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Sample records for hereditary hearing impairment

  1. Phenotype and genotype analysis of a Chinese family with prelingual X-linked hereditary hearing impairment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Bing; CHENG Jing; YANG Shu-zhi; CAO Ju-yang; SHEN Wei-dong; JI Fei; KANG Dong-yang; ZHANG Xin; DAI Pu; YUAN Hui-jun

    2009-01-01

    Background X-linked hearing impairment is clinically and genetically a heterogeneous disease.Although many disorders manifest with hearing loss,a limited number of sex-linked loci and only one gene (POU3F4) have been shown to be implicated in X-linked non-syndromic hearing impairment.In the present study,we have performed a clinical and genetic analysis of a Chinese family with X-linked non-syndromic hearing loss,with emphasis on audiological findings and genomic mapping.Methods The clinical features of Family JX01 were evaluated by physical and audiometric examination in eighteen family members.Mutation screening of POU3F4 was identified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and sequencing.Molecular evaluation consisted of X-chromosome wide genotyping by microsatellite makers (STR),followed by analyzing using MLINK computer program.Results Five affected males demonstrated bilateral,symmetrical sensorineural and profound hearing loss.The hearing impairment started prelingual.The female carriers did not have any complain of hearing loss,however,two of them were tested with milder loss with high frequency.No causative mutations in POU3F4 gene were detected by DNA sequencing.Linkage analysis indicated that the responsible gene was linked to locus DXS1227 (maximum lod score=2.04 at θ=0).Conclusions The affected males in Family JX01 have profound prelingual sensorineural hearing impairment,In addition,two female carriers showed mild to moderate hearing losses.However,none of females complained of any hearing loss.Analysis of hereditary deafness in this family mapped most compatibly to the Xq27.2.

  2. Hereditary Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, LenhAnh P.; Grundfast, Kenneth M.

    1997-01-01

    This article discusses inheritance patterns in hearing loss, epidemiology, clues to genetic causes, locating genes that cause hereditary disorders, genes related to hearing loss disorders in individuals with Usher syndrome, Waardenburg syndrome, Treacher-Collins syndrome, Branchio-oto-renal and Pendred syndromes, and the significance of finding…

  3. DFNA5 and Hereditary Hearing Impairment%DFNA5与遗传性耳聋

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金占国

    2011-01-01

    @@ 遗传性耳聋是危害人类健康的重大疾病之一,根据是否合并其他系统器官疾病,分为综合征性耳聋和非综合征性耳聋,而非综合征性耳聋具有很高的遗传异质性.迄今为止,常染色体显性遗传非综合征性耳聋(DFNA)已成功定位了64个位点,24个基因(Hereditary Hearing Loss Homepage:http://webhost.ua.ac.be/hhh/).第五个常染色体显性遗传非综合征性耳聋基因DFNA 5(OMIM 600994)于1995年在一个高频进展性听力下降的荷兰家系中首先定位在7p15[1],1998年确认了DFNA5的致聋基因[2].本文就已报道DFNA5的基因突变特点、家系的临床特征及目前对该基因功能的研究进展等方面进行综述.

  4. Hearing Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavender, Anna; Ladner, Richard E.

    For many people with hearing impairments, the degree of hearing loss is only a small aspect of their disability and does not necessarily determine the types of accessibility solutions or accommodations that may be required. For some people, the ability to adjust the audio volume may be sufficient. For others, translation to a signed language may be more appropriate. For still others, access to text alternatives may be the best solution. Because of these differences, it is important for researchers in Web accessibility to understand that people with hearing impairments may have very different cultural-linguistic traditions and personal backgrounds.

  5. Identification of Two Disease-causing Genes TJP2 and GJB2 in a Chinese Family with Unconditional Autosomal Dominant Nonsyndromic Hereditary Hearing Impairment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Yang Wang; Ya-Li Zhao; Qiong Liu; Hu Yuan; Yun Gao; Lan Lan; Lan Yu

    2015-01-01

    Background: There are more than 300 genetic loci that have been found to be related to hereditary hearing impairment (HHI), including 92 causative genes for nonsyndromic hearing loss, among which 34 genes are related to autosomal dominant nonsyndromic HHI (ADNSHHI).Traditional linkage analysis and candidate gene sequencing are not effective at detecting the ADNSHHI, especially for the unconditional families that may have more than one pathogenic cause.This study identified two disease-causing genes TJP2 and GJB2 in a Chinese family with unconditional ADNSHHI.Methods: To decipher the genetic code of a Chinese family (family 686) with ADNSHHI, different gene screening techniques have been performed, including linkage analysis, candidate genes screening, high-throughput sequencing and Sanger sequencing.These techniques were done on samples obtained from this family over a period of 10 years.Results: We identified a pathogenic missense mutation, c.2081G>A (p.G694E), in TJP2, a gene that plays a crucial role in apoptosis and age-related hearing loss (ARHL).The mutation was co-segregated in this pedigree in all, but not in the two patients who presented with different phenotypes from the other affected family members.In one of the two patients, we confirmed that the compound heterozygosity for p.Y136* and p.G45E in the GJB2 gene may account for the phenotype shown in this patient.Conclusions: We identified the co-occurrence of two genetic causes in family 686.The possible disease-causing missense mutation of TJP2 in family 686 presents an opportunity for further investigation into ARHL.It is necessary to combine various genes screening methods, especially for some unconventional cases.

  6. Identification of Two Disease-causing Genes TJP2 and GJB2 in a Chinese Family with Unconditional Autosomal Dominant Nonsyndromic Hereditary Hearing Impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Yang Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are more than 300 genetic loci that have been found to be related to hereditary hearing impairment (HHI, including 92 causative genes for nonsyndromic hearing loss, among which 34 genes are related to autosomal dominant nonsyndromic HHI (ADNSHHI. Traditional linkage analysis and candidate gene sequencing are not effective at detecting the ADNSHHI, especially for the unconditional families that may have more than one pathogenic cause. This study identified two disease-causing genes TJP2 and GJB2 in a Chinese family with unconditional ADNSHHI. Methods: To decipher the genetic code of a Chinese family (family 686 with ADNSHHI, different gene screening techniques have been performed, including linkage analysis, candidate genes screening, high-throughput sequencing and Sanger sequencing. These techniques were done on samples obtained from this family over a period of 10 years. Results: We identified a pathogenic missense mutation, c. 2081G>A (p.G694E, in TJP2, a gene that plays a crucial role in apoptosis and age-related hearing loss (ARHL. The mutation was co-segregated in this pedigree in all, but not in the two patients who presented with different phenotypes from the other affected family members. In one of the two patients, we confirmed that the compound heterozygosity for p.Y136FNx01 and p.G45E in the GJB2 gene may account for the phenotype shown in this patient. Conclusions: We identified the co-occurrence of two genetic causes in family 686. The possible disease-causing missense mutation of TJP2 in family 686 presents an opportunity for further investigation into ARHL. It is necessary to combine various genes screening methods, especially for some unconventional cases.

  7. Heterogeneity of Hereditary Hearing Loss in Iran: a Comprehensive Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beheshtian, Maryam; Babanejad, Mojgan; Azaiez, Hela; Bazazzadegan, Niloofar; Kolbe, Diana; Sloan-Heggen, Christina; Arzhangi, Sanaz; Booth, Kevin; Mohseni, Marzieh; Frees, Kathy; Azizi, Mohammad Hossein; Daneshi, Ahmad; Farhadi, Mohammad; Kahrizi, Kimia; Smith, Richard Jh; Najmabadi, Hossein

    2016-10-01

    A significant contribution to the causes of hereditary hearing impairment comes from genetic factors. More than 120 genes and 160 loci have been identified to be involved in hearing impairment. Given that consanguine populations are more vulnerable to most inherited diseases, such as hereditary hearing loss (HHL), the genetic picture of HHL among the Iranian population, which consists of at least eight ethnic subgroups with a high rate of intermarriage, is expected to be highly heterogeneous. Using an electronic literature review through various databases such as PubMed, MEDLINE, and Scopus, we review the current picture of HHL in Iran. In this review, we present more than 39 deafness genes reported to cause non-syndromic HHL in Iran, of which the most prevalent causative genes include GJB2, SLC26A4, MYO15A, and MYO7A. In addition, we highlight some of the more common genetic causes of syndromic HHL in Iran. These results are of importance for further investigation and elucidation of the molecular basis of HHL in Iran and also for developing a national diagnostic tool tailored to the Iranian context enabling early and efficient diagnosis of hereditary hearing impairment.

  8. Is Hearing Impairment Associated with Rheumatoid Arthritis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emamifar, Amir; Bjoerndal, Kristine; Jensen Hansen, Inger Marie

    2016-01-01

    and ComDisDome to cover all relative reports. The following keywords were used: hearing loss, hearing difficulties, hearing disorders, hearing impairment, sensorineural hearing loss, conductive hearing loss, mixed hearing loss, autoimmune hearing loss, drug ototoxicity, drug-induced hearing loss, hearing...

  9. Hereditary hearing loss: from human mutation to mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Danielle R; Avraham, Karen B

    2011-11-01

    The genetic heterogeneity of hereditary hearing loss is thus far represented by hundreds of genes encoding a large variety of proteins. Mutations in these genes have been discovered for patients with different modes of inheritance and types of hearing loss, ranging from syndromic to non-syndromic and mild to profound. In many cases, the mechanisms whereby the mutations lead to hearing loss have been partly elucidated using cell culture systems and mouse and other animal models. The discovery of the genes has completely changed the practice of genetic counseling in this area, providing potential diagnosis in many cases that can be coupled with clinical phenotypes and offer predictive information for families. In this review we provide three examples of gene discovery in families with hereditary hearing loss, all associated with elucidation of some of the mechanisms leading to hair cell degeneration and pathology of deafness.

  10. Pyrosequencing SNP and Allele Frequency Quantification in Genetic Screening for Hereditary Hearing Impairment Patients%焦磷酸测序技术在遗传性聋基因筛查中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈垲钿; 宗凌; 杜进涛; 周蔚; 姜鸿彦

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical applicability and feasibility of pyrosequencing genetic screen ing method with both individual and DNA pools in hereditary hearing impairment. Methods One hundred non - syndromic hereditary hearing loss patients' DNA samples,confirmed by Sanger sequencing, were selected to screen for the frequent mutant allele SLC26A4 IVS7-2A>G and the rare mutant allele GJB3 538C>T,547G>A mutation individually and with DNA pools estimation by Pyrosequencing. The results were analyzed by SPSS for correlation and regression. Furthermore, a standard curve for SLC26A4 IVS7 -2A>G was built according to the results. Results Pyrosequencing SNP method was in good consistency with Sanger sequencing results (N=100). Relative flu orescence ratios for mutant rates x in DNA individual samples for SLC26A4 IVS7 -2A allele were correlated with true mutant rates y (r=0. 994,PT, 547G >A, Pyrosequencing could predict true mutant rate for individual samples by DNA pools estimation (95% CI was - 3. 07%~-1. 35% between average true mutant rates and estimation rates). Conclusion Pyrosequencing system has good clinical applicability and feasibility in genetic screen for both individual and pools samples of hereditary hearing impairment patients.%目的 研究焦磷酸测序(Pyrosequencing)单样本及多样本混合测序方法在遗传性聋基因筛查中的可行性及适用性.方法 利用焦磷酸测序遗传分析检测系统,选择遗传性聋常见突变位点SLC26A4 IVS7-2A>G及少见的突变位点GJB3 538C>T、547G>A,分别对100例经过Sanger测序法验证的遗传性聋病例DNA样本进行单个样本和多样本混合的位点突变频率定量,分析两种方法的相关性,并进一步制定针对耳聋常见突变位点的焦磷酸测序技术筛查的标准曲线.结果 焦磷酸测序技术SNP与Sanger测序法结果一致(N=100),准确率为100%.焦磷酸测序技术对SLC26A4 IVS7-2A位点突变位点频率相对荧光比值与实际基因

  11. Sensorineural hearing impairment in patients with Pmp22 duplication, deletion, and frameshift mutations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, W.I.M.; Huygen, P.L.M.; Gabreëls-Festen, A.A.W.M.; Engelhart, M.J.; Mierlo, P.J. van; Engelen, B.G.M. van

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To characterize and distinguish the types of sensorineural hearing impairment (SNHI) that occur in hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy Type 1a (HMSN-1a) and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP), which are caused by deletion or frameshift mutation. STUDY DESI

  12. On Being Hearing Impaired in the Workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hites, Jeanne

    1994-01-01

    Describes the author's experience with the loss of hearing in early adulthood. The use of hearing aids, the situations in which hearing is easier or more difficult, and discrimination faced by people with hearing disabilities are discussed. A vision of a future that enables hearing-impaired persons to participate is described. (Contains three…

  13. Is Hearing Impairment Associated with Rheumatoid Arthritis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emamifar, Amir; Bjoerndal, Kristine; Jensen Hansen, Inger Marie

    2016-01-01

    and ComDisDome to cover all relative reports. The following keywords were used: hearing loss, hearing difficulties, hearing disorders, hearing impairment, sensorineural hearing loss, conductive hearing loss, mixed hearing loss, autoimmune hearing loss, drug ototoxicity, drug-induced hearing loss, hearing......BACKGROUND: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic, inflammatory disease that affects 1% of the population. The auditory system may be involved during the course of disease; however the association of RA and hearing impairment has not been clearly defined. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this review...... is to evaluate published clinical reports related to hearing impairment in patients with RA. Furthermore, we discuss possible pathologies and associated factors as well as new treatment modalities. METHOD: A thorough literature search was performed using available databases including Pubmed, Embase, Cochrane...

  14. Hearing impairment: technological advances and insights

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chang, A; O'Leary, S

    2008-01-01

    ... treatment or rehabilitation, resulting in functional impairment and social isolation. OBJECTIVE: This article outlines the available options and recent advances in the treatment of hearing impairment...

  15. Hearing impairment in Estonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teek, R; Kruustük, K; Zordania, R

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: The present study was initiated to establish the etiological causes of early onset hearing loss (HL) among Estonian children between 2000-2009. Methods: The study group consisted of 233 probands who were first tested with an arrayed primer extension assay, which covers 199...... (2.2%) and was considered diagnostic. In 4 probands a heterozygous IVS2-2A>G change in the SLC26A5 gene was found. We did not find any instances of homozygosity for this splice variant in the probands. CMA identified in 4 probands chromosomal regions with the loss of one allele. In 2 of them we were...

  16. Molecular and hereditary mechanisms of sensorineural hearing loss with focus on selected endocrinopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masindova, I; Varga, L; Stanik, J; Valentinova, L; Profant, M; Klimes, I; Gasperikova, D

    2012-07-01

    Hearing loss is one of the most widespread sensory disorders. The incidence of deafness in general population is 1:1000 newborns. About one half of the cases of the congenital sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) is inherited. Recessive mutations in the gap junction beta 2 (GJB2) gene are the most common genetic causes of the nonsyndromic SNHL. The GJB2 encodes a protein connexin 26 which forms a subunit of gap junction essential for the correct function of the inner ear. The syndromic SNHL is associated with a wide range of other symptoms, which encompass also dysfunctions of endocrine organs. The Pendred syndrome associated with the hearing impairment is characterized by a prelingual, bilateral sever to profound SNHL, goiter, and iodine organification defect. It is an autosomal recessive disorder, which develops due to mutations in pendrin, an anion channel encoded by SLC26A4 gene. Another important type of syndromic hearing loss is the Maternally Inherited Diabetes and Deafness syndrome, which is caused by several mitochondrial DNA mutations. These mutations are clinically manifested by a hearing impairment with development of the diabetes in the adult age. Hearing impairment occurs during puberty when sensation of high frequency tones is affected following with further progress to profound bilateral sensorineural hearing impairment in the whole frequency range. This review deals with the molecular mechanisms of common genetic causes of the hereditary SNHL along with the selected endocrinopathies emphasizing that the DNA analyses along with the functional studies significantly contribute to the early SNHL diagnosis followed by personalized therapy and genetic counseling.

  17. Volleyball training of people with hearing impairments

    OpenAIRE

    Poluhová, Adéla

    2015-01-01

    Title: Volleyball training of people with hearing impairments. This thesis describes and characterizes volleyball training of people with hearing impairments. Options for active sports life of people with hearing impairments in the Czech Republic are under the umbrella of Association of the Deaf athletes. Sensory disability does not limit players in physicalperformance,howeverrenders a number of specific needs that must be respected during a training unit. The aim of this thesis is to describ...

  18. The effect of hearing impairment on mathematical skill of hearing-impaired elementary-school students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azam Sharifi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Hearing impairment can effect many educational abilities and will lead in a dealy in his growth. The objective of this research was to study the effect of hearing impairment on mathematical skill of hearing-impaired students of 4th grade of elementary in contrast with normal-hearing students.Methods: The project was cross-sectional and the tool used was the international standard booklet of mathematical questions. There has been 35 hearing-impaired students with range of moderately sever-profound hearing loss selected from the 4th grade of elementary from exceptional schools in Ray, Pakdasht and Varamina, Iran, and 35 normal-hearing students were randomly selected from ordinary schools next to exceptional schools.Results: By analyzing the outcomes, the normal-hearing students showed a better result in knowing, application, argument in aspects of cognitive in contrast with hearing-impaired students and there has been a meaningful difference (p<0.05. There was not a meaningful difference in mathematical skill between Ray, Pakdasht and Varamina, Iran in hearing-impaired and normal-hearing groups.Conclusion: The hearing impairment effects learing of mathematical skill. It is important for hearing-impaired students to presentation various methods in instruction in progress deductive thought and cognitive structure and also development in concepts understand in mathematical domain in rehabilitation services.

  19. Difficulties in Parenting Hearing-Impaired Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Gita Movallali

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Despite the abundance of literature about deaf children, few works specifically address the concept and practice of difficulties in parenting hearing-impaired children. The first interactions of the child are with his parents, and parents have the most important role in child improvements during early intervention programs. The main purpose of this paper was to investigate different aspects of parenting hearing-impaired children.Methods: In this article, we reviewed all aspects of parenting hearing-impaired children in papers from 1984-2009 in Medline, Scopus and Proquest and relative textbooks. The semi-professional role of parents of hearing-impaired children make them feel under excessive stress and this usually affects their other roles as fathers and mothers. Many factors including child age, type of hearing loss and parents’ individual characteristics may influence the impact of child’s hearing loss on parents.Conclusion: Parenting a hearing-impaired child is both similar and different to parenting any other child. Where there are differences, there are usually challenges too. Taking support and advice from professionals and other parents are necessary and invaluable for parents of hearing-impaired children.

  20. Characteristics of hearing-impairment among patients in Ghana

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and some causes of hearing loss of patients who report for management at. Komfo Anokye Teaching .... The proportion of hearing-impaired people in different age and sex ..... impairment and reported hearing disability among Adults in Great ...

  1. Hearing dummies: individualized computer models of hearing impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Manasa R; Lecluyse, Wendy; Tan, Christine M; Jürgens, Tim; Meddis, Ray

    2014-10-01

    Objective: Our aim was to explore the usage of individualized computer models to simulate hearing loss based on detailed psychophysical assessment and to offer hypothetical diagnoses of the underlying pathology. Individualized computer models of normal and impaired hearing were constructed and evaluated using the psychophysical data obtained from human listeners. Computer models of impaired hearing were generated to reflect the hypothesized underlying pathology (e.g. dead regions, outer hair cell dysfunction, or reductions in endocochlear potential). These models were evaluated in terms of their ability to replicate the original patient data. Auditory profiles were measured for two normal and five hearing-impaired listeners using a battery of three psychophysical tests (absolute thresholds, frequency selectivity, and compression). The individualized computer models were found to match the data. Useful fits to the impaired profiles could be obtained by changing only a single parameter in the model of normal hearing. Sometimes, however, it was necessary to include an additional dead region. The creation of individualized computer models of hearing loss can be used to simulate auditory profiles of impaired listeners and suggest hypotheses concerning the underlying peripheral pathology.

  2. Psychopathology in hearing-impaired children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theunissen, Stephanie Carla Petra Maria

    2013-01-01

    Children with hearing loss are at risk for developing psychopathology, which has detrimental consequences for academic and psychosocial functioning. Therefore, the aims of this thesis were to objectify levels of psychopathology in hearing-impaired children, and to investigate the influence of

  3. Surdez infantil Childhood hearing impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Oliveira

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available A Surdez Infantil é considerada actualmente um verdadeiro problema de Saúde Pública devido não só à sua elevada prevalência, mas sobretudo às múltiplas conseqüências que acarreta sob os mais variados prismas. Trata-se de um tema em constante evolução, sendo necessárias freqüentes actualizações por forma a acompanhar os avanços da técnica e do conhecimento. Este trabalho visa abordar de uma forma global mas sucinta o problema Surdez Infantil, dando particular ênfase aos Modelos de Rastreio e aos Métodos utilizados com esse fim.Childhood Hearing Impairment is nowadays considered as a Health Care matter due to its high prevalence and to its multiple consequences. As a developing subject, frequent updates are justified to keep up with the evolution of techniques and knowledge. This paper aims to discuss the matter from a global point of view, paying particular attention to the Screening Models and Instruments available.

  4. OPHTHALMOLOGIC ABNORMALITIES IN CHILDREN WITH IMPAIRED HEARING

    OpenAIRE

    Inderjit; Jagdeepak; Prempal; Anup Narayanrao

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To determine the nature of ophthalmologic abnormalities in severe and profound grades of hearing impaired children and to treat visual impairment if any at the earliest . MATERIAL AND METHODS: Study was conducted on100 children in the age group of 5 - 14 years with severe and profound hearing loss visiting outpatient department of Ram Lal Eye and ENT hospital Govt. Medical College Amritsar and subjected to detailed ophthalmological examination. R...

  5. A novel locus for autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing impairment, DFNB63, maps to chromosome 11q13.2-q13.4.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalay, E.; Caylan, R.; Kiroglu, A.F.; Yasar, T.; Collin, R.W.J.; Heister, J.G.A.M.; Oostrik, J.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Brunner, H.G.; Karaguzel, A.; Kremer, H.

    2007-01-01

    Hereditary hearing impairment is a genetically heterogeneous disorder. To date, 49 autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing impairment (ARNSHI) loci have been described, and there are more than 16 additional loci announced. In 25 of the known loci, causative genes have been identified. A genome scan

  6. Noise-induced hearing impairment and handicap

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    A permanent, noise-induced hearing loss has doubly harmful effect on speech communications. First, the elevation in the threshold of hearing means that many speech sounds are too weak to be heard, and second, very intense speech sounds may appear to be distorted. The whole question of the impact of noise-induced hearing loss upon the impairments and handicaps experienced by people with such hearing losses was somewhat controversial partly because of the economic aspects of related practical noise control and workmen's compensation.

  7. Image and Video for Hearing Impaired People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aran Oya

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a global overview of image- and video-processing-based methods to help the communication of hearing impaired people. Two directions of communication have to be considered: from a hearing person to a hearing impaired person and vice versa. In this paper, firstly, we describe sign language (SL and the cued speech (CS language which are two different languages used by the deaf community. Secondly, we present existing tools which employ SL and CS video processing and recognition for the automatic communication between deaf people and hearing people. Thirdly, we present the existing tools for reverse communication, from hearing people to deaf people that involve SL and CS video synthesis.

  8. Image and Video for Hearing Impaired People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Burger

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available We present a global overview of image- and video-processing-based methods to help the communication of hearing impaired people. Two directions of communication have to be considered: from a hearing person to a hearing impaired person and vice versa. In this paper, firstly, we describe sign language (SL and the cued speech (CS language which are two different languages used by the deaf community. Secondly, we present existing tools which employ SL and CS video processing and recognition for the automatic communication between deaf people and hearing people. Thirdly, we present the existing tools for reverse communication, from hearing people to deaf people that involve SL and CS video synthesis.

  9. Targeted Next-Generation Sequencing Successfully Detects Causative Genes in Chinese Patients with Hereditary Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Siqi; Dong, Cheng; Wang, Qi; Zhong, Zhen; Qi, Yu; Ke, Xiaomei; Liu, Yuhe

    2016-11-01

    We attempted to identify the genetic epidemiology of hereditary hearing loss among the Chinese Han population using next-generation sequencing (NGS). The entire length of the genes GJB2, SLC26A4, and GJB3, as well as exons of 57 additional candidate genes were sequenced from 116 individuals suffering from hearing loss. Thirty potentially causative mutations from these 60 genes were identified as the likely etiologies of hearing loss in 67 of the cases. In our study, SLC26A4 and GJB2 were the most frequently affected genes among the Chinese Han population with hearing loss. Collectively, they account for 52.8% of the cases, followed by MTRNR1, PCDH15, and TECTA. These data also illustrate that NGS can be used to identify rare alleles responsible for hereditary hearing loss: 22 of the 30 (73.3%) genes identified with mutations are rarely mutated in hereditary hearing loss and only account for 21.5% (42/195) of the total mutation frequency, explaining no more than 2% for each gene. These rarely mutated genes would be missed by conventional diagnostic sequencing approaches. NGS can be used effectively to identify both the common and rare genes causing hereditary hearing loss.

  10. Childhood Hearing Impairment: How do Parents Feel about it?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DATONYE ALASIA

    affected children have developmental delay in ... parents of children with hearing impairment. Material and Method: This ... countries, the cost of special education and lost employment .... The poor suffer more from hearing impairment because ...

  11. Hearing impairment associated with oral terbinafine use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholl, Joep; Van Grootheest, Kees; Van Puijenbroek, Eugene

    2012-01-01

    Background: The Netherlands Pharmacovigilance Centre Lareb received six reports of hearing impairment in association with oral terbinafine use. This study describes these cases and provides support for this association from the Lareb database of spontaneous ADR reporting and from Vigibase, the adver

  12. New Program Builds Bridges for Hearing Impaired.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jeannie

    1998-01-01

    Describes a new approach to teaching English-as-a-Second-Language to New Mexico elementary school students who have hearing impairments and whose dominant language is American Sign Language (ASL). These students must first acquire ASL as a bridge to learning English. Then, using the bilingual approach, they are able to focus on English literacy.…

  13. New Program Builds Bridges for Hearing Impaired.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jeannie

    1998-01-01

    Describes a new approach to teaching English-as-a-Second-Language to New Mexico elementary school students who have hearing impairments and whose dominant language is American Sign Language (ASL). These students must first acquire ASL as a bridge to learning English. Then, using the bilingual approach, they are able to focus on English literacy.…

  14. The effect of hearing impairment on educational achievement of hearing-impaired students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Asghar Kakojoibari

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Hearing is one of the most vital sensational abilities. Learning, which is the most basic ability for human compatibility to mental development, is affected by hearing ability. The main goal of this article was to review the effect of hearing impairment on educational achievement of hearing-impaired students, especially in the field of basic learning skills (reading, writing, and mathematics.Methods: In this article, the researches on the effect of hearing impairment on educational achievement were reviewed. There were 37 articles extracted from different databases such as Iran Medex, Scopus, PubMed, Magiran, Iran Journal, Google Scholar, and 12 credible books published from 1944 to 2013. In order to search in these databases, educational achievement and other related keywords were used.Conclusion: Hearing impairment affects listening skills, which is a mental process and is known as the first lingual skill. Subsequently, other lingual skills and learning abilities like educational achievement are affected as well. In order to decrease the educational gap in hearing-impaired students, it is very important to interfere in early stages and use of presentation methods to improve lingual skills in educational system.

  15. Study of families of nonsyndromic hearing impairment segregating with mutations in Cx26 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramchander P

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing impairment (ARNSHI is the most common form with profound hereditary hearing impairment linked to DFNB1 locus (connexin26 gene at 13q12. Mutations in connexin26 (Cx26 gene are known to be frequently associated with ARNSHI. Here, we report results on 13 families with NSHI screened for entire coding region of Cx26 using ARMS-PCR, restriction digestion analysis, SSCP and sequencing. Cx26 mutations were found in seven of the 13 families with inheritance of W24X (G to A at 71bp in six and R127H (G to A at 380bp in one of them. The observations imply that the G to A transition at position 71 in exon2 of Cx26 gene could play a major role in the phenotypic expression of recessive hearing impairment while R127H could be an associated polymorphism in Indian population.

  16. OPHTHALMOLOGIC ABNORMALITIES IN CHILDREN WITH IMPAIRED HEARING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inderjit

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To determine the nature of ophthalmologic abnormalities in severe and profound grades of hearing impaired children and to treat visual impairment if any at the earliest . MATERIAL AND METHODS: Study was conducted on100 children in the age group of 5 - 14 years with severe and profound hearing loss visiting outpatient department of Ram Lal Eye and ENT hospital Govt. Medical College Amritsar and subjected to detailed ophthalmological examination. RESULTS: 100 children in the age group 5 - 14 years with hearing impairment were enrolled for t he study , 68 had profound and 32 had severe hearing loss . Visual disorders were found to be as high as 71%. Highest percentage was seen in children aged 7 years. Majority of them (50% had refractive error. Out of these 50 children , 28(56% had myopia , 10 (20% hypermetropia and 12(24% had astigmatism . The other ophthalmic abnormalities in our study were conjunctivitis 14(19.71% , fundus abnormalities and squint 11(15.49% , blepharitis 5 (7.04% , vitamin A deficiency 6 (8.04% , amblyopia 8 (11.26% , pupil disorder 3 (4.22% , cataract 3 (4.22% and heterochromia iridis 7 (9.85%. CONCLUSION : The high prevalence of ophthalmic abnormalities in deaf children mandate screening them for possible ophthalmic abnormalities. Early diagnosis and correction of visual d isturbances would go a long way in social and professional performance of these children.

  17. Hearing impairment and ear pathology in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, P; Bridges, A; Guragain, R; Friedman, D; Prasad, R; Weir, N

    1993-05-01

    A stratified random cluster sample of 15,845 subjects was performed in two regions of Nepal to determine the prevalence and main causes of hearing impairment (the most common disability) and the prevalence of ear disease. Subjects reporting current ear pain, or ear discharge, or hearing impairment on direct questioning by a Nepali health worker (primary screening failed), had otoscopy and audiometry (using the Liverpool Field Audiometer) performed, and a questionnaire administered relating to past history. In every fifth house subjects who passed the primary screening (1,716 subjects) were examined to assess the false negative rate of screening. An estimated 16.6 per cent of the study population have hearing impairment (either ear worse than 30 dB hearing threshold level (HTL) 1.0-4.0 kHz, or 50 dB HTL 0.5 kHz), and 7.4 per cent ear drum pathology, equivalent to respectively 2.71 and 1.48 million people extrapolated to the whole of Nepal. Most hearing impairment in the school age group (55.2 per cent) is associated with otitis media or its sequelae. Probably at least 14 per cent of sensorineural deafness is preventable (7 per cent infectious disease, 3.9 per cent trauma, 0.8 per cent noise exposure, 1 per cent cretinism, and 1 per cent abnormal pregnancy or labour). Most individuals reporting current ear pathology (61 per cent) had never attended a health post, and of those receiving ear drop treatment, 84 per cent still had serious pathology. Of subjects who reported ear drop treatment at any time, 31 per cent still had serious pathology. The use of traditional remedies was prevalent.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Linking hearing impairment, employment and education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garramiola-Bilbao, I; Rodríguez-Álvarez, A

    2016-12-01

    To analyse the impact that hearing impairment and other relevant variables have on the education and employment situation of those affected by it in the Principality of Asturias, Spain. To achieve this objective, two discrete choice models (probit) are presented. The first one associates, among other variables, hearing impairment with the individual's employment status and in the second model, an ordered multinomial probit model is used to analyse, among other variables, how the impairment affects the individual's level of studies. Although the levels of statistical significance are low, the model's estimates appear to indicate that hearing impairment in Spain increases the probability of being unemployed by 18.4% (P = 0.09). Additionally, the people suffering from such a disability are, compared with the rest of the population, 10.2% (P = 0.05) more likely to have only completed elementary studies without pursuing any further education. If an individual is able to reach a level of secondary or higher education thus enabling a future incorporation to the work place, a benefit is obviously generated for both the individual as well as society (which has additionally incurred an investment in human capital). In this regard, encouraging the education of hearing-impaired students would profit both the individual (who receives an early integration as a child), which may contribute positively to family and social factors, as well as society who have incurred the investment. Therefore, our result could indicate that programmes created to support individuals with this type of disability represent an increase of welfare both individually and socially. Copyright © 2016 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Career planning for hearing impaired employees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashdown, B.G.; Patterson, J.L.

    1983-06-01

    In recognition of the special needs of hearing-impaired employees, Union Carbide Nuclear Division staff members restructured and rewrote the existing Career Planning Program to accommodate the barriers experienced by deaf people. Consideration for reworking the training program included awareness that hearing-impaired people: learn mostly through their eyes; use sign language, which is grammatically and structurally different than the English language; have a limited understanding of the English language; live in an isolated world influenced mostly by the deaf community; and have sometimes been stigmatized because of their handicap, resulting in the belief by their parents and others in the hearing world that they lack in intelligence and ability. Twelve deaf employees participated in the program, including four from the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant, six from the Oak Ridge National Laboraory, and two from the Department of Energy. All twelve employees completed the 6 1/2 days of sessions spanning over six weeks, evaluating the program overall as very good. Although most did not feel a need for career change, they learned strategies for enhancing and developing their current positions. They also discovered they were not alone in many feelings of isolation or lack of self-confidence, and that many of their problems are shared by hearing people.

  20. Hearing screenings on children under three years at risk of hearing impairment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelino Lizano Rabelo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the results of newborn hearing screenings on infants under three years at risk of hearing impairment at Paediatric Hospital of Sancti Spíritus¸on from 2008 to 2010. All children at risk of hearing impairment were tested by an auditory brainstem response (ABR for the positive diagnosis of hearing impairment. Results: Over the period, 398 infants were screened, among whom 36 (8,98% were diagnosed as deaf or hard of hearing. twenty seven children (6,8% had a sensorineural hearing impairment, The most important risk factors for sensorineural hearing loss were: severe birth asphyxia; mechanic ventilation, and antibiotics.Conclusion: Our hearing screening on infants at risk allowed 36 children diagnosed as hearing impairment, all of then received early management.

  1. Cellular and deafness mechanisms underlying connexin mutation induced hearing loss – A common hereditary deafness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey C Wingard

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Hearing loss due to mutations in the connexin gene family which encodes gap junctional proteins is a common form of hereditary deafness. In particular, connexin 26 (Cx26, GJB2 mutations are responsible for ~50% of nonsyndromic hearing loss, which is the highest incidence of genetic disease. In the clinic, Cx26 mutations cause various auditory phenotypes ranging from profound congenital deafness at birth to mild, progressive hearing loss in late childhood. Recent experiments demonstrate that congenital deafness mainly results from cochlear developmental disorders rather than hair cell degeneration and endocochlear potential (EP reduction, while late-onset hearing loss results from reduction of active cochlear amplification, even though cochlear hair cells have no connexin expression. Moreover, new experiments further demonstrate that the hypothesized K+-recycling disruption is not a principal deafness mechanism for connexin deficiency induced hearing loss. Additionally, there is no clear relationship between specific changes in connexin (channel functions and the phenotypes of mutation-induced hearing loss. Cx30, Cx29, Cx31, and Cx43 mutations can also cause hearing loss with distinct pathological changes in the cochlea. These new studies provide invaluable information about deafness mechanisms underlying connexin mutation induced hearing loss and also provide important information for developing new protective and therapeutic strategies for this common deafness. However, the detailed cellular mechanisms underlying these pathological changes and pathogeneses of specific-mutation induced hearing loss remain unclear. Finally, little information is available for humans. Further studies to address these deficiencies are urgently required.

  2. Experiences of Girls with Hearing Impairment in Accessing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    This study described experiences of 167 girls with hearing impairment in accessing reproductive ... social barriers in their communities1. Finding ..... visual aids and taking extra ir patients. ... independent questioning skill among the hearing.

  3. Prevalence and Social Risk Factors for Hearing Impairment in Chinese Children—A National Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunfeng Yun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hearing impairment may affect children’s communication skills, social development, and educational achievement. Little is known about the prevalence of hearing impairment among Chinese children. Data were taken from the 2006 second China National Survey on Disability (CNSD. Hearing impairment was defined as moderate (41–60 dB HL, severe (61–80 dB HL, profound (81–90 dB HL, or complete (>91 dB HL. Logistic regression was used to estimate the odds ratio (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI. A weighted number of 567,915 hearing impairment children were identified, yielding a prevalence of 17.49 per 10,000 people (95% CI: 16.90–18.08, with prevention or treatment options possible for 64.6% of hearing impairment children. The main causes of hearing impairment were hereditary, tympanitis, and drug intoxication. Illiteracy in one or both parents (mother: OR = 1.388, 95% CI: 1.125–1.714, p < 0.0001; father: OR = 1.537, 95% CI: 1.152–2.049, p < 0.0001 relative to no school or primary school, annual family income lower than national average (OR = 1.323, 95% CI: 1.044–1.675, p = 0.0203, relative to higher than national average, household size larger than three people (OR = 1.432, 95% CI: 1.164–1.762, p = 0.0007, relative to smaller than three people and single-mother family (OR = 2.056, 95% CI: 1.390–3.042, p = 0.0176, relative to intact family were the independence risk factors for hearing impairment among Chinese children. Lower annual family income, male children, larger household size, single-mother family, and lower levels of maternal and paternal education were independent risk factors for hearing impairment for Chinese children. Further studies on hearing impairment prevention and the relationship between parental social factors and the risk of hearing impairment are needed.

  4. Performance Visualization for Hearing-Impaired Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rumi Hiraga

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available We have been teaching computer music to hearing impaired students of Tsukuba College of Technology for six years. Although students have hearing difficulties, almost all of them show an interest in music. Thus, this has been a challenging class to turn their weakness into enjoyment. We thought that performance visualization is a good method for them to keep their interest in music and try cooperative performances with others. In this paper, we describe our computer music class and the result of our preliminary experiment on the effectiveness of visual assistance. Though it was not a complete experiment with a sufficient number of subjects, the result showed that the show-ahead and selected-note-only types of performance visualization were necessary according to the purpose of the visual aid.

  5. Modeling Speech Intelligibility in Hearing Impaired Listeners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheidiger, Christoph; Jørgensen, Søren; Dau, Torsten

    2014-01-01

    Models of speech intelligibility (SI) have a long history, starting with the articulation index (AI, [17]), followed by the SI index (SI I, [18]) and the speech transmission index (STI, [7]), to only name a few. However, these models fail to accurately predict SI with nonlinearly processed noisy...... speech, e.g. phase jitter or spectral subtraction. Recent studies predict SI for normal-hearing (NH) listeners based on a signal-to-noise ratio measure in the envelope domain (SNRenv), in the framework of the speech-based envelope power spectrum model (sEPSM, [20, 21]). These models have shown good...... agreement with measured data under a broad range of conditions, including stationary and modulated interferers, reverberation, and spectral subtraction. Despite the advances in modeling intelligibility in NH listeners, a broadly applicable model that can predict SI in hearing-impaired (HI) listeners...

  6. Early intervention programme for hearing impaired children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanswamy, S

    1992-01-01

    The School for Young Deaf Children was founded in 1969 when the All India Institute of Speech and Hearing at Mysore and the Christian Medical College Hospital at Vellore started diagnosing hearing impairment in children and prescribing hearing aids. These schools admitted children when they were 5 years old. Bala Vidyalaya was funded as an experimental school to satisfy the needs of younger children. A multi sensory approach based on the Montessori method of teaching with special emphasis on language acquisition was adopted. The School that began with 5 children and 2 teachers had 120 children and 15 teachers in 1992: 50 children were under 3 years old and the rest were between 3 and 6 years. Early auditory management and training is the foundation of the child's linguistic achievement which help the child use the innate ability to develop sophisticated listening skills such as listening to one signal in the presence of competing sounds. Simple games captivate the infants. At the age of 2 1/2 years ideovisual reading is introduced to the child: written sentences are presented to the child about an activity that the child had just experienced. Even before 2 years of age he or she starts scribbling. School lessons are used as tools for writing. The school takes efforts to win the confidence of the parents. So far 97 children have joined the mainstream of education after an initial training the school. Of these, 6 are settled in jobs, 5 are in college or in postgraduate studies, 11 are studying at the university, 8 are in the higher secondary school (classes XI or XII)m 28 are studying in high school (class VI to class X), while the remaining 39 are in primary schools. It has been demonstrated that early educational intervention and involvement of the family into the educational program are very important for the successful integration of hearing-impaired children into the main stream.

  7. Story retelling skills in Persian speaking hearing-impaired children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarollahi, Farnoush; Mohamadi, Reyhane; Modarresi, Yahya; Agharasouli, Zahra; Rahimzadeh, Shadi; Ahmadi, Tayebeh; Keyhani, Mohammad-Reza

    2017-05-01

    Since the pragmatic skills of hearing-impaired Persian-speaking children have not yet been investigated particularly through story retelling, this study aimed to evaluate some pragmatic abilities of normal-hearing and hearing-impaired children using a story retelling test. 15 normal-hearing and 15 profound hearing-impaired 7-year-old children were evaluated using the story retelling test with the content validity of 89%, construct validity of 85%, and reliability of 83%. Three macro structure criteria including topic maintenance, event sequencing, explicitness, and four macro structure criteria including referencing, conjunctive cohesion, syntax complexity, and utterance length were assessed. The test was performed with live voice in a quiet room where children were then asked to retell the story. The tasks of the children were recorded on a tape, transcribed, scored and analyzed. In the macro structure criteria, utterances of hearing-impaired students were less consistent, enough information was not given to listeners to have a full understanding of the subject, and the story events were less frequently expressed in a rational order than those of normal-hearing group (P hearing students who obtained high scores, hearing-impaired students failed to gain any scores on the items of this section. These results suggest that Hearing-impaired children were not able to use language as effectively as their hearing peers, and they utilized quite different pragmatic functions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparison of Reading Literacy in Hearing Impaired and Normal Hearing Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Ali Asghar Kakojoibari

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: listening, speaking, reading and writing are considered the lingual skills. These skills are in direct relation with each other. Listening is the first skill learnt by the individual through development. If damaged by hearing impairment, listening can cause serious defect to lingual skills. The goal of our research was to study the effect of hearing loss on reading literacy in hearing impairment students in comparison with normal hearing students.Methods: Study was performed using the examination booklets of Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS 2001. 119 hearing impairment students of 4th grade primary school, last year guidance school, and last year high school levels in schools providing exceptional student education were included. These individuals were compared to 46 normal hearing students of 4th grade primary school of ordinary schools. Comparative statistical analysis was performed using t-test.Results: Reading literacy and literal contents understanding was shown to have a significant difference between normal hearing and whole hearing impaired student (p<0.05, except the ones in high school level with moderate hearing loss. There was also seen a significant difference between normal hearing and hearing impairment students in understanding of information contents (p=0.03.Conclusion: Hearing loss has a negative effect on reading literacy. Consequently, curriculum change and evolution of educational programs in exceptional centers is needed, in order to promote reading literacy and to enhance rest hearing

  9. Timbre discrimination in normal-hearing and hearing-impaired listeners under different noise conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emiroglu, Suzan; Kollmeier, Birger

    2008-07-18

    In an attempt to quantify differences in object separation and timbre discrimination between normal-hearing and hearing-impaired listeners with a moderate sensorineural hearing loss of two different configurations, psychoacoustic measurements were performed with a total of 50 listeners. The experiments determined just noticeable differences (JND) of timbre in normal-hearing and hearing-impaired subjects along continua of "morphed" musical instruments and investigated the variance of JND in silence and different background noise conditions and on different sound levels. The results show that timbre JNDs of subjects with a steep hearing loss are significantly higher than of normal-hearing subjects, both in silence and noise, whereas timbre JNDs of flat/diagonal hearing-impaired subjects are similar to JNDs of normal-hearing subjects for signal levels above 55 dB (plus appropriate amplification for hearing-impaired). In noise (SNR=+10 dB) timbre JNDs of all subject groups are significantly higher than in silence. In the condition testing, transferability from silence to noise (i.e., the ability to imagine how the stimulus heard in silence would sound in noise), no significant JND differences across listener groups were found. The results can be explained by primary factors involved in sensorineural hearing loss and contradict the hypothesis that hearing-impaired people generally have more problems in object discrimination than normal-hearing people.

  10. Attitude and help-seeking for hearing impairment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vandenBrink, RHS; Wit, HP; Kempen, GIJM; vanHeuvelen, MJG

    1996-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate help-seeking for hearing impairment in the elderly, and to compare groups showing dissimilar help-seeking on their attitude toward hearing loss and hearing aids. Attitude factors were based on a revised version of the Health Belief Model, and included

  11. Perinatal Gjb2 gene transfer rescues hearing in a mouse model of hereditary deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iizuka, Takashi; Kamiya, Kazusaku; Gotoh, Satoru; Sugitani, Yoshinobu; Suzuki, Masaaki; Noda, Tetsuo; Minowa, Osamu; Ikeda, Katsuhisa

    2015-07-01

    Hearing loss is the most widespread sensory disorder, with an incidence of congenital genetic deafness of 1 in 1600 children. For many ethnic populations, the most prevalent form of genetic deafness is caused by recessive mutations in the gene gap junction protein, beta 2, 26 kDa (GJB2), which is also known as connexin 26 (Cx26). Despite this knowledge, existing treatment strategies do not completely recover speech perception. Here we used a gene delivery system to rescue hearing in a mouse model of Gjb2 deletion. Mice lacking Cx26 are characterized by profound deafness from birth and improper development of cochlear cells. Cochlear delivery of Gjb2 using an adeno-associated virus significantly improved the auditory responses and development of the cochlear structure. Using gene replacement to restore hearing in a new mouse model of Gjb2-related deafness may lead to the development of therapies for human hereditary deafness.

  12. [Hearing impairment and psychopathological disorders in children and adolescents. Review of the recent literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailly, D; Dechoulydelenclave, M-B; Lauwerier, L

    2003-01-01

    of this association remains unclear. Many of the authors conclude that hearing impairment is unlikely to be an etiological factor in autism. However, auditory impairment may be a marker for brain damage in autism. Although some studies showed high rates of depression and anxiety disorders, particularly social phobias, in deaf and hard-of-hearing children and adolescents, most of the studies conclude that the prevalence of affective disorders in hearing-impaired children and adolescents is comparable with estimates of prevalence for hearing young people. A number of studies have suggested that deaf children show greater degrees of impulsivity than hearing children. However, it seems that this background of greater impulsivity does not lead to higher rates of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) among deaf children. Using standardized instruments to estimate the prevalence of ADHD in this population, recent studies conclude that deaf children with hereditary deafness are not at greater risk of developing ADHD but that children with acquired deafness are, and that this difference is probably related to the medical conditions and family climates distinguishing these two groups. Psychotic disorders are no more common among hearing-impaired young people than among young people with normal hearing. However, some recent studies showed that the presentation of schizophrenia can differ in deaf people because of the high frequency of visual hallucinations observed in them. Lastly, if primitive personality has been described as being more prevalent among hearing-impaired children and adolescents, most of the studies found a normal range of emotional-behavioral functioning in them. In summary, if varying incidences of emotional disturbances and behavioral problems have been reported for hearing-impaired children and adolescents, except autism, it seems that children with hearing impairment experience the same range of mental health problems as hearing children. A

  13. Subjective hearing impairment after subarachnoid haemorrhage : Prevalence and risk factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Erik M.; Greebe, Paut; Visser-Meily, J. M Anne|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/180428047; Rinkel, Gabriel J E|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/085712000; Vergouwen, Mervyn D I

    2017-01-01

    Background Sensorineural hearing impairment is a key symptom in patients with superficial siderosis of the central nervous system, a disease caused by chronic or intermittent haemorrhage into the subarachnoid space. We investigated the prevalence and risk factors of subjective hearing impairment

  14. Issues in the Evaluation of Hearing Impaired Children and Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulissi, Stephen Mark

    Intended for mental health professionals who evaluate hearing impaired children and adolescents, the paper discusses issues of general concern. Areas touched upon include psychological and sociological effects from the hearing impaired subculture, complicating medical and physical disorders, and modification of assessment devices to remove the…

  15. An Optimistic Look at Literacy and Hearing Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luetke-Stahlman, Barbara

    1982-01-01

    Discusses learning to read by hearing impaired children and maintains that given a language base (in sign alone, oral and/or signed English), a total communication environment, and the opportunity to utilize various modes to decode written English, it appears likely that hearing impaired children can develop reading and writing skills in English.…

  16. Project LITERACY-HI: Hypermedia for Readers with Hearing Impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horney, Mark; And Others

    This paper describes Project LITERACY-HI, an ongoing 3-year federally funded study of the benefits of electronically enhanced text for mainstreamed students with hearing impairments. Preliminary information documents the ongoing difficulties with reading experienced by most students with hearing impairments. The project is creating electronic…

  17. The Oral Referential Communication Skills of Hearing-Impaired Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Julian; Lieven, Elena; Arnold, Paul

    2005-01-01

    This paper focuses on the oral referential communication skills of hearing-impaired (HI) children. A task based on that used with language impaired children by Leinonen and Letts (1997) was used to assess the speaking and listening skills of 20 HI children (mean age=10;2 years; mean better ear average hearing loss=88.85 dBHL). Their performance…

  18. Timbre perception and object separation with normal and impaired hearing

    OpenAIRE

    Emiroglu, Suzan Selma

    2007-01-01

    Timbre is a combination of all auditory object attributes other than pitch, loudness and duration. A timbre distortion caused by a sensorineural hearing loss not only affects music perception, but may also influence object recognition in general. In order to quantify differences in object segregation and timbre discrimination between normal-hearing and hearing-impaired listeners with a sensorineural hearing loss, a new method for studying timbre perception was developed, which uses cross-fade...

  19. Relative clause reading in hearing impairment: Different profiles of syntactic impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronit eSzterman

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Children with hearing impairment show difficulties in sentences derived by Wh-movement, such as relative clauses and Wh-questions. This study examines the nature of this deficit in 48 hearing impaired children aged 9-12 years and 38 hearing controls. The task involved reading aloud and paraphrasing of object relatives that include a noun-verb heterophonic homograph. The correct pronunciation of the homograph in these sentences depended upon the correct construction of the syntactic structure of the sentence. An analysis of the reading and paraphrasing of each participant exposed two different patterns of syntactic impairment. Some hearing-impaired children paraphrased the object relatives incorrectly but could still read the homograph, indicating impaired assignment of thematic roles alongside good syntactic structure building; other hearing-impaired children could neither read the homograph nor paraphrase the sentence, indicating a structural deficit in the syntactic tree. Further testing of these children confirmed the different impairments: some are impaired only in Wh-movement, whereas others have CP impairment. The syntactic impairment correlated with whether or not a hearing device was fitted by the age of one year, but not with the type of hearing device or the depth of hearing loss: children who had a hearing device fitted during the first year of life had better syntactic abilities than children whose hearing devices were fitted later.

  20. CONTEMPOPARY VIEWS TO SIGN LANGUAGE OF HEARING IMPAIRED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojka TATAREVA

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available The place of the sign language in education of hearing impaired children in Denmark, USA and Sweden.Hearing impaired people ought to have a possibility of access to vital information, so they can move step by step, to live as useful members of society.Sign language is nonverbal communication which appears as a kind of compensation of the language lack, a means of development of that activity an opinion of unlimited human communicative nature.Mimic sign language in the system of education of hearing impaired children in Denmark, USA and Sweden take a primary place. The school with Hearing impaired children are bilingual. In the schools sign language is taken as a training language and it is available to every child.Contemporary views and practice tell us that teaching of hearing impaired children with sign language is more effective and more available.

  1. Induced pluripotent stem cells:Landscape for studying and treating hereditary hearing loss

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Peng; Yunpeng Dong; Ganghua Zhu; Dinghua Xie

    2014-01-01

    Hearing loss (HL) is one of the most widespread sensory disorders, affecting approximately 1 in 500 newborns. Heritable diseases of the inner ear are the leading causes of prelingual HL. Treating of hereditary HL and understanding its underlying mechanisms remain difficult challenges to otolaryngologists. As stem cells are capable of self-renewal and differentiation, they are ideally suited both for disease modeling and regenerative medicine. Recently, description of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) has allowed the field of disease modeling and personalized therapy to become far more accessible and physiologically relevant, as iPSCs can be generated from patients of any genetic background. This review briefly describes the advantages of iPSCs technology and discusses potential applications of this powerful biological tool in studying and treating hereditary HL.

  2. Satisfaction with Hearing Aids Based on Technology and Style among Hearing Impaired Persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraji-Khiavi, Farzad; Dashti, Rezvan; Sameni, Seyyed-Jalal; Bayat, Arash

    2016-09-01

    Hearing loss is one of the most disabling impairments. Using a hearing aid as an attempt to improve the hearing problem can positively affect the quality of life for these people. This research was aimed to assess satisfaction of hearing impaired patients with their hearing aids regarding the employed technology and style. This descriptive-analytic cross-sectional research was conducted on 187 subjects with hearing loss who were using a hearing aid. The subjects were over 18 years of age and were using a hearing aid for at least 6 months. The Persian version of Satisfaction with Amplification in Daily Life (SADL) questionnaire was the instrument which was used for assessing satisfaction with the hearing aid. Cronbach's alpha was calculated to be 0.80 for instrument reliability. A significant difference was observed among satisfaction subscales' mean scores with hearing aid technology. Also a significant difference was observed between the total satisfaction score and the hearing aid model. With respect to the analysis of satisfaction with the hearing aid and its style, cost and services was the only subscale which showed a significant difference (P=0.005). Respondents using hearing aids with different technology and style were estimated to be quite satisfied. Training audiologists in using more appropriate and fitting hearing aids in addition to using self-reporting questionnaires like SADL for estimating patients' social condition and participation in their life can essentially change their disability condition and countervail their hearing loss.

  3. Satisfaction with Hearing Aids Based on Technology and Style among Hearing Impaired Persons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraji- Khiavi, Farzad; Dashti, Rezvan; Sameni, Seyyed-Jalal; Bayat, Arash

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Hearing loss is one of the most disabling impairments. Using a hearing aid as an attempt to improve the hearing problem can positively affect the quality of life for these people. This research was aimed to assess satisfaction of hearing impaired patients with their hearing aids regarding the employed technology and style. Materials and Methods: This descriptive-analytic cross-sectional research was conducted on 187 subjects with hearing loss who were using a hearing aid. The subjects were over 18 years of age and were using a hearing aid for at least 6 months. The Persian version of Satisfaction with Amplification in Daily Life (SADL) questionnaire was the instrument which was used for assessing satisfaction with the hearing aid. Cronbach’s alpha was calculated to be 0.80 for instrument reliability. Results: A significant difference was observed among satisfaction subscales’ mean scores with hearing aid technology. Also a significant difference was observed between the total satisfaction score and the hearing aid model. With respect to the analysis of satisfaction with the hearing aid and its style, cost and services was the only subscale which showed a significant difference (P=0.005). Conclusion: Respondents using hearing aids with different technology and style were estimated to be quite satisfied. Training audiologists in using more appropriate and fitting hearing aids in addition to using self-reporting questionnaires like SADL for estimating patients’ social condition and participation in their life can essentially change their disability condition and countervail their hearing loss. PMID:27738608

  4. Cellular and Deafness Mechanisms Underlying Connexin Mutation-Induced Hearing Loss - A Common Hereditary Deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingard, Jeffrey C; Zhao, Hong-Bo

    2015-01-01

    Hearing loss due to mutations in the connexin gene family, which encodes gap junctional proteins, is a common form of hereditary deafness. In particular, connexin 26 (Cx26, GJB2) mutations are responsible for ~50% of non-syndromic hearing loss, which is the highest incidence of genetic disease. In the clinic, Cx26 mutations cause various auditory phenotypes ranging from profound congenital deafness at birth to mild, progressive hearing loss in late childhood. Recent experiments demonstrate that congenital deafness mainly results from cochlear developmental disorders rather than hair cell degeneration and endocochlear potential reduction, while late-onset hearing loss results from reduction of active cochlear amplification, even though cochlear hair cells have no connexin expression. However, there is no apparent, demonstrable relationship between specific changes in connexin (channel) functions and the phenotypes of mutation-induced hearing loss. Moreover, new experiments further demonstrate that the hypothesized K(+)-recycling disruption is not a principal deafness mechanism for connexin deficiency induced hearing loss. Cx30 (GJB6), Cx29 (GJC3), Cx31 (GJB3), and Cx43 (GJA1) mutations can also cause hearing loss with distinct pathological changes in the cochlea. These new studies provide invaluable information about deafness mechanisms underlying connexin mutation-induced hearing loss and also provide important information for developing new protective and therapeutic strategies for this common deafness. However, the detailed cellular mechanisms underlying these pathological changes remain unclear. Also, little is known about specific mutation-induced pathological changes in vivo and little information is available for humans. Such further studies are urgently required.

  5. Idiopathic Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss With Minimal Hearing Impairment

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Ho Yun; Cho, Chin Saeng

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of the study was to determine the characteristics of patients who did not match the audiometric criteria of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) but complained of acute hearing loss. Methods By thorough medical chart reviews, historical cohort study was performed with consecutive data of 589 patients complaining of acute unilateral sensorineural hearing loss without identifiable causes between 2005 and 2013. Those patients demonstrating a hearing loss of at ...

  6. Mitochondrial processes are impaired in hereditary inclusion body myopathy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisenberg, I.; Novershtern, N.; Itzhaki, Z.; Becker-Cohen, M.; Sadeh, M.; Willems, P.H.G.M.; Friedman, N.; Koopman, W.J.H.; Mitrani-Rosenbaum, S.

    2008-01-01

    Hereditary inclusion body myopathy (HIBM) is an adult onset, slowly progressive distal and proximal myopathy. Although the causing gene, GNE, encodes for a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of sialic acid, its primary function in HIBM remains unknown. To elucidate the pathological mechanisms leading fr

  7. Visual aid for the hearing impaired

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhabvala, Murzban D.; Lin, Hung C.

    1991-07-01

    A multichannel electronic visual aid device which is able to signal to the user whether sound is coming from the left or right, front or back, or both is presented. For the plurality of channels, which may operate in pairs, the sound is picked up by a respective microphone and amplified and rectified into a DC voltage. The DC voltage is next fed to an analog to digital converter and then to a digital encoder. The binary code from the encoder is coupled into a logic circuit where the binary code is decoded to proved a plurality of output levels which are used to drive an indicator which, in turn, provides a visual indication of the sound level received. The binary codes for each pair of channels are also fed into a digital comparator. The output of the comparator is used to enable the logic circuits of the two channels such that if, for example, the signal coming from the right is louder than that coming from the left, the output of the logic unit of the right channel will be enabled and the corresponding indicator activated, indicating the sound source on the right. An indication of the loudness is also provided. One embodiment of the invention may be carried by the hearing impaired or deaf, as a system which is embedded into eye glasses or a cap. Another embodiment of the invention may be integrated with a vehicle to give a hearing impaired or deaf driver a warning, with a directional indication, that an emergency vehicle is in the vicinity. In this second embodiment, the emergency vehicle transmits a radio frequency signal which would be used as an enabling signal for the visual aid device to avoid false alarms from traffic and other sound sources in the vicinity of the driver's vehicle.

  8. Hearing impairment and language delay in infants: Diagnostics and genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang-Roth, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    This overview study provides information on important phoniatric and audiological aspects of early childhood hearing and language development with the aim of presenting diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. The article first addresses the universal newborn hearing screening that has been implemented in Germany for all infants since January 2009. The process of newborn hearing screening from the maternity ward to confirmation diagnostics is presented in accordance with a decision by the Federal Joint Committee (G-BA). The second topic is pediatric audiology diagnostics. Following confirmation of a permanent early childhood hearing disorder, the search for the cause plays an important role. Hereditary hearing disorders and intrauterine cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection, probably the most common cause of an acquired hearing disorder, are discussed and compared with the most common temporary hearing disorder, otitis media with effusion, which in some cases is severe enough to be relevant for hearing and language development and therefore requires treatment. The third topic covered in this article is speech and language development in the first 3 years of life, which is known today to be crucial for later language development and learning to read and write. There is a short overview and introduction to modern terminology, followed by the abnormalities and diagnostics of early speech and language development. Only some aspects of early hearing and language development are addressed here. Important areas such as the indication for a cochlear implant in the first year of life or because of unilateral deafness are not included due to their complexity. PMID:25587365

  9. Advantages of a miniature pig model in research on human hereditary hearing loss

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weiwei Guo; Shi-ming Yang

    2015-01-01

    In medical laboratory animals, the pig is the closest species to human in evolution, except for primates. As an animal model, the pig is highly concerned by many scientists, including comparative biology, developmental biology, medical genetics. Rodents as animal model for human hearing defects has are poor producibility and reliability, due to differences in anatomical structure, evolutionary rate and metabolic rate, but these happens to be the advantages of the pig model. In this paper, we will summarize the application of miniature pig in the study of human hereditary deafness.

  10. Peripheral auditory processing and speech reception in impaired hearing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strelcyk, Olaf

    One of the most common complaints of people with impaired hearing concerns their difficulty with understanding speech. Particularly in the presence of background noise, hearing-impaired people often encounter great difficulties with speech communication. In most cases, the problem persists even i....... Overall, this work provides insights into factors affecting auditory processing in listeners with impaired hearing and may have implications for future models of impaired auditory signal processing as well as advanced compensation strategies....... if reduced audibility has been compensated for by hearing aids. It has been hypothesized that part of the difficulty arises from changes in the perception of sounds that are well above hearing threshold, such as reduced frequency selectivity and deficits in the processing of temporal fine structure (TFS...

  11. Screening of hearing impairment in the newborn using the auditory response cradle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, S M; Bhattacharya, J

    1992-01-01

    The Auditory Response Cradle (ARC) is a fully automated microprocessor controlled machine that was designed for the hearing screening of full term neonates. In order to evaluate the ARC, 6000 babies were screened at a district maternity hospital over a period of three years. Every infant subsequently entered a three year follow up programme. One hundred and two babies (1.7%) failed the ARC screen (that is, they failed two ARC tests) and 20 of these were found to have some hearing impairment: in 10 it was severe (80-90 dBHL), in seven moderate (45-60 dBHL), and in three it was mild to moderate (less than 45 dBHL). In addition, of the 20 babies who failed a first test and were discharged before a second could be performed, two were confirmed to have a severe hearing loss; 79 infants failing the screen were cleared on further testing, giving the ARC a false positive rate of 1.3%. On following up all 6000 infants for three years, seven children who passed the neonatal screen were subsequently found to have a hearing loss. For two babies the aetiology was unknown but for five the hearing impairment was either due to a hereditary progressive loss or definite postnatal factors. Progressive and acquired hearing losses cannot be detected at a neonatal screen and this emphasises the need for follow up screens at other stages in the child's life. In this long term study the ARC has been found to have a high detection rate for severe hearing loss and confirms the practical possibility of using a behavioural technique for the universal screening of hearing in neonates. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:1519957

  12. Summarization strategies of hearing-impaired and normally hearing college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, L N; French, L

    1988-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the summary writing skills of hearing-impaired and normally hearing college students. Summarization was defined in terms of the following measures: deletion of trivial text information, inclusion of most important ideas, selection of topic sentences, creation of topic statements, and integration of information within and among several paragraphs. Inclusion of opinionated, incorrect, and uninterpretable information was measured also. Thirty hearing-impaired and 30 normally hearing students read and summarized two expository science passages that were controlled for the number of topic (main idea) sentences and that had been rated previously for the importance of "idea units." Students' factual comprehension also was assessed. Hearing-impaired and normally hearing students exhibited a similar pattern of use among several measured summarization strategies, except for the inclusion of opinions or comments in their summaries. Hearing-impaired students were not as sensitive as normally hearing students to importance of ideas and used the following summarization strategies significantly less often: inclusion of important ideas, selection of topic sentences, creation of topic statements, and integration of ideas within and among paragraphs. The results indicated that hearing-impaired college students have basic summarization skills but do not apply summarization strategies as effectively as normally hearing students.

  13. Comparison of general health status in mothers of hearing and hearing-impaired children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Movallali

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: The birth of a hearing-impaired child and raising him/her often brings special psychological feelings for parents, especially mothers who spend more time with the child. This study aimed to compare the general health status in mothers of hearing-impaired and hearing children. Methods: This was a descriptive-analytic study. General Health Questionnaire was used to identify general health status; and data were analyzed with independent-t test. Results: The general health level of mothers of hearing-impaired children was lower than mothers of normal hearing children (p=0.01 . The average scores of anxiety (p=0.01, depression (p= 0.01 and physical (p=0.02 symptoms and social function (p=0.01 of mothers of hearing-impaired children was higher than mothers of normal hearing ones (p=0.01. Conclusion: Having a child with hearing impairment affects mothers’ general health status. Our findings show that it’s necessary to provide psychological and social support for mothers of hearing-impaired children.

  14. Characteristics of hearing-impairment among patients in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amedofu, Geoffrey K; Ocansey, Grace; Antwi, Barbara B

    2006-01-01

    The causes, and characteristics of hearing-impairment were determined prospectively among six thousand, four hundred and twenty-eight (6,428) patients who reported at the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital (KATH) with hearing problems. The purpose of the study was to determine the characteristics and some causes of hearing loss of patients who report for management at Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital. The procedure adopted included a detailed case history, Otoscopy and Pure-tone Audiometry. Of the 6,428 patients, 5,734 (89.9 %) were diagnosed as having significant hearing loss. There were more hearing impaired women than men at all ages. Majority of the patients had mild hearing loss. The overall prevalence of Sensorineural Hearing Loss was more in worse ear than better ear. Again, the occurrence of Sensorineural Hearing Loss was more than other types of hearing loss. Noise, Fever, Presbycusis, Sickness, Meningitis and Meniere's diseases were the major causes of Sensorineural Hearing Loss. Conductive Hearing Loss was attributed in the main to Wax, Foreign Bodies, Otitis Media, and Traumas. These findings have important implications on the need of resources for rehabilitation.

  15. General dental practitioners and hearing impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messano, Giuseppe Alessio; Petti, Stefano

    2012-10-01

    Hearing impairment (HI) remains a problem among dentists Hearing loss at speech frequencies was recently reported among dentists and dental hygienists. This study aimed to investigate prevalence and factors associated with perceived HI among dentists. In 2009-2010, 100 general dental practitioners (GDPs) and 115 general (medical) practitioners (GPs) (mean ages, 43.7 and 44.4 years) from Rome (Italy), who commenced practice ≥ 10 years ago, were interviewed on a series of occupation- and recreation-related HI risk factors and on HI-associated symptoms (tinnitus, sensation of fullness, hypoacusis). Prevalence of presumptive HI (≥ 1 symptom perceived during workdays and weekends) was assessed and factors associated with presumptive HI were investigated. Prevalence was 30.0% (95% confidence interval, 21.0-39.0%) and 14.8% (95% confidence interval, 8.3-21.3%) among GDPs and GPs, respectively. Occupation (GDP vs. GP), family history of hypoacusis, hypertension, ear diseases and smoking were significantly associated with presumptive HI. Within GDPs alone, significant associations were found for frequent use of ultrasonic scalers, use of dental turbines aged≥1 year and prosthodontics as prevalent specialty. GDPs experienced HI risk than GPs. Such a risk was not generalized to all dentists, but was specific for those who frequently used noisy equipment (aged turbines, ultrasonic scalers) during their daily practice. GDPs with 10 or more years of practice who routinely use potentially noisy equipment, could be at risk of HI. In order to prevent such condition, daily maintenance and periodical replacement of dental instruments is recommended. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Refining a model of hearing impairment using speech psychophysics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Morten Løve; Dau, Torsten; Ghitza, Oded

    2014-01-01

    The premise of this study is that models of hearing, in general, and of individual hearing impairment, in particular, can be improved by using speech test results as an integral part of the modeling process. A conceptual iterative procedure is presented which, for an individual, considers measures...

  17. Syntactic Movement in Orally Trained Children With Hearing Impairment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Naama Friedmann; Ronit Szterman

    This study explored the comprehension and production of sentences derived by syntactic movement, in orally trained school-age Hebrew-speaking children with moderate to profound hearing impairment, aged 7;8-9;9 years...

  18. HIV/AIDS among Adolescents with Hearing Impairment in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Toshiba

    that make the prevention of HIV/AIDS to be elusive; such as prejudice ... adolescents, adolescents with hearing impairment are sexually active and also exposed to so ... infection in any disabled population in most African countries. Although in ...

  19. A new nonsyndromic X-linked sensorineural hearing impairment linked to Xp21.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lalwani, A.K.; Brister, J.R.; Fex, J.; Grundfast, K.M.; Pikus, A.T.; Ploplis, B.; San Agustin, T.; Skarka, H.; Wilcox, E.R. [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1994-10-01

    X-linked deafness is a rare cause of hereditary hearing impairment. We have identified a family with X-linked dominant sensorineural hearing impairment, characterized by incomplete penetrance and variable expressivity in carrier females, that is linked to the Xp21.2, which contains the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) locus. The auditory impairment in affected males was congenital, bilateral, profound, sensorineural, affecting all frequencies, and without evidence of radiographic abnormality of the temporal bone. Adult carrier females manifested bilateral, mild-to-moderate high-frequency sensorineural hearing impairment of delayed onset during adulthood. Eighteen commercially available polymorphic markers from the X chromosome, generating a 10-15-cM map, were initially used for identification of a candidate region. DXS997, located within the DMD gene, generated a two-point LOD score of 2.91 at {theta} = 0, with every carrier mother heterozygous at this locus. Recombination events at DXS992 (located within the DMD locus, 3{prime} to exon 50 of the dystrophin gene) and at DXS1068 (5{prime} to the brain promoter of the dystrophin gene) were observed. No recombination events were noted with the following markers within the DMD locus: 5{prime}DYS II, intron 44, DXS997, and intron 50. There was no clinical evidence of Duchenne or Becker muscular dystrophy in any family member. It is likely that this family represents a new locus on the X chromosome, which when mutated results in nonsyndromic sensorineural hearing loss and is distinct from the heterogeneous group of X-linked hearing losses that have been previously described. 57 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  20. [Suprasegmental speech in prelingual hearing-impaired children with cochlear implants, hearing-impaired children without implants and normal hearing children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligthelm, A; Groenewald, E

    1999-01-01

    A review of the relevant literature indicates a lack of knowledge regarding suprasegmental speech characteristics in prelingual hearing impaired children with cochlear implants. This study is aimed at examining certain suprasegmental features in the speech of prelingual hearing impaired children with cochlear implants by perceptual ratings and acoustic analyses, comparing these results to that of prelingual hearing impaired children without implants, and normal hearing children of the same age. Twelve Afrikaansspeaking children between the ages of six and ten years were included in three groups. An integrated view of the perceptual and acoustic results shows that the cochlear implanted children's suprasegmental speech characteristics bear closer resemblance to those of the normal hearing group than those of the hearing impaired group.

  1. Syntactic and Semantic Characteristics in the Written Language of Hearing Impaired and Normally Hearing School-Aged Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshinaga, Christine

    To investigate semantic and syntactic variables in the written language of normally hearing and hearing impaired children, 49 hearing impaired and 49 normally hearing children (10-14 years old) were asked to write compositions based on the Accident/Emergency Picture in the Peabody Language Development Kit. In addition, syntactic characteristics…

  2. Improving communication with patients with a hearing impairment

    OpenAIRE

    Seema Rupani Shah; Newton, Valerie E

    2013-01-01

    The main barrier to communication for people who are hearing impaired is the lack of consideration by others. These patients can face prolonged or unnecessary illnesses due to inadequate communication with their health care providers. However, by being prepared, and by preparing the patient, health workers can ensure good communication, thereby giving patients access to appropriate and effective health care. Please note that patients with both visual and hearing impairments require even more ...

  3. Improving communication with patients with a hearing impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seema Rupani Shah

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The main barrier to communication for people who are hearing impaired is the lack of consideration by others. These patients can face prolonged or unnecessary illnesses due to inadequate communication with their health care providers. However, by being prepared, and by preparing the patient, health workers can ensure good communication, thereby giving patients access to appropriate and effective health care. Please note that patients with both visual and hearing impairments require even more consideration!

  4. Clinical and audiological evaluation of hearing impaired children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zafarullah Beigh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Daily activities, interpersonal relationship, employment, and general well being; among such skills, communication skills are essential to a successful life for all individuals. Such skills affect education, adequate hearing acuity is of paramount importance and acts as a prerequisite in the overall personality development of an individual. Hearing impairment at any age has serious effects on the day to day life of an individual and he/she feels handicapped socially, emotionally, and scholastically. A child stuck with this malady is a back bencher in the class, excommunicative, and absent-minded. This study was conducted in order to find out various causes of hearing impairment in children and to study role of various audiological and radiological tests in finding the cause of impaired hearing in children. Aims and Objectives: To assess the possible etiological causes of hearing impairment in children. Study role of various audiological tests in finding the cause of impaired hearing in children. Study Design: Prospective study. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted in the Department of ENT and HNS of government medical college Srinagar. A total of 150 children of age range 0-14 years visited our ENT Department with complaints of impaired hearing, but only 70 children who met the inclusion criteria of impaired hearing and defective/delayed speech were selected for this study. Results of initial evaluation by means of comprehensive clinical history and followed by proper thorough systemic physical examination from head to toe was performed. These hearing impaired children were subjected to various subjective and objective tests; pure tone audiometry and behavioral observation audiometry were performed for subjective tests and impedance audiometry, Oto-acoustic emissions (OAE, and brainstem evoked response audiometry (BERA were performed for objective tests. Results: Possible etiological cause on the basis of history were birth anoxia (2

  5. High-frequency audibility: benefits for hearing-impaired listeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, C A; Turner, C W

    1998-07-01

    The present study was a systematic investigation of the benefit of providing hearing-impaired listeners with audible high-frequency speech information. Five normal-hearing and nine high-frequency hearing-impaired listeners identified nonsense syllables that were low-pass filtered at a number of cutoff frequencies. As a means of quantifying audibility for each condition, Articulation Index (AI) was calculated for each condition for each listener. Most hearing-impaired listeners demonstrated an improvement in speech recognition as additional audible high-frequency information was provided. In some cases for more severely impaired listeners, increasing the audibility of high-frequency speech information resulted in no further improvement in speech recognition, or even decreases in speech recognition. A new measure of how well hearing-impaired listeners used information within specific frequency bands called "efficiency" was devised. This measure compared the benefit of providing a given increase in speech audibility to a hearing-impaired listener to the benefit observed in normal-hearing listeners for the same increase in speech audibility. Efficiencies were calculated using the old AI method and the new AI method (which takes into account the effects of high speech presentation levels). There was a clear pattern in the results suggesting that as the degree of hearing loss at a given frequency increased beyond 55 dB HL, the efficacy of providing additional audibility to that frequency region was diminished, especially when this degree of hearing loss was present at frequencies of 4000 Hz and above. A comparison of analyses from the "old" and "new" AI procedures suggests that some, but not all, of the deficiencies of speech recognition in these listeners was due to high presentation levels.

  6. Modeling auditory perception of individual hearing-impaired listeners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Morten Løve; Dau, Torsten

    showed that, in most cases, the reduced or absent cochlear compression, associated with outer hair-cell loss, quantitatively accounts for broadened auditory filters, while a combination of reduced compression and reduced inner hair-cell function accounts for decreased sensitivity and slower recovery from...... selectivity. Three groups of listeners were considered: (a) normal hearing listeners; (b) listeners with a mild-to-moderate sensorineural hearing loss; and (c) listeners with a severe sensorineural hearing loss. A fixed set of model parameters were derived for each hearing-impaired listener. The simulations...

  7. Prevalence and causes of hearing impairment in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulwafu, W; Kuper, H; Ensink, R J H

    2016-02-01

    To systematically assess the data on the prevalence and causes of hearing impairment in Africa. Systematic review on the prevalence and causes of hearing loss in Africa. We undertook a literature search of seven electronic databases (EMBASE, PubMed, Medline, Global Health, Web of Knowledge, Academic Search Complete and Africa Wide Information) and manually searched bibliographies of included articles. The search was restricted to population-based studies on hearing impairment in Africa. Data were extracted using a standard protocol. We identified 232 articles and included 28 articles in the final analysis. The most common cut-offs used for hearing impairment were 25 and 30 dB HL, but this ranged between 15 and 40 dB HL. For a cut-off of 25 dB, the median was 7.7% for the children- or school-based studies and 17% for population-based studies. For a cut-off of 30 dB HL, the median was 6.6% for the children or school-based studies and 31% for population-based studies. In schools for the deaf, the most common cause of hearing impairment was cryptogenic deafness (50%) followed by infectious causes (43%). In mainstream schools and general population, the most common cause of hearing impairment was middle ear disease (36%), followed by undetermined causes (35%) and cerumen impaction (24%). There are very few population-based studies available to estimate the prevalence of hearing impairment in Africa. Those studies that are available use different cut-offs, making comparison difficult. However, the evidence suggests that the prevalence of hearing impairment is high and that much of it is avoidable or treatable. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Peculiarities of hearing impairment depending on interaction with acoustic stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myshchenko, Iryna; Nazarenko, Vasyl; Kolganov, Anatoliy; Tereshchenko, Pavlo

    2015-01-01

    Aims: The functional state of the auditory analyzer of several operators groups was study. The objective of this study was to determine some characteristics of hearing impairment in relation with features of acoustic stimuli and informative significance of noise. Materials and Methods: 236 employees (middle age 35.4 ± 0.74 years) were divided into four groups according to features of noise perception at the workplaces. The levels of permanent shifts of acoustic thresholds were estimated using audiometric method. Statistical Analysis Used: Common statistical methods were used in research. Mean quantity and mean absolute errors were calculated. Statistical significance between operators' groups was calculated with 0.05 confidential intervals. Results: The peculiarities of hearing impairment in observed groups were different. Operators differentiating acoustic signals had peak of hearing impairment in the field of language frequencies, while the employees who work with noise background at the workplaces had maximal hearing threshold on the 4000 Hz frequency (P ≤ 0.05). Conclusions: Hearing impairment depends both on energy and human interaction with acoustic irritant. The distinctions in hearing impairment may be related with the necessity of recognizing of acoustic signals and their frequency characteristics. PMID:26957812

  9. Vowel Formant Values in Hearing and Hearing-Impaired Children: A Discriminant Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozbic, Martina; Kogovsek, Damjana

    2010-01-01

    Hearing-impaired speakers show changes in vowel production and formant pitch and variability, as well as more cases of overlapping between vowels and more restricted formant space, than hearing speakers; consequently their speech is less intelligible. The purposes of this paper were to determine the differences in vowel formant values between 32…

  10. Comparison of Human Figure Drawings by Hearing and Hearing-Impaired Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cates, Jim A.

    1991-01-01

    The study compared human figure drawings (using the Goodenough-Harris Drawing Test and Koppitz' Emotional Indicators) of 26 hearing-impaired and 26 normal-hearing children and adolescents. No significant differences were found between groups but the Emotional Indicators did not perform as predicted in determining emotional disturbance. (Author/DB)

  11. Hearing Impairment CausedbyOccupational Noise*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1971-08-28

    Aug 28, 1971 ... done on the non-auditory effects of noise such as annoy- ance effect, effect ... on hearing, it may be worth while to refresh the memory with a few remarks ... lute musical hearing sense, can name the note on e.g. the piano of a ...

  12. Hearing impairment and vowel production. A comparison between normally hearing, hearing-aided and cochlear implanted Dutch children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoeven, Jo; Hide, Oydis; De Maeyer, Sven; Gillis, San; Gillis, Steven

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the acoustic characteristics of the Belgian Standard Dutch vowels in children with hearing impairment and in children with normal hearing. In a balanced experimental design, the 12 vowels of Belgian Standard Dutch were recorded in three groups of children: a group of children with normal hearing, a group with a conventional hearing aid and a group with a cochlear implant. The formants, the surface area of the vowel space and the acoustic differentiation between the vowels were determined. The analyses revealed that many of the vowels in hearing-impaired children showed a reduction of the formant values. This reduction was particularly significant with respect to F2. The size of the vowel space was significantly smaller in the hearing-impaired children. Finally, a smaller acoustic differentiation between the vowels was observed in children with hearing impairment. The results show that even after 5 years of device use, the acoustic characteristics of the vowels in hearing-assisted children remain significantly different as compared to their NH peers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Perda auditiva hereditária: relato de casos Hereditary hearing loss: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Mizozoe de Amorim

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: descrever os resultados da avaliação auditiva de uma família com perda auditiva de caráter hereditário autossômico dominante. MÉTODOS: foram avaliados 17 indivíduos, por meio da audiometria tonal, audiometria vocal, timpanometria e pesquisa dos reflexos acústicos, além de acompanhamento genético. RESULTADOS: Dos 17 sujeitos avaliados, 11 apresentaram algum grau de perda auditiva neurossensorial (64,7%, sendo oito do sexo feminino (73% e três do sexo masculino (27%. A idade dos sujeitos avaliados variou de cinco a 68 anos (média=29,6 e a idade do aparecimento da queixa variou de 20 a 38 anos (média=26,1. Ocorreu a progressão da perda auditiva com o aumento da idade, sendo que a partir dos 41 anos, não houve indivíduos com audição normal na família. CONCLUSÃO: a investigação audiológica de todos os membros da família, independentemente da queixa, é imprescindível, pois a perda auditiva pode existir, mesmo que esta ocorra em freqüências isoladas.PURPOSE: to describe the hearing findings of a family with autosome dominant hereditary hearing loss. METHODS: we evaluated 17 subjects. The evaluation was made by pure tone audiometry, Speech audiometry, tympanometry and acoustic reflex testing, in addition to genetic follow-up. RESULTS: from 17 evaluated subjects, 11 showed some degree of neurosensorial hearing loss (64.7%, being 8 female gender (73% and 3 male gender (27%. The subject age varied from 5 to 68 years (average = 39.6 and the time from the complaint's appearance varied from 20 to 38 years. The hearing loss was modified with age. We did not find normal hearing after the age of 41 years in the family. CONCLUSION: the hearing investigation regarding all members of the family regardless of any complaint is extremely indispensable due to the existence of hearing loss even when limited to isolated frequencies.

  14. Comparison of the Speech Syntactic Features between Hearing-Impaired and Normal Hearing Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza PahlavanNezhad

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The present study seeks to describe and analyze the syntactic features of children with severely hearing loss who had access to the hearing aids compared with children with normal hearing, assigning them to the same separate gender classes.   Materials and Methods: In the present study, eight children with severe hearing impairment who used a hearing aid and eight hearing children matched for age and gender were selected using an available sampling method based on the principles of auditory-verbal approach. Hearing children had an average age of 5.45 ±1.9 years and subjects had a mean age of 5.43±2.17 years and their rehabilitation had begun before they were 18 months old. The assessment instrument of the study included the language development test, TOLDP-3. The syntactic skills of these children were analyzed and compared with the hearing children of the same age based on gender.   Results: There was a significant difference between the syntactic scores of the hearing-impaired children and the scores of the hearing children of the same age in the “sentence imitation” (t=−2/90, P

  15. [Rehabilitative measures in hearing-impaired children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Wedel, H; von Wedel, U C; Zorowka, P

    1991-12-01

    On the basis of certain fundamental data on the maturation processes of the central auditory pathways in early childhood the importance of early intervention with hearing aids is discussed and emphasized. Pathological hearing, that is acoustical deprivation in early childhood will influence the maturation process. Very often speech development is delayed if diagnosis and therapy or rehabilitation are not early enough. Anamnesis, early diagnosis and clinical differential diagnosis are required before a hearing aid can be fitted. Selection criteria and adjustment parameters are discussed, showing that the hearing aid fitting procedure must be embedded in a complex matrix of requirements related to the development of speech as well as to the cognitive, emotional and social development of the child. As a rule, finding and preparing the "best" hearing aids (binaural fitting is obligatory) for a child is a long and often difficult process, which can only be performed by specialists who are pedo-audiologists. After the binaural fitting of hearing aids an intensive hearing and speech education in close cooperation between parents, pedo-audiologist and teacher must support the whole development of the child.

  16. Communication between hearing impaired and normal hearing students: a facilitative proposal of learning in higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krysne Kelly de França Oliveira

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There has been an increase in the number of hearing impaired people with access to higher education. Most of them are young people from a different culture who present difficulties in communication, inter-relationship, and learning in a culture of normal hearing people, because they use a different language, the Brazilian Sign Language - LIBRAS. Objective: The present study aimed to identify the forms of communication used between hearing impaired and normal hearing students, verifying how they can interfere with the learning process of the first. Methods: A qualitative study that used the space of a private university in the city of Fortaleza, Ceará state, Brazil, from February to April 2009. We carried out semi-structured interviews with three hearing impaired students, three teachers, three interpreters, and three normal hearing students. The content of the speeches was categorized and organized by the method of thematic analysis. Results: We verified that the forms of communication used ranged from mime and gestures to writing and drawing, but the most accepted by the hearing impaired students was LIBRAS. As a method of communication, it supports the learning of hearing impaired students, and with the mediation of interpreters, it gives them conditions to settle in their zones of development, according to the precepts of Vygotsky. Conclusion: Thus, we recognize the importance of LIBRAS as predominant language, essential to the full academic achievement of hearing impaired students; however, their efforts and dedication, as well as the interest of institutions and teachers on the deaf culture, are also important for preparing future professionals.

  17. Binaural pitch perception in normal-hearing and hearing-impaired listeners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santurette, Sébastien; Dau, Torsten

    2007-01-01

    -pitch perception and performance in measures of spectral and temporal resolution. Reduced frequency discrimination appeared to be linked to poorer melody recognition skills. Reduced frequency selectivity was also found to impede the perception of binaural-pitch stimuli. Overall, binaural-pitch stimuli might......The effects of hearing impairment on the perception of binaural-pitch stimuli were investigated. Several experiments were performed with normal-hearing and hearing-impaired listeners, including detection and discrimination of binaural pitch, and melody recognition using different types of binaural...

  18. Externalization versus Internalization of Sound in Normal-hearing and Hearing-impaired Listeners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohl, Björn; Laugesen, Søren; Buchholz, Jörg

    2010-01-01

    , an auralization system for headphones using individual cues was implemented and a strategy to modify the degree of the externalization was proposed. While normal-hearing listeners obtained consistent results, both individually and across subjects, the limits of externalization varied more within and across...... listeners in the hearing-impaired group. Partly, there was an influence by the direction of sound incidence. On average across subjects, the dynamic range available to perceive externalization was reduced compared to normal-hearing subjects. Overall, it was shown that hearing-impaired listeners are able......The externalization of sound, i. e. the perception of auditory events as being located outside of the head, is a natural phenomenon for normalhearing listeners, when perceiving sound coming from a distant physical sound source. It is potentially useful for hearing in background noise...

  19. Hearing Impairment Is Associated with Smaller Brain Volume in Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigters, Stephanie C.; Bos, Daniel; Metselaar, Mick; Roshchupkin, Gennady V.; Baatenburg de Jong, Robert J.; Ikram, M. Arfan; Vernooij, Meike W.; Goedegebure, André

    2017-01-01

    Although recent studies show that age-related hearing impairment is associated with cerebral changes, data from a population perspective are still lacking. Therefore, we studied the relation between hearing impairment and brain volume in a large elderly cohort. From the population-based Rotterdam Study, 2,908 participants (mean age 65 years, 56% female) underwent a pure-tone audiogram to quantify hearing impairment. By performing MR imaging of the brain we quantified global and regional brain tissue volumes (total brain volume, gray matter volume, white matter (WM) volume, and lobe-specific volumes). We used multiple linear regression models, adjusting for age, sex, head size, time between hearing test and MR imaging, and relevant cognitive and cardiovascular covariates. Furthermore, we performed voxel-based morphometry to explore sub-regional differences. We found that a higher pure-tone threshold was associated with a smaller total brain volume [difference in standardized brain volume per decibel increase in hearing threshold in the age-sex adjusted model: -0.003 (95% confidence interval -0.004; -0.001)]. Specifically, WM volume was associated. Both associations were more pronounced in the lower frequencies. All associations were consistently present in all brain lobes in the lower frequencies and in most lobes in the higher frequencies, and were independent of cognitive function and cardiovascular risk factors. In voxel-based analyses we found associations of hearing impairment with smaller white volumes and some smaller and larger gray volumes, yet these were statistically non-significant. Our findings demonstrate that hearing impairment in elderly is related to smaller total brain volume, independent of cognition and cardiovascular risk factors. This mainly seems to be driven by smaller WM volume, throughout the brain.

  20. Follow-up of permanent hearing impairment in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Volpe, A; De Lucia, A; Pastore, V; Bracci Laudiero, L; Buonissimo, I; Ricci, G

    2016-02-01

    Programmes for early childhood childhood hearing impairment identification allows to quickly start the appropriate hearing aid fitting and rehabilitation process; nevertheless, a large number of patients do not join the treatment program. The goal of this article is to present the results of a strategic review of the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats connected with the audiologic/prosthetic/language follow-up process of children with bilateral permanent hearing impairment. Involving small children, the follow-up includes the involvement of specialised professionals of a multidisciplinary team and a complex and prolonged multi-faced management. Within the framework of the Italian Ministry of Health project CCM 2013 "Preventing Communication Disorders: a Regional Program for Early Identification, Intervention and Care of Hearing Impaired Children", the purpose of this analysis was to propose recommendations that can harmonise criteria for outcome evaluation and provide guidance on the most appropriate assessment methods to be used in the follow-up course of children with permanent hearing impairment. © Copyright by Società Italiana di Otorinolaringologia e Chirurgia Cervico-Facciale.

  1. Psychopathology among a sample of hearing impaired adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosaku, Kolawole; Akinpelu, Victoria; Ogunniyi, Grace

    2015-12-01

    Hearing impairment is a recognized cause of emotional and psychological disturbances worldwide, however little is known about this condition in Nigeria. The aim of this study is to compare the prevalence of psychopathology between hearing impaired adolescents and healthy adolescents. Students attending two special schools for the hearing impaired were assessed for psychopathology with the help of a trained signer and their teacher, using the International Classification of Diseases Diagnostic Criteria (ICD 10). Fifty two hearing impaired students and 52 age and sex matched controls from the same school were also interviewed using the same instrument. The mean age of the hearing impaired students was 16 (sd=3.8), while for the controls the mean age was 16 (sd=2.5). Psychopathology was present in 10 (19%) of the hearing impaired adolescents compared to 2 (4%) among the control group, this difference was statistically significant (χ(2)=4.62 p=0.03). The most common diagnosis was generalized anxiety disorder 4 (8%), followed by depression 2 (4%). Years spent in school (t=4.81, p=0.001), primary guardian (χ(2)=18.3, p=0.001) and mean income of guardian (t=7.10, p=0.001) were all significantly different between the two groups. Psychopathology is relatively common in this population. Proper assessment and treatment should be made available for this population group. A limitation to this study is communication difficulty which made only a third party assessment possible; this may affect the generalizability of the findings.

  2. Balance assessment in hearing-impaired children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walicka-Cupryś, Katarzyna; Przygoda, Łukasz; Czenczek, Ewelina; Truszczyńska, Aleksandra; Drzał-Grabiec, Justyna; Zbigniew, Trzaskoma; Tarnowski, Adam

    2014-11-01

    According to the scientific reports the postural stability is inseparably associated with hearing organ's correct functioning. The aim of the study was to evaluate the degree of disorders occurring in balance reactions in this group of children with profound hearing loss compared to their healthy peers. The study worked with a total of 228 children, including 65 who are deaf (DCH) and 163 subjects without any hearing deficits (CON) in the control group. Stabilometric measurements were performed with the use of a force distribution platform. The results indicate statistically significant differences in terms of one parameter (the total path length) recorded in the test with the eyes open and a whole range of parameters recorded when the subjects had their eyes closed (the width, height, and area of the ellipse, the total path length, and the horizontal and vertical sway). The study results showed better values of the static balance parameters in deaf children as compared to their peers without hearing disorders and the differences were particularly evident in the test with the subject's eyes closed. The results suggest significantly better processing of sensory stimuli in postural reactions particularly from propioception, and to a lesser extent, from the vision system observed in the subjects as compared to their peers in the control group.

  3. Exome sequencing and genome-wide copy number variant mapping reveal novel associations with sensorineural hereditary hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraksingh, Rajini R; Jahanbani, Fereshteh; Rodriguez-Paris, Juan; Gelernter, Joel; Nadeau, Kari C; Oghalai, John S; Schrijver, Iris; Snyder, Michael P

    2014-12-20

    The genetic diversity of loci and mutations underlying hereditary hearing loss is an active area of investigation. To identify loci associated with predominantly non-syndromic sensorineural hearing loss, we performed exome sequencing of families and of single probands, as well as copy number variation (CNV) mapping in a case-control cohort. Analysis of three distinct families revealed several candidate loci in two families and a single strong candidate gene, MYH7B, for hearing loss in one family. MYH7B encodes a Type II myosin, consistent with a role for cytoskeletal proteins in hearing. High-resolution genome-wide CNV analysis of 150 cases and 157 controls revealed deletions in genes known to be involved in hearing (e.g. GJB6, OTOA, and STRC, encoding connexin 30, otoancorin, and stereocilin, respectively), supporting CNV contributions to hearing loss phenotypes. Additionally, a novel region on chromosome 16 containing part of the PDXDC1 gene was found to be frequently deleted in hearing loss patients (OR=3.91, 95% CI: 1.62-9.40, p=1.45×10(-7)). We conclude that many known as well as novel loci and distinct types of mutations not typically tested in clinical settings can contribute to the etiology of hearing loss. Our study also demonstrates the challenges of exome sequencing and genome-wide CNV mapping for direct clinical application, and illustrates the need for functional and clinical follow-up as well as curated open-access databases.

  4. Hearing aid fitting in older persons with hearing impairment: the influence of cognitive function, age, and hearing loss on hearing aid benefit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meister H

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Hartmut Meister,1 Sebastian Rählmann,1 Martin Walger,2 Sabine Margolf-Hackl,3 Jürgen Kießling3 1Jean Uhrmacher Institute for Clinical ENT-Research, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany; 2Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany; 3Department of Othorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Giessen, Giessen, Germany Purpose: To examine the association of cognitive function, age, and hearing loss with clinically assessed hearing aid benefit in older hearing-impaired persons.Methods: Hearing aid benefit was assessed using objective measures regarding speech recognition in quiet and noisy environments as well as a subjective measure reflecting everyday situations captured using a standardized questionnaire. A broad range of general cognitive functions such as attention, memory, and intelligence were determined using different neuropsychological tests. Linear regression analyses were conducted with the outcome of the neuropsychological tests as well as age and hearing loss as independent variables and the benefit measures as dependent variables. Thirty experienced older hearing aid users with typical age-related hearing impairment participated.Results: Most of the benefit measures revealed that the participants obtained significant improvement with their hearing aids. Regression models showed a significant relationship between a fluid intelligence measure and objective hearing aid benefit. When individual hearing thresholds were considered as an additional independent variable, hearing loss was the only significant contributor to the benefit models. Lower cognitive capacity – as determined by the fluid intelligence measure – was significantly associated with greater hearing loss. Subjective benefit could not be predicted by any of the variables considered.Conclusion: The present study does not give evidence that hearing aid benefit is critically associated with cognitive

  5. COMMUNICATION, WORK PERFORMANCE AND HEARING IMPAIRMENT

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    Héctor Florencio Martínez Pérez

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research is to describe the work performance of employees with hearing disabilities in education and their communication style. Theoretically, Karns, Dow and Neville (2012, postulated that the deaf processed Visual and tactile stimuli in their tasks. In job performance there are the contributions of Treviño et al (2010, Chiavenato (2009, 2011 and Robbins and Judge (2009. Venezuelan laws are included as basis and strengthening of inclution-participation of the deaf. The methodology is phenomenological-hermeneutical (Van Manen, 2003, using techniques and tools as participant observation, interview and questionnaire, respectively. As a result it was obtained that deaf people role is skillfully in their jobs, provided they do not involve hearing and his style of communication is respected; they are more responsible, punctual, and collaborators. It is recommended to avoid understatement, pity and increase knowledge about the skills of the deaf; all capabilities are so valued.

  6. Objective Scaling of Sound Quality for Normal-Hearing and Hearing-Impaired Listeners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars Bramsløw

    ) Subjective sound quality ratings of clean and distorted speech and music signals, by normal-hearing and hearing-impaired listeners, to provide reference data, 2) An auditory model of the ear, including the effects of hearing loss, based on existing psychoacoustic knowledge, coupled to 3) An artificial neural...... to be only slightly larger than the random variance in the subjective ratings. Analysis of the neural network after training could not identify qualitative relations between the physical signal parameters and the perceived sound quality. Further verification of OSSQAR with new signals and distortion types...

  7. Neuropsychologic function of children with severe hearing impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J J; Rapin, I; Wilson, B C; Van Denburg, F V

    1975-12-01

    A neuropsychologic and medical study was carried out on a selected sample of 34 hearing-impaired children aged seven to 10 years at the onset of the study. In 16 children the cause of the hearing loss was thought to be exogenous. Eight of these had evidence for organic brain dysfunction. Nine children were thought to have genetic etiologies, and in nine no cause could be determined (sporadic hearing loss). Medical examination revealed several unsuspected abnormalities, particularly visual ones. Motor and visual motor deficits were frequent among hearing-impaired children with brain damage. The Performance Scale of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, and Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices, as well as the Paper Folding item of the Hiskey-Nebraska Test of Learning Aptitude appeared sensitive to the presence of brain damage. The mean score for the WISC Performance Scale fell within the average range for hearing children, supporting previous findings of cognitive competence of the deaf. In this sample, Hiskey-Nebraska scores tended to be lower than WISC scores. Reasons for this discrepancy were suggested and did not appear to be accounted for by brain damage. Deficits in items requiring visual memory, sequencing, and categorization were relatively prevalent but showed no etiologic predilection. They were thought to be related to the consequence of hearing loss rather than to brain damage. Difficulty with stereognosis highlighted the problem of deciding why a hearing-impaired child might fail a particular task. This difficulty suggested that failure might not indicate a deficit in the function the task was designed to measure, but rather, reliance on an inefficient strategy for success.

  8. A Hearing-Impaired Child's Acquisition of Schemata: Something's Missing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshinaga-Itano, Christine; Downey, Doris M.

    1986-01-01

    The difficulties hearing impaired students experience in acquiring the conceptual information underlying narratives is discussed in terms of schemata development and the role of incidental learning. Principles for teaching concepts and labels, elaborating the schema, using questions to fill in conceptual gaps, and using imaginary play and…

  9. Vocabulary Developing Strategies Applied to Individuals with Hearing Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasu, Guzin; Girgin, Umit; Uzuner, Yildiz; Kaya, Zehranur

    2016-01-01

    The general purpose of this research was to investigate the strategies utilized for vocabulary development of ten individuals (first year college students) in Graphic Art Department, School for The Handicapped, Anadolu University with hearing impairment. The reflective and cyclical data were consisted of videotape recordings of the actual lessons,…

  10. E-Learning Environment for Hearing Impaired Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Hisyamuddin; Tasir, Zaidatun; Mohamad, Siti Khadijah

    2013-01-01

    The usage of technology within the educational department has become more vital by each year passing. One of the most popular technological approaches used is the e-learning environment. The usage of e-learning environment in education involves a wide range of types of students, and this includes the hearing impaired ones. Some adjustment or…

  11. Phenotypic characterization of DFNA24: prelingual progressive sensorineural hearing impairment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos, R.L.; Hafner, F.M.; Huygen, P.L.M.; Linder, T.E.; Schinzel, A.; Spillmann, T.; Leal, S.M.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the hearing impairment (HI) phenotype which segregates in a large multi-generation Swiss-German family with autosomal dominant nonsyndromic HI. The locus segregating within this pedigree is located on chromosome 4q35-qter and is designated as DFNA24. For this pedigree, audiome

  12. Soybean β-Conglycinin Prevents Age-Related Hearing Impairment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tohru Tanigawa

    Full Text Available Obesity-related complications are associated with the development of age-related hearing impairment. β-Conglycinin (β-CG, one of the main storage proteins in soy, offers multiple health benefits, including anti-obesity and anti-atherosclerotic effects. Here, to elucidate the potential therapeutic application of β-CG, we investigated the effect of β-CG on age-related hearing impairment. Male wild-type mice (age 6 months were randomly divided into β-CG-fed and control groups. Six months later, the body weight was significantly lower in β-CG-fed mice than in the controls. Consumption of β-CG rescued the hearing impairment observed in control mice. Cochlear blood flow also increased in β-CG-fed mice, as did the expression of eNOS in the stria vascularis (SV, which protects vasculature. β-CG consumption also ameliorated oxidative status as assessed by 4-HNE staining. In the SV, lipofuscin granules of marginal cells and vacuolar degeneration of microvascular pericytes were decreased in β-CG-fed mice, as shown by transmission electron microscopy. β-CG consumption prevented loss of spiral ganglion cells and reduced the frequencies of lipofuscin granules, nuclear invaginations, and myelin vacuolation. Our observations indicate that β-CG ameliorates age-related hearing impairment by preserving cochlear blood flow and suppressing oxidative stress.

  13. Anger Expression Styles of Hearing Impaired Individuals Doing Sport and Those Not Doing Sport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altin, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research was to determine the anger expression styles between the sportive hearing impaired individuals and the sedentary hearing impaired individuals. In the sportive hearing impaired group, there were 170 participants: 62 females and 108 males doing basketball, volleyball and football teams as licensed sportsmen in various clubs…

  14. Temporal modulation transfer functions obtained using sinusoidal carriers with normally hearing and hearing-impaired listeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, B C; Glasberg, B R

    2001-08-01

    Temporal modulation transfer functions were obtained using sinusoidal carriers for four normally hearing subjects and three subjects with mild to moderate cochlear hearing loss. Carrier frequencies were 1000, 2000 and 5000 Hz, and modulation frequencies ranged from 10 to 640 Hz in one-octave steps. The normally hearing subjects were tested using levels of 30 and 80 dB SPL. For the higher level, modulation detection thresholds varied only slightly with modulation frequency for frequencies up to 80 Hz, but decreased for high modulation frequencies. The decrease can be attributed to the detection of spectral sidebands. For the lower level, thresholds varied little with modulation frequency for all three carrier frequencies. The absence of a decrease in the threshold for large modulation frequencies can be explained by the low sensation level of the spectral sidebands. The hearing-impaired subjects were tested at 80 dB SPL, except for two cases where the absolute threshold at the carrier frequency was greater than 70 dB SPL; in these cases a level of 90 dB was used. The results were consistent with the idea that spectral sidebands were less detectable for the hearing-impaired than for the normally hearing subjects. For the two lower carrier frequencies, there were no large decreases in threshold with increasing modulation frequency, and where decreases did occur, this happened only between 320 and 640 Hz. For the 5000-Hz carrier, thresholds were roughly constant for modulation frequencies from 10 to 80 or 160 Hz, and then increased monotonically, becoming unmeasurable at 640 Hz. The results for this carrier may reflect "pure" effects of temporal resolution, without any influence from the detection of spectral sidebands. The results suggest that temporal resolution for deterministic stimuli is similar for normally hearing and hearing-impaired listeners.

  15. Prevalence of hearing impairement in the district of Lucknow, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupam Mishra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A multi-cluster study (survey was carried out by department of ENT KG Medical University, Lucknow from July 2003 to August 2004 in rural and urban population of Lucknow district to estimate prevalence and causes of hearing impairment in the community. Data included audiological profile and basic ear examination that was analysed through EARFORM software program of WHO. Overall hearing impairment was seen in 15.14% of rural as opposed to 5.9% of urban population. A higher prevalence of disabling hearing impairment (DHI in elderly and deafness in 0-10 years age group was seen. The prevalence of sensorineural deafness necessitating hearing aids was 20% in rural and 50% in urban areas respectively. The presence of DHI was seen in 1/2 urban subjects and 1/3rd of rural counterparts. The incidence of cerumen / debris was very common in both types of population and the need of surgery was much more amongst rural subjects indicating more advanced / dangerous ear disease.

  16. Impact of hearing impairment on quality of life of adolescents

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    Škrbić Renata

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Hearing impairment, as a type of sensory disability affects the quality of life of adolescents. The aim of this study was to determine whether the quality of life of adolescents with hearing impairments was different from the quality of life of adolescents without disabilities, and to examine the correlation between self- reported quality of life and proxy- report by their parents. Materials and Methods. The study included 52 adolescents with hearing impairment and 122 adolescents without developmental disabilities, aged from 13 to 18 years and their parents. Data were collected by a standardized questionnaire, the PedsQLTM 4.0 Generic Core Scale. The survey was conducted during May and June 2011 in 6 schools in Novi Sad and Belgrade. Results. Adolescents with hearing impairment and their parents reported lower scores on all scales of questionnaire. The average score of physical health was 77.58; p<0.001 (adolescents, and 75; p=0,006 (parents; on psycho-social summary scale 75.35; p=0.025 (adolescents, and 73.37; p=0.02 (parents. On the overall scale, the adolescents scored 76.13; p<0.001, and parents reported 73.93; p<0.001. The parents assessed the quality of life lower than their children. On the total summary scale, a moderate agreement (r = 0.51 was found between self- report and proxy- report. Conclusion. Hearing loss affects all aspects of the quality of life of adolescents. A multidisciplinary approach is required in order to provide better conditions for functioning of these children and improve their quality of life.

  17. Hearing impairment and nightmares: a theoretical insight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rego, Maria Francisca; Duarte, Ivone; Nunes, Rui

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article is to address the issue of nightmares in the deaf population, given that there are no documented studies on this matter to the best of our knowledge. The study of nightmares in the deaf population is of high relevance given their specific characteristics (impossibility of verbalisation) and the lack of studies with this population. Nightmares are dreams of negative content that trigger an awakening associated with a rapid return to a full state of alert and a persistent feeling of anxiety and fear, which may cause significant distress. Various studies show that the deaf population has dreams with more negative imagery and emotions, are more exposed to interpersonal traumas and have higher rates of dissociation, than hearing people. These concepts seem to be connected given that, in the presence of traumatic events, dissociation may act as a defence mechanism and nightmares may operate as an adaptive coping strategy.

  18. Age-related hearing impairment and the triad of acquired hearing loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chao-Hui; Schrepfer, Thomas; Schacht, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    Understanding underlying pathological mechanisms is prerequisite for a sensible design of protective therapies against hearing loss. The triad of age-related, noise-generated, and drug-induced hearing loss displays intriguing similarities in some cellular responses of cochlear sensory cells such as a potential involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptotic and necrotic cell death. On the other hand, detailed studies have revealed that molecular pathways are considerably complex and, importantly, it has become clear that pharmacological protection successful against one form of hearing loss will not necessarily protect against another. This review will summarize pathological and pathophysiological features of age-related hearing impairment (ARHI) in human and animal models and address selected aspects of the commonality (or lack thereof) of cellular responses in ARHI to drugs and noise. PMID:26283913

  19. Age-related Hearing Impairment and the Triad of Acquired Hearing Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Hui eYang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Understanding underlying pathological mechanisms is prerequisite for a sensible design of protective therapies against hearing loss. The triad of age-related, noise-generated, and drug-induced hearing loss ¬¬displays intriguing similarities in some cellular responses of cochlear sensory cells such as a potential involvement of reactive oxygen species and apoptotic and necrotic cell death. On the other hand, detailed studies have revealed that molecular pathways are considerably complex and, importantly, it has become clear that pharmacological protection successful against one form of hearing loss will not necessarily protect against another. This review will summarize pathological and pathophysiological features of age-related hearing impairment (ARHI in human and animal models and address selected aspects of the commonality (or lack thereof of cellular responses in ARHI to drugs and noise.

  20. Narrative competence among hearing-impaired and normal-hearing children: analytical cross-sectional study

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    Alexandra Dezani Soares

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Oral narrative is a means of language development assessment. However, standardized data for deaf patients are scarce. The aim here was to compare the use of narrative competence between hearing-impaired and normal-hearing children. DESIGN AND SETTING: Analytical cross-sectional study at the Department of Speech-Language and Hearing Sciences, Universidade Federal de São Paulo. METHODS: Twenty-one moderately to profoundly bilaterally hearing-impaired children (cases and 21 normal-hearing children without language abnormalities (controls, matched according to sex, age, schooling level and school type, were studied. A board showing pictures in a temporally logical sequence was presented to each child, to elicit a narrative, and the child's performance relating to narrative structure and cohesion was measured. The frequencies of variables, their associations (Mann-Whitney test and their 95% confidence intervals was analyzed. RESULTS: The deaf subjects showed poorer performance regarding narrative structure, use of connectives, cohesion measurements and general punctuation (P < 0.05. There were no differences in the number of propositions elaborated or in referent specification between the two groups. The deaf children produced a higher proportion of orientation-related propositions (P = 0.001 and lower proportions of propositions relating to complicating actions (P = 0.015 and character reactions (P = 0.005. CONCLUSION: Hearing-impaired children have abnormalities in different aspects of language, involving form, content and use, in relation to their normal-hearing peers. Narrative competence was also associated with the children's ages and the school type.

  1. Phonemic restoration by hearing-impaired listeners with mild to moderate sensorineural hearing loss

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baskent, Deniz; Eiler, Cheryl L; Edwards, Brent

    2010-01-01

    The auditory system is capable of perceptually restoring inaudible portions of speech. This restoration may be compromised as a result of hearing impairment, particularly if it is combined with advanced age, because of degradations in the bottom-up and top-down processes. To test this hypothesis, ph

  2. Oral health conditions and behaviors among hearing impaired and normal hearing college students at Ratchasuda College, Nakhon Pathom, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vichayanrat, Tippanart; Kositpumivate, Waritorn

    2014-09-01

    This study aimed to explore oral health and oral health related behaviors among hearing impaired and normal hearing students at Rachasuda College. The association between socioeconomic factors, hearing status, oral health behaviors, oral hygiene levels and dental caries status were also examined. The students filled out a self-administered questionnaire with assistance of a sign language video to obtain personal and behavior information. A total of 180 students, 83 normal hearing and 97 hearing impaired students completed the questionnaire and underwent an oral examination. The prevalences of caries were 53.6% and 50.6% among students with hearing impairment and normal hearing, respectively (p=0.354). After age stratification, the hearing impaired students aged 18-21 years had significantly less filled teeth (p=0.012), and those older than 21 years had less missing teeth due to caries than normal-hearing students (p=0.023). Poor oral hygiene was found in 51.8% and 42.2% of normal and hearing-impaired students, respectively (p=0.365). Caries status was significantly associated with maternal education level (OR 3.56; 95% CI: 1.52-8.32) and oral hygiene (OR 3.26; 95% CI: 1.64-6.45). The high prevalence of dental caries and poor oral hygiene among college students is alarming. Hearing impairment did not appear to affect the prevalences of these conditions compared to those with normal hearing. Oral health education tools need to be developed and utilized for both normal hearing and hearing impaired college students in Thailand.

  3. Multicenter audiometric results with the Vibrant Soundbridge, a semi-implantable hearing device for sensorineural hearing impairment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snik, A.F.M.; Mylanus, E.A.M.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Dillier, N.; Fisch, U.; Gnadeberg, D.; Lenarz, T.; Mazolli, M.; Babighian, G.; Uziel, A.; Cooper, H.R.; Connor, A.F. O'; Fraysse, B.; Charachon, R.; Shehata-Dieler, W.E.

    2001-01-01

    The Vibrant Soundbridge, a semi-implantable hearing device for subjects with moderate to severe sensorineural hearing impairment was introduced commercially. First audiologic results are presented on 63 patients from 10 European implant centers. Hearing loss was at 0.5, 1, 2, and 4 kHz varying betwe

  4. Aided and unaided speech perception by older hearing impaired listeners.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L Woods

    Full Text Available The most common complaint of older hearing impaired (OHI listeners is difficulty understanding speech in the presence of noise. However, tests of consonant-identification and sentence reception threshold (SeRT provide different perspectives on the magnitude of impairment. Here we quantified speech perception difficulties in 24 OHI listeners in unaided and aided conditions by analyzing (1 consonant-identification thresholds and consonant confusions for 20 onset and 20 coda consonants in consonant-vowel-consonant (CVC syllables presented at consonant-specific signal-to-noise (SNR levels, and (2 SeRTs obtained with the Quick Speech in Noise Test (QSIN and the Hearing in Noise Test (HINT. Compared to older normal hearing (ONH listeners, nearly all unaided OHI listeners showed abnormal consonant-identification thresholds, abnormal consonant confusions, and reduced psychometric function slopes. Average elevations in consonant-identification thresholds exceeded 35 dB, correlated strongly with impairments in mid-frequency hearing, and were greater for hard-to-identify consonants. Advanced digital hearing aids (HAs improved average consonant-identification thresholds by more than 17 dB, with significant HA benefit seen in 83% of OHI listeners. HAs partially normalized consonant-identification thresholds, reduced abnormal consonant confusions, and increased the slope of psychometric functions. Unaided OHI listeners showed much smaller elevations in SeRTs (mean 6.9 dB than in consonant-identification thresholds and SeRTs in unaided listening conditions correlated strongly (r = 0.91 with identification thresholds of easily identified consonants. HAs produced minimal SeRT benefit (2.0 dB, with only 38% of OHI listeners showing significant improvement. HA benefit on SeRTs was accurately predicted (r = 0.86 by HA benefit on easily identified consonants. Consonant-identification tests can accurately predict sentence processing deficits and HA benefit in OHI

  5. Acoustics and sociolinguistics: Patterns of communication in hearing impairing classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKellin, William; Shahin, Kimary; Jamieson, Janet; Hodgson, Murray; Pichora-Fuller, Kathleen

    2005-04-01

    In elementary school classes, noise during student led activities is often taken as evidence of successful interaction and learning. In this complex social environment of elementary school classrooms, acquisition of complex language and social skills-the focus of activities in early education-is expected to take place in hearing-hostile environments. Communication and language processing in these contexts requires interactive strategies, discourse forms, and syntactic structures different from the educationally desired forms used in acoustically advantageous environments. Recordings were made of the interaction of groups of students in grades 1-3, 5, and 7 during collaborative group work in their regular classrooms. Each student wore microphones at the ear level and head-mounted video cameras. Each group as a whole was also audio- and videotaped and noise level readings were recorded. Analysis of the acoustical and phonological properties of language heard by each student has demonstrated that the language variety used in these noisy and reverberant settings is similar to that of individuals with hearing impairments. This paper reports similarities between the syntactic structures and pragmatic strategies used by hearing impaired children and normally hearing children in noisy contexts. [Work supported by Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies, University of British Columbia.

  6. Towards Empowering Hearing Impaired Students' Skills in Computing and Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nihal Esam Abuzinadah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies have shown that deaf and hearing-impaired students have many difficulties in learning applied disciplines such as Medicine, Engineering, and Computer Programming. This study aims to investigate the readiness of deaf students to pursue higher education in applied sciences, more specifically in computer science. This involves investigating their capabilities in computer skills and applications. Computer programming is an integral component in the technological field that can facilitate the development of further scientific advances. Devising a manner of teaching the deaf and hearing-impaired population will give them an opportunity to contribute to the technology sector. This would allow these students to join the scientific world when otherwise; they are generally unable to participate because of the limitations they encounter. The study showed that deaf students in Jeddah are eager to continue their higher education and that a large percentage of these students are keen on studying computer science, particularly if they are provided with the right tools.

  7. Hearing Characteristics of Stroke Patients: Prevalence and Characteristics of Hearing Impairment and Auditory Processing Disorders in Stroke Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koohi, Nehzat; Vickers, Deborah A; Lakshmanan, Rahul; Chandrashekar, Hoskote; Werring, David J; Warren, Jason D; Bamiou, Doris-Eva

    2017-06-01

    Stroke survivors may suffer from a range of hearing impairments that may restrict their participation in postacute rehabilitation programs. Hearing impairment may have a significant impact on listening, linguistic skills, and overall communication of the affected stroke patient. However, no studies sought to systematically characterize auditory function of stroke patients in detail, to establish the different types of hearing impairments in this cohort of patients. Such information would be clinically useful in understanding and addressing the hearing needs of stroke survivors. The present study aimed to characterize and classify the hearing impairments, using a detailed audiological assessment test battery, in order to determine the level of clinical need and inform appropriate rehabilitation for this patient population. A case-control study. Forty-two recruited stroke patients who were discharged from a stroke unit and 40 control participants matched for age. All participants underwent pure-tone audiometry and immittance measurements including acoustic reflex threshold, transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions, auditory-evoked brainstem response, and a central auditory processing assessment battery, performed in a single session. Hearing impairments were classified as peripheral hearing loss (cochlear and neural type), central auditory processing disorder (CAPD), and as a combination of CAPD and peripheral hearing loss. Overall mean hearing thresholds were not significantly different between the control and stroke groups. The most common type of hearing impairment in stroke patients was the combination type, "peripheral and CAPD," in the 61- to 80-yr-old subgroup (in 55%), and auditory processing deficits in 18- to 60-yr-olds (in 40%), which were both significantly higher than in controls. This is the first study to examine hearing function in detail in stroke patients. Given the importance of hearing for the efficiency of communication, it is essential to identify

  8. Use of Adaptive Digital Signal Processing to Improve Speech Communication for Normally Hearing aand Hearing-Impaired Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Richard W.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A two-microphone adaptive digital noise cancellation technique improved word-recognition ability for 20 normal and 12 hearing-impaired adults by reducing multitalker speech babble and speech spectrum noise 18-22 dB. Word recognition improvements averaged 37-50 percent for normal and 27-40 percent for hearing-impaired subjects. Improvement was best…

  9. Effects of Hearing Impairment and Hearing Aid Amplification on Listening Effort: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlenforst, Barbara; Jansma, Elise P.; Wang, Yang; Naylor, Graham; Lorens, Artur; Lunner, Thomas; Kramer, Sophia E.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To undertake a systematic review of available evidence on the effect of hearing impairment and hearing aid amplification on listening effort. Two research questions were addressed: Q1) does hearing impairment affect listening effort? and Q2) can hearing aid amplification affect listening effort during speech comprehension? Design: English language articles were identified through systematic searches in PubMed, EMBASE, Cinahl, the Cochrane Library, and PsycINFO from inception to August 2014. References of eligible studies were checked. The Population, Intervention, Control, Outcomes, and Study design strategy was used to create inclusion criteria for relevance. It was not feasible to apply a meta-analysis of the results from comparable studies. For the articles identified as relevant, a quality rating, based on the 2011 Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation Working Group guidelines, was carried out to judge the reliability and confidence of the estimated effects. Results: The primary search produced 7017 unique hits using the keywords: hearing aids OR hearing impairment AND listening effort OR perceptual effort OR ease of listening. Of these, 41 articles fulfilled the Population, Intervention, Control, Outcomes, and Study design selection criteria of: experimental work on hearing impairment OR hearing aid technologies AND listening effort OR fatigue during speech perception. The methods applied in those articles were categorized into subjective, behavioral, and physiological assessment of listening effort. For each study, the statistical analysis addressing research question Q1 and/or Q2 was extracted. In seven articles more than one measure of listening effort was provided. Evidence relating to Q1 was provided by 21 articles that reported 41 relevant findings. Evidence relating to Q2 was provided by 27 articles that reported 56 relevant findings. The quality of evidence on both research questions (Q1 and Q2) was very low

  10. HOW HEARING IMPAIRED PUPILS COMPREHEND CONCEPTS OF LIVING NATURE?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmina KARIКЈ

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available This research represents a part of a broader research on forming and accepting concepts about living beings in the field of nature and society by hearing impaired pupils. Shown results relate to the comprehension of concepts on higher level acquired during two researches. The first research relates to examining comprehension of concepts by recognizing complete classifications and the other to examining comprehension of concepts by analyzing definitions in the same pupil sample.

  11. Form and Meaning in the Written Language of Hearing-Impaired Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshinaga-Itano, Christine; Snyder, Lynn

    1985-01-01

    Semantic discourse features of written narratives of 49 hearing impaired children (10-15 years old) were examined in an analysis of the relationship between form and meaning in the writing of both hearing and hearing impaired Ss. Syntactic and semantic written language growth appear to be qualitatively and quantitatively different in the groups.…

  12. Cigarette smoking causes hearing impairment among Bangladeshi population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Faisal Sumit

    Full Text Available Lifestyle including smoking, noise exposure with MP3 player and drinking alcohol are considered as risk factors for affecting hearing synergistically. However, little is known about the association of cigarette smoking with hearing impairment among subjects who carry a lifestyle without using MP3 player and drinking alcohol. We showed here the influence of smoking on hearing among Bangladeshi subjects who maintain a lifestyle devoid of using MP3 player and drinking alcohol. A total of 184 subjects (smokers: 90; non-smokers: 94 were included considering their duration and frequency of smoking for conducting this study. The mean hearing thresholds of non-smoker subjects at 1, 4, 8 and 12 kHz frequencies were 5.63 ± 2.10, 8.56±5.75, 21.06 ± 11.06, 40.79 ± 20.36 decibel (dB, respectively and that of the smokers were 7 ± 3.8, 13.27 ± 8.4, 30.66 ± 12.50 and 56.88 ± 21.58 dB, respectively. The hearing thresholds of the smokers at 4, 8 and 12 kHz frequencies were significantly (p5 years showed higher level of auditory threshold (62.16 ± 19.87 dB at 12 kHz frequency compared with that (41.52 ± 19.21 dB of the subjects smoked for 1-5 years and the difference in auditory thresholds was statistically significant (p<0.0002. In this study, the Brinkman Index (BI of smokers was from 6 to 440 and the adjusted odds ratio showed a positive correlation between hearing loss and smoking when adjusted for age and body mass index (BMI. In addition, age, but not BMI, also played positive role on hearing impairment at all frequencies. Thus, these findings suggested that cigarette smoking affects hearing level at all the frequencies tested but most significantly at extra higher frequencies.

  13. A new side effect of immunosuppression: high incidence of hearing impairment after liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rifai, Kinan; Kirchner, Gabriele I; Bahr, Matthias J; Cantz, Tobias; Rosenau, Jens; Nashan, Björn; Klempnauer, Jürgen L; Manns, Michael P; Strassburg, Christian P

    2006-03-01

    Little is known about hearing impairment in patients after organ transplantation. We conducted a single-center study to evaluate hearing impairment in patients after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). A questionnaire was sent to 695 adult patients after OLT to assess characteristics and course of auditory impairment. Risk factors such as ototoxic drugs were taken into consideration. Clinical follow-up, including immunosuppressive therapy, was analyzed in detail. The questionnaire was completed by 521 patients (75%). Hearing impairment was reported by 184 patients (35%). A total of 43 patients (8%) suffered from hearing abnormalities prior to OLT. The remaining 141 patients (27%) developed hearing impairment after transplantation. Main problems were hearing loss (52%), tinnitus (38%), and otalgia (30%). There was no association of post-OLT hearing disorders with age or known risk factors. In 43% of patients, onset of hearing impairment was within 2 yr post-OLT. Hearing loss was positively associated with tacrolimus immunosuppression in univariate (P Patients using a hearing aid received tacrolimus more frequently than cyclosporine (P hearing impairment is frequent in patients after OLT and contributes to post-OLT morbidity. Calcineurin inhibitor-related neurotoxicity appears as a possible mechanism. Further prospective investigations with objective hearing tests are necessary to confirm these results and to evaluate the role of immunosuppression.

  14. The effect of symmetrical and asymmetrical hearing impairment on music quality perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yuexin; Zhao, Fei; Chen, Yuebo; Liang, Maojin; Chen, Ling; Yang, Haidi; Xiong, Hao; Zhang, Xueyuan; Zheng, Yiqing

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of symmetrical, asymmetrical and unilateral hearing impairment on music quality perception. Six validated music pieces in the categories of classical music, folk music and pop music were used to assess music quality in terms of its 'pleasantness', 'naturalness', 'fullness', 'roughness' and 'sharpness'. 58 participants with sensorineural hearing loss [20 with unilateral hearing loss (UHL), 20 with bilateral symmetrical hearing loss (BSHL) and 18 with bilateral asymmetrical hearing loss (BAHL)] and 29 normal hearing (NH) subjects participated in the present study. Hearing impaired (HI) participants had greater difficulty in overall music quality perception than NH participants. Participants with BSHL rated music pleasantness and naturalness to be higher than participants with BAHL. Moreover, the hearing thresholds of the better ears from BSHL and BAHL participants as well as the hearing thresholds of the worse ears from BSHL participants were negatively correlated to the pleasantness and naturalness perception. HI participants rated the familiar music pieces higher than unfamiliar music pieces in the three music categories. Music quality perception in participants with hearing impairment appeared to be affected by symmetry of hearing loss, degree of hearing loss and music familiarity when they were assessed using the music quality rating test (MQRT). This indicates that binaural symmetrical hearing is important to achieve a high level of music quality perception in HI listeners. This emphasizes the importance of provision of bilateral hearing assistive devices for people with asymmetrical hearing impairment.

  15. Mainstreaming hearing-impaired students: the effect of effort in communicating on cooperation and interpersonal attraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D W; Johnson, R T

    1985-01-01

    Cooperative and individualistic learning experiences were compared in terms of their effects on interaction and relationships between hearing and hearing-impaired students. Two contradictory hypotheses were tested--one stating that the effort required for hearing and hearing-impaired students to communicate would lead to frustration, withdrawal, exclusion, and rejection; the other stating that cooperative learning experiences would lead to cross-handicap interpersonal attraction regardless of communication difficulties. Thirty 3rd-grade students (20 hearing and 10 hearing impaired) were assigned to conditions on a stratified, random basis controlling for handicap, sex, and ability level. They participated in the study for 55 min a day for 15 instructional days. The results indicate that subjects involved in cooperative learning experiences performed higher on measures of interaction and interpersonal attraction between hearing and hearing-impaired students than did subjects involved in individualistic learning experiences.

  16. Factors associated with third-party disability in spouses of older people with hearing impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarinci, Nerina; Worrall, Linda; Hickson, Louise

    2012-01-01

    This study had two aims: (1) to describe the extent of third-party disability in a sample of spouses of older people with hearing impairment, and (2) to investigate factors associated with third-party hearing disability. Third-party disability is defined as the disability and functioning of family members as a result of the health condition of their significant other. One hundred older spouses who had partners with hearing impairment participated. All assessments were self-reported, and included a set of measures (the 36-item Significant Other Scale for Hearing Disability, SOS-HEAR; the Relationship Assessment Scale; and the Significant Other Assessment of Communication) administered to the target population of normally hearing older spouses, and those administered to the hearing impaired partners of the spouses in the study (the Self Assessment of Communication). To address the first aim, descriptive statistics were used to describe the extent of third-party hearing disability in the spouses. To address the second aim, binary logistic regression analysis was used to examine factors associated with third-party hearing disability. Factors investigated were focused on the spouse (e.g., spouse perception of relationship satisfaction) and on the partners with hearing impairment (e.g., partners' level of hearing impairment). Most spouses (98%) reported some degree of third-party hearing disability on at least one item of the SOS-HEAR, with the majority reporting a mild disability. Three risk factors were found to be significantly associated with severe or complete third-party disability: lower relationship satisfaction as reported by the spouse (Relationship Assessment Scale), spousal age difference, and spouse perception of their partner's hearing disability (Significant Other Assessment of Communication). Partners' level of hearing impairment, self-reported hearing disability (Self Assessment of Communication), use of hearing aids, and spouse satisfaction that their

  17. Achieving effective hearing aid fitting within one month after identification of childhood permanent hearing impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastanza, G; Gallus, R; De Carlini, M; Picciotti, P M; Muzzi, E; Ciciriello, E; Orzan, E; Conti, G

    2016-02-01

    Diagnosis of child permanent hearing impairment (PHI) can be made with extreme timeliness compared to the past thanks to improvements in PHI identification through newborn hearing screening programmes. It now becomes essential to provide an effective amplification as quickly as possible in order to restore auditory function and favour speech and language development. The early fitting of hearing aids and possible later cochlear implantation indeed prompts the development of central auditory pathways, connections with secondary sensory brain areas, as well as with motor and articulatory cortex. The aim of this paper is to report the results of a strategic analysis that involves identification of strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats regarding the process of achieving early amplification in all cases of significant childhood PHI. The analysis is focused on the Italian situation and is part of the Italian Ministry of Health project CCM 2013 "Preventing Communication Disorders: a Regional Program for Early Identification, Intervention and Care of Hearing Impaired Children". © Copyright by Società Italiana di Otorinolaringologia e Chirurgia Cervico-Facciale.

  18. Installation and impact of sound field systems on hearing and hearing impaired children and their teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dockrell, Julie; Rigby, Kate; Shield, Bridget; Carey, Anne

    2005-04-01

    An evaluation of the installation and use of sound field systems in ten schools in England has been carried out. The evaluation included noise surveys of classrooms, questionnaire surveys of pupils and teachers and experimental testing of children with and without the use of SFS. The aim of this project was to investigate the impact of SFS on teaching and learning in elementary school classrooms, in particular, to ascertain whether the SFS differentially benefited children with hearing impairments. Barriers to teachers use of SFS were found in terms of equipment placement and maintenance, appropriate training, and teacher's knowledge. Nonetheless positive reports are recorded from both teachers and pupils. Teachers' and pupils' perceptions are compared with objective data evaluating change in performance when SFS are used for language and cognitive tasks. Data from children with hearing impairments and additional learning needs are analyzed for comparative purposes. The results are discussed in terms of effective practice for the use of SFS with elementary school pupils.

  19. Speech intelligibility for normal hearing and hearing-impaired listeners in simulated room acoustic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arweiler, Iris; Dau, Torsten; Poulsen, Torben

    , a classroom and a church. The data from the study provide constraints for existing models of speech intelligibility prediction (based on the speech intelligibility index, SII, or the speech transmission index, STI) which have shortcomings when reverberation and/or fluctuating noise affect speech......Speech intelligibility depends on many factors such as room acoustics, the acoustical properties and location of the signal and the interferers, and the ability of the (normal and impaired) auditory system to process monaural and binaural sounds. In the present study, the effect of reverberation...... on spatial release from masking was investigated in normal hearing and hearing impaired listeners using three types of interferers: speech shaped noise, an interfering female talker and speech-modulated noise. Speech reception thresholds (SRT) were obtained in three simulated environments: a listening room...

  20. The Investigation of Physical Performance Status of Visually and Hearing Impaired Applying Judo Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakoc, Onder

    2016-01-01

    It was aimed to investigate the physical performances of visually and hearing impaired doing judo training in this study. 32 male athletes, who were doing judo training, volunteer and, visually and hearing impaired, participated in this study. The investigation was applied to visually impaired (N = 12, mean ± SD; age: 25.75 ± 3.55 years, height:…

  1. 45 CFR 1308.11 - Eligibility criteria: Hearing impairment including deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Eligibility criteria: Hearing impairment including deafness. 1308.11 Section 1308.11 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE... impairment including deafness. (a) A child is classified as deaf if a hearing impairment exists which is...

  2. Adaptive psychological structure in childhood hearing impairment: audiological correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, A; Spinato, G; Cocuzza, S; Licciardello, L; Pavone, P; Maiolino, L

    2017-06-01

    . On the contrary, in normal hearing children, the emotion 'fear' is the most difficult to identify. Deaf children seem to be more susceptible to recognition of visual emotions. Furthermore, deaf children present significant problem-solving skills and emotional recognition skills, possibly as a result of their hearing impairment. © Copyright by Società Italiana di Otorinolaringologia e Chirurgia Cervico-Facciale, Rome, Italy.

  3. Evidence-based practice in audiology: rehabilitation options for adults with hearing impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickson, Louise; Laplante-Lévesque, Ariane; Wong, Lena

    2013-12-01

    The authors address 3 questions: (a) What is evidence-based practice (EBP), and why is it important for adults with hearing impairment? (b) What is the evidence about intervention options for adults who fail a hearing screening and are identified with hearing impairment? (c) What intervention options do adults choose when identified with hearing impairment for the first time? The 5 steps of the EBP process are discussed in relation to a clinical question about whether hearing aids and communication programs reduce activity limitations and participation restrictions compared with no treatment for adults who fail a hearing screening and are identified with hearing impairment. Systematic reviews of the evidence indicate that both hearing aids and communication programs reduce activity limitations and participation restrictions for this population and are therefore appropriate options. A study is then described in which these options were presented to 153 clients identified with hearing impairment for the first time: 43% chose hearing aids, 18% chose communication programs, and the remaining 39% chose not to take any action. EBP supports the offer of intervention options to adults who fail a hearing screening and are identified with hearing impairment.

  4. The effect of hearing impairment in older people on the spouse: development and psychometric testing of the significant other scale for hearing disability (SOS-HEAR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarinci, Nerina; Worrall, Linda; Hickson, Louise

    2009-01-01

    The effects of hearing impairment on the person with the impairment and on their significant others are pervasive and affect the quality of life for all involved. The effect of hearing impairment on significant others is known as a third-party disability. This study aimed to develop and psychometrically test a scale to measure the third-party disability experienced by spouses of older people with hearing impairment. The Significant Other Scale for Hearing Disability (SOS-HEAR) was based on results of a previous qualitative study investigating the effect of hearing impairment on a spouse's everyday life. Psychometric testing with 100 spouses was conducted using item analysis, Cronbach's alpha, factor analysis, and test-retest reliability. Principal components analysis identified six key underlying factors. A combined set of 27 items was found to be reliable (alpha = 0.94), with weighted kappa for items ranging from fair to very good. The SOS-HEAR is a brief, easy to administer instrument that has evidence of reliability and validity. The SOS-HEAR could serve as a means of identifying spouses of older people with hearing impairment in need of intervention, directed towards either the couple or the spouse alone.

  5. An overview of motor skill performance and balance in hearing impaired children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy Finita

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Childhood hearing impairment is a common chronic condition that may have a major impact on acquisition of speech, social and physical development. Numerous literature states that injury to the vestibular organs may result in accompanying balance and motor development disorders. But still postural control and motor assessments are not a routine procedure in hearing impaired children. Hence, we aim to provide an overview on motor skill performance and balance in hearing impaired children.

  6. Stress coping strategies in hearing-impaired students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahman Akbari

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: The majority of people experience problems and stressors, such as job layoffs and illnesses during their lives. However, the way people cope with stress varies. According to previous research, use of effective coping strategies can significantly reduce stress and tension. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effectiveness of stress coping strategies on hearing-impaired students.Methods: This is a quasi-experimental study with pre-test, post-test, and control group. The sample consisted of 40 hearing-impaired male students of guidance and high schools of the city of Sari, Iran, in the years 2010 and 2011. They were randomly selected and assigned to two experimental and control groups (n=20. The data collection tool was the General Health Questionnaire-28. The experimental group was administered eight sessions of stress coping strategies based on cognitive-behavioral techniques two hours weekly. Data were analyzed using statistical indices including mean, standard deviation, and two-way analysis of variance.Results: There was a significant difference between the pre-test and post-test scores in the subscales of somatic symptoms, anxiety and insomnia, depression, and social function (p<0.05. Moreover, after the eight sessions the rate of general health of the experimental group was higher than the control group.Conclusion: Stress coping strategies based on cognitive-behavioral techniques increased the general health of hearing-impaired people. Therefore, stress management training should be developed and expanded as an appropriate intervention.

  7. The Understanding of the Gene Diagnosis of Hereditary Hearing Loss%对遗传性聋基因诊断的认识

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘玉和

    2015-01-01

    耳聋发病率高,遗传因素是导致耳聋发生的最重要的病因。遗传性聋临床表型多样,包括综合征性聋和非综合征性聋。遗传性聋是经典的单基因遗传病,其遗传方式包括孟德尔遗传中的常染色体显性、隐性、性连锁遗传,也包括线粒体母系遗传和表观遗传。随着科学技术的发展,遗传性聋的基因研究取得很大进展,目前已发现118个耳聋相关基因,为遗传性聋的基因诊断提供了可能。遗传性聋的基因诊断能够明确病因、预测迟发性聋、有效预防遗传性聋的发生,提供遗传咨询以及将遗传性聋分型和分类,指导临床耳聋管理、药物治疗或听觉干预。新一代测序技术与遗传性聋的基因研究结果结合,使临床广泛开展遗传性聋的基因诊断成为可能。随着医疗大数据和云处理时代的到来,相信不久的将来,遗传性聋基因诊断一定会在临床广泛应用并成为疾病诊断的必备依据。%Genetic factors contribute to the most important cause of hearing loss with the high prevalence of morbidity. Hereditary hearing loss, with a diversity of phenotypes, includes two kinds of categories: the syndromic and non-syndromic. The modes of inheritance include autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X-linked of Mendelian inheritance, and the mitochondrial and epigenetic inheritance while hereditary hearing loss is the classic single-gene inheritance disorder. With the development of science and technology, great progress has been made in the research of hereditary hearing loss related gene. The discovery of the 118 genes associated with hearing loss makes it possible the gene diagnosis of hereditary hearing loss. The gene diagnosis of hereditary hearing loss can better determine the etiologies, predicting late-onset hearing loss, effectively preventing the occurrence of hereditary hearing loss, providing genetic counseling for patients and their

  8. Filling the Silent Void: Genetic Therapies for Hearing Impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Sng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The inner ear cytoarchitecture forms one of the most intricate and delicate organs in the human body and is vulnerable to the effects of genetic disorders, aging, and environmental damage. Owing to the inability of the mammalian cochlea to regenerate sensory hair cells, the loss of hair cells is a leading cause of deafness in humans. Millions of individuals worldwide are affected by the emotionally and financially devastating effects of hearing impairment (HI. This paper provides a brief introduction into the key role of genes regulating inner ear development and function. Potential future therapies that leverage on an improved understanding of these molecular pathways are also described in detail.

  9. Genetic hearing impairment : a clinical study of various dominant inherited types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ensink, Robbert Jan Herman

    2000-01-01

    In this thesis a presentation is given of different patterns of inheritance, present in the cochlea or in the auditory chain of ossicles. Presentation and diagnosis of hereditary hearing loss is reviewed. A rare pattern of inheritance is the so called mitochondrial or maternal inheritance. In this r

  10. Genetic hearing impairment : a clinical study of various dominant inherited types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ensink, Robbert Jan Herman

    2000-01-01

    In this thesis a presentation is given of different patterns of inheritance, present in the cochlea or in the auditory chain of ossicles. Presentation and diagnosis of hereditary hearing loss is reviewed. A rare pattern of inheritance is the so called mitochondrial or maternal inheritance. In this

  11. Hearing impairment and cognitive function among a community-dwelling population in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namba Atsushi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hearing impairment is a prevalent and chronic condition in older people. This study investigated the relationship between cognitive function and hearing impairment in a Japanese population. Methods A pure-tone average (0.5-2.0 kHz was used to evaluate hearing impairment in 846 participants of the Iwaki Health Promotion Project who were aged at least 50 years old (310 men and 536 women. We also administered the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE, the Center for Epidemiologic Studies for Depression (CES-D scale, Starkstein's apathy scale (AS and the Short Form Health Survey Version 2 (SF-36v2. A multiple linear regression analysis assessed the association between hearing impairment and mental correlates. Results The overall prevalence of hearing impairment in this study population was 37.7%. The participants with hearing impairment were older and less educated compared to those with no hearing problems. We observed significant differences in the MMSE and AS scores between the mild/moderate to severe groups versus the non-impaired group. After adjusting for age, gender and amount of education, hearing impairment was significantly associated with MMSE and AS scores, but not with CES-D scores. Hearing impairment was significantly related to the social functioning (SF and role emotional (RE scores of the SF-36v2. Conclusions Hearing impairment is common among older people and is associated with cognitive impairment, apathy and a poor health-related quality of life. Screening for and correcting hearing impairments might improve the quality of life and functional status of older patients.

  12. Masker phase effects in normal-hearing and hearing-impaired listeners: evidence for peripheral compression at low signal frequencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oxenham, Andrew J.; Dau, Torsten

    2004-01-01

    curvature. Results from 12 listeners with sensorineural hearing loss showed reduced masker phase effects, when compared with data from normal-hearing listeners, at both 250- and 1000-Hz signal frequencies. The effects of hearing impairment on phase-related masking differences were not well simulated...... are affected by a common underlying mechanism, presumably related to cochlear outer hair cell function. The results also suggest that normal peripheral compression remains strong even at 250 Hz....

  13. Lateralized speech perception in normal-hearing and hearing-impaired listeners and its relationship to temporal processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Locsei, Gusztav; Pedersen, Julie Hefting; Laugesen, Søren;

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the role of temporal fine structure (TFS) coding in spatially complex, lateralized listening tasks. Speech reception thresholds (SRTs) were measured in young normal-hearing (NH) and two groups of elderly hearing-impaired (HI) listeners in the presence of speech-shaped noise...

  14. Coordination of Gaze and Speech in Communication between Children with Hearing Impairment and Normal-Hearing Peers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandgren, Olof; Andersson, Richard; van de Weijer, Joost; Hansson, Kristina; Sahlén, Birgitta

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate gaze behavior during communication between children with hearing impairment (HI) and normal-hearing (NH) peers. Method: Ten HI-NH and 10 NH-NH dyads performed a referential communication task requiring description of faces. During task performance, eye movements and speech were tracked. Using verbal event (questions,…

  15. Speech quality measurement for the hearing impaired on the basis of PESQ

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerends, J.G.; Krebber, J.; Huber, R.; Eneman, K.; Luts, H.

    2008-01-01

    One of the research topics within the HearCom project, a European project that studies the impact of hearing loss on communication, is to find methods with which the speech quality as perceived by the hearing impaired can be measured objectively. ITU-T Recommendation P.862 PESQ and its wideband exte

  16. Affective Properties of Mothers' Speech to Infants with Hearing Impairment and Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondaurova, Maria V.; Bergeson, Tonya R.; Xu, Huiping; Kitamura, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The affective properties of infant-directed speech influence the attention of infants with normal hearing to speech sounds. This study explored the affective quality of maternal speech to infants with hearing impairment (HI) during the 1st year after cochlear implantation as compared to speech to infants with normal hearing. Method:…

  17. A Study of Rate of Speech and Intelligibility of Speech in Hearing impaired Pupils of Baghcheban School of Zahedan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahla SAEDI

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Hearing loss results in disruption of coordination in muscles and structures engaged in speech timing tasks and consequently acquisition of speech sounds is affected. The purpose of this study is to investigate and compare the speed and intelligibility of speech in hearing impaired and normal hearing Persian speaking elementary school boys and girls. 33 hearing impaired students are randomly selected from three hearing impaired groups (profound, severe and moderately-severe and compared with 60 normal hearing students. The speed of speech was measured according to reading Words Per Minute (WPM, and speech intelligibility was tested by a 5-rank scale method. As expected, the normal hearing had more speed and intelligibility of speech in contrast to the hearing impaired group. Also hearing impaired boys had a better speed and intelligibility of speech compared to hearing impaired girls but in normal hearing group, girls had better speed. The amount of P-value for moderately-severe and sever hearing impaired was 0.006 and this amount for profound and moderately-severe hearing impaired was 0.002, so p-value is <0.05 and significantly important. Profound hearing impaired group read the text more slowly and had lower speech intelligibility than other two hearing impaired groups.

  18. Dialogue enabling speech-to-text user assistive agent system for hearing-impaired person.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seongjae; Kang, Sunmee; Han, David K; Ko, Hanseok

    2016-06-01

    A novel approach for assisting bidirectional communication between people of normal hearing and hearing-impaired is presented. While the existing hearing-impaired assistive devices such as hearing aids and cochlear implants are vulnerable in extreme noise conditions or post-surgery side effects, the proposed concept is an alternative approach wherein spoken dialogue is achieved by means of employing a robust speech recognition technique which takes into consideration of noisy environmental factors without any attachment into human body. The proposed system is a portable device with an acoustic beamformer for directional noise reduction and capable of performing speech-to-text transcription function, which adopts a keyword spotting method. It is also equipped with an optimized user interface for hearing-impaired people, rendering intuitive and natural device usage with diverse domain contexts. The relevant experimental results confirm that the proposed interface design is feasible for realizing an effective and efficient intelligent agent for hearing-impaired.

  19. How Hearing Impairment Affects Sentence Comprehension: Using Eye Fixations to Investigate the Duration of Speech Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wendt, Dorothea; Kollmeier, Birger; Brand, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to investigate the extent to which hearing impairment influences the duration of sentence processing. An eye-tracking paradigm is introduced that provides an online measure of how hearing impairment prolongs processing of linguistically complex sentences; this...

  20. Use of the Kaufman-Assessment Battery for Children with the Hearing Impaired.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulissi, Stephen Mark; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Fifty hearing-impaired elementary-school students completed the Kaufman-Assessment Battery for Children; scores correlated highly with scores from the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised and with school achievement. The Simultaneous Processing Scale and the Nonverbal Scale seemed appropriate for hearing-impaired children while the…

  1. Causes and Prevalence of Antisocial Behaviour among Students with Hearing Impairment in Ibadan, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojo, Isaiah Olugbenga

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the causes and prevalence of antisocial behaviour among secondary school students with hearing impairment in Ibadan, Nigeria. Descriptive survey research design was adopted to carry out the study. Purposive sampling technique was used to select 60 students with hearing impairment from Methodist Grammar School (Deaf Unit),…

  2. A Review of Self-Esteem of the Hearing Impaired Football Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Açak, Mahmut; Kaya, Oktay

    2016-01-01

    The current study aimed at reviewing the level of self-esteem of the hearing impaired football players. The sample of the study was composed of 95 football players who played in the 1st hearing impaired football league. To gather the study-data; a Personal Information Form and Self-esteem Scale were used. The data obtained were analyzed through…

  3. Perception of Quality of Life for Adults with Hearing Impairment in the LGBT Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly-Campbell, Rebecca J.; Atcherson, Samuel R.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the this study was to examine the perception of both generic and disease-specific quality of life (QoL) in adults with hearing impairment who are members of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community. Eighty-three adults who self-identified as having hearing impairment and as being members of the LGBT community and…

  4. Perception of Quality of Life for Adults with Hearing Impairment in the LGBT Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly-Campbell, Rebecca J.; Atcherson, Samuel R.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the this study was to examine the perception of both generic and disease-specific quality of life (QoL) in adults with hearing impairment who are members of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community. Eighty-three adults who self-identified as having hearing impairment and as being members of the LGBT community and…

  5. Analyzing the Subjective Consciousness of the Hearing-Impaired Students in Fine-Art Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yang

    2009-01-01

    Initiative plays an important role in special fine art education. Teachers should take into full consideration the profile of the hearing-impaired students. For better teaching achievement, it is the teachers who shoulder the responsibility to activate the subjective role and consciousness of the hearing-impaired students by arousing their sense…

  6. Hearing Impaired Adolescents' Signed and Written Expression of Locative State Relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempt, Donna; Maxwell, Madeline M.

    1989-01-01

    Analysis of hearing-impaired adolescents' signed and written sentences expressing simple locative state relations found noun reversal and pragmatic focus errors in 7 percent of signed and 15 percent of written responses. Most errors were produced by profoundly hearing-impaired signers attending public day school. (Author/CB)

  7. Using Modality Replacement to Facilitate Communication between Visually and Hearing-Impaired People

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moustakas, K.; Tzovaras, D.; Dybkjaer, L.

    2011-01-01

    Using sign language, speech, and haptics as communication modalities, a virtual treasure-hunting game serves as an entertainment and educational tool for visually-and hearing-impaired users.......Using sign language, speech, and haptics as communication modalities, a virtual treasure-hunting game serves as an entertainment and educational tool for visually-and hearing-impaired users....

  8. How Students with Hearing Impairments: Can Learn and Flourish in Your Music Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Maureen

    2004-01-01

    Activities in music class allow students, especially students with hearing impairments, to explore new means of expression and to enhance existing ones. Additional benefits may include increases in auditory awareness, cognitive ability, attention span, memory recall, and vocabulary. Students with hearing impairments can learn and flourish in music…

  9. Program for Hearing Impaired Adolescents: Secondary School Phase. Maxi II Practicum Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Edward J.

    Described in the practicum report is the design, implementation, and evaluation of the first comprehensive high school program for five hearing impaired adolescents in Southeastern Massachusetts. Sections focus on the following topics: the Southeastern region's need for a high school hearing impaired program, the impact of the state invitation to…

  10. Language Assessment of Hearing-Impaired Children and Youth: Patterns of Test Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Suzanne; Stoker, Richard

    1988-01-01

    A survey of 182 educational programs for hearing-impaired children and youth identified those test instruments most widely used to assess language at infant, preschool, primary, and secondary levels. Also analyzed were communication modes and manual systems used in testing, difficulties encountered in assessing hearing-impaired children, and…

  11. Comparison of Different Levels of Reading Comprehension between Hearing-Impaired Loss and Normal-Hearing Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azam Sharifi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Reading skill is one of the most important necessities of students' learning in everyday life. This skill is referred to the ability of comprehension, comment and conclusion from texts and receiving the meaning of the massage which is composed. Educational development in any student has a direct relation with the ability of the comprehension. This study is designed to investigate the effects of hearing loss on reading comprehension in hearing-impaired students compared to normal-hearing ones.Methods: Seventeen hearing-impaired students in 4th year of primary exceptional schools in Karaj, Robatkarim and Shahriyar, Iran, were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. Seventeen normal-hearing students were randomly selected from ordinary schools next to exceptional ones as control group. They were compared for different levels of reading comprehension using the international standard booklet (PIRLS 2001. Results: There was a significant difference in performance between hearing-impaired and normal- hearing students in different levels of reading comprehension (p<0.05.Conclusion: Hearing loss has negative effects on different levels of reading comprehension, so in exceptional centers, reconsideration in educational planning in order to direct education from memorizing to comprehension and deeper layers of learning seems necessary.

  12. Effects of signal level and spectral contrast on vowel formant discrimination for normal-hearing and hearing-impaired listeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodall, Ashley; Liu, Chang

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether increasing the overall speech level or the individual spectral contrasts of vowel sounds can improve vowel formant discrimination for listeners both with and without normal hearing. Thresholds of vowel formant discrimination were examined for the F2 frequencies of 3 American English vowels for listeners with and without normal hearing. Spectral contrasts of the F2 were enhanced by 3, 6, and 9 dB. Vowel stimuli were presented at 70 and 90 dB SPL. The thresholds of listeners with hearing impairment were reduced significantly after spectral enhancement was implemented, especially at 90 dB SPL, whereas normal-hearing listeners did not benefit from spectral enhancement. These results indicate that a combination of spectral enhancement of F2 and high speech level is most beneficial to improve vowel formant discrimination for listeners with hearing impairment.

  13. American-sign-language statements and delay of gratification in hearing-impaired and nonhandicapped children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toner, I J; Ritchie, F K

    1984-04-01

    Hearing-impaired children were individually administered a task in which possession of accumulating candy rewards was made contingent upon the child's decision to stop any further accumulation of the candy. Hearing-impaired children, who under instruction periodically made American Sign Language (ASL) statements about the goodness of the reward, waited significantly longer before terminating the waiting period than did hearing-impaired children instructed to sign statements about the act of waiting and somewhat longer than did hearing-impaired children instructed to sign a neutral statement. Since the pattern of delay was unlike that reported in earlier investigations when nonhandicapped children verbalized similar statements and since variation in mode of communication did not influence delay in nonhandicapped children in the present investigation, the results were interpreted in terms of differences in cognitive controlling mechanisms between nonhandicapped and hearing-impaired children.

  14. Hearing Impairment Affects Dementia Incidence. An Analysis Based on Longitudinal Health Claims Data in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritze, Thomas; Teipel, Stefan; Óvári, Attila; Kilimann, Ingo; Witt, Gabriele; Doblhammer, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Recent research has revealed an association between hearing impairment and dementia. The objective of this study is to determine the effect of hearing impairment on dementia incidence in a longitudinal study, and whether ear, nose, and throat (ENT) specialist care, care level, institutionalization, or depression mediates or moderates this pathway. The present study used a longitudinal sample of 154,783 persons aged 65 and older from claims data of the largest German health insurer; containing 14,602 incident dementia diagnoses between 2006 and 2010. Dementia and hearing impairment diagnoses were defined according to International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision, codes. We used a Kaplan Meier estimator and performed Cox proportional hazard models to explore the effect of hearing impairment on dementia incidence, controlling for ENT specialist care, care level, institutionalization, and depression. Gender, age, and comorbidities were controlled for as potential confounders. Patients with bilateral (HR = 1.43, pdementia incidence than patients without hearing impairment. We found no significant effect for unilateral hearing impairment and other diseases of the ear. The effect of hearing impairment was only partly mediated through ENT specialist utilization. Significant interaction between hearing impairment and specialist care, care level, and institutionalization, respectively, indicated moderating effects. We discuss possible explanations for these effects. This study underlines the importance of the association between hearing impairment and dementia. Preserving hearing ability may maintain social participation and may reduce the burden associated with dementia. The particular impact of hearing aid use should be the subject of further investigations, as it offers potential intervention on the pathway to dementia.

  15. [Hearing screening in a public hospital in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais State, Brazil: hearing impairment and risk factors in neonates and infants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiensoli, Luciana Oliveira; Goulart, Lúcia Maria Horta de Figueiredo; Resende, Luciana Macedo de; Colosimo, Enrico Antônio

    2007-06-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of hearing impairment in children in a public hospital in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil, and to investigate the association with risk factors described in the literature. This study was cross-sectional and retrospective and analyzed 798 newborns and infants evaluated in the Universal Neonatal Hearing Screening Program from June 2002 to December 2003. The risk factors established by the Joint Committee on Infant Hearing in 1994 and Azevedo in 1996 were studied, besides prematurity. Prevalence of hearing impairment was 1.8% (15 cases). A multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to verify associations between risk factors and hearing impairment, showing a significant statistical association (p ototoxic drugs, and low birth weight. A significant prevalence of hearing impairment in neonates and infants was confirmed. Attention should thus be focused on risk factors for hearing impairment, using hearing programs that ensure prevention, early detection, and intervention.

  16. Hearing impairment among mill workers in small scale enterprises in southwest Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omokhodion, Folashade O; Adeosun, A A; Fajola, A A

    2007-01-01

    This cross-sectional study was conducted among mill workers in a large market in Ibadan, southwest Nigeria. These workers are engaged in small scale businesses with little or no regulation of work exposures. Questionnaires administered to mill workers sought information on personal characteristics, length of time engaged in the job, type of milling done and symptoms of hearing impairment. Noise exposure and hearing impairment were assessed among 85 mill workers. Audiometry was done on mill workers and 45 controls with no known exposure to noise and no history of aural disease. Noise levels at work stations ranged from 88-90dB for small mills and 101-105 for larger mills. None of the workers used hearing protection. Analysis based on total number of ears showed that 56% of the workers had hearing impairment ranging from mild (49%) moderate (6.4%) to severe (0.6%) whilst 33% of the controls had hearing impairment which was mild (26%), moderate (7%) and no severe losses, P = 0.001. There was no association between age and hearing impairment but prevalence of hearing impairment was highest among those who had been engaged in the trade for more than 20 years. There is a need for regulation of small scale enterprises to protect the health of workers. Health education and provision of low cost ear plugs will reduce the occurrence and severity of hearing impairment among these low income workers.

  17. The play behavior of hearing-impaired kindergarten children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelius, G; Hornett, D

    1990-10-01

    This exploratory study examined the cognitive and social play behaviors of hearing-impaired kindergarten children with regard to classroom instructional mode and communication strategies. Two classes were observed--one using sign communication and the other using an oral-based method of communication. Functional, constructive, dramatic, and social play behaviors were observed and documented. Statistically significant differences were found between the two groups of children with regard to social and dramatic play as well as with regard to levels of aggression. For example, children in the sign-based class demonstrated higher levels of social play behavior and lower levels of aggression than the children in the oral-based class. Guidelines and strategies to help children initiate and sustain play are suggested.

  18. Professional Attributes in Teacher Preparation for Teaching Students with Hearing Impairment: Implications for Inclusive Education in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onu, V. C.; Eskay, M. K.; Ugwuanyi, L.; Igbo, J. N.; Obiyo, N. O.

    2012-01-01

    This descriptive survey research study assessed the professional attributes of teacher preparation for teaching students with hearing impairment. It discussed the role of teaching competence in ensuring the smooth delivery of lessons to children with special needs, especially the hearing-impaired. THAQ (Teaching Hearing-impaired Assessment…

  19. Cantonese tone production performance of mainstream school children with hearing impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Karen K L; Lau, Ada H Y; Lam, Joffee H S; Lee, Kathy Y S

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated the Cantonese tone production ability of children with hearing impairment studying in mainstream schools. The participants were 87 Cantonese-speaking children with mild-to-profound degrees of hearing loss aged 5.92-13.58 in Hong Kong. Most of the children were fitted with hearing aids (n = 65); 17 of them had profound hearing impairment, one who had severe hearing loss had cochlear implantation, and four who had mild hearing loss were without any hearing device. The Hong Kong Cantonese Articulation Test was administered, and the tones produced were rated by two of the authors and a speech-language pathologist. Group effects of tones, hearing loss level, and also an interaction of the two were found to be significant. The children with profound hearing impairment performed significantly worse than most of the other children. Tone 1 was produced most accurately, whereas tone 6 productions were the poorest. No relationship was found between the number of years of mainstreaming and tone production ability. Tone production error pattern revealed that confusion patterns in tone perception coincided with those in production. Tones having a similar fundamental frequency (F0) at the onset also posed difficulty in tone production for children with hearing impairment.

  20. The effect of educational level elevation on the mathematical skill in hearing-impaired students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azam Sharifi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: There is a relation between language skills and science learning in educational approach. Hearing-impairment and delay in learning of language skills influence the progress of learning. The aim of this research was to study the effect of educational level elevation on growth of mathematical skill. Therefore, third grade hearing-impaired students of secondary school, and forth grade hearing-impaired and normal-hearing students of elementary school were compared in terms of mathematical skill.Methods: The research was cross-sectional and the internationally standardized mathematics questions (2007 were selected as the tools of the test. The sample included 31 students of 4th grade elementary and third grade of secondary school with sever hearing loss from exceptional schools, and 17 normal-hearing students were randomly selected from ordinary schools next to the exceptional schools in Robatkarim, Karaj, and Shahriyar cities, Iran.Results: According to data analysis there was a meaningful difference between hearing-impaired students of forth and third grades and normal-hearing students in the three fields of knowledge, application and argument (p0.05.Conclusion: No significant improvement was seen in the mathematical skill of hearing-impaired students by educational level elevation. Writing mathematical books for the pre-elementary courses, revision of teaching methods, and increasing teaching hours are necessary in mathematics.

  1. Relationship between the theory of mind and empathy in students with hearing impairment and those with normal hearing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Rezaei Mirhesari

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Empathy is a basic human skill that is important in daily life. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of the theory of mind in predicting empathy.Methods: This study adopted a causal-comparative design. 40 students with profound hearing impairment and 40 students with normal hearing, aged between 8 and 14, participated in the study. Instruments including false belief tasks and empathy questionnaires were distributed to the participants. For multivariate analysis of variance, a correlation analysis and multiple regression methods were used. Results: Results indicated a significant difference between the total score of false belief tasks and empathy in students with hearing impairment and those with normal hearing (p<0.001 . A significant relationship between the theory of mind and empathy was found in both groups (p<0.01. Also theory of mind could predict the empathy (p=0.001.Conclusion: Based on the obtained results, significant reduction in the theory of mind and empathy was seen in students with hearing impairment. Therefore, training programs that focus on social skills are required for students with hearing impairment in order to address this problem. Moreover, training materials need to be tailored to their cognitive understanding.

  2. Motor Skills in Hearing Impaired Children with or without Cochlear Implant--A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidranski, Tihomir; Farkaš, Daria

    2015-07-01

    Hearing impairment is a major limitation in communication, and it can obstruct psychological development, development of social skills and motor development. Hearing impairment is the third most common contemporary chronic health condition, and it has become a public health problem. The effectiveness of problem solving in everyday life and in emergency situations depends greatly on the amount and quality of the motor programs. Therefore, it is evident that the normal motor development in persons with hearing impairment is essential for everyday life. The aim of this research is to analyze the available information pertaining to motor skills of hearing impaired children both with and without a cochlear implant (CI) and to analyze possibilities of influencing their motor skills. The relevant studies on motor skills of hearing impaired children both with and without CI were obtained by an extensive computer search of various databases using special keywords and extraction with respect to certain criteria, resulting in 22 studies. The overall results of this systematic review indicate that the children with hearing impairment exhibit suboptimal levels of motor skills especially balance. Very few studies compared children with hearing impairment with CI units and without CI units and the results of those studies are quite contradictory. Numerous studies have confirmed that the regular and appropriate physical exercise can improve motor skills of children with hearing impairment, especially balance. The fact that the development of motor skills is crucial for the child's interaction with the outside world, action, perception and acquisition of academic skills and other skills necessary for life shows the importance of motor skills development for children with hearing impairment.

  3. SPEECH INTELLIGIBILITY DEVELOPMENT IN SEVERE TO PROFOUND HEARING-IMPAIRED CHILDREN ESTABLISHMENT OF A DATA COLLECTION FOR EARLY INTERVENTION IN HEARING-IMPAIRED CHILDREN IN IRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Daneshman P. Borghei

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of early detection of hearing impairment in children is early intervention. There is growing interest in early detection of hearing impairment in developing countries. The main purpose of this study was to investigate the spoken language development in severe to profound hearing impaired children and compared their speech intelligibility with normal hearing children at the same age. Nine severe to profound hearing impaired children below 2 years old out of the primer 42 cases were selected for this survey. They receive aural habilitation and also speech therapy after beginning the speech production. Speech intelligibility test of these children was recorded on audio-tape, when they read five questions which can be answered with one word only, at the age of 4, 5 and 6 in comparison with 27 normal hearing children at the same age. At the age of 4 the mean speech intelligibility score of the studied group was 31.77% (SD 12.17 and the control was %96 (SD 2.23. At the age of 5, this score was %51.22 (SD 14.42, the control one 97.85% (SD 1.93. Finally at age 6 it was 72% (SD 18.97 for hearing–impaired group and 99.22% (SD 1.18 in control one. Severe to profound hearing impaired children acquired spoken language but not at the same level. In general, their speech development showed about 2 to 3 years delay. Their speech intelligibility was acceptable for severe group around the age 6 but almost semi–intelligible for profound group at the same age.

  4. Pitch strength and pitch dominance of iterated rippled noises in hearing-impaired listeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leek, M R; Summers, V

    2001-06-01

    Reports using a variety of psychophysical tasks indicate that pitch perception by hearing-impaired listeners may be abnormal, contributing to difficulties in understanding speech and enjoying music. Pitches of complex sounds may be weaker and more indistinct in the presence of cochlear damage, especially when frequency regions are affected that form the strongest basis for pitch perception in normal-hearing listeners. In this study, the strength of the complex pitch generated by iterated rippled noise was assessed in normal-hearing and hearing-impaired listeners. Pitch strength was measured for broadband noises with spectral ripples generated by iteratively delaying a copy of a given noise and adding it back into the original. Octave-band-pass versions of these noises also were evaluated to assess frequency dominance regions for rippled-noise pitch. Hearing-impaired listeners demonstrated consistently weaker pitches in response to the rippled noises relative to pitch strength in normal-hearing listeners. However, in most cases, the frequency regions of pitch dominance, i.e., strongest pitch, were similar to those observed in normal-hearing listeners. Except where there exists a substantial sensitivity loss, contributions from normal pitch dominance regions associated with the strongest pitches may not be directly related to impaired spectral processing. It is suggested that the reduced strength of rippled-noise pitch in listeners with hearing loss results from impaired frequency resolution and possibly an associated deficit in temporal processing.

  5. Correlations between risk factors for hearing impairment and TEOAE screening test outcome in neonates at risk for hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratyńska, J; Grzanka, A; Mueller-Malesińska, M; Skarzyński, H; Hatzopoulos, S

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the study was to find the correlation between specific risk factors for hearing impairment as well as between risk factors and TEOAE screening results in neonates at risk for hearing impairment. Seventy-one newborns at risk for hearing impairment have been included in the study. Strong correlations between specific risk factors were found. Investigation of the relationship between specific risk factors and TEOAE signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) showed that in children with genetic risk factors, TORCH (toxoplasmosis, rubella, CMV, herpes virus, others) infections and in those treated with ototoxic drugs, the values of SNRs were significantly lower than in children at risk who did not present those factors. In case of hyperbilirubinaemic children the values of SNR were significantly higher than in the controls. In our opinion these relationships may be partially explained by the positive predictive values of these risk factors, but other intrinsic factors may also be involved.

  6. Mediterranean spotted fever and hearing impairment: a rare complication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaella Rossio

    2015-06-01

    We describe a case of Rickettsia conorii that was complicated with hearing loss and did not respond to specific treatment. Hearing loss is a rare event, but clinicians should be aware of this complication.

  7. Inhibition of TFG function causes hereditary axon degeneration by impairing endoplasmic reticulum structure

    OpenAIRE

    Beetz, Christian; Johnson, Adam; Schuh, Amber L.; Thakur, Seema; Varga, Rita-Eva; Fothergill, Thomas; Hertel, Nicole; Bomba-Warczak, Ewa; Thiele, Holger; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Altmüller, Janine; Saxena, Renu; Chapman, Edwin R.; Dent, Erik W.; Nürnberg, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegias are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of gait disorders. Their pathological hallmark is a length-dependent distal axonopathy of nerve fibers in the corticospinal tract. Involvement of other neurons can cause additional neurological symptoms, which define a diverse set of complex hereditary spastic paraplegias. We present two siblings who have the unusual combination of early-onset spastic paraplegia, optic atrophy, and neuropathy. Genome-wide SNP-...

  8. Social Interaction and Participation of Hearing Impaired Students in the Regular Classroom Setting : The Case of Four Hearing Impaired Students in Amhara Regional State, Ethiopia.

    OpenAIRE

    Habte, Nitsuh Belachew

    2008-01-01

    This study is carried out in the classroom and out of classroom at one of the school in the Amhara Regional State in Debre Markos. The purpose of the study is to investigate the social interaction and participation of hearing impaired students with their teachers and hearing peers in the regular classroom setting in different teaching learning activities. Out of classroom in extra-curricular activities, guidance and counseling, sport and play during break time are also investigated in this st...

  9. A comparison of vowel productions in prelingually deaf children using cochlear implants, severe hearing-impaired children using conventional hearing aids and normal-hearing children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudonck, Nele; Van Lierde, K; Dhooge, I; Corthals, P

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare vowel productions by deaf cochlear implant (CI) children, hearing-impaired hearing aid (HA) children and normal-hearing (NH) children. 73 children [mean age: 9;14 years (years;months)] participated: 40 deaf CI children, 34 moderately to profoundly hearing-impaired HA children and 42 NH children. For the 3 corner vowels [a], [i] and [u], F(1), F(2) and the intrasubject SD were measured using the Praat software. Spectral separation between these vowel formants and vowel space were calculated. The significant effects in the CI group all pertain to a higher intrasubject variability in formant values, whereas the significant effects in the HA group all pertain to lower formant values. Both hearing-impaired subgroups showed a tendency toward greater intervowel distances and vowel space. Several subtle deviations in the vowel production of deaf CI children and hearing-impaired HA children could be established, using a well-defined acoustic analysis. CI children as well as HA children in this study tended to overarticulate, which hypothetically can be explained by a lack of auditory feedback and an attempt to compensate it by proprioceptive feedback during articulatory maneuvers. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Elucidation of the molecular genetic basis of inherited hearing impairment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijendijk, Mirjam Wilhelmina Johanna

    2006-01-01

    Hearing loss is the most common sensory disorder in the human population. It affects 0.1% of all young children and by the age of 70, 30% of the population suffers from hearing loss greater than 40 dB. When early onset hearing loss is inherited, 70% is classified as nonsyndromic and 30% as

  11. Hearing impairment and risk of Alzheimer's disease: a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yuqiu; Fan, Shengnuo; Liao, Wang; Fang, Wenli; Xiao, Songhua; Liu, Jun

    2017-02-01

    Observational studies suggested an association between hearing impairment and cognitive disorders. However, whether hearing impairment is an independent risk factor or a harbinger of Alzheimer's disease remains controversial. Our goal was to assess the association between hearing impairment (HI) and the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD) by conducting a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies. We comprehensively searched the PubMed, Embase, Web of Science and Cochrane Library databases on January 19, 2016 to incorporate all the prospective cohort studies meeting the inclusion criteria to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis. Four prospective cohort studies with comparison between hearing impairment and normal hearing were incorporated, with 7461 participants. The outcomes of three studies were the incidence of Alzheimer's disease and the outcome of the fourth study was the incidence of mild cognitive impairment. The overall combined relative risk of people with hearing impairment to develop Alzheimer's disease was 4.87 (95% CI 0.90-26.35; p = 0.066), compared with the control group. Since both Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment are cognitive disorders, we incorporated all the four studies and the overall combined relative risk was 2.82 (95% CI 1.47-5.42; p = 0.002), indicating that the difference was significant. This meta-analysis suggests that hearing impairment significantly increases the risk of cognitive disorders and future well-designed prospective cohort studies are awaited to confirm the association between hearing impairment and risk of Alzheimer's disease.

  12. Children's and Adolescents' Moral Emotion Attributions and Judgements about Exclusion of Peers with Hearing Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilver-Stainer, Jennifer; Gasser, Luciano; Perrig-Chiello, Pasqualina

    2014-01-01

    Children and adolescents with hearing impairments are at risk of being excluded from activities with hearing peers. Moral emotion attributions may represent important indicators for children's identification with the moral norm not to exclude peers based on disability. Against this background, we investigated how 10-, 12- and 15-year-olds…

  13. Children's and Adolescents' Moral Emotion Attributions and Judgements about Exclusion of Peers with Hearing Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilver-Stainer, Jennifer; Gasser, Luciano; Perrig-Chiello, Pasqualina

    2014-01-01

    Children and adolescents with hearing impairments are at risk of being excluded from activities with hearing peers. Moral emotion attributions may represent important indicators for children's identification with the moral norm not to exclude peers based on disability. Against this background, we investigated how 10-, 12- and 15-year-olds…

  14. Preparing the Hearing-Impaired Social Studies Teacher: Special Challenge to a Special Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, David S.

    The paper focuses on the special adaptations made at Gallaudet College (Washington, DC) to train hearing impaired students to teach social studies to hearing students at the elementary and secondary levels. It is pointed out that all instruction at Gallaudet employs the simultaneous communication method of voice and signed English while using…

  15. An Evaluation of Methods Used to Teach Speech to the Hearing Impaired Using a Simulation Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Suzanne; Stoker, Richard G.

    1984-01-01

    The effectiveness of syllable practice and word methods in teaching speech to severely hearing-impaired children was investigated with normal-hearing listeners. The effect of Cued Speech was evaluated for each teaching method. Results indicated that a syllable practice approach showed significantly higher average gains in acquisition of novel…

  16. Mainstreaming Hearing-Impaired Students within a Postsecondary Educational Setting: An Ecological Model of Social Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Susan; DeCaro, Patricia Mudgett

    Findings are presented from a study of social interactions between hearing-impaired and hearing college students living on one floor of a mainstreamed residence hall at the Rochester (New York) Institute of Technology, home of the National Technical Institute for the Deaf. Twelve ethnographic observations were completed, and interviews were…

  17. Evaluation of non-verbal cognitive function in infants with severe hearing impairment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuyu Wang; Xiaoming Li; Li Zhao; Jianhong Li; Yuxia Pan

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The relationship between hearing impairment and verbal developmental deficits in infants has become a hotspot in research, focusing on improving hearing and promoting verbal development. However, language is only one element of cognition. There are other elements of non-verbal cognitive deficits in infants with hearing impairment.OBJECTIVE: This study was designed to compare the differences in gross motor, fine motor, adaptability, and behavioral development between infants with severe hearing impairment and ordinary children of the same age. DESIGN: Case-control observation.SETTING: Department of Otolaryngology-Head Surgery, Bethune International Peace Hospital.PARTICIPANTS: Fifty-two infants with hearing impairment, who received treatment in the Department of Otolaryngology-Head Surgery, Bethune International Peace Hospital from February to December 2007, were confirmed to suffer from severe (or extremely severe) sensorineural deafness by auditory brain-stem response (ABR) and were recruited for this study. The infants comprised 30 males and 22 females. Among them, 18 were aged 0-1 year, 18 were aged 1-2 years, and 16 were aged 2-3 years. An additional 60 individuals, aged 0-3 years, who received developmental monitoring simultaneously, and were confirmed to have normal hearing and verbal ability, were included as controls. Among the control subjects, there were 31 males and 29 females: 20 were 0.05). The behavioral developmental quotient was significantly less in hearing-impaired infants compared to control infants, who were between 1 and 2 years of age (P < 0.05). The development quotients of fine motor and behavioral development were significantly less in hearing-impaired infants than in control infants, who were 2-3 years of age (P < 0.05).CONCLUSION: Compared to control infants, severe hearing-impaired infants have a lower behavioral developmental quotient after 1 year and a lower fine motor developmental quotient after 2 years of age.

  18. An Alternative Strategy for Teaching Reading to Hearing-Impaired High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, Harold W., III

    1983-01-01

    Discusses a teaching technique that requires students to retell stories in reading classes for hearing impaired high school students as a way to provide maximum student involvement in classes, while developing reading, organization, vocabulary, and comprehension skills. (EKN)

  19. Characteristics of reading and understanding of hearing impaired students in classes VI-VIII

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustaf Morina

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Good reading has a very important role in the development of children with hearing impaired; also reading in explicit way is one of the crucial factors which affect the oral language development of children with hearing impaired. The best form and possibility of improvement, development of oral language, development of communicating, receipt of information, knowledge, and ideas over the world, is reading. When the auditory perception is damaged reading is poor. Hearing impairment causes a lot of problems in the development of personality of children with hearing impairment in these fields: poor development of vocabulary, poor quality of lexica, poor quality of sentences, and disorder in articulation. The purpose of this research is to verify the following: 1-Speed of reading of hearing impaired children, 2-The number of errors, 3-The kind of errors, 4-To understand the text in the context of the degree of hearing impairment, age (class, success in school and gender. This theoretical-experimental study was made with students from two schools; special school “Mother Teresa” in Prizren and Primary School “Elena Gjika” in Prishtina (class attached. The research included a total of 32 students (respondent 27 students (respondent from special schools “Mother Teresa” in Prizren and 5 elementary school students “Elena Gjika” Prishtina, all these students are with hearing impairment. From 32 students involved in the research, 23 were male and 9 female. The research was done by applying a text fables “The fox and the raven” watched and analyzed in terms of three dimensions. The research results have shown that students with hearing impairments have considerable problems in many aspects; in terms of speed of reading, students with hearing impairment have stagnated compared with their peers in the ratio 8/1. In terms of reading errors have stagnated considered being incomparable. In terms of understanding the text students with hearing

  20. The specifics of reading to students with hearing and speech impairment in classes VI-VIII

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustaf Morina

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Good reading has a very important role in the development of children with hearing impaired; also reading in explicit way is one of the crucial factors which affect the oral language development of children with hearing impaired. The best form and possibility of improvement, development of oral language, development of communicating, receipt of information, knowledge, and ideas over the world, is reading. When the auditory perception is damaged reading is poor. Hearing impairment causes a lot of problems in the development of personality of children with hearing impairment in these fields: poor development of vocabulary, poor quality of lexica, poor quality of sentences, and disorder in articulation. The purpose of this research is to verify the following: 1-Speed of reading of hearing impaired children, 2-The number of errors, 3-The kind of errors, 4-To understand the text in the context of the degree of hearing impairment, age (class, success in school and gender. This theoretical-experimental study was made with students from two schools; special school “Mother Teresa” in Prizren and Primary School “Elena Gjika” in Prishtina (class attached. The research included a total of 32 students (respondent 27 students (respondent from special schools “Mother Teresa” in Prizren and 5 elementary school students “Elena Gjika” Prishtina, all these students are with hearing impairment. From 32 students involved in the research, 23 were male and 9 female. The research was done by applying a text fables “The fox and the raven” watched and analyzed in terms of three dimensions. The research results have shown that students with hearing impairments have considerable problems in many aspects; in terms of speed of reading, students with hearing impairment have stagnated compared with their peers in the ratio 8/1. In terms of reading errors have stagnated considered being incomparable. In terms of understanding the text students with hearing

  1. The Importance of Saccular Function to Motor Development in Children with Hearing Impairments

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    Mary S. Shall

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Children with hearing deficits frequently have delayed motor development. The purpose of this study was to evaluate saccular function in children with hearing impairments using the Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potential (VEMP. The impact of the saccular hypofunction on the timely maturation of normal balance strategies was examined using the Movement Assessment Battery for Children (Movement ABC. Thirty-three children with bilateral severe/profound hearing impairment between 4 and 7 years of age were recruited from a three-state area. Approximately half of the sample had one or bilateral cochlear implants, one used bilateral hearing aids, and the rest used no amplification. Parents reported whether the hearing impairment was diagnosed within the first year or after 2 years of age. No VEMP was evoked in two thirds of the hearing impaired (HI children in response to the bone-conducted stimulus. Children who were reportedly hearing impaired since birth had significantly poorer scores when tested with the Movement ABC.

  2. Classification of the hearing impaired for independent living using the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlap, W R; Sands, D I

    1990-12-01

    Training hearing-impaired persons in independent living skills has become a focus of education and rehabilitation programs for the hearing impaired. Yet, few programs and assessment instruments are designed to evaluate a person's potential for acquiring independent living skills. In this study, the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale was used to classify 118 hearing-impaired persons in groups based on their ability to be trained in independent living skills. Cluster analysis was used to group the subjects according to four domains: communication, daily living, socialization, and maladaptive behavior. The results indicate that the behavior scale can be used to classify hearing-impaired persons according to their ability to acquire independent living skills. The cluster analysis resulted in three groups. The persons in the lowest group did not have the most severe hearing losses, but they were more likely to have additional handicaps. This suggests that additional handicaps may be more important than degree of hearing loss in determining whether hearing-impaired persons can acquire independent living skills.

  3. Rhyme and Syllable Recognition in Severe to Profound Hearing-Impaired Children

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    MohammadReza Keihani

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: A research was conducted to assess the phonological awareness in hearing-impaired children in comparison to normal children. In this context, we discussed about the ability of these children in identification of rhyme and word segmentation to syllables. Method and Material: The sample of this study is composed of 320 children, 160 normal & 160 hearing-impaired with a hearing-loss. Of over 70 dB, studying in the 1st t 4th grade of the primary schools in Tehran. They are divided into two groups at each level (20 girls & 20 boys. Results: 1 Hearing-impaired children's scores on test related to rhyme and syllable is lower as compared with normal children. 2 Hearing-impaired children are more potent on test of word segmentation to syllables in comparison to that related to rhyme, while normal children are more successful on test of word segmentation to syllables as compared with that related to rhyme. Discussion: Hearing is an important factor in phonological awareness. Formal education at special schools doesn't compensate for the hearing impairment as to development of the phonological awareness.

  4. Sunrise alarm clock for the hearing impaired - biomed 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follum, James D; Catchpole, Jennifer M

    2011-01-01

    The Sunrise Alarm Clock is a device designed to be more effective than standard alarm clocks and more pleasant than specialty devices in waking the hearing impaired. This is accomplished with the inclusion of visual, physical, and audio alarms. The visual alarm stimulus is created by manipulating the light output of a bedside lamp to mimic the sunrise. This is achieved by varying the duty cycle of a pulse width modulated signal supplied through a standard three-prong receptacle located on the side of the alarm clock. Physical alarms are in the form of wristbands containing vibrating motors. Finally, audio alarms are provided with both volume and pitch control to match the user’s specific needs. The entire system is designed with two users in mind by providing two independently controlled receptacles, wristbands, and audio systems. At the conclusion of development, a nearly fully functional prototype has been produced. The prototype’s audio and physical alarm system along with one visual alarm are fully functional. Shortcomings include poor timekeeping accuracy and problems clearly displaying the time. Even so, this development in sleep technology is capable of performing its task and waking its user with all three alarm systems.

  5. Assistive Courseware for Hearing Impaired Learners in Malaysia

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    Nurul Nadwan Aziz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a research on Hearing Impaired (HI learners in Malaysia which focuses on beginner level. This research has been carried out with intention to solve problem faced by parents of HI children in teaching their children to know the six basic sounds which is known as Ling-6 Sound. The HI learners were assisted by speciallydeveloped electronic-learning application or known as Assistive Courseware (AC in their teaching and learning process. The AC utilizes their mother tongue language.  The objectives of the study include 1 To identify the characteristic of AC for HI learners, 2 To design the storyboard of AC for HI learners, and 3 To design the interface of AC for HI learners. This study adapts the Iterative Triangulation Methodology, and is integrated with the IntView Methodology. The storyboard of the prototype is outlined next. The findings of this paper highlight the prototype of the AC labelled with certain characteristics that has been identified and the result is based on interview with parents. The final part concludes this paper.

  6. Delivery of Services to Hispanic Families with Young Hearing-Impaired Children: One Model. Part I [and] Part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goring, Mary Beth; Martindale, Maura E.

    The number of Hispanic school-age children with hearing impairments in the United States is rising. Hispanic parents who discover that their baby has a hearing impairment lack basic information about deafness and experience guilt feelings about the cause of their child's hearing loss. They often do not know how to obtain information or medical…

  7. Psychosocial implications of service dog ownership for people who have mobility or hearing impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, D P; Kiddoo, M; LaFleur, B

    1993-01-01

    Service dogs for people with mobility impairments and hearing ear dogs for persons with hearing impairments have grown in popularity because the important practical tasks these dogs perform enhance the independence of their owners. Little is known about the psychosocial impact of service dog ownership, however. The results of a survey of 24 owners and seven trainers on the psychosocial benefits and liabilities of service dog ownership are presented and the implications for social work practice are discussed.

  8. [Study on hearing impairment at high frequency among the flight cadets].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Honglei; Zhu, Xiaoquan; Guo, Rui; Li, Dapeng; Li, Jia; Li, Li

    2014-07-01

    To study the incidence of hearing loss at high frequency and the related influence factors among the flight cadets. Using multi-stage sampling method, 312 flight cadets were randomly selected from grade 2011,2012,2013. The level of binaural hearing threshold at 4 kHz, 6 kHz, 8 kHz were measured by hearing-assistant evaluative apparatus. Whether or not have hearing loss was chosen as dependent variable. Territory, smoking, dietary habit, previous history of tinnitus, the noise exposure time, the vestibular function and the psychological quality were chosen as independent vailables. T test, ANOVA and accumulative logistic regression were performed to analyze the factors influence on hearing impairment by software SPSS 18.0. The morbidity of hearing impairment among flight cadets was 18.9%. Results from single factor analysis showed that the levels of hearing thresholds at 4 kHz, 6 kHz frequency had statistically significant differences between smoking group and non-smoking group (P frequency had statistically significant differences between spicy diet group and not spicy diet group (P frequency had statistically significant differences among different strong noise exposure groups (P frequency hearing loss increased when noise exposing increased. The levels of hearing thresholds at 4 kHz, 6 kHz frequency had statistically significant difference among different vestibular function groups (P frequency, and excellent vestibular function seemed to be a preventive factor. Smoking and strong noise exposure were also risk factors causing hearing impairment at 6 kHz frequency. Hearing impairment appears higher morbidity among flight cadets, and it has statistical correlation with smoking, strong noise exposure and vestibular function.

  9. Road Traffic Noise Exposure and Hearing Impairment Among Traffic Policemen in Surat, Western India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandel, B. N.; Macwan, J. E. M.

    2017-06-01

    Among all of the sources responsible for noise pollution, traffic related sources are of great environmental concern and increasing level of discomfort in urban areas with increasing traffic concentration. It will be a larger and serious problem in the future, if effective precautions are not taken addressed and attended to. Hence, a study was undertaken to measure the levels of road traffic noise at major intersections of Surat city, located in Western India and assess the hearing impairment among the exposed group of population i.e. the traffic policemen. Manual noise measurements and vehicle counts were performed at three of the busiest traffic intersections in the city for a period of 12 h. Audiometric screening was done on 46 policemen working at these intersections to determine the occurrence of hearing impairment. At all the three intersections, Leq measured was well above the permissible levels of 65 dBA for daytime. The Lmax recorded for three intersections were 84.6 dBA (07:36 pm), 87.3 dBA (06:32 pm) and 85.6 dBA (11:41 am). Audiometric screening showed that only 10 policemen (22%) had normal hearing. Slight, moderate and severe hearing impairment was recorded among 13 (28%), 18 (39%) and 5 (11%) policemen respectively. Of the total 46 policemen, none had profound impairment (deafness, hearing loss >81 dB). Of the 36 policemen having hearing impairment, 27 had bilateral impairment.

  10. Hearing-impaired students' reading skills in exceptional and ordinary schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliasghar Kakojoibari

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Reading skills, a complicated process, should be learnt and solely is not depend on sounds conforming with the written symbols on a page. Readers will be able to understand and perceive the deeper meaning of the text based on their experiences and knowledge obtained through reading. This research aimed to compare hearing-impaired students' reading literacy in exceptional and ordinary schools in Iran.Methods: This cross-sectional study was done on 28 hearing-impaired students of the 4th year of primary exceptional and ordinary schools of Shahr-e-Ray and Shahryar cities, Iran, using the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS 2006 booklets. Comparative statistical analysis was performed using Student's t-test.Results: The hearing-impaired students in ordinary schools had significantly (p<0.05 higher scores [mean (SD] in reading literacy [3.67 (1.74], comprehension of informational contents [4.21 (2.48], and comprehension of literary contents [3.14(1.23] than hearing-impaired students in exceptional schools [1.78 (1.06, 1.92 (1.49, and 1.64 (1.62, respectively].Conclusion: Hearing-impaired students in ordinary schools meaningfully had higher performance of reading skills in comparison with hearing-impaired students in exceptional schools. It seems that an appropriate cultural bed should be provided in order to conduct these students and accept them in ordinary schools.

  11. Students with hearing impairment at a South African university: Self-identity and disclosure

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    Diane Bell

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: A growing number of students with hearing loss are being granted access to higher education in South Africa due to the adoption of inclusive educational policies. However, available statistics indicate that participation by students with hearing impairments in higher education remains low and research suggests that support provisioning for those who do gain access is inadequate.Objectives:  This article aims to illustrate that the assumed self-identity of students with hearing impairment influences their choice to disclose their disability. The choice not to disclose their hearing loss prevents them from accessing the necessary reasonable accommodations and this in turn may affect their eventual educational success.Method: Reported here is a qualitative descriptive case study at a South African university. Purposive sampling methods were employed. Data were gathered from in-depth interviews with seven students with hearing impairment ranging from moderate to profound, using spoken language. Constructivist grounded theory was used as an approach to the process of generating and transforming the data, as well as the construction of theory.Findings: All the student participants identified as having a hearing rather than a D/deaf identity cultural paradigm and viewed themselves as ‘normal’. Linked to this was their unwillingness to disclose their hearing impairment and thus access support.Conclusion: It is crucially important for academic, support and administrative staff to be aware of both the assumed ‘hearing’ identity and therefore subsequent non-disclosure practices of students with a hearing impairment using the oral method of communication. Universities need to put measures in place to encourage students to voluntarily disclose their hearing impairment in order to provide more targeted teaching and learning support. This could lead to improved educational outcomes for students.

  12. Mental Health of the People with Hearing Impairment in Korea: A Population-Based Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hyun-Young

    2017-01-01

    Background The prevalence of hearing impairment is increasing and an association between hearing impairment and mental health has been reported. Our study aimed to determine the association between hearing impairment and mental health in Korea. Methods This was a cross-sectional study of data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2010–2013, with a sample size of 18,563 individuals (6,395 with hearing impairment and 12,168 without hearing impairment), aged ≥20 years. Results The female group with hearing impairment tended to have a higher rate of stress (odds ratio [OR], 1.32; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.11 to 1.56). The association between hearing impairment and depressive symptoms was higher in elderly males (OR, 1.60; 95% CI, 1.10 to 2.32), while the association of hearing impairment with suicide ideation was higher in elderly females (OR, 1.32; 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.75). Conclusion Elderly individuals with hearing impairment are easily susceptible to poor mental health status. Early targeted intervention to address mental health problems is recommended for people with hearing impairment. PMID:28360980

  13. The Effect of Early Confirmation of Hearing Loss on the Behaviour in Middle Childhood of Children with Bilateral Hearing Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Jim; McCann, Donna C.; Law, Catherine M.; Mullee, Mark; Petrou, Stavros; Worsfold, Sarah; Yuen, Ho M.; Kennedy, Colin R.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To determine if the benefit of early confirmation of permanent childhood hearing impairment (PCHI) on children's receptive language development is associated with fewer behavioural problems. Method: Follow-up of a total population cohort of 120 children with PCHI of moderate or greater severity (greater than or equal to 40 decibels relative…

  14. Perception of a Sung Vowel as a Function of Frequency-Modulation Rate and Excursion in Listeners with Normal Hearing and Hearing Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatti, Marianna; Santurette, Sébastien; Pontoppidan, Niels Henrik; Dau, Torsten

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Frequency fluctuations in human voices can usually be described as coherent frequency modulation (FM). As listeners with hearing impairment (HI listeners) are typically less sensitive to FM than listeners with normal hearing (NH listeners), this study investigated whether hearing loss affects the perception of a sung vowel based on FM…

  15. Visual feedback and lip-positioning skills of children with and without impaired hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, S G

    1986-06-01

    Interplay between visual feedback and lip-positioning skill was studied in 10 5- to 14-year-old children with normal hearing and 10 with severe to profound hearing impairment. With visual feedback, the subjects in both groups had similar response times and accuracy in matching six visually specified lip separation "targets." Special skill in processing visual information by the hearing-impaired subjects was suggested by higher velocities of lip movement toward the targets and shorter latencies in reaching the goal positions. In the responses of the hearing children, lip-closing movements were executed more accurately than opening movements both with and without visual feedback. In general, the findings showed that, given visually displayed lip-position targets and feedback from positioning actions, children can achieve the targets with high accuracy regardless of hearing status or prior speaking experience.

  16. Characteristics of competitive activity of qualified basketball with hearing impairment compare to qualified healthy basketball player

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    Sobko I. N.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose - the comparison of competitive activity skilled basketball players with normal hearing and impaired hearing aid. The study involved female athletes Ukrainian National Team with hearing (n = 12 and healthy female athletes (n = 12. Technical protocols processed 20 games World Cup, Europe, Ukraine among deaf athletes. Processed records 20 games of the Ukrainian Championship. Found that healthy athletes for the game significantly longer perform and get into the basket fine and three point shots, fewer mistakes, but they are inferior in rebounds. Installed insignificant differences between the number of throws, entering the basket from the middle distance, interceptions in athletes with hearing impairment and healthy athletes. Recommended to increase the coherence of group and team interactions basketball with hearing during the game to use the special visual aids.

  17. Hypertension and hearing impairment in workers of iron and steel industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narlawar, Uday W; Surjuse, Bhooshan G; Thakre, Sushama S

    2006-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were to study the (i) prevalence of hypertension and hearing impairment in iron and steel industry workers, (ii) association between hypertension and hearing impairment, (iii) association between hypertension and hearing impairment, with duration of exposure, and (iv) correlation between levels of sound and noise induced health problems viz. hypertension and hearing impairment in a cross sectional study involving Workers working in iron and steel industry at Nagpur. Of a total of 804 workers, 770 workers participated in the study. There were five sections in the factory; Steel melting section (SMS), rolling mill section (RMS), quality control department (QCD), maintenance department (MD) and administration department (AD). Workers working in SMS, RMS, & QCD formed a continuously exposed group (CEG); workers of MD and AD formed intermittently exposed group (IEG). Workers were interviewed, examined and information was collected in a pre-tested pro-forma. Blood pressure was measured, and tuning fork tests were done to assess hearing ability. Prevalence of hypertension among CEG (25.51%) was significantly higher than IEG (14.05%). (X2-14.28, df-1, P0.05). The results of the present study indicate that hypertension and hearing impairment are commoner in workers continuously exposed to high levels of occupational noise.

  18. In Vivo Evidence for Lysosome Depletion and Impaired Autophagic Clearance in Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia Type SPG11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, Rita-Eva; Khundadze, Mukhran; Damme, Markus; Nietzsche, Sandor; Hoffmann, Birgit; Stauber, Tobias; Koch, Nicole; Hennings, J Christopher; Franzka, Patricia; Huebner, Antje K; Kessels, Michael M; Biskup, Christoph; Jentsch, Thomas J; Qualmann, Britta; Braulke, Thomas; Kurth, Ingo; Beetz, Christian; Hübner, Christian A

    2015-08-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is characterized by a dying back degeneration of corticospinal axons which leads to progressive weakness and spasticity of the legs. SPG11 is the most common autosomal-recessive form of HSPs and is caused by mutations in SPG11. A recent in vitro study suggested that Spatacsin, the respective gene product, is needed for the recycling of lysosomes from autolysosomes, a process known as autophagic lysosome reformation. The relevance of this observation for hereditary spastic paraplegia, however, has remained unclear. Here, we report that disruption of Spatacsin in mice indeed causes hereditary spastic paraplegia-like phenotypes with loss of cortical neurons and Purkinje cells. Degenerating neurons accumulate autofluorescent material, which stains for the lysosomal protein Lamp1 and for p62, a marker of substrate destined to be degraded by autophagy, and hence appears to be related to autolysosomes. Supporting a more generalized defect of autophagy, levels of lipidated LC3 are increased in Spatacsin knockout mouse embryonic fibrobasts (MEFs). Though distinct parameters of lysosomal function like processing of cathepsin D and lysosomal pH are preserved, lysosome numbers are reduced in knockout MEFs and the recovery of lysosomes during sustained starvation impaired consistent with a defect of autophagic lysosome reformation. Because lysosomes are reduced in cortical neurons and Purkinje cells in vivo, we propose that the decreased number of lysosomes available for fusion with autophagosomes impairs autolysosomal clearance, results in the accumulation of undegraded material and finally causes death of particularly sensitive neurons like cortical motoneurons and Purkinje cells in knockout mice.

  19. In Vivo Evidence for Lysosome Depletion and Impaired Autophagic Clearance in Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia Type SPG11.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita-Eva Varga

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP is characterized by a dying back degeneration of corticospinal axons which leads to progressive weakness and spasticity of the legs. SPG11 is the most common autosomal-recessive form of HSPs and is caused by mutations in SPG11. A recent in vitro study suggested that Spatacsin, the respective gene product, is needed for the recycling of lysosomes from autolysosomes, a process known as autophagic lysosome reformation. The relevance of this observation for hereditary spastic paraplegia, however, has remained unclear. Here, we report that disruption of Spatacsin in mice indeed causes hereditary spastic paraplegia-like phenotypes with loss of cortical neurons and Purkinje cells. Degenerating neurons accumulate autofluorescent material, which stains for the lysosomal protein Lamp1 and for p62, a marker of substrate destined to be degraded by autophagy, and hence appears to be related to autolysosomes. Supporting a more generalized defect of autophagy, levels of lipidated LC3 are increased in Spatacsin knockout mouse embryonic fibrobasts (MEFs. Though distinct parameters of lysosomal function like processing of cathepsin D and lysosomal pH are preserved, lysosome numbers are reduced in knockout MEFs and the recovery of lysosomes during sustained starvation impaired consistent with a defect of autophagic lysosome reformation. Because lysosomes are reduced in cortical neurons and Purkinje cells in vivo, we propose that the decreased number of lysosomes available for fusion with autophagosomes impairs autolysosomal clearance, results in the accumulation of undegraded material and finally causes death of particularly sensitive neurons like cortical motoneurons and Purkinje cells in knockout mice.

  20. In Vivo Evidence for Lysosome Depletion and Impaired Autophagic Clearance in Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia Type SPG11.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita-Eva Varga

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP is characterized by a dying back degeneration of corticospinal axons which leads to progressive weakness and spasticity of the legs. SPG11 is the most common autosomal-recessive form of HSPs and is caused by mutations in SPG11. A recent in vitro study suggested that Spatacsin, the respective gene product, is needed for the recycling of lysosomes from autolysosomes, a process known as autophagic lysosome reformation. The relevance of this observation for hereditary spastic paraplegia, however, has remained unclear. Here, we report that disruption of Spatacsin in mice indeed causes hereditary spastic paraplegia-like phenotypes with loss of cortical neurons and Purkinje cells. Degenerating neurons accumulate autofluorescent material, which stains for the lysosomal protein Lamp1 and for p62, a marker of substrate destined to be degraded by autophagy, and hence appears to be related to autolysosomes. Supporting a more generalized defect of autophagy, levels of lipidated LC3 are increased in Spatacsin knockout mouse embryonic fibrobasts (MEFs. Though distinct parameters of lysosomal function like processing of cathepsin D and lysosomal pH are preserved, lysosome numbers are reduced in knockout MEFs and the recovery of lysosomes during sustained starvation impaired consistent with a defect of autophagic lysosome reformation. Because lysosomes are reduced in cortical neurons and Purkinje cells in vivo, we propose that the decreased number of lysosomes available for fusion with autophagosomes impairs autolysosomal clearance, results in the accumulation of undegraded material and finally causes death of particularly sensitive neurons like cortical motoneurons and Purkinje cells in knockout mice.

  1. In Vivo Evidence for Lysosome Depletion and Impaired Autophagic Clearance in Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia Type SPG11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, Rita-Eva; Khundadze, Mukhran; Damme, Markus; Nietzsche, Sandor; Hoffmann, Birgit; Stauber, Tobias; Koch, Nicole; Hennings, J. Christopher; Franzka, Patricia; Huebner, Antje K.; Kessels, Michael M.; Biskup, Christoph; Jentsch, Thomas J.; Qualmann, Britta; Braulke, Thomas; Kurth, Ingo; Beetz, Christian; Hübner, Christian A.

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is characterized by a dying back degeneration of corticospinal axons which leads to progressive weakness and spasticity of the legs. SPG11 is the most common autosomal-recessive form of HSPs and is caused by mutations in SPG11. A recent in vitro study suggested that Spatacsin, the respective gene product, is needed for the recycling of lysosomes from autolysosomes, a process known as autophagic lysosome reformation. The relevance of this observation for hereditary spastic paraplegia, however, has remained unclear. Here, we report that disruption of Spatacsin in mice indeed causes hereditary spastic paraplegia-like phenotypes with loss of cortical neurons and Purkinje cells. Degenerating neurons accumulate autofluorescent material, which stains for the lysosomal protein Lamp1 and for p62, a marker of substrate destined to be degraded by autophagy, and hence appears to be related to autolysosomes. Supporting a more generalized defect of autophagy, levels of lipidated LC3 are increased in Spatacsin knockout mouse embryonic fibrobasts (MEFs). Though distinct parameters of lysosomal function like processing of cathepsin D and lysosomal pH are preserved, lysosome numbers are reduced in knockout MEFs and the recovery of lysosomes during sustained starvation impaired consistent with a defect of autophagic lysosome reformation. Because lysosomes are reduced in cortical neurons and Purkinje cells in vivo, we propose that the decreased number of lysosomes available for fusion with autophagosomes impairs autolysosomal clearance, results in the accumulation of undegraded material and finally causes death of particularly sensitive neurons like cortical motoneurons and Purkinje cells in knockout mice. PMID:26284655

  2. Patients with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy fail to compensate impaired oxidative phosphorylation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korsten, A.; Coo, I.F.M. de; Spruijt, L.; Wit, L.E. de; Smeets, H.J.M.; Sluiter, W.

    2010-01-01

    Ninety-five percent of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) patients carry a mutation in one out of three mtDNA-encoded ND subunits of complex I. Penetrance is reduced and more male than female carriers are affected. To assess if a consistent biochemical phenotype is associated with LHON express

  3. Physiology, Psychoacoustics and Cognition in Normal and Impaired Hearing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Pim; Başkent, Deniz; Gaudrain, Etienne; de Kleine, Emile; Wagner, Anita; Lanting, Cornelis

    2016-01-01

    The International Symposium on Hearing is a prestigious, triennial gathering where world-class scientists present and discuss the most recent advances in the field of human and animal hearing research. The 2015 edition will particularly focus on integrative approaches linking physiological, psychoph

  4. The effect of mild hearing impairment on auditory processing tests.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neijenhuis, C.A.M.; Tschur, H.; Snik, A.F.M.

    2004-01-01

    The application of auditory processing tests to patients with sensorineural hearing loss is controversial. Several studies have shown that it is difficult to separate peripheral from central hearing processes. In the present study, a Dutch auditory processing test battery was administered to 24

  5. Prediction of speech intelligibility in spatial noise and reverberation for normal-hearing and hearing-impaired listeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beutelmann, Rainer; Brand, Thomas

    2006-07-01

    Binaural speech intelligibility of individual listeners under realistic conditions was predicted using a model consisting of a gammatone filter bank, an independent equalization-cancellation (EC) process in each frequency band, a gammatone resynthesis, and the speech intelligibility index (SII). Hearing loss was simulated by adding uncorrelated masking noises (according to the pure-tone audiogram) to the ear channels. Speech intelligibility measurements were carried out with 8 normal-hearing and 15 hearing-impaired listeners, collecting speech reception threshold (SRT) data for three different room acoustic conditions (anechoic, office room, cafeteria hall) and eight directions of a single noise source (speech in front). Artificial EC processing errors derived from binaural masking level difference data using pure tones were incorporated into the model. Except for an adjustment of the SII-to-intelligibility mapping function, no model parameter was fitted to the SRT data of this study. The overall correlation coefficient between predicted and observed SRTs was 0.95. The dependence of the SRT of an individual listener on the noise direction and on room acoustics was predicted with a median correlation coefficient of 0.91. The effect of individual hearing impairment was predicted with a median correlation coefficient of 0.95. However, for mild hearing losses the release from masking was overestimated.

  6. Clinical measurement of various aspects of hearing impairment and their relation to auditory functioning: the development of an Auditory Profile

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Esch, T.E.M.

    2013-01-01

    In terms of disability and handicap, problems in auditory function involve much more than a reduced sensitivity to soft sounds, the most commonly used measure of hearing impairment. In daily life, many hearing-impaired (HI) listeners suffer more from impaired processing of audible sounds, than from

  7. GRM7 variants confer susceptibility to age-related hearing impairment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friedman, R.A.; Laer, L. van; Huentelman, M.J.; Sheth, S.S.; Eyken, E. van; Corneveaux, J.J.; Tembe, W.D.; Halperin, R.F.; Thorburn, A.Q.; Thys, S.; Bonneux, S.; Fransen, E.; Huyghe, J.; Pyykko, I.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Kremer, H.; Dhooge, I.J.; Stephens, D.; Orzan, E.; Pfister, M.; Bille, M.; Parving, A.; Sorri, M.; Heyning, P. van de; Makmura, L.; Ohmen, J.D.; Linthicum Jr, F.H.; Fayad, J.N.; Pearson, J.V.; Craig, D.W.; Stephan, D.A.; Camp, G. van

    2009-01-01

    Age-related hearing impairment (ARHI), or presbycusis, is the most prevalent sensory impairment in the elderly. ARHI is a complex disease caused by an interaction between environmental and genetic factors. Here we describe the results of the first whole genome association study for ARHI. The study w

  8. GRM7 variants confer susceptibility to age-related hearing impairment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friedman, Rick A; Van Laer, Lut; Huentelman, Matthew J;

    2009-01-01

    Age-related hearing impairment (ARHI), or presbycusis, is the most prevalent sensory impairment in the elderly. ARHI is a complex disease caused by an interaction between environmental and genetic factors. Here we describe the results of the first whole genome association study for ARHI. The study...

  9. Protein energy malnutrition associates with different types of hearing impairments in toddlers: Anemia increases cochlear dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamel, Terez Boshra; Deraz, Tharwat Ezzat; Elkabarity, Rasha H; Ahmed, Rasha K

    2016-06-01

    This work aimed to highlight a challenging asymptomatic problem which is early detection of hearing impairment in toddlers with protein energy malnutrition (PEM) as a neuro-cognitive effect of PEM on developing brain in relation to hemoglobin level. 100 toddlers, aged 6-24 months, fifty with moderate/severe PEM and fifty healthy children, were included in study. Both TEOAEs and ABR testing were used to assess auditory function. Study reported an association between malnutrition and hearing impairment, 26% of cases had conductive deafness secondary to otitis media with effusion using tympanometry; 84.6% showed type B and 15.4% type C which may suggest developing or resolving otitis media. Their ABR showed 46% mild and 53% moderate impairment. 32% of PEM cases had sensory neural hearing loss and with type (A) tympanometry. Those were assessed using ABR; 58% had mild, 34% moderate and 8% profound impairment. 10% of PEM cases had mixed hearing loss with 50% type B and 50% type C tympanometry and their ABR showed moderate to profound impairment. TEOAEs latencies at different frequencies correlate negatively with hemoglobin level. Toddlers with moderate/severe PEM had hearing impairments of different types and degrees. Neuro-physiological methods could be early and safe detectors of auditory disorders especially in high-risk toddlers. Anemia increases risk for auditory dysfunction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Performance evaluation of the next-generation sequencing approach for molecular diagnosis of hereditary hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakumaran, Theru A; Husami, Ammar; Kissell, Diane; Zhang, Wenying; Keddache, Mehdi; Black, Angela P; Tinkle, Brad T; Greinwald, John H; Zhang, Kejian

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate the performance of a next-generation sequencing (NGS)-based targeted resequencing genetic test, OtoSeq, to identify the sequence variants in the genes causing sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). Retrospective study. Tertiary children's hospital. A total of 8 individuals presenting with prelingual hearing loss were used in this study. The coding and flanking intronic regions of 24 well-studied SNHL genes were enriched using microdroplet polymerase chain reaction and sequenced on an Illumina HiSeq 2000 sequencer. The filtered high-quality sequence reads were mapped to reference sequence, and variants were detected using NextGENe software. A total of 1148 sequence variants were detected in 8 samples in 24 genes. Using in-house developed NGS data analysis criteria, we classified 810 (~71%) of these variants as potential true variants that include previously detected pathogenic mutations in 5 patients. To validate our strategy, we Sanger sequenced the target regions of 5 of the 24 genes, accounting for about 29.2% of all target sequence. Our results showed >99.99% concordance between NGS and Sanger sequencing in these 5 genes, resulting in an analytical sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 99.997%, respectively. We were able to successfully detect single base substitutions, small deletions, and insertions of up to 22 nucleotides. This study demonstrated that our NGS-based mutation screening strategy is highly sensitive and specific in detecting sequence variants in the SNHL genes. Therefore, we propose that this NGS-based targeted sequencing method would be an alternative to current technologies for identifying the multiple genetic causes of SNHL.

  11. Genetic and biochemical impairment of mitochondrial complex I activity in a family with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy and hereditary spastic dystonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DeVries, DD; Went, LN; Bruyn, GW; Scholte, HR; Hofstra, RMW; Bolhuis, PA; vanOost, BA

    1996-01-01

    A rare form of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) that is associated with hereditary spastic dystonia has been studied in a large Dutch family. Neuropathy and ophthalmological lesions were present together in some family members, whereas only one type of abnormality was found in others. mtDNA

  12. M-CSF receptor mutations in hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids impair not only kinase activity but also surface expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiyoshi, Masateru; Hashimoto, Michihiro; Yukihara, Mamiko; Bhuyan, Farzana; Suzu, Shinya, E-mail: ssuzu06@kumamoto-u.ac.jp

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •Many mutations were identified in Fms as a putative genetic cause of HDLS. •All of the mutations tested severely impair the kinase activity. •Most of the mutations also impair the trafficking to the cell surface. •These defects further suggest that HDLS is caused by a loss of Fms function. -- Abstract: The tyrosine kinase Fms, the cell surface receptor for M-CSF and IL-34, is critical for microglial proliferation and differentiation in the brain. Recently, a number of mutations have been identified in Fms as a putative genetic cause of hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids (HDLS), implying an important role of microglial dysfunction in HDLS pathogenesis. In this study, we initially confirmed that 11 mutations, which reside within the ATP-binding or major tyrosine kinase domain, caused a severe impairment of ligand-induced Fms auto-phosphorylation. Intriguingly, we found that 10 of the 11 mutants also showed a weak cell surface expression, which was associated with a concomitant increase in the low molecular weight hypo-N-glycosylated immature gp130Fms-like species. Indeed, the mutant proteins heavily accumulated to the Golgi-like perinuclear regions. These results indicate that all of the Fms mutations tested severely impair the kinase activity and most of the mutations also impair the trafficking to the cell surface, further suggesting that HDLS is caused by the loss of Fms function.

  13. Modeling speech intelligibility in quiet and noise in listeners with normal and impaired hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhebergen, Koenraad S; Lyzenga, Johannes; Dreschler, Wouter A; Festen, Joost M

    2010-03-01

    The speech intelligibility index (SII) is an often used calculation method for estimating the proportion of audible speech in noise. For speech reception thresholds (SRTs), measured in normally hearing listeners using various types of stationary noise, this model predicts a fairly constant speech proportion of about 0.33, necessary for Dutch sentence intelligibility. However, when the SII model is applied for SRTs in quiet, the estimated speech proportions are often higher, and show a larger inter-subject variability, than found for speech in noise near normal speech levels [65 dB sound pressure level (SPL)]. The present model attempts to alleviate this problem by including cochlear compression. It is based on a loudness model for normally hearing and hearing-impaired listeners of Moore and Glasberg [(2004). Hear. Res. 188, 70-88]. It estimates internal excitation levels for speech and noise and then calculates the proportion of speech above noise and threshold using similar spectral weighting as used in the SII. The present model and the standard SII were used to predict SII values in quiet and in stationary noise for normally hearing and hearing-impaired listeners. The present model predicted SIIs for three listener types (normal hearing, noise-induced, and age-induced hearing loss) with markedly less variability than the standard SII.

  14. A comparison of oral hygiene status and dental caries experience among institutionalized visually impaired and hearing impaired children of age between 7 and 17 years in central India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venugopal K Reddy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study is to compare the oral hygiene status and dental caries experience among institutionalized visually impaired and hearing impaired children of age between 7 and 17 years in Bhopal city of Madhya Pradesh located in Central India. Materials and Methods: A total of 95 hearing impaired and 48 visually impaired children of age between 7 and 17 years were recruited from special care institutions (one institution of hearing impaired and two institutions of visually impaired in Bhopal city. Information related to different study variables was obtained from both groups. Oral hygiene index simplified (OHI[S], decayed,extracted, filled teeth (deft and DECAYED, MISSING, FILLED TETTH (DMFT indices were used to record the oral hygiene status and dental caries experience. Results: Mean OHI(S score for hearing impaired was 1.15 ± 0.72 while it was 1.51 ± 0.93 for visually impaired children (P < 0.05. Mean DMFT score was 1.4 ± 1.95 and 0.94 ± 1.45 among hearing impaired and visually impaired respectively. The hearing impaired had a mean deft score of 0.47 ± 1.01 and in visually impaired it was 0.19 ± 0.79 and the difference was statistically significant (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Oral hygiene status of hearing impaired children was better than visually impaired and the difference was statistically significant. There was no significant difference between both groups with respect to DMFT. The hearing impaired children had significantly higher deft than visually impaired.

  15. Working memory and referential communication – multimodal aspects of interaction between children with sensorineural hearing impairment and normal hearing peers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olof eSandgren

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Whereas the language development of children with sensorineural hearing impairment (SNHI has repeatedly been shown to differ from that of peers with normal hearing (NH, few studies have used an experimental approach to investigate the consequences on everyday communicative interaction. This mini review gives an overview of a range of studies on children with SNHI and NH exploring intra- and inter-individual cognitive and linguistic systems during communication.Over the last decade, our research group has studied the conversational strategies of Swedish speaking children and adolescents with SNHI and NH using referential communication, an experimental analogue to problem-solving in the classroom. We have established verbal and nonverbal control and validation mechanisms, related to working memory capacity (WMC and phonological short term memory (PSTM. We present main findings and future directions relevant for the field of cognitive hearing science and for the clinical and school-based management of children and adolescents with SNHI.

  16. Sentence Writing and Perception of Written Sentences in Hearing-Impaired and Normal-Hearing Primary School Students in Hamadan, Western Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afsaneh Yaghobi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Learning language is acquired in early childhood and gradually developed by new words and new structures. Hearing sense is the most important acquisition for learning this skill. Hearing disorders are barriers for natural language learning. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between writing sentences and perception of written sentences in hearing-impaired and normal-hearing students.Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among thirty hearing-impaired students with hearing loss of 70-90 dB and thirty normal hearing students. They were selected from 3rd grade primary school students in Hamadan, a large city in Western Iran. The language skills and non language information was assessed by questionnaire, Action Picture Test, and Sentence Perception Test.Results: Results showed that there was a significant relation between writing sentences and perception of written sentences in hearing impaired students (p<0.001, (r=0.8. This significant relation was seen in normal-hearing students as well (p<0.001, (r=0.7.Conclusion: Disability of hearing-impaired students in verbal communication is not only related to articulation and voice disorders but also is related to their disability to explore and use of language rules. They suffer lack of perception of written sentences, and they are not skilled to convey their feelings and thoughts in order to presenting themselves by using language structures.

  17. Normal-hearing and hearing-impaired subjects' ability to just follow conversation in competing speech, reversed speech, and noise backgrounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hygge, S; Rönnberg, J; Larsby, B; Arlinger, S

    1992-02-01

    The performance on a conversation-following task by 24 hearing-impaired persons was compared with that of 24 matched controls with normal hearing in the presence of three background noises: (a) speech-spectrum random noise, (b) a male voice, and (c) the male voice played in reverse. The subjects' task was to readjust the sound level of a female voice (signal), every time the signal voice was attenuated, to the subjective level at which it was just possible to understand what was being said. To assess the benefit of lipreading, half of the material was presented audiovisually and half auditorily only. It was predicted that background speech would have a greater masking effect than reversed speech, which would in turn have a lesser masking effect than random noise. It was predicted that hearing-impaired subjects would perform more poorly than the normal-hearing controls in a background of speech. The influence of lipreading was expected to be constant across groups and conditions. The results showed that the hearing-impaired subjects were equally affected by the three background noises and that normal-hearing persons were less affected by the background speech than by noise. The performance of the normal-hearing persons was superior to that of the hearing-impaired subjects. The prediction about lipreading was confirmed. The results were explained in terms of the reduced temporal resolution by the hearing-impaired subjects.

  18. Phonological Abilities of Hearing-Impaired Cantonese-Speaking Children with Cochlear Implants or Hearing Aids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Zoe W. Y.; So, Lydia K. H.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This article examined the phonological skills of 2 groups of Cantonese-speaking children with prelingual, profound bilateral hearing loss. The phonological abilities of 7 children fitted with hearing aids were compared with the abilities of 7 children who wore cochlear implants. Method: Participants in each group ranged in age from 5;1…

  19. Prevalence and causes of hearing impairment in Fundong Health District, North-West Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrite, Silvia; Mactaggart, Islay; Kuper, Hannah; Oye, Joseph; Polack, Sarah

    2017-04-01

    To estimate the prevalence and causes of hearing impairment in Fundong Health District, North-West Cameroon. We selected 51 clusters of 80 people (all ages) through probability proportionate to size sampling. Initial hearing screening was undertaken through an otoacoustic emission (OAE) test. Participants aged 4+ years who failed this test in both ears or for whom an OAE reading could not be taken underwent a manual pure-tone audiometry (PTA) screening. Cases of hearing impairment were defined as those with pure-tone average ≥41 dBHL in adults and ≥35 dBHL in children in the better ear, or children under age 4 who failed the OAE test in both ears. Each case with hearing loss was examined by an ear, nose and throat nurse who indicated the main likely cause. We examined 3567 (86.9%) of 4104 eligible people. The overall prevalence of hearing impairment was 3.6% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.8-4.6). The prevalence was low in people aged 0-17 (1.1%, 0.7-1.8%) and 18-49 (1.1%, 0.5-2.6%) and then rose sharply in people aged 50+ (14.8%, 11.7-19.1%). Among cases, the majority were classified as moderate (76%), followed by severe (15%) and profound (9%). More than one-third of cases of hearing impairment were classified as unknown (37%) or conductive (37%) causes, while sensorineural causes were less common (26%). Prevalence of hearing impairment in North-West Cameroon is in line with the WHO estimate for sub-Saharan Africa. The majority of cases with known causes are treatable, with impacted wax playing a major role. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. [Epidemiologic study on hearing impairment and ear diseases in old people].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cheng; Bu, Xing-Kuan; Xing, Guang-qian; Zhou, Ling; Xu, Xia; Wang, Deng-yuan; Chen, Zhi-bin; Zhou, Han; Tian, Hui-qin; Li, Xiao-lu; Lu, Ling; Zhao, Xiao-nian; Li, Fang-li; Tan, Chang-qiang

    2006-09-01

    To investigate the prevalence of hearing impairment and ear diseases in old people and provide scientific data for drawing up the prevention and treatment strategies. Using the probability proportion to size (PPS) method, 1261 people over 60 years were investigated in 40 clusters in Jiangsu Province with the WHO protocol. The prevalence of hearing impairment was 58.1% (the standardized rate: 59.5% in the whole country, 60.9% in Jiangsu province). Degrees of hearing impairment were mild (33.1%), moderate (17.8%), severe (5.9%) and profound (1.3%). The prevalence of hearing disability was 25.0% (the standardized rate: 26.6% in the whole country, 28.1% in Jiangsu province). There were significant difference of the prevalence between male and female, as well as urban and rural, and different ages. The prevalence of the ear diseases was auricle malformation (0.2%), wax (1.7%), otitis externa (0.1%), fungi (0.5%), serous otitis media (1.2%), chronic suppurative otitis media (1.6%), dry perforation of tympanic membrance (2.3%). The causes of hearing impairment were ear diseases (2.9%), non-infectious condition (92.6%), genetic condition (0.3%) and undetermined causes (4.2%). Of which, 31.1% of persons needed hearing aids while 2.3% of persons needed medicine treatment, but 0.9% of persons needed non-urgent surgery and 1.0% of persons needed other treatment. The prevalence of hearing impairment and disability in the old rised obviously than the last investigation in 1987. It was a heavy burden for social development in China. The government and the whole society should take more concern about the problem. The scientific strategies of prevention and treatment were urgently needed and implemented.

  1. Acoustic Analysis of Persian Vowels in Cochlear Implant Users: A Comparison With Hearing-impaired Children Using Hearing Aid and Normal-hearing Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Narges; Yadegari, Fariba; Jalaie, Shohreh

    2016-11-01

    Vowel production in essence is auditorily controlled; hence, the role of the auditory feedback in vowel production is very important. The purpose of this study was to compare formant frequencies and vowel space in Persian-speaking deaf children with cochlear implantation (CI), hearing-impaired children with hearing aid (HA), and their normal-hearing (NH) peers. A total of 40 prelingually children with hearing impairment and 20 NH groups participated in this study. Participants were native Persian speakers. The average of first formant frequency (F1) and second formant frequency (F2) of the six vowels were measured using Praat software (version 5.1.44). One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to analyze the differences between the three3 groups. The mean value of F1 for vowel /i/ was significantly different (between CI and NH children and also between HA and NH groups) (F2, 57 = 9.229, P vowel /a/, the mean value of F1 was significantly different (between HA and NH groups) (F2, 57 = 3.707, P vowel /o/ was significantly different (F2, 57 = 4.572, P vowel /a/ was significantly different (F2, 57 = 3.184, P vowel spaces than hearing-impaired listeners with hearing aids. Probably, this condition is because CI has a subtly positive impact on the place of articulation of vowels. Copyright © 2016 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Efficacy of a distinctive feature model of therapy for hearing-impaired adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subtelny, J; Snell, K B

    1988-05-01

    Extensive measures of speech production and perception were secured before and after the individualized training of 75 hearing-impaired postsecondary students to evaluate the efficacy of therapy. Additional measures of hearing, reading, writing, nonverbal intelligence, and manual and simultaneous communication reception were made to explore variables that might influence response to training. Significant improvements in vowel, word and sentence production, and word and sentence perception were observed. Pretherapy measures of speech production and perception were the most powerful factors explaining variability in posttest scores. Other variables predicting the outcome of speech therapy were residual hearing and linguistic competence. Clinical implications are discussed.

  3. Medical aspects of ageing in a population with intellectual disability: II. Hearing impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evenhuis, H M

    1995-02-01

    Hearing function of an institutionalized population with intellectual disability, consisting of 70 subjects with a mean age of 70.1 (range 60-92) years at initial evaluation, was assessed during a 10-year longitudinal study. One subject had Down's syndrome and could not be assessed as a result of dementia. The total prevalence of mild to severe hearing loss (33.3% in the 60-70 age group and 70.4% in those over age 70) was comparable to reported data from an ageing population without intellectual disability in the United Kingdom (37%, respectively 60%). However, the proportion of moderate to severe losses might be higher (16.7% vs. 7% in the 60-70 age group and 33.3% vs. 18% in the older age group). Excess impairment was caused by severe congenital and childhood hearing impairment on one hand, and by conductive losses, probably caused by unrecognized chronic middle ear infections, superposed upon presbyacusis, on the other. Impacted ear wax was also a major problem. The incidence of new cases with hearing loss during follow-up was 50%. After individual habituation training hearing aids were used without difficulties by 20 out of 24 subjects. The importance of active screening and treatment of middle ear infections and hearing impairment from a young age onwards, and regular cleaning of the external ear canals is stressed.

  4. Assessing DMFT index in 12 years old students attending hearing impaired schools in Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrabi M

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Extensive studies on the epidemiology of teeth and oral diseases are an important part of health care programs specially for hearing impaired groups. For adequate programming in this field, proper situation analysis is mandatory. The aim of this study was to assess the DMFT (decayed missed filled teeth of 12 years old students attending hearing impaired schools in Tehran and exploring the relation between sex, hygiene and hearing threshold with the index. Materials and Methods: This cross sectional descriptive study was based on examining 12 years old (± 6 month students (117 cases attending hearing impaired schools in Tehran. A questionnaire was filled for each case. T, Chi-square and Kruskall-Wallis tests were used to analyze the results with p<0.05 as the limit of significance. Results: The mean DMFT in these students was 3.07. Mean DMFT in students with very severe hearing loss was 2.99. Mean ranked DMFT in girls and boys was similar (56.09 in boys and 61.96 in girls. Mean ranked DMFT in students who didn’t use floss (66.40 was higher than those who used floss (46.71. Mean ranked DMFT in students who seldom brushed, was the highest (72.82 and in students who brushed once a day was the lowest (51.26. Conclusion: The DMFT index in hearing disabled children was 3.07. Regular brushing and flossing reduced the index.

  5. Speech intelligibility of normal listeners and persons with impaired hearing in traffic noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aniansson, G.; Peterson, Y.

    1983-10-01

    Speech intelligibility (PB words) in traffic-like noise was investigated in a laboratory situation simulating three common listening situations, indoors at 1 and 4 m and outdoors at 1 m. The maximum noise levels still permitting 75% intelligibility of PB words in these three listening situations were also defined. A total of 269 persons were examined. Forty-six had normal hearing, 90 a presbycusis-type hearing loss, 95 a noise-induced hearing loss and 38 a conductive hearing loss. In the indoor situation the majority of the groups with impaired hearing retained good speech intelligibility in 40 dB(A) masking noise. Lowering the noise level to less than 40 dB(A) resulted in a minor, usually insignificant, improvement in speech intelligibility. Listeners with normal hearing maintained good speech intelligibility in the outdoor listening situation at noise levels up to 60 dB(A), without lip-reading (i.e., using non-auditory information). For groups with impaired hearing due to age and/or noise, representing 8% of the population in Sweden, the noise level outdoors had to be lowered to less than 50 dB(A), in order to achieve good speech intelligibility at 1 m without lip-reading.

  6. Assistive video or assistive courseware: What hearing-impaired learners say?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutalib, Ariffin Abdul; Salam, Sobihatun Nur Abdul; Ahmad, Mazida; Mahmuddin, Massudi; Yahaya, Sharifah Nadiya Syed

    2016-08-01

    This paper explains about a comparison between assistive video for hearing-impaired learners (AV4HI) and assistive courseware for hearing-impaired learners (AC4HI). The rationale is that previous statement was made after learners experience normal courseware, not the courseware specifically designed for them. Hence, perhaps if the courseware is designed special for them, the hearing-impaired learners would experience differently, and behave more positive upon the AC4HI. Hence, this paper aims at describing the execution of the comparison. It involves a 3-stage process: designing the AC4HI, developing the AC4HI, and user experience. In the end, it was found that users are happy with both, but in terms of content acquisition, they prefer to have notes in the learning material.

  7. The preparation for the year main competition teams in basketball with hearing impairments with innovative technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sobko I.N.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : develop and prove experimentally comprehensive training program on the Ukrainian national team basketball with hearing impairment in the annual cycle for the major competitions. Material : The study involved 12 basketball hearing impaired 20-25 years old - female players team of Ukraine on basketball. Also analyzed the test results and competitive activity 12 basketball players with hearing impairments - Lithuanian team players. Results : We showed the need for a qualitative change in the training process through the development and application of innovative technologies. This allows a greater level of communication between the coach and athletes to intensify training process. Developed and experimentally substantiated comprehensive training program for the Ukrainian national team. In technical training device used light. This increased mobility, agility, activity and intensity workouts. In tactical training improved situational and planned change tactical drawing game using copyright protection of video tutorials with animated illustrations. Conclusions : A positive impact of the developed system for basketball training result in major competitions.

  8. National Survey of State Identification Audiometry Programs and Special Educational Services for Hearing Impaired Children and Youth United States: 1972.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallaudet Coll., Washington, DC. Office of Demographic Studies.

    Reported were descriptive data concerning identification audiometry (hearing screening) and special educational programs for the hearing impaired. Data were provided in tabular format for each state in the country and the District of Columbia. Hearing screening program data included extent of coverage, grade or ages covered annually, year and…

  9. Searching the co-occurrence of pathogenic mutations for Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy and hearing loss in more than 26,000 whole mitochondrial genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haixin; Liu, Rui; Wang, Chuan-Chao

    2016-09-01

    The co-occurrence of pathogenic or candidate mutations for Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and hearing loss has long been suggested to be a rare incident. The "rare" is probably caused by inadequate database searches. In this study, we created and released a comprehensive database with detailed information of haplogroup, variants, coding sites, and potential pathogenic mutations for more than 26,000 whole mitochondrial genomes. We found the co-occurrence in more than 200 individuals including not only LHON or hearing loss patients but also individuals sampled from general populations with various haplogroup backgrounds. The results highlighted the significant importance of adequate database searching in the genetic analysis of mitochondrial disorders.

  10. Cognitive Compensation of Speech Perception With Hearing Impairment, Cochlear Implants, and Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Jeanne; Pals, Carina; Benard, Michel R.; Bhargava, Pranesh; Saija, Jefta; Sarampalis, Anastasios; Wagner, Anita; Gaudrain, Etienne

    2016-01-01

    External degradations in incoming speech reduce understanding, and hearing impairment further compounds the problem. While cognitive mechanisms alleviate some of the difficulties, their effectiveness may change with age. In our research, reviewed here, we investigated cognitive compensation with hearing impairment, cochlear implants, and aging, via (a) phonemic restoration as a measure of top-down filling of missing speech, (b) listening effort and response times as a measure of increased cognitive processing, and (c) visual world paradigm and eye gazing as a measure of the use of context and its time course. Our results indicate that between speech degradations and their cognitive compensation, there is a fine balance that seems to vary greatly across individuals. Hearing impairment or inadequate hearing device settings may limit compensation benefits. Cochlear implants seem to allow the effective use of sentential context, but likely at the cost of delayed processing. Linguistic and lexical knowledge, which play an important role in compensation, may be successfully employed in advanced age, as some compensatory mechanisms seem to be preserved. These findings indicate that cognitive compensation in hearing impairment can be highly complicated—not always absent, but also not easily predicted by speech intelligibility tests only.

  11. Static and Dynamic Balance in Congenital Severe to Profound Hearing-Impaired Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farideh HajiHeydari

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Research conducted since the early 1900s has consistently identified differences between deaf and hearing children on performance of a wide variety of motor tasks, most notably balance. Our study was performed to test static and dynamic balance skills in congenital severe to profound hearing impaired children in comparison with normal age-matched children.Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 30 severe to profound hearing impaired and 40 normal children with age 6 to 10 years old. Bruininks-Oseretsky test of motor proficiency 2, balance subset with 9 parts was used for evaluation of balance skills.Results: Hearing-impaired children showed 16.7 to 100% fail results in 7 parts of the balance subset. In normal children fail result was revealed just in 3 parts of the balance subset from 2.5 to 57.5%, and differences between two groups were significant (p<0.0001. There was a significant difference between two groups in two static balance skills of standing on one leg on a line and standing on one leg on a balance beam with eyes closed (p<0.0001.conclusion: It seems that development of static balance skills are longer than dynamic ones. Because severe to profound hearing-impaired children showed more weakness than normal children in both static and dynamic balance abilities, functional tests of balance proficiency can help to identify balance disorders in these children.

  12. Cognitive Compensation of Speech Perception With Hearing Impairment, Cochlear Implants, and Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deniz Başkent

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available External degradations in incoming speech reduce understanding, and hearing impairment further compounds the problem. While cognitive mechanisms alleviate some of the difficulties, their effectiveness may change with age. In our research, reviewed here, we investigated cognitive compensation with hearing impairment, cochlear implants, and aging, via (a phonemic restoration as a measure of top-down filling of missing speech, (b listening effort and response times as a measure of increased cognitive processing, and (c visual world paradigm and eye gazing as a measure of the use of context and its time course. Our results indicate that between speech degradations and their cognitive compensation, there is a fine balance that seems to vary greatly across individuals. Hearing impairment or inadequate hearing device settings may limit compensation benefits. Cochlear implants seem to allow the effective use of sentential context, but likely at the cost of delayed processing. Linguistic and lexical knowledge, which play an important role in compensation, may be successfully employed in advanced age, as some compensatory mechanisms seem to be preserved. These findings indicate that cognitive compensation in hearing impairment can be highly complicated—not always absent, but also not easily predicted by speech intelligibility tests only.

  13. [Prevalence and etiology of people with hearing impairment in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xi-bin; Wei, Zhi-yun; Yu, Li-mei; Wang, Qi; Liang, Wei

    2008-07-01

    To investigate the prevalence and etiology of people with hearing disability in China and to provide evidence for development of related prevention and treatment strategies. Using the statistics and inference from data of the Second China National Sample Survey on Disability. 27.80 million people were diagnosed with hearing disability, including 20.04 million with pure disability. The overall prevalence was 2.11% including 'single disability' as 1.52% (accounting for 72.08%) and the rate was 11.04% among the elderly(accounting for 73.57%). The prevalence of hearing disability was higher in males than in females as well as higher in the rural than in the urban. Sufferers were mainly engaging in agriculture with poor education background. Among all the people with hearing disability, Grade III and IV was accounted for 73.42% but among the elderly, they were accounted for 79.13%. Grade I and II was accounted for 67.36% among children aged four to six and 83.90% in children aged below three. Speech disabilities were more than 70% in aged below six. The whole etiology contains presbycusis, unknown causation and tympanitis with primary causes as heredity, pregnant virus infection, neonatal asphyxiation, drug-induced deafness, premature delivery and low birth avoirdupois, other than unknown deaf among the 0-6 year olds. However, the primary causation would include presbycusis, tympanitis, sickness, noise/detonation and drug-induced deafness for the elderly. Active prevention on presbycusis with emphasis on prevention and cure to rural population was important in reducing the venture of hearing disability. Related consultation on genetic factors was another measure to be taken to prevent hearing disability developed in the newborns.

  14. Effect of recreational noise exposure on hearing impairment among teenage students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Chen-Yin; Chao, Keh-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have focused on the potential impact of children's hearing loss on learning and development. Recently, numerous teenage students have been found to be fond of listening to music on personal devices and participating in recreational music activities. The objective of this study was to investigate teenage students' hearing impairment, their experience with recreational noise exposure, and their self-reported hearing. The participants were 1878 first-year students at a university in Taiwan. The result of the pure tone audiometry test showed that 11.9% of the participants had one or two ears with a hearing threshold over 25 dB. Over the past year, approximately 80.9% of the participants had taken part in at least one loud-noise recreational activity, and 90.9% of the participants were in the habit of using earphones. Among the participants, 190 students with a high level of recreational noise exposure were assigned to the exposure group, and 191 students with a low level of recreational noise exposure constituted the control group. The exposure group had more hearing problems than the control group, but no significant difference existed between the two groups in the pure tone audiometry test (p=0.857). It is suggested that the schools should reinforce hearing health education and proactively provide intervention measures, such as hearing tests, evaluation of noise exposure, and hearing protection. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Performance, fatigue and stress in open-plan offices: The effects of noise and restoration on hearing impaired and normal hearing individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Jahncke

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hearing impaired and normal hearing individuals were compared in two within-participant office noise conditions (high noise: 60 L Aeq and low noise: 30 L Aeq . Performance, subjective fatigue, and physiological stress were tested during working on a simulated open-plan office. We also tested two between-participants restoration conditions following the work period with high noise (nature movie or continued office noise. Participants with a hearing impairment (N = 20 were matched with normal hearing participants (N = 18 and undertook one practice session and two counterbalanced experimental sessions. In each experimental session they worked for two hours with basic memory and attention tasks. We also measured physiological stress indicators (cortisol and catecholamines and self-reports of mood and fatigue. The hearing impaired participants were more affected by high noise than the normal hearing participants, as shown by impaired performance for tasks that involve recall of semantic information. The hearing impaired participants were also more fatigued by high noise exposure than participants with normal hearing, and they tended to have higher stress hormone levels during the high noise compared to the low noise condition. Restoration with a movie increased performance and motivation for the normal hearing participants, while rest with continued noise did not. For the hearing impaired participants, continued noise during rest increased motivation and performance, while the movie did not. In summary, the impact of noise and restorative conditions varied with the hearing characteristics of the participants. The small sample size does however encourage caution when interpreting the results.

  16. A Comparative Study of the Cognitive Function of the Hearing-impaired and Non-Hearing-impaired Pupils of Two Primary Schools in Lagos State, Nigeria.

    OpenAIRE

    Obilade, Titilola T.

    2007-01-01

    Presented at the Southeastern Symposium on Child and Family Development, 23rd February, 2007. The World Summit for Children of which Nigeria is a signatory promised to ratify the convention on the rights of the child. In Africa, the problem of the handicapped child is by no means insignificant. Communicable diseases are important causes of morbidity and mortality in Nigerian children. There is a disagreement even amongst experts about the thinking processes of people with hearing impair...

  17. Providing Hearing-Impaired Students with Learning Care after Classes through Smart Phones and the GPRS Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chen-Chung; Hong, Yi-Ching

    2007-01-01

    Although computers and network technology have been widely utilised to assist students learn, few technical supports have been developed to help hearing-impaired students learn in Taiwan. A significant challenge for teachers is to provide after-class learning care and assistance to hearing-impaired students that sustain their motivation to…

  18. 14 CFR 382.119 - What information must carriers give individuals with vision or hearing impairment on aircraft?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What information must carriers give individuals with vision or hearing impairment on aircraft? 382.119 Section 382.119 Aeronautics and Space... carriers give individuals with vision or hearing impairment on aircraft? (a) As a carrier, you must...

  19. 14 CFR 382.53 - What information must carriers give individuals with a vision or hearing impairment at airports?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What information must carriers give individuals with a vision or hearing impairment at airports? 382.53 Section 382.53 Aeronautics and Space... information must carriers give individuals with a vision or hearing impairment at airports? (a)(1) As a...

  20. Providing Hearing-Impaired Students with Learning Care after Classes through Smart Phones and the GPRS Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chen-Chung; Hong, Yi-Ching

    2007-01-01

    Although computers and network technology have been widely utilised to assist students learn, few technical supports have been developed to help hearing-impaired students learn in Taiwan. A significant challenge for teachers is to provide after-class learning care and assistance to hearing-impaired students that sustain their motivation to…

  1. Project SKI*HI Outreach Programming for Hearing Impaired Infants and Families: Recertification Statement, Questions, Responses, and Approval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Carol J.; Clark, Thomas C.

    This program evaluation report presents information on Project SKI*HI, a home-based program for infants and young children with hearing impairments and their families. The program's major goals are early identification of hearing-impaired infants and a home program to facilitate child development. A parent advisor makes weekly home visits to each…

  2. iPads Enhance Social Interaction Skills among Hearing-Impaired Children of Low Income Families in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahatheg, Raja Omar

    2015-01-01

    This research tries to investigate the technical contribution on improving the social interaction of hearing-impaired children from low income families in Saudi Arabia. It compares the social interaction skills of hearing-impaired children who do and do not have access to iPads. To achieve the goals of the study; seventeen children aged five years…

  3. Optimizing Hearing Loss Prevention and Treatment, Rehabilitation and Re - Integration of Soldiers with Hearing Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    repeat common words. Speech Discrimination: This test assesses how well subjects understand one-syllable words with vowels and consonants that are... emotional interaction, and a substantial effector of quality of life. Hearing loss that occurs outside of Military settings effects Military performance...international missions. Hearing loss is a particularly salient problem in Service member’s lives, endangering their fitness-for-duty, their emotional well

  4. Risk of sudden sensorineural hearing loss in patients with common preexisting sensorineural hearing impairment: a population-based study in Taiwan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malcolm Koo

    Full Text Available The role of preexisting sensorineural hearing impairment on the risk for sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSHL is still unclear. In this study, we aimed to assess the risk of SSHL in patients with common preexisting sensorineural hearing impairment using population-based data.A population-based case-control study design was used to analyze claims data between January 2001 and December 2011 obtained from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. The cases consisted of 514 patients with SSHL and the controls were frequency matched to 2,570 cases by sex, 10-year age group, and year of index date. Common sensorineural hearing impairments were retrospectively assessed in the cases and controls. Associations between sensorineural hearing impairment and risk of SSHL were evaluated using unconditional univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses.The mean age for the 3,084 study subjects was 53.1 years (standard deviation, S.D. = 15.6. Of the 514 cases, 49 (9.5% had sensorineural hearing impairment while only 44 (1.7% of the 2,570 controls had the same condition. Univariate logistic regression analyses indicated that preexisting sensorineural hearing impairment was significantly associated with SSHL (odds ratio, OR = 6.05, p < 0.001. Other comorbidities including hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and hyperlipidemia also showed significant associations with SSHL. Similar results were obtained when the association between SSHL and sensorineural hearing impairment was adjusted with either all the covariates (adjusted OR = 6.22, p < 0.001 or with only those selected using a backward elimination procedure (adjusted OR = 6.20, p < 0.001.Results from this population-based case-control study revealed that common sensorineural hearing impairment might be a novel risk factor for SSHL.

  5. Status of Perceived Social Support and Quality of Life among Hearing-Impaired Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayebeh Reyhani

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Annual four to five thousand babies are born with hearing loss in the Iran. Hearing impairment is a disability that affects the quality of life of people with this problem. These individuals need to support from family and friends because of their specific conditions that this received support has impact on their quality of life. This study was conducted to assess the status of perceived social support and quality of life of hearing-impaired adolescent. Material and Methods A cross-correlation study was performed with cluster and multi stage random sampling method on 83 students with hearing impairment who met the inclusion criteria of the study in Mashhad. The data collection tools included Pediatric quality of life inventory (adolescent form and perceived social support inventory (from family and friends.The data obtained from the questionnaires were analyzed through SPSS software version 16. Results The results showed that the majority of the most of adolescents with hearing impairment were reported moderate total quality of life (%51.8. But the majority of them reported perceived social support from family was moderate (%61.5 and from friends was week (%45.8. Also there was a significant relationship between category of total quality of life of adolescent viewpoint with perceived social support from family (P=0.056. Conclusion Based on the obtained results, the majority of the most of adolescents with hearing impairment were reported moderate total quality of life. Disability and condition of these persons affects quality of life of them, so need for adequate support from family, friends and society. Nurses play an important role in identifying and introduce these needs and condition and how to deal with them.

  6. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN LIFE BUILDING SKILLS AND SOCIAL ADJUSTMENT OF STUDENTS WITH HEARING IMPAIRMENT: IMPLICATIONS FOR COUNSELING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel O. ADENIYI

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Hearing impairment contributes greatly to social and psychological deficits of the affected individuals, which can affect their interpersonal relation. The inability to hear and communicate effectively results in adjustment problem that leads to social isolation. Objectives: The objective of this study is to examine the relationship between life building skills and social adjustment of students with hearing impairment. Methods: The study employed descriptive survey research design. The samples consisted of 150 students with hearing impairment purposively selected from two inclusive schools in Lagos state, Nigeria. The samples comprised of 65 boys and 85 girls with age range between 15 and 18 years in the Senior Secondary School. The instruments used for data collection were Life building skills inventory (adapted with reliability of 0.80 and Social adjustment scale (Self developed. The instruments consisted of two sections namely: A&B. Section A of Life building skills contained bio- data of the respondents, while B contained 3 subscales: Self-efficacy inventory adapted from Schwarzer and Jerusalem 1995 with reliability of 0.85, Decision-making inventory adapted from Rowe 1997 with reliability of 0.75, Assertiveness inventory adapted from Aberti and Emmons 1995 with reliability of 0.80. The self-constructed Social Adjustment scale contained 10 items probing questions with reliability of 0.69. Data collected was analysed using Pearson Product Moment Correlation and Multiple Regression. Results: The results revealed relative contributions of some life building skills to social adjustment of students with hearing impairment. There were joint contributions of the independent variables to dependent variable, while decision-making contributed mostly. Conclusion: This study examined relationship between life building skills and social adjustment of students with hearing impairment with a bid to provide adequate counseling services. It was

  7. Risk factors for hearing impairment among adults with diabetes: The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen E. Bainbridge

    2016-12-01

    Conclusions: Current smoking, alcohol consumption, high triglycerides, and chronic kidney disease are potentially preventable correlates of hearing impairment for persons with diabetes. Low income is a marker of increased likelihood of hearing impairment.

  8. Hearing impairment in dementia – how to reconcile two intertwined challenges in diagnostic screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Lemke

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Prevalence of dementia as well as hearing impairment is increasing with age. As a consequence older people are often affected by both conditions. Especially among the people with dementia a majority also has significant hearing problems. With population aging and more people getting even older the number of these patients will increase immensely over the next years. Dementia refers to a spectrum of brain disorders, all of which involve cognitive impairment but vary widely in terms of the cause, course, and prognosis. Dementia is more than just memory impairment; it involves impairment in multiple areas of cognition. Prevalence of dementia exponentially increases from 2% of people under the age of 65 years with doubling of numbers every five years up to 30-50% at the age of 90 years. Dementia is the leading cause of institutionalization among the elderly. Prevalence among elderly nursing home residents is estimated to be 60- 80%...

  9. Early Hearing-Impairment Results in Crossmodal Reorganization of Ferret Core Auditory Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Alex Meredith

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous investigations of cortical crossmodal plasticity, most often in congenital or early-deaf subjects, have indicated that secondary auditory cortical areas reorganize to exhibit visual responsiveness while the core auditory regions are largely spared. However, a recent study of adult-deafened ferrets demonstrated that core auditory cortex was reorganized by the somatosensory modality. Because adult animals have matured beyond their critical period of sensory development and plasticity, it was not known if adult-deafening and early-deafening would generate the same crossmodal results. The present study used young, ototoxically-lesioned ferrets (n=3 that, after maturation (avg. = 173 days old, showed significant hearing deficits (avg. threshold = 72 dB SPL. Recordings from single-units (n=132 in core auditory cortex showed that 72% were activated by somatosensory stimulation (compared to 1% in hearing controls. In addition, tracer injection into early hearing-impaired core auditory cortex labeled essentially the same auditory cortical and thalamic projection sources as seen for injections in the hearing controls, indicating that the functional reorganization was not the result of new or latent projections to the cortex. These data, along with similar observations from adult-deafened and adult hearing-impaired animals, support the recently proposed brainstem theory for crossmodal plasticity induced by hearing loss.

  10. Pioneering Strategies for Relieving Dental Anxiety in Hearing Impaired Children: a Randomized Controlled Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekhar, Shalini; Madu, Ghanashyam Prasad; Ambati, Naga Radhakrishna; Suravarapu, Pavani Reddy; Uppu, Kalyani; Bolla, Deepthi

    2017-06-01

    Hearing impaired children have a problem in understanding and comprehending with dental treatments. Visual language is the sensible answer of how to improve communication with them. To evaluate the applicability of dental sign language in Hearing impaired children in relieving anxiety during stressful dental treatment by improving their means of communication. This randomized clinical trial was carried out in the Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry which included 40 Hearing Impaired children meeting inclusion criteria. The selected children were randomly divided into the study and control group comprising of 20 each. In the control group, initial oral examination and dental treatment (oral prophylaxis and class I restoration) were performed without the use of dental sign language. In the study group, the dental sign language specific to dental treatment was educated and during their subsequent visit to the dental clinic after dental sign language reinforcement, oral prophylaxis and class I restoration were done. Subjective and objective measurements of anxiety were recorded for both groups using facial image scale (FIS), pulse oximeter and electronic blood pressure apparatus to compare for correlation. The obtained data were subjected to statistical analysis using unpaired t-test. There was a statistically significant reduction in the anxiety levels (pcontrol group. Dental sign language was effective in reducing the level of anxiety in children who are hard of hearing. Dental sign language was able to improve behavior positively during dental treatment and may also aid in developing a positive dental attitude among children who are hard of hearing.

  11. [Examination of relationship between level of hearing and written language skills in 10-14-year-old hearing impaired children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turğut, Nedim; Karlıdağ, Turgut; Başar, Figen; Yalçın, Şinasi; Kaygusuz, İrfan; Keleş, Erol; Birkent, Ömer Faruk

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to review the relationship between written language skills and factors which are thought to affect this skill such as mean hearing loss, duration of auditory deprivation, speech discrimination score, and pre-school education attendance and socioeconomic status of hearing impaired children who attend 4th-7th grades in primary school in inclusive environment. The study included 25 hearing impaired children (14 males, 11 females; mean age 11.4±1.4 years; range 10 to 14 years) (study group) and 20 children (9 males, 11 females; mean age 11.5±1.3 years; range 10 to 14 years) (control group) with normal hearing in the same age group and studying in the same class. Study group was separated into two subgroups as group 1a and group 1b since some of the children with hearing disability used hearing aid while some used cochlear implant. Intragroup comparisons and relational screening were performed for those who use hearing aids and cochlear implants. Intergroup comparisons were performed to evaluate the effect of the parameters on written language skills. Written expression skill level of children with hearing disability was significantly lower than their normal hearing peers (p=0.001). A significant relationship was detected between written language skills and mean hearing loss (p=0.048), duration of auditory deprivation (p=0.021), speech discrimination score (p=0.014), and preschool attendance (p=0.005), when it comes to socioeconomic status we were not able to find any significant relationship (p=0.636). It can be said that hearing loss affects written language skills negatively and hearing impaired individuals develop low-level written language skills compared to their normal hearing peers.

  12. Functional hearing in the classroom: assistive listening devices for students with hearing impairment in a mainstream school setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanin, Julien; Rance, Gary

    2016-12-01

    To assess the benefit of assistive listening devices (ALDs) for students with hearing impairment in mainstream schools. Speech recognition (CNC words) in background noise was assessed in a typical classroom. Participants underwent testing using four device configurations: (1) HA(s)/CI(s) alone, (2) soundfield amplification, (3) remote microphone (Roger Pen) on desk and (4) remote microphone at the loudspeaker. A sub-group of students subsequently underwent a 2-week classroom trial of each ALD. Degree of improvement from baseline [HA(s)/CI(s)] alone was assessed using teacher and student Listening Inventory for Education-Revised (LIFE-R) questionnaires. In all, 20 students, aged 12.5-18.9 years, underwent speech recognition assessment. In total, 10 of these participated in the classroom trial. Hearing loss ranged from mild-to-profound levels. Performance in each ALD configuration was higher than for HAs/CIs alone (p  0.05). Speech recognition improvements were demonstrated with the implementation of both remote microphones and soundfield systems. Both students and teachers reported functional hearing advantages in the classroom when using the remote microphone in concert with their standard hearing devices.

  13. Detection threshold for sound distortion resulting from noise reduction in normal-hearing and hearing-impaired listeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brons, Inge; Dreschler, Wouter A; Houben, Rolph

    2014-09-01

    Hearing-aid noise reduction should reduce background noise, but not disturb the target speech. This objective is difficult because noise reduction suffers from a trade-off between the amount of noise removed and signal distortion. It is unknown if this important trade-off differs between normal-hearing (NH) and hearing-impaired (HI) listeners. This study separated the negative effect of noise reduction (distortion) from the positive effect (reduction of noise) to allow the measurement of the detection threshold for noise-reduction (NR) distortion. Twelve NH subjects and 12 subjects with mild to moderate sensorineural hearing loss participated in this study. The detection thresholds for distortion were determined using an adaptive procedure with a three-interval, two-alternative forced-choice paradigm. Different levels of distortion were obtained by changing the maximum amount of noise reduction. Participants were also asked to indicate their preferred NR strength. The detection threshold for overall distortion was higher for HI subjects than for NH subjects, suggesting that stronger noise reduction can be applied for HI listeners without affecting the perceived sound quality. However, the preferred NR strength of HI listeners was closer to their individual detection threshold for distortion than in NH listeners. This implies that HI listeners tolerate fewer audible distortions than NH listeners.

  14. Ira as a pioneer in audiology: His contributions to the clinical measurement of hearing and hearing impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formby, C.; Gagne, J. P.

    2002-05-01

    Ira Hirsh's contributions to clinical science and research are diverse and significant. In fact, approximately one-third of the 100+ publications that Ira lists in his curriculum vitae (CV) are clinical in nature, dealing with various aspects of audiology, deafness, hearing aids, aural rehabilitation, and speech and language pathology. The majority of these citations, fully one-quarter of his publication list, addresses problems specific to the clinical measurement of hearing and hearing impairment. Undoubtedly, the most influential of these published works appears in his CV under the citation ``The Measurement of Hearing.'' The forward for this publication, his only textbook, was penned in June, 1952 (now precisely half a century past at the time of this session). The aims of this presentation are to (1) provide perspective on the fundamental importance of his virtually timeless text in shaping the fledgling discipline of audiology, and (2) celebrate Ira's many contributions to the profession and practice of audiology. [Preparation for this presentation was supported, in part, by a K24 career development award from NIDCD.

  15. Recommendations of the NIDCD Working Group on Early Identification of Hearing Impairment on Acceptable Protocols for Use in State-Wide Universal Newborn Hearing Screening Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Inst. on Deafness and Other Communications Disorders, Bethesda, MD.

    This document presents the consensus statement of a 2-day conference which addressed issues concerned with the early identification of hearing impairment. The conference resulted in the following consensus conclusions: (1) all infants admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit should be screened for hearing loss prior to discharge; (2) universal…

  16. The contribution of GJB2 (Connexin 26) 35delG to age-related hearing impairment and noise-induced hearing loss.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eyken, E. van; Laer, L. van; Fransen, E.; Topsakal, V.; Hendrickx, J.J.; Demeester, K.; Heyning, P. van de; Maki-Torkko, E.; Hannula, S.; Sorri, M.; Jensen, M.; Parving, A.; Bille, M.; Baur, M.; Pfister, M.; Bonaconsa, A.; Mazzoli, M.; Orzan, E.; Espeso, A.; Stephens, D.; Verbruggen, K.; Huyghe, J.; Dhooge, I.J.; Huygen, P.L.M.; Kremer, H.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Kunst, S.J.W.; Manninen, M.; Pyykko, I.; Rajkowska, E.; Pawelczyk, M.; Sliwinska-Kowalska, M.; Steffens, M.; Wienker, T.F.; Camp, G. van

    2007-01-01

    HYPOTHESIS: The common GJB2 (Connexin 26) 35delG mutation might contribute to the development of age-related hearing impairment (ARHI) and noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). BACKGROUND: GJB2, a gene encoding a gap junction protein expressed in the inner ear, has been suggested to be involved in the

  17. Cognitive Impairment Involving Social Cognition in SPG4 Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludivine Chamard

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To describe cognitive assessment including social cognition in SPG4 patients. Methods. We reported a series of nine patients with SPG4 mutation with an extensive neuropsychological examination including social cognition assessment. Results. None of our patients presented with mental retardation or dementia. All presented with mild cognitive impairment with a high frequency of attention deficit (100%, executive disorders (89%, and social cognition impairment (78%. An asymptomatic patient for motor skills presented with the same cognitive profile. No correlation was found in this small sample between cognitive impairment and motor impairment, age at disease onset, or disease duration. Conclusions. SPG4 phenotypes share some cognitive features of frontotemporal lobar degeneration and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Cognitive disorders including executive disorders and social cognition impairment are frequent in SPG4 patients and might sometimes occur before motor disorders. Therefore, cognitive functions including social cognition should be systematically assessed in order to improve the clinical management of this population.

  18. Telephone speech enhancement for hearing-impaired listeners using multi-channel compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Harikrishna P.; Krishnamurthy, Ashok K.; Feth, Lawrence L.

    2002-05-01

    Elderly listeners with sensorineural hearing impairment usually have difficulty with telephone communication if they do not use a hearing aid or telephone amplifier. In many cases, these devices may not be readily available or maybe uncomfortable to use. We describe here an alternative strategy to enhance the speech by pre-processing the signal before sending it over the telephone line. The pre-processing is based on a multi-channel compression algorithm that modifies the critical band spectrum of the speech signal to bring it within the dynamic hearing range of the listener, while also compensating for the effects of the telephone line. We describe the algorithm and the results of a simulation study in which the Articulation Index (AI) is used to measure the intelligibility enhancement, and the Glasberg, Moore and Stone (1999) model is used to simulate the effects of the hearing loss.

  19. Psychopathology and its risk and protective factors in hearing-impaired children and adolescents: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theunissen, Stephanie C P M; Rieffe, Carolien; Netten, Anouk P; Briaire, Jeroen J; Soede, Wim; Schoones, Jan W; Frijns, Johan H M

    2014-02-01

    Pediatric hearing impairment is a chronic handicap that can potentially lead to the development of psychopathology. Yet, for hearing-impaired children and adolescents, the exact occurrence of various forms of psychopathology and its causes are unclear, while this knowledge is essential to enable targeted screenings and interventions. To investigate the level of psychopathological symptoms in hearing-impaired children and adolescents as compared with normally hearing peers. Second, the influence of type of hearing device and possible risk and protective factors on psychopathology were examined. A systematic literature search was performed covering relevant databases, including PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science. Two independent researchers identified the relevant articles. The final search was performed on May 2, 2013, and resulted in a total of 35 articles. Literature consistently demonstrated that hearing-impaired children and adolescents were more prone to developing depression, aggression, oppositional defiant disorder, conduct disorder, and psychopathy than their normally hearing peers. Levels of anxiety, somatization, and delinquency were elevated in some, but not all, hearing-impaired participants, for reasons related to sex, age, and type of school. Divergent results were obtained for the level of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and the influence of type of hearing device on psychopathology. Possible risk and protective factors were identified, including age at detection and intervention of hearing loss, additional disabilities, communication skills, intelligence, type of school, and number of siblings. Literature on psychopathology in hearing-impaired children and adolescents is scarce and sometimes inconsistent. To define a more precise occurrence of psychopathology, more studies are needed. These studies should have a longitudinal design to draw firmer conclusions on causality. Hopefully, this will lead to more knowledge in the future to help and

  20. Development of a Low Cost Assistive Listening System for Hearing-Impaired Student Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setha Pan-ngum

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the design, development, and tests of a low cost ALS. It was designed for hearing-impaired student classrooms. It utilised digital wireless technology and was aimed to be an alternative to a popular FM ALS. Key specifications include transmitting in 2.4 GHz ISM band with eight selectable transmission channels, battery operated and chargeable, pocket size, and ranged up to thirty metres. Audio characteristics and user tests show that it is comparable to a commercial system, currently employed in our partner school. The results also show that wearing an ALS clearly improves hearing of hearing-impaired students. Long-term usage by school children will be monitored to evaluate the system robustness and durability.

  1. Effects of assistance dogs on persons with mobility or hearing impairments: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rintala, Diana H; Matamoros, Rebeca; Seitz, Laura L

    2008-01-01

    Service dogs help persons with mobility impairments by retrieving items and performing other tasks. Hearing dogs alert persons with hearing impairments to environmental sounds. We conducted a pre-post, wait list-controlled pilot study to assess the impact of the dogs on the lives of recipients. Participants were recruited through two assistance dog training organizations and completed an initial questionnaire packet. The Experimental group completed another packet 6 months after receiving a dog. The Control group completed a second packet 6 months after the initial data collection. On average, dog recipients were very satisfied with their assistance dogs. Both service and hearing dog recipients reduced their dependence on other persons. Service dog recipients reduced hours of paid assistance. No other significant change occurred in various standardized outcome measures. Assistance dogs had a major positive impact on the lives of recipients. More appropriate measurement instruments are needed to capture the impact of these dogs.

  2. Simultaneous reflection masking: dependency on direct sound level and hearing-impairment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchholz, Jörg; Mihai, Paul Glad

    2008-01-01

    Simultaneous reflection masked thresholds (RMTs) were measured for 3 normal-hearing (NH) and 3 hearing-impaired (HI) subjects as a function of reflection delay. All stimuli were presented diotically and dichotically, using a 200 ms long broadband noise (100-50000 Hz) as input signal. For 55 d......B-SL direct sound level, NH-listeners showed a binaural suppression effect for delays smaller than 7-10 ms and a binaural enhancement effect for larger delays. When decreasing the direct sound level to 15 dB-SL, the only significant change observed was that the dichotic RMT increased for delays larger than...... delays. Hence, in contrast to binaural reflection enhancement, binaural reflection suppression seems to involve mechanisms that are robust to auditory-internal noise-floor and hearing-impairment. Moreover, differences between the RMTs for HI- and NH-listeners were in prin-ciple agreement with differences...

  3. THE FREQUENCY OF SYMPTOMS OF THE PREMENSTRUAL SYNDROME BY ADOLESCENT FEMALES WITH HEARING IMPAIRMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvira Čekić

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine among adolescent females with hearing impairment the frequency of symptoms of the premenstrual syndrome. The tested sample consisted of 62 adolescents with hearing impairment, and the control sample 62 “hearing” adolescents, the average age of 14-16 years in Sarajevo and Tuzla. Measuring instruments that were used Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM IV. The most dominant symptoms of PMS established in this research are: emotional instability, anger and irritability, sensitivity in breast area, headache and depressed mood. The following frequency of symptoms was found: apparent emotional instability (100%, permanent and visible anger or irritability (90.32%, apparent anxiety, feeling of tension (77.41, reduced interest in usual activities (70.96%. There is no qualitative difference in the symptoms between adolescents with and without hearing impairment. There is a statistically signifcant difference in the prevalence of symptoms of the premenstrual syndrome in adolescents with hearing impairments compared to the control group adolescents.

  4. Stress in Mothers of Hearing Impaired Children Compared to Mothers of Normal and Other Disabled Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnaz Aliakbari Dehkordi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Stress is associated with life satisfaction and also development of some physical diseases. Birth of a disabled child with mental or physical disability (especially deaf or blind children, impose an enormous load of stress on their parents especially the mothers. This study compared stress levels of mothers with hearing impaired children and mothers of normal children or with other disabilities.Methods: In this study, cluster random sampling was performed in Karaj city. 120 mothers in four groups of having a child with mental retardation, low vision, hearing impairment and with normal children were included. Family inventory of life events (FILE of Mc Cubbin et al. was used to determine stress level in four groups of mothers.Results: The results of this research indicated a significant difference (p<0.05 between stress levels of mothers with hearing impaired children and mothers of other disabled and normal children in subscales of intra-family stress, finance and business strains, stress of job transitions, stress of illness and family care and family members "in and out''. There was no difference between compared groups in other subscales.Conclusion: Since deafness is a hidden inability, the child with hearing impairment has a set of social and educational problems causing great stress for parents, especially to mother. In order to decrease mother’s stress, it is suggested to provide more family consultation, adequate social support and to run educational classes for parents to practice stress coping strategies.

  5. Learning to Communicate: Babies with Hearing Impairments Make Their Needs Known.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshinaga-Itano, Christine; Stredler-Brown, Arlene

    1992-01-01

    This study of 82 hearing-impaired children (ages 6 to 36 months) sought to provide normative data concerning their communication efforts and to document the course of development of these earliest communication efforts. The study found that certain cognitive abilities and strategies are prerequisite to the development of certain language…

  6. Beyond the Sentence Level: What's in a Hearing-Impaired Child's Story?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshinaga-Itano, Christine

    1986-01-01

    A model for studying written language is described and illustrated in a written language sample of a 12-year-old with profound hearing impairment. Approaches are noted for analyzing semantic components, coherence, and causality. Implications for remediation are offered. (CL)

  7. Progressive sensorineural hearing impairment in maternally inherited diabetes mellitus and deafness (MIDD).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendrickx, J.J.; Mudde, A.H.; Hart, L.M. 't; Huygen, P.L.M.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the progression of hearing impairment (HI) and audiological features in patients with the mitochondrial A to G mutation in the tRNA(LEU(RUU)) gene at position 3,243 associated with maternally inherited diabetes and deafness. DESIGN: Retrospective phenotype genotype family study.

  8. The Relationship between Knowledge of Story Structure and Question Comprehension in Young Hearing Impaired Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluwin, Thomas N.; Papalia, Julie

    Thirty hearing-impaired children at a residential school for the deaf, a day school for the deaf, and a day program for the deaf in a regular public elementary school were shown picture books, asked to tell the story, and asked to respond to specific questions. Results showed that the ability to process questions was related to the structure of…

  9. Investigation of the Home Reading Patterns of Families with Children with Hearing Impairment: ICEM Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girgin, Umit

    2012-01-01

    Parents play a critical role in the literacy development of their children. The current case study explores the reading patterns that parents have with their children with hearing impairment. First, the home reading patterns of parents with their children were investigated. Then, the home reading patterns preferred by children were addressed along…

  10. A Model for Teaching Written Language to Hearing-Impaired Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacson, Stephen L.; Luckner, John L.

    1988-01-01

    Presents a model of written language that can guide the instruction of hearing-impaired students, and strategies and techniques for improving writing skills, using research and theory from such areas as fluency, syntax, vocabulary, content, conventions, student motivation, guided practice, student interaction, and selective feedback. (CB) (Adjunct…

  11. Process Approach to Developing Language with Hearing Impaired Children: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Richard D.

    1987-01-01

    Language Delivery Model includes eight steps for teaching language to hearing-impaired students: assessing student language needs and identifying Target Structure (TS) to be taught; analyzing TS grammar; analyzing TS for language sense; designing and implementing activities; reinforcing the TS; assessing student progress; generalizing TS other…

  12. The Concept of Inclusive Education: Teacher Training and Acquisition of English Language in the Hearing Impaired

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wamae, Gertrude M.I.; Kang'ethe-Kamau, Rachael W.

    2004-01-01

    Three languages are widely used in schools in Kenya English, Kiswahili and Kenya Sign Language. Many pupils with hearing impairments are taught separately from the mainstream, in specialist settings. The fact that most of the formal teaching, assessment and examination processes in Kenyan schools rely upon spoken and written English compounds the…

  13. Hearing Impairment and Undiagnosed Disease: The Potential Role of Clinical Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlow, Nicole M.; Malaty, John; Jo, Ara; Tanner, Rebecca J.; Beau de Rochars, Valery M.; Carek, Peter J.; Mainous, Arch G., III

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to use cross-sectional, nationally representative data to examine the relationship between self-reported hearing impairment and undetected diabetes, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and chronic kidney disease. Method: We analyzed the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey for the years…

  14. A Naturalistic Study of Collaborative Play Transformations of Preschoolers with Hearing Impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selmi, Ann M.; Rueda, Robert S.

    1998-01-01

    This naturalistic study examined the classroom collaborative play activities of nine preschoolers with hearing impairments and language delays, but without sign-language skills. Findings indicated the children constructed collaborative play episodes which incorporated role, action, and object transformations using a nonverbal metacommunication…

  15. The Ability of Hearing Impaired Children to Comprehend the Semantics of English Prepositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluwin, Thomas N.

    Hearing impaired adolescents were administered one of four tests of syntax in preposition usage. Results indicated a clear developmental sequence: generally prepositions are first acquired in locative phrases, then as temporals, and then as manner relationships. The acquisition process is detailed. The author concludes that the complexity and…

  16. The Effect of iPad on School Preparedness among Preschool Children with Hearing-Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkestani, Maryam Hafez

    2015-01-01

    With modern technological developments and with the fast expansion of mobile technical equipment, conducting a field study to find out how technology influences various developmental aspects of normal and special needs children at the preschool stage was deemed appropriate and timely hearing impairment. In this study aimed at finding out the…

  17. Computer-Assisted Learning for the Hearing Impaired: An Interactive Written Language Enviroment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, R. D.; Rostron, A. B.

    1983-01-01

    To help hearing-impaired children develop their linguistic competence, a computer system that can process sentences and give feedback about their acceptability was developed. Suggestions are made of ways to use the system as an environment for interactive written communication. (Author/CL)

  18. Cochlear implantation in postlingually hearing-impaired adults : Choosing the most appropriate ear

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, Emke; Dunnebier, Erwin Alexander

    2009-01-01

    Choice of the most appropriate car for CI in postlingually hearing-impaired adults is becoming more relevant as more patients are considered eligible for intervention. The aim of this stud), is to review factors that influence this choice and to formulate a flowchart. An extensive Medline search was

  19. The effect of positive parenting program on parenting stress of mothers with impaired hearing children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnaz Aliakbari Dehkordi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Research indicates that impaired hearing is one of the most stressful disabilities. The parenting stress involved could lead to family malfunction and improper parenting. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the effects of positive parenting programs on the parenting stress of mothers with impaired hearing children.Methods: The statistical population comprised mothers of all 7-12-year-old impaired hearing children in Tehran city. Thereafter, using the random sampling method, 24 individuals were shortlisted as research participants and were randomly assigned to two groups: control and experimental. The experimental group was trained with a positive parenting program based on the Sanders program (1993 over eight sessions. The measurement instrument was the Abidin parenting stress questionnaire.Results: The mean score for grades in the experimental groups’ parent and child domains at the pre- and post-test stages had reduced more than that in the control group. In addition, the results of a multivariate covariance analysis indicated that positive parenting training was effective in the reduction of parenting stress scores, reinforcement, and child mood components in the child domain, and in the feelings of competence, relationships with the spouse, and role limitation components (p<0.05 in the parent domain.Conclusion : Considering the benefits of training parents for the reduction of parenting stress of mothers with impaired hearing children, this method is recommended in all learning centers for the deaf.

  20. Mother's Perspective toward Al-Quran Education for Hearing Impaired Children in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadim, Nafiseh Alaghehband; Jomhari, Nazean; Alias, Norlidah; Rashid, Syar Meeze Mohd; Yusoff, Mohd Yakub Zulkifli Bin Mohd

    2013-01-01

    An interview with parents of children with hearing impairment was carried out in the initial study since the coordinated effort of parents and children is essential in the education of children. Considering that this interview was appropriate for collecting qualitative-oriented data, it has been chosen as the knowledge elicitation method. In most…

  1. Medications Used by Students with Visual and Hearing Impairments: Implications for Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Pat; And Others

    This document presents summary information in chart form on medications used by students with visual and hearing impairments. First, a checklist identifies educational considerations for students who are medicated. Next, common antipsychotic, anticonvulsant, antiasthmatic and other drugs are listed in chart form with drug name, indications, peak…

  2. Sexual vulnerability and HIV seroprevalence among the deaf and hearing impaired in Cameroon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Touko Adonis

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This quantitative cross-sectional study examines sexual behaviour of a target group of hearing-impaired persons in Yaounde, the capital city of the Republic of Cameroon. It measures their HIV prevalence to enable assessment of their sexual vulnerability and to help reduce the gap in existing HIV serology data among people with disabilities in general and the deaf in particular. Methods The snowball sampling procedure was adopted as an adequate approach to meet this hard-to-reach group. A total of 118 deaf participants were interviewed for the behavioural component, using sign language as a means of data collection, while 101 participants underwent HIV serology testing. Descriptive analyses were done for behavioural data with Epi info software, while sera were tested by health personnel, using rapid and confirmation test reagents. Results From the results, it was clear that the hearing impaired were highly involved in risky sexual practices, as observed through major sexual indicators, such as: age at first sexual intercourse; condom use; and knowledge of sexually transmitted infections and AIDS. Furthermore, it was noted that the HIV prevalence rate of the hearing impaired in the capital of Cameroon was 4%, close to the prevalence in the city's general population (4.7%. Conclusions Such results suggest that there is a need for in-depth behavioural research and serological studies in this domain to better understand the determinants of risky sexual behaviour among the hearing impaired, and to propose operational prevention approaches for this group.

  3. Hearing Impairment in Adults with an Intellectual Disability: epidemiology and rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Meuwese-Jongejeugd (Anneke)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractIn this thesis, the results are presented of an epidemiological study of hearing impairment in adults with an intellectual disability (ID), as well as the results of a study on the implementation of an audiological rehabilitation protocol in centres for persons with an ID. It is prece

  4. Progress and Prospects in Human Genetic Research into Age-Related Hearing Impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasue Uchida

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related hearing impairment (ARHI is a complex, multifactorial disorder that is attributable to confounding intrinsic and extrinsic factors. The degree of impairment shows substantial variation between individuals, as is also observed in the senescence of other functions. This individual variation would seem to refute the stereotypical view that hearing deterioration with age is inevitable and may indicate that there is ample scope for preventive intervention. Genetic predisposition could account for a sizable proportion of interindividual variation. Over the past decade or so, tremendous progress has been made through research into the genetics of various forms of hearing impairment, including ARHI and our knowledge of the complex mechanisms of auditory function has increased substantially. Here, we give an overview of recent investigations aimed at identifying the genetic risk factors involved in ARHI and of what we currently know about its pathophysiology. This review is divided into the following sections: (i genes causing monogenic hearing impairment with phenotypic similarities to ARHI; (ii genes involved in oxidative stress, biologic stress responses, and mitochondrial dysfunction; and (iii candidate genes for senescence, other geriatric diseases, and neurodegeneration. Progress and prospects in genetic research are discussed.

  5. Training of Speechreading for Severely Hearing-Impaired Persons by Human and Computer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bothe, Hans-Heinrich

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes evaluation results for a software programme that is intended to be used as a training-aid for lipreading in German. Tests were carried out in schools for hearing-impaired children in Germany which indicate that the ability to lipread increases significantly already after use...

  6. Acoustic Characteristics of Vowels and Plosives/Affricates of Mandarin-Speaking Hearing-Impaired Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Shu-Chuan; Kuei, Ko; Tsou, Pei-Chen

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the results of an acoustic analysis of vowels and plosives/affricates produced by 45 Mandarin-speaking children with hearing impairment. Vowel production is represented and categorized into three groups by vowel space size calculated with normalized F1 and F2 values of corner vowels. The correlation between speech…

  7. Intellectual Estimates of Hearing-Impaired Children: A Comparison of Three Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, David R.

    1976-01-01

    The Arthur Adaptation of the Leiter International Performance Scale, Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices, and Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Performance Section were administered to 31 children with mild to moderate hearing impairments. A comparison of test results indicated moderate convergent validity among the measures. (Author)

  8. Correcting the Enuresis of a Hearing-Impaired, Developmentally Disabled Adolescent Using an Auditory Enuresis Alarm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Ronald H.

    1983-01-01

    The enuresis of a hearing-impaired, developmentally disabled adolescent was corrected through the use of an auditory alarm and specific training procedures. The young man progressed from wetting the bed every night to being consistently dry after five weeks of treatment. He has remaind dry for over two years. (Author/CL)

  9. Assessing Special Needs of Students with Hearing Impairment in Jordan and Its Relation to Some Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Zraigat, Ibrahim A.

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of the present study was to assess special needs for students with hearing impairment. The sample of the study consisted of 231 students enrolled at schools for deaf children in Jordan, 113 males and 118 females. A special needs scale was developed and used in assessing special needs for students. The reliability and validity of…

  10. Metalinguistic Abilities of Young Hearing-Impaired Children: Performance on a Judgment of Synonomy Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borman, Deborah L.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Metalinguistic abilities of 20 hearing-impaired children, aged 4-10, were assessed by asking them to judge synonymy of sentence pairs presented in Signed English, Pidgin Sign English, and American Sign Language. None of the children had developed metalinguistic abilities in any of the sign language systems. (Author/JDD)

  11. The effect of participating into sport on the fitness level of youths with hearing impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramiz Arabacı

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to compare the physical fitness levels of physically active and sedentary individuals with hearing impairment. The study included physical active (G1 n=30 and sedentary (G2 n=15 students with upper level hearing impairment, ranging in age from 16 to 20 years and communicating through lip- reading and sign language. In order to determine the physical fitness level of the subjects, their anthropometric characteristics, and other characteristics such as aerobic capacity, anaerobic power, vertical jump, right and left hand grip and velocity were measured. Analysis of the data obtained from the subjects was made using the “Independent - Samples T” test. A significant difference was observed between G1 and G2 in terms of aerobic power (MaxVO2 respectively 54,3 and 45 ml/kg/dk, vertical jump 53,6 and 45 cm, anaerobic power 110.2 kg/m/sec, 100.4 kg/m/sec, and velocity- 30 m run 4.31 and 4.59 sec (p<0.05. In conclusion, it can be said that there was a favorable result in favor of the physical fitness level of the students with hearing impairment who had participated in a soccer training workout at least twice a week and, by means of that, their physical fitness level resembled that of the ones with no hearing impairment.

  12. The Integration Experience of Hearing Impaired Elementary School Students in Separated and Integrated School Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, Alexandra; Lohle, Erwin; Bengel, Jurgen; Burger, Thorsten

    2010-01-01

    Integration experiences of hearing impaired German elementary school students in separate educational settings (n = 31) were compared with those of counterparts at the same level in integrated settings (n = 26), and evaluated in regard to psychosocial behavior, semantic-lexical abilities, and communicative skills. Analysis of questionnaire…

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF COMMUNICATION SKILLS OF HEARING IMPAIRED CHILDREN OF PRESCHOOL AGE BY MEANS OF THEATRICAL ACTIVITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Isaakyan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The work is devoted to the development of comm unicative  skills of  hearing impaired  children  of  preschool age. The changes that are taking place in the education system  now, relate to pre-school  education. There is a change in the direction of education from the orientation on the formation of knowledge, knacks and skills to the all-round development. This highlights the challenge to identify the ways of such development at all  age levels.  The development of speech is a unique, sophisticated process flowing differently in  different  children,  especially hearing impaired children. It is important for the successful development of hearing-impaired children that they have   acquired   from   childhood   vital   information about the surrounding objects and phenomena. Modern pedagogical science, which considers education as the playback of human spiritual potential , suggests the using a variety spheres of education influence on the child. The sphere of art is proposed by  the  authors  as  a  space  conducive  to  the  fo rmation   of   social   and   aesthetic   activity  hearing impaired  children of preschool age.  Given  that the game at the preschool age is the leading type of a ctivity, and it was one of the most simple and effective way to develop communication skills in hearing impaired children of preschool age. The main motive for using a theatrical play’s activities to development of hearing impaired children of preschool age is identified; it is the role communication during the concerted activities with each other.   The results of experimental activities on the development of co mmunicative skills of hearing impaired children of preschool age by means of theatrical activities are depicted in article.

  14. Association between idiopathic hearing loss and mitochondrial DNA mutations: A study on 169 hearing-impaired subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    GUARAN, VALERIA; ASTOLFI, LAURA; CASTIGLIONE, ALESSANDRO; SIMONI, EDI; OLIVETTO, ELENA; GALASSO, MARCO; TREVISI, PATRIZIA; BUSI, MICOL; VOLINIA, STEFANO; MARTINI, ALESSANDRO

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have been shown to be an important cause of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). In this study, we performed a clinical and genetic analysis of 169 hearing-impaired patients and some of their relatives suffering from idiopathic SNHL, both familial and sporadic. The analysis of four fragments of their mtDNA identified several polymorphisms, the well known pathogenic mutation, A1555G, and some novel mutations in different genes, implying changes in the aminoacidic sequence. A novel sporadic mutation in 12S rRNA (MT-RNR1), not previously reported in the literature, was found in a case of possible aminoglycoside-induced progressive deafness. PMID:23969527

  15. Antithrombin III Basel. Identification of a Pro-Leu substitution in a hereditary abnormal antithrombin with impaired heparin cofactor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, J Y; Tran, T H

    1986-01-25

    Antithrombin III Basel is a hereditary abnormal antithrombin with normal progressive inhibition activity (normal reactive site) and reduced heparin cofactor activity (impaired heparin binding site). Structures of antithrombin III Basel and normal antithrombin III isolated from the same patient were compared by peptide mapping using the dimethylaminoazobenzene isothiocyanate precolumn derivatization technique. Of the approximately 50 tryptic peptides of normal and abnormal antithrombin III, one peptide comprising residues 40-46 had a different retention time in reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography. The amino acid sequence of the peptide from antithrombin III Basel had a single substitution of Pro (normal) by Leu (abnormal) at position 41. This substitution is close to an Arg (residue 47) and a Trp (residue 49) which have previously been shown to be critical for heparin binding by antithrombin III. Although additional amino acid substitutions in antithrombin III Basel cannot be ruled out, this Pro-Leu replacement could cause a conformational change by increasing both the helical structure and the hydrophobicity around residue 41. These data suggest that: (i) the heparin binding site of antithrombin III encompasses the region containing residues 41, 47, and 49; and (ii) the impaired heparin cofactor activity of antithrombin III Basel is likely due to a conformational change of the heparin binding site induced by the Pro-Leu substitution at position 41.

  16. A Comparison of Persian Vowel Production in Hearing-Impaired Children Using a Cochlear Implant and Normal-Hearing Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Narges; Drinnan, Michael; Mohamadi, Reyhane; Yadegari, Fariba; Nourbakhsh, Mandana; Torabinezhad, Farhad

    2016-05-01

    Normal-hearing (NH) acuity and auditory feedback control are crucial for human voice production and articulation. The lack of auditory feedback in individuals with profound hearing impairment changes their vowel production. The purpose of this study was to compare Persian vowel production in deaf children with cochlear implants (CIs) and that in NH children. The participants were 20 children (12 girls and 8 boys) with age range of 5 years; 1 month to 9 years. All patients had congenital hearing loss and received a multichannel CI at an average age of 3 years. They had at least 6 months experience of their current device (CI). The control group consisted of 20 NH children (12 girls and 8 boys) with age range of 5 to 9 years old. The two groups were matched by age. Participants were native Persian speakers who were asked to produce the vowels /i/, /e/, /ӕ/, /u/, /o/, and /a/. The averages for first formant frequency (F1) and second formant frequency (F2) of six vowels were measured using Praat software (Version 5.1.44, Boersma & Weenink, 2012). The independent samples t test was conducted to assess the differences in F1 and F2 values and the area of the vowel space between the two groups. Mean values of F1 were increased in CI children; the mean values of F1 for vowel /i/ and /a/, F2 for vowel /a/ and /o/ were significantly different (P vowel space for CI children. F1 is increased in CI children, probably because CI children tend to overarticulate. We hypothesis this is due to a lack of auditory feedback; there is an attempt by hearing-impaired children to compensate via proprioceptive feedback during articulatory process. Copyright © 2016 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Temporal Resolution of the Normal Ear in Listeners with Unilateral Hearing Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Srikanta K; Dey, Ratul; Davessar, Jai Lal

    2015-12-01

    Unilateral hearing loss (UHL) leads to an imbalanced input to the brain and results in cortical reorganization. In listeners with unilateral impairments, while the perceptual deficits associated with the impaired ear are well documented, less is known regarding the auditory processing in the unimpaired, clinically normal ear. It is commonly accepted that perceptual consequences are unlikely to occur in the normal ear for listeners with UHL. This study investigated whether the temporal resolution in the normal-hearing (NH) ear of listeners with long-standing UHL is similar to those in listeners with NH. Temporal resolution was assayed via measuring gap detection thresholds (GDTs) in within- and between-channel paradigms. GDTs were assessed in the normal ear of adults with long-standing, severe-to-profound UHL (N = 13) and age-matched, NH listeners (N = 22) at two presentation levels (30 and 55 dB sensation level). Analysis indicated that within-channel GDTs for listeners with UHL were not significantly different than those for the NH subject group, but the between-channel GDTs for listeners with UHL were poorer (by greater than a factor of 2) than those for the listeners with NH. The hearing thresholds in the normal or impaired ears were not associated with the elevated between-channel GDTs for listeners with UHL. Contrary to the common assumption that auditory processing capabilities are preserved for the normal ear in listeners with UHL, the current study demonstrated that a long-standing unilateral hearing impairment may adversely affect auditory perception--temporal resolution--in the clinically normal ear. From a translational perspective, these findings imply that the temporal processing deficits in the unimpaired ear of listeners with unilateral hearing impairments may contribute to their overall auditory perceptual difficulties.

  18. Auditory Spatial Discrimination and the Mismatch Negativity Response in Hearing-Impaired Individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuexin Cai

    Full Text Available The aims of the present study were to investigate the ability of hearing-impaired (HI individuals with different binaural hearing conditions to discriminate spatial auditory-sources at the midline and lateral positions, and to explore the possible central processing mechanisms by measuring the minimal audible angle (MAA and mismatch negativity (MMN response. To measure MAA at the left/right 0°, 45° and 90° positions, 12 normal-hearing (NH participants and 36 patients with sensorineural hearing loss, which included 12 patients with symmetrical hearing loss (SHL and 24 patients with asymmetrical hearing loss (AHL [12 with unilateral hearing loss on the left (UHLL and 12 with unilateral hearing loss on the right (UHLR] were recruited. In addition, 128-electrode electroencephalography was used to record the MMN response in a separate group of 60 patients (20 UHLL, 20 UHLR and 20 SHL patients and 20 NH participants. The results showed MAA thresholds of the NH participants to be significantly lower than the HI participants. Also, a significantly smaller MAA threshold was obtained at the midline position than at the lateral position in both NH and SHL groups. However, in the AHL group, MAA threshold for the 90° position on the affected side was significantly smaller than the MMA thresholds obtained at other positions. Significantly reduced amplitudes and prolonged latencies of the MMN were found in the HI groups compared to the NH group. In addition, contralateral activation was found in the UHL group for sounds emanating from the 90° position on the affected side and in the NH group. These findings suggest that the abilities of spatial discrimination at the midline and lateral positions vary significantly in different hearing conditions. A reduced MMN amplitude and prolonged latency together with bilaterally symmetrical cortical activations over the auditory hemispheres indicate possible cortical compensatory changes associated with poor

  19. Murine model for congenital CMV infection and hearing impairment

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    Tao Liu

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV infection is the leading cause of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL, and SNHL is the most frequent sequela of congenital CMV infection. But the pathogenic mechanism remains unknown, and there is no ideal CMV intrauterine infection animal model to study the mechanisms by which SNHL develops. Methods We established the congenital murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV infection model by directly injecting the virus into the placenta on day 12.5 of gestation. Then, we observed the development and the MCMV congenital infection rate of the fetuses on the day they were born. Furthermore, we detected the auditory functions, the conditions of the MCMV infection, and the histological change of the inner ears of 28-day-old and 70-day-old offspring. Results Both the fetal loss rate and the teratism rate of offspring whose placentas were inoculated with MCMV increased, and their body length, head circumference, and weight decreased. The hearing level of offspring both decreased at both 28- and 70-days post birth; the 70-day-old mice developed lower hearing levels than did the 28-day old mice. No significant inflammatory changes in the cochleae of the mice were observed. MCMV DNA signals were mainly detected in the spiral ganglion neurons and the endolymph area, but not in the perilymph area. The number of neurons decreased, and their ultrastructures changed. Moreover, with age, the number of neurons dramatically decreased, and the ultrastructural lesions of neurons became much more severe. Conclusions The results suggest that the direct injection of MCMV into the placenta may efficiently cause fetal infection and disturb the intrauterine development of the fetus, and placental inoculation itself has no obvious adverse effects on offspring. The reduction in the number of spiral ganglion neurons and the ultrastructural lesions of the neurons may be the major cause of congenital CMV infection-induced progressive SNHL.

  20. Effect of Cigarette Smoking and Passive Smoking on Hearing Impairment: Data from a Population–Based Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jiwon; Ryou, Namhyung; Jun, Hyung Jin; Hwang, Soon Young; Song, Jae-Jun; Chae, Sung Won

    2016-01-01

    Objectives In the present study, we aimed to determine the effect of both active and passive smoking on the prevalence of the hearing impairment and the hearing thresholds in different age groups through the analysis of data collected from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES). Study Design Cross-sectional epidemiological study. Methods The KNHANES is an ongoing population study that started in 1998. We included a total of 12,935 participants aged ≥19 years in the KNHANES, from 2010 to 2012, in the present study. Pure-tone audiometric (PTA) testing was conducted and the frequencies tested were 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 6 kHz. Smoking status was categorized into three groups; current smoking group, passive smoking group and non-smoking group. Results In the current smoking group, the prevalence of speech-frequency bilateral hearing impairment was increased in ages of 40−69, and the rate of high frequency bilateral hearing impairment was elevated in ages of 30−79. When we investigated the impact of smoking on hearing thresholds, we found that the current smoking group had significantly increased hearing thresholds compared to the passive smoking group and non-smoking groups, across all ages in both speech-relevant and high frequencies. The passive smoking group did not have an elevated prevalence of either speech-frequency bilateral hearing impairment or high frequency bilateral hearing impairment, except in ages of 40s. However, the passive smoking group had higher hearing thresholds than the non-smoking group in the 30s and 40s age groups. Conclusion Current smoking was associated with hearing impairment in both speech-relevant frequency and high frequency across all ages. However, except in the ages of 40s, passive smoking was not related to hearing impairment in either speech-relevant or high frequencies. PMID:26756932

  1. Fine-structure processing, frequency selectivity and speech perception in hearing-impaired listeners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strelcyk, Olaf; Dau, Torsten

    2008-01-01

    Hearing-impaired people often experience great difficulty with speech communication when background noise is present, even if reduced audibility has been compensated for. Other impairment factors must be involved. In order to minimize confounding effects, the subjects participating in this study...... consisted of groups with homogeneous, symmetric audiograms. The perceptual listening experiments assessed the intelligibility of full-spectrum as well as low-pass filtered speech in the presence of stationary and fluctuating interferers, the individual's frequency selectivity and the integrity of temporal...... modulation were obtained. In addition, these binaural and monaural thresholds were measured in a stationary background noise in order to assess the persistence of the fine-structure processing to interfering noise. Apart from elevated speech reception thresholds, the hearing impaired listeners showed poorer...

  2. Oral communication in individuals with hearing impairment-considerations regarding attentional, cognitive and social resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemke, Ulrike; Scherpiet, Sigrid

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, audiology research has focused primarily on hearing and related disorders. In recent years, however, growing interest and insight has developed into the interaction of hearing and cognition. This applies to a person's listening and speech comprehension ability and the neural realization thereof. The present perspective extends this view to oral communication, when two or more people interact in social context. Specifically, the impact of hearing impairment and cognitive changes with age is discussed. In focus are executive functions, a group of top-down processes that guide attention, thought and action according to goals and intentions. The strategic allocation of the limited cognitive processing capacity among concurrent tasks is often effortful, especially under adverse communication conditions and in old age. Working memory, a sub-function extensively discussed in cognitive hearing science, is here put into the context of other executive and cognitive functions required for oral communication and speech comprehension. Finally, taking an ecological view on hearing impairment, activity limitations and participation restrictions are discussed regarding their psycho-social impact and third-party disability.

  3. Oral communication in individuals with hearing impairment – considerations regarding attentional, cognitive and social resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike eLemke

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, audiology research has focused primarily on hearing and related disorders. In recent years, however, growing interest and insight has developed into the interaction of hearing and cognition. This applies to a person’s listening and speech comprehension ability and the neural realization thereof. The present perspective extends this view to oral communication, when two or more people interact in social context. Specifically, the impact of hearing impairment and cognitive changes with age is discussed.In focus are executive functions, a group of top-down processes that guide attention, thought and action according to goals and intentions. The strategic allocation of the limited cognitive processing capacity among concurrent tasks is often effortful, especially under adverse communication conditions and in old age. Working memory, a sub-function extensively discussed in cognitive hearing science, is here put into the context of other executive and cognitive functions required for oral communication and speech comprehension. Finally, taking an ecological view on hearing impairment, activity limitations and participation restrictions are discussed regarding their psycho-social impact and third-party disability.

  4. The Effectiveness of a Group Counseling Program on the Mental Health of Parents of Hearing Impaired Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Mahshid Foroughan

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Most of the studies indicates that the parents of the hearing impaired children show many mental health problems after the diagnosis of their children's hearing impairment. Counselling with the parents of the hearing impaired children is one of the most important goals of any early intervention program. This paper describes a study to determine the effectiveness of a group counselling programme for parents of hearing impaired children. Materials and Method: It was a semi-experimental study with a single group pretest-post test design. The participants were all the parents of hearing impaired children attending in an early intervention center. First the parents' mental health were assessed.Then the group counselling program was implemented. Program has involved six weekly 1.5 hour sessions. The format of each session included both lecture presentation and group discussion using cognitive behavioral procedure. Subjects were assessed before and immediately after group therapy by means of General Health Questionnaire(GHQ and Symptom Check List 90 (SCL-90 questionnaires. Resuts: The first part of the project had shown that over the half of the parents had considerable psychosocial morbidity. Comparisons showed a significant reduction from pretreatment to posttreatment in depression, anxiety and most of other psychological problems. Conclusion: The study supports the effectiveness of group therapy programs in the treatment of parents of hearing impaired children. Concerning the progress of early detection programs for the children's hearing impairment more studies should be done in the field of counseling with their parents.

  5. Storms in Space: Bringing NASA Earth-Sun Science Educational Resources to Hearing- Impaired Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, K.; Sindt, M.; Jahn, J.

    2007-12-01

    Using assistive technology, children with hearing loss can actively participate in the hearing world. However, to develop the necessary skills, hearing-impaired students need to be immersed in a language-rich environment which compensates for the lack of "incidental" learning that typifies the language acquisition of their peers with typical hearing. For any subject matter taught in class, this means that the conceptual and language framework of the topic has to be provided in addition to regular class materials. In a collaboration between the Sunshine Cottage School for Deaf Children and the Southwest Research Institute, we are exploring how NASA-developed educational resources covering Space Science topics can be incorporated successfully in blended classrooms containing children with hearing loss and those with typical hearing in grades 3-5. Utilizing the extensive routine language monitoring performed at Sunshine Cottage, student progress is directly monitored during the year as well as from year to year. This allow us to evaluate the effectiveness of the resources used. Since all instruction at Sunshine Cottage is auditory-oral, our experiences in using those materials can be fed back directly into mainstream classrooms of the same grade levels.

  6. Effect of Early Intervention on Language Development in Hearing-Impaired Children

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    Elahe Shojaei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hearing loss from birth up to the age of 3 years has a negative effect on speech/language development and results in sensory, cognitive, emotional, and academic defects in adulthood by causing delayed development of communicative-linguistic abilities. The present study was performed in order to assess the effect of early intervention on language development in Persian children aged 6-7 years with severe sensorineural hearing loss.   Materials and Methods: Thirty boys and girls aged 6-7 years participated in this study, all of them had severe congenital sensorineural hearing loss in both ears. All children were using bilateral behind-the-ear hearing aid, and had similar economic/socio-cultural backgrounds. Subjects were categorized into two groups based on the age of identification/intervention of hearing loss (3-6 and 12-15 months of age. The Persian TOLD-P3 test was used to evaluate language development in all subjects. Data collection was accomplished by observation, completion of questionnaires, and speech recording.   Results: There was a significant difference in language development in 11 sub-tests and five lingual gains on the Persian TOLD-P3 test between early (3-6 months of age and late identified/intervened (12-15 months of age hearing-impaired children (P

  7. [The prevalence of hearing impairment in transport workers and peculiarities of management of occupational loss of hearing (as exemplified by the situation in the air and railway transport)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankova, V B; Skryabina, L Yu; Kas'kov, Yu N

    2016-01-01

    This article presents data on the prevalence of hearing impairment among the workers engaged in the main means of transportation(air and railway transport). They show that the relative frequency of occupational loss of hearing in the cockpit members of commercial aviation amounts to one third of all cases of analogous diseases in this country. The main professional groups of transport works suffering from hearing impairment are constituted by the representatives of the so-called elite specialities, such as flying crew personnel, locomotive engineers, and their assistants. This fact constitutes an important aspect (not only of medical but also of socio-economic significance) of the problem under consideration. The high prevalence of professional hearing impairment among the transport workers is attributable to the high noise level in the cabins of locomotives and aircraft cockpits as well as to the inadequate expert and diagnostic work or imperfection of the regulatory documentation.

  8. Impact of cognitive and linguistic ability on gaze behavior in children with hearing impairment

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    Olof eSandgren

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to explore verbal-nonverbal integration, we investigated the influence of cognitive and linguistic ability on gaze behavior during spoken language conversation between children with mild-to-moderate hearing impairment (HI and normal-hearing (NH peers. Ten HI-NH and ten NH-NH dyads performed a referential communication task requiring description of faces. During task performance, eye movements and speech were tracked. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to model associations between performance on cognitive and linguistic tasks and the probability of gaze to the conversational partner’s face. Analyses compare the listeners in each dyad (HI: n = 10, mean age = 12;6 years, SD = 2;0, mean better ear pure-tone average 33.0 dB HL, SD = 7.8; NH: n = 10, mean age = 13;7 years, SD = 1;11. Group differences in gaze behavior – with HI gazing more to the conversational partner than NH – remained significant despite adjustment for ability on receptive grammar, expressive vocabulary, and complex working memory. Adjustment for phonological short term memory, as measured by nonword repetition, removed group differences, revealing an interaction between group membership and nonword repetition ability. Stratified analysis showed a twofold increase of the probability of gaze-to-partner for HI with low phonological short term memory capacity, and a decreased probability for HI with high capacity, as compared to NH peers. The results revealed differences in gaze behavior attributable to performance on a phonological short term memory task. Participants with hearing impairment and low phonological short term memory capacity showed a doubled probability of gaze to the conversational partner, indicative of a visual bias. The results stress the need to look beyond the hearing impairment in diagnostics and intervention. Acknowledgment of the finding requires clinical assessment of children with hearing impairment to be supported by tasks tapping

  9. Hearing impairments in middle age: the acceptability, benefit and cost of detection (ABCD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, A; Stephens, D; Rayment, A; Thomas, K

    1992-02-01

    The major epidemiological investigations of hearing impairment, disability and handicap show that the elderly are the group most disabled by their hearing impairment. There is considerable debate concerning the most efficient way of reducing this inevitable burden of age-related hearing impairments in the next generation. Early fitting of 'targeted' individuals with hearing aids may help but there are a large number of methodological problems associated with conducting and evaluating such a programme of research (especially retrospectively). The logical prerequisite to early fitting as a means of reducing later disability is to ascertain the acceptability of and benefit given by intervention at this early stage. This study therefore set out to investigate the age/sex register provided by the primary physician (GP) as an appropriate base to identify candidates for early aid fitting among a sample of middle-aged patients (50-65 years) living in Roath, Cardiff. Of the 662 who replied to an initial contact letter (1050 were on the age/sex register), 21 already possessed hearing aids. After screening and examination 66 people were offered some form of management which was accepted by 43 during the course of the study. Aid use thereby increased from about 3% to over 9% in this middle-aged group. A 2 year follow-up indicated continued use of the aids, and benefit on a speech reception task was measured. The cost of detecting those who might benefit was calculated using a two-question 'paper and pencil' screen as the first step. A national programme for Wales would cost at least 188,000 pounds per annum at 1990 prices over an initial 5 year span if a criterion which aimed to find at least 45 dB HTL impairments over mid-frequencies was implemented. For a criterion of 35 dB the cost would be 378,000 pounds pa.

  10. Processing of Binaural Pitch Stimuli in Hearing-Impaired Listeners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santurette, Sébastien; Dau, Torsten

    2009-01-01

    hearingloss; 3: retro-cochlear impairment) were asked to identify the pitch contour of series of five notes of equal duration, ranging from 523 to 784 Hz, played either with Huggins’ binaural pitch stimuli (BP) or perceptually similar, but monaurally detectable, pitches (MP). All subjects from groups 1 and 2...

  11. The effects of hearing impairment on the ability to glimpse speech in a spectro-temporally complex noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozmeral, Erol James

    The aim of this project was to investigate the effects of hearing impairment on speech perception in spectro-temporally complex noise. The specific objective of the project was to psychophysically and computationally assess speech reception in the presence of a masker that fluctuates both in time and frequency. The experiments were designed to compare hearing-impaired and normal-hearing listeners on a task which has been shown to highlight the effect of spread of masking. Through dichotic stimulation, a previous study had shown a sizeable benefit when compared to monaural stimulation. Experiment 1 tested normal-hearing and hearing-impaired listeners on consonant recognition in the presence of an asynchronously modulated noise. We tested the primary hypotheses that spread of masking reduces available glimpsing opportunities for hearing-impaired listeners, and that removing spread of masking enhances performance relative to normal-hearing listeners. Results showed greater masking release in normal-hearing listeners compared to hearing-impaired listeners, but all listeners achieved some benefit of reducing the effects of spread of masking. Experiment 2 tested consonant recognition in similar masking conditions as Experiment 1, testing normal-hearing listeners with simulated reduced audibility and reduced frequency resolution. We tested the primary hypothesis that reduced audibility is not the only limiting factor for hearing-impaired listeners to glimpse speech, but rather, that reduced frequency resolution also plays an important role in the ability to glimpse speech in spectro-temporally complex noise. Results showed that while reduced audibility was a key factor, reduced frequency resolution also contributes to deficits seen in Experiment 1. Experiment 3 tested a computational glimpsing model. We tested the hypotheses that spectral resolution plays a key role in glimpsing for both normal-hearing and hearing-impaired listeners; by analyzing dichotically presented

  12. Bullying victimization: A risk factor of health problems among adolescents with hearing impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, Bushra; Munawar, Asima

    2016-01-01

    To find bullying victimisation as a predictor of physical and psychological health problems among school-going children with hearing impairment. The co-relational cross-sectional study was conducted in Gujrat district of Pakistan's Punjab province from August 2014 to January 2015, and comprised adolescents with hearing impairment. The subjects were selected through multi-stage stratified proportionate sampling from the local schools. Two standardised instruments were administered to assess the relationship between bullying and health problems. Multidimensional Peer Victimisation Scale was used for measuring bullying behaviour, while the Health Questionnaire was used to assess physical and psychological health problems. Both scales were translated into Urdu using lexicon equivalence method of translation. Of the 286 subjects, 183(64%) were boys. A significant positive relationship was found between the four components of bullying and health problems (p0.05). Children with hearing impairment experienced bullying just like those without such an impairment. Bullying needs to be considered a significant public health issue and should be dealt with effectively.

  13. The global burden of disabling hearing impairment: a call to action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olusanya, Bolajoko O; Neumann, Katrin J; Saunders, James E

    2014-05-01

    At any age, disabling hearing impairment has a profound impact on interpersonal communication, psychosocial well-being, quality of life and economic independence. According to the World Health Organization's estimates, the number of people with such impairment increased from 42 million in 1985 to about 360 million in 2011. This last figure includes 7.5 million children less than 5 years of age. In 1995, a "roadmap" for curtailing the burden posed by disabling hearing impairment was outlined in a resolution of the World Health Assembly. While the underlying principle of this roadmap remains valid and relevant, some updating is required to reflect the prevailing epidemiologic transition. We examine the traditional concept and grades of disabling hearing impairment - within the context of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health - as well as the modifications to grading that have recently been proposed by a panel of international experts. The opportunity offered by the emerging global and high-level interest in promoting disability-inclusive post-2015 development goals and disability-free child survival is also discussed. Since the costs of rehabilitative services are so high as to be prohibitive in low- and middle-income countries, the critical role of primary prevention is emphasized. If the goals outlined in the World Health Assembly's 1995 resolution on the prevention of hearing impairment are to be reached by Member States, several effective country-level initiatives - including the development of public-private partnerships, strong leadership and measurable time-bound targets - will have to be implemented without further delay.

  14. The Effects of Hearing Impairment, Age, and Hearing Aids on the Use of Self-Motion for Determining Front/Back Location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brimijoin, W Owen; Akeroyd, Michael A

    2016-07-01

    There are two cues that listeners use to disambiguate the front/back location of a sound source: high-frequency spectral cues associated with the head and pinnae, and self-motion-related binaural cues. The use of these cues can be compromised in listeners with hearing impairment and users of hearing aids. To determine how age, hearing impairment, and the use of hearing aids affect a listener's ability to determine front from back based on both self-motion and spectral cues. We used a previously published front/back illusion: signals whose physical source location is rotated around the head at twice the angular rate of the listener's head movements are perceptually located in the opposite hemifield from where they physically are. In normal-hearing listeners, the strength of this illusion decreases as a function of low-pass filter cutoff frequency, this is the result of a conflict between spectral cues and dynamic binaural cues for sound source location. The illusion was used as an assay of self-motion processing in listeners with hearing impairment and users of hearing aids. We recruited 40 hearing-impaired participants, with an average age of 62 yr. The data for three listeners were discarded because they did not move their heads enough during the experiment. Listeners sat at the center of a ring of 24 loudspeakers, turned their heads back and forth, and used a wireless keypad to report the front/back location of statically presented signals and of dynamically moving signals with illusory locations. Front/back accuracy for static signals, the strength of front/back illusions, and minimum audible movement angle were measured for each listener in each condition. All measurements were made in each listener both aided and unaided. Hearing-impaired listeners were less accurate at front/back discrimination for both static and illusory conditions. Neither static nor illusory conditions were affected by high-frequency content. Hearing aids had heterogeneous effects from

  15. SELF-REGULATION STRATEGIES OF ORAL COMMUNICATION IN CHILDREN WITH HEARING IMPAIRMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alois GHERGUT

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The study identifies some self-regulation strategies used by deaf children in order to make their speech more intelligible. To achieve self-control while speaking, the child with severe hearing loss needs not only a high level of intelligence, but also an effective lip-reading capability and a strong intrinsic motivation. This is the reason why there are many cases of children with a high level of intelligence, but with a mediocre lip-reading capability and others with a lower level of intelligence, but with a good lip-reading capability. These differences also depend on the degree of hearing loss. Among the self-regulation strategies used by the children that achieve an intelligible speech are: the cognitive and meta-cognitive strategies, the motivational strategies etc. These results are important while designing the therapeutic activities, and especially the speech intelligibility factor being crucial in the social integration of those children with hearing impairment.

  16. The lexical development of children with hearing impairment and associated factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penna, Leticia Macedo; Lemos, Stela Maris Aguiar; Alves, Cláudia Regina Lindgren

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed at analyzing the association between the lexical development of children with hearing impairment and their psychosocial and socioeconomic characteristics and medical history. An analytic transversal study was conducted in an Auditive Health Attention Service. One hundred and ten children from 6 to 10 years old using hearing aids and presenting hearing loss that ranged from light to deep levels were evaluated. All children were subjected to oral, written language and auditory perception tests. Parents answered a structured questionnaire to collect data from their medical history and socioeconomic status, and questionnaires about the features of the family environment and psychosocial characteristics. Multivariate analysis was performed by logistic regression, being the initial model composed by variables with plearning difficulties often observed in these children.

  17. Relations between frequency selectivity, temporal fine-structure processing, and speech reception in impaired hearing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strelcyk, Olaf; Dau, Torsten

    2009-01-01

    and binaural TFS-processing deficits in the HI listeners, no relation was found between TFS processing and frequency selectivity. The effect of noise on TFS processing was not larger for the HI listeners than for the NH listeners. Finally, TFS-processing performance was correlated with speech reception......Frequency selectivity, temporal fine-structure (TFS) processing, and speech reception were assessed for six normal-hearing (NH) listeners, ten sensorineurally hearing-impaired (HI) listeners with similar high-frequency losses, and two listeners with an obscure dysfunction (OD). TFS processing...... was investigated at low frequencies in regions of normal hearing, through measurements of binaural masked detection, tone lateralization, and monaural frequency modulation (FM) detection. Lateralization and FM detection thresholds were measured in quiet and in background noise. Speech reception thresholds were...

  18. Modeling auditory processing and speech perception in hearing-impaired listeners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Morten Løve

    A better understanding of how the human auditory system represents and analyzes sounds and how hearing impairment affects such processing is of great interest for researchers in the fields of auditory neuroscience, audiology, and speech communication as well as for applications in hearing......-instrument and speech technology. In this thesis, the primary focus was on the development and evaluation of a computational model of human auditory signal-processing and perception. The model was initially designed to simulate the normal-hearing auditory system with particular focus on the nonlinear processing...... aimed at experimentally characterizing the effects of cochlear damage on listeners' auditory processing, in terms of sensitivity loss and reduced temporal and spectral resolution. The results showed that listeners with comparable audiograms can have very different estimated cochlear input...

  19. Interactive Auroral Science for Hearing-Impaired Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samara, M.; Michell, R. G.; Jahn, J.; Pfeifer, M.; Ibarra, S.; Hampton, D. L.; Powell, D.

    2012-12-01

    Under a NASA E/PO grant, we have partnered with San Antonio's Sunshine Cottage School for Deaf Children to develop a science class experience where students directly interact with scientists and participate in a research-grade space science measurement campaign. The unique aspect of partnering with Sunshine Cottage lies in Sunshine's approach of auditory-verbal communication. Aided by technology (hearing aids, cochlear implants), a diverse student body with students of all levels of hearing loss (moderate through profound) is taught in an entirely auditory-verbal environment at Sunshine Cottage. Bringing these students into early contact with research work can lay the foundation for future careers in the STEM field that normally they might not consider as indicated by the first year of this collaboration where the student response was distinctly positive. Here we report on the first year of those activities, as they related to a ground based imaging approach to exploring the northern lights and from the point of view of the scientists that participated. The major components of that activity included a site visit to SwRI by the students and their teachers, a semester long lab at school utilizing current research tools and a real-time campaign night. The students used a number of diagnostics to first predict and then verify auroral activity. One of the tools used was the MOOSE observatory which is a community resource state of the art observatory comprised of 5 EMCCD imagers in Alaska, established through an NSF MRI grant. We will discuss the approach and lessons learned during the first year of the project and the directions that we will likely take in the second year. Lessons learned from teaching these students space science related topic can be flowed right back into mainstream classroom settings. One other significant and unexpected aspect of this first year was that we were able to connect two groups of students through skype (in the 4th to 5th grades) that

  20. A novel ENG mutation causing impaired co-translational processing of endoglin associated with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Atsuo; Nakashima, Daisuke; Miyawaki, Yuhri; Fujita, Junko; Maki, Asuka; Fujimori, Yuta; Takagi, Akira; Murate, Takashi; Teranishi, Masaaki; Matsushita, Tadashi; Saito, Hidehiko; Kojima, Tetsuhito

    2012-05-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an inherited autosomal dominant vascular dysplasia caused by mutations in mainly the endoglin gene (ENG) or activin-like kinase receptor 1 (ALK1) gene (ACVRL1). We investigated the molecular basis of HHT in a Japanese patient, and identified a novel missense mutation in ENG (c.38T>A, p.Leu13Gln) located in the signal peptide's hydrophobic core, but not in ACVRL1. In experiments in COS-1 cells, the Leu13Gln (L13Q) mutant endoglin appeared to be expressed as a precursor form, probably due to impaired protein processing. Flow cytometry analyses of the COS-1 cells transiently expressing recombinant endoglins revealed that the wild-type endoglin was detected on the cell surface, but the L13Q mutant was not. We also analyzed expression patterns of the recombinant endoglins by immunofluorescent staining, and found that the wild-type co-localized with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), but the L13Q mutant did not. These results implied that the L13Q mutant endoglin fails to insert into the ER, probably due to destruction of the hydrophobic core structure in the signal peptide to be recognized by signal recognition particles. Thus, the Leu13 in the signal peptide of endoglin might be essential for correct protein processing through the ER and cell-surface expression. Taken together, the novel c.38T>A mutation in ENG would impair co-translational processing of the endoglin, and could be responsible for HHT in this patient. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Summation bandwidths at threshold in normal and hearing-impaired listeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, M B; Turner, C W

    1990-12-01

    The bandwidths for summation at threshold were measured for subjects with normal hearing and subjects with sensorineural hearing loss. Thresholds in quiet and in the presence of a masking noise were measured for complex stimuli consisting of 1 to 40 pure-tone components spaced 20 Hz apart. The single component condition consisted of a single pure tone at 1100 Hz; additional components were added below this frequency, in a replication of the Gässler [Acustica 4, 408-414 (1954)] procedure. For the normal subjects, thresholds increased approximately 3 dB per doubling of bandwidth for signal bandwidths exceeding the critical bandwidth. This slope was less for the hearing-impaired subjects. Summation bandwidths, as estimated from two-line fits, were wider for the hearing-impaired than for the normal subjects. These findings provide evidence that hearing-impaired subjects integrate sound energy over a wider-than-normal frequency range for the detection of complex signals. A second experiment used stimuli similar to those of Spiegel [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 66, 1356-1363 (1979)], and added components both above and below the frequency of the initial component. Using these stimuli, the slope of the threshold increase beyond the critical bandwidth was approximately 1.5 dB per doubling of bandwidth, thus replicating the Spiegel (1979) experiment. It is concluded that the differences between the Gässler (1954) and Spiegel (1979) studies were due to the different frequency content of the stimuli used in each study. Based upon the present results, it would appear that the slope of threshold increase is dependent upon the direction of signal expansion, and the size of the critical bands into which the signal is expanded.

  2. Audio-visual perception of compressed speech by profoundly hearing-impaired subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drullman, R; Smoorenburg, G F

    1997-01-01

    For many people with profound hearing loss conventional hearing aids give only little support in speechreading. This study aims at optimizing the presentation of speech signals in the severely reduced dynamic range of the profoundly hearing impaired by means of multichannel compression and multichannel amplification. The speech signal in each of six 1-octave channels (125-4000 Hz) was compressed instantaneously, using compression ratios of 1, 2, 3, or 5, and a compression threshold of 35 dB below peak level. A total of eight conditions were composed in which the compression ratio varied per channel. Sentences were presented audio-visually to 16 profoundly hearing-impaired subjects and syllable intelligibility was measured. Results show that all auditory signals are valuable supplements to speechreading. No clear overall preference is found for any of the compression conditions, but relatively high compression ratios (> 3-5) have a significantly detrimental effect. Inspection of the individual results reveals that compression may be beneficial for one subject.

  3. An assistive technology for hearing-impaired persons: analysis, requirements and architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielke, Matthias; Grunewald, Armin; Bruck, Rainer

    2013-01-01

    In this contribution, a concept of an assistive technology for hearing-impaired and deaf persons is presented. The concept applies pattern recognition algorithms and makes use of modern communication technology to analyze the acoustic environment around a user, identify critical acoustic signatures and give an alert to the user when an event of interest happened. A detailed analysis of the needs of deaf and hearing-impaired people has been performed. Requirements for an adequate assisting device have been derived from the results of the analysis, and have been turned into an architecture for its implementation that will be presented in this article. The presented concept is the basis for an assistive system which is now under development at the Institute of Microsystem Engineering at the University of Siegen.

  4. Effectiveness of oral hygiene instruction media on periodontal health among hearing impaired children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunakul, Malee; Kuphasuk, Yosvimol; Boonyathanasit, Romcharee

    2012-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of oral hygiene instruction media on periodontal health in hearing impaired children over a period of three months. The study was carried out among 66 hearing impaired children (aged 6-10 years). The children were randomly divided into 4 groups by oral hygiene instruction media type: video presentation group, illustrated book group, both video presentation and illustrated book group, and control group. The gingival index (GI), gingival bleeding index (BI), and plaque index (PI) were recorded at baseline and at 3 months follow-up. After three months, there was a significant reduction from baseline in the mean values for GI, BI, and PI in all groups including the control group (p < 0.001). Further studies to determine what factors resulted in this reduction are accessary.

  5. THE DEVELOPMENT OF SCIENCE LEARNING MODULE FOR CHILDRENT WITH HEARING IMPAIRMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Marzuqi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available There are the absence of teaching materials in accordance with the characteristics and conditions of a hearing impairment children in terms of learning, especially science subjects. The characteristics of hearing impairment children is poor in their vocabularies, so that, the teaching materials emphasizing the visual aspect is necessary. This study used a Research and Development (R & D adapted by the Sugiyono model in order to produce teaching materials in the form of pictorial modules and to test their effectiveness. The result of the research showed that it was a very valid criteria with a score of 97% of the materials experts, 85% of media experts, and 93% of skilled practitioners. The score of the effectiveness of the modules was 75% with the effective criteria.

  6. The SKI*HI Model: Programming for Hearing Impaired Infants through Home Intervention, Home Visit Curriculum. Fourth Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Thomas C.; Watkins, Susan

    The manual describes the SKI*HI Model, a comprehensive approach to identification and home intervention treatment of hearing impaired children and their families. The model features home programing in four basic areas: the home hearing aid program (nine lessons which facilitate the proper fit and acceptance of amplification by the child), home…

  7. Improving word recognition in noise among hearing-impaired subjects with a single-channel cochlear noise-reduction algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Nir; Furst, Miriam; Muchnik, Chava

    2012-09-01

    A common complaint of the hearing impaired is the inability to understand speech in noisy environments even with their hearing assistive devices. Only a few single-channel algorithms have significantly improved speech intelligibility in noise for hearing-impaired listeners. The current study introduces a cochlear noise reduction algorithm. It is based on a cochlear representation of acoustic signals and real-time derivation of a binary speech mask. The contribution of the algorithm for enhancing word recognition in noise was evaluated on a group of 42 normal-hearing subjects, 35 hearing-aid users, 8 cochlear implant recipients, and 14 participants with bimodal devices. Recognition scores of Hebrew monosyllabic words embedded in Gaussian noise at several signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) were obtained with processed and unprocessed signals. The algorithm was not effective among the normal-hearing participants. However, it yielded a significant improvement in some of the hearing-impaired subjects under different listening conditions. Its most impressive benefit appeared among cochlear implant recipients. More than 20% improvement in recognition score of noisy words was obtained by 12, 16, and 26 hearing-impaired at SNR of 30, 24, and 18 dB, respectively. The algorithm has a potential to improve speech intelligibility in background noise, yet further research is required to improve its performances.

  8. Hearing impairment, social support, and depressive symptoms among U.S. adults: A test of the stress process paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Jessica S

    2017-09-21

    Hearing impairment is a growing physical disability affecting older adults and is an important physical health stressor, but few studies have examined it in relation to mental health outcomes and even fewer have considered the role of social support in buffering this relationship. The current study builds on the stress process framework and uses longitudinal data from three waves of the Health and Retirement Study (2006, 2010, 2014) to examine the relationship between hearing impairment and depressive symptoms among U.S. adults aged 50 and older (n = 6075). The analysis uses fixed-effects models to assess this relationship and examine the extent to which social support mediates (buffers) or moderates (interaction) the association. The results found that worse self-rated hearing was associated with a significant increase in depressive symptoms, even after controlling for sociodemographic factors. Social support did not buffer this relationship. Instead, social support interacted with hearing impairment: low levels of social support were associated with more depressive symptoms but only among people with poor self-rated hearing. Among those with excellent self-rated hearing, low levels of social support did not increase depressive symptoms. Moreover, high levels of social support reduced depressive symptoms for those with poor hearing. These findings suggest that hearing impairment is a chronic stressor in individuals' lives, and that responses to this stressor vary by the availability of social resources. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Dynamic Range Across Music Genres and the Perception of Dynamic Compression in Hearing-Impaired Listeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchberger, Martin; Russo, Frank A

    2016-02-10

    Dynamic range compression serves different purposes in the music and hearing-aid industries. In the music industry, it is used to make music louder and more attractive to normal-hearing listeners. In the hearing-aid industry, it is used to map the variable dynamic range of acoustic signals to the reduced dynamic range of hearing-impaired listeners. Hence, hearing-aided listeners will typically receive a dual dose of compression when listening to recorded music. The present study involved an acoustic analysis of dynamic range across a cross section of recorded music as well as a perceptual study comparing the efficacy of different compression schemes. The acoustic analysis revealed that the dynamic range of samples from popular genres, such as rock or rap, was generally smaller than the dynamic range of samples from classical genres, such as opera and orchestra. By comparison, the dynamic range of speech, based on recordings of monologues in quiet, was larger than the dynamic range of all music genres tested. The perceptual study compared the effect of the prescription rule NAL-NL2 with a semicompressive and a linear scheme. Music subjected to linear processing had the highest ratings for dynamics and quality, followed by the semicompressive and the NAL-NL2 setting. These findings advise against NAL-NL2 as a prescription rule for recorded music and recommend linear settings.

  10. Dynamic Range Across Music Genres and the Perception of Dynamic Compression in Hearing-Impaired Listeners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Kirchberger

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic range compression serves different purposes in the music and hearing-aid industries. In the music industry, it is used to make music louder and more attractive to normal-hearing listeners. In the hearing-aid industry, it is used to map the variable dynamic range of acoustic signals to the reduced dynamic range of hearing-impaired listeners. Hence, hearing-aided listeners will typically receive a dual dose of compression when listening to recorded music. The present study involved an acoustic analysis of dynamic range across a cross section of recorded music as well as a perceptual study comparing the efficacy of different compression schemes. The acoustic analysis revealed that the dynamic range of samples from popular genres, such as rock or rap, was generally smaller than the dynamic range of samples from classical genres, such as opera and orchestra. By comparison, the dynamic range of speech, based on recordings of monologues in quiet, was larger than the dynamic range of all music genres tested. The perceptual study compared the effect of the prescription rule NAL-NL2 with a semicompressive and a linear scheme. Music subjected to linear processing had the highest ratings for dynamics and quality, followed by the semicompressive and the NAL-NL2 setting. These findings advise against NAL-NL2 as a prescription rule for recorded music and recommend linear settings.

  11. Apparent auditory source width insensitivity in older hearing-impaired individuals

    OpenAIRE

    Whitmer, William M; Seeber, Bernhard U.; Michael A Akeroyd

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have shown a loss in the precision of horizontal localization responses of older hearing-impaired (HI) individuals, along with potentially poorer neural representations of sound-source location. These deficits could be the result or corollary of greater difficulties in discriminating spatial images, and an insensitivity to punctate sound sources. This hypothesis was tested in three headphone-presentation experiments varying interaural coherence (IC), the cue most associated w...

  12. A Deficit in Movement-Derived Sentences in German-Speaking Hearing-Impaired Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruigendijk, Esther; Friedmann, Naama

    2017-01-01

    Children with hearing impairment (HI) show disorders in syntax and morphology. The question is whether and how these disorders are connected to problems in the auditory domain. The aim of this paper is to examine whether moderate to severe hearing loss at a young age affects the ability of German-speaking orally trained children to understand and produce sentences. We focused on sentence structures that are derived by syntactic movement, which have been identified as a sensitive marker for syntactic impairment in other languages and in other populations with syntactic impairment. Therefore, our study tested subject and object relatives, subject and object Wh-questions, passive sentences, and topicalized sentences, as well as sentences with verb movement to second sentential position. We tested 19 HI children aged 9;5-13;6 and compared their performance with hearing children using comprehension tasks of sentence-picture matching and sentence repetition tasks. For the comprehension tasks, we included HI children who passed an auditory discrimination task; for the sentence repetition tasks, we selected children who passed a screening task of simple sentence repetition without lip-reading; this made sure that they could perceive the words in the tests, so that we could test their grammatical abilities. The results clearly showed that most of the participants with HI had considerable difficulties in the comprehension and repetition of sentences with syntactic movement: they had significant difficulties understanding object relatives, Wh-questions, and topicalized sentences, and in the repetition of object who and which questions and subject relatives, as well as in sentences with verb movement to second sentential position. Repetition of passives was only problematic for some children. Object relatives were still difficult at this age for both HI and hearing children. An additional important outcome of the study is that not all sentence structures are impaired

  13. EMPLOYABILITY SKILLS OF TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL STUDENTS WITH HEARING IMPAIREMENTS: EMPLOYERS’ PERSPECTIVES

    OpenAIRE

    Fazlinda Ab Halim; Ab. Rahim Bakar; Ramlah Hamzah; Abdullah Mat Rashid

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to explore the employers’ requirement for employability skills of the technical and vocational students who are hearing impaired. The research instrument used was adapted from the Secretary's Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills (SCANS) which consists of thirty nine items. The employability skills surveyed include basic skills, thinking skills, personal qualities, sourcing skills, information skills, interpersonal skills, system skills and technology skills. The instrument...

  14. Sign-Lingo : Feasibility of a Serious Game for Involving Parents in the Language Development of their Deaf or Hearing Impaired Child

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schalk, I van der; Spruit, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/297391879

    2017-01-01

    Family involvement plays a critical factor in the language development of a deaf or hearing impaired child. Hearing parents often have major difficulties in communicating with their child when it is deaf or hearing impaired. These difficulties often lead to issues in the language development of the

  15. EMPLOYABILITY SKILLS OF TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL STUDENTS WITH HEARING IMPAIREMENTS: EMPLOYERS’ PERSPECTIVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazlinda Ab Halim

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to explore the employers’ requirement for employability skills of the technical and vocational students who are hearing impaired. The research instrument used was adapted from the Secretary's Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills (SCANS which consists of thirty nine items. The employability skills surveyed include basic skills, thinking skills, personal qualities, sourcing skills, information skills, interpersonal skills, system skills and technology skills. The instrument was distributed to 110 industry employers throughout Malaysia. However, only 23 (21% employers returned the survey form. The majority of respondents are from service industry (78.2% including the retail, food service, restaurants and hotel as well as the fashion designing industry. A high percentage of the respondents (65.2% are Human Resource Manager who had one to five years of working experience. Based on the survey, the three top most highly rated skills are, personal qualities (M=4.37, SD=.39, basic skills (M=4.10, SD=.58 and interpersonal skills (M=4.07, SD=.47. Knowing the skills that employers demand from their hearing impaired employees, institutions can provide the appropriate training to prepare their hearing impaired graduates for future employment.

  16. Auditory filtering and the discrimination of spectral shapes by normal and hearing-impaired subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, C W; Holte, L A; Relkin, E

    1987-01-01

    A review of the literature suggests that many hearing-impaired patients suffer from sensory deficits in addition to the reduced audibility of speech signals. Poor frequency resolution, or abnormal spread of masking, is a consistently identified deficit in sensorineural hearing loss. Frequency resolution was measured in individual subjects using the input filter pattern paradigm, and the minimum detectable amplitude of a second-formant spectral peak in a spectral-shape discrimination task was also determined for each subject. The two tasks were designed to test the identical frequency regions in each subject. A nearly perfect correlation was found between the degree of frequency resolution as measured by the input filter pattern and performance on the spectral-shape discrimination task. These results suggest that measures of frequency selectivity may offer predictive value as to the degree of impairment that individual hearing-impaired patients may have in perceiving the spectral characteristics of speech, and also lead to suggestions for signal processing strategies to aid these patients.

  17. Adaptation of the Fresenius PD+ Cycler for a hearing-impaired patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushner, A

    2000-01-01

    Continuous cycling peritoneal dialysis (CCPD) uses a cycler to perform dialysis exchanges and requires the patient to respond to an audible alarm signifying an interruption in the therapy. Consequently, an unassisted hearing-impaired patient could not use the system. By converting the standard alarm to a vibrating signal, the cycler was successfully adapted to accommodate the special needs of our hearing-impaired patient. The items required for the modification were the Sonic Alert Wake Up Alarm (Model SA-WA300: Sonic Alert, Troy, MI, U.S.A.) and the Sonic Alert Super Shaker Bed Vibrator (Model SA-SS120V: Sonic Alert). The patient can place the vibrator under either the pillow or the mattress. When the cycler alarm is activated, vibration wakens the patient. The equipment was purchased from Harris Communications (Eden Prairie, MN, U.S.A.) through a referral by the Easter Seal Society. Three days were needed to complete training compared to an average of one or two days for patients previously trained for continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). The patient remained on cycler therapy for approximately four months when the unrelated development of an abdominal hernia required termination of peritoneal dialysis and subsequent transfer to hemodialysis. In conclusion, a modified cycler can provide a safe and efficient renal replacement therapy option for a hearing-impaired patient.

  18. Breaking the sound barrier: oral health education for children with hearing impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Vabitha; Kumar, Jithendra; Hegde, Amitha

    2014-01-01

    In our study, a visual oral health education (OHE) program was specially designed for children with hearing impairment. Its efficacy in improving their oral health status was evaluated after periods of reinforcement and nonreinforcement. One hundred and ten institutionalized children with moderate-to-severe hearing impairment aged 6-14 years were selected for the study. Oral health status was evaluated at the start of the study (pre-OHE level) using the Modified Gingival Index (MGI) and the Turesky-Gilmore-Glickman modification of the Quigley Hein Plaque Index (MQPI). Salivary Streptococcus mutans levels of the children were also evaluated. Brushing skills were assessed using the Simmons index at the start of the study. Significant decreases were observed in the mean values of both the MGI and MQPI from the baseline up to the values obtained at the end of both periods of reinforcement and nonreinforcement. Significant reduction in S. mutans counts was observed, from Pre-OHE levels up to the levels at the end of the period of nonreinforcement. Brushing skills of children improved significantly at the end of study, notably in areas where brushing was previously deemed unsatisfactory. The OHE program specially formulated for the hearing impaired children was effective in improving their oral health status significantly.

  19. Methods of technical and tactical training basketball players with hearing impairments using innovative technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozina Zh.L

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to develop information technology for technical and tactical training of skilled basketball players with hearing impairments. Material : the study involved 24 women's national team athletes Ukrainian Basketball hearing impaired (age - 25-30 years. Technical protocols were processed 12 games from the World Cup and Europe, XXII Summer Deaflympics. Fixed number of shots and hit free throws, steals, rebounds and on its offensive rebounds, fouls and errors. Results : the developed system of tactical training basketball players with hearing impairments. Accentuation was made of the prevalence of method visibility while developing tactical interactions. The main result was the development of the author's method of video tutorials with animated illustrations. Also, use the lamp LS Line-3-65-12-C to control the training process athletes. Conclusions : there was a significant improvement in competitive activity athletes. Athletes performed significantly more hits from the foul line and successful shots from long range compared to main rivals. Also increased the number of interceptions in games. Application of information technology had an impact on the competitive result: basketball team of Ukraine took the second place in the Deaflympics in Sofia in 2013.

  20. Investigation of in-vehicle speech intelligibility metrics for normal hearing and hearing impaired listeners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samardzic, Nikolina

    The effectiveness of in-vehicle speech communication can be a good indicator of the perception of the overall vehicle quality and customer satisfaction. Currently available speech intelligibility metrics do not account in their procedures for essential parameters needed for a complete and accurate evaluation of in-vehicle speech intelligibility. These include the directivity and the distance of the talker with respect to the listener, binaural listening, hearing profile of the listener, vocal effort, and multisensory hearing. In the first part of this research the effectiveness of in-vehicle application of these metrics is investigated in a series of studies to reveal their shortcomings, including a wide range of scores resulting from each of the metrics for a given measurement configuration and vehicle operating condition. In addition, the nature of a possible correlation between the scores obtained from each metric is unknown. The metrics and the subjective perception of speech intelligibility using, for example, the same speech material have not been compared in literature. As a result, in the second part of this research, an alternative method for speech intelligibility evaluation is proposed for use in the automotive industry by utilizing a virtual reality driving environment for ultimately setting targets, including the associated statistical variability, for future in-vehicle speech intelligibility evaluation. The Speech Intelligibility Index (SII) was evaluated at the sentence Speech Receptions Threshold (sSRT) for various listening situations and hearing profiles using acoustic perception jury testing and a variety of talker and listener configurations and background noise. In addition, the effect of individual sources and transfer paths of sound in an operating vehicle to the vehicle interior sound, specifically their effect on speech intelligibility was quantified, in the framework of the newly developed speech intelligibility evaluation method. Lastly

  1. Speech intelligibility for normal hearing and hearing-impaired listeners in simulated room acoustic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arweiler, Iris; Dau, Torsten; Poulsen, Torben

    Speech intelligibility depends on many factors such as room acoustics, the acoustical properties and location of the signal and the interferers, and the ability of the (normal and impaired) auditory system to process monaural and binaural sounds. In the present study, the effect of reverberation...... intelligibility and when binaural cues are effective. (Poster). Partly from HEARCOM project....

  2. Novel Mutations and Mutation Combinations of TMPRSS3 Cause Various Phenotypes in One Chinese Family with Autosomal Recessive Hearing Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guo-Jian; Xu, Jin-Cao; Su, Yu

    2017-01-01

    Autosomal recessive hearing impairment with postlingual onset is rare. Exceptions are caused by mutations in the TMPRSS3 gene, which can lead to prelingual (DFNB10) as well as postlingual deafness (DFNB8). TMPRSS3 mutations can be classified as mild or severe, and the phenotype is dependent on the combination of TMPRSS3 mutations. The combination of two severe mutations leads to profound hearing impairment with a prelingual onset, whereas severe mutations in combination with milder TMPRSS3 mutations lead to a milder phenotype with postlingual onset. We characterized a Chinese family (number FH1523) with not only prelingual but also postlingual hearing impairment. Three mutations in TMPRSS3, one novel mutation c.36delC [p.(Phe13Serfs⁎12)], and two previously reported pathogenic mutations, c.916G>A (p.Ala306Thr) and c.316C>T (p.Arg106Cys), were identified. Compound heterozygous mutations of p.(Phe13Serfs⁎12) and p.Ala306Thr manifest as prelingual, profound hearing impairment in the patient (IV: 1), whereas the combination of p.Arg106Cys and p.Ala306Thr manifests as postlingual, milder hearing impairment in the patient (II: 2, II: 3, II: 5), suggesting that p.Arg106Cys mutation has a milder effect than p.(Phe13Serfs⁎12). We concluded that different combinations of TMPRSS3 mutations led to different hearing impairment phenotypes (DFNB8/DFNB10) in this family. PMID:28246597

  3. Oral Communication Development in Severe to Profound Hearing Impaired Children After Receiving Aural Habilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soleimani Farin

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Communication, cognition, language, and speech are interrelated and develop together. It should come as no surprise to us that the key to intervention with deaf children is to establish, as early as possible, a functional communication system for the child and the parents. Early intervention programs need to be multidisciplinary, technologically sound and most important, it should take cognizance of the specific context (community, country in which the child and family function. The main aim of this study was to obtain oral communication development regarding current status of the intervention (aural habilitation and speech therapyfor children with severe to profound hearing impairment in Iran. A prospective longitudinal study was undertaken on a consecutive group of children with severe to profound deafness. Nine severe to profound hearing-impaired children out of the primer 42 cases, who were detected below two years old, had been selected in the previous study to receive aural habilitation. The average of their speech intelligibility scores was near 70% at age 6, which was accounted as poor oral communication and only two of them were able to communicate by spoken language. An integrated intervention services continued again for one year and their oral communication skill was assessed by their speech intelligibility. The intelligibility test of children was recorded on audio-tape, when they read 10 questions such as where is your home. This can be answered only in one word. Each tape was presented to10 normal hearing listeners, and their task was to write down, the answers in Persian orthography. At the beginning (at age 6 the average speech intelligibility score of these children was 72% and only two of them had score of 90% and 100%. At age 7, all of the severe groups were over 90%, and only two profound ones achieved the score of 48% and 62%. All of severe groups develop oral communication, but profound ones had a semi-intelligible speech

  4. Use of nouns and verbs in the oral narrative of individuals with hearing impairment and normal hearing between 5 and 11 years of age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Endo Amemiya

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Nouns and verbs indicate actions in oral communication. However, hearing impairment can compromise the acquisition of oral language to such an extent that appropriate use of these can be challenging. The objective of this study was to compare the use of nouns and verbs in the oral narrative of hearing-impaired and hearing children. DESIGN AND SETTING: Analytical cross-sectional study at the Department of Speech-Language and Hearing Sciences, Universidade Federal de São Paulo. METHODS: Twenty-one children with moderate to profound bilateral neurosensory hearing impairment and twenty-one with normal hearing (controls were matched according to sex, school year and school type. A board showing pictures was presented to each child, to elicit a narrative and measure their performance in producing nouns and verbs. RESULTS: Twenty-two (52.4% of the subjects were males. The mean age was 8 years (standard deviation, SD = 1.5. Comparing averages between the groups of boys and girls, we did not find any significant difference in their use of nouns, but among verbs, there was a significant difference regarding use of the imperative (P = 0.041: more frequent among boys (mean = 2.91. There was no significant difference in the use of nouns and verbs between deaf children and hearers, in relation to school type. Regarding use of the indicative, there was a nearly significant trend (P = 0.058. CONCLUSION: Among oralized hearing-impaired children who underwent speech therapy, their performance regarding verbs and noun use was similar to that of their hearing counterparts.

  5. Maternal Interactions with a Hearing and Hearing-Impaired Twin: Similarities and Differences in Speech Input, Interaction Quality, and Word Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Christa; Kitamura, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined a mother's speech style and interactive behaviors with her twin sons: 1 with bilateral hearing impairment (HI) and the other with normal hearing (NH). Method: The mother was video-recorded interacting with her twin sons when the boys were 12.5 and 22 months of age. Mean F0, F0 range, duration, and F1/F2 vowel space of…

  6. Genetic and biochemical impairment of mitochondrial complex I activity in a family with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy and hereditary spastic dystonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Vries, D.D.; Oost, B.A. van [Univ. Hospital Nijmegen (Netherlands); Went, L.N.; Bruyn, G.W. [Univ. of Leiden (Netherlands)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    A rare form of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) that is associated with hereditary spastic dystonia has been studied in a large Dutch family. Neuropathy and ophthalmological lesions were present together in some family members, whereas only one type of abnormality was found in others. mtDNA mutations previously reported in LHON were not present. Sequence analysis of the protein-coding mitochondrial genes revealed two previously unreported mtDNA mutations. A heteroplasmic A{yields}G transition at nucleotide position 11696 in the ND4 gene resulted in the substitution of an isoleucine for valine at amino acid position 312. A second mutation, a homoplasmic T{yields}A transition at nucleotide position 14596 in the ND6 gene, resulted in the substitution of a methionine for the isoleucine at amino acid residue 26. Biochemical analysis of a muscle biopsy revealed a severe complex I deficiency, providing a link between these unique mtDNA mutations and this rare, complex phenotype including Leber optic neuropathy. 80 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. A randomized controlled trial evaluating the active communication education program for older people with hearing impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickson, Louise; Worrall, Linda; Scarinci, Nerina

    2007-04-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of the Active Communication Education (ACE) program for older people with hearing impairment and to investigate factors that influence response to the program. The ACE is a group program that runs for 2 hr per week for 5 wk. In this double-blinded, randomized, controlled trial, 178 older people with, on average, mild to moderate hearing impairment were randomly allocated to one of two groups. Approximately half had been fitted with hearing aid/s in the past. One group (N = 78) undertook a placebo social program for the first 5 wk, followed by the ACE program. They were assessed before the social program, immediately after it, and then again immediately post-ACE. The other group (N = 100) undertook the ACE program only and were assessed before and after ACE. In addition, 167 participants were reassessed 6 mo after completing ACE. Assessments were all self-report and included two sets of measures: 1) those administered both before and after the program-the Hearing Handicap Questionnaire, the Quantified Denver Scale of Communicative Function, the Self-Assessment of Communication, the Ryff Psychological Well-Being Scale, the Short-Form 36 health-related quality of life measure; and 2) those administered postprogram only-the Client Oriented Scale of Improvement, the International Outcome Inventory-Alternative Interventions, and a qualitative questionnaire. All assessments were conducted by a researcher blinded to participants' group membership. The relationships between participant response to the ACE program and a number of client-related factors were also investigated. These factors were the participants' age, gender, hearing loss, hearing aid use, attitudes to hearing impairment (as measured using the Hearing Attitudes to Rehabilitation Questionnaire) and the involvement of significant others. For those participants who completed the social program initially, significant improvements were found on the Quantified Denver Scale of

  8. Auditory processing in children : a study of the effects of age, hearing impairment and language impairment on auditory abilities in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stollman, Martin Hubertus Petrus

    2003-01-01

    In this thesis we tested the hypotheses that the auditory system of children continues to mature until at least the age of 12 years and that the development of auditory processing in hearing-impaired and language-impaired children is often delayed or even genuinely disturbed. Data from a longitudin

  9. Getting in and Getting On? The Experiences of Young People with Visual Impairments and Hearing Impairments in Third-Level Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Bronagh

    2014-01-01

    Young disabled people continue to be under-represented throughout further and higher education settings. Drawing on Pierre Bourdieu's social theory of habitus, capital and field, this paper explores the practices of domination and oppression that have made it difficult for young people with visual impairments and hearing impairments to participate…

  10. Getting in and Getting On? The Experiences of Young People with Visual Impairments and Hearing Impairments in Third-Level Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Bronagh

    2014-01-01

    Young disabled people continue to be under-represented throughout further and higher education settings. Drawing on Pierre Bourdieu's social theory of habitus, capital and field, this paper explores the practices of domination and oppression that have made it difficult for young people with visual impairments and hearing impairments to…

  11. Getting in and Getting On? The Experiences of Young People with Visual Impairments and Hearing Impairments in Third-Level Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Bronagh

    2014-01-01

    Young disabled people continue to be under-represented throughout further and higher education settings. Drawing on Pierre Bourdieu's social theory of habitus, capital and field, this paper explores the practices of domination and oppression that have made it difficult for young people with visual impairments and hearing impairments to participate…

  12. Age at the diagnosis and in the beginning of intervention from hearing impaired children, in a public Brazilian hearing health service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinto, Meliane Melina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The earlier the diagnosis and the intervention from the hearing impairment less will be the impact for the development of cognitive abilities, hearing and of speech from the child. Objective: Characterize the age in the diagnosis and the beginning of intervention of the hearing loss and the accompaniment of the assisted children in a public Brazillian hearing health service - Espaço Reouvir from the Clinicas Hospital from the Medical School from the University of São Paulo. Method: Retrospective study with information from 166 medical records from children regarding the: gender; etiology, type, degree and laterality of the hearing impairment; age in the diagnosis and adaptation of the Hearing aids (HA and accompaniment in the service. Results: The sample was composed by 56% men and 44% women. The prevailing etiology was from multifactorial origin. The hearing loss from the neurosensory type occurred in 88,6% of the cases. The degree of moderate hearing loss was the most frequent (30,7%, symmetry in both ears was found in 69,9% of the cases and unilateral hearing loss in 2,4%. The average age in the diagnosis was of 5,46 years and in the intervention was of 6,86 years. A total of 96,98% of children had already completed the process of adaptation and 78,32% still remained in the accompaniment. Conclusion: The program Reouvir-HCFMUSP still receives children, both for diagnosis and or intervention in a late manner. However, still is possible the realization of the accompaniment of a significant number of users of the hearing aids, enabling a process of adaptation more effective.

  13. Speech quality evaluation of a sparse coding shrinkage noise reduction algorithm with normal hearing and hearing impaired listeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Jinqiu; Hu, Hongmei; Zheng, Chengshi; Li, Guoping; Lutman, Mark E; Bleeck, Stefan

    2015-09-01

    Although there are numerous papers describing single-channel noise reduction strategies to improve speech perception in a noisy environment, few studies have comprehensively evaluated the effects of noise reduction algorithms on speech quality for hearing impaired (HI). A model-based sparse coding shrinkage (SCS) algorithm has been developed, and has shown previously (Sang et al., 2014) that it is as competitive as a state-of-the-art Wiener filter approach in speech intelligibility. Here, the analysis is extended to include subjective quality ratings and a method called Interpolated Paired Comparison Rating (IPCR) is adopted to quantitatively link the benefit of speech intelligibility and speech quality. The subjective quality tests are performed through IPCR to efficiently quantify noise reduction effects on speech quality. Objective measures including frequency-weighted segmental signal-to-noise ratio (fwsegSNR), perceptual evaluation of speech quality (PESQ) and hearing aid speech quality index (HASQI) are adopted to predict the noise reduction effects. Results show little difference in speech quality between the SCS and the Wiener filter algorithm but a difference in quality rating between the HI and NH listeners. HI listeners generally gave better quality ratings of noise reduction algorithms than NH listeners. However, SCS reduced the noise more efficiently at the cost of higher distortions that were detected by NH but not by the HI. SCS is a promising candidate for noise reduction algorithms for HI. In general, care needs to be taken when adopting algorithms that were originally developed for NH participants into hearing aid applications. An algorithm that is evaluated negatively with NH might still bring benefits for HI participants.

  14. Prevalence of hearing impairment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA, Wegener's granulomatosis), or systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahne, Torsten; Clauß, Franziska; Plontke, Stefan K; Keyßer, Gernot

    2017-07-01

    Hearing loss in patients with autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA, Wegener's granulomatosis), or rheumatoid arthritis (RA), is controversial. Many studies lack measurements of bone-conduction thresholds to sufficiently differentiate between sensorineural hearing loss and conductive hearing loss. In addition, many studies lack control groups or comparisons to an age-related normal hearing threshold. This study investigates hearing performance with an extended audiological battery using psychoacoustic and objective measures. A total of 22 adults with RA, 16 with GPA, 20 with SLE, and two age- and gender-matched control groups (n = 34 for GPA and RA and n = 42 for SLE) were included. Pure-tone hearing thresholds, speech perception in quiet and noise, tympanometry, and high-resolution otoacoustic emissions were assessed. GPA patients exhibited impaired pure-tone hearing compared to the control group, whereas SLE and RA patients did not. In GPA patients, a larger air-bone gap indicated conductive hearing loss. In addition, speech perception was reduced exclusively in GPA patients. A significant correlation was found between hearing loss and both the cumulative steroid dose and number of organ manifestations in GPA and SLE patients. Our data indicate that GPA and SLE patients are at moderate-to-high risk of conductive hearing loss. In contrast, RA patients are at low risk of disease-associated hearing loss.

  15. Dynein mutations associated with hereditary motor neuropathies impair mitochondrial morphology and function with age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschbach, Judith; Sinniger, Jérôme; Bouitbir, Jamal; Fergani, Anissa; Schlagowski, Anna-Isabel; Zoll, Joffrey; Geny, Bernard; René, Frédérique; Larmet, Yves; Marion, Vincent; Baloh, Robert H; Harms, Matthew B; Shy, Michael E; Messadeq, Nadia; Weydt, Patrick; Loeffler, Jean-Philippe; Ludolph, Albert C; Dupuis, Luc

    2013-10-01

    Mutations in the DYNC1H1 gene encoding for dynein heavy chain cause two closely related human motor neuropathies, dominant spinal muscular atrophy with lower extremity predominance (SMA-LED) and axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease, and lead to sensory neuropathy and striatal atrophy in mutant mice. Dynein is the molecular motor carrying mitochondria retrogradely on microtubules, yet the consequences of dynein mutations on mitochondrial physiology have not been explored. Here, we show that mouse fibroblasts bearing heterozygous or homozygous point mutation in Dync1h1, similar to human mutations, show profoundly abnormal mitochondrial morphology associated with the loss of mitofusin 1. Furthermore, heterozygous Dync1h1 mutant mice display progressive mitochondrial dysfunction in muscle and mitochondria progressively increase in size and invade sarcomeres. As a likely consequence of systemic mitochondrial dysfunction, Dync1h1 mutant mice develop hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia and progress to glucose intolerance with age. Similar defects in mitochondrial morphology and mitofusin levels are observed in fibroblasts from patients with SMA-LED. Last, we show that Dync1h1 mutant fibroblasts show impaired perinuclear clustering of mitochondria in response to mitochondrial uncoupling. Our results show that dynein function is required for the maintenance of mitochondrial morphology and function with aging and suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to dynein-dependent neurological diseases, such as SMA-LED.

  16. COPA mutations impair ER-Golgi transport causing hereditary autoimmune-mediated lung disease and arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkin, Levi B.; Jessen, Birthe; Wiszniewski, Wojciech; Vece, Timothy; Jan, Max; Sha, Youbao; Thamsen, Maike; Santos-Cortez, Regie L. P.; Lee, Kwanghyuk; Gambin, Tomasz; Forbes, Lisa; Law, Christopher S.; Stray-Petersen, Asbjørg; Cheng, Mickie H.; Mace, Emily M.; Anderson, Mark S.; Liu, Dongfang; Tang, Ling Fung; Nicholas, Sarah K.; Nahmod, Karen; Makedonas, George; Canter, Debra; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Hicks, John; Jones, Kirk D.; Penney, Samantha; Jhangiani, Shalini N.; Rosenblum, Michael D.; Dell, Sharon D.; Waterfield, Michael R.; Papa, Feroz R.; Muzny, Donna M.; Zaitlen, Noah; Leal, Suzanne M.; Gonzaga-Jauregui, Claudia; Boerwinkle, Eric; Eissa, N. Tony; Gibbs, Richard A.; Lupski, James R.; Orange, Jordan S.; Shum, Anthony K.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in genomics have allowed unbiased genetic studies of human disease with unexpected insights into the molecular mechanisms of cellular immunity and autoimmunity1. We performed whole exome sequencing (WES) and targeted sequencing in patients with an apparent Mendelian syndrome of autoimmune disease characterized by high-titer autoantibodies, inflammatory arthritis and interstitial lung disease (ILD). In five families, we identified four unique deleterious variants in the Coatomer subunit alpha (COPA) gene all located within the same functional domain. We hypothesized that mutant COPA leads to a defect in intracellular transport mediated by coat protein complex I (COPI)2–4. We show that COPA variants impair binding of proteins targeted for retrograde Golgi to ER transport and demonstrate that expression of mutant COPA leads to ER stress and the upregulation of Th17 priming cytokines. Consistent with this pattern of cytokine expression, patients demonstrated a significant skewing of CD4+ T cells toward a T helper 17 (Th17) phenotype, an effector T cell population implicated in autoimmunity5,6. Our findings uncover an unexpected molecular link between a vesicular transport protein and a syndrome of autoimmunity manifested by lung and joint disease. These findings provide a unique opportunity to understand how alterations in cellular homeostasis caused by a defect in the intracellular trafficking pathway leads to the generation of human autoimmune disease. PMID:25894502

  17. Comprehensive molecular etiology analysis of nonsyndromic hearing impairment from typical areas in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Dongyang

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Every year, 30,000 babies are born with congenital hearing impairment in China. The molecular etiology of hearing impairment in the Chinese population has not been investigated thoroughly. To provide appropriate genetic testing and counseling to families, we performed a comprehensive investigation of the molecular etiology of nonsyndromic deafness in two typical areas from northern and southern China. Methods A total of 284 unrelated school children with hearing loss who attended special education schools in China were enrolled in this study, 134 from Chifeng City in Inner Mongolia and the remaining 150 from Nangtong City in JiangSu Province. Screening was performed for GJB2, GJB3, GJB6, SLC26A4, 12S rRNA, and tRNAser(UCN genes in this population. All patients with SLC26A4 mutations or variants were subjected to high-resolution temporal bone CT scan to verify the enlarged vestibular aqueduct. Results Mutations in the GJB2 gene accounted for 18.31% of the patients with nonsyndromic hearing loss, 1555A>G mutation in mitochondrial DNA accounted for 1.76%, and SLC26A4 mutations accounted for 13.73%. Almost 50% of the patients with nonsyndromic hearing loss in these typical Chinese areas carried GJB2 or SLC26A4 mutations. No significant differences in mutation spectrum or prevalence of GJB2 and SLC26A4 were found between the two areas. Conclusion In this Chinese population, 54.93% of cases with hearing loss were related to genetic factors. The GJB2 gene accounted for the etiology in about 18.31% of the patients with hearing loss, SLC26A4 accounted for about 13.73%, and mtDNA 1555A>G mutation accounted for 1.76%. Mutations in GJB3, GJB6, and mtDNA tRNAser(UCN were not common in this Chinese cohort. Conventionally, screening is performed for GJB2, SLC26A4, and mitochondrial 12S rRNA in the Chinese deaf population.

  18. The Persian Vowel Formants in Normal, Moderate and Severe Hearing Impaired Students Age 7-9 Years in Isfahan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faranak Salehi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Nowadays, auditory perception is not a complete method to assess vowels quality and we need to use more objective instruments.In this study we want to determine and compare the persian vowels formants in normal and hearing Impaired students in 7ـ9 year old children of Isfahan.Materials and Methods: This cross sectional study was performed on 64 normal and hearing impaired students. Background information was by interview and then, vowel production test was performed. First three formants of each vowel were obtained and recorded by speech studio soft ware and Dr. Speech device Data were compared between groups. Results: Mean F1 and F2, and F2/F1 and F3/F1 ratio of Persian vowels between these three studied groups were different significantly. Mean F3 of /o/, /e/ and /a/ in all groups was different significantly. Although we could not find such a significant differences for /u/, /i/ and /æ/ between these groups(p<0.05.Conclusion: The most important difference between normal and hearing impaired children is their vowel Space, and we found that, the more sever the hearing impairment is, the closer vowel space will be seen. The hearing impaired children rely mostly on their proprioceptive sense because of their hearing deficiency and it causes less movement of the tongue, so they usually substitute vowels which have similar F1 and F2.

  19. Visual impairment, but not hearing impairment, is independently associated with lower subjective well-being among individuals over 95 years of age: A population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zuyun; Wu, Di; Huang, Jiapin; Qian, Degui; Chen, Fei; Xu, Jun; Li, Shilin; Jin, Li; Wang, Xiaofeng

    2016-01-01

    Sensory impairment affects an increasing number of elderly adults, with a negative psychological impact. Our objective was to examine the associations of visual and hearing impairment with subjective well-being (SWB), an important psychological concept defined by life satisfaction [LS], positive affect [PA], negative affect [NA], and affect balance [AB] among long-lived individuals (LLIs) over 95 years of age. Data on 442 LLIs from the Rugao longevity cohort, a population-based study in Rugao, China, were analyzed. Graded classifications of visual and hearing impairment (none, mild, moderate, and severe) were constructed from self-reported items. Bivariate correlation and multiple regression analysis were performed to test the associations. Approximately 66.1% and 87.3% of the subjects reported varying degrees of visual and hearing impairment. Following the degree of vision impairment, LS, PA, and AB decreased linearly, whereas NA increased linearly (all p for trendimpairment with LS, NA, and AB, while diminished, still existed. Visual impairment, but not hearing impairment, was independently associated with low SWB among LLIs, and functional ability may play a mediating role in the observed relationship. The findings indicate that rehabilitation targeted for those with reduced vision and functioning in long-lived populations may be important for promoting well-being and quality of life. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Apparent auditory source width insensitivity in older hearing-impaired individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmer, William M; Seeber, Bernhard U; Akeroyd, Michael A

    2012-07-01

    Previous studies have shown a loss in the precision of horizontal localization responses of older hearing-impaired (HI) individuals, along with potentially poorer neural representations of sound-source location. These deficits could be the result or corollary of greater difficulties in discriminating spatial images, and the insensitivity to punctate sound sources. This hypothesis was tested in three headphone-presentation experiments varying interaural coherence (IC), the cue most associated with apparent auditory source width. First, thresholds for differences in IC were measured for a broad sampling of participants. Older HI participants were significantly worse at discriminating IC across reference values than younger normal-hearing participants. These results are consistent with senescent increases in temporal jitter. Performance decreased with age, a finding corroborated in a second discrimination experiment using a separate group of participants matched for hearing loss. This group also completed a third, visual experiment, with both a cross-mapping task where they drew the size of the sound they heard and the identification task where they chose the image that best corresponded to what they heard. The results from the visual tasks indicate that older HI individuals do not hear punctate images and are relatively insensitive to changes in width based on IC.

  1. Safety of audiology direct access for medicare patients complaining of impaired hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapala, David A; Stamper, Greta C; Shelfer, Janet S; Walker, David A; Karatayli-Ozgursoy, Selmin; Ozgursoy, Ozan B; Hawkins, David B

    2010-06-01

    Allowing Medicare beneficiaries to self-refer to audiologists for evaluation of hearing loss has been advocated as a cost-effective service delivery model. Resistance to audiology direct access is based, in part, on the concern that audiologists might miss significant otologic conditions. To evaluate the relative safety of audiology direct access by comparing the treatment plans of audiologists and otolaryngologists in a large group of Medicare-eligible patients seeking hearing evaluation. Retrospective chart review study comparing assessment and treatment plans developed by audiologists and otolaryngologists. 1550 records comprising all Medicare eligible patients referred to the Audiology Section of the Mayo Clinic Florida in 2007 with a primary complaint of hearing impairment. Assessment and treatment plans were compiled from the electronic medical record and placed in a secured database. Records of patients seen jointly by audiology and otolaryngology practitioners (Group 1: 352 cases) were reviewed by four blinded reviewers, two otolaryngologists and two audiologists, who judged whether the audiologist treatment plan, if followed, would have missed conditions identified and addressed in the otolaryngologist's treatment plan. Records of patients seen by audiology but not otolaryngology (Group 2: 1198 cases) were evaluated by a neurotologist who judged whether the patient should have seen an otolaryngologist based on the audiologist's documentation and test results. Additionally, the audiologist and reviewing neurotologist judgments about hearing asymmetry were compared to two mathematical measures of hearing asymmetry (Charing Cross and AAO-HNS [American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery] calculations). In the analysis of Group 1 records, the jury of four judges found no audiology discrepant treatment plans in over 95% of cases. In no case where a judge identified a discrepancy in treatment plans did the audiologist plan risk missing conditions

  2. Neurobehavioral observation and hearing impairment in children at school age in eastern Slovakia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sovcikova, E.; Trnovec, T.; Petrik, J.; Kocan, A.; Drobna, B.; Wimmerova, S.; Wsolova, L. [Slovak Medical Univ., Bratislava (Slovakia); Hustak, M. [Air Force Military Hospital, Kosice (Slovakia)

    2004-09-15

    Neurotoxicity of PCBs has been reported in humans and confirmed in animal studies. It was shown that PCBs can alter a number of developmental physiological processes in which the thyroid plays an essential role. In children, the prenatal exposure to PCBs was associated with reduced birth weight and poor recognition memory. In children with longer duration of breast feeding implying higher PCB exposure, altered behavior, lengthening of psychomotor activities, worse attention, and worse memory performance were found. The so far published data on the association between PCBs exposure and hearing were based mainly on animal observations. Low-frequency auditory impairments have been documented in PCB exposed rats, including elevated behavioral auditory thresholds, decreased amplitude and prolonged latency auditory evoked brain stem responses. Two papers were related to humans only. The first one reported PCB-associated increased thresholds at two out of eight frequencies on audiometry, but only on the left side, and no deficits on evoked potentials or contrast sensitivity in 7-year-old children prenatally exposed to seafood neurotoxicants. The other paper was focused on hearing impairments in boys of fish-eating mothers, but no individual PCB exposure data were available. The aim of this study was to evaluate the associations between exposure to PCBs and health outcomes assessed, as performance in neurobehavioral tests, thyroid hormones production and hearing status. Selected confounder factors such as heavy metals and health/social background of development in children were also taken into consideration.

  3. Emotion Recognition/Understanding Ability in Hearing or Vision-Impaired Children: Do Sounds, Sights, or Words Make the Difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyck, Murray J.; Farrugia, Charles; Shochet, Ian M.; Holmes-Brown, Martez

    2004-01-01

    Background: This study was designed to assess whether children with a sensory disability have consistent delays in acquiring emotion recognition and emotion understanding abilities. Method: Younger (6-11 years) and older (12-18 years) hearing-impaired children (HI; n = 49), vision-impaired children (VI; n = 42), and children with no sensory…

  4. The grainyhead like 2 gene (GRHL2), alias TFCP2L3, is associated with age-related hearing impairment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laer, L. van; Eyken, E. van; Fransen, E.; Huyghe, J.R.; Topsakal, V.; Hendrickx, J.J.; Hannula, S.; Maki-Torkko, E.; Jensen, M.; Demeester, K.; Baur, M.; Bonaconsa, A.; Mazzoli, M.; Espeso, A.; Verbruggen, K.; Huyghe, J.; Huygen, P.; Kunst, S.; Manninen, M.; Konings, A.; Diaz-Lacava, A.N.; Steffens, M.; Wienker, T.F.; Pyykko, I.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Kremer, H.; Dhooge, I.; Stephens, D.; Orzan, E.; Pfister, M.; Bille, M.; Parving, A.; Sorri, M.; Heyning, PH Van de; Camp, G. van

    2008-01-01

    Age-related hearing impairment (ARHI) is the most prevalent sensory impairment in the elderly. ARHI is a complex disease caused by an interaction between environmental and genetic factors. The contribution of various environmental factors has been relatively extensively studied. In contrast, investi

  5. The grainyhead like 2 gene (GRHL2), alias TFCP2L3, is associated with age-related hearing impairment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laer, L. Van; Eyken, E. Van; Fransen, E.;

    2008-01-01

    Age-related hearing impairment (ARHI) is the most prevalent sensory impairment in the elderly. ARHI is a complex disease caused by an interaction between environmental and genetic factors. The contribution of various environmental factors has been relatively extensively studied. In contrast, inve...

  6. The effectiveness of mental rehabilitation based on positive thinking skills training on increasing happiness in hearing impaired adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Rostami

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Hearing impairment can have an impact on adolescents’ quality of life and can lead to their isolation and depression. The main purpose of this research was to study the effectiveness of a mental rehabilitation program based on positive thinking skills training on increasing happiness in a group of hearing impaired girls and boys.Methods: In this experimental study, pre- and post-test plan with a control group was used. All of the hearing impaired students (girls and boys in all high schools of southern parts of Tehran, Iran, in year 2012-13 were our statistical research community. 48 hearing impaired girls and boys were selected by multistage sampling including stratified, purposive, and random sampling. They were randomly divided into two groups of experimental and control. Each group consists of 12 boys and 12 girls. Positive thinking skills were trained to experimental groups during eight 45-minutes sessions, twice a week. We used the Oxford happiness questionnaire to assess the level of happiness.Results: Using analysis of covariance showed that positive thinking skills training had meaningful and positive effect on increasing happiness of hearing impaired boys and girls in the experimental groups (p<0.01. Also, the mean happiness scores of boys and girls were meaningfully different (p<0.01.Conclusion: Positive thinking skills training increases the happiness scores of hearing impaired adolescents. So, the approach taken in this study can be considered as an appropriate method for psychological-education interventions, counseling and treatment in hearing impaired adolescent.

  7. Effectiveness of art therapy on reduction of hopelessness and solitude in children with hearing impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salar Faramarzi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Deaf children face many psychological problems due to their inability to hear. The present study investigates the effectiveness of art therapy (painting in reducing the hopelessness and solitude experienced by these children.Methods: An experimental design with pre- and post-testing and a control group was used. Multi-stage method was used for selecting 30 children with hearing impairment (age range: 7-10 years from Isfahan. Subjects were randomly appointed to experimental and control groups. Data was collected using Kazdin hopelessness scale and Asher solitude scale. Analysis of covariance statistical method was used to analyze the data.Results: Findings indicated a significant difference between feelings of hopelessness and solitude of deaf children in experimental and control groups (p<0.001.Conclusion: From these findings it can be concluded that art therapy decreases the rate of hopelessness and solitude in deaf children and can be applied as an educational and therapeutic method.

  8. Higher social distress and lower psycho-social wellbeing: examining the coping capacity and health of people with hearing impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Anthony; Phillips, Rebecca L; Brumby, Susan A; Williams, Warwick; Mercer-Grant, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this paper are as follows: (1) propose an explanatory model as to how hearing disability may impact on health and (2) examine the model's utility. Data were collected on the psycho-social wellbeing, disability and physical health of farmers (n = 56) participating in an intervention to manage the social impacts of hearing disability. Two models were proposed and examined using multiple hierarchical linear regression. Model 1 used self-rated quality of life and model 2 used capacity to manage hearing and listening impairments, as dependent variables. The analyses found that physical measures of hearing impairment (audiograms) were not correlated with physical or mental health outcomes. However, in model 1, self-confidence and self-rated ability to manage hearing impairment were most closely associated with reduced quality of life (anxiety and diastolic blood pressure were positively associated with quality of life). In model 2, higher anxiety and reduced self-confidence were associated with decreasing ability to successfully manage one's hearing impairment. The findings support the explanatory model that stress is higher and wellbeing lower when the fit between the person's coping capacity and environmental demands is poor. This paper demonstrates that anxiety is associated with coping with the psycho-social aspects of hearing disability. This finding has important implications for the many hearing services, which only provide assessment and devices. To negate anxiety and its long-term impacts, rehabilitation providers need to ensure people with hearing disability have the capacity to manage the psycho-social aspects of communication breakdown.

  9. Noise exposure and hearing impairment among Chinese restaurant workers and entertainment employees in Hong Kong.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Qian Lao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL is a major concern in the non-manufacturing industries. This study aimed to investigate the occupational noise exposure and the NIHL among Chinese restaurant workers and entertainment employees working in the service industry in Hong Kong. METHODS: This cross-sectional survey involved a total of 1,670 participants. Among them, 937 were randomly selected from the workers of Chinese restaurants and 733 were selected from workers in three entertainment sectors: radio and television stations; cultural performance halls or auditoria of the Leisure and Cultural Services Department (LCSD; and karaoke bars. Noise exposure levels were measured in the sampled restaurants and entertainment sectors. Each participant received an audiometric screening test. Those who were found to have abnormalities were required to take another diagnostic test in the health center. The "Klockhoff digit" method was used to classify NIHL in the present study. RESULTS: The main source of noise inside restaurants was the stoves. The mean hearing thresholds showed a typical dip at 3 to 6 KHz and a substantial proportion (23.7% of the workers fulfilled the criteria for presumptive NIHL. For entertainment sectors, employees in radio and television stations generally had higher exposure levels than those in the halls or auditoria of the LCSD and karaoke bars. The mean hearing thresholds showed a typical dip at 6 KHz and a substantial proportion of the employees fulfilled the criteria for presumptive NIHL (38.6%, 95%CI: 35.1-42.1%. Being male, older, and having longer service and daily alcohol consumption were associated with noise-induced hearing impairment both in restaurant workers and entertainment employees. CONCLUSION: Excessive noise exposure is common in the Chinese restaurant and entertainment industries and a substantial proportion of restaurant workers and entertainment employees suffer from NIHL. Comprehensive hearing

  10. Noise exposure and hearing impairment among Chinese restaurant workers and entertainment employees in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, Xiang Qian; Yu, Ignatius Tak Sun; Au, Dennis Kin Kwok; Chiu, Yuk Lan; Wong, Claudie Chiu Yi; Wong, Tze Wai

    2013-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is a major concern in the non-manufacturing industries. This study aimed to investigate the occupational noise exposure and the NIHL among Chinese restaurant workers and entertainment employees working in the service industry in Hong Kong. This cross-sectional survey involved a total of 1,670 participants. Among them, 937 were randomly selected from the workers of Chinese restaurants and 733 were selected from workers in three entertainment sectors: radio and television stations; cultural performance halls or auditoria of the Leisure and Cultural Services Department (LCSD); and karaoke bars. Noise exposure levels were measured in the sampled restaurants and entertainment sectors. Each participant received an audiometric screening test. Those who were found to have abnormalities were required to take another diagnostic test in the health center. The "Klockhoff digit" method was used to classify NIHL in the present study. The main source of noise inside restaurants was the stoves. The mean hearing thresholds showed a typical dip at 3 to 6 KHz and a substantial proportion (23.7%) of the workers fulfilled the criteria for presumptive NIHL. For entertainment sectors, employees in radio and television stations generally had higher exposure levels than those in the halls or auditoria of the LCSD and karaoke bars. The mean hearing thresholds showed a typical dip at 6 KHz and a substantial proportion of the employees fulfilled the criteria for presumptive NIHL (38.6%, 95%CI: 35.1-42.1%). Being male, older, and having longer service and daily alcohol consumption were associated with noise-induced hearing impairment both in restaurant workers and entertainment employees. Excessive noise exposure is common in the Chinese restaurant and entertainment industries and a substantial proportion of restaurant workers and entertainment employees suffer from NIHL. Comprehensive hearing conservation programs should be introduced to the service industry

  11. Auditory-verbal therapy for promoting spoken language development in children with permanent hearing impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan-Jones, Christopher G; White, Jo; Rush, Robert W; Law, James

    2014-03-12

    Congenital or early-acquired hearing impairment poses a major barrier to the development of spoken language and communication. Early detection and effective (re)habilitative interventions are essential for parents and families who wish their children to achieve age-appropriate spoken language. Auditory-verbal therapy (AVT) is a (re)habilitative approach aimed at children with hearing impairments. AVT comprises intensive early intervention therapy sessions with a focus on audition, technological management and involvement of the child's caregivers in therapy sessions; it is typically the only therapy approach used to specifically promote avoidance or exclusion of non-auditory facial communication. The primary goal of AVT is to achieve age-appropriate spoken language and for this to be used as the primary or sole method of communication. AVT programmes are expanding throughout the world; however, little evidence can be found on the effectiveness of the intervention. To assess the effectiveness of auditory-verbal therapy (AVT) in developing receptive and expressive spoken language in children who are hearing impaired. CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, speechBITE and eight other databases were searched in March 2013. We also searched two trials registers and three theses repositories, checked reference lists and contacted study authors to identify additional studies. The review considered prospective randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-randomised studies of children (birth to 18 years) with a significant (≥ 40 dBHL) permanent (congenital or early-acquired) hearing impairment, undergoing a programme of auditory-verbal therapy, administered by a certified auditory-verbal therapist for a period of at least six months. Comparison groups considered for inclusion were waiting list and treatment as usual controls. Two review authors independently assessed titles and abstracts identified from the searches and obtained full-text versions of all potentially

  12. [The nursing process in helping a family with foreign mother and hearing impaired child].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Meei-Lian; Tang, Jing-Shia

    2004-12-01

    This case report aims to present a nursing experience involving a child with severe hearing impairment and delayed language development. The patient was discovered during a home visit. At the time she was two and a half years old, but still had not developed any language behavior. She only used eye contact, physical touch, and body language to communicate with her family. She also did not respond to sound stimulation. The results of a Denver Developmental Screening Test (DDST) showed delayed development, especially of language. The child's mother is from Vietnam. The culture, education, language, and environment of Vietnam are totally different from Taiwan. In addition, the mother did not know how to raise her child. So the author tried to follow up on the case. Data were collected by home visits, phone calls, interviews, and communication with members of a professional health care team during the nursing care period (about six months). Data were recorded and it was written a processing analyzed. They revealed five health problems, as follows: (1) hearing impairment causing delayed language development; (2) poor family recognition deviation understanding of delayed development; (3) insufficient community resources; (4) low self-protection, limited capacity for caused by hearing impairment; (5) foreign mother's sense of helplessness about raising the child. The author provided supportive care to the patient and her family, counseled them, and transferred the child quickly to a treatment center. She also coordinated resources and the professional care team in assisting the parents in facing and adapting to the child's developmental delay. As a result, the parents gained knowledge and the ability to make judgments about developmental delay. This fostered a positive attitude on their part and acceptance of the child's admission to the treatment center. The child and family could deal with their problems appropriately because the nurse intervened at the appropriate time

  13. Cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia co-morbid with hearing impairment: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson-Fröjmark, Markus; Linton, Steven J; Flink, Ida K; Granberg, Sarah; Danermark, Berth; Norell-Clarke, Annika

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of the current study was to examine the effects of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT-I) for insomnia on patients with insomnia co-morbid with hearing impairment. A randomized controlled design was used with a 3-month follow-up. Thirty-two patients with insomnia co-morbid with hearing impairment were randomized to either CBT-I or a waitlist condition (WLC). The primary outcome was insomnia severity. Secondary outcomes were sleep diary parameters, dysfunction, anxiety, and depression. Compared to WLC, CBT-I resulted in lower insomnia severity at post-treatment and at follow-up (d = 1.18-1.56). Relative to WLC, CBT-I also led, at both assessment points, to reduced total wake time (d = 1.39) and increased sleep restoration (d = 1.03-1.07) and sleep quality (d = 0.91-1.16). Both groups increased their total sleep time, but no significant group difference emerged. Compared to WLC, CBT-I resulted in higher function (d = 0.81-0.96) and lower anxiety (d = 1.29-1.30) at both assessment points. Neither CBT-I nor WLC led to improvement on depression. Based on the Insomnia Severity Index, more CBT-I (53-77%) than WLC participants (0-7%) were treatment responders. Also, more CBT-I (24%) than WLC participants (0%) remitted. In patients with insomnia co-morbid with hearing impairment, CBT-I was effective in decreasing insomnia severity, subjective sleep parameters, dysfunction, and anxiety. These findings are in line with previous results on the effects of CBT-I in other medical conditions.

  14. Auditory and auditory-visual intelligibility of speech in fluctuating maskers for normal-hearing and hearing-impaired listeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Joshua G W; Grant, Ken W

    2009-05-01

    Speech intelligibility for audio-alone and audiovisual (AV) sentences was estimated as a function of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for a female target talker presented in a stationary noise, an interfering male talker, or a speech-modulated noise background, for eight hearing-impaired (HI) and five normal-hearing (NH) listeners. At the 50% keywords-correct performance level, HI listeners showed 7-12 dB less fluctuating-masker benefit (FMB) than NH listeners, consistent with previous results. Both groups showed significantly more FMB under AV than audio-alone conditions. When compared at the same stationary-noise SNR, FMB differences between listener groups and modalities were substantially smaller, suggesting that most of the FMB differences at the 50% performance level may reflect a SNR dependence of the FMB. Still, 1-5 dB of the FMB difference between listener groups remained, indicating a possible role for reduced audibility, limited spectral or temporal resolution, or an inability to use auditory source-segregation cues, in directly limiting the ability to listen in the dips of a fluctuating masker. A modified version of the extended speech-intelligibility index that predicts a larger FMB at less favorable SNRs accounted for most of the FMB differences between listener groups and modalities. Overall, these data suggest that HI listeners retain more of an ability to listen in the dips of a fluctuating masker than previously thought. Instead, the fluctuating-masker difficulties exhibited by HI listeners may derive from the reduced FMB associated with the more favorable SNRs they require to identify a reasonable proportion of the target speech.

  15. Help-seeking behaviour of hearing-impaired persons aged >= 55 years; Effect of complaints, significant others and hearing aid image

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijvestijn, JA; Anteunis, LJC; Hoek, CJ; Van den Brink, RHS; Chenault, MN; Manni, JJ

    2003-01-01

    Objective-To determine factors influencing help-seeking behaviour in hearing-impaired persons aged greater than or equal to 55 years. Material and Methods-The study comprised 1,419 persons (480 females, 939 males) aged greater than or equal to 55 years who participated voluntarily in a driving test.

  16. Features of the technical training athletes with hearing impaired in various sports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khurtyk D.V.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available It was analysed scientific-methodical and specialized literature on adaptive sports: table tennis, basketball, judo, skiing. It is conducted interviews with leading coaches working in the Deaflympic sport. Monitor the training process of elite athletes with hearing impairments, specializing in ski racing. Found that for technical training of athletes use the principle of learning the exercises and improvement from simple to complex with the rote. It was shown the necessity of attracting able-bodied athletes in the training process deflimpiytsev to optimize their technical training. The data obtained allow us to determine the direction of improving the technical skills of this category of athletes.

  17. A Dutch family with hearing loss linked to the DFNA20/26 locus: longitudinal analysis of hearing impairment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemperman, M.H.; Leenheer, E. de; Huygen, P.L.M.; Wijk, E. van; Duijnhoven, G.C.F. van; Cremers, F.P.M.; Kremer, J.M.J.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To perform linkage analysis and to outline hearing loss characteristics in a family exhibiting a nonsyndromic, autosomal dominant type of progressive sensorineural hearing loss. DESIGN: Genetic analysis was performed using microsatellite markers. Audiometric data were collected and analy

  18. The effectiveness of social work services on the social adjustment of parents of children with hearing impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abas Mahvash Wernoosfaderani

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Hearing impairment is one of the most stressful disabilities. The mental health of parents caring for children with hearing impairment is at risk. Therefore, technical support and intervention are very valuable for these families. These services are also useful for children’s development. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of social work services on the social adjustment of parents of children with hearing impairment.Methods: In this study, 37 parents of children with hearing impairment were selected as the sample population. Interviews and case studies were conducted to determine whether the parents were receiving social work services. The social adjustment scale was used to assess parents’ social adjustment. Analysis of variance (F was used to analyze the data and information obtained from parents.Results: Data analysis showed that there is a significant difference between parents who had received social work services and parents who had not received social work services (p<0.001.Conclusion: According to the obtained results, parents who had received social work services experienced higher social adjustment. It can be said that providing assistance to parents of children with hearing impairment can improve their social integration.

  19. Factors contributing to hearing impairment in patients with cleft lip/palate in Malaysia: A prospective study of 346 ears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Jack Pein; Soo, Siew Shuin; Manuel, Anura Michelle

    2016-09-01

    To determine the factors contributing towards hearing impairment in patients with cleft lip/palate. A prospective analysis was conducted on 173 patients (346 ears) with cleft lip and palate (CL/P) who presented to the combined cleft clinic at University Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC) over 12 months. The patients' hearing status was determined using otoacoustic emission (OAE), pure tone audiometry (PTA) and auditory brainstem response (ABR). These results were analysed against several parameters, which included age, gender, race, types of cleft pathology, impact and timing of repair surgery. The patients' age ranged from 1-26 years old. They comprised 30% with unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP), 28% with bilateral cleft lip and palate (BCLP), 28% with isolated cleft palate (ICP) and 14% with isolated cleft lip (ICL). Majority of the patients (68.2%) had normal otoscopic findings. Out of the 346 ears, 241 ears (70%) ears had passed the hearing tests. There was no significant relationship between patients' gender and ethnicity with their hearing status. The types of cleft pathology significantly influenced the outcome of PTA and ABR screening results (p cleft groups and the outcome of hearing tests. However, hearing improvement occurred when palatal repair was performed at the age of cleft patients had normal hearing (70%). Hearing threshold varied significantly between the different types of cleft pathology. Surgery conferred no significant impact on the hearing outcome unless surgery was performed at the age of <1 year old. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Hearing Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... years, or in adulthood — and it can be sudden or progressive (happening slowly over time). According to the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, about 37.5 million ...

  1. Hearing Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chief culprits of NIHL among teens. Video games, television sets, movie theaters, traffic, and some machines and ... will go away (usually after a good night's sleep), but it means that next time you want ...

  2. [The algorithm for the medical maintenance of the aircraft personnel suffering from chronic sensorineural impairment of hearing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankova, V B; Skryabina, L Yu; Barkhatova, O A

    2016-01-01

    The present study was designed to systematize the causes underlying the development of chronic sensorineural impairment of hearing in the aircraft personnel engaged in commercial aviation of the Russian Federation. A detailed clinical and audiological picture of chronic sensorineural loss of hearing in the aircraft personnel is presented with special reference to the criteria accepted in the civil aviationfor the evaluation of professional suitability and occupational selection in terms of hearing conditions. The study has demonstrated the paramount importance of the aviation medical expertise for the flight safety control in civil aviation. We analyzed the results of the audiological examination of the aircraft personnel suffering from chronic sensorineural impairment of hearing and proposed the algorithm for the rehabilitation of such subjects taking into consideration the stage of the chronic process.

  3. Sexuality education for the visually and hearing impaired child in the regular classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baugh, R J

    1984-11-01

    With more than two million handicapped children being "mainstreamed" into the regular classroom, teachers are confronted for the first time with assisting visual- and hearing-impaired children. Sensory-impaired children usually will demonstrate a deficiency in psychosocial-sexual adjustment, and teachers may doubt their ability to help in this area. These children have the same emotional and social needs as others, and their maladjustment is due usually to a lack of sufficient information concerning their sexuality. With a better understanding and an early recognition of the impediments these individuals experience in acquiring sexuality information, teachers can modify their methods of presentation and provide opportunities and assistance in the child's psychosocial-sexual adjustment.

  4. A Robotic Voice Simulator and the Interactive Training for Hearing-Impaired People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideyuki Sawada

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A talking and singing robot which adaptively learns the vocalization skill by means of an auditory feedback learning algorithm is being developed. The robot consists of motor-controlled vocal organs such as vocal cords, a vocal tract and a nasal cavity to generate a natural voice imitating a human vocalization. In this study, the robot is applied to the training system of speech articulation for the hearing-impaired, because the robot is able to reproduce their vocalization and to teach them how it is to be improved to generate clear speech. The paper briefly introduces the mechanical construction of the robot and how it autonomously acquires the vocalization skill in the auditory feedback learning by listening to human speech. Then the training system is described, together with the evaluation of the speech training by auditory impaired people.

  5. Relationship between disease activity and hearing impairment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis compared with controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Adem; Surucu, Gulseren; Dogan, Sedat; Karabiber, Mehmet

    2016-02-01

    The characteristics of hearing impairment (HI) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are still poorly understood, and their association with disease activity is based on conflicting information. This study compared HI between RA patients and controls and between active and remission RA groups using multi-frequency audiometry. This study enrolled 88 RA patients and 50 controls. The pure-tone hearing thresholds at 500 to 4000 Hz for air (AC) and bone (BC) conduction were compared between RA and controls as well as between active and remission RA patients using DAS28-CRP scores. The pure-tone hearing thresholds for AC and BC were significantly higher at high frequencies (2000 and 4000 Hz) in the RA group for both ears compared with controls. In addition, the BC threshold at 1000 Hz for the right ear was higher in the RA group than controls. When active and remission RA patients were compared, the thresholds were higher only at 4000 Hz for both ears for AC and BC in patients with active RA. The air-bone gap differed significantly at 2000 and 4000 Hz in both ears. This study demonstrated that patients with RA have a heightened risk of HI, and disease activity increases this risk, particularly at high frequencies. Clinicians who manage RA should be aware of HI and consider performing audiological evaluations in RA patients with active disease in particular.

  6. Auditory training of speech recognition with interrupted and continuous noise maskers by children with hearing impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Jessica R; Thibodeau, Linda M; Assmann, Peter F

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that individuals with normal hearing (NH) experience a perceptual advantage for speech recognition in interrupted noise compared to continuous noise. In contrast, adults with hearing impairment (HI) and younger children with NH receive a minimal benefit. The objective of this investigation was to assess whether auditory training in interrupted noise would improve speech recognition in noise for children with HI and perhaps enhance their utilization of glimpsing skills. A partially-repeated measures design was used to evaluate the effectiveness of seven 1-h sessions of auditory training in interrupted and continuous noise. Speech recognition scores in interrupted and continuous noise were obtained from pre-, post-, and 3 months post-training from 24 children with moderate-to-severe hearing loss. Children who participated in auditory training in interrupted noise demonstrated a significantly greater improvement in speech recognition compared to those who trained in continuous noise. Those who trained in interrupted noise demonstrated similar improvements in both noise conditions while those who trained in continuous noise only showed modest improvements in the interrupted noise condition. This study presents direct evidence that auditory training in interrupted noise can be beneficial in improving speech recognition in noise for children with HI.

  7. Hereditary spherocytosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weed, R.I.

    1975-10-01

    Studies of the clinical features of hereditary spherocytosis since 1871 and laboratory investigation of the cellular abnormalities since 1940 have led to the characterization of hereditary spherocytosis as a prime example of a Mendelian dominant, genetically determined disorder of the erythrocyte membrane. This review of hereditary spherocytosis emphasizes the contributions of Dr. Lawrence Young and many others to our present understanding of the disease and discusses current studies of the protein abnormality in the membrane of hereditary spherocytes.

  8. Phenotypic and molecular assessment of seven patients with 6p25 deletion syndrome: Relevance to ocular dysgenesis and hearing impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritch Robert

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thirty-nine patients have been described with deletions involving chromosome 6p25. However, relatively few of these deletions have had molecular characterization. Common phenotypes of 6p25 deletion syndrome patients include hydrocephalus, hearing loss, and ocular, craniofacial, skeletal, cardiac, and renal malformations. Molecular characterization of deletions can identify genes that are responsible for these phenotypes. Methods We report the clinical phenotype of seven patients with terminal deletions of chromosome 6p25 and compare them to previously reported patients. Molecular characterization of the deletions was performed using polymorphic marker analysis to determine the extents of the deletions in these seven 6p25 deletion syndrome patients. Results Our results, and previous data, show that ocular dysgenesis and hearing impairment are the two most highly penetrant phenotypes of the 6p25 deletion syndrome. While deletion of the forkhead box C1 gene (FOXC1 probably underlies the ocular dysgenesis, no gene in this region is known to be involved in hearing impairment. Conclusions Ocular dysgenesis and hearing impairment are the two most common phenotypes of 6p25 deletion syndrome. We conclude that a locus for dominant hearing loss is present at 6p25 and that this locus is restricted to a region distal to D6S1617. Molecular characterization of more 6p25 deletion patients will aid in refinement of this locus and the identification of a gene involved in dominant hearing loss.

  9. Sentence Recognition Prediction for Hearing-impaired Listeners in Stationary and Fluctuation Noise With FADE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birger Kollmeier

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available To characterize the individual patient’s hearing impairment as obtained with the matrix sentence recognition test, a simulation Framework for Auditory Discrimination Experiments (FADE is extended here using the Attenuation and Distortion (A+D approach by Plomp as a blueprint for setting the individual processing parameters. FADE has been shown to predict the outcome of both speech recognition tests and psychoacoustic experiments based on simulations using an automatic speech recognition system requiring only few assumptions. It builds on the closed-set matrix sentence recognition test which is advantageous for testing individual speech recognition in a way comparable across languages. Individual predictions of speech recognition thresholds in stationary and in fluctuating noise were derived using the audiogram and an estimate of the internal level uncertainty for modeling the individual Plomp curves fitted to the data with the Attenuation (A- and Distortion (D- parameters of the Plomp approach. The “typical” audiogram shapes from Bisgaard et al with or without a “typical” level uncertainty and the individual data were used for individual predictions. As a result, the individualization of the level uncertainty was found to be more important than the exact shape of the individual audiogram to accurately model the outcome of the German Matrix test in stationary or fluctuating noise for listeners with hearing impairment. The prediction accuracy of the individualized approach also outperforms the (modified Speech Intelligibility Index approach which is based on the individual threshold data only.

  10. GJB2 and GJB6 gene mutations found in Indian probands with congenital hearing impairment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G. Padma; P. V. Ramchander; U. V. Nandur; T. Padma

    2009-12-01

    Genetically caused deafness is a common trait affecting one in 1000 children and is predominantly inherited in an autosomal-recessive fashion. Several mutations in the GJB2 gene and a deletion of 342 kb in GJB6 gene (delGJB6-D13S1830) have been identified worldwide in patients with hearing impairment. In the present study, 303 nonsyndromic hearing-impaired patients (140 familial; 163 sporadic) were examined clinically and screened for mutations in GJB2 and GJB6 genes. Mutations in GJB2 gene were found in 33 (10.9%) patients of whom six (18.2%) were carriers for the mutant allele. The most frequent mutation was p.W24X accounting for 87% of the mutant alleles. In addition, six other sequence variations were identified in the GJB2 gene viz., c.IVS1+1G>A, c.167delT, c.235delC, p.W77X, p.R127H (polymorphism), p.M163V. None of the samples showed del(GJB6-D13S1830) or any point mutations in GJB6 gene.

  11. Auditory inspired machine learning techniques can improve speech intelligibility and quality for hearing-impaired listeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaghan, Jessica J M; Goehring, Tobias; Yang, Xin; Bolner, Federico; Wang, Shangqiguo; Wright, Matthew C M; Bleeck, Stefan

    2017-03-01

    Machine-learning based approaches to speech enhancement have recently shown great promise for improving speech intelligibility for hearing-impaired listeners. Here, the performance of three machine-learning algorithms and one classical algorithm, Wiener filtering, was compared. Two algorithms based on neural networks were examined, one using a previously reported feature set and one using a feature set derived from an auditory model. The third machine-learning approach was a dictionary-based sparse-coding algorithm. Speech intelligibility and quality scores were obtained for participants with mild-to-moderate hearing impairments listening to sentences in speech-shaped noise and multi-talker babble following processing with the algorithms. Intelligibility and quality scores were significantly improved by each of the three machine-learning approaches, but not by the classical approach. The largest improvements for both speech intelligibility and quality were found by implementing a neural network using the feature set based on auditory modeling. Furthermore, neural network based techniques appeared more promising than dictionary-based, sparse coding in terms of performance and ease of implementation.

  12. Developing a bilingual "persian cued speech" website for parents and professionals of children with hearing impairment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guita Movallali

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of the internet as a source of information gathering, self-help and support is becoming increasingly recognized. Parents and professionals of children with hearing impairment have been shown to seek information about different communication approaches online. Cued Speech is a very new approach to Persian speaking pupils. Our aim was to develop a useful website to give related information about Persian Cued Speech to parents and professionals of children with hearing impairment.All Cued Speech websites from different countries that fell within the first ten pages of Google and Yahoo search-engines were assessed. Main subjects and links were studied. All related information was gathered from the websites, textbooks, articles etc.Using a framework that combined several criteria for health-information websites, we developed the Persian Cued Speech website for three distinct audiences (parents, professionals and children.An accurate, complete, accessible and readable resource about Persian Cued Speech for parents and professionals is available now.

  13. Empowering the family during the first months after identification of permanent hearing impairment in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciciriello, E; Bolzonello, P; Marchi, R; Falzone, C; Muzzi, E; Orzan, E

    2016-02-01

    The latest international guidelines highlight the importance of involving the family in the diagnostic and rehabilitation process of children affected by permanent hearing impairment. This emphasises how meaningful this approach is for the development of the deaf child. So far, there is very little evidence about this approach in Italy, and there are still some barriers to its practical management. The aim of this paper is to report the results of a strategic analysis, which identifies the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of the family empowerment process during early auditory diagnosis and rehabilitation. The audiology programme should have the goal to offer information and support to families in order to achieve a conscious decision about the use and type of auditory prosthesis and rehabilitation choice within three months after audiologic diagnosis. Within the framework of the Ministry of Health project CCM 2013 "Preventing Communication Disorders: a Regional Program for Early Identification, Intervention and Care of Hearing Impaired Children", a group of professionals identified three main recommendations that can be useful to foster the natural communicative development of the child by strengthening the therapeutic alliance and empowerment of the family. The recommendations obtained with this analysis can help to develop new Italian guidelines with the aim to foster natural communicative development of the child by strengthening the therapeutic alliance and empowerment of the family. © Copyright by Società Italiana di Otorinolaringologia e Chirurgia Cervico-Facciale.

  14. Family member involvement in audiology appointments with older people with hearing impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekberg, Katie; Meyer, Carly; Scarinci, Nerina; Grenness, Caitlin; Hickson, Louise

    2015-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate family members' involvement in audiology rehabilitation appointments. Audiology appointments were video-recorded and analysed using quantitative coding and conversation analysis (CA). The study sample included 13 audiologists, 17 older adults with hearing impairment, and 17 family members. Initial coding showed that family members participated in 12% of the total talk time during audiology appointments. The CA results demonstrated that family members were not typically invited to join the conversation. However, family members would self-select to speak by: (1) responding to questions from the audiologist which were directed at the client; (2) self-initiating expansions on clients' turns; and (3) self-initiating questions. When family members did participate in the interaction, audiologists typically responded by shifting the conversation back to the client. While family members currently have minimal participation in audiology appointments, they display a strong interest in being involved and sharing their experiences of the client's hearing impairment. The findings suggest support for implementing family-centred care principles in audiology practice.

  15. Sentence Recognition Prediction for Hearing-impaired Listeners in Stationary and Fluctuation Noise With FADE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schädler, Marc René; Warzybok, Anna; Meyer, Bernd T.; Brand, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    To characterize the individual patient’s hearing impairment as obtained with the matrix sentence recognition test, a simulation Framework for Auditory Discrimination Experiments (FADE) is extended here using the Attenuation and Distortion (A+D) approach by Plomp as a blueprint for setting the individual processing parameters. FADE has been shown to predict the outcome of both speech recognition tests and psychoacoustic experiments based on simulations using an automatic speech recognition system requiring only few assumptions. It builds on the closed-set matrix sentence recognition test which is advantageous for testing individual speech recognition in a way comparable across languages. Individual predictions of speech recognition thresholds in stationary and in fluctuating noise were derived using the audiogram and an estimate of the internal level uncertainty for modeling the individual Plomp curves fitted to the data with the Attenuation (A-) and Distortion (D-) parameters of the Plomp approach. The “typical” audiogram shapes from Bisgaard et al with or without a “typical” level uncertainty and the individual data were used for individual predictions. As a result, the individualization of the level uncertainty was found to be more important than the exact shape of the individual audiogram to accurately model the outcome of the German Matrix test in stationary or fluctuating noise for listeners with hearing impairment. The prediction accuracy of the individualized approach also outperforms the (modified) Speech Intelligibility Index approach which is based on the individual threshold data only. PMID:27604782

  16. Hearing impairment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: association with anti-citrullinated protein antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Fabrício Silva; Dossi, Mario Orlando; Batista, Lígia; Shinzato, Márcia Midori

    2016-09-01

    It has been suggested that hearing impairment (HI) is one of the extra-articular features of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Nevertheless, the prevalence and nature of HI in RA is still uncertain. The objectives were to study hearing function in patients with RA using audiometric tests and to examine whether HI correlates with autoantibodies. Hearing functions were investigated in 43 consecutive RA patients and 23 control subjects (less than 60 years old). Their sera were evaluated for the presence of rheumatoid factor (RF), anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP), and anti-mutated citrullinated vimentin (anti-MCV) antibodies. HI was observed in 46.5 % of RA patients and in 30.4 % of control subjects, p = 0.32. HI was characterized as sensorineural in 80 and 85.7 % of RA patients and control subjects with HI, respectively, p = 1.00. RA patients had a worse hearing threshold for air conduction at 6 kHz in the right ear (p = 0.019) and had a decreased amplitude of otoacoustic emissions (OAEs) at 2 kHz bilaterally (p = 0.04) compared with control subjects. In the RA group, patients with and without HI were 80 and 34.78 % anti-CCP positive, respectively, p = 0.008. RA patients with and without HI were 85 and 43.48 % anti-MCV positive, respectively, p = 0.013. HI in RA patients was mainly sensorineural and was associated with anti-CCP and anti-MCV antibodies.

  17. GJB2 and GJB6 mutations: genotypic and phenotypic correlations in a large cohort of hearing-impaired patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlin, Sandrine; Feldmann, Delphine; Blons, Hélène; Loundon, Natalie; Rouillon, Isabelle; Albert, Sébastien; Chauvin, Pierre; Garabédian, Eréa-Noël; Couderc, Rémy; Odent, Sylvie; Joannard, Alain; Schmerber, Sébastien; Delobel, Bruno; Leman, Jacques; Journel, Hubert; Catros, Hélène; Lemarechal, Cédric; Dollfus, Hélène; Eliot, Marie-Madeleine; Delaunoy, Jean-Louis; David, Albert; Calais, Catherine; Drouin-Garraud, Valérie; Obstoy, Marie-Françoise; Goizet, Cyril; Duriez, Françoise; Fellmann, Florence; Hélias, Jocelyne; Vigneron, Jacqueline; Montaut, Bettina; Matin-Coignard, Dominique; Faivre, Laurence; Baumann, Clarisse; Lewin, Patricia; Petit, Christine; Denoyelle, Françoise

    2005-06-01

    To analyze the clinical features of hearing impairment and to search for correlations with the genotype in patients with DFNB1. Case series. Collaborative study in referral centers, institutional practice. Patients A total of 256 hearing-impaired patients selected on the basis of the presence of biallelic mutations in GJB2 or the association of 1 GJB2 mutation with the GJB6 deletion (GJB6-D13S1830)del. The prevalence of GJB2 mutations and the GJB6 deletion and audiometric phenotypes related to the most frequent genotypes. Twenty-nine different GJB2 mutations were identified. Allelic frequency of 35delG was 69%, and the other common mutations, 313del14, E47X, Q57X, and L90P, accounted for 2.6% to 2.9% of the variants. Concerning GJB6, (GJB6-D13S1830)del accounted for 5% of all mutated alleles and was observed in 25 of 93 compound heterozygous patients. Three novel GJB2 mutations, 355del9, V95M, and 573delCA, were identified. Hearing impairment was frequently less severe in compound heterozygotes 35delG/L90P and 35delG/N206S than in 35delG homozygotes. Moderate or mild hearing impairment was more frequent in patients with 1 or 2 noninactivating mutations than in patients with 2 inactivating mutations. Of 93 patients, hearing loss was stable in 73, progressive in 21, and fluctuant in 2. Progressive hearing loss was more frequent in patients with 1 or 2 noninactivating mutations than in those with 2 inactivating mutations. In 49 families, hearing loss was compared between siblings with similar genotypes, and variability in terms of severity was found in 18 families (37%). Genotype may affect deafness severity, but environmental and other genetic factors may also modulate the severity and evolution of GJB2-GJB6 deafness.

  18. MARVELD2 (DFNB49) Mutations in the Hearing Impaired Central European Roma Population - Prevalence, Clinical Impact and the Common Origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mátyás, Petra; Ficek, Andrej; Hučková, Miloslava; Sůrová, Martina; Šafka-Brožková, Dana; Anwar, Saima; Bene, Judit; Straka, Slavomír; Janicsek, Ingrid; Ahmed, Zubair M.; Seeman, Pavel; Melegh, Béla; Profant, Milan; Klimeš, Iwar; Riazuddin, Saima; Kádasi, Ľudevít; Gašperíková, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Background In the present study we aimed: 1) To establish the prevalence and clinical impact of DFNB49 mutations in deaf Roma from 2 Central European countries (Slovakia and Hungary), and 2) to analyze a possible common origin of the c.1331+2T>C mutation among Roma and Pakistani mutation carriers identified in the present and previous studies. Methods We sequenced 6 exons of the MARVELD2 gene in a group of 143 unrelated hearing impaired Slovak Roma patients. Simultaneously, we used RFLP to detect the c.1331+2T>C mutation in 85 Hungarian deaf Roma patients, control groups of 702 normal hearing Romanies from both countries and 375 hearing impaired Slovak Caucasians. We analyzed the haplotype using 21 SNPs spanning a 5.34Mb around the mutation c.1331+2T>C. Results One pathogenic mutation (c.1331+2T>C) was identified in 12 homozygous hearing impaired Roma patients. Allele frequency of this mutation was higher in Hungarian (10%) than in Slovak (3.85%) Roma patients. The identified common haplotype in Roma patients was defined by 18 SNP markers (3.89 Mb). Fourteen common SNPs were also shared among Pakistani and Roma homozygotes. Biallelic mutation carriers suffered from prelingual bilateral moderate to profound sensorineural hearing loss. Conclusions We demonstrate different frequencies of the c.1331+2T>C mutation in hearing impaired Romanies from 3 Central European countries. In addition, our results provide support for the hypothesis of a possible common ancestor of the Slovak, Hungarian and Czech Roma as well as Pakistani deaf patients. Testing for the c.1331+2T>C mutation may be recommended in GJB2 negative Roma cases with early-onset sensorineural hearing loss. PMID:25885414

  19. [Assistive Services in the Workplace of People with Hearing Impairment in the State of North Rhine-Westphalia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, A; Menzel, F; Weber, U; Niehaus, M; Kaul, T; Schlenker-Schulte, C

    2015-09-01

    Assistive services in the workplace are an important aspect of the participation of people with hearing impairment in working life. This article presents the results of the GINKO study and an survey conducted by the University of Cologne on behalf of the MAIS in order to provide a comprehensive examination of the employment situation of hearing impaired people in North Rhine-Westphalia. The GINKO study examines the impact of laws on the integration of hard-of-hearing and deaf people as well as people who have become deaf as adults, focusing on communication and organizations; this project was funded by the German Federal Ministry for Labour and Social Affairs (BMAS). In the GINKO study, conducted in cooperation with the German Association of the Hard of Hearing and the German Association of the Deaf, a standardised questionnaire with questions about the workplace was administered to employed people with hearing impairments. The questionnaire was administered on paper and was also available online accompanied by sign language videos. The University of Cologne study in North Rhine-Westphalia examined the service situation of hard-of-hearing, deaf and deaf-blind people through face-to-face interviews and government statistics. The results of the nationwide GINKO study show that hearing-impaired people in North Rhine-Westphalia draw on assistive services in employment more often than hearing-impaired people in the rest of Germany. The study found statistically significant differences in the categories of "maintenance and development of professional knowledge and skills" and "psychosocial support in conflict situations resulting from disability". One reason for the more positive evaluations of the participants in North Rhine-Westphalia as compared to other regions in Germany could be the particular network of support services in that state. However, the overall positive results from North Rhine-Westphalia should not obscure the fact that a majority of participants in

  20. Clinical aspects of an autosomal dominantly inherited hearing impairment linked to the DFNA60 locus on chromosome 2q23.1-2q23.3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beelen, E. van; Schraders, M.; Huygen, P.L.M.; Oostrik, J.; Plantinga, R.F.; Drunen, W.J. van; Collin, R.W.J.; Kooper, D.P.; Pennings, R.J.E.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Kremer, H.; Kunst, H.P.M.

    2013-01-01

    A total of 64 loci for autosomal dominant non-syndromic hearing impairment have been described, and the causative genes have been identified for 24 of these. The present study reports on the clinical characteristics of an autosomal dominantly inherited hearing impairment that is linked to a region w

  1. Lexical influences on spoken spondaic word recognition in hearing-impaired patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie eMoulin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Top-down contextual influences play a major part in speech understanding, especially in hearing-impaired patients with deteriorated auditory input. Those influences are most obvious in difficult listening situations, such as listening to sentences in noise but can also be observed at the word level under more favorable conditions, as in one of the most commonly used tasks in audiology, i.e., repeating isolated words in silence. This study aimed to explore the role of top-down contextual influences and their dependence on lexical factors and patient-specific factors using standard clinical linguistic material. Spondaic word perception was tested in 160 hearing-impaired patients aged 23 to 88 years with a four-frequency average pure-tone threshold ranging from 21 to 88 dB HL. Sixty spondaic words were randomly presented at a level adjusted to correspond to a speech perception score ranging between 40% and 70% of the performance intensity function obtained using monosyllabic words. Phoneme and whole-word recognition scores were used to calculate two context-influence indices (the j factor and the ratio of word scores to phonemic scores and were correlated with linguistic factors, such as the phonological neighborhood density and several indices of word occurrence frequencies. Contextual influence was greater for spondaic words than in similar studies using monosyllabic words, with an overall j factor of 2.07 (SD=0.5. For both indices, context use decreased with increasing hearing loss once the average hearing loss exceeded 55 dB HL. In right-handed patients, significantly greater context influence was observed for words presented in the right ears than for words presented in the left, especially in patients with many years of education. The correlations between raw word scores (and context influence indices and word occurrence frequencies showed a significant age-dependent effect, with a stronger correlation between perception scores and word

  2. Auditory Condition and Hearing Aids in 91 Adults with Hearing-impairment%91例成人听力状况及助听效果分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱素梅; 冯娟; 邹建华

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the auditory condition in adults with hearing-impairment and evaluate the outcome of the hearing aid. Methods The threshold of air-bone-conduction audiometry and binaural hearing aid in 91 adults were determined with pure tone audi-ometry, and their satisfaction to hearing aids were investigated with free interview. Results The threshold of hearing and hearing aid were positively correlated. The satisfaction did not significantly correlate with the threshold of hearing aid, but with the time of deprivation of hearing. The hearing threshold classification was better in the patients with the audiogram of flat, raising, slow down type than with audio-gram of Shu type, which defined as hearing reacted only in 1 or 2 frequency. Conclusion It is important to improve the primary otology pro-tection, as well as the rehabilitation from the hearing aids.%目的:了解成人听力状况,评价助听效果。方法回顾性分析91例听力损害成人纯音测听法双耳气骨导听阈及助听听阈;通过与患者的日常用语交谈确定患者满意程度。结果裸耳听阈与助听听阈呈正相关;助听效果最适并不代表患者心理感知最好;听力剥夺时间越短,佩戴助听器后的心理感知越好;听力曲线呈平坦型、上升型、缓降型的助听效果较佳,蜀型助听效果较差。结论应加强耳科初级保护,及时发现听力问题,同时保证助听器发挥最大作用。

  3. Prevalence of the A1555G (12S rRNA and tRNA Ser(UCN mitochondrial mutations in hearing-impaired Brazilian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abreu-Silva R.S.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial mutations are responsible for at least 1% of the cases of hereditary deafness, but the contribution of each mutation has not yet been defined in African-derived or native American genetic backgrounds. A total of 203 unselected hearing-impaired patients were screened for the presence of the mitochondrial mutation A1555G in the 12S rRNA gene and mutations in the tRNA Ser(UCN gene in order to assess their frequency in the ethnically admixed Brazilian population. We found four individuals with A1555G mutation (2%, which is a frequency similar to those reported for European-derived populations in unselected samples. On the other hand, complete sequencing of the tRNA Ser(UCN did not reveal reported pathogenic substitutions, namely A7445G, 7472insC, T7510C, or T7511C. Instead, other rare substitutions were found such as T1291C, A7569G, and G7444A. To evaluate the significance of these findings, 110 "European-Brazilians" and 190 "African-Brazilians" unrelated hearing controls were screened. The T1291C, A7569G and G7444A substitutions were each found in about 1% (2/190 of individuals of African ancestry, suggesting that they are probably polymorphic. Our results indicate that screening for the A1555G mutation is recommended among all Brazilian deaf patients, while testing for mutations in the tRNA Ser(UCN gene should be considered only when other frequent deafness-causing mutations have been excluded or in the presence of a maternal transmission pattern.

  4. Prevalence of the A1555G (12S rRNA and tRNA Ser(UCN mitochondrial mutations in hearing-impaired Brazilian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.S. Abreu-Silva

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial mutations are responsible for at least 1% of the cases of hereditary deafness, but the contribution of each mutation has not yet been defined in African-derived or native American genetic backgrounds. A total of 203 unselected hearing-impaired patients were screened for the presence of the mitochondrial mutation A1555G in the 12S rRNA gene and mutations in the tRNA Ser(UCN gene in order to assess their frequency in the ethnically admixed Brazilian population. We found four individuals with A1555G mutation (2%, which is a frequency similar to those reported for European-derived populations in unselected samples. On the other hand, complete sequencing of the tRNA Ser(UCN did not reveal reported pathogenic substitutions, namely A7445G, 7472insC, T7510C, or T7511C. Instead, other rare substitutions were found such as T1291C, A7569G, and G7444A. To evaluate the significance of these findings, 110 "European-Brazilians" and 190 "African-Brazilians" unrelated hearing controls were screened. The T1291C, A7569G and G7444A substitutions were each found in about 1% (2/190 of individuals of African ancestry, suggesting that they are probably polymorphic. Our results indicate that screening for the A1555G mutation is recommended among all Brazilian deaf patients, while testing for mutations in the tRNA Ser(UCN gene should be considered only when other frequent deafness-causing mutations have been excluded or in the presence of a maternal transmission pattern.

  5. Manifestation of speech and language disorders in children with hearing impairment compared with children with specific language disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keilmann, Annerose; Kluesener, Patrick; Freude, Christina; Schramm, Bianka

    2011-04-01

    Children with hearing impairment (HI) often suffer from speech and language disorders. We wondered if the manifestation of these disorders resembled the ones in children with specific language impairment (SLI). Using matched pairs, we compared the manifestation of a speech and language disorder in 5- and 6-year-old children with HI and SLI. We looked at receptive language skills using the Reynell scales, the lexicon, syntax and morphology, output phonology, and phonological short-term memory. Receptive language skills were more impaired in HI children. No significant differences were recorded for all other domains. We conclude that language deficits that are at least partially caused by the hearing impairment affect receptive language skills to a greater extent than expressive language skills.

  6. Visual Cues Contribute Differentially to Audiovisual Perception of Consonants and Vowels in Improving Recognition and Reducing Cognitive Demands in Listeners With Hearing Impairment Using Hearing Aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Shahram; Lidestam, Björn; Danielsson, Henrik; Ng, Elaine Hoi Ning; Rönnberg, Jerker

    2017-09-18

    We sought to examine the contribution of visual cues in audiovisual identification of consonants and vowels-in terms of isolation points (the shortest time required for correct identification of a speech stimulus), accuracy, and cognitive demands-in listeners with hearing impairment using hearing aids. The study comprised 199 participants with hearing impairment (mean age = 61.1 years) with bilateral, symmetrical, mild-to-severe sensorineural hearing loss. Gated Swedish consonants and vowels were presented aurally and audiovisually to participants. Linear amplification was adjusted for each participant to assure audibility. The reading span test was used to measure participants' working memory capacity. Audiovisual presentation resulted in shortened isolation points and improved accuracy for consonants and vowels relative to auditory-only presentation. This benefit was more evident for consonants than vowels. In addition, correlations and subsequent analyses revealed that listeners with higher scores on the reading span test identified both consonants and vowels earlier in auditory-only presentation, but only vowels (not consonants) in audiovisual presentation. Consonants and vowels differed in terms of the benefits afforded from their associative visual cues, as indicated by the degree of audiovisual benefit and reduction in cognitive demands linked to the identification of consonants and vowels presented audiovisually.

  7. Hearing impairment in the P23H-1 retinal degeneration rat model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge V. Sotoca

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The transgenic P23H line 1 (P23H-1 rat expresses a variant of rhodopsin with a mutation that leads to loss of visual function. This rat strain is an experimental model usually employed to study photoreceptor degeneration. Although the mutated protein should not interfere with other sensory functions, observing severe loss of auditory reflexes in response to natural sounds led us to study auditory brain response (ABR recording. Animals were separated into different hearing levels following the response to natural stimuli (hand clapping and kissing sounds. Of all the analyzed animals, 25.9% presented auditory loss before 50 days of age (P50 and 45% were totally deaf by P200. ABR recordings showed that all the rats had a higher hearing threshold than the control Sprague-Dawley (SD rats, which was also higher than any other rat strains. The integrity of the central and peripheral auditory pathway was analyzed by histology and immunocytochemistry. In the cochlear nucleus (CN, statistical differences were found between SD and P23H-1 rats in VGluT1 distribution, but none were found when labeling all the CN synapses with anti-Syntaxin. This finding suggests anatomical and/or molecular abnormalities in the auditory downstream pathway. The inner ear of the hypoacusic P23H-1 rats showed several anatomical defects, including loss and disruption of hair cells and spiral ganglion neurons. All these results can explain, at least in part, how hearing impairment can occur in a high percentage of P23H-1 rats. P23H-1 rats may be considered an experimental model with visual and auditory dysfunctions in future research.

  8. Preventing Sexual Abuse of Persons with Disabilities: A Curriculum for Hearing Impaired, Physically Disabled, Blind and Mentally Retarded Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Day, Bonnie; And Others

    The curriculum on sexual abuse is intended for professionals working with hearing impaired, physically disabled, blind, and mentally retarded students. Introductory material addresses the vulnerability of disabled adolescents to sexual abuse; presents background information on such topics as victims, offenders, reporting abuse, and Minnesota laws…

  9. Directory of Services for the Multiply Handicapped Deaf and/or Hearing Impaired. Resources for the Rubella Deaf Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallaudet Coll., Washington, DC.

    The directory contains information on centers, facilities, and schools which provide some services or programs suitable to the needs of the deaf or hearing impaired who have additonal handicaps (adults as well as children). A brief description of the facility, the clients served, and the services offered accompanies the listing of each facility's…

  10. Screening for hearing, visual and dual sensory impairment in older adults using behavioural cues : A validation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roets-Merken, Lieve M.; Zuidema, Sytse U.; Vernooij-Dassen, Myrra J. F. J.; Kempen, Gertrudis I. J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study investigated the psychometric properties of the Severe Dual Sensory Loss screening tool, a tool designed to help nurses and care assistants to identify hearing, visual and dual sensory impairment in older adults. Design: Construct validity of the Severe Dual Sensory Loss screen

  11. The Effectiveness and Usability of the Educational Software on Concept Education for Young Children with Impaired Hearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goker, Hanife; Ozaydin, Latife; Tekedere, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    Early intervention and early education have a special place in educating the children with Impaired Hearing (IH). The advancements in information and communication technologies have led to adopting the view that such technologies could be applied in the educational process of the children with IH. Besides, the positive results acquired in the…

  12. The Role of Music in Speech Intelligibility of Learners with Post Lingual Hearing Impairment in Selected Units in Lusaka District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katongo, Emily Mwamba; Ndhlovu, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to establish the role of music in speech intelligibility of learners with Post Lingual Hearing Impairment (PLHI) and strategies teachers used to enhance speech intelligibility in learners with PLHI in selected special units for the deaf in Lusaka district. The study used a descriptive research design. Qualitative and quantitative…

  13. When a Story Is Not a Story: A Process Analysis of the Written Language of Hearing-Impaired Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshinaga-Itano, Christine; Downey, Doris M.

    1992-01-01

    The Colorado Process Analysis of the Written Language of Hearing-Impaired Children assesses the semantic characteristics of expressive written language narratives prepared by beginning writers. The validity of the instrument was examined with 284 children (ages 7-21), indicating that the model does identify characteristics that are critical to the…

  14. The Colorado Individual Performance Profile for Hearing-Impaired Students: A Data-Driven Approach to Decision Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshinaga-Itano, Christine; Ruberry, Joan

    1992-01-01

    The Colorado Individual Performance Profile for Hearing-Impaired Students is presented as a tool for providing objective criteria for determining appropriate levels of educational services. The profile rates each student's audiological acuity, communication, English language skills, social-emotional development, life skills, cognition, and other…

  15. General and Specific Characteristics of a University-School Partnership: Promoting Learning Opportunities for Students with Deafness or Hearing Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Joong; Park, Yong Joon; Cho, Jeong-IL; Kim, Daesang

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to identify six key features involved in the development and enhancement of a university-school partnership and to share insights on how these features can be used to promote richer experiential learning opportunities of both university students and young children with deafness or hearing impairments, eventually…

  16. The ICF and third-party disability: its application to spouses of older people with hearing impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarinci, Nerina; Worrall, Linda; Hickson, Louise

    2009-01-01

    Third-party disability is defined as the disability of family members due to the health condition of their significant other and was identified as a direction for future development by the World Health Organization in 2001. The aim of this article is to identify the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) domains and categories that describe third-party disability of spouses of older people with hearing impairment. Ten spouses of older people with hearing impairment participated in individual semi-structured in-depth interviews. Themes identified by participants were linked according to ICF instructions to deliver a set of ICF category codes relevant to the study of third-party disability in spouses of older people with hearing impairment. A total of 18 themes and 50 sub-themes emerged from analysis of the interviews. The majority of these themes were able to be linked to the ICF, with the majority linking to codes in the activities and participation component. A number of contextual factors also emerged in the interviews that impacted on the spouses' third-party disability. Difficulties arose when attempting to link themes to the body function component. The ICF appears to be a useful tool in describing the effects of hearing impairment on the significant other; however, further research is necessary to clarify the applicability of some codes to third-party disability, especially the relevance of body functions to third-party disability.

  17. Development of an Exercise Program to Improve the Static and Dynamic Balance of Profoundly Hearing-Impaired Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Sandra; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Sixteen hearing-impaired children, aged 6 to 10 years, participated in a six-week posture and body awareness activity program. Pre- and posttests showed that the balance of the experimental group Ss improved, whereas the balance of the control group Ss did not improve. (Author/CL)

  18. Current Trends in High School Graduation and College Enrollment of Hearing-Impaired Students Attending Residential Schools for Deaf Persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Corinne S.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Results of a telephone survey of administrators at all 53 public residential high schools serving hearing impaired students indicated that the size of the graduating clases for 1983 through 1985 will be substantially larger than recent classes and that approximately 30 percent of the graduates in each year's class are expected to enter academic…

  19. The effect of visual cues on difficulty ratings for segregation of musical streams in listeners with impaired hearing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamish Innes-Brown

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Enjoyment of music is an important part of life that may be degraded for people with hearing impairments, especially those using cochlear implants. The ability to follow separate lines of melody is an important factor in music appreciation. This ability relies on effective auditory streaming, which is much reduced in people with hearing impairment, contributing to difficulties in music appreciation. The aim of this study was to assess whether visual cues could reduce the subjective difficulty of segregating a melody from interleaved background notes in normally hearing listeners, those using hearing aids, and those using cochlear implants. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Normally hearing listeners (N = 20, hearing aid users (N = 10, and cochlear implant users (N = 11 were asked to rate the difficulty of segregating a repeating four-note melody from random interleaved distracter notes. The pitch of the background notes was gradually increased or decreased throughout blocks, providing a range of difficulty from easy (with a large pitch separation between melody and distracter to impossible (with the melody and distracter completely overlapping. Visual cues were provided on half the blocks, and difficulty ratings for blocks with and without visual cues were compared between groups. Visual cues reduced the subjective difficulty of extracting the melody from the distracter notes for normally hearing listeners and cochlear implant users, but not hearing aid users. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Simple visual cues may improve the ability of cochlear implant users to segregate lines of music, thus potentially increasing their enjoyment of music. More research is needed to determine what type of acoustic cues to encode visually in order to optimise the benefits they may provide.

  20. Narrative spoken language skills in severely hearing impaired school-aged children with cochlear implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boons, Tinne; De Raeve, Leo; Langereis, Margreet; Peeraer, Louis; Wouters, Jan; van Wieringen, Astrid

    2013-11-01

    Cochlear implants have a significant positive effect on spoken language development in severely hearing impaired children. Previous work in this population has focused mostly on the emergence of early-developing language skills, such as vocabulary. The current study aims at comparing narratives, which are more complex and later-developing spoken language skills, of a contemporary group of profoundly deaf school-aged children using cochlear implants (n=66, median age=8 years 3 months) with matched normal hearing peers. Results show that children with cochlear implants demonstrate good results on quantity and coherence of the utterances, but problematic outcomes on quality, content and efficiency of retold stories. However, for a subgroup (n=20, median age=8 years 1 month) of deaf children without additional disabilities who receive cochlear implantation before the age of 2 years, use two implants, and are raised with one spoken language, age-adequate spoken narrative skills at school-age are feasible. This is the first study to set the goals regarding spoken narrative skills for deaf children using cochlear implants. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. An algorithm to improve speech recognition in noise for hearing-impaired listeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Eric W; Yoho, Sarah E; Wang, Yuxuan; Wang, DeLiang

    2013-10-01

    Despite considerable effort, monaural (single-microphone) algorithms capable of increasing the intelligibility of speech in noise have remained elusive. Successful development of such an algorithm is especially important for hearing-impaired (HI) listeners, given their particular difficulty in noisy backgrounds. In the current study, an algorithm based on binary masking was developed to separate speech from noise. Unlike the ideal binary mask, which requires prior knowledge of the premixed signals, the masks used to segregate speech from noise in the current study were estimated by training the algorithm on speech not used during testing. Sentences were mixed with speech-shaped noise and with babble at various signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs). Testing using normal-hearing and HI listeners indicated that intelligibility increased following processing in all conditions. These increases were larger for HI listeners, for the modulated background, and for the least-favorable SNRs. They were also often substantial, allowing several HI listeners to improve intelligibility from scores near zero to values above 70%.

  2. Preparing for communication interactions: the value of anticipatory strategies for adults with hearing impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tye-Murray, N

    1992-04-01

    Some people with hearing impairment may use anticipatory strategies to prepare for an upcoming communication interaction, such as a doctor's appointment. They may consider vocabulary and statements that might occur, and they may practice speechreading a partner saying the items. Experiment 1 evaluated the effectiveness of two types of anticipatory strategies: workbook activities and situation-specific lipreading practice. Two groups of normal-hearing subjects were asked to prepare for a communication interaction in a bank setting where they would be required to recognize speech using only the visual signal. Each group was assigned to one type of anticipatory strategy. A third group served as a control group. Experiment 2 evaluated whether multifaceted anticipatory practice improved cochlear implant users' ability to recognize statements and words audiovisually that might occur in a doctor's office, bank, movie theater, and gas station. One group of implanted subjects received 4 days of training, 1 day for each setting, and a second group served as a control group. In both experiments, subjects who used anticipatory strategies did not improve their performance on situation-specific sentence tests more than the control subjects.

  3. Acquisition of adjectives and adverbs in sentences written by hearing impaired and aphasic children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heward, W L; Eachus, H T

    1979-01-01

    The effect of an instructional package, which included modeling, reinforcement, and remedial feedback on the rate, accuracy, and topography of sentences composed by four hearing impaired and aphasic children, was examined. In a specially designed classroom, students wrote sentences describing a stimulus picture on acetate sheets placed on the stage of an overhead projector which was built into each student's desk. This arrangement provided the teacher and other students immediate and continuous visual access to each student's sentences. In a multiple baseline design across behaviors, model sentences were projected and token reinforcment and remedial feedback were made contingent upon writing correct sentences containing prenominal adjectives only, then adverbs only, then prenomial adjectives plus adverbs. During baseline all student displayed poor written language skills and seldom wrote sentences containing modifiers. When the instructional package was implemented, all students demonstrated significant increases in response rate, accuracy, and percentage of correct sentences including prenominal adjectives and adverbs.

  4. Simultaneous reflection masking: dependency on direct sound level and hearing-impairment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchholz, Jörg; Mihai, Paul Glad

    2008-01-01

    B-SL direct sound level, NH-listeners showed a binaural suppression effect for delays smaller than 7-10 ms and a binaural enhancement effect for larger delays. When decreasing the direct sound level to 15 dB-SL, the only significant change observed was that the dichotic RMT increased for delays larger than...... about 7 ms. In consequence, the binaural enhancement effect was strongly reduced, but the binaural suppression effect was unchanged. HI-listeners (at 30 dB-SL) showed a strong binaural suppression effect for delays smaller than about 3ms and only a very small binaural enhancement effect for larger...... delays. Hence, in contrast to binaural reflection enhancement, binaural reflection suppression seems to involve mechanisms that are robust to auditory-internal noise-floor and hearing-impairment. Moreover, differences between the RMTs for HI- and NH-listeners were in prin-ciple agreement with differences...

  5. Inclusion of Children with Hearing Impairment in Schools: A Survey on Teachers’ Attitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Santhi S Prakash

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Inclusion of children with disabilities in mainstream classrooms has become the focus of extensive research in education. It has both academic and social benefits for all students, such as providing opportunities for communication and social interaction. The evaluation of teachers’ attitudes towards inclusion appears to be a good method to determine the success of the programme. Although this has been widely researched in many countries, the available evidence is not consistent. This study was undertaken in the state of Andhra Pradesh in India, to measure and compare teachers’ attitudes towards the inclusion of children with hearing impairment in schools.Method: A questionnaire developed by Giles and Tanner (1995 measuring three domains - (1 effective strategies for meeting the needs of all students, (2 the support for educational change in their district, and (3 inclusive education - was modified in keeping with cultural and geographical variations and used as the test tool. A hundred teachers of various Government and non-Government schools in 2 districts of Andhra Pradesh, India, participated in the study.Results: Higher scores on domain 1 indicate that teachers feel effective strategies to benefit students with disabilities should be implemented in schools. The results also indicate that most teachers are agreeable to the inclusion of students with disabilities in their classrooms. Significant difference in attitudes was observed, based on the teachers’ qualifications, teaching experience, gender, level of teaching and management.Conclusion: The study concludes that there is a need for intervention to foster more positive attitudes among teachers, if the implementation of inclusive education is to succeed. It also has implications for the framing of laws and policies for children with hearing impairments.doi: 10.5463/dcid.v23i3.117

  6. A Comparison of job selection by students with and without hearing impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aysun Idil

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available AbstractObjectives: Hearing loss can significantly affect an individual’s life, particularly in communication, education, social life and work life. The objective of the present study was to determine the required educational levels for the preferred jobs by the students with and without hearing impairment. Methods: This study, based on surveys made in two different schools, was performed in Ankara in May 2004. Surveys were made in Yahya Özsoy Primary School for the Deaf (n=119 with students having a hearing loss over 70 dB, and in a National Primary School (n=119 with students without a hearing impairment. The study, conducted by trained staff on both groups was done by filling up questionnaires focused on the job and educational level preferences of students. The required education levels for preferred jobs were considered as two groups: the first group required an education of a minimum of 11 years in order to become doctors, nurses, teachers etc. The second group did not require any education or required an education of less than 11 years in order to become shoe painters, drivers, ironers, grocers etc. Logistic regression analyses were used for the statistical analyses. Results: It was found that several factors influence the required education levels for the preferred jobs: students who were attending the hearing impaired school and were male were more likely to prefer less than 11 years educational level job compared to the other group. There was no association between the required educational levels for the preferred jobs of the students and the class, maternal age, employment status or education, or of the paternal age, employment status or education. Considering only the students with hearing impairment, male students more frequently prefer less than 11 years educational jobs than females. Similar results were also seen in the group of students without hearing impairment. Conclusions: The importance of career training and counseling

  7. Late-onset Leber hereditary optic neuropathy mimicking Susac's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoccolella, Stefano; Petruzzella, Vittoria; Prascina, Francesco; Artuso, Lucia; Pacillo, Francesca; Dell'Aglio, Rosa; Avolio, Carlo; Delle Noci, Nicola; Attimonelli, Marcella; Specchio, Luigi Maria

    2010-12-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a mitochondrial disorder characterized by bilateral painless optic atrophy and blindness. It usually occurs in young men in association with three major mutations in the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA). We report a patient with a history of alcohol abuse who developed at age 63 years visual impairment, sensorineural hearing loss, and memory dysfunction, suggestive of Susac's syndrome. The patient carried the heteroplasmic mt. 11778G>A mutation on the T2e mtDNA haplogroup. It remains unclear if chronic alcohol abuse combined with the mitochondrial genetic background prompted an aged-related neurodegeneration or deferred the onset of the LHON disease.

  8. Hereditary peripheral neuropathies of childhood: an overview for clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmshurst, Jo M; Ouvrier, Robert

    2011-11-01

    This review focuses on the "pure" hereditary peripheral neuropathies where peripheral nerve disease is the main manifestation and does not address neurodegenerative disorders associated with but not dominated by peripheral neuropathy. Aetiologies of childhood-onset peripheral neuropathies differ from those of adult-onset, with more inherited conditions, especially autosomal recessive. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease is the commonest neuromuscular disorder. The genetic labels of CMT (Charcot-Marie-Tooth) disease types 1-4 are the preferred sub-type terms. Clinical presentations and molecular genetic heterogeneity of hereditary peripheral neuropathies are diverse. For most patients worldwide, diagnostic studies are limited to clinical assessment. Such markers which could be used to identify specific sub-types include presentation in early childhood, scoliosis, marked sensory involvement, respiratory compromise, upper limb involvement, visual or hearing impairment, pyramidal signs and mental retardation. These key markers may assist targeted genetic testing and aid in diagnosing children where DNA testing is not possible.

  9. Vibrotactile Presentation of Musical Notes to the Glabrous Skin for Adults with Normal Hearing or a Hearing Impairment: Thresholds, Dynamic Range and High-Frequency Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maté-Cid, Saúl; Fulford, Robert; Seiffert, Gary; Ginsborg, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Presentation of music as vibration to the skin has the potential to facilitate interaction between musicians with hearing impairments and other musicians during group performance. Vibrotactile thresholds have been determined to assess the potential for vibrotactile presentation of music to the glabrous skin of the fingertip, forefoot and heel. No significant differences were found between the thresholds for sinusoids representing notes between C1 and C6 when presented to the fingertip of participants with normal hearing and with a severe or profound hearing loss. For participants with normal hearing, thresholds for notes between C1 and C6 showed the characteristic U-shape curve for the fingertip, but not for the forefoot and heel. Compared to the fingertip, the forefoot had lower thresholds between C1 and C3, and the heel had lower thresholds between C1 and G2; this is attributed to spatial summation from the Pacinian receptors over the larger contactor area used for the forefoot and heel. Participants with normal hearing assessed the perception of high-frequency vibration using 1s sinusoids presented to the fingertip and were found to be more aware of transient vibration at the beginning and/or end of notes between G4 and C6 when stimuli were presented 10dB above threshold, rather than at threshold. An average of 94% of these participants reported feeling continuous vibration between G4 and G5 with stimuli presented 10dB above threshold. Based on the experimental findings and consideration of health effects relating to vibration exposure, a suitable range of notes for vibrotactile presentation of music is identified as being from C1 to G5. This is more limited than for human hearing but the fundamental frequencies of the human voice, and the notes played by many instruments, lie within it. However, the dynamic range might require compression to avoid the negative effects of amplitude on pitch perception. PMID:27191400

  10. Vibrotactile Presentation of Musical Notes to the Glabrous Skin for Adults with Normal Hearing or a Hearing Impairment: Thresholds, Dynamic Range and High-Frequency Perception.

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    Carl Hopkins

    Full Text Available Presentation of music as vibration to the skin has the potential to facilitate interaction between musicians with hearing impairments and other musicians during group performance. Vibrotactile thresholds have been determined to assess the potential for vibrotactile presentation of music to the glabrous skin of the fingertip, forefoot and heel. No significant differences were found between the thresholds for sinusoids representing notes between C1 and C6 when presented to the fingertip of participants with normal hearing and with a severe or profound hearing loss. For participants with normal hearing, thresholds for notes between C1 and C6 showed the characteristic U-shape curve for the fingertip, but not for the forefoot and heel. Compared to the fingertip, the forefoot had lower thresholds between C1 and C3, and the heel had lower thresholds between C1 and G2; this is attributed to spatial summation from the Pacinian receptors over the larger contactor area used for the forefoot and heel. Participants with normal hearing assessed the perception of high-frequency vibration using 1s sinusoids presented to the fingertip and were found to be more aware of transient vibration at the beginning and/or end of notes between G4 and C6 when stimuli were presented 10dB above threshold, rather than at threshold. An average of 94% of these participants reported feeling continuous vibration between G4 and G5 with stimuli presented 10dB above threshold. Based on the experimental findings and consideration of health effects relating to vibration exposure, a suitable range of notes for vibrotactile presentation of music is identified as being from C1 to G5. This is more limited than for human hearing but the fundamental frequencies of the human voice, and the notes played by many instruments, lie within it. However, the dynamic range might require compression to avoid the negative effects of amplitude on pitch perception.

  11. Can basic auditory and cognitive measures predict hearing-impaired listeners' localization and spatial speech recognition abilities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neher, Tobias; Laugesen, Søren; Jensen, Niels Søgaard; Kragelund, Louise

    2011-09-01

    This study aimed to clarify the basic auditory and cognitive processes that affect listeners' performance on two spatial listening tasks: sound localization and speech recognition in spatially complex, multi-talker situations. Twenty-three elderly listeners with mild-to-moderate sensorineural hearing impairments were tested on the two spatial listening tasks, a measure of monaural spectral ripple discrimination, a measure of binaural temporal fine structure (TFS) sensitivity, and two (visual) cognitive measures indexing working memory and attention. All auditory test stimuli were spectrally shaped to restore (partial) audibility for each listener on each listening task. Eight younger normal-hearing listeners served as a control group. Data analyses revealed that the chosen auditory and cognitive measures could predict neither sound localization accuracy nor speech recognition when the target and maskers were separated along the front-back dimension. When the competing talkers were separated along the left-right dimension, however, speech recognition performance was significantly correlated with the attentional measure. Furthermore, supplementary analyses indicated additional effects of binaural TFS sensitivity and average low-frequency hearing thresholds. Altogether, these results are in support of the notion that both bottom-up and top-down deficits are responsible for the impaired functioning of elderly hearing-impaired listeners in cocktail party-like situations. © 2011 Acoustical Society of America

  12. CENTRAL AUDTIORY DEVELOPMENT IN CHILDREN WITH HEARING LOSS: CLINICAL RELEVANCE OF THE P1 CAEP BIOMARKER IN HEARING-IMPAIRED CHILDREN WITH MULTIPLE DISABILITIES*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anu; Glick, Hannah; Campbell, Julia; Biever, Allison

    2013-01-01

    Objective First, we review the development and plasticity of the central auditory pathways in infants and children with hearing loss who are fitted with cochlear implants (CIs). Second, we describe case studies demonstrating the clinical utility of the P1 central auditory evoked potential (CAEP) for evaluating cortical auditory maturation in the rapidly increasing number of cochlear-implanted children who have multiple disabilities. Study Design Children who receive CIs provide a platform to examine the trajectories of deprivation-induced and experience-dependent plasticity in the central auditory system. We review the evidence for, and time limits of sensitive periods for cortical auditory maturation framing an optimal period for cochlear implantation. Finally, we evaluate the use of the P1 biomarker as an objective assessment tool in the special case of children with multiple disabilities. Results The P1 response was useful in assessing central auditory maturation in patients with CHARGE association, ANSD, and Pallister-Killian Syndrome concomitant with hearing loss. Conclusion The presence of co-existing disabilities in addition to hearing loss poses unique challenges regarding both pre-intervention evaluation and post-intervention rehabilitation for children with multiple disabilities. When combined with a standard audiological test battery, the P1 CAEP biomarker has a useful role in objectively evaluating the maturation of central auditory pathways to determine the effectiveness of various intervention strategies in hearing-impaired children with multiple disabilities. PMID:24273704

  13. Acoustic correlates of vowel intelligibility in clear and conversational speech for young normal-hearing and elderly hearing-impaired listenersa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargus Ferguson, Sarah; Quené, Hugo

    2014-01-01

    The present investigation carried out acoustic analyses of vowels in clear and conversational speech produced by 41 talkers. Mixed-effects models were then deployed to examine relationships among acoustic and perceptual data for these vowels. Acoustic data include vowel duration, steady-state formant frequencies, and two measures of dynamic formant movement. Perceptual data consist of vowel intelligibility in noise for young normal-hearing and elderly hearing-impaired listeners, as reported by Ferguson in 2004 and 2012 [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 116, 2365–2373 (2004); J. Speech Lang. Hear. Res. 55, 779–790 (2012)], respectively. Significant clear speech effects were observed for all acoustic metrics, although not all measures changed for all vowels and considerable talker variability was observed. Mixed-effects analyses revealed that the contribution of duration and steady-state formant information to vowel intelligibility differed for the two listener groups. This outcome is consistent with earlier research suggesting that hearing loss, and possibly aging, alters the way acoustic cues are used for identifying vowels. PMID:24907820

  14. Self-esteem in hearing-impaired children: the influence of communication, education, and audiological characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theunissen, Stephanie C P M; Rieffe, Carolien; Netten, Anouk P; Briaire, Jeroen J; Soede, Wim; Kouwenberg, Maartje; Frijns, Johan H M

    2014-01-01

    Sufficient self-esteem is extremely important for psychosocial functioning. It is hypothesized that hearing-impaired (HI) children have lower levels of self-esteem, because, among other things, they frequently experience lower language and communication skills. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare HI children's self-esteem across different domains with those of normal hearing (NH) children and to investigate the influence of communication, type of education, and audiological characteristics. This large (N = 252) retrospective, multicenter study consisted of two age- and gender-matched groups: 123 HI children and 129 NH controls (mean age  = 11.8 years). Self-reports were used to measure self-esteem across four domains: perceived social acceptance by peers, perceived parental attention, perceived physical appearance, and global self-esteem. HI children experienced lower levels of self-esteem regarding peers and parents than NH controls. Particularly HI children who attended special education for the deaf were at risk, even after correcting for their language development and intelligence. Yet, levels of global self-esteem and self-esteem involving physical appearance in HI children equalled those of NH controls. Furthermore, younger age at implantation and longer duration of having cochlear implants (CIs) were related to higher levels of self-esteem. HI children experience lower levels of self-esteem in the social domains. Yet, due to the heterogeneity of the HI population, there is high variability in levels of self-esteem. Clinicians must always be aware of the risk and protective factors related to self-esteem in order to help individual patients reach their full potential.

  15. Speech perception in older hearing impaired listeners: benefits of perceptual training.

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    David L Woods

    Full Text Available Hearing aids (HAs only partially restore the ability of older hearing impaired (OHI listeners to understand speech in noise, due in large part to persistent deficits in consonant identification. Here, we investigated whether adaptive perceptual training would improve consonant-identification in noise in sixteen aided OHI listeners who underwent 40 hours of computer-based training in their homes. Listeners identified 20 onset and 20 coda consonants in 9,600 consonant-vowel-consonant (CVC syllables containing different vowels (/ɑ/, /i/, or /u/ and spoken by four different talkers. Consonants were presented at three consonant-specific signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs spanning a 12 dB range. Noise levels were adjusted over training sessions based on d' measures. Listeners were tested before and after training to measure (1 changes in consonant-identification thresholds using syllables spoken by familiar and unfamiliar talkers, and (2 sentence reception thresholds (SeRTs using two different sentence tests. Consonant-identification thresholds improved gradually during training. Laboratory tests of d' thresholds showed an average improvement of 9.1 dB, with 94% of listeners showing statistically significant training benefit. Training normalized consonant confusions and improved the thresholds of some consonants into the normal range. Benefits were equivalent for onset and coda consonants, syllables containing different vowels, and syllables presented at different SNRs. Greater training benefits were found for hard-to-identify consonants and for consonants spoken by familiar than unfamiliar talkers. SeRTs, tested with simple sentences, showed less elevation than consonant-identification thresholds prior to training and failed to show significant training benefit, although SeRT improvements did correlate with improvements in consonant thresholds. We argue that the lack of SeRT improvement reflects the dominant role of top-down semantic processing in

  16. A genome-wide association study for age-related hearing impairment in the Saami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Laer, Lut; Huyghe, Jeroen R; Hannula, Samuli; Van Eyken, Els; Stephan, Dietrich A; Mäki-Torkko, Elina; Aikio, Pekka; Fransen, Erik; Lysholm-Bernacchi, Alana; Sorri, Martti; Huentelman, Matthew J; Van Camp, Guy

    2010-06-01

    This study aimed at contributing to the elucidation of the genetic basis of age-related hearing impairment (ARHI), a common multifactorial disease with an important genetic contribution as demonstrated by heritability studies. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in the Finnish Saami, a small, ancient, genetically isolated population without evidence of demographic expansion. The choice of this study population was motivated by its anticipated higher extent of LD, potentially offering a substantial power advantage for association mapping. DNA samples and audiometric measurements were collected from 352 Finnish Saami individuals, aged between 50 and 75 years. To reduce the burden of multiple testing, we applied principal component (PC) analysis to the multivariate audiometric phenotype. The first three PCs captured 80% of the variation in hearing thresholds, while maintaining biologically important audiometric features. All subjects were genotyped with the Affymetrix 100 K chip. To account for multiple levels of relatedness among subjects, as well as for population stratification, association testing was performed using a mixed model. We summarised the top-ranking association signals for the three traits under study. The top-ranked SNP, rs457717 (P-value 3.55 x 10(-7)), was associated with PC3 and was localised in an intron of the IQ motif-containing GTPase-activating-like protein (IQGAP2). Intriguingly, the SNP rs161927 (P-value 0.000149), seventh-ranked for PC1, was positioned immediately downstream from the metabotropic glutamate receptor-7 gene (GRM7). As a previous GWAS of a European and Finnish sample set already suggested a role for GRM7 in ARHI, this study provides further evidence for the involvement of this gene.

  17. Self-esteem in hearing-impaired children: the influence of communication, education, and audiological characteristics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie C P M Theunissen

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Sufficient self-esteem is extremely important for psychosocial functioning. It is hypothesized that hearing-impaired (HI children have lower levels of self-esteem, because, among other things, they frequently experience lower language and communication skills. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare HI children's self-esteem across different domains with those of normal hearing (NH children and to investigate the influence of communication, type of education, and audiological characteristics. METHODS: This large (N = 252 retrospective, multicenter study consisted of two age- and gender-matched groups: 123 HI children and 129 NH controls (mean age  = 11.8 years. Self-reports were used to measure self-esteem across four domains: perceived social acceptance by peers, perceived parental attention, perceived physical appearance, and global self-esteem. RESULTS: HI children experienced lower levels of self-esteem regarding peers and parents than NH controls. Particularly HI children who attended special education for the deaf were at risk, even after correcting for their language development and intelligence. Yet, levels of global self-esteem and self-esteem involving physical appearance in HI children equalled those of NH controls. Furthermore, younger age at implantation and longer duration of having cochlear implants (CIs were related to higher levels of self-esteem. CONCLUSION: HI children experience lower levels of self-esteem in the social domains. Yet, due to the heterogeneity of the HI population, there is high variability in levels of self-esteem. DISCUSSION: Clinicians must always be aware of the risk and protective factors related to self-esteem in order to help individual patients reach their full potential.

  18. Self-Esteem in Hearing-Impaired Children: The Influence of Communication, Education, and Audiological Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theunissen, Stephanie C. P. M.; Rieffe, Carolien; Netten, Anouk P.; Briaire, Jeroen J.; Soede, Wim; Kouwenberg, Maartje; Frijns, Johan H. M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Sufficient self-esteem is extremely important for psychosocial functioning. It is hypothesized that hearing-impaired (HI) children have lower levels of self-esteem, because, among other things, they frequently experience lower language and communication skills. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare HI children's self-esteem across different domains with those of normal hearing (NH) children and to investigate the influence of communication, type of education, and audiological characteristics. Methods This large (N = 252) retrospective, multicenter study consisted of two age- and gender-matched groups: 123 HI children and 129 NH controls (mean age  = 11.8 years). Self-reports were used to measure self-esteem across four domains: perceived social acceptance by peers, perceived parental attention, perceived physical appearance, and global self-esteem. Results HI children experienced lower levels of self-esteem regarding peers and parents than NH controls. Particularly HI children who attended special education for the deaf were at risk, even after correcting for their language development and intelligence. Yet, levels of global self-esteem and self-esteem involving physical appearance in HI children equalled those of NH controls. Furthermore, younger age at implantation and longer duration of having cochlear implants (CIs) were related to higher levels of self-esteem. Conclusion HI children experience lower levels of self-esteem in the social domains. Yet, due to the heterogeneity of the HI population, there is high variability in levels of self-esteem. Discussion Clinicians must always be aware of the risk and protective factors related to self-esteem in order to help individual patients reach their full potential. PMID:24722329

  19. Postural control, motor skills, and health-related quality of life in children with hearing impairment: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendran, Venkadesan; Roy, Finita Glory; Jeevanantham, Deepa

    2012-04-01

    Children with hearing impairment have balance and motor deficits primarily due to concomitant damage to the vestibular structures. Psycho-intellectual and social developmental disorders, as well as elimination of social activities and participation may diminish health-related quality of life in these children. Despite the documentation, assessment of balance, motor deficits, and health-related quality of life of these children are not included in the educational program, unless obvious neurological or orthopedic disorders are diagnosed. The objective of this review was to systematically analyze the available information in the literatures regarding the postural control, motor skills, and health-related quality of life in children with hearing impairment. Searches of data sources PubMed, MEDLINE, CINHAL, EMBASE, SCOPUS, ISI of web science, Cochrane Library, and AMED database were performed from the earliest to 7 February 2011. Study eligibility criteria included non-interventional studies that addressed postural control, motor skills, and health-related quality of life in children with hearing impairment. For each eligible article, data were extracted using custom-designed forms by a single investigator. Collected data included study demographics, study design, study population, sample size, outcome measures, and results. A total of 11,872 articles were retrieved, and 17 articles were found to be eligible for inclusion. Of the 17 articles included, five articles analyzed health-related quality of life alone, two articles analyzed balance alone, two articles analyzed motor performance alone, two articles analyzed vestibular dysfunction alone, two articles included both vestibular dysfunction and balance, two articles included both motor performance and balance, and two articles investigated vestibular, balance as well as motor impairments. Heterogeneity of the studies prevented us from performing methodological quality assessment and meta-analysis. The results of

  20. Diagnostic Value of SLC26A4 Mutation Status in Hereditary Hearing Loss With EVA: A PRISMA-Compliant Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ya-Jie; Yao, Jun; Wei, Qin-Jun; Xing, Guang-Qian; Cao, Xin

    2015-12-01

    Many SLC26A4 mutations have been identified in patients with nonsyndromic enlarged vestibular aqueduct (EVA). However, the roles of SLC26A4 genotypes and phenotypes in hereditary deafness remain unexplained. This study aims to perform a meta-analysis based on the PRISMA statement to evaluate the diagnostic value of SLC26A4 mutant alleles and their correlations with multiethnic hearing phenotypes in EVA patients. The systematic literature search of the PubMed, Wiley Online Library, EMBASE, Web of Science, and Science Direct databases was conducted in English for articles published before July 15, 2015. Two investigators independently reviewed retrieved literature and evaluated eligibility. Discrepancy was resolved by discussion and a third investigator. Quality of included studies was evaluated using Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale. Data were synthesized using random-effect or fixed-effect models. The effect sizes were estimated by measuring odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence interval (CI). Twenty-five eligible studies involved 2294 cases with EVA data. A total of 272 SLC26A4 variations were found in deafness with EVA and 26 mutations of SCL26A4 had higher frequency. The overall OR was 646.71 (95% CI: 383.30-1091.15, P = 0.000). A total of 22 mutants were considered statistically significant in all ethnicities (ORs >1, P 1, P 1, P G mutations in SLC26A4 were found to have the highest frequency in deafness individuals with EVA phenotype (62.42%). Moreover, subgroups for studies limited to cases with EVA phenotype, 11 mutants relevant risks (RRs) were P G bi-allelic mutants assayed in a deafness population (RR = 0.880, P = 0.000). Diagnostic accuracy of SLC26A4 mutation results also identified the significant association of IVS7-2A>G (AUC = 0.99, 95% CI: 0.97-0.99) and p.H723R (AUC = 0.99, 95% CI: 0.98-1.00) detecting deafness with EVA. To conclude, the IVS7-2A>G and H723R in SLC26A4 present a significant predicting value and

  1. A PROSPECTIVE STUDY OF HEARING IMPAIRMENT IN SCHOOL GOING CHILDREN OF GHAZIABAD CITY ATTENDING A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

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    Saud Lateef chishty

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Overcrowding, poor hygiene, socio-economic status, climate, lack of resources to avail medical facilities, poor medical awareness have their bearing on the incidence of hearing loss .The family of each hearing-impaired child has its own cultural, social, educational, and financial background, and its own special needs. The aim of this study is to determine the percentage of hearing impaired school going children in Ghaziabad city. Materials and Methods: The material for the present study were a representative sample constituting 1000 school children selected from various localities of Ghaziabad city within age group of 6 — 12 years. The children belonged to all the strata of society and children from both sexes were evaluated for hearing loss and its underlying etiological factors. Children were subjected to detailed ENT examination in our OPD. Results: In the present study sample the incidence of hearing loss is 9.3 %. The maximum cases 60.22 % belonged to the low socio-economic strata. A statistically significant difference of distribution by gender was noticed with a male preponderance (61.29% as against 38.71% for females. The hearing loss in majority of cases was of a mild degree i.e., 26 to 45 dB (34.41% of which majority of cases (87.10% had conductive loss. Wax was the commonest cause of hearing loss (41 .94%. CSOM was found in 21.50 % of all cases. Peak prevalence of hearing loss was found at 8 years of age, again declining after that from 20.43 % to 5.38 % by 12 years of age. Also it was observed that 59.14% children were living in crowded localities of city & 40.86% were living in non- crowded/open locality which is again statistically significant (p< or =0.05 Conclusion: The inferences drawn from the present study substantiates the view point of earlier workers that school screening is the most effective method of diagnosing deafness in school going children and should be extended to all schools in all the areas

  2. Gender-specific associations of vision and hearing impairments with adverse health outcomes in older Japanese: a population-based cohort study

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    Saito Hideyuki

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several epidemiological studies have shown that self-reported vision and hearing impairments are associated with adverse health outcomes (AHOs in older populations; however, few studies have used objective sensory measurements or investigated the role of gender in this association. Therefore, we examined the association of vision and hearing impairments (as measured by objective methods with AHOs (dependence in activities of daily living or death, and whether this association differed by gender. Methods From 2005 to 2006, a total of 801 residents (337 men and 464 women aged 65 years or older of Kurabuchi Town, Gunma, Japan, participated in a baseline examination that included vision and hearing assessments; they were followed up through September 2008. Vision impairment was defined as a corrected visual acuity of worse than 0.5 (logMAR = 0.3 in the better eye, and hearing impairment was defined as a failure to hear a 30 dB hearing level signal at 1 kHz in the better ear. Information on outcomes was obtained from the town hall and through face-to-face home visit interviews. We calculated the risk ratios (RRs of AHOs for vision and hearing impairments according to gender. Results During a mean follow-up period of 3 years, 34 men (10.1% and 52 women (11.3% had AHOs. In both genders, vision impairment was related to an elevated risk of AHOs (multi-adjusted RR for men and women together = 1.60, 95% CI = 1.05-2.44, with no statistically significant interaction between the genders. In contrast, a significant association between hearing impairment and AHOs (multi-adjusted RR = 3.10, 95% CI = 1.43-6.72 was found only in the men. Conclusion In this older Japanese population, sensory impairments were clearly associated with AHOs, and the association appeared to vary according to gender. Gender-specific associations between sensory impairments and AHOs warrant further investigation.

  3. [Hereditary hemocromatosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchini, Massimo; Veneri, Dino

    2004-10-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis is a disorder of iron metabolism characterized by a progressive tissue iron overload which leads to an irreversible organ damage if it is not treated timely. The recent developments in the field of molecular medicine have radically changed the physiopathology and the diagnosis of this disease. However, transferrin saturation and serum ferritin are still the most reliable tests for the detection of subjects with hereditary hemochromatosis. Therapeutic phlebotomy is the mainstay of the treatment of hereditary hemochromatosis. If phlebotomy is started before the onset of irreversible organ damages, the life expectancy of these patients is similar to that of normal population.

  4. The Effects of Promoting Educational Level on the Development of Reading Comprehension Levels in Hearing-Impaired Students

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    Mohammad Reza Sarmadi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Hearing-impaired students have some delays in learning language skills such as reading because of hearing loss. To study the effect of promoting educational level on the development of reading comprehension, the students of the 4th grade of elementary and last year guidance school were compared based on international test of reading literacy.Methods: The project was cross-sectional and the tool used was the international standard booklet of PIRLS 2001. Thirty-six students selected with moderately severe and severe hearing loss from the 4th grade of elementary and last year guidance school from Shahriar, Robatkarim, Karaj and Hashtgerd, Iran, exceptional schools. Comparative statistical analysis was performed using t-test.Results: The first level (focus on and retrieve explicity information showed a meaningful difference between the last year guidance school and the 4th grade of elementary students (p<0.05, but there were no significant differences in other levels, make straightforward information-interpret and integrate ideas-examine and evaluate content, (p> 0.05.Conclusion: Hearing-impaired students have difficulties in understanding in deep levels of reading despite promoting educational level. Thus, in making policies for special trainings, continuing the rehabilitation in guidance and high school levels to promote the complex levels of comprehension should be taken more into consideration.

  5. A novel biallelic splice site mutation of TECTA causes moderate to severe hearing impairment in an Algerian family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behlouli, Asma; Bonnet, Crystel; Abdi, Samia; Hasbellaoui, Mokhtar; Boudjenah, Farid; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Louha, Malek; Makrelouf, Mohamed; Ammar-Khodja, Fatima; Zenati, Akila; Petit, Christine

    2016-08-01

    Congenital deafness is certainly one of the most common monogenic diseases in humans, but it is also one of the most genetically heterogeneous, which makes molecular diagnosis challenging in most cases. Whole-exome sequencing in two out of three Algerian siblings affected by recessively-inherited, moderate to severe sensorineural deafness allowed us to identify a novel splice donor site mutation (c.5272+1G > A) in the gene encoding α-tectorin, a major component of the cochlear tectorial membrane. The mutation was present at the homozygous state in the three affected siblings, and at the heterozygous state in their unaffected, consanguineous parents. To our knowledge, this is the first reported TECTA mutation leading to the DFNB21 form of hearing impairment among Maghrebian individuals suffering from congenital hearing impairment, which further illustrates the diversity of the genes involved in congenital deafness in the Maghreb.

  6. THE EFFECT OF ROLE PLAYING METHOD TOWARD THE ABILITY OF FICTION READING COMPREHENSION OF HEARING IMPAIRMENT STUDENT

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    Lestari Wahyuningtyas

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This research was carried out with the aim at describing: (1 the ability of fiction reading comprehension of student with hearing impairment of grade VIII at SMPLBN Malang before and after being applied role playing method, (2 the effect of role playing method toward the ability of fiction reading comprehension of student with hearing impairment of grade VIII at SMPLBN Malang. This study used quantitative research design with Single Subject Reserch Method (SSR of A-B-A design. Based on the analysis, it was obtained the following results. On baseline-1 showed that the ability of fiction reading comprehension of students was low. On the intervention phase showed that the ability of fiction reading comprehension improved, if it was compared to the mean level in baseline-1. In baseline 2 phase showed that the ability of fiction reading comprehension was dropped.

  7. [Social-Emotional Competence in Young Children with Hearing, Visual or Intellectual Impairments - an Explorative Study with the ITSEA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarimski, Klaus; Hintermair, Manfred; Lang, Markus

    2016-10-01

    Social-Emotional Competence in Young Children with Hearing, Visual or Intellectual Impairments - an Explorative Study with the ITSEA Early emotional and social competence is considered as an important requirement for social participation in family and child care settings. We report on a study exploring the usefulness of the competence scales as a part of the "Infant-Toddler Social and Emotional Assessment" (ITSEA) for one- to three-year old children in a sample of 253 toddlers with hearing, visual or intellectual impairments. Internal consistency of the six scales is good (alpha > .86). An ANOVA reveals significant differences between the three groups and a correlation with additional disabilities. These explorative results support the development of a German standardization of the ITSEA.

  8. Psychological well-being of parents and family caregivers of children with hearing impairment in south India: influence of behavioural problems in children and social support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Driessche, Anne; Jotheeswaran, A T; Murthy, G V S; Pilot, Eva; Sagar, Jayanthi; Pant, Hira; Singh, Vivek; Dpk, Babu

    2014-08-01

    Parents of children with hearing impairment are at increased risk of mental health morbidities. We examined the predictive factors associated with caregiver's strain and psychological morbidities in parents and family caregivers of children with hearing impairment. In total, n = 201 parents and family caregivers of children with and without hearing impairment aged 3 to 16 years were recruited. Caregiver's strain and psychological morbidities were measured using the Zarit Burden scale and the World Health Organization's Self-Reporting Questionnaire (SRQ-20). Presence of behavioural problems in children was measured using the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire. After adjustment, low educational attainment and domestic violence were found to be associated with caregiving strain, whereas dissatisfaction with social support from family, behavioural problems in children, and domestic violence strongly predicted psychological morbidities. Addressing the mental healthcare needs of parents may help in downsizing the impact of psychological morbidities on the well-being of children with hearing impairment.

  9. Cognitive Compensation of Speech Perception With Hearing Impairment, Cochlear Implants, and Aging : How and to What Degree Can It Be Achieved?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baskent, Deniz; Clarke, Jeanne; Pals, Carina; Benard, Michel R.; Bhargava, Pranesh; Saija, Jefta; Sarampalis, Anastasios; Wagner, Anita; Gaudrain, Etienne

    2016-01-01

    External degradations in incoming speech reduce understanding, and hearing impairment further compounds the problem. While cognitive mechanisms alleviate some of the difficulties, their effectiveness may change with age. In our research, reviewed here, we investigated cognitive compensation with

  10. Cognitive Compensation of Speech Perception With Hearing Impairment, Cochlear Implants, and Aging : How and to What Degree Can It Be Achieved?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baskent, Deniz; Clarke, Jeanne; Pals, Carina; Benard, Michel R.; Bhargava, Pranesh; Saija, Jefta; Sarampalis, Anastasios; Wagner, Anita; Gaudrain, Etienne

    2016-01-01

    External degradations in incoming speech reduce understanding, and hearing impairment further compounds the problem. While cognitive mechanisms alleviate some of the difficulties, their effectiveness may change with age. In our research, reviewed here, we investigated cognitive compensation with hea

  11. Cognitive Compensation of Speech Perception With Hearing Impairment, Cochlear Implants, and Aging : How and to What Degree Can It Be Achieved?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baskent, Deniz; Clarke, Jeanne; Pals, Carina; Benard, Michel R.; Bhargava, Pranesh; Saija, Jefta; Sarampalis, Anastasios; Wagner, Anita; Gaudrain, Etienne

    2016-01-01

    External degradations in incoming speech reduce understanding, and hearing impairment further compounds the problem. While cognitive mechanisms alleviate some of the difficulties, their effectiveness may change with age. In our research, reviewed here, we investigated cognitive compensation with hea

  12. Sepsis otopathy: experimental sepsis leads to significant hearing impairment due to apoptosis and glutamate excitotoxicity in murine cochlea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim Schmutzhard

    2013-05-01

    Hearing loss is frequent in intensive care patients and can be due to several causes. However, sepsis has not been examined as a possible cause. The aim of this study is to assess the influence of experimental sepsis on hearing thresholds and to evaluate pathological changes in the cochlea. The cecal ligation puncture technique was used to induce sepsis in 18 mice. Results were compared with those from 13 sham-operated and 13 untreated control mice. The hearing thresholds of the animals were evaluated with auditory evoked brainstem responses prior to the induction of sepsis and again at the peak of the disease. Immediately after the second measurement, the mice were sacrificed and the inner ears harvested and prepared for further evaluation. The cochleae were examined with light microscopy, electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry for Bax, cleaved caspase-3 and Bcl-2. The mice with sepsis showed a significant hearing loss but not the control groups. Induction of apoptosis could be shown in the supporting cells of the organ of Corti. Furthermore, excitotoxicity could be shown at the basal pole of the inner hair cells. In this murine model, sepsis leads to significant hearing impairment. The physiological alteration could be linked to apoptosis in the supporting cells of the organ of Corti and to a disturbance of the synapses of the inner hair cells.

  13. Acoustic dimensions of hearing-impaired speakers' intelligibility: segmental and suprasegmental characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, D E; Schiavetti, N; Samar, V J; Sitler, R W

    1990-09-01

    Regression and principal components analyses were employed to study the relationship between 28 segmental and suprasegmental acoustic parameters of speech production and measures of speech intelligibility for 40 severely to profoundly hearing-impaired persons in an effort to extend the findings of Metz, Samar, Schiavetti, Sitler, and Whitehead (1985). The principal components analysis derived six factors that accounted for 59% of the variance in the original 28 parameters. Consistent with the findings of Metz et al., a subsequent regression analysis using these six factors as predictor variables revealed two factors with strong predictive relationships to speech intelligibility. One factor primarily reflected segmental production processes related to the temporal and spatial differentiation of phonemes, whereas the other primarily reflected suprasegmental production processes associated with contrastive stress. However, the predictive capability of the present factor structure was somewhat reduced relative to the findings of Metz et al. (1985). Data presented indicate that the populations sampled in the two studies may have differed on one or more dimensions of subject characteristics. Considered collectively, the present findings and the findings of Metz et al. support the tractability of employing selected acoustic variables for the estimation of speech intelligibility.

  14. Sharp Transition Multiband Filter in Speech Processing Scheme for Hearing Impaired

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph X. Rodrigues

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: A simple analytical approach to the synthesis of a sharp transition, linear phase, multiband FIR filter is presented. The filter magnitude response is modeled using trigonometric functions of frequency. Approach: Employing variable density of ripple cycles in passband and stopband regions with large density of ripples cycles at the sharp transition edges, reduces the abrupt discontinuities at these edges. Results: As a result, Gibb’s phenomenon is reduced in the filter implementation thus giving a flat passband and good stopband attenuation. A closed form expression for impulse response coefficients is obtained. The filter design is easily tunable and allows for variation in transition bandwidth of each band. A speech processing scheme is implemented using a pair of the proposed sharp transition multiband FIR filters to split the speech spectrum into complementary short time spectral bands. Conclusion: The adjacent speech formants are fed dichotically to the two ears to reduce the effect of spectral masking and hence improve speech perception in sensorineural hearing impaired.

  15. Demographic factors influencing educational placement of the hearing-impaired child with a cochlear implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yehudai, Noam; Tzach, Naama; Shpak, Talma; Most, Tova; Luntz, Michal

    2011-08-01

    To analyze educational placement settings of Israeli children with cochlear implants (CIs) and evaluate the prognostic influence of the following demographic variables on mainstreaming: age at implantation, experience with CI, socioeconomic status, ethnicity, and parents' educational level. Retrospective review. Tertiary referral center. The study population comprised 245 children with severe-to-profound hearing impairment and at least 1 year of experience with a unilateral CI. Mean age at implantation was 4.5 ± 3.9 years, and mean duration of CI use was 5.4 ± 2.8 years. Follow-up review and statistical analysis of available data on educational placement after cochlear implantation. Placement in mainstream education. Regular schools were attended by 89 children (36.3%) and special education schools by 156 (63.7%). Variables found to be significantly associated with mainstream educational placement were younger age at implantation, higher level of parental education, higher socioeconomic status, and ethnicity. Multivariate analysis using a logistic regression model revealed that the factor with the highest positive correlation with mainstreaming was parental education level. Our results show that parental education, a variable that the health system cannot control, significantly influences postimplantation results in term of educational placement and can thus limit the chances of implanted children to achieve mainstream placement even when identified and implanted at an early age.

  16. Importance of “Process Evaluation” in Audiological Rehabilitation: Examples from Studies on Hearing Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchaiah, Vinaya; Danermark, Berth; Rönnberg, Jerker; Lunner, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The main focus of this paper is to discuss the importance of “evaluating the process of change” (i.e., process evaluation) in people with disability by studying their lived experiences. Detailed discussion is made about “why and how to investigate the process of change in people with disability?” and some specific examples are provided from studies on patient journey of persons with hearing impairment (PHI) and their communication partners (CPs). In addition, methodological aspects in process evaluation are discussed in relation to various metatheoretical perspectives. The discussion has been supplemented with relevant literature. The healthcare practice and disability research in general are dominated by the use of outcome measures. Even though the values of outcome measures are not questioned, there seems to be a little focus on understanding the process of change over time in relation to health and disability. We suggest that the process evaluation has an additional temporal dimension and has applications in both clinical practice and research in relation to health and disability. PMID:25276135

  17. Autosomal Recessive Nonsyndromic Hearing Impairment due to a Novel Deletion in the RDX Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwanghyuk Lee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The RDX gene anchors cytoskeletal actin of stereocilia to hair cell transmembrane and is responsible for autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing impairment (ARNSHI due to DFNB24. A genome scan was performed using DNA samples from a consanguineous Pakistani family with ARNSHI. A significant maximum two-point LOD score of 4.5 (θ=0 and multipoint LOD score of 5.8 were achieved at marker D11S1998 (chr11 : 117.20 Mb. The region of homozygosity is bounded by markers D11S2000 (105.06 Mb and D11S4464 (123.13 Mb and contains the NSHI genes TECTA and RDX. Although no potentially causal variants were identified in the TECTA gene, within the RDX gene a novel deletion c.1076_1079delTTAA (p.Ile359Lysfs*6 was identified. The RDX deletion segregates with ARNSHI within the family and was not observed in 500 control chromosomes. It is predicted to cause premature truncation of radixin at the α-helical domain and to result in nonfunctional transcripts within the cochlea. RDX isoforms which encode the coiled-coil region of the α-helical domain are deemed necessary for proper function of hair cell stereocilia.

  18. Hearing impairment and audiovisual speech integration ability: a case study report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altieri, Nicholas; Hudock, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Research in audiovisual speech perception has demonstrated that sensory factors such as auditory and visual acuity are associated with a listener's ability to extract and combine auditory and visual speech cues. This case study report examined audiovisual integration using a newly developed measure of capacity in a sample of hearing-impaired listeners. Capacity assessments are unique because they examine the contribution of reaction-time (RT) as well as accuracy to determine the extent to which a listener efficiently combines auditory and visual speech cues relative to independent race model predictions. Multisensory speech integration ability was examined in two experiments: an open-set sentence recognition and a closed set speeded-word recognition study that measured capacity. Most germane to our approach, capacity illustrated speed-accuracy tradeoffs that may be predicted by audiometric configuration. Results revealed that some listeners benefit from increased accuracy, but fail to benefit in terms of speed on audiovisual relative to unisensory trials. Conversely, other listeners may not benefit in the accuracy domain but instead show an audiovisual processing time benefit.

  19. Cognition of Children with Hearing/Visual Impairments and its Applicability to Language Teaching: Toward Barrier-Free Elementary School English Education

    OpenAIRE

    Saito, Kurumi

    2015-01-01

    In this article cognition of children with hearing/visual impairments are applied in foreign language teaching, especially elementary school English. Firstly, the most recent cognitive assessments and experiments are reviewed. Secondly, the English teaching materials provided by the Japanese ministry (MEXT) are examined, which can be improved, by making the best use of the cognitive characteristics of hearing/visual impaired children. Finally, the applicability of neuro-science, including unp...

  20. A Phenomenological Study on the Perception of Hearing-Impaired Students Towards Note-Taking Support: in an Effort to Comprehend their Meaning for College Life.

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    With the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities adopted in Japan in 2014, support systems for students with disabilities are being put into place at colleges nationwide. However, it is reported that the lecture note-taking service is not being received by more than half of hearing- impaired students enrolled in college. The aim of this study is to elucidate the perception of hearing-impaired students towards note-taking support from their own viewpoint.Semi-structured interview...

  1. Hereditary pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Richard M Charnley

    2003-01-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis is an autosomal dominant condition,which results in recurrent attacks of acute pancreatitis,progressing to chronic pancreatitis often at a young age.The majority of patients with hereditary pancreatitis expressone of two mutations (R122H or N29I) in the cationictrypsinogen gene (PRSS1 gene). It has been hypothesisedthat one of these mutations, the R122H mutation causespancreatitis by altering a trypsin recognition site sopreventing deactivation of trypsin within the pancreas andprolonging its action, resulting in autodigestion. Families withthese two mutations have been identified in many countriesand there are also other rarer mutations, which have alsobeen linked to hereditary pancreatitis.Patients with hereditary pancreatitis present in the sameway as those with sporadic pancreatitis but at an earlierage. It is common for patients to remain undiagnosed formany years, particularly ifthey present with non-specificsymptoms. Hereditary pancreatitis should always beconsidered in patients who present with recurrent pancreatitiswith a family history of pancreatic disease. If patients withthe 2 common mutations are compared, those with theR122H mutation are more likely to present at a younger ageand are more likely to require surgical intervention than thosewith N29I. Hereditary pancreatitis carries a 40 % lifetimerisk of pancreatic cancer with those patients aged between50 to 70 being most at risk in whom screening tests maybecome important.

  2. Eeyore: a novel mouse model of hereditary deafness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerry A Miller

    Full Text Available Animal models that recapitulate human disease are proving to be an invaluable tool in the identification of novel disease-associated genes. These models can improve our understanding of the complex genetic mechanisms involved in disease and provide a basis to guide therapeutic strategies to combat these conditions. We have identified a novel mouse model of non-syndromic sensorineural hearing loss with linkage to a region on chromosome 18. Eeyore mutant mice have early onset progressive hearing impairment and show abnormal structure of the sensory epithelium from as early as 4 weeks of age. Ultrastructural and histological analyses show irregular hair cell structure and degeneration of the sensory hair bundles in the cochlea. The identification of new genes involved in hearing is central to understanding the complex genetic pathways involved in the hearing process and the loci at which these pathways are interrupted in people with a genetic hearing loss. We therefore discuss possible candidate genes within the linkage region identified in eeyore that may underlie the deafness phenotype in these mice. Eeyore provides a new model of hereditary sensorineural deafness and will be an important tool in the search for novel deafness genes.

  3. Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer Request Permissions Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 11/2015 What is hereditary diffuse gastric cancer? Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) is an inherited ...

  4. Working Memory Capacity as a Factor Influencing the Relationship between Language Outcome and Rehabilitation in Mandarin-Speaking Preschoolers with Congenital Hearing Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Ming; Chen, Pei-Hua

    2017-01-01

    Memory processes could account for a significant part of the variance in language performances of hearing-impaired children. However, the circumstance in which the performance of hearing-impaired children can be nearly the same as the performance of hearing children remains relatively little studied. Thus, a group of pre-school children with congenital, bilateral hearing loss and a group of pre-school children with normal hearing were invited to participate in this study. In addition, the hearing-impaired participants were divided into two groups according to their working memory span. A language disorder assessment test for Mandarin-speaking preschoolers was used to measure the outcomes of receptive and expressive language of the two groups of children. The results showed that the high-span group performed as good as the hearing group, while the low-span group showed lower accuracy than the hearing group. A linear mixed-effects analysis showed that not only length of rehabilitation but also the memory span affected the measure of language outcome. Furthermore, the rehabilitation length positively correlated with the measure of expressive language only among the participants of the high-span group. The pattern of the results indicates that working memory capacity is one of the factors that could support the children to acquire age-equivalent language skills.

  5. Working Memory Capacity as a Factor Influencing the Relationship between Language Outcome and Rehabilitation in Mandarin-Speaking Preschoolers with Congenital Hearing Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Ming; Chen, Pei-Hua

    2017-01-01

    Memory processes could account for a significant part of the variance in language performances of hearing-impaired children. However, the circumstance in which the performance of hearing-impaired children can be nearly the same as the performance of hearing children remains relatively little studied. Thus, a group of pre-school children with congenital, bilateral hearing loss and a group of pre-school children with normal hearing were invited to participate in this study. In addition, the hearing-impaired participants were divided into two groups according to their working memory span. A language disorder assessment test for Mandarin-speaking preschoolers was used to measure the outcomes of receptive and expressive language of the two groups of children. The results showed that the high-span group performed as good as the hearing group, while the low-span group showed lower accuracy than the hearing group. A linear mixed-effects analysis showed that not only length of rehabilitation but also the memory span affected the measure of language outcome. Furthermore, the rehabilitation length positively correlated with the measure of expressive language only among the participants of the high-span group. The pattern of the results indicates that working memory capacity is one of the factors that could support the children to acquire age-equivalent language skills. PMID:28337168

  6. Hearing impairment in children with congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection based on distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE) and brain evoked response audiometry stimulus click (BERA Click) examinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airlangga, T. J.; Mangunatmadja, I.; Prihartono, J.; Zizlavsky, S.

    2017-08-01

    Congenital cytomegalovirus (congenital CMV) infection is a leading factor of nongenetic sensorineural hearing loss in children. Hearing loss caused by CMV infection does not have a pathognomonic configuration hence further research is needed. The development of knowledge on hearing loss caused by congenital CMV infection is progressing in many countries. Due to a lack of research in the context of Indonesia, this study assesses hearing impairment in children with congenital CMV infection in Indonesia, more specifically in the Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital. Our objective was to profile hearing impairment in children 0-5 years of age with congenital CMV infection using Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emissions (DPOAE) and Brain Evoked Response Audiometry Stimulus Click (BERA Click) examinations. This cross-sectional study was conducted in the Cipto Mangunkusum Hospital from November, 2015 to May 2016 with 27 children 0-5 years of age with congenital CMV infection. Of individual ears studied, 58.0% exhibited sensorineural hearing loss. There was a significant relationship between developmental delay and incidence of sensorineural hearing loss. Subjects with a developmental delay were 6.57 times more likely (CI 95%; 1.88-22.87) to experience sensorineural hearing loss. Congenital CMV infection has an important role in causing sensorineural hearing loss in children.

  7. Cognitive Processing Speed, Working Memory, and the Intelligibility of Hearing Aid-Processed Speech in Persons with Hearing Impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wycliffe Kabaywe Yumba

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have demonstrated that successful listening with advanced signal processing in digital hearing aids is associated with individual cognitive capacity, particularly working memory capacity (WMC. This study aimed to examine the relationship between cognitive abilities (cognitive processing speed and WMC and individual listeners’ responses to digital signal processing settings in adverse listening conditions. A total of 194 native Swedish speakers (83 women and 111 men, aged 33–80 years (mean = 60.75 years, SD = 8.89, with bilateral, symmetrical mild to moderate sensorineural hearing loss who had completed a lexical decision speed test (measuring cognitive processing speed and semantic word-pair span test (SWPST, capturing WMC participated in this study. The Hagerman test (capturing speech recognition in noise was conducted using an experimental hearing aid with three digital signal processing settings: (1 linear amplification without noise reduction (NoP, (2 linear amplification with noise reduction (NR, and (3 non-linear amplification without NR (“fast-acting compression”. The results showed that cognitive processing speed was a better predictor of speech intelligibility in noise, regardless of the types of signal processing algorithms used. That is, there was a stronger association between cognitive processing speed and NR outcomes and fast-acting compression outcomes (in steady state noise. We observed a weaker relationship between working memory and NR, but WMC did not relate to fast-acting compression. WMC was a relatively weaker predictor of speech intelligibility in noise. These findings might have been different if the participants had been provided with training and or allowed to acclimatize to binary masking noise reduction or fast-acting compression.

  8. Cognitive Processing Speed, Working Memory, and the Intelligibility of Hearing Aid-Processed Speech in Persons with Hearing Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yumba, Wycliffe Kabaywe

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that successful listening with advanced signal processing in digital hearing aids is associated with individual cognitive capacity, particularly working memory capacity (WMC). This study aimed to examine the relationship between cognitive abilities (cognitive processing speed and WMC) and individual listeners’ responses to digital signal processing settings in adverse listening conditions. A total of 194 native Swedish speakers (83 women and 111 men), aged 33–80 years (mean = 60.75 years, SD = 8.89), with bilateral, symmetrical mild to moderate sensorineural hearing loss who had completed a lexical decision speed test (measuring cognitive processing speed) and semantic word-pair span test (SWPST, capturing WMC) participated in this study. The Hagerman test (capturing speech recognition in noise) was conducted using an experimental hearing aid with three digital signal processing settings: (1) linear amplification without noise reduction (NoP), (2) linear amplification with noise reduction (NR), and (3) non-linear amplification without NR (“fast-acting compression”). The results showed that cognitive processing speed was a better predictor of speech intelligibility in noise, regardless of the types of signal processing algorithms used. That is, there was a stronger association between cognitive processing speed and NR outcomes and fast-acting compression outcomes (in steady state noise). We observed a weaker relationship between working memory and NR, but WMC did not relate to fast-acting compression. WMC was a relatively weaker predictor of speech intelligibility in noise. These findings might have been different if the participants had been provided with training and or allowed to acclimatize to binary masking noise reduction or fast-acting compression. PMID:28861009

  9. Temporal Fine-Structure Coding and Lateralized Speech Perception in Normal-Hearing and Hearing-Impaired Listeners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Locsei, Gusztav; Pedersen, Julie Hefting; Laugesen, Søren;

    2016-01-01

    hearing loss above 1.5 kHz participated in the study. Speech reception thresholds (SRTs) were estimated in the presence of either speech-shaped noise, two-, four-, or eight-talker babble played reversed, or a nonreversed two-talker masker. Target audibility was ensured by applying individualized linear...... understanding in spatially complex environments, these limitations were unrelated to TFS coding abilities and were only weakly associated with a reduction in binaural-unmasking benefit for spatially separated competing sources....

  10. The Auditory-Visual Speech Benefit on Working Memory in Older Adults with Hearing Impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana B. Frtusova

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the effect of auditory-visual (AV speech stimuli on working memory in hearing impaired participants (HIP in comparison to age- and education-matched normal elderly controls (NEC. Participants completed a working memory n-back task (0- to 2-back in which sequences of digits were presented in visual-only (i.e., speech-reading, auditory-only (A-only, and AV conditions. Auditory event-related potentials (ERP were collected to assess the relationship between perceptual and working memory processing. The behavioural results showed that both groups were faster in the AV condition in comparison to the unisensory conditions. The ERP data showed perceptual facilitation in the AV condition, in the form of reduced amplitudes and latencies of the auditory N1 and/or P1 components, in the HIP group. Furthermore, a working memory ERP component, the P3, peaked earlier for both groups in the AV condition compared to the A-only condition. In general, the HIP group showed a more robust AV benefit; however, the NECs showed a dose-response relationship between perceptual facilitation and working memory improvement, especially for facilitation of processing speed. Two measures, reaction time and P3 amplitude, suggested that the presence of visual speech cues may have helped the HIP to counteract the demanding auditory processing, to the level that no group differences were evident during the AV modality despite lower performance during the A-only condition. Overall, this study provides support for the theory of an integrated perceptual-cognitive system. The practical significance of these findings is also discussed.

  11. GJB2 mutation spectrum in 2063 Chinese patients with nonsyndromic hearing impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Liang

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in GJB2 are the most common molecular defects responsible for autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing impairment (NSHI. The mutation spectra of this gene vary among different ethnic groups. Methods In order to understand the spectrum and frequency of GJB2 mutations in the Chinese population, the coding region of the GJB2 gene from 2063 unrelated patients with NSHI was PCR amplified and sequenced. Results A total of 23 pathogenic mutations were identified. Among them, five (p.W3X, c.99delT, c.155_c.158delTCTG, c.512_c.513insAACG, and p.Y152X are novel. Three hundred and seven patients carry two confirmed pathogenic mutations, including 178 homozygotes and 129 compound heterozygotes. One hundred twenty five patients carry only one mutant allele. Thus, GJB2 mutations account for 17.9% of the mutant alleles in 2063 NSHI patients. Overall, 92.6% (684/739 of the pathogenic mutations are frame-shift truncation or nonsense mutations. The four prevalent mutations; c.235delC, c.299_c.300delAT, c.176_c.191del16, and c.35delG, account for 88.0% of all mutantalleles identified. The frequency of GJB2 mutations (alleles varies from 4% to 30.4% among different regions of China. It also varies among different sub-ethnic groups. Conclusion In some regions of China, testing of the three most common mutations can identify at least one GJB2 mutant allele in all patients. In other regions such as Tibet, the three most common mutations account for only 16% the GJB2 mutant alleles. Thus, in this region, sequencing of GJB2 would be recommended. In addition, the etiology of more than 80% of the mutant alleles for NSHI in China remains to be identified. Analysis of other NSHI related genes will be necessary.

  12. Prediction of consonant recognition in quiet for listeners with normal and impaired hearing using an auditory model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jürgens, Tim; Ewert, Stephan D; Kollmeier, Birger; Brand, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    Consonant recognition was assessed in normal-hearing (NH) and hearing-impaired (HI) listeners in quiet as a function of speech level using a nonsense logatome test. Average recognition scores were analyzed and compared to recognition scores of a speech recognition model. In contrast to commonly used spectral speech recognition models operating on long-term spectra, a "microscopic" model operating in the time domain was used. Variations of the model (accounting for hearing impairment) and different model parameters (reflecting cochlear compression) were tested. Using these model variations this study examined whether speech recognition performance in quiet is affected by changes in cochlear compression, namely, a linearization, which is often observed in HI listeners. Consonant recognition scores for HI listeners were poorer than for NH listeners. The model accurately predicted the speech reception thresholds of the NH and most HI listeners. A partial linearization of the cochlear compression in the auditory model, while keeping audibility constant, produced higher recognition scores and improved the prediction accuracy. However, including listener-specific information about the exact form of the cochlear compression did not improve the prediction further.

  13. The impact of different background noises: effects on cognitive performance and perceived disturbance in employees with aided hearing impairment and normal hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Håkan; Emilsson, Magnus; Kähäri, Kim; Widén, Stephen; Möller, Claes; Lyxell, Björn

    2014-10-01

    Health care professionals frequently meet employees with hearing impairment (HI) who experience difficulties at work. There are indications that the majority of these difficulties might be related to the presence of background noise. Moreover, research has also shown that high-level noise has a more detrimental effect on cognitive performance and self-rated disturbance in individuals with HI than low-level noise. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of different types of background noise on cognitive performance and perceived disturbance (PD) in employees with aided HI and normal hearing. A mixed factorial design was conducted to examine the effect of noise in four experimental conditions. A total of 40 participants (21 men and 19 women) were recruited to take part in the study. The study sample consisted of employees with HI (n = 20) and normal hearing (n = 20). The group with HI had a mild-moderate sensorineural HI, and they were all frequent hearing-aid users. The current study was conducted by using four general work-related tasks (mental arithmetic, orthographic decoding, phonological decoding, and serial recall) in four different background conditions: (1) quiet, (2) office noise at 56 dBA, (3) daycare noise at 73.5 dBA, and (4) traffic noise at 72.5 dBA. Reaction time and the proportion of correct answers in the working tasks were used as outcome measures of cognitive performance. The Borg CR-10 scale was used to assess PD. Data collection occurred on two separate sessions, completed within 4 wk of each other. All tasks and experimental conditions were used in a counterbalanced order. Two-way analysis of variance with repeated measures was performed to analyze the results. To examine interaction effects, pairwise t-tests were used. Pearson correlation coefficients between reaction time and proportion of correct answers, and cognitive performance and PD were also calculated to examine the possible correlation between the different variables. No

  14. Discrimination task reveals differences in neural bases of tinnitus and hearing impairment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima T Husain

    Full Text Available We investigated auditory perception and cognitive processing in individuals with chronic tinnitus or hearing loss using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. Our participants belonged to one of three groups: bilateral hearing loss and tinnitus (TIN, bilateral hearing loss without tinnitus (HL, and normal hearing without tinnitus (NH. We employed pure tones and frequency-modulated sweeps as stimuli in two tasks: passive listening and active discrimination. All subjects had normal hearing through 2 kHz and all stimuli were low-pass filtered at 2 kHz so that all participants could hear them equally well. Performance was similar among all three groups for the discrimination task. In all participants, a distributed set of brain regions including the primary and non-primary auditory cortices showed greater response for both tasks compared to rest. Comparing the groups directly, we found decreased activation in the parietal and frontal lobes in the participants with tinnitus compared to the HL group and decreased response in the frontal lobes relative to the NH group. Additionally, the HL subjects exhibited increased response in the anterior cingulate relative to the NH group. Our results suggest that a differential engagement of a putative auditory attention and short-term memory network, comprising regions in the frontal, parietal and temporal cortices and the anterior cingulate, may represent a key difference in the neural bases of chronic tinnitus accompanied by hearing loss relative to hearing loss alone.

  15. Public Speaking Course and the Hearing-Impaired College Student: Classroom Communication, Challenges and Rewards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hureau, Marcelle S. M.

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the communication barriers and relationships between hearing and non-hearing college students in a classroom setting. Twelve college students, six female and six males, between 18 and 22 years of age took part in this ethnographic study during a sixteen week course in public speaking, conducted at the University of Colorado,…

  16. Outcome analysis of hearing aids fitting for 2 635 hearing-impaired people%2635例助听器验配情况分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱珍珍; 郑芸; 李刚

    2013-01-01

    目的:调查具备助听器适应证的患者未成功验配助听器的原因.方法:回顾性分析2005-2010年2635例患者验配助听器的资料,对其中助听器验配未验成功者的数据进行分析.结果:2 635例患者中,1 700例成功验配了助听器,验配总成功率为64.52%,验配成功率总体变化趋势为逐年上升.对935例助听器验配失败患者的数据分析结果表明,在影响助听器成功验配的众多因素中,经济因素所占比例最大(23.64%),其次是患者不接受助听器(18.61%),对专业机构的认可度及满意度(10.27%),此外患者对助听器效果不满意占8.13%.听力专科门诊的验配成功率要高于普通耳鼻咽喉科门诊(P<0.05).935例助听器验配失败的患者中年龄≥50岁者有568例;<50岁者助听器验配成功率(61.29%)低于≥50岁者(66.33%),差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论:针对经济因素、患者对助听器的接受程度、验配机构专业性等诸多影响助听器成功验配的重要因素,在日常工作中,助听器验配人员需要针对性地开展工作,包括加大听力康复知识的宣传力度和提高自身的专业素质和水平.只有这样,才能有效增进患者对助听器验配人员和助听器本身的信任,有效提高助听器验配成功率.%Objective: To investigate the reasons that hearing-impaired patients who owned the indication of hearing aid fitting hut were not successfully fitted. Method: Analyzing the records of hearing aid fitting for 2 635 hearing-impaired people from 2005 to 2010, especially for the people who were not successfully fitted. Result: In general, there were 1 700 people having proper hearing aids. The success rate of hearing aid fitting is 64. 52%, which increased year by year. According to the analysis of records about hearing-impaired people who were not successfully fitting, the primary factor was economic constraints(23. 64%), the second was the patients could not accept

  17. Hereditary spherocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iolascon, A; Avvisati, R A; Piscopo, C

    2010-09-01

    Hereditary spherocytosis is a common hemolytic disorder characterized by a defect or deficiency in one or more of the proteins composing red blood cell membrane. As a result, red blood cells have an abnormal shape, higher metabolic requirements, and are prematurely trapped and destroyed in the spleen. Hereditary spherocytosis, including the very mild or subclinical forms, is the most common cause of non-immune hemolytic anemia among people of Northern European ancestry, with a prevalence of approximately 1 in 2000. However very mild forms of the disease may be much more common. Hereditary spherocytosis is inherited in a dominant fashion in 75% of cases, whereas the remaining are truly recessive cases and de novo mutations. This review reports current concepts on red cell membrane structure and it will attempt to clarify molecular defects leading to spherocyte and their consequences.

  18. [Hereditary neuropathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallat, Jean-Michel; Calvo, Judith; Ghorab, Karima; Tazir, Meriem

    2008-11-15

    Although there are many human hereditary neuropathies, most of them with the exception of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease or hereditary sensorimotor neuropathy, are rare. Irrespective of their type, the mode of transmission may be autosomal dominant or recessive, or X-linked. The most difficult to diagnose, however, are the sporadic forms. It is customary to distinguish the cases in which the neuropathy is the sole clinical expression from multisystemic diseases where neuropathy is one component of multi-organ involvement. The complexity and the multiplicity of genes involved and the lack of understanding of their exact functions hinder logical presentation of these hereditary neuropathies. For understandable technical reasons, the stage of specific treatment, namely the repair of the mutated gene, has yet to be attained.

  19. 以突发听力下降为首发症状的遗专性耳聋病例分析%Hereditary hearing loss presented with sudden deafness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵飞帆; 王大勇; 韩冰; 纵亮; 赵亚丽; 李倩; 王秋菊

    2012-01-01

    Objective To study management and prognosis of hereditary hearing loss first presented with sudden deafness. Methods A retrospective analysis was performed in cases presented with sudden deafness from January to December in 2011., Screening of common causative genes, including GJB2、SLC26A4 and mitochondrial 12SRNA 1494 and 1595, was applied in subjects who were suspected to have hereditary hearing loss based on their history, radiological and auxiliary test results. Clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes in 3 patients with confirmed diagnosis of hereditary hearing loss by different responsible genes were analyzed. Results In the 3 patients, homozygous mutation c,109C>A in GJB2 gene was identified in one patient, in whom sudden hearing loss in left ear was significantly improved after medical treatment; homozygous c.919-2A>G mutation in the SLC26A4 gene was identified in one patient whose sudden hearing loss in left ear was moderately improved after medical treatment; and mitochondrial mutation 12S rRNA 1555 A>G was identified in the last patient, whose bilateral hearing loss also improved after medical treatment. Conclusion Hereditary hearing loss can present with sudden hearing loss in some patients. The audiovestibular doctor must use relevant knowledge and consider deafness gene screening in patients in whom hereditary factors are reasonably suspected, for early accurate diagnosis which may guide treatment and improve prognosis.%目的 探讨以突发性听力下降为首要症状的患者中,遗传性耳聋患者的诊治及转归.方法 对我院2011年1月-12月耳内科病房诊治的以突发听力下降为主诉患者,进行了详细的病史和家族史询问,听力学检查,包括纯音测听,声导抗,畸变耳声发射,听觉脑干诱发电位和言语测听;以及影像学检查,包括颞骨CT,颅脑MRI等;根据病史及辅助检查,对高度怀疑遗传性聋的患者施行常见耳聋基因筛查,包括GJB2、SLC26A4和线粒体DNA12SRNA

  20. A comparative evaluation of dental caries status among hearing-impaired and normal children of Malda, West Bengal, evaluated with the Caries Assessment Spectrum and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudipta Kar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Dental caries is one of the major modern-day diseases of dental hard tissue. It may affect both normal and hearing-impaired children. Aims: This study is aimed to evaluate and compare the prevalence of dental caries in hearing-impaired and normal children of Malda, West Bengal, utilizing the Caries Assessment Spectrum and Treatment (CAST. Settings and Design: In a cross-sectional, case-control study of dental caries status of 6-12-year-old children was assessed. Subjects and Methods: Statistically significant difference was found in studied (hearing-impaired and control group (normal children. In the present study, caries affected hearing-impaired children found to be about 30.51% compared to 15.81% in normal children, and the result was statistically significant. Regarding individual caries assessment criteria, nearly all subgroups reflect statistically significant difference except sealed tooth structure group, internal caries-related discoloration in dentin, and distinct cavitation into dentine group, and the result is significant at P < 0.05. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical analysis was carried out utilizing Z-test. Results: Statistically significant difference was found in studied (hearing-impaired and control group (normal children. In the present study, caries effected hearing-impaired children found about 30.51% instead of 15.81% in normal children, and the result was statistically significant (P < 0.05. Regarding individual caries assessment criteria, nearly all subgroups reflect statistically significant difference except sealed tooth structure group, internal caries-related discoloration in dentin, and distinct cavitation into dentine group. Conclusions: Dental health of hearing-impaired children was found unsatisfactory than normal children when studied in relation to dental caries status evaluated with CAST.