) = 52%), glucose (h(2) = 51%), HDLc (h(2) = 58%), and waist circumference (WC; h(2) = 49%) were high. Significantly adjusted genetic correlations were observed between insulin paired with each of the following phenotypes; (BMI; ρg = 0.48), WC (ρg = 0.47) and HDLc (ρg = -0.47). The homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was genetically correlated with BMI (ρg = 0.53) and HDLc (ρg = -0.58). The adjusted genetic correlations between traits were consistently higher compared with the environmental correlations. In conclusion, glucose metabolism and adiposity traits are highly heritable and share common genetic effects with body adiposity traits.

  12. Heritability estimates of muscle strength-related phenotypes: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

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    Zempo, H; Miyamoto-Mikami, E; Kikuchi, N; Fuku, N; Miyachi, M; Murakami, H

    2016-11-23

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the heritability estimates of human muscle strength-related phenotypes (H(2) -msp). A systematic literature search was conducted using PubMed (through August 22, 2016). Studies reporting the H(2) -msp for healthy subjects in a sedentary state were included. Random-effects models were used to calculate the weighted mean heritability estimates. Moreover, subgroup analyses were performed based on phenotypic categories (eg, grip strength, isotonic strength, jumping ability). Sensitivity analyses were also conducted to investigate potential sources of heterogeneity of H(2) -msp, which included age and sex. Twenty-four articles including 58 measurements were included in the meta-analysis. The weighted mean H(2) -msp for all 58 measurements was 0.52 (95% confidence intervals [CI]: 0.48-0.56), with high heterogeneity (I(2) =91.0%, Pstrength, other isometric strength, isotonic strength, isokinetic strength, jumping ability, and other power measurements was 0.56 (95% CI: 0.46-0.67), 0.49 (0.47-0.52), 0.49 (0.32-0.67), 0.49 (0.37-0.61), 0.55 (0.45-0.65), and 0.51 (0.31-0.70), respectively. The H(2) -msp decreased with age (Pstrength-related phenotypes is comparable. Moreover, the role of environmental factors increased with age. These findings may contribute toward an understanding of muscle strength-related phenotypes.

  13. Imaging Phenotype vs. Genotype in Non-Hypertrophic Heritable Cardiomyopathies: Dilated Cardiomyopathy and Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy

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    Raman, Subha V.; Basso, Cristina; Tandri, Harikrishna; Taylor, Matthew R. G.

    2011-01-01

    Advances in cardiovascular imaging increasingly afford unique insights into heritable myocardial disease. As clinical presentation of genetic cardiomyopathies may range from nonspecific symptoms to sudden cardiac death, accurate diagnosis has implications for individual patients as well as related family members. The initial consideration of genetic cardiomyopathy may occur in the imaging laboratory, where one must recognize the patient with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) among the many with ventricular arrhythmia referred to define myocardial substrate. Accurate diagnosis of the patient presenting with dyspnea and palpitations whose first-degree relatives have lamin A/C cardiomyopathy may warrant genetic testing1, 2 plus imaging of diastolic function and myocardial fibrosis3. As advances in cardiac imaging afford detection of subclinical structural and functional changes, the imaging specialist must be attuned to signatures of specific genetic disorders. With increased availability of both advanced imaging as well as genotyping techniques, this review seeks to provide cardiovascular imaging specialists and clinicians with the contemporary information needed for more precise diagnosis and treatment of heritable myocardial disease. A companion paper in this series covers imaging phenotype and genotype considerations in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). This review details clinical features, imaging phenotype and current genetic understanding for two of the most common non-HCM conditions that prompt myocardial imaging - dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC). While all modalities are considered herein, considerable focus is given to CMR with its unique capabilities for myocardial tissue characterization. PMID:21081743

  14. Heritabilities and genetic and phenotypic correlations of litter uniformity and litter size in Large White sows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Tian; ZHAO Ke-bin; WANG Li-xian; WANG Li-gang; SHI Hui-bi; YAN Hua; ZHANG Long-chao; LIU Xin; PU Lei; LIANG Jing; ZHANG Yue-bo

    2016-01-01

    Litter uniformity, which is usualy represented by within-litter weight coefifcient of variation at birth (CVB), could inlfuence litter performance of sows and the proiftability of pig enterprises. The objective of this study was to characterize CVB and its effect on other reproductive traits in Large White sows. Genetic parameters and genetic correlation of the reproductive traits, including CVB, within-litter weight coefifcient of variation at three weeks (CVT), total number born (TNB), number born alive (NBA), number born dead (NBD), gestation length (GL), piglet mortality at birth (M0), piglet mortality at three weeks (M3), total litter weight at birth (TLW0), and total litter weight at three weeks (TLW3) were estimated for 2032 Large White litters. The effects of parity and classiifed litter size on CVB, CVT, TNB, NBA, NBD, GL, M0, M3, TLW0, and TLW3 were also estimated. The heritabilities of these reproductive traits ranged from 0.06 to 0.17, with the lowest heritability for CVB and the highest heritability for TLW0. Phenotypic and genetic correlations between these reproductive traits were low to highly positive and negative (ranging from −0.03 to 0.93, and −0.53 to 0.93, respectively). The genetic correlations between TNB and CVB, and between M0 and CVB were 0.32 and 0.29, respectively. In addition, CVB was signiifcantly inlfuenced by parity and litter size class (P<0.05). Al the results suggest that piglet uniformity should be maintained in pig production practices and pig breeding programs.

  15. Heritability, phenotypic and genotypic correlations of Peanut bud necrosis virus (PBNV reaction parameters in peanut

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    Aran Patanothai

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Peanut bud necrosis disease (PBND caused by Peanut bud necrosis virus (PBNV is an important disease of peanut (Arachis hypogaea L. in Thailand especially during the dry season. Host plant resistance is one of the effective methods to control the disease. The objectives of this study were to estimate broad sense heritability and to evaluate phenotypic and genotypic correlation between PBND score and PBND incidence in the F4 generation of 10 crosses of peanut. A randomized complete block design with 4 replications was used for testing the mentioned F3 families in F4 generation at two locations in Kalasin province in the Northeast of Thailand. Characters under study were PBND score and PBND incidence (percent infected plants evaluated at 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, and 90 days after sowing (DAS. The 50 and 60 day data are reported herein. There were significant differences among crosses for PBND score and PBND incidence. Means for PBND score and PBND incidence of resistant x susceptible group were intermediate between resistant x resistant group and susceptible x susceptible one. ICGV 86388 x IC 34 and IC 10 x KK 4 had lower PBND score and PBND incidence than the other crosses. Heritability estimates for PBND score and PBND incidence evaluated at 50 and 60 DAS were moderate to high, ranging from 0.27 to 0.90, revealing that families that had low PBND score and PBND incidence could be readily identified in the F4 generation. Phenotypic and genotypic correlations between PBND score and PBND incidence were closely associated, indicating that single parameter evaluation is sufficient. PBND incidence is more suitable than PBND score because of its simplicity.

  16. Heritability of Obesity-related Phenotypes and Association with Adiponectin Gene Polymorphisms in the Chinese National Twin Registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, Juan; Chen, Li; Snieder, Harold; Chen, Da F.; Lee, Li M.; Liu, Gai F.; Wu, Ting; Tang, Xun; Zhan, Si Y.; Cao, Wei H.; Lv, Jun; Gao, Wen J.; Hu, Yong H.

    P>The purpose of this study was to estimate the heritability of obesity-related phenotypes and investigate the association of adiponectin gene polymorphisms +45T > G and +276G > T with these measures in Chinese twins. 1260 twin pairs were recruited from two cities through the Chinese National Twin

  17. Heritability of Obesity-related Phenotypes and Association with Adiponectin Gene Polymorphisms in the Chinese National Twin Registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, Juan; Chen, Li; Snieder, Harold; Chen, Da F.; Lee, Li M.; Liu, Gai F.; Wu, Ting; Tang, Xun; Zhan, Si Y.; Cao, Wei H.; Lv, Jun; Gao, Wen J.; Hu, Yong H.

    2010-01-01

    P>The purpose of this study was to estimate the heritability of obesity-related phenotypes and investigate the association of adiponectin gene polymorphisms +45T > G and +276G > T with these measures in Chinese twins. 1260 twin pairs were recruited from two cities through the Chinese National Twin R

  18. Body size phenotypes are heritable and mediate fecundity but not fitness in the lepidopteran frugivore Cydia pomonella

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    Davis, Thomas Seth; Landolt, Peter J.

    2012-06-01

    The inheritance and functional roles of quantitative traits are central concerns of evolutionary ecology. We report two sets of experiments that investigated the heritability and reproductive consequences of body size phenotypes in a globally distributed lepidopteran frugivore, Cydia pomonella (L.). In our first set of experiments, we tested the hypotheses that (1) body size is heritable and (2) parental body size mediates egg production and offspring survival. Midparent-offspring regression analyses revealed that body mass is highly heritable for females and moderately heritable for males. The contribution of fathers to estimates of additive genetic variance was slightly greater than for mothers. Egg production increased with mean parental size, but offspring survival rates were equivalent. Based on this result, we tested two additional hypotheses in a second set of experiments: (3) male size moderates female egg production and egg fertility and (4) egg production, egg fertility, and offspring survival rate are influenced by female mating opportunities. Females paired with large males produced more eggs and a higher proportion of fertile eggs than females paired with small males. Females with multiple mating opportunities produced more fertile eggs than females paired with a single male. However, egg production and offspring survival rates were unaffected by the number of mating opportunities. Our experiments demonstrate that body mass is heritable in C. pomonella and that size phenotypes may mediate fecundity but not fitness. We conclude that male size can influence egg production and fertility, but female mate choice also plays a role in determining egg fertility.

  19. Heritability and Phenotypic Variation of Canine Hip Dysplasia Radiographic Traits in a Cohort of Australian German Shepherd Dogs

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    Wilson, Bethany J.; Nicholas, Frank W.; James, John W.; Wade, Claire M.; Tammen, Imke; Raadsma, Herman W.; Castle, Kao; Thomson, Peter C.

    2012-01-01

    Canine Hip Dysplasia (CHD) is a common, painful and debilitating orthopaedic disorder of dogs with a partly genetic, multifactorial aetiology. Worldwide, potential breeding dogs are evaluated for CHD using radiographically based screening schemes such as the nine ordinally-scored British Veterinary Association Hip Traits (BVAHTs). The effectiveness of selective breeding based on screening results requires that a significant proportion of the phenotypic variation is caused by the presence of favourable alleles segregating in the population. This proportion, heritability, was measured in a cohort of 13,124 Australian German Shepherd Dogs born between 1976 and 2005, displaying phenotypic variation for BVAHTs, using ordinal, linear and binary mixed models fitted by a Restricted Maximum Likelihood method. Heritability estimates for the nine BVAHTs ranged from 0.14–0.24 (ordinal models), 0.14–0.25 (linear models) and 0.12–0.40 (binary models). Heritability for the summed BVAHT phenotype was 0.30±0.02. The presence of heritable variation demonstrates that selection based on BVAHTs has the potential to improve BVAHT scores in the population. Assuming a genetic correlation between BVAHT scores and CHD-related pain and dysfunction, the welfare of Australian German Shepherds can be improved by continuing to consider BVAHT scores in the selection of breeding dogs, but that as heritability values are only moderate in magnitude the accuracy, and effectiveness, of selection could be improved by the use of Estimated Breeding Values in preference to solely phenotype based selection of breeding animals. PMID:22761846

  20. Pathway-Based Factor Analysis of Gene Expression Data Produces Highly Heritable Phenotypes That Associate with Age

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    Anand Brown, Andrew; Ding, Zhihao; Viñuela, Ana; Glass, Dan; Parts, Leopold; Spector, Tim; Winn, John; Durbin, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Statistical factor analysis methods have previously been used to remove noise components from high-dimensional data prior to genetic association mapping and, in a guided fashion, to summarize biologically relevant sources of variation. Here, we show how the derived factors summarizing pathway expression can be used to analyze the relationships between expression, heritability, and aging. We used skin gene expression data from 647 twins from the MuTHER Consortium and applied factor analysis to concisely summarize patterns of gene expression to remove broad confounding influences and to produce concise pathway-level phenotypes. We derived 930 “pathway phenotypes” that summarized patterns of variation across 186 KEGG pathways (five phenotypes per pathway). We identified 69 significant associations of age with phenotype from 57 distinct KEGG pathways at a stringent Bonferroni threshold (P<5.38×10−5). These phenotypes are more heritable (h2=0.32) than gene expression levels. On average, expression levels of 16% of genes within these pathways are associated with age. Several significant pathways relate to metabolizing sugars and fatty acids; others relate to insulin signaling. We have demonstrated that factor analysis methods combined with biological knowledge can produce more reliable phenotypes with less stochastic noise than the individual gene expression levels, which increases our power to discover biologically relevant associations. These phenotypes could also be applied to discover associations with other environmental factors. PMID:25758824

  1. Laser Irradiation-Induced DNA Methylation Changes Are Heritable and Accompanied with Transpositional Activation of mPing in Rice

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    Li, Siyuan; Xia, Qiong; Wang, Fang; Yu, Xiaoming; Ma, Jian; Kou, Hongping; Lin, Xiuyun; Gao, Xiang; Liu, Bao

    2017-01-01

    DNA methylation is an integral component of the epigenetic code in most higher eukaryotes. Exploring the extent to which DNA methylation can be altered under a specific condition and its heritability is important for elucidating the biological functions of this epigenetic modification. Here, we conducted MSAP analysis of rice plants with altered phenotypes subsequent to a low-dose Nd3+YAG laser irradiation. We found that all four methylation patterns at the 5′-CCGG sites that are analyzable by MSAP showed substantial changes in the immediately treated M0 plants. Interestingly, the frequencies of hypo- and hypermethylation were of similar extents, which largely offset each other and render the total methylation levels unchanged. Further analysis revealed that the altered methylation patterns were meiotically heritable to at least the M2 generation but accompanied with further changes in each generation. The methylation changes and their heritability of the metastable epigenetic state were verified by bisulfite sequencing of portion of the retrotranspon, Tos17, an established locus for assessing DNA methylation liability in rice. Real-time PCR assay indicated that the expression of various methylation-related chromatin genes was perturbed, and a Pearson correlation analysis showed that many of these genes, especially two AGOs (AGO4-1 and AGO4-2), were significantly correlated with the methylation pattern alterations. In addition, excisions of a MITE transposon, mPing, occurred rampantly in the laser irradiated plants and their progenies. Together, our results indicate that heritable DNA methylation changes can be readily induced by low-dose laser irradiation, and which can be accompanied by transpostional activation of transposable elements.

  2. Genetic and environmental dissections of sub-phenotypes of metabolic syndrome in the chinese population: a twin-based heritability study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duan, Haiping; Pang, Zengchang; Zhang, Dongfeng

    2011-01-01

    Objective: We perform a comprehensive heritability study on multiple phenotypes related to metabolic syndrome using Chinese twins to assess the genetic and environmental effects in determining the variation and covariation of the phenotypes in the Chinese population. Methods: The studied sample...... of the phenotypes. Conclusions: Our results showed significant genetic contributions to the sub-phenotypes of metabolic syndrome. Although pleiotropic genetic control may exist for some physiologically similar phenotypes, our results do not support a common genetic mechanism among the phenotypes covered in our...

  3. Methodological Considerations in Estimation of Phenotype Heritability Using Genome-Wide SNP Data, Illustrated by an Analysis of the Heritability of Height in a Large Sample of African Ancestry Adults

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    Chen, Fang; He, Jing; Zhang, Jianqi; Chen, Gary K.; Thomas, Venetta; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Bandera, Elisa V.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Bernstein, Leslie; Blot, William J.; Cai, Qiuyin; Carpten, John; Casey, Graham; Chanock, Stephen J.; Cheng, Iona; Chu, Lisa; Deming, Sandra L.; Driver, W. Ryan; Goodman, Phyllis; Hayes, Richard B.; Hennis, Anselm J. M.; Hsing, Ann W.; Hu, Jennifer J.; Ingles, Sue A.; John, Esther M.; Kittles, Rick A.; Kolb, Suzanne; Leske, M. Cristina; Monroe, Kristine R.; Murphy, Adam; Nemesure, Barbara; Neslund-Dudas, Christine; Nyante, Sarah; Ostrander, Elaine A; Press, Michael F.; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L.; Rybicki, Ben A.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Stanford, Janet L.; Signorello, Lisa B.; Strom, Sara S.; Stevens, Victoria; Van Den Berg, David; Wang, Zhaoming; Witte, John S.; Wu, Suh-Yuh; Yamamura, Yuko; Zheng, Wei; Ziegler, Regina G.; Stram, Alexander H.; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Marchand, Loïc Le; Henderson, Brian E.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Stram, Daniel O.

    2015-01-01

    Height has an extremely polygenic pattern of inheritance. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have revealed hundreds of common variants that are associated with human height at genome-wide levels of significance. However, only a small fraction of phenotypic variation can be explained by the aggregate of these common variants. In a large study of African-American men and women (n = 14,419), we genotyped and analyzed 966,578 autosomal SNPs across the entire genome using a linear mixed model variance components approach implemented in the program GCTA (Yang et al Nat Genet 2010), and estimated an additive heritability of 44.7% (se: 3.7%) for this phenotype in a sample of evidently unrelated individuals. While this estimated value is similar to that given by Yang et al in their analyses, we remain concerned about two related issues: (1) whether in the complete absence of hidden relatedness, variance components methods have adequate power to estimate heritability when a very large number of SNPs are used in the analysis; and (2) whether estimation of heritability may be biased, in real studies, by low levels of residual hidden relatedness. We addressed the first question in a semi-analytic fashion by directly simulating the distribution of the score statistic for a test of zero heritability with and without low levels of relatedness. The second question was addressed by a very careful comparison of the behavior of estimated heritability for both observed (self-reported) height and simulated phenotypes compared to imputation R2 as a function of the number of SNPs used in the analysis. These simulations help to address the important question about whether today's GWAS SNPs will remain useful for imputing causal variants that are discovered using very large sample sizes in future studies of height, or whether the causal variants themselves will need to be genotyped de novo in order to build a prediction model that ultimately captures a large fraction of the variability

  4. Methodological Considerations in Estimation of Phenotype Heritability Using Genome-Wide SNP Data, Illustrated by an Analysis of the Heritability of Height in a Large Sample of African Ancestry Adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Chen

    Full Text Available Height has an extremely polygenic pattern of inheritance. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have revealed hundreds of common variants that are associated with human height at genome-wide levels of significance. However, only a small fraction of phenotypic variation can be explained by the aggregate of these common variants. In a large study of African-American men and women (n = 14,419, we genotyped and analyzed 966,578 autosomal SNPs across the entire genome using a linear mixed model variance components approach implemented in the program GCTA (Yang et al Nat Genet 2010, and estimated an additive heritability of 44.7% (se: 3.7% for this phenotype in a sample of evidently unrelated individuals. While this estimated value is similar to that given by Yang et al in their analyses, we remain concerned about two related issues: (1 whether in the complete absence of hidden relatedness, variance components methods have adequate power to estimate heritability when a very large number of SNPs are used in the analysis; and (2 whether estimation of heritability may be biased, in real studies, by low levels of residual hidden relatedness. We addressed the first question in a semi-analytic fashion by directly simulating the distribution of the score statistic for a test of zero heritability with and without low levels of relatedness. The second question was addressed by a very careful comparison of the behavior of estimated heritability for both observed (self-reported height and simulated phenotypes compared to imputation R2 as a function of the number of SNPs used in the analysis. These simulations help to address the important question about whether today's GWAS SNPs will remain useful for imputing causal variants that are discovered using very large sample sizes in future studies of height, or whether the causal variants themselves will need to be genotyped de novo in order to build a prediction model that ultimately captures a large fraction of the

  5. Plastic and heritable components of phenotypic variation in Nucella lapillus: an assessment using reciprocal transplant and common garden experiments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Pascoal

    Full Text Available Assessment of plastic and heritable components of phenotypic variation is crucial for understanding the evolution of adaptive character traits in heterogeneous environments. We assessed the above in relation to adaptive shell morphology of the rocky intertidal snail Nucella lapillus by reciprocal transplantation of snails between two shores differing in wave action and rearing snails of the same provenance in a common garden. Results were compared with those reported for similar experiments conducted elsewhere. Microsatellite variation indicated limited gene flow between the populations. Intrinsic growth rate was greater in exposed-site than sheltered-site snails, but the reverse was true of absolute growth rate, suggesting heritable compensation for reduced foraging opportunity at the exposed site. Shell morphology of reciprocal transplants partially converged through plasticity toward that of native snails. Shell morphology of F(2s in the common garden partially retained characteristics of the P-generation, suggesting genetic control. A maternal effect was revealed by greater resemblance of F(1s than F(2s to the P-generation. The observed synergistic effects of plastic, maternal and genetic control of shell-shape may be expected to maximise fitness when environmental characteristics become unpredictable through dispersal.

  6. Heritability of volumetric brain changes and height in children entering puberty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Soelen, Inge L C; Brouwer, Rachel M; van Baal, G Caroline M; Schnack, Hugo G; Peper, Jiska S; Chen, Lei; Kahn, René S; Boomsma, Dorret I; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E

    2013-03-01

    The human brain undergoes structural changes in children entering puberty, while simultaneously children increase in height. It is not known if brain changes are under genetic control, and whether they are related to genetic factors influencing the amount of overall increase in height. Twins underwent magnetic resonance imaging brain scans at age 9 (N = 190) and 12 (N = 125). High heritability estimates were found at both ages for height and brain volumes (49-96%), and high genetic correlation between ages were observed (r(g) > 0.89). With increasing age, whole brain (+1.1%), cerebellum (+4.2%), cerebral white matter (+5.1%), and lateral ventricle (+9.4%) volumes increased, and third ventricle (-4.0%) and cerebral gray matter (-1.6%) volumes decreased. Children increased on average 13.8 cm in height (9.9%). Genetic influences on individual difference in volumetric brain and height changes were estimated, both within and across traits. The same genetic factors influenced both cerebral (20% heritable) and cerebellar volumetric changes (45%). Thus, the extent to which changes in cerebral and cerebellar volumes are heritable in children entering puberty are due to the same genes that influence change in both structures. The increase in height was heritable (73%), and not associated with cerebral volumetric change, but positively associated with cerebellar volume change (r(p) = 0.24). This association was explained by a genetic correlation (r(g) = 0.48) between height and cerebellar change. Brain and body each expand at their own pace and through separate genetic pathways. There are distinct genetic processes acting on structural brain development, which cannot be explained by genetic increase in height.

  7. Phenotypic variance, plasticity and heritability estimates of critical thermal limits depend on methodological context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chown, Steven L.; Jumbam, Keafon R.; Sørensen, Jesper Givskov

    2009-01-01

    this is the case for critical thermal limits using a population of the model species Drosophila melanogaster and the invasive ant species Linepithema humile. 4.  We found that effects of the different rates of temperature change are variable among traits and species. However, in general, different rates....... humile. 5.  Although it seems premature to dismiss past generalities concerning interspecific and acclimation-related variation in critical thermal limits, we recommend that conditions during trials be appropriately selected, carefully reported and rigorously controlled....

  8. The heritability of oxycodone reward and concomitant phenotypes in a LG/J × SM/J mouse advanced intercross line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Camron D; Guido, Michael A; Kole, Loren A; Cheng, Riyan

    2014-07-01

    The rewarding property of opioids likely contributes to their abuse potential. Therefore, determining the genetic basis of opioid reward could aid in understanding the neurobiological mechanisms of opioid addiction, provided that it is a heritable trait. Here, we characterized the rewarding property of the widely abused prescription opioid oxycodone (OXY) in the conditioned place preference (CPP) assay using LG/J and SM/J parental inbred mouse strains and 17 parent-offspring families of a LG/J × SM/J F47 /F48 advanced intercross line (AIL). Following OXY training (5 mg/kg, i.p.), SM/J mice and AIL mice, but not LG/J mice, showed an increase in preference for the OXY-paired side, suggesting a genetic basis for OXY-CPP. SM/J mice showed greater locomotor activity than LG/J mice in response to both saline and OXY. LG/J, SM/J, and AIL mice all exhibited robust OXY-induced locomotor sensitization. Narrow-sense heritability (h(2) ) estimates of the phenotypes using linear regression and maximum likelihood estimation showed good agreement (r = 0.91). OXY-CPP was clearly not a heritable trait whereas drug-free- and OXY-induced locomotor activity and sensitization were significantly and sometimes highly heritable (h(2)  = 0.30-0.84). Interestingly, the number of transitions between the saline- and OXY-paired sides emerged as a reliably heritable trait following OXY training (h(2)  = 0.46-0.66) and could represent a genetic component of drug-seeking behavior. Thus, although OXY-CPP does not appear to be amenable to genome-wide quantitative trait locus mapping, this protocol will be useful for mapping other traits potentially relevant to opioid abuse.

  9. Pathway-based factor analysis of gene expression data produces highly heritable phenotypes that associate with age

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Andrew Anand; Ding, Zhihao; Viñuela, Ana; Glass, Dan; Parts, Leopold; Spector, Tim; Winn, John; Durbin, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Statistical factor analysis methods have previously been used to remove noise components from high-dimensional data prior to genetic association mapping and, in a guided fashion, to summarize biologically relevant sources of variation. Here, we show how the derived factors summarizing pathway expression can be used to analyze the relationships between expression, heritability, and aging. We used skin gene expression data from 647 twins from the MuTHER Consortium and applied factor analysis to...

  10. Paramutation:A Heritable Change in Gene Expression by Allelic Interactions In Trans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maike Stam

    2009-01-01

    Epigenetic gene regulation involves the stable propagation of gene activity states through mitotic,and sometimes even meiotic,cell divisions without changes in DNA sequence.Paramutation is an epigenetic phenomenon involving changes in gene expression that are stably transmitted through mitosis as well as meiosis.These heritable changes are mediated by in trans interactions between homologous DNA sequences on different chromosomes.During these in trans interactions,epigenetic information is transferred from one allele of a gene to another allele of the same gene,resulting in a change in gene expression.Although paramutation was initially discovered in plants,it has recently been observed in mammals as well,suggesting that the mechanisms underlying paramutation might be evolutionarily conserved.Recent findings point to a crucial role for small RNAs in the paramutation process.In mice,small RNAs appear sufficient to induce paramutation,whereas in maize,it seems not to be the only player in the process.In this review,potential mechanisms are discussed in relation to the various paramutation phenomena.

  11. Changes in selection regime cause loss of phenotypic plasticity in planktonic freshwater copepods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sereda, Sergej Vital'evič; Wilke, Thomas; Schultheiß, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Rapid phenotypic adaptation is critical for populations facing environmental changes and can be facilitated by phenotypic plasticity in the selected traits. Whereas recurrent environmental fluctuations can favour the maintenance or de novo evolution of plasticity, strong selection is hypothesized to decrease plasticity or even fix the trait (genetic assimilation). Despite advances in the theoretical understanding of the impact of plasticity on diversification processes, comparatively little empirical data of populations undergoing diversification mediated by plasticity are available. Here we use the planktonic freshwater copepod Acanthodiaptomus denticornis from two lakes as model system to study UV stress responses of two phenotypically different populations under laboratory conditions. Our study reveals heritable lake- and sex-specific differences of behaviour, physiological plasticity, and mortality. We discuss specific selective scenarios causing these differences and argue that phenotypic plasticity will be higher when selection pressure is moderate, but will decrease or even be lost under stronger pressure.

  12. The heritability of level and rate-of-change in cognitive functioning in Danish twins aged 70 years and older.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGue, Matt; Christensen, Kaare

    2002-01-01

    To investigate heritable influences on overall level and rate-of-change in cognitive ability, biometric growth models were fit to cognitive data from nearly 1000 Danish twins age 70 years and older. Twins are participants in the ongoing Longitudinal Study of Aging Danish Twins, a cohort-sequential study of twins assessed every 2 years for up to four waves. Cognitive ability was assessed by five brief cognitive tasks: a fluency measure, forward and backward digit span, and immediate and delayed list recall. Model-fitting results indicated that although the overall level of cognitive functioning was highly heritable (h(2) = .76, 95% confidence interval of .68 to .82), the rate of linear change was not (h(2) = .06, 95% confidence interval of .00 to .57). These findings suggest that the search for specific genes might reasonably focus on average level of cognitive performance, whereas specific environmental influences might account for cognitive change.

  13. Multiple Phenotypic Changes Define Neutrophil Priming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miralda, Irina; Uriarte, Silvia M.; McLeish, Kenneth R.

    2017-01-01

    Exposure to pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, mitochondrial contents, and bacterial and viral products induces neutrophils to transition from a basal state into a primed one, which is currently defined as an enhanced response to activating stimuli. Although, typically associated with enhanced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by the NADPH oxidase, primed neutrophils show enhanced responsiveness of exocytosis, NET formation, and chemotaxis. Phenotypic changes associated with priming also include activation of a subset of functions, including adhesion, transcription, metabolism, and rate of apoptosis. This review summarizes the breadth of phenotypic changes associated with priming and reviews current knowledge of the molecular mechanisms behind those changes. We conclude that the current definition of priming is too restrictive. Priming represents a combination of enhanced responsiveness and activated functions that regulate both adaptive and innate immune responses. PMID:28611952

  14. Maintenance of phenotypic variation: repeatibility, heritability, and size-dependent processes in a wild brook trout population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin H. Letcher; Jason A Coombs; Keith H. Nislow

    2011-01-01

    Phenotypic variation in body size can result from within-cohort variation in birth dates, among-individual growth variation and size-selective processes. We explore the relative effects of these processes on the maintenance of wide observed body size variation in stream-dwelling brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis). Based on the analyses of multiple...

  15. Genotype–phenotype characteristics and baseline natural history of heritable neuropathies caused by mutations in the MPZ gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feely, Shawna; Scherer, Steven S.; Herrmann, David N.; Burns, Joshua; Muntoni, Francesco; Li, Jun; Siskind, Carly E.; Day, John W.; Laura, Matilde; Sumner, Charlotte J.; Lloyd, Thomas E.; Ramchandren, Sindhu; Shy, Rosemary R.; Grider, Tiffany; Bacon, Chelsea; Finkel, Richard S.; Yum, Sabrina W.; Moroni, Isabella; Piscosquito, Giuseppe; Pareyson, Davide; Reilly, Mary M.; Shy, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to characterize genotype–phenotype correlations and establish baseline clinical data for peripheral neuropathies caused by mutations in the myelin protein zero (MPZ) gene. MPZ mutations are the second leading cause of Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease type 1. Recent research makes clinical trials for patients with MPZ mutations a realistic possibility. However, the clinical severity varies with different mutations and natural history data on progression is sparse. We present cross-sectional data to begin to define the phenotypic spectrum and clinical baseline of patients with these mutations. A cohort of patients with MPZ gene mutations was identified in 13 centres of the Inherited Neuropathies Consortium - Rare Disease Clinical Research Consortium (INC-RDCRC) between 2009 and 2012 and at Wayne State University between 1996 and 2009. Patient phenotypes were quantified by the Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease neuropathy score version 1 or 2 and the Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease paediatric scale outcome instruments. Genetic testing was performed in all patients and/or in first- or second-degree relatives to document mutation in MPZ gene indicating diagnosis of Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease type 1B. There were 103 patients from 71 families with 47 different MPZ mutations with a mean age of 40 years (range 3–84 years). Patients and mutations were separated into infantile, childhood and adult-onset groups. The infantile onset group had higher Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease neuropathy score version 1 or 2 and slower nerve conductions than the other groups, and severity increased with age. Twenty-three patients had no family history of Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease. Sixty-one patients wore foot/ankle orthoses, 19 required walking assistance or support, and 10 required wheelchairs. There was hearing loss in 21 and scoliosis in 17. Forty-two patients did not begin walking until after 15 months of age. Half of the infantile onset patients then required

  16. The Baldwin effect and genetic assimilation: revisiting two mechanisms of evolutionary change mediated by phenotypic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crispo, Erika

    2007-11-01

    Two different, but related, evolutionary theories pertaining to phenotypic plasticity were proposed by James Mark Baldwin and Conrad Hal Waddington. Unfortunately, these theories are often confused with one another. Baldwin's notion of organic selection posits that plasticity influences whether an individual will survive in a new environment, thus dictating the course of future evolution. Heritable variations can then be selected upon to direct phenotypic evolution (i.e., "orthoplasy"). The combination of these two processes (organic selection and orthoplasy) is now commonly referred to as the "Baldwin effect." Alternately, Waddington's genetic assimilation is a process whereby an environmentally induced phenotype, or "acquired character," becomes canalized through selection acting upon the developmental system. Genetic accommodation is a modern term used to describe the process of heritable changes that occur in response to a novel induction. Genetic accommodation is a key component of the Baldwin effect, and genetic assimilation is a type of genetic accommodation. I here define both the Baldwin effect and genetic assimilation in terms of genetic accommodation, describe cases in which either should occur in nature, and propose that each could play a role in evolutionary diversification.

  17. The heritability of level and rate-of-change in cognitive functioning in Danish twins aged 70 years and older

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGue, Matt; Christensen, Kaare

    2002-01-01

    -sequential study of twins assessed every 2 years for up to four waves. Cognitive ability was assessed by five brief cognitive tasks: a fluency measure, forward and backward digit span, and immediate and delayed list recall. Model-fitting results indicated that although the overall level of cognitive functioning......To investigate heritable influences on overall level and rate-of-change in cognitive ability, biometric growth models were fit to cognitive data from nearly 1000 Danish twins age 70 years and older. Twins are participants in the ongoing Longitudinal Study of Aging Danish Twins, a cohort...

  18. Color change, phenotypic plasticity, and camouflage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin eStevens

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The ability to change appearance over a range of timescales is widespread in nature, existing in many invertebrate and vertebrate groups. This can include color change occurring in seconds, minutes, and hours, to longer term changes associated with phenotypic plasticity and development. A major function is for camouflage against predators because color change and plasticity enables animals to match their surroundings and potentially reduce the risk of predation. Recently, we published findings (Stevens et al. 2014a showing how shore crabs can change their appearance and better match the background to predator vision in the short term. This, coupled with a number of past studies, emphasizes the potential that animals have to modify their appearance for camouflage. However, the majority of studies on camouflage and color plasticity have focused on a small number of species capable of unusually rapid changes. There are many broad questions that remain about the nature, mechanisms, evolution, and adaptive value of color change and plasticity for concealment. Here, I discuss past work and outline six questions relating to color change and plasticity, as well as major avenues for future work.

  19. Accounting for female space sharing in St. Kilda Soay sheep (Ovis aries) results in little change in heritability estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, C E; Pilkington, J G; Bérénos, C; Pemberton, J M; Smiseth, P T; Wilson, A J

    2017-01-01

    When estimating heritability in free-living populations, it is common practice to account for common environment effects, because of their potential to generate phenotypic covariance among relatives thereby biasing heritability estimates. In quantitative genetic studies of natural populations, however, philopatry, which results in relatives being clustered in space, is rarely accounted for. The two studies that have been carried out so far suggest absolute declines in heritability estimates of up to 43% when accounting for space sharing by relatives. However, due to methodological limitations these estimates may not be representative. We used data from the St. Kilda Soay sheep population to estimate heritabilities with and without accounting for space sharing for five traits for which there is evidence for additive genetic variance (birthweight, birth date, lamb August weight, and female post-mortem jaw and metacarpal length). We accounted for space sharing by related females by separately incorporating spatial autocorrelation, and a home range similarity matrix. Although these terms accounted for up to 18% of the variance in these traits, heritability estimates were only reduced by up to 7%. Our results suggest that the bias caused by not accounting for space sharing may be lower than previously thought. This suggests that philopatry does not inevitably lead to a large bias if space sharing by relatives is not accounted for. We hope our work stimulates researchers to model shared space when relatives in their study population share space, as doing so will enable us to better understand when bias may be of particular concern.

  20. Transgenerational Effects of Stress Exposure on Offspring Phenotypes in Apomictic Dandelion

    OpenAIRE

    Koen J F Verhoeven; Thomas P van Gurp

    2012-01-01

    Heritable epigenetic modulation of gene expression is a candidate mechanism to explain parental environmental effects on offspring phenotypes, but current evidence for environment-induced epigenetic changes that persist in offspring generations is scarce. In apomictic dandelions, exposure to various stresses was previously shown to heritably alter DNA methylation patterns. In this study we explore whether these induced changes are accompanied by heritable effects on offspring phenotypes. We o...

  1. Genomic Heritability: What Is It?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de los Campos, Gustavo; Sorensen, Daniel; Gianola, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    of phenotypic variance that can be explained by regression on molecular markers. This is so even though some of the assumptions commonly adopted for data analysis are at odds with important quantitative genetic concepts. In this article we develop theory that leads to a precise definition of parameters arising...... in high dimensional genomic regressions; we focus on the so-called genomic heritability: the proportion of variance of a trait that can be explained (in the population) by a linear regression on a set of markers. We propose a definition of this parameter that is framed within the classical quantitative...... genetics theory and show that the genomic heritability and the trait heritability parameters are equal only when all causal variants are typed. Further, we discuss how the genomic variance and genomic heritability, defined as quantitative genetic parameters, relate to parameters of statistical models...

  2. Equitoxic doses of 5-azacytidine and 5-aza-2'deoxycytidine induce diverse immediate and overlapping heritable changes in the transcriptome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangning Qiu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The hypomethylating agent 5-Azacytidine (5-Aza-CR is the first drug to prolong overall survival in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS. Surprisingly, the deoxyribonucleoside analog 5-Aza-2'deoxycytidine (5-Aza-CdR did not have a similar effect on survival in a large clinical trial. Both drugs are thought to exert their effects after incorporation into DNA by covalent binding of DNA methyltransferase (DNMT. While 5-Aza-CdR is incorporated into only DNA, 5-Aza-CR is also incorporated into RNA. Here, we have analyzed whether this difference in nucleic acid incorporation may influence the capacities of these drugs to regulate the expression of mRNA and microRNAs (miRNA, which may potentially affect the activities of the drugs in patients. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A hematopoietic (HL-60; acute myeloid leukemia and a solid (T24; transitional cell carcinoma cancer cell line were treated with equitoxic doses of 5-Aza-CR and 5-Aza-CdR for 24 hrs, and the immediate (day 2 and lasting (day 8 effects on RNA expression examined. There was considerable overlap between the RNAs heritably upregulated by both drugs on day 8 but more RNAs were stably induced by the deoxy analog. Both drugs strongly induced expression of cancer testis antigens. On day 2 more RNAs were downregulated by 5-Aza-CR, particularly at higher doses. A remarkable downregulation of miRNAs and a significant upregulation of tRNA synthetases and other genes involved in amino acid metabolism was observed in T24 cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Overall, this suggests that significant differences exist in the immediate action of the two drugs, however the dominant pattern of the lasting, and possible heritable changes, is overlapping.

  3. Paramutation: a heritable change in gene expression by allelic interactions in trans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stam, M.

    2009-01-01

    Epigenetic gene regulation involves the stable propagation of gene activity states through mitotic, and sometimes even meiotic, cell divisions without changes in DNA sequence. Paramutation is an epigenetic phenomenon involving changes in gene expression that are stably transmitted through mitosis as

  4. Heritability of Anxious-Depressive and Withdrawn Behavior: Age-Related Changes during Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Diane J.; Middeldorp, Christel M.; van Beijsterveldt, Catarina E. M.; Bartels, Meike; van der Aa, Niels; Polderman, Tinca J. C.; Boomsma, Dorret I.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To explain the differential course of anxiety and depression in individuals from childhood to adulthood by examining age-related changes in the genetic and environmental etiology of anxious and depressive symptoms. Method: A sample of 1470, 1839, and 2023 Dutch twins aged 12, 14, and 16 years reported on symptoms of anxious depression…

  5. On the reliability of a simple method for scoring phenotypes to estimate heritability: A case study with pupal color in Heliconius erato phyllis , Fabricius 1775 (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Andrejew Ferreira

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, two methods for assessing the degree of melanization of pupal exuviae from the butterfly Heliconius erato phyllis , Fabricius 1775 (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae, Heliconiini are compared. In the first method, which was qualitative, the exuviae were classified by scoring the degree of melanization, whereas in the second method, which was quantitative, the exuviae were classified by optical density followed by analysis with appropriate software. The heritability (h 2 of the degree of melanization was estimated by regression and analysis of variance. The estimates of h 2 were similar with both methods, indicating that the qualitative method could be particularly suitable for field work. The low estimates obtained for heritability may have resulted from the small sample size ( n = 7-18 broods, including the parents or from the allocation-priority hypothesis in which pupal color would be a lower priority trait compared to morphological traits and adequate larval development.

  6. Heritability of bipolar affective disorder: Family study

    OpenAIRE

    Obradović Tanja; Veličković Ružica; Timotijević Ivana; Anđelković Marko

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aim. Bipolar affective disorder is mental disorder with polygenic type of heredity. Heritability - relation between genetic and environmental variance is used to estimate the level of influence of genetic variance to phenotype variance. Study results show decreasing trend in the value of heritability of bipolar affective disorder, thus indicating that this disorder is a complex behavioral threshold characteristic. Therefore, the aim of this study was to estimate the contribut...

  7. Heritability of bipolar affective disorder: Family study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obradović Tanja

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Bipolar affective disorder is mental disorder with polygenic type of heredity. Heritability - relation between genetic and environmental variance is used to estimate the level of influence of genetic variance to phenotype variance. Study results show decreasing trend in the value of heritability of bipolar affective disorder, thus indicating that this disorder is a complex behavioral threshold characteristic. Therefore, the aim of this study was to estimate the contribution of genetic variance to phenotype variance of bipolar affective disorder, i.e. to estimate heritability of this disorder. Methods. By the use of a questionnaire, 80 patients with over crossed threshold for bipolar affective disorder were asked for functional information about the members of their families belonging to the first degree of relation (fathers, mothers and full- sibs. By using ”Applet for calculating heritability for threshold traits (disease“, and regression analysis, heritability of bipolar affective disorder as well as its statistical significance, were estimated (χ2 test. Results. Heritability and relationship of genetic and environmental variance of bipolar affective disorder is 0.2 with statistically significant difference from zero (p < 0.001. Conclusion. The estimated contribution of genetic variance to phenotype variance of bipolar affective disorder is low being 20%, while the contribution of environmental variance is 80%. This result contributes to the understanding of bipolar affective disorder as a complex behavioral threshold trait.

  8. Heritable variation in garter snake color patterns in postglacial populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael F Westphal

    Full Text Available Global climate change is expected to trigger northward shifts in the ranges of natural populations of plants and animals, with subsequent effects on intraspecific genetic diversity. Investigating how genetic diversity is patterned among populations that arose following the last Ice Age is a promising method for understanding the potential future effects of climate change. Theoretical and empirical work has suggested that overall genetic diversity can decrease in colonial populations following rapid expansion into postglacial landscapes, with potential negative effects on the ability of populations to adapt to new environmental regimes. The crucial measure of this genetic variation and a population's overall adaptability is the heritable variation in phenotypic traits, as it is this variation that mediates the rate and direction of a population's multigenerational response to selection. Using two large full-sib quantitative genetic studies (N(Manitoba = 144; N(South Dakota = 653 and a smaller phenotypic analysis from Kansas (N(Kansas = 44, we compared mean levels of pigmentation, genetic variation and heritability in three pigmentation traits among populations of the common garter snake, Thamnophis sirtalis, along a north-south gradient, including a postglacial northern population and a putative southern refuge population. Counter to our expectations, we found that genetic variance and heritability for the three pigmentation traits were the same or higher in the postglacial population than in the southern population.

  9. Transgenerational effects of stress exposure on offspring phenotypes in apomictic dandelion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, K.J.F.; Van Gurp, T.P.

    2012-01-01

    Heritable epigenetic modulation of gene expression is a candidate mechanism to explain parental environmental effects on offspring phenotypes, but current evidence for environment-induced epigenetic changes that persist in offspring generations is scarce. In apomictic dandelions, exposure to various

  10. Transgenerational Effects of Stress Exposure on Offspring Phenotypes in Apomictic Dandelion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, K.J.F.; Gurp, van T.P.

    2012-01-01

    Heritable epigenetic modulation of gene expression is a candidate mechanism to explain parental environmental effects on offspring phenotypes, but current evidence for environment-induced epigenetic changes that persist in offspring generations is scarce. In apomictic dandelions, exposure to various

  11. Transgenerational effects of stress exposure on offspring phenotypes in apomictic dandelion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, K.J.F.; Van Gurp, T.P.

    2012-01-01

    Heritable epigenetic modulation of gene expression is a candidate mechanism to explain parental environmental effects on offspring phenotypes, but current evidence for environment-induced epigenetic changes that persist in offspring generations is scarce. In apomictic dandelions, exposure to various

  12. Transgenerational Effects of Stress Exposure on Offspring Phenotypes in Apomictic Dandelion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, K.J.F.; Gurp, van T.P.

    2012-01-01

    Heritable epigenetic modulation of gene expression is a candidate mechanism to explain parental environmental effects on offspring phenotypes, but current evidence for environment-induced epigenetic changes that persist in offspring generations is scarce. In apomictic dandelions, exposure to various

  13. Genomic heritability: what is it?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo de Los Campos

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Whole-genome regression methods are being increasingly used for the analysis and prediction of complex traits and diseases. In human genetics, these methods are commonly used for inferences about genetic parameters, such as the amount of genetic variance among individuals or the proportion of phenotypic variance that can be explained by regression on molecular markers. This is so even though some of the assumptions commonly adopted for data analysis are at odds with important quantitative genetic concepts. In this article we develop theory that leads to a precise definition of parameters arising in high dimensional genomic regressions; we focus on the so-called genomic heritability: the proportion of variance of a trait that can be explained (in the population by a linear regression on a set of markers. We propose a definition of this parameter that is framed within the classical quantitative genetics theory and show that the genomic heritability and the trait heritability parameters are equal only when all causal variants are typed. Further, we discuss how the genomic variance and genomic heritability, defined as quantitative genetic parameters, relate to parameters of statistical models commonly used for inferences, and indicate potential inferential problems that are assessed further using simulations. When a large proportion of the markers used in the analysis are in LE with QTL the likelihood function can be misspecified. This can induce a sizable finite-sample bias and, possibly, lack of consistency of likelihood (or Bayesian estimates. This situation can be encountered if the individuals in the sample are distantly related and linkage disequilibrium spans over short regions. This bias does not negate the use of whole-genome regression models as predictive machines; however, our results indicate that caution is needed when using marker-based regressions for inferences about population parameters such as the genomic heritability.

  14. Global change and the evolution of phenotypic plasticity in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matesanz, Silvia; Gianoli, Ernesto; Valladares, Fernando

    2010-09-01

    Global change drivers create new environmental scenarios and selective pressures, affecting plant species in various interacting ways. Plants respond with changes in phenology, physiology, and reproduction, with consequences for biotic interactions and community composition. We review information on phenotypic plasticity, a primary means by which plants cope with global change scenarios, recommending promising approaches for investigating the evolution of plasticity and describing constraints to its evolution. We discuss the important but largely ignored role of phenotypic plasticity in range shifts and review the extensive literature on invasive species as models of evolutionary change in novel environments. Plasticity can play a role both in the short-term response of plant populations to global change as well as in their long-term fate through the maintenance of genetic variation. In new environmental conditions, plasticity of certain functional traits may be beneficial (i.e., the plastic response is accompanied by a fitness advantage) and thus selected for. Plasticity can also be relevant in the establishment and persistence of plants in novel environments that are crucial for populations at the colonizing edge in range shifts induced by climate change. Experimental studies show taxonomically widespread plastic responses to global change drivers in many functional traits, though there is a lack of empirical support for many theoretical models on the evolution of phenotypic plasticity. Future studies should assess the adaptive value and evolutionary potential of plasticity under complex, realistic global change scenarios. Promising tools include resurrection protocols and artificial selection experiments. © 2010 New York Academy of Sciences.

  15. Heritability and coefficient of genetic variation analyses of phenotypic traits provide strong basis for high-resolution QTL mapping in the Collaborative Cross mouse genetic reference population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iraqi, Fuad A; Athamni, Hanifa; Dorman, Alexandra; Salymah, Yasser; Tomlinson, Ian; Nashif, Aysar; Shusterman, Ariel; Weiss, Ervin; Houri-Haddad, Yael; Mott, Richard; Soller, Morris

    2014-04-01

    Most biological traits of human importance are complex in nature; their manifestation controlled by the cumulative effect of many genetic factors interacting with one another and with the individual's life history. Because of this, mouse genetic reference populations (GRPs) consisting of collections of inbred lines or recombinant inbred lines (RIL) derived from crosses between inbred lines are of particular value in analysis of complex traits, since massive amounts of data can be accumulated on the individual lines. However, existing mouse GRPs are derived from inbred lines that share a common history, resulting in limited genetic diversity, and reduced mapping precision due to long-range gametic disequilibrium. To overcome these limitations, the Collaborative Cross (CC) a genetically highly diverse collection of mouse RIL was established. The CC, now in advanced stages of development, will eventually consist of about 500 RIL derived from reciprocal crosses of eight divergent founder strains of mice, including three wild subspecies. Previous studies have shown that the CC indeed contains enormous diversity at the DNA level, that founder haplotypes are inherited in expected frequency, and that long-range gametic disequilibrium is not present. We here present data, primarily from our own laboratory, documenting extensive genetic variation among CC lines as expressed in broad-sense heritability (H(2)) and by the well-known "coefficient of genetic variation," demonstrating the ability of the CC resource to provide unprecedented mapping precision leading to identification of strong candidate genes.

  16. Phenotypic ranges and relationships among carcass and meat palatability traits for fourteen cattle breeds, and heritabilities and expected progeny differences for Warner-Bratzler shear force in three beef cattle breeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikeman, M E; Pollak, E J; Zhang, Z; Moser, D W; Gill, C A; Dressler, E A

    2005-10-01

    Carcass and Warner-Bratzler shear force (WBSF) data from strip loin steaks were obtained from 7,179 progeny of Angus, Brahman, Brangus, Charolais, Gelbvieh, Hereford, Limousin, Maine-Anjou, Red Angus, Salers, Shorthorn, Simbrah, Simmental, and South Devon sires. Trained sensory panel (TSP) evaluations were obtained on 2,320 steaks sampled from contemporary groups of progeny from one to five sires of each breed. Expected progeny differences for marbling and WBSF were developed for 103 Simmental sires from 1,295 progeny, 23 Shorthorn sires from 310 progeny, and 69 Hereford sires from 1,457 progeny. Pooled phenotypic residual correlations, including all progeny, showed that marbling was lowly correlated with WBSF (-0.21) and with TSP overall tenderness (0.18). The residual correlation between WBSF and TSP tenderness was -0.68, whereas residual correlations for progeny sired by the three Bos indicus breeds were only slightly different than for progeny sired by Bos taurus breeds. The phenotypic range of mean WBSF among sires across breeds was 6.27 kg, and the phenotypic range among breed means was 3.93 kg. Heritability estimates for fat thickness, marbling score, WBSF, and TSP tenderness, juiciness, and flavor were 0.19, 0.68, 0.40, 0.37, 0.46, and 0.07, respectively. Ranges in EPD for WBSF and marbling were -0.41 to +0.26 kg and +0.48 to -0.22, respectively, for Simmentals; -0.41 to +0.36 kg and 0.00 to -0.32, respectively, for Shorthorns; and -0.48 to +0.22 kg and +0.40 to -0.24, respectively, for Herefords. More than 20% of steaks were unacceptable in tenderness. Results of this study demonstrated that 1) selection for marbling would result in little improvement in meat tenderness; 2) heritability of marbling, tenderness, and juiciness are high; and 3) sufficient variation exists in WBSF EPD among widely used Simmental, Shorthorn, and Hereford sires to allow for genetic improvement in LM tenderness.

  17. Demography, not inheritance, drives phenotypic change in hunted bighorn sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traill, Lochran W; Schindler, Susanne; Coulson, Tim

    2014-09-09

    Selective harvest, such as trophy hunting, can shift the distribution of a quantitative character such as body size. If the targeted character is heritable, then there will be an evolutionary response to selection, and where the trait is not, then any response will be plastic or demographic. Identifying the relative contributions of these different mechanisms is a major challenge in wildlife conservation. New mathematical approaches can provide insight not previously available. Here we develop a size- and age-based two-sex integral projection model based on individual-based data from a long-term study of hunted bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) at Ram Mountain, Canada. We simulate the effect of trophy hunting on body size and find that the inheritance of body mass is weak and that any perceived decline in body mass of the bighorn population is largely attributable to demographic change and environmental factors. To our knowledge, this work provides the first use of two-sex integral projection models to investigate the potential eco-evolutionary consequences of selective harvest.

  18. Tic symptom dimensions and their heritabilities in Tourette's syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haan, Marcel J; Delucchi, Kevin L; Mathews, Carol M; Cath, Danielle C

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome (TS) is both genotypically and phenotypically heterogeneous. Gene-finding strategies have had limited success, possibly because of symptom heterogeneity. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed at specifically investigating heritabilities of tic symptom factors in

  19. Tic symptom dimensions and their heritabilities in Tourette's syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haan, Marcel J; Delucchi, Kevin L; Mathews, Carol M; Cath, Danielle C

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome (TS) is both genotypically and phenotypically heterogeneous. Gene-finding strategies have had limited success, possibly because of symptom heterogeneity. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed at specifically investigating heritabilities of tic symptom factors in

  20. Tic symptom dimensions and their heritabilities in Tourette's syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haan, Marcel J; Delucchi, Kevin L; Mathews, Carol M; Cath, Danielle C

    INTRODUCTION: Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome (TS) is both genotypically and phenotypically heterogeneous. Gene-finding strategies have had limited success, possibly because of symptom heterogeneity. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed at specifically investigating heritabilities of tic symptom factors in

  1. Crab-mediated phenotypic changes in Spartina densiflora Brong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolus, Alejandro; Laterra, Pedro; Iribarne, Oscar

    2004-01-01

    Although plant phenotypic plasticity has been historically studied as an important adaptive strategy to overcome herbivory and environmental heterogeneity, there are several aspects of its ecological importance that remain controversial. The burrowing crab Chasmagnathus granulata eats Spartina densiflora, and also causes several geomorphologic changes that indirectly affect Spartina growth. Here we evaluate if this crab affects the sexual reproductive effort of S. densiflora by mediating changes in plant phenotypic plasticity (i.e., shape of leaves and spikes) while affecting aboveground production, and if these effects interact with disturbance intensity. We conducted local and regional surveys and two-year field experiments manipulating the density of crabs in a mature Spartina marsh where we clipped at ground level different 1×1 m marsh areas to create and compare crab's effect on young (plants growing after the clipping) and mature (unclipped) Spartina stands. Our results suggest that crabs mediate the phenotypic plasticity of sexual reproductive structures of Spartina. Crabs induced an increase in seed production (up to 721%) and seed viability, potentially favoring Spartina dispersal and colonization of distant sites. This effect appears to be maximal when combined with the experimental clipping disturbance. Crabs also exerted a strong effect on clipped plants by increasing the number of standing dead stems and decreasing the photosynthetic area and leaf production. These effects disappear in about two years if no other disturbance occurs. An a posteriori regional field survey agreed with our experimental results corroborating the prediction that plants in old undisturbed marshes have lower sexual reproductive effort than plants in highly disturbed marshes populated by burrowing-herbivore crabs. All these phenotypic changes have important taxonomic and macro-ecological implications that should not be ignored in discussions of applied ecology and

  2. Heritable alteration of DNA methylation induced by whole-chromosome aneuploidy in wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lihong; Diarso, Moussa; Zhang, Ai; Zhang, Huakun; Dong, Yuzhu; Liu, Lixia; Lv, Zhenling; Liu, Bao

    2016-01-01

    Aneuploidy causes changes in gene expression and phenotypes in all organisms studied. A previous study in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana showed that aneuploidy-generated phenotypic changes can be inherited to euploid progenies and implicated an epigenetic underpinning of the heritable variations. Based on an analysis by amplified fragment length polymorphism and methylation-sensitive amplified fragment length polymorphism markers, we found that although genetic changes at the nucleotide sequence level were negligible, extensive changes in cytosine DNA methylation patterns occurred in all studied homeologous group 1 whole-chromosome aneuploid lines of common wheat (Triticum aestivum), with monosomic 1A showing the greatest amount of methylation changes. The changed methylation patterns were inherited by euploid progenies derived from the aneuploid parents. The aneuploidy-induced DNA methylation alterations and their heritability were verified at selected loci by bisulfite sequencing. Our data have provided empirical evidence supporting earlier suggestions that heritability of aneuploidy-generated, but aneuploidy-independent, phenotypic variations may have an epigenetic basis. That at least one type of aneuploidy - monosomic 1A - was able to cause significant epigenetic divergence of the aneuploid plants and their euploid progenies also lends support to recent suggestions that aneuploidy may have played an important and protracted role in polyploid genome evolution.

  3. Environment Changes Genetic Effects on Respiratory Conditions and Allergic Phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Yong; Schwager, Michelle J; Backer, Vibeke

    2017-01-01

    separated population. We evaluated 18 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) corresponding to 8 genes (ADAM33, ALOX5, LT-α, LTC4S, NOS1, ORMDL3, TBXA2R and TNF-α), the lung function and five respiratory/allergic conditions (ever asthma, bronchitis, rhinitis, dermatitis and atopy) in two populations of Inuit...... associated with bronchitis risk. LT-α SNP rs2844484 was related to dermatitis susceptibility and was significantly influenced by the place of residence. The observed gene-phenotype relationships were exclusively present in one population and absent in the other population. We conclude that the genotype......-phenotype associations relating to bronchitis and allergy susceptibility are dependent on the environment and that environmental factors/lifestyles modify genetic predisposition and change the genetic effects on diseases....

  4. Phenotypic changes in satellite glial cells in cultured trigeminal ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belzer, Vitali; Shraer, Nathanael; Hanani, Menachem

    2010-11-01

    Satellite glial cells (SGCs) are specialized cells that form a tight sheath around neurons in sensory ganglia. In recent years, there is increasing interest in SGCs and they have been studied in both intact ganglia and in tissue culture. Here we studied phenotypic changes in SGCs in cultured trigeminal ganglia from adult mice, containing both neurons and SGCs, using phase optics, immunohistochemistry and time-lapse photography. Cultures were followed for up to 14 days. After isolation virtually every sensory neuron is ensheathed by SGCs, as in the intact ganglia. After one day in culture, SGCs begin to migrate away from their parent neurons, but in most cases the neurons still retain an intact glial cover. At later times in culture, there is a massive migration of SGCs away from the neurons and they undergo clear morphological changes, and at 7 days they become spindle-shaped. At one day in culture SGCs express the glial marker glutamine synthetase, and also the purinergic receptor P2X7. From day 2 in culture the glutamine synthetase expression is greatly diminished, whereas that of P2X7 is largely unchanged. We conclude that SGCs retain most of their characteristics for about 24 h after culturing, but undergo major phenotypic changes at later times.

  5. Estimating heritability from nuclear family and pedigree data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochud, Murielle

    2012-01-01

    Heritability is a measure of familial resemblance. Estimating the heritability of a trait represents one of the first steps in the gene mapping process. This chapter describes how to estimate heritability for quantitative traits from nuclear and pedigree data using the ASSOC program in the Statistical Analysis for Genetic Epidemiology (S.A.G.E.) software package. Estimating heritability rests on the assumption that the total phenotypic variance of a quantitative trait can be partitioned into independent genetic and environmental components. In turn, the genetic variance can be divided into an additive (polygenic) genetic variance, a dominance variance (nonlinear interaction effects between alleles at the same locus), and an epistatic variance (interaction effects between alleles at different loci). The last two are often assumed to be zero. The additive genetic variance represents the average effects of individual alleles on the phenotype and reflects transmissible resemblance between relatives. Heritability in the narrow sense (h (2)) refers to the ratio of the additive genetic variance to the total phenotypic variance. Heritability is a dimensionless population-specific parameter. ASSOC estimates association parameters (regression coefficients) and variance components from family data. ASSOC uses a linear regression model in which the total residual variance is partitioned, after regressing on covariates, into the sum of a random additive polygenic component, a random sibship component, random nuclear family components, a random marital component, and an individual-specific random component. Assortative mating, nonrandom ascertainment of families and failure to account for key confounding factors may bias heritability estimates.

  6. Phenotypic Changes Exhibited by E. coli Cultured in Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zea, Luis; Larsen, Michael; Estante, Frederico

    2017-01-01

    Bacteria will accompany humans in our exploration of space, making it of importance to study their adaptation to the microgravity environment. To investigate potential phenotypic changes for bacteria grown in space, Escherichia coli was cultured onboard the International Space Station with matched...... controls on Earth. Samples were challenged with different concentrations of gentamicin sulfate to study the role of drug concentration on the dependent variables in the space environment. Analyses included assessments of final cell count, cell size, cell envelope thickness, cell ultrastructure, and culture...... morphology. A 13-fold increase in final cell count was observed in space with respect to the ground controls and the space flight cells were able to grow in the presence of normally inhibitory levels of gentamicin sulfate. Contrast light microscopy and focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy showed...

  7. Epigenetic variation, phenotypic heritability, and evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Furrow, Robert E.; Christiansen, Freddy Bugge; Feldman, Marcus W.

    2014-01-01

    Familial aggregation of complex diseases may have many causes in addition to and apart from genetic predisposition due to common ancestry. For example, exposure to an environment that induces susceptibility to a disease may produce similar familial aggregations when the environment is shared by f...

  8. Heritability of antisocial behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kretschmer, Tina; DeLisi, Matt

    2016-01-01

    This chapter reviews important strands of research on the heritability of antisocial behavior and crime, including both quantitative genetic studies using twin or adoption designs as well as molecular genetic approaches. Study designs are introduced and findings discussed. Contemporary avenues inclu

  9. Heritable Disorders of Connective Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Connective Tissue Find a Clinical Trial Journal Articles Connective Tissue August 2016 Questions and Answers about Heritable Disorders of Connective Tissue This publication contains general information about heritable (genetic) ...

  10. Assessing the heritability of attentional networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fossella John A

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current efforts to study the genetics of higher functions have been lacking appropriate phenotypes to describe cognition. One of the problems is that many cognitive concepts for which there is a single word (e.g. attention have been shown to be related to several anatomical networks. Recently we have developed an Attention Network Test (ANT that provides a separate measure for each of three anatomically defined attention networks. In this small scale study, we ran 26 pairs of MZ and DZ twins in an effort to determine if any of these networks show sufficient evidence of heritability to warrant further exploration of their genetic basis. Results The efficiency of the executive attention network, that mediates stimulus and response conflict, shows sufficient heritability to warrant further study. Alerting and overall reaction time show some evidence for heritability and in our study the orienting network shows no evidence of heritability. Conclusions These results suggest that genetic variation contributes to normal individual differences in higher order executive attention involving dopamine rich frontal areas including the anterior cingulate. At least the executive portion of the ANT may serve as a valid endophenotype for larger twin studies and subsequent molecular genetic analysis in normal subject populations.

  11. Heritability and biological explanation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkheimer, E

    1998-10-01

    Modern neuroscientific and genetic technologies have provoked intense disagreement between scientists who envision a future in which biogenetic theories will enrich or even replace psychological theories, and others who consider biogenetic theories exaggerated, dehumanizing, and dangerous. Both sides of the debate about the role of genes and brains in the genesis of human behavior have missed an important point: All human behavior that varies among individuals is partially heritable and correlated with measurable aspects of brains, but the very ubiquity of these findings makes them a poor basis for reformulating scientists' conceptions of human behavior. Materialism requires psychological processes to be physically instantiated, but more crucial for psychology is the occasional empirical discovery of behavioral phenomena that are specific manifestations of low-level biological variables. Heritability and psychobiological association cannot be the basis for establishing whether behavior is genetic or biological, because to do so leads only to the banal tautology that all behavior is ultimately based in the genotype and brain.

  12. Heritability in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gordon, Hannah; Trier Moller, Frederik; Andersen, Vibeke

    2015-01-01

    Since Tysk et al's pioneering analysis of the Swedish twin registry, twin and family studies continue to support a strong genetic basis of the inflammatory bowel diseases. The coefficient of heritability for siblings of inflammatory bowel disease probands is 25 to 42 for Crohn's disease and 4 to 15...... for ulcerative colitis. Heritability estimates for Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis from pooled twin studies are 0.75 and 0.67, respectively. However, this is at odds with the much lower heritability estimates from Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS). This "missing heritability" is likely due...... to shortfalls in both family studies and GWAS. The coefficient of heritability fails to account for familial shared environment. Heritability calculations from twin data are based on Falconer's method, with premises that are increasingly understood to be flawed. GWAS based heritability estimates may...

  13. Chimpanzee intelligence is heritable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, William D; Russell, Jamie L; Schaeffer, Jennifer

    2014-07-21

    The role that genes play in human intelligence or IQ has remained a point of significant scientific debate dating back to the time of Galton [1]. It has now become increasingly clear that IQ is heritable in humans, but these effects can be modified by nongenetic mechanisms [2-4]. In contrast to human IQ, until recently, views of learning and cognition in animals have largely been dominated by the behaviorist school of thought, originally championed by Watson [5] and Skinner [6]. A large body of accumulated research now demonstrates a variety of cognitive abilities in nonhuman animals and challenges traditional behaviorist interpretations of performance [7, 8]. This, in turn, has led to a renewed interest in the role that social and biological factors might play in explaining individual and phylogenetic differences in cognition [9]. Specifically, aside from early attempts to selectively breed for learning skills in rodents [10-12], studies examining the role that genetic factors might play in individual variation in cognitive abilities in nonhuman animals, particularly nonhuman primates, are scarce. Here, we utilized a modified Primate Cognitive Test Battery [13] in conjunction with quantitative genetic analyses to examine whether cognitive performance is heritable in chimpanzees. We found that some but not all cognitive traits were significantly heritable in chimpanzees. We further found significant genetic correlations between different dimensions of cognitive functioning, suggesting that the genes that explain the variability of one cognitive trait might also explain that of other cognitive traits.

  14. Genomic Changes in Resynthesized Brassica napus and Their Effect on Gene Expression and Phenotype

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Robert T. Gaeta; J. Chris Pires; Federico Iniguez-Luy; Enrique Leon; Thomas C. Osborn

    2007-01-01

    .... We analyzed genetic, epigenetic, gene expression, and phenotypic changes in ∼50 resynthesized Brassica napus lines independently derived by hybridizing double haploids of Brassica oleracea and Brassica rapa...

  15. Heritability of performance deficit accumulation during acute sleep deprivation in twins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuna, Samuel T; Maislin, Greg; Pack, Frances M; Staley, Bethany; Hachadoorian, Robert; Coccaro, Emil F; Pack, Allan I

    2012-09-01

    To determine if the large and highly reproducible interindividual differences in rates of performance deficit accumulation during sleep deprivation, as determined by the number of lapses on a sustained reaction time test, the Psychomotor Vigilance Task (PVT), arise from a heritable trait. Prospective, observational cohort study. Academic medical center. There were 59 monozygotic (mean age 29.2 ± 6.8 [SD] yr; 15 male and 44 female pairs) and 41 dizygotic (mean age 26.6 ± 7.6 yr; 15 male and 26 female pairs) same-sex twin pairs with a normal polysomnogram. Thirty-eight hr of monitored, continuous sleep deprivation. Patients performed the 10-min PVT every 2 hr during the sleep deprivation protocol. The primary outcome was change from baseline in square root transformed total lapses (response time ≥ 500 ms) per trial. Patient-specific linear rates of performance deficit accumulation were separated from circadian effects using multiple linear regression. Using the classic approach to assess heritability, the intraclass correlation coefficients for accumulating deficits resulted in a broad sense heritability (h(2)) estimate of 0.834. The mean within-pair and among-pair heritability estimates determined by analysis of variance-based methods was 0.715. When variance components of mixed-effect multilevel models were estimated by maximum likelihood estimation and used to determine the proportions of phenotypic variance explained by genetic and nongenetic factors, 51.1% (standard error = 8.4%, P sleep deprivation.

  16. Phenotypic Changes Exhibited by E. coli Cultured in Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zea, Luis; Larsen, Michael; Estante, Frederico; Qvortrup, Klaus; Moeller, Ralf; Dias de Oliveira, Sílvia; Stodieck, Louis; Klaus, David

    2017-01-01

    Bacteria will accompany humans in our exploration of space, making it of importance to study their adaptation to the microgravity environment. To investigate potential phenotypic changes for bacteria grown in space, Escherichia coli was cultured onboard the International Space Station with matched controls on Earth. Samples were challenged with different concentrations of gentamicin sulfate to study the role of drug concentration on the dependent variables in the space environment. Analyses included assessments of final cell count, cell size, cell envelope thickness, cell ultrastructure, and culture morphology. A 13-fold increase in final cell count was observed in space with respect to the ground controls and the space flight cells were able to grow in the presence of normally inhibitory levels of gentamicin sulfate. Contrast light microscopy and focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy showed that, on average, cells in space were 37% of the volume of their matched controls, which may alter the rate of molecule-cell interactions in a diffusion-limited mass transport regime as is expected to occur in microgravity. TEM imagery showed an increase in cell envelope thickness of between 25 and 43% in space with respect to the Earth control group. Outer membrane vesicles were observed on the spaceflight samples, but not on the Earth cultures. While E. coli suspension cultures on Earth were homogenously distributed throughout the liquid medium, in space they tended to form a cluster, leaving the surrounding medium visibly clear of cells. This cell aggregation behavior may be associated with enhanced biofilm formation observed in other spaceflight experiments.

  17. Phenotypic Changes Exhibited by E. coli Cultured in Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Zea

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria will accompany humans in our exploration of space, making it of importance to study their adaptation to the microgravity environment. To investigate potential phenotypic changes for bacteria grown in space, Escherichia coli was cultured onboard the International Space Station with matched controls on Earth. Samples were challenged with different concentrations of gentamicin sulfate to study the role of drug concentration on the dependent variables in the space environment. Analyses included assessments of final cell count, cell size, cell envelope thickness, cell ultrastructure, and culture morphology. A 13-fold increase in final cell count was observed in space with respect to the ground controls and the space flight cells were able to grow in the presence of normally inhibitory levels of gentamicin sulfate. Contrast light microscopy and focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy showed that, on average, cells in space were 37% of the volume of their matched controls, which may alter the rate of molecule–cell interactions in a diffusion-limited mass transport regime as is expected to occur in microgravity. TEM imagery showed an increase in cell envelope thickness of between 25 and 43% in space with respect to the Earth control group. Outer membrane vesicles were observed on the spaceflight samples, but not on the Earth cultures. While E. coli suspension cultures on Earth were homogenously distributed throughout the liquid medium, in space they tended to form a cluster, leaving the surrounding medium visibly clear of cells. This cell aggregation behavior may be associated with enhanced biofilm formation observed in other spaceflight experiments.

  18. Genetic and Environmental Regulation on Longitudinal Change of Metabolic Phenotypes in Danish and Chinese Adult Twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Shuxia; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm; Pang, Zengchang

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The rate of change in metabolic phenotypes can be highly indicative of metabolic disorders and disorder-related modifications. We analyzed data from longitudinal twin studies on multiple metabolic phenotypes in Danish and Chinese twins representing two populations of distinct ethnic...... environmental contribution to blood pressure but no genetic contribution to longitudinal change in body mass traits. CONCLUSION: Our results emphasize the major contribution of unique environment to the observed intra-individual variation in all metabolic phenotypes in both samples, and meanwhile reveal...... differential patterns of genetic and common environmental regulation on changes over time in metabolic phenotypes across the two samples....

  19. Using extended genealogy to estimate components of heritability for 23 quantitative and dichotomous traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitlen, Noah; Kraft, Peter; Patterson, Nick; Pasaniuc, Bogdan; Bhatia, Gaurav; Pollack, Samuela; Price, Alkes L

    2013-05-01

    Important knowledge about the determinants of complex human phenotypes can be obtained from the estimation of heritability, the fraction of phenotypic variation in a population that is determined by genetic factors. Here, we make use of extensive phenotype data in Iceland, long-range phased genotypes, and a population-wide genealogical database to examine the heritability of 11 quantitative and 12 dichotomous phenotypes in a sample of 38,167 individuals. Most previous estimates of heritability are derived from family-based approaches such as twin studies, which may be biased upwards by epistatic interactions or shared environment. Our estimates of heritability, based on both closely and distantly related pairs of individuals, are significantly lower than those from previous studies. We examine phenotypic correlations across a range of relationships, from siblings to first cousins, and find that the excess phenotypic correlation in these related individuals is predominantly due to shared environment as opposed to dominance or epistasis. We also develop a new method to jointly estimate narrow-sense heritability and the heritability explained by genotyped SNPs. Unlike existing methods, this approach permits the use of information from both closely and distantly related pairs of individuals, thereby reducing the variance of estimates of heritability explained by genotyped SNPs while preventing upward bias. Our results show that common SNPs explain a larger proportion of the heritability than previously thought, with SNPs present on Illumina 300K genotyping arrays explaining more than half of the heritability for the 23 phenotypes examined in this study. Much of the remaining heritability is likely to be due to rare alleles that are not captured by standard genotyping arrays.

  20. Using extended genealogy to estimate components of heritability for 23 quantitative and dichotomous traits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noah Zaitlen

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Important knowledge about the determinants of complex human phenotypes can be obtained from the estimation of heritability, the fraction of phenotypic variation in a population that is determined by genetic factors. Here, we make use of extensive phenotype data in Iceland, long-range phased genotypes, and a population-wide genealogical database to examine the heritability of 11 quantitative and 12 dichotomous phenotypes in a sample of 38,167 individuals. Most previous estimates of heritability are derived from family-based approaches such as twin studies, which may be biased upwards by epistatic interactions or shared environment. Our estimates of heritability, based on both closely and distantly related pairs of individuals, are significantly lower than those from previous studies. We examine phenotypic correlations across a range of relationships, from siblings to first cousins, and find that the excess phenotypic correlation in these related individuals is predominantly due to shared environment as opposed to dominance or epistasis. We also develop a new method to jointly estimate narrow-sense heritability and the heritability explained by genotyped SNPs. Unlike existing methods, this approach permits the use of information from both closely and distantly related pairs of individuals, thereby reducing the variance of estimates of heritability explained by genotyped SNPs while preventing upward bias. Our results show that common SNPs explain a larger proportion of the heritability than previously thought, with SNPs present on Illumina 300K genotyping arrays explaining more than half of the heritability for the 23 phenotypes examined in this study. Much of the remaining heritability is likely to be due to rare alleles that are not captured by standard genotyping arrays.

  1. Identification of a heritable polymorphism in bovine PRNP associated with genetic transmissible spongiform encephalopathy: evidence of heritable BSE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric M Nicholson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE of cattle. Classical BSE is associated with ingestion of BSE-contaminated feedstuffs. H- and L-type BSE, collectively known as atypical BSE, differ from classical BSE by displaying a different disease phenotype and they have not been linked to the consumption of contaminated feed. Interestingly, the 2006 US H-type atypical BSE animal had a polymorphism at codon 211 of the bovine prion gene resulting in a glutamic acid to lysine substitution (E211K. This substitution is analogous a human polymorphism associated with the most prevalent form of heritable TSE in humans, and it is considered to have caused BSE in the 2006 US atypical BSE animal. In order to determine if this amino acid change is a heritable trait in cattle, we sequenced the prion alleles of the only known offspring of this animal, a 2-year-old heifer. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Sequence analysis revealed that both the 2006 US atypical BSE animal and its 2-year-old heifer were heterozygous at bovine prion gene nucleotides 631 through 633 for GAA (glutamic acid and AAA (lysine. Both animals carry the E211K polymorphism, indicating that the allele is heritable and may persist within the cattle population. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first evidence that the E211K polymorphism is a germline polymorphism, not a somatic mutation, suggesting BSE may be transmitted genetically in cattle. In the event that E211K proves to result in a genetic form of BSE, this would be the first indication that all 3 etiologic forms of TSEs (spontaneous, hereditary, and infectious are present in a non-human species. Atypical BSE arising as both genetic and spontaneous disease, in the context of reports that at least some forms of atypical BSE can convert to classical BSE in mice, suggests a cattle origin for classical BSE.

  2. Heritability of sex tendency in a harpacticoid copepod, Tigriopus californicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voordouw, Maarten J; Anholt, Bradley R

    2002-09-01

    Systems with genetic variation for the primary sex ratio are important for testing sex-ratio theory and for understanding how this variation is maintained. Evidence is presented for heritable variation of the primary sex ratio in the harpacticoid copepod Tigriopus californicus. Variation in the primary sex ratio among families cannot be accounted for by Mendelian segregation of sex chromosomes. The covariance in sex phenotype between full-sibling clutches and between mothers and offspring suggests that this variation has a polygenic basis. Averaged over four replicates, the full-sibling heritability of sex tendency is 0.13 +/- 0.040; and the mother-offspring heritability of sex tendency is 0.31 +/- 0.216. Genetic correlations in the sex phenotype across two temperature treatments indicate large genotype-by-temperature interactions. Future experiments need to distinguish between zygotic, parental, or cytoplasmic mechanisms of sex determination in T. californicus.

  3. Heritability of caffeine metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthaei, Johannes; Tzvetkov, Mladen V; Strube, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    Heritability of caffeine pharmacokinetics and CYP1A2 activity is controversial. Here we analyzed the pharmacokinetics of caffeine, an in vivo probe drug for CYP1A2 and arylamine N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) activity, in monozygotic and dizygotic twins. In the entire group, common and unique...... environmental effects explained most variation in caffeine AUC. Apparently, smoking and hormonal contraceptives masked the genetic effects on CYP1A2 activity. However, when excluding smokers and users of hormonal contraceptives, 89% of caffeine AUC variation was due to genetic effects and even in the entire...... group, 8% of caffeine AUC variation could be explained by a CYP1A1/1A2 promotor polymorphism (rs2470893). In contrast, nearly all of the variation (99%) of NAT2 activity was explained by genetic effects. This study illustrates two very different situations in pharmacogenetics, from an almost exclusively...

  4. Heritability of clubfoot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engell, Vilhelm; Nielsen, Jan; Damborg, Frank

    2014-01-01

    born in Denmark over the last 140 years. All 46,418 twin individuals born from 1931 through 1982, who had earlier consented to contact, received a 17-page Omnibus questionnaire in the spring of 2002. Data were analysed with structural equation models to identify the best fitting aetiological model...... representing 12 monozygotic, 22 same-sex dizygotic, 18 opposite-sex dizygotic, and 3 with unclassified zygosity. The model with only environmental factors (CE) was best fitting based on AIC, and the model with an additive genetic factor (ACE) came in second. Due to the small statistical power, we hypothesise...... based on a balance of goodness-of-fit and parsimony and to estimate heritability. RESULTS: We found an overall self-reported prevalence of congenital clubfoot of 0.0027 (95 % confidence interval 0.0022-0.0034). Fifty-five complete (both twins answered the question) twin pairs were identified...

  5. Secular change in 13 metabolic phenotypes: A Chinese longitudinal twin study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Shuxia; Pang, Zengchang; Zhang, Dongfeng

    Aims: The genetic and environmental influences on metabolic phenotypes have been intensively studied by twin modeling in different populations. However, twin studies on secular change in metabolic phenotypes have been rare due to high expenses, losses of follow up, and long waiting time...... in prospective investigations. Based on Chinese twin data collected from Danish-Chinese collaboration research, we perform twin modeling on 13 metabolic phenotypes (total cholesterol; triglyceride; high density lipoprotein (HDL); low density lipoprotein (LDL); urine acid (UA); glucose; weight; body mass index...... environmental factors. Secular changes in all phenotypes are under moderate to high (e2: 0.45 - 0.79) control by unique environmental factors. Conclusions: Variations in secular change in the 13 metabolic phenotypes show limited genetic control. Our results emphasize the special importance of unique environment...

  6. Global changes in gene expression associated with phenotypic switching of wild yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stovicek, Vratislav; Váchová, Libuše; Begany, Markéta

    2014-01-01

    transitions that affect other properties of phenotypic strain-variants, such as resistance to the impact of environmental stress. Here we document the regulatory role of the histone deacetylase Hda1p in developing such a resistance. Conclusions : We provide detailed analysis of transcriptomic and phenotypic...... restores its ability to form structured biofilm colonies. Phenotypic, microscopic and transcriptomic analyses show that phenotypic transition is a complex process that affects various aspects of feral strain physiology; it leads to a phenotype that resembles the original wild strain in some aspects...... and the domesticated derivative in others. We specify the genetic determinants that are likely involved in the formation of a structured biofilm colonies. In addition to FLO11, these determinants include genes that affect the cell wall and membrane composition. We also identify changes occurring during phenotypic...

  7. Transcriptional changes are involved in phenotype switching in Streptococcus equi subspecies equi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steward, Karen F; Robinson, Carl; Waller, Andrew S

    2016-04-01

    Phenotypic heterogeneity within a population of bacteria, through genetic or transcriptional variation, enables survival and persistence in challenging and changing environments. We report here that a recent clinical isolate of S. equi, strain 1691 (Se1691), yielded a mixture of reduced capsule and mucoid colonies on primary isolation when grown on colistin-oxolinic acid blood agar (COBA) streptococcal selective plates. Passaging colonies of Se1691, with a reduced capsule phenotype maintained this mixed phenotype. In contrast, passaging mucoid colonies fixed the mucoid phenotype, suggesting adaptive genetic or transcriptional changes in response to growth on artificial media. However, despite obvious phenotypic and transcriptional differences, there were no apparent differences in the genome sequences of Se1691 recovered from colonies with a mucoid or reduced capsule phenotype. We identified 105 differentially transcribed genes in the transcriptomes of reduced capsule and mucoid colonies. The reduced capsule phenotype was associated with a significant reduction in transcription of the has locus (SEQ_0269 Q = 0.0015, SEQ_0270 Q = 0.0015, SEQ_0271 Q = 0.0285) and the amount of hyaluronic acid on the surface of S. equi recovered from non-mucoid colonies (P = 0.017). Significant differences in the transcription of 21 surface and secreted proteins were also observed. Our data show that changes in the bacterial transcriptome are linked to the mixed colony phenotype of Se1691.

  8. Heritability of substance dependence in a native American population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelmsen, Kirk C; Ehlers, Cindy

    2005-06-01

    To estimate the heritability of substance dependence and associated symptoms in a sample of Southwest California (Mission) Indians. Families from eight contiguous Indian reservations were recruited in order to ascertain information on substance dependence symptoms and diagnoses using a semi-structured diagnostic interview. Dependence diagnoses for alcohol, marijuana, stimulants and a measure of regular tobacco usage, any drug dependence or tobacco usage were obtained. Composite measures of alcohol dependence symptoms for withdrawal, drinking severity, antisocial problems and interpersonal problems were constructed from the nine groups of symptoms summarized in the diagnostic interview. Heritability estimates were calculated using variance component methods, as implemented in SOLAR. In this population, marijuana dependence (0.38) and regular tobacco use (0.43), alcohol dependence (DSM-III-R 0.19; ICD-10, 0.29) and stimulant dependence (0.25) showed evidence for moderate genetic influences as determined by heritability estimates. Four phenotypes constructed using the composite symptoms of alcohol dependence revealed that withdrawal had the highest heritability estimate (0.71), followed by antisocial problems (0.36) and drinking severity (0.34). Symptom clusters reflecting interpersonal problems did not appear to be highly heritable (0.19). Marijuana dependence, regular tobacco usage and composite phenotypes constructed from alcohol dependence symptoms for antisocial problems, drinking severity and withdrawal generally have patterns of familial aggregation, suggesting that they can be successfully used for linkage analysis in this Southwest California Indian sample.

  9. Changing course in ageing research: The healthy ageing phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Oscar H; Karnik, Kavita; Osborne, Gabrielle; Ordovas, Jose M; Catt, Michael; van der Ouderaa, Frans

    2009-05-20

    Ageing is often associated with the aged and the diseased, nevertheless ageing is a process that starts in-uterus and is characterised by a progressive functional loss but not necessarily by the presence of disease and poor quality of life. How to meander through life without crossing the confines of major chronic disease and cognitive and physical impairment remains one of the most relevant challenges for science and humankind. Delimiting that 'immaculate' trajectory - that we dub as the 'Healthy Ageing Phenotype' - and exploring solutions to help the population to stay or return to this trajectory should constitute the core focus of scientific research. Nevertheless, current efforts on ageing research are mainly focused on developing animal models to disentangle the human ageing process, and on age-related disorders often providing merely palliative solutions. Therefore, to identify alternative perspectives in ageing research, Unilever and the Medical Research Council (MRC) UK convened a Spark workshop entitled 'The Healthy Ageing Phenotype'. In this meeting, international specialists from complementary areas related to ageing research, gathered to find clear attributes and definitions of the 'Healthy Ageing Phenotype', to identify potential mechanisms and interventions to improve healthy life expectancy of the population; and to highlight areas within ageing research that should be prioritised in the future. General agreement was reached in recognising ageing research as a disaggregated field with little communication between basic, epidemiological and clinical areas of research and limited translation to society. A more holistic, multi-disciplinary approach emanating from a better understanding of healthy ageing trajectories and centred along human biological resilience, its maintenance and the reversibility from early deviations into pathological trajectories, is urgently required. Future research should concentrate on understanding the mechanisms that permit

  10. Secular change in 13 metabolic phenotypes: A Chinese longitudinal twin study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Shuxia; Pang, Zengchang; Zhang, Dongfeng

    in prospective investigations. Based on Chinese twin data collected from Danish-Chinese collaboration research, we perform twin modeling on 13 metabolic phenotypes (total cholesterol; triglyceride; high density lipoprotein (HDL); low density lipoprotein (LDL); urine acid (UA); glucose; weight; body mass index...... fitted to the secular changes in each of the 13 phenotypes with best fitting model selected based on model performance. Age and sex were included as covariates in the models to adjust for their effects on secular trend. Results: Variations in secular change in 3 lipids (total cholesterol; triglyceride...... environmental factors. Secular changes in all phenotypes are under moderate to high (e2: 0.45 - 0.79) control by unique environmental factors. Conclusions: Variations in secular change in the 13 metabolic phenotypes show limited genetic control. Our results emphasize the special importance of unique environment...

  11. Genetic and Environmental Regulation on Longitudinal Change of Metabolic Phenotypes in Danish and Chinese Adult Twins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuxia; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm; Pang, Zengchang; Zhang, Dongfeng; Duan, Haiping; Tan, Qihua; Hjelmborg, Jacob; Kruse, Torben; Dalgård, Christine

    2016-01-01

    The rate of change in metabolic phenotypes can be highly indicative of metabolic disorders and disorder-related modifications. We analyzed data from longitudinal twin studies on multiple metabolic phenotypes in Danish and Chinese twins representing two populations of distinct ethnic, cultural, social-economic backgrounds and geographical environments. The study covered a relatively large sample of 502 pairs of Danish adult twins followed up for a long period of 12 years with a mean age at intake of 38 years (range: 18-65) and a total of 181 Chinese adult twin pairs traced for about 7 years with a mean baseline age of 39.5 years (range: 23-64). The classical twin models were fitted to the longitudinal change in each phenotypephenotype) to estimate the genetic and environmental contributions to the variation in Δphenotype. Moderate to high contributions by the unique environment were estimated for all phenotypes in both Danish (from 0.51 for low density lipoprotein cholesterol up to 0.72 for triglycerides) and Chinese (from 0.41 for triglycerides up to 0.73 for diastolic blood pressure) twins; low to moderate genetic components were estimated for long-term change in most of the phenotypes in Danish twins except for triglycerides and hip circumference. Compared with Danish twins, the Chinese twins tended to have higher genetic control over the longitudinal changes in lipids (except high density lipoprotein cholesterol) and glucose, higher unique environmental contribution to blood pressure but no genetic contribution to longitudinal change in body mass traits. Our results emphasize the major contribution of unique environment to the observed intra-individual variation in all metabolic phenotypes in both samples, and meanwhile reveal differential patterns of genetic and common environmental regulation on changes over time in metabolic phenotypes across the two samples.

  12. The Wnts of Change: How Wnts Regulate Phenotype Switching in Melanoma

    OpenAIRE

    Webster, Marie R.; Kugel, Curtis H.; Weeraratna, Ashani T.

    2015-01-01

    The outgrowth of metastatic and therapy-resistant subpopulations in cancer remains a critical barrier for the successful treatment of this disease. In melanoma, invasion and proliferation are uncoupled, such that highly proliferative melanoma cells are less likely to be invasive, and vice versa. The transition between each state is likely a dynamic rather than a static, permanent change. This is referred to as “phenotype switching”. Wnt signaling pathways drive phenotypic changes and promote ...

  13. Beyond missing heritability: prediction of complex traits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Makowsky

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite rapid advances in genomic technology, our ability to account for phenotypic variation using genetic information remains limited for many traits. This has unfortunately resulted in limited application of genetic data towards preventive and personalized medicine, one of the primary impetuses of genome-wide association studies. Recently, a large proportion of the "missing heritability" for human height was statistically explained by modeling thousands of single nucleotide polymorphisms concurrently. However, it is currently unclear how gains in explained genetic variance will translate to the prediction of yet-to-be observed phenotypes. Using data from the Framingham Heart Study, we explore the genomic prediction of human height in training and validation samples while varying the statistical approach used, the number of SNPs included in the model, the validation scheme, and the number of subjects used to train the model. In our training datasets, we are able to explain a large proportion of the variation in height (h(2 up to 0.83, R(2 up to 0.96. However, the proportion of variance accounted for in validation samples is much smaller (ranging from 0.15 to 0.36 depending on the degree of familial information used in the training dataset. While such R(2 values vastly exceed what has been previously reported using a reduced number of pre-selected markers (<0.10, given the heritability of the trait (∼ 0.80, substantial room for improvement remains.

  14. The Human Microbiome and the Missing Heritability Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Sandoval-Motta

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The “missing heritability” problem states that genetic variants in Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS cannot completely explain the heritability of complex traits. Traditionally, the heritability of a phenotype is measured through familial studies using twins, siblings and other close relatives, making assumptions on the genetic similarities between them. When this heritability is compared to the one obtained through GWAS for the same traits, a substantial gap between both measurements arise with genome wide studies reporting significantly smaller values. Several mechanisms for this “missing heritability” have been proposed, such as epigenetics, epistasis, and sequencing depth. However, none of them are able to fully account for this gap in heritability. In this paper we provide evidence that suggests that in order for the phenotypic heritability of human traits to be broadly understood and accounted for, the compositional and functional diversity of the human microbiome must be taken into account. This hypothesis is based on several observations: (A The composition of the human microbiome is associated with many important traits, including obesity, cancer, and neurological disorders. (B Our microbiome encodes a second genome with nearly a 100 times more genes than the human genome, and this second genome may act as a rich source of genetic variation and phenotypic plasticity. (C Human genotypes interact with the composition and structure of our microbiome, but cannot by themselves explain microbial variation. (D Microbial genetic composition can be strongly influenced by the host's behavior, its environment or by vertical and horizontal transmissions from other hosts. Therefore, genetic similarities assumed in familial studies may cause overestimations of heritability values. We also propose a method that allows the compositional and functional diversity of our microbiome to be incorporated to genome wide association studies.

  15. Plant defence as a complex and changing phenotype throughout ontogeny

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa-López, Sofía; Villamil, Nora; Zedillo-Avelleyra, Paulina; Boege, Karina

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Ontogenetic changes in anti-herbivore defences are common and result from variation in resource availability and herbivore damage throughout plant development. However, little is known about the simultaneous changes of multiple defences across the entire development of plants, and how such changes affect plant damage in the field. The aim of this study was to assess if changes in the major types of plant resistance and tolerance can explain natural herbivore damage throughout plant ontogeny. Methods An assessment was made of how six defensive traits, including physical, chemical and biotic resistance, simultaneously change across the major transitions of plant development, from seedlings to reproductive stages of Turnera velutina growing in the greenhouse. In addition, an experiment was performed to assess how plant tolerance to artificial damage to leaves changed throughout ontogeny. Finally, leaf damage by herbivores was evaluated in a natural population. Key Results The observed ontogenetic trajectories of all defences were significantly different, sometimes showing opposite directions of change. Whereas trichome density, leaf toughness, extrafloral nectary abundance and nectar production increased, hydrogen cyanide and compensatory responses decreased throughout plant development, from seedlings to reproductive plants. Only water content was higher at the intermediate juvenile ontogenetic stages. Surveys in a natural population over 3 years showed that herbivores consumed more tissue from juvenile plants than from younger seedlings or older reproductive plants. This is consistent with the fact that juvenile plants were the least defended stage. Conclusions The results suggest that defensive trajectories are a mixed result of predictions by the Optimal Defence Theory and the Growth–Differentiation Balance Hypothesis. The study emphasizes the importance of incorporating multiple defences and plant ontogeny into further studies for a more

  16. An experimental analysis of the heritability of variation in glucocorticoid concentrations in a wild avian population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Brittany R.; Vitousek, Maren N.; Hubbard, Joanna K.; Safran, Rebecca J.

    2014-01-01

    Glucocorticoid hormones (CORT) are predicted to promote adaptation to variable environments, yet little is known about the potential for CORT secretion patterns to respond to selection in free-living populations. We assessed the heritable variation underlying differences in hormonal phenotypes using a cross-foster experimental design with nestling North American barn swallows (Hirundo rustica erythrogaster). Using a bivariate animal model, we partitioned variance in baseline and stress-induced CORT concentrations into their additive genetic and rearing environment components and estimated their genetic correlation. Both baseline and stress-induced CORT were heritable with heritability of 0.152 and 0.343, respectively. We found that the variation in baseline CORT was best explained by rearing environment, whereas the variation in stress-induced CORT was contributed to by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Further, we did not detect a genetic correlation between these two hormonal traits. Although rearing environment appears to play an important role in the secretion of both types of CORT, our results suggest that stress-induced CORT levels are underlain by greater additive genetic variance compared with baseline CORT levels. Accordingly, we infer that the glucocorticoid response to stress has a greater potential for evolutionary change in response to selection compared with baseline glucocorticoid secretion patterns. PMID:25056627

  17. An experimental analysis of the heritability of variation in glucocorticoid concentrations in a wild avian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Brittany R; Vitousek, Maren N; Hubbard, Joanna K; Safran, Rebecca J

    2014-09-01

    Glucocorticoid hormones (CORT) are predicted to promote adaptation to variable environments, yet little is known about the potential for CORT secretion patterns to respond to selection in free-living populations. We assessed the heritable variation underlying differences in hormonal phenotypes using a cross-foster experimental design with nestling North American barn swallows (Hirundo rustica erythrogaster). Using a bivariate animal model, we partitioned variance in baseline and stress-induced CORT concentrations into their additive genetic and rearing environment components and estimated their genetic correlation. Both baseline and stress-induced CORT were heritable with heritability of 0.152 and 0.343, respectively. We found that the variation in baseline CORT was best explained by rearing environment, whereas the variation in stress-induced CORT was contributed to by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Further, we did not detect a genetic correlation between these two hormonal traits. Although rearing environment appears to play an important role in the secretion of both types of CORT, our results suggest that stress-induced CORT levels are underlain by greater additive genetic variance compared with baseline CORT levels. Accordingly, we infer that the glucocorticoid response to stress has a greater potential for evolutionary change in response to selection compared with baseline glucocorticoid secretion patterns.

  18. Stem cell plasticity revisited: The continuum marrow model and phenotypic changes mediated by microvesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesenberry, Peter J.; Dooner, Mark S.; Aliotta, Jason M.

    2010-01-01

    The phenotype of marrow hematopoietic stem cells is determined by cell cycle state and microvesicle entry into the stem cells. The stem cell population is continually changing based on cell cycle transit and thus can only be defined on a population basis. Purification of marrow stem cells only addresses the heterogeneity of these populations. When whole marrow is studied, the long-term repopulating stem cells are in active cell cycle. However, with some variability, when highly purified stem cells are studied, the cells appear to be dormant. Thus, the study of purified stem cells is intrinsically misleading. Tissue-derived microvesicles enhanced by injury effect the phenotype of different cell classes. We propose that previously described stem cell plasticity is due to microvesicle modulation. We further propose a stem cell population model in which the individual cell phenotypes continually changes, but the population phenotype is relatively stable. This, in turn, is modulated by microvesicle and microenvironmental influences. PMID:20382199

  19. Predicting when climate-driven phenotypic change affects population dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McLean, Nina; Lawson, C.R.; Leech, David; Van de Pol, M.

    2016-01-01

    Species' responses to climate change are variable and diverse, yet our understanding of how different responses (e.g. physiological, behavioural, demographic) relate and how they affect the parameters most relevant for conservation (e.g. population persistence) is lacking. Despite this, studies that

  20. Alzheimer's disease: analyzing the missing heritability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perry G Ridge

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a complex disorder influenced by environmental and genetic factors. Recent work has identified 11 AD markers in 10 loci. We used Genome-wide Complex Trait Analysis to analyze >2 million SNPs for 10,922 individuals from the Alzheimer's Disease Genetics Consortium to assess the phenotypic variance explained first by known late-onset AD loci, and then by all SNPs in the Alzheimer's Disease Genetics Consortium dataset. In all, 33% of total phenotypic variance is explained by all common SNPs. APOE alone explained 6% and other known markers 2%, meaning more than 25% of phenotypic variance remains unexplained by known markers, but is tagged by common SNPs included on genotyping arrays or imputed with HapMap genotypes. Novel AD markers that explain large amounts of phenotypic variance are likely to be rare and unidentifiable using genome-wide association studies. Based on our findings and the current direction of human genetics research, we suggest specific study designs for future studies to identify the remaining heritability of Alzheimer's disease.

  1. Phenotypic plasticity as an adaptive response to predictable and unpredictable environmental changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manenti, Tommaso

    Phenotypic plasticity is the ability of a genotype to modify its phenotype in response to environmental changes as a consequence of an interaction between genes and environment (Bradshaw, 1965). Plasticity contributes to the vast phenotypic variation observed in natural populations. Many examples...... such as anti-predator behaviours or the activation of mechanisms to prevent thermal stress injuries suggest that plasticity is an adaptive response, favoured by natural selection. At the same time, organisms do show limited plastic responses, indicating that this ability is not for free. Costs and benefits...... to be an adaptive response. Despite almost a century of studies on phenotypic plasticity, the relation between plasticity and evolution is still not clear and theoretical prediction are often not met by empirical data. In my PhD I have investigated if and when plasticity can evolve. I selected Drosophila simulans...

  2. The Wnts of change: How Wnts regulate phenotype switching in melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Marie R; Kugel, Curtis H; Weeraratna, Ashani T

    2015-12-01

    The outgrowth of metastatic and therapy-resistant subpopulations in cancer remains a critical barrier for the successful treatment of this disease. In melanoma, invasion and proliferation are uncoupled, such that highly proliferative melanoma cells are less likely to be invasive, and vice versa. The transition between each state is likely a dynamic rather than a static, permanent change. This is referred to as "phenotype switching". Wnt signaling pathways drive phenotypic changes and promote therapy resistance in melanoma, as well as play roles in the modulation of the immune microenvironment. Three Wnt signaling pathways play a role in melanoma progression, canonical (β-catenin dependent), polar cell polarity (PCP), and the Wnt/Ca²⁺ pathway. Here we summarize phenotype plasticity and its role in therapy resistance and immune evasion. Targeting the Wnt signaling pathways may be an effective way to overcome tumor plasticity in melanoma. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. More heritability probably captured by psoriasis genome-wide association study in Han Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Long; Liu, Lu; Cheng, Yuyan; Lin, Yan; Shen, Changbing; Zhu, Caihong; Yang, Sen; Yin, Xianyong; Zhang, Xuejun

    2015-11-15

    Missing heritability is a common problem in genome-wide association studies in complex diseases/traits. To quantify the unbiased heritability estimate, we applied the phenotype correlation-genotype correlation regression in psoriasis genome-wide association data in Han Chinese which comprises 1139 cases and 1132 controls. We estimated that 45.7% heritability of psoriasis in Han Chinese were captured by common variants (s.e.=12.5%), which reinforced that the majority of psoriasis heritability can be covered by common variants in genome-wide association data (68.2%). The results provided evidence that the heritability covered by psoriasis genome-wide genotyping data was probably underestimated in previous restricted maximum likelihood method. Our study highlights the broad role of common variants in the etiology of psoriasis and sheds light on the possibility to identify more common variants of small effect by increasing the sample size in psoriasis genome-wide association studies.

  4. Phenotypic plasticity changes correlations of traits following experimental introductions of Trinidadian guppies (Poecilia reticulata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handelsman, Corey A; Ruell, Emily W; Torres-Dowdall, Julián; Ghalambor, Cameron K

    2014-11-01

    Colonization of novel environments can alter selective pressures and act as a catalyst for rapid evolution in nature. Theory and empirical studies suggest that the ability of a population to exhibit an adaptive evolutionary response to novel selection pressures should reflect the presence of sufficient additive genetic variance and covariance for individual and correlated traits. As correlated traits should not respond to selection independently, the structure of correlations of traits can bias or constrain adaptive evolution. Models of how multiple correlated traits respond to selection often assume spatial and temporal stability of trait-correlations within populations. Yet, trait-correlations can also be plastic in response to environmental variation. Phenotypic plasticity, the ability of a single genotype to produce different phenotypes across environments, is of particular interest because it can induce population-wide changes in the combination of traits exposed to selection and change the trajectory of evolutionary divergence. We tested the ability of phenotypic plasticity to modify trait-correlations by comparing phenotypic variance and covariance in the body-shapes of four experimental populations of Trinidadian guppies (Poecilia reticulata) to their ancestral population. We found that phenotypic plasticity produced both adaptive and novel aspects of body-shape, which was repeated in all four experimental populations. Further, phenotypic plasticity changed patterns of covariance among morphological characters. These findings suggest our ability to make inferences about patterns of divergence based on correlations of traits in extant populations may be limited if novel environments not only induce plasticity in multiple traits, but also change the correlations among the traits.

  5. Phenotypic Changes in Different Spinach Varieties Grown and Selected under Organic Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Schermann

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Organic and low-input agriculture needs flexible varieties that can buffer environmental stress and adapt to the needs of farmers. We implemented an experiment to investigate the evolutionary capacities of a sample of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L. population varieties for a number of phenotypic traits. Three farmers cultivated, selected and multiplied one or several populations over two years on their farms. The third year, the versions of the varieties cultivated and selected by the different farmers were compared to the original seed lots they had been given. After two cycles of cultivation and on-farm mass selection, all the observed varieties showed significant phenotypic changes (differences between the original version and the version cultivated by farmers for morphological and phenological traits. When the divergence among versions within varieties was studied, the results show that the varieties conserved their identity, except for one variety, which evolved in such a way that it may now be considered two different varieties. The heterogeneity of the population varieties was assessed in comparison with a commercial F1 hybrid used as control, and we found no specific differences in phenotypic diversity between the hybrid and population varieties. The phenotypic changes shown by the population varieties in response to on-farm cultivation and selection could be useful for the development of specific adaptation. These results call into question the current European seed legislation and the requirements of phenotypic stability for conservation varieties.

  6. Utilizing intraspecific variation in phenotypic plasticity to bolster agricultural and forest productivity under climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspinwall, Michael J; Loik, Michael E; Resco de Dios, Victor; Tjoelker, Mark G; Payton, Paxton R; Tissue, David T

    2015-09-01

    Climate change threatens the ability of agriculture and forestry to meet growing global demands for food, fibre and wood products. Information gathered from genotype-by-environment interactions (G × E), which demonstrate intraspecific variation in phenotypic plasticity (the ability of a genotype to alter its phenotype in response to environmental change), may prove important for bolstering agricultural and forest productivity under climate change. Nonetheless, very few studies have explicitly quantified genotype plasticity-productivity relationships in agriculture or forestry. Here, we conceptualize the importance of intraspecific variation in agricultural and forest species plasticity, and discuss the physiological and genetic factors contributing to intraspecific variation in phenotypic plasticity. Our discussion highlights the need for an integrated understanding of the mechanisms of G × E, more extensive assessments of genotypic responses to climate change under field conditions, and explicit testing of genotype plasticity-productivity relationships. Ultimately, further investigation of intraspecific variation in phenotypic plasticity in agriculture and forestry may prove important for identifying genotypes capable of increasing or sustaining productivity under more extreme climatic conditions.

  7. Heritability of adult body height

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silventoinen, Karri; Sammalisto, Sampo; Perola, Markus

    2003-01-01

    /unique environment (AE) model. Among women the heritability estimates were generally lower than among men with greater variation between countries, ranging from 0.68 to 0.84 when an additive genes/shared environment/unique environment (ACE) model was used. In four populations where an AE model fit equally well...

  8. Partitioning the heritability of Tourette syndrome and obsessive compulsive disorder reveals differences in genetic architecture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lea K Davis

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The direct estimation of heritability from genome-wide common variant data as implemented in the program Genome-wide Complex Trait Analysis (GCTA has provided a means to quantify heritability attributable to all interrogated variants. We have quantified the variance in liability to disease explained by all SNPs for two phenotypically-related neurobehavioral disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD and Tourette Syndrome (TS, using GCTA. Our analysis yielded a heritability point estimate of 0.58 (se = 0.09, p = 5.64e-12 for TS, and 0.37 (se = 0.07, p = 1.5e-07 for OCD. In addition, we conducted multiple genomic partitioning analyses to identify genomic elements that concentrate this heritability. We examined genomic architectures of TS and OCD by chromosome, MAF bin, and functional annotations. In addition, we assessed heritability for early onset and adult onset OCD. Among other notable results, we found that SNPs with a minor allele frequency of less than 5% accounted for 21% of the TS heritability and 0% of the OCD heritability. Additionally, we identified a significant contribution to TS and OCD heritability by variants significantly associated with gene expression in two regions of the brain (parietal cortex and cerebellum for which we had available expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs. Finally we analyzed the genetic correlation between TS and OCD, revealing a genetic correlation of 0.41 (se = 0.15, p = 0.002. These results are very close to previous heritability estimates for TS and OCD based on twin and family studies, suggesting that very little, if any, heritability is truly missing (i.e., unassayed from TS and OCD GWAS studies of common variation. The results also indicate that there is some genetic overlap between these two phenotypically-related neuropsychiatric disorders, but suggest that the two disorders have distinct genetic architectures.

  9. Partitioning the Heritability of Tourette Syndrome and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Reveals Differences in Genetic Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Lea K.; Yu, Dongmei; Keenan, Clare L.; Gamazon, Eric R.; Konkashbaev, Anuar I.; Derks, Eske M.; Neale, Benjamin M.; Yang, Jian; Lee, S. Hong; Evans, Patrick; Barr, Cathy L.; Bellodi, Laura; Benarroch, Fortu; Berrio, Gabriel Bedoya; Bienvenu, Oscar J.; Bloch, Michael H.; Blom, Rianne M.; Bruun, Ruth D.; Budman, Cathy L.; Camarena, Beatriz; Campbell, Desmond; Cappi, Carolina; Cardona Silgado, Julio C.; Cath, Danielle C.; Cavallini, Maria C.; Chavira, Denise A.; Chouinard, Sylvain; Conti, David V.; Cook, Edwin H.; Coric, Vladimir; Cullen, Bernadette A.; Deforce, Dieter; Delorme, Richard; Dion, Yves; Edlund, Christopher K.; Egberts, Karin; Falkai, Peter; Fernandez, Thomas V.; Gallagher, Patience J.; Garrido, Helena; Geller, Daniel; Girard, Simon L.; Grabe, Hans J.; Grados, Marco A.; Greenberg, Benjamin D.; Gross-Tsur, Varda; Haddad, Stephen; Heiman, Gary A.; Hemmings, Sian M. J.; Hounie, Ana G.; Illmann, Cornelia; Jankovic, Joseph; Jenike, Michael A.; Kennedy, James L.; King, Robert A.; Kremeyer, Barbara; Kurlan, Roger; Lanzagorta, Nuria; Leboyer, Marion; Leckman, James F.; Lennertz, Leonhard; Liu, Chunyu; Lochner, Christine; Lowe, Thomas L.; Macciardi, Fabio; McCracken, James T.; McGrath, Lauren M.; Mesa Restrepo, Sandra C.; Moessner, Rainald; Morgan, Jubel; Muller, Heike; Murphy, Dennis L.; Naarden, Allan L.; Ochoa, William Cornejo; Ophoff, Roel A.; Osiecki, Lisa; Pakstis, Andrew J.; Pato, Michele T.; Pato, Carlos N.; Piacentini, John; Pittenger, Christopher; Pollak, Yehuda; Rauch, Scott L.; Renner, Tobias J.; Reus, Victor I.; Richter, Margaret A.; Riddle, Mark A.; Robertson, Mary M.; Romero, Roxana; Rosàrio, Maria C.; Rosenberg, David; Rouleau, Guy A.; Ruhrmann, Stephan; Ruiz-Linares, Andres; Sampaio, Aline S.; Samuels, Jack; Sandor, Paul; Sheppard, Brooke; Singer, Harvey S.; Smit, Jan H.; Stein, Dan J.; Strengman, E.; Tischfield, Jay A.; Valencia Duarte, Ana V.; Vallada, Homero; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip; Veenstra-VanderWeele, Jeremy; Walitza, Susanne; Wang, Ying; Wendland, Jens R.; Westenberg, Herman G. M.; Shugart, Yin Yao; Miguel, Euripedes C.; McMahon, William; Wagner, Michael; Nicolini, Humberto; Posthuma, Danielle; Hanna, Gregory L.; Heutink, Peter; Denys, Damiaan; Arnold, Paul D.; Oostra, Ben A.; Nestadt, Gerald; Freimer, Nelson B.; Pauls, David L.; Wray, Naomi R.

    2013-01-01

    The direct estimation of heritability from genome-wide common variant data as implemented in the program Genome-wide Complex Trait Analysis (GCTA) has provided a means to quantify heritability attributable to all interrogated variants. We have quantified the variance in liability to disease explained by all SNPs for two phenotypically-related neurobehavioral disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and Tourette Syndrome (TS), using GCTA. Our analysis yielded a heritability point estimate of 0.58 (se = 0.09, p = 5.64e-12) for TS, and 0.37 (se = 0.07, p = 1.5e-07) for OCD. In addition, we conducted multiple genomic partitioning analyses to identify genomic elements that concentrate this heritability. We examined genomic architectures of TS and OCD by chromosome, MAF bin, and functional annotations. In addition, we assessed heritability for early onset and adult onset OCD. Among other notable results, we found that SNPs with a minor allele frequency of less than 5% accounted for 21% of the TS heritability and 0% of the OCD heritability. Additionally, we identified a significant contribution to TS and OCD heritability by variants significantly associated with gene expression in two regions of the brain (parietal cortex and cerebellum) for which we had available expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs). Finally we analyzed the genetic correlation between TS and OCD, revealing a genetic correlation of 0.41 (se = 0.15, p = 0.002). These results are very close to previous heritability estimates for TS and OCD based on twin and family studies, suggesting that very little, if any, heritability is truly missing (i.e., unassayed) from TS and OCD GWAS studies of common variation. The results also indicate that there is some genetic overlap between these two phenotypically-related neuropsychiatric disorders, but suggest that the two disorders have distinct genetic architectures. PMID:24204291

  10. Phenotypic Differentiation Is Associated with Gender Plasticity and Its Responsive Delay to Environmental Changes in Alternanthera philoxeroides – Phenotypic Differentiation in Alligator Weed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Deng, Ru-Fang; Liu, Wen-Ping; Wang, Zhang-Ming; Ye, Wan-Hui; Wang, Lan-Ying; Cao, Hong-Lin; Shen, Hao

    2011-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity is common in many taxa, and it may increase an organism's fitness in heterogeneous environments. However, in some cases, the frequency of environmental changes can be faster than the ability of the individual to produce new adaptive phenotypes. The importance of such a time delay in terms of individual fitness and species adaptability has not been well studied. Here, we studied gender plasticity of Alternanthera philoxeroides to address this issue through a reciprocal transplant experiment. We observed that the genders of A. philoxeroides were plastic and reversible between monoclinous and pistillody depending on habitats, the offspring maintained the maternal genders in the first year but changed from year 2 to 5, and there was a cubic relationship between the rate of population gender changes and environmental variations. This relationship indicates that the species must overcome a threshold of environmental variations to switch its developmental path ways between the two genders. This threshold and the maternal gender stability cause a significant delay of gender changes in new environments. At the same time, they result in and maintain the two distinct habitat dependent gender phenotypes. We also observed that there was a significant and adaptive life-history differentiation between monoclinous and pistillody individuals and the gender phenotypes were developmentally linked with the life-history traits. Therefore, the gender phenotypes are adaptive. Low seed production, seed germination failure and matching phenotypes to habitats by gender plasticity indicate that the adaptive phenotypic diversity in A. philoxeroides may not be the result of ecological selection, but of gender plasticity. The delay of the adaptive gender phenotype realization in changing environments can maintain the differentiation between gender systems and their associated life-history traits, which may be an important component in evolution of novel traits and

  11. Phenotypic differentiation is associated with gender plasticity and its responsive delay to environmental changes in Alternanthera philoxeroides--phenotypic differentiation in alligator weed.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Liu

    Full Text Available Phenotypic plasticity is common in many taxa, and it may increase an organism's fitness in heterogeneous environments. However, in some cases, the frequency of environmental changes can be faster than the ability of the individual to produce new adaptive phenotypes. The importance of such a time delay in terms of individual fitness and species adaptability has not been well studied. Here, we studied gender plasticity of Alternanthera philoxeroides to address this issue through a reciprocal transplant experiment. We observed that the genders of A. philoxeroides were plastic and reversible between monoclinous and pistillody depending on habitats, the offspring maintained the maternal genders in the first year but changed from year 2 to 5, and there was a cubic relationship between the rate of population gender changes and environmental variations. This relationship indicates that the species must overcome a threshold of environmental variations to switch its developmental path ways between the two genders. This threshold and the maternal gender stability cause a significant delay of gender changes in new environments. At the same time, they result in and maintain the two distinct habitat dependent gender phenotypes. We also observed that there was a significant and adaptive life-history differentiation between monoclinous and pistillody individuals and the gender phenotypes were developmentally linked with the life-history traits. Therefore, the gender phenotypes are adaptive. Low seed production, seed germination failure and matching phenotypes to habitats by gender plasticity indicate that the adaptive phenotypic diversity in A. philoxeroides may not be the result of ecological selection, but of gender plasticity. The delay of the adaptive gender phenotype realization in changing environments can maintain the differentiation between gender systems and their associated life-history traits, which may be an important component in evolution of novel

  12. Development of hand phenotypes and changes in hand pain and problems over time in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Daniel J; Jordan, Kelvin P; Protheroe, Joanne; van der Windt, Danielle A

    2016-03-01

    Hand disabilities are frequent causes of pain and disability in older people, yet knowledge regarding the characteristics and patterns of hand pain and problems over time is lacking. The main aim of this study was to identify subgroups of older individuals with distinct presentations (phenotypes) of hand pain and function, investigate how these might change over a 6-year period, and explore what characteristics and factors are associated with long-term status. The study population stemmed from the North Staffordshire Osteoarthritis Project, a large, general population-based, prospective, cohort study of adults aged 50 years and older. Information on hand pain and problems was collected using questionnaires at baseline, 3 years, and 6 years. Overall, 5617 participants responded at all time points and were included in the analysis. Five phenotypes were identified using latent transition analysis ("least affected," "high pain," "poor gross function," "high pain and poor gross function," and "severely affected") based on 8 hand pain and functional items. The most common transition between phenotypes was from "high pain" at baseline to "least-affected" group. There was a high level of stability in individuals in the "least-affected" or "severely affected" group at baseline. Individuals with widespread body pain, nodes, sleep problems, and pain in both hands at baseline were more likely to be in a severe hand phenotype at 6 years. The results provide clinically relevant information regarding the pattern of hand pain and problems over time and factors that predict transition to more severe hand phenotypes.

  13. Protein change in plant evolution: tracing one thread connecting molecular and phenotypic diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madelaine eBartlett

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Proteins change over the course of evolutionary time. New protein-coding genes and gene families emerge and diversify, ultimately affecting an organism’s phenotype and interactions with its environment. Here we survey the range of structural protein change observed in plants and review the role these changes have had in the evolution of plant form and function. Verified examples tying evolutionary change in protein structure to phenotypic change remain scarce. We will review the existing examples, as well as draw from investigations into domestication, and quantitative trait locus (QTL cloning studies searching for the molecular underpinnings of natural variation. The evolutionary significance of many cloned QTL has not been assessed, but all the examples identified so far have begun to reveal the extent of protein structural diversity tolerated in natural systems. This molecular (and phenotypic diversity could come to represent part of natural selection’s source material in the adaptive evolution of novel traits. Protein structure and function can change in many distinct ways, but the changes we identified in studies of natural diversity and protein evolution were predicted to fall primarily into one of six categories: altered active and binding sites; hypomorphic and hypermorphic alleles; altered protein-protein interactions; altered domain content; altered protein stability; and altered activity as an activator or repressor. Variability was also observed in the evolutionary scale at which particular changes were observed. Some changes were detected at both micro- and macroevolutionary timescales, while others were observed primarily at deep or shallow phylogenetic levels. This variation might be used to determine the trajectory of future investigations in structural molecular evolution.

  14. Protein change in plant evolution: tracing one thread connecting molecular and phenotypic diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Madelaine E; Whipple, Clinton J

    2013-10-10

    Proteins change over the course of evolutionary time. New protein-coding genes and gene families emerge and diversify, ultimately affecting an organism's phenotype and interactions with its environment. Here we survey the range of structural protein change observed in plants and review the role these changes have had in the evolution of plant form and function. Verified examples tying evolutionary change in protein structure to phenotypic change remain scarce. We will review the existing examples, as well as draw from investigations into domestication, and quantitative trait locus (QTL) cloning studies searching for the molecular underpinnings of natural variation. The evolutionary significance of many cloned QTL has not been assessed, but all the examples identified so far have begun to reveal the extent of protein structural diversity tolerated in natural systems. This molecular (and phenotypic) diversity could come to represent part of natural selection's source material in the adaptive evolution of novel traits. Protein structure and function can change in many distinct ways, but the changes we identified in studies of natural diversity and protein evolution were predicted to fall primarily into one of six categories: altered active and binding sites; altered protein-protein interactions; altered domain content; altered activity as an activator or repressor; altered protein stability; and hypomorphic and hypermorphic alleles. There was also variability in the evolutionary scale at which particular changes were observed. Some changes were detected at both micro- and macroevolutionary timescales, while others were observed primarily at deep or shallow phylogenetic levels. This variation might be used to determine the trajectory of future investigations in structural molecular evolution.

  15. Multiple phenotypic changes associated with large-scale horizontal gene transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Dougherty

    Full Text Available Horizontal gene transfer often leads to phenotypic changes within recipient organisms independent of any immediate evolutionary benefits. While secondary phenotypic effects of horizontal transfer (i.e., changes in growth rates have been demonstrated and studied across a variety of systems using relatively small plasmids and phage, little is known about the magnitude or number of such costs after the transfer of larger regions. Here we describe numerous phenotypic changes that occur after a large-scale horizontal transfer event (∼1 Mb megaplasmid within Pseudomonas stutzeri including sensitization to various stresses as well as changes in bacterial behavior. These results highlight the power of horizontal transfer to shift pleiotropic relationships and cellular networks within bacterial genomes. They also provide an important context for how secondary effects of transfer can bias evolutionary trajectories and interactions between species. Lastly, these results and system provide a foundation to investigate evolutionary consequences in real time as newly acquired regions are ameliorated and integrated into new genomic contexts.

  16. Multiple phenotypic changes associated with large-scale horizontal gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Kevin; Smith, Brian A; Moore, Autumn F; Maitland, Shannon; Fanger, Chris; Murillo, Rachel; Baltrus, David A

    2014-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer often leads to phenotypic changes within recipient organisms independent of any immediate evolutionary benefits. While secondary phenotypic effects of horizontal transfer (i.e., changes in growth rates) have been demonstrated and studied across a variety of systems using relatively small plasmids and phage, little is known about the magnitude or number of such costs after the transfer of larger regions. Here we describe numerous phenotypic changes that occur after a large-scale horizontal transfer event (∼1 Mb megaplasmid) within Pseudomonas stutzeri including sensitization to various stresses as well as changes in bacterial behavior. These results highlight the power of horizontal transfer to shift pleiotropic relationships and cellular networks within bacterial genomes. They also provide an important context for how secondary effects of transfer can bias evolutionary trajectories and interactions between species. Lastly, these results and system provide a foundation to investigate evolutionary consequences in real time as newly acquired regions are ameliorated and integrated into new genomic contexts.

  17. Heritability of the limbic networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawadler, Jamie M.; Dell'Acqua, Flavio; Rijsdijk, Frühling V.; Kane, Fergus; Picchioni, Marco; McGuire, Philip; Toulopoulou, Timothea; Georgiades, Anna; Kalidindi, Sridevi; Kravariti, Eugenia; Murray, Robin M.; Murphy, Declan G.; Craig, Michael C.; Catani, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Individual differences in cognitive ability and social behaviour are influenced by the variability in the structure and function of the limbic system. A strong heritability of the limbic cortex has been previously reported, but little is known about how genetic factors influence specific limbic networks. We used diffusion tensor imaging tractography to investigate heritability of different limbic tracts in 52 monozygotic and 34 dizygotic healthy adult twins. We explored the connections that contribute to the activity of three distinct functional limbic networks, namely the dorsal cingulum (‘medial default-mode network’), the ventral cingulum and the fornix (‘hippocampal-diencephalic-retrosplenial network’) and the uncinate fasciculus (‘temporo-amygdala-orbitofrontal network’). Genetic and environmental variances were mapped for multiple tract-specific measures that reflect different aspects of the underlying anatomy. We report the highest heritability for the uncinate fasciculus, a tract that underpins emotion processing, semantic cognition, and social behaviour. High to moderate genetic and shared environmental effects were found for pathways important for social behaviour and memory, for example, fornix, dorsal and ventral cingulum. These findings indicate that within the limbic system inheritance of specific traits may rely on the anatomy of distinct networks and is higher for fronto-temporal pathways dedicated to complex social behaviour and emotional processing. PMID:26714573

  18. Automated local bright feature image analysis of nuclear proteindistribution identifies changes in tissue phenotype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knowles, David; Sudar, Damir; Bator, Carol; Bissell, Mina

    2006-02-01

    The organization of nuclear proteins is linked to cell and tissue phenotypes. When cells arrest proliferation, undergo apoptosis, or differentiate, the distribution of nuclear proteins changes. Conversely, forced alteration of the distribution of nuclear proteins modifies cell phenotype. Immunostaining and fluorescence microscopy have been critical for such findings. However, there is an increasing need for quantitative analysis of nuclear protein distribution to decipher epigenetic relationships between nuclear structure and cell phenotype, and to unravel the mechanisms linking nuclear structure and function. We have developed imaging methods to quantify the distribution of fluorescently-stained nuclear protein NuMA in different mammary phenotypes obtained using three-dimensional cell culture. Automated image segmentation of DAPI-stained nuclei was generated to isolate thousands of nuclei from three-dimensional confocal images. Prominent features of fluorescently-stained NuMA were detected using a novel local bright feature analysis technique, and their normalized spatial density calculated as a function of the distance from the nuclear perimeter to its center. The results revealed marked changes in the distribution of the density of NuMA bright features as non-neoplastic cells underwent phenotypically normal acinar morphogenesis. In contrast, we did not detect any reorganization of NuMA during the formation of tumor nodules by malignant cells. Importantly, the analysis also discriminated proliferating non-neoplastic cells from proliferating malignant cells, suggesting that these imaging methods are capable of identifying alterations linked not only to the proliferation status but also to the malignant character of cells. We believe that this quantitative analysis will have additional applications for classifying normal and pathological tissues.

  19. Step-wise and punctuated genome evolution drive phenotype changes of tumor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stepanenko, Aleksei, E-mail: a.a.stepanenko@gmail.com [Department of Biosynthesis of Nucleic Acids, Institute of Molecular Biology and Genetics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kyiv 03680 (Ukraine); Andreieva, Svitlana; Korets, Kateryna; Mykytenko, Dmytro [Department of Biosynthesis of Nucleic Acids, Institute of Molecular Biology and Genetics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kyiv 03680 (Ukraine); Huleyuk, Nataliya [Institute of Hereditary Pathology, National Academy of Medical Sciences of Ukraine, Lviv 79008 (Ukraine); Vassetzky, Yegor [CNRS UMR8126, Université Paris-Sud 11, Institut de Cancérologie Gustave Roussy, Villejuif 94805 (France); Kavsan, Vadym [Department of Biosynthesis of Nucleic Acids, Institute of Molecular Biology and Genetics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kyiv 03680 (Ukraine)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • There are the step-wise continuous and punctuated phases of cancer genome evolution. • The system stresses during the different phases may lead to very different responses. • Stable transfection of an empty vector can result in genome and phenotype changes. • Functions of a (trans)gene can be opposite/versatile in cells with different genomes. • Contextually, temozolomide can both promote and suppress tumor cell aggressiveness. - Abstract: The pattern of genome evolution can be divided into two phases: the step-wise continuous phase (step-wise clonal evolution, stable dominant clonal chromosome aberrations (CCAs), and low frequency of non-CCAs, NCCAs) and punctuated phase (marked by elevated NCCAs and transitional CCAs). Depending on the phase, system stresses (the diverse CIN promoting factors) may lead to the very different phenotype responses. To address the contribution of chromosome instability (CIN) to phenotype changes of tumor cells, we characterized CCAs/NCCAs of HeLa and HEK293 cells, and their derivatives after genotoxic stresses (a stable plasmid transfection, ectopic expression of cancer-associated CHI3L1 gene or treatment with temozolomide) by conventional cytogenetics, copy number alterations (CNAs) by array comparative genome hybridization, and phenotype changes by cell viability and soft agar assays. Transfection of either the empty vector pcDNA3.1 or pcDNA3.1-CHI3L1 into 293 cells initiated the punctuated genome changes. In contrast, HeLa-CHI3L1 cells demonstrated the step-wise genome changes. Increased CIN correlated with lower viability of 293-pcDNA3.1 cells but higher colony formation efficiency (CFE). Artificial CHI3L1 production in 293-CHI3L1 cells increased viability and further contributed to CFE. The opposite growth characteristics of 293-CHI3L1 and HeLa-CHI3L1 cells were revealed. The effect and function of a (trans)gene can be opposite and versatile in cells with different genetic network, which is defined by

  20. Phenotypic changes of human cells in human-rat liver during partial hepatectomy-induced regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Sun; Dong Xiao; Hong-An Li; Jin-Fang Jiang; Qing Li; Ruo-Shuang Zhang; Xi-Gu Chen

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To examine the human hepatic parenchymal and stromal components in rat liver and the phenotypic changes of human cells in liver of human-rat chimera (HRC) generated by in utero transplantation of human cells during partial hepatectomy (PHx)-induced liver regeneration. METHODS: Human hepatic parenchymal and stromal components and phenotypic changes of human cells during liver regeneration were examined by flow cytometry, in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: ISH analysis demonstrated human Alupositive cells in hepatic parenchyma and stroma of recipient liver. Functional human hepatocytes generated in this model potentially constituted human hepatic functional units with the presence of donor-derived human endothelial and biliary duct cells in host liver. Alpha fetoprotein (AFP)+, CD34+ and CD45+ cells were observed in the chimeric liver on day 10 after PHxinduced liver regeneration and then disappeared in PHx group, but not in non-PHx group, suggesting that dynamic phenotypic changes of human cells expressing AFP, CD34 and CD45 cells may occur during the chimeric liver regeneration. Additionally, immunostaining for human proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) showed that the number of PCNA-positive cells in the chimeric liver of PHx group was markedly increased, as compared to that of control group, indicating that donor-derived human cells are actively proliferated during PHx-induced regeneration of HRC liver.

  1. Changes in the adhesive phenotype of regional lymphocytes in rats with adjuvant arthritis: alteration by cyclophosphamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altankov, G; Marinova-Mutafchieva, L; Nikolaeva, N; Penkova, R

    1991-05-01

    A quantitative spectrophotometrical method was used to study the adhesive phenotype of lymphocytes from regional lymph nodes of rats with early stage adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA), pretreated or not with cyclophosphamide (CY). The results showed that adhesion of lymphocytes from AA-sensitized lymph nodes to gelatin and collagens (type I, II, III and IV) was enhanced, especially to collagen type II. However, adhesion to fibronectin and to fibrinogen did not differ from adhesion in nontreated rats. Application of CY was found to aggravate AA development and influence the lymphocytes' adhesiveness. Adhesion was inhibited in all cases except to fibrinogen, where it was augmented, compared to the adhesion in both AA and control groups. Relationships between the lymphocyte adhesive phenotype and the expression of histological changes suggest that lymphocyte-matrix interactions could play an important role in the pathogenesis of AA development and the mechanism of CY action.

  2. The heritability of blood donation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ole Birger; Axel, Skytthe; Rostgaard, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Voluntary blood donation is believed to be mostly motivated by altruism. Because studies have suggested that altruistic personality is determined by both genetic and environmental factors, we speculated that willingness to donate blood could also be governed by constitutional factors...... active Danish blood donors from 2002 to 2012, to establish blood donor status for Danish twins, who at age 17 years became eligible for donation in 2002 or later. Casewise concordance in monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) twins were presented and heritability was estimated in Mx by variance component...... to donate blood, respectively. CONCLUSION: Becoming a volunteer blood donor is determined by both genetic and environmental factors shared within families....

  3. [Effects of pregnancy and changes in body weight on polycystic ovary syndrome phenotypes according to the Rotterdam criteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echiburú, Bárbara; Ladrón de Guevara, Amanda; Pereira, Cecilia; Pérez, Constanza; Michael, Pía; Crisosto, Nicolás; Sir-Petermann, Teresa

    2014-08-01

    Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) is tightly associated with insulin resistance and obesity and characterized by hyperandrogenism, chronic oligo-anovulation and polycystic ovarian morphology when fully expressed. The 2003 Rotterdam consensus proposed that two or three of these features were necessary to make the diagnosis, which generated four phenotypes. Several studies have suggested that these phenotypes could differ in their metabolic and endocrine characteristics and that they could vary in the same patient when analyzed throughout life. To determine if the initial classification of PCOS phenotypes is modified by different physiological conditions. We performed a non-concurrent prospective analysis of 88 women with PCOS according to the Rotterdam criteria. The effect of physiological conditions such as changes in body weight, pregnancy and ageing more than five years on PCOS phenotype expression was analyzed. Twenty four percent of women became pregnant, 37% decreased and 24% increased their body weight during follow up. These conditions modified significantly the proportion of the different phenotypes (c2 = 32.2, p change to a better phenotype (p = 0.047) and even a normalization of the PCOS condition in 27% of the patients. On the other hand, an increase in body weight modifying body mass index in one unit, conferred an 8% probability of changing to a worst phenotype. Pregnancy and changes in body weight significantly modify PCOS phenotypes.

  4. Alterations in Mesenteric Lymph Node T Cell Phenotype and Cytokine Secretion are Associated with Changes in Thymocyte Phenotype after LP-BM5 Retrovirus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria C. Lopez

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, mouse MLN cells and thymocytes from advanced stages of LP-BM5 retrovirus infection were studied. A decrease in the percentage of IL-7+ cells and an increase in the percentage of IL-16+ cells in the MLN indicated that secretion of these cytokines was also altered after LP-BM5 infection. The percentage of MLN T cells expressing IL-7 receptors was significantly reduced, while the percentage of MLN T cells expressing TNFR-p75 and of B cells expressing TNFR-p55 increased. Simultaneous analysis of surface markers and cytokine secretion was done in an attempt to understand whether the deregulation of IFN-Υ secretion could be ascribed to a defined cell phenotype, concluding that all T cell subsets studied increased IFN-Υ secretion after retrovirus infection. Finally, thymocyte phenotype was further analyzed trying to correlate changes in thymocyte phenotype with MLN cell phenotype. The results indicated that the increase in single positive either CD4+CD8- or CD4- CD8+ cells was due to accumulation of both immature (CD3- and mature (CD3+ single positive thymocytes. Moreover, single positive mature thymocytes presented a phenotype similar to the phenotype previously seen on MLN T cells. In summary, we can conclude that LP-BM5 uses the immune system to reach the thymus where it interferes with the generation of functionally mature T cells, favoring the development of T cells with an abnormal phenotype. These new T cells are activated to secrete several cytokines that in turn will favor retrovirus replication and inhibit any attempt of the immune system to control infection.

  5. Heritability of rectal temperature and genetic correlations with production and reproduction traits in dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikmen, S; Cole, J B; Null, D J; Hansen, P J

    2012-06-01

    Genetic selection for body temperature during heat stress might be a useful approach to reduce the magnitude of heat stress effects on production and reproduction. Objectives of the study were to estimate the genetic parameters of rectal temperature (RT) in dairy cows in freestall barns under heat stress conditions and to determine the genetic and phenotypic correlations of rectal temperature with other traits. Afternoon RT were measured in a total of 1,695 lactating Holstein cows sired by 509 bulls during the summer in North Florida. Genetic parameters were estimated with Gibbs sampling, and best linear unbiased predictions of breeding values were predicted using an animal model. The heritability of RT was estimated to be 0.17 ± 0.13. Predicted transmitting abilities for rectal temperature changed 0.0068 ± 0.0020°C/yr from (birth year) 2002 to 2008. Approximate genetic correlations between RT and 305-d milk, fat, and protein yields, productive life, and net merit were significant and positive, whereas approximate genetic correlations between RT and somatic cell count score and daughter pregnancy rate were significant and negative. Rectal temperature during heat stress has moderate heritability, but genetic correlations with economically important traits mean that selection for RT could lead to lower productivity unless methods are used to identify genes affecting RT that do not adversely affect other traits of economic importance.

  6. Probability landscape of heritable and robust epigenetic state of lysogeny in phage lambda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Youfang; Lu, Hsiao-Mei; Liang, Jie

    2010-10-26

    Computational studies of biological networks can help to identify components and wirings responsible for observed phenotypes. However, studying stochastic networks controlling many biological processes is challenging. Similar to Schrödinger's equation in quantum mechanics, the chemical master equation (CME) provides a basic framework for understanding stochastic networks. However, except for simple problems, the CME cannot be solved analytically. Here we use a method called discrete chemical master equation (dCME) to compute directly the full steady-state probability landscape of the lysogeny maintenance network in phage lambda from its CME. Results show that wild-type phage lambda can maintain a constant level of repressor over a wide range of repressor degradation rate and is stable against UV irradiation, ensuring heritability of the lysogenic state. Furthermore, it can switch efficiently to the lytic state once repressor degradation increases past a high threshold by a small amount. We find that beyond bistability and nonlinear dimerization, cooperativity between repressors bound to O(R)1 and O(R)2 is required for stable and heritable epigenetic state of lysogeny that can switch efficiently. Mutants of phage lambda lack stability and do not possess a high threshold. Instead, they are leaky and respond to gradual changes in degradation rate. Our computation faithfully reproduces the hair triggers for UV-induced lysis observed in mutants and the limitation in robustness against mutations. The landscape approach computed from dCME is general and can be applied to study broad issues in systems biology.

  7. Phenotypic, genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic changes in Bacillus cereus after a short-term space flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Longxiang; Zhou, Lisha; Liu, Jinwen; Cen, Zhong; Wu, Chunyan; Wang, Tong; Zhou, Tao; Chang, De; Guo, Yinghua; Fang, Xiangqun; Wang, Junfeng; Li, Tianzhi; Yin, Sanjun; Dai, Wenkui; Zhou, Yuping; Zhao, Jiao; Fang, Chengxiang; Yang, Ruifu; Liu, Changting

    2014-01-01

    The environment in space could affect microorganisms by changing a variety of features, including proliferation rate, cell physiology, cell metabolism, biofilm production, virulence, and drug resistance. However, the relevant mechanisms remain unclear. To explore the effect of a space environment on Bacillus cereus, a strain of B. cereus was sent to space for 398 h by ShenZhou VIII from November 1, 2011 to November 17, 2011. A ground simulation with similar temperature conditions was simultaneously performed as a control. After the flight, the flight and control strains were further analyzed using phenotypic, genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic techniques to explore the divergence of B. cereus in a space environment. The flight strains exhibited a significantly slower growth rate, a significantly higher amikacin resistance level, and changes in metabolism relative to the ground control strain. After the space flight, three polymorphic loci were found in the flight strains LCT-BC25 and LCT-BC235. A combined transcriptome and proteome analysis was performed, and this analysis revealed that the flight strains had changes in genes/proteins relevant to metabolism. In addition, certain genes/proteins that are relevant to structural function, gene expression modification and translation, and virulence were also altered. Our study represents the first documented analysis of the phenotypic, genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic changes that occur in B. cereus during space flight, and our results could be beneficial to the field of space microbiology.

  8. Heritability of Attractiveness to Mosquitoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Grandon, G. Mandela; Gezan, Salvador A.; Armour, John A. L.; Pickett, John A.; Logan, James G.

    2015-01-01

    Female mosquitoes display preferences for certain individuals over others, which is determined by differences in volatile chemicals produced by the human body and detected by mosquitoes. Body odour can be controlled genetically but the existence of a genetic basis for differential attraction to insects has never been formally demonstrated. This study investigated heritability of attractiveness to mosquitoes by evaluating the response of Aedes aegypti (=Stegomyia aegypti) mosquitoes to odours from the hands of identical and non-identical twins in a dual-choice assay. Volatiles from individuals in an identical twin pair showed a high correlation in attractiveness to mosquitoes, while non-identical twin pairs showed a significantly lower correlation. Overall, there was a strong narrow-sense heritability of 0.62 (SE 0.124) for relative attraction and 0.67 (0.354) for flight activity based on the average of ten measurements. The results demonstrate an underlying genetic component detectable by mosquitoes through olfaction. Understanding the genetic basis for attractiveness could create a more informed approach to repellent development. PMID:25901606

  9. Changes in insulin-like growth factor signaling alter phenotypes in Fragile X Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, T L

    2017-02-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is an inherited form of intellectual disability that is usually caused by expansion of a polymorphic CGG repeat in the 5' untranslated region of the X-linked FMR1 gene, which leads to hypermethylation and transcriptional silencing. Two non-neurological phenotypes of FXS are enlarged testes and connective tissue dysplasia, which could be caused by alterations in a growth factor signaling pathway. FXS patients also frequently have autistic-like symptoms, suggesting that the signaling pathways affected in FXS may overlap with those affected in autism. Identifying these pathways is important for both understanding the effects of FMR1 inactivation and developing treatments for both FXS and autism. Here we show that decreasing the levels of the insulin-like growth factor (Igf) receptor 1 corrects a number of phenotypes in the mouse model of FXS, including macro-orchidism, and that increasing the levels of IGF2 exacerbates the seizure susceptibility phenotype. These results suggest that the pathways altered by the loss of the FMR1-encoded protein (FMRP) may overlap with the pathways affected by changes in Igf signaling or that one or more of the proteins that play a role in Igf signaling could interact with FMRP. They also indicate a new set of potential targets for drug treatment of FXS and autism spectrum disorders.

  10. Social disinhibition is a heritable subphenotype of tics in Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschtritt, Matthew E; Darrow, Sabrina M; Illmann, Cornelia; Osiecki, Lisa; Grados, Marco; Sandor, Paul; Dion, Yves; King, Robert A; Pauls, David L; Budman, Cathy L; Cath, Danielle C; Greenberg, Erica; Lyon, Gholson J; Yu, Dongmei; McGrath, Lauren M; McMahon, William M; Lee, Paul C; Delucchi, Kevin L; Scharf, Jeremiah M; Mathews, Carol A

    2016-08-02

    To identify heritable symptom-based subtypes of Tourette syndrome (TS). Forty-nine motor and phonic tics were examined in 3,494 individuals (1,191 TS probands and 2,303 first-degree relatives). Item-level exploratory factor and latent class analyses (LCA) were used to identify tic-based subtypes. Heritabilities of the subtypes were estimated, and associations with clinical characteristics were examined. A 6-factor exploratory factor analysis model provided the best fit, which paralleled the somatotopic representation of the basal ganglia, distinguished simple from complex tics, and separated out socially disinhibited and compulsive tics. The 5-class LCA model best distinguished among the following groups: unaffected, simple tics, intermediate tics without social disinhibition, intermediate with social disinhibition, and high rates of all tic types. Across models, a phenotype characterized by high rates of social disinhibition emerged. This phenotype was associated with increased odds of comorbid psychiatric disorders, in particular, obsessive-compulsive disorder and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, earlier age at TS onset, and increased tic severity. The heritability estimate for this phenotype based on the LCA was 0.53 (SE 0.08, p 1.7 × 10(-18)). Expanding on previous modeling approaches, a series of TS-related phenotypes, including one characterized by high rates of social disinhibition, were identified. These phenotypes were highly heritable and may reflect underlying biological networks more accurately than traditional diagnoses, thus potentially aiding future genetic, imaging, and treatment studies. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  11. Progressive, transgenerational changes in offspring phenotype and epigenotype following nutritional transition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham C Burdge

    Full Text Available Induction of altered phenotypes during development in response to environmental input involves epigenetic changes. Phenotypic traits can be passed between generations by a variety of mechanisms, including direct transmission of epigenetic states or by induction of epigenetic marks de novo in each generation. To distinguish between these possibilities we measured epigenetic marks over four generations in rats exposed to a sustained environmental challenge. Dietary energy was increased by 25% at conception in F0 female rats and maintained at this level to generation F3. F0 dams showed higher pregnancy weight gain, but lower weight gain and food intake during lactation than F1 and F2 dams. On gestational day 8, fasting plasma glucose concentration was higher and β-hydroxybutyrate lower in F0 and F1 dams than F2 dams. This was accompanied by decreased phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK and increased PPARα and carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1 mRNA expression. PEPCK mRNA expression was inversely related to the methylation of specific CpG dinucleotides in its promoter. DNA methyltransferase (Dnmt 3a2, but not Dnmt1 or Dnmt3b, expression increased and methylation of its promoter decreased from F1 to F3 generations. These data suggest that the regulation of energy metabolism during pregnancy and lactation within a generation is influenced by the maternal phenotype in the preceding generation and the environment during the current pregnancy. The transgenerational effects on phenotype were associated with altered DNA methylation of specific genes in a manner consistent with induction de novo of epigenetic marks in each generation.

  12. Abiotic stress leads to somatic and heritable changes in homologous recombination frequency, point mutation frequency and microsatellite stability in Arabidopsis plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao Youli, E-mail: youli.yao@uleth.ca [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, T1K 3M4 Alberta (Canada); Kovalchuk, Igor, E-mail: igor.kovalchuk@uleth.ca [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, T1K 3M4 Alberta (Canada)

    2011-02-10

    In earlier studies, we showed that abiotic stresses, such as ionizing radiation, heavy metals, temperature and water, trigger an increase in homologous recombination frequency (HRF). We also demonstrated that many of these stresses led to inheritance of high-frequency homologous recombination, HRF. Although an increase in recombination frequency is an important indicator of genome rearrangements, it only represents a minor portion of possible stress-induced mutations. Here, we analyzed the influence of heat, cold, drought, flood and UVC abiotic stresses on two major types of mutations in the genome, point mutations and small deletions/insertions. We used two transgenic lines of Arabidopsis thaliana, one allowing an analysis of reversions in a stop codon-containing inactivated {beta}-glucuronidase transgene and another one allowing an analysis of repeat stability in a microsatellite-interrupted {beta}-glucuronidase transgene. The transgenic Arabidopsis line carrying the {beta}-glucuronidase-based homologous recombination substrate was used as a positive control. We showed that the majority of stresses increased the frequency of point mutations, homologous recombination and microsatellite instability in somatic cells, with the frequency of homologous recombination being affected the most. The analysis of transgenerational changes showed an increase in HRF to be the most prominent effect observed in progeny. Significant changes in recombination frequency were observed upon exposure to all types of stress except drought, whereas changes in microsatellite instability were observed upon exposure to UVC, heat and cold. The frequency of point mutations in the progeny of stress-exposed plants was the least affected; an increase in mutation frequency was observed only in the progeny of plants exposed to UVC. We thus conclude that transgenerational changes in genome stability in response to stress primarily involve an increase in recombination frequency.

  13. Abiotic stress leads to somatic and heritable changes in homologous recombination frequency, point mutation frequency and microsatellite stability in Arabidopsis plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Youli; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2011-02-10

    In earlier studies, we showed that abiotic stresses, such as ionizing radiation, heavy metals, temperature and water, trigger an increase in homologous recombination frequency (HRF). We also demonstrated that many of these stresses led to inheritance of high-frequency homologous recombination, HRF. Although an increase in recombination frequency is an important indicator of genome rearrangements, it only represents a minor portion of possible stress-induced mutations. Here, we analyzed the influence of heat, cold, drought, flood and UVC abiotic stresses on two major types of mutations in the genome, point mutations and small deletions/insertions. We used two transgenic lines of Arabidopsis thaliana, one allowing an analysis of reversions in a stop codon-containing inactivated β-glucuronidase transgene and another one allowing an analysis of repeat stability in a microsatellite-interrupted β-glucuronidase transgene. The transgenic Arabidopsis line carrying the β-glucuronidase-based homologous recombination substrate was used as a positive control. We showed that the majority of stresses increased the frequency of point mutations, homologous recombination and microsatellite instability in somatic cells, with the frequency of homologous recombination being affected the most. The analysis of transgenerational changes showed an increase in HRF to be the most prominent effect observed in progeny. Significant changes in recombination frequency were observed upon exposure to all types of stress except drought, whereas changes in microsatellite instability were observed upon exposure to UVC, heat and cold. The frequency of point mutations in the progeny of stress-exposed plants was the least affected; an increase in mutation frequency was observed only in the progeny of plants exposed to UVC. We thus conclude that transgenerational changes in genome stability in response to stress primarily involve an increase in recombination frequency.

  14. Cerebral vasoconstriction after subarachnoid hemorrhage--role of changes in vascular receptor phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen-Schwartz, Jacob; Ansar, Saema; Edvinsson, Lars

    2008-01-01

    The pathological constriction of cerebral arteries known as cerebral vasospasm (CVS) is with a delay of 4 to 10 days linked to subarachnoid hemorrhage. Several agents have been suggested as being responsible; amongst these perhaps 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and endothelin-1 (ET-1) are the most...... prominent given their ability to elicit powerful constriction of cerebral arteries. Investigating both 5-HT and ET receptors we have observed that there are distinct changes in receptor phenotype after experimental SAH, namely upregulation of the ETB and 5-HT1B receptors, and that this upregulation...

  15. Peripheral NK cell phenotypes: multiple changing of faces of an adapting, developing cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perussia, Bice; Chen, Yingying; Loza, Matthew J

    2005-02-01

    We have defined the existence of developmental relationships among human peripheral NK cells with distinct phenotypic and functional characteristics. These findings closely parallel the changes that occur in vivo during NK cell development, and in vitro in experimental culture systems supporting NK cell generation from hematopoietic progenitors. These new insights provide a simplified framework to understand NK cell immunobiology and the cellular bases for their roles in innate immunity, initiation and maintenance of immune responses via regulation of adaptive and accessory cell functions, and immune pathologies.

  16. Docetaxel-resistance in prostate cancer: evaluating associated phenotypic changes and potential for resistance transfer via exosomes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Corcoran, Claire; Rani, Sweta; O'Brien, Keith; O'Neill, Amanda; Prencipe, Maria; Sheikh, Rizwan; Webb, Glenn; McDermott, Ray; Watson, William; Crown, John; O'Driscoll, Lorraine

    2012-01-01

    .... Here we aimed to investigate phenotypic changes associated with docetaxel-resistance in order to help determine the complexity of this problem and to assess the relevance of secreted exosomes in prostate cancer...

  17. High heritability is compatible with the broad distribution of set point viral load in HIV carriers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Bonhoeffer

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Set point viral load in HIV patients ranges over several orders of magnitude and is a key determinant of disease progression in HIV. A number of recent studies have reported high heritability of set point viral load implying that viral genetic factors contribute substantially to the overall variation in viral load. The high heritability is surprising given the diversity of host factors associated with controlling viral infection. Here we develop an analytical model that describes the temporal changes of the distribution of set point viral load as a function of heritability. This model shows that high heritability is the most parsimonious explanation for the observed variance of set point viral load. Our results thus not only reinforce the credibility of previous estimates of heritability but also shed new light onto mechanisms of viral pathogenesis.

  18. Mild folate deficiency induces genetic and epigenetic instability and phenotype changes in prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsui Sei-Ichi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Folate (vitamin B9 is essential for cellular proliferation as it is involved in the biosynthesis of deoxythymidine monophosphate (dTMP and s-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet. The link between folate depletion and the genesis and progression of cancers of epithelial origin is of high clinical relevance, but still unclear. We recently demonstrated that sensitivity to low folate availability is affected by the rate of polyamine biosynthesis, which is prominent in prostate cells. We, therefore, hypothesized that prostate cells might be highly susceptible to genetic, epigenetic and phenotypic changes consequent to folate restriction. Results We studied the consequences of long-term, mild folate depletion in a model comprised of three syngenic cell lines derived from the transgenic adenoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP model, recapitulating different stages of prostate cancer; benign, transformed and metastatic. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis demonstrated that mild folate depletion (100 nM sufficed to induce imbalance in both the nucleotide and AdoMet pools in all prostate cell lines. Random oligonucleotide-primed synthesis (ROPS revealed a significant increase in uracil misincorporation and DNA single strand breaks, while spectral karyotype analysis (SKY identified five novel chromosomal rearrangements in cells grown with mild folate depletion. Using global approaches, we identified an increase in CpG island and histone methylation upon folate depletion despite unchanged levels of total 5-methylcytosine, indicating a broad effect of folate depletion on epigenetic regulation. These genomic changes coincided with phenotype changes in the prostate cells including increased anchorage-independent growth and reduced sensitivity to folate depletion. Conclusions This study demonstrates that prostate cells are highly susceptible to genetic and epigenetic changes consequent to mild folate depletion as compared to cells grown with

  19. Mild folate deficiency induces genetic and epigenetic instability and phenotype changes in prostate cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Folate (vitamin B9) is essential for cellular proliferation as it is involved in the biosynthesis of deoxythymidine monophosphate (dTMP) and s-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet). The link between folate depletion and the genesis and progression of cancers of epithelial origin is of high clinical relevance, but still unclear. We recently demonstrated that sensitivity to low folate availability is affected by the rate of polyamine biosynthesis, which is prominent in prostate cells. We, therefore, hypothesized that prostate cells might be highly susceptible to genetic, epigenetic and phenotypic changes consequent to folate restriction. Results We studied the consequences of long-term, mild folate depletion in a model comprised of three syngenic cell lines derived from the transgenic adenoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) model, recapitulating different stages of prostate cancer; benign, transformed and metastatic. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis demonstrated that mild folate depletion (100 nM) sufficed to induce imbalance in both the nucleotide and AdoMet pools in all prostate cell lines. Random oligonucleotide-primed synthesis (ROPS) revealed a significant increase in uracil misincorporation and DNA single strand breaks, while spectral karyotype analysis (SKY) identified five novel chromosomal rearrangements in cells grown with mild folate depletion. Using global approaches, we identified an increase in CpG island and histone methylation upon folate depletion despite unchanged levels of total 5-methylcytosine, indicating a broad effect of folate depletion on epigenetic regulation. These genomic changes coincided with phenotype changes in the prostate cells including increased anchorage-independent growth and reduced sensitivity to folate depletion. Conclusions This study demonstrates that prostate cells are highly susceptible to genetic and epigenetic changes consequent to mild folate depletion as compared to cells grown with supraphysiological

  20. [Heritability of neurodynamics and psychodynamics in human populations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulaeva, K B; Trubnikov, V I; Isaĭchev, S A; Pavlova, T A; Dubinin, N P

    1986-06-01

    A component analysis of human neurodynamic and psychodynamic characters in the norm was carried out in 8 human populations characterized by different degrees of isolation and ethnic origin. An increase in phenotypic variability and a decrease in heritability with increasing complexity of organization of the characters under study were demonstrated for all these populations. The additive effect plays the major role in genetic determination of neurodynamic and psychodynamic characters studied. For a number of neurodynamic parameters the effect of intralocus dominance indicative of the oligogenic determination system was observed. Data in favour of real contribution of the factors linked to X-chromosome were obtained for simple sensomotor reactions.

  1. Mutagen sensitivity has high heritability: evidence from a twin study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xifeng; Spitz, Margaret R; Amos, Christopher I; Lin, Jie; Shao, Lina; Gu, Jian; de Andrade, Mariza; Benowitz, Neal L; Shields, Peter G; Swan, Gary E

    2006-06-15

    Despite numerous studies showing that mutagen sensitivity is a cancer predisposition factor, the heritability of mutagen sensitivity has not been clearly established. In this report, we used a classic twin study design to examine the role of genetic and environmental factors on the mutagen sensitivity phenotype. Mutagen sensitivity was measured in peripheral blood lymphocytes from 460 individuals [148 pairs of monozygotic (MZ) twins, 57 pairs of dizygotic (DZ) twins, and 50 siblings]. The intraclass correlation coefficients were all significantly higher in MZ twins than in dizygotes (DZ pairs and MZ-sibling pairs combined) for sensitivity to four different mutagen challenges. Applying biometric genetic modeling, we calculated a genetic heritability of 40.7%, 48.0%, 62.5%, and 58.8% for bleomycin, benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide, gamma-radiation, and 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide sensitivity, respectively. This study provides the strongest and most direct evidence that mutagen sensitivity is highly heritable, thereby validating the use of mutagen sensitivity as a cancer susceptibility factor.

  2. Leveraging population admixture to explain missing heritability of complex traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitlen, Noah; Pasaniuc, Bogdan; Sankararaman, Sriram; Bhatia, Gaurav; Zhang, Jianqi; Gusev, Alexander; Young, Taylor; Tandon, Arti; Pollack, Samuela; Vilhjálmsson, Bjarni J.; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Blot, William J.; Chanock, Stephen; Franceschini, Nora; Goodman, Phyllis G.; He, Jing; Hennis, Anselm JM; Hsing, Ann; Ingles, Sue A.; Isaacs, William; Kittles, Rick A.; Klein, Eric A.; Lange, Leslie A.; Nemesure, Barbara; Patterson, Nick; Reich, David; Rybicki, Benjamin A.; Stanford, Janet L.; Stevens, Victoria L; Strom, Sara S.; Whitsel, Eric A; Witte, John S.; Xu, Jianfeng; Haiman, Christopher; Wilson, James G.; Kooperberg, Charles; Stram, Daniel; Reiner, Alex P.; Tang, Hua; Price, Alkes L.

    2014-01-01

    Despite recent progress on estimating the heritability explained by genotyped SNPs (hg2), a large gap between hg2 and estimates of total narrow-sense heritability (h2) remains. Explanations for this gap include rare variants, or upward bias in family-based estimates of h2 due to shared environment or epistasis. We estimate h2 from unrelated individuals in admixed populations by first estimating the heritability explained by local ancestry (hγ2). We show that hγ2 = 2FSTCθ(1−θ)h2, where FSTC measures frequency differences between populations at causal loci and θ is the genome-wide ancestry proportion. Our approach is not susceptible to biases caused by epistasis or shared environment. We examined 21,497 African Americans from three cohorts, analyzing 13 phenotypes. For height and BMI, we obtained h2 estimates of 0.55 ± 0.09 and 0.23 ± 0.06, respectively, which are larger than estimates of hg2 in these and other data, but smaller than family-based estimates of h2. PMID:25383972

  3. Will phenotypic plasticity affecting flowering phenology keep pace with climate change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Bryce A; Chaney, Lindsay; Shaw, Nancy L; Still, Shannon M

    2016-10-14

    Rising temperatures have begun to shift flowering time, but it is unclear whether phenotypic plasticity can accommodate projected temperature change for this century. Evaluating clines in phenological traits and the extent and variation in plasticity can provide key information on assessing risk of maladaptation and developing strategies to mitigate climate change. In this study, flower phenology was examined in 52 populations of big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) growing in three common gardens. Flowering date (anthesis) varied 91 days from late July to late November among gardens. Mixed-effects modeling explained 79% of variation in flowering date, of which 46% could be assigned to plasticity and genetic variation in plasticity and 33% to genetics (conditional R(2) = 0.79, marginal R(2) = 0.33). Two environmental variables that explained the genetic variation were photoperiod and the onset of spring, the Julian date of accumulating degree days > 5°C reaching 100. The genetic variation was mapped for contemporary and future climates (decades 2060 and 2090), showing flower date change varies considerably across the landscape. Plasticity was estimated to accommodate, on average, a +/- 13-day change in flowering date. However, the examination of genetic variation in plasticity suggests that the magnitude of plasticity could be affected by variation in the sensitivity to photoperiod and temperature. In a warmer common garden, lower latitude populations have greater plasticity (+16 days) compared to higher latitude populations (+10 days). Mapped climatypes of flowering date for contemporary and future climates illustrate the wide breadth of plasticity and large geographic overlap. Our research highlights the importance of integrating information on genetic variation, phenotypic plasticity and climatic niche modeling to evaluate plant responses and elucidate vulnerabilities to climate change. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Quantitative assessment of the importance of phenotypic plasticity in adaptation to climate change in wild bird populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedder, Oscar; Bouwhuis, Sandra; Sheldon, Ben C

    2013-07-01

    Predictions about the fate of species or populations under climate change scenarios typically neglect adaptive evolution and phenotypic plasticity, the two major mechanisms by which organisms can adapt to changing local conditions. As a consequence, we have little understanding of the scope for organisms to track changing environments by in situ adaptation. Here, we use a detailed individual-specific long-term population study of great tits (Parus major) breeding in Wytham Woods, Oxford, UK to parameterise a mechanistic model and thus directly estimate the rate of environmental change to which in situ adaptation is possible. Using the effect of changes in early spring temperature on temporal synchrony between birds and a critical food resource, we focus in particular on the contribution of phenotypic plasticity to population persistence. Despite using conservative estimates for evolutionary and reproductive potential, our results suggest little risk of population extinction under projected local temperature change; however, this conclusion relies heavily on the extent to which phenotypic plasticity tracks the changing environment. Extrapolating the model to a broad range of life histories in birds suggests that the importance of phenotypic plasticity for adjustment to projected rates of temperature change increases with slower life histories, owing to lower evolutionary potential. Understanding the determinants and constraints on phenotypic plasticity in natural populations is thus crucial for characterising the risks that rapidly changing environments pose for the persistence of such populations.

  5. Quantitative assessment of the importance of phenotypic plasticity in adaptation to climate change in wild bird populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Vedder

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Predictions about the fate of species or populations under climate change scenarios typically neglect adaptive evolution and phenotypic plasticity, the two major mechanisms by which organisms can adapt to changing local conditions. As a consequence, we have little understanding of the scope for organisms to track changing environments by in situ adaptation. Here, we use a detailed individual-specific long-term population study of great tits (Parus major breeding in Wytham Woods, Oxford, UK to parameterise a mechanistic model and thus directly estimate the rate of environmental change to which in situ adaptation is possible. Using the effect of changes in early spring temperature on temporal synchrony between birds and a critical food resource, we focus in particular on the contribution of phenotypic plasticity to population persistence. Despite using conservative estimates for evolutionary and reproductive potential, our results suggest little risk of population extinction under projected local temperature change; however, this conclusion relies heavily on the extent to which phenotypic plasticity tracks the changing environment. Extrapolating the model to a broad range of life histories in birds suggests that the importance of phenotypic plasticity for adjustment to projected rates of temperature change increases with slower life histories, owing to lower evolutionary potential. Understanding the determinants and constraints on phenotypic plasticity in natural populations is thus crucial for characterising the risks that rapidly changing environments pose for the persistence of such populations.

  6. Phenotypic and gene expression changes between low (glucose-responsive) and High (glucose non-responsive) MIN-6 beta cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O´Driscoll, L.; Gammell, p.; McKierman, E.

    2006-01-01

    that the glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) phenotype is relatively unstable, in long-term culture. This study aimed to investigate phenotypic and gene expression changes associated with this loss of GSIS, using the MIN-6 cell line as model. Phenotypic differences between MIN-6(L, low passage) and MIN-6(H......, high passage) were determined by ELISA (assessing GSIS and cellular (pro)insulin content), proliferation assays, phase contrast light microscopy and analysis of alkaline phosphatase expression. Differential mRNA expression was investigated using microarray, bioinformatics and real-time PCR technologies....... Long-term culture was found to be associated with many phenotypic changes, including changes in growth rate and cellular morphology, as well as loss of GSIS. Microarray analyses indicate expression of many mRNAs, including many involved in regulated secretion, adhesion and proliferation...

  7. Transgenerational effects of stress exposure on offspring phenotypes in apomictic dandelion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koen J F Verhoeven

    Full Text Available Heritable epigenetic modulation of gene expression is a candidate mechanism to explain parental environmental effects on offspring phenotypes, but current evidence for environment-induced epigenetic changes that persist in offspring generations is scarce. In apomictic dandelions, exposure to various stresses was previously shown to heritably alter DNA methylation patterns. In this study we explore whether these induced changes are accompanied by heritable effects on offspring phenotypes. We observed effects of parental jasmonic acid treatment on offspring specific leaf area and on offspring interaction with a generalist herbivore; and of parental nutrient stress on offspring root-shoot biomass ratio, tissue P-content and leaf morphology. Some of the effects appeared to enhance offspring ability to cope with the same stresses that their parents experienced. Effects differed between apomictic genotypes and were not always consistently observed between different experiments, especially in the case of parental nutrient stress. While this context-dependency of the effects remains to be further clarified, the total set of results provides evidence for the existence of transgenerational effects in apomictic dandelions. Zebularine treatment affected the within-generation response to nutrient stress, pointing at a role of DNA methylation in phenotypic plasticity to nutrient environments. This study shows that stress exposure in apomictic dandelions can cause transgenerational phenotypic effects, in addition to previously demonstrated transgenerational DNA methylation effects.

  8. Transgenerational effects of stress exposure on offspring phenotypes in apomictic dandelion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoeven, Koen J F; van Gurp, Thomas P

    2012-01-01

    Heritable epigenetic modulation of gene expression is a candidate mechanism to explain parental environmental effects on offspring phenotypes, but current evidence for environment-induced epigenetic changes that persist in offspring generations is scarce. In apomictic dandelions, exposure to various stresses was previously shown to heritably alter DNA methylation patterns. In this study we explore whether these induced changes are accompanied by heritable effects on offspring phenotypes. We observed effects of parental jasmonic acid treatment on offspring specific leaf area and on offspring interaction with a generalist herbivore; and of parental nutrient stress on offspring root-shoot biomass ratio, tissue P-content and leaf morphology. Some of the effects appeared to enhance offspring ability to cope with the same stresses that their parents experienced. Effects differed between apomictic genotypes and were not always consistently observed between different experiments, especially in the case of parental nutrient stress. While this context-dependency of the effects remains to be further clarified, the total set of results provides evidence for the existence of transgenerational effects in apomictic dandelions. Zebularine treatment affected the within-generation response to nutrient stress, pointing at a role of DNA methylation in phenotypic plasticity to nutrient environments. This study shows that stress exposure in apomictic dandelions can cause transgenerational phenotypic effects, in addition to previously demonstrated transgenerational DNA methylation effects.

  9. Equality in Educational Policy and the Heritability of Educational Attainment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colodro-Conde, Lucía; Rijsdijk, Frühling; Tornero-Gómez, María J; Sánchez-Romera, Juan F; Ordoñana, Juan R

    2015-01-01

    Secular variation in the heritability of educational attainment are proposed to be due to the implementation of more egalitarian educational policies leading to increased equality in educational opportunities in the second part of the 20th century. The action of effect is hypothesized to be a decrease of shared environmental (e.g., family socioeconomic status or parents' education) influences on educational attainment, giving more room for genetic differences between individuals to impact on the variation of the trait. However, this hypothesis has not yet found consistent evidence. Support for this effect relies mainly on comparisons between countries adopting different educational systems or between different time periods within a country reflecting changes in general policy. Using a population-based sample of 1271 pairs of adult twins, we analyzed the effect of the introduction of a specific educational policy in Spain in 1970. The shared-environmental variance decreased, leading to an increase in heritability in the post-reform cohort (44 vs. 67%) for males. Unstandardized estimates of genetic variance were of a similar magnitude (.56 vs. .57) between cohorts, while shared environmental variance decreased from .56 to .04. Heritability remained in the same range for women (40 vs. 34%). Our results support the role of educational policy in affecting the relative weight of genetic and environmental factors on educational attainment, such that increasing equality in educational opportunities increases heritability estimates by reducing variation of non-genetic familial origin.

  10. Equality in Educational Policy and the Heritability of Educational Attainment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucía Colodro-Conde

    Full Text Available Secular variation in the heritability of educational attainment are proposed to be due to the implementation of more egalitarian educational policies leading to increased equality in educational opportunities in the second part of the 20th century. The action of effect is hypothesized to be a decrease of shared environmental (e.g., family socioeconomic status or parents' education influences on educational attainment, giving more room for genetic differences between individuals to impact on the variation of the trait. However, this hypothesis has not yet found consistent evidence. Support for this effect relies mainly on comparisons between countries adopting different educational systems or between different time periods within a country reflecting changes in general policy. Using a population-based sample of 1271 pairs of adult twins, we analyzed the effect of the introduction of a specific educational policy in Spain in 1970. The shared-environmental variance decreased, leading to an increase in heritability in the post-reform cohort (44 vs. 67% for males. Unstandardized estimates of genetic variance were of a similar magnitude (.56 vs. .57 between cohorts, while shared environmental variance decreased from .56 to .04. Heritability remained in the same range for women (40 vs. 34%. Our results support the role of educational policy in affecting the relative weight of genetic and environmental factors on educational attainment, such that increasing equality in educational opportunities increases heritability estimates by reducing variation of non-genetic familial origin.

  11. Heritability of and mortality prediction with a longevity phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanders, Jason L; Minster, Ryan L; Barmada, M Michael

    2014-01-01

    Longevity-associated genes may modulate risk for age-related diseases and survival. The Healthy Aging Index (HAI) may be a subphenotype of longevity, which can be constructed in many studies for genetic analysis. We investigated the HAI's association with survival in the Cardiovascular Health Stu...

  12. Heritability of MMPI-2 scales in the UCSF Family Alcoholism Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gizer, Ian R.; Seaton-Smith, Kimberley L.; Ehlers, Cindy L.; Vietan, Cassandra; Wilhelmsen, Kirk C.

    2009-01-01

    The present study evaluated the heritability of personality traits and psychopathology symptoms assessed by the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Interview 2nd edition (MMPI-2) in a family-based sample selected for alcohol dependence. Participants included 950 probands and 1204 first-degree relatives recruited for the UCSF Family Alcoholism Study. Heritability estimates (h2) for MMPI-2 scales ranged from .25–.49. When alcohol dependence was used as a covariate, heritability estimates remained significant but generally declined. However, when the MMPI-2 scales were used as covariates to estimate the heritability of alcohol dependence, scales measuring antisocial behavior (ASP), depressive symptoms (DEP), and addictive behavior (MAC-R) led to moderate increases in the heritability of alcohol dependence. This suggests that the ASP, DEP, and MAC-R scales may explain some of the non-genetic variance in the alcohol dependence diagnosis in this population when utilized as covariates, and thus may serve to produce a more homogeneous and heritable alcohol dependence phenotype. PMID:20390702

  13. The contribution of social effects to heritable variation in finishing traits of domestic pigs (Sus scrofa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergsma, R; Kanis, E; Knol, E F; Bijma, P

    2008-03-01

    Social interactions among individuals are ubiquitous both in animals and in plants, and in natural as well as domestic populations. These interactions affect both the direction and the magnitude of responses to selection and are a key factor in evolutionary success of species and in the design of breeding schemes in agriculture. At present, however, very little is known of the contribution of social effects to heritable variance in trait values. Here we present estimates of the direct and social genetic variance in growth rate, feed intake, back fat thickness, and muscle depth in a population of 14,032 domestic pigs with known pedigree. Results show that social effects contribute the vast majority of heritable variance in growth rate and feed intake in this population. Total heritable variance expressed relative to phenotypic variance was 71% for growth rate and 70% for feed intake. These values clearly exceed the usual range of heritability for those traits. Back fat thickness and muscle depth showed no heritable variance due to social effects. Our results suggest that genetic improvement in agriculture can be substantially advanced by redirecting breeding schemes, so as to capture heritable variance due to social effects.

  14. Genetic heritability of ischemic stroke and the contribution of previously reported candidate gene and genomewide associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevan, Steve; Traylor, Matthew; Adib-Samii, Poneh; Malik, Rainer; Paul, Nicola L M; Jackson, Caroline; Farrall, Martin; Rothwell, Peter M; Sudlow, Cathie; Dichgans, Martin; Markus, Hugh S

    2012-12-01

    The contribution of genetics to stroke risk, and whether this differs for different stroke subtypes, remainsuncertain. Genomewide complex trait analysis allows heritability to be assessed from genomewide association study (GWAS) data. Previous candidate gene studies have identified many associations with stoke but whether these are important requires replication in large independent data sets. GWAS data sets provide a powerful resource to perform replication studies. We applied genomewide complex trait analysis to a GWAS data set of 3752 ischemic strokes and 5972 controls and determined heritability for all ischemic stroke and the most common subtypes: large-vessel disease, small-vessel disease, and cardioembolic stroke. By systematic review we identified previous candidate gene and GWAS associations with stroke and previous GWAS associations with related cardiovascular phenotypes (myocardial infarction, atrial fibrillation, and carotid intima-media thickness). Fifty associations were identified. For all ischemic stroke, heritability was 37.9%. Heritability varied markedly by stroke subtype being 40.3% for large-vessel disease and 32.6% for cardioembolic but lower for small-vessel disease (16.1%). No previously reported candidate gene was significant after rigorous correction for multiple testing. In contrast, 3 loci from related cardiovascular GWAS studies were significant: PHACTR1 in large-vessel disease (P=2.63e(-6)), PITX2 in cardioembolic stroke (P=4.78e(-8)), and ZFHX3 in cardioembolic stroke (P=5.50e(-7)). There is substantial heritability for ischemic stroke, but this varies for different stroke subtypes. Previous candidate gene associations contribute little to this heritability, but GWAS studies in related cardiovascular phenotypes are identifying robust associations. The heritability data, and data from GWAS, suggest detecting additional associations will depend on careful stroke subtyping.

  15. The evolution of phenotypic correlations and "developmental memory".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Richard A; Wagner, Günter P; Pavlicev, Mihaela; Weinreich, Daniel M; Mills, Rob

    2014-04-01

    Development introduces structured correlations among traits that may constrain or bias the distribution of phenotypes produced. Moreover, when suitable heritable variation exists, natural selection may alter such constraints and correlations, affecting the phenotypic variation available to subsequent selection. However, exactly how the distribution of phenotypes produced by complex developmental systems can be shaped by past selective environments is poorly understood. Here we investigate the evolution of a network of recurrent nonlinear ontogenetic interactions, such as a gene regulation network, in various selective scenarios. We find that evolved networks of this type can exhibit several phenomena that are familiar in cognitive learning systems. These include formation of a distributed associative memory that can "store" and "recall" multiple phenotypes that have been selected in the past, recreate complete adult phenotypic patterns accurately from partial or corrupted embryonic phenotypes, and "generalize" (by exploiting evolved developmental modules) to produce new combinations of phenotypic features. We show that these surprising behaviors follow from an equivalence between the action of natural selection on phenotypic correlations and associative learning, well-understood in the context of neural networks. This helps to explain how development facilitates the evolution of high-fitness phenotypes and how this ability changes over evolutionary time.

  16. The evolution of phenotypic correlations and ‘developmental memory’

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Richard A.; Wagner, Günter P.; Pavlicev, Mihaela; Weinreich, Daniel M.; Mills, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Development introduces structured correlations among traits that may constrain or bias the distribution of phenotypes produced. Moreover, when suitable heritable variation exists, natural selection may alter such constraints and correlations, affecting the phenotypic variation available to subsequent selection. However, exactly how the distribution of phenotypes produced by complex developmental systems can be shaped by past selective environments is poorly understood. Here we investigate the evolution of a network of recurrent non-linear ontogenetic interactions, such as a gene regulation network, in various selective scenarios. We find that evolved networks of this type can exhibit several phenomena that are familiar in cognitive learning systems. These include formation of a distributed associative memory that can ‘store’ and ‘recall’ multiple phenotypes that have been selected in the past, recreate complete adult phenotypic patterns accurately from partial or corrupted embryonic phenotypes, and ‘generalise’ (by exploiting evolved developmental modules) to produce new combinations of phenotypic features. We show that these surprising behaviours follow from an equivalence between the action of natural selection on phenotypic correlations and associative learning, well-understood in the context of neural networks. This helps to explain how development facilitates the evolution of high-fitness phenotypes and how this ability changes over evolutionary time. PMID:24351058

  17. Phenotypic changes associated with RNA interference silencing of chalcone synthase in apple (Malus × domestica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dare, Andrew P; Tomes, Sumathi; Jones, Midori; McGhie, Tony K; Stevenson, David E; Johnson, Ross A; Greenwood, David R; Hellens, Roger P

    2013-05-01

    We have identified in apple (Malus × domestica) three chalcone synthase (CHS) genes. In order to understand the functional redundancy of this gene family RNA interference knockout lines were generated where all three of these genes were down-regulated. These lines had no detectable anthocyanins and radically reduced concentrations of dihydrochalcones and flavonoids. Surprisingly, down-regulation of CHS also led to major changes in plant development, resulting in plants with shortened internode lengths, smaller leaves and a greatly reduced growth rate. Microscopic analysis revealed that these phenotypic changes extended down to the cellular level, with CHS-silenced lines showing aberrant cellular organisation in the leaves. Fruit collected from one CHS-silenced line was smaller than the 'Royal Gala' controls, lacked flavonoids in the skin and flesh and also had changes in cell morphology. Auxin transport experiments showed increased rates of auxin transport in a CHS-silenced line compared with the 'Royal Gala' control. As flavonoids are well known to be key modulators of auxin transport, we hypothesise that the removal of almost all flavonoids from the plant by CHS silencing creates a vastly altered environment for auxin transport to occur and results in the observed changes in growth and development. © 2013 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Functional and phenotypic changes in human lymphocytes after coincubation with Leishmania donovani in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, L; Sørensen, A L; Kharazmi, A

    1990-01-01

    that the inhibition of the proliferative response to PHA by live L. donovani in vitro is associated with early processes in lymphocyte activation. Further studies on the inhibitory phenomena described may be of potential significance in the investigation of the suppressive mechanisms in human visceral leishmaniasis.......In this paper we describe functional and phenotypic changes in T cells after in vitro coincubation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and Leishmania donovani parasites at different parasite/peripheral blood mononuclear cell ratios. The phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-induced lymphoproliferative...... response was reduced by the coincubation, and at the maximal parasite/peripheral blood mononuclear cell ratio used (7.5:1), the average response was less than 40% of the response in the absence of parasites. The cause of the reduction in lymphoproliferation is not clear, but it requires live parasites...

  19. Small RNAs and heritable epigenetic variation in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Donna M; Baulcombe, David C

    2014-02-01

    Recent studies suggest that inheritance of phenotypes in plants is more likely to involve epigenetics than in mammals. There are two reasons for this difference. First, there is a RNA-based system in plants involving small (s)RNAs that influences de novo establishment and maintenance of DNA methylation at many sites in plant genomes. These regions of methylated DNA are epigenetic marks with the potential to affect gene expression that are transmitted between dividing cells of the same generation. Second, unlike mammals, DNA methyltransferases in plants are active during gametogenesis and embryogenesis so that patterns of DNA methylation can persist from parent to progeny and do not need to be reset. We discuss how the effects of stress and genome interactions in hybrid plants are two systems that illustrate how RNA-based mechanisms can influence heritable phenotypes in plants.

  20. Quantitative Assessment of the Importance of Phenotypic Plasticity in Adaptation to Climate Change in Wild Bird Populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vedder, Oscar; Bouwhuis, Sandra; Sheldon, Ben C.

    Predictions about the fate of species or populations under climate change scenarios typically neglect adaptive evolution and phenotypic plasticity, the two major mechanisms by which organisms can adapt to changing local conditions. As a consequence, we have little understanding of the scope for

  1. Heritability of physical activity traits in Brazilian families: the Baependi Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horimoto, Andréa R V R; Giolo, Suely R; Oliveira, Camila M; Alvim, Rafael O; Soler, Júlia P; de Andrade, Mariza; Krieger, José E; Pereira, Alexandre C

    2011-11-29

    It is commonly recognized that physical activity has familial aggregation; however, the genetic influences on physical activity phenotypes are not well characterized. This study aimed to (1) estimate the heritability of physical activity traits in Brazilian families; and (2) investigate whether genetic and environmental variance components contribute differently to the expression of these phenotypes in males and females. The sample that constitutes the Baependi Heart Study is comprised of 1,693 individuals in 95 Brazilian families. The phenotypes were self-reported in a questionnaire based on the WHO-MONICA instrument. Variance component approaches, implemented in the SOLAR (Sequential Oligogenic Linkage Analysis Routines) computer package, were applied to estimate the heritability and to evaluate the heterogeneity of variance components by gender on the studied phenotypes. The heritability estimates were intermediate (35%) for weekly physical activity among non-sedentary subjects (weekly PA_NS), and low (9-14%) for sedentarism, weekly physical activity (weekly PA), and level of daily physical activity (daily PA). Significant evidence for heterogeneity in variance components by gender was observed for the sedentarism and weekly PA phenotypes. No significant gender differences in genetic or environmental variance components were observed for the weekly PA_NS trait. The daily PA phenotype was predominantly influenced by environmental factors, with larger effects in males than in females. Heritability estimates for physical activity phenotypes in this sample of the Brazilian population were significant in both males and females, and varied from low to intermediate magnitude. Significant evidence for heterogeneity in variance components by gender was observed. These data add to the knowledge of the physical activity traits in the Brazilian study population, and are concordant with the notion of significant biological determination in active behavior.

  2. Heritability of physical activity traits in Brazilian families: the Baependi Heart Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horimoto Andréa RVR

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is commonly recognized that physical activity has familial aggregation; however, the genetic influences on physical activity phenotypes are not well characterized. This study aimed to (1 estimate the heritability of physical activity traits in Brazilian families; and (2 investigate whether genetic and environmental variance components contribute differently to the expression of these phenotypes in males and females. Methods The sample that constitutes the Baependi Heart Study is comprised of 1,693 individuals in 95 Brazilian families. The phenotypes were self-reported in a questionnaire based on the WHO-MONICA instrument. Variance component approaches, implemented in the SOLAR (Sequential Oligogenic Linkage Analysis Routines computer package, were applied to estimate the heritability and to evaluate the heterogeneity of variance components by gender on the studied phenotypes. Results The heritability estimates were intermediate (35% for weekly physical activity among non-sedentary subjects (weekly PA_NS, and low (9-14% for sedentarism, weekly physical activity (weekly PA, and level of daily physical activity (daily PA. Significant evidence for heterogeneity in variance components by gender was observed for the sedentarism and weekly PA phenotypes. No significant gender differences in genetic or environmental variance components were observed for the weekly PA_NS trait. The daily PA phenotype was predominantly influenced by environmental factors, with larger effects in males than in females. Conclusions Heritability estimates for physical activity phenotypes in this sample of the Brazilian population were significant in both males and females, and varied from low to intermediate magnitude. Significant evidence for heterogeneity in variance components by gender was observed. These data add to the knowledge of the physical activity traits in the Brazilian study population, and are concordant with the notion of significant

  3. MULTIVARIATE DIVERSITY, HERITABILITY AND GENETIC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    biomass yield per plant showed high phenotypic coefficients of variation; 18.9, 17.5 and 16.9% in that order. Harvest index (15.1%) showed the highest genotypic coefficient of variation while the lowest (3.5%) was ..... zone of origin, and improved varieties ..... Resources and Crop Evolution 46:273-284. ... and Development.

  4. Heritability of fear: Ukrainian experience

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    O.V. Filiptsova

    2014-08-04

    Aug 4, 2014 ... Evaluation and decomposition of total phenotypic variance were performed according to the ... of fear – psychic disorder development, complications in personal life, making responsible ... notypic variation (VP) that is due to variation in genetic val- ... Ukraine is a population with a unique history and cultural.

  5. Natural epigenetic variation contributes to heritable flowering divergence in a widespread asexual dandelion lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilschut, Rutger A; Oplaat, Carla; Snoek, L Basten; Kirschner, Jan; Verhoeven, Koen J F

    2016-04-01

    Epigenetic variation has been proposed to contribute to the success of asexual plants, either as a contributor to phenotypic plasticity or by enabling transient adaptation via selection on transgenerationally stable, but reversible, epialleles. While recent studies in experimental plant populations have shown the potential for epigenetic mechanisms to contribute to adaptive phenotypes, it remains unknown whether heritable variation in ecologically relevant traits is at least partially epigenetically determined in natural populations. Here, we tested the hypothesis that DNA methylation variation contributes to heritable differences in flowering time within a single widespread apomictic clonal lineage of the common dandelion (Taraxacum officinale s. lat.). Apomictic clone members of the same apomictic lineage collected from different field sites showed heritable differences in flowering time, which was correlated with inherited differences in methylation-sensitive AFLP marker profiles. Differences in flowering between apomictic clone members were significantly reduced after in vivo demethylation using the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor zebularine. This synchronization of flowering times suggests that flowering time divergence within an apomictic lineage was mediated by differences in DNA methylation. While the underlying basis of the methylation polymorphism at functional flowering time-affecting loci remains to be demonstrated, our study shows that epigenetic variation contributes to heritable phenotypic divergence in ecologically relevant traits in natural plant populations. This result also suggests that epigenetic mechanisms can facilitate adaptive divergence within genetically uniform asexual lineages. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Microglia change from a reactive to an age-like phenotype with the time in culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia eCaldeira

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Age-related neurodegenerative diseases have been associated with chronic neuroinflammation and microglia activation. However, cumulative evidence supports that inflammation only occurs at an early stage once microglia change the endogenous characteristics with ageing and switch to irresponsive/senescent and dystrophic phenotypes with disease progression. Thus, it will be important to have the means to assess the role of reactive and aged microglia when studying advanced brain neurodegeneration processes and age-associated related disorders. Yet, most studies are done with microglia from neonates since there are no adequate means to isolate degenerating microglia for experimentation. Indeed, only a few studies report microglia isolation from aged animals, using either short-term cultures or high concentrations of mitogens in the medium, which trigger microglia reactivity. The purpose of this study was to develop an experimental process to naturally age microglia after isolation from neonatal mice and to characterize the cultured cells at 2 days in vitro (DIV, 10 DIV and 16 DIV. We found that 2 DIV (young microglia had predominant amoeboid morphology and markers of stressed/reactive phenotype. In contrast, 16 DIV (aged microglia evidenced ramified morphology and increased metalloproteinase (MMP-2 activation, as well as reduced MMP-9, glutamate release and nuclear factor kappa-B activation, in parallel with decreased expression of Toll-like receptor (TLR-2 and TLR-4, capacity to migrate and phagocytose. These findings together with the reduced expression of microRNA (miR-124, and miR-155, decreased autophagy, enhanced senescence associated beta-galactosidase activity and elevated miR-146a expression, are suggestive that 16 DIV cells mainly correspond to irresponsive/senescent microglia. Data indicate that the model represent an opportunity to understand and control microglial aging, as well as to explore strategies to recover microglia surveillance

  7. Antarctic climate change: extreme events disrupt plastic phenotypic response in Adelie penguins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amélie Lescroël

    Full Text Available In the context of predicted alteration of sea ice cover and increased frequency of extreme events, it is especially timely to investigate plasticity within Antarctic species responding to a key environmental aspect of their ecology: sea ice variability. Using 13 years of longitudinal data, we investigated the effect of sea ice concentration (SIC on the foraging efficiency of Adélie penguins (Pygoscelis adeliae breeding in the Ross Sea. A 'natural experiment' brought by the exceptional presence of giant icebergs during 5 consecutive years provided unprecedented habitat variation for testing the effects of extreme events on the relationship between SIC and foraging efficiency in this sea-ice dependent species. Significant levels of phenotypic plasticity were evident in response to changes in SIC in normal environmental conditions. Maximum foraging efficiency occurred at relatively low SIC, peaking at 6.1% and decreasing with higher SIC. The 'natural experiment' uncoupled efficiency levels from SIC variations. Our study suggests that lower summer SIC than currently observed would benefit the foraging performance of Adélie penguins in their southernmost breeding area. Importantly, it also provides evidence that extreme climatic events can disrupt response plasticity in a wild seabird population. This questions the predictive power of relationships built on past observations, when not only the average climatic conditions are changing but the frequency of extreme climatic anomalies is also on the rise.

  8. Antarctic climate change: extreme events disrupt plastic phenotypic response in Adélie penguins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lescroël, Amélie; Ballard, Grant; Grémillet, David; Authier, Matthieu; Ainley, David G

    2014-01-01

    In the context of predicted alteration of sea ice cover and increased frequency of extreme events, it is especially timely to investigate plasticity within Antarctic species responding to a key environmental aspect of their ecology: sea ice variability. Using 13 years of longitudinal data, we investigated the effect of sea ice concentration (SIC) on the foraging efficiency of Adélie penguins (Pygoscelis adeliae) breeding in the Ross Sea. A 'natural experiment' brought by the exceptional presence of giant icebergs during 5 consecutive years provided unprecedented habitat variation for testing the effects of extreme events on the relationship between SIC and foraging efficiency in this sea-ice dependent species. Significant levels of phenotypic plasticity were evident in response to changes in SIC in normal environmental conditions. Maximum foraging efficiency occurred at relatively low SIC, peaking at 6.1% and decreasing with higher SIC. The 'natural experiment' uncoupled efficiency levels from SIC variations. Our study suggests that lower summer SIC than currently observed would benefit the foraging performance of Adélie penguins in their southernmost breeding area. Importantly, it also provides evidence that extreme climatic events can disrupt response plasticity in a wild seabird population. This questions the predictive power of relationships built on past observations, when not only the average climatic conditions are changing but the frequency of extreme climatic anomalies is also on the rise.

  9. c-Jun-N-Terminal Kinase Signaling Is Involved in Cyclosporine-Induced Epithelial Phenotypic Changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Pallet

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tubular epithelial cells play a central role in the pathogenesis of chronic nephropathies. Previous toxicogenomic studies have demonstrated that cyclosporine- (CsA- induced epithelial phenotypic changes (EPCs are reminiscent of an incomplete epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT in a TGF-β-independent manner. Furthermore, we identified endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress as a potential mechanism that may participate in the modulation of tubular cell plasticity during CsA exposure. Because c-jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK, which is activated during ER stress, is implicated in kidney fibrogenesis, we undertook the current study to identify the role of JNK signaling in EPCs induced by CsA. In primary cultures of human renal epithelial cells, CsA activates JNK signaling, and the treatment with a JNK inhibitor reduces the occurrence of cell shape changes, E-cadherin downregulation, cell migration, and Snail-1 expression. Our results suggest that CsA activates JNK signaling, which, in turn, may participate in the morphological alterations through the regulation of Snail-1 expression.

  10. Age-dependent changes in innate immune phenotype and function in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Asquith

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Aged individuals are more susceptible to infections due to a general decline in immune function broadly referred to as immune senescence. While age-related changes in the adaptive immune system are well documented, aging of the innate immune system remains less well understood, particularly in nonhuman primates. A more robust understanding of age-related changes in innate immune function would provide mechanistic insight into the increased susceptibility of the elderly to infection. Rhesus macaques have proved a critical translational model for aging research, and present a unique opportunity to dissect age-dependent modulation of the innate immune system. We examined age-related changes in: (i innate immune cell frequencies; (ii expression of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs and innate signaling molecules; (iii cytokine responses of monocytes and dendritic cells (DC following stimulation with PRR agonists; and (iv plasma cytokine levels in this model. We found marked changes in both the phenotype and function of innate immune cells. This included an age-associated increased frequency of myeloid DC (mDC. Moreover, we found toll-like receptor (TLR agonists lipopolysaccharide (TLR4, fibroblast stimulating ligand-1 (TLR2/6, and ODN2006 (TLR7/9 induced reduced cytokine responses in aged mDC. Interestingly, with the exception of the monocyte-derived TNFα response to LPS, which increased with age, TNFα, IL-6, and IFNα responses declined with age. We also found that TLR4, TLR5, and innate negative regulator, sterile alpha and TIR motif containing protein (SARM, were all expressed at lower levels in young animals. By contrast, absent in melanoma 2 and retinoic acid-inducible gene I expression was lowest in aged animals. Together, these observations indicate that several parameters of innate immunity are significantly modulated by age and contribute to differential immune function in aged macaques.

  11. Epigenetic regulation by heritable RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinhard Liebers

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Genomic concepts are based on the assumption that phenotypes arise from the expression of genetic variants. However, the presence of non-Mendelian inheritance patterns provides a direct challenge to this view and suggests an important role for alternative mechanisms of gene regulation and inheritance. Over the past few years, a highly complex and diverse network of noncoding RNAs has been discovered. Research in animal models has shown that RNAs can be inherited and that RNA methyltransferases can be important for the transmission and expression of modified phenotypes in the next generation. We discuss possible mechanisms of RNA-mediated inheritance and the role of these mechanisms for human health and disease.

  12. High-Dimensional Analysis of Acute Myeloid Leukemia Reveals Phenotypic Changes in Persistent Cells during Induction Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrell, Paul Brent; Diggins, Kirsten Elizabeth; Polikowsky, Hannah Grace; Mohan, Sanjay Ram; Seegmiller, Adam C; Irish, Jonathan Michael

    2016-01-01

    The plasticity of AML drives poor clinical outcomes and confounds its longitudinal detection. However, the immediate impact of treatment on the leukemic and non-leukemic cells of the bone marrow and blood remains relatively understudied. Here, we conducted a pilot study of high dimensional longitudinal monitoring of immunophenotype in AML. To characterize changes in cell phenotype before, during, and immediately after induction treatment, we developed a 27-antibody panel for mass cytometry focused on surface diagnostic markers and applied it to 46 samples of blood or bone marrow tissue collected over time from 5 AML patients. Central goals were to determine whether changes in AML phenotype would be captured effectively by cytomic tools and to implement methods for describing the evolving phenotypes of AML cell subsets. Mass cytometry data were analyzed using established computational techniques. Within this pilot study, longitudinal immune monitoring with mass cytometry revealed fundamental changes in leukemia phenotypes that occurred over time during and after induction in the refractory disease setting. Persisting AML blasts became more phenotypically distinct from stem and progenitor cells due to expression of novel marker patterns that differed from pre-treatment AML cells and from all cell types observed in healthy bone marrow. This pilot study of single cell immune monitoring in AML represents a powerful tool for precision characterization and targeting of resistant disease.

  13. Quantifying missing heritability at known GWAS loci.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Gusev

    Full Text Available Recent work has shown that much of the missing heritability of complex traits can be resolved by estimates of heritability explained by all genotyped SNPs. However, it is currently unknown how much heritability is missing due to poor tagging or additional causal variants at known GWAS loci. Here, we use variance components to quantify the heritability explained by all SNPs at known GWAS loci in nine diseases from WTCCC1 and WTCCC2. After accounting for expectation, we observed all SNPs at known GWAS loci to explain 1.29 x more heritability than GWAS-associated SNPs on average (P=3.3 x 10⁻⁵. For some diseases, this increase was individually significant: 2.07 x for Multiple Sclerosis (MS (P=6.5 x 10⁻⁹ and 1.48 x for Crohn's Disease (CD (P = 1.3 x 10⁻³; all analyses of autoimmune diseases excluded the well-studied MHC region. Additionally, we found that GWAS loci from other related traits also explained significant heritability. The union of all autoimmune disease loci explained 7.15 x more MS heritability than known MS SNPs (P 20,000 Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA samples typed on ImmunoChip, with 2.37 x more heritability from all SNPs at GWAS loci (P = 2.3 x 10⁻⁶ and 5.33 x more heritability from all autoimmune disease loci (P < 1 x 10⁻¹⁶ compared to known RA SNPs (including those identified in this cohort. Our methods adjust for LD between SNPs, which can bias standard estimates of heritability from SNPs even if all causal variants are typed. By comparing adjusted estimates, we hypothesize that the genome-wide distribution of causal variants is enriched for low-frequency alleles, but that causal variants at known GWAS loci are skewed towards common alleles. These findings have important ramifications for fine-mapping study design and our understanding of complex disease architecture.

  14. Heritability and complex segregation analysis of hypoadrenocorticism in the standard poodle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Famula, T R; Belanger, J M; Oberbauer, A M

    2003-01-01

    The heritability of hypoadrenocorticism (Addison's disease) was evaluated in 778 standard poodles with known Addisonian phenotypes. Addisonian status was confirmed clinically by adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) challenge and 8.6 per cent of the poodles enrolled in the study were classified as being Addisonian. Hypoadrenocorticism affected both sexes with equal probability (P > 0.1). The most common coat colours had a negligible effect on the incidence of hypoadrenocorticism (P > 0.09), although red coat colour had a significant impact on the disease, probably due to the relatively small numbers of dogs with that coat colour. The heritability of hypoadrenocorticism in the standard poodle was estimated to be 0.75. Complex segregation analyses suggested that hypoadrenocorticism in the breed is influenced by an autosomal recessive locus. Clarification of both the heritability and mode of inheritance of hypoadrenocorticism in the standard poodle allows for better-informed breeding decisions.

  15. Children’s head motion during fMRI tasks is heritable and stable over time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura E. Engelhardt

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Head motion during fMRI scans negatively impacts data quality, and as post-acquisition techniques for addressing motion become increasingly stringent, data retention decreases. Studies conducted with adult participants suggest that movement acts as a relatively stable, heritable phenotype that serves as a marker for other genetically influenced phenotypes. Whether these patterns extend downward to childhood has critical implications for the interpretation and generalizability of fMRI data acquired from children. We examined factors affecting scanner motion in two samples: a population-based twin sample of 73 participants (ages 7–12 years and a case-control sample of 32 non-struggling and 78 struggling readers (ages 8–11 years, 30 of whom were scanned multiple times. Age, but not ADHD symptoms, was significantly related to scanner movement. Movement also varied as a function of task type, run length, and session length. Twin pair concordance for head motion was high for monozygotic twins and moderate for dizygotic twins. Cross-session test-retest reliability was high. Together, these findings suggest that children’s head motion is a genetically influenced trait that has the potential to systematically affect individual differences in BOLD changes within and across groups. We discuss recommendations for future work and best practices for pediatric neuroimaging.

  16. Morphological change and phenotypic plasticity in native and non-native pumpkinseed sunfish in response to sustained water velocities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavno, S; Fox, M G

    2013-11-01

    Phenotypic plasticity can contribute to the proliferation and invasion success of nonindigenous species by promoting phenotypic changes that increase fitness, facilitate range expansion and improve survival. In this study, differences in phenotypic plasticity were investigated using young-of-year pumpkinseed sunfish from colonies established with lentic and lotic populations originating in Canada (native) and Spain (non-native). Individuals were subjected to static and flowing water treatments for 80 days. Inter- and intra-population differences were tested using ancova and discriminant function analysis, and differences in phenotypic plasticity were tested through a manova of discriminant function scores. Differences between Iberian and North American populations were observed in dorsal fin length, pectoral fin position and caudal peduncle length. Phenotypic plasticity had less influence on morphology than genetic factors, regardless of population origin. Contrary to predictions, Iberian pumpkinseed exhibited lower levels of phenotypic plasticity than native populations, suggesting that canalization may have occurred in the non-native populations during the processes of introduction and range expansion.

  17. [Cancer Cells as Dynamic System - Molecular and Phenotypic Changes During Tumor Formation, Progression and Dissemination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommerová, L; Ondroušková, E; Hrstka, R

    Dynamic, punctual and perfectly coordinated cellular response to internal and external stimuli is a crucial prerequisite for adaptation of mammalian cells to all changes that occur during cellular development under physiological conditions. Hijacking this ability is characteristic for tumor cells that are capable to adapt to unfavorable conditions which contribute to the formation and development of cancer during the process of tumor formation and progression. By changing key mechanisms, malignant cells can avoid cell death and thus allow development and spread of the tumor. The changes at the genetic level are manifested by various phenotypic characteristics, through which tumor cells are able to escape defense mechanisms, to acquire resistance to treatment, to invade and to create secondary tumors. In recent years, one of the most studied properties include changes in energy metabolism, when tumor cells specifically control reprogramming of the main metabolic pathways for their own benefit and to satisfy their increased needs not only for energy, but also for building materials required for increased proliferation. To adapt to extracellular conditions, it is necessary that cells undergo morphological changes, where modifications in the cell shape through reorganization of cytoskeletal filaments allow tumor cells to increase their invasiveness and other aggressive features. Clarifying these changes together with understanding of the switch in the genetic program within cancer cells, which allows them to overcome different stages of differentiation from cancer stem cells to fully differentiated cells, would be an important prerequisite for identification of the cancer cell "weaknesses" and may lead to improved cancer treatment. The ability of tumor cells to alter the rules of their own organism thus represents an important challenge for oncological research.Key words: cellular reprogramming - cancer cell plasticity - cancer metabolism - tumor heterogeneity

  18. Phenotypic interactions between tree hosts and invasive forest pathogens in the light of globalization and climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenlid, Jan; Oliva, Jonàs

    2016-12-05

    Invasive pathogens can cause considerable damage to forest ecosystems. Lack of coevolution is generally thought to enable invasive pathogens to bypass the defence and/or recognition systems in the host. Although mostly true, this argument fails to predict intermittent outcomes in space and time, underlining the need to include the roles of the environment and the phenotype in host-pathogen interactions when predicting disease impacts. We emphasize the need to consider host-tree imbalances from a phenotypic perspective, considering the lack of coevolutionary and evolutionary history with the pathogen and the environment, respectively. We describe how phenotypic plasticity and plastic responses to environmental shifts may become maladaptive when hosts are faced with novel pathogens. The lack of host-pathogen and environmental coevolution are aligned with two global processes currently driving forest damage: globalization and climate change, respectively. We suggest that globalization and climate change act synergistically, increasing the chances of both genotypic and phenotypic imbalances. Short moves on the same continent are more likely to be in balance than if the move is from another part of the world. We use Gremmeniella abietina outbreaks in Sweden to exemplify how host-pathogen phenotypic interactions can help to predict the impacts of specific invasive and emergent diseases.This article is part of the themed issue 'Tackling emerging fungal threats to animal health, food security and ecosystem resilience'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  19. Down-regulation of Stathmin Is Required for the Phenotypic Changes and Classical Activation of Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kewei; Harrison, Rene E

    2015-07-31

    Macrophages are important cells of innate immunity with specialized capacity for recognition and elimination of pathogens and presentation of antigens to lymphocytes for adaptive immunity. Macrophages become activated upon exposure to pro-inflammatory cytokines and pathogenic stimuli. Classical activation of macrophages with interferon-γ (IFNγ) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) triggers a wide range of signaling events and morphological changes to induce the immune response. Our previous microtubule (MT) proteomic work revealed that the stathmin association with MTs is considerably reduced in activated macrophages, which contain significantly more stabilized MTs. Here, we show that there is a global decrease in stathmin levels, an MT catastrophe protein, in activated macrophages using both immunoblotting and immunofluorescent microscopy. This is an LPS-specific response that induces proteasome-mediated degradation of stathmin. We explored the functions of stathmin down-regulation in activated macrophages by generating a stable cell line overexpressing stathmin-GFP. We show that stathmin-GFP overexpression impacts MT stability, impairs cell spreading, and reduces activation-associated phenotypes. Furthermore, overexpressing stathmin reduces complement receptor 3-mediated phagocytosis and cellular activation, implicating a pivotal inhibitory role for stathmin in classically activated macrophages.

  20. Transient dynamic phenotypes as criteria for model discrimination: fold-change detection in Rhodobacter sphaeroides chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamadeh, Abdullah; Ingalls, Brian; Sontag, Eduardo

    2013-03-01

    The chemotaxis pathway of the bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides shares many similarities with that of Escherichia coli. It exhibits robust adaptation and has several homologues of the latter's chemotaxis proteins. Recent theoretical results have correctly predicted that the E. coli output behaviour is unchanged under scaling of its ligand input signal; this property is known as fold-change detection (FCD). In the light of recent experimental results suggesting that R. sphaeroides may also show FCD, we present theoretical assumptions on the R. sphaeroides chemosensory dynamics that can be shown to yield FCD behaviour. Furthermore, it is shown that these assumptions make FCD a property of this system that is robust to structural and parametric variations in the chemotaxis pathway, in agreement with experimental results. We construct and examine models of the full chemotaxis pathway that satisfy these assumptions and reproduce experimental time-series data from earlier studies. We then propose experiments in which models satisfying our theoretical assumptions predict robust FCD behaviour where earlier models do not. In this way, we illustrate how transient dynamic phenotypes such as FCD can be used for the purposes of discriminating between models that reproduce the same experimental time-series data.

  1. Heritable and non-heritable genetic effects on retained placenta in Meuse-Rhine-Yssel cattle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benedictus, L.; Koets, A.P.; Kuijpers, F.H.J.; Joosten, I.; Eldik, van P.; Heuven, H.C.M.

    2013-01-01

    Failure of the timely expulsion of the fetal membranes, called retained placenta, leads to reduced fertility, increased veterinary costs and reduced milk yields. The objectives of this study were to concurrently look at the heritable and non-heritable genetic effects on retained placenta and test th

  2. On the Estimation of Heritability with Family-Based and Population-Based Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngdoe Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available For a family-based sample, the phenotypic variance-covariance matrix can be parameterized to include the variance of a polygenic effect that has then been estimated using a variance component analysis. However, with the advent of large-scale genomic data, the genetic relationship matrix (GRM can be estimated and can be utilized to parameterize the variance of a polygenic effect for population-based samples. Therefore narrow sense heritability, which is both population and trait specific, can be estimated with both population- and family-based samples. In this study we estimate heritability from both family-based and population-based samples, collected in Korea, and the heritability estimates from the pooled samples were, for height, 0.60; body mass index (BMI, 0.32; log-transformed triglycerides (log TG, 0.24; total cholesterol (TCHL, 0.30; high-density lipoprotein (HDL, 0.38; low-density lipoprotein (LDL, 0.29; systolic blood pressure (SBP, 0.23; and diastolic blood pressure (DBP, 0.24. Furthermore, we found differences in how heritability is estimated—in particular the amount of variance attributable to common environment in twins can be substantial—which indicates heritability estimates should be interpreted with caution.

  3. Functional characterization of serum- and growth factor-induced phenotypic changes in intact bovine tracheal smooth muscle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gosens, R; Meurs, H; Bromhaar, MMG; McKay, S; Nelemans, SA; Zaagsma, J

    2002-01-01

    1 The present study aims to investigate whether phenotypic changes, reported to occur in cultured isolated airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells, are of relevance to intact ASM. Moreover, we aimed to gain insight into the signalling pathways involved. 2 Culturing of bovine tracheal smooth muscle (BTSM) s

  4. Heritability of brain activity related to response inhibition: A longitudinal genetic study in adolescent twins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anokhin, Andrey P; Golosheykin, Simon; Grant, Julia D; Heath, Andrew C

    2017-05-01

    The ability to inhibit prepotent but context- or goal-inappropriate responses is essential for adaptive self-regulation of behavior. Deficits in response inhibition, a key component of impulsivity, have been implicated as a core dysfunction in a range of neuropsychiatric disorders such as ADHD and addictions. Identification of genetically transmitted variation in the neural underpinnings of response inhibition can help to elucidate etiological pathways to these disorders and establish the links between genes, brain, and behavior. However, little is known about genetic influences on the neural mechanisms of response inhibition during adolescence, a developmental period characterized by weak self-regulation of behavior. Here we investigated heritability of ERPs elicited in a Go/No-Go task in a large sample of adolescent twins assessed longitudinally at ages 12, 14, and 16. Genetic analyses showed significant heritability of inhibition-related frontal N2 and P3 components at all three ages, with 50 to 60% of inter-individual variability being attributable to genetic factors. These genetic influences included both common genetic factors active at different ages and novel genetic influences emerging during development. Finally, individual differences in the rate of developmental changes from age 12 to age 16 were significantly influenced by genetic factors. In conclusion, the present study provides the first evidence for genetic influences on neural correlates of response inhibition during adolescence and suggests that ERPs elicited in the Go/No-Go task can serve as intermediate neurophysiological phenotypes (endophenotypes) for the study of disinhibition and impulse control disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Genetic Variation, Heritability, and Diversity Analysis of Upland Rice (Oryza sativa L. Genotypes Based on Quantitative Traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mst. Tuhina-Khatun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Upland rice is important for sustainable crop production to meet future food demands. The expansion in area of irrigated rice faces limitations due to water scarcity resulting from climate change. Therefore, this research aimed to identify potential genotypes and suitable traits of upland rice germplasm for breeding programmes. Forty-three genotypes were evaluated in a randomised complete block design with three replications. All genotypes exhibited a wide and significant variation for 22 traits. The highest phenotypic and genotypic coefficient of variation was recorded for the number of filled grains/panicle and yields/plant (g. The highest heritability was found for photosynthetic rate, transpiration rate, stomatal conductance, intercellular CO2, and number of filled grains/panicle and yields/plant (g. Cluster analysis based on 22 traits grouped the 43 rice genotypes into five clusters. Cluster II was the largest and consisted of 20 genotypes mostly originating from the Philippines. The first four principle components of 22 traits accounted for about 72% of the total variation and indicated a wide variation among the genotypes. The selected best trait of the number of filled grains/panicle and yields/plant (g, which showed high heritability and high genetic advance, could be used as a selection criterion for hybridisation programmes in the future.

  6. Genetic Variation, Heritability, and Diversity Analysis of Upland Rice (Oryza sativa L.) Genotypes Based on Quantitative Traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuhina-Khatun, Mst; Hanafi, Mohamed M; Rafii Yusop, Mohd; Wong, M Y; Salleh, Faezah M; Ferdous, Jannatul

    2015-01-01

    Upland rice is important for sustainable crop production to meet future food demands. The expansion in area of irrigated rice faces limitations due to water scarcity resulting from climate change. Therefore, this research aimed to identify potential genotypes and suitable traits of upland rice germplasm for breeding programmes. Forty-three genotypes were evaluated in a randomised complete block design with three replications. All genotypes exhibited a wide and significant variation for 22 traits. The highest phenotypic and genotypic coefficient of variation was recorded for the number of filled grains/panicle and yields/plant (g). The highest heritability was found for photosynthetic rate, transpiration rate, stomatal conductance, intercellular CO₂, and number of filled grains/panicle and yields/plant (g). Cluster analysis based on 22 traits grouped the 43 rice genotypes into five clusters. Cluster II was the largest and consisted of 20 genotypes mostly originating from the Philippines. The first four principle components of 22 traits accounted for about 72% of the total variation and indicated a wide variation among the genotypes. The selected best trait of the number of filled grains/panicle and yields/plant (g), which showed high heritability and high genetic advance, could be used as a selection criterion for hybridisation programmes in the future.

  7. Repeatability and heritability of response to superovulation in Holstein cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonhati, H; Lôbo, R B; Oliveira, H N

    1999-04-15

    The objective of this study was to estimate the relative effects of genetic and phenotypic factors on the efficacy and efficiency of superovulation for Holstein-Friesian cows reared in Brazil. A database, established by the Associacao Brasileira de Criadores de Bovinos da Raca Holandesa, consisting of a total of 5387 superovulations of 2941 cows distributed over 473 herds and sired by 690 bulls was used for the analysis. The records were analyzed by MTDFREML (Multiple Trait Derivative-Free Restricted Maximum Likelihood), using a repeatability animal model. The fixed effects included in the model were contemporaneous group (veterinarian, herd, year and season of the superovulation); number of semen doses; cow age; and superovulation order. The estimated repeatability of the number of the transferable embryos was low (0.13), and the estimated heritability was 0.03. These results indicate that environmental factors play a critical role in the response of a cow to a superovulation treatment. There is little evidence that future responses to superovulation by individual females can be predicted by previous treatment(s) or that superovulation response is an heritable trait.

  8. Heritable site-specific mutagenesis using TALENs in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Char, Si Nian; Unger-Wallace, Erica; Frame, Bronwyn; Briggs, Sarah A; Main, Marcy; Spalding, Martin H; Vollbrecht, Erik; Wang, Kan; Yang, Bing

    2015-09-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) technology has been utilized widely for targeted gene mutagenesis, especially for gene inactivation, in many organisms, including agriculturally important plants such as rice, wheat, tomato and barley. This report describes application of this technology to generate heritable genome modifications in maize. TALENs were employed to generate stable, heritable mutations at the maize glossy2 (gl2) locus. Transgenic lines containing mono- or di-allelic mutations were obtained from the maize genotype Hi-II at a frequency of about 10% (nine mutated events in 91 transgenic events). In addition, three of the novel alleles were tested for function in progeny seedlings, where they were able to confer the glossy phenotype. In a majority of the events, the integrated TALEN T-DNA segregated independently from the new loss of function alleles, producing mutated null-segregant progeny in T1 generation. Our results demonstrate that TALENs are an effective tool for genome mutagenesis in maize, empowering the discovery of gene function and the development of trait improvement.

  9. A multicenter study to map genes for Fuchs endothelial corneal dystrophy: baseline characteristics and heritability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louttit, Megan D; Kopplin, Laura J; Igo, Robert P; Fondran, Jeremy R; Tagliaferri, Angela; Bardenstein, David; Aldave, Anthony J; Croasdale, Christopher R; Price, Marianne O; Rosenwasser, George O; Lass, Jonathan H; Iyengar, Sudha K

    2012-01-01

    To describe the methods for family and case-control recruitment for a multicenter genetic and associated heritability analyses of Fuchs endothelial corneal dystrophy (FECD). Twenty-nine enrolling sites with 62 trained investigators and coordinators gathered individual and family information, graded the phenotype, and collected blood and/or saliva for genetic analysis on all individuals with and without FECD. The degree of FECD was assessed in a 0 to 6 semiquantitative scale using standardized clinical methods with pathological verification of FECD on at least 1 member of each family. Central corneal thickness was measured by ultrasonic pachymetry. Three hundred twenty-two families with 330 affected sibling pairs with FECD were enrolled and included a total of 650 sibling pairs of all disease grades. Using the entire 7-step FECD grading scale or a dichotomous definition of severe disease, heritability was assessed in families via sib-sib correlations. Both binary indicators of severe disease and semiquantitative measures of disease severity were significantly heritable, with heritability estimates of 30% for severe disease, 37% to 39% for FECD score, and 47% for central corneal thickness. Genetic risk factors have a strong role in the severity of the FECD phenotype and corneal thickness. Genotyping this cohort with high-density genetic markers followed by appropriate statistical analyses should lead to novel loci for disease susceptibility.

  10. Estimation of Epistatic Variance Components and Heritability in Founder Populations and Crosses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Alexander I.; Durbin, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Genetic association studies have explained only a small proportion of the estimated heritability of complex traits, leaving the remaining heritability “missing.” Genetic interactions have been proposed as an explanation for this, because they lead to overestimates of the heritability and are hard to detect. Whether this explanation is true depends on the proportion of variance attributable to genetic interactions, which is difficult to measure in outbred populations. Founder populations exhibit a greater range of kinship than outbred populations, which helps in fitting the epistatic variance. We extend classic theory to founder populations, giving the covariance between individuals due to epistasis of any order. We recover the classic theory as a limit, and we derive a recently proposed estimator of the narrow sense heritability as a corollary. We extend the variance decomposition to include dominance. We show in simulations that it would be possible to estimate the variance from pairwise interactions with samples of a few thousand from strongly bottlenecked human founder populations, and we provide an analytical approximation of the standard error. Applying these methods to 46 traits measured in a yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) cross, we estimate that pairwise interactions explain 10% of the phenotypic variance on average and that third- and higher-order interactions explain 14% of the phenotypic variance on average. We search for third-order interactions, discovering an interaction that is shared between two traits. Our methods will be relevant to future studies of epistatic variance in founder populations and crosses. PMID:25326236

  11. The executive prominent/memory prominent spectrum in Alzheimer's disease is highly heritable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mez, Jesse; Mukherjee, Shubhabrata; Thornton, Timothy; Fardo, David W; Trittschuh, Emily; Sutti, Sheila; Sherva, Richard; Kauwe, John S; Naj, Adam C; Beecham, Gary W; Gross, Alden; Saykin, Andrew J; Green, Robert C; Crane, Paul K

    2016-05-01

    Late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) can present heterogeneously, with several subtypes recognized, including dysexecutive AD. One way to identify people with dysexecutive AD is to consider the difference between memory and executive functioning, which we refer to as the executive prominent/memory prominent spectrum. We aimed to determine if this spectrum was heritable. We used neuropsychological and genetic data from people with mild LOAD (Clinical Dementia Rating 0.5 or 1.0) from the National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center and the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. We cocalibrated the neuropsychological data to obtain executive functioning and memory scores and used their difference as a continuous phenotype to calculate its heritability overall and by chromosome. Narrow-sense heritability of the difference between memory and executive functioning scores was 0.68 (standard error 0.12). Single nucleotide polymorphisms on chromosomes 1, 2, 4, 11, 12, and 18 explained the largest fraction of phenotypic variance, with signals from each chromosome accounting for 5%-7%. The chromosomal pattern of heritability differed substantially from that of LOAD itself.

  12. Rho/ROCK signal cascade mediates asymmetric dimethylarginine-induced vascular smooth muscle cells migration and phenotype change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yi-ming; Lan, Xi; Guo, Han-bin; Zhang, Yan; Ma, Li; Cao, Jian-biao

    2014-01-01

    Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) induces vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) migration. VSMC phenotype change is a prerequisite of migration. RhoA and Rho-kinase (ROCK) mediate migration of VSMCs. We hypothesize that ADMA induces VSMC migration via the activation of Rho/ROCK signal pathway and due to VSMCs phenotype change. ADMA activates Rho/ROCK signal pathway that interpreted by the elevation of RhoA activity and phosphorylation level of a ROCK substrate. Pretreatment with ROCK inhibitor, Y27632 completely reverses the induction of ADMA on ROCK and in turn inhibits ADMA-induced VSMCs migration. When the Rho/ROCK signal pathway has been blocked by pretreatment with Y27632, the induction of ERK signal pathway by ADMA is completely abrogated. Elimination of ADMA via overexpression of dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase 2 (DDAH2) and L-arginine both blocks the effects of ADMA on the activation of Rho/ROCK and extra cellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in VSMCs. The expression of differentiated phenotype relative proteins was reduced and the actin cytoskeleton was disassembled by ADMA, which were blocked by Y27632, further interpreting that ADMA inducing VSMCs migration via Rho/ROCK signal pathway is due to its effect on the VSMCs phenotype change. Our present study may help to provide novel insights into the therapy and prevention of atherosclerosis.

  13. Microenvironment-Dependent Phenotypic Changes in a SCID Mouse Model for Malignant Mesothelioma

    OpenAIRE

    Darai-Ramqvist, Eva; Nilsonne, Gustav; Flores-Staino, Carmen; Hjerpe, Anders; Dobra, Katalin

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims: Malignant mesothelioma is an aggressive, therapy-resistant tumor. Mesothelioma cells may assume an epithelioid or a sarcomatoid phenotype, and presence of sarcomatoid cells predicts poor prognosis. In this study, we investigated differentiation of mesothelioma cells in a xenograft model, where mesothelioma cells of both phenotypes were induced to form tumors in severe combined immunodeficiency mice. Methods: Xenografts were established and thoroughly characterized usin...

  14. Microenvironment-dependent phenotypic changes in a SCID mouse model for malignant mesothelioma

    OpenAIRE

    Eva eDarai-Ramqvist; Gustav eNilsonne; Carmen eFlores-Staino; Anders eHjerpe; Katalin eDobra

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims: Malignant mesothelioma is an aggressive, therapy-resistant tumor. Mesothelioma cells may assume an epithelioid or a sarcomatoid phenotype, and presence of sarcomatoid cells predicts poor prognosis. In this study, we investigated differentiation of mesothelioma cells in a xenograft model, where mesothelioma cells of both phenotypes were induced to form tumors in SCID mice. Methods: Xenografts were established and thoroughly characterized using a comprehensive immunohistoch...

  15. Phenotype definition in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winawer, Melodie R

    2006-05-01

    Phenotype definition consists of the use of epidemiologic, biological, molecular, or computational methods to systematically select features of a disorder that might result from distinct genetic influences. By carefully defining the target phenotype, or dividing the sample by phenotypic characteristics, we can hope to narrow the range of genes that influence risk for the trait in the study population, thereby increasing the likelihood of finding them. In this article, fundamental issues that arise in phenotyping in epilepsy and other disorders are reviewed, and factors complicating genotype-phenotype correlation are discussed. Methods of data collection, analysis, and interpretation are addressed, focusing on epidemiologic studies. With this foundation in place, the epilepsy subtypes and clinical features that appear to have a genetic basis are described, and the epidemiologic studies that have provided evidence for the heritability of these phenotypic characteristics, supporting their use in future genetic investigations, are reviewed. Finally, several molecular approaches to phenotype definition are discussed, in which the molecular defect, rather than the clinical phenotype, is used as a starting point.

  16. Apomixis Allows the Transgenerational Fixation of Phenotypes in Hybrid Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sailer, Christian; Schmid, Bernhard; Grossniklaus, Ueli

    2016-02-01

    The introduction of apomixis-asexual reproduction through seeds-into crop plants is considered the holy grail of agriculture, as it would provide a mechanism to maintain agriculturally important phenotypes [1, 2]. Apomicts produce clonal offspring, such that apomixis could be used to transgenerationally fix any genotype, including that of F1 hybrids, which are used in agriculture due to their superior vigor and yield [3-9]. However, traits (phenotypes) do not only result from a complex combination of genetic and environmental variation but can also be influenced by epigenetic variation, which can be transgenerationally heritable in plants [10-15]. Hence, it is far from clear whether genetic fixation by apomixis suffices to fix the agriculturally relevant phenotypes of F1 hybrids, in particular because hybridization was recently shown to induce epigenetic changes [16, 17]. Here, we show that the phenotypes of Hieracium pilosella hybrids can be fixed across generations by apomixis. Using a natural apomict, we created 11 hybrid genotypes (lines). In these and a parental line, we analyzed 20 phenotypic traits that are related to plant growth and reproduction. Of the 20 traits, 18 (90%) were stably inherited over two apomictic generations, grown at the same time in a randomized design, in 11 of the 12 lines. Although one hybrid line showed phenotypic instability, our results provide a fundamental proof of principle, demonstrating that apomixis can indeed be used in plant breeding and seed production to fix complex, quantitative phenotypes across generations.

  17. Changes in frailty conditions and phenotype components in elderly after hospitalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchiori, Gianna Fiori; Tavares, Darlene Mara Dos Santos

    2017-07-10

    describing the changes in frailty conditions over the period of a year after hospital discharge, verifying predictive variables for changes in frailty conditions and frailty phenotype components according to worsening, improving and stable groups. a longitudinal survey carried out with 129 elderly. A structured form for socioeconomic and health data, scales (Geriatric Depression Scale - short form, Katz scale, Lawton and Brody scale) and frailty phenotype according to Fried were used. Descriptive analysis and multinomial logistic regression model (pgrupos de piora, melhora e estabilidade. inquérito longitudinal, realizado com 129 idosos. Utilizou-se formulário estruturado para dados socioeconômicos e saúde, escalas (Depressão Geriátrica Abreviada, Katz, Lawton e Brody) e fenótipo de fragilidade, segundo Fried. Procederam-se às análises descritiva e modelo de regressão logística multinomial (pgrupo de piora, o aumento do número de morbidades foi preditor para exaustão e/ou fadiga, enquanto que, no grupo de melhora, o aumento na dependência das atividades instrumentais de vida diária foi preditor para a perda de peso, e a diminuição dos escores do indicativo de depressão para o baixo nível de atividade física. houve maior percentual de mudança na condição de idosos não frágeis para pré-frágeis e as variáveis de saúde foram preditoras apenas para os componentes do fenótipo de fragilidade. describir los cambios en las condiciones de fragilidad a lo largo de un año después del alta hospitalaria, y verificar las variables predictoras del cambio de las condiciones de fragilidad y de los componentes del fenotipo de fragilidad, según grupos de empeoramiento, mejoría y estabilidad. encuesta longitudinal, realizada con 129 ancianos. Se utilizó formulario estructurado para recoger datos socioeconómicos y salud; se utilizaron las escalas Depresión Geriátrica Abreviada (GDS-15), Actividades Básicas de Vida Diaria de Katz, Actividades

  18. Heritability of Blood Pressure in an Iranian Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Saadat

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available The fact that life styles and personal interests, aggregate within families suggests that shared environment in addition to shared bioligical factors could play a role in determining the phenotypic similarity of idividuals living in the same household. It is a major concern of cardiovascular epidemiologists to know how much of the familial aggregation of blood pressure is attributable to shared genes and/or shared family environment. Genetic and environmental influences on blood pressure was examined in a sample representative of the adult population of Shiraz, Fars province, south of Iran. The studied population was the 107 pairs of mother and dauther. Analysis of the data suggest that the genetic heritabilities were estimated to be 0.58,0.30, 0.60 for systolic, diastolic, and mean blood pressure, respectively.

  19. Pectus excavatum and heritable disorders of the connective tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tocchioni, Francesca; Ghionzoli, Marco; Messineo, Antonio; Romagnoli, Paolo

    2013-09-24

    Pectus excavatum, the most frequent congenital chest wall deformity, may be rarely observed as a sole deformity or as a sign of an underlying connective tissue disorder. To date, only few studies have described correlations between this deformity and heritable connective tissue disorders such as Marfan, Ehlers-Danlos, Poland, MASS (Mitral valve prolapse, not progressive Aortic enlargement, Skeletal and Skin alterations) phenotype among others. When concurring with connective tissue disorder, cardiopulmonary and vascular involvement may be associated to the thoracic defect. Ruling out the concomitance of pectus excavatum and connective tissue disorders, therefore, may have a direct implication both on surgical outcome and long term prognosis. In this review we focused on biological bases of connective tissue disorders which may be relevant to the pathogenesis of pectus excavatum, portraying surgical and clinical implication of their concurrence.

  20. Pectus excavatum and heritable disorders of the connective tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Tocchioni

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Pectus excavatum, the most frequent congenital chest wall deformity, may be rarely observed as a sole deformity or as a sign of an underlying connective tissue disorder. To date, only few studies have described correlations between this deformity and heritable connective tissue disorders such as Marfan, Ehlers-Danlos, Poland, MASS (Mitral valve prolapse, not progressive Aortic enlargement, Skeletal and Skin alterations phenotype among others. When concurring with connective tissue disorder, cardiopulmonary and vascular involvement may be associated to the thoracic defect. Ruling out the concomitance of pectus excavatum and connective tissue disorders, therefore, may have a direct implication both on surgical outcome and long term prognosis. In this review we focused on biological bases of connective tissue disorders which may be relevant to the pathogenesis of pectus excavatum, portraying surgical and clinical implication of their concurrence.

  1. Herdabilidades para ganho de peso da desmama ao sobreano e perímetro escrotal ao sobreano e tendências genética e fenotípica para ganho de peso da desmama ao sobreano em bovinos Nelore-Angus Heritabilities for post-weaning daily gain and scrotal circumference at yearling age and genetic and phenotypic trends for post-weaning daily gain in Nellore-Angus crossbreds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arione Augusti Boligon

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de estimar herdabilidades para ganho de peso médio diário da desmama ao sobreano (GMDDS e para perímetro escrotal ao sobreano (PES e tendências genética e fenotípica para GMDDS, foram utilizados 47.668 registros de peso e de ganho de peso de uma população multirracial Nelore-Angus, coletados entre 1991 e 2001 em diversas regiões do Brasil. Os dados foram analisados pelo método REML e as estimativas das (covariâncias foram obtidas por meio de um modelo animal, no qual foram considerados fixos os efeitos da composição racial do animal (obtida pela concatenação do percentual da raça Nelore do próprio animal, de seu pai e de sua mãe e do grupo de contemporâneos pós-desmama (animais nascidos no mesmo rebanho, ano, época e pertencentes ao mesmo sexo e grupo de manejo e, como aleatórios, os efeitos genético aditivo direto e residual. A herdabilidade para PES foi estimada utlizando-se o mesmo modelo, acrescido dos efeitos fixos do peso e da idade do animal ao sobreano (covariáveis. As médias para idade nas pesagens foram 215 e 528 dias para a desmama e o sobreano, respectivamente. A herdabilidade estimada para GMDDS foi 0,44 ± 0,02 e para PES, 0,22 ± 0,08. A tendência genética anual predita para GMDDS foi decrescente até 1996 e crescente a partir desse período. A tendência fenotípica anual foi de 9,4 g/dia/ano.Data consisting of 47.668 records of a Nellore-Angus crossbred population, raised in several regions of Brazil, from 1991 to 2001, were used to estimate heritability for post-weaning daily gain (ADG and for scrotal circumference at yearling age (SCY using REML. Genetic and phenotypic trends for ADG were also estimated. The model used to estimate heritability and breeding values (BVs for ADG included the fixed effects of breed composition (defined by the percentage of contribution of the Nellore breed of the animal and his parents and the contemporary group after weaning (herd, year/season of birth

  2. Describing the genetic architecture of epilepsy through heritability analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speed, Doug; O'Brien, Terence J; Palotie, Aarno; Shkura, Kirill; Marson, Anthony G; Balding, David J; Johnson, Michael R

    2014-10-01

    Epilepsy is a disease with substantial missing heritability; despite its high genetic component, genetic association studies have had limited success detecting common variants which influence susceptibility. In this paper, we reassess the role of common variants on epilepsy using extensions of heritability analysis. Our data set consists of 1258 UK patients with epilepsy, of which 958 have focal epilepsy, and 5129 population control subjects, with genotypes recorded for over 4 million common single nucleotide polymorphisms. Firstly, we show that on the liability scale, common variants collectively explain at least 26% (standard deviation 5%) of phenotypic variation for all epilepsy and 27% (standard deviation 5%) for focal epilepsy. Secondly we provide a new method for estimating the number of causal variants for complex traits; when applied to epilepsy, our most optimistic estimate suggests that at least 400 variants influence disease susceptibility, with potentially many thousands. Thirdly, we use bivariate analysis to assess how similar the genetic architecture of focal epilepsy is to that of non-focal epilepsy; we demonstrate both significant differences (P = 0.004) and significant similarities (P = 0.01) between the two subtypes, indicating that although the clinical definition of focal epilepsy does identify a genetically distinct epilepsy subtype, there is also scope to improve the classification of epilepsy by incorporating genotypic information. Lastly, we investigate the potential value in using genetic data to diagnose epilepsy following a single epileptic seizure; we find that a prediction model explaining 10% of phenotypic variation could have clinical utility for deciding which single-seizure individuals are likely to benefit from immediate anti-epileptic drug therapy.

  3. Extensive transcriptome analysis correlates the plasticity of Entamoeba histolytica pathogenesis to rapid phenotype changes depending on the environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Christian; Koutero, Mikael; Dillies, Marie-Agnes; Varet, Hugo; Lopez-Camarillo, Cesar; Coppée, Jean Yves; Hon, Chung-Chau; Guillén, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Amoebiasis is a human infectious disease due to the amoeba parasite Entamoeba histolytica. The disease appears in only 20% of the infections. Diversity in phenotypes may occur within the same infectious strain in the gut; for instance, parasites can be commensal (in the intestinal lumen) or pathogenic (inside the tissue). The degree of pathogenesis of clinical isolates varies greatly. These findings raise the hypothesis that genetic derivation may account for amoebic diverse phenotypes. The main goal of this study was to analyse gene expression changes of a single virulent amoebic strain in different environmental contexts where it exhibit different degrees of virulence, namely isolated from humans and maintained through animal liver passages, in contact with the human colon and short or prolonged in vitro culture. The study reveals major transcriptome changes in virulent parasites upon contact with human colon explants, including genes related to sugar metabolism, cytoskeleton rearrangement, stress responses and DNA repair. Furthermore, in long-term cultured parasites, drastic changes in gene expression for proteins with functions for proteasome and tRNA activities were found. Globally we conclude that rapid changes in gene expression rather than genetic derivation can sustain the invasive phenotype of a single virulent isolate of E. histolytica. PMID:27767091

  4. Heritability of Sex Tendency in a Harpacticoid Copepod, Tigriopus californicus

    OpenAIRE

    Voordouw, Maarten J; Anholt, Bradley R.

    2011-01-01

    Systems with genetic variation for the primary sex ratio are important for testing sex-ratio theory and for understanding how this variation is maintained. Evidence is presented for heritable variation of the primary sex ratio in the harpacticoid copepod Tigriopus californicus. Variation in the primary sex ratio among families cannot be accounted for by Mendelian segregation of sex chromosomes. The covariance in sex phenotype between full-sibling clutches and between mothers and offspring sug...

  5. Sex differences in heritability of neck Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fejer, René; Hartvigsen, Jan; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm

    2006-01-01

    Experimental studies have suggested biological factors as a possible explanation for gender disparities in perception of pain. Recently, heritability of liability to neck pain (NP) has been found to be statistically significantly larger in women compared to men. However, no studies have been cond...

  6. Introduction to the symposium-uniting evolutionary and physiological approaches to understanding phenotypic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Haruka; Sewall, Kendra B

    2014-11-01

    Diverse subfields of biology have addressed phenotypic plasticity, but have emphasized different aspects of the definition, thereby shaping the questions that are asked and the methodological approaches that are employed. A key difference between studies of plasticity in the fields of evolutionary biology and physiology is the degree of focus upon the contribution of genetic variance to plastic traits. Although evolutionary biology is generally focused on the heritability and adaptive value of plastic traits and therefore the potential for plasticity to impact changes in traits across generations, physiological studies have historically focused on the timing and reversibility of plastic change across seasons or ages and the mechanisms underlying traits' plasticity. In this review and the symposium from which it emerged, we aimed to highlight ways that integrative biologists can better communicate about their research and design better studies to address phenotypic plasticity. Evolutionary theory clarifies the need to assess fitness using reliable measures, such as survival and reproductive success, and to consider the heritability and genetic variance underlying plasticity. Reciprocally, physiological research demonstrates that understanding the mechanisms that permit, or limit, plasticity, whether through pleiotropic effects, developmental, or functional linkages between traits, or epigenetic modifications, will shed light on limitations to phenotypic plasticity. Uniting the fields of evolution and physiology to address all aspects of phenotypic plasticity will be increasingly important as the rate of anthropogenic environmental change increases and biologists must predict the responses of wild populations to novel environments, as well as determine the most effective conservation interventions.

  7. Late Language Emergence in 24-Month-Old Twins: Heritable and Increased Risk for Late Language Emergence in Twins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Mabel L.; Zubrick, Stephen R.; Taylor, Catherine L.; Gayán, Javier; Bontempo, Daniel E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the etiology of late language emergence (LLE) in 24-month-old twins, considering possible twinning, zygosity, gender, and heritability effects for vocabulary and grammar phenotypes. Method: A population-based sample of 473 twin pairs participated. Multilevel modeling estimated means and variances of vocabulary and…

  8. Precision phenotyping of biomass accumulation in triticale reveals temporal genetic patterns of regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busemeyer, Lucas; Ruckelshausen, Arno; Möller, Kim; Melchinger, Albrecht E.; Alheit, Katharina V.; Maurer, Hans Peter; Hahn, Volker; Weissmann, Elmar A.; Reif, Jochen C.; Würschum, Tobias

    2013-08-01

    To extend agricultural productivity by knowledge-based breeding and tailor varieties adapted to specific environmental conditions, it is imperative to improve our ability to assess the dynamic changes of the phenome of crops under field conditions. To this end, we have developed a precision phenotyping platform that combines various sensors for a non-invasive, high-throughput and high-dimensional phenotyping of small grain cereals. This platform yielded high prediction accuracies and heritabilities for biomass of triticale. Genetic variation for biomass accumulation was dissected with 647 doubled haploid lines derived from four families. Employing a genome-wide association mapping approach, two major quantitative trait loci (QTL) for biomass were identified and the genetic architecture of biomass accumulation was found to be characterized by dynamic temporal patterns. Our findings highlight the potential of precision phenotyping to assess the dynamic genetics of complex traits, especially those not amenable to traditional phenotyping.

  9. Phenotypic changes in different spinach varieties grown and selected under organic conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serpolay, E.; Schermann, N.; Dawson, J.C.; Lammerts Van Bueren, E.; Goldringer, I.; Chable, V.

    2011-01-01

    Organic and low-input agriculture needs flexible varieties that can buffer environmental stress and adapt to the needs of farmers. We implemented an experiment to investigate the evolutionary capacities of a sample of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) population varieties for a number of phenotypic tra

  10. Microenvironment-dependent phenotypic changes in a SCID mouse model for malignant mesothelioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva eDarai-Ramqvist

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Malignant mesothelioma is an aggressive, therapy-resistant tumor. Mesothelioma cells may assume an epithelioid or a sarcomatoid phenotype, and presence of sarcomatoid cells predicts poor prognosis. In this study, we investigated differentiation of mesothelioma cells in a xenograft model, where mesothelioma cells of both phenotypes were induced to form tumors in SCID mice. Methods: Xenografts were established and thoroughly characterized using a comprehensive immunohistochemical panel, array comparative genomic hybridization of chromosome 3, fluorescent in situ hybridization and electron microscopy.Results: Epithelioid and sarcomatoid cells gave rise to xenografts of similar epithelioid morphology. While sarcomatoid-derived xenografts had higher growth rates, the morphology and expression of differentiation-related markers was similar between xenografts derived from both phenotypes. Array comparative genomic hybridization showed a convergent genotype for both xenografts, resembling the original aggressive sarcomatoid cell sub-line.Conclusions: Human mesothelioma xenografts from sarcomatoid and epithelioid phenotypes converged to a similar differentiation state, and genetic analyses suggested that clonal selection in the mouse microenvironment was a major contributing factor. This thoroughly characterized animal model can be used for further studies of molecular events underlying tumor cell differentiation.

  11. Mowat-Wilson syndrome: facial phenotype changing with age: study of 19 Italian patients and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garavelli, L; Zollino, M; Mainardi, P Cerruti; Gurrieri, F; Rivieri, F; Soli, F; Verri, R; Albertini, E; Favaron, E; Zignani, M; Orteschi, D; Bianchi, P; Faravelli, F; Forzano, F; Seri, M; Wischmeijer, A; Turchetti, D; Pompilii, E; Gnoli, M; Cocchi, G; Mazzanti, L; Bergamaschi, R; De Brasi, D; Sperandeo, M P; Mari, F; Uliana, V; Mostardini, R; Cecconi, M; Grasso, M; Sassi, S; Sebastio, G; Renieri, A; Silengo, M; Bernasconi, S; Wakamatsu, N; Neri, G

    2009-03-01

    Mowat-Wilson syndrome (MWS; OMIM #235730) is a genetic condition caused by heterozygous mutations or deletions of the ZEB2 gene, and characterized by typical face, moderate-to-severe mental retardation, epilepsy, Hirschsprung disease, and multiple congenital anomalies, including genital anomalies (particularly hypospadias in males), congenital heart defects, agenesis of the corpus callosum, and eye defects. Since the first delineation by Mowat et al. [Mowat et al. (1998); J Med Genet 35:617-623], approximately 179 patients with ZEB2 mutations, deletions or cytogenetic abnormalities have been reported primarily from Europe, Australia and the United States. Genetic defects include chromosome 2q21-q23 microdeletions (or different chromosome rearrangements) in few patients, and ZEB2 mutations in most. We report on clinical and genetic data from 19 Italian patients, diagnosed within the last 5 years, including six previously published, and compare them with patients already reported. The main purpose of this review is to underline a highly consistent phenotype and to highlight the phenotypic evolution occurring with age, particularly of the facial characteristics. The prevalence of MWS is likely to be underestimated. Knowledge of the phenotypic spectrum of MWS and of its changing phenotype with age can improve the detection rate of this condition.

  12. SNP based heritability estimation using a Bayesian approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, Kristian; Janss, Luc; Mahdi Shariati, Mohammad;

    2013-01-01

    Heritability is a central element in quantitative genetics. New molecular markers to assess genetic variance and heritability are continually under development. The availability of molecular single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers can be applied for estimation of variance components and heri......Heritability is a central element in quantitative genetics. New molecular markers to assess genetic variance and heritability are continually under development. The availability of molecular single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers can be applied for estimation of variance components...

  13. Heritable yeast prions have a highly organized three-dimensional architecture with interfiber structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saibil, Helen R; Seybert, Anja; Habermann, Anja; Winkler, Juliane; Eltsov, Mikhail; Perkovic, Mario; Castaño-Diez, Daniel; Scheffer, Margot P; Haselmann, Uta; Chlanda, Petr; Lindquist, Susan; Tyedmers, Jens; Frangakis, Achilleas S

    2012-09-11

    Yeast prions constitute a "protein-only" mechanism of inheritance that is widely deployed by wild yeast to create diverse phenotypes. One of the best-characterized prions, [PSI(+)], is governed by a conformational change in the prion domain of Sup35, a translation-termination factor. When this domain switches from its normal soluble form to an insoluble amyloid, the ensuing change in protein synthesis creates new traits. Two factors make these traits heritable: (i) the amyloid conformation is self-templating; and (ii) the protein-remodeling factor heat-shock protein (Hsp)104 (acting together with Hsp70 chaperones) partitions the template to daughter cells with high fidelity. Prions formed by several other yeast proteins create their own phenotypes but share the same mechanistic basis of inheritance. Except for the amyloid fibril itself, the cellular architecture underlying these protein-based elements of inheritance is unknown. To study the 3D arrangement of prion assemblies in their cellular context, we examined yeast [PSI(+)] prions in the native, hydrated state in situ, taking advantage of recently developed methods for cryosectioning of vitrified cells. Cryo-electron tomography of the vitrified sections revealed the prion assemblies as aligned bundles of regularly spaced fibrils in the cytoplasm with no bounding structures. Although the fibers were widely spaced, other cellular complexes, such as ribosomes, were excluded from the fibril arrays. Subtomogram image averaging, made possible by the organized nature of the assemblies, uncovered the presence of an additional array of densities between the fibers. We suggest these structures constitute a self-organizing mechanism that coordinates fiber deposition and the regulation of prion inheritance.

  14. Heritability of the Severity of the Metabolic Syndrome in Whites and Blacks in 3 Large Cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musani, Solomon K; Martin, Lisa J; Woo, Jessica G; Olivier, Michael; Gurka, Matthew J; DeBoer, Mark D

    2017-04-01

    Although dichotomous criteria for the metabolic syndrome (MetS) appear heritable, it is not known whether MetS severity as assessed by a continuous MetS score is heritable and whether this varies by race. We used SOLAR (Sequential Oligogenic Linkage Analysis Routines) to evaluate heritability of Adult Treatment Panel-III MetS and a sex- and race-specific MetS severity Z score among 3 large familial cohorts: the JHS (Jackson Heart Study, 1404 black participants), TOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly, 1947 white participants), and PLRS (Princeton Lipid Research Study, 229 black and 527 white participants). Heritability estimates were larger for Adult Treatment Panel-III MetS among black compared with white cohort members (JHS 0.48; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.28-0.68 and PLRS blacks 0.93 [95% CI, 0.73-1.13] versus TOPS 0.21 [95% CI, -0.18 to 0.60] and PLRS whites 0.27 [95% CI, -0.04 to 0.58]). The difference by race narrowed when assessing heritability of the MetS severity score (JHS 0.52 [95% CI, 0.38, 0.66] and PLRS blacks 0.64 [95% CI, 0.13-1.15] versus TOPS 0.23 [95% CI, 0.15-0.31] and PLRS whites 0.60 [95% CI, 0.33-0.87]). There was a high degree of genetic and phenotypic correlation between MetS severity and the individual components of MetS among all groups, although the genetic correlations failed to reach statistical significance among PLRS blacks. Meta-analyses revealed a combined heritability estimate for Adult Treatment Panel-III MetS of 0.24 (95% CI, 0.11-0.36) and for the MetS severity score of 0.50 (95% CI, -0.05 to 0.99). MetS severity seems highly heritable among whites and blacks. This continuous MetS severity Z score may provide a more useful means of characterizing phenotypic MetS in genetic studies by minimizing racial differences. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Genotype-phenotype correlations in Cornelia de Lange syndrome: Behavioral characteristics and changes with age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Joanna; Penhallow, Jessica; Ansari, Morad; Barton, Stephanie; Bourn, David; FitzPatrick, David R; Goodship, Judith; Hammond, Peter; Roberts, Catherine; Welham, Alice; Oliver, Chris

    2017-06-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is a multisystem genetic disorder associated with unusual facial features, limb abnormalities, a wide range of health conditions, and intellectual disability. Mutations in five genes that encode (SMC1A, SMC3, RAD21) or regulate (NIPBL, HDAC8) the cohesin complex have been identified in up to 70% of individuals. Genetic cause remains unknown for a proportion of individuals. There is substantial heterogeneity in all aspects of CdLS but very little is known about what predicts phenotypic heterogeneity. In this study, we evaluated genotype-phenotype associations in 34 individuals with CdLS. Participants with NIPBL mutations had significantly lower self help skills and were less likely to have verbal skills relative to those who were negative for the NIPBL mutation. No significant differences were identified between the groups in relation to repetitive behavior, mood, interest and pleasure, challenging behavior, activity, impulsivity, and characteristics of autism spectrum disorder whilst controlling differences in self help skills. Significant correlations indicating lower mood, interest and pleasure, and increased insistence on sameness with older age were identified for those who were NIPBL mutation positive. The findings suggest similarities in the behavioral phenotype between those with and without the NIPBL mutation once differences in self help skills are controlled for. However, there may be subtle differences in the developmental trajectory of these behaviors according to genetic mutation status in CdLS. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. A review and meta-analysis of the heritability of specific phobia subtypes and corresponding fears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Houtem, C M H H; Laine, M L; Boomsma, D I; Ligthart, L; van Wijk, A J; De Jongh, A

    2013-05-01

    Evidence from twin studies suggests that genetic factors contribute to the risk of developing a fear or a phobia. The aim of the present study was to review the current literature regarding twin studies describing the genetic basis of specific phobias and their corresponding fears. The analysis included five twin studies on fears and ten twin studies on specific phobias. Heritability estimates of fear subtypes and specific phobia subtypes both varied widely, even within the subtypes. A meta-analysis performed on the twin study results indicated that fears and specific phobias are moderately heritable. The highest mean heritability (±SEM) among fear subtypes was found for animal fear (45%±0.004), and among specific phobias for the blood-injury-injection phobia (33%±0.06). For most phenotypes, variance could be explained solely by additive genetic and unique environmental effects. Given the dearth of independent data on the heritability of specific phobias and fears, additional research is needed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Heritability of racing durability traits in the Australian and Hong Kong Thoroughbred racing populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velie, B D; Hamilton, N A; Wade, C M

    2016-05-01

    Many attempts have been made to improve the well-being of racing Thoroughbreds through improvements in management and veterinary care. However, these attempts are often limited by the industry's ability to regulate a large number of environmental variables and as a result have arguably had limited success in providing long-lasting change for the breed. To identify heritable durability traits for Thoroughbred horses racing in Australia and Hong Kong. Heritability analysis of a longitudinal dataset. Performance data on the Thoroughbred populations racing in Australia and Hong Kong between 2000 and 2011 (n = 168,993) were used to estimate the heritabilities and probability values of fixed effects and covariates for a range of racing durability traits. Heritabilities for all durability traits were estimated using a single trait animal model. Each model included, as a minimum, the effects of sex and trainer. Racing longevity (0.12 ± 0.01), racing persistence (0.10 ± 0.01), racing frequency (0.03 ± 0.01), spells (a time period between consecutive races, official trials and/or jump-outs greater than 90 days in length) per year (0.05 ± 0.01), spells per 10 starts (0.03 ± 0.01) and variation of days between races (0.08 ± 0.03) were all significantly heritable for horses racing in Australia. Racing longevity (0.08 ± 0.02), racing persistence (0.04 ± 0.02), spells per year (0.06 ± 0.02) and spells per 10 starts (0.11 ± 0.04) were significantly heritable for horses racing in Hong Kong. The heritabilities estimated for durability traits in this study provide support for the successful and practical application of genetic selection methodologies to improving the well-being of racing Thoroughbreds. © 2015 EVJ Ltd.

  18. Heritability in the genomics era--concepts and misconceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visscher, Peter M; Hill, William G; Wray, Naomi R

    2008-04-01

    Heritability allows a comparison of the relative importance of genes and environment to the variation of traits within and across populations. The concept of heritability and its definition as an estimable, dimensionless population parameter was introduced by Sewall Wright and Ronald Fisher nearly a century ago. Despite continuous misunderstandings and controversies over its use and application, heritability remains key to the response to selection in evolutionary biology and agriculture, and to the prediction of disease risk in medicine. Recent reports of substantial heritability for gene expression and new estimation methods using marker data highlight the relevance of heritability in the genomics era.

  19. Gene Frequency and Heritability of Rh Blood Group Gene in 44 Human Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supriyo CHAKRABORTY

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The frequency of RhD and Rhd alleles of Rh blood group gene was estimated in 44 human populations distributed all over the world from the RhD phenotypic data. The average frequency of RhD and Rhd allele over these populations was 0.70 and 0.30, respectively. Higher frequency of RhD allele than the expected estimate (0.50 in all the populations, under Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium condition assuming equal frequency of both alleles in the initial population, indicated inbreeding at RhD/d locus as well as natural selection for RhD allele. Very high heritability estimate (84.04% of Rh allele frequency revealed that this trait was under weak selection pressure and resulted in greater genetic variation in existing populations. It is consistent with Fishers fundamental theorem of natural selection. The results from the present study suggest that inbreeding at RhD/d locus and some other factors (possibly mutation, migration and genetic drift other than natural selection alone played major roles in changing the Rh allele frequency in these populations.

  20. Phenotypic malignant changes and untargeted lipidomic analysis of long-term exposed prostate cancer cells to endocrine disruptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bedia, Carmen, E-mail: carmen.bedia@idaea.csic.es; Dalmau, Núria, E-mail: nuria.dalmau@idaea.csic.es; Jaumot, Joaquim, E-mail: joaquim.jaumot@idaea.csic.es; Tauler, Romà, E-mail: roma.tauler@idaea.csic.es

    2015-07-15

    Endocrine disruptors (EDs) are a class of environmental toxic molecules able to interfere with the normal hormone metabolism. Numerous studies involve EDs exposure to initiation and development of cancers, including prostate cancer. In this work, three different EDs (aldrin, aroclor 1254 and chlorpyrifos (CPF)) were investigated as potential inducers of a malignant phenotype in DU145 prostate cancer cells after a chronic exposure. Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) induction, proliferation, migration, colony formation and release of metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) were analyzed in 50-day exposed cells to the selected EDs. As a result, aldrin and CPF exposure led to an EMT induction (loss of 16% and 14% of E-cadherin levels, respectively, compared to the unexposed cells). Aroclor and CPF presented an increased migration (134% and 126%, respectively), colony formation (204% and 144%, respectively) and MMP-2 release (137% in both cases) compared to the unexposed cells. An untargeted lipidomic analysis was performed to decipher the lipids involved in the observed transformations. As general results, aldrin exposure showed a global decrease in phospholipids and sphingolipids, and aroclor and CPF showed an increase of certain phospholipids, glycosphingolipids as well as a remarkable increase of some cardiolipin species. Furthermore, the three exposures resulted in an increase of some triglyceride species. In conclusion, some significant changes in lipids were identified and thus we postulate that some lipid compounds and lipid metabolic pathways could be involved in the acquisition of the malignant phenotype in exposed prostate cancer cells to the selected EDs. - Highlights: • Aldrin, aroclor and chlorpyrifos induced an aggressive phenotype in DU145 cells. • An untargeted lipidomic analysis has been performed on chronic exposed cells. • Lipidomic results showed changes in specific lipid species under chronic exposure. • These lipids may have a role in the

  1. Potential Pitfalls in Estimating Viral Load Heritability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leventhal, Gabriel E; Bonhoeffer, Sebastian

    2016-09-01

    In HIV patients, the set-point viral load (SPVL) is the most widely used predictor of disease severity. Yet SPVL varies over several orders of magnitude between patients. The heritability of SPVL quantifies how much of the variation in SPVL is due to transmissible viral genetics. There is currently no clear consensus on the value of SPVL heritability, as multiple studies have reported apparently discrepant estimates. Here we illustrate that the discrepancies in estimates are most likely due to differences in the estimation methods, rather than the study populations. Importantly, phylogenetic estimates run the risk of being strongly confounded by unrealistic model assumptions. Care must be taken when interpreting and comparing the different estimates to each other.

  2. Novel molecular therapies for heritable skin disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uitto, Jouni; Christiano, Angela M; McLean, W H Irwin; McGrath, John A

    2012-03-01

    Tremendous progress has been made in the past two decades in molecular genetics of heritable skin diseases, and pathogenic mutations have been identified in as many as 500 distinct human genes. This progress has resulted in improved diagnosis with prognostic implications, has refined genetic counseling, and has formed the basis for prenatal and presymptomatic testing and preimplantation genetic diagnosis. However, there has been relatively little progress in developing effective and specific treatments for these often devastating diseases. However, very recently, a number of novel molecular strategies, including gene therapy, cell-based approaches, and protein replacement therapy, have been explored for the treatment of these conditions. This overview will focus on the prototypic heritable blistering disorders, epidermolysis bullosa, and related keratinopathies, in which significant progress has been made recently toward treatment, and it will illustrate how some of the translational research therapies have already entered the clinical arena.

  3. The heritability of leucocyte telomere length dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjelmborg, Jacob B; Dalgård, Christine; Möller, Sören

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Leucocyte telomere length (LTL) is a complex trait associated with ageing and longevity. LTL dynamics are defined by LTL and its age-dependent attrition. Strong, but indirect evidence suggests that LTL at birth and its attrition during childhood largely explains interindividual LTL...... unique environmental factors, estimated at 72% (95% CI 56% to 84%) affected LTL attrition rate with no indication of shared environmental effects. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study that estimated heritability of LTL and also its age-dependent attrition. As LTL attrition is much slower in adults than...... in children and given that having a long or a short LTL is largely determined before adulthood, our findings suggest that heritability and early life environment are the main determinants of LTL throughout the human life course. Thus, insights into factors that influence LTL at birth and its dynamics during...

  4. Food neophobia shows heritable variation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaapila, Antti; Tuorila, Hely; Silventoinen, Karri; Keskitalo, Kaisu; Kallela, Mikko; Wessman, Maija; Peltonen, Leena; Cherkas, Lynn F; Spector, Tim D; Perola, Markus

    2007-08-15

    Food neophobia refers to reluctance to eat unfamiliar foods. We determined the heritability of food neophobia in a family and a twin sample. The family sample consisted of 28 Finnish families (105 females, 50 males, aged 18-78 years, mean age 49 years) and the twin sample of 468 British female twin pairs (211 monozygous and 257 dizygous pairs, aged 17-82 years, mean age 55 years). Food neophobia was measured using the ten-item Food Neophobia Scale (FNS) questionnaire, and its internationally validated six-item modification. The heritability estimate for food neophobia was 69 and 66% in Finnish families (h(2)) and 67 and 66% in British female twins (a(2)+d(2)) using the ten- and six-item versions of the FNS, respectively. The results from both populations suggest that about two thirds of variation in food neophobia is genetically determined.

  5. Parameters in dynamic models of complex traits are containers of missing heritability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunpeng Wang

    Full Text Available Polymorphisms identified in genome-wide association studies of human traits rarely explain more than a small proportion of the heritable variation, and improving this situation within the current paradigm appears daunting. Given a well-validated dynamic model of a complex physiological trait, a substantial part of the underlying genetic variation must manifest as variation in model parameters. These parameters are themselves phenotypic traits. By linking whole-cell phenotypic variation to genetic variation in a computational model of a single heart cell, incorporating genotype-to-parameter maps, we show that genome-wide association studies on parameters reveal much more genetic variation than when using higher-level cellular phenotypes. The results suggest that letting such studies be guided by computational physiology may facilitate a causal understanding of the genotype-to-phenotype map of complex traits, with strong implications for the development of phenomics technology.

  6. Multiple Changes of Gene Expression and Function Reveal Genomic and Phenotypic Complexity in SLE-like Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Wilbe

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of clinical manifestations commonly observed in autoimmune disorders poses a major challenge to genetic studies of such diseases. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE affects humans as well as other mammals, and is characterized by the presence of antinuclear antibodies (ANA in patients' sera and multiple disparate clinical features. Here we present evidence that particular sub-phenotypes of canine SLE-related disease, based on homogenous (ANA(H and speckled ANA (ANA(S staining pattern, and also steroid-responsive meningitis-arteritis (SRMA are associated with different but overlapping sets of genes. In addition to association to certain MHC alleles and haplotypes, we identified 11 genes (WFDC3, HOMER2, VRK1, PTPN3, WHAMM, BANK1, AP3B2, DAPP1, LAMTOR3, DDIT4L and PPP3CA located on five chromosomes that contain multiple risk haplotypes correlated with gene expression and disease sub-phenotypes in an intricate manner. Intriguingly, the association of BANK1 with both human and canine SLE appears to lead to similar changes in gene expression levels in both species. Our results suggest that molecular definition may help unravel the mechanisms of different clinical features common between and specific to various autoimmune disease phenotypes in dogs and humans.

  7. Ovarian cancer progression is controlled by phenotypic changes in dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarlett, Uciane K; Rutkowski, Melanie R; Rauwerdink, Adam M; Fields, Jennifer; Escovar-Fadul, Ximena; Baird, Jason; Cubillos-Ruiz, Juan R; Jacobs, Ana C; Gonzalez, Jorge L; Weaver, John; Fiering, Steven; Conejo-Garcia, Jose R

    2012-03-12

    We characterized the initiation and evolution of the immune response against a new inducible p53-dependent model of aggressive ovarian carcinoma that recapitulates the leukocyte infiltrates and cytokine milieu of advanced human tumors. Unlike other models that initiate tumors before the development of a mature immune system, we detect measurable anti-tumor immunity from very early stages, which is driven by infiltrating dendritic cells (DCs) and prevents steady tumor growth for prolonged periods. Coinciding with a phenotypic switch in expanding DC infiltrates, tumors aggressively progress to terminal disease in a comparatively short time. Notably, tumor cells remain immunogenic at advanced stages, but anti-tumor T cells become less responsive, whereas their enduring activity is abrogated by different microenvironmental immunosuppressive DCs. Correspondingly, depleting DCs early in the disease course accelerates tumor expansion, but DC depletion at advanced stages significantly delays aggressive malignant progression. Our results indicate that phenotypically divergent DCs drive both immunosurveillance and accelerated malignant growth. We provide experimental support for the cancer immunoediting hypothesis, but we also show that aggressive cancer progression after a comparatively long latency period is primarily driven by the mobilization of immunosuppressive microenvironmental leukocytes, rather than loss of tumor immunogenicity.

  8. Microglia phenotype diversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olah, M.; Biber, K.; Vinet, J.; Boddeke, H. W. G. M.

    2011-01-01

    Microglia, the tissue macrophages of the brain, have under healthy conditions a resting phenotype that is characterized by a ramified morphology. With their fine processes microglia are continuously scanning their environment. Upon any homeostatic disturbance microglia rapidly change their phenotype

  9. Microglia phenotype diversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olah, M.; Biber, K.; Vinet, J.; Boddeke, H. W. G. M.

    2011-01-01

    Microglia, the tissue macrophages of the brain, have under healthy conditions a resting phenotype that is characterized by a ramified morphology. With their fine processes microglia are continuously scanning their environment. Upon any homeostatic disturbance microglia rapidly change their phenotype

  10. Microglia phenotype diversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olah, M.; Biber, K.; Vinet, J.; Boddeke, H. W. G. M.

    Microglia, the tissue macrophages of the brain, have under healthy conditions a resting phenotype that is characterized by a ramified morphology. With their fine processes microglia are continuously scanning their environment. Upon any homeostatic disturbance microglia rapidly change their phenotype

  11. Phenotypes, antioxidant responses, and gene expression changes accompanying a sugar-only diet in Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Er-Hu; Hou, Qiu-Li; Wei, Dan-Dan; Jiang, Hong-Bo; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2017-08-17

    Diet composition (yeast:carbohydrate ratio) is an important determinant of growth, development, and reproduction. Recent studies have shown that decreased yeast intake elicits numerous transcriptomic changes and enhances somatic maintenance and lifespan, which in turn reduces reproduction in various insects. However, our understanding of the responses leading to a decrease in yeast ratio to 0% is limited. In the present study, we investigated the effects of a sugar-only diet (SD) on the gene expression patterns of the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), one of the most economically important pests in the family Tephritidae. RNA sequencing analyses showed that flies reared on an SD induced significant changes in the expression levels of genes associated with specific metabolic as well as cell growth and death pathways. Moreover, the observed upregulated genes in energy production and downregulated genes associated with reproduction suggested that SD affects somatic maintenance and reproduction in B. dorsalis. As expected, we observed that SD altered B. dorsalis phenotypes by significantly increasing stress (starvation and desiccation) resistance, decreasing reproduction, but did not extend lifespan compared to those that received a normal diet (ND) regime. In addition, administration of an SD resulted in a reduction in antioxidant enzyme activities and an increase in MDA concentrations, thereby suggesting that antioxidants cannot keep up with the increase in oxidative damage induced by SD regime. The application of an SD diet induces changes in phenotypes, antioxidant responses, and gene expressions in B. dorsalis. Previous studies have associated extended lifespan with reduced fecundity. The current study did not observe a prolongation of lifespan in B. dorsalis, which instead incurred oxidative damage. The findings of the present study improve our understanding of the molecular, biochemical, and phenotypic response of B. dorsalis to an SD diet.

  12. Polymorphic changes of cell phenotype caused by elevated expression of an exogenous NEU proto-oncogene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarakhovsky, A M; Resnikov, M; Zaichuk, T; Tugusheva, M V; Butenko, Z A; Prassolov, V S

    1990-03-01

    The NEU proto-oncogene encodes a 185,000 dalton transmembrane glycoprotein with extensive homology to epidermal growth factor receptor. In the current study the effect of exogenous NEU expression on phenotype and growth properties of cells established lines was examined. The replication defective retroviruses were used to express constitutively NEU cDNA in the Rat-1, NIH3T3 and Balb/c3T3 cells. In spite of the practically similar NEU mRNA and protein content in infected cells only in Balb/c3T3 cells, high NEU expression ultimately led to oncogenic transformation. The Rat-1 cells were practically insensitive to oncogenic action of NEU. Subpopulation divergency with respect to NEU-dependent transformation was also revealed in infected NIH3T3 cells. These results suggest the existence of unknown host-specific factor(s) determining the response of cells to NEU overexpression.

  13. Reconsidering the heritability of intelligence in adulthood: taking assortative mating and cultural transmission into account.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinkhuyzen, Anna A E; van der Sluis, Sophie; Maes, Hermine H M; Posthuma, Danielle

    2012-03-01

    Heritability estimates of general intelligence in adulthood generally range from 75 to 85%, with all heritability due to additive genetic influences, while genetic dominance and shared environmental factors are absent, or too small to be detected. These estimates are derived from studies based on the classical twin design and are based on the assumption of random mating. Yet, considerable positive assortative mating has been reported for general intelligence. Unmodeled assortative mating may lead to biased estimates of the relative magnitude of genetic and environmental factors. To investigate the effects of assortative mating on the estimates of the variance components of intelligence, we employed an extended twin-family design. Psychometric IQ data were available for adult monozygotic and dizygotic twins, their siblings, the partners of the twins and siblings, and either the parents or the adult offspring of the twins and siblings (N = 1314). Two underlying processes of assortment were considered: phenotypic assortment and social homogamy. The phenotypic assortment model was slightly preferred over the social homogamy model, suggesting that assortment for intelligence is mostly due to a selection of mates on similarity in intelligence. Under the preferred phenotypic assortment model, the variance of intelligence in adulthood was not only due to non-shared environmental (18%) and additive genetic factors (44%) but also to non-additive genetic factors (27%) and phenotypic assortment (11%).This non-additive nature of genetic influences on intelligence needs to be accommodated in future GWAS studies for intelligence.

  14. Treatment of body composition changes in obese and overweight older adults: insight into the phenotype of sarcopenic obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggiogalle, Eleonora; Migliaccio, Silvia; Lenzi, Andrea; Donini, Lorenzo Maria

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, mounting interest has been directed to sarcopenic obesity (SO), given the parallel increase of life expectancy and prevalence of obesity in Western countries. The phenotype of SO is characterized by the coexistence of excess fat mass and decreased muscle mass, leading to the impairment of physical performance. The aim of the present review was to summarize the impact of different treatment strategies contrasting body composition changes in older obese and overweight subjects, providing insight into the SO phenotype. Revision questions were formulated; relevant articles were identified from Pubmed through a systematic search strategy: definition of the search terms (sarcopenic obesity, diet, nutritional supplements, physical activity, exercise, pharmacological treatment); limits: papers published in the last 10 years; humans; age ≥ 60 years old; body mass index >25 kg/m(2); language: English. Studies dealing with sarcopenia associated to cancer cachexia or neurological diseases, any malignant disease, inflammatory or autoimmune diseases, corticosteroids for systemic use, bedridden subjects, and syndromic obesity were excluded. 14 articles were identified for inclusion in the present systematic review, and were grouped basing on the type of the main intervention: data assessing body composition changes after combined lifestyle interventions, exercise/physical activity, dietary interventions, and pharmacological treatment. Most of the studies were randomized, controlled. Sample size ranged from 12 to 439 subjects, and study duration varied from 6 weeks to 12 months. Weight loss based on diet combined with exercise seems to be the best strategy to adopt for treatment of phenotypic aspects of SO, improving metabolic consequences related to excess fat, preserving lean mass, and allowing functional recovery.

  15. Changes in muscle cell metabolism and mechanotransduction are associated with myopathic phenotype in a mouse model of collagen VI deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara De Palma

    Full Text Available This study identifies metabolic and protein phenotypic alterations in gastrocnemius, tibialis anterior and diaphragm muscles of Col6a1(-/- mice, a model of human collagen VI myopathies. All three muscles of Col6a1(-/- mice show some common changes in proteins involved in metabolism, resulting in decreased glycolysis and in changes of the TCA cycle fluxes. These changes lead to a different fate of α-ketoglutarate, with production of anabolic substrates in gastrocnemius and tibialis anterior, and with lipotoxicity in diaphragm. The metabolic changes are associated with changes of proteins involved in mechanotransduction at the myotendineous junction/costameric/sarcomeric level (TN-C, FAK, ROCK1, troponin I fast and in energy metabolism (aldolase, enolase 3, triose phosphate isomerase, creatine kinase, adenylate kinase 1, parvalbumin, IDH1 and FASN. Together, these change may explain Ca(2+ deregulation, impaired force development, increased muscle-relaxation-time and fiber damage found in the mouse model as well as in patients. The severity of these changes differs in the three muscles (gastrocnemius

  16. Heritability and confirmation of genetic association studies for childhood asthma in twins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullemar, V; Magnusson, P K E; Lundholm, C; Zettergren, A; Melén, E; Lichtenstein, P; Almqvist, C

    2016-02-01

    Although the genetics of asthma has been extensively studied using both quantitative and molecular genetic analysis methods, both approaches lack studies specific to the childhood phenotype and including other allergic diseases. This study aimed to give specific estimates for the heritability of childhood asthma and other allergic diseases, to attempt to replicate findings from genomewide association studies (GWAS) for childhood asthma and to test the same variants against other allergic diseases. In a cohort of 25 306 Swedish twins aged 9 or 12 years, data on asthma were available from parental interviews and population-based registers. The interviews also inquired about wheeze, hay fever, eczema, and food allergy. Through structural equation modeling, the heritability of all phenotypes was calculated. A subset of 10 075 twins was genotyped for 16 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) selected from previous GWAS; these were first tested for association with asthma and significant findings also against the other allergic diseases. The heritability of any childhood asthma was 0.82 (95% CI 0.79-0.85). For the other allergic diseases, the range was approximately 0.60-0.80. Associations for six SNPs with asthma were replicated, including rs2305480 in the GSDMB gene (OR 0.80, 95% CI 0.74-0.86, P = 1.5*10(-8) ; other significant associations all below P = 3.5*10(-4) ). Of these, only rs3771180 in IL1RL1 was associated with any other allergic disease (for hay fever, OR 0.64, 95% CI 0.53-0.77, P = 2.5*10(-6) ). Asthma and allergic diseases of childhood are highly heritable, and these high-risk genetic variants associated specifically with childhood asthma, except for one SNP shared with hay fever. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Phenotypic distribution models corroborate species distribution models: A shift in the role and prevalence of a dominant prairie grass in response to climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Adam B; Alsdurf, Jacob; Knapp, Mary; Baer, Sara G; Johnson, Loretta C

    2017-10-01

    Phenotypic distribution within species can vary widely across environmental gradients but forecasts of species' responses to environmental change often assume species respond homogenously across their ranges. We compared predictions from species and phenotype distribution models under future climate scenarios for Andropogon gerardii, a widely distributed, dominant grass found throughout the central United States. Phenotype data on aboveground biomass, height, leaf width, and chlorophyll content were obtained from 33 populations spanning a ~1000 km gradient that encompassed the majority of the species' environmental range. Species and phenotype distribution models were trained using current climate conditions and projected to future climate scenarios. We used permutation procedures to infer the most important variable for each model. The species-level response to climate was most sensitive to maximum temperature of the hottest month, but phenotypic variables were most sensitive to mean annual precipitation. The phenotype distribution models predict that A. gerardii could be largely functionally eliminated from where this species currently dominates, with biomass and height declining by up to ~60% and leaf width by ~20%. By the 2070s, the core area of highest suitability for A. gerardii is projected to shift up to ~700 km northeastward. Further, short-statured phenotypes found in the present-day short grass prairies on the western periphery of the species' range will become favored in the current core ~800 km eastward of their current location. Combined, species and phenotype models predict this currently dominant prairie grass will decline in prevalence and stature. Thus, sourcing plant material for grassland restoration and forage should consider changes in the phenotype that will be favored under future climate conditions. Phenotype distribution models account for the role of intraspecific variation in determining responses to anticipated climate change and

  18. Expression of annual cycles in preen wax composition in red knots: Constraints on the changing phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Reneerkens, Jeroen; Piersma, Theunis; Damste, Jaap S. Sinninghe

    2007-01-01

    Birds living in seasonal environments change physiology and behavior in correspondence to temporally changing environmental supplies, demands and opportunities. We recently reported that the chemical composition of uropygial gland secretions of sandpipers (Scolopacidae, order Charadriformes) changes during the breeding season from mixtures of monoesters to diesters, which fulfill specific functions related to incubation. A proper temporal match between the expression of diester preen waxes an...

  19. The effects of phenotypic plasticity and local adaptation on forecasts of species range shifts under climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valladares, Fernando; Matesanz, Silvia; Guilhaumon, François; Araújo, Miguel B; Balaguer, Luis; Benito-Garzón, Marta; Cornwell, Will; Gianoli, Ernesto; van Kleunen, Mark; Naya, Daniel E; Nicotra, Adrienne B; Poorter, Hendrik; Zavala, Miguel A

    2014-11-01

    Species are the unit of analysis in many global change and conservation biology studies; however, species are not uniform entities but are composed of different, sometimes locally adapted, populations differing in plasticity. We examined how intraspecific variation in thermal niches and phenotypic plasticity will affect species distributions in a warming climate. We first developed a conceptual model linking plasticity and niche breadth, providing five alternative intraspecific scenarios that are consistent with existing literature. Secondly, we used ecological niche-modeling techniques to quantify the impact of each intraspecific scenario on the distribution of a virtual species across a geographically realistic setting. Finally, we performed an analogous modeling exercise using real data on the climatic niches of different tree provenances. We show that when population differentiation is accounted for and dispersal is restricted, forecasts of species range shifts under climate change are even more pessimistic than those using the conventional assumption of homogeneously high plasticity across a species' range. Suitable population-level data are not available for most species so identifying general patterns of population differentiation could fill this gap. However, the literature review revealed contrasting patterns among species, urging greater levels of integration among empirical, modeling and theoretical research on intraspecific phenotypic variation.

  20. Phenotypic Changes and Impaired Function of Peripheral γδ T Cells in Patients With Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Xue-Lian; Feng, Ting; Zhang, Jiang-Qian; Cao, Xing; Wu, Qi-Hong; Xie, Zhi-Chao; Kang, Yan; Li, Hong

    2017-09-01

    Recent studies demonstrated the significant loss of gamma delta T (γδ T) cells in patients with sepsis. Given the distinct functions of γδ T cells in human anti-infection immunity, we are interested in evaluating the phenotype and function of peripheral γδ T cells in septic patients and determining their prognostic implication. This prospective study has been conducted in three intensive care units of a university hospital. During the period from October 2014 to June 2015, we enrolled 107 patients who were consecutively admitted and diagnosed with severe sepsis or septic shock (excluding previous immunosuppression) and 45 healthy controls. Using flow cytometry, we analyzed the in vivo percentage of γδ T cells in cluster of differentiation (CD)3 cells from peripheral blood mononuclear cells as well as their expression of surface markers (CD69, natural-killer group 2 member D [NKG2D], programmed death receptor 1 [PD-1]) and intracellular cytokines (interferon-γ [IFN-γ], interleukin [IL]-17, IL-10, transforming growth factor-β [TGF-β]). Then we further evaluated the different responses of γδ T cells after the antigen stimulation ex vivo by measuring CD69 and IFN-γ expression. Lastly, we conducted the multiple logistic regressions to analyze the risk factor for prognosis. Compared with control group, γδ T cells in septic patients displayed a decrease in percentage, increase in CD69, decrease in NKG2D, and increase in cytokine expression (pro-inflammatory IFN-γ, IL-17, anti-inflammatory IL-10, TGF-β) in vivo. After the antigen stimulation ex vivo, both CD69 and IFN-γ expression in γδ T cells were significantly lower in septic patients than control group. Importantly, the decrease in CD69 and IFN-γ expression was more pronounced in non-survivors than survivors. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that lower expression of IFN-γ after stimulation is a dependent risk factor that associated with patient 28-day death in septic patients (OR

  1. Low heritability in pharmacokinetics of talinolol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthaei, Johannes; Tzvetkov, Mladen V; Gal, Valerie;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Efflux transporters like MDR1 and MRP2 may modulate the pharmacokinetics of about 50 % of all drugs. It is currently unknown how much of the variation in the activities of important drug membrane transporters like MDR1 or MRP2 is determined by genetic or by environmental factors....... In this study we assessed the heritability of the pharmacokinetics of talinolol as a putative probe drug for MDR1 and possibly other membrane transporters. METHODS: Talinolol pharmacokinetics were investigated in a repeated dose study in 42 monozygotic and 13 same-sex dizygotic twin pairs. The oral clearance...

  2. Heritability, parental transmission and environment correlation of pediatric-onset type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome-related traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda-Lora, América L; Vilchis-Gil, Jenny; Molina-Díaz, Mario; Flores-Huerta, Samuel; Klünder-Klünder, Miguel

    2017-04-01

    To estimate the heritability, parental transmission and environmental contributions to the phenotypic variation in type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome-related traits in families of Mexican children and adolescents. We performed a cross-sectional study of 184 tri-generational pedigrees with a total of 1160 individuals (99 families with a type 2 diabetes mellitus proband before age 19). The family history of type 2 diabetes mellitus in three generations was obtained by interview. Demographic, anthropometric, biochemical and lifestyle information was corroborated in parents and offspring. We obtained correlations for metabolic traits between relative pairs, and variance component methods were used to determine the heritability and environmental components. The heritability of early-onset of type 2 diabetes mellitus was 0.50 (p0.50) for blood pressure, HbA1c and HDL-cholesterol after multivariate adjustment (pdiabetes mellitus and insulin resistance, were significantly correlated only through the mother and others, such as hypertriglyceridemia, were significantly correlated only through the father. This study demonstrates that type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome-related traits are highly heritable among Mexican children and adolescents. Furthermore, several cardiometabolic factors have strong heritability and/or high environmental contributions that highlight the complex architecture of these alterations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Heritability of cognitive functions in families with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antila, Mervi; Tuulio-Henriksson, Annamari; Kieseppä, Tuula; Soronen, Pia; Palo, Outi M; Paunio, Tiina; Haukka, Jari; Partonen, Timo; Lönnqvist, Jouko

    2007-09-01

    Bipolar disorder is highly heritable. Cognitive dysfunctions often observed in bipolar patients and their unaffected relatives implicate that these impairments may be associated with genetic predisposition to bipolar disorder and thus fulfill the criteria of a valid endophenotype for the disorder. However, the most fundamental criterion, their heritability, has not been directly studied in any bipolar population. This population-based study estimated the heritability of cognitive functions in bipolar disorder. A comprehensive neuropsychological test battery and the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV were administered to a population-based sample of 110 individuals from 52 families with bipolar disorder. Heritability of cognitive functions as assessed with neuropsychological test scores were estimated using the Solar package. Significant additive heritabilities were found in verbal ability, executive functioning, and psychomotor processing speed. Genetic contribution was low to verbal learning functions. High heritability, in executive functioning and psychomotor processing speed suggest that these may be valid endophenotypic traits for genetic studies of bipolar disorder.

  4. Plant Phenotypic and Transcriptional Changes Induced by Volatiles from the Fungal Root Pathogen Rhizoctonia solani

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordovez, Viviane; Mommer, Liesje; Moisan, Kay; Lucas-Barbosa, Dani; Pierik, Ronald; Mumm, Roland; Carrion, Victor J.; Raaijmakers, Jos M.

    2017-01-01

    Beneficial soil microorganisms can affect plant growth and resistance by the production of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Yet, little is known on how VOCs from soil-borne plant pathogens affect plant growth and resistance. Here we show that VOCs released from mycelium and sclerotia of the fungal root pathogen Rhizoctonia solani enhance growth and accelerate development of Arabidopsis thaliana. Seedlings briefly exposed to the fungal VOCs showed similar phenotypes, suggesting that enhanced biomass and accelerated development are primed already at early developmental stages. Fungal VOCs did not affect plant resistance to infection by the VOC-producing pathogen itself but reduced aboveground resistance to the herbivore Mamestra brassicae. Transcriptomics of A. thaliana revealed that genes involved in auxin signaling were up-regulated, whereas ethylene and jasmonic acid signaling pathways were down-regulated by fungal VOCs. Mutants disrupted in these pathways showed similar VOC-mediated growth responses as the wild-type A. thaliana, suggesting that other yet unknown pathways play a more prominent role. We postulate that R. solani uses VOCs to predispose plants for infection from a distance by altering root architecture and enhancing root biomass. Alternatively, plants may use enhanced root growth upon fungal VOC perception to sacrifice part of the root biomass and accelerate development and reproduction to survive infection. PMID:28785271

  5. Disease and the extended phenotype: parasites control host performance and survival through induced changes in body plan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett A Goodman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: By definition, parasites harm their hosts. However, some forms of parasite-induced alterations increase parasite transmission between hosts, such that manipulated hosts can be considered extensions of the parasite's phenotype. While well accepted in principle, surprisingly few studies have quantified how parasite manipulations alter host performance and survival under field and laboratory conditions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By interfering with limb development, the trematode Ribeiroia ondatrae causes particularly severe morphological alterations within amphibian hosts that provide an ideal system to evaluate parasite-induced changes in phenotype. Here, we coupled laboratory performance trials with a capture-mark-recapture study of 1388 Pacific chorus frogs (Pseudacris regilla to quantify the effects of parasite-induced malformations on host locomotion, foraging, and survival. Malformations, which affected ∼ 50% of metamorphosing frogs in nature, caused dramatic reductions in all measures of organismal function. Malformed frogs exhibited significantly shorter jumping distances (41% reduction, slower swimming speeds (37% reduction, reduced endurance (66% reduction, and lower foraging success relative to infected hosts without malformations. Furthermore, while normal and malformed individuals had comparable survival within predator-free exclosures, deformed frogs in natural populations had 22% lower biweekly survival than normal frogs and rarely recruited to the adult population over a two-year period. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results highlight the ability of parasites to deeply alter multiple dimensions of host phenotype with important consequences for performance and survival. These patterns were best explained by malformation status, rather than infection per se, helping to decouple the direct and indirect effects of parasitism on host fitness.

  6. A Multi-Center Study to Map Genes for Fuchs’ Endothelial Corneal Dystrophy: Baseline Characteristics and Heritability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louttit, Megan D; Kopplin, Laura J; Igo, Robert P; Fondran, Jeremy R; Tagliaferri, Angela; Bardenstein, David; Aldave, Anthony J; Croasdale, Christopher R; Price, Marianne; Rosenwasser, George O; Lass, Jonathan H; Iyengar, Sudha K

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To describe the methods for family and case-control recruitment for a multi-center genetic and associated heritability analysis of Fuchs’ Endothelial Corneal Dystrophy (FECD). Methods Twenty-nine enrolling sites with 62 trained investigators and coordinators gathered individual and family information, graded the phenotype, and collected blood and/or saliva for genetic analysis on all individuals with and without FECD. The degree of FECD was assessed in a 0–6 semi-quantitative scale using standardized clinical methods with pathologic verification of FECD on at least one member of each family. Central corneal thickness was measured by ultrasonic pachymetry. Results Three hundred twenty-two families with 330 affected sibling pairs with FECD were enrolled, and included a total of 650 sibling pairs of all disease grades. Using the entire 0–6 step FECD grading scale or a dichotomous definition of severe disease, heritability was assessed in families via sib-sib correlations. Both binary indicators of severe disease as well as semi-quantitative measures of disease severity were significantly heritable, with heritability estimates of 30% for severe disease, 37–39% for FECD score and 47% for central corneal thickness. Conclusion Genetic risk factors have a strong role in the severity of the FECD phenotype and corneal thickness. Genotyping this cohort with high-density genetic markers followed by appropriate statistical analyses should lead to novel loci for disease susceptibility. PMID:22045388

  7. Heritable transmission of stress resistance by high dietary glucose in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauffenberger, Arnaud; Parker, J Alex

    2014-05-01

    Glucose is a major energy source and is a key regulator of metabolism but excessive dietary glucose is linked to several disorders including type 2 diabetes, obesity and cardiac dysfunction. Dietary intake greatly influences organismal survival but whether the effects of nutritional status are transmitted to the offspring is an unresolved question. Here we show that exposing Caenorhabditis elegans to high glucose concentrations in the parental generation leads to opposing negative effects on fecundity, while having protective effects against cellular stress in the descendent progeny. The transgenerational inheritance of glucose-mediated phenotypes is dependent on the insulin/IGF-like signalling pathway and components of the histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylase complex are essential for transmission of inherited phenotypes. Thus dietary over-consumption phenotypes are heritable with profound effects on the health and survival of descendants.

  8. Handedness, heritability, neurocognition and brain asymmetry in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deep-Soboslay, Amy; Hyde, Thomas M; Callicott, Joseph P; Lener, Marc S; Verchinski, Beth A; Apud, José A; Weinberger, Daniel R; Elvevåg, Brita

    2010-10-01

    Higher rates of non-right-handedness (i.e. left- and mixed-handedness) have been reported in schizophrenia and have been a centrepiece for theories of anomalous lateralization in this disorder. We investigated whether non-right-handedness is (i) more prevalent in patients as compared with unaffected siblings and healthy unrelated control participants; (ii) familial; (iii) associated with disproportionately poorer neurocognition; and (iv) associated with grey matter volume asymmetries. We examined 1445 participants (375 patients with schizophrenia, 502 unaffected siblings and 568 unrelated controls) using the Edinburgh Handedness Inventory, a battery of neuropsychological tasks and structural magnetic resonance imaging data. Patients displayed a leftward shift in Edinburgh Handedness Inventory laterality quotient scores as compared with both their unaffected siblings and unrelated controls, but this finding disappeared when sex was added to the model. Moreover, there was no evidence of increased familial risk for non-right-handedness. Non-right-handedness was not associated with disproportionate neurocognitive disadvantage or with grey matter volume asymmetries in the frontal pole, lateral occipital pole or temporal pole. Non-right-handedness was associated with a significant reduction in left asymmetry in the superior temporal gyrus in both patients and controls. Our data neither provide strong support for 'atypical' handedness as a schizophrenia risk-associated heritable phenotype nor that it is associated with poorer neurocognition or anomalous cerebral asymmetries.

  9. Diagnosis of human heritable diseases--laboratory approaches and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowton, S B; Slaugh, R A

    1995-05-01

    Detection of mutant human genes is rapidly becoming an integral part of clinical practice. Human disease may arise by genetic deletion, insertion, fusion, point mutation, or amplification of unstable sequences. Such changes in structure may occur in germ cells or somatically. Rapid advances in understanding the complex nuclear and mitochondrial genomes necessitates deployment of a variety of methods to identify aberrant genes. These techniques include polymerase chain reaction, Southern transfer, and allele-specific hybridization studies, as well as methods to unmask mismatches between mutant and normal sequences. Development of protein truncation tests has added a vehicle for assessing larger DNA segments for mutations that cause premature translational termination. Linkage analysis remains an important tool where direct assay of disease-causing mutations is not possible. Considerations of confidentiality, informed consent, and insurability are important whenever genetic testing is used. These issues will assume increasing importance as presymptomatic testing for heritable predispositions emerges for common conditions.

  10. Root phenotyping: from component trait in the lab to breeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuijken, René C P; van Eeuwijk, Fred A; Marcelis, Leo F M; Bouwmeester, Harro J

    2015-09-01

    In the last decade cheaper and faster sequencing methods have resulted in an enormous increase in genomic data. High throughput genotyping, genotyping by sequencing and genomic breeding are becoming a standard in plant breeding. As a result, the collection of phenotypic data is increasingly becoming a limiting factor in plant breeding. Genetic studies on root traits are being hampered by the complexity of these traits and the inaccessibility of the rhizosphere. With an increasing interest in phenotyping, breeders and scientists try to overcome these limitations, resulting in impressive developments in automated phenotyping platforms. Recently, many such platforms have been thoroughly described, yet their efficiency to increase genetic gain often remains undiscussed. This efficiency depends on the heritability of the phenotyped traits as well as the correlation of these traits with agronomically relevant breeding targets. This review provides an overview of the latest developments in root phenotyping and describes the environmental and genetic factors influencing root phenotype and heritability. It also intends to give direction to future phenotyping and breeding strategies for optimizing root system functioning. A quantitative framework to determine the efficiency of phenotyping platforms for genetic gain is described. By increasing heritability, managing effects caused by interactions between genotype and environment and by quantifying the genetic relation between traits phenotyped in platforms and ultimate breeding targets, phenotyping platforms can be utilized to their maximum potential. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Components of variance and heritability of resistance to important fungal diseases agents in grapevine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Dragan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In four interspecies crossing combinations of grapevine (Seedling 108 x Muscat Hamburg, Muscat Hamburg x Seedling 108, S.V.I8315 x Muscat Hamburg and Muscat Hamburg x S.V.I2375 during three years period, resistance to important fungal diseases agents (Plasmopara viticola and Botrytis cinerea were examined. Based on results of analysis of variance, for investigated characteristics, components of variance, coefficients of genetic and phenotypic variation and coefficient of heritability in a broader sense were calculated. It was established that for both characteristics and in all crossing combinations, genetic variance took the biggest part in total variability. The lowest coefficients of genetic and phenotypic variation were established for both properties in crossing combination Seedling 108 x Muscat Hamburg. The highest coefficients of genetic and phenotypic variation were determined for leaf resistance to Plasmopara viticola in crossing combination Muscat Hamburg x S.V.I2375, and for bunch resistance to Botrytis cinerea in crossing combination Muscat Hamburg x Seedling 108. Considering all investigated crossing combinations, coefficient of heritability for leaf resistance to Plasmopara viticola was from 87.23% to 94.88%, and for bunch resistance to Botrytis cinerea from 88.04% to 93.32%. .

  12. Genetic variability and heritability in cultivated okra [Abel moschus esculentus (L.) Moench

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nwangburuka, C. C.; Denton, O. A.; Khinde, O. B.; Ojo, D. K.; Popoola, A. R.

    2012-11-01

    Twenty-nine okra accessions from different agro-ecological regions in Nigeria were grown during the rainy and dry seasons, between 2006 and 2007 at Abeokuta (derived savanah) and Ilishan (rainforest) and assessed to determine their genetic variability, heritability and genetic advance from eight yield related characters. The experiment was laid out in a Randomized Complete Block Design with five replications. There was high genotypic coefficient of variability, % broad-sense heritability and genetic advance in traits such as plant height (26.2, 90.7, 51.5), fresh pod length (23.9, 98.5, 48.8), fresh pod width (23.9, 98.5, 48.8), mature pod length (28.6, 98.5, 52.3), branching per plant (29.3, 82.3, 54.8) and pod weight per plant (33.9, 90.0, 63.3), suggesting the effect of additive genes and reliability of selection based on phenotype of these traits for crop improvement. The positive and significant phenotypic and genotypic correlation between plant height at maturity, fresh pod width, seeds per pod and pods per plant, branches per plant with seed weight per plant and pod weight per plant, suggests that selection on the basis of the phenotype of these characters will lead to high seed and pod yield in okra. (Author) 26 refs.

  13. Heritable influences on amygdala and orbitofrontal cortex contribute to genetic variation in core dimensions of personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, G J; Panizzon, M S; Eyler, L; Fennema-Notestine, C; Chen, C-H; Neale, M C; Jernigan, T L; Lyons, M J; Dale, A M; Kremen, W S; Franz, C E

    2014-12-01

    While many studies have reported that individual differences in personality traits are genetically influenced, the neurobiological bases mediating these influences have not yet been well characterized. To advance understanding concerning the pathway from genetic variation to personality, here we examined whether measures of heritable variation in neuroanatomical size in candidate regions (amygdala and medial orbitofrontal cortex) were associated with heritable effects on personality. A sample of 486 middle-aged (mean=55 years) male twins (complete MZ pairs=120; complete DZ pairs=84) underwent structural brain scans and also completed measures of two core domains of personality: positive and negative emotionality. After adjusting for estimated intracranial volume, significant phenotypic (r(p)) and genetic (r(g)) correlations were observed between left amygdala volume and positive emotionality (r(p)=.16, porbitofrontal cortex thickness and negative emotionality were also observed (r(g)=.34, p<.01; r(e)=-.19, p<.05, respectively). These findings support a model positing that heritable bases of personality are, at least in part, mediated through individual differences in the size of brain structures, although further work is still required to confirm this causal interpretation.

  14. The heritable basis of gene-environment interactions in cardiometabolic traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poveda, Alaitz; Chen, Yan; Brändström, Anders; Engberg, Elisabeth; Hallmans, Göran; Johansson, Ingegerd; Renström, Frida; Kurbasic, Azra; Franks, Paul W

    2017-03-01

    Little is known about the heritable basis of gene-environment interactions in humans. We therefore screened multiple cardiometabolic traits to assess the probability that they are influenced by genotype-environment interactions. Fourteen established environmental risk exposures and 11 cardiometabolic traits were analysed in the VIKING study, a cohort of 16,430 Swedish adults from 1682 extended pedigrees with available detailed genealogical, phenotypic and demographic information, using a maximum likelihood variance decomposition method in Sequential Oligogenic Linkage Analysis Routines software. All cardiometabolic traits had statistically significant heritability estimates, with narrow-sense heritabilities (h (2)) ranging from 24% to 47%. Genotype-environment interactions were detected for age and sex (for the majority of traits), physical activity (for triacylglycerols, 2 h glucose and diastolic BP), smoking (for weight), alcohol intake (for weight, BMI and 2 h glucose) and diet pattern (for weight, BMI, glycaemic traits and systolic BP). Genotype-age interactions for weight and systolic BP, genotype-sex interactions for BMI and triacylglycerols and genotype-alcohol intake interactions for weight remained significant after multiple test correction. Age, sex and alcohol intake are likely to be major modifiers of genetic effects for a range of cardiometabolic traits. This information may prove valuable for studies that seek to identify specific loci that modify the effects of lifestyle in cardiometabolic disease.

  15. Polygenic risk score and heritability estimates reveals a genetic relationship between ASD and OCD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, W; Samuels, J F; Wang, Y; Cao, H; Ritter, M; Nestadt, P S; Krasnow, J; Greenberg, B D; Fyer, A J; McCracken, J T; Geller, D A; Murphy, D L; Knowles, J A; Grados, M A; Riddle, M A; Rasmussen, S A; McLaughlin, N C; Nurmi, E L; Askland, K D; Cullen, B A; Piacentini, J; Pauls, D L; Bienvenu, O J; Stewart, S E; Goes, F S; Maher, B; Pulver, A E; Valle, D; Mattheisen, M; Qian, J; Nestadt, G; Shugart, Y Y

    2017-07-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are both highly heritable neurodevelopmental disorders that conceivably share genetic risk factors. However, the underlying genetic determinants remain largely unknown. In this work, the authors describe a combined genome-wide association study (GWAS) of ASD and OCD. The OCD dataset includes 2998 individuals in nuclear families. The ASD dataset includes 6898 individuals in case-parents trios. GWAS summary statistics were examined for potential enrichment of functional variants associated with gene expression levels in brain regions. The top ranked SNP is rs4785741 (chromosome 16) with P value=6.9×10(-7) in our re-analysis. Polygenic risk score analyses were conducted to investigate the genetic relationship within and across the two disorders. These analyses identified a significant polygenic component of ASD, predicting 0.11% of the phenotypic variance in an independent OCD data set. In addition, we examined the genomic architecture of ASD and OCD by estimating heritability on different chromosomes and different allele frequencies, analyzing genome-wide common variant data by using the Genome-wide Complex Trait Analysis (GCTA) program. The estimated global heritability of OCD is 0.427 (se=0.093) and 0.174 (se=0.053) for ASD in these imputed data. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Heritable genome editing with CRISPR/Cas9 in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wei

    Full Text Available We report the establishment of an efficient and heritable gene mutagenesis method in the silkworm Bombyx mori using modified type II clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR with an associated protein (Cas9 system. Using four loci Bm-ok, BmKMO, BmTH, and Bmtan as candidates, we proved that genome alterations at specific sites could be induced by direct microinjection of specific guide RNA and Cas9-mRNA into silkworm embryos. Mutation frequencies of 16.7-35.0% were observed in the injected generation, and DNA fragments deletions were also noted. Bm-ok mosaic mutants were used to test for mutant heritability due to the easily determined translucent epidermal phenotype of Bm-ok-disrupted cells. Two crossing strategies were used. In the first, injected Bm-ok moths were crossed with wild-type moths, and a 28.6% frequency of germline mutation transmission was observed. In the second strategy, two Bm-ok mosaic mutant moths were crossed with each other, and 93.6% of the offsprings appeared mutations in both alleles of Bm-ok gene (compound heterozygous. In summary, the CRISPR/Cas9 system can act as a highly specific and heritable gene-editing tool in Bombyx mori.

  17. Heritability of body weight and resistance to ammonia in the Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei juveniles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenjia; Lu, Xia; Luan, Sheng; Luo, Kun; Sui, Juan; Kong, Jie

    2016-09-01

    Ammonia, toxic to aquaculture organisms, represents a potential problem in aquaculture systems, and the situation is exacerbated in closed and intensive shrimp farming operations, expecially for Litopenaeus vannamei. Assessing the potential for the genetic improvement of resistance to ammonia in L. vannamei requires knowledge of the genetic parameters of this trait. The heritability of resistance to ammonia was estimated using two descriptors in the present study: the survival time (ST) and the survival status at half lethal time (SS50) for each individual under high ammonia challenge. The heritability of ST and SS50 were low (0.154 4±0.044 6 and 0.147 5±0.040 0, respectively), but they were both significantly different from zero ( P0.05), suggesting that ST and SS50 could be used as suitable indicators for resistance to ammonia. There were also positive phenotypic and genetic correlation between resistance to ammonia and body weight, which means that resistance to ammonia can be enhanced by the improvement of husbandry practices that increase the body weight. The results from the present study suggest that the selection for higher body weight does not have any negative consequences for resistance to ammonia. In addition to quantitative genetics, tools from molecular genetics can be applied to selective breeding programs to improve the efficiency of selection for traits with low heritability.

  18. Heritability of problem drinking and the genetic overlap with personality in a general population sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marleen H.M. De Moor

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the heritability of problem drinking and investigated the phenotypic and genetic relationships between problem drinking and personality. It was conducted in a sample of 5,870 twins and siblings and 4,420 additional family members from the Netherlands Twin Register. Data on problem drinking (assessed with the AUDIT and CAGE; 12 items and personality (NEO-FFI; 60 items were collected in 2009/2010 through surveys. Factor analysis on the AUDIT and CAGE items showed that the items clustered on two separate but highly correlated (r=0.74 underlying factors. A higher order factor was extracted that reflected those aspects of problem drinking that are common to the AUDIT and CAGE , which showed a heritability of 40%. The correlations between problem drinking and the five dimensions of personality were small but significant, ranging from 0.06 for Extraversion to -0.12 for Conscientiousness. All personality dimensions (with broad-sense heritabilities between 32% and 55%, and some evidence for non-additive genetic influences were genetically correlated with problem drinking. The genetic correlations were small to modest (between |0.12-0.41|. Future studies with longitudinal data and DNA polymorphisms are needed to determine the biological mechanisms that underlie the genetic link between problem drinking and personality.

  19. Heritability of Stroop and flanker performance in 12-year old children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polderman Tinca JC

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is great interest in appropriate phenotypes that serve as indicator of genetically transmitted frontal (dysfunction, such as ADHD. Here we investigate the ability to deal with response conflict, and we ask to what extent performance variation on response interference tasks is caused by genetic variation. We tested a large sample of 12-year old monozygotic and dizygotic twins on two well-known and closely related response interference tasks; the color Stroop task and the Eriksen flanker task. Using structural equation modelling we assessed the heritability of several performance indices derived from those tasks. Results In the Stroop task we found high heritabilities of overall reaction time and – more important – Stroop interference (h2 = nearly 50 %. In contrast, we found little evidence of heritability on flanker performance. For both tasks no effects of sex on performance variation were found. Conclusions These results suggest that normal variation in Stroop performance is influenced by underlying genetic variation. Given that Stroop performance is often hampered not only in people suffering from frontal dysfunction, but also in their unaffected relatives, we conclude that this variable may constitute a suitable endophenotype for future genetic studies. We discuss several reasons for the absence of genetic effects on the flanker task.

  20. Heritable influences on amygdala and orbitofrontal cortex contribute to genetic variation in core dimensions of personality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, G.J.; Panizzon, M.S.; Eyler, L.; Fennema-Notestine, C.; Chen, C.-H.; Neale, M.C.; Jernigan, T.L.; Lyons, M.J.; Dale, A.M.; Kremen, W.S.; Franz, C.E.

    2015-01-01

    While many studies have reported that individual differences in personality traits are genetically influenced, the neurobiological bases mediating these influences have not yet been well characterized. To advance understanding concerning the pathway from genetic variation to personality, here we examined whether measures of heritable variation in neuroanatomical size in candidate regions (amygdala and medial orbitofrontal cortex) were associated with heritable effects on personality. A sample of 486 middle-aged (mean = 55 years) male twins (complete MZ pairs = 120; complete DZ pairs = 84) underwent structural brain scans and also completed measures of two core domains of personality: positive and negative emotionality. After adjusting for estimated intracranial volume, significant phenotypic (rp) and genetic (rg) correlations were observed between left amygdala volume and positive emotionality (rp = .16, p < .01; rg = .23, p < .05, respectively). In addition, after adjusting for mean cortical thickness, genetic and nonshared-environmental correlations (re) between left medial orbitofrontal cortex thickness and negative emotionality were also observed (rg = .34, p < .01; re = −.19, p < .05, respectively). These findings support a model positing that heritable bases of personality are, at least in part, mediated through individual differences in the size of brain structures, although further work is still required to confirm this causal interpretation. PMID:25263286

  1. Heritability of the somatotype components in Biscay families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebato, E; Jelenkovic, A; Salces, I

    2007-01-01

    The anthropometric somatotype is a quantitative description of body shape and composition. Familial studies indicate the existence of a familial resemblance for this phenotype and they suggest a substantial action by genetic factors on this aggregation. The aim of this study is to examine the degree of familial resemblance of the somatotype components and of a factor of shape, in a sample of Biscay nuclear families (Basque Country, Spain). One thousand three hundred and thirty nuclear families were analysed. The anthropometric somatotype components [Carter, J.E.L., Heath, B.H., 1990. Somatotyping. Development and applications. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, p. 503] were computed. Each component was fitted for the other two through a stepwise multiple regression, and also fitted through the LMS method [Cole, T., 1988. Fitting smoothed centile curves to reference data. J. Roy. Stat. Soc. 151, 385-418] in order to eliminate the age, sex and generation effects. The three raw components were introduced in a PCA from which a shape factor (PC1) was extracted for each generation. The correlations analysis was performed with the SEGPATH package [Province, M.A., Rao, D.C., 1995. General purpose model and computer programme for combined segregation and path analysis (SEGPATH): automatically creating computer from symbolic language model specifications. Genet. Epidemiol. 12, 203-219]. A general model of transmission and nine reduced models were tested. Maximal heritability was estimated with the formula of [Rice, T., Warwick, D.E., Gagnon, J., Bouchard, C., Leon, A.S., Skinner, J.S., Wilmore, J.H., Rao, D.C., 1997. Familial resemblance for body composition measures: the HERITAGE family study. Obes. Res. 5, 557-562]. The correlations were higher between offspring than in parents and offspring and a significant resemblance between mating partners existed. Maximum heritabilities were 55%, 52% and 46% for endomorphy, mesomorphy and ectomorphy, respectively, and 52% for PC1

  2. Group differences in the heritability of items and test scores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wicherts, J.M.; Johnson, W.

    2009-01-01

    It is important to understand potential sources of group differences in the heritability of intelligence test scores. On the basis of a basic item response model we argue that heritabilities which are based on dichotomous item scores normally do not generalize from one sample to the next. If groups

  3. Heritable retinoblastoma and accelerated aortic valve disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeyratne, L R; Kingston, J E; Onadim, Z; Dubrey, S W

    2013-01-01

    Heritable retinoblastoma is associated with a germline mutation in the tumour suppressor gene RBI. The Rb protein (pRb) arises from the RB1 gene, which was the first demonstrated cancer susceptibility gene in humans. 1 Second primary malignancies are recognised complications of retinoblastoma. Furthermore, pRb is implicated in valve remodelling in calcific aortic valve disease. 2 3 We report a family with hereditary retinoblastoma and associated secondary primary malignancies. There are two interesting aspects to this family. The first is the concept of ‘cancer susceptibility genes’; the RBI gene being the first reported in humans. A further feature of note is that two family members also have bicuspid aortic valves. We discuss a potential association between the gene defect responsible for retinoblastoma (with its associated propensity for further malignancies) and accelerated deterioration of the bicuspid aortic valve in the proband carrying this gene defect. PMID:23595191

  4. Heritable factors influence sexual orientation in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, J M; Pillard, R C; Neale, M C; Agyei, Y

    1993-03-01

    Homosexual female probands with monozygotic cotwins, dizygotic cotwins, or adoptive sisters were recruited using homophile publications. Sexual orientation of relatives was assessed either by asking relatives directly, or, when this was impossible, by asking the probands. Of the relatives whose sexual orientation could be confidently rated, 34 (48%) of 71 monozygotic cotwins, six (16%) of 37 dizygotic cotwins, and two (6%) of 35 adoptive sisters were homosexual. Probands also reported 10 (14%) nontwin biologic sisters to be homosexual, although those sisters were not contacted to confirm their orientations. Heritabilities were significant using a wide range of assumptions about both the base rate of homosexuality in the population and ascertainment bias. The likelihood that a monozygotic cotwin would also be homosexual was unrelated to measured characteristics of the proband such as self-reported history of childhood gender nonconformity. Concordant monozygotic twins reported similar levels of childhood gender nonconformity.

  5. Human somatic, germinal and heritable mutagenicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendelsohn, M.L.

    1987-05-01

    This report deals with the general process of variant formation rather than with the consequences of a specific variant being present. It focusses on mutational mechanisms, mutagens, and the method for detecting de novo mutants and estimating mutation rate. It is to human genetics much like disease causation and prevention medicine are to medicine as a whole. The word ''mutagenicity'' is used in the title and throughout the text to connote the causation of all classes of genetic damage. Mutagenicity and the corresponding words mutation, mutagen and mutagenesis can have multiple meaning, sometimes relating to gene mutation, sometimes to heritable mutation, and somtimes to all types of genetic damage. 38 refs., 1 tab.

  6. Heritability of metoprolol and torsemide pharmacokinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthaei, Johannes; Brockmöller, Jürgen; Tzvetkov, Mladen;

    2015-01-01

    Genetic variation in the pharmacokinetics of metoprolol and torsemide due to polymorphisms in CYP2D6, CYP2C9 and OATP1B1 has been extensively studied. However, it is still unknown how much of variation in pharmacokinetics of these two clinically important drugs in total is due to genetic factors....... Metoprolol and torsemide were intravenously administered to 44 monozygotic and 14 dizygotic twin pairs. Metoprolol AUC varied 4.7-fold and torsemide AUC 3.5-fold. A very high fraction of AUC variations, 91% of metoprolol and 86% of torsemide, were found to be due to additive genetic effects. However, known...... of the heritable variability in the pharmacokinetics of metoprolol and torsemide remains to be elucidated. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  7. Familial aggregation and heritability of pyloric stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Camilla; Fischer, Thea K; Skotte, Line;

    2010-01-01

    .1 for twins. The rate ratios of pyloric stenosis were 182 (95% confidence interval [CI], 70.7-467) for monozygotic twins, 29.4 (95% CI, 9.45-91.5) for dizygotic twins, 18.5 (95% CI, 13.7-25.1) for siblings, 4.99 (95% CI, 2.59-9.65) for half-siblings, 3.06 (95% CI, 2.10-4.44) for cousins, and 1.60 (95% CI, 0.......51-4.99) for half-cousins. We found no difference in rate ratios for maternal and paternal relatives of children with pyloric stenosis and no difference according to sex of cohort member or sex of relative. The heritability of pyloric stenosis was 87%. CONCLUSION: Pyloric stenosis in Danish children shows strong...

  8. Twin and family studies reveal strong environmental and weaker genetic cues explaining heritability of eosinophilic esophagitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Eileen S.; Martin, Lisa J.; Collins, Margaret H.; Kottyan, Leah; Sucharew, Heidi; He, Hua; Mukkada, Vincent A.; Succop, Paul A.; Abonia, J. Pablo; Foote, Heather; Eby, Michael D.; Grotjan, Tommie M.; Greenler, Alexandria J.; Dellon, Evan S.; Demain, Jeffrey G.; Furuta, Glenn T.; Gurian, Larry E.; Harley, John B.; Hopp, Russell J.; Kaul, Ajay; Nadeau, Kari C.; Noel, Richard J.; Putnam, Philip E.; von Tiehl, Karl F.; Rothenberg, Marc E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic antigen-driven allergic inflammatory disease, likely involving the interplay of genetic and environmental factors, yet their respective contributions to heritability are unknown. Objective To quantify risk associated with genes and environment on familial clustering of EoE. Methods Family history was obtained from a hospital-based cohort of 914 EoE probands, (n=2192 first-degree “Nuclear-Family” relatives) and the new international registry of monozygotic and dizygotic twins/triplets (n=63 EoE “Twins” probands). Frequencies, recurrence risk ratios (RRRs), heritability and twin concordance were estimated. Environmental exposures were preliminarily examined. Results Analysis of the Nuclear-Family–based cohort revealed that the rate of EoE, in first-degree relatives of a proband, was 1.8% (unadjusted) and 2.3% (sex-adjusted). RRRs ranged from 10–64, depending on the family relationship, and were higher in brothers (64.0; p=0.04), fathers (42.9; p=0.004) and males (50.7; p<0.001) compared to sisters, mothers and females, respectively. Risk of EoE for other siblings was 2.4%. In the Nuclear-Families, combined gene and common environment heritability (hgc2) was 72.0±2.7% (p<0.001). In the Twins cohort, genetic heritability was 14.5±4.0% (p<0.001), and common family environment contributed 81.0±4% (p<0.001) to phenotypic variance. Proband-wise concordance in MZ co-twins was 57.9±9.5% compared to 36.4±9.3% in DZ (p=0.11). Greater birth-weight difference between twins (p=0.01), breastfeeding (p=0.15) and Fall birth season (p=0.02) were associated with twin discordance in disease status. Conclusions EoE recurrence risk ratios are increased 10–64-fold compared with the general population. EoE in relatives is 1.8–2.4%, depending upon relationship and sex. Nuclear-Family heritability appeared to be high (72.0%). However, Twins cohort analysis revealed a powerful role for common environment (81

  9. MSH1-induced non-genetic variation provides a source of phenotypic diversity in Sorghum bicolor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto de la Rosa Santamaria

    Full Text Available MutS Homolog 1 (MSH1 encodes a plant-specific protein that functions in mitochondria and chloroplasts. We showed previously that disruption or suppression of the MSH1 gene results in a process of developmental reprogramming that is heritable and non-genetic in subsequent generations. In Arabidopsis, this developmental reprogramming process is accompanied by striking changes in gene expression of organellar and stress response genes. This developmentally reprogrammed state, when used in crossing, results in a range of variation for plant growth potential. Here we investigate the implications of MSH1 modulation in a crop species. We found that MSH1-mediated phenotypic variation in Sorghum bicolor is heritable and potentially valuable for crop breeding. We observed phenotypic variation for grain yield, plant height, flowering time, panicle architecture, and above-ground biomass. Focusing on grain yield and plant height, we found some lines that appeared to respond to selection. Based on amenability of this system to implementation in a range of crops, and the scope of phenotypic variation that is derived, our results suggest that MSH1 suppression provides a novel approach for breeding in crops.

  10. DNA evidence for strong genetic stability and increasing heritability of intelligence from age 7 to 12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trzaskowski, M; Yang, J; Visscher, P M; Plomin, R

    2014-03-01

    Two genetic findings from twin research have far-reaching implications for understanding individual differences in the development of brain function as indexed by general cognitive ability (g, aka intelligence): (1) The same genes affect g throughout development, even though (2) heritability increases. It is now possible to test these hypotheses using DNA alone. From 1.7 million DNA markers and g scores at ages 7 and 12 on 2875 children, the DNA genetic correlation from age 7 to 12 was 0.73, highly similar to the genetic correlation of 0.75 estimated from 6702 pairs of twins from the same sample. DNA-estimated heritabilities increased from 0.26 at age 7 to 0.45 at age 12; twin-estimated heritabilities also increased from 0.35 to 0.48. These DNA results confirm the results of twin studies indicating strong genetic stability but increasing heritability for g, despite mean changes in brain structure and function from childhood to adolescence.

  11. Superparasitism Drives Heritable Symbiont Epidemiology and Host Sex Ratio in a Wasp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven R Parratt

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Heritable microbial symbionts have profound impacts upon the biology of their arthropod hosts. Whilst our current understanding of the dynamics of these symbionts is typically cast within a framework of vertical transmission only, horizontal transmission has been observed in a number of cases. For instance, several symbionts can transmit horizontally when their parasitoid hosts share oviposition patches with uninfected conspecifics, a phenomenon called superparasitism. Despite this, horizontal transmission, and the host contact structures that facilitates it, have not been considered in heritable symbiont epidemiology. Here, we tested for the importance of host contact, and resulting horizontal transmission, for the epidemiology of a male-killing heritable symbiont (Arsenophonus nasoniae in parasitoid wasp hosts. We observed that host contact through superparasitism is necessary for this symbiont's spread in populations of its primary host Nasonia vitripennis, such that when superparasitism rates are high, A. nasoniae almost reaches fixation, causes highly female biased population sex ratios and consequently causes local host extinction. We further tested if natural interspecific variation in superparasitism behaviours predicted symbiont dynamics among parasitoid species. We found that A. nasoniae was maintained in laboratory populations of a closely related set of Nasonia species, but declined in other, more distantly related pteromalid hosts. The natural proclivity of a species to superparasitise was the primary factor determining symbiont persistence. Our results thus indicate that host contact behaviour is a key factor for heritable microbe dynamics when horizontal transmission is possible, and that 'reproductive parasite' phenotypes, such as male-killing, may be of secondary importance in the dynamics of such symbiont infections.

  12. Heritability and fitness correlates of personality in the Ache, a natural-fertility population in Paraguay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drew H Bailey

    Full Text Available The current study assessed the heritability of personality in a traditional natural-fertility population, the Ache of eastern Paraguay. Self-reports (n = 110 and other-reports (n = 66 on the commonly used Big Five Personality Inventory (i.e., extraversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, neuroticism, openness were collected. Self-reports did not support the Five Factor Model developed with Western samples, and did not correlate with other-reports for three of the five measured personality factors. Heritability was assessed using factors that were consistent across self- and other-reports and factors assessed using other-reports that showed reliabilities similar to those found in Western samples. Analyses of these items in combination with a multi-generation pedigree (n = 2,132 revealed heritability estimates similar to those found in most Western samples, although we were not able to separately estimate the influence of the common environment on these traits. We also assessed relations between personality and reproductive success (RS, allowing for a test of several mechanisms that might be maintaining heritable variation in personality. Phenotypic analyses, based largely on other-reports, revealed that extraverted men had higher RS than other men, but no other dimensions of personality predicted RS in either sex. Mothers with more agreeable children had more children, and parents mated assortatively on personality. Of the evolutionary processes proposed to maintain variation in personality, assortative mating, selective neutrality, and temporal variation in selection pressures received the most support. However, the current study does not rule out other processes affecting the evolution and maintenance of individual differences in human personality.

  13. Superparasitism Drives Heritable Symbiont Epidemiology and Host Sex Ratio in a Wasp.

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    Steven R Parratt

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Heritable microbial symbionts have profound impacts upon the biology of their arthropod hosts. Whilst our current understanding of the dynamics of these symbionts is typically cast within a framework of vertical transmission only, horizontal transmission has been observed in a number of cases. For instance, several symbionts can transmit horizontally when their parasitoid hosts share oviposition patches with uninfected conspecifics, a phenomenon called superparasitism. Despite this, horizontal transmission, and the host contact structures that facilitates it, have not been considered in heritable symbiont epidemiology. Here, we tested for the importance of host contact, and resulting horizontal transmission, for the epidemiology of a male-killing heritable symbiont (Arsenophonus nasoniae in parasitoid wasp hosts. We observed that host contact through superparasitism is necessary for this symbiont's spread in populations of its primary host Nasonia vitripennis, such that when superparasitism rates are high, A. nasoniae almost reaches fixation, causes highly female biased population sex ratios and consequently causes local host extinction. We further tested if natural interspecific variation in superparasitism behaviours predicted symbiont dynamics among parasitoid species. We found that A. nasoniae was maintained in laboratory populations of a closely related set of Nasonia species, but declined in other, more distantly related pteromalid hosts. The natural proclivity of a species to superparasitise was the primary factor determining symbiont persistence. Our results thus indicate that host contact behaviour is a key factor for heritable microbe dynamics when horizontal transmission is possible, and that 'reproductive parasite' phenotypes, such as male-killing, may be of secondary importance in the dynamics of such symbiont infections.

  14. Heritability and fitness correlates of personality in the Ache, a natural-fertility population in Paraguay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Drew H; Walker, Robert S; Blomquist, Gregory E; Hill, Kim R; Hurtado, A Magdalena; Geary, David C

    2013-01-01

    The current study assessed the heritability of personality in a traditional natural-fertility population, the Ache of eastern Paraguay. Self-reports (n = 110) and other-reports (n = 66) on the commonly used Big Five Personality Inventory (i.e., extraversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, neuroticism, openness) were collected. Self-reports did not support the Five Factor Model developed with Western samples, and did not correlate with other-reports for three of the five measured personality factors. Heritability was assessed using factors that were consistent across self- and other-reports and factors assessed using other-reports that showed reliabilities similar to those found in Western samples. Analyses of these items in combination with a multi-generation pedigree (n = 2,132) revealed heritability estimates similar to those found in most Western samples, although we were not able to separately estimate the influence of the common environment on these traits. We also assessed relations between personality and reproductive success (RS), allowing for a test of several mechanisms that might be maintaining heritable variation in personality. Phenotypic analyses, based largely on other-reports, revealed that extraverted men had higher RS than other men, but no other dimensions of personality predicted RS in either sex. Mothers with more agreeable children had more children, and parents mated assortatively on personality. Of the evolutionary processes proposed to maintain variation in personality, assortative mating, selective neutrality, and temporal variation in selection pressures received the most support. However, the current study does not rule out other processes affecting the evolution and maintenance of individual differences in human personality.

  15. When aging reaches CD4+ T-cells: phenotypic and functional changes

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    Marco Antonio Moro-García

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Beyond midlife, the immune system shows aging features and its defensive capability becomes impaired, by a process known as immunosenescence that involves many changes in the innate and adaptive responses. Innate immunity seems to be better preserved globally, while the adaptive immune response exhibits profound age-dependent modifications. Elderly people display a decline in numbers of naïve T-cells in peripheral blood and lymphoid tissues, while, in contrast, their proportion of highly differentiated effector and memory T-cells, such as the CD28null T-cells, increases markedly. Naïve and memory CD4+ T-cells constitute a highly dynamic system with constant homeostatic and antigen-driven proliferation, influx, and loss of T-cells. Thymic activity dwindles with age and essentially ceases in the later decades of life, severely constraining the generation of new T-cells. Homeostatic control mechanisms are very effective at maintaining a large and diverse subset of naïve CD4+ T-cells throughout life, but although later than in CD8+T-cell compartment, these mechanisms ultimately fail with age.

  16. How the cerebral serotonin homeostasis predicts environmental changes: a model to explain seasonal changes of brain 5-HTT as intermediate phenotype of the 5-HTTLPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalbitzer, Jan; Kalbitzer, Urs; Knudsen, Gitte Moos; Cumming, Paul; Heinz, Andreas

    2013-12-01

    Molecular imaging studies with positron emission tomography have revealed that the availability of serotonin transporter (5-HTT) in the human brain fluctuates over the course of the year. This effect is most pronounced in carriers of the short allele of the 5-HTT promoter region (5-HTTLPR), which has in several previous studies been linked to an increased risk to develop mood disorders. We argue that long-lasting fluctuations in the cerebral serotonin transmission, which is regulated via the 5-HTT, are responsible for mediating responses to environmental changes based on an assessment of the expected "safety" of the environment; this response is obtained in part through serotonergic modulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. We posit that the intermediate phenotype of the s-allele may properly be understood as mediating a trade-off, wherein increased responsiveness of cerebral serotonin transmission to seasonal and other forms of environmental change imparts greater behavioral flexibility, at the expense of increased vulnerability to stress. This model may explain the somewhat higher prevalence of the s-allele in some human populations dwelling at geographic latitudes with pronounced seasonal climatic changes, while this hypothesis does not rule out that genetic drift plays an additional or even exclusive role. We argue that s-allele manifests as an intermediate phenotype in terms of an increased responsiveness of the 5-HTT expression to number of daylight hours, which may serve as a stable surrogate marker of other environmental factors, such as availability of food and safety of the environment in populations that live closer to the geographic poles.

  17. Methodology for high-throughput field phenotyping of canopy temperature using airborne thermography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Matthew Deery

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Lower canopy temperature (CT, resulting from increased stomatal conductance, has been associated with increased yield in wheat. Historically, CT has been measured with hand-held infrared thermometers. Using the hand-held CT method on large field trials is problematic, mostly because measurements are confounded by temporal weather changes during the time requiredto measure all plots. The hand-held CT method is laborious and yet the resulting heritability low, thereby reducing confidence in selection in large scale breeding endeavours.We have developed a reliable and scalable crop phenotyping method for assessing CT in large field experiments. The method involves airborne thermography from a manned helicopter using a radiometrically-calibrated thermal camera. Thermal image data is acquired from large experiments in the order of seconds, thereby enabling simultaneous measurement of CT on potentially 1,000s of plots. Effects of temporal weather variation when phenotyping large experiments using hand-held infrared thermometers are therefore reduced. The method is designed for cost-effective and large-scale use by the non-technical user and includes custom-developed software for data processing to obtain CT data on a single-plot basis for analysis.Broad-sense heritability was routinely greater than 0.50, and as high as 0.79, for airborne thermography CT measured near anthesis on a wheat experiment comprising 768 plots of size 2 x 6 m. Image analysis based on the frequency distribution of temperature pixels to remove the possible influence of background soil did not improve broad-sense heritability. Total imageacquisition and processing time was ca. 25 min and required only one person (excluding the helicopter pilot. The results indicate the potential to phenotype CT on large populations in genetics studies or for selection within a plant breeding program.

  18. [Changes of resistant phenotype and CRISPR/Cas system of four Shigella strains passaged for 90 times without antibiotics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, B; Hong, L J; Duan, G C; Liang, W J; Yang, H Y; Xi, Y L

    2017-02-10

    Objective: To explore the stability of resistant phenotypes and changes of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated (Cas) gene system on four Shigella strains in the absence of antibiotics. Methods: Four clinical isolated Shigella strains that resistant to different antibiotics were consecutive passaged for 90 times without antibiotics. Agar dilution method was used to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration of Shigella strains. After sequence analysis with PCR, CRISPR Finder and Clustal X 2.1 were applied to identify the changes of CRISPR loci in the Shigella strains. Results: After the consecutive transfer of 90 generations, sensitivity to certain antibiotics of four Shigella strains with different drug resistant spectrums increased. Mel-sf1998024/zz resistance to ampicillin, cephalexin, cefotaxime, chloramphenicol decreased, mel-s2014026/sx resistance to norfloxacin, trimethoprim decreased, mel-sf2004004/sx drug resistance to ampicillin, cefuroxime, cefotaxime, chloramphenicol, trimethoprim decreased and mel-sf2013004/bj resistance to chloramphenicol decreased. The spacer of which matched gene codes Cas and its upstream repeat in 3'end of CRISPR3 got lost in mel-sf1998024/zz and mel-sf2013004/bj. Conclusions:Shigella strains could reduce or lose their resistance to some antibiotics after consecutive transfers, without the interference of antibiotics. CRISPR3 locus had dynamic spacers in Shigella strains while CRISPR3 locus and cas genes might have been co-evolved.

  19. [Responses of Agriophyllum squarrosum phenotypic plasticity to the changes of soil nutrient and moisture contents and population density].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying-xin; Zhao, Xue-yong; Zhang, Hong-xuan; Luo, Ya-yong; Mao, Wei

    2008-12-01

    This paper studied the phenotypic plasticity of Agriophyllum squarrosum under effects of soil nutrient and moisture contents and population density. The results showed that with the increase of soil nutrient content, the root/shoot ratio of A. squarrosum was decreased from 0.135 to 0.073. However, soil moisture content and population density had less effect on the root/shoot ratio. The plasticity of reproductive allocation of A. squarrosum as responding to the changes of soil nutrient and moisture contents was a "real plasticity", and the allocation was negatively correlated with soil nutrient content but positively correlated with soil moisture content. When soil nutrient content was high or moisture content was low, the reproductive allocation of A. squarrosum changed larger with plant size. Population density had no effects on the reproductive allocation, while plant size conditioned the allocation. Among the three test affecting factors, soil nutrient content had the greatest effects on the morphological characters and biomass of A. squarrosum.

  20. Sexual variation in heritability and genetic correlations of morphological traits in house sparrow (Passer domesticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, H; Saether, B E; Ringsby, T H; Tufto, J; Griffith, S C; Ellegren, H

    2003-11-01

    Estimates of genetic components are important for our understanding of how individual characteristics are transferred between generations. We show that the level of heritability varies between 0.12 and 0.68 in six morphological traits in house sparrows (Passer domesticus L.) in northern Norway. Positive and negative genetic correlations were present among traits, suggesting evolutionary constraints on the evolution of some of these characters. A sexual difference in the amount of heritable genetic variation was found in tarsus length, wing length, bill depth and body condition index, with generally higher heritability in females. In addition, the structure of the genetic variance-covariance matrix for the traits differed between the sexes. Genetic correlations between males and females for the morphological traits were however large and not significantly different from one, indicating that sex-specific responses to selection will be influenced by intersexual differences in selection differentials. Despite this, some traits had heritability above 0.1 in females, even after conditioning on the additive genetic covariance between sexes and the additive genetic variances in males. Moreover, a meta-analysis indicated that higher heritability in females than in males may be common in birds. Thus, this indicates sexual differences in the genetic architecture of birds. Consequently, as in house sparrows, the evolutionary responses to selection will often be larger in females than males. Hence, our results suggest that sex-specific additive genetic variances and covariances, although ignored in most studies, should be included when making predictions of evolutionary changes from standard quantitative genetic models.

  1. The genomic-level heritabilities of preparedness and plasticity in human life history: the strategic differentiation and integration of genetic transmissibilities

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    Michael Anthony Woodley of Menie

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The Continuous Parameter Estimation Model is applied to develop individual genomic-level heritabilities for the latent hierarchical structure and developmental dynamics of Life History (LH strategy LH strategies relate to the allocations of bioenergetic resources into different domains of fitness. LH has moderate to high population-level heritability in humans, both at the level of the high-order Super-K Factor and the lower-order factors, the K-Factor, Covitality Factor, and General Factor of Personality (GFP. Several important questions remain unexplored. We developed measures of genome-level heritabilities employing an American sample of 316 monozygotic (MZ and 274 dizygotic (DZ twin dyads and a Swedish sample of 863 MZ and 475 DZ twin dyads. This novel heritability index measures individual genetic transmissibility, therefore opening new avenues for analyzing complex interactions among heritable traits inaccessible to standard structural equations methods. For these samples: (1 moderate to high heritability of factor loadings of Super-K on its lower-order factors is demonstrated, evidencing biological preparedness, genetic accommodation, and the gene-culture coevolution of biased epigenetic rules of development; (2 moderate to high heritability of the magnitudes of the effect of the higher-order factors upon their loadings on their constituent factors, evidencing genetic constraints upon phenotypic plasticity; and (3 that heritability of the LH factors, of factor loadings, and of the magnitudes of the correlations among factors are weaker among those with slower LH speeds, demonstrating that inter-individual variation in transmissibility is a function of individual socioecological selection pressures.

  2. Variation and Heritability of Phenology in the Fungus Monilinia vaccinii-corymbosi on Blueberry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, J S; Oudemans, P V

    2000-04-01

    ABSTRACT The germination of field-collected pseudosclerotia and the development of apothecia from eight New Jersey populations of the mummy berry fungus Monilinia vaccinii-corymbosi were evaluated under controlled conditions in the greenhouse. Development data for apothecia were used to describe the timing of apothecium formation and to estimate broad- and narrow-sense heritabilities of fungal phenology. Mean development times for the formation of apothecia ranged from 35.4 to 54.7 days. The mean development times for populations collected from early-season cv. Weymouth ranged from 35.4 to 39.6 days and were significantly shorter than the development times for three of the four populations collected from late-season cv. Jersey (46.9 to 54.7 days) or for the population collected from mixed stands of cultivated blueberries (42.7 days). The development of populations from late cultivars planted in very close proximity to early cv. Weymouth was early (36.5 to 39.0 days) and not significantly different from the development of populations collected from cv. Weymouth. Phenotypic and genetic variances of apothecium development for individual populations ranged from 18.9 to 44.8 and 7.2 to 30.9, respectively. Broad-sense heritabilities of apothecia development for each fungal population, calculated by partitioning phenotypic variation into genetic and environmental components, ranged from 0.31 to 0.78. Narrow-sense heritabilities of apothecia development, based on parent-offspring regression, ranged from 0.58 to 0.78. These results indicate that populations of M. vaccinii-corymbosi differ in phenology and that a significant portion of the phenological variation within populations is genetic. Thus, it is plausible to propose that the phenology of apothecium development is a component of fungal fitness and that host phenology can influence the timing of pathogen development.

  3. Survey of the Heritability and Sparse Architecture of Gene Expression Traits across Human Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Heather E.; Shah, Kaanan P.; Brenner, Jonathon; Garcia, Tzintzuni; Aquino-Michaels, Keston; Cox, Nancy J.; Nicolae, Dan L.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the genetic architecture of gene expression traits is key to elucidating the underlying mechanisms of complex traits. Here, for the first time, we perform a systematic survey of the heritability and the distribution of effect sizes across all representative tissues in the human body. We find that local h2 can be relatively well characterized with 59% of expressed genes showing significant h2 (FDR compute distal h2. Bayesian Sparse Linear Mixed Model (BSLMM) analysis provides strong evidence that the genetic contribution to local expression traits is dominated by a handful of genetic variants rather than by the collective contribution of a large number of variants each of modest size. In other words, the local architecture of gene expression traits is sparse rather than polygenic across all 40 tissues (from DGN and GTEx) examined. This result is confirmed by the sparsity of optimal performing gene expression predictors via elastic net modeling. To further explore the tissue context specificity, we decompose the expression traits into cross-tissue and tissue-specific components using a novel Orthogonal Tissue Decomposition (OTD) approach. Through a series of simulations we show that the cross-tissue and tissue-specific components are identifiable via OTD. Heritability and sparsity estimates of these derived expression phenotypes show similar characteristics to the original traits. Consistent properties relative to prior GTEx multi-tissue analysis results suggest that these traits reflect the expected biology. Finally, we apply this knowledge to develop prediction models of gene expression traits for all tissues. The prediction models, heritability, and prediction performance R2 for original and decomposed expression phenotypes are made publicly available (https://github.com/hakyimlab/PrediXcan). PMID:27835642

  4. Hypertriglyceridemic Waist Phenotype and Changes in the Fasting Glycemia and Blood Pressure in Children and Adolescents Over One-Year Follow-Up Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Priscila Ribas de Farias; Assis, Ana Marlúcia Oliveira; Cunha, Carla de Magalhães; Pereira, Emile Miranda; de Jesus, Gabriela dos Santos; da Silva, Lais Eloy Machado; Alves, Wilanne Pinheiro de Oliveira

    2017-01-01

    Background The hypertriglyceridemic waist (HTW) phenotype is defined as the simultaneous presence of increased waist circumference (WC) and serum triglycerides (TG) levels and it has been associated with cardiometabolic risk in children and adolescents. Objective The objective was to evaluate the influence of HTW phenotype in the fasting glycemia and blood pressure in children and adolescents over one-year follow-up period. Methods It is a cohort study involving 492 children and adolescents from 7 to 15 years old, both genders, who were submitted to anthropometric, biochemical and clinical evaluation at the baseline, and also after 6 and 12 months of follow-up. Generalized Estimating Equation (GEE) models were calculated to evaluate the longitudinal influence of the HTW phenotype in the glycemia and blood pressure over one-year. Results It was observed a prevalence of 10.6% (n = 52) of HTW phenotype in the students. The GEE models identified that students with HTW phenotype had an increase of 3.87 mg/dl in the fasting glycemia mean (CI: 1.68-6.05) and of 3.67mmHg in the systolic blood pressure (SBP) mean (CI: 1.55-6.08) over one-year follow-up, after adjusting for confounding variables. Conclusions The results of this study suggest that HTW phenotype is a risk factor for longitudinal changes in glycemia and SBP in children and adolescents over one-year follow-up period. PMID:28562834

  5. Change in phenotypic plasticity of a morphological defence in Daphnia galeata (Crustacea: Cladocera in a selection experiment

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    Koichi FUJII

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Some water fleas Daphnia change their head morphology to reduce predation risk in response to chemical substances (kairomones released from larvae of the invertebrate predator Chaoborus (Insecta: Diptera. We tested for evidence of the costs associated with elongation of the head spine in Daphnia galeata and the consequences of these costs on the inducibility of head spine elongation in predictable and unpredictable environments. We exposed D. galeata in outdoor experimental ponds to conditions under which predation pressure by Chaoborus larvae and the concentration of kairomones from this predator were controlled for about 70 days. In the laboratory, we then used Daphnia clones collected from the outdoor ponds to investigate the inducibility of head spine formation in response to Chaoborus kairomones. The inducibility of head spine formation increased in D. galeata from the ponds that had contained both predators and kairomones, whereas in water fleas from the ponds containing only kairomones the plasticity (inducibility of head spine formation decreased compared with that in the control ponds. These results suggest that the production of a defensive head spine, its phenotypic plasticity, or both entail some costs. Contrary to our predictions, exposure to Chaoborus kairomones in the laboratory resulted in head lengths that were not significantly different among any of the clones from the three outdoor treatments. We found no evidence for costs associated with head spine elongation in terms of fecundity, time to maturity, or intrinsic rate of natural population increase. Average within-clone partial correlations calculated for head length and intrinsic rate of natural population increase, corrected for body length, were not significantly negative, indicating no cost of defence. This was probably because food conditions in the laboratory were so good that the costs of defence could not be detected. Furthermore, community-level changes, such as

  6. IQ heritability estimation: analyzing genetically-informative data with structural equation models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallardo Pujol, David; García-Forero, Carlos; Kramp, Uwe; Maydeu-Olivares, Albert; Andrés-Pueyo, Antonio

    2007-02-01

    When analyzing genetic data, Structural Equations Modeling (SEM) provides a straightforward methodology to decompose phenotypic variance using a model-based approach. Furthermore, several models can be easily implemented, tested, and compared using SEM, allowing the researcher to obtain valuable information about the sources of variability. This methodology is briefly described and applied to re-analyze a Spanish set of IQ data using the biometric ACE model. In summary, we report heritability estimates that are consistent with those of previous studies and support substantial genetic contribution to phenotypic IQ; around 40% of the variance can be attributable to it. With regard to the environmental contribution, shared environment accounts for 50% of the variance, and non-shared environment accounts for the remaining 10%. These results are discussed in the text.

  7. Experimental tests for heritable morphological color plasticity in non-native brown trout (Salmo trutta populations.

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    Peter A H Westley

    Full Text Available The success of invasive species is frequently attributed to phenotypic plasticity, which facilitates persistence in novel environments. Here we report on experimental tests to determine whether the intensity of cryptic coloration patterns in a global invader (brown trout, Salmo trutta was primarily the result of plasticity or heritable variation. Juvenile F1 offspring were created through experimental crosses of wild-caught parents and reared for 30 days in the laboratory in a split-brood design on either light or dark-colored gravel substrate. Skin and fin coloration quantified with digital photography and image analysis indicated strong plastic effects in response to substrate color; individuals reared on dark substrate had both darker melanin-based skin color and carotenoid-based fin colors than other members of their population reared on light substrate. Slopes of skin and fin color reaction norms were parallel between environments, which is not consistent with heritable population-level plasticity to substrate color. Similarly, we observed weak differences in population-level color within an environment, again suggesting little genetic control on the intensity of skin and fin colors. Taken as whole, our results are consistent with the hypothesis that phenotypic plasticity may have facilitated the success of brown trout invasions and suggests that plasticity is the most likely explanation for the variation in color intensity observed among these populations in nature.

  8. Heritability of dimensions of Eysenck's pen model and the alternative five-factor model of personality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smederevac Snežana

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this study is to estimate the heritability of AFFM and PEN dimensions, including 67 pairs of twins (34 monozygotic and 33 dizygotic of both genders, aged 18 - 44. The heritability has been estimated by the biometric method, two full (ACE and ADE and three reduced (AE, DE and CE models tested for each personality trait. Taking into consideration the AFFM dimensions, additive genetic factors and a non-shared environment contribute the most significantly to the phenotypic variation of activity, sociability and the impulsive sensation seeking; anxiety and aggressiveness are best accounted for by the dominant genetic effects. In the PEN domain, fit indicators suggest that ACE and the reduced AE models provide the best explanation for the phenotypic manifestations of neuroticism, while ACE and CE models account for the variation of L scale. Although the fit indicators calculated for extraversion and psychotic behavior are somewhat problematic, the parameter estimates show that extraversion is best accounted for by the additive genetic variance, shared environmental effects, and the non-shared environment, whereas psychotic behavior is the most adequately explained by both shared and non-shared environmental effects.

  9. Variability components and heritability of pomological and chemical characteristics in sour cherry clones of cultivar Montmorency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fotirić Milica

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In 12 sour cherry clones of cultivar Montmorency 5 pomological (fruit length, fruit width, fruit weight, stone weight and fruit stem length and 4 chemical characteristics (soluble solid content, total acid content, invert sugar content and total sugar content were investigated. Based on results of analysis of variance for all examined characteristics, variability components, coefficients of genetic and phenotypic variation and coefficient of heritability in a broader sense were calculated. Considering components of total variability, year represented the component that caused variability of majority examined characteristics in the highest percentage. Coefficients of genetic variation showed that in investigated clones total acid content varied the least (CVg = 1.79%, and the most fruit weight (CVg = 11.41%. The lowest phenotypic varying was determined for fruit length (CVf = 4.01% but the highest for fruit weight (CVf = 13.86%. Coefficient of heritability was the highest for stone weight (h2 = 70.27%, and the lowest for total acid content (h2 = 7.73%.

  10. Presenilin 2 deficiency causes a mild pulmonary phenotype and no changes in amyloid precursor protein processing but enhances the embryonic lethal phenotype of presenilin 1 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herreman, A; Hartmann, D; Annaert, W; Saftig, P; Craessaerts, K; Serneels, L; Umans, L; Schrijvers, V; Checler, F; Vanderstichele, H; Baekelandt, V; Dressel, R; Cupers, P; Huylebroeck, D; Zwijsen, A; Van Leuven, F; De Strooper, B

    1999-10-12

    Mutations in the homologous presenilin 1 (PS1) and presenilin 2 (PS2) genes cause the most common and aggressive form of familial Alzheimer's disease. Although PS1 function and dysfunction have been extensively studied, little is known about the function of PS2 in vivo. To delineate the relationships of PS2 and PS1 activities and whether PS2 mutations involve gain or loss of function, we generated PS2 homozygous deficient (-/-) and PS1/PS2 double homozygous deficient mice. In contrast to PS1(-/-) mice, PS2(-/-) mice are viable and fertile and develop only mild pulmonary fibrosis and hemorrhage with age. Absence of PS2 does not detectably alter processing of amyloid precursor protein and has little or no effect on physiologically important apoptotic processes, indicating that Alzheimer's disease-causing mutations in PS2, as in PS1, result in gain of function. Although PS1(+/-) PS2( -/-) mice survive in relatively good health, complete deletion of both PS2 and PS1 genes causes a phenotype closely resembling full Notch-1 deficiency. These results demonstrate in vivo that PS1 and PS2 have partially overlapping functions and that PS1 is essential and PS2 is redundant for normal Notch signaling during mammalian embryological development.

  11. Heritability of metoprolol and torsemide pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthaei, J; Brockmöller, J; Tzvetkov, M V; Sehrt, D; Sachse-Seeboth, C; Hjelmborg, J B; Möller, S; Halekoh, U; Hofmann, U; Schwab, M; Kerb, R

    2015-12-01

    Genetic variation in the pharmacokinetics of metoprolol and torsemide due to polymorphisms in CYP2D6, CYP2C9, and OATP1B1 has been extensively studied. However, it is still unknown how much of the variation in pharmacokinetics of these two clinically important drugs in total is due to genetic factors. Metoprolol and torsemide were intravenously administered to 44 monozygotic and 14 dizygotic twin pairs. Metoprolol area under the curve (AUC) varied 4.7-fold and torsemide AUC 3.5-fold. A very high fraction of AUC variations, 91% of metoprolol and 86% of torsemide, were found to be due to additive genetic effects. However, known genetic variants of CYP2D6, -2C9, and OATP1B1 explained only 39%, 2%, and 39% of that variation, respectively. Comparable results for genetically explained variation in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics have been found for other substrates of these enzymes earlier. These findings indicate that a substantial fraction of the heritable variability in the pharmacokinetics of metoprolol and torsemide remains to be elucidated.

  12. Non-unity molecular heritability demonstrated by continuous evolution in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, T.; Lehman, N.

    1999-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: When catalytic RNA is evolved in vitro, the molecule's chemical reactivity is usually the desired selection target. Sometimes the phenotype of a particular RNA molecule cannot be unambiguously determined from its genotype, however. This can occur if a nucleotide sequence can adopt multiple folded states, an example of non-unity heritability (i.e. one genotype gives rise to more than one phenotype). In these cases, more rounds of selection are required to achieve a phenotypic shift. We tested the influence of non-unity heritability at the molecular level by selecting for variants of a ligase ribozyme via continuous evolution. RESULTS: During 20 bursts of continuous evolution of a 152-nucleotide ligase ribozyme in which the Mg2+ concentration was periodically lowered, a nine-error variant of the starting 'wild-type' molecule became dominant in the last eight bursts. This variant appears to be more active than the wild type. Kinetic analyses of the mutant suggest that it may not possess a higher first-order catalytic rate constant, however. Examination of the multiple RNA conformations present under the continuous evolution conditions suggests that the mutant is superior to the wild type because it is less likely to misfold into inactive conformers. CONCLUSIONS: The evolution of genotypes that are more likely to exhibit a particular phenotype is an epiphenomenon usually ascribed only to complex living systems. We show that this can occur at the molecular level, demonstrating that in vitro systems may have more life-like characteristics than previously thought, and providing additional support for an RNA world.

  13. Genetic Diversity, Population Structure, and Heritability of Fruit Traits in Capsicum annuum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel P Naegele

    Full Text Available Cultivated pepper (Capsicum annuum is a phenotypically diverse species grown throughout the world. Wild and landrace peppers are typically small-fruited and pungent, but contain many important traits such as insect and disease resistance. Cultivated peppers vary dramatically in size, shape, pungency, and color, and often lack resistance traits. Fruit characteristics (e.g. shape and pericarp thickness are major determinants for cultivar selection, and their association with disease susceptibility can reduce breeding efficacy. This study evaluated a diverse collection of peppers for mature fruit phenotypic traits, correlation among fruit traits and Phytophthora fruit rot resistance, genetic diversity, population structure, and trait broad sense heritability. Significant differences within all fruit phenotype categories were detected among pepper lines. Fruit from Europe had the thickest pericarp, and fruit from Ecuador had the thinnest. For fruit shape index, fruit from Africa had the highest index, while fruit from Europe had the lowest. Five genetic clusters were detected in the pepper population and were significantly associated with fruit thickness, end shape, and fruit shape index. The genetic differentiation between clusters ranged from little to very great differentiation when grouped by the predefined categories. Broad sense heritability for fruit traits ranged from 0.56 (shoulder height to 0.98 (pericarp thickness. When correlations among fruit phenotypes and fruit disease were evaluated, fruit shape index was negatively correlated with pericarp thickness, and positively correlated with fruit perimeter. Pepper fruit pericarp, perimeter, and width had a slight positive correlation with Phytophthora fruit rot, whereas fruit shape index had a slight negative correlation.

  14. Genetic Diversity, Population Structure, and Heritability of Fruit Traits in Capsicum annuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naegele, Rachel P.; Mitchell, Jenna; Hausbeck, Mary K.

    2016-01-01

    Cultivated pepper (Capsicum annuum) is a phenotypically diverse species grown throughout the world. Wild and landrace peppers are typically small-fruited and pungent, but contain many important traits such as insect and disease resistance. Cultivated peppers vary dramatically in size, shape, pungency, and color, and often lack resistance traits. Fruit characteristics (e.g. shape and pericarp thickness) are major determinants for cultivar selection, and their association with disease susceptibility can reduce breeding efficacy. This study evaluated a diverse collection of peppers for mature fruit phenotypic traits, correlation among fruit traits and Phytophthora fruit rot resistance, genetic diversity, population structure, and trait broad sense heritability. Significant differences within all fruit phenotype categories were detected among pepper lines. Fruit from Europe had the thickest pericarp, and fruit from Ecuador had the thinnest. For fruit shape index, fruit from Africa had the highest index, while fruit from Europe had the lowest. Five genetic clusters were detected in the pepper population and were significantly associated with fruit thickness, end shape, and fruit shape index. The genetic differentiation between clusters ranged from little to very great differentiation when grouped by the predefined categories. Broad sense heritability for fruit traits ranged from 0.56 (shoulder height) to 0.98 (pericarp thickness). When correlations among fruit phenotypes and fruit disease were evaluated, fruit shape index was negatively correlated with pericarp thickness, and positively correlated with fruit perimeter. Pepper fruit pericarp, perimeter, and width had a slight positive correlation with Phytophthora fruit rot, whereas fruit shape index had a slight negative correlation. PMID:27415818

  15. Non-unity molecular heritability demonstrated by continuous evolution in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, T.; Lehman, N.

    1999-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: When catalytic RNA is evolved in vitro, the molecule's chemical reactivity is usually the desired selection target. Sometimes the phenotype of a particular RNA molecule cannot be unambiguously determined from its genotype, however. This can occur if a nucleotide sequence can adopt multiple folded states, an example of non-unity heritability (i.e. one genotype gives rise to more than one phenotype). In these cases, more rounds of selection are required to achieve a phenotypic shift. We tested the influence of non-unity heritability at the molecular level by selecting for variants of a ligase ribozyme via continuous evolution. RESULTS: During 20 bursts of continuous evolution of a 152-nucleotide ligase ribozyme in which the Mg2+ concentration was periodically lowered, a nine-error variant of the starting 'wild-type' molecule became dominant in the last eight bursts. This variant appears to be more active than the wild type. Kinetic analyses of the mutant suggest that it may not possess a higher first-order catalytic rate constant, however. Examination of the multiple RNA conformations present under the continuous evolution conditions suggests that the mutant is superior to the wild type because it is less likely to misfold into inactive conformers. CONCLUSIONS: The evolution of genotypes that are more likely to exhibit a particular phenotype is an epiphenomenon usually ascribed only to complex living systems. We show that this can occur at the molecular level, demonstrating that in vitro systems may have more life-like characteristics than previously thought, and providing additional support for an RNA world.

  16. Phenotypic changes of p53, HER2, and FAS system in multiple normal tissues surrounding breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottolese, Marcella; Nádasi, Edit A; Botti, Claudio; Cianciulli, Anna M; Merola, Roberta; Buglioni, Simonetta; Benevolo, Maria; Giannarelli, Diana; Marandino, Ferdinando; Donnorso, Raffaele Perrone; Venturo, Irene; Natali, Pier Giorgio

    2005-07-01

    To determine whether phenotypic field changes occur in tissues adjacent to carcinoma, we assayed, by immunohistochemistry, the expression of HER-2, p53, Fas, and FasL in 72 breast cancers (BC) and multiple autologous peritumoral tissues (PTTs) sampled up to 5 cm distance and in 44 benign breast tumors (BBTs). About 5% and 3% of the PTTs and 4.5% and 6.8% of BBTs showed alterations in HER2 and p53 expression, respectively. Of interest, gene amplification was observed in 50% of HER2 positive PTTs, but not in any HER2 positive BBTs. Fas, highly expressed in BBTs and downregulated in BC, maintained its expression in PTTs, whereas FasL, usually negative in BBTs, was upregulated in BC as well as in the PTTs closest (1 cm) to the invasive lesion. Our data suggest that FasL could be a potential novel biomarker of transformation, which may identify, along with HER2 and p53, precursor lesions in a genetically altered breast tissue.

  17. Resolving Salmonella infection reveals dynamic and persisting changes in murine bone marrow progenitor cell phenotype and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Ewan A; Flores-Langarica, Adriana; Bobat, Saeeda; Coughlan, Ruth E; Marshall, Jennifer L; Hitchcock, Jessica R; Cook, Charlotte N; Carvalho-Gaspar, Manuela M; Mitchell, Andrea M; Clarke, Mary; Garcia, Paloma; Cobbold, Mark; Mitchell, Tim J; Henderson, Ian R; Jones, Nick D; Anderson, Graham; Buckley, Christopher D; Cunningham, Adam F

    2014-08-01

    The generation of immune cells from BM precursors is a carefully regulated process. This is essential to limit the potential for oncogenesis and autoimmunity yet protect against infection. How infection modulates this is unclear. Salmonella can colonize systemic sites including the BM and spleen. This resolving infection has multiple IFN-γ-mediated acute and chronic effects on BM progenitors, and during the first week of infection IFN-γ is produced by myeloid, NK, NKT, CD4(+) T cells, and some lineage-negative cells. After infection, the phenotype of BM progenitors rapidly but reversibly alters, with a peak ∼ 30-fold increase in Sca-1(hi) progenitors and a corresponding loss of Sca-1(lo/int) subsets. Most strikingly, the capacity of donor Sca-1(hi) cells to reconstitute an irradiated host is reduced; the longer donor mice are exposed to infection, and Sca-1(hi) c-kit(int) cells have an increased potential to generate B1a-like cells. Thus, Salmonella can have a prolonged influence on BM progenitor functionality not directly related to bacterial persistence. These results reflect changes observed in leucopoiesis during aging and suggest that BM functionality can be modulated by life-long, periodic exposure to infection. Better understanding of this process could offer novel therapeutic opportunities to modulate BM functionality and promote healthy aging.

  18. Local adaptation in brown trout early life-history traits: implications for climate change adaptability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, L.F.; Hansen, Michael Møller; Pertoldi, C.

    2008-01-01

    to adapt. Temperature-related adaptability in traits related to phenology and early life history are expected to be particularly important in salmonid fishes. We focused on the latter and investigated whether four populations of brown trout (Salmo trutta) are locally adapted in early life-history traits...... and heritable variation in phenotypic plasticity suggest that although increasing temperatures are likely to affect some populations negatively, they may have the potential to adapt to changing temperature regimes.  ...

  19. ANOPHTHALMIA: A NON-HERITABLE EYE DEFORMITY IN Oreochromis mossambicus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Tave

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available Seven male Oreochromis mossambicus with anophthalmia were found in a hatchery population. The deformity was not observed in either the Fl or F2 generations; consequently, it was a non-heritable congenital deformity.

  20. Heritability of cardiovascular and personality traits in 6,148 Sardinians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Pilia

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available In family studies, phenotypic similarities between relatives yield information on the overall contribution of genes to trait variation. Large samples are important for these family studies, especially when comparing heritability between subgroups such as young and old, or males and females. We recruited a cohort of 6,148 participants, aged 14-102 y, from four clustered towns in Sardinia. The cohort includes 34,469 relative pairs. To extract genetic information, we implemented software for variance components heritability analysis, designed to handle large pedigrees, analyze multiple traits simultaneously, and model heterogeneity. Here, we report heritability analyses for 98 quantitative traits, focusing on facets of personality and cardiovascular function. We also summarize results of bivariate analyses for all pairs of traits and of heterogeneity analyses for each trait. We found a significant genetic component for every trait. On average, genetic effects explained 40% of the variance for 38 blood tests, 51% for five anthropometric measures, 25% for 20 measures of cardiovascular function, and 19% for 35 personality traits. Four traits showed significant evidence for an X-linked component. Bivariate analyses suggested overlapping genetic determinants for many traits, including multiple personality facets and several traits related to the metabolic syndrome; but we found no evidence for shared genetic determinants that might underlie the reported association of some personality traits and cardiovascular risk factors. Models allowing for heterogeneity suggested that, in this cohort, the genetic variance was typically larger in females and in younger individuals, but interesting exceptions were observed. For example, narrow heritability of blood pressure was approximately 26% in individuals more than 42 y old, but only approximately 8% in younger individuals. Despite the heterogeneity in effect sizes, the same loci appear to contribute to variance

  1. Heritability of Cardiovascular and Personality Traits in 6,148 Sardinians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scuteri, Angelo; Orrú, Marco; Albai, Giuseppe; Dei, Mariano; Lai, Sandra; Usala, Gianluca; Lai, Monica; Loi, Paola; Mameli, Cinzia; Vacca, Loredana; Deiana, Manila; Olla, Nazario; Masala, Marco; Cao, Antonio; Najjar, Samer S; Terracciano, Antonio; Nedorezov, Timur; Sharov, Alexei; Zonderman, Alan B; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Costa, Paul; Lakatta, Edward; Schlessinger, David

    2006-01-01

    In family studies, phenotypic similarities between relatives yield information on the overall contribution of genes to trait variation. Large samples are important for these family studies, especially when comparing heritability between subgroups such as young and old, or males and females. We recruited a cohort of 6,148 participants, aged 14–102 y, from four clustered towns in Sardinia. The cohort includes 34,469 relative pairs. To extract genetic information, we implemented software for variance components heritability analysis, designed to handle large pedigrees, analyze multiple traits simultaneously, and model heterogeneity. Here, we report heritability analyses for 98 quantitative traits, focusing on facets of personality and cardiovascular function. We also summarize results of bivariate analyses for all pairs of traits and of heterogeneity analyses for each trait. We found a significant genetic component for every trait. On average, genetic effects explained 40% of the variance for 38 blood tests, 51% for five anthropometric measures, 25% for 20 measures of cardiovascular function, and 19% for 35 personality traits. Four traits showed significant evidence for an X-linked component. Bivariate analyses suggested overlapping genetic determinants for many traits, including multiple personality facets and several traits related to the metabolic syndrome; but we found no evidence for shared genetic determinants that might underlie the reported association of some personality traits and cardiovascular risk factors. Models allowing for heterogeneity suggested that, in this cohort, the genetic variance was typically larger in females and in younger individuals, but interesting exceptions were observed. For example, narrow heritability of blood pressure was approximately 26% in individuals more than 42 y old, but only approximately 8% in younger individuals. Despite the heterogeneity in effect sizes, the same loci appear to contribute to variance in young and old

  2. Changes in the population of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius and dissemination of antimicrobial-resistant phenotypes in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duim, Birgitta; Verstappen, Koen M.; Broens, E.M.; Laarhoven, Laura M.; Duijkeren, Van Engeline; Hordijk, Joost; Heus, De Phebe; Spaninks, Mirlin; Timmerman, Arjen J.; Wagenaar, J.A.

    2016-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP), which is often multidrug resistant (MDR), has recently emerged as a threat to canine health worldwide. Knowledge of the temporal distribution of specific MRSP lineages, their antimicrobial resistance phenotypes, and their association w

  3. Heritabilities of somatotype components in a population from rural Mozambique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saranga, Sílvio Pedro José; Prista, António; Nhantumbo, Leonardo; Beunen, Gaston; Rocha, Jorge; Williams-Blangero, Sarah; Maia, José A

    2008-01-01

    There have been few genetic studies of normal variation in body size and composition conducted in Africa. In particular, the genetic determinants of somatotype remain to be established for an African population. (1) To estimate the heritabilities of aspects of somatotype and (2) to compare the quantitative genetic effects in an African population to those that have been assessed in European and American populations. The sample composed of 329 subjects (173 males and 156 females) aged 7-17 years, belonging to 132 families. The sibships in the sample ranged in size from two to seven individuals. All sampled individuals were residents of the Calanga region, an area located to the north of Maputo in Mozambique. Somatotype was assessed using the Heath-Carter technique. Herit abilities were estimated using SAGE software. Moderate heritabilities were determined for each trait. Between 30 and 40% of the variation in each somatotype measure was attributable to genetic factors. The heritability of ectomorphy was 31%. Mesomorphy was similarly moderately heritable, with approximately 30% of the variationattributable to genetic factors. The heritability of endomorph was higher in the Calanga population (h(2) = 0.40). Quantitative genetic analyses of somatotype variation among siblings indicate that genetic factors significantly influence endomorphy, mesomorhpy, and ectomorphy. However, environmental factors also have significant effects on the variation in physique present in the population of Calanga. Lack of proper nutrition, housing, medical assistance, and primary health care, together with very demanding and sex-specific daily chores may contribute to the environmental effects on these traits.

  4. Genomic Heritability of Bovine Growth Using a Mixed Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihye Ryu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated heritability for bovine growth estimated with genomewide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP information obtained from a DNA microarray chip. Three hundred sixty seven Korean cattle were genotyped with the Illumina BovineSNP50 BeadChip, and 39,112 SNPs of 364 animals filtered by quality assurance were analyzed to estimate heritability of body weights at 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, 21, and 24 months of age. Restricted maximum likelihood estimate of heritability was obtained using covariance structure of genomic relationships among animals in a mixed model framework. Heritability estimates ranged from 0.58 to 0.76 for body weights at different ages. The heritability estimates using genomic information in this study were larger than those which had been estimated previously using pedigree information. The results revealed a trend that the heritability for body weight increased at a younger age (6 months. This suggests an early genetic evaluation for bovine growth using genomic information to increase genetic merits of animals.

  5. Evidence for a heritable unidimensional symptom factor underlying obsessionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Carol A; Greenwood, Tiffany; Wessel, Jennifer; Azzam, Amin; Garrido, Helena; Chavira, Denise A; Chandavarkar, Uma; Bagnarello, Monica; Stein, Murray; Schork, Nicholas J

    2008-09-05

    The division of obsessive-compulsive symptoms (OCS) into specific factors is now widely accepted. However, the utility of these categories for genetic studies remains unclear, as studies examining their heritability have been inconsistent. Less attention has been paid to the possibility that clinically significant obsessionality is primarily determined by a "core" group of OCS that crosses the boundaries between symptom subgroups. The aim of this study is to determine whether such a core group exists, and to compare its heritability to that of the more traditionally derived symptom factors. We examined the properties and heritability of obsessive-compulsive symptoms in college students, medical students, and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) families using the Leyton Obsessional Inventory. In each of the three samples, we identified a core group of symptoms that comprised a single unique construct and accounted for over 90% of the variation of the four more traditional symptom factors. This core construct was highly correlated with OCD in our families and had a heritability estimate of 0.19 when OCD was not included as a covariate and 0.49 when OCD was included as a covariate. In contrast, the four symptom factors were not heritable. There appears to be an underlying unidimensional component to obsessionality, both in non-clinical and clinical samples. This component, which is heritable, accounts for the majority of the variation of the more traditionally derived symptom factors in our sample, and is composed of OCS that are not specific to any of the symptom subgroups.

  6. Heritability of compulsive Internet use in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vink, Jacqueline M; van Beijsterveldt, Toos C E M; Huppertz, Charlotte; Bartels, Meike; Boomsma, Dorret I

    2016-03-01

    Over the past decades, Internet use has grown substantially, and it now serves people as a supportive tool that is used regularly and-in large parts of the world-inevitably. Some people develop problematic Internet use, which may lead to addictive behavior and it is becoming important to explore the risk factors for compulsive Internet use. Data were analyzed on compulsive Internet use [with the Compulsive Internet Use Scale (CIUS)] from 5247 monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) adolescent twins registered with the Netherlands Twin Register. The participants form a sample that is informative for genetic analyses, allowing the investigation of the causes of individual differences in compulsive Internet use. The internal consistency of the instrument was high and the 1.6-year test-retest correlation in a subsample (n = 902) was 0.55. CIUS scores increased slightly with age. Remarkably, gender did not explain variation in CIUS scores, as mean scores on the CIUS were the same in boys and girls. However, the time spent on specific Internet activities differed: boys spent more time on gaming, whereas girls spent more time on social network sites and chatting. The heritability estimates were the same for boys and girls: 48 percent of the individual differences in CIUS score were influenced by genetic factors. The remaining variance (52 percent) was due to environmental influences that were not shared between family members. Because a life without Internet is almost impossible nowadays, it is important to further explore the determinants of compulsive Internet use, including genetic risk factors.

  7. Heritability of strabismus: genetic influence is specific to eso-deviation and independent of refractive error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanfilippo, Paul G; Hammond, Christopher J; Staffieri, Sandra E; Kearns, Lisa S; Melissa Liew, S H; Barbour, Julie M; Hewitt, Alex W; Ge, Dongliang; Snieder, Harold; Mackinnon, Jane R; Brown, Shayne A; Lorenz, Birgit; Spector, Tim D; Martin, Nicholas G; Wilmer, Jeremy B; Mackey, David A

    2012-10-01

    Strabismus represents a complex oculomotor disorder characterized by the deviation of one or both eyes and poor vision. A more sophisticated understanding of the genetic liability of strabismus is required to guide searches for associated molecular variants. In this classical twin study of 1,462 twin pairs, we examined the relative influence of genes and environment in comitant strabismus, and the degree to which these influences can be explained by factors in common with refractive error. Participants were examined for the presence of latent ('phoria') and manifest ('tropia') strabismus using cover-uncover and alternate cover tests. Two phenotypes were distinguished: eso-deviation (esophoria and esotropia) and exo-deviation (exophoria and exotropia). Structural equation modeling was subsequently employed to partition the observed phenotypic variation in the twin data into specific variance components. The prevalence of eso-deviation and exo-deviation was 8.6% and 20.7%, respectively. For eso-deviation, the polychoric correlation was significantly greater in monozygotic (MZ) (r = 0.65) compared to dizygotic (DZ) twin pairs (r = 0.33), suggesting a genetic role (p = .003). There was no significant difference in polychoric correlation between MZ (r = 0.55) and DZ twin pairs (r = 0.53) for exo-deviation (p = .86), implying that genetic factors do not play a significant role in the etiology of exo-deviation. The heritability of an eso-deviation was 0.64 (95% CI 0.50-0.75). The additive genetic correlation for eso-deviation and refractive error was 0.13 and the bivariate heritability (i.e., shared variance) was less than 1%, suggesting negligible shared genetic effect. This study documents a substantial heritability of 64% for eso-deviation, yet no corresponding heritability for exo-deviation, suggesting that the genetic contribution to strabismus may be specific to eso-deviation. Future studies are now needed to identify the genes associated with eso-deviation and

  8. Analysis of Heritability and Shared Heritability Based on Genome-Wide Association Studies for Thirteen Cancer Types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sampson, Joshua N; Wheeler, William A; Yeager, Meredith; Panagiotou, Orestis; Wang, Zhaoming; Berndt, Sonja I; Lan, Qing; Abnet, Christian C; Amundadottir, Laufey T; Figueroa, Jonine D; Landi, Maria Teresa; Mirabello, Lisa; Savage, Sharon A; Taylor, Philip R; Vivo, Immaculata De; McGlynn, Katherine A; Purdue, Mark P; Rajaraman, Preetha; Adami, Hans-Olov; Ahlbom, Anders; Albanes, Demetrius; Amary, Maria Fernanda; An, She-Juan; Andersson, Ulrika; Andriole, Gerald; Andrulis, Irene L; Angelucci, Emanuele; Ansell, Stephen M; Arici, Cecilia; Armstrong, Bruce K; Arslan, Alan A; Austin, Melissa A; Baris, Dalsu; Barkauskas, Donald A; Bassig, Bryan A; Becker, Nikolaus; Benavente, Yolanda; Benhamou, Simone; Berg, Christine; Van Den Berg, David; Bernstein, Leslie; Bertrand, Kimberly A; Birmann, Brenda M; Black, Amanda; Boeing, Heiner; Boffetta, Paolo; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Bracci, Paige M; Brinton, Louise; Brooks-Wilson, Angela R; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Burdett, Laurie; Buring, Julie; Butler, Mary Ann; Cai, Qiuyin; Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine; Canzian, Federico; Carrato, Alfredo; Carreon, Tania; Carta, Angela; Chan, John K C; Chang, Ellen T; Chang, Gee-Chen; Chang, I-Shou; Chang, Jiang; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chen, Chien-Jen; Chen, Chih-Yi; Chen, Chu; Chen, Chung-Hsing; Chen, Constance; Chen, Hongyan; Chen, Kexin; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Chen, Kun-Chieh; Chen, Ying; Chen, Ying-Hsiang; Chen, Yi-Song; Chen, Yuh-Min; Chien, Li-Hsin; Chirlaque, María-Dolores; Choi, Jin Eun; Choi, Yi Young; Chow, Wong-Ho; Chung, Charles C; Clavel, Jacqueline; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Cocco, Pierluigi; Colt, Joanne S; Comperat, Eva; Conde, Lucia; Connors, Joseph M; Conti, David; Cortessis, Victoria K; Cotterchio, Michelle; Cozen, Wendy; Crouch, Simon; Crous-Bou, Marta; Cussenot, Olivier; Davis, Faith G; Ding, Ti; Diver, W Ryan; Dorronsoro, Miren; Dossus, Laure; Duell, Eric J; Ennas, Maria Grazia; Erickson, Ralph L; Feychting, Maria; Flanagan, Adrienne M; Foretova, Lenka; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Freedman, Neal D; Beane Freeman, Laura E; Fuchs, Charles; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Gallinger, Steven; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gapstur, Susan M; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; García-Closas, Reina; Gascoyne, Randy D; Gastier-Foster, Julie; Gaudet, Mia M; Gaziano, J Michael; Giffen, Carol; Giles, Graham G; Giovannucci, Edward; Glimelius, Bengt; Goggins, Michael; Gokgoz, Nalan; Goldstein, Alisa M; Gorlick, Richard; Gross, Myron; Grubb, Robert; Gu, Jian; Guan, Peng; Gunter, Marc; Guo, Huan; Habermann, Thomas M; Haiman, Christopher A; Halai, Dina; Hallmans, Goran; Hassan, Manal; Hattinger, Claudia; He, Qincheng; He, Xingzhou; Helzlsouer, Kathy; Henderson, Brian; Henriksson, Roger; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Hoffman-Bolton, Judith; Hohensee, Chancellor; Holford, Theodore R; Holly, Elizabeth A; Hong, Yun-Chul; Hoover, Robert N; Horn-Ross, Pamela L; Hosain, G M Monawar; Hosgood, H Dean; Hsiao, Chin-Fu; Hu, Nan; Hu, Wei; Hu, Zhibin; Huang, Ming-Shyan; Huerta, Jose-Maria; Hung, Jen-Yu; Hutchinson, Amy; Inskip, Peter D; Jackson, Rebecca D; Jacobs, Eric J; Jenab, Mazda; Jeon, Hyo-Sung; Ji, Bu-Tian; Jin, Guangfu; Jin, Li; Johansen, Christoffer; Johnson, Alison; Jung, Yoo Jin; Kaaks, Rudolph; Kamineni, Aruna; Kane, Eleanor; Kang, Chang Hyun; Karagas, Margaret R; Kelly, Rachel S; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Christopher; Kim, Hee Nam; Kim, Jin Hee; Kim, Jun Suk; Kim, Yeul Hong; Kim, Young Tae; Kim, Young-Chul; Kitahara, Cari M; Klein, Alison P; Klein, Robert J; Kogevinas, Manolis; Kohno, Takashi; Kolonel, Laurence N; Kooperberg, Charles; Kricker, Anne; Krogh, Vittorio; Kunitoh, Hideo; Kurtz, Robert C; Kweon, Sun-Seog; LaCroix, Andrea; Lawrence, Charles; Lecanda, Fernando; Lee, Victor Ho Fun; Li, Donghui; Li, Haixin; Li, Jihua; Li, Yao-Jen; Li, Yuqing; Liao, Linda M; Liebow, Mark; Lightfoot, Tracy; Lim, Wei-Yen; Lin, Chien-Chung; Lin, Dongxin; Lindstrom, Sara; Linet, Martha S; Link, Brian K; Liu, Chenwei; Liu, Jianjun; Liu, Li; Ljungberg, Börje; Lloreta, Josep; Lollo, Simonetta Di; Lu, Daru; Lund, Eiluv; Malats, Nuria; Mannisto, Satu; Marchand, Loic Le; Marina, Neyssa; Masala, Giovanna; Mastrangelo, Giuseppe; Matsuo, Keitaro; Maynadie, Marc; McKay, James; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; Melbye, Mads; Melin, Beatrice S; Michaud, Dominique S; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Monnereau, Alain; Montalvan, Rebecca; Moore, Lee E; Mortensen, Lotte Maxild; Nieters, Alexandra; North, Kari E; Novak, Anne J; Oberg, Ann L; Offit, Kenneth; Oh, In-Jae; Olson, Sara H; Palli, Domenico; Pao, William; Park, In Kyu; Park, Jae Yong; Park, Kyong Hwa; Patiño-Garcia, Ana; Pavanello, Sofia; Peeters, Petra H M; Perng, Reury-Perng; Peters, Ulrike; Petersen, Gloria M; Picci, Piero; Pike, Malcolm C; Porru, Stefano; Prescott, Jennifer; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Qian, Biyun; Qiao, You-Lin; Rais, Marco; Riboli, Elio; Riby, Jacques; Risch, Harvey A; Rizzato, Cosmeri; Rodabough, Rebecca; Roman, Eve; Roupret, Morgan; Ruder, Avima M; Sanjose, Silvia de; Scelo, Ghislaine; Schned, Alan; Schumacher, Fredrick; Schwartz, Kendra; Schwenn, Molly; Scotlandi, Katia; Seow, Adeline; Serra, Consol; Serra, Massimo; Sesso, Howard D; Setiawan, Veronica Wendy; Severi, Gianluca; Severson, Richard K; Shanafelt, Tait D; Shen, Hongbing; Shen, Wei; Shin, Min-Ho; Shiraishi, Kouya; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Siddiq, Afshan; Sierrasesúmaga, Luis; Sihoe, Alan Dart Loon; Skibola, Christine F; Smith, Alex; Smith, Martyn T; Southey, Melissa C; Spinelli, John J; Staines, Anthony; Stampfer, Meir; Stern, Marianna C; Stevens, Victoria L; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael S; Su, Jian; Su, Wu-Chou; Sund, Malin; Sung, Jae Sook; Sung, Sook Whan; Tan, Wen; Tang, Wei; Tardón, Adonina; Thomas, David; Thompson, Carrie A; Tinker, Lesley F; Tirabosco, Roberto; Tjønneland, Anne; Travis, Ruth C; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Tsai, Fang-Yu; Tsai, Ying-Huang; Tucker, Margaret; Turner, Jenny; Vajdic, Claire M; Vermeulen, Roel C H; Villano, Danylo J; Vineis, Paolo; Virtamo, Jarmo; Visvanathan, Kala; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Wang, Chaoyu; Wang, Chih-Liang; Wang, Jiu-Cun; Wang, Junwen; Wei, Fusheng; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Weiner, George J; Weinstein, Stephanie; Wentzensen, Nicolas; White, Emily; Witzig, Thomas E; Wolpin, Brian M; Wong, Maria Pik; Wu, Chen; Wu, Guoping; Wu, Junjie; Wu, Tangchun; Wu, Wei; Wu, Xifeng; Wu, Yi-Long; Wunder, Jay S; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Xu, Jun; Xu, Ping; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Yang, Tsung-Ying; Ye, Yuanqing; Yin, Zhihua; Yokota, Jun; Yoon, Ho-Il; Yu, Chong-Jen; Yu, Herbert; Yu, Kai; Yuan, Jian-Min; Zelenetz, Andrew; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Zhang, Xu-Chao; Zhang, Yawei; Zhao, Xueying; Zhao, Zhenhong; Zheng, Hong; Zheng, Tongzhang; Zheng, Wei; Zhou, Baosen; Zhu, Meng; Zucca, Mariagrazia; Boca, Simina M; Cerhan, James R; Ferri, Giovanni M; Hartge, Patricia; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Magnani, Corrado; Miligi, Lucia; Morton, Lindsay M; Smedby, Karin E; Teras, Lauren R; Vijai, Joseph; Wang, Sophia S; Brennan, Paul; Caporaso, Neil E; Hunter, David J; Kraft, Peter; Rothman, Nathaniel; Silverman, Debra T; Slager, Susan L; Chanock, Stephen J; Chatterjee, Nilanjan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies of related individuals have consistently demonstrated notable familial aggregation of cancer. We aim to estimate the heritability and genetic correlation attributable to the additive effects of common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for cancer at 13 anatomical sites.

  9. Multivariate Analysis of Genotype-Phenotype Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitteroecker, Philipp; Cheverud, James M; Pavlicev, Mihaela

    2016-04-01

    With the advent of modern imaging and measurement technology, complex phenotypes are increasingly represented by large numbers of measurements, which may not bear biological meaning one by one. For such multivariate phenotypes, studying the pairwise associations between all measurements and all alleles is highly inefficient and prevents insight into the genetic pattern underlying the observed phenotypes. We present a new method for identifying patterns of allelic variation (genetic latent variables) that are maximally associated-in terms of effect size-with patterns of phenotypic variation (phenotypic latent variables). This multivariate genotype-phenotype mapping (MGP) separates phenotypic features under strong genetic control from less genetically determined features and thus permits an analysis of the multivariate structure of genotype-phenotype association, including its dimensionality and the clustering of genetic and phenotypic variables within this association. Different variants of MGP maximize different measures of genotype-phenotype association: genetic effect, genetic variance, or heritability. In an application to a mouse sample, scored for 353 SNPs and 11 phenotypic traits, the first dimension of genetic and phenotypic latent variables accounted for >70% of genetic variation present in all 11 measurements; 43% of variation in this phenotypic pattern was explained by the corresponding genetic latent variable. The first three dimensions together sufficed to account for almost 90% of genetic variation in the measurements and for all the interpretable genotype-phenotype association. Each dimension can be tested as a whole against the hypothesis of no association, thereby reducing the number of statistical tests from 7766 to 3-the maximal number of meaningful independent tests. Important alleles can be selected based on their effect size (additive or nonadditive effect on the phenotypic latent variable). This low dimensionality of the genotype-phenotype map

  10. Multivariate Analysis of Genotype–Phenotype Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitteroecker, Philipp; Cheverud, James M.; Pavlicev, Mihaela

    2016-01-01

    With the advent of modern imaging and measurement technology, complex phenotypes are increasingly represented by large numbers of measurements, which may not bear biological meaning one by one. For such multivariate phenotypes, studying the pairwise associations between all measurements and all alleles is highly inefficient and prevents insight into the genetic pattern underlying the observed phenotypes. We present a new method for identifying patterns of allelic variation (genetic latent variables) that are maximally associated—in terms of effect size—with patterns of phenotypic variation (phenotypic latent variables). This multivariate genotype–phenotype mapping (MGP) separates phenotypic features under strong genetic control from less genetically determined features and thus permits an analysis of the multivariate structure of genotype–phenotype association, including its dimensionality and the clustering of genetic and phenotypic variables within this association. Different variants of MGP maximize different measures of genotype–phenotype association: genetic effect, genetic variance, or heritability. In an application to a mouse sample, scored for 353 SNPs and 11 phenotypic traits, the first dimension of genetic and phenotypic latent variables accounted for >70% of genetic variation present in all 11 measurements; 43% of variation in this phenotypic pattern was explained by the corresponding genetic latent variable. The first three dimensions together sufficed to account for almost 90% of genetic variation in the measurements and for all the interpretable genotype–phenotype association. Each dimension can be tested as a whole against the hypothesis of no association, thereby reducing the number of statistical tests from 7766 to 3—the maximal number of meaningful independent tests. Important alleles can be selected based on their effect size (additive or nonadditive effect on the phenotypic latent variable). This low dimensionality of the

  11. Model Invariance across Genders of the Broad Autism Phenotype Questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broderick, Neill; Wade, Jordan L.; Meyer, J. Patrick; Hull, Michael; Reeve, Ronald E.

    2015-01-01

    ASD is one of the most heritable neuropsychiatric disorders, though comprehensive genetic liability remains elusive. To facilitate genetic research, researchers employ the concept of the broad autism phenotype (BAP), a milder presentation of traits in undiagnosed relatives. Research suggests that the BAP Questionnaire (BAPQ) demonstrates…

  12. Familial Aggregation and Heritability of Schizophrenia and Co-aggregation of Psychiatric Illnesses in Affected Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, I-Jun; Kuo, Chang-Fu; Huang, Yu-Shu; Valdes, Ana M; See, Lai-Chu; Yu, Kuang-Hui; Huang, Lu-Shuang; Tseng, Wen-Yi; Zhang, Weiya; Doherty, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Strong familial aggregation of schizophrenia has been reported but there is uncertainty concerning the degree of genetic contribution to the phenotypic variance of the disease. This study aimed to examine the familial aggregation and heritability of schizophrenia, and the relative risks (RRs) of other psychiatric diseases, in relatives of people with schizophrenia using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Database. The study population included individuals with affected first-degree or second-degree relatives identified from all beneficiaries (n = 23 422 955) registered in 2013. Diagnoses of schizophrenia made by psychiatrists were ascertained between January 1, 1996 and December 31, 2013. Having an affected co-twin, first-degree relative, second-degree relative, or spouse was associated with an adjusted RR (95% CI) of 37.86 (30.55–46.92), 6.30 (6.09–6.53), 2.44 (1.91–3.12), and 1.88 (1.64–2.15), respectively. Compared with the general population, individuals with one affected first-degree relative had a RR (95% CI) of 6.00 (5.79–6.22) and those with 2 or more had a RR (95% CI) of 14.66 (13.00–16.53) for schizophrenia. The accountability for the phenotypic variance of schizophrenia was 47.3% for genetic factors, 15.5% for shared environmental factors, and 37.2% for non-shared environmental factors. The RR (95% CI) in individuals with a first-degree relative with schizophrenia was 3.49 (3.34–3.64) for mood disorders and 3.91 (3.35–4.57) for delusional disorders. A family history of schizophrenia is therefore associated with a higher risk of developing schizophrenia, mood disorders, and delusional disorders. Heritability and environmental factors each account for half of the phenotypic variance of schizophrenia. PMID:27872260

  13. Heritability in the efficiency of nonsense-mediated mRNA decay in humans

    KAUST Repository

    Seoighe, Cathal

    2010-07-21

    Background: In eukaryotes mRNA transcripts of protein-coding genes in which an intron has been retained in the coding region normally result in premature stop codons and are therefore degraded through the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) pathway. There is evidence in the form of selective pressure for in-frame stop codons in introns and a depletion of length three introns that this is an important and conserved quality-control mechanism. Yet recent reports have revealed that the efficiency of NMD varies across tissues and between individuals, with important clinical consequences. Principal Findings: Using previously published Affymetrix exon microarray data from cell lines genotyped as part of the International HapMap project, we investigated whether there are heritable, inter-individual differences in the abundance of intron-containing transcripts, potentially reflecting differences in the efficiency of NMD. We identified intronic probesets using EST data and report evidence of heritability in the extent of intron expression in 56 HapMap trios. We also used a genome-wide association approach to identify genetic markers associated with intron expression. Among the top candidates was a SNP in the DCP1A gene, which forms part of the decapping complex, involved in NMD. Conclusions: While we caution that some of the apparent inter-individual difference in intron expression may be attributable to different handling or treatments of cell lines, we hypothesize that there is significant polymorphism in the process of NMD, resulting in heritable differences in the abundance of intronic mRNA. Part of this phenotype is likely to be due to a polymorphism in a decapping enzyme on human chromosome 3. © 2010 Seoighe, Gehring.

  14. Heritability in the efficiency of nonsense-mediated mRNA decay in humans.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Seoighe, Cathal

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In eukaryotes mRNA transcripts of protein-coding genes in which an intron has been retained in the coding region normally result in premature stop codons and are therefore degraded through the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) pathway. There is evidence in the form of selective pressure for in-frame stop codons in introns and a depletion of length three introns that this is an important and conserved quality-control mechanism. Yet recent reports have revealed that the efficiency of NMD varies across tissues and between individuals, with important clinical consequences. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using previously published Affymetrix exon microarray data from cell lines genotyped as part of the International HapMap project, we investigated whether there are heritable, inter-individual differences in the abundance of intron-containing transcripts, potentially reflecting differences in the efficiency of NMD. We identified intronic probesets using EST data and report evidence of heritability in the extent of intron expression in 56 HapMap trios. We also used a genome-wide association approach to identify genetic markers associated with intron expression. Among the top candidates was a SNP in the DCP1A gene, which forms part of the decapping complex, involved in NMD. CONCLUSIONS: While we caution that some of the apparent inter-individual difference in intron expression may be attributable to different handling or treatments of cell lines, we hypothesize that there is significant polymorphism in the process of NMD, resulting in heritable differences in the abundance of intronic mRNA. Part of this phenotype is likely to be due to a polymorphism in a decapping enzyme on human chromosome 3.

  15. Heritability in the efficiency of nonsense-mediated mRNA decay in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathal Seoighe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In eukaryotes mRNA transcripts of protein-coding genes in which an intron has been retained in the coding region normally result in premature stop codons and are therefore degraded through the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD pathway. There is evidence in the form of selective pressure for in-frame stop codons in introns and a depletion of length three introns that this is an important and conserved quality-control mechanism. Yet recent reports have revealed that the efficiency of NMD varies across tissues and between individuals, with important clinical consequences. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using previously published Affymetrix exon microarray data from cell lines genotyped as part of the International HapMap project, we investigated whether there are heritable, inter-individual differences in the abundance of intron-containing transcripts, potentially reflecting differences in the efficiency of NMD. We identified intronic probesets using EST data and report evidence of heritability in the extent of intron expression in 56 HapMap trios. We also used a genome-wide association approach to identify genetic markers associated with intron expression. Among the top candidates was a SNP in the DCP1A gene, which forms part of the decapping complex, involved in NMD. CONCLUSIONS: While we caution that some of the apparent inter-individual difference in intron expression may be attributable to different handling or treatments of cell lines, we hypothesize that there is significant polymorphism in the process of NMD, resulting in heritable differences in the abundance of intronic mRNA. Part of this phenotype is likely to be due to a polymorphism in a decapping enzyme on human chromosome 3.

  16. Biogenetic mechanisms predisposing to complex phenotypes in parents may function differently in their children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulminski, Alexander M; Arbeev, Konstantin G; Christensen, Kaare

    2013-01-01

    This study focuses on the participants of the Long Life Family Study to elucidate whether biogenetic mechanisms underlying relationships among heritable complex phenotypes in parents function in the same way for the same phenotypes in their children. Our results reveal 3 characteristic groups of ...

  17. Heritability estimates for enteric methane emissions from Holstein cattle measured using noninvasive methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassen, Jan; Løvendahl, Peter

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate heritability of enteric methane emissions from dairy cattle. Methane (CH4) and CO2 were measured with a portable air-sampler and analyzer unit based on Fourier transform infrared detection. Data were collected on 3,121 Holstein dairy cows from 20 herds using automatic milking systems. Three CH4 phenotypes were acquired: the ratio between CH4 and CO2 in the breath of the cows (CH4_RATIO), the estimated quantified amount of CH4 (in g/d) measured over a week (CH4_GRAMSw), and CH4 intensity, defined as grams of CH4 per liter of milk produced (CH4_MILK). Fat- and protein-corrected milk (FPCM) and live weight data were also derived for the analysis. Data were analyzed using several univariate and bivariate linear animal models. The heritability of CH4_GRAMSw and CH4_MILK was 0.21 with a standard error of 0.06, and the heritability of CH4_RATIO was 0.16 with a standard error of 0.04. The 2 CH4 traits CH4_GRAMSw and CH4_RATIO were genetically highly correlated (rg=0.83) and they were strongly correlated with FPCM, meaning that, in this study, a high genetic potential for milk production will also mean a high genetic potential for CH4 production. The genetic correlation between CH4_MILK and FPCM and live weight showed similar patterns as the other CH4 phenotypes, although the correlations in general were closer to zero. The genetic correlations between the 3 CH4 phenotypes and live weight were low and only just significantly different from zero, meaning there is less indication of a genetic relationship between CH4 emission and live weight of the cow. None of the residual correlations between the ratio of CH4 and CO2, CH4 production in grams per day, FPCM, and live weight were significantly different from zero. The results from this study suggest that CH4 emission is partly under genetic control, that it is possible to decrease CH4 emission from dairy cattle through selection, and that selection for higher milk yield will lead to

  18. Heritability of glutathione and related metabolites in stored red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van 't Erve, Thomas J; Doskey, Claire M; Wagner, Brett A; Hess, John R; Darbro, Benjamin W; Ryckman, Kelli K; Murray, Jeffrey C; Raife, Thomas J; Buettner, Garry R

    2014-11-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) collected for transfusion deteriorate during storage. This deterioration is termed the "RBC storage lesion." There is increasing concern over the safety, therapeutic efficacy, and toxicity of transfusing longer-stored units of blood. The severity of the RBC storage lesion is dependent on storage time and varies markedly between individuals. Oxidative damage is considered a significant factor in the development of the RBC storage lesion. In this study, the variability during storage and heritability of antioxidants and metabolites central to RBC integrity and function were investigated. In a classic twin study, we determined the heritability of glutathione (GSH), glutathione disulfide (GSSG), the status of the GSSG,2H(+)/2GSH couple (Ehc), and total glutathione (tGSH) in donated RBCs over 56 days of storage. Intracellular GSH and GSSG concentrations both decrease during storage (median net loss of 0.52 ± 0.63 mM (median ± SD) and 0.032 ± 0.107 mM, respectively, over 42 days). Taking into account the decline in pH, Ehc became more positive (oxidized) during storage (median net increase of 35 ± 16 mV). In our study population heritability estimates for GSH, GSSG, tGSH, and Ehc measured over 56 days of storage are 79, 60, 67, and, 75%, respectively. We conclude that susceptibility of stored RBCs to oxidative injury due to variations in the GSH redox buffer is highly variable among individual donors and strongly heritable. Identifying the genes that regulate the storage-related changes in this redox buffer could lead to the development of new methods to minimize the RBC storage lesion.

  19. Heritability and Genetic Advance among Chili Pepper Genotypes for Heat Tolerance and Morphophysiological Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usman, Magaji G.; Rafii, M. Y.; Ismail, M. R.; Malek, M. A.; Abdul Latif, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    High temperature tolerance is an important component of adaptation to arid and semiarid cropping environment in chili pepper. Two experiments were carried out to study the genetic variability among chili pepper for heat tolerance and morphophysiological traits and to estimate heritability and genetic advance expected from selection. There was a highly significant variation among the genotypes in response to high temperature (CMT), photosynthesis rate, plant height, disease incidence, fruit length, fruit weight, number of fruits, and yield per plant. At 5% selection intensity, high genetic advance as percent of the mean (>20%) was observed for CMT, photosynthesis rate, fruit length, fruit weight, number of fruits, and yield per plant. Similarly, high heritability (>60%) was also observed indicating the substantial effect of additive gene more than the environmental effect. Yield per plant showed strong to moderately positive correlations (r = 0.23–0.56) at phenotypic level while at genotypic level correlation coefficient ranged from 0.16 to 0.72 for CMT, plant height, fruit length, and number of fruits. Cluster analysis revealed eight groups and Group VIII recorded the highest CMT and yield. Group IV recorded 13 genotypes while Groups II, VII, and VIII recorded one each. The results showed that the availability of genetic variance could be useful for exploitation through selection for further breeding purposes. PMID:25478590

  20. Partitioning heritability analysis reveals a shared genetic basis of brain anatomy and schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Phil H.; Baker, Justin T.; Holmes, Avram J.; Jahanshad, Neda; Ge, Tian; Jung, Jae-Yoon; Cruz, Yanela; Manoach, Dara S.; Hibar, Derrek P.; Faskowitz, Joshua; McMahon, Katie L.; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Martin, Nicolas H.; Wright, Margaret J.; Öngür, Dost; Buckner, Randy; Roffman, Joshua; Thompson, Paul M.; Smoller, Jordan W.

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a devastating neurodevelopmental disorder with a complex genetic etiology. Widespread cortical gray matter loss has been observed in patients and prodromal samples. However, it remains unresolved whether schizophrenia-associated cortical structure variations arise due to disease etiology or secondary to the illness. Here we address this question using a partitioning-based heritability analysis of genome-wide SNP and neuroimaging data from 1,750 healthy individuals. We find that schizophrenia-associated genetic variants explain a significantly enriched proportion of trait heritability in eight brain phenotypes (FDR=10%). In particular, intracranial volume (ICV) and left superior frontal gyrus thickness exhibit significant and robust associations with schizophrenia genetic risk under varying SNP selection conditions. Cross disorder comparison suggests that the neurogenetic architecture of schizophrenia-associated brain regions is, at least in part, shared with other psychiatric disorders. Our study highlights key neuroanatomical correlates of schizophrenia genetic risk in the general population. These may provide fundamental insights into the complex pathophysiology of the illness, and a potential link to neurocognitive deficits shaping the disorder. PMID:27725656

  1. Heritability and Genetic Advance among Chili Pepper Genotypes for Heat Tolerance and Morphophysiological Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magaji G. Usman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available High temperature tolerance is an important component of adaptation to arid and semiarid cropping environment in chili pepper. Two experiments were carried out to study the genetic variability among chili pepper for heat tolerance and morphophysiological traits and to estimate heritability and genetic advance expected from selection. There was a highly significant variation among the genotypes in response to high temperature (CMT, photosynthesis rate, plant height, disease incidence, fruit length, fruit weight, number of fruits, and yield per plant. At 5% selection intensity, high genetic advance as percent of the mean (>20% was observed for CMT, photosynthesis rate, fruit length, fruit weight, number of fruits, and yield per plant. Similarly, high heritability (>60% was also observed indicating the substantial effect of additive gene more than the environmental effect. Yield per plant showed strong to moderately positive correlations (r=0.23–0.56 at phenotypic level while at genotypic level correlation coefficient ranged from 0.16 to 0.72 for CMT, plant height, fruit length, and number of fruits. Cluster analysis revealed eight groups and Group VIII recorded the highest CMT and yield. Group IV recorded 13 genotypes while Groups II, VII, and VIII recorded one each. The results showed that the availability of genetic variance could be useful for exploitation through selection for further breeding purposes.

  2. Direct and maternal (co)variance components and heritability estimates for body weights in Chokla sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushwaha, B P; Mandal, A; Arora, A L; Kumar, R; Kumar, S; Notter, D R

    2009-08-01

    Estimates of (co)variance components were obtained for weights at birth, weaning and 6, 9 and 12 months of age in Chokla sheep maintained at the Central Sheep and Wool Research Institute, Avikanagar, Rajasthan, India, over a period of 21 years (1980-2000). Records of 2030 lambs descended from 150 rams and 616 ewes were used in the study. Analyses were carried out by restricted maximum likelihood (REML) fitting an animal model and ignoring or including maternal genetic or permanent environmental effects. Six different animal models were fitted for all traits. The best model was chosen after testing the improvement of the log-likelihood values. Direct heritability estimates were inflated substantially for all traits when maternal effects were ignored. Heritability estimates for weight at birth, weaning and 6, 9 and 12 months of age were 0.20, 0.18, 0.16, 0.22 and 0.23, respectively in the best models. Additive maternal and maternal permanent environmental effects were both significant at birth, accounting for 9% and 12% of phenotypic variance, respectively, but the source of maternal effects (additive versus permanent environmental) at later ages could not be clearly identified. The estimated repeatabilities across years of ewe effects on lamb body weights were 0.26, 0.14, 0.12, 0.13, and 0.15 at birth, weaning, 6, 9 and 12 months of age, respectively. These results indicate that modest rates of genetic progress are possible for all weights.

  3. Heritability of fear of humans in urban and rural populations of a bird species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrete, Martina; Martínez-Padilla, Jesús; Rodríguez-Martínez, Sol; Rebolo-Ifrán, Natalia; Palma, Antonio; Tella, José L

    2016-08-08

    Flight initiation distance (FID), a measure of an animal's tolerance to human disturbance and a descriptor of its fear of humans, is increasingly employed for conservation purposes and to predict the response of species to urbanization. However, most work devoted to understanding variability in FID has been conducted at the population level and little is still known about inter-individual variability in this behaviour. We estimated the heritability of FID, a factor fundamental to understanding the strength and evolutionary consequences of selection of particular phenotypes associated with human disturbances. We used a population of burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia) monitored long-term and for which FID was previously shown to be highly consistent across an individual's lifespan. Heritability estimates varied between 0.37 and 0.80, depending on the habitat considered (urban-rural) and method used (parent-offspring regressions or animal models). These values are unusually high compared with those previously reported for other behavioural traits. Although more research is needed to fully understand the underlying causes of this resemblance between relatives, selection pressures acting on this behaviour should be seriously considered as an important evolutionary force in animal populations increasingly exposed to human disturbance worldwide.

  4. Genetic contribution to rate of change in functional abilities among Danish twins aged 75 years or more.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Kaare; Gaist, David; Vaupel, James W; McGue, Matt

    2002-01-15

    In a previous cross-sectional study of twins, the authors found evidence of a substantial genetic influence on functional abilities among elderly women. It has been suggested that rate of change in functional abilities over time could underlie such findings and that rate-of-change phenotypes may have an even larger genetic component than "level" phenotypes (e.g., functional abilities per se). If so, rate-of-change phenotypes could be more powerful than level phenotypes in studies aimed at identifying specific polymorphisms of importance for aging. In 1995, the authors assessed a population-based sample of 2,401 Danish twins aged 75 years or more. The survivors were recontacted after 2 years and again after 4 years. Consistent mean-level declines, high within-person correlations over time, and substantial heritability in the female sample were observed for functional abilities. Nonetheless, structural-equation analyses revealed only a very modest and nonsignificant heritability for rate of change in functional abilities: 16% (95% confidence interval: 0, 35) for women and 9% (95% confidence interval: 0, 44) for men. This study had a large initial sample size, high participation rates, and a valid and reliable measure of rate of change in a phenotype that had previously shown substantial heritability in cross-sectional analyses in the same twin population. Still, the present study revealed only a modest and nonsignificant genetic influence on rate of change, which suggests that detection of polymorphisms influencing rate of change in functional abilities among the elderly may prove to be difficult.

  5. The Critical Role of Proteolytic Relay through Cathepsins B and E in the Phenotypic Change of Microglia/Macrophage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Junjun; Wu, Zhou; Peterts, Christoph; Yamamoto, Kenji; Qing, Hong; Nakanishi, Hiroshi

    2015-09-01

    Proteinase cascades are part of the basic machinery of neuronal death pathways. Neuronal cathepsin B (CatB), a typical cysteine lysosomal protease, plays a critical role in neuronal death through lysosomal leakage or excessive autophagy. On the other hand, much attention has been paid to microglial CatB in neuronal death. We herein show the critical role of proteolytic relay through microglial CatB and CatE in the polarization of microglia/macrophages in the neurotoxic phenotype, leading to hypoxia/ischemia (HI)-induced hippocampal neuronal damage in neonatal mice. HI caused extensive brain injury in neonatal wild-type mice, but not in CatB(-/-) mice. Furthermore, HI-induced polarization of microglia/macrophages in the neurotoxic phenotype followed by the neuroprotective phenotype in wild-type mice. On the other hand, microglia/macrophages exhibited only the early and transient polarization in the neuroprotective phenotype in CatB(-/-) mice. CA-074Me, a specific CatB inhibitor, significantly inhibited the neuronal death of primary cultured hippocampal neurons induced by the conditioned medium from cultured microglia polarized in the neurotoxic phenotype. Furthermore, CA-074Me prevented the activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) in cultured microglia by inhibiting autophagic inhibitor of κBα degradation following exposure to oxygen-glucose deprivation. Rather surprisingly, CatE increased the CatB expression after HI by the liberation of the tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) from microglia through the proteasomal pathway. A significant increase in CatB and CatE levels was found exclusively in microglia/macrophages after HI. Thus, a proteolytic relay through the early CatE/TRAIL-dependent proteosomal and late CatB-dependent autophagic pathways for NF-κB activation may play a critical role in the polarization of microglia/macrophages in the neurotoxic phenotype. Significance statement: Proteinase cascades are part of the basic

  6. Heritable influence of DBH on adrenergic and renal function: twin and disease studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalal N Pasha

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Elevated sympathetic activity is associated with kidney dysfunction. Here we used twin pairs to probe heritability of GFR and its genetic covariance with other traits. METHODS: We evaluated renal and adrenergic phenotypes in twins. GFR was estimated by CKD-EPI algorithm. Heritability and genetic covariance of eGFR and associated risk traits were estimated by variance-components. Meta-analysis probed reproducibility of DBH genetic effects. Effect of DBH genetic variation on renal disease was tested in the NIDDK-AASK cohort. RESULTS: Norepinephrine secretion rose across eGFR tertiles while eGFR fell (p<0.0001. eGFR was heritable, at h(2 = 67.3±4.7% (p = 3.0E-18, as were secretion of norepinephrine (h(2 = 66.5±5.0%, p = 3.2E-16 and dopamine (h(2 = 56.5±5.6%, p = 1.8E-13, and eGFR displayed genetic co-determination (covariance with norepinephrine (ρG = -0.557±0.088, p = 1.11E-08 as well as dopamine (ρG = -0.223±0.101, p = 2.3E-02. Since dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH catalyzes conversion of dopamine to norepinephrine, we studied functional variation at DBH; DBH promoter haplotypes predicted transcriptional activity (p<0.001, plasma DBH (p<0.0001 and norepinephrine (p = 0.0297 secretion; transcriptional activity was inversely (p<0.0001 associated with basal eGFR. Meta-analysis validated DBH haplotype effects on eGFR across 3 samples. In NIDDK-AASK, we established a role for DBH promoter variation in long-term renal decline rate (GFR slope, p = 0.003. CONCLUSIONS: The heritable GFR trait shares genetic determination with catecholamines, suggesting new pathophysiologic, diagnostic and therapeutic approaches towards disorders of GFR as well as CKD. Adrenergic activity may play a role in progressive renal decline, and genetic variation at DBH may assist in profiling subjects for rational preventive treatment.

  7. Heritability of aerobic power of individuals in northeast Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, L; Souza, Ec; Oliveira, Mv; do Nascimento, Lfe; Dantas, Pms

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the genetic and environmental contribution to variation in aerobic power in monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) twins. The sample consisted of 20 MZ individuals (12 females and 8 males) and 16 DZ individuals (12 females and 4 males), aged from 8 to 26 years, residents in Natal, Rio Grande do Norte. The twins were assessed by a multistage fitness test. The rate of heritability found for aerobic power was 77%. Based on the results, the estimated heritability was largely responsible for the differences in aerobic power. This implies that such measures are under strong genetic influence.

  8. An assessment of gene-by-gene interactions as a tool to unfold missing heritability in dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascheretti, S; Bureau, A; Trezzi, V; Giorda, R; Marino, C

    2015-07-01

    Even if substantial heritability has been reported and candidate genes have been identified extensively, all known marker associations explain only a small proportion of the phenotypic variance of developmental dyslexia (DD) and related quantitative phenotypes. Gene-by-gene interaction (also known as "epistasis"--G × G) triggers a non-additive effect of genes at different loci and should be taken into account in explaining part of the missing heritability of this complex trait. We assessed potential G × G interactions among five DD candidate genes, i.e., DYX1C1, DCDC2, KIAA0319, ROBO1, and GRIN2B, upon DD-related neuropsychological phenotypes in 493 nuclear families with DD, by implementing two complementary regression-based approaches: (1) a general linear model equation whereby the trait is predicted by the main effect of the number of rare alleles of the two genes and by the effect of the interaction between them, and (2) a family-based association test to detect G × G interactions between two unlinked markers by splitting up the association effect into a between- and a within-family genetic orthogonal components. After applying 500,000 permutations and correcting for multiple testing, both methods show that G × G effects between markers within the DYX1C1, KIAA0319/TTRAP, and GRIN2B genes lower the memory letters composite z-score of on average 0.55 standard deviation. We provided initial evidence that the effects of familial transmission of synergistic interactions between genetic risk variants can be exploited in the study of the etiology of DD, explain part of its missing heritability, and assist in designing customized charts of individualized neurocognitive impairments in complex disorders, such as DD.

  9. Changes in the Population of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius and Dissemination of Antimicrobial-Resistant Phenotypes in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duim, Birgitta; Verstappen, Koen M; Broens, Els M; Laarhoven, Laura M; van Duijkeren, Engeline; Hordijk, Joost; de Heus, Phebe; Spaninks, Mirlin; Timmerman, Arjen J; Wagenaar, Jaap A

    2016-02-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP), which is often multidrug resistant (MDR), has recently emerged as a threat to canine health worldwide. Knowledge of the temporal distribution of specific MRSP lineages, their antimicrobial resistance phenotypes, and their association with clinical conditions may help us to understand the emergence and spread of MRSP in dogs. The aim of this study was to determine the yearly proportions of MRSP lineages and their antimicrobial-resistant phenotypes in the Netherlands and to examine possible associations with clinical conditions. MRSP was first isolated from a canine specimen submitted for diagnostics to the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine of Utrecht University in 2004. The annual cumulative incidence of MRSP among S. pseudintermedius increased from 0.9% in 2004 to 7% in 2013. MRSP was significantly associated with pyoderma and, to a lesser extent, with wound infections and otitis externa. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) of 478 MRSP isolates yielded 39 sequence types (ST) belonging to 4 clonal complexes (CC) and 15 singletons. CC71 was the dominant lineage that emerged since 2004, and CC258, CC45, and several unlinked isolates became more frequent during the following years. All but two strains conferred an MDR phenotype, but strains belonging to CC258 or singletons were less resistant. In conclusion, our study showed that MDR CC71 emerged as the dominant lineage from 2004 and onward and that less-resistant lineages were partly replacing CC71.

  10. Phenotypic plasticity, trade-offs and gene expression changes accompanying dietary restriction and switches in Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Er-Hu; Hou, Qiu-Li; Wei, Dan-Dan; Jiang, Hong-Bo; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2017-05-16

    In this study, we investigated the effects of dietary restriction (DR) and variable diets on phenotypes and gene expression in oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), one of the most economically important pests in the family Tephritidae around the world. As expected, we found that DR altered the B. dorsalis phenotypes by significantly increasing stress resistance and lifespan, but reduced egg production when compared with the control diet. The results suggested a trade-off between reproduction versus somatic maintenance (stress resistance) and lifespan in B. dorsalis. Diet also had a significant effect on hatchability, and DR could increase the egg hatching success of B. dorsalis. Furthermore, DR up-regulated metabolic pathways involved in energy homeostasis and down-regulated pathways in egg production, which might mediate trade-offs between somatic maintenance and reproduction under DR regimes. The gene expression profiles in response to the acute dietary switches indicated that the digestive and metabolic pathways maybe involved in the adaptability of flies to variable dietary resources. In summary, the research facilitates a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms responsible for the B. dorsalis' phenotypic adjustments to the different qualities of the available diets.

  11. Morphological change and phenotypic plasticity in native and non-native pumpkinseed sunfish in response to competition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavno, Stan; Rooke, Anna C.; Fox, Michael G.

    2014-06-01

    Non-indigenous species are oftentimes exposed to ecosystems with unfamiliar species, and organisms that exhibit a high degree of phenotypic plasticity may be better able to contend with the novel competitors that they may encounter during range expansion. In this study, differences in morphological plasticity were investigated using young-of-year pumpkinseed sunfish ( Lepomis gibbosus) from native North American and non-native European populations. Two Canadian populations, isolated from bluegill sunfish ( L. macrochirus) since the last glaciation, and two Spanish populations, isolated from bluegill since their introduction in Europe, were reared in a common environment using artificial enclosures. Fish were subjected to allopatric (without bluegill) or sympatric (with bluegill) conditions, and differences in plasticity were tested through a MANOVA of discriminant function scores. All pumpkinseed populations exhibited dietary shifts towards more benthivorous prey when held with bluegill. Differences between North American and European populations were observed in body dimensions, gill raker length and pelvic fin position. Sympatric treatments induced an increase in body width and a decrease in caudal peduncle length in native fish; non-native fish exhibited longer caudal peduncle lengths when held in sympatry with bluegill. Overall, phenotypic plasticity influenced morphological divergence less than genetic factors, regardless of population. Contrary to predictions, pumpkinseeds from Europe exhibited lower levels of phenotypic plasticity than Canadian populations, suggesting that European pumpkinseeds are more canalized than their North American counterparts.

  12. Thrombopoietin induced proliferation and differentiation of fetal liver CD34+ cells with phenotype change from hemopoiesis to neurogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning Ma; Dongchu Ma; Yi Tao; Yinghui Sun; Di Lin; Huiying Yu; Jinlong Jian; Wei Jia; Boquan Jin

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies have reported a neurotrophin-like motif in the N-terminal receptor binding region of the thrombopoietin (TPO) molecule, and have described localization of TPO and TPO receptor in the brain. Therefore, it is believed that TPO may be involved in regulation of neurogenesis.OBJECTIVE: To validate the effect of TPO on trans-differentiation, or differentiation from hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to neural stem cells (NSCs).DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: Comparative studies were performed from March 2004 to April 2007 at the Department of Experimental Medicine, Northern Hospital, and the Department of Immunology, Fourth Military Medical University of Chinese PLA.MATERIALS: Human fetal liver (FL) was obtained from fetuses after water-balloon abortion. Gestational age ranged from 16 to 20 weeks. The study was approved by the Institutional Review Board and Ethics Committee of the Northern Hospital. TPO was kindly provided by Genentech Inc (USA). Iscove's Modified Dulbecco's Medium (IMDM) and neurobasal(tm) medium were purchased from Invitrogen (USA). MACS CD34 multisort kit was purchased from Miltenyi Biotec (Germany). METHODS: CD34+ cells were isolated from human FL mononuclear cells using MACS CD34 multisort kit and cultured at 1 × 105/mL in IMDM, containing TPO for 60 days with weekly changes of half of the medium. After culturing for 30 and 60 days, the TPO-induced cells were resuspended in neurobasal(tm) medium containing 10% fetal brain extracts and plated in an 8-well BIOCOAT(R) poly-D-Lysine Culture Slide and cultured for another 7 days. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Cell number, viability, phenotype and expression of hemopoiesis-related and neurogenesis-related proteins were examined by trypan blue exclusion with hemocytometer, immunoblot, immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry.RESULTS: After 60 days of induction with TPO, the cell number increased by 4.6-fold compared to the initial culture. Although the proportion of the cells expressing the

  13. Stable Phenotypic Changes of the Host T Cells Are Essential to the Long-Term Stability of Latent HIV-1 Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seu, Lillian; Sabbaj, Steffanie; Duverger, Alexandra; Wagner, Frederic; Anderson, Joshua C; Davies, Elizabeth; Wolschendorf, Frank; Willey, Christopher D; Saag, Michael S; Goepfert, Paul; Kutsch, Olaf

    2015-07-01

    The extreme stability of the latent HIV-1 reservoir in the CD4(+) memory T cell population prevents viral eradication with current antiretroviral therapy. It has been demonstrated that homeostatic T cell proliferation and clonal expansion of latently infected T cells due to viral integration into specific genes contribute to this extraordinary reservoir stability. Nevertheless, given the constant exposure of the memory T cell population to specific antigen or bystander activation, this reservoir stability seems remarkable, unless it is assumed that latent HIV-1 resides exclusively in memory T cells that recognize rare antigens. Another explanation for the stability of the reservoir could be that the latent HIV-1 reservoir is associated with an unresponsive T cell phenotype. We demonstrate here that host cells of latent HIV-1 infection events were functionally altered in ways that are consistent with the idea of an anergic, unresponsive T cell phenotype. Manipulations that induced or mimicked an anergic T cell state promoted latent HIV-1 infection. Kinome analysis data reflected this altered host cell phenotype at a system-wide level and revealed how the stable kinase activity changes networked to stabilize latent HIV-1 infection. Protein-protein interaction networks generated from kinome data could further be used to guide targeted genetic or pharmacological manipulations that alter the stability of latent HIV-1 infection. In summary, our data demonstrate that stable changes to the signal transduction and transcription factor network of latently HIV-1 infected host cells are essential to the ability of HIV-1 to establish and maintain latent HIV-1 infection status. The extreme stability of the latent HIV-1 reservoir allows the infection to persist for the lifetime of a patient, despite completely suppressive antiretroviral therapy. This extreme reservoir stability is somewhat surprising, since the latently HIV-1 infected CD4(+) memory T cells that form the

  14. Heritability and artificial selection on ambulatory dispersal distance in Tetranychus urticae: effects of density and maternal effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellyn Valery Bitume

    Full Text Available Dispersal distance is understudied although the evolution of dispersal distance affects the distribution of genetic diversity through space. Using the two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae, we tested the conditions under which dispersal distance could evolve. To this aim, we performed artificial selection based on dispersal distance by choosing 40 individuals (out of 150 that settled furthest from the home patch (high dispersal, HDIS and 40 individuals that remained close to the home patch (low dispersal, LDIS with three replicates per treatment. We did not observe a response to selection nor a difference between treatments in life-history traits (fecundity, survival, longevity, and sex-ratio after ten generations of selection. However, we show that heritability for dispersal distance depends on density. Heritability for dispersal distance was low and non-significant when using the same density as the artificial selection experiments while heritability becomes significant at a lower density. Furthermore, we show that maternal effects may have influenced the dispersal behaviour of the mites. Our results suggest primarily that selection did not work because high density and maternal effects induced phenotypic plasticity for dispersal distance. Density and maternal effects may affect the evolution of dispersal distance and should be incorporated into future theoretical and empirical studies.

  15. Heritability and Genome-Wide Association Studies for Hair Color in a Dutch Twin Family Based Sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bochao Danae Lin

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Hair color is one of the most visible and heritable traits in humans. Here, we estimated heritability by structural equation modeling (N = 20,142, and performed a genome wide association (GWA analysis (N = 7091 and a GCTA study (N = 3340 on hair color within a large cohort of twins, their parents and siblings from the Netherlands Twin Register (NTR. Self-reported hair color was analyzed as five binary phenotypes, namely “blond versus non-blond”, “red versus non-red”, “brown versus non-brown”, “black versus non-black”, and “light versus dark”. The broad-sense heritability of hair color was estimated between 73% and 99% and the genetic component included non-additive genetic variance. Assortative mating for hair color was significant, except for red and black hair color. From GCTA analyses, at most 24.6% of the additive genetic variance in hair color was explained by 1000G well-imputed SNPs. Genome-wide association analysis for each hair color showed that SNPs in the MC1R region were significantly associated with red, brown and black hair, and also with light versus dark hair color. Five other known genes (HERC2, TPCN2, SLC24A4, IRF4, and KITLG gave genome-wide significant hits for blond, brown and light versus dark hair color. We did not find and replicate any new loci for hair color.

  16. Heritability and Genome-Wide Association Studies for Hair Color in a Dutch Twin Family Based Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bochao Danae; Mbarek, Hamdi; Willemsen, Gonneke; Dolan, Conor V.; Fedko, Iryna O.; Abdellaoui, Abdel; de Geus, Eco J.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan

    2015-01-01

    Hair color is one of the most visible and heritable traits in humans. Here, we estimated heritability by structural equation modeling (N = 20,142), and performed a genome wide association (GWA) analysis (N = 7091) and a GCTA study (N = 3340) on hair color within a large cohort of twins, their parents and siblings from the Netherlands Twin Register (NTR). Self-reported hair color was analyzed as five binary phenotypes, namely “blond versus non-blond”, “red versus non-red”, “brown versus non-brown”, “black versus non-black”, and “light versus dark”. The broad-sense heritability of hair color was estimated between 73% and 99% and the genetic component included non-additive genetic variance. Assortative mating for hair color was significant, except for red and black hair color. From GCTA analyses, at most 24.6% of the additive genetic variance in hair color was explained by 1000G well-imputed SNPs. Genome-wide association analysis for each hair color showed that SNPs in the MC1R region were significantly associated with red, brown and black hair, and also with light versus dark hair color. Five other known genes (HERC2, TPCN2, SLC24A4, IRF4, and KITLG) gave genome-wide significant hits for blond, brown and light versus dark hair color. We did not find and replicate any new loci for hair color. PMID:26184321

  17. BODE-index, modified BODE-index and ADO-score in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: relationship with COPD phenotypes and CT lung density changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camiciottoli, Gianna; Bigazzi, Francesca; Bartolucci, Maurizio; Cestelli, Lucia; Paoletti, Matteo; Diciotti, Stefano; Cavigli, Edoardo; Magni, Chiara; Buonasera, Luigi; Mascalchi, Mario; Pistolesi, Massimo

    2012-06-01

    COPD is a heterogeneous disorder whose assessment is going to be increasingly multidimensional. Grading systems such as BODE (Body-Mass Index, Obstruction, Dyspnea, Exercise), mBODE (BODE modified in grading of walked distance), ADO (Age, Dyspnea, Obstruction) are proposed to assess COPD severity and outcome. Computed tomography (CT) is deemed to reflect COPD lung pathologic changes. We studied the relationship of multidimensional grading systems (MGS) with clinically determined COPD phenotypes and CT lung density. Seventy-two patients underwent clinical and chest x-ray evaluation, pulmonary function tests (PFT), 6-minute walking test (6MWT) to derive: predominant COPD clinical phenotype, BODE, mBODE, ADO. Inspiratory and expiratory CT was performed to calculate mean lung attenuation (MLA), relative area with density below-950 HU at inspiration (RAI(-950)), and below -910 HU at expiration (RAE(-910)). MGS, PFT, and CT data were compared between bronchial versus emphysematous COPD phenotype. MGS were correlated with CT data. The prediction of CT density by means of MGS was investigated by direct and stepwise multivariate regression. MGS did not differ in clinically determined COPD phenotypes. BODE was more closely related and better predicted CT findings than mBODE and ADO; the better predictive model was obtained for CT expiratory data; stepwise regression models of CT data did not include 6MWT distance; the dyspnea score MRC was included only to predict RA-950 and RA-910 which quantify emphysema extent. BODE reflect COPD severity better than other MGS, but not its clinical heterogeneity. 6MWT does not significantly increase BODE predictivity of CT lung density changes.

  18. Sex-specific heritability of spontaneous lipid levels in an extended pedigree of Indian-origin rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Vinson

    Full Text Available The rhesus macaque is an important model for human atherosclerosis but genetic determinants of relevant phenotypes have not yet been investigated in this species. Because lipid levels are well-established and heritable risk factors for human atherosclerosis, our goal was to assess the heritability of lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride levels in a single, extended pedigree of 1,289 Indian-origin rhesus macaques. Additionally, because increasing evidence supports sex differences in the genetic architecture of lipid levels and lipid metabolism in humans and macaques, we also explored sex-specific heritability for all lipid measures investigated in this study. Using standard methods, we measured lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride levels from fasted plasma in a sample of 193 pedigreed rhesus macaques selected for membership in large, paternal half-sib cohorts, and maintained on a low-fat, low cholesterol chow diet. Employing a variance components approach, we found moderate heritability for total cholesterol (h²=0.257, P=0.032, LDL cholesterol (h²=0.252, P=0.030, and triglyceride levels (h²=0.197, P=0.034 in the full sample. However, stratification by sex (N=68 males, N=125 females revealed substantial sex-specific heritability for total cholesterol (0.644, P=0.004, females only, HDL cholesterol (0.843, P=0.0008, females only, VLDL cholesterol (0.482, P=0.018, males only, and triglyceride levels (0.705, P=0.001, males only that was obscured or absent when sexes were combined in the full sample. We conclude that genes contribute to spontaneous variation in circulating lipid levels in the Indian-origin rhesus macaque in a sex-specific manner, and that the rhesus macaque is likely to be a valuable model for sex-specific genetic effects on lipid risk factors for human atherosclerosis. These findings are a first-ever report of heritability for cholesterol levels in this species, and support the need for expanded analysis of these traits in

  19. Assessment of heritability for personality, based on a short-form of the Eysenck Personality Inventory: a study of 12,898 twin pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floderus-Myrhed, B; Pedersen, N; Rasmuson, I

    1980-03-01

    The influence of genetic factors for two personality dimensions was analyzed using data from 12,898 unselected twin pairs of the Swedish Twin Registry. The heritability index was 0.50 (men) and 0.58 (women) for psychosocial instability. Corresponding figures for psychosocial extraversion were 0.54 and 0.66. Thus, about half the phenotypic variation may be attributed to genetic factors.

  20. Heritability of cold tolerance in Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus, juveniles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Charo-Karisa, H.; Rezk, M.A.; Bovenhuis, H.; Komen, J.

    2005-01-01

    The inability of tilapia to tolerate low temperatures is of major economic concern as it reduces their growing season and leads to over winter mortality. In this study, cold tolerance of juvenile Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus, was investigated and heritability estimates obtained. A total of 80

  1. Race/class : Jamaica's discourse of heritable identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane J. Austin-Broos

    1994-07-01

    Full Text Available Argues that Jamaican notions of 'race' and 'class' can be rendered as a discourse of heritable biological and environmental identity. There has been a movement in the meaning of colour categories from an emphasis on biology, to a greater emphasis on environment. This transition has been encouraged by the emergence of class as a 20th-c. idiom.

  2. Heritability of decisions and outcomes of public goods games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraishi, Kai; Shikishima, Chizuru; Yamagata, Shinji; Ando, Juko

    2015-01-01

    Prosociality is one of the most distinctive features of human beings but there are individual differences in cooperative behavior. Employing the twin method, we examined the heritability of cooperativeness and its outcomes on public goods games using a strategy method. In two experiments (Study 1 and Study 2), twin participants were asked to indicate (1) how much they would contribute to a group when they did not know how much the other group members were contributing, and (2) how much they would contribute if they knew the contributions of others. Overall, the heritability estimates were relatively small for each type of decision, but heritability was greater when participants knew that the others had made larger contributions. Using registered decisions in Study 2, we conducted seven Monte Carlo simulations to examine genetic and environmental influences on the expected game payoffs. For the simulated one-shot game, the heritability estimates were small, comparable to those of game decisions. For the simulated iterated games, we found that the genetic influences first decreased, then increased as the numbers of iterations grew. The implication for the evolution of individual differences in prosociality is discussed.

  3. Heritability of decisions and outcomes of public goods games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai eHiraishi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Prosociality is one of the most distinctive features of human beings but there are individual differences in cooperative behavior. Employing the twin method, we examined the heritability of cooperativeness and its outcomes on public goods games using a strategy method. In two experiments (Study 1 and Study 2, twin participants were asked to indicate 1 how much they would contribute to a group when they did not know how much the other group members were contributing, and 2 how much they would contribute if they knew the contributions of others. Overall, the heritability estimates were relatively small for each type of decision, but heritability was greater when participants knew that the others had made larger contributions. Using registered decisions in Study 2, we conducted five Monte Carlo simulations to examine genetic and environmental influences on the expected game payoffs. For the simulated one-shot game, the heritability estimates were small, comparable to those of game decisions. For the simulated iterated games, we found that the genetic influences first decreased, then increased as the numbers of iterations grew. The implication for the evolution of individual differences in prosociality is discussed.

  4. Partitioning heritability by functional category using GWAS summary statistics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finucane, Hilary K.; Bulik-Sullivan, Brendan; Gusev, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of 17 complex diseases and traits with an average sample size of 73,599. To enable this analysis, we introduce a new method, stratified LD score regression, for partitioning heritability from GWAS summary statistics while accounting for linked markers. This new...

  5. The heritability of chimpanzee and human brain asymmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Robles, Aida; Hopkins, William D; Schapiro, Steven J; Sherwood, Chet C

    2016-12-28

    Human brains are markedly asymmetric in structure and lateralized in function, which suggests a relationship between these two properties. The brains of other closely related primates, such as chimpanzees, show similar patterns of asymmetry, but to a lesser degree, indicating an increase in anatomical and functional asymmetry during hominin evolution. We analysed the heritability of cerebral asymmetry in chimpanzees and humans using classic morphometrics, geometric morphometrics, and quantitative genetic techniques. In our analyses, we separated directional asymmetry and fluctuating asymmetry (FA), which is indicative of environmental influences during development. We show that directional patterns of asymmetry, those that are consistently present in most individuals in a population, do not have significant heritability when measured through simple linear metrics, but they have marginally significant heritability in humans when assessed through three-dimensional configurations of landmarks that reflect variation in the size, position, and orientation of different cortical regions with respect to each other. Furthermore, genetic correlations between left and right hemispheres are substantially lower in humans than in chimpanzees, which points to a relatively stronger environmental influence on left-right differences in humans. We also show that the level of FA has significant heritability in both species in some regions of the cerebral cortex. This suggests that brain responsiveness to environmental influences, which may reflect neural plasticity, has genetic bases in both species. These results have implications for the evolvability of brain asymmetry and plasticity among humans and our close relatives.

  6. Heritability of telomere length in the Zebra Finch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Atema, Els; Mulder, Ellis; Dugdale, Hannah L.; Briga, Michael; van Noordwijk, Arie J.; Verhulst, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Telomere length predicts survival in birds, and many stressors that presumably reduce fitness have also been linked to telomere length. The response to selection of telomere length will be largely determined by the heritability of this trait; however, little is known about the genetic component of t

  7. 40 CFR 798.5460 - Rodent heritable translocation assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Rodent heritable translocation assays. 798.5460 Section 798.5460 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC...) Species. The mouse is the species generally used, and is recommended. (ii) Age. Healthy sexually...

  8. Release of tensile strain on engineered human tendon tissue disturbs cell adhesions, changes matrix architecture, and induces an inflammatory phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bayer, Monika L; Schjerling, Peter; Herchenhan, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    -inflammatory mediators and tendon phenotypic specific molecules, in an in vitro model where tendon-like tissue was engineered from human tendon cells. Tissue sampling was performed 1, 2, 4 and 6 days after surgical de-tensioning of the tendon construct. When tensile stimulus was removed, integrin type collagen receptors...... were upregulated. Stimulation with the cytokine TGF-β1 had distinct effects on some tendon-related genes in both tensioned and de-tensioned tissue. These findings indicate an important role of mechanical loading for cellular and matrix responses in tendon, including that loss of tension leads...

  9. The development of a handbook from heritable literature for desirable characteristics among Thai youths in schools in Bangkok

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mali Mokaramanee

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This investigation was deigned to develop a teacher’s handbook for desirable characteristic creation from heritable literature for Thai youth in schools in Bangkok. The conceptual framework was developed by analyzing four pieces of heritable literature: Ramayana (King Rama I Issue, I-nao (King Rama II Issue, Khun Chang – Khun Phan (National Library Issue and Phra Aphai Mani (Sunthorn Phu Issue. The research results found that there are nine current problems that need to be overcome in order to develop desirable characteristics for youths in schools. There are additionally eight desirable characteristics that need to be developed among youths, based on the statement of the Office of the Basic Education Commission. The investigation found that families, social media, community and religious leaders and schools all have an important role in promoting or creating desirable characteristics for youths. The content analysis found that all but one piece of heritable literature analysed contained content according to the eight desirable characteristics for youths. The handbook developed from the four pieces of heritable literature could be divided into four books for each piece of literature, which can be used as classroom teaching materials to create desirable characteristics for youths.

  10. Heritability of body weight: moving beyond genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, P; Lauria, F; Siani, A

    2010-12-01

    Obesity is a complex disease, arising from the interaction between several genetic and environmental factors. Until recently, the genetic basis of complex diseases in general, and of obesity in particular, were poorly characterized. While the relatively rare monogenic and syndromic forms of obesity clearly recognize a genetic origin, the actual worldwide epidemics of obesity represent a challenge for the identification of the genetic factors involved, being likely the effect of several loci each having a subtle influence on the phenotypic expression. Progress in DNA analysis techniques and in computational tools, and the increasing level of characterization of the variability of the human genome has recently allowed to study comprehensively the association between genetic variants and obesity. To date, well-conducted and powered genome-wide association studies allowed to consistently identify genomic regions - lying on different chromosomes and affecting different metabolic pathways - influencing the predisposition to the accumulation of body fat, ultimately leading to overweight and obesity. However, the population attributable risk for obesity linked to the most statistically significant loci, like FTO and MC4R, remains discouragingly low, explaining only small fractions of the overall variance of body weight. In the last few years, the role of the complex interaction between genetic determinants and environmental factors in the rapid global increase of obesity has been further challenged by the entry of new players, that is the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation, summarized under the emerging discipline of epigenetics. The key challenge now is to move from the identification of causal genes and variants to the integration of different "omics" disciplines, finally allowing the molecular understanding of obesity and related conditions. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Gillespie eco‐evolutionary models (GEMs) reveal the role of heritable trait variation in eco‐evolutionary dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    DeLong, John P.; Gibert, Jean P.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Heritable trait variation is a central and necessary ingredient of evolution. Trait variation also directly affects ecological processes, generating a clear link between evolutionary and ecological dynamics. Despite the changes in variation that occur through selection, drift, mutation, and recombination, current eco‐evolutionary models usually fail to track how variation changes through time. Moreover, eco‐evolutionary models assume fitness functions for each trait and each ecologic...

  12. Variability, heritability and genetic advance in some agronomic and forage quality characters of spring triticale in western Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljarrah, Mazen; Oatway, Lori; Albers, Susan; Bergen, Colin

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate variability, broad sense heritability, and genetic advance for dry matter yield (DMY), days to anthesis (ANTH), plant height (HT), in-vitro fiber digestibility-30h (IVFD), lignin (LIGN), starch (STAR %), crude protein content (CP %), acid detergent fiber (ADF) and neutral detergent fiber (NDF) in spring triticale genotypes. Eighteen genotypes were tested at the Field Crop Development Centre (FCDC) in Lacombe, Alberta in 2010-2011 and 2011-2012 growing season. The experimental design was randomized complete block design with 3 replicates. Combined analysis of variance was carried out using SAS Enterprise 4.2 statistical package. Heritability was estimated following the variance component method. Simple correlation coefficients were determined among all traits using two years average data. The genotype mean squares were significant (P ≤ 0.05) for DMY, ANTH, HT, IFVD, ADF, NDF, STAR %, LIGN, and CP %. The effect of year was also highly significant on all studied traits. The phenotypic coefficient of variation was higher than the genetic coefficient of variation for all traits, indicating high influence of the environment on these traits. The significant genetic variability and the high heritability combined with high genetic advance of HT, STAR% and ADF in triticale genotypes suggested that selection could be successfully practiced for those traits. Correlation analysis showed significant and positive correlation of DMY with ANTH and HT, indicating that late and tall genotypes are more suitable as a forage type and they tend to produce more biomass yield. However, DMY did not show any significant correlation with the digestibility. IVFD and STAR % were negatively correlated with LIGN. In general, these results indicated that breeding for low lignin and high starch content will improve the digestibility in triticale genotypes. The preliminary results of this study were promising. Further research must include more diverse

  13. GENOTYPIC VARIABILITY, HERITABILITY AND GENETIC ADVANCE IN ETHIOPIAN MUSTARD (BRASSICA CARINATA A.BRAUN. GENOTYPES AT NORTHWESTERN ETHIOPIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tesfaye W. Mekonnen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The assessment of genetic variability is fundamental for the purpose of to identify the most important traits in Ethiopian mustard breeding program. The objective of the study was to estimate variability, heritability and genetic advance on thirty six morphological characters of Ethiopian mustard (Brassica carinata genotypes were evaluated Adet Agricultural Research Center, Ethiopia. The experiment was laid out in simple lattice design. ANOVA of the experiment showed highly significant (p<0.01 for Day of maturity, grain filling period, number of pod per plot, secondary branches  per plant, harvest index, seed yield per plot, seed yield per hectare and oil content. Significant differences (p<0.01 were noted for day of flowering, plant height, primary branch per plant, biomass per plot, oil yield per plot. High phenotypic coefficient of variation (PCV was recorded for days to flowering, grain filling period, plant height, secondary branches per plant, harvest index, oil yield per plot, seed yield per plot and hectare. The magnitudes of PCV and genotypic coefficient of variation (GCV were high for grain filling period, plant height and secondary branches per plant. Heritability estimates were high for days to maturity, grain-filling period, days to flowering, plant height, biomass per plot, secondary branches per plant, primary branches per plant, oil content and oil yield per plot. High heritability was coupled with high genetic advance as percent of mean for plant height, grain filling period, secondary branches per plant were recorded. The study showed that there are variation in the extent of genetic variability, heritability and genetic advance in traits under study which can facilitate selection for further improvement of important traits of Ethiopian mustard.

  14. Release of Tensile Strain on Engineered Human Tendon Tissue Disturbs Cell Adhesions, Changes Matrix Architecture, and Induces an Inflammatory Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Monika L.; Schjerling, Peter; Herchenhan, Andreas; Zeltz, Cedric; Heinemeier, Katja M.; Christensen, Lise; Krogsgaard, Michael; Gullberg, Donald; Kjaer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical loading of tendon cells results in an upregulation of mechanotransduction signaling pathways, cell-matrix adhesion and collagen synthesis, but whether unloading removes these responses is unclear. We investigated the response to tension release, with regard to matrix proteins, pro-inflammatory mediators and tendon phenotypic specific molecules, in an in vitro model where tendon-like tissue was engineered from human tendon cells. Tissue sampling was performed 1, 2, 4 and 6 days after surgical de-tensioning of the tendon construct. When tensile stimulus was removed, integrin type collagen receptors showed a contrasting response with a clear drop in integrin subunit α11 mRNA and protein expression, and an increase in α2 integrin mRNA and protein levels. Further, specific markers for tendon cell differentiation declined and normal tendon architecture was disturbed, whereas pro-inflammatory molecules were upregulated. Stimulation with the cytokine TGF-β1 had distinct effects on some tendon-related genes in both tensioned and de-tensioned tissue. These findings indicate an important role of mechanical loading for cellular and matrix responses in tendon, including that loss of tension leads to a decrease in phenotypical markers for tendon, while expression of pro-inflammatory mediators is induced. PMID:24465881

  15. Association Between Mortality and Heritability of the Scale of Aging Vigor in Epidemiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanders, Jason L; Singh, Jatinder; Minster, Ryan L

    2016-01-01

    (LLFS) in the United States and Denmark. PARTICIPANTS: Long-lived individuals (N = 4,875, including 4,075 genetically related individuals) and their families (N = 551). MEASUREMENTS: The SAVE was administered to 3,599 participants and included weight change, weakness (grip strength), fatigue......OBJECTIVES: To investigate the association between mortality and heritability of a rescaled Fried frailty index, the Scale of Aging Vigor in Epidemiology (SAVE), to determine its value for genetic analyses. DESIGN: Longitudinal, community-based cohort study. SETTING: The Long Life Family Study......, suggesting a genetic component to age-related vigor and frailty and supporting its use for further genetic analyses....

  16. Interplay between heritability of smoking and environmental conditions? A comparison of two birth cohorts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vink Jacqueline M

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Attitudes and policy towards smoking changed over the past years in many countries including the Netherlands. Generally, this led to a decrease in smoking prevalence. As demonstrated in twin and family studies, individual differences in smoking behavior are partly influenced by genetic factors. We explore whether the current change in environmental conditions has influenced the genetic architecture of smoking. This would constitute evidence for Gene × Environment (G×E interaction. Methods Data on smoking were available from 2 cohorts of young adult twins (18-25 year registered with the Netherlands Twin Register. The first cohort completed a survey in 1993-1995 (n = 2669 and the second in 2009-2010 (n = 2339. Prevalence and genetic architecture of smoking were compared across cohorts using structural equation models in MX. Results Smoking prevalence decreased from 40-51% to 22-23% between 1993-1995 and 2009-2010. Genetic analyses, making use of the different genetic resemblance in monozygotic and dizygotic twins, showed that the heritability was the same in both cohorts. Conclusions The change in policy and smoking attitudes that led to a decrease in prevalence of smoking did not change the heritability of smoking and thus no evidence was found for GxE interaction.

  17. Analysis of Heritability and Shared Heritability Based on Genome-Wide Association Studies for Thirteen Cancer Types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sampson, Joshua N; Wheeler, William A; Yeager, Meredith; Panagiotou, Orestis; Wang, Zhaoming; Berndt, Sonja I; Lan, Qing; Abnet, Christian C; Amundadottir, Laufey T; Figueroa, Jonine D; Landi, Maria Teresa; Mirabello, Lisa; Savage, Sharon A; Taylor, Philip R; Vivo, Immaculata De; McGlynn, Katherine A; Purdue, Mark P; Rajaraman, Preetha; Adami, Hans-Olov; Ahlbom, Anders; Albanes, Demetrius; Amary, Maria Fernanda; An, She-Juan; Andersson, Ulrika; Andriole, Gerald; Andrulis, Irene L; Angelucci, Emanuele; Ansell, Stephen M; Arici, Cecilia; Armstrong, Bruce K; Arslan, Alan A; Austin, Melissa A; Baris, Dalsu; Barkauskas, Donald A; Bassig, Bryan A; Becker, Nikolaus; Benavente, Yolanda; Benhamou, Simone; Berg, Christine; Van Den Berg, David; Bernstein, Leslie; Bertrand, Kimberly A; Birmann, Brenda M; Black, Amanda; Boeing, Heiner; Boffetta, Paolo; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Bracci, Paige M; Brinton, Louise; Brooks-Wilson, Angela R; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/06929528X; Burdett, Laurie; Buring, Julie; Butler, Mary Ann; Cai, Qiuyin; Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine; Canzian, Federico; Carrato, Alfredo; Carreon, Tania; Carta, Angela; Chan, John K C; Chang, Ellen T; Chang, Gee-Chen; Chang, I-Shou; Chang, Jiang; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chen, Chien-Jen; Chen, Chih-Yi; Chen, Chu; Chen, Chung-Hsing; Chen, Constance; Chen, Hongyan; Chen, Kexin; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Chen, Kun-Chieh; Chen, Ying; Chen, Ying-Hsiang; Chen, Yi-Song; Chen, Yuh-Min; Chien, Li-Hsin; Chirlaque, María-Dolores; Choi, Jin Eun; Choi, Yi Young; Chow, Wong-Ho; Chung, Charles C; Clavel, Jacqueline; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Cocco, Pierluigi; Colt, Joanne S; Comperat, Eva; Conde, Lucia; Connors, Joseph M; Conti, David; Cortessis, Victoria K; Cotterchio, Michelle; Cozen, Wendy; Crouch, Simon; Crous-Bou, Marta; Cussenot, Olivier; Davis, Faith G; Ding, Ti; Diver, W Ryan; Dorronsoro, Miren; Dossus, Laure; Duell, Eric J; Ennas, Maria Grazia; Erickson, Ralph L; Feychting, Maria; Flanagan, Adrienne M; Foretova, Lenka; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Freedman, Neal D; Beane Freeman, Laura E; Fuchs, Charles; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Gallinger, Steven; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gapstur, Susan M; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; García-Closas, Reina; Gascoyne, Randy D; Gastier-Foster, Julie; Gaudet, Mia M; Gaziano, J Michael; Giffen, Carol; Giles, Graham G; Giovannucci, Edward; Glimelius, Bengt; Goggins, Michael; Gokgoz, Nalan; Goldstein, Alisa M; Gorlick, Richard; Gross, Myron; Grubb, Robert; Gu, Jian; Guan, Peng; Gunter, Marc; Guo, Huan; Habermann, Thomas M; Haiman, Christopher A; Halai, Dina; Hallmans, Goran; Hassan, Manal; Hattinger, Claudia; He, Qincheng; He, Xingzhou; Helzlsouer, Kathy; Henderson, Brian; Henriksson, Roger; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Hoffman-Bolton, Judith; Hohensee, Chancellor; Holford, Theodore R; Holly, Elizabeth A; Hong, Yun-Chul; Hoover, Robert N; Horn-Ross, Pamela L; Hosain, G M Monawar; Hosgood, H Dean; Hsiao, Chin-Fu; Hu, Nan; Hu, Wei; Hu, Zhibin; Huang, Ming-Shyan; Huerta, Jose-Maria; Hung, Jen-Yu; Hutchinson, Amy; Inskip, Peter D; Jackson, Rebecca D; Jacobs, Eric J; Jenab, Mazda; Jeon, Hyo-Sung; Ji, Bu-Tian; Jin, Guangfu; Jin, Li; Johansen, Christoffer; Johnson, Alison; Jung, Yoo Jin; Kaaks, Rudolph; Kamineni, Aruna; Kane, Eleanor; Kang, Chang Hyun; Karagas, Margaret R; Kelly, Rachel S; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Christopher; Kim, Hee Nam; Kim, Jin Hee; Kim, Jun Suk; Kim, Yeul Hong; Kim, Young Tae; Kim, Young-Chul; Kitahara, Cari M; Klein, Alison P; Klein, Robert J; Kogevinas, Manolis; Kohno, Takashi; Kolonel, Laurence N; Kooperberg, Charles; Kricker, Anne; Krogh, Vittorio; Kunitoh, Hideo; Kurtz, Robert C; Kweon, Sun-Seog; LaCroix, Andrea; Lawrence, Charles; Lecanda, Fernando; Lee, Victor Ho Fun; Li, Donghui; Li, Haixin; Li, Jihua; Li, Yao-Jen; Li, Yuqing; Liao, Linda M; Liebow, Mark; Lightfoot, Tracy; Lim, Wei-Yen; Lin, Chien-Chung; Lin, Dongxin; Lindstrom, Sara; Linet, Martha S; Link, Brian K; Liu, Chenwei; Liu, Jianjun; Liu, Li; Ljungberg, Börje; Lloreta, Josep; Lollo, Simonetta Di; Lu, Daru; Lund, Eiluv; Malats, Nuria; Mannisto, Satu; Marchand, Loic Le; Marina, Neyssa; Masala, Giovanna; Mastrangelo, Giuseppe; Matsuo, Keitaro; Maynadie, Marc; McKay, James; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; Melbye, Mads; Melin, Beatrice S; Michaud, Dominique S; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Monnereau, Alain; Montalvan, Rebecca; Moore, Lee E; Mortensen, Lotte Maxild; Nieters, Alexandra; North, Kari E; Novak, Anne J; Oberg, Ann L; Offit, Kenneth; Oh, In-Jae; Olson, Sara H; Palli, Domenico; Pao, William; Park, In Kyu; Park, Jae Yong; Park, Kyong Hwa; Patiño-Garcia, Ana; Pavanello, Sofia; Peeters, Petra H M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074099655; Perng, Reury-Perng; Peters, Ulrike; Petersen, Gloria M; Picci, Piero; Pike, Malcolm C; Porru, Stefano; Prescott, Jennifer; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Qian, Biyun; Qiao, You-Lin; Rais, Marco; Riboli, Elio; Riby, Jacques; Risch, Harvey A; Rizzato, Cosmeri; Rodabough, Rebecca; Roman, Eve; Roupret, Morgan; Ruder, Avima M; Sanjose, Silvia de; Scelo, Ghislaine; Schned, Alan; Schumacher, Fredrick; Schwartz, Kendra; Schwenn, Molly; Scotlandi, Katia; Seow, Adeline; Serra, Consol; Serra, Massimo; Sesso, Howard D; Setiawan, Veronica Wendy; Severi, Gianluca; Severson, Richard K; Shanafelt, Tait D; Shen, Hongbing; Shen, Wei; Shin, Min-Ho; Shiraishi, Kouya; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Siddiq, Afshan; Sierrasesúmaga, Luis; Sihoe, Alan Dart Loon; Skibola, Christine F; Smith, Alex; Smith, Martyn T; Southey, Melissa C; Spinelli, John J; Staines, Anthony; Stampfer, Meir; Stern, Marianna C; Stevens, Victoria L; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael S; Su, Jian; Su, Wu-Chou; Sund, Malin; Sung, Jae Sook; Sung, Sook Whan; Tan, Wen; Tang, Wei; Tardón, Adonina; Thomas, David; Thompson, Carrie A; Tinker, Lesley F; Tirabosco, Roberto; Tjønneland, Anne; Travis, Ruth C; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Tsai, Fang-Yu; Tsai, Ying-Huang; Tucker, Margaret; Turner, Jenny; Vajdic, Claire M; Vermeulen, Roel C H; Villano, Danylo J; Vineis, Paolo; Virtamo, Jarmo; Visvanathan, Kala; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Wang, Chaoyu; Wang, Chih-Liang; Wang, Jiu-Cun; Wang, Junwen; Wei, Fusheng; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Weiner, George J; Weinstein, Stephanie; Wentzensen, Nicolas; White, Emily; Witzig, Thomas E; Wolpin, Brian M; Wong, Maria Pik; Wu, Chen; Wu, Guoping; Wu, Junjie; Wu, Tangchun; Wu, Wei; Wu, Xifeng; Wu, Yi-Long; Wunder, Jay S; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Xu, Jun; Xu, Ping; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Yang, Tsung-Ying; Ye, Yuanqing; Yin, Zhihua; Yokota, Jun; Yoon, Ho-Il; Yu, Chong-Jen; Yu, Herbert; Yu, Kai; Yuan, Jian-Min; Zelenetz, Andrew; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Zhang, Xu-Chao; Zhang, Yawei; Zhao, Xueying; Zhao, Zhenhong; Zheng, Hong; Zheng, Tongzhang; Zheng, Wei; Zhou, Baosen; Zhu, Meng; Zucca, Mariagrazia; Boca, Simina M; Cerhan, James R; Ferri, Giovanni M; Hartge, Patricia; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Magnani, Corrado; Miligi, Lucia; Morton, Lindsay M; Smedby, Karin E; Teras, Lauren R; Vijai, Joseph; Wang, Sophia S; Brennan, Paul; Caporaso, Neil E; Hunter, David J; Kraft, Peter; Rothman, Nathaniel; Silverman, Debra T; Slager, Susan L; Chanock, Stephen J; Chatterjee, Nilanjan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies of related individuals have consistently demonstrated notable familial aggregation of cancer. We aim to estimate the heritability and genetic correlation attributable to the additive effects of common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for cancer at 13 anatomical sites. METHO

  18. Analysis of Heritability and Shared Heritability Based on Genome-Wide Association Studies for Thirteen Cancer Types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sampson, Joshua N; Wheeler, William A; Yeager, Meredith; Panagiotou, Orestis; Wang, Zhaoming; Berndt, Sonja I; Lan, Qing; Abnet, Christian C; Amundadottir, Laufey T; Figueroa, Jonine D; Landi, Maria Teresa; Mirabello, Lisa; Savage, Sharon A; Taylor, Philip R; Vivo, Immaculata De; McGlynn, Katherine A; Purdue, Mark P; Rajaraman, Preetha; Adami, Hans-Olov; Ahlbom, Anders; Albanes, Demetrius; Amary, Maria Fernanda; An, She-Juan; Andersson, Ulrika; Andriole, Gerald; Andrulis, Irene L; Angelucci, Emanuele; Ansell, Stephen M; Arici, Cecilia; Armstrong, Bruce K; Arslan, Alan A; Austin, Melissa A; Baris, Dalsu; Barkauskas, Donald A; Bassig, Bryan A; Becker, Nikolaus; Benavente, Yolanda; Benhamou, Simone; Berg, Christine; Van Den Berg, David; Bernstein, Leslie; Bertrand, Kimberly A; Birmann, Brenda M; Black, Amanda; Boeing, Heiner; Boffetta, Paolo; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Bracci, Paige M; Brinton, Louise; Brooks-Wilson, Angela R; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Burdett, Laurie; Buring, Julie; Butler, Mary Ann; Cai, Qiuyin; Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine; Canzian, Federico; Carrato, Alfredo; Carreon, Tania; Carta, Angela; Chan, John K C; Chang, Ellen T; Chang, Gee-Chen; Chang, I-Shou; Chang, Jiang; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chen, Chien-Jen; Chen, Chih-Yi; Chen, Chu; Chen, Chung-Hsing; Chen, Constance; Chen, Hongyan; Chen, Kexin; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Chen, Kun-Chieh; Chen, Ying; Chen, Ying-Hsiang; Chen, Yi-Song; Chen, Yuh-Min; Chien, Li-Hsin; Chirlaque, María-Dolores; Choi, Jin Eun; Choi, Yi Young; Chow, Wong-Ho; Chung, Charles C; Clavel, Jacqueline; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Cocco, Pierluigi; Colt, Joanne S; Comperat, Eva; Conde, Lucia; Connors, Joseph M; Conti, David; Cortessis, Victoria K; Cotterchio, Michelle; Cozen, Wendy; Crouch, Simon; Crous-Bou, Marta; Cussenot, Olivier; Davis, Faith G; Ding, Ti; Diver, W Ryan; Dorronsoro, Miren; Dossus, Laure; Duell, Eric J; Ennas, Maria Grazia; Erickson, Ralph L; Feychting, Maria; Flanagan, Adrienne M; Foretova, Lenka; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Freedman, Neal D; Beane Freeman, Laura E; Fuchs, Charles; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Gallinger, Steven; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gapstur, Susan M; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; García-Closas, Reina; Gascoyne, Randy D; Gastier-Foster, Julie; Gaudet, Mia M; Gaziano, J Michael; Giffen, Carol; Giles, Graham G; Giovannucci, Edward; Glimelius, Bengt; Goggins, Michael; Gokgoz, Nalan; Goldstein, Alisa M; Gorlick, Richard; Gross, Myron; Grubb, Robert; Gu, Jian; Guan, Peng; Gunter, Marc; Guo, Huan; Habermann, Thomas M; Haiman, Christopher A; Halai, Dina; Hallmans, Goran; Hassan, Manal; Hattinger, Claudia; He, Qincheng; He, Xingzhou; Helzlsouer, Kathy; Henderson, Brian; Henriksson, Roger; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Hoffman-Bolton, Judith; Hohensee, Chancellor; Holford, Theodore R; Holly, Elizabeth A; Hong, Yun-Chul; Hoover, Robert N; Horn-Ross, Pamela L; Hosain, G M Monawar; Hosgood, H Dean; Hsiao, Chin-Fu; Hu, Nan; Hu, Wei; Hu, Zhibin; Huang, Ming-Shyan; Huerta, Jose-Maria; Hung, Jen-Yu; Hutchinson, Amy; Inskip, Peter D; Jackson, Rebecca D; Jacobs, Eric J; Jenab, Mazda; Jeon, Hyo-Sung; Ji, Bu-Tian; Jin, Guangfu; Jin, Li; Johansen, Christoffer; Johnson, Alison; Jung, Yoo Jin; Kaaks, Rudolph; Kamineni, Aruna; Kane, Eleanor; Kang, Chang Hyun; Karagas, Margaret R; Kelly, Rachel S; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Christopher; Kim, Hee Nam; Kim, Jin Hee; Kim, Jun Suk; Kim, Yeul Hong; Kim, Young Tae; Kim, Young-Chul; Kitahara, Cari M; Klein, Alison P; Klein, Robert J; Kogevinas, Manolis; Kohno, Takashi; Kolonel, Laurence N; Kooperberg, Charles; Kricker, Anne; Krogh, Vittorio; Kunitoh, Hideo; Kurtz, Robert C; Kweon, Sun-Seog; LaCroix, Andrea; Lawrence, Charles; Lecanda, Fernando; Lee, Victor Ho Fun; Li, Donghui; Li, Haixin; Li, Jihua; Li, Yao-Jen; Li, Yuqing; Liao, Linda M; Liebow, Mark; Lightfoot, Tracy; Lim, Wei-Yen; Lin, Chien-Chung; Lin, Dongxin; Lindstrom, Sara; Linet, Martha S; Link, Brian K; Liu, Chenwei; Liu, Jianjun; Liu, Li; Ljungberg, Börje; Lloreta, Josep; Lollo, Simonetta Di; Lu, Daru; Lund, Eiluv; Malats, Nuria; Mannisto, Satu; Marchand, Loic Le; Marina, Neyssa; Masala, Giovanna; Mastrangelo, Giuseppe; Matsuo, Keitaro; Maynadie, Marc; McKay, James; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; Melbye, Mads; Melin, Beatrice S; Michaud, Dominique S; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Monnereau, Alain; Montalvan, Rebecca; Moore, Lee E; Mortensen, Lotte Maxild; Nieters, Alexandra; North, Kari E; Novak, Anne J; Oberg, Ann L; Offit, Kenneth; Oh, In-Jae; Olson, Sara H; Palli, Domenico; Pao, William; Park, In Kyu; Park, Jae Yong; Park, Kyong Hwa; Patiño-Garcia, Ana; Pavanello, Sofia; Peeters, Petra H M; Perng, Reury-Perng; Peters, Ulrike; Petersen, Gloria M; Picci, Piero; Pike, Malcolm C; Porru, Stefano; Prescott, Jennifer; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Qian, Biyun; Qiao, You-Lin; Rais, Marco; Riboli, Elio; Riby, Jacques; Risch, Harvey A; Rizzato, Cosmeri; Rodabough, Rebecca; Roman, Eve; Roupret, Morgan; Ruder, Avima M; Sanjose, Silvia de; Scelo, Ghislaine; Schned, Alan; Schumacher, Fredrick; Schwartz, Kendra; Schwenn, Molly; Scotlandi, Katia; Seow, Adeline; Serra, Consol; Serra, Massimo; Sesso, Howard D; Setiawan, Veronica Wendy; Severi, Gianluca; Severson, Richard K; Shanafelt, Tait D; Shen, Hongbing; Shen, Wei; Shin, Min-Ho; Shiraishi, Kouya; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Siddiq, Afshan; Sierrasesúmaga, Luis; Sihoe, Alan Dart Loon; Skibola, Christine F; Smith, Alex; Smith, Martyn T; Southey, Melissa C; Spinelli, John J; Staines, Anthony; Stampfer, Meir; Stern, Marianna C; Stevens, Victoria L; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael S; Su, Jian; Su, Wu-Chou; Sund, Malin; Sung, Jae Sook; Sung, Sook Whan; Tan, Wen; Tang, Wei; Tardón, Adonina; Thomas, David; Thompson, Carrie A; Tinker, Lesley F; Tirabosco, Roberto; Tjønneland, Anne; Travis, Ruth C; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Tsai, Fang-Yu; Tsai, Ying-Huang; Tucker, Margaret; Turner, Jenny; Vajdic, Claire M; Vermeulen, Roel C H; Villano, Danylo J; Vineis, Paolo; Virtamo, Jarmo; Visvanathan, Kala; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Wang, Chaoyu; Wang, Chih-Liang; Wang, Jiu-Cun; Wang, Junwen; Wei, Fusheng; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Weiner, George J; Weinstein, Stephanie; Wentzensen, Nicolas; White, Emily; Witzig, Thomas E; Wolpin, Brian M; Wong, Maria Pik; Wu, Chen; Wu, Guoping; Wu, Junjie; Wu, Tangchun; Wu, Wei; Wu, Xifeng; Wu, Yi-Long; Wunder, Jay S; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Xu, Jun; Xu, Ping; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Yang, Tsung-Ying; Ye, Yuanqing; Yin, Zhihua; Yokota, Jun; Yoon, Ho-Il; Yu, Chong-Jen; Yu, Herbert; Yu, Kai; Yuan, Jian-Min; Zelenetz, Andrew; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Zhang, Xu-Chao; Zhang, Yawei; Zhao, Xueying; Zhao, Zhenhong; Zheng, Hong; Zheng, Tongzhang; Zheng, Wei; Zhou, Baosen; Zhu, Meng; Zucca, Mariagrazia; Boca, Simina M; Cerhan, James R; Ferri, Giovanni M; Hartge, Patricia; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Magnani, Corrado; Miligi, Lucia; Morton, Lindsay M; Smedby, Karin E; Teras, Lauren R; Vijai, Joseph; Wang, Sophia S; Brennan, Paul; Caporaso, Neil E; Hunter, David J; Kraft, Peter; Rothman, Nathaniel; Silverman, Debra T; Slager, Susan L; Chanock, Stephen J; Chatterjee, Nilanjan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies of related individuals have consistently demonstrated notable familial aggregation of cancer. We aim to estimate the heritability and genetic correlation attributable to the additive effects of common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for cancer at 13 anatomical sites. METHO

  19. Thermal adaptation and phenotypic plasticity in a warming world: Insights from common garden experiments on Alaskan sockeye salmon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Morgan M; Westley, Peter A H; Falke, Jeffrey A; Quinn, Thomas P

    2017-06-06

    An important unresolved question is how populations of coldwater-dependent fishes will respond to rapidly warming water temperatures. For example, the culturally and economically important group, Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.), experience site-specific thermal regimes during early development that could be disrupted by warming. To test for thermal local adaptation and heritable phenotypic plasticity in Pacific salmon embryos, we measured the developmental rate, survival, and body size at hatching in two populations of sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) that overlap in timing of spawning but incubate in contrasting natural thermal regimes. Using a split half-sibling design, we exposed embryos of 10 families from each of two populations to variable and constant thermal regimes. These represented both experienced temperatures by each population, and predicted temperatures under plausible future conditions based on a warming scenario from the downscaled global climate model (MIROC A1B scenario). We did not find evidence of thermal local adaptation during the embryonic stage for developmental rate or survival. Within treatments, populations hatched within 1 day of each other, on average, and among treatments, did not differ in survival in response to temperature. We did detect plasticity to temperature; embryos developed 2.5 times longer (189 days) in the coolest regime compared to the warmest regime (74 days). We also detected variation in developmental rates among families within and among temperature regimes, indicating heritable plasticity. Families exhibited a strong positive relationship between thermal variability and phenotypic variability in developmental rate but body length and mass at hatching were largely insensitive to temperature. Overall, our results indicated a lack of thermal local adaptation, but a presence of plasticity in populations experiencing contrasting conditions, as well as family-specific heritable plasticity that could facilitate

  20. Analysis of Heritability and Shared Heritability Based on Genome-Wide Association Studies for 13 Cancer Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, William A.; Yeager, Meredith; Panagiotou, Orestis; Wang, Zhaoming; Berndt, Sonja I.; Lan, Qing; Abnet, Christian C.; Amundadottir, Laufey T.; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Landi, Maria Teresa; Mirabello, Lisa; Savage, Sharon A.; Taylor, Philip R.; Vivo, Immaculata De; McGlynn, Katherine A.; Purdue, Mark P.; Rajaraman, Preetha; Adami, Hans-Olov; Ahlbom, Anders; Albanes, Demetrius; Amary, Maria Fernanda; An, She-Juan; Andersson, Ulrika; Andriole, Gerald; Andrulis, Irene L.; Angelucci, Emanuele; Ansell, Stephen M.; Arici, Cecilia; Armstrong, Bruce K.; Arslan, Alan A.; Austin, Melissa A.; Baris, Dalsu; Barkauskas, Donald A.; Bassig, Bryan A.; Becker, Nikolaus; Benavente, Yolanda; Benhamou, Simone; Berg, Christine; Van Den Berg, David; Bernstein, Leslie; Bertrand, Kimberly A.; Birmann, Brenda M.; Black, Amanda; Boeing, Heiner; Boffetta, Paolo; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Bracci, Paige M.; Brinton, Louise; Brooks-Wilson, Angela R.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Burdett, Laurie; Buring, Julie; Butler, Mary Ann; Cai, Qiuyin; Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine; Canzian, Federico; Carrato, Alfredo; Carreon, Tania; Carta, Angela; Chan, John K. C.; Chang, Ellen T.; Chang, Gee-Chen; Chang, I-Shou; Chang, Jiang; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chen, Chien-Jen; Chen, Chih-Yi; Chen, Chu; Chen, Chung-Hsing; Chen, Constance; Chen, Hongyan; Chen, Kexin; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Chen, Kun-Chieh; Chen, Ying; Chen, Ying-Hsiang; Chen, Yi-Song; Chen, Yuh-Min; Chien, Li-Hsin; Chirlaque, María-Dolores; Choi, Jin Eun; Choi, Yi Young; Chow, Wong-Ho; Chung, Charles C.; Clavel, Jacqueline; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Cocco, Pierluigi; Colt, Joanne S.; Comperat, Eva; Conde, Lucia; Connors, Joseph M.; Conti, David; Cortessis, Victoria K.; Cotterchio, Michelle; Cozen, Wendy; Crouch, Simon; Crous-Bou, Marta; Cussenot, Olivier; Davis, Faith G.; Ding, Ti; Diver, W. Ryan; Dorronsoro, Miren; Dossus, Laure; Duell, Eric J.; Ennas, Maria Grazia; Erickson, Ralph L.; Feychting, Maria; Flanagan, Adrienne M.; Foretova, Lenka; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Freedman, Neal D.; Beane Freeman, Laura E.; Fuchs, Charles; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Gallinger, Steven; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gapstur, Susan M.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; García-Closas, Reina; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Gastier-Foster, Julie; Gaudet, Mia M.; Gaziano, J. Michael; Giffen, Carol; Giles, Graham G.; Giovannucci, Edward; Glimelius, Bengt; Goggins, Michael; Gokgoz, Nalan; Goldstein, Alisa M.; Gorlick, Richard; Gross, Myron; Grubb, Robert; Gu, Jian; Guan, Peng; Gunter, Marc; Guo, Huan; Habermann, Thomas M.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Halai, Dina; Hallmans, Goran; Hassan, Manal; Hattinger, Claudia; He, Qincheng; He, Xingzhou; Helzlsouer, Kathy; Henderson, Brian; Henriksson, Roger; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Hoffman-Bolton, Judith; Hohensee, Chancellor; Holford, Theodore R.; Holly, Elizabeth A.; Hong, Yun-Chul; Hoover, Robert N.; Horn-Ross, Pamela L.; Hosain, G. M. Monawar; Hosgood, H. Dean; Hsiao, Chin-Fu; Hu, Nan; Hu, Wei; Hu, Zhibin; Huang, Ming-Shyan; Huerta, Jose-Maria; Hung, Jen-Yu; Hutchinson, Amy; Inskip, Peter D.; Jackson, Rebecca D.; Jacobs, Eric J.; Jenab, Mazda; Jeon, Hyo-Sung; Ji, Bu-Tian; Jin, Guangfu; Jin, Li; Johansen, Christoffer; Johnson, Alison; Jung, Yoo Jin; Kaaks, Rudolph; Kamineni, Aruna; Kane, Eleanor; Kang, Chang Hyun; Karagas, Margaret R.; Kelly, Rachel S.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Christopher; Kim, Hee Nam; Kim, Jin Hee; Kim, Jun Suk; Kim, Yeul Hong; Kim, Young Tae; Kim, Young-Chul; Kitahara, Cari M.; Klein, Alison P.; Klein, Robert J.; Kogevinas, Manolis; Kohno, Takashi; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Kooperberg, Charles; Kricker, Anne; Krogh, Vittorio; Kunitoh, Hideo; Kurtz, Robert C.; Kweon, Sun-Seog; LaCroix, Andrea; Lawrence, Charles; Lecanda, Fernando; Lee, Victor Ho Fun; Li, Donghui; Li, Haixin; Li, Jihua; Li, Yao-Jen; Li, Yuqing; Liao, Linda M.; Liebow, Mark; Lightfoot, Tracy; Lim, Wei-Yen; Lin, Chien-Chung; Lin, Dongxin; Lindstrom, Sara; Linet, Martha S.; Link, Brian K.; Liu, Chenwei; Liu, Jianjun; Liu, Li; Ljungberg, Börje; Lloreta, Josep; Lollo, Simonetta Di; Lu, Daru; Lund, Eiluv; Malats, Nuria; Mannisto, Satu; Marchand, Loic Le; Marina, Neyssa; Masala, Giovanna; Mastrangelo, Giuseppe; Matsuo, Keitaro; Maynadie, Marc; McKay, James; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; Melbye, Mads; Melin, Beatrice S.; Michaud, Dominique S.; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Monnereau, Alain; Montalvan, Rebecca; Moore, Lee E.; Mortensen, Lotte Maxild; Nieters, Alexandra; North, Kari E.; Novak, Anne J.; Oberg, Ann L.; Offit, Kenneth; Oh, In-Jae; Olson, Sara H.; Palli, Domenico; Pao, William; Park, In Kyu; Park, Jae Yong; Park, Kyong Hwa; Patiño-Garcia, Ana; Pavanello, Sofia; Peeters, Petra H. M.; Perng, Reury-Perng; Peters, Ulrike; Petersen, Gloria M.; Picci, Piero; Pike, Malcolm C.; Porru, Stefano; Prescott, Jennifer; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Qian, Biyun; Qiao, You-Lin; Rais, Marco; Riboli, Elio; Riby, Jacques; Risch, Harvey A.; Rizzato, Cosmeri; Rodabough, Rebecca; Roman, Eve; Roupret, Morgan; Ruder, Avima M.; de Sanjose, Silvia; Scelo, Ghislaine; Schned, Alan; Schumacher, Fredrick; Schwartz, Kendra; Schwenn, Molly; Scotlandi, Katia; Seow, Adeline; Serra, Consol; Serra, Massimo; Sesso, Howard D.; Setiawan, Veronica Wendy; Severi, Gianluca; Severson, Richard K.; Shanafelt, Tait D.; Shen, Hongbing; Shen, Wei; Shin, Min-Ho; Shiraishi, Kouya; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Siddiq, Afshan; Sierrasesúmaga, Luis; Sihoe, Alan Dart Loon; Skibola, Christine F.; Smith, Alex; Smith, Martyn T.; Southey, Melissa C.; Spinelli, John J.; Staines, Anthony; Stampfer, Meir; Stern, Marianna C.; Stevens, Victoria L.; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael S.; Su, Jian; Su, Wu-Chou; Sund, Malin; Sung, Jae Sook; Sung, Sook Whan; Tan, Wen; Tang, Wei; Tardón, Adonina; Thomas, David; Thompson, Carrie A.; Tinker, Lesley F.; Tirabosco, Roberto; Tjønneland, Anne; Travis, Ruth C.; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Tsai, Fang-Yu; Tsai, Ying-Huang; Tucker, Margaret; Turner, Jenny; Vajdic, Claire M.; Vermeulen, Roel C. H.; Villano, Danylo J.; Vineis, Paolo; Virtamo, Jarmo; Visvanathan, Kala; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Wang, Chaoyu; Wang, Chih-Liang; Wang, Jiu-Cun; Wang, Junwen; Wei, Fusheng; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Weiner, George J.; Weinstein, Stephanie; Wentzensen, Nicolas; White, Emily; Witzig, Thomas E.; Wolpin, Brian M.; Wong, Maria Pik; Wu, Chen; Wu, Guoping; Wu, Junjie; Wu, Tangchun; Wu, Wei; Wu, Xifeng; Wu, Yi-Long; Wunder, Jay S.; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Xu, Jun; Xu, Ping; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Yang, Tsung-Ying; Ye, Yuanqing; Yin, Zhihua; Yokota, Jun; Yoon, Ho-Il; Yu, Chong-Jen; Yu, Herbert; Yu, Kai; Yuan, Jian-Min; Zelenetz, Andrew; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Zhang, Xu-Chao; Zhang, Yawei; Zhao, Xueying; Zhao, Zhenhong; Zheng, Hong; Zheng, Tongzhang; Zheng, Wei; Zhou, Baosen; Zhu, Meng; Zucca, Mariagrazia; Boca, Simina M.; Cerhan, James R.; Ferri, Giovanni M.; Hartge, Patricia; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Magnani, Corrado; Miligi, Lucia; Morton, Lindsay M.; Smedby, Karin E.; Teras, Lauren R.; Vijai, Joseph; Wang, Sophia S.; Brennan, Paul; Caporaso, Neil E.; Hunter, David J.; Kraft, Peter; Rothman, Nathaniel; Silverman, Debra T.; Slager, Susan L.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Chatterjee, Nilanjan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Studies of related individuals have consistently demonstrated notable familial aggregation of cancer. We aim to estimate the heritability and genetic correlation attributable to the additive effects of common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for cancer at 13 anatomical sites. Methods: Between 2007 and 2014, the US National Cancer Institute has generated data from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for 49 492 cancer case patients and 34 131 control patients. We apply novel mixed model methodology (GCTA) to this GWAS data to estimate the heritability of individual cancers, as well as the proportion of heritability attributable to cigarette smoking in smoking-related cancers, and the genetic correlation between pairs of cancers. Results: GWAS heritability was statistically significant at nearly all sites, with the estimates of array-based heritability, hl 2, on the liability threshold (LT) scale ranging from 0.05 to 0.38. Estimating the combined heritability of multiple smoking characteristics, we calculate that at least 24% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 14% to 37%) and 7% (95% CI = 4% to 11%) of the heritability for lung and bladder cancer, respectively, can be attributed to genetic determinants of smoking. Most pairs of cancers studied did not show evidence of strong genetic correlation. We found only four pairs of cancers with marginally statistically significant correlations, specifically kidney and testes (ρ = 0.73, SE = 0.28), diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and pediatric osteosarcoma (ρ = 0.53, SE = 0.21), DLBCL and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) (ρ = 0.51, SE =0.18), and bladder and lung (ρ = 0.35, SE = 0.14). Correlation analysis also indicates that the genetic architecture of lung cancer differs between a smoking population of European ancestry and a nonsmoking Asian population, allowing for the possibility that the genetic etiology for the same disease can vary by population and environmental exposures. Conclusion: Our

  1. Heritability of cortisol response to confinement stress in European sea bass dicentrarchus labrax

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volckaert, F.A.M.; Hellemans, B.; Batargias, C.; Louro, B.; Massault, C.; Houdt, Van J.K.J.; Haley, C.; Koning, de D.J.; Canario, A.V.M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: In fish, the most studied production traits in terms of heritability are body weight or growth, stress or disease resistance, while heritability of cortisol levels, widely used as a measure of response to stress, is less studied. In this study, we have estimated heritabilities of two gro

  2. Integrating early life experience, gene expression, brain development, and emergent phenotypes: unraveling the thread of nature via nurture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Ian C G

    2014-01-01

    Adaptation to environmental changes is based on the perpetual generation of new phenotypes. Modern biology has focused on the role of epigenetic mechanisms in facilitating the adaptation of organisms to changing environments through alterations in gene expression. Inherited and/or acquired epigenetic factors are relatively stable and have regulatory roles in numerous genomic activities that translate into phenotypic outcomes. Evidence that dietary and pharmacological interventions have the potential to reverse environment-induced modification of epigenetic states (e.g., early life experience, nutrition, medication, infection) has provided an additional stimulus for understanding the biological basis of individual differences in cognitive abilities and disorders of the brain. It has been suggested that accurate quantification of the relative contribution of heritable genetic and epigenetic variation is essential for understanding phenotypic divergence and adaptation in changing environments, a process requiring stable modulation of gene expression. The main challenge for epigenetics in psychology and psychiatry is to determine how experiences and environmental cues, including the nature of our nurture, influence the expression of neuronal genes to produce long-term individual differences in behavior, cognition, personality, and mental health. To this end, focusing on DNA and histone modifications and their initiators, mediators and readers may provide new inroads for understanding the molecular basis of phenotypic plasticity and disorders of the brain. In this chapter, we review recent discoveries highlighting epigenetic aspects of normal brain development and mental illness, as well as discuss some future directions in the field of behavioral epigenetics.

  3. Cervical Cancer Cell Supernatants Induce a Phenotypic Switch from U937-Derived Macrophage-Activated M1 State into M2-Like Suppressor Phenotype with Change in Toll-Like Receptor Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Reyes, Karina; Bravo-Cuellar, Alejandro; Hernández-Flores, Georgina; Lerma-Díaz, José Manuel; Jave-Suárez, Luis Felipe; Gómez-Lomelí, Paulina; de Celis, Ruth; Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana; Domínguez-Rodríguez, Jorge Ramiro; Ortiz-Lazareno, Pablo Cesar

    2014-01-01

    Cervical cancer (CC) is the second most common cancer among women worldwide. Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is the main risk factor for developing CC. Macrophages are important immune effector cells; they can be differentiated into two phenotypes, identified as M1 (classically activated) and M2 (alternatively activated). Macrophage polarization exerts profound effects on the Toll-like receptor (TLR) profile. In this study, we evaluated whether the supernatant of human CC cells HeLa, SiHa, and C-33A induces a shift of M1 macrophage toward M2 macrophage in U937-derived macrophages. Results. The results showed that soluble factors secreted by CC cells induce a change in the immunophenotype of macrophages from macrophage M1 into macrophage M2. U937-derived macrophages M1 released proinflammatory cytokines and nitric oxide; however, when these cells were treated with the supernatant of CC cell lines, we observed a turnover of M1 toward M2. These cells increased CD163 and IL-10 expression. The expression of TLR-3, -7, and -9 is increased when the macrophages were treated with the supernatant of CC cells. Conclusions. Our result strongly suggests that CC cells may, through the secretion of soluble factors, induce a change of immunophenotype M1 into M2 macrophages. PMID:25309919

  4. Cervical Cancer Cell Supernatants Induce a Phenotypic Switch from U937-Derived Macrophage-Activated M1 State into M2-Like Suppressor Phenotype with Change in Toll-Like Receptor Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Sánchez-Reyes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer (CC is the second most common cancer among women worldwide. Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV is the main risk factor for developing CC. Macrophages are important immune effector cells; they can be differentiated into two phenotypes, identified as M1 (classically activated and M2 (alternatively activated. Macrophage polarization exerts profound effects on the Toll-like receptor (TLR profile. In this study, we evaluated whether the supernatant of human CC cells HeLa, SiHa, and C-33A induces a shift of M1 macrophage toward M2 macrophage in U937-derived macrophages. Results. The results showed that soluble factors secreted by CC cells induce a change in the immunophenotype of macrophages from macrophage M1 into macrophage M2. U937-derived macrophages M1 released proinflammatory cytokines and nitric oxide; however, when these cells were treated with the supernatant of CC cell lines, we observed a turnover of M1 toward M2. These cells increased CD163 and IL-10 expression. The expression of TLR-3, -7, and -9 is increased when the macrophages were treated with the supernatant of CC cells. Conclusions. Our result strongly suggests that CC cells may, through the secretion of soluble factors, induce a change of immunophenotype M1 into M2 macrophages.

  5. Heritable oxidative phosphorylation differences in a pollutant resistant Fundulus heteroclitus population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Xiao, E-mail: xdu@rsmas.miami.edu [Marine Biology and Ecology, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, 4600 Rickenbacker Causeway, Miami, FL 33149 (United States); Crawford, Douglas L. [Marine Biology and Ecology, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, 4600 Rickenbacker Causeway, Miami, FL 33149 (United States); Nacci, Diane E. [Population Ecology Branch, Atlantic Ecology Division, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 27 Tarzwell Dr., Narragansett, RI 02882 (United States); Oleksiak, Marjorie F., E-mail: moleksiak@rsmas.miami.edu [Marine Biology and Ecology, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, 4600 Rickenbacker Causeway, Miami, FL 33149 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Laboratory reared fish from a highly polluted and clean reference population were compared. • Oxidative phosphorylation (e.g., State 3, enzymes, and proton LEAK) was quantified. • Laboratory reared F3 fish from polluted population displayed higher routine metabolism and complex II activity but lower complex I enzyme activity. • Enhanced OxPhos metabolism and toxicity resistance were retained in laboratory reared F3 fish from the polluted population. - Abstract: Populations can adapt to stress including recent anthropogenic pollution. Our published data suggests heritable differences in hepatocyte oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) metabolism in field-caught killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) from the highly polluted Elizabeth River, VA, USA, relative to fish from a nearby, relatively unpolluted reference site in King’s Creek VA. Consistent with other studies showing that Elizabeth River killifish are resistant to some of the toxic effects of certain contaminants, OxPhos measurements in hepatocytes from field-caught King’s Creek but not field-caught Elizabeth River killifish were altered by acute benzo [a] pyrene exposures. To more definitively test whether the enhanced OxPhos metabolism and toxicity resistance are heritable, we measured OxPhos metabolism in a laboratory-reared F3 generation from the Elizabeth River population versus a laboratory-reared F1 generation from the King’s Creek population and compared these results to previous data from the field-caught fish. The F3 Elizabeth River fish compared to F1 King’s Creek fish had significantly higher State 3 respiration (routine metabolism) and complex II activity, and significantly lower complex I activity. The consistently higher routine metabolism in the F3 and field-caught Elizabeth River fish versus F1 and field-caught King’s Creek fish implies a heritable change in OxPhos function. The observation that LEAK, E-State, Complex I and Complex II were different in laboratory bred

  6. Genetic contribution to rate of change in functional abilities among Danish twins aged 75 years or more

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kaare; Gaist, David; Vaupel, James W

    2002-01-01

    -based sample of 2,401 Danish twins aged 75 years or more. The survivors were recontacted after 2 years and again after 4 years. Consistent mean-level declines, high within-person correlations over time, and substantial heritability in the female sample were observed for functional abilities. Nonetheless......, structural-equation analyses revealed only a very modest and nonsignificant heritability for rate of change in functional abilities: 16% (95% confidence interval: 0, 35) for women and 9% (95% confidence interval: 0, 44) for men. This study had a large initial sample size, high participation rates......In a previous cross-sectional study of twins, the authors found evidence of a substantial genetic influence on functional abilities among elderly women. It has been suggested that rate of change in functional abilities over time could underlie such findings and that rate-of-change phenotypes may...

  7. Phenotypic modulation of chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells by phorbol ester: induction of IgM secretion and changes in the expression of B cell-associated surface antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, J; Mellstedt, H; Aman, P; Biberfeld, P; Klein, G

    1984-01-01

    Freshly explanted neoplastic populations from 22 cases of phenotypically well-characterized chronic type B lymphocytic leukemia were studied for their capacity to respond to the phorbol ester TPA in vitro. In all but four cases the secretion of IgM was either induced or increased, often to a high level. In contrast, the export of free immunoglobulin (Ig) light chains, an almost consistent feature of the B lymphocytic leukemias, remained relatively constant after TPA treatment. Parallel changes in leukemic cell surface phenotype were probed with both "conventional" and monoclonal antibodies, revealing some modulation of markers in every case investigated. A diminution in the level of surface Ig (preferentially IgD) and the accumulation of cytoplasmic Ig observed after phorbol ester treatment were accompanied by a corresponding reduction or loss of the B1 antigen and usually of B2 when present. The most consistent change induced by TPA was the appearance of BB-1, a marker of activated B lymphocytes, which was rarely expressed on fresh leukemic cells. Another marker of activated lymphocytes, LB-1, was also often induced or increased in its expression after exposure of the cells to TPA. The magnitude of the TPA response appeared to relate to the stage of maturation arrest of the individual leukemic clones rather than to any clinical parameter explored. The significance of the findings to normal B cell differentiation and their potential clinical utility are discussed.

  8. Heritability of retinal vascular fractals: a twin study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vergmann, Anna Stage; Broe, Rebecca; Kessel, Line

    Purpose: To determine the genetic contribution to the pattern of retinal vascular branching expressed by its fractal dimension. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study of 50-degree, disc-centred fundus photographs from 59 monozygotic and 55 dizygotic, same-sex twin pairs aged 20-46 years....... The retinal vascular fractal dimension was measured using the box-counting method and compared within monozygotic and dizygotic twin pairs using Pearson correlation coefficents. Falconer´s formula and quantitative genetic models were used to determine the genetic component of variation. Results: The retinal...... for quantitative analysis of heritability. The intrapair correlation was markedly higher (0.505, p=0.0002) in monozygotic twins than in dizygotic twins (0.108, p=0.46), corresponding to a heritability h2 for the fractal dimension of 0.79. In quantitative genetic models, 54% of the variation was explained...

  9. Heritability and genetics of lipid metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenger, Mogens

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the concept of heritability and genetic effect will be reviewed and our current knowledge of the genetics of lipid metabolism summarized. The concepts of polygenic conditions and epistasis are discussed at length, and an effort is made to put the biological processes in context i...... in the search for genetic factors influencing the metabolic pathways. Particular physiological heterogeneity is addressed and procedures to handle this complex issue are suggested.......In this article, the concept of heritability and genetic effect will be reviewed and our current knowledge of the genetics of lipid metabolism summarized. The concepts of polygenic conditions and epistasis are discussed at length, and an effort is made to put the biological processes in context...

  10. Genomic heritabilities and genomic estimated breeding values for methane traits in Angus cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, B J; Donoghue, K A; Reich, C M; Mason, B A; Bird-Gardiner, T; Herd, R M; Arthur, P F

    2016-03-01

    Enteric methane emissions from beef cattle are a significant component of total greenhouse gas emissions from agriculture. The variation between beef cattle in methane emissions is partly genetic, whether measured as methane production, methane yield (methane production/DMI), or residual methane production (observed methane production - expected methane production), with heritabilities ranging from 0.19 to 0.29. This suggests methane emissions could be reduced by selection. Given the high cost of measuring methane production from individual beef cattle, genomic selection is the most feasible approach to achieve this reduction in emissions. We derived genomic EBV (GEBV) for methane traits from a reference set of 747 Angus animals phenotyped for methane traits and genotyped for 630,000 SNP. The accuracy of GEBV was tested in a validation set of 273 Angus animals phenotyped for the same traits. Accuracies of GEBV ranged from 0.29 ± 0.06 for methane yield and 0.35 ± 0.06 for residual methane production. Selection on GEBV using the genomic prediction equations derived here could reduce emissions for Angus cattle by roughly 5% over 10 yr.

  11. Heritability and genetic correlation of hair cortisol in vervet monkeys in low and higher stress environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbanks, Lynn A; Jorgensen, Matthew J; Bailey, Julia N; Breidenthal, Sherry E; Grzywa, Rachel; Laudenslager, Mark L

    2011-09-01

    Chronic activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal (HPA) system is a risk factor for a variety of physical and mental disorders, and yet the complexity of the system has made it difficult to define the role of genetic and environmental factors in producing long-term individual differences in HPA activity. Cortisol levels in hair have been suggested as a marker of total HPA activation over a period of several months. This study takes advantage of a pedigreed nonhuman primate colony to investigate genetic and environmental influences on hair cortisol levels before and after an environmental change. A sample of 226 adult female vervet monkeys (age 3-18) living in multigenerational, matrilineal social groups at the Vervet Research Colony were sampled in a stable low stress baseline environment and 6 months after the entire colony was moved to a new facility with more frequent handling and group disturbances (higher stress environment). Variance components analysis using the extended colony pedigree was applied to determine heritability of hair cortisol levels in the two environments. Bivariate genetic correlation assessed degree of overlap in genes influencing hair cortisol levels in the low and higher stress environments. The results showed that levels of cortisol in hair of female vervets increased significantly from the baseline to the post-move environment. Hair cortisol levels were heritable in both environments (h(2)=0.31), and there was a high genetic correlation across environments (rhoG=0.79), indicating substantial overlap in the genes affecting HPA activity in low and higher stress environments. This is the first study to demonstrate that the level of cortisol in hair is a heritable trait. It shows the utility of hair cortisol as a marker for HPA activation, and a useful tool for identifying genetic influences on long term individual differences in HPA activity. The results provide support for an additive model of the effects of genes and environment

  12. Heritability of hsp70 expression in the beetle Tenebrio molitor: Ontogenetic and environmental effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lardies, Marco A; Arias, María Belén; Poupin, María Josefina; Bacigalupe, Leonardo D

    2014-08-01

    Ectotherms constitute the vast majority of terrestrial biodiversity and are especially likely to be vulnerable to climate warming because their basic physiological functions such as locomotion, growth, and reproduction are strongly influenced by environmental temperature. An integrated view about the effects of global warming will be reached not just establishing how the increase in mean temperature impacts the natural populations but also establishing the effects of the increase in temperature variance. One of the molecular responses that are activated in a cell under a temperature stress is the heat shock protein response (HSP). Some studies that have detected consistent differences among thermal treatments and ontogenetic stages in HSP70 expression have assumed that these differences had a genetic basis and consequently expression would be heritable. We tested for changes in quantitative genetic parameters of HSP70 expression in a half-sib design where individuals of the beetle Tenebrio molitor were maintained in constant and varying thermal environments. We estimated heritability of HSP70 expression using a linear mixed modelling approach in different ontogenetic stages. Expression levels of HSP70 were consistently higher in the variable environment and heritability estimates were low to moderate. The results imply that within each ontogenetic stage additive genetic variance was higher in the variable environment and in adults compared with constant environment and larvae stage, respectively. We found that almost all the genetic correlations across ontogenetic stages and environment were positive. These suggest that directional selection for higher levels of expression in one environment will result in higher expression levels of HSP70 on the other environment for the same ontogenetic stage.

  13. Heritability and genetics of lipid metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenger, Mogens

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the concept of heritability and genetic effect will be reviewed and our current knowledge of the genetics of lipid metabolism summarized. The concepts of polygenic conditions and epistasis are discussed at length, and an effort is made to put the biological processes in context...... in the search for genetic factors influencing the metabolic pathways. Particular physiological heterogeneity is addressed and procedures to handle this complex issue are suggested....

  14. Will Big Data Close the Missing Heritability Gap?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hwasoon; Grueneberg, Alexander; Vazquez, Ana I; Hsu, Stephen; de Los Campos, Gustavo

    2017-09-11

    Despite the important discoveries reported by Genome-Wide Association studies, for most traits and diseases the prediction R-squared (R-sq.) achieved with genetic scores remains considerably lower than the trait heritability. Modern biobanks will soon deliver unprecedentedly large biomedical data sets: Will the advent of Big Data close the gap between the trait heritability and the proportion of variance that can be explained by a genomic predictor? We addressed this question using Bayesian methods and a data analysis approach that produces a surface response relating prediction R-sq. with sample size and model complexity (e.g., number of SNPs). We applied the methodology to data from the interim release of the UK Biobank. Focusing on human height as a model trait and using 80,000 records for model training, we achieved a prediction R-sq. in testing (n=22,221) of 0.24 (95% CI: 0.23-0.25). Our estimates show that prediction R-sq. increases with sample size reaching an estimated plateau at values that ranged from 0.1 to 0.37 for models using 500 and 50,000 (GWA-selected) SNPs, respectively. Soon much larger data sets will become available. Using the estimated surface response, we forecast that larger sample sizes will lead to further improvements in prediction R-sq. We conclude that Big Data will lead to a substantial reduction of the gap between trait heritability and the proportion of inter-individual differences that can be explained with a genomic predictor. However, even with the power of Big Data, for complex traits, we anticipate that the gap between prediction R-sq. and trait heritability will not be fully closed. Copyright © 2017, Genetics.

  15. Heritable retroviral transgenes are highly expressed in chickens.

    OpenAIRE

    Briskin, M J; Hsu, R Y; Boggs, T; Schultz, J. A.; Rishell, W; Bosselman, R A

    1991-01-01

    This report describes expression of heritable reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) vector ME111 in 20 independent lines of transgenic chickens. The results are strikingly different from studies of Moloney virus in transgenic mice, where restricted expression of inherited proviruses has led to their use primarily as insertional mutagens rather than general agents for gene transfer. In contrast, the REV ME111 provirus is actively transcribed in a variety of tissues from transgenic chickens, is exp...

  16. Heritability of heart rate recovery and vagal rebound after exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nederend, Ineke; Schutte, Nienke M; Bartels, Meike; Ten Harkel, Arend D J; de Geus, Eco J C

    2016-12-01

    The prognostic power of heart rate recovery (HRR) after exercise has been well established but the exact origin of individual differences in HRR remains unclear. This study aims to estimate the heritability of HRR and vagal rebound after maximal exercise in adolescents. Furthermore, the role of voluntary regular exercise behavior (EB) in HRR and vagal rebound is tested. 491 healthy adolescent twins and their siblings were recruited for maximal exercise testing, followed by a standardized cooldown with measurement of the electrocardiogram and respiratory frequency. Immediate and long-term HRR (HRR60 and HRR180) and vagal rebound (heart rate variability in the respiratory frequency range) were assessed 1 and 3 min after exercise. Multivariate twin modeling was used to estimate heritability of all measured variables and to compute the genetic contribution to their covariance. Heritability of HRR60, HRR180 and immediate and long-term vagal rebound is 60 % (95 % CI: 48-67), 65 % (95 % CI: 54-73), 23 % (95 % CI: 11-35) and 3 % (95 % CI: 0-11), respectively. We find evidence for two separate genetic factors with one factor influencing overall cardiac vagal control, including resting heart rate and respiratory sinus arrhythmia, and a specific factor for cardiac vagal exercise recovery. EB was only modestly associated with resting heart rate (r = -0.27) and HRR (rHRR60 = 0.10; rHRR180 = 0.19) with very high genetic contribution to these associations (88-91 %). Individual differences in HRR and immediate vagal rebound can to a large extent be explained by genetic factors. These innate cardiac vagal exercise recovery factors partly reflect the effects of heritable differences in EB.

  17. A clinico-radiological phenotype of voltage-gated potassium channel complex antibody-mediated disorder presenting with seizures and basal ganglia changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacohen, Yael; Wright, Sukhvir; Siddiqui, Ata; Pandya, Nikki; Lin, Jean-Pierre; Vincent, Angela; Lim, Ming

    2012-12-01

    In childhood, central nervous system (CNS) presentations associated with antibodies to voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) complex include limbic encephalitis, status epilepticus, epileptic encephalopathy, and autistic regression. We report the cases of two individuals (a 6-year-old male and an 11-year-old female) who presented with an acute-onset explosive seizure disorder with positive VGKC complex antibodies and bilateral basal ganglia changes on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Both patients made a complete clinical recovery, without immunotherapy, with resolution of the MRI changes and normalization of the antibody levels. Extended antibody testing, including testing for leucine-rich glioma-inactivated 1 (LGI1), contactin-associated protein 2, and contactin-2 was negative. This could suggest that the clinico-radiological phenotype in our patients may in fact be associated with a novel autoreactive target(s) within the VGKC complex, as may be the case in other children with VGKC complex-mediated CNS disorders.

  18. Similar changes in muscle fiber phenotype with differentiated consequences for rate of force development: endurance versus resistance training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farup, Jean; Sørensen, Henrik; Kjølhede, Tue

    2014-04-01

    Resistance training has been shown to positively affect the rate of force development (RFD) whereas there is currently no data on the effect of endurance training on RFD. Subjects completed ten weeks of either resistance training (RT, n=7) or endurance cycling (END, n=7). Pre and post measurements included biopsies obtained from m. vastus lateralis to quantify fiber phenotype and fiber area and isokinetic dynamometer tests to quantify maximal torque (Nm) and RFD (Nm/s) at 0-30, 0-50, 0-100 and 0-200ms during maximal isometric contraction for both knee extensors and flexors. Both groups increased the area percentage of type IIa fibers (p<.01) and decreased the area percentage of type IIx fibers (p=.05), whereas only RT increased fiber size (p<.05). RT significantly increased eccentric, concentric and isometric strength for both knee extensors and flexors, whereas END did not. RT increased 200ms RFD (p<.01) in knee flexor RFD and a tendency towards an increase at 100ms (p<.1), whereas tendencies towards decreases were observed for the END group at 30, 50 and 100ms (p<.1), resulting in RT having a higher RFD than END at post (p<.01). In conclusion, resistance training may be very important for maintaining RFD, whereas endurance training may negatively impact RFD.

  19. Morphological evolution and heritability estimates for some biometric traits in the Murgese horse breed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dario, C; Carnicella, D; Dario, M; Bufano, G

    2006-06-30

    A data set concerning 1,816 subjects entered in the Italian Horse Registry from 1925 to 2002 was analyzed to investigate the morphological evolution of the Murgese horse and to obtain useful elements to enhance breeding practices. Three basic body measurements (height at withers, chest girth, and cannon bone circumference) were considered for each subject. Heritabilities were calculated for each parameter to infer the growth and development traits of this breed. Over the past 20 years the Murgese horse has undergone considerable changes, passing from a typical mesomorphic structure (height at withers: 156.30 and 151.04 cm; chest girth: 185.80 and 176.11 cm; cannon bone: 21.10 and 19.82 cm for males and females, respectively) to a mesodolichomorphic structure (height at withers: 160.31 and 156.44 cm; chest girth: 187.89 and 182.48 cm; cannon bone: 21.07 and 20.37 cm, for males and females, respectively). Due to these changes and to its characteristic strength and power, the Murgese, which was once used in agriculture and for meat production (at the end of its life), is now involved in sports, mainly in trekking and equestrian tourism. The heritability estimates for the three body measurements were found to be 0.24, 0.39 and 0.44.

  20. Heritable temperament pathways to early callous-unemotional behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Rebecca; Trentacosta, Christopher J; Shaw, Daniel S; Neiderhiser, Jenae M; Ganiban, Jody M; Reiss, David; Leve, Leslie D; Hyde, Luke W

    2016-12-01

    Early callous-unemotional behaviours identify children at risk for antisocial behaviour. Recent work suggests that the high heritability of callous-unemotional behaviours is qualified by interactions with positive parenting. To examine whether heritable temperament dimensions of fearlessness and low affiliative behaviour are associated with early callous-unemotional behaviours and whether parenting moderates these associations. Using an adoption sample (n = 561), we examined pathways from biological mother self-reported fearlessness and affiliative behaviour to child callous-unemotional behaviours via observed child fearlessness and affiliative behaviour, and whether adoptive parent observed positive parenting moderated pathways. Biological mother fearlessness predicted child callous-unemotional behaviours via earlier child fearlessness. Biological mother low affiliative behaviour predicted child callous-unemotional behaviours, although not via child affiliative behaviours. Adoptive mother positive parenting moderated the fearlessness to callous-unemotional behaviour pathway. Heritable fearlessness and low interpersonal affiliation traits contribute to the development of callous-unemotional behaviours. Positive parenting can buffer these risky pathways. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2016.

  1. Dominant-lethal mutations and heritable translocations in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Generoso, W.M.

    1983-01-01

    Chromosome aberrations are a major component of radiation or chemically induced genetic damage in mammalian germ cells. The types of aberration produced are dependent upon the mutagen used and the germ-cell stage treated. For example, in male meiotic and postmeiotic germ cells certain alkylating chemicals induce both dominant-lethal mutations and heritable translocations while others induce primarily dominant-lethal mutations. Production of these two endpoints appears to be determined by the stability of alkylation products with the chromosomes. If the reaction products are intact in the male chromosomes at the time of sperm entry, they may be repaired in fertilized eggs. If repair is not effected and the alkylation products persist to the time of pronuclear chromosome replication, they lead to chromatid-type aberrations and eventually to dominant-lethality. The production of heritable translocations, on the other hand, requires a transformation of unstable alkylation products into suitable intermediate lesions. The process by which these lesions are converted into chromosome exchange within the male genome takes place after sperm enters the egg but prior to the time of pronuclear chromosome replication (i.e., chromosome-type). Thus, dominant-lethal mutations result from both chromatid- and chromosome-type aberrations while heritable translocations result primarily from the latter type. DNA target sites associated with the production of these two endpoints are discussed.

  2. Childhood intelligence is heritable, highly polygenic and associated with FNBP1L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benyamin, B; Pourcain, Bst; Davis, O S; Davies, G; Hansell, N K; Brion, M-J A; Kirkpatrick, R M; Cents, R A M; Franić, S; Miller, M B; Haworth, C M A; Meaburn, E; Price, T S; Evans, D M; Timpson, N; Kemp, J; Ring, S; McArdle, W; Medland, S E; Yang, J; Harris, S E; Liewald, D C; Scheet, P; Xiao, X; Hudziak, J J; de Geus, E J C; Jaddoe, V W V; Starr, J M; Verhulst, F C; Pennell, C; Tiemeier, H; Iacono, W G; Palmer, L J; Montgomery, G W; Martin, N G; Boomsma, D I; Posthuma, D; McGue, M; Wright, M J; Davey Smith, G; Deary, I J; Plomin, R; Visscher, P M

    2014-02-01

    Intelligence in childhood, as measured by psychometric cognitive tests, is a strong predictor of many important life outcomes, including educational attainment, income, health and lifespan. Results from twin, family and adoption studies are consistent with general intelligence being highly heritable and genetically stable throughout the life course. No robustly associated genetic loci or variants for childhood intelligence have been reported. Here, we report the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) on childhood intelligence (age range 6-18 years) from 17,989 individuals in six discovery and three replication samples. Although no individual single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were detected with genome-wide significance, we show that the aggregate effects of common SNPs explain 22-46% of phenotypic variation in childhood intelligence in the three largest cohorts (P=3.9 × 10(-15), 0.014 and 0.028). FNBP1L, previously reported to be the most significantly associated gene for adult intelligence, was also significantly associated with childhood intelligence (P=0.003). Polygenic prediction analyses resulted in a significant correlation between predictor and outcome in all replication cohorts. The proportion of childhood intelligence explained by the predictor reached 1.2% (P=6 × 10(-5)), 3.5% (P=10(-3)) and 0.5% (P=6 × 10(-5)) in three independent validation cohorts. Given the sample sizes, these genetic prediction results are consistent with expectations if the genetic architecture of childhood intelligence is like that of body mass index or height. Our study provides molecular support for the heritability and polygenic nature of childhood intelligence. Larger sample sizes will be required to detect individual variants with genome-wide significance.

  3. Analysis of variability, heritability, and interrelationships among grain yield and related characters in barley advanced lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadi Jafar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this study was to improve pure lines for low input agricultural areas of the semi-arid region of Iran and similar environmental conditions. Forty barley pure lines provided from ICARDA along with three check cultivars were evaluated under rain-fed conditions in a semi-arid region of Iran during two years (2011-2013. The experiments were conducted in a randomized complete block design with four replications to estimate genetic variation and heritability for agro-morphological traits. The highest values of phenotypic and genotypic coefficients of variation were observed for the number of grains per spike followed by peduncle length, early vigor and grain yield. The broad heritability estimates ranged from 24% for grain yield to 96% for the number of grains per spike. The highest and lowest expected genetic advance, observed for days to physiological maturity and the number of grains per spike, respectively. Results of stepwise regression and path analysis showed that hectoliter grain weight and thousand grain weight exhibited the highest direct effects on grain yield, respectively. Comparisons between the pure lines and check cultivars indicated that out of 40 pure lines, 27 lines had a higher grain yield. Also, the pure lines No. 29, 13, 9 and 33 were identified as the superior lines for semi-arid environmental conditions. Our results indicate that check cultivars could be improved by selecting for pure lines with taller peduncle and the number of grains per spike, but with heavier grains. Therefore, these lines can be used as genetic material to broaden the genetic basis of barley breeding programs all over the world.

  4. Mouse phenotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Adler, Thure; Aguilar-Pimentel, Juan Antonio; Becker, Lore; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Da Silva-Buttkus, Patricia; Neff, Frauke; Götz, Alexander; Hans, Wolfgang; Hölter, Sabine M; Horsch, Marion; Kastenmüller, Gabi; Kemter, Elisabeth; Lengger, Christoph; Maier, Holger; Matloka, Mikolaj; Möller, Gabriele; Naton, Beatrix; Prehn, Cornelia; Puk, Oliver; Rácz, Ildikó; Rathkolb, Birgit; Römisch-Margl, Werner; Rozman, Jan; Wang-Sattler, Rui; Schrewe, Anja; Stöger, Claudia; Tost, Monica; Adamski, Jerzy; Aigner, Bernhard; Beckers, Johannes; Behrendt, Heidrun; Busch, Dirk H; Esposito, Irene; Graw, Jochen; Illig, Thomas; Ivandic, Boris; Klingenspor, Martin; Klopstock, Thomas; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Mempel, Martin; Neschen, Susanne; Ollert, Markus; Schulz, Holger; Suhre, Karsten; Wolf, Eckhard; Wurst, Wolfgang; Zimmer, Andreas; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin

    2011-02-01

    Model organisms like the mouse are important tools to learn more about gene function in man. Within the last 20 years many mutant mouse lines have been generated by different methods such as ENU mutagenesis, constitutive and conditional knock-out approaches, knock-down, introduction of human genes, and knock-in techniques, thus creating models which mimic human conditions. Due to pleiotropic effects, one gene may have different functions in different organ systems or time points during development. Therefore mutant mouse lines have to be phenotyped comprehensively in a highly standardized manner to enable the detection of phenotypes which might otherwise remain hidden. The German Mouse Clinic (GMC) has been established at the Helmholtz Zentrum München as a phenotyping platform with open access to the scientific community (www.mousclinic.de; [1]). The GMC is a member of the EUMODIC consortium which created the European standard workflow EMPReSSslim for the systemic phenotyping of mouse models (http://www.eumodic.org/[2]). Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Mouse breast cancer model-dependent changes in metabolic syndrome-associated phenotypes caused by maternal dioxin exposure and dietary fat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Merrill, Michele; Baston, David S; Denison, Michael S; Birnbaum, Linda S; Pomp, Daniel; Threadgill, David W

    2009-01-01

    Diets high in fat are associated with increased susceptibility to obesity and metabolic syndrome. Increased adipose tissue that is caused by high-fat diets (HFD) results in altered storage of lipophilic toxicants like 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), which may further increase susceptibility to metabolic syndrome. Because both TCDD and HFD are associated with increased breast cancer risk, we examined their effects on metabolic syndrome-associated phenotypes in three mouse models of breast cancer: 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA), Tg(MMTV-Neu)202Mul/J (HER2), and TgN(MMTV-PyMT)634Mul/J (PyMT), all on an FVB/N genetic background. Pregnant mice dosed with 1 microg/kg of TCDD or vehicle on gestational day 12.5 were placed on a HFD or low-fat diet (LFD) at parturition. Body weights, percent body fat, and fasting blood glucose were measured longitudinally, and triglycerides were measured at study termination. On HFD, all cancer models reached the pubertal growth spurt ahead of FVB controls. Among mice fed HFD, the HER2 model had a greater increase in body weight and adipose tissue from puberty through adulthood compared with the PyMT and DMBA models. However, the DMBA model consistently had higher fasting blood glucose levels than the PyMT and HER2 models. TCDD only impacted serum triglycerides in the PyMT model maintained on HFD. Because the estrogenic activity of the HFD was three times lower than that of the LFD, differential dietary estrogenic activities did not drive the observed phenotypic differences. Rather, the HFD-dependent changes were cancer model dependent. These results show that cancer models can have differential effects on metabolic syndrome-associated phenotypes even before cancers arise.

  6. Disruption of both chloroplastic and cytosolic FBPase genes results in a dwarf phenotype and important starch and metabolite changes in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-González, José A; Soto-Súarez, Mauricio; García-Díaz, Ángel; Romero-Puertas, María C; Sandalio, Luisa M; Mérida, Ángel; Thormählen, Ina; Geigenberger, Peter; Serrato, Antonio J; Sahrawy, Mariam

    2015-05-01

    In this study, evidence is provided for the role of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatases (FBPases) in plant development and carbohydrate synthesis and distribution by analysing two Arabidopsis thaliana T-DNA knockout mutant lines, cyfbp and cfbp1, and one double mutant cyfbp cfbp1 which affect each FBPase isoform, cytosolic and chloroplastic, respectively. cyFBP is involved in sucrose synthesis, whilst cFBP1 is a key enzyme in the Calvin-Benson cycle. In addition to the smaller rosette size and lower rate of photosynthesis, the lack of cFBP1 in the mutants cfbp1 and cyfbp cfbp1 leads to a lower content of soluble sugars, less starch accumulation, and a greater superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. The mutants also had some developmental alterations, including stomatal opening defects and increased numbers of root vascular layers. Complementation also confirmed that the mutant phenotypes were caused by disruption of the cFBP1 gene. cyfbp mutant plants without cyFBP showed a higher starch content in the chloroplasts, but this did not greatly affect the phenotype. Notably, the sucrose content in cyfbp was close to that found in the wild type. The cyfbp cfbp1 double mutant displayed features of both parental lines but had the cfbp1 phenotype. All the mutants accumulated fructose-1,6-bisphosphate and triose-phosphate during the light period. These results prove that while the lack of cFBP1 induces important changes in a wide range of metabolites such as amino acids, sugars, and organic acids, the lack of cyFBP activity in Arabidopsis essentially provokes a carbon metabolism imbalance which does not compromise the viability of the double mutant cyfbp cfbp1.

  7. Functional changes in the uterine artery precede the hypertensive phenotype in a transgenic model of hypertensive pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaleyeva, Liliya M.; Varagic, Jasmina; McGee, Carolynne; Bader, Michael; Dechend, Ralf; Brosnihan, K. Bridget

    2015-01-01

    The pregnant female human angiotensinogen (hAGN) transgenic rat mated with the male human renin (hREN) transgenic rat is a model of preeclampsia (TgA) with increased blood pressure, proteinuria, and placenta alterations of edema and necrosis at late gestation. We studied vascular responses and the role of COX-derived prostanoids in the uterine artery (UA) at early gestation in this model. TgA UA showed lower stretch response, similar smooth muscle α-actin content, and lower collagen content compared with Sprague-Dawley (SD) UA. Vasodilation to acetylcholine was similar in SD and TgA UA (64 ± 8 vs. 75 ± 6% of relaxation, P > 0.05), with an acetylcholine-induced contraction in TgA UA that was abolished by preincubation with indomethacin (78 ± 6 vs. 83 ± 11%, P > 0.05). No differences in the contraction to phenylephrine were observed (159 ± 11 vs. 134 ± 12 %KMAX, P > 0.05), although in TgA UA this response was greatly affected by preincubation with indomethacin (179 ± 16 vs. 134 ± 9 %KMAX, P 0.05). Plasma thromboxane levels were similar between groups. In summary, TgA UA displays functional alterations at early gestation before the preeclamptic phenotype is established. Inhibition of COX enzymes normalizes some of the functional defects in the TgA UA. An increased role for COX-derived prostanoids in this model of preeclampsia may contribute to the development of a hypertensive pregnancy. PMID:26394667

  8. Genetic and phenotypic changes accompanying the emergence of epizootic subtype IC Venezuelan equine encephalitis viruses from an enzootic subtype ID progenitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, E; Barrera, R; Boshell, J; Ferro, C; Freier, J E; Navarro, J C; Salas, R; Vasquez, C; Weaver, S C

    1999-05-01

    Recent studies have indicated that epizootic Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) viruses can evolve from enzootic, subtype ID strains that circulate continuously in lowland tropical forests (A. M. Powers, M. S. Oberste, A. C. Brault, R. Rico-Hesse, S. M. Schmura, J. F. Smith, W. Kang, W. P. Sweeney, and S. C. Weaver, J. Virol. 71:6697-6705, 1997). To identify mutations associated with the phenotypic changes leading to epizootics, we sequenced the entire genomes of two subtype IC epizootic VEE virus strains isolated during a 1992-1993 Venezuelan outbreak and four sympatric, subtype ID enzootic strains closely related to the predicted epizootic progenitor. Analysis by maximum-parsimony phylogenetic methods revealed 25 nucleotide differences which were predicted to have accompanied the 1992 epizootic emergence; 7 of these encoded amino acid changes in the nsP1, nsP3, capsid, and E2 envelope glycoprotein, and 2 were mutations in the 3' untranslated genome region. Comparisons with the genomic sequences of IAB and other IC epizootic VEE virus strains revealed that only one of the seven amino acid changes associated with the 1992 emergence, a threonine-to-methionine change at position 360 of the nsP3 protein, accompanied another VEE virus emergence event. Two changes in the E2 envelope glycoprotein region believed to include the major antigenic determinants, both involving replacement of uncharged residues with arginine, are also candidates for epizootic determinants.

  9. The evolutionary fate of phenotypic plasticity and functional traits under domestication in manioc: changes in stem biomechanics and the appearance of stem brittleness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ménard, Léa; McKey, Doyle; Mühlen, Gilda S; Clair, Bruno; Rowe, Nick P

    2013-01-01

    Domestication can influence many functional traits in plants, from overall life-history and growth form to wood density and cell wall ultrastructure. Such changes can increase fitness of the domesticate in agricultural environments but may negatively affect survival in the wild. We studied effects of domestication on stem biomechanics in manioc by comparing domesticated and ancestral wild taxa from two different regions of greater Amazonia. We compared mechanical properties, tissue organisation and wood characteristics including microfibril angles in both wild and domesticated plants, each growing in two different habitats (forest or savannah) and varying in growth form (shrub or liana). Wild taxa grew as shrubs in open savannah but as lianas in overgrown and forested habitats. Growth form plasticity was retained in domesticated manioc. However, stems of the domesticate showed brittle failure. Wild plants differed in mechanical architecture between shrub and liana phenotypes, a difference that diminished between shrubs and lianas of the domesticate. Stems of wild plants were generally stiffer, failed at higher bending stresses and were less prone to brittle fracture compared with shrub and liana phenotypes of the domesticate. Biomechanical differences between stems of wild and domesticated plants were mainly due to changes in wood density and cellulose microfibril angle rather than changes in secondary growth or tissue geometry. Domestication did not significantly modify "large-scale" trait development or growth form plasticity, since both wild and domesticated manioc can develop as shrubs or lianas. However, "finer-scale" developmental traits crucial to mechanical stability and thus ecological success of the plant were significantly modified. This profoundly influenced the likelihood of brittle failure, particularly in long climbing stems, thereby also influencing the survival of the domesticate in natural situations vulnerable to mechanical perturbation. We

  10. The evolutionary fate of phenotypic plasticity and functional traits under domestication in manioc: changes in stem biomechanics and the appearance of stem brittleness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Léa Ménard

    Full Text Available Domestication can influence many functional traits in plants, from overall life-history and growth form to wood density and cell wall ultrastructure. Such changes can increase fitness of the domesticate in agricultural environments but may negatively affect survival in the wild. We studied effects of domestication on stem biomechanics in manioc by comparing domesticated and ancestral wild taxa from two different regions of greater Amazonia. We compared mechanical properties, tissue organisation and wood characteristics including microfibril angles in both wild and domesticated plants, each growing in two different habitats (forest or savannah and varying in growth form (shrub or liana. Wild taxa grew as shrubs in open savannah but as lianas in overgrown and forested habitats. Growth form plasticity was retained in domesticated manioc. However, stems of the domesticate showed brittle failure. Wild plants differed in mechanical architecture between shrub and liana phenotypes, a difference that diminished between shrubs and lianas of the domesticate. Stems of wild plants were generally stiffer, failed at higher bending stresses and were less prone to brittle fracture compared with shrub and liana phenotypes of the domesticate. Biomechanical differences between stems of wild and domesticated plants were mainly due to changes in wood density and cellulose microfibril angle rather than changes in secondary growth or tissue geometry. Domestication did not significantly modify "large-scale" trait development or growth form plasticity, since both wild and domesticated manioc can develop as shrubs or lianas. However, "finer-scale" developmental traits crucial to mechanical stability and thus ecological success of the plant were significantly modified. This profoundly influenced the likelihood of brittle failure, particularly in long climbing stems, thereby also influencing the survival of the domesticate in natural situations vulnerable to mechanical

  11. Expression of the Beet necrotic yellow vein virus p25 protein induces hormonal changes and a root branching phenotype in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltier, Claire; Schmidlin, Laure; Klein, Elodie; Taconnat, Ludivine; Prinsen, Els; Erhardt, Mathieu; Heintz, Dimitri; Weyens, Guy; Lefebvre, Marc; Renou, Jean-Pierre; Gilmer, David

    2011-06-01

    The RNA-3-encoded p25 protein was previously characterized as one of the major symptom determinants of the Beet necrotic yellow vein virus. Previous analyses reported the influence of the p25 protein in root proliferation phenotype observed in rhizomania disease on infected sugar beets (Beta vulgaris). A transgenic approach was developed, in which the p25 protein was constitutively expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana Columbia (Col-0) ecotype in order to provide new clues as to how the p25 protein might promote alone disease development and symptom expression. Transgenic plants were characterized by Southern blot and independent lines carrying single and multiple copies of the transgene were selected. Mapping of the T-DNA insertion was performed on the monocopy homozygote lines. P25 protein was localized both in the nucleus and in the cytoplasm of epidermal and root cells of transgenic plants. Although A. thaliana was not described as a susceptible host for BNYVV infection, abnormal root branching was observed on p25 protein-expressing A. thaliana plants. Moreover, these transgenic plants were more susceptible than wild-type plants to auxin analog treatment (2,4-D) but more resistant to methyl jasmonate (MeJA), abscisic acid (ABA) and to lesser extend to salicylic acid (SA). Hormonal content assays measuring plant levels of auxin (IAA), jasmonate (JA) and ethylene precursor (ACC) revealed major hormonal changes. Global transcript profiling analyses on roots displayed differential gene expressions that could corroborate root branching phenotype and stress signaling modifications.

  12. Hypertriglyceridemic Waist Phenotype and Changes in the Fasting Glycemia and Blood Pressure in Children and Adolescents Over One-Year Follow-Up Period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Priscila Ribas de Farias; Assis, Ana Marlúcia Oliveira; Cunha, Carla de Magalhães; Pereira, Emile Miranda; Jesus, Gabriela Dos Santos de; Silva, Lais Eloy Machado da; Alves, Wilanne Pinheiro de Oliveira

    2017-07-01

    The hypertriglyceridemic waist (HTW) phenotype is defined as the simultaneous presence of increased waist circumference (WC) and serum triglycerides (TG) levels and it has been associated with cardiometabolic risk in children and adolescents. The objective was to evaluate the influence of HTW phenotype in the fasting glycemia and blood pressure in children and adolescents over one-year follow-up period. It is a cohort study involving 492 children and adolescents from 7 to 15 years old, both genders, who were submitted to anthropometric, biochemical and clinical evaluation at the baseline, and also after 6 and 12 months of follow-up. Generalized Estimating Equation (GEE) models were calculated to evaluate the longitudinal influence of the HTW phenotype in the glycemia and blood pressure over one-year. It was observed a prevalence of 10.6% (n = 52) of HTW phenotype in the students. The GEE models identified that students with HTW phenotype had an increase of 3.87 mg/dl in the fasting glycemia mean (CI: 1.68-6.05) and of 3.67mmHg in the systolic blood pressure (SBP) mean (CI: 1.55-6.08) over one-year follow-up, after adjusting for confounding variables. The results of this study suggest that HTW phenotype is a risk factor for longitudinal changes in glycemia and SBP in children and adolescents over one-year follow-up period. O fenótipo de cintura hipertrigliceridêmica (CHT) é definido como a presença simultânea de circunferência de cintura (CC) e níveis séricos de triglicérides (TG) aumentados e tem sido associado com risco cardiometabólico em crianças e adolescentes. Avaliar a influência do fenótipo CHT na glicemia de jejum e na pressão arterial em crianças e adolescentes em um período de acompanhamento de um ano. Trata-se de um estudo de coorte envolvendo 492 crianças e adolescentes de 7 a 15 anos de ambos os sexos, que foram submetidos à avaliação antropométrica, bioquímica e clínica no início e também após 6 e 12 meses de seguimento. Os

  13. Evolutionary potential in the Alpine: trait heritabilities and performance variation of the dwarf willow Salix herbacea from different elevations and microhabitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlacek, Janosch; Cortés, Andrés J; Wheeler, Julia; Bossdorf, Oliver; Hoch, Guenter; Klápště, Jaroslav; Lexer, Christian; Rixen, Christian; Wipf, Sonja; Karrenberg, Sophie; van Kleunen, Mark

    2016-06-01

    Alpine ecosystems are seriously threatened by climate change. One of the key mechanisms by which plants can adapt to changing environmental conditions is through evolutionary change. However, we still know little about the evolutionary potential in wild populations of long-lived alpine plants. Here, we investigated heritabilities of phenological traits, leaf size, and performance traits in natural populations of the long-lived alpine dwarf shrub Salix herbacea using relatedness estimates inferred from SSR (Simple Sequence Repeat) markers. Salix herbacea occurs in early- and late-snowmelt microhabitats (ridges and snowbeds), and we assessed how performance consequences of phenological traits and leaf size differ between these microhabitats in order to infer potential for evolutionary responses. Salix herbacea showed low, but significant, heritabilities of leaf size, clonal and sexual reproduction, and moderate heritabilities of phenological traits. In both microhabitats, we found that larger leaves, longer intervals between snowmelt and leaf expansion, and longer GDD (growing-degree days) until leaf expansion resulted in a stronger increase in the number of stems (clonal reproduction). In snowbeds, clonal reproduction increased with a shorter GDD until flowering, while the opposite was found on ridges. Furthermore, the proportion of flowering stems increased with GDD until flowering in both microhabitats. Our results suggest that the presence of significant heritable variation in morphology and phenology might help S. herbacea to adapt to changing environmental conditions. However, it remains to be seen if the rate of such an evolutionary response can keep pace with the rapid rate of climate change.

  14. Efficient callus formation and plant regeneration are heritable characters in sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagami, Hiroyo; Taguchi, Kazunori; Arakawa, Takumi; Kuroda, Yosuke; Tamagake, Hideto; Kubo, Tomohiko

    2016-01-01

    Obtaining dedifferentiated cells (callus) that can regenerate into whole plants is not always feasible for many plant species. Sugar beet is known to be recalcitrant for dedifferentiation and plant regeneration. These difficulties were major obstacles for obtaining transgenic sugar beets through an Agrobacterium-mediated transformation procedure. The sugar beet line 'NK-219mm-O' is an exceptional line that forms callus efficiently and is easy to regenerate, but the inheritance of these characters was unknown. Another concern was whether these characters could coexist with an annual habitat that makes it possible to breed short life-cycle sugar beet suitable for molecular genetic analysis. Five sugar beet lines including NK-219mm-O were crossed with each other and subjected to in vitro culture to form callus. F1s with a NK-219mm-O background generally formed callus efficiently compared to the others, indicating that efficient callus formation is heritable. The regeneration potential was examined based on the phenotypes of calli after placement on regeneration medium. Five phenotypes were observed, of which two phenotypes regenerated shoots or somatic embryo-like structures. Vascular differentiation was evident in regenerable calli, whereas non-regenerable calli lacked normally developed vascular tissues. In a half-diallel cross, the callus-formation efficiency and the regeneration potential of reciprocal F1s progeny having a NK-219mm-O background were high. Finally, we crossed NK-219mm-O with an annual line that had a poor in vitro performance. The callus-formation efficiency and the regeneration potential of reciprocal F1 were high. The regenerated plants showed an annual habitat. Efficient callus formation and the high plant regeneration potential of NK-219mm-O were inherited and expressed in the F1. The annual habitat does not impair these high in vitro performances.

  15. Phenotypic inheritance induced by hairpin RNA in Drosophila

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huaguang Li; Yi Lu

    2009-01-01

    Phenotypic inheritance induced by RNA has been docu-mented in mouse and Caenorhabditis elegans. Here we report a similar inheritance in Drosophila. Mutant phe-notypes of eye defects and antenna duplication gener-ated from the crossing of one RNA interference (RNAi)transgenic line harboring one hairpin RNA transgene with a GAL4 driver line were inherited independently of the GAL4 driver. Hairpin RNA injection exper-iments demonstrated that the hairpin RNA could induce heritable mutant-like phenotypes on the eye and antenna. The penetrance of mutant phenotypes was reduced when the mutants were crossed to agol and piwi mutants. Our data suggest that hairpin RNA can induce phenotypic inheritance in Drosophila.

  16. Strategies to modulate heritable epigenetic defects in cellular machinery: lessons from nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandian, Ganesh N; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2012-12-27

    Natural epigenetic processes precisely orchestrate the intricate gene network by expressing and suppressing genes at the right place and time, thereby playing an essential role in maintaining the cellular homeostasis. Environment-mediated alteration of this natural epigenomic pattern causes abnormal cell behavior and shifts the cell from the normal to a diseased state, leading to certain cancers and neurodegenerative disorders. Unlike heritable diseases that are caused by the irreversible mutations in DNA, epigenetic errors can be reversed. Inheritance of epigenetic memory is also a major concern in the clinical translation of the Nobel Prize-winning discovery of induced pluripotent stem cell technology. Consequently, there is an increasing interest in the development of novel epigenetic switch-based therapeutic strategies that could potentially restore the heritable changes in epigenetically inherited disorders. Here we give a comprehensive overview of epigenetic inheritance and suggest the prospects of therapeutic gene modulation using epigenetic-based drugs, in particular histone deacetylase inhibitors. This review suggests that there is a need to develop therapeutic strategies that effectively mimic the natural environment and include the ways to modulate the gene expression at both the genetic and epigenetic levels. The development of tailor-made small molecules that could epigenetically alter DNA in a sequence-specific manner is a promising approach for restoring defects in an altered epigenome and may offer a sustainable solution to some unresolved clinical issues.

  17. Strategies To Modulate Heritable Epigenetic Defects in Cellular Machinery: Lessons from Nature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganesh N. Pandian

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Natural epigenetic processes precisely orchestrate the intricate gene network by expressing and suppressing genes at the right place and time, thereby playing an essential role in maintaining the cellular homeostasis. Environment-mediated alteration of this natural epigenomic pattern causes abnormal cell behavior and shifts the cell from the normal to a diseased state, leading to certain cancers and neurodegenerative disorders. Unlike heritable diseases that are caused by the irreversible mutations in DNA, epigenetic errors can be reversed. Inheritance of epigenetic memory is also a major concern in the clinical translation of the Nobel Prize-winning discovery of induced pluripotent stem cell technology. Consequently, there is an increasing interest in the development of novel epigenetic switch-based therapeutic strategies that could potentially restore the heritable changes in epigenetically inherited disorders. Here we give a comprehensive overview of epigenetic inheritance and suggest the prospects of therapeutic gene modulation using epigenetic-based drugs, in particular histone deacetylase inhibitors. This review suggests that there is a need to develop therapeutic strategies that effectively mimic the natural environment and include the ways to modulate the gene expression at both the genetic and epigenetic levels. The development of tailor-made small molecules that could epigenetically alter DNA in a sequence-specific manner is a promising approach for restoring defects in an altered epigenome and may offer a sustainable solution to some unresolved clinical issues.

  18. Disentangling environmental and heritable nestmate recognition cues in a carpenter ant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zweden, Jelle S; Dreier, Stephanie; d'Ettorre, Patrizia

    2009-02-01

    Discriminating between group members and strangers is a key feature of social life. Nestmate recognition is very effective in social insects and is manifested by aggression and rejection of alien individuals, which are prohibited to enter the nest. Nestmate recognition is based on the quantitative variation in cuticular hydrocarbons, which can include heritable cues from the workers, as well as acquired cues from the environment or queen-derived cues. We tracked the profile of six colonies of the ant Camponotus aethiops for a year under homogeneous laboratory conditions. We performed chemical and behavioral analyses. We show that nestmate recognition was not impaired by constant environment, even though cuticular hydrocarbon profiles changed over time and were slightly converging among colonies. Linear hydrocarbons increased over time, especially in queenless colonies, but appeared to have weak diagnostic power between colonies. The presence of a queen had little influence on nestmate discrimination abilities. Our results suggest that heritable cues of workers are the dominant factor influencing nestmate discrimination in these carpenter ants and highlight the importance of colony kin structure for the evolution of eusociality.

  19. Global changes and animal phenotypic responses: melanin-based plumage redness of scops owls increased with temperature and rainfall during the last century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeotti, Paolo; Rubolini, Diego; Sacchi, Roberto; Fasola, Mauro

    2009-08-23

    The ecological effects of global climate changes include shifts of species' distribution and changes in migration strategies and phenotype. Colour polymorphism, which can be envisaged as a species' evolutionary response to alternating conditions or to a wide range of habitats, may be affected by climate changes as well. The scops owl (Otus scops) shows two main colour morphs, dark- and pale-reddish, as well as intermediate morphs. We investigated temporal trends in an index of plumage colour of Italian scops owls from museum collections (1870-2007). We found a significant increase in plumage redness over the last century, which was correlated with an increase in temperature and rainfall of the years before specimen collection. However, the temporal increase in plumage redness persisted after controlling for climatic variables, suggesting that other environmental factors could be involved. Our study indicates that ongoing climate changes might have either shifted the selective balance between colour morphs, or differentially affected migration and movement patterns of colour morphs.

  20. Global changes and animal phenotypic responses: melanin-based plumage redness of scops owls increased with temperature and rainfall during the last century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeotti, Paolo; Rubolini, Diego; Sacchi, Roberto; Fasola, Mauro

    2009-01-01

    The ecological effects of global climate changes include shifts of species' distribution and changes in migration strategies and phenotype. Colour polymorphism, which can be envisaged as a species' evolutionary response to alternating conditions or to a wide range of habitats, may be affected by climate changes as well. The scops owl (Otus scops) shows two main colour morphs, dark- and pale-reddish, as well as intermediate morphs. We investigated temporal trends in an index of plumage colour of Italian scops owls from museum collections (1870–2007). We found a significant increase in plumage redness over the last century, which was correlated with an increase in temperature and rainfall of the years before specimen collection. However, the temporal increase in plumage redness persisted after controlling for climatic variables, suggesting that other environmental factors could be involved. Our study indicates that ongoing climate changes might have either shifted the selective balance between colour morphs, or differentially affected migration and movement patterns of colour morphs. PMID:19411274

  1. Initiation, establishment, and maintenance of heritable MuDR transposon silencing in maize are mediated by distinct factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret Roth Woodhouse

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Paramutation and transposon silencing are two epigenetic phenomena that have intrigued and puzzled geneticists for decades. Each involves heritable changes in gene activity without changes in DNA sequence. Here we report the cloning of a gene whose activity is required for the maintenance of both silenced transposons and paramutated color genes in maize. We show that this gene, Mop1 (Mediator of paramutation1 codes for a putative RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, whose activity is required for the production of small RNAs that correspond to the MuDR transposon sequence. We also demonstrate that although Mop1 is required to maintain MuDR methylation and silencing, it is not required for the initiation of heritable silencing. In contrast, we present evidence that a reduction in the transcript level of a maize homolog of the nucleosome assembly protein 1 histone chaperone can reduce the heritability of MuDR silencing. Together, these data suggest that the establishment and maintenance of MuDR silencing have distinct requirements.

  2. Heritable components of the human fecal microbiome are associated with visceral fat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, Michelle; Goodrich, Julia K; Jackson, Matthew A; Yet, Idil; Davenport, Emily R; Vieira-Silva, Sara; Debelius, Justine; Pallister, Tess; Mangino, Massimo; Raes, Jeroen; Knight, Rob; Clark, Andrew G; Ley, Ruth E; Spector, Tim D; Bell, Jordana T

    2016-09-26

    Variation in the human fecal microbiota has previously been associated with body mass index (BMI). Although obesity is a global health burden, the accumulation of abdominal visceral fat is the specific cardio-metabolic disease risk factor. Here, we explore links between the fecal microbiota and abdominal adiposity using body composition as measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry in a large sample of twins from the TwinsUK cohort, comparing fecal 16S rRNA diversity profiles with six adiposity measures. We profile six adiposity measures in 3666 twins and estimate their heritability, finding novel evidence for strong genetic effects underlying visceral fat and android/gynoid ratio. We confirm the association of lower diversity of the fecal microbiome with obesity and adiposity measures, and then compare the association between fecal microbial composition and the adiposity phenotypes in a discovery subsample of twins. We identify associations between the relative abundances of fecal microbial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) and abdominal adiposity measures. Most of these results involve visceral fat associations, with the strongest associations between visceral fat and Oscillospira members. Using BMI as a surrogate phenotype, we pursue replication in independent samples from three population-based cohorts including American Gut, Flemish Gut Flora Project and the extended TwinsUK cohort. Meta-analyses across the replication samples indicate that 8 OTUs replicate at a stringent threshold across all cohorts, while 49 OTUs achieve nominal significance in at least one replication sample. Heritability analysis of the adiposity-associated microbial OTUs prompted us to assess host genetic-microbe interactions at obesity-associated human candidate loci. We observe significant associations of adiposity-OTU abundances with host genetic variants in the FHIT, TDRG1 and ELAVL4 genes, suggesting a potential role for host genes to mediate the link between the fecal microbiome

  3. Aorta measurements are heritable and influenced by bicuspid aortic valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa J Martin

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Word Count 266, 1609 charactersObjectives: To determine whether the contributions of genetics and bicuspid aortic valve (BAV independently influence aortic (Ao dimensions.Background: Ao dilation is a risk factor for aneurysm, dissection, and sudden cardiac death. Frequent association of BAV with Ao dilation implicates a common underlying defect possibly due to genetic factors. Methods: Families enriched for BAV underwent standardized transthoracic echocardiography. In addition to BAV status, echocardiographic measures of Ao (annulus to descending Ao, pulmonary artery and mitral valve annulus diameters were obtained. Using variance components analysis, heritability was estimated with and without BAV status. Additionally, bivariate genetic analyses between Ao dimensions and BAV were performed.Results: Our cohort was obtained from 209 families enriched for BAV. After adjusting for age, body surface area and sex, individuals with BAV had a statistically significant increase in all echocardiographic measurements (p < 0.006 except descending Ao and mitral valve annulus. Individuals with BAV were at greater odds of having Ao dilation (OR = 4.44, 95% CI 2.93 – 6.72 than family members without BAV. All echocardiographic measurements exhibited moderate to strong heritability (0.25 to 0.53, and these estimates were not influenced by inclusion of BAV as a covariate. Bivariate genetic analyses supported that the genetic correlation between BAV and echo measures were not significantly different from zero.Conclusions: We show for the first time that echocardiographic measurements of Ao, pulmonary artery and mitral valve annulus diameters are quantitative traits that exhibit significant heritability. In addition, our results suggest the presence of BAV independently influences the proximal Ao and pulmonary artery measures but not those in the descending Ao or mitral valve annulus.

  4. Phenotypic plasticity with instantaneous but delayed switches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Utz, Margarete; Jeschke, Jonathan M.; Loeschcke, Volker; Gabriel, Wilfried

    2014-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity is a widespread phenomenon, allowing organisms to better adapt to changing environments. Most empirical and theoretical studies are restricted to irreversible plasticity where the expression of a specific phenotype is mostly determined during development. However, reversible pl

  5. Lessons on the pathogenesis of aneurysm from heritable conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Mark E.; Dietz, Harry C.

    2013-01-01

    Aortic aneurysm is common, accounting for 1–2% of all deaths in industrialized countries. Early theories of the causes of human aneurysm mostly focused on inherited or acquired defects in components of the extracellular matrix in the aorta. Although several mutations in the genes encoding extracellular matrix proteins have been recognized, more recent discoveries have shown important perturbations in cytokine signalling cascades and intracellular components of the smooth muscle contractile apparatus. The modelling of single-gene heritable aneurysm disorders in mice has shown unexpected involvement of the transforming growth factor-β cytokine pathway in aortic aneurysm, highlighting the potential for new therapeutic strategies. PMID:21593863

  6. Heritability of several traits in a early population of maize

    OpenAIRE

    1987-01-01

    [EN] The heritability in the narrow sense of days to pollen shedding, days to silking plant height, ear height, lodging, kernel moisture, number of ears per plant, number of ear rows, ear length, 1000-kernel weight and yield were estimated in an early population of maize (Zea mays L) using 40 families of half sibs grown in a blocks-in-replications desing for two years. The estimates ranged from 0.13 for kernel moisture to 1.00 for number of ear rows. The heritabiliy for yield was 0.38. [ES...

  7. Heritability of psoriasis in a large twin sample

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lønnberg, Ann Sophie; Skov, L; Skytthe, A;

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To study the concordance of psoriasis in a population-based twin sample. METHODS: Data on psoriasis in 10,725 twin pairs, 20-71 years of age, from the Danish Twin Registry was collected via a questionnaire survey. The concordance and heritability of psoriasis were estimated. RESULTS: In total......, 4.1% of the men and 4.2% of the women had a lifetime history of psoriasis. The probandwise concordance for psoriasis was larger in monozygotic than in dizygotic twins, 0.33 vs. 0.17. Genetic factors explained 68% (60-75%) of the variation in the susceptibility to psoriasis, whereas the rest...

  8. Prospects for DNA methods to measure human heritable mutation rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendelsohn, M.L.

    1985-06-14

    A workshop cosponsored by ICPEMC and the US Department of Energy was held in Alta, Utah, December 9-13, 1984 to examine the extent to which DNA-oriented methods might provide new approaches to the important but intractable problem of measuring mutation rates in control and exposed human populations. The workshop identified and analyzed six DNA methods for detection of human heritable mutation, including several created at the meeting, and concluded that none of the methods combine sufficient feasibility and efficiency to be recommended for general application. 8 refs.

  9. Prenatal cadmium exposure produces persistent changes to thymus and spleen cell phenotypic repertoire as well as the acquired immune response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holásková, Ida; Elliott, Meenal; Hanson, Miranda L.; Schafer, Rosana [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Cell Biology, West Virginia University School of Medicine, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Barnett, John B., E-mail: jbarnett@hsc.wvu.edu [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Cell Biology, West Virginia University School of Medicine, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center, West Virginia University School of Medicine, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a common environmental contaminant. Adult exposure to Cd alters the immune system, however, there are limited studies on the effects of prenatal exposure to Cd. Pregnant C57Bl/6 mice were exposed to an environmentally relevant dose of CdCl{sub 2} (10 ppm) and the effects on the immune system of the offspring were assessed at 20 weeks of age. Prenatal Cd exposure caused an increase in the percent of CD4{sup −}CD8{sup −}CD44{sup +}CD25{sup −} (DN1) thymocytes in both sexes and a decrease in the percent of CD4{sup −}CD8{sup −}CD44{sup −}CD25{sup +} (DN3) thymocytes in females. Females had an increase in the percent of splenic CD4{sup +} T cells, CD8{sup +} T cells, and CD45R/B220{sup +} B cells and a decrease in the percent of NK cells and granulocytes (Gr-1{sup +}). Males had an increase in the percent of splenic CD4{sup +} T cells and CD45R/B220{sup +} B cells and a decrease in the percent of CD8{sup +} T cells, NK cells, and granulocytes. The percentage of neutrophils and myeloid-derived suppressor cells were reduced in both sexes. The percent of splenic nTreg cells was decreased in all Cd-exposed offspring. Cd-exposed offspring were immunized with a streptococcal vaccine and the antibody response was determined. PC-specific serum antibody titers were decreased in Cd exposed female offspring but increased in the males. PspA-specific serum IgG titers were increased in both females and males compared to control animals. Females had a decrease in PspA-specific serum IgM antibody titers. Females and males had a decrease in the number of splenic anti-PspA antibody-secreting cells when standardized to the number of B cells. These findings demonstrate that very low levels of Cd exposure during gestation can result in long term sex-specific alterations on the immune system of the offspring. -- Highlights: ► Prenatal exposure to cadmium alters the immune system of 20 week old offspring. ► The percentage of DN1 and DN3 thymocytes was changed

  10. Are range-size distributions consistent with species-level heritability?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borregaard, Michael Krabbe; Gotelli, Nicholas; Rahbek, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    been that it is not compatible with the observed shape of present-day species range-size distributions (SRDs), a claim that has never been tested. To assess this claim, we used forward simulation of range-size evolution in clades with varying degrees of range-size heritability, and compared the output...... of three different models to the range-size distribution of the South American avifauna. Although there were differences among the models, a moderate-to-high degree of range-size heritability consistently leads to SRDs that were similar to empirical data. These results suggest that range-size heritability......The concept of species-level heritability is widely contested. Because it is most likely to apply to emergent, species-level traits, one of the central discussions has focused on the potential heritability of geographic range size. However, a central argument against range-size heritability has...

  11. Transcriptional and phenotypic changes in aorta and aortic valve with aging and MnSOD deficiency in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, Carolyn M; Hagler, Michael; Zhang, Bin; Oehler, Elise A; Arghami, Arman; Miller, Jordan D

    2013-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to characterize changes in antioxidant and age-related gene expression in aorta and aortic valve with aging, and test the hypothesis that increased mitochondrial oxidative stress accelerates age-related endothelial and aortic valve dysfunction. Wild-type (MnSOD(+/+)) and manganese SOD heterozygous haploinsufficient (MnSOD(+/-)) mice were studied at 3 and 18 mo of age. In aorta from wild-type mice, antioxidant expression was preserved, although there were age-associated increases in Nox2 expression. Haploinsufficiency of MnSOD did not alter antioxidant expression in aorta, but increased expression of Nox2. When compared with that of aorta, age-associated reductions in antioxidant expression were larger in aortic valves from wild-type and MnSOD haploinsufficient mice, although Nox2 expression was unchanged. Similarly, sirtuin expression was relatively well-preserved in aorta from both genotypes, whereas expression of SIRT1, SIRT2, SIRT3, SIRT4, and SIRT6 were significantly reduced in the aortic valve. Expression of p16(ink4a), a marker of cellular senescence, was profoundly increased in both aorta and aortic valve from MnSOD(+/+) and MnSOD(+/-) mice. Functionally, we observed comparable age-associated reductions in endothelial function in aorta from both MnSOD(+/+) and MnSOD(+/-) mice. Interestingly, inhibition of NAD(P)H oxidase with apocynin or gp91ds-tat improved endothelial function in MnSOD(+/+) mice but significantly impaired endothelial function in MnSOD(+/-) mice at both ages. Aortic valve function was not impaired by aging or MnSOD haploinsufficiency. Changes in antioxidant and sirtuin gene expression with aging differ dramatically between aorta and aortic valve. Furthermore, although MnSOD does not result in overt cardiovascular dysfunction with aging, compensatory transcriptional responses to MnSOD deficiency appear to be tissue specific.

  12. Antibacterial compounds of Canadian honeys target bacterial cell wall inducing phenotype changes, growth inhibition and cell lysis that resemble action of β-lactam antibiotics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrina Brudzynski

    Full Text Available Honeys show a desirable broad spectrum activity against Gram-positive and negative bacteria making antibacterial activity an intrinsic property of honey and a desirable source for new drug development. The cellular targets and underlying mechanism of action of honey antibacterial compounds remain largely unknown. To facilitate the target discovery, we employed a method of phenotypic profiling by directly comparing morphological changes in Escherichia coli induced by honeys to that of ampicillin, the cell wall-active β-lactam of known mechanism of action. Firstly, we demonstrated the purity of tested honeys from potential β-lactam contaminations using quantitative LC-ESI-MS. Exposure of log-phase E. coli to honey or ampicillin resulted in time- and concentration-dependent changes in bacterial cell shape with the appearance of filamentous phenotypes at sub-inhibitory concentrations and spheroplasts at the MBC. Cell wall destruction by both agents, clearly visible on microscopic micrographs, was accompanied by increased permeability of the lipopolysaccharide outer membrane as indicated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS. More than 90% E. coli exposed to honey or ampicillin became permeable to propidium iodide. Consistently with the FACS results, both honey-treated and ampicillin-treated E. coli cells released lipopolysaccharide endotoxins at comparable levels, which were significantly higher than controls (p<0.0001. E. coli cells transformed with the ampicillin-resistance gene (β-lactamase remained sensitive to honey, displayed the same level of cytotoxicity, cell shape changes and endotoxin release as ampicillin-sensitive cells. As expected, β-lactamase protected the host cell from antibacterial action of ampicillin. Thus, both honey and ampicillin induced similar structural changes to the cell wall and LPS and that this ability underlies antibacterial activities of both agents. Since the cell wall is critical for cell growth and

  13. Pronounced phenotypic changes in transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing sucrose synthase may reveal a novel sugar signaling pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quynh Anh eNguyen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Soluble sugars not only serve as nutrients, but also act as signals for plant growth and development, but how sugar signals are perceived and translated into physiological responses in plants remains unclear. We manipulated sugar levels in transgenic plants by overexpressing sucrose synthase (SuSy, which is a key enzyme believed to have reversible sucrose synthesis and sucrose degradation functions. The ectopically expressed SuSy protein exhibited sucrose-degrading activity, which may change the flux of sucrose demand from photosynthetic to non-photosynthetic cells, and trigger an unknown sucrose signaling pathway that lead to increased sucrose content in the transgenic plants. An experiment on the transition from heterotrophic to autotrophic growth demonstrated the existence of a novel sucrose signaling pathway, which stimulated photosynthesis, and enhanced photosynthetic synthesis of sucrose, which was the direct cause or the sucrose increase. In addition, a light/dark time treatment experiment, using different day length ranges for photosynthesis/respiration showed the carbohydrate pattern within a 24-hour day and consolidated the role of sucrose signaling pathway as a way to maintain sucrose demand, and indicated the relationships between increased sucrose and upregulation of genes controlling development of the shoot apical meristem (SAM. As a result, transgenic plants featured a higher biomass and a shorter time required to switch to reproduction compared to those of control plants, indicating altered phylotaxis and more rapid advancement of developmental stages in the transgenic plants.

  14. [Estimation of heritability and repeatability of resting metabolic rate in birds, with free-living pied flycatchers Ficedula hypoleuca (Aves: Passeriformes) as an example].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushuev, A V; Kerimov, A B; Ivankina, E V

    2010-01-01

    Estimates of a trait heritability and repeatability can get at an idea of its usefulness for being an individual characteristic and its ability to change under selection pressure. Heritability and repeatability of energetic parameters still poorly studied in birds. The most important physiological characteristic of homoiotherms is resting metabolic rate (RMR), which, in the absence of productive processes, does not exceed basal metabolic rate (BMR). We estimated BMR repeatability in free-living pied flycatchers in Moscow Region (55 degrees 44' N, 36 degrees 51' E; 1992-2008) and Tomsk (56 degrees 20' N, 84 degrees 56' E; 2008-2009) populations over intervals from 40 days to 3 years. In Moscow Region population, BMR repeatability amounted to tau = 0.34 +/- 0.10 (n=80) if measured over 1 year interval, tau = 0.60 +/- 0.15 (n=19) if measured over 2 years interval, and tau = 0.85 +/- 0.13 (n=6) if measured over 3 years interval providing that consecutive BMR measurements were done in the same period of reproductive season. In Tomsk population, BMR repeatability, measured over 1 year interval, amounted to tau = 0.49 +/- 0.11 (n=50). Repeatability is a measure of a trait constancy and sets the upper limit of its heritability. To estimate RMR heritability, cross-fostering experiments have been conducted in 2003-2005 with flycatchers of Moscow Region population. RMR of chicks positively correlated with BMR of their biological fathers, whereas such correlation in metabolic rates between chicks and their foster fathers was absent. The RMR heritability estimate turned out to be h2 = 0.43 +/- 0.17 (n=210). The obtained estimates of heritability and repeatability of fundamental energetic traits are rather high for physiological features. This suggests the existence of a potential for direct selection on BMR and evolutionary stable diversity of avian populations with regard to basal metabolic rate.

  15. Tumor cell heterogeneity in Small Cell Lung Cancer (SCLC: phenotypical and functional differences associated with Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT and DNA methylation changes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Krohn

    Full Text Available Small Cell Lung Cancer (SCLC is a specific subtype of lung cancer presenting as highly metastatic disease with extremely poor prognosis. Despite responding initially well to chemo- or radiotherapy, SCLC almost invariably relapses and develops resistance to chemotherapy. This is suspected to be related to tumor cell subpopulations with different characteristics resembling stem cells. Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT is known to play a key role in metastatic processes and in developing drug resistance. This is also true for NSCLC, but there is very little information on EMT processes in SCLC so far. SCLC, in contrast to NSCLC cell lines, grow mainly in floating cell clusters and a minor part as adherent cells. We compared these morphologically different subpopulations of SCLC cell lines for EMT and epigenetic features, detecting significant differences in the adherent subpopulations with high levels of mesenchymal markers such as Vimentin and Fibronectin and very low levels of epithelial markers like E-cadherin and Zona Occludens 1. In addition, expression of EMT-related transcription factors such as Snail/Snai1, Slug/Snai2, and Zeb1, DNA methylation patterns of the EMT hallmark genes, functional responses like migration, invasion, matrix metalloproteases secretion, and resistance to chemotherapeutic drug treatment all differed significantly between the sublines. This phenotypic variability might reflect tumor cell heterogeneity and EMT during metastasis in vivo, accompanied by the development of refractory disease in relapse. We propose that epigenetic regulation plays a key role during phenotypical and functional changes in tumor cells and might therefore provide new treatment options for SCLC patients.

  16. Changes in winter depression phenotype correlate with white blood cell gene expression profiles: a combined metagene and gene ontology approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosker, Fokko J; Terpstra, Peter; Gladkevich, Anatoliy V; Janneke Dijck-Brouwer, D A; te Meerman, Gerard; Nolen, Willem A; Schoevers, Robert A; Meesters, Ybe

    2015-04-03

    In the present study we evaluate the feasibility of gene expression in white blood cells as a peripheral marker for winter depression. Sixteen patients with winter type seasonal affective disorder were included in the study. Blood was taken by venous puncture at three time points; in winter prior and following bright light therapy and in summer. RNA was isolated, converted into cRNA, amplified and hybridized on Illumina® gene expression arrays. The raw optical array data were quantile normalized and thereafter analyzed using a metagene approach, based on previously published Affymetrix gene array data. The raw data were also subjected to a secondary analysis focusing on circadian genes and genes involved in serotonergic neurotransmission. Differences between the conditions were analyzed, using analysis of variance on the principal components of the metagene score matrix. After correction for multiple testing no statistically significant differences were found. Another approach uses the correlation between metagene factor weights and the actual expression values, averaged over conditions. When comparing the correlations of winter vs. summer and bright light therapy vs. summer significant changes for several metagenes were found. Subsequent gene ontology analyses (DAVID and GeneTrail) of 5 major metagenes suggest an interaction between brain and white blood cells. The hypothesis driven analysis with a smaller group of genes failed to demonstrate any significant effects. The results from the combined metagene and gene ontology analyses support the idea of communication between brain and white blood cells. Future studies will need a much larger sample size to obtain information at the level of single genes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Estimated reproductive success of brooders and heritability of growth traits for large yellow croaker (Larimichthys crocea) using microsatellites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiande; SUI Banliang; WANG Zhiyong; CAI Mingyi; YAO Cuiluan; CHEN Qingkai

    2011-01-01

    We estimated the reproductive success of adult brood fish and the heritability of growthrelated traits for large yellow croaker (Larimichthys crocea).We created two independent full-factorial cross groups (1 and 2) by crossing 4 males×4 females and 4 males×3 females,respectively.We measured the body weight (BW),body length (BL),and body height (BH) of 281 individuals from group 1 and 318 individuals from group 2 at 20 months post hatch (harvest age).We also collected a tissue sample from each individual.The parents and offspring were genotyped using six polymorphic microsatellites.Of the 599 offspring,99.2% were assigned to a single pair of parents.In both groups,some parent pairs produced a large number of offsprings while other pairs did not produce any offspring.The genetic diversity and putative Ne were lower in the offsprings than in the parents in both groups.The heritability estimates at 20-month age were 0.13±0.10 for BW,0.19±0.13 for BL,and 0.09±0.06 for BH.The genetic and phenotype correlation between BW,BL,and BH was close to 1.The results provide basic information for selective breeding and further genetic characterization of large yellow croaker.

  18. Dark matter: are mice the solution to missing heritability?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarissa Carlin Parker

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS in humans have identified hundreds of single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with complex traits, yet for most traits studied, the sum total of all these identified variants fail to explain a significant portion of the heritable variation. Reasons for this missing heritability are thought to include the existence of rare causative variants not captured by current genotyping arrays, structural variants that go undetected by existing technology, insufficient power to identify multi-gene interactions, small sample sizes, and the influence of environmental and epigenetic effects. As genotyping technologies have evolved it has become inexpensive and relatively straightforward to perform GWAS in mice. Mice offer a powerful tool for elucidating the genetic architecture of behavioral and physiological traits, and are complementary to human studies. Unlike F2 crosses of inbred strains, advanced intercross lines, heterogeneous stocks, outbred, and wild-caught mice have more rapid breakdown of linkage disequilibrium which allow for increasingly high resolution mapping. Because some of these populations are created using a small number of founder chromosomes they are not expected to harbor rare alleles. We discuss the differences between these mouse populations and examine their potential to overcome some of the pitfalls that have plagued human GWAS studies.

  19. High-efficiency and heritable gene targeting in mouse by transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Zhongwei; Liu, Meizhen; Chen, Zhaohua; Shao, Yanjiao; Pan, Hongjie; Wei, Gaigai; Yu, Chao; Zhang, Long; Li, Xia; Wang, Ping; Fan, Heng-Yu; Du, Bing; Liu, Bin; Liu, Mingyao; Li, Dali

    2013-06-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) are a powerful new approach for targeted gene disruption in various animal models, but little is known about their activities in Mus musculus, the widely used mammalian model organism. Here, we report that direct injection of in vitro transcribed messenger RNA of TALEN pairs into mouse zygotes induced somatic mutations, which were stably passed to the next generation through germ-line transmission. With one TALEN pair constructed for each of 10 target genes, mutant F0 mice for each gene were obtained with the mutation rate ranged from 13 to 67% and an average of ∼40% of total healthy newborns with no significant differences between C57BL/6 and FVB/N genetic background. One TALEN pair with single mismatch to their intended target sequence in each side failed to yield any mutation. Furthermore, highly efficient germ-line transmission was obtained, as all the F0 founders tested transmitted the mutations to F1 mice. In addition, we also observed that one bi-allele mutant founder of Lepr gene, encoding Leptin receptor, had similar diabetic phenotype as db/db mouse. Together, our results suggest that TALENs are an effective genetic tool for rapid gene disruption with high efficiency and heritability in mouse with distinct genetic background.

  20. Heritable components of the human fecal microbiome are associated with visceral fat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roy, Caroline I; Beaumont, Michelle; Jackson, Matthew A; Steves, Claire J; Spector, Timothy D; Bell, Jordana T

    2017-08-02

    Obesity and its associated diseases are one of the major causes of death worldwide. The gut microbiota has been identified to have essential regulatory effects on human metabolism and obesity in particular. In a recent study we provided some insights into the link between the gut microbiota (GM) and adiposity, as well as host genetic modulation of these processes. Our results identify novel evidence of association between 6 adiposity phenotypes and faecal microbial operational taxonomic units (OTUs). Accumulation of visceral fat, a key risk factor for cardio-metabolic disease, has the strongest and most pervasive signature on the gut microbiota of the factors we examined. Furthermore, we observe that the adiposity-associated OTUs were classified as heritable and in some cases were also associated with host genetic variation at obesity-associated human candidate genes FHIT, TDRG1 and ELAVL4. This addendum confirms our previously published results in the TwinsUK cohort using a different approach to OTU clustering and multivariate analysis, and discusses further the importance of considering the GM as a complex ecosystem.

  1. Evaluation of genetic divergence and heritability in pea (Pisum sativum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Georgieva

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available An experiment on genetic evaluation of five genotypes of forage pea (Glyans, Svit, Kamerton, Modus, Pleven 4 was conducted during 2012-2014 period. Analysis of variance showed significant differences among genotypes for the traits pod width, seeds per plant, seed weight per plant and 1000 seed weight. The estimates of genetic parameters of five varieties of Pisum sativum L. indicated a good amount of genetic variation in the experimental materials under investigation. Moderate phenotypic and genotypic coefficients of variation were observed for most of traits except pod length and pod width. For the traits studied seeds per plant, seed weight per plant and plant height were found high heritability along with high genetic gain indicating preponderance of additive effects. Therefore, selection programme based on these characters would be more effective in improving yield parameters of forage pea. The seed yield was positively and significantly correlated with 1000 seed weight and pod stem, which suggested the possibilities of improving seed yield by simultaneous improvement of these traits.

  2. YIELD COMPONENTS ANALYSIS AND HERITABILITY OF AGRONOMIC TRAITS AMONG SOME ACCESSIONS OF SORGHUM IN GHANA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Nyadanu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench is an important staple food crop in Ghana. It is used to prepare ‘tuo zaafi’, porridge and cake and to brew local beer known as ‘pito’.  Unfortunately, sorghum attracts limited research attention to improve its low productivity which is of great disincentive to farmers. Understanding of yield and its components in sorghum is needed to improve the yield of existing local varieties. A study was carried out under field conditions in Navrongo in the Kassena-Nankana district of the Upper East region of Ghana using four local accessions of sorghum; Banina, Kadaga, Naga red and Kapala to investigate yield and its components and their genetic parameters. There were significant (P<0.05 differences in yield traits among the accessions. High values for phenotypic coefficient of variation (PCV and genotypic coefficient of variation (GCV were recorded for harvest index and number of grains per panicle. High heritability and high genetic advance (GA were observed for number of days to flowering, number of primary panicles, grain weight per panicle, and days to maturity. Banina variety produced the highest number of leaves, panicle height, panicle width, plant height, number of grains per panicle, grains weight, economic and biological yield. There were also significant and positive correlation among most of the characters studied. Principal components analysis revealed that Banina was the highest yielding accession and number of grains per panicle was the principal contributing factor of this accession.

  3. Assumption-free estimation of heritability from genome-wide identity-by-descent sharing between full siblings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter M Visscher

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The study of continuously varying, quantitative traits is important in evolutionary biology, agriculture, and medicine. Variation in such traits is attributable to many, possibly interacting, genes whose expression may be sensitive to the environment, which makes their dissection into underlying causative factors difficult. An important population parameter for quantitative traits is heritability, the proportion of total variance that is due to genetic factors. Response to artificial and natural selection and the degree of resemblance between relatives are all a function of this parameter. Following the classic paper by R. A. Fisher in 1918, the estimation of additive and dominance genetic variance and heritability in populations is based upon the expected proportion of genes shared between different types of relatives, and explicit, often controversial and untestable models of genetic and non-genetic causes of family resemblance. With genome-wide coverage of genetic markers it is now possible to estimate such parameters solely within families using the actual degree of identity-by-descent sharing between relatives. Using genome scans on 4,401 quasi-independent sib pairs of which 3,375 pairs had phenotypes, we estimated the heritability of height from empirical genome-wide identity-by-descent sharing, which varied from 0.374 to 0.617 (mean 0.498, standard deviation 0.036. The variance in identity-by-descent sharing per chromosome and per genome was consistent with theory. The maximum likelihood estimate of the heritability for height was 0.80 with no evidence for non-genetic causes of sib resemblance, consistent with results from independent twin and family studies but using an entirely separate source of information. Our application shows that it is feasible to estimate genetic variance solely from within-family segregation and provides an independent validation of previously untestable assumptions. Given sufficient data, our new paradigm will

  4. Assumption-free estimation of heritability from genome-wide identity-by-descent sharing between full siblings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The study of continuously varying, quantitative traits is important in evolutionary biology, agriculture, and medicine. Variation in such traits is attributable to many, possibly interacting, genes whose expression may be sensitive to the environment, which makes their dissection into underlying causative factors difficult. An important population parameter for quantitative traits is heritability, the proportion of total variance that is due to genetic factors. Response to artificial and natural selection and the degree of resemblance between relatives are all a function of this parameter. Following the classic paper by R. A. Fisher in 1918, the estimation of additive and dominance genetic variance and heritability in populations is based upon the expected proportion of genes shared between different types of relatives, and explicit, often controversial and untestable models of genetic and non-genetic causes of family resemblance. With genome-wide coverage of genetic markers it is now possible to estimate such parameters solely within families using the actual degree of identity-by-descent sharing between relatives. Using genome scans on 4,401 quasi-independent sib pairs of which 3,375 pairs had phenotypes, we estimated the heritability of height from empirical genome-wide identity-by-descent sharing, which varied from 0.374 to 0.617 (mean 0.498, standard deviation 0.036. The variance in identity-by-descent sharing per chromosome and per genome was consistent with theory. The maximum likelihood estimate of the heritability for height was 0.80 with no evidence for non-genetic causes of sib resemblance, consistent with results from independent twin and family studies but using an entirely separate source of information. Our application shows that it is feasible to estimate genetic variance solely from within-family segregation and provides an independent validation of previously untestable assumptions. Given sufficient data, our new paradigm will

  5. Disentangling environmental and heritable nestmate recognition cues in a carpenter ant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Zweden, Jelle S; Dreier, Stephanie; d'Ettorre, Patrizia

    2009-01-01

    Discriminating between group members and strangers is a key feature of social life. Nestmate recognition is very effective in social insects and is manifested by aggression and rejection of alien individuals, which are prohibited to enter the nest. Nestmate recognition is based on the quantitative...... and behavioral analyses. We show that nestmate recognition was not impaired by constant environment, even though cuticular hydrocarbon profiles changed over time and were slightly converging among colonies. Linear hydrocarbons increased over time, especially in queenless colonies, but appeared to have weak...... diagnostic power between colonies. The presence of a queen had little influence on nestmate discrimination abilities. Our results suggest that heritable cues of workers are the dominant factor influencing nestmate discrimination in these carpenter ants and highlight the importance of colony kin structure...

  6. Heritable patterns of tooth decay in the permanent dentition: principal components and factor analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, John R; Feingold, Eleanor; Wang, Xiaojing; Tcuenco, Karen T; Weeks, Daniel E; DeSensi, Rebecca S; Polk, Deborah E; Wendell, Steve; Weyant, Robert J; Crout, Richard; McNeil, Daniel W; Marazita, Mary L

    2012-03-09

    Dental caries is the result of a complex interplay among environmental, behavioral, and genetic factors, with distinct patterns of decay likely due to specific etiologies. Therefore, global measures of decay, such as the DMFS index, may not be optimal for identifying risk factors that manifest as specific decay patterns, especially if the risk factors such as genetic susceptibility loci have small individual effects. We used two methods to extract patterns of decay from surface-level caries data in order to generate novel phenotypes with which to explore the genetic regulation of caries. The 128 tooth surfaces of the permanent dentition were scored as carious or not by intra-oral examination for 1,068 participants aged 18 to 75 years from 664 biological families. Principal components analysis (PCA) and factor analysis (FA), two methods of identifying underlying patterns without a priori surface classifications, were applied to our data. The three strongest caries patterns identified by PCA recaptured variation represented by DMFS index (correlation, r = 0.97), pit and fissure surface caries (r = 0.95), and smooth surface caries (r = 0.89). However, together, these three patterns explained only 37% of the variability in the data, indicating that a priori caries measures are insufficient for fully quantifying caries variation. In comparison, the first pattern identified by FA was strongly correlated with pit and fissure surface caries (r = 0.81), but other identified patterns, including a second pattern representing caries of the maxillary incisors, were not representative of any previously defined caries indices. Some patterns identified by PCA and FA were heritable (h(2) = 30-65%, p = 0.043-0.006), whereas other patterns were not, indicating both genetic and non-genetic etiologies of individual decay patterns. This study demonstrates the use of decay patterns as novel phenotypes to assist in understanding the multifactorial nature of dental caries.

  7. Pedigree-free estimates of heritability in the wild: promising prospects for selfing populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurene Gay

    Full Text Available Estimating the genetic variance available for traits informs us about a population's ability to evolve in response to novel selective challenges. In selfing species, theory predicts a loss of genetic diversity that could lead to an evolutionary dead-end, but empirical support remains scarce. Genetic variability in a trait is estimated by correlating the phenotypic resemblance with the proportion of the genome that two relatives share identical by descent ('realized relatedness'. The latter is traditionally predicted from pedigrees (Φ A : expected value but can also be estimated using molecular markers (average number of alleles shared. Nevertheless, evolutionary biologists, unlike animal breeders, remain cautious about using marker-based relatedness coefficients to study complex phenotypic traits in populations. In this paper, we review published results comparing five different pedigree-free methods and use simulations to test individual-based models (hereafter called animal models using marker-based relatedness coefficients, with a special focus on the influence of mating systems. Our literature review confirms that Ritland's regression method is unreliable, but suggests that animal models with marker-based estimates of relatedness and genomic selection are promising and that more testing is required. Our simulations show that using molecular markers instead of pedigrees in animal models seriously worsens the estimation of heritability in outcrossing populations, unless a very large number of loci is available. In selfing populations the results are less biased. More generally, populations with high identity disequilibrium (consanguineous or bottlenecked populations could be propitious for using marker-based animal models, but are also more likely to deviate from the standard assumptions of quantitative genetics models (non-additive variance.

  8. Heritable patterns of tooth decay in the permanent dentition: principal components and factor analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaffer John R

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dental caries is the result of a complex interplay among environmental, behavioral, and genetic factors, with distinct patterns of decay likely due to specific etiologies. Therefore, global measures of decay, such as the DMFS index, may not be optimal for identifying risk factors that manifest as specific decay patterns, especially if the risk factors such as genetic susceptibility loci have small individual effects. We used two methods to extract patterns of decay from surface-level caries data in order to generate novel phenotypes with which to explore the genetic regulation of caries. Methods The 128 tooth surfaces of the permanent dentition were scored as carious or not by intra-oral examination for 1,068 participants aged 18 to 75 years from 664 biological families. Principal components analysis (PCA and factor analysis (FA, two methods of identifying underlying patterns without a priori surface classifications, were applied to our data. Results The three strongest caries patterns identified by PCA recaptured variation represented by DMFS index (correlation, r = 0.97, pit and fissure surface caries (r = 0.95, and smooth surface caries (r = 0.89. However, together, these three patterns explained only 37% of the variability in the data, indicating that a priori caries measures are insufficient for fully quantifying caries variation. In comparison, the first pattern identified by FA was strongly correlated with pit and fissure surface caries (r = 0.81, but other identified patterns, including a second pattern representing caries of the maxillary incisors, were not representative of any previously defined caries indices. Some patterns identified by PCA and FA were heritable (h2 = 30-65%, p = 0.043-0.006, whereas other patterns were not, indicating both genetic and non-genetic etiologies of individual decay patterns. Conclusions This study demonstrates the use of decay patterns as novel phenotypes to assist in understanding

  9. Pedigree-Free Estimates of Heritability in the Wild: Promising Prospects for Selfing Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, Laurene; Siol, Mathieu; Ronfort, Joelle

    2013-01-01

    Estimating the genetic variance available for traits informs us about a population’s ability to evolve in response to novel selective challenges. In selfing species, theory predicts a loss of genetic diversity that could lead to an evolutionary dead-end, but empirical support remains scarce. Genetic variability in a trait is estimated by correlating the phenotypic resemblance with the proportion of the genome that two relatives share identical by descent (‘realized relatedness’). The latter is traditionally predicted from pedigrees (ΦA: expected value) but can also be estimated using molecular markers (average number of alleles shared). Nevertheless, evolutionary biologists, unlike animal breeders, remain cautious about using marker-based relatedness coefficients to study complex phenotypic traits in populations. In this paper, we review published results comparing five different pedigree-free methods and use simulations to test individual-based models (hereafter called animal models) using marker-based relatedness coefficients, with a special focus on the influence of mating systems. Our literature review confirms that Ritland’s regression method is unreliable, but suggests that animal models with marker-based estimates of relatedness and genomic selection are promising and that more testing is required. Our simulations show that using molecular markers instead of pedigrees in animal models seriously worsens the estimation of heritability in outcrossing populations, unless a very large number of loci is available. In selfing populations the results are less biased. More generally, populations with high identity disequilibrium (consanguineous or bottlenecked populations) could be propitious for using marker-based animal models, but are also more likely to deviate from the standard assumptions of quantitative genetics models (non-additive variance). PMID:23825602

  10. Impaired mechanical response of an EDMD mutation leads to motility phenotypes that are repaired by loss of prenylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuela, Noam; Zwerger, Monika; Levin, Tal; Medalia, Ohad; Gruenbaum, Yosef

    2016-05-01

    There are roughly 14 distinct heritable autosomal dominant diseases associated with mutations in lamins A/C, including Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD). The mechanical model proposes that the lamin mutations change the mechanical properties of muscle nuclei, leading to cell death and tissue deterioration. Here, we developed an experimental protocol that analyzes the effect of disease-linked lamin mutations on the response of nuclei to mechanical strain in living Caenorhabditis elegans We found that the EDMD mutation L535P disrupts the nuclear mechanical response specifically in muscle nuclei. Inhibiting lamin prenylation rescued the mechanical response of the EDMD nuclei, reversed the muscle phenotypes and led to normal motility. The LINC complex and emerin were also required to regulate the mechanical response of C. elegans nuclei. This study provides evidence to support the mechanical model and offers a potential future therapeutic approach towards curing EDMD.

  11. Cancer cells exhibit clonal diversity in phenotypic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathis, Robert Austin; Sokol, Ethan S; Gupta, Piyush B

    2017-02-01

    Phenotypic heterogeneity in cancers is associated with invasive progression and drug resistance. This heterogeneity arises in part from the ability of cancer cells to switch between phenotypic states, but the dynamics of this cellular plasticity remain poorly understood. Here we apply DNA barcodes to quantify and track phenotypic plasticity across hundreds of clones in a population of cancer cells exhibiting epithelial or mesenchymal differentiation phenotypes. We find that the epithelial-to-mesenchymal cell ratio is highly variable across the different clones in cancer cell populations, but remains stable for many generations within the progeny of any single clone-with a heritability of 0.89. To estimate the effects of combination therapies on phenotypically heterogeneous tumours, we generated quantitative simulations incorporating empirical data from our barcoding experiments. These analyses indicated that combination therapies which alternate between epithelial- and mesenchymal-specific treatments eventually select for clones with increased phenotypic plasticity. However, this selection could be minimized by increasing the frequency of alternation between treatments, identifying designs that may minimize selection for increased phenotypic plasticity. These findings establish new insights into phenotypic plasticity in cancer, and suggest design principles for optimizing the effectiveness of combination therapies for phenotypically heterogeneous tumours.

  12. Heritability of Biomarkers of Oxidized Lipoproteins: Twin Pair Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Fangwen; Schork, Andrew J; Maihofer, Adam X; Nievergelt, Caroline M; Marcovina, Santica M; Miller, Elizabeth R; Witztum, Joseph L; O'Connor, Daniel T; Tsimikas, Sotirios

    2015-07-01

    To determine whether biomarkers of oxidized lipoproteins are genetically determined. Lipoprotein(a) (Lp[a]) is a heritable risk factor and carrier of oxidized phospholipids (OxPL). We measured oxidized phospholipids on apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins (OxPL-apoB), Lp(a), IgG, and IgM autoantibodies to malondialdehyde-modified low-density lipoprotein, copper oxidized low-density lipoprotein, and apoB-immune complexes in 386 monozygotic and dizygotic twins to estimate trait heritability (h(2)) and determine specific genetic effects among traits. A genome-wide linkage study followed by genetic association was performed. The h(2) (scale: 0-1) for Lp(a) was 0.91±0.01 and for OxPL-apoB 0.87±0.02, which were higher than physiological, inflammatory, or lipid traits. h(2) of IgM malondialdehyde-modified low-density lipoprotein, copper oxidized low-density lipoprotein, and apoB-immune complexes were 0.69±0.04, 0.67±0.05, and 0.80±0.03, respectively, and for IgG malondialdehyde-modified low-density lipoprotein, copper oxidized low-density lipoprotein, and apoB-immune complexes 0.62±0.05, 0.52±0.06, and 0.53±0.06, respectively. There was an inverse correlation between the major apo(a) isoform and OxPL-apoB (R=-0.49; Plipoprotein and copper oxidized low-density lipoprotein, and apoB-immune complexes. Sib-pair genetic linkage of the Lp(a) trait revealed that single nucleotide polymorphism rs10455872 was significantly associated with OxPL-apoB after adjusting for Lp(a). OxPL-apoB and other biomarkers of oxidized lipoproteins are highly heritable cardiovascular risk factors that suggest novel genetic origins of atherothrombosis. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Heritability of Thoracic Spine Curvature and Genetic Correlations With Other Spine Traits: The Framingham Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yau, Michelle S; Demissie, Serkalem; Zhou, Yanhua; Anderson, Dennis E; Lorbergs, Amanda L; Kiel, Douglas P; Allaire, Brett T; Yang, Laiji; Cupples, L Adrienne; Travison, Thomas G; Bouxsein, Mary L; Karasik, David; Samelson, Elizabeth J

    2017-01-01

    Hyperkyphosis is a common spinal disorder in older adults, characterized by excessive forward curvature of the thoracic spine and adverse health outcomes. The etiology of hyperkyphosis has not been firmly established, but may be related to changes that occur with aging in the vertebrae, discs, joints, and muscles, which function as a unit to support the spine. Determining the contribution of genetics to thoracic spine curvature and the degree of genetic sharing among co-occurring measures of spine health may provide insight into the etiology of hyperkyphosis. The purpose of our study was to estimate heritability of thoracic spine curvature using T4–T12 kyphosis (Cobb) angle and genetic correlations between thoracic spine curvature and vertebral fracture, intervertebral disc height narrowing, facet joint osteoarthritis (OA), lumbar spine volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD), and paraspinal muscle area and density, which were all assessed from computed tomography (CT) images. Participants included 2063 women and men in the second and third generation offspring of the original cohort of the Framingham Study. Heritability of kyphosis angle, adjusted for age, sex, and weight, was 54% (95% confidence interval [CI], 43% to 64%). We found moderate genetic correlations between kyphosis angle and paraspinal muscle area ( ρ^G, −0.46; 95% CI, −0.67 to −0.26), vertebral fracture ( ρ^G, 0.39; 95% CI, 0.18 to 0.61), vBMD ( ρ^G,−0.23; 95% CI, −0.41 to −0.04), and paraspinal muscle density ( ρ^G,−0.22; 95% CI, −0.48 to 0.03). Genetic correlations between kyphosis angle and disc height narrowing ( ρ^G, 0.17; 95% CI, −0.05 to 0.38) and facet joint OA ( ρ^G, 0.05; 95% CI, −0.15 to 0.24) were low. Thoracic spine curvature may be heritable and share genetic factors with other age-related spine traits including trunk muscle size, vertebral fracture, and bone mineral density. PMID:27455046

  14. Heritability of longevity in Large White and Landrace sows using continuous time and grouped data models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sölkner Johann

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Using conventional measurements of lifetime, it is not possible to differentiate between productive and non-productive days during a sow's lifetime and this can lead to estimated breeding values favoring less productive animals. By rescaling the time axis from continuous to several discrete classes, grouped survival data (discrete survival time models can be used instead. Methods The productive life length of 12319 Large White and 9833 Landrace sows was analyzed with continuous scale and grouped data models. Random effect of herd*year, fixed effects of interaction between parity and relative number of piglets, age at first farrowing and annual herd size change were included in the analysis. The genetic component was estimated from sire, sire-maternal grandsire, sire-dam, sire-maternal grandsire and animal models, and the heritabilities computed for each model type in both breeds. Results If age at first farrowing was under 43 weeks or above 60 weeks, the risk of culling sows increased. An interaction between parity and relative litter size was observed, expressed by limited culling during first parity and severe risk increase of culling sows having small litters later in life. In the Landrace breed, heritabilities ranged between 0.05 and 0.08 (s.e. 0.014-0.020 for the continuous and between 0.07 and 0.11 (s.e. 0.016-0.023 for the grouped data models, and in the Large White breed, they ranged between 0.08 and 0.14 (s.e. 0.012-0.026 for the continuous and between 0.08 and 0.13 (s.e. 0.012-0.025 for the grouped data models. Conclusions Heritabilities for length of productive life were similar with continuous time and grouped data models in both breeds. Based on these results and because grouped data models better reflect the economical needs in meat animals, we conclude that grouped data models are more appropriate in pig.

  15. The cortisol response to ACTH in pigs, heritability and influence of corticosteroid-binding globulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larzul, C; Terenina, E; Foury, A; Billon, Y; Louveau, I; Merlot, E; Mormede, P

    2015-12-01

    In the search for biological basis of robustness, this study aimed (i) at the determination of the heritability of the cortisol response to ACTH in juvenile pigs, using restricted maximum likelihood methodology applied to a multiple trait animal model, and (ii) at the study of the relationships between basal and stimulated cortisol levels with corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG), IGF-I and haptoglobin, all important players in glucose metabolism and production traits. At 6 weeks of age, 298 intact male and female piglets from 30 litters (30 dams and 30 boars) were injected with 250 µg ACTH(1-24) (Synacthen). Blood was taken before ACTH injection to measure basal levels of cortisol, glucose, CBG, IGF-I and haptoglobin, and 60 min later to measure stimulated cortisol levels and glucose. Cortisol increased 2.8-fold after ACTH injection, with a high correlation between basal and stimulated levels (phenotypic correlation, r p=0.539; genetic correlation, r g=0.938). Post-ACTH cortisol levels were highly heritable (h 2=0.684) and could therefore be used for genetic selection of animals with a more reactive hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis. CBG binding capacity correlated with cortisol levels measured in basal conditions in males only. No correlation was found between CBG binding capacity and post-ACTH cortisol levels. Basal IGF-I concentration was positively correlated with BW at birth and weaning, and showed a high correlation with CBG binding capacity with a strong sexual dimorphism, the correlation being much higher in males than in females. Basal haptoglobin concentrations were negatively correlated with CBG binding capacity and IGF-I concentrations. Complex relationships were also found between circulating glucose levels and these different variables that have been shown to be related to glucose resistance in humans. These data are therefore valuable for the genetic selection of animals to explore the consequences on production and robustness traits, but

  16. Phenotypic plasticity and modularity allow for the production of novel mosaic phenotypes in ants

    OpenAIRE

    Londe, Sylvain; Monnin, Thibaud; Cornette, Raphaël; Debat, Vincent; Brian L Fisher; Molet, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Background: The origin of discrete novelties remains unclear. Some authors suggest that qualitative phenotypic changes may result from the reorganization of preexisting phenotypic traits during development (i.e., developmental recombination) following genetic or environmental changes. Because ants combine high modularity with extreme phenotypic plasticity (queen and worker castes), their diversified castes could have evolved by developmental recombination. We performed...

  17. Sex hormone binding globulin phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornelisse, M M; Bennett, Patrick; Christiansen, M

    1994-01-01

    Human sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) is encoded by a normal and a variant allele. The resulting SHBG phenotypes (the homozygous normal SHBG, the heterozygous SHBG and the homozygous variant SHBG phenotype) can be distinguished by their electrophoretic patterns. We developed a novel detection....... This method of detection was used to determine the distribution of SHBG phenotypes in healthy controls of both sexes and in five different pathological conditions characterized by changes in the SHBG level or endocrine disturbances (malignant and benign ovarian neoplasms, hirsutism, liver cirrhosis...... on the experimental values. Differences in SHBG phenotypes do not appear to have any clinical significance and no sex difference was found in the SHBG phenotype distribution....

  18. GIT2 acts as a potential keystone protein in functional hypothalamic networks associated with age-related phenotypic changes in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne Chadwick

    Full Text Available The aging process affects every tissue in the body and represents one of the most complicated and highly integrated inevitable physiological entities. The maintenance of good health during the aging process likely relies upon the coherent regulation of hormonal and neuronal communication between the central nervous system and the periphery. Evidence has demonstrated that the optimal regulation of energy usage in both these systems facilitates healthy aging. However, the proteomic effects of aging in regions of the brain vital for integrating energy balance and neuronal activity are not well understood. The hypothalamus is one of the main structures in the body responsible for sustaining an efficient interaction between energy balance and neurological activity. Therefore, a greater understanding of the effects of aging in the hypothalamus may reveal important aspects of overall organismal aging and may potentially reveal the most crucial protein factors supporting this vital signaling integration. In this study, we examined alterations in protein expression in the hypothalami of young, middle-aged, and old rats. Using novel combinatorial bioinformatics analyses, we were able to gain a better understanding of the proteomic and phenotypic changes that occur during the aging process and have potentially identified the G protein-coupled receptor/cytoskeletal-associated protein GIT2 as a vital integrator and modulator of the normal aging process.

  19. Molecular phenotyping of lignin-modified tobacco reveals associated changes in cell-wall metabolism, primary metabolism, stress metabolism and photorespiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauwe, Rebecca; Morreel, Kris; Goeminne, Geert; Gielen, Birgit; Rohde, Antje; Van Beeumen, Jos; Ralph, John; Boudet, Alain-Michel; Kopka, Joachim; Rochange, Soizic F; Halpin, Claire; Messens, Eric; Boerjan, Wout

    2007-10-01

    Lignin is an important component of secondarily thickened cell walls. Cinnamoyl CoA reductase (CCR) and cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) are two key enzymes that catalyse the penultimate and last steps in the biosynthesis of the monolignols. Downregulation of CCR in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) has been shown to reduce lignin content, whereas lignin in tobacco downregulated for CAD incorporates more aldehydes. We show that altering the expression of either or both genes in tobacco has far-reaching consequences on the transcriptome and metabolome. cDNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism-based transcript profiling, combined with HPLC and GC-MS-based metabolite profiling, revealed differential transcripts and metabolites within monolignol biosynthesis, as well as a substantial network of interactions between monolignol and other metabolic pathways. In general, in all transgenic lines, the phenylpropanoid biosynthetic pathway was downregulated, whereas starch mobilization was upregulated. CCR-downregulated lines were characterized by changes at the level of detoxification and carbohydrate metabolism, whereas the molecular phenotype of CAD-downregulated tobacco was enriched in transcript of light- and cell-wall-related genes. In addition, the transcript and metabolite data suggested photo-oxidative stress and increased photorespiration, mainly in the CCR-downregulated lines. These predicted effects on the photosynthetic apparatus were subsequently confirmed physiologically by fluorescence and gas-exchange measurements. Our data provide a molecular picture of a plant's response to altered monolignol biosynthesis.

  20. Estimating heritability for cause specific mortality based on twin studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheike, Thomas; Holst, Klaus Kähler; von Bornemann Hjelmborg, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    There has been considerable interest in studying the magnitude and type of inheritance of specific diseases. This is typically derived from family or twin studies, where the basic idea is to compare the correlation for different pairs that share different amount of genes. We here consider data from...... the Danish twin registry and discuss how to define heritability for cancer occurrence. The key point is that this should be done taking censoring as well as competing risks due to e.g.  death into account. We describe the dependence between twins on the probability scale and show that various models can...... be used to achieve sensible estimates of the dependence within monozygotic and dizygotic twin pairs that may vary over time. These dependence measures can subsequently be decomposed into a genetic and environmental component using random effects models. We here present several novel models that in essence...

  1. Marfan Syndrome and Related Heritable Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Dissections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Backer, Julie; Renard, Marjolijn; Campens, Laurence; Mosquera, Laura Muino; De Paepe, Anne; Coucke, Paul; Callewaert, Bert; Kodolitsch, Yskert von

    2015-01-01

    In this overview we aim to address a number of recent insights and developments regarding clinical aspects, etiology, and treatment of Heritable Thoracic Aortic Disease (H-TAD). We will focus on monogenetic disorders related to aortic aneurysms. H-TADs are rare but they provide a unique basis for the study of underlying pathogenetic pathways in the complex disease process of aneurysm formation. The understanding of pathomechanisms may help us to identify medical treatment targets to improve prognosis. Among the monogenetic aneurysm disorders, Marfan syndrome is considered as a paradigm entity and many insights are derived from the study of clinical, genetic and animal models for Marfan syndrome. We will therefore first provide a detailed overview of the various aspects of Marfan syndrome after which we will give an overview of related H-TAD entities.

  2. Human-directed social behaviour in dogs shows significant heritability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, M E; Roth, L S V; Johnsson, M; Wright, D; Jensen, P

    2015-04-01

    Through domestication and co-evolution with humans, dogs have developed abilities to attract human attention, e.g. in a manner of seeking assistance when faced with a problem solving task. The aims of this study were to investigate within breed variation in human-directed contact seeking in dogs and to estimate its genetic basis. To do this, 498 research beagles, bred and kept under standardized conditions, were tested in an unsolvable problem task. Contact seeking behaviours recorded included both eye contact and physical interactions. Behavioural data was summarized through a principal component analysis, resulting in four components: test interactions, social interactions, eye contact and physical contact. Females scored significantly higher on social interactions and physical contact and age had an effect on eye contact scores. Narrow sense heritabilities (h(2) ) of the two largest components were estimated at 0.32 and 0.23 but were not significant for the last two components. These results show that within the studied dog population, behavioural variation in human-directed social behaviours was sex dependent and that the utilization of eye contact seeking increased with age and experience. Hence, heritability estimates indicate a significant genetic contribution to the variation found in human-directed social interactions, suggesting that social skills in dogs have a genetic basis, but can also be shaped and enhanced through individual experiences. This research gives the opportunity to further investigate the genetics behind dogs' social skills, which could also play a significant part into research on human social disorders such as autism.

  3. Workshop phenotyping, genotyping, breeding, reproduction techniques and evaluating alternative crop species for adaptation to climate change - State-of-art and opportunities for further cooperation, 27-28 October 2016, Wageningen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekhorst, te D.

    2016-01-01

    The workshop highlighted opportunities, gaps, needs and priorities for novel breeding techniques like phenotyping for resilience under climate change. Starting with four key presentations, the scene was set from the perspectives of policy, end-users and science, accompanied by an overview of phenoty

  4. Workshop phenotyping, genotyping, breeding, reproduction techniques and evaluating alternative crop species for adaptation to climate change - State-of-art and opportunities for further cooperation, 27-28 October 2016, Wageningen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekhorst, te D.

    2016-01-01

    The workshop highlighted opportunities, gaps, needs and priorities for novel breeding techniques like phenotyping for resilience under climate change. Starting with four key presentations, the scene was set from the perspectives of policy, end-users and science, accompanied by an overview of phenoty

  5. Sex-Specific Life Course Changes in the Neuro-Metabolic Phenotype of Glut3 Null Heterozygous Mice: Ketogenic Diet Ameliorates Electroencephalographic Seizures and Improves Sociability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yun; Zhao, Yuanzi; Tomi, Masatoshi; Shin, Bo-Chul; Thamotharan, Shanthie; Mazarati, Andrey; Sankar, Raman; Wang, Elizabeth A; Cepeda, Carlos; Levine, Michael S; Zhang, Jingjing; Frew, Andrew; Alger, Jeffry R; Clark, Peter M; Sondhi, Monica; Kositamongkol, Sudatip; Leibovitch, Leah; Devaskar, Sherin U

    2017-04-01

    We tested the hypothesis that exposure of glut3+/- mice to a ketogenic diet ameliorates autism-like features, which include aberrant behavior and electrographic seizures. We first investigated the life course sex-specific changes in basal plasma-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)-brain metabolic profile, brain glucose transport/uptake, glucose and monocarboxylate transporter proteins, and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in the presence or absence of systemic insulin administration. Glut3+/- male but not female mice (5 months of age) displayed reduced CSF glucose/lactate concentrations with no change in brain Glut1, Mct2, glucose uptake or ATP. Exogenous insulin-induced hypoglycemia increased brain glucose uptake in glut3+/- males alone. Higher plasma-CSF ketones (β-hydroxybutyrate) and lower brain Glut3 in females vs males proved protective in the former while enhancing vulnerability in the latter. As a consequence, increased synaptic proteins (neuroligin4 and SAPAP1) with spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic activity subsequently reduced hippocampal glucose content and increased brain amyloid β1-40 deposition in an age-dependent manner in glut3+/- males but not females (4 to 24 months of age). We then explored the protective effect of a ketogenic diet on ultrasonic vocalization, sociability, spatial learning and memory, and electroencephalogram seizures in male mice (7 days to 6 to 8 months of age) alone. A ketogenic diet partially restored sociability without affecting perturbed vocalization, spatial learning and memory, and reduced seizure events. We conclude that (1) sex-specific and age-dependent perturbations underlie the phenotype of glut3+/- mice, and (2) a ketogenic diet ameliorates seizures caused by increased cortical excitation and improves sociability, but fails to rescue vocalization and cognitive deficits in glut3+/- male mice. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society.

  6. Phenotypes and genotypes of old and contemporary porcine strains indicate a temporal change in the S. aureus population structure in pigs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Espinosa-Gongora

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus sequence type ST398 has recently gained attention due to the spread of methicillin-resistant strains among people exposed to livestock. The aim of this study was to explore temporal changes in the population structure of S. aureus in pigs over the last 40 years with particular reference to the occurrence of ST398.We analysed a unique collection of 91 porcine strains isolated in six countries between 1973 and 2009 using a biotyping scheme described in the 1970's in combination with spa typing and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST. The collection comprised 32 historical isolates from 1973-1974 (n = 19 and from 1991-2003 (n = 13, and 59 contemporary isolates from 2004-2009. The latter isolates represented the most common MLST types (ST1, ST9, ST97 and ST433 and spa types isolated from pigs in Europe.S. aureus sequence type ST398 was not found among old isolates from the 1970's or from 1991-2003, suggesting that this lineage was absent or present at low frequencies in pigs in the past. This hypothesis is supported by the observed association of ST398 with the ovine ecovar, which was not described in pigs by studies carried out in the 1970's. In addition, various phenotypic and genotypic differences were observed between old and contemporary isolates. Some biotypes commonly reported in pigs in the 1970's were either absent (human ecovar or rare (biotype A among contemporary isolates. Nine clonal lineages found among old porcine isolates are occasionally reported in pigs today (ST8, ST30, ST97, ST387, ST1092, ST2468 or have never been described in this animal host (ST12, ST133, ST1343. These results indicate that the population structure of porcine S. aureus has changed over the last 40 years and confirm the current theory that S. aureus ST398 does not originate from pigs.

  7. Relationships between body condition score change, prior mid-lactation phenotypic residual feed intake, and hyperketonemia onset in transition dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathbun, Francesca M; Pralle, Ryan S; Bertics, Sandra J; Armentano, Louis E; Cho, K; Do, C; Weigel, Kent A; White, Heather M

    2017-05-01

    Extensive efforts have been made to identify more feed-efficient dairy cows, yet it is unclear how selection for feed efficiency will influence metabolic health. The objectives of this research were to determine the relationships between residual feed intake (RFI), a measure of feed efficiency, body condition score (BCS) change, and hyperketonemia (HYK) incidence. Blood and milk samples were collected twice weekly from cows 5 to 18 d postcalving for a total of 4 samples. Hyperketonemia was diagnosed at a blood β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) ≥1.2 mmol/L and cows were treated upon diagnosis. Dry period, calving, and final blood sampling BCS was recorded. Prior mid-lactation production, body weight, body weight change, and dry matter intake (DMI) data were used to determine RFI phenotype, calculated as the difference between observed DMI and predicted DMI. The maximum BHB concentration (BHBmax) for each cow was used to group cows into HYK or not hyperketonemic. Lactation number, BCS, and RFI data were analyzed with linear and quadratic orthogonal contrasts. Of the 570 cows sampled, 19.7% were diagnosed with HYK. The first positive HYK test occurred at 9 ± 0.9 d postpartum and the average BHB concentration at the first positive HYK test was 1.53 ± 0.14 mmol/L. In the first 30 d postpartum, HYK-positive cows had increased milk yield and fat concentration, decreased milk protein concentration, and decreased somatic cell count. Cows with a dry BCS ≥4.0, or that lost 1 or more BCS unit across the transition to lactation period, had greater BHBmax than cows with lower BCS. Prior-lactation RFI did not alter BHBmax. Avoiding over conditioning of dry cows and subsequent excessive fat mobilization during the transition period may decrease HYK incidence; however, RFI during a prior lactation does not appear to be associated with HYK onset. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Circadian system heritability as assessed by wrist temperature: a twin study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Minguez, Jesus; Ordoñana, Juan R; Sánchez-Romera, Juan F; Madrid, Juan A; Garaulet, Marta

    2015-02-01

    Previous research shows that wrist temperature (WT) is a good marker to assess the circadian system health in different circumstances. However, no studies have been performed in order to know the genetic component of this circadian marker. For this purpose, the aim was to determine, using classical twin models, the relative genetic and environmental influences on WT. The study was performed in 53 pairs of female twins (28 monozygotic (MZ) and 25 dizygotic (DZ)), with a body mass index 25.9 ± 3.78 and mean age 52 ± 6 years. The sample was selected from the Murcia Twin Register. Circadian patterns were studied by analyzing WT during one week every 10 min "Circadianware®". Genetic influences to WT variability were estimated by comparing correlations of MZ and DZ twin pairs and fitting genetic structural equation models to measured variables. MZ twins showed higher intra-pair correlations than DZ twins for most of the parameters. Genetic factors were responsible for between 46% and 70% of variance (broad sense heritability) in parameters such as mean temperature, mesor, acrophase, Rayleigh test, percentage of rhythmicity and f