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Sample records for hereditary skin cancer

  1. Is Pancreatic Cancer Hereditary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Board Patient Education / Basics of Pancreatic Cancer Is pancreatic cancer hereditary? Cancer of the pancreas is a genetic ... found in cigarette smoke. The genetics of hereditary pancreatic cancer is a focus of research at Johns Hopkins. ...

  2. [Hereditary ovarian cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zikán, M; Foretová, L; Cibula, D; Kotlas, J; Pohlreich, P

    2006-05-01

    This article reviews the topic of hereditary ovarian cancer, describes persons at risk of hereditary disposition to cancer and gives instructions for genetic counselling and molecular analysis, including contacts to specialized centres in the Czech Republic. Review. Institute of Biochemistry and Experimental Oncology, Charles University in Prague. Hereditary ovarian cancer occurs in three autosomal dominant syndromes: appropriate hereditary ovarian cancer (HOC), hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) and hereditary non-poliposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). Physician in practice or specialist at the clinic should focus interest on patients form families with frequent occurrence of breast and/or ovarian cancer, patients with early onset disease or tumour duplicity (breast and ovarian cancer). Hereditary disposition to ovarian (and breast) cancer could be assessed by molecular genetic analysis of two main susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, or other genes in families with diverse tumours. Molecular genetic analysis should be in any cases indicated by experienced clinical genetic. In the Czech Republic, the consensus of genetic and clinical care of risk patients was published and specialized centres for families with hereditary predisposition were settled in Prague and Brno. Persons with hereditary susceptibility to cancer constitute noted group where painstaking dispensarisation and preventive care may prevent malignancy or detect it in the early stage.

  3. HEREDITARY BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Bit-Sava

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary breast cancer occurs in 5–20 % of cases and it is associated with inherited mutations in particular genes, such as BRCA1 и BRCA2 in most cases. The CHEK2, PTEN, TP53, ATM, RAD51, BLM, PALB2, Nbs genes are associated with low and median risks ofdeveloping breast cancer. Molecular genetic studies identify germinal mutations underlying hereditary breast cancer. In most cases hereditary breast cancer refers to triple-negative phenotype, which is the most aggressive type of breast cancer, that does not express the genes for estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2. The review presents the diagnostic and treatment methods of hereditary breast cancer. Clinical-morphological aspects allow the new diagnostic and treatment methods of hereditary breast cancer to be identified. Poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP inhibitors demonstrate the potential for effective treatment of BRCA-associated breast cancer.

  4. Hereditary gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Carla; Seruca, Raquel; Carneiro, Fátima

    2009-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a heterogeneous and highly prevalent disease, being the fourth most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer associated death worldwide. Most cases are sporadic and familial clustering is observed in about 10% of the cases. Hereditary gastric cancer accounts for a very low percentage of cases (1-3%) and a single hereditary syndrome - Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer (HDGC) - has been characterised. Among families that fulfil the clinical criteria for HDGC, about 40% carry CDH1 germline mutations, the genetic cause of the others being unknown. The management options for CDH1 asymptomatic germline carriers are intensive endoscopic surveillance and prophylactic gastrectomy. In this chapter we review the pathophysiology and clinicopathological features of HDGC and discuss issues related with genetic testing and management of family members.

  5. Hereditary cancer syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahner, Nils; Steinke, Verena

    2008-10-01

    Persons carrying mutations for hereditary cancer syndromes are at high risk for the development of tumors at an early age, as well as the synchronous or metachronous development of multiple tumors of the corresponding tumor spectrum. The genetic causes of many hereditary cancer syndromes have already been identified. About 5% of all cancers are part of a hereditary cancer syndrome. Selective literature review, including evidence-based guidelines and recommendations. Clinical criteria are currently available according to which many hereditary cancer syndromes can be diagnosed or suspected and which point the way to further molecular genetic analysis. A physician can easily determine whether these criteria are met by directed questioning about the patient's personal and family medical history. The identification of the causative germ line mutation in the family allows confirmation of the diagnosis in the affected individual and opens up the option of predictive testing in healthy relatives. Mutation carriers for hereditary cancer syndromes need long-term medical surveillance in a specialized center. It is important that these persons should be identified in the primary care setting and then referred for genetic counseling if molecular genetic testing is to be performed in a targeted, rational manner.

  6. Managing hereditary ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mourits, M. J.; de Bock, G. H.

    2009-01-01

    In this review we present an overview of recent developments in the management of hereditary ovarian cancer. Until recently, intensive screening of the ovaries was recommended to mutation carriers and their first-degree female relatives. However, since screening is not effective in detecting

  7. Hereditary breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Martin J; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 are only detected in 25% of families with a strong history of breast cancer, though hereditary factors are expected to be involved in the remaining families with no recognized mutation. Molecular characterization is expected to provide new insight...... into the tumor biology to guide the search of new high-risk alleles and provide better classification of the growing number of BRCA1/2 variants of unknown significance (VUS). In this review, we provide an overview of hereditary breast cancer, its genetic background, and clinical implications, before focusing...... on the pathologically and molecular features associated with the disease. Recent transcriptome and genome profiling studies of tumor series from BRCA1/2 mutation carriers as well as familial non-BRCA1/2 will be discussed. Special attention is paid to its association with molecular breast cancer subtypes as well...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary diffuse gastric cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Conditions Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) is an inherited disorder that greatly increases ...

  9. Hereditary colorectal cancer diagnostics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarskov, Louise; Holck, Susanne; Bernstein, Inge

    2012-01-01

    BackgroundThe hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) subset of tumours can broadly be divided into tumours caused by an underlying mismatch-repair gene mutation, referred to as Lynch syndrome, and those that develop in families with similar patterns of heredity but without disease......-predisposing germline mismatch repair mutations, referred to as familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX). Recognition of HNPCC-associated colorectal cancers is central since surveillance programmes effectively reduce morbidity and mortality. The characteristic morphological features linked to Lynch syndrome can aid...... in the identification of this subset, whereas the possibility to use morphological features as an indicator of FCCTX is uncertain.Objective and methodsTo perform a detailed morphological evaluation of HNPCC-associated colorectal cancers and demonstrate significant differences between tumours associated with FCCTX...

  10. Hereditary Renal Cancer Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Naomi B.

    2013-01-01

    Inherited susceptibility to kidney cancer is a fascinating and complex topic. Our knowledge about types of genetic syndromes associated with an increased risk of disease is continually expanding. Currently, there are 10 syndromes associated with an increased risk of all types of renal cancer, which are reviewed herein. Clear cell renal cancer is associated with von Hippel Lindau disease, chromosome 3 translocations, PTEN hamartomatous syndrome and mutations in BAP1, as well as several of the genes encoding the proteins comprising the succinate dehydrogenase complex (SDHB/C/D). Type 1 papillary renal cancers arise in conjunction with germline mutations in MET and type 2 as part of Hereditary Leiomyomatosis and Renal Cell Cancer (FH mutations). Chromophone and oncocytic renal cancers are predominantly associated with Birt Hogg Dubé syndrome. Angiomyolipomas are commonly and their malignant counterpart epitheliod angiomyolipomas rarely are found in patients with Tuberous Sclerosis Complex. The targeted therapeutic options for the renal cancer associated with these diseases are just starting to expand, and are an area of active clinical research. PMID:24359990

  11. [Hereditary and familial colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaguer, Francesc

    2014-09-01

    Up to 5% of all colorectal cancer cases are caused by a known hereditary syndrome. These hereditary types often need a higher degree of clinical suspicion to be diagnosed and require specific and specialized management. In addition, diagnosing hereditary colorectal cancer has significant consequences not only for the patient, for whom there are effective preventative measures, but also for their families, who could be carriers of the condition. The most significant advances in the field of colorectal cancer have come from the diagnosis and characterization of these syndromes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Skin deposits in hereditary cystatin C amyloidosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benedikz, Eirikur; Blöndal, H; Gudmundsson, G

    1990-01-01

    . Skin from 12 individuals who served as controls and skin from 14 close relatives of the patients was negative for amyloid. Punch biopsy of the skin is a simple procedure which is of value for the diagnosis of HCCA, even before the appearance of clinical symptoms. This method might also be of use......Clinically normal skin from 47 individuals aged 9-70 years was investigated. Cystatin C amyloid deposits were found in various locations of the skin by light and/or electron microscopy, in all 12 patients with a clinical history of hereditary cystatin C amyloidosis (HCCA). Six asymptomatic...... individuals, who had the Alu 1 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) marker reported to cosegregate with the disease, also had cystatin C amyloid deposits in the skin. Three asymptomatic individuals (age 17-46) belonging to the HCCA families were without amyloid in the skin but had Alu 1 RFLP marker...

  13. Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States. The two most common types ... face, neck, hands, and arms. Another type of skin cancer, melanoma, is more dangerous but less common. Anyone ...

  14. Pathology of hereditary breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    van der Groep, Petra; van der Wall, Elsken; van Diest, Paul J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Hereditary breast cancer runs in families where several members in different generations are affected. Most of these breast cancers are caused by mutations in the high penetrance genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 accounting for about 5% of all breast cancers. Other genes that include CHEK2, PTEN, TP53, ATM, STK11/LKB1, CDH1, NBS1, RAD50, BRIP1 and PALB2 have been described to be high or moderate penetrance breast cancer susceptibility genes, all contributing to the hereditary breast cancer spe...

  15. Immunophenotyping of hereditary breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Groep, P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304810789

    2009-01-01

    Hereditary breast cancer runs in families where several family members in different generations are affected. Most of these breast cancers are caused by mutations in the high penetrance genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 which account for about 5% of all breast cancers. However, mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 may

  16. Drug therapy for hereditary cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imyanitov Evgeny N

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Tumors arising in patients with hereditary cancer syndromes may have distinct drug sensitivity as compared to their sporadic counterparts. Breast and ovarian neoplasms from BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers are characterized by deficient homologous recombination (HR of DNA, that makes them particularly sensitive to platinum compounds or inhibitors of poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP. Outstandingly durable complete responses to high dose chemotherapy have been observed in several cases of BRCA-related metastatic breast cancer (BC. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that women with BRCA1-related BC may derive less benefit from taxane-based treatment than other categories of BC patients. There is virtually no reports directly assessing drug response in hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC patients; studies involving non-selected (i.e., both sporadic and hereditary CRC with high-level microsatellite instability (MSI-H suggest therapeutic advantage of irinotecan. Celecoxib has been approved for the treatment of familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP. Hereditary medullary thyroid cancers (MTC have been shown to be highly responsive to a multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor vandetanib, which exerts specific activity towards mutated RET receptor. Given the rapidly improving accessibility of DNA analysis, it is foreseen that the potential predictive value of cancer-associated germ-line mutations will be increasingly considered in the future studies.

  17. Hereditary aspects of prostate cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    McLellan, D. L.; Norman, R. W.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review current literature on the hereditary aspects of prostate cancer and to evaluate the importance of family history in history taking and screening for prostate cancer. DATA SOURCES: MEDLINE was searched for articles in English or French published between Jan. 1, 1956, and Oct. 31, 1994, with the use of MeSH headings "prostatic neoplasms," "genetics" and "chromosomes." Additional references were selected from the bibliographies of articles found during the search. STUDY SELE...

  18. Oncologic Management of Hereditary Colorectal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Yacoub, George; Nagalla, Srikanth; Aklilu, Mebea

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common cancer in females and the third most common cancer diagnosed in males. Familial CRC comprises ~20 to 30% of all CRC cases. Lynch syndrome (LS), previously called hereditary nonpolyposis CRC (HNPCC), is the most common of the hereditary CRC syndromes. In this review, the oncological management of hereditary colorectal cancer from the medical oncologist perspective is discussed with special emphasis on Lynch syndrome. Lynch syndrome is character...

  19. SEOM clinical guidelines for hereditary cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graña, Begoña; Lastra, Enrique; Llort, Gemma; Brunet, Joan; Isla, Dolores

    2011-08-01

    Research in genetics has facilitated the identification of highly penetrant genes responsible for a large number of diseases. In the oncology field, genetic counselling and gene testing are focused on the two most common syndromes in familial cancer: hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome (HBOC) and hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer or Lynch syndrome (LS). The objective of this guideline in hereditary cancer is to summarise the current state of knowledge and make recommendations in the areas of diagnosis, prevention and treatment of hereditary cancer.

  20. Hereditary bladder cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.

    2008-01-01

    First degree relatives of patients with bladder cancer have a two-fold increased risk of bladder cancer but high-risk bladder cancer families are extremely rare. There is no clear Mendelian inheritance pattern that can explain the increased familial risk. This makes classical linkage studies for the

  1. [Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lax, S F

    2017-05-01

    Hereditary breast and ovarian carcinomas are frequently caused by germline mutations of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes (BRCA1/2 syndromes) and are often less associated with other hereditary syndromes such as Li-Fraumeni and Peutz-Jeghers. The BRCA1/2 proteins have a special role in DNA repair. Therefore, loss of function due to mutation causes an accumulation of mutations in other genes and subsequent tumorigenesis at an early age. BRCA1/2 mutations are irregularly distributed over the length of the genes without hot spots, although special mutations are known. Breast and ovarian cancer occur far more frequently in women with BRCA1/2 germline mutations compared with the general population. Breast cancer occurs increasingly from the age of 30, ovarian cancer in BRCA1 syndrome from the age of 40 and BRCA2 from the age of 50. Suspicion of a BRCA syndrome should be prompted in the case of clustering of breast cancer in 1st degree relatives, in particular at a young age, if breast and ovarian cancer have occurred, and if cases of male breast cancer are known. Breast carcinomas with medullary differentiation seem to predominate in BRCA syndromes, but other carcinoma types may also occur. BRCA germline mutations seem to occur frequently in triple-negative breast carcinomas, whereas an association with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is rare. Ovarian carcinomas in BRCA syndromes are usually high-grade serous, mucinous carcinomas and borderline tumors are unusual. Pathology plays a special role within the multidisciplinary team in the recognition of patients with hereditary cancer syndromes.

  2. Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Finn Cilius; Hansen, Thomas van Overeem; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard

    2016-01-01

    Genetic abnormalities in the DNA repair genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 predispose to hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC). However, only approximately 25% of cases of HBOC can be ascribed to BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. Recently, exome sequencing has uncovered substantial locus heterogeneity among...... of putative causal variants and the clinical application of new HBOC genes in cancer risk management and treatment decision-making....... affected families without BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. The new pathogenic variants are rare, posing challenges to estimation of risk attribution through patient cohorts. In this Review article, we examine HBOC genes, focusing on their role in genome maintenance, the possibilities for functional testing...

  3. Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gastric cancer in the world are in China, Japan, and other countries in Southeast Asia, as well ... of people with this syndrome. Additional screening for women: Women at risk for HDGC are at high ...

  4. Role of detection of microsatellite instability in Chinese with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer or ordinary hereditary colorectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Wen-Zhi; Jin, Feng; ZHANG, ZHEN-HAI; Wang, Shu-Bao

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To detect microsatellite instability (MSI) in patients with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer or ordinary hereditary colorectal cancer and to provide criteria for screening the kindreds with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer at molecular level.

  5. Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Post, Rachel S; Vogelaar, Ingrid P; Carneiro, Fátima

    2015-01-01

    Germline CDH1 mutations confer a high lifetime risk of developing diffuse gastric (DGC) and lobular breast cancer (LBC). A multidisciplinary workshop was organised to discuss genetic testing, surgery, surveillance strategies, pathology reporting and the patient's perspective on multiple aspects......, including diet post gastrectomy. The updated guidelines include revised CDH1 testing criteria (taking into account first-degree and second-degree relatives): (1) families with two or more patients with gastric cancer at any age, one confirmed DGC; (2) individuals with DGC before the age of 40 and (3......) families with diagnoses of both DGC and LBC (one diagnosis before the age of 50). Additionally, CDH1 testing could be considered in patients with bilateral or familial LBC before the age of 50, patients with DGC and cleft lip/palate, and those with precursor lesions for signet ring cell carcinoma. Given...

  6. Hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes and genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaron, Carole; Leach, Brandie H; Burke, Carol A

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer and cancer deaths in the Western world. Approximately 5-10% of CRC are hereditary, due to a defined genetic cause. Individuals and families affected with a hereditary CRC syndrome exhibit benign and malignant extra-intestinal tumors, require aggressive cancer screening and benefit from management by a multi-disciplinary team of professionals. The clinical manifestations, genetic causes and current management of patients with hereditary colon cancer syndrome is provided. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Hereditary & familial colorectal cancer : Identification, characteristics, surveillance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kallenberg, F.G.J.

    2017-01-01

    Of all colorectal cancer (CRC) cases, 15-20% is related to familial or hereditary factors. Diagnosing familial and hereditary CRC syndromes is important for several reasons. One of these is that surveillance colonoscopies can reduce CRC incidence and mortality importantly. A complete family history

  8. Skin Cancer Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Host a Fundraising Event | About Us | Store The Skin Cancer Foundation The Skin Cancer Foundation is the only ... Handbook A "Sunscreen Gene"? Skin Cancer Facts & Statistics Skin Cancer Treatment Glossary Information on medications and procedures The ...

  9. Skin Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Skin Cancer Skin Cancer Screening Research Skin Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Skin Cancer ... Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) depends mostly ...

  10. Therapeutic Strategies for Hereditary Kidney Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidana, Abhinav; Srinivasan, Ramaprasad

    2016-08-01

    The study of hereditary forms of kidney cancer has vastly increased our understanding of metabolic and genetic pathways involved in the development of both inherited and sporadic kidney cancers. The recognition that diverse molecular events drive different forms of kidney cancers has led to the preclinical and clinical development of specific pathway-directed strategies tailored to treat distinct subgroups of kidney cancer. Here, we describe the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of several different types of hereditary renal cancers, review their clinical characteristics, and summarize the treatment strategies for the management of these cancers.

  11. Diagnostic Approach to Hereditary Colorectal Cancer Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalady, Matthew F.; Heald, Brandie

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 5 to 10% of colorectal cancers develop within a known hereditary syndrome. Specific underlying genetic mutations drive the clinical phenotype and it is imperative to determine the genetic etiology to provide meaningful surveillance and intervention. Recognizing potential patients and families with a hereditary predisposition is the first step in management. Syndromes can be categorized according to polyp burden as polyposis or nonpolyposis. Clinical assessment should start with a personal and family medical history, physical examination, and evaluation for the presence and type of colorectal polyps or cancers. Key information is gained from these simple steps and should guide the specific genetic analysis for diagnosis. Genetic counseling is a critical component to any hereditary colorectal cancer program and should be conducted before genetic testing to provide education about the implications of test results. This review focuses on the thought process that drives initial clinical evaluation and guides genetic testing for patients with suspected hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes. PMID:26664327

  12. [Preventive resection of hereditary diffuse gastric cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogerbrugge-van der Linden, N.; Ligtenberg, M.J.L.; Nagengast, F.M.; Bonenkamp, J.J.; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van

    2006-01-01

    Hereditary diffuse gastric cancers are rare, accounting for at most 1-3% of gastric cancers. It can be caused by a mutation in the tumour-suppressor gene CDH1. A healthy person carrying a CDH1 mutation has a cumulative risk of developing gastric cancer of 70-80%. In most cases, gastric cancer is

  13. Gynecologic screening in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijcken, FEM; Mourits, MJE; Kleibeuker, JH; Hollema, H; van der Zee, AGJ

    2003-01-01

    Objective. In hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), women with a mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutation have a cumulative lifetime risk of 25-50% for endometrial cancer and 8-12% for ovarian cancer. Therefore, female members of HNPCC families are offered an annual gynecologic and

  14. Anyone Can Get Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Skin Cancer Skin Cancer Screening Research Anyone Can Get Skin Cancer Order the free Anyone Can ... rarely, younger children can develop skin cancer. How can people with dark skin get skin cancer? Although ...

  15. Risks of Skin Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Skin Cancer Skin Cancer Screening Research Skin Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? Go to ... all skin colors can get skin cancer. Skin Cancer Screening Key Points Tests are used to screen for ...

  16. The Korean Hereditary Breast Cancer Study: Review and Future Perspectives

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kang, Eunyoung; Kim, Sung-Won

    2013-01-01

    .... In 2007, the Korean Hereditary Breast Cancer (KOHBRA) Study was established to obtain evidence for the accurate risk assessment and management of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) in Korea...

  17. Clinical management of hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasen, Hans F A; Tomlinson, Ian; Castells, Antoni

    2015-02-01

    Hereditary factors are involved in the development of a substantial proportion of all cases of colorectal cancer. Inherited forms of colorectal cancer are usually subdivided into polyposis syndromes characterized by the development of multiple colorectal polyps and nonpolyposis syndromes characterized by the development of few or no polyps. Timely identification of hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes is vital because patient participation in early detection programmes prevents premature death due to cancer. Polyposis syndromes are fairly easy to recognize, but some patients might have characteristics that overlap with other clinically defined syndromes. Comprehensive analysis of the genes known to be associated with polyposis syndromes helps to establish the final diagnosis in these patients. Recognizing Lynch syndrome is more difficult than other polyposis syndromes owing to the absence of pathognomonic features. Most investigators therefore recommend performing systematic molecular analysis of all newly diagnosed colorectal cancer using immunohistochemical methods. The implementation in clinical practice of new high-throughput methods for molecular analysis might further increase the identification of individuals at risk of hereditary colorectal cancer. This Review describes the clinical management of the various hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes and demonstrates the advantage of using a classification based on the underlying gene defects.

  18. Skin Cancer Can Strike Anyone

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Skin Cancer Skin Cancer Can Strike Anyone Past Issues / Summer 2013 Table ... 76,690; deaths: 9,480. Read More "Skin Cancer" Articles Skin Cancer Can Strike Anyone / Skin Cancer: Biology, Risk ...

  19. Hereditary Colorectal Cancer (CRC Program in Latvia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irmejs Arvids

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The aim of the study is to evaluate the incidence and phenotype - genotype characteristics of hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes in Latvia in order to develop the basis of clinical management for patients and their relatives affected by these syndromes. Materials and methods From 02/1999-09/2002 in several hospitals in Latvia cancer family histories were collected from 865 patients with CRC. In families suspected of having a history consistent with a hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome, DNA testing for MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 genes was performed. In addition immunohistochemical (IH examination of the normal and cancer tissue from large bowel tumors for MSH2 and MSH6 protein expression was performed prior to DNA analysis. Results From the 865 CRC cases only 3 (0.35% pedigrees fulfilled the Amsterdam II criteria of Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC and 15 cases (1.73% were suspected of HNPCC. In 69 cases (8% with a cancer family aggregation (CFA were identified. Thus far 27 IH analyses have been performed and in 3 cancers homogenous lack of MSH2 or MSH6 protein expression was found. In one of these cases a mutation in MSH6 was identified. In 18 patients suspected of HNPCC or of matching the Amsterdam II criteria, denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC followed by DNA sequencing of any heteroduplexes of the 35 exons comprising both MLH1 and MSH2 was performed revealing 3 mutations. For all of kindreds diagnosed definitively or with a high probability of being an HNPCC family appropriate recommendations concerning prophylactic measures, surveillance and treatment were provided in written form. Conclusions Existing pedigree/clinical data suggest that in Latvia the frequency of HNPCC is around 2% of consecutive colorectal cancer patients. It is crucial that genetic counseling is an integral part of cancer family syndrome management.

  20. Cancer risk in families with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer diagnosed by mutation analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasen, HFA; Wijnen, JT; Menko, FH; Kleibeuker, JH; Taal, BG; Griffioen, G; Nagengast, FM; MeijersHeijboer, EH; Bertario, L; Varesco, L; Bisgaard, ML; Mohr, J; Fodde, R; Khan, PM

    Background & Aims: Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer is characterized by early-onset colorectal cancer and the occurrence of various other cancers, The recent isolation of four mismatch repair genes responsible for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer allows for the identification of

  1. Cancer risk in families with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer diagnosed by mutation analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasen, H. F.; Wijnen, J. T.; Menko, F. H.; Kleibeuker, J. H.; Taal, B. G.; Griffioen, G.; Nagengast, F. M.; Meijers-Heijboer, E. H.; Bertario, L.; Varesco, L.; Bisgaard, M. L.; Mohr, J.; Fodde, R.; Khan, P. M.

    1996-01-01

    Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer is characterized by early-onset colorectal cancer and the occurrence of various other cancers. The recent isolation of four mismatch repair genes responsible for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer allows for the identification of carriers within

  2. Committee opinion no. 634: Hereditary cancer syndromes and risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    A hereditary cancer syndrome is a genetic predisposition to certain types of cancer, often with onset at an early age, caused by inherited mutations in one or more genes. Cases of cancer commonly encountered by obstetrician-gynecologists or other obstetric-gynecologic providers--such as breast cancer, ovarian cancer, and endometrial cancer--are features of specific hereditary cancer syndromes. The most common hereditary cancer syndromes related to gynecologic cancer include hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome, Lynch syndrome, Li-Fraumeni syndrome, Cowden syndrome, and Peutz-Jeghers syndrome. A hereditary cancer risk assessment is the key to identifying patients and families who may be at increased risk of developing certain types of cancer. Screening should include, at minimum, a personal cancer history and a first- and second-degree relative cancer history that includes a description of the type of primary cancer, the age of onset, and the lineage (paternal versus maternal) of the family member. In addition, a patient's ethnic background can influence her genetic risk. If a hereditary cancer risk assessment suggests an increased risk of a hereditary cancer syndrome, referral to a specialist in cancer genetics or a health care provider with expertise in genetics is recommended for expanded gathering of family history information, risk assessment, education, and counseling, which may lead to genetic testing.

  3. Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cancer media Media contacts Press kits Public service advertisements Stats and facts Conditions Prevention and care News ... and melanoma in adults: systematic review and meta-analysis. J Am Acad Dermatol 2014;70:847–57. ...

  4. HEREDITARY COLORECTAL CANCER REGISTRY: A CLEVELAND CLINIC FOUNDATION EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Church, MBCHB

    2017-07-01

    SUMMARY: the Cleveland Clinic approach to hereditary colorectal cancer is described. This is multidisciplinary, involving several specialties and both genetic counseling and mental health services within the registry.

  5. Hereditary ovarian cancer: beyond the usual suspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, Kathryn P; Swisher, Elizabeth M

    2012-02-01

    In the past, hereditary ovarian carcinoma was attributed almost entirely to mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2, with a much smaller contribution from mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes. Recently, three new ovarian cancer susceptibility genes have been identified: RAD51C, RAD51D, and BRIP1. In addition, germline mutations in women with ovarian carcinoma have been recently identified in many of the previously identified breast cancer genes in the Fanconi anemia (FA)-BRCA pathway. While mutations in genes other than BRCA1 and BRCA2 are each individually rare, together they make up a significant proportion of cases. With at least 16 genes implicated in hereditary ovarian cancer to date, comprehensive testing for ovarian cancer risk will require assessment of many genes. As the cost of genomic sequencing continues to fall, the practice of evaluating cancer susceptibility one gene at a time is rapidly becoming obsolete. New advances in genomic technologies will likely accelerate the discovery of additional cancer susceptibility genes and increase the feasibility of comprehensive evaluation of multiple genes simultaneously at low cost. Improved recognition of inherited risk will identify individuals who are candidates for targeted prevention. In addition, identifying inherited mutations in a variety of FA-BRCA pathway genes may aid in identifying individuals who will selectively benefit from PARP inhibitors. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Genetic profiles distinguish different types of hereditary ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanska, Katarina; Malander, Susanne; Staaf, Johan

    2010-01-01

    Heredity represents the strongest risk factor for ovarian cancer with disease predisposing mutations identified in 15% of the tumors. With the aim to identify genetic classifiers for hereditary ovarian cancer, we profiled hereditary ovarian cancers linked to the hereditary breast and ovarian cancer...... that HBOC and HNPCC associated ovarian cancer develop along distinct genetic pathways and genetic profiles can thus be applied to distinguish between different types of hereditary ovarian cancer....... (HBOC) syndrome and the hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) syndrome. Genome-wide array comparative genomic hybridization was applied to 12 HBOC associated tumors with BRCA1 mutations and 8 HNPCC associated tumors with mismatch repair gene mutations with 24 sporadic ovarian cancers...

  7. Genetic profiles distinguish different types of hereditary ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanska, Katarina; Malander, Susanne; Staaf, Johan

    2010-01-01

    (HBOC) syndrome and the hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) syndrome. Genome-wide array comparative genomic hybridization was applied to 12 HBOC associated tumors with BRCA1 mutations and 8 HNPCC associated tumors with mismatch repair gene mutations with 24 sporadic ovarian cancers......Heredity represents the strongest risk factor for ovarian cancer with disease predisposing mutations identified in 15% of the tumors. With the aim to identify genetic classifiers for hereditary ovarian cancer, we profiled hereditary ovarian cancers linked to the hereditary breast and ovarian cancer...... that HBOC and HNPCC associated ovarian cancer develop along distinct genetic pathways and genetic profiles can thus be applied to distinguish between different types of hereditary ovarian cancer....

  8. Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer presenting as metastatic kidney cancer at 18 years of age: implications for surveillance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spaendonck-Zwarts, K.Y. van; Badeloe, S.; Oosting, S.F.; Hovenga, S.; Semmelink, H.J.; Moorselaar, R.J. van; Waesberghe, J.H. van; Mensenkamp, A.R.; Menko, F.H.

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC) is an autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by skin piloleiomyomas, uterine leiomyomas and papillary type 2 renal cancer caused by germline mutations in the fumarate hydratase (FH) gene. Previously, we proposed renal imaging for FH mutation

  9. Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer presenting as metastatic kidney cancer at 18 years of age : implications for surveillance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Spaendonck-Zwarts, Karin Y.; Badeloe, Sadhanna; Oosting, Sjoukje F.; Hovenga, Sjoerd; Semmelink, Harry J. F.; van Moorselaar, R. Jeroen A.; van Waesberghe, Jan Hein; Mensenkamp, Arjen R.; Menko, Fred H.

    Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC) is an autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by skin piloleiomyomas, uterine leiomyomas and papillary type 2 renal cancer caused by germline mutations in the fumarate hydratase (FH) gene. Previously, we proposed renal imaging for FH mutation

  10. Novel mutations in FH and expansion of the spectrum of phenotypes expressed in families with hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wei, M-H; Toure, O; Glenn, G M; Pithukpakorn, M; Neckers, L; Stolle, C; Choyke, P; Grubb, R; Middelton, L; Turner, M L; Walther, M M; Merino, M J; Zbar, B; Linehan, W M; Toro, J R

    Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC; OMIM 605839) is the predisposition to develop smooth muscle tumours of the skin and uterus and/or renal cancer and is associated with mutations in the fumarate hydratase gene (FH...

  11. Skin Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Having a weakened immune system . Being exposed to arsenic . Risk factors for melanoma skin cancer: Having a ... such as “NCI’s PDQ cancer information summary about breast cancer prevention states the risks in the following way: [ ...

  12. Attitude towards pre-implantation genetic diagnosis for hereditary cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammens, Chantal; Bleiker, Eveline; Aaronson, Neil; Vriends, Annette; Ausems, Margreet; Jansweijer, Maaike; Wagner, Anja; Sijmons, Rolf; van den Ouweland, Ans; van der Luijt, Rob; Spruijt, Liesbeth; Garcia, Encarna Gomez; Ruijs, Marielle; Verhoef, Senno

    2009-01-01

    The use of pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for hereditary cancer is subject to on-going debate, particularly among professionals. This study evaluates the attitude towards PGD and attitude-associated characteristics of those concerned: family members with a hereditary cancer predisposition.

  13. Methylation profiles of hereditary and sporadic ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bol, Guus M.; Suijkerbuijk, Karijn P. M.; Bart, Joost; Vooijs, Marc; van der Wall, Elsken; van Diest, Paul J.

    Aims: Tumour suppressor gene silencing through promoter hypermethylation plays an important role in oncogenesis. Carcinogenesis of hereditary cancers usually differs from that of their sporadic counterparts, but methylation has hardly been studied in hereditary ovarian cancer. The aim of this study

  14. Basal cell skin cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basal cell skin cancer almost never spreads. If it is left untreated, it may spread into surrounding areas and nearby tissues and bone. In these cases, treatment can injure the appearance of the skin.

  15. Hereditary Ovarian Cancer and Risk Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Lesley; Mutch, David G

    2017-05-01

    Mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 account for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome in a majority of families and 14% of epithelial ovarian cancer cases. Despite next-generation sequencing, other identified genes (Lynch Syndrome, RAD51C, RAD51D, and BRIP1) account for only a small proportion of cases. The risk of ovarian cancer by age 70 is approximately 40% for BRCA1 and 18% for BRCA2. Most of these cancers are high-grade serous cancers that predominantly arise in the fimbriae of the fallopian tube. Ovarian screening does not improve outcomes, so women at high risk are recommended to undergo risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy around the age of 40, followed by hormone replacement therapy (HRT). Specimens should be carefully examined for occult malignancy. Mutation carriers may benefit from newly developed poly ADP ribose polymerase inhibitors. Genetic testing should only be performed after careful counseling, particularly if testing involves the testing of panels of genes that may identify unsuspected disease predisposition or confusing variants of uncertain significance. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Phenotypic heterogeneity of hereditary gynecologic cancers: a report from the Creighton hereditary cancer registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Murray Joseph; Bewtra, Chhanda; Lynch, Henry T; Snyder, Carrie; Stacy, Mark; Watson, Patrice

    2013-12-01

    To determine the validity of observations suggesting a significant dichotomy of gynecologic cancers determined by linkage to specific genetic defects associated with two major autosomal dominant hereditary cancer syndromes; the Creighton University Hereditary Cancer Registry was searched for female carriers of germ line mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2, associated with the Hereditary Breast Ovarian Cancer syndrome, and in the mismatch repair (MMR) genes MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6, associated with Lynch syndrome, who were registered with invasive uterine, ovarian, fallopian tube or peritoneal cancers between January 1, 1959 and December 31, 2010. From 217 such cases, a total of 174 subjects, consisting of 95 BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers and 79 carriers of mutations in MMR genes, were identified who had current signed Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act forms and complete primary diagnostic pathology reports and clinical records. Data meticulously extracted from these cases were categorized and statistically analyzed. There were highly significant differences between carriers of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations and carriers of MMR gene mutations in the proportion of serous carcinomas compared with endometrioid carcinomas of the uterus, including cervix and endometium (p cancers (p cancer, and endometrioid carcinoma was found in two of four MMR gene mutation carriers with fallopian tube cancers. All other fallopian tube cancers were serous carcinomas. Seven BRCA1 and one BRCA2 mutation carriers were diagnosed with primary peritoneal serous carcinoma; no peritoneal carcinomas were registered in MMR gene mutation carriers. Nine of 14 gynecologic cancers with associated endometriosis in mutation carriers were endometrioid or endometrioid mixed carcinomas compared with just three of other histologic types. Primary breast cancers, that characterize the HBOC syndrome, were much more frequent in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers; while multiple gynecologic cancers and

  17. Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer: Cutaneous lesions & atypical fibroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Bortoletto

    2017-07-01

    Precis: 27-year-old woman with multiple cutaneous lesions is found to have uterine leiomyomas and undergoes robotic myomectomy. Genetic testing of uterine leiomyomas reveals mutation in fumarate hydratase, etiologic in hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC.

  18. Genes and SNPs associated with non-hereditary and hereditary colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassiri, Mohammadreza; Kooshyar, Mohammad Mahdi; Roudbar, Zahra; Mahdavi, Morteza; Doosti, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in both men and women in the world and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths. The incidence of colorectal cancer has increased in Iran in the past three decades and is now considered as a serious problem for our society. This cancer has two types hereditary and non-hereditary, 80% of cases being the latter. Considering that the relationship between SNPs with diseases is a concern, many researchers believed that they offer valuable markers for identifying genes responsible for susceptibility to common diseases. In some cases, they are direct causes of human disease. One SNP can increase risk of cancer, but when considering the rate of overlap and frequency of DNA repair pathways, it might be expected that SNP alone cannot affect the final result of cancer, although several SNPs together can exert a significant influence. Therefore identification of these SNPs is very important. The most important loci which include mutations are: MLH1, MSH2, PMS2, APC, MUTYH, SMAD7, STK11, XRCC3, DNMT1, MTHFR, Exo1, XRCC1 and VDR. Presence of SNPs in these genes decreases or increases risk of colorectal cancer. In this article we reviewed the Genes and SNPs associated with non-hereditary and hereditary of colorectal cancer that recently were reported from candidate gene y, meta-analysis and GWAS studies. As with other cancers, colorectal cancer is associated with SNPs in gene loci. Generally, by exploring SNPs, it is feasible to predict the risk of developing colorectal cancer and thus establishing proper preventive measures. SNPs of genes associated with colorectal cancer can be used as a marker SNP panel as a potential tool for improving cancer diagnosis and treatment planning.

  19. Occupational skin cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gawkrodger, D.J. [Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield (United Kingdom). Dept. of Dermatology

    2004-10-01

    Skin cancer due to occupation is more common than is generally recognized, although it is difficult to obtain an accurate estimate of its prevalence. Over the past two centuries, occupational skin cancers have particularly been due to industrial exposure of men (it seems more so than women) to chemical carcinogens such as polycyclic hydrocarbons (e.g. from coal tar products) or to arsenic. Industrial processes have improved in most Western countries to limit this type of exposure, but those with outdoor occupations are still exposed to solar ultraviolet irradiation without this being widely recognized as an industrial hazard. Ionizing radiation such as X-rays can also cause skin cancer. Occupational skin cancers often resemble skin tumours found in non-occupational subjects, e.g. basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and malignant melanoma, but some pre-malignant lesions can be more specific and point to an occupational origin, e.g. tar keratoses or arsenical keratoses. An uncommon but well-recognized cause of occupational skin cancer is that which results from scar formation following an industrial burn. In the future it will be necessary to focus on preventative measures, e.g. for outdoor workers, the need to cover up in the sun and use sun protective creams and a campaign for earlier recognition of skin cancers, which are usually curable if treated in their early stages.

  20. Stages of Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with a nozzle is used to spray liquid nitrogen or liquid carbon dioxide to freeze and destroy ... or small particles to rub away skin cells. Radiation therapy Radiation therapy is a cancer treatment that ...

  1. Skin Cancer - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Expand Section Skin Cancer: MedlinePlus Health Topic - English Cáncer de piel: Tema de salud de MedlinePlus - español (Spanish) National Library of Medicine Ukrainian (українська ) Expand Section Skin Cancer - українська (Ukrainian) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Characters ...

  2. Diagnosis and Management of Hereditary Renal Cell Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menko, Fred H; Maher, Eamonn R

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell cancer (RCC) is the common denominator for a heterogeneous group of diseases. The subclassification of these tumours is based on histological type and molecular pathogenesis. Insight into molecular pathogenesis has led to the development of targeted systemic therapies. Genetic susceptibility is the principal cause of RCC in about 2-4% of cases. Hereditary RCC is the umbrella term for about a dozen different conditions, the most frequent of which is von Hippel-Lindau disease . Here, we describe the main hereditary RCC syndromes, consider criteria for referral of RCC patients for clinical genetic assessment and discuss management options for patients with hereditary RCC and their at-risk relatives.

  3. Practice Bulletin No 182: Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome is an inherited cancer-susceptibility syndrome characterized by multiple family members with breast cancer, ovarian cancer, or both. Based on the contemporary understanding of the origins and management of ovarian cancer and for simplicity in this document, ovarian cancer also refers to fallopian tube cancer and primary peritoneal cancer. Clinical genetic testing for gene mutations allows more precise identification of those women who are at an increased risk of inherited breast cancer and ovarian cancer. For these individuals, screening and prevention strategies can be instituted to reduce their risks. Obstetrician-gynecologists play an important role in the identification and management of women with hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome. If an obstetrician-gynecologist or other gynecologic care provider does not have the necessary knowledge or expertise in cancer genetics to counsel a patient appropriately, referral to a genetic counselor, gynecologic or medical oncologist, or other genetics specialist should be considered (1). More genes are being discovered that impart varying risks of breast cancer, ovarian cancer, and other types of cancer, and new technologies are being developed for genetic testing. This Practice Bulletin focuses on the primary genetic mutations associated with hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome, BRCA1 and BRCA2, but also will briefly discuss some of the other genes that have been implicated.

  4. Skin cancer in skin of color.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, Porcia T

    2009-01-01

    In general, skin cancer is uncommon in people of color when compared to Caucasians. When it does occur, it is often associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Differences in survival rates may be attributed to skin cancers being diagnosed at a more advanced stage, and socioeconomic factors such as lack of adequate insurance coverage and lack of transportation can function as barriers to timely diagnosis and early treatment. In addition to advanced stage at presentation, malignant skin lesions in skin of color often present in an atypical fashion. Because skin cancer prevention and screening practices historically have been lower among Hispanics, Blacks, and Asians, and given the changing demographics in the United States, interventions that are tailored to each of these groups will be needed. Public educational campaigns should be expanded to educate people of all skin types with emphasis on skin cancers occurring in areas not exposed to the sun (Byrd-Miles et al., 2007), since sunlight is not as important an etiologic factor in the pathogenesis of skin cancer in people of color. Dermatologists and primary care physicians should instruct their darker-skinned patients on how to perform routine skin self-examinations. Physicians should also encourage patients to ask their specialists such as their gynecologist, dentist, and ophthalmologist to look for abnormal pigmentation during routine exams. To reduce the burden of skin cancer, several prevention methods for all people have been strongly encouraged, including monthly self-examinations, daily use of SPF 30 or greater sunscreen, sunglasses with UV-absorbing lenses, and avoiding tanning booths (American Cancer Society, 2008) (see Table 7). In addition, recommendations for clinicians to promote the prevention of skin cancer in skin of color have also been made, including closely monitoring changing pigmented lesions on the palms and soles and hyperkeratotic or poorly healing ulcers in immunosuppressed patients

  5. Targeted therapy for hereditary cancer syndromes: hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome, Lynch syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis, and Li-Fraumeni syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Rishi; Liebe, Sarah; Turski, Michelle L; Vidwans, Smruti J; Janku, Filip; Garrido-Laguna, Ignacio; Munoz, Javier; Schwab, Richard; Rodon, Jordi; Kurzrock, Razelle; Subbiah, Vivek

    2014-12-01

    Cancer genetics has rapidly evolved in the last two decades. Understanding and exploring the several genetic pathways in the cancer cell is the foundation of targeted therapy. Several genomic aberrations have been identified and their role in carcinogenesis is being explored. In contrast to most cancers where these mutations are acquired, patients with hereditary cancer syndromes have inherited genomic aberrations. The understanding of the molecular pathobiology in hereditary cancer syndromes has advanced dramatically. In addition, many molecularly targeted therapies have been developed that could have potential roles in the treatment of patients with hereditary cancer syndromes. In this review, we outline the presentation, molecular biology, and possible targeted therapies for two of the most widely recognized hereditary cancer syndromes -- hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome and hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer syndrome (Lynch syndrome). We will also discuss other syndromes such as familial adenomatous polyposis and Li-Fraumeni syndrome (TP53).

  6. Malignant melanoma in patients with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponti, G; Losi, L; Pellacani, G; Wannesson, L; Cesinaro, A M; Venesio, T; Petti, C; Seidenari, S

    2008-07-01

    Malignant melanoma (MM) is the most aggressive skin cancer. Most MMs are sporadic, and in this setting an association with mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutations, typical of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) tumours, has been proposed. To characterize clinically and/or by molecular biology the patients with MM belonging to a cohort of 60 kindreds with HNPCC. Methods Patients with HNPCC with a diagnosis of MM were studied by immunohistochemistry (IHC) on tumour tissue using antibodies to MLH1, MSH2, p16, beta-catenin and E-cadherin, and by direct sequencing of MMR genes on germline DNA, and BRAF and NRAS on somatic DNA extracted from MM. Nine cutaneous MMs were detected in the tumour spectrum of eight families with HNPCC. The median age at diagnosis was 46 years. In one HNPCC family the diagnosis of MM was made in two first-degree relatives fitting the clinical definition of familial melanoma. IHC and sequencing analysis showed an MSH2 mutation in one patient with MM. Dermatological surveillance should be recommended to families in which MM is diagnosed in at least one member, especially at a young age. The combination of MMR gene mutations and abnormalities of p16 or other molecular pathways is needed to induce melanocytic carcinogenesis in a familial setting as well as in sporadic MM.

  7. Sulindac treatment in hereditary non-pollyposis colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijcken, Fleur E. M.; Hollema, Harry; van der Zee, Ate G. J.; van der Sluis, Tineke; Ek, Wytske Boersma-van; Kleibeuker, Jan H.

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, e.g. sulindac have been extensively studied for chemoprevention in familial adenomatous polyposis, but not in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). We evaluated these effects in HNPCC using surrogate end-points for cancer risk. In a randomised

  8. Organization and Running of the First Comprehensive Hereditary Cancer Clinic in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajkumar T

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hereditary cancers are thought to account for around 5% of cancers, particularly breast/ovarian and colorectal cancers. In India there is a paucity of data on hereditary cancers and the mutations in some of the common genes linked to hereditary cancers, such as BRCA1, BRCA2, hMSH2 and hMLH1. The country's first comprehensive hereditary cancer clinic was established in February 2002. The article describes the organization and running of the Clinic. It also discusses some of the social issues relevant to the given population in running the Hereditary Cancer Clinic.

  9. Mutator gene and hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Chapelle, Albert [Helsingfors, FI; Vogelstein, Bert [Baltimore, MD; Kinzler, Kenneth W [Baltimore, MD

    2008-02-05

    The human MSH2 gene, responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, was identified by virtue of its homology to the MutS class of genes, which are involved in DNA mismatch repair. The sequence of cDNA clones of the human gene are provided, and the sequence of the gene can be used to demonstrate the existence of germ line mutations in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) kindreds, as well as in replication error.sup.+ (RER.sup.+) tumor cells.

  10. Squamous cell skin cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... squamous cell cancer include: Having light-colored skin, blue or green eyes, or blond or red hair Long-term, daily sun exposure (such as in people who work outside) Many severe sunburns early in life Older age Having had many x-rays Chemical exposure A weakened immune system, especially in ...

  11. Skin Cancer: NIH Research to Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Skin Cancer NIH Research to Results Past Issues / Summer 2013 ... successful regression of advanced melanoma. Read More "Skin Cancer" Articles Skin Cancer Can Strike Anyone / Skin Cancer: Biology, Risk ...

  12. Treatment Options for Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Skin Cancer Skin Cancer Screening Research Skin Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Skin Cancer ... Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) depends mostly ...

  13. Skin Cancer: Biology, Risk Factors & Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... turn Javascript on. Feature: Skin Cancer Skin Cancer: Biology, Risk Factors & Treatment Past Issues / Summer 2013 Table ... Articles Skin Cancer Can Strike Anyone / Skin Cancer: Biology, Risk Factors & Treatment / Timely Healthcare Checkup Catches Melanoma ...

  14. Hereditary Ovarian Cancer: Not Only BRCA 1 and 2 Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Toss

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available More than one-fifth of ovarian tumors have hereditary susceptibility and, in about 65–85% of these cases, the genetic abnormality is a germline mutation in BRCA genes. Nevertheless, several other suppressor genes and oncogenes have been associated with hereditary ovarian cancers, including the mismatch repair (MMR genes in Lynch syndrome, the tumor suppressor gene, TP53, in the Li-Fraumeni syndrome, and several other genes involved in the double-strand breaks repair system, such as CHEK2, RAD51, BRIP1, and PALB2. The study of genetic discriminators and deregulated pathways involved in hereditary ovarian syndromes is relevant for the future development of molecular diagnostic strategies and targeted therapeutic approaches. The recent development and implementation of next-generation sequencing technologies have provided the opportunity to simultaneously analyze multiple cancer susceptibility genes, reduce the delay and costs, and optimize the molecular diagnosis of hereditary tumors. Particularly, the identification of mutations in ovarian cancer susceptibility genes in healthy women may result in a more personalized cancer risk management with tailored clinical and radiological surveillance, chemopreventive approaches, and/or prophylactic surgeries. On the other hand, for ovarian cancer patients, the identification of mutations may provide potential targets for biologic agents and guide treatment decision-making.

  15. Hereditary ovarian cancer: not only BRCA 1 and 2 genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toss, Angela; Tomasello, Chiara; Razzaboni, Elisabetta; Contu, Giannina; Grandi, Giovanni; Cagnacci, Angelo; Schilder, Russell J; Cortesi, Laura

    2015-01-01

    More than one-fifth of ovarian tumors have hereditary susceptibility and, in about 65-85% of these cases, the genetic abnormality is a germline mutation in BRCA genes. Nevertheless, several other suppressor genes and oncogenes have been associated with hereditary ovarian cancers, including the mismatch repair (MMR) genes in Lynch syndrome, the tumor suppressor gene, TP53, in the Li-Fraumeni syndrome, and several other genes involved in the double-strand breaks repair system, such as CHEK2, RAD51, BRIP1, and PALB2. The study of genetic discriminators and deregulated pathways involved in hereditary ovarian syndromes is relevant for the future development of molecular diagnostic strategies and targeted therapeutic approaches. The recent development and implementation of next-generation sequencing technologies have provided the opportunity to simultaneously analyze multiple cancer susceptibility genes, reduce the delay and costs, and optimize the molecular diagnosis of hereditary tumors. Particularly, the identification of mutations in ovarian cancer susceptibility genes in healthy women may result in a more personalized cancer risk management with tailored clinical and radiological surveillance, chemopreventive approaches, and/or prophylactic surgeries. On the other hand, for ovarian cancer patients, the identification of mutations may provide potential targets for biologic agents and guide treatment decision-making.

  16. Role of detection of microsatellite instability in Chinese with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer or ordinary hereditary colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen-Zhi; Jin, Feng; Zhang, Zhen-Hai; Wang, Shu-Bao

    2006-08-07

    To detect microsatellite instability (MSI) in patients with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer or ordinary hereditary colorectal cancer and to provide criteria for screening the kindreds with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer at molecular level. MSI was detected in the specimens from 20 cases with HNPCC, 20 cases with ordinary hereditary colorectal cancer and 20 cases with sporadic colorectal cancer by means of polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism. The positive rate of MSI was 85% (17/20) in HNPCC group, 40% (8/20) in ordinary hereditary colorectal cancer group and 10% (2/20) in the sporadic colorectal cancer group respectively. The differences were significant. The mean ages of the three groups were 43.6, 52.2, and 61.8 years respectively, which increased gradually. The incidence of right hemicolon cancer was 64.7%, 37.5%, and 0% respectively, which decreased gradually and had significant difference. The expression ratio of BAT26 and BAT25 was 94.1% respectively, which was highest in the 5 gene sites studied. The incidence of poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma was 70.6% in HNPCC group among high frequency microsatellite instability (MSI-H), which was higher than the other two groups, which had 50% and 50% respectively. The incidence of MSI-H is higher in HNPCC group. The detection of MSI is simple and economical and has high correlation with the clinicopathologic feature of HNPCC and can be used as a screening method to detect the germ line mutation of the mismatch repair gene.

  17. Genetics and Genetic Testing in Hereditary Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoffel, Elena M; Boland, C Richard

    2015-10-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains the third most common cancer affecting men and women in the United States. Approximately one-third of CRCs are diagnosed in individuals who have family members also affected with the disease. Although the vast majority of colorectal neoplasms develop as a consequence of somatic genomic alterations arising in individual cells, approximately 5% of all CRCs arise in the setting of germline mutations in genes involved in key cellular processes. To date, multiple genes have been implicated in single-gene hereditary cancer syndromes, many of which are associated with increased risk for CRC, as well as other tumor types. This review outlines the clinical, pathologic, and genetic features of the hereditary cancer syndromes known to be associated with increased risk for CRC and delineates strategies for implementing genetic risk assessments in clinical settings. Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Discovery – Preventing Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer research includes stopping cancer before it spreads. NCI funded the development of the Melanoma Risk Assessment Tool and the ABC method. Both help to diagnose high-risk patients and prevent melanoma earlier in the fight against skin cancer.

  19. Drugs Approved for Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for skin cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  20. Risk factors for cancer in hereditary pancreatitis. International Hereditary Pancreatitis Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowenfels, A B; Maisonneuve, P; Whitcomb, D C

    2000-05-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis is a rare form of pancreatitis, accounting for approximately 1% of all types of pancreatitis. It is inherited as an autosomal dominant disease, with incomplete penetrance. The genetic defect is believed to be caused by mutations in the trypsinogen gene. Patients who inherit the disorder suffer from a form of pancreatitis that resembles other types of pancreatitis, but the age of onset is much earlier. Sixteen biopsy-proven pancreatic cancers have developed in a cohort of 412 patients with a median follow-up period of 18 years (interquartile range, 7 to 30 years) since the onset of symptoms. Compared with the background population, the risk of pancreatic cancer is approximately 50 to 60 times greater than expected. Smoking appears to be an additional risk factor in these patients: Smoking increases the risk of developing pancreatic cancer and lowers the age of onset by approximately 20 years. Patients with hereditary pancreatitis are urged to avoid smoking because it greatly increases the risk of pancreatic cancer and to avoid alcohol, a known risk factor for all forms of pancreatitis.

  1. Management of Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer. The Asian Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ava Kwong

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations are the most common high penetrant genes associated with an increased lifetime risk for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC. Although genetic testing is standard of care in Western developed countries, there are still variations in availability of genetic testing and risk assessment for HBOC in Asia. Depending on the countries, there are variations in the clinical strategies and cancer management. The Asian BRCA Consortium has grouped together 14 Asian countries and reviewed genetic counselling/testing uptake rates and clinical management options in these countries. Moreover economic factors, healthcare and legal frameworks, and cultural issues affecting the genetic service availability in Asia were discussed. Mutation spectrum, and VUS rates and the increase use of NGS gene panel testing poses more decisional issues in the clinical management of Hereditary Breast cancer in Asia. These will be discussed. Keywords: BRCA1/BRCA2, germline, HBOC, Asia BRCA Consortium, NGS

  2. CLINICAL AND MORPHOLOGICAL FEATURES OF HEREDITARY OVARIAN CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. B. Kotiv

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Germ-line mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are the most established risk factors for hereditary breast and ovarian cancers. The purpose of the study was to analyze BRCA1/2 testing in ovarian cancer patients. Materials and methods. We analyzed 222 patients with ovarian cancer (OC who underwent genetic testing. Results. Recurrent Slavic mutations in these genes were detected in 60/222 (27% patients.104 patients lacked any clinical signs of hereditary form of the disease, however BRCA1/2 genetic defects were identified among 11 (11% of these women. BRCA1/2-associated carcinomas were characterized by more advanced stage at diagnosis and predominance of high-grade serous histological tumor subtype. Conclusion. These results emphasize the need for BRCA1/2 testing for all patients with OC. BRCA1/2-associated carcinomas have clinical and pathological cgaracteristics, which should be considered while planning therapy. 

  3. Organization and Running of the First Comprehensive Hereditary Cancer Clinic in India

    OpenAIRE

    Rajkumar, T; Soumittra, N; Vidubala, E; Sridevi, V; Mahajan, V; Ramanan, SG; Vijaya, S

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Hereditary cancers are thought to account for around 5% of cancers, particularly breast/ovarian and colorectal cancers. In India there is a paucity of data on hereditary cancers and the mutations in some of the common genes linked to hereditary cancers, such as BRCA1, BRCA2, hMSH2 and hMLH1. The country's first comprehensive hereditary cancer clinic was established in February 2002. The article describes the organization and running of the Clinic. It also discusses some of the social...

  4. Epidemiology of skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiter, Ulrike; Eigentler, Thomas; Garbe, Claus

    2014-01-01

    Melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) are now the most common types of cancer in white populations. Both tumor entities show an increasing incidence rate worldwide but a stable or decreasing mortality rate. NMSC is the most common cancer in white-skinned individuals with a worldwide increasing incidence. NMSC is an increasing problem for health care services worldwide which causes significant morbidity. The rising incidence rates of NMSC are probably caused by a combination of increased exposure to ultraviolet (UV) or sun light, increased outdoor activities, changes in clothing style, increased longevity, ozone depletion, genetics and in some cases, immune suppression. An intensive UV exposure in childhood and adolescence was causative for the development of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) whereas for the etiology of SCC a chronic UV exposure in the earlier decades was accused. Cutaneous melanoma is the most rapidly increasing cancer in white populations, in the last 3 decades incidence rates have risen up to 5-fold. In 2008 melanoma was on place 5 in women and on place 8 in men of the most common solid tumor entities in Germany. The frequency of its occurrence is closely associated with the constitutive color of the skin, and the geographical zone. Changes in outdoor activities and exposure to sunlight during the past 50 years are an important factor for the increasing incidence of melanoma. Mortality rates of melanoma show a stabilization in the USA, Australia and also in European countries. In contrast to SCC, melanoma risk seems to be associated with an intermittent exposure to sunlight. Prevention campaigns aim on reducing incidence and achieving earlier diagnosis, which resulted in an ongoing trend toward thin melanoma since the last two decades. However, the impact of primary prevention measures on incidence rates of melanoma is unlikely to be seen in the near future, rather increasing incidence rates to 40-50/100,000 inhabitants/year should be expected in

  5. Descriptive Epidemiology, Molecular Biology and Genetics of Hereditary Prostate Cancer in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzon, Diem Nguyen

    2012-01-01

    A search for markers that can differentiate indolent prostate cancers from more aggressive forms. Assessment of clinical differences between hereditary and sporadicc prostate cancer.......A search for markers that can differentiate indolent prostate cancers from more aggressive forms. Assessment of clinical differences between hereditary and sporadicc prostate cancer....

  6. Dark Skin No Shield from Deadly Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 166194.html Dark Skin No Shield From Deadly Skin Cancer Death rates from melanoma are higher for people ... deadly melanomas, an expert warns. This type of skin cancer can be affected by genetics and is far ...

  7. Hereditary Colorectal Cancer : Genetics and Screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brosens, Lodewijk A A; Offerhaus, G. Johan A; Giardiello, Francis M.

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer and the third leading cause of cancer death in men and women in the United States. About 30% of patients with CRC report a family history of CRC. However, only 5% of CRCs arise in the setting of a well-established mendelian inherited disorder.

  8. Towards a dietary prevention of hereditary breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsopoulos, Joanne; Narod, Steven A

    2005-03-01

    Inheritance of a deleterious mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2 confers a high lifetime risk of developing breast cancer. Variation in penetrance between individuals suggests that factors other than the gene mutation itself may influence the risk of cancer in susceptible women. Several risk factors have been identified which implicate estrogen-induced growth stimulation as a probable contributor to breast cancer pre-disposition. The protein products of both of these genes appear to help preserve genomic integrity via their participation in the DNA damage response and repair pathways. To date, the evidence for a cancer-protective role of dietary nutrients, for the most part those with antioxidant properties, has been based on women without any known genetic pre-disposition and it is important to identify and evaluate dietary factors which may modify the risk of cancer in BRCA carriers. Here we propose that diet modification may modulate the risk of hereditary breast cancer by decreasing DNA damage (possibly linked to estrogen exposure) or by enhancing DNA repair. The prevention of hereditary breast cancer through diet is an attractive complement to current management strategies and deserves exploration.

  9. High Prevalence of Hereditary Cancer Syndromes in Adolescents and Young Adults With Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mork, Maureen E; You, Y Nancy; Ying, Jun; Bannon, Sarah A; Lynch, Patrick M; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A; Vilar, Eduardo

    2015-11-01

    Established guidelines recommend evaluation for hereditary cancer syndromes in patients younger than 50 years diagnosed with colorectal cancer (CRC). This group has been well described in the literature; however, patients diagnosed as adolescents and young adults are not well represented in CRC studies. Here, we define the clinical profile, including the extent of hereditary cancer syndromes and family history of cancer, in patients diagnosed with CRC at age 35 or younger. We reviewed patients who underwent genetic counseling at our institution during 5 years (2009 to 2013). Data were collected regarding demographics, clinicopathologic information, tumor and genetic testing, and family history. Patients with an identified hereditary cancer syndrome were compared with those without a syndrome. Of the 193 patients with evaluable data, 35% had an identifiable hereditary cancer syndrome, including 23 with Lynch syndrome, 22 with mutation-negative Lynch syndrome, 16 with familial adenomatous polyposis, two with constitutional mismatch repair deficiency, two with biallelic MUTYH mutations, and one with Li-Fraumeni syndrome. Patients without a hereditary syndrome more frequently presented with metastatic disease, whereas patients with a syndrome were more likely to present at earlier stages and to have a family history of cancer. Nevertheless, a substantial proportion of the hereditary syndromes (19%) were diagnosed in individuals with no family history of the disease. We conclude that patients diagnosed with CRC at age 35 years or younger should receive genetic counseling regardless of their family history and phenotype. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  10. Introduction to skin cancer nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godsell, Gillian

    The incidence of skin cancer continues to increase annually and it is the most common cancer in the UK with over 100,000 cases each year. The treatment of skin cancer can involve many different disciplines including dermatology, plastic surgery, oncology, radiotherapy, ENT and maxillofacial and involves both adult and paediatric services in primary and secondary care. This article considers the many duties of a skin cancer clinical nurse specialist, and the increasing pressure such nurses are under. The skin cancer nurse specialist must liaise and work with the many different departments, and will be involved in the care of the patient with skin cancer from diagnosis throughout the pathway to discharge or death.

  11. Prophylactic total gastrectomy in hereditary diffuse gastric cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Linda; Hansen, Thomas V O; Gerdes, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Inactivating mutations in the CDH1 (E-cadherin) gene are the predisposing cause of gastric cancer in most families with hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC). The lifetime risk of cancer in mutation positive members is more than 80 % and prophylactic total gastrectomy is recommended. Not all...... mutations in the CDH1 gene are however pathogenic and it is important to classify mutations before this major operation is performed. Probands from two Danish families with gastric cancer and a history suggesting HDGC were screened for CDH1 gene mutations. Two novel CDH1 gene mutations were identified....... Hospital stay was 6-8 days and there were no complications. Small foci of diffuse gastric cancer were found in all patients-intramucosal in six and advanced in one. Preoperative endoscopic biopsies had revealed a microscopic cancer focus in two of the patients. Our data confirmed the pathogenic nature...

  12. Gene panel testing for hereditary breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winship, Ingrid; Southey, Melissa C

    2016-03-21

    Inherited predisposition to breast cancer is explained only in part by mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Most families with an apparent familial clustering of breast cancer who are investigated through Australia's network of genetic services and familial cancer centres do not have mutations in either of these genes. More recently, additional breast cancer predisposition genes, such as PALB2, have been identified. New genetic technology allows a panel of multiple genes to be tested for mutations in a single test. This enables more women and their families to have risk assessment and risk management, in a preventive approach to predictable breast cancer. Predictive testing for a known family-specific mutation in a breast cancer predisposition gene provides personalised risk assessment and evidence-based risk management. Breast cancer predisposition gene panel tests have a greater diagnostic yield than conventional testing of only the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. The clinical validity and utility of some of the putative breast cancer predisposition genes is not yet clear. Ethical issues warrant consideration, as multiple gene panel testing has the potential to identify secondary findings not originally sought by the test requested. Multiple gene panel tests may provide an affordable and effective way to investigate the heritability of breast cancer.

  13. Genetic Testing for Hereditary Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Having a family health history of colorectal (colon) cancer can make you more likely to get colorectal ... Health History? If you have a family health history of colorectal cancer, your doctor may consider your family health history ...

  14. Revised Bethesda Guidelines for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (Lynch syndrome) and microsatellite instability

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Umar, Asad; Boland, C Richard; Terdiman, Jonathan P; Syngal, Sapna; de la Chapelle, Albert; Rüschoff, Josef; Fishel, Richard; Lindor, Noralane M; Burgart, Lawrence J; Hamelin, Richard; Hamilton, Stanley R; Hiatt, Robert A; Jass, Jeremy; Lindblom, Annika; Lynch, Henry T; Peltomaki, Païvi; Ramsey, Scott D; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A; Vasen, Hans F A; Hawk, Ernest T; Barrett, J Carl; Freedman, Andrew N; Srivastava, Sudhir

    2004-01-01

    Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), also known as Lynch syndrome, is a common autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by early age at onset, neoplastic lesions, and microsatellite instability (MSI...

  15. Surveillance for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer - A long-term study on 114 families

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cappel, WHDTN; Nagengast, FM; Griffioen, G; Menko, FH; Taal, BG; Kleibeuker, JH; Vasen, HF

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer is caused by germline mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes. Mutation carriers have a 60 to 85 percent risk of developing colorectal cancer. In the Netherlands hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer families are monitored in an intensive

  16. Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer: new genes in confined pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Finn Cilius; van Overeem Hansen, Thomas; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard

    2016-09-01

    Genetic abnormalities in the DNA repair genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 predispose to hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC). However, only approximately 25% of cases of HBOC can be ascribed to BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. Recently, exome sequencing has uncovered substantial locus heterogeneity among affected families without BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. The new pathogenic variants are rare, posing challenges to estimation of risk attribution through patient cohorts. In this Review article, we examine HBOC genes, focusing on their role in genome maintenance, the possibilities for functional testing of putative causal variants and the clinical application of new HBOC genes in cancer risk management and treatment decision-making.

  17. Predisposing genes in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Huusko, P. (Pia)

    1999-01-01

    Abstract In the present study, mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2, the two major genes predisposing individuals to hereditary breast and ovarian cancer, were screened in Finnish and Turkish cancer families. Germline BRCA1 mutations were found in 7% (6/88) and BRCA2 mutations in 6% (5/88) of the Finnish families studied in Oulu. Two distinct BRCA1 (3745delT, 4216nt-2A→G) and three BRCA2 (999delTCAAA, 6503delTT, 9346nt-2A→G) mutations were identified, all of which are recurrently found in Finland....

  18. [Early diagnosis of skin cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolm, Isabell; Hofbauer, Günther; Braun, Ralph P

    2010-09-01

    The skin is the most affected organ by cancer. The incidence rates of skin cancer are steadily increasing, both for melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers (squamous cell carcinoma, basal cell carcinoma). Over 90 % of the death cases from skin cancers attribute to melanoma. Survival from melanoma is strongly related to tumour thickness. Therefore early detection is the most important step to improve prognosis. In the last years a number of new non invasive techniques for the early diagnosis of melanoma have been developed which are superior to the naked eye examination. In this overview article we present some non-invasive diagnostic techniques like total body photography, digital dermoscopy and confocal microscopy which in addition to dermoscopy assist the dermatologist in differentiating nevi from early melanomas.Non-melanoma skin cancer can be prevented by accurate sun protection. Early squamous cell carcinomas and basal cell carcinomas can be treated either invasively or non-invasively with excellent prognosis.

  19. Deranged Wnt signaling is frequent in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isinger-Ekstrand, Anna; Therkildsen, Christina; Bernstein, Inge

    2011-01-01

    The Wnt signaling pathway is frequently deranged in colorectal cancer and is a key target for future preventive and therapeutic approaches. Colorectal cancers associated with the hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) syndrome are characterized by wide-spread microsatellite instability......, but show few gross genomic alterations. We characterized expression of the Wnt signaling pathway markers β-catenin, E-cadherin, TCF-4, and PTEN using immunohistochemical staining in colorectal cancers from individuals with HNPCC. Reduced membranous staining for β-catenin was found in 64% and for E......% of the tumors. In summary, altered expression of target molecules in the Wnt signaling pathway was demonstrated in the vast majority of the HNPCC-associated tumors, which support deranged Wnt-signaling as a central tumorigenic mechanism also in MMR defective colorectal cancer....

  20. Deranged Wnt signaling is frequent in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isinger-Ekstrand, Anna; Therkildsen, Christina; Bernstein, Inge

    2011-01-01

    The Wnt signaling pathway is frequently deranged in colorectal cancer and is a key target for future preventive and therapeutic approaches. Colorectal cancers associated with the hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) syndrome are characterized by wide-spread microsatellite instability......, but show few gross genomic alterations. We characterized expression of the Wnt signaling pathway markers ß-catenin, E-cadherin, TCF-4, and PTEN using immunohistochemical staining in colorectal cancers from individuals with HNPCC. Reduced membranous staining for ß-catenin was found in 64% and for E......% of the tumors. In summary, altered expression of target molecules in the Wnt signaling pathway was demonstrated in the vast majority of the HNPCC-associated tumors, which support deranged Wnt-signaling as a central tumorigenic mechanism also in MMR defective colorectal cancer....

  1. Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer : Identification of mutation carriers and assessing pathogenicity of mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niessen, RC; Sijmons, RH; Berends, MJW; Ou, J; Hofstra, RNW; Kleibeuker, JH

    2004-01-01

    Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), also referred to as Lynch syndrome, is an autosomal dominantly inherited disorder that is characterized by susceptibility to colorectal cancer and extracolonic malignancies, in particular endometrial cancer. HNPCC is caused by pathogenic mutations

  2. Hereditary ovarian cancer and two-compartment tumor metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E.; Balliet, Renee M.; Lin, Zhao; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Howell, Anthony; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the BRCA1 tumor suppressor gene are commonly found in hereditary ovarian cancers. Here, we used a co-culture approach to study the metabolic effects of BRCA1-null ovarian cancer cells on adjacent tumor-associated stromal fibroblasts. Our results directly show that BRCA1-null ovarian cancer cells produce large amounts of hydrogen peroxide, which can be abolished either by administration of simple antioxidants (N-acetyl-cysteine; NAC) or by replacement of the BRCA1 gene. Thus, the BRCA1 gene normally suppresses tumor growth by functioning as an antioxidant. Importantly, hydrogen peroxide produced by BRCA1-null ovarian cancer cells induces oxidative stress and catabolic processes in adjacent stromal fibroblasts, such as autophagy, mitophagy and glycolysis, via stromal NFκB activation. Catabolism in stromal fibroblasts was also accompanied by the upregulation of MCT4 and a loss of Cav-1 expression, which are established markers of a lethal tumor microenvironment. In summary, loss of the BRCA1 tumor suppressor gene induces hydrogen peroxide production, which then leads to metabolic reprogramming of the tumor stroma, driving stromal-epithelial metabolic coupling. Our results suggest that new cancer prevention trials with antioxidants are clearly warranted in patients that harbor hereditary/familial BRCA1 mutations. PMID:23047606

  3. [Familiality of breast cancer and hereditary factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, M

    1982-05-01

    Recent results in family studies of breast cancer were overviewed. Site specific familial aggregation of the disease, with no significant increase of other cancers, by itself suggests a specified etiological role of the familial predisposition. Probably it must be interpreted by a synergism of some genetic and environmental factors. Among the cases in Cancer Institute Hospital, familially predisposed patients showed a significant differences in younger age at menarche and taller stature compared with the other patients. It has been frequently observed that a risk for the disease in the relatives of a patient is higher in pre-than in postmenopausal onset. It appears, however, that the age specific incidence rate among those women with a positive family history is consistently higher than that of the general population in any age classes except the premenopausal period. Findings obtained by recent endoclinological studies point out the concept that a possible genetic abnormality associated with the breast cancer disposition should be pertaining to the metabolism of ovarian hormone.

  4. Awareness of endometrial cancer risk and compliance with screening in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ketabi, Zohreh; Mosgaard, Berit J; Gerdes, Anne-Marie

    2012-01-01

    Women with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) have a 40-60% lifetime risk for endometrial cancer. Guidelines in Denmark recommend gynecologic screening for female members of families with HNPCC. We estimated the knowledge of endometrial cancer risk and identified possible predictors...

  5. Urinary tract cancer and hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer : Risks and screening options

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijmons, RH; Kiemeney, LALM; Witjes, JA; Vasen, HFA

    Purpose: We investigate the risk of the different types of urinary tract cancer in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer families and review screening options. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively calculated the relative and cumulative risks of developing urinary tract cancer by comparing

  6. Hereditary breast cancer: the era of new susceptibility genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolou, Paraskevi; Fostira, Florentia

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among females. 5%-10% of breast cancer cases are hereditary and are caused by pathogenic mutations in the considered reference BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. As sequencing technologies evolve, more susceptible genes have been discovered and BRCA1 and BRCA2 predisposition seems to be only a part of the story. These new findings include rare germline mutations in other high penetrant genes, the most important of which include TP53 mutations in Li-Fraumeni syndrome, STK11 mutations in Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, and PTEN mutations in Cowden syndrome. Furthermore, more frequent, but less penetrant, mutations have been identified in families with breast cancer clustering, in moderate or low penetrant genes, such as CHEK2, ATM, PALB2, and BRIP1. This paper will summarize all current data on new findings in breast cancer susceptibility genes.

  7. Hereditary Breast Cancer: The Era of New Susceptibility Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paraskevi Apostolou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among females. 5%–10% of breast cancer cases are hereditary and are caused by pathogenic mutations in the considered reference BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. As sequencing technologies evolve, more susceptible genes have been discovered and BRCA1 and BRCA2 predisposition seems to be only a part of the story. These new findings include rare germline mutations in other high penetrant genes, the most important of which include TP53 mutations in Li-Fraumeni syndrome, STK11 mutations in Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, and PTEN mutations in Cowden syndrome. Furthermore, more frequent, but less penetrant, mutations have been identified in families with breast cancer clustering, in moderate or low penetrant genes, such as CHEK2, ATM, PALB2, and BRIP1. This paper will summarize all current data on new findings in breast cancer susceptibility genes.

  8. Nicotinamide for skin cancer chemoprevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damian, Diona L

    2017-08-01

    Nicotinamide (vitamin B 3 ) has a range of photoprotective effects in vitro and in vivo; it enhances DNA repair, reduces UV radiation-induced suppression of skin immune responses, modulates inflammatory cytokine production and skin barrier function and restores cellular energy levels after UV exposure. Pharmacological doses of nicotinamide have been shown to reduce actinic keratoses and nonmelanoma skin cancer incidence in high-risk individuals, making this a nontoxic and accessible option for skin cancer chemoprevention in this population. © 2017 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  9. Hereditary genes and SNPs associated with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdi, Kooshyar Mohammad; Nassiri, Mohammad Reza; Nasiri, Khadijeh

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women affecting up to one third of tehm during their lifespans. Increased expression of some genes due to polymorphisms increases the risk of breast cancer incidence. Since mutations that are recognized to increase breast cancer risk within families are quite rare, identification of these SNPs is very important. The most important loci which include mutations are; BRCA1, BRCA2, PTEN, ATM, TP53, CHEK2, PPM1D, CDH1, MLH1, MRE11, MSH2, MSH6, MUTYH, NBN, PMS1, PMS2, BRIP1, RAD50, RAD51C, STK11 and BARD1. Presence of SNPs in these genes increases the risk of breast cancer and associated diagnostic markers are among the most reliable for assessing prognosis of breast cancer. In this article we reviewed the hereditary genes of breast cancer and SNPs associated with increasing the risk of breast cancer that were recently were reported from candidate gene, meta-analysis and GWAS studies. SNPs of genes associated with breast cancer can be used as a potential tool for improving cancer diagnosis and treatment planning.

  10. Occupational skin cancer: Systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jéssica Suellen Sena

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Objective: To analyze the epidemiological profile, risk factors in the workplace environment and prevention methods for professionals at risk of skin cancer. Method: A systematic review of articles on occupational skin cancer, published in the Lilacs, Scielo, Medline and Cochrane Library from January 1st, 2008, to December 31st, 2013, was performed. The search included the following terms: “neoplasias cutâneas” (DeCS, “exposição ocupacional” (DeCS, “epidemiologia” (DeCS as well as the keyword “prevenção”, and their equivalents in English. Results: After analyzing the titles and summaries of articles, the search strategy resulted in 83 references, of which 22 articles met the eligibility criteria. Discussion: We found that sun exposure is the main occupational risk factor for skin cancer, causing outdoor workers to be the most vulnerable to developing occupational skin cancer. Professionals with low levels of education and European descent are at increased risk of developing this cancer. Conclusion: Outdoor workers are more vulnerable to developing occupational skin cancer, estimating that professionals with low level of education and European descent are at increased risk of developing this cancer. Therefore, companies need to invest more in the health of workers by providing protective equipment and thus preventing occupational skin cancer.

  11. [Radiotherapy of skin cancers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennequin, C; Rio, E; Mahé, M-A

    2016-09-01

    The indications of radiotherapy for skin cancers are not clearly defined because of the lack of randomised trials or prospective studies. For basal cell carcinomas, radiotherapy frequently offers a good local control, but a randomized trial showed that surgery is more efficient and less toxic. Indications of radiotherapy are contra-indications of surgery for patients older than 60, non-sclerodermiform histology and occurring in non-sensitive areas. Adjuvant radiotherapy could be proposed to squamous cell carcinomas, in case of poor prognostic factors. Dose of 60 to 70Gy are usually required, and must be modulated to the size of the lesions. Adjuvant radiotherapy seems beneficial for desmoplastic melanomas but not for the other histological types. Prophylactic nodal irradiation (45 to 50Gy), for locally advanced tumours (massive nodal involvement), decreases the locoregional failure rate but do not increase survival. Adjuvant radiotherapy (50 to 56Gy) for Merckel cell carcinomas increases also the local control rate, as demonstrated by meta-analysis and a large epidemiological study. Nodal areas must be included, if there is no surgical exploration (sentinel lymph node dissection). Kaposi sarcomas are radiosensitive and could be treated with relatively low doses (24 to 30Gy). Also, cutaneous lymphomas are good indications for radiotherapy: B lymphomas are electively treated with limited fields. The role of total skin electron therapy for T-lymphomas is still discussed; but palliative radiotherapy is very efficient in case of cutaneous nodules. Copyright © 2016 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. 6 Common Cancers - Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... involves the cells that produce the skin pigment melanin, which is responsible for skin and hair color. ... acted like a carrier pigeon to deliver a gene encoding a specific protein, called a T cell ...

  13. Methylation profiles of the BRCA1 promoter in hereditary and sporadic breast cancer among Han Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Da; Zhao, Yashuang; Xue, Weinan; Shan, Ming; Chen, Yanbo; Zhang, Youxue; Zhang, Guoqiang; Liu, Feng; Li, Dalin; Yang, Yanmei

    2012-09-01

    The development of breast cancer is a multistep process associated with complex changes in host gene expression patterns including inactivation of tumor suppressor genes and activation of oncogenes. Critically, hereditary predisposition plays a significant role in cancer susceptibility. However, mutation of the BRCA1 gene is found only in the minority of hereditary breast cancer, which indicates that there might be alternative, novel mechanisms contributing to inactivation of the BRCA1 gene. Studies have shown that aberrant methylation of genomic DNA plays an important role in carcinogenesis. The aim of this study was to investigate whether DNA methylation may be an alternative mechanism for the inactivation of BRCA1 as an epigenetic modification of the genome and whether hereditary breast cancer has a different BRCA1 methylation phenotype pattern than sporadic breast cancer. The pattern of CpG island methylation within the promoter region of BRCA1 was assessed by bisulfite sequencing DNA from peripheral blood cells of 72 patients with hereditary predisposition but without BRCA1 mutations and 30 sporadic breast cancer controls. The overall methylation level in patients with hereditary predisposition was significantly lower than that in the sporadic control group. However, patients with hereditary predisposition showed a significantly higher methylation susceptibility for the sites -518 when compared to controls. These results suggest that there might be different BRCA1 promoter methylation levels and patterns in sporadic and hereditary breast cancer in peripheral blood DNA. These findings may facilitate the early diagnosis of hereditary breast cancer.

  14. Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer syndrome: a family affair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, Jiasian; Kinnear, Ned; Douglass-Molloy, Hannah; Hennessey, Derek Barrry

    2017-01-25

    A 49-year-old woman with cutaneous and uterine leiomyomas, flank pain and a family history of hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC) syndrome sought genetic testing. She was found to harbour a fumarate hydratase (FH) genetic mutation and a previously undetected renal tumour. The patient underwent radical nephrectomy, and remains well at follow-up. HLRCC syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disease, with patients at increased risk for cutaneous leiomyomas, early-onset uterine leiomyomas and aggressive renal carcinoma. Although the syndrome may manifest life-threatening complications, outcomes may be improved by preventative family screening and surveillance, compelling early diagnosis. 2017 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  15. Cancer incidence in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Christine W; Black, Adam W; Lucas, F Lee; Vary, Calvin P H

    2017-02-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a genetic disorder characterized by deficiency in endoglin, an angiogenic protein. We previously showed that HHT, in which systemic endoglin expression is reduced, was associated with better survival outcomes in cancer patients (Duarte et al. in Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 23:117-125, 2014). Here, we evaluated whether HHT was associated with reduced cancer incidence. A matched case-control analysis using SEER Medicare was conducted to evaluate the effect of HHT on diagnosis with breast, colorectal, lung, or prostate cancer between 2000 and 2007 (n = 633,162). Cancer and non-cancer patients were matched on age, sex, SEER registry region, and length of the ascertainment period for HHT. We assessed crude association using a McNemar's test and then adjusted for demographic variables, cancer type, cancer stage, comorbidities, and ascertainment period with a conditional logistic regression model for cancer incidence. The McNemar's test showed no significant association between HHT and cancer incidence (p = 0.74). Adjusting for covariates with the conditional logistic regression model did not change the result [HHT odds ratio 0.978; 95 % CI (0.795, 1.204)]. The lack of association between HHT and cancer incidence is unexpected given the previously discovered significant association between HHT and improved survival outcomes (Duarte et al. in Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 23:117-125, 2014). We conclude that the protective effect of reduced systemic endoglin expression in cancer is specific to cancer progression through its effect on vascularization and other stromal effects but does not extend to cancer initiation.

  16. [Skin cancer incidence in Zacatecas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinedo-Vega, José Luis; Castañeda-López, Rosalba; Dávila-Rangel, J Ignacio; Mireles-García, Fernando; Ríos-Martínez, Carlos; López-Saucedo, Adrián

    2014-01-01

    Skin cancer is the most frequent cancer related to ultraviolet radiation. The aim was to estimate the incidence of skin cancer type, melanoma and non-melanoma in Zacatecas, Mexico. An epidemiological study was carried out during the period from 2008 to 2012. The data were obtained from the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS), Instituto de Seguridad y Servicios Sociales de los Trabajadores del Estado (ISSSTE), Secretaría de Salud de Zacatecas (SSZ) and a private source, the Centro Médico Alameda. The incidence and the global prevalence were estimated. We studied 958 skin cancer cases, histopathologically confirmed. The cases were distributed as: 63.6 % basal cell carcinomas, 25.8 % squamous cell carcinomas, and 10.6 % melanoma. Significantly higher proportions were observed in women in the basal cell carcinomas (60.4 %) and squamous cell carcinomas (53.4 %). However, in the case of melanoma, the major proportion was observed in men (55.9 %). The more frequent skin cancer location was the face and for basal cell carcinoma was the nose (53 %); for squamous cell carcinomas were the lips (36 %), and for melanoma it was also the nose (40 %). The skin cancer incidence was estimated in 20 cases for each 100 000 inhabitants. Linear regression analysis showed that the skin cancer is increasing at an annual rate of 10.5 %. The anatomical location indicates that solar UV radiation is a risk factor, since the face is the zone with major exposure to solar radiation.

  17. Endometrial cancers in mutation carriers from hereditary breast ovarian cancer syndrome kindreds: report from the Creighton University Hereditary Cancer Registry with review of the implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Murray Joseph; Bewtra, Chhanda; Lynch, Henry T; Snyder, Carrie L; Stacey, Mark

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to categorize and report endometrial cancers in mutation carriers from hereditary breast ovarian cancer families. Our Hereditary Cancer Registry was searched for gynecologic and peritoneal cancers linked to mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2. Invasive cancers were registered in 101 mutation carriers with complete pathology reports. Efforts were made to secure diagnostic surgical pathology tissues for review. All records and available diagnostic slides were meticulously studied, and primary cancers were classified. Eight malignancies were classified as primary endometrial cancers. Five of these were low- or intermediate-grade endometrioid carcinomas, and 3 were pure serous carcinomas or contained serous carcinoma elements mixed with high-grade endometrioid carcinoma. Breast cancers were diagnosed in 5 patients before and in 1 patient after endometrial carcinoma. Three endometrioid carcinomas were preceded by estrogen treatment, 2 for many years and the other for only 2 months, and 2 of the patients with serous carcinoma had been treated with tamoxifen. The finding that 8 of gynecologic and peritoneal cancers in 101 mutation carriers were endometrial cancers with a smaller proportion of endometrioid carcinomas than reported in general populations is added to the current controversial literature on endometrial cancer, particularly regarding serous carcinomas, in hereditary breast ovarian cancer syndrome. Well-designed prospective programs for standardized surgical and pathologic handling, processing, and reporting are essential for working out the pathogenesis, true risks, and best management of this disease in carriers of deleterious BRCA1 and BRCA2 germline mutations.

  18. UV Clothing and Skin Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Tarbuk, Anita; Grancarić, Ana Marija; Šitum, Mirna; Martinis, Mladen

    2010-01-01

    Skin cancer incidence in Croatia is steadily incresing in spite of public and govermental permanently measurements. It is clear that will soon become a major public health problem. The primary cause of skin cancer is believed to be a long exposure to solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation. The future designers of UV protective materials should be able to block totally the ultraviolet radiation. The aim of this paper is to present results of measurements concerning UV protecting ability of garments ...

  19. Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer in families referred for fumarate hydratase germline mutation analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, D. L.; Mensenkamp, A. R.; Badeloe, S.; Breuning, M. H.; Simon, M. E. H.; van Spaendonck, K. Y.; Aalfs, C. M.; Post, J. G.; Shanley, S.; Krapels, I. P. C.; Hoefsloot, L. H.; van Moorselaar, R. J. A.; Starink, T. M.; Bayley, J-P; Frank, J.; van Steensel, M. A. M.; Menko, F. H.

    Heterozygous fumarate hydratase (FH) germline mutations cause hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC), an autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by multiple cutaneous piloleiomyomas, uterine leiomyomas and papillary type 2 renal cancer. The main objective of our study was to

  20. Hereditary Breast Cancer in the Han Chinese Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Wenming; Wang, Xiaojia; Li, Ji-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among women and has a strong genetic background. So far, 13 breast cancer susceptibility genes of high or moderate penetrance have been identified. This review summarizes findings on these genes in Han Chinese. BRCA1 and BRCA2 are the 2 most important susceptibility genes. They have a relatively low mutation rate, and the most frequent sites of mutation are in exon 11. Frameshift mutations are the main type of mutation. Founder mutations may also exist, and BRCA-associated breast cancer has specific clinicopathologic characteristics. TP53 and PALB2 are relatively rare susceptibility genes. The relationship between the other 9 genes and breast cancer has not been fully elucidated. At present, the mutation spectrum for these susceptibility genes is not well understood in the Chinese population, and there are few reports on prognosis and clinical intervention in high-risk populations. Therefore, the true value of genetic counseling for breast cancer has yet to be realized. This article reviews studies of hereditary breast cancer in the Han Chinese population, highlights potential inadequacies, and provides a foundation for genetic counseling for breast cancer in China. PMID:23318652

  1. Epigenetic cancer prevention mechanisms in skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Kamalika; Hornyak, Thomas J; Eckert, Richard L

    2013-10-01

    Epigenetics is an important emerging area for study of mechanisms of cancer prevention. In recent years, it has been realized that cancer prevention agents, derived from natural dietary sources, impact cancer cell survival by modulating epigenetic processes. In the present manuscript, we review key epigenetic regulatory mechanisms and examine the impact of sulforaphane and green tea polyphenols on these processes. We also discuss available information on the epigenetics in the context of skin cancer. These studies indicate that diet-derived chemopreventive agents modulate DNA methylation status and histone modification via multiple processes and point to additional areas for study of epigenetic mechanisms in skin cancer.

  2. Hereditary Kidney Cancer Syndromes and Surgical Management of the Small Renal Mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Kevin A; Syed, Jamil S; Shuch, Brian

    2017-05-01

    The management of patients with hereditary kidney cancers presents unique challenges to clinicians. In addition to an earlier age of onset compared with patients with sporadic kidney cancer, those with hereditary kidney cancer syndromes often present with bilateral and/or multifocal renal tumors and are at risk for multiple de novo lesions. This population of patients may also present with extrarenal manifestations, which adds an additional layer of complexity. Physicians who manage these patients should be familiar with the underlying clinical characteristics of each hereditary kidney cancer syndrome and the suggested surgical approaches and recommendations of genetic testing for at-risk individuals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Prevalence of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer in patients with colorectal cancer in Iran: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Esmaeilzadeh

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third leading cause of cancer deaths in the world, and hereditary factors and family history are responsible for the incidence and development of the disease in 20 to 30% of cases. Lynch syndrome, or hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC, is the most common hereditary form of CRC that is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. This study consisted of a systematic literature review of research articles that described the prevalence of HNPCC in Iranian patients with CRC. Methods: A systematic literature search was conducted in the PubMed, Scopus, IranMedex, and Google Scholar databases to identify relevant articles that describe HNPCC or Lynch syndrome in patients with CRC in Iran. For this purpose, a keyword search of the following terms was employed: (((Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer OR HNPCC OR Lynch syndrome AND (colorectal cancer OR familial colorectal cancer OR colon cancer OR rectal cancer OR bowel cancer AND IRAN. All eligible documents were collected, and the desired data were qualitatively analyzed.Result: Of the 67 articles that were found via the initial database search, only 12 were deemed to be of relevance to the current study. These articles included a total population of 3237 and this sample was selected and qualitatively analyzed. The findings of the review revealed that the frequency of mutation in MLH1, MSH2, PMS2, and MSH6 genes varied between 23.1% and 62.5% among the studied families. This indicated that HNPCC is linked with up to 5.5% of the total cases of colorectal cancers in Iran.Conclusion: The results of this study revealed that the hereditary form of HNPCC or Lynch syndrome is significantly high among patients with CRC in Iran

  4. Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility genes (review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Ohno, Sumire; Sasaki, Yoshikazu; Matsuura, Miyuki

    2013-09-01

    Women with hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) syndrome represent a unique group who are diagnosed at a younger age and result in an increased lifetime risk for developing breast, ovarian and other cancers. This review integrates recent progress and insights into the molecular basis that underlie the HBOC syndrome. A review of English language literature was performed by searching MEDLINE published between January 1994 and October 2012. Mutations and common sequence variants in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA) genes are responsible for the majority of HBOC syndrome. Lifetime cancer risks in BRCA mutation carriers are 60-80% for breast cancer and 20-40% for ovarian cancer. Mutations in BRCA genes cannot account for all cases of HBOC, indicating that the remaining cases can be attributed to the involvement of constitutive epimutations or other cancer susceptibility genes, which include Fanconi anemia (FA) cluster (FANCD2, FANCA and FANCC), mismatch repair (MMR) cluster (MLH1, MSH2, PMS1, PMS2 and MSH6), DNA repair cluster (ATM, ATR and CHK1/2), and tumor suppressor cluster (TP53, SKT11 and PTEN). Sporadic breast cancers with TP53 mutations or epigenetic silencing (hypermethylation), ER- and PgR-negative status, an earlier age of onset and high tumor grade resemble phenotypically BRCA1 mutated cancers termed 'BRCAness', those with no BRCA mutations but with a dysfunction of the DNA repair system. In conclusion, genetic or epigenetic loss-of-function mutations of genes that are known to be involved in the repair of DNA damage may lead to increased risk of developing a broad spectrum of breast and ovarian cancers.

  5. Uptake of prenatal diagnostic testing for retinoblastoma compared to other hereditary cancer syndromes in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dommering, Charlotte J.; Henneman, Lidewij; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Jonker, Marianne A.; Tops, Carli M. J.; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Mensenkamp, Arjen R.; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Redeker, Egbert J. W.; de Die-Smulders, Christine E. M.; Moll, Annette C.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne

    Since the 1980s the genetic cause of many hereditary tumor syndromes has been elucidated. As a consequence, carriers of a deleterious mutation in these genes may opt for prenatal diagnoses (PND). We studied the uptake of prenatal diagnosis for five hereditary cancer syndromes in the Netherlands.

  6. Uptake of prenatal diagnostic testing for retinoblastoma compared to other hereditary cancer syndromes in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.J. Dommering (Charlotte); L. Henneman (Lidewij); A.H. van der Hout (Annemarie); M.A. Jonker (Marianne); C. Tops (Carli); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); R.B. van der Luijt (Rob); Mensenkamp, A.R. (Arjen R.); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); E.J.W. Redeker (Egbert); C. de Die-Smulders (Christine); A.C. Moll (Annette); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractSince the 1980s the genetic cause of many hereditary tumor syndromes has been elucidated. As a consequence, carriers of a deleterious mutation in these genes may opt for prenatal diagnoses (PND). We studied the uptake of prenatal diagnosis for five hereditary cancer syndromes in the

  7. Uptake of prenatal diagnostic testing for retinoblastoma compared to other hereditary cancer syndromes in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dommering, C.J.; Henneman, L.; Hout, A.H. van der; Jonker, M.A.; Tops, C.M.; Ouweland, A.M. van den; Luijt, R.B. van der; Mensenkamp, A.R.; Hogervorst, F.B.; Redeker, E.J.; Die-Smulders, C.E.M. de; Moll, A.C.; Meijers-Heijboer, H.

    2017-01-01

    Since the 1980s the genetic cause of many hereditary tumor syndromes has been elucidated. As a consequence, carriers of a deleterious mutation in these genes may opt for prenatal diagnoses (PND). We studied the uptake of prenatal diagnosis for five hereditary cancer syndromes in the Netherlands.

  8. With Summer Sun Comes Heightened Skin Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... comes a warning to protect yourself from skin cancer. "Skin cancer, like all types of cancer, is capable ... Doctors should examine patients with prior skin pre-cancers or skin cancers at least once a year, but some ...

  9. Skin Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2012 Media Resources Media Contacts Multicultural Media Events Scientific Meetings & Lectures Conferences Advisory Board Meetings Social Media Cancer Currents Blog About NCI NCI Overview History Contributing to Cancer Research Leadership Director's Page Deputy Director's Page Previous NCI ...

  10. Skin Cancer and UV Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarbuk Anita

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of skin cancer is increasing by epidemic proportions. Basal cell cancer remains the most common skin neoplasm, and simple excision is generally curative. On the other hand, aggressive local growth and metastasis are common features of malignant melanoma, which accounts for 75% of all deaths associated with skin cancer. The primary cause of skin cancer is long exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation (UV-R crossed with the amount of skin pigmentation and family genetics. It is believed that in childhood and adolescence, 80% of UV-R gets absorbed while in the remaining, 20 % gets absorbed later in the lifetime. This suggests that proper and early photoprotection may reduce the risk of subsequent occurrence of skin cancer. Reducing the exposure time to sunlight, using sunscreens and protective textiles are the three ways of UV protection. Most people think that all the clothing will protect them, but it does not provide full sun screening properties. Literature sources claim that only 1/3 of the spring and summer collections tested give off proper UV protection. This is very important during the summer months, when UV index is the highest. Fabric UV protection ability highly depends on large number of factors such as type of fiber, fabric surface, construction, porosity, density, moisture content, type and concentration of dyestuff, fluorescent whitening agents, UV-B protective agents (UV absorbers, as well as nanoparticles, if applied. For all of these reasons, in the present paper, the results of UV protecting ability according to AS/NZS 4399:1996 will be discussed to show that standard clothing materials are not always adequate to prevent effect of UV-R to the human skin; and to suggest the possibilities for its improvement for this purpose enhancing light conversion and scattering. Additionally, the discrepancy in UV protection was investigated in distilled water as well as Adriatic Sea water.

  11. Identification of novel hereditary cancer genes by whole exome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolenko, Anna P; Suspitsin, Evgeny N; Kuligina, Ekatherina Sh; Bizin, Ilya V; Frishman, Dmitrij; Imyanitov, Evgeny N

    2015-12-28

    Whole exome sequencing (WES) provides a powerful tool for medical genetic research. Several dozens of WES studies involving patients with hereditary cancer syndromes have already been reported. WES led to breakthrough in understanding of the genetic basis of some exceptionally rare syndromes; for example, identification of germ-line SMARCA4 mutations in patients with ovarian hypercalcemic small cell carcinomas indeed explains a noticeable share of familial aggregation of this disease. However, studies on common cancer types turned out to be more difficult. In particular, there is almost a dozen of reports describing WES analysis of breast cancer patients, but none of them yet succeeded to reveal a gene responsible for the significant share of missing heritability. Virtually all components of WES studies require substantial improvement, e.g. technical performance of WES, interpretation of WES results, mode of patient selection, etc. Most of contemporary investigations focus on genes with autosomal dominant mechanism of inheritance; however, recessive and oligogenic models of transmission of cancer susceptibility also need to be considered. It is expected that the list of medically relevant tumor-predisposing genes will be rapidly expanding in the next few years. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer Syndrome: CDH1 Mutations and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansford, Samantha; Kaurah, Pardeep; Li-Chang, Hector; Woo, Michelle; Senz, Janine; Pinheiro, Hugo; Schrader, Kasmintan A; Schaeffer, David F; Shumansky, Karey; Zogopoulos, George; Santos, Teresa Almeida; Claro, Isabel; Carvalho, Joana; Nielsen, Cydney; Padilla, Sarah; Lum, Amy; Talhouk, Aline; Baker-Lange, Katie; Richardson, Sue; Lewis, Ivy; Lindor, Noralane M; Pennell, Erin; MacMillan, Andree; Fernandez, Bridget; Keller, Gisella; Lynch, Henry; Shah, Sohrab P; Guilford, Parry; Gallinger, Steven; Corso, Giovanni; Roviello, Franco; Caldas, Carlos; Oliveira, Carla; Pharoah, Paul D P; Huntsman, David G

    2015-04-01

    E-cadherin (CDH1) is a cancer predisposition gene mutated in families meeting clinically defined hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC). Reliable estimates of cancer risk and spectrum in germline mutation carriers are essential for management. For families without CDH1 mutations, genetic-based risk stratification has not been possible, resulting in limited clinical options. To derive accurate estimates of gastric and breast cancer risks in CDH1 mutation carriers and determine if germline mutations in other genes are associated with HDGC. Testing for CDH1 germline mutations was performed on 183 index cases meeting clinical criteria for HDGC. Penetrance was derived from 75 mutation-positive families from within this and other cohorts, comprising 3858 probands (353 with gastric cancer and 89 with breast cancer). Germline DNA from 144 HDGC probands lacking CDH1 mutations was screened using multiplexed targeted sequencing for 55 cancer-associated genes. Accurate estimates of gastric and breast cancer risks in CDH1 mutation carriers and the relative contribution of other cancer predisposition genes in familial gastric cancers. Thirty-one distinct pathogenic CDH1 mutations (14 novel) were identified in 34 of 183 index cases (19%). By the age of 80 years, the cumulative incidence of gastric cancer was 70% (95% CI, 59%-80%) for males and 56% (95% CI, 44%-69%) for females, and the risk of breast cancer for females was 42% (95% CI, 23%-68%). In CDH1 mutation-negative index cases, candidate mutations were identified in 16 of 144 probands (11%), including mutations within genes of high and moderate penetrance: CTNNA1, BRCA2, STK11, SDHB, PRSS1, ATM, MSR1, and PALB2. This is the largest reported series of CDH1 mutation carriers, providing more precise estimates of age-associated risks of gastric and breast cancer that will improve counseling of unaffected carriers. In HDGC families lacking CDH1 mutations, testing of CTNNA1 and other tumor suppressor genes should be considered

  13. Genetic heterogeneity in hereditary breast cancer: Role of BRCA1 and BRCA2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebbeck, T.R.; Couch, F.J.; Kant, J. [Univ. of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1996-09-01

    The common hereditary forms of breast cancer have been largely attributed to the inheritance of mutations in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes. However, it is not yet clear what proportion of hereditary breast cancer is explained by BRCA1 and BRCA2 or by some other unidentified susceptibility gene(s). We describe the proportion of hereditary breast cancer explained by BRCA1 or BRCA2 in a sample of North American hereditary breast cancers and assess the evidence for additional susceptibility genes that may confer hereditary breast or ovarian cancer risk. Twenty-three families were identified through two high-risk breast cancer research programs. Genetic analysis was undertaken to establish linkage between the breast or ovarian cancer cases and markers on chromosomes 17q (BRCA1) and 13q (BRCA2). Mutation analysis in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes was also undertaken in all families. The pattern of hereditary cancer in 14 (61%) of the 23 families studied was attributed to BRCA1 by a combination of linkage and mutation analyses. No families were attributed to BRCA2. Five families (22%) provided evidence against linkage to both BRCA1 and BRCA2. No BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations were detected in these five families. The BRCA1 or BRCA2 status of four families (17%) could not be determined. BRCA1 and BRCA2 probably explain the majority of hereditary breast cancer that exists in the North American population. However, one or more additional genes may yet be found that explain some proportion of hereditary breast cancer. 19 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  14. Preventing Skin Cancer

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-05-18

    A man and a woman talk about how they’ve learned to protect their skin from the sun over the years. .  Created: 5/18/2016 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 5/18/2016.

  15. Previvors' Uncertainty Management Strategies for Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Marleah; Davidson, Lindy G

    2016-12-15

    Individuals with a genetic predisposition to develop hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC), but who have not been diagnosed with cancer, are referred to as previvors. Although genetic testing may reduce previvors' worries about whether or not they have a high genetic cancer risk, testing positive produces negative emotions and long-term uncertainty-thus requiring the management of uncertainty. Existing research indicates family, friends, and social support networks are limited in their assistance for previvors' uncertainty management. Therefore, this study examined how health care providers may assist previvors in uncertainty management by asking: What strategies do BRCA-positive previvors enact with their health care providers to help manage their uncertainty about HBOC? Purposive sampling was employed to recruit participants via online social media. The final sample consisted of 34 BRCA-positive women. Interviews revealed four uncertainty management strategies-seeking health care providers as informational sources, seeking health care providers as partners for decision making, seeking health care providers for supportive communication, and seeking referrals from health care providers for social support networks. Findings indicate that health care providers who are knowledgeable about BRCA, provide information, answer questions, check understanding, and provide additional resources assist previvors in managing their uncertainties by distinguishing options and fostering meaning.

  16. Genome-wide sequencing to identify the cause of hereditary cancer syndromes: with examples from familial pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Nicholas J.; Klein, Alison P.

    2013-01-01

    Advances in our understanding of the human genome and next-generation technologies have facilitated the use of genome-wide sequencing to decipher the genetic basis of Mendelian disease and hereditary cancer syndromes. The application of genome-wide sequencing in hereditary cancer syndromes has had mixed success, in part, due to complex nature of the underlying genetic architecture. In this review we discuss the use of genome-wide sequencing in both Mendelian diseases and hereditary cancer syndromes, highlighting the potential and challenges of this approach using familial pancreatic cancer as an example. PMID:23196058

  17. Hereditary Cancer: Example of a Public Health Approach to Ensure Population Health Benefits of Genetic Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Cragun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article introduces the identification, prevention, and treatment of hereditary cancer as an important public health concern. Hereditary cancer research and educational outreach activities are used to illustrate how public health functions can help to achieve health benefits of genetic and genomic medicine. First, we evaluate genetic service delivery through triangulating patient and provider survey results which reveal variability among providers in hereditary cancer knowledge and genetic service provision. Second, we describe efforts we have made to assure competency among healthcare providers and to inform, educate and empower patients with regard to the rapidly evolving field of genomics and hereditary cancer. Lastly, key policy-issues raised by our experiences are discussed in the context of how they may help us to more effectively translate future genomic technologies into practice in order to attain population health benefits from genetic and genomic medicine.

  18. Guidelines for the clinical management of Lynch syndrome (hereditary non-polyposis cancer).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasen, H.F.; Moslein, G.; Alonso, A.; Bernstein, I.; Bertario, L.; Blanco, I.; Burn, J.; Capella, G.; Engel, C.; Frayling, I.; Friedl, W.; Hes, F.J.; Hodgson, S.; Mecklin, J.P.; Moller, P.; Nagengast, F.M.; Parc, Y.; Renkonen-Sinisalo, L.; Sampson, J.R.; Stormorken, A.; Wijnen, J.

    2007-01-01

    Lynch syndrome (hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer) is characterised by the development of colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer and various other cancers, and is caused by a mutation in one of the mismatch repair genes: MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2. The discovery of these genes, 15 years ago,

  19. UV clothing and skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarbuk, Anita; Grancarić, Ana Marija; Situm, Mirna; Martinis, Mladen

    2010-04-01

    Skin cancer incidence in Croatia is steadily increasing in spite of public and governmental permanently measurements. It is clear that will soon become a major public health problem. The primary cause of skin cancer is believed to be a long exposure to solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation. The future designers of UV protective materials should be able to block totally the ultraviolet radiation. The aim of this paper is to present results of measurements concerning UV protecting ability of garments and sun-screening textiles using transmission spectrophotometer Cary 50 Solarscreen (Varian) according to AS/NZS 4399:1996; to show that standard clothing materials are not always adequate to prevent effect of UV radiation to the human skin; and to suggest the possibilities for its improvement for this purpose.

  20. Occupational skin cancer may be underreported

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carøe, Tanja Korfitsen; Ebbehøj, Niels Erik; Wulf, Hans Christian

    2013-01-01

    Skin cancer may, in some cases, be caused by occupational exposures. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of and exposures leading to occupationally induced skin cancers in Denmark during a ten-year period.......Skin cancer may, in some cases, be caused by occupational exposures. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of and exposures leading to occupationally induced skin cancers in Denmark during a ten-year period....

  1. Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer - pathophysiology and clinical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Hugo; Oliveira, Carla; Seruca, Raquel; Carneiro, Fátima

    2014-12-01

    Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer is an autosomal dominant inherited gastric cancer syndrome caused by germline alterations in CDH1 (E-cadherin) and CTNNA1 (alpha-E-catenin) genes. Germline CDH1 alterations encompass small frameshifts, splice-site, nonsense, and missense mutations, as well as large rearrangements. Most CDH1 truncating mutations are pathogenic, and several missense CDH1 mutations have a deleterious effect on E-cadherin function. CDH1 testing should be performed in probands. Screening of at-risk individuals is indicated from the age of consent following counselling with a multidisciplinary team. In mutation-positive individuals prophylactic gastrectomy is recommended. Endoscopic surveillance is an option for those refusing/postponing gastrectomy, those with mutations of undetermined significance, and in CDH1-negative families. Ongoing research focus on the search of genetic causes other than CDH1 or CTNNA1 germline defects; assessment of the pathogenicity and penetrance of CDH1 missense mutations and identification of somatic mechanisms behind the progression from early (indolent) lesions to invasive (lethal) carcinomas. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Mismatch repair defective breast cancer in the hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Uffe Birk; Sunde, Lone; Timshel, Susanne

    2010-01-01

    Whether or not breast cancer can be a feature of the hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) syndrome has been debated. In order to clarify if defective mismatch repair (MMR) may indeed play a role in breast cancer, we used the Danish HNPCC register to identify all breast cancers that o...... the low number do not motivate surveillance, our observation supports a role for defective MMR in breast cancer progression in HNPCC, presumably through accelerated accumulation of mutations in breast cancer-associated genes.......Whether or not breast cancer can be a feature of the hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) syndrome has been debated. In order to clarify if defective mismatch repair (MMR) may indeed play a role in breast cancer, we used the Danish HNPCC register to identify all breast cancers...... that occurred in MMR gene mutation carriers. In total, 20 female mutation carriers were diagnosed with breast cancer at mean 50 years of age. These tumors were predominantly ductal carcinomas with extensive lymphocytic reactions in 8/14 evaluated tumors. MMR protein immunostaining showed loss of expression...

  3. Advocate's Viewpoint on Hereditary Breast/Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolling-Dandrieu Francisca

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper discusses the presentation I held at the symposium on genetics during the 4th European Breast Cancer Conference held in Hamburg in March 2004. Primarily, the goals and working methods of the advocacy group specialised in Hereditary Breast/Ovarian Cancer of the Dutch Breast Cancer Patient Organisation known as BorstkankerVereniging Nederland (BVN are explained. Furthermore, some specific individual problems that mutation carriers might encounter before and after BRCA1/2 susceptibility testing are discussed. These include: dilemmas in choosing preventive interventions, dealing with the psychological impact of knowing you are a mutation carrier, dealing with the social implications of being genetically at risk, an example of insurance discrimination. In addition, some controversial social and ethical issues that are currently under debate are highlighted, such as the issue of the European patenting of the breast cancer susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2. Since this topic could also become relevant for other gene-related diseases, society as a whole has to consider the ethical and social implications related to the patenting of human genes in general. Another ethical area of debate is the controversial issue of prenatal BRCA testing and the choice of pregnancy termination. Finally, the Working Party pleads for the international co-operation and exchange of data and experience among professionals as well as patients. It appears that professionals in different European countries tend to advise on different risk management strategies and treatments and as such, the Working Party strongly advocates the international standardisation of risk management and treatment of mutation carriers. In this respect, specific attention should be given to a group that has had a non-informative or negative BRCA test result, because this group is still considered to be at high risk to develop the disease.

  4. Skin Cancer Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Control and Prevention Maintained By: Division of Cancer Prevention and Control Email Recommend Tweet YouTube Instagram Listen Watch RSS ABOUT About CDC Jobs Funding LEGAL Policies Privacy FOIA No Fear Act OIG 1600 Clifton Road Atlanta , GA 30329- ...

  5. Chemoprevention of Skin Cancer Program Project | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Skin cancer is the most common malignancy in the world. One out of three new cancers is a skin cancer. More than 1 million cases of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) (basal cell carcinoma [BCC] and squamous cell cancers [SCC]) occur annually. While the incidence rates for non-melanoma skin cancers continue to rise, there continues to be a substantial impact on morbidity, health and health care costs. |

  6. [Consensus on hereditary cancer between the Spanish Oncology Society and the primary care societies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles, L; Balmaña, J; Barrel, I; Grandes, S; Graña, B; Guillén, C; Marcos, H; Ramírez, D; Redondo, E; Sánchez, J

    2013-01-01

    It is believed that 5% of all cancers are hereditary, on being caused by mutations in the germinal line in cancer susceptibility genes. The hereditary pattern in the majority of cases is autosomal dominant. Genetic tests are only recommended to individuals whose personal or family history is highly suggestive of a hereditary cancer. The appropriate assessment of these individuals and their families must be performed in Cancer Genetic Counselling Units (UCGC). Representatives of the Spanish Medical Oncology Society (Sociedad Española de Oncología Médica [SEOM]) and the three primary care scientific societies: Spanish Society of Family and Community Medicine (Sociedad Española de Medicina de Familia y Comunitaria [SEMFyC]), Spanish Society of Primary Care Physicians (Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria [SEMERGEN]) and the Spanish Society of General and Family Doctors (Sociedad Española de Médicos Generales y de Familia [SEMG]), met to prepare this consensus document on hereditary cancer. The consensus identified the three main aspects: how to identify subjects at risk of hereditary cancer; how to refer to a UCGC; and the usefulness of the assessment and genetic studies. A document, with the text fully agreed by all the participants, has been prepared. It contains a summary of the principal characteristics of the care for individuals with hereditary cancer. It shows how to; identify them, assess them, refer them to a UCGC. How to assess their genetic risk, perform genetic studies, as well as prevention measures and reduction of the risk is also presented. This consensus document is a landmark in the relationships with several Scientific Societies that represent the professionals who provide care to individuals with cancer and their families, and will help to improve care in hereditary cancer in Spain. Copyright © 2013. Publicado por Elsevier España.

  7. [Colon cancer risk in persons at familial or hereditary risk aged < 55 years].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldmann, A; Raspe, H; Katalinic, A

    2009-10-01

    The question whether persons at familial or hereditary risk differ in terms of absolute, relative, or cumulative risk for colorectal cancer or not is of importance for the estimation of the potential of early detection of colorectal cancer in persons with familial or hereditary risks. Based on the results of a systematic literature search on absolute, relative, and cumulative risks of familial and hereditary disposition for colorectal cancer as well as actual German tumour incidence data, projections were conducted. The absolute risk for colorectal cancer in familial risk persons identified by means of a questionnaire is increased by a factor of 2 - 4 depending on the age at questioning, the age of the family member at cancer diagnosis and number of family members with colorectal cancer. Their absolute colorectal cancer risk equals that of persons without this risk who are 10 to 15 years older. Persons with hereditary risk show an increase in risk by a factor of 8 - 80. Persons aged 40 to 45 years with a familial risk constellation show a risk for colorectal cancer that equals the risk of 55- to 59-year-old persons from the general population. Therefore, the legal right for screening colonoscopy should be extended to the persons at risk aged 40 to 45 years. Persons suspected for hereditary risk should have a genetic counselling and, in case of germ mutation, a colonoscopic surveillance according to the actual guidelines. Copyright Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart . New York.

  8. A comprehensive custom panel design for routine hereditary cancer testing: preserving control, improving diagnostics and revealing a complex variation landscape

    OpenAIRE

    Elisabeth Castellanos; Bernat Gel; Inma Rosas; Eva Tornero; Sheila Santín; Raquel Pluvinet; Juan Velasco; Lauro Sumoy; Jesús del Valle; Manuel Perucho; Ignacio Blanco; Matilde Navarro; Joan Brunet; Marta Pineda; Lidia Feliubadaló

    2017-01-01

    We wanted to implement an NGS strategy to globally analyze hereditary cancer with diagnostic quality while retaining the same degree of understanding and control we had in pre-NGS strategies. To do this, we developed the I2HCP panel, a custom bait library covering 122 hereditary cancer genes. We improved bait design, tested different NGS platforms and created a clinically driven custom data analysis pipeline. The I2HCP panel was developed using a training set of hereditary colorectal cancer, ...

  9. The risk of brain tumours in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasen, HFA; Sanders, EACM; Taal, BG; Nagengast, FM; Griffioen, G; Menko, FH; Kleibeuker, JH; HouwingDuistermaat, JJ; Khan, PM

    1996-01-01

    Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is known to be associated with several extracolonic cancers, e.g., cancers of the endometrium, stomach, urinary tract, small bowel and ovary. An association between HNPCC and brain tumours has also been reported, although previous risk analysis did

  10. HEREDITARY CHARACTERISTICS BRCA1 5382INSC/СHEK2/BLM-ASSOCIATED BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Е. М. Bit-Sava

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The hereditary breast cancer (HBC occurs in 5–10 % of all cases of breast cancer. The mutations in the genes of high penetrance – BRCA1, BRCA2 is mainly the reason HBC. In the study presented the features of HBC (age of onset of the disease, cancer family history, primary tumor process multiple character. Depending on the presence of mutations BRCA1 5382insC, BLM, CHEK2 carried out a comparative analysis of the occurrence of hereditary characteristics in breast cancer patients.

  11. An effect from anticipation also in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer families without identified mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timshel, Susanne; Therkildsen, Christina; Bendahl, Pär-Ola

    2009-01-01

    the Amsterdam criteria for HNPCC and showed normal MMR function and/or lack of disease-predisposing MMR gene mutation. In total, 319 cancers from 212 parent-child pairs in 99 families were identified. A paired t-test and a bivariate statistical model were used to assess anticipation. Both methods demonstrated......Optimal prevention of hereditary cancer is central and requires initiation of surveillance programmes and/or prophylactic measures at a safe age. Anticipation, expressed as an earlier age at onset in successive generations, has been demonstrated in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC...... an effect from anticipation with cancer diagnosed mean 11.4 years (t-test, p

  12. An effect from anticipation also in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer families without identified mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timshel, Susanne; Therkildsen, Christina; Bendahl, Pär-Ola

    2009-01-01

    Optimal prevention of hereditary cancer is central and requires initiation of surveillance programmes and/or prophylactic measures at a safe age. Anticipation, expressed as an earlier age at onset in successive generations, has been demonstrated in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC...... the Amsterdam criteria for HNPCC and showed normal MMR function and/or lack of disease-predisposing MMR gene mutation. In total, 319 cancers from 212 parent-child pairs in 99 families were identified. A paired t-test and a bivariate statistical model were used to assess anticipation. Both methods demonstrated...... an effect from anticipation with cancer diagnosed mean 11.4 years (t-test, p

  13. Hereditary kidney cancer syndromes: Genetic disorders driven by alterations in metabolism and epigenome regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasumi, Hisashi; Yao, Masahiro

    2018-01-11

    Although hereditary kidney cancer syndrome accounts for around five percent of all kidney cancers, the mechanistic insight into tumor development in these rare conditions has provided the foundation for the development of molecular targeting agents currently used for sporadic kidney cancer. In the late 1980s, the comprehensive study for hereditary kidney cancer syndrome was launched in the National Cancer Institute, U.S.A. and the first kidney cancer associated gene, VHL was identified through kindred analysis of von Hippel-Lindau syndrome in 1993. Subsequent molecular studies on VHL function have elucidated that the VHL protein is a component of E3 ubiquitin ligase complex for hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF), which provided basis for the development of tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting the HIF-VEGF/PDGF pathway. Recent whole-exome sequencing analysis of sporadic kidney cancer exhibited the recurrent mutations in chromatin remodeling genes and the later study has revealed that several chromatin remodeling genes are altered in kidney cancer kindred at germline level. To date, more than 10 hereditary kidney cancer syndromes together with each responsible gene have been characterized and most of causative genes for these genetic disorders are associated with either metabolism or epigenome regulation. In this review article, we describe the molecular mechanisms how an alteration of each kidney cancer associated gene leads to renal tumorigenesis as well as denote therapeutic targets elicited by studies on hereditary kidney cancer. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. The spectrum of genetic variants in hereditary pancreatic cancer includes Fanconi anemia genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, Thomas P; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nehoray, Bita; Niell-Swiller, Mariana; Solomon, Ilana; Rybak, Christina; Blazer, Kathleen; Adamson, Aaron; Yang, Kai; Sand, Sharon; Guerrero-Llamas, Nancy; Castillo, Danielle; Herzog, Josef; Wu, Xiwei; Tao, Shu; Raja, Shivali; Chung, Vincent; Singh, Gagandeep; Nadesan, Sue; Brown, Sandra; Cruz-Correa, Marcia; Petersen, Gloria M; Weitzel, Jeffrey

    2017-07-08

    Approximately 5-10% of all pancreatic cancer patients carry a predisposing mutation in a known susceptibility gene. Since >90% of patients present with late stage disease, it is crucial to identify high risk individuals who may be amenable to early detection or other prevention. To explore the spectrum of hereditary pancreatic cancer susceptibility, we evaluated germline DNA from pancreatic cancer participants (n = 53) from a large hereditary cancer registry. For those without a known predisposition mutation gene (n = 49), germline next generation sequencing was completed using targeted capture for 706 candidate genes. We identified 16 of 53 participants (30%) with a pathogenic (P) or likely pathogenic (LP) variant that may be related to their hereditary pancreatic cancer predisposition; seven had mutations in genes associated with well-known cancer syndromes (13%) [ATM (2), BRCA2 (3), MSH2 (1), MSH6 (1)]. Many had mutations in Fanconi anemia complex genes [BRCA2 (3 participants), FANCF, FANCM]. Eight participants had rare protein truncating variants of uncertain significance with no other P or LP variants. Earlier age of pancreatic cancer diagnosis (57.5 vs 64.8 years) was indicative of possessing a P or LP variant, as was cancer family history (p values cancer predisposing genetic susceptibility in those at risk for hereditary pancreatic cancer may have direct applicability to clinical practice in cases with mutations in actionable genes. Future pancreatic cancer predisposition studies should include evaluation of the Fanconi anemia genes.

  15. Non-melanoma skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madan, Vishal; Lear, John T; Szeimies, Rolf-Markus

    2010-02-20

    The rising incidence and morbidity of non-melanoma skin cancers has generated great interest in unravelling of their pathogenesis and in the search for new non-invasive treatments. Whereas the role of cumulative sun exposure in pathogenesis of squamous-cell carcinoma seems clear, the relation between sun-exposure patterns and subtypes of basal-cell carcinoma remains undetermined. Several complex genotypic, phenotypic, and environmental factors contribute to pathogenesis of non-melanoma skin cancers. Unlike basal-cell carcinoma, squamous-cell carcinomas can arise from precursor lesions. Diagnosis of non-melanoma skin cancer is made clinically and confirmed by histological testing. Prognosis depends on lesion and host characteristics, which also dictate choice of treatment. Prevention strategies aim at reduction of sun exposure, but are of unproven benefit, especially for basal-cell carcinoma. Surgical excision with predetermined margins is the mainstay of treatment for squamous-cell carcinoma and for most basal-cell carcinomas. Of the new non-invasive treatments, only photodynamic therapy and topical imiquimod have become established treatments for specific subtypes of basal-cell carcinoma, and the search for more effective and tissue-salvaging therapies continues. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Genetic screening analysis of patients with hereditary diffuse gastric cancer from northern and northeastern Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Moreira-Nunes, Caroline Aquino; Barros, Mariceli Baia Leão; do Nascimento Borges, Bárbara; Montenegro, Raquel Carvalho; Lamarão, Leticia Martins; Ribeiro, Helem Ferreira; Bona, Amanda Braga; Assumpção, Paulo Pimentel; Rey, Juan Antonio; Pinto, Giovanny Rebouças; Burbano, Rommel Rodriguez

    2014-01-01

    Background Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) is a hereditary autosomal inherited syndrome associated with CDH1 germline mutations. In Brazil, gastrointestinal tumors are among the most prevalent tumor types and constitute a serious public health problem, especially in the northern and northeastern regions. This study aimed to investigate germline mutations, methylation pattern and genomic rearrangements in the CDH1 gene and quantitative changes in the DNA of HDGC patients in northern a...

  17. Practice Bulletin No. 182 Summary: Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome is an inherited cancer-susceptibility syndrome characterized by multiple family members with breast cancer, ovarian cancer, or both. Based on the contemporary understanding of the origins and management of ovarian cancer and for simplicity in this document, ovarian cancer also refers to fallopian tube cancer and primary peritoneal cancer. Clinical genetic testing for gene mutations allows more precise identification of those women who are at an increased risk of inherited breast cancer and ovarian cancer. For these individuals, screening and prevention strategies can be instituted to reduce their risks. Obstetrician-gynecologists play an important role in the identification and management of women with hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome. If an obstetrician-gynecologist or other gynecologic care provider does not have the necessary knowledge or expertise in cancer genetics to counsel a patient appropriately, referral to a genetic counselor, gynecologic or medical oncologist, or other genetics specialist should be considered (1). More genes are being discovered that impart varying risks of breast cancer, ovarian cancer, and other types of cancer, and new technologies are being developed for genetic testing. This Practice Bulletin focuses on the primary genetic mutations associated with hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome, BRCA1 and BRCA2, but also will briefly discuss some of the other genes that have been implicated.

  18. Discrepancies between estimated and perceived risk of cancer among individuals with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanska, K; Nilbert, Mef; Soller, M

    2007-01-01

    Communicating cancer risk and recommending adequate control programs is central for genetic counseling. Individuals affected by hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) are at about 80% life-time risk of colorectal cancer and for female carriers 40-60% risk of endometrial cancer and 10...... to individual characteristics. A perceived risk of colorectal cancer above 60% was reported by 22/45 individuals, and only one out of five mutation carriers reported a perceived risk > 80%. Female mutation carriers, individuals below age 50, and individuals who received their oncogenetic counseling within 1...... and an increasing amount of data on the cancer risk in HNPCC, a minority of the mutation carriers report a perceived risk at the same level as that communicated during oncogenetic counseling....

  19. Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer: not just a barium enema{exclamation_point} Radiographic manifestations and screening tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster, L.; Jeon, P. [Health Sciences Center, Diagnostic Imaging, St. John' s, Newfoundland (Canada)]. E-mail: u43dlb@mun.ca; Green, J. [Health Sciences Center, Discipline of Genetics, Faculty of Medicine, St. John' s, Newfoundland (Canada)

    2007-10-15

    Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is an autosomal dominant trait characterized by presentation of colorectal cancer (CRC) at an early age and by an increased risk of other primary malignancies, including those of the endometrium. ovaries, stomach, small bowel, upper biliary tract, skin, and brain, as well as by transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) that especially involves the renal pelvis and ureter. Because specific genetic mutations causing HNPCC have been recently discovered, genetic screening options have been developed for some families. Subsequently, radiology has an increasing role in surveillance for and management of these HNPCC-associated tumours. Although colonoscopy is the mainstay of a screening regimen for colon cancer, the barium enema has been a standard radiologic investigation. Further, computed tomography (CT) colonography (now practised in various centres) will, with further refinement, prove to be of increasing value. Ultrasonography is a standard investigation for endometrial and ovarian cancer, with CT and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging often playing a central role. As for TCC, intravenous urography (IVU) had been a standard investigation tool. However, with continued evolution of multidetector row CT with postprocessing manipulation (CT urography [CTU]), the role of IVU is diminishing in most centres. Newfoundland has a high prevalence of HNPCC exhibiting a broad range of manifestations. In this article, radiologic images of various tumours from individuals with HNPCC demonstrate a radiologic spectrum of this fascinating hereditary disease. Screening implications and specific screening methods are reviewed. (author)

  20. Human papillomaviruses and skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smola, Sigrun

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) infect squamous epithelia and can induce hyperproliferative lesions. More than 120 different HPV types have been characterized and classified into five different genera. While mucosal high-risk HPVs have a well-established causal role in anogenital carcinogenesis, the biology of cutaneous HPVs is less well understood. The clinical relevance of genus beta-PV infection has clearly been demonstrated in patients suffering from epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV), a rare inherited disease associated with ahigh rate of skin cancer. In the normal population genus beta-PV are suspected to have an etiologic role in skin carcinogenesis as well but this is still controversially discussed. Their oncogenic potency has been investigated in mouse models and in vitro. In 2009, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classified the genus beta HPV types 5 and 8 as "possible carcinogenic" biological agents (group 2B) in EV disease. This chapter will give an overview on the knowns and unknowns of infections with genus beta-PV and discuss their potential impact on skin carcinogenesis in the general population.

  1. Burden and Chemoprevention of Skin Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.M. Hollestein (Loes)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstractThe incidence of skin cancer is increasing in the Netherlands since 1989, the first year of the Netherlands Cancer Registry (NCR). In 2010 more than 43,000 patients were newly diagnosed with skin cancer in the Netherlands. During a life time at least 1 in 5 persons living in

  2. [Recognising hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer without a clear family history

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruin, J.H.F.M. de; Nagengast, F.M.; Ligtenberg, M.J.L.; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van; Niermeijer, M.F.; Hoogerbrugge-van der Linden, N.

    2004-01-01

    In 3 patients, 2 men aged 46 and 51 years and a woman aged 54 years, with colorectal cancer there was insufficient information on the basis of the family history to diagnose 'hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer' (HNPCC). Further investigation showed microsatellite instability in the tumour

  3. Informing relatives about their hereditary or familial cancer risk: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Geus, E.D.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304841161; Aalfs, C.M.; Verdam, M.G.E.; de Haes, J.C.J.M.; Smets, E.M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Genetic counseling for hereditary breast or colon cancer has implications for both counselees and their relatives. Although counselees are encouraged by genetic counselors to disclose genetic cancer risk information, they do not always share this information with their at-risk relatives.

  4. Informing relatives about their hereditary or familial cancer risk: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Geus, Eveline; Aalfs, Cora M.; Verdam, Mathilde G. E.; de Haes, Hanneke C. J. M.; Smets, Ellen M. A.

    2014-01-01

    Genetic counseling for hereditary breast or colon cancer has implications for both counselees and their relatives. Although counselees are encouraged by genetic counselors to disclose genetic cancer risk information, they do not always share this information with their at-risk relatives. Reasons for

  5. Informing relatives about their hereditary or familial cancer risk: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Geus, E.; Aalfs, C.M.; Verdam, M.G.E.; de Haes, H.C.J.M.; Smets, E.M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Genetic counseling for hereditary breast or colon cancer has implications for both counselees and their relatives. Although counselees are encouraged by genetic counselors to disclose genetic cancer risk information, they do not always share this information with their at-risk relatives.

  6. Deciphering the genetics of hereditary non-syndromic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaemmanuil, Eli; Carvajal-Carmona, Luis; Sellick, Gabrielle S; Kemp, Zoe; Webb, Emily; Spain, Sarah; Sullivan, Kate; Barclay, Ella; Lubbe, Steven; Jaeger, Emma; Vijayakrishnan, Jayaram; Broderick, Peter; Gorman, Maggie; Martin, Lynn; Lucassen, Anneke; Bishop, D Timothy; Evans, D Gareth; Maher, Eamonn R; Steinke, Verena; Rahner, Nils; Schackert, Hans K; Goecke, Timm O; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Propping, Peter; Van Wezel, Tom; Wijnen, Juul; Cazier, Jean-Baptiste; Thomas, Huw; Houlston, Richard S; Tomlinson, Ian

    2008-12-01

    Previously we have localized to chromosome 3q21-q24, a predisposition locus for colorectal cancer (CRC), through a genome-wide linkage screen (GWLS) of 69 families without familial adenomatous polyposis or hereditary non-polyposis CRC. To further investigate Mendelian susceptibility to CRC, we extended our screen to include a further GWLS of an additional 34 CRC families. We also searched for a disease gene at 3q21-q24 by linkage disequilibrium mapping in 620 familial CRC cases and 960 controls by genotyping 1676 tagging SNPs and sequencing 30 candidate genes from the region. Linkage analysis was conducted using the Affymetrix 10K SNP array. Data from both GWLSs were pooled and multipoint linkage statistics computed. The maximum NPL score (3.01; P=0.0013) across all families was at 3q22, maximal evidence for linkage coming from families segregating rectal CRC. The same genomic position also yielded the highest multipoint heterogeneity LOD (HLOD) score under a dominant model (HLOD=2.79; P=0.00034), with an estimated 43% of families linked. In the case-control analysis, the strongest association was obtained at rs698675 (P=0.0029), but this was not significant after adjusting for multiple testing. Analysis of candidate gene mapping to the region of maximal linkage on 3q22 failed to identify a causal mutation. There was no evidence for linkage to the previously reported 9q CRC locus (NPL=0.95, P=0.23; HLOD(dominant)=0.40, HLOD(recessive)=0.20). Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that variation at 3q22 contributes to the risk of CRC, but this is unlikely to be mediated through a restricted set of alleles.

  7. Outdoor sports and skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moehrle, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation is estimated to be one of the most important risk factors for nonmelanoma and melanoma skin cancers. Athletes practicing outdoor sports receive considerable UV doses because of training and competition schedules with high sun exposure, and in alpine sports, by altitude-related increase of UV radiation and reflection from snow- and ice-covered surfaces. Extreme UV exposure in outdoor sports such as skiing, mountaineering, cycling, or triathlon has been documented in a series of dosimetric studies. Sweating because of physical exercise may contribute to UV-related skin damage as it increases the individual photosensitivity of the skin, facilitating the risk of sunburns. Large epidemiological studies showed that recreational activities such as sun exposure on the beach or during water sports were associated with an increased risk of basal cell carcinoma, whereas skiing has been shown to be at increased risk for squamous cell carcinoma. Risk factors of cutaneous melanoma such as the number of melanocytic nevi and solar lentigines have been found to be more frequent in subjects practicing endurance outdoor sports. An increased risk for cutaneous melanoma may be assumed for these athletes. In addition to the important sun exposure, exercise-induced immunosuppression may increase the risk for nonmelanoma skin cancer and cutaneous melanoma in athletes. Frequently, athletes seem to know little about the risk of sun exposure. Protective means such as avoiding training and competition with considerable sun exposure, choosing adequate clothing, and applying water-resistant sunscreen still need to be propagated in the community of outdoor sportsmen.

  8. Germ line mutations of mismatch repair genes in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer patients with small bowel cancer: International Society for Gastrointestinal Hereditary Tumours Collaborative Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Jae-Gahb; Kim, Duck-Woo; Hong, Chang Won

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of study was to determine the clinical characteristics and mutational profiles of the mismatch repair genes in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) patients with small bowel cancer (SBC). EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: A questionnaire was mailed to 55 members...... of the International Society for Gastrointestinal Hereditary Tumours, requesting information regarding patients with HNPCC-associated SBC and germ line mismatch repair gene mutations. RESULTS: The study population consisted of 85 HNPCC patients with identified mismatch repair gene mutations and SBCs. SBC was the first...... HNPCC-associated malignancy in 14 of 41 (34.1%) patients for whom a personal history of HNPCC-associated cancers was available. The study population harbored 69 different germ line mismatch repair gene mutations, including 31 mutations in MLH1, 34 in MSH2, 3 in MSH6, and 1 in PMS2. We compared...

  9. Population screening for hereditary and familial cancer syndromes in Valka district of Latvia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanags Andrejs

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The growing possibilities of cancer prevention and treatment as well as the increasing knowledge about hereditary cancers require proper identification of the persons at risk. The aim of this study was to test the outcome of population screening in the scientific and practical evaluation of hereditary cancer. Methods Population screening for hereditary cancer was carried out retrospectively in a geographic area of Latvia. Family cancer histories were collected from 18642 adults representing 76.6% of the population of this area. Hereditary cancer syndromes were diagnosed clinically. Molecular testing for BRCA1 founder mutations 300 T/G, 4153delA and 5382insC was conducted in 588 persons who reported at least one case of breast or ovary cancer among blood relatives. Results Clinically, 74 (0.40%; 95% confidence interval (CI: 0.32 - 0.50% high-risk and 548 (2.94%, 95% CI: 2.71 - 3.19 moderate-risk hereditary cancer syndromes were detected covering wide cancer spectrum. All syndromes were characterised by high cancer frequency among blood relatives ranging 8.6 - 46.2% in contrast to spouse correlation of 2.5 - 3.6%. The mean age of cancer onset ranged 38.0 - 72.0 years in different syndromes. The BRCA1 gene mutations were identified in 10 (1.7%; 95% CI: 0.9 - 3.1% probands. Families with established BRCA1 gene founder mutations were identified with the frequency 1:2663 clinically screened persons. Conclusions Population screening is a useful practical tool for the identification of persons belonging to families with high frequency of malignant tumours. The whole hereditary and familial cancer spectrum along with the age structure was identified adjusting follow-up guidelines. Another benefit of the population screening is the possibility to identify oncologically healthy persons belonging to hereditary and familial cancer families so that appropriate surveillance can be offered. Clinical diagnostics is appropriate for population

  10. Knowledge about breast cancer and hereditary breast cancer among nurses in a public hospital 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prolla, Carmen Maria Dornelles; da Silva, Patrícia Santos; Netto, Cristina Brinckmann Oliveira; Goldim, José Roberto; Ashton-Prolla, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the knowledge of nurses involved in the care of oncology patients in a public university hospital, regarding breast cancer and hereditary breast cancer, and to verify the use of such knowledge in their daily practice. METHODS: This is a descriptive cross-sectional study. Data were obtained through a structured, self-administered questionnaire. Out of 154 nurses, 137 (88.9%) agreed to participate in the study. Two questionnaires were excluded such that 135 questionnaires were analyzed. RESULTS: The global percentage of correct answers was not associated with age (p=0.173) or degree/specialization (p=0.815). Questions were classified into categories. In categories involving knowledge of established breast cancer risk factors and indicators of hereditary breast cancer, the rate of correct answers was 65.8% and 66.4%, respectively. On the practice of genetic counseling, 40.7% of those interviewed were not sure about the definition of genetic counseling and 78.5% reported never having identified or referred a patient at genetic risk for specialized risk assessment. Practice of educational actions regarding this subject was reported by 48.5% of those interviewed. CONCLUSION: This study reinforces the need to develop qualifying actions for nurses, so that strategies to control breast cancer become effective in their health care practice. PMID:25806636

  11. Knowledge about breast cancer and hereditary breast cancer among nurses in a public hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Maria Dornelles Prolla

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the knowledge of nurses involved in the care of oncology patients in a public university hospital, regarding breast cancer and hereditary breast cancer, and to verify the use of such knowledge in their daily practice.METHODS: This is a descriptive cross-sectional study. Data were obtained through a structured, self-administered questionnaire. Out of 154 nurses, 137 (88.9% agreed to participate in the study. Two questionnaires were excluded such that 135 questionnaires were analyzed.RESULTS: The global percentage of correct answers was not associated with age (p=0.173 or degree/specialization (p=0.815. Questions were classified into categories. In categories involving knowledge of established breast cancer risk factors and indicators of hereditary breast cancer, the rate of correct answers was 65.8% and 66.4%, respectively. On the practice of genetic counseling, 40.7% of those interviewed were not sure about the definition of genetic counseling and 78.5% reported never having identified or referred a patient at genetic risk for specialized risk assessment. Practice of educational actions regarding this subject was reported by 48.5% of those interviewed.CONCLUSION: This study reinforces the need to develop qualifying actions for nurses, so that strategies to control breast cancer become effective in their health care practice.

  12. MLH1 and MSH2 protein expression as a pre-screening marker in hereditary and non-hereditary endometrial hyperplasia and cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berends, MJW; Hollema, H; Wu, Y; van der Sluis, T; Mensink, RGJ; ten Hoor, KA; Sijmons, RH; de Vries, EGE; Pras, E; Mourits, MJE; Hofstra, RMW; Buys, CHCM; Kleibeuker, JH; van der Zee, AGJ

    2001-01-01

    The predictive value of MLH1 or MSH2 protein expression for the presence of truncating germline mutations was examined in benign and (pre)malignant endometrial samples from 3 patient groups: (1) 10 endometrial cancer patients from hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) families with (n =

  13. Advantages and Some Remaining Challenges in Hereditary Gastrointestinal Cancer Panel Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maga, Tara; Balay, Lara; Jung, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer affects 1 in 20 men and women in their lifetime. About 30% of these cases have been shown to be familial while only about 5% are associated with a highly penetrant hereditary colon cancer syndrome. In many familial cases, however, no mutation in the commonly implicated CRC genes is found. With the development of next-generation sequencing, testing laboratories are now able to offer hereditary gastrointestinal panel testing, which allows for the simultaneous sequencing of a much broader set of genes associated with CRC. We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of such testing to inform best clinical practice. PMID:28492537

  14. Non Melanoma Skin Cancer Pathogenesis Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didona, Dario; Paolino, Giovanni; Bottoni, Ugo; Cantisani, Carmen

    2018-01-02

    (1) Background: Non-melanoma skin cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in humans. The process of skin carcinogenesis is still not fully understood. However, several studies have been conducted to better explain the mechanisms that lead to malignancy; (2) Methods: We reviewed the more recent literature about the pathogenesis of non-melanoma skin cancer focusing on basal cell carcinomas, squamous cell carcinoma and actinic keratosis; (3) Results: Several papers reported genetic and molecular alterations leading to non-melanoma skin cancer. Plenty of risk factors are involved in non-melanoma skin cancer pathogenesis, including genetic and molecular alterations, immunosuppression, and ultraviolet radiation; (4) Conclusion: Although skin carcinogenesis is still not fully understood, several papers demonstrated that genetic and molecular alterations are involved in this process. In addition, plenty of non-melanoma skin cancer risk factors are now known, allowing for an effective prevention of non-melanoma skin cancer development. Compared to other papers on the same topic, our review focused on molecular and genetic factors and analyzed in detail several factors involved in non-melanoma skin cancer.

  15. Be vigilant for skin manifestations of inherited cancer syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tidman, Alice SM

    2017-01-01

    More than 200 hereditary cancer susceptibility syndromes have been described, and it is thought that they account for 5-10% of all cancers. Many have dermatological manifestations (usually lesions, occasionally rashes) which frequently precede other systemic pathology. Dermatological signs are usually non-specific and often trivial in appearance, making their significance easy to overlook and a clinical diagnosis challenging. Histological examination is often required to differentiate lesions. They are usually benign and pathologically unrelated to the primary tumours, with the exception of the atypical moles of the dysplastic naevus syndrome, and may present simply as a cosmetic problem for the patient. However, a number of cancer syndromes exhibit an increased risk of developing malignant skin lesions. For instance, Gorlin syndrome (nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome) which typically results in the development of multiple basal cell carcinomas, within the first few decades of life. The majority of cancer syndromes with skin signs are inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern demonstrating complete penetrance before the age of 70. Once a cancer syndrome has been diagnosed, the cornerstone of management is frequent surveillance for the early detection and treatment of malignancy. Genetic testing and counselling should be offered to family members.

  16. Development and validation of a 36-gene sequencing assay for hereditary cancer risk assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina S. Vysotskaia

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The past two decades have brought many important advances in our understanding of the hereditary susceptibility to cancer. Numerous studies have provided convincing evidence that identification of germline mutations associated with hereditary cancer syndromes can lead to reductions in morbidity and mortality through targeted risk management options. Additionally, advances in gene sequencing technology now permit the development of multigene hereditary cancer testing panels. Here, we describe the 2016 revision of the Counsyl Inherited Cancer Screen for detecting single-nucleotide variants (SNVs, short insertions and deletions (indels, and copy number variants (CNVs in 36 genes associated with an elevated risk for breast, ovarian, colorectal, gastric, endometrial, pancreatic, thyroid, prostate, melanoma, and neuroendocrine cancers. To determine test accuracy and reproducibility, we performed a rigorous analytical validation across 341 samples, including 118 cell lines and 223 patient samples. The screen achieved 100% test sensitivity across different mutation types, with high specificity and 100% concordance with conventional Sanger sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA. We also demonstrated the screen’s high intra-run and inter-run reproducibility and robust performance on blood and saliva specimens. Furthermore, we showed that pathogenic Alu element insertions can be accurately detected by our test. Overall, the validation in our clinical laboratory demonstrated the analytical performance required for collecting and reporting genetic information related to risk of developing hereditary cancers.

  17. Skin Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Controlled Tanning Is Not Safe Tanning Guidelines for School Programs to Prevent Skin Cancer Research Related Links Buttons and Badges Stay Informed Rates by Race and Ethnicity for Other Kinds of Cancer All ...

  18. Hereditary breast cancer: an update on risk assessment and genetic testing in 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuckey, Ashley R; Onstad, Michaela A

    2015-08-01

    The last 5 years have brought significant innovation and advancement in the genetics of breast cancer. This clinical opinion aims to summarize and update current approaches to the care of women at risk for a hereditary predisposition to breast cancer. Implications of the BRCA mutation and several other hereditary syndromes will be discussed. Risk assessment and criteria for referral to cancer genetic professionals as well as high-risk screening and prophylactic options will be reviewed. Finally, the newly available genetic cancer panels and implications of mutations in some of these lesser known genes will be discussed. As the field of cancer genetics continues to evolve, the education of medical students, residents, and faculty will be paramount to identify appropriate candidates for genetic counseling and testing in conjunction with cancer genetic professionals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Outcome of genetic evaluation of patients with kidney cancer referred for suspected hereditary cancer syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratton, Kelly L; Alanee, Shaheen; Glogowski, Emily A; Schrader, Kasmintan A; Rau-Murthy, Rohini; Klein, Robert; Russo, Paul; Coleman, Jonathan; Offit, Kenneth

    2016-05-01

    To analyze patients with kidney cancer referred for evaluation at a high-volume genetics service at a comprehensive cancer center and identify factors associated with positive tests for hereditary cancer syndromes. A retrospective review of patients referred to the Clinical Genetics Service at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center was performed, and patients with a personal history of kidney cancer were identified. Patient and disease characteristics were reviewed. In all, 4 variables including age at diagnosis of kidney tumor, presence of syndromic manifestations, family history of kidney cancer, and number of primary malignancies were evaluated for association with positive test results in 2 groups: patients tested for renal cell carcinoma syndromes and Lynch syndrome. Guidance for genetic testing strategy in patients with kidney cancer is provided. Between 1999 and 2012, 120 patients with a history of kidney cancer were evaluated by the Clinical Genetics Service. The mean age at kidney cancer diagnosis was 52 years (interquartile range: 42-63), with 57% being women. A family history of kidney cancer was reported by 39 patients (33%). Time between diagnosis of first cancer and genetic consultation was 5 years in the remaining 23%. Overall, 95 patients were tested for genetic abnormalities with 27 (28%) testing positive. Testing for renal cell carcinoma (RCC)-related syndromes was performed on 43 patients, with 13 testing positive (30%). Lynch syndrome testing was positive in 9 patients (32%) after 28 were tested. In RCC-associated syndromes, young age of diagnosis was associated with positive test results. Conversely, syndromic manifestations and increasing number of primary malignancies were associated with positive Lynch testing. The discovery of inherited kidney cancer syndromes has provided a unique opportunity to identify patients at increased risk for cancer. Factors associated with positive genetic testing are unique to different syndromes. These data

  20. Familial pancreatic cancer and hereditary syndromes: screening strategy for high-risk individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubayashi, Hiroyuki

    2011-11-01

    Globally, and almost evenly across nations, a familial disposition can be found in 4-10% of patients with pancreatic cancer (PC). A family history of PC is a risk for this disease and the risk level changes in correlation with the number of affected relatives. Several hereditary syndromes with potential germline mutation also have a high risk for PC; however, little is yet known regarding the genes responsible for familial pancreatic cancer (FPC). Characteristics of FPC cases are similar to those of other familial tumors, including younger onset than in sporadic cases and an ethnic difference (Ashkenazi Jewish > other Caucasian). Other risks resemble those of sporadic cases and include smoking and diabetes mellitus. People with several genetic syndromes, including Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, hereditary pancreatitis, breast-ovarian cancer syndrome, hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, and familial adenomatous polyposis also have an increased risk of PC. In many countries, but not yet in Japan, screening of these high-risk individuals is now ongoing for the detection of early PC under established familial pancreatic cancer registries. In addition to the ordinary risk factors, such as smoking, diabetes, pancreatitis, cysts, duct ectasia, and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN), individuals with a family history of PC and hereditary syndromes are expected to be entered into the screening protocol.

  1. Can You Recognize the Signs of Skin Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 166922.html Can You Recognize the Signs of Skin Cancer? First step: Get to know your own skin ... 2017 WEDNESDAY, June 28, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- With skin cancer the most common type of cancer in the ...

  2. BRCA1/2-negative hereditary triple-negative breast cancers exhibit BRCAness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domagala, Pawel; Hybiak, Jolanta; Cybulski, Cezary; Lubinski, Jan

    2017-04-01

    BRCA1/2-associated breast cancers are sensitive to poly(ADPribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors and platinum compounds mainly due to their deficiency in DNA repair via homologous recombination (HR). However, approximately only 15% of triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs) are BRCA1/2-associated. TNBCs that exhibit BRCAness (a phenotype reflecting impaired HR in BRCA1/2-negative tumors) are also regarded sensitive to PARP inhibitors and platinum compounds. Thus, we hypothesized that hereditary BRCA1/2-negative TNBCs may exhibit BRCAness. To find a subset of hereditary BRCA1/2-negative TNBCs among 360 TNBCs, we first identified a group of 41 hereditary TNBCs by analyzing the family histories of the patients. Next, we tested this group for the presence of germline BRCA1/2 mutations, and finally, we compared the expression levels of 120 genes involved in HR and five other major mechanisms of DNA damage repair between BRCA1/2-associated and BRCA1/2-negative subgroups of hereditary TNBCs using real-time PCR arrays. Approximately 73% of the hereditary TNBCs were BRCA1/2-associated and 27% were BRCA1/2-negative. The expression levels of the analyzed genes showed no significant differences between these two subgroups indicating the BRCAness of the BRCA1/2-negative hereditary TNBCs and thereby distinguishing a novel subset of TNBCs as a potential target for PARP inhibitors or platinum-based therapy. The results show the significance of family history in selecting patients with TNBC for therapies directed at incompetent DNA repair (e.g., PARP inhibitors and/or platinum-based therapies) and indicate that a relatively simple strategy for broadening the target group for these modes of treatment is to identify patients with hereditary TNBCs. © 2016 UICC.

  3. Laser speckle and skin cancer: skin roughness assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tim K.; Tchvialeva, Lioudmila; Zeng, Haishan; McLean, David I.; Lui, Harvey

    2009-10-01

    Incidence of skin cancer has been increasing rapidly since the last few decades. Non-invasive optical diagnostic tools may improve the diagnostic accuracy. In this paper, skin structure, skin cancer statistics and subtypes of skin cancer are briefly reviewed. Among the subtypes, malignant melanoma is the most aggressive and dangerous; early detection dramatically improves the prognosis. Therefore, a non-invasive diagnostic tool for malignant melanoma is especially needed. In addition, in order for the diagnostic tool to be useful, it must be able to differentiate melanoma from common skin conditions such as seborrheic keratosis, a benign skin disease that resembles melanoma according to the well known clinical-assessment ABCD rule. The key diagnostic feature between these two diseases is surface roughness. Based on laser speckle contrast, our research team has recently developed a portable, optical, non-invasive, in-vivo diagnostic device for quantifying skin surface roughness. The methodology of our technique is described in details. Examining the preliminary data collected in a pilot clinical study for the prototype, we found that there was a difference in roughness between melanoma and seborrheic keratosis. In fact, there was a perfect cutoff value for the two diseases based on our initial data.

  4. A comprehensive custom panel design for routine hereditary cancer testing: preserving control, improving diagnostics and revealing a complex variation landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos, Elisabeth; Gel, Bernat; Rosas, Inma; Tornero, Eva; Santín, Sheila; Pluvinet, Raquel; Velasco, Juan; Sumoy, Lauro; Del Valle, Jesús; Perucho, Manuel; Blanco, Ignacio; Navarro, Matilde; Brunet, Joan; Pineda, Marta; Feliubadaló, Lidia; Capellá, Gabi; Lázaro, Conxi; Serra, Eduard

    2017-01-04

    We wanted to implement an NGS strategy to globally analyze hereditary cancer with diagnostic quality while retaining the same degree of understanding and control we had in pre-NGS strategies. To do this, we developed the I2HCP panel, a custom bait library covering 122 hereditary cancer genes. We improved bait design, tested different NGS platforms and created a clinically driven custom data analysis pipeline. The I2HCP panel was developed using a training set of hereditary colorectal cancer, hereditary breast and ovarian cancer and neurofibromatosis patients and reached an accuracy, analytical sensitivity and specificity greater than 99%, which was maintained in a validation set. I2HCP changed our diagnostic approach, involving clinicians and a genetic diagnostics team from panel design to reporting. The new strategy improved diagnostic sensitivity, solved uncertain clinical diagnoses and identified mutations in new genes. We assessed the genetic variation in the complete set of hereditary cancer genes, revealing a complex variation landscape that coexists with the disease-causing mutation. We developed, validated and implemented a custom NGS-based strategy for hereditary cancer diagnostics that improved our previous workflows. Additionally, the existence of a rich genetic variation in hereditary cancer genes favors the use of this panel to investigate their role in cancer risk.

  5. A comprehensive custom panel design for routine hereditary cancer testing: preserving control, improving diagnostics and revealing a complex variation landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos, Elisabeth; Gel, Bernat; Rosas, Inma; Tornero, Eva; Santín, Sheila; Pluvinet, Raquel; Velasco, Juan; Sumoy, Lauro; del Valle, Jesús; Perucho, Manuel; Blanco, Ignacio; Navarro, Matilde; Brunet, Joan; Pineda, Marta; Feliubadaló, Lidia; Capellá, Gabi; Lázaro, Conxi; Serra, Eduard

    2017-01-01

    We wanted to implement an NGS strategy to globally analyze hereditary cancer with diagnostic quality while retaining the same degree of understanding and control we had in pre-NGS strategies. To do this, we developed the I2HCP panel, a custom bait library covering 122 hereditary cancer genes. We improved bait design, tested different NGS platforms and created a clinically driven custom data analysis pipeline. The I2HCP panel was developed using a training set of hereditary colorectal cancer, hereditary breast and ovarian cancer and neurofibromatosis patients and reached an accuracy, analytical sensitivity and specificity greater than 99%, which was maintained in a validation set. I2HCP changed our diagnostic approach, involving clinicians and a genetic diagnostics team from panel design to reporting. The new strategy improved diagnostic sensitivity, solved uncertain clinical diagnoses and identified mutations in new genes. We assessed the genetic variation in the complete set of hereditary cancer genes, revealing a complex variation landscape that coexists with the disease-causing mutation. We developed, validated and implemented a custom NGS-based strategy for hereditary cancer diagnostics that improved our previous workflows. Additionally, the existence of a rich genetic variation in hereditary cancer genes favors the use of this panel to investigate their role in cancer risk. PMID:28051113

  6. Prevention of non-melanoma skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratton, S P

    2001-07-01

    Basal cell and squamous cell carcinomas comprise the majority of non-melanoma skin cancers. Whereas the incidence of skin cancer is equivalent to that of all other cancers combined, non-melanoma skin cancer receives a disproportionate share of attention because mortality is relatively low. However, the impact on public health is striking. This review is intended to update readers on the current findings in research on the prevention of these diseases. Topics covered include preventive strategies targeting high-risk populations, chemoprevention (including treatment of intraepithelial neoplasia), and an overview of recent and ongoing clinical and preclinical studies involving new chemopreventive agents.

  7. Need For Improved Skin Cancer Surveillance in Pediatric Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Divya; Lee, Thomas; Friedman, Adam J; Redbord, Kelley Pagliai

    2017-04-01

    Survivors of pediatric cancer are at increased risk of developing secondary malignancies, with non-melanoma skin cancer being the most common. These patients are also at increased risk of melanoma. Currently, guidelines provided by the National Cancer Institute and Children's Oncology Group emphasize the importance of annual clinical examination for skin cancer screening; however, the literature reports that less than one-third of survivors of pediatric cancer have ever had a clinical skin exam by a physician. In this article, we review the risk factors for skin cancer in survivors of pediatric cancer as well as the current evidence and recommendations for their care. We suggest that dermatologists collectively establish guidelines for skin cancer surveillance in survivors of pediatric cancer.

  8. Proximal adenomas in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer are prone to rapid malignant transformation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijcken, FEM; Hollema, H; Kleibeuker, JH

    Background: Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is thought to arise from adenomas. HNPCC mostly occurs in the proximal colon. We investigated whether this proximal preponderance is due to a proximal preponderance of adenomas or (also) differences in transformation rates from adenomas

  9. Genetic etiology of hereditary colorectal cancer: new mechanisms and advanced mutation detection techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gazzoli, I.

    2006-01-01

    The human DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system functions to repair mispaired bases in DNA that result from DNA replication errors and thereby prevents the accumulation of mutations due to such replication errors. Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), the most common form of inherited colon

  10. Our genes, our selves: hereditary breast cancer and biological citizenship in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, Pål; Hovig, Eivind

    2017-09-22

    The concept 'hereditary breast cancer' is commonly used to delineate a group of people genetically at risk for breast cancer-all of whom also having risk for other cancers. People carrying pathogenic variants of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are often referred to as those having predisposition for 'hereditary breast cancer'. The two genes, however, are when altered, associated with different risks for and dying from breast cancer. The main risk for dying for carriers of both genes is from ovarian cancer. These biological facts are of philosophical interest, because they are the facts underlying the public debate on BRCA1/2 genetic testing as a model for the discussion of how to implement genetic knowledge and technologies in personalized medicine. A contribution to this public debate describing inherited breast cancer as 'biological citizenship' recently printed in Med Health Care and Philos illustrated how fragmented and detached from the biological and socio-political facts this debate sometimes is. We here briefly summarize some of the biological facts and how they are implemented in today's healthcare based on agreed philosophical, ethical and moral principles. The suggestion of a 'biological citizenship' defined by hereditary breast cancer is incorrect and ill-advised. 'Identity politics' focusing hereditary breast cancer patients as a group based on a bundle of ill-defined negative arguments is well known, but is supported neither by scientific nor philosophical arguments. To those born with the genetic variants described, the philosophical rule of not doing harm is violated by unbalanced negative arguments.

  11. Germline multi-gene hereditary cancer panel testing in an unselected endometrial cancer cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ring, Kari L; Bruegl, Amanda S; Allen, Brian A; Elkin, Eric P; Singh, Nanda; Hartman, Anne-Renee; Daniels, Molly S; Broaddus, Russell R

    2016-11-01

    Hereditary endometrial carcinoma is associated with germline mutations in Lynch syndrome genes. The role of other cancer predisposition genes is unclear. We aimed to determine the prevalence of cancer predisposition gene mutations in an unselected endometrial carcinoma patient cohort. Mutations in 25 genes were identified using a next-generation sequencing-based panel applied in 381 endometrial carcinoma patients who had undergone tumor testing to screen for Lynch syndrome. Thirty-five patients (9.2%) had a deleterious mutation: 22 (5.8%) in Lynch syndrome genes (three MLH1, five MSH2, two EPCAM-MSH2, six MSH6, and six PMS2) and 13 (3.4%) in 10 non-Lynch syndrome genes (four CHEK2, one each in APC, ATM, BARD1, BRCA1, BRCA2, BRIP1, NBN, PTEN, and RAD51C). Of 21 patients with deleterious mutations in Lynch syndrome genes with tumor testing, 2 (9.5%) had tumor testing results suggestive of sporadic cancer. Of 12 patients with deleterious mutations in MSH6 and PMS2, 10 were diagnosed at age >50 and 8 did not have a family history of Lynch syndrome-associated cancers. Patients with deleterious mutations in non-Lynch syndrome genes were more likely to have serous tumor histology (23.1 vs 6.4%, P=0.02). The three patients with non-Lynch syndrome deleterious mutations and serous histology had mutations in BRCA2, BRIP1, and RAD51C. Current clinical criteria fail to identify a portion of actionable mutations in Lynch syndrome and other hereditary cancer syndromes. Performance characteristics of tumor testing are sufficiently robust to implement universal tumor testing to identify patients with Lynch syndrome. Germline multi-gene panel testing is feasible and informative, leading to the identification of additional actionable mutations.

  12. BRCA Previvors: Medical and Social Factors That Differentiate Them From Previvors With Other Hereditary Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campo-Engelstein, Lisa

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, I outline some of the reasons why BRCA “previvors” (i.e., “survivors of a predisposition to cancer” are different from previvors with other hereditary cancers. I examine how the absence of a standard of care for breast cancer risk for women with a BRCA mutation, coupled with a broad range of genetic penetrance and lower mortality, makes BRCA different than other hereditary cancers that have clear and established guidelines. In addition to these medical differences, social factors like the cultural prominence of breast cancer and the social significance of breasts have engendered a more complicated individual previvor identity for and cultural response to women with a BRCA mutation.

  13. Routine use of gene panel testing in hereditary breast cancer should be performed with caution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Marcke, Cedric; De Leener, Anne; Berlière, Martine; Vikkula, Miikka; Duhoux, Francois P

    2016-12-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent cancer occurring in women. Ten percent of these cancers are considered hereditary. Among them, 30% are attributed to germline mutations in the tumor suppressor genes BRCA1 and BRCA2. Other genes of lower penetrance are also known, explaining together up to 40% of the hereditary risk of breast cancer. New techniques, such as next-generation sequencing, allow the simultaneous analysis of multiple genes in a cost-effective way. As a logical consequence, gene panel testing is entering clinical practice with the promise of personalized care. We however advocate that gene panel testing is not ready for non-specialist clinical use, as it generates many variants of unknown significance and includes more genes than are presently considered clinically useful. We hereby review the data for each gene that can change the risk management of patients carrying a pathogenic variant. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The Hereditary Spectrum of Pancreatic Cancer: The Edmonton Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret Lilley

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Pancreatic cancer is known to aggregate in some families and has been associated with a wide variety of cancer syndromes. The authors describe their experience with pancreatic cancer and the range of associated cancer syndromes.

  15. Results of a preliminary analysis of the pattern of hereditary breast cancer in the women of a Kyrgyz population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. B. Makieva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The phenotypic and morphological features of hereditary breast cancer in relation to abnormal BRCA genotype among Kyrgyz women remain virtually unelucidated now. This paper presents the results of the first medical genetic study conducted in the Kyrgyz Republic, which has yielded preliminary data on the spectrum of mutations associated with hereditary breast cancer in the Kyrgyz female popu- lation. The findings suggest that it is possible and expedient to further study the problem of hereditary breast cancer for substantiation of screening for a genetic predisposition to this disease in order to form risk groups and to timely undertake primary prevention.

  16. Using Genetics to Identify Hereditary Colorectal Polyposis and Cancer Syndromes in Your Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaron, Carole; Heald, Brandie; Burke, Carol A

    2015-10-01

    The majority of patients with colorectal polyps and cancer do not have a Mendelian cause of the disease. Age, lifestyle, and environmental factors interact with complex genetic traits to contribute to the etiology. However, approximately 5-10 % of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) and more than 40 % of patients meeting specific clinical features of the hereditary polyposis syndromes have a discoverable, actionable genetic cause which will significantly alter their medical management.

  17. ACG Clinical Guideline: Genetic Testing and Management of Hereditary Gastrointestinal Cancer Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syngal, Sapna; Brand, Randall E.; Church, James M.; Giardiello, Francis M.; Hampel, Heather L.; Burt, Randall W.

    2015-01-01

    This guideline presents recommendations for the management of patients with hereditary gastrointestinal cancer syndromes. The initial assessment is the collection of a family history of cancers and premalignant gastrointestinal conditions and should provide enough information to develop a preliminary determination of the risk of a familial predisposition to cancer. Age at diagnosis and lineage (maternal and/or paternal) should be documented for all diagnoses, especially in first- and second-degree relatives. When indicated, genetic testing for a germline mutation should be done on the most informative candidate(s) identified through the family history evaluation and/or tumor analysis to confirm a diagnosis and allow for predictive testing of at-risk relatives. Genetic testing should be conducted in the context of pre- and post-test genetic counseling to ensure the patient's informed decision making. Patients who meet clinical criteria for a syndrome as well as those with identified pathogenic germline mutations should receive appropriate surveillance measures in order to minimize their overall risk of developing syndrome-specific cancers. This guideline specifically discusses genetic testing and management of Lynch syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), attenuated familial adenomatous polyposis (AFAP), MUTYH-associated polyposis (MAP), Peutz–Jeghers syndrome, juvenile polyposis syndrome, Cowden syndrome, serrated (hyperplastic) polyposis syndrome, hereditary pancreatic cancer, and hereditary gastric cancer. PMID:25645574

  18. Hereditary cancer registries improve the care of patients with a genetic predisposition to cancer : Contributions from the Dutch Lynch syndrome registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasen, Hans F A; Velthuizen, Mary E; Kleibeuker, Jan H; Menko, Fred H; Nagengast, Fokke M; Cats, Annemieke; van der Meulen-de Jong, Andrea E; Breuning, Martijn H; Roukema, J.A.; van Leeuwen-Cornelisse, Inge; de Vos Tot Nederveen Cappel, Wouter H; Wijnen, Juul T

    2016-01-01

    The Dutch Hereditary Cancer Registry was established in 1985 with the support of the Ministry of Health (VWS). The aims of the registry are: (1) to promote the identification of families with hereditary cancer, (2) to encourage the participation in surveillance programs of individuals at high risk,

  19. The Danish Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer Dermatology Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamberg, Anna Lei; Sølvsten, Henrik; Lei, Ulrikke

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The Danish Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer Dermatology Database was established in 2008. The aim of this database was to collect data on nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) treatment and improve its treatment in Denmark. NMSC is the most common malignancy in the western countries and represents...... a significant challenge in terms of public health management and health care costs. However, high-quality epidemiological and treatment data on NMSC are sparse. STUDY POPULATION: The NMSC database includes patients with the following skin tumors: basal cell carcinoma (BCC), squamous cell carcinoma, Bowen......'s disease, and keratoacanthoma diagnosed by the participating office-based dermatologists in Denmark. MAIN VARIABLES: Clinical and histological diagnoses, BCC subtype, localization, size, skin cancer history, skin phototype, and evidence of metastases and treatment modality are the main variables...

  20. Population prevalence of hereditary breast cancer phenotypes and implementation of a genetic cancer risk assessment program in southern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    In 2004, a population-based cohort (the Núcleo Mama Porto Alegre - NMPOA Cohort) was started in Porto Alegre, southern Brazil and within that cohort, a hereditary breast cancer study was initiated, aiming to determine the prevalence of hereditary breast cancer phenotypes and evaluate acceptance of a genetic cancer risk assessment (GCRA) program. Women from that cohort who reported a positive family history of cancer were referred to GCRA. Of the 9218 women enrolled, 1286 (13.9%) reported a family history of cancer. Of the 902 women who attended GCRA, 55 (8%) had an estimated lifetime risk of breast cancer ≥ 20% and 214 (23.7%) had pedigrees suggestive of a breast cancer predisposition syndrome; an unexpectedly high number of these fulfilled criteria for Li-Fraumeni-like syndrome (122 families, 66.7%). The overall prevalence of a hereditary breast cancer phenotype was 6.2% (95%CI: 5.67-6.65). These findings identified a problem of significant magnitude in the region and indicate that genetic cancer risk evaluation should be undertaken in a considerable proportion of the women from this community. The large proportion of women who attended GCRA (72.3%) indicates that the program was well-accepted by the community, regardless of the potential cultural, economic and social barriers. PMID:21637504

  1. Population prevalence of hereditary breast cancer phenotypes and implementation of a genetic cancer risk assessment program in southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edenir I. Palmero

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2004, a population-based cohort (the Núcleo Mama Porto Alegre - NMPOA Cohort was started in Porto Alegre, southern Brazil and within that cohort, a hereditary breast cancer study was initiated, aiming to determine the prevalence of hereditary breast cancer phenotypes and evaluate acceptance of a genetic cancer risk assessment (GCRA program. Women from that cohort who reported a positive family history of cancer were referred to GCRA. Of the 9218 women enrolled, 1286 (13.9% reported a family history of cancer. Of the 902 women who attended GCRA, 55 (8% had an estimated lifetime risk of breast cancer ³ 20% and 214 (23.7% had pedigrees suggestive of a breast cancer predisposition syndrome; an unexpectedly high number of these fulfilled criteria for Li-Fraumeni-like syndrome (122 families, 66.7%. The overall prevalence of a hereditary breast cancer phenotype was 6.2% (95%CI: 5.67-6.65. These findings identified a problem of significant magnitude in the region and indicate that genetic cancer risk evaluation should be undertaken in a considerable proportion of the women from this community. The large proportion of women who attended GCRA (72.3% indicates that the program was well-accepted by the community, regardless of the potential cultural, economic and social barriers.

  2. Behavioral Counseling to Prevent Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding Task Force Recommendations Behavioral Counseling to Prevent Skin Cancer The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) has issued a final recommendation statement on Behavioral Counseling ...

  3. Nonmelanoma skin cancer in India: Current scenario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panda Saumya

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Incidence of skin cancers has been increasing since the last few decades worldwide. Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC is the commonest variety of cutaneous malignancy. Conventional wisdom has it that the incidence of all varieties of skin cancers is lower among Indians due to the protective effects of melanin. Though national surveys and cross-country data in India are unavailable, there are indirect indications from several smaller reports that NMSCs may be on the rise in India. Reports of quite a few atypical cases lead us to hypothesize that factors other than ultraviolet radiation may be important in the occurrences of these cancers, particularly in the skin types prevalent in India. The descriptive epidemiology and clinical characteristics of squamous and basal cell carcinoma in India, including their variants, are discussed here along with hypotheses on their etiopathogenesis. Novel management techniques currently available in India are also highlighted.

  4. Skin cancer: From smearing to cutting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.W.J. Kelleners-Smeets (Nicole); M.W. Bekkenk (Marcel); E.R.M. de Haas (Ellen)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThe most common skin cancers are basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Conventional excision is still the current treatment of choice for these malignant tumours. Given the many subtypes and high incidence, the treatment of these skin tumours is not only a matter

  5. Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC): renal cancer risk, surveillance and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menko, Fred H; Maher, Eamonn R; Schmidt, Laura S; Middelton, Lindsay A; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Tomlinson, Ian; Richard, Stéphane; Linehan, W Marston

    2014-12-01

    Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC) is an autosomal dominant condition in which susceptible individuals are at risk for the development of cutaneous leiomyomas, early onset multiple uterine leiomyomas and an aggressive form of type 2 papillary renal cell cancer. HLRCC is caused by germline mutations in the fumarate hydratase (FH) gene which inactivate the enzyme and alters the function of the tricarboxylic acid (Krebs) cycle. Issues surrounding surveillance and treatment for HLRCC-associated renal cell cancer were considered as part of a recent international symposium on HLRCC. The management protocol proposed in this article is based on a literature review and a consensus meeting. The lifetime renal cancer risk for FH mutation carriers is estimated to be 15 %. In view of the potential for early onset of RCC in HLRCC, periodic renal imaging and, when available, predictive testing for a FH mutation is recommended from 8 to 10 years of age. However, the small risk of renal cell cancer in the 10-20 years age range and the potential drawbacks of screening should be carefully discussed on an individual basis. Surveillance preferably consists of annual abdominal MRI. Treatment of renal tumours should be prompt and generally consist of wide-margin surgical excision and consideration of retroperitoneal lymph node dissection. The choice for systemic treatment in metastatic disease should, if possible, be part of a clinical trial. Screening procedures in HLRCC families should preferably be evaluated in large cohorts of families.

  6. Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC). Renal cancer risk, surveillance and treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menko, Fred H.; Maher, Eamonn; Schmidt, Laura S.; Middelton, Lindsay A.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Tomlinson, Ian; Richard, Stéphane; Linehan, W. Marston

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC) is an autosomal dominant condition in which susceptible individuals are at risk for the development of cutaneous leiomyomas, early onset multiple uterine leiomyomas and an aggressive form of type 2 papillary renal cell cancer. HLRCC is caused by germline mutations in the fumarate hydratase (FH) gene, which inactivates the enzyme and alters the function of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA/ Krebs) cycle. Issues surrounding surveillance and treatment for HLRCC-associated renal cell cancer were considered as part of a recent international symposium on HLRCC. The management protocol proposed in this article is based on a literature review and a consensus meeting. The estimated lifetime renal cancer risk for FH mutation carriers is estimated to be 15%. In view of the potential for early onset of RCC in HLRCC, periodic renal imaging and, when available, predictive testing for a FH mutation is recommended from 8 to 10 years of age. However, the small risk of renal cell cancer in the 10-20 years age range and the potential drawbacks of screening should be carefully discussed on an individual basis. Surveillance preferably consists of annual abdominal MRI. Treatment of renal tumours should be prompt and generally consist of wide-margin surgical excision and consideration of retroperitoneal lymph node dissection. The choice for systemic treatment in metastatic disease should, if possible, be part of a clinical trial. Screening procedures in HLRCC families should preferably be evaluated in large cohorts of families. PMID:25012257

  7. Founder and recurrent CDH1 mutations in families with hereditary diffuse gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaurah, Pardeep; MacMillan, Andrée; Boyd, Niki; Senz, Janine; De Luca, Alessandro; Chun, Nicki; Suriano, Gianpaolo; Zaor, Sonya; Van Manen, Lori; Gilpin, Cathy; Nikkel, Sarah; Connolly-Wilson, Mary; Weissman, Scott; Rubinstein, Wendy S; Sebold, Courtney; Greenstein, Robert; Stroop, Jennifer; Yim, Dwight; Panzini, Benoit; McKinnon, Wendy; Greenblatt, Marc; Wirtzfeld, Debrah; Fontaine, Daniel; Coit, Daniel; Yoon, Sam; Chung, Daniel; Lauwers, Gregory; Pizzuti, Antonio; Vaccaro, Carlos; Redal, Maria Ana; Oliveira, Carla; Tischkowitz, Marc; Olschwang, Sylviane; Gallinger, Steven; Lynch, Henry; Green, Jane; Ford, James; Pharoah, Paul; Fernandez, Bridget; Huntsman, David

    2007-06-06

    Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer is caused by germline mutations in the epithelial cadherin (CDH1) gene and is characterized by an increased risk for diffuse gastric cancer and lobular breast cancer. To determine whether recurring germline CDH1 mutations occurred due to independent mutational events or common ancestry. Thirty-eight families diagnosed clinically with hereditary diffuse gastric cancer were accrued between November 2004 and January 2006 and were analyzed for CDH1 mutations as part of an ongoing study at the British Columbia Cancer Agency. Twenty-six families had at least 2 gastric cancer cases with 1 case of diffuse gastric cancer in a person younger than 50 years; 12 families had either a single case of diffuse gastric cancer diagnosed in a person younger than 35 years or multiple cases of diffuse gastric cancer diagnosed in persons older than 50 years. Classification of family members as carriers or noncarriers of CDH1 mutations. Haplotype analysis to assess recurring mutations for common ancestry was performed on 7 families from this study and 7 previously reported families with the same mutations. Thirteen mutations (6 novel) were identified in 15 of the 38 families (40% detection rate). The 1137G>A splicing mutation and the 1901C>T (A634V) missense/splicing mutation occurred on common haplotypes in 2 families but on different haplotypes in a third family. The 2195G>A (R732Q) missense/splicing mutation occurred in 2 families on different haplotypes. The 2064-2065delTG mutation occurred on a common haplotype in 2 families. Two families from this study plus 2 additional families carrying the novel 2398delC mutation shared a common haplotype, suggesting a founder effect. All 4 families originate from the southeast coast of Newfoundland. Due to concentrations of lobular breast cancer cases, 2 branches of this family had been diagnosed as having hereditary breast cancer and were tested for BRCA mutations. Within these 4 families, the cumulative risk

  8. Anatomical and molecular imaging of skin cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Hong

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Hao Hong1, Jiangtao Sun1, Weibo Cai1,21Departments of Radiology and Medical Physics, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin – Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, USA; 2University of Wisconsin Paul P. Carbone Comprehensive Cancer Center, Madison, Wisconsin, USAAbstract: Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer types. It is generally divided into two categories: melanoma (∼5% and nonmelanoma (∼95%, which can be further categorized into basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and some rare skin cancer types. Biopsy is still the gold standard for skin cancer evaluation in the clinic. Various anatomical imaging techniques have been used to evaluate different types of skin cancer lesions, including laser scanning confocal microscopy, optical coherence tomography, high-frequency ultrasound, terahertz pulsed imaging, magnetic resonance imaging, and some other recently developed techniques such as photoacoustic microscopy. However, anatomical imaging alone may not be sufficient in guiding skin cancer diagnosis and therapy. Over the last decade, various molecular imaging techniques (in particular single photon emission computed tomography and positron emission tomography have been investigated for skin cancer imaging. The pathways or molecular targets that have been studied include glucose metabolism, integrin αvβ3, melanocortin-1 receptor, high molecular weight melanoma-associated antigen, and several other molecular markers. Preclinical molecular imaging is thriving all over the world, while clinical molecular imaging has not lived up to the expectations because of slow bench-to-bedside translation. It is likely that this situation will change in the near future and molecular imaging will truly play an important role in personalized medicine of melanoma patients.Keywords: skin cancer, molecular imaging, melanoma, anatomical imaging, positron emission tomography, antibody

  9. [Retrospective NGS Study in High-risk Hereditary Cancer Patients at Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macháčková, E; Hazova, J; Sťahlová Hrabincová, E; Vašíčková, P; Navrátilová, M; Svoboda, M; Foretová, L

    2016-01-01

    Currently, more than 200 hereditary cancer syndromes have been described, yet, in most countries genetic testing is restricted to a narrow spectrum of genes within a limited group of people tested. For this retrospective study we used the TruSight cancer panel (Illumina)--NGS panel targeting 94 cancer predisposition genes in order to analyze 50 high-risk cancer patients with significant personal and family history of cancer who did not carry mutations in BRCA1, BRCA2, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, TP53 or APC genes. All pathogenic and potentially pathogenic mutations detected by NGS technology have been confirmed by Sanger sequencing. There were several deleterious (frame-shift/nonsense) mutations detected in ATM, BAP1, FANCC, FANCI, PMS2, SBDS, ERCC2, RECQL4 genes. Various pathogenic or potentially pathogenic (missense, predicted splice site, in-frame insertion/deletion) mutations were detected in ATM, BRIP1, CDH1, CHEK2, ERCC2, ERCC3, ERCC4, FANCA, MC1R, MEN1, MRE11A, MUTYH, PALB2, RAD51C, RET, SDHB, STK11. These mutations affect highly conserved protein domains and affect their function as proved by the available functional assays. They were confirmed to be pathogenic as an "Parent No2 " in serious recessive diseases such as Ataxia telangiectasia or Fanconi anemia. The clinical significance of the majority of detected missense variants still remains to be identified. Moderate or low penetrance variants are of limited clinical importance. Panel genetic testing in high-risk individuals with cancer provides important information concerning the cause of the investigated cancer, and may assist in the risk assesment and optimal management of the cancer, as well as in further preventive care.

  10. Screening for Lynch syndrome (hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer) among endometrial cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampel, Heather; Frankel, Wendy; Panescu, Jenny; Lockman, Janet; Sotamaa, Kaisa; Fix, Daniel; Comeras, Ilene; La Jeunesse, Jennifer; Nakagawa, Hidewaki; Westman, Judith A; Prior, Thomas W; Clendenning, Mark; Penzone, Pamela; Lombardi, Janet; Dunn, Patti; Cohn, David E; Copeland, Larry; Eaton, Lynne; Fowler, Jeffrey; Lewandowski, George; Vaccarello, Luis; Bell, Jeffrey; Reid, Gary; de la Chapelle, Albert

    2006-08-01

    Endometrial cancer is the most common cancer in women with Lynch syndrome. The identification of individuals with Lynch syndrome is desirable because they can benefit from increased cancer surveillance. The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility and desirability of molecular screening for Lynch syndrome in all endometrial cancer patients. Unselected endometrial cancer patients (N = 543) were studied. All tumors underwent microsatellite instability (MSI) testing. Patients with MSI-positive tumors underwent testing for germ line mutations in MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2. Of 543 tumors studied, 118 (21.7%) were MSI positive (98 of 118 MSI high and 20 of 118 MSI low). All 118 patients with MSI-positive tumors had mutation testing, and nine of them had deleterious germ line mutations (one MLH1, three MSH2, and five MSH6). In addition, one case with an MSI-negative tumor had abnormal MSH6 immunohistochemical staining and was subsequently found to have a mutation in MSH6. Immunohistochemical staining was consistent with the mutation result in all seven truncating mutation-positive cases but was not consistent in two of the three missense mutation cases. We conclude that in central Ohio, at least 1.8% (95% confidence interval, 0.9-3.5%) of newly diagnosed endometrial cancer patients had Lynch syndrome. Seven of the 10 Lynch syndrome patients did not meet any published criteria for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, and six of them were diagnosed at age >50. Studying all endometrial cancer patients for Lynch syndrome using a combination of MSI and immunohistochemistry for molecular prescreening followed by gene sequencing and deletion analysis is feasible and may be desirable.

  11. Variants of cancer susceptibility genes in Korean BRCA1/2 mutation-negative patients with high risk for hereditary breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Ji Soo; Lee, Seung-Tae; Nam, Eun Ji; Han, Jung Woo; Lee, Jung-Yun; Kim, Jieun; Kim, Tae Il; Park, Hyung Seok

    2018-01-01

    Background We evaluated the incidence and spectrum of pathogenic and likely pathogenic variants of cancer susceptibility genes in BRCA1/2 mutation-negative Korean patients with a high risk for hereditary breast cancer using a comprehensive multigene panel that included 35 cancer susceptibility genes. Methods Samples from 120 patients who were negative for BRCA1/2 mutations, but had been diagnosed with breast cancer that was likely hereditary, were prospectively evaluated for the prevalence of...

  12. A multi-gene panel study in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cock-Rada, A M; Ossa, C A; Garcia, H I; Gomez, L R

    2018-01-01

    Germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 account for approximately 50% of inherited breast and ovarian cancers. Three founder mutations in BRCA1/2 have been reported in Colombia, but the pattern of mutations in other cancer susceptibility genes is unknown. This study describes the frequency and type of germline mutations in hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancer genes in a referral cancer center in Colombia. Eighty-five women referred to the oncogenetics unit of the Instituto de Cancerologia Las Americas in Medellin (Colombia), meeting testing criteria for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome (NCCN 2015), who had germline testing with a commercial 25-gene hereditary cancer panel, were included in the analysis. Nineteen patients (22.4%) carried a deleterious germline mutation in a cancer susceptibility gene: BRCA1 (7), BRCA2 (8), PALB2 (1), ATM (1), MSH2 (1) and PMS2 (1). The frequency of mutations in BRCA1/2 was 17.6%. One BRCA2 mutation (c.9246dupG) was recurrent in five non-related individuals and is not previously reported in the country. Seventeen mutation-carriers had a diagnosis of breast cancer (median age of diagnosis of 36 years) and two of ovarian cancer. All BRCA1 mutation-carriers with breast cancer had triple negative tumors (median age of diagnosis of 31 years). Variants of unknown significance were reported in 35% of test results. This is the first report of a multi-gene study for hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancer in a Latin American country. We found a high frequency and a wide spectrum of germline mutations in cancer susceptibility genes in Colombian patients, some of which were not previously reported in the country. We observed a very low frequency of known Colombian founder BRCA1/2 mutations (1.2%) and we found mutations in other genes such as PALB2, ATM, MSH2 and PMS2. Our results highlight the importance of performing multi-gene panel testing, including comprehensive BRCA1/2 analysis (full gene sequencing and large rearrangement

  13. Advances in the diagnosis of hereditary kidney cancer: Initial results of a multigene panel test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Kevin A; Syed, Jamil S; Espenschied, Carin R; LaDuca, Holly; Bhagat, Ansh M; Suarez-Sarmiento, Alfredo; O'Rourke, Timothy K; Brierley, Karina L; Hofstatter, Erin W; Shuch, Brian

    2017-11-15

    Panel testing has been recently introduced to evaluate hereditary cancer; however, limited information is available regarding its use in kidney cancer. The authors retrospectively reviewed test results and clinical data from patients who underwent targeted multigene panel testing of up to 19 genes associated with hereditary kidney cancer from 2013 to 2016. The frequency of positive (mutation/variant likely pathogenic), inconclusive (variant of unknown significance), and negative results was evaluated. A logistic regression analysis evaluated predictive factors for a positive test. Patients (n = 1235) had a median age at diagnosis of 46 years, which was significantly younger than the US population of individuals with kidney cancer (P genes included folliculin (FLCN) and fumarate hydratase (FH), which were altered in 1.8% and 1.3% of patients, respectively. Tuberous Sclerosis Complex 2 (TSC2), mesenchymal epithelial transition factor proto-oncogene (MET), and PMS1 homolog 2 (PMS2) had the highest rates of variants of unknown significance, which were identified in 2.7%, 2.2%, and 1.7% of patients, respectively. Early age of onset was the only factor that was identified as predictive of a positive test on multivariate analysis (odds ratio, 0.975; P = .0052) and may be the only identifying characteristic of low-penetrant syndromes, such as those associated with MITF (melanogenesis-associated transcription factor) mutations, which do not have singular histology or a family history of kidney cancer. Panel tests may be particularly useful for patients who lack distinguishing clinical characteristics of known hereditary kidney cancer syndromes. The current results support the use of early age of onset for genetic counseling and/or testing. Cancer 2017;123:4363-71. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  14. Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer: clinical features and survival. Results from the Danish HNPCC register

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Myrhøj, T; Bisgaard, M L; Bernstein, Inge Thomsen

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is a dominantly inherited syndrome characterized by the development of colorectal cancer (CRC) and other carcinomas. Our aim was to evaluate tumour parameters and survival in HNPCC. METHODS: One hundred and eight Danish HNPCC patients...... were compared with 870 patients with sporadic colorectal cancer. RESULTS: The median age at CRC diagnosis was 41 years in the HNPCC group. HNPCC patients had significantly more carcinomas located to the right colon (68% against 49% in controls), more synchromous tumours (7% versus 1%), more...

  15. [Ethnic aspects of hereditary breast cancer in the region of Siberia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherdyntseva, N V; Pisareva, L F; Ivanova, A A; Panferova, Ye V; Malinovskaya, E A; Odintsova, I N; Doroshenko, A V; Gervas, P A; Slonimskaya, E M; Shivit-ool, A A; Dvornichenko, V V; Choinzonov, Ye L

    2014-01-01

    Ethnic diversity of the population in the region of Siberia suggests the existence of different germline mutations in the BRCA1/2 genes associated with breast and ovarian cancer in different ethnic populations, but spectrum of these mutations has not been studied. Our aim was to evaluate the frequency of the most common mutations BRCA1/2 (BRCA1 5382insC, BRCA1 185delAG, BRCA1 4153delAG, BRCAI T300G, BRCA2 6174delT) in women diagnosed with breast cancer among indigenous people and newcomers living in Siberia. We tested 1281 genomic DNA samples for the presence of BRCA1 5382insC mutation in patients diagnosed with breast cancer considering no family history. 72 patients having hereditary cancer signs were tested for the mutations BRCA1 185delAG, BRCA1 4153delAG, BRCA1 T300G, BRCA2 6174delT. Out of 765 patients of Slavic ethnic group, 27 women (3.5%) were carriers of allele BRCA1 5382insC. The frequencies of mutations in patients with signs of hereditary cancer were: 8.3% in group of young patients (under 40 years), 20.0% in patients with bilateral cancer and 5.7% in patients with family history of breast or ovarian cancers. We tested 516 BC patients residing on the territory of the Buryat-Aginsky district, Republics of Tyva and Altai. Out of them, there were 197 patients among the indigenous population (buryats, tuvinians, altaians), and 319 patients among newcomers (Slavic ethnics). Mutations BRCA1 5382insC were detected only in women from Slavic ethnic groups. The frequency of BRCA1 5382insC mutation was 6% in the group where family history was excluded and 14% in the group of patients with characteristics of family cancer. Allele BRCA1 5382insC was not found in indigenous breast cancer patients, although 59 patients had signs of hereditary cancer. In women from Slavic ethnic group, the BRCA1 185delAG, BRCA1 4153delAG and BRCA1 T300G mutations were detected in 9.1% of cases and were not found in patients among the indigenous population. studies of mutations in the

  16. Targeted Next-Generation Sequencing for Hereditary Cancer Syndromes: A Focus on Lynch Syndrome and Associated Endometrial Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafe, Laura J

    2015-09-01

    Lynch syndrome is a hereditary cancer syndrome that results from germline mutations in one of the DNA mismatch repair genes, leading to an increased lifetime risk of cancer. Colorectal cancer is most commonly identified with Lynch syndrome; however, women with Lynch syndrome have an increased risk of developing endometrial cancer (up to 60%), which is the sentinel diagnosis in approximately one-half of the cases. Current screening algorithms are developed on family history and laboratory-based tests, including immunohistochemistry for mismatch repair proteins and microsatellite instability testing. Next-generation sequencing assays are rapidly being incorporated into clinical laboratory practices and have diagnostic applications for hereditary cancer syndromes. Important challenges of next-generation sequencing include interpreting incidental and uncertain findings, counseling before and after testing, and informed consent of patients. Here, with the use of Lynch syndrome in endometrial cancer as a model, some of the applications and intricacies of next-generation sequencing testing for hereditary cancer syndromes are reviewed. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. For Some Skin Cancers, Targeted Drug Hits the Mark

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Skin Cancer Screening Research For Some Skin Cancers, Targeted Drug Hits the Mark Adapted from the NCI Cancer ... this page included, e.g., “For Some Skin Cancers, Targeted Drug Hits the Mark was originally published by the ...

  18. Germline Mutations in FAN1 Cause Hereditary Colorectal Cancer by Impairing DNA Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seguí, Nuria; Mina, Leonardo B; Lázaro, Conxi; Sanz-Pamplona, Rebeca; Pons, Tirso; Navarro, Matilde; Bellido, Fernando; López-Doriga, Adriana; Valdés-Mas, Rafael; Pineda, Marta; Guinó, Elisabet; Vidal, August; Soto, José Luís; Caldés, Trinidad; Durán, Mercedes; Urioste, Miguel; Rueda, Daniel; Brunet, Joan; Balbín, Milagros; Blay, Pilar; Iglesias, Silvia; Garré, Pilar; Lastra, Enrique; Sánchez-Heras, Ana Beatriz; Valencia, Alfonso; Moreno, Victor; Pujana, Miguel Ángel; Villanueva, Alberto; Blanco, Ignacio; Capellá, Gabriel; Surrallés, Jordi; Puente, Xose S; Valle, Laura

    2015-09-01

    Identification of genes associated with hereditary cancers facilitates management of patients with family histories of cancer. We performed exome sequencing of DNA from 3 individuals from a family with colorectal cancer who met the Amsterdam criteria for risk of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer. These individuals had mismatch repair-proficient tumors and each carried nonsense variant in the FANCD2/FANCI-associated nuclease 1 gene (FAN1), which encodes a nuclease involved in DNA inter-strand cross-link repair. We sequenced FAN1 in 176 additional families with histories of colorectal cancer and performed in vitro functional analyses of the mutant forms of FAN1 identified. We detected FAN1 mutations in approximately 3% of families who met the Amsterdam criteria and had mismatch repair-proficient cancers with no previously associated mutations. These findings link colorectal cancer predisposition to the Fanconi anemia DNA repair pathway, supporting the connection between genome integrity and cancer risk. Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. [Genes beyond BRCA1 and BRCA2 for hereditary breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Katharina; Geigl, Jochen B; Pristauz, Gunda

    2010-11-01

    germline mutations in the tumor suppressor genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 are identified in less than 50% of hereditary breast cancer cases. Besides BRCA1/2 further high-risk breast cancer genes are known; however they account only for a small fraction of inherited breast cancer cases. Most of them are involved in rare cancer predisposition syndromes. Moderate and low-risk breast cancer genes confer modest cancer risk up to 10% and may be more relevant due to polygenic inheritance. The majority of hereditary breast cancer cases are still caused by unknown genes. genetic testing of other known genes is not yet routinely performed in families tested negative for BRCA1/2-mutations, but can be recommended in special patients. In case of a calculated high-risk situation, participation in an early-detection screening program should be recommended. genetic susceptibility to breast cancer is heterogeneous and conferred by a large number of identified and yet undetected genes.

  20. Hereditary pancreatic cancer: related syndromes and clinical perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Carrera, Sergio; Sancho, Aintzane; Azkona, Eider; Azkuna, Josune; Lopez-Vivanco, Guillermo

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a very aggressive disease with a poor prognosis. The majority of them are attributed to sporadic causes, especially to many modifiable risk factors such as tobacco or alcohol abuse. The principal histologic subtype of pancreatic cancer is ductal adenocarcinoma. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, which constitute a more indolent entity, represent second type of pancreatic cancer in terms of incidence. Individuals with a family history of pancreatic cancer carry an increased...

  1. Oncogenic pathways in hereditary and sporadic breast cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kenemans, P.; Verstraeten, R.A.; Verheijen, R.H.M.

    2004-01-01

    Cancer is a genetic disease. Breast cancer tumorigenesis can be described as a multi-step process in which each step is thought to correlate with one or more distinct mutations in major regulatory genes. The question addressed is how far a multi-step progression model for sporadic breast cancer

  2. The Impact of Tumour Characteristics on Hereditary Breast Cancer Screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M.A. Tilanus-Linthorst (Madeleine)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractIn the Western world breast cancer is a fairly common disease in women, nearly one in ten is diagnosed with breast cancer during her life. Worldwide 1.200.000 women are diagnosed with breast cancer annually, in the Netherlands about 12.000, 25% of them before age 50 years 1. Worldwide

  3. Influence of the Angelina Jolie Announcement and Insurance Reimbursement on Practice Patterns for Hereditary Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jihyoun; Kim, Sungwon; Kang, Eunyoung; Park, Suyeon; Kim, Zisun; Lee, Min Hyuk

    2017-01-01

    Lack of awareness, the stigma of carrying a genetic mutation, and economic factors are barriers to acceptance of BRCA genetic testing or appropriate risk management. We aimed to investigate the influence of Angelina Jolie's announcement of her medical experience and also health insurance reimbursement for BRCA gene testing on practice patterns for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC). A survey regarding changes in practice patterns for HBOC before and after the announcement was conduct...

  4. Disease management for chronic skin cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. van der Geer-Rutten (Simone)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractWorldwide non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is a rapidly rising problem. In this thesis we show that an enormous gap exists between the official first primary figures available at cancer registries and the actual burden in a dermatology practice. NMSC needs to be regarded as a chronic

  5. Epidemiological features of the skin cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Оlena Oshyvalova

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The relevance of the study of oncological pathology of the skin is due to the annual increase of morbidity rate of skin cancer and significantly high mortality rate among patients. The research of epidemiological features of skin cancer will identify risk groups and those who need primary medical care.The basis for the research of the epidemiological features of skin cancer among the contingent of SIS – State Institution of Science “Research and Practical Centre of Preventive and Clinical Medicine” of the State Administrative Department (SIS “RPC PCM” SAD is personalized information on patients that's stored in the database of the SIS since 1996. For the retrospective epidemiological analysis were used data from 2005 to 2014. The obtained results were compared with corresponding figures among patients from Kyiv and Ukraine.Results: The morbidity rate of melanoma and NMCS (Non-melanoma cancers of the skin is higher than the corresponding figures of the population of Kyiv and Ukraine, despite the decline in the incidence of melanoma in 2014 by 14 % compared to the year 2013. The mortality rate of patients with skin cancer, mainly due to patients with melanoma, among the contingent of SIS is also higher than the corresponding figures of the population of Kyiv and Ukraine. The majority of patients with skin cancer were men of the 2nd period of middle age and elderly age. The highest morbidity rate of skin cancer was registered in age groups of 65–74 years old and 75 years old and older regardless of gender. The recurrence and prolongation of oncological process were registered among patients with melanoma in 2.3 %, and among patients with NMCS– 1.1 % annually.Conclusions: The obtained results showed a significant prevalence of skin cancer among the contingent of SIS compared with the morbidity rate of melanoma among the population of Kyiv and Ukraine. The analysis of epidemiological characteristics show the need for raising

  6. Grenz ray-induced nonmelanoma skin cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frentz, G.

    1989-09-01

    In 28 patients, nonmelanoma skin cancers developed in areas previously exposed to grenz rays. In 17 patients who did not have psoriasis, no other relevant carcinogenic exposure could be incriminated. Women were more often affected than men. Most of the tumors were basal cell cancers, and most of the patients had multiple tumors. No threshold dose could be established. The distribution of the latency time among patients without psoriasis was strictly normal (median 18 years). These observations suggest that usual therapeutic doses of grenz rays, as a single agent, are capable of causing skin cancer, but only in those persons who are abnormally sensitive to x-rays. 9 references.

  7. Patterns in Skin Cancers in Tikur Anbessa Hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    may be due to due to melanin protection against ultraviolet rays (5-8). The ratio of skin cancers in dark skinned populations are reported to be 10 to 20 times lower than lighter- skinned populations (4). However. the rate of skin cancer for. African blacks despite their pigmented skin, is occasionally reported to be higher.

  8. Uptake of prenatal diagnostic testing for retinoblastoma compared to other hereditary cancer syndromes in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dommering, Charlotte J; Henneman, Lidewij; van der Hout, Annemarie H; Jonker, Marianne A; Tops, Carli M J; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; van der Luijt, Rob B; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Redeker, Egbert J W; de Die-Smulders, Christine E M; Moll, Annette C; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne

    2017-04-01

    Since the 1980s the genetic cause of many hereditary tumor syndromes has been elucidated. As a consequence, carriers of a deleterious mutation in these genes may opt for prenatal diagnoses (PND). We studied the uptake of prenatal diagnosis for five hereditary cancer syndromes in the Netherlands. Uptake for retinoblastoma (Rb) was compared with uptake for Von Hippel-Lindau disease (VHL), Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS), familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), and hereditary breast ovarian cancer (HBOC). A questionnaire was completed by all nine DNA-diagnostic laboratories assessing the number of independent mutation-positive families identified from the start of diagnostic testing until May 2013, and the number of PNDs performed for these syndromes within these families. Of 187 families with a known Rb-gene mutation, 22 had performed PND (11.8%), this was significantly higher than uptake for FAP (1.6%) and HBOC (cancer syndromes PND started 10-15 years after the introduction and uptake for PND showed an increase after 2009. We conclude that uptake of PND for Rb was significantly higher than for FAP and HBOC, but not different from VHL and LFS. Early onset, high penetrance, lack of preventive surgery and perceived burden of disease may explain these differences.

  9. Hereditary breast cancer. Risk assessment of patients with a family history of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, E.; Heisey, R. E.; Goel, V.; Carroll, J. C.; McCready, D. R.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assist family physicians in stratifying women with a family history of breast cancer as being at low, moderate, or high risk of hereditary breast cancer (HBC). To present guidelines for managing each of these risk groups. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: A MEDLINE search was conducted from January 1976 to December 1997 using key words related to breast cancer risk factors, risk assessment, prevention, and screening. Risk stratification criteria were derived empirically and assessed using retrospective chart review. MAIN FINDINGS: Although up to 20% of women in the general population have a family history of breast cancer, less than 5% are at high risk for HBC. Certain features in a family history suggest increased risk. Women with none of these features are at low risk for HBC and should have annual clinical breast examinations and mammography at least every 2 years starting at age 50. Women with one or more features of increased risk who do not meet criteria for referral to a familial cancer clinic are at moderate risk for HBC and should begin annual mammography and clinical breast examination at age 40. Women who meet referral criteria are at high risk for HBC and should be counseled regarding referral to a familial cancer clinic for more detailed risk assessment and consideration for genetic testing. All women should be taught proper breast self-examination technique and encouraged but not pressured to practise it monthly for life. CONCLUSION: A simple algorithm can assist physicians in stratifying women into low, moderate, and high HBC risk groups. Management strategies for each group are given in this article and the two following (Heisey et al page 114 and Carroll et al page 126). PMID:10889863

  10. Skin Cancer Screening (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Having a skin exam to screen for skin cancer has not been shown to decrease your chance of dying from skin cancer. Learn about this and other tests that have been studied to detect or screen for skin cancer in this expert reviewed summary.

  11. Skin Cancers of the Feet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Feature Article Library Getting Your Practice Online Member Logo State Laws & Regulations Anti-Fee Discrimination Any Willing ... of extreme importance for patients for the early detection of both benign and malignant skin tumors. Learn ...

  12. Radiation Therapy for Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... make sure they are safe to use during radiation therapy. • Eat a balanced diet. If food tastes ... your fluid intake. • Treat the skin exposed to radiation with special care. Stay out of the sun, ...

  13. Multi-gene panel testing for hereditary cancer predisposition in unsolved high-risk breast and ovarian cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Beth; Adams, Sophie B; Sittler, Taylor; van den Akker, Jeroen; Chan, Salina; Leitner, Ofri; Ryan, Lauren; Gil, Elad; van 't Veer, Laura

    2017-06-01

    Many women with an elevated risk of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer have previously tested negative for pathogenic mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2. Among them, a subset has hereditary susceptibility to cancer and requires further testing. We sought to identify specific groups who remain at high risk and evaluate whether they should be offered multi-gene panel testing. We tested 300 women on a multi-gene panel who were previously enrolled in a long-term study at UCSF. As part of their long-term care, all previously tested negative for mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 either by limited or comprehensive sequencing. Additionally, they met one of the following criteria: (i) personal history of bilateral breast cancer, (ii) personal history of breast cancer and a first or second degree relative with ovarian cancer, and (iii) personal history of ovarian, fallopian tube, or peritoneal carcinoma. Across the three groups, 26 women (9%) had a total of 28 pathogenic mutations associated with hereditary cancer susceptibility, and 23 women (8%) had mutations in genes other than BRCA1 and BRCA2. Ashkenazi Jewish and Hispanic women had elevated pathogenic mutation rates. In addition, two women harbored pathogenic mutations in more than one hereditary predisposition gene. Among women at high risk of breast and ovarian cancer who have previously tested negative for pathogenic BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations, we identified three groups of women who should be considered for subsequent multi-gene panel testing. The identification of women with multiple pathogenic mutations has important implications for family testing.

  14. Specialists’ perceptions of hereditary colorectal cancer screening in Newfoundland and Labrador

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacEachern, J.; Mathews, M.; Green, J.; Pullman, D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Colorectal cancer (crc) screening is particularly valuable in Newfoundland and Labrador (NL), where a substantial proportion of crc cases have a hereditary link. We examined the perceptions of gastroenterologists and general surgeons with respect to screening practices for patients with hereditary crc. Methods We surveyed all gastroenterologists and general surgeons in NL to determine demographic and professional practice characteristics and screening knowledge, practices, and attitudes for four groups of patients with hereditary crc. Results Of the 43 eligible physicians, 36 (83.7%) responded. Most of the physicians surveyed knew the correct age to start screening, preferred screening by colonoscopy, had a systematic means in their own practice of prioritizing patients for screening, and felt that family doctors or patients (or both) should be responsible for monitoring screening compliance. Most physicians reported that patients with hereditary nonpolyposis crc and familial adenomatous polyposis waited 3 months for screening; patients with a family history of crc or adenomatous polyp waited 6 months or longer. Although respondents agreed on the need for a province-wide crc registry [4.36 on a 5-point Likert scale (1 = strongly disagree; 5 = strongly agree)], they disagreed that wait times were reasonable (2.81) and that other health professionals should perform colonoscopies (2.86). They were equivocal about the need for centralized bookings (3.25) and about whether genetic testing is useful for prioritizing patients (3.25). Conclusions Gastroenterologists and general surgeons in NL were knowledgeable about screening, but had varying opinions about individual roles in screening, wait times, and the means for prioritizing and providing screening for patients with hereditary crc. PMID:22670101

  15. Specialists' perceptions of hereditary colorectal cancer screening in Newfoundland and Labrador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maceachern, J; Mathews, M; Green, J; Pullman, D

    2012-06-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening is particularly valuable in Newfoundland and Labrador (NL), where a substantial proportion of CRC cases have a hereditary link. We examined the perceptions of gastroenterologists and general surgeons with respect to screening practices for patients with hereditary crc. We surveyed all gastroenterologists and general surgeons in NL to determine demographic and professional practice characteristics and screening knowledge, practices, and attitudes for four groups of patients with hereditary CRC. Of the 43 eligible physicians, 36 (83.7%) responded. Most of the physicians surveyed knew the correct age to start screening, preferred screening by colonoscopy, had a systematic means in their own practice of prioritizing patients for screening, and felt that family doctors or patients (or both) should be responsible for monitoring screening compliance. Most physicians reported that patients with hereditary nonpolyposis CRC and familial adenomatous polyposis waited 3 months for screening; patients with a family history of CRC or adenomatous polyp waited 6 months or longer. Although respondents agreed on the need for a province-wide CRC registry [4.36 on a 5-point Likert scale (1 = strongly disagree; 5 = strongly agree)], they disagreed that wait times were reasonable (2.81) and that other health professionals should perform colonoscopies (2.86). They were equivocal about the need for centralized bookings (3.25) and about whether genetic testing is useful for prioritizing patients (3.25). Gastroenterologists and general surgeons in NL were knowledgeable about screening, but had varying opinions about individual roles in screening, wait times, and the means for prioritizing and providing screening for patients with hereditary CRC.

  16. Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer and familial colorectal cancer in Central part of Iran, Isfahan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Nemati

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is a lack of data on familial aggregation of colorectal cancer (CRC in Iran. We aimed to deter-mine the frequency of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC and familial colorectal cancer (FCC and to determine the frequency of extracolonic cancers in these families in Isfahan. Methods: We reviewed documents of all patients with a pathologically confirmed diagnosis of CRC admitted to Isfa-han referral hospitals between 1995 and 2006. We also studied our CRC registry at Poursina Hakim Research Institute from 2003 to 2008. We found HNPCC and FCC families based on the Amsterdam II criteria and interviewed them for family history of CRC and extracolonic tumors. The family history was taken at least up to the second-degree relatives. Results: During 1996 to 2008, a total of 2580 CRC cases have been diagnosed. We found 14 HNPCC and 53 FCC families. Mean age of CRC at diagnosis was 48.0 ΁ 14.6 and 49.0 ΁ 13.9 years in the HNPCC and FCC families, re-spectively (p > 0.05. The total numbers of observed extracolonic tumors were 70 (21.6%; mean age = 53.6 ΁ 11.0 years and 157 (13.8%; mean age = 54.8 ΁ 18.0 years in HNPCC and FCC families, respectively (p > 0.05. CRC was respectively found in 52 and 76 members of the HNPCC and FCC families, revealing the frequency of HNPCC and FCC as 2.0% (52/2580 and 2.9% (76/2580, respectively. Conclusions: We found a relative high frequency of HNPCC (2.0% and FCC (2.9% among CRC cases in our socie-ty and high incidence of extracolonic tumors in their families. Further studies focusing on molecular basis in this field and designing a specific screening and national cancer registry program for HNPCC and FCC families should be con-ducted.

  17. Knowledge regarding basic concepts of hereditary cancers, and the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    [1] Primary healthcare providers, in particular ... 22 (36.1%) of the GPs referred patients to appropriate facilities for assessment and testing, while 32 (52.5%) were aware of genetic testing services. ... Many of the GPs in this study had limited knowledge about inherited cancers, cancer risk management and genetic services.

  18. Hereditary predisposition to ovarian cancer, looking beyond BRCA1/BRCA2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minion, Lindsey E; Dolinsky, Jill S; Chase, Dana M; Dunlop, Charles L; Chao, Elizabeth C; Monk, Bradley J

    2015-04-01

    Genetic predisposition to ovarian cancer is well documented. With the advent of next generation sequencing, hereditary panel testing provides an efficient method for evaluating multiple genes simultaneously. Therefore, we sought to investigate the contribution of 19 genes identified in the literature as increasing the risk of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) in a BRCA1 and BRCA2 negative population of patients with a personal history of breast and/or ovarian cancer by means of a hereditary cancer panel. Subjects were referred for multi-gene panel testing between February 2012 and March 2014. Clinical data was ascertained from requisition forms. The incidence of pathogenic mutations (including likely pathogenic), and variant of unknown significance were then calculated for each gene and/or patient cohort. In this cohort of 911 subjects, panel testing identified 67 mutations. With 7.4% of subjects harboring a mutation on this multi-gene panel, the diagnostic yield was increased, compared to testing for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations alone. In the ovarian cancer probands, the most frequently mutated genes were BRIP1 (n=8; 1.72%) and MSH6 (n=6; 1.29%). In the breast cancer probands, mutations were most commonly observed in CHEK2 (n=9; 2.54%), ATM (n=3; 0.85%), and TP53 (n=3; 0.85%). Although further studies are needed to clarify the exact management of patients with a mutation in each gene, this study highlights information that can be captured with panel testing and provides support for incorporation of panel testing into clinical practice. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. The molecular genetics of hereditary and sporadic ovarian cancer: implications for the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Bakir, Maise; Gabra, Hani

    2014-12-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is a heterogeneous condition with poor survival outcomes. The genetics of hereditary and sporadic ovarian cancers will be covered and its implications to management and future research are discussed. Key recent published literature. Both genetic and environmental factors play a role in the development of EOC. Most EOCs develop sporadically and are divided into low-grade/genetically stable type I tumours and high-grade/genetically unstable type II tumours. The commonest hereditary syndromes are hereditary breast ovarian cancer syndrome (HBOC-BRCA mutations) and Lynch syndrome (DNA mismatch repair mutations). The different histological types of EOC may not solely originate from the ovary but from the fallopian tube and endometriosis deposits; there is increasing evidence to support this. Our understanding of the genetics and frequencies of mutations in ovarian cancer is expanding. The proportion of heritable EOC is larger than previously estimated and not all patients have a clear family history for this. Mutations in genes involving the downstream BRCA signalling pathway have recently been implicated in HBOC. TP53 mutations are the single most commonly identified mutations in aggressive sporadic high-grade serous carcinomas, affecting essentially 100% of such tumours. Furthermore, there is increasing recognition that the different histological sub-types need to be treated as separate entities. Given how heterogeneous 'ovarian' cancer is, trials into new drugs should report responses for the different histo-/geno-types rather than simply using staging. Although the effect of new drugs such as poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors are being investigated in ovarian cancer, there is still a need to develop targeted therapies-especially to tackle mutations in PI3 K pathway, RAS pathway and TP53. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Gene Expression Profiling in Hereditary, BRCA1-linked Breast Cancer: Preliminary Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dudaladava Volha

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Global analysis of gene expression by DNA microarrays is nowadays a widely used tool, especially relevant for cancer research. It helps the understanding of complex biology of cancer tissue, allows identification of novel molecular markers, reveals previously unknown molecular subtypes of cancer that differ by clinical features like drug susceptibility or general prognosis. Our aim was to compare gene expression profiles in breast cancer that develop against a background of inherited predisposing mutations versus sporadic breast cancer. In this preliminary study we analysed seven hereditary, BRCA1 mutation-linked breast cancer tissues and seven sporadic cases that were carefully matched by histopathology and ER status. Additionally, we analysed 6 samples of normal breast tissue. We found that while the difference in gene expression profiles between tumour tissue and normal breast can be easily recognized by unsupervised algorithms, the difference between those two types of tumours is more discrete. However, by supervised methods of data analysis, we were able to select a set of genes that may differentiate between hereditary and sporadic tumours. The most significant difference concerns genes that code for proteins engaged in regulation of transcription, cellular metabolism, signalling, proliferation and cell death. Microarray results for chosen genes (TOB1, SEPHS2 were validated by real-time RT-PCR.

  1. Gene Expression Profiling in Hereditary, BRCA1-linked Breast Cancer: Preliminary Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Global analysis of gene expression by DNA microarrays is nowadays a widely used tool, especially relevant for cancer research. It helps the understanding of complex biology of cancer tissue, allows identification of novel molecular markers, reveals previously unknown molecular subtypes of cancer that differ by clinical features like drug susceptibility or general prognosis. Our aim was to compare gene expression profiles in breast cancer that develop against a background of inherited predisposing mutations versus sporadic breast cancer. In this preliminary study we analysed seven hereditary, BRCA1 mutation-linked breast cancer tissues and seven sporadic cases that were carefully matched by histopathology and ER status. Additionally, we analysed 6 samples of normal breast tissue. We found that while the difference in gene expression profiles between tumour tissue and normal breast can be easily recognized by unsupervised algorithms, the difference between those two types of tumours is more discrete. However, by supervised methods of data analysis, we were able to select a set of genes that may differentiate between hereditary and sporadic tumours. The most significant difference concerns genes that code for proteins engaged in regulation of transcription, cellular metabolism, signalling, proliferation and cell death. Microarray results for chosen genes (TOB1, SEPHS2) were validated by real-time RT-PCR. PMID:20223001

  2. Diet and Skin Cancer: The Potential Role of Dietary Antioxidants in Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Katta, Rajani; Brown, Danielle Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the most common cancer among Americans. Ultraviolet (UV) radiation exposure is the major risk factor for the development of NMSC. Dietary AOs may prevent free radical-mediated DNA damage and tumorigenesis secondary to UV radiation. Numerous laboratory studies have found that certain dietary AOs show significant promise in skin cancer prevention. These results have been substantiated by animal studies. In human studies, researchers have evaluated both oral AO...

  3. Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer: new genes, new treatments, new concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meindl, Alfons; Ditsch, Nina; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Schmutzler, Rita K

    2011-05-01

    Every year, 60,000 women in Germany are found to have breast cancer, and 9000 to have ovarian cancer. Familial clustering of carcinoma is seen in about 20% of cases. We selectively review relevant articles published up to December 2010 that were retrieved by a search in PubMed, and we also discuss findings from the experience of the German Consortium for Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer. High risk is conferred by the highly penetrant BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes as well as by other genes such as RAD51C. Genes for breast cancer that were originally designated as moderately penetrant display higher penetrance than previously thought in families with a hereditary predisposition. The role these genes play in DNA repair is thought to explain why tumors associated with them are sensitive to platin derivatives and PARP inhibitors. In carriers of BRCA1 and BRCA2, prophylactic bilateral mastectomy and adnexectomy significantly lowers the incidence of breast and ovarian cancer. Moreover, prophylactic adnexectomy also lowers the breast-and-ovarian-cancer-specific mortality, as well as the overall mortality. If a woman bearing a mutation develops cancer in one breast, her risk of developing cancer in the other breast depends on the particular gene that is mutated and on her age at the onset of disease. About half of all monogenically determined carcinomas of the breast and ovary are due to a mutation in one or the other of the highly penetrant BRCA genes (BRCA1 and BRCA2). Women carrying a mutated gene have an 80% to 90% chance of developing breast cancer and a 20% to 50% chance of developing ovarian cancer. Other predisposing genes for breast and ovarian cancer have been identified. Clinicians should develop and implement evidence-based treatments on the basis of these new findings.

  4. DNA Repair Gene Polymorphisms in Hereditary and Sporadic Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ricks-Santi, Luisel

    2006-01-01

    .... There is variable penetrance for breast cancer among women in families with known BRCA1 mutations, and we hypothesize that this might be due to genetic variants in wild-type BRCA1 or other DNA repair...

  5. Beyond BRCA: new hereditary breast cancer susceptibility genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Economopoulou, P; Dimitriadis, G; Psyrri, A

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 5-10% of breast cancer cases might be inheritable, up to 30% of which are due to BRCA1/2 mutations. During the past few years and thanks to technology evolution, we have been witnesses of an intensive search of additional genes with similar characteristics, under the premise that successful gene discovery will provide substantial opportunities for primary and secondary prevention of breast cancer. Consequently, new genes have emerged as breast cancer susceptibility genes, including rare germline mutations in high penetrant genes, such as TP53 and PTEN, and more frequent mutations in moderate penetrant genes, such as CHEK2, ATM and PALB2. This review will summarize current data on new findings in breast cancer susceptibility genes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Prevalence and impact of founder mutations in hereditary breast cancer in Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Ashton-Prolla

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 10% of all cancers are considered hereditary and are primarily caused by germline, high penetrance mutations in cancer predisposition genes. Although most cancer predisposition genes are considered molecularly heterogeneous, displaying hundreds of different disease-causing sequence alterations, founder mutations have been identified in certain populations. In some Latin American countries, founder mutations associated with increased risk of breast and other cancers have been described. This is particularly interesting considering that in most of these countries, populations are highly admixed with genetic contributions from native populations and from the influx of several distinct populations of immigrants. In this article, we present a review of the scientific literature on the subject and describe current data available on founder mutations described in the most common breast cancer predisposition genes: BRCA1, BRCA2 and TP53.

  7. Revised Bethesda Guidelines for Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer (Lynch Syndrome) and Microsatellite Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umar, Asad; Boland, C. Richard; Terdiman, Jonathan P.; Syngal, Sapna; de la Chapelle, Albert; Rüschoff, Josef; Fishel, Richard; Lindor, Noralane M.; Burgart, Lawrence J.; Hamelin, Richard; Hamilton, Stanley R.; Hiatt, Robert A.; Jass, Jeremy; Lindblom, Annika; Lynch, Henry T.; Peltomaki, Païvi; Ramsey, Scott D.; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A.; Vasen, Hans F. A.; Hawk, Ernest T.; Barrett, J. Carl; Freedman, Andrew N.; Srivastava, Sudhir

    2010-01-01

    Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), also known as Lynch syndrome, is a common autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by early age at onset, neoplastic lesions, and microsatellite instability (MSI). Because cancers with MSI account for approximately 15% of all colorectal cancers and because of the need for a better understanding of the clinical and histologic manifestations of HNPCC, the National Cancer Institute hosted an international workshop on HNPCC in 1996, which led to the development of the Bethesda Guidelines for the identification of individuals with HNPCC who should be tested for MSI. To consider revision and improvement of the Bethesda Guidelines, another HNPCC workshop was held at the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, MD, in 2002. In this commentary, we summarize the Workshop presentations on HNPCC and MSI testing; present the issues relating to the performance, sensitivity, and specificity of the Bethesda Guidelines; outline the revised Bethesda Guidelines for identifying individuals at risk for HNPCC; and recommend criteria for MSI testing. PMID:14970275

  8. Controversies in communication of genetic risk for hereditary breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Amy; Patrick-Miller, Linda; Bradbury, Angela R

    2009-01-01

    Increased availability and heightened consumer awareness of "cancer genes" has increased consumer interest in, and demand for breast cancer risk assessment, and thus a pressing need for providers to identify effective, efficient methods of communicating complicated genetic information to consumers and their potentially at-risk relatives. With increasing direct-to-consumer and -physician marketing of predictive genetic tests, there has been considerable growth in web- and telephone-based genetic services. There is urgent need to further evaluate the psychosocial and behavioral outcomes (i.e., risks and benefits) of telephone and web-based methods of delivery before they become fully incorporated into clinical care models. Given the implications of genetic test results for family members, and the inherent conflicts in health care providers' dual responsibilities to protect patient privacy and to "warn" those at-risk, new models for communicating risk to at-risk relatives are emerging. Additional controversies arise when the at-risk relative is a minor. Research evaluating the impact of communicating genetic risk to offspring is necessary to inform optimal communication of genetic risk for breast cancer across the lifespan. Better understanding the risks and benefits associated with each of these controversial areas in cancer risk communication are crucial to optimizing adherence to recommended breast cancer risk management strategies and ensuring psycho-social well-being in the clinical delivery of genetic services for breast cancer susceptibility.

  9. HEREDITARY NON-POLYPOSIS COLORECTAL CANCER (LYNCH SYNDROME PADA WANITA UMUR 16 TAHUN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asril Zahari

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakKanker kolorektal menduduki peringkat ketiga jenis kanker yang paling sering terjadi di dunia. Sekitar 3% kasus kanker kolorektal merupakan jenis hereditary non polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC/Lynch syndrome, yang sering muncul pada usia muda. Dilaporkan satu kasus di rumah sakit Dr. M. Djamil Padang, wanita berumur 16 tahun dengan keluhan nyeri perut kanan bawah. Didapatkan riwayat penyakit serupa pada kakek, bibi pasien dan enam anggota keluarga yang lain. Pada pemeriksaan fisik abdomen teraba massa dengan konsistensi keras dan terfiksir. Pada kolonoskopi dan biopsi ditemukan tumor jenis adenocarcinoma colon moderatly differentiated di fleksura hepatika dan polip di kolon sigmoid. Berdasarkan kriteria Amsterdam pasien didiagnosa Lynch syndrome. Pada Pasien dilakukan subtotal kolektomi, anastomose ileorectal dan kemoterapi ajuvan. Identifikasi genetik sedang dikerjakan untuk melihat adanya kelainan genetik pada pasien. Pasien melakukan skrining berkala untuk mencegah kanker HNPCC jenis yang lain.Kata kunci : Hereditary non polyposis colorectal cancer, Lynch syndrome, Microsatellite instability, skrining.AbstractCarcinoma colorectal is the third most common type of cancer that occurs in the world. About 2% -3% of cases of colorectal cancer is hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC/Lynch syndrome, which often appear at a young age. Amsterdam and Bethesda criteria have been used to identify patients with Lynch syndrome.one case was reported at the Dr. M. Djamil Padang hospital, a 16-year-old girl with right lower abdominal pain. Obtained a history of similar disease in grandparents, aunts and six other family members. On physical examination found palpable fixed abdominal mass with hard consistency in the lower right abdomen. At colonoscopy and biopsy found a moderatly differentiated adenocarcinoma colon type at the hepatic flexure and the sigmoid colon polyp. Based on the Amsterdam criteria, patients diagnosed with HNPCC

  10. Investigation of skin cancer treatment efficiency by raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, M. S.; Kim, D. W. [Kyungpook National University, Taegu (Korea)

    2000-04-01

    From the successful perform of the molecular structures of various kinds of human skin cancer. We can predict the types of cancer when a small abnormal change change occurs on skin by raman spectrum. When we applied the cancer causing chemicals, bezopyrene, to nude mouse, it did not develop to cancer. But we had radiated UV light after developed to skin cancer in a few days. We can deduce the development of human skin cancer from the result of nude mouse skin cancer, because the two skin are structurally very similar to each other. From the results of own research we could conform the UV light is essential for the development of skin cancer. The results of own research can be directly apply to early detection and proper treatment of skin cancer in hospital. 32 refs., 40 figs., 16 tabs. (Author)

  11. Skin Cancers of the Feet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and/or a diameter greater than 6 mm. Melanomas may resemble benign moles, blood blisters, ingrown nails, plantar warts, ulcers ... for patients for the early detection of both benign and malignant skin tumors. Learn the ABCDs of melanoma. If you notice a mole, bump, or patch ...

  12. Reduced frequency of extracolonic cancers in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer families with monoallelic hMLH1 expression.

    OpenAIRE

    Jäger, A C; Bisgaard, M L; Myrhøj, T; Bernstein, I; Rehfeld, J F; Nielsen, F C

    1997-01-01

    Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is an autosomal dominant disease caused by mutations in one of at least four different DNA mismatch repair genes, hMLH1, hMSH2, hPMS1, and hPMS2. Phenotypically, HNPCC is characterized by the early onset of colorectal cancers and various extracolonic cancers. Depending on the presence or absence of extracolonic tumors, HNPCG-has been divided into two syndromes (Lynch syndrome I and Lynch syndrome II), but, so far, no correlation to distinct ge...

  13. Family history record and hereditary cancer risk perception according to National Cancer Institute criteria in a Spanish medical oncology service: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez-Rodas, Iván; López-Trabada, Daniel; Rupérez Blanco, Ana Belén; Custodio Cabello, Sara; Peligros Gómez, María Isabel; Orera Clemente, María; Calvo, Felipe A; Martín, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Identification of patients at risk of hereditary cancer is an essential component of oncology practice, since it enables clinicians to offer early detection and prevention programs. However, the large number of hereditary syndromes makes it difficult to take them all into account in daily practice. Consequently, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has suggested a series of criteria to guide initial suspicion. It was the aim of this study to assess the perception of the risk of hereditary cancer according to the NCI criteria in our medical oncology service. We retrospectively analyzed the recordings of the family history in new cancer patients seen in our medical oncology service from January to November 2009, only 1 year before the implementation of our multidisciplinary hereditary cancer program. The family history was recorded in only 175/621 (28%) patients. A total of 119 (19%) patients met 1 or more NCI criteria (1 criterion, n = 91; 2 criteria, n = 23; 3 criteria, n = 4; and 4 criteria, n = 1), and only 14 (11.4%) patients were referred to genetic counseling. This study shows that few clinicians record the family history. The perception of the risk of hereditary cancer is low according to the NCI criteria in our medical oncology service. These findings can be explained by the lack of a multidisciplinary hereditary cancer program when the study was performed. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Blocking protein quality control to counter hereditary cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampmeyer, Caroline; Nielsen, Sofie V.; Clausen, Lene

    2017-01-01

    imbalance, which makes them more dependent on protein quality control (PQC) mechanisms than normal cells. Accordingly, blocking PQC, e.g. by proteasome inhibitors, may cause a lethal proteotoxic crisis in cancer cells, while leaving normal cells unaffected. Evidence, however, suggests that the PQC system...

  15. Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer/Lynch syndrome in three dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravochuck, Sara E; Church, James M

    2017-12-01

    Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is defined by family history, and Lynch syndrome (LS) is defined genetically. However, universal tumour testing is now increasingly used to screen for patients with defective mismatch repair. This mixing of the results of family history, tumour testing and germline testing produces multiple permutations and combinations that can foster confusion. We wanted to clarify hereditary colorectal cancer using the three dimensions of classification: family history, tumour testing and germline testing. Family history (Amsterdam I or II criteria versus not Amsterdam criteria) was used to define patients and families with HNPCC. Tumour testing and germline testing were then performed to sub-classify patients and families. The permutations of these classifications are applied to our registry. There were 234 HNPCC families: 129 had LS of which 55 were three-dimensional Lynch (family history, tumour testing and germline testing), 66 were two-dimensional Lynch and eight were one-dimensional Lynch. A total of 10 families had tumour Lynch (tumours with microsatellite instability or loss of expression of a mismatch repair protein but an Amsterdam-negative family and negative germline testing), five were Lynch like (Amsterdam-positive family, tumours with microsatellite instability or loss of expression of a mismatch repair protein on immunohistochemistry but negative germline testing), 26 were familial colorectal cancer type X and 95 were HNPCC. Hereditary colorectal cancer can be confusing. Sorting families in three dimensions can clarify the confusion and may direct further testing and, ultimately, surveillance. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  16. Genomics of Hereditary Colorectal Cancer: Lessons Learnt from 25 Years of the Singapore Polyposis Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Min Hoe; Tan, Wah Siew; Liu, Yanqun; Cheah, Peh Yean; Loi, Carol Tt; Tang, Choong Leong

    2015-08-01

    The Singapore Polyposis Registry (SPR) was established in 1989 in Singapore General Hospital (SGH). The aims were to provide a central registry service to facilitate identification, surveillance and management of families and individuals at high risk of colorectal cancer. This is a review of published literature in the department. The registry currently has 253 families with several genetic conditions-93 familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) families, 138 Amsterdam-criteria positive presumed Lynch syndrome (LS) families, 12 families with Peutz Jeghers syndrome, 2 families with Cowden's syndrome, and 8 families with hereditary mixed polyposis syndrome (HMPS). There are also 169 families with a strong family history of colorectal cancer but no abnormal genes yet identified. In FAP, a diagnostic tool developed has allowed a 94% local APC germline detection rate in FAP families. Knowledge obtained studying the phenotype of FAP patients has allowed better choice of surgery between ileal pouch anal anastomosis (IPAA) against an ileal-rectal anastomosis (IRA). In LS, our review has noted a highly heterogenous mutational spectrum and novel variants made up 46.7% (28/60) of all variants identified in this cohort. This may suggest that our Southeast Asian ethnic groups have distinct mutational variants from Western populations. Pathogenic mutations were only confined to MLH1 and MSH2, and identified in 28.8% of families. The impact of predictive gene testing for hereditary cancer risk in clinical practice has allowed evolution of care. Risk-reducing surgery and aggressive surveillance allows reduction in morbidity and mortality of patients. The SPR will continue to grow and improve outcomes in hereditary colorectal cancer patients and families.

  17. Frequency of breast cancer with hereditary risk features in Spain: Analysis from GEICAM "El Álamo III" retrospective study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván Márquez-Rodas

    Full Text Available To determine the frequency of breast cancer (BC patients with hereditary risk features in a wide retrospective cohort of patients in Spain.a retrospective analysis was conducted from 10,638 BC patients diagnosed between 1998 and 2001 in the GEICAM registry "El Álamo III", dividing them into four groups according to modified ESMO and SEOM hereditary cancer risk criteria: Sporadic breast cancer group (R0; Individual risk group (IR; Familial risk group (FR; Individual and familial risk group (IFR with both individual and familial risk criteria.7,641 patients were evaluable. Of them, 2,252 patients (29.5% had at least one hereditary risk criteria, being subclassified in: FR 1.105 (14.5%, IR 970 (12.7%, IFR 177 (2.3%. There was a higher frequency of newly diagnosed metastatic patients in the IR group (5.1% vs 3.2%, p = 0.02. In contrast, in RO were lower proportion of big tumors (> T2 (43.8% vs 47.4%, p = 0.023, nodal involvement (43.4% vs 48.1%, p = 0.004 and lower histological grades (20.9% G3 for the R0 vs 29.8% when compared to patients with any risk criteria.Almost three out of ten BC patients have at least one hereditary risk cancer feature that would warrant further genetic counseling. Patients with hereditary cancer risk seems to be diagnosed with worse prognosis factors.

  18. The Danish Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer Dermatology Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberg, Anna Lei; Sølvsten, Henrik; Lei, Ulrikke; Vinding, Gabrielle Randskov; Stender, Ida Marie; Jemec, Gregor Borut Ernst; Vestergaard, Tine; Thormann, Henrik; Hædersdal, Merete; Dam, Tomas Norman; Olesen, Anne Braae

    2016-01-01

    The Danish Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer Dermatology Database was established in 2008. The aim of this database was to collect data on nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) treatment and improve its treatment in Denmark. NMSC is the most common malignancy in the western countries and represents a significant challenge in terms of public health management and health care costs. However, high-quality epidemiological and treatment data on NMSC are sparse. The NMSC database includes patients with the following skin tumors: basal cell carcinoma (BCC), squamous cell carcinoma, Bowen's disease, and keratoacanthoma diagnosed by the participating office-based dermatologists in Denmark. Clinical and histological diagnoses, BCC subtype, localization, size, skin cancer history, skin phototype, and evidence of metastases and treatment modality are the main variables in the NMSC database. Information on recurrence, cosmetic results, and complications are registered at two follow-up visits at 3 months (between 0 and 6 months) and 12 months (between 6 and 15 months) after treatment. In 2014, 11,522 patients with 17,575 tumors were registered in the database. Of tumors with a histological diagnosis, 13,571 were BCCs, 840 squamous cell carcinomas, 504 Bowen's disease, and 173 keratoakanthomas. The NMSC database encompasses detailed information on the type of tumor, a variety of prognostic factors, treatment modalities, and outcomes after treatment. The database has revealed that overall, the quality of care of NMSC in Danish dermatological clinics is high, and the database provides the necessary data for continuous quality assurance.

  19. Skin Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) are the most common types of skin cancer. Find out about risk factors, symptoms, tests to diagnose, prognosis, staging, and treatment for skin cancer.

  20. Accuracy of Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer Testing Criteria and Outcomes in Patients With a Germline Mutation in CDH1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Post, Rachel S.; Vogelaar, Ingrid P.; Manders, Peggy; van der Kolk, Lizet E.; Cats, Annemieke; van Hest, Liselotte P.; Sijmons, Rolf; Aalfs, Cora M.; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; Garcia, Encarna B. Gomez; Wagner, Anja; Hes, Frederik J.; Arts, Neeltje; Mensenkamp, Arjen R.; van Krieken, J. Han; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J. L.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Germline mutations in the cadherin 1, type 1, E-cadherin gene (CDH1) cause a predisposition to gastric cancer. We evaluated the ability of the internationally accepted hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) criteria to identify individuals with pathogenic mutations in CDH1, and

  1. Accuracy of Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer Testing Criteria and Outcomes in Patients With a Germline Mutation in CDH1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Post, Rachel S.; Vogelaar, Ingrid P.; Manders, Peggy; Van Der Kolk, Lizet E.; Cats, Annemieke; Van Hest, Liselotte P.; Sijmons, Rolf; Aalfs, Cora M.; Ausems, Margreet G E M; Gómez García, Encarna B.; Wagner, Anja; Hes, Frederik J.; Arts, Neeltje; Mensenkamp, Arjen R.; Van Krieken, J. Han; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J L

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Germline mutations in the cadherin 1, type 1, E-cadherin gene (CDH1) cause a predisposition to gastric cancer. We evaluated the ability of the internationally accepted hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) criteria to identify individuals with pathogenic mutations in CDH1, and

  2. SEOM clinical guidelines in Hereditary Breast and ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llort, G; Chirivella, I; Morales, R; Serrano, R; Sanchez, A Beatriz; Teulé, A; Lastra, E; Brunet, J; Balmaña, J; Graña, B

    2015-12-01

    Approximately, 7 % of all breast cancers (BC) and 11-15 % of ovarian cancers (OC) are associated with inherited predisposition, mainly related to germline mutations in high penetrance BRCA1/2 genes. Clinical criteria for genetic testing are based on personal and family history to estimate a minimum 10 % detection rate. Selection criteria are evolving according to new advances in this field and the clinical utility of genetic testing. Multiplex panel testing carries its own challenges and we recommend inclusion of genes with clinical utility. We recommend screening with annual mammography from age 30 and breast MRI from age 25 for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy should be offered to women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation, between 35 and 40 years and after completion of childbearing, or individualise based on the earliest age of ovarian cancer diagnosed in the family. Bilateral risk-reducing mastectomy is an option for healthy BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, as well as contralateral mastectomy for young patients with a prior BC diagnosis. BRCA genetic testing in patients with BC and OC may influence their locoregional and systemic treatment.

  3. Photodynamic therapy for skin field cancerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Braathen, L R; Morton, C A; Basset-Seguin, N

    2012-01-01

    at least equivalent efficacy and tolerability, field directed therapies are therefore often more worthwhile than lesion targeted approaches. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) with its selective sensitization and destruction of diseased tissue is one ideal form of therapy for this indication. In the following...... paper the use of PDT for the treatment of field cancerized skin is reviewed and recommendations are given for its use....

  4. Familial gastric cancer: detection of a hereditary cause helps to understand its etiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vogelaar Ingrid P

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Worldwide, gastric cancer is one of the most common forms of cancer, with a high morbidity and mortality. Several environmental factors predispose to the development of gastric cancer, such as Helicobacter pylori infection, diet and smoking. Familial clustering of gastric cancer is seen in 10% of cases, and approximately 3% of gastric cancer cases arise in the setting of hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC. In families with HDGC, gastric cancer presents at relatively young age. Germline mutations in the CDH1 gene are the major cause of HDGC and are identified in approximately 25-50% of families which fulfill strict criteria. Prophylactic gastrectomy is the only option to prevent gastric cancer in individuals with a CDH1 mutation. However, in the majority of families with multiple cases of gastric cancer no germline genetic abnormality can be identified and therefore preventive measures are not available, except for general lifestyle advice. Future research should focus on identifying new genetic predisposing factors for all types of familial gastric cancer.

  5. Evaluation of an online family history tool for identifying hereditary and familial colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallenberg, F G J; Aalfs, C M; The, F O; Wientjes, C A; Depla, A C; Mundt, M W; Bossuyt, P M M; Dekker, E

    2017-09-21

    Identifying a hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC) syndrome or familial CRC (FCC) in a CRC patient may enable the patient and relatives to enroll in surveillance protocols. As these individuals are insufficiently recognized, we evaluated an online family history tool, consisting of a patient-administered family history questionnaire and an automated genetic referral recommendation, to facilitate the identification of patients with hereditary CRC or FCC. Between 2015 and 2016, all newly diagnosed CRC patients in five Dutch outpatient clinics, were included in a trial with a stepped-wedge design, when first visiting the clinic. Each hospital continued standard procedures for identifying patients at risk (control strategy) and then, after a predetermined period, switched to offering the family history tool to included patients (intervention strategy). After considering the tool-based recommendation, the health care provider could decide on and arrange the referral. Primary outcome was the relative number of CRC patients who received screening or surveillance recommendations for themselves or relatives because of hereditary CRC or FCC, provided by genetic counseling. The intervention effect was evaluated using a logit-linear model. With the tool, 46/489 (9.4%) patients received a screening or surveillance recommendation, compared to 35/292 (12.0%) in the control group. In the intention-to-treat-analysis, accounting for time trends and hospital effects, this difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.58). A family history tool does not necessarily assist in increasing the number of CRC patients and relatives enrolled in screening or surveillance recommendations for hereditary CRC or FCC. Other interventions should be considered.

  6. Non Melanoma Skin Cancer and Subsequent Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Judy R.; Zens, M. Scot; Gui, Jiang; Celaya, Maria O.; Riddle, Bruce L.; Karagas, Margaret R.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Several studies have shown an increased risk of cancer after non melanoma skin cancers (NMSC) but the individual risk factors underlying this risk have not been elucidated, especially in relation to sun exposure and skin sensitivity to sunlight. Purpose The aim of this study was to examine the individual risk factors associated with the development of subsequent cancers after non melanoma skin cancer. Methods Participants in the population-based New Hampshire Skin Cancer Study provided detailed risk factor data, and subsequent cancers were identified via linkage with the state cancer registry. Deaths were identified via state and national death records. A Cox proportional hazard model was used to estimate risk of subsequent malignancies in NMSC patients versus controls and to assess the potential confounding effects of multiple risk factors on this risk. Results Among 3584 participants, risk of a subsequent cancer (other than NMSC) was higher after basal cell carcinoma (BCC) (adjusted HR 1.40 [95% CI 1.15, 1.71]) than squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) (adjusted HR 1.18 [95% CI 0.95, 1.46]) compared to controls (adjusted for age, sex and current cigarette smoking). After SCC, risk was higher among those diagnosed before age 60 (HR 1.96 [95% CI 1.24, 3.12]). An over 3-fold risk of melanoma after SCC (HR 3.62; 95% CI 1.85, 7.11) and BCC (HR 3.28; 95% CI 1.66, 6.51) was observed, even after further adjustment for sun exposure-related factors and family history of skin cancer. In men, prostate cancer incidence was higher after BCC compared to controls (HR 1.64; 95% CI 1.10, 2.46). Conclusions Our population-based study indicates an increased cancer risk after NMSC that cannot be fully explained by known cancer risk factors. PMID:24937304

  7. Non melanoma skin cancer and subsequent cancer risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judy R Rees

    Full Text Available Several studies have shown an increased risk of cancer after non melanoma skin cancers (NMSC but the individual risk factors underlying this risk have not been elucidated, especially in relation to sun exposure and skin sensitivity to sunlight.The aim of this study was to examine the individual risk factors associated with the development of subsequent cancers after non melanoma skin cancer.Participants in the population-based New Hampshire Skin Cancer Study provided detailed risk factor data, and subsequent cancers were identified via linkage with the state cancer registry. Deaths were identified via state and national death records. A Cox proportional hazard model was used to estimate risk of subsequent malignancies in NMSC patients versus controls and to assess the potential confounding effects of multiple risk factors on this risk.Among 3584 participants, risk of a subsequent cancer (other than NMSC was higher after basal cell carcinoma (BCC (adjusted HR 1.40 [95% CI 1.15, 1.71] than squamous cell carcinoma (SCC (adjusted HR 1.18 [95% CI 0.95, 1.46] compared to controls (adjusted for age, sex and current cigarette smoking. After SCC, risk was higher among those diagnosed before age 60 (HR 1.96 [95% CI 1.24, 3.12]. An over 3-fold risk of melanoma after SCC (HR 3.62; 95% CI 1.85, 7.11 and BCC (HR 3.28; 95% CI 1.66, 6.51 was observed, even after further adjustment for sun exposure-related factors and family history of skin cancer. In men, prostate cancer incidence was higher after BCC compared to controls (HR 1.64; 95% CI 1.10, 2.46.Our population-based study indicates an increased cancer risk after NMSC that cannot be fully explained by known cancer risk factors.

  8. Pattern of Skin cancer at the National Orthopaedic Hospital, Enugu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... that cover the body should be undertaken by albinos. Public enlightenment towards early recognition of skin cancer will enhance early presentation and ensure adequate and curative treatment. Keywords: Skin cancers, squamous cell carcinoma, late presentation of skin cancer. Nigerian Journal of Plastic Surgery Vol.

  9. Outcome of 24 years national surveillance in different hereditary colorectal cancer subgroups leading to more individualised surveillance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Lars Joachim; Ladelund, Steen; Frederiksen, Birgitte Lidegaard

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Individuals with hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) have a high risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). The benefits of colonic surveillance in Lynch syndrome and Amsterdam-positive (familial CRC type X familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX)) families are clear; only...... the interval between colonoscopies is debated. The potential benefits for families not fulfilling the Amsterdam criteria are uncertain. The aim of this study was to compare the outcome of colonic surveillance in different hereditary subgroups and to evaluate the surveillance programmes. METHODS: A prospective......, observational study on the outcome of colonic surveillance in different hereditary subgroups based on 24 years of surveillance data from the national Danish HNPCC register. RESULTS: We analysed 13 444 surveillance sessions, including 8768 incidence sessions and 20 450 years of follow-up. CRC was more incident...

  10. Recommendations to improve identification of hereditary and familial colorectal cancer in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vasen, H F A; Möslein, G; Alonso, A

    2010-01-01

    were distributed amongst members of a European collaborative group of experts that aims to improve the prognosis of families with hereditary CRC. The survey showed that in all countries obtaining a family history followed by referral to clinical genetics centres of suspected cases was the main strategy...... recommended as tools to select high-risk patients for genetic testing and are performed in most countries in patients suspected of Lynch syndrome. In one country, IHC was recommended in all new cases of CRC. In most countries there are no specific programs on cancer genetics in the teaching curriculum...

  11. Guidelines for complex genetic analysis of hereditary breast ovarian cancer syndrome in slovak population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konecny M

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Genetic diagnostics of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC has been performed in Slovakia in many different forms before the year 2000. Complex HBOC genetic analysis consists of many steps, including the initial genetic consultation, laboratory testing of genes associated with HBOC, interpretation and report of DNA analysis results, secondary explanatory genetic consultation and recommendation of clinical management for pathological mutation carriers. Many clinicians are participating on this workflow, such as clinical geneticists, laboratory diagnosticians as well as gynaecologists, oncologists or radio-diagnosticians. Currently, genetic testing is still technically and financially demanding and aimed only at selected families or patients who fulfil the defined clinical indication criteria.

  12. Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer syndrome associated renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamane, Shraddha; Desai, Sangeeta; Menon, Santosh

    2017-01-01

    Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell carcinoma (HLRCC) is a recently described entity with unknown exact prevalence. The affected individuals are predisposed to have multiple leiomyomas and renal cancer due to germline mutation in fumarate hydratase gene on chromosome 1. The knowledge of this rare tumour is essential for early recognition and institution of appropriate therapy, since they have a grave prognosis. Herein, we present the first case from India of HLRCC in a 42 year old lady who presented with a renal mass and metastasis with consequent fulminant course of disease. We discuss the detailed histomorphologic features and iunique immunohistochemical signature of this unusual renal tumour with discussion of differential diagnosis.

  13. Preventive strategies for hereditary breast cancer pre-disposition; Praeventive Strategien bei familiaerer Brustkrebspraedisposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiechle, M. [Frauenklinik der Technischen Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Schmutzler, R. [Universitaets-Frauenklinik Bonn (Germany)

    2001-04-01

    First retrospective data show that hereditary Breast cancer risk can be positively influenced by prophylactic surgical procedures and hereby a thorough consultation seem to be an option for mutant gene carriers. A first evaluation of the women of 1050 high-risk families by the German Consortium 'Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer promoted by the German Cancer Aid (Deutsche Krebshilfe)' has shown that approximately 80% of the women concerned decide to participate in an intensive early detection - programme and only 5% of the women have decided to submit themselves to prophylactic surgical measures. This again shows how absolutely necessary the elaboration and evaluation of early detection measures within the different investigation projects are. (orig.) [German] Erste retrospektive erhobene Daten zeigen, dass prophylaktische operative Massnahmen das Mammakarzinomrisiko bei familiaerer Belastung guenstig beeinflussen koennen und stellen somit eine Option fuer Anlagetraegerinnen dar, nachdem eine eingehende Beratung erfolgt ist. Eine erste Evaluation der Frauen aus 1050 Hochrisikofamilien des Deutschen Konsortiums 'Hereditaeres Mamma- und Ovarialkarzinom, gefoerdert von der Deutschen Krebshilfe' hat gezeigt, dass sich ca. 80% der Frauen fuer die Teilnahme an einem intensiven Frueherkennungsprogramm und nur 5% der Frauen fuer prophylaktische operative Massnahmen entscheiden. Dies macht noch einmal deutlich, wie dringend die Erarbeitung und Auswertung von Frueherkennungsmassnahmen innerhalb von Forschungsprojekten erforderlich ist. (orig.)

  14. The results of gynecologic surveillance in families with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ketabi, Zohreh; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Mosgaard, Berit

    2014-01-01

    Objective. We aimed to estimate the incidence rate of endometrial cancer (EC) and to evaluate the results of EC-surveillance in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) families. Methods. All at-risk women recommended for EC-surveillance by the HNPCC-register-2959 women (19,334 women years...... with gynecological malignancies or premalignancies were diagnosed. Thirty-nine women had EC. Of these, 31 were from families with identified MMR gene mutations with the median age at diagnosis of 54 (39-83) years (Incidence Rate, IR = 0.63 per 100 women years) and four women from each Amsterdam (AMS......)-positive and AMS-like families (median age 64 (55-73) years, IR = 0.06 and 0.05 per 100 women years, respectively, p prevalent cancers, diagnosed at the first visit-and 6/13 based on symptoms...

  15. Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer syndrome: An update and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Viral M; Handler, Marc Z; Schwartz, Robert A; Lambert, W Clark

    2017-07-01

    Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC) syndrome is a rare genetic disorder that predisposes individuals to multiple cutaneous leiomyomas, renal cell carcinomas, and in women, uterine leiomyomas. Also known as Reed syndrome, it is caused by a germline heterozygous mutation of the fumarate hydratase tumor suppressor gene. HLRCC is associated with significant morbidity because of pain from cutaneous and uterine leiomyomas, the cutaneous pain often of unique character. Although genetic testing is currently considered the criterion standard to diagnose HLRCC, newer immunohistochemistry markers may provide rapid and cost effective alternatives to genetic testing. Because of the potentially aggressive nature of renal cell carcinomas that develop as early as in childhood, close annual cancer surveillance is desirable in individuals with HLRCC. In this review, we offer an update and an approach to the diagnosis, management, and renal cancer surveillance in HLRCC. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer: Multidisciplinary Case Report with Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Wilcox

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC is a rare, inherited cancer syndrome with at least one fourth of HDGC patients having an autosomal dominantly inherited mutation of CDH1 (E-Cadherin. Penetrance is relatively high (70–80% lifetime risk for gastric cancer. It is important for pathologists to recognize the syndrome's phenotype in early gastric lesions: patchy intramucosal signet ring cells often associated with pagetoid spread. Due to the insidious nature of this lesion, surveillance is limited and currently prophylactic gastrectomy is an option chosen by many HDGC patients. We present a case report from a multidisciplinary team of authors with a review of the literature that includes the updated guidelines for CDH1 genetic testing.

  17. Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer: Review of clinical, molecular genetics, and counseling aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellacosa, A.; Genuardi, M.; Anti, M.; Viel, A.; Ponz de Leon, M. [Universita di Modena (Italy)

    1996-04-24

    Lynch syndrome, or hereditary nonpolyposis colon cancer (HNPCC), is an autosomal dominant disease accounting for approximately 1-5% of all colorectal cancer cases. Due to the lack of pathognomonic morphological or biomolecular markers, HNPCC has traditionally posed unique problems to clinicians and geneticists alike, both in terms of diagnosis and clinical management. Recently, novel insight into the pathogenesis of this syndrome has been provided by the identification of its molecular basis. In HNPCC families, germline mutations in any of four genes encoding proteins of a specialized DNA repair system, the mismatch repair, predispose to cancer development. Mutations in mismatch repair genes lead to an overall increase of the mutation rate and are associated with a phenotype of length instability of microsatellite loci. The present report summarizes the clinicopathological aspects of HNPCC and reviews the most recent molecular and biochemical findings. 115 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. High-Risk Palliative Care Patients' Knowledge and Attitudes about Hereditary Cancer Testing and DNA Banking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quillin, John M; Emidio, Oluwabunmi; Ma, Brittany; Bailey, Lauryn; Smith, Thomas J; Kang, In Guk; Yu, Brandon J; Owodunni, Oluwafemi Patrick; Abusamaan, Mohammed; Razzak, Rab; Bodurtha, Joann N

    2017-12-04

    Even at the end of life, testing cancer patients for inherited susceptibility may provide life-saving information to their relatives. Prior research suggests palliative care inpatients have suboptimal understanding of genetic importance, and testing may be underutilized in this clinical setting. These conclusions are based on limited research. This study aimed to estimate genetic testing prevalence among high-risk palliative care patients in a National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center. We also aimed to understand these patients' understanding of, and attitudes toward, hereditary cancer testing and DNA banking. Palliative care in-patients with cancer completed structured interviews, and their medical records were reviewed. Among patients at high risk for hereditary cancer, we assessed history of genetic testing/DNA banking; and related knowledge and attitudes. Among 24 high-risk patients, 14 (58.3%) said they/their relatives had genetic testing or they had been referred for a genetics consultation. Of the remaining 10 patients, seven (70%) said they would "probably" or "definitely" get tested. Patients who had not had testing were least concerned about the impact of future testing on their family relationships; two (20%) said they were "extremely concerned" about privacy related to genetic testing. Of patients without prior testing, five (50%) said they had heard or read "a fair amount" about genetic testing. No high-risk patients had banked DNA. Overall, 23 (95.8%) said they had heard or read "almost nothing" or "relatively little" about DNA banking. Written materials and clinician discussion were most preferred ways to learn about genetic testing and DNA banking. Overall, this study demonstrates underutilization of genetics services at the end of life continues to be problematic, despite high patient interest.

  19. The impact of hereditary cancer gene panels on clinical care and lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okur, Volkan; Chung, Wendy K

    2017-11-01

    Mutations in hereditary cancer syndromes account for a modest fraction of all cancers; however, identifying patients with these germline mutations offers tremendous health benefits to both patients and their family members. There are about 60 genes that confer a high lifetime risk of specific cancers, and this information can be used to tailor prevention, surveillance, and treatment. With advances in next-generation sequencing technologies and the elimination of gene patents for evaluating genetic information, we are now able to analyze multiple genes simultaneously, leading to the widespread clinical use of gene panels for germline cancer testing. Over the last 4 years since these panels were introduced, we have learned about the diagnostic yield of testing, the expanded phenotypes of the patients with mutations, and the clinical utility of genetic testing in patients with cancer and/or without cancer but with a family history of cancer. We have also experienced challenges including the large number of variants of unknown significance (VUSs), identification of somatic mutations and need to differentiate these from germline mutations, technical issues with particular genes and mutations, insurance coverage and reimbursement issues, lack of access to data, and lack of clinical management guidelines for newer and, especially, moderate and low-penetrance genes. The lessons learned from cancer genetic testing panels are applicable to other clinical areas as well and highlight the problems to be solved as we advance genomic medicine. © 2017 Okur and Chung; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  20. Validation of an online questionnaire for identifying people at risk of familial and hereditary colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallenberg, F G J; IJspeert, J E G; Bossuyt, P M M; Aalfs, C M; Dekker, E

    2015-09-01

    We developed and validated an online questionnaire to document familial cancer history, in order to facilitate the detection of persons with a familial or hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. The development of the self-administered online questionnaire for the assessment of familial and hereditary CRC risk was based on nationwide criteria for referral to genetic specialists due to a Lynch syndrome suspicion, as well as existing criteria for surveillance colonoscopies because of an increased risk of familial CRC. The questionnaire was validated at a private colonoscopy center. Patients scheduled for colonoscopy were enrolled (n = 150). Performance of the questionnaire was assessed by comparing referrals based on questionnaire data against referral decisions based on full pedigree data. In a second validation phase, referrals based on questionnaire data were compared with referrals based on data collected in a telephone interview. We also calculated inter-observer agreement in referral decisions. In the first validation phase, the questionnaire had a sensitivity of 90% (95% CI 55-98%) at a specificity of 98% (95% CI 87-100%) in identifying persons qualifying for referral. In the second validation phase, sensitivity was 100% (95% CI 63-100) at a specificity of 97% (95% CI 91-99%). In both validation phases an inter-observer agreement of 100% in referral decisions was achieved. The online questionnaire has a high sensitivity and specificity in identifying persons qualifying for referral because of suspected Lynch syndrome or familial CRC. Implementation of this tool in colonoscopy clinics can facilitate the detection of patients with hereditary or familial CRC.

  1. Targeted Therapy in Nonmelanoma Skin Cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spallone, Giulia; Botti, Elisabetta; Costanzo, Antonio, E-mail: antonio.costanzo@uniroma2.it [Department of Dermatology, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Via Montpellier 1, 00199, Rome (Italy)

    2011-05-03

    Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the most prevalent cancer in light-skinned populations, and includes mainly Basal Cell Carcinomas (BCC), representing around 75% of NMSC and Squamous Cell Carcinomas (SCC). The incidence of these tumors is continuously growing. It was found that the overall number of procedures for NMSC in US rose by 76%, from 1,158,298 in 1992 to 2,048,517 in 2006. Although mortality from NMSC tends to be very low, clearly the morbidity related to these skin cancers is very high. Treatment options for NMSC include both surgical and nonsurgical interventions. Surgery was considered the gold standard therapy, however, advancements in the knowledge of pathogenic mechanisms of NMSCs led to the identification of key targets for drug intervention and to the consequent development of several targeted therapies. These represent the future in treatment of these common forms of cancer ensuring a high cure rate, preservation of the maximal amount of normal surrounding tissue and optimal cosmetic outcome. Here, we will review recent advancements in NMSC targeted therapies focusing on BCC and SCC.

  2. Targeted Therapy in Nonmelanoma Skin Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Spallone

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC is the most prevalent cancer in light-skinned populations, and includes mainly Basal Cell Carcinomas (BCC, representing around 75% of NMSC and Squamous Cell Carcinomas (SCC. The incidence of these tumors is continuously growing. It was found that the overall number of procedures for NMSC in US rose by 76%, from 1,158,298 in 1992 to 2,048,517 in 2006. Although mortality from NMSC tends to be very low, clearly the morbidity related to these skin cancers is very high. Treatment options for NMSC include both surgical and nonsurgical interventions. Surgery was considered the gold standard therapy, however, advancements in the knowledge of pathogenic mechanisms of NMSCs led to the identification of key targets for drug intervention and to the consequent development of several targeted therapies. These represent the future in treatment of these common forms of cancer ensuring a high cure rate, preservation of the maximal amount of normal surrounding tissue and optimal cosmetic outcome. Here, we will review recent advancements in NMSC targeted therapies focusing on BCC and SCC.

  3. Optical mapping of nonmelanoma skin cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaroslavsky, Anna N.; Neel, Victor; Anderson, Richard R.

    2004-07-01

    More than two million cases of nonmelanoma skin cancers are diagnosed every year. Therefore, there is a strong need for practical, reliable, rapid, and precise methods for tumor delineation, to guide surgery and other treatments of skin cancer. Once developed, such methods may be useful for squamous cell carcinomas of other organs. Non-invasive optical imaging techniques including polarization sensitive reflectance and fluorescence imaging were evaluated for the demarcation of nonmelanoma skin tumors. Thick freshly excised tumor specimens obtained from Mohs surgery were used for the experiments. Imaging was performed using linearly polarized incident light in the visible and near infrared spectral range from 577 nm to 750 nm. Non-toxic absorbing and fluorescent dyes (Toluidine Blue O, Methylene Blue) were employed to enhance tumor contrast in the images. The images were acquired using the remitted light polarized in the directions parallel and perpendicular to the polarization of incident light. Reflectance and fluorescence polarization images were evaluated. The data were processed and analyzed for dependence of the remitted light polarization on the tissue type (cancerous/normal). The data obtained so far from fresh tumor specimens in vitro using dye-enhanced polarized light reflectance, and exogenous fluorescence polarization imaging suggest that optical mapping can become a valuable guidance tool in nonmelanoma cancer surgery.

  4. Lobulitis in nonneoplastic breast tissue from breast cancer patients: association with phenotypes that are common in hereditary breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulbahce, H Evin; Vanderwerf, Steve; Blair, Cindy; Sweeney, Carol

    2014-01-01

    Lobular inflammation (lobulitis) has been demonstrated in benign breast tissue adjacent to in situ and invasive breast cancers and, more recently, in nonneoplastic tissue from prophylactic mastectomy specimens for hereditary high-risk breast carcinoma. The aim of this study is to investigate the incidence of lobulitis in benign breast tissue of patients with breast cancer and associated clinicopathologic features. We reviewed nonneoplastic breast tissue sections from 334 patients with invasive breast carcinoma to study lobulitis in normal breast tissue and to correlate its presence with clinicopathologic features of the associated tumor. Clinical information (age, menopausal status, and follow-up), tumor characteristics (type, grade, size, lymph node status, stage, estrogen and progesterone receptor, HER2), and survival were recorded. Characteristics of women with and without lobulitis were cross-classified with categories of clinical, pathologic, and histologic characteristics, and differences in distributions were tested in univariate and multivariate analysis. Lobulitis was found in 26 (8%) of 334 patients. The lymphocytic infiltrate was predominantly T-cell type. In a multivariate model, lobulitis in patients with breast cancer was significantly associated with younger age, triple (estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, HER2)-negative cancers, and medullary phenotypes. Lobulitis in nonneoplastic breast tissue, away from tumor, is associated with clinicopathologic features more commonly seen in hereditary breast cancer. © 2013.

  5. Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer and lynch syndromes in a BRCA1/2 negative breast cancer patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njoroge, Scolastica W; Burgess, Kelly R; Cobleigh, Melody A; Alnajar, Hussein H; Gattuso, Paolo; Usha, Lydia

    2017-11-01

    Genetic counseling and testing is recommended for women with a personal and/or family history of breast and other cancers (ovarian, pancreatic, male breast and others). Mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes (BRCA1/2) are the most common causes of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer. Additional genetic counseling and testing with a multi-gene panel may be considered in breast cancer patients who tested negative for mutations in these two genes. In about 11% of BRCA1/2-negative patients, further genetic testing reveals pathogenic mutations in other high or moderate cancer risk genes. In 0.2% of cases, an individual may carry pathogenic mutations in more than one high penetrance gene (a double heterozygote). Finding one or more pathogenic mutations is important for cancer prevention in patients and/or their families. Here we present a case of a breast cancer patient who did not have a pathogenic mutation in BRCA1/2 and had a family history of breast and stomach cancers. On an additional multi-gene panel testing, she was found to carry pathogenic mutations in the CDH1 and PMS2 genes, which cause Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer and Lynch syndromes, respectively. To our knowledge, this is the first description of such a double heterozygote. Clinical manifestations, genetics, and management of both syndromes are reviewed, including prophylactic surgery and screening for unaffected family members. Management challenges for a mutation carrier with advanced breast cancer are discussed. Our case supports the clinical utility of additional multi-gene panel testing for breast cancer patients who do not have a pathogenic mutation in BRCA1/2 genes.

  6. Genetic screening analysis of patients with hereditary diffuse gastric cancer from northern and northeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira-Nunes, Caroline Aquino; Barros, Mariceli Baia Leão; do Nascimento Borges, Bárbara; Montenegro, Raquel Carvalho; Lamarão, Leticia Martins; Ribeiro, Helem Ferreira; Bona, Amanda Braga; Assumpção, Paulo Pimentel; Rey, Juan Antonio; Pinto, Giovanny Rebouças; Burbano, Rommel Rodriguez

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) is a hereditary autosomal inherited syndrome associated with CDH1 germline mutations. In Brazil, gastrointestinal tumors are among the most prevalent tumor types and constitute a serious public health problem, especially in the northern and northeastern regions. This study aimed to investigate germline mutations, methylation pattern and genomic rearrangements in the CDH1 gene and quantitative changes in the DNA of HDGC patients in northern and northeastern Brazil. Twenty-seven DNA samples from the members of four families affected by HDGC were analyzed using array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH), DNA sequencing and methylation pattern. No evidence of gain and loss events or any rearrangements were found in any of the samples tested using aCGH. No promoter region hypermethylation was observed either. Two of the four families presented different types of germline mutations. The 185G > T and 1018A > G germline mutations detected in this study have been described in Asian and European families, respectively. The ancestors of the two families carrying these mutations had originated from those continents. This is the first study to evaluate CDH1 gene germline mutations in Brazilian families with HDGC. In our study, 50% of the families showed no CDH1 gene alterations, and it is possible that in regions with a high incidence of gastric cancer, such as northern and northeastern Brazil, environmental factors might have induced the different genetic alterations analyzed in this study.

  7. Genetic Testing: Challenges and Changes in Testing for Hereditary Cancer Syndromes
.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Elisabeth; Mahon, Suzanne M

    2017-10-01

    The practice of genetic testing for hereditary cancer syndromes has changed dramatically in recent years, and patients often approach oncology nurses requesting information about genetic testing.
. This article aims to explore changes in cancer genetics, the role of genetics professionals in providing comprehensive genetic care, and the implications of these new developments in genetics for oncology nurses.
. A literature review was conducted and focused on articles about the updating of genetic tests with panel testing, insurance changes, alternative genetic counseling strategies, and direct-to-consumer genetic testing.
. Oncology nurses play an important role in identifying and referring patients, including those who have tested negative for hereditary susceptibility genes, to genetics professionals. Genetics professionals can assist with insurance issues, interpretation of test results, clarification when a variant of unknown clinical significance is detected, and recommendations for care based on personal and family history and testing results. Oncology nurses can assist families with understanding the limitations of direct-to-consumer genetic testing.

  8. Hereditary breast cancer in Middle Eastern and North African (MENA) populations: identification of novel, recurrent and founder BRCA1 mutations in the Tunisian population

    OpenAIRE

    Mahfoudh, Wijden; Bouaouina, Noureddine; Ahmed, Slim Ben; Gabbouj, Sallouha; Shan, Jingxuan; Mathew, Rebecca; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Troudi, Wafa; Elgaaied, Amel Ben Ammar; Hassen, Elham; Chouchane, Lotfi

    2011-01-01

    Germ-line mutations in BRCA1 breast cancer susceptibility gene account for a large proportion of hereditary breast cancer families and show considerable ethnic and geographical variations. The contribution of BRCA1 mutations to hereditary breast cancer has not yet been thoroughly investigated in Middle Eastern and North African populations. In this study, 16 Tunisian high-risk breast cancer families were screened for germline mutations in the entire BRCA1 coding region and exon?intron boundar...

  9. Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer is predicted to contribute towards colorectal cancer in young South African blacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ramsay

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A disproportionately large number of young (<50 years black patients present with colorectal cancer (CRC in South Africa. Although a phenomenon previously described elsewhere in Africa, its specificmolecular basis,whether sporadic or hereditary, has not been established. Molecular analysis of these tumours could link them to the features known to be associated with specific types of hereditary colorectal cancer, specifically through examination of levels of microsatellite instability, promoter methylation and the presence or absence of KRAS and BRAF mutations. The molecular features of cancer tissue samples from 44 CRC cases of black and white patients in South Africa were accordingly retrospectively analysed without knowledge of family history. Compared with samples from older blacks (>50 years, those from young black patients presented more often with a low methylation phenotype (CIMP-L and high levels of microsatellite instability (MSI-H. Furthermore, as determined by real-time PCR using probe technology, the tissues from35%of young blacks showed mutations within exon 1 of the KRAS gene. The BRAF-V600E mutation was only evident in the case of a single young black patient. Based on these results it seems likely that a proportion of CRC cases in young black patients from South Africa develop through the accumulation of mutations resulting in a mismatch repair deficiency linked to MSI-H and, possibly, germline mutations in the mismatch repair genes. The features in these patients are consistent with a diagnosis of the Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC syndrome. This finding has important implications for patient management and suggests that family members may be at high risk for CRC.

  10. Genetic testing for hereditary cancer predisposition: BRCA1/2, Lynch syndrome, and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, M J; Obeid, E I; Schwartz, S C; Mantia-Smaldone, G; Forman, A D; Daly, M B

    2016-03-01

    Obstetrician/gynecologists and gynecologic oncologists serve an integral role in the care of women at increased hereditary risk of cancer. Their contribution includes initial identification of high risk patients, screening procedures like bimanual exam, trans-vaginal ultrasound and endometrial biopsy, prophylaxis via TAH and/or BSO, and chemoprevention. Further, gynecologists also serve a central role in the management of the secondary repercussions of efforts to mitigate increased cancer risks, including vasomotor symptoms, sexual function, bone health, cardiovascular disease, and mental health. The past several years has seen multiple new high and moderate penetrance genes introduced into the clinical care of women at increased risk of gynecologic malignancy. Awareness of these new genes and the availability of new multi-gene panel tests is critical for providers on the front-line of women's health. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Genetic testing for hereditary cancer predisposition: BRCA1/2, Lynch syndrome, and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, MJ; Obeid, EI; Schwartz, SC; Mantia-Smaldone, G; Forman, AD; Daly, MB

    2016-01-01

    Obstetrician/gynecologists and gynecologic oncologists serve an integral role in the care of women at increased hereditary risk of cancer. Their contribution includes initial identification of high risk patients, screening procedures like bimanual exam, trans-vaginal ultrasound and endometrial biopsy, prophylaxis via TAH and/or BSO, and chemoprevention. Further, gynecologists also serve a central role in the management of the secondary repercussions of efforts to mitigate increased cancer risks, including vasomotor symptoms, sexual function, bone health, cardiovascular disease, and mental health. The past several years has seen multiple new high and moderate penetrance genes introduced into the clinical care of women at increased risk of gynecologic malignancy. Awareness of these new genes and the availability of new multigene panel tests is critical for providers on the front-line of women’s health. PMID:26812021

  12. Influence of the Angelina Jolie Announcement and Insurance Reimbursement on Practice Patterns for Hereditary Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jihyoun; Kim, Sungwon; Kang, Eunyoung; Park, Suyeon; Kim, Zisun; Lee, Min Hyuk

    2017-06-01

    Lack of awareness, the stigma of carrying a genetic mutation, and economic factors are barriers to acceptance of BRCA genetic testing or appropriate risk management. We aimed to investigate the influence of Angelina Jolie's announcement of her medical experience and also health insurance reimbursement for BRCA gene testing on practice patterns for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC). A survey regarding changes in practice patterns for HBOC before and after the announcement was conducted online. The rate of BRCA gene testing was obtained from the National Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service database. From May to August 2016, 70 physicians responded to the survey. Genetic testing recommendations and prophylactic management were increased after the announcement. Risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy and contralateral prophylactic mastectomy was significantly increased in BRCA carriers with breast cancer. The BRCA testing rate increased annually. Health insurance and a celebrity announcement were associated with increased genetic testing.

  13. BRCA Mutations Increase Fertility in Families at Hereditary Breast/Ovarian Cancer Risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrice Kwiatkowski

    Full Text Available Deleterious mutations in the BRCA genes are responsible for a small, but significant, proportion of breast and ovarian cancers (5 - 10 %. Proof of de novo mutations in hereditary breast/ovarian cancer (HBOC families is rare, in contrast to founder mutations, thousands of years old, that may be carried by as much as 1 % of a population. Thus, if mutations favoring cancer survive selection pressure through time, they must provide advantages that compensate for the loss of life expectancy.This hypothesis was tested within 2,150 HBOC families encompassing 96,325 individuals. Parameters included counts of breast/ovarian cancer, age at diagnosis, male breast cancer and other cancer locations. As expected, well-known clinical parameters discriminated between BRCA-mutated families and others: young age at breast cancer, ovarian cancer, pancreatic cancer and male breast cancer. The major fertility differences concerned men in BRCA-mutated families: they had lower first and mean age at paternity, and fewer remained childless. For women in BRCA families, the miscarriage rate was lower. In a logistic regression including clinical factors, the different miscarriage rate and men's mean age at paternity remained significant.Fertility advantages were confirmed in a subgroup of 746 BRCA mutation carriers and 483 non-carriers from BRCA mutated families. In particular, female carriers were less often nulliparous (9.1 % of carriers versus 16.0 %, p = 0.003 and had more children (1.8 ± 1.4 SD versus 1.5 ± 1.3, p = 0.002 as well as male carriers (1.7 ± 1.3 versus 1.4 ± 1.3, p = 0.024.Although BRCA mutations shorten the reproductive period due to cancer mortality, they compensate by improving fertility both in male and female carriers.

  14. Epithelial ovarian cancer and the occurrence of skin cancer in the Netherlands: histological type connotations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niekerk, G.C. van; Bulten, J.; Verbeek, A.L.M.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Patients with epithelial ovarian cancer have a high risk of (non-)melanoma skin cancer. The association between histological variants of primary ovarian cancer and skin cancer is poorly documented. Objectives. To further evaluate the risk of skin cancer based on the histology of the

  15. PGD for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer : the route to universal tests for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drusedau, Marion; Dreesen, Jos C.; Derks-Smeets, Inge; Coonen, Edith; van Golde, Ron; van Echten-Arends, Jannie; Kastrop, Peter M. M.; Blok, Marinus J.; Gomez-Garcia, Encarna; Geraedts, Joep P.; Smeets, Hubert J.; de Die-Smulders, Christine E.; Paulussen, Aimee D.

    2013-01-01

    Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis (PGD) is a method of testing in vitro embryos as an alternative to prenatal diagnosis with possible termination of pregnancy in case of an affected child. Recently, PGD for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer caused by BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations has found its way in

  16. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in Danish families with hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Mads; Hansen, Thomas V O; Borg, Ake

    2008-01-01

    A national study of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in Danish HBOC (Hereditary Breast Ovarian Cancer) families revealed a total number of 322 mutation positive families, 206 (64%) BRCA1 and 116 (36%) BRCA2 positive families from a population of 5.5 million inhabitants. Seven hundred and twenty six...

  17. The impact of social and personal resources on psychological distress in women at risk for hereditary breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Heijer, M.; de Vos, J.; Seynaeve, C.; Vanheusden, K.; Duivenvoorden, H.J.; Tilanus-Linthorst, M.; Menke-Pluymers, M.B.E.; Tibben, A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The objectives of the present study were to (1) evaluate whether social and personal resources were independently related to psychological distress and (2) examine the interrelationships of social and personal resources in women at risk for hereditary breast cancer. Methods: General and

  18. The impact of social and personal resources on psychological distress in women at risk for hereditary breast cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijer, M. den; Vos, J.; Seynaeve, C.; Vanheusden, K.; Duivenvoorden, H.J.; Tilanus-Linthorst, M.; Menke-Pluymers, M.B.; Tibben, A.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objectives of the present study were to (1) evaluate whether social and personal resources were independently related to psychological distress and (2) examine the interrelationships of social and personal resources in women at risk for hereditary breast cancer. METHODS: General and

  19. Prognostic factors for hereditary cancer distress six months after BRCA1/2 or HNPCC genetic susceptibility testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oostrom, Iris; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Duivenvoorden, Hugo J.; Brocker-Vriends, Annette H. J. T.; van Asperen, Christi J.; Sijmons, Rolf H.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Van Gool, Arthur R.; Klijn, Jan G. M.; Tibben, Aad

    This study explored predictors for hereditary cancer distress six months after genetic susceptibility testing for a known familial BRCA1/2 or HNPCC related mutation, in order to gain insight into aspects relevant for the identification of individuals needing additional psychosocial support. Coping,

  20. Prognostic factors for hereditary cancer distress six months after BRCA1/2 or HNPCC genetic susceptibility testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oostrom, Iris; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Duivenvoorden, Hugo J.; Bröcker-Vriends, Annette H. J. T.; van Asperen, Christi J.; Sijmons, Rolf H.; Seynaeve, Caroline; van Gool, Arthur R.; Klijn, Jan G. M.; Tibben, Aad

    2007-01-01

    This study explored predictors for hereditary cancer distress six months after genetic susceptibility testing for a known familial BRCA1/2 or HNPCC related mutation, in order to gain insight into aspects relevant for the identification of individuals needing additional psychosocial support. Coping,

  1. Prognostic factors for hereditary cancer distress six months after BRCA1/2 or HNPCC genetic susceptibility testing.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostrom, I.I.H. van; Meijers-Heijboer, H.; Duivenvoorden, H.J.; Brocker-Vriends, A.H.; Asperen, C.J. van; Sijmons, R.H.; Seynaeve, C.; Gool, A.R. van; Klijn, J.G.M.; Tibben, A.

    2007-01-01

    This study explored predictors for hereditary cancer distress six months after genetic susceptibility testing for a known familial BRCA1/2 or HNPCC related mutation, in order to gain insight into aspects relevant for the identification of individuals needing additional psychosocial support. Coping,

  2. Inclusion of malignant fibrous histiocytoma in the tumour spectrum associated with hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijmons, Rolf; Hofstra, Roelof; Hollema, Harmen; Mensink, R; VANDERHOUT, A; Hoekstra, Harald; Kleibeuker, Jan; Molenaar, Willemina; Wijnen, Juul; Fodde, R; Vasen, H; Buys, Carolus

    2000-01-01

    Sarcomas, including the malignant fibrous histiocytomas (MFHs), are not known to be part of the tumour spectrum of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) as epidemiologically established. Therefore, occurrence of MFH in an HNPCC family may very well be coincidental. HNPCC is associated

  3. Association of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer-related tumors displaying low microsatellite instability with MSH6 germline mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Y; Berends, MJW; Mensink, RGJ; Kempinga, C; Sijmons, RH; van der Zee, AGJ; Hollema, H; Kleibeuker, JH; Buys, CHCM; Hofstra, RMW

    1999-01-01

    Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) (Amsterdam criteria) is often caused by mutations in mismatch repair (MMR) genes, and tumors of patients with HNPCC show microsatellite instability (MSI-high phenotype), Germline mutations of MMR genes have rarely been found in families that have

  4. Germline mutations of EXO1 gene in patients with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) and atypical HNPCC forms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Y; Berends, MJW; Post, JG; Mensink, RGJ; Verlind, E; Van Der Sluis, T; Kempinga, C; Sijmons, RH; Van der Zee, AGJ; Hollema, H; Kleibeuker, JH; Buys, CHCM; Hofstra, RMW

    (Background & Aims) under bar: Germline mutations in one of four mismatch repair genes have been found in the majority of families with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), but only in a small part of families with atypical HNPCC. The recently cloned EXO1 gene might be involved in the

  5. Hereditary Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... E-News Sign-Up Home Hereditary Pancreatitis Hereditary Pancreatitis Hereditary Pancreatitis (HP) is a rare genetic condition characterized by ... of pancreatic attacks, which can progress to chronic pancreatitis . Symptoms include abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. Onset ...

  6. Molecular genetic approach for screening of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metka Ravnik-Glavač

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The main goal of knowledge concerning human diseases is to transfer as much as possible useful information into clinical applications. Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC is the most common autosomal dominant inherited predisposition for colorectal cancer, accounting for 1–2% of all bowel cancer. The only way to diagnose HNPCC is by a family history consistent with the disease defined by International Collaborative Group on HNPCC (Amsterdam criteria I and II. The main molecular cause of HNPCC is a constitutional mutation in one of the mismatch repair (MMR genes. Since HNPCC mutations have been detected also in families that did not fulfil the Amsterdam criteria, molecular genetic characteristics of HNPCC cancers have been proposed as valuable first step in HNPCC identification. Microsatellite instability is present in about 90% of cancers of HNPCC patients. However, of all MSI colorectal cancers 80– 90% are sporadic. Several molecular mechanisms have been uncovered that enable distinguishing to some extent between sporadic and HNPCC cancers with MSI including hypermethylation of hMLH1 promoter and frequent mutations in BAX and TGFBR2 in sporadic CRC with MSI-H.Conclusions: The determination of MSI status and careful separation of MSI positive colorectal cancer into sporadic MSIL, sporadic MSI-H, and HNPCC MSI-H followed by mutation detection in MMR genes is important for prevention, screening and management of colorectal cancer. In some studies we and others have already shown that large-scale molecular genetic analysis for HNPCC can be done and is sensitive enough to approve population screening. Population screening includes also colonoscopy which is restricted only to the obligate carriers of the mutation. This enables that the disease is detected in earlier stages which would greatly decrease medical treatment costs and most importantly decrease mortality. In Slovenia we have started population screening based

  7. Cost sharing and hereditary cancer risk: predictors of willingness-to-pay for genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matro, Jennifer M; Ruth, Karen J; Wong, Yu-Ning; McCully, Katen C; Rybak, Christina M; Meropol, Neal J; Hall, Michael J

    2014-12-01

    Increasing use of predictive genetic testing to gauge hereditary cancer risk has been paralleled by rising cost-sharing practices. Little is known about how demographic and psychosocial factors may influence individuals' willingness-to-pay for genetic testing. The Gastrointestinal Tumor Risk Assessment Program Registry includes individuals presenting for genetic risk assessment based on personal/family cancer history. Participants complete a baseline survey assessing cancer history and psychosocial items. Willingness-to-pay items include intention for: genetic testing only if paid by insurance; testing with self-pay; and amount willing-to-pay ($25-$2,000). Multivariable models examined predictors of willingness-to-pay out-of-pocket (versus only if paid by insurance) and willingness-to-pay a smaller versus larger sum (≤$200 vs. ≥$500). All statistical tests are two-sided (α = 0.05). Of 385 evaluable participants, a minority (42%) had a personal cancer history, while 56% had ≥1 first-degree relative with colorectal cancer. Overall, 21.3% were willing to have testing only if paid by insurance, and 78.7% were willing-to-pay. Predictors of willingness-to-pay were: 1) concern for positive result; 2) confidence to control cancer risk; 3) fewer perceived barriers to colorectal cancer screening; 4) benefit of testing to guide screening (all p risk assessment are willing-to-pay out-of-pocket for genetic testing, and anticipate benefits to reducing cancer risk. Identifying factors associated with willingness-to-pay for genetic services is increasingly important as testing is integrated into routine cancer care.

  8. Mid-infrared spectroscopy in skin cancer cell type identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastl, Lena; Kemper, Björn; Lloyd, Gavin R.; Nallala, Jayakrupakar; Stone, Nick; Naranjo, Valery; Penaranda, Francisco; Schnekenburger, Jürgen

    2017-07-01

    Mid infrared spectroscopy samples were developed for the analysis of skin tumor cell types and three dimensional tissue phantoms towards the application of midIR spectroscopy for fast and reliable skin cancer diagnostics.

  9. Radiation Therapy in Elderly Skin Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Hee [Keimyung University College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-06-15

    To evaluate the long term results (local control, survival, failure, and complications) after radiation therapy for skin cancer in elderly patients. The study spanned from January 1990 to October 2002. Fifteen elderly patients with skin cancer were treated by radiotherapy at the Keimyung University Dongsan Medical Center. The age distribution of the patients surveyed was 72 to 95 years, with a median age of 78.8 years. The pathologic classification of the 15 patients included squamous cell carcinoma (10 patients), basal cell carcinoma (3 patients), verrucous carcinoma (1 patient) and skin adnexal origin carcinoma (1 patient). The most common tumor location was the head (13 patients). The mean tumor diameter was 4.9 cm (range 2 to 9 cm). The radiation dose was delivered via an electron beam of 6 to 15 MeV. The dose range was adjusted to the tumor diameter and depth of tumor invasion. The total radiation dose ranged from 50{approx}80 Gy (mean: 66 Gy) with a 2 Gy fractional dose prescribed to the 80% isodose line once a day and 5 times a week. One patient with lymph node metastasis was treated with six MV photon beams boosted with electron beams. The length of the follow-up periods ranged from 10 to 120 months with a median follow-up period of 48 months. The local control rates were 100% (15/15). In addition, the five year disease free survival rate (5YDFS) was 80% and twelve patients (80%) had no recurrence and skin cancer recurrence occurred in 3 patients (20%). Three patients have lived an average of 90 months (68{approx}120 months) without recurrence or metastasis. A total of 9 patients who died as a result of other causes had a mean survival time of 55.8 months after radiation therapy. No severe acute or chronic complications were observed after radiation therapy. Only minor complications including radiation dermatitis was treated with supportive care. The results suggest that radiation therapy is an effective and safe treatment method for the treatment of skin

  10. HPV vaccination for prevention of skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinzón, Sabrina E; Rösl, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous papillomaviruses are associated with specific skin diseases, such as extensive wart formation and the development of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), especially in immunosuppressed patients. Hence, clinical approaches are required that prevent such lesions. Licensed human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines confer type-restricted protection against HPV types 6, 11, 16 and 18, responsible of 90% of genital warts and 70% of cervical cancers, respectively. However, they do not protect against less prevalent high-risk types or cutaneous HPVs. Over the past few years, several studies explored the potential of developing vaccines targeting cutaneous papillomaviruses. These vaccines showed to be immunogenic and prevent skin tumor formation in certain animal models. Furthermore, under conditions mimicking the ones found in the intended target population (i.e., immunosuppression and in the presence of an already established infection before vaccination), recent preclinical data shows that immunization can still be effective. Strategies are currently focused on finding vaccine formulations that can confer protection against a broad range of papillomavirus-associated diseases. The state-of-the-art of these approaches and the future directions in the field will be presented.

  11. Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer: genetics, prophylactic total gastrectomy, and follow up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenoy S

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Santosh Shenoy1, Carl Palmer2, Teresa Dunsworth3, Stephen McNatt41Department of Surgery, Louis A Johnson VA Medical Center, Clarksburg, WV, USA; 2Department of Medicine, West Virginia University, General Internal Medicine and Geriatrics, Morgantown, WV, USA; 3General Internal Medicine and Geriatrics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, USA; 4Department of Surgery, Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, Winston-Salem, NC, USABackground: Germline truncating mutations in the E-cadherin (CDH1 gene have been identified in families with hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC and lobular breast cancers. This disease entity has an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance with approximately 70% to 80% penetrance. Currently there is no definitive diagnostic modality for surveillance to detect this form of gastric cancer (GC which carries a poor prognosis and high mortality. Prophylactic total gastrectomy is an option in the affected carriers and may offer improved long term survival for HDGC.Methods: Two siblings from a single family with multi generation history of GC were identified as carriers of the mutation. After genetic counseling, they underwent laparoscopic prophylactic total gastrectomy with Roux-en-y esophagojejunostomy reconstruction. We describe the demographics and pedigree analysis, and postoperative and 5-year outcomes, and review the literature.Results: Pathologic examination of the stomach revealed no foci of cancer in Patient 1; evidence of foci of gastric cancer was noted in Patient 2. Patient 2 subsequently developed lobular carcinoma of breast and underwent prophylactic bilateral mastectomy. No metastatic disease has been noted at 5-year follow up. She also had a successful pregnancy and birth of a healthy baby 3 years post gastrectomy. Both patients had a 30 to 40 lbs (13.5 to 18 kg permanent weight loss. Both patients have maintained their preoperative activities and occupations.Conclusion: HDGC is an uncommon

  12. Frequent alterations of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathways in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Mats; Ekstrand, Anna Isinger; Jönsson, Mats

    2010-01-01

    , and PTEN in colorectal cancers linked to hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). Sequencing was used to identify mutations in PIK3CA, a real-time PCR-based method to identify KRAS mutations, and immunohistochemical staining was used to evaluate the expression of PIK3CA, phosphorylated AKT......The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases-AKT-mammalian target of rapamycin pathway (PI3K/AKT/mTOR) is central in colorectal tumors. Data on its role in hereditary cancers are, however, scarce and we therefore characterized mutations in PIK3CA and KRAS, and expression of PIK3CA, phosphorylated AKT...... and PTEN in 58 HNPCC-associated colorectal cancers. Derangements of at least one of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR components analyzed were found in 51/58 (88%) tumors. Mutations in PIK3CA and KRAS were identified in 14 and 31% of the tumors respectively. Overexpression of PIK3CA and phosphorylated AKT occurred in 59...

  13. Identification of mismatch repair gene mutations in young patients with colorectal cancer and in patients with multiple tumours associated with hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niessen, R.C.; Berends, M.J.; Wu, Y.; Sijmons, R.H.; Hollema, H.; Ligtenberg, M.J.L.; Walle, H.E. de; Vries, E.G.F. de; Karrenbeld, A.; Buys, C.H.C.M.; Zee, A.G. van der; Hofstra, R.M.; Kleibeuker, J.H.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with early-onset colorectal cancer (CRC) or those with multiple tumours associated with hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) raise suspicion of the presence of germline DNA mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutations. AIM: To analyse the value of family history,

  14. Identification of mismatch repair gene mutations in young patients with colorectal cancer and in patients with multiple tumours associated with hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niessen, R C; Berends, M J W; Wu, Y; Sijmons, R H; Hollema, H; Ligtenberg, M J L; de Walle, H E K; de Vries, E G E; Karrenbeld, A; Buys, C H C M; van der Zee, A G J; Hofstra, R M W; Kleibeuker, J H

    2006-01-01

    Background: Patients with early-onset colorectal cancer (CRC) or those with multiple tumours associated with hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) raise suspicion of the presence of germline DNA mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutations. Aim: To analyse the value of family history,

  15. Genetics of Skin Cancer (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the genetics of skin cancer — basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and melanoma — including information about specific gene mutations and related cancer syndromes. The summary also contains information about interventions that may influence the risk of developing skin cancer in individuals who may be genetically susceptible to these syndromes.

  16. Silencing of tumor suppressor genes RASSF1A, SLIT2, and WIF1 by promoter hypermethylation in hereditary breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Carolina; Tapia, Teresa; Cornejo, Valeria; Fernandez, Wanda; Muñoz, Alex; Camus, Mauricio; Alvarez, Manuel; Devoto, Luigi; Carvallo, Pilar

    2013-06-01

    Promoter hypermethylation is gaining strength as one of the main mechanisms through which tumor suppressor genes are silenced during tumor progression. Three tumor suppressor genes are frequently found methylated in their promoter, in concordance with absence of expression, RASSF1A, SLIT2, and WIF1. In addition, a previous array-CGH analysis from our group showed that these genes are found in deleted genomic regions observed in hereditary breast cancer tumors. In the present work we analyzed the methylation status of these three tumor suppressor gene promoters in 47 hereditary breast cancer tumors. Promoter methylation status analysis of hereditary breast tumors revealed high methylation frequencies for the three genes (67% RASSF1A, 80% SLIT2, and 72% WIF1). Additionally, the presence of methylated PCR products was associated with absence of protein expression for the three genes and statistically significant for RASSF1A and WIF1. Interestingly, methylation of all the three genes was found in 4 out of 6 grade I invasive ductal carcinoma tumors. Association between RASSF1A methylation and DCIS tumors was found. These results suggest that silencing of these tumor suppressor genes is an early event in hereditary breast cancer, and could be a marker for pre-malignant phenotypes. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Genetics and nonmelanoma skin cancer in kidney transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Michael T; Isbel, Nicole; Barraclough, Katherine A; Jung, Ji-Won; Wells, James W; Staatz, Christine E

    2015-01-01

    Kidney transplant recipients (KTRs) have a 65- to 250-fold greater risk than the general population of developing nonmelanoma skin cancer. Immunosuppressive drugs combined with traditional risk factors such as UV radiation exposure are the main modifiable risk factors for skin cancer development in transplant recipients. Genetic variation affecting immunosuppressive drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics has been associated with other transplant complications and may contribute to differences in skin cancer rates between KTRs. Genetic polymorphisms in genes encoding the prednisolone receptor, GST enzyme, MC1R, MTHFR enzyme and COX-2 enzyme have been shown to increase the risk of nonmelanoma skin cancer in KTRs. Genetic association studies may improve our understanding of how genetic variation affects skin cancer risk and potentially guide immunosuppressive treatment and skin cancer screening in at risk individuals.

  18. Skin cancer in rural workers: nursing knowledge and intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Regina Cezar-Vaz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVETo identify the exposure of rural workers to the sun's ultraviolet radiation and pesticides; to identify previous cases of skin cancer; and to implement clinical and communicative nursing actions among rural workers with a previous diagnosis of skin cancer.METHODObservational-exploratory study conducted with rural workers exposed to ultraviolet radiation and pesticides in a rural area in the extreme south of Brazil. A clinical judgment and risk communication model properly adapted was used to develop interventions among workers with a previous history of skin cancer.RESULTSA total of 123 (97.7% workers were identified under conditions of exposure to the sun's ultraviolet radiation and pesticides; seven (5.4% were identified with a previous diagnosis of skin cancer; four (57.1% of these presented potential skin cancer lesions.CONCLUSIONThis study's results enabled clarifying the combination of clinical knowledge and risk communication regarding skin cancer to rural workers.

  19. Decreased risk of prostate cancer after skin cancer diagnosis: A protective role of ultraviolet radiation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. de Vries (Esther); I. Soerjomataram (Isabelle); S. Houterman (Saskia); M.W.J. Louwman (Marieke); J.W.W. Coebergh (Jan Willem)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractUltraviolet radiation causes skin cancer but may protect against prostate cancer. The authors hypothesized that skin cancer patients had a lower prostate cancer incidence than the general population. In the southeastern part of the Netherlands, a population-based cohort of male skin

  20. Expanding the genotype-phenotype spectrum in hereditary colorectal cancer by gene panel testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohlin, Anna; Rambech, Eva; Kvist, Anders

    2017-01-01

    Hereditary syndromes causing colorectal cancer include both polyposis and non-polyposis syndromes. Overlapping phenotypes between the syndromes have been recognized and this make targeted molecular testing for single genes less favorable, instead there is a gaining interest for multi-gene panel......-based approaches detecting both SNVs, indels and CNVs in the same assay. We applied a panel including 19 CRC susceptibility genes to 91 individuals of six phenotypic subgroups. Targeted NGS-based sequencing of the whole gene regions including introns of the 19 genes was used. The individuals had a family history...... of CRC or had a phenotype consistent with a known CRC syndrome. The purpose of the study was to demonstrate the diagnostic difficulties linked to genotype-phenotype diversity and the benefits of using a gene panel. Pathogenicity classification was carried out on 46 detected variants. In total we detected...

  1. Molecular genetics analysis of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer patients in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumittra Nagasamy

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hereditary cancers account for 5–10% of cancers. In this study BRCA1, BRCA2 and CHEK2*(1100delC were analyzed for mutations in 91 HBOC/HBC/HOC families and early onset breast and early onset ovarian cancer cases. Methods PCR-DHPLC was used for mutation screening followed by DNA sequencing for identification and confirmation of mutations. Kaplan-Meier survival probabilities were computed for five-year survival data on Breast and Ovarian cancer cases separately, and differences were tested using the Log-rank test. Results Fifteen (16% pathogenic mutations (12 in BRCA1 and 3 in BRCA2, of which six were novel BRCA1 mutations were identified. None of the cases showed CHEK2*1100delC mutation. Many reported polymorphisms in the exonic and intronic regions of BRCA1 and BRCA2 were also seen. The mutation status and the polymorphisms were analyzed for association with the clinico-pathological features like age, stage, grade, histology, disease status, survival (overall and disease free and with prognostic molecular markers (ER, PR, c-erbB2 and p53. Conclusion The stage of the disease at diagnosis was the only statistically significant (p

  2. Lynch syndrome and Lynch syndrome mimics: The growing complex landscape of hereditary colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carethers, John M; Stoffel, Elena M

    2015-08-21

    Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) was previously synonymous with Lynch syndrome; however, identification of the role of germline mutations in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes has made it possible to differentiate Lynch syndrome from other conditions associated with familial colorectal cancer (CRC). Broadly, HNPCC may be dichotomized into conditions that demonstrate defective DNA MMR and microsatellite instability (MSI) vs those conditions that demonstrate intact DNA MMR. Conditions characterized by MMR deficient CRCs include Lynch syndrome (germline MMR mutation), Lynch-like syndrome (biallelic somatic MMR mutations), constitutional MMR deficiency syndrome (biallelic germline MMR mutations), and sporadic MSI CRC (somatic biallelic methylation of MLH1). HNPCC conditions with intact DNA MMR associated with familial CRC include polymerase proofreading associated polyposis and familial colorectal cancer type X. Although next generation sequencing technologies have elucidated the genetic cause for some HNPCC conditions, others remain genetically undefined. Differentiating between Lynch syndrome and the other HNPCC disorders has profound implications for cancer risk assessment and surveillance of affected patients and their at-risk relatives. Clinical suspicion coupled with molecular tumor analysis and testing for germline mutations can help differentiate the clinical mimicry within HNPCC and facilitate diagnosis and management.

  3. Hereditary breast cancer and the BRCA1-associated FANCJ/BACH1/BRIP1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantor, Sharon B; Guillemette, Shawna

    2011-01-01

    It is clear that FANCJ, also known as BACH1 or BRIP1, is an essential tumor suppressor gene based on the identification of clinically relevant mutations not only in breast cancer, but also the childhood cancer syndrome, Fanconi anemia. This conclusion is further supported by the direct and functional interaction between FANCJ and the hereditary breast cancer-associated gene product BRCA1. In the absence of the FANCJ DNA helicase or its interaction with BRCA1, cells have defects in several aspects of the DNA damage response. In particular, the BRCA1–FANCJ interaction is essential for promoting error-free repair, checkpoint control and for limiting DNA damage tolerance. As the number of FANCJ clinical mutations and affected patients accumulate, it will be critical to understand whether the associated tumors resemble BRCA-associated tumors. If so, FANCJ patients could also benefit from new therapies that selectively sensitize DNA repair-defective tumors and spare healthy cells. In this article, we summarize the breast cancer-associated FANCJ mutations and discuss functional outcomes for DNA repair and tumor suppression. PMID:21345144

  4. Recommendations to improve identification of hereditary and familial colorectal cancer in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasen, H F A; Möslein, G; Alonso, A; Aretz, S; Bernstein, I; Bertario, L; Blanco, I; Bulow, S; Burn, J; Capella, G; Colas, C; Engel, C; Frayling, I; Rahner, N; Hes, F J; Hodgson, S; Mecklin, J-P; Møller, P; Myrhøj, T; Nagengast, F M; Parc, Y; Ponz de Leon, M; Renkonen-Sinisalo, L; Sampson, J R; Stormorken, A; Tejpar, S; Thomas, H J W; Wijnen, J; Lubinski, J; Järvinen, H; Claes, E; Heinimann, K; Karagiannis, J A; Lindblom, A; Dove-Edwin, I; Müller, H

    2010-06-01

    Familial colorectal cancer (CRC) accounts for 10-15% of all CRCs. In about 5% of all cases, CRC is associated with a highly penetrant dominant inherited syndrome. The most common inherited form of non-polyposis CRC is the Lynch syndrome which is responsible for about 2-4% of all cases. Surveillance of individuals at high risk for CRC prevents the development of advanced CRC. About 1 million individuals in Western Europe are at risk for Lynch syndrome. We performed a survey to evaluate the strategies currently used to identify individuals at high risk for CRC in 14 Western European countries. Questionnaires were distributed amongst members of a European collaborative group of experts that aims to improve the prognosis of families with hereditary CRC. The survey showed that in all countries obtaining a family history followed by referral to clinical genetics centres of suspected cases was the main strategy to identify familial and hereditary CRC. In five out of seven countries with a (regional or national) CRC population screening program, attention was paid in the program to the detection of familial CRC. In only one country were special campaigns organized to increase the awareness of familial CRC among the general population. In almost all countries, the family history is assessed when a patient visits a general practitioner or hospital. However, the quality of family history taking was felt to be rather poor. Microsatellite instability testing (MSI) or immunohistochemical analysis (IHC) of CRC are usually recommended as tools to select high-risk patients for genetic testing and are performed in most countries in patients suspected of Lynch syndrome. In one country, IHC was recommended in all new cases of CRC. In most countries there are no specific programs on cancer genetics in the teaching curriculum for medical doctors. In conclusion, the outcome of this survey and the discussions within an European expert group may be used to improve the strategies to

  5. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of skin cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patalay, Rakesh; Talbot, Clifford; Munro, Ian; Breunig, Hans Georg; König, Karsten; Alexandrov, Yuri; Warren, Sean; Neil, Mark A. A.; French, Paul M. W.; Chu, Anthony; Stamp, Gordon W.; Dunsby, Chris

    2011-03-01

    Fluorescence intensity imaging and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) using two photon microscopy (TPM) have been used to study tissue autofluorescence in ex vivo skin cancer samples. A commercially available system (DermaInspect®) was modified to collect fluorescence intensity and lifetimes in two spectral channels using time correlated single photon counting and depth-resolved steady state measurements of the fluorescence emission spectrum. Uniquely, image segmentation has been used to allow fluorescence lifetimes to be calculated for each cell. An analysis of lifetime values obtained from a range of pigmented and non-pigmented lesions will be presented.

  6. Skin cancer recognition by using a neuro-fuzzy system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salah, Bareqa; Alshraideh, Mohammad; Beidas, Rasha; Hayajneh, Ferial

    2011-02-02

    Skin cancer is the most prevalent cancer in the light-skinned population and it is generally caused by exposure to ultraviolet light. Early detection of skin cancer has the potential to reduce mortality and morbidity. There are many diagnostic technologies and tests to diagnose skin cancer. However many of these tests are extremely complex and subjective and depend heavily on the experience of the clinician. To obviate these problems, image processing techniques, a neural network system (NN) and a fuzzy inference system were used in this study as promising modalities for detection of different types of skin cancer. The accuracy rate of the diagnosis of skin cancer by using the hierarchal neural network was 90.67% while using neuro-fuzzy system yielded a slightly higher rate of accuracy of 91.26% in diagnosis skin cancer type. The sensitivity of NN in diagnosing skin cancer was 95%, while the specificity was 88%. Skin cancer diagnosis by neuro-fuzzy system achieved sensitivity of 98% and a specificity of 89%.

  7. [HNPCC (hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer) or Lynch syndrome: a syndrome related to a failure of DNA repair system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manceau, Gilles; Karoui, Mehdi; Charachon, Antoine; Delchier, Jean-Charles; Sobhani, Iradj

    2011-03-01

    The HNPCC syndrome (hereditary non polyposis colon cancer) or Lynch syndrome stands for an autosomic dominant condition leading to the most prevalent hereditary colo-rectal cancers (CCR). MMR (mismatch repair)'s genes are involved in carcinogenesis as they play a role in ADNA mismatch repair. Microsatellite instability (MSI+ phenotype) induced by germline mutations is characteristic of such tumors and is necessary to assert the diagnosis. The HNPCC syndrome is associated with a significant increased risk of CCR altogether with endometrium, upper urinary tract and small bowel carcinomas as well as ovarian, biliary system and gastric cancers although of lesser extent. It is of importance to diagnose HNPCC syndrome prior to the treatment starts because it may influence patient's (as well as her/his relatives) disease management (type of surgery, surveillance and screening exams). New French recommendations, developed in 2009, about prophylactic colo-rectal and gynecologic surgeries and monitoring update latest ones published on 2004.

  8. The role of skin self-examination at the Swiss skin cancer day

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Badertscher, N.; Meier, M.; Rosemann, T.; Braun, R.; Cozzio, A.; Tag, B.; Wensing, M.; Tandjung, R.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The rising incidence of melanoma - Switzerland has the highest incidence in Europe - is a major public health challenge. Swiss dermatologist introduced the "Swiss Skin Cancer Day" (SSCD) in 2006, which provides skin cancer screening at no costs. The aim of the study was to describe the

  9. Women with hereditary breast cancer predispositions should avoid using their smartphones, tablets and laptops at night

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Ali Reza Mortazavi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among women, both in the developed and developing countries. Women with mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes have an increased risk of breast and ovarian cancers. Recent studies show that short-wavelength visible light disturb the secretion of melatonin and causes circadian rhythm disruption. We have previously studied the health effects of exposure to different levels of radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMFs such as mobile phones, mobile base stations, mobile phone jammers, laptop computers, and radars. Moreover, over the past several years, we investigated the health effects of exposure to the short wavelength visible light in the blue region emitted from digital screens. The reduction of melatonin secretion after exposure to blue light emitted from smartphone’s screen has been reported to be associated with the negative impact of smartphone use at night on sleep. We have shown that both the blue light and RF-EMFs generated by mobile phones are linked to the disruption of the circadian rhythm in people who use their phones at night. Therefore, if women with hereditary breast cancer predispositions use their smartphones, tablets and laptops at night, disrupted circadian rhythms (suppression of melatonin caused by exposure to blue light emitted from the digital screens, amplifies the risk of breast cancer. It can be concluded that women who carry mutated BRCA1 or BRCA2, or women with family history of breast cancer should avoid using their smartphones, tablets and laptops at night. Using sunglasses with amber lenses, or smartphone applications which decrease the users’ exposure to blue light before sleep, at least to some extent, can decrease the risk of circadian rhythm disruption and breast cancer.

  10. Women with hereditary breast cancer predispositions should avoid using their smartphones, tablets, and laptops at night.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, Seyed Ali Reza; Mortazavi, Seyed Mohammad Javad

    2018-02-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among women, both in the developed and developing countries. Women with mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes have an increased risk of breast and ovarian cancers. Recent studies show that short-wavelength visible light disturb the secretion of melatonin and causes circadian rhythm disruption. We have previously studied the health effects of exposure to different levels of radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMFs) such as mobile phones, mobile base stations, mobile phone jammers, laptop computers, and radars. Moreover, over the past several years, we investigated the health effects of exposure to the short wavelength visible light in the blue region emitted from digital screens. The reduction of melatonin secretion after exposure to blue light emitted from smartphone's screen has been reported to be associated with the negative impact of smartphone use at night on sleep. We have shown that both the blue light and RF-EMFs generated by mobile phones are linked to the disruption of the circadian rhythm in people who use their phones at night. Therefore, if women with hereditary breast cancer predispositions use their smartphones, tablets and laptops at night, disrupted circadian rhythms (suppression of melatonin caused by exposure to blue light emitted from the digital screens), amplifies the risk of breast cancer. It can be concluded that women who carry mutated BRCA1 or BRCA2, or women with family history of breast cancer should avoid using their smartphones, tablets and laptops at night. Using sunglasses with amber lenses, or smartphone applications which decrease the users' exposure to blue light before sleep, at least to some extent, can decrease the risk of circadian rhythm disruption and breast cancer.

  11. Total Gastrectomy for Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer at a Single Center: Postsurgical Outcomes in 41 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Vivian E; Gholami, Sepideh; Shah, Manish A; Tang, Laura H; Janjigian, Yelena Y; Schattner, Mark; Selby, Luke V; Yoon, Sam S; Salo-Mullen, Erin; Stadler, Zsofia K; Kelsen, David; Brennan, Murray F; Coit, Daniel G

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to describe postoperative outcomes of total gastrectomy at our institution for patients with hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC). HDGC, which is mainly caused by germline mutations in the E-cadherin gene (CDH1), renders a lifetime risk of gastric cancer of up to 70%, prompting a recommendation for prophylactic total gastrectomy. A prospective gastric cancer database identified 41 patients with CDH1 mutation who underwent total gastrectomy during 2005 to 2015. Perioperative, histopathologic, and long-term data were collected. Of the 41 patients undergoing total gastrectomy, median age was 47 years (range 20 to 71). There were 14 men and 27 women, with 25 open operations and 16 minimally invasive operations. Median length of stay was 7 days (range 4 to 50). In total, 11 patients (27%) experienced a complication requiring intervention, and there was 1 peri-operative mortality (2.5%). Thirty-five patients (85%) demonstrated 1 or more foci of intramucosal signet ring cell gastric cancer in the examined specimen. At 16 months median follow-up, the median weight loss was 4.7 kg (15% of preoperative weight). By 6 to 12 months postoperatively, weight patterns stabilized. Overall outcome was reported to be "as expected" by 40% of patients and "better than expected" by 45%. Patient-reported outcomes were similar to those of other patients undergoing total gastrectomy. Total gastrectomy should be considered for all CDH1 mutation carriers because of the high risk of invasive diffuse-type gastric cancer and lack of reliable surveillance options. Although most patients have durable weight loss after total gastrectomy, weights stabilize at about 6 to 12 months postoperatively, and patients report outcomes as being good to better than their preoperative expectations. No patients have developed gastric cancer recurrence after resections.

  12. Development and validation of a simple questionnaire for the identification of hereditary breast cancer in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palmero Edenir I

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer is a significant public health problem worldwide and the development of tools to identify individuals at-risk for hereditary breast cancer syndromes, where specific interventions can be proposed to reduce risk, has become increasingly relevant. A previous study in Southern Brazil has shown that a family history suggestive of these syndromes may be prevalent at the primary care level. Development of a simple and sensitive instrument, easily applicable in primary care units, would be particularly helpful in underserved communities in which identification and referral of high-risk individuals is difficult. Methods A simple 7-question instrument about family history of breast, ovarian and colorectal cancer, FHS-7, was developed to screen for individuals with an increased risk for hereditary breast cancer syndromes. FHS-7 was applied to 9218 women during routine visits to primary care units in Southern Brazil. Two consecutive samples of 885 women and 910 women who answered positively to at least one question and negatively to all questions were included, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative predictive values were determined. Results Of the 885 women reporting a positive family history, 211 (23.8%; CI95%: 21.5–26.2 had a pedigree suggestive of a hereditary breast and/or breast and colorectal cancer syndrome. Using as cut point one positive answer, the sensitivity and specificity of the instrument were 87.6% and 56.4%, respectively. Concordance between answers in two different applications was given by a intra-class correlation (ICC of 0.84 for at least one positive answer. Temporal stability of the instrument was adequate (ICC = 0.65. Conclusion A simple instrument for the identification of the most common hereditary breast cancer syndrome phenotypes, showing good specificity and temporal stability was developed and could be used as a screening tool in primary care to refer at

  13. Familial Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor with Germline KIT Mutations Accompanying Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekido, Yuki; Ohigashi, Seiji; Takahashi, Tsuyoshi; Hayashi, Naoki; Suzuki, Koyu; Hirota, Seiichi

    2017-03-01

    Familial gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is a rare disease with germline mutations in the c-kit gene (KIT) or platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha gene (PDGFRA). We had encountered multiple GISTs in the stomach and small intestine during a screening of ovarian cancer for a woman with hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome (HBOC) with breast cancer susceptibility gene II (BRCA2) mutations. The aim of this study was to examine this case in detail. A 65-year-old woman diagnosed with HBOC harboring BRCA2 mutations was found to have multiple tumors in the stomach and small intestine by abdominal screening. All tumors were resected, and KIT gene mutations (p.Trp557Leu and p.Lys558Glu) in exon 11 were detected in all tumors and peripheral blood leukocytes. The patient was diagnosed with familial GIST. This was an extremely rare case in which familial GIST with germline KIT gene mutations co-existed with HBOC. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  14. QUOTE-geneca: development of a counselee-centred instrument to measure needs and preferences in genetic counseling for hereditary cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieterse, A.; Dulmen, S. van; Ausems, M.; Schoemaker, A.; Beemer, F.; Bensing, J.

    2005-01-01

    Counselees' motives for seeking genetic counseling for hereditary cancer have already been investigated, however not using instruments based on counselees' perspective. In addition, expectations regarding the process of counseling have scarcely been assessed. This article describes the construction

  15. QUOTE-gene(ca) : Development of a counselee-centered instrument to measure needs and preferences in genetic counseling for hereditary cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poeterse, A; Van Dulmen, S; Ausems, M; Beemer, F; Bensing, J

    Counselees' motives for seeking genetic counseling for hereditary cancer have already been investigated, however not using instruments based on counselees' perspective. In addition, expectations regarding the process of counseling have scarcely been assessed. This article describes the construction

  16. Dynamic infrared imaging for skin cancer screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoy, Sebastián E.; Ramirez, David A.; Myers, Stephen A.; von Winckel, Greg; Krishna, Sanchita; Berwick, Marianne; Padilla, R. Steven; Sen, Pradeep; Krishna, Sanjay

    2015-05-01

    Dynamic thermal imaging (DTI) with infrared cameras is a non-invasive technique with the ability to detect the most common types of skin cancer. We discuss and propose a standardized analysis method for DTI of actual patient data, which achieves high levels of sensitivity and specificity by judiciously selecting pixels with the same initial temperature. This process compensates the intrinsic limitations of the cooling unit and is the key enabling tool in the DTI data analysis. We have extensively tested the methodology on human subjects using thermal infrared image sequences from a pilot study conducted jointly with the University of New Mexico Dermatology Clinic in Albuquerque, New Mexico (ClinicalTrials ID number NCT02154451). All individuals were adult subjects who were scheduled for biopsy or adult volunteers with clinically diagnosed benign condition. The sample size was 102 subjects for the present study. Statistically significant results were obtained that allowed us to distinguish between benign and malignant skin conditions. The sensitivity and specificity was 95% (with a 95% confidence interval of [87.8% 100.0%]) and 83% (with a 95% confidence interval of [73.4% 92.5%]), respectively, and with an area under the curve of 95%. Our results lead us to conclude that the DTI approach in conjunction with the judicious selection of pixels has the potential to provide a fast, accurate, non-contact, and non-invasive way to screen for common types of skin cancer. As such, it has the potential to significantly reduce the number of biopsies performed on suspicious lesions.

  17. Long-term effect of aspirin on cancer risk in carriers of hereditary colorectal cancer: an analysis from the CAPP2 randomised controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burn, John; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Macrae, Finlay

    2011-01-01

    Observational studies report reduced colorectal cancer in regular aspirin consumers. Randomised controlled trials have shown reduced risk of adenomas but none have employed prevention of colorectal cancer as a primary endpoint. The CAPP2 trial aimed to investigate the antineoplastic effects of as...... of aspirin and a resistant starch in carriers of Lynch syndrome, the major form of hereditary colorectal cancer; we now report long-term follow-up of participants randomly assigned to aspirin or placebo....

  18. Colon cancer in rapidly developing countries: review of the lifestyle, dietary, consanguinity and hereditary risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulbari Bener

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Colon cancer rates are rising dramatically in once low incidence nations. These nations are undergoing rapid economic development and are known as “nations in transition” (NIT. This review identifies some of the most common etiological risk factors of colon cancer in these nations and evaluates the existing epidemiological evidence. The main risk factors which were found to be prevalent in NIT include: lifestyle factors such as physical inactivity, obesity and abdominal adiposity, alcohol consumption and cigarette smoking; dietary factors such as fatty food and red meat consumption. Protective factors included white meat and fiber consumption. Several studies found to have significantly higher rates of colon cancer among the young population (<40 years old. There appears to be a quantitative and qualitative increase in risk to relatives of patients diagnosed at a young age compared with those diagnosed later in life, at least part of which is likely to be the result of a hereditary susceptibility. Close relatives of patients with colon cancer are at an increased risk of developing a colon cancer. Close relatives of early onset cases warrant more intensive endoscopic screening and at an earlier age than relatives of patients diagnosed at older ages. Furthermore, these suggest the existence of genetic predispositions in these nations which need to be investigated further and have implications for screening programs. In conclusion, public health awareness campaigns promoting prevention of modifiable risk factors and screening initiatives with guidelines suited to the age-specific incidence rates of NIT are needed very urgently.

  19. Facilitating decision-making in women undergoing genetic testing for hereditary breast cancer: BRECONDA randomized controlled trial results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Kerry A; Kilby, Christopher J; Shaw, Laura-Kate; Winch, Caleb; Kirk, Judy; Tucker, Kathy; Elder, Elisabeth

    2017-12-01

    Decision-making concerning risk-reducing mastectomy for women at hereditary risk of breast cancer entails complex personal choices. Deciding whether and how to restore breast shape after risk-reducing mastectomy is a key part of this process. We developed a web-based decision aid, BRECONDA (Breast Reconstruction Decision Aid), to assist women in decision-making regarding breast reconstruction. This study assessed the efficacy of BRECONDA to assist women at increased risk of breast cancer in making decisions regarding risk-reducing mastectomy in terms of decisional conflict, knowledge, and satisfaction with information. Women at hereditary risk of breast cancer (N = 64) were recruited into this randomized controlled trial from four Australian hereditary cancer clinics. Participants initially provided online consent and completed baseline questionnaires assessing decisional conflict, knowledge, and satisfaction with information. They were then randomly assigned to either: 1) Intervention - unlimited access to BRECONDA, with usual care; or, 2) Control - usual care. At 2-months follow-up (N = 60) the outcomes were re-assessed. Intervention participants also completed user acceptability ratings for the intervention overall and specific key modules. MANCOVA analyses indicated that Intervention participants reported lower decisional conflict (P = 0.027), and greater knowledge (P = 0.019) and satisfaction with information (P < 0.0005) at 2-months follow-up compared with Controls. Intervention participants reported high user acceptability and satisfaction with the intervention. BRECONDA benefits women considering risk-reducing mastectomy by reducing decisional conflict, and improving knowledge and satisfaction with information. These benefits, coupled with high user acceptability, demonstrate the feasibility of implementing BRECONDA in the hereditary cancer risk context. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Early detection of skin cancer: experience of a skin cancer prevention campaign in Piauí-Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Bandeira Lages

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the correlation between the diagnoses of skin cancer and known risk factors through analysis of data from the National Skin Cancer Prevention Campaign held by Brazilian Society of Dermatology in the state of Piauí, Brazil, in recent years. Methods: Cross-sectional descriptive and analytical report using quantitative data obtained from a prevention campaign in the state of Piauí, in 2009 and 2010. Collected data was submitted to a descriptive analysis, and multivariate logistic regression, using as dependent variable the skin cancer diagnosis. Results: In 2009 and 2010, this campaign was responsible for 1141 consultations, diagnosing 122 (10.7% cases of skin cancer: 108 basal cell carcinomas (BCC, 10 squamous cell (SCC and four melanomas. Of those examined, 35.4% were male, 73.1% reported inadequate sun protection, 16.4% had a family history of skin cancer and 7.2% had personal history. Those with history of skin cancer were 5.24 times more likely to have a new diagnosis of cancer, while those presenting non-black skin were 4.91 times more likely to diagnosis. Conclusion: Personal or family history of epithelial neoplasia, non-colored black skin and the male gender were associated to higher chances of developing skin cancer. In addition, unprotected sun exposure remains routine.

  1. DNA mismatch repair deficiency and hereditary syndromes in Latino patients with colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricker, Charité N; Hanna, Diana L; Peng, Cheng; Nguyen, Nathalie T; Stern, Mariana C; Schmit, Stephanie L; Idos, Greg E; Patel, Ravi; Tsai, Steven; Ramirez, Veronica; Lin, Sonia; Shamasunadara, Vinay; Barzi, Afsaneh; Lenz, Heinz-Josef; Figueiredo, Jane C

    2017-10-01

    The landscape of hereditary syndromes and clinicopathologic characteristics among US Latino/Hispanic individuals with colorectal cancer (CRC) remains poorly understood. A total of 265 patients with CRC who were enrolled in the Hispanic Colorectal Cancer Study were included in the current study. Information regarding CRC risk factors was elicited through interviews, and treatment and survival data were abstracted from clinical charts. Tumor studies and germline genetic testing results were collected from medical records or performed using standard molecular methods. The mean age of the patients at the time of diagnosis was 53.7 years (standard deviation, 10.3 years), and 48.3% were female. Overall, 21.2% of patients reported a first-degree or second-degree relative with CRC; 3.4% met Amsterdam I/II criteria. With respect to Bethesda guidelines, 38.5% of patients met at least 1 criterion. Of the 161 individuals who had immunohistochemistry and/or microsatellite instability testing performed, 21 (13.0%) had mismatch repair (MMR)-deficient (dMMR) tumors. dMMR tumors were associated with female sex (61.9%), earlier age at the time of diagnosis (50.4 ± 12.4 years), proximal location (61.9%), and first-degree (23.8%) or second-degree (9.5%) family history of CRC. Among individuals with dMMR tumors, 13 (61.9%) had a germline MMR mutation (MutL homolog 1 [MLH1] in 6 patients; MutS homolog 2 [MSH2] in 4 patients; MutS homolog 6 [MHS6] in 2 patients; and PMS1 homolog 2, mismatch repair system component [PMS2] in 1 patient). The authors identified 2 additional MLH1 mutation carriers by genetic testing who had not received immunohistochemistry/microsatellite instability testing. In total, 5.7% of the entire cohort were confirmed to have Lynch syndrome. In addition, 6 individuals (2.3%) had a polyposis phenotype. The percentage of dMMR tumors noted among Latino individuals (13%) is similar to estimates in non-Hispanic white individuals. In the current study, the majority of

  2. The Role of Antioxidants in Skin Cancer Prevention and Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Godic, Aleksandar; Poljšak, Borut; Adamic, Metka; Dahmane, Raja

    2014-01-01

    Skin cells are constantly exposed to reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress from exogenous and endogenous sources. UV radiation is the most important environmental factor in the development of skin cancer and skin aging. The primary products caused by UV exposure are generally direct DNA oxidation or generation of free radicals which form and decompose extremely quickly but can produce effects that can last for hours, days, or even years. UV-induced generation of ROS in the skin d...

  3. BRCA1 and BRCA2 rearrangements in Brazilian individuals with Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Petroni Ewald

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Approximately 5-10% of breast cancers are caused by germline mutations in high penetrance predisposition genes. Among these, BRCA1 and BRCA2, which are associated with the Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer (HBOC syndrome, are the most frequently affected genes. Recent studies confirm that gene rearrangements, especially in BRCA1, are responsible for a significant proportion of mutations in certain populations. In this study we determined the prevalence of BRCA rearrangements in 145 unrelated Brazilian individuals at risk for HBOC syndrome who had not been previously tested for BRCA mutations. Using Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA and a specific PCR-based protocol to identify a Portuguese founder BRCA2 mutation, we identified two (1,4% individuals with germline BRCA1 rearrangements (c.547+240_5193+178del and c.4675+467_5075-990del and three probands with the c.156_157insAlu founder BRCA2 rearrangement. Furthermore, two families with false positive MLPA results were shown to carry a deleterious point mutation at the probe binding site. This study comprises the largest Brazilian series of HBOC families tested for BRCA1 and BRCA2 rearrangements to date and includes patients from three regions of the country. The overall observed rearrangement frequency of 3.44% indicates that rearrangements are relatively uncommon in the admixed population of Brazil.

  4. Skin cancer: an overview of epidemiology and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Randy

    2013-08-01

    To provide a general overview of malignant melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer, with an emphasis on epidemiology, clinical presentation, and the multiple and varied risk factors associated with skin cancer. Peer-reviewed journal articles, government health reports, book chapters, and Web-based resources. Skin cancer is the most common carcinoma, affecting millions worldwide. Incidence is increasing yearly, making it a pre-eminent public health threat. Myriad factors increase the risk of skin cancer and may serve as important prognostic indicators for the disease. To provide nurses with a clearer understanding of the causative mechanisms of skin cancer and an improved awareness of the risk factors associated with the disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Skin temperature during sunbathing--relevance for skin cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Bibi; Philipsen, Peter Alshede; Wulf, Hans Christian

    2014-01-01

    It has been found that exposure to heat and infrared radiation (IR) can be carcinogenic, and that a combination of ultraviolet radiation (UVR) and IR possibly amplifies carcinogenesis. To investigate how the skin temperature is affected by sunbathing, we measured the skin temperature on 20 healthy...... volunteers over 6 days' sun holiday in Egypt. Temperatures were measured with an infrared thermometer gun at 8 skin sites on the volunteers while they were indoors in the morning and when sunbathing during the day. Skin temperatures were higher during sunbathing (33.5 °C ± 2.1 °C) (mean ± SD) than when...... by activation of the heat shock response, is likely to contribute to the immediate and delayed effects of UV in a way that has to be found out in future studies....

  6. Impact of Panel Gene Testing for Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer on Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumish, Heidi S; Steinfeld, Hallie; Koval, Carrie; Russo, Donna; Levinson, Elana; Wynn, Julia; Duong, James; Chung, Wendy K

    2017-10-01

    Recent advances in next generation sequencing have enabled panel gene testing, or simultaneous testing for mutations in multiple genes for a clinical condition. With more extensive and widespread genetic testing, there will be increased detection of genes with moderate penetrance without established clinical guidelines and of variants of uncertain significance (VUS), or genetic variants unknown to either be disease-causing or benign. This study surveyed 232 patients who underwent genetic counseling for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer to examine the impact of panel gene testing on psychological outcomes, patient understanding, and utilization of genetic information. The survey used standardized instruments including the Impact of Event Scale (IES), Multidimensional Impact of Cancer Risk Assessment (MICRA), Satisfaction with Decision Instrument (SWD), Ambiguity Tolerance Scale (AT-20), genetics knowledge, and utilization of genetic test results. Study results suggested that unaffected individuals with a family history of breast or ovarian cancer who received positive results were most significantly impacted by intrusive thoughts, avoidance, and distress. However, scores were also modestly elevated among unaffected patients with a family history of breast and ovarian cancer who received VUS, highlighting the impact of ambiguous results that are frequent among patients undergoing genetic testing with large panels of genes. Potential risk factors for increased genetic testing-specific distress in this study included younger age, black or African American race, Hispanic origin, lower education level, and lower genetic knowledge and highlight the need for developing strategies to provide effective counseling and education to these communities, particularly when genetic testing utilizes gene panels that more commonly return VUS. More detailed pre-test education and counseling may help patients appreciate the probability of various types of test results and how results

  7. The results of gynecologic surveillance in families with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketabi, Zohreh; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Mosgaard, Berit; Ladelund, Steen; Bernstein, Inge

    2014-06-01

    We aimed to estimate the incidence rate of endometrial cancer (EC) and to evaluate the results of EC-surveillance in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) families. All at-risk women recommended for EC-surveillance by the HNPCC-register-2959 women (19,334women years)-were included. Data on EC-surveillance were available for 871 women (6894women years), who had performed 1945 surveillance visits. The average surveillance period was 7.9 (range 0.1-21.7) years and 46% of the women had had less than 3years between their visits. During 19,334women years, 60 women with gynecological malignancies or premalignancies were diagnosed. Thirty-nine women had EC. Of these, 31 were from families with identified MMR gene mutations with the median age at diagnosis of 54 (39-83) years (Incidence Rate, IR=0.63 per 100women years) and four women from each Amsterdam (AMS)-positive and AMS-like families (median age 64 (55-73) years, IR=0.06 and 0.05 per 100women years, respectively, pprevalent cancers, diagnosed at the first visit-and 6/13 based on symptoms. In addition, five complex atypical hyperplasias and four ovarian cancers (OCs) were diagnosed. All these women were MMR mutation carriers. Based on 19,334women years of EC-surveillance, our analysis provides a thorough estimation of the EC risk in women with an MMR mutation, or suspected of having Lynch syndrome. We conclude that EC surveillance should only be targeted at MMR-mutation carriers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Prevalence and differentiation of hereditary breast and ovarian cancers in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Seigo; Takahashi, Masato; Tozaki, Mitsuhiro; Nakayama, Takahiro; Nomizu, Tadashi; Miki, Yoshio; Murakami, Yoshie; Aoki, Daisuke; Iwase, Takuji; Nishimura, Seiichiro; Yamauchi, Hideko; Ohsumi, Shozo; Baba, Shinichi; Shimizu, Tadao

    2015-09-01

    We assembled needed data on the prevalence and characteristics of BRCA1/2 in Japan. Our study of BRCA1/2 collected data at eight institutions in Japan on 320 individuals with a strong family history of breast cancer, according to the NCCN guidelines, by the end of March 2012. Among 260 proband cases, 46 (17.7 %) were positive for BRCA1, and 35 (13.5 %) were BRCA2-positive. Therefore, the total pathological mutation rate was 30.7 %. Pathology data after breast surgery were obtained from 37 cases of BRCA1 mutation, 23 (62.2 %) of which were triple negative (TN). On the other hand, 29 cases (82.9 %) of BRCA2 mutations were Luminal type. The most prevalent BRCA1 mutation site was L63X, found in 10 families. L63X was reported previously by studies in Japan, and it may be a founder mutation. We found two cases of large deletion detected by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. One was an entire deletion of exon 20 and the lacked exons 1-9. TN with a family history of ovarian cancer was 11/20 (55 %). TN under 40-year-old (y.o.) 15/23 (65.2 %) and TN with one or more breast cancers in family history 17/32 (53.1 %) showed higher incidences of BRCA1 mutation. Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) may have nearly the same prevalence in Japan as in the US or Europe. If TN cases are taken into account, the ratio of BRCA1 is higher. L63X may be one of the founder mutations in Japan. A nationwide database of HBOC is important to develop risk models for BRCA1/2 carriers in Japan.

  9. Genetic heterogeneity in Finnish hereditary prostate cancer using ordered subset analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Claire L; Cropp, Cheryl D; Wahlfors, Tiina; George, Asha; Jones, Marypat S; Harper, Ursula; Ponciano-Jackson, Damaris; Tammela, Teuvo; Schleutker, Johanna; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E

    2013-04-01

    Prostate cancer (PrCa) is the most common male cancer in developed countries and the second most common cause of cancer death after lung cancer. We recently reported a genome-wide linkage scan in 69 Finnish hereditary PrCa (HPC) families, which replicated the HPC9 locus on 17q21-q22 and identified a locus on 2q37. The aim of this study was to identify and to detect other loci linked to HPC. Here we used ordered subset analysis (OSA), conditioned on nonparametric linkage to these loci to detect other loci linked to HPC in subsets of families, but not the overall sample. We analyzed the families based on their evidence for linkage to chromosome 2, chromosome 17 and a maximum score using the strongest evidence of linkage from either of the two loci. Significant linkage to a 5-cM linkage interval with a peak OSA nonparametric allele-sharing LOD score of 4.876 on Xq26.3-q27 (ΔLOD=3.193, empirical P=0.009) was observed in a subset of 41 families weakly linked to 2q37, overlapping the HPCX1 locus. Two peaks that were novel to the analysis combining linkage evidence from both primary loci were identified; 18q12.1-q12.2 (OSA LOD=2.541, ΔLOD=1.651, P=0.03) and 22q11.1-q11.21 (OSA LOD=2.395, ΔLOD=2.36, P=0.006), which is close to HPC6. Using OSA allows us to find additional loci linked to HPC in subsets of families, and underlines the complex genetic heterogeneity of HPC even in highly aggregated families.

  10. Public Health Approaches and Barriers to Educating Providers about Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela M. Trepanier

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services implemented and evaluated two initiatives designed to enhance provider knowledge of patients appropriate for breast and/or ovarian cancer genetic risk assessment and hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC syndrome testing. The first initiative targeted select providers who had diagnosed patients meeting HBOC risk criteria. Specifically, the initiative used 2008–2009 state cancer registry data to identify all providers who had diagnosed breast cancers in women ≤50 years of age, male breast cancers, and ovarian cancers in four health systems with newly established cancer genetics clinics. Using a method coined bidirectional reporting (BDR, reports highlighting how many of these cases each provider had seen were generated and mailed. Reports on 475 cancers (9.5% of the 5005 cases statewide meeting criteria were sent to 69 providers with information about how and why to refer such patients for genetic counseling. Providers who received a report were contacted to assess whether the reports increased awareness or resulted in action (genetic counseling/referral. Based on the few responses received, despite multiple attempts to contact, and attrition rate, it is not possible to ascertain the impact of this initiative on providers. However the project resulted in the MDHHS identifying which providers see the largest proportion of at-risk patients, creating an opportunity to target those providers with HBOC education efforts. The second initiative involved creating and broadly disseminating an online, interactive case-based educational module to increase awareness and referral decisions for HBOC using high- and low-risk patient scenarios. A total of 1835 unique users accessed the module in a one year. Collectively the users viewed topic pages 2724 times and the interactive case studies 1369 times. Point of care tools (fact sheets were viewed 1624 times and downloaded 764 times. Satisfaction

  11. Can a selfie promote public engagement with skin cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noar, Seth M; Leas, Eric; Althouse, Benjamin M; Dredze, Mark; Kelley, Dannielle; Ayers, John W

    2017-11-03

    Social media may provide new opportunities to promote skin cancer prevention, but research to understand this potential is needed. In April of 2015, Kentucky native Tawny Willoughby (TW) shared a graphic skin cancer selfie on Facebook that subsequently went viral. We examined the volume of comments and shares of her original Facebook post; news volume of skin cancer from Google News; and search volume for skin cancer Google queries. We compared these latter metrics after TWs announcement against expected volumes based on forecasts of historical trends. TWs skin cancer story was picked up by the media on May 11, 2015 after the social media post had been shared approximately 50,000 times. All search queries for skin cancer increased 162% (95% CI 102 to 320) and 155% (95% CI 107 to 353) on May 13th and 14th, when news about TW's skin cancer selfie was at its peak, and remained higher through May 17th. Google searches about skin cancer prevention and tanning were also significantly higher than expected volumes. In practical terms, searches reached near-record levels - i.e., May 13th, 14th and 15th were respectively the 6th, 8th, and 40th most searched days for skin cancer since January 1, 2004 when Google began tracking searches. We conclude that an ordinary person's social media post caught the public's imagination and led to significant increases in public engagement with skin cancer prevention. Digital surveillance methods can rapidly detect these events in near real time, allowing public health practitioners to engage and potentially elevate positive effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. University Student Awareness of Skin Cancer: Behaviors, Recognition, and Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trad, Megan; Estaville, Lawrence

    2017-03-01

    Skin cancer is the most common cancer, and it often is preventable. The authors sought to evaluate behavior and knowledge regarding skin cancer among students at a Texas university. The authors recruited a diverse group of students in terms of sex, age, and ethnicity to participate in a survey regarding knowledge of skin cancer signs, use of tanning beds, and performance of self-assessment for skin cancer. Participating students could complete surveys in classrooms, at health fairs, or online via Survey Monkey. The authors examined data for the 3 variables in relation to sex, ethnicity, and age. A total of 512 responses were completed. Female students completed 371 (72.46%) surveys, and male students completed 141 (27.54%). The ethnicity of student participants was nearly evenly split among whites, African Americans, and Hispanics. Ethnicity was the most significant factor influencing the knowledge of skin cancer and behaviors to prevent it. Specifically, Hispanic and African American students possessed a lower level of skin cancer awareness. More female students than male students used tanning beds, and although use was self-reported as infrequent, the results imply that 4500 of the university's students might use tanning beds, which is concerning if extrapolated to other university student populations in Texas. Behavioral intervention is critical in reducing students' risk of skin cancer in later years, and university students must acquire knowledge to increase their awareness of skin health and to minimize their risk of developing skin cancer. Radiation therapists are uniquely positioned to share knowledge of skin cancer. ©2017 American Society of Radiologic Technologists.

  13. Clinicopathological evaluation of nonmelanoma skin cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjula Adinarayan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Basal cell carcinoma (BCC and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC, in combination, are referred to as nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSCs. NMSC is not as extensively studied in the Asian population as it is in the Caucasian population. Aim: This study sought to evaluate the clinical and histopathologic aspects of NMSC from cases of cutaneous malignancies. Materials and Methods: The present study is a descriptive analysis of NMSC specimens seen at Department of Pathology, SSIMS and RC, Davangere. Histologically diagnosed NMSC, i.e. BCC and SCC specimens from January 2005 to December 2009 were analyzed according to site distribution, risk factors and histological variants. Results: Of the various specimens received during the 5year study period, 60 were histologically categorized as skin malignancies, of which 31(51.6% cases were of NMSC. SCC was the most common NMSC constituting 26 (83.9% cases and 5 NMSC cases (16.1% were of BCC. The most common incidence was among the age group 60-80 years (80% for BCC and 40-60 years (50% for SCC. Head and neck was the most common site of presentation with predilection for face. Forty-six percent of SCC was histologically categorized as well differentiated, 42.3% as moderately differentiated and 11.5% as poorly differentiated. Most common histological variant of BCC was solid (nodular type. Conclusion: NMSC often associated with greater morbidity, necessitating increased efforts to assess risk factors in individuals, to encourage periodic self-examination and professional evaluation of skin and to optimize strategies for earlier diagnosis and treatment.

  14. Recruiting families at risk for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer from a statewide cancer registry: a methodological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katapodi, Maria C; Duquette, Deb; Yang, James J; Mendelsohn-Victor, Kari; Anderson, Beth; Nikolaidis, Christos; Mancewicz, Emily; Northouse, Laurel L; Duffy, Sonia; Ronis, David; Milliron, Kara J; Probst-Herbst, Nicole; Merajver, Sofia D; Janz, Nancy K; Copeland, Glenn; Roberts, Scott

    2017-03-01

    Cancer genetic services (counseling/testing) are recommended for women diagnosed with breast cancer younger than 45 years old (young breast cancer survivors-YBCS) and at-risk relatives. We present recruitment of YBCS, identification and recruitment of at-risk relatives, and YBCS willingness to contact their cancer-free, female relatives. A random sample of 3,000 YBCS, stratified by race (Black vs. White/Other), was identified through a population-based cancer registry and recruited in a randomized trial designed to increase use of cancer genetic services. Baseline demographic, clinical, and family characteristics, and variables associated with the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) were assessed as predictors of YBCS' willingness to contact at-risk relatives. The 883 YBCS (33.2% response rate; 40% Black) who returned a survey had 1,875 at-risk relatives and were willing to contact 1,360 (72.5%). From 853 invited at-risk relatives (up to two relatives per YBCS), 442 responded (51.6% response rate). YBCS with larger families, with a previous diagnosis of depression, and motivated to comply with recommendations from family members were likely to contact a greater number of relatives. Black YBCS were more likely to contact younger relatives and those living further than 50 miles compared to White/Other YBCS. It is feasible to recruit diverse families at risk for hereditary cancer from a population-based cancer registry. This recruitment approach can be used as a paradigm for harmonizing processes and increasing internal and external validity of large-scale public health genomic initiatives in the era of precision medicine.

  15. Hereditary colorectal cancer registries in Canada: report from the Colorectal Cancer Association of Canada consensus meeting; Montreal, Quebec; October 28, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothenmund, H.; Singh, H.; Candas, B.; Chodirker, B.N.; Serfas, K.; Aronson, M.; Holter, S.; Volenik, A.; Green, J.; Dicks, E.; Woods, M.O.; Gilchrist, D.; Gryfe, R.; Cohen, Z.; Foulkes, W.D.

    2013-01-01

    At a consensus meeting held in Montreal, October 28, 2011, a multidisciplinary group of Canadian experts in the fields of genetics, gastroenterology, surgery, oncology, pathology, and health care services participated in presentation and discussion sessions for the purpose of developing consensus statements pertaining to the development and maintenance of hereditary colorectal cancer registries in Canada. Five statements were approved by all participants. PMID:24155632

  16. Very low prevalence of germline MSH6 mutations in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer suspected patients with colorectal cancer without microsatellite instability.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kets, M.; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van; Hebeda, K.M.; Wezenberg, S.J.; Goossens, M.; Brunner, H.G.; Ligtenberg, M.J.L.; Hoogerbrugge-van der Linden, N.

    2006-01-01

    Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is caused by mutations in one of the mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, or PMS2 and results in high-level microsatellite instability (MSI-high) in tumours of HNPCC patients. The MSI test is considered reliable for indicating mutations in MLH1

  17. Parents' perceptions of skin cancer threat and children's physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Alexander D; Aalborg, Jenny; Asdigian, Nancy L; Morelli, Joseph G; Mokrohisky, Stefan T; Dellavalle, Robert P; Berwick, Marianne; Box, Neil F; Crane, Lori A

    2012-01-01

    Sun exposure is a major risk factor for skin cancer, but without physical activity, children are at risk of childhood obesity. The objective of this study was to explore relationships between parental perceptions of skin cancer threat, sun protection behaviors, physical activity, and body mass index (BMI) in children. This is a cross-sectional analysis nested within the Colorado Kids Sun Care Program sun safety intervention trial. In summer 2007, parent telephone interviews provided data on demographics, perceptions of skin cancer threat, sun protection behaviors, and physical activity. Physical examinations provided data on phenotype, freckling, and BMI. Data from 999 Colorado children born in 1998 were included in analysis. We used analysis of variance, Spearman's rho (ρ) correlation, and multivariable linear regression analysis to evaluate relationships with total amount of outdoor physical activity. After controlling for sex, race/ethnicity, skin color, and sun protection, regression analysis showed that each unit increase in perceived severity of nonmelanoma skin cancer was associated with a 30% increase in hours of outdoor physical activity (P = .005). Hours of outdoor physical activity were not related to perceived severity of melanoma or perceived susceptibility to skin cancer. BMI-for-age was not significantly correlated with perceptions of skin cancer threat, use of sun protection, or level of physical activity. The promotion of sun safety is not likely to inhibit physical activity. Skin cancer prevention programs should continue to promote midday sun avoidance and sun protection during outdoor activities.

  18. Health system costs of skin cancer and cost-effectiveness of skin cancer prevention and screening: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Louisa G; Rowell, David

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to review the literature for malignant melanoma, basal and squamous cell carcinomas to understand: (a) national estimates of the direct health system costs of skin cancer and (b) the cost-effectiveness of interventions for skin cancer prevention or early detection. A systematic review was performed using Medline, Cochrane Library and the National Health Service Economic Evaluation Databases as well as a manual search of reference lists to identify relevant studies up to 31 August 2013. A narrative synthesis approach was used to summarize the data. National cost estimates were adjusted for country-specific inflation and presented in 2013 euros. The CHEERS statement was used to assess the quality of the economic evaluation studies. Sixteen studies reporting national estimates of skin cancer costs and 11 cost-effectiveness studies on skin cancer prevention or early detection were identified. Relative to the size of their respective populations, the annual direct health system costs for skin cancer were highest for Australia, New Zealand, Sweden and Denmark (2013 euros). Skin cancer prevention initiatives are highly cost-effective and may also be cost-saving. Melanoma early detection programmes aimed at high-risk individuals may also be cost-effective; however, updated analyses are needed. There is a significant cost burden of skin cancer for many countries and health expenditure for this disease will grow as incidence increases. Public investment in skin cancer prevention and early detection programmes show strong potential for health and economic benefits.

  19. Epithelial ovarian cancer and the occurrence of skin cancer in the Netherlands: histological type connotations

    OpenAIRE

    André L. M. Verbeek; Johan Bulten; van Niekerk, Catharina C.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Patients with epithelial ovarian cancer have a high risk of (non-)melanoma skin cancer. The association between histological variants of primary ovarian cancer and skin cancer is poorly documented. Objectives. To further evaluate the risk of skin cancer based on the histology of the epithelial ovarian cancer. Methods. A cross-sectional study within a large population-based dataset. Results. Skin cancer was found in 2.7% (95% CI: 2.3–3.1) of the 5366 individuals forming our dataset...

  20. Collection of Prostate Cancer Families and Mapping Additional Hereditary Prostate Cancer Genes (HPC2, HPC3..)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Isaacs, William

    2001-01-01

    Segregation analyses of familial prostate cancer have provided evidence for the existence of dominantly-acting prostate cancer susceptibility alleles, with such genes being estimated to be responsible...

  1. Collection of Prostate Cancer Families and Mapping Additional Hereditary Prostate Cancer Genes (HPC2, HPC3,...)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Isaacs, William

    2000-01-01

    Segregation analyses of familial prostate cancer have provided evidence for the existence of dominantly-acting prostate cancer susceptibility alleles, with such genes being estimated to be responsible...

  2. Prevalence and characteristics of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) syndrome in immigrant Asian colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jasmine; Xiao, Yin-Yi; Sun, Yan Yu; Balderacchi, Jasminka; Clark, Bradley; Desani, Jatin; Kumar, Vivek; Saverimuthu, Angela; Win, Khin Than; Huang, Yiwu; Xu, Yiqing

    2017-12-13

    The prevalence of Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC) is 2 to 5% in the Caucasian population. HNPCC is caused by genomic mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes (MMR), namely MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, PMS2, and EPCAM. A non-hereditary, acquired process of hypermethylation of the MLH1 promoter can also lead to silencing of MLH1 protein expression. Diagnosis of HNPCC in patients with colorectal and other related cancers is important in the clinical treatment and surveillance of related cancers. The prevalence and clinical characteristics of HNPCC in Asian colorectal cancer patients has been reported in small studies and unique features have been suggested. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical characteristics of Asian patients who were diagnosed of colon cancer between 1/2002 and 6/2015, and performed IHC for four MMR protein expressions on tumor specimens as a screening test for HNPCC, followed by confirmatory tests of genomic sequencing and hypermethylation analysis. One hundred forty-three patients were identified. Thirty-one patients were diagnosed younger than 50 years old, while 112 patients were diagnosed older than 50 years old. Six cases of HNPCC were found with a prevalence of 4.19%. The prevalence in the group of patients diagnosed younger than 50 years old is 16.1%, and that in patients diagnosed older than 50 years old is 0.89%. All patients with HNPCC had family histories of colon or gastric cancer. Tumor locations in the HNPCC patients were predominantly in the descending or sigmoid colon (67%). Half of the HNPCC patients had MSH6 mutations. Hypermethylation of the MLH1 gene was only present in 2.80% of the patients. The prevalence of HNPCC is high in patients younger than 50 years old and extremely low in those older than 50 years old. These results may be useful in the future development of guidelines for HNPCC laboratory screening among Asian patients. The pathological and clinical features of HNPCC in this group of Asian immigrant

  3. Hopefulness predicts resilience after hereditary colorectal cancer genetic testing: a prospective outcome trajectories study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chu Annie TW

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background - Genetic testing for hereditary colorectal cancer (HCRC had significant psychological consequences for test recipients. This prospective longitudinal study investigated the factors that predict psychological resilience in adults undergoing genetic testing for HCRC. Methods - A longitudinal study was carried out from April 2003 to August 2006 on Hong Kong Chinese HCRC family members who were recruited and offered genetic testing by the Hereditary Gastrointestinal Cancer Registry to determine psychological outcomes after genetic testing. Self-completed questionnaires were administered immediately before (pre-disclosure baseline and 2 weeks, 4 months and 1 year after result disclosure. Using validated psychological inventories, the cognitive style of hope was measured at baseline, and the psychological distress of depression and anxiety was measured at all time points. Results - Of the 76 participating subjects, 71 individuals (43 men and 28 women; mean age 38.9 ± 9.2 years from nine FAP and 24 HNPCC families completed the study, including 39 mutated gene carriers. Four patterns of outcome trajectories were created using established norms for the specified outcome measures of depression and anxiety. These included chronic dysfunction (13% and 8.7%, recovery (0% and 4.3%, delayed dysfunction (13% and 15.9% and resilience (76.8% and 66.7%. Two logistic regression analyses were conducted using hope at baseline to predict resilience, with depression and anxiety employed as outcome indicators. Because of the small number of participants, the chronic dysfunction and delayed dysfunction groups were combined into a non-resilient group for comparison with the resilient group in all subsequent analysis. Because of low frequencies, participants exhibiting a recovery trajectory (n = 3 for anxiety and n = 0 for depression were excluded from further analysis. Both regression equations were significant. Baseline hope was a significant

  4. By the pricking of my thumbs, something wicked this way comes: sporadic cancers versus eponymous hereditary cancer predisposition syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaklavas, Christos; Ross, John R; Nabell, Lisle M; Forero, Andres; Heslin, Martin J; Wood, Tina E

    2012-01-01

    Advances in cancer genomics have led to the recognition of a growing number of high-penetrance single-gene cancer predisposition syndromes. Frequently, the suspicion for a hereditary syndrome is raised by a strongly positive family history. However, other features, such as younger-than-usual age at diagnosis and rare histology should also prompt consideration of a genetic syndrome. Common malignancies frequently show a positive family history without an eponymous syndrome being recognized. This article reports on a case with an unusual constellation of malignancies with distinctive pathologies, which raised suspicion for an eponymous cancer pre-disposition syndrome. Absent a positive family history, a de novo mutation-an alteration in a gene that is present for the first time in a family member as a result of a mutation in a germ cell of one of the parents or in the fertilized ovum-was suspected. The authors discuss indications for genetic counseling and testing, limitations, and the evidence that supports the recommendations as formulated by working groups and the NCCN. Most frequently, these recommendations are reasonable statements based on the natural history of the disease, but without population-based studies for many rare syndromes, the actual penetrance, variable expressivity, and actual associated cancer risk are unknown.

  5. Increased susceptibility of skin from HERDA (Hereditary Equine Regional Dermal Asthenia)-affected horses to bacterial collagenase degradation: a potential contributing factor to the clinical signs of HERDA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashmir-Raven, Ann; Lavagnino, Michael; Sedlak, Aleksa; Gardner, Keri; Arnoczky, Steven

    2015-12-01

    Hereditary equine regional dermal asthenia (HERDA) is a genetic disorder of collagen resulting in fragile, hyper-extensible skin and ulcerative lesions. The predominance of skin lesions have been shown to occur on the dorsum of HERDA-affected horses. While this has been postulated to be due to increased exposure to sunlight of these areas, the precise pathological mechanism which causes this to occur is unclear. We hypothesized that an increase in collagenase activity, that has been associated with the exposure of dermal fibroblasts to sunlight, will significantly degrade the material properties of skin from HERDA-affected horses when compared to unaffected controls. Six unaffected and seven HERDA-affected horses, all euthanized for other reasons. Full-thickness skin samples from similar locations on each horse were collected and cut into uniform strips and their material properties (tensile modulus) determined by mechanical testing before (n = 12 samples/horse) or after (n = 12 samples/horse) incubation in bacterial collagenase at 37°C for 6 h. The change in modulus following treatment was then compared between HERDA-affected and unaffected horses using a Student's t-test. The modulus of skin from HERDA-affected horses decreased significantly more than that from unaffected horses following collagenase treatment (54 ± 7% versus 30 ± 16%, P = 0.004). The significant decrease in the modulus of skin from HERDA-affected horses following collagenase exposure suggests that their altered collagen microarchitecture is more susceptible to enzymatic degradation and may explain the localization of skin lesions in HERDA-affected horses to those areas of the body most exposed to sunlight. These findings appear to support the previously reported benefits of sunlight restriction in HERDA-affected horses. © 2015 ESVD and ACVD.

  6. Validation of microsatellite instability histology scores with Bethesda guidelines in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Mustafa; Basak, Fatih; Sisik, Abdullah; Hasbahceci, Mustafa; Bas, Gurhan; Alimoglu, Orhan; Topal, Cumhur Selçuk; Kir, Gozde

    2017-01-01

    Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is a subgroup of colorectal cancer (CRC) which should be differentiated because of the high risk for additional cancers and risk evaluation for other family members, especially for CRC. It is not practical to perform genetic testing for all CRC patients; therefore, various prediction modalities, for example, Bethesda guideline (BG) were studied in the literature. We aimed to assess the association of microsatellite instability (MSI), histology scores, and BG for predicting HNPCC risk. Data were collected from CRC patients between 2009 and 2012. A total of 127 patients were retrospectively reviewed for BG status and the MSI scores, MsPath, and PathScore. Definitive statistical methods (mean, standard deviation, median, frequency, and percentage) were used to evaluate the study data. Comparison used Student's t-test, Continuity (Yates) correction, Fisher-Freeman-Halton test, Pearson correlation, and receiver operating characteristics curve analysis. Patients who were detected as Bethesda-positive had significantly higher MsPath and PathScore scores (P = 0.001 and P = 0.007, respectively). According to the cut-off value of 2.8 and 2.9 for MsPath and PathScore, respectively, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy were 90%, 43%, 22.8%, 95.8%, and 50.4% for MsPath, and 55%, 83.2%, 37.9%, 90.8%, and 78.7% for PathScore, respectively. The MSI scoring systems, MsPath, and PathScore, are reliable systems and effectively correlated with BG for predicting patients who need advanced analysis techniques because of the risk of HNPCC.

  7. Comparative study of endoscopic surveillance in hereditary diffuse gastric cancer according to CDH1 mutation status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Emma Z; Mi, Ella Z; di Pietro, Massimiliano; O'Donovan, Maria; Hardwick, Richard H; Richardson, Susan; Ziauddeen, Hisham; Fletcher, Paul C; Caldas, Carlos; Tischkowitz, Marc; Ragunath, Krish; Fitzgerald, Rebecca C

    2018-02-01

    Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) accounts for 1% of gastric cancer cases. For patients with a germline CDH1 mutation, risk-reducing gastrectomy is recommended. However, for those delaying surgery or for families with no causative mutation identified, regular endoscopy is advised. This study aimed to determine the yield of signet ring cell carcinoma (SRCC) foci in individuals with a CDH1 pathogenic variant compared with those without and how this varies with successive endoscopies. Patients fulfilling HDGC criteria were recruited to a prospective longitudinal cohort study. Endoscopy was performed according to a strict protocol with visual inspection followed by focal lesion and random biopsy sampling to detect foci of SRCC. Survival analysis determined progression to finding of SRCC according to CDH1 mutation status. The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Core 30 and 36-item Short Form Health Survey questionnaires assessed quality of life before surveillance and each endoscopy. Eighty-five individuals fulfilling HDGC criteria underwent 201 endoscopies; 54 (63.5%) tested positive for CDH1 mutation. SRCC yield was 61.1% in CDH1 mutation carriers compared with 9.7% in noncarriers, and mutation-positive patients had a 10-fold risk of SRCC on endoscopy compared with those with no mutation detected (P prevalent in CDH1 mutation carriers and can be detected at endoscopy using a standardized, multiple biopsy sampling protocol. Decreasing yield over time suggests that the frequency of endoscopy might be reduced. For patients with no CDH1 pathogenic variant detected, the cost-to-benefit ratio needs to be assessed in view of the low yield. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Efficacy of annual colonoscopic surveillance in individuals with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Christoph; Rahner, Nils; Schulmann, Karsten; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Goecke, Timm O; Schackert, Hans K; Kloor, Matthias; Steinke, Verena; Vogelsang, Holger; Möslein, Gabriela; Görgens, Heike; Dechant, Stefan; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus; Rüschoff, Josef; Friedrichs, Nicolaus; Büttner, Reinhard; Loeffler, Markus; Propping, Peter; Schmiegel, Wolff

    2010-02-01

    Individuals with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC; Lynch syndrome) have a high risk for developing colorectal cancer (CRC). We evaluated the efficacy of annual surveillance colonoscopies to detect adenomas and CRCs. In a prospective, multicenter cohort study, 1126 individuals underwent 3474 colonoscopies. We considered individuals from 3 groups of HNPCC families: those with a pathogenic germline mutation in a mismatch repair gene (MUT group), those without a mutation but with microsatellite instability (MSI group), and those who fulfilled the Amsterdam criteria without microsatellite instability (MSS group). Compliance to annual intervals was good, with 81% of colonoscopies completed within 15 months. Ninety-nine CRC events were observed in 90 patients. Seventeen CRCs (17%) were detected through symptoms (8 before baseline colonoscopy, 8 at intervals >15 months to the preceding colonoscopy, and 1 interval cancer). Only 2 of 43 CRCs detected by follow-up colonoscopy were regionally advanced. Tumor stages were significantly lower among CRCs detected by follow-up colonoscopies compared with CRCs detected by symptoms (P = .01). Cumulative CRC risk at the age of 60 years was similar in the MUT and MSI groups (23.0% combined; 95% confidence interval [CI], 14.8%-31.2%) but considerably lower in the MSS group (1.8%; 95% CI, 0.0%-5.1%). Adenomas at baseline colonoscopy predicted an earlier occurrence of subsequent adenoma (hazard ratio, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.7-4.0) and CRC (hazard ratio, 3.9; 95% CI, 1.7-8.5), providing information about interindividual heterogeneity of adenomas and kinetics of CRC formation. Annual colonoscopic surveillance is recommended for individuals with HNPCC. Less intense surveillance might be appropriate for MSS families. Copyright 2010 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer: updated clinical guidelines with an emphasis on germline CDH1 mutation carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Post, Rachel S; Vogelaar, Ingrid P; Carneiro, Fátima; Guilford, Parry; Huntsman, David; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Caldas, Carlos; Schreiber, Karen E Chelcun; Hardwick, Richard H; Ausems, Margreet G E M; Bardram, Linda; Benusiglio, Patrick R; Bisseling, Tanya M; Blair, Vanessa; Bleiker, Eveline; Boussioutas, Alex; Cats, Annemieke; Coit, Daniel; DeGregorio, Lynn; Figueiredo, Joana; Ford, James M; Heijkoop, Esther; Hermens, Rosella; Humar, Bostjan; Kaurah, Pardeep; Keller, Gisella; Lai, Jennifer; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J L; O'Donovan, Maria; Oliveira, Carla; Ragunath, Krish; Rasenberg, Esther; Richardson, Susan; Roviello, Franco; Schackert, Hans; Seruca, Raquel; Taylor, Amy; ter Huurne, Anouk; Tischkowitz, Marc; Joe, Sheena Tjon A; van Dijck, Benjamin; van Grieken, Nicole C T; van Hillegersberg, Richard; van Sandick, Johanna W; Vehof, Rianne; van Krieken, J Han; Fitzgerald, Rebecca C

    2015-01-01

    Germline CDH1 mutations confer a high lifetime risk of developing diffuse gastric (DGC) and lobular breast cancer (LBC). A multidisciplinary workshop was organised to discuss genetic testing, surgery, surveillance strategies, pathology reporting and the patient's perspective on multiple aspects, including diet post gastrectomy. The updated guidelines include revised CDH1 testing criteria (taking into account first-degree and second-degree relatives): (1) families with two or more patients with gastric cancer at any age, one confirmed DGC; (2) individuals with DGC before the age of 40 and (3) families with diagnoses of both DGC and LBC (one diagnosis before the age of 50). Additionally, CDH1 testing could be considered in patients with bilateral or familial LBC before the age of 50, patients with DGC and cleft lip/palate, and those with precursor lesions for signet ring cell carcinoma. Given the high mortality associated with invasive disease, prophylactic total gastrectomy at a centre of expertise is advised for individuals with pathogenic CDH1 mutations. Breast cancer surveillance with annual breast MRI starting at age 30 for women with a CDH1 mutation is recommended. Standardised endoscopic surveillance in experienced centres is recommended for those opting not to have gastrectomy at the current time, those with CDH1 variants of uncertain significance and those that fulfil hereditary DGC criteria without germline CDH1 mutations. Expert histopathological confirmation of (early) signet ring cell carcinoma is recommended. The impact of gastrectomy and mastectomy should not be underestimated; these can have severe consequences on a psychological, physiological and metabolic level. Nutritional problems should be carefully monitored. PMID:25979631

  10. A mobile system for skin cancer diagnosis and monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yanliang; Tang, Jinshan

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we propose a mobile system for aiding doctors in skin cancer diagnosis and other persons in skin cancer monitoring. The basic idea is to use image retrieval techniques to help the users to find the similar skin cancer cases stored in a database by using smart phones. The query image can be taken by a smart phone from a patient or can be uploaded from other resources. The shapes of the skin lesions are used for matching two skin lesions, which are segmented from skin images using the skin lesion extraction method developed in 1. The features used in the proposed system are obtained by Fourier descriptor. A prototype application has been developed and can be installed in an iPhone. In this application, the iPhone users can use the iPhone as a diagnosis tool to find the potential skin lesions in a persons' skin and compare the skin lesions detected by the iPhone with the skin lesions stored in a database in a remote server.

  11. Applications of positron annihilation to dermatology and skin cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Guang; Chen, Hongmin; Chakka, Lakshmi [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Gadzia, Joseph E. [Dermatology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS 66103 and Kansas Medical Clinic, Topeka, KS 66614 (United States); Jean, Y.C. [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); R and D Center for Membrane Technology, Chung Yuan Christian University, Chung-Li (China)

    2007-07-01

    Positronium annihilation lifetime experiments have been performed to investigate the interaction between skin cancer and positronium for human skin samples. Positronium annihilation lifetime is found to be shorter and intensity is found to be less for the samples with basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma than the normal skin samples. These results indicate a reduction of free volume in the molecular level for the skin with cancer with respect to the skin without cancer. Positron annihilation spectroscopy may be potentially developed as a new noninvasive and external method for dermatology clinics, early detection of cancer, and nano-PET technology in the future. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  12. Hereditary risk factors for the development of gastric cancer in younger patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akbari Mohammad

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is believed that the development of gastric cancer (GC before the age of 50 has a hereditary basis. Blood group A and history of gastric cancer in first-degree relatives have been shown to be risk factors for GC. Methods In this case-control study, we enrolled patients with GC who were diagnosed before the age of 50. Patients who were diagnosed as having GC were selected. A total of 534 cases were found; of these, 44 diagnosed before the age of 50 were included in the case group. For the control group, 22 males and 22 females were randomly selected from the remaining subjects, who had diagnoses of GC after the age of 50. All the surviving patients and family members of the dead patients were interviewed about the history of cancer in the family and the age at which other family members developed cancer. The blood group of each subject was also obtained. Results forty-four cases under 50 years old (mean age: 36.2 years and forty-four controls (mean age: 67.1 years were enrolled in the study. At the time of the study, 59.1% of the study group and 50% of the control group were alive (P value = NS. In the study group, 68.1%, 13.6%, 13.6% and 4.5% had blood groups O, A, B and AB, respectively. In the control group the corresponding figures were 27.7%, 63.6%, 6.8% and 4.5%. First or second-degree relatives with cancer, including gastric (the most frequent, breast, lung, gynecological and hematological malignancies, were noted in 54.5% of the cases and 11.4% of the controls (p Conclusions It seems that the development of GC before the age of 50 is likely to be accompanied by familial susceptibility. Interestingly, our study showed a significant correlation between blood group O and the development of gastric cancer under the age of 50.

  13. Managing hereditary breast cancer risk in women with and without ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Mary Linton; Garber, Judy E; Tung, Nadine

    2017-07-01

    Current guidelines recommend that all women with ovarian cancer undergo germline genetic testing for BRCA1/2. Increasingly, genetic testing is being performed via panels that include other genes that confer a high or moderate risk of breast cancer. In addition, many women with a family history of breast or ovarian cancer are not found to have a mutation, but may have increased risk of breast cancer for which surveillance and risk reduction strategies are indicated. This review discusses how to assess and manage an increased risk of breast cancer through surveillance, preventive medications, and risk-reducing surgery. Assessing and managing the increased risk of breast cancer in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers after a diagnosis of ovarian cancer can be challenging. For the first few years after an ovarian cancer diagnosis, BRCA1/2 mutation carriers have a relatively low risk of breast cancer, and their prognosis is largely determined by the ovarian cancer. However, if these women remain in remission after two years, the risk of breast cancer becomes comparable with, and in some cases exceeds, their risk of ovarian cancer recurrence. For these women, breast cancer surveillance and risk reduction becomes important to their overall health. Specifically, for BRCA1/2 carriers who are diagnosed with early-stage ovarian cancer, we recommend regular breast cancer surveillance and consideration of risk reduction with medication and/or prophylactic mastectomy. For women with advanced ovarian cancer who do not achieve remission, breast cancer surveillance or prophylaxis is not of value. However, among carriers with more favorable advanced disease, it is reasonable to initiate breast cancer surveillance. Patients with less favorable advanced stage disease who achieve sustained remission (>2-5years) should also consider more aggressive strategies for breast cancer screening and prevention. For mutation carriers who remain in remission after five years, prophylactic mastectomy can be

  14. The Effects of a Genetic Counseling Educational Program on Hereditary Breast Cancer for Korean Healthcare Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jihyoun; Cho, Hyung Jung; Yoo, Han-Wook; Park, Sue K.; Yang, Jae Jeong; Kim, Sung-Won; Kang, Eunyoung; Ahn, Sei-Hyun; Lee, Soo-Jung; Suh, Young Jin; Kim, Sung Yong; Kim, Eun-Kyu; Moon, Nan Mo

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Systematic educational programs and genetic counseling certification courses for hereditary breast/ovarian cancer (HBOC) have not yet been introduced in Korea. We provided and evaluated the effects of genetic counseling education on Korean healthcare providers' knowledge, awareness, and counseling skills for patients at high risk of HBOC. Methods A 3-day educational program was conducted for healthcare providers who were interested in genetic counseling for patients at high risk of HBOC. Participants who completed a knowledge test and satisfaction questionnaire were included in the present sample. Pre-post comparisons were conducted to determine the effects of the intervention. Results Significant differences between preprogram and postprogram knowledge scores were observed (p=0.002). Awareness (pcounseling significantly increased after the training. Doctors and participants with fewer years of work experience performed well on the knowledge test. Previous educational experience was correlated with increased confidence in knowledge and counseling skills. Conclusion Genetic counseling education regarding HBOC improved knowledge and awareness of HBOC and enhanced confidence in the counseling process. The effects varied according to occupation and participants' previous education. The implementation of systematic educational programs that consider participant characteristics may improve the effects of such interventions. PMID:24155764

  15. Factors influencing intrafamilial communication of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer genetic information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nycum, Gillian; Avard, Denise; Knoppers, Bartha M

    2009-07-01

    What factors influence intrafamilial communication of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) genetic risk information? Such information can have health implications for individuals who undergo genetic testing, but it can also have implications for their blood relatives. This literature review adopts an ecological model to summarize factors at the individual, familial, and community levels, as well as cross cutting factors relating to the complexity of HBOC genetic information and responsibilities that this information can give rise to. These factors are complex and may result in conflicting senses of responsibility. Faced with the task of communicating HBOC genetic information, the response may be to attempt to balance the potential negative impact of the information on the well-being of the informee (eg, can s/he handle this information?) against the potential health benefit that the knowledge could result in. This balancing represents an effort to reconcile conflicting approaches to protecting family members, and is a moral dilemma. This review sheds light on the factors that contribute to resolve this dilemma.

  16. Expanding the genotype-phenotype spectrum in hereditary colorectal cancer by gene panel testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohlin, Anna; Rambech, Eva; Kvist, Anders; Törngren, Therese; Eiengård, Frida; Lundstam, Ulf; Zagoras, Theofanis; Gebre-Medhin, Samuel; Borg, Åke; Björk, Jan; Nilbert, Mef; Nordling, Margareta

    2017-04-01

    Hereditary syndromes causing colorectal cancer include both polyposis and non-polyposis syndromes. Overlapping phenotypes between the syndromes have been recognized and this make targeted molecular testing for single genes less favorable, instead there is a gaining interest for multi-gene panel-based approaches detecting both SNVs, indels and CNVs in the same assay. We applied a panel including 19 CRC susceptibility genes to 91 individuals of six phenotypic subgroups. Targeted NGS-based sequencing of the whole gene regions including introns of the 19 genes was used. The individuals had a family history of CRC or had a phenotype consistent with a known CRC syndrome. The purpose of the study was to demonstrate the diagnostic difficulties linked to genotype-phenotype diversity and the benefits of using a gene panel. Pathogenicity classification was carried out on 46 detected variants. In total we detected sixteen pathogenic or likely pathogenic variants and 30 variants of unknown clinical significance. Four of the pathogenic or likely pathogenic variants were found in BMPR1A in patients with unexplained familial adenomatous polyposis or atypical adenomatous polyposis, which extends the genotype-phenotype spectrum for this gene. Nine patients had more than one variant remaining after the filtration, including three with truncating mutations in BMPR1A, PMS2 and AXIN2. CNVs were found in three patients, in upstream regions of SMAD4, MSH3 and CTNNB1, and one additional individual harbored a 24.2 kb duplication in CDH1 intron1.

  17. Detecting splicing patterns in genes involved in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davy, Grégoire; Rousselin, Antoine; Goardon, Nicolas; Castéra, Laurent; Harter, Valentin; Legros, Angelina; Muller, Etienne; Fouillet, Robin; Brault, Baptiste; Smirnova, Anna S; Lemoine, Fréderic; de la Grange, Pierre; Guillaud-Bataille, Marine; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; Houdayer, Claude; Bonnet, Françoise; Blanc-Fournier, Cécile; Gaildrat, Pascaline; Frebourg, Thierry; Martins, Alexandra; Vaur, Dominique; Krieger, Sophie

    2017-10-01

    Interpretation of variants of unknown significance (VUS) is a major challenge for laboratories performing molecular diagnosis of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC), especially considering that many genes are now known to be involved in this syndrome. One important way these VUS can have a functional impact is through their effects on RNA splicing. Here we present a custom RNA-Seq assay plus bioinformatics and biostatistics pipeline to analyse specifically alternative and abnormal splicing junctions in 11 targeted HBOC genes. Our pipeline identified 14 new alternative splices in BRCA1 and BRCA2 in addition to detecting the majority of known alternative spliced transcripts therein. We provide here the first global splicing pattern analysis for the other nine genes, which will enable a comprehensive interpretation of splicing defects caused by VUS in HBOC. Previously known splicing alterations were consistently detected, occasionally with a more complex splicing pattern than expected. We also found that splicing in the 11 genes is similar in blood and breast tissue, supporting the utility and simplicity of blood splicing assays. Our pipeline is ready to be integrated into standard molecular diagnosis for HBOC, but it could equally be adapted for an integrative analysis of any multigene disorder.

  18. Discrepancies between estimated and perceived risk of cancer among individuals with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanska, K; Nilbert, Mef; Soller, M

    2007-01-01

    year prior to the study reported higher, albeit not significantly, perceived risks of colorectal cancer. Higher perceived risks were also reported by individuals who had lost a parent to HNPCC-related cancer at early age, whereas individuals with a personal history of cancer did not report a higher...... perceived risk. Regarding gynecological cancer, 6/18 females reported a perceived risk of 40-60% for endometrial cancer, whereas the remaining women both underestimated and overestimated their risk, and none of the women referred to the risk of ovarian cancer. We conclude that despite educational efforts...

  19. Epidemiology of Skin Cancer: Role of Some Environmental Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabbrocini, Gabriella, E-mail: gafabbro@unina.it [Department of Systematic Pathology, Division of Dermatology, University of Naples Federico II, Naples (Italy); Triassi, Maria [Department of Preventive Medical Sciences, Division of Hygiene, University of Naples Federico II Naples (Italy); Mauriello, Maria Chiara [Department of Systematic Pathology, Division of Dermatology, University of Naples Federico II, Naples (Italy); Torre, Guglielma [Department of Preventive Medical Sciences, Division of Hygiene, University of Naples Federico II Naples (Italy); Annunziata, Maria Carmela; Vita, Valerio De; Pastore, Francesco; D’Arco, Vincenza; Monfrecola, Giuseppe [Department of Systematic Pathology, Division of Dermatology, University of Naples Federico II, Naples (Italy)

    2010-11-24

    The incidence rate of melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer entities is dramatically increasing worldwide. Exposure to UVB radiation is known to induce basal and squamous cell skin cancer in a dose-dependent way and the depletion of stratospheric ozone has implications for increases in biologically damaging solar UVB radiation reaching the earth’s surface. In humans, arsenic is known to cause cancer of the skin, as well as cancer of the lung, bladder, liver, and kidney. Exposure to high levels of arsenic in drinking water has been recognized in some regions of the world. SCC and BCC (squamous and basal cell carcinoma) have been reported to be associated with ingestion of arsenic alone or in combination with other risk factors. The impact of changes in ambient temperature will influence people’s behavior and the time they spend outdoors. Higher temperatures accompanying climate change may lead, among many other effects, to increasing incidence of skin cancer.

  20. Pedigree and BRCA gene analysis in breast cancer patients to identify hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome to prevent morbidity and mortality of disease in Indian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darooei, Mina; Poornima, Subhadra; Salma, Bibi Umae; Iyer, Gayatri R; Pujar, Akhilesh N; Annapurna, Srirambhatla; Shah, Ashwin; Maddali, Srinivas; Hasan, Qurratulain

    2017-02-01

    Global burden of breast cancer is expected to increase to >2 million new cases every year by 2030 and 10% of these are likely to have hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome. Identifying these individuals by pedigree and BRCA1/2 mutation analyses will enable us to offer targeted mutation testing and appropriate counseling. This study from a tertiary care hospital showed that of the 127 breast cancer patients on treatment during 2014-2015, 24 of them fulfilled the criteria of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome after detailed verbal autopsy and pedigree analysis, and BRCA1 and 2 next-generation sequencing done after pre-test counseling revealed mutations in 13 cases (54%), these included 9 BRCA1 mutations (69%) and 4 BRCA2 mutation (31%). Subsequent post-test counseling recommended targeted mutation analysis for 64 high-risk members in these 13 families with pathogenic mutations, which will help in surveillance for early detection, appropriate management, and prevention of the disease by decreasing the burden to both family and nation. Results from this preliminary study highlight the importance of genetic counseling, pedigree analysis, and genetic testing. It can be recommended that all oncology units should have a genetic counseling service for providing appropriate support to oncologists, patients, and families to prevent unnecessary testing; however, breast cancer screening program is incomplete without evaluating for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome.

  1. Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer: assessment of point mutations and copy number variations in Brazilian patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Germ line mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) and other susceptibility genes have been identified as genetic causes of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC). To identify the disease-causing mutations in a cohort of 120 Brazilian women fulfilling criteria for HBOC, we carried out a comprehensive screening of BRCA1/2, TP53 R337H, CHEK2 1100delC, followed by an analysis of copy number variations in 14 additional breast cancer susceptibility genes (PTEN, ATM, NBN, RAD50, RAD51, BRIP1, PALB2, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, TP53, CDKN2A, CDH1 and CTNNB1). Methods Capillary sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) were used for detecting point mutations and copy number variations (CNVs), respectively, for the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes; capillary sequencing was used for point mutation for both variants TP53 R337H and CHEK2 1100delC, and finally array comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) was used for identifying CNVs in the 14 additional genes. Results The positive detection rate in our series was 26%. BRCA1 pathogenic mutations were found in 20 cases, including two cases with CNVs, whereas BRCA2 mutations were found in 7 cases. We also found three patients with the TP53 R337H mutation and one patient with the CHEK2 1100delC mutation. Seven (25%) pathogenic mutations in BRCA1/2 were firstly described, including a splice-site BRCA1 mutation for which pathogenicity was confirmed by the presence of an aberrant transcript showing the loss of the last 62 bp of exon 7. Microdeletions of exon 4 in ATM and exon 2 in PTEN were identified in BRCA2-mutated and BRCA1/2-negative patients, respectively. Conclusions In summary, our results showed a high frequency of BRCA1/2 mutations and a higher prevalence of BRCA1 (64.5%) gene. Moreover, the detection of the TP53 R337H variant in our series and the fact that this variant has a founder effect in our population prompted us to suggest that all female breast cancer patients with clinical criteria

  2. Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer: assessment of point mutations and copy number variations in Brazilian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Felipe C; Lisboa, Bianca Cg; Figueiredo, Marcia Cp; Torrezan, Giovana T; Santos, Erika Mm; Krepischi, Ana C; Rossi, Benedito M; Achatz, Maria I; Carraro, Dirce M

    2014-05-15

    Germ line mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) and other susceptibility genes have been identified as genetic causes of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC). To identify the disease-causing mutations in a cohort of 120 Brazilian women fulfilling criteria for HBOC, we carried out a comprehensive screening of BRCA1/2, TP53 R337H, CHEK2 1100delC, followed by an analysis of copy number variations in 14 additional breast cancer susceptibility genes (PTEN, ATM, NBN, RAD50, RAD51, BRIP1, PALB2, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, TP53, CDKN2A, CDH1 and CTNNB1). Capillary sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) were used for detecting point mutations and copy number variations (CNVs), respectively, for the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes; capillary sequencing was used for point mutation for both variants TP53 R337H and CHEK2 1100delC, and finally array comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) was used for identifying CNVs in the 14 additional genes. The positive detection rate in our series was 26%. BRCA1 pathogenic mutations were found in 20 cases, including two cases with CNVs, whereas BRCA2 mutations were found in 7 cases. We also found three patients with the TP53 R337H mutation and one patient with the CHEK2 1100delC mutation. Seven (25%) pathogenic mutations in BRCA1/2 were firstly described, including a splice-site BRCA1 mutation for which pathogenicity was confirmed by the presence of an aberrant transcript showing the loss of the last 62 bp of exon 7. Microdeletions of exon 4 in ATM and exon 2 in PTEN were identified in BRCA2-mutated and BRCA1/2-negative patients, respectively. In summary, our results showed a high frequency of BRCA1/2 mutations and a higher prevalence of BRCA1 (64.5%) gene. Moreover, the detection of the TP53 R337H variant in our series and the fact that this variant has a founder effect in our population prompted us to suggest that all female breast cancer patients with clinical criteria for HBOC and negative for BRCA1/2 genes

  3. Targeted Next-Generation Sequencing Identifies a Recurrent Mutation in MCPH1 Associating with Hereditary Breast Cancer Susceptibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuomo Mantere

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is strongly influenced by hereditary risk factors, a majority of which still remain unknown. Here, we performed a targeted next-generation sequencing of 796 genes implicated in DNA repair in 189 Finnish breast cancer cases with indication of hereditary disease susceptibility and focused the analysis on protein truncating mutations. A recurrent heterozygous mutation (c.904_916del, p.Arg304ValfsTer3 was identified in early DNA damage response gene, MCPH1, significantly associating with breast cancer susceptibility both in familial (5/145, 3.4%, P = 0.003, OR 8.3 and unselected cases (16/1150, 1.4%, P = 0.016, OR 3.3. A total of 21 mutation positive families were identified, of which one-third exhibited also brain tumors and/or sarcomas (P = 0.0007. Mutation carriers exhibited significant increase in genomic instability assessed by cytogenetic analysis for spontaneous chromosomal rearrangements in peripheral blood lymphocytes (P = 0.0007, suggesting an effect for MCPH1 haploinsufficiency on cancer susceptibility. Furthermore, 40% of the mutation carrier tumors exhibited loss of the wild-type allele. These findings collectively provide strong evidence for MCHP1 being a novel breast cancer susceptibility gene, which warrants further investigations in other populations.

  4. Health initiatives for the prevention of skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greinert, Rüdiger; Breitbart, Eckhard W; Mohr, Peter; Volkmer, Beate

    2014-01-01

    Skin cancer is the most frequent type of cancer in white population worldwide. However, because the most prominent risk factor-solar UV-radiation and/or artificial UV from sunbeds-is known, skin cancer is highly preventable be primary prevention. This prevention needs, that the public is informed by simple and balanced messages about the possible harms and benefits of UV-exposure and how a person should behave under certain conditions of UV-exposure. For this purpose information and recommendations for the public must be age- and target-group specific to cover all periods of life and to reach all sub-groups of a population, continuously. There is a need that political institutions together with Health Institutions and Societies (e.g., European Commission, WHO, EUROSKIN, ICNIRP, etc.), which are responsible for primary prevention of skin cancer, find a common language to inform the public, in order not to confuse it. This is especially important in connection with the ongoing Vitamin D debate, where possible positive effects of UV have to be balanced with the well known skin cancer risk of UV. A continuously ongoing evaluation of interventions and programs in primary prevention is a pre-requisite to assess the effectiveness of strategies. There is surely no "no message fits all" approach, but balanced information in health initiatives for prevention of skin cancer, which use evidence-base strategies, will further be needed in the future to reduce the incidence, morbidity and mortality skin cancer.

  5. Hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline endorsement of the familial risk-colorectal cancer: European Society for Medical Oncology Clinical Practice Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoffel, Elena M; Mangu, Pamela B; Gruber, Stephen B; Hamilton, Stanley R; Kalady, Matthew F; Lau, Michelle Wan Yee; Lu, Karen H; Roach, Nancy; Limburg, Paul J

    2015-01-10

    To provide recommendations on prevention, screening, genetics, treatment, and management for people at risk for hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC) syndromes. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has a policy and set of procedures for endorsing clinical practice guidelines that have been developed by other professional organizations. The Familial Risk-Colorectal Cancer: European Society for Medical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline published in 2013 on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) Guidelines Working Group in Annals of Oncology was reviewed for developmental rigor by methodologists, with content and recommendations reviewed by an ASCO endorsement panel. The ASCO endorsement panel determined that the recommendations of the ESMO guidelines are clear, thorough, and based on the most relevant scientific evidence. The ASCO panel endorsed the ESMO guidelines and added a few qualifying statements. Approximately 5% to 6% of patient cases of CRC are associated with germline mutations that confer an inherited predisposition for cancer. The possibility of a hereditary cancer syndrome should be assessed for every patient at the time of CRC diagnosis. A diagnosis of Lynch syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis, or another genetic syndrome can influence clinical management for patients with CRC and their family members. Screening for hereditary cancer syndromes in patients with CRC should include review of personal and family histories and testing of tumors for DNA mismatch repair deficiency and/or microsatellite instability. Formal genetic evaluation is recommended for individuals who meet defined criteria. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  6. Hereditary Colorectal Cancer Syndromes: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Endorsement of the Familial Risk–Colorectal Cancer: European Society for Medical Oncology Clinical Practice Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoffel, Elena M.; Mangu, Pamela B.; Gruber, Stephen B.; Hamilton, Stanley R.; Kalady, Matthew F.; Lau, Michelle Wan Yee; Lu, Karen H.; Roach, Nancy; Limburg, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To provide recommendations on prevention, screening, genetics, treatment, and management for people at risk for hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC) syndromes. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has a policy and set of procedures for endorsing clinical practice guidelines that have been developed by other professional organizations. Methods The Familial Risk–Colorectal Cancer: European Society for Medical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline published in 2013 on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) Guidelines Working Group in Annals of Oncology was reviewed for developmental rigor by methodologists, with content and recommendations reviewed by an ASCO endorsement panel. Results The ASCO endorsement panel determined that the recommendations of the ESMO guidelines are clear, thorough, and based on the most relevant scientific evidence. The ASCO panel endorsed the ESMO guidelines and added a few qualifying statements. Recommendations Approximately 5% to 6% of patient cases of CRC are associated with germline mutations that confer an inherited predisposition for cancer. The possibility of a hereditary cancer syndrome should be assessed for every patient at the time of CRC diagnosis. A diagnosis of Lynch syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis, or another genetic syndrome can influence clinical management for patients with CRC and their family members. Screening for hereditary cancer syndromes in patients with CRC should include review of personal and family histories and testing of tumors for DNA mismatch repair deficiency and/or microsatellite instability. Formal genetic evaluation is recommended for individuals who meet defined criteria. PMID:25452455

  7. Impact of skin cancer screening and secondary prevention campaigns on skin cancer incidence and mortality: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunssen, Alicia; Waldmann, Annika; Eisemann, Nora; Katalinic, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Benefits of skin cancer screening remain controversial. We sought to update evidence on the impact of skin cancer screening and secondary prevention campaigns on skin cancer incidence, mortality, stage-specific incidence, and interval cancers after negative screening. We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE for studies published in English or German between January 1, 2005, and February 4, 2015. Two reviewers independently performed study selection, data extraction, and critical appraisal. Results were described in a narrative synthesis. Of 2066 records identified in databases and 10 records found by manual search, we included 15 articles. Overall, evidence suggests that with implementation of skin cancer screening, incidence of in situ and invasive skin cancer increased; increasing rates of thin and decreasing rates of thick melanoma were observed. After cessation of screening, invasive melanoma incidence decreased. A significant melanoma mortality reduction was shown in a German study; 2 other studies observed fewer deaths than expected. No study on interval cancers was identified. Publication bias cannot be ruled out. Most studies are limited because of their ecological design. Large ecological studies, a cohort study, a case-control study, and a survey indicate benefits of skin cancer screening, but the evidence level is very low. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Skin metastases from lung cancer: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajaziti, Laura; Hapçiu, Syzana Rexhepi; Dobruna, Shkendije; Hoxha, Naim; Kurshumliu, Fisnik; Pajaziti, Artina

    2015-04-11

    Lung cancer is one of the most frequent malignancies, with high mortality rates. It can metastasize in almost all organs, but more often invades hilar nodes, liver, adrenal glands, bones and brain. There are various data on the incidence of lung cancer metastases in the skin. In 1-12% of patients with lung cancer are developed skin metastases. Metastases in the skin may be the first sign of lung cancer. Forty-five years old Albanian male, smoker, was admitted to our department with multiple nodules localized in the skin of the head, neck, back and chest. The nodules measuring 5-15 millimeters in greatest dimension were round and skin-colored, with telangiectasias, firm and tender. They appeared in an eruptive form about two weeks before being admitted at our hospital. In addition, the patient exhibited signs of weight loss, anorexia and fatigue. Excisional biopsy was performed to one of the lesions. Histopathology confirmed metastatic nature of the lesion namely, malignant tumor of neuroendocrine phenotype consistent with small-cell carcinoma. Chest X-ray and computed tomography revealed an expansive process in the 7(th) segment of the left lung, left hilar and mediastinal lymphadenopathy and a suspicious initial secondary deposit in the left adrenal gland. The patient was referred to the department of oncology for further treatment. After the third cycle of chemotherapy, the magnetic resonance imaging revealed brain metastases. The patient passed away four months after the diagnosis of lung cancer first presented with skin metastases. Metastases in skin may be the first sign of lung cancer. Although rare appearing, we should raise suspicion in cases of atypical lesions in the skin not only of the smokers, but also of the non-smokers. Skin metastases from small-cell lung carcinoma are a poor prognostic indicator. The appearance of multiple skin metastases with other internal metastases shorten the survival time.

  9. Terahertz pulse imaging in reflection geometry of human skin cancer and skin tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodward, Ruth M [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Cole, Bryan E [TeraView Limited, 302/304 Cambridge Science Park, Milton Road, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Wallace, Vincent P [TeraView Limited, 302/304 Cambridge Science Park, Milton Road, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Pye, Richard J [Department of Dermatology, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Arnone, Donald D [TeraView Limited, 302/304 Cambridge Science Park, Milton Road, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Linfield, Edmund H [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Pepper, Michael [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2002-11-07

    We demonstrate the application of terahertz pulse imaging (TPI) in reflection geometry for the study of skin tissue and related cancers both in vitro and in vivo. The sensitivity of terahertz radiation to polar molecules, such as water, makes TPI suitable for studying the hydration levels in the skin and the determination of the lateral spread of skin cancer pre-operatively. By studying the terahertz pulse shape in the time domain we have been able to differentiate between diseased and normal tissue for the study of basal cell carcinoma (BCC). Basal cell carcinoma has shown a positive terahertz contrast, and inflammation and scar tissue a negative terahertz contrast compared to normal tissue. In vivo measurements on the stratum corneum have enabled visualization of the stratum corneum-epidermis interface and the study of skin hydration levels. These results demonstrate the potential of terahertz pulse imaging for the study of skin tissue and its related disorders, both in vitro and in vivo.

  10. Skin cancer in patients with psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeberg, A; Thyssen, J P; Gislason, G H

    2016-01-01

    . OBJECTIVES: We investigated the risk of new-onset melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), respectively, in a large cohort of patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. METHODS: Data on all Danish individuals aged ≥18 years between 1 January 1997 and 31 December 2012 were linked at individual......-level in nationwide registers. Incidence rates per 10 000 person-years were calculated, and incidence rate ratios (IRRs) were estimated by Poisson regression models. RESULTS: The study comprised 5 559 420 individuals with a maximum follow-up time of 16 years. There were 75 410 patients with psoriasis, and 25 087...... and 58 051 individuals developed melanoma and NMSC, respectively, during follow-up. Adjusted IRRs (95% CI) of melanoma were 1.19 (1.03-1.37), 1.09 (0.75-1.58) and 1.36 (0.94-1.99), in mild psoriasis, severe psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis, respectively, and the corresponding adjusted IRRs of NMSC were...

  11. Predictors of skin cancer in commercial airline pilots

    OpenAIRE

    Nicholas, Joyce S.; Swearingen, Christopher J.; Kilmer, Jeffrey B.

    2009-01-01

    Background Skin cancers among commercial airline pilots have been reported to occur at increased rates in pilot populations worldwide. The reasons for these increases are unclear, but postulated factors include ionizing radiation, circadian disruption and leisure sun exposure.

  12. Skin Cancer of the Hand and Upper Extremity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... examined, as they are a common site for metastasis, especially for melanoma and SCC. Other evaluations, such as a sentinel ... PET scan may be needed to check for metastasis, especially with melanoma. TREATMENT The standard treatment for skin cancer is ...

  13. Plesiotherapy for non-melanoma skin cancer: Innovating to overcome!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray Amitabh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The non-surgical management of non-melanoma skin cancers is an area requiring clinical investigation. Radiotherapy has a role in treatment for a defined subset of patients. Aims: The application of radiotherapy is subject to availability of proper equipment, non-availability of which precludes appropriate radiotherapy in most centers in third world countries. Materials and Methods: The introduction of innovations is needed to circumvent this. Plesiotherapy is such a mode of therapy for non-melanoma skin cancer. Results: In this paper we present successful management of a cohort of non-melanoma skin cancer patients with plesiotherapy using stepping source 192 Ir HDR source. Conclusions: Plesiothrapy is an effective mode of therapy for non-melanoma skin cancer.

  14. Photosensitizing medication use and risk of skin cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaae, Jeanette; Boyd, Heather A; Hansen, Anne

    2010-01-01

    Many commonly used medications, including both medications for long-term (daily) use and short-term use (treatment courses of finite duration), have photosensitizing properties. Whether use of these medications affects skin cancer risk, however, is unclear.......Many commonly used medications, including both medications for long-term (daily) use and short-term use (treatment courses of finite duration), have photosensitizing properties. Whether use of these medications affects skin cancer risk, however, is unclear....

  15. Germline MSH6 mutations are more prevalent in endometrial cancer patient cohorts than hereditary non polyposis colorectal cancer cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devlin, Lisa A; Graham, Colin A; Price, John H; Morrison, Patrick J

    2008-01-01

    To determine and compare the prevalence of MSH6 (a mismatch repair gene) mutations in a cohort of families with Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC), and in an unselected cohort of endometrial cancer patients (EC). Two patient cohorts participated in the study. A cohort of HNPCC families who were known to the Regional Medical Genetics department, and an unselected cohort of patients with a history of EC. All participants received genetic counselling on the implications of molecular testing, and blood was taken for DNA extraction with consent. All samples underwent sequencing and Multiple Ligation probe analysis (MLPA) for mutations in MSH6. DNA from one hundred and forty-three probands from HNPCC families and 125 patients with EC were included in the study. Molecular analysis of DNA in all participants from both cohorts for mutations in MSH6. Prevalence of pathogenic mutations in MSH6. A truncating mutation in MSH6 was identified in 3.8% (95% CI 1.0-9.5%) of patients in the endometrial cancer cohort, and 2.6% (95% CI 0.5-7.4%) of patients in the HNPCC cohort. A missense mutation was identified in 2.9% and 4.4% of the same cohorts respectively. No genomic rearrangements in MSH6 were identified. MSH6 mutations are more common in EC patients than HNPCC families. Genomic rearrangements do not contribute to a significant proportion of mutations in MSH6, but missense variants are relatively common and their pathogenicity can be uncertain. HNPCC families may be ascertained through an individual presenting with EC, and recognition of these families is important so that appropriate cancer surveillance can be put in place.

  16. Prevalence of Germline Mutations in Genes Engaged in DNA Damage Repair by Homologous Recombination in Patients with Triple-Negative and Hereditary Non-Triple-Negative Breast Cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Domagala

    Full Text Available This study sought to assess the prevalence of common germline mutations in several genes engaged in the repair of DNA double-strand break by homologous recombination in patients with triple-negative breast cancers and hereditary non-triple-negative breast cancers. Tumors deficient in this type of DNA damage repair are known to be especially sensitive to DNA cross-linking agents (e.g., platinum drugs and to poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP inhibitors.Genetic testing was performed for 36 common germline mutations in genes engaged in the repair of DNA by homologous recombination, i.e., BRCA1, BRCA2, CHEK2, NBN, ATM, PALB2, BARD1, and RAD51D, in 202 consecutive patients with triple-negative breast cancers and hereditary non-triple-negative breast cancers.Thirty five (22.2% of 158 patients in the triple-negative group carried mutations in genes involved in DNA repair by homologous recombination, while 10 (22.7% of the 44 patients in the hereditary non-triple-negative group carried such mutations. Mutations in BRCA1 were most frequent in patients with triple-negative breast cancer (18.4%, and mutations in CHEK2 were most frequent in patients with hereditary non-triple-negative breast cancers (15.9%. In addition, in the triple-negative group, mutations in CHEK2, NBN, and ATM (3.8% combined were found, while mutations in BRCA1, NBN, and PALB2 (6.8% combined were identified in the hereditary non-triple-negative group.Identifying mutations in genes engaged in DNA damage repair by homologous recombination other than BRCA1/2 can substantially increase the proportion of patients with triple-negative breast cancer and hereditary non-triple-negative breast cancer who may be eligible for therapy using PARP inhibitors and platinum drugs.

  17. Prevalence of Germline Mutations in Genes Engaged in DNA Damage Repair by Homologous Recombination in Patients with Triple-Negative and Hereditary Non-Triple-Negative Breast Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domagala, Pawel; Jakubowska, Anna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Kaczmarek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Kurlapska, Agnieszka; Cybulski, Cezary; Lubinski, Jan

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to assess the prevalence of common germline mutations in several genes engaged in the repair of DNA double-strand break by homologous recombination in patients with triple-negative breast cancers and hereditary non-triple-negative breast cancers. Tumors deficient in this type of DNA damage repair are known to be especially sensitive to DNA cross-linking agents (e.g., platinum drugs) and to poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors. Genetic testing was performed for 36 common germline mutations in genes engaged in the repair of DNA by homologous recombination, i.e., BRCA1, BRCA2, CHEK2, NBN, ATM, PALB2, BARD1, and RAD51D, in 202 consecutive patients with triple-negative breast cancers and hereditary non-triple-negative breast cancers. Thirty five (22.2%) of 158 patients in the triple-negative group carried mutations in genes involved in DNA repair by homologous recombination, while 10 (22.7%) of the 44 patients in the hereditary non-triple-negative group carried such mutations. Mutations in BRCA1 were most frequent in patients with triple-negative breast cancer (18.4%), and mutations in CHEK2 were most frequent in patients with hereditary non-triple-negative breast cancers (15.9%). In addition, in the triple-negative group, mutations in CHEK2, NBN, and ATM (3.8% combined) were found, while mutations in BRCA1, NBN, and PALB2 (6.8% combined) were identified in the hereditary non-triple-negative group. Identifying mutations in genes engaged in DNA damage repair by homologous recombination other than BRCA1/2 can substantially increase the proportion of patients with triple-negative breast cancer and hereditary non-triple-negative breast cancer who may be eligible for therapy using PARP inhibitors and platinum drugs.

  18. Patient accuracy of reporting on hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer-related malignancy in family members

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katballe, Niels; Juul, Svend; Christensen, M.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The cancer family history is important in identifying individuals with hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). The accuracy of a suspected HNPCC family history reported by patients with colorectal cancer was evaluated. METHODS: This was a prospective population-based study...... was rejected in three of 14 cases (false-positive rate 21 per cent). Furthermore, seven of 18 probands whose families met the Amsterdam criteria I or II after verification were identified by further exploration in families who, according to the probands, met weaker criteria (false-negative rate 39 per cent......). CONCLUSION: The present study suggests that family studies on HNPCC are not reliable unless the diagnoses of family members are verified from official sources. If endoscopic screening is offered entirely on the basis of unverified information from patients with colorectal cancer, there is a risk that a large...

  19. "It was an Emotional Baby": Previvors' Family Planning Decision-Making Styles about Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Marleah; Rauscher, Emily A

    2017-12-01

    Women who test positive for a BRCA genetic mutation are at an increased risk for developing hereditary breast and ovarian cancer and have a 50% chance of passing on their genetic mutation to their children. The purpose of this study was to investigate how women who test positive for a BRCA mutation but have not been diagnosed with cancer make decisions regarding family planning. Analysis of interviews with 20 women revealed they engage in logical and emotional decision-making styles. Although women want to be logical to reduce their hereditary cancer risk, emotions often complicate their decision-making. Women experience fear and worry about a future cancer diagnosis, yet also desire to create a family, particularly having children through natural conception. That is, women negotiate having preventative surgeries in a logical doctor-recommended timeframe but also organize those decisions around emotional desires of motherhood. Overall, this study demonstrates the complex decisions women who test positive for a BRCA mutation must make in regards to genetic testing timing, family planning, and overall quality of life.

  20. [Prevention of skin cancer: considerations on strategic communication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, M P; Baumann, E; Breitbart, E W

    2014-03-01

    In recent decades the numbers of cases of skin cancer have been increasing worldwide in light skinned populations. In Germany skin cancer is the most common form of cancer. To reduce the burden of skin cancer protection from ultraviolet radiation (primary prevention) and early detection (secondary prevention) of the disease play a decisive role. In this context information to the population about preventive behavior and the support of informed decision-making in skin cancer screening are important aspects in communication. This paper gives an overview about communicational aspects in the promotion of skin cancer prevention. In the development of communicational interventions it is important to identify the relevant target groups. Relevant key opinion leaders have to be included in the information process. Additionally, interventions should be based on a theoretical framework and be designed for the respective target group. Furthermore, different forms of communication and communication tools are provided for the realization of an information intervention. To appraise the intervention elements of summative and formal evaluation are available. The current results provide important findings about different effects of communicational aspects on knowledge and behavior of the population; however, due to the complexity of information interventions a particular effect cannot be explained by a single communicational element.

  1. Long-term psychological distress in women at risk for hereditary breast cancer adhering to regular surveillance: a risk profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Heijer, Mariska; Seynaeve, Caroline; Vanheusden, Kathleen; Timman, Reinier; Duivenvoorden, Hugo J; Tilanus-Linthorst, Madeleine; Menke-Pluijmers, Marian B E; Tibben, Aad

    2013-03-01

    Some women at risk for hereditary breast cancer are at increased risk of psychological distress. In order to tailor support for individual women, the availability of a tool enabling the identification of psychologically vulnerable women at an early stage is warranted. The objectives of this study were (1) to explore long-term psychological distress in women at risk for hereditary breast cancer adhering to regular surveillance, and (2) to identify women being vulnerable for long-term psychological distress, defined in terms of a multifactorial risk profile. General distress and cancer-related distress were assessed at baseline (T0) and after 5-8 years (T1) in 197 high-risk women adhering to breast cancer surveillance. Coping styles, occurrence of breast cancer in the family of origin, breast cancer risk perception, and frequency of breast self-examination, as assessed at T0, were examined as predictor variables for long-term distress (T1). Across time, women reported a significant reduction in intrusion and avoidance. Intrusion levels were increased among women who had lost a first-degree relative to breast cancer. Predictors of increased long-term distress were passive and palliative coping styles, excessive breast self-examination, and overestimation of breast cancer risk. On the other hand, coping through fostering reassuring thoughts was predictive for decreased long-term distress. On the basis of the identified risk profile, it is possible to identify vulnerable women at an early stage, who then may be offered additional and individually tailored support. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Thymidylate synthase gene (TYMS polymorphisms in sporadic and hereditary breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junior José da Silva Nogueira

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer (BC is a genetic disorder characterized by growth and proliferation of breast cells in a disorderly. In Brazil, there are approximately 49.240 new cases of BC, every year. The BC etiology is still poorly understood. The BC can be sporadic (SBC or hereditary (HBC. Recent studies have correlated gene polymorphisms with the BC, such as alterations in thymidylate synthase gene (TYMS, which are used to improve diagnosis and prevention of the disease. Polymorphisms in the TYMS gene 5’-UTR region, usually present reps double (2R and/or triple (3R. Studies have shown that homozygous 3R/3R is overexpressed compared with 2R/2R genotype, and these polymorphic variations may contribute to individual susceptibility to the development of BC. In this context, the objective of this study was to evaluate the frequency of the TYMS 2R and 3R polymorphisms, comparing genotypic and allelic distribution with SBC and HBC patients. Methods In this study we included a total of 204 subjects, 70 with BC (33 with SBC, and 37 with HBC and 134 healthy subjects (controls. The Polymerase Chain Reaction was the method used. Results Results demonstrated a high frequency of the 3R allele at BC, SBC, and HBC groups. The frequency of genotype 2R/3R was significantly higher in BC group. This work showed association between the 2R/3R variants (OR = 4.14, CI95% = 1.77-9.71 in the development of SBC, and 2R/2R (OR = 0.233, CI95% = 1.63-7.65 and 2R/3R (OR = 3.53, CI95% = 0.06-0.81 for developing HBC. To BC, there was association with the genotype 2R/3R (OR: 3.79, CI95% = 2.03-7.08. Conclusion Our results show relation to the development of BC in association with the analyzed polymorphisms.

  3. 10th International Symposium on Head And Neck Skin Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brekel, Michiel W M; Balm, Alfons J M; Lohuis, Peter J F M; van der Veen, J P Wietse

    2011-07-01

    Since 1993, ten multidisciplinary symposia were organized at The Netherlands Cancer Institute on the diagnosis and treatment of malignancies of the head and neck. The symposia are meant to provide up-to-date teaching for physicians by world-renowned speakers. The previous symposia dealt with sarcomas, reconstruction, cancer in young patients, salivary glands, melanoma, unknown primaries, as well as several other topics. This 10th symposium focused on skin cancer of the head and neck. There are many types of skin cancer and the differential diagnosis can often be difficult. In this symposium, diagnosis, molecular biology, epidemiology, staging and the treatment of various skin cancers were discussed by leaders in the field. There were over 200 participants from many different countries in Europe and overseas, representing specialties in the fields of dermatology, maxillofacial surgery, otolaryngology, head and neck surgery, general surgery, plastic and reconstructive surgery, and radiotherapy.

  4. of superficial non-melanomatous skin cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uma Goyal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Electronic brachytherapy (eBT is a form of contact radiation therapy used for thin superficial non-melano­matous skin cancers (NMSCs. An accurate measurement of diameter and depth is important for eBT treatment planning. Therefore, we compared clinical measurements by an experienced physician to measurements obtained using ultrasound (US, an objective imaging modality, in order to determine if clinical measurements were accurate enough for adequate NMSC treatment. Material and methods : Eighteen patients with 20 biopsy-proven NMSCs first had a clinical examination and then an US evaluation prior to starting eBT. One physician provided a clinical measurement for diameter and depth based on physical examination during radiation oncology consultation. The patients then had an US evaluation with a 14 or 18 MHz US unit, to determine both the diameter and depth measurements; eBT dose prescription was done using the US derived measurements. The clinical measurements and US measurements were compared using a t-test. Results: Seventeen lesions were basal cell carcinoma and 3 lesions were squamous cell carcinoma. The most common location was the nose (10 lesions. The difference between the clinical and the US derived measurements for the second largest diameter was found to be statistically significant (p = 0.03, while the difference for the largest diameter of the lesions was not (p = 0.24. More importantly, the depth measurements obtained with US were also found to be significantly different from the clinical estimates (p = 0.02. All patients have had a complete response to therapy with a median follow-up of 24 months. Conclusions : Statistically different measurements were obtained in 2 of 3 parameters used in choosing applicator size and prescription depth using an US assessment. The data presented suggests that US is a more objective modality than clinical judgment for determining superficial NMSC diameter and prescription depth for

  5. "It's not if I get cancer, it's when I get cancer": BRCA-positive patients' (un)certain health experiences regarding hereditary breast and ovarian cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Marleah

    2016-08-01

    Women with a harmful mutation in the BReast CAncer (BRCA) gene are at significantly increased risk of developing hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) during their lifetime, compared to those without. Such patients-with a genetic predisposition to develop cancer but who have not yet been diagnosed with cancer-live in a constant state of uncertainty and wonder not if they might get cancer but when. Framed by uncertainty management theory, the purpose of this study was to explore BRCA-positive patients' health experiences after testing positive for the BRCA genetic mutation, specifically identifying their sources of uncertainty. Thirty-four, qualitative interviews were conducted with female patients. Participants responded to online research postings on the non-profit organization Facing Our Risk of Cancer Empowered's (FORCE) message board and social media pages as well as HBOC-specific Facebook groups. The interview data were coded using the constant comparison method. Two major themes representing BRCA-positive patients' sources of uncertainty regarding their genetic predisposition and health experiences emerged from the data. Medical uncertainty included the following three subthemes: the unknown future, medical appointments, and personal cancer scares. Familial uncertainty encompassed the subthemes traumatic family cancer memories and motherhood. Overall, the study supports and extends existing research on uncertainty-revealing uncertainty is inherent in BRCA-positive patients' health experiences-and offers new insight regarding uncertainty management and HBOC risk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Presymptomatic diagnosis using a deletion of a single codon in families with hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ripa, R S; Katballe, N; Wikman, F P

    2005-01-01

    The diagnosis of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is often confirmed by a mutation in one of several mismatch-repair genes, in particular MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6. Presymptomatic diagnosis requires the identification of a mutation causing the disease. Three different deletions......, identified after mutation screening of MSH2 and MLH1. All patients in the families were haplotyped using markers flanking the MSH2 gene. The haplotypes revealed that the five families with high probability descended from only two founders. The N596del segregated with the HNPCC phenotype with lod scores of 3...

  7. FROM FAMILIES SYNDROMES TO GENES… THE FIRST CLINICAL AND GENETIC CHARACTERIZATIONS OF HEREDITARY SYNDROMES PREDISPOSING TO CANCER: WHAT WAS THE BEGINNING?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charité Ricker, MS, LCGC

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Assessment for hereditary susceptibility to cancer is considered standard of care, as it impacts not only a clinician's understanding of cancer causation but also options for prevention and treatment. The roots of our current knowledge about hereditary cancer syndromes can be traced to early reports of families with striking cancer histories. The purpose of this article is to review the historical timeline of the two most commonly assessed hereditary cancer syndromes, hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC and Lynch syndrome (LS. While many individuals identified with these syndromes today come from families similar to those seen in the early historical reports, our understanding of these syndromes, their expression and penetrance, has evolved over the years. In addition, the increased utilization of broad multi-gene panels continues to add to the complexity of defining associated phenotypes. These findings can lead to challenges with translating results to clinical management for patients and families, but also provide an opportunity to continue to gain understanding of the genetic underpinnings of cancer etiology.

  8. Predictors of skin cancer in commercial airline pilots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swearingen, Christopher J.; Kilmer, Jeffrey B.

    2009-01-01

    Background Skin cancers among commercial airline pilots have been reported to occur at increased rates in pilot populations worldwide. The reasons for these increases are unclear, but postulated factors include ionizing radiation, circadian disruption and leisure sun exposure. Aims To investigate the potential association of these occupational and lifestyle factors, as well as medical history and skin type, with non-melanoma skin cancer in pilots. Methods Data were collected using a confidential Internet survey administered in collaboration with the Air Line Pilots Association International to all active pilots in four US commercial airlines. Pilots with non-melanoma skin cancer were compared to those without using multivariable analysis. Results The response rate was 19%. Among pilots flying pilots with ≥20 years flight time prior to diagnosis, childhood sunburns and family history of non-melanoma skin cancer persisted as risk factors, with the addition of flight time at high latitude. Conclusions Further investigation regarding the potential health impact of long-term flying at high latitudes is recommended. Additionally, occupational health programmes for pilots should stress awareness of and protection against established risk factors for non-melanoma skin cancer. PMID:19465434

  9. Spectral biopsy for skin cancer diagnosis: initial clinical results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moy, Austin J.; Feng, Xu; Nguyen, Hieu T. M.; Zhang, Yao; Sebastian, Katherine R.; Reichenberg, Jason S.; Tunnell, James W.

    2017-02-01

    Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States and is a recognized public health issue. Diagnosis of skin cancer involves biopsy of the suspicious lesion followed by histopathology. Biopsies, which involve excision of the lesion, are invasive, at times unnecessary, and are costly procedures ( $2.8B/year in the US). An unmet critical need exists to develop a non-invasive and inexpensive screening method that can eliminate the need for unnecessary biopsies. To address this need, our group has reported on the continued development of a noninvasive method that utilizes multimodal spectroscopy towards the goal of a "spectral biopsy" of skin. Our approach combines Raman spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy to collect comprehensive optical property information from suspicious skin lesions. We previously described an updated spectral biopsy system that allows acquisition of all three forms of spectroscopy through a single fiber optic probe and is composed of off-the-shelf OEM components that are smaller, cheaper, and enable a more clinic-friendly system. We present initial patient data acquired with the spectral biopsy system, the first from an extensive clinical study (n = 250) to characterize its performance in identifying skin cancers (basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and melanoma). We also present our first attempts at analyzing this initial set of clinical data using statistical-based models, and with models currently being developed to extract biophysical information from the collected spectra, all towards the goal of noninvasive skin cancer diagnosis.

  10. Continuous wave terahertz transmission imaging of nonmelanoma skin cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Cecil S; Yaroslavsky, Anna N; Neel, Victor A; Goyette, Thomas M; Giles, Robert H

    2011-08-01

    Continuous wave terahertz imaging has the potential to offer a safe, noninvasive medical imaging modality for delineating human skin cancers. Terahertz pulse imaging (TPI) has already shown that there is contrast between basal cell carcinoma and normal skin. Continuous-wave imaging offers a simpler, lower cost alternative to TPI. The goal of this study was to investigate the feasibility of continuous wave terahertz imaging for delineating skin cancers by demonstrating contrast between cancerous and normal tissue in transmission mode. Two CO(2) optically pumped far-infrared molecular gas lasers were used for illuminating the tissue at two frequencies, 1.39 and 1.63 THz. The transmitted signals were detected using a liquid Helium cooled Silicon bolometer. Fresh skin cancer specimens were obtained from Mohs surgeries. The samples were processed and imaged within 24 hours after surgery. During the imaging experiment the samples were kept in pH-balanced saline to prevent tissue dehydration. At both THz frequencies two-dimensional THz transmission images of nonmelanoma skin cancers were acquired with spatial resolution of 0.39 mm at 1.4 THz and 0.49 mm at 1.6 THz. For evaluation purposes, hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) histology was processed from the imaged tissue. A total of 10 specimens were imaged and it was determined that for both frequencies, the areas of decreased transmission in the THz image correlated well with cancerous areas in the histopathology. Two negative controls were also imaged. The difference in transmission between normal and cancerous tissue was found to be approximately 60% at both frequencies, which suggests that contrast between normal and cancerous tissue at these frequencies is dominated by differences in water content. Our results suggest that intraoperative delineation of nonmelanoma skin cancers using continuous-wave terahertz imaging is feasible. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Epidemiogic aspects of skin cancer in organ-transplant recipients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wisgerhof, Hermina Christina

    2011-01-01

    The risk of (skin) cancer is highly increased in organ-transplant recipients who are kept on immunesuppressive drugs to prevent graft rejection. This thesis dealt with the epidemiologic aspects and risk factors for cancer focused on cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma and basal cell carcinoma.

  12. Tumor Suppressor Function of CYLD in Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. C. Masoumi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ubiquitin and ubiquitin-related proteins posttranslationally modify substrates, and thereby alter the functions of their targets. The ubiquitination process is involved in various physiological responses, and dysregulation of components of the ubiquitin system has been linked to many diseases including skin cancer. The ubiquitin pathways activated among skin cancers are highly diverse and may reflect the various characteristics of the cancer type. Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, the most common types of human skin cancer, are instances where the involvement of the deubiquitination enzyme CYLD has been recently highlighted. In basal cell carcinoma, the tumor suppressor protein CYLD is repressed at the transcriptional levels through hedgehog signaling pathway. Downregulation of CYLD in basal cell carcinoma was also shown to interfere with TrkC expression and signaling, thereby promoting cancer progression. By contrast, the level of CYLD is unchanged in squamous cell carcinoma, instead, catalytic inactivation of CYLD in the skin has been linked to the development of squamous cell carcinoma. This paper will focus on the current knowledge that links CYLD to nonmelanoma skin cancers and will explore recent insights regarding CYLD regulation of NF-κB and hedgehog signaling during the development and progression of these types of human tumors.

  13. Long-term effect of resistant starch on cancer risk in carriers of hereditary colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathers, John C; Movahedi, Mohammad; Macrae, Finlay

    2012-01-01

    have been done. We assessed the effect of resistant starch on the incidence of colorectal cancer. METHODS: In the CAPP2 study, individuals with Lynch syndrome were randomly assigned in a two-by-two factorial design to receive 600 mg aspirin or aspirin placebo or 30 g resistant starch or starch placebo......, for up to 4 years. Randomisation was done with a block size of 16. Post-intervention, patients entered into double-blind follow-up; participants and investigators were masked to treatment allocation. The primary endpoint for this analysis was development of colorectal cancer in participants randomly...

  14. Variants of cancer susceptibility genes in Korean BRCA1/2 mutation-negative patients with high risk for hereditary breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji Soo; Lee, Seung-Tae; Nam, Eun Ji; Han, Jung Woo; Lee, Jung-Yun; Kim, Jieun; Kim, Tae Il; Park, Hyung Seok

    2018-01-16

    We evaluated the incidence and spectrum of pathogenic and likely pathogenic variants of cancer susceptibility genes in BRCA1/2 mutation-negative Korean patients with a high risk for hereditary breast cancer using a comprehensive multigene panel that included 35 cancer susceptibility genes. Samples from 120 patients who were negative for BRCA1/2 mutations, but had been diagnosed with breast cancer that was likely hereditary, were prospectively evaluated for the prevalence of high-penetrance and moderate-penetrance germline mutations. Nine patients (7.5%) had at least one pathogenic or likely pathogenic variant. Ten variants were identified in these patients: TP53 in two patients, PALB2 in three patients, BARD1 in two patients, BRIP1 in two patients, and MRE11A in one patient. We also identified 30 types of 139 variants of unknown significance (VUS). High-penetrance germline mutations, including TP53 and PALB2, tended to occur with high frequency in young (cancer patients (4/19, 21.1%) than in those diagnosed with breast cancer at ≥35 years of age (1/101, 1.0%; p = 0.003). These combined results demonstrate that multigene panels offer an alternative strategy for identifying veiled pathogenic and likely pathogenic mutations in breast cancer susceptibility genes.

  15. Botanical Agents for the Treatment of Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jillian W. Millsop

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonmelanoma skin cancers, including basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, are common neoplasms worldwide and are the most common cancers in the United States. Standard therapy for cutaneous neoplasms typically involves surgical removal. However, there is increasing interest in the use of topical alternatives for the prevention and treatment of nonmelanoma skin cancer, particularly superficial variants. Botanicals are compounds derived from herbs, spices, stems, roots, and other substances of plant origin and may be used in the form of dried or fresh plants, extracted plant material, or specific plant-derived chemicals. They possess multiple properties including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and immunomodulatory properties and are, therefore, believed to be possible chemopreventive agents or substances that may suppress or reverse the process of carcinogenesis. Here, we provide a review of botanical agents studied for the treatment and prevention of nonmelanoma skin cancers.

  16. Risk of gynecologic cancers in Danish hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boilesen, Astrid Elisabeth Bruun; Bisgaard, Marie Luise; Bernstein, Inge

    2008-01-01

    cancer. Lifetime risk was elevated four times in familial CRC families. In these families, frequency was correlated to the pedigree phenotype, with significantly higher frequency demonstrated in Amsterdam II families compared to Amsterdam I families and families suspected of HNPCC. A total of 39 cases...

  17. Confirmation of genetic variants associated with lethal prostate cancer in a cohort of men from hereditary prostate cancer families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karyadi, Danielle M; Zhao, Shanshan; He, Qianchuan; McIntosh, Laura; Wright, Jonathan L; Ostrander, Elaine A; Feng, Ziding; Stanford, Janet L

    2015-05-01

    Germline genetic variants have been suggested as prognostic biomarkers for identifying patients at high risk for lethal prostate cancer (PCa). Validation studies have confirmed the association of several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with fatal PCa, but whether these variants affect PCa-specific mortality (PCSM) in patients with an inherited predisposition to PCa, based on familial history, is unknown. For this study, a cohort of 957 PCa patients from 270 hereditary prostate cancer families of European ancestry was genotyped for a panel of 22 PCSM-associated SNPs. Death certificates were reviewed to confirm cause of death. Mixed-effect Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess survival according to genotypes, accounting for relatedness and clinicopathological factors. Within this cohort, 98 PCa deaths were confirmed over an average follow-up period of 12.7 years after diagnosis. Variant allele carriers for three SNPs had significantly altered risk for PCSM [rs635261 at RNASEL, hazard ratio (HR), 0.35, 95% CI, 0.18-0.66; p = 0.002; rs915927 in XRCC1, HR, 1.91, 95% CI, 1.21-3.02; p = 0.009; and rs2494750 at AKT1, HR, 0.45, 95% CI, 0.23-0.90; p = 0.016). These results confirm the association of genetic variation in three genes with PCa lethality in a cohort of men with an inherited susceptibility to the disease and provide validation evidence that germline SNPs provide prognostic information for PCa patients. Development of a panel of germline biomarkers with clinical utility for distinguishing patients at detection who have an increased risk for fatal PCa is warranted. © 2014 UICC.

  18. CRAFT: Multimodality confocal skin imaging for early cancer diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Tong; Xie, Hao; Ding, Yichen; Wang, Weichao; Li, Zhiming; Jin, Dayong; Tang, Yuanhe; Ren, Qiushi; Xi, Peng

    2012-05-01

    Although histological analysis serves as a gold standard to cancer diagnosis, its application on skin cancer detection is largely prohibited due to its invasive nature. To obtain both the structural and pathological information in situ, a Confocal Reflectance/Auto-Fluorescence Tomography (CRAFT) system was established to examine the skin sites in vivo with both reflectance and autofluorescence modes simultaneously. Nude mice skin with cancerous sites and normal skin sites were imaged and compared with the system. The cellular density and reflective intensity in cancerous sites reflects the structural change of the tissue. With the decay coefficient analysis, the corresponding NAD(P)H decay index for cancerous sites is 1.65-fold that of normal sites, leading to a 97.8% of sensitivity and specificity for early cancer diagnosis. The results are verified by the followed histological analysis. Therefore, CRAFT may provide a novel method for the in vivo, non-invasive diagnosis of early cancer. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Hereditary Neuropathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the appearance of an inverted champagne glass) or scoliosis (curvature of the spine). The symptoms of hereditary neuropathies may be apparent ... the appearance of an inverted champagne glass) or scoliosis (curvature of the spine). The symptoms of hereditary neuropathies may be apparent ...

  20. Identification of six pathogenic RAD51C mutations via mutational screening of 1228 Danish individuals with increased risk of hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jønson, Lars; Ahlborn, Lise B; Steffensen, Ane Y

    2016-01-01

    families with increased risk of hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancer. Moreover, we identified 24 additional RAD51C variants of which 14 have not been previously reported in the literature. In this study, we determine the prevalence of RAD51C mutations in Danish breast and/or ovarian cancer families. We......Germ-line mutations in the RAD51C gene have recently been identified in families with breast and ovarian cancer and have been associated with an increased risk of ovarian cancer. In this study, we describe the frequency of pathogenic RAD51C mutations identified in Danish breast and/or ovarian...... cancer families. We screened the RAD51C gene in 1228 Danish hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancer families by next-generation sequencing analysis. The frequency of the identified variants was examined in the exome sequencing project database and in data from 2000 Danish exomes and the presumed...

  1. Risk of skin cancer following tamoxifen treatment in more than 16,000 breast cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Præstegaard, Camilla; Kjaer, Susanne K.; Andersson, Michael

    2016-01-01

    compared to non-users. The observed number of these types of cancer (37 SCCs and 38 melanomas among users) did not allow stratification on calendar-period. The overall IRR for BCC was 0.96 (95 % CI 0.84–1.09), but the IRR differed by menopausal status and calendar-period at diagnosis of breast cancer......Background: Women with breast cancer are at increased risk of developing skin cancer. Little is known about how tamoxifen affects this risk. We aimed to investigate whether tamoxifen treatment following breast cancer is associated with skin cancer. Methods: A cohort consisting of 44,589 women...... diagnosed with breast cancer during 1977–2007 from the nationwide clinical database of the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group, was followed for a primary skin cancer [basal cell carcinoma (BCC), squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) or melanoma] in the Danish Cancer Registry supplemented by data on BCC and SCC...

  2. Skin Cancer Knowledge, Attitudes, and Behaviors in Collegiate Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courtney Hobbs

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Outdoor athletes represent an important group at risk for skin cancer because they are routinely exposed to high levels of ultraviolet radiation. The purpose of this study was to assess current skin cancer knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors among collegiate athletes. A modified version of the Melanoma Risk Behavior Survey was completed by 343 athletes attending a Southern University in the USA, generating an 87% response rate. Survey results demonstrated that the majority of the athletes do not limit their sun exposure and reported low levels of sun protective behaviors. In addition, athletes lacked knowledge about skin cancer and sun protection. Eighty-three percent of the athletes stated that tanning beds improve one’s overall health. Race was significantly associated with skin cancer knowledge, whereas, gender was found to be significantly associated with knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors towards skin cancer. Additionally, there was a significant relationship between knowledge and behavior, but not between attitude and behavior. This study highlights the need to educate athletes about the hazards of tanning to minimize UV exposure and promote sun protection habits. Moreover, athletes should be educated on the dangers of indoor tanning facilities and encouraged to avoid these facilities.

  3. Economic evaluation of skin cancer prevention in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Sophy Ting-Fang; Carter, Rob; Sinclair, Craig; Mihalopoulos, Cathrine; Vos, Theo

    2009-11-01

    Australia has the highest incidence of skin cancer in the world, despite prevention campaigns being implemented since the early 1980s. This study assesses the cost-effectiveness of a skin cancer prevention program (named SunSmart) since it was introduced, together with its potential cost-effectiveness as an upgraded and ongoing national program. The reduction in melanoma incidence attributable to SunSmart was modelled as the primary end-point. Historical expenditures on SunSmart were obtained from representative Australian states in three latitude zones. Melanoma incidence rates from these states were used to model key health outcomes. Non-melanoma skin cancer was modelled separately based on national survey results. We estimate that SunSmart has averted 28,000 disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs), equivalent to 22,000 life-years saved, in the state of Victoria since its introduction in 1988, as well as saving money from cost offset in skin cancer management (dominant). An upgraded national program for the next 20 years is estimated to avert 120,000 DALYs, with associated reductions in the use of health care resources. It remains a dominant intervention in which every dollar invested in SunSmart will return an estimated AU$2.30. This study demonstrates that a sustained modest investment in skin cancer control is likely to be an excellent value for money.

  4. Estimating Skin Cancer Risk: Evaluating Mobile Computer-Adaptive Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djaja, Ngadiman; Janda, Monika; Olsen, Catherine M; Whiteman, David C; Chien, Tsair-Wei

    2016-01-22

    Response burden is a major detriment to questionnaire completion rates. Computer adaptive testing may offer advantages over non-adaptive testing, including reduction of numbers of items required for precise measurement. Our aim was to compare the efficiency of non-adaptive (NAT) and computer adaptive testing (CAT) facilitated by Partial Credit Model (PCM)-derived calibration to estimate skin cancer risk. We used a random sample from a population-based Australian cohort study of skin cancer risk (N=43,794). All 30 items of the skin cancer risk scale were calibrated with the Rasch PCM. A total of 1000 cases generated following a normal distribution (mean [SD] 0 [1]) were simulated using three Rasch models with three fixed-item (dichotomous, rating scale, and partial credit) scenarios, respectively. We calculated the comparative efficiency and precision of CAT and NAT (shortening of questionnaire length and the count difference number ratio less than 5% using independent t tests). We found that use of CAT led to smaller person standard error of the estimated measure than NAT, with substantially higher efficiency but no loss of precision, reducing response burden by 48%, 66%, and 66% for dichotomous, Rating Scale Model, and PCM models, respectively. CAT-based administrations of the skin cancer risk scale could substantially reduce participant burden without compromising measurement precision. A mobile computer adaptive test was developed to help people efficiently assess their skin cancer risk.

  5. Arsenic and skin cancer – Case report with chemoprevention

    OpenAIRE

    Uwe Wollina

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Arsenic is a potentially hazardous metalloid that can cause skin cancer. We want to demonstrate a case of chronic arsenicosis and the potential of chemoprevention with retinoids. Case Report: This is a case report of a 72-year-old male patient who was exposed to arsenics by dust and direct skin contact over 3 years in a chemical plant in the late fourties. He developed multiple arsenic keratosis clincialll resembling actinic keratoses, Bowen’s disease and palmar...

  6. Melanocortin 1 receptor variants and skin cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jiali; Kraft, Peter; Colditz, Graham A; Wong, Jason; Hunter, David J

    2006-10-15

    Melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) gene variants are associated with red hair and fair skin color. We assessed the associations of common MC1R genotypes with the risks of 3 types of skin cancer simultaneously in a nested case-control study within the Nurses' Health Study (219 melanoma, 286 squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and 300 basal cell carcinoma (BCC) cases, and 873 controls). We found that the 151Cys, 160Trp and 294His variants were significantly associated with red hair, fair skin color and childhood tanning tendency. The MC1R variants, especially the 151Cys variant, were associated with increased risks of the 3 types of skin cancer, after controlling for hair color, skin color and other skin cancer risk factors. Carriers of the 151Cys variant had an OR of 1.65 (95% CI, 1.04-2.59) for melanoma, 1.67 (1.12-2.49) for SCC and 1.56 (1.03-2.34) for BCC. Women with medium or olive skin color carrying 1 nonred hair color allele and 1 red hair color allele had the highest risk of melanoma. A similar interaction pattern was observed for red hair and carrying at least 1 red hair color allele on melanoma risk. We also observed that the 151Cys variant contributed additional melanoma risk among red-haired women. The information on MC1R status modestly improved the risk prediction; the increase was significant for melanoma and BCC (p, 0.004 and 0.05, respectively). These findings indicated that the effects of the MC1R variants on skin cancer risk were independent from self-reported phenotypic pigmentation. Copyright 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. A DNA repair variant in POLQ (c.-1060A > G) is associated to hereditary breast cancer patients: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandalize, Ana Paula Carneiro; Schüler-Faccini, Lavínia; Hoffmann, Jean-Sébastien; Caleffi, Maira; Cazaux, Christophe; Ashton-Prolla, Patricia

    2014-11-19

    One of the hallmarks of cancer is the occurrence of high levels of chromosomal rearrangements as a result of inaccurate repair of double-strand breaks (DSB). Germline mutations in BRCA and RAD51 genes, involved in DSB repair, are strongly associated with hereditary breast cancer. Pol θ, a translesional DNA polymerase specialized in the replication of damaged DNA, has been also shown to contribute to DNA synthesis associated to DSB repair. It is noteworthy that POLQ is highly expressed in breast tumors and this expression is able to predict patient outcome. The objective of this study was to analyze genetic variants related to POLQ as new population biomarkers of risk in hereditary (HBC) and sporadic (SBC) breast cancer. We analyzed through case-control study nine SNPs of POLQ in hereditary (HBC) and sporadic (SBC) breast cancer patients using Taqman Real Time PCR assays. Polymorphisms were systematically identified through the NCBI database and are located within exons or promoter regions. We recruited 204 breast cancer patients (101 SBC and 103 HBC) and 212 unaffected controls residing in Southern Brazil. The rs581553 SNP located in the promoter region was strongly associated with HBC (c.-1060A > G; HBC GG = 15, Control TT = 8; OR = 5.67, CI95% = 2.26-14.20; p Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer (HBOC) syndrome. Furthermore, 12 of them developed bilateral breast cancer and one had a familial history of bilateral breast cancer. This polymorphism was also associated with bilateral breast cancer in 67 patients (OR = 9.86, CI95% = 3.81-25.54). There was no statistically significant difference of age at breast cancer diagnosis between SNP carriers and non-carriers. Considering that Pol θ is involved in DBS repair, our results suggest that this polymorphism may contribute to the etiology of HBC, particularly in patients with bilateral breast cancer.

  8. Continuous-wave terahertz imaging of nonmelanoma skin cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Cecil Sudhir

    Continuous wave terahertz imaging has the potential to offer a safe, non-invasive medical imaging modality for detecting different types of human skin cancers. Terahertz pulse imaging (TPI) has already shown that there is contrast between basal cell carcinoma and normal skin. Continuous-wave imaging offers a simpler, lower cost alternative to terahertz pulse imaging. This project aims to isolate the optimal contrast frequency for a continuous wave terahertz imaging system and demonstrate transmission based, in-vitro , imaging of thin sections of non-melanoma skin cancers and correlate the images to sample histology. The aim of this project is to conduct a proof-of-principle experiment that establishes whether continuous-wave terahertz imaging can detect differences between cancerous and normal tissue while outlining the basic requirements for building a system capable of performing in vivo tests.

  9. Skin cancer in patients with chronic radiation dermatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, M.M.; Hanke, C.W.; Zollinger, T.W.; Montebello, J.F.; Hornback, N.B.; Norins, A.L.

    1989-04-01

    The cases of 76 patients with chronic radiation dermatitis resulting from low-dose ionizing radiation for benign disease were reviewed retrospectively for risk factors leading to the development of neoplasia. The patients were studied with respect to original hair color, eye color, sun reactive skin type, benign disease treated, area treated, age at treatment, and age at development of first skin cancer. Analysis of data showed 37% of patients had sun-reactive skin type I, 27% had type II, and 36% had type III. Types IV through VI were not represented. There appeared to be an overrepresentation of types I and II. Increased melanin pigmentation may therefore be either directly or indirectly protective against the development of skin cancers in patients who have received low-dose superficial ionizing radiation for benign disease. The sun-reactive skin type of patients with chronic radiation dermatitis may be used as a predictor of skin cancer risk when the total dose of ionizing radiation is not known.

  10. P63 marker Expression in Usual Skin Cancers Compared With Non Tumoral Skin Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolhamid Esmaili

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Non-melanoma skin cancers including basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma are the most common cancers in human. The aim of this study was to determine the expression of P63 marker in usual skin cancers compared with non-tomoral skin lesions. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, sampling was performed from archival blocks of Shahid Mohammadi hospital patients during 2010-2011. 60 samples (including 30 samples of non tumoral skin lesions and 30 samples of basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma were studied and evaluation of p63 gene expression was done with Immunohistochemistry method. T-test and Chi-square were used for analysis of data. Results: P63 gene were expressed in 4 cases (13.33 % of non tumoral lesions and all tumoral lesions (100 %. In tumoral lesions, 5 cases (16.66 % showed 1+ severity experssion, 11 cases (36.66% 2 + severity experssion and 14 cases (46.66 % 3+severity experssion. All 4 non tumoral lesions shoed 1+ severity experssion of P63gene. Conclusion: The results of this study indicated that the incidence and severity of gene expression of P63 can be use for differentiation between basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma as well as non-tumoral skin lesions. 

  11. Modelling the healthcare costs of skin cancer in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Louisa G; Elliott, Thomas M; Wright, Caradee Y; Deghaye, Nicola; Visser, Willie

    2016-04-02

    Skin cancer is a growing public health problem in South Africa due to its high ambient ultraviolet radiation environment. The purpose of this study was to estimate the annual health system costs of cutaneous melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) in South Africa, incorporating both the public and private sectors. A cost-of-illness study was used to measure the economic burden of skin cancer and a 'bottom-up' micro-costing approach. Clinicians provided data on the patterns of care and treatments while national costing reports and clinician fees provided cost estimates. The mean costs per melanoma and per SCC/BCC were extrapolated to estimate national costs using published incidence data and official population statistics. One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were undertaken to address the uncertainty of the parameters used in the model. The estimated total annual cost of treating skin cancers in South Africa were ZAR 92.4 million (2015) (or US$15.7 million). Sensitivity analyses showed that the total costs could vary between ZAR 89.7 to 94.6 million (US$15.2 to $16.1 million) when melanoma-related variables were changed and between ZAR 78.4 to 113.5 million ($13.3 to $19.3 million) when non-melanoma-related variables were changed. The primary drivers of overall costs were the cost of excisions, follow-up care, radical lymph node dissection, cryotherapy and radiation therapy. The cost of managing skin cancer in South Africa is sizable. Since skin cancer is largely preventable through improvements to sun-protection awareness and skin cancer prevention programs, this study highlights these healthcare resources could be used for other pressing public health problems in South Africa.

  12. Survival of patients with Stage III colon cancer is improved in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer compared with sporadic cases. A Danish registry based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brixen, L M; Bernstein, I T; Bülow, S; Ehrnrooth, E

    2013-07-01

    Patients with hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) seem to have a better prognosis than those with sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC). The aim was to compare survival after Stage III CC in patients with HNPCC with those having sporadic CC. A total of 230 patients with hereditary cancer from the Danish HNPCC Register and 3557 patients with sporadic CC from the Danish Colorectal Cancer Database, diagnosed during May 2001-December 2008, were included. HNPCC patients were classified according to mismatch repair mutation status and family pedigree. Sporadic cases had no known family history of cancer. Patient characteristics, geographical differences and survival data were analysed. The overall survival (OS) was better in HNPCC patients compared with sporadic CC after stratification for sex and age (P = 0.02; CI 1.04-1.7). The 5-year survival was 70% in HNPCC patients compared with 56% in sporadic CC (P < 0.001). No survival difference was found between HNPCC subgroups but a tendency to better OS was seen in patients with Lynch syndrome. No geographical differences in OS were found. The median follow-up was 3.9 (0-9.5) years for HNPCC vs 3.2 (0-9.6) years for sporadic CC. HNPCC patients with Stage III CC have a better OS compared with sporadic CC. No significant difference in OS was found within HNPCC subgroups. Colorectal Disease © 2013 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  13. Optimism and adolescent perception of skin cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Megan E; Gibbons, Frederick X; Gerrard, Meg; Alert, Marissa D

    2011-11-01

    The present study examined comparative optimism for skin cancer (the belief that one is at lower risk for skin cancer than one's peers) among adolescents in two age groups: 11- and 12-year-olds versus 13- and 14-year-olds. Specifically, we tested whether optimism was enhanced when adolescents at lower relative risk (i.e., nontanners) were exposed to higher-risk comparison targets (photos of tanned models) and whether this effect was moderated by age. Students (N = 211) viewed pictures of either tanned or fair-skinned models, and then responded to a questionnaire that included an assessment of their comparative optimism for skin cancer in later life. Students, as a whole, were comparatively optimistic about their likelihood of developing skin cancer, despite the fact that more than half (55.6%) of them reported intentionally tanning. Analysis of variance revealed a significant 3-way interaction among behavior (tanner vs. nontanner), target (pale vs. tanned model), and age (early vs. mid-adolescents). The interaction was driven by a particularly strong amount of comparative optimism in one group: mid-adolescent, nontanning students in the tan-target condition. Most adolescents believe they are less likely than their peers to experience a negative health outcome. It also appears that the relation between social comparison and comparative optimism develops with age, as only the midadolescent students showed evidence of making a self-to-target comparison. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved.

  14. Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy in Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Laure Matthey-Giè

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The management of lymph nodes in nonmelanoma skin cancer patients is currently still debated. Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC, pigmented epithelioid melanocytoma (PEM, and other rare skin neoplasms have a well-known risk to spread to regional lymph nodes. The use of sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB could be a promising procedure to assess this risk in clinically N0 patients. Metastatic SNs have been observed in 4.5–28% SCC (according to risk factors, in 9–42% MCC, and in 14–57% PEM. We observed overall 30.8% positive SNs in 13 consecutive patients operated for high-risk nonmelanoma skin cancer between 2002 and 2011 in our institution. These high rates support recommendation to implement SLNB for nonmelanoma skin cancer especially for SCC patients. Completion lymph node dissection following positive SNs is also a matter of discussion especially in PEM. It must be remembered that a definitive survival benefit of SLNB in melanoma patients has not been proven yet. However, because of its low morbidity when compared to empiric elective lymph node dissection or radiation therapy of lymphatic basins, SLNB has allowed sparing a lot of morbidity and could therefore be used in nonmelanoma skin cancer patients, even though a significant impact on survival has not been demonstrated.

  15. Red tattoos, ultraviolet radiation and skin cancer in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lerche, Catharina M; Heerfordt, Ida M; Serup, Jørgen

    2017-01-01

    cell carcinoma (SCC) was measured. All UV-irradiated mice developed SCCs. The time to the onset of the first and second tumor was identical in the red-tattooed group compared with the control group (182 vs 186 days and 196 vs 203 days, P=ns). Statistically, the third tumor appeared slightly faster......Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) induces skin cancer. The combination of UVR and red tattoos may be associated with increased risk of skin cancer due to potential carcinogens in tattoo inks. This combination has not been studied previously. Immunocompetent C3.Cg/TifBomTac hairless mice (n=99) were...

  16. Novel LOVD databases for hereditary breast cancer and colorectal cancer genes in the Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Min; Cong, Peikuan; Wang, Yue; Lin, Changsong; Yuan, Ying; Dong, Jian; Banerjee, Santasree; Zhang, Tao; Chen, Yanling; Zhang, Ting; Chen, Mingqing; Hu, Peter; Zheng, Shu; Zhang, Jin; Qi, Ming

    2011-12-01

    The Human Variome Project (HVP) is an international consortium of clinicians, geneticists, and researchers from over 30 countries, aiming to facilitate the establishment and maintenance of standards, systems, and infrastructure for the worldwide collection and sharing of all genetic variations effecting human disease. The HVP-China Node will build new and supplement existing databases of genetic diseases. As the first effort, we have created a novel variant database of BRCA1 and BRCA2, mismatch repair genes (MMR), and APC genes for breast cancer, Lynch syndrome, and familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), respectively, in the Chinese population using the Leiden Open Variation Database (LOVD) format. We searched PubMed and some Chinese search engines to collect all the variants of these genes in the Chinese population that have already been detected and reported. There are some differences in the gene variants between the Chinese population and that of other ethnicities. The database is available online at http://www.genomed.org/LOVD/. Our database will appear to users who survey other LOVD databases (e.g., by Google search, or by NCBI GeneTests search). Remote submissions are accepted, and the information is updated monthly. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Case-control analysis of truncating mutations in DNA damage response genes connects TEX15 and FANCD2 with hereditary breast cancer susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantere, Tuomo; Tervasmäki, Anna; Nurmi, Anna; Rapakko, Katrin; Kauppila, Saila; Tang, Jiangbo; Schleutker, Johanna; Kallioniemi, Anne; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Mannermaa, Arto; Nieminen, Pentti; Hanhisalo, Riitta; Lehto, Sini; Suvanto, Maija; Grip, Mervi; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Tengström, Maria; Auvinen, Päivi; Kvist, Anders; Borg, Åke; Blomqvist, Carl; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Greenberg, Roger A; Winqvist, Robert; Nevanlinna, Heli; Pylkäs, Katri

    2017-04-06

    Several known breast cancer susceptibility genes encode proteins involved in DNA damage response (DDR) and are characterized by rare loss-of-function mutations. However, these explain less than half of the familial cases. To identify novel susceptibility factors, 39 rare truncating mutations, identified in 189 Northern Finnish hereditary breast cancer patients in parallel sequencing of 796 DDR genes, were studied for disease association. Mutation screening was performed for Northern Finnish breast cancer cases (n = 578-1565) and controls (n = 337-1228). Mutations showing potential cancer association were analyzed in additional Finnish cohorts. c.7253dupT in TEX15, encoding a DDR factor important in meiosis, associated with hereditary breast cancer (p = 0.018) and likely represents a Northern Finnish founder mutation. A deleterious c.2715 + 1G > A mutation in the Fanconi anemia gene, FANCD2, was over two times more common in the combined Finnish hereditary cohort compared to controls. A deletion (c.640_644del5) in RNF168, causative for recessive RIDDLE syndrome, had high prevalence in majority of the analyzed cohorts, but did not associate with breast cancer. In conclusion, truncating variants in TEX15 and FANCD2 are potential breast cancer risk factors, warranting further investigations in other populations. Furthermore, high frequency of RNF168 c.640_644del5 indicates the need for its testing in Finnish patients with RIDDLE syndrome symptoms.

  18. Review of natural compounds for potential skin cancer treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Chinembiri, Tawona N; Du Plessis, Lissinda H; Gerber, Minja; Hamman, Josias H; Du Plessis, Jeanetta

    2014-01-01

    Most anti-cancer drugs are derived from natural resources such as marine, microbial and botanical sources. Cutaneous malignant melanoma is the most aggressive form of skin cancer, with a high mortality rate. Various treatments for malignant melanoma are available, but due to the development of multi-drug resistance, current or emerging chemotherapies have a relatively low success rates. This emphasizes the importance of discovering new compounds that are both safe and effective against melano...

  19. Nonsurgical Innovations in the Treatment of Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Amini, Sadegh; Viera, Martha H.; Valins, Whitney; Berman, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma are the most frequent types of cancer in the United States and represent 75 percent and 20 percent, respectively, of all nonmelanoma skin cancers. Since ultraviolet radiation is implicated in their development, photoprotection is fundamental in their prevention. Additional preventive measures include identifying high-risk individuals for early detection along with using agents, such as retinoids, that are effective in decreasing the risk of pre...

  20. Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura Misdiagnosed as Hereditary Angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Michelle Fog; Bygum, Anette

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema is a rare, but potentially life-threatening genetic disorder that results from an autosomal dominant trait. It is characterized by acute, recurrent attacks of severe local edema, most commonly affecting the skin and mucosa. Swelling in hereditary angioedema patients does how...... of hereditary angioedema. The case illustrates how clinicians can have difficulties in handling patients with rare diseases, especially in the emergency care setting....

  1. Assessing physicians' preferences on skin cancer treatment in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrandiz, L; Ruiz-de-Casas, A; Trakatelli, M; de Vries, E; Ulrich, M; Aquilina, S; Saksela, O; Majewski, S; Ranki, A; Proby, C; Magnoni, C; Pitkänen, S; Kalokasidis, K; Siskou, S; Hinrichs, B; Altsitsiadis, E; Stockfleth, E; Moreno-Ramirez, D

    2012-08-01

    A wide variety of both surgical and nonsurgical therapies is currently available for patients with skin cancer. This part of the EPIDERM (European Prevention Initiative for Dermatological Malignancies) project is aimed at the evaluation of the treatment preferences for skin cancer in eight countries of the European Union. A multicentre hospital-based case-control study was carried out at dermatology departments in Finland, Germany, Greece, Italy, Malta, Poland, Scotland and Spain. Patients with skin cancer (basal cell carcinoma, actinic keratosis, squamous cell carcinoma, cutaneous malignant melanoma and Bowen disease) were consecutively enrolled between July 2008 and July 2010. Information on the study variables (sex, age, country, tumour type, anatomical location and treatment) was obtained from questionnaires designed by the EPIDERM project. In total, 1708 patients with skin cancer were included. Surgery was the first treatment option in 76·5% of the patients (P = 0·001). Actinic keratosis was the only tumour type in which nonsurgical treatment was more frequent than surgery (91·4%). Tumours on the head were less likely to be surgically excised than those at other locations (odds ratio 0·25, P = 0·001). Simple excision or curettage was the most common surgical procedure (65·4%), followed by graft and flaps (22·4%). Cryotherapy was the most common nonsurgical option (52·4%), followed by imiquimod (18·0%), photodynamic therapy (PDT; 12·0%), 5-fluorouracil (5-FU; 5·7%), and diclofenac with hyaluronic acid (4·0%). Surgery remains the first-choice treatment of skin cancer. Regarding nonsurgical treatments, the conservative treatments available (imiquimod, 5-FU, PDT and diclofenac gel) have not yet exceeded the use of ablative options such as cryotherapy despite their accepted benefit of treating field cancerization. © 2012 The Authors. BJD © 2012 British Association of Dermatologists.

  2. [Genetic analysis of precancer-cancer of the stomach system. II. Lactate dehydrogenase in families of the patients: is it a marker of hereditary predisposition?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al'tshuller, B A; Bazhenova, M D; Bassalyk, L S; Pashintseva, L P; Bridko, V V

    1986-03-01

    The possibility of using the LDH as a marker of hereditary predisposition to the stomach cancer was analysed by using the genetical correlational analysis. The LDH isoenzymes in the gastric body were studied in 56 pedigrees. Similar LDH alterations were detected in relatives with cancer and precancer (ulcer disease, atrophic gastritis). Relatives with no such pathology had LDH isoenzymes, similar to the control individuals. High and significant coefficients of phenotypic and environmental correlation of LDH and predisposition to the stomach cancer were obtained. The coefficient of genetic correlation was not significant. The problem of the origin of these LDH variances is discussed. The preliminary conclusion is that the LDH isoenzyme changes revealed in patients with stomach cancer appear as a consequence of the disease, and cannot be used as the marker of hereditary predisposition.

  3. Total body photography for skin cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dengel, Lynn T; Petroni, Gina R; Judge, Joshua; Chen, David; Acton, Scott T; Schroen, Anneke T; Slingluff, Craig L

    2015-11-01

    Total body photography may aid in melanoma screening but is not widely applied due to time and cost. We hypothesized that a near-simultaneous automated skin photo-acquisition system would be acceptable to patients and could rapidly obtain total body images that enable visualization of pigmented skin lesions. From February to May 2009, a study of 20 volunteers was performed at the University of Virginia to test a prototype 16-camera imaging booth built by the research team and to guide development of special purpose software. For each participant, images were obtained before and after marking 10 lesions (five "easy" and five "difficult"), and images were evaluated to estimate visualization rates. Imaging logistical challenges were scored by the operator, and participant opinion was assessed by questionnaire. Average time for image capture was three minutes (range 2-5). All 55 "easy" lesions were visualized (sensitivity 100%, 90% CI 95-100%), and 54/55 "difficult" lesions were visualized (sensitivity 98%, 90% CI 92-100%). Operators and patients graded the imaging process favorably, with challenges identified regarding lighting and positioning. Rapid-acquisition automated skin photography is feasible with a low-cost system, with excellent lesion visualization and participant acceptance. These data provide a basis for employing this method in clinical melanoma screening. © 2014 The International Society of Dermatology.

  4. Genetic counseling does not fulfill the counselees' need for certainty in hereditary breast/ovarian cancer families: an explorative assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, Joël; Menko, Fred H; Oosterwijk, Jan C; van Asperen, Christi J; Stiggelbout, Anne M; Tibben, Aad

    2013-05-01

    Many cancer-patients undergo DNA testing in the BRCA1/2 genes to receive information about the likelihood that cancer is heritable. Previous nonsystematic studies suggested that DNA testing often does not fulfill the counselees' needs for certainty. We explored the balance between the counselees' need for certainty and perceived certainty (NfC-PC, i.e., level of fulfillment of NfC) regarding the specific domains of DNA test result, heredity and cancer. We also examined relationships of NfC-PC with coping styles and distress. Before disclosure of BRCA1/2 test results for hereditary breast/ovarian cancer (T1), questionnaires were filled in by 467 cancer-patients. Another questionnaire (T2) was filled in after disclosure of pathogenic mutation results (n = 30), uninformative results (n = 202) or unclassified-variants (n = 16). Before and after DNA test result disclosure, overall 58-94% of all counselees experienced unfulfilled NfC regarding the DNA test result, heredity and cancer. Compared with T1, the communication of pathogenic mutations (T2) caused more fulfillment of the NfC about the DNA test result, but less about cancer and heredity (p NfC > PC). Compared with T1, uninformative results (T2) caused more fulfillments of all needs than before disclosure (p NfC and PC between the domains of DNA-test result, heredity and cancer (p NfC-PC) were uncorrelated with cognitive understanding of the DNA test result. The counselees' NfC needs more attention in research and practice, for example, when the potential uncertainties of testing are discussed. The counselees' NfC may be assessed and used in tailored, mutual communication of DNA test results. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Statin use and risk of nonmelanoma skin cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnspang, S.; Pottegård, A.; Friis, Søren

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Evidence is conflicting regarding statin use and risk of basal cell (BCC) and squamous cell skin cancer (SCC). METHODS: Using Danish nationwide registries, we identified all patients with incident BCC/SCC during 2005-2009 and matched them to population controls. We computed odds ratios...

  6. Ozone depletion and skin cancer incidence: an integrated modelling approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slaper H; den Elzen MGJ; de Woerd HJ; de Greef J

    1992-01-01

    A decrease in stratospheric ozone, probably caused by chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) emissions, has been observed over large parts of the globe. The incidence of skin cancer is expected to increase due to ozone depletion. An integrated source-risk model is developed and applied to evaluate the increased

  7. Ultraviolet light exposure, skin cancer risk and vitamin D production

    Science.gov (United States)

    RIVAS, MIGUEL; ROJAS, ELISA; ARAYA, MARÍA C.; CALAF, GLORIA M.

    2015-01-01

    The danger of overexposure to solar ultraviolet radiation has been widely reviewed since the 1980s due to the depletion of the ozone layer. However, the benefits of mild exposure of the skin to ultraviolet (UV) light have not been widely investigated. Numerous reports have demonstrated that an association exists between low light exposure to the sun, non-melanoma skin cancer and a lack of vitamin D synthesis. As vitamin D synthesis in the body depends on skin exposure to UVB radiation from the sun (wavelength, 290–320 nm), experimental measurements for this type of solar radiation are important. The present study analyzed data obtained from a laboratory investigating UV radiation from the sun at the University of Tarapacá (Arica, Chile), where systematic experimental UVB measurements had been performed using a calibrated biometer instrument since 2006. These data were compared with skin cancer data from the local population. The results demonstrated that the incidence of skin cancer systematically increased from 7.4 to 18.7 in men and from 10.0 to 21.7 in women between 2000 and 2006 in Arica, respectively; this increase may be due to multiple factors, including the lack of adequate levels of vitamin D in risk groups such as post-menopausal women and senior age. This marked increase may also be due to the high levels of UV radiation measured in this region throughout the year. However, it is not certain that the local population has adequate vitamin D levels, nor that their skin has been predominantly exposed to artificial light that does not allow adequate vitamin D synthesis. Thus, the current study presents the association between skin type IV, the time to induce solar erythema and the time required to produce 1,000 international units of vitamin D. PMID:26622830

  8. The contribution of self-esteem and self-concept in psychological distress in women at risk of hereditary breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Heijer, Mariska; Seynaeve, Caroline; Vanheusden, Kathleen; Duivenvoorden, Hugo J; Vos, Joël; Bartels, Carina C M; Menke-Pluymers, Marian B E; Tibben, Aad

    2011-11-01

    Clarification of the role of several aspects of self-concept regarding psychological distress in women at risk of hereditary breast cancer will help to target counselling and psychosocial interventions more appropriately. In this study, we aimed (1) to examine the role of general self-esteem and specific aspects of self-concept (i.e. stigma, vulnerability, and mastery) in psychological distress in women at risk of hereditary breast cancer and (2) to compare the relative importance of these self-concept aspects in psychological distress in women with low versus high self-esteem. General and breast-cancer-specific distress, self-esteem, self-concept, and demographics were assessed in 246 women being at risk of hereditary breast cancer, who opted either for regular breast surveillance or prophylactic surgery. In the total study group, self-esteem was negatively associated with general distress. Furthermore, feeling stigmatized was strongly associated with more breast-cancer-specific distress, and to a lesser degree with general distress. In women with low-self esteem, feelings of stigmatization were strongly associated with higher levels of both breast-cancer-specific and general distress, while a sense of mastery was associated with less general distress. For women with high self-esteem, feelings of both stigmatization and vulnerability were associated with more breast-cancer-specific distress, whereas there were no significant associations with general distress. Psychosocial interventions or support groups for women at risk of hereditary breast cancer should focus on self-esteem and feelings of stigmatization and isolation, and consequently tailor the interventions on specific items for respective women. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. MSH6 Mutations are Frequent in Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer Families With Normal pMSH6 Expression as Detected by Immunohistochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okkels, Henrik; Larsen, K.L.; Thorlacius-Ussing, O.

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is an autosomal dominant condition accounting for 2% to 4% of all colorectal cancer cases worldwide. Families with germ line mutations in 1 of 6 mismatch repair genes are known as Lynch syndrome families. The largest number of mutations has been...... detected in the mismatch repair genes MLH1 and MSH2, but several mutations in MSH6 have also been demonstrated....

  10. The role of antioxidants in skin cancer prevention and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godic, Aleksandar; Poljšak, Borut; Adamic, Metka; Dahmane, Raja

    2014-01-01

    Skin cells are constantly exposed to reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress from exogenous and endogenous sources. UV radiation is the most important environmental factor in the development of skin cancer and skin aging. The primary products caused by UV exposure are generally direct DNA oxidation or generation of free radicals which form and decompose extremely quickly but can produce effects that can last for hours, days, or even years. UV-induced generation of ROS in the skin develops oxidative stress when their formation exceeds the antioxidant defense ability. The reduction of oxidative stress can be achieved on two levels: by lowering exposure to UVR and/or by increasing levels of antioxidant defense in order to scavenge ROS. The only endogenous protection of our skin is melanin and enzymatic antioxidants. Melanin, the pigment deposited by melanocytes, is the first line of defense against DNA damage at the surface of the skin, but it cannot totally prevent skin damage. A second category of defense is repair processes, which remove the damaged biomolecules before they can accumulate and before their presence results in altered cell metabolism. Additional UV protection includes avoidance of sun exposure, usage of sunscreens, protective clothes, and antioxidant supplements.

  11. The Role of Antioxidants in Skin Cancer Prevention and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandar Godic

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Skin cells are constantly exposed to reactive oxygen species (ROS and oxidative stress from exogenous and endogenous sources. UV radiation is the most important environmental factor in the development of skin cancer and skin aging. The primary products caused by UV exposure are generally direct DNA oxidation or generation of free radicals which form and decompose extremely quickly but can produce effects that can last for hours, days, or even years. UV-induced generation of ROS in the skin develops oxidative stress when their formation exceeds the antioxidant defense ability. The reduction of oxidative stress can be achieved on two levels: by lowering exposure to UVR and/or by increasing levels of antioxidant defense in order to scavenge ROS. The only endogenous protection of our skin is melanin and enzymatic antioxidants. Melanin, the pigment deposited by melanocytes, is the first line of defense against DNA damage at the surface of the skin, but it cannot totally prevent skin damage. A second category of defense is repair processes, which remove the damaged biomolecules before they can accumulate and before their presence results in altered cell metabolism. Additional UV protection includes avoidance of sun exposure, usage of sunscreens, protective clothes, and antioxidant supplements.

  12. 78 FR 47320 - Preventing Skin Cancer Through Reduction of UV Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-05

    ... of melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer costs an estimated $1.7 billion each year, while costs due... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Preventing Skin Cancer Through Reduction of UV...: Skin cancer rates, including rates of melanoma, are increasing in the United States and worldwide. An...

  13. A case of radiation-induced skin ulcer, cerebral meningioma and skin cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuo, Yuki; Yano, Kenji [Kure National Hospital, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2000-10-01

    We report a case of radiation-induced skin ulcer, cerebral meningioma, and skin cancer in a 69-year-old woman who had undergone local irradiation and application of radium directly to the skin for actinomycosis of the face at the age of twenty. Some forty to fifty years later, a skin ulcer in the preauricular area in the center of the radiodermatitis, cerebral meningioma in the right sphenoid ridge, and a keratotic skin tumor in the right auricle all developed within the previously irradiated region. The cerebral meningioma was extirpated. The skin ulcer was excised and covered with a forearm flap. After the skin tumor was excised and the subcutaneous tumor in the postauricular area was excised, the postoperative histopathological diagnosis was squamous cell carcinoma with lymph node metastasis. It was considered that the squamous cell carcinoma was derived from irradiated keratosis. Four months later, right neck lymph node dissection was performed. Both the meningioma and squamous cell carcinoma satisfied Cahan's criteria for radiation-induced tumors. So we diagnosed these as radiation-induced cerebral meningioma and squamous cell carcinoma. We haven't detected any recurrence of the squamous cell carcinoma for two years. We learned from this case that chronic radiation disturbances cause an irreversible reaction and various radiolesions, including malignancies, can occur after a long period of latency. It is important to never underestimate a small lesion in the irradiated area, to plan early preventive surgical treatment to remove skin that may have been over-subjected to irradiation, and to continue long-term follow-up for patients with chronic radiodermatitis. (author)

  14. ATF3 activates Stat3 phosphorylation through inhibition of p53 expression in skin cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Zhen-Feng; Ao, Jun-Hong; Zhang, Jie; Su, You-Ming; Yang, Rong-Ya

    2013-01-01

    ATF3, a member of the ATF/CREB family of transcription factors, has been found to be selectively induced by calcineurin/NFAT inhibition and to enhance keratinocyte tumor formation, although the precise role of ATF3 in human skin cancer and possible mechanisms remain unknown. In this study, clinical analysis of 30 skin cancer patients and 30 normal donors revealed that ATF3 was accumulated in skin cancer tissues. Functional assays demonstrated that ATF3 significantly promoted skin cancer cell proliferation. Mechanically, ATF3 activated Stat3 phosphorylation in skin cancer cell through regulation of p53 expression. Moreover, the promotion effect of ATF3 on skin cancer cell proliferation was dependent on the p53-Stat3 signaling cascade. Together, the results indicate that ATF3 might promote skin cancer cell proliferation and enhance skin keratinocyte tumor development through inhibiting p53 expression and then activating Stat3 phosphorylation.

  15. Computer vision techniques for the diagnosis of skin cancer

    CERN Document Server

    Celebi, M

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this volume is to summarize the state-of-the-art in the utilization of computer vision techniques in the diagnosis of skin cancer. Malignant melanoma is one of the most rapidly increasing cancers in the world. Early diagnosis is particularly important since melanoma can be cured with a simple excision if detected early. In recent years, dermoscopy has proved valuable in visualizing the morphological structures in pigmented lesions. However, it has also been shown that dermoscopy is difficult to learn and subjective. Newer technologies such as infrared imaging, multispectral imaging, and confocal microscopy, have recently come to the forefront in providing greater diagnostic accuracy. These imaging technologies presented in this book can serve as an adjunct to physicians and  provide automated skin cancer screening. Although computerized techniques cannot as yet provide a definitive diagnosis, they can be used to improve biopsy decision-making as well as early melanoma detection, especially for pa...

  16. Detection of Melanoma Skin Cancer in Dermoscopy Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltayef, Khalid; Li, Yongmin; Liu, Xiaohui

    2017-02-01

    Malignant melanoma is the most hazardous type of human skin cancer and its incidence has been rapidly increasing. Early detection of malignant melanoma in dermoscopy images is very important and critical, since its detection in the early stage can be helpful to cure it. Computer Aided Diagnosis systems can be very helpful to facilitate the early detection of cancers for dermatologists. In this paper, we present a novel method for the detection of melanoma skin cancer. To detect the hair and several noises from images, pre-processing step is carried out by applying a bank of directional filters. And therefore, Image inpainting method is implemented to fill in the unknown regions. Fuzzy C-Means and Markov Random Field methods are used to delineate the border of the lesion area in the images. The method was evaluated on a dataset of 200 dermoscopic images, and superior results were produced compared to alternative methods.

  17. Quality of life in non-melanoma skin cancer--the skin cancer quality of life (SCQoL) questionnaire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinding, Gabrielle Randskov; Christensen, Karl Bang; Esmann, Solveig

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Disease-specific quality of life (QoL) questionnaires are increasingly used to provide patient-reported out-come measures in both malignant and non-malignant disease. OBJECTIVE: To create, validate and test the psychometrics of the Skin Cancer Quality of Life (SCQoL), which was design...

  18. Skin Cancer Education Materials: Selected Annotations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Cancer Inst. (NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    This annotated bibliography presents 85 entries on a variety of approaches to cancer education. The entries are grouped under three broad headings, two of which contain smaller sub-divisions. The first heading, Public Education, contains prevention and general information, and non-print materials. The second heading, Professional Education,…

  19. Experience of ReCell in Skin Cancer Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onur Gilleard

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The ReCell system (Avita Medical is a cell culture product that allows the immediate processingof a small split-thickness skin biopsy to produce a complete population of cells includingkeratinocytes, melanocytes, Langerhans cells and fibroblasts. This series is the first to highlightthe reconstructive applications of ReCell following ablative skin cancer surgery. The ReCell systemwas utilized for three patients following skin cancer excision. In two cases, the cells were appliedto forehead flap donor sites following nasal reconstruction. In one case, the cells were appliedto the calvarial periosteum following wide local excision of a melanoma scar. Assessment of thetreated area was performed using the patient and observer scar assessment scale after 1 year.The Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale (POSAS scores for the 2 patients treated withReCell following forehead flap surgery were 22 and 32. The score for the patient that underwentwide local excision of a melanoma scar was 45. The absence of a donor site, accelerated healingand the satisfactory aesthetic appearance of the mature scars in this series suggest that ReCellmay play a useful role in reconstruction following skin cancer excision.

  20. [Assessment of clinical diagnostic accuracy for skin cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemelman, Viviana; Valenzuela, Carlos Y; Fich, Félix; Roa, Johanna; Fisch, Felix; Road, Johanna; Honeyman, Juan

    2003-12-01

    There is an increase in the incidence rates of skin cancer in Chile. To study the clinical diagnostic accuracy (CDA) for skin cancer. CDA was defined as the percentage of agreement between clinical and pathological diagnosis. Approximately 600,000 pathological reports from five hospitals in Santiago were reviewed. A total of 2,593 skin tumours; 230 Malignant Melanoma (MM); 412 Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC) and 1,951 Basal Cell Carcinoma (BCC) were studied. These tumours were clinically diagnosed and surgically treated by dermatologists. The CDA was studied for each tumour, by the anatomical localization of the tumour, Breslow Index in MM, by age and sex of the patient. The highest CDA was observed for BCC (76.2%); followed by MM (64.3%) and SCC (34.7%). By anatomical localization, for MM the highest CDA was observed in the soles (p < 0.05); for BCC, the highest CDA was in the face (p < 0.05). No significant differences were observed in SCC. By age, for MM, the CDA was higher in patients aged less than 50 years. No differences in CDA by age were observed in the other two tumours. By sex, no differences were found. A higher CDA was found in MM with Breslow indexes III and IV than for MM with Breslow indexes I and II. CDA is affected by the clinical variables analyzed in this study. A more accurate clinical diagnosis of skin cancer could be obtained taking into account these variables.

  1. Rapid visualization of non-melanoma skin cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Ethan; Mann, Margaret; Honda, Kord; Vidimos, Allison; Schluchter, Mark; Straight, Brian; Bogyo, Matthew; Popkin, Daniel; Basilion, James P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS) examines all margins of the resected sample and has a 99% cure rate. However, many non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSCs) are not readily amenable for MMS. This defines an unmet clinical need to assess the completeness of non-MMS resections during surgery to prevent re-excision/recurrence. Objective Examine the utility of quenched activity-based probe (QABP) imaging to discriminate cancerous versus normal skin tissue. Methods The QABP GB119 was applied to NMSC excised from 68 patients. We validated activation of the probe for H&E confirmed cancerous tissue versus normal skin tissue. Results Topical application of the probe differentiated basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) from normal skin with overall estimated sensitivity and specificity [95% CI] of 0.989 [0.940–1.00] and 0.894 [0.769–0.965], respectively. Probe activation accurately defined peripheral margins of NMSC as compared to conventional H&E based pathology. Limitations This study only examined NMSC debulking excision specimens. The sensitivity and specificity for this approach using final NMSC excision margins will be clinically important. Conclusions These findings merit further studies to determine whether QABP technology may enable cost-effective increased cure rates for NMSC patients by reducing re-excision and recurrence rates with a rapid and easily interpretable technological advance. PMID:27876303

  2. Experience of ReCell in Skin Cancer Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onur Gilleard

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The ReCell system (Avita Medical is a cell culture product that allows the immediate processing of a small split-thickness skin biopsy to produce a complete population of cells including keratinocytes, melanocytes, Langerhans cells and fibroblasts. This series is the first to highlight the reconstructive applications of ReCell following ablative skin cancer surgery. The ReCell system was utilized for three patients following skin cancer excision. In two cases, the cells were applied to forehead flap donor sites following nasal reconstruction. In one case, the cells were applied to the calvarial periosteum following wide local excision of a melanoma scar. Assessment of the treated area was performed using the patient and observer scar assessment scale after 1 year. The Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale (POSAS scores for the 2 patients treated with ReCell following forehead flap surgery were 22 and 32. The score for the patient that underwent wide local excision of a melanoma scar was 45. The absence of a donor site, accelerated healing and the satisfactory aesthetic appearance of the mature scars in this series suggest that ReCell may play a useful role in reconstruction following skin cancer excision.

  3. The frequency of cancer predisposition gene mutations in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer patients in Taiwan: From BRCA1/2 to multi-gene panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Pi-Lin; Wen, Kuo-Chang; Chen, Yi-Jen; Chao, Ta-Chung; Tsai, Yi-Fang; Tseng, Ling-Ming; Qiu, Jian-Tai Timothy; Chao, Kuan-Chong; Wu, Hua-Hsi; Chuang, Chi-Mu

    2017-01-01

    An important role of genetic factors in the development of breast cancer (BC) or ovarian cancer (OC) in Taiwanese (ethnic Chinese) patients has been suggested. However, other than germline BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations, which are related to hereditary breast-ovarian cancer (HBOC), cancer-predisposition genes have not been well studied in this population. The aim of the present study was to more accurately summarize the prevalence of genetic mutations in HBOC patients using various gene panels ranging in size from BRCA1/2 alone to multi-gene panels. Among 272 HBOC patients analyzed, the prevalence of BRCA1, BRCA2 and non-BRCA1/2 pathogenic mutations was 7.7% (21/272), 6.8% (16/236) and 8.2% (13/159), respectively. The total mutation rate was 18.4% (50/272). Although no founder mutations were identified in this study, two recurrent mutations, BRCA1 (c.3607C>T) and BRCA2 (c.5164_5165 delAG), were found. The main pathogenic/likely pathogenic mutations in non-BRCA1/2 genes included ATM, BRIP1, FANCI, MSH2, MUYTH, RAD50, RAD51C and TP53. The prevalence rate of gene mutations in HBOC patients did not differ with respect to whether BC or OC was the first diagnosis or they presented a family history of the disease or their age at diagnosis. HBOC patients with both BC and OC exhibited a higher prevalence rate of mutations (50.0%) than patients with OC (25.0%) or BC (8.6%) alone. In conclusion, evaluation of hereditary cancer risk in Taiwan HBOC patients, particularly individuals with double cancer, is strongly encouraged. Panel testing can yield additional genomic information, and widespread and well-designed panel testing will help in assessing more accurate mutational prevalence of risk genes. PMID:28961279

  4. The frequency of cancer predisposition gene mutations in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer patients in Taiwan: From BRCA1/2 to multi-gene panels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Pi-Lin; Wen, Kuo-Chang; Chen, Yi-Jen; Chao, Ta-Chung; Tsai, Yi-Fang; Tseng, Ling-Ming; Qiu, Jian-Tai Timothy; Chao, Kuan-Chong; Wu, Hua-Hsi; Chuang, Chi-Mu; Wang, Peng-Hui; Huang, Chi-Ying F

    2017-01-01

    An important role of genetic factors in the development of breast cancer (BC) or ovarian cancer (OC) in Taiwanese (ethnic Chinese) patients has been suggested. However, other than germline BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations, which are related to hereditary breast-ovarian cancer (HBOC), cancer-predisposition genes have not been well studied in this population. The aim of the present study was to more accurately summarize the prevalence of genetic mutations in HBOC patients using various gene panels ranging in size from BRCA1/2 alone to multi-gene panels. Among 272 HBOC patients analyzed, the prevalence of BRCA1, BRCA2 and non-BRCA1/2 pathogenic mutations was 7.7% (21/272), 6.8% (16/236) and 8.2% (13/159), respectively. The total mutation rate was 18.4% (50/272). Although no founder mutations were identified in this study, two recurrent mutations, BRCA1 (c.3607C>T) and BRCA2 (c.5164_5165 delAG), were found. The main pathogenic/likely pathogenic mutations in non-BRCA1/2 genes included ATM, BRIP1, FANCI, MSH2, MUYTH, RAD50, RAD51C and TP53. The prevalence rate of gene mutations in HBOC patients did not differ with respect to whether BC or OC was the first diagnosis or they presented a family history of the disease or their age at diagnosis. HBOC patients with both BC and OC exhibited a higher prevalence rate of mutations (50.0%) than patients with OC (25.0%) or BC (8.6%) alone. In conclusion, evaluation of hereditary cancer risk in Taiwan HBOC patients, particularly individuals with double cancer, is strongly encouraged. Panel testing can yield additional genomic information, and widespread and well-designed panel testing will help in assessing more accurate mutational prevalence of risk genes.

  5. An individual with both MUTYH-associated polyposis and Lynch syndrome identified by multi-gene hereditary cancer panel testing: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie A Cohen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The utilization of next-generation sequencing technology to interrogate multiple genes simultaneously is being utilized more frequently in hereditary cancer testing. While this has benefits of reducing cost and allowing clinicians to cast a wide net in the elucidation of their patient’s cancer, panel testing has the potential to reveal unexpected information. We report on a proband with pathogenic variants resulting in two different hereditary colon cancer syndromes.A 39-year-old male with a history of colon cancer, more than 20 colon polyps and a family history of colon cancer presented for genetic counseling. Testing with a 7-gene high-risk hereditary colon cancer panel identified a homozygous pathogenic variant, c.1187G>A (p.Gly396Asp in MUTYH, and a likely pathogenic duplication of exon 7 in MSH2. Since this test result, the proband’s mother was diagnosed with colon cancer; subsequent genetic testing confirmed she also carries the likely pathogenic duplication in the MSH2 gene.Although the cancer risk in individuals who carry multiple pathogenic variants has not been established for combined biallelic MUTYH-associated polyposis and Lynch syndrome, the identification of multiple pathogenic variants does allow for screening for cancers associated with both syndromes and has implications for cancer risk for family members. In particular, this has significant impact on those who test negative for a known familial pathogenic variant, yet could be still be at risk for cancer due to a second pathogenic variant in a family. More information is needed on the frequency of occurrence of multiple pathogenic variants, as well as the phenotypic spectrum when multiple pathogenic variants are present.

  6. Recontouring, resurfacing, and scar revision in skin cancer reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Michael J; Perro, Christopher A

    2009-08-01

    Residual disfigurement is a common problem for patients who have undergone skin cancer reconstruction. Restoring form and function in these patients is an artistic and technical endeavor. The efficacy of surgical scar revision, dermabrasion, chemical peels, and laser resurfacing is predicated upon the skin's innate ability to regenerate over time in response to mechanical, chemical, and thermal or ablative stresses. The patient and surgeon should be accepting of a process that is often gradual and may proceed in stages. Achieving proficiency with the secondary procedures for improving scars and local flaps may allow the motivated surgeon to mold an initially passable surgical result into an excellent one.

  7. Photodynamic therapy for nonmelanoma skin cancers. Current review and update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitouni, Nathalie C; Oseroff, Allan R; Shieh, Sherry

    2003-07-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a therapeutic modality involving the use of a photosensitizing agent activated by light to destroy tumor cells. Over the past 25 years, PDT has been shown useful in the treatment of actinic keratoses and certain nonmelanoma skin cancers, such as Bowen's disease and basal cell carcinoma. We review the current data available for PDT with systemic photofrin and topical 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA). PDT offers many advantages including its non-invasiveness and its ability to treat multiple lesions simultaneously and is, therefore, an interesting alternative for treating certain skin malignancies.

  8. Skin cancer: role of ultraviolet radiation in carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancebo, Silvia E; Wang, Steven Q

    2014-01-01

    UV radiation is a carcinogen known to play a role in the development of non-melanoma and melanoma skin cancers. Acute and chronic exposure to UV radiation causes clinical and biological effects that promote the unregulated proliferation of skin cells. In recent decades, changes in climate and increased air pollution have led to environmental changes that increase UV light transmission. In this chapter, we discuss sources of UV radiation that are relevant to human health, as well as the acute and chronic effects that result from UV radiation exposure.

  9. Skin deep: Coverage of skin cancer and recreational tanning in Canadian women's magazines (2000-2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWhirter, Jennifer E; Hoffman-Goetz, Laurie

    2015-06-18

    Skin cancer is a significant public health problem among Canadians. Knowledge and attitudes about health are informed by mass media. The aim of our study was to describe the volume and nature of coverage of skin cancer and recreational tanning in Canadian women's magazines. Directed content analysis on article text and images in six popular Canadian women's magazines (Chatelaine, Canadian Living, Homemakers, Flare, FASHION, ELLE Canada) from 2000-2012 with attention to risk factors, ultraviolet radiation (UV) exposure and protection behaviours, and early detection. Six popular American women's magazines were used for a between-country comparison. There were 154 articles (221 images) about skin cancer and tanning published over 13 years. Volume of coverage did not increase in a linear fashion over time. The most common risk factor reported on was UV exposure (39%), with other risk factors less frequently identified. Although 72% of articles promoted sunscreen use, little content encouraged other protection behaviours. Only 15% of articles and 1% of images discouraged indoor tanning, while 41% of articles and 53% of images promoted the tanned look as attractive. Few articles (<11%) reported on early detection. Relative to American magazines, Canadian magazines had a greater proportion of content that encouraged sunscreen use and promoted the tanned look and a lesser proportion of content on risk factors and early detection. Skin cancer and tanning messages in Canadian women's magazines had a narrow focus and provided limited information on risk factors or screening. Conflicting messages about prevention (text vs. images) may contribute to harmful UV behaviours among Canadian women.

  10. Identification of a comprehensive spectrum of genetic factors for hereditary breast cancer in a Chinese population by next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaochen; Wu, Jiong; Lu, Jingsong; Liu, Guangyu; Di, Genhong; Chen, Canming; Hou, Yifeng; Sun, Menghong; Yang, Wentao; Xu, Xiaojing; Zhao, Ying; Hu, Xin; Li, Daqiang; Cao, Zhigang; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Huang, Xiaoyan; Liu, Zhebin; Chen, Huan; Gu, Yanzi; Chi, Yayun; Yan, Xia; Han, Qixia; Shen, Zhenzhou; Shao, Zhimin; Hu, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    The genetic etiology of hereditary breast cancer has not been fully elucidated. Although germline mutations of high-penetrance genes such as BRCA1/2 are implicated in development of hereditary breast cancers, at least half of all breast cancer families are not linked to these genes. To identify a comprehensive spectrum of genetic factors for hereditary breast cancer in a Chinese population, we performed an analysis of germline mutations in 2,165 coding exons of 152 genes associated with hereditary cancer using next-generation sequencing (NGS) in 99 breast cancer patients from families of cancer patients regardless of cancer types. Forty-two deleterious germline mutations were identified in 21 genes of 34 patients, including 18 (18.2%) BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations, 3 (3%) TP53 mutations, 5 (5.1%) DNA mismatch repair gene mutations, 1 (1%) CDH1 mutation, 6 (6.1%) Fanconi anemia pathway gene mutations, and 9 (9.1%) mutations in other genes. Of seven patients who carried mutations in more than one gene, 4 were BRCA1/2 mutation carriers, and their average onset age was much younger than patients with only BRCA1/2 mutations. Almost all identified high-penetrance gene mutations in those families fulfill the typical phenotypes of hereditary cancer syndromes listed in the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines, except two TP53 and three mismatch repair gene mutations. Furthermore, functional studies of MSH3 germline mutations confirmed the association between MSH3 mutation and tumorigenesis, and segregation analysis suggested antagonism between BRCA1 and MSH3. We also identified a lot of low-penetrance gene mutations. Although the clinical significance of those newly identified low-penetrance gene mutations has not been fully appreciated yet, these new findings do provide valuable epidemiological information for the future studies. Together, these findings highlight the importance of genetic testing based on NCCN guidelines and a multi-gene analysis using NGS

  11. Identification of a comprehensive spectrum of genetic factors for hereditary breast cancer in a Chinese population by next-generation sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaochen Yang

    Full Text Available The genetic etiology of hereditary breast cancer has not been fully elucidated. Although germline mutations of high-penetrance genes such as BRCA1/2 are implicated in development of hereditary breast cancers, at least half of all breast cancer families are not linked to these genes. To identify a comprehensive spectrum of genetic factors for hereditary breast cancer in a Chinese population, we performed an analysis of germline mutations in 2,165 coding exons of 152 genes associated with hereditary cancer using next-generation sequencing (NGS in 99 breast cancer patients from families of cancer patients regardless of cancer types. Forty-two deleterious germline mutations were identified in 21 genes of 34 patients, including 18 (18.2% BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations, 3 (3% TP53 mutations, 5 (5.1% DNA mismatch repair gene mutations, 1 (1% CDH1 mutation, 6 (6.1% Fanconi anemia pathway gene mutations, and 9 (9.1% mutations in other genes. Of seven patients who carried mutations in more than one gene, 4 were BRCA1/2 mutation carriers, and their average onset age was much younger than patients with only BRCA1/2 mutations. Almost all identified high-penetrance gene mutations in those families fulfill the typical phenotypes of hereditary cancer syndromes listed in the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN guidelines, except two TP53 and three mismatch repair gene mutations. Furthermore, functional studies of MSH3 germline mutations confirmed the association between MSH3 mutation and tumorigenesis, and segregation analysis suggested antagonism between BRCA1 and MSH3. We also identified a lot of low-penetrance gene mutations. Although the clinical significance of those newly identified low-penetrance gene mutations has not been fully appreciated yet, these new findings do provide valuable epidemiological information for the future studies. Together, these findings highlight the importance of genetic testing based on NCCN guidelines and a multi-gene analysis

  12. Triage amalgamated dermoscopic algorithm (TADA) for skin cancer screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Tova; Marino, Maria; Dusza, Stephen W.; Bajaj, Shirin; Marchetti, Michael A.; Marghoob, Ashfaq

    2017-01-01

    Importance Dermoscopic triage algorithms have been shown to improve beginners’ abilities for identifying pigmented skin lesions requiring biopsy. Objective To estimate the diagnostic accuracy of the Triage Amalgamated Dermoscopic Algorithm (TADA) for pigmented and nonpigmented skin cancers. Secondarily, to compare TADAs performance to those of existing triage algorithms for the identification of pigmented skin cancers. Design Cross-sectional, observational, reader study that took place at a beginner and intermediate level dermoscopy course. Participants Two hundred medical professionals of various specialties attended the course and 120 voluntarily joined the study (60% participation rate). Exposures After receiving basic dermoscopy training, participants evaluated 50 polarized, dermoscopic images of pigmented (22 benign, 18 malignant) and nonpigmented (1 benign, 9 malignant) skin lesions using TADA. Pigmented lesions were also evaluated using the Three-Point Checklist and AC Rule. With TADA, participants first determined if a lesion was an unequivocal angioma, dermatofibroma, or seborrheic keratosis, which would exclude it from further evaluation. All other lesions were assessed for architectural disorder, starburst pattern, blue-black or gray color, shiny white structures, negative network, ulcer/erosion, or vessels. Any one feature indicated suspicion for malignancy. Results Most participants were dermatologists (n=64, 53.3%) or primary care physicians (n=41, 34.2%), and many lacked previous dermoscopy training (n=52, 43.3%). TADA’s sensitivity and specificity for all skin cancers was 94.6% (95% CI=93.4–95.7%) and 72.5% (95% CI=70.1–74.7%), respectively. For pigmented skin cancers, the sensitivity and specificity were 94.0% (95% CI=92.9–95.0%) and 75.5% (95% CI=73.8–77.2%). This compared to 71.9% (95%CI=69.8–73.9%) and 81.4% (95%CI=79.7–83.0%) for the Three-Point Checklist and 88.6% (95%CI=87.1–89.9%) and 78.7% (95%CI=76.9–80.3%) for the AC

  13. Mutational analysis ofBRCA1andBRCA2genes in Peruvian families with hereditary breast and ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buleje, Jose; Guevara-Fujita, Maria; Acosta, Oscar; Huaman, Francia D P; Danos, Pierina; Murillo, Alexis; Pinto, Joseph A; Araujo, Jhajaira M; Aguilar, Alfredo; Ponce, Jaime; Vigil, Carlos; Castaneda, Carlos; Calderon, Gabriela; Gomez, Henry L; Fujita, Ricardo

    2017-09-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most prevalent malignancies in the world. In Peru, breast cancer is the second cause of death among women. Five to ten percent of patients present a high genetic predisposition due to BRCA1 and BRCA2 germline mutations. We performed a comprehensive analysis of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes by Sanger sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) to detect large rearrangements in patients from 18 families, which met the criteria for hereditary breast cancer. In this series, we found four pathogenic mutations, three previously reported ( BRCA1 : c.302-1G>C and c.815_824dup10; BRCA2 : c.5946delT) and a duplication of adenines in exon 15 in BRCA1 gene (c.4647_4648dupAA, ClinVar SCV000256598.1). We also found two exonic and four intronic variants of unknown significance and 28 polymorphic variants. This is the first report to determine the spectrum of mutations in the BRCA1/BRCA2 genes in Peruvian families selected by clinical and genetic criteria. The alteration rate in BRCA1/BRCA2 with proven pathogenic mutation was 22.2% (4 out 18) and this finding could be influenced by the reduced sample size or clinical criteria. In addition, we found three known BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations and a BRCA1 c.4647_4648dupAA as a novel pathogenic mutation.

  14. Novel fumarate hydratase mutation in a family with atypical uterine leiomyomas and hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Karen C; Warr, Dillon J; Warsetsky, Sarah I; Barmat, Larry I

    2016-01-01

    To describe a novel mutation in the fumarate hydratase (FH) gene in a family with atypical uterine leiomyomas. Case report and review of the literature. Academic community hospital. Three sisters who presented as nulligravidas aged 27-30 years with large atypical uterine leiomyomas. Abdominal myomectomy, robotic myomectomy, hysterectomy, gene sequencing. Identification of a family with hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC) syndrome and a novel mutation in the FH gene. Two of the three sisters tested positive for a novel FH mutation p.Leu99Glufsx6. The eldest sister was clinically diagnosed with HLRCC. The patients' father also carries the same mutation in the FH gene. The patients and their father are now undergoing yearly screening for renal cancer. Patients with HLRCC are at risk for developing renal cancer as well as losing their fertility via early hysterectomy. Physicians must be aware of this condition and refer at-risk individuals for genetic testing. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Frequent alterations of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathways in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekstrand, Anna Isinger; Jönsson, Mats; Lindblom, Annika

    2010-01-01

    The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases-AKT-mammalian target of rapamycin pathway (PI3K/AKT/mTOR) is central in colorectal tumors. Data on its role in hereditary cancers are, however, scarce and we therefore characterized mutations in PIK3CA and KRAS, and expression of PIK3CA, phosphorylated AKT...... and PTEN in 58 HNPCC-associated colorectal cancers. Derangements of at least one of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR components analyzed were found in 51/58 (88%) tumors. Mutations in PIK3CA and KRAS were identified in 14 and 31% of the tumors respectively. Overexpression of PIK3CA and phosphorylated AKT occurred in 59...... and 75% and were strongly associated (P = 0.005). Reduced/lost PTEN expression was found in 63% of the tumors. Though HNPCC-associated colorectal cancers show simple genetic profiles with few chromosomal alterations, we demonstrate frequent and repeated targeting of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway, which...

  16. A population-based study of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer: evidence of pathologic and genetic heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warden, G; Harnett, D; Green, J; Wish, T; Woods, M O; Green, R; Dicks, E; Rahman, P; Zhai, G; Parfrey, P

    2013-12-01

    Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) may be the result of Lynch syndrome (LS) caused by mutations in mismatch repair (MMR) genes, a syndrome of unknown etiology called familial colorectal cancer type-X (FCCTX), or familial serrated neoplasia associated with the colorectal cancer (CRC) somatic BRAF mutation. To determine the cause of HNPCC in the founder population of the island of Newfoundland, we studied 37 families with LS and 29 families without LS who fulfilled the Amsterdam I criteria. In non-LS, four index CRCs were BRAF mutation positive, one of which was microsatellite instable. Geographic clustering of LS families caused by three different founder mutations in MSH2 was observed. Nine unique MMR mutations in four MMR genes were identified in single families distributed in different geographic isolates. The geographic distribution of non-LS was similar to LS. The coefficient of relatedness using genotype data was significantly higher for non-LS than for all CRC. Extensive genealogic investigation failed to connect non-LS families and in some clusters pathologic CRC heterogeneity was observed. We conclude that non-LS HNPCC may be a heterogeneous disorder with different pathogenic pathways, and that the geographic distribution is consistent with multiple different mutations in unknown CRC susceptibility gene(s). © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Profile of skin biopsies and patterns of skin cancer in a tertiary care center of Western Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ajay; Shrestha, Prashanna Raj; Pun, Jenny; Thapa, Pratichya; Manandhar, Merina; Sathian, Brijesh

    2015-01-01

    Skin biopsy is the method to assist clinicians to make definite dermatological diagnosis which further helps in holistic management. Skin cancers are relatively rare clinical diagnosis in developing countries like Nepal, but the prevalence is on rise. To investigate the profile of skin biopsies and frequencies and pattern of skin cancers in a tertiary care centre of Western Nepal. The materials consisted of 434 biopsies (1.37%) out of 31,450 OPD visits performed in the Department of Dermatology, Manipal Teaching Hospital, Pokhara, Nepal, during the period of Dec 2011-Nov 2014. Data were collected and analyzed using SPSS-16 with reference to incidence, age, sex, race and clinical and histopathological features. The commonest disorders observed in biopsies were papulosquamous lesions, skin tuberculosis of different types, benign skin tumors, leprosy, collagen and fungal diseases. Viral diseases were rarely seen, probably due to straight forward clinical diagnosis. Dermatological malignancies accounted for 55/434 (12.67%) of biopsies. Skin disorders in general were commoner in females 280/434 (64%), including malignancies 32/55(58.2%). Mean age of patients with skin cancer was 54.5 years. Facilities for proper laboratory investigation of dermatological disorders will improve the quality of life. The most prevalent lesion in skin biopsies was papulosquamous disorders followed by skin tuberculosis of different types. Dermatological malignancy constituted 55/434 (12.67%) cases. The prevalence of skin malignancy is on rise in Nepalese society probably due to increase in life expectancy and better diagnostic services.

  18. The role of optical radiations in skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, Fabrizio; Palla, Marco; Di Trolio, Rossella; Mozzillo, Nicola; Ascierto, Paolo A

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Electromagnetic radiation with wavelength in the range 100 nm to 1 mm is known as optical radiation and includes ultraviolet radiation, the visible spectrum, and infrared radiation. The deleterious short- and long-term biological effects of ultraviolet radiation, including melanoma and other skin cancers, are well recognized. Infrared radiation may also have damaging biological effects. Methods. The objective of this review was to assess the literature over the last 15 years and to summarize correlations between exposure to optical radiation and the risk of melanoma and other cancers. Results. There is a clear correlation between exposure to UV radiation and the development of skin cancer. Most importantly, a strong association between artificial UV radiation exposure, for example, tanning devices, and the risk of melanoma and squamous cell carcinoma has been clearly demonstrated. There is no clear evidence that exposure to IR and laser radiation may increase the risk of skin cancer, although negative health effects have been observed. Conclusions. Preventative strategies that involve provision of public information highlighting the risks associated with exposure to sunlight remain important. In addition, precautionary measures that discourage exposure to tanning appliances are required, as is legislation to prevent their use during childhood.

  19. Skin Cancer: ClinicoPathological Study of 204 Patients in Southern Governorates of Yemen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlZou, Amer Bin; Thabit, Mazen Abood Bin; AlSakkaf, Khalid Abdulla; Basaleem, Huda Omer

    2016-01-01

    Skin cancer is a group of heterogeneous malignancies, in general classified into nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) and melanoma skin cancer (MSC). Incidences are high in many parts in the world with considerable geographical and racial variation. In the Yemen, there has been scarce information about skin cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the demographic characteristics and histological trend of skin cancer in Southern Governorates of Yemen. This retrospective study covered 204 cases of skin cancer at the Modern Histopathology Laboratory and Aden Cancer Registry and Research Center, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Aden, for the period 20062013. Data were classified regarding different demographic and tumor related variables and analyzed using CanReg4 for cancer registry and SPSS (version 21). The commonest encountered skin cancer was NMSC (93.1%). Generally, skin cancer appears slightly more frequently in females than males with a 1:1.06 male: female ratio, with a mean age of 62.9 years. Slightly higher than onethird (36.3%) were from Aden governorate. The head and neck proved to be the most common site in both males and females (58%). Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common histological type of skin cancer (50.5%). Skin cancer is a common cancer in patients living in southern governorates of Yemen. The pattern appears nearly similar to the international figures with a low incidence of MSC.

  20. Preparing young people for future decision-making about cancer risk in families affected or at risk from hereditary breast cancer: A qualitative interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Emma; Plumridge, Gill; Considine, Anna-Marie; Metcalfe, Alison

    2016-12-01

    Women carrying the mutated BRCA gene, have approximately an 80% life-time risk of developing breast cancer with 50% risk of their children inheriting the gene mutation. Many parents find it difficult to know when and how to disclose this information to their children and how such disclosure might affect their child's future decision-making. This study explored the communication of genetic risk information in families using qualitative semi-structured interviews conducted with parents, children (7-11years) and young people (12-18years) affected or at risk from a BRCA gene mutation. Thematic analysis was applied to coded transcripts producing four themes; family communication, perception of cancer risks, risk management strategies and impact of genetic risk communication in children and young people's decision making. Twenty-seven individuals from 11 families took part, recruited through purposive sampling techniques. Cancer risk caused by a BRCA gene mutation induced a sense of fear in parents about their children's future. As a result, parents with hereditary breast cancer disclosed limited information about the risks associated with prophylactic surgery and/or the psychological and emotional impacts of surgery on body image. This had implications to children and young people's perceptions of prophylactic procedures, which were already influenced by cultural understandings of the 'desirable body' and increasing acceptance and proliferation cosmetic surgery. Lack of risk management information and the acculturation of cosmetic surgery combined to limit children and young people's understanding of the impact of hereditary breast cancer; reducing their ability to actualise the physiological, psychological and emotional consequences of surgery. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. A hyperspectral fluorescence lifetime probe for skin cancer diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Beule, P. A. A.; Dunsby, C.; Galletly, N. P.; Stamp, G. W.; Chu, A. C.; Anand, U.; Anand, P.; Benham, C. D.; Naylor, A.; French, P. M. W.

    2007-12-01

    The autofluorescence of biological tissue can be exploited for the detection and diagnosis of disease but, to date, its complex nature and relatively weak signal levels have impeded its widespread application in biology and medicine. We present here a portable instrument designed for the in situ simultaneous measurement of autofluorescence emission spectra and temporal decay profiles, permitting the analysis of complex fluorescence signals. This hyperspectral fluorescence lifetime probe utilizes two ultrafast lasers operating at 355 and 440nm that can excite autofluorescence from many different biomolecules present in skin tissue including keratin, collagen, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate), and flavins. The instrument incorporates an optical fiber probe to provide sample illumination and fluorescence collection over a millimeter-sized area. We present a description of the system, including spectral and temporal characterizations, and report the preliminary application of this instrument to a study of recently resected (skin lesions, illustrating its potential for skin cancer detection and diagnosis.

  2. Brachytherapy in the treatment of skin cancer: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skowronek, Janusz

    2015-10-01

    The incidence of skin cancer worldwide is constantly growing and it is the most frequently diagnosed tumor. Brachytherapy (BT) in particular localizations is a valuable tool of the exact radiation depot inside the tumor mass. In localizations such as the face, skull skin and inoperable tumors, relapses after surgery, radiotherapy are usually not suitable for primary or secondary invasive treatment. Brachytherapy is a safe procedure for organs at risk according to rapid fall of a dose outside the axis of the applicator with satisfactory dose localization inside the target. The complications rate is acceptable and treatment costs are low. In some tumors (great skin lesions in the scalp, near eyes or on the nose) BT allows for a great dose reduction in surrounding healthy tissues. Brachytherapy provides minimal dose delivery to surrounding healthy tissue, thus enabling good functional and cosmetic results. Treatment is possible almost in all cases on an outpatient basis.

  3. Rare copy number variants observed in hereditary breast cancer cases disrupt genes in estrogen signaling and TP53 tumor suppression network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katri Pylkäs

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women in developed countries, and the contribution of genetic susceptibility to breast cancer development has been well-recognized. However, a great proportion of these hereditary predisposing factors still remain unidentified. To examine the contribution of rare copy number variants (CNVs in breast cancer predisposition, high-resolution genome-wide scans were performed on genomic DNA of 103 BRCA1, BRCA2, and PALB2 mutation negative familial breast cancer cases and 128 geographically matched healthy female controls; for replication an independent cohort of 75 similarly mutation negative young breast cancer patients was used. All observed rare variants were confirmed by independent methods. The studied breast cancer cases showed a consistent increase in the frequency of rare CNVs when compared to controls. Furthermore, the biological networks of the disrupted genes differed between the two groups. In familial cases the observed mutations disrupted genes, which were significantly overrepresented in cellular functions related to maintenance of genomic integrity, including DNA double-strand break repair (P = 0.0211. Biological network analysis in the two independent breast cancer cohorts showed that the disrupted genes were closely related to estrogen signaling and TP53 centered tumor suppressor network. These results suggest that rare CNVs represent an alternative source of genetic variation influencing hereditary risk for breast cancer.

  4. Rare copy number variants observed in hereditary breast cancer cases disrupt genes in estrogen signaling and TP53 tumor suppression network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pylkäs, Katri; Vuorela, Mikko; Otsukka, Meeri; Kallioniemi, Anne; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Winqvist, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women in developed countries, and the contribution of genetic susceptibility to breast cancer development has been well-recognized. However, a great proportion of these hereditary predisposing factors still remain unidentified. To examine the contribution of rare copy number variants (CNVs) in breast cancer predisposition, high-resolution genome-wide scans were performed on genomic DNA of 103 BRCA1, BRCA2, and PALB2 mutation negative familial breast cancer cases and 128 geographically matched healthy female controls; for replication an independent cohort of 75 similarly mutation negative young breast cancer patients was used. All observed rare variants were confirmed by independent methods. The studied breast cancer cases showed a consistent increase in the frequency of rare CNVs when compared to controls. Furthermore, the biological networks of the disrupted genes differed between the two groups. In familial cases the observed mutations disrupted genes, which were significantly overrepresented in cellular functions related to maintenance of genomic integrity, including DNA double-strand break repair (P = 0.0211). Biological network analysis in the two independent breast cancer cohorts showed that the disrupted genes were closely related to estrogen signaling and TP53 centered tumor suppressor network. These results suggest that rare CNVs represent an alternative source of genetic variation influencing hereditary risk for breast cancer.

  5. Preferences for multigene panel testing for hereditary breast cancer risk among ethnically diverse BRCA-uninformative families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicuña, Belinda; Delaney, Harold D; Flores, Kristina G; Ballinger, Lori; Royce, Melanie; Dayao, Zoneddy; Pal, Tuya; Kinney, Anita Y

    2017-10-02

    Until recently, genetic testing for hereditary breast cancer has primarily focused on pathogenic variants in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA) genes. However, advances in DNA sequencing technologies have made simultaneous testing for multiple genes possible. We examined correlates of interest in multigene panel testing and risk communication preferences in an ethnically diverse sample of women who tested negative for BRCA mutations previously but remain at high risk based on their family history (referred to as "BRCA-uninformative") and their at-risk female family members. Two-hundred and thirteen women with a previous breast cancer diagnosis and a BRCA-uninformative test result and their first-degree relatives completed a survey on interest in multigene panel testing, communication preferences, and sociodemographic, psychological, and clinical factors. Stepwise logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with testing interest. Chi-square analyses were used to test differences in risk communication preferences. Interest in multigene panel testing was high (84%) and did not considerably differ by cancer status or ethnicity. In multivariable analysis, factors significantly associated with interest in genetic testing were having had a mammogram in the past 2 years (odds ratio (OR) = 4.04, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.80-9.02) and high cancer worry (OR = 3.77, 95% CI 1.34-10.60). Overall, the most commonly preferred genetic communication modes were genetic counselors, oncologists, and print materials. However, non-Hispanic women were more likely than Hispanic women to prefer web-based risk communication (p testing. Cancer-related emotions and communication preferences should be considered in developing targeted genetic risk communication strategies.

  6. Multiple-gene panel analysis in a case series of 255 women with hereditary breast and ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedaldi, Gianluca; Tebaldi, Michela; Zampiga, Valentina; Danesi, Rita; Arcangeli, Valentina; Ravegnani, Mila; Cangini, Ilaria; Pirini, Francesca; Petracci, Elisabetta; Rocca, Andrea; Falcini, Fabio; Amadori, Dino; Calistri, Daniele

    2017-07-18

    As new genes predisposing to breast (BC) and ovarian cancer (OC) are constantly emerging, the use of panels of genes analyzed by Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) is increasing in clinical diagnostics. The identification of a large number of new germline mutations allows for deeper knowledge of cancer predisposition, although raising many questions about patient management.BC and OC patients recruited by our counseling service between 2012-2015 were included in this study. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood and a panel of 94 genes involved in hereditary tumors was analyzed by NGS. Patient clinical features of BC and OC and cancer family history were collected and compared to the patient genetic profile.A total of 255 women were analyzed, 57 of whom had a pathogenic mutation in BRCA1/2 genes, and 17 carried pathogenic mutations in other genes, such as PALB2, ATM, BRIP1, RAD51D, MSH6, PPM1D, RECQL4, ERCC3, TSC2, SLX4 and other Fanconi anemia genes.Patients with a pathogenic mutation in genes other than BRCA1 and BRCA2 showed no significant difference from the BRCA1/2-mutated carriers with respect to age at diagnosis and clinical features, suggesting that mutations in other genes could pose a high risk of cancer development.These patients had a much higher percentage of bilateral breast cancer (BBC) and a lower rate of OC than BRCA-mutated patients and patients with no pathogenic mutations: as a consequence, the surveillance protocol should be customized to the patient genetic characteristics.

  7. Early detection of skin cancer: experience of a skin cancer prevention campaign in Piauí-Brazil - doi: 10.5020/18061230.2012.p221

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Bandeira Lages

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the correlation between the diagnoses of skin cancer and known risk factors through analysis of data from the National Skin Cancer Prevention Campaign held by Brazilian Society of Dermatology in the state of Piauí, Brazil, in recent years. Methods: Cross-sectional descriptive and analytical report using quantitative data obtained from a prevention campaign in the state of Piauí, in 2009 and 2010. Collected data was submitted to a descriptive analysis, and multivariate logistic regression, using as dependent variable the skin cancer diagnosis. Results: In 2009 and 2010, this campaign was responsible for 1141 consultations, diagnosing 122 (10.7% cases of skin cancer: 108 basal cell carcinomas (BCC, 10 squamous cell (SCC and four melanomas. Of those examined, 35.4% were male, 73.1% reported inadequate sun protection, 16.4% had a family history of skin cancer and 7.2% had personal history. Those with history of skin cancer were 5.24 times more likely to have a new diagnosis of cancer, while those presenting non-black skin were 4.91 times more likely to diagnosis. Conclusion: Personal or family history of epithelial neoplasia, non-colored black skin and the male gender were associated to higher chances of developing skin cancer. In addition, unprotected sun exposure remains routine

  8. [Familial prostate cancer research: meaningfulness of hereditary criteria in view of demographic change].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herkommer, K; Heimpel, M; Gschwend, J E

    2014-12-01

    In view of demographic changes and previous research results, it is debatable whether hereditary criteria should be further applied when it comes to determining the status of prostate carcinoma (PC) patients. A total of 30,455 patients in the national research program "Familial Prostate Carcinoma" were divided into four groups based on birth year: I: 1920-1929 (n = 3.968), II: 1930-1939 (n = 14.110), III: 1940-1949 (n = 10.137), IV: 1950-1959 (n = 2.169). In all, 9.316 PC patients with a positive family history were analyzed with respect to their relatives (first degree). The average number of siblings (group I: 3.3; IV: 2.2), brothers (I: 2.1; IV: 1.3), children (I: 2.2; IV: 1.7), and sons (I: 1.1; IV: 0.9) have decreased. The number of patients without a brother/son (I: 9.6/32.8%; IV: 27.6/37.5%) has increased. In the same period of time, the number of patients with two brothers/sons (I: 34.5/6.3%; IV: 14.8/2.2 %) has decreased. The number of fathers > 65 years has risen from 66.8% (I) to 71.1% (IV). Hereditary criteria are less and less suited in order to determine the status of PC patients. However, positive family history remains one of the most crucial risk factors of prostate carcinoma and, therefore, detailed data ascertainment should be urged.

  9. Metal arc welding and the risk of skin cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heltoft, K N; Slagor, R M; Agner, T

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Arc welding produces the full spectrum of ultraviolet radiation and may be a contributory cause of skin cancer; however, there has been little research into this occupational hazard. The aim of this study is to explore if metal arc welding increases the risk of malignant melanoma and...... >30 years (n = 5). No statistically significant difference was observed for SCC. The risk of CMM at the neck was also significantly elevated after 30 years of welding, but this is based upon only one exposed case. CONCLUSION: This study indicates that long-term exposure to metal arc welding may...... be related to increased risk of BCC and AK located exclusively at the neck. The study provides no support for the hypothesis that welding exposure increases the risk for skin cancer at other locations....

  10. [Ultrasound in the management of non-melanoma skin cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández Ibáñez, C; Aguilar Bernier, M; de Troya Martín, M

    2015-11-01

    Cutaneous ultrasound plays an important role in the study and management of non-melanoma skin cancer. Among other factors, this technique contributes to the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of these tumours, the establishment of their size and relation to neighbouring structures, the delimitation of surgical margins, and the detection of subclinical and recurrent lesions. The present article analyses the role of cutaneous ultrasound in the field of non-melanoma skin cancer (basal and squamous cell carcinomas, lymphomas and dermatofibrosarcoma) through a literature review. Copyright © 2015 Academia Española de Dermatología y Venereología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. [The relationship between the ozone layer and skin cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez C, Francisca

    2006-09-01

    In the recent decades, a sustained increase in the worldwide incidence of skin cancer has been observed and Chile is not the exception. The most important risk factor is the exaggerated and repeated exposure to ultraviolet radiation coming from the sun. The ozone layer restricts the transmission of type B and C ultraviolet light. Since 1980, a sustained depletion of stratospheric ozone levels is occurring, specially in middle latitudes (-30 to -60). Along with this depletion, the amount of ultraviolet light that reaches the earth surface is increasing. This article reviews some basic concepts about the ozone layer and the association between its depletion and skin cancer. The general population should be informed about the risks of inadequate and exaggerated exposure to sunlight.

  12. Detection of human papillomavirus in nonmelanoma skin cancer lesions and healthy perilesional skin in kidney transplant recipients and immunocompetent patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernat-García, J; Morales Suárez-Varela, M; Vilata-Corell, J J; Marquina-Vila, A

    2014-04-01

    The influence of human papillomavirus (HPV) on the development of nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is a topic of debate. HPV types from the beta genus (HPV-β) have been most frequently associated with the development of skin cancer. To analyze the prevalence and range of HPV types in NMSC lesions and healthy perilesional skin in immunodepressed and immunocompetent patients and to evaluate the influence of various clinical factors on the prevalence of HPV in skin cancer. Nested polymerase chain reaction and sequencing were used to detect HPV in 120 NMSC samples obtained by biopsy from 30 kidney transplant recipients and 30 immunocompetent patients. In all cases, a sample was taken from the tumor site and the surrounding healthy skin. Potential confounders were assessed and the data analyzed by multivariate logistic regression. HPV DNA was detected in 44 (73.3%) of the 60 samples from immunodepressed patients and in 32 (53.3%) of the 60 samples from immunocompetent patients (adjusted odds ratio, 3.4; 95% CI, 1.2-9.6). In both groups of patients, HPV was more common in healthy perilesional skin than in lesional skin. HPV-β was the most common type isolated. We found a wide range of HPV types (mostly HPV-β) in the skin of kidney transplant recipients and immunocompetent patients with skin cancer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  13. Diagnosis of Malignant Melanoma of Skin Cancer Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Hassin Alasadi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Malignant melanoma is a kind of skin cancer that begins in melanocytes. It can influence on the skin only, or it may expand to the bones and organs. It is less common, but more serious and aggressive than other types of skin cancer. Malignant Melanoma can happen anywhere on the skin, but it is widespread in certain locations such as the legs in women, the back and chest in men, the face, the neck, mouth, eyes, and genitals. In this paper, a proposed algorithm is designed for diagnosing malignant melanoma types by using digital image processing techniques. The algorithm consists of four steps: preprocessing, separation, features extraction, and diagnosis. A neural network (NN used to diagnosis malignant melanoma types. The total accuracy of the neural network was 100% for training and 93% for testing. The evaluation of the algorithm is done by using sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy. The sensitivity of NN in diagnosing malignant melanoma types was 95.6%, while the specificity was 92.2% and the accuracy was 93.9%. The experimental results are acceptable.

  14. Obesity as a risk factor for malignant melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, K; Lindgren, T H; Koch, C A; Brodell, Robert T

    2016-09-01

    The dramatic increases in incidence of both obesity and many cancers including skin cancer emphasize the need to better understand the pathophysiology of both conditions and their connections. Melanoma is considered the fastest growing cancer and rates of non-melanoma skin cancer have also increased over the last decade. The molecular mechanisms underlying the association between obesity and skin cancer are not clearly understood but emerging evidence points to changes in the tumor microenvironment including aberrant cell signaling and genomic instability in the chronic inflammatory state many obese individuals experience. This article reviews the literature linking obesity to melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer.

  15. Three-Dimensional In Vitro Skin and Skin Cancer Models Based on Human Fibroblast-Derived Matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berning, Manuel; Prätzel-Wunder, Silke; Bickenbach, Jackie R; Boukamp, Petra

    2015-09-01

    Three-dimensional in vitro skin and skin cancer models help to dissect epidermal-dermal and tumor-stroma interactions. In the model presented here, normal human dermal fibroblasts isolated from adult skin self-assembled into dermal equivalents with their specific fibroblast-derived matrix (fdmDE) over 4 weeks. The fdmDE represented a complex human extracellular matrix that was stabilized by its own heterogeneous collagen fiber meshwork, largely resembling a human dermal in vivo architecture. Complemented with normal human epidermal keratinocytes, the skin equivalent (fdmSE) thereof favored the establishment of a well-stratified and differentiated epidermis and importantly allowed epidermal regeneration in vitro for at least 24 weeks. Moreover, the fdmDE could be used to study the features of cutaneous skin cancer. Complementing fdmDE with HaCaT cells in different stages of malignancy or tumor-derived cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma cell lines, the resulting skin cancer equivalents (fdmSCEs) recapitulated the respective degree of tumorigenicity. In addition, the fdmSCE invasion phenotypes correlated with their individual degree of tissue organization, disturbance in basement membrane organization, and presence of matrix metalloproteinases. Together, fdmDE-based models are well suited for long-term regeneration of normal human epidermis and, as they recapitulate tumor-specific growth, differentiation, and invasion profiles of cutaneous skin cancer cells, also provide an excellent human in vitro skin cancer model.

  16. Viral oncogenesis and its role in nonmelanoma skin cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tuttleton Arron, S

    2011-06-01

    In recent years, the contribution of viruses to cutaneous oncogenesis has steadily gained recognition. The archetype is human herpesvirus 8, which is well established as the causative agent in Kaposi sarcoma. Other viruses believed to play a role in nonmelanoma skin cancer include human papillomavirus and the recently described Merkel cell polyomavirus. We review the mechanisms by which these three viruses interact with the host cell, ultraviolet radiation and immunosuppression to result in carcinogenesis.

  17. Evaluation of selenium in biological sample of arsenic exposed female skin lesions and skin cancer patients with related to non-exposed skin cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolachi, Nida F.; Kazi, Tasneem G., E-mail: tgkazi@yahoo.com; Wadhwa, Sham K.; Afridi, Hassan I.; Baig, Jameel A.; Khan, Sumaira; Shah, Faheem

    2011-08-01

    The antagonistic effects between selenium (Se) and arsenic (As) suggest that low Se status plays an important role in arsenism development. The objective of present study was to assess Se contents in biological samples of As exposed females have skin lesions and cancer with related to non-exposed skin cancer patients. The biological samples (blood and scalp hair) of As exposed group comprises, female skin cancer (ESC) patients admitted in cancer hospitals have skin lesions (ESL) and exposed referents have not both diseases (ER), belongs to As exposed area of Pakistan. For comparative purposes, age matched female skin cancerous patient (RP) and non-cancerous females (NER) belong to non-exposed areas were also selected. The As and Se in acid digests of biological samples were pre-concentrated by complexing with chelating agent (ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate), and resulted complexes were extracted into non-ionic extractant (Triton X-114), prior to analysis by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. The enhancement factor of about 25 was obtained by pre-concentrating 10 mL of sample solutions. The accuracy of the optimized procedure was evaluated by using certified reference material (BCR 397) with certified values for Se and As and standard addition method at three concentration levels in real samples. No significant differences was observed (p > 0.05) when comparing the values obtained by the proposed method, added and certified values of both elements. The biological samples of ESC patients had 2-3 folds higher As and lower Se levels as compared to RP (p < 0.001). Understudied exposed referents have high level of As and lower Se contents as compared to referents subjects of non-exposed area (p < 0.01). The higher concentration of As and lower levels of Se in biological samples of cancerous patients are consisted with reported studies. - Research Highlights: {yields} Advance extraction method for the enrichment of arsenic and selenium in biological

  18. Review of natural compounds for potential skin cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinembiri, Tawona N; du Plessis, Lissinda H; Gerber, Minja; Hamman, Josias H; du Plessis, Jeanetta

    2014-08-06

    Most anti-cancer drugs are derived from natural resources such as marine, microbial and botanical sources. Cutaneous malignant melanoma is the most aggressive form of skin cancer, with a high mortality rate. Various treatments for malignant melanoma are available, but due to the development of multi-drug resistance, current or emerging chemotherapies have a relatively low success rates. This emphasizes the importance of discovering new compounds that are both safe and effective against melanoma. In vitro testing of melanoma cell lines and murine melanoma models offers the opportunity for identifying mechanisms of action of plant derived compounds and extracts. Common anti-melanoma effects of natural compounds include potentiating apoptosis, inhibiting cell proliferation and inhibiting metastasis. There are different mechanisms and pathways responsible for anti-melanoma actions of medicinal compounds such as promotion of caspase activity, inhibition of angiogenesis and inhibition of the effects of tumor promoting proteins such as PI3-K, Bcl-2, STAT3 and MMPs. This review thus aims at providing an overview of anti-cancer compounds, derived from natural sources, that are currently used in cancer chemotherapies, or that have been reported to show anti-melanoma, or anti-skin cancer activities. Phytochemicals that are discussed in this review include flavonoids, carotenoids, terpenoids, vitamins, sulforaphane, some polyphenols and crude plant extracts.

  19. Review of Natural Compounds for Potential Skin Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tawona N. Chinembiri

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Most anti-cancer drugs are derived from natural resources such as marine, microbial and botanical sources. Cutaneous malignant melanoma is the most aggressive form of skin cancer, with a high mortality rate. Various treatments for malignant melanoma are available, but due to the development of multi-drug resistance, current or emerging chemotherapies have a relatively low success rates. This emphasizes the importance of discovering new compounds that are both safe and effective against melanoma. In vitro testing of melanoma cell lines and murine melanoma models offers the opportunity for identifying mechanisms of action of plant derived compounds and extracts. Common anti-melanoma effects of natural compounds include potentiating apoptosis, inhibiting cell proliferation and inhibiting metastasis. There are different mechanisms and pathways responsible for anti-melanoma actions of medicinal compounds such as promotion of caspase activity, inhibition of angiogenesis and inhibition of the effects of tumor promoting proteins such as PI3-K, Bcl-2, STAT3 and MMPs. This review thus aims at providing an overview of anti-cancer compounds, derived from natural sources, that are currently used in cancer chemotherapies, or that have been reported to show anti-melanoma, or anti-skin cancer activities. Phytochemicals that are discussed in this review include flavonoids, carotenoids, terpenoids, vitamins, sulforaphane, some polyphenols and crude plant extracts.

  20. Skin artifact removal technique for breast cancer radar detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caorsi, S.; Lenzi, C.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we propose a new model-based skin artifact cleaning technique with the aim to remove skin reflections with good effectiveness, without introducing significant signal distortions, and without assuming a priori information on the real structure of the breast. The reference cleaning model, constituted by a two-layer geometry skin-adipose tissue, is oriented to all the ultrawideband radar methods able to detect the tumor starting by the knowledge of each trace recorded around the breast. All the radar signal measurements were simulated by using realistic breast models derived from the University of Wisconsin computational electromagnetic laboratory database and the finite difference time domain (FDTD)-based open source software GprMax. First, we have searched for the best configuration for the reference cleaning model with the aim to minimize the distortions introduced on the radar signal. Second, the performance of the proposed cleaning technique has been assessed by using a breast cancer radar detection technique based on the use of artificial neural network (ANN). In order to minimize the signal distortions, we found that it was necessary to use the real skin thickness and the static Debye parameters of both skin and adipose tissue. In such a case the ANN-based radar approach was able to detect the tumor with an accuracy of 87%. By extending the performance assessment also to the case when only average standard values are used to characterize the reference cleaning model, the detection accuracy was of 84%.