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Sample records for hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

  1. Dysphonia and vocal fold telangiectasia in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    Chang, Joseph; Yung, Katherine C

    2014-11-01

    This case report is the first documentation of dysphonia and vocal fold telangiectasia as a complication of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Case report of a 40-year-old man with HHT presenting with 2 years of worsening hoarseness. Hoarseness corresponded with a period of anticoagulation. Endoscopy revealed vocal fold scarring, vocal fold telangiectasias, and plica ventricular is suggestive of previous submucosal vocal fold hemorrhage and subsequent counterproductive compensation with ventricular phonation. Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia may present as dysphonia with vocal fold telangiectasias and place patients at risk of vocal fold hemorrhage. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. Imaging of Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    Carette, Marie-France; Nedelcu, Cosmina; Tassart, Marc; Grange, Jean-Didier; Wislez, Marie; Khalil, Antoine

    2009-01-01

    This pictorial review is based on our experience of the follow-up of 120 patients at our multidisciplinary center for hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Rendu-Osler-Weber disease or HHT is a multiorgan autosomal dominant disorder with high penetrance, characterized by epistaxis, mucocutaneous telangiectasis, and visceral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). The research on gene mutations is fundamental and family screening by clinical examination, chest X-ray, research of pulmonary shunting, and abdominal color Doppler sonography is absolutely necessary. The angioarchitecture of pulmonary AVMs can be studied by unenhanced multidetector computed tomography; however, all other explorations of liver, digestive bowels, or brain require administration of contrast media. Magnetic resonance angiography is helpful for central nervous system screening, in particular for the spinal cord, but also for pulmonary, hepatic, and pelvic AVMs. Knowledge of the multiorgan involvement of HHT, mechanism of complications, and radiologic findings is fundamental for the correct management of these patients.

  3. Splenic Involvement in Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    Susumu Takamatsu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 33-year-old man who presented with prolonged epigastric pain was referred to our hospital. He had experienced recurrent epistaxis and had a family history of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed splenomegaly and a 9 cm hypervascular mass in his spleen. Computed tomography also showed a pulmonary arteriovenous malformation and heterogeneous enhancement of the liver parenchyma, suggesting the presence of arteriosystemic shunts and telangiectases. Based on these findings, the patient was definitely diagnosed with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia according to Curaçao criteria. He underwent splenectomy, and his symptoms disappeared after surgery. Pathological examination of the resected specimen revealed that the hypervascular lesion of the spleen was not a tumor but was composed of abnormal vessels associated with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. Symptomatic splenic involvement may be a rare manifestation of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia but can be revealed by imaging modalities.

  4. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    ... Central OMIM: JUVENILE POLYPOSIS/HEREDITARY HEMORRHAGIC TELANGIECTASIA SYNDROME McDonald J, Bayrak-Toydemir P, Pyeritz RE. Hereditary hemorrhagic ... 10.1097/GIM.0b013e3182136d32. Review. Citation on PubMed McDonald J, Wooderchak-Donahue W, VanSant Webb C, Whitehead ...

  5. Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia clinical and molecular genetics

    Letteboer, T.G.W.

    2010-01-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) or Rendu-Osler-Weber (ROW) syndrome is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by vascular malformations in multiple organ systems. HHT has an age-related penetrance and variable clinical expression. The clinical symptoms are caused by direct

  6. Brain abscesses and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    Vives, Daniel A.; Bauni, Carlos E.; Mendoza, Monica E.

    2003-01-01

    Rendu-Osler-Weber disease or Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT) is a generalized familial angiodysplastic disorder. The neurological manifestations of this entity are due to Central Nervous System vascular lesions or to complications of other visceral lesions such as pulmonary arteriovenous fistulae. This report describes two patients (males, 40 and 61 years old), with brain abscesses associated with HHT. The CT, MRI and Angiographic findings as well as the therapeutic approach are analyzed. Patients with brain abscess of unknown origin must be evaluated for the presence of lung vascular malformation in association with HHT. (author)

  7. CLINICAL APPROACH TO HEREDITARY HEMORRHAGIC TELANGIECTASIA

    Mary Hachmeriyan

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT or Rendu-Osler-Weber disease is a rare syndrome, inherited as an autosomal dominant trait with incidence of 1/10000. The clinical manifestations are due to vascular malformations and predisposition to hemorrhages in different organs, the leading symptom being recurrent epistaxis. If diagnosed with HHT, the patient and his relatives and especially children have to be screened for occult vascular malformations.Case report: A 30 years old woman was treated for cerebral stroke, epistaxis, anemia, arterio-venous malformations for over 6 months. Only at this point she was diagnosed with HHT, after noticing the typical mucosal changes. Focused family history revealed symptoms of HHT in her only child, her father, aunt and two cousins The child was screened for occult vascular malformations – attainment of the nasal mucosa, lungs, gastrointestinal system, liver and brain. Pulmonary and gastrointestinal arterio-venous malformations were proven.Conclusion: Any case of recurrent epistaxis should be evaluated for HHT. After confirmation of the diagnosis every patient and close relatives have to be screened for attainment of other organs and followed up in order to prevent severe life threatening complications.

  8. Gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    Kjeldsen, A D; Kjeldsen, J

    2000-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding occurs in a number of patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) and may lead to a high transfusion need. The aim of this study was to estimate the occurrence and severity of gastrointestinal bleeding in a geographically well defined HHT population....

  9. [Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia presenting with hematuria and severe anemia].

    Paz, A; Goren, E; Segal, M

    1995-07-01

    A patient with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia was admitted with hematuria and severe anemia after mild recurrent episodes of epistaxis. Telangiectasias were found in the skin and buccal and nasal mucosa. No defect in the coagulation mechanism was found; thrombocyte count and function were normal. On cystoscopy, tortuous engorged vessels, some actively bleeding, were seen in the trigonal mucosa. Biopsy showed enlarged vessels in the lamina propria. Electrocoagulation of the bleeding vessels stopped hematuria, but 6 months later it recurred. This time Nd-YAG laser was used to stop the bleeding after electrocoagulation was ineffective.

  10. Treatment of Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia-Related Epistaxis.

    Sautter, Nathan B; Smith, Timothy L

    2016-06-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an autosomal dominant disease with an incidence of 1:5000. Recurrent, spontaneous epistaxis is the most common presenting symptom. Severity of epistaxis varies widely, from mild, self-limited nosebleeds to severe, life-threatening nasal hemorrhage. Treatment of HHT-related epistaxis presents a challenge to the otolaryngologist due to the recurrent, persistent nature of epistaxis often requiring multiple treatments. Treatment modalities range from conservative topical therapies to more aggressive surgical treatments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Efficiency of laser treatment in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    Jørgensen, Gita; Lange, Bibi; Wanscher, Jens Højberg

    2011-01-01

    Earlier studies have shown the effect of laser treatment on epistaxis in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). At the present time, only very few prospective trials have been performed, and many studies are based on patients' subjective assessment of the severity of epistaxis....... This prospective study measures the objective effect of laser treatment in HHT patients with mild to moderate epistaxis. We introduce an objective measure to assess the severity of epistaxis: the bleeding time (BT). Before and after treatment, the quality of life, as measured by the patient, was assessed...

  12. Defective fluid shear stress mechanotransduction mediates hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    Baeyens, Nicolas; Larrivée, Bruno; Ola, Roxana; Hayward-Piatkowskyi, Brielle; Dubrac, Alexandre; Huang, Billy; Ross, Tyler D.; Coon, Brian G.; Min, Elizabeth; Tsarfati, Maya; Tong, Haibin; Eichmann, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Morphogenesis of the vascular system is strongly modulated by mechanical forces from blood flow. Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an inherited autosomal-dominant disease in which arteriovenous malformations and telangiectasias accumulate with age. Most cases are linked to heterozygous mutations in Alk1 or Endoglin, receptors for bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) 9 and 10. Evidence suggests that a second hit results in clonal expansion of endothelial cells to form lesions with poor mural cell coverage that spontaneously rupture and bleed. We now report that fluid shear stress potentiates BMPs to activate Alk1 signaling, which correlates with enhanced association of Alk1 and endoglin. Alk1 is required for BMP9 and flow responses, whereas endoglin is only required for enhancement by flow. This pathway mediates both inhibition of endothelial proliferation and recruitment of mural cells; thus, its loss blocks flow-induced vascular stabilization. Identification of Alk1 signaling as a convergence point for flow and soluble ligands provides a molecular mechanism for development of HHT lesions. PMID:27646277

  13. An evaluation of the severity and progression of epistaxis in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia 1 versus hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia 2.

    Hunter, Benjamin N; Timmins, Benjamin H; McDonald, Jamie; Whitehead, Kevin J; Ward, P Daniel; Wilson, Kevin F

    2016-04-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an autosomal dominant vascular dysplasia whose hallmark symptom is spontaneous recurrent epistaxis. Two major genetic subtypes of this syndrome are HHT1 and HHT2. Severity of epistaxis ranges from occasional low-volume bleeding to frequent large-volume hemorrhage. This study evaluated the severity and progression of epistaxis in HHT1 versus HHT2. Retrospective cohort study. A retrospective chart review was performed for 183 genotyped HHT patients seen at our center from 2010 to 2013. Data collected included epistaxis severity score (ESS), age of epistaxis onset, number and type of treatments, age at which treatments were sought, complete blood count values, ferritin, number of telangiectases, blood transfusions, iron therapy history, and patient demographics. 115 subjects with HHT2 were compared to 68 with HHT1. Subjects with HHT2 had a higher ESS compared to HHT1 (P = .043) and a later age of onset of epistaxis (P = .005). HHT2 subjects were more likely to use oral iron (P = .032) and were more likely to seek interventions to control their epistaxis (P = .029). HHT2 is associated with more severe epistaxis and a subsequent higher rate of interventions, requiring more aggressive therapy as compared to HHT1. 4. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  14. An epistaxis severity score for hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    Hoag, Jeffrey B; Terry, Peter; Mitchell, Sally; Reh, Douglas; Merlo, Christian A

    2010-04-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT)-related epistaxis leads to alterations in social functioning and quality of life. Although more than 95% experience epistaxis, there is considerable variability of severity. Because no standardized method exists to measure epistaxis severity, the purpose of this study was to determine factors associated with patient-reported severity to develop a severity score. Prospective, survey-based study. HHT care providers and a focus group of patients were interviewed to determine epistaxis-associated factors. From this, an electronic survey was developed and administered to patients with HHT. Descriptive analyses were performed with calculations of means and medians for continuous and proportions for categorical variables. Multiple ordinal logistic and linear regression models were developed to determine risk factors for epistaxis severity. Nine hundred respondents from 21 countries were included. Eight hundred fifty-five (95%) subjects reported epistaxis. The mean (standard deviation) age was 52.1 (13.9) years, and 61.4% were female. Independently associated risk factors for self-reported epistaxis severity included epistaxis frequency (odds ratio [OR] 1.57), duration (OR 2.17), intensity (OR 2.45), need for transfusion (OR 2.74), anemia (OR 1.44), and aggressiveness of treatment required (OR 1.53, P epistaxis severity in patients with HHT include frequency, duration, and intensity of episodes; invasiveness of prior therapy required to stop epistaxis; anemia; and the need for blood transfusion. From these factors, an epistaxis severity score will be presented.

  15. Splenic arteriovenous malformation manifested by thrombocytopenia in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia: a case report

    Kwon, Hee Jin; Choi, Jong Cheol; Oh, Jong Yeong; Cho, Jin Han; Kang, Myong Jin; Lee, Jin Hwa; Yoon, Seong Kuk; Nam, Kyeong Jin [College of Medicine, Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-09-15

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an autosomal dominant inherited disease characterized by epistaxis, telangiectases and visceral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). The involvement of the gastrointestinal tract, liver, lung and cerebrum for HHT has been described, whereas little is known about AVMs of the spleen. We report here the radiological findings of a case of a splenic AVM manifested by thrombocytopenia in HHT.

  16. Splenic arteriovenous malformation manifested by thrombocytopenia in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia: a case report

    Kwon, Hee Jin; Choi, Jong Cheol; Oh, Jong Yeong; Cho, Jin Han; Kang, Myong Jin; Lee, Jin Hwa; Yoon, Seong Kuk; Nam, Kyeong Jin

    2008-01-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an autosomal dominant inherited disease characterized by epistaxis, telangiectases and visceral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). The involvement of the gastrointestinal tract, liver, lung and cerebrum for HHT has been described, whereas little is known about AVMs of the spleen. We report here the radiological findings of a case of a splenic AVM manifested by thrombocytopenia in HHT

  17. Diagnostic criteria for hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome)

    Shovlin, C L; Guttmacher, A E; Buscarini, E

    2000-01-01

    Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT) is easily recognized in individuals displaying the classical triad of epistaxis, telangiectasia, and a suitable family history, but the disease is more difficult to diagnosis in many patients. Serious consequences may result if visceral arteriovenous ma...... in this disorder. These criteria may be refined as molecular diagnostic tests become available in the next few years....... of the HHT Foundation International, Inc., we present consensus clinical diagnostic criteria. The four criteria (epistaxes, telangiectasia, visceral lesions and an appropriate family history) are carefully delineated. The HHT diagnosis is definite if three criteria are present. A diagnosis of HHT cannot...

  18. Dyspnea with anemia turned out to be a case of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    Amitabha Sengupta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT is a rare autosomal dominant inherited disorder of the vascular system. It can be asymptomatic but when symptomatic most common presentation being epistaxis. It can involve any organs of the body like lungs, skin, liver brain, GI mucosa etc. We are reporting a case of HHT presented to us with dyspnea and severe anemia. He had arteriovenous malformations of different visceral organs and telangiectasia of skin along with presence of similar history in first-degree relatives.

  19. Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia: genetics and molecular diagnostics in a new era

    Jamie eMcDonald

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT is a vascular dysplasia characterized by telangiectases and arteriovenous malformations (AVMs in particular locations described in consensus clinical diagnostic criteria published in 2000. Two genes in the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β signaling pathway, ENG and ACVRL1, were discovered almost two decades ago, and mutations in these genes have been reported to cause up to 85% of HHT. In our experience, approximately 96% of individuals with HHT have a mutation in these two genes, when published (Curaçao diagnostic criteria for HHT are strictly applied. More recently, two additional genes in the same pathway, SMAD4 and GDF2, have been identified in a much smaller number of patients with a similar or overlapping phenotype to HHT. Yet families still exist with compelling evidence of a hereditary telangiectasia disorder, but no identifiable mutation in a known gene. Recent availability of whole exome and genome testing has created new opportunities to facilitate gene discovery, identify genetic modifiers to explain clinical variability, and potentially define an increased spectrum of hereditary telangiectasia disorders. An expanded approach to molecular diagnostics for inherited telangiectasia disorders that incorporates a multi-gene next generation sequencing (NGS HHT panel is proposed.

  20. Hemorrhage-Adjusted Iron Requirements, Hematinics and Hepcidin Define Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia as a Model of Hemorrhagic Iron Deficiency

    Finnamore, Helen; Le Couteur, James; Hickson, Mary; Busbridge, Mark; Whelan, Kevin; Shovlin, Claire L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Iron deficiency anemia remains a major global health problem. Higher iron demands provide the potential for a targeted preventative approach before anemia develops. The primary study objective was to develop and validate a metric that stratifies recommended dietary iron intake to compensate for patient-specific non-menstrual hemorrhagic losses. The secondary objective was to examine whether iron deficiency can be attributed to under-replacement of epistaxis (nosebleed) hemorrhagic iron losses in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Methodology/Principal Findings The hemorrhage adjusted iron requirement (HAIR) sums the recommended dietary allowance, and iron required to replace additional quantified hemorrhagic losses, based on the pre-menopausal increment to compensate for menstrual losses (formula provided). In a study population of 50 HHT patients completing concurrent dietary and nosebleed questionnaires, 43/50 (86%) met their recommended dietary allowance, but only 10/50 (20%) met their HAIR. Higher HAIR was a powerful predictor of lower hemoglobin (p = 0.009), lower mean corpuscular hemoglobin content (pstopped. Conclusions/significance HAIR values, providing an indication of individuals’ iron requirements, may be a useful tool in prevention, assessment and management of iron deficiency. Iron deficiency in HHT can be explained by under-replacement of nosebleed hemorrhagic iron losses. PMID:24146883

  1. Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia Presenting as High Output Cardiac Failure during Pregnancy

    Tareq Goussous

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available High-output cardiac failure secondary to hepatic involvement is a rare complication of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT. Here we report a 43-year-old woman who presented at 29 weeks gestation of her second pregnancy with complications of right-sided heart failure and preterm labor. After delivery via cesarean section, the patient was found to have intrahepatic arteriovenous malformations through non-invasive imaging. Subsequently, a family history of vascular malformations and epistaxis was elucidated and a diagnosis of HHT was made. This case is presented, along with a review of the literature and discussion of hepatic involvement in HHT with particular focus on the pregnant patient.

  2. Hemorrhage-adjusted iron requirements, hematinics and hepcidin define hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia as a model of hemorrhagic iron deficiency.

    Helen Finnamore

    Full Text Available Iron deficiency anemia remains a major global health problem. Higher iron demands provide the potential for a targeted preventative approach before anemia develops. The primary study objective was to develop and validate a metric that stratifies recommended dietary iron intake to compensate for patient-specific non-menstrual hemorrhagic losses. The secondary objective was to examine whether iron deficiency can be attributed to under-replacement of epistaxis (nosebleed hemorrhagic iron losses in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT.The hemorrhage adjusted iron requirement (HAIR sums the recommended dietary allowance, and iron required to replace additional quantified hemorrhagic losses, based on the pre-menopausal increment to compensate for menstrual losses (formula provided. In a study population of 50 HHT patients completing concurrent dietary and nosebleed questionnaires, 43/50 (86% met their recommended dietary allowance, but only 10/50 (20% met their HAIR. Higher HAIR was a powerful predictor of lower hemoglobin (p = 0.009, lower mean corpuscular hemoglobin content (p<0.001, lower log-transformed serum iron (p = 0.009, and higher log-transformed red cell distribution width (p<0.001. There was no evidence of generalised abnormalities in iron handling Ferritin and ferritin(2 explained 60% of the hepcidin variance (p<0.001, and the mean hepcidinferritin ratio was similar to reported controls. Iron supplement use increased the proportion of individuals meeting their HAIR, and blunted associations between HAIR and hematinic indices. Once adjusted for supplement use however, reciprocal relationships between HAIR and hemoglobin/serum iron persisted. Of 568 individuals using iron tablets, most reported problems completing the course. For patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, persistent anemia was reported three-times more frequently if iron tablets caused diarrhea or needed to be stopped.HAIR values, providing an indication of

  3. Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia and pregnancy: potential adverse events and pregnancy outcomes

    Bari O

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Omar Bari,1 Philip R Cohen2 1School of Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA; 2Department of Dermatology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA Abstract: Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT is an autosomal dominant condition with a prevalence of ~1 in 5,000 individuals. The pathophysiology of this condition centers on the lack of capillary beds between arterioles and venules, leading to direct contact between these vessels. This results in telangiectases on characteristic locations such as the face, fingers, mouth, and nasal mucosa. Visceral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs are also observed in many patients, and these are most commonly seen in the brain, gastrointestinal tract, and lungs. Liver AVMs are present in many patients with HHT, though these individuals are usually asymptomatic; however, liver AVMs may lead to serious complications, such as high output cardiac failure. Diagnosis of HHT hinges upon fulfilling three out of four criteria: family history of the condition, mucocutaneous telangiectases, spontaneous and recurrent episodes of epistaxis, and visceral AVMs. Management is guided by international consensus guidelines and targets patients’ specific AVMs. Prognosis is good, though severe complications including hemorrhage and paradoxical emboli are possible. Novel therapeutics are being explored in clinical trials; bevacizumab and pazopanib inhibit angiogenesis, while thalidomide bolsters blood vessel maturation. Pregnancy in patients with HHT is considered high risk. While the majority of pregnancies proceed normally, severe complications have been reported in some women with HHT; these include heart failure, intracranial hemorrhage, pulmonary hemorrhage, and stroke. Such complications occur most often in the second and third trimesters when maternal changes such as peripheral vasodilation and increased cardiac output are at their maximum. Awareness of the diagnosis of HHT has

  4. Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia

    Kjeldsen, A D; Vase, P; Green, A

    1999-01-01

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a dominantly inherited disease characterized by telangiectatic lesions. The disease manifestations are variable and include epistaxis, gastrointestinal bleeding, pulmonary arteriovenous malformations and cerebral arteriovenous malformations. Early...

  5. Pregnancy and mesenchimal dysplasias (Marfan syndrome, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia).

    Radetskaya, L S; Makatsariya, A D; Bitsadze, V O; Khizroeva, J K

    2018-07-01

    The objective of this article is to attract the attention of clinical physicians to the rare but extremely relevant clinical pathology of mesenchymal dysplasias (Marfan syndrome, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia) and especially specific characteristics of such diseases during pregnancy. Connective tissue pathology can cover different organs and systems, symptoms of the same disease can vary in different patients thus making diagnostics significantly difficult. Here clinical diagnostic criteria and methods of molecular diagnostics of diseases are described. The pathogenesis of mesenchymal dysplasias is not currently well understood. For the patients with mesenchymal dysplasias pregnancy is fraught with high risk of life-threatening complications. The preferred delivery method for such patients is caesarean section.

  6. The brain in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia with pulmonary AVM: The clinical importance of paradoxical embolism

    Kim, W.S.; Kinnison, M.L.; Charnas, L.; Rosenbaum, A.E.; White, R.I. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Despite the literature's emphasis on the presence of intracerebral vascular malformations in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT), few cases have been documented. The authors prospectively evaluated brain CT scans in 29 consecutive patients with pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) and known HHT. Fifty-five percent of the CT scans revealed the signs of embolic phenomena: infarctions (n=11) and intracerebral abscesses (n=5). In only one patient was a small enhancing vascular lesion seen. They conclude that embolic phenomena rather than vascular malformations cause the majority of abnormal CT findings in patients with HHT and pulmonary AVMs. Infarctions and intracerebral abscesses probably result from paradoxical embolization through the AVMs in the lungs. The therapeutic implications seem clear, since 55% of these patients are potentially treatable by balloon occlusion of the pulmonary AVMs

  7. Embolotherapy for pulmonary arteriovenous malformations in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome)

    Andersen, P E; Kjeldsen, A D; Oxhøj, H

    1998-01-01

    experienced an improved functional level. One patient experienced severe pleurisy and another a rise in temperature following treatment, but otherwise no symptomatic complications were observed. CONCLUSION: Embolotherapy is a definitive treatment for PAVMs: it is very effective with a high success rate......PURPOSE: To evaluate the clinical results of embolization of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT), the Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twelve patients in the county of Fyn, Denmark, were treated...... with transcatheter embolization of 20 PAVMs using 12 detachable silicone balloons and 26 steel coils. RESULTS: All PAVMs were completely occluded and we observed a significant rise in PaO2 after treatment and a significant decrease in right-to-left shunt estimated by contrast echocardiography. All patients...

  8. Allelic Dropout in the ENG Gene, Affecting the Results of Genetic Testing in Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    Tørring, Pernille M; Kjeldsen, A.D.; Ousager, L.B.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an autosomal-dominant vascular disorder with three disease-causing genes identified to date: ENG, ACVRL1, and SMAD4. We report an HHT patient with allelic dropout that on routine sequence analysis for a known mutation in the family (c.817......-3T>G in ENG) initially seemed to be homozygous for the mutation. Aim: To explore the possibility of allelic dropout causing a false result in this patient. Methods: Mutation analysis of additional family members was performed and haplotype analysis carried out. New primers were designed to reveal...... the presence of a possible sequence variant, which could explain the presumed allelic dropout. Results: Allelic dropout caused by a six-nucleotide duplication close to the standard reverse primer was the assumed cause of a false homozygous diagnosis. Conclusion: Sequence variants outside of the primer regions...

  9. Intranasal topical estrogen in the management of epistaxis in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    Minami, Kazuhiko; Haji, Tomoyuki

    2016-01-01

    Application of topical estriol ointment is an effective treatment for hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) epistaxis. HHT is an autosomal-dominant disease characterized by epistaxis in more than 96% of patients. Management of this major symptom, epistaxis, has not been standardized. This study reports experience with topical application of estriol in patients with HHT. Five patients with a confirmed diagnosis of HHT who first visited the hospital between 2012 and 2013 received 0.1% estriol ointment and were guided to apply the ointment twice daily to the anterior part of both nasal cavities. Severity of epistaxis was valued using epistaxis severity score (ESS) before and 3 months after initiating therapy. Five patients (three males, two females) received treatment. After the initiation of treatment, intensity and frequency of epistaxis became moderate in all patients. ESS decreased significantly from pre- to post-treatment (p = 0.043). No adverse events were recorded during follow-up.

  10. [Mutations of ACVRL1 gene in a pedigree with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia].

    Luo, Jie-wei; Chen, Hui; Yang, Liu-qing; Zhu, Ai-lan; Wu, Yan-an; Li, Jian-wei

    2008-06-01

    To identify the activin A receptor type II-like 1 gene (ACVRL1) mutations in a Chinese family with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT2). The exons 3, 7 and 8 of ACVRL1 gene of the proband and her five family members were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and the PCR products were sequenced. The proband had obvious telangiectasis of gastric mucosa, and small arteriovenous fistula in the right kidney. All the patients in the HHT2 family had iterative epistaxis or bleeding in other sites, and had telangiectasis of nasal mucosa, tunica mucosa oris and finger tips. ACVRL1 gene analysis confirmed that there is frameshift mutation caused by deletion of G145 in exon 3 in the 4 patients, but the mutation is absent in 2 members without HHT2. The HHT2 family is caused by a 145delG mutation of ACVRL1 gene, resulting in frameshift and a new stop codon at codon 53.

  11. Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia with bilateral pulmonary vascular malformations: A case report

    Lončarević Olivera

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT also known as Osler-Weber-Rendu syndrome is an autosomal dominant disease that occurs due to vascular dysplasia associated with the disorder in the signaling pathway of transforming growth factor β (TGF-β. The clinical consequence is a disorder of blood vessels in multiple organ systems with the existence of telangiectasia which causes dilation of capillaries and veins, are present from birth and are localized on the skin and mucosa of the mouth, respiratory, gastrointestinal and urinary tract. They can make a rupture with consequent serious bleeding that can end up with fatal outcome. Since there is a disruption of blood vessels of more than one organic system, the diagnosis is very complex and requires a multidisciplinary approach. Case report. We reported a 40-year-old female patient with a long-time evolution of problems, who was diagnosed and treated at the Clinic for Lung Diseases of the Military Medical Academy in Belgrade, Serbia, because of bilaterally pulmonary arteriovenous malformations associated with HHT. Embolization was performed in two acts, followed with normalization of clinical, radiological and functional findings with the cessation of hemoptysis, effort intolerance with a significant improvement of the quality of life. Conclusion. HHT is a rare dominant inherited multisystem disease that requires multidisciplinary approach to diagnosis and treatment. Embolization is the method of choice in the treatment of arteriovenous malformations with minor adverse effects and very satisfying therapeutic effect.

  12. Nasal closure for the treatment of epistaxis secondary to hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    Sena Esteves, Sara; Cardoso, Carla; Silva, Ana; Abrunhosa, José; Almeida E Sousa, Cecília

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT), also known by the eponym Osler-Weber-Rendu syndrome, is an autosomal dominant disorder characterised by the presence of multiple arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) affecting multiple organs. Many procedures have been used for epistaxis control in patients with this disorder. The objective of this study was to report the treatment of severe HHT-related epistaxiswith the modified Young's procedure. We describe the treatment of 4 patients with severe blood-transfusion-dependent epistaxis who underwent a modified Young's procedure in a tertiary hospital. The nasal closure was bilateral and complete in all cases. All patients were followed for 12 months or longer. The procedure was well tolerated and complete cessation of bleeding was achieved in all the patients. Young's technique is a safe surgical procedure, well tolerated by patients with severe epistaxis and HHT. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. All rights reserved.

  13. Prospective randomized trial of sclerotherapy vs standard treatment for epistaxis due to hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    Boyer, Holly; Fernandes, Patricia; Le, Chap; Yueh, Bevan

    2015-05-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated the tolerability and low side-effect profile of office-based sclerotherapy with sodium tetradecyl sulfate (STS) for treating recurrent epistaxis due to hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). The objective of this study was to use a prospective randomized trial to determine the effectiveness of sclerotherapy with STS vs standard treatment. This prospective randomized trial (conducted from November 1, 2011, through January 31, 2014) involved 17 patients with recurrent epistaxis due to HHT. We defined standard treatment as continuation of any treatment that the patient had previously undergone, such as moisturization, packing, and cautery. We used a crossover design, so study participants were randomized to either sclerotherapy or standard treatment during the first time period, and then to the other during the second period. The primary outcome measure was frequency and severity of epistaxis, as measured by the epistaxis severity score (ESS). The ESS is a 10-point scale, with higher scores corresponding to more bleeding. After controlling for treatment order, bleeding was substantially better controlled after sclerotherapy; the ESS after sclerotherapy was nearly one point lower than after standard treatment (-0.95, 1-sided p = 0.027). Treatment order, baseline ESS, the number of lesions, moisturization practices, and a history of previous blood transfusions did not significantly affect the results. This trial demonstrated that sclerotherapy with STS (vs standard treatment) significantly reduced epistaxis due to HHT. © 2015 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  14. Thalidomide for Epistaxis in Patients with Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia: A Preliminary Study.

    Fang, Jia; Chen, Xiaomeng; Zhu, Bijun; Ye, Haibo; Zhang, Weitian; Guan, Jian; Su, Kaiming

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of thalidomide for epistaxis in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT), 7 HHT patients with recurrent epistaxis were treated with thalidomide at an initial dose of 50 mg/d, gradually increasing to 100 mg/d if needed. The Epistaxis Severity Score (ESS) was used to evaluate the treatment effects. Patients reported that epistaxis improved 1 to 3 weeks after starting thalidomide. The mean ESS before treatment, at the end of treatment, and 3 months after stopping treatment was 5.03 ± 2.05, 0.90 ± 0.84 ( P = .003), and 1.98 ± 1.33 ( P = .006), respectively. Four patients reported mild to moderate side effects, including drowsiness, dizziness, constipation, nausea, and peripheral neuropathy. Two patients stopped the treatment because of adverse effects. Those results showed that thalidomide may be a treatment choice for recurrent epistaxis in HHT patients, although the side effects should be considered. Further study should focus on guidelines for dosing and course and investigate how to reduce the adverse effects.

  15. Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia in children: endovascular treatment of neurovascular malformations. Results in 31 patients

    Krings, T.; Chng, S.M.; Ozanne, A.; Alvarez, H.; Lasjaunias, P.L.; Rodesch, G.

    2005-01-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a heterogeneous disease that can present with a variety of clinical manifestations. The neurovascular complications of this disease, especially in children, may be potentially devastating. The purpose of this article was to review the therapeutic results of endovascular treatment of neurovascular malformations in children. A total of 31 patients under the age of 16 were included in this retrospective analysis. All children were treated in a single center. Twenty children presented with 28 arteriovenous (AV) fistulae, including seven children with spinal AV fistulae and 14 children with cerebral AV fistulae (one child had both a spinal and cerebral fistulae). Eleven children had small nidus-type AV malformations. All embolizations were performed employing superselective glue injection. Follow-up ranged between 3 and 168 months (mean 66 months). A total of 115 feeding vessels were embolized in 81 single sessions, resulting in a mean overall occlusion rate of the malformation of 77.4% (ranging from 30 to 100%). Two of 31 patients (6.5%) died as a direct complication of the embolization procedure; two patients (6.5%) had a persistent new neurological deficit; eight patients (26.7%) were clinically unchanged following the procedure; in 13 patients (41.9%) an amelioration of symptoms but no cure could be achieved; and six patients (19.4%) were completely asymptomatic following the endovascular procedure. (orig.)

  16. The effect of bevacizumab (Avastin) treatment on epistaxis in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    Simonds, Jana; Miller, Frank; Mandel, Jess; Davidson, Terence M

    2009-05-01

    Determine the effectiveness of treating epistaxis in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) with potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP) laser cautery combined with submucosal injection of 100 mg of bevacizumab. Retrospective pilot study. Bevacizumab was injected throughout the nasal cavity following KTP laser treatment in 10 patients (bevacizumab/KTP group) and compared to nine patients previously treated with KTP laser alone (KTP group). Epistaxis frequency and severity, blood transfusion requirement, intravenous iron supplementation, emergency department visit frequency, and quality of life within 1 month and 1 year pre- and postsurgery were analyzed. Benefit was defined as less than three nosebleeds per week, with less than 10 minutes to stop each nosebleed, and no blood transfusions. The pre- and postsurgery data were analyzed within and between the two groups. The groups were comparable in age and gender. Significant benefit was found in frequency of epistaxis (P epistaxis is superior to KTP laser treatment alone. It significantly decreases frequency and severity of nosebleeds and blood transfusion requirements, and significantly improves work ability and quality of life.

  17. Are patients with severe epistaxis caused by hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia satisfied with nostril closure surgery?

    Ichimura, Keiichi; Kikuchi, Hisashi; Imayoshi, Shoichiro; Yamauchi, Tomohiko; Ishikawa, Kotaro

    2012-02-01

    Recurrent epistaxis as a manifestation of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is usually difficult to control. Although no treatment is regarded to be completely efficacious, nostril closure is considered a modality of choice for the most severe cases. The cessation of airflow resulting from this procedure can stop bleeding by minimizing risk factors. However, loss of nasal functions is a disadvantage of nostril closure. We conducted a questionnaire survey of patients who underwent nostril closure surgery, regarding the effects and disadvantages of the operation. Seven patients were asked questions on issues including frequency and severity of epistaxis pre- and post-operatively, satisfaction of treatment, and impairment in daily living activities. Most patients reported complete cessation of bleeding. Some still had bleeding, but the frequency and severity were far lower. No transfusions were required in any of the cases. Patients reported some disadvantages, for example, respiratory, olfactory, and phonatory issues. Six out of seven patients were very satisfied with the outcome of surgery. Nostril closure surgery can remarkably reduce frequency and volume of epistaxis. Our survey indicated that satisfactory results were achieved. However, difficulties caused by complete nasal obstruction varied. Thus, individualized coping strategies are required. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Recurrent gastrointestinal hemorrhage in treatment with dasatinib in a patient showing SMAD4 mutation with acute lymphoblastic leukemia Philadelphia positive and juvenile polyposis hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia syndrome

    Chiara Sartor

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a patient affected by juvenile polyposis and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia linked to a SMAD4 mutation who developed acute lymphoblastic leukemia positive for the Philadelphia chromosome translocation and with a complex karyotype. During the treatment with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor dasatinib the patient presented recurrent severe gastrointestinal hemorrhages linked to the genetic background and aggravated by thrombocytopenia.

  19. Emerging roles of BMP9 and BMP10 in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    Emmanuelle eTillet

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome, also known as hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT, is an autosomal dominant vascular disorder. Three genes are causally related to HHT: the ENG gene encoding endoglin, a co-receptor of the TGFß family (HHT1, the ACVRL1 gene encoding ALK1 (activin receptor-like kinase 1, a type I receptor of the TGFß family (HHT2, and the SMAD4 gene, encoding a transcription factor critical for this signaling pathway. Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs are growth factors of the TGFß family. Among them, BMP9 and BMP10 have been shown to bind directly with high affinity to ALK1 and endoglin, and BMP9 mutations have recently been linked to a vascular-anomaly syndrome that has phenotypic overlap with HHT. BMP9 and BMP10 are both circulating cytokines in blood, and the current working model is that BMP9 and BMP10 maintain a quiescent endothelial state that is dependent on the level of ALK1/endoglin activation on endothelial cells. In accordance with this model, to explain the etiology of HHT we hypothesize that a deficient BMP9/BMP10/ALK1/endoglin pathway may lead to re-activation of angiogenesis or a greater sensitivity to an angiogenic stimulus. Resulting endothelial hyperproliferation and hypermigration may lead to vasodilatation and formation of arteriovenous malformation (AVM. HHT would thus result from a defect in the angiogenic balance. This review will focus on the emerging role played by BMP9 and BMP10 in the development of this disease and the therapeutic approaches that this opens.

  20. Hepatic artery embolization for treatment of patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia and symptomatic hepatic vascular malformations

    Chavan, Ajay [Hannover Medical School, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Hannover (Germany); Klinikum Oldenburg, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Oldenburg (Germany); Caselitz, Martin; Wagner, Siegfried; Manns, Michael [Hannover Medical School, Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Hannover (Germany); Gratz, Karl-Friedrich [Hannover Medical School, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hannover (Germany); Lotz, Joachim; Kirchhoff, Timm; Galanski, Michael [Hannover Medical School, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Hannover (Germany); Piso, Plinio [Hannover Medical School, Department of Abdominal and Transplantation Surgery, Hannover (Germany)

    2004-11-01

    At present there is no established therapy for treating patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) and symptomatic hepatic involvement. We present the results of a prospective study with 15 consecutive patients who were treated with staged hepatic artery embolization (HAE). Branches of the hepatic artery were selectively catheterized and embolized in stages using polyvinyl alcohol particles (PVA) and platinum microcoils or steel macrocoils. Prophylactic antibiotics, analgesics and anti-emetics were administered after every embolization. Clinical symptomatology and cardiac output were assessed before and after therapy as well as at the end of follow-up (median 28 months; range 10-136 months). Five patients had abdominal pain and four patients had symptoms of portal hypertension. The cardiac output was raised in all patients, with cardiac failure being present in 11 patients. After treatment, pain resolved in all five patients, and portal hypertension improved in two of the four patients. The mean cardiac output decreased significantly (P<0.001) from 12.57{+-}3.27 l/min pre-treatment to 8.36{+-}2.60 l/min at the end of follow-up. Symptoms arising from cardiac failure resolved or improved markedly in all but one patient. Cholangitis and/or cholecystitis occurred in three patients of whom two required a cholecystectomy. One patient with pre-existent hepatic cirrhosis died as a complication of the procedure. Staged HAE yields long-term relief of clinical symptoms in patients with HHT and hepatic involvement. Patients with pre-existing hepatic cirrhosis may be poor candidates for HAE. (orig.)

  1. Sinonasal quality of life outcomes following laser treatment of epistaxis related to hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    Kuan, Edward C; Peng, Kevin A; Thompson, Christopher F; Suh, Jeffrey D; Wang, Marilene B

    2017-04-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an inherited vascular disorder which manifests as recurrent, episodic, and potentially debilitating epistaxis. In this study, we aim to (1) characterize baseline sinonasal symptoms for HHT patients and to (2) analyze changes in sinonasal symptoms before and after laser surgical treatment for HHT. We performed a retrospective chart review of sinonasal outcome test-22 (SNOT-22) scores before and after one or more laser surgical treatments for HHT-related epistaxis between January 1, 2010 and December 1, 2015 at a tertiary academic medical center with an HHT Foundation-approved Center of Excellence. Preoperative and all subsequent postoperative SNOT-22 scores (short-term, epistaxis. Mean preoperative, short-term postoperative, and long-term postoperative SNOT-22 scores were 34.6 ± 5.4, 33.9 ± 5.5, and 18.8 ± 4.6, respectively. When analyzing subcategory scores, there was a significant improvement in the rhinologic domain from short-term to long-term postoperatively (13.5 vs. 7.3; p = 0.004), in the non-rhinologic otolaryngic domain from short-term to long-term postoperatively (2.8 vs. 1.7; p = 0.014), and in the psychological domain from preoperative and short-term postoperative to long-term postoperatively (12.2 and 10.0 vs. 6.0; p = 0.015 and 0.01, respectively). Following laser surgery for HHT-related epistaxis, patients' rhinologic symptoms worsened on the short run postoperatively but improved over time. The main benefit of laser treatment appears to be long-term improvement in psychological factors. This study once again underscores the important role of the otolaryngologist in managing sinonasal manifestations of HHT.

  2. The minimal important difference of the epistaxis severity score in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    Yin, Linda X; Reh, Douglas D; Hoag, Jeffrey B; Mitchell, Sally E; Mathai, Stephen C; Robinson, Gina M; Merlo, Christian A

    2016-05-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a disease of abnormal angiogenesis, causing epistaxis in over 96% of patients. The Epistaxis Severity Score (ESS) was developed as a standardized measurement of nasal symptoms among HHT patients. The minimal important difference (MID) of a disease index estimates the smallest change that a patient and clinician would identify as important. This study aims to establish the MID of the ESS in a diverse population of HHT patients. Retrospective cross-sectional study in patients with a diagnosis of HHT using Curacao criteria or genetic testing. The ESS questionnaire and Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form (SF-36) were administered to participants recruited through the HHT Foundation Web site. Demographics and relevant medical histories were collected from all participants. An anchor-based method using a change of 5 in the Physical Component Summary (PCS) of the SF-36 and a distributional method were used to estimate the MID. A total of 604 subjects were recruited between April and August 2008. All participants reported epistaxis. An increasing ESS in the study cohort showed a significant negative correlation to the PCS (r = -0.43, P < 0.001). The MID was determined to be 0.41 via the anchor-based approach and 1.01 via the distribution-based approach, giving a mean MID of 0.71. Using both the anchor-based and distribution-based approaches, the estimated MID for the ESS in HHT is 0.71. Further implications include key metrics to help guide treatment responses in clinical care and essential information to calculate power and sample size for future clinical trials. 4. Laryngoscope, 126:1029-1032, 2016. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  3. Quality of life in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia in Norway: a population based study.

    Geirdal, Amy Østertun; Dheyauldeen, Sinan; Bachmann-Harildstad, Gregor; Heimdal, Ketil

    2012-06-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a rare, autosomal dominant disease characterized by the presence of recurrent epistaxis and small characteristic malformations of the peripheral blood vessels near the surface of the skin or mucosal linings. Arteriovenous malformations (AVM) of the lung, liver, and CNS are also known clinical findings. The purpose of this study was to examine quality of life (QoL) in patients with HHT in Norway. Sixty-six affected patients (39 women and 27 men) were included. QoL on overall-, health-related (HR-QoL), and disease-specific levels were measured with Cantril's Ladder (CL), Short Form 36 (SF-36), and a Symptom-specific QoL question in HHT patients (SFB-HHT-Q), respectively. Comparisons were made between patients and an age and gender adjusted normative sample from the Norwegian population (N = 990). Overall, the results reflected that several HHT disease-related variables were associated with reduced QoL on all three levels; overall QoL (CL), HR-QoL (SF36) as well as disease-specific QoL (SFB-HHT-Q), while demographic variables impacted HR-QoL in HHT patients. Compared to the normative sample, all subscales of SF36, but bodily pain, were significantly poorer in the HHT patients. HHT disease variables had the strongest association with QoL compared to demographic variables. The results substantiate that disease severity is associated with poorer QoL in this patients. Pain contributed independently to all levels of QoL. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Lifestyle and dietary influences on nosebleed severity in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    Silva, B Maneesha; Hosman, Anna E; Devlin, Hannah L; Shovlin, Claire L

    2013-05-01

    To identify factors influencing the severity of epistaxis in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Participants with and without HHT were recruited from a specialist service and online following advertisement by the HHT Foundation International. Both groups were asked to complete a nonbiased questionnaire. The reported effects of specific treatments or lifestyle factors on epistaxis were assigned positive values if beneficial, negative values if detrimental, or zero if "no difference" and were summed to enable statistical analysis. Epistaxis affected 649 of 666 (97%) participants with HHT and was significantly more frequent than in control participants. Specialist invasive treatments were reported as beneficial, laser therapy more frequently than cauterization. Medical treatments commonly used for HHT epistaxis (female hormones, antiestrogens, tranexamic acid, aminocaproic acid, nasal creams, and bevacizumab) also had significantly positive (beneficial) scores. Lifestyle and dietary factors were generally detrimental, but room humidification, nasal lubrication, and saline treatments were all reported as beneficial (95% confidence intervals greater than zero). Multiple food items were volunteered as being detrimental to epistaxis. The most frequently reported items were alcohol (n = 45; 6.8% of participants) and spices (n = 26, 3.9% of participants). Remaining foods reported to exacerbate epistaxis were also found to be high in salicylates (including red wine, spices, chocolate, coffee, and certain fruits), natural antiplatelet activity (garlic, ginger, ginseng, ginkgo biloba, and vitamin E15), or omega-3 acids (oily fish, salmon). This study supports existing treatments and suggests lifestyle and dietary maneuvers that may also improve nosebleeds in HHT. 2c. Copyright © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  5. Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia: progress of diagnostic imaging and vascular therapeutic embolization

    Lu Chuan; Liu Zuoqin

    2008-01-01

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a genetic autosomal-dominant disorder characterized by the presence of epistaxis, vascular telangiectasis in mucosal and cutaneous tissues, with visceral lesions and family history. However, many specialists or radiologists are still in lack of appreciation concerning the full range of consequences in diagnosis and their family relationship resulting the poor recognition of the disease. Understanding the diagnostic imaging and therapeutic measure for HHT will be critical, because of the continuous growth and risk existance of these arteriovenous malformations arousing early diagnosis, proper treatment, adequate follow-up and screening of the family. (authors)

  6. Novel brain arteriovenous malformation mouse models for type 1 hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    Eun-Jung Choi

    Full Text Available Endoglin (ENG is a causative gene of type 1 hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT1. HHT1 patients have a higher prevalence of brain arteriovenous malformation (AVM than the general population and patients with other HHT subtypes. The pathogenesis of brain AVM in HHT1 patients is currently unknown and no specific medical therapy is available to treat patients. Proper animal models are crucial for identifying the underlying mechanisms for brain AVM development and for testing new therapies. However, creating HHT1 brain AVM models has been quite challenging because of difficulties related to deleting Eng-floxed sequence in Eng(2fl/2fl mice. To create an HHT1 brain AVM mouse model, we used several Cre transgenic mouse lines to delete Eng in different cell-types in Eng(2fl/2fl mice: R26CreER (all cell types after tamoxifen treatment, SM22α-Cre (smooth muscle and endothelial cell and LysM-Cre (lysozyme M-positive macrophage. An adeno-associated viral vector expressing vascular endothelial growth factor (AAV-VEGF was injected into the brain to induce focal angiogenesis. We found that SM22α-Cre-mediated Eng deletion in the embryo caused AVMs in the postnatal brain, spinal cord, and intestines. Induction of Eng deletion in adult mice using R26CreER plus local VEGF stimulation induced the brain AVM phenotype. In both models, Eng-null endothelial cells were detected in the brain AVM lesions, and formed mosaicism with wildtype endothelial cells. However, LysM-Cre-mediated Eng deletion in the embryo did not cause AVM in the postnatal brain even after VEGF stimulation. In this study, we report two novel HHT1 brain AVM models that mimic many phenotypes of human brain AVM and can thus be used for studying brain AVM pathogenesis and testing new therapies. Further, our data indicate that macrophage Eng deletion is insufficient and that endothelial Eng homozygous deletion is required for HHT1 brain AVM development.

  7. The effects of epistaxis on health-related quality of life in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    Merlo, Christian A; Yin, Linda X; Hoag, Jeffrey B; Mitchell, Sally E; Reh, Douglas D

    2014-11-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an autosomal dominant disease mainly characterized by epistaxis in more than 96% of patients. Recently, a validated questionnaire known as the HHT Epistaxis Severity Score (ESS) was developed. However, little is known about the relationship between epistaxis and quality of life. We hypothesize that epistaxis severity is a major factor predicting health-related quality of life (HR-QoL) in HHT patients. This is a cross-sectional study. The ESS questionnaire and Medical Outcomes Study 36-item short form (SF-36) were administered to subjects through an Internet survey. All participants had a definitive diagnosis of HHT through Curaçao criteria or genetic testing. Demographic information, genetics, and extensive histories were also collected. Descriptive analyses were performed with calculations of means and standard deviations (SDs) for continuous variables and proportions for categorical variables. Linear regressions were then performed to assess the association between HR-QoL and ESS. A total of 604 subjects participated between April and August 2008. All patients reported epistaxis, 285 (47.2%) had telangiectasias, and 545 (90.2%) had a family history of HHT; 167 (27.6%) patients had mild epistaxis (ESS epistaxis (≥4 ESS epistaxis (ESS ≥7). Patients with severe epistaxis had lower scores for both the Physical Component Summary (PCS) and the Mental Component Summary (MCS) of HR-QoL when compared to those with mild epistaxis (p epistaxis. © 2014 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  8. Amplatzer Vascular Plugs Versus Coils for Embolization of Pulmonary Arteriovenous Malformations in Patients with Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    Tau, Noam, E-mail: taunoam@gmail.com; Atar, Eliyahu [Rabin Medical Center – Beilinson and HaSharon Campuses, Department of Diagnostic Imaging (Israel); Mei-Zahav, Meir [Schneider Children’s Medical Center of Israel, Department of Pulmonology and National HHT Center (Israel); Bachar, Gil N. [Rabin Medical Center – Beilinson and HaSharon Campuses, Department of Diagnostic Imaging (Israel); Dagan, Tamir; Birk, Einat; Bruckheimer, Elchanan [Schneider Children’s Medical Center of Israel, Institute of Pediatric Cardiology (Israel)

    2016-08-15

    PurposeCoil embolization of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) has a high re-canalization/re-perfusion rate. Embolization with Amplatzer plugs has been previously described, but the long-term efficacy is not established. This study reports the experience of a referral medical center with the use of coils and Amplatzer plugs for treating PAVMs in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia.MethodsThe study was approved by the Institutional Review Board with waiver of informed consent. The cohort included all patients who underwent PAVM embolization in 2004–2014 for whom follow-up imaging scans were available. The medical files were retrospectively reviewed for background data, embolization method (coils, Amplatzer plugs, both), and complications. Re-canalization of treated PAVMs was assessed from intrapulmonary angiograms (following percutaneous procedures) or computed tomography angiograms. Fisher’s exact test and Pearson Chi-squared test or t test were used for statistical analysis, with significance at p < 0.05.Results16 patients met the study criteria. Imaging scans were available for 63 of the total 110 PAVMs treated in 41 procedures. Coils were used for embolization in 37 PAVMs, Amplatzer plugs in 21, and both in five. Median follow-up time was 7.7 years (range 1.4–18.9). Re-canalization was detected in seven vessels, all treated with coils; there were no cases of re-canalization in plug-occluded vessels (p = 0.0413).ConclusionThe use of Amplatzer plugs for the embolization of PAVMs in patients with hemorrhagic telangiectasia is associated with a significantly lower rate of re-canalization of feeding vessels than coils. Long-term prospective studies are required to confirm these findings.

  9. Amplatzer Vascular Plugs Versus Coils for Embolization of Pulmonary Arteriovenous Malformations in Patients with Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    Tau, Noam; Atar, Eliyahu; Mei-Zahav, Meir; Bachar, Gil N.; Dagan, Tamir; Birk, Einat; Bruckheimer, Elchanan

    2016-01-01

    PurposeCoil embolization of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) has a high re-canalization/re-perfusion rate. Embolization with Amplatzer plugs has been previously described, but the long-term efficacy is not established. This study reports the experience of a referral medical center with the use of coils and Amplatzer plugs for treating PAVMs in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia.MethodsThe study was approved by the Institutional Review Board with waiver of informed consent. The cohort included all patients who underwent PAVM embolization in 2004–2014 for whom follow-up imaging scans were available. The medical files were retrospectively reviewed for background data, embolization method (coils, Amplatzer plugs, both), and complications. Re-canalization of treated PAVMs was assessed from intrapulmonary angiograms (following percutaneous procedures) or computed tomography angiograms. Fisher’s exact test and Pearson Chi-squared test or t test were used for statistical analysis, with significance at p < 0.05.Results16 patients met the study criteria. Imaging scans were available for 63 of the total 110 PAVMs treated in 41 procedures. Coils were used for embolization in 37 PAVMs, Amplatzer plugs in 21, and both in five. Median follow-up time was 7.7 years (range 1.4–18.9). Re-canalization was detected in seven vessels, all treated with coils; there were no cases of re-canalization in plug-occluded vessels (p = 0.0413).ConclusionThe use of Amplatzer plugs for the embolization of PAVMs in patients with hemorrhagic telangiectasia is associated with a significantly lower rate of re-canalization of feeding vessels than coils. Long-term prospective studies are required to confirm these findings.

  10. An evaluation of the severity and progression of epistaxis in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) 1 vs. HHT 2

    Hunter, Benjamin N.; Timmins, Benjamin H.; McDonald, Jamie; Whitehead, Kevin J.; Ward, P. Daniel; Wilson, Kevin F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an autosomal dominant vascular dysplasia whose hallmark symptom is spontaneous recurrent epistaxis. Two major genetic sub-types of this syndrome are HHT1 and HHT2. Severity of epistaxis ranges from occasional low-volume bleeding to frequent large-volume hemorrhage. This study evaluated the severity and progression of epistaxis in HHT1 vs. HHT2. Study Design Retrospective cohort study Methods Retrospective chart review was performed for 183 genotyped HHT patients seen at our Center from 2010-2013. Data collected included epistaxis severity score (ESS), age of epistaxis onset, number and type of treatments, age at which treatments were sought, complete blood count values, ferritin, number of telangiectases, blood transfusions, iron therapy history, and patient demographics. Results 115 subjects with HHT2 were compared to 68 with HHT1. Subjects with HHT2 had a higher ESS compared to HHT1 (p=0.043) and a later age of onset of epistaxis (p=0.005). HHT2 subjects were more likely to use oral iron (p=0.032) and were more likely to seek interventions to control their epistaxis (p= 0.029). Conclusion HHT2 is associated with more severe epistaxis and a subsequent higher rate of interventions, requiring more aggressive therapy as compared to HHT1. PMID:26372311

  11. Treatment of epistaxis in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia with tranexamic acid - a double-blind placebo-controlled cross-over phase IIIB study.

    Geisthoff, Urban W; Seyfert, Ulrich T; Kübler, Marcus; Bieg, Birgitt; Plinkert, Peter K; König, Jochem

    2014-09-01

    Epistaxis is the most frequent manifestation in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, in which no optimal treatment exists. It can lead to severe anemia and reduced quality of life. Positive effects of tranexamic acid, an antifibrinolytic drug, have been reported on epistaxis related to this disorder. We sought to evaluate the efficacy of treating nosebleeds in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia with tranexamic acid. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled, cross-over phase IIIB study, 1 gram of tranexamic acid or placebo was given orally 3 times daily for 3 months for a total of 6 months. 22 patients were included in the intention-to-treat analysis. Hemoglobin levels, the primary outcome measure, did not change significantly (p=0.33). The secondary outcome measure was epistaxis score and patients reported a statistically significant reduction in nosebleeds, equaling a clinically relevant 54% diminution (p=0.0031), as compared to the placebo period. No severe side effects were observed. Tranexamic acid reduces epistaxis in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. (Clinical trial registration numbers: BfArM 141 CHC 9008-001 and ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01031992). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Probiotics and infective endocarditis in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia: a clinical case and a review of the literature.

    Boumis, Evangelo; Capone, Alessandro; Galati, Vincenzo; Venditti, Carolina; Petrosillo, Nicola

    2018-02-01

    In the last decades, probiotics have been widely used as food supplements because of their putative beneficial health effects. They are generally considered safe but rare reports of serious infections caused by bacteria included in the definition of probiotics raise concerns on their potential pathogenic role in patients with particular predisposing factors. Patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) are exposed to infections because of telangiectasias and arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). We describe what is, to our knowledge, the first case of infective endocarditis (IE) caused by Lactobacillus rhamnosus in a patient with HHT. A systematic review of the relevant medical literature is presented. A patient with HHT and an aortic bioprosthesis was admitted because of prolonged fever not responding to antibiotics. The patient had a history of repeated serious infections with hospitalizations and prolonged use of antibiotics, and used to assume large amounts of different commercial products containing probiotics. Weeks before the onset of symptoms the patient had been treated with nasal packings and with surgical closure of a nasal bleeding site because of recurrent epistaxis. A diagnosis of IE of the aortic bioprosthesis was made. All blood coltures were positive for L. rhamnosus. The patients responded to a cycle of 6 weeks of amoxicillin/clavulanate plus gentamicin. A systematic review of IE linked to consumption of probiotics, and of infective endocarditis in patients with HHT was conducted. 10 cases of IE linked to probiotics consumption and 6 cases of IE in patients with HHT were found. Consumption of probiotics can pose a risk of serious infections in patients with particular predisposing factors. Patients with HHT can be considered at risk because of their predisposition to infections. Prophylaxis with antibiotics before nasal packings in patients with HHT can be considered.

  13. [Paradoxical brain embolism mediated through a pulmonary arteriovenous malformation with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia in a Japanese patient].

    Takeda, June; Todo, Kenichi; Yamamoto, Shiro; Yamagami, Hiroshi; Kawamoto, Michi; Kohara, Nobuo

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of paradoxical brain embolism mediated through a pulmonary arteriovenous malformation (PAVM) with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). A 25-year-old right handed man was admitted to our hospital after sudden headache and visual field abnormality. In neurologic examinations, he had left superior-quadrantanopsia. Laboratory findings showed iron deficiency anemia. Diffusion weighted images disclosed a high-signal-intensity area in the right occipito-temporal lobe, and intraarterial digital subtraction cerebral angiography revealed occlusion of the right posterior cerebral artery. Transesophageal echocardiography revealed continuous right-to-left shunt. We confirmed his history of spontaneous recurrent epistaxis and the first-degree relatives with epistaxis or PAVM. A contrast enhanced CT scan of the chest revealed a PAVM. The diagnosis of paradoxical brain embolism mediated through the PAVM with HHT was, thus, established. The PAVM was occluded by using embolization coils successfully. In Asian countries, the prevalence of PAVM with HHT is thought to be lower than in European countries. We should carefully take medical and family histories, especially epistaxis, in a young stroke patient.

  14. Influence of temporary nasal occlusion (tNO) on epistaxis frequency in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT).

    Wirsching, Kornelia E C; Haubner, Frank; Kühnel, Thomas S

    2017-04-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the influence of temporary nasal occlusion (tNO) with hypoallergenic tape on the frequency and severity of epistaxis in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). This prospective observational study included 20 HHT patients who were undergoing Nd:YAG laser therapy at regular intervals. Over a 3-month period, laser therapy was supplemented by tNO with hypoallergenic tape for 5 h/day on average. On a 0-10 numeric rating scale, the patients reported significantly greater satisfaction in epistaxis terms after tNO treatment, with mean scores of 5 before and 7 after 3-month tNO (p = 0.05). The Epistaxis Severity Score also fell significantly from a median of 3.59-2.43 after 3-month tNO compared with laser therapy alone (p = 0.01). The patients' hemoglobin levels remained stable during the study (median: 12.2 g/dL before tNO; median: 11.7 g/dL after tNO; p = 0.387). Overall, the present study confirms the positive influence of tNO on epistaxis in HHT patients and on subjective satisfaction. This simple and inexpensive strategy is therefore a helpful option, especially in addition to regular Nd:YAG laser therapy, and is recommended by the authors.

  15. Complications from office sclerotherapy for epistaxis due to hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT or Osler-Weber-Rendu).

    Hanks, John E; Hunter, David; Goding, George S; Boyer, Holly C

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to identify and evaluate adverse clinical outcomes following office-based sclerotherapy using sodium tetradecyl sulfate (STS) for epistaxis due to hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasias (HHT or Osler-Weber-Rendu). A retrospective chart review of 36 adult patients treated with STS sclerotherapy for severe and/or recurrent epistaxis due to HHT was performed. A total of 153 separate treatment sessions were analyzed. Each patient underwent an average of 4.3 sessions with an average of 7 intralesional injections per session. Bleeding during the procedure was experienced by 8 patients with a maximum reported blood loss of 200 mL in 1 patient, but less than 50 mL in all others. Seven patients reported some postinjection pain, which included nasal, cheek, and eye pain. Nasal congestion, sneezing, and vasovagal responses were each noted to occur 2 times. No complications of postprocedural visual loss, deep venous thrombosis/pulmonary embolus, transient ischemic attack (TIA)/stroke, or anaphylaxis were encountered. Conventional therapies used in the management of HHT-related epistaxis, such as laser coagulation, septodermoplasty, selective arterial embolization, and Young's occlusion each have specific associated complications, including worsened epistaxis, septal perforation, foul odor, nasal crusting, and compromised nasal breathing. STS is a safe office-based treatment option for HHT-mediated epistaxis that is associated with exceedingly few of the aforementioned serious sequelae. © 2014 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  16. Telangiectasia hemorrágica hereditária e malformações arteriovenosas pulmonares - Embolização com rolhão vascular Amplatzer Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia and pulmonary arteriovenous malformations - Embolization with Amplatzer vascular plug

    Cláudia Sofia Santos

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available As malformações arteriovenosas pulmonares (MAVP estão associadas a telangiectasia hemorrágica hereditária em cerca de 70% dos casos, podendo cursar com complicações neurológicas graves decorrentes do embolismo paradoxal potencial. A terapêutica das malformações é realizada no sentido de prevenir estas complicações. Descreve-se o caso clínico de uma doente com duas MAVP, no contexto de telangiectasia hemorrágica hereditária,submetida a embolização com o rolhão vascular Amplatzer. Este novo dispositivo é cada vez mais utilizado nestas situações, salientando-se algumas das suas características e vantagens em relação a outras técnicas de embolização mais frequentemente utilizadas.Pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs are associated to hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia in about 70% of the cases. PAVMs are associated to serious neurologic complications, secondary to inherent paradoxical embolisms. Treatment of the malformations is done to prevent these complications. The authors report a clinical case of a patient with two PAVMs, with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, who was treated by embolization with na Amplatzer vascular plug, a new device increasingly used in these situations. The authors emphasise some of its characteristics and advantages when compared with other embolization techniques most commonly used.

  17. Clinical features of Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    Hosman, A.E.

    2017-01-01

    Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT), also known as Rendu-Osler-Weber disease (ROW), is an autosomal dominant disease with multi-systemic vascular dysplasia characterized by mucocutaneous telangiectasia, arteriovenous malformations and recurrent spontaneous epistaxis (nosebleeds). Most cases

  18. Depression and post-traumatic stress disorder in individuals with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia: A cross-sectional survey.

    Chaturvedi, Shruti; Clancy, Marianne; Schaefer, Nicole; Oluwole, Olalekan; McCrae, Keith R

    2017-05-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is characterized by frequent severe bleeding, particularly epistaxis, and life-threatening complications including stroke, brain abscess and heart failure. The psychological impact of HHT is not known. We conducted this cross sectional study to determine the prevalence of depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) related to HHT. A survey tool comprising demographic and clinical information and two validated self-administered questionnaires, the PTSD checklist for DSM-5 (PCL-5) and Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), was distributed to individuals with HHT. Associations with clinical and demographic variables with depression and PTSD were evaluated in a logistic regression model. A total of 222 individuals responded to the survey. Of these, 185 completed either the BDI II or PCL-5 and were included in the analysis. Median age was 54years and 142 (76.8%) were female. An existing diagnosis of depression, anxiety disorder and PTSD was present in 81 (43.8%), 59 (31.9%) and 16(8.6%) respondents, respectively. BDI-II scores>13 indicating at least mild depressive symptoms were present in 142 (88.7%) patients and 52 (28.1%) patients had a positive screen for PTSD (PCL-5 score≥38). On multivariable analysis, depression [OR 2.17 (95% CI 1.045-4.489), p=0.038], anxiety disorder [OR 2.232 (95% CI 1.066-4.676), p=0.033], and being unemployed [OR 2.234 (95% CI 1.46-4.714), p=0.019) were associated with PTSD. We report a high prevalence of depressive and PTSD symptoms in individuals with HHT. While selection bias may lead to overestimation of prevalence in this study, our results are concerning and clinicians should remain vigilant for signs of psychological distress and consider screening for these disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Treatment of severe refractory epistaxis in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia using a two-flap nasal closure method

    Timmins, Benjamin H.; Hunter, Benjamin N.; Wilson, Kevin F.; Ward, P. Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Background Nasal closure has been shown to effectively manage severe epistaxis refractory to other treatments in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). The nasal closure procedure may be underutilized due to its surgical complexity and flap breakdown. Methods Retrospective review of thirteen HHT patients treated for severe epistaxis with nasal closure between 2005 and 2013. Operating room (OR) time, need for revision surgery, pre- and post-procedure epistaxis severity score (ESS), complete blood count values, and Glasgow Benefit Inventory (GBI) questionnaire results were collected for each patient. The technique is described. We characterize a typical nasal closure patient and compare outcomes based on our experience with the traditional three-flap closure and a simplified two-flap nasal closure procedure. Results The average candidate for nasal closure in this series had an ESS of 7.88, Hgb of 8.3 g/dL, and received multiple transfusions, iron therapy, and cautery/coagulation procedures. Average ESS subsequent to nasal closure using the two flap method is 0.92 and mean GBI score is 56.3. Comparison of five patients who underwent the traditional three-flap nasal closure procedure and eight patients receiving the two flap nasal closure showed no significant difference in post-op ESS or GBI metrics. Mean operating room times of the traditional and simplified methods were 3.12 hours and 1.44 hours (p=0.0001). Mean time to first revision for eight nasal closure patients is 21.5 months. Conclusion In short-term follow-up, the two-flap procedure has shown comparable effectiveness with significantly reduced complexity and operative time compared to the traditional nasal closure method. PMID:26751606

  20. Tranexamic acid for epistaxis in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia patients: a European cross-over controlled trial in a rare disease.

    Gaillard, S; Dupuis-Girod, S; Boutitie, F; Rivière, S; Morinière, S; Hatron, P-Y; Manfredi, G; Kaminsky, P; Capitaine, A-L; Roy, P; Gueyffier, F; Plauchu, H

    2014-09-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a genetic disorder associated with abnormal angiogenesis and disabling epistaxis. Tranexamic acid (TA) has been widely used in the treatment of these severe bleeds but with no properly designed trial. To demonstrate the efficacy of TA in epistaxis in HHT patients and to explore its safety of use. A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, cross-over trial was conducted. Participants were randomized to receive TA (3 g a day) then placebo or the opposite sequence. The main analysis compared intra-individual mean duration of epistaxis under TA vs. placebo on a log scale. The primary outcome was the mean duration of epistaxis per month, assessed with specific grids to be completed by participants. The number of epistaxis episodes was recorded as a secondary outcome. A total of 118 randomized patients contributed to the statistical analysis. The mean duration of epistaxis per month was significantly shorter with TA than placebo (0.19 on the log scale; SD = 0.07; P = 0.005), corresponding to a decrease of 17.3% (15.7 min) in the duration of epistaxis per month (CI 95%, 5.5-27.6). The median number of epistaxis episodes per month was 22.1 episodes in the placebo arm vs. 23.3 episodes in the TA arm. No thrombophlebitis was observed. In the ATERO study, we demonstrated a significant decrease in the duration of epistaxis in HHT patients taking TA. No safety issues were recorded in our cohort of patients. © 2014 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  1. Effect of Topical Intranasal Therapy on Epistaxis Frequency in Patients With Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Whitehead, Kevin J; Sautter, Nathan B; McWilliams, Justin P; Chakinala, Murali M; Merlo, Christian A; Johnson, Maribeth H; James, Melissa; Everett, Eric M; Clancy, Marianne S; Faughnan, Marie E; Oh, S Paul; Olitsky, Scott E; Pyeritz, Reed E; Gossage, James R

    2016-09-06

    Epistaxis is a major factor negatively affecting quality of life in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT; also known as Osler-Weber-Rendu disease). Optimal treatment for HHT-related epistaxis is uncertain. To determine whether topical therapy with any of 3 drugs with differing mechanisms of action is effective in reducing HHT-related epistaxis. The North American Study of Epistaxis in HHT was a double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial performed at 6 HHT centers of excellence. From August 2011 through March 2014, there were 121 adult patients who met the clinical criteria for HHT and had experienced HHT-related epistaxis with an Epistaxis Severity Score of at least 3.0. Follow-up was completed in September 2014. Patients received twice-daily nose sprays for 12 weeks with either bevacizumab 1% (4 mg/d), estriol 0.1% (0.4 mg/d), tranexamic acid 10% (40 mg/d), or placebo (0.9% saline). The primary outcome was median weekly epistaxis frequency during weeks 5 through 12. Secondary outcomes included median duration of epistaxis during weeks 5 through 12, Epistaxis Severity Score, level of hemoglobin, level of ferritin, need for transfusion, emergency department visits, and treatment failure. Among the 121 patients who were randomized (mean age, 52.8 years [SD, 12.9 years]; 44% women with a median of 7.0 weekly episodes of epistaxis [interquartile range {IQR}, 3.0-14.0]), 106 patients completed the study duration for the primary outcome measure (43 were women [41%]). Drug therapy did not significantly reduce epistaxis frequency (P = .97). After 12 weeks of treatment, the median weekly number of bleeding episodes was 7.0 (IQR, 4.5-10.5) for patients in the bevacizumab group, 8.0 (IQR, 4.0-12.0) for the estriol group, 7.5 (IQR, 3.0-11.0) for the tranexamic acid group, and 8.0 (IQR, 3.0-14.0) for the placebo group. No drug treatment was significantly different from placebo for epistaxis duration. All groups had a significant

  2. Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia - HHT

    ... GUIDELINES, CLINICAL TOPIC ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS MACRA MATTERS HEALTH POLICY, ECONOMICS, CODING REIMBURSEMENT AND APPEALS ... NOW BENEFITS MEMBERSHIP CATEGORIES SIR FELLOWSHIP VOLUNTEER CENTRAL COMMITTEES ...

  3. Imaging findings of arteriovenous malformations involving lung and liver in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia(Osler-weber-rendu disease): two cases report

    Yi, Jeong Geun; Lee, Joo Hyuk; Seong, Su Ok

    1999-01-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) or Osler-Weber-Rendu disease is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by repeated episodes of bleeding. Multiple telangiectases consisting of thin-walled, dilated vascular channels with arteriovenous communication may involve, for example, mucocutaneous tissue, the gastrointestinal tract, and the liver, lung, and brain. We report the imaging findings of two cases of HHT involving arteriovenous malformation of both the lungs and liver, a rare condition. Chest radiography revealed a round mass, while helical CT showed a feeding artery and draining vein with arteriovenous malformation in the lung. Color Doppler sonography revealed an enlarged and tortuous hepatic artery with high systolic velocity. CT demonstrated an enlarged hepatic artery, arteriovenous shunt, and early draining hepatic vein in the liver. Celiac angiography showed arteriovenous malformation

  4. Imaging findings of arteriovenous malformations involving lung and liver in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia(Osler-weber-rendu disease): two cases report

    Yi, Jeong Geun; Lee, Joo Hyuk; Seong, Su Ok [Cheongju St. Mary' s Hospital, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-09-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) or Osler-Weber-Rendu disease is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by repeated episodes of bleeding. Multiple telangiectases consisting of thin-walled, dilated vascular channels with arteriovenous communication may involve, for example, mucocutaneous tissue, the gastrointestinal tract, and the liver, lung, and brain. We report the imaging findings of two cases of HHT involving arteriovenous malformation of both the lungs and liver, a rare condition. Chest radiography revealed a round mass, while helical CT showed a feeding artery and draining vein with arteriovenous malformation in the lung. Color Doppler sonography revealed an enlarged and tortuous hepatic artery with high systolic velocity. CT demonstrated an enlarged hepatic artery, arteriovenous shunt, and early draining hepatic vein in the liver. Celiac angiography showed arteriovenous malformation.

  5. Hepatic and pancreatic involvement in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia: quantitative and qualitative evaluation with 64-section CT in asymptomatic adult patients

    Barral, Matthias; Sirol, Marc; Hamzi, Lounis; Gayat, Etienne; Boudiaf, Mourad [Hopital Lariboisiere-APHP, Department of Abdominal Imaging, Paris (France); Place, Vinciane [Hopital Lariboisiere-APHP, Department of Abdominal Imaging, Paris (France); Universite Diderot-Paris 7, UFR de Medecine, Paris (France); Borsik, Michel [Hopital Lariboisiere-APHP, Deparment of Ear, Nose and Throat, Paris (France); Soyer, Philippe [Hopital Lariboisiere-APHP, Department of Abdominal Imaging, Paris (France); Universite Diderot-Paris 7, UFR de Medecine, Paris (France); Unite 965 INSERM/Paris7, Hopital Lariboisiere-APHP, Paris (France)

    2012-01-15

    To analyse quantitatively and qualitatively asymptomatic hepatic and pancreatic involvement in hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) using 64-section helical CT. The 64-section helical CT examinations of 19 patients with HHT (8 men, 11 women; mean age, 58.6 years) were quantitatively and qualitatively analysed and compared to those of 19 control subjects who were matched for age and sex. Comparisons were made using univariate analysis. Dilated and tortuous intrahepatic arterial branches was the most discriminating independent variable (P < 0.0001) and had the highest specificity (100%; 19/19; 95%CI: 82%-100%) and accuracy (97%; 37/38; 95%CI: 86%-100%) for the diagnosis of HHT. Heterogeneous enhancement of hepatic parenchyma, intrahepatic telangiectases, hepatic artery to hepatic vein shunting, hepatic artery enlargement (i.e. diameter > 6.5 mm) and portal vein enlargement (i.e. diameter > 13 mm) were other variables that strongly correlated with the presence of HHT. Intrapancreatic telangiectases and arteriovenous malformations were found in 42% and 16% of patients with HHT, respectively. Liver and pancreatic involvement in asymptomatic HHT patients is associated with myriad suggestive findings on 64-section helical CT. It can be anticipated that familiarity with these findings would result in more confident diagnosis of HHT. (orig.)

  6. Absceso intramedular en paciente con enfermedad de Rendu-Osler-Weber Spinal abscess in a patient with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    Lorena V Maldonado

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available La enfermedad de Rendu-Osler-Weber es una enfermedad autosómica dominante que se manifiesta por telangiectasias en piel y mucosas y malformaciones arteriovenosas en diversos órganos. El compromiso neurológico puede ocurrir por la presencia de malformaciones arterio-venosas cerebrales, hemorragia intracraneal, y más habitualmente por accidentes cerebrovasculares isquémicos y abscesos cerebrales secundarios a embolia paradojal, en pacientes con malformaciones arteriovenosas pulmonares. El absceso intramedular es una entidad rara, inusual como complicación de la enfermedad de Rendu-Osler-Weber. Presentamos el caso de una mujer de 56 años de edad, con antecedentes familiares de enfermedad de Rendu-Osler- Weber, que ingresó a Terapia Intensiva con cuadriplejia aguda e hipoxemia, en quien se diagnosticó fístulas arteriovenosas pulmonares y un absceso intramedular cervical.Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by multiple skin and mucosal telangiectasis and multiorgan arteriovenous malformations. Neurological manifestations may occur because of cerebral arteriovenous malformations, intracranial hemorrhage, and most commonly by ischemic stroke and brain abscess secondary to paradoxical embolization in patients with pulmonary arteriovenous malformations. Intramedullary abscess is a rare, unusual condition, in Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome. We report the case of a 56 years old woman, with a familial history of Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome, admitted to intensive care with acute quadriplegia and hypoxemia. Our diagnosis was pulmonary arteriovenous malformations and intramedullary abscess.

  7. Telangiectasia hemorrágica hereditária: ácido tranexâmico no tratamento de úlcera plantar Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia: tranexamic acid for plantar ulcer

    Gabriella Corrêa de Albuquerque

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Relato de um caso de úlcera plantar por fístula arteriovenosa em paciente portador de telangiectasia hemorrágica hereditária ou doença de Rendu-Osler-Weber tratado com ácido tranexâmico. Este fármaco é utilizado para tratamento de epistaxe, referindo-se o principal achado deste artigo ao uso eficaz desse medicamento na terapia de úlceras plantares hemorrágicas. São descritos os aspectos fisiopatológicos e clínicos da doença e as propriedades antifibrinolíticas do ácido tranexâmico. Este foi bem tolerado e apresentou evidências de eficácia na utilização para controle do sangramento e cicatrização da úlcera.Case report of one patient with Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia, also known as Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome, treated with Tranexamic Acid for arteriovenous plantar ulcer. This drug has proved effective in controlling epistaxis, but the main point of this report is to expose the success use of this medication in the therapy of skin bleeding ulcer. The pathophysiologic and clinical features of the disease are reviewed and also the pharmacological aspects of the antifibrinolytic drugs. This drug was well tolerated by the patient and show evidence of good activity in the bleeding and healed the ulcer.

  8. Ischaemic strokes in patients with pulmonary arteriovenous malformations and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia: associations with iron deficiency and platelets.

    Claire L Shovlin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pulmonary first pass filtration of particles marginally exceeding ∼7 µm (the size of a red blood cell is used routinely in diagnostics, and allows cellular aggregates forming or entering the circulation in the preceding cardiac cycle to lodge safely in pulmonary capillaries/arterioles. Pulmonary arteriovenous malformations compromise capillary bed filtration, and are commonly associated with ischaemic stroke. Cohorts with CT-scan evident malformations associated with the highest contrast echocardiographic shunt grades are known to be at higher stroke risk. Our goal was to identify within this broad grouping, which patients were at higher risk of stroke. METHODOLOGY: 497 consecutive patients with CT-proven pulmonary arteriovenous malformations due to hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia were studied. Relationships with radiologically-confirmed clinical ischaemic stroke were examined using logistic regression, receiver operating characteristic analyses, and platelet studies. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Sixty-one individuals (12.3% had acute, non-iatrogenic ischaemic clinical strokes at a median age of 52 (IQR 41-63 years. In crude and age-adjusted logistic regression, stroke risk was associated not with venous thromboemboli or conventional neurovascular risk factors, but with low serum iron (adjusted odds ratio 0.96 [95% confidence intervals 0.92, 1.00], and more weakly with low oxygen saturations reflecting a larger right-to-left shunt (adjusted OR 0.96 [0.92, 1.01]. For the same pulmonary arteriovenous malformations, the stroke risk would approximately double with serum iron 6 µmol/L compared to mid-normal range (7-27 µmol/L. Platelet studies confirmed overlooked data that iron deficiency is associated with exuberant platelet aggregation to serotonin (5HT, correcting following iron treatment. By MANOVA, adjusting for participant and 5HT, iron or ferritin explained 14% of the variance in log-transformed aggregation-rate (p = 0

  9. Topical application of timolol decreases the severity and frequency of epistaxis in patients who have previously undergone nasal dermoplasty for hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    Ichimura, Keiichi; Kikuchi, Hisashi; Imayoshi, Shoichiro; Dias, Mari Shimada

    2016-08-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is widely known to cause bleeding that is difficult to control because of the associated vascular wall fragility. Although nasal dermoplasty results in decreased severity and frequency of nasal bleeding in patients with HHT, it does not eradicate epistaxis because this procedure cannot cover the entire nasal cavity. Residual bleeding warrants additional effective therapy. Preliminary reports on the use of β-adrenergic blockers for treating epistaxis in patients with HHT encouraged us to examine their effects in HHT patients who had previously undergone nasal dermoplasty but still complained of epistaxis. We performed a prospective topical timolol, a nonselective beta blocker, application study involving 12 HHT patients who had undergone nasal dermoplasty. The observation period lasted for 3 months. There was one improperly enrolled case in which timolol administration was discontinued. The mean score of bleeding intensity and that of bleeding frequency were markedly reduced after treatment. Two patients who had required transfusions before treatment did not need them afterward, and patients were generally satisfied with the treatment. Topical timolol application was effective in decreasing epistaxis. Although no adverse effects were observed in the properly selected patients, there are contraindications to timolol application that should be kept in mind when applying this treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Efficacy and safety of thalidomide for the treatment of severe recurrent epistaxis in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia: results of a prospective phase II clinical trial

    Invernizzi, Rosangela; Quaglia, Federica; Klersy, Caherine; Pagella, Fabio; Ornati, Federica; Chu, Francesco; Matti, Elina; Spinozzi, Giuseppe; Plumitallo, Sara; Grignani, Pierangela; Olivieri, Carla; Bastia, Raffaella; Bellistri, Francesca; Danesino, Cesare; Benazzo, Marco; Balduini, Carlo L

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a genetic disease that leads to multiregional angiodysplasia. Severe recurrent epistaxis is the most common presentation, frequently leading to severe anemia. Multiple therapeutic approaches have been tried, but they are largely palliative with variable results.We aimed to assess the efficacy of thalidomide in reducing epistaxis in patients with HHT refractory to standard therapy. Methods HHT patients with severe recurrent epistaxis refractory to mini-invasive surgical procedures were included in an open label, phase II, prospective, non-randomized, single-centre study. Thalidomide was administered at a starting dose of 50 mg/day orally. In the event of no response, thalidomide dosage was increased by 50 mg/day every four weeks until response to a maximum dose of 200 mg/day. After response achievement, patients were treated for eight to16 additional weeks. Monthly follow-up was based on the epistaxis severity score and transfusion need, with adverse events being reported (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01485224). Findings Thirty-one patients, mean age 62∙6 (SD 11∙1) years, were enrolled (median follow-up 15∙9 months, 25th-75th 10∙1-22∙3). Treatment induced cessation of bleeding in three cases (9∙7%) and a significant decrease in all epistaxis parameters in 28 cases (90∙3%). Twenty-five patients (80∙7%) obtained remission with 50 mg/day of thalidomide, five (16∙1%) with 100 mg/day and one (3∙2%) with 150 mg/day. Treatment significantly increased hemoglobin levels (pepistaxis in HHT patients, allowing for a rapid, often durable clinical improvement. Funding Telethon Foundation PMID:26686256

  11. ELLIPSE Study: a Phase 1 study evaluating the tolerance of bevacizumab nasal spray in the treatment of epistaxis in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    Dupuis-Girod, Sophie; Ambrun, Alexis; Decullier, Evelyne; Samson, Géraldine; Roux, Adeline; Fargeton, Anne-Emmanuelle; Rioufol, Catherine; Schwiertz, Verane; Disant, François; Chapuis, François; Donazzolo, Yves; Paintaud, Gilles; Edery, Patrick; Faure, Frederic

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a dominantly inherited genetic vascular disorder in which epistaxis is the most frequent manifestation, responsible for high morbidity. Management of this symptom has no standard, and local treatments are often aggressive. Their efficacy is variable and has not been proven. Anti-angiogenic drugs, such as bevacizumab, are a new treatment strategy. Its systemic administration in patients with HHT improves liver damage-related symptoms and epistaxis. To limit the systemic adverse effects of bevacizumab and to ease administration, a local administration seems suitable. To evaluate the tolerance of increasing doses of bevacizumab administered as a nasal spray in patients with HHT-related epistaxis. Secondary objectives were to study the bioavailability and efficacy of bevacizumab against epistaxis when given as a nasal spray. Phase 1, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, monocentric study performed sequentially (dose escalation) on 5 groups of 8 patients. Each group was made up of 6 verum and 2 placebos. Five increasing doses of bevacizumab nasal spray (25 mg/mL) were evaluated: 12.5, 25, 50, 75 and 100 mg. A total of 40 patients were included between October 2011 and October 2012. Bevacizumab nasal spray was well tolerated in all patients and the drug was not detected in their serum. No dose limiting toxicity was observed. No efficacy was observed at any dose in this study. Based on these results, bevacizumab nasal spray is a safe treatment of epistaxis in HHT. However, a randomized Phase 2 study is needed to determine its efficacy. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier #NCT01507480.

  12. Evidence-based management of epistaxis in hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    Syed, I; Sunkaraneni, V S

    2015-05-01

    There are currently no guidelines in the UK for the specific management of hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia related epistaxis. The authors aimed to review the literature and provide an algorithm for the management of hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia related epistaxis. The Medline and Embase databases were interrogated on 15 November 2013 using the search items 'hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia' (title), 'epistaxis' (title) and 'treatment' (title and abstract), and limiting the search to articles published in English. A total of 46 publications were identified, comprising 1 systematic review, 2 randomised, controlled trials, 27 case series, 9 case reports, 4 questionnaire studies and 3 in vitro studies. There is a lack of high-level evidence for the use of many of the available treatments for the specific management of epistaxis in hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia. Current management should be based on a multidisciplinary team approach involving both a hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia physician and an ENT surgeon, especially when systemic therapy is being considered. The suggested treatment algorithm considers that the severity of epistaxis merits intervention at different levels of the treatment ladder. The patient should be assessed using a reproducible validated assessment tool, for example an epistaxis severity score, to guide treatment. More research is required, particularly in the investigation of topical agents targeting the development and fragility of telangiectasiae in hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia.

  13. Research on Potential Biomarkers in Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    Luisa Maria Botella

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT is a genetically heterogeneous disorder, involving mutations in two predominant genes known as Endoglin (ENG; HHT1 and Activin receptor like kinase 1 (ACVRL1/ALK1; HHT2, as well as in some less frequent genes, such as MADH4/SMAD4 (JP-HHT or BMP9/GDF2 (HHT5. The diagnosis of HHT patients currently remains at the clinical level, according to the Curaçao criteria, whereas the molecular diagnosis is used to confirm or rule out suspected HHT cases, especially when a well characterized index case is present in the family or in an isolated population. Unfortunately, many suspected patients do not present a clear HHT diagnosis or do not show pathogenic mutations in HHT genes, prompting the need to investigate additional biomarkers of the disease. Here, several HHT biomarkers and novel methodological approaches developed during the last years will be reviewed. On one hand, products detected in plasma or serum samples: soluble proteins (VEGF, TGF-β1, soluble endoglin, angiopoietin-2 and microRNA variants (miR-27a, miR-205, miR-210. On the other hand, differential HHT gene expression fingerprinting, Next Generation Sequencing (NGS of a panel of genes involved in HHT, and infrared spectroscopy combined with Artificial Neural Network (ANN patterns will also be reviewed. All these biomarkers might help to improve and refine HHT diagnosis by distinguishing from the non-HHT population.

  14. Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia: a cause of preventable morbidity and mortality.

    Brady, A P

    2012-01-31

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an autosomal dominant condition whose effects are mediated through deficient blood vessel formation and regeneration, with multisystem involvement. Patients are usually aware of resulting skin telangiectasia and epistaxis, but are also exposed to dangers posed by occult vascular malformations in other organs. About 15-35% of HHT patients have pulmonary AVMs (PAVMs), 10% have cerebral AVMs (CAVMs), 25-33% suffer significant GI blood loss from GI tract telangiectasia, and an unknown but high percentage have liver involvement. In total, 10% of affected individuals die prematurely or suffer major disability from HHT, largely because of bleeding from CAVMs and PAVMs, or paradoxical embolization through PAVMs. Screening for and early intervention to treat occult PAVMs and CAVMs can largely eliminate these risks, and should be undertaken in a specialist centre. The National HHT Center in The Mercy University Hospital in Cork is the referral centre for HHT screening in Ireland.

  15. [Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia diagnosed in connection with a traffic accident].

    Sivapalan, Pradeesh; Demény, Ann Kathrin; Almind, Merete; Kjeldsen, Anette Drøhse

    2014-02-17

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by vascular dysplasia and haemorrhage. It is manifested by mucocutaneous telangiec-tases and arteriovenous malformations in organs such as lungs, liver and brain. We present a case of HHT. A 16-year-old patient with a history of recurrent epistaxis was admitted to the local hospital with chest pain and desaturation. A CT scan revealed pulmonary arteriovenous malformations.

  16. Quality of life in patients with hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT).

    Zarrabeitia, Roberto; Fariñas-Álvarez, Concepción; Santibáñez, Miguel; Señaris, Blanca; Fontalba, Ana; Botella, Luisa María; Parra, José Antonio

    2017-01-23

    There are very few studies about general quality of life parameters, standards for the description of health status and comparison with general population data on patients with Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT), a rare disease in which epistaxis is a cardinal symptom. To assess the quality of life in a population of Spanish patients with HHT and compare it with the general population. Between January 1 st 2005 and December 31 st 2013, 187 adult patients diagnosed with HHT who were admitted to the HHT Unit of the Hospital Sierrallana, completed on their first visit, the EuroQol 5D-3L (five dimensions and three levels) quality of life descriptive test and the visual analog scale (VAS). The numerical social index value was also determined and the subjective effect of the nasal epistaxis on their quality of life was estimated classified as mild, moderate or severe. Patients with HHT had greater problems than the general population in the five dimensions of the EuroQol 5D-3L, particularly considering pain/discomfort and anxiety/depression. In the VAS and the social index value, patients with HHT also scored lower than the general population, particularly older patients, males, and patients with HHT2. They also had values similar to those of populations with chronic illnesses. The subjective perception of the severity of epistaxis correlated strongly with the VAS and social index values. The quality of life of patients with HHT, estimated using the EuroQol 5D-3L scale, is affected across all dimensions. The scores are similar to those seen in cases of other chronic diseases. Older patients, males and the carriers of the ACVRL1 mutation generally have worse scores on these scales. The VAS and the social index value are index that correlate well with the severity of the clinical symptoms associated mainly with epistaxis.

  17. Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT) and Pulmonary Hypertension

    ... has said these might be symptoms of pulmonary hypertension. How does this relate to my HHT? About ... differences are significant. In HHT-associated pulmonary arterial hypertension, abnormal blood flow through the blood vessels in ...

  18. Manuseio anestésico de paciente portador de telangiectasia hemorrágica hereditária (síndrome de Rendu-Osler-Weber: relato de caso Manoseo anestésico de paciente portador de telangiectasia hemorrágica hereditaria (síndrome de Rendu - Osler - Weber: relato de caso Anesthetic management of a patient with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome: case report

    Alexandre Palmeira Goulart

    2009-02-01

    síndrome de Rendu-Osler-Weber, es una enfermedad autosómica dominante, caracterizada por displasia vascular muco-cutánea y visceral asociada a frecuentes episodios de epistaxis y sangramientos gastrointestinales. El objetivo del presente relato fue el de describir la anestesia en paciente portador de ese síndrome. RELATO DEL CASO: Paciente del sexo masculino, 25 años, sometido a la corrección quirúrgica de fractura de órbita izquierda. Portador de la tríade epistaxis recurrente, historial familiar y telangiectasia presentaba diagnóstico de THH. Durante la investigación preoperatoria no se encontraron malformaciones vasculares pulmonares, encefálicas o del tracto gastrointestinal. El paciente se sometió a la anestesia venosa total, una hora después de la administración profiláctica de antifibrinolítico. El sangramiento fue considerado normal para la operación propuesta, y no hubo inestabilidad hemodinámica o necesidad de transfusión sanguínea perioperatoria. La extubación fue hecha en la sala de cirugía, y el paciente fue enviado a la habitación 60 minutos después. El alta fue en 24 horas. CONCLUSIONES: La THH es una enfermedad autosómica dominante, caracterizada por displasia vascular muco-cutánea y visceral. Puede haber pérdida sanguínea perioperatoria por encima de la esperada para pacientes portadores de ese síndrome. Como el sangramiento no es resultado de un defecto en la cascada de coagulación, sino de la exposición quirúrgica de la estructura vascular malformada, la conducta perioperatoria incluye el uso de antifibrinolíticos, la realización de una hemostasis adecuada y la hipotensión arterial inducida, cuando no haya contraindicación. La evaluación preanestésica debe incluir la investigación de malformaciones vasculares encefálicas, pulmonares o del tracto gastrointestinal.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT, also known as Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome, is an autosomal dominant disorder

  19. Bevacizumab: an option for refractory epistaxis in hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    Amann, Arno; Steiner, Normann; Gunsilius, Eberhard

    2015-08-01

    Recurrent epistaxis in hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) patients significantly decreases their quality of life. Treatment in therapy refractory patients is limited although various options have been tested so far. Herein, one patient is described that was treated for HHT for over 20 years with only intermediate benefits. As epistaxis duration and frequency increased continuously, bevacizumab 5 mg/kg was administered every 2 weeks. During the time of treatment (six doses) and up to 3 month afterwards clinical symptoms, blood pressure, cardiac output, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), bleeding duration and frequency were assessed as criteria for treatment benefit. Duration and frequency of epistaxis decreased immediately after the first application resulting in reduced need of blood transfusions. After completion of six cycles, a further decrease in frequency and duration of bleeding was noted. Cardiac output and PAH decreased or remained stable, respectively, during time and after treatment. No increase in blood pressure could be found but a significant increase in heart rate was experienced after completion of all six applications. Unfortunately, the patient died due to a cerebral abscess. Bevacizumab led to an improvement of HHT related epistaxis, refractory to other treatments.

  20. Treatment of Laryngeal Telangiectatic Lesions in a Patient Diagnosed with Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    Kjeldsen, Anette Drøhse; Printz, Trine; Slot Mehlum, Camilla

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We here present a case concerning a 69 year old female patient with Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT). She was suffering from hoarseness due to a telangiectatic lesion on the right vocal cord. The lesion was treated with laser and the voice improved markedly, which is document...

  1. Living with hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia: coping and psychological distress - a cross-sectional study.

    Geirdal, Amy Østertun; Dheyauldeen, Sinan; Bachmann-Harildstad, Gregor; Heimdal, Ketil

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between coping strategies measured by Coping Orientation to Problems Experienced Scale (COPE) and psychological distress measured by Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and Becks Hopelessness Scale (BHS) in individuals living with Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) and to examine if coping strategies might have a mediating role between experienced illness and psychological distress. HHT is mainly caused by mutations in the ENG- or ALK1-genes and associated with a shorter life span. 90% of patients have recurrent nosebleeds. 66 individuals affected of HHT participated in this cross-sectional study, completing questions due to demographic variables, Experience of illness, COPE, BHS and HADS. X(2) test, bivariate correlations with Pearson r and hierarchical multiple regression were used using PASW 18. Experience of illness made the highest variance in anxiety, depression and hopelessness and the coping strategy "behavioral disengagement" seems to have a mediating role between nose bleedings, being afraid of complications, satisfied with life and psychological distress. Experience of illness is of big importance in psychological distress in individuals affected of HHT, and behavioral disengagement explained the actual relationship between experience of illness and psychological distress.

  2. Clinical symptoms according to genotype amongst patients with hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia

    Kjeldsen, A D; Møller, T R; Brusgaard, K

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a dominantly inherited disease, characterized by a wide variety of clinical manifestations, including epistaxis, gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) and neurological symptoms. HHT is a genetically...... patients had experienced more severe GI bleeding than HHT2 patients. There was no significant difference in severity of epistaxis or age at debut. Finally the mortality over a 90-month observation period was not significantly increased....

  3. Neurologic Manifestation as Initial Presentation in a Case of Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    Yeow Kwan Teo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT, or Osler-Weber-Rendu syndrome is an uncommon autosomal dominant multi-organ condition of vascular dysplasias. We describe a 19 year old Indian female who presented with cerebral abscess secondary to paradoxical emboli from pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs associated with HHT. Cerebral, pulmonary, hepatic and gastrointestinal involvement can be life-threatening and it is important to have lifelong follow-ups on these patients.

  4. Mutations found in the Danish population causing Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    Tørring, Pernille M; Brusgaard, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    University Hospital, Denmark HHT is an autosomal vascular disorder caused by mutations of either of three loci ENG, ACVLR1 or MADH4. HHT is characterised by recurrent nosebleeds, mucocutaneous telangiectases, and more severe visceral malformations. During the last decade the Danish HHT centre has...

  5. ENG mutational mosaicism in a family with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    Tørring, Pernille M; Kjeldsen, Anette D; Ousager, Lilian Bomme

    2018-01-01

    mutation using Sanger sequencing. Analyzing her DNA by NGS HHT panel sequencing when extracted from both peripheral blood leukocytes, and cheek swabs, identified the familial ENG mutation at low levels. CONCLUSION: We provide evidence of ENG mutational mosaicism in an individual presenting with clinical...

  6. Follow-up of Thalidomide treatment in patients with Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia.

    Hosman, A; Westermann, C J J; Snijder, R; Disch, F; Mummery, C L; Mager, J J

    2015-12-01

    Patients with a hereditary vascular disorder called Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome (Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia, HHT) haemorrhage easily due to weak-walled vessels. Haemorrhage in lungs or brain can be fatal but patients suffer most from chronic and prolonged nosebleeds (epistaxis), the frequency and intensity of which increases with age. Several years ago, it was discovered serendipitously that the drug Thalidomide had beneficial effects on the disease symptoms in several of a small group of HHT patients: epistaxis and the incidence of anaemia were reduced and patients required fewer blood transfusions. In addition, they reported a better quality of life. However, Thalidomide has significant negative side effects, including neuropathy and fatigue. We followed up all HHT patients in the Netherlands who had been taking Thalidomide at the time the original study was completed to find out (i) how many had continued taking Thalidomide and for how long (ii) the nature and severity of any side-effects and (iii) whether side-effects had influenced their decision to continue taking Thalidomide. Only a minority of patients had continued taking the drug despite its beneficial effects on their symptoms and that the side effects were the primary reason to stop. Despite symptom reduction, alternative treatments are still necessary for epistaxis in HHT patients and a large-scale clinical trial is not justified although incidental use in the most severely affected patients can be considered.

  7. Experience of the Irish National Centre for hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia 2003-2008.

    Ni Bhuachalla, C F

    2012-01-31

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a group of autosomal dominant disorders of vascular structure. The Irish National Centre for HHT at the Mercy University Hospital, Cork, Ireland was founded in 2003. From 2003 to 2008, screening of 164 patients with contrast echocardiography, thoracic computerised tomography (CT) and cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has identified 88 patients with definite HHT, 72 (82%) of whom had epistaxis, 70 (80%) had telangiectasia and 81 (92%) had a first-degree relative with HHT. We sought to describe the manifestations of HHT in an Irish population and to determine differences between internationally reported data. The HHT patient database was analysed to describe demographics, clinical manifestations and interventional procedures performed in all referred patients. Contrast echocardiography and\\/or CT were performed in 86 patients with definite HHT, identifying 27 patients (31%) with pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (pAVMs). Nineteen patients with single or multiple pAVMs had 28 embolisation procedures performed, with 1-6 pAVMs embolised per procedure. Cerebral MRI was performed in 78 (89%) patients and 2 (2.3%) had cerebral arteriovenous malformations (cAVMs). HHT prevalence is thought to be 1 in 2500-8000, suggesting that there are many undiagnosed cases in Irish patients. Internationally published data suggest a prevalence of 15-35% for pAVMs and 10-23% for cAVMs in patients with HHT. While the prevalence of pAVMs in our group is consistent with these data, the prevalence of cAVMs is considerably lower, suggesting that Irish patients with HHT may differ genotypically and phenotypically from those in other countries.

  8. Reproducibility of right-to-left shunt quantification using transthoracic contrast echocardiography in hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    Vorselaars, V M M; Velthuis, S; Huitema, M P; Hosman, A E; Westermann, C J J; Snijder, R J; Mager, J J; Post, M C

    2018-04-01

    Transthoracic contrast echocardiography (TTCE) is recommended for screening of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) in hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia. Shunt quantification is used to find treatable PAVMs. So far, there has been no study investigating the reproducibility of this diagnostic test. Therefore, this study aimed to describe inter-observer and inter-injection variability of TTCE. We conducted a prospective single centre study. We included all consecutive persons screened for presence of PAVMs in association with hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia in 2015. The videos of two contrast injections per patient were divided and reviewed by two cardiologists blinded for patient data. Pulmonary right-to-left shunts were graded using a three-grade scale. Inter-observer and inter-injection agreement was calculated with κ statistics for the presence and grade of pulmonary right-to-left shunts. We included 107 persons (accounting for 214 injections) (49.5% male, mean age 45.0 ± 16.6 years). A pulmonary right-to-left shunt was present in 136 (63.6%) and 131 (61.2%) injections for observer 1 and 2, respectively. Inter-injection agreement for the presence of pulmonary right-to-left shunts was 0.96 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.9-1.0) and 0.98 (95% CI 0.94-1.00) for observer 1 and 2, respectively. Inter-injection agreement for pulmonary right-to-left shunt grade was 0.96 (95% CI 0.93-0.99) and 0.95 (95% CI 0.92-0.98) respectively. There was disagreement in right-to-left shunt grade between the contrast injections in 11 patients (10.3%). Inter-observer variability for presence and grade of the pulmonary right-to-left shunt was 0.95 (95% CI 0.91-0.99) and 0.97 (95% CI 0.95-0.99) respectively. TTCE has an excellent inter-injection and inter-observer agreement for both the presence and grade of pulmonary right-to-left shunts.

  9. Pulmonary arteriovenous malformations in hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia. Correlations between computed tomography findings and cerebral complications

    Etievant, Johan; Si-Mohamed, Salim; Vinurel, Nicolas; Revel, Didier [Hospices Civils de Lyon, Hopital Cardiologique Louis Pradel, Departement d' Imagerie Cardiaque et Thoracique, Diagnostique et Interventionnelle, Bron (France); Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Villeurbanne (France); Dupuis-Girod, Sophie [Hospices Civils de Lyon, Hopital Femme-Mere-Enfant, Service de Genetique, Centre de Reference pour la maladie de Rendu-Osler, Lyon (France); Decullier, Evelyne [Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Villeurbanne (France); Hospices Civils de Lyon, Pole Information Medicale Evaluation Recherche, Lyon (France); Gamondes, Delphine [Hospices Civils de Lyon, Hopital Cardiologique Louis Pradel, Departement d' Imagerie Cardiaque et Thoracique, Diagnostique et Interventionnelle, Bron (France); Khouatra, Chahera [Hospices Civils de Lyon, Hopital Cardiologique Louis Pradel, Service de pneumologie - Centre des Maladies Orphelines Pulmonaires, Lyon (France); Cottin, Vincent [Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Villeurbanne (France); Hospices Civils de Lyon, Hopital Cardiologique Louis Pradel, Service de pneumologie - Centre des Maladies Orphelines Pulmonaires, Lyon (France)

    2018-03-15

    Computed tomography (CT) is the modality of choice to characterise pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs) in patients with hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Our objective was to determine if CT findings were associated with frequency of brain abscess and ischaemic stroke. This retrospective study included patients with HHT-related PAVMs. CT results, i.e. PAVM presentation (unique, multiple, disseminated or diffuse), the number of PAVMs and the largest feeding artery size, were correlated to prevalence of ischaemic stroke and brain abscess. All CTs were reviewed in consensus by two radiologists. Of 170 patients, 73 patients had unique (42.9 %), 49 multiple (28.8 %), 36 disseminated (21.2 %) and 12 diffuse (7.1 %) PAVMs. Fifteen patients presented with brain abscess; 26 patients presented with ischaemic stroke. The number of PAVMs was significantly correlated with brain abscess (11.5 vs. 6.2, respectively; p=0.025). The mean diameter of the largest feeding artery was significantly correlated with ischaemic stroke frequency (4.9 vs. 3.2 mm, respectively; p=0.0098). The number of PAVMs correlated significantly with risk of brain abscess, and a larger feeding artery significantly with more ischaemic strokes. These findings can lead to a better recognition and management of the PAVMs at risk of cerebral complications. (orig.)

  10. PI3 kinase inhibition improves vascular malformations in mouse models of hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    Ola, Roxana; Dubrac, Alexandre; Han, Jinah; Zhang, Feng; Fang, Jennifer S; Larrivée, Bruno; Lee, Monica; Urarte, Ana A; Kraehling, Jan R; Genet, Gael; Hirschi, Karen K; Sessa, William C; Canals, Francesc V; Graupera, Mariona; Yan, Minhong; Young, Lawrence H; Oh, Paul S; Eichmann, Anne

    2016-11-29

    Activin receptor-like kinase 1 (ALK1) is an endothelial serine-threonine kinase receptor for bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) 9 and 10. Inactivating mutations in the ALK1 gene cause hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia type 2 (HHT2), a disabling disease characterized by excessive angiogenesis with arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Here we show that inducible, endothelial-specific homozygous Alk1 inactivation and BMP9/10 ligand blockade both lead to AVM formation in postnatal retinal vessels and internal organs including the gastrointestinal (GI) tract in mice. VEGF and PI3K/AKT signalling are increased on Alk1 deletion and BMP9/10 ligand blockade. Genetic deletion of the signal-transducing Vegfr2 receptor prevents excessive angiogenesis but does not fully revert AVM formation. In contrast, pharmacological PI3K inhibition efficiently prevents AVM formation and reverts established AVMs. Thus, Alk1 deletion leads to increased endothelial PI3K pathway activation that may be a novel target for the treatment of vascular lesions in HHT2.

  11. Endoplasmic reticulum quality control is involved in the mechanism of endoglin-mediated hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    Bassam R Ali

    Full Text Available Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT is an autosomal dominant genetic condition affecting the vascular system and is characterised by epistaxis, arteriovenous malformations and mucocutaneous and gastrointestinal telangiectases. This disorder affects approximately 1 in 8,000 people worldwide. Significant morbidity is associated with this condition in affected individuals, and anaemia can be a consequence of repeated haemorrhages from telangiectasia in the gut and nose. In the majority of the cases reported, the condition is caused by mutations in either ACVRL1 or endoglin genes, which encode components of the TGF-beta signalling pathway. Numerous missense mutations in endoglin have been reported as causative defects for HHT but the exact underlying cellular mechanisms caused by these mutations have not been fully established despite data supporting a role for the endoplasmic reticulum (ER quality control machinery. For this reason, we examined the subcellular trafficking of twenty-five endoglin disease-causing missense mutations. The mutant proteins were expressed in HeLa and HEK293 cell lines, and their subcellular localizations were established by confocal fluorescence microscopy alongside the analysis of their N-glycosylation profiles. ER quality control was found to be responsible in eight (L32R, V49F, C53R, V125D, A160D, P165L, I271N and A308D out of eleven mutants located on the orphan extracellular domain in addition to two (C363Y and C382W out of thirteen mutants in the Zona Pellucida (ZP domain. In addition, a single intracellular domain missense mutant was examined and found to traffic predominantly to the plasma membrane. These findings support the notion of the involvement of the ER's quality control in the mechanism of a significant number, but not all, missense endoglin mutants found in HHT type 1 patients. Other mechanisms including loss of interactions with signalling partners as well as adverse effects on functional

  12. Global Gene Expression Profiling of Telangiectasial Tissue from Patients with Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    Tørring, Pernille M; Larsen, Martin Jakob; Kjeldsen, Anette D

    2015-01-01

    and arteriovenous malformations in visceral organs, primarily the lungs, brain and liver. The most common symptom in HHT is epistaxis originating from nasal telangiectasia, which can be difficult to prevent and can lead to severe anaemia. The clinical manifestations of HHT are extremely variable, even within family...

  13. Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia: study of hepatic vascular alterations with multi-detector row helical CT and reconstruction programs

    Memeo, Maurizio; Stabile Ianora, Amato Antonio; Scaldapane, Arnaldo; Rotondo, Antonio; Angelelli, Giuseppe; Suppressa, Patrizia; Cirulli, Anna; Sabba', Carlo

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate hepatic alterations in patients affected by Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT) by using multidetector row helical CT (MDCT) and new reconstruction programs. Materials and methods: An MDCT multiphasic study of the liver was performed in 105 consecutive patients: 89 considered to be affected by HHT and 16 with suspicion of disease alone. The scan delay was determined by using a test bolus of contrast material. The CT examination was performed with a triphasic technique (double arterial phase and portal venous phase). multiplanar and angiographic reconstructions were then obtained, and the images checked for the presence of shunts, hepatic perfusion disorders, vascular lesions (telangiectasis and large confluent vascular masses), indirect signs of portal hypertension, and anatomical vascular variants. Results: Hepatic vascular alterations were found in 78/105 cases (67/89) patients affected by HHT and 11/16 patients with clinical suspicion alone). Therefore HHT diagnosis was excluded in 5 patients. 78/100 (78%) patients with HHT had intrahepatic vascular alterations: arterioportal shunts in 40/78 (51.2%) arteriosystemic shunts in 16/78 (20.5%) and both shunt types in 22/78 (28.3%). Intraparenchymal perfusion disorders were found in 46/78 (58.9%) patients. Telangiectasis were recognised in 50/78 (64.1%) patients. Large confluent vascular masses (LCVMs) were identified in 20/78 (25.6%) patients. indirect signs of portal hypertension were found in 46/78 (58.9%) cases. Variant hepatic arterial anatomy was present in 38/100 cases (38%). Conclusions: Multiphasic MDCT and the new reconstruction programs enable the identification and characterisation of the complex vascular alterations typical of HHT [it

  14. Efficacy and safety of thalidomide for the treatment of severe recurrent epistaxis in hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia: results of a non-randomised, single-centre, phase 2 study.

    Invernizzi, Rosangela; Quaglia, Federica; Klersy, Catherine; Pagella, Fabio; Ornati, Federica; Chu, Francesco; Matti, Elina; Spinozzi, Giuseppe; Plumitallo, Sara; Grignani, Pierangela; Olivieri, Carla; Bastia, Raffaella; Bellistri, Francesca; Danesino, Cesare; Benazzo, Marco; Balduini, Carlo L

    2015-11-01

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia is a genetic disease that leads to multiregional angiodysplasia. Severe recurrent epistaxis is the most common presentation, frequently leading to severe anaemia. Several therapeutic approaches have been investigated, but they are mostly palliative and have had variable results. We aimed to assess the efficacy of thalidomide for the reduction of epistaxis in patients with hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia that is refractory to standard therapy. We recruited patients aged 17 years or older with hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia who had severe recurrent epistaxis refractory to minimally invasive surgical procedures into an open-label, phase 2, non-randomised, single-centre study at IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo Foundation (Pavia, Italy). We gave patients thalidomide at a starting dose of 50 mg/day orally. If they had no response, we increased the thalidomide dose by 50 mg/day increments every 4 weeks, until a response was seen, up to a maximum dose of 200 mg/day. After patients had achieved a response, they continued treatment for 8-16 additional weeks. The primary endpoint was the efficacy of thalidomide measured as the percentage of patients who had reductions of at least one grade in the frequency, intensity, or duration of epistaxis. We followed up patients each month to assess epistaxis severity score and transfusion need, and any adverse events were reported. We included all patients who received any study drug and who participated in at least one post-baseline assessment in the primary efficacy population. The safety population consisted of all patients who received any dose of study treatment. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01485224. Between Dec 1, 2011, and May 12, 2014, we enrolled 31 patients. Median follow-up was 15·9 months (IQR 10·1-22·3). Three (10%, 95% CI 2-26) patients had a complete response, with bleeding stopped, 28 (90%, 95% CI 74-98) patients had partial responses

  15. Microglia in diffuse plaques in hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis (Dutch). An immunohistochemical study

    Maat-Schieman, M. L.; Rozemuller, A. J.; van Duinen, S. G.; Haan, J.; Eikelenboom, P.; Roos, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    In hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis (Dutch) (HCHWA-D) beta/A4 amyloid deposition is found in meningocortical blood vessels and in diffuse plaques in the cerebral cortex. Diffuse plaques putatively represent early stages in the formation of senile plaques. Microglia are intimately

  16. Neurovascular phenotypes in hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia patients according to age. Review of 50 consecutive patients aged 1 day-60 years

    Krings, T.; Ozanne, A.; Chng, S.M.; Alvarez, H.; Lasjaunias, P.L.; Rodesch, G.

    2005-01-01

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait with varying penetrance and expressivity. Some of the most devastating consequences of this disease result from cerebral vascular malformations that manifest themselves in either arteriovenous fistulae (AVF), small nidus-type arteriovenous malformations (AVM) or micro-AVMs with a nidus less than 1 cm in size. The purpose of this study was to compare the phenotypes of CNS-manifestations of HHT with the age of the patient. The charts and angiographic films of 50 patients diagnosed with HHT according to the Curacao criteria were retrospectively evaluated concerning age of onset of symptoms, or, if not applicable of first consultation. The files were reviewed for clinical presentation, family and personal history, while the patients' angiograms were analysed with respect to the number of lesions (single and multiple), the location (superficial supratentorial, deep supratentorial, infratentorial, and spinal), and type of lesion (fistulous AVM, nidus-type AVM, and micro-AVM). A total of 75 central nervous system manifestations of HHT were found. Lesions included seven spinal cord AVFs that were all present in the paediatric age group (mean age: 2.2 years), 34 cerebral AV fistulae, all but two affected patients were less than 6 years (mean age 3.0). Sixteen nidus type AVMs (mean age: 23.1 years) and 18 micro-AVMs (mean age: 31.8 years) were found. HHT displays an age-related penetrance of clinical manifestations. Since members of the same family can present with completely different phenotypes of this disease there seems to be no relationship between the type of mutation and the phenotype of the disease. Since there seems to be a continuum of vascular abnormalities (from large fistulous areas to small AVMs and micro-AVMs) associated with HHT, the most likely determinating factor of the HHT phenotype is the timing of the revealing event in relation to the maturity of the vessel

  17. Effect of Bevacizumab Nasal Spray on Epistaxis Duration in Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangectasia: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Dupuis-Girod, Sophie; Ambrun, Alexis; Decullier, Evelyne; Fargeton, Anne-Emmanuelle; Roux, Adeline; Bréant, Valentine; Colombet, Bettina; Rivière, Sophie; Cartier, César; Lacombe, Pascal; Chinet, Thierry; Blivet, Sandra; Blondel, Jean-Hugues; Gilbert-Dussardier, Brigitte; Dufour, Xavier; Michel, Justin; Harle, Jean-Robert; Dessi, Patrick; Faure, Frédéric

    2016-09-06

    Epistaxis is the most frequent and disabling manifestation of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). The efficacy of intravenous bevacizumab (an anti-vascular endothelial growth factor monoclonal antibody) for epistaxis has been shown. However, the efficacy of intranasal bevacizumab has yet to be evaluated. To evaluate the efficacy of 3 different doses of bevacizumab administered as a nasal spray in a repeated manner for the duration of nosebleeds in patients with HHT. Randomized, multicenter, placebo-controlled, phase 2/3 clinical trial with dose selection at an intermediate analysis and prespecified stopping rules (nonbinding stopping for futility). Patients aged 18 years or older with a diagnosis of HHT were recruited from 5 French centers from April 2014 to January 2015 with a 6-month follow-up after the end of treatment. Participants had a history of self-reported nosebleeds with a monthly duration of more than 20 minutes in at least the 3 months prior to inclusion corroborated by epistaxis grids completed during the same preinclusion period. Eighty consecutive HHT patients were randomized and treated in the phase 2 study, with 4 parallel groups in a 1:1:1:1 ratio. One group received placebo (n = 21); the other 3 received bevacizumab nasal spray. Each bevacizumab group received a different dose of the drug (25 mg [n = 20], 50 mg [n = 20], or 75 mg [n = 19] per treatment) in 3 doses 14 days apart for a total treatment duration of 4 weeks, resulting in a total dose of 75 mg, 150 mg, and 225 mg in each treatment group. Mean monthly epistaxis duration for 3 consecutive months immediately after the end of the treatment. Of the 80 patients who were randomized (mean age, 60.47 [SD, 10.61] years; 37 women [46.25%]), 75 completed the study. Mean monthly epistaxis duration measured at 3 months was not significantly different in the 59 patients receiving bevacizumab in comparison with the placebo group (P = .57) or between the bevacizumab groups

  18. Hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis in patients of Dutch origin is related to Alzheimer disease

    van Duinen, S.G.; Castano, E.M.; Prelli, F.; Bots, G.T.A.B.; Luyendijk, W.; Frangione, B.

    1987-01-01

    Hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis in Dutch patients is an autosomal dominant form of vascular amyloidosis restricted to the leptomeninges and cerebral cortex. Clinically the disease is characterized by cerebral hemorrhages leading to an early death. Immunohistochemical studies of five patients revealed that the vascular amyloid deposits reacted intensely with an antiserum raised against a synthetic peptide homologous to the Alzheimer disease-related β-protein. Silver stain-positive, senile plaque-like structures were also labeled by the antiserum, yet these lesions lacked the dense amyloid cores present in typical plaques of Alzheimer disease. No neurofibrillary tangles were present. Amyloid fibrils were purified from the leptomeningeal vessels of one patient who clinically had no signs of dementia. The protein had a molecular weight of ∼ 4000 and its partial amino acid sequence to position 21 showed homology to the β-protein of Alzheimer disease and Down syndrome. These results suggest that hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis of Dutch origin is pathogenetically related to Alzheimer disease and support the concept that the initial amyloid deposition in this disorder occurs in the vessel walls before damaging the brain parenchyma. Thus, deposition of β-protein in brain tissue seems to be related to a spectrum of diseases involving vascular syndromes, progressive dementia, or both

  19. Cellular processing of the amyloidogenic cystatin C variant of hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis, Icelandic type

    Benedikz, Eirikur; Merz, G S; Schwenk, V

    1999-01-01

    of an amyloidogenic mutation on the intracellular processing of its protein product. The protein, a mutant of the cysteine protease inhibitor cystatin C, is the amyloid precursor protein in Hereditary Cerebral Hemorrhage with Amyloidosis--Icelandic type (HCHWA-I). The amyloid fibers are composed of mutant cystatin C...... (L68Q) that lacks the first 10 amino acids. We have previously shown that processing of wild-type cystatin C entails formation of a transient intracellular dimer that dissociates prior to secretion, such that extracellular cystatin C is monomeric. We report here that the cystatin C mutation engenders...

  20. Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia: study of hepatic vascular alterations with multi-detector row helical CT and reconstruction programs; Telangiectasia emorragica ereditaria: TC multidetettore multifasica e programmi di ricostruzione nello studio delle alterazioni vascolari epatiche

    Memeo, Maurizio; Stabile Ianora, Amato Antonio; Scaldapane, Arnaldo; Rotondo, Antonio; Angelelli, Giuseppe [Policlinico Universitario, Bari (Italy). DiMIMP Sezione di Diagnostica per Immagini; Suppressa, Patrizia; Cirulli, Anna; Sabba' , Carlo [Policlinico Universitario, Bari (Italy). Centro Interdipartimentale per lo studio dell' HHT

    2005-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate hepatic alterations in patients affected by Hereditary Haemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT) by using multidetector row helical CT (MDCT) and new reconstruction programs. Materials and methods: An MDCT multiphasic study of the liver was performed in 105 consecutive patients: 89 considered to be affected by HHT and 16 with suspicion of disease alone. The scan delay was determined by using a test bolus of contrast material. The CT examination was performed with a triphasic technique (double arterial phase and portal venous phase). multiplanar and angiographic reconstructions were then obtained, and the images checked for the presence of shunts, hepatic perfusion disorders, vascular lesions (telangiectasis and large confluent vascular masses), indirect signs of portal hypertension, and anatomical vascular variants. Results: Hepatic vascular alterations were found in 78/105 cases (67/89) patients affected by HHT and 11/16 patients with clinical suspicion alone). Therefore HHT diagnosis was excluded in 5 patients. 78/100 (78%) patients with HHT had intrahepatic vascular alterations: arterioportal shunts in 40/78 (51.2%) arteriosystemic shunts in 16/78 (20.5%) and both shunt types in 22/78 (28.3%). Intraparenchymal perfusion disorders were found in 46/78 (58.9%) patients. Telangiectasis were recognised in 50/78 (64.1%) patients. Large confluent vascular masses (LCVMs) were identified in 20/78 (25.6%) patients. indirect signs of portal hypertension were found in 46/78 (58.9%) cases. Variant hepatic arterial anatomy was present in 38/100 cases (38%). Conclusions: Multiphasic MDCT and the new reconstruction programs enable the identification and characterisation of the complex vascular alterations typical of HHT. [Italian] Scopo: Valutare le alterazioni epatiche nei pazienti affetti da Telangiectasia Emorraica Ereditaria (TEE) utilizzando una TC multidetettore (TCMD) ed in nuovi programmi di ricostruzione. Materiale e metodi: E' stato eseguito uno

  1. Microglia in diffuse plaques in hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis (Dutch). An immunohistochemical study.

    Maat-Schieman, M L; Rozemuller, A J; van Duinen, S G; Haan, J; Eikelenboom, P; Roos, R A

    1994-09-01

    In hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis (Dutch) (HCHWA-D) beta/A4 amyloid deposition is found in meningocortical blood vessels and in diffuse plaques in the cerebral cortex. Diffuse plaques putatively represent early stages in the formation of senile plaques. Microglia are intimately associated with congophilic plaques in Alzheimer's disease (AD), but microglial involvement in diffuse plaque formation is controversial. Therefore, we studied the relationship between microglia and diffuse plaques in the cerebral cortex of four patients with HCHWA-D using a panel of macrophage/microglia markers (mAbs LCA, LeuM5, LeuM3, LN3, KP1, OKIa, CLB54, Mac1, Ki-M6, AMC30 and the lectin RCA-1). Eight AD patients, one demented Down's syndrome (DS) patient and four non-demented controls were included for comparison. In controls and HCHWA-D patients ramified or "resting" microglia formed a reticular array in cortical gray and subcortical white matter. Microglial cells in or near HCHWA-D diffuse plaques retained their normal regular spacing and ramified morphology. In AD/DS gray matter more microglial cells were stained than in controls and HCHWA-D patients. Intensely immunoreactive microglia with enlarged cell bodies and short, thick processes clustered in congophilic plaques. In contrast to the resting microglia, these "activated microglia" strongly expressed class II major histocompatibility complex antigen, HLA-DR, and were AMC30-immunoreactive. These findings support the view that microglia play a role in the formation of congophilic plaques but do not initiate diffuse plaque formation. Another finding in this study is the presence of strong monocyte/macrophage marker immunoreactivity in the wall of cortical congophilic blood vessels in HCHWA-D.

  2. Telangiectasia hemorrágica hereditária e malformações arteriovenosas pulmonares – Embolização com rolhão vascular Amplatzer

    Cláudia Sofia Santos

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Resumo: As malformações arteriovenosas pulmonares (MAVP estão associadas a telangiectasia hemorrágica hereditária em cerca de 70% dos casos, podendo cursar com complicações neurológicas graves decorrentes do embolismo paradoxal potencial. A terapêutica das malformações é realizada no sentido de prevenir estas complicações.Descreve-se o caso clínico de uma doente com duas MAVP, no contexto de telangiectasia hemorrágica hereditária, submetida a embolização com o rolhão vascular Amplatzer. Este novo dispositivo é cada vez mais utilizado nestas situações, salientando-se algumas das suas características e vantagens em relação a outras técnicas de embolização mais frequentemente utilizadas. Abstract: Pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs are associated to hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia in about 70% of the cases. PAVMs are associated to serious neurologic complications, secondary to inherent paradoxical embolisms. Treatment of the malformations is done to prevent these complications.The authors report a clinical case of a patient with two PAVMs, with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, who was treated by embolization with an Amplatzer vascular plug, a new device increasingly used in these situations. The authors emphasise some of its characteristics and advantages when compared with other embolization techniques most commonly used. Palavras-chave: Malformação arteriovenosa pulmonar, telangiectasia hemorrágica hereditária, rolhão vascular Amplatzer, Key-words: Pulmonary arteriovenous malformations, hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, Amplatzer vascular plug

  3. Bladder Wall Telangiectasia in a Patient with Ataxia-Telangiectasia and How to Manage?

    Fatma Deniz Aygün

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T is a rare neurodegenerative, inherited disease causing severe morbidity. Oculocutaneous telangiectasias are almost constant findings among the affected cases as telangiectasia is considered the main clinical finding for diagnosis. Vascular abnormalities in organs have been reported infrequently but bladder wall telangiectasias are extremely rare. We aimed to report recurrent hemorrhage from bladder wall telangiectasia in a 9-year-old boy with A-T who had received intravenous cyclophosphamide for non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Since A-T patients are known to be more susceptible to chemical agents, we suggested that possibly cyclophosphamide was the drug which induced bladder wall injury in this patient.

  4. Malformações arteriovenosas pulmonares – Associação a telangiectasia hemorrágica hereditária. Casos clínicos e rastreio familiar

    Diva Ferreira

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Resumo: As malformações arteriovenosas pulmonares são raras e mais de metade dos casos surgem em associação a telangiectasia hemorrágica hereditária.Faz-se uma revisão teórica sobre a apresentação clínica, abordagem diagnóstica, terapêutica e prognóstico destas malformações vasculares. Estão associadas a morbilidade e mortalidade consideráveis, pelo que se preconiza o seu tratamento, assim como o rastreio dos familiares directos quando se identificam malformações arteriovenosas pulmonares num doente com telangiectasia hemorrágica hereditária. Ainda não existem estudos prospectivos que estabeleçam o melhor plano de estudo do doente e seus familiares.Descrevem-se dois casos clínicos de malformações arteriovenosas pulmonares no contexto familiar de telangiectasia hemorrágica hereditária. A identificação das doentes implicou o rastreio familiar que permitiu detectar malformações arteriovenosas pulmonares em dois familiares e excluir o envolvimento pulmonar em quatro familiares com a doença.Rev Port Pneumol 2006; XII (4: 383-399 Abstract: Pulmonary arteriovenous malformations are a rare disorder associated to hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia in over50 % of the cases.Clinical presentation, diagnostic work-up, therapeutic options and prognosis are reviewed by the authors. Pulmonary arteriovenous malformations are known to have considerable morbidity and mortality, their treatment being advisable as well as their screening among family members, especially if the index case is diagnosed with both pulmonary arteriovenous malformations and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. To this moment prospective studies establishing the best diagnostic work-up for the patients and their families are lacking.The authors report two pulmonary arteriovenous malformations cases in a family with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. Patient’s diagnosis led

  5. Germline mutations in BMP9 are not identified in a series of Danish and French patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    Tørring, P. M.; Dupuis-Girod, S.; Giraud, S

    2016-01-01

    undiscovered HHT causative genes. A new vascular-anomaly syndrome caused by mutations in BMP9 has recently been published. Three patients suspected of HHT, with familial nose bleedings and dermal manifestations not characteristic for HHT, were described. Although, it was concluded that these patients probably...

  6. Case Report: Neuro-Imaging Findings in Ataxia Telangiectasia

    Farhad Mahvelati

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Ataxia Telangiectasia (AT is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder in which cutaneous and scleral Telangiectasia, cerebellar ataxia and immunodeficiency occur. There is a high incidence of development of malignant tumors, mainly lymphomas. Cerebellar atrophy is the most prominent abnormality and is shown better by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI than CT-Scan. Intracranial hemorrhage occurs rarely. We report a 7 years old boy who admitted for recurrent pulmonary infections. His examination showed ataxic gait with decreased deep tendon reflexes in lower extremities. He had telangiectasia in the eyes and his speech was slurred and difficult. Brain MRI showed cerebellar atrophy with diffuse hyperintensity in white matter, most prominent in occipital region, which was suggestive of leukodystrophy. This white matter change was not reported before in AT.

  7. Ataxia telangiectasia: a review

    Cynthia Rothblum-Oviatt

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Definition of the disease Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T is an autosomal recessive disorder primarily characterized by cerebellar degeneration, telangiectasia, immunodeficiency, cancer susceptibility and radiation sensitivity. A-T is often referred to as a genome instability or DNA damage response syndrome. Epidemiology The world-wide prevalence of A-T is estimated to be between 1 in 40,000 and 1 in 100,000 live births. Clinical description A-T is a complex disorder with substantial variability in the severity of features between affected individuals, and at different ages. Neurological symptoms most often first appear in early childhood when children begin to sit or walk. They have immunological abnormalities including immunoglobulin and antibody deficiencies and lymphopenia. People with A-T have an increased predisposition for cancers, particularly of lymphoid origin. Pulmonary disease and problems with feeding, swallowing and nutrition are common, and there also may be dermatological and endocrine manifestations. Etiology A-T is caused by mutations in the ATM (Ataxia Telangiectasia, Mutated gene which encodes a protein of the same name. The primary role of the ATM protein is coordination of cellular signaling pathways in response to DNA double strand breaks, oxidative stress and other genotoxic stress. Diagnosis The diagnosis of A-T is usually suspected by the combination of neurologic clinical features (ataxia, abnormal control of eye movement, and postural instability with one or more of the following which may vary in their appearance: telangiectasia, frequent sinopulmonary infections and specific laboratory abnormalities (e.g. IgA deficiency, lymphopenia especially affecting T lymphocytes and increased alpha-fetoprotein levels. Because certain neurological features may arise later, a diagnosis of A-T should be carefully considered for any ataxic child with an otherwise elusive diagnosis. A diagnosis of A-T can be confirmed by the

  8. Hereditary syndromes with enhanced radiosensitivity

    Lohmann, D.

    2000-01-01

    Sensitivity to ionizing radiation is modified by heritable genetic factors. This is exemplified by heritable disorders that are characterized by predisposition to the development of neoplasms. Cells derived from patients with ataxia telangiectasia, Nijmegen breakage syndrome and ataxia telangiektasia-like disorder show a markedly changed reaction to exposure to ionizing radiation. Correspondingly, at least in patients with ataxia telangiectasia, an enhanced radiosensitivity that is of clinical importance has been observed. In addition to these recessive disorders, some autosomal dominant cancer predisposition syndromes are associated with increased radiosensitivity. As cells from these patients still have a normal allele (that is dominant over the mutant allele), the cellular phenotype is most often normal. Specifically, there is no overtly altered reaction in response to ionizing radiation. Nevertheless, two dominant cancer predisposition syndromes, namely hereditary retinoblastoma and naevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, are associated with a enhanced radiosensitivity as indicated by increased development of tumors following radiation therapy. (orig.) [de

  9. Hepatic telangiectasia in Osler's disease treated with arterial embolization

    Goethlin, J H; Nordgard, K; Jonsson, K; Nyman, U

    1982-02-01

    Hepatic hereditary telangiectasia in 2 females was treated with hepatic artery embolization. In one patient both peripheral and central arterial occlusion was performed; the patient died of massive gastro-intestinal bleeding 2 months later. Autopsy showed extensive regions with necrosis in the right liver lobe. In the next patient only central occlusion of the right hepatic artery was performed and the arterio-venous shunting in the left liver lobe left remaining. After a long reconvalescence period the patient recovered completely. It is advocated to centrally occlude only that hepatic artery supplying the most affected parts of the liver in Osler's disease. Thus extensive necrosis with possible ensuing death may be avoided.

  10. Hashimoto thyroiditis associated with ataxia telangiectasia.

    Patiroglu, Turkan; Gungor, Hatice Eke; Unal, Ekrem; Kurtoglu, Selim; Yikilmaz, Ali; Patiroglu, Tahir

    2012-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia is a rare genetic disease characterized by neurological manifestations, infections, and cancers. In addition to these cardinal features, different autoimmune diseases can be seen in patients with ataxia telangiectasia. Although there were reports of positive autoimmune thyroid antibodies associated with ataxia telangiectasia, to our knowledge, we report the first cases of nodular Hashimoto thyroiditis in two patients with ataxia telangiectasia in the English medical literature. These cases illustrate that despite the rarity of nodular Hashimoto thyroiditis associated with ataxia telangiectasia, physicians should be aware of this possibility. Furthermore, thyroid examination of patient with ataxia telangiectasia is recommended for early diagnosis.

  11. National mutation study among Danish patients with hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia

    Tørring, P M; Brusgaard, K; Ousager, L B

    2014-01-01

    carry mutations in the ENG, ACVRL1 or SMAD4 genes. Here, we report on the genetic heterogeneity in the Danish national HHT population and address the prevalence of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVM). Probands of 107 apparently unrelated families received genetic testing, including sequencing...... and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) analyses of ENG, ACVRL1 and SMAD4. These 107 families included 320 patients confirmed to have HHT either clinically or genetically. In 89% of the probands (n=95), a mutation was identified. We detected 64 unique mutations of which 27 (41%) were novel....... Large deletions were identified in ENG and ACVRL1. The prevalence of PAVM was 52.3% in patients with an ENG mutation and 12.9% in the ACVRL1 mutation carriers. We diagnosed 80% of the patients clinically, fulfilling the Curaçao criteria, and those remaining were diagnosed by genetic testing...

  12. Vertical transmission of macular telangiectasia type 2.

    Delaere, Lien; Spielberg, Leigh; Leys, Anita M

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to report vertical transmission of macular telangiectasia type 2 and type 2 diabetes mellitus in 3 families. In this retrospective interventional case series, the charts of patients with inherited macular telangiectasia type 2 were reviewed. A large spectrum of presentations of macular telangiectasia type 2 was observed and has been studied with different techniques including best-corrected visual acuity, microperimetry, confocal blue reflectance fundus autofluorescence, fluorescein angiography, and time domain and spectral domain optical coherence tomography. Vertical transmission of macular telangiectasia type 2 and associated type 2 diabetes mellitus is described in 3 families. Symptomatic as well as asymptomatic eyes with macular telangiectasia type 2 were identified. In 2 families, a mother and son experienced visual loss and were diagnosed with macular telangiectasia type 2. All 4 patients had type 2 diabetes. Diabetic retinopathy was observed in one mother and her son. In the third family, the index patient was diagnosed macular telangiectasia type 2 after complaints of metamorphopsia. She and her family members had type 2 diabetes mellitus, and further screening of her family revealed familial macular telangiectasia type 2. None of the patients were treated for macular telangiectasia type 2. Macular telangiectasia type 2 may be more common than previously assumed, as vision can remain preserved and patients may go undiagnosed. Screening of family members is indicated, and detection of mild anomalies is possible using fundus autofluorescence and spectral domain optical coherence tomography.

  13. Hereditary angioedema

    ... disease; HAE- Hereditary angioedema; Kallikrein inhibitor-HAE: bradykinin receptor antagonist-HAE; C1-inhibitors-HAE; Hives-HAE ... aunt, uncle, or grandparent. Dental procedures, sickness (including colds and the flu), and surgery may trigger HAE ...

  14. Atm reactivation reverses ataxia telangiectasia phenotypes in vivo.

    Di Siena, Sara; Campolo, Federica; Gimmelli, Roberto; Di Pietro, Chiara; Marazziti, Daniela; Dolci, Susanna; Lenzi, Andrea; Nussenzweig, Andre; Pellegrini, Manuela

    2018-02-22

    Hereditary deficiencies in DNA damage signaling are invariably associated with cancer predisposition, immunodeficiency, radiation sensitivity, gonadal abnormalities, premature aging, and tissue degeneration. ATM kinase has been established as a central player in DNA double-strand break repair and its deficiency causes ataxia telangiectasia, a rare, multi-system disease with no cure. So ATM represents a highly attractive target for the development of novel types of gene therapy or transplantation strategies. Atm tamoxifen-inducible mouse models were generated to explore whether Atm reconstitution is able to restore Atm function in an Atm-deficient background. Body weight, immunodeficiency, spermatogenesis, and radioresistance were recovered in transgenic mice within 1 month from Atm induction. Notably, life span was doubled after Atm restoration, mice were protected from thymoma and no cerebellar defects were observed. Atm signaling was functional after DNA damage in vivo and in vitro. In summary, we propose a new Atm mouse model to investigate novel therapeutic strategies for ATM activation in ataxia telangiectasia disease.

  15. Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer

    ... Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer Request Permissions Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 10/2017 What is hereditary diffuse gastric cancer? Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) is a rare ...

  16. Radiosensitivity in ataxia-telangiectasia

    Lavin, M.F.; Khanna, K.K.; Watters, D.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Radiosensitivity is a major hallmark of the human genetic disorder ataxia-telangiectasia. This hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation has been demonstrated in vitro after exposure of patients to therapeutic thought to be the major factor contculture. Clearly an understanding of the nature of the molecular defect in ataxia-telangiectasia will be of considerable assistance in delineating additional pathways that determine cellular radiosensitivity/radioresistance. Furthermore, since patients with this syndrome are also predisposed to developing a number of leukaemias and lymphomas the possible connection between radiosensitivity and cancer predisposition is of interest. Now that the gene (ATM) responsible for this genetic disease has been cloned and identified, progress is being made in determining the role of the ATM protein in mediating the effects of cellular exposure to ionizing radiation and other forms of redox stress. Proteins such as the product of the tumour suppressor gene p53 and the proto-oncogene c-Abl (a protein tyrosine kinase) have been shown to interact with ATM. Since several intermediate steps in both the p53 and c-Abl pathways, activated by ionizing radiation, are known it will be possible to map the position of ATM in these pathways and describe its mechanism of action. What are the clinical implications of understanding the molecular basis of the defect in ataxia-telangiectasia? As outlined above since radiosensitivity is a universal characteristic of A-T understanding the mechanism of action of ATM will provide additional information or radiation signalling in human cells. With this information it may be possible to sensitize tumour cells to radiation and thus increase the therapeutic benefit of radiotherapy. This might involve the use of small molecules that would interfere with the normal ATM controlled pathways and thus sensitize cells to radiation or alternatively it might involve the efficient introduction of ATM anti-sense c

  17. Radiosensitivity in ataxia-telangiectasia

    Lavin, M.F. [Royal Brisbane Hospital, QLD (Australia). Queensland Institute of Medical Research and The Department of Surgery; Khanna, K.K.; Watters, D. [Royal Brisbane Hospital, QLD (Australia). Queensland Institute of Medical Research

    1998-12-31

    Full text: Radiosensitivity is a major hallmark of the human genetic disorder ataxia-telangiectasia. This hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation has been demonstrated in vitro after exposure of patients to therapeutic thought to be the major factor contculture. Clearly an understanding of the nature of the molecular defect in ataxia-telangiectasia will be of considerable assistance in delineating additional pathways that determine cellular radiosensitivity/radioresistance. Furthermore, since patients with this syndrome are also predisposed to developing a number of leukaemias and lymphomas the possible connection between radiosensitivity and cancer predisposition is of interest. Now that the gene (ATM) responsible for this genetic disease has been cloned and identified, progress is being made in determining the role of the ATM protein in mediating the effects of cellular exposure to ionizing radiation and other forms of redox stress. Proteins such as the product of the tumour suppressor gene p53 and the proto-oncogene c-Abl (a protein tyrosine kinase) have been shown to interact with ATM. Since several intermediate steps in both the p53 and c-Abl pathways, activated by ionizing radiation, are known it will be possible to map the position of ATM in these pathways and describe its mechanism of action. What are the clinical implications of understanding the molecular basis of the defect in ataxia-telangiectasia? As outlined above since radiosensitivity is a universal characteristic of A-T understanding the mechanism of action of ATM will provide additional information or radiation signalling in human cells. With this information it may be possible to sensitize tumour cells to radiation and thus increase the therapeutic benefit of radiotherapy. This might involve the use of small molecules that would interfere with the normal ATM controlled pathways and thus sensitize cells to radiation or alternatively it might involve the efficient introduction of ATM anti-sense c

  18. Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    ... Home » Patients & Families » About Stroke » Intracerebral Hemorrhage Intracerebral Hemorrhage What is a Stroke? Ischemic Stroke Intracerebral Hemorrhage Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Pediatric Stroke Warning Signs Stroke Statistics ...

  19. Hereditary angioedema.

    Bracho, Francisco A

    2005-11-01

    Hereditary angioedema is an autosomal-dominant deficiency of C1 inhibitor--a serpin inhibitor of kallikrein, C1r, C1s, factor XII, and plasmin. Quantitative or qualitative deficiency of C1 inhibitor leads to the generation of vasoactive mediators, most likely bradykinin. The clinical syndrome is repeated bouts of nonpruritic, nonpitting edema of the face, larynx, extermities, and intestinal viscera. Recently, investigators, physicians, and industry have demonstrated a renewed interest in the biology and treatment of hereditary angioedema. Investigators have generated a C1INH-/- mouse model that has demonstrated the importance of the contact activation system for hereditary angioedema-related vascular permeability. An interactive database of mutations is available electronically. Investigators have continued exploration into mRNA/protein levels. The proceedings of a recent workshop have been impressive in the scope and depth. Clinicians have produced consensus documents and expert reviews. The pharmaceutical industry has initiated clinical trails with novel agents. Hereditary angioedema is often misdiagnosed and poorly treated. Diagnosis requires careful medical and family history and the measurement of functional C1 inhibitor and C4 levels. Attenuated androgens, anti-fibrinolytics, and C1 inhibitor concentrates are used for long-term and preprocedure prophylaxis, but have significant drawbacks. C1 inhibitor concentrates and fresh frozen plasma are available for acute intervention. The mainstays of supportive care are airway monitoring, pain relief, hydration, and control of nausea. New agents such as recombinant C1 inhibitor, kallikrein inhibitors, and bradykinin inhibitors may offer safer and more tolerable treatments.

  20. [Ataxia telangiectasia: review of 13 new cases].

    Valbuena, O; Póo, P; Campistol, J; Vernet, A; Fernández-Alvarez, E; Sierra, I; Gean, E

    1996-01-01

    We report the review of 13 patients who were diagnosed of ataxia telangiectasia before 6 years of age. All of them manifested cerebelous ataxia, oculocutaneus telangiectasias (11), sinopulmonary infections (9), dystonia (9), oculomotor apraxia (9) and Burkitt linfoma (1). We analyse the most common presentation of the disease in early stages and the complementary studies performed. The prompt diagnosis allow us a better control of infections, malignant process and finally the possibility of genetic counseling.

  1. Ataxia-telangiectasia: future prospects

    Chaudhary MW

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Mohammed Wajid Chaudhary, Raidah Saleem Al-Baradie Pediatric Neurology, Neurosciences Centre, King Fahad Specialist Hospital, Dammam, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Abstract: Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T is an autosomal recessive multi-system disorder caused by mutation in the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated gene (ATM. ATM is a large serine/threonine protein kinase, a member of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase-related protein kinase (PIKK family whose best-studied function is as master controller of signal transduction for the DNA damage response (DDR in the event of double strand breaks (DSBs. The DDR rapidly recognizes DNA lesions and initiates the appropriate cellular programs to maintain genome integrity. This includes the coordination of cell-cycle checkpoints, transcription, translation, DNA repair, metabolism, and cell fate decisions, such as apoptosis or senescence. DSBs can be generated by exposure to ionizing radiation (IR or various chemical compounds, such as topoisomerase inhibitors, or can be part of programmed generation and repair of DSBs via cellular enzymes needed for the generation of the antibody repertoire as well as the maturation of germ cells. AT patients have immunodeficiency, and are sterile with gonadal dysgenesis as a result of defect in meiotic recombination. In the cells of nervous system ATM has additional role in vesicle dynamics as well as in the maintenance of the epigenetic code of histone modifications. Moderate levels of ATM are associated with prolonged lifespan through resistance to oxidative stress. ATM inhibitors are being viewed as potential radiosensitizers as part of cancer radiotherapy. Though there is no cure for the disease at present, glucocorticoids have been shown to induce alternate splicing site in the gene for ATM partly restoring its activity, but their most effective timing in the disease natural history is not yet known. Gene therapy is promising but large size of the gene makes it technically difficult

  2. Intraretinal hemorrhages in cystoid macular edema.

    Bovino, J A; Kelly, T J; Marcus, D F

    1984-08-01

    Retinal hemorrhages can be associated with typical cystoid macular edema. We examined the fundus photographs and fluorescein angiograms of 313 eyes of 264 patients with documented cystoid macular edema to establish the incidence and characteristics of associated intraretinal hemorrhages. As we wanted to study only those hemorrhages unique to cystoid macular edema, we excluded 86 eyes because the patients had diseases known to be associated with retinal hemorrhages. These diseases included diabetes mellitus, branch retinal vein occlusion, hypertensive retinopathy, venous stasis retinopathy, and perifoveal telangiectasia. Of the remaining 227 eyes with cystoid macular edema, 56 (24.7%) were identified with retinal hemorrhages not associated with systemic disease. The hemorrhages were characteristically oval, round, or linear and frequently filled or partially filled the intraretinal cystoid space. In many patients, a blood-fluid level was observed.

  3. Hereditary hemochromatosis

    Stephen A. Geller

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH is the most commonly identified autosomal recessive genetic disorder in the white population, characterized by increased intestinal iron absorption and secondary abnormal accumulation in parenchymal organs, not infrequently accompanied by functional impairment. This entity is associated with mutations of the HFE gene (located on the short arm of chromosome 6 at location 6p22.2; closely linked to the HLA-A3 locus, which encodes the HFE protein, a membrane protein thought to regulate iron absorption by affecting the interaction between transferrin receptor and transferrin.

  4. Vitreous hemorrhage as a clue to late presenting Pulmonary Arterio Venous Malformation

    Brijesh Takkar

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Retinal vasculature is frequently altered in systemic vascular disorders such as Diabetes and Hypertension. We present a rare case in which vitreous hemorrhage was the presenting sign of an underlying congenital cyanotic heart disease. Keywords: Vitreous hemorrhage, Cyanotic heart disease, Conjunctival telangiectasia

  5. Splinter hemorrhages

    Fingernail hemorrhage ... Splinter hemorrhages look like thin, red to reddish-brown lines of blood under the nails. They run in the direction of nail growth. They are named splinter hemorrhages because they look like a splinter under the ...

  6. Very early disease manifestations of macular telangiectasia type 2

    Issa, P.C.; Heeren, T.F.C.; Kupitz, E.H.; Holz, F.G.; Berendschot, T.T.J.M.

    Background: To report very early morphologic and functional alterations in patients with macular telangiectasia type 2. Methods: Patients with asymmetric disease manifestations, in whom retinal alterations characteristic for macular telangiectasia type 2 were present in one but not in the apparently

  7. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary pancreatitis

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Hereditary pancreatitis Hereditary pancreatitis Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Hereditary pancreatitis is a genetic condition characterized by recurrent episodes ...

  8. Genetic and cellular features of ataxia telangiectasia

    Taylor, A M.R.; Byrd, P J; McConville, C M; Thacker, S [Birmingham Univ. (United Kingdom). CRC Dept. of Cancer Studies

    1994-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (AT) is a developmental disorder in which many organ systems are affected. The children are recognized by a progressive cerebellar deterioration. The gene for AT has now been localized to a region of chromosome 11q22-23 of no more than 3Mb in size and its product appears to be involved directly or indirectly in some form of DNA recombination. Patients and their cells are unusually sensitive to ionizing radiation and various radiometric drugs. Observations on the progressive nature of the disorder, with loss of selected cells or failure to develop normally, might be compatible with the pathological effect of an inability to correctly regulate apoptosis in some cell lineages. While this is an intriguing speculation, there is, at present, no evidence for such a defect in AT. (author).

  9. Complementation analysis of ataxia-telangiectasia

    Jaspers, N.G.; Painter, R.B.; Paterson, M.C.; Kidson, C.; Inoue, T.

    1985-01-01

    In a number of laboratories genetic analysis of ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) has been performed by studying the expression of the AT phenotype in fused somatic cells or mixtures of cell-free extracts from different patients. Complementation of the defective response to ionizing radiation was observed frequently, considering four different parameters for radiosensitivity in AT. The combined results from studies on cultured fibroblasts or lymphoblastoid cells from 17 unrelated families revealed the presence of at least four and possibly nine complementation groups. These findings suggest that there is an extensive genetic heterogeneity in AT. More extensive studies are needed for an integration of these data and to provide a set of genetically characterized cell strains for future research of the AT genetic defect

  10. Cell biological study on ataxia-telangiectasia

    Ohta, Shigeru; Katsura, Tadahiko; Shimada, Morimi; Shima, Akihiro; Chishiro, Hiroko; Kasahara, Yoshitaka.

    1985-01-01

    Diagnosis of ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) has largely been dependent on the clinical findings such as cerebellar ataxia, telangiectasia, and immunological deficiency. However, diagnosis of AT by these ordinary criteria is sometimes not sufficient because of the lack of immunological abnormalities. We examined three cases of AT by ordinary clinical criteria and also by X-ray sensitivity of cultured skin fibroblasts. Case 1, a 9-year-old boy, revealed typical clinical features of AT. However, he had no abnormality in serum IgA or IgE. Case 2, a 10-year-old boy, showed decreased serum IgA level. Case 3, a 19-year-old female, had typical clinical features of AT with normal serum IgA, and developed papillary adenocarcinoma of thyroid which was surgically removed. Fibroblast strains derived from these three cases of AT and from the parents of Case 3 were examined with regard to X-ray sensitivity. Three fibroblast strains derived from AT patients (AT homozygotes) showed remarkable hypersensitivity to X-ray. Fibroblast strains derived from the parents (AT heterozygotes) of Case 3, however, showed normal X-ray sensitivity. Recently, AT fibroblasts have been known to show hypersensitivity also to some mutagen like neocarzinostazin as reported by Shiloh et al. Fibroblasts from Case 3 revealed hypersensitivity to neocarzinostazin. However, the sensitivity of the strains from AT heterozygotes (the parents of Case 3) showed no apparent difference from that of control cells. The assay system for mutagen is quite unstable and proper conditioning of the seeding cell number is important for the carrier detection. However, the diagnosis of AT homozygotes was definitely established by X-ray irradiation to cultured fibroblasts from patients. (author)

  11. Preretinal hemorrhage

    Eduardo Felippe

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available A case of Valsalva hemorrhagic retinopathy treated with Nd:YAGlaser indescribed. The patient presented decreased visual acuityafter coughing, and a preretinal hemorrhage was diagnosed in theposterior pole; puncturing the posterior hyaloid face was performedwith Nd:Yag laser. Rapid hemorrhage absorption was observedafter the therapy proposed and visual acuity was recovered. Nd:Yaglaser proved to be safe and efficient in the management of preretinalhemorrhage.

  12. Learning about Hereditary Hemochromatosis

    Skip to main content Learning About Hereditary Hemochromatosis Enter Search Term(s): Español Research Funding An Overview Bioinformatics Current Grants Education and Training Funding Extramural Research ...

  13. Long non-coding RNA expression profiles in hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia

    Tørring, Pernille M; Larsen, Martin Jakob; Kjeldsen, Anette D

    2014-01-01

    transcriptome, we wanted to assess whether lncRNAs play a role in the molecular pathogenesis of HHT manifestations. By microarray technology, we profiled lncRNA transcripts from HHT nasal telangiectasial and non-telangiectasial tissue using a paired design. The microarray probes were annotated using the GENCODE...... v.16 dataset, identifying 4,810 probes mapping to 2,811 lncRNAs. Comparing HHT telangiectasial tissue with HHT non-telangiectasial tissue, we identified 42 lncRNAs that are differentially expressed (qUsing GREAT, a tool that assumes cis-regulation, we showed that differently expressed lncRNAs...... to the TGF-β signalling pathway. The exact mechanism of how haploinsufficiency of ENG and ACVRL1 leads to HHT manifestations remains to be identified. As long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are increasingly recognized as key regulators of gene expression and constitute a sizable fraction of the human...

  14. Ataxia telangiectasia: LET dependence of cellular inactivation

    Blakely, E.A.; Tobias, C.A.

    1984-01-01

    Human Ataxia telangiectasia cells (AT 2SF line) have been irradiated in vitro under aerobic and hypoxic conditions with heavy-ion beams accelerated at the Berkeley Bevalac as a part of a study to characterize the radiation responses of genetically sensitive and resistant cell lines to high LET radiations. Results from track-segment exposures to neon, silicon, argon and iron ion beams accelerated to initial energies of from 225 to 670 MeV/amu provided an LET range between 30 to 1,000 KeV/μm. The data indicate: (1) The sensitivity of AT cells increases with increasing LET, similar to resistant human lines (e.g., T-1 cells). However, due to efficient repair, T-1 cells are more resistant than AT cells at LET values below 200 keV/μm; (2) Maximum cell kill occurs for both lines at 100-200 keV/μm; at higher LET the sensitivity of the two lines approach each other; (3) There is only small variation in the sensitivity of AT cells to particles of various atomic numbers at the same LET; differences are more pronounced in the LET domain between 50 and 200 keV/μm; and (4) AT cells have slightly lower OER values than T-1 cells in the range of LET studied below 200 keV/μm

  15. Diode laser for the treatment of telangiectasias following hemangioma involution.

    Cerrati, Eric W; O, Teresa M; Chung, Hoyun; Waner, Milton

    2015-02-01

    Infantile hemangiomas are well known for their rapid growth during the first 6 to 9 months of life, followed by a spontaneous but slow involution. The standard of care is to treat these lesions at an early age with propranolol to expedite the involution process; however, surgery still remains an active component in the management. Medical treatment with propranolol or natural involution will often result in residual telangiectasias. We evaluated the efficacy of using a diode laser as a treatment for telangiectasias following cervicofacial infantile hemangioma involution. Case series with chart review. Tertiary care hospital and practice specializing in the care of vascular anomalies. Twenty patients, aged 4 months to 11 years (average 2.69 years), underwent treatment with a 532-nm diode laser to treat the residual telangiectasias following hemangioma involution. All procedures were performed in the operating room. To assess the efficacy, we independently evaluated pre- and posttreatment digital photographs and ranked them on a 0- to 4-point scale (0 = no change and 4 = complete response). Adverse reactions were also recorded. The telangiectasias showed considerable improvement following treatment. In more than half of the patients treated, the affected area demonstrated a complete response. No adverse reactions were noted. A 532-nm diode laser effectively treats the remaining telangiectasias following hemangioma involution. Whether used independently or in conjunction with other treatment modalities, the diode laser should be part of the surgical armamentarium when treating infantile hemangiomas. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2014.

  16. Subconjunctival hemorrhage

    ... the eyes Viral infection Certain eye surgeries or injuries A subconjunctival hemorrhage is common in newborn infants. In this case, the condition is thought to be caused by the pressure changes across the infant's body during childbirth.

  17. Intracranial Hemorrhage

    2011-01-01

    Intracranial hemorrhage is a life-threatening condition, the outcome of which can be improved by intensive care. Intracranial hemorrhage may be spontaneous, precipitated by an underlying vascular malformation, induced by trauma, or related to therapeutic anticoagulation. The goals of critical care are to assess the proximate cause, minimize the risks of hemorrhage expansion through blood pressure control and correction of coagulopathy, and obliterate vascular lesions with a high risk of acute rebleeding. Simple bedside scales and interpretation of computed tomography scans assess the severity of neurological injury. Myocardial stunning and pulmonary edema related to neurological injury should be anticipated, and can usually be managed. Fever (often not from infection) is common and can be effectively treated, although therapeutic cooling has not been shown to improve outcomes after intracranial hemorrhage. Most functional and cognitive recovery takes place weeks to months after discharge; expected levels of functional independence (no disability, disability but independence with a device, dependence) may guide conversations with patient representatives. Goals of care impact mortality, with do-not-resuscitate status increasing the predicted mortality for any level of severity of intraparenchymal hemorrhage. Future directions include refining the use of bedside neuromonitoring (electroencephalogram, invasive monitors), novel approaches to reduce intracranial hemorrhage expansion, minimizing vasospasm, and refining the assessment of quality of life to guide rehabilitation and therapy. PMID:22167847

  18. Pulmonary function in adolescents with ataxia telangiectasia.

    McGrath-Morrow, Sharon; Lefton-Greif, Maureen; Rosquist, Karen; Crawford, Thomas; Kelly, Amber; Zeitlin, Pamela; Carson, Kathryn A; Lederman, Howard M

    2008-01-01

    Pulmonary complications are common in adolescents with ataxia telangiectasia (A-T), however objective measurements of lung function may be difficult to obtain because of underlying bulbar weakness, tremors, and difficulty coordinating voluntary respiratory maneuvers. To increase the reliability of pulmonary testing, minor adjustments were made to stabilize the head and to minimize leaks in the system. Fifteen A-T adolescents completed lung volume measurements by helium dilution. To assess for reproducibility of spirometry testing, 10 A-T adolescents performed spirometry on three separate occasions. Total lung capacity (TLC) was normal or just mildly decreased in 12/15 adolescents tested. TLC correlated positively with functional residual capacity (FRC), a measurement independent of patient effort (R2=0.71). The majority of individuals had residual volumes (RV) greater than 120% predicted (10/15) and slow vital capacities (VC) less than 70% predicted (9/15). By spirometry, force vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1) values were reproducible in the 10 individuals who underwent testing on three separate occasions (R=0.97 and 0.96 respectively). Seven of the 10 adolescents had FEV1/FVC ratios>90%. Lung volume measurements from A-T adolescents revealed near normal TLC values with increased RV and decreased VC values. These findings indicate a decreased ability to expire to residual volume rather then a restrictive defect. Spirometry was also found to be reproducible in A-T adolescents suggesting that spirometry testing may be useful for tracking changes in pulmonary function over time in this population. Copyright (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Hereditary Hearing Loss.

    Tran, LenhAnh P.; Grundfast, Kenneth M.

    1997-01-01

    This article discusses inheritance patterns in hearing loss, epidemiology, clues to genetic causes, locating genes that cause hereditary disorders, genes related to hearing loss disorders in individuals with Usher syndrome, Waardenburg syndrome, Treacher-Collins syndrome, Branchio-oto-renal and Pendred syndromes, and the significance of finding…

  20. Hereditary periodic fever syndromes

    McDermott, MF; Frenkel, J

    Hereditary periodic fever syndromes are defined by recurrent attacks of generalised inflammation for which no infectious or auto-immune cause can be identified. For most of these disorders, the molecular basis has recently been elucidated. This has opened the prospect of novel therapeutic

  1. Effects of hyperthermia and ionizing radiation in normal and ataxia telangiectasia human fibroblast lines

    Mitchel, R.E.J.; Chan, A.; Smith, B.P.; Child, S.D.; Paterson, M.C.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of 45 0 C hyperthermia and γ radiation have been studied in three normal human fibroblast lines (GM38, GM730, WI38) and compared to the effects in two lines derived from patients with the hereditary disease ataxia telangiectasia (AR3BI, AT5BI). All lines, both normal and γ-sensitive AT, showed a similar resistance to killing by heat alone, suggesting that the defect responsible for the increased radiation sensitivity in AT lines does not confer increased heat sensitivity. Shouldered survival curves were obtained in each case indicating the ability to accumulate sublethal heat damage. All normal and AT cell lines exhibited increased resistance to the lethal effects of heat in response to a thermal stress, indicating that the defect that causes radiosensitivity in AT cell lines does not prevent the induction of thermotolerance. It was hypothesized that in normal cells, this heat treatment inactivates the process which is already defective in AT lines, and that this process may be required for the proper rejoining of double-strand breaks produced during the repair of other radiation-induced lesions

  2. Ataxia Telangiectasia - A Report of a case in Port Harcourt

    TNHJOURNALPH

    ocularand cutaneous telangiectasia, and a predisposition to ... complications because early management with monitoring of lung ... Blymphoid malignancy and hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation. 4 Data on the prevalence of A-T in Nigeria is limited. Few cases of A-T have been reported in Nigeria. 5 The prevalence.

  3. Hereditary breast cancer

    Larsen, Martin J; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 are only detected in 25% of families with a strong history of breast cancer, though hereditary factors are expected to be involved in the remaining families with no recognized mutation. Molecular characterization is expected to provide new insight...... into the tumor biology to guide the search of new high-risk alleles and provide better classification of the growing number of BRCA1/2 variants of unknown significance (VUS). In this review, we provide an overview of hereditary breast cancer, its genetic background, and clinical implications, before focusing...... on the pathologically and molecular features associated with the disease. Recent transcriptome and genome profiling studies of tumor series from BRCA1/2 mutation carriers as well as familial non-BRCA1/2 will be discussed. Special attention is paid to its association with molecular breast cancer subtypes as well...

  4. Dementia in hereditary cystatin C amyloidosis

    Blöndal, H; Guomundsson, G; Benedikz, Eirikur

    1989-01-01

    in seventeen cases of whom two presented with dementia. At the last examination the majority had severe dementia and severely abnormal EEG. Anti-cystatin C positive amyloid vascular and perivascular infiltrates were found. The resulting damage to the microvasculature of the brain and secondary hemorrhages......Nineteen cases with verified Hereditary Cystatin C Amyloid Angiopathy are presented. All of the cases had one or more cerebrovascular insults starting at the age of 20-41 years and survived from 10 days to 23 years after the first insult. Progressive dementia was a prominent clinical feature...... and infarctions were considered to be an adequate explanation for the dementia in these cases. Skin biopsies can now probably be used to demonstrate cystatin C positive amyloid deposits conclusively in the tissues of these patients....

  5. Hereditary pancreatitis for the endoscopist

    Patel, Milan R.; Eppolito, Amanda L.; Willingham, Field F.

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis shares a majority of clinical and morphologic features with chronic alcoholic pancreatitis, but may present at an earlier age. The term hereditary pancreatitis has primarily been associated with mutations in the serine protease 1 gene (PRSS1) which encodes for cationic trypsinogen. PRSS1 mutations account for approximately 68–81% of hereditary pancreatitis. Mutations in other genes, primarily serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 1 (SPINK1) and the cystic fibrosis trans...

  6. EAMJ Oct Hereditary.indd

    HEREDITARY GINGIVAL FIBROMATOSIS: REPORT OF FAMILY CASE SERIES. E. G. Wagaiyu ... Senior Lecturer, Department of Periodontology/Community and Preventive Dentistry, ... fibrous connective tissue held in chronically inflamed.

  7. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary fructose intolerance

    ... Twitter Home Health Conditions Hereditary fructose intolerance Hereditary fructose intolerance Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Hereditary fructose intolerance is a condition that affects a person's ...

  8. Hereditary angioedema in women

    Bouillet Laurence

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Women with hereditary angioedema (HAE are more likely to be symptomatic that men. Hormonal factors (puberty, contraception, pregnancy,.... play a significant role in the precipitation or worsening of the condition in women. So, combined contraceptive pills are not indicated and progestogen pill must be preferred. During pregnancy, attack rate can increase (38-48% of women. C1Inhibitor concentrate and tranexamic acid can be used during pregnancy. Attenuated androgens for long term prophylaxis are effective but side effects appear more often in female patients. These side effects are dose dependant and can be attenuated by titrating the dose down the lowest effective level.

  9. Hereditary Angioedema in Childhood

    Kjaer, Line; Bygum, Anette

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare inherited disease that is often difficult to diagnose. We report a case of a 9-year-old boy with a spontaneous mutation causing HAE, diagnosed after a life-threatening episode of angioedema of the head and upper respiratory tract after a 5-year history of r...... of recurrent skin swellings and abdominal pain leading to several hospital admissions. The aim of this report is to direct focus on this rare disease, which can be treated effectively, to diminish morbidity and mortality of children suffering from undiagnosed HAE....

  10. Startle responses in hereditary hyperekplexia

    Tijssen, M. A.; Voorkamp, L. M.; Padberg, G. W.; van Dijk, J. G.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with hereditary hyperekplexia have excessive startle responses that are accompanied by transient stiffness and also continuous stiffness in infancy. A point of mutation has been identified for the major form of hereditary hyperekplexia in the gene encoding the alpha 1 subunit of

  11. Startle responses in hereditary hyperekplexia

    Tijssen, MAJ; Voorkamp, LM; Padberg, GW; vanDijk, JG

    Background: Patients with hereditary hyperekplexia have excessive startle responses that are accompanied by transient stiffness and also continuous stiffness in infancy. A point of mutation has been identified for the major form of hereditary hyperekplexia in the gene encoding the alpha 1 subunit of

  12. The Development of Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated Kinase Inhibitors

    Andrs, M.; Kobarecny, J.; Nepovimova, E.; Jun, D.; Hodný, Zdeněk; Moravcová, Simona; Hanzlíková, Hana; Kuca, K.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 10 (2014), s. 805-811 ISSN 1389-5575 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/30.0044 Grant - others:MH CZ - DRO (University Hospital Hradec Kralove(CZ) 00179906 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Ataxia telangiectasia mutated * cancer * chemosensitization * DNA damage response Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.903, year: 2014

  13. Pulmonary arteriovenous fistulas

    Medeiros Sobrinho, J.H. de; Kambara, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    Six cases of pulmonary arteriovenous fistulas, isolated, without hemorrhagic hereditary telangiectasia (Rendu-Osler-Weber Symdrome) are reported emphasizing the radiographic, tomographic and angiographic examinations, (M.A.C.) [pt

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Full Text Available ... and naproxen Certain rare genetic conditions such as hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, which causes bleeding in the bowels ... iron-deficiency anemia may cause the following complications: Depression Heart problems. If you do not have enough ...

  15. Hereditary neuromuscular diseases

    Oezsarlak, O. E-mail: ozkan.ozsarlak@uza.be; Schepens, E.; Parizel, P.M.; Goethem, J.W. van; Vanhoenacker, F.; Schepper, A.M. de; Martin, J.J

    2001-12-01

    This article presents the actual classification of neuromuscular diseases based on present expansion of our knowledge and understanding due to genetic developments. It summarizes the genetic and clinical presentations of each disorder together with CT findings, which we studied in a large group of patients with neuromuscular diseases. The muscular dystrophies as the largest and most common group of hereditary muscle diseases will be highlighted by giving detailed information about the role of CT and MRI in the differential diagnosis. The radiological features of neuromuscular diseases are atrophy, hypertrophy, pseudohypertrophy and fatty infiltration of muscles on a selective basis. Although the patterns and distribution of involvement are characteristic in some of the diseases, the definition of the type of disease based on CT scan only is not always possible.

  16. Hereditary colorectal cancer diagnostics

    Klarskov, Louise; Holck, Susanne; Bernstein, Inge

    2012-01-01

    BackgroundThe hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) subset of tumours can broadly be divided into tumours caused by an underlying mismatch-repair gene mutation, referred to as Lynch syndrome, and those that develop in families with similar patterns of heredity but without disease......-predisposing germline mismatch repair mutations, referred to as familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX). Recognition of HNPCC-associated colorectal cancers is central since surveillance programmes effectively reduce morbidity and mortality. The characteristic morphological features linked to Lynch syndrome can aid...... in the identification of this subset, whereas the possibility to use morphological features as an indicator of FCCTX is uncertain.Objective and methodsTo perform a detailed morphological evaluation of HNPCC-associated colorectal cancers and demonstrate significant differences between tumours associated with FCCTX...

  17. Hereditary spastic paraplegia.

    Blackstone, Craig

    2018-01-01

    The hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) are a heterogeneous group of neurologic disorders with the common feature of prominent lower-extremity spasticity, resulting from a length-dependent axonopathy of corticospinal upper motor neurons. The HSPs exist not only in "pure" forms but also in "complex" forms that are associated with additional neurologic and extraneurologic features. The HSPs are among the most genetically diverse neurologic disorders, with well over 70 distinct genetic loci, for which about 60 mutated genes have already been identified. Numerous studies elucidating the molecular pathogenesis underlying HSPs have highlighted the importance of basic cellular functions - especially membrane trafficking, mitochondrial function, organelle shaping and biogenesis, axon transport, and lipid/cholesterol metabolism - in axon development and maintenance. An encouragingly small number of converging cellular pathogenic themes have been identified for the most common HSPs, and some of these pathways present compelling targets for future therapies. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Hereditary chronic pancreatitis

    Mössner Joachim

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hereditary chronic pancreatitis (HCP is a very rare form of early onset chronic pancreatitis. With the exception of the young age at diagnosis and a slower progression, the clinical course, morphological features and laboratory findings of HCP do not differ from those of patients with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis. As well, diagnostic criteria and treatment of HCP resemble that of chronic pancreatitis of other causes. The clinical presentation is highly variable and includes chronic abdominal pain, impairment of endocrine and exocrine pancreatic function, nausea and vomiting, maldigestion, diabetes, pseudocysts, bile duct and duodenal obstruction, and rarely pancreatic cancer. Fortunately, most patients have a mild disease. Mutations in the PRSS1 gene, encoding cationic trypsinogen, play a causative role in chronic pancreatitis. It has been shown that the PRSS1 mutations increase autocatalytic conversion of trypsinogen to active trypsin, and thus probably cause premature, intrapancreatic trypsinogen activation disturbing the intrapancreatic balance of proteases and their inhibitors. Other genes, such as the anionic trypsinogen (PRSS2, the serine protease inhibitor, Kazal type 1 (SPINK1 and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR have been found to be associated with chronic pancreatitis (idiopathic and hereditary as well. Genetic testing should only be performed in carefully selected patients by direct DNA sequencing and antenatal diagnosis should not be encouraged. Treatment focuses on enzyme and nutritional supplementation, pain management, pancreatic diabetes, and local organ complications, such as pseudocysts, bile duct or duodenal obstruction. The disease course and prognosis of patients with HCP is unpredictable. Pancreatic cancer risk is elevated. Therefore, HCP patients should strongly avoid environmental risk factors for pancreatic cancer.

  19. Dementia with non-hereditary cystatin C angiopathy

    Benedikz, Eirikur; Blöndal, H; Jóhannesson, G

    1989-01-01

    Brain biopsies from two patients with non-hereditary cerebral hemorrhages and eighty autopsied cases with the clinical diagnosis of dementia are presented. The biopsied cases, both males aged 64 and 59, had a sudden onset of cerebral hemorrhage, mild progressive dementia and cystatin C cerebral...... amyloid angiopathy. Of the autopsied cases 59 had senile plaques and cerebral amyloid angiopathy was also found in 36 of them. Both senile plaques and the blood vessel amyloid stained positively with beta-protein antibodies, and five of them also showed a positive reaction to cystatin C antibodies....... These cystatin C positive cases were three males aged 76, 80 and 83, and one female 93 years old and the fifth case was a female aged 47 with Down's syndrome....

  20. Hereditary familial vestibular degenerative diseases.

    Sun, J.; Alphen, A.M. van; Wagenaar, M.; Huygen, P.L.M.; Hoogenraad, C.C.; Hasson, T.; Koekkoek, S.K.; Bohne, B.A.; Zeeuw, C.I. de

    2001-01-01

    Identification of genes involved in hereditary vestibular disease is growing at a remarkable pace. Mutant mouse technology can be an important tool for understanding the biological mechanism of human vestibular diseases.

  1. Hereditary forms of breast cancer

    Bella, V.

    2009-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common oncologic disease in the female population. Besides the sporadic occurrence it occurs in the familial and hereditary form. Persons with the occurrence of positive family anamnesis of breast cancer should be actively investigated. In the indicated cases it is necessary to send the woman to genetic examination. In case that the hereditary form of breast cancer is affirmed it is necessary to examine her family relatives. Women with the hereditary form of breast cancer occur in about 5 – 10 % portion from all women diagnosed with breast cancer. Nowadays we already know that 80 % of hereditary breast cancers are due to germ mutations in BRCA 1 and BRCA 2 gene. Persons with detected gene mutations must be dispensarized in the centres intended for it. (author)

  2. Motor pathway degeneration in young ataxia telangiectasia patients: A diffusion tractography study

    Ishani Sahama

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Whole tract analysis of the corticomotor, corticospinal and somatosensory pathways in ataxia telangiectasia showed significant white matter degeneration along the entire length of motor circuits, highlighting that ataxia–telangiectasia gene mutation impacts the cerebellum and multiple other motor circuits in young patients.

  3. DNA-repair synthesis in ataxia telangiectasia lymphoblastoid cells

    Ford, M.D.; Houldsworth, J.; Lavin, M.F. (Queensland Univ., Brisbane (Australia). Dept. of Biochemistry)

    1981-12-01

    The ability of a number of Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphoblastoid cells from ataxia telangiectasia (AT) patients to repair ..gamma..-radiation damage to DNA was determined. All of these AT cells were previously shown to be hypersensitive to ..gamma..-radiation. Two methods were used to determine DNA-repair synthesis: isopycnic gradient analysis and a method employing hydroxyurea to inhibit semiconservative DNA synthesis. Control, AT heterozygote and AT homozygote cells were demonstrated to have similar capacities for repair of radiation damage to DNA. In addition at high radiation doses (10-40 krad) the extent of inhibition of DNA synthesis was similar in the different cell types.

  4. Clinical and genetic features of ataxia-telangiectasia

    Bundey, S.

    1994-01-01

    There are several variants of ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T): classical A-T with marked radiation sensitivity; classical A-T with intermediate levels of radiation sensitivity; mild A-T with intermediate levels of radiation sensitivity; A-T without telangiectasia; A-T without oculomoto apraxia; and A-T with microcephaly. These disorders are probably caused by different allelic mutations, because affected sibs resemble the index patients, and because there is an association of certain haplo-types of 11q22-23 with specific phenotypes. The Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome, with its lack of ataxia, seems on clinical grounds to be a different disorder. Although A-T is almost always inherited as an autosomal recessive, there are some unusual features; an unexpectedly low parental consanguinity rate, an incidence in sibs that is < 0.25, and occurrence of disease in many different races and in the offspring of mixed race unions. Moreover, looking at haplotypes from 63 UK patients, there is a remarkably low incidence of homozygosity. An autosomal recessive condition that is deficient in parental consanguinity, and in homozygosity for the region around the gene, can be explained by J.H. Edwards' hypothesis that homozygosity for alleles at a neighbouring locus are lethal early in embryogenesis. Other possible mechanisms to explain the unusual genetic features are discussed. (author)

  5. ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated) abnormality and diseases

    Takagi, Masatoshi; Nakata, Shinichiro; Mizutani, Shuki

    2007-01-01

    Ataxia-Telangiectasia (A-T) is an autosomal recessive inherited disease due to mutation of ATM gene on chromosome 11q22.3, with major symptoms of ataxia, telangiectasia, immunodeficiency and frequent complication of cancer, and the cells have characters of chromosomal break, high sensitivity to radiation and inappropriate continuation of DNA synthesis after radiation. This review describes past and present studies of ATM functions with clinical features in the following order: Clinical symptoms and epidemiology; ATM gene mutation in A-T patients, mainly by frame-shift (80-90%); ATM, whose gene consisted from 66 exons (150 kb), functions in phosphoinositide-3-kinase related kinase family which protecting cells from stress and integrating their system, at response to DNA double strand break, and in the cell cycle checkpoints at G1/S, S and G2/M phases; ATM nonsense/missense mutations in embryonic cells leading to carcinogenesis and role of ATM in the suppression of carcinogenesis in somatic cells; Chromosomal translocation which relating to carcinogenesis, by functional defect of ATM; and Other functions of ATM in neuronal growth, immunodeficiency, carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, early senescence, and virus infection. ATM is thus an essential molecule to maintain growth and homeostasis. (T.I.)

  6. Hereditary pancreatitis: current perspectives

    Raphael KL

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Kara L Raphael, Field F Willingham Division of Digestive Diseases, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA Abstract: Hereditary pancreatitis (HP is a rare cause of acute, recurrent acute, and chronic pancreatitis. It may present similarly to other causes of acute and chronic pancreatitis, and often there has been a protracted evaluation prior to the diagnosis of HP. Since it was first described in 1952, multiple genetic defects that affect the action of digestive enzymes in the pancreas have been implicated. The most common mutations involve the PRSS1, CFTR, SPINK1, and CTRC genes. New mutations in these genes and previously unrecognized mutations in other genes are being discovered due to the increasing use of next-generation genomic sequencing. While the inheritance pathways of these genetic mutations may be variable and complex, sometimes involving coinheritance of other mutations, the clinical presentation of patients tends to be similar. Interactions with environmental triggers often play a role. Patients tend to present at an early age (prior to the second decade of life and have a significantly increased risk for the development of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Patients with HP may develop sequelae of chronic pancreatitis such as strictures and fluid collections as well as exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. Management of patients with HP involves avoidance of environmental triggers, surveillance for pancreatic adenocarcinoma, medical therapy for endocrine and exocrine insufficiency, pain management, and endoscopic or surgical treatment for complications. Care for affected patients should be individualized, with an emphasis on early diagnosis and multidisciplinary involvement to develop a comprehensive treatment strategy. Keywords: pancreatic cancer, chronic pancreatitis, idiopathic pancreatitis, pancreatitis, familial pancreatitis, genetic mutations

  7. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary diffuse gastric cancer

    ... Health Conditions Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... Diffuse Gastric Cancer MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Gastric Cancer National Cancer ... Option Overview General Information from MedlinePlus ( ...

  8. Cellular characteristics of hereditary diseases of man

    Sasaki, Masao

    1978-01-01

    Hereditary diseases of which abnormal characters could be detected at cultured cell level were introduced, and tissue cultures of them were described. Characteristics such as reproduction, disorder, elimination, and repair of DNA in hereditary diseases with high cancer risk such as Bloom syndrome, etc. were investigated. Radiosensitivity of these hereditary diseases was also described, and factors of carcinogenesis were investigated. (Serizawa, K.)

  9. Intracerebral hemorrhage (image)

    Intracerebral hemorrhage may be caused by trauma (brain injury) or abnormalities of the blood vessels (aneurysm or angioma), but it is most commonly associated with high blood pressure (hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage).

  10. DNA strand breakage repair in ataxia telangiectasia fibroblast-like cells

    Vincent, Jr, R A; Sheridan, III, R B; Huang, P C [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, Md. (USA). Dept. of Environmental and Biophysical Sciences

    1975-12-01

    Human diploid fibroblast-like cells derived from four patients with the genetic disease ataxia telangiectasia and from two non-mutant donors were examined for the repair of x-ray induced strand breaks in DNA. The ataxia telangiectasia cultures showed no significant differences from the non-mutant cultures in the kinetics and extent of strand repair. This suggests that the increased spontaneous and x-ray induced chromatid aberrations observed in ataxia telangiectasia cells are not caused by a defect in the repair of single strand breaks as might be suspected from a general model of aberration production.

  11. Cutaneous granulomatosis and combined immunodeficiency revealing Ataxia-Telangiectasia: a case report

    Folgori, Laura; Scarselli, Alessia; Angelino, Giulia; Ferrari, Francesca; Antoccia, Antonio; Chessa, Luciana; Finocchi, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is a complex multisystem disorder characterized by progressive neurological impairment, variable immunodeficiency and oculo-cutaneous telangiectasia. A-T is a member of chromosomal breakage syndromes and it is caused by a mutation in the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene. Because of a wide clinical heterogeneity, A-T is often difficult to diagnose in children. We report an unusual case of a 3-year-old boy affected by A-T who presented exclusively wi...

  12. CT in pontine hemorrhage

    Iwasaki, Yasuo; Kinoshita, Masao; Ikeda, Ken; Sasaki, Atsushi.

    1988-01-01

    The clinical and CT findings in 10 patients with primary pontine hemorrhage were reviewed. All patients were hypertensive. Pontine hemorrhage can be divided into 3 groups from the viewpoint of location of hematomas. These are the tegmentobasilar type, tegmental type and basilar type. The tegmentobasilar type produces characteristic clinical features for pontine hemorrhage and poor prognosis, otherwise, another two types produce atypical clinical features for pontine hemorrhage and good prognosis. (author)

  13. ERS statement on the multidisciplinary respiratory management of ataxia telangiectasia

    Jayesh M. Bhatt

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T is a rare, progressive, multisystem disease that has a large number of complex and diverse manifestations which vary with age. Patients with A-T die prematurely with the leading causes of death being respiratory diseases and cancer. Respiratory manifestations include immune dysfunction leading to recurrent upper and lower respiratory infections; aspiration resulting from dysfunctional swallowing due to neurodegenerative deficits; inefficient cough; and interstitial lung disease/pulmonary fibrosis. Malnutrition is a significant comorbidity. The increased radiosensitivity and increased risk of cancer should be borne in mind when requesting radiological investigations. Aggressive proactive monitoring and treatment of these various aspects of lung disease under multidisciplinary expertise in the experience of national multidisciplinary clinics internationally forms the basis of this statement on the management of lung disease in A-T. Neurological management is outwith the scope of this document.

  14. Drug therapy for hereditary cancers

    Imyanitov Evgeny N

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Tumors arising in patients with hereditary cancer syndromes may have distinct drug sensitivity as compared to their sporadic counterparts. Breast and ovarian neoplasms from BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers are characterized by deficient homologous recombination (HR of DNA, that makes them particularly sensitive to platinum compounds or inhibitors of poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP. Outstandingly durable complete responses to high dose chemotherapy have been observed in several cases of BRCA-related metastatic breast cancer (BC. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that women with BRCA1-related BC may derive less benefit from taxane-based treatment than other categories of BC patients. There is virtually no reports directly assessing drug response in hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC patients; studies involving non-selected (i.e., both sporadic and hereditary CRC with high-level microsatellite instability (MSI-H suggest therapeutic advantage of irinotecan. Celecoxib has been approved for the treatment of familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP. Hereditary medullary thyroid cancers (MTC have been shown to be highly responsive to a multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor vandetanib, which exerts specific activity towards mutated RET receptor. Given the rapidly improving accessibility of DNA analysis, it is foreseen that the potential predictive value of cancer-associated germ-line mutations will be increasingly considered in the future studies.

  15. Immunophenotyping of hereditary breast cancer

    van der Groep, P.

    2009-01-01

    Hereditary breast cancer runs in families where several family members in different generations are affected. Most of these breast cancers are caused by mutations in the high penetrance genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 which account for about 5% of all breast cancers. However, mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 may

  16. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary hemochromatosis

    ... Type 1 hemochromatosis results from mutations in the HFE gene, and type 2 hemochromatosis results from mutations in ... about the genes associated with hereditary hemochromatosis HAMP HFE HJV PNPLA3 SLC40A1 TFR2 Related Information What is a gene? What is a gene mutation and how do ...

  17. Terapia alternativa para microvarizes e telangiectasias com uso de agulha Alternative therapy for microvarices and telangiectasias with use of needle

    Raimundo Rosendo de Oliveira

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXTO: O desenvolvimento de terapia alternativa à convencional para a destruição de microvarizes e telangiectasias sem o uso de produtos químicos tem como objetivo reduzir os efeitos colaterais, faz uso de agulha para lise mecânica dos vasos e tem como modelo experimental galinhas da linhagem Lohmann Brown. OBJETIVO: Elaborar uma nova técnica, desenvolvendo um tratamento alternativo, sem uso de produtos químicos, objetivando a redução dos efeitos colaterais. MÉTODOS: Foram utilizadas 30 galinhas da linhagem Lohmann Brown, sendo que 15 foram submetidas ao método convencional de tratamento de microvarizes e telangiectasias (grupo-controle e as outras 15 receberam o tratamento experimental proposto (grupo experimental. O grupo experimental foi tratado com agulha de lise vascular, percorrendo todo o trajeto dos vasos escolhidos em punções escalonadas até que todo o vaso ser atingido. O grupo-controle foi tratado com oleato de monoetanolamina e glicose a 50%, puncionando-se o vaso com agulha 13 x 3 mm e injetando-se, em média, 0,3 mL da solução em cada vaso. RESULTADOS: Dos 50 vasos tratados no grupo experimental, dois apresentaram recidiva total, cinco apresentaram recidiva parcial, e 43 apresentaram destruição (lise satisfatória; enquanto que, no grupo-controle, dos 51 vasos tratados, quatro apresentaram recidiva total, 12, recidiva parcial, 22, destruição satisfatória, e em 13 ocorreu endurecimento de trajeto. CONCLUSÃO: O presente estudo demonstrou que o método experimental proposto, com uso de agulha de lise vascular, possui mais eficiência no tratamento de microvarizes se comparado com o método convencional, devido à redução das recidivas e à ausência de hipercromia de trajeto endurecido.BACKGROUND: The development of an alternative to the conventional therapy for microvarices and telangiectasias without using chemical products aims at reducing side effects, using a needle for mechanical lysis of vessels. It

  18. CT and MR imaging of splenic leiomyoma in a child with ataxia telangiectasia

    Coskun, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Hacettepe University Hospital, Ankara (Turkey); Aydingoez, Ue. [Dept. of Radiology, Hacettepe University Hospital, Ankara (Turkey); Tacal, T. [Dept. of Radiology, Hacettepe University Hospital, Ankara (Turkey); Ariyuerek, M. [Dept. of Radiology, Hacettepe University Hospital, Ankara (Turkey); Demirkazik, F. [Dept. of Radiology, Hacettepe University Hospital, Ankara (Turkey); Oguzkurt, L. [Dept. of Radiology, Hacettepe University Hospital, Ankara (Turkey)

    1995-02-01

    Computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging findings of a splenic leiomyoma in an 8-year-old boy with ataxia telangiectasia are presented. This is the first reported case of a splenic leiomyoma in the literature. (orig.)

  19. CT and MR imaging of splenic leiomyoma in a child with ataxia telangiectasia

    Coskun, M.; Aydingoez, Ue.; Tacal, T.; Ariyuerek, M.; Demirkazik, F.; Oguzkurt, L.

    1995-01-01

    Computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging findings of a splenic leiomyoma in an 8-year-old boy with ataxia telangiectasia are presented. This is the first reported case of a splenic leiomyoma in the literature. (orig.)

  20. Brain glucose metabolism in adults with ataxia-telangiectasia and their asymptomatic relatives.

    Volkow, Nora D; Tomasi, Dardo; Wang, Gene-Jack; Studentsova, Yana; Margus, Brad; Crawford, Thomas O

    2014-06-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia is a recessive genetic disorder (ATM is the mutated gene) of childhood with severe motor impairments and whereas homozygotes manifest the disorder, heterozygotes are asymptomatic. Structural brain imaging and post-mortem studies in individuals with ataxia-telangiectasia have reported cerebellar atrophy; but abnormalities of motor control characteristic of extrapyramidal dysfunction suggest impairment of broader motor networks. Here, we investigated possible dysfunction in other brain areas in individuals with ataxia-telangiectasia and tested for brain changes in asymptomatic relatives to assess if heterozygocity affects brain function. We used positron emission tomography and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose to measure brain glucose metabolism (quantified as µmol/100 g/min), which serves as a marker of brain function, in 10 adults with ataxia-telangiectasia, 19 non-affected adult relatives (12 siblings, seven parents) and 29 age-matched healthy controls. Statistical parametric mapping and region of interest analyses were used to compare individuals with ataxia-telangiectasia, asymptomatic relatives, and unrelated controls. We found that participants with ataxia-telangiectasia had lower metabolism in cerebellar hemispheres (14%, P brain stimulation. Our finding of decreased metabolism in vermis and hippocampus of asymptomatic relatives suggests that heterozygocity influences the function of these brain regions. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain 2014. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  1. Glutamine deprivation induces interleukin-8 expression in ataxia telangiectasia fibroblasts.

    Kim, Min-Hyun; Kim, Aryung; Yu, Ji Hoon; Lim, Joo Weon; Kim, Hyeyoung

    2014-05-01

    To investigate whether glutamine deprivation induces expression of inflammatory cytokine interleukin-8 (IL-8) by determining NF-κB activity and levels of oxidative indices (ROS, reactive oxygen species; hydrogen peroxide; GSH, glutathione) in fibroblasts isolated from patients with ataxia telangiectasia (A-T). We used A-T fibroblasts stably transfected with empty vector (Mock) or with human full-length ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) cDNA (YZ5) and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) transiently transfected with ATM small interfering RNA (siRNA) or with non-specific control siRNA. The cells were cultured with or without glutamine or GSH. ROS levels were determined using a fluorescence reader and confocal microscopy. IL-8 or murine IL-8 homolog, keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC), and hydrogen peroxide levels in the medium were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and colorimetric assay. GSH level was assessed by enzymatic assay, while IL-8 (KC) mRNA level was measured by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and/or quantitative real-time PCR. NF-κB DNA-binding activity was determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Catalase activity and ATM protein levels were determined by O2 generation and Western blotting. While glutamine deprivation induced IL-8 expression and increased NF-κB DNA-binding activity in Mock cells, both processes were decreased by treatment of cells with glutamine or GSH or both glutamine and GSH. Glutamine deprivation had no effect on IL-8 expression or NF-κB DNA-binding activity in YZ5 cells. Glutamine-deprived Mock cells had higher oxidative stress indices (increases in ROS and hydrogen peroxide, reduction in GSH) than glutamine-deprived YZ5 cells. In Mock cells, glutamine deprivation-induced oxidative stress indices were suppressed by treatment with glutamine or GSH or both glutamine and GSH. GSH levels and catalase activity were lower in Mock cells than YZ5 cells. MEFs transfected with ATM siRNA and

  2. New treatments of hereditary blindness

    Bertelsen, Mette; Rosenberg, Thomas; Larsen, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Ongoing clinical trials are targeting several previously intractable hereditary causes of blindness of congenital, childhood or early adulthood onset, mainly in the optic nerve and retina. The intended stage of initiation of the new therapeutic approaches ranges from neonatal life and a structura......Ongoing clinical trials are targeting several previously intractable hereditary causes of blindness of congenital, childhood or early adulthood onset, mainly in the optic nerve and retina. The intended stage of initiation of the new therapeutic approaches ranges from neonatal life...... and a structurally intact retinal tissue to adult life with a complete loss of photoreceptors. It must be assumed that some of the trials will succeed in producing new therapies and action must be taken to refine and accelerate diagnostics and to preserve therapeutic potential in blind people....

  3. Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer

    Nielsen, Finn Cilius; Hansen, Thomas van Overeem; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard

    2016-01-01

    Genetic abnormalities in the DNA repair genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 predispose to hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC). However, only approximately 25% of cases of HBOC can be ascribed to BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. Recently, exome sequencing has uncovered substantial locus heterogeneity among...... of putative causal variants and the clinical application of new HBOC genes in cancer risk management and treatment decision-making....

  4. The ATM gene and the radiobiology of ataxia-telangiectasia

    Jorgensen, T.J.; Shiloh, Y.

    1996-01-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is the classic human genetic disease involving severe ionizing radiation sensitivity and as such has been intensely studied by radiation biologists over the years. Unlike its counterpart for UV light sensitivity -xeroderma pigmentosum - A-T has no obvious DNA repair defect; and there has been much speculation as to the mechanism underlying the altered radioresponses associated with this disease. The gene defective in A-T (ATM) has recently been cloned, and its primary coding sequence determined. The primary sequence of the ATM protein suggests that it has some regulatory functions related to cellular radioresponse and maintenance of genomic stability, and shares these functions with a growing family of other proteins in various organisms. At this juncture it is appropriate to review our current knowledge about the radiobiology of A-T and reflect on the possible radiobiological mechanisms that are suggested by the ATM gene itself. This article will attempt briefly to review current knowledge about the radiobiology of A-T and to introduce new speculations about underlying radiobiological mechanisms that are suggested by the primary amino acid sequence of the predicted ATM gene product. (Author)

  5. Defect in radiation signal transduction in ataxia-telangiectasia

    Lavin, M.F.

    1994-01-01

    Exposure of mammalian cells to ionizing radiation causes a delay in progression through the cycle at several checkpoints. Cells from patients with ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) ignore these checkpoint controls postirradiation. The tumour suppressor gene product p53 plays a key role at the G 1 /S checkpoint preventing the progression of cells into S phase. The induction of p53 by radiation is reduced and/or delayed in A-T cells, which appears to account for the failure of delay at the G 1 /S checkpoint. We have investigated further this defect in radiation signal transduction in A-T. While the p53 response was defective after radiation, agents that interfered with cell cycle progression such as mimosine, aphidicolin and deprivation of serum led to a normal p53 response in A-T cells. None of these agents caused breaks in DNA, as determined by pulse-field gel electrophoresis, in order to elicit the response. Since this pathway is mediated by protein kinases, we investigated the activity of several of these enzymes in control and A-T cells. Ca +2 -dependent and -independent protein kinase C activities were increased by radiation to the same extent in the two cell types, a variety of serine/threonine protein kinase activities were approximately the same and anti-tyrosine antibodies failed to reveal any differences in protein phosphorylation between A-T and control cells. (author)

  6. Automatic telangiectasia analysis in dermoscopy images using adaptive critic design.

    Cheng, B; Stanley, R J; Stoecker, W V; Hinton, K

    2012-11-01

    Telangiectasia, tiny skin vessels, are important dermoscopy structures used to discriminate basal cell carcinoma (BCC) from benign skin lesions. This research builds off of previously developed image analysis techniques to identify vessels automatically to discriminate benign lesions from BCCs. A biologically inspired reinforcement learning approach is investigated in an adaptive critic design framework to apply action-dependent heuristic dynamic programming (ADHDP) for discrimination based on computed features using different skin lesion contrast variations to promote the discrimination process. Lesion discrimination results for ADHDP are compared with multilayer perception backpropagation artificial neural networks. This study uses a data set of 498 dermoscopy skin lesion images of 263 BCCs and 226 competitive benign images as the input sets. This data set is extended from previous research [Cheng et al., Skin Research and Technology, 2011, 17: 278]. Experimental results yielded a diagnostic accuracy as high as 84.6% using the ADHDP approach, providing an 8.03% improvement over a standard multilayer perception method. We have chosen BCC detection rather than vessel detection as the endpoint. Although vessel detection is inherently easier, BCC detection has potential direct clinical applications. Small BCCs are detectable early by dermoscopy and potentially detectable by the automated methods described in this research. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  7. Ataxia-telangiectasia: the pattern of cerebellar atrophy on MRI

    Tavani, F.; Zimmerman, R.A.; Gatti, R.; Bingham, P.; Berry, G.T.; Sullivan, K.

    2003-01-01

    We describe MRI of the brain in 19 patients with ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) and correlate the appearances with the degree of neurologic deficit. We examined 10 male and nine female patients; 17 were aged between 2 and 12 years (mean 8 years) but a woman and her brother were 35 and 38 years old, and had a variant of AT. Ataxia was the first recognized sign of the disease in every patient. We detected the following patterns of cerebellar atrophy: in the youngest patient, aged 2 years, the study was normal; in the five next youngest patients 3-7 years of age, the lateral cerebellum and superior vermis showed the earliest changes of atrophy; and all but one of the other patients had moderate to marked diffuse atrophy of vermis and cerebellar hemispheres. There were 12 patients aged 9 years and above; one, who was normal, was 9 years old. The five patients who at the time of examination were unable to walk all had diffuse atrophy involving both vermis and cerebellar hemispheres. (orig.)

  8. Evaluation of Intraventricular Hemorrhage in Pediatric Intracerebral hemorrhage

    Kleinman, Jonathan T; Beslow, Lauren A; Engelmann, Kyle; Smith, Sabrina E; Licht, Daniel J; Ichord, Rebecca N; Jordan, Lori C

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies of pediatric intracerebral hemorrhage have investigated isolated intraparenchymal hemorrhage. We investigated whether detailed assessment of intraventricular hemorrhage enhanced outcome prediction after intracerebral hemorrhage. We prospectively enrolled 46 children, full-term to 17 years, median age 2.7 years with spontaneous intraparenchymal hemorrhage and/or intraventricular hemorrhage. Outcome was assessed with the King’s Outcome Scale for Childhood Head Injury. Twenty-si...

  9. Cerebral Cavernous Malformation and Hemorrhage

    ... Text Size: SMALL • LARGE Cerebral Cavernous Angioma and Hemorrhage By Jack Hoch; Reviewed by Dr. Issam Awad ... for years, the mechanism by which these lesions hemorrhage remains poorly understood. Hemorrhage Types Since cavernous angiomas ...

  10. Treating viral hemorrhagic fever.

    Mairuhu, A.T.; Brandjes, D.P.; Gorp, E. van

    2003-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic fevers are illnesses associated with a number of geographically restricted, mostly tropical areas. Over recent decades a number of new hemorrhagic fever viruses have emerged. Advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology of these diseases have improved our initial supportive

  11. Hemorrhagic prepatellar bursitis

    Donahue, F. [Dept. of Radiology, Musculoskeletal Section, Univ. of Miami/Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, FL (United States); Turkel, D. [Dept. of Radiology, Musculoskeletal Section, Univ. of Miami/Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, FL (United States); Mnaymneh, W. [Dept. of Orthopedics, Univ. of Miami/Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, FL (United States); Ghandur-Mnaymneh, L. [Dept. of Pathology, Univ. of Miami/Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, FL (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Simple prepatellar bursitis is easily diagnosed both clinically and by MRI. MRI shows the typical T1 and T2 lengthening of fluid within the bursa. However, because of complex MRI appearance of hemorrhage, chronic hemorrhagic bursitis and the size of the prepatellar mass the clinical and MRI appearance can be very different. (orig.)

  12. Spontaneous adrenal pheochromocytoma rupture complicated by intraperitoneal hemorrhage and shock

    Kwasnik Edward

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract MEN2A is a hereditary syndrome characterized by medullary thyroid carcinoma, hyperparathyroidism, and pheochromocytoma. Classically patients with a pheochromocytoma initially present with the triad of paroxysmal headaches, palpitations, and diaphoresis accompanied by marked hypertension. However, although reported as a rare presentation, spontaneous hemorrhage within a pheochromocytoma can present as an abdominal catastrophe. Unrecognized, this transformation can rapidly result in death. We report the only documented case of a thirty eight year old gentleman with MEN2A who presented to a community hospital with hemorrhagic shock and peritonitis secondary to an unrecognized hemorrhagic pheochromocytoma. The clinical course is notable for an inability to localize the source of hemorrhage during an initial damage control laparotomy that stabilized the patient sufficiently to allow emergent transfer to our facility, re-exploration for continued hemorrhage and abdominal compartment syndrome, and ultimately angiographic embolization of the left adrenal artery for control of the bleeding. Following recovery from his critical illness and appropriate medical management for pheochromocytoma, he returned for interval bilateral adrenal gland resection, from which his recovery was unremarkable. Our review of the literature highlights the high mortality associated with the undertaking of an operative intervention in the face of an unrecognized functional pheochromocytoma. This reinforces the need for maintaining a high index of suspicion for pheochromocytoma in similar cases. Our case also demonstrates the need for a mutimodal treatment approach that will often be required in these cases.

  13. Hereditary iron and copper deposition

    Aaseth, Jan; Flaten, Trond Peder; Andersen, Ole

    2007-01-01

    Hereditary deposition of iron (primary haemochromatosis) or copper (Wilson's disease) are autosomal recessive metabolic disease characterized by progressive liver pathology and subsequent involvement of various other organs. The prevalence of primary haemochromatosis is approximately 0.5%, about......, they may be inadequate in patients diagnosed so late that extensive body deposits of metal have been developed. The main research needs in this field are to further clarify molecular mechanisms of disease progression and to develop new chelators that are more effective and less toxic than those presently...

  14. Hepatitis C infection in patients with hereditary bleeding disorders: epidemiology, natural history, and management.

    Papadopoulos, Nikolaos; Argiana, Vasiliki; Deutsch, Melanie

    2018-01-01

    Hereditary bleeding disorders include a group of diseases with abnormalities of coagulation. Prior to 1990, infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) was mainly transmitted via pooled plasma products as a treatment for hereditary bleeding disorders. Anti-HCV positivity in these patients may be as high as >70% in some areas, while some of them have also been coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus. Since about 20% of HCV-infected patients clear the infection naturally, chronic HCV infection represents a significant health problem in this group of patients. Mortality due to chronic HCV infection is estimated to be >10 times higher in patients with hemophilia than in the general population, and is mainly due to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The antiviral treatment of HCV in patients with hereditary bleeding disorders is not different from that of any other infected patients. Nevertheless, many patients with hereditary bleeding disorders have declined (Peg)interferon-based treatment because of side effects. In recent years, multiple orally administrated direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) have been approved for HCV treatment. Unfortunately, there is not much experience from treating these patients with DAA regimens, as major studies and real-life data did not include adequate numbers of patients with inherited hemorrhagic disorders. However, the available data indicate that DAAs have an excellent safety profile with a sustained virological response rate of >90%.

  15. [Rendu-Osler-Weber disease

    Sys, L.M.; Hoogen, F.J.A. van den

    2005-01-01

    Rendu-Osler-Weber disease or hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a multisystem autosomal dominant hereditary disorder. The disorder is manifested by multiple dysplasia of blood vessels of the skin and mucous membranes. This results in recurrent and sometimes severe bleeding, of which

  16. Hereditary & familial colorectal cancer : Identification, characteristics, surveillance

    Kallenberg, F.G.J.

    2017-01-01

    Of all colorectal cancer (CRC) cases, 15-20% is related to familial or hereditary factors. Diagnosing familial and hereditary CRC syndromes is important for several reasons. One of these is that surveillance colonoscopies can reduce CRC incidence and mortality importantly. A complete family history

  17. Cutaneous granulomatosis and combined immunodeficiency revealing Ataxia-Telangiectasia: a case report

    Antoccia Antonio

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T is a complex multisystem disorder characterized by progressive neurological impairment, variable immunodeficiency and oculo-cutaneous telangiectasia. A-T is a member of chromosomal breakage syndromes and it is caused by a mutation in the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM gene. Because of a wide clinical heterogeneity, A-T is often difficult to diagnose in children. We report an unusual case of a 3-year-old boy affected by A-T who presented exclusively with extensive cutaneous granulomatosis and severe combined immunodeficiency, without neurological abnormalities, at the time of diagnosis. This case clearly emphasizes the variable presentation of A-T syndrome and highlights the difficulties in the early diagnosis of A-T. A-T should be considered in children with evidence of combined humoral and cellular immunodeficiency associated with unexplained skin granulomatous lesions, even in the absence of the classic features of this syndrome.

  18. Health risks for ataxia-telangiectasia mutated heterozygotes : a systematic review, meta-analysis and evidence-based guideline

    van Os, N J H; Roeleveld, N; Weemaes, C M R; Jongmans, M C J; Janssens, G O; Taylor, A M R; Hoogerbrugge, N; Willemsen, Michel A A P

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder with immunodeficiency and an increased risk of developing cancer, caused by mutations in the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene. Logically, blood relatives may also carry a pathogenic ATM mutation. Female carriers

  19. The molecular classification of hereditary endocrine diseases.

    Ye, Lei; Ning, Guang

    2015-12-01

    Hereditary endocrine diseases are an important group of diseases with great heterogeneity. The current classification for hereditary endocrine disease is mostly based upon anatomy, which is helpful for pathophysiological interpretation, but does not address the pathogenic variability associated with different underlying genetic causes. Identification of an endocrinopathy-associated genetic alteration provides evidence for differential diagnosis, discovery of non-classical disease, and the potential for earlier diagnosis and targeted therapy. Molecular diagnosis should be routinely applied when managing patients with suspicion of hereditary disease. To enhance the accurate diagnosis and treatment of patients with hereditary endocrine diseases, we propose categorization of endocrine diseases into three groups based upon the function of the mutant gene: cell differentiation, hormone synthesis and action, and tumorigenesis. Each category was further grouped according to the specific gene function. We believe that this format would facilitate practice of precision medicine in the field of hereditary endocrine diseases.

  20. Evaluation of Intraventricular Hemorrhage in Pediatric Intracerebral hemorrhage

    Kleinman, Jonathan T; Beslow, Lauren A; Engelmann, Kyle; Smith, Sabrina E; Licht, Daniel J; Ichord, Rebecca N; Jordan, Lori C

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies of pediatric intracerebral hemorrhage have investigated isolated intraparenchymal hemorrhage. We investigated whether detailed assessment of intraventricular hemorrhage enhanced outcome prediction after intracerebral hemorrhage. We prospectively enrolled 46 children, full-term to 17 years, median age 2.7 years with spontaneous intraparenchymal hemorrhage and/or intraventricular hemorrhage. Outcome was assessed with the King’s Outcome Scale for Childhood Head Injury. Twenty-six (57%) had intraparenchymal hemorrhage, 10 (22%) had pure intraventricular hemorrhage, and 10 (22%) had both. There were 2 deaths, both with intraparenchymal hemorrhage + intraventricular hemorrhage volume ≥4% of total brain volume. Presence of intraventricular hemorrhage was not associated with poor outcome, but hydrocephalus showed a trend (p=0.09) toward poor outcome. In receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, combined intraparenchymal hemorrhage + intraventricular hemorrhage volume also showed a trend toward better outcome prediction than intraparenchymal hemorrhage volume alone. Although not an independent outcome predictor, future studies should assess intraventricular hemorrhage qualitatively and quantitatively. PMID:22068828

  1. Mortality after hemorrhagic stroke

    González-Pérez, Antonio; Gaist, David; Wallander, Mari-Ann

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate short-term case fatality and long-term mortality after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) using data from The Health Improvement Network database. METHODS: Thirty-day case fatality was stratified by age, sex, and calendar year after ICH...... = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS: More than one-third of individuals die in the first month after hemorrhagic stroke, and patients younger than 50 years are more likely to die after ICH than SAH. Short-term case fatality has decreased over time. Patients who survive hemorrhagic stroke have a continuing elevated......, 54.6% for 80-89 years; SAH: 20.3% for 20-49 years, 56.7% for 80-89 years; both p-trend stroke patients...

  2. Intracranial Hemorrhage Revealing Pseudohypoparathyroidism as a Cause of Fahr Syndrome

    Abhijit Swami

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudohypoparathyroidism is an infrequently encountered disease. It is one of the causes of Fahr syndrome which also is a rare clinical entity caused by multiple diseases. A 4-year-old man hospitalized for sudden onset left hemiparesis and hypertension was diagnosed to have right thalamic and midbrain hemorrhage on plain CT scan of the head which also revealed co-existent extensive intracranial calcifications involving the basal ganglia and cerebellum bilaterally. General physical examination revealed features of Albright hereditary osteodystrophy, goitre, hypertension, left hemiparesis, and signs of cerebellar dysfunction. Laboratory findings suggested hypocalcemia, hyperphosphatemia along with high TSH, low FT4, low FT3, and high anti-TPO antibody. Though bilateral intracranial calcifications are usually encountered as an incidental radiological finding in the CT scan of brain, in this case, the patient admitted for thalamic and midbrain hemorrhage was on investigation for associated intracranial calcification, and goitre was also found to have coexisting pseudohypoparathyroidism and autoimmune hypothyroidism.

  3. Imaging features of type 1 hereditary tyrosinemia: a review of 30 patients

    Dubois, J. [Department of Radiology, Hopital Sainte-Justine, Montreal, Que. (Canada); Garel, L. [Department of Radiology, Hopital Sainte-Justine, Montreal, Que. (Canada); Patriquin, H. [Department of Radiology, Hopital Sainte-Justine, Montreal, Que. (Canada); Paradis, K. [Department of Pediatrics, Gastroenterology, Universite de Montreal, Que. (Canada); Forget, S. [Department of Pediatrics, Gastroenterology, Universite de Montreal, Que. (Canada); Filiatrault, D. [Department of Radiology, Hopital Sainte-Justine, Montreal, Que. (Canada); Grignon, A. [Department of Radiology, Hopital Sainte-Justine, Montreal, Que. (Canada); Russo, P. [Department of Pathology, Hopital Sainte-Justine, Montreal, Que. (Canada); St-Vil, D. [Department of Surgery, Hopital Sainte-Justine, Montreal, Que. (Canada)

    1996-12-01

    Hereditary tyrosinemia type 1, a common genetic disorder in the province of Quebec, is characterized by a deficiency of fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase. In this autosomal recessive disorder of tyrosine metabolism, the accumulation of succinylacetone leads to neurologic crises, acute and chronic liver failure, complex renal tubulopathy, rickets and a hemorrhagic syndrome. Liver trans- plantation has dramatically modified the spontaneous course of this lethal disease. The present paper describes the imaging fea- tures of tyrosinemia in 30 patients followed from 1980 to 1995 at Hopital Sainte-Justine, Montreal, Canada. (orig.). With 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Recurrent Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    Schmidt, Linnea Boegeskov; Goertz, Sanne; Wohlfahrt, Jan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a disease with high mortality and a substantial risk of recurrence. However, the recurrence risk is poorly documented and the knowledge of potential predictors for recurrence among co-morbidities and medicine with antithrombotic effect is limited....... OBJECTIVES: 1) To estimate the short- and long-term cumulative risks of recurrent intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). 2) To investigate associations between typical comorbid diseases, surgical treatment, use of medicine with antithrombotic effects, including antithrombotic treatment (ATT), selective serotonin...

  5. Prophylactic Therapy for Hereditary Angioedema.

    Longhurst, Hilary; Zinser, Emily

    2017-08-01

    Long-term prophylaxis is needed in many patients with hereditary angioedema and poses many challenges. Attenuated androgens are effective in many but are limited by side effect profiles. There is less evidence for efficacy of tranexamic acid and progestagens; however, the small side effect profile makes tranexamic acid an option for prophylaxis in children and progestagens an option for women. C1 inhibitor is beneficial, but at present requires intravenous delivery and may need dose titration for maximum efficacy. Short-term prophylaxis should be considered for all procedures. New therapies are promising in overcoming many problems encountered with current options for long-term prophylaxis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Hemorrhagic brain metastases

    Takahashi, Motoichiro; Takekawa, S.D.; Suzuki, Kenzo

    1986-01-01

    Tumor hemorrhage on computed tomography (CT) was found in 14 patients with brain metastases (7 % of two hundred patients with brain metastases), from April 1979 to July 1983. Primary foci of these lesions were the lung (6 patients), breast (2), kidney (2), uterus (2), colon (1) and adrenal gland (1). ''Stroke'' syndrome was the initial presenting symptom in 3 patients; neurological focal sign or symptoms of increased intracranial pressure in the remaining patients. CT demonstrated peritumoral hemorrhage in all patients with solid mass, intratumoral hemorrhage in a few patients and also cerebral or ventricular hemorrhage, which was fatal complication, in 2 patients (colon and breast cancers). A cystic mass with fluid-blood level was noted in a patient with breast cancer. Several predisposing factors including chemotherapy, thrombocytopenia, radiotherapy or combination of these were recognized in 8 patients. Of these, chemotherapy was the most causative factor of tumor hemorrhage. Brain irradiation for hemorrhagic brain metastases was effective for prolongation of mean survival time of these patients as follows; 10 months in irradiated group, whereas 1.5 months in non-irradiated group. (author)

  7. Imaging of Hemorrhagic Stroke.

    Hakimi, Ryan; Garg, Ankur

    2016-10-01

    Hemorrhagic stroke comprises approximately 15% to 20% of all strokes. This article provides readers with an understanding of the indications and significance of various neuroimaging techniques available for patients presenting with hemorrhagic strokes of distinct causes. The most common initial neuroimaging study is a noncontrast head CT, which allows for the identification of hemorrhage. Once an intracranial hemorrhage has been identified, the pattern of blood and the patient's medical history, neurologic examination, and laboratory studies lead the practitioner to pursue further neuroimaging studies to guide the medical, surgical, and interventional management. Given that hemorrhagic stroke constitutes a heterogeneous collection of diagnoses, the subsequent neuroimaging pathway necessary to better evaluate and care for these patients is variable based on the etiology.With an increasing incidence and prevalence of atrial fibrillation associated with the aging population and the introduction of three new direct factor Xa inhibitors and one direct thrombin inhibitor to complement vitamin K antagonists, oral anticoagulant use continues to increase. Patients on oral anticoagulants have a sevenfold to tenfold increased risk for intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Furthermore, patients who have an ICH associated with oral anticoagulant use have a higher mortality rate than those with primary ICH. Despite the reduced incidence of hypertension-related ICH over the past decade, it is expected that the incidence of ICH will continue to increase. Neuroimaging studies are integral to the identification of hemorrhagic stroke, determination of the underlying etiology, prevention of hematoma expansion, treatment of acute complications, and treatment of the underlying etiology, if indicated. Neuroimaging is essential for prognostication and thus directly impacts patient care.

  8. Genetics 101 --The Hereditary Material of Life

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Genetics 101 Genetics 101 — The Hereditary Material of Life Past Issues / Summer 2013 Table of Contents Genetics is the study of heredity, the process in ...

  9. Hereditary History Preserving Bisimilarity Is Undecidable

    Jurdzinski, Marcin; Nielsen, Mogens

    2000-01-01

    History preserving bisimilarity (hp-bisimilarity) and hereditary history preserving bisimilarity (hhp-bisimilarity) are behavioural equivalences taking into account causal relationships between events of concurrent systems. Their prominent feature is being preserved under action refinement...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary hypophosphatemic rickets

    ... A characteristic of X-linked inheritance is that fathers cannot pass X-linked traits to their sons. ... families, hereditary hypophosphatemic rickets has had an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern, which means one copy of an ...

  11. A Review of Hereditary Fructose Intolerance

    Mogoş Tiberius

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Fructose intolerance is a metabolic disorder with hereditary determinism, clinically manifested on terms of fructose intake. Untreated, hereditary fructose intolerance may result in renal and hepatic failure. Unfortunately, there are no formal diagnostic and surveillance guidelines for this disease. If identified and treated before the occurrence of permanent organ damage, patients can improve their symptoms and self-rated health. Implementation and adherence to a strict fructose free diet is often difficult, but not impossible.

  12. Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I

    Auer-Grumbach Michaela

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I (HSN I is a slowly progressive neurological disorder characterised by prominent predominantly distal sensory loss, autonomic disturbances, autosomal dominant inheritance, and juvenile or adulthood disease onset. The exact prevalence is unknown, but is estimated as very low. Disease onset varies between the 2nd and 5th decade of life. The main clinical feature of HSN I is the reduction of sensation sense mainly distributed to the distal parts of the upper and lower limbs. Variable distal muscle weakness and wasting, and chronic skin ulcers are characteristic. Autonomic features (usually sweating disturbances are invariably observed. Serious and common complications are spontaneous fractures, osteomyelitis and necrosis, as well as neuropathic arthropathy which may even necessitate amputations. Some patients suffer from severe pain attacks. Hypacusis or deafness, or cough and gastrooesophageal reflux have been observed in rare cases. HSN I is a genetically heterogenous condition with three loci and mutations in two genes (SPTLC1 and RAB7 identified so far. Diagnosis is based on the clinical observation and is supported by a family history. Nerve conduction studies confirm a sensory and motor neuropathy predominantly affecting the lower limbs. Radiological studies, including magnetic resonance imaging, are useful when bone infections or necrosis are suspected. Definitive diagnosis is based on the detection of mutations by direct sequencing of the SPTLC1 and RAB7 genes. Correct clinical assessment and genetic confirmation of the diagnosis are important for appropriate genetic counselling and prognosis. Differential diagnosis includes the other hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN, especially HSAN II, as well as diabetic foot syndrome, alcoholic neuropathy, neuropathies caused by other neurotoxins/drugs, immune mediated neuropathy, amyloidosis, spinal cord diseases, tabes dorsalis, lepra

  13. Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I.

    Auer-Grumbach, Michaela

    2008-03-18

    Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I (HSN I) is a slowly progressive neurological disorder characterised by prominent predominantly distal sensory loss, autonomic disturbances, autosomal dominant inheritance, and juvenile or adulthood disease onset. The exact prevalence is unknown, but is estimated as very low. Disease onset varies between the 2nd and 5th decade of life. The main clinical feature of HSN I is the reduction of sensation sense mainly distributed to the distal parts of the upper and lower limbs. Variable distal muscle weakness and wasting, and chronic skin ulcers are characteristic. Autonomic features (usually sweating disturbances) are invariably observed. Serious and common complications are spontaneous fractures, osteomyelitis and necrosis, as well as neuropathic arthropathy which may even necessitate amputations. Some patients suffer from severe pain attacks. Hypacusis or deafness, or cough and gastrooesophageal reflux have been observed in rare cases. HSN I is a genetically heterogenous condition with three loci and mutations in two genes (SPTLC1 and RAB7) identified so far. Diagnosis is based on the clinical observation and is supported by a family history. Nerve conduction studies confirm a sensory and motor neuropathy predominantly affecting the lower limbs. Radiological studies, including magnetic resonance imaging, are useful when bone infections or necrosis are suspected. Definitive diagnosis is based on the detection of mutations by direct sequencing of the SPTLC1 and RAB7 genes. Correct clinical assessment and genetic confirmation of the diagnosis are important for appropriate genetic counselling and prognosis. Differential diagnosis includes the other hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN), especially HSAN II, as well as diabetic foot syndrome, alcoholic neuropathy, neuropathies caused by other neurotoxins/drugs, immune mediated neuropathy, amyloidosis, spinal cord diseases, tabes dorsalis, lepra neuropathy, or decaying skin

  14. Viral hemorrhagic septicemia

    Batts, William N.; Winton, James R.

    2012-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic septicemia (VHS) is one of the most important viral diseases of finfish worldwide. In the past, VHS was thought to affect mainly rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss reared at freshwater facilities in Western Europe where it was known by various names including Egtved disease and infectious kidney swelling and liver degeneration (Wolf 1988). Today, VHS is known as an important source of mortality for cultured and wild fish in freshwater and marine environments in several regions of the northern hemisphere (Dixon 1999; Gagné et al. 2007; Kim and Faisal 2011; Lumsden et al. 2007; Marty et al. 1998, 2003; Meyers and Winton 1995; Skall et al. 2005b; Smail 1999; Takano et al. 2001). Viral hemorrhagic septicemia is caused by the fish rhabdovirus, viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV), a member of the genus Novirhabdovirus of the family Rhabdoviridae

  15. Microcatheter embolization of hemorrhages

    Seppaenen, Seppo K.; Leppaenen, Martti J.; Pimenoff, Georg; Seppaenen, Janne M.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the efficacy of embolotherapy using microcatheters in patients with hemorrhage from various locations. Methods. Among 29 patients there were 13 with severe epistaxis, 7 with gastrointestinal bleeding, 4 with hemorrhage in the kidney, 4 with bleeding in pelvic organs and 1 with bleeding in the shoulder region. In all cases, a Tracker-18 or Tracker-10 microcatheter was advanced coaxially through a 4.1 Fr guiding catheter in order to reach the bleeding site as distally as possible. Polyvinyl alcohol microparticles and/or platinum microcoils were used as embolic material. Results. The bleeding was stopped in 90% (26 of 29) of cases. In 66% of cases the treatment was curative, in 7% preoperative, and in 17% palliative. There were 3 clinical failures. Conclusion. Microcatheter embolization is an effective and safe means of managing different kinds of hemorrhage of various causes from a variety of sites

  16. The technical hereditary of CWD

    Smulders, P.T.

    1990-01-01

    An overview is given of the activities of the Dutch foundation CWD since 1975. The financing of the foundation stopped July 1st 1990. From 1975 the CWD stimulated the use of small scale wind energy to pump up water in developing countries. The hereditary of the CWD consists of knowledge of the design and performance of components of wind mills, knowledge to design integral systems based on these components and preconditions, and knowledge how to manufacture, install and maintain the wind mills locally. The CWD designed three wind mill pumps of which 250 have been brought into operation in developing countries. A CWD-type pump was developed in Sri-Lanka of which 150 pumps were installed. Also attention is paid to the external situation which effected the CWD activities: the lack of interest from the Dutch industry to cooperate in developing CWD pumps; the actual market far away in developing countries; and too little competition in the research and development. The nature of the CWD-participants caused some internal friction which did not contribute to the effectivity of the CWD organisation. It is recommended to continue the development and testing of small wind energy systems and to preserve the knowledge gained by the CWD. 3 figs., 2 tabs., 3 refs

  17. Movement disorders in hereditary ataxias.

    Garcia Ruiz, Pedro J; Mayo, David; Hernandez, Jaime; Cantarero, Susana; Ayuso, Carmen

    2002-10-15

    Movement disorders are well known features of some dominant hereditary ataxias (HA), specially SCA3/Machado-Joseph disease and dentatorubropallidolusyan atrophy. However, little is known about the existence and classification of movement disorders in other dominant and recessive ataxias. We prospectively studied the presence of movement disorders in patients referred for HA over the last 3 years. Only those patients with a confirmed family history of ataxia were included. We studied 84 cases of HA, including 46 cases of recessive and 38 cases of dominant HA. Thirty out of 46 cases of recessive HA could be classified as: Friedreich ataxia (FA), 29 cases; vitamin E deficiency, 1 case. Twenty-three out of 38 cases of dominant HA could be classified as: SCA 2, 4 cases; SCA 3, 8 cases; SCA 6, 4 cases; SCA 7, 6 cases and SCA 8, 1 case. We observed movement disorders in 20/38 (52%) patients with dominant HA and 25/46 (54%) cases with recessive HA, including 16 patients (16/29) with FA. In general, postural tremor was the most frequent observed movement disorder (27 cases), followed by dystonia (22 cases). Five patients had akinetic rigid syndrome, and in 13 cases, several movement disorders coexisted. Movement disorders are frequent findings in HA, not only in dominant HA but also in recessive HA. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science B.V.

  18. Intraventricular hemorrhage of the newborn

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007301.htm Intraventricular hemorrhage of the newborn To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) of the newborn is bleeding into the ...

  19. Ebola hemorrhagic Fever.

    Burnett, Mark W

    2014-01-01

    Ebola hemorrhagic fever is an often-fatal disease caused by a virus of the Filoviridae family, genus Ebolavirus. Initial signs and symptoms of the disease are nonspecific, often progressing on to a severe hemorrhagic illness. Special Operations Forces Medical Providers should be aware of this disease, which occurs in sporadic outbreaks throughout Africa. Treatment at the present time is mainly supportive. Special care should be taken to prevent contact with bodily fluids of those infected, which can transmit the virus to caregivers. 2014.

  20. Ataxia telangiectasia derived iPS cells show preserved x-ray sensitivity and decreased chromosomal instability

    Fukawatase, Yoshihiro; Toyoda, Masashi; Okamura, Kohji; Nakamura, Ken-ichi; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Takada, Shuji; Yamazaki-Inoue, Mayu; Masuda, Akira; Nasu, Michiyo; Hata, Kenichiro; Hanaoka, Kazunori; Higuchi, Akon; Takubo, Kaiyo; Umezawa, Akihiro

    2014-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia is a neurodegenerative inherited disease with chromosomal instability and hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation. iPS cells lacking ATM (AT-iPS cells) exhibited hypersensitivity to X-ray irradiation, one of the characteristics of the disease. While parental ataxia telangiectasia cells exhibited significant chromosomal abnormalities, AT-iPS cells did not show any chromosomal instability in vitro for at least 80 passages (560 days). Whole exome analysis also showed a compa...

  1. Management of gastrointestinal hemorrhage.

    Hilsden, R. J.; Shaffer, E. A.

    1995-01-01

    Acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage is a common problem that requires prompt recognition and management to prevent serious morbidity and mortality. Management goals are stabilization of the patient with vigorous fluid resuscitation followed by investigation and definitive treatment of the bleeding source. Endoscopy is often the initial diagnostic test and allows therapeutic measures to be performed at the same time.

  2. Subarachnoid mesencephalic hemorrhage

    Oviedo, Soledad; De Luca, Silvina; Ceciliano, Alejandro; Mondello, Eduardo; Oviedo, Jorge D.; Lopardo Villarino, Guzman; Eyheremendy, Eduardo

    2004-01-01

    The case of a 57 y.o. male who has had severe headache of sudden onset without neck stiffness or other signs of neurological foci was reported. Initial CT scan showed perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage. Brain MRI and digital angiography were performed later and bleeding was interpreted as a result of an abnormal hemodynamic status developed by cerebral venous thrombosis. (author)

  3. Hemorrhage and vascular abnormalities

    Bradley, W.G.

    1990-01-01

    While many brain lesions have a similar appearance on MRI and CT, this is not true of hemorrhage. On CT, acute hemorrhage becomes hyperdense within an hour as the clot forms. This lasts for several days and then fades to isodensity and eventually hypodensity. On MRI, hemorrhage less than 12 to 24 hours old may not be distinguishable from vasogenic edema. Its appearance subsequently is an evolving pattern of variable signal intensity which depends on the specific form of hemoglobin which is present, or whether the red cells are intact or lysed, on the operating field strength, on the type of signal (that is, spin echo or gradient echo), and on contrast (that is, T 1 - or T 2 -weighing). The appearance of hemorrhage also depends on the compartment of the brain involved---subarachnoid, subdural, or intraparenchymal. Finally, for parenchymal hematomas, different zones may be defined from the inner core to the outer rim which all vary in appearance depending on field strength and imaging technique

  4. Massive antenatal fetomaternal hemorrhage

    Dziegiel, Morten Hanefeld; Koldkjaer, Ole; Berkowicz, Adela

    2005-01-01

    Massive fetomaternal hemorrhage (FMH) can lead to life-threatening anemia. Quantification based on flow cytometry with anti-hemoglobin F (HbF) is applicable in all cases but underestimation of large fetal bleeds has been reported. A large FMH from an ABO-compatible fetus allows an estimation...

  5. Macular telangiectasia type 2 (MacTel) in a 34-year-old patient.

    Nicolai, Heleen; Wirix, Mieke; Spielberg, Leigh; Leys, Anita

    2014-09-23

    We report macular telangiectasia type 2 (MacTel) in a 34-year-old man, the youngest patient so far published with MacTel type 2. The patient presented with metamorphopsia and impaired reading ability. Diagnosis was based on bilateral abnormal macular autofluorescence, perifoveal telangiectasia with fluorescein angiographic hyperfluorescence without cystoid oedema, a small foveal avascular zone, asymmetric configuration of the foveal pit, disruptions in the inner segment/outer segment layer and hyper-reflective haze and spots in the outer nuclear layer. Although MacTel usually manifests with a slowly progressive decrease in visual acuity in the fifth to seventh decades of life, younger patients may occasionally be diagnosed with the disease. Awareness of subtle signs of the condition is essential for early diagnosis. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  6. Establishment of cell lines derived from ataxia telangiectasia and xeroderma pigmentosum patients with high radiation sensitivity

    Hashimoto, Tomoko; Furuyama, Jun-ichi; Nakano, Yoshiro; Owada, M. Koji; Kakunaga, Takeo

    1986-01-01

    Four human fibroblast cell lines, three of which were derived from a patient with ataxia telangiectasia and the other from a patient with xeroderma pigmentosum, were established after transfection with cloned SV40 DNA. These 4 cell lines showed some phenotypes characteristic of neoplastically transformed cells, and had a human karyotype with heteromorphisms identical to those of the parental fibroblasts. Their sensitivity to the cytotoxic effects of γ-rays or ultraviolet irradiation was as high as those of their parental fibroblasts. (Auth.)

  7. Gastric outlet obstruction due to adenocarcinoma in a patient with Ataxia-Telangiectasia syndrome: a case report and review of the literature

    Hammond Sue

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ataxia-Telangiectasia syndrome is characterized by progressive cerebellar dysfunction, conjuctival and cutaneous telangiectasias, severe immune deficiencies, premature aging and predisposition to cancer. Clinical and radiographic evaluation for malignancy in ataxia-telangiectasia patients is usually atypical, leading to delays in diagnosis. Case presentation We report the case of a 20 year old ataxia-telangiectasia patient with gastric adenocarcinoma that presented as complete gastric outlet obstruction. Conclusion A literature search of adenocarcinoma associated with ataxia-telangiectasia revealed 6 cases. All patients presented with non-specific gastrointestinal complaints suggestive of ulcer disease. Although there was no correlation between immunoglobulin levels and development of gastric adenocarcinoma, the presence of chronic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia seem to lead to the development of gastric adenocarcinoma. One should consider adenocarcinoma in any patient with ataxia-telangiectasia who presents with non-specific gastrointestinal complaints, since this can lead to earlier diagnosis.

  8. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary sensory neuropathy type IA

    ... sensory neuropathy type IA Hereditary sensory neuropathy type IA Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... expand/collapse boxes. Description Hereditary sensory neuropathy type IA is a condition characterized by nerve abnormalities in ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer

    ... Home Health Conditions HLRCC Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... expand/collapse boxes. Description Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer ( HLRCC ) is a disorder in which affected individuals ...

  10. Targeted disruption of Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated gene in miniature pigs by somatic cell nuclear transfer

    Kim, Young June; Ahn, Kwang Sung; Kim, Minjeong; Kim, Min Ju; Park, Sang-Min; Ryu, Junghyun; Ahn, Jin Seop; Heo, Soon Young; Kang, Jee Hyun; Choi, You Jung [Department of Nanobiomedical Science and BK21 PLUS NBM Global Research Center for Regenerative Medicine, Dankook University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Seong-Jun [Institute of Tissue Regeneration Engineering, Dankook University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Shim, Hosup, E-mail: shim@dku.edu [Department of Nanobiomedical Science and BK21 PLUS NBM Global Research Center for Regenerative Medicine, Dankook University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Tissue Regeneration Engineering, Dankook University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physiology, Dankook University School of Medicine, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • ATM gene-targeted pigs were produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer. • A novel large animal model for ataxia telangiectasia was developed. • The new model may provide an alternative to the mouse model. - Abstract: Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a recessive autosomal disorder associated with pleiotropic phenotypes, including progressive cerebellar degeneration, gonad atrophy, and growth retardation. Even though A-T is known to be caused by the mutations in the Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene, the correlation between abnormal cellular physiology caused by ATM mutations and the multiple symptoms of A-T disease has not been clearly determined. None of the existing ATM mouse models properly reflects the extent to which neurological degeneration occurs in human. In an attempt to provide a large animal model for A-T, we produced gene-targeted pigs with mutations in the ATM gene by somatic cell nuclear transfer. The disrupted allele in the ATM gene of cloned piglets was confirmed via PCR and Southern blot analysis. The ATM gene-targeted pigs generated in the present study may provide an alternative to the current mouse model for the study of mechanisms underlying A-T disorder and for the development of new therapies.

  11. Imaging study of lymphoreticular tumor development in ataxia-telangiectasia and Nijmegen breakage syndrome

    Martinez-Leon, M. I.; Ceres-Ruiz, L.; Cuesta, M. A.; Garcia-Martin, F. J.

    2003-01-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (AT), or Louis-Bar syndrome, is an autosomal recessive illness characterized by progressive cerebellar ataxia, oculo-cutaneous telangiectasia, immunodeficiency combined with susceptibility to sinopulmonary infections and high incidence of neoplastic development. Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS) is a variant of AT, is also an autosomal recessive illness that presents cerebellar ataxia, as well as combined immunodeficiency and a tendency toward tumor development. Contrary to Louis-Bar syndrome, it doesn't present telangiectasia and exhibits a characteristics phenotype (short stature, bird-like face and microcephaly). Both entities are classified as syndrome of chromosomal instability or chromosomal fragility, a group which also includes Bloom syndrome and Fanconi anemia. All of these show an increase in the frequency of neoplastic pathologies, mainly lymphoid tumors. We present three patients,two with AT and one with NBS, who developed different lymphoma types in the course of the illness. We highlight the most outstanding aspects from a clinical-radiological point of view. (Author) 17 refs

  12. Targeted disruption of Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated gene in miniature pigs by somatic cell nuclear transfer

    Kim, Young June; Ahn, Kwang Sung; Kim, Minjeong; Kim, Min Ju; Park, Sang-Min; Ryu, Junghyun; Ahn, Jin Seop; Heo, Soon Young; Kang, Jee Hyun; Choi, You Jung; Choi, Seong-Jun; Shim, Hosup

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • ATM gene-targeted pigs were produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer. • A novel large animal model for ataxia telangiectasia was developed. • The new model may provide an alternative to the mouse model. - Abstract: Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a recessive autosomal disorder associated with pleiotropic phenotypes, including progressive cerebellar degeneration, gonad atrophy, and growth retardation. Even though A-T is known to be caused by the mutations in the Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene, the correlation between abnormal cellular physiology caused by ATM mutations and the multiple symptoms of A-T disease has not been clearly determined. None of the existing ATM mouse models properly reflects the extent to which neurological degeneration occurs in human. In an attempt to provide a large animal model for A-T, we produced gene-targeted pigs with mutations in the ATM gene by somatic cell nuclear transfer. The disrupted allele in the ATM gene of cloned piglets was confirmed via PCR and Southern blot analysis. The ATM gene-targeted pigs generated in the present study may provide an alternative to the current mouse model for the study of mechanisms underlying A-T disorder and for the development of new therapies

  13. [Paediatric retinal detachment and hereditary vitreoretinal disorders].

    Meier, P

    2013-09-01

    The number of retinal detachments in children is very low in comparison to the number in adults. One predisposing factor for development of paediatric retinal detachment is suffering from hereditary vitreoretinal degeneration (e.g., Stickler syndrome, Wagner syndrome, Kniest dysplasia, familial exudative vitreoretinopathy, congenital X-linked retinoschisis, Knobloch syndrome, incontinentia pigmenti, Norrie disease). Hereditary vitreoretinopathies are characterised by an abnormal-appearing vitreous gel with associated retinal changes. In most of these eyes further ocular abnormalities can be diagnosed. A group of hereditary disorders is associated with characteristic systemic abnormalities. Allied conditions should be considered in the clinical diagnosis. Vitreoretinopathies are the most common cause of inherited retinal detachment. In most eyes primary vitrectomy is necessary, and disease-specific surgical treatment is discussed. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Pancreatic cancer risk in hereditary pancreatitis

    Frank Ulrich Weiss

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is part of the body’s immune response in order to remove harmful stimuli – like pathogens, irritants or damaged cells - and start the healing process. Recurrent or chronic inflammation on the other side seems a predisposing factor for carcinogenesis and has been found associated with cancer development. In chronic pancreatitis mutations of the cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1 gene have been identified as risk factors of the disease. Hereditary pancreatitis is a rare cause of chronic pancreatic inflammation with an early onset, mostly during childhood. Hereditary pancreatitis often starts with recurrent episodes of acute pancreatitis and the clinical phenotype is not very much different from other etiologies of the disease. The long-lasting inflammation however generates a tumor promoting environment and represents a major risk factor for tumor development This review will reflect our knowledge concerning the specific risk of hereditary pancreatitis patients to develop pancreatic cancer.

  15. Therapeutic Strategies for Hereditary Kidney Cancer.

    Sidana, Abhinav; Srinivasan, Ramaprasad

    2016-08-01

    The study of hereditary forms of kidney cancer has vastly increased our understanding of metabolic and genetic pathways involved in the development of both inherited and sporadic kidney cancers. The recognition that diverse molecular events drive different forms of kidney cancers has led to the preclinical and clinical development of specific pathway-directed strategies tailored to treat distinct subgroups of kidney cancer. Here, we describe the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of several different types of hereditary renal cancers, review their clinical characteristics, and summarize the treatment strategies for the management of these cancers.

  16. Diagnosis and management of hereditary hemochromatosis.

    Salgia, Reena J; Brown, Kimberly

    2015-02-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis is a rare genetic disorder that can have significant clinical consequences. Hemochromatosis is associated with iron overload, and can initially be recognized through laboratory testing for serum ferritin and transferrin saturation. Genetic testing for the HFE mutation can be performed in patients with elevated iron indices and a suspicion for hemochromatosis or liver disease. The main pathway resulting in iron overload is through altered hepcidin levels. Treatment of patients with the clinical phenotype of hereditary hemochromatosis is commonly through phlebotomy for removal of excess iron stores. This article highlights the current information and data regarding the diagnosis and management of hemochromatosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura Misdiagnosed as Hereditary Angioedema

    Andersen, Michelle Fog; Bygum, Anette

    2015-01-01

    however not always have to be caused by angioedema but can relate to other concomitant disorders. In this report we are focusing on misdiagnosis in a patient with known hereditary angioedema, whose bleeding episode caused by idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura was mistaken for an acute attack...

  18. Hereditary spherocytosis: Consequences of delayed diagnosis

    Sarah C Steward

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine whether patients with undiagnosed hereditary spherocytosis hospitalized for transfusions might have avoided hospitalization via earlier diagnosis. Study design: Charts of all (N = 30 patients with hereditary spherocytosis seen in pediatric hematology at West Virginia University-Charleston were reviewed. Family and transfusion history and presence of neonatal jaundice were recorded. Complete blood count and reticulocyte values during infancy were available for 20 of 30 patients, while baseline steady-state values were available for all 30. Results: Transfusions were given to 22 patients; 12 of 14 with an aplastic crisis were undiagnosed. In 10 of 12, the severity of anemia led to hospitalization (3 to intensive care. All 10 had prior mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration and/or red cell distribution width elevations and a history of neonatal jaundice; 7 of 10 had a positive family history. Conclusions: Undiagnosed hereditary spherocytosis may lead to inpatient transfusions for severe anemia. Earlier detection of hereditary spherocytosis is easily achievable and may reduce hospitalizations via closer monitoring.

  19. Major and minor form of hereditary hyperekplexia

    Tijssen, MAJ; Vergouwe, MN; van Dijk, JG; Rees, M; Frants, RR; Brown, P

    Hyperekplexia is a hereditary neurological disorder characterized by excessive startle responses. Within the disorder two clinical forms can be distinguished. The major form is characterized by continuous generalized stiffness in the first year of life and an exaggerated startle reflex, accompanied

  20. MRI in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy

    Matthews, Lucy; Enzinger, Christian; Fazekas, Franz

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and a multiple sclerosis (MS)-like illness appear to coexist 50 times more frequently than would be expected by chance. This association of LHON and MS (LMS) raises an important question about whether there could be a common pathophysiological...

  1. Autosomal dominant hereditary ataxia in Sri Lanka

    Sumathipala, Dulika S; Abeysekera, Gayan S; Jayasekara, Rohan W; Tallaksen, Chantal ME; Dissanayake, Vajira HW

    2013-01-01

    Background Spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA) are a group of hereditary neurodegenerative disorders. Prevalence of SCA subtypes differ worldwide. Autosomal dominant ataxias are the commonest types of inherited ataxias seen in Sri Lanka. The aim of the study is to determine the genetic etiology of patients with autosomal dominant ataxia in Sri Lanka and to describe the clinical features of each genetic subtype. Methods ...

  2. Hereditary hemochromatosis: An opportunity for gene therapy

    FERNANDO EZQUER

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Levels of body iron should be tightly controlled to prevent the formation of oxygen radicals, lipoperoxidation, genotoxicity, and the production of cytotoxic cytokines, which result in damage to a number of organs. Enterocytes in the intestinal villae are involved in the apical uptake of iron from the intestinal lumen; iron is further exported from the cells into the circulation. The apical divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1 transports ferrous iron from the lumen into the cells, while the basolateral transporter ferroportin extrudes iron from the enterocytes into the circulation. Patients with hereditary hemochromatosis display an accelerated transepithelial uptake of iron, which leads to body iron accumulation that results in cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, pancreatitis, and cardiomyopathy. Hereditary hemochromatosis, a recessive genetic condition, is the most prevalent genetic disease in Caucasians, with a prevalence of one in 300 subjects. The majority of patients with hereditary hemochromatosis display mutations in the gene coding for HFE, a protein that normally acts as an inhibitor of transepithelial iron transport. We discuss the different control points in the homeostasis of iron and the different mutations that exist in patients with hereditary hemochromatosis. These control sites may be influenced by gene therapeutic approaches; one general therapy for hemochromatosis of different etiologies is the inhibition of DMT1 synthesis by antisense-generating genes, which has been shown to markedly inhibit apical iron uptake by intestinal epithelial cells. We further discuss the most promising strategies to develop gene vectors and deliver them into enterocytes

  3. Epidemiology of Non-hereditary Angioedema

    Madsen, Flemming; Attermann, Jorn; Linneberg, Allan

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of non-hereditary angioedema was investigated in a general population sample (n = 7,931) and in a sample of Danish patients (n = 7,433) tested for deficiency of functional complement C1 esterase inhibitor protein (functional C1 INH). The general population sample (44% response rate...

  4. Epidemiology of Non-hereditary Angioedema

    Madsen, Flemming; Attermann, Jørn; Linneberg, Allan

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of non-hereditary angioedema was investigated in a general population sample (n¿=¿7,931) and in a sample of Danish patients (n¿=¿7,433) tested for deficiency of functional complement C1 esterase inhibitor protein (functional C1 INH). The general population sample (44% response rate...

  5. Revisited diagnostics of hereditary epidermolysis bullosa

    V. I. Albanova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary epidermolysis bullosa is a big group of hereditary diseases with the main manifestations in the form of blisters on the skin and mucous coat after slight mechanical injuries. It is not always possible to diagnose this disease based on the clinical picture. The article discusses current laboratory diagnostics methods for hereditary epidermolysis bullosa including immunofluorescence antigen mapping (IFM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and genetic analysis (molecular or DNA diagnostics as well as their advantages and disadvantages. TEM determines the micro splitting level and nature of ultrafine changes in the area of the dermoepidermal junction; at the same time, such tests need special expensive equipment. Substantial experience is also needed to analyze the resulting submicroscopic images. IFM determines whether expression of the affected protein related to the disease development is reduced or absent; however, invalid (false positive or false negative results can be obtained in patients with the reduced expression of the affected protein. Genetic analysis plays a key role for prenatal diagnostics. Therefore, to make an exact diagnosis of hereditary epidermolysis bullosa, it is expedient to apply IFM, TEM and genetic analysis. The need to set an exact diagnosis of the disease is related to the fact that the promising treatment methods being currently developed are aimed at treating patients with certain forms of the disease.

  6. MR of acute subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Spickler, E.; Lufkin, R.; Frazee, J.; Lylyk, P.; Vinuela, F.; Bentson, J.; Dion, J.

    1987-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage was produced in four Macaca nemestrina monkeys using the technique of Frazee. CT and MR imaging was performed immediately after the procedure and at frequent intervals up to 2 weeks after hemorrhage. The imaging studies were compared with clinical evaluations and pathologic specimens of all animals. Additional human clinical CT/MR studies of subarachnoid hemorrhage were also studied. Acute hemorrhage was recognized on MR images as an increase in signal in the region of clot compared with surrounding cerebrospinal fluid. This most likely reflects T1 shortening due to proton binding rather than a pure paramagnetic effect. While CT is sensitive to the hemoglobin protein in acute hemorrhage, the superior resolution of MR of the basal cisterns results in equal or better definition of acute subarachnoid hemorrhage on MR studies in many cases

  7. Various phases of intracerebral hemorrhage

    Kino, Masao; Anno, Izumi; Yano, Yuhiko; Anno, Yasuro.

    1980-01-01

    Cases of intracerebral hemorrhage except typical putamen thalamic hemorrhage were reported. It is not difficult to diagnose typical attacks of cerebral apoplexy in patients older than 40 years with hypertension by CT. When the condition of the onset is not typical, cerebral infarction must be considered. Though conservative treatment is performed for severe cerebral hemorrhage and cerbral infarction, there is no specific medicine curing these diseases completely. On the contrary, the risk that the administration of fibrinolysis activators and STA-MCA anastomosis may induce cerebral hemorrhage is stressed. Not a few patients with cerebral apoplexy accompanied by small hemorrhagic focuses have been found, especially since CT was used widely. However, treatment for this disease has many inconsistencies. From above-mentioned facts, we recognize excellent roles of CT in an application of surgery for cerebral hemorrhage of early stage, and we, general radiologists, are under an obligation to advise most adequate theraphy for each patient. (Tsunoda, M.)

  8. Osler-Weber-Rendu disease presenting with hepatocellular carcinoma: radiologic and genetic findings

    Lee, Joo Ho; Lee, Yung Sang; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Lee, Beom Hee; Kim, Gu-Whan; Yoo, Han-Wook; Heo, Nae-Yun; Lim, Young-Suk; Lee, Han Chu; Chung, Young-Hwa; Suh, Dong Jin

    2011-01-01

    This is a case report of a 68-year-old man with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) accompanied by hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT), also known as Osler-Weber-Rendu disease, and hepatic vascular malformation. HHT is an autosomal dominant disorder of the fibrovascular tissue that is characterized by recurrent epistaxis, mucocutaneous telangiectasias, and visceral arteriovenous malformations. HHT is caused by mutation of the genes involved in the signaling pathway of transforming growth f...

  9. Non-aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Bashir, Asma; Mikkelsen, Ronni; Sørensen, Leif

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Repeat imaging in patients with non-aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (NASAH) remains controversial. We aim to report our experience with NASAH with different hemorrhage patterns, and to investigate the need for further diagnostic workup to determine the underlying cause of hemorrhage. M...... adequate with absence of hematoma and vasospasm. In contrast, a follow-up DSA should be mandatory for confirming or excluding vascular pathology in case of nPMSAH in order to prevent rebleeding....

  10. Perimesencephalic hemorrhage: a nonaneurysmal and benign form of subarachnoid hemorrhage

    van Gijn, J.; van Dongen, K. J.; Vermeulen, M.; Hijdra, A.

    1985-01-01

    We studied 28 patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage and normal angiograms. On early CT (within 5 days) in 13 cases, blood was seen mainly or only in the cisterns around the midbrain. This pattern of hemorrhage was found in only 1 of 92 patients with a ruptured aneurysm. None of the unexplained

  11. Subconjunctival Hemorrhage (Broken Blood Vessel in Eye)

    Subconjunctival hemorrhage (broken blood vessel in eye) Overview A subconjunctival hemorrhage (sub-kun-JUNK-tih-vul HEM-uh-ruj) ... may not even realize you have a subconjunctival hemorrhage until you look in the mirror and notice ...

  12. Post-tonsillectomy hemorrhage

    Heidemann, Christian; Wallén, Mia; Aakesson, Marie

    2008-01-01

    Post-tonsillectomy hemorrhage (PTH) is a relatively common and potentially life-threatening complication. The objective of this study was to examine the rate of PTH and identify risk factors. A retrospective cohort study was carried out including all tonsillectomies (430 patients) performed...... as surgical technique" [relative risk (RR) = 5.3], "peritonsillar abscess as indication for surgery" (RR = 0.3) and "age equal to or above 15 years at the time of surgery" (RR = 5.4). It is concluded that patient age, PTA as indication for surgery and the use of coblation significantly affect the occurrence...

  13. Excision of gamma-ray induced thymine lesions by preparations from ataxia telangiectasia fibroblasts

    Remsen, J F; Cerutti, P A [Florida Univ., Gainesville (USA). Inst. of Food and Agricultural Sciences; Florida Univ., Gainesville (USA). Dept. of Biochemistry)

    1977-04-01

    The capacity of whole cell sonicates of skin fibroblasts of normal individuals and patients with the autosomal recessive disease Ataxia telangiectasia (AT) to remove aerobic gamma-ray products of the 5,6-dihydroxydihydrothymine type (tsub(O/sub 2/)sup(..gamma..)) from exogenous DNA substrates was investigated. All four AT strains (AT CRL 1312, AT CRL 1343, AT GM 367, AT 4BI) possessed normal capabilities to excise tsub(O/sub 2/)sup(..gamma..) from irradiated bacteriophage DNA and irradiated chromatin isolated from normal and AT-skin fibroblasts.

  14. Circumstances surrounding aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Schievink, W. I.; Karemaker, J. M.; Hageman, L. M.; van der Werf, D. J.

    1989-01-01

    The circumstances surrounding aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage were investigated in a group of 500 consecutive patients admitted to a neurosurgical center. Subarachnoid hemorrhage occurred during stressful events in 42.8% of the patients, during nonstrenuous activities in 34.4%, and during rest or

  15. Anosmia After Perimesencephalic Nonaneurysmal Hemorrhage

    Greebe, Paut; Rinkel, Gabriel J. E.; Algra, Ale

    Background and Purpose-Anosmia frequently occurs after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage not only after clipping, but also after endovascular coiling. Thus, at least in part, anosmia is caused by the hemorrhage itself and not only by surgical treatment. However, it is unknown whether anosmia is

  16. Computed Tomography of Interacerebral Hemorrhage

    Kim, Seung Hyeon; Lee, Jong Beum; Lee, Yong Chul; Lee, Kwan Seh; Park, Soo Soung

    1983-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is the most accurate and reliable method for the diagnosis of intracerebral and intraventricular hemorrhage. The precise anatomic extent of the nematoma, associated cerebral edema, ventricular deformity and displacement, and hydrocephalus are all readily assessed. Aside from head trauma, the principal cause of intracerebral hematoma is hypertensive vascular disease. Although hematomas from various causes may present similar CT appearances frequently the correct etiology may be suggested by consideration of patient's age, clinical history, and the location of the hematoma. The analytical study was performed in 180 cases of intracerebral hemorrhages by CT from October 1981 to January 1983. The results were as follows; 1. The most prevalent age group was 6th decade (37.2%). Male was prevalent to female at the ration of 1.6 to 1. 2. The most common symptom and sign was mental disturbance (48.7%), motor weakness (23%), headache (10.6%), nausea and vomiting (9.8%). 3. The causes of hemorrhage were hypertension (53.9%), head trauma (30.6%), aneurysm (6.1%) and A-V malformation (7.2%). 4. The frequent locations of hemorrhage were basal ganglia and thalamus (40.4%), lobes (35%), ventricles (21.8%). 5. The distribution of hemorrhage was intracerebral hemorrhage (65.6%), intracerebral and intraventricular hemorrhage (30.3%), intraventricular hemorrhage (4.4%).

  17. Innovative Magnetic Resonance Imaging Markers of Hereditary Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy at 7 Tesla.

    Koemans, Emma A; van Etten, Ellis S; van Opstal, Anna M; Labadie, Gerda; Terwindt, Gisela M; Wermer, Marieke J H; Webb, Andrew G; Gurol, Edip M; Greenberg, Steven M; van Buchem, Mark A; van der Grond, Jeroen; van Rooden, Sanneke

    2018-06-01

    The aim of the present study is to explore whether using 7 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging, additional brain changes can be observed in hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis-Dutch type (HCHWA-D) patients as compared with the established magnetic resonance imaging features of sporadic cerebral amyloid angiopathy. The local institutional review board approved this prospective cohort study. In all cases, informed consent was obtained. This prospective parallel cohort study was conducted between 2012 and 2014. We performed T 2 *-weighted magnetic resonance imaging performed at 7 Tesla in presymptomatic mutation carriers (n=11, mean age 35±12 years), symptomatic HCHWA-D patients (n=15, mean age 45±14 years), and in control subjects (n=29, mean age 45±14 years). Images were analyzed for the presence of changes that have not been reported before in sporadic cerebral amyloid angiopathy and HCHWA-D. Innovative observations comprised intragyral hemorrhaging and cortical changes. The presence of these changes was systematically assessed in all participants of the study. Symptomatic HCHWA-D-patients had a higher incidence of intragyral hemorrhage (47% [7/15], controls 0% [0/29], P <0.001), and a higher incidence of specific cortical changes (40% [6/15] versus 0% [0/29], P <0.005). In presymptomatic HCHWA-D-mutation carriers, the prevalence of none of these markers was increased compared with control subjects. The presence of cortical changes and intragyral hemorrhage are imaging features of HCHWA-D that may help recognizing sporadic cerebral amyloid angiopathy in living patients. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Hereditary noetherian prime rings and idealizers

    Levy, Lawrence S

    2011-01-01

    The direct sum behaviour of its projective modules is a fundamental property of any ring. Hereditary Noetherian prime rings are perhaps the only noncommutative Noetherian rings for which this direct sum behaviour (for both finitely and infinitely generated projective modules) is well-understood, yet highly nontrivial. This book surveys material previously available only in the research literature. It provides a re-worked and simplified account, with improved clarity, fresh insights and many original results about finite length modules, injective modules and projective modules. It culminates in the authors' surprisingly complete structure theorem for projective modules which involves two independent additive invariants: genus and Steinitz class. Several applications demonstrate its utility. The theory, extending the well-known module theory of commutative Dedekind domains and of hereditary orders, develops via a detailed study of simple modules. This relies upon the substantial account of idealizer subrings wh...

  19. Hereditary spastic paraplegia with cerebellar ataxia

    Nielsen, J E; Johnsen, B; Koefoed, P

    2004-01-01

    Complex forms of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) are rare and usually transmitted in an autosomal recessive pattern. A family of four generations with autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (AD-HSP) and a complex phenotype with variably expressed co-existing ataxia, dysarthria......, unipolar depression, epilepsy, migraine, and cognitive impairment was investigated. Genetic linkage analysis and sequencing of the SPG4 gene was performed and electrophysiologic investigations were carried out in six individuals and positron emission tomography (PET) in one patient. The disease was linked...... in those individuals who were clinically affected by a complex phenotype consisting of HSP and cerebellar ataxia. Other features noted in this kindred including epilepsy, cognitive impairment, depression, and migraine did not segregate with the HSP phenotype or mutation, and therefore the significance...

  20. Hereditary Transthyretin Amyloidosis in Eight Chinese Families

    Ling-Chao Meng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mutations of transthyretin (TTR cause the most common type of autosomal-dominant hereditary systemic amyloidosis, which occurs worldwide. To date, more and more mutations in the TTR gene have been reported. Some variations in the clinical presentation are often observed in patients with the same mutation or the patients in the same family. The purpose of this study was to find out the clinicopathologic and genetic features of Chinese patients with hereditary TTR amyloidosis. Methods: Clinical and necessary examination materials were collected from nine patients of eight families with hereditary TTR amyloidosis at Peking University First Hospital from January 2007 to November 2014. Sural nerve biopsies were taken for eight patients and skin biopsies were taken in the calf/upper arm for two patients, for light and electron microscopy examination. The TTR genes from the nine patients were analyzed. Results: The onset age varied from 23 to 68 years. The main manifestations were paresthesia, proximal and/or distal weakness, autonomic dysfunction, cardiomyopathy, vitreous opacity, hearing loss, and glossohypertrophia. Nerve biopsy demonstrated severe loss of myelinated fibers in seven cases and amyloid deposits in three. One patient had skin amyloid deposits which were revealed from electron microscopic examination. Genetic analysis showed six kinds of mutations of TTR gene, including Val30Met, Phe33Leu, Ala36Pro, Val30Ala, Phe33Val, and Glu42Gly in exon 2. Conclusions: Since the pathological examinations of sural nerve were negative for amyloid deposition in most patients, the screening for TTR mutations should be performed in all the adult patients, who are clinically suspected with hereditary TTR amyloidosis.

  1. Multiple Hereditary Osteochondromatosis: A Case Report

    K???kesmen, ?i?dem; ?zen, Bu?ra; Ak?am, Mustafa

    2007-01-01

    Objectives Common carious lesions owing to vomiting are not widespread in children. In this case, we aimed to report an 11-years-old male patient with common carious lesions due to repeated vomitings, chewing and eating difficulty and retarded growth with Multiple Hereditary Osteochondromatosis (MHO). Case Report An 11-years-old boy was referred to Department of Pediatric Dentistry in Faculty of Dentistry because of eating difficulty owing to common carious lesions. It was seen that the patie...

  2. Mania associated with complicated hereditary spastic paraparesis

    Raghavendra B Nayak; Govind S Bhogale; Nanasaheb M Patil; Aditya A Pandurangi

    2011-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraparesis (HSP) is an inherited group of neurological disorders with progressive lower limb spasticity. HSP can be clinically grouped into pure and complicated forms. Pure HSP is one without any associated neurological/psychiatric comorbidity. Depression is the most common psychiatric comorbidity. Presence of mania or bipolar affective illness with HSP is a rare phenomenon. We report a case of a 17-year-old boy who presented with classical features of HSP with complaints ...

  3. Cellular Pathways of Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia*

    Blackstone, Craig

    2012-01-01

    Human voluntary movement is controlled by the pyramidal motor system, a long CNS pathway comprising corticospinal and lower motor neurons. Hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) are a large, genetically diverse group of inherited neurologic disorders characterized by a length-dependent distal axonopathy of the corticospinal tracts, resulting in lower limb spasticity and weakness. A range of studies are converging on alterations in the shaping of organelles, particularly the endoplasmic reticul...

  4. Current problems in haematology. 2: Hereditary spherocytosis.

    Smedley, J C; Bellingham, A J

    1991-01-01

    Hereditary spherocytosis is a relatively common haematological disorder and will be encountered by all haematologists. The abundance of new information, dealing principally with molecular and genetic aspects of pathophysiology, is beginning to have implications for its investigation and management. While these advances have not yet exerted a large influence at therapeutic level, the promise of such advents as prenatal diagnosis make this an exciting field to watch.

  5. Multimodality imaging features of hereditary multiple exostoses

    Kok, H K; Fitzgerald, L; Campbell, N; Lyburn, I D; Munk, P L; Buckley, O; Torreggiani, W C

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary multiple exostoses (HME) or diaphyseal aclasis is an inherited disorder characterised by the formation of multiple osteochondromas, which are cartilage-capped osseous outgrowths, and the development of associated osseous deformities. Individuals with HME may be asymptomatic or develop clinical symptoms, which prompt imaging studies. Different modalities ranging from plain radiographs to cross-sectional and nuclear medicine imaging studies can be helpful in the diagnosis and detecti...

  6. Pancreatic cancer risk in hereditary pancreatitis

    Weiss, Frank U.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is part of the body’s immune response in order to remove harmful stimuli – like pathogens, irritants or damaged cells - and start the healing process. Recurrent or chronic inflammation on the other side seems a predisposing factor for carcinogenesis and has been found associated with cancer development. In chronic pancreatitis mutations of the cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1) gene have been identified as risk factors of the disease. Hereditary pancreatitis is a rare cause of chronic...

  7. Disease expression in women with hereditary angioedema

    Bouillet, Laurence; Longhurst, Hilary; Boccon-Gibod, Isabelle

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Fluctuations in sex hormones can trigger angioedema attacks in women with hereditary angioedema. Combined oral contraceptive therapies, as well as pregnancy, can induce severe attacks. The course of angioedema may be very variable in different women. STUDY DESIGN: Within the PREHAEAT p......-sensitive phenotype for some patients. CONCLUSION: The course of angioedema in women with C1 inhibitor deficiency is affected by physiologic hormonal changes; consequently, physicians should take these into account when advising on management.......OBJECTIVE: Fluctuations in sex hormones can trigger angioedema attacks in women with hereditary angioedema. Combined oral contraceptive therapies, as well as pregnancy, can induce severe attacks. The course of angioedema may be very variable in different women. STUDY DESIGN: Within the PREHAEAT...... project launched by the European Union, data on 150 postpubertal women with hereditary angioedema were collected in 8 countries, using a patient-based questionnaire. RESULTS: Puberty worsened the disease for 62%. Combined oral contraceptives worsened the disease for 79%, whereas progestogen-only pills...

  8. Hereditary pituitary hyperplasia with infantile gigantism.

    Gläsker, Sven; Vortmeyer, Alexander O; Lafferty, Antony R A; Hofman, Paul L; Li, Jie; Weil, Robert J; Zhuang, Zhengping; Oldfield, Edward H

    2011-12-01

    We report hereditary pituitary hyperplasia. The objective of the study was to describe the results of the clinical and laboratory analysis of this rare instance of hereditary pituitary hyperplasia. The study is a retrospective analysis of three cases from one family. The study was conducted at the National Institutes of Health, a tertiary referral center. A mother and both her sons had very early-onset gigantism associated with high levels of serum GH and prolactin. The condition was treated by total hypophysectomy. We performed clinical, pathological, and molecular evaluations, including evaluation basal and provocative endocrine testing, neuroradiological assessment, and assessment of the pituitary tissue by microscopic evaluation, immunohistochemistry, and electron microscopy. All three family members had very early onset of gigantism associated with abnormally high serum levels of GH and prolactin. Serum GHRH levels were not elevated in either of the boys. The clinical, radiographic, surgical, and histological findings indicated mammosomatotroph hyperplasia. The pituitary gland of both boys revealed diffuse mammosomatotroph hyperplasia of the entire pituitary gland without evidence of adenoma. Prolactin and GH were secreted by the same cells within the same secretory granules. Western blot and immunohistochemistry demonstrated expression of GHRH in clusters of cells distributed throughout the hyperplastic pituitary of both boys. This hereditary condition seems to be a result of embryonic pituitary maldevelopment with retention and expansion of the mammosomatotrophs. The findings suggest that it is caused by paracrine or autocrine pituitary GHRH secretion during pituitary development.

  9. Advances and challenges in hereditary cancer pharmacogenetics.

    Cascorbi, Ingolf; Werk, Anneke Nina

    2017-01-01

    Cancer pharmacogenetics usually considers tumor-specific targets. However, hereditary genetic variants may interfere with the pharmacokinetics of antimetabolites and other anti-cancer drugs, which may lead to severe adverse events. Areas covered: Here, the impact of hereditary genes considered in drug labels such as thiopurine S-methyltransferase (TPMT), UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UTG1A1) and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPYD) are discussed with respect to guidelines of the Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC). Moreover, the association between genetic variants of drug transporters with the clinical outcome is comprehensively discussed. Expert opinion: Precision therapy in the field of oncology is developing tremendously. There are a number of somatic tumor genetic markers that are indicative for treatment with anti-cancer drugs. By contrast, for some hereditary variants, recommendations have been developed. Although we have vast knowledge on the association between drug transporter variants and clinical outcome, the overall data is inconsistent and the predictability of the related phenotype is low. Further developments in research may lead to the discovery of rare, but functionally relevant single nucleotide polymorphisms and a better understanding of multiple genomic, epigenomic as well as phenotypic factors, contributing to drug response in malignancies.

  10. Multimodality imaging in macular telangiectasia 2: A clue to its pathogenesis

    Lihteh Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Macular telangiectasia type 2 also known as idiopathic perifoveal telangiectasia and juxtafoveolar retinal telangiectasis type 2A is an acquired bilateral neurodegenerative macular disease that manifests itself during the fifth or sixth decades of life. It is characterized by minimal dilatation of the parafoveal capillaries with graying of the retinal area involved, a lack of lipid exudation, right-angled retinal venules, refractile deposits in the superficial retina, hyperplasia of the retinal pigment epithelium, foveal atrophy, and subretinal neovascularization (SRNV. Our understanding of the disease has paralleled advances in multimodality imaging of the fundus. Optical coherence tomography (OCT images typically demonstrate the presence of intraretinal hyporeflective spaces that are usually not related to retinal thickening or fluorescein leakage. The typical fluorescein angiographic (FA finding is a deep intraretinal hyperfluorescent staining in the temporal parafoveal area. With time, the staining may involve the whole parafoveal area but does not extend to the center of the fovea. Long-term prognosis for central vision is poor, because of the development of SRNV or macular atrophy. Its pathogenesis remains unclear but multimodality imaging with FA, spectral domain OCT, adaptive optics, confocal blue reflectance and short wave fundus autofluorescence implicate Müller cells and macular pigment. Currently, there is no known treatment for this condition.

  11. Neurodegeneration in ataxia-telangiectasia: Multiple roles of ATM kinase in cellular homeostasis.

    Choy, Kay Rui; Watters, Dianne J

    2018-01-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is characterized by neuronal degeneration, cancer, diabetes, immune deficiency, and increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation. A-T is attributed to the deficiency of the protein kinase coded by the ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated) gene. ATM is a sensor of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and signals to cell cycle checkpoints and the DNA repair machinery. ATM phosphorylates numerous substrates and activates many cell-signaling pathways. There has been considerable debate about whether a defective DNA damage response is causative of the neurological aspects of the disease. In proliferating cells, ATM is localized mainly in the nucleus; however, in postmitotic cells such as neurons, ATM is mostly cytoplasmic. Recent studies reveal an increasing number of roles for ATM in the cytoplasm, including activation by oxidative stress. ATM associates with organelles including mitochondria and peroxisomes, both sources of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which have been implicated in neurodegenerative diseases and aging. ATM is also associated with synaptic vesicles and has a role in regulating cellular homeostasis and autophagy. The cytoplasmic roles of ATM provide a new perspective on the neurodegenerative process in A-T. This review will examine the expanding roles of ATM in cellular homeostasis and relate these functions to the complex A-T phenotype. Developmental Dynamics 247:33-46, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Sugammadex reversal of rocuronium-induced neuromuscular block in a patient with ataxia-telangiectasia

    Kang, E.; Jung, J.W.

    2015-01-01

    A 17-year-old adolescent with ataxia-telangiectasia was scheduled to have laparoscopic colectomy for a resection of colon cancer. He had symptoms and signs of dyspnea, generalized dystonia, dysmetria, ataxia, and telangiectasia on the orbit. General anesthesia was performed, and rocuronium 30 mg was administered for muscle relaxation. Deep neuromuscular block (post-tetanic count: 0-8) was maintained for 95 minutes without additional rocuronium. On completion of surgery, sugammadex 80 mg was injected and train-of-four ratio was 0.93 at 210 seconds after administration. The tracheal tube was removed 5 min after the end of surgery. He recovered full spontaneous respiration and voluntary movements within 1 minute after extubation. After the surgery, he transferred to the intensive care unit and discharged 14 days after the surgery without any concrete problem. The reversal of rocuronium induced neuromuscular block by sugammadex was fast, complete, and recovered to the initial preoperative level of neuromuscular function in this patient. (author)

  13. Abnormal responses to the carcinogen 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide of cultured fibroblasts from patients with dysplastic nevus syndrome and hereditary cutaneous malignant melanoma

    Smith, P.J.; Greene, M.H.; Adams, D.; Paterson, M.C.

    1983-01-01

    The dysplastic nevus syndrome (DNS) is a preneoplastic melanocyte abnormality which occurs in families affected by hereditary cutaneous malignant melanoma (HCMM). A putative role of host-environmental interactions in the etiology of hereditary melanoma has been strengthened by the recent finding that fibroblasts derived from HCMM/DNS patients demonstrated enhanced sensitivity to u.v.-irradiation in vitro. An extension of these studies is reported in which we have examined the invitro responses to a model environmental carcinogen, 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4NQO), of six non-tumor skin fibroblast strains from HCMM/DNS patients representing five families. Three of the six HCMM/DNS strains showed enhanced cell killing with sensitivities greater than that of a xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) variant strain but less than those of ataxia telangiectasia and XP Group D cell strains. The inhibition and recovery of de novo DNA synthesis, together with the expression of repair synthesis, following 4NQO exposure appeared to be normal in HCMM/DNS strains, irrespective of their subsequent clonogenic potential. The data point to a metabolic anomaly which may contribute to the carcinogenic risk of the melanoma prone preneoplastic state presented by some DNS patients

  14. Nontraumatic temporal subcortical hemorrhage

    Weisberg, L.A.; Stazio, A.; Shamsnia, M.; Elliott, D.; Charity Hospital, New Orleans, LA

    1990-01-01

    Thirty patients with temporal hematomas were analyzed. Four with frontal extension survived. Of 6 with ganglionic extension, three had residual deficit. Of 8 with parietal extension, 4 had delayed deterioration and died, two patients recovered, and two with peritumoral hemorrhage due to glioblastoma multiforme died. Five patients with posterior temporal hematomas recovered. In 7 patients with basal-inferior temporal hematomas, angiography showed aneurysms in 3 cases, angiomas in 2 cases and no vascular lesion in 2 cases. Of 23 cases with negative angiography and no systemic cause for temporal hematoma, 12 patients were hypertensive and 11 were normotensive. Ten hypertensive patients without evidence of chronic vascular disease had the largest hematomas, extending into the parietal or ganglionic regions. Seven of these patients died; 3 had residual deficit. Eleven normotensive and two hypertensive patients with evidence of chronic vascular change had smaller hematomas. They survived with good functional recovery. (orig.)

  15. Intracerebral hemorrhage in brain tumors

    Fujita, Katsuzo; Matsumoto, Satoshi

    1980-01-01

    A series of 16 cases of intracerebral hemorrhage associated with brain tumors are described. The literature is reviewed and the incidence of these cases is reported to be low, but we had clinically encountered these cases more commonly than reported, since CT was introduced to the neurosurgical field as a diagnostic aid. The presenting symptoms were those of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage or brain tumor. The intracerebral hemorrhage associated with brain tumor may mask the cause of bleeding and confuse the diagnosis. The majority of the tumor causing the intracerebral hemorrhage are highly malignant as glioblastoma or metastatic brain tumor, but there are some benign tumors such as pituitary adenoma, hemangioblastoma, benign astrocytoma and meningioma, which would have good survival rates if discovered early. The mechanisms of massive hemorrhage with brain tumor are not clear. From pathological findings of our cases and other reports, the mechanism seems to be due to the vascular endothelial proliferation with subsequent obliteration of the lumen of the vessel. Thin walled, poorly formed vessels in tumor may also become distorted with growth of the tumor and these may easily rupture and bleed. Necrosis with subsequent loss of vessel support may be a factor in production of hemorrhage. Radiation therapy may be a predisposing factor. Children are rarely involved in these cases. The prognosis in the majority of cases would seen to be poor, since the majority of the tumor are highly malignant and most such patients are seen by the neurosurgeon some time after the hemorrhage has accomplished its fatal mischief. (author)

  16. Neonatal intracranial hemorrhages (perinatal onset)

    Ban, Sadahiko; Ogata, Masahiro; Yamamoto, Toyoshiro; Nakao, Satoshi; Mizue, Hidenari; Kobayashi, Yutaka.

    1982-01-01

    1. We have reviewed 34 cases of neonatal intracranial hemorrhages (perinatal onset, 23 mature and 11 premature infants) experienced in 10-year period from 1971 to 1980, with special reference to gestational age, birth weight, type of delivery, presence or absence of asphyxia, symptoms and cause of death. 2. Regarding 9 autopsied cases and 7 cases diagnosed by CT-scan, 10 mature infants composed of 3 subarachnoid hemorrhages, 2 intraventricular hemorrhages, 2 subdural hematomas, 2 intracerebral and 1 subependymal hemorrhage; 6 premature infants consisted of 4 subependymal hemorrhages with ventricular rupture and 2 subarachnoid hemorrhages. Most of them presented with respiratory distress, vomiting and convulsive seizures which developed within 5 days after birth. 3. Poor outcome including death amounted 49% of mature and 63% of premature infants. Along with degree of intracranial hematoma, prematurity and pulmonary complication were felt to be important prognostic factors. 4. Introduction of CT-scan led to prompt diagnosis and treatment, thus lowering mortality rate of neonatal intracranial hemorrhages. (author)

  17. Hydrocephalus secondary to subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Koga, Nobunori; Nakamura, Saburo; Kushi, Hidehiko; Yamamoto, Takamitsu; Tsubokawa, Takashi; Moriyasu, Nobuo

    1982-01-01

    The relationship between the extension and severity of subarachnoid hemorrhage, as demonstrated by computed tomography (CT), and hydrocephalus secondary to subarachnoid hemorrhage was studied. In 94 cases with subarachnoid hemorrhage, as analyzed by CT scan performed within 7 days after onset, high-density areas in the subarachnoid space were recognized in 61 cases (64%) and secondary hydrocephalus occurred in 22 cases (23%). 17 cases died within 2 weeks, before the occurrence of the hydrocephalus. The CT findings of subarachnoid hemorrhage was classified into 5 types, according to its severity and extension; especially the degree of high density in the basal cistern and/or cisterns around the brain stem was remarked. Secondary hydrocephalus after subarachnoid hemorrhage was observed in 90% of the cases; they had a density higher than a CT number of 60 in the basal cistern and/or cisterns around the brain stem (Type V). The mean interval between the onset of subarachnoid hemorrhage and the appearance of hydrocephalus was 20.6 days. We conclude that a significantly high density of extravasated blood in the subarachnoid space, especially in the basal cistern and/or the cisterns around the brain stem, can be predictive of secondary hydrocephalus after subarachnoid hemorrhage. (author)

  18. Intracerebral hemorrhage in brain tumors

    Fujita, K; Matsumoto, S [Kobe Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1980-10-01

    A series of 16 cases of intracerebral hemorrhage associated with brain tumors are described. The literature is reviewed and the incidence of these cases is reported to be low, but we had clinically encountered these cases more commonly than reported, since CT was introduced to the neurosurgical field as a diagnostic aid. The presenting symptoms were those of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage or brain tumor. The intracerebral hemorrhage associated with brain tumor may mask the cause of bleeding and confuse the diagnosis. The majority of the tumor causing the intracerebral hemorrhage are highly malignant as glioblastoma or metastatic brain tumor, but there are some benign tumors such as pituitary adenoma, hemangioblastoma, benign astrocytoma and meningioma, which would have good survival rates if discovered early. The mechanisms of massive hemorrhage with brain tumor are not clear. From pathological findings of our cases and other reports, the mechanism seems to be due to the vascular endothelial proliferation with subsequent obliteration of the lumen of the vessel. Thin walled, poorly formed vessels in tumor may also become distorted with growth of the tumor and these may easily rupture and bleed. Necrosis with subsequent loss of vessel support may be a factor in production of hemorrhage. Radiation therapy may be a predisposing factor. Children are rarely involved in these cases. The prognosis in the majority of cases would seen to be poor, since the majority of the tumor are highly malignant and most such patients are seen by the neurosurgeon some time after the hemorrhage has accomplished its fatal mischief.

  19. Embolization for gastrointestinal hemorrhages

    Kraemer, S.C.; Goerich, J.; Rilinger, N.; Aschoff, A.J.; Vogel, J.; Brambs, H.J.; Siech, M.

    2000-01-01

    Retrospective evaluation of interventional embolization therapy in the treatment of gastrointestinal hemorrhage over a long-term observation period from 1989 to 1997. Included in the study were 35 patients (age range 18-89 years) with gastrointestinal bleeding (GI) referred for radiological intervention either primarily or following unsuccessful endoscopy or surgery. Sources of GI bleeding included gastric and duodenal ulcers (n = 7), diverticula (n = 3), erosion of the intestinal wall secondary to malignancy (n = 6), vascular malformations (n = 4), and hemorrhoids (n = 2), as well as from postoperative (n = 6), posttraumatic (n = 2), postinflammatory (n = 4) or unknown (n = 1) causes. Ethibloc (12 cases) or metal coils (14 cases) were predominantly used as embolisates. In addition, combinations of tissue adhesive and gelfoam particles and of coils and Ethibloc were used (six cases). Finally, polyvinyl alcohol particles, a coated stent, and an arterial wire dissection were utilized in one case each. Bleeding was stopped completely in 29 of 35 cases (83 %). In one case (3 %) the source of bleeding was recognized but the corresponding vessel could not be catheterized. In five other cases (14 %) there was partial success with reduced, though still persistent, bleeding. The rate of complications was 14 %, including four instances of intestinal ischemia with fatal outcome in the first years, and, later, one partial infarction of the spleen without serious consequences. Gastrointestinal hemorrhage can be controlled in a high percentage of patients, including the seriously ill and those who had previously undergone surgery, with the use of minimally invasive interventional techniques. The availability of minicoils instead of fluid embolization agents has reduced the risk of serious complications. (orig.)

  20. Embolization for gastrointestinal hemorrhages

    Kraemer, S.C.; Goerich, J.; Rilinger, N.; Aschoff, A.J.; Vogel, J.; Brambs, H.J. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Ulm (Germany); Siech, M. [Dept. of Abdominal Surgery, University of Ulm (Germany)

    2000-05-01

    Retrospective evaluation of interventional embolization therapy in the treatment of gastrointestinal hemorrhage over a long-term observation period from 1989 to 1997. Included in the study were 35 patients (age range 18-89 years) with gastrointestinal bleeding (GI) referred for radiological intervention either primarily or following unsuccessful endoscopy or surgery. Sources of GI bleeding included gastric and duodenal ulcers (n = 7), diverticula (n = 3), erosion of the intestinal wall secondary to malignancy (n = 6), vascular malformations (n = 4), and hemorrhoids (n = 2), as well as from postoperative (n = 6), posttraumatic (n = 2), postinflammatory (n = 4) or unknown (n = 1) causes. Ethibloc (12 cases) or metal coils (14 cases) were predominantly used as embolisates. In addition, combinations of tissue adhesive and gelfoam particles and of coils and Ethibloc were used (six cases). Finally, polyvinyl alcohol particles, a coated stent, and an arterial wire dissection were utilized in one case each. Bleeding was stopped completely in 29 of 35 cases (83 %). In one case (3 %) the source of bleeding was recognized but the corresponding vessel could not be catheterized. In five other cases (14 %) there was partial success with reduced, though still persistent, bleeding. The rate of complications was 14 %, including four instances of intestinal ischemia with fatal outcome in the first years, and, later, one partial infarction of the spleen without serious consequences. Gastrointestinal hemorrhage can be controlled in a high percentage of patients, including the seriously ill and those who had previously undergone surgery, with the use of minimally invasive interventional techniques. The availability of minicoils instead of fluid embolization agents has reduced the risk of serious complications. (orig.)

  1. Imaging features of diffuse pulmonary hemorrhage

    Schmit, M.; Vogel, W.; Horger, M.

    2006-01-01

    There are diverse etiologies of diffuse pulmonary hemorrhage, so specific diagnosis may be difficult. Conventional radiography tends to be misleading as hemoptysis may lacking in patients with hemorrhagic anemia. Diffuse pulmonary hemorrhage should be differentiated from focal pulmonary hemorrhage resulting from chronic bronchitis, bronchiectasis, active infection (tuberculosis) neoplasia, trauma, or embolism. (orig.)

  2. Transcatheter embolization of hepatic arteriovenous fistulas in Rendu-Osler-Weber disease: a case report and review of the literature

    Stockx, L.; Raat, H.; Caerts, B.; Wilms, G.; Marchal, G.; Cutsem, E. van

    1999-01-01

    A patient with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia and diffuse intrahepatic arteriovenous fistulas developed secondary high-output ventricular failure and pulmonary hypertension. A serial staged hepatic arterial coil embolization was performed with long-term resultant haemodynamic and clinical improvement. The methods of this procedure and related complications are discussed. (orig.)

  3. Hemorrhagic Lacrimation and Epistaxis in Acute Hemorrhagic Edema of Infancy

    Shireen Mreish

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute hemorrhagic edema of infancy is an uncommon benign cutaneous vasculitis. Despite its worrisome presentation, it carries good prognosis with rarely reported systemic involvement. Management of these cases has been an area of debate with majority of physicians adopting conservative modalities. We report a case that presented with classic triad of rash, low grade fever, and peripheral edema along with two rarely reported manifestations in literature: hemorrhagic lacrimation and epistaxis.

  4. Failure of signal transduction pathway of DNA damage in hereditary microcephaly

    Miyamoto, Tatsuo; Matsuura, Shinya

    2009-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying the brain size determination are considered from an aspect of DNA-damage signaling recently revealed by studies on hereditary microcephaly (M), in relation to the radiation-induced M. International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP) assesses the risk of M by in utero exposure as 40%/Sv, the threshold dose is about 0.2 Gy (deterministic effect), A-bomb M is conceived to be due to the exposure at 8-5 weeks of gestation, and M is induced by radiation at 10 days after fertilization in the mouse. Recent studies on causing genes of M have revealed its particular connection with signaling pathways: in ataxia-telangiectasia (AT), genes of ATM; in Seckel syndrome, of ATR (AT and Rad3-related) and pericentrin (PCNT); Nijmegen syndrome (NBS), of NBS1; NBS-like disease, of Rad50 and Mre11; AT-like disease, of Mre11; Lig4 syndrome, of Lig4; immunodeficiency combined with M, of XLF; primary M, of MCPH1, ASPM, CdkRap2, CENP-J and STIL. Single and double strand breaks of DNA respectively activate the signaling pathway of ATR where PCNT and MCPH1 participate, and pathway of ATM where NBS1, Mre11 and Rad50 do. PCNT is a major protein, pericentrin, composing the centrosome, of which defect results in the Seckel disease with spindle dysfunction. At present, M can be thus said to be of the cellular common features of failure of ATM/ATR signaling and of dysfunction of centrosome. As well, ASPM gene expression is recently reported to be suppressed by radiation. Thus future studies on M will spread to wider biological field of cell and development as well as radiation and inheritance. (K.T.)

  5. Using the ultra-long pulse width pulsed dye laser and elliptical spot to treat resistant nasal telangiectasia.

    Madan, Vishal; Ferguson, Janice

    2010-01-01

    Thick linear telangiectasia on the ala nasi and nasolabial crease can be resistant to treatment with the potassium-titanyl-phosphate (KTP) laser and the traditional round spot on a pulsed dye laser (PDL). We evaluated the efficacy of a 3 mm x 10 mm elliptical spot using the ultra-long pulse width on a Candela Vbeam(R) PDL for treatment of PDL- and KTP laser-resistant nasal telangiectasia. Nasal telangiectasia resistant to PDL (12 patients) and KTP laser (12 patients) in 18 patients were treated with a 3 mm x 10 mm elliptical spot on the ultra-long pulse pulsed dye laser (ULPDL) utilising long pulse width [595 nm, 40 ms, double pulse, 30:20 dynamic cooling device (DCD)]. Six patients had previously received treatment with both PDL and KTP laser prior to ULPDL (40 treatments, range1-4, mean 2.2). Complete clearance was seen in ten patients, and eight patients displayed more than 80% improvement after ULPDL treatment. Self-limiting purpura occurred with round spot PDL and erythema with KTP laser and ULPDL. Subtle linear furrows along the treatment sites were seen in three patients treated with the KTP laser. ULPDL treatment delivered using a 3 mm x 10 mm elliptical spot was non-purpuric and highly effective in the treatment of nasal telangiectasia resistant to KTP laser and PDL.

  6. Small Molecules Targeting Ataxia Telangiectasia and Rad3-Related (ATR) Kinase: An Emerging way to Enhance Existing Cancer Therapy

    Andrs, M.; Korábečný, J.; Nepovimova, E.; Jun, D.; Hodný, Zdeněk; Kuca, K.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 3 (2016), s. 200-208 ISSN 1568-0096 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related kinase (ATR) * cancer * chemosensitization * DNA damage response * phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related protein kinases (PIKK) * radiosensitization * synthetic lethality Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.992, year: 2016

  7. Ataxia Telangiectasia

    ... is the measurement of "fetal proteins," or serum alpha-fetoprotein , in the blood. These are proteins that are ... than 95 percent) have elevated levels of serum alpha-fetoprotein. When other causes of elevations of alpha-fetoprotein ...

  8. Ataxia Telangiectasia

    ... the hair, difficulty swallowing, and delayed physical and sexual development. Children with A-T usually have normal or ... the hair, difficulty swallowing, and delayed physical and sexual development. Children with A-T usually have normal or ...

  9. Massive postpartum right renal hemorrhage.

    Kiracofe, H L; Peterson, N

    1975-06-01

    All reported cases of massive postpartum right renal hemorrhage have involved healthy young primigravidas and blacks have predominated (4 of 7 women). Coagulopathies and underlying renal disease have been absent. Hematuria was painless in 5 of 8 cases. Hemorrhage began within 24 hours in 1 case, within 48 hours in 4 cases and 4 days post partum in 3 cases. Our first case is the only report in which hemorrhage has occurred in a primipara. Failure of closure or reopening of pyelovenous channels is suggested as the pathogenesis. The hemorrhage has been self-limiting, requiring no more than 1,500 cc whole blood replacement. Bleeding should stop spontaneously, and rapid renal pelvic clot lysis should follow with maintenance of adequate urine output and Foley catheter bladder decompression. To date surgical intervention has not been necessary.

  10. Hereditary Colorectal Cancer (CRC Program in Latvia

    Irmejs Arvids

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The aim of the study is to evaluate the incidence and phenotype - genotype characteristics of hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes in Latvia in order to develop the basis of clinical management for patients and their relatives affected by these syndromes. Materials and methods From 02/1999-09/2002 in several hospitals in Latvia cancer family histories were collected from 865 patients with CRC. In families suspected of having a history consistent with a hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome, DNA testing for MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 genes was performed. In addition immunohistochemical (IH examination of the normal and cancer tissue from large bowel tumors for MSH2 and MSH6 protein expression was performed prior to DNA analysis. Results From the 865 CRC cases only 3 (0.35% pedigrees fulfilled the Amsterdam II criteria of Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC and 15 cases (1.73% were suspected of HNPCC. In 69 cases (8% with a cancer family aggregation (CFA were identified. Thus far 27 IH analyses have been performed and in 3 cancers homogenous lack of MSH2 or MSH6 protein expression was found. In one of these cases a mutation in MSH6 was identified. In 18 patients suspected of HNPCC or of matching the Amsterdam II criteria, denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC followed by DNA sequencing of any heteroduplexes of the 35 exons comprising both MLH1 and MSH2 was performed revealing 3 mutations. For all of kindreds diagnosed definitively or with a high probability of being an HNPCC family appropriate recommendations concerning prophylactic measures, surveillance and treatment were provided in written form. Conclusions Existing pedigree/clinical data suggest that in Latvia the frequency of HNPCC is around 2% of consecutive colorectal cancer patients. It is crucial that genetic counseling is an integral part of cancer family syndrome management.

  11. Bone scintigraphy in hereditary multiple exostoses

    Epstein, D.A.; Levin, E.J.

    1978-01-01

    Two adult patients with multiple hereditary exostoses, a skeletal disorder with recognized malignant potential, each demonstrated increased /sup 99m/Tc diphosphonate uptake in an exostosis in which renewed growth had begun. None of the other multiple exostoses in either patient showed abnormal uptake. Histologic study of the lesions demonstrated chondrosarcoma in one case and benign osteochondroma in the second. Although bone scintigraphy nonspecifically identifies bone growth rather than malignant degeneration, it is more useful than radiographic bone survey in the periodic surveillance of adult patients with this disorder

  12. Skin deposits in hereditary cystatin C amyloidosis

    Benedikz, Eirikur; Blöndal, H; Gudmundsson, G

    1990-01-01

    Clinically normal skin from 47 individuals aged 9-70 years was investigated. Cystatin C amyloid deposits were found in various locations of the skin by light and/or electron microscopy, in all 12 patients with a clinical history of hereditary cystatin C amyloidosis (HCCA). Six asymptomatic...... individuals, who had the Alu 1 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) marker reported to cosegregate with the disease, also had cystatin C amyloid deposits in the skin. Three asymptomatic individuals (age 17-46) belonging to the HCCA families were without amyloid in the skin but had Alu 1 RFLP marker...

  13. Knowledge regarding basic concepts of hereditary cancers, and the ...

    Background. In families with hereditary cancer, at-risk individuals can benefit from genetic counselling and testing. General practitioners (GPs) are ideally placed to identify such families and refer them appropriately. Objective. To assess the practices, knowledge and attitudes of GPs regarding common hereditary cancers.

  14. Review: Clinical aspects of hereditary DNA Mismatch repair gene mutations

    Sijmons, Rolf H.; Hofstra, Robert M. W.

    Inherited mutations of the DNA Mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2 can result in two hereditary tumor syndromes: the adult-onset autosomal dominant Lynch syndrome, previously referred to as Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC) and the childhood-onset autosomal recessive

  15. Attitude towards pre-implantation genetic diagnosis for hereditary cancer

    Lammens, Chantal; Bleiker, Eveline; Aaronson, Neil; Vriends, Annette; Ausems, Margreet; Jansweijer, Maaike; Wagner, Anja; Sijmons, Rolf; van den Ouweland, Ans; van der Luijt, Rob; Spruijt, Liesbeth; Gómez García, Encarna; Ruijs, Mariëlle; Verhoef, Senno

    2009-01-01

    The use of pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for hereditary cancer is subject to on-going debate, particularly among professionals. This study evaluates the attitude towards PGD and attitude-associated characteristics of those concerned: family members with a hereditary cancer predisposition.

  16. Hereditary lymphedema of the leg – A Case Report

    Heinig, Birgit; Lotti, T.; Tchernev, Georgi; Wollina, Uwe

    2017-01-01

    Primary of hereditary lymphedema is a rare but progressive disease. It is yet not curable. We present a 48-year-old male patient with hereditary lymphedema of his left leg, that was realised by minor trauma (able twist) when he was seven years old. He had never been treated for lymphedema but

  17. Hypertensive thalamic hemorrhage

    Munaka, Masahiro; Nishikawa, Michio; Hirai, Osamu; Kaneko, Takaaki; Watanabe, Syu; Fukuma, Jun; Handa, Hajime

    1988-01-01

    In the past six years, we have had experience with 40 patients with hypertensive thalamic hemorrhages, as verified by CT scan at our hospital within 24 hours. These patients were classified into the following three groups according to the location of the bleeding point and the size of the hematoma: (1) anteromedial (4 cases), (2) posterolateral (16 cases), and (3) massive (20 cases). The (1) and (2) hematomas were small (less than 3 cm in diameter), while those in (3) were large (more than 3 cm in diameter). Twenty cases (50% of all the thalamic hematomas) were small hematomas. The characteristic clinical symptoms of the anteromedial type were a mild disturbance of consciousness and thalamic dementia, while those of the posterolateral type were motor and sensory disturbance, and thalamic aphasia, respectively. Twenty cases (50%) were large hematomas. The clinical symptoms of these cases were mainly consciousness disturbance; 7 of them expired. Based on this experience, it may be considered that the patients whose hematoma size was larger than 3 cm had a poor prognosis and that the patients with the posterolateral type had a poor functional diagnosis. (author)

  18. MRI of intracranial hemorrhage

    Inoue, Yuichi; Takemoto, Kazumasa; Hashimoto, Hiromi

    1986-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images of 23 patients with putaminal or thalamic hematomas were reviewed. Inversion recovery (IR, TR; 2100 - 2500 msec, TI; 600 msec) and long spin echo (SE, TR; 1800 - 2500 msec, TE; 120 msec) images were obtained with a 0.5T MR scanner. Hematomas within 3 hours after hemorrhage were isointense to the gray matter on both IR and long SE images. Two day-old hematomas were hyperintense in part of it on IR images and hypointense on long SE images. In acute hematomas, there was a marked hyperintense crescent area around hematomas on long SE images which marked hypointense on IR images. Hematomas in the resolving stage had peripheral hyperintensity on IR images and then on long SE images. This hyperintensity filled into the center of hematomas with time. In the resolving stage linear hypointensity was recognized at immedeately adjacent to the hematoma on long SE images. In the chronic stage, hematomas were hypointense on both IR and long SE images. In a few cases, the central portion of hematomas demonstrated hyperintensity on long SE images which indicated the presence of fluid in the old hematoma cavity. (author)

  19. Stable radioresistance in ataxia-telangiectasia cells containing DNA from normal human cells

    Kapp, L.N.; Painter, R.B.

    1989-01-01

    SV40-transformed ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) cells were transfected with a cosmid containing a normal human DNA library and selectable marker, the neo gene, which endows successfully transformed mammalian cells with resistance to the antibiotic G418. Cells from this line were irradiated with 50 Gy of X-rays and fused with non-transfected AT cells. Among the G418-resistant colonies recovered was one stably resistant to radiation. Resistance to ionizing radiation of both primary transfectant line and its fusion derivative was intermediate between that of AT cells and normal cells, as assayed by colony-forming ability and measurement of radiation-induced G 2 chromatic aberrations; both cell lines retained AT-like radioresistant DNA synthesis. Results suggest that, because radioresistance in transfected cells was not as great as in normal human cells, two hallmarks of AT, radiosensitivity and radioresistant DNA synthesis, may still be the result of a single defective AT gene. (author)

  20. Cellular and molecular response to irradiation in ataxia telangiectasia and in Fanconi's anemia

    Ridet, A.; Guillouf, C.; Duchaud, E.; Moustacchi, E.; Rosselli, F.

    1997-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (AT) and Fanconi anemia (FA) are recessive genetic diseases featuring chromosomal instability, increased predisposition to cancer and in vitro hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation (AT) or DNA cross-linking agents (FA). Moreover, an in vivo hypersensitivity to γ-rays exposure was reported in both syndromes. Cellular response to irradiation includes growth arrest (cell cycle modification) and cell death (by apoptosis or necrosis). Since it is generally accepted that apoptosis modulates cellular sensitivity to genotoxic stress, it was of interest to investigate the contribution of apoptosis in determining FA and AT responses to DNA Damaging Agents. The results support the contention that the in vivo hypersensitivity to radiation in these syndromes is not related to a higher rate of apoptotic cells but could be to a higher necrotic response triggering inflammatory reactions in the patients affected by this syndromes. (authors)

  1. Cellular and molecular response to irradiation in ataxia telangiectasia and in Fanconi`s anemia

    Ridet, A.; Guillouf, C.; Duchaud, E.; Moustacchi, E.; Rosselli, F. [Institut Curie-Recherche, UMR 218, CNRS, 75 - Paris (France)

    1997-03-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (AT) and Fanconi anemia (FA) are recessive genetic diseases featuring chromosomal instability, increased predisposition to cancer and in vitro hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation (AT) or DNA cross-linking agents (FA). Moreover, an in vivo hypersensitivity to {gamma}-rays exposure was reported in both syndromes. Cellular response to irradiation includes growth arrest (cell cycle modification) and cell death (by apoptosis or necrosis). Since it is generally accepted that apoptosis modulates cellular sensitivity to genotoxic stress, it was of interest to investigate the contribution of apoptosis in determining FA and AT responses to DNA Damaging Agents. The results support the contention that the in vivo hypersensitivity to radiation in these syndromes is not related to a higher rate of apoptotic cells but could be to a higher necrotic response triggering inflammatory reactions in the patients affected by this syndromes. (authors)

  2. Cell and Molecular Biology of Ataxia Telangiectasia Heterozygous Human Mammary Epithelial Cells Irradiated in Culture

    Richmond, Robert C.

    2001-01-01

    Autologous isolates of cell types from obligate heterozygotes with the autosomal disorder ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T)were used to begin a tissue culture model for assessing pathways of radiation-induced cancer formation in this target tissue. This was done by establishing cultures of stromal fibroblasts and long-term growth human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) in standard 2-dimensional tissue culture in order to establish expression of markers detailing early steps of carcinogenesis. The presumptive breast cancer susceptibility of A-T heterozygotes as a sequel to damage caused by ionizing radiation provided reason to study expression of markers in irradiated HMEC. Findings from our study with HMEC have included determination of differences in specific protein expression amongst growth phase (e.g., log vs stationary) and growth progression (e.g., pass 7 vs pass 9), as well as differences in morphologic markers within populations of irradiated HMEC (e.g., development of multinucleated cells).

  3. Efficacy of Intravitreal Bevacizumab in Treatment of Proliferative Type 2 Idiopathic Juxtafoveal Telangiectasia

    Ökkeş Baz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the effectiveness of intravitreal bevacizumab (IVB in patients with subretinal neovascularization secondary to type 2 juxtafoveal telangiectasia. Materials and Methods: Ten eyes of 10 patients were included in this retrospective study. All cases were treated with IVB (1.25 mg bevacizumab. Visual acuity and slit-lamp anterior and posterior segment examinations were performed at each visit. Central macular thickness (CMT and intraretinal/subretinal fluid were evaluated via spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT. Loss of a line in visual acuity chart and presence of fluid on OCT were defined as criteria for repeated treatment. Results: The mean age of patients was 66.0±7.0 years (56-75. The mean follow-up time was 54.7±16.0 month (24-72. The mean BCVA was 0.62±0.35 (0.00-1.00 logMAR at baseline and 0.54±0.35 (0.00-1.00 logMAR at final exam (p=0.03. The mean CMT was 251±25.4 µm at baseline and 239±39.3 µm at final exam (p=0.01. Patients received an average of 1.7±1.0 IVB injections during follow-up. At baseline, all cases had intraretinal/subretinal fluid. There was no fluid at final examination of all cases. Conclusion: IVB treatment may be effective in the treatment of subretinal neovascularization secondary to type 2 juxtafoveal telangiectasia.

  4. Genetic profiles distinguish different types of hereditary ovarian cancer

    Domanska, Katarina; Malander, Susanne; Staaf, Johan

    2010-01-01

    (HBOC) syndrome and the hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) syndrome. Genome-wide array comparative genomic hybridization was applied to 12 HBOC associated tumors with BRCA1 mutations and 8 HNPCC associated tumors with mismatch repair gene mutations with 24 sporadic ovarian cancers......Heredity represents the strongest risk factor for ovarian cancer with disease predisposing mutations identified in 15% of the tumors. With the aim to identify genetic classifiers for hereditary ovarian cancer, we profiled hereditary ovarian cancers linked to the hereditary breast and ovarian cancer...... that HBOC and HNPCC associated ovarian cancer develop along distinct genetic pathways and genetic profiles can thus be applied to distinguish between different types of hereditary ovarian cancer....

  5. BRCA1/2 associated hereditary breast cancer

    Li-song TENG; Yi ZHENG; Hao-hao WANG

    2008-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the leading causes of death in women today. Some of the patients are hereditary, with a large proportion characterized by mutation in BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 genes. In this review, we provide an overview of these two genes,focusing on their relationship with hereditary breast cancers. BRCA1/2 associated hereditary breast cancers have unique features that differ from the general breast cancers, including alterations in cellular molecules, pathological bases, biological behavior, and a different prevention strategy. But the outcome of BRCA1/2 associated hereditary breast cancers still remains controversial;further studies are needed to elucidate the nature of BRCA1/2 associated hereditary breast cancers.

  6. Pavlodar city children's some hereditary diseases

    Shajmardanova, B. Kh.; Gorbach, S.V.

    1997-01-01

    Territory of the Pavlodar region directly adjoining to the Semipalatinsk test site is unique object for study of many year tests consequences on population health. Health worsening caused by small doses of radiation on artificial pollution background is defined. Purpose of the work is Pavlodar city children's some hereditary diseases (Downs syndrome, crack of upper lip and/or palate, hemophilia) under study of frequency dynamic of statistical data within period from 1980 by 1995. It is defined: a) tendency to growth Downs syndrome frequency has been distinctly observed beginning of the 1982; b) it is noted Downs syndrome frequency growth stabilization within period from 1988 by 1991; c) among children with Downs syndrome is distinguished low viability; d) there is rather higher correlation rate of Downs syndrome and congenial heart threshold against average statistical index; e) character of frequencies changes of crack of upper lip and/or palate has tendency to growth; f) it is defined that boys predominate among children with this disease; g) congenial crack of soft palate have being revealed as solitary thresholds of development; h) genealogy analysis of hemophilia sick reveals, that it has only hereditary character. 8 refs

  7. Genetics of Hereditary Ataxia in Scottish Terriers.

    Urkasemsin, G; Nielsen, D M; Singleton, A; Arepalli, S; Hernandez, D; Agler, C; Olby, N J

    2017-07-01

    Scottish Terriers have a high incidence of juvenile onset hereditary ataxia primarily affecting the Purkinje neuron of the cerebellar cortex and causing slowly progressive cerebellar dysfunction. To identify chromosomal regions associated with hereditary ataxia in Scottish Terriers. One hundred and fifty-three Scottish Terriers were recruited through the Scottish Terrier Club of America. Prospective study. Dogs were classified as affected if they had slowly progressive cerebellar signs. When possible, magnetic resonance imaging and histopathological evaluation of the brain were completed as diagnostic aids. To identify genomic regions connected with the disease, genome-wide mapping was performed using both linkage- and association-based approaches. Pedigree evaluation and homozygosity mapping were also performed to examine mode of inheritance and to investigate the region of interest, respectively. Linkage and genome-wide association studies in a cohort of Scottish Terriers both identified a region on CFA X strongly associated with the disease trait. Homozygosity mapping revealed a 4 Mb region of interest. Pedigree evaluation failed to identify the possible mode of inheritance due to the lack of complete litter information. This finding suggests that further genetic investigation of the potential region of interest on CFA X should be considered in order to identify the causal mutation as well as develop a genetic test to eliminate the disease from this breed. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  8. Surgical treatment of hereditary lens subluxations.

    Ozdek, Sengul; Sari, Ayca; Bilgihan, Kamil; Akata, Fikret; Hasanreisoglu, Berati

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness and results of pars plana vitreolensectomy approach with transscleral fixation of intraocular lens in hereditary lens subluxations. Fifteen eyes of 9 consecutive patients with a mean age of 12.8+/-6.2 years (6-26 years) with hereditary lens subluxation were operated on and the results were evaluated in a prospective study. Surgery was considered if best spectacle corrected visual acuity (BSCVA) was less than 20/70. All eyes underwent a 2-port pars plana vitreolensectomy and transscleral fixation of an intraocular lens (IOL). The mean follow-up period was 12.6+/-7.5 months (6-22 months). There was no major intraoperative complication. Preoperatively, 8 eyes (53.3%) had a BSCVA of counting fingers (CF) and 7 eyes (46.6%) had a BSCVA of 20/200 to 20/70. Postoperatively, 14 eyes (93.3%) had a BSCVA of 20/50 or better. None of the patients had IOL decentration or intraocular pressure (IOP) increase during the follow-up period. There was a macular hole formation in 1 eye postoperatively. The early results of pars plana vitreolensectomy with IOL implantation using scleral fixation technique had shown that it not only promises a rapid visual rehabilitation but it is also a relatively safe method. More serious complications, however, may occur in the long term.

  9. Recommendations regarding splenectomy in hereditary hemolytic anemias

    Iolascon, Achille; Andolfo, Immacolata; Barcellini, Wilma; Corcione, Francesco; Garçon, Loïc; De Franceschi, Lucia; Pignata, Claudio; Graziadei, Giovanna; Pospisilova, Dagmar; Rees, David C.; de Montalembert, Mariane; Rivella, Stefano; Gambale, Antonella; Russo, Roberta; Ribeiro, Leticia; Vives-Corrons, Jules; Martinez, Patricia Aguilar; Kattamis, Antonis; Gulbis, Beatrice; Cappellini, Maria Domenica; Roberts, Irene; Tamary, Hannah

    2017-01-01

    Hereditary hemolytic anemias are a group of disorders with a variety of causes, including red cell membrane defects, red blood cell enzyme disorders, congenital dyserythropoietic anemias, thalassemia syndromes and hemoglobinopathies. As damaged red blood cells passing through the red pulp of the spleen are removed by splenic macrophages, splenectomy is one possible therapeutic approach to the management of severely affected patients. However, except for hereditary spherocytosis for which the effectiveness of splenectomy has been well documented, the efficacy of splenectomy in other anemias within this group has yet to be determined and there are concerns regarding short- and long-term infectious and thrombotic complications. In light of the priorities identified by the European Hematology Association Roadmap we generated specific recommendations for each disorder, except thalassemia syndromes for which there are other, recent guidelines. Our recommendations are intended to enable clinicians to achieve better informed decisions on disease management by splenectomy, on the type of splenectomy and the possible consequences. As no randomized clinical trials, case control or cohort studies regarding splenectomy in these disorders were found in the literature, recommendations for each disease were based on expert opinion and were subsequently critically revised and modified by the Splenectomy in Rare Anemias Study Group, which includes hematologists caring for both adults and children. PMID:28550188

  10. Molecular biology of hereditary diabetes insipidus.

    Fujiwara, T Mary; Bichet, Daniel G

    2005-10-01

    The identification, characterization, and mutational analysis of three different genes-the arginine vasopressin gene (AVP), the arginine vasopressin receptor 2 gene (AVPR2), and the vasopressin-sensitive water channel gene (aquaporin 2 [AQP2])-provide the basis for understanding of three different hereditary forms of "pure" diabetes insipidus: Neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus, X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI), and non-X-linked NDI, respectively. It is clinically useful to distinguish two types of hereditary NDI: A "pure" type characterized by loss of water only and a complex type characterized by loss of water and ions. Patients who have congenital NDI and bear mutations in the AVPR2 or AQP2 genes have a "pure" NDI phenotype with loss of water but normal conservation of sodium, potassium, chloride, and calcium. Patients who bear inactivating mutations in genes (SLC12A1, KCNJ1, CLCNKB, CLCNKA and CLCNKB in combination, or BSND) that encode the membrane proteins of the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle have a complex polyuro-polydipsic syndrome with loss of water, sodium, chloride, calcium, magnesium, and potassium. These advances provide diagnostic and clinical tools for physicians who care for these patients.

  11. Hypertensive cerebellar hemorrhage and cerebellar hemorrhage caused by cryptic angioma

    Yoshida, Shinichi; Sano, Keiji; Kwak, Suyong; Saito, Isamu.

    1981-01-01

    A series of 44 patients with hypertensive cerebellar hemorrhage and nine patients with cerebellar hemorrhage caused by small angiomas is described. Hypertensive hemorrhage occurred most frequently in the patients in their seventies, whereas the onset of angioma-caused hemorrhage was often seen below the age of 40. Clinical syndromes of cerebellar hemorrhages can be categorized into three basic types: the vertigo syndrome, cerebellar dysfunction syndrome and brain stem compression syndrome. Patients with small (>= 2 cm in diameter in CT scans) and medium-sized (2 cm = 3 cm) hematomas deteriorated into unresponsive conditions and developed signs of brain stem compression. Surgical mortality was 32% in the hypertensive group, while it was 0% in the angioma group. Mortality as well as morbidity in both groups was strongly influenced by the preoperative status of consciousness. Our results suggest that substantial improvement could be obtained in the overall outcome of this disease by emergency craniectomy and removal of hematomas in all patients with large hematomas regardless of the levels of consciousness and regardless of the causes of bleeding. Furthermore, when clinical information and CT findings are suggestive of a ''cryptic'' angioma as the causative lesion, posterior fossa surgery may be indicated to extirpate the lesion, even if the hematoma is small. (author)

  12. Appreciating the broad clinical features of SMAD4 mutation carriers: a multicenter chart review.

    Wain, Karen E; Ellingson, Marissa S; McDonald, Jamie; Gammon, Amanda; Roberts, Maegan; Pichurin, Pavel; Winship, Ingrid; Riegert-Johnson, Douglas L; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Lindor, Noralane M

    2014-08-01

    Heterozygous loss-of-function SMAD4 mutations are associated with juvenile polyposis syndrome and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. Some carriers exhibit symptoms of both conditions, leading to juvenile polyposis-hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia syndrome. Three families have been reported with connective tissue abnormalities. To better understand the spectrum and extent of clinical findings in SMAD4 carriers, medical records of 34 patients (20 families) from five clinical practices were reviewed. Twenty-one percent of the patients (7/34) had features suggesting a connective tissue defect: enlarged aortic root (n = 3), aortic and mitral insufficiency (n = 2), aortic dissection (n = 1), retinal detachment (n = 1), brain aneurysms (n = 1), and lax skin and joints (n = 1). Juvenile polyposis-specific findings were almost uniformly present but variable. Ninety-seven percent of the patients had colon polyps that were generally pan-colonic and of variable histology and number. Forty-eight percent of the patients (15/31) had extensive gastric polyposis. Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia features, including epistaxis (19/31, 61%), mucocutaneous telangiectases (15/31, 48%), liver arteriovenous malformation (6/16, 38%), brain arteriovenous malformation (1/26, 4%), pulmonary arteriovenous malformation (9/17, 53%), and intrapulmonary shunting (14/23, 61%), were documented in 76% of the patients. SMAD4 carriers should be managed for juvenile polyposis and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia because symptoms of both conditions are likely yet unpredictable. Connective tissue abnormalities are an emerging component of juvenile polyposis-hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia syndrome, and larger studies are needed to understand these manifestations.

  13. Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    2015-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a worldwide health burden with high fatality and permanent disability rates. The overall prognosis depends on the volume of the initial bleed, rebleeding, and degree of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). Cardiac manifestations and neurogenic pulmonary edema indicate the severity of SAH. The International Subarachnoid Aneurysm Trial (ISAT) reported a favorable neurological outcome with the endovascular coiling procedure compared with surgical clipping at the end of 1 year. The ISAT trial recruits were primarily neurologically good grade patients with smaller anterior circulation aneurysms, and therefore the results cannot be reliably extrapolated to larger aneurysms, posterior circulation aneurysms, patients presenting with complex aneurysm morphology, and poor neurological grades. The role of hypothermia is not proven to be neuroprotective according to a large randomized controlled trial, Intraoperative Hypothermia for Aneurysms Surgery Trial (IHAST II), which recruited patients with good neurological grades. Patients in this trial were subjected to slow cooling and inadequate cooling time and were rewarmed rapidly. This methodology would have reduced the beneficial effects of hypothermia. Adenosine is found to be beneficial for transient induced hypotension in 2 retrospective analyses, without increasing the risk for cardiac and neurological morbidity. The neurological benefit of pharmacological neuroprotection and neuromonitoring is not proven in patients undergoing clipping of aneurysms. DCI is an important cause of morbidity and mortality following SAH, and the pathophysiology is likely multifactorial and not yet understood. At present, oral nimodipine has an established role in the management of DCI, along with maintenance of euvolemia and induced hypertension. Following SAH, hypernatremia, although less common than hyponatremia, is a predictor of poor neurological outcome. PMID:25272066

  14. Thalamic hemorrhage following carotid angioplasty and stenting

    Friedman, Jonathan A.; Kallmes, David F.; Wijdicks, Eelco F.M.

    2004-01-01

    Carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAS) has emerged as an alternative treatment of carotid stenosis for patients poorly suited for endarterectomy. Intracerebral hemorrhage following carotid revascularization is rare and thought to be related to hyperperfusion injury in most cases. Early experience suggests an increased incidence of hemorrhage following CAS as compared to endarterectomy. We describe a patient who suffered a thalamic hemorrhage following CAS. Because this hemorrhage occurred in a vascular territory unlikely to have been supplied by the treated artery, this case suggests that the mechanism of intracerebral hemorrhage following CAS may in some cases be different from the hyperperfusion hemorrhage classically described following endarterectomy. (orig.)

  15. Obstetric hemorrhage: A global review.

    Goffman, Dena; Nathan, Lisa; Chazotte, Cynthia

    2016-03-01

    Postpartum hemorrhage remains the number one cause of maternal death globally despite the fact that it is largely a preventable and most often a treatable condition. While the global problem is appreciated, some may not realize that in the United States postpartum hemorrhage is a leading cause of mortality and unfortunately, the incidence is on the rise. In New York, obstetric hemorrhage is the second leading cause of maternal mortality in the state. National data suggests that hemorrhage is disproportionally overrepresented as a contributor to severe maternal morbidity and we suspect as we explore further this will be true in New York State as well. Given the persistent and significant contribution to maternal mortality, it may be useful to analyze the persistence of this largely preventable cause of death within the framework of the historic "Three Delays" model of maternal mortality. The ongoing national and statewide problem with postpartum hemorrhage will be reviewed in this context of delays in an effort to inform potential solutions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Brazilian guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of hereditary angioedema

    Pedro Giavina-Bianchi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary angioedema is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by edema attacks with multiple organ involvement. It is caused by a quantitative or functional deficiency of the C1 inhibitor, which is a member of the serine protease inhibitor family. Hereditary angioedema is unknown to many health professionals and is therefore an underdiagnosed disease. The causes of death from hereditary angioedema include laryngeal edema with asphyxia. The estimated mortality rate in patients in whom the disease goes undetected and who are therefore incorrectly treated is 25-40%. In addition to edema of the glottis, hereditary angioedema often results in edema of the gastrointestinal tract, which can be incapacitating. Patients with hereditary angioedema may undergo unnecessary surgical interventions because the digestive tract can be the primary or only organ system involved, thus mimicking acute surgical abdomen. It is estimated that patients with hereditary angioedema experience some degree of disability 20-100 days per year. The Experts in Clinical Immunology and Allergy of the "Associação Brasileira de Alergia e Imunopatologia -ASBAI" developed these guidelines for the diagnosis, therapy, and management of hereditary angioedema.

  17. Brazilian guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of hereditary angioedema.

    Giavina-Bianchi, Pedro; França, Alfeu T; Grumach, Anete S; Motta, Abílio A; Fernandes, Fátima R; Campos, Regis A; Valle, Solange O; Rosário, Nelson A; Sole, Dirceu

    2011-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by edema attacks with multiple organ involvement. It is caused by a quantitative or functional deficiency of the C1 inhibitor, which is a member of the serine protease inhibitor family. Hereditary angioedema is unknown to many health professionals and is therefore an underdiagnosed disease. The causes of death from hereditary angioedema include laryngeal edema with asphyxia. The estimated mortality rate in patients in whom the disease goes undetected and who are therefore incorrectly treated is 25-40%. In addition to edema of the glottis, hereditary angioedema often results in edema of the gastrointestinal tract, which can be incapacitating. Patients with hereditary angioedema may undergo unnecessary surgical interventions because the digestive tract can be the primary or only organ system involved, thus mimicking acute surgical abdomen. It is estimated that patients with hereditary angioedema experience some degree of disability 20-100 days per year. The Experts in Clinical Immunology and Allergy of the "Associação Brasileira de Alergia e Imunopatologia -ASBAI" developed these guidelines for the diagnosis, therapy, and management of hereditary angioedema.

  18. Spontaneous non aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Bian Jieyong; Wang Zhong; Zhou Dai

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To study the etiology and the treatment of spontaneous non-aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Methods: Twenty five cases of cerebral vessel angiography negative patients were analysed retrospectively, the majority of them had been undergone CT, DSA, MRI examination in order to define the etiological factor. Results: Among them, there was 1 case of spinal arteria-vena malformation, 1 case of hemorrhagic blood and 2 cases according to the revealing of MRI could be explained as bled vascular-occult malformation or cavernous angioma. Conclusion: The management and prognosis of patients in whom non-aneurysm is founded on the initial angiogram depends on the pattern of hemorrhage of the initial CT scanning, repeated angiography should be avoided for the case of premise encephalic non-aneurysmal SAH and MRI examination may be indicated to defining of etiological factors

  19. Imaging study of lymphoreticular tumor development in ataxia-telangiectasia and Nijmegen breakage syndrome; Estudio por imagen del desarrollo de tumores linforreticulares en la ataxia telangiectasia y el sindrome de Nijmegen

    Martinez-Leon, M. I.; Ceres-Ruiz, L.; Cuesta, M. A.; Garcia-Martin, F. J. [Hospital Materno-Infantil C.H.U. Carlos Haya. Malaga (Spain)

    2003-07-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (AT), or Louis-Bar syndrome, is an autosomal recessive illness characterized by progressive cerebellar ataxia, oculo-cutaneous telangiectasia, immunodeficiency combined with susceptibility to sinopulmonary infections and high incidence of neoplastic development. Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS) is a variant of AT, is also an autosomal recessive illness that presents cerebellar ataxia, as well as combined immunodeficiency and a tendency toward tumor development. Contrary to Louis-Bar syndrome, it doesn't present telangiectasia and exhibits a characteristics phenotype (short stature, bird-like face and microcephaly). Both entities are classified as syndrome of chromosomal instability or chromosomal fragility, a group which also includes Bloom syndrome and Fanconi anemia. All of these show an increase in the frequency of neoplastic pathologies, mainly lymphoid tumors. We present three patients,two with AT and one with NBS, who developed different lymphoma types in the course of the illness. We highlight the most outstanding aspects from a clinical-radiological point of view. (Author) 17 refs.

  20. FLAIR images of subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Mikami, Takeshi; Saito, Koji; Okuyama, Tohru; Sakamoto, Yasuo; Takahashi, Akira; Shibata, Kazunori [Kushiro Neurosurgical Hospital, Hokkaido (Japan)

    1996-12-01

    We studied MR fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) pulse sequences in 37 cases with subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by aneurysmal rupture. FLAIR sequence suppressed the CSF signal and produced very heavy T{sub 2} weighted images. Subarachnoid hemorrhage was able to be demonstrated as high signal intensity on FLAIR sequences in all patients clear visualization of acute subarachnoid hemorrhage was able to be obtained by MR FLAIR sequences in not only Fisher`s group 3 or 4, but also Fisher`s group 2. Moreover it was suited for the detection of intraaxial hematoma, Sylvian hematoma, subdural hematoma and subarachnoid hemorrhage in the posterior fossa and interhemispheric fissure. Especially, it was useful for detecting intraventricular hemorrhage. Therefore, if patients suffering from subarachnoid hemorrhage present slight headache or atypical symptoms, sometimes it may be more suitable to perform MRI FLAIR pulse sequences first. Aneurysms were found in 21 cases (56.8%). When the aneurysmal size is more than 7 mm, the rate of detection becomes 100%. Aneurysms present various MR appearances because of flow characteristics. Aneurysms were demonstrated as low signal intensity except in 3 cases. In one out of 3 cases, aneurysms were revealed as high signal intensity and in the other two cases, it was revealed as mixed signal intensity. According to the previous studies, rapid flow was demonstrated as low signal intensity by vascular flow void, and delayed flow was demonstrated as high or mixed signal intensity by flow related enhancement and even echo rephasing. MR clearly delineates the size, the lumen, the flow, and the extraaxial location of aneurysms. (K.H.)

  1. Cerebral hemorrhage caused by amyloid angiopathy

    Hanyu, Haruo; Tomonaga, Masanori; Yoshimura, Masahiro; Yamanouchi, Hiroshi; Shimada, Hiroyuki.

    1985-01-01

    Cerebral hemorrhage caused by amyloid angiopathy was studied clinicopathologically, with special attention given to the CT images. Cerebral hemorrhage caused by amyloid angiopathy is characterized, by a lobar-type hemorrhage involving the cortex, with direct extension into the subarachnoid space. Multiple hemorrhages are frequent, and cortical infarctions are present as complications in elderly patients without risk factors. CT scans taken in 5 cases demonstrated lobar hemorrhages in superficial locations, frequently in multiple sites or recurrently, with surrounding edema and mass effect. A subarachnoid extension of the hemorrhage through the superficial cortex, proven pathologically in all cases, was noted by CT in 4 of the 5 cases. However, cortical infarction was not detected by CT in any case. Therefore, CT is of value in the diagnosis of cerebral hemorrhage due to amyloid angiopathy based on distinctive findings such as a lobar hemorrhage in superficial regions, with extension into the subarachnoid space, frequently in multiple sites or recurrently. (author)

  2. Recurrent encephalic hemorrhage associated with cocaine abuse

    Pumar, J.; Otero, E.; Castineira, A.; Arrojo, L.; Linares, M.; Castineira, J.A.; Vidal, J.

    1994-01-01

    We report a case of recurrent intracerebral hemorrhage secondary to cocaine abuse in a patient with no other predisposing factors. The hemorrhages were located both supra- and infratentorially. (orig.)

  3. PULMONARY HEMORRHAGE. ENDOSCOPIC DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT

    A. M. Gasanov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the article, we report the incidence and etiology of pulmonary hemorrhage, and modern classifications according to the literature data. Methods of endoscopic diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary hemorrhage are analyzed.

  4. Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy: A Case Report

    Chi-Wu Chang

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON is a maternally inherited mitochondrial disease that primarily affects the optic nerve, causing bilateral vision loss in juveniles and young adults. A 12-year-old boy had complained of blurred vision in both eyes for more than 1 year. His best-corrected visual acuity was 0.08 in the right eye and 0.1 in the left. Ophthalmologic examination showed bilateral optic disc hyperemia and margin blurring, peripapillary telangiectasis, and a relative afferent pupil defect in his right eye. Fluorescein angiography showed no stain or leakage around the optic disc in the late phase. Visual field analysis showed central scotoma in the left eye and a near-total defect in the right. Upon examination of the patient's mitochondrial DNA, a point mutation at nucleotide position 11778 was found, and the diagnosis of LHON was confirmed. Coenzyme Q10 was used to treat the patient.

  5. Mania associated with complicated hereditary spastic paraparesis

    Raghavendra B Nayak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary spastic paraparesis (HSP is an inherited group of neurological disorders with progressive lower limb spasticity. HSP can be clinically grouped into pure and complicated forms. Pure HSP is one without any associated neurological/psychiatric comorbidity. Depression is the most common psychiatric comorbidity. Presence of mania or bipolar affective illness with HSP is a rare phenomenon. We report a case of a 17-year-old boy who presented with classical features of HSP with complaints of excessive happiness, irritability, increased self-esteem and decreased sleep since 1 month. The patient also had complex partial seizure ever since he had features of HSP. The patient′s father and younger sister suffer from pure HSP. The patient was diagnosed to have first episode mania with complicated HSP. The details of treatment and possible neurobiology are discussed in this case report.

  6. Mania associated with complicated hereditary spastic paraparesis.

    Nayak, Raghavendra B; Bhogale, Govind S; Patil, Nanasaheb M; Pandurangi, Aditya A

    2011-07-01

    Hereditary spastic paraparesis (HSP) is an inherited group of neurological disorders with progressive lower limb spasticity. HSP can be clinically grouped into pure and complicated forms. Pure HSP is one without any associated neurological/psychiatric comorbidity. Depression is the most common psychiatric comorbidity. Presence of mania or bipolar affective illness with HSP is a rare phenomenon. We report a case of a 17-year-old boy who presented with classical features of HSP with complaints of excessive happiness, irritability, increased self-esteem and decreased sleep since 1 month. The patient also had complex partial seizure ever since he had features of HSP. The patient's father and younger sister suffer from pure HSP. The patient was diagnosed to have first episode mania with complicated HSP. The details of treatment and possible neurobiology are discussed in this case report.

  7. Deprivation amblyopia and congenital hereditary cataract.

    Mansouri, Behzad; Stacy, Rebecca C; Kruger, Joshua; Cestari, Dean M

    2013-01-01

    Amblyopia is a neurodevelopmental disorder of vision associated with decreased visual acuity, poor or absent stereopsis, and suppression of information from one eye.(1,2) Amblyopia may be caused by strabismus (strabismic amblyopia), refractive error (anisometropic amblyopia), or deprivation from obstructed vision (deprivation amblyopia). 1 In the developed world, amblyopia is the most common cause of childhood visual impairment, 3 which reduces quality of life 4 and also almost doubles the lifetime risk of legal blindness.(5, 6) Successful treatment of amblyopia greatly depends on early detection and treatment of predisposing disorders such as congenital cataract, which is the most common cause of deprivational amblyopia. Understanding the genetic causes of congenital cataract leads to more effective screening tests, early detection and treatment of infants and children who are at high risk for hereditary congenital cataract.

  8. Pleural liquid during hemorrhagic hypotension.

    Tresoldi, Claudio; Porta, Cristina; Zocchi, Luciano; Agostoni, Emilio

    2007-02-15

    The effect of approximately 25% or 35% blood loss (b.l.) on volume, pressure, and protein concentration of pleural liquid has been determined in anesthetized rabbits in lateral or supine posture. Volume and pressure of pleural liquid did not change with 25% b.l. 30 and 60 min after beginning of hemorrhage, and with 35% b.l. at 30 min (bleeding time approximately 10 and 12 min, respectively). With 35% b.l. protein concentration of pleural liquid was 85% greater (PPleural liquid seems protected against derangements from hemorrhage up to 25% b.l. for periods shorter than 1 h.

  9. Recurrent IVF failure and hereditary thrombophilia.

    Safdarian, Leila; Najmi, Zahra; Aleyasin, Ashraf; Aghahosseini, Marzieh; Rashidi, Mandana; Asadollah, Sara

    2014-07-01

    The largest percentage of failed invitro fertilization (IVF (cycles, are due to lack of implantation. As hereditary thrombophilia can cause in placentation failure, it may have a role in recurrent IVF failure. Aim of this case-control study was to determine whether hereditary thrombophilia is more prevalent in women with recurrent IVF failures. Case group comprised 96 infertile women, with a history of recurrent IVF failure. Control group was comprised of 95 healthy women with proven fertility who had conceived spontaneously. All participants were assessed for the presence of inherited thrombophilias including: factor V Leiden, methilen tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) mutation, prothrombin mutation, homocystein level, protein S and C deficiency, antithrombin III (AT-III) deficiency and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) mutation. Presence of thrombophilia was compared between groups. Having at least one thrombophilia known as a risk factor for recurrent IVF failure (95% CI=1.74-5.70, OR=3.15, p=0.00). Mutation of factor V Leiden (95% CI=1.26-10.27, OR=3.06, P=0.01) and homozygote form of MTHFR mutation (95% CI=1.55-97.86, OR=12.33, p=0.05) were also risk factors for recurrent IVF failure. However, we could not find significant difference in other inherited thrombophilia's. Inherited thrombophilia is more prevalent in women with recurrent IVF failure compared with healthy women. Having at least one thrombophilia, mutation of factor V Leiden and homozygote form of MTHFR mutation were risk factors for recurrent IVF failure.

  10. Chaperonopathies: spotlight on hereditary motor neuropathies

    Vincenzo Lupo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Distal hereditary motor neuropathies (dHMN comprise a group of rare hereditary neuromuscular disorders characterized by a peroneal muscular atrophy without sensory symptoms. To date twenty-three genes for dHMN have been reported and four of them encode for chaperones: DNAJB2, which encodes a member of the HSP40/DNAJ co-chaperone family, and HSPB1, HSPB3 and HSPB8, which encode three members of the family of small heat shock proteins. Except for HSPB1, with around thirty different mutations, the remaining three genes comprise a much low number of cases. Thus, only one case has been described caused by an HSPB3 mutation, whereas few DNAJB2 and HSPB8 cases are known, most of them caused by a founder c.352+1G>A mutation in DNAJB2 and by mutations affecting the hot spot K141 residue of the HSPB8 chaperone. This low number of cases makes it difficult to understand the pathomechanism underlying the neuropathy. Chaperones can assemble in multi-chaperone complexes forming an integrative chaperone network in the cell, which plays relevant cellular roles in a variety of processes such as the correct folding of newly synthesized proteins, their escort to their precise cellular locations to form functional proteins and complexes and the response to protein misfolding, including the degradation of proteins that fail to refold properly. Despite of this variety of functions, mutations in some of them lead to diseases with a similar clinical picture, suggesting common pathways. This review gives an overview of the genetics of dHMNs caused by mutations in four genes, DNAJB2, HSPB1, HSPB3 and HSPB8, which encode chaperones and show a common disease mechanism.

  11. Gender specific issues in hereditary ocular disorders.

    Iragavarapu, Saradha; Gorin, Michael B

    2015-02-01

    This review is intended to summarize the current knowledge from basic science and clinical medical literature cited within PubMed that pertain to gender-related factors and affect those individuals with hereditary ocular disorders. We consider gender-related biological factors that (a) affect disease onset and progression, (b) gender differences for major X-linked ocular disorders, (c) gender-specific conditions, (d) medications that may influence genetic eye disorders, and finally, (e) gender-related issues that influence the management and quality of life of these patients. Several studies have demonstrated the manner in which sex-related hormones in animal models are capable of influencing cell pathway and survival that are likely to affect hereditary eye disorders. There are very few clinical studies that provide compelling evidence for gender differences in human ocular conditions, other than for a number of X-linked disorders. Disease expression for X-linked disorders may be impacted by genetic mechanisms such as lyonization or uniparental disomy. Clinical evidence regarding the impact of gender-related medical conditions and therapies on eye conditions is extremely limited and primarily based on anecdotal evidence. Gender-specific factors may play a major role in the underlying biological pathways that influence the onset, rate of progression, and clinical findings associated with ocular genetic conditions. Clinicians need to be aware of the variable phenotypes observed in female carriers of X-linked disorders of gender specific issues, many of which are inadequately addressed in the current literature. Clinicians need to be sensitive to gender differences in social, cultural, and religious systems and they should also be aware of how their own gender biases may influence how they counsel patients. Finally, it is clear that the lack of effective clinical studies in this area creates an opportunity for future research that will have real benefits for these

  12. Human hereditary diseases associated with elevated frequency of chromosome aberrations

    Ejima, Yosuke

    1988-01-01

    Human recessive diseases collectively known as chromosome breakage syndromes include Fanconi's anemia, Bloom's syndrome and ataxia telangiectasia. Cells from these patients show chromosome instabilities both spontaneously and following treatments with radiations or certain chemicals, where defects in DNA metabolisms are supposed to be involved. Cells from patients with ataxia telangiectasia are hypersensitive to ionizing radiations, though DNA replication is less affected than in normal cells. Chromatid-type as well as chromosom-type aberrations are induced in cells irradiated in G 0 or G 1 phases. These unusual responses to radiations may provide clues for understanding the link between DNA replicative response and cellular radiosensitivity. Alterations in cellular radiosensitivity or spontaneous chromosome instabilities are observed in some patients with congenital chromosome anomalies or dominant diseases, where underlying defects may be different from those in recessive diseases. (author)

  13. Human hereditary diseases associated with elevated frequency of chromosome aberrations

    Ejima, Yosuke; Ikushima, Takaji (ed.)

    1988-07-01

    Human recessive diseases collectively known as chromosome breakage syndromes include Fanconi's anemia, Bloom's syndrome and ataxia telangiectasia. Cells from these patients show chromosome instabilities both spontaneously and following treatments with radiations or certain chemicals, where defects in DNA metabolisms are supposed to be involved. Cells from patients with ataxia telangiectasia are hypersensitive to ionizing radiations, though DNA replication is less affected than in normal cells. Chromatid-type as well as chromosom-type aberrations are induced in cells irradiated in G/sub 0/ or G/sub 1/ phases. These unusual responses to radiations may provide clues for understanding the link between DNA replicative response and cellular radiosensitivity. Alterations in cellular radiosensitivity or spontaneous chromosome instabilities are observed in some patients with congenital chromosome anomalies or dominant diseases, where underlying defects may be different from those in recessive diseases.

  14. Human iPSC-Derived Cerebellar Neurons from a Patient with Ataxia-Telangiectasia Reveal Disrupted Gene Regulatory Networks

    Sam P. Nayler

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T is a rare genetic disorder caused by loss of function of the ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated kinase and is characterized by a predisposition to cancer, pulmonary disease, immune deficiency and progressive degeneration of the cerebellum. As animal models do not faithfully recapitulate the neurological aspects, it remains unclear whether cerebellar degeneration is a neurodevelopmental or neurodegenerative phenotype. To address the necessity for a human model, we first assessed a previously published protocol for the ability to generate cerebellar neuronal cells, finding it gave rise to a population of precursors highly enriched for markers of the early hindbrain such as EN1 and GBX2, and later more mature cerebellar markers including PTF1α, MATH1, HOXB4, ZIC3, PAX6, and TUJ1. RNA sequencing was used to classify differentiated cerebellar neurons generated from integration-free A-T and control induced pluripotent stem cells. Comparison of RNA sequencing data with datasets from the Allen Brain Atlas reveals in vitro-derived cerebellar neurons are transcriptionally similar to discrete regions of the human cerebellum, and most closely resemble the cerebellum at 22 weeks post-conception. We show that patient-derived cerebellar neurons exhibit disrupted gene regulatory networks associated with synaptic vesicle dynamics and oxidative stress, offering the first molecular insights into early cerebellar pathogenesis of ataxia-telangiectasia.

  15. Treatment of nonneovascular idiopathic macular telangiectasia type 2 with intravitreal ranibizumab: results of a phase II clinical trial.

    Toy, Brian C; Koo, Euna; Cukras, Catherine; Meyerle, Catherine B; Chew, Emily Y; Wong, Wai T

    2012-05-01

    To evaluate the safety and preliminary efficacy of intravitreal ranibizumab for nonneovascular idiopathic macular telangiectasia Type 2. Single-center, open-label Phase II clinical trial enrolling five participants with bilateral nonneovascular idiopathic macular telangiectasia Type 2. Intravitreal ranibizumab (0.5 mg) was administered every 4 weeks in the study eye for 12 months with the contralateral eye observed. Outcome measures included changes in best-corrected visual acuity, area of late-phase leakage on fluorescein angiography, and retinal thickness on optical coherence tomography. The study treatment was well tolerated and associated with few adverse events. Change in best-corrected visual acuity at 12 months was not significantly different between treated study eyes (0.0 ± 7.5 letters) and control fellow eyes (+2.2 ± 1.9 letters). However, decreases in the area of late-phase fluorescein angiography leakage (-33 ± 20% for study eyes, +1 ± 8% for fellow eyes) and in optical coherence tomography central subfield retinal thickness (-11.7 ± 7.0% for study eyes and -2.9 ± 3.5% for fellow eyes) were greater in study eyes compared with fellow eyes. Despite significant anatomical responses to treatment, functional improvement in visual acuity was not detected. Intravitreal ranibizumab administered monthly over a time course of 12 months is unlikely to provide a general and significant benefit to patients with nonneovascular idiopathic macular telangiectasia Type 2.

  16. Eleven cases of neonatal intracranial hemorrhage

    Matsuda, Tadashi; Asao, Toyohiko; Shibata, Takeo

    1981-01-01

    Eleven cases of neonatal intracranial hemorrhage were diagnosed and followed up by CT scanning. By CT, hemorrhagic lesions were shown as high density areas in an acute stage and imaged as low density areas after the hemorrhage was absorbed. The time of absorption varies depending upon the site and the severity of hemorrhage. Intraventricular hemorrhage, petechial hemorrhage and subdural hematoma were absorbed rapidly in more than 70% of the exanimed cases, CT scanning 1 - 2 weeks after the onset revealed absorption of hemorrhage. However, the absorption delayed in intracerebral hematoma; CT scan taken after one month showed hemorrhagic lesions remaining in 75% of the cases. In nine cases who survived, following the absorption of the hemorrhagic lesions, cerebral atrophy was observed in 4 cases (44%), ventricular enlargement in 3 cases (33%), and complete recovery in 2 cases (22%). From these results, CT scanning for diagnosis of neonatal intracranial hemorrhage should be done before the hemorrhagic lesion is absorbed (within 7 days of the onset). Follow-up study by CT is important for observing changes and predicting prognosis of intracranial hemorrhage. (Ueda, J.)

  17. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy following subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Wajnberg, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy corresponds to a syndrome characterized by a transient myocardial dysfunction affecting the left ventricular apex that classically occurs after major physical or emotional stress (also called 'broken heart syndrome' or 'stress-induced cardiomyopathy'). The author describes the case of a patient with takotsubo cardiomyopathy induced by subarachnoid hemorrhage. (author)

  18. Antifibrinolytic treatment in subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Vermeulen, M.; Lindsay, K. W.; Murray, G. D.; Cheah, F.; Hijdra, A.; Muizelaar, J. P.; Schannong, M.; Teasdale, G. M.; van Crevel, H.; van Gijn, J.

    1984-01-01

    We enrolled 479 patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage in a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to determine whether treatment with the antifibrinolytic agent tranexamic acid improves outcome by preventing rebleeding. At three months there was no statistical difference

  19. Reducing postpartum hemorrhage in Africa

    Lazarus, Jeff; Lalonde, A

    2005-01-01

    Postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) is the leading cause of maternal mortality in sub-Saharan Africa. This is being addressed by leading professional organizations, which point to the importance of a skilled attendant at birth. But they also emphasize that the active management of the third stage of labor...

  20. Cardiac abnormalities after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Bilt, I.A.C. van der

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage(aSAH) is a devastating neurological disease. During the course of the aSAH several neurological and medical complications may occur. Cardiac abnormalities after aSAH are observed often and resemble stress cardiomyopathy or Tako-tsubo cardiomyopathy(Broken Heart

  1. Rebleeding After Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Larsen, Carl Christian; Astrup, Jens

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To summarize the current knowledge of the mechanisms leading to rebleeding and the prevention of rebleeding after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). METHODS: A literature search was performed to investigate factors associated with rebleeding after SAH. RESULTS: The review of the literature...

  2. Squamous cell carcinoma complicating an hereditary epidermo-lysis bullosa

    Mseddi, M.; Turki, H.; Marrekchi, S.; Abdelmaksoud, W.; Masmoudi, A.; Bouassida, S.; Zahaf, A.

    2004-01-01

    The dystrophic form of hereditary epidermo-lysis bullosa is associated with an increased frequency of squamous cell carcinoma. We report a new case. An 18-year-old patient, carrying a Hallopeau Siemens hereditary epidermo-lysis bullosa, presented a subcutaneous nodular lesion, for 1 year that ulcerated and budded with inguinal lymphadenopathy. The histological study ted to the conclusion of a well differentiated squamous cell carcinoma. The patient was treated surgically. Tumor and metastatic lymph nodes were excised. A radiotherapy was decided but the postoperative course was fatal due to an infection and to a deterioration of her general condition. Squamous cell carcinoma frequently occurs on the cicatricial lesion of hereditary epidermo-lysis bullosa and usually affects males with recessive hereditary epidermo-lysis bullosa. Metastases are frequent, precocious and multiple. The treatment may be surgical. The particularities of our observation are the young age of patient and the localization. (author)

  3. Hereditary Lymphedema of the Leg – A Case Report

    Birgit Heinig

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Primary of hereditary lymphedema is a rare but progressive disease. It is yet not curable. We present a 48-year-old male patient with hereditary lymphedema of his left leg, that was realised by minor trauma (able twist when he was seven years old. He had never been treated for lymphedema but experienced multiple erysipelas during his life. After diagnostic procedures to exclude other causes of leg swelling, the diagnosis of hereditary lymphedema of the leg, stage III was confirmed. We initialized complex decongestive therapy. During two weeks of intensive treatment, the circumference of the left leg could be reduced by 10 cm. This case illustrates the "natural course" hereditary lymphedema. But it raises the hope that even after decades of ignorance, the patients benefits from complex decongestive treatment. Therapeutic nihilism is unnecessary and poses lymphedema patients to risks of infection and secondary malignancies like Stewart-Trewes syndrome.

  4. CT differential diagnosis between hypertensive putaminal hemorrhage and hemorrhagic infarction localized in basal ganglia

    Tazawa, Toshiaki; Mizukami, Masahiro; Kawase, Takeshi.

    1984-01-01

    The symptoms of hypertensive putaminal hemorrhage and of middle cerebral artery occlusion are sometimes similar to each other. Hemorrhage sometimes occurs following cerebral infarction. We experienced 7 patients with hemorrhages localized in the basal ganglia following cerebral infarction. The CT findings of 55 patients with putaminal hemorrhage and 7 patients with hemorrhagic infarction localized at the basal ganglia were investigated retrospectively in order to discuss their characteristics. The high-density area (HD) of a putaminal hemorrhage was homogeneous on a plain CT within a week of the onset. There was a close correlation between the size of the HD and the timing of its disappearance. The HD with a maximum diameter of A cm generally disappeared A weeks after. On the other hand, the HD of a hemorrhagic infarction was lower in density than that of the putaminal hemorrhage. The HD of a hemorrhagic infarction generally disappeared earlier than that of a putaminal hemorrhage. Ring enhancement was visualized on contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) from 2 or 3 weeks after the onset in patients with putaminal hemorrhages except in the case of small hemorrhages (less than 1 cm diameter). Ring enhancement was also visualized in 6 out of 7 patients with hemorrhagic infarction; one of them was recognized within a week of the onset. Contrast enhancement of the cortex in the territory of the middle cerebral artery was visualized in 4 out of 7 patients with hemorrhagic infarction. This finding seems to indicate one characteristic of hemorrhagic infarction. (author)

  5. Computed tomography in subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Lee, Seung Ro; Chang, Kee Hyun; Choi, Byung Ihn; Han, Man Chung; Sim, Bo Sung

    1981-01-01

    Computed Tomography has become increasingly important diagnostic method as the initial examination in the diagnosis of subarachnoid hemorrhage with direct detection of extravasated blood in basal cistern and cortical sulci. Furthermore, CT provides better and exact visualization of the presence, localization, extent and degree of intracerebral, intraventricular and subdural hemorrhage, infarction, hydrocephalus and rebleeding which may be associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage, and also could detect the causative lesions with contrast enhancement in many cases. The purpose of the paper is to describe the CT findings of subarachnoid hemorrhage due to various causes and to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of CT in subarachnoid hemorrhage. Authors analysed a total of 153 cases with subarachnoid hemorrhage confirmed by lumbar puncture at Seoul National University Hospital from March 1979 to April 1981, with special emphasis on CT findings. All of the cases took CT scan and 125 cases of them angiography. The results are as follows: 1. Most prevalent age group was 4th to 6th decades (78%). The ratio of male to female was 1.1: 1. 2. Of 125 cases with angiography, aneurysm was a major cause (68%). Others were arterio-venous malformation (9.6%), Moya-moya disease (4%) and unknown (18.4%). 3. Of all 153 cases with CT scan, hemorrhage was demonstrated in 98 cases (64.1%); SAH in 72 cases (47.1%), ICH in 65 cases (42.5%), IVH in 34 cases (22.2%) and SDH in 1 case (0.7%). SAH combined with ICH was a major group (34.7%) in SAH. Detection rate of SAH was 68.3% within the first 7 days and 5.8% after 7 dyas. 4. In aneurysms, SAH was detected in 60 of 85 cases (70.6%); 88.1% within the first 7 dyas and 5.6% after 7 dyas. Anterior communicating artery was the most common site of the aneurysms (40%), in which detection rate of SAH was 100% within the first 7 days. SAH was combined with ICH in 38.3%. 5. On CT, SAH of unilateral Sylvian fissure was pathognomonic for ruptured MCA

  6. Computed tomography in intracranial hemorrhage in leukemia

    Hanyu, Haruo; Katsunuma, Hideyo; Yoshimura, Masahiro; Tomonaga, Masanori.

    1984-01-01

    In tracranial hemorrhage in leukemia was clinicopathologically studied in 62 cases of autopsy materials, with special attention paid to a morphological comparison of CT images with pathological findings. Intracranial hemorrhage was found in 32 of the 62 leukemic patients (51.6%), and in 13 of these patients (21.0%) it was responsible for death. Leukemic intracranial hemorrhage occurred more often in the acute leukemic type than in the chronic type, and even more often in younger leukemic patinents; it was pathologically characterized by multiple lesions in the white matter of the cerebral hemisphere, prone to combination with SAH or SDH. The hemorrhages could be divided into five types: (1) scattered small hemorrhagic type, (2) hematoma type, (3) fusion type (large hemorrhage composed of assembled small hemorrhages), (4) SAH type, and (5) SDH type. Among these types, the fusion type was considered to be characteristic of leukemia. CT was undertaken in 5 pathologically proven cases, with findings of the scattered small hemorrhagic type in 1, of the SDH type in 3, and of the fusion type in 1. Yet, one case with scattered small hemorrhages and two cases with SDH failed to be detected by CT. However, one case with a typical fusion hemorrhage was found to have multiple, irregular, high-density areas with surrounding edema and a mass effect as well as pathological findings. Therefore, a large-fusion hemorrhage, which is one of the most characteristic types of leukemic intracranial hemorrhage, could be demonstrated as distinctive CT images which reflected neuropathological findings. On the other hand, small parenchymal hemorrhages and relatively thin subdural hemorrhages could not be detected by CT. In conclusion, it seems that CT has value in the diagnosis of intracranial hemorrhage in leukemia. (J.P.N.)

  7. New forms of -compactness with respect to hereditary classes

    Abdo Mohammed Qahis

    2019-01-01

    Full Text Available A hereditary class on a set X is a nonempty collection of subsets closed under heredity. The aim of this paper is to introduce and study strong forms of u-compactness in generalized topological spaces with respect to a hereditary class, called  SuH-compactness and S- SuH-compactness. Also several of their properties are presented. Finally some eects of various kinds of functions on them are studied.

  8. Glycemia in Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage: Clinical Implications

    Alvis-Miranda Hernando

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous cerebral hemorrhage or intracranial hemorrhage accounts for 10-15% of all strokes. Intracranial hemorrhage is much less common than ischemic stroke, but has higher mortality and morbidity, one of the leading causes of severe disability. Various alterations, among these the endocrine were identified when an intracerebral hemorrhage, these stress-mediated mechanisms exacerbate secondary injury. Deep knowledge of the injuries which are directly involved alterations of glucose, offers insight as cytotoxicity, neuronal death and metabolic dysregulations alter the prognosis of patients with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage.

  9. Migraine and risk of hemorrhagic stroke

    Gaist, David; González-Pérez, Antonio; Ashina, Messoud

    2014-01-01

    to select 10,000 controls free from hemorrhagic stroke. Using unconditional logistic regression models, we calculated the risk of hemorrhagic stroke associated with migraine, adjusting for age, sex, calendar year, alcohol, body mass index, hypertension, previous cerebrovascular disease, oral contraceptive......BACKGROUND: We investigated the association between hemorrhagic stroke and migraine using data from The Health Improvement Network database. FINDINGS: We ascertained 1,797 incident cases of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and 1,340 of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Density-based sampling was used...

  10. Effect of caffeine on γ-ray induced G2 delay in ataxia telangiectasia

    Bates, P.R.; Lavin, M.F.

    1985-01-01

    Exposure of normal control and ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) lymphoblastoid cell lines to ionizing radiation gives rise to an increase in the proportion of G2 phase cells. The size and extent of the G2 phase block is greater in A-T cells than in normal cells. Caffeine has a similar overall effect in control and A-T cell lines in reducing the G2 arrest observed after ionizing radiation. While the proportion of cells accumulated in G2 in A-T cells is considerably greater than in controls, addition of caffeine at the time of maximal G2 block brings about a return of G2 phase cell numbers to unirradiated values in 3 hours in both cell types. In normal control cells the caffeine-mediated decrease in G2 cells is reflected by an increase in mitotic cells. These mitotic cells have a higher frequency of chromosome aberrations compared to cells harvested in the absence of caffeine. Similarly in A-T cells addition of caffeine to irradiated cultures, delayed in G2 phase, increased the number of mitotic cells and the frequency of chromosome aberrations. (author)

  11. Common ataxia telangiectasia mutated haplotypes and risk of breast cancer: a nested case–control study

    Tamimi, Rulla M; Hankinson, Susan E; Spiegelman, Donna; Kraft, Peter; Colditz, Graham A; Hunter, David J

    2004-01-01

    The ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene is a tumor suppressor gene with functions in cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Based on family studies, women heterozygous for mutations in the ATM gene are reported to have a fourfold to fivefold increased risk of breast cancer compared with noncarriers of the mutations, although not all studies have confirmed this association. Haplotype analysis has been suggested as an efficient method for investigating the role of common variation in the ATM gene and breast cancer. Five biallelic haplotype tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms are estimated to capture 99% of the haplotype diversity in Caucasian populations. We conducted a nested case–control study of breast cancer within the Nurses' Health Study cohort to address the role of common ATM haplotypes and breast cancer. Cases and controls were genotyped for five haplotype tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms. Haplotypes were predicted for 1309 cases and 1761 controls for which genotype information was available. Six unique haplotypes were predicted in this study, five of which occur at a frequency of 5% or greater. The overall distribution of haplotypes was not significantly different between cases and controls (χ 2 = 3.43, five degrees of freedom, P = 0.63). There was no evidence that common haplotypes of ATM are associated with breast cancer risk. Extensive single nucleotide polymorphism detection using the entire genomic sequence of ATM will be necessary to rule out less common variation in ATM and sporadic breast cancer risk

  12. Ultrastructural and clinical evidence of subretinal debris accumulation in type 2 macular telangiectasia.

    Cherepanoff, Svetlana; Killingsworth, Murray C; Zhu, Meidong; Nolan, Timothy; Hunyor, Alex P; Young, Stephanie H; Hageman, Gregory S; Gillies, Mark C

    2012-11-01

    To describe subretinal debris found on ultrastructural examination in an eye with macular telangiectasia (MacTel) type 2 and on optical coherence tomography (OCT) in a subset of patients with MacTel type 2. Blocks from the mid-periphery and temporal perifovea of an eye with clinically documented MacTel type 2 were examined with electron microscopy (EM). Cases came from the Sydney centre of the MacTel project and the practices of the authors. On EM examination, subretinal debris was found in the perifovea with accumulation of degenerate photoreceptor elements in the subretinal space. Despite the substantial subretinal debris, there was minimal retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) reaction. Focal defects were seen in the inner limiting membrane in the perifovea. Of the 65 Sydney MacTel project participants, three (5%) had prominent yellow material at the fovea. OCT revealed smooth mounds between the RPE and the ellipsoid region. The material was hyperautofluorescent. This study suggests that subretinal accumulation of photoreceptor debris may be a feature of MacTel type 2. Ultrastructural and OCT evidence of disease beyond the vasculature, involving photoreceptors and Muller cells, is presented.

  13. Radiation-induced chromosome aberrations and cell killing in normal human fibroblasts and ataxia telangiectasia fibroblasts

    Kawata, T.; Saito, M.; Uno, T.; Ito, H.; Shigematsu, N.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: When cells are held in a non-dividing state (G0) after irradiation, an enhanced survival can be observed compared to that of immediate plating. A change of survival depending on post irradiation condition is known to be repair of potentially lethal damage (RPLD). The effects of confluent holding recovery (24-h incubation following irradiation) on chromosome aberrations in normal human fibroblasts (AG1522) and ataxia telangiectasia fibroblasts (GM02052C) were examined. A chemical-induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique with fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was applied to study chromosome aberrations in G2 and M-phase. Results from cell survival showed that the capacity for potentially lethal damage repair was normal in AG1522 cells but very little in GM02052C cells. The frequency of chromosome aberrations in AG1522 cells decreased when cells were allowed to repair for 24-h. Especially complex type exchanges were found to decrease markedly at high doses (4Gy and 6Gy). However, the frequency of chromosome aberrations including complex type exchanges showed little decrease in GM02052C cells. Confluent holding can effectively reduce chromosome aberrations, especially complex type exchanges in normal cells

  14. Impaired recovery and mutagenic SOS-like responses in ataxia telangiectasia cells

    Hilgers, G. (Universite Libre de Bruxelles (Belgium) Rijksuniversiteit Leiden (Netherlands)); Abrahams, P.J. (Rijksuniversiteit Leiden (Netherlands)); Chen, Y.Q. (Universite Libre de Bruxelles (Belgium)); Schouten, R. (Rijksuniversiteit Leiden (Netherlands)); Cornelis, J.J. (Universite Libre de Bruxelles (Belgium) Institut Pasteur, 75 - Paris (France)); Lowe, J.E. (Sussex Univ., Brighton (UK)); Eb, A.J. van der (Rijksuniversiteit Leiden (Netherlands)); Rommelaere, J. (Universite Libre de Bruxelles (Belgium) Institut Pasteur, 75 - Paris (France))

    1989-01-01

    Radiosensitive fibroblasts from patients with ataxia telangiectasia (AT) were studied for their proficiency in two putative eukaryotic SOS-like responses, namely the enhanced reactivation (ER) and enhanced mutagenesis of damaged viruses infecting pre-irradiated versus mock-treated cells. A previous report indicated that, unlike normal human cells, a line of AT fibroblasts (AT5BIVA) could not be induced to express ER of damaged parvovirus H-1, a single-stranded DNA virus, by UV- or X-irradiation. In the present study, AT5BIVA fibroblasts were also distinguished from normal cells by the inability of the former to achieve enhanced mutagenesis of damaged H-1 virus upon cell UV-irradiation. In contrast, dose-response and time-course experiments revealed normal levels of ER of Herpes simplex virus 1, a double-stranded DNA virus, in X- or UV-irradiated AT5BIVA cells. Taken together, these data point to a possible deficiency of AT cells in a conditioned mutagenic process that contributes to a greater extent to the recovery of damaged single-stranded than double-stranded DNA. Such a defect may concern the replication of damaged DNA or the generation of signals promoting the latter process and may be related to the lack of radiation-induced delay that is typical of AT cell DNA synthesis. (author).

  15. Impaired recovery and mutagenic SOS-like responses in ataxia telangiectasia cells

    Hilgers, G.; Abrahams, P.J.; Chen, Y.Q.; Schouten, R.; Cornelis, J.J.; Lowe, J.E.; Eb, A.J. van der; Rommelaere, J.

    1989-01-01

    Radiosensitive fibroblasts from patients with ataxia telangiectasia (AT) were studied for their proficiency in two putative eukaryotic SOS-like responses, namely the enhanced reactivation (ER) and enhanced mutagenesis of damaged viruses infecting pre-irradiated versus mock-treated cells. A previous report indicated that, unlike normal human cells, a line of AT fibroblasts (AT5BIVA) could not be induced to express ER of damaged parvovirus H-1, a single-stranded DNA virus, by UV- or X-irradiation. In the present study, AT5BIVA fibroblasts were also distinguished from normal cells by the inability of the former to achieve enhanced mutagenesis of damaged H-1 virus upon cell UV-irradiation. In contrast, dose-response and time-course experiments revealed normal levels of ER of Herpes simplex virus 1, a double-stranded DNA virus, in X- or UV-irradiated AT5BIVA cells. Taken together, these data point to a possible deficiency of AT cells in a conditioned mutagenic process that contributes to a greater extent to the recovery of damaged single-stranded than double-stranded DNA. Such a defect may concern the replication of damaged DNA or the generation of signals promoting the latter process and may be related to the lack of radiation-induced delay that is typical of AT cell DNA synthesis. (author)

  16. Role of ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) in porcine oocyte in vitro maturation.

    Lin, Zi-Li; Kim, Nam-Hyung

    2015-06-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is critical for the DNA damage response, cell cycle checkpoints, and apoptosis. Significant effort has focused on elucidating the relationship between ATM and other nuclear signal transducers; however, little is known about the connection between ATM and oocyte meiotic maturation. We investigated the function of ATM in porcine oocytes. ATM was expressed at all stages of oocyte maturation and localized predominantly in the nucleus. Furthermore, the ATM-specific inhibitor KU-55933 blocked porcine oocyte maturation, reducing the percentages of oocytes that underwent germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) and first polar body extrusion. KU-55933 also decreased the expression of DNA damage-related genes (breast cancer 1, budding uninhibited by benzimidazoles 1, and P53) and reduced the mRNA and protein levels of AKT and other cell cycle-regulated genes that are predominantly expressed during G2/M phase, including bone morphogenetic protein 15, growth differentiation factor 9, cell division cycle protein 2, cyclinB1, and AKT. KU-55933 treatment decreased the developmental potential of blastocysts following parthenogenetic activation and increased the level of apoptosis. Together, these data suggested that ATM influenced the meiotic and cytoplasmic maturation of porcine oocytes, potentially by decreasing their sensitivity to DNA strand breaks, stimulating the AKT pathway, and/or altering the expression of other maternal genes. © 2015 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  17. The role of the neuro-astro-vascular unit in the etiology of Ataxia Telangiectasia

    Leenoy eMeshulam

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The growing recognition that brain pathologies do not affect neurons only but rather are, to a large extent, pathologies of glial cells as well as of the vasculature opens to new perspectives in our understanding of genetic disorders of the CNS. To validate the role of the neuron-glial-vascular unit in the etiology of genome instability disorders, we report about cell death and morphological aspects of neuro-glia networks and the associated vasculature in a mouse model of Ataxia Telangiectasia (A-T, a human genetic disorder that induces severe motor impairment. We found that AT-mutated protein deficiency was consistent with aberrant astrocytic morphology and alterations of the vasculature, often accompanied by reactive gliosis. Interestingly similar findings could also be reported in the case of other genetic disorders. These observations bolster the notion that astrocyte-specific pathologies, hampered vascularization and astrocyte-endothelium interactions in the CNS could play a crucial role in the etiology of genome instability brain disorders and could underlie neurodegeneration.

  18. NAD+ Replenishment Improves Lifespan and Healthspan in Ataxia Telangiectasia Models via Mitophagy and DNA Repair.

    Fang, Evandro Fei; Kassahun, Henok; Croteau, Deborah L; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Marosi, Krisztina; Lu, Huiming; Shamanna, Raghavendra A; Kalyanasundaram, Sumana; Bollineni, Ravi Chand; Wilson, Mark A; Iser, Wendy B; Wollman, Bradley N; Morevati, Marya; Li, Jun; Kerr, Jesse S; Lu, Qiping; Waltz, Tyler B; Tian, Jane; Sinclair, David A; Mattson, Mark P; Nilsen, Hilde; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2016-10-11

    Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by progressive neurodegeneration and cerebellar ataxia. A-T is causally linked to defects in ATM, a master regulator of the response to and repair of DNA double-strand breaks. The molecular basis of cerebellar atrophy and neurodegeneration in A-T patients is unclear. Here we report and examine the significance of increased PARylation, low NAD + , and mitochondrial dysfunction in ATM-deficient neurons, mice, and worms. Treatments that replenish intracellular NAD + reduce the severity of A-T neuropathology, normalize neuromuscular function, delay memory loss, and extend lifespan in both animal models. Mechanistically, treatments that increase intracellular NAD + also stimulate neuronal DNA repair and improve mitochondrial quality via mitophagy. This work links two major theories on aging, DNA damage accumulation, and mitochondrial dysfunction through nuclear DNA damage-induced nuclear-mitochondrial signaling, and demonstrates that they are important pathophysiological determinants in premature aging of A-T, pointing to therapeutic interventions. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Identification of 4 ataxia telangiectasia cell lines hypersensitive to. gamma. -irradiation but not to hydrogen peroxide

    Cantoni, O.; Sestili, P.; Santoro, M.P.; Tannoia, M.C.; Cattabeni, F. (Universita degli Studi di Urbino (Italy). Istituto di Farmacologia e Farmacognosia and Centro di Farmacologia Oncologia Sperimentale); Novelli, G.; Dallapiccola, B. (Universit degli Studi di Urbino (Italy). Cattedra di Genetica); Fiorilli, M. (Universita di Roma ' La Sapienze' (Italy). Cattedra di Allergologia e Immunologia Clinica)

    1989-09-01

    The effct of hydrogen peroxide on the rate of semi-conservative DNA synthesis in ataxia telangiectasia (AT) and normal human lymphoblastoid cells was investigated. The rate of DNA synthesis in AT cells was not depressed to a lesser extent than in normal cells, as might have been expected since H{sub 2O2} is a radiomimetic agent. On the contrary, 4 AT cell lines displayed a higher sensitivity to the inhibitory effect of H{sub 2O2} on DNA synthesis than 2 normal cell lines. Comparable levels of cytotoxicity were detected in cell vaibility studies. Furthermore, neither the level of DNA breakage produced by H{sub 2O2}, nor the rate of repair of these lesions was signigicantly different in normal and AT cells. Together, these results indicate that the AT cell lines utilized in this study are not hypersensitive to the oxidant. It is suggested that H-2-O-2 may not induce lethality via the direct ation of the hydroxyl radical (OH). (Author). 20 refs.; 3 figs.; 1 tab.

  20. Breast cancer risk in ataxia telangiectasia (AT) heterozygotes: haplotype study in French AT families

    Janin, N; Andrieu, N; Ossian, K; Laugé, A; Croquette, M-F; Griscelli, C; Debré, M; Bressac-de-Paillerets, B; Aurias, A; Stoppa-Lyonnet, D

    1999-01-01

    Epidemiological studies in ataxia telangiectasia (AT) families have suggested that AT heterozygotes could have an increased cancer risk, especially breast cancer (BC) in women. It has also been suggested that an increased sensibility of AT heterozygotes to the effect of ionizing radiation could be responsible for the increased BC risk. BC relative risk (RR) estimation in AT heterozygotes within families ascertained through AT children is presented here. Family data collected included demographic characteristics, occurrence of cancers, past radiation exposures and blood samples. DNA samples were studied using seven ATM linked microsatellites markers allowing AT haplotypes reconstitution. The relative risk of BC was assessed using French estimated incidence rates. A significant increase risk of BC is found among obligate ATM heterozygotes with a point estimate of 3.32 (P = 0.002). BC relative risk calculated according to age is significantly increased among the obligate ATM heterozygotes female relatives with an age ≤ 44 years (RR = 4.55, P = 0.005). The BC relative risk is statistically borderline among the obligate ATM heterozygote female relatives with an age ≥ 45 years (RR = 2.48, P = 0.08). The estimated BC relative risk among ATM heterozygotes is consistent with previously published data. However, the increased risk is only a little higher than classical reproductive risk factors and similar to the risk associated with a first-degree relative affected by BC. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10362113

  1. Identification of ataxia telangiectasia heterozygotes by flow cytometric analysis of X-ray damage

    Rudolph, N.S.

    1989-01-01

    Flow cytometry was used to identify heterozygotes for the autosomal recessive DNA-repair deficiency disease ataxia telangiectasia (AT). Confluent G 0 /G 1 fibroblasts from 4 homozygotes (at/at), 5 obligate heterozygates (at/+) and 7 presumed normal (+/+) were X-irradiated with 200 Rad and subcultured immediately in medium containing 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). Cells were harvested 72 h later and stained with fluoresceinated anti-BrdU antibody to identify cells that had entered S phase. They were counterstained with propidium iodide to measure total DNA content. On the basis of relative release from G 0 /G 1 , the at/+ strains as a group were distinguished from both the presumed +/+ strains and at/at strains, although the individual values for some strains did show overlap between genotypes. When 10 cell strains were coded and analyzed in 'blind' experiments, all 4 heterozygotes were correctly assigned. By a similar assay in which exponentially growing cultures were pulsed briefly with BrdU 8 h after irradiation with 400 Rad and then harvested immediately, presumed +/+ cells as a group could be distinguished from at/at cells but not from at/- cells. This combination of assays assists in the identification of all 3 AT genotypes. This should be of both basic and diagnostic use, particularly in families known to segregate AT. (author). 37 refs.; 3 figs.; 5 tabs

  2. Intracranial hemorrhage of the mature newborn infant

    Takemine, Hisao

    1983-01-01

    Concerning four mature newborn infants with intracranial hemorrhage diagnosed by CT, the labour course, treatment, and prognoses were discussed. Of intracranial hemorrhage, 70.7% was small hemorrhage along the cerebellar tentorium and the falx cerebri, 12.2% subdural hemorrhage in the posterior cranial fossa, and 9.8% subdural hemorrhage in the fornex. Intraventricular or extradural hemorrhage was rarely found. The prognosis is determined by severeness of neurotic symptoms due to cerebral hypoxia. Subdural hemorrhage of the posterior cranial fossa resulted in cerebral palsy in one fifth of the cases, and in slight enlargement of the ventricle in three fifths. Subdural hematoma left porencephaly in one fourth of the patients, but the remaining recovered to normal. (Ueda, J.)

  3. Hereditary neuropathies: systematization and diagnostics (clinical case of hereditary motor and sensor neuropathy of the IA type

    Kolokolova A.M.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to study the value of routine methods (clinical symptoms, electrophysiological findings and results of DNA analysis in diagnostics of hereditary motor sensory neuropathy type IA in outpatient clinics. Material and Methods. The review of foreign literature is represented. The phenotypic polymorphism, genetic heterogeneity and the difficulties of diagnostics are identified. A family with hereditary motor sensory neuropathy of lAtype is presented, which was diagnosed on the base of available methods in outpatient practice (clinical symptoms, genealogical method, electro-physiological findings and DNA analysis results. Results. Routine algorithm (consistent valuation of clinical symptoms, neurophysiologic findings and the results of DNA analysis helped to verify the diagnosis of hereditary motor sensory neuropathy of lAtype in outpatient practice after more than 20 years of the onset of the disease. Conclusion. The neurologists of outpatient clinics and other specialists must be informed about the availability of diagnostics of hereditary diseases of nervous system.

  4. Hereditary and non-hereditary microangiopathies in the young. An up-date.

    Ringelstein, E Bernd; Kleffner, Ilka; Dittrich, Ralf; Kuhlenbäumer, Gregor; Ritter, Martin A

    2010-12-15

    In recent years, a considerable number of new sporadic or hereditary small artery diseases of the brain have been detected which preferably occur in younger age, below 45 years. Cerebral microangiopathies constitute an appreciable portion of all strokes. In middle aged patients, hereditary cerebral small vessel diseases have to be separated from sporadic degenerative cerebral microangiopathy which is mainly due to a high vascular risk load. Features of the following disorders and details how to differentiate them, are reviewed here, namely CADASIL, MELAS, AD-RVLC, HEMID, CARASIL, PADMAL, FABRY, COL4A1-related cerebral small vessel diseases and a Portuguese type of autosomal dominant cerebral small vessel disease (SVDB). The symptomatic overlap of the cerebral microangiopathies include also other distinctive non-hereditary diseases like posterior (reversible) encephalopathy and Susac's syndrome which are also described. Some of the microangiopathies described here are not only seen in the young but also in the elderly. The precise diagnosis has direct therapeutic implications in several of these entities. Cerebral microangiopathies cause recurring strokes and diffuse white matter lesions leading to a broad spectrum of gait disturbances and in most of these disorders cognitive impairment or even vascular dementia in the long term. Often, they also involve the eye, the inner ear or the kidney. Several typical imaging findings from illustrative cases are presented. The order in which these diseases are presented here is not dictated by an inner logic principle, because a genetically or pathophysiologically based classification system of all these entities does not exist yet. Some entities are well established and not unusual, whereas others have only been described in a few cases in total. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Coinheritance of hereditary spherocytosis and reversibility of cirrhosis in a young female patient with hereditary hemochromatosis.

    Höblinger, A; Erdmann, C; Strassburg, C P; Sauerbruch, T; Lammert, F

    2009-04-16

    Here we report a 33-years-old woman with hereditary spherocytosis and hemochromatosis due to homozygosity for the C282Y mutation of the HFE gene. The coinheritance of both conditions led to severe iron overload and liver cirrhosis at young age. The patient was treated by repeated phlebotomy, and reversibility of cirrhosis was documented by transient elastography. This report discusses the pathophysiology of iron accumulation in patients with hemolytic anemia combined with HFE C282Y homozygosity. The case indicates that patients with hematological disorders characterized by increased erythropoetic activity should be screened for HFE mutations.

  6. Computed tomography of intraventricular hemorrhage

    Cho, Bum Shin; Shin, Kyoung Hee; Hahm, Chang Kok

    1982-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is a new non-invasive diagnostic imaging method, which has ability to differentiate C.S.F., hematoma, and even edematous brain from normal brain tissue. Prior to the introduction of the CT, the diagnosis of the intraventricular hemorrhage in living patients was difficult and was confirmed by surgery of autopsy. Intracranial hemorrhages are visible on the CT with density higher than brain tissue in acute phase. CT is an accurate method for detecting of intraventricular hemorrhage including detection of nature, location, amount, and associated changes. CT is also useful as a guidance and in the evaluation of fate of the hematomas by easily performable follow up studies. The causes of the intraventricular hemorrhages are hypertension, rupture of aneurysm, arteriovenous malformation, head trauma, brain tumor, and others. This study included evaluation of CT of 69 patients who show the high density in cerebral ventricular system during the period of 31 months from Feb. 1979 to Aug. 1981 in the Department of Radiology, College of Medicine, Hanyang University. The results were as follows. 1. Age distribution of the total 69 patient was broad ranging from 1 month to 80 years. 28% of patients were in the 6th decade. The mate to female ratio was 2 : 1. 2. The consciousness of patients at CT study: Those were conscious in 11 cases, stuporous in 41 cases and unconscious in 17 cases. 3. The causes of intraventricular hemorrhages were hypertension in 28 cases, head trauma in 12 cases, aneurysm in 4 cases, tumor in 2 cases and others in 23 cases. 4. 9 cases showed intraventricular hematomas only, other 60 cases showed associated intracranial hematomas: Those were intracerebral hematomas in 53 cases including 30 cases of basal ganglial and thalamic hematomas, subarachnoid hemorrhage in 17 cases, epidural hematomas in 3 cases, and subdural hematomas in 2 cases. 5. All cases of the intraventricular hematomas except one sowed hematoma in the lateral

  7. CT findings of fundal hemorrhage in subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Munemoto, Shigeru; Ishiguro, Shuzo; Kimura, Akira; Futami, Kazuya; Kogure, Yuzaburo; Wakamatsu, Koichi; Demachi, Hiroshi

    1987-01-01

    The patient was a 66-year-old man. He lost consciousness as a result of a third subarachnoid hemorrhage attack. On neurological examination, he was found to be comatose and to have no spontaneous respiration. A mydriasis was noticed on both eyes. Bilateral retinal bleeding was also observed, with the bleeding of the left side more severe than that of the right side. After his death, his brain and eyes were examined by means of a CT scan. The CT films showed a severe subarachnoid hemorrhage and ventricular hematoma. The thin-sliced CT films showed left retinal bleeding. Retinal bleeding may be caused by a subarachnoid hemorrhage. Usually we make a sketch of the retinal bleeding on the basis of a doctor's report. A photo of an optic fundus is a good record; however, taking a photo is troublesome for severely ill patients. The CT finding of retinal bleeding is gross, but a CT image is one good way to record retinal bleeding. (author)

  8. Leber hereditary optic neuropathy: current perspectives

    Meyerson, Cherise; Van Stavern, Greg; McClelland, Collin

    2015-01-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is one of the most common inherited optic neuropathies causing bilateral central vision loss. The disorder results from point mutations in mitochondrial DNA and subsequent mitochondrial dysfunction. The primary cell type that is lost in LHON is the retinal ganglion cell, which is highly susceptible to disrupted ATP production and oxidative stress. Inheritance of LHON follows that of mitochondrial genetics, and it has a highly variable clinical phenotype, as other genetic and environmental factors also play a role. Although LHON usually presents with isolated vision loss, some patients suffer other neurological sequelae. For ill-defined reasons, male LHON mutation carriers are more affected than females. Most LHON patients remain legally blind, but a small proportion can experience spontaneous partial recovery, often within the first year of symptom onset. Unfortunately, at this time there are no established curative interventions and treatment is largely supportive. Patients should be offered low vision services and counseled on mitigating risk factors for additional vision loss, such as smoking and consuming alcohol. Encouraging treatments currently undergoing investigation includes ubiquinone analogs, such as idebenone, as well as gene therapy and stem cells to restore ATP synthesis and provide neuroprotection to surviving retinal ganglion cells. PMID:26170609

  9. Molecular Diagnostic and Pathogenesis of Hereditary Hemochromatosis

    Paulo C. J. L. Santos

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by enhanced intestinal absorption of dietary iron. Without therapeutic intervention, iron overload leads to multiple organ damage such as liver cirrhosis, cardiomyopathy, diabetes, arthritis, hypogonadism and skin pigmentation. Most HH patients carry HFE mutant genotypes: homozygosity for p.Cys282Tyr or p.Cys282Tyr/p.His63Asp compound heterozygosity. In addition to HFE gene, mutations in the genes that encode hemojuvelin (HJV, hepcidin (HAMP, transferrin receptor 2 (TFR2 and ferroportin (SLC40A1 have been associated with regulation of iron homeostasis and development of HH. The aim of this review was to identify the main gene mutations involved in the pathogenesis of type 1, 2, 3 and 4 HH and their genetic testing indication. HFE testing for the two main mutations (p.Cys282Tyr and p.His63Asp should be performed in all patients with primary iron overload and unexplained increased transferrin saturation and/or serum ferritin values. The evaluation of the HJV p.Gly320Val mutation must be the molecular test of choice in suspected patients with juvenile hemochromatosis with less than 30 years and cardiac or endocrine manifestations. In conclusion, HH is an example that genetic testing can, in addition to performing the differential diagnostic with secondary iron overload, lead to more adequate and faster treatment.

  10. Genetics of hereditary neurological disorders in children.

    Huang, Yue; Yu, Sui; Wu, Zhanhe; Tang, Beisha

    2014-04-01

    Hereditary neurological disorders (HNDs) are relatively common in children compared to those occurring in adulthood. Recognising clinical manifestations of HNDs is important for the selection of genetic testing, genetic testing results interpretation, and genetic consultation. Meanwhile, advances in next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have significantly enabled the discovery of genetic causes of HNDs and also challenge paediatricians on applying genetic investigation. Combination of both clinical information and advanced technologies will enhance the genetic test yields in clinical setting. This review summarises the clinical presentations as well as genetic causes of paediatric neurological disorders in four major areas including movement disorders, neuropsychiatric disorders, neuron peripheral disorders and epilepsy. The aim of this review is to help paediatric neurologists not only to see the clinical features but also the complex genetic aspect of HNDs in order to utilise genetic investigation confidently in their clinical practice. A smooth transition from research based to clinical use of comprehensive genetic testing in HNDs in children could be foreseen in the near future while genetic testing, genetic counselling and genetic data interpretation are in place appropriately.

  11. [Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever].

    Saijo, Masayuki; Moriikawa, Shigeru; Kurane, Ichiro

    2004-12-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is an acute infectious disease caused by CCHF virus (CCHFV), a member of the family Bunyaviridae, genus Nairovirus. The case fatality rate of CCHF ranges from 10-40%. Because CCHF is not present in Japan, many Japanese virologists and clinicians are not very familiar with this disease. However, there remains the possibility of an introduction of CCHFV or other hemorrhagic fever viruses into Japan from surrounding endemic areas. Development of diagnostic laboratory capacity for viral hemorrhagic fevers is necessary even in countries without these diseases. At the National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo, Japan, laboratory-based systems such as recombinant protein-based antibody detection, antigen-capture and pathological examination have been developed. In this review article, epidemiologic and clinical data on CCHF in the Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, compiled through field investigations and diagnostic testing utilizing the aforementioned laboratory systems, are presented. CCHFV infections are closely associated with the environmental conditions, life styles, religion, occupation, and human economic activities. Based on these data, preventive measures for CCHFV infections are also discussed.

  12. MR imaging of intraocular hemorrhage

    Saint-Louis, L.A.; Weiss, R.; Ellsworth, R.; Chang, S.; Deck, M.D.F.

    1987-01-01

    The authors evaluated with MR imaging 11 globes (nine patients) with spontaneous or traumatic intraocular hemorrhage. Subretinal blood was present in eight. Intravitreal bleeding was associated in seven and three subchoroidal. The ages of the hemorrhages ranged from 1 day to 6 months. Six of the subretinal and two subchoroidal cases had clotted blood with different intensity on the short TE images but were markedly hypointense on long TR/long TE images. The intravitreal blood was hyperintense on all sequences except in one. All imaging was performed with .5 T, 256 matrix, and 4- and 7- mm section thickness. Because of the varied appearance of hemorrhages, the authors scanned and are scanning two rabbits with intravitreal blood in vivo. Parameters include: 3-mm sections, T1, PD, T2 scans in .3-T and 1.5-T imagers. Initial results for the first 2 days show no change in signal intensity (hyperintense on all sequences). The T1 images show a diminishing intensity up to 8 days, and T2 scans remained hyperintense. These results so far correlate with the patient findings. The authors present the clinical findings and experimental correlation

  13. Analysis of angiographic findings in cerebral arteriovenous malformation with hemorrhage: comparison between intracerebral and intraventricular hemorrhage

    Kim, Jae Kyun; Kim, Joon Hyung; Kwon, Jin Sook; Yoon, Soo Woong; Lee, Ho Kyu; Choi, Choong Gon; Suh, Dae Chul

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the angioarchitectures of cerebral arteriovenous malformation (AVM) and to determine whether there was correlation between angioarchitectures and patterns of intracranial hemorrhage (intracerebral, intraventricular, and both) in cerebral AVM. One hundred and twenty-eight patients who between November 1989 and December 1994 suffered supratentorial AVM with intracranial hemorrhage were studied retrospectively. Among 128 patients, intracerebral and intraventricular hemorrhage were seen in 68(53%) and 24 patients(19%), respectively, while both types were seen in the remaining 36 (28%). We analyzed the angioarchitectual characteristics of AVM, namely nidi, feeding arteries and draining veins, in three hemorrhagic groups of patients with intracerebral hemorrhage, intraventricular hemorrhage and both. The X 2 test or Fisher's exact test was used for statistical analysis. A cortically located nidus was most common in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage, while a periventricular location was most common in those with intraventricular hemorrhage (p<0.001). Location in the corpus callosum, choroid plexus, or intraventricular area was more frequent in the intraventricular than the intracerebral hemorrhagic group (p<0.05). Superficial venous drainage was most common in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (p<0.001), and deep venous drainage in those with intraventricular hemorrhage (p=3D0.001). The angioarchitectual characteristics of cerebral arteriovenous malformation correlate significantly with patterns of intracranial hemorrhage, and awareness of the type of hemorrhage could help to manage patients and determine prognosis.=20

  14. Type I IFN-related NETosis in ataxia telangiectasia and Artemis deficiency.

    Gul, Ersin; Sayar, Esra Hazar; Gungor, Bilgi; Eroglu, Fehime Kara; Surucu, Naz; Keles, Sevgi; Guner, Sukru Nail; Findik, Siddika; Alpdundar, Esin; Ayanoglu, Ihsan Cihan; Kayaoglu, Basak; Geckin, Busra Nur; Sanli, Hatice Asena; Kahraman, Tamer; Yakicier, Cengiz; Muftuoglu, Meltem; Oguz, Berna; Cagdas Ayvaz, Deniz Nazire; Gursel, Ihsan; Ozen, Seza; Reisli, Ismail; Gursel, Mayda

    2017-11-16

    Pathological inflammatory syndromes of unknown etiology are commonly observed in ataxia telangiectasia (AT) and Artemis deficiency. Similar inflammatory manifestations also exist in patients with STING-associated vasculopathy in infancy (SAVI). We sought to test the hypothesis that the inflammation-associated manifestations observed in patients with AT and Artemis deficiency stem from increased type I IFN signature leading to neutrophil-mediated pathological damage. Cytokine/protein signatures were determined by ELISA, cytometric bead array, or quantitative PCR. Stat1 phosphorylation levels were determined by flow cytometry. DNA species accumulating in the cytosol of patients' cells were quantified microscopically and flow cytometrically. Propensity of isolated polymorhonuclear granulocytes to form neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) was determined using fluorescence microscopy and picogreen assay. Neutrophil reactive oxygen species levels and mitochondrial stress were assayed using fluorogenic probes, microscopy, and flow cytometry. Type I and III IFN signatures were elevated in plasma and peripheral blood cells of patients with AT, Artemis deficiency, and SAVI. Chronic IFN production stemmed from the accumulation of DNA in the cytoplasm of AT and Artemis-deficient cells. Neutrophils isolated from patients spontaneously produced NETs and displayed indicators of oxidative and mitochondrial stress, supportive of their NETotic tendencies. A similar phenomenon was also observed in neutrophils from healthy controls exposed to patient plasma samples or exogeneous IFN-α. Type I IFN-mediated neutrophil activation and NET formation may contribute to inflammatory manifestations observed in patients with AT, Artemis deficiency, and SAVI. Thus, neutrophils represent a promising target to manage inflammatory syndromes in diseases with active type I IFN signature. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  15. Body composition, muscle strength and hormonal status in patients with ataxia telangiectasia: a cohort study.

    Pommerening, H; van Dullemen, S; Kieslich, M; Schubert, R; Zielen, S; Voss, S

    2015-12-09

    Ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) is a devastating human autosomal recessive disorder that causes progressive cerebellar ataxia, immunodeficiency, premature aging, chromosomal instability and increased cancer risk. Affected patients show growth failure, poor weight gain, low body mass index (BMI), myopenia and increased fatigue during adolescence. The prevalence of alterations in body composition, muscle strength and hormonal status has not been well described in classical A-T patients. Additionally, no current guidelines are available for the assessment and management of these changes. We analyzed body composition, manual muscle strength and hormonal status in 25 A-T patients and 26 age-matched, healthy controls. Bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) was performed to evaluate the body composition, fat-free mass (FFM), body cell mass (BCM), extracellular matrix (ECM), phase angle (PhA), fat mass (FM) and ECM to BCM ratio. Manual muscle strength was measured using a hydraulic hand dynamometer. The BMI, FFM and PhA were significantly lower in A-T patients than in controls (BMI 16.56 ± 3.52 kg/m(2) vs. 19.86 ± 3.54 kg/m(2); Z-Score: -1.24 ± 1.29 vs. 0.05 ± 0.92, p body composition, characterized by depleted BMI, PhA and BCM; by the need to sit in a wheelchair; by altered hormone levels; and by poor muscle strength, is a major factor underlying disease progression and increased fatigue in A-T patients. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02345200.

  16. Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) interacts with p400 ATPase for an efficient DNA damage response.

    Smith, Rebecca J; Savoian, Matthew S; Weber, Lauren E; Park, Jeong Hyeon

    2016-11-04

    Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and TRRAP proteins belong to the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related kinase family and are involved in DNA damage repair and chromatin remodeling. ATM is a checkpoint kinase that is recruited to sites of DNA double-strand breaks where it phosphorylates a diverse range of proteins that are part of the chromatin and DNA repair machinery. As an integral subunit of the TRRAP-TIP60 complexes, p400 ATPase is a chromatin remodeler that is also targeted to DNA double-strand break sites. While it is understood that DNA binding transcriptional activators recruit p400 ATPase into a regulatory region of the promoter, how p400 recognises and moves to DNA double-strand break sites is far less clear. Here we investigate a possibility whether ATM serves as a shuttle to deliver p400 to break sites. Our data indicate that p400 co-immunoprecipitates with ATM independently of DNA damage state and that the N-terminal domain of p400 is vital for this interaction. Heterologous expression studies using Sf9 cells revealed that the ATM-p400 complex can be reconstituted without other mammalian bridging proteins. Overexpression of ATM-interacting p400 regions in U2OS cells induced dominant negative effects including the inhibition of both DNA damage repair and cell proliferation. Consistent with the dominant negative effect, the stable expression of an N-terminal p400 fragment showed a decrease in the association of p400 with ATM, but did not alter the association of p400 with TRRAP. Taken together, our findings suggest that a protein-protein interaction between ATM and p400 ATPase occurs independently of DNA damage and contributes to efficient DNA damage response and repair.

  17. Ataxia Telangiectasia-Mutated (ATMPolymorphisms and Risk of Lung Cancer in a Chinese Population

    Ajay A. Myneni

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM gene has a key role in DNA repair including activation and stabilization of p53, which implicates the importance of ATM polymorphisms in the development of cancer. This study aims to investigate the association of two ATM single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs with lung cancer, as well as their potential interaction with p53 gene and other known risk factors of lung cancer.MethodsA population-based case–control study was conducted in Taiyuan city, China with 399 cases and 466 controls matched on the distribution of age and sex of cases. The two ATM gene SNPs, ATMrs227060 and ATMrs228589 as well as p53 gene SNP, p53rs1042522 were genotyped using Sequenom platform. Unconditional logistic regression models were used to estimate crude and adjusted odds ratios (aOR and 95% confidence intervals (CIs. Adjusted models controlled for age, sex, and smoking status.ResultsThe study showed that TT genotype of ATMrs227060 (aOR = 1.58, 95% CI: 1.06–2.35 and AA genotype of ATMrs228589 were significantly associated with lung cancer (aOR = 1.50, 95% CI: 1.08–2.08 in a recessive model. Additionally, carrying variant genotypes of ATMrs227060 (TT, ATMrs228589 (AA, and p53rs1042522 (CC concomitantly was associated with much higher risk (aOR = 3.68, 95% CI: 1.43–9.45 of lung cancer than carrying variant genotypes of any one of the above three SNPs. We also found multiplicative and additive interaction between tea drinking and ATMrs227060 in association with lung cancer.ConclusionThis study indicates that ATM gene variants might be associated with development of lung cancer in Chinese population. These results need to be validated in larger and different population samples.

  18. Neonatal adrenal hemorrhage presenting as late onset neonatal jaundice

    Qureshi, Umar Amin; Ahmad, Nisar; Rasool, Akhter; Choh, Suhail

    2009-01-01

    Clinical manifestations of adrenal hemorrhage vary depending on the degree and rate of hemorrhage, as well as the amount of adrenal cortex compromised by hemorrhage. We report here a case of neonatal adrenal hemorrhage that presented with late onset neonatal jaundice. The cause of adrenal hemorrhage was birth asphyxia.

  19. MR imaging of acute hemorrhagic brain infarction

    Uchino, Akira; Ohnari, Norihiro; Ohno, Masato

    1989-01-01

    Six patients with acute hemorrhagic brain infarct were imaged using spin-echo (SE) pulse sequences on a 1.5 Tesla MR scanner. Including two patients with repeated MR imaging, a total of eight examinations, all performed within 15 days after stroke, were analyzed retrospectively. Four patients revealed massive hemorrhages in the basal ganglia or cerebellum and three cases demonstrated multiple linear hemorrhages in the cerebral cortex. On T1-weighted images, hemorrhages were either mildly or definitely hyperintense relative to gray matter, while varied from mildly hypointense to hyperintense on T2-weighted images. T1-weighted images were superior to T2-weighted images in detection of hemorrhgage. CT failed to detect hemorrhage in two of five cases: indicative of MR superiority to CT in the diagnosis of acute hemorrhagic infarcts. (author)

  20. MR imaging of acute subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Spickler, E.; Lufkin, R.B.; Frazee, J.; Lylyk, P.; Vinuela, F.; Bentson, J.R.; Dion, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage was produced in four Macaca nemestrina monkeys using the technique of Frazee. CT and MR imaging were performed immediately after the procedure and at frequent intervals up to 2 weeks after hemorrhage. The imaging studies were compared with clinical evaluations and pathologic specimens of all animals. Additional human clinical CT/MR studies of subarachnoid hemorrhage were also studied. Acute hemorrhage was recognized on MR as an increase in signal in the region of clot compared with surrounding cerebrospinal fluid. This most likely reflects T1 shortening due to proton binding rather than a pure paramagnetic effect. While CT is sensitive to the hemoglobin protein in acute hemorrhage, the superior resolution of the basal cisterns on MR images results in equal or better definition of acute subarachnoid hemorrhage on MR in many cases

  1. The prevalence of depression in hereditary spastic paraplegia.

    Vahter, L; Braschinsky, M; Haldre, S; Gross-Paju, K

    2009-09-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of depression and sensitivity and specificity of the single-item interview 'Are you depressed?' for people with hereditary spastic paraplegia in Estonia. Single-item interview 'Are you depressed?' was used as a screening question for depression; all participants then completed the Beck Depression Inventory. People with hereditary spastic paraplegia identified from the epidemiological database who agreed to participate in the study. Beck Depression Inventory, clinical interview. The epidemiological database consisted of 59 patients with clinically confirmed diagnosis of hereditary spastic paraplegia. Forty-eight of these consented to participate in the study. The Beck Depression Inventory score was higher than cut-off point in 58% (28/48) and lower in 42% (20/48). Of the study group, 44% (21/48) had mild, 13% (6/48) moderate and one person revealed severe depression. There was a statistically significant correlation between Beck Depression Inventory score and level of mobility; no other significant correlations with other measures were detected. Of the participants, 54% (26/48) had subjective complaints about depression and answered 'Yes' to the single-item interview 'Are you depressed?'. The sensitivity of the one-item interview in the hereditary spastic paraplegia group was 75% and specificity 75%. Our results show that mild depression is prevalent among people with hereditary spastic paraplegia. Although the single question may be helpful, it cannot be relied upon entirely when assessing a person for depression.

  2. Musculoskeletal disease burden of hereditary hemochromatosis.

    Sahinbegovic, Enijad; Dallos, Tomáš; Aigner, Elmar; Axmann, Roland; Manger, Bernhard; Englbrecht, Matthias; Schöniger-Hekele, Maximilian; Karonitsch, Thomas; Stamm, Tanja; Farkas, Martin; Karger, Thomas; Stölzel, Ulrich; Keysser, Gernot; Datz, Christian; Schett, Georg; Zwerina, Jochen

    2010-12-01

    To determine the prevalence, clinical picture, and disease burden of arthritis in patients with hereditary hemochromatosis. In this cross-sectional observational study of 199 patients with hemochromatosis and iron overload, demographic and disease-specific variables, genotype, and organ involvement were recorded. The prevalence, intensity, and localization of joint pain were assessed, and a complete rheumatologic investigation was performed. Radiographs of the hands, knees, and ankles were scored for joint space narrowing, erosions, osteophytes, and chondrocalcinosis. In addition, the number and type of joint replacement surgeries were recorded. Joint pain was reported by 72.4% of the patients. Their mean ± SD age at the time of the initial joint symptoms was 45.8 ± 13.2 years. If joint pain was present, it preceded the diagnosis of hemochromatosis by a mean ± SD of 9.0 ± 10.7 years. Bony enlargement was observed in 65.8% of the patients, whereas synovitis was less common (13.6%). Joint space narrowing and osteophytes as well as chondrocalcinosis of the wrist and knee joints were frequent radiographic features of hemochromatosis. Joint replacement surgery was common, with 32 patients (16.1%) undergoing total joint replacement surgery due to severe OA. The mean ± SD age of these patients was 58.3 ± 10.4 years at time of joint replacement surgery. Female sex, metacarpophalangeal joint involvement, and the presence of chondrocalcinosis were associated with a higher risk of early joint failure (i.e., the need for joint replacement surgery). Arthritis is a frequent, early, and severe symptom of hemochromatosis. Disease is not confined to involvement of the metacarpophalangeal joints and often leads to severe damage requiring the replacement of joints. Copyright © 2010 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  3. Outcomes of Lensectomy in Hereditary Lens Subluxation

    Mohammad-Hossein Dehghan

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the results of pars plana lensectomy in patients with hereditary lens subluxation. METHOD: Hospital records of patients with hereditary lens subluxation who had undergone pars plana lensectomy at Labbafinejad Medical Center, Tehran-Iran from 1996 to 2003 were reviewed. Patients with more than 6 months of follow up were included. Underlying disorders, best corrected visual acuity (BCVA before and after surgery, intraocular pressure (IOP, postoperative refraction and complications were evaluated. RESULTS: Overall, records of 87 eyes of 49 patients including 27 male and 22 female subjects were reviewed. Mean follow up duration was 20±18 months. Underlying disorders leading to lens subluxation included Marfan syndrome (79.5%, Weill-Marchesani syndrome (8.2%, simple ectopia lentis (8.2%, and homocystinuria (4.1%. The most common indication for surgery was non-correctable refractive error (92.1%. Mean BCVA was 1.13 LogMAR (20/250 preoperatively, which improved to 0.26 LogMAR (20/30-20/40 postoperatively (P < 0.001. BCVA better than 20/40 was achieved in 82.8% of cases after surgery. Angle-supported anterior chamber intraocular lens (ACIOL was implanted in

  4. Rehabilitation Outcomes: Ischemic versus Hemorrhagic Strokes

    Perna, Robert; Temple, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    Background. Ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes have different pathophysiologies and possibly different long-term cerebral and functional implications. Hemorrhagic strokes expose the brain to irritating effects of blood and ischemic strokes reflect localized or diffuse cerebral vascular pathology. Methods. Participants were individuals who suffered either an ischemic (n = 172) or hemorrhagic stroke (n = 112) within the past six months and were involved in a postacute neurorehabilitation program....

  5. Obstetric Emergencies: Shoulder Dystocia and Postpartum Hemorrhage.

    Dahlke, Joshua D; Bhalwal, Asha; Chauhan, Suneet P

    2017-06-01

    Shoulder dystocia and postpartum hemorrhage represent two of the most common emergencies faced in obstetric clinical practice, both requiring prompt recognition and management to avoid significant morbidity or mortality. Shoulder dystocia is an uncommon, unpredictable, and unpreventable obstetric emergency and can be managed with appropriate intervention. Postpartum hemorrhage occurs more commonly and carries significant risk of maternal morbidity. Institutional protocols and algorithms for the prevention and management of shoulder dystocia and postpartum hemorrhage have become mainstays for clinicians. The goal of this review is to summarize the diagnosis, incidence, risk factors, and management of shoulder dystocia and postpartum hemorrhage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Surgical management of spontaneous hypertensive brainstem hemorrhage

    Bal Krishna Shrestha

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous hypertensive brainstem hemorrhage is the spontaneous brainstem hemorrhage associated with long term hypertension but not having definite focal or objective lesion. It is a catastrophic event which has a poor prognosis and usually managed conservatively. It is not uncommon, especially in eastern Asian populations, accounting approximately for 10% of the intracerebral hemorrhage. Before the advent of computed tomography, the diagnosis of brainstem hemorrhage was usually based on the clinical picture or by autopsy and believed to be untreatable via surgery. The introduction of computed tomography permitted to categorize the subtypes of brainstem hemorrhage with more predicted outcome. Continuous ongoing developments in the stereotactic surgery and microsurgery have added more specific surgical management in these patients. However, whether to manage conservatively or promptly with surgical evacuation of hematoma is still a controversy. Studies have shown that an accurate prognostic assessment based on clinical and radiological features on admission is critical for establishing a reasonable therapeutic approach. Some authors have advocate conservative management, whereas others have suggested the efficacy of surgical treatment in brainstem hemorrhage. With the widening knowledge in microsurgical techniques as well as neuroimaging technology, there seems to have more optimistic hope of surgical management of spontaneous hypertensive brainstem hemorrhage for better prognosis. Here we present five cases of severe spontaneous hypertensive brainstem hemorrhage patients who had undergone surgery; and explore the possibilities of surgical management in patients with the spontaneous hypertensive brainstem hemorrhage.

  7. CT findings of fulminant subarachnoid hemorrhages

    Ikeda, Yukio; Isayama, Kazuo; Yajima, Kouzo; Nakazawa, Shozo; Yano, Masami; Otsuka, Toshibumi

    1985-01-01

    We studied the clinical features and CT findings of 20 cases with fulminant subarachonid hemorrhages in the acute stage. They were admitted to our hospital within 3 hours after the attack as DOA (dead on arrival) or near DOA. CT-visualized subarachnoid hemorrhages were located in the basal cisterns surrounding the brain stem in all cases. In 90 % of the cases, the subarachnoid hemorrhage formed a clot or a thick layer. Massive intracerebral hematomas were observed in 10 % of the cases. Acute intraventricular hemorrhages were seen in 80 % of the cases. The mechanism of intraventricular hemorrhage in 70 % of the cases was of the reflux type, which was characterized by a reflux of the severe subarachnoid hemorrhage in the basal cistern. Acute and diffuse brain swelling on CT scan was observed in several cases, which also showed initial increased intracranial pressures. The major mechanisms leading to acute death or a very severe state soon after subarachnoid hemorrhage might be caused by acute brain-stem failure due to severe subarachnoid hemorrhages in the basal cisterns surrounding the brain-stem and an acute increase in intracranial pressure by cerebral edema following subarachnoid hemorrhage and secondary cerebral ischemia due to cardiac and respiratory arrest. (author)

  8. The Roles of Thrombospondins in Hemorrhagic Stroke

    Xuan Wu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemorrhagic stroke is a devastating cerebrovascular disease with significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Thrombospondins (TSPs, as matricellular proteins, belong to the TSP family which is comprised of five members. All TSPs modulate a variety of cellular functions by binding to various receptors. Recently, TSPs gained attention in the area of hemorrhagic stroke, especially TSP-1. TSP-1 participates in angiogenesis, the inflammatory response, apoptosis, and fibrosis after hemorrhagic stroke through binding to various molecules including but not limited to CD36, CD47, and TGF-β. In this review, we will discuss the roles of TSPs in hemorrhagic stroke and focus primarily on TSP-1.

  9. Cancer risk in families with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer diagnosed by mutation analysis

    Vasen, H. F.; Wijnen, J. T.; Menko, F. H.; Kleibeuker, J. H.; Taal, B. G.; Griffioen, G.; Nagengast, F. M.; Meijers-Heijboer, E. H.; Bertario, L.; Varesco, L.; Bisgaard, M. L.; Mohr, J.; Fodde, R.; Khan, P. M.

    1996-01-01

    Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer is characterized by early-onset colorectal cancer and the occurrence of various other cancers. The recent isolation of four mismatch repair genes responsible for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer allows for the identification of carriers within

  10. Cancer risk in families with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer diagnosed by mutation analysis

    Vasen, HFA; Wijnen, JT; Menko, FH; Kleibeuker, JH; Taal, BG; Griffioen, G; Nagengast, FM; MeijersHeijboer, EH; Bertario, L; Varesco, L; Bisgaard, ML; Mohr, J; Fodde, R; Khan, PM

    Background & Aims: Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer is characterized by early-onset colorectal cancer and the occurrence of various other cancers, The recent isolation of four mismatch repair genes responsible for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer allows for the identification of

  11. Hereditary angioedema: a bradykinin-mediated swelling disorder.

    Björkqvist, Jenny; Sala-Cunill, Anna; Renné, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Edema is tissue swelling and is a common symptom in a variety of diseases. Edema form due to accumulation of fluids, either through reduced drainage or increased vascular permeability. There are multiple vascular signalling pathways that regulate vessel permeability. An important mediator that increases vascular leak is the peptide hormone bradykinin, which is the principal agent in the swelling disorder hereditary angioedema. The disease is autosomal dominant inherited and presents clinically with recurrent episodes of acute swelling that can be life-threatening involving the skin, the oropharyngeal, laryngeal, and gastrointestinal mucosa. Three different types of hereditary angiodema exist in patients. The review summarises current knowledge on the pathophysiology of hereditary angiodema and focuses on recent experimental and pharmacological findings that have led to a better understanding and new treatments for the disease.

  12. Neuromyelitis optica antibody in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy: case report

    Luciano Mesquita Simão

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Neuromyelitis optica antibody (or aquaporin-4 antibody is a well stablished serum marker associated to high-risk neuromyelitis optica syndrome that presents as an inflammatory demyelinating disease characterized by the occurrence of bilateral and simultaneous optic neuritis without complete visual recovery or it occurs as an isolated episode of transverse myelitis accompanied by longitudinally extensive spinal cord lesions. On the other hand, Leber hereditary optic neuropathy is a primarily hereditary disorder that affects all tissues of the body and its clinical presentation is tissue-specific for the optic nerve and, eventually, it might reach the spinal cord. Overlapping clinical features of neuromyelitis optica and Leber hereditary optic neuropathy may suggest common target organ diseases. The case report described herein emphasizes the coexistence of serum markers of both diseases, and suggests that further investigation of this challenging clinical presentation is warranted to confirm or rule out this association.

  13. Intragenic Duplication A Novel Mutational Mechanism in Hereditary Pancreatitis

    Joergensen, M. T.; Geisz, A.; Brusgaard, K.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In a hereditary pancreatitis family from Denmark, we identified a novel intragenic duplication of 9 nucleotides in exon-2 of the human cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1) gene (c.63_71dup) which at the amino-acid level resulted in the insertion of 3 amino acids within the activation peptide...... pancreatitis. The accelerated activation of p.K23_I24insIDK by cathepsin B is a unique biochemical property not found in any other pancreatitis-associated trypsinogen mutant. In contrast, the robust autoactivation of the novel mutant confirms the notion that increased autoactivation is a disease......-relevant mechanism in hereditary pancreatitis....

  14. Fetal MRI of hereditary multiple intestinal atresia with postnatal correlation

    Githu, Tangayi; Merrow, Arnold C.; Lee, Jason K.; Garrison, Aaron P.; Brown, Rebeccah L.

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary multiple intestinal atresia (HMIA) is an extremely uncommon cause of congenital bowel obstruction. The morbidity and mortality of this disease differ significantly from those of isolated intestinal atresias and non-hereditary forms of multiple intestinal atresia. Most notably, despite successful operative repairs of the atresias found in this disease, HMIA maintains a 100% lethality rate from continued post-operative intestinal failure and an associated severe immunodeficiency. We present a case of HMIA evaluated with fetal MRI and subsequently diagnosed by a combination of corroborative postnatal imaging with surgical exploration and pathological examination. (orig.)

  15. Hereditary Gigantism-the biblical giant Goliath and his brothers.

    Donnelly, Deirdre E; Morrison, Patrick J

    2014-05-01

    The biblical giant Goliath has an identifiable family tree suggestive of autosomal dominant inheritance. We suggest that he had a hereditary pituitary disorder possibly due to the AIP gene, causing early onset and familial acromegaly or gigantism. We comment on the evidence within the scriptures for his other relatives including a relative with six digits and speculate on possible causes of the six digits. Recognition of a hereditary pituitary disorder in the biblical Goliath and his family sheds additional information on his and other family members' battles with David and his relatives.

  16. Fetal MRI of hereditary multiple intestinal atresia with postnatal correlation

    Githu, Tangayi [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Radiology of Huntsville, P.C., Huntsville, AL (United States); Merrow, Arnold C.; Lee, Jason K. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Garrison, Aaron P. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Surgical Services, Division of Pediatric General and Thoracic Surgery, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Akron Children' s Hospital, Pediatric Surgery, Akron, OH (United States); Brown, Rebeccah L. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Surgical Services, Division of Pediatric General and Thoracic Surgery, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Hereditary multiple intestinal atresia (HMIA) is an extremely uncommon cause of congenital bowel obstruction. The morbidity and mortality of this disease differ significantly from those of isolated intestinal atresias and non-hereditary forms of multiple intestinal atresia. Most notably, despite successful operative repairs of the atresias found in this disease, HMIA maintains a 100% lethality rate from continued post-operative intestinal failure and an associated severe immunodeficiency. We present a case of HMIA evaluated with fetal MRI and subsequently diagnosed by a combination of corroborative postnatal imaging with surgical exploration and pathological examination. (orig.)

  17. Pulmonary hemorrhage resulting from leptospirosis

    Mauro Razuk Filho

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Leptospirosis is one of the most widespread zoonoses in the world, although the mechanisms responsible for the pathogenesis of spirochetes of the genus Leptospira are largely unknown. Human infection occurs either by direct contact with infected animals or indirectly, through contact with water or soil contaminated with urine, as the spirochetes easily penetrate human skin. The present report exposes the case of a female patient, diagnosed with leptospirosis after having had contact with a dog infected by Leptospira sp. that developed pulmonary hemorrhage, acute respiratory distress syndrome and acute renal failure.

  18. Subarachnoid hemorrhage in pituitary tumor

    Ashis Patnaik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH is the bleeding into the subarachnoid space containing cerebrospinal fluid. The most common cause of SAH is trauma. Rupture of aneurysms, vascular anomalies, tumor bleeds and hypertension are other important etiologies. SAH in the setting of pituitary tumor can result from various causes. It can be due to intrinsic tumor related pathology, injury to surrounding the vessel during the operative procedure or due to an associated aneurysm. We discuss the pathological mechanisms and review relevant literature related to this interesting phenomenon. Early and accurate diagnosis of the cause of the SAH in pituitary tumors is important, as this influences the management.

  19. Phospho-SMC1 in-Cell ELISA based Detection of Ataxia Telangiectasia

    Majid Zaki dizaji

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundAtaxia telangiectasia (A-T is a common genetically inherited cause of early childhood-onset ataxia. The infrequency of this disease, vast phenotype variation, disorders with features similar to those of A-T, and lack of definite laboratory test, make diagnosis difficult.  In addition, there is no rapid reliable laboratory method for identifying A-T heterozygotes, who susceptible to ionizing radiation (IR, atherosclerosis, diabetes, and cancers. We used SMC1pSer966 (pSMC1 in-cell colorimetric ELISA to diagnosis and screen in A-T families.Materials and Methods: With informed consent, 2cc peripheral blood was collected from the 15 A-T patients, their parents, and 24 healthy controls with no family history of malignancy, diabetes, and atherosclerosis. Extracted peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs were cultured in poly-L-Lysine treated 96-well plate with density of 70,000 cells per well. SMC1 phosphorylation was evaluated with cell-based ELISA kit 1 hour after 5 Gy IR and the pSMC1data normalized with Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH.Results: SMC1 phosphorylation was significantly low in A-T`s PBMC (mean + standard deviation [SD]: 0.075 + 0.034 in comparison to carriers (mean + SD: 0.190 + 0.060 and healthy controls (mean + SD: 0.312 +0.081, but unluckily could only discriminate A-T patients (Area Under the Curve -receiver operating characteristic [AUC-ROC]: 1.00, 1.00-1.00. This method in spite of rapidness and simplicity showed poor imprecision (22.49% coefficient of variation [CV] for intraday imprecision.Conclusion: It seems pSMC1 assessment by in-cell ELISA can be used for detection of A-T patients, but it may not sensitive enough for identification of carriers. This ELISA test is very simple, rapid, and requires less than 2cc blood. Thus it may be proposed for the early differential diagnosis of A-T as an alternative method.

  20. Telomere length, ATM mutation status and cancer risk in Ataxia-Telangiectasia families.

    Renault, Anne-Laure; Mebirouk, Noura; Cavaciuti, Eve; Le Gal, Dorothée; Lecarpentier, Julie; d'Enghien, Catherine Dubois; Laugé, Anthony; Dondon, Marie-Gabrielle; Labbé, Martine; Lesca, Gaetan; Leroux, Dominique; Gladieff, Laurence; Adenis, Claude; Faivre, Laurence; Gilbert-Dussardier, Brigitte; Lortholary, Alain; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Dahan, Karin; Bay, Jacques-Olivier; Longy, Michel; Buecher, Bruno; Janin, Nicolas; Zattara, Hélène; Berthet, Pascaline; Combès, Audrey; Coupier, Isabelle; Hall, Janet; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Andrieu, Nadine; Lesueur, Fabienne

    2017-10-01

    Recent studies have linked constitutive telomere length (TL) to aging-related diseases including cancer at different sites. ATM participates in the signaling of telomere erosion, and inherited mutations in ATM have been associated with increased risk of cancer, particularly breast cancer. The goal of this study was to investigate whether carriage of an ATM mutation and TL interplay to modify cancer risk in ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) families.The study population consisted of 284 heterozygous ATM mutation carriers (HetAT) and 174 non-carriers (non-HetAT) from 103 A-T families. Forty-eight HetAT and 14 non-HetAT individuals had cancer, among them 25 HetAT and 6 non-HetAT were diagnosed after blood sample collection. We measured mean TL using a quantitative PCR assay and genotyped seven single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) recurrently associated with TL in large population-based studies.HetAT individuals were at increased risk of cancer (OR = 2.3, 95%CI = 1.2-4.4, P = 0.01), and particularly of breast cancer for women (OR = 2.9, 95%CI = 1.2-7.1, P = 0.02), in comparison to their non-HetAT relatives. HetAT individuals had longer telomeres than non-HetAT individuals (P = 0.0008) but TL was not associated with cancer risk, and no significant interaction was observed between ATM mutation status and TL. Furthermore, rs9257445 (ZNF311) was associated with TL in HetAT subjects and rs6060627 (BCL2L1) modified cancer risk in HetAT and non-HetAT women.Our findings suggest that carriage of an ATM mutation impacts on the age-related TL shortening and that TL per se is not related to cancer risk in ATM carriers. TL measurement alone is not a good marker for predicting cancer risk in A-T families. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  1. Intravascular volume after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Hoff, R.G.

    2009-01-01

    Intravascular volume after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage A subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) from a ruptured cerebral aneurysm is a devastating disorder with an often poor prognosis. The occurrence of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) is one of the most important factors determining outcome in

  2. Spontaneous Retroperitoneal Hemorrhage from Adrenal Artery Aneurysm

    Gonzalez Valverde, F.M.; Balsalobre, M.; Torregrosa, N.; Molto, M.; Gomez Ramos, M.J.; Vazquez Rojas, J.L.

    2007-01-01

    Spontaneous adrenal hemorrhage is a very rare but serious disorder of the adrenal gland that can require emergent treatment. We report on a 42-year-old man who underwent selective angiography for diagnosis and treatment of retroperitoneal hemorrhage from small adrenal artery aneurysm. This case gives further details about the value of transluminal artery embolization in the management of visceral aneurysm rupture

  3. Neonatal adrenal hemorrhage mimicking an acute scrotum.

    Adorisio, O; Mattei, R; Ciardini, E; Centonze, N; Noccioli, B

    2007-02-01

    Twenty-two cases of scrotal hematoma caused by neonatal adrenal hemorrhage are reported in the literature and unnecessary surgical exploration was performed in nine (41%), suspecting testicular torsion. In this paper, we present a newborn male with right adrenal gland hemorrhage causing right scrotal swelling and discoloration of groin managed conservatively.

  4. Primary brain tumor presenting as intracranial hemorrhage

    Tsunoda, Shigeru; Sakaki, Toshisuke; Miyamoto, Seiji; Kyoi, Kikuo; Utsumi, Shozaburo; Kamada, Kitaro; Inui, Shoji; Masuda, Akio.

    1989-01-01

    Ten cases of primary brain tumor presenting as intracranial hemorrhage were studied in terms of the radiological and histological findings. The cases having hemorrhage in the tumor, as established through CT or histologically, were excluded if their onsets were not sudden due to intracranial hemorrhages. The results obtained may be summarized as follows: 1) From an anatomical point of view, cerebral subcortical hemorrhages account for 80%; hemorrhages in the cerebellopontine angle, 10%, and hemorrhages in the basal ganglia, 10%. 2) Plain CT findings showed perifocal low-density areas within 24 hours after onset in all 10 cases. 3) Enhanced CT findings showed enhanced areas in 4 or 6 cases. 4) Angiographic findings revealed abnormalities besides the mass effect in 5 of the 10 cases. 4) Angiographic findings revealed abnormalities besides the mass effect in 5 of the 10 cases. 5) From a histological point of view, glioblastomas account for 30%; malignant astrocytomas, 20%; astrocytomas, 20%; malignant ependymomas, 10%; hemangioblastoma, 10%, and transitional meningiomas, 10%. In conclusion, a perifocal low-density area on CT within 24 hours after onset is the most meaningful indication of intracranial hemorrhage originating from a brain tumor. A histological 'perinuclear halo' in an astrocytoma as an artifact due to hemorrhage may often be misleading in diagnosing mixed oligo-astrocytomas. (author)

  5. Neonatal adrenal hemorrhage presenting as acute scrotum

    Introduction. In newborns, adrenal hemorrhage is not an uncommon event. The large size of the adrenal cortex contributes to an increased vulnerability to trauma during a difficult delivery [1]. However, the neonatal adrenal hemorrhage may rarely present as inguinoscrotal swelling [2,3]. This condition can simulate torsion of ...

  6. Detecting fetomaternal hemorrhage by flow cytometry

    Dziegiel, Morten Hanefeld; Nielsen, Leif Kofoed; Berkowicz, Adela

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize the most recent developments in the area of detection of fetomaternal hemorrhage by flow cytometry.......The aim of this review is to summarize the most recent developments in the area of detection of fetomaternal hemorrhage by flow cytometry....

  7. Recurrent spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage associated with ...

    Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) accounts for 15% of stroke cases in the US and Europe and up to 30% in Asian populations. Intracerebral hemorrhage is a relatively uncommon form of stroke-it causes only 10 to 15 percent of all strokes. It is more disabling and has a higher mortality rate than ischemic stroke, ...

  8. Recurrent Bleeding After Perimesencephalic Hemorrhage.

    Kauw, Frans; Velthuis, Birgitta K; Kizilates, Ufuk; van der Schaaf, Irene C; Rinkel, Gabriel J E; Vergouwen, Mervyn D I

    2017-12-01

    Perimesencephalic hemorrhage (PMH) is a type of subarachnoid hemorrhage with excellent long-term outcomes. Only 1 well-documented case of in-hospital rebleeding after PMH is described in the literature, which occurred after initiating antithrombotic treatment because of myocardial ischemia. We describe a patient with PMH without antithrombotic treatment who had 2 episodes of recurrent bleeding on the day of ictus. To validate the radiologic findings, we conducted a case-control study. Six neuroradiologists and 2 neuroradiology fellows performed a blinded assessment of serial unenhanced head computed tomography (CT) scans of 8 patients with a perimesencephalic bleeding pattern (1 index patient, 6 patients with PMH, 1 patient with perimesencephalic bleeding pattern and basilar artery aneurysm) to investigate a potential increase in amount of subarachnoid blood. A 56-year-old woman with a perimesencephalic bleeding pattern and negative CT angiography had 2 episodes after the onset headache with a sudden increase of the headache. Blinded assessment of serial head CT scans of 8 patients with a perimesencephalic bleeding pattern identified the patient who was clinically suspected to have 2 episodes of recurrent bleeding to have an increased amount of subarachnoid blood on 2 subsequent CT scans. Recurrent bleeding after PMH may also occur in patients not treated with antithrombotics. Even after early rebleeding, the prognosis of PMH is excellent. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Hydrocephalus associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Nosaka, Yoshiki

    1981-01-01

    Thirteen patients exhibited a communicating hydrocephalus following subarachnoid hemorrhage secondary to ruptured intracranial aneurysms and were treated with shunt procedures. The interval between subarachnoid hemorrhage and surgery averaged 9 weeks. Seven of the patients showed improvement. The prognostic value for surgical management was evaluated on the basis of three different diagnostic examinations (computed tomography (CT), cisternography and constant infusion test). A correct diagnosis was obtained in 78 per cent in cisternography, and 63 per cent in infusion test and CT. All patients responding to surgery showed a typical pattern in cisternography, consisting of ventricular retention of radiopharmaceutical tracer for 48 h or longer in association with no radioactivity over the cerebral hemispheres. The constant infusion test correlated well with typical cisternographic patterns. CT is useful in demonstrating pathophysiological changes in hydrocephalus. Periventricular hypodensity was visible in patients with normal or slightly elevated intracranial pressure, accompanied by fairly rapid deterioration. All of them responded well to shunting. In most cases which benefited from the shunt, the postoperative CT showed not only normal-sized ventricles but also marked regression of the hypodensity over a short period. (author)

  10. Lateral type of intracerebral hemorrhage

    Yamagami, Tatsuhito; Gotoh, Yasunobu; Imataka, Kiyoharu; Niijima, Kyo; Handa, Hajime.

    1987-01-01

    The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of intracerebral hemorrhages (lateral type) was studied. The strength of the magnetic field was 0.2 Tesla. Four cases were studied with inversion recovery (IR) and saturation recovery (SR) images. The findings of the acute stage (within 1 week) were a central isointensity and a peripheral low intensity on the IR image. On the SR image we recognized a central isointensity and a peripheral high intensity holding a faintly high intensity area around the hematoma. The findings of the subacute stage (from 1 to 3 weeks) were characterized by a central isointensity and a peripheral high-intensity ring, with a low-intensity area outside the hematoma on the IR image. A widespread high-intensity area including the hematoma itself and the surrounding white matter was observed on the SR image. The findings of the chronic stage (over 3 weeks) were the disapperance of a high-intensity ring and a change to a low-intensity area on the IR image. The hematoma itself and surrounding white matter had a high intensity, which has decreased in size in comparison with that of the subacute stage. The hypointensity rim was found in the immediately adjacent part of the original hematoma on the SR image. The MRI of a small hematoma 70 days from the onset showed an almost normal brain structure. Some magnetic resonance findings of intracerebral hemorrhage were reviewed. (author)

  11. Medulla Oblongata Hemorrhage and Reverse Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy.

    Gobeske, Kevin T; Sarano, Maurice E; Fugate, Jennifer E; Wijdicks, Eelco F

    2017-12-19

    Acute brain injury with strong surges of adrenergic outflow has resulted in takotsubo cardiomyopathy, but there are surprisingly few reports of takotsubo cardiomyopathy after intracranial hemorrhage, and none have been described from hemorrhage within the brainstem. We describe a patient with reverse and reversible cardiomyopathy following a hemorrhage in the lateral medulla oblongata. While it is limited in size, the location of the hemorrhage caused acute systolic failure with left ventricular ejection fraction of 27% and vasopressor requirement for cardiogenic shock and pulmonary edema. There was full recovery after 7 days. Detailed case report. Hemorrhage into medulla oblongata pressor centers may result in acute, reversible, stress-induced cardiomyopathy, affirming the adrenergic origin of this condition.

  12. Neck and scleral hemorrhage in drowning.

    Alexander, Russell T; Jentzen, Jeffrey M

    2011-03-01

    The determination of the cause and manner of death for a body recovered from the water can be difficult because of a lack of autopsy findings specific for drowning. This case report describes a 30-year-old man found submerged at the bottom of a hotel pool. An autopsy revealed scleral hemorrhages and fascial hemorrhages of multiple muscles of the anterior and posterior neck bilaterally. No evidence of traumatic injury was on the surface of the body. An investigation by law enforcement found no evidence of foul play. The occurrence of petechial and neck hemorrhage in a body recovered from the water is controversial, and a review of this literature will be given. We suggest that fascial hemorrhages of the muscles of the neck, as well as cephalic hemorrhages, can be explained by drowning-related elevated central venous pressure that is communicated to the head through the valveless veins of the neck. © 2010 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  13. A case of idiopathic omental hemorrhage

    Toshimitsu Hosotani

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available With the exception of trauma, intraperitoneal hemorrhage in young women is caused by the high frequency of ectopic pregnancy and ovarian bleeding. Here, we describe a case of idiopathic omental hemorrhage, which is a rare cause of intraperitoneal hemorrhage. Intraperitoneal hemorrhage was suspected in a 38-year-old Japanese woman based on contrast-enhanced computed tomography. Her last menstrual period was 23 days prior, and ovarian bleeding was considered based on bloody ascites revealed by culdocentesis. She underwent emergency surgery for hypovolemic shock. Although both ovaries were of normal size and no abnormal findings were observed, we performed a partial omentectomy because multiple clots were attached only to the greater omentum. Postoperatively, no rebleeding occurred, and she was discharged 11 days after the surgery. Because she did not have a clear history of trauma and underlying disease, idiopathic omental hemorrhage was diagnosed.

  14. A case of traumatic intraventricular hemorrhage

    Ikeda, Yukio; Yamakawa, Kazuomi; Nakazawa, Shozo.

    1980-01-01

    CT scan is recognized to be a rapid, noninvasive and informative examination in evaluation of the head injured patient. It is also possible to evaluate the presence of the intracerebral hematoma without remarkable mass effect, cerebral contusion, associated cerebral edema and ventricular hemorrhage. We present a case of traumatic intraventricular hemorrhage. The patient was a 40-year-old male admitted to our hospital in a drowsy state following a fall from about one meter high. Craniogram showed a linear fracture in the left parietotemporal regions. In the CT scan, intraventricular hemorrhage associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage without intracerebral hematoma was shown. A symmetrical moderate dilatation of both lateral ventricles was also shown. Cerebral angiography revealed no abnormality. His condition deteriorated progressively, so ventricular drainage was performed, but he expired 5 days later. Considering this case, the mechanisms of pure intraventricular hemorrhage following head injury were discussed. (author)

  15. Vocal fold varices and risk of hemorrhage.

    Tang, Christopher Guan-Zhong; Askin, Gülce; Christos, Paul J; Sulica, Lucian

    2016-05-01

    To establish risk of hemorrhage in patients with varices compared to those without, determine additional risk factors, and make evidence-based treatment recommendations. Retrospective cohort study. Patients who were vocal performers presenting for care during a 24-month period were analyzed to determine incidence of hemorrhage. Patients with varices were compared to those without. Demographic information and examination findings (presence, location, character, and size of varices; presence of mucosal lesions or paresis) were analyzed to determine predictors of hemorrhage. A total of 513 patients (60.4% female, mean age 36.6 years ± 13.95 years) were evaluated; 14 patients presenting with hemorrhage were excluded. One hundred and twelve (22.4%) patients had varices; 387 (77.6%) did not. The rate of hemorrhage in patients with varices was 2.68% at 12 months compared to 0.8% in patients without. Cox proportional hazard regression analysis revealed a hazard ratio of 10.1 for patients with varix developing hemorrhage compared to nonvarix patients (P hemorrhage was 3.3 cases per 1,000 person-months for varix patients compared to 0.5 cases per 1,000 person-months in the nonvarix group. There was no significant difference in the incidence of paresis, mucosal lesions, location of varix (left or right side; medial or lateral), or varix morphology (pinpoint, linear, lake) between patients who hemorrhaged and those that did not. The presence of varices increases the risk of hemorrhage. Varix patients had 10 times the rate of hemorrhage compared to nonvarix patients, although the overall incidence is low. This data may be used to inform treatment of patients with varices. 4. Laryngoscope, 126:1163-1168, 2016. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  16. A role for MLH3 in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer

    Wu, Y; Berends, MJW; Sijmons, RH; Mensink, RGJ; Verlind, E; Kooi, KA; van der Sluis, T; Kempinga, C; van der Zee, AGJ; Hollema, H; Buys, CHCM; Kleibeuker, JH; Hofstra, RMW

    2001-01-01

    We investigated a possible role of the mismatch-repair gene MLH3 in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer by scanning for mutations in 39 HNPCC families and in 288 patients suspected of having HNPCC. We identified ten different germline MLH3 variants, one frameshift and nine missense mutations,

  17. Hereditary hemochromatosis: genetic complexity and new diagnostic approaches.

    Swinkels, D.W.; Janssen, M.C.H.; Bergmans, J.; Marx, J.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Since the discovery of the hemochromatosis gene (HFE) in 1996, several novel gene defects have been detected, explaining the mechanism and diversity of iron-overload diseases. At least 4 main types of hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) have been identified. Surprisingly, genes involved in HH encode for

  18. Alterations of red blood cell metabolome in overhydrated hereditary stomatocytosis.

    Darghouth, D.; Koehl, B.; Heilier, J.F.; Madalinski, G.; Bovee, P.H.; Bosman, G.J.C.G.M.; Delaunay, J.; Junot, C.; Romeo, P.H.

    2011-01-01

    Overhydrated hereditary stomatocytosis, clinically characterized by hemolytic anemia, is a rare disorder of the erythrocyte membrane permeability to monovalent cations, associated with mutations in the Rh-associated glycoprotein gene. We assessed the red blood cell metabolome of 4 patients with this

  19. Intragenic duplication: a novel mutational mechanism in hereditary pancreatitis

    Joergensen, Maiken T; Geisz, Andrea; Brusgaard, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    In a hereditary pancreatitis family from Denmark, we identified a novel intragenic duplication of 9 nucleotides in exon-2 of the human cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1) gene (c.63_71dup) which at the amino-acid level resulted in the insertion of 3 amino acids within the activation peptide of cationic...

  20. Hereditary Angioedema - Consequences of a New Treatment Paradigm in Denmark

    Bygum, Anette

    2014-01-01

    stopped long-term prophylaxis with danazol or tranexamic acid and changed treatment regimen to on-demand treatment with C1 inhibitor concentrate or icatibant. At least 10% of the attacks remained un-treated. More than half of the patients felt that hereditary angioedema had a significant psychological...

  1. On the many faces of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy

    Oostra, RJ; Tijmes, NT; Cobben, JM; Bolhuis, PA; vanNesselrooij, BPM; Houtman, WA; deKokNazaruk, MM; BleekerWagemakers, EM

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a maternally inherited disorder, associated with mutations in the mitochondrial DNA, which is notorious for its aspecific presentations. Two pedigrees are described with cases that are atypical for LHON with respect to sex, age of onset, interval between

  2. On the many faces of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy

    Oostra, R. J.; Tijmes, N. T.; Cobben, J. M.; Bolhuis, P. A.; van Nesselrooij, B. P.; Houtman, W. A.; de Kok-Nazaruk, M. M.; Bleeker-Wagemakers, E. M.

    1997-01-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a maternally inherited disorder, associated with mutations in the mitochondrial DNA, which is notorious for its aspecific presentations. Two pedigrees are described with cases that are atypical for LHON with respect to sex, age of onset, interval between

  3. RB1 mutations and second primary malignancies after hereditary retinoblastoma

    Dommering, Charlotte J.; Marees, Tamara; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Imhof, Saskia M.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Ringens, Peter J.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Moll, Annette C.

    2012-01-01

    Survivors of hereditary retinoblastoma have a high risk of second primary malignancies, but it has not been investigated whether specific RB1 germline mutations are associated with greater risk of second primary malignancies in a large cohort. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 199

  4. RB1 mutations and second primary malignancies after hereditary retinoblastoma

    Dommering, Charlotte J.; Marees, Tamara; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Imhof, Saskia M.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Ringens, Peter J.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Moll, Annette C.

    Survivors of hereditary retinoblastoma have a high risk of second primary malignancies, but it has not been investigated whether specific RB1 germline mutations are associated with greater risk of second primary malignancies in a large cohort. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 199

  5. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy and vitamin B12 deficiency

    Pott, Jan Willem R.; Wong, Kwok H.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a maternally inherited optic neuropathy caused by mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). It is also believed that several epigenetic factors have an influence on the development of LHON. Methods: A case series was observed. Results: Three

  6. Visual Rehabilitation of Persons with Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy.

    Rudanko, S.-L.

    1995-01-01

    This article presents results of a noncontrolled clinical study of 20 persons with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy who were treated from 1976 to 1990 at the Low Vision Centre of the Finnish Federation of the Visually Handicapped. The importance of early functional visual rehabilitation is emphasized, as is the use of low vision aids to help…

  7. Motor activation in SPG4-linked hereditary spastic paraplegia

    Scheuer, KH; Nielsen, JE; Krabbe, Katja

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate the extent of motor cortical functional reorganisation in patients with SPG4-linked hereditary spastic paraplegia by exploring cortical motor activation related to movements of clinically affected (lower) and unaffected (upper) limbs. METHODS: T...

  8. Sulindac treatment in hereditary non-pollyposis colorectal cancer

    Rijcken, Fleur E. M.; Hollema, Harry; van der Zee, Ate G. J.; van der Sluis, Tineke; Ek, Wytske Boersma-van; Kleibeuker, Jan H.

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, e.g. sulindac have been extensively studied for chemoprevention in familial adenomatous polyposis, but not in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). We evaluated these effects in HNPCC using surrogate end-points for cancer risk. In a randomised

  9. Hereditary breast cancer: from molecular pathology to tailored therapies.

    Tan, D S P; Marchiò, C; Reis-Filho, J S

    2008-10-01

    Hereditary breast cancer accounts for up to 5-10% of all breast carcinomas. Recent studies have demonstrated that mutations in two high-penetrance genes, namely BRCA1 and BRCA2, are responsible for about 16% of the familial risk of breast cancer. Even though subsequent studies have failed to find another high-penetrance breast cancer susceptibility gene, several genes that confer a moderate to low risk of breast cancer development have been identified; moreover, hereditary breast cancer can be part of multiple cancer syndromes. In this review we will focus on the hereditary breast carcinomas caused by mutations in BRCA1, BRCA2, Fanconi anaemia (FANC) genes, CHK2 and ATM tumour suppressor genes. We describe the hallmark histological features of these carcinomas compared with non-hereditary breast cancers and show how an accurate histopathological diagnosis may help improve the identification of patients to be screened for mutations. Finally, novel therapeutic approaches to treat patients with BRCA1 and BRCA2 germ line mutations, including cross-linking agents and PARP inhibitors, are discussed.

  10. Study of glycolytic intermediates in hereditary elliptocytosis with thalassemia

    Pavri Roshan

    1977-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycolytic intermediates like ATP, DPG and GSH have been studied in a family with. hereditary elliptocytosis and thalassemia. Results indicate a fall in ATP with a concomitant rise in DPG in the Patient. Findings are discussed in relation to other data.

  11. RECRUITMENT OF PATIENTS WITH HEREDITARY HAEMOCHROMATOSIS AS BLOOD DONORS

    Marko Cukjati

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hereditary haemochromatosis is the most common inherited disorder in white persons with prevalence of about 1 in 200. Therapeutic phlebotomy is an effective treatment for the disease and prevents its sequele. In addition to their altruism, patients with hereditary haemochromatosis have also medical and monetary incentives for blood donation. Current guidelines do not allow haemochromatosis patients to donate blood. About two thirds of patients are eligible as blood donors and about two thirds of therapeutically drawn blood is suitable for transfusion. Therapeutically drawn blood could increase the blood supply by 1.5 to 30%.Conclusions. The number of states that already accept patients with hereditary haemochromatosis as blood donors is increasing. To avoid monetary incentives they offer free phlebotomies for all patients with hereditary haemochromatosis. There have been no reports about higher incidence of transfusion reactions. In Slovenia the number of therapeutic phlebotomy is increasing. We should evaluate the possibilities for recruitment of haemochromatosis patients as blood donors also in our country. It is necessary to modify regulatory restrictions and to ensure that there is no other incentives than altruism for blood donation.

  12. An ABC of the Warning Signs of Hereditary Angioedema

    Grumach, Anete Sevciovic; Ferraroni, Natasha; Olivares, Maria Margarita

    2017-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) with C1 inhibitor deficiency is a genetic disorder that clinically manifests with attacks of angioedema in the subcutaneous and submucosal tissues, mainly in the extremities, abdomen, and upper airway. During attacks, vascular permeability is increased due to increased...

  13. Genetics and ionizing radiations. 1. Genetics and hereditary diseases

    Dutrillaux, B.

    1980-01-01

    The desoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is the chemical vehicle of heredity. Each hereditary character is determined by a short segment of the DNA molecule called gene. Gene operations are governed by regulating systems. The DNA is located in the chromosomes, easily analysed by light microscopy. The chromosome number and form are fairly characteristic of a species. Ours has 46 chromosomes, i.e. 23 pairs. Anomalies of the hereditary stock can be qualitative: affecting one gene they are expressed by diversely serious diseases. They can be quantitative and bear on the lack or excess of a chromosome or a segment of chromosome; most often, resulting diseases are very serious; Downs's syndrome is a well-known example. The various modes of transmission of these hereditary characters are analysed. The change of a chromosome or a gene from a normal to an abnormal form is called a mutation. It occurs scarcely, but the effects of mutations accumulate. At birth, nearly 10% of children should have one abnormal hereditary character at least, however most of these characters do not induce a true disease. Anomalies are more frequent at conception, many abnormal embryos or foetuses being aliminated by miscarriages [fr

  14. Hereditary Ovarian Cancer: Not Only BRCA 1 and 2 Genes

    Angela Toss

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available More than one-fifth of ovarian tumors have hereditary susceptibility and, in about 65–85% of these cases, the genetic abnormality is a germline mutation in BRCA genes. Nevertheless, several other suppressor genes and oncogenes have been associated with hereditary ovarian cancers, including the mismatch repair (MMR genes in Lynch syndrome, the tumor suppressor gene, TP53, in the Li-Fraumeni syndrome, and several other genes involved in the double-strand breaks repair system, such as CHEK2, RAD51, BRIP1, and PALB2. The study of genetic discriminators and deregulated pathways involved in hereditary ovarian syndromes is relevant for the future development of molecular diagnostic strategies and targeted therapeutic approaches. The recent development and implementation of next-generation sequencing technologies have provided the opportunity to simultaneously analyze multiple cancer susceptibility genes, reduce the delay and costs, and optimize the molecular diagnosis of hereditary tumors. Particularly, the identification of mutations in ovarian cancer susceptibility genes in healthy women may result in a more personalized cancer risk management with tailored clinical and radiological surveillance, chemopreventive approaches, and/or prophylactic surgeries. On the other hand, for ovarian cancer patients, the identification of mutations may provide potential targets for biologic agents and guide treatment decision-making.

  15. The neuropathology of hereditary congenital facial palsy vs Mobius syndrome.

    Verzijl, H.T.F.M.; Zwaag, B. van der; Lammens, M.M.Y.; Donkelaar, H.J. ten; Padberg, G.W.A.M.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To characterize the neuropathology of hereditary congenital facial palsy. METHODS: The authors compared brainstem pathology of three members of one family with autosomal dominant congenital facial palsy to that in three age-matched controls. The neuropathologic findings of the familial

  16. Hereditary hemochromatosis and risk of ischemic heart disease

    Ellervik, Christina; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Grande, Peer

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We tested the hypothesis that the hereditary hemochromatosis genotypes C282Y/C282Y, C282Y/H63D, or C282Y/wild-type are risk factors for ischemic heart disease (IHD) and myocardial infarction (MI). METHODS AND RESULTS: We performed a prospective study of 9178 individuals from the Danish...

  17. Friedreich's ataxia mimicking hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy.

    Panas, Marios; Kalfakis, Nikolaos; Karadima, Georgia; Davaki, Panagiota; Vassilopoulos, Demetris

    2002-11-01

    Four patients from three unrelated families, with clinical and electrophysiological findings compatible with the diagnosis of hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy, are presented. The molecular analysis showed that the affected individuals were homozygous for the mutation in the X25 gene, characteristic of Friedreich's ataxia. These patients seem to represent a form of Friedreich's ataxia mimicking Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

  18. Organization and Running of the First Comprehensive Hereditary Cancer Clinic in India

    Rajkumar T

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hereditary cancers are thought to account for around 5% of cancers, particularly breast/ovarian and colorectal cancers. In India there is a paucity of data on hereditary cancers and the mutations in some of the common genes linked to hereditary cancers, such as BRCA1, BRCA2, hMSH2 and hMLH1. The country's first comprehensive hereditary cancer clinic was established in February 2002. The article describes the organization and running of the Clinic. It also discusses some of the social issues relevant to the given population in running the Hereditary Cancer Clinic.

  19. Inherited focal, episodic neuropathies: hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies and hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy.

    Chance, Phillip F

    2006-01-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP; also called tomaculous neuropathy) is an autosomal-dominant disorder that produces a painless episodic, recurrent, focal demyelinating neuropathy. HNPP generally develops during adolescence, and may cause attacks of numbness, muscular weakness, and atrophy. Peroneal palsies, carpal tunnel syndrome, and other entrapment neuropathies may be frequent manifestations of HNPP. Motor and sensory nerve conduction velocities may be reduced in clinically affected patients, as well as in asymptomatic gene carriers. The histopathological changes observed in peripheral nerves of HNPP patients include segmental demyelination and tomaculous or "sausage-like" formations. Mild overlap of clinical features with Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease type 1 (CMT1) may lead patients with HNPP to be misdiagnosed as having CMT1. HNPP and CMT1 are both demyelinating neuropathies, however, their clinical, pathological, and electrophysiological features are quite distinct. HNPP is most frequently associated with a 1.4-Mb pair deletion on chromosome 17p12. A duplication of the identical region leads to CMT1A. Both HNPP and CMT1A result from a dosage effect of the PMP22 gene, which is contained within the deleted/duplicated region. This is reflected in reduced mRNA and protein levels in sural nerve biopsy samples from HNPP patients. Treatment for HNPP consists of preventative and symptom-easing measures. Hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy (HNA; also called familial brachial plexus neuropathy) is an autosomal-dominant disorder causing episodes of paralysis and muscle weakness initiated by severe pain. Individuals with HNA may suffer repeated episodes of intense pain, paralysis, and sensory disturbances in an affected limb. The onset of HNA is at birth or later in childhood with prognosis for recovery usually favorable; however, persons with HNA may have permanent residual neurological dysfunction following attack(s). Episodes are often

  20. Role of chromatin structure modulation by the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A on the radio-sensitivity of ataxia telangiectasia

    Meschini, Roberta, E-mail: meschini@unitus.it; Morucci, Elisa; Berni, Andrea; Lopez-Martinez, Wilner; Palitti, Fabrizio

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Role of chromatin compaction on chromosomal instability. • Reduced radiation-induced clastogenicity in Ataxia telangiectasia cell lines. • Histone tails hyperacetylation reduces heterochromatin content favouring DSBs repair. - Abstract: At present, a lot is known about biochemical aspects of double strand breaks (DBS) repair but how chromatin structure affects this process and the sensitivity of DNA to DSB induction is still an unresolved question. Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) patients are characterised by very high sensitivity to DSB-inducing agents such as ionising radiation. This radiosensitivity is revealed with an enhancement of chromosomal instability as a consequence of defective DNA repair for a small fraction of breaks located in the heterochromatin, where they are less accessible. Besides, recently it has been reported that Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM) mediated signalling modifies chromatin structure. In order to study the impact of chromatin compaction on the chromosomal instability of A-T cells, the response to trichostatin-A, an histone deacetylase inhibitor, in normal and A-T lymphoblastoid cell lines was investigated testing its effect on chromosomal aberrations, cell cycle progression, DNA damage and repair after exposure to X-rays. The results suggest that the response to both trichostatin-A pre- and continuous treatments is independent of the presence of either functional or mutated ATM protein, as the reduction of chromosomal damage was found also in the wild-type cell line. The presence of trichostatin-A before exposure to X-rays could give rise to prompt DNA repair functioning on chromatin structure already in an open conformation. Differently, trichostatin-A post-treatment causing hyperacetylation of histone tails and reducing the heterochromatic DNA content might diminish the requirement for ATM and favour DSBs repair reducing chromosomal damage only in A-T cells. This fact could suggest that trichostatin-A post

  1. Acute hemorrhagic edema of infancy

    Sultan Ecer Menteş

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute hemorrhagic edema of infancy is a rare form of leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Mostly it appears under three years of age and is characterized by purpuric skin lesions, fever and edema. A three years-old boy, who has cough and coryzea was admitted to our clinic for fever and red spots on legs and arms. In physical examination; ecimotic skin lesions on right ear, face, arms, dorsal of the hands, buttocks, legs and dorsal of the feet were found. In the laboratory tests acute phase reactants were elevated and blood coagulation tests were in normal range. Hepatit A,B,C and TORCH markers were negative. Punch biopsy obtained from gluteal area showed leukositoclastic vasculity. Focal fibrinogen accumulation was detected by immun fluorescent microscopy. Regression on lesions was not observed despite supportive therapy, so prednisolone (1 mg/kg/day therapy was started. On the third day of the steroid therapy, complete recovery was achived.

  2. Management of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Etminan, N; Macdonald, R L

    2017-01-01

    Spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) affects people with a mean age of 55 years. Although there are about 9/100 000 cases per year worldwide, the young age and high morbidity and mortality lead to loss of many years of productive life. Intracranial aneurysms account for 85% of cases. Despite this, the majority of survivors of aneurysmal SAH have cognitive deficits, mood disorders, fatigue, inability to return to work, and executive dysfunction and are often unable to return to their premorbid level of functioning. The main proven interventions to improve outcome are aneurysm repair in a timely fashion by endovascular coiling rather than neurosurgical clipping when feasible and administration of nimodipine. Management also probably is optimized by neurologic intensive care units and multidisciplinary teams. Improved diagnosis, early aneurysm repair, administration of nimodipine, and advanced neurointensive care support may be responsible for improvement in survival from SAH in the last few decades. © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Asymptomatic cerebral hemorrhage detected by MRI

    Nakajima, Yumi; Ohsuga, Hitoshi; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Shinohara, Yukito

    1991-01-01

    Detection of previous cerebral infarction on CT films of patients with no history of stroke is a common occurrence. The incidence of silent cerebral infarction was reported to be about 10 to 11 percent, but very few reports concerning asymptomatic cerebral hemorrhage available. However, recent clinical application of MRI has resulted in the detection of old asymptomatic hemorrhage in patients with no history known stroke-like episodes. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the incidence, the cause and the character of the asymptomatic cerebral hemorrhage among patients who had undergone MRI examinations. From September 1987 through June 1990, 2757 patients have undergone 3474 MR scans of the brain with 1.0 Tesla Siemens Magneton unit in our hospital. Seventeen patients showed no clinical signs or symptoms suggesting a stroke episode corresponding to the detected hemorrhagic lesion. The 17 patients corresponded to 0.6% of the patients who underwent MRI, 1.5% of the patients with cerebrovascular disease and 9.5% of the patients with intracerebral hemorrhage(ICH), which was rather higher than expected. Among the 17 patients, 12 were diagnosed as primary ICH and 5 as secondary ICH. Most of the primary asymptomatic hemorrhage were hypertensive ones and slit-like curvilinear lesions between the putamen and claustrum or external capsule. The secondary asymptomatic hemorrhage were due to AVM and angiomas in the frontal cortex, thalamus and pons. (author)

  4. Asymptomatic cerebral hemorrhage detected by MRI

    Nakajima, Yumi; Ohsuga, Hitoshi; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Shinohara, Yukito [Tokai Univ., Isehara, Kanagawa (Japan). School of Medicine

    1991-03-01

    Detection of previous cerebral infarction on CT films of patients with no history of stroke is a common occurrence. The incidence of silent cerebral infarction was reported to be about 10 to 11 percent, but very few reports concerning asymptomatic cerebral hemorrhage available. However, recent clinical application of MRI has resulted in the detection of old asymptomatic hemorrhage in patients with no history known stroke-like episodes. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the incidence, the cause and the character of the asymptomatic cerebral hemorrhage among patients who had undergone MRI examinations. From September 1987 through June 1990, 2757 patients have undergone 3474 MR scans of the brain with 1.0 Tesla Siemens Magneton unit in our hospital. Seventeen patients showed no clinical signs or symptoms suggesting a stroke episode corresponding to the detected hemorrhagic lesion. The 17 patients corresponded to 0.6% of the patients who underwent MRI, 1.5% of the patients with cerebrovascular disease and 9.5% of the patients with intracerebral hemorrhage(ICH), which was rather higher than expected. Among the 17 patients, 12 were diagnosed as primary ICH and 5 as secondary ICH. Most of the primary asymptomatic hemorrhage were hypertensive ones and slit-like curvilinear lesions between the putamen and claustrum or external capsule. The secondary asymptomatic hemorrhage were due to AVM and angiomas in the frontal cortex, thalamus and pons. (author).

  5. Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever

    Emadi Koochak H

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF was first described in the Crimea in 1944 and then in 1956 in congo. CCHF is a viral hemorrhagic fever of the Nairovirus group that belongs to Bunyaviridae family virus. It is transmitted to human by tick bite. The most efficient and common tick that is the vectors of CCHF is a member of the Hyalomma genus which infected many mammals such as livestock, this tick is the main reservoire of virus in nature. Humans also become infected with CCHF virus by direct contact with blood or other infected tissues from livestock or human patients (nosocomial infection. Disease has been found in saharic Africa, Eastern Europe, Pakistan, India and Middle East (specially Iran and Iraq. This disease recently spread in Iran so in 1999 to 2001 at least 222 suspected case(81 definite case reported that led to the death of 15 of 81 cases. It is estimated that 30 percent of the country's cattle are contaminated with this virus."nIn humans, after a short incubation period it appears suddenly with fever, chills, myalgia and GI symptoms followed by severe bleeding and DIC that led to death .If the patient improved, has a long {2-4 weeks convalescence period. Disease diagnosed by clinical manifestations, serologic tests, viral culture and PCR and its specific treatment is oral ribavirin for 10 days, for prevention of disease personal protective measures from tick bite, spraying poison of mews to reduce of ticks crowd, isolation of patients and dis-infection of contaminated personal equipments that who suffering from CCHF is recommended.

  6. Hemodynamics in Korean Hemorrhagic Fever

    Han, Ji Young; Lee, Jung Sang; Koh, Chang Soon; Lee, Mun Ho

    1974-01-01

    The author in an attempt to evaluate hemodynamic changes in the clinical stages of Korean hemorrhagic fever measured plasma volume, cardiac output and effective renal plasma flow utilizing radioisoto as during various phases of the disease. Cardiac output was measured by radiocardiography with external monitoring method using RIHSA. Effective renal plasma flow was obtained from blood clearance curve drawn by external monitoring after radiohippuran injection according to the method described by Razzak et al. The study was carried out in thirty-eight cases of Korean hemorrhagic fever and the following conclusions were obtained. 1) Plasma volume was increased in the patients during the oliguric and hypertensive-diuretic phases, while it was normal in the patients during the normotensive-diuretic phase. 2) Cardiac index was increased in the patients during the oliguric phase and was slightly increased in the patients at the hypertensive diuretic phase. It was normal in the other phases. 3) Total peripheral resistance was increased in the hypertensive patients during diuretic phase, while it was normal in the rest of phases. 4) Effective renal plasma flow was significantly reduced in the patients during the oliguric and diuretic phases as well as at one month after the oliguric onset. There was no significant difference between the oliguric and the early diuretic phases. Renal plasma flow in the group of patients at one month after the oliguric onset was about 45% of the normal, however, it returned to normal level at six months after the onset. 5) Clinical syndrome of relative hypervolemia was observed in some patients during the oliguric phase or hypertensive diuretic phase. Characteristic hemodynamic findings were high cardiac output and normal to relatively increased peripheral resistance these cases. Relatively increased circulating blood volumes due to decreased effective vascular space was suggested for the mechanism of relative hypervolemia. 6) Cardiac

  7. Troponin elevation in subarachnoid hemorrhage

    Ioannis N. Mavridis

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Troponin (tr elevation in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH patients is often difficult to be appropriately assessed by clinicians, causing even disagreements regarding its management between neurosurgeons and cardiologists. The purpose of this article was to review the literature regarding the clinical interpretation of tr elevation in SAH. We searched for articles in PubMed using the key words: “troponin elevation” and “subarachnoid hemorrhage”. All of them, as well as relative neurosurgical books, were used for this review. Some type of cardiovascular abnormality develops in most SAH patients. Neurogenic stunned myocardium is a frequent SAH complication, due to catecholamine surge which induces cardiac injury, as evidenced by increased serum tr levels, electrocardiographic (ECG changes and cardiac wall motion abnormalities. Tr elevation, usually modest, is an early and specific marker for cardiac involvement after SAH and its levels peak about two days after SAH. Cardiac tr elevation predictors include poor clinical grade, intraventricular hemorrhage, loss of consciousness at ictus, global cerebral edema, female sex, large body surface area, lower systolic blood pressure, higher heart rate and prolonged Q-Tc interval. Elevated tr levels are associated with disability and death (especially tr >1 μg/L, worse neurological grade, systolic and diastolic cardiac dysfunction, pulmonary congestion, longer intensive care unit stay and incidence of vasospasm. Tr elevation is a common finding in SAH patients and constitutes a rightful cause of worry about the patients' cardiac function and prognosis. It should be therefore early detected, carefully monitored and appropriately managed by clinicians.

  8. Evaluation of computed tomography of intraventricular hemorrhage

    Yoo, Seon Young; Lee, Young Sik; Suh, Jeong Soo; Rhee, Chung Sik; Kim, Hee Seup

    1983-01-01

    Prior to the introduction of computed tomography, the clinical and radiological diagnosis of the intraventricular hemorrhage in living patients was difficult. C.T. scanning is an invaluable investigation providing the rapid and noninvasive diagnosis of intracerebral and intraventricular hemorrhage. It reliably demonstrates the presence and distribution of fresh blood within the ventricular system. C.T. is also useful as a surgical guidance and in the evaluation of fate of the hematoma by easily performable follow-up studies. We reviewed 31 cases of intraventricular hemorrhage in C.T. in the department of radiology of Ewha Womans University Hospital during the period from August, 1982 to August, 1983. The results were as follows: 1. The most patients were encountered in the 5th decade and the male to female ratio was 1.2 : 1. 2. Hypertension was the main cause of the intraventricular hemorrhage; 18 out of 31 patients. Remaining 13 patients were caused by hypoxia, aneurysm, Moya Moya disease, coagulation defect, trauma and undetermined etiology. 3. 18 out of 31 patients showed hemorrhage in the lateral ventricles only and all ventricles in 10 patients. 4. 28 out of 31 patients showed associated with intracranial hematoma; Those were intracerebral hematomas in 16 patients, intracerebral hematoma with subarachnoid hemorrhage in 4 patients and extracerebral hematoma in 2 patients. 5. Outcome was assessed using the Glasgow scale. According to them, the total mortality rates was 54.8%, however, 32.3% of patients returned to normal or minor disability. Patients, who had hypertension and marked degree of hemorrhage in the ventricular systems had a poor outcome. Patients with only ventricular hemorrhage had better outcome than associated intracranial hematoma. 6. 16 out of 31 patients were treated by surgical methods and 15 out of 31 patients by conservative methods. 75% of patients were died in conservative treatment. 7. Conclusively, causes, degree of intraventricular

  9. Socioeconomic burden of hereditary angioedema: results from the hereditary angioedema burden of illness study in Europe.

    Aygören-Pürsün, Emel; Bygum, Anette; Beusterien, Kathleen; Hautamaki, Emily; Sisic, Zlatko; Wait, Suzanne; Boysen, Henrik B; Caballero, Teresa

    2014-07-04

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) due to C1 inhibitor deficiency is a rare but serious and potentially life-threatening disease marked by spontaneous, recurrent attacks of swelling. The study objective was to characterize direct and indirect resource utilization associated with HAE from the patient perspective in Europe. The study was conducted in Spain, Germany, and Denmark to assess the real-world experience of HAE via a cross-sectional survey of HAE patients, including direct and indirect resource utilization during and between attacks for patients and their caregivers over the past 6 months. A regression model examined predictors of medical resource utilization. Overall, 164 patients had an attack in the past 6 months and were included in the analysis. The most significant predictor of medical resource utilization was the severity of the last attack (OR 2.6; p career/educational advancement. HAE poses a considerable burden on patients and their families in terms of direct medical costs and indirect costs related to lost productivity. This burden is substantial at the time of attacks and in between attacks.

  10. Plain radiographic, nuclear medicine and angiographic observations of hepatogenic pulmonary angiodysplasia

    Sang Oh, K; Bender, T M; Bowen, A D; Ledesma-Medina, J

    1983-05-01

    Clinical and radiological findings of hepatogenic pulmonary angiodysplasia are reported in two cases. Myriad spidery pulmonary blood vessles are seen on plain radiographs and verified with right to left intrapulmonary shunting on pulmonary angiogram and pulmonary isotopic perfusion scan. Pathophysiology and differential diagnosis are discussed. We propose the medical term ''pulmonary angiodysplasia'' to include: 1) Pulmonary telangiectasia 2) Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (Osler-Rendu-Weber syndrome) 3) Classical discrete pulmonary arteriovenous fistula 4) Hepatogenic discrete pulmonary angiodysplasia: pulmonary arteriovenous communications with right to left shunting secondary to hepatic cirrhosis.

  11. Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome: what radiologists should know. Literature review and three cases report

    Paulo Moraes Agnollitto

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome or hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia is an autosomal dominant vascular disease involving multiple systems whose main pathological change is the presence of abnormal arteriovenous communications. Most common symptoms include skin and mucosal telangiectasias, epistaxis, gastrointestinal, pulmonary and intracerebral bleeding. The key imaging finding is the presence of visceral arteriovenous malformations. The diagnosis is based on clinical criteria and can be confirmed by molecular biology techniques. Treatment includes measures for management of epistaxis, as well as surgical excision, radiotherapy and embolization of arteriovenous malformations, with emphasis on endovascular treatment. The present pictorial essay includes a report of three typical cases of this entity and a literature review.

  12. Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome: what radiologists should know. Literature review and three cases report

    Agnollitto, Paulo Moraes; Barreto, Andre Rodrigues Facanha; Barbieri, Raul Fernando Pinsetta; Junior, Jorge Elias; Muglia, Valdair Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome or hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia is an autosomal dominant vascular disease involving multiple systems whose main pathological change is the presence of abnormal arteriovenous communications. Most common symptoms include skin and mucosal telangiectasias, epistaxis, gastrointestinal, pulmonary and intracerebral bleeding. The key imaging finding is the presence of visceral arteriovenous malformations. The diagnosis is based on clinical criteria and can be confirmed by molecular biology techniques. Treatment includes measures for management of epistaxis, as well as surgical excision, radiotherapy and embolization of arteriovenous malformations, with emphasis on endovascular treatment. The present pictorial essay includes a report of three typical cases of this entity and a literature review. (author)

  13. Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome: what radiologists should know. Literature review and three cases report; Sindrome de Rendu-Osler-Weber: o que o radiologista precisa saber: revisao da literatura e apresentacao de tres casos

    Agnollitto, Paulo Moraes; Barreto, Andre Rodrigues Facanha; Barbieri, Raul Fernando Pinsetta; Junior, Jorge Elias; Muglia, Valdair Francisco, E-mail: agno53@gmail.com [Universidade de Sao Paulo (HC/FMRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina. Hospital das Clinicas

    2013-05-15

    Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome or hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia is an autosomal dominant vascular disease involving multiple systems whose main pathological change is the presence of abnormal arteriovenous communications. Most common symptoms include skin and mucosal telangiectasias, epistaxis, gastrointestinal, pulmonary and intracerebral bleeding. The key imaging finding is the presence of visceral arteriovenous malformations. The diagnosis is based on clinical criteria and can be confirmed by molecular biology techniques. Treatment includes measures for management of epistaxis, as well as surgical excision, radiotherapy and embolization of arteriovenous malformations, with emphasis on endovascular treatment. The present pictorial essay includes a report of three typical cases of this entity and a literature review. (author)

  14. Hemorrhagic chondroid chordoma mimicking pituitary apoplexy

    Lee, H.J.; Kalnin, A.J.; Holodny, A.I. [Dept. of Radiology, University Hospital, Newark, NJ (United States); Schulder, M.; Grigorian, A. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, University Hospital, Newark, NJ (United States); Sharer, L.R. [Dept. of Pathology, University Hospital, Newark, NJ (United States)

    1998-11-01

    We describe a hemorrhagic chondroid chordoma involving the sella turcica with suprasellar extension. The CT and MRI appearances mimiked a hemorrhagic pituitary adenoma. Chondroid chordoma is a variant composed of elements of both chordoma and cartilaginous tissue. An uncommon bone neoplasm, located almost exclusively in the spheno-occipital region, it is usually not considered in the differential diagnosis of a tumor with acute hemorrhage in the sellar region. We discuss the clinical and radiological characteristics which may allow one to differentiate chondroid chordoma from other tumors of this area. (orig.) With 3 figs., 9 refs.

  15. Subconjunctival hemorrhage: risk factors and potential indicators

    Tarlan B

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Bercin Tarlan,1 Hayyam Kiratli21Department of Ophthalmology, Kozluk State Hospital, Batman, Turkey; 2Ocular Oncology Service, Hacettepe University Schoolof Medicine, Ankara, TurkeyAbstract: Subconjunctival hemorrhage is a benign disorder that is a common cause of acute ocular redness. The major risk factors include trauma and contact lens usage in younger patients, whereas among the elderly, systemic vascular diseases such as hypertension, diabetes, and arteriosclerosis are more common. In patients in whom subconjunctival hemorrhage is recurrent or persistent, further evaluation, including workup for systemic hypertension, bleeding disorders, systemic and ocular malignancies, and drug side effects, is warranted.Keywords: subconjunctival hemorrhage, contact lens, hypertension, red eye

  16. Spontaneous muscle hematomas in a patient with Dengue hemorrhagic fever

    Jency Maria Koshy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF and Dengue shock syndrome manifest in various forms, ranging from petechial skin hemorrhage to life threatening cerebral, pulmonary, gastrointestinal and genitourinary hemorrhages. However it is very rare to have muscle hematomas in DHF. We report a rare case of spontaneous Iliopsoas hematoma complicating Dengue hemorrhagic fever.

  17. Imaging features of diffuse pulmonary hemorrhage; Roentgenmorphologie von diffusen Lungenhaemorrhagien

    Schmit, M.; Vogel, W.; Horger, M.

    2006-09-15

    There are diverse etiologies of diffuse pulmonary hemorrhage, so specific diagnosis may be difficult. Conventional radiography tends to be misleading as hemoptysis may lacking in patients with hemorrhagic anemia. Diffuse pulmonary hemorrhage should be differentiated from focal pulmonary hemorrhage resulting from chronic bronchitis, bronchiectasis, active infection (tuberculosis) neoplasia, trauma, or embolism. (orig.)

  18. CT findings of subarachnoid hemorrhage due to ruptured cerebral aneurysm with fundal hemorrhage

    Kashihara, Kengo; Yamashima, Tetsumori; Hasegawa, Takeshi; Kida, Shinya; Nitta, Hisashi; Yamamoto, Shinjiro

    1985-01-01

    CT scan and fundus oculi of subarachnoid hemorrhage due to ruptured cerebral aneurysm were investigated in 42 patients who were admitted between January, 1980, and August, 1984. Fundal hemorrhage (FH) was observed in 22 patients. The patients with FH showed a worse clinical grade (Hunt Kosnik) on admission than those without FH. The mortality rate of patients with FH was 64 %, much higher than the 5 % rate of those without FH. Moreover, the patients with FH showed more trouble in daily living than those without FH. CT scans of patients with FH usually showed severe subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), whereas those of patients without FH showed only mild hemorrhage. These findings suggest that fundal hemorrhage is caused by acute intracranial hypertension following subarachnoid hemorrhage due to a ruptured cerebral aneurysm. However, no significant correlation between the laterality of FH and the hemispheric dominancy of SAH could be demonstrated. (author)

  19. Gamma-ray induced inhibition of DNA synthesis in ataxia telangiectasia fibroblasts is a function of excision repair capacity

    Smith, P.J.; Paterson, M.C.

    1980-01-01

    The extent of the deficiency in γ-ray induced DNA repair synthesis in an ataxia telangiectasia (AT) human fibroblast strain was found to show no oxygen enhancement, consistent with a defect in the repair of base damage. Repair deficiency, but not repair proficiency, in AT cells was accompanied by a lack of inhibition of DNA synthesis by either γ-rays or the radiomimetic drug bleomycin. Experiments with 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide indicated that lack of inhibition was specific for radiogenic-type damage. Thus excision repair, perhaps by DNA strand incision or chromatin modification, appears to halt replicon initiation in irradiated repair proficient cells whereas in repair defective AT strains this putatively important biological function is inoperative

  20. Murine scid cells complement ataxia-telangiectasia cells and show a normal port-irradiation response of DNA synthesis

    Komatsu, K.; Yoshida, M.; Okumura, Y.

    1993-01-01

    The murine severe combined immunodeficient mutation (scid) is characterized by a lack of both B and T cells, due to a deficit in lymphoid variable-(diversity)-joining (V(D)J) rearrangement. Scid cells are highly sensitive to both radiation-induced killing and chromosomal aberrations. Significantly reduced D 0 and n values were demonstrated in scid cells and were similar to ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) cells (a unique human disease conferring whole body radiosensitivity). However, the kinetics of DNA synthesis after irradiation were different between the two cell types. In contrast with the radioresistant DNA synthesis of AT cells, DNA synthesis of scid cells was markedly inhibited after irradiation. The existence of different mutations was also supported by evidence of complementation in somatic cell hybrids between scid cells and AT cells. Results indicate that the radiobiological character of scid is similar to AT but is presumably caused by different mechanisms. (author)

  1. Effects of radiation therapy for Hodgkin's disease in a child with ataxia telangiectasia: a clinical, biological and pathologic study

    Pritchard, J.; Sandland, M.R.; Breatnach, F.B.; Pincott, J.R.; Cox, R.; Husband, P.

    1982-01-01

    Stage I lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin's disease was diagnosed in a 44-month-old girl. Although immune deficiency was suspected and IgA deficiency demonstrated, the diagnosis of an ataxia-telangiectasia (AT)-like syndrome was not confirmed until eight weeks later when results of studies on the radiosensitivity of cultured skin fibroblasts were available. The child had none of the usual physical stigmata of AT. Severe acute radiation damage followed the treatment of this child with standard doses of radiation therapy. Clinical, pathologic, and radiobiologic correlations are drawn. The diagnosis of a malignant lymphoma disorder in children under the age of five should alert clinicians to the possibility of immune deficiency and, even in the absence of classical physical signs, to AT in particular. Suggestions for the management of future similar cases are put forward

  2. The production and repair of double strand breaks in cells from normal humans and patients with ataxia telangiectasia

    Lehman, A.R.; Stevens, S.

    1977-01-01

    The production and repair of double strand breaks induced by γ-rays in the DNA of human fibroblasts have been measured by sedimentation in sucrose gradients under non-denaturing conditions. Unirradiated DNA formed a rapidly sedimenting gel. Low doses of radiation released freely sedimenting DNA molecules from this gel. Higher doses reduced the rate of sedimentation of the free DNA due to the introduction of double strand breaks. The breakage efficiency was 1 break/1.3x10 10 daltons of DNA/krad. Postirradiation incubation after a high dose of radiation resulted in an increase in molecular weight of the free DNA molecules, and after a low dose the rapidly-sedimenting gel was reformed. These data suggest that double strand breaks are repaired in human fibroblasts. No significant differences were found between fibroblasts from two normal donors and four patients with the radiosensitive disorder, ataxia telangiectasia, in either the production or repair of double strand breaks

  3. Contribution of placenta accreta to the incidence of postpartum hemorrhage and severe postpartum hemorrhage.

    Mehrabadi, Azar; Hutcheon, Jennifer A; Liu, Shiliang; Bartholomew, Sharon; Kramer, Michael S; Liston, Robert M; Joseph, K S

    2015-04-01

    To quantify the contribution of placenta accreta to the rate of postpartum hemorrhage and severe postpartum hemorrhage. All hospital deliveries in Canada (excluding Quebec) for the years 2009 and 2010 (N=570,637) were included in a retrospective cohort study using data from the Canadian Institute for Health Information. Placenta accreta included placental adhesion to the uterine wall, musculature, and surrounding organs (accreta, increta, or percreta). Severe postpartum hemorrhage included postpartum hemorrhage with blood transfusion, hysterectomy, or other procedures to control bleeding (including uterine suturing and ligation or embolization of pelvic arteries). Rates, rate ratios, population-attributable fractions (ie, incidence of postpartum hemorrhage attributable to placenta accreta), and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated. Logistic regression was used to quantify associations between placenta accreta and risk factors. The incidence of placenta accreta was 14.4 (95% CI 13.4-15.4) per 10,000 deliveries (819 cases among 570,637 deliveries), whereas the incidence of placenta accreta with postpartum hemorrhage was 7.2 (95% CI 6.5-8.0) per 10,000 deliveries. Postpartum hemorrhage among women with placenta accreta was predominantly third-stage hemorrhage (41% of all cases). Although placenta accreta was strongly associated with postpartum hemorrhage (rate ratio 8.3, 95% CI 7.7-8.9), its low frequency resulted in a small population-attributable fraction (1.0%, 95% CI 0.93-1.16). However, the strong association between placenta accreta and postpartum hemorrhage with hysterectomy (rate ratio 286, 95% CI 226-361) resulted in a population-attributable fraction of 29.0% (95% CI 24.3-34.3). Placenta accreta is too infrequent to account for the recent temporal increase in postpartum hemorrhage but contributes substantially to the proportion of postpartum hemorrhage with hysterectomy.

  4. Incidence of Intraventricular Hemorrhage and Post Hemorrhagic Hydrocephalus in Preterm Infants

    Negar Sajjadian

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available "nGerminal matrix-intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH is the most common variety of neonatal intracranial hemorrhage and is characteristics of the premature infant. The importance of the lesion relates not only to its high incidence but to their attendant complications (IC: hydrocephalus. Brain sonography is the procedure of choice in diagnosis of germinal matrix- intraventricular hemorrhage and hydrocephalus. In this study we have used brain sonography for detection of intraventricular hemorrhage and post hemorrhagic hydrocephalus and their incidences. The studied population was consisted of premature neonate (birth weight equal or less than 1500g and gestational age equal or less than 37 weeks who admitted in Mofid Hospital NICU (Tehran, Iran during a one year period. For all neonate (including criteria brain sonography in first week of life was done and in presence of IVH, serial Brain sonography was done weekly for detection of hydrocephalus. A total of 57 neonate entered the study. Intraventicular-germinal matrix hemorrhage was seen in 64.4% (35 patients. Forty percent of patients with intraventricular-germinal matrix hemorrhage had grade I, 11% grade II, 25.7% grade III, 2.8% grade VI. Hydrocephalus was detected in 20 percent of patients who had intraventricular-germinal matrix hemorrhage. That incidence of IVH in our study in comparison with other area and situation is higher. Hydrocephaly had direct relation with severity of IVH. This shows that with control of risk factor of IVH, we can control Post hemorrhagic hydrocephalus.

  5. Hemorrhagic Retinopathy after Spondylosis Surgery and Seizure.

    Kord Valeshabad, Ali; Francis, Andrew W; Setlur, Vikram; Chang, Peter; Mieler, William F; Shahidi, Mahnaz

    2015-08-01

    To report bilateral hemorrhagic retinopathy in an adult female subject after lumbar spinal surgery and seizure. A 38-year-old woman presented with bilateral blurry vision and spots in the visual field. The patient had lumbar spondylosis surgery that was complicated by a dural tear with persistent cerebrospinal fluid leak. Visual symptoms started immediately after witnessed seizure-like activity. At presentation, visual acuity was 20/100 and 20/25 in the right and left eye, respectively. Dilated fundus examination demonstrated bilateral hemorrhagic retinopathy with subhyaloid, intraretinal, and subretinal involvement. At 4-month follow-up, visual acuity improved to 20/60 and 20/20 in the right and left eye, respectively. Dilated fundus examination and fundus photography showed resolution of retinal hemorrhages in both eyes. The first case of bilateral hemorrhagic retinopathy after lumbar spondylosis surgery and witnessed seizure in an adult was reported. Ophthalmic examination may be warranted after episodes of seizure in adults.

  6. Intracerebral hemorrhage complicating viral hepatitis A | Belfquih ...

    HVA IgM. Eight 8 weeks after, she developed hemorrhagic syndrome coupled with fever associated and persistent jaundice. The blood count showed aregenerative pancytopenia secondary to aplastic anemia confirmed by bone marrow biopsy.

  7. Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome (HFRS)

    ... Care includes careful management of the patient’s fluid (hydration) and electrolyte (e.g., sodium, potassium, chloride) levels, ... TG, Peters CJ. Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers. Seminars in Pediatric Infectious Diseases 1997;8(Suppl 1):64-73 . ...

  8. Current management of massive hemorrhage in trauma

    Johansson, Pär I; Stensballe, Jakob; Ostrowski, Sisse R

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Hemorrhage remains a major cause of potentially preventable deaths. Trauma and massive transfusion are associated with coagulopathy secondary to tissue injury, hypoperfusion, dilution, and consumption of clotting factors and platelets. Concepts of damage control surgery have evolved...

  9. Glioblastoma Multiforme Presenting as Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    Cagatay Ozdol

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Brain tumors with concomitant intracerebral hemorrhage are rarely encountered. Hemorrhage as the initial presentation of a brain tumour may pose some diagnostic problems, especially if the tumour is small or the hemorrhage is abundant. We present a 47-year-old man who admitted to the emergency department with sudden onset headache, right blurred vision and gait disturbance. A non-contrast cranial computerized tomography scan performed immediately after his admission revealed a well circumscribed right occipitoparietal haematoma with intense peripheral edema causing compression of the ipsilateral ventricles. On 6th hour of his admission the patient%u2019s neurological status deteriorated and he subsequently underwent emergent craniotomy and microsurgical evacuation of the haematoma. The histopathological examination of the mass was consistent with a glioblastoma multiforme. Neoplasms may be hidden behind each case of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage. Histological sampling and investigation is mandatory in the presence of preoperative radiological features suggesting a neoplasm.

  10. Previously undiagnosed hemophilia patient with intracerebral hemorrhage

    Eray Atalay

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial bleeding in hemophilia patients is a rare but a mortal complication. Diagnosis of hemophilia in adulthood is an uncommon occurrence. In this case report an adult patient with intracranial hemorrhage is presented.

  11. Alkhurma Hemorrhagic Fever in Saudi Arabia

    This podcast looks at the epidemiologic characteristics of Alkhurma Hemorrhagic Fever in humans in Najran City, Saudi Arabia. CDC epidemiologist Dr. Adam MacNeil discusses the severity and risk factors for the illness.

  12. Potentialities of embolization of life threatening hemorrhages

    Moskvichev, V.G.

    1985-01-01

    The author analysed experience in the embolization of the abdominal vessels in 79 patients with diseases and lesions of the peritoneal cavity and retroperitoneal space accompanied by life threatening hemorrhage. In 51 cases embolization was used as an independent method of hemorrhage arrest and in 28 cases for patients' preoperative preparation. A hemostatic sponge combined with a superselective administration of 150-200 ml of aminocaproic acid was used as an emboilizing material. Complications attributed to embolization were noted in 5 patients: pancreatitis, subdiaphragmatic abscess, paranephritis, ischemia of the gluteal soft tissues, sciatic neuritis. An analysis has shown that urgent embolization of the abdominal vessels in diseases and lesions of the organs of the peritoneal cavity and retroperitoneal space accompanied by massive hemorrhage, can be used as an independent method for hemorrhage arrest

  13. How I treat patients with massive hemorrhage

    Johansson, Pär I; Stensballe, Jakob; Oliveri, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Massive hemorrhage is associated with coagulopathy and high mortality. The transfusion guidelines up to 2006 recommended that resuscitation of massive hemorrhage should occur in successive steps using crystalloids, colloids and red blood cells (RBC) in the early phase, and plasma and platelets...... in the late phase. With the introduction of the cell-based model of hemostasis in the mid 1990ties, our understanding of the hemostatic process and of coagulopathy has improved. This has contributed to a change in resuscitation strategy and transfusion therapy of massive hemorrhage along with an acceptance...... outcome, although final evidence on outcome from randomized controlled trials are lacking. We here present how we in Copenhagen and Houston, today, manage patients with massive hemorrhage....

  14. Fetomaternal hemorrhage during external cephalic version.

    Boucher, Marc; Marquette, Gerald P; Varin, Jocelyne; Champagne, Josette; Bujold, Emmanuel

    2008-07-01

    To estimate the frequency and volume of fetomaternal hemorrhage during external cephalic version for term breech singleton fetuses and to identify risk factors involved with this complication. A prospective observational study was performed including all patients undergoing a trial of external cephalic version for a breech presentation of at least 36 weeks of gestation between 1987 and 2001 in our center. A search for fetal erythrocytes using the standard Kleihauer-Betke test was obtained before and after each external cephalic version. The frequency and volume of fetomaternal hemorrhage were calculated. Putative risk factors for fetomaternal hemorrhage were evaluated by chi(2) test and Mann-Whitney U test. A Kleihauer-Betke test result was available before and after 1,311 trials of external cephalic version. The Kleihauer-Betke test was positive in 67 (5.1%) before the procedure. Of the 1,244 women with a negative Kleihauer-Betke test before external cephalic version, 30 (2.4%) had a positive Kleihauer-Betke test after the procedure. Ten (0.8%) had an estimated fetomaternal hemorrhage greater than 1 mL, and one (0.08%) had an estimated fetomaternal hemorrhage greater than 30 mL. The risk of fetomaternal hemorrhage was not influenced by parity, gestational age, body mass index, number of attempts at version, placental location, or amniotic fluid index. The risk of detectable fetomaternal hemorrhage during external cephalic version was 2.4%, with fetomaternal hemorrhage more than 30 mL in less than 0.1% of cases. These data suggest that the performance of a Kleihauer-Betke test is unwarranted in uneventful external cephalic version and that in Rh-negative women, no further Rh immune globulin is necessary other than the routine 300-microgram dose at 28 weeks of gestation and postpartum. II.

  15. Treatment for Supra-tentorial Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    長島, 梧郎; 藤本, 司; 鈴木, 龍太; 浅井, 潤一郎; 松永, 篤子; 張, 智為; 永井, 美穂; Goro, NAGASHIMA; Tsukasa, FUJIMOTO; Ryuta, SUZUKI; Jun-ichiro, ASAI; Atsuko, MATSUNAGA; Tomoo, CHANG; Miho, NAGAI; 昭和大学藤が丘病院脳神経外科

    2002-01-01

    Only vague guidelines exist for the surgical management of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). We investigated the indications for surgical management of intracerebral hemorrhage and compared the outcomes of computed tomography (CT)-guided stereotactic hematoma aspiration with those after hematoma removal under craniotomy. Our indications for CT-guided stereotactic hematoma aspiration were an age < 80 years old, a hematoma volume ≧ 10 ml, and a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score ≦ 14. Those for hemat...

  16. Reperfusion hemorrhage following superior mesenteric artery stenting.

    Moore, Michael

    2012-02-03

    Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stent placement is now an established treatment option for chronic mesenteric ischemia and is associated with low mortality and morbidity rates. We present a case of reperfusion hemorrhage complicating endovascular repair of superior mesenteric artery stenosis. Although a recognized complication following repair of carotid stenosis, hemorrhage has not previously been reported following mesenteric endovascular reperfusion. We describe both spontaneous cessation of bleeding and treatment with coil embolization.

  17. Ultrasound diagnosis of adrenal hemorrhage in meningococcemia

    Sarnaik, A.P.; Sanfilippo, D.J.K.; Slovis, T.L.; Children's Hospital of Michigan, Detroit; Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI

    1988-01-01

    Adrenal hemorrhage (AH) is a well-described complication of the neonatal period, anticoagulant therapy, and overwhelming bacterial infection especially with N. meningitis. Until recently the diagnosis of acute AH was based predominantly on autopsy findings. Ultrasound and computed tomography examinations have been successfully used for antemortem detection of AH in neonates and anticoagulated patients. We report two patients with fulminant meningococcal infection who demonstrated bilateral adrenal hemorrhages on ultrasonography. (orig.)

  18. A Case of Rivaroxaban Associated Intracranial Hemorrhage

    Jean Chin-Yu Lo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Rivaroxaban is a newer anticoagulant initially approved by the Food and Drug Administration to treat nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. Rivaroxaban has several characteristics that are more favorable than warfarin. One of the characteristics is decreased risk of hemorrhage. We report one of the first case reports of severe intracranial hemorrhage associated with rivaroxaban in an elderly patient with decreased renal function. We aim to alert emergency medicine providers regarding the likelihood of encountering these patient as newer anticoagulants rise in popularity.

  19. Isolated trochlear nerve palsy with midbrain hemorrhage

    Raghavendra S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Midbrain hemorrhage causing isolated fourth nerve palsy is extremely rare. Idiopathic, traumatic and congenital abnormalities are the most common causes of fourth nerve palsy. We report acute isolated fourth nerve palsy in an 18-year-old lady due to a midbrain hemorrhage probably due to a midbrain cavernoma. The case highlights the need for neuroimaging in selected cases of isolated trochlear nerve palsy.

  20. Iron in hereditary retinal degeneration: PIXE microanalysis Preliminary results

    Sergeant, C.; Gouget, B.; Llabador, Y.; Simonoff, M.; Yefimova, M.; Courtois, Y.; Jeanny, J.C.

    1999-01-01

    Several types of hereditary retinal degeneration with progressive alteration of photoreceptors exist in men and animals. Recent immunohistochemical results have shown strong degradation of transferrin, the protein responsible for iron transport, in retinas of rats with hereditary retinal degeneration. Freeze-dried thin sections of rat retinas from different stages of the disease, and respective coeval control sections, have been analyzed using nuclear microprobe. In this first part of the study, the rat retinas at post-natal stages of 35 and 45 days have been analyzed. The sample preparation and the post-irradiation staining to determine precisely the retinal layers involved are described. Preliminary results of element distributions (K, Ca, Fe) in the rat retina layers are discussed. A very high content of calcium in the choriocapillaris of dystrophic rat retinas was observed. Preliminary results on iron distribution in the rat retina layers are presented

  1. Spinal Exostosis in a Boy with Multiple Hereditary Exostoses

    Ali Al Kaissi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on a 13-year-old boy who presented with multiple hereditary exostosis and had development of back pain, associated with neurological deficits, and was found to have exostoses in the spinal canal. Spine radiograph showed a cauliflower-like abnormality of multiple exostoses of the posterior arch (pedicle of the thoracic vertebrae (T3–5. Reformatted CT scanning revealed the simultaneous development of intra- and extraspinal osteochondromatosis of T3–5. The spinal cord was compressed by the intraspinal exostosis. Our patient was surgically treated for intraspinal exostoses and showed cessation of neurological deficits. We report what might be a rare association of spinal cord compression in a patient with multiple hereditary exostoses.

  2. Could Ossification of the Achilles Tendon Have a Hereditary Component?

    Chawki Cortbaoui

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ossification of the Achilles tendon (OTA is an unusual clinical condition. It is characterized by the presence of an ossified mass within the fibrocartilaginous substance of the Achilles tendon. The etiology of the ossification of the Achilles tendon is unknown. Review of the literature suggests that its etiology is multifactorial. The major contributing factors are trauma and surgery with other minor causes such as systemic diseases, metabolic conditions, and infections. To our knowledge, no previous reports suggest any genetic/hereditary predisposition in OAT. We report 3 siblings who have OAT with no history of any of the aforementioned predisposing factors. Could OAT have a hereditary component as one of its etiologies?

  3. Hereditary arrhythmias and cardiomyopathies: decision-making about genetic testing.

    Louis, Clauden; Calamaro, Emily; Vinocur, Jeffrey M

    2018-01-01

    The modern field of clinical genetics has advanced beyond the traditional teachings familiar to most practicing cardiologists. Increased understanding of the roles of genetic testing may improve uptake and appropriateness of use. Clinical genetics has become integral to the management of patients with hereditary arrhythmia and cardiomyopathy diagnoses. Depending on the condition, genetic testing may be useful for diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, family screening, and reproductive planning. However, genetic testing is a powerful tool with potential for underuse, overuse, and misuse. In the absence of a substantial body of literature on how these guidelines are applied in clinical practice, we use a case-based approach to highlight key lessons and pitfalls. Importantly, in many scenarios genetic testing has become the standard of care supported by numerous class I recommendations; genetic counselors can improve accessibility to and appropriate use and application of testing. Optimal management of hereditary arrhythmias and cardiomyopathies incorporates genetic testing, applied as per consensus guidelines, with involvement of a multidisciplinary team.

  4. Ethical, social and counselling issues in hereditary cancer susceptibility.

    Garber, J E; Patenaude, A F

    1995-01-01

    Genetic testing for hereditary susceptibility to disease is new. Much has been learned from experience with Huntington's disease and other non-malignant conditions. There are some differences in the case of predisposition testing for cancer: there is often the perception that cancer is preventable and sometimes curable, in contrast to other hereditary conditions. Testing raises many issues new to the medical community and to the public as well. There is great concern that the explosive technology be used responsibly, so that the potential benefits of genetic knowledge are not eclipsed by the risks to autonomy, privacy and justice. Practical concerns about insurability and discrimination may inhibit some at risk individuals from taking advantage of this powerful technology. There has been considerable effort already in the UK, Europe and the USA at the research and social levels to create protection for individuals found to carry genetic susceptibility to disease.

  5. PATHOGENESIS OF HEMORRHAGIC DUE TO DENGUE VIRUS

    Arief Suseno

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dengue is a viral disease that is mediated by a mosquito, which causes morbidity and mortality. Viruses can increase vascular permeability which can lead to hemorrhagic diathesis or disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC known as dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF. In Indonesia, dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF are caused by dengue virus infection which was found to be endemic accompanied by an explosion of extraordinary events that appear at various specified period. The diagnosis of dengue is determined based on the criteria of the World Health Organization (WHO, 1999, which are sudden high fever accompanied by a marked tendency to hemorrhage positive tourniquet test, petechiae, ecchymosis, purpura, mucosal hemorrhagic, hematemesis or melena and thrombocytopenia. The problem that still exists today is the mechanism of thrombocytopenia in patients with varying degrees of dengue involving levels of vWF (von Willebrand factor and prostaglandin I2 (PGI2 can not be explained. The mechanism of hemorrhagic in dengue virus infections acquired as a result of thrombocytopenia, platelet disfunction decreased coagulation factors, vasculopathy with endothelial injury and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC.

  6. Impaired Fracture Healing after Hemorrhagic Shock

    Philipp Lichte

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Impaired fracture healing can occur in severely injured patients with hemorrhagic shock due to decreased soft tissue perfusion after trauma. We investigated the effects of fracture healing in a standardized pressure controlled hemorrhagic shock model in mice, to test the hypothesis that bleeding is relevant in the bone healing response. Male C57/BL6 mice were subjected to a closed femoral shaft fracture stabilized by intramedullary nailing. One group was additionally subjected to pressure controlled hemorrhagic shock (HS, mean arterial pressure (MAP of 35 mmHg for 90 minutes. Serum cytokines (IL-6, KC, MCP-1, and TNF-α were analyzed 6 hours after shock. Fracture healing was assessed 21 days after fracture. Hemorrhagic shock is associated with a significant increase in serum inflammatory cytokines in the early phase. Histologic analysis demonstrated a significantly decreased number of osteoclasts, a decrease in bone quality, and more cartilage islands after hemorrhagic shock. μCT analysis showed a trend towards decreased bone tissue mineral density in the HS group. Mechanical testing revealed no difference in tensile failure. Our results suggest a delay in fracture healing after hemorrhagic shock. This may be due to significantly diminished osteoclast recruitment. The exact mechanisms should be studied further, particularly during earlier stages of fracture healing.

  7. Risk factors for post-tonsillectomy hemorrhage.

    Ikoma, Ryo; Sakane, Sayaka; Niwa, Kazutomo; Kanetaka, Sayaka; Kawano, Toshiro; Oridate, Nobuhiko

    2014-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the rate of post-tonsillectomy hemorrhage (PTH) in a single institution and to evaluate the clinical risk factors for PTH. We reviewed the records of 692 patients who underwent tonsillectomy (TE) at Yokohama Minami Kyosai Hospital in Japan. PTH grades were grouped into three categories according to the severity of the hemorrhagic episode: (I) minimal hemorrhage that stopped after noninvasive treatment, (II) hemorrhage requiring treatment with local anesthesia, and (III) hemorrhage requiring reoperation under general anesthesia in the operating room. Clinical risk factors such as sex, age (adults vs. children), TE indication, surgeon's skill level, operative time, ligature type, and duration of antibiotic administration for PTH were investigated. Among the 692 patients, 80 (11.6%) showed PTH, with primary and secondary hemorrhage accounting for 1.6% and 10.0%, respectively. A category III PTH was observed in 18 patients; thus, the overall risk of reoperation was 2.6%. The PTH episode most frequently occurred on postoperative days 5 and 6. The frequency of PTH was significantly higher in male patients and in adults (Pdefinition of PTH. Clinical risk factors for PTH were adult age and male gender. The surgeon's skill level was an additional risk factor for category III PTH. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Vocal fold hemorrhage: factors predicting recurrence.

    Lennon, Christen J; Murry, Thomas; Sulica, Lucian

    2014-01-01

    Vocal fold hemorrhage is an acute phonotraumatic injury treated with voice rest; recurrence is a generally accepted indication for surgical intervention. This study aims to identify factors predictive of recurrence based on outcomes of a large clinical series. Retrospective cohort. Retrospective review of cases of vocal fold hemorrhage presenting to a university laryngology service. Demographic information was compiled. Videostroboscopic exams were evaluated for hemorrhage extent, presence of varix, mucosal lesion, and/or vocal fold paresis. Vocal fold hemorrhage recurrence was the main outcome measure. Follow-up telephone survey was used to complement clinical data. Forty-seven instances of vocal fold hemorrhage were evaluated (25M:22F; 32 professional voice users). Twelve of the 47 (26%) patients experienced recurrence. Only the presence of varix demonstrated significant association with recurrence (P = 0.0089) on multivariate logistic regression. Vocal fold hemorrhage recurred in approximately 26% of patients. Varix was a predictor of recurrence, with 48% of those with varix experiencing recurrence. Monitoring, behavioral management and/or surgical intervention may be indicated to treat patients with such characteristics. © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  9. Hereditary hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia: report of a rare case.

    Paramkusam, Geetha; Meduri, Venkateswarlu; Nadendla, Lakshmi Kavitha; Shetty, Namratha

    2013-09-01

    Hereditary Hypohidrotic Ectodermal Dysplasia (HHED), an X-linked, recessive, Mendelian character, is seen usually in males and it is inherited through female carriers. It is characterised by congenital dysplasia of one or more ectodermal structures and it is manifested by hypohidrosis, hypotrichosis and hypodontia. It results from abnormal morphogenesis of cutaneous and oral embryonic ectoderm. Here, we are presenting a rare case of HHED in a 19 year female with classic features of this condition.

  10. HEREDITARY INTRAVENTRICULAR CONDUCTION DISORDERS IN THE FAMILY FROM KRASNOYARSK

    A. A. Chernova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pedigree of the family from Krasnoyarsk city with hereditary disorders of intracardiac conduction was studied. The diagnosis of each family member was verified by electrocardiography (ECG, echocardiography , bicycle ergometry , ECG Holter monitoring. The family 10-year follow-up showed familial aggregation of intracardiac conduction disorders in grandson, niece, son of the proband niece, ie, in the III-degree relatives. Family history of III-degree relatives with intracardiac conduction disorders and discordant pathology is identified.

  11. The prevalence of primary hereditary hemochromatosis in central Anatolia.

    Karaca, Halit; Güven, Kadri; Önal, Müge; Gürsoy, Şebnem; Başkol, Mevlüt; Özkul, Yusuf

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis is an autosomal recessive disorder associated with the HFE genes. Early identification and diagnosis is important as end stage organ damage may occur if treatment is delayed.. This study aimed to identify the prevalence of hereditary hemochromatosis in Kayseri and surroundings known as Central Anatolia. 2304 participants (1220 males, 1084 females) who were older then the age of 17 were included in the study conducted between December 2005 and December 2006 in Kayseri, Turkey. Transferin saturation was measured from overnight fasting blood samples. Serum iron, total iron binding capacity, and transferin saturation were measured. Serum ferritin levels and hereditary hemochromatosis genetic analysis were also performed after an overnight fasting blood samples from participants whose transferin saturation results were more than 50% in man and more than 45% in women. The homozygote C282Y mutation and heterozygote C282Y mutation prevalences were found as 0.08% (1/1220) and 0.08% (1/1220) in male participants, respectively. The heterozygote H63D mutation prevalence was found in 0.09% (1/1084) of female participants. Calculated prevalences in general population are as follows; The homozygote C282Y mutation prevalence is 0.043% (1/2304), the heterozygote C282Y mutation prevalence is 0.043% (1/2304) and the heterozygote H63D mutation prevalence is 0.043% (1/2304). The prevalence of hereditary hemochromatosis in Central Anatolia is 0.043% (1/2304). Because of the relatively low frequency, population screening studies are not cost-effective.

  12. Hereditary spastic paraplegias: membrane traffic and the motor pathway

    Blackstone, Craig; O’Kane, Cahir J.; Reid, Evan

    2011-01-01

    Voluntary movement is a fundamental way in which animals respond to, and interact with, their environment. In mammals, the main CNS pathway controlling voluntary movement is the corticospinal tract, which encompasses connections between the cerebral motor cortex and the spinal cord. Hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) are a group of genetic disorders that lead to a length-dependent, distal axonopathy of fibres of the corticospinal tract, causing lower limb spasticity and weakness. Recent wo...

  13. Increased Mortality and Comorbidity Associated With Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy

    Vestergaard, Nanna; Rosenberg, Thomas; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a mitochondrial genetic disease in which optic neuropathy is considered a key feature. Several other manifestations of LHON have been reported; however, only little is known of their incidence and the life expectancy in LHON patients. Methods...... patients (RR: 4.26, 95% CI: 1.91-9.48; P neuropathy, and alcohol-related disorders. Conclusions: The manifestation of LHON was associated...

  14. The molecular basis of hereditary enamel defects in humans.

    Wright, J T; Carrion, I A; Morris, C

    2015-01-01

    The formation of human enamel is highly regulated at the molecular level and involves thousands of genes. Requisites for development of this highly mineralized tissue include cell differentiation; production of a unique extracellular matrix; processing of the extracellular matrix; altering of cell function during different stages of enamel formation; cell movement and attachment; regulation of ion and protein movement; and regulation of hydration, pH, and other conditions of the microenvironment, to name just a few. Not surprising, there is a plethora of hereditary conditions with an enamel phenotype. The objective of this review was to identify the hereditary conditions listed on Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) that have an associated enamel phenotype and whether a causative gene has been identified. The OMIM database was searched with the terms amelogenesis, enamel, dental, and tooth, and all results were screened by 2 individuals to determine if an enamel phenotype was identified. Gene and gene product function was reviewed on OMIM and from publications identified in PubMed. The search strategy revealed 91 conditions listed in OMIM as having an enamel phenotype, and of those, 71 have a known molecular etiology or linked genetic loci. The purported protein function of those conditions with a known genetic basis included enzymes, regulatory proteins, extracellular matrix proteins, transcription factors, and transmembrane proteins. The most common enamel phenotype was a deficient amount of enamel, or enamel hypoplasia, with hypomineralization defects being reported less frequently. Knowing these molecular defects allows an initial cataloging of molecular pathways that lead to hereditary enamel defects in humans. This knowledge provides insight into the diverse molecular pathways involved in enamel formation and can be useful when searching for the genetic etiology of hereditary conditions that involve enamel. © International & American Associations for

  15. Hereditary Angioedema: The Economics of Treatment of an Orphan Disease.

    Lumry, William Raymond

    2018-01-01

    This review will discuss the cost burden of hereditary angioedema on patients, healthcare systems, and society. The impact of availability of and access to novel and specific therapies on morbidity, mortality, and the overall burden of disease will be explored along with potential changes in treatment paradigms to improve effectiveness and reduce cost of treatment. The prevalence of orphan diseases, legislative incentives to encourage development of orphan disease therapies and the impact of orphan disease treatment on healthcare payment systems will be discussed.

  16. The Molecular Basis of Hereditary Enamel Defects in Humans

    Carrion, I.A.; Morris, C.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of human enamel is highly regulated at the molecular level and involves thousands of genes. Requisites for development of this highly mineralized tissue include cell differentiation; production of a unique extracellular matrix; processing of the extracellular matrix; altering of cell function during different stages of enamel formation; cell movement and attachment; regulation of ion and protein movement; and regulation of hydration, pH, and other conditions of the microenvironment, to name just a few. Not surprising, there is a plethora of hereditary conditions with an enamel phenotype. The objective of this review was to identify the hereditary conditions listed on Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) that have an associated enamel phenotype and whether a causative gene has been identified. The OMIM database was searched with the terms amelogenesis, enamel, dental, and tooth, and all results were screened by 2 individuals to determine if an enamel phenotype was identified. Gene and gene product function was reviewed on OMIM and from publications identified in PubMed. The search strategy revealed 91 conditions listed in OMIM as having an enamel phenotype, and of those, 71 have a known molecular etiology or linked genetic loci. The purported protein function of those conditions with a known genetic basis included enzymes, regulatory proteins, extracellular matrix proteins, transcription factors, and transmembrane proteins. The most common enamel phenotype was a deficient amount of enamel, or enamel hypoplasia, with hypomineralization defects being reported less frequently. Knowing these molecular defects allows an initial cataloging of molecular pathways that lead to hereditary enamel defects in humans. This knowledge provides insight into the diverse molecular pathways involved in enamel formation and can be useful when searching for the genetic etiology of hereditary conditions that involve enamel. PMID:25389004

  17. Appreciating the broad clinical features of SMAD4 mutation carriers: a multi-center chart review

    Wain, K.E.; Ellingson, M.S.; McDonald, J.; Gammon, A.; Roberts, M.; Pichurin, P.; Winship, I.; Riegert-Johnson, D.; Weitzel, J. N.; Lindor, N.M.

    2014-01-01

    Heterozygous loss-of-function (LOF) SMAD4 mutations are associated with juvenile polyposis syndrome (JP) and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Some carriers exhibit symptoms of both conditions, leading to the name JP-HHT syndrome. Three families have been reported with connective tissue abnormalities. In order to better understand the spectrum and extent of clinical findings in SMAD4 carriers, medical records of 34 patients (20 families) from five clinical practices were reviewed. ...

  18. CT findings of falical and tentorial subdural hemorrhage

    Kim, Ok Keun; Jung, Nam Keun; Kim, Kab Tae; Sol, Chang Hyo; Kim, Byung Soo

    1987-01-01

    Computed tomography has been established as an indispensable tool in the detection of intracranial hemorrhages. Extra axial fluid collections are usually easily distinguished from intracerebral hemorrhages. However, hemorrhages in atypical locations, such as in falx and tentorial regions, can be difficult to diagnose with CT. The tentorial and falcial collection of subdural blood are rather unusual. Authors report here 84 cases of falcial and tentorial subdural hemorrhages with reference data that we have encountered in the last two years. The results were as follows; 1. In 589 cases of intracranial hemorrhage, the incidence of subdural hemorrhage was 372 cases (63.2%). 2. Among 372 cases with subdural hemorrhage, 84 cases (22.6%) had falcial and/or tentorial subdural hemorrhage. In 84 cases with falcial and/or tentorial subdural hemorrhage, there were 50 cases (13.4%) of falcial subdural hemorrhages, 21 cases (5.7%) of tentorial subdural hemorrhage and 13 cases (3.5%) of combined falcial and tentorial subdural hemorrhage. 3. The location of falcial subdural hemorrhage was anterior in 30 cases (60%), posterior in 15 cases (30%) and middle in 5 cases (10%). 4. The location of tentorial subdural hemorrhage was petrous edge in 7 cases (33.3%), occipital attachment in 6 cases (28.6%), tentorial hiatus in 5 cases (23.8%), and diffuse in 3 cases (14.3%). 5. In 13 cases showing combined falcial and tentorial subdural hemorrhage, there was 3 cases (23.1%) of posterior falx and tentorial hiatus, 2 cases (15.4%) of anterior falx and petrous edge, 2 cases of anterior falx and tentorial hiatus, 2 cases of posterior falx and petrous edge, 2 cases of posterior falx and occipital attachment, 1 case (7.7%) of posterior falx and diffuse, and 1 case of posterior, middle falx and diffuse. 6. In the cases with falcial and/or tentorial subdural hemorrhage, the incidence of associated intracranial hemorrhage were intracrania subdural hemorrhage in 40 cases (47.6%), hemorrhagic brain

  19. Hereditary myopathies with early respiratory insufficiency in adults.

    Naddaf, Elie; Milone, Margherita

    2017-11-01

    Hereditary myopathies with early respiratory insufficiency as a predominant feature of the clinical phenotype are uncommon and underestimated in adults. We reviewed the clinical and laboratory data of patients with hereditary myopathies who demonstrated early respiratory insufficiency before the need for ambulatory assistance. Only patients with disease-causing mutations or a specific histopathological diagnosis were included. Patients with cardiomyopathy were excluded. We identified 22 patients; half had isolated respiratory symptoms at onset. The diagnosis of the myopathy was often delayed, resulting in delayed ventilatory support. The most common myopathies were adult-onset Pompe disease, myofibrillar myopathy, multi-minicore disease, and myotonic dystrophy type 1. Single cases of laminopathy, MELAS (mitochondrial encephalomyopathy with lactic acidosis and strokelike events), centronuclear myopathy, and cytoplasmic body myopathy were identified. We highlighted the most common hereditary myopathies associated with early respiratory insufficiency as the predominant clinical feature, and underscored the importance of a timely diagnosis for patient care. Muscle Nerve 56: 881-886, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Hemorrhagic Aspects of Gaucher Disease

    Hanna Rsenbaum

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Gaucher disease (GD is an inherited lysosomal disorder, originating from deficient activity of the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase (GCase. Normally, GCase hydrolyzes glucocerebroside (GC to glucose and ceramide; however, impaired activity of this enzyme leads to the accumulation of GC in macrophages, termed “Gaucher cells.” Gaucher disease is associated with hepatosplenomegaly, cytopenias, skeletal complications and in some forms involves the central nervous system. Coagulation abnormalities are common among GD patients due to impaired production and chronic consumption of coagulation factors. Bleeding phenomena are variable (as are other symptoms of GD and include mucosal and surgical hemorrhages. Four main etiological factors account for the hemostatic defect in GD: thrombocytopenia, abnormal platelet function, reduced production of coagulation factors, and activation of fibrinolysis. Thrombocytopenia relates not only to hypersplenism and decreased megakaryopoiesis by the infiltrated bone marrow but also to immune thrombocytopenia. Autoimmunity, especially the induction of platelet antibody production, might cause persistent thrombocytopenia. Enzyme replacement therapy reverses only part of the impaired coagulation system in Gaucher disease. Other therapeutic and supportive measures should be considered to prevent and/or treat bleeding in GD. Gaucher patients should be evaluated routinely for coagulation abnormalities especially prior to surgery and dental and obstetric procedures.