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Sample records for hereditary megaloblastic anemia

  1. Thiamine– Responsive Megaloblastic Anemia Syndrome

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    F Motavaselian

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Thiamine Responsive megaloblastic anemia in DIDMOA (Wolfram syndrome has an autosomal- recessive mode of inheritance . Megaloblastic anemia and sideroblastic anemia is accompanied by diabetes insipidus (DI, diabetes mellitus (DM ,optic atrophy (OA and deafness (D. Neutropenia and thrombocytopenia are also present. We report a 7 month old girl with congenital macrocytic anemia; a rare clinical feature of Wolfram,s syndrome with increased plasma levels of blood glucose, both of which dramatically responded to administration of thiamine in large doses . The patient also had neurosensorial deafness, but no improvement was observed in the deafness. We presented the case because thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia is a rare clinical presentation of Wolfram syndrome and after institution of treatment with thiamine, the anemia and hyperglycemia returned to normal.

  2. Genetics Home Reference: thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome

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    ... Thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome Thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... the expand/collapse boxes. Description Thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome is a rare condition characterized by hearing ...

  3. Cubilin P1297L mutation associated with hereditary megaloblastic anemia 1 causes impaired recognition of intrinsic factor-vitamin B(12) by cubilin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, M; Aminoff, M; Jacobsen, Christian

    2000-01-01

    Megaloblastic anemia 1 (MGA1) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by the selective intestinal malabsorption of intrinsic factor (IF) and vitamin B(12)/cobalamin (Cbl) in complex. Most Finnish patients with MGA1 carry the disease-specific P1297L mutation (FM1) in the IF-B(12) receptor, cubilin......-IF-Cbl in cubilin-expressing epithelial cells. In conclusion, the data presented show a substantial loss in affinity of the FM1 mutant form of the IF-Cbl binding region of cubilin. This now explains the malabsorption of Cbl and Cbl-dependent anemia in MGA1 patients with the FM1 mutation. (Blood. 2000...

  4. Pyrexia due to megaloblastic anemia: An Unusual Case

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    Singh PS, Vijay Verma, Vidyasagar, Granth Kumar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Postmenopausal vegetarian female presented with short febrile illness associated with generalized weakness Clinical and investigative findings evidenced megaloblastic anemia Since none of investigations could pinpoint the cause for pyrexia and patient did not respond to empirical antibiotic and conservative antimalarial therapy, megaloblastic anemia itself was suspected to be cause for febrile episode Patient was treated with parenteral B12 and oral folic acid for megaloblastic anemia and she responded to it and became afebrile within 72 hours. Subsequently megaloblastic anemia was correlated to be cause of febrile illness.

  5. THIAMINE–RESPONSIVE MEGALOBLASTIC ANEMIA, SENSORINEURAL DEAFNESS AND DIABETES MELLITUS

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    M. Kadivar R. Moradian

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract- The syndrome of diabetes mellitus, sensorineural deafness and megaloblastic anemia dose not result from thiamine deficiency. The previous reported patients had no sign of beriberi, had normal nutrition, and had no evidence of malabsorption. The features of this syndrome with apparent inheritance of autosomal recessive trait may define this puzzling syndrome as a true thiamine dependency state. The first Iranian patient was described by Vossough et al. in 1995. We found nine new cases with diagnostic criteria of thiamine responsive megaloblastic anemia during eight years of our study. In two patients, presentation of diabetes and anemia was concomitant. All of them were deaf with sensorineural hearing loss which was detected in infancy up to two years of age. The presence of congenital valvular heart disease was eliminated by normal echocardiography, but cardiomyopathy was discovered in two. Nonspecific amino-aciduria was discovered in three but urinary screening tests for hereditary orotic aciduria were negative. Ox-Phos biochemistry of muscle mitochondria which demonstrates severe defect in complexes I, III, IV in diabetes mellitus associated with deafness, were done but was unremarkable in our patients. Urinary methylmalonic acid and methyl malonyl carnitine by GS/MS and TMS was done in our patients and showed abnormal results in six patients. Thiamine gene, SLC 19A2, was detected in four patients.

  6. Diphyllobothrium pacificum Infection is Seldom Associated with Megaloblastic Anemia

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    Jimenez, Juan A.; Rodriguez, Silvia; Gamboa, Ricardo; Rodriguez, Lourdes; Garcia, Hector H.

    2012-01-01

    Twenty cases of Dyphillobothrium pacificum (fish tapeworm) infections were prospectively studied to determine whether this tapeworm is associated with megaloblastic anemia, as commonly reported for D. latum infections. The most frequent symptoms were fatigue and mild abdominal pain, which were identified in approximately 66.6% of the 18 patients interviewed. Fourteen patients received treatment with niclosamide and all were cured. The other six patients spontaneously eliminated the tapeworms. One patient, who also had chronic diabetes and gastric atrophy, had low vitamin B12 levels and megaloblastic anemia. In all other patients, including three other patients with anemia, baseline vitamin B12 levels were in the reference range and did not significantly change when re-assessed three months later. Unlike D. latum, infection with D. pacificum is seldom associated with megaloblastic anemia or vitamin B12 deficit. PMID:22987655

  7. Iron deficiency anemia and megaloblastic anemia in obese patients.

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    Arshad, Mahmoud; Jaberian, Sara; Pazouki, Abdolreza; Riazi, Sajedeh; Rangraz, Maryam Aghababa; Mokhber, Somayyeh

    2017-03-01

    The association between obesity and different types of anemia remained uncertain. The present study aimed to assess the relation between obesity parameters and the occurrence of iron deficiency anemia and also megaloblastic anemia among Iranian population. This cross-sectional study was performed on 1252 patients with morbid obesity that randomly selected from all patients referred to Clinic of obesity at Rasoul-e-Akram Hospital in 2014. The morbid obesity was defined according to the guideline as body mass index (BMI) equal to or higher than 40 kg/m2. Various laboratory parameters including serum levels of hemoglobin, iron, ferritin, folic acid, and vitamin B12 were assessed using the standard laboratory techniques. BMI was adversely associated with serum vitamin B12, but not associated with other hematologic parameters. The overall prevalence of iron deficiency anemia was 9.8%. The prevalence of iron deficiency anemia was independent to patients' age and also to body mass index. The prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency was totally 20.9%. According to the multivariable logistic regression model, no association was revealed between BMI and the occurrence of iron deficiency anemia adjusting gender and age. A similar regression model showed that higher BMI could predict occurrence of vitamin B12 deficiency in morbid obese patients. Although iron deficiency is a common finding among obese patients, vitamin B12 deficiency is more frequent so about one-fifth of these patients suffer vitamin B12 deficiency. In fact, the exacerbation of obesity can result in exacerbation of vitamin B12 deficiency.

  8. The human intrinsic factor-vitamin B12 receptor, cubilin: molecular characterization and chromosomal mapping of the gene to 10p within the autosomal recessive megaloblastic anemia (MGA1) region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kozyraki, R; Kristiansen, M; Silahtaroglu, A

    1998-01-01

    -5445 on the short arm of chromosome 10. This is within the autosomal recessive megaloblastic anemia (MGA1) 6-cM region harboring the unknown recessive-gene locus of juvenile megaloblastic anemia caused by intestinal malabsorption of cobalamin (Imerslund-Gräsbeck's disease). In conclusion, the present...... molecular and genetic information on human cubilin now provides circumstantial evidence that an impaired synthesis, processing, or ligand binding of cubilin is the molecular background of this hereditary form of megaloblastic anemia. Udgivelsesdato: 1998-May-15...

  9. Megaloblastic anemia - A clinical spectrum and a hematological profile: The day-to-day public health problem

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    S Srikanth

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: To know the various parameters and diagnostic approach of megaloblastic anemia. To know the age incidence and sex ratio. Materials and Methods: A hospital-based retrospective and prospective study was done for a period of 1-year. Totally, 21 cases were analyzed, and we correlated signs, symptoms, and hematological investigations. Results: Totally, 21 children with megaloblastic anemia in the above said period were studied. The patients age group was ranged from 2 months to 15 years. Megaloblastic anemia was observed in all the cases. Conclusion: Megaloblastic anemia is one of the common causes of undiagnosed anemia, and the treatment is simple and easily affordable. If left untreated, it can lead to morbidity both because of anemia and attendant neurological involvement.

  10. Megaloblastic anemia with peripheral neuropathy, a misleading initial presentation in POEMS syndrome: A case report

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    Iadarilang Tiewsoh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available POEMS (peripheral neuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, M protein, skin changes syndrome is a rare multisystem paraneoplastic disorder that occurs in the setting of a plasma cell dyscrasia. A 57-year-old male with initial presentation of peripheral neuropathy of lower limbs and a peripheral blood picture of megaloblastic anemia, presented with progressive lower motor neuron weakness over few months; followed by additional features of skin hyperpigmentation, generalized lymphadenopathy, erectile dysfunction, weight loss, and an attack of cerebrovascular accident (stroke infarct which recovered. On further evaluation with time, there were presence of hepatosplenomegaly, Castleman′s disease of the lymph node on biopsy, serum electrophoresis suggestive of monoclonal gammopathy with light band lambda chain, and endocrinopathy (hypothyroidism and hypogonadism. His bone marrow was suggestive of plasmacytosis. This case report describes a patient who presented with initial picture of peripheral neuropathy with megaloblastic anemia, but when followed-up there were diverse clinical manifestations fulfilling the diagnostic clinical criteria of POEMS Syndrome.

  11. Bilateral macular hemorrhage due to megaloblastic anemia: A rare case report

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    Sree Kumar Vaggu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 17-year-old female patient who presented with sudden, painless, nonprogressive diminished vision in both eyes (best corrected visual acuity in right eye - 6/60 and left eye - 6/36. An ophthalmological evaluation revealed bilateral pale tarsal conjunctiva and bilateral macular hemorrhage. Hematological evaluation revealed the presence of megalocytic anemia (with hemoglobin - 4.9 g%. General examination showed severe pallor. On systemic examination, no abnormality was detected, confirmed by ultrasonography abdomen. Other causes of severe anemia have been ruled out. Intraocular pressure in both eyes was 12 mmHg. This case documents the rare occurrence of bilateral subinternal limiting membrane macular hemorrhage with megaloblastic anemia without thrombocytopenia and other retinal features of anemic retinopathy.

  12. Thiamine responsive megaloblastic anemia: a novel SLC19A2 compound heterozygous mutation in two siblings.

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    Mozzillo, Enza; Melis, Daniela; Falco, Mariateresa; Fattorusso, Valentina; Taurisano, Roberta; Flanagan, Sarah E; Ellard, Sian; Franzese, Adriana

    2013-08-01

    Thiamine responsive megaloblastic anemia (TRMA) is an autosomal recessive disease caused by loss of function mutations in the SLC19A2 gene. TRMA is characterized by anemia, deafness, and diabetes. In some cases, optic atrophy or more rarely retinitis pigmentosa is noted. We now report two sisters, the eldest of which presented to a different hospital during childhood with sensorineural deafness, which was treated with a hearing prosthesis, insulin requiring diabetes, retinitis pigmentosa, optic atrophy, and macrocytic anemia. These features initially suggested a clinical diagnosis of Wolfram syndrome (WS). Therapy with thiamine was initiated which resulted in the resolution of the anemia. The younger sister, who was affected with sensorineural deafness, was referred to our hospital for non-autoimmune diabetes. She was found to have macrocytosis and ocular abnormalities. Because a diagnosis of TRMA was suspected, therapy with insulin and thiamine was started. Sequencing analysis of the SLC19A2 gene identified a compound heterozygous mutation p.Y81X/p.L457X (c.242insA/c.1370delT) in both sisters. Non-autoimmune diabetes associated with deafness and macrocytosis, without anemia, suggests a diagnosis of TRMA. Patients clinically diagnosed with WS with anemia and/or macrocytosis should be reevaluated for TRMA. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  13. Fundus autofluorescence and optical coherence tomography findings in thiamine responsive megaloblastic anemia.

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    Ach, Thomas; Kardorff, Rüdiger; Rohrschneider, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    To report ophthalmologic fundus autofluorescence and spectral domain optical coherence tomography findings in a patient with thiamine responsive megaloblastic anemia (TRMA). A 13-year-old girl with genetically proven TRMA was ophthalmologically (visual acuity, funduscopy, perimetry, electroretinogram) followed up over >5 years. Fundus imaging also included autofluorescence and spectral domain optical coherence tomography. During a 5-year follow-up, visual acuity and visual field decreased, despite a special TRMA diet. Funduscopy revealed bull's eye appearance, whereas fundus autofluorescence showed central and peripheral hyperfluorescence and perifoveal hypofluorescence. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography revealed affected inner segment ellipsoid band and irregularities in the retinal pigment epithelium and choroidea. Autofluorescence and spectral domain optical coherence tomography findings in a patient with TRMA show retinitis pigmentosa-like retina, retinal pigment epithelium, and choroid alterations. These findings might progress even under special TRMA diet, indispensable to life. Ophthalmologist should consider TRMA in patients with deafness and ophthalmologic disorders.

  14. Recommendations regarding splenectomy in hereditary hemolytic anemias

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    Iolascon, Achille; Andolfo, Immacolata; Barcellini, Wilma; Corcione, Francesco; Garçon, Loïc; De Franceschi, Lucia; Pignata, Claudio; Graziadei, Giovanna; Pospisilova, Dagmar; Rees, David C.; de Montalembert, Mariane; Rivella, Stefano; Gambale, Antonella; Russo, Roberta; Ribeiro, Leticia; Vives-Corrons, Jules; Martinez, Patricia Aguilar; Kattamis, Antonis; Gulbis, Beatrice; Cappellini, Maria Domenica; Roberts, Irene; Tamary, Hannah

    2017-01-01

    Hereditary hemolytic anemias are a group of disorders with a variety of causes, including red cell membrane defects, red blood cell enzyme disorders, congenital dyserythropoietic anemias, thalassemia syndromes and hemoglobinopathies. As damaged red blood cells passing through the red pulp of the spleen are removed by splenic macrophages, splenectomy is one possible therapeutic approach to the management of severely affected patients. However, except for hereditary spherocytosis for which the effectiveness of splenectomy has been well documented, the efficacy of splenectomy in other anemias within this group has yet to be determined and there are concerns regarding short- and long-term infectious and thrombotic complications. In light of the priorities identified by the European Hematology Association Roadmap we generated specific recommendations for each disorder, except thalassemia syndromes for which there are other, recent guidelines. Our recommendations are intended to enable clinicians to achieve better informed decisions on disease management by splenectomy, on the type of splenectomy and the possible consequences. As no randomized clinical trials, case control or cohort studies regarding splenectomy in these disorders were found in the literature, recommendations for each disease were based on expert opinion and were subsequently critically revised and modified by the Splenectomy in Rare Anemias Study Group, which includes hematologists caring for both adults and children. PMID:28550188

  15. METHYLMALONIC ACID AND HOMOCYSTEIN SERUM IN DIAGNOSING MEGALOBLASTIC ANEMIA DUE TO COBALAMIN AND FOLATE DEFICIENCY IN TRAVEL MEDICINE

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    Made Gian Indra Rahayuda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE Anemia is a major global health problem, especially in developing countries. Anemia is a condition where the red blood cell mass and / or hemoglobin mass that circulating in the body was decreased to below normal level so it can not function well in providing oxygen to the body tissues. One of the most common type is megaloblastic anemia. Megaloblastic anemia is mostly caused by vitamin B12 (cobalamin and folate deficiency. One of the causes of cobalamin and folate deficiency anemia is tropical sprue. Cobalamin deficiency anemia and folate deficiency anemia gives a similar symptom, but in cobalamin deficiency there is neuropathy symptoms. Normal serum folate is between 3-15 ng/mL. Normal folate erythrocyte is 150-600 ng/mL. In cobalamin deficiency, serum cobalamin decreased below the cut off point 100pg/mL (normally 100 - 400pg/mL. Other examination such as elevated homocysteine??, methylmalonic acid, or formioglutamic acid (FIGLU in the urine can confirm the diagnosis of cobalamin and folic acid deficiency. There is no consensus on the cut-off point of homocysteine ??and MMA. Homocysteine ??has been considered to increase when the levels are above 12-14 ?mol /L in women and in the 14-15 ?mol/L. According to research by Robert et al in the case of cobalamin deficiency, serum tHcy> 15.0 ?mol/L. Most research considers the increase of MMA in cobalamin deficiency is> 0:28 ?mol / L, but the cut off point in circulation varies between 0:21 to 0:48 ?mol/L. MMA level is increased in serum and urine in cobalamin deficiency, whereas MMA normal in folate deficiency. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font

  16. Oral versus intramuscular cobalamin treatment in megaloblastic anemia: a single-center, prospective, randomized, open-label study.

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    Bolaman, Zahit; Kadikoylu, Gurhan; Yukselen, Vahit; Yavasoglu, Irfan; Barutca, Sabri; Senturk, Taskin

    2003-12-01

    Cobalamin (vitamin B12) deficiency, the most common cause of megaloblastic anemia, is treated with intramuscular (IM) cobalamin. It has been suggested by some investigators that oral (p.o.) cobalamin treatment may be as effective in the treatment of this condition, with the advantages of ease of administration and lower cost. This study assessed the effects and cost of p.o. versus i.m. cobalamin treatment in patients with megaloblastic anemia due to cobalamin deficiency. This was a 90-day, prospective, randomized, open-label study conducted at the Division of Hematology, Department of Internal Medicine, Adnan Menderes University Research and Practice Hospital (Aydin, Turkey). Patients aged > or =16 years with megaloblastic anemia due to cobalamin deficiency were randomized to receive 1000-microg cobalamin p.o. once daily for 10 days (p.o. group) or 1000-microg cobalamin i.m. once daily for 10 days (i.m. group). After 10 days, both treatments were administered once a week for 4 weeks, and after that, once a month for life. Patients were assessed for the presence of reticulocytosis between treatment days 5 and 10 until it was detected. Therapeutic effectiveness was assessed by measuring hematologic parameters on days 0, 10, 30, and 90 and serum vitamin B12 concentration on days 0 and 90. The Mini-Mental State Examination was used before and after the B12 therapy for cognitive function assessment and 125-Hz diapozone was used for vibration threshold testing. Neurologic sensory assessment, including soft-touch and pinprick examinations, was used to identify neuropathy at baseline and study end. Tolerability was assessed using laboratory tests and patient interview. Cost was assessed using the cost of the study drug and of the injection. Sixty patients completed the study 26 in the p.o. group (16 men, 10 women; mean [SD] age, 60 [15] years) and 34 in the i.m. group (17 men, 17 women; mean [SD] age, 64 [10] years). Reticulocytosis was observed in all patients. In the p

  17. Monogenic diabetes syndromes: Locus‐specific databases for Alström, Wolfram, and Thiamine‐responsive megaloblastic anemia

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    Astuti, Dewi; Sabir, Ataf; Fulton, Piers; Zatyka, Malgorzata; Williams, Denise; Hardy, Carol; Milan, Gabriella; Favaretto, Francesca; Yu‐Wai‐Man, Patrick; Rohayem, Julia; López de Heredia, Miguel; Hershey, Tamara; Tranebjaerg, Lisbeth; Chen, Jian‐Hua; Chaussenot, Annabel; Nunes, Virginia; Marshall, Bess; McAfferty, Susan; Tillmann, Vallo; Maffei, Pietro; Paquis‐Flucklinger, Veronique; Geberhiwot, Tarekign; Mlynarski, Wojciech; Parkinson, Kay; Picard, Virginie; Bueno, Gema Esteban; Dias, Renuka; Arnold, Amy; Richens, Caitlin; Paisey, Richard; Urano, Fumihiko; Semple, Robert; Sinnott, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Abstract We developed a variant database for diabetes syndrome genes, using the Leiden Open Variation Database platform, containing observed phenotypes matched to the genetic variations. We populated it with 628 published disease‐associated variants (December 2016) for: WFS1 (n = 309), CISD2 (n = 3), ALMS1 (n = 268), and SLC19A2 (n = 48) for Wolfram type 1, Wolfram type 2, Alström, and Thiamine‐responsive megaloblastic anemia syndromes, respectively; and included 23 previously unpublished novel germline variants in WFS1 and 17 variants in ALMS1. We then investigated genotype–phenotype relations for the WFS1 gene. The presence of biallelic loss‐of‐function variants predicted Wolfram syndrome defined by insulin‐dependent diabetes and optic atrophy, with a sensitivity of 79% (95% CI 75%–83%) and specificity of 92% (83%–97%). The presence of minor loss‐of‐function variants in WFS1 predicted isolated diabetes, isolated deafness, or isolated congenital cataracts without development of the full syndrome (sensitivity 100% [93%–100%]; specificity 78% [73%–82%]). The ability to provide a prognostic prediction based on genotype will lead to improvements in patient care and counseling. The development of the database as a repository for monogenic diabetes gene variants will allow prognostic predictions for other diabetes syndromes as next‐generation sequencing expands the repertoire of genotypes and phenotypes. The database is publicly available online at https://lovd.euro-wabb.org. PMID:28432734

  18. Monogenic diabetes syndromes: Locus-specific databases for Alström, Wolfram, and Thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia.

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    Astuti, Dewi; Sabir, Ataf; Fulton, Piers; Zatyka, Malgorzata; Williams, Denise; Hardy, Carol; Milan, Gabriella; Favaretto, Francesca; Yu-Wai-Man, Patrick; Rohayem, Julia; López de Heredia, Miguel; Hershey, Tamara; Tranebjaerg, Lisbeth; Chen, Jian-Hua; Chaussenot, Annabel; Nunes, Virginia; Marshall, Bess; McAfferty, Susan; Tillmann, Vallo; Maffei, Pietro; Paquis-Flucklinger, Veronique; Geberhiwot, Tarekign; Mlynarski, Wojciech; Parkinson, Kay; Picard, Virginie; Bueno, Gema Esteban; Dias, Renuka; Arnold, Amy; Richens, Caitlin; Paisey, Richard; Urano, Fumihiko; Semple, Robert; Sinnott, Richard; Barrett, Timothy G

    2017-07-01

    We developed a variant database for diabetes syndrome genes, using the Leiden Open Variation Database platform, containing observed phenotypes matched to the genetic variations. We populated it with 628 published disease-associated variants (December 2016) for: WFS1 (n = 309), CISD2 (n = 3), ALMS1 (n = 268), and SLC19A2 (n = 48) for Wolfram type 1, Wolfram type 2, Alström, and Thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia syndromes, respectively; and included 23 previously unpublished novel germline variants in WFS1 and 17 variants in ALMS1. We then investigated genotype-phenotype relations for the WFS1 gene. The presence of biallelic loss-of-function variants predicted Wolfram syndrome defined by insulin-dependent diabetes and optic atrophy, with a sensitivity of 79% (95% CI 75%-83%) and specificity of 92% (83%-97%). The presence of minor loss-of-function variants in WFS1 predicted isolated diabetes, isolated deafness, or isolated congenital cataracts without development of the full syndrome (sensitivity 100% [93%-100%]; specificity 78% [73%-82%]). The ability to provide a prognostic prediction based on genotype will lead to improvements in patient care and counseling. The development of the database as a repository for monogenic diabetes gene variants will allow prognostic predictions for other diabetes syndromes as next-generation sequencing expands the repertoire of genotypes and phenotypes. The database is publicly available online at https://lovd.euro-wabb.org. © 2017 The Authors. **Human Mutation published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Celiac disease manifesting as isolated cobalamin deficiency megaloblastic anemia: Case series and review

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    Vikram Sakaleshpur Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is an immune-mediated enteropathy triggered by the ingestion of gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. It has been identified as one of the most common lifelong disorders on a worldwide basis. Enteropathy in CD is thought to be the final consequence of an abnormal immune reaction, showing features of both an innate and adaptive response to gluten prolamins. The clinical spectrum is wide, including cases with either typical intestinal or atypical extra intestinal features, or silent forms. Anemia has frequently been reported as the only manifestation or the most frequent extra-intestinal symptom of CD. The only available treatment consists in dietary exclusion of grains containing gluten.

  20. [Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia presenting with hematuria and severe anemia].

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    Paz, A; Goren, E; Segal, M

    1995-07-01

    A patient with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia was admitted with hematuria and severe anemia after mild recurrent episodes of epistaxis. Telangiectasias were found in the skin and buccal and nasal mucosa. No defect in the coagulation mechanism was found; thrombocyte count and function were normal. On cystoscopy, tortuous engorged vessels, some actively bleeding, were seen in the trigonal mucosa. Biopsy showed enlarged vessels in the lamina propria. Electrocoagulation of the bleeding vessels stopped hematuria, but 6 months later it recurred. This time Nd-YAG laser was used to stop the bleeding after electrocoagulation was ineffective.

  1. Dyspnea with anemia turned out to be a case of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

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    Amitabha Sengupta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT is a rare autosomal dominant inherited disorder of the vascular system. It can be asymptomatic but when symptomatic most common presentation being epistaxis. It can involve any organs of the body like lungs, skin, liver brain, GI mucosa etc. We are reporting a case of HHT presented to us with dyspnea and severe anemia. He had arteriovenous malformations of different visceral organs and telangiectasia of skin along with presence of similar history in first-degree relatives.

  2. Finnish Fanconi anemia mutations and hereditary predisposition to breast and prostate cancer.

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    Mantere, T; Haanpää, M; Hanenberg, H; Schleutker, J; Kallioniemi, A; Kähkönen, M; Parto, K; Avela, K; Aittomäki, K; von Koskull, H; Hartikainen, J M; Kosma, V-M; Laasanen, S-L; Mannermaa, A; Pylkäs, K; Winqvist, R

    2015-07-01

    Mutations in downstream Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway genes, BRCA2, PALB2, BRIP1 and RAD51C, explain part of the hereditary breast cancer susceptibility, but the contribution of other FA genes has remained questionable. Due to FA's rarity, the finding of recurrent deleterious FA mutations among breast cancer families is challenging. The use of founder populations, such as the Finns, could provide some advantage in this. Here, we have resolved complementation groups and causative mutations of five FA patients, representing the first mutation confirmed FA cases in Finland. These patients belonged to complementation groups FA-A (n = 3), FA-G (n = 1) and FA-I (n = 1). The prevalence of the six FA causing mutations was then studied in breast (n = 1840) and prostate (n = 565) cancer cohorts, and in matched controls (n = 1176 females, n = 469 males). All mutations were recurrent, but no significant association with cancer susceptibility was observed for any: the prevalence of FANCI c.2957_2969del and c.3041G>A mutations was even highest in healthy males (1.7%). This strengthens the exclusive role of downstream genes in cancer predisposition. From a clinical point of view, current results provide fundamental information of the mutations to be tested first in all suspected FA cases in Finland. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Hemolysis of the red cell : Towards improved understanding of hereditary hemolytic anemia and new diagnostics

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    Huisjes, Henk Rick

    2018-01-01

    The condition in which in the oxygen-carrying capacity of RBCs or their number is insufficient to meet physiological needs is characterized as anemia. Anemia is an underestimated burden of disease and despite that the vast majority of anemia is caused by iron deficiency, a substantial number of

  4. A case of red-cell adenosine deaminase overproduction associated with hereditary hemolytic anemia found in Japan.

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    Miwa, S; Fujii, H; Matsumoto, N; Nakatsuji, T; Oda, S; Asano, H; Asano, S

    1978-01-01

    A case of red cell adenosine deaminase (ADA) overproduction associated with hereditary hemolytic anemia is reported here. This appears to be the second report. Proband is a 38-year-old Japanese male who had hemoglobin, 15.8 g/100 ml; reticulocyte count, 4.5%; serum indirect bilirubin, 4.9 mg/100 ml; 51Cr-labeled red cell half-life, 12 days; red cells showed moderate stomatocytosis. His red cell ADA activity showed 40-fold increase while that of the mother showed 4-fold increase. The mother was hematologically normal. The father had a normal enzyme activity. The proband and the mother showed slightly high serum uric acid levels. The proband's red cell showed: ATP, 628 nmoles/ml (normal, 1,010--1,550); adenine nucleotide pool, 46% of the normal mean; 2,3-diphosphoglycerate content, 3,782 nmoles/ml (normal 4,170--5,300); increased oxygen affinity of hemoglobin, P50 of intact erythrocytes being 21.8 mmHg (normal, 24.1--26.1). Red cell glycolytic intermediates in the proband were low in general, and the rate of lactate production was low. Kinetic studies using crude hemolysate revealed a normal Km for adenosine, normal electrophoretic mobility but slightly abnormal pH curve and slightly low utilization of 2-deoxyadenosine. The ADA activity of lymphocytes was nearly normal.

  5. Anemia

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    ... child might have anemia. They will do a physical exam and review your health history and symptoms. To diagnose anemia, your doctor ... and Wellness Staying Healthy Healthy Living Travel Occupational Health First Aid and ... Pets and Animals myhealthfinder Food and Nutrition Healthy Food ...

  6. Pyridoxine responsive megaloblastic anaemia in pregnancy: a case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In pregnancy megaloblastic anaemia commonly results from folic acid deficiency partly due to placenta transfer to fetus, but mainly because of increased folate catabolism due to cleavage of folate coenzymes in rapidly proliferating tissues. Cobalamin deficiency causing megaloblastic anaemia has been described in infants ...

  7. Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a hemoglobin value of less than 13.5 gm/dl in a man or less than 12.0 gm/dl in a woman. Normal values for children ... types of anemia cannot be prevented, eating healthy foods can help you avoid both iron-and vitamin- ...

  8. Ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry-based multiplex enzyme assay for six enzymes associated with hereditary hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chul Min; Lee, Kyunghoon; Jun, Sun-Hee; Song, Sang Hoon; Song, Junghan

    2017-08-15

    Deficiencies in erythrocyte metabolic enzymes are associated with hereditary hemolytic anemia. Here, we report the development of a novel multiplex enzyme assay for six major enzymes, namely glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, pyruvate kinase, pyrimidine 5'-nucleotidase, hexokinase, triosephosphate isomerase, and adenosine deaminase, deficiencies in which are implicated in erythrocyte enzymopathies. To overcome the drawbacks of traditional spectrophotometric enzyme assays, the present assay was based on ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS). The products of the six enzymes were directly measured by using ion pairing UPLC-MS/MS, and the precision, linearity, ion suppression, optimal sample amounts, and incubation times were evaluated. Eighty-three normal individuals and 13 patients with suspected enzymopathy were analyzed. The UPLC running time was within 5min. No ion suppression was observed at the retention time for the products or internal standards. We selected an optimal dilution factor and incubation time for each enzyme system. The intra- and inter-assay imprecision values (CVs) were 2.5-12.1% and 2.9-14.3%, respectively. The linearity of each system was good, with R 2 values >0.97. Patient samples showed consistently lower enzyme activities than those from normal individuals. The present ion paring UPLC-MS/MS assay enables facile and reproducible multiplex evaluation of the activity of enzymes implicated in enzymopathy-associated hemolytic anemia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Osteopoikilosis associated with keloids formation, rheumatoid arthritis, myasthenia, Graves` disease and megaloblastic anaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Zimmermann-Górska

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Osteopoikilosis is an uncommon hereditary dysplasia of skeleton characterized by small sclerotic foci clustered mainly in periarticular osseus regions. The radiographic pattern is pathognomonic. The disease can be a result of the loss-of-function mutations in LEMD3 – the gene responsible for bone density which can influence also on the expression of transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1 signalling. TGF-β1 is a key mediator of fibrosis and a modulator of immune responses. Patients with osteopoikilosis demonstrate a higher incidence of keloid formation and autoimmune diseases. In the presented case osteopoikilosis was associated with keloids formation and autoimmune diseases: rheumatoid arthritis, myasthenia, Graves’ disease and megaloblastic anaemia.

  10. Inborn anemias in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernstein, S.E.; Barker, J.E.; Russell, E.S.

    1981-06-01

    hereditary anemias of mice have been the chief objects of investigation. At present under study are four macrocytic anemias, five hemolytic anemias, nonhemolytic microcytic anemia, transitory siderocytic anemia, sex-linked iron-transport anemia, an α-thalassemia, and a new target-cell anemia. Each of these blood dyscrasias is caused by the action of a unique mutant gene, which determines the structure of different intracellular molecules, and thus controls a different metabolic process. Thus our wide range of different hereditary anemias has considerable potential for uncovering many different aspects of hemopoietic homeostatic mechanisms in the mouse. Each anemia is studied through: (a) characterization of peripheral blood values, (b) determinations of radiosensitivity under a variety of conditions, (c) measurements of iron metabolism and heme synthesis, (d) histological and biochemical study of blood-forming tissue, (e) functional tests of the stem cell component, (f) examination of responses to erythroid stimuli, and (g) transplantation of tissue between individuals of differently affected genotypes

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and naproxen Certain rare genetic conditions such as hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, which causes bleeding in the bowels ... iron-deficiency anemia may cause the following complications: Depression Heart problems. If you do not have enough ...

  12. Anemia of Chronic Liver Diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hyun Chung; Lee, Jhung Sang; Koh, Chang Soon; Lee, Mun Ho [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1971-09-15

    The pathogenetic mechanisms of anemia in patients with chronic liver disease were observed. Seventeen patients with moderate to advanced hepatic diseases were studied by various methods. Only patients without previous blood loss were included : 14 had cirrhosis, 2 had active chronic hepatitis, and one had inferior vena cava obstruction with associated liver cirrhosis. The followings were the results: 1. The anemia based on red blood cell count, Hb., and Ht. was found in 76.5-78.6% of the patients. 2. Red cell indices indicated that normo-macrocytic and normochromic anemia was present is the majority of the patients. 3. No evidence of megaloblastic anemia was found on the basis of the morphological examinations. 4. Serum iron, TIBC, % saturation and iron content in the bone marrow indicated that iron deficiency anemia was present in about half of the patients. 5. In the view of the erythrocyte dynamics, primary increase in the red cell destruction was ascribed to the cause of the anemia. 6. Decrease in the red cell survival time was not correlated with MCV, % saturation and S.L. ratio. Also, hemoglobin level was not correlated with MCV, % saturation and T{sub 50} Cr. Therefore, multiple causes may be involved in the pathogenesis of the anemia. 7. Anemia as determined by the red cell volume was found in only 60% of the patients. It may be possible that hemodilutional anemia is present.

  13. Anemia of Chronic Liver Diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Hyun Chung; Lee, Jhung Sang; Koh, Chang Soon; Lee, Mun Ho

    1971-01-01

    The pathogenetic mechanisms of anemia in patients with chronic liver disease were observed. Seventeen patients with moderate to advanced hepatic diseases were studied by various methods. Only patients without previous blood loss were included : 14 had cirrhosis, 2 had active chronic hepatitis, and one had inferior vena cava obstruction with associated liver cirrhosis. The followings were the results: 1. The anemia based on red blood cell count, Hb., and Ht. was found in 76.5-78.6% of the patients. 2. Red cell indices indicated that normo-macrocytic and normochromic anemia was present is the majority of the patients. 3. No evidence of megaloblastic anemia was found on the basis of the morphological examinations. 4. Serum iron, TIBC, % saturation and iron content in the bone marrow indicated that iron deficiency anemia was present in about half of the patients. 5. In the view of the erythrocyte dynamics, primary increase in the red cell destruction was ascribed to the cause of the anemia. 6. Decrease in the red cell survival time was not correlated with MCV, % saturation and S.L. ratio. Also, hemoglobin level was not correlated with MCV, % saturation and T 50 Cr. Therefore, multiple causes may be involved in the pathogenesis of the anemia. 7. Anemia as determined by the red cell volume was found in only 60% of the patients. It may be possible that hemodilutional anemia is present.

  14. Megaloblastic anaemia, diabetes and deafness in a 2-year-old child ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Megaloblastic anaemia in childhood usually occurs as a result of dietary folate deficiency or, rarely, congenital disorders of vitamin B12 metabolism. We present a 2-year-old girl with megaloblastic anaemia and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, both of which proved responsive to pharmacological doses of thiamine.

  15. Pernicious anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... malabsorption); Anemia - intrinsic factor; Anemia - IF; Anemia - atrophic gastritis ... of pernicious anemia include: Weakened stomach lining (atrophic gastritis) An autoimmune condition in which the body's immune ...

  16. Aplastic crisis due to human parvovirus B19 infection in hereditary hemolytic anaemia Crise aplástica devido à infecção por parvovirus humano B19 em anemia hemolítica hereditária

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. N. Cubel

    1992-10-01

    Full Text Available Specific anti-B19 IgM was demonstrated in sera from three children showing transient aplastic crisis. A two years-old boy living in Rio de Janeiro suffering from sickle-cell anaemia showed the crisis during August, 1990. Two siblings living in Santa Maria, RS, developed aplastic crisis during May, 1991, when they were also diagnosed for hereditary spherocytosis. For a third child from this same family, who first developed aplastic crisis no IgM anti-B19 was detected in her sera.IgM específica anti-B19 foi demonstrada nos soros de três crianças apresentando aplasia transitória de medula. Um menino de dois anos de idade vivendo no Rio de Janeiro e sendo portador de anemia falciforme, apresentou a crise durante Agosto de 1990. Dois irmãos vivendo em Santa Maria - RS, desenvolveram crise de aplasia em Maio de 1991, quando foram também diagnosticados como portadores de microesferocitose. IgM anti-B19 não foi detectada no soro de uma terceira criança, desta mesma família, a qual primeiramente apresentou crise de aplasia.

  17. Hereditary angioedema

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease; HAE- Hereditary angioedema; Kallikrein inhibitor-HAE: bradykinin receptor antagonist-HAE; C1-inhibitors-HAE; Hives-HAE ... aunt, uncle, or grandparent. Dental procedures, sickness (including colds and the flu), and surgery may trigger HAE ...

  18. Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer Request Permissions Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 10/2017 What is hereditary diffuse gastric cancer? Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) is a rare ...

  19. Hearing loss and speech perception in noise difficulties in Fanconi anemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheij, Emmy; Oomen, Karin P.Q.; Smetsers, Stephanie E.; van Zanten, Gijsbert A.; Speleman, Lucienne

    2017-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis: Fanconi anemia is a hereditary chromosomal instability disorder. Hearing loss and ear abnormalities are among the many manifestations reported in this disorder. In addition, Fanconi anemia patients often complain about hearing difficulties in situations with background noise

  20. Hereditary elliptocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in every 2,500 people of northern European heritage. It is more common in people of African ... away or symptoms of anemia or gallstones. Prevention Genetic counseling may be appropriate for people with a ...

  1. CLASSIFICATION AND DIAGNOSTICS OF ANEMIA IN CHILDREN

    OpenAIRE

    A. G. Rumyantsev

    2011-01-01

    Anemia in children is one of the most frequent somatic diseases. Criteria of anemia diagnosis are strictly regulated as decrease of hemoglobin/erythrocytes level accompanies majority of infectious, inflammatory, autoimmune, hereditary diseases and, in several cases, it is estimated as transitory disease in some periods of children’s growth and development. The article presents main classification and differential diagnostic schemes of anemia. Diagnostics makes accent on laboratory analysis; t...

  2. Inborn anemias in mice. Progress report to accompany twenty-first renewal proposal, 1 May 1975--30 April 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, E.S.; Bernstein, S.E.

    1976-05-15

    Progress is reported on studies on hereditary anemias of mice. At present under study are four macrocytic anemias, four hemolytic anemias, nonhemolytic microcytic anemia, transitory siderocytic anemia, sex-linked iron-transport anemia, and the autoimmune hemolytic anemia of NZB. Each of these blood dyscrasias is caused by the action of a unique mutant gene, each of which determines the structure of different intracellular molecules, and thus controls a different metabolic process. Thus our wide range of different hereditary anemias has considerable potential for uncovering many different aspects of hemopoietic homeostatic mechanisms in the mouse.

  3. Hereditary angioedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracho, Francisco A

    2005-11-01

    Hereditary angioedema is an autosomal-dominant deficiency of C1 inhibitor--a serpin inhibitor of kallikrein, C1r, C1s, factor XII, and plasmin. Quantitative or qualitative deficiency of C1 inhibitor leads to the generation of vasoactive mediators, most likely bradykinin. The clinical syndrome is repeated bouts of nonpruritic, nonpitting edema of the face, larynx, extermities, and intestinal viscera. Recently, investigators, physicians, and industry have demonstrated a renewed interest in the biology and treatment of hereditary angioedema. Investigators have generated a C1INH-/- mouse model that has demonstrated the importance of the contact activation system for hereditary angioedema-related vascular permeability. An interactive database of mutations is available electronically. Investigators have continued exploration into mRNA/protein levels. The proceedings of a recent workshop have been impressive in the scope and depth. Clinicians have produced consensus documents and expert reviews. The pharmaceutical industry has initiated clinical trails with novel agents. Hereditary angioedema is often misdiagnosed and poorly treated. Diagnosis requires careful medical and family history and the measurement of functional C1 inhibitor and C4 levels. Attenuated androgens, anti-fibrinolytics, and C1 inhibitor concentrates are used for long-term and preprocedure prophylaxis, but have significant drawbacks. C1 inhibitor concentrates and fresh frozen plasma are available for acute intervention. The mainstays of supportive care are airway monitoring, pain relief, hydration, and control of nausea. New agents such as recombinant C1 inhibitor, kallikrein inhibitors, and bradykinin inhibitors may offer safer and more tolerable treatments.

  4. White centered retinal hemorrhages in vitamin b(12) deficiency anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehetner, Claus; Bechrakis, Nikolaos E

    2011-05-01

    To report a case of severe vitamin B(12) deficiency anemia presenting with white centered retinal hemorrhages. Interventional case report. A 40-year-old man, general practitioner himself, presented with a 1-day history of diminished left visual acuity and a drop-shaped central scotoma. The corrected visual acuities were 20/20, OD and 20/100, OS. Ophthalmic examination revealed bilaterally pale tarsal conjunctiva, discretely icteric bulbar conjunctiva and disseminated white centered intraretinal hemorrhages with foveal involvement. OCT imaging through these lesions revealed a retinal thickening caused by a sub-ILM accumulation of hyperreflective and inhomogeneous deposits within the nerve fiber layer. Immediate laboratory work-up showed severe megaloblastic anemia caused by vitamin B(12) deficiency requiring erythrocyte transfusions. Most reports of white centered retinal hemorrhages have been described in patients with leukemic retinopathy and bacterial endocarditis. It is interesting that this case of vitamin B(12) deficiency anemia retinopathy has a clinically indistinguishable fundus appearance. This is probably due to the common pathology of capillary disruption and subsequent hemostatic fibrin plug formation. In megaloblastic anemia, direct anoxia results in endothelial dysfunction. The loss of impermeability allows extrusion of whole blood and subsequent diffusion from the disrupted site throughout and above the nerve fiber layer. Therefore the biomicroscopic pattern of white centered hemorrhages observed in anemic retinopathy is most likely due to the clot formation as the reparative sequence after capillary rupture.

  5. White Centered Retinal Hemorrhages in Vitamin B12 Deficiency Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claus Zehetner

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: To report a case of severe vitamin B12 deficiency anemia presenting with white centered retinal hemorrhages. Methods: Interventional case report. Results: A 40-year-old man, general practitioner himself, presented with a 1-day history of diminished left visual acuity and a drop-shaped central scotoma. The corrected visual acuities were 20/20, OD and 20/100, OS. Ophthalmic examination revealed bilaterally pale tarsal conjunctiva, discretely icteric bulbar conjunctiva and disseminated white centered intraretinal hemorrhages with foveal involvement. OCT imaging through these lesions revealed a retinal thickening caused by a sub-ILM accumulation of hyperreflective and inhomogeneous deposits within the nerve fiber layer. Immediate laboratory work-up showed severe megaloblastic anemia caused by vitamin B12 deficiency requiring erythrocyte transfusions. Discussion: Most reports of white centered retinal hemorrhages have been described in patients with leukemic retinopathy and bacterial endocarditis. It is interesting that this case of vitamin B12 deficiency anemia retinopathy has a clinically indistinguishable fundus appearance. This is probably due to the common pathology of capillary disruption and subsequent hemostatic fibrin plug formation. In megaloblastic anemia, direct anoxia results in endothelial dysfunction. The loss of impermeability allows extrusion of whole blood and subsequent diffusion from the disrupted site throughout and above the nerve fiber layer. Therefore the biomicroscopic pattern of white centered hemorrhages observed in anemic retinopathy is most likely due to the clot formation as the reparative sequence after capillary rupture.

  6. Hemolytic anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia - hemolytic ... bones that helps form all blood cells. Hemolytic anemia occurs when the bone marrow isn't making ... destroyed. There are several possible causes of hemolytic anemia. Red blood cells may be destroyed due to: ...

  7. Hereditary hemochromatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen A. Geller

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH is the most commonly identified autosomal recessive genetic disorder in the white population, characterized by increased intestinal iron absorption and secondary abnormal accumulation in parenchymal organs, not infrequently accompanied by functional impairment. This entity is associated with mutations of the HFE gene (located on the short arm of chromosome 6 at location 6p22.2; closely linked to the HLA-A3 locus, which encodes the HFE protein, a membrane protein thought to regulate iron absorption by affecting the interaction between transferrin receptor and transferrin.

  8. Etiology of anemia in primary hypothyroid subjects in a tertiary care center in Eastern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanchal Das

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The association of anemia with primary hypothyroidism has been common knowledge for many years. However; its pathogenesis is far from clear in many cases. Often the causes of anemia are manifold. Aims and objectives: In this study, we evaluated the causes of anemia in patients with primary hypothyroidism. Materials and Methods : Sixty adult nonpregnant untreated primary hypothyroid patients with anemia without any obvious cause were included. All patients were subjected to full medical history, clinical examination, biochemical and imaging studies. Serum iron profile, vitamin B12, folic acid, anti parietal cell antibody, anti TPO antibody, bone marrow study, and stool for occult blood, Coomb′s test, HPLC for hemoglobinopathies and complete hemogram with reticulocyte count were done and analyzed. Results: Normocytic, normochromic anemia was present in 31 patients (51.6% followed by microcytic anemia in 26 patients (43.3%. Six patients (10% had megaloblastic anemia with vitamin B12 deficiency including 3 cases of pernicious anemia. Two patients had combined deficiency of iron and vitamin B12. Conclusion: Normocytic normochromic anemia with normal bone marrow was commonest type of anemia in this study, followed by iron deficiency anemia.

  9. A long-term follow-up study of subtotal splenectomy in children with hereditary spherocytosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosman, Colin; Broens, P M A; Trzpis, M; Tamminga, R Y J

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hereditary spherocytosis (HS) is a heterogeneous hemolytic anemia treated with splenectomy in patients suffering from severe or moderate disease. Total splenectomy, however, renders patients vulnerable to overwhelming postsplenectomy infection despite preventive measures. Although

  10. Aplastic Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aplastic anemia is a rare but serious blood disorder. If you have it, your bone marrow doesn't make ... blood cells. There are different types, including Fanconi anemia. Causes include Toxic substances, such as pesticides, arsenic, ...

  11. Hereditary spherocytosis: Consequences of delayed diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah C Steward

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine whether patients with undiagnosed hereditary spherocytosis hospitalized for transfusions might have avoided hospitalization via earlier diagnosis. Study design: Charts of all (N = 30 patients with hereditary spherocytosis seen in pediatric hematology at West Virginia University-Charleston were reviewed. Family and transfusion history and presence of neonatal jaundice were recorded. Complete blood count and reticulocyte values during infancy were available for 20 of 30 patients, while baseline steady-state values were available for all 30. Results: Transfusions were given to 22 patients; 12 of 14 with an aplastic crisis were undiagnosed. In 10 of 12, the severity of anemia led to hospitalization (3 to intensive care. All 10 had prior mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration and/or red cell distribution width elevations and a history of neonatal jaundice; 7 of 10 had a positive family history. Conclusions: Undiagnosed hereditary spherocytosis may lead to inpatient transfusions for severe anemia. Earlier detection of hereditary spherocytosis is easily achievable and may reduce hospitalizations via closer monitoring.

  12. Hemolytic Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... worsen your condition or lead to complications. Hemolytic Anemia and Children Parents of children who have hemolytic anemia usually ... members, friends, and your child's classmates about hemolytic anemia. You also may want to tell your child's teachers or other caregivers about the condition. Let ...

  13. Fanconi anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... possibly given through a vein) to treat infections Blood transfusions to treat symptoms due to low blood counts ... have regular check-ups to screen for cancer. Alternative Names Fanconi's anemia; Anemia - Fanconi's Images Formed elements of blood References Bagby GC. Aplastic anemia and related bone ...

  14. Hemolytic anemias during pregnancy and the reproductive years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mintz, U.; Moohr, J.W.; Ultmann, J.E.

    1977-11-01

    Anemia is a common phenomenon in women during the reproductive years. In pregnancy, it is associated with an increased incidence of maternal-fetal morbidity and mortality. The approach to the investigation of anemic women suspected of having hemolytic anemia of either congenital or acquired etiology is the subject of this article. Various conditions in the pregnant women can have hematologic consequences for the newborn infant; these conditions include sensitization to fetal blood cells, infections, drug ingestion and the possession of genes for hereditary hemolytic disorders, which may be transmitted to the fetus. Because several forms of hemolytic anemias are hereditary or are caused by an altered gene, genetic consultation is important.

  15. Orofacial manifestations of hematological disorders: Anemia and hemostatic disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Titilope A Adeyemo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to review the literature and identify orofacial manifestations of hematological diseases, with particular reference to anemias and disorders of hemostasis. A computerized literature search using MEDLINE was conducted for published articles on orofacial manifestations of hematological diseases, with emphasis on anemia. Mesh phrases used in the search were: oral diseases AND anaemia; orofacial diseases AND anaemia; orofacial lesions AND anaemia; orofacial manifestations AND disorders of haemostasis. The Boolean operator "AND" was used to combine and narrow the searches. Anemic disorders associated with orofacial signs and symptoms include iron deficiency anemia, Plummer-Vinson syndrome, megaloblastic anemia, sickle cell anemia, thalassaemia and aplastic anemia. The manifestations include conjunctiva and facial pallor, atrophic glossitis, angular stomatitis, dysphagia, magenta tongue, midfacial overgrowth, osteoclerosis, osteomyelitis and paraesthesia/anesthesia of the mental nerve. Orofacial petechiae, conjunctivae hemorrhage, nose-bleeding, spontaneous and post-traumatic gingival hemorrhage and prolonged post-extraction bleeding are common orofacial manifestations of inherited hemostatic disorders such as von Willebrand′s disease and hemophilia. A wide array of anemic and hemostatic disorders encountered in internal medicine has manifestations in the oral cavity and the facial region. Most of these manifestations are non-specific, but should alert the hematologist and the dental surgeon to the possibilities of a concurrent disease of hemopoiesis or hemostasis or a latent one that may subsequently manifest itself.

  16. Alterations of red blood cell metabolome in overhydrated hereditary stomatocytosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Darghouth, D.; Koehl, B.; Heilier, J.F.; Madalinski, G.; Bovee, P.H.; Bosman, G.J.C.G.M.; Delaunay, J.; Junot, C.; Romeo, P.H.

    2011-01-01

    Overhydrated hereditary stomatocytosis, clinically characterized by hemolytic anemia, is a rare disorder of the erythrocyte membrane permeability to monovalent cations, associated with mutations in the Rh-associated glycoprotein gene. We assessed the red blood cell metabolome of 4 patients with this

  17. UV-repair is impaired in fibroblasts from patients with Fanconi's anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwaiger, H.; Hirsch-Kauffmann, M.; Schweiger, M.; Innsbruck Univ.

    1982-01-01

    Fanconi's anemia, a hereditary autosomal disease with chromosomal instability, elevated incidence of cancer and clinical symptoms is accompanied by a DNA repair deficiency. Fibroblasts from patients with Fanconi's anemia were found to be impaired in the DNA repair of UV damage. Nucleoid decondensation and recondensation after UV irradiation were less efficient in fibroblasts from patients with Fanconi's anemia than in those from a healthy proband. These data confirm our earlier findings that DNA ligase is deficient in Fanconi's anemia. (orig.)

  18. Pregnancy Complications: Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... online community Home > Complications & Loss > Pregnancy complications > Anemia Anemia E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... anemia at a prenatal care visit . What causes anemia? Usually, a woman becomes anemic (has anemia) because ...

  19. Anemia (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Anemia KidsHealth / For Parents / Anemia What's in this article? ... Deficiency Anemia in My Kids? Print What Is Anemia? Anemia is when the level of healthy red ...

  20. What Is Aplastic Anemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home / Anemia Aplastic Anemia Also known as What Is Aplastic anemia (a-PLAS-tik uh-NEE-me-uh) is ... heart, heart failure , infections, and bleeding. Severe aplastic anemia can even cause death. Overview Aplastic anemia is ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Hereditary pancreatitis Hereditary pancreatitis Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Hereditary pancreatitis is a genetic condition characterized by recurrent episodes ...

  2. Your Guide to Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Inherited Causes l Folate or iron deficiency l Fanconi anemia from poor diet l Shwachman-Diamond l Demand ... cells, leading to aplastic anemia. These conditions include Fanconi anemia, Shwachman-Diamond syndrome, dyskeratosis congenita, Diamond- Blackfan anemia, ...

  3. About Anemia (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español About Anemia KidsHealth / For Kids / About Anemia What's in this ... to every cell in your body. What Is Anemia? Anemia happens when a person doesn't have ...

  4. Learning about Hereditary Hemochromatosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Learning About Hereditary Hemochromatosis Enter Search Term(s): Español Research Funding An Overview Bioinformatics Current Grants Education and Training Funding Extramural Research ...

  5. Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, A D; Vase, P; Green, A

    1999-01-01

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a dominantly inherited disease characterized by telangiectatic lesions. The disease manifestations are variable and include epistaxis, gastrointestinal bleeding, pulmonary arteriovenous malformations and cerebral arteriovenous malformations. Early...

  6. Inborn anemias in mice. Progress report, 1 August 1979-15 July 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, S.E.; Russell, E.S.

    1980-08-01

    Four macrocytic anemias, four hemolytic anemias, nonhemolytic microcytic anemia, transitory siderocytic anemia, sex-linked iron-transport anemia, an ..cap alpha..-thalassemia, and a new target-cell anemia are under investigation in mice. Each of these blood dyscrasias is caused by the action of a unique mutant gene, which determines the structure of different intracellular molecules, and thus controls a different metabolic process. Thus the wide range of different hereditary anemias has considerable potential for uncovering many different aspects of hemopoietic homeostatic mechanisms in the mouse. Each anemia is studied through: (a) characterization of peripheral blood values; (b) determinations of radiosensitivity under a variety of conditions; (c) measurements of iron metabolism and heme synthesis; (d) histological and biochemical study of blood-forming tissue; (e) functional tests of the stem cell component; (f) examination of responses to erythroid stimuli; and (g) transplantation of tissue between individuals of differently affected genotypes.

  7. Coinheritance of hereditary spherocytosis and reversibility of cirrhosis in a young female patient with hereditary hemochromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höblinger, A; Erdmann, C; Strassburg, C P; Sauerbruch, T; Lammert, F

    2009-04-16

    Here we report a 33-years-old woman with hereditary spherocytosis and hemochromatosis due to homozygosity for the C282Y mutation of the HFE gene. The coinheritance of both conditions led to severe iron overload and liver cirrhosis at young age. The patient was treated by repeated phlebotomy, and reversibility of cirrhosis was documented by transient elastography. This report discusses the pathophysiology of iron accumulation in patients with hemolytic anemia combined with HFE C282Y homozygosity. The case indicates that patients with hematological disorders characterized by increased erythropoetic activity should be screened for HFE mutations.

  8. Vitamin B12 deficiency - a major cause of megaloblastic anaemia in patients attending a tertiary care hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, S.P.; Kakepoto, G.N.; Iqbal, S.P.

    2009-01-01

    Folate and vitamin B12 deficiencies have been known to cause megaloblastic anaemia. Since the deficiencies of these two vitamins are very common in Pakistani population, it would be imperative to investigate their role in causing megaloblastic anaemia. The objective of this study was to find out the contribution of folate and vitamin B12 deficiencies in causing megaloblastic anaemia in our patient population. Methods: In this retrospective cohort study, clinical records of 220 patients (101 females and 119 males with an age range of 1 - 80 years) who presented themselves with macrocytic anaemia at the Aga Khan University Hospital were collected. Data pertaining to complete blood count and serum levels of folate and vitamin B12 were analysed. Results: The mean haemoglobin (Hb) level was 6.8 +- 0.2 gm/dl. Sixty-nine percent of the patients had severe anaemia (Hb<8 gm/dl). Mean +- SEM values of haemoglobin, serum folate and serum B12 were not significantly different between males and females (Hb 6.4 +- 0.3 gm/dl vs 6.3 +- 0.3 gm/dl; folate 6.9 +- 0.8 mu g/ml vs 7.8 +- 1 mu g/ml; B12 259 +- 65 mu g/ml vs 225 +- 45 mu g/ml, respectively). Linear regression analysis showed that serum folate was inversely related with the mean corpuscular volume (MCV, p=0.04). Spearman's correlation analysis indicated an inverse mild association between MCV and serum folate (correlation coefficient= -0.18). Folate deficiency was 43.4%, while vitamin B12 deficiency was 78.5% in these patients. Seventy-one percent of folate-deficient patients had vitamin B12 deficiency as well, while 26.1% of patients with B12 deficiency had a co-occurrence of folate deficiency. Conclusion: Vitamin B12 deficiency appears to be the major factor leading to megaloblastic anaemia in our study population. Inadequate dietary intake, over-cooking of our food and poor absorption might be contributing to high prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency in this population. (author)

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency ... iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency ... anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency ... anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor ...

  12. APLASTIC ANEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Made Dharma Laksmi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Aplastic Anemia describes a disorder of the clinical syndrome is marked by a deficiency of red blood cells, neutrophils, monocytes and platelets in the absence of other forms of bone marrow damage. Aplastic anemia is classified as a rare disease in developed countries the incidence of 3-6 cases / 1 million inhabitants / year. The exact cause of someone suffering from aplastic anemia also can not be established with certainty, but there are several sources of potential risk factors. Prognosis or course of the disease varies widely aplastic anemia, but without treatment generally gives a poor prognosis /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  13. Prevalence of celiac disease in nutritional anemia at a tertiary care center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavimandan, Amit; Sharma, Meenakshi; Verma, Anil K; Das, Prasenjit; Mishra, Prabhash; Sinha, Sanjeev; Mohan, Anant; Sreenivas, V; Datta Gupta, Siddhartha; Makharia, Govind K

    2014-03-01

    While anemia occurs in 80 % to 90 % of patients with celiac disease (CD), it may be the sole manifestation of CD. The prevalence of CD in Indian patients with nutritional anemia is not known. Adolescent and adult patients presenting with nutritional anemia were prospectively screened for CD using IgA anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody (anti-tTG Ab) followed, if positive, by upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and duodenal biopsy. Ninety-six patients [mean ± SD age 32.1 ± 13.1 years and median duration of anemia 11 months (range 1 to 144 months)] were screened. Of these patients, 80 had iron deficiency anemia, 11 had megaloblastic anemia, and 5 had dimorphic anemia. Seventy-three patients were on hematinics and 36.4 % had received blood transfusions. Nineteen had a history of chronic diarrhea and the mean ± SD duration of diarrhea in them was 9.7 ± 35.8 months. IgA anti-tTG Ab was positive in 13 patients, of whom 12 agreed to undergo duodenal biopsy. Ten patients had villous atrophy (Marsh grade 3a in three, 3b in one, and 3c in six) and two did not. Thus, 10 patients with nutritional anemia (iron deficiency 9, vitamin B12 deficiency 1) were diagnosed to have CD. On multivariate logistic regression, age, duration of symptoms, and presence of diarrhea were found to be the predictors of CD. All the patients with CD were put on gluten-free diet and with iron and vitamin supplementations and showed a significant improvement in hemoglobin concentration. CD screening should be included in the work up of otherwise unexplained nutritional anemia.

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... detect signs of iron-deficiency anemia and help rule out other types of anemia. Treatment will explain ... your blood. More testing may be needed to rule out other types of anemia. Tests for gastrointestinal ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you are diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia. Risk Factors You may have an increased risk for iron- ... iron-deficiency anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... may require intravenous (IV) iron therapy or a blood transfusion . Iron supplements Your doctor may recommend that you ... Anemia Aplastic Anemia Arrhythmia Blood Donation Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Heart-Healthy Lifestyle Changes Heart Failure Hemolytic Anemia ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... view the colon directly. What if my doctor thinks something else is causing my iron-deficiency anemia? ... deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in premature ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to moderate iron-deficiency anemia, or red blood cell transfusion for severe iron-deficiency anemia. You may ... body needs iron to make healthy red blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blood Transfusion Heart-Healthy Lifestyle Changes Heart Failure Hemolytic Anemia Hemophilia Pernicious Anemia Restless Legs Syndrome Von Willebrand Disease Other Resources NHLBI resources Your Guide to Anemia [ ...

  20. Severe Aplastic Anemia (SAA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page Print this page My Cart Severe aplastic anemia (SAA) Severe aplastic anemia (SAA) is a disease ... leukemia (ALL) Other diseases What is severe aplastic anemia (SAA)? SAA is a bone marrow disease. The ...

  1. What Is Anemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Intramural Research Home / Anemia Anemia Also known as Iron-poor blood , Low blood , ... you or your child diagnosed with Diamond-Blackfan anemia? The registry is collecting information from people with ...

  2. Fanconi Anemia Research Fund

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Support Publications Fundraising News What is the Fanconi Anemia Research Fund? Fanconi anemia is an inherited disease that can lead to ... population. Lynn and Dave Frohnmayer started the Fanconi Anemia Research Fund, in 1989 to find effective treatments ...

  3. Anemia and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Advocacy Toolkit Home For Patients Blood Disorders Anemia Anemia and Pregnancy Your body goes through significant changes ... becoming anemic. back to top Is Pregnancy-Related Anemia Preventable? Good nutrition is the best way to ...

  4. UV-repair is impaired in fibroblasts from patients with Fanconi's anemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwaiger, H.; Hirsch-Kauffmann, M.; Schweiger, M.

    1982-05-01

    Fanconi's anemia, a hereditary autosomal disease with chromosomal instability, elevated incidence of cancer and clinical symptoms is accompanied by a DNA repair deficiency. Fibroblasts from patients with Fanconi's anemia were found to be impaired in the DNA repair of UV damage. Nucleoid decondensation and recondensation after UV irradiation were less efficient in fibroblasts from patients with Fanconi's anemia than in those from a healthy proband. These data confirm our earlier findings that DNA ligase is deficient in Fanconi's anemia.

  5. Hereditary Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, LenhAnh P.; Grundfast, Kenneth M.

    1997-01-01

    This article discusses inheritance patterns in hearing loss, epidemiology, clues to genetic causes, locating genes that cause hereditary disorders, genes related to hearing loss disorders in individuals with Usher syndrome, Waardenburg syndrome, Treacher-Collins syndrome, Branchio-oto-renal and Pendred syndromes, and the significance of finding…

  6. Hereditary periodic fever syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McDermott, MF; Frenkel, J

    Hereditary periodic fever syndromes are defined by recurrent attacks of generalised inflammation for which no infectious or auto-immune cause can be identified. For most of these disorders, the molecular basis has recently been elucidated. This has opened the prospect of novel therapeutic

  7. Fanconi anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soulier, Jean

    2011-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is the most frequent inherited cause of BM failure (BMF). Fifteen FANC genes have been identified to date, the most prevalent being FANCA, FANCC, FANCG, and FANCD2. In addition to classical presentations with progressive BMF during childhood and a positive chromosome breakage test in the blood, atypical clinical and/or biological situations can be seen in which a FA diagnosis has to be confirmed or eliminated. For this, a range of biological tools have been developed, including analysis of skin fibroblasts. FA patients experience a strong selective pressure in the BM that predisposes to clonal evolution and to the emergence in their teens or young adulthood of myelodysplasia syndrome (MDS) and/or acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with a specific pattern of somatic chromosomal lesions. The cellular mechanisms underlying (1) the hematopoietic defect which leads to progressive BMF and (2) somatic clonal evolutions in this background, are still largely elusive. Elucidation of these mechanisms at the molecular and cellular levels should be useful to understand the physiopathology of the disease and to adapt the follow-up and treatment of FA patients. This may also ultimately benefit older, non-FA patients with aplastic anemia, MDS/AML for whom FA represents a model genetic condition.

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... anemia, your doctor may order the following blood tests to diagnose iron-deficiency anemia: Complete blood count (CBC) to ... than normal when viewed under a microscope. Different tests help your doctor diagnose iron-deficiency anemia. In iron-deficiency anemia, blood ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... en español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type of anemia that occurs if you do not ... iron-deficiency anemia and help rule out other types of anemia. Treatment will explain treatment-related complications ...

  10. Anemia (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Anemia KidsHealth / For Teens / Anemia What's in this article? ... Enough Iron Print en español Anemia What Is Anemia? Lots of teens are tired. With all the ...

  11. Inborn anemias in mice. Progress report, 1 May 1977--31 July 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, S.E.; Russell, E.S.

    1978-08-01

    Hereditary anemias of mice have been the chief objects of investigation. At present under study are four macrocytic anemias, four hemolytic anemias, nonhemolytic microcytic anemia, transitory siderocytic anemia, sex-linked iron-transport anemia, and the autoimmune hemolytic anemia of NZB. Each of these blood dyscrasias is caused by the action of a unique mutant gene, which determines the structure of different intracellular molecules, and thus controls a different metabolic process. Thus our wide range of different hereditary anemias has considerable potential for uncovering many different aspects of hemopoietic homeostatic mechanisms in the mouse. Each anemia is studied through: characterization of peripheral blood values, determinations of radiosensitivity under a variety of conditions, measurements of iron metabolism and heme synthesis, histological and biochemical study of blood-forming tissue, functional tests of the stem cell component, examination of responses to erythroid stimuli, and transplantation of tissue between individuals of differently affected genotypes. Considerable effort is devoted to perfection of hematologic, cell culture, and transplant methods to make these techniques useful in dealing with special problems associated with abnormal function.

  12. Hereditary breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Martin J; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 are only detected in 25% of families with a strong history of breast cancer, though hereditary factors are expected to be involved in the remaining families with no recognized mutation. Molecular characterization is expected to provide new insight...... into the tumor biology to guide the search of new high-risk alleles and provide better classification of the growing number of BRCA1/2 variants of unknown significance (VUS). In this review, we provide an overview of hereditary breast cancer, its genetic background, and clinical implications, before focusing...... on the pathologically and molecular features associated with the disease. Recent transcriptome and genome profiling studies of tumor series from BRCA1/2 mutation carriers as well as familial non-BRCA1/2 will be discussed. Special attention is paid to its association with molecular breast cancer subtypes as well...

  13. Parvovirose e anemia acentuada em paciente imunocompetente Parvovirus and severe anemia in an immunocompetent patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Annete Damasceno

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Paciente de 16 anos, sexo masculino, com vírus da imunodeficiência humana (HIV negativo e sem doença hematológica prévia, desenvolveu anemia acentuada devido à infecção por parvovírus B19. A doença apresentou evolução bifásica, com acalmia clínica e retorno dos sintomas após 15 dias. Ao exame físico, apresentava-se descorado e febril, sem adeno e organomegalias, com sinais de insuficiência cardíaca. O aspirado de medula óssea mostrava megaloblastos com nucléolos aberrantes e, na histologia, foram observadas células gigantes com nucleolação aberrante e presença do corpúsculo de inclusão nuclear típico da parvovirose. O exame de imuno-histoquímica mostrou positividade para anticorpo específico para parvovírus. A sorologia comprovou a infecção.A 16-year-old human immunodeficiency virus (HIV negative male patient without hematological disease developed acute anemia due to parvovirus B19 infection. The disease showed a biphasic evolution: clinical remission and return of symptoms after 15 days. Physical examination revealed paleness and fever, neither adeno nor organomegalies, and signs of heart failure. The bone marrow aspiration showed megaloblasts with aberrant nucleoli. As far as histology is concerned, giant cells with aberrant nucleoli and the presence of intranuclear inclusions typical of Parvoviruses were observed. Immunohistochemistry revealed positivity for specific Parvovirus antibody. Serology confirmed parvovirus B19 infection.

  14. Hereditary pancreatitis for the endoscopist

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Milan R.; Eppolito, Amanda L.; Willingham, Field F.

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis shares a majority of clinical and morphologic features with chronic alcoholic pancreatitis, but may present at an earlier age. The term hereditary pancreatitis has primarily been associated with mutations in the serine protease 1 gene (PRSS1) which encodes for cationic trypsinogen. PRSS1 mutations account for approximately 68–81% of hereditary pancreatitis. Mutations in other genes, primarily serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 1 (SPINK1) and the cystic fibrosis trans...

  15. EAMJ Oct Hereditary.indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HEREDITARY GINGIVAL FIBROMATOSIS: REPORT OF FAMILY CASE SERIES. E. G. Wagaiyu ... Senior Lecturer, Department of Periodontology/Community and Preventive Dentistry, ... fibrous connective tissue held in chronically inflamed.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary fructose intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Twitter Home Health Conditions Hereditary fructose intolerance Hereditary fructose intolerance Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Hereditary fructose intolerance is a condition that affects a person's ...

  17. Anemia Due to Excessive Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hemolytic Anemia Hemoglobin C, S-C, and E Diseases Iron Deficiency Anemia Sickle Cell Disease Thalassemias Vitamin Deficiency Anemia (See ... Hemolytic Anemia Hemoglobin C, S-C, and E Diseases Iron Deficiency Anemia Sickle Cell Disease Thalassemias Vitamin Deficiency Anemia NOTE: ...

  18. Hereditary angioedema in women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouillet Laurence

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Women with hereditary angioedema (HAE are more likely to be symptomatic that men. Hormonal factors (puberty, contraception, pregnancy,.... play a significant role in the precipitation or worsening of the condition in women. So, combined contraceptive pills are not indicated and progestogen pill must be preferred. During pregnancy, attack rate can increase (38-48% of women. C1Inhibitor concentrate and tranexamic acid can be used during pregnancy. Attenuated androgens for long term prophylaxis are effective but side effects appear more often in female patients. These side effects are dose dependant and can be attenuated by titrating the dose down the lowest effective level.

  19. Hereditary Angioedema in Childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Line; Bygum, Anette

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare inherited disease that is often difficult to diagnose. We report a case of a 9-year-old boy with a spontaneous mutation causing HAE, diagnosed after a life-threatening episode of angioedema of the head and upper respiratory tract after a 5-year history of r...... of recurrent skin swellings and abdominal pain leading to several hospital admissions. The aim of this report is to direct focus on this rare disease, which can be treated effectively, to diminish morbidity and mortality of children suffering from undiagnosed HAE....

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... heart failure . Increased risk of infections Motor or cognitive development delays in children Pregnancy complications, such as ... for iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about exciting research areas that NHLBI is exploring about iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Hemophilia Pernicious Anemia Restless Legs Syndrome Von Willebrand Disease Other Resources NHLBI resources Your Guide to Anemia [PDF, 1.54MB] Cardiovascular Health Study Recipient Epidemiology Donor Studies (REDS) program ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... hemoglobin levels. This was associated with a greater risk of death even with mild anemia. Now, anemia in older adults is recognized as an important condition. NHLBI Small Business Program. Through the NHLBI Small Business Program , we ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to improve health through research and scientific discovery. Improving health with current research Learn about the following ... deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in premature ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... contribute to differences in disease severity and how patients respond to treatment. The NHLBI Strategic Vision highlights ... Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases) Avoiding Anemia (National ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how ... Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases) Avoiding Anemia (National ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... deficiency anemia can cause serious complications, including heart failure and development delays in children. Explore this Health ... lead to iron-deficiency anemia include: End-stage kidney failure, where there is blood loss during dialysis. ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in ... Visit Children and Clinical Studies to hear experts, parents, and children talk about their experiences with clinical ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... may be diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia if you have low iron or ferritin levels in your blood. More testing may be needed to rule out other types of anemia. Tests for gastrointestinal ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... deficiency anemia can cause serious complications, including heart failure and development delays in children. Explore this Health ... to iron-deficiency anemia include: End-stage kidney failure, where there is blood loss during dialysis. People ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... mg and women need 18 mg. After age 51, both men and women need 8 mg. Pregnant ... for iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about exciting research areas that NHLBI is exploring about iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia. These conditions include: Intestinal and digestive conditions, such as celiac disease; inflammatory bowel diseases, ... iron-deficiency anemia , such as bleeding in the digestive or urinary tract or heavy menstrual bleeding, your ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... less than 12 g/dl for women is diagnostic of anemia. In iron-deficiency anemia, red blood ... both full-term and preterm infants. Look for Diagnosis will explain tests and procedures that your doctor ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... less than 12 g/dl for women is diagnostic of anemia. In iron-deficiency anemia, red blood ... physical exam, or order blood tests or other diagnostic tests. Physical exam Your doctor may ask about ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-fortified foods that have iron added. Vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you choose nonmeat ... Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases) Avoiding Anemia (National ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen ... the size of your liver and spleen. Blood tests Based on results from blood tests to screen ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... from developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, eggs, lean red meat, ... signs of iron-deficiency anemia include: Brittle nails ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... heavy menstrual periods. Individuals with a gene for hemophilia, including symptomatic female carriers who have heavy menstrual ... Heart-Healthy Lifestyle Changes Heart Failure Hemolytic Anemia Hemophilia Pernicious Anemia Restless Legs Syndrome Von Willebrand Disease ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... your doctor may recommend you eat heart-healthy foods or control other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... learning how having iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. ... iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ...

  1. Anemia in the Newborn

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Overview of Horseshoe Kidney Additional Content Medical News Anemia in the Newborn By Andrew W. Walter, MS ... for the Professional Version Blood Problems in Newborns Anemia in the Newborn Hemolytic Disease of the Newborn ...

  2. Vitamin Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are unique to specific vitamin deficiencies. Folate-deficiency anemia risk factors include: Undergoing hemodialysis for kidney failure. ... the metabolism of folate. Vitamin B-12 deficiency anemia risk factors include: Lack of intrinsic factor. Most ...

  3. Sickle cell anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia - sickle cell; Hemoglobin SS disease (Hb SS); Sickle cell disease ... Sickle cell anemia is caused by an abnormal type of hemoglobin called hemoglobin S. Hemoglobin is a protein inside red blood cells ...

  4. Side Effects: Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia is a side effect of cancer treatments, including chemotherapy and radiation therapy. It can make women and men feel fatigued, dizzy, and short of breath. Learn how to manage fatigue caused by anemia during cancer treatment.

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... endoscopy or colonoscopy, to stop bleeding. Healthy lifestyle changes To help you meet your daily recommended iron ... iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and iron-fortified foods that have iron ... Anemia Restless Legs Syndrome Von Willebrand Disease Other Resources NHLBI resources Your Guide to Anemia [PDF, 1. ...

  7. Sickle cell anemia.

    OpenAIRE

    ŘÍHOVÁ, Tereza

    2013-01-01

    This thesis is about the disease called sickle cell anemia, or drepanocytosis. In this thesis is described the history of the disease, pathophysiology, laboratory features, various clinical features, diferencial diagnosis, quality of life in sickle cell anemia and therapy.

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... leaving cells where it is stored or from being absorbed in the duodenum, the first part of ... treatments for iron-deficiency anemia. Living With After being diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia, it is important ...

  9. Startle responses in hereditary hyperekplexia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijssen, M. A.; Voorkamp, L. M.; Padberg, G. W.; van Dijk, J. G.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with hereditary hyperekplexia have excessive startle responses that are accompanied by transient stiffness and also continuous stiffness in infancy. A point of mutation has been identified for the major form of hereditary hyperekplexia in the gene encoding the alpha 1 subunit of

  10. Startle responses in hereditary hyperekplexia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijssen, MAJ; Voorkamp, LM; Padberg, GW; vanDijk, JG

    Background: Patients with hereditary hyperekplexia have excessive startle responses that are accompanied by transient stiffness and also continuous stiffness in infancy. A point of mutation has been identified for the major form of hereditary hyperekplexia in the gene encoding the alpha 1 subunit of

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... exploring about iron-deficiency anemia. Read more New treatments for disorders that lead to iron-deficiency anemia. We are ... and other pathways. This could help develop new therapies for conditions that ... behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend you eat heart-healthy foods or control other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español ... bleeding Consuming less than recommended daily amounts of iron Iron-deficiency anemia can be caused by getting ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency anemia is a ... address the cause of your iron deficiency, such as any underlying bleeding. If undiagnosed or untreated, iron- ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Topics section only, or the News and Resources section. NHLBI Entire Site NHLBI Entire Site Health ... español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type of anemia that occurs if you do not have enough iron in your body. People with mild or moderate iron-deficiency anemia ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Topics News & Resources Intramural Research Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer ... and symptoms as well as complications from iron-deficiency anemia. Research for Your Health The NHLBI is part of the U.S. Department ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend you eat heart-healthy foods or control other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  18. Iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia - iron deficiency ... iron from old red blood cells. Iron deficiency anemia develops when your body's iron stores run low. ... You may have no symptoms if the anemia is mild. Most of the time, ... slowly. Symptoms may include: Feeling weak or tired more often ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Medicine (TOPMed) Program Non-NHLBI resources Anemia (National Library of Medicine, MedlinePlus) Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease ( ... Supplement Fact Sheet (NIH) Iron-Deficiency Anemia (National Library of Medicine, MedlinePlus) Building 31 31 Center Drive ...

  20. Hereditary neuromuscular diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oezsarlak, O. E-mail: ozkan.ozsarlak@uza.be; Schepens, E.; Parizel, P.M.; Goethem, J.W. van; Vanhoenacker, F.; Schepper, A.M. de; Martin, J.J

    2001-12-01

    This article presents the actual classification of neuromuscular diseases based on present expansion of our knowledge and understanding due to genetic developments. It summarizes the genetic and clinical presentations of each disorder together with CT findings, which we studied in a large group of patients with neuromuscular diseases. The muscular dystrophies as the largest and most common group of hereditary muscle diseases will be highlighted by giving detailed information about the role of CT and MRI in the differential diagnosis. The radiological features of neuromuscular diseases are atrophy, hypertrophy, pseudohypertrophy and fatty infiltration of muscles on a selective basis. Although the patterns and distribution of involvement are characteristic in some of the diseases, the definition of the type of disease based on CT scan only is not always possible.

  1. Hereditary colorectal cancer diagnostics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarskov, Louise; Holck, Susanne; Bernstein, Inge

    2012-01-01

    BackgroundThe hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) subset of tumours can broadly be divided into tumours caused by an underlying mismatch-repair gene mutation, referred to as Lynch syndrome, and those that develop in families with similar patterns of heredity but without disease......-predisposing germline mismatch repair mutations, referred to as familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX). Recognition of HNPCC-associated colorectal cancers is central since surveillance programmes effectively reduce morbidity and mortality. The characteristic morphological features linked to Lynch syndrome can aid...... in the identification of this subset, whereas the possibility to use morphological features as an indicator of FCCTX is uncertain.Objective and methodsTo perform a detailed morphological evaluation of HNPCC-associated colorectal cancers and demonstrate significant differences between tumours associated with FCCTX...

  2. Hereditary spastic paraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackstone, Craig

    2018-01-01

    The hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) are a heterogeneous group of neurologic disorders with the common feature of prominent lower-extremity spasticity, resulting from a length-dependent axonopathy of corticospinal upper motor neurons. The HSPs exist not only in "pure" forms but also in "complex" forms that are associated with additional neurologic and extraneurologic features. The HSPs are among the most genetically diverse neurologic disorders, with well over 70 distinct genetic loci, for which about 60 mutated genes have already been identified. Numerous studies elucidating the molecular pathogenesis underlying HSPs have highlighted the importance of basic cellular functions - especially membrane trafficking, mitochondrial function, organelle shaping and biogenesis, axon transport, and lipid/cholesterol metabolism - in axon development and maintenance. An encouragingly small number of converging cellular pathogenic themes have been identified for the most common HSPs, and some of these pathways present compelling targets for future therapies. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Hereditary chronic pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mössner Joachim

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hereditary chronic pancreatitis (HCP is a very rare form of early onset chronic pancreatitis. With the exception of the young age at diagnosis and a slower progression, the clinical course, morphological features and laboratory findings of HCP do not differ from those of patients with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis. As well, diagnostic criteria and treatment of HCP resemble that of chronic pancreatitis of other causes. The clinical presentation is highly variable and includes chronic abdominal pain, impairment of endocrine and exocrine pancreatic function, nausea and vomiting, maldigestion, diabetes, pseudocysts, bile duct and duodenal obstruction, and rarely pancreatic cancer. Fortunately, most patients have a mild disease. Mutations in the PRSS1 gene, encoding cationic trypsinogen, play a causative role in chronic pancreatitis. It has been shown that the PRSS1 mutations increase autocatalytic conversion of trypsinogen to active trypsin, and thus probably cause premature, intrapancreatic trypsinogen activation disturbing the intrapancreatic balance of proteases and their inhibitors. Other genes, such as the anionic trypsinogen (PRSS2, the serine protease inhibitor, Kazal type 1 (SPINK1 and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR have been found to be associated with chronic pancreatitis (idiopathic and hereditary as well. Genetic testing should only be performed in carefully selected patients by direct DNA sequencing and antenatal diagnosis should not be encouraged. Treatment focuses on enzyme and nutritional supplementation, pain management, pancreatic diabetes, and local organ complications, such as pseudocysts, bile duct or duodenal obstruction. The disease course and prognosis of patients with HCP is unpredictable. Pancreatic cancer risk is elevated. Therefore, HCP patients should strongly avoid environmental risk factors for pancreatic cancer.

  4. Open-heart surgery using a centrifugal pump: a case of hereditary spherocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzaki, Yuichi; Tomioka, Hideyuki; Saso, Masaki; Azuma, Takashi; Saito, Satoshi; Aomi, Shigeyuki; Yamazaki, Kenji

    2016-08-26

    Hereditary spherocytosis is a genetic, frequently familial hemolytic blood disease characterized by varying degrees of hemolytic anemia, splenomegaly, and jaundice. There are few reports on adult open-heart surgery for patients with hereditary spherocytosis. We report a rare case of an adult open-heart surgery associated with hereditary spherocytosis. A 63-year-old man was admitted for congestive heart failure due to bicuspid aortic valve, aortic valve regurgitation, and sinus of subaortic aneurysm. The family history, the microscopic findings of the blood smear, and the characteristic osmotic fragility confirmed the diagnosis of hereditary spherocytosis. Furthermore, splenectomy had not been undertaken preoperatively. The patient underwent a successful operation by means of a centrifugal pump. Haptoglobin was used during the cardiopulmonary bypass, and a biological valve was selected to prevent hemolysis. No significant hemolysis occurred intraoperatively or postoperatively. There are no previous reports of patients with hereditary spherocytosis, and bicuspid aortic valve. We have successfully performed an adult open-heart surgery using a centrifugal pump in an adult patient suffering from hereditary spherocytosis and bicuspid aortic valve.

  5. Pulmonary hypertension in chronic hemolytic anemias: Pathophysiology and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haw, Alexandra; Palevsky, Harold I

    2018-04-01

    Pulmonary hypertension has emerged as a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with hemoglobinopathies and chronic hemolytic anemias. These hematological diseases include - but are not limited to - sickle cell disease (SCD), thalassemia, paroxysmal nocturnal hematuria, and hereditary spherocytosis. Although most studies have been based on the use of echocardiography as a screening tool for pulmonary hypertension as opposed to the gold standard of right heart catheterization for definitive diagnosis, the association between chronic hemolytic anemia and pulmonary hypertension is evident. Studies have shown that patients with SCD and a tricuspid regurgitant velocity (TRV) ≥ 2.5 m/sec are at increased risk of pulmonary hypertension and are at increased mortality risk. Additional markers of risk of pulmonary hypertension and increased mortality include a pro-BNP >160 pg/mL combined with a 6-min walk distance of pulmonary hypertension in chronic hemolytic anemias. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... artérielle Heart Disease Mineral & Bone Disorder Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease What is anemia? Anemia is a condition in ... as they should. How is anemia related to chronic kidney disease? Anemia commonly occurs in people with chronic kidney ...

  7. Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cysts Solitary Kidney Your Kidneys & How They Work Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease What is anemia? Anemia is a condition in which the body ... function as well as they should. How is anemia related to chronic kidney disease? Anemia commonly occurs ...

  8. Hereditary familial vestibular degenerative diseases.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, J.; Alphen, A.M. van; Wagenaar, M.; Huygen, P.L.M.; Hoogenraad, C.C.; Hasson, T.; Koekkoek, S.K.; Bohne, B.A.; Zeeuw, C.I. de

    2001-01-01

    Identification of genes involved in hereditary vestibular disease is growing at a remarkable pace. Mutant mouse technology can be an important tool for understanding the biological mechanism of human vestibular diseases.

  9. Hereditary forms of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bella, V.

    2009-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common oncologic disease in the female population. Besides the sporadic occurrence it occurs in the familial and hereditary form. Persons with the occurrence of positive family anamnesis of breast cancer should be actively investigated. In the indicated cases it is necessary to send the woman to genetic examination. In case that the hereditary form of breast cancer is affirmed it is necessary to examine her family relatives. Women with the hereditary form of breast cancer occur in about 5 – 10 % portion from all women diagnosed with breast cancer. Nowadays we already know that 80 % of hereditary breast cancers are due to germ mutations in BRCA 1 and BRCA 2 gene. Persons with detected gene mutations must be dispensarized in the centres intended for it. (author)

  10. Reliability of the dual-isotope Schilling test for the diagnosis of pernicious anemia or malabsorption syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domstad, P.A.; Choy, Y.C.; Kim, E.E.; DeLand, F.H.

    1981-01-01

    To evaluate the dual-isotope Schilling test for the diagnosis of pernicious anemia or malabsorption syndrome, 65 studies were selected for clinical correlation. Criteria for pernicious anemia included mean corpuscular volume greater than 100 cu micrometer, serum B12 greater than 100 ng/l, megaloblastic marrow, achlorhydria, reticulocytes greater than 5% on B12 therapy, atrophic gastritis, and elevated serum antibodies to parietal cells or intrinsic factor. Criteria for malabsorption syndrome included: decreased serum B12, folate, and carotene; increased fecal fat; abnormal D-xylose absorption; abnormal radiographic and biopsy findings. 58 Co-cyanocobalamin and 57 Co-cyanocobalamin bound to intrinsic factor were given orally to fasting patients; 1 mg of nonradioactive B12 was injected intramuscularly within two hours. Aliquots of 24-hour urine samples were counted. If the excretion of 58 Co was less than 7% and the 57 Co/ 58 Co ratio was greater than 1.7, the test indicated pernicious anemia; a ratio less than 1.7 indicated malabsorption syndrome. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the dual-isotope Schilling test were 83%, 98%, and 94% for pernicious anemia, and 67%, 90%, and 86% for malabsorption syndrome, respectively

  11. CLINICAL APPROACH TO HEREDITARY HEMORRHAGIC TELANGIECTASIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Hachmeriyan

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT or Rendu-Osler-Weber disease is a rare syndrome, inherited as an autosomal dominant trait with incidence of 1/10000. The clinical manifestations are due to vascular malformations and predisposition to hemorrhages in different organs, the leading symptom being recurrent epistaxis. If diagnosed with HHT, the patient and his relatives and especially children have to be screened for occult vascular malformations.Case report: A 30 years old woman was treated for cerebral stroke, epistaxis, anemia, arterio-venous malformations for over 6 months. Only at this point she was diagnosed with HHT, after noticing the typical mucosal changes. Focused family history revealed symptoms of HHT in her only child, her father, aunt and two cousins The child was screened for occult vascular malformations – attainment of the nasal mucosa, lungs, gastrointestinal system, liver and brain. Pulmonary and gastrointestinal arterio-venous malformations were proven.Conclusion: Any case of recurrent epistaxis should be evaluated for HHT. After confirmation of the diagnosis every patient and close relatives have to be screened for attainment of other organs and followed up in order to prevent severe life threatening complications.

  12. Hereditary pancreatitis: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael KL

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Kara L Raphael, Field F Willingham Division of Digestive Diseases, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA Abstract: Hereditary pancreatitis (HP is a rare cause of acute, recurrent acute, and chronic pancreatitis. It may present similarly to other causes of acute and chronic pancreatitis, and often there has been a protracted evaluation prior to the diagnosis of HP. Since it was first described in 1952, multiple genetic defects that affect the action of digestive enzymes in the pancreas have been implicated. The most common mutations involve the PRSS1, CFTR, SPINK1, and CTRC genes. New mutations in these genes and previously unrecognized mutations in other genes are being discovered due to the increasing use of next-generation genomic sequencing. While the inheritance pathways of these genetic mutations may be variable and complex, sometimes involving coinheritance of other mutations, the clinical presentation of patients tends to be similar. Interactions with environmental triggers often play a role. Patients tend to present at an early age (prior to the second decade of life and have a significantly increased risk for the development of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Patients with HP may develop sequelae of chronic pancreatitis such as strictures and fluid collections as well as exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. Management of patients with HP involves avoidance of environmental triggers, surveillance for pancreatic adenocarcinoma, medical therapy for endocrine and exocrine insufficiency, pain management, and endoscopic or surgical treatment for complications. Care for affected patients should be individualized, with an emphasis on early diagnosis and multidisciplinary involvement to develop a comprehensive treatment strategy. Keywords: pancreatic cancer, chronic pancreatitis, idiopathic pancreatitis, pancreatitis, familial pancreatitis, genetic mutations

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... grams per deciliter (g/dl) for men and less than 12 g/dl for women is diagnostic of anemia. In iron-deficiency anemia, ... blood levels of iron will be low, or less than 10 micromoles per liter (mmol/L) for both men and women. Normal levels are 10 to 30 mmol/L. ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... loss and lead to iron-deficiency anemia. Common causes of blood loss that lead to iron-deficiency anemia include: Bleeding in your GI tract, from an ulcer, colon cancer, or regular use of medicines such as aspirin ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron supplements work best to treat iron-deficiency anemia in children who do not consume the daily recommended amount ... and Clinical Studies to hear experts, parents, and children talk about their experiences with clinical ... Anemia Arrhythmia Blood Donation Blood Tests Blood ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia. Search the NIH Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools (RePORT) to learn about research that ... iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... how having iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in premature or very small newborns . In collaboration with the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... blocks the intestine from taking up iron. Other medical conditions Other medical conditions that may lead to iron-deficiency anemia ... daily amount of iron. If you have other medical conditions that cause iron-deficiency anemia , such as ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... if you are diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia. Risk Factors You may have an increased risk for iron-deficiency anemia because of your age, ... or sex. Age You may be at increased risk for iron deficiency at certain ages: Infants between ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Are you curious about how inflammation from chronic diseases can cause iron-deficiency anemia? Read more When there is ... DBDR) is a leader in research on the causes, prevention, and treatment of blood diseases, including iron-deficiency anemia. Search the NIH Research ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... stores are developed during the third trimester of pregnancy. Children between ages 1 and 2, especially if they drink a lot ... Resources NHLBI resources Your Guide to Anemia [PDF, ... (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases) Avoiding Anemia (National ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in ... deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend heart-healthy eating and choosing iron-rich foods, especially during certain stages of life when more ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in premature or very small newborns . In collaboration with the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how best to treat ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen ... check the size of your liver and spleen. Blood tests Based on results from blood tests to screen ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... also are hoping to determine which iron supplements work best to treat iron-deficiency anemia in children who do not consume the daily recommended amount of iron. Read less Participate in NHLBI Clinical Trials We lead or sponsor many studies related to iron-deficiency anemia. See if you ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in premature or very small newborns . In collaboration with the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s Health All Science A- ... to help your body absorb iron. Avoid drinking black tea, which reduces iron ... was associated with a greater risk of death even with mild anemia. Now, anemia in older ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... anemia. Return to Signs, Symptoms, and Complications to review signs and symptoms as well as complications from iron-deficiency ... NIH]) Heavy Menstrual Bleeding (Centers for Disease Control and ... Dietary Supplement Fact Sheet (NIH) Iron-Deficiency Anemia (National Library ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... be at risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, ... you are experiencing side effects such as a bad metallic taste, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, or upset stomach. ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... over 65 years of age had low hemoglobin levels. This was associated with a greater risk of death even with mild anemia. Now, anemia in older adults is recognized as an important condition. NHLBI Small Business Program. Through the NHLBI Small Business Program , we ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... even with mild anemia. Now, anemia in older adults is recognized as an important condition. NHLBI Small Business Program. Through the NHLBI Small Business Program , we fund research and development for domestic small businesses that have strong potential ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... how we are using current research and advancing research to prevent iron-deficiency anemia. Participate in NHLBI Clinical Trials will explain our ongoing clinical studies that are investigating prevention strategies for iron-deficiency anemia. Signs, Symptoms, and Complications ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary diffuse gastric cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Conditions Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... Diffuse Gastric Cancer MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Gastric Cancer National Cancer ... Option Overview General Information from MedlinePlus ( ...

  15. Anemia pós-cirurgia bariátrica: as causas nem sempre são relacionadas à cirurgia Anemia after bariatric surgery: the causes sometimes are not related to the surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Alfredo Pedroso Baretta

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available RACIONAL: As anemias ferropriva, perniciosa e megaloblástica são comuns após procedimentos bariátricos como o bypass e as derivações biliopancreáticas. As principais causas devem-se ao desvio duodenal e do jejuno proximal do trânsito alimentar e, em menor grau, às úlceras anastomóticas. Entretanto a dieta pobre em nutrientes, a suplementação vitamínica inadequada, medicamentos, uso de álcool e neoplasias devem ser lembrados. RELATO DOS CASOS: Os autores relatam dois casos de pacientes pós-procedimentos bariátricos com anemia severa sem controle clínico e cuja investigação identificou melanoma metastático em um caso e neoplasia colônica no segundo, ambos tratados cirurgicamente com bons resultados. CONCLUSÃO: Anemias são comuns após procedimentos bariátricos, porém causas atípicas como neoplasias devem ser suspeitadas nos pacientes mais idosos e principalmente naqueles refratários ao controle clínico.BACKGROUND: Iron deficiency anemia, pernicious and megaloblastic are common after gastric bypass and biliopancreatic diversion. The main causes are due to duodenal exclusion and anastomotic ulcers. However, low protein diet, vitaminic supplementation, medicines, alcohol and tumors must be remembered. CASES REPORT: The authors relate two cases of severe anemia after bariatric procedures that were diagnosed as metastatic melanoma in small bowel and a colorectal cancer treated surgically with good results. CONCLUSION: Anemias are common after bariatric surgery, however unusual causes like tumors must be suspected in the elderly and in those patients that clinical treatment didn't have good results.

  16. Cellular characteristics of hereditary diseases of man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Masao

    1978-01-01

    Hereditary diseases of which abnormal characters could be detected at cultured cell level were introduced, and tissue cultures of them were described. Characteristics such as reproduction, disorder, elimination, and repair of DNA in hereditary diseases with high cancer risk such as Bloom syndrome, etc. were investigated. Radiosensitivity of these hereditary diseases was also described, and factors of carcinogenesis were investigated. (Serizawa, K.)

  17. Drug therapy for hereditary cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imyanitov Evgeny N

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Tumors arising in patients with hereditary cancer syndromes may have distinct drug sensitivity as compared to their sporadic counterparts. Breast and ovarian neoplasms from BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers are characterized by deficient homologous recombination (HR of DNA, that makes them particularly sensitive to platinum compounds or inhibitors of poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP. Outstandingly durable complete responses to high dose chemotherapy have been observed in several cases of BRCA-related metastatic breast cancer (BC. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that women with BRCA1-related BC may derive less benefit from taxane-based treatment than other categories of BC patients. There is virtually no reports directly assessing drug response in hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC patients; studies involving non-selected (i.e., both sporadic and hereditary CRC with high-level microsatellite instability (MSI-H suggest therapeutic advantage of irinotecan. Celecoxib has been approved for the treatment of familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP. Hereditary medullary thyroid cancers (MTC have been shown to be highly responsive to a multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor vandetanib, which exerts specific activity towards mutated RET receptor. Given the rapidly improving accessibility of DNA analysis, it is foreseen that the potential predictive value of cancer-associated germ-line mutations will be increasingly considered in the future studies.

  18. Immunophenotyping of hereditary breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Groep, P.

    2009-01-01

    Hereditary breast cancer runs in families where several family members in different generations are affected. Most of these breast cancers are caused by mutations in the high penetrance genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 which account for about 5% of all breast cancers. However, mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 may

  19. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary hemochromatosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Type 1 hemochromatosis results from mutations in the HFE gene, and type 2 hemochromatosis results from mutations in ... about the genes associated with hereditary hemochromatosis HAMP HFE HJV PNPLA3 SLC40A1 TFR2 Related Information What is a gene? What is a gene mutation and how do ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... blood loss during dialysis. People who have chronic kidney disease also often take other medicines—such as proton ... anemia or who have chronic conditions such as kidney disease or celiac disease may be more likely to ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... fatigue or tiredness, shortness of breath, or chest pain. If your doctor diagnoses you with iron-deficiency ... Common symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia include: Chest pain Coldness in the hands and feet Difficulty concentrating ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... body to absorb iron from the gastrointestinal tract (GI tract). Blood loss When you lose blood, you ... to iron-deficiency anemia include: Bleeding in your GI tract, from an ulcer, colon cancer, or regular ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... anemia? Read more When there is inflammation, your liver makes more of a hormone called hepcidin. Hepcidin ... your abdomen to check the size of your liver and spleen. Blood tests Based on results from ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... for gastrointestinal bleeding To see if gastrointestinal bleeding is causing your iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may order the following procedures to guide treatment . Fecal ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... complications, including heart failure and development delays in children. Explore this Health ... red blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because your body’s intake of iron ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Supplement Fact Sheet (NIH) Iron-Deficiency Anemia (National Library of Medicine, MedlinePlus) ... Privacy Policy Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Accessibility Copyright and Usage No FEAR ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... your blood, such as vitamin B12 or folic acid. Visit our Pernicious Anemia Health Topic to learn ... recommend options such as taking your supplements with food, lowering the dose, trying a different type of ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... our clinical trials . Are you a frequent blood donor living in New York City? This study is looking at how iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Health and Human Development, we are investigating how best to treat premature newborns with low hemoglobin levels. ... are hoping to determine which iron supplements work best to treat iron-deficiency anemia in children who ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... and Strategic Vision Leadership Scientific Divisions Operations and Administration Advisory Committees Budget and Legislative Information Jobs and ... may recommend you eat heart-healthy foods or control other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... making new blood cells. Visit our Aplastic Anemia Health Topic to learn more. ... recommend that you take iron supplements, also called iron pills or oral iron, by mouth once or several times a ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia may cause the following complications: Depression Heart problems. If you do not have enough ... these usually go away within a day or two. Red blood cell transfusions. These may be used ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... more. Read less Reminders Return to Causes to review how blood loss, not consuming the recommended amount ... iron-deficiency anemia. Return to Risk Factors to review family history, lifestyle, unhealthy environments, or other factors ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... red blood cells, called hemolysis . Hemolysis, in this case, is caused by strong muscle contractions and the ... to prevent iron-deficiency anemia. Participate in NHLBI Clinical Trials will explain our ongoing clinical studies that ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... A-Z Clinical Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness ... If your doctor diagnoses you with iron-deficiency anemia, your treatment will depend on the cause and severity of the condition. Your ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... and dark green leafy vegetables. Foods rich in vitamin C, such as oranges, strawberries, and tomatoes, may ... of other nutrients in your blood, such as vitamin B12 or folic acid. Visit our Pernicious Anemia ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... your blood may be normal even if the total amount of iron in your body is low. ... iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... counts, hemoglobin or hematocrit levels, or mean corpuscular volume (MCV) that would suggest anemia. Different tests help ... complete blood count measures hemoglobin and mean corpuscular volume (MCV). Hemoglobin of less than 13 grams per ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... interferes with the body’s ability to make hemoglobin. Family history and genetics Von Willebrand disease is an ... deficiency anemia. Return to Risk Factors to review family history, lifestyle, unhealthy environments, or other factors that ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... diagnoses you with iron-deficiency anemia, your treatment will depend on the cause and severity of the ... of iron. The recommended daily amounts of iron will depend on your age, sex, and whether you ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... from developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, ... iron is needed, such as childhood and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... A-Z Clinical Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness The Science Science Home Blood Disorders ... infancy has lasting effects. We are interested in learning how having iron-deficiency anemia early in life ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... heart failure . Increased risk of infections Motor or cognitive development delays in children Pregnancy complications, such as ... iron-deficiency anemia may require intravenous (IV) iron therapy or a blood transfusion . Iron supplements Your doctor ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... absorb iron and lead to iron-deficiency anemia. These conditions include: Intestinal and digestive conditions, such as ... tract. Inflammation from congestive heart failure or obesity . These chronic conditions can lead to inflammation that may ...

  5. Anemia of chronic disease

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    ... systemic lupus erythematosus , rheumatoid arthritis , and ulcerative colitis Cancer , including lymphoma and Hodgkin disease Long-term infections, such as bacterial endocarditis, osteomyelitis (bone infection), HIV/AIDS , lung abscess, hepatitis B or hepatitis C Symptoms Anemia of ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Blood Disorders and Blood Safety Sleep Science and Sleep Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine ... prevention and treatment of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders, including iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the current ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... as a TMRPSS6 gene mutation that causes a person’s body to make too much of a hormone ... anemia from trauma, surgery, or heavy menstrual periods. Individuals with a gene for hemophilia, including symptomatic female ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... is caused by strong muscle contractions and the impact of feet repeatedly striking the ground, such as ... funding on iron-deficiency anemia. We stimulate high-impact research. Our Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... were born prematurely may be at an even higher risk, as most of a newborn’s iron stores ... men of the same age. Women are at higher risk for iron-deficiency anemia under some circumstances, ...

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    Full Text Available ... may recommend erythropoiesis stimulating agents (esa) . These medicines stimulate the bone marrow to make more red blood ... NHLBI is funding on iron-deficiency anemia. We stimulate high-impact research. Our Trans-Omics for Precision ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... tests, especially in infants and small children Heavy menstrual periods Injury or surgery Urinary tract bleeding Consuming ... iron-deficiency anemia from trauma, surgery, or heavy menstrual periods. Individuals with a gene for hemophilia, including ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... making new blood cells. Visit our Aplastic Anemia Health Topic to learn more. Read ... to review family history, lifestyle, unhealthy environments, or other factors that increase your risk of ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Learn more about participating in a clinical trial . View all trials from ClinicalTrials.gov . Visit Children and Clinical ... Resources NHLBI resources Your Guide to Anemia [PDF, 1. ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... improved health for people with iron-deficiency anemia. Recipient Epidemiology Donor Studies program findings help to protect blood donors . NHLBI’s Recipient Epidemiology Donor Studies (REDS) program , which began in ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  10. Immune hemolytic anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) or removal of the spleen (splenectomy) may be considered. You may receive treatment to ... need special treatment. In most people, steroids or splenectomy can totally or partially control anemia.

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... lead to iron-deficiency anemia include: End-stage kidney failure, where there is blood loss during dialysis. People who have chronic kidney disease also often take other medicines—such as ...

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  1. Mouse models of Fanconi anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parmar, Kalindi; D'Andrea, Alan; Niedernhofer, Laura J.

    2009-01-01

    Fanconi anemia is a rare inherited disease characterized by congenital anomalies, growth retardation, aplastic anemia and an increased risk of acute myeloid leukemia and squamous cell carcinomas. The disease is caused by mutation in genes encoding proteins required for the Fanconi anemia pathway, a response mechanism to replicative stress, including that caused by genotoxins that cause DNA interstrand crosslinks. Defects in the Fanconi anemia pathway lead to genomic instability and apoptosis of proliferating cells. To date, 13 complementation groups of Fanconi anemia were identified. Five of these genes have been deleted or mutated in the mouse, as well as a sixth key regulatory gene, to create mouse models of Fanconi anemia. This review summarizes the phenotype of each of the Fanconi anemia mouse models and highlights how genetic and interventional studies using the strains have yielded novel insight into therapeutic strategies for Fanconi anemia and into how the Fanconi anemia pathway protects against genomic instability.

  2. Mouse models of Fanconi anemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parmar, Kalindi; D' Andrea, Alan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, 44 Binney Street, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Niedernhofer, Laura J., E-mail: niedernhoferl@upmc.edu [Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and Cancer Institute, 5117 Centre Avenue, Hillman Cancer Center, Research Pavilion 2.6, Pittsburgh, PA 15213-1863 (United States)

    2009-07-31

    Fanconi anemia is a rare inherited disease characterized by congenital anomalies, growth retardation, aplastic anemia and an increased risk of acute myeloid leukemia and squamous cell carcinomas. The disease is caused by mutation in genes encoding proteins required for the Fanconi anemia pathway, a response mechanism to replicative stress, including that caused by genotoxins that cause DNA interstrand crosslinks. Defects in the Fanconi anemia pathway lead to genomic instability and apoptosis of proliferating cells. To date, 13 complementation groups of Fanconi anemia were identified. Five of these genes have been deleted or mutated in the mouse, as well as a sixth key regulatory gene, to create mouse models of Fanconi anemia. This review summarizes the phenotype of each of the Fanconi anemia mouse models and highlights how genetic and interventional studies using the strains have yielded novel insight into therapeutic strategies for Fanconi anemia and into how the Fanconi anemia pathway protects against genomic instability.

  3. Hereditary Spherocytosis Unmasked by Human Parvovirus B19 Induced Aplastic Crisis in a Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samin Alavi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Human parvovirus (HPV B19 induced aplastic crisis in a family leading to the diagnosis of hereditary spherocytosis (HS is a very rare condition being barely reported in the literature. We herein report a 4-year-old girl, her brother, and their mother who all presented with progressive pallor and jaundice after a febrile illness. The HPV B19 was diagnosed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR and positive serology for specific anti-HPV B19 IgM. They were further diagnosed with having HS. The clinical importance of this report is that in the case of an abrupt onset of unexplained severe anemia and jaundice, one should consider underlying hemolytic anemias mostly hereditary spherocytosis complicated by HPV B19 aplastic crisis. Herein, we report the occurrence of this condition, simultaneously in three members of a family. The distinguished feature of this report is that all affected family members developed some degrees of transient pancytopenia, not only anemia, all simultaneously in the course of their disease.

  4. New treatments of hereditary blindness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Mette; Rosenberg, Thomas; Larsen, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Ongoing clinical trials are targeting several previously intractable hereditary causes of blindness of congenital, childhood or early adulthood onset, mainly in the optic nerve and retina. The intended stage of initiation of the new therapeutic approaches ranges from neonatal life and a structura......Ongoing clinical trials are targeting several previously intractable hereditary causes of blindness of congenital, childhood or early adulthood onset, mainly in the optic nerve and retina. The intended stage of initiation of the new therapeutic approaches ranges from neonatal life...... and a structurally intact retinal tissue to adult life with a complete loss of photoreceptors. It must be assumed that some of the trials will succeed in producing new therapies and action must be taken to refine and accelerate diagnostics and to preserve therapeutic potential in blind people....

  5. An epistaxis severity score for hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoag, Jeffrey B; Terry, Peter; Mitchell, Sally; Reh, Douglas; Merlo, Christian A

    2010-04-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT)-related epistaxis leads to alterations in social functioning and quality of life. Although more than 95% experience epistaxis, there is considerable variability of severity. Because no standardized method exists to measure epistaxis severity, the purpose of this study was to determine factors associated with patient-reported severity to develop a severity score. Prospective, survey-based study. HHT care providers and a focus group of patients were interviewed to determine epistaxis-associated factors. From this, an electronic survey was developed and administered to patients with HHT. Descriptive analyses were performed with calculations of means and medians for continuous and proportions for categorical variables. Multiple ordinal logistic and linear regression models were developed to determine risk factors for epistaxis severity. Nine hundred respondents from 21 countries were included. Eight hundred fifty-five (95%) subjects reported epistaxis. The mean (standard deviation) age was 52.1 (13.9) years, and 61.4% were female. Independently associated risk factors for self-reported epistaxis severity included epistaxis frequency (odds ratio [OR] 1.57), duration (OR 2.17), intensity (OR 2.45), need for transfusion (OR 2.74), anemia (OR 1.44), and aggressiveness of treatment required (OR 1.53, P epistaxis severity in patients with HHT include frequency, duration, and intensity of episodes; invasiveness of prior therapy required to stop epistaxis; anemia; and the need for blood transfusion. From these factors, an epistaxis severity score will be presented.

  6. Anemia and malaria in a Yanomami Amerindian population from the southern Venezuelan Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Mato, S

    1998-12-01

    The prevalence and age distribution of anemia and malaria among Yanomami Amerindians undergoing sociocultural assimilation are described. Anemia and malaria proportions were determined in 103 individuals randomly selected from 515 villagers in Mavaca in the southern Venezuelan Amazon. The age and sex distribution reflected that of the entire village cluster. Anemia (hematocrit less than World Health Organization/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reference values) was found in 91% of the study population. As a group, adults (> or = 15 years old) had the highest proportion of anemia (P=0.037). Adult females had lower mean hematocrit values than adult males (P=0.013). The anemia was predominantly hypochromic and microcytic (62%), a finding that could suggest a diagnosis of iron deficiency in the absence of known hereditary hemoglobinopathies in these Amerindians. Malaria was diagnosed in 14% overall. Children (< 10 years old) displayed the highest proportion of Plasmodium falciparum (17%) and P. vivax (14%) parasitemia, splenomegaly (94%), and fever (34%) (P=0.059, 0.039, 0.005, and 0.008, respectively). The high proportions of anemia and splenomegaly observed in the survey may be used as indicators of inadequately controlled malaria in this community. Further studies to assess the epidemiology of risk factors for the high prevalence of anemia, and predominance of P. falciparum infections in the area are urgently needed.

  7. Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Finn Cilius; Hansen, Thomas van Overeem; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard

    2016-01-01

    Genetic abnormalities in the DNA repair genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 predispose to hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC). However, only approximately 25% of cases of HBOC can be ascribed to BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. Recently, exome sequencing has uncovered substantial locus heterogeneity among...... of putative causal variants and the clinical application of new HBOC genes in cancer risk management and treatment decision-making....

  8. Cancer-related anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Rzaeq, Hikmat N.

    2004-01-01

    Anemia is the most common hematological abnormality in cancer patients is often under-recognized and undertreated. The pathogenesis of cancer anemia is complex and most of time multifactorial; involving factors related to the tumor itself or its therapy. While anemia can be present in a wide range of symptoms, involing almost every organ, it is beleived that it contributes much to cancer-related-fatigue, one of the most common symptoms in cancer patients. In addition there is increasing evidence to suggest that anemia is an independent factor adversely affecting tumor reponse and patient survival. While blood transfusion was the only option to treat cancer related anemia, the use of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) is becomig the new standard of care, more so with the recent studies demonstrating the feasibility of a sigle weekly injection .Things are even getting better with the recent approval of a new form of rHuEPO; Darbepoetin an analogue with a 3-fold longer half-life. In addition to its effects in raising homoglobin, several well controlled studies demonstrated decrease in transfusion requirementsand better qualify of life assessed objectively using standard assesments scales. (author)

  9. Severe anemia in Malawian children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calis, Job C. J.; Phiri, Kamija S.; Faragher, E. Brian; Brabin, Bernard J.; Bates, Imelda; Cuevas, Luis E.; de Haan, Rob J.; Phiri, Ajib I.; Malange, Pelani; Khoka, Mirriam; Hulshof, Paul J. M.; van Lieshout, Lisette; Beld, Marcel G. H. M.; teo, Yik Y.; Rockett, Kirk A.; Richardson, Anna; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P.; Molyneux, Malcolm E.; Boele van Hensbroek, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Background Severe anemia is a major cause of sickness and death in African children, yet the causes of anemia in this population have been inadequately studied. Methods We conducted a case-control study of 381 preschool children with severe anemia (hemoglobin concentration, <5.0 g per deciliter) and

  10. Severe anemia in Malawian children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calis, Job Cj; Phiri, Kamija S.; Faragher, E. Brian; Brabin, Bernard J.; Bates, Imelda; Cuevas, Luis E.; de Haan, Rob J.; Phiri, Ajib I.; Malange, Pelani; Khoka, Mirriam; Hulshof, Paul Jm; van Lieshout, Lisette; Beld, Marcel Ghm; teo, Yik Y.; Rockett, Kirk A.; Richardson, Anna; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P.; Molyneux, Malcolm E.; van Hensbroek, Michaël Boele

    2016-01-01

    Severe anemia is a major cause of sickness and death in African children, yet the causes of anemia in this population have been inadequately studied. We conducted a case-control study of 381 preschool children with severe anemia (hemoglobin concentration, <5.0 g per deciliter) and 757 preschool

  11. Severe Anemia in Malawian Children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calis, J.C.J.; Kamija, S.P.; Faragher, E.B.; Brabin, B.J.; Bates, I.; Cuevas, L.E.; Haan, de R.J.; Phiri, A.I.; Malange, P.; Khoka, M.; Hulshof, P.J.M.; Lieshout, L.; Beld, M.G.H.M.; Teo, Y.Y.; Rockett, K.A.; Richardson, A.; Kwiatkowski, D.P.; Molyneux, M.E.; Hensbroek, van M.B.

    2008-01-01

    Background Severe anemia is a major cause of sickness and death in African children, yet the causes of anemia in this population have been inadequately studied. Methods We conducted a case¿control study of 381 preschool children with severe anemia (hemoglobin concentration,

  12. Anemia in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinsson, Andreas; Andersson, Charlotte; Andell, Pontus

    2014-01-01

    predictor of mortality, with the highest mortality observed for macrocytic anemia, which was less prevalent than microcytic and normocytic anemia. Dietary intake of iron and vitamin B12 were significantly lower and use of antithrombotic medications was significantly higher in subjects with anemia. The World...

  13. [Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, A; Meier, H P; Straub, R; Gerber, V

    2009-04-01

    Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA) is a reportable, eradicable epizootic disease caused by the equine lentivirus of the retrovirus family which affects equids only and occurs worldwide. The virus is transmitted by blood, mainly by sanguivorous insects. The main symptoms of the disease are pyrexia, apathy, loss of body condition and weight, anemia, edema and petechia. However, infected horses can also be inapparent carriers without any overt signs. The disease is diagnosed by serological tests like the Coggins test and ELISA tests. Presently, Switzerland is offi cially free from EIA. However, Switzerland is permanently at risk of introducing the virus as cases of EIA have recently been reported in different European countries.

  14. [Molecular genetic diagnostics and screening of hereditary hemochromatosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlocha, J; Kovács, L; Pozgayová, S; Kupcová, V; Durínová, S

    2006-06-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis is considered one of the most common hereditary diseases in population of Caucasian origin. In recent years, a candidate gene for HLA-linked hemochromatosis, HFE, has been cloned, and a single G-to-A mutation resulting in a cysteine-to-tyrosine substitution (C282Y) has been identified in up to 80% of study patients with type 1 hereditary hemochromatosis. The purpose of the paper was to confirm the importance of genetic testing for HFE mutations in making the diagnosis of hemochromatosis and find out a suitable diagnostic algorithm for the indication of this form of diagnostics in patients suspected of hereditary hemochromatosis. The examination of C282Y mutation was conducted in 500 subjects. The most frequent indications for DNA analysis were hepatopathy of unknown ethiology, liver cirrhosis, diabetes mellitus, bronze skin pigmentation in connection with high serum iron concentration, elevated transferrin saturation and elevated serum ferritin levels. In our group of patients, 29 homozygotes and 75 heterozygotes for C282Y mutation were identified, 10 patients carried both C282Y and H63D mutations of HFE gene (compound heterozygotes), whereas in 386 subjects the mutation was not found. The genotype-phenotype correlation showed that 22 homozygotes had liver affection proved by imaging and/or histologic methods. Except the liver disorders, the most common symptoms of these patients were type 2 diabetes mellitus or glucose tolerance disorder (10 patients), arthritis or joint pain (9 patients) and cardiovascular disorders, such as cardiomyopathy (2 patients). Bronze skin pigmentation was present in 9 homozygotes. Transferin saturation values were significantly higher in homozygotes for C282Y mutation as compared to C282Y heterozygotes (p diagnostics of this severe, but in early recognition curable disease. Early detection and phlebotomy treatment prior to the onset of cirrhosis can reduce morbidity and normalize life expectancy. It is readily

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is blood loss during dialysis. People who have chronic kidney disease also often take other medicines—such as proton ... reduces iron absorption. Other treatments If you have chronic kidney disease and iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... A-Z Clinical Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness The Science Science Home Blood Disorders ... Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) ... We are interested in learning how having iron-deficiency anemia early in life ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... This is sometimes used to deliver iron through a blood vessel to increase iron levels in the blood. One benefit of IV iron ... over 65 years of age had low hemoglobin levels. This was associated with a greater risk of death even with mild anemia. ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Science Science Home Blood Disorders and Blood Safety Sleep Science and Sleep Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision ... prevention and treatment of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders, including iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... infection. A history of gastrointestinal surgery, such as weight-loss surgery—especially gastric bypass—or gastrectomy. Certain rare ... prevention and treatment of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders, including iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Topics A-Z Clinical Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness The Science Science Home Blood Disorders ... Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and ... of Health [NIH]) Heavy Menstrual Bleeding (Centers for Disease Control ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Working at the NHLBI Contact and FAQs Accessible Search Form Search the NHLBI, use the drop down list to ... treatment of blood diseases, including iron-deficiency anemia. Search the NIH Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools (RePORT) ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or even heart failure . Increased risk of infections Motor or cognitive development delays in children Pregnancy complications, ... Upper endoscopy to look for bleeding in the esophagus, stomach, and the first part of the ... blood, and sleep disorders, including iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the current ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s ... making new blood cells. Visit our Aplastic Anemia Health Topic to learn more. ... recommend that you take iron supplements, also called iron pills or oral iron, by mouth once or several times a ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Sleep Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and ... stimulate high-impact research. Our Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) Program now includes participants with anemia, which ...

  5. Anemia - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... XYZ List of All Topics All Anemia - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Arabic (العربية) ... Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page last updated on 30 April 2018

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... supplements. Iron supplements can change how certain medicines work. Your doctor may suggest check-ups to make sure your ... To prevent complications from iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may ... during certain stages of life when more iron is needed, such as childhood ...

  7. Folate-deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... raise your risk for this type of anemia: Alcoholism Eating overcooked food Poor diet (often seen in the poor, the older people, and people who do not eat fresh fruits or vegetables) Pregnancy Folic acid is needed to help a baby ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Services’ National Institutes of Health (NIH)—the Nation’s biomedical research agency that makes important scientific discoveries to improve ... efforts for iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about exciting research areas that ... This could help develop new therapies for conditions that affect the balance of iron ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Complications Undiagnosed or untreated iron-deficiency anemia may cause the following complications: Depression Heart problems. If you do not have enough hemoglobin-carrying red blood cells, your heart has to work harder to move oxygen-rich blood through your ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how best to treat premature newborns with low hemoglobin levels. We also are hoping to determine which iron supplements work best to treat iron-deficiency anemia in children ...

  11. Anemia and School Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobonis, Gustavo J.; Miguel, Edward; Puri-Sharma, Charu

    2006-01-01

    Anemia is among the most widespread health problems for children in developing countries. This paper evaluates the impact of a randomized health intervention delivering iron supplementation and deworming drugs to Indian preschool children. At baseline, 69 percent were anemic and 30 percent had intestinal worm infections. Weight increased among…

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... do not have enough iron in your body. People with mild or moderate iron-deficiency anemia may ... as a TMRPSS6 gene mutation that causes a person’s body to make too much of a hormone ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because your body’s intake of iron is too ... clamping of your newborn’s umbilical cord at the time of delivery. This may help prevent iron-deficiency ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 2, especially if they drink a lot of cow’s milk. Cow’s milk is low in iron. Teens, who have ... our Pernicious Anemia Health Topic to learn more. Bone marrow tests help your doctor see whether your ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in you getting less than the recommended daily amount of iron. Frequent blood donation. Individuals who donate blood often may be ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to advancing science and translating discoveries into clinical practice to promote the prevention and treatment of heart, ... Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how best to treat premature newborns with low hemoglobin ... resources Your Guide to Anemia [PDF, 1. ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s Health All Science A-Z Grants ... health for people with iron-deficiency anemia. Recipient Epidemiology Donor Studies program findings help to protect blood ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and save lives. We are committed to advancing science and translating discoveries into clinical practice to promote the prevention and treatment of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders, including iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the current and future NHLBI efforts to improve health through ...

  19. Twin anemia polycythemia sequence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slaghekke, Femke

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis we describe that Twin Anemia Polycythemia Sequence (TAPS) is a form of chronic feto-fetal transfusion in monochorionic (identical) twins based on a small amount of blood transfusion through very small anastomoses. For the antenatal diagnosis of TAPS, Middle Cerebral Artery – Peak

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how best to treat premature newborns with low hemoglobin levels. We also are hoping to determine which iron supplements work best to treat iron-deficiency anemia in children ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how best to treat premature newborns with low hemoglobin levels. We also are hoping to determine which iron ... anemia in children who do not consume the daily recommended amount ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the body. When your heart has to work harder, this can lead to several conditions: irregular heartbeats called arrhythmias , a heart murmur , an ... chronic conditions, iron-deficiency anemia can make their condition worse or result in treatments not working as well. Look for Diagnosis will discuss any ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... normally stores but has used up. Increase your intake of vitamin C to help your body absorb iron. Avoid drinking black tea, which reduces iron absorption. Other treatments If you have chronic kidney disease and iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend ...

  4. Sickle Cell Anemia Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christy, Steven C.

    Presents sources for the acquisition of medical, social, psychological, educational, and practical knowledge of sickle cell anemia. The materials listed are designed to help parents, educators, and public service workers. Materials include journal articles, films, brochures, slides, and fact sheets. The usual bibliographic information is given.…

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... deficiency anemia. We stimulate high-impact research. Our Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) Program now includes ... Studies (REDS) program Blood Disorders and Blood Safety Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) Program Non-NHLBI ...

  6. Hereditary iron and copper deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaseth, Jan; Flaten, Trond Peder; Andersen, Ole

    2007-01-01

    Hereditary deposition of iron (primary haemochromatosis) or copper (Wilson's disease) are autosomal recessive metabolic disease characterized by progressive liver pathology and subsequent involvement of various other organs. The prevalence of primary haemochromatosis is approximately 0.5%, about......, they may be inadequate in patients diagnosed so late that extensive body deposits of metal have been developed. The main research needs in this field are to further clarify molecular mechanisms of disease progression and to develop new chelators that are more effective and less toxic than those presently...

  7. Hereditary & familial colorectal cancer : Identification, characteristics, surveillance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kallenberg, F.G.J.

    2017-01-01

    Of all colorectal cancer (CRC) cases, 15-20% is related to familial or hereditary factors. Diagnosing familial and hereditary CRC syndromes is important for several reasons. One of these is that surveillance colonoscopies can reduce CRC incidence and mortality importantly. A complete family history

  8. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Central OMIM: JUVENILE POLYPOSIS/HEREDITARY HEMORRHAGIC TELANGIECTASIA SYNDROME McDonald J, Bayrak-Toydemir P, Pyeritz RE. Hereditary hemorrhagic ... 10.1097/GIM.0b013e3182136d32. Review. Citation on PubMed McDonald J, Wooderchak-Donahue W, VanSant Webb C, Whitehead ...

  9. Multidisciplinary approach to anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca Ghiațău

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: We present the case of a 65 years- old woman who was admitted with a severe macrocytic anemia Hb= 5.7g/dl and diffuse bone pain. Biologically she has moderate thrombocytopenia 35 000/µl, a hepatic cytolysis and cholestatic syndrome. Material and method: The patient was extensively evaluated before presentation for a mild iron - deficiency anemia for which she underwent endoscopic examination of the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract- normal. The bone marrow aspiration on admission revealed a marked hyperplasia of the erythroblastic line with ~50% basophilic erythroblasts suggesting a regenerative erythroid hyperplasia. These changes along with the marked reticulocytosis on the peripheral blood smear oriented us towards a hemolytic anemia; Folic acid, vitamin B12, autoimmune tests and hemolytic tests were all normal. We continued the investigations with a thoraco-abdominopelvic computed tomography which identified diffuse demineralization, vertebral compactation and pelvic stress fractures. The breast examination revealed a right breast nodule, but the breast ultrasonography pleaded for benignity. Lacking a clear definitive diagnosis we decided to perform a bone marrow biopsy. Results: The osteo- medullary biopsy pointed towards a medullar invasion from a lobular mammary carcinoma; In these circumstances we performed an ultrasound guided biopsy of the right mammary lump thus histologically confirming a tumoral invasion of the bone marrow with subsequent anemia. The patient started chemotherapy in the Oncology ward. Conclusion: The particularity of this case consists in the pattern of anemia, which initially seemed iron deficient and afterwards macrocytic – apparently hemolytic and was actually due to the tumoral medullar invasion and also the nonspecific ultrasonographic appearance of the breast tumor.

  10. The molecular classification of hereditary endocrine diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Lei; Ning, Guang

    2015-12-01

    Hereditary endocrine diseases are an important group of diseases with great heterogeneity. The current classification for hereditary endocrine disease is mostly based upon anatomy, which is helpful for pathophysiological interpretation, but does not address the pathogenic variability associated with different underlying genetic causes. Identification of an endocrinopathy-associated genetic alteration provides evidence for differential diagnosis, discovery of non-classical disease, and the potential for earlier diagnosis and targeted therapy. Molecular diagnosis should be routinely applied when managing patients with suspicion of hereditary disease. To enhance the accurate diagnosis and treatment of patients with hereditary endocrine diseases, we propose categorization of endocrine diseases into three groups based upon the function of the mutant gene: cell differentiation, hormone synthesis and action, and tumorigenesis. Each category was further grouped according to the specific gene function. We believe that this format would facilitate practice of precision medicine in the field of hereditary endocrine diseases.

  11. Hearing loss and speech perception in noise difficulties in Fanconi anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheij, Emmy; Oomen, Karin P Q; Smetsers, Stephanie E; van Zanten, Gijsbert A; Speleman, Lucienne

    2017-10-01

    Fanconi anemia is a hereditary chromosomal instability disorder. Hearing loss and ear abnormalities are among the many manifestations reported in this disorder. In addition, Fanconi anemia patients often complain about hearing difficulties in situations with background noise (speech perception in noise difficulties). Our study aimed to describe the prevalence of hearing loss and speech perception in noise difficulties in Dutch Fanconi anemia patients. Retrospective chart review. A retrospective chart review was conducted at a Dutch tertiary care center. All patients with Fanconi anemia at clinical follow-up in our hospital were included. Medical files were reviewed to collect data on hearing loss and speech perception in noise difficulties. In total, 49 Fanconi anemia patients were included. Audiograms were available in 29 patients and showed hearing loss in 16 patients (55%). Conductive hearing loss was present in 24.1%, sensorineural in 20.7%, and mixed in 10.3%. A speech in noise test was performed in 17 patients; speech perception in noise was subnormal in nine patients (52.9%) and abnormal in two patients (11.7%). Hearing loss and speech perception in noise abnormalities are common in Fanconi anemia. Therefore, pure tone audiograms and speech in noise tests should be performed, preferably already at a young age, because hearing aids or assistive listening devices could be very valuable in developing language and communication skills. 4. Laryngoscope, 127:2358-2361, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  12. Acute myocardial infarction and pulmonary embolism in a young man with pernicious anemia-induced severe hyperhomocysteinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hofmann Marion A

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A 27 year-old man who presented to the hospital with progressive lower extremity weakness, developed an acute ST elevation myocardial infarction on his second hospital day. Primary angioplasty to the left anterior descending coronary artery was performed. Due to persistent dyspnea, the patient underwent a diagnostic chest computed tomography which confirmed multiple small pulmonary emboli. Laboratory analysis revealed a megaloblastic anemia with a reduced vitamin B12 level and positive titers for antibodies against intrinsic factor, establishing a diagnosis of pernicious anemia. Screening for hypercoaguable markers documented an isolated severely elevated homocysteine levels (105 μmol/l. No other significant risk factors for coronary artery disease including a family history of premature atherosclerosis were identified. This case illustrates the importance of testing for hyperhomocysteinemia as part of a workup for atherothrombotic disease, especially in patients without other significant risk factors. The severity of hyperhomocysteinemia found in our patient is unusual for patients with vitamin B12 malabsorption and raises the question of whether the widely practiced folic acid fortification in the United States may mask or even worsen vitamin B12 deficiency over time, leading to more severe cases of vitamin B12 deficiency and hyperhomocysteinemia than seen in the past.

  13. Response to parenteral iron therapy distinguish unexplained refractory iron deficiency anemia from iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin, M; Sarbay, H; Guler, S; Balci, Y I; Polat, A

    2016-04-01

    We evaluated that response to parenteral iron therapy could be helpful in distinguishing the types of iron deficiency anemia. This study analyzed responses to IV iron sucrose therapy of 15 children with unexplained refractory iron deficiency anemia (URIDA). We compared the results at diagnosis, 6 weeks and 6 months after the therapy. Results were compared with responses of 11 patients' results with iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA) from our previous study. Six weeks after the start of treatment, ferritin, MCV, MCH and Hb values were in normal range in 10 patients. The increase in Hb, MCH, MCV, and ferritin values ranged 2.6-3.5 g/dL, 1.7-4.2 pg, 2-9 fL, and 13-25 ng/mL, respectively. In five patients, Hb, MCH, and MCV mean (range) values [11.2 g/dL (11-12.2), 24.5 pg (24-25.6), and 67 fL (65-70)] were nearly normal but ferritin mean (range) values [9.8 ng/mL (8-11)] were below normal. Six weeks after the start of treatment, Hb, MCH, MCV and ferritin values of patients with IRIDA were increased. The increase in Hb, MCH, MCV, and ferritin values ranged 0.8-2.7 g/dL, 1.7-4.2 pg, 2-9 fL, and 13-25 ng/mL, respectively. IRIDA is only partially responsive to parenteral iron supplementation. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the response to intravenous iron therapy for the URIDA cases improved blood parameters more effectively than hereditary IRIDA. Response to parenteral iron therapy would be helpful to distinguish unexplained refractory IDA from hereditary IRIDA for clinicians who do not have access to hepcidin or TMPRS6 mutation analysis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. [Anemia in the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maerevoet, M; Sattar, L; Bron, D; Gulbis, B; Pepersack, T

    2014-09-01

    Anaemia is a problem that affects almost 10% over 65 years and 20% over 85 years. There is no physiological anaemia in the elderly. Any anaemia expresses the existence of a pathological process, regardless of its severity. Anaemia in the elderly is always associated with a poor prognosis that is in terms of mortality, morbidity and risk of fragility. The diagnostic approach to anemia in the elderly is the same as in younger individual. There are many causes of anaemia; anaemia balance is a complex diagnostic process. Most anaemias are due to a deficiency, chronic inflammation or comorbidity. However, in the elderly, the etiology of anaemia is often multifactorial. In a number of cases remain unexplained anaemia. In a number of cases, anemia remain unexplained. Treatment of anaemia is the treatment of the cause, but specific therapeutic aspects to the elderly should be considered, as among other martial substitution or use of erythropoietin (EPO).

  15. Laparoscopic splenectomy for hereditary spherocytosis-preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogulski, Robert; Adamowicz-Salach, Anna; Matysiak, Michał; Piotrowski, Dariusz; Gogolewski, Michał; Piotrowska, Anna; Roik, Danuta; Kamiński, Andrzej

    2016-06-01

    Splenectomy is considered standard surgical therapy in hereditary spherocytosis. The procedure is indicated in patients with severe anemia, recurrent hemolytic, and aplastic crises. The aim of the study was to assess treatment outcomes in patients with hereditary spherocytosis who underwent total or partial laparoscopic splenectomy. Fifteen patients aged 4-17 yr underwent laparoscopic splenectomy from 2009 to 2012. Partial and total splenectomies were performed (five and 10 children, respectively). Hematologic parameters, liver function tests, and splenic volume before and after the surgery were analyzed retrospectively. Total follow-up was 1-30 months. Hospitalization and operating time were similar in both groups. In partial splenectomy group, branches of splenic arteries gave better blood supply than short gastric vessels. In both groups, hematologic parameters were improved. Postoperative markedly elevated platelet count was maintained up to 6 months, and after that, platelet count gradually decreased to normal values. Bilirubin level was decreased in early postoperative period; however, it increased later to achieve levels lower than in preoperative period. No severe general infections were observed in both groups. Laboratory parameters (hemoglobin and bilirubin concentrations and RBC) after the surgery improved in all patients, and the effect was maintained during 12 months of follow-up. Platelet count increased significantly after the surgery and was maintained at high levels during the next 6 months. However, it returned to preoperative levels within a year after the surgery. Our study showed that partial splenectomy was not inferior to total splenectomy. However, full assessment requires longer follow-up and larger group of patients. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Laparoscopic partial vs total splenectomy in children with hereditary spherocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morinis, Julia; Dutta, Sanjeev; Blanchette, Victor; Butchart, Sheila; Langer, Jacob C

    2008-09-01

    Open partial splenectomy provides reversal of anemia and relief of symptomatic splenomegaly while theoretically retaining splenic immune function for hereditary spherocytosis. We recently developed a laparoscopic approach for partial splenectomy. The purpose of the present study is to compare the outcomes in a group of patients undergoing laparoscopic partial splenectomy (LPS) with those in a group of children undergoing laparoscopic total splenectomy (LTS) over the same period. Systematic chart review was conducted of all children with hereditary spherocytosis who had LTS or LPS from 2000 to 2006 at the Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. T tests were used for continuous data, and chi(2) for proportional data; P value of less than .05 was considered significant. There were 9 patients (14 males) in each group. Groups were similar in sex, age, concomitant cholecystectomy, and preoperative hospitalizations, transfusions, and spleen size. Estimated blood loss was greater in the LPS group (188 + 53 vs 67 + 17 mL; P = .02), but transfusion requirements were similar (1/9 vs 0/9). Complication rate was similar between groups. The LPS group had higher morphine use (4.1 + 0.6 vs 2.4 + 0.2 days; P = .03), greater time to oral intake (4.4 + 0.7 vs 2.0 + 0.2 days; P = .01), and longer hospital stay (6.3 + 1.0 vs 2.7 + 0.3 days; P = .005) than the LTS group. Nuclear scan 6 to 8 weeks postoperatively demonstrated residual perfused splenic tissue in all LPS patients. No completion splenectomy was necessary after a mean follow-up of 25 months. These data suggest that LPS is as effective as LTS for control of symptoms. However, LPS is associated with more pain, longer time to oral intake, and longer hospital stay. These disadvantages may be balanced by retained splenic immune function, but further studies are required to assess long-term splenic function in these patients.

  17. [Anemia: guidelines comparison].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Vecchio, Lucia

    2009-01-01

    The development of recombinant human erythropoietin and its introduction into the market in the late 1980s has significantly improved the quality of life of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and reduced the need for blood transfusions. Starting from a cautious target, a progressive increase in the recommended hemoglobin levels has been observed over the years, in parallel with an increase in the obtained levels. This trend has gone together with the publication of findings of observational studies showing a relationship between the increase in hemoglobin levels and a reduction in the mortality risk, with the conduction of clinical trials testing the effects of complete anemia correction, and with the compilation of guidelines on anemia control in CKD patients by scientific societies and organizations. In the last two years, evidence of a possible increase in the mortality risk in those patients who were randomized to high hemoglobin levels has resulted in a decrease in the upper limit of the recommended Hb target to be obtained with erythropoietin stimulating agents (ESA), and consequently in a narrowing of the target range. Comparison of guidelines on anemia control in CKD patients is an interesting starting point to discuss single recommendations, strengthen their importance, or suggest new topics of research to fill up important gaps in knowledge.

  18. Prophylactic Therapy for Hereditary Angioedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhurst, Hilary; Zinser, Emily

    2017-08-01

    Long-term prophylaxis is needed in many patients with hereditary angioedema and poses many challenges. Attenuated androgens are effective in many but are limited by side effect profiles. There is less evidence for efficacy of tranexamic acid and progestagens; however, the small side effect profile makes tranexamic acid an option for prophylaxis in children and progestagens an option for women. C1 inhibitor is beneficial, but at present requires intravenous delivery and may need dose titration for maximum efficacy. Short-term prophylaxis should be considered for all procedures. New therapies are promising in overcoming many problems encountered with current options for long-term prophylaxis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Imaging of Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carette, Marie-France; Nedelcu, Cosmina; Tassart, Marc; Grange, Jean-Didier; Wislez, Marie; Khalil, Antoine

    2009-01-01

    This pictorial review is based on our experience of the follow-up of 120 patients at our multidisciplinary center for hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Rendu-Osler-Weber disease or HHT is a multiorgan autosomal dominant disorder with high penetrance, characterized by epistaxis, mucocutaneous telangiectasis, and visceral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). The research on gene mutations is fundamental and family screening by clinical examination, chest X-ray, research of pulmonary shunting, and abdominal color Doppler sonography is absolutely necessary. The angioarchitecture of pulmonary AVMs can be studied by unenhanced multidetector computed tomography; however, all other explorations of liver, digestive bowels, or brain require administration of contrast media. Magnetic resonance angiography is helpful for central nervous system screening, in particular for the spinal cord, but also for pulmonary, hepatic, and pelvic AVMs. Knowledge of the multiorgan involvement of HHT, mechanism of complications, and radiologic findings is fundamental for the correct management of these patients.

  20. Hereditary syndromes with enhanced radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohmann, D.

    2000-01-01

    Sensitivity to ionizing radiation is modified by heritable genetic factors. This is exemplified by heritable disorders that are characterized by predisposition to the development of neoplasms. Cells derived from patients with ataxia telangiectasia, Nijmegen breakage syndrome and ataxia telangiektasia-like disorder show a markedly changed reaction to exposure to ionizing radiation. Correspondingly, at least in patients with ataxia telangiectasia, an enhanced radiosensitivity that is of clinical importance has been observed. In addition to these recessive disorders, some autosomal dominant cancer predisposition syndromes are associated with increased radiosensitivity. As cells from these patients still have a normal allele (that is dominant over the mutant allele), the cellular phenotype is most often normal. Specifically, there is no overtly altered reaction in response to ionizing radiation. Nevertheless, two dominant cancer predisposition syndromes, namely hereditary retinoblastoma and naevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, are associated with a enhanced radiosensitivity as indicated by increased development of tumors following radiation therapy. (orig.) [de

  1. Genetics Home Reference: Diamond-Blackfan anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions Diamond-Blackfan anemia Diamond-Blackfan anemia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Diamond-Blackfan anemia is a disorder of the bone marrow . The ...

  2. Drug-induced immune hemolytic anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immune hemolytic anemia secondary to drugs; Anemia - immune hemolytic - secondary to drugs ... Drugs that can cause this type of hemolytic anemia include: Cephalosporins (a class of antibiotics), most common ...

  3. Avoiding Anemia: Boost Your Red Blood Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues Subscribe January 2014 Print this issue Avoiding Anemia Boost Your Red Blood Cells En español Send ... Disease When Blood Cells Bend Wise Choices Preventing Anemia To prevent or treat iron-deficiency anemia: Eat ...

  4. Special Issues for People with Aplastic Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Menu Donate Special Issues for People with Aplastic Anemia Because you have aplastic anemia , everyday events can ... bleeding, such as contact sports. Pregnancy and Aplastic Anemia Pregnancy is possible for women who have been ...

  5. Genetics 101 --The Hereditary Material of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Genetics 101 Genetics 101 — The Hereditary Material of Life Past Issues / Summer 2013 Table of Contents Genetics is the study of heredity, the process in ...

  6. Hereditary History Preserving Bisimilarity Is Undecidable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jurdzinski, Marcin; Nielsen, Mogens

    2000-01-01

    History preserving bisimilarity (hp-bisimilarity) and hereditary history preserving bisimilarity (hhp-bisimilarity) are behavioural equivalences taking into account causal relationships between events of concurrent systems. Their prominent feature is being preserved under action refinement...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary hypophosphatemic rickets

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A characteristic of X-linked inheritance is that fathers cannot pass X-linked traits to their sons. ... families, hereditary hypophosphatemic rickets has had an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern, which means one copy of an ...

  8. Clinical features of Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hosman, A.E.

    2017-01-01

    Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT), also known as Rendu-Osler-Weber disease (ROW), is an autosomal dominant disease with multi-systemic vascular dysplasia characterized by mucocutaneous telangiectasia, arteriovenous malformations and recurrent spontaneous epistaxis (nosebleeds). Most cases

  9. Splenic Involvement in Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susumu Takamatsu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 33-year-old man who presented with prolonged epigastric pain was referred to our hospital. He had experienced recurrent epistaxis and had a family history of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed splenomegaly and a 9 cm hypervascular mass in his spleen. Computed tomography also showed a pulmonary arteriovenous malformation and heterogeneous enhancement of the liver parenchyma, suggesting the presence of arteriosystemic shunts and telangiectases. Based on these findings, the patient was definitely diagnosed with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia according to Curaçao criteria. He underwent splenectomy, and his symptoms disappeared after surgery. Pathological examination of the resected specimen revealed that the hypervascular lesion of the spleen was not a tumor but was composed of abnormal vessels associated with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. Symptomatic splenic involvement may be a rare manifestation of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia but can be revealed by imaging modalities.

  10. A Review of Hereditary Fructose Intolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mogoş Tiberius

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Fructose intolerance is a metabolic disorder with hereditary determinism, clinically manifested on terms of fructose intake. Untreated, hereditary fructose intolerance may result in renal and hepatic failure. Unfortunately, there are no formal diagnostic and surveillance guidelines for this disease. If identified and treated before the occurrence of permanent organ damage, patients can improve their symptoms and self-rated health. Implementation and adherence to a strict fructose free diet is often difficult, but not impossible.

  11. Aplastic anemia due to radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Kunio; Saito, Akira

    1978-01-01

    The relationship between radiation exposure and aplastic anemia, clarified previously, is discussed. When persons such as radiological technicians receive whole-body irradiation in rather large doses, it is possible that aplastic anemia will result later on. However, this is difficult to determine because the irradiated region is limited despite large doses of radiation. (Bell, E.)

  12. Correction of anemia in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Analía Cánepa

    2015-11-01

    Se observó que en el 50% de las pacientes estudiadas no se logró corregir la anemia. Concluimos que existe una dificultad en la corrección de la anemia y una necesidad de realizar futuros estudios que permitan conocer las causas de este problema e implementar acciones en base a ellas.

  13. Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auer-Grumbach Michaela

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I (HSN I is a slowly progressive neurological disorder characterised by prominent predominantly distal sensory loss, autonomic disturbances, autosomal dominant inheritance, and juvenile or adulthood disease onset. The exact prevalence is unknown, but is estimated as very low. Disease onset varies between the 2nd and 5th decade of life. The main clinical feature of HSN I is the reduction of sensation sense mainly distributed to the distal parts of the upper and lower limbs. Variable distal muscle weakness and wasting, and chronic skin ulcers are characteristic. Autonomic features (usually sweating disturbances are invariably observed. Serious and common complications are spontaneous fractures, osteomyelitis and necrosis, as well as neuropathic arthropathy which may even necessitate amputations. Some patients suffer from severe pain attacks. Hypacusis or deafness, or cough and gastrooesophageal reflux have been observed in rare cases. HSN I is a genetically heterogenous condition with three loci and mutations in two genes (SPTLC1 and RAB7 identified so far. Diagnosis is based on the clinical observation and is supported by a family history. Nerve conduction studies confirm a sensory and motor neuropathy predominantly affecting the lower limbs. Radiological studies, including magnetic resonance imaging, are useful when bone infections or necrosis are suspected. Definitive diagnosis is based on the detection of mutations by direct sequencing of the SPTLC1 and RAB7 genes. Correct clinical assessment and genetic confirmation of the diagnosis are important for appropriate genetic counselling and prognosis. Differential diagnosis includes the other hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN, especially HSAN II, as well as diabetic foot syndrome, alcoholic neuropathy, neuropathies caused by other neurotoxins/drugs, immune mediated neuropathy, amyloidosis, spinal cord diseases, tabes dorsalis, lepra

  14. Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer-Grumbach, Michaela

    2008-03-18

    Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I (HSN I) is a slowly progressive neurological disorder characterised by prominent predominantly distal sensory loss, autonomic disturbances, autosomal dominant inheritance, and juvenile or adulthood disease onset. The exact prevalence is unknown, but is estimated as very low. Disease onset varies between the 2nd and 5th decade of life. The main clinical feature of HSN I is the reduction of sensation sense mainly distributed to the distal parts of the upper and lower limbs. Variable distal muscle weakness and wasting, and chronic skin ulcers are characteristic. Autonomic features (usually sweating disturbances) are invariably observed. Serious and common complications are spontaneous fractures, osteomyelitis and necrosis, as well as neuropathic arthropathy which may even necessitate amputations. Some patients suffer from severe pain attacks. Hypacusis or deafness, or cough and gastrooesophageal reflux have been observed in rare cases. HSN I is a genetically heterogenous condition with three loci and mutations in two genes (SPTLC1 and RAB7) identified so far. Diagnosis is based on the clinical observation and is supported by a family history. Nerve conduction studies confirm a sensory and motor neuropathy predominantly affecting the lower limbs. Radiological studies, including magnetic resonance imaging, are useful when bone infections or necrosis are suspected. Definitive diagnosis is based on the detection of mutations by direct sequencing of the SPTLC1 and RAB7 genes. Correct clinical assessment and genetic confirmation of the diagnosis are important for appropriate genetic counselling and prognosis. Differential diagnosis includes the other hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN), especially HSAN II, as well as diabetic foot syndrome, alcoholic neuropathy, neuropathies caused by other neurotoxins/drugs, immune mediated neuropathy, amyloidosis, spinal cord diseases, tabes dorsalis, lepra neuropathy, or decaying skin

  15. Evaluating eosin-5-maleimide binding as a diagnostic test for hereditary spherocytosis in newborn infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, R D; Agarwal, A M; Nussenzveig, R H; Heikal, N; Liew, M A; Yaish, H M

    2015-05-01

    Neonates with undiagnosed hereditary spherocytosis (HS) are at risk for developing hazardous hyperbilirubinemia and anemia. Making an early diagnosis of HS in a neonate can prompt anticipatory guidance to prevent these adverse outcomes. A recent comparison study showed that a relatively new diagnostic test for HS, eosin-5-maleimide (EMA)-flow cytometry, performs better than other available tests in confirming HS. However, reports have not specifically examined the performance of this test among neonates. We compared EMA-flow cytometry from blood samples of healthy control neonates vs samples from neonates suspected of having HS on the basis of severe Coombs-negative jaundice and spherocytes on blood film. The diagnosis of HS was later either confirmed or excluded based on clinical findings and next generation sequencing (NGS) after which we correlated the EMA-flow results with the diagnosis. EMA-flow was performed on the blood of 31 neonates; 20 healthy term newborns and 11 who were suspected of having HS. Eight of the 11 were later confirmed positive for HS and one was confirmed positive for hereditary elliptocytosis (HE). All nine had persistently abnormal erythroid morphology, reticulocytosis and anemia, and eight of the nine had relevant mutations discovered using NGS. The other was confirmed positive for HS on the basis that a parent had HS, and the neonate's spherocytosis, reticulocytosis and anemia persisted. The 20 healthy controls and the 2 in whom HS was initially suspected but later excluded all had EMA-flow results in the range reported in healthy children and adults. In contrast, all nine in whom HS or HE was confirmed had abnormal EMA-flow results consistent with previous reports in older children and adults with HS. Although our sample size is small, our findings are consistent with the literature in older children and adults suggesting that EMA-flow cytometric testing performs well in supporting the diagnosis of HS/HE during the early neonatal

  16. Telomerase gene therapy rescues telomere length, bone marrow aplasia, and survival in mice with aplastic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bär, Christian; Povedano, Juan Manuel; Serrano, Rosa; Benitez-Buelga, Carlos; Popkes, Miriam; Formentini, Ivan; Bobadilla, Maria; Bosch, Fatima; Blasco, Maria A

    2016-04-07

    Aplastic anemia is a fatal bone marrow disorder characterized by peripheral pancytopenia and marrow hypoplasia. The disease can be hereditary or acquired and develops at any stage of life. A subgroup of the inherited form is caused by replicative impairment of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells due to very short telomeres as a result of mutations in telomerase and other telomere components. Abnormal telomere shortening is also described in cases of acquired aplastic anemia, most likely secondary to increased turnover of bone marrow stem and progenitor cells. Here, we test the therapeutic efficacy of telomerase activation by using adeno-associated virus (AAV)9 gene therapy vectors carrying the telomerase Tert gene in 2 independent mouse models of aplastic anemia due to short telomeres (Trf1- and Tert-deficient mice). We find that a high dose of AAV9-Tert targets the bone marrow compartment, including hematopoietic stem cells. AAV9-Tert treatment after telomere attrition in bone marrow cells rescues aplastic anemia and mouse survival compared with mice treated with the empty vector. Improved survival is associated with a significant increase in telomere length in peripheral blood and bone marrow cells, as well as improved blood counts. These findings indicate that telomerase gene therapy represents a novel therapeutic strategy to treat aplastic anemia provoked or associated with short telomeres. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  17. Biallelic mutations in BRCA1 cause a new Fanconi anemia subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Sarah L; Tian, Lei; Kähkönen, Marketta; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Kircher, Martin; Majewski, Jacek; Dyment, David A; Innes, A Micheil; Boycott, Kym M; Moreau, Lisa A; Moilanen, Jukka S; Greenberg, Roger A

    2015-02-01

    Deficiency in BRCA-dependent DNA interstrand crosslink (ICL) repair is intimately connected to breast cancer susceptibility and to the rare developmental syndrome Fanconi anemia. Bona fide Fanconi anemia proteins, BRCA2 (FANCD1), PALB2 (FANCN), and BRIP1 (FANCJ), interact with BRCA1 during ICL repair. However, the lack of detailed phenotypic and cellular characterization of a patient with biallelic BRCA1 mutations has precluded assignment of BRCA1 as a definitive Fanconi anemia susceptibility gene. Here, we report the presence of biallelic BRCA1 mutations in a woman with multiple congenital anomalies consistent with a Fanconi anemia-like disorder and breast cancer at age 23. Patient cells exhibited deficiency in BRCA1 and RAD51 localization to DNA-damage sites, combined with radial chromosome formation and hypersensitivity to ICL-inducing agents. Restoration of these functions was achieved by ectopic introduction of a BRCA1 transgene. These observations provide evidence in support of BRCA1 as a new Fanconi anemia gene (FANCS). We establish that biallelic BRCA1 mutations cause a distinct FA-S, which has implications for risk counselling in families where both parents harbor BRCA1 mutations. The genetic basis of hereditary cancer susceptibility syndromes provides diagnostic information, insights into treatment strategies, and more accurate recurrence risk counseling to families. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  18. The technical hereditary of CWD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smulders, P.T.

    1990-01-01

    An overview is given of the activities of the Dutch foundation CWD since 1975. The financing of the foundation stopped July 1st 1990. From 1975 the CWD stimulated the use of small scale wind energy to pump up water in developing countries. The hereditary of the CWD consists of knowledge of the design and performance of components of wind mills, knowledge to design integral systems based on these components and preconditions, and knowledge how to manufacture, install and maintain the wind mills locally. The CWD designed three wind mill pumps of which 250 have been brought into operation in developing countries. A CWD-type pump was developed in Sri-Lanka of which 150 pumps were installed. Also attention is paid to the external situation which effected the CWD activities: the lack of interest from the Dutch industry to cooperate in developing CWD pumps; the actual market far away in developing countries; and too little competition in the research and development. The nature of the CWD-participants caused some internal friction which did not contribute to the effectivity of the CWD organisation. It is recommended to continue the development and testing of small wind energy systems and to preserve the knowledge gained by the CWD. 3 figs., 2 tabs., 3 refs

  19. Movement disorders in hereditary ataxias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Ruiz, Pedro J; Mayo, David; Hernandez, Jaime; Cantarero, Susana; Ayuso, Carmen

    2002-10-15

    Movement disorders are well known features of some dominant hereditary ataxias (HA), specially SCA3/Machado-Joseph disease and dentatorubropallidolusyan atrophy. However, little is known about the existence and classification of movement disorders in other dominant and recessive ataxias. We prospectively studied the presence of movement disorders in patients referred for HA over the last 3 years. Only those patients with a confirmed family history of ataxia were included. We studied 84 cases of HA, including 46 cases of recessive and 38 cases of dominant HA. Thirty out of 46 cases of recessive HA could be classified as: Friedreich ataxia (FA), 29 cases; vitamin E deficiency, 1 case. Twenty-three out of 38 cases of dominant HA could be classified as: SCA 2, 4 cases; SCA 3, 8 cases; SCA 6, 4 cases; SCA 7, 6 cases and SCA 8, 1 case. We observed movement disorders in 20/38 (52%) patients with dominant HA and 25/46 (54%) cases with recessive HA, including 16 patients (16/29) with FA. In general, postural tremor was the most frequent observed movement disorder (27 cases), followed by dystonia (22 cases). Five patients had akinetic rigid syndrome, and in 13 cases, several movement disorders coexisted. Movement disorders are frequent findings in HA, not only in dominant HA but also in recessive HA. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science B.V.

  20. A Pediatrician’s Practical Guide to Diagnosing and Treating Hereditary Spherocytosis in Neonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaish, Hassan M.; Gallagher, Patrick G.

    2015-01-01

    Newborn infants who have hereditary spherocytosis (HS) can develop anemia and hyperbilirubinemia. Bilirubin-induced neurologic dysfunction is less likely in these neonates if the diagnosis of HS is recognized and appropriate treatment provided. Among neonates listed in the USA Kernicterus Registry, HS was the third most common underlying hemolytic condition after glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency and ABO hemolytic disease. HS is the leading cause of direct antiglobulin test (direct Coombs) negative hemolytic anemia requiring erythrocyte transfusion in the first months of life. We anticipate that as physicians become more familiar with diagnosing HS in the newborn period, fewer neonates with HS will develop hazardous hyperbilirubinemia or present to emergency departments with unanticipated symptomatic anemia. We predict that early suspicion, prompt diagnosis and treatment, and anticipatory guidance will prevent adverse outcomes in neonates with HS. The purpose of this article was to review the neonatal presentation of HS and to provide practical and up-to-date means of diagnosing and treating HS in neonates. PMID:26009624

  1. Metformin Therapy for Fanconis Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0300 TITLE: Metformin Therapy for Fanconis Anemia PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Markus Grompe CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION... Anemia 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-16-1-0300 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Markus Grompe 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK...298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 This award pertains to the treatment of the inherited bone marrow failure syndrome Fanconi’s Anemia

  2. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary sensory neuropathy type IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sensory neuropathy type IA Hereditary sensory neuropathy type IA Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... expand/collapse boxes. Description Hereditary sensory neuropathy type IA is a condition characterized by nerve abnormalities in ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions HLRCC Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... expand/collapse boxes. Description Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer ( HLRCC ) is a disorder in which affected individuals ...

  4. [Paediatric retinal detachment and hereditary vitreoretinal disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, P

    2013-09-01

    The number of retinal detachments in children is very low in comparison to the number in adults. One predisposing factor for development of paediatric retinal detachment is suffering from hereditary vitreoretinal degeneration (e.g., Stickler syndrome, Wagner syndrome, Kniest dysplasia, familial exudative vitreoretinopathy, congenital X-linked retinoschisis, Knobloch syndrome, incontinentia pigmenti, Norrie disease). Hereditary vitreoretinopathies are characterised by an abnormal-appearing vitreous gel with associated retinal changes. In most of these eyes further ocular abnormalities can be diagnosed. A group of hereditary disorders is associated with characteristic systemic abnormalities. Allied conditions should be considered in the clinical diagnosis. Vitreoretinopathies are the most common cause of inherited retinal detachment. In most eyes primary vitrectomy is necessary, and disease-specific surgical treatment is discussed. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Pancreatic cancer risk in hereditary pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Ulrich Weiss

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is part of the body’s immune response in order to remove harmful stimuli – like pathogens, irritants or damaged cells - and start the healing process. Recurrent or chronic inflammation on the other side seems a predisposing factor for carcinogenesis and has been found associated with cancer development. In chronic pancreatitis mutations of the cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1 gene have been identified as risk factors of the disease. Hereditary pancreatitis is a rare cause of chronic pancreatic inflammation with an early onset, mostly during childhood. Hereditary pancreatitis often starts with recurrent episodes of acute pancreatitis and the clinical phenotype is not very much different from other etiologies of the disease. The long-lasting inflammation however generates a tumor promoting environment and represents a major risk factor for tumor development This review will reflect our knowledge concerning the specific risk of hereditary pancreatitis patients to develop pancreatic cancer.

  6. The Proportion of Anemia Associated with Iron Deficiency in Low, Medium, and High Human Development Index Countries: A Systematic Analysis of National Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petry, Nicolai; Olofin, Ibironke; Hurrell, Richard F.; Boy, Erick; Wirth, James P.; Moursi, Mourad; Donahue Angel, Moira; Rohner, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    Iron deficiency is commonly assumed to cause half of all cases of anemias, with hereditary blood disorders and infections such as hookworm and malaria being the other major causes. In countries ranked as low, medium, and high by the Human Development Index, we conducted a systematic review of nationally representative surveys that reported the prevalence of iron deficiency, iron deficiency anemia, and anemia among pre-school children and non-pregnant women of reproductive age. Using random effects meta-analyses techniques, data from 23 countries for pre-school children and non-pregnant women of reproductive age was pooled, and the proportion of anemia attributable to iron deficiency was estimated by region, inflammation exposure, anemia prevalence, and urban/rural setting. For pre-school children and non-pregnant women of reproductive age, the proportion of anemia associated with iron deficiency was 25.0% (95% CI: 18.0, 32.0) and 37.0% (95% CI: 28.0, 46.0), respectively. The proportion of anemia associated with iron deficiency was lower in countries where anemia prevalence was >40%, especially in rural populations (14% for pre-school children; 16% for non-pregnant women of reproductive age), and in countries with very high inflammation exposure (20% for pre-school children; 25% for non-pregnant women of reproductive age). Despite large heterogeneity, our analyses suggest that the proportion of anemia associated with iron deficiency is lower than the previously assumed 50% in countries with low, medium, or high Human Development Index ranking. Anemia-reduction strategies and programs should be based on an analysis of country-specific data, as iron deficiency may not always be the key determinant of anemia. PMID:27827838

  7. The Proportion of Anemia Associated with Iron Deficiency in Low, Medium, and High Human Development Index Countries: A Systematic Analysis of National Surveys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolai Petry

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Iron deficiency is commonly assumed to cause half of all cases of anemias, with hereditary blood disorders and infections such as hookworm and malaria being the other major causes. In countries ranked as low, medium, and high by the Human Development Index, we conducted a systematic review of nationally representative surveys that reported the prevalence of iron deficiency, iron deficiency anemia, and anemia among pre-school children and non-pregnant women of reproductive age. Using random effects meta-analyses techniques, data from 23 countries for pre-school children and non-pregnant women of reproductive age was pooled, and the proportion of anemia attributable to iron deficiency was estimated by region, inflammation exposure, anemia prevalence, and urban/rural setting. For pre-school children and non-pregnant women of reproductive age, the proportion of anemia associated with iron deficiency was 25.0% (95% CI: 18.0, 32.0 and 37.0% (95% CI: 28.0, 46.0, respectively. The proportion of anemia associated with iron deficiency was lower in countries where anemia prevalence was >40%, especially in rural populations (14% for pre-school children; 16% for non-pregnant women of reproductive age, and in countries with very high inflammation exposure (20% for pre-school children; 25% for non-pregnant women of reproductive age. Despite large heterogeneity, our analyses suggest that the proportion of anemia associated with iron deficiency is lower than the previously assumed 50% in countries with low, medium, or high Human Development Index ranking. Anemia-reduction strategies and programs should be based on an analysis of country-specific data, as iron deficiency may not always be the key determinant of anemia.

  8. The Proportion of Anemia Associated with Iron Deficiency in Low, Medium, and High Human Development Index Countries: A Systematic Analysis of National Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petry, Nicolai; Olofin, Ibironke; Hurrell, Richard F; Boy, Erick; Wirth, James P; Moursi, Mourad; Donahue Angel, Moira; Rohner, Fabian

    2016-11-02

    Iron deficiency is commonly assumed to cause half of all cases of anemias, with hereditary blood disorders and infections such as hookworm and malaria being the other major causes. In countries ranked as low, medium, and high by the Human Development Index, we conducted a systematic review of nationally representative surveys that reported the prevalence of iron deficiency, iron deficiency anemia, and anemia among pre-school children and non-pregnant women of reproductive age. Using random effects meta-analyses techniques, data from 23 countries for pre-school children and non-pregnant women of reproductive age was pooled, and the proportion of anemia attributable to iron deficiency was estimated by region, inflammation exposure, anemia prevalence, and urban/rural setting. For pre-school children and non-pregnant women of reproductive age, the proportion of anemia associated with iron deficiency was 25.0% (95% CI: 18.0, 32.0) and 37.0% (95% CI: 28.0, 46.0), respectively. The proportion of anemia associated with iron deficiency was lower in countries where anemia prevalence was >40%, especially in rural populations (14% for pre-school children; 16% for non-pregnant women of reproductive age), and in countries with very high inflammation exposure (20% for pre-school children; 25% for non-pregnant women of reproductive age). Despite large heterogeneity, our analyses suggest that the proportion of anemia associated with iron deficiency is lower than the previously assumed 50% in countries with low, medium, or high Human Development Index ranking. Anemia-reduction strategies and programs should be based on an analysis of country-specific data, as iron deficiency may not always be the key determinant of anemia.

  9. Genetics Home Reference: Fanconi anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fanconi anemia: at the crossroads of DNA repair. Biochemistry (Mosc). 2011 Jan;76(1):36-48. Review. ... not be used as a substitute for professional medical care or advice. Users with questions about a ...

  10. Therapeutic Strategies for Hereditary Kidney Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidana, Abhinav; Srinivasan, Ramaprasad

    2016-08-01

    The study of hereditary forms of kidney cancer has vastly increased our understanding of metabolic and genetic pathways involved in the development of both inherited and sporadic kidney cancers. The recognition that diverse molecular events drive different forms of kidney cancers has led to the preclinical and clinical development of specific pathway-directed strategies tailored to treat distinct subgroups of kidney cancer. Here, we describe the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of several different types of hereditary renal cancers, review their clinical characteristics, and summarize the treatment strategies for the management of these cancers.

  11. Diagnosis and management of hereditary hemochromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgia, Reena J; Brown, Kimberly

    2015-02-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis is a rare genetic disorder that can have significant clinical consequences. Hemochromatosis is associated with iron overload, and can initially be recognized through laboratory testing for serum ferritin and transferrin saturation. Genetic testing for the HFE mutation can be performed in patients with elevated iron indices and a suspicion for hemochromatosis or liver disease. The main pathway resulting in iron overload is through altered hepcidin levels. Treatment of patients with the clinical phenotype of hereditary hemochromatosis is commonly through phlebotomy for removal of excess iron stores. This article highlights the current information and data regarding the diagnosis and management of hemochromatosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Mice with a targeted disruption of the Fanconi anemia homolog Fanca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, N C; van de Vrugt, H J; van der Valk, M A; Oostra, A B; Krimpenfort, P; de Vries, Y; Joenje, H; Berns, A; Arwert, F

    2000-07-22

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a hereditary chromosomal instability syndrome with cancer predisposition. Bone marrow failure resulting in pancytopenia is the main cause of death of FA patients. Diagnosis of FA is based on their cellular hypersensitivity to DNA crosslinking agents and chromosome breakages. Somatic complementation experiments suggest the involvement of at least eight genes in FA. The gene for complementation group A (FANCA) is defective in the majority of FA patients. We show here that mice deficient of FANCA: are viable and have no detectable developmental abnormalities. The hematological parameters showed a slightly decreased platelet count and a slightly increased erythrocyte mean cell volume in mice at young age, but this did not progress to anemia. Consistent with the clinical phenotype of FA patients, both male and female mice showed hypogonadism and impaired fertility. Furthermore, embryonic fibroblasts of the knock-out mice exhibited spontaneous chromosomal instability and were hyper-responsive to the clastogenic effect of the crosslinker mitomycin C.

  13. Genetics Home Reference: iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... refractory iron deficiency anemia Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... expand/collapse boxes. Description Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia is one of many types of anemia , which ...

  14. Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura Misdiagnosed as Hereditary Angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Michelle Fog; Bygum, Anette

    2015-01-01

    however not always have to be caused by angioedema but can relate to other concomitant disorders. In this report we are focusing on misdiagnosis in a patient with known hereditary angioedema, whose bleeding episode caused by idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura was mistaken for an acute attack...

  15. Major and minor form of hereditary hyperekplexia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijssen, MAJ; Vergouwe, MN; van Dijk, JG; Rees, M; Frants, RR; Brown, P

    Hyperekplexia is a hereditary neurological disorder characterized by excessive startle responses. Within the disorder two clinical forms can be distinguished. The major form is characterized by continuous generalized stiffness in the first year of life and an exaggerated startle reflex, accompanied

  16. MRI in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthews, Lucy; Enzinger, Christian; Fazekas, Franz

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and a multiple sclerosis (MS)-like illness appear to coexist 50 times more frequently than would be expected by chance. This association of LHON and MS (LMS) raises an important question about whether there could be a common pathophysiological...

  17. Autosomal dominant hereditary ataxia in Sri Lanka

    OpenAIRE

    Sumathipala, Dulika S; Abeysekera, Gayan S; Jayasekara, Rohan W; Tallaksen, Chantal ME; Dissanayake, Vajira HW

    2013-01-01

    Background Spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA) are a group of hereditary neurodegenerative disorders. Prevalence of SCA subtypes differ worldwide. Autosomal dominant ataxias are the commonest types of inherited ataxias seen in Sri Lanka. The aim of the study is to determine the genetic etiology of patients with autosomal dominant ataxia in Sri Lanka and to describe the clinical features of each genetic subtype. Methods ...

  18. Hereditary hemochromatosis: An opportunity for gene therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FERNANDO EZQUER

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Levels of body iron should be tightly controlled to prevent the formation of oxygen radicals, lipoperoxidation, genotoxicity, and the production of cytotoxic cytokines, which result in damage to a number of organs. Enterocytes in the intestinal villae are involved in the apical uptake of iron from the intestinal lumen; iron is further exported from the cells into the circulation. The apical divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1 transports ferrous iron from the lumen into the cells, while the basolateral transporter ferroportin extrudes iron from the enterocytes into the circulation. Patients with hereditary hemochromatosis display an accelerated transepithelial uptake of iron, which leads to body iron accumulation that results in cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, pancreatitis, and cardiomyopathy. Hereditary hemochromatosis, a recessive genetic condition, is the most prevalent genetic disease in Caucasians, with a prevalence of one in 300 subjects. The majority of patients with hereditary hemochromatosis display mutations in the gene coding for HFE, a protein that normally acts as an inhibitor of transepithelial iron transport. We discuss the different control points in the homeostasis of iron and the different mutations that exist in patients with hereditary hemochromatosis. These control sites may be influenced by gene therapeutic approaches; one general therapy for hemochromatosis of different etiologies is the inhibition of DMT1 synthesis by antisense-generating genes, which has been shown to markedly inhibit apical iron uptake by intestinal epithelial cells. We further discuss the most promising strategies to develop gene vectors and deliver them into enterocytes

  19. Epidemiology of Non-hereditary Angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Flemming; Attermann, Jorn; Linneberg, Allan

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of non-hereditary angioedema was investigated in a general population sample (n = 7,931) and in a sample of Danish patients (n = 7,433) tested for deficiency of functional complement C1 esterase inhibitor protein (functional C1 INH). The general population sample (44% response rate...

  20. Epidemiology of Non-hereditary Angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Flemming; Attermann, Jørn; Linneberg, Allan

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of non-hereditary angioedema was investigated in a general population sample (n¿=¿7,931) and in a sample of Danish patients (n¿=¿7,433) tested for deficiency of functional complement C1 esterase inhibitor protein (functional C1 INH). The general population sample (44% response rate...

  1. Revisited diagnostics of hereditary epidermolysis bullosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Albanova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary epidermolysis bullosa is a big group of hereditary diseases with the main manifestations in the form of blisters on the skin and mucous coat after slight mechanical injuries. It is not always possible to diagnose this disease based on the clinical picture. The article discusses current laboratory diagnostics methods for hereditary epidermolysis bullosa including immunofluorescence antigen mapping (IFM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and genetic analysis (molecular or DNA diagnostics as well as their advantages and disadvantages. TEM determines the micro splitting level and nature of ultrafine changes in the area of the dermoepidermal junction; at the same time, such tests need special expensive equipment. Substantial experience is also needed to analyze the resulting submicroscopic images. IFM determines whether expression of the affected protein related to the disease development is reduced or absent; however, invalid (false positive or false negative results can be obtained in patients with the reduced expression of the affected protein. Genetic analysis plays a key role for prenatal diagnostics. Therefore, to make an exact diagnosis of hereditary epidermolysis bullosa, it is expedient to apply IFM, TEM and genetic analysis. The need to set an exact diagnosis of the disease is related to the fact that the promising treatment methods being currently developed are aimed at treating patients with certain forms of the disease.

  2. Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia clinical and molecular genetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Letteboer, T.G.W.

    2010-01-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) or Rendu-Osler-Weber (ROW) syndrome is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by vascular malformations in multiple organ systems. HHT has an age-related penetrance and variable clinical expression. The clinical symptoms are caused by direct

  3. A importância do aconselhamento genético na anemia falciforme The importance of genetic counseling at sickle cell anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cínthia Tavares Leal Guimarães

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available O aconselhamento genético tem a finalidade de nortear as pessoas sobre a tomada de decisões a respeito da procriação, ajudando-as a entender como a hereditariedade pode colaborar para a ocorrência ou risco de recorrência de doenças genéticas, como é o caso da anemia falciforme. Esta anemia é a doença hereditária de maior prevalência no Brasil, com complicações clínicas que podem prejudicar o desenvolvimento, a qualidade de vida e levar à morte. O presente artigo tem o intuito de elucidar a importância do aconselhamento genético para os portadores de anemia ou traço falciforme, visando salientar as principais características dessa doença, suas complicações e como é feito o diagnóstico e a captação desses doentes. O estudo realizado foi embasado no método bibliográfico, buscando estudos que dissertam sobre esse tipo de anemia e aconselhamento genético, correlacionando-os com as diretrizes e dados do Ministério da Saúde. A partir dos dados encontrados, infere-se a importância do aconselhamento genético para os indivíduos que apresentam a forma heterozigota da anemia falciforme - o traço falcêmico - e destaca-se a necessidade de implantação de programas de diagnóstico precoce e de orientação tanto genética quanto social e psicológica para as pessoas que possuem a doença ou o traço falciforme.The genetic counseling has the purpose of guiding people through a conscientious and balanced decision making process regarding procreation, helping them to understand how the hereditary succession can contribute for the occurrence or risk of recurrence of genetic illnesses, as it is the case of the sickle cell anemia. This type of anemia is the most prevalence hereditary illness in Brazil and has clinical complications that can harm the development, the quality of life and lead to death. The present article has the objective to clarify the importance of the genetic counseling for the anemia carriers or falciform

  4. Fanconi anemia and radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Asako; Komatsu, Kenshi [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. for Nuclear Medicine and Biology

    1999-09-01

    Aplastic Fanconi anemia (FA) accompanying malformation was firstly reported in 1927. This review concerns the recent findings on FA. FA belongs to the chromosomal instability syndrome and its detailed molecular mechanism is still unknown. The disease has been defined to be highly sensitive to radiation, however, which is quite an important problem since irradiation with a large dose of radiation is required before its radical treatment (bone marrow transplantation). FA cells are also mitomycin C-sensitive and FA patients are said to be the mosaic of the sensitive and normal cells. This enables to classify FA into 8 types of A-H groups, whose genotypes (FAA-FAH, FANCA-FANCH) are becoming clear. However, the intracellular function of the FANC-expressed protein, although known to form a big complex, is not elucidated yet. There is an abnormality in DNA processing such as re-linkage of the double strand-broken DNA in FA cells. FA causal gene FANCG is found identical to XRCC9 which is associated to high sensitivity to radiation. Analysis of FANC genes will provide useful findings on molecular mechanism of DNA-repair. (K.H.)

  5. Fanconi anemia and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Asako; Komatsu, Kenshi

    1999-01-01

    Aplastic Fanconi anemia (FA) accompanying malformation was firstly reported in 1927. This review concerns the recent findings on FA. FA belongs to the chromosomal instability syndrome and its detailed molecular mechanism is still unknown. The disease has been defined to be highly sensitive to radiation, however, which is quite an important problem since irradiation with a large dose of radiation is required before its radical treatment (bone marrow transplantation). FA cells are also mitomycin C-sensitive and FA patients are said to be the mosaic of the sensitive and normal cells. This enables to classify FA into 8 types of A-H groups, whose genotypes (FAA-FAH, FANCA-FANCH) are becoming clear. However, the intracellular function of the FANC-expressed protein, although known to form a big complex, is not elucidated yet. There is an abnormality in DNA processing such as re-linkage of the double strand-broken DNA in FA cells. FA causal gene FANCG is found identical to XRCC9 which is associated to high sensitivity to radiation. Analysis of FANC genes will provide useful findings on molecular mechanism of DNA-repair. (K.H.)

  6. Evaluation of anemia diagnosis based on elastic light scattering (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Lieshu; Wang, Xinrui; Xie, Dengling; Chen, Xiaoya; Chu, Kaiqin; Dou, Hu; Smith, Zachary J.

    2017-03-01

    Currently, one-third of humanity is still suffering from anemia. In China the most common forms of anemia are iron deficiency and Thalassemia minor. Differentiating these two is the key to effective treatment. Iron deficiency is caused by malnutrition and can be cured by iron supplementation. Thalassemia is a hereditary disease in which the hemoglobin β chain is lowered or absent. Iron therapy is not effective, and there is evidence that iron therapy may be harmful to patients with Thalassemia. Both anemias can be diagnosed using red blood cell morphology: Iron deficiency presents a smaller mean cell volume compared to normal cells, but with a wide distribution; Thalassemia, meanwhile, presents a very small cell size and tight particle size distribution. Several researchers have proposed diagnostic indices based on red cell morphology to differentiate these two diseases. However, these indices lack sensitivity and specificity and are constructed without statistical rigor. Using multivariate methods we demonstrate a new classification method based on red cell morphology that diagnoses anemia in a Chinese population with enough accuracy for its use as a screening method. We further demonstrate a low cost instrument that precisely measures red cell morphology using elastic light scattering. This instrument is combined with an automated analysis program that processes scattering data to report red cell morphology without the need for user intervention. Despite using consumer-grade components, when comparing our experimental results with gold-standard measurements, the device can still achieve the high precision required for sensing clinically significant changes in red cell morphology.

  7. Severe anemia in Malawian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calis, Job Cj; Phiri, Kamija S; Faragher, E Brian; Brabin, Bernard J; Bates, Imelda; Cuevas, Luis E; de Haan, Rob J; Phiri, Ajib I; Malange, Pelani; Khoka, Mirriam; Hulshof, Paul Jm; van Lieshout, Lisette; Beld, Marcel Ghm; Teo, Yik Y; Rockett, Kirk A; Richardson, Anna; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P; Molyneux, Malcolm E; van Hensbroek, Michaël Boele

    2016-09-01

    Severe anemia is a major cause of sickness and death in African children, yet the causes of anemia in this population have been inadequately studied. We conducted a case-control study of 381 preschool children with severe anemia (hemoglobin concentration, <5.0 g per deciliter) and 757 preschool children without severe anemia in urban and rural settings in Malawi. Causal factors previously associated with severe anemia were studied. The data were examined by multivariate analysis and structural equation modeling. Bacteremia (adjusted odds ratio, 5.3; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.6 to 10.9), malaria (adjusted odds ratio, 2.3; 95% CI, 1.6 to 3.3), hookworm (adjusted odds ratio, 4.8; 95% CI, 2.0 to 11.8), human immunodeficiency virus infection (adjusted odds ratio, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.0 to 3.8), the G6PD -202/-376 genetic disorder (adjusted odds ratio, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.3 to 4.4), vitamin A deficiency (adjusted odds ratio, 2.8; 95% CI, 1.3 to 5.8), and vitamin B 12 deficiency (adjusted odds ratio, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.4 to 3.6) were associated with severe anemia. Folate deficiency, sickle cell disease, and laboratory signs of an abnormal inflammatory response were uncommon. Iron deficiency was not prevalent in case patients (adjusted odds ratio, 0.37; 95% CI, 0.22 to 0.60) and was negatively associated with bacteremia. Malaria was associated with severe anemia in the urban site (with seasonal transmission) but not in the rural site (where malaria was holoendemic). Seventy-six percent of hookworm infections were found in children under 2 years of age. There are multiple causes of severe anemia in Malawian preschool children, but folate and iron deficiencies are not prominent among them. Even in the presence of malaria parasites, additional or alternative causes of severe anemia should be considered.

  8. Genetics Home Reference: congenital dyserythropoietic anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions CDA Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia ( CDA ) is an inherited blood disorder that affects ...

  9. FastStats: Anemia or Iron Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Anemia or Iron Deficiency Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... visits Number of visits to emergency departments with anemia as the primary hospital discharge diagnosis: 188,000 ...

  10. [Correlation of the degree of band 3 protein absence on erythrocyte membrane by eosin-5'-maleimide binding test and clinical phenotype in hereditary spherocytosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, G X; Yang, W R; Jing, L P; Zhang, L; Zhou, K; Li, Y; Ye, L; Li, Y; Li, J P; Fan, H H; Song, L; Zhao, X; Wu, Z J; Yang, Y; Xiong, Y Z; Wang, H J; Zhang, F K

    2017-06-14

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between the eosin-5'-maleimide (EMA) binding test and the clinical severity of hereditary spherocytosis (HS). Methods: A total of 258 un-splenectomize HS patients were consecutively enrolled. Correlation of hemoglobin concentration, hemolytic parameters, compensating erythropoiesis and the EMA binding test were evaluated. Results: 258 (128 male and 130 female) patients were included in this study, including 91 compensatory hemolysis patients, 53 patients with mild anemia, 78 patients with moderate anemia and 36 patients with severe anemia. The median age at diagnosis was 23 (2-70) years. The median decreased fluorescence intensity of EMA binding test was 29.97% (16.09%-47.34%) and the average intensity was (29.70±6.28) % of 258 HS patients. The decreased EMA binding fluorescence intensity correlated with MCV ( r =-0.343, P <0.001) and MCHC ( r =0.223, P <0.001). There was no relationship between EMA fluorescence intensity and absolute reticulocyte count ( r =0.080, P =0.198) , reticulocyte percentile ( r =-0.015, P =0.813) , IBIL levels ( r =-0.009, P =0.902) , HGB levels ( r =-0.067, P =0.280). Evaluated as a quartile variable, EMA fluorescence intensity was not correlated with anemia severity ( C =0.150, P =0.746). Conclusion: EMA binding test does not related to anemia levels and has no major clinical implications for disease severity in HS.

  11. Anemia of Inflammation and Chronic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AI/ACD. AI/ACD is easily confused with iron- deficiency anemia because in both forms of anemia levels of ... cell production. Low blood iron levels occur in iron-deficiency anemia because levels of the iron stored in the ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Iron-Deficiency Anemia KidsHealth / For Parents / Iron-Deficiency Anemia What's in ... common nutritional deficiency in children. About Iron-Deficiency Anemia Every red blood cell in the body contains ...

  13. Syngeneic transplantation in aplastic anemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerull, Sabine; Stern, Martin; Apperley, Jane

    2013-01-01

    Aplastic anemia is usually treated with immunosuppression or allogeneic transplant, depending on patient and disease characteristics. Syngeneic transplant offers a rare treatment opportunity with minimal transplant-related mortality, and offers an insight into disease mechanisms. We present here...... a retrospective analysis of all syngeneic transplants for aplastic anemia reported to the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Between 1976 and 2009, 88 patients received 113 transplants. Most transplants (n=85) were preceded by a conditioning regimen, 22 of these including anti-thymocyte globulin...

  14. Hereditary noetherian prime rings and idealizers

    CERN Document Server

    Levy, Lawrence S

    2011-01-01

    The direct sum behaviour of its projective modules is a fundamental property of any ring. Hereditary Noetherian prime rings are perhaps the only noncommutative Noetherian rings for which this direct sum behaviour (for both finitely and infinitely generated projective modules) is well-understood, yet highly nontrivial. This book surveys material previously available only in the research literature. It provides a re-worked and simplified account, with improved clarity, fresh insights and many original results about finite length modules, injective modules and projective modules. It culminates in the authors' surprisingly complete structure theorem for projective modules which involves two independent additive invariants: genus and Steinitz class. Several applications demonstrate its utility. The theory, extending the well-known module theory of commutative Dedekind domains and of hereditary orders, develops via a detailed study of simple modules. This relies upon the substantial account of idealizer subrings wh...

  15. Hereditary spastic paraplegia with cerebellar ataxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J E; Johnsen, B; Koefoed, P

    2004-01-01

    Complex forms of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) are rare and usually transmitted in an autosomal recessive pattern. A family of four generations with autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (AD-HSP) and a complex phenotype with variably expressed co-existing ataxia, dysarthria......, unipolar depression, epilepsy, migraine, and cognitive impairment was investigated. Genetic linkage analysis and sequencing of the SPG4 gene was performed and electrophysiologic investigations were carried out in six individuals and positron emission tomography (PET) in one patient. The disease was linked...... in those individuals who were clinically affected by a complex phenotype consisting of HSP and cerebellar ataxia. Other features noted in this kindred including epilepsy, cognitive impairment, depression, and migraine did not segregate with the HSP phenotype or mutation, and therefore the significance...

  16. Hereditary Transthyretin Amyloidosis in Eight Chinese Families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling-Chao Meng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mutations of transthyretin (TTR cause the most common type of autosomal-dominant hereditary systemic amyloidosis, which occurs worldwide. To date, more and more mutations in the TTR gene have been reported. Some variations in the clinical presentation are often observed in patients with the same mutation or the patients in the same family. The purpose of this study was to find out the clinicopathologic and genetic features of Chinese patients with hereditary TTR amyloidosis. Methods: Clinical and necessary examination materials were collected from nine patients of eight families with hereditary TTR amyloidosis at Peking University First Hospital from January 2007 to November 2014. Sural nerve biopsies were taken for eight patients and skin biopsies were taken in the calf/upper arm for two patients, for light and electron microscopy examination. The TTR genes from the nine patients were analyzed. Results: The onset age varied from 23 to 68 years. The main manifestations were paresthesia, proximal and/or distal weakness, autonomic dysfunction, cardiomyopathy, vitreous opacity, hearing loss, and glossohypertrophia. Nerve biopsy demonstrated severe loss of myelinated fibers in seven cases and amyloid deposits in three. One patient had skin amyloid deposits which were revealed from electron microscopic examination. Genetic analysis showed six kinds of mutations of TTR gene, including Val30Met, Phe33Leu, Ala36Pro, Val30Ala, Phe33Val, and Glu42Gly in exon 2. Conclusions: Since the pathological examinations of sural nerve were negative for amyloid deposition in most patients, the screening for TTR mutations should be performed in all the adult patients, who are clinically suspected with hereditary TTR amyloidosis.

  17. Multiple Hereditary Osteochondromatosis: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    K???kesmen, ?i?dem; ?zen, Bu?ra; Ak?am, Mustafa

    2007-01-01

    Objectives Common carious lesions owing to vomiting are not widespread in children. In this case, we aimed to report an 11-years-old male patient with common carious lesions due to repeated vomitings, chewing and eating difficulty and retarded growth with Multiple Hereditary Osteochondromatosis (MHO). Case Report An 11-years-old boy was referred to Department of Pediatric Dentistry in Faculty of Dentistry because of eating difficulty owing to common carious lesions. It was seen that the patie...

  18. Mania associated with complicated hereditary spastic paraparesis

    OpenAIRE

    Raghavendra B Nayak; Govind S Bhogale; Nanasaheb M Patil; Aditya A Pandurangi

    2011-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraparesis (HSP) is an inherited group of neurological disorders with progressive lower limb spasticity. HSP can be clinically grouped into pure and complicated forms. Pure HSP is one without any associated neurological/psychiatric comorbidity. Depression is the most common psychiatric comorbidity. Presence of mania or bipolar affective illness with HSP is a rare phenomenon. We report a case of a 17-year-old boy who presented with classical features of HSP with complaints ...

  19. Cellular Pathways of Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia*

    OpenAIRE

    Blackstone, Craig

    2012-01-01

    Human voluntary movement is controlled by the pyramidal motor system, a long CNS pathway comprising corticospinal and lower motor neurons. Hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) are a large, genetically diverse group of inherited neurologic disorders characterized by a length-dependent distal axonopathy of the corticospinal tracts, resulting in lower limb spasticity and weakness. A range of studies are converging on alterations in the shaping of organelles, particularly the endoplasmic reticul...

  20. Current problems in haematology. 2: Hereditary spherocytosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Smedley, J C; Bellingham, A J

    1991-01-01

    Hereditary spherocytosis is a relatively common haematological disorder and will be encountered by all haematologists. The abundance of new information, dealing principally with molecular and genetic aspects of pathophysiology, is beginning to have implications for its investigation and management. While these advances have not yet exerted a large influence at therapeutic level, the promise of such advents as prenatal diagnosis make this an exciting field to watch.

  1. Multimodality imaging features of hereditary multiple exostoses

    OpenAIRE

    Kok, H K; Fitzgerald, L; Campbell, N; Lyburn, I D; Munk, P L; Buckley, O; Torreggiani, W C

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary multiple exostoses (HME) or diaphyseal aclasis is an inherited disorder characterised by the formation of multiple osteochondromas, which are cartilage-capped osseous outgrowths, and the development of associated osseous deformities. Individuals with HME may be asymptomatic or develop clinical symptoms, which prompt imaging studies. Different modalities ranging from plain radiographs to cross-sectional and nuclear medicine imaging studies can be helpful in the diagnosis and detecti...

  2. Pancreatic cancer risk in hereditary pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Weiss, Frank U.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is part of the body’s immune response in order to remove harmful stimuli – like pathogens, irritants or damaged cells - and start the healing process. Recurrent or chronic inflammation on the other side seems a predisposing factor for carcinogenesis and has been found associated with cancer development. In chronic pancreatitis mutations of the cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1) gene have been identified as risk factors of the disease. Hereditary pancreatitis is a rare cause of chronic...

  3. ANEMIA DAN ANEMIA GIZI BESI PADA KEHAMILAN: HUBUNGANNYA DENGAN ASUPAN PROTEIN DAN ZAT GIZI MIKRO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Handayani Utami

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Anemia masih menjadi permasalahan kesehatan pada wanita hamil. Zat besi dianggap sebagai salah satu zat gizi mikro yang berperan terhadap terjadinya anemia. Kekurangan gizi besi dalam tingkat lanjut dapat menyebabkan anemia, yang disebut sebagai anemia gizi besi. Tujuan studi ini adalah untuk menganalisis perbedaan antara asupan protein dan gizi mikro serta menghitung odd ratio (OR kejadian anemia dan anemia gizi besi akibat asupan protein dan gizi mikro pada wanita hamil di lokasi studi. Analisis ini merupakan analisa dari data studi kohor Tumbuh Kembang anak pada tahun pertama, yang dilaksanakan di Kelurahan Kebon Kalapa dan Ciwaringin, Kota Bogor yang dianalisa menggunakan disainkasus kontrol. Sebanyak 47 ibu hamil menjadi sampel dalam analisa ini. Kategori untuk anemia yaitu apabila kadar hemoglobin (Hb ibu hamil ≤11 g/dL. Kekurangan gizi besi dikategorikan apabila kadar serum transferrin reseptor (sTfR diatas 4.4 mg/L. Sedangkan Anemia Gizi Besi dikategorikan apabila memiliki kadar Hb < 11 g/dL dan sTfr > 4.4 mg/L. Tes one way anova digunakan untuk menganalisa adanya perbedaan asupan energi, protein dan zat gizi mikro antara ibu hamil yang mengalami anemia, anemia gizi besi maupun yang normal. Odd ratio dianalisa dengan menggunakan uji chi square. Nilai signifikan ditentukan apabila nilai p value < 0.05 dan perhitungan OR> 1. 27.7% dari ibu hamil di lokasi studi mengalami anemia, 14.9% tergolong dalam anemia ringan, 10.6% anemia sedang dan 2.1% anemia berat. Anemia gizi besi dialami oleh 17% dari wanita hamil. Terdapat hubungan yang signifikan antara keparahan anemia dan terjadinya anemia gizi besi. Tidak ditemukan perbedaan antara asupan protein, besi, folate dan zink pada wanita yang mengalami anemia, anemia gizi besi maupun yang normal. Akan tetapi terdapat kecenderungan bahwa asupan zat besi dan seng pada ibu yang anemia dan anemia gizi besi lebih rendah daripada ibu yang normal. Anemia masih menjadi permasalahan kesehatan pada ibu

  4. Human parvovirus B19-induced aplastic crisis in an adult patient with hereditary spherocytosis: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yujin; Hatta, Yoshihiro; Ishiwatari, Yusaku; Kanno, Hitoshi; Takei, Masami

    2014-03-11

    Although there are several case reports of human parvovirus B19 infection in patients with hereditary spherocytosis, no systematic reviews of adult patients with hereditary spherocytosis with human parvovirus B19 infection have been published as clinical case reports. In this study, we report a case of aplastic crisis due to human parvovirus B19 infection in an adult patient with hereditary spherocytosis. A 33-year-old woman with hereditary spherocytosis and gallstones was admitted because of rapid progress in marked anemia and fever. Although empiric antibiotic therapy was prescribed, her clinical symptoms and liver function test worsened. Because the anti-human parvovirus B19 antibody and deoxyribonucleic acid levels assessed by polymerase chain reaction were positive, the patient was diagnosed with aplastic crisis due to the human parvovirus B19 infection. We collected and reviewed several case reports of patients with hereditary spherocytosis aged > 18 years with human parvovirus B19 infection between 1984 and 2010. A total of 19 reports with 22 cases [median age, 28 years (range, 18-43 range); male: female ratio, 6:16], including the present case were identified. The male-to-female ratio of 6:16 implied that younger females were predominantly affected. Although fever and abdominal symptoms were common initial symptoms, liver dysfunction or skin eruptions were less commonly documented. Anti-human parvovirus B19 antibody or deoxyribonucleic acid levels assessed by polymerase chain reaction was commonly used to diagnose human parvovirus B19 infection and may be useful to distinguish human parvovirus B19 infection from other abdominal infection in patients with hereditary spherocytosis.

  5. Anemia and survival in human immunodeficiency virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, Jens Dilling; Mocroft, Amanda

    2003-01-01

    The prospective, multicenter cohort study EuroSIDA has previously reported on predictors and outcomes of anemia in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus. In a Cox proportional-hazards model with serial measures of CD4+ cell count, plasma viral load, and degrees of anemia fitted...... as time-dependent variables, the relative hazard of death increased markedly for patients with anemia versus no anemia. A clinical scoring system was developed and validated for patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy using the most recent laboratory measures. Mild and severe anemia were...... independently (Panemia. The mechanisms underlying why hemoglobin is such a strong prognostic...

  6. Disease expression in women with hereditary angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouillet, Laurence; Longhurst, Hilary; Boccon-Gibod, Isabelle

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Fluctuations in sex hormones can trigger angioedema attacks in women with hereditary angioedema. Combined oral contraceptive therapies, as well as pregnancy, can induce severe attacks. The course of angioedema may be very variable in different women. STUDY DESIGN: Within the PREHAEAT p......-sensitive phenotype for some patients. CONCLUSION: The course of angioedema in women with C1 inhibitor deficiency is affected by physiologic hormonal changes; consequently, physicians should take these into account when advising on management.......OBJECTIVE: Fluctuations in sex hormones can trigger angioedema attacks in women with hereditary angioedema. Combined oral contraceptive therapies, as well as pregnancy, can induce severe attacks. The course of angioedema may be very variable in different women. STUDY DESIGN: Within the PREHAEAT...... project launched by the European Union, data on 150 postpubertal women with hereditary angioedema were collected in 8 countries, using a patient-based questionnaire. RESULTS: Puberty worsened the disease for 62%. Combined oral contraceptives worsened the disease for 79%, whereas progestogen-only pills...

  7. Hereditary pituitary hyperplasia with infantile gigantism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gläsker, Sven; Vortmeyer, Alexander O; Lafferty, Antony R A; Hofman, Paul L; Li, Jie; Weil, Robert J; Zhuang, Zhengping; Oldfield, Edward H

    2011-12-01

    We report hereditary pituitary hyperplasia. The objective of the study was to describe the results of the clinical and laboratory analysis of this rare instance of hereditary pituitary hyperplasia. The study is a retrospective analysis of three cases from one family. The study was conducted at the National Institutes of Health, a tertiary referral center. A mother and both her sons had very early-onset gigantism associated with high levels of serum GH and prolactin. The condition was treated by total hypophysectomy. We performed clinical, pathological, and molecular evaluations, including evaluation basal and provocative endocrine testing, neuroradiological assessment, and assessment of the pituitary tissue by microscopic evaluation, immunohistochemistry, and electron microscopy. All three family members had very early onset of gigantism associated with abnormally high serum levels of GH and prolactin. Serum GHRH levels were not elevated in either of the boys. The clinical, radiographic, surgical, and histological findings indicated mammosomatotroph hyperplasia. The pituitary gland of both boys revealed diffuse mammosomatotroph hyperplasia of the entire pituitary gland without evidence of adenoma. Prolactin and GH were secreted by the same cells within the same secretory granules. Western blot and immunohistochemistry demonstrated expression of GHRH in clusters of cells distributed throughout the hyperplastic pituitary of both boys. This hereditary condition seems to be a result of embryonic pituitary maldevelopment with retention and expansion of the mammosomatotrophs. The findings suggest that it is caused by paracrine or autocrine pituitary GHRH secretion during pituitary development.

  8. Advances and challenges in hereditary cancer pharmacogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascorbi, Ingolf; Werk, Anneke Nina

    2017-01-01

    Cancer pharmacogenetics usually considers tumor-specific targets. However, hereditary genetic variants may interfere with the pharmacokinetics of antimetabolites and other anti-cancer drugs, which may lead to severe adverse events. Areas covered: Here, the impact of hereditary genes considered in drug labels such as thiopurine S-methyltransferase (TPMT), UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UTG1A1) and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPYD) are discussed with respect to guidelines of the Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC). Moreover, the association between genetic variants of drug transporters with the clinical outcome is comprehensively discussed. Expert opinion: Precision therapy in the field of oncology is developing tremendously. There are a number of somatic tumor genetic markers that are indicative for treatment with anti-cancer drugs. By contrast, for some hereditary variants, recommendations have been developed. Although we have vast knowledge on the association between drug transporter variants and clinical outcome, the overall data is inconsistent and the predictability of the related phenotype is low. Further developments in research may lead to the discovery of rare, but functionally relevant single nucleotide polymorphisms and a better understanding of multiple genomic, epigenomic as well as phenotypic factors, contributing to drug response in malignancies.

  9. Anemias hemolíticas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Cediel Ángel

    1957-04-01

    Full Text Available Hayem (1898 y más tarde Widal (1907 señalaron que, al paso que la forma congénita clásica de anemia hemolítica de Minkowski y Chauffard a menudo causaba pocos síntomas, otro tipo que ellos clasificaron como adquirido, con frecuencia' se asociaba con anemia severa y acentuada incapacidad. Incluyeron allí casos de excesiva destrucción de sangre asociada a diversas infecciones ó intoxicaciones lo mismo que casos de etiología desconocida. Chauffard fue capaz de demostrar autohemolisinas en el suero de unos pocos casos de anemia hemolítica aguda adquirida y se refirió a ellos como "ictericias hemolisínicas". Sin embargo por muchos años existió la duda de que hubiera un verdadero tipo de anemia hemolítica adquirida y muy poco fue tenida en cuenta la posibilidad de que pudiera jugar papel en estos casos una reacción inmunológica.

  10. Radiosensitivity in Fanconi's anemia patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alter, Blanche P.

    2002-01-01

    The risks of radiation therapy in patients with Fanconi's anemia who have cancer are not clear. Possible toxicity was reported in six of 14 patients: 1/1 with vaginal cancer, 4/10 with head and neck or esophageal cancer, and 1/3 with oral cancer following bone marrow transplant

  11. Management of Iron Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Kristine; Kulnigg-Dabsch, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Anemia affects one-fourth of the world’s population, and iron deficiency is the predominant cause. Anemia is associated with chronic fatigue, impaired cognitive function, and diminished well-being. Patients with iron deficiency anemia of unknown etiology are frequently referred to a gastroenterologist because in the majority of cases the condition has a gastrointestinal origin. Proper management improves quality of life, alleviates the symptoms of iron deficiency, and reduces the need for blood transfusions. Treatment options include oral and intravenous iron therapy; however, the efficacy of oral iron is limited in certain gastrointestinal conditions, such as inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, and autoimmune gastritis. This article provides a critical summary of the diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency anemia. In addition, it includes a management algorithm that can help the clinician determine which patients are in need of further gastrointestinal evaluation. This facilitates the identification and treatment of the underlying condition and avoids the unnecessary use of invasive methods and their associated risks. PMID:27099596

  12. Cooley's Anemia: A Psychosocial Directory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Washington, DC.

    The directory is intended to aid patients and their families who are coping with the genetic disorder of Cooley's anemia. A brief review of the disease covers background, genetics, symptoms, effect on the patient, treatment, and current research. The next section looks at psychosocial needs at various times (time of diagnosis, infancy and toddler…

  13. Cryohemolysis, erythrocyte osmotic fragility, and supplementary hematimetric indices in the diagnosis of hereditary spherocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emilse, Ledesma Achem Miryam; Cecilia, Haro; María, Terán Magdalena; Eugenia, Mónaco María; Alicia, Issé Blanca; Lazarte, Sandra Stella

    2018-03-01

    Hereditary spherocytosis (HS) is a chronic hemolytic anemia characterized by microspherocytes in the peripheral blood and increased erythrocyte osmotic fragility (EOF). This study evaluated the cryohemolysis test (CHT); initial hemolysis (IH); immediate and incubated hemolysis percentage in 5.5 g/L NaCl (H5.5); mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC); red blood cell distribution width (RDW); and Hb/MCHC, Hb/RDW, and MCHC/RDW ratios for the diagnosis of HS. Data from 13 patients with HS were evaluated at the Instituto de Bioquímica Aplicada and compared with data from 14 unaffected individuals and 11 patients with anemia due to another etiology. Total blood and reticulocyte counts, CHT, and immediate and incubated EOF were performed in all subjects; sensitivity, specificity, efficiency, and Youden index (YI) were calculated. Eight patients with HS had MCHC ≥345 g/L, 10 had RDW ≥14.5%, 12 had IH >5.0 g/L, 11 had immediate H5.5 ≥5%, and 13 had incubated H5.5 ≥50% (the cut-off value to consider HS). The efficiency and YI were: immediate H5.5 (0.94-0.85), incubated H5.5 (0.89-0.82), IH (0.89-0.78), MCHC (0.87-0.62), CHT (0.84-0.54), and Hb/MCHC (0.71-0.56), respectively. The calculated ratios could distinguish subjects with HS from unaffected individuals ( P 0.05). Although the CHT and supplementary hematimetric indexes were useful to differentiate individuals with SH from healthy controls, they cannot distinguish from anemias of other etiology. CHT and MCHC, in addition to EOF, are recommended for diagnosing HS patients because of their low cost and efficiency.

  14. Predictors of anemia in preschool children: Biomarkers Reflecting Inflammation and Nutritional Determinants of Anemia (BRINDA) project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaron, Grant J; Huang, Jin; Varadhan, Ravi; Temple, Victor; Rayco-Solon, Pura; Macdonald, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Background: A lack of information on the etiology of anemia has hampered the design and monitoring of anemia-control efforts. Objective: We aimed to evaluate predictors of anemia in preschool children (PSC) (age range: 6–59 mo) by country and infection-burden category. Design: Cross-sectional data from 16 surveys (n = 29,293) from the Biomarkers Reflecting Inflammation and Nutritional Determinants of Anemia (BRINDA) project were analyzed separately and pooled by category of infection burden. We assessed relations between anemia (hemoglobin concentration anemia (hemoglobin concentration anemia with concomitant iron deficiency (defined as an inflammation-adjusted ferritin concentration anemia in >50% of surveys. Associations between breastfeeding and anemia were attenuated by controlling for child age, which was negatively associated with anemia. The most consistent predictors of severe anemia were malaria, poor sanitation, and underweight. In multivariable pooled models, child age, iron deficiency, and stunting independently predicted anemia and severe anemia. Inflammation was generally associated with anemia in the high- and very high–infection groups but not in the low- and medium-infection groups. In PSC with anemia, 50%, 30%, 55%, and 58% of children had concomitant iron deficiency in low-, medium-, high-, and very high–infection categories, respectively. Conclusions: Although causal inference is limited by cross-sectional survey data, results suggest anemia-control programs should address both iron deficiency and infections. The relative importance of factors that are associated with anemia varies by setting, and thus, country-specific data are needed to guide programs. PMID:28615260

  15. Hereditary Colorectal Cancer (CRC Program in Latvia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irmejs Arvids

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The aim of the study is to evaluate the incidence and phenotype - genotype characteristics of hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes in Latvia in order to develop the basis of clinical management for patients and their relatives affected by these syndromes. Materials and methods From 02/1999-09/2002 in several hospitals in Latvia cancer family histories were collected from 865 patients with CRC. In families suspected of having a history consistent with a hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome, DNA testing for MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 genes was performed. In addition immunohistochemical (IH examination of the normal and cancer tissue from large bowel tumors for MSH2 and MSH6 protein expression was performed prior to DNA analysis. Results From the 865 CRC cases only 3 (0.35% pedigrees fulfilled the Amsterdam II criteria of Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC and 15 cases (1.73% were suspected of HNPCC. In 69 cases (8% with a cancer family aggregation (CFA were identified. Thus far 27 IH analyses have been performed and in 3 cancers homogenous lack of MSH2 or MSH6 protein expression was found. In one of these cases a mutation in MSH6 was identified. In 18 patients suspected of HNPCC or of matching the Amsterdam II criteria, denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC followed by DNA sequencing of any heteroduplexes of the 35 exons comprising both MLH1 and MSH2 was performed revealing 3 mutations. For all of kindreds diagnosed definitively or with a high probability of being an HNPCC family appropriate recommendations concerning prophylactic measures, surveillance and treatment were provided in written form. Conclusions Existing pedigree/clinical data suggest that in Latvia the frequency of HNPCC is around 2% of consecutive colorectal cancer patients. It is crucial that genetic counseling is an integral part of cancer family syndrome management.

  16. Fanconi anemia - learning from children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Svahn

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Fanconi Anemia (FA is a rare autosomic recessive and X-linked disease with chromosomal instability after exposure to crosslinking agents as the hallmark. Clinical features of FA are somatic malformations, progressive bone marrow failure and cancer proneness, however there is wide clinical heterogeneity. The symptom most frequently and early associated with morbidity and mortality is progressive pancytopenia in the first decade of life although acute myelogenous leukemia (AML or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS can appear before aplastic anemia. Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC of the head-neck, intestinal or genital tract has a very high incidence in FA and can appear at young age. This paper will focus on treatment of bone marrow failure in FA.

  17. Brain abscesses and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vives, Daniel A.; Bauni, Carlos E.; Mendoza, Monica E.

    2003-01-01

    Rendu-Osler-Weber disease or Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT) is a generalized familial angiodysplastic disorder. The neurological manifestations of this entity are due to Central Nervous System vascular lesions or to complications of other visceral lesions such as pulmonary arteriovenous fistulae. This report describes two patients (males, 40 and 61 years old), with brain abscesses associated with HHT. The CT, MRI and Angiographic findings as well as the therapeutic approach are analyzed. Patients with brain abscess of unknown origin must be evaluated for the presence of lung vascular malformation in association with HHT. (author)

  18. Bone scintigraphy in hereditary multiple exostoses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epstein, D.A.; Levin, E.J.

    1978-01-01

    Two adult patients with multiple hereditary exostoses, a skeletal disorder with recognized malignant potential, each demonstrated increased /sup 99m/Tc diphosphonate uptake in an exostosis in which renewed growth had begun. None of the other multiple exostoses in either patient showed abnormal uptake. Histologic study of the lesions demonstrated chondrosarcoma in one case and benign osteochondroma in the second. Although bone scintigraphy nonspecifically identifies bone growth rather than malignant degeneration, it is more useful than radiographic bone survey in the periodic surveillance of adult patients with this disorder

  19. Skin deposits in hereditary cystatin C amyloidosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benedikz, Eirikur; Blöndal, H; Gudmundsson, G

    1990-01-01

    Clinically normal skin from 47 individuals aged 9-70 years was investigated. Cystatin C amyloid deposits were found in various locations of the skin by light and/or electron microscopy, in all 12 patients with a clinical history of hereditary cystatin C amyloidosis (HCCA). Six asymptomatic...... individuals, who had the Alu 1 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) marker reported to cosegregate with the disease, also had cystatin C amyloid deposits in the skin. Three asymptomatic individuals (age 17-46) belonging to the HCCA families were without amyloid in the skin but had Alu 1 RFLP marker...

  20. Acquired Aplastic Anemia in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartung, Helge D.; Olson, Timothy S.; Bessler, Monica

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS This article provides a practice-based and concise review of the etiology, diagnosis, and management of acquired aplastic anemia in children. Bone marrow transplantation, immunosuppressive therapy, and supportive care are discussed in detail. The aim is to provide the clinician with a better understanding of the disease and to offer guidelines for the management of children with this uncommon yet serious disorder. PMID:24237973

  1. APLASTIC ANEMIA AND VIRAL HEPATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Cudillo

    2009-11-01

    Liver histology is characterized by T cell infiltrating the parenchyma as reported in acute hepatitis. Recently in HAA it has been demonstrated intrahepatic  and blood lymphocytes with  T cell repertoire similar to that of confirmed viral acute hepatitis. The expanded T cell clones return to a normal distribution after response to immunosuppressive treatment, suggesting the antigen or T cell clearance. Therapeutic options are the same as acquired aplastic anemia.

  2. Knowledge regarding basic concepts of hereditary cancers, and the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. In families with hereditary cancer, at-risk individuals can benefit from genetic counselling and testing. General practitioners (GPs) are ideally placed to identify such families and refer them appropriately. Objective. To assess the practices, knowledge and attitudes of GPs regarding common hereditary cancers.

  3. Review: Clinical aspects of hereditary DNA Mismatch repair gene mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijmons, Rolf H.; Hofstra, Robert M. W.

    Inherited mutations of the DNA Mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2 can result in two hereditary tumor syndromes: the adult-onset autosomal dominant Lynch syndrome, previously referred to as Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC) and the childhood-onset autosomal recessive

  4. Attitude towards pre-implantation genetic diagnosis for hereditary cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammens, Chantal; Bleiker, Eveline; Aaronson, Neil; Vriends, Annette; Ausems, Margreet; Jansweijer, Maaike; Wagner, Anja; Sijmons, Rolf; van den Ouweland, Ans; van der Luijt, Rob; Spruijt, Liesbeth; Gómez García, Encarna; Ruijs, Mariëlle; Verhoef, Senno

    2009-01-01

    The use of pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for hereditary cancer is subject to on-going debate, particularly among professionals. This study evaluates the attitude towards PGD and attitude-associated characteristics of those concerned: family members with a hereditary cancer predisposition.

  5. Hereditary lymphedema of the leg – A Case Report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinig, Birgit; Lotti, T.; Tchernev, Georgi; Wollina, Uwe

    2017-01-01

    Primary of hereditary lymphedema is a rare but progressive disease. It is yet not curable. We present a 48-year-old male patient with hereditary lymphedema of his left leg, that was realised by minor trauma (able twist) when he was seven years old. He had never been treated for lymphedema but

  6. Iron, Anemia, and Iron Deficiency Anemia among Young Children in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Priya M.; Perrine, Cria G.; Mei, Zuguo; Scanlon, Kelley S.

    2016-01-01

    Iron deficiency and anemia are associated with impaired neurocognitive development and immune function in young children. Total body iron, calculated from serum ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor concentrations, and hemoglobin allow for monitoring of the iron and anemia status of children in the United States. The purpose of this analysis is to describe the prevalence of iron deficiency (ID), anemia, and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) among children 1–5 years using data from the 2007–201...

  7. An unusual cause of anemia and encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev Kumar Sharma

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The authors present here an interesting case of recent onset anemia that was associated with an encephalopathy of the unusual cause.Although severe anemia can theoretically result in anemic hypoxia and can then lead to hypoxic encephalopathy, it is not a primary cause of encephalopathy. More frequently anemia can contribute together with other multiple causes of encephalopathy, such as infections, metabolic abnormalities, trauma, hepatic dysfunction, hypertension, toxins.

  8. Genetic profiles distinguish different types of hereditary ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanska, Katarina; Malander, Susanne; Staaf, Johan

    2010-01-01

    (HBOC) syndrome and the hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) syndrome. Genome-wide array comparative genomic hybridization was applied to 12 HBOC associated tumors with BRCA1 mutations and 8 HNPCC associated tumors with mismatch repair gene mutations with 24 sporadic ovarian cancers......Heredity represents the strongest risk factor for ovarian cancer with disease predisposing mutations identified in 15% of the tumors. With the aim to identify genetic classifiers for hereditary ovarian cancer, we profiled hereditary ovarian cancers linked to the hereditary breast and ovarian cancer...... that HBOC and HNPCC associated ovarian cancer develop along distinct genetic pathways and genetic profiles can thus be applied to distinguish between different types of hereditary ovarian cancer....

  9. BRCA1/2 associated hereditary breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-song TENG; Yi ZHENG; Hao-hao WANG

    2008-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the leading causes of death in women today. Some of the patients are hereditary, with a large proportion characterized by mutation in BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 genes. In this review, we provide an overview of these two genes,focusing on their relationship with hereditary breast cancers. BRCA1/2 associated hereditary breast cancers have unique features that differ from the general breast cancers, including alterations in cellular molecules, pathological bases, biological behavior, and a different prevention strategy. But the outcome of BRCA1/2 associated hereditary breast cancers still remains controversial;further studies are needed to elucidate the nature of BRCA1/2 associated hereditary breast cancers.

  10. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked sideroblastic anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions X-linked sideroblastic anemia X-linked sideroblastic anemia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... the expand/collapse boxes. Description X-linked sideroblastic anemia is an inherited disorder that prevents developing red ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia Printable PDF Open All Close All ... the expand/collapse boxes. Description X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia is a rare condition characterized by ...

  12. Aplastic anemia in Japanese radiological technicians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitabatake, T.; Watanabe, T.; Saito, A.; Nakamura, M.; Shiohama Hospital, Mie

    1976-01-01

    Among the Japanese radiological technicians, four deaths from aplastic anemia have been reported after 1930. On the other hand, during the period from 1930 to 1960, the population of radiological technicians is estimated to be 74,400 man-years, in which 0.5 aplastic anemias are expected. However, actually three died from aplastic anemia. This difference is statistically significant at the 1% level. While, in the period from 1961 to 1973, the observed value is 1 against 0.7 expected. It is concluded that aplastic anemia had been induced frequently among the Japanese radiological technicians in the era when there was much exposure to occupational radiation. (orig.) [de

  13. The challenge of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassanain Hani Hassan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Microangiopathic hemolytic anemia (MAHA is a Coomb's-negative hemolytic anemia characterized by red cell fragmentation (schistocytes. Thrombotic microangiopathy anemia, including thrombotic thrombocytopenia and hemolytic-uremic syndrome, malignant hypertension, preeclampsia are among the most common causes. We present a case of MAHA presenting with thrombocytopenia initially diagnosed as MAHA secondary to thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and received five sessions plasmapheresis without improvement but with worsening of anemia and thrombocytopenia. On further inquiry, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency was identified, and the patient showed dramatic recovery after the trial of B12 and folate.

  14. Pavlodar city children's some hereditary diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shajmardanova, B. Kh.; Gorbach, S.V.

    1997-01-01

    Territory of the Pavlodar region directly adjoining to the Semipalatinsk test site is unique object for study of many year tests consequences on population health. Health worsening caused by small doses of radiation on artificial pollution background is defined. Purpose of the work is Pavlodar city children's some hereditary diseases (Downs syndrome, crack of upper lip and/or palate, hemophilia) under study of frequency dynamic of statistical data within period from 1980 by 1995. It is defined: a) tendency to growth Downs syndrome frequency has been distinctly observed beginning of the 1982; b) it is noted Downs syndrome frequency growth stabilization within period from 1988 by 1991; c) among children with Downs syndrome is distinguished low viability; d) there is rather higher correlation rate of Downs syndrome and congenial heart threshold against average statistical index; e) character of frequencies changes of crack of upper lip and/or palate has tendency to growth; f) it is defined that boys predominate among children with this disease; g) congenial crack of soft palate have being revealed as solitary thresholds of development; h) genealogy analysis of hemophilia sick reveals, that it has only hereditary character. 8 refs

  15. Genetics of Hereditary Ataxia in Scottish Terriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urkasemsin, G; Nielsen, D M; Singleton, A; Arepalli, S; Hernandez, D; Agler, C; Olby, N J

    2017-07-01

    Scottish Terriers have a high incidence of juvenile onset hereditary ataxia primarily affecting the Purkinje neuron of the cerebellar cortex and causing slowly progressive cerebellar dysfunction. To identify chromosomal regions associated with hereditary ataxia in Scottish Terriers. One hundred and fifty-three Scottish Terriers were recruited through the Scottish Terrier Club of America. Prospective study. Dogs were classified as affected if they had slowly progressive cerebellar signs. When possible, magnetic resonance imaging and histopathological evaluation of the brain were completed as diagnostic aids. To identify genomic regions connected with the disease, genome-wide mapping was performed using both linkage- and association-based approaches. Pedigree evaluation and homozygosity mapping were also performed to examine mode of inheritance and to investigate the region of interest, respectively. Linkage and genome-wide association studies in a cohort of Scottish Terriers both identified a region on CFA X strongly associated with the disease trait. Homozygosity mapping revealed a 4 Mb region of interest. Pedigree evaluation failed to identify the possible mode of inheritance due to the lack of complete litter information. This finding suggests that further genetic investigation of the potential region of interest on CFA X should be considered in order to identify the causal mutation as well as develop a genetic test to eliminate the disease from this breed. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  16. Surgical treatment of hereditary lens subluxations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdek, Sengul; Sari, Ayca; Bilgihan, Kamil; Akata, Fikret; Hasanreisoglu, Berati

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness and results of pars plana vitreolensectomy approach with transscleral fixation of intraocular lens in hereditary lens subluxations. Fifteen eyes of 9 consecutive patients with a mean age of 12.8+/-6.2 years (6-26 years) with hereditary lens subluxation were operated on and the results were evaluated in a prospective study. Surgery was considered if best spectacle corrected visual acuity (BSCVA) was less than 20/70. All eyes underwent a 2-port pars plana vitreolensectomy and transscleral fixation of an intraocular lens (IOL). The mean follow-up period was 12.6+/-7.5 months (6-22 months). There was no major intraoperative complication. Preoperatively, 8 eyes (53.3%) had a BSCVA of counting fingers (CF) and 7 eyes (46.6%) had a BSCVA of 20/200 to 20/70. Postoperatively, 14 eyes (93.3%) had a BSCVA of 20/50 or better. None of the patients had IOL decentration or intraocular pressure (IOP) increase during the follow-up period. There was a macular hole formation in 1 eye postoperatively. The early results of pars plana vitreolensectomy with IOL implantation using scleral fixation technique had shown that it not only promises a rapid visual rehabilitation but it is also a relatively safe method. More serious complications, however, may occur in the long term.

  17. Molecular biology of hereditary diabetes insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, T Mary; Bichet, Daniel G

    2005-10-01

    The identification, characterization, and mutational analysis of three different genes-the arginine vasopressin gene (AVP), the arginine vasopressin receptor 2 gene (AVPR2), and the vasopressin-sensitive water channel gene (aquaporin 2 [AQP2])-provide the basis for understanding of three different hereditary forms of "pure" diabetes insipidus: Neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus, X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI), and non-X-linked NDI, respectively. It is clinically useful to distinguish two types of hereditary NDI: A "pure" type characterized by loss of water only and a complex type characterized by loss of water and ions. Patients who have congenital NDI and bear mutations in the AVPR2 or AQP2 genes have a "pure" NDI phenotype with loss of water but normal conservation of sodium, potassium, chloride, and calcium. Patients who bear inactivating mutations in genes (SLC12A1, KCNJ1, CLCNKB, CLCNKA and CLCNKB in combination, or BSND) that encode the membrane proteins of the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle have a complex polyuro-polydipsic syndrome with loss of water, sodium, chloride, calcium, magnesium, and potassium. These advances provide diagnostic and clinical tools for physicians who care for these patients.

  18. Treatment of anemia with darbepoetin alfa in systolic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swedberg, Karl; Young, James B; Anand, Inder S

    2013-01-01

    Patients with systolic heart failure and anemia have worse symptoms, functional capacity, and outcomes than those without anemia. We evaluated the effects of darbepoetin alfa on clinical outcomes in patients with systolic heart failure and anemia.......Patients with systolic heart failure and anemia have worse symptoms, functional capacity, and outcomes than those without anemia. We evaluated the effects of darbepoetin alfa on clinical outcomes in patients with systolic heart failure and anemia....

  19. Use of Laser Assisted Optical Rotational Cell Analyzer (LoRRca MaxSis in the Diagnosis of RBC Membrane Disorders, Enzyme Defects, and Congenital Dyserythropoietic Anemias: A Monocentric Study on 202 Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Zaninoni

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Chronic hemolytic anemias are a group of heterogeneous diseases mainly due to abnormalities of red cell (RBC membrane and metabolism. The more common RBC membrane disorders, classified on the basis of blood smear morphology, are hereditary spherocytosis (HS, elliptocytosis, and hereditary stomatocytoses (HSt. Among RBC enzymopathies, the most frequent is pyruvate kinase (PK deficiency, followed by glucose-6-phosphate isomerase, pyrimidine 5′ nucleotidase P5′N, and other rare enzymes defects. Because of the rarity and heterogeneity of these diseases, diagnosis may be often challenging despite the availability of a variety of laboratory tests. The ektacytometer laser-assisted optical rotational cell analyser (LoRRca MaxSis, able to assess the RBC deformability in osmotic gradient conditions (Osmoscan analysis, is a useful diagnostic tool for RBC membrane disorders and in particular for the identification of hereditary stomatocytosis. Few data are so far available in other hemolytic anemias. We evaluated the diagnostic power of LoRRca MaxSis in a large series of 140 patients affected by RBC membrane disorders, 37 by enzymopathies, and 16 by congenital diserythropoietic anemia type II. Moreover, nine patients with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH were also investigated. All the hereditary spherocytoses, regardless the biochemical defect, showed altered Osmoscan curves, with a decreased Elongation Index (EI max and right shifted Omin; hereditary elliptocytosis (HE displayed a trapezoidal curve and decreased EImax. Dehydrated hereditary stomatocytosis (DHSt caused by PIEZO1 mutations was characterized by left-shifted curve, whereas KCNN4 mutations were associated with a normal curve. Congenital diserythropoietic anemia type II and RBC enzymopathies had Osmoscan curve within the normal range except for glucosephosphate isomerase (GPI deficient cases who displayed an enlarged curve associated with significantly increased Ohyper, offering a

  20. Esferocitosis hereditaria: aspectos clínicos, bioquímicos y moleculares Hereditary spherocytosis: Clinical, biochemical and molecular aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayelín Herrera García

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available La esferocitosis hereditaria (EH es una enfermedad caracterizada por anemia hemolítica de severidad variable, con presencia de esferocitos en sangre periférica y una respuesta clínica favorable a la esplenectomía. Con el desarrollo de nuevas técnicas se encontraron las primeras alteraciones bioquímicas de las proteínas de la membrana eritrocitaria, y posteriormente, se han podido precisar las alteraciones moleculares mediante las técnicas del ADN recombinante. La EH es una enfermedad muy heterogénea que se produce por un defecto intrínseco del glóbulo rojo, y existen otras alteraciones secundarias a esta afección. La prueba más utilizada para el diagnóstico de la EH es la fragilidad osmótica del glóbulo rojo. Se ha demostrado que esta enfermedad es producida por defectos de las proteínas que intervienen en las interacciones verticales entre el esqueleto de la membrana y la bicapa lipídica. El tratamiento de elección en la EH es la esplenectomía, ya que es el más efectivo en el control de la anemia, aunque la sobrevida de los glóbulos rojos permanece acortada y los esferocitos no desaparecen. Este proceder se indica en pacientes con anemia hemolítica severa o en individuos moderadamente asintomáticos pero que presentan litiasis vesicularHereditary spherocytosis(HS is a disease characterized by hemolytic anemia of variable severity, with spherocytes in peripheral blood and a clinical response to splenectomy. The development of new techniques allowed finding out the first biochemical alterations in erythrocyte membrane proteins and later on, the recombinant DNA techniques made possible to detect molecular alternations. HS is a very heterogeneous disease caused by an intrinsic defect of red cells; there are other secondary disorders to this affection. The most used test for diagnosing HS is the osmotic fragility of the red cell. It has been proved that this disease is caused by defects in proteins participating in vertical

  1. Brazilian guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of hereditary angioedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Giavina-Bianchi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary angioedema is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by edema attacks with multiple organ involvement. It is caused by a quantitative or functional deficiency of the C1 inhibitor, which is a member of the serine protease inhibitor family. Hereditary angioedema is unknown to many health professionals and is therefore an underdiagnosed disease. The causes of death from hereditary angioedema include laryngeal edema with asphyxia. The estimated mortality rate in patients in whom the disease goes undetected and who are therefore incorrectly treated is 25-40%. In addition to edema of the glottis, hereditary angioedema often results in edema of the gastrointestinal tract, which can be incapacitating. Patients with hereditary angioedema may undergo unnecessary surgical interventions because the digestive tract can be the primary or only organ system involved, thus mimicking acute surgical abdomen. It is estimated that patients with hereditary angioedema experience some degree of disability 20-100 days per year. The Experts in Clinical Immunology and Allergy of the "Associação Brasileira de Alergia e Imunopatologia -ASBAI" developed these guidelines for the diagnosis, therapy, and management of hereditary angioedema.

  2. Brazilian guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of hereditary angioedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giavina-Bianchi, Pedro; França, Alfeu T; Grumach, Anete S; Motta, Abílio A; Fernandes, Fátima R; Campos, Regis A; Valle, Solange O; Rosário, Nelson A; Sole, Dirceu

    2011-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by edema attacks with multiple organ involvement. It is caused by a quantitative or functional deficiency of the C1 inhibitor, which is a member of the serine protease inhibitor family. Hereditary angioedema is unknown to many health professionals and is therefore an underdiagnosed disease. The causes of death from hereditary angioedema include laryngeal edema with asphyxia. The estimated mortality rate in patients in whom the disease goes undetected and who are therefore incorrectly treated is 25-40%. In addition to edema of the glottis, hereditary angioedema often results in edema of the gastrointestinal tract, which can be incapacitating. Patients with hereditary angioedema may undergo unnecessary surgical interventions because the digestive tract can be the primary or only organ system involved, thus mimicking acute surgical abdomen. It is estimated that patients with hereditary angioedema experience some degree of disability 20-100 days per year. The Experts in Clinical Immunology and Allergy of the "Associação Brasileira de Alergia e Imunopatologia -ASBAI" developed these guidelines for the diagnosis, therapy, and management of hereditary angioedema.

  3. Erythropoietin in Cardiorenal Anemia Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emir Fazlibegović

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Incidents of heart and renal failure (HF, RF together, are increasing in our country and all over the world, so a great attention has been dedicated to this problem recently. These diseases together have shown bad results because of the process of accelerated arteriosclerosis, structural changes of myocardium, oxidative stress, inflammation, increased activities of sympathetic nervous system (SNS, increased activities of a renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS. These factors are crucial in the development of patho-physiological process and consequential development of anemia, that together with heart and renal failure through interaction, cause serious disorder that we call the cardio-renal anemia syndrome. We examined effects of erythropoietin (Epoetin beta at 90 (60 men and 30 women pre-dialysed and dialysed patients with HF signs during a period of three years in individual dozes of 2000-6000 units subcutaneous (sc weekly. Using computer S PLUS and SAS multiple variant analysis we have got correlations by Pearson. Epoetin beta significantly develops anemiaparameters: number of erythrocytes (r=0.51779; p<0.0001, hemoglobin (r=0.38811; p<0.0002, MCV (r=0.59876; p<0.0001 at patients with HF. Positive effects are seen at NYHA class (r=0.59906; p<0.0001, on quality of life before and after prescribing medicine. Parameters of renal functions are improving: more urea (r =0.45557; p<0.0001 than creatinine (r=0.26397; p<0.00119 and potassium values K(+ are not changed significantly (r=0.02060; p<0.8471. Epoetin beta has been useful in treatment of pre-dialysed and dialysed patients with HF and anemia by improving functional ability of myocardium and quality of life.

  4. The Student with Sickle Cell Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetrault, Sylvia M.

    1981-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is the most common and severe of inherited chronic blood disorders. In the United States, sickle cell anemia is most common among the Black population. Among the most commonly occurring symptoms are: an enlarged spleen, episodes of severe pain, easily contracted infections, skin ulcers, and frequent urination. (JN)

  5. 9 CFR 311.34 - Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Anemia. 311.34 Section 311.34 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.34 Anemia. Carcasses of...

  6. An analysis of anemia and child mortality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brabin, B. J.; Premji, Z.; Verhoeff, F.

    2001-01-01

    The relationship of anemia as a risk factor for child mortality was analyzed by using cross-sectional, longitudinal and case-control studies, and randomized trials. Five methods of estimation were adopted: 1) the proportion of child deaths attributable to anemia; 2) the proportion of anemic children

  7. Salmonella osteomyelitis by sickle cell anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rausch, H.; Tran, V.T.; Boeckmann, U.; Duesseldorf Univ.

    1985-01-01

    Case report of a 28 year old black sickle cell anemia patient with salmonella osteomyelitis of the radius. Aside from sickle cell anemia patients this skeletal complication of enteric salmonellosis is an extreme rarity. Description of the typical roentgenological features includes intracortical fissures and sequestration. (orig.) [de

  8. Anemia: An approach to evaluation, 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Kuriakose

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Anemia is very commonly encountered in general clinical practice among all age groups. The more commonly used way to classify anemia has been to categorize it as being microcytic (mean corpuscular volume [MCV] 100 fL, which in turn allows for a more practical way to attempt to come up with a cause for any decrease in hemoglobin. Microcytic anemias are usually due to iron deficiency (in turn, a result of a number of different etiologies ranging from decreased intake, malabsorption, or blood loss, hemoglobinopathies (thalassemic syndromes, and some cases of severe anemia resulting from chronic disease. Normocytic anemia is often a result of anemia of chronic disease, hemolysis, or secondary to bone marrow failure. Macrocytic anemias are frequently caused by deficiencies of folic acid and/or Vitamin B12, exposure to toxic agents like drugs that interfere with DNA metabolism and alcohol, as also bone marrow failure states, such as from myelodysplastic syndrome. A comprehensive history, physical examination, and directed laboratory evaluation will help to identify a specific cause for anemia.

  9. Anemia in chronic renal failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junkers, K.; Jontofson, R.; Meuret, G.; Blume, K.G.; Heinze, V.; Freiburg Univ.; Freiburg Univ.

    1975-01-01

    Radio-iron utilization was nearly normal in these patients, only bilateral nephrectomized patients showed a reduced radio-iron utilization. Red blood half-life span was shortened in all patients, well corresponding to the degree of anemia. Parameters of erythropoesis like plasma iron clearance, bone marrow transit time, erythron iron turnover, non-erythron iron turnover and hemolysis iron turnover failed to quantitate disorders of red blood cell regeneration in these patients. No defect in red blood cell enzyme activity could be demonstrated. Enzymes of glycolysis were increased corresponding to the reduced erythrocyte half-life span. (orig.) [de

  10. Dementia in hereditary cystatin C amyloidosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blöndal, H; Guomundsson, G; Benedikz, Eirikur

    1989-01-01

    in seventeen cases of whom two presented with dementia. At the last examination the majority had severe dementia and severely abnormal EEG. Anti-cystatin C positive amyloid vascular and perivascular infiltrates were found. The resulting damage to the microvasculature of the brain and secondary hemorrhages......Nineteen cases with verified Hereditary Cystatin C Amyloid Angiopathy are presented. All of the cases had one or more cerebrovascular insults starting at the age of 20-41 years and survived from 10 days to 23 years after the first insult. Progressive dementia was a prominent clinical feature...... and infarctions were considered to be an adequate explanation for the dementia in these cases. Skin biopsies can now probably be used to demonstrate cystatin C positive amyloid deposits conclusively in the tissues of these patients....

  11. Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Wu Chang

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON is a maternally inherited mitochondrial disease that primarily affects the optic nerve, causing bilateral vision loss in juveniles and young adults. A 12-year-old boy had complained of blurred vision in both eyes for more than 1 year. His best-corrected visual acuity was 0.08 in the right eye and 0.1 in the left. Ophthalmologic examination showed bilateral optic disc hyperemia and margin blurring, peripapillary telangiectasis, and a relative afferent pupil defect in his right eye. Fluorescein angiography showed no stain or leakage around the optic disc in the late phase. Visual field analysis showed central scotoma in the left eye and a near-total defect in the right. Upon examination of the patient's mitochondrial DNA, a point mutation at nucleotide position 11778 was found, and the diagnosis of LHON was confirmed. Coenzyme Q10 was used to treat the patient.

  12. Mania associated with complicated hereditary spastic paraparesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghavendra B Nayak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary spastic paraparesis (HSP is an inherited group of neurological disorders with progressive lower limb spasticity. HSP can be clinically grouped into pure and complicated forms. Pure HSP is one without any associated neurological/psychiatric comorbidity. Depression is the most common psychiatric comorbidity. Presence of mania or bipolar affective illness with HSP is a rare phenomenon. We report a case of a 17-year-old boy who presented with classical features of HSP with complaints of excessive happiness, irritability, increased self-esteem and decreased sleep since 1 month. The patient also had complex partial seizure ever since he had features of HSP. The patient′s father and younger sister suffer from pure HSP. The patient was diagnosed to have first episode mania with complicated HSP. The details of treatment and possible neurobiology are discussed in this case report.

  13. Mania associated with complicated hereditary spastic paraparesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Raghavendra B; Bhogale, Govind S; Patil, Nanasaheb M; Pandurangi, Aditya A

    2011-07-01

    Hereditary spastic paraparesis (HSP) is an inherited group of neurological disorders with progressive lower limb spasticity. HSP can be clinically grouped into pure and complicated forms. Pure HSP is one without any associated neurological/psychiatric comorbidity. Depression is the most common psychiatric comorbidity. Presence of mania or bipolar affective illness with HSP is a rare phenomenon. We report a case of a 17-year-old boy who presented with classical features of HSP with complaints of excessive happiness, irritability, increased self-esteem and decreased sleep since 1 month. The patient also had complex partial seizure ever since he had features of HSP. The patient's father and younger sister suffer from pure HSP. The patient was diagnosed to have first episode mania with complicated HSP. The details of treatment and possible neurobiology are discussed in this case report.

  14. Deprivation amblyopia and congenital hereditary cataract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansouri, Behzad; Stacy, Rebecca C; Kruger, Joshua; Cestari, Dean M

    2013-01-01

    Amblyopia is a neurodevelopmental disorder of vision associated with decreased visual acuity, poor or absent stereopsis, and suppression of information from one eye.(1,2) Amblyopia may be caused by strabismus (strabismic amblyopia), refractive error (anisometropic amblyopia), or deprivation from obstructed vision (deprivation amblyopia). 1 In the developed world, amblyopia is the most common cause of childhood visual impairment, 3 which reduces quality of life 4 and also almost doubles the lifetime risk of legal blindness.(5, 6) Successful treatment of amblyopia greatly depends on early detection and treatment of predisposing disorders such as congenital cataract, which is the most common cause of deprivational amblyopia. Understanding the genetic causes of congenital cataract leads to more effective screening tests, early detection and treatment of infants and children who are at high risk for hereditary congenital cataract.

  15. Recurrent IVF failure and hereditary thrombophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safdarian, Leila; Najmi, Zahra; Aleyasin, Ashraf; Aghahosseini, Marzieh; Rashidi, Mandana; Asadollah, Sara

    2014-07-01

    The largest percentage of failed invitro fertilization (IVF (cycles, are due to lack of implantation. As hereditary thrombophilia can cause in placentation failure, it may have a role in recurrent IVF failure. Aim of this case-control study was to determine whether hereditary thrombophilia is more prevalent in women with recurrent IVF failures. Case group comprised 96 infertile women, with a history of recurrent IVF failure. Control group was comprised of 95 healthy women with proven fertility who had conceived spontaneously. All participants were assessed for the presence of inherited thrombophilias including: factor V Leiden, methilen tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) mutation, prothrombin mutation, homocystein level, protein S and C deficiency, antithrombin III (AT-III) deficiency and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) mutation. Presence of thrombophilia was compared between groups. Having at least one thrombophilia known as a risk factor for recurrent IVF failure (95% CI=1.74-5.70, OR=3.15, p=0.00). Mutation of factor V Leiden (95% CI=1.26-10.27, OR=3.06, P=0.01) and homozygote form of MTHFR mutation (95% CI=1.55-97.86, OR=12.33, p=0.05) were also risk factors for recurrent IVF failure. However, we could not find significant difference in other inherited thrombophilia's. Inherited thrombophilia is more prevalent in women with recurrent IVF failure compared with healthy women. Having at least one thrombophilia, mutation of factor V Leiden and homozygote form of MTHFR mutation were risk factors for recurrent IVF failure.

  16. Chaperonopathies: spotlight on hereditary motor neuropathies

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    Vincenzo Lupo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Distal hereditary motor neuropathies (dHMN comprise a group of rare hereditary neuromuscular disorders characterized by a peroneal muscular atrophy without sensory symptoms. To date twenty-three genes for dHMN have been reported and four of them encode for chaperones: DNAJB2, which encodes a member of the HSP40/DNAJ co-chaperone family, and HSPB1, HSPB3 and HSPB8, which encode three members of the family of small heat shock proteins. Except for HSPB1, with around thirty different mutations, the remaining three genes comprise a much low number of cases. Thus, only one case has been described caused by an HSPB3 mutation, whereas few DNAJB2 and HSPB8 cases are known, most of them caused by a founder c.352+1G>A mutation in DNAJB2 and by mutations affecting the hot spot K141 residue of the HSPB8 chaperone. This low number of cases makes it difficult to understand the pathomechanism underlying the neuropathy. Chaperones can assemble in multi-chaperone complexes forming an integrative chaperone network in the cell, which plays relevant cellular roles in a variety of processes such as the correct folding of newly synthesized proteins, their escort to their precise cellular locations to form functional proteins and complexes and the response to protein misfolding, including the degradation of proteins that fail to refold properly. Despite of this variety of functions, mutations in some of them lead to diseases with a similar clinical picture, suggesting common pathways. This review gives an overview of the genetics of dHMNs caused by mutations in four genes, DNAJB2, HSPB1, HSPB3 and HSPB8, which encode chaperones and show a common disease mechanism.

  17. Gender specific issues in hereditary ocular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iragavarapu, Saradha; Gorin, Michael B

    2015-02-01

    This review is intended to summarize the current knowledge from basic science and clinical medical literature cited within PubMed that pertain to gender-related factors and affect those individuals with hereditary ocular disorders. We consider gender-related biological factors that (a) affect disease onset and progression, (b) gender differences for major X-linked ocular disorders, (c) gender-specific conditions, (d) medications that may influence genetic eye disorders, and finally, (e) gender-related issues that influence the management and quality of life of these patients. Several studies have demonstrated the manner in which sex-related hormones in animal models are capable of influencing cell pathway and survival that are likely to affect hereditary eye disorders. There are very few clinical studies that provide compelling evidence for gender differences in human ocular conditions, other than for a number of X-linked disorders. Disease expression for X-linked disorders may be impacted by genetic mechanisms such as lyonization or uniparental disomy. Clinical evidence regarding the impact of gender-related medical conditions and therapies on eye conditions is extremely limited and primarily based on anecdotal evidence. Gender-specific factors may play a major role in the underlying biological pathways that influence the onset, rate of progression, and clinical findings associated with ocular genetic conditions. Clinicians need to be aware of the variable phenotypes observed in female carriers of X-linked disorders of gender specific issues, many of which are inadequately addressed in the current literature. Clinicians need to be sensitive to gender differences in social, cultural, and religious systems and they should also be aware of how their own gender biases may influence how they counsel patients. Finally, it is clear that the lack of effective clinical studies in this area creates an opportunity for future research that will have real benefits for these

  18. Anemia of Chronic Disease and Iron Deficiency Anemia in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murawska, Natalia; Fabisiak, Adam; Fichna, Jakub

    2016-05-01

    Anemia coexists with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in up to two-thirds of patients, significantly impairing quality of life. The most common types of anemia in patients with IBD are iron deficiency anemia and anemia of chronic disease, which often overlap. In most cases, available laboratory tests allow successful diagnosis of iron deficiency, where difficulties appear, recently established indices such as soluble transferrin-ferritin ratio or percentage of hypochromic red cells are used. In this review, we discuss the management of the most common types of anemia in respect of the latest available data. Thus, we provide the mechanisms underlying pathophysiology of these entities; furthermore, we discuss the role of hepcidin in developing anemia in IBD. Next, we present the treatment options for each type of anemia and highlight the importance of individual choice of action. We also focus on newly developed intravenous iron preparations and novel, promising drug candidates targeting hepcidin. Concurrently, we talk about difficulties in differentiating between the true and functional iron deficiency, and discuss tools facilitating the process. Finally, we emphasize the importance of proper diagnosis and treatment of anemia in IBD. We conclude that management of anemia in patients with IBD is tricky, and appropriate screening of patients regarding anemia is substantial.

  19. Prevalence and Correlates of Maternal Anemia in Rural Sidama ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to assess the prevalence and correlates of prenatal anemia, a survey was conducted among 700 randomly selected pregnant women in rural Sidama, Southern Ethiopia. The prevalences of anemia, Iron Deficiency (ID) and ID anemia were 31.6%, 17.4% and 8.7%, respectively. The burden of anemia was ...

  20. Iron Deficiency, Anemia and Mortality in Renal Transplant Recipients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisenga, Michele F.; Minovic, Isidor; Berger, Stefan P.; Kootstra-Ros, Jenny E.; van den Berg, Else; Riphagen, Ineke J.; Navis, Gerjan; van der Meer, Peter; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Gaillard, Carlo A. J. M.

    Anemia, iron deficiency anemia (IDA), and iron deficiency (ID) are highly prevalent in renal transplant recipients (RTR). Anemia is associated with poor outcome, but the role of ID is unknown. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the association of ID, irrespective of anemia, with all-cause mortality

  1. Iron Deficiency, Anemia and Mortality in Renal Transplant Recipients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisenga, Michele F.; Minovic, Isidor; Berger, Stefan P; Kootstra-Ros, Jenny E.; van den Berg, Else; Riphagen, Ineke J.; Navis, Gerjan J.; Van der Meer, Peter; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Gaillard, Carlo A. J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Anemia, iron deficiency anemia (IDA), and iron deficiency (ID) are highly prevalent in renal transplant recipients (RTR). Anemia is associated with poor outcome, but the role of ID is unknown. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the association of ID, irrespective of anemia, with all-cause mortality

  2. Squamous cell carcinoma complicating an hereditary epidermo-lysis bullosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mseddi, M.; Turki, H.; Marrekchi, S.; Abdelmaksoud, W.; Masmoudi, A.; Bouassida, S.; Zahaf, A.

    2004-01-01

    The dystrophic form of hereditary epidermo-lysis bullosa is associated with an increased frequency of squamous cell carcinoma. We report a new case. An 18-year-old patient, carrying a Hallopeau Siemens hereditary epidermo-lysis bullosa, presented a subcutaneous nodular lesion, for 1 year that ulcerated and budded with inguinal lymphadenopathy. The histological study ted to the conclusion of a well differentiated squamous cell carcinoma. The patient was treated surgically. Tumor and metastatic lymph nodes were excised. A radiotherapy was decided but the postoperative course was fatal due to an infection and to a deterioration of her general condition. Squamous cell carcinoma frequently occurs on the cicatricial lesion of hereditary epidermo-lysis bullosa and usually affects males with recessive hereditary epidermo-lysis bullosa. Metastases are frequent, precocious and multiple. The treatment may be surgical. The particularities of our observation are the young age of patient and the localization. (author)

  3. Hereditary Lymphedema of the Leg – A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit Heinig

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Primary of hereditary lymphedema is a rare but progressive disease. It is yet not curable. We present a 48-year-old male patient with hereditary lymphedema of his left leg, that was realised by minor trauma (able twist when he was seven years old. He had never been treated for lymphedema but experienced multiple erysipelas during his life. After diagnostic procedures to exclude other causes of leg swelling, the diagnosis of hereditary lymphedema of the leg, stage III was confirmed. We initialized complex decongestive therapy. During two weeks of intensive treatment, the circumference of the left leg could be reduced by 10 cm. This case illustrates the "natural course" hereditary lymphedema. But it raises the hope that even after decades of ignorance, the patients benefits from complex decongestive treatment. Therapeutic nihilism is unnecessary and poses lymphedema patients to risks of infection and secondary malignancies like Stewart-Trewes syndrome.

  4. Treatment of epistaxis in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia with tranexamic acid - a double-blind placebo-controlled cross-over phase IIIB study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisthoff, Urban W; Seyfert, Ulrich T; Kübler, Marcus; Bieg, Birgitt; Plinkert, Peter K; König, Jochem

    2014-09-01

    Epistaxis is the most frequent manifestation in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, in which no optimal treatment exists. It can lead to severe anemia and reduced quality of life. Positive effects of tranexamic acid, an antifibrinolytic drug, have been reported on epistaxis related to this disorder. We sought to evaluate the efficacy of treating nosebleeds in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia with tranexamic acid. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled, cross-over phase IIIB study, 1 gram of tranexamic acid or placebo was given orally 3 times daily for 3 months for a total of 6 months. 22 patients were included in the intention-to-treat analysis. Hemoglobin levels, the primary outcome measure, did not change significantly (p=0.33). The secondary outcome measure was epistaxis score and patients reported a statistically significant reduction in nosebleeds, equaling a clinically relevant 54% diminution (p=0.0031), as compared to the placebo period. No severe side effects were observed. Tranexamic acid reduces epistaxis in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. (Clinical trial registration numbers: BfArM 141 CHC 9008-001 and ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01031992). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. New forms of -compactness with respect to hereditary classes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdo Mohammed Qahis

    2019-01-01

    Full Text Available A hereditary class on a set X is a nonempty collection of subsets closed under heredity. The aim of this paper is to introduce and study strong forms of u-compactness in generalized topological spaces with respect to a hereditary class, called  SuH-compactness and S- SuH-compactness. Also several of their properties are presented. Finally some eects of various kinds of functions on them are studied.

  6. Genetic diagnosis for congenital hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohga, Shouichi

    2016-01-01

    Congenital hemolytic anemia is a group of monogenic diseases presenting with anemia due to increased destruction of circulating erythrocytes. The etiology of inherited anemia accounts for germline mutations of the responsible genes coding for the structural components of erythrocytes and extra-erythrocytes. The erythrocyte abnormalities are classified into three major disorders of red cell membrane defects, hemoglobinopathies, and red cell enzymopathies. The extra-erythrocyte abnormalities, typified by consumption coagulopathy and intravascular hemolysis, include Upshaw-Schulman syndrome and atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. The clinical manifestations of congenital hemolytic anemia are anemia, jaundice, cholelithiasis and splenomegaly, while the onset mode and severity are both variable. Genetic overlapping of red cell membrane protein disorders, and distinct frequency and mutation spectra differing among races make it difficult to understand this disease entity. On the other hand, genetic modifiers for the phenotype of β-globin diseases provide useful information for selecting the optimal treatment and for long-term management. Recently, next generation sequencing techniques have enabled us to determine the novel causative genes in patients with undiagnosed hemolytic anemias. We herein review the concept and strategy for genetic diagnosis of inherited hemolytic anemias.

  7. Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... federal government website managed by the Office on Women's Health in the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services . 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20201 1-800-994- ...

  8. Evidence-based management of epistaxis in hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, I; Sunkaraneni, V S

    2015-05-01

    There are currently no guidelines in the UK for the specific management of hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia related epistaxis. The authors aimed to review the literature and provide an algorithm for the management of hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia related epistaxis. The Medline and Embase databases were interrogated on 15 November 2013 using the search items 'hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia' (title), 'epistaxis' (title) and 'treatment' (title and abstract), and limiting the search to articles published in English. A total of 46 publications were identified, comprising 1 systematic review, 2 randomised, controlled trials, 27 case series, 9 case reports, 4 questionnaire studies and 3 in vitro studies. There is a lack of high-level evidence for the use of many of the available treatments for the specific management of epistaxis in hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia. Current management should be based on a multidisciplinary team approach involving both a hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia physician and an ENT surgeon, especially when systemic therapy is being considered. The suggested treatment algorithm considers that the severity of epistaxis merits intervention at different levels of the treatment ladder. The patient should be assessed using a reproducible validated assessment tool, for example an epistaxis severity score, to guide treatment. More research is required, particularly in the investigation of topical agents targeting the development and fragility of telangiectasiae in hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia.

  9. Early postnatal diagnosis of hereditary spherocytosis by combining light microscopy, acidified glycerol lysis test and eosin-5'-maleimide binding assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andres, Oliver; Eber, Stefan; Speer, Christian P

    2015-12-01

    Exact diagnosis of hereditary spherocytosis (HS) is widely considered unreliable around birth. However, early postnatal diagnosis at the beginning of congenital hemolysis may be essential for managing neonatal anemia and hemolytic icterus, identifying those at high risk for severe hyperbilirubinemia, irreversible kernicterus, or sudden need for red cell transfusion. We analyzed 37 blood samples from neonates or infants up to six weeks of life that had been collected in-house or shipped to our laboratory due to suspected red cell membrane disorder. By combining assessment of red cell morphology, acidified glycerol lysis test (AGLT), and eosin-5'-maleimide (EMA) binding assay, we were able to clearly exclude HS in 22 and confirm HS in 10 patients, of which one had undergone red cell transfusion prior to blood sampling. Assessment of red cell morphology and normal test results allowed diagnosis of infantile pyknocytosis or Heinz body anemia in three neonates. Re-evaluation of five patients with inconsistent results of AGLT and EMA binding led to confirmation of HS in two cases. Automated analysis of hematologic parameters revealed elevated proportion of hyperdense cells to be a highly significant indicator for HS in neonatal infants. We showed that assessment of red cell morphology in combination with AGLT and EMA binding assay is a reliable basis for confirming or rejecting suspected diagnosis of HS even in neonates. Our data underline the necessity for blood sampling and laboratory exploration in suspected red cell membrane or enzyme defects at the earliest occasion.

  10. A comparative evaluation of Eosin-5'-maleimide flow cytometry reveals a high diagnostic efficacy for hereditary spherocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, P; Aggarwal, A; Jamwal, M; Sachdeva, M U S; Bansal, D; Malhotra, P; Sharma, P; Das, R

    2016-10-01

    Laboratory diagnosis of hereditary spherocytosis (HS) relies on increased incubated red cell osmotic fragility test for screening. We evaluated the diagnostic role of eosin-5'-maleimide (EMA) binding test by flow cytometry in spherocytic and microcytic hypochromic hematological disorders in North Indians. EMA binding test using flow cytometry was performed on 55 HS (40 families), 26 iron deficiency anemia (IDA), 32 β-thalassemia trait (βTT), and 10 autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) cases and 121 normals. Mean channel fluorescence (MCF) and coefficient of variation (CV) were studied. Different MCF parameters (MCF, MCF ratio, percent decrease MCF) and percent increase in CV were analyzed. Receiver operating characteristics analysis was performed to determine best cutoff values, sensitivity, and specificity for discriminating HS from other red cell disorders. MCF ratio of HS group was significantly lower than normals (0.67 ± 0.07 vs. 1.01 ± 0.05, P < 0.001) and other cases. All patients with HS showed MCF ratio to be ≤0.79. Four postsplenectomy cases with near-normal hemograms also revealed low MCF ratio, showing the specificity of the test. EMA assay was efficient to diagnose cases of HS including postsplenectomy cases and shows no overlap with IDA, βTT, and AIHA. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Hemorrhage-Adjusted Iron Requirements, Hematinics and Hepcidin Define Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia as a Model of Hemorrhagic Iron Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnamore, Helen; Le Couteur, James; Hickson, Mary; Busbridge, Mark; Whelan, Kevin; Shovlin, Claire L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Iron deficiency anemia remains a major global health problem. Higher iron demands provide the potential for a targeted preventative approach before anemia develops. The primary study objective was to develop and validate a metric that stratifies recommended dietary iron intake to compensate for patient-specific non-menstrual hemorrhagic losses. The secondary objective was to examine whether iron deficiency can be attributed to under-replacement of epistaxis (nosebleed) hemorrhagic iron losses in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Methodology/Principal Findings The hemorrhage adjusted iron requirement (HAIR) sums the recommended dietary allowance, and iron required to replace additional quantified hemorrhagic losses, based on the pre-menopausal increment to compensate for menstrual losses (formula provided). In a study population of 50 HHT patients completing concurrent dietary and nosebleed questionnaires, 43/50 (86%) met their recommended dietary allowance, but only 10/50 (20%) met their HAIR. Higher HAIR was a powerful predictor of lower hemoglobin (p = 0.009), lower mean corpuscular hemoglobin content (pstopped. Conclusions/significance HAIR values, providing an indication of individuals’ iron requirements, may be a useful tool in prevention, assessment and management of iron deficiency. Iron deficiency in HHT can be explained by under-replacement of nosebleed hemorrhagic iron losses. PMID:24146883

  12. Hereditary neuropathies: systematization and diagnostics (clinical case of hereditary motor and sensor neuropathy of the IA type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolokolova A.M.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to study the value of routine methods (clinical symptoms, electrophysiological findings and results of DNA analysis in diagnostics of hereditary motor sensory neuropathy type IA in outpatient clinics. Material and Methods. The review of foreign literature is represented. The phenotypic polymorphism, genetic heterogeneity and the difficulties of diagnostics are identified. A family with hereditary motor sensory neuropathy of lAtype is presented, which was diagnosed on the base of available methods in outpatient practice (clinical symptoms, genealogical method, electro-physiological findings and DNA analysis results. Results. Routine algorithm (consistent valuation of clinical symptoms, neurophysiologic findings and the results of DNA analysis helped to verify the diagnosis of hereditary motor sensory neuropathy of lAtype in outpatient practice after more than 20 years of the onset of the disease. Conclusion. The neurologists of outpatient clinics and other specialists must be informed about the availability of diagnostics of hereditary diseases of nervous system.

  13. Retinal phlebitis associated with autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Fiona L M; Tajunisah, Iqbal

    2009-01-01

    To describe a case of retinal phlebitis associated with autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Observational case report. A 44-year-old Indian man diagnosed with autoimmune hemolytic anemia presented with a 1-week history of blurred vision in both eyes. Fundus biomicroscopy revealed bilateral peripheral retinal venous sheathing and cellophane maculopathy. Fundus fluorescent angiogram showed bilateral late leakage from the peripheral venous arcades and submacular fluid accumulation. The retinal phlebitis resolved following a blood transfusion and administration of systemic steroids. Retinopathy associated with autoimmune hemolytic anemia is not well known. This is thought to be the first documentation of retinal phlebitis occurring in this condition.

  14. Protrusio acetabuli in sickle-cell anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, S.; Apple, J.S.; Baber, C.; Putman, C.E.; Rosse, W.F.

    1984-01-01

    Of 155 adults with sickle-cell anemia (SS, SC), radiographs of the pelvis or hip demonstrated protrusio acetabuli on at least one side in 14 (3 men and 11 women), as indicated by projection of the acetabular line medial to the ilio-ischial line. All 14 patients had bone changes attributable to sickle-cell anemia, including marrow hyperplasia and osteonecrosis; however, the severity of femoral or acetabular osteonecrosis did not appear directly related to the protrusion. The authors conclude that sickle-cell anemia can predispose to development of protrusio acetabuli

  15. Hereditary and non-hereditary microangiopathies in the young. An up-date.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringelstein, E Bernd; Kleffner, Ilka; Dittrich, Ralf; Kuhlenbäumer, Gregor; Ritter, Martin A

    2010-12-15

    In recent years, a considerable number of new sporadic or hereditary small artery diseases of the brain have been detected which preferably occur in younger age, below 45 years. Cerebral microangiopathies constitute an appreciable portion of all strokes. In middle aged patients, hereditary cerebral small vessel diseases have to be separated from sporadic degenerative cerebral microangiopathy which is mainly due to a high vascular risk load. Features of the following disorders and details how to differentiate them, are reviewed here, namely CADASIL, MELAS, AD-RVLC, HEMID, CARASIL, PADMAL, FABRY, COL4A1-related cerebral small vessel diseases and a Portuguese type of autosomal dominant cerebral small vessel disease (SVDB). The symptomatic overlap of the cerebral microangiopathies include also other distinctive non-hereditary diseases like posterior (reversible) encephalopathy and Susac's syndrome which are also described. Some of the microangiopathies described here are not only seen in the young but also in the elderly. The precise diagnosis has direct therapeutic implications in several of these entities. Cerebral microangiopathies cause recurring strokes and diffuse white matter lesions leading to a broad spectrum of gait disturbances and in most of these disorders cognitive impairment or even vascular dementia in the long term. Often, they also involve the eye, the inner ear or the kidney. Several typical imaging findings from illustrative cases are presented. The order in which these diseases are presented here is not dictated by an inner logic principle, because a genetically or pathophysiologically based classification system of all these entities does not exist yet. Some entities are well established and not unusual, whereas others have only been described in a few cases in total. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Clinical management of aplastic anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeZern, Amy E; Brodsky, Robert A

    2011-01-01

    Acquired aplastic anemia is a potentially fatal bone marrow failure disorder that is characterized by pancytopenia and a hypocellular bone marrow. Hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation or bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is the treatment of choice for young patients who have a matched sibling donor. Immunosuppression with either anti-thymocyte globulin and cyclosporine or high-dose cyclophosphamide is an effective therapy for patients who are not suitable BMT candidates owing to age or lack of a suitable donor. Results of BMT from unrelated and mismatched donors are improving, but presently this treatment option is best reserved for those patients who do not respond, relapse or develop secondary clonal disorders following immunosuppressive therapy. Efforts are currently underway to both improve immunosuppressive regimens and to expand the application of BMT. PMID:21495931

  17. Results after laparoscopic partial splenectomy for children with hereditary spherocytosis: Are outcomes influenced by genetic mutation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugi, Jakob; Carcao, Manuel; Drury, Luke J; Langer, Jacob C

    2018-05-01

    Laparoscopic partial splenectomy (LPS) theoretically maintains long-term splenic immune function for children with hereditary spherocytosis (HS). Our goal was to review our results after LPS and to determine if specific genetic mutations influence outcome. All children with HS undergoing LPS between 2005 and 2016 were reviewed. Thirty-one children underwent LPS (16 male) at a median age of 9 (range 2-18) years. All experienced an increase in hemoglobin and decrease in reticulocyte count early after LPS and at last follow-up. Twenty-two were sent for genetic analysis. Mutations in α-spectrin, β-spectrin, and Ankyrin were identified in 6, 5, and 11 patients, respectively. Gene mutation was not correlated with complications, perioperative transfusion, length of hospital stay, or median hemoglobin, platelet, or reticulocyte counts. Three children required completion splenectomy at 10.9, 6.9, and 3.2years post-LPS, each with a different gene mutation. LPS is effective in reversing anemia and reducing reticulocytosis. So far less than 10% have required completion splenectomy, and those children did benefit from delaying the risks of asplenia. In this preliminary analysis, genetic mutation did not influence outcome after LPS. A larger multicenter study is necessary to further investigate potential correlations with specific genetic mutations. Prognosis Study. IV. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Hemorrhage-adjusted iron requirements, hematinics and hepcidin define hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia as a model of hemorrhagic iron deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Finnamore

    Full Text Available Iron deficiency anemia remains a major global health problem. Higher iron demands provide the potential for a targeted preventative approach before anemia develops. The primary study objective was to develop and validate a metric that stratifies recommended dietary iron intake to compensate for patient-specific non-menstrual hemorrhagic losses. The secondary objective was to examine whether iron deficiency can be attributed to under-replacement of epistaxis (nosebleed hemorrhagic iron losses in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT.The hemorrhage adjusted iron requirement (HAIR sums the recommended dietary allowance, and iron required to replace additional quantified hemorrhagic losses, based on the pre-menopausal increment to compensate for menstrual losses (formula provided. In a study population of 50 HHT patients completing concurrent dietary and nosebleed questionnaires, 43/50 (86% met their recommended dietary allowance, but only 10/50 (20% met their HAIR. Higher HAIR was a powerful predictor of lower hemoglobin (p = 0.009, lower mean corpuscular hemoglobin content (p<0.001, lower log-transformed serum iron (p = 0.009, and higher log-transformed red cell distribution width (p<0.001. There was no evidence of generalised abnormalities in iron handling Ferritin and ferritin(2 explained 60% of the hepcidin variance (p<0.001, and the mean hepcidinferritin ratio was similar to reported controls. Iron supplement use increased the proportion of individuals meeting their HAIR, and blunted associations between HAIR and hematinic indices. Once adjusted for supplement use however, reciprocal relationships between HAIR and hemoglobin/serum iron persisted. Of 568 individuals using iron tablets, most reported problems completing the course. For patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, persistent anemia was reported three-times more frequently if iron tablets caused diarrhea or needed to be stopped.HAIR values, providing an indication of

  19. Leber hereditary optic neuropathy: current perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyerson, Cherise; Van Stavern, Greg; McClelland, Collin

    2015-01-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is one of the most common inherited optic neuropathies causing bilateral central vision loss. The disorder results from point mutations in mitochondrial DNA and subsequent mitochondrial dysfunction. The primary cell type that is lost in LHON is the retinal ganglion cell, which is highly susceptible to disrupted ATP production and oxidative stress. Inheritance of LHON follows that of mitochondrial genetics, and it has a highly variable clinical phenotype, as other genetic and environmental factors also play a role. Although LHON usually presents with isolated vision loss, some patients suffer other neurological sequelae. For ill-defined reasons, male LHON mutation carriers are more affected than females. Most LHON patients remain legally blind, but a small proportion can experience spontaneous partial recovery, often within the first year of symptom onset. Unfortunately, at this time there are no established curative interventions and treatment is largely supportive. Patients should be offered low vision services and counseled on mitigating risk factors for additional vision loss, such as smoking and consuming alcohol. Encouraging treatments currently undergoing investigation includes ubiquinone analogs, such as idebenone, as well as gene therapy and stem cells to restore ATP synthesis and provide neuroprotection to surviving retinal ganglion cells. PMID:26170609

  20. Molecular Diagnostic and Pathogenesis of Hereditary Hemochromatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo C. J. L. Santos

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by enhanced intestinal absorption of dietary iron. Without therapeutic intervention, iron overload leads to multiple organ damage such as liver cirrhosis, cardiomyopathy, diabetes, arthritis, hypogonadism and skin pigmentation. Most HH patients carry HFE mutant genotypes: homozygosity for p.Cys282Tyr or p.Cys282Tyr/p.His63Asp compound heterozygosity. In addition to HFE gene, mutations in the genes that encode hemojuvelin (HJV, hepcidin (HAMP, transferrin receptor 2 (TFR2 and ferroportin (SLC40A1 have been associated with regulation of iron homeostasis and development of HH. The aim of this review was to identify the main gene mutations involved in the pathogenesis of type 1, 2, 3 and 4 HH and their genetic testing indication. HFE testing for the two main mutations (p.Cys282Tyr and p.His63Asp should be performed in all patients with primary iron overload and unexplained increased transferrin saturation and/or serum ferritin values. The evaluation of the HJV p.Gly320Val mutation must be the molecular test of choice in suspected patients with juvenile hemochromatosis with less than 30 years and cardiac or endocrine manifestations. In conclusion, HH is an example that genetic testing can, in addition to performing the differential diagnostic with secondary iron overload, lead to more adequate and faster treatment.

  1. Genetics of hereditary neurological disorders in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yue; Yu, Sui; Wu, Zhanhe; Tang, Beisha

    2014-04-01

    Hereditary neurological disorders (HNDs) are relatively common in children compared to those occurring in adulthood. Recognising clinical manifestations of HNDs is important for the selection of genetic testing, genetic testing results interpretation, and genetic consultation. Meanwhile, advances in next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have significantly enabled the discovery of genetic causes of HNDs and also challenge paediatricians on applying genetic investigation. Combination of both clinical information and advanced technologies will enhance the genetic test yields in clinical setting. This review summarises the clinical presentations as well as genetic causes of paediatric neurological disorders in four major areas including movement disorders, neuropsychiatric disorders, neuron peripheral disorders and epilepsy. The aim of this review is to help paediatric neurologists not only to see the clinical features but also the complex genetic aspect of HNDs in order to utilise genetic investigation confidently in their clinical practice. A smooth transition from research based to clinical use of comprehensive genetic testing in HNDs in children could be foreseen in the near future while genetic testing, genetic counselling and genetic data interpretation are in place appropriately.

  2. 9511 ANEMIA AND ASSOCIATED FACTORS AMONG SCHOOL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mimi

    Children with Hb lower than 11.5 g/dL were considered anemic. Information ... Anemia is commonly associated with nutritional deficiencies, especially iron ... children aged five to six years, given that public access to preschool education is not.

  3. Role of Erythropoietin in Renal Anemia Therapy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of erythropoietin and others drugs in renal anemia treatment, as well as the cause of erythropoietin resistance. .... mouth health, atrophy prevention, prevention of artery hardening ... Secondary hyperthyroidism can lead to osteitis fibrosa ...

  4. Clinical Outcomes of Splenectomy in Children: Report of the Splenectomy in Congenital Hemolytic Anemia (SICHA) Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Henry E; Englum, Brian R; Rothman, Jennifer; Leonard, Sarah; Reiter, Audra; Thornburg, Courtney; Brindle, Mary; Wright, Nicola; Heeney, Matthew M; Smithers, Charles; Brown, Rebeccah L; Kalfa, Theodosia; Langer, Jacob C; Cada, Michaela; Oldham, Keith T; Scott, J Paul; St. Peter, Shawn; Sharma, Mukta; Davidoff, Andrew M.; Nottage, Kerri; Bernabe, Kathryn; Wilson, David B; Dutta, Sanjeev; Glader, Bertil; Crary, Shelley E; Dassinger, Melvin S; Dunbar, Levette; Islam, Saleem; Kumar, Manjusha; Rescorla, Fred; Bruch, Steve; Campbell, Andrew; Austin, Mary; Sidonio, Robert; Blakely, Martin L

    2014-01-01

    The outcomes of children with congenital hemolytic anemia (CHA) undergoing total splenectomy (TS) or partial splenectomy (PS) remain unclear. In this study, we collected data from 100 children with CHA who underwent TS or PS from 2005–2013 at 16 sites in the Splenectomy in Congenital Hemolytic Anemia (SICHA) consortium using a patient registry. We analyzed demographics and baseline clinical status, operative details, and outcomes at 4, 24, and 52 weeks after surgery. Results were summarized as hematologic outcomes, short-term adverse events (AEs) (≤ 30 days after surgery), and long-term AEs (31–365 days after surgery). For children with hereditary spherocytosis, after surgery there was an increase in hemoglobin (baseline 10.1 ± 1.8 gm/dl, 52 week 12.8 ± 1.6 gm/dl; mean ± SD), decrease in reticulocyte and bilirubin as well as control of symptoms. Children with sickle cell disease had control of clinical symptoms after surgery, but had no change in hematologic parameters. There was an 11% rate of short-term AEs and 11% rate of long-term AEs. As we accumulate more subjects and longer follow-up, use of a patient registry should enhance our capacity for clinical trials and engage all stakeholders in the decision-making process. PMID:25382665

  5. Family structure and child anemia in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeer, Kammi K

    2013-10-01

    Utilizing longitudinal data from the nationally-representative Mexico Family Life Survey, this study assesses the association between family structure and iron-deficient anemia among children ages 3-12 in Mexico. The longitudinal models (n = 4649), which control for baseline anemia status and allow for consideration of family structure transitions, suggest that children living in stable-cohabiting and single-mother families and those who have recently experienced a parental union dissolution have higher odds of anemia than those in stable-married, father-present family structures. Interaction effects indicate that unmarried family contexts have stronger associations with anemia in older children (over age five); and, that the negative effects of parental union dissolution are exacerbated in poorer households. Resident maternal grandparents have a significant beneficial effect on child anemia independent of parental family structure. These results highlight the importance of family structure for child micronutrient deficiencies and suggest that understanding social processes within households may be critical to preventing child anemia in Mexico. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Thyroid storm and warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Joseph A; Gliga, Louise; Nagalla, Srikanth

    2017-08-01

    Graves' disease is often associated with other autoimmune disorders, including rare associations with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). We describe a unique presentation of thyroid storm and warm AIHA diagnosed concurrently in a young female with hyperthyroidism. The patient presented with nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and altered mental status. Laboratory studies revealed hemoglobin 3.9g/dL, platelets 171×10 9 L -1 , haptoglobin storm and warm AIHA. She was started on glucocorticoids to treat both warm AIHA and thyroid storm, as well as antithyroid medications, propranolol and folic acid. Due to profound anemia and hemodynamic instability, the patient was transfused two units of uncrossmatched packed red blood cells slowly and tolerated this well. She was discharged on methimazole as well as a prolonged prednisone taper, and achieved complete resolution of the thyrotoxicosis and anemia at one month. Hyperthyroidism can affect all three blood cell lineages of the hematopoietic system. Anemia can be seen in 10-20% of patients with thyrotoxicosis. Several autoimmune processes can lead to anemia in Graves' disease, including pernicious anemia, celiac disease, and warm AIHA. This case illustrates a rarely described presentation of a patient with Graves' disease presenting with concurrent thyroid storm and warm AIHA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. From Bad to Worse: Anemia on Admission and Hospital-Acquired Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Colleen G; Li, Liang; Sun, Zhiyuan; Hixson, Eric D; Tang, Anne S; Phillips, Shannon C; Blackstone, Eugene H; Henderson, J Michael

    2017-12-01

    Anemia at hospitalization is often treated as an accompaniment to an underlying illness, without active investigation, despite its association with morbidity. Development of hospital-acquired anemia (HAA) has also been associated with increased risk for poor outcomes. Together, they may further heighten morbidity risk from bad to worse. The aims of this study were to (1) examine mortality, length of stay, and total charges in patients with present-on-admission (POA) anemia and (2) determine whether these are exacerbated by development of HAA. In this cohort investigation, from January 1, 2009, to August 31, 2011, a total of 44,483 patients with POA anemia were admitted to a single health system compared with a reference group of 48,640 without POA anemia or HAA. Data sources included the University HealthSystem Consortium database and electronic medical records. Risk-adjustment methods included logistic and linear regression models for mortality, length of stay, and total charges. Present-on-admission anemia was defined by administrative coding. Hospital-acquired anemia was determined by changes in hemoglobin values from the electronic medical record. Approximately one-half of the patients experienced worsening of anemia with development of HAA. Risk for death and resource use increased with increasing severity of HAA. Those who developed severe HAA had 2-fold greater odds for death; that is, mild POA anemia with development of severe HAA resulted in greater mortality (odds ratio, 2.57; 95% confidence interval, 2.08-3.18; P < 0.001), increased length of stay (2.23; 2.16-2.31; P < 0.001), and higher charges (2.09; 2.03-2.15; P < 0.001). Present-on-admission anemia is associated with increased mortality and resource use. This risk is further increased from bad to worse when patients develop HAA. Efforts to address POA anemia and HAA deserve attention.

  8. Correlative study on anemia and radiotherapy effects in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jinsheng; Jiang Yuanshi; Cao Xibiao; Zhan Yongzhong; Yang Liye; Chen Jianxiu; Chen Chengwu; Li Yang

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of oxygen-carrying ability of blood efficacy of radiotherapy for patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Methods: Altogether 161 cases of patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma were classified according to severity of anemia, and Hb, RBC, MCH, HCT, MCV, MCHC and RDW were tested before, during and after radiotherapy. The patients were followed-up for up to 5 years, the relationship and mechanism among anemia, radiotherapy effects and survival rate was discussed. Results: The survival rate between anemia group and non-anemia group was different significantly (P<0.05). Anemia before radiotherapy, anemia appearance or anemia deterioration during radiotherapy were sensitive factors affecting radiotherapy results. The anemia more severe, the radiotherapy worse. Conclusion: Anemia-hypohemoglobinemia leads to decrease of oxygen-carrying capacity of blood, resulting in oxygen deficiency of tumor cells and their radiotherapy resistance. Therefore this method is worthy of further studies

  9. APLASTIC ANEMIA AND VIRAL HEPATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Cudillo

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available

    Acquired aplastic anemia(aAA is a severe and rare disease, characterized by hematopoietic bone marrow failure and peripheral cytopenia. The pathophysiology is immune mediated in most cases, activated T1 lymphocytes have been identified as effector cells . The disease can be successfully treated with combined immunosuppressive therapy or allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Hepatitis-associated aplastic anemia (HAA  is a syndrome of bone marrow failure following the development of acute seronegative hepatitis. HAA syndrome most often affects young males who presented severe pancytopenia two to three months after an episode of acute hepatitis. The clinical course of hepatitis is more frequently benign but a fulminant severe course is also described. The bone marrow failure can be explosive and severe and it is usually fatal if untreated, no correlations have been observed between severity of hepatitis and AA.

    In none of the  studies a specific virus could be identified and most cases are seronegative for known hepatitis viruses. The clinical characteristics  and response to immunotherapy indicate a central role for immune-mediated mechanism in the pathogenesis of HAA. The initial

  10. FANCD2 Western blot as a diagnostic tool for Brazilian patients with Fanconi anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.V. Pilonetto

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Fanconi anemia is a rare hereditary disease showing genetic heterogeneity due to a variety of mutations in genes involved in DNA repair pathways, which may lead to different clinical manifestations. Phenotypic variability makes diagnosis difficult based only on clinical manifestations, therefore laboratory tests are necessary. New advances in molecular pathogenesis of this disease led researchers to develop a diagnostic test based on Western blot for FANCD2. The objective of the present study was to determine the efficacy of this method for the diagnosis of 84 Brazilian patients with Fanconi anemia, all of whom tested positive for the diepoxybutane test, and 98 healthy controls. The FANCD2 monoubiquitinated isoform (FANCDS+/FANCD2L- was not detected in 77 patients (91.7%. In 2 patients (2.4%, there was an absence of both the monoubiquitinated and the non-ubiquitinated proteins (FANCD2S-/FANCD2L- and 5 patients (5.9% had both isoforms (FANCD2S+/FANCD2L+. This last phenotype suggests downstream subtypes or mosaicism. All controls were diepoxybutane negative and were also negative on the FANCD2 Western blot. The Western blot for FANCD2 presented a sensitivity of 94% (79/84 and specificity of 100% (98/98. This method was confirmed as an efficient approach to screen Brazilian patients with deleterious mutations on FANCD2 (FANCD2S-/FANCD2L- or other upstream genes of the FA/BRCA pathway (FANCDS+/FANCD2L-, to confirm the chromosome breakage test and to classify patients according to the level of FA/BRCA pathway defects. However, patients showing both FANCD2 isoforms (FANCD2S+/FANCD2L+ require additional studies to confirm mutations on downstream Fanconi anemia genes or the presence of mosaicism.

  11. The prevalence of depression in hereditary spastic paraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahter, L; Braschinsky, M; Haldre, S; Gross-Paju, K

    2009-09-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of depression and sensitivity and specificity of the single-item interview 'Are you depressed?' for people with hereditary spastic paraplegia in Estonia. Single-item interview 'Are you depressed?' was used as a screening question for depression; all participants then completed the Beck Depression Inventory. People with hereditary spastic paraplegia identified from the epidemiological database who agreed to participate in the study. Beck Depression Inventory, clinical interview. The epidemiological database consisted of 59 patients with clinically confirmed diagnosis of hereditary spastic paraplegia. Forty-eight of these consented to participate in the study. The Beck Depression Inventory score was higher than cut-off point in 58% (28/48) and lower in 42% (20/48). Of the study group, 44% (21/48) had mild, 13% (6/48) moderate and one person revealed severe depression. There was a statistically significant correlation between Beck Depression Inventory score and level of mobility; no other significant correlations with other measures were detected. Of the participants, 54% (26/48) had subjective complaints about depression and answered 'Yes' to the single-item interview 'Are you depressed?'. The sensitivity of the one-item interview in the hereditary spastic paraplegia group was 75% and specificity 75%. Our results show that mild depression is prevalent among people with hereditary spastic paraplegia. Although the single question may be helpful, it cannot be relied upon entirely when assessing a person for depression.

  12. Musculoskeletal disease burden of hereditary hemochromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahinbegovic, Enijad; Dallos, Tomáš; Aigner, Elmar; Axmann, Roland; Manger, Bernhard; Englbrecht, Matthias; Schöniger-Hekele, Maximilian; Karonitsch, Thomas; Stamm, Tanja; Farkas, Martin; Karger, Thomas; Stölzel, Ulrich; Keysser, Gernot; Datz, Christian; Schett, Georg; Zwerina, Jochen

    2010-12-01

    To determine the prevalence, clinical picture, and disease burden of arthritis in patients with hereditary hemochromatosis. In this cross-sectional observational study of 199 patients with hemochromatosis and iron overload, demographic and disease-specific variables, genotype, and organ involvement were recorded. The prevalence, intensity, and localization of joint pain were assessed, and a complete rheumatologic investigation was performed. Radiographs of the hands, knees, and ankles were scored for joint space narrowing, erosions, osteophytes, and chondrocalcinosis. In addition, the number and type of joint replacement surgeries were recorded. Joint pain was reported by 72.4% of the patients. Their mean ± SD age at the time of the initial joint symptoms was 45.8 ± 13.2 years. If joint pain was present, it preceded the diagnosis of hemochromatosis by a mean ± SD of 9.0 ± 10.7 years. Bony enlargement was observed in 65.8% of the patients, whereas synovitis was less common (13.6%). Joint space narrowing and osteophytes as well as chondrocalcinosis of the wrist and knee joints were frequent radiographic features of hemochromatosis. Joint replacement surgery was common, with 32 patients (16.1%) undergoing total joint replacement surgery due to severe OA. The mean ± SD age of these patients was 58.3 ± 10.4 years at time of joint replacement surgery. Female sex, metacarpophalangeal joint involvement, and the presence of chondrocalcinosis were associated with a higher risk of early joint failure (i.e., the need for joint replacement surgery). Arthritis is a frequent, early, and severe symptom of hemochromatosis. Disease is not confined to involvement of the metacarpophalangeal joints and often leads to severe damage requiring the replacement of joints. Copyright © 2010 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  13. Fanconi Anemia — Case Report of Rare Aplastic Anemia at Child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deaconu Alina

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Fanconi anemia is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by congenital abnormalities, defective haematopoiesis, and a high risk of developing acute myeloid leukaemia, myelodysplastic syndrome and cancers. FA was first described in 1927 by the Swiss pediatrician Guido Fanconi. The diagnosis is based on morphological abnormalities, hematologic abnormalities (pancytopenia, macrocytic anemia and progressive bone marrow failure and genetic tests (cariograma.

  14. Outcomes of Lensectomy in Hereditary Lens Subluxation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad-Hossein Dehghan

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the results of pars plana lensectomy in patients with hereditary lens subluxation. METHOD: Hospital records of patients with hereditary lens subluxation who had undergone pars plana lensectomy at Labbafinejad Medical Center, Tehran-Iran from 1996 to 2003 were reviewed. Patients with more than 6 months of follow up were included. Underlying disorders, best corrected visual acuity (BCVA before and after surgery, intraocular pressure (IOP, postoperative refraction and complications were evaluated. RESULTS: Overall, records of 87 eyes of 49 patients including 27 male and 22 female subjects were reviewed. Mean follow up duration was 20±18 months. Underlying disorders leading to lens subluxation included Marfan syndrome (79.5%, Weill-Marchesani syndrome (8.2%, simple ectopia lentis (8.2%, and homocystinuria (4.1%. The most common indication for surgery was non-correctable refractive error (92.1%. Mean BCVA was 1.13 LogMAR (20/250 preoperatively, which improved to 0.26 LogMAR (20/30-20/40 postoperatively (P < 0.001. BCVA better than 20/40 was achieved in 82.8% of cases after surgery. Angle-supported anterior chamber intraocular lens (ACIOL was implanted in

  15. Iron deficiency or anemia of inflammation? : Differential diagnosis and mechanisms of anemia of inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nairz, Manfred; Theurl, Igor; Wolf, Dominik; Weiss, Günter

    2016-10-01

    Iron deficiency and immune activation are the two most frequent causes of anemia, both of which are based on disturbances of iron homeostasis. Iron deficiency anemia results from a reduction of the body's iron content due to blood loss, inadequate dietary iron intake, its malabsorption, or increased iron demand. Immune activation drives a diversion of iron fluxes from the erythropoietic bone marrow, where hemoglobinization takes place, to storage sites, particularly the mononuclear phagocytes system in liver and spleen. This results in iron-limited erythropoiesis and anemia. This review summarizes current diagnostic and pathophysiological concepts of iron deficiency anemia and anemia of inflammation, as well as combined conditions, and provides a brief outlook on novel therapeutic options.

  16. Fanconi's Anemia Effect or Sickle Cell Anemia Effect: That is the Question.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, Sule; Chui, David H K; Gumruk, Fatma

    2015-01-01

    A 16-year-old boy who was diagnosed to have sickle cell anemia was referred to our center. The parental consanguinity, growth retardation and dysmorphic features prompted a search for possible Fanconi's Anemia (FA). The diepoxybutane (DEB) test was positive, confirming FA. The interaction of both diseases might account for his relatively mild phenotype in terms of both sickle cell anemia (or Hb S, HBB: c.20A > T) and FA. The high Hb F level that might be related to concomitant FA, may have caused a milder phenotype of sickle cell anemia, whereas nitric oxide (NO) depletion as a consequence of sickle cell anemia, may have caused a delay in the bone marrow failure of FA.

  17. Anemia, tumor hypoxemia, and the cancer patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varlotto, John; Stevenson, Mary Ann

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To review the impact of anemia/tumor hypoxemia on the quality of life and survival in cancer patients, and to assess the problems associated with the correction of this difficulty. Methods: MEDLINE searches were performed to find relevant literature regarding anemia and/or tumor hypoxia in cancer patients. Articles were evaluated in order to assess the epidemiology, adverse patient effects, anemia correction guidelines, and mechanisms of hypoxia-induced cancer cell growth and/or therapeutic resistance. Past and current clinical studies of radiosensitization via tumor oxygenation/hypoxic cell sensitization were reviewed. All clinical studies using multi-variate analysis were analyzed to show whether or not anemia and/or tumor hypoxemia affected tumor control and patient survival. Articles dealing with the correction of anemia via transfusion and/or erythropoietin were reviewed in order to show the impact of the rectification on the quality of life and survival of cancer patients. Results: Approximately 40-64% of patients presenting for cancer therapy are anemic. The rate of anemia rises with the use of chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and hormonal therapy for prostate cancer. Anemia is associated with reductions both in quality of life and survival. Tumor hypoxemia has been hypothesized to lead to tumor growth and resistance to therapy because it leads to angiogenesis, genetic mutations, resistance to apoptosis, and a resistance to free radicals from chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Nineteen clinical studies of anemia and eight clinical studies of tumor hypoxemia were found that used multi-variate analysis to determine the effect of these conditions on the local control and/or survival of cancer patients. Despite differing definitions of anemia and hypoxemia, all studies have shown a correlation between low hemoglobin levels and/or higher amounts of tumor hypoxia with poorer prognosis. Radiosensitization through improvements in tumor oxygenation/hypoxic cell

  18. Fanconi anemia and DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grompe, M; D'Andrea, A

    2001-10-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by defects in at least eight distinct genes FANCA, B, C, D1, D2, E, F and G. The clinical phenotype of all FA complementation groups is similar and is characterized by progressive bone marrow failure, cancer proneness and typical birth defects. The principal cellular phenotype is hypersensitivity to DNA damage, particularly interstrand DNA crosslinks. The FA proteins constitute a multiprotein pathway whose precise biochemical function(s) remain unknown. Five of the FA proteins (FANCA, C, E, F and G) interact in a nuclear complex upstream of FANCD2. FANCB and FANCD1 have not yet been cloned, but it is likely that FANCB is part of the nuclear complex and that FANCD1 acts downstream of FANCD2. The FA nuclear complex regulates the mono-ubiquitination of FANCD2 in response to DNA damage, resulting in targeting of this protein into nuclear foci. These foci also contain BRCA1 and other DNA damage response proteins. In male meiosis, FANCD2 also co-localizes with BRCA1 at synaptonemal complexes. Together, these data suggest that the FA pathway functions primarily as a DNA damage response system, although its exact role (direct involvement in DNA repair versus indirect, facilitating role) has not yet been defined.

  19. Fanconi Anemia and Laron Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilla-Cortazar, Inma; de Ita, Julieta Rodriguez; Aguirre, Gabriel Amador; Castorena-Torres, Fabiola; Ortiz-Urbina, Jesús; García-Magariño, Mariano; de la Garza, Rocío García; Diaz Olachea, Carlos; Elizondo Leal, Martha Irma

    2017-05-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a condition characterized by genetic instability and short stature, which is due to growth hormone (GH) deficiency in most cases. However, no apparent relationships have been identified between FA complementation group genes and GH. In this study, we thereby considered an association between FA and Laron syndrome (LS) (insulin-like growth factor 1 [IGF-1] deficiency). A 21-year-old female Mexican patient with a genetic diagnosis of FA was referred to our research department for an evaluation of her short stature. Upon admission to our facility, her phenotype led to a suspicion of LS; accordingly, serum levels of IGF-1 and IGF binding protein 3 were analyzed and a GH stimulation test was performed. In addition, we used a next-generation sequencing approach for a molecular evaluation of FA disease-causing mutations and genes involved in the GH-IGF signaling pathway. Tests revealed low levels of IGF-1 and IGF binding protein 3 that remained within normal ranges, as well as a lack of response to GH stimulation. Sequencing confirmed a defect in the GH receptor signaling pathway. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to suggest an association between FA and LS. We propose that IGF-1 administration might improve some FA complications and functions based upon IGF-1 beneficial actions observed in animal, cell and indirect clinical models: erythropoiesis modulation, immune function improvement and metabolic regulation. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Aspectos moleculares da anemia falciforme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galiza Neto Gentil Claudino de

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available No presente artigo abordaram-se vários aspectos relacionados à natureza molecular da anemia falciforme, desordem hematológica de caráter hereditário que acomete expressivo número de indivíduos em várias regiões do mundo. As pesquisas realizadas em torno desta patologia da hemácia, ao longo de quase um século, a partir de 1910, cooperaram para a criação de um novo e importante segmento da ciência, denominado biologia molecular. A descoberta dos polimorfismos da mutação (GAT->GTG no gene que codifica a cadeia beta da hemoglobina, originando diferentes haplótipos da doença, permitiu um melhor e mais amplo conhecimento em torno da heterogeneidade clínica nos pacientes falcêmicos. Analisando a hemoglobina na sua estrutura normal e mutante, sua produção e evolução, pode-se ter um entendimento mais completo da fisiopatologia desta doença e da sua complexidade clínica.

  1. Iron deficiency and anemia in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çavuşoğlu, Yüksel; Altay, Hakan; Çetiner, Mustafa; Güvenç, Tolga Sinan; Temizhan, Ahmet; Ural, Dilek; Yeşilbursa, Dilek; Yıldırım, Nesligül; Yılmaz, Mehmet Birhan

    2017-03-01

    Heart failure is an important community health problem. Prevalence and incidence of heart failure have continued to rise over the years. Despite recent advances in heart failure therapy, prognosis is still poor, rehospitalization rate is very high, and quality of life is worse. Co-morbidities in heart failure have negative impact on clinical course of the disease, further impair prognosis, and add difficulties to treatment of clinical picture. Therefore, successful management of co-morbidities is strongly recommended in addition to conventional therapy for heart failure. One of the most common co-morbidities in heart failure is presence of iron deficiency and anemia. Current evidence suggests that iron deficiency and anemia are more prevalent in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction, as well as those with heart failure and preserved ejection fraction. Moreover, iron deficiency and anemia are referred to as independent predictors for poor prognosis in heart failure. There is strong relationship between iron deficiency or anemia and severity of clinical status of heart failure. Over the last two decades, many clinical investigations have been conducted on clinical effectiveness of treatment of iron deficiency or anemia with oral iron, intravenous iron, and erythropoietin therapies. Studies with oral iron and erythropoietin therapies did not provide any clinical benefit and, in fact, these therapies have been shown to be associated with increase in adverse clinical outcomes. However, clinical trials in patients with iron deficiency in the presence or absence of anemia have demonstrated considerable clinical benefits of intravenous iron therapy, and based on these positive outcomes, iron deficiency has become target of therapy in management of heart failure. The present report assesses current approaches to iron deficiency and anemia in heart failure in light of recent evidence.

  2. Cancer risk in families with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer diagnosed by mutation analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasen, H. F.; Wijnen, J. T.; Menko, F. H.; Kleibeuker, J. H.; Taal, B. G.; Griffioen, G.; Nagengast, F. M.; Meijers-Heijboer, E. H.; Bertario, L.; Varesco, L.; Bisgaard, M. L.; Mohr, J.; Fodde, R.; Khan, P. M.

    1996-01-01

    Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer is characterized by early-onset colorectal cancer and the occurrence of various other cancers. The recent isolation of four mismatch repair genes responsible for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer allows for the identification of carriers within

  3. Cancer risk in families with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer diagnosed by mutation analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasen, HFA; Wijnen, JT; Menko, FH; Kleibeuker, JH; Taal, BG; Griffioen, G; Nagengast, FM; MeijersHeijboer, EH; Bertario, L; Varesco, L; Bisgaard, ML; Mohr, J; Fodde, R; Khan, PM

    Background & Aims: Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer is characterized by early-onset colorectal cancer and the occurrence of various other cancers, The recent isolation of four mismatch repair genes responsible for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer allows for the identification of

  4. Hereditary angioedema: a bradykinin-mediated swelling disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björkqvist, Jenny; Sala-Cunill, Anna; Renné, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Edema is tissue swelling and is a common symptom in a variety of diseases. Edema form due to accumulation of fluids, either through reduced drainage or increased vascular permeability. There are multiple vascular signalling pathways that regulate vessel permeability. An important mediator that increases vascular leak is the peptide hormone bradykinin, which is the principal agent in the swelling disorder hereditary angioedema. The disease is autosomal dominant inherited and presents clinically with recurrent episodes of acute swelling that can be life-threatening involving the skin, the oropharyngeal, laryngeal, and gastrointestinal mucosa. Three different types of hereditary angiodema exist in patients. The review summarises current knowledge on the pathophysiology of hereditary angiodema and focuses on recent experimental and pharmacological findings that have led to a better understanding and new treatments for the disease.

  5. Neuromyelitis optica antibody in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Mesquita Simão

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Neuromyelitis optica antibody (or aquaporin-4 antibody is a well stablished serum marker associated to high-risk neuromyelitis optica syndrome that presents as an inflammatory demyelinating disease characterized by the occurrence of bilateral and simultaneous optic neuritis without complete visual recovery or it occurs as an isolated episode of transverse myelitis accompanied by longitudinally extensive spinal cord lesions. On the other hand, Leber hereditary optic neuropathy is a primarily hereditary disorder that affects all tissues of the body and its clinical presentation is tissue-specific for the optic nerve and, eventually, it might reach the spinal cord. Overlapping clinical features of neuromyelitis optica and Leber hereditary optic neuropathy may suggest common target organ diseases. The case report described herein emphasizes the coexistence of serum markers of both diseases, and suggests that further investigation of this challenging clinical presentation is warranted to confirm or rule out this association.

  6. Intragenic Duplication A Novel Mutational Mechanism in Hereditary Pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joergensen, M. T.; Geisz, A.; Brusgaard, K.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In a hereditary pancreatitis family from Denmark, we identified a novel intragenic duplication of 9 nucleotides in exon-2 of the human cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1) gene (c.63_71dup) which at the amino-acid level resulted in the insertion of 3 amino acids within the activation peptide...... pancreatitis. The accelerated activation of p.K23_I24insIDK by cathepsin B is a unique biochemical property not found in any other pancreatitis-associated trypsinogen mutant. In contrast, the robust autoactivation of the novel mutant confirms the notion that increased autoactivation is a disease......-relevant mechanism in hereditary pancreatitis....

  7. Fetal MRI of hereditary multiple intestinal atresia with postnatal correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Githu, Tangayi; Merrow, Arnold C.; Lee, Jason K.; Garrison, Aaron P.; Brown, Rebeccah L.

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary multiple intestinal atresia (HMIA) is an extremely uncommon cause of congenital bowel obstruction. The morbidity and mortality of this disease differ significantly from those of isolated intestinal atresias and non-hereditary forms of multiple intestinal atresia. Most notably, despite successful operative repairs of the atresias found in this disease, HMIA maintains a 100% lethality rate from continued post-operative intestinal failure and an associated severe immunodeficiency. We present a case of HMIA evaluated with fetal MRI and subsequently diagnosed by a combination of corroborative postnatal imaging with surgical exploration and pathological examination. (orig.)

  8. Hereditary Gigantism-the biblical giant Goliath and his brothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Deirdre E; Morrison, Patrick J

    2014-05-01

    The biblical giant Goliath has an identifiable family tree suggestive of autosomal dominant inheritance. We suggest that he had a hereditary pituitary disorder possibly due to the AIP gene, causing early onset and familial acromegaly or gigantism. We comment on the evidence within the scriptures for his other relatives including a relative with six digits and speculate on possible causes of the six digits. Recognition of a hereditary pituitary disorder in the biblical Goliath and his family sheds additional information on his and other family members' battles with David and his relatives.

  9. Dysphonia and vocal fold telangiectasia in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Joseph; Yung, Katherine C

    2014-11-01

    This case report is the first documentation of dysphonia and vocal fold telangiectasia as a complication of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Case report of a 40-year-old man with HHT presenting with 2 years of worsening hoarseness. Hoarseness corresponded with a period of anticoagulation. Endoscopy revealed vocal fold scarring, vocal fold telangiectasias, and plica ventricular is suggestive of previous submucosal vocal fold hemorrhage and subsequent counterproductive compensation with ventricular phonation. Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia may present as dysphonia with vocal fold telangiectasias and place patients at risk of vocal fold hemorrhage. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. Fetal MRI of hereditary multiple intestinal atresia with postnatal correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Githu, Tangayi [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Radiology of Huntsville, P.C., Huntsville, AL (United States); Merrow, Arnold C.; Lee, Jason K. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Garrison, Aaron P. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Surgical Services, Division of Pediatric General and Thoracic Surgery, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Akron Children' s Hospital, Pediatric Surgery, Akron, OH (United States); Brown, Rebeccah L. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Surgical Services, Division of Pediatric General and Thoracic Surgery, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Hereditary multiple intestinal atresia (HMIA) is an extremely uncommon cause of congenital bowel obstruction. The morbidity and mortality of this disease differ significantly from those of isolated intestinal atresias and non-hereditary forms of multiple intestinal atresia. Most notably, despite successful operative repairs of the atresias found in this disease, HMIA maintains a 100% lethality rate from continued post-operative intestinal failure and an associated severe immunodeficiency. We present a case of HMIA evaluated with fetal MRI and subsequently diagnosed by a combination of corroborative postnatal imaging with surgical exploration and pathological examination. (orig.)

  11. Reticulocyte maturity indices in iron deficiency anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muriel Wollmann

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to analyze the reticulocyte maturity indices (low, medium, and high fluorescence ratios in iron deficient 1- to 6-year-old children, and identify the prevalence of iron deficiency anemia in this population. Methods: The present study included 39 subjects, divided into two groups: control subjects (n = 33, and subjects with iron deficiency anemia (n = 6. The results were analyzed by Student's t-test for comparison of means. Differences were considered significant when two-tailed p-value < 0.05. Results: Subjects with iron deficiency anemia presented increases in the proportion of mean (10.3 ± 4.7% vs. 6.0 ± 3.4%; p-value = 0.003, and high fluorescence reticulocytes (2.3 ± 0.87% vs. 0.9 ± 0.9%; p-value = 0.03 compared to the control group. The prevalence of anemia in this population was 15% (n = 6. Conclusion: The indices related to immaturity of reticulocytes are higher in the presence of iron deficiency, thus demonstrating a deficiency in the raw material to form hemoglobin and are, therefore, possible early markers of iron deficiency and anemia. We emphasize the need to standardize these indices for use in clinical practice and lab test results.

  12. Sickle Cell Anemia: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cell Disease Also called: Hemoglobin SS disease, Sickle cell anemia On this page Basics Summary Start Here Diagnosis ... red blood cells. This is a condition called anemia , and it can make you feel tired. The ...

  13. Esferocitosis hereditaria: de la biogénesis a la patogénesis Hereditary spherocytosis: from biogenesis to pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidys Garrote-Santana

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available La esferocitosis hereditaria es la anemia hemolítica congénita más frecuente en la población caucásica. Tiene una amplia variabilidad clínica y desde el punto de vista hematológico se caracteriza por anemia y presencia de esferocitos en la lámina periférica. Su base fisiopatológica está determinada por el defecto de algunas de las proteínas que conforman la membrana eritrocitaria, por el efecto del bazo sobre los hematíes anómalos y otros factores. A la luz de los conocimientos actuales, la interpretación dinámica del proceso requiere adentrarse en los estadios iniciales de la hematopoyesis, pues desde etapas tan tempranas como la enucleación del eritroblasto en la formación del reticulocito, hasta posibles procesos inflamatorios tardíos, pudieran modular la expresión de la enfermedad. Se hace una revisión de las características estructurales y funcionales de la membrana eritrocitaria, así como algunos aspectos generales de las propiedades del hematíe para facilitar la comprensión de los eventos que tienen lugar a partir del compromiso molecular de las proteínas que conforman la membrana.Hereditary spherocytosis is the most common congenital hemolytic anemia among Caucasian population. It has wide clinical variety and from the haematological point of view, it is characterized by the presence of spherocytes anemia in peripheral lamina. Its pathophysiological defect is determined by some of the proteins that make up the red cell membrane due to the effect on erythrocytes of abnormal spleen, and other factors. In view of current knowledge, the dynamic interpretation of this process requires delving into the early stages of hematopoiesis, since the expression of this disease could modulate from early stages of erythroblast enucleation in reticulocyte formation until late potential inflammatory processes. A review was made on the structural and functional characteristics of the erythrocyte membrane, as well as some general

  14. Tissue Factor and Thrombin in Sickle Cell Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Chantrathammachart, Pichika; Pawlinski, Rafal

    2012-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is an inherited hematologic disorder associated with hemolytic and vaso-occlusive complications. An activation of coagulation is also a prominent feature of sickle cell anemia. Growing evidence indicates that coagulation may contribute to the inflammation and vascular injury in sickle cell anemia. This review focuses on tissue factor expression and its contribution to the activation of coagulation, thrombosis and vascular inflammation in sickle cell anemia.

  15. Diagnosis of Fanconi Anemia by Diepoxybutane Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auerbach, Arleen D.

    2015-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous disorder characterized by congenital malformations, progressive bone marrow failure, and predisposition to cancer, particularly hematological malignancies and solid tumors of the head and neck. The main role of FA proteins is in the repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs). FA results from pathogenic variants in at least 16 distinct genes, causing genomic instability. Although the highly variable phenotype makes accurate diagnosis on the basis of clinical manifestations difficult in some patients, diagnosis based on a profound sensitivity to DNA crosslinking agents can be used to identify the pre-anemia patient as well as patients with aplastic anemia or leukemia who may or may not have the physical stigmata associated with the syndrome. Diepoxybutane (DEB) analysis is the preferred test for FA because other agents have higher rates of false-positive and false-negative results. PMID:25827349

  16. Pediatric gastric ganglioneuroma presenting as anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrina M. Morgan

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Primary gastric masses are rare in childhood, and a gastric ganglioneuroma has not been reported in the pediatric population. In this report, we describe a 12-year-old female who presented with iron deficiency anemia and melena. Endoscopy was performed to elucidate the source of her symptoms, and revealed a gastric mass with overlying ulceration. Following resection and pathologic examination, the mass was diagnosed as a solitary polypoid ganglioneuroma. A solitary polypoid ganglioneuroma is an uncommon, benign tumor of neural crest cell origin. They are most often asymptomatic and found incidentally, but can present with rectal bleeding, obstruction, pain, and changes in bowel function. Complete resection is the therapy of choice to prevent progression of symptoms or rare transformation into a malignant neuroblastic tumor, like neuroblastoma. As of the patient's last post-operative appointment, she was healthy with resolution of her anemia. Keywords: Ganglioneuroma, Pediatric, Gastric mass, Anemia, Neuroblastic tumor

  17. Idiopathic Thrombocytopenia with Iron Deficiency Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramy Ibrahim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of anemia and thrombocytopenia as a result of uterine fibroid and adenomyosis, complicated by immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP. Symptoms were presented as menorrhagia and metrorrhagia in a 34-year-old African American woman, who was later treated with blood and platelet transfusion and iron therapy with steroids. Uterine fibroids are commonly found to cause hematologic disturbances such as anemia and reactive thrombocytosis and, less commonly, thrombocytopenia. Moreover, such hematologic disturbances are secondary to heavy and irregular uterine bleeding, which is typically presented. A previous uterine fibroid diagnosis was made and reconfirmed by pelvic and transvaginal ultrasound to exclude other locoregional pathologies. ITP was suggested by Coombs test and several other serologies, leading to confirmation via bone marrow biopsy. In a previous case study, we reported positive responses in hemotecrit and platelet count after the introduction of iron therapy to an iron-depleted middle-aged female presenting severe anemia and thrombocytopenia. 1

  18. Unexpected Anemia and Reticulocytopenia in an Adolescent With Sickle Cell Anemia Receiving Chronic Transfusion Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blauel, Emily R; Grossmann, Lily T; Vissa, Madhav; Miller, Scott T

    2015-10-01

    In a patient with sickle cell disease receiving chronic transfusion, exacerbation of anemia with reticulocytopenia must prompt consideration of a delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction with hyperhemolysis, as further transfusion may worsen this condition; definitive diagnosis is sometimes difficult. Anemia evolving during parvovirus B19-induced erythroid hypoplasia (transient aplastic crisis) should be attenuated in chronic transfusion patients due to superior survival of transfused over endogenous red blood cells. A 16-year-old with sickle cell disease receiving chronic transfusion of modified intensity (goal to maintain hemoglobin S<50%) who developed symptomatic anemia with reticulocytopenia was later shown to have had transient aplastic crisis.

  19. Assessment of anemia during CT pulmonary angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Caroline; Groth, Michael; Bley, Thorsten A.; Henes, Frank O.; Treszl, András; Adam, Gerhard; Bannas, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Anemia is associated with increased mortality in patients with acute symptomatic pulmonary embolism (PE). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of Hounsfield unit (HU) measurements on the single unenhanced trigger slice of pulmonary CT angiography scans for diagnosis of anemia. Material and Methods: 150 consecutive patients (median age 64 ± 16 years) with suspected PE underwent pulmonary CT angiography. Two radiologists, blinded to laboratory results, performed HU measurements in the single unenhanced trigger scan independently by region-based analysis (ROI). HU values from ascending and descending aorta and the calculated mean of both were correlated with serum hemoglobin levels. Inter- and intraobserver variability was determined for HU measurements, and ROC analysis was performed for diagnosis of anemia. Calculated linear models were used to assess formulas for estimation of hemoglobin levels from HU measurements. Results: HU measurements revealed high intra- and interrater reliability (ICC > 0.981 and ICC > 0.965, respectively). Calculated mean HU values showed a strong correlation with serum hemoglobin levels (r = 0.734), which allowed generation of different formulas for calculation of hemoglobin levels from HU measurements. ROC analyses confirmed a high sensitivity (80.4 for men; 91.3 for women) and specificity (84.0 for men; 84.9 for women) for diagnosing anemia. Conclusion: Diagnosis of anemia and quantification of hemoglobin levels upon a single unenhanced trigger scan of pulmonary CT angiography is feasible. We suggest disclosing the anemic state in the radiological report, independent of the presence of PE, since anemia carries increased risks of morbidity and mortality.

  20. Assessment of anemia during CT pulmonary angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Caroline, E-mail: cjung@uke.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Eppendorf, Martinistrasse 52, 20246 Hamburg (Germany); Groth, Michael; Bley, Thorsten A.; Henes, Frank O. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Eppendorf, Martinistrasse 52, 20246 Hamburg (Germany); Treszl, András [Department of Medical Biometry and Epidemiology, University Hospital Eppendorf, Martinistrasse 52, 20246 Hamburg (Germany); Adam, Gerhard; Bannas, Peter [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Eppendorf, Martinistrasse 52, 20246 Hamburg (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    Objectives: Anemia is associated with increased mortality in patients with acute symptomatic pulmonary embolism (PE). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of Hounsfield unit (HU) measurements on the single unenhanced trigger slice of pulmonary CT angiography scans for diagnosis of anemia. Material and Methods: 150 consecutive patients (median age 64 ± 16 years) with suspected PE underwent pulmonary CT angiography. Two radiologists, blinded to laboratory results, performed HU measurements in the single unenhanced trigger scan independently by region-based analysis (ROI). HU values from ascending and descending aorta and the calculated mean of both were correlated with serum hemoglobin levels. Inter- and intraobserver variability was determined for HU measurements, and ROC analysis was performed for diagnosis of anemia. Calculated linear models were used to assess formulas for estimation of hemoglobin levels from HU measurements. Results: HU measurements revealed high intra- and interrater reliability (ICC > 0.981 and ICC > 0.965, respectively). Calculated mean HU values showed a strong correlation with serum hemoglobin levels (r = 0.734), which allowed generation of different formulas for calculation of hemoglobin levels from HU measurements. ROC analyses confirmed a high sensitivity (80.4 for men; 91.3 for women) and specificity (84.0 for men; 84.9 for women) for diagnosing anemia. Conclusion: Diagnosis of anemia and quantification of hemoglobin levels upon a single unenhanced trigger scan of pulmonary CT angiography is feasible. We suggest disclosing the anemic state in the radiological report, independent of the presence of PE, since anemia carries increased risks of morbidity and mortality.