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Sample records for hereditary dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy

  1. Isolation and characterization of a full length cDNA for dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA) gene

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    Oyake, M.; Onodera, O.; Ikeuchi, T. [Niigata Univ. (Japan)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Hereditary dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA) is an autosomal dominant spinocerebellar degeneration characterized by anticipation and variable combination of symptoms including myoclonus, epilepsy, cerebellar ataxia, choleoathetosis, and dementia. Recently, we discovered that DRPLA is caused by unstable expansion of a CAG repeat of a B37 gene on chromosome 12. To characterize functions of the DRPLA gene product, we isolated several cDNA clones for the DRPLA gene from human adult and fetus brain cDNA libraries, using an oligonucleotide flanking the CAG repeat. The cDNA spans 4247 bp in length and there is only an open reading frame coding for 986 amino acids. The CAG repeat, which is expanded in DRPLA, is located 291 bp downstream from the initiation methionine and encodes a polyglutamine tract. The deduced amino acid sequence from amino acids residues 582 to 707 has a high homology to published human hippocampus derived expressed sequence (M78755) located at chromosome 1p (63.8% identity), and 3{prime}-untranslated region of the DRPLA cDNA revealed homology to the mouse small nuclear RNA U7 gene (X54165). Northern blot analysis revealed a 4.7 knt transcript which is widely expressed in various tissues including heart, lung, kidney, placenta, skeletal muscle, and brain. In human adult brain, the transcript was broadly expressed including amygdala, caudate nucleus, corpus callosum, hippocampus, hypothalamus, substantia nigra, subthalamic nucleus and thalamus, and was not specific to the dentatorubral-pallidoluysian system. The availability of a full length cDNA will be highly useful for analyzing the pathogenesis of this unique neurodegenerative disease as well as for analyzing other CAG repeat related neurodegenerative diseases.

  2. Molecular cloning of a full-length cDNA for dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy and regional expressions of the expanded alleles in the CNS

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    Onodera, Osamu; Oyake, Mutsuo; Takano, Hiroki [Niigata Univ. (Japan)] [and others

    1995-11-01

    Dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder characterized by genetic anticipation and variable combinations of symptoms including myoclonus, epilepsy, cerebellar ataxia, choreoathetosis, and dementia. Recently, we discovered that DRPLA is caused by unstable expansion of a CAG repeat of a gene on the short arm of chromosome 12. We determined the consensus DRPLA cDNA sequence containing the complete coding region for 1,185 amino acids. The CAG repeat, which is expanded in DRPLA, is located 1,462 bp downstream from the putative methionine initiation codon and encodes a poly-glutamine tract. Although poly-serine and proline tracts exist near the CAG repeats, these poly-serine or proline tracts did not show any polymorphisms, which is in strong contrast to the high heterogeneity in the length of the CAG repeat. Northern blot analysis revealed a 4.7-kb transcript that is widely expressed in various tissues including heart, lung, kidney, placenta, skeletal muscle, and brain. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed that the expanded alleles are transcribed to levels comparable to those of normal alleles. These results indicate that there is no difference in transcriptional efficiency between expanded and normal alleles. Furthermore, mRNA from cerebellar hemispheres of DRPLA patients showed smaller sizes of CAG repeats compared with other regions of the brain, which reflects somatic mosaicism of the expanded alleles of the DRPLA gene. 49 refs., 6 figs.

  3. Genetics Home Reference: dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Management Resources (3 links) GeneReview: DRPLA MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Dementia MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Epilepsy General Information from MedlinePlus (5 links) Diagnostic Tests Drug Therapy Genetic Counseling Palliative Care Surgery and Rehabilitation Related Information How are genetic ...

  4. Progressive cerebellar atrophy: hereditary ataxias and disorders with spinocerebellar degeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, N.I.; Koenig, M.; Dulac, O.L.M.; Sarnat, H.B.

    2013-01-01

    The hereditary ataxias with onset in childhood are a group of heterogeneous disorders, usually with autosomal recessive inheritance. In many of them, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) shows cerebellar atrophy. The most prominent exception to this is Friedreich's ataxia, where MRI shows normal

  5. Mutations in BICD2 Cause Dominant Congenital Spinal Muscular Atrophy and Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oates, Emily C.; Rossor, Alexander M.; Hafezparast, Majid; Gonzalez, Michael; Speziani, Fiorella; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Lek, Monkol; Cottenie, Ellen; Scoto, Mariacristina; Foley, A. Reghan; Hurles, Matthew; Houlden, Henry; Greensmith, Linda; Auer-Grumbach, Michaela; Pieber, Thomas R.; Strom, Tim M.; Schule, Rebecca; Herrmann, David N.; Sowden, Janet E.; Acsadi, Gyula; Menezes, Manoj P.; Clarke, Nigel F.; Züchner, Stephan; Muntoni, Francesco; North, Kathryn N.; Reilly, Mary M.

    2013-01-01

    Dominant congenital spinal muscular atrophy (DCSMA) is a disorder of developing anterior horn cells and shows lower-limb predominance and clinical overlap with hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP), a lower-limb-predominant disorder of corticospinal motor neurons. We have identified four mutations in bicaudal D homolog 2 (Drosophila) (BICD2) in six kindreds affected by DCSMA, DCSMA with upper motor neuron features, or HSP. BICD2 encodes BICD2, a key adaptor protein that interacts with the dynein-dynactin motor complex, which facilitates trafficking of cellular cargos that are critical to motor neuron development and maintenance. We demonstrate that mutations resulting in amino acid substitutions in two binding regions of BICD2 increase its binding affinity for the cytoplasmic dynein-dynactin complex, which might result in the perturbation of BICD2-dynein-dynactin-mediated trafficking, and impair neurite outgrowth. These findings provide insight into the mechanism underlying both the static and the slowly progressive clinical features and the motor neuron pathology that characterize BICD2-associated diseases, and underscore the importance of the dynein-dynactin transport pathway in the development and survival of both lower and upper motor neurons. PMID:23664120

  6. Atrofia óptica hereditaria autosómica dominante: A propósito de una familia Dominant autosomal hereditary optical atrophy: Apropos of a family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noel Taboada Lugo

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Entre las causas de pérdida insidiosa, bilateral y simétrica de la visión central se deben tener siempre presente las atrofias ópticas heredo degenerativas. La atrofia óptica hereditaria autosómica dominante es la forma más frecuente de atrofia óptica heredofamiliar simple o monosintomática. Se realizó la caracterización clínica de una familia con el diagnóstico de esta discapacidad visual.Among the causes of insidious, bilateral and symmetric loss of the central vision, the hereditary and degenerative optical atrophies should always be taken into account. The dominant autosomal hereditary optical atrophy is the most frequent form of simple or monosymptomatic hereditary family optical atrophy. The clinical characterization of a family with the diagnosis of this visual impairment was made.

  7. Non-Mendelian transmission in dentatorubral-pallidolysian atrophy and Machado-Joseph disease: The mutant allele is preferentially transmitted in male meiosis

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    Ikeuchi, Takeshi; Igarashi, Shuichi; Takiyama, Yoshihisa; Onodera, Osamu [Niigata Univ. (Japan)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    Autosomal dominant dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA) and Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) are neurodegenerative disorders caused by CAG trinucleotide repeat expansions. An inverse correlation of age at onset with the length of the expanded CAG trinucleotide repeats has been demonstrated, and the intergenerational instability of the length of the CAG trinucleotide repeats, which is more prominent in paternal than in maternal transmissions, has been shown to underlie the basic mechanisms of anticipation in DRPLA and MJD. Our previous observations on DRPLA and MJD pedigrees, as well as a review of the literature, have suggested that the numbers of affected offspring exceed those of unaffected offspring, which is difficult to explain by the Mendelian principle of random segregation of alleles. In the present study, we analyzed the segregation patterns in 211 transmissions in 24 DRPLA pedigrees and 80 transmissions in 7 MJD pedigrees, with the diagnoses confirmed by molecular testing. Significant distortions in favor of transmission of the mutant alleles were found in male meiosis, where the mutant alleles were transmitted to 62% of all offspring in DRPLA ({chi}{sup 2} = 7.69; P < .01) and 73% in MJD ({chi}{sup 2} = 6.82; P < .01). The results were consistent with meiotic drive in DRPLA and MJD. Since more prominent meiotic instability of the length of the CAG trinucleotide repeats is observed in male meiosis than in female meiosis and meiotic drive is observed only in male meiosis, these results raise the possibility that a common molecular mechanism underlies the meiotic drive and the meiotic instability in male meiosis. 23 refs., 1 tab.

  8. Genetic Characterization of Movement Disorders and Dementias

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-28

    Ataxia; Dystonia; Parkinson's Disease; Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis; Corticobasal Degeneration; Multiple System Atrophy; Alzheimer's Disease; Lewy Body Dementia; Parkinson Disease-Dementia; Dentatorubral-pallidoluysian Atrophy; Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease and Fatal Familial Insomnia; Fragile X-associated Tremor/Ataxia Syndrome; Krabbe's Disease; Niemann-Pick Disease, Type C; Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis

  9. Disease: H00060 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Kawashima M, Tanaka F, Adachi H, Sobue G Molecular genetics and biomarkers of po...Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 354:1005-11 (1999) PMID:9933295 Kanazawa I Dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy or Naito-Oyanagi disease. Neurogenetics 2:1-17 (1998) ...

  10. Reevaluation of the linkage of an optic atrophy susceptibility gene to X-chromosomal markers in Finnish families with Leber hereditary optic neuroretinopathy (LHON)

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    Juvonen, V.; Aula, P.; Vilkki, J.; Nikoskelainen, E.; Savontaus, M.-L.

    1993-07-01

    One of the commonest reasons for sudden-onset optic nerve degeneration in young men can be attributed to maternally inherited Leber hereditary optic neuroretinopathy (LHON) (Nikoskelainen et al. 1987). Specific point mutations at either np 11778 (Wallace et al. 1988) or np 3460 (Howell et al. 1991; Huoponen et al. 1991) in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) encoding for respiratory enzyme complex I subunits (i.e., ND4 or ND1) can be found in 70% of families. These mutations exist as being either homoplasmic or heteroplasmic, but the correlation between the degree of heteroplasmy and the risk of developing optic atrophy is far from clear (Holt et al. 1989; Vilkki et al. 1990). Neither does heteroplasmy explain the strong male bias seen in LHON families, when the sex ratio of patients with visual impairment is observed. Earlier results indicated that susceptibility to optic atrophy in Finnish families with LHON was probably determined by an X-chromosomal gene closely linked to DXS7. Contradictory results prompted reevaluation of the existence of an X-chromosomal visual loss susceptibility gene in Finnish LHON families. The results of this present study clearly demonstrate that the earlier close linkage to DXS7 is implausible. The altered Z is due to revised pedigrees, the use of liability classes, and separation of the families according to the associated mtDNA mutation. 16 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  11. [Hereditary optic neuropathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milea, D; Verny, C

    2012-10-01

    Hereditary optic neuropathies are a group of heterogeneous conditions affecting both optic nerves, with an autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X-related or mitochondrial transmission. The two most common non-syndromic hereditary optic neuropathies (Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy and autosomal dominant optic atrophy) are very different in their clinical presentation and their genetic transmission, leading however to a common, non-specific optic nerve atrophy. Beyond the optic atrophy-related visual loss, which is the clinical hallmark of this group of diseases, other associated neurological signs are increasingly recognized. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  12. Disease: H01616 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available H01616 Spinocerebellar degeneration, including: Spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) [DS:H...00063]; Dentatorubropallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA) [DS:H00060]; Friedreich ataxia [DS:H00067]; Multiple syst...reditary spinocerebellar degeneration includes spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA), dentatorubral-pallidoluysian at...rophy (DRPLA), and Friedreich ataxia (FA). Neurodegenerative disease ... Taltirelin [DR:D01925] See also H00063 Spinocerebellar atax...lum, brain stem, spinal cord, and basal ganglia to various degrees. Patients display limb and truncal atax

  13. Muscle atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscle wasting; Wasting; Atrophy of the muscles ... There are two types of muscle atrophy: disuse and neurogenic. Disuse atrophy is caused by not using the muscles enough . This type of atrophy can often be ...

  14. Hereditary Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... E-News Sign-Up Home Hereditary Pancreatitis Hereditary Pancreatitis Hereditary Pancreatitis (HP) is a rare genetic condition characterized by ... of pancreatic attacks, which can progress to chronic pancreatitis . Symptoms include abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. Onset ...

  15. Fasciculations in human hereditary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterer, Josef; Aliyev, Rahim

    2015-06-01

    Fasciculations are a manifestation of peripheral nerve hyperexcitability in addition to myokymia, neuromyotonia, cramps, or tetany. Fasciculations occur in hereditary and non-hereditary diseases. Among the hereditary diseases, fasciculations are most frequently reported in familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS), and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). Among the non-hereditary diseases, fasciculations occur most frequently in peripheral nerve hyperexcitability syndromes (Isaac's syndrome, voltage-gated potassium channelopathy, cramp fasciculation syndrome, Morvan syndrome). If the cause of fasciculations remains unknown, they are called benign. Systematically reviewing the literature about fasciculations in hereditary disease shows that fasciculations can be a phenotypic feature in bulbospinal muscular atrophy (BSMA), GM2-gangliosidosis, triple-A syndrome, or hereditary neuropathy. Additionally, fasciculations have been reported in familial amyloidosis, spinocerebellar ataxias, Huntington's disease, Rett syndrome, central nervous system disease due to L1-cell adhesion molecule (L1CAM) mutations, Fabry's disease, or Gerstmann-Sträussler disease. Rarely, fasciculations may be a phenotypic feature in patients with mitochondrial disorders or other myopathies. Fasciculations are part of the phenotype in much more genetic disorders than commonly assumed. Fasciculations not only occur in motor neuron disease, but also in hereditary neuropathy, spinocerebellar ataxia, GM2-gangliosidosis, Huntington's disease, Rett syndrome, Fabry's disease, Gerstmann-Sträussler disease, mitochondrial disorders, or muscular dystrophies.

  16. Genotype–phenotype correlations in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tońska, Katarzyna; Kodroń, Agata; Bartnik, Ewa

    2010-01-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON), acute or subacute vision loss due to retinal ganglion cell death which in the long run leads to optic nerve atrophy is one of the most widely studied maternally inherited diseases caused...

  17. Hereditary Neuropathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the appearance of an inverted champagne glass) or scoliosis (curvature of the spine). The symptoms of hereditary neuropathies may be apparent ... the appearance of an inverted champagne glass) or scoliosis (curvature of the spine). The symptoms of hereditary neuropathies may be apparent ...

  18. Carrier testing for spinal muscular atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitlin, Jonathan M.; Fischbeck, Kenneth; Crawford, Thomas O.; Cwik, Valerie; Fleischman, Alan; Gonye, Karla; Heine, Deborah; Hobby, Kenneth; Kaufmann, Petra; Keiles, Steven; MacKenzie, Alex; Musci, Thomas; Prior, Thomas; Lloyd-Puryear, Michele; Sugarman, Elaine A.; Terry, Sharon F.; Urv, Tiina; Wang, Ching; Watson, Michael; Yaron, Yuval; Frosst, Phyllis; Howell, R. Rodney

    2014-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy is the most common fatal hereditary disease among newborns and infants. There is as yet no effective treatment. Although a carrier test is available, currently there is disagreement among professional medical societies who proffer standards of care as to whether or not carrier screening for spinal muscular atrophy should be offered as part of routine reproductive care. This leaves health care providers without clear guidance. In fall 2009, a meeting was held by National Institutes of Health to examine the scientific basis for spinal muscular atrophy carrier screening and to consider the issues that accompany such screening. In this article, the meeting participants summarize the discussions and conclude that pan-ethnic carrier screening for spinal muscular atrophy is technically feasible and that the specific study of implementing a spinal muscular atrophy carrier screening program raises broader issues about determining the scope and specifics of carrier screening in general. PMID:20808230

  19. Hereditary neuromuscular diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oezsarlak, O. E-mail: ozkan.ozsarlak@uza.be; Schepens, E.; Parizel, P.M.; Goethem, J.W. van; Vanhoenacker, F.; Schepper, A.M. de; Martin, J.J

    2001-12-01

    This article presents the actual classification of neuromuscular diseases based on present expansion of our knowledge and understanding due to genetic developments. It summarizes the genetic and clinical presentations of each disorder together with CT findings, which we studied in a large group of patients with neuromuscular diseases. The muscular dystrophies as the largest and most common group of hereditary muscle diseases will be highlighted by giving detailed information about the role of CT and MRI in the differential diagnosis. The radiological features of neuromuscular diseases are atrophy, hypertrophy, pseudohypertrophy and fatty infiltration of muscles on a selective basis. Although the patterns and distribution of involvement are characteristic in some of the diseases, the definition of the type of disease based on CT scan only is not always possible.

  20. Multiple System Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home » Disorders » Patient & Caregiver Education » Fact Sheets Multiple System Atrophy Fact Sheet What is multiple system atrophy? ... can I get more information? What is multiple system atrophy? Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a progressive ...

  1. Hereditary hyperbilirubinemias

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    Radlović Nedeljko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Inherited disorders of bilirubin metabolism involve four autosomal recessive syndromes: Gilbert, Crigler- Najjar, Dubin-Johnson and Rotor, among which the first two are characterized by unconjugated and the second two by conjugated hyperbilirubinemia. Gilbert syndrome occurs in 2%-10% of general population, while others are rare. Except for Crigler-Najjar syndrome, hereditary hyperbilirubinemias belong to benign disorders and thus no treatment is required.

  2. Hereditary angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peterson, M P; Bygum, A

    2016-01-01

    We report a 64-year-old man who suffered from recurrent visible swelling attacks since the age of 20 as well as episodes with severe upper airway edema, resulting in 4 emergency tracheotomies. Eventually after 44 years he was diagnosed with hereditary angioedema (HAE) type II. The aims of this re...... of this report is to emphasize the importance of awareness concerning HAE, which does not respond to traditional anti-allergic therapy, and remind physicians to test for functional C1-INH deficiency....

  3. Medical Management of Hereditary Optic Neuropathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Morgia, Chiara; Carbonelli, Michele; Barboni, Piero; Sadun, Alfredo Arrigo; Carelli, Valerio

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary optic neuropathies are diseases affecting the optic nerve. The most common are mitochondrial hereditary optic neuropathies, i.e., the maternally inherited Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and dominant optic atrophy (DOA). They both share a mitochondrial pathogenesis that leads to the selective loss of retinal ganglion cells and axons, in particular of the papillo-macular bundle. Typically, LHON is characterized by an acute/subacute loss of central vision associated with impairment of color vision and swelling of retinal nerve fibers followed by optic atrophy. DOA, instead, is characterized by a childhood-onset and slowly progressive loss of central vision, worsening over the years, leading to optic atrophy. The diagnostic workup includes neuro-ophthalmologic evaluation and genetic testing of the three most common mitochondrial DNA mutations affecting complex I (11778/ND4, 3460/ND1, and 14484/ND6) for LHON and sequencing of the nuclear gene OPA1 for DOA. Therapeutic strategies are still limited including agents that bypass the complex I defect and exert an antioxidant effect (idebenone). Further strategies are aimed at stimulating compensatory mitochondrial biogenesis. Gene therapy is also a promising avenue that still needs to be validated. PMID:25132831

  4. Medical management of hereditary optic neuropathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara eLa Morgia

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary optic neuropathies are diseases of the optic nerve. The most common are mitochondrial hereditary optic neuropathies, i.e. the maternally inherited Leber’s Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON and Dominant Optic Atrophy (DOA. They both share a mitochondrial pathogenesis that leads to the selective loss of retinal ganglion cells and axons, in particular of the papillo-macular bundle. Typically, LHON is an acute/subacute loss of central vision associated with impairment of color vision and swelling of retinal nerve fibers followed by optic atrophy. DOA, instead, is characterized by a childhood-onset and slowly progressive loss of central vision, worsening over the years, leading to optic atrophy. The diagnostic workup includes neuro-ophthalmologic evaluation and genetic testing of the three most common mitochondrial DNA mutations affecting complex I (11778/ND4, 3460/ND1 and 14484/ND6 for LHON and sequencing of the nuclear gene OPA1 for DOA. Therapeutic strategies are limited including agents that bypass the complex I defect and exert an antioxidant effect (idebenone. Further strategies are aimed at stimulating compensatory mitochondrial biogenesis. Gene therapy is also a promising venue that still needs to be validated.

  5. Hereditary hemochromatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen A. Geller

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH is the most commonly identified autosomal recessive genetic disorder in the white population, characterized by increased intestinal iron absorption and secondary abnormal accumulation in parenchymal organs, not infrequently accompanied by functional impairment. This entity is associated with mutations of the HFE gene (located on the short arm of chromosome 6 at location 6p22.2; closely linked to the HLA-A3 locus, which encodes the HFE protein, a membrane protein thought to regulate iron absorption by affecting the interaction between transferrin receptor and transferrin.

  6. Hereditary spherocytosis

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    Meenakshi Kalyan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary spherocytosis (HS is a familial hemolytic disorder with marked heterogeneity of clinical features, ranging from an asymptomatic condition to a fulminant hemolytic anemia. In severe cases, the disorder may present in early childhood, but in some cases it may go unnoticed until later in adult life. We present a 32-year-old male who presented with anemia, jaundice, splenomegaly, and gallstones. Seven of his family members had similar illness in the past. The Mother died of similar illness at the age of 40. The Blood film showed spherocytosis and reticulocytosis. There was increased osmotic fragility and a negative direct coomb′s test. He was given folic acid supplements and was advised for splenectomy and cholecystectomy. This case is reported due to its rarity in Indian population.

  7. Cardiac pathology in spinal muscular atrophy : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijngaarde, C A|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413993779; Blank, A C|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304821578; Stam, M; Wadman, R I|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/341753637; van den Berg, L H|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/288255216; van der Pol, W L|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/203721721

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hereditary proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a severe neuromuscular disease of childhood caused by homozygous loss of function of the survival motor neuron (SMN) 1 gene. The presence of a second, nearly identical SMN gene (SMN2) in the human genome ensures production of residual

  8. Best practice guidelines for molecular analysis in spinal muscular atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheffer, H; Cobben, JM; Matthijs, G; Wirth, B

    With a prevalence of approximately 1/10 000, and a carrier frequency of 1/40-1/60 the proximal spinal muscular atrophies (SMAs) are among the most frequent autosomal recessive hereditary disorders. Patients can be classified clinically into four groups: acute, intermediate, mild, and adult (SMA

  9. Genetics Home Reference: infantile-onset ascending hereditary spastic paralysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... characterized by progressive muscle stiffness (spasticity) and eventual paralysis of the lower limbs (paraplegia). The spasticity and paraplegia result from degeneration (atrophy) of motor neurons , which are specialized nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord that control muscle movement. Hereditary ...

  10. Dominant optic atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenaers Guy

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Definition of the disease Dominant Optic Atrophy (DOA is a neuro-ophthalmic condition characterized by a bilateral degeneration of the optic nerves, causing insidious visual loss, typically starting during the first decade of life. The disease affects primary the retinal ganglion cells (RGC and their axons forming the optic nerve, which transfer the visual information from the photoreceptors to the lateral geniculus in the brain. Epidemiology The prevalence of the disease varies from 1/10000 in Denmark due to a founder effect, to 1/30000 in the rest of the world. Clinical description DOA patients usually suffer of moderate visual loss, associated with central or paracentral visual field deficits and color vision defects. The severity of the disease is highly variable, the visual acuity ranging from normal to legal blindness. The ophthalmic examination discloses on fundoscopy isolated optic disc pallor or atrophy, related to the RGC death. About 20% of DOA patients harbour extraocular multi-systemic features, including neurosensory hearing loss, or less commonly chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia, myopathy, peripheral neuropathy, multiple sclerosis-like illness, spastic paraplegia or cataracts. Aetiology Two genes (OPA1, OPA3 encoding inner mitochondrial membrane proteins and three loci (OPA4, OPA5, OPA8 are currently known for DOA. Additional loci and genes (OPA2, OPA6 and OPA7 are responsible for X-linked or recessive optic atrophy. All OPA genes yet identified encode mitochondrial proteins embedded in the inner membrane and ubiquitously expressed, as are the proteins mutated in the Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy. OPA1 mutations affect mitochondrial fusion, energy metabolism, control of apoptosis, calcium clearance and maintenance of mitochondrial genome integrity. OPA3 mutations only affect the energy metabolism and the control of apoptosis. Diagnosis Patients are usually diagnosed during their early childhood, because of

  11. Dominant optic atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenaers, Guy; Hamel, Christian; Delettre, Cécile; Amati-Bonneau, Patrizia; Procaccio, Vincent; Bonneau, Dominique; Reynier, Pascal; Milea, Dan

    2012-07-09

    DEFINITION OF THE DISEASE: Dominant Optic Atrophy (DOA) is a neuro-ophthalmic condition characterized by a bilateral degeneration of the optic nerves, causing insidious visual loss, typically starting during the first decade of life. The disease affects primary the retinal ganglion cells (RGC) and their axons forming the optic nerve, which transfer the visual information from the photoreceptors to the lateral geniculus in the brain. The prevalence of the disease varies from 1/10000 in Denmark due to a founder effect, to 1/30000 in the rest of the world. DOA patients usually suffer of moderate visual loss, associated with central or paracentral visual field deficits and color vision defects. The severity of the disease is highly variable, the visual acuity ranging from normal to legal blindness. The ophthalmic examination discloses on fundoscopy isolated optic disc pallor or atrophy, related to the RGC death. About 20% of DOA patients harbour extraocular multi-systemic features, including neurosensory hearing loss, or less commonly chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia, myopathy, peripheral neuropathy, multiple sclerosis-like illness, spastic paraplegia or cataracts. Two genes (OPA1, OPA3) encoding inner mitochondrial membrane proteins and three loci (OPA4, OPA5, OPA8) are currently known for DOA. Additional loci and genes (OPA2, OPA6 and OPA7) are responsible for X-linked or recessive optic atrophy. All OPA genes yet identified encode mitochondrial proteins embedded in the inner membrane and ubiquitously expressed, as are the proteins mutated in the Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy. OPA1 mutations affect mitochondrial fusion, energy metabolism, control of apoptosis, calcium clearance and maintenance of mitochondrial genome integrity. OPA3 mutations only affect the energy metabolism and the control of apoptosis. Patients are usually diagnosed during their early childhood, because of bilateral, mild, otherwise unexplained visual loss related to optic discs

  12. Is Pancreatic Cancer Hereditary?

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    ... Board Patient Education / Basics of Pancreatic Cancer Is pancreatic cancer hereditary? Cancer of the pancreas is a genetic ... found in cigarette smoke. The genetics of hereditary pancreatic cancer is a focus of research at Johns Hopkins. ...

  13. Optic nerve atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Optic atrophy; Optic neuropathy ... There are many causes of optic atrophy. The most common is poor blood flow. This is called ischemic optic neuropathy. The problem most often affects older adults. ...

  14. Multiple System Atrophy (MSA)

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    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) Overview Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a rare, degenerative neurological disorder affecting your body's involuntary (autonomic) functions, including blood pressure, breathing, bladder function and muscle ...

  15. [Hereditary ovarian cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zikán, M; Foretová, L; Cibula, D; Kotlas, J; Pohlreich, P

    2006-05-01

    This article reviews the topic of hereditary ovarian cancer, describes persons at risk of hereditary disposition to cancer and gives instructions for genetic counselling and molecular analysis, including contacts to specialized centres in the Czech Republic. Review. Institute of Biochemistry and Experimental Oncology, Charles University in Prague. Hereditary ovarian cancer occurs in three autosomal dominant syndromes: appropriate hereditary ovarian cancer (HOC), hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) and hereditary non-poliposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). Physician in practice or specialist at the clinic should focus interest on patients form families with frequent occurrence of breast and/or ovarian cancer, patients with early onset disease or tumour duplicity (breast and ovarian cancer). Hereditary disposition to ovarian (and breast) cancer could be assessed by molecular genetic analysis of two main susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, or other genes in families with diverse tumours. Molecular genetic analysis should be in any cases indicated by experienced clinical genetic. In the Czech Republic, the consensus of genetic and clinical care of risk patients was published and specialized centres for families with hereditary predisposition were settled in Prague and Brno. Persons with hereditary susceptibility to cancer constitute noted group where painstaking dispensarisation and preventive care may prevent malignancy or detect it in the early stage.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary angioedema

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... named? Additional Information & Resources MedlinePlus (2 links) Encyclopedia: Hereditary angioedema Health Topic: Vascular Diseases Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) Hereditary ...

  17. Polyglutamine diseases and transport problems: deadly traffic jams on neuronal highways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawardena, Shermali; Goldstein, Lawrence S B

    2005-01-01

    The expansion of CAG repeats encoding glutamine (polyQ) causes, to date, 9 late-onset progressive neurodegenerative disorders, including Huntington disease, spinobulbar muscular atrophy, dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy, and spinocerebellar ataxias 1, 2, 3, 6, 7, and 17. Although many studies using both knockout and transgenic mouse models suggest that a toxic gain of function is central to neuronal dysfunction, the exact mechanisms of neurotoxic effects remain elusive. Protein aggregations within neurons seem to be a common manifestation in almost all polyQ diseases, and such accumulations are perhaps major triggers of cellular stress and neuronal death. Recent data lead to the tantalizing proposal that disruption of axonal transport pathways within long, narrow-caliber axons could lead to protein accumulations that can elicit neuronal death, ultimately causing a neuronal dysfunction pathway observed in polyQ expanded diseases. Perhaps perturbations in transport pathways are an early event involved in instigating polyQ disease pathology.

  18. Progress study on the mechanism of CAG repeats dynamic mutation in polyQ disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Chun-rong

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Polyglutamine (polyQ disease is a group of neurodegenerative disorders caused by abnormal expansion of CAG repeats within coding regions of certain causative genes, which are translated into a series of abnormally expanded polyQ tracts causing cytotoxicity. So far, nine diseases caused by expanded polyQ tracts have been demonstrated including Huntington's disease (HD, spinobulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA, dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA and several spinocerebellar ataxias subtypes (SCA. In human, long CAG repeats tend to expand during transmissions from parent to offspring, named as dynamic mutation, leading to an earlier age of disease onset and more severe symptoms in subsequent generations. The review presents some novel mechanisms based on dynamic mutation.

  19. HEREDITARY BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Bit-Sava

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary breast cancer occurs in 5–20 % of cases and it is associated with inherited mutations in particular genes, such as BRCA1 и BRCA2 in most cases. The CHEK2, PTEN, TP53, ATM, RAD51, BLM, PALB2, Nbs genes are associated with low and median risks ofdeveloping breast cancer. Molecular genetic studies identify germinal mutations underlying hereditary breast cancer. In most cases hereditary breast cancer refers to triple-negative phenotype, which is the most aggressive type of breast cancer, that does not express the genes for estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2. The review presents the diagnostic and treatment methods of hereditary breast cancer. Clinical-morphological aspects allow the new diagnostic and treatment methods of hereditary breast cancer to be identified. Poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP inhibitors demonstrate the potential for effective treatment of BRCA-associated breast cancer.

  20. Novel EXOSC3 mutation causes complicated hereditary spastic paraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halevy, Ayelet; Lerer, Israela; Cohen, Rony; Kornreich, Liora; Shuper, Avinoam; Gamliel, Moria; Zimerman, Bat-El; Korabi, Isam; Meiner, Vardiella; Straussberg, Rachel; Lossos, Alexander

    2014-11-01

    We describe two pairs of siblings from a consanguineous family manifesting autosomal recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia caused by a novel mutation in the EXOSC3 gene, previously reported in pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 1. Clinical findings included delayed motor milestones, early-onset spastic paraplegia, variable cognitive disability, and cerebellar signs. Cerebral imaging demonstrated enlarged cisterna magna and mild hypoplasia and atrophy of the lower vermis with a normal pons. Genetic analysis using homozygosity mapping followed by whole exome sequencing identified homozygous c.571G>T; p.G191C mutation in the EXOSC3 gene. We suggest that EXOSC3 mutations may present not only as pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 1, but also as a complicated form of hereditary spastic paraplegia without pontine hypoplasia or atrophy.

  1. Proximal spinal muscular atrophy: current orthopedic perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haaker G

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Gerrit Haaker, Albert Fujak Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen, Germany Abstract: Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is a hereditary neuromuscular disease of lower motor neurons that is caused by a defective "survival motor neuron" (SMN protein that is mainly associated with proximal progressive muscle weakness and atrophy. Although SMA involves a wide range of disease severity and a high mortality and morbidity rate, recent advances in multidisciplinary supportive care have enhanced quality of life and life expectancy. Active research for possible treatment options has become possible since the disease-causing gene defect was identified in 1995. Nevertheless, a causal therapy is not available at present, and therapeutic management of SMA remains challenging; the prolonged survival is increasing, especially orthopedic, respiratory and nutritive problems. This review focuses on orthopedic management of the disease, with discussion of key aspects that include scoliosis, muscular contractures, hip joint disorders, fractures, technical devices, and a comparative approach of conservative and surgical treatment. Also emphasized are associated complications including respiratory involvement, perioperative care and anesthesia, nutrition problems, and rehabilitation. The SMA disease course can be greatly improved with adequate therapy with established orthopedic procedures in a multidisciplinary therapeutic approach. Keywords: spinal muscular atrophy, scoliosis, contractures, fractures, lung function, treatment, rehabilitation, surgery, ventilation, nutrition, perioperative management

  2. Learning about Hereditary Hemochromatosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Learning About Hereditary Hemochromatosis Enter Search Term(s): Español Research Funding An Overview Bioinformatics Current Grants Education and Training Funding Extramural Research ...

  3. Hereditary fructose intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fructosemia; Fructose intolerance; Fructose aldolase B-deficiency; Fructose-1, 6-bisphosphate aldolase deficiency ... substances build up in the liver. Hereditary fructose intolerance is inherited, which means it can be passed ...

  4. Nuclear matrix proteins and hereditary diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjakste, N; Sjakste, T

    2005-03-01

    The review summarizes literature data on alterations of structure or expression of different nuclear matrix proteins in hereditary syndromes. From the point of view of involvement of nuclear matrix proteins in etiology and pathogenesis of the disease hereditary pathologies can be classified in pathologies with pathogenesis associated with defects of nuclear matrix proteins and pathologies associated to changes of the nuclear matrix protein spectrum. The first group includes laminopathies, hereditary diseases with abnormal nuclear-matrix associated proteins and triplet extension diseases associated with accumulation of abnormal proteins in the nuclear matrix. Laminopathies are hereditary diseases coupled to structural defects of the nuclear lamina. These diseases include Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy, limb girdle muscular dystrophy, dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) with conduction system disease, familial partial lipodystrophy (FPLD), autosomal recessive axonal neuropathy (Charcot-Marie-Tooth disorder type 2, CMT2), mandibuloacral dysplasia (MAD), Hutchison Gilford Progeria syndrome (HGS), Greenberg Skeletal Dysplasia, and Pelger-Huet anomaly (PHA). Most of them are due to mutations in the lamin A/C gene, one - to mutations in emerin gene, some are associated with mutations in Lamin B receptor gene. In Werner's, Bloom's, Cockayne's syndromes, Fanconi anemia, multiple carboxylase deficiency mutations in nuclear matrix protein or enzyme gene lead to deficient DNA repair, abnormal regulation of cell growth and differentiation or other specific metabolic functions. Proteins with a long polyglutamic tract synthesized in the cells of patients with dentato-rubral and pallido-luysian atrophy, myotonic dystrophy and Huntington disease interfere with transcription on the nuclear matrix. Down's syndrome is a representative of the group of diseases with altered nuclear matrix protein spectrum.

  5. Slimming down fat makes neuropathic hippo: the Fat/Hippo tumor suppressor pathway protects adult neurons through regulation of autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calamita, Piera; Fanto, Manolis

    2011-08-01

    Polyglutamine diseases are accompanied by large-scale alterations of transcription that may be responsible for neurodegeneration. We have monitored early transcriptional alterations in a Drosophila model for dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA) and reported the critical downregulation of the fat tumor suppressor gene. We show that, besides partially mediating neurodegeneration in the Drosophila model for DRPLA, fat and the downstream hippo pathway are essential for adult neuronal homeostasis. This function of the Fat/Hippo pathway is independent of the well-established actions on proliferation and cell polarity; rather it has an impact upon autophagy, which is blocked and ineffective in fat/hippo mutants. These findings reveal the unexpected role in postmitotic neuronal homeostasis of a tumor suppressor pathway and hint at a new player involved directly or indirectly in the regulation of autophagy.

  6. [Hereditary kidney diseases in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan-qin; Ding, Jie; Wang, Fang; Zhang, Hong-wen

    2013-04-18

    About 10 to 15 percent of kidney diseases are inherited or related to genetic factors. While, hereditary kidney diseases have no specific clinical manifestations and react poorly to the therapy, as a result, about 30 percent of hospitalized children with chronic renal failure is due to hereditary kidney diseases in our country. Hereditary kidney diseases are related to many genes. Molecular genetic analysis plays an important role in the diagnosis and prenatal diagnosis of hereditary kidney diseases. Our group have made a series of research in hereditary kidney diseases for nearly 30 years. Here we review the research work and the main results in hereditary kidney diseases of our group.

  7. Optic Nerve Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cord (hydrocephalus) may prevent further optic nerve damage. Spectacles may be prescribed to correct refractive error. When optic atrophy is unilateral protection of the good eye is essential and wearing of protective lenses should ...

  8. Genes for Hereditary Sensory and Autonomic Neuropathies: A Genotype-Phenotype Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotthier, Annelies; Baets, Jonathan; De Vriendt, Els; Jacobs, An; Auer-Grumbach, Michaela; Levy, Nicolas; Bonello-Palot, Nathalie; Kilic, Sara Sebnem; Weis, Joachim; Nascimento, Andres; Swinkels, Marielle; Kruyt, Moyo C.; Jordanova, Albena; De Jonghe, Peter; Timmerman, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN) are clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders characterized by axonal atrophy and degeneration, exclusively or predominantly affecting the sensory and autonomic neurons. So far, disease-associated mutations have been identified in seven genes: two genes for autosomal dominant ("SPTLC1"…

  9. Mitochondrial DNA analysis as a diagnostic tool in singleton cases of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostra, R. J.; Bolhuis, P. A.; Bleeker-Wagemakers, E. M.

    1993-01-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is characterized by subacute loss of central vision due to bilateral optic nerve atrophy accompanied by several nonspecific clinical findings. The only pathognomonic feature is its strictly maternal inheritance. It was therefore impossible to establish the

  10. Hereditary cancer syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahner, Nils; Steinke, Verena

    2008-10-01

    Persons carrying mutations for hereditary cancer syndromes are at high risk for the development of tumors at an early age, as well as the synchronous or metachronous development of multiple tumors of the corresponding tumor spectrum. The genetic causes of many hereditary cancer syndromes have already been identified. About 5% of all cancers are part of a hereditary cancer syndrome. Selective literature review, including evidence-based guidelines and recommendations. Clinical criteria are currently available according to which many hereditary cancer syndromes can be diagnosed or suspected and which point the way to further molecular genetic analysis. A physician can easily determine whether these criteria are met by directed questioning about the patient's personal and family medical history. The identification of the causative germ line mutation in the family allows confirmation of the diagnosis in the affected individual and opens up the option of predictive testing in healthy relatives. Mutation carriers for hereditary cancer syndromes need long-term medical surveillance in a specialized center. It is important that these persons should be identified in the primary care setting and then referred for genetic counseling if molecular genetic testing is to be performed in a targeted, rational manner.

  11. Hereditary gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Carla; Seruca, Raquel; Carneiro, Fátima

    2009-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a heterogeneous and highly prevalent disease, being the fourth most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer associated death worldwide. Most cases are sporadic and familial clustering is observed in about 10% of the cases. Hereditary gastric cancer accounts for a very low percentage of cases (1-3%) and a single hereditary syndrome - Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer (HDGC) - has been characterised. Among families that fulfil the clinical criteria for HDGC, about 40% carry CDH1 germline mutations, the genetic cause of the others being unknown. The management options for CDH1 asymptomatic germline carriers are intensive endoscopic surveillance and prophylactic gastrectomy. In this chapter we review the pathophysiology and clinicopathological features of HDGC and discuss issues related with genetic testing and management of family members.

  12. [Hereditary systemic autoinflammatory diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aróstegui, Juan I

    2011-01-01

    Systemic autoinflammatory diseases encompass different rare clinical entities characterized by recurrent acute inflammatory episodes secondary to a dysregulated inflammatory process. Since their first clinical descriptions, the Mendelian hereditary nature of some of them became evident, with their genetic and molecular basis being recently elucidated. There are disease-causing mutations in genes encoding for different proteins involved in the innate immune response and inflammation. Herein, we will introduce the reader to an updated review of the main clinical, physiopathological and therapeutic features of the different hereditary systemic autoinflammatory diseases. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  13. Morphometric analysis of progressive changes in hereditary cerebellar cortical degenerative disease (abiotrophy) in rabbits caused by abnormal synaptogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Sato, Junko; Yamada, Naoaki; Kobayashi, Ryosuke; Tsuchitani, Minoru; Kobayashi, Yoshiyasu

    2015-01-01

    We previously investigated rabbit hereditary cerebellar cortical degenerative disease, called cerebellar cortical abiotrophy in the veterinary field, and determined that the pathogenesis of this disease is the result of failed synaptogenesis between parallel fibers and Purkinje cells. In this study, longitudinal changes in the development and atrophy of the cerebellum of rabbits with hereditary abiotrophy after birth were morphometrically examined (postnatal day [PD] 15 and 42) using image an...

  14. [Frequency of hereditary neurologic diseases. A clinical study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, M; Baldini, S; Voltolin, G; Norat, M; Bottacchi, E

    1993-09-01

    The nervous system is affected in 30% of hereditary monogenic disorders and as many as 500 single-gene disorders display major neurologic symptoms. We have studied the frequency of hereditary neurological diseases to assess their importance in daily hospital activity. Only single-gene hereditary diseases with central or peripheral nervous system involvement were considered; thus chromosomal diseases and diseases with multifactorial etiology were excluded. We surveyed admission to in- and out-patient departments of Neurology, Pediatrics, and Dermatology of the Aosta Regional Hospital for the calendar years 1982-1991, collecting 229 cases, 95 women and 134 men. Out-patient departments held 126 patients, the others came from in-patient departments. Admission to the neurological in-patient department were 1.8% of total neurological admissions in the same period. Each diagnosis was assigned to the code number of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-IX Revision, 1975). We found 33 different phenotypes. Most frequent diagnoses were: essential tremor (89 patients), hereditary sensory-motor neuropathy (HSMN) type I (28), Huntington's chorea (13), progressive muscular dystrophy limb-girdle type (8), neurofibromatosis type I (9), HSMN type II (9), spinocerebellar ataxia (9), hereditary spastic paraplegia (7), spinal muscular atrophy type IV (5), myotonic dystrophy (5), cerebellar ataxia (4), HSMN type III (4), spinal muscular atrophy type II and III (3), tuberous sclerosis (3). Essential tremor mostly affected persons in the over-50 age groups. On the contrary, the other neurologic monogenic diseases were diagnosed in all ages with the following age-group breakdown: 0-9, 11%; 10-19, 16%; 20-29, 15%; 30-39, 8%; 40-49, 11%; 50-59, 19%; 60-69, 14%, 70+, 7%. Consistently with the general rule, autosomic recessive diseases have the earliest onset and autosomic dominant ones the latest; HSMN, spinal muscular atrophy and Huntington's chorea were the disorders diagnosed

  15. Managing hereditary ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mourits, M. J.; de Bock, G. H.

    2009-01-01

    In this review we present an overview of recent developments in the management of hereditary ovarian cancer. Until recently, intensive screening of the ovaries was recommended to mutation carriers and their first-degree female relatives. However, since screening is not effective in detecting

  16. Hereditary periodic fever syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McDermott, MF; Frenkel, J

    Hereditary periodic fever syndromes are defined by recurrent attacks of generalised inflammation for which no infectious or auto-immune cause can be identified. For most of these disorders, the molecular basis has recently been elucidated. This has opened the prospect of novel therapeutic

  17. Hereditary Angioedema in Childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Line; Bygum, Anette

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare inherited disease that is often difficult to diagnose. We report a case of a 9-year-old boy with a spontaneous mutation causing HAE, diagnosed after a life-threatening episode of angioedema of the head and upper respiratory tract after a 5-year history of r...

  18. Hereditary Renal Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Lakshmi; Jim, Belinda

    2017-07-01

    Hereditary kidney disease comprises approximately 10% of adults and nearly all children who require renal replacement therapy. Technologic advances have improved our ability to perform genetic diagnosis and enhanced our understanding of renal and syndromic diseases. In this article, we review the genetics of renal diseases, including common monogenic diseases such as polycystic kidney disease, Alport syndrome, and Fabry disease, as well as complex disorders such as congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract. We provide the nephrologist with a general strategy to approach hereditary disorders, which includes a discussion of commonly used genetic tests, a guide to genetic counseling, and reproductive options such as prenatal diagnosis or pre-implantation genetic diagnosis for at-risk couples. Finally, we review pregnancy outcomes in certain renal diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Hereditary breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Martin J; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 are only detected in 25% of families with a strong history of breast cancer, though hereditary factors are expected to be involved in the remaining families with no recognized mutation. Molecular characterization is expected to provide new insight...... into the tumor biology to guide the search of new high-risk alleles and provide better classification of the growing number of BRCA1/2 variants of unknown significance (VUS). In this review, we provide an overview of hereditary breast cancer, its genetic background, and clinical implications, before focusing...... on the pathologically and molecular features associated with the disease. Recent transcriptome and genome profiling studies of tumor series from BRCA1/2 mutation carriers as well as familial non-BRCA1/2 will be discussed. Special attention is paid to its association with molecular breast cancer subtypes as well...

  20. Hereditary neuropathies: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojkovic, T

    2016-12-01

    Hereditary neuropathies are the most common inherited neuromuscular diseases. Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease represents the most common form with an average prevalence ranging from 1/2500 to 1/1200, depending on the studies. To date and with the advances of the latest generation sequencing, more than 80 genes have been identified. Although the common clinical phenotype comprises a progressive distal muscle weakness and sensory loss, foot deformities and decreased or absent tendon reflexes, clinical and electrophysiological phenotypes exhibit great variability. Moreover, atypical phenotypes are arising, overlapping with spastic paraplegia, hereditary sensory neuropathies or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The causative genes are involved in various biological processes such as myelin development and maintenance, biosynthesis and degradation of proteins, neuronal structural maintenance, axonal transport, endocytosis, membrane dynamics, ion-channel function and the mitochondrial network. An accurate genetic diagnosis is important for appropriate genetic counselling and treatment options. Therapeutic advances, particularly small interfering RNA therapy, are encouraging in hereditary transthyretin amyloid neuropathy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. HFE-Associated Hereditary Haemochromatosis

    OpenAIRE

    Eijkelkamp, Emmeke J; Yapp, Thomas R; Powell, Lawrie W

    2000-01-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis is a common inherited disorder of the iron metabolism. Screening studies indicate that it has a prevalence of one in 200 to 400, depending on the population studied, and a carrier rate of about one in seven to one in 10. Feder et al identified the hereditary hemochromatosis gene (HFE) in 1996 and two candidate mutations; the C282Y mutation has been shown to be responsible for the majority of the hereditary hemochromatosis cases worldwide. The gene discovery has led ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary hyperekplexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Neuromuscular Disorders Health Topic: Sudden Infant Death Syndrome Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) Hereditary hyperekplexia Additional NIH Resources (1 link) National Institute ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary fructose intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions Hereditary fructose intolerance Hereditary fructose intolerance Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Hereditary fructose intolerance is a condition that affects a person's ability ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary diffuse gastric cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Conditions Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) is an inherited disorder that greatly increases ...

  5. Dominant optic atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenaers, Guy; Hamel, Christian; Delettre, Cécile

    2012-01-01

    DEFINITION OF THE DISEASE: Dominant Optic Atrophy (DOA) is a neuro-ophthalmic condition characterized by a bilateral degeneration of the optic nerves, causing insidious visual loss, typically starting during the first decade of life. The disease affects primary the retinal ganglion cells (RGC......) and their axons forming the optic nerve, which transfer the visual information from the photoreceptors to the lateral geniculus in the brain....

  6. [Muscle fiber atrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonaka, Ikuya

    2012-01-01

    Muscle fibers have been classified into two major forms of red (slow twitch) and white (fast twitch) muscles. The red muscle utilizes lipid as energy source through mitochondrial metabolism and function to sustain the position against gravity (sometimes called as antigravity muscle). Under microgravity the red muscle is selectively involved. In our unloading study by hindlimb suspension experiment on rats, the one of the representative red muscle of soleus muscle underwent rapid atrophy; they reduced their weights about 50% after 2 week-unloading. In addition, myofibrils were occasionally markedly disorganized with selective thin filament loss. Mitochondria in the degenerated area were decreased in number. The white muscle fibers in the soleus muscle had mostly transformed to the red ones. It took about 1 month to recover morphologically. The satellite cell playing a major role in muscle regeneration was not activated. There still remained unsolved what are the mechanosensors to keep muscle function under normal gravity. Dr Nikawa's group proposed that one of ubiquitin ligases, Cbl-b is activated under microgravity and induces muscle fiber degeneration. There might be many factors to induce muscle atrophy and degeneration under microgravity. Further study is necessary to explore the pathomechanism of muscle atrophy in disused and under immobility conditions.

  7. Progressive hemifacial atrophy with ciliary body atrophy and ocular hypotony

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Ashwini Kini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Progressive hemifacial atrophy (PHA is a disease of unknown etiology affecting one-half of the face. Ocular involvement is uncommon. Atrophy of iris is rare, with only a few cases of partial atrophy being reported in the literature. We report a case of total atrophy of iris and ciliary body with associated ocular hypotony in a 16-year-old girl with PHA. We believe this is the first reported case of complete atrophy of iris and ciliary body in PHA. Ocular hypotony in PHA was thought to be due to intra-ocular inflammation. However in our case it appears to be secondary to severe atrophy of the ciliary body.

  8. Training improves oxidative capacity, but not function, in spinal muscular atrophy type III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Karen Lindhardt; Hansen, Regitze Sølling; Preisler, Nicolai

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In this study we investigated the effect of 12 weeks of cycle ergometer training in patients with spinal muscular atrophy type III (SMA III), a hereditary motor neuron disease with progressive muscle weakness and atrophy. METHODS: Six SMA III patients and 9 healthy subjects completed......max (17 ± 2 to 21 ± 2 ml/kg/min, P SMA III without causing muscle...... damage, but it also induces significant fatigue. This warrants study into alternative training methods to improve exercise capacity in SMA III patients....

  9. Case report of optic atrophy in Dentatorubropallidoluysian Atrophy (DRPLA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Michael R; Sethi, Kapil D; Mehta, Shyamal H; Nichols, Fenwick T; Morgan, John C

    2015-12-18

    Dentatorubropallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA) is a rare autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease that is associated with numerous movement disorders. Ocular problems also occur with DRPLA with reports of corneal endothelial degeneration in some patients living with the disease. We report a new visual problem associated with DRPLA, optic atrophy. A 47 year-old man presented complaining of progressive visual loss associated with optic atrophy on ophthalmological evaluation. He gradually developed a progressive ataxia with dystonia. Brain MRI revealed a diffuse leukoencephalopathy. Genetic analysis revealed 62 CAG repeats in one allele of the DRPLA gene and he was diagnosed with DRPLA. Optic atrophy should be included in the clinical spectrum of DRPLA.

  10. Multiparametric 3T MRI evaluation of hereditary spastic paraplegia: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonam Priya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP is a rare heterogeneous group of familial neurodegenerative disorders characterized by degeneration of the corticospinal tracts and posterior column of the spinal cord. Previously described radiological findings included nonspecific brain abnormalities such as brain atrophy and white matter lesions, as well as atrophy of the corpus callosum and spinal cord. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy may reveal reduced concentrations of normal brain metabolites and elevated levels of myoinositol. Diffusion tensor imaging shows increased mean diffusivity and reduced fractional anisotropy in the periventricular white matter, which is compatible with damaged myelinated axons. We present here two cases of HSP in a single family with typical imaging findings.

  11. A recurrent WARS mutation is a novel cause of autosomal dominant distal hereditary motor neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Pei-Chien; Soong, Bing-Wen; Mademan, Inès; Huang, Yen-Hua; Liu, Chia-Rung; Hsiao, Cheng-Tsung; Wu, Hung-Ta; Liu, Tze-Tze; Liu, Yo-Tsen; Tseng, Yen-Ting; Lin, Kon-Ping; Yang, Ueng-Cheng; Chung, Ki Wha; Choi, Byung-Ok; Nicholson, Garth A; Kennerson, Marina L; Chan, Chih-Chiang; De Jonghe, Peter; Cheng, Tzu-Hao; Liao, Yi-Chu; Züchner, Stephan; Baets, Jonathan; Lee, Yi-Chung

    2017-05-01

    Distal hereditary motor neuropathy is a heterogeneous group of inherited neuropathies characterized by distal limb muscle weakness and atrophy. Although at least 15 genes have been implicated in distal hereditary motor neuropathy, the genetic causes remain elusive in many families. To identify an additional causal gene for distal hereditary motor neuropathy, we performed exome sequencing for two affected individuals and two unaffected members in a Taiwanese family with an autosomal dominant distal hereditary motor neuropathy in which mutations in common distal hereditary motor neuropathy-implicated genes had been excluded. The exome sequencing revealed a heterozygous mutation, c.770A > G (p.His257Arg), in the cytoplasmic tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase (TrpRS) gene (WARS) that co-segregates with the neuropathy in the family. Further analyses of WARS in an additional 79 Taiwanese pedigrees with inherited neuropathies and 163 index cases from Australian, European, and Korean distal hereditary motor neuropathy families identified the same mutation in another Taiwanese distal hereditary motor neuropathy pedigree with different ancestries and one additional Belgian distal hereditary motor neuropathy family of Caucasian origin. Cell transfection studies demonstrated a dominant-negative effect of the p.His257Arg mutation on aminoacylation activity of TrpRS, which subsequently compromised protein synthesis and reduced cell viability. His257Arg TrpRS also inhibited neurite outgrowth and led to neurite degeneration in the neuronal cell lines and rat motor neurons. Further in vitro analyses showed that the WARS mutation could potentiate the angiostatic activities of TrpRS by enhancing its interaction with vascular endothelial-cadherin. Taken together, these findings establish WARS as a gene whose mutations may cause distal hereditary motor neuropathy and alter canonical and non-canonical functions of TrpRS. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of

  12. Canine hereditary ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urkasemsin, Ganokon; Olby, Natasha J

    2014-11-01

    The hereditary ataxias are a group of neurodegenerative diseases that cause a progressive (or episodic) cerebellar ataxia. A large number of different disorders have been described in different breeds of purebred dog, and in some instances, more than one disorder occurs in a single breed, creating a confusing clinical picture. The mutations associated with these disorders are being described at a rapid rate, potentially changing our ability to prevent, diagnose, and treat affected dogs. A breed-related neurodegenerative process should be suspected in any pure bred dog with slowly progressive, symmetric signs of ataxia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Hereditary angioedema in women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouillet Laurence

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Women with hereditary angioedema (HAE are more likely to be symptomatic that men. Hormonal factors (puberty, contraception, pregnancy,.... play a significant role in the precipitation or worsening of the condition in women. So, combined contraceptive pills are not indicated and progestogen pill must be preferred. During pregnancy, attack rate can increase (38-48% of women. C1Inhibitor concentrate and tranexamic acid can be used during pregnancy. Attenuated androgens for long term prophylaxis are effective but side effects appear more often in female patients. These side effects are dose dependant and can be attenuated by titrating the dose down the lowest effective level.

  14. HFE-associated hereditary hemochromatosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijkelkamp, EJ; Yapp, TR; Powell, LW

    Hereditary hemochromatosis is a common inherited disorder of the iron metabolism Screening studies indicate that it has a prevalence of one in 200 to 400, depending on the population studied, and a carrier rate of about one in seven to one in 10. Feder et al identified the hereditary hemochromatosis

  15. EAMJ Oct Hereditary.indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HEREDITARY GINGIVAL FIBROMATOSIS: REPORT OF FAMILY CASE SERIES. E. G. WAGAIYU, R. N. NG'ANG'A and A. M. KEMOLI. SUMMARY. Hereditary gingival hyperplasia (HGF) is a rare condition characterised by hyperplastic, dense fibrous connective tissue with acanthotic gingival epithelium. A family presented.

  16. Chaperonopathies: spotlight on hereditary motor neuropathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Lupo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Distal hereditary motor neuropathies (dHMN comprise a group of rare hereditary neuromuscular disorders characterized by a peroneal muscular atrophy without sensory symptoms. To date twenty-three genes for dHMN have been reported and four of them encode for chaperones: DNAJB2, which encodes a member of the HSP40/DNAJ co-chaperone family, and HSPB1, HSPB3 and HSPB8, which encode three members of the family of small heat shock proteins. Except for HSPB1, with around thirty different mutations, the remaining three genes comprise a much low number of cases. Thus, only one case has been described caused by an HSPB3 mutation, whereas few DNAJB2 and HSPB8 cases are known, most of them caused by a founder c.352+1G>A mutation in DNAJB2 and by mutations affecting the hot spot K141 residue of the HSPB8 chaperone. This low number of cases makes it difficult to understand the pathomechanism underlying the neuropathy. Chaperones can assemble in multi-chaperone complexes forming an integrative chaperone network in the cell, which plays relevant cellular roles in a variety of processes such as the correct folding of newly synthesized proteins, their escort to their precise cellular locations to form functional proteins and complexes and the response to protein misfolding, including the degradation of proteins that fail to refold properly. Despite of this variety of functions, mutations in some of them lead to diseases with a similar clinical picture, suggesting common pathways. This review gives an overview of the genetics of dHMNs caused by mutations in four genes, DNAJB2, HSPB1, HSPB3 and HSPB8, which encode chaperones and show a common disease mechanism.

  17. Hereditary pancreatitis for the endoscopist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Milan R.; Eppolito, Amanda L.

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis shares a majority of clinical and morphologic features with chronic alcoholic pancreatitis, but may present at an earlier age. The term hereditary pancreatitis has primarily been associated with mutations in the serine protease 1 gene (PRSS1) which encodes for cationic trypsinogen. PRSS1 mutations account for approximately 68–81% of hereditary pancreatitis. Mutations in other genes, primarily serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 1 (SPINK1) and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) are also associated with hereditary pancreatitis. While chronic alcoholic pancreatitis may develop in the fourth or fifth decades, patients with hereditary pancreatitis may develop symptoms in the first or second decades of life. Hereditary pancreatitis is diagnosed either by detecting a causative gene mutation or by the presence of chronic pancreatitis in two first-degree or three second-degree relatives, in two or more generations, without precipitating factors and with a negative workup for known causes. Patients with hereditary pancreatitis may have recurrent acute pancreatitis and may develop pancreatic exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. Hereditary pancreatitis may involve premature trypsinogen activation or decreased control of trypsin. Recurrent inflammation can lead to acute pancreatitis and subsequently to chronic pancreatitis with parenchymal calcification. There is a markedly increased risk of pancreatic carcinoma compared with the general population. Patients are often referred for evaluation of pancreatitis, biliary or pancreatic ductal dilatation, jaundice, biliary obstruction, pancreatic duct stone or stricture, pancreatic pseudocysts, and for evaluation for malignancy. Medical treatment includes pancreatic enzyme supplementation, nutritional supplementation, diabetes management, and palliation of pain. Patients should avoid tobacco use and alcohol exposure. Hereditary pancreatitis is reviewed and recommendations for

  18. [Hereditary and familial colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaguer, Francesc

    2014-09-01

    Up to 5% of all colorectal cancer cases are caused by a known hereditary syndrome. These hereditary types often need a higher degree of clinical suspicion to be diagnosed and require specific and specialized management. In addition, diagnosing hereditary colorectal cancer has significant consequences not only for the patient, for whom there are effective preventative measures, but also for their families, who could be carriers of the condition. The most significant advances in the field of colorectal cancer have come from the diagnosis and characterization of these syndromes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Hereditary colorectal cancer diagnostics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarskov, Louise; Holck, Susanne; Bernstein, Inge

    2012-01-01

    BackgroundThe hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) subset of tumours can broadly be divided into tumours caused by an underlying mismatch-repair gene mutation, referred to as Lynch syndrome, and those that develop in families with similar patterns of heredity but without disease......-predisposing germline mismatch repair mutations, referred to as familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX). Recognition of HNPCC-associated colorectal cancers is central since surveillance programmes effectively reduce morbidity and mortality. The characteristic morphological features linked to Lynch syndrome can aid...... in the identification of this subset, whereas the possibility to use morphological features as an indicator of FCCTX is uncertain.Objective and methodsTo perform a detailed morphological evaluation of HNPCC-associated colorectal cancers and demonstrate significant differences between tumours associated with FCCTX...

  20. Hereditary Fructose Intolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Nagornaya

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary fructose intolerance, the prevalence of which is 1 : 20,000 population, is diagnosed much less frequently than is found in child and adult populations. Presented pathology is caused by a deficiency in ferment aldolase B and block of fructose transformation in the gastrointestinal tract with the accumulation of unprocessed fructose in the intestine, manifesting by characteristic symptom and numerous biochemical changes in the body. The disease is asymptomatic until a person begins to use fructose, sucrose or sorbitol. This article describes the fructose metabolism, genetic aspects of the discussing disease, the diversity of its clinical manifestations. The authors presented modern diagnostic criteria and international approaches to diet therapy.

  1. Hereditary iron and copper deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaseth, Jan; Flaten, Trond Peder; Andersen, Ole

    2007-01-01

    Hereditary deposition of iron (primary haemochromatosis) or copper (Wilson's disease) are autosomal recessive metabolic disease characterized by progressive liver pathology and subsequent involvement of various other organs. The prevalence of primary haemochromatosis is approximately 0.5%, about...

  2. Association of celiac disease and hereditary angioedema due to C1-inhibitor deficiency. Screening patients with hereditary angioedema for celiac disease: is it worth the effort?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csuka, Dorottya; Kelemen, Zsuzsanna; Czaller, Ibolya; Molnár, Katalin; Füst, George; Varga, Lilian; Rajczy, Katalin; Szabó, Zsófia; Miklós, Kata; Bors, András; Farkas, Henriette

    2011-03-01

    Hereditary angioedema due to C1-inhibitor deficiency is a life-threatening condition, which manifests as edematous attacks involving subcutaneous tissues and/or the upper airway/gastrointestinal mucosa. Celiac disease is a gluten-sensitive small intestinal disorder that can lead to severe villous atrophy, malabsorption, and malignancy. Both hereditary angioedema and celiac disease may present with abdominal symptoms. Our aim was to study the occurrence of celiac disease in the hereditary angioedema population, as well as to analyze the clinical course of cases with both diseases. One hundred and twenty-eight patients with hereditary angioedema were screened for celiac disease, using serological methods [antiendomysial antibodies-immunoglobulin A (IgA), antiendomysial antibodies-IgG and tissue transglutaminase-IgA, tissue transglutaminase-IgG]. Clinical data of a child with hereditary angioedema and celiac disease diagnosed earlier were added to the dataset to be analyzed. Thus, the total number of patients was 129, comprising 107 adults and 22 pediatric patients. In patients with celiac disease, molecular genetics analysis (human leukocyte antigen-DQA1, human leukocyte antigen-DQB1) was carried out along with the introduction of a gluten-free diet and regular follow-up. Four out of the 22 children were diagnosed with celiac disease in our hereditary angioedema population. The prevalence of celiac disease among our pediatric patients with hereditary angioedema (22 children) was higher than in the general population (18.1 vs. 1.2%). Switching from the wheat starch-containing tranexamic acid product to danazol and introducing a gluten-free diet mitigated abdominal symptoms of hereditary angioedema. Similarities between the symptoms of hereditary angioedema and celiac disease may cause difficulties in differential diagnosis, as well as in choosing the appropriate therapy. In our opinion, screening hereditary angioedema patients for celiac disease is warranted if

  3. Spinal muscular atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D'Amico Adele

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disease characterized by degeneration of alpha motor neurons in the spinal cord, resulting in progressive proximal muscle weakness and paralysis. Estimated incidence is 1 in 6,000 to 1 in 10,000 live births and carrier frequency of 1/40-1/60. This disease is characterized by generalized muscle weakness and atrophy predominating in proximal limb muscles, and phenotype is classified into four grades of severity (SMA I, SMAII, SMAIII, SMA IV based on age of onset and motor function achieved. This disease is caused by homozygous mutations of the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1 gene, and the diagnostic test demonstrates in most patients the homozygous deletion of the SMN1 gene, generally showing the absence of SMN1 exon 7. The test achieves up to 95% sensitivity and nearly 100% specificity. Differential diagnosis should be considered with other neuromuscular disorders which are not associated with increased CK manifesting as infantile hypotonia or as limb girdle weakness starting later in life. Considering the high carrier frequency, carrier testing is requested by siblings of patients or of parents of SMA children and are aimed at gaining information that may help with reproductive planning. Individuals at risk should be tested first and, in case of testing positive, the partner should be then analyzed. It is recommended that in case of a request on carrier testing on siblings of an affected SMA infant, a detailed neurological examination should be done and consideration given doing the direct test to exclude SMA. Prenatal diagnosis should be offered to couples who have previously had a child affected with SMA (recurrence risk 25%. The role of follow-up coordination has to be managed by an expert in neuromuscular disorders and in SMA who is able to plan a multidisciplinary intervention that includes pulmonary, gastroenterology/nutrition, and orthopedic care. Prognosis

  4. Hereditary Renal Cancer Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Naomi B.

    2013-01-01

    Inherited susceptibility to kidney cancer is a fascinating and complex topic. Our knowledge about types of genetic syndromes associated with an increased risk of disease is continually expanding. Currently, there are 10 syndromes associated with an increased risk of all types of renal cancer, which are reviewed herein. Clear cell renal cancer is associated with von Hippel Lindau disease, chromosome 3 translocations, PTEN hamartomatous syndrome and mutations in BAP1, as well as several of the genes encoding the proteins comprising the succinate dehydrogenase complex (SDHB/C/D). Type 1 papillary renal cancers arise in conjunction with germline mutations in MET and type 2 as part of Hereditary Leiomyomatosis and Renal Cell Cancer (FH mutations). Chromophone and oncocytic renal cancers are predominantly associated with Birt Hogg Dubé syndrome. Angiomyolipomas are commonly and their malignant counterpart epitheliod angiomyolipomas rarely are found in patients with Tuberous Sclerosis Complex. The targeted therapeutic options for the renal cancer associated with these diseases are just starting to expand, and are an area of active clinical research. PMID:24359990

  5. Muscular atrophy in diabetic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H; Gadeberg, P C; Brock, B

    1997-01-01

    Diabetic patients with polyneuropathy develop motor dysfunction. To establish whether motor dysfunction is associated with muscular atrophy the ankle dorsal and plantar flexors of the non-dominant leg were evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging in 8 patients with symptomatic neuropathy, in 8 non......-neuropathic patients and in 16 individually matched control subjects. In the neuropathic patients the muscle strength of the ankle dorsal and plantar flexors was reduced by 41 % as compared to the non-neuropathic patients (p ... confirmed that the atrophy predominated distally. We conclude that muscular atrophy underlies motor weakness at the ankle in diabetic patients with polyneuropathy and that the atrophy is most pronounced in distal muscles of the lower leg indicating that a length dependent neuropathic process explains...

  6. Multiple system atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeraully, Tasneem

    2014-04-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a rare adult-onset synucleinopathy associated with dysautonomia and the variable presence of poorly levodopa-responsive parkinsonism and/or cerebellar ataxia. Other clinical symptoms that can be associated with MSA include hyperreflexia, stridor, sleep apnea, and rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD). Mean survival from time of diagnosis ranges between 6 to 10 years, and definitive diagnosis is made on autopsy with demonstration of oligodendroglial cytoplasmic inclusions consisting of fibrillar α-synuclein. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may be positive for cruciform T2 hyperintensity within the pons (the "hot cross bun sign"), volume loss in the pons and cerebellum, and T2 signal loss in the dorsolateral putamen with hyperintense rim on fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequencing. Although most cases are sporadic, genetic polymorphisms have been identified both in familial and sporadic cases of MSA, and influence observed phenotypes. Treatment is symptomatic, with both pharmacological and nonpharmacological strategies. There are currently no consensus guidelines on management. Current and future research is aimed at identifying biomarkers and developing disease-modifying therapies. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  7. Posterior cortical atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakzanis, K K; Boulos, M I

    2001-11-01

    The term posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) was introduced in 1988 to describe five patients with fairly homogeneous, but otherwise unclassified, symptoms. These patients showed signs of a slowly progressive dementia bearing behavioral and physiologic similarities to Alzheimer's disease, but with notable distinctions. Specifically, PCA is characterized by an early onset of visual agnosia, followed by some or all components of Balint's syndrome, Gerstmann's syndrome, and transcortical sensory aphasia. In this review, the history, epidemiology, pathophysiology, neurobehavioral aspects, assessment (including neurologic and neuropsychologic), differential diagnosis, and treatment recommendations for this disorder are reviewed. As originally defined, PCA appears to be a clinically homogeneous syndrome. The cluster of symptoms that are common to virtually all examined cases evidences this. Although the behavioral and cognitive properties of the disorder are well established, many aspects of PCA remain unclear. Specifically, available research and understanding of PCA epidemiology and treatment are highly inadequate. In fact, the majority of such information regarding PCA is derived from studies of Alzheimer's disease. To a lesser extent, Pick's disease and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease research have also provided insight into the underpinnings of PCA. Until PCA is categorically defined as a variant or subgroup of these other neurodegenerative disorders, however, such derivations are merely speculations.

  8. [Macular atrophy in Terson's syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Vicente, J L; Frau-Aguilera, L; Sánchez-Vicente, P; Herrador-Montiel, A; Rueda-Rueda, T; Castilla-Lázpita, A; Romera-Piñero, A; Medina-Tapia, A

    2015-01-01

    The case is presented on a 63-year-old patient with Terson's syndrome who complained of loss of visual acuity. The optical coherence tomography showed macular atrophy. The patient developed macular atrophy probably secondary to macular hemorrhage caused by the rupture of a cerebral aneurysm. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. [Ataxias and hereditary spastic paraplegias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüle, R; Schöls, L

    2017-07-01

    Hereditary ataxias and spastic paraplegias are genetic disorders with age-dependent nearly complete penetrance. The mostly monogenetic etiology allows one to establish the diagnosis, study pathogenesis and to develop new causative therapeutic approaches for these diseases. Both the causative genes as well as the clinical presentation overlap considerably between hereditary ataxias and spastic paraplegias. This strongly argues towards a united classification for these two groups of diseases. Next generation sequencing technologies have greatly expanded the number of genes known to be causative for hereditary ataxias and spastic paraplegias and allow simultaneous time- and cost-effective diagnostic testing of > 200 genes. However, repeat expansions and large genomic deletions must be considered separately. Here, we suggest a pragmatic algorithm for genetic testing in hereditary ataxias and spastic paraplegias that we have developed in our specialized outpatient clinics. Detailed phenotyping remains crucial to interpret the multitude of genetic variants discovered by high throughput sequencing techniques. Despite recent technical advances, a substantial proportion of ataxia and spastic paraplegia families are still without a molecular diagnosis. Beside new and so far undetected ataxia and spasticity genes, unusual mutation types including noncoding variants and polygenic inheritance patterns may contribute. Because of these clinical, genetic, and technological challenges, patients with hereditary ataxias and spastic paraplegias should be referred to specialized centers offering research and clinical studies. This will also help to recruit representative patient cohorts for upcoming interventional trials.

  10. Hereditary pancreatitis: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael KL

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Kara L Raphael, Field F Willingham Division of Digestive Diseases, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA Abstract: Hereditary pancreatitis (HP is a rare cause of acute, recurrent acute, and chronic pancreatitis. It may present similarly to other causes of acute and chronic pancreatitis, and often there has been a protracted evaluation prior to the diagnosis of HP. Since it was first described in 1952, multiple genetic defects that affect the action of digestive enzymes in the pancreas have been implicated. The most common mutations involve the PRSS1, CFTR, SPINK1, and CTRC genes. New mutations in these genes and previously unrecognized mutations in other genes are being discovered due to the increasing use of next-generation genomic sequencing. While the inheritance pathways of these genetic mutations may be variable and complex, sometimes involving coinheritance of other mutations, the clinical presentation of patients tends to be similar. Interactions with environmental triggers often play a role. Patients tend to present at an early age (prior to the second decade of life and have a significantly increased risk for the development of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Patients with HP may develop sequelae of chronic pancreatitis such as strictures and fluid collections as well as exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. Management of patients with HP involves avoidance of environmental triggers, surveillance for pancreatic adenocarcinoma, medical therapy for endocrine and exocrine insufficiency, pain management, and endoscopic or surgical treatment for complications. Care for affected patients should be individualized, with an emphasis on early diagnosis and multidisciplinary involvement to develop a comprehensive treatment strategy. Keywords: pancreatic cancer, chronic pancreatitis, idiopathic pancreatitis, pancreatitis, familial pancreatitis, genetic mutations

  11. LHON and other optic nerve atrophies: the mitochondrial connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Neil

    2003-01-01

    The clinical, biochemical and genetic features of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) are reviewed. The etiology of LHON is complex, but the primary risk factor is a mutation in one of the seven mitochondrial genes that encode subunits of respiratory chain complex I. The pathogenesis of LHON is not yet understood, but one plausible model is that increased or altered mitochondrial ROS production renders the retinal ganglion cells vulnerable to apoptotic cell death. In addition to LHON, there are a large number of other optic nerve degenerative disorders including autosomal dominant optic atrophy, the toxic/nutritional optic neuropathies and glaucoma. A review of the recent scientific literature suggests that these disorders also involve mitochondrial dysfunction or altered mitochondrial signaling pathways in their pathogenesis. This mitochondrial link provides new avenues of experimental investigation to these major causes of loss of vision.

  12. Pathology of hereditary breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    van der Groep, Petra; van der Wall, Elsken; van Diest, Paul J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Hereditary breast cancer runs in families where several members in different generations are affected. Most of these breast cancers are caused by mutations in the high penetrance genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 accounting for about 5% of all breast cancers. Other genes that include CHEK2, PTEN, TP53, ATM, STK11/LKB1, CDH1, NBS1, RAD50, BRIP1 and PALB2 have been described to be high or moderate penetrance breast cancer susceptibility genes, all contributing to the hereditary breast cancer spe...

  13. [Familial posterior cortical atrophy with visual agnosia and Bálint's syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuki, M; Soma, Y; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, K; Tanno, Y; Uesugi, Y; Tsuji, S

    1995-12-01

    We report a patient of posterior cortical atrophy with progressive visual agnosia, Bálint's syndrome and dementia in which posterior cortical atrophy with similar characteristics on CT and progressive dementia were found in a sister. The patient was a 75-year-old woman who noted the onset of a progressive visual disorder at the age of 70, and whose family first noticed disoriented behavior at around the same period. Ophthalmologic examinations revealed mild cataract but no evidence of peripheral optic nerve or retinal lesions. Neuropsychological examination showed right homonymous hemianopia, visual agnosia, Bálint's syndrome, mild transcortical sensory aphasia, Gerstmann's syndrome, constructional apraxia, mild ideomotor apraxia and memory disorder. MRI showed marked dilatation of both lateral ventricles, especially the posterior horns, and severe atrophy of the occipital lobes, hippocampus, and the parahippocampal gyrus. Assessment of regional cerebral blood flow by IMP-SPECT revealed a generalized decrease in the temporo-parieto-occipital region bilaterally. The patient's sister began to show evidence of progressive dementia at 80 years of age and CT of the brain revealed marked atrophy, predominantly in the occipital lobes, similar to that of the patient. We believe this to be the first report of posterior cortical atrophy with a positive family history, suggesting the possibility of a hereditary syndrome.

  14. Molecular screening of 980 cases of suspected hereditary optic neuropathy with a report on 77 novel OPA1 mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferré, Marc; Bonneau, Dominique; Milea, Dan

    2009-01-01

    We report the results of molecular screening in 980 patients carried out as part of their work-up for suspected hereditary optic neuropathies. All the patients were investigated for Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA), by searching for the ten...... primary LHON-causing mtDNA mutations and examining the entire coding sequences of the OPA1 and OPA3 genes, the two genes currently identified in ADOA. Molecular defects were identified in 440 patients (45% of screened patients). Among these, 295 patients (67%) had an OPA1 mutation, 131 patients (30%) had...... an mtDNA mutation, and 14 patients (3%), belonging to three unrelated families, had an OPA3 mutation. Interestingly, OPA1 mutations were found in 157 (40%) of the 392 apparently sporadic cases of optic atrophy. The eOPA1 locus-specific database now contains a total of 204 OPA1 mutations, including 77...

  15. ATPase-deficient mitochondrial inner membrane protein ATAD3A disturbs mitochondrial dynamics in dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia

    OpenAIRE

    Cooper, Helen M.; Yang, Yang; Ylikallio, Emil; Khairullin, Rafil; Woldegebriel, Rosa; Lin, Kai-Lan; Euro, Liliya; Palin, Eino; Wolf, Alexander; Trokovic, Ras; Isohanni, Pirjo; Kaakkola, Seppo; Auranen, Mari; Lonnqvist, Tuula; Wanrooij, Sjoerd

    2017-01-01

    Abstract De novo mutations in ATAD3A (ATPase family AAA-domain containing protein 3A) were recently found to cause a neurological syndrome with developmental delay, hypotonia, spasticity, optic atrophy, axonal neuropathy, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Using whole-exome sequencing, we identified a dominantly inherited heterozygous variant c.1064G?>?A (p.G355D) in ATAD3A in a mother presenting with hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) and axonal neuropathy and her son with dyskinetic cerebral...

  16. Modeling neurodevelopment and cortical dysfunction in SPG11-linked hereditary spastic paraplegia using human induced pluripotent stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Mishra, Himanshu Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) are a heterogeneous group of inherited motor neuron diseases characterized by progressive spasticity and weakness of the lower limbs. Mutations in the Spastic Paraplegia Gene11 (SPG11), encoding spatacsin, cause the most frequent form of autosomal recessive HSP. SPG11 patients are clinically distinguishable from most other HSPs, by severe cortical atrophy and presence of a thin corpus callosum (TCC), associated with cognitive deficits. Partly due to l...

  17. Immunophenotyping of hereditary breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Groep, P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304810789

    2009-01-01

    Hereditary breast cancer runs in families where several family members in different generations are affected. Most of these breast cancers are caused by mutations in the high penetrance genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 which account for about 5% of all breast cancers. However, mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 may

  18. Drug therapy for hereditary cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imyanitov Evgeny N

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Tumors arising in patients with hereditary cancer syndromes may have distinct drug sensitivity as compared to their sporadic counterparts. Breast and ovarian neoplasms from BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers are characterized by deficient homologous recombination (HR of DNA, that makes them particularly sensitive to platinum compounds or inhibitors of poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP. Outstandingly durable complete responses to high dose chemotherapy have been observed in several cases of BRCA-related metastatic breast cancer (BC. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that women with BRCA1-related BC may derive less benefit from taxane-based treatment than other categories of BC patients. There is virtually no reports directly assessing drug response in hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC patients; studies involving non-selected (i.e., both sporadic and hereditary CRC with high-level microsatellite instability (MSI-H suggest therapeutic advantage of irinotecan. Celecoxib has been approved for the treatment of familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP. Hereditary medullary thyroid cancers (MTC have been shown to be highly responsive to a multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor vandetanib, which exerts specific activity towards mutated RET receptor. Given the rapidly improving accessibility of DNA analysis, it is foreseen that the potential predictive value of cancer-associated germ-line mutations will be increasingly considered in the future studies.

  19. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary hemochromatosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... several genes, including HAMP , HFE , HFE2 , SLC40A1 , and TFR2 , can cause hereditary hemochromatosis . Type 1 hemochromatosis results ... the HFE2 or HAMP gene. Mutations in the TFR2 gene cause type 3 hemochromatosis, and mutations in ...

  20. Targeted high throughput sequencing in hereditary ataxia and spastic paraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Zafar; Rydning, Siri L; Wedding, Iselin M; Koht, Jeanette; Pihlstrøm, Lasse; Rengmark, Aina H; Henriksen, Sandra P; Tallaksen, Chantal M E; Toft, Mathias

    2017-01-01

    Hereditary ataxia and spastic paraplegia are heterogeneous monogenic neurodegenerative disorders. To date, a large number of individuals with such disorders remain undiagnosed. Here, we have assessed molecular diagnosis by gene panel sequencing in 105 early and late-onset hereditary ataxia and spastic paraplegia probands, in whom extensive previous investigations had failed to identify the genetic cause of disease. Pathogenic and likely-pathogenic variants were identified in 20 probands (19%) and variants of uncertain significance in ten probands (10%). Together these accounted for 30 probands (29%) and involved 18 different genes. Among several interesting findings, dominantly inherited KIF1A variants, p.(Val8Met) and p.(Ile27Thr) segregated in two independent families, both presenting with a pure spastic paraplegia phenotype. Two homozygous missense variants, p.(Gly4230Ser) and p.(Leu4221Val) were found in SACS in one consanguineous family, presenting with spastic ataxia and isolated cerebellar atrophy. The average disease duration in probands with pathogenic and likely-pathogenic variants was 31 years, ranging from 4 to 51 years. In conclusion, this study confirmed and expanded the clinical phenotypes associated with known disease genes. The results demonstrate that gene panel sequencing and similar sequencing approaches can serve as efficient diagnostic tools for different heterogeneous disorders. Early use of such strategies may help to reduce both costs and time of the diagnostic process.

  1. Genetics of Hereditary Angioedema Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germenis, Anastasios E; Speletas, Matthaios

    2016-10-01

    Contemporary genetic research has provided evidences that angioedema represents a diverse family of disorders related to kinin metabolism, with a much greater genetic complexity than was initially considered. Convincing data have also recently been published indicating that the clinical heterogeneity of hereditary angioedema due to C1 inhibitor deficiency (classified as C1-INH-HAE) could be attributed at least in part, either to the type of SERPING1 mutations or to mutations in genes encoding for enzymes involved in the metabolism and function of bradykinin. Alterations detected in at least one more gene (F12) are nowadays considered responsible for 25 % of cases of hereditary angioedema with normal C1-INH (type III hereditary angioedema (HAE), nlC1-INH-HAE). Interesting data derived from genetic approaches of non-hereditary angioedemas indicate that other immune pathways might be implicated in the pathogenesis of HAE. More than 125 years after the recognition of the hereditary nature of HAE by Osler, the heterogeneity of clinical expressions, the genetics of this disorder, and the genotype-phenotype relationships, still presents a challenge that will be discussed in this review. Large scale, in-depth genetic studies are expected not only to answer these emerging questions but also to further elucidate many of the unmet aspects of angioedema pathogenesis. Uncovering genetic biomarkers affecting the severity of the disease and/or the effectiveness of the various treatment modalities might lead to the prevention of attacks and the optimization of C1-INH-HAE management that is expected to provide a valuable benefit to the sufferers of angioedema.

  2. Diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy: study of the Wolfram syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas-Gómez, Bernardette; Reza-Albarrán, Alfredo Adolfo

    2017-01-01

    Wolfram syndrome (WS), also known by the acronym DIDMOAD, is a rare and progresive hereditary disease of autosomal recessive inheritance which minimum ascertainment diagnostic criteria are the occurrence together of diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy before 15 years of age. To describe the clinical, biochemical and molecular profile of WS in a tertiary care hospital in Mexico. We reviewed patients records who fulfill the minimum ascertainment diagnostic criteria of WS presenting between January 1987 and May 2015 in a tertiary care hospital in Mexico. Five patients fulfill the inclusion criteria (three male and two female). Diabetes mellitus was the first manifestation of the syndrome in all of them, with a mean age at diagnosis of 5.8 ± 2.71 years, while the WS diagnosis was established at a mean age of 15.8 ± 8.37 years. All the patients had optic atrophy and two of them presented with the complete DIDMOAD spectrum. We found new associations with autoimmune hepatitis and testicular cancer. This study shows the variability of clinical presentation of WS, as well as two new associations.

  3. [Nocturnal stridor in multiple system atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louter, M.; Pelleboer, R.H.; Broek, G.B. van den; Post, B.; Pevernagie, D.A.; Overeem, S.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Multiple system atrophy is a neurodegenerative disorder with parkinsonism, cerebellar ataxia and autonomic dysfunction. The occurrence of nocturnal stridor in patients with multiple system atrophy is associated with a decreased life expectancy. This is what makes adequate treatment so

  4. Syringomyelia in hereditary multiple exostosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legare, Janet M; Modaff, Peggy; Iskandar, Bermans J; Pauli, Richard M

    2016-11-01

    We describe five children with Hereditary Multiple Exostosis (HME) who also had syringomyelia. Of these, four had a tethered cord/fibrolipoma. No spinal osteochondromas were found in these patients. All had antecedent neurological signs or symptoms that prompted spinal imaging with MRI. Of all patients with HME seen in the Midwest Regional Bone Dysplasia Clinic from 1982 to present, 44% (17/39) of patients had signs or symptoms concerning for possible cord-related neurological findings. However, only 10 of 39 had spinal imaging. Assuming that all individuals with syringomyelia were identified, then 5/39 (13%) were in that way affected. This, of course, is a minimal estimate given that many were not imaged. The incidence of syringomyelia appears to be increased in this population, and seems to be unrelated to spinal osteochondromas. A low threshold for obtaining spinal MRI in patients with Hereditary Multiple Exostosis seems rational. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. New treatments of hereditary blindness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Mette; Rosenberg, Thomas; Larsen, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Ongoing clinical trials are targeting several previously intractable hereditary causes of blindness of congenital, childhood or early adulthood onset, mainly in the optic nerve and retina. The intended stage of initiation of the new therapeutic approaches ranges from neonatal life and a structura......Ongoing clinical trials are targeting several previously intractable hereditary causes of blindness of congenital, childhood or early adulthood onset, mainly in the optic nerve and retina. The intended stage of initiation of the new therapeutic approaches ranges from neonatal life...... and a structurally intact retinal tissue to adult life with a complete loss of photoreceptors. It must be assumed that some of the trials will succeed in producing new therapies and action must be taken to refine and accelerate diagnostics and to preserve therapeutic potential in blind people....

  6. Hereditary aspects of prostate cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    McLellan, D. L.; Norman, R. W.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review current literature on the hereditary aspects of prostate cancer and to evaluate the importance of family history in history taking and screening for prostate cancer. DATA SOURCES: MEDLINE was searched for articles in English or French published between Jan. 1, 1956, and Oct. 31, 1994, with the use of MeSH headings "prostatic neoplasms," "genetics" and "chromosomes." Additional references were selected from the bibliographies of articles found during the search. STUDY SELE...

  7. Genomic deletions in OPA1 in Danish patients with autosomal dominant optic atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almind, Gitte J; Grønskov, Karen; Milea, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA, Kjer disease, MIM #165500) is the most common form of hereditary optic neuropathy. Mutations in OPA1 located at chromosome 3q28 are the predominant cause for ADOA explaining between 32 and 89% of cases. Although deletions of OPA1 were recently reported...... in ADOA, the frequency of OPA1 genomic rearrangements in Denmark, where ADOA has a high prevalence, is unknown. The aim of the study was to identify copy number variations in OPA1 in Danish ADOA patients....

  8. [Hereditary carcinoma: pathogenesis and diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungck, M

    2000-01-01

    Effective prevention of cancer in patients with a hereditary disposition to malignant tumours was made possible by intensive prevention programs and molecular diagnosis. Taken hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) as an example this article deals with the pathogenesis and molecular diagnosis in hereditary dispositions to cancer. HNPCC is inherited in an autosomal-dominant fashion and caused by germline mutations in genes responsible for detection an removal of DNA-basepair-mismatches (DNA-mismatch-repair-genes). The error rate in DNA replication is reduced thousandfold by these genes. A defective DNA-mismatch-repair results in tumours if the increased mutation rate causes alterations of tumour-suppressor- or oncogenes. HNPCC patients develop colorectal cancer but also tumours of the renal pelvis, the ureter, the small bowel, the endometrium and less often in other organs. The clinical presentation of these tumours may be characteristic, the clinical diagnosis may be guided by different clinical criteria catalogues. The suspicion is proven by the identification of a germline mutation in DNA-mismatch-repair-genes. This laborious diagnostic procedure is often preceded by prescreening procedures as the detection of microsatellite instability or immunohistochemical tests. Once the germline mutation is identified in a affected family member, the first degree relatives may be tested for this mutation. If they have inherited the mutation, they harbour a extremely high risk for developing cancer and therefore may be included in prevention programs. This so called predictive testing must be preceded by genetic counseling.

  9. Hereditary spastic paraplegia and amyotrophy associated with a novel locus on chromosome 19

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meilleur, K.G.; Traoré, M.; Sangaré, M.; Britton, A.; Landouré, G.; Coulibaly, S.; Niaré, B.; Mochel, F.; La Pean, A.; Rafferty, I.; Watts, C.; Littleton-Kearney, M. T.; Blackstone, C.; Singleton, A.; Fischbeck, K.H.

    2010-01-01

    We identified a family in Mali with two sisters affected by spastic paraplegia. In addition to spasticity and weakness of the lower limbs, the patients had marked atrophy of the distal upper extremities. Homozygosity mapping using single nucleotide polymorphism arrays showed that the sisters shared a region of extended homozygosity at chromosome 19p13.11-q12 that was not shared by controls. These findings indicate a clinically and genetically distinct form of hereditary spastic paraplegia with amyotrophy, designated SPG43. PMID:20039086

  10. Leber hereditary optic neuropathy - historical report in comparison with the current knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowska, Agnieszka; Korwin, Magdalena; Bartnik, Ewa; Tońska, Katarzyna

    2015-01-15

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a genetic, maternally inherited disease caused by point mutations in the mitochondrial genome. LHON patients present with sudden, painless and usually bilateral loss of vision caused by optic nerve atrophy. The first clinical description of the disease was made by Theodor Leber, a German ophthalmologist, in 1871. Here we present his thorough notes about members of four families and their pedigrees. We also provide insights into the current knowledge about LHON pathology, genetics and treatment in comparison with Leber's findings. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Genetic heterogeneity in Leber hereditary optic neuroretinopathy revealed by mitochondrial DNA polymorphism.

    OpenAIRE

    Vilkki, J; Savontaus, M L; Nikoskelainen, E K

    1989-01-01

    The presence or absence of a recently observed mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutation associated with Leber hereditary optic neuroretinopathy (LHON) was tested in 19 Finnish families with cases of LHON. Leukocyte and muscle DNA from individuals with optic atrophy, microangiopathy, or normal fundi from maternal lineages were studied by Southern blot analysis, using mouse mtDNA as a hybridization probe. The mtDNA mutation, detected as SfaNI site polymorphism, was seen in 10 of the 19 families. In o...

  12. Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura Misdiagnosed as Hereditary Angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Michelle Fog; Bygum, Anette

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema is a rare, but potentially life-threatening genetic disorder that results from an autosomal dominant trait. It is characterized by acute, recurrent attacks of severe local edema, most commonly affecting the skin and mucosa. Swelling in hereditary angioedema patients does how...... of hereditary angioedema. The case illustrates how clinicians can have difficulties in handling patients with rare diseases, especially in the emergency care setting....

  13. Oncologic Management of Hereditary Colorectal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Yacoub, George; Nagalla, Srikanth; Aklilu, Mebea

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common cancer in females and the third most common cancer diagnosed in males. Familial CRC comprises ~20 to 30% of all CRC cases. Lynch syndrome (LS), previously called hereditary nonpolyposis CRC (HNPCC), is the most common of the hereditary CRC syndromes. In this review, the oncological management of hereditary colorectal cancer from the medical oncologist perspective is discussed with special emphasis on Lynch syndrome. Lynch syndrome is character...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary multiple osteochondromas

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Topic: Benign Tumors Health Topic: Bone Diseases Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) Hereditary multiple osteochondromas Educational Resources (6 links) Cleveland Clinic: ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Osler-Weber-Rendu syndrome Health Topic: Arteriovenous Malformations Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia Additional NIH Resources (1 link) National ...

  16. SEOM clinical guidelines for hereditary cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graña, Begoña; Lastra, Enrique; Llort, Gemma; Brunet, Joan; Isla, Dolores

    2011-08-01

    Research in genetics has facilitated the identification of highly penetrant genes responsible for a large number of diseases. In the oncology field, genetic counselling and gene testing are focused on the two most common syndromes in familial cancer: hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome (HBOC) and hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer or Lynch syndrome (LS). The objective of this guideline in hereditary cancer is to summarise the current state of knowledge and make recommendations in the areas of diagnosis, prevention and treatment of hereditary cancer.

  17. Neuronal involvement in muscular atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Alejandro Cisterna

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The innervation of skeletal myofibers exerts a crucial influence on the maintenance of muscle tone and normal operation. Consequently, denervated myofibers manifest atrophy, which is preceded by an increase in sarcolemma permeability. Recently, de novo expression of hemichannels formed by connexins and other none selective channels, including P2X7 receptors, TRPV2 channels were demonstrated in denervated fast skeletal muscles. The denervation-induced atrophy was drastically prevented in denervated muscles deficient in connexins 43 and 45. Nonetheless, the transduction mechanism by which the nerve represses the expression of the above mentioned none selective channels remains unknown. The paracrine action of extracellular signaling molecules including ATP, neurotrophic factors (i.e., BDNF, agrin/Lrp4/MuSK and acetylcholine are among the possible perpetrators of repression for connexin expression. This review discusses the possible role of relevant factors in maintaining the normal functioning of fast skeletal muscles and suppression of connexin hemichannel expression.

  18. Spinal cord magnetic resonance imaging in autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedera, P. [University of Michigan, Department of Neurology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Vanderbilt University, Department of Neurology, Nashville, TN (United States); Eldevik, O.P.; Maly, P. [University of Michigan, Department of Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Rainier, S. [University of Michigan, Department of Neurology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Fink, J.K. [University of Michigan, Department of Neurology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Ann Arbor Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2005-10-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is a genetically heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders characterized by progressive lower extremity weakness and spasticity. HSP pathology involves axonal degeneration that is most pronounced in the terminal segments of the longest descending (pyramidal) and ascending (dorsal columns) tracts. In this study, we compared spinal cord magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 13 HSP patients with four different types of autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (SPG3A, SPG4, SPG6, and SPG8) with age-matched control subjects. The cross-section area of HSP subjects at cervical level C2 was 59.42{+-}12.57 mm{sup 2} and at thoracic level T9 was 28.58{+-}5.25 mm{sup 2}. Both of these values were less than in the healthy controls (p<0.001). The degree of cord atrophy was more prominent in patients with SPG6 and SPG8 who had signs of severe cord atrophy (47.60{+-}6.58 mm{sup 2} at C2, 21.40{+-}2.4 mm{sup 2} at T9) than in subjects with SPG3 and SPG4 (66.0{+-}8.94 mm{sup 2} at C2, p<0.02; 31.75{+-}2.76 mm{sup 2} at T9, p<0.001). These observations indicate that spinal cord atrophy is a common finding in the four genetic types of HSP. Spinal cord atrophy was more severe in SPG6 and SPG8 HSP subjects than in other types of HSP we studied. This may suggest a different disease mechanism with more prominent axonal degeneration in these two types of HSP when compared with HSP due to spastin and atlastin mutations. (orig.)

  19. [A family of hereditary spastic paraplegia with dementia, ataxia, and dystonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruta, K; Kondo, I

    2001-10-01

    We reported three siblings with complicated hereditary spastic paraplegia. The striking features in these patients were characterized by early onset of gait disturbance, mental deficiency, and dystonia. The most likely diagnosis was Mast syndrome. Patient 1: A 44 years-old woman. She first developed gait disturbances at age of 8. She was admitted in our hospital because of progressive spastic paraplegia. Neurological examination revealed mental deficiency, saccadic pursuit eye movement, speech disturbance of cerebellar type, ataxia, and spastic paraplegia. She showed also dystonia in the face, tongue, and trunk. MRI showed cerebellar atrophy. Patient 2: A 51 years-old brother of the patient 1. He had mentally retarded. Late teens he developed gait disturbance. Gradually he manifested spastic paraplegia, dysarthria, dysphasia, mental deficiency, and ataxia. He also showed incontinence of urine and feces. Then he became bedridden, apathetic, and showed forced crying. MRI showed diffuse brain atrophy. Patient 3: A 48 year-old woman. This woman, a sister of the patient 1, showed progressive gait disturbance and dysarthria. She also developed incontinence, apathy, and dystonia. She became bedridden, responding to simple questions with only occasional single-word answers. Her speech was slurred, and spastic paraplegia was noted. MRI showed diffuse brain atrophy including marked atrophy of the cerebellum.

  20. Lobar atrophy without Pick bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulette, C M; Crain, B J

    1992-01-01

    Four patients from the Kathleen Price Bryan Brain Bank with clinical Pick's syndrome are presented. Thorough neurological evaluation revealed no evidence of a movement disorder. The brains showed marked knife-blade type atrophy of the frontal and temporal lobes with relative sparing of the superior temporal gyrus and parietal and occipital lobes. There was marked caudate atrophy in all four. Histologically there was severe neuronal loss and gemistocytic astrocytosis in the involved areas with marked myelin pallor in the deep white matter and subcortical gliosis. There was sometimes marked spongiform change in cortical layer 2. There was severe neuronal loss and gliosis of the caudate nucleus. The gross and microscopic features were characteristic of Pick's disease except that careful search failed to uncover either Pick's bodies or Pick's cells. Review of the literature revealed that fronto-temporal cortical and caudate atrophy with clinical features of Pick's disease has received many different names including Pick's disease type C, Pick's disease type II, progressive subcortical gliosis, presenile glial dystrophy, long duration Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, frontal lobe degeneration, dysphasic dementia, and dementia lacking distinctive histologic features. Nevertheless, the morphologic findings in the present cases so closely resemble Pick's disease that they may well represent endstage Pick's disease. In our experience, such cases account for a significant proportion of non-Alzheimer disease dementia.

  1. Role of detection of microsatellite instability in Chinese with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer or ordinary hereditary colorectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Wen-Zhi; Jin, Feng; ZHANG, ZHEN-HAI; Wang, Shu-Bao

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To detect microsatellite instability (MSI) in patients with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer or ordinary hereditary colorectal cancer and to provide criteria for screening the kindreds with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer at molecular level.

  2. Clinical features of pure hereditary spastic paraplegia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WEI Qian-qian

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To study the clinical features and diagnostic methods of patients with pure hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP. Methods Patients diagnosed with pure HSP from October 2006 to February 2013 admitted to Department of Neurology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University were included. The patients were assessed by the Spastic Paraplegia Rating Scale and the clinical features were reviewed. Results Thirty-three HSP patients (21 men and 12 women were included in the study. Thirteen patients (39.39% had family history of HSP and the most common genetic mode of the familial cases were autosomal dominant inheritance (11/13. The mean age of onset were (20.35 ± 15.55 years and the mean disease duration were (12.77 ± 9.83 years. All of the included patients presented with signs of impairment of the pyramidal tract such as increased muscular tone, tendon hyperreflexia and positive Babinski's sign of the lower limbs. Impairment of the pyramidal tract also presented in the upper limbs in some patients. Scissors gait appeared in 29 patients and feet deformity in 5 patients. Atrophy of thoracic cord on MRI were presented in 5 patients while 2 patients complicated with peripheral nerve damage. Four patients had a novel exon 10-17 deletion in SPG4 gene. There were no differences in onset age, disease duration and mean score of the Spastic Paraplegia Rating Scale between male and female patients as well as between patients with and without family history (P > 0.05, for all. Conclusion The onset age of pure HSP is variational and males are more common than females. The most common inheritance mode is autosomal dominant and most of the cases are characterized by impairment of the pyramidal tract of the lower limbs and occasionally bladder dysfunction and peripheral nerve damage. Gender and family history do not affect the clinical features. Clinical features, family history and spinal cord MRI will assist the correct diagnosis, and making a definite

  3. [Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lax, S F

    2017-05-01

    Hereditary breast and ovarian carcinomas are frequently caused by germline mutations of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes (BRCA1/2 syndromes) and are often less associated with other hereditary syndromes such as Li-Fraumeni and Peutz-Jeghers. The BRCA1/2 proteins have a special role in DNA repair. Therefore, loss of function due to mutation causes an accumulation of mutations in other genes and subsequent tumorigenesis at an early age. BRCA1/2 mutations are irregularly distributed over the length of the genes without hot spots, although special mutations are known. Breast and ovarian cancer occur far more frequently in women with BRCA1/2 germline mutations compared with the general population. Breast cancer occurs increasingly from the age of 30, ovarian cancer in BRCA1 syndrome from the age of 40 and BRCA2 from the age of 50. Suspicion of a BRCA syndrome should be prompted in the case of clustering of breast cancer in 1st degree relatives, in particular at a young age, if breast and ovarian cancer have occurred, and if cases of male breast cancer are known. Breast carcinomas with medullary differentiation seem to predominate in BRCA syndromes, but other carcinoma types may also occur. BRCA germline mutations seem to occur frequently in triple-negative breast carcinomas, whereas an association with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is rare. Ovarian carcinomas in BRCA syndromes are usually high-grade serous, mucinous carcinomas and borderline tumors are unusual. Pathology plays a special role within the multidisciplinary team in the recognition of patients with hereditary cancer syndromes.

  4. Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Finn Cilius; Hansen, Thomas van Overeem; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard

    2016-01-01

    Genetic abnormalities in the DNA repair genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 predispose to hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC). However, only approximately 25% of cases of HBOC can be ascribed to BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. Recently, exome sequencing has uncovered substantial locus heterogeneity among...... of putative causal variants and the clinical application of new HBOC genes in cancer risk management and treatment decision-making....... affected families without BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. The new pathogenic variants are rare, posing challenges to estimation of risk attribution through patient cohorts. In this Review article, we examine HBOC genes, focusing on their role in genome maintenance, the possibilities for functional testing...

  5. Hereditary & familial colorectal cancer : Identification, characteristics, surveillance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kallenberg, F.G.J.

    2017-01-01

    Of all colorectal cancer (CRC) cases, 15-20% is related to familial or hereditary factors. Diagnosing familial and hereditary CRC syndromes is important for several reasons. One of these is that surveillance colonoscopies can reduce CRC incidence and mortality importantly. A complete family history

  6. Hereditary cerebral small vessel disease and stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Christian Baastrup; Nielsen, Jørgen Erik; Hansen, Christine Krarup

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease is considered hereditary in about 5% of patients and is characterized by lacunar infarcts and white matter hyperintensities on MRI. Several monogenic hereditary diseases causing cerebral small vessel disease and stroke have been identified. The purpose of this system...

  7. Hereditary spastic paraplegia with cerebellar ataxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J E; Johnsen, B; Koefoed, P

    2004-01-01

    Complex forms of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) are rare and usually transmitted in an autosomal recessive pattern. A family of four generations with autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (AD-HSP) and a complex phenotype with variably expressed co-existing ataxia, dysarthria...

  8. The molecular classification of hereditary endocrine diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Lei; Ning, Guang

    2015-12-01

    Hereditary endocrine diseases are an important group of diseases with great heterogeneity. The current classification for hereditary endocrine disease is mostly based upon anatomy, which is helpful for pathophysiological interpretation, but does not address the pathogenic variability associated with different underlying genetic causes. Identification of an endocrinopathy-associated genetic alteration provides evidence for differential diagnosis, discovery of non-classical disease, and the potential for earlier diagnosis and targeted therapy. Molecular diagnosis should be routinely applied when managing patients with suspicion of hereditary disease. To enhance the accurate diagnosis and treatment of patients with hereditary endocrine diseases, we propose categorization of endocrine diseases into three groups based upon the function of the mutant gene: cell differentiation, hormone synthesis and action, and tumorigenesis. Each category was further grouped according to the specific gene function. We believe that this format would facilitate practice of precision medicine in the field of hereditary endocrine diseases.

  9. Microvillous inclusion disease (microvillous atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goulet Olivier

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Microvillous inclusion disease (MVID or microvillous atrophy is a congenital disorder of the intestinal epithelial cells that presents with persistent life-threatening watery diarrhea and is characterized by morphological enterocyte abnormalities. MVID manifests either in the first days of life (early-onset form or in the first two months (late-onset form of life. MVID is a very rare disorder of unknown origin, probably transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait. To date, no prevalence data are available. Ultrastructural analyses reveal: 1 a partial to total atrophy of microvilli on mature enterocytes with apical accumulation of numerous secretory granules in immature enterocytes; 2 the highly characteristic inclusion bodies containing rudimentary or fully differentiated microvilli in mature enterocytes. Light microscopy shows accumulation of PAS-positive granules at the apical pole of immature enterocytes, together with atrophic band indicating microvillus atrophy and, in parallel, an intracellular PAS or CD10 positive line (marking the microvillous inclusion bodies seen on electron microscopy. Intestinal failure secondary to diarrhea is definitive. To date, no curative therapy exists and children with MVID are totally dependent on parenteral nutrition. Long-term outcome is generally poor, due to metabolic decompensation, repeated states of dehydration, infectious and liver complications related to the parenteral nutrition. As MVID is a very rare disorder, which is extremely difficult to diagnose and manage, children with MVID should be transferred to specialized pediatric gastro-intestinal centers, if possible, a center equipped to perform small bowel transplantation. Early small bowel transplantation resulting in intestinal autonomy gives new hope for disease management and outcome.

  10. OPA1-related dominant optic atrophy is not strongly influenced by mitochondrial DNA background

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amati-Bonneau Patrizia

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON and autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA are the most frequent forms of hereditary optic neuropathies. LHON is associated with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA mutations whereas ADOA is mainly due to mutations in the OPA1 gene that encodes a mitochondrial protein involved in the mitochondrial inner membrane remodeling. A striking influence of mtDNA haplogroup J on LHON expression has been demonstrated and it has been recently suggested that this haplogroup could also influence ADOA expression. In this study, we have tested the influence of mtDNA backgrounds on OPA1 mutations. Methods To define the relationships between OPA1 mutations and mtDNA backgrounds, we determined the haplogroup affiliation of 41 French patients affected by OPA1-related ADOA by control-region sequencing and RFLP survey of their mtDNAs. Results The comparison between patient and reference populations did not revealed any significant difference. Conclusion Our results argue against a strong influence of mtDNA background on ADOA expression. These data allow to conclude that OPA1 could be considered as a "severe mutation", directly responsible of the optic atrophy, whereas OPA1-negative ADOA and LHON mutations need an external factor(s to express the pathology (i.e. synergistic interaction with mitochondrial background.

  11. Hereditary motor and autonomic neuronopathy 1 maps to chromosome 20q13.2-13.3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Marques Jr.

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The spinal muscular atrophies (SMA or hereditary motor neuronopathies result from the continuous degeneration and death of spinal cord lower motor neurons, leading to progressive muscular weakness and atrophy. We describe a large Brazilian family exhibiting an extremely rare, late-onset, dominant, proximal, and progressive SMA accompanied by very unusual manifestations, such as an abnormal sweating pattern, and gastrointestinal and sexual dysfunctions, suggesting concomitant involvement of the autonomic nervous system. We propose a new disease category for this disorder, `hereditary motor and autonomic neuronopathy', and attribute the term, `survival of motor and autonomic neurons 1' (SMAN1 to the respective locus that was mapped to a 14.5 cM region on chromosome 20q13.2-13.3 by genetic linkage analysis and haplotype studies using microsatellite polymorphic markers. This locus lies between markers D20S120 and D20S173 showing a maximum LOD score of 4.6 at D20S171, defining a region with 33 known genes, including several potential candidates. Identifying the SMAN1 gene should not only improve our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying lower motor neuron diseases but also help to clarify the relationship between motor and autonomic neurons.

  12. Autosomal dominant juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and distal hereditary motor neuronopathy with pyramidal tract signs: synonyms for the same disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jonghe, P; Auer-Grumbach, M; Irobi, J; Wagner, K; Plecko, B; Kennerson, M; Zhu, D; De Vriendt, E; Van Gerwen, V; Nicholson, G; Hartung, H-P; Timmerman, V

    2002-06-01

    Autosomal dominant juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a rare disorder and so far only one family has been reported. Genetic linkage studies mapped the disease locus to chromosome 9q34 (ALS4). The diagnosis of ALS in this family is based on the clinical signs with almost exclusively lower motor neurone pathology in combination with less prominent pyramidal tract signs. Atypical features include normal life expectancy, the absence of bulbar involvement and the symmetrical distal distribution of atrophy and weakness. We performed a molecular genetic study in three families that we had diagnosed as having distal hereditary motor neuronopathy, i.e. distal spinal muscular atrophy or spinal Charcot-Marie-Tooth syndrome, and found linkage to the ALS4 locus. The clinical phenotype in these three families, of different geographic origin (Austria, Belgium and England), is strikingly similar to the autosomal dominant juvenile ALS family except for a younger onset age in two of the distal hereditary motor neuronopathy families. These data suggest that ALS4 and distal hereditary motor neuronopathy with pyramidal tract signs may be one and the same disorder.

  13. Mutation analysis of genes within the dynactin complex in a cohort of hereditary peripheral neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tey, S; Ahmad-Annuar, A; Drew, A P; Shahrizaila, N; Nicholson, G A; Kennerson, M L

    2016-08-01

    The cytoplasmic dynein-dynactin genes are attractive candidates for neurodegenerative disorders given their functional role in retrograde transport along neurons. The cytoplasmic dynein heavy chain (DYNC1H1) gene has been implicated in various neurodegenerative disorders, and dynactin 1 (DCTN1) genes have been implicated in a wide spectrum of disorders including motor neuron disease, Parkinson's disease, spinobulbar muscular atrophy and hereditary spastic paraplegia. However, the involvement of other dynactin genes with inherited peripheral neuropathies (IPN) namely, hereditary sensory neuropathy, hereditary motor neuropathy and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease is under reported. We screened eight genes; DCTN1-6 and ACTR1A and ACTR1B in 136 IPN patients using whole-exome sequencing and high-resolution melt (HRM) analysis. Eight non-synonymous variants (including one novel variant) and three synonymous variants were identified. Four variants have been reported previously in other studies, however segregation analysis within family members excluded them from causing IPN in these families. No variants of disease significance were identified in this study suggesting the dynactin genes are unlikely to be a common cause of IPNs. However, with the ease of querying gene variants from exome data, these genes remain worthwhile candidates to assess unsolved IPN families for variants that may affect the function of the proteins. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura Misdiagnosed as Hereditary Angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Michelle Fog; Bygum, Anette

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema is a rare, but potentially life-threatening genetic disorder that results from an autosomal dominant trait. It is characterized by acute, recurrent attacks of severe local edema, most commonly affecting the skin and mucosa. Swelling in hereditary angioedema patients does...... however not always have to be caused by angioedema but can relate to other concomitant disorders. In this report we are focusing on misdiagnosis in a patient with known hereditary angioedema, whose bleeding episode caused by idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura was mistaken for an acute attack...

  15. Hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes and genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaron, Carole; Leach, Brandie H; Burke, Carol A

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer and cancer deaths in the Western world. Approximately 5-10% of CRC are hereditary, due to a defined genetic cause. Individuals and families affected with a hereditary CRC syndrome exhibit benign and malignant extra-intestinal tumors, require aggressive cancer screening and benefit from management by a multi-disciplinary team of professionals. The clinical manifestations, genetic causes and current management of patients with hereditary colon cancer syndrome is provided. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Seronegative Intestinal Villous Atrophy: A Diagnostic Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudio Martins

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease is the most important cause of intestinal villous atrophy. Seronegative intestinal villous atrophy, including those that are nonresponsive to a gluten-free diet, is a diagnostic challenge. In these cases, before establishing the diagnosis of seronegative celiac disease, alternative etiologies of atrophic enteropathy should be considered. Recently, a new clinical entity responsible for seronegative villous atrophy was described—olmesartan-induced sprue-like enteropathy. Herein, we report two uncommon cases of atrophic enteropathy in patients with arterial hypertension under olmesartan, who presented with severe chronic diarrhea and significant involuntary weight loss. Further investigation revealed intestinal villous atrophy and intraepithelial lymphocytosis. Celiac disease and other causes of villous atrophy were ruled out. Drug-induced enteropathy was suspected and clinical improvement and histologic recovery were verified after olmesartan withdrawal. These cases highlight the importance for clinicians to maintain a high index of suspicion for olmesartan as a precipitant of sprue-like enteropathy.

  17. Optimization of Spinal Muscular Atrophy subject's muscle activity during gait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umat, Gazlia; Rambely, Azmin Sham

    2014-06-01

    Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) is a hereditary disease related muscle nerve disorder caused by degeneration of the anterior cells of the spinal cord. SMA is divided into four types according to the degree of seriousness. SMA patients show different gait with normal people. Therefore, this study focused on the effects of SMA patient muscle actions and the difference that exists between SMA subjects and normal subjects. Therefore, the electromyography (EMG) test will be used to track the behavior of muscle during walking and optimization methods are used to get the muscle stress that is capable of doing the work while walking. Involved objective function is non-linear function of the quadratic and cubic functions. The study concludes with a comparison of the objective function using the force that sought to use the moment of previous studies and the objective function using the data obtained from EMG. The results shows that the same muscles, peroneus longus and bisepsfemoris, were used during walking activity by SMA subjects and control subjects. Muscle stress force best solution achieved from part D in simulation carried out.

  18. Diagnostic Approach to Hereditary Colorectal Cancer Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalady, Matthew F.; Heald, Brandie

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 5 to 10% of colorectal cancers develop within a known hereditary syndrome. Specific underlying genetic mutations drive the clinical phenotype and it is imperative to determine the genetic etiology to provide meaningful surveillance and intervention. Recognizing potential patients and families with a hereditary predisposition is the first step in management. Syndromes can be categorized according to polyp burden as polyposis or nonpolyposis. Clinical assessment should start with a personal and family medical history, physical examination, and evaluation for the presence and type of colorectal polyps or cancers. Key information is gained from these simple steps and should guide the specific genetic analysis for diagnosis. Genetic counseling is a critical component to any hereditary colorectal cancer program and should be conducted before genetic testing to provide education about the implications of test results. This review focuses on the thought process that drives initial clinical evaluation and guides genetic testing for patients with suspected hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes. PMID:26664327

  19. How we manage persons with hereditary angioedema

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zuraw, Bruce L; Christiansen, Sandra C

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema ( HAE ) is a rare autosomal dominant genetic disorder clinically characterized by recurrent attacks of subcutaneous and mucosal swelling that can result in significant morbidity and even mortality...

  20. Hereditary History Preserving Bisimilarity Is Undecidable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jurdzinski, Marcin; Nielsen, Mogens

    2000-01-01

    History preserving bisimilarity (hp-bisimilarity) and hereditary history preserving bisimilarity (hhp-bisimilarity) are behavioural equivalences taking into account causal relationships between events of concurrent systems. Their prominent feature is being preserved under action refinement...

  1. Genetics 101 --The Hereditary Material of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Genetics 101 Genetics 101 — The Hereditary Material of Life Past Issues / Summer 2013 Table of Contents Genetics is the study of heredity, the process in ...

  2. [Sudden blindness: consider Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schieving, J.H.; Vries, L.B.A. de; Hol, F.A.; Stroink, H.

    2008-01-01

    In 3 young male patients, aged 10, 19 and 21 years respectively, sequential, severe, painless bilateral visual loss occurred. Ophthalmological examination revealed no other abnormalities and this delayed the diagnosis Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). LHON is a mitochondrial genetic

  3. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary antithrombin deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may have an increased risk for pregnancy loss (miscarriage) or stillbirth. Related Information What does it mean ... Meer J. High long-term absolute risk of recurrent venous thromboembolism in patients with hereditary deficiencies of ...

  4. A recurrent deletion mutation in OPA1 causes autosomal dominant optic atrophy in a Chinese family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liping; Shi, Wei; Song, Liming; Zhang, Xiao; Cheng, Lulu; Wang, Yanfang; Ge, Xianglian; Li, Wei; Zhang, Wei; Min, Qingjie; Jin, Zi-Bing; Qu, Jia; Gu, Feng

    2014-11-01

    Autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA) is the most frequent form of hereditary optic neuropathy and occurs due to the degeneration of the retinal ganglion cells. To identify the genetic defect in a family with putative ADOA, we performed capture next generation sequencing (CNGS) to screen known retinal disease genes. However, six exons failed to be sequenced by CNGS in optic atrophy 1 gene (OPA1). Sequencing of those exons identified a 4 bp deletion mutation (c.2983-1_2985del) in OPA1. Furthermore, we sequenced the transcripts of OPA1 from the patient skin fibroblasts and found there is six-nucleotide deletion (c.2984-c.2989, AGAAAG). Quantitative-PCR and Western blotting showed that OPA1 mRNA and its protein expression have no obvious difference between patient skin fibroblast and control. The analysis of protein structure by molecular modeling suggests that the mutation may change the structure of OPA1 by formation of an alpha helix protruding into an existing pocket. Taken together, we identified an OPA1 mutation in a family with ADOA by filling the missing CNGS data. We also showed that this mutation affects the structural intactness of OPA1. It provides molecular insights for clinical genetic diagnosis and treatment of optic atrophy.

  5. Hereditary spastic paraplegia: More than an upper motor neuron disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parodi, L; Fenu, S; Stevanin, G; Durr, A

    2017-05-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) are a group of rare inherited neurological diseases characterized by extreme heterogeneity in both their clinical manifestations and genetic backgrounds. Based on symptoms, HSPs can be divided into pure forms, presenting with pyramidal signs leading to lower-limb spasticity, and complex forms, when additional neurological or extraneurological symptoms are detected. The clinical diversity of HSPs partially reflects their underlying genetic backgrounds. To date, 76 loci and 58 corresponding genes [spastic paraplegia genes (SPGs)] have been linked to HSPs. The genetic diagnosis is further complicated by the fact that causative mutations of HSP can be inherited through all possible modes of transmission (autosomal-dominant and -recessive, X-linked, maternal), with some genes showing multiple inheritance patterns. The pathogenic mutations of SPGs primarily lead to progressive degeneration of the upper motor neurons (UMNs) comprising corticospinal tracts. However, it is possible to observe lower-limb muscle atrophy and fasciculations on clinical examination that are clear signs of lower motor neuron (LMN) involvement. The purpose of this review is to classify HSPs based on their degree of motor neuron involvement, distinguishing forms in which only UMNs are affected from those involving both UMN and LMN degeneration, and to describe their differential diagnosis from diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Leber’s Hereditary Optic Neuropathy: a Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Daneshvar Kakhki

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Aims: One of the most prevalent mitochondrial genetic diseases is Leber disease. Most of the patients are with the bilateral ocular involvement, simultaneously in 25% and one after another in 75% of the patients with an average of 8-week involvement distance between two eyes. The aim of the study was to report a rare case of Leber disease with 11-year engagement distance between two eyes. Patient Profile: A 38 years old male patient, who had been hospitalized in autumn 2012 in Beheshti Hospital in Kashan, Iran, due to his left-eye vision loss, was studied. One day before referring to the hospital, his left-eye vision had gradually blurred, only could perceive light. The patient were with HBs Ag positive (Carrier, and was hypertensive from about one year before hospitalization. Based on the ophthalmoscopy results, the right-eye disc was lost and the left-eye disc was pale. Findings: At first, the patient received methylprednisolone pulse therapy, while no treatment response was observed after a 2-week therapy. Based on the genetic assessments of peripheral blood cells, the homoplastic 14233 mutation was diagnosed, confirming the clinical suspicion of Leber disease (LHON. The patient received 100mg a day Q10 coenzyme and multivitamin. Conclusion: The diagnosis of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy should be noticed in young men with bilateral optic atrophy.

  7. The Genetics Of Blood Disorders: Hereditary Hemoglobinopathies.

    OpenAIRE

    Sonati M.F.; Costa F.F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To summarize recently published data on the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of sickle cell diseases and β-Thalassemias, the most relevant hereditary hemoglobinopathies in the global population. Sources: Searches were run on the MEDLINE and SCIELO databases, limited to the period from 2003 to May 2008, using the terms hereditary hemoglobinopathies, sickle cell diseases and β-thalassemia. Two books and two chapters were also included. Summary of the findings: More than 2,000...

  8. A Review of Hereditary Fructose Intolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mogoş Tiberius

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Fructose intolerance is a metabolic disorder with hereditary determinism, clinically manifested on terms of fructose intake. Untreated, hereditary fructose intolerance may result in renal and hepatic failure. Unfortunately, there are no formal diagnostic and surveillance guidelines for this disease. If identified and treated before the occurrence of permanent organ damage, patients can improve their symptoms and self-rated health. Implementation and adherence to a strict fructose free diet is often difficult, but not impossible.

  9. A Review of Hereditary Fructose Intolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Mogoş Tiberius; Iacobini Andra Evelin

    2016-01-01

    Fructose intolerance is a metabolic disorder with hereditary determinism, clinically manifested on terms of fructose intake. Untreated, hereditary fructose intolerance may result in renal and hepatic failure. Unfortunately, there are no formal diagnostic and surveillance guidelines for this disease. If identified and treated before the occurrence of permanent organ damage, patients can improve their symptoms and self-rated health. Implementation and adherence to a strict fructose free diet is...

  10. Commonalities in Biological Pathways, Genetics, and Cellular Mechanism between Alzheimer Disease and Other Neurodegenerative Diseases: An In Silico-Updated Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Khurshid; Baig, Mohammad Hassan; Mushtaq, Gohar; Kamal, Mohammad Amjad; Greig, Nigel H; Choi, Inho

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common and well-studied neurodegenerative disease (ND). Biological pathways, pathophysiology and genetics of AD show commonalities with other NDs viz. Parkinson's disease (PD), Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Huntington's disease (HD), Prion disease and Dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA). Many of the NDs, sharing the common features and molecular mechanisms suggest that pathology may be directly comparable and be implicated in disease prevention and development of highly effective therapies. In this review, a brief description of pathophysiology, clinical symptoms and available treatment of various NDs have been explored with special emphasis on AD. Commonalities in these fatal NDs provide support for therapeutic advancements and enhance the understanding of disease manifestation. The studies concentrating on the commonalities in biological pathways, cellular mechanisms and genetics may provide the scope to researchers to identify few novel common target(s) for disease prevention and development of effective common drugs for multi-neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  11. [Studies on the CTA/CTG trinucleotide repeats of ATXN8OS gene in Chinese Hans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junling; Zhang, Shen; Xu, Qian; Li, Xiaohui; Song, Xingwang; Jiang, Hong; Shen, Lu; Yan, Xinxiang; Pan, Qian; Xia, Kun; Tang, Beisha

    2008-10-01

    To study the normal range of (CTA/CTG)n repeats of ATXN8OS gene in Chinese Hans, and the frequency of ATXN8OS (CTA/CTG)n repeat expansion in spinocerebellar ataxia(SCA) patients in Mainland China. The (CTA/CTG)n repeats of ATXN8OS gene were detected using fluorescence-PCR, 8% denaturing polyacrylamide gel and capillary electrophoresis technique in 132 SCA patients in whom CAG expansion at the SCA1, SCA2, SCA3, SCA6, SCA7, SCA12, SCA17 and dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy(DRPLA) loci has been excluded, and 261 healthy controls. There were no obvious abnormal changes of the (CTA/CTG)n repeats of ATXN8OS gene in the 132 SCA patients. Thirty-five SCA patients were homozygotes (26.5%), and the range of CTA/CTG repeat number was 17 to 47 (24.20+/-4.57), among which 18 repeats appeared most frequently. In 261 normal controls, 70 were homozygotes (26.8%), and the range of the CTA/CTG repeat number was from 12 to 43 (24.04+/-4.53), among which 18 repeats was the most frequent. SCA8 is a rare subtype of SCA in Mainland China. The low prevalence of SCA8 seems to be correlated with the low frequency of large (CTA/CTG)n copy number alleles in Chinese population.

  12. Huntington's disease and Huntington's disease-like syndromes: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gövert, Felix; Schneider, Susanne A

    2013-08-01

    The differential diagnosis of chorea syndromes may be complex and includes various genetic disorders such as Huntington's disease and mimicking disorders called Huntington's disease-like (HDL) phenotypes. To familiarize clinicians with these (in some cases very rare) conditions we will summarize the main characteristics. HDL disorders are rare and account for about 1% of cases presenting with a Huntington's disease phenotype. They share overlapping clinical features, so making the diagnosis purely on clinical grounds may be challenging, however presence of certain characteristics may be a clue (e.g. prominent orofacial involvement in neuroferritinopathy etc.), Information of ethnic descent will also guide genetic work-up [HDL2 in Black Africans; dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA) in Japanese etc.], Huntington's disease, the classical HDL disorders (except HDL3) and DRPLA are repeat disorders with anticipation effect and age-dependent phenotype in some, but genetic underpinnings may be more complicated in the other chorea syndromes. With advances in genetics more and more rare diseases are disentangled, allowing molecular diagnoses in a growing number of choreic patients. Hopefully, with better understanding of their pathophysiology we are moving towards mechanistic therapies.

  13. Transfer of genetic therapy across human populations: molecular targets for increasing patient coverage in repeat expansion diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, Miguel A; Curtis, Helen J; Douglas, Andrew G L; Hammond, Suzan M; O'Loughlin, Aisling J; Sobrido, Maria J; Scholefield, Janine; Wood, Matthew J A

    2016-02-01

    Allele-specific gene therapy aims to silence expression of mutant alleles through targeting of disease-linked single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). However, SNP linkage to disease varies between populations, making such molecular therapies applicable only to a subset of patients. Moreover, not all SNPs have the molecular features necessary for potent gene silencing. Here we provide knowledge to allow the maximisation of patient coverage by building a comprehensive understanding of SNPs ranked according to their predicted suitability toward allele-specific silencing in 14 repeat expansion diseases: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia, dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy, myotonic dystrophy 1, myotonic dystrophy 2, Huntington's disease and several spinocerebellar ataxias. Our systematic analysis of DNA sequence variation shows that most annotated SNPs are not suitable for potent allele-specific silencing across populations because of suboptimal sequence features and low variability (>97% in HD). We suggest maximising patient coverage by selecting SNPs with high heterozygosity across populations, and preferentially targeting SNPs that lead to purine:purine mismatches in wild-type alleles to obtain potent allele-specific silencing. We therefore provide fundamental knowledge on strategies for optimising patient coverage of therapeutics for microsatellite expansion disorders by linking analysis of population genetic variation to the selection of molecular targets.

  14. Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer-Grumbach, Michaela

    2008-01-01

    Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I (HSN I) is a slowly progressive neurological disorder characterised by prominent predominantly distal sensory loss, autonomic disturbances, autosomal dominant inheritance, and juvenile or adulthood disease onset. The exact prevalence is unknown, but is estimated as very low. Disease onset varies between the 2nd and 5th decade of life. The main clinical feature of HSN I is the reduction of sensation sense mainly distributed to the distal parts of the upper and lower limbs. Variable distal muscle weakness and wasting, and chronic skin ulcers are characteristic. Autonomic features (usually sweating disturbances) are invariably observed. Serious and common complications are spontaneous fractures, osteomyelitis and necrosis, as well as neuropathic arthropathy which may even necessitate amputations. Some patients suffer from severe pain attacks. Hypacusis or deafness, or cough and gastrooesophageal reflux have been observed in rare cases. HSN I is a genetically heterogenous condition with three loci and mutations in two genes (SPTLC1 and RAB7) identified so far. Diagnosis is based on the clinical observation and is supported by a family history. Nerve conduction studies confirm a sensory and motor neuropathy predominantly affecting the lower limbs. Radiological studies, including magnetic resonance imaging, are useful when bone infections or necrosis are suspected. Definitive diagnosis is based on the detection of mutations by direct sequencing of the SPTLC1 and RAB7 genes. Correct clinical assessment and genetic confirmation of the diagnosis are important for appropriate genetic counselling and prognosis. Differential diagnosis includes the other hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN), especially HSAN II, as well as diabetic foot syndrome, alcoholic neuropathy, neuropathies caused by other neurotoxins/drugs, immune mediated neuropathy, amyloidosis, spinal cord diseases, tabes dorsalis, lepra neuropathy, or decaying skin

  15. Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auer-Grumbach Michaela

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I (HSN I is a slowly progressive neurological disorder characterised by prominent predominantly distal sensory loss, autonomic disturbances, autosomal dominant inheritance, and juvenile or adulthood disease onset. The exact prevalence is unknown, but is estimated as very low. Disease onset varies between the 2nd and 5th decade of life. The main clinical feature of HSN I is the reduction of sensation sense mainly distributed to the distal parts of the upper and lower limbs. Variable distal muscle weakness and wasting, and chronic skin ulcers are characteristic. Autonomic features (usually sweating disturbances are invariably observed. Serious and common complications are spontaneous fractures, osteomyelitis and necrosis, as well as neuropathic arthropathy which may even necessitate amputations. Some patients suffer from severe pain attacks. Hypacusis or deafness, or cough and gastrooesophageal reflux have been observed in rare cases. HSN I is a genetically heterogenous condition with three loci and mutations in two genes (SPTLC1 and RAB7 identified so far. Diagnosis is based on the clinical observation and is supported by a family history. Nerve conduction studies confirm a sensory and motor neuropathy predominantly affecting the lower limbs. Radiological studies, including magnetic resonance imaging, are useful when bone infections or necrosis are suspected. Definitive diagnosis is based on the detection of mutations by direct sequencing of the SPTLC1 and RAB7 genes. Correct clinical assessment and genetic confirmation of the diagnosis are important for appropriate genetic counselling and prognosis. Differential diagnosis includes the other hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN, especially HSAN II, as well as diabetic foot syndrome, alcoholic neuropathy, neuropathies caused by other neurotoxins/drugs, immune mediated neuropathy, amyloidosis, spinal cord diseases, tabes dorsalis, lepra

  16. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in a leber hereditary optic neuropathy patient with mitochondrial DNA 11778G>A point mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da, Yuwei; Zhang, Xuxiang; Li, Fang; Yang, Xiaoping; Zhang, Xinqing; Jia, Jianping

    2013-09-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a maternally inherited mitochondrial disorder that primarily affects the optic nerve. We report a case of reduced visual acuity secondary to optic atrophy in a 13-year-old boy. Transient seizures developed subsequently. Serial magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. Ragged red fibers were not detected on skeletal muscle biopsy. A 11778G>A mitochondrial DNA point mutation was identified in the lymphocytes isolated from peripheral blood. His younger brother was a carrier with the same mutation. The presentation of this case is unusual documenting LHON in association with PRES.

  17. Hereditary Predispositions to Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah A. Bannon

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS are heterogeneous clonal hematopoietic disorders characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis, bone marrow dysplasia, and peripheral cytopenias. Familial forms of MDS have traditionally been considered rare, especially in adults; however, the increasing availability of somatic and germline genetic analyses has identified multiple susceptibility loci. Bone marrow failure syndromes have been well-described in the pediatric setting, e.g., Fanconi anemia (FA, dyskeratosis congenita (DC, Diamond–Blackfan anemia (DBA, and Shwachman–Diamond syndrome (SBS, hallmarked by clinically-recognizable phenotypes (e.g., radial ray anomalies in FA and significantly increased risks for MDS and/or acute myeloid leukemia (AML in the setting of bone marrow failure. However, additional families with multiple cases of MDS or AML have long been reported in the medical literature with little known regarding potential hereditary etiologies. Over the last decade, genomic investigation of such families has revealed multiple genes conferring inherited risks for MDS and/or AML as the primary malignancy, including RUNX1, ANKRD26, DDX41, ETV6, GATA2, and SRP72. As these syndromes are increasingly appreciated in even apparently de novo presentations of MDS, it is important for hematologists/oncologists to become familiar with these newly-described syndromes. Herein, we provide a review of familial MDS syndromes and practical aspects of management in patients with predisposition syndromes.

  18. Spinal Muscular Atrophy: A Short Review Article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farah Ashrafzadeh

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is a genetic disorder which affect nervous system and is characterized with progressive distal motor neuron weakness. The survival motor neuron (SMN protein level reduces in patients with SMA. Two different genes code survival motor neuron protein in human genome. Skeletal and intercostal muscles denervation lead to weakness, hypotony, hyporeflexia, respiratory failure, symmetric muscle atrophy and paralysis in patients with SMA. Manifestations are prominent in proximal muscle of lower extremities. There is no curative treatment for spinal muscular atrophy, and supportive treatment should be considered to improve patients’ quality of life and independency. New treatment strategies focus on gene therapy or invent method to increase survival motor neuron protein level. The aim of this study is to review Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA clinical and molecular manifestations.

  19. [Spinal muscular atrophies in the adult].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camu, W

    2004-02-01

    Spinal muscular atrophies are heterogeneous group. The diagnostic process should be careful to uncover the main differential diagnoses and to identify familial cases. Clinical phenotype is highly variable. In familial ALS cases with SOD1 mutation, the clinical scene may mimic spinal muscular atrophy. A careful questionning and a complete electroneuromyographic exam are warranted to allow the neurologist to choose among more invasive investigations for differential and positive diagnosis such as MRI, nerve or muscle biopsy, genetic analysis.

  20. Late-onset Leber hereditary optic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Margaret L; Hashemi, Nafiseh; Foroozan, Rod; Lee, Andrew G

    2013-01-01

    While Leber hereditary optic neuropathy typically causes bilateral visual loss in the second through fourth decades, we highlight visual loss from Leber hereditary optic neuropathy in older patients to characterize the clinical features of this cohort. Retrospective case series. Patients seen between January 2003 and July 2012 at Baylor College of Medicine and between April 2010 and July 2012 at The Methodist Hospital in Houston, Texas. Patients with visual loss from genetically confirmed Leber hereditary optic neuropathy were identified via retrospective chart review. Clinical courses of patients. Five patients with visual loss from genetically confirmed Leber hereditary optic neuropathy were greater than 60 years of age at the time of visual loss (range 62-70 years, mean 66.4 ± 3.0). This series reinforces the importance of including Leber hereditary optic neuropathy in the differential diagnosis of patients of any age with optic neuropathy. © 2013 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology © 2013 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  1. Genetics Home Reference: distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type V

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... neuropathy, type V Distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type V Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... collapse boxes. Description Distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type V is a progressive disorder that affects nerve cells ...

  2. The Korean Hereditary Breast Cancer Study: Review and Future Perspectives

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kang, Eunyoung; Kim, Sung-Won

    2013-01-01

    .... In 2007, the Korean Hereditary Breast Cancer (KOHBRA) Study was established to obtain evidence for the accurate risk assessment and management of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) in Korea...

  3. [Quality control of DNA testing in hereditary diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouweland, A.M.W. van den; Scheffer, H.

    2001-01-01

    The laboratories performing diagnostic studies regarding hereditary diseases and the specialists providing hereditary counselling are housed in clinical genetic centres. The laboratories are subject to the Special Medical Performances Act and have had licenses from the Ministry. The DNA diagnostic

  4. Hereditary Cerebellar Ataxias: A Korean Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Sun Kim

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary ataxia is a heterogeneous disorder characterized by progressive ataxia combined with/without peripheral neuropathy, extrapyramidal symptoms, pyramidal symptoms, seizure, and multiple systematic involvements. More than 35 autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxias have been designated as spinocerebellar ataxia, and there are 55 recessive ataxias that have not been named systematically. Conducting genetic sequencing to confirm a diagnosis is difficult due to the large amount of subtypes with phenotypic overlap. The prevalence of hereditary ataxia can vary among countries, and estimations of prevalence and subtype frequencies are necessary for planning a diagnostic strategy in a specific population. This review covers the various hereditary ataxias reported in the Korean population with a focus on the prevalence and subtype frequencies as the clinical characteristics of the various subtypes.

  5. Genetic and Clinical Analyses of DOA and LHON in 304 Chinese Patients with Suspected Childhood-Onset Hereditary Optic Neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yadi; Li, Jie; Jia, Xiaoyun; Xiao, Xueshan; Li, Shiqiang; Guo, Xiangming

    2017-01-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and dominant optic atrophy (DOA), the most common forms of hereditary optic neuropathy, are easily confused, and it is difficult to distinguish one from the other in the clinic, especially in young children. The present study was designed to survey the mutation spectrum of common pathogenic genes (OPA1, OPA3 and mtDNA genes) and to analyze the genotype-phenotype characteristics of Chinese patients with suspected childhood-onset hereditary optic neuropathy. Genomic DNA and clinical data were collected from 304 unrelated Chinese probands with suspected hereditary optic neuropathy with an age of onset below 14 years. Sanger sequencing was used to screen variants in the coding and adjacent regions of OPA1, OPA3 and the three primary LHON-related mutation sites in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) (m.3460G>A, m.11778G>A and m.14484T>C). All patients underwent a complete ophthalmic examination and were compared with age-matched controls. We identified 89/304 (29.3%) primary mtDNA mutations related to LHON in 304 probands, including 76 mutations at m.11778 (76/89, 85.4% of all mtDNA mutations), four at m.3460 (4/89, 4.5%) and nine at m.14484 (9/89, 10.1%). This result was similar to the mutation frequency among Chinese patients with LHON of any age. Screening of OPA1 revealed 23 pathogenic variants, including 11 novel and 12 known pathogenic mutations. This study expanded the OPA1 mutation spectrum, and our results showed that OPA1 mutation is another common cause of childhood-onset hereditary optic neuropathy in Chinese pediatric patients, especially those with disease onset during preschool age.

  6. Genetic and Clinical Analyses of DOA and LHON in 304 Chinese Patients with Suspected Childhood-Onset Hereditary Optic Neuropathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadi Li

    Full Text Available Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON and dominant optic atrophy (DOA, the most common forms of hereditary optic neuropathy, are easily confused, and it is difficult to distinguish one from the other in the clinic, especially in young children. The present study was designed to survey the mutation spectrum of common pathogenic genes (OPA1, OPA3 and mtDNA genes and to analyze the genotype-phenotype characteristics of Chinese patients with suspected childhood-onset hereditary optic neuropathy. Genomic DNA and clinical data were collected from 304 unrelated Chinese probands with suspected hereditary optic neuropathy with an age of onset below 14 years. Sanger sequencing was used to screen variants in the coding and adjacent regions of OPA1, OPA3 and the three primary LHON-related mutation sites in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA (m.3460G>A, m.11778G>A and m.14484T>C. All patients underwent a complete ophthalmic examination and were compared with age-matched controls. We identified 89/304 (29.3% primary mtDNA mutations related to LHON in 304 probands, including 76 mutations at m.11778 (76/89, 85.4% of all mtDNA mutations, four at m.3460 (4/89, 4.5% and nine at m.14484 (9/89, 10.1%. This result was similar to the mutation frequency among Chinese patients with LHON of any age. Screening of OPA1 revealed 23 pathogenic variants, including 11 novel and 12 known pathogenic mutations. This study expanded the OPA1 mutation spectrum, and our results showed that OPA1 mutation is another common cause of childhood-onset hereditary optic neuropathy in Chinese pediatric patients, especially those with disease onset during preschool age.

  7. Albright hereditary osteodystrophy: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goswami M

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Albright hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO is a rare hereditary metabolic disorder that may be associated with or without resistant to parathyroid hormone (pseudohypoparathyroidism. It is commonly characterized by a constellation of physical features of short stature, round face, short neck, and small metacarpals and metatarsals, mild mental retardation, osteoporosis, subcutaneous calcification, and sometimes olfactory and hearing functional defect. Hypocalcaemia and hyperphosphatemia are the most important manifestations of the case. We report a clinical case of siblings with AHO with reduced Gs-alpha activity and we discuss their clinical features with oral manifestations, radiographic findings, laboratory tests along with treatment.

  8. Therapeutic Strategies for Hereditary Kidney Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidana, Abhinav; Srinivasan, Ramaprasad

    2016-08-01

    The study of hereditary forms of kidney cancer has vastly increased our understanding of metabolic and genetic pathways involved in the development of both inherited and sporadic kidney cancers. The recognition that diverse molecular events drive different forms of kidney cancers has led to the preclinical and clinical development of specific pathway-directed strategies tailored to treat distinct subgroups of kidney cancer. Here, we describe the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of several different types of hereditary renal cancers, review their clinical characteristics, and summarize the treatment strategies for the management of these cancers.

  9. Extramedullary paraspinal hematopoiesis in hereditary spherocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gogia P

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary spherocytosis (HS is a common inherited hemolytic anemia due to red cell membrane defects. Extramedullary hematopoiesis is a compensatory response to insufficient bone marrow blood cell production. The preferred sites of extramedullary hematopoietic involvement are the spleen, liver and lymph nodes; but in HS, the posterior paravertebral mediastinum is also commonly involved. We report a case of a 50-year-old male who presented to us in respiratory distress and with bilateral paravertebral posterior mediastinal masses, which on trucut biopsy were found to be extra-hematopoietic masses; and the patient was found to have hereditary spherocytosis.

  10. [Recurrent urinary lithiasis revealing hereditary xanthinuria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahlous, Afef; Gasmi, Manef; Mohsni, Amira; Abdelmoula, Jaouida

    2007-09-01

    Hereditary xanthinuria, due to a purine metabolism disorder, is a rare cause of urinary lithiasis in children. We report the case of a child aged 3 and a half years, who presented recurrent urinary lithiasis that led to destruction of the right kidney. Infrared spectrophotometric analysis of the calculus concluded that it was composed of 100% xanthine. Laboratory tests showed hypouricemia and hypouricosuria with elevated urinary excretion of oxypurines. These findings led to a diagnosis of hereditary xanthinuria. Early diagnosis of this rare disease is essential to avoid its complications. Metabolic causes must be sought in children with lithiasis.

  11. Differential cerebro spinal fluid proteome investigation of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Aguanno, Simona; Barassi, Alessandra; Lupisella, Santina; d'eril, Gianlodovico Melzi; Del Boccio, Piero; Pieragostino, Damiana; Pallotti, Francesco; Carelli, Valerio; Valentino, Maria Lucia; Liguori, Rocco; Avoni, Patrizia; Bernardini, Sergio; Gambi, Domenico; Urbani, Andrea; Federici, Giorgio

    2008-01-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a genetic disease leading to the loss of central vision and optic nerve atrophy. The existence of occasional cases of LHON patients developing a Multiple Sclerosis (MS)-like illness and the hypothesis that mtDNA variants may be involved in MS suggest the possibility of some common molecular mechanisms linking the two diseases. We have pursued a comparative proteomics approach on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from LHON and MS patients, as well as healthy donors by employing 2-DE gel separations coupled to MALDI-TOF-MS and nLC-MS/MS investigations. 7 protein spots showed significant differential distribution among the three groups. Both CSF of LHON or MS patients are characterized by lower level of transthyretin dimer adduct while a specific up regulation of Apo A-IV was detected in LHON CSF.

  12. Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy Plus: A Case Report and Review of Literatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Sharifian Dorche

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON is an inherited visual loss and optic atrophy due to mitochondrial mutation. Most of these patients had not any other neurological signs and symptoms more than a visual loss. In a small group of the patients, other neurological manifestations may be occurs. This rare presentation of the disease was named " LHON plus syndromes ." Case presentation: A 15-year-old boy who was completely healthy until age 9, when he gradually developed painless visual loss in his right eye. After 3 months, similar symptoms occurred in his left eye. Within next 2 years, psychomotor regression happened, and at age 11, very intractable seizures were started. According to physical examination and past medical history, LHON plus syndrome was diagnosed for him.  Management of seizure and other symptomatic treatments were started, and there was a weak response to drugs. Conclusion: Early diagnosis and ruling out treatable conditions are critical points in these patients.

  13. [A case of hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 1E with frontal lobe dysfunction as an initial symptom].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Masashi; Matsumoto, Yushi; Okamoto, Kensho; Okuda, Bungo; Mizuta, Ikuko; Mizuno, Toshiki

    2017-12-27

    A 49-year-old man had developed gradually personality change, gait disturbance, and hearing loss for five years. On admission, he presented with frontal release signs, stuttering, vertical gaze palsy, sensorineural deafness, muscle rigidity, ataxia, and sensory disturbance with areflexia in the lower extremities. Brain MRI demonstrated atrophy in the cerebellum and midbrain tegmentum as well as cerebral atrophy, predominantly in the frontal lobe. He was tentatively diagnosed as progressive supranuclear palsy on the basis of clinical features and imagings. On nerve conduction study, no sensory nerve action potentials were elicited in the upper and lower extremities. Details of family history revealed a hereditary sensory neuropathy with autosomal dominant inheritance in his relatives. Because genetic analysis showed a rare missense mutation (c.1483T>C, p.Y495H) in DNA methyltransferase 1 gene, we diagnosed him as having hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type 1E (HSAN1E). In addition, p.M232R mutation in prion protein gene was detected. It should be kept in mind that there are some patients with HSAN1E presenting with frontal lobe dysfunction as an initial symptom and with clinical features mimicking progressive supranuclear palsy.

  14. Morphometric analysis of progressive changes in hereditary cerebellar cortical degenerative disease (abiotrophy) in rabbits caused by abnormal synaptogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Junko; Yamada, Naoaki; Kobayashi, Ryosuke; Tsuchitani, Minoru; Kobayashi, Yoshiyasu

    2015-01-01

    We previously investigated rabbit hereditary cerebellar cortical degenerative disease, called cerebellar cortical abiotrophy in the veterinary field, and determined that the pathogenesis of this disease is the result of failed synaptogenesis between parallel fibers and Purkinje cells. In this study, longitudinal changes in the development and atrophy of the cerebellum of rabbits with hereditary abiotrophy after birth were morphometrically examined (postnatal day [PD] 15 and 42) using image analysis. Although development of the cerebellum in rabbits with abiotrophy was observed from PD 15 to PD 42, the growth rate of the cerebellum was less than that in normal rabbits. In rabbits with abiotrophy, the number of granular cells undergoing apoptosis was significantly higher at PD 15 and dramatically decreased at PD 42. The number of granular cells did not increase from PD 15 to 42. The synaptogenesis peak at PD 15 occurred when the largest number of apoptotic granular cells in rabbits with abiotrophy was observed. Although 26% to 36% of parallel fiber terminals formed synaptic junctions with Purkinje cell spines, the remainder did not at PD 15 and 42. The rate of failure of synaptogenesis in the present study might be specific to this case of abiotrophy. Morphometric analysis revealed detailed changes in development and atrophy in animals with postnatal cerebellar disease occurring soon after birth. PMID:26028816

  15. Secondary post-geniculate involvement in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Rizzo

    Full Text Available Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON is characterized by retinal ganglion cell (RGC degeneration with the preferential involvement of those forming the papillomacular bundle. The optic nerve is considered the main pathological target for LHON. Our aim was to investigate the possible involvement of the post-geniculate visual pathway in LHON patients. We used diffusion-weighted imaging for in vivo evaluation. Mean diffusivity maps from 22 LHON visually impaired, 11 unaffected LHON mutation carriers and 22 healthy subjects were generated and compared at level of optic radiation (OR. Prefrontal and cerebellar white matter were also analyzed as internal controls. Furthermore, we studied the optic nerve and the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN in post-mortem specimens obtained from a severe case of LHON compared to an age-matched control. Mean diffusivity values of affected patients were higher than unaffected mutation carriers (P<0.05 and healthy subjects (P<0.01 in OR and not in the other brain regions. Increased OR diffusivity was associated with both disease duration (B = 0.002; P<0.05 and lack of recovery of visual acuity (B = 0.060; P<0.01. Post-mortem investigation detected atrophy (41.9% decrease of neuron soma size in the magnocellular layers and 44.7% decrease in the parvocellular layers and, to a lesser extent, degeneration (28.5% decrease of neuron density in the magnocellular layers and 28.7% decrease in the parvocellular layers in the LHON LGN associated with extremely severe axonal loss (99% in the optic nerve. The post-geniculate involvement in LHON patients is a downstream post-synaptic secondary phenomenon, reflecting de-afferentation rather than a primary neurodegeneration due to mitochondrial dysfunction of LGN neurons.

  16. Epidemiology of Non-hereditary Angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Flemming; Attermann, Jørn; Linneberg, Allan

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of non-hereditary angioedema was investigated in a general population sample (n¿=¿7,931) and in a sample of Danish patients (n¿=¿7,433) tested for deficiency of functional complement C1 esterase inhibitor protein (functional C1 INH). The general population sample (44% response rate...

  17. Epidemiology of Non-hereditary Angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Flemming; Attermann, Jorn; Linneberg, Allan

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of non-hereditary angioedema was investigated in a general population sample (n = 7,931) and in a sample of Danish patients (n = 7,433) tested for deficiency of functional complement C1 esterase inhibitor protein (functional C1 INH). The general population sample (44% response rate...

  18. [Preventive resection of hereditary diffuse gastric cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogerbrugge-van der Linden, N.; Ligtenberg, M.J.L.; Nagengast, F.M.; Bonenkamp, J.J.; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van

    2006-01-01

    Hereditary diffuse gastric cancers are rare, accounting for at most 1-3% of gastric cancers. It can be caused by a mutation in the tumour-suppressor gene CDH1. A healthy person carrying a CDH1 mutation has a cumulative risk of developing gastric cancer of 70-80%. In most cases, gastric cancer is

  19. Hereditary spherocytosis. | Hassan | Annals of African Medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hereditary spherocytosis (HS) is a familial hemolytic disorder with marked heterogeneity of clinical features, ranging from an asymptomatic condition to a fulminant hemolytic anemia. Although a positive family history of spherocytosis increases the risk for this disorder, it may be sporadic in some cases. In severe cases the ...

  20. Presumed hereditary retinal degenerations: Ibadan experience ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a hereditary retinal degenerative condition with no known treatment. Associated ocular conditions, such as cataract and glaucoma, when present further worsen vision, but these conditions are often treatable. There are, however, no known reports of cataract or glaucoma surgery in ...

  1. Gynecologic screening in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijcken, FEM; Mourits, MJE; Kleibeuker, JH; Hollema, H; van der Zee, AGJ

    2003-01-01

    Objective. In hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), women with a mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutation have a cumulative lifetime risk of 25-50% for endometrial cancer and 8-12% for ovarian cancer. Therefore, female members of HNPCC families are offered an annual gynecologic and

  2. Clinical management of hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasen, Hans F A; Tomlinson, Ian; Castells, Antoni

    2015-02-01

    Hereditary factors are involved in the development of a substantial proportion of all cases of colorectal cancer. Inherited forms of colorectal cancer are usually subdivided into polyposis syndromes characterized by the development of multiple colorectal polyps and nonpolyposis syndromes characterized by the development of few or no polyps. Timely identification of hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes is vital because patient participation in early detection programmes prevents premature death due to cancer. Polyposis syndromes are fairly easy to recognize, but some patients might have characteristics that overlap with other clinically defined syndromes. Comprehensive analysis of the genes known to be associated with polyposis syndromes helps to establish the final diagnosis in these patients. Recognizing Lynch syndrome is more difficult than other polyposis syndromes owing to the absence of pathognomonic features. Most investigators therefore recommend performing systematic molecular analysis of all newly diagnosed colorectal cancer using immunohistochemical methods. The implementation in clinical practice of new high-throughput methods for molecular analysis might further increase the identification of individuals at risk of hereditary colorectal cancer. This Review describes the clinical management of the various hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes and demonstrates the advantage of using a classification based on the underlying gene defects.

  3. Hereditary spectrin deficiency in Golden Retriever dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slappendel, Robbert J.; van Zwieten, Rob; van Leeuwen, Martin; Schneijdenberg, Chris T. W. M.

    2005-01-01

    Spectrin deficiency with increased erythrocyte osmotic fragility (OF) is a hallmark of hereditary spherocytosis, which is the most common congenital hemolytic anemia in humans of northern European ancestry. A radioimmunoassay revealed that erythrocyte spectrin concentration was 50-65% of normal in 5

  4. Demyelinating polyneuropathy in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilhuis, H.J.; Schelhaas, H.J.; Cruysberg, J.R.M.; Zwarts, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    We report a patient with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (G11778A mtDNA) and a severe demyelinating neuropathy, for which no other cause except his mitochondrial disorder could be found. The involvement of the peripheral nervous system of patients with LHON, in particular with a 11778 mtDNA, is

  5. Hereditary spherocytosis presenting as indolent leg ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammed K

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Indolent leg ulcertation, which is the rarest manifestation of hereditary spherocytosis, started at the age of 5 years affecting a 15-year-old boy and his mother is reported. Review of literature showed very few reports from India and abroad. The response to oral folic acid was excellent

  6. Geographic atrophy phenotype identification by cluster analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monés, Jordi; Biarnés, Marc

    2017-07-20

    To identify ocular phenotypes in patients with geographic atrophy secondary to age-related macular degeneration (GA) using a data-driven cluster analysis. This was a retrospective analysis of data from a prospective, natural history study of patients with GA who were followed for ≥6 months. Cluster analysis was used to identify subgroups within the population based on the presence of several phenotypic features: soft drusen, reticular pseudodrusen (RPD), primary foveal atrophy, increased fundus autofluorescence (FAF), greyish FAF appearance and subfoveal choroidal thickness (SFCT). A comparison of features between the subgroups was conducted, and a qualitative description of the new phenotypes was proposed. The atrophy growth rate between phenotypes was then compared. Data were analysed from 77 eyes of 77 patients with GA. Cluster analysis identified three groups: phenotype 1 was characterised by high soft drusen load, foveal atrophy and slow growth; phenotype 3 showed high RPD load, extrafoveal and greyish FAF appearance and thin SFCT; the characteristics of phenotype 2 were midway between phenotypes 1 and 3. Phenotypes differed in all measured features (p≤0.013), with decreases in the presence of soft drusen, foveal atrophy and SFCT seen from phenotypes 1 to 3 and corresponding increases in high RPD load, high FAF and greyish FAF appearance. Atrophy growth rate differed between phenotypes 1, 2 and 3 (0.63, 1.91 and 1.73 mm(2)/year, respectively, p=0.0005). Cluster analysis identified three distinct phenotypes in GA. One of them showed a particularly slow growth pattern. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  7. Mirror movements in progressive hemifacial atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Verma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mirror movements are simultaneous, involuntary, identical movements occurring during contralateral voluntary movements. These movements are considered as soft neurologic signs seen uncommonly in clinical practice. The mirror movements are described in various neurological disorders which include parkinsonism, cranio veretebral junction anamolies, and hemiplegic cerebral palsy. These movements are intriguing and can pose significant disability. However, no such observation regarding mirror movements in progressive hemifacial atrophy have been reported previously. We are reporting a teenage girl suffering from progressive hemifacial atrophy and epilepsy with demonstrable mirror movements in hand.

  8. CT features of olivopontocerebellar atrophy in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, S.D. [Sultan Qaboos Univ., Muscat (Oman). Dept. of Radiology; Chand, R.P. [Sultan Qaboos Univ., Muscat (Oman). Dept. of Medicine (Neurology); Gururaj, A.K. [Sultan Qaboos Univ., Muscat (Oman). Dept. of Child Health; Jeans, W.D. [Sultan Qaboos Univ., Muscat (Oman). Dept. of Radiology

    1995-11-01

    Between 1990 and 1992, 14 children were seen in whom a clinical diagnosis of olivopontocerebellar atrophy (OPCA) had been made. The majority of patients presented with cerebellar ataxia and hypotonia. Five children had a family history of a similar illness in first-degree relatives. All cases had undergone clinical and neurologic examinations, routine laboratory tests and cranial CT. CT features were graded to quantitative the degree of atrophy in each cerebellar hemisphere, vermis and brain stem. All patients had varying degrees of atrophic changes of cerebellum, brain stem and cerebrum. These CT features appear to be distinctive enough to enable the diagnosis of OPCA to be made. (orig.).

  9. Liver Atrophy Associated With Monolobar Caroli's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, L. N.; Kilpadi, A. B.; D'Cunha, S.

    1991-01-01

    The association of the atrophy-hypertrophy complex in monolobar Caroli’s disease (Type I) is reported in a 30 year old male who presented with recurrent cholangitis. Ultrasound and CT scan showed localised, right sided, saccular biliary dilatation in a normal sized liver. Severe right lobar atrophy was detected at operation and the resected right lobe weighed only 140 gms. Distortion of the hilar vascular anatomy and posterior displacement of the right hepatic duct orifice were problems encountered at surgery. PMID:1931788

  10. Intrathecal baclofen therapy for the symptomatic treatment of hereditary spastic paraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margetis, Konstantinos; Korfias, Stefanos; Boutos, Nikolaos; Gatzonis, Stylianos; Themistocleous, Marios; Siatouni, Anna; Dalivigka, Zoi; Flaskas, Theofanis; Stranjalis, George; Boviatsis, Efstathios; Sakas, Damianos

    2014-08-01

    We study the effectiveness and safety of intrathecal baclofen therapy for the treatment of spasticity and gait improvement in patients suffering from hereditary spastic paraplegia. Sixteen patients diagnosed with hereditary spastic paraplegia (mean age: 43 years) were enrolled in this open prospective study. The main inclusion criteria were: spastic paraparesis with a negative laboratory and imaging work-up (apart from spinal cord atrophy), unsuccessful trial of oral anti-spasticity drugs. An intrathecal baclofen trial was initially performed and a pump for the intrathecal administration of baclofen was implanted to the patients who responded favorably to the baclofen trial. The patients were followed for lower limbs' spasticity, walking performance and complications. Fourteen patients had a positive baclofen trial and were submitted to the implantation of the baclofen pump. The average follow-up period was 25.8 months. All patients had a reduction in lower limbs' spasticity measured in the modified Ashworth scale from 2.6 (±0.8) to 0.7 (±0.9) (p=.000). Walking ability was improved in a modified version of the functional walking scale of the Gillette Functional Assessment Questionnaire from 5.9 (±1.7) to 7.4 (±2.0) (p=.001). Two patients had to be re-operated due to a catheter fracture. Intrathecal baclofen can offer an improvement in spasticity and in the walking performance in patients suffering from hereditary spastic paraplegia. The underlying residual motor function and the patient's adherence to the rehabilitation program might contribute to the post-operative improvement of gait. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Training improves oxidative capacity, but not function, in spinal muscular atrophy type III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Karen Lindhardt; Hansen, Regitze Sølling; Preisler, Nicolai; Thøgersen, Frank; Berthelsen, Martin Peter; Vissing, John

    2015-08-01

    In this study we investigated the effect of 12 weeks of cycle ergometer training in patients with spinal muscular atrophy type III (SMA III), a hereditary motor neuron disease with progressive muscle weakness and atrophy. Six SMA III patients and 9 healthy subjects completed a 12-week training program, performing 42 30-minute sessions exercising at 65-70% of maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max ). VO2max , muscle strength, functional tests, and self-reported activities of daily living were assessed before and after the training. Training induced a 27 ± 3% increase in VO2max (17 ± 2 to 21 ± 2 ml/kg/min, P sleep in 3 patients, and led to training modifications in 2 patients. Cycle exercise improves VO2max in SMA III without causing muscle damage, but it also induces significant fatigue. This warrants study into alternative training methods to improve exercise capacity in SMA III patients. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Genetics Home Reference: spinal muscular atrophy with progressive myoclonic epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... myoclonic epilepsy Spinal muscular atrophy with progressive myoclonic epilepsy Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... boxes. Description Spinal muscular atrophy with progressive myoclonic epilepsy (SMA-PME) is a neurological condition that causes ...

  13. Multifocal motor neuropathy and progressive atrophy : Pathophysiological similarities and differences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlam, L.

    2015-01-01

    Progressive muscular atrophy (PMA) and multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) share many clinical similarities. They are both characterized by progressive asymmetric muscle weakness with atrophy and fasciculations. Tendon reflexes are normally low or absent, although in some patients with MMN normal

  14. [A amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) 4 family misdiagnosed as hereditary spastic paraplegia-a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Takaki; Hokezu, Youichi; Okada, Takashi; Ishibashi, Masato; Hashiguchi, Akihiro; Matsuura, Eiji; Takashima, Hiroshi

    2017-11-25

    We report a 44 years old man with slowly progressive muscular atrophy of the extremities for over 30 years. He experienced difficulty in walking in his 10's and was diagnosed as hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) in his 20's. And then, muscle atrophy of the extremities slowly progressed especially in his distal muscles. Sensory axonal neuropathy was detected with sural nerve biopsy. His father and uncle have been diagnosed as HSP in their early days. His father noticed weakness of his leg in his 20's. He lost motor function of the leg in his 60's. In addition, marked disturbance of thermal sensation, vibration, and sense of position were found by physical examination. Our genetic study detected senataxin (SETX) gene mutation (c.8C>T,p.T3I) in the blood of those two patients, and they had been identified as family cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) 4. As clinical symptoms of ALS4 would be similar to those of HSP at the onset, we suggest considering ALS4 in seeing patients with HSP without gene diagnosis.

  15. Cube propagation for focal brain atrophy estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pai, Akshay Sadananda Uppinakudru; Sørensen, Lauge; Darkner, Sune

    2013-01-01

    Precise and robust whole brain, ventricle, and hippocampal atrophy measurements are important as they serve as biomarkers for Alzheimer’s disease. They are used as secondary outcomes in drug trials, and they correlate with the cognitive scores. When two successive scans are non-linearly aligned...

  16. Corpus callosum atrophy in Wernicke's encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soon-Tae; Jung, Young-Min; Na, Duk L; Park, Seong Ho; Kim, Manho

    2005-10-01

    Neuropathologic changes in Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) involve variable brain structures. Corpus callosum involvement in WE, however, is largely unknown. The authors investigated the degree and the pattern of corpus callosum changes in WE according to the etiologies. Nineteen patients with WE (between 34 and 81 years) and 19 age- and sex-matched control participants were included. The total cross-sectional callosal area and 5 callosal subregions (C1-C5) were measured by tracing outer margins in the midsagittal sections. Subregions were determined by placing radial dividers with 10 rays. The pixel numbers for corpus callosums were calculated, and the values obtained were adjusted for head size variations. The causes of WE were alcoholism (10), intestinal surgery (5), anorexia (3), and hyperemesis gravidarum (1). The mean size of the total corpus callosum was significantly reduced in alcoholic WE (P< .001; 527.8 +/- 70.8 mm2 for alcoholic WE; 664.6 +/- 58.1 mm2 for the corresponding controls), but not in nonalcoholic WE. In subregion analysis, prefrontal callosum (C2) atrophy was the most prominent in alcoholic WE. In contrast, only splenium (C5) was atrophied in nonalcoholic WE. The degree of atrophy did not change throughout the follow-up period (mean 5.3 weeks). This study suggests that the extent and location of corpus callosum atrophy differs between alcoholic WE and nonalcoholic WE, implying separate contribution of alcohol neurotoxicity and nutritional deficiency.

  17. Hippocampal atrophy in subcortical vascular dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Pol, L.A.; Gertz, H.J.; Scheltens, P.; Wolf, H

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose: New research criteria for subcortical vascular dementia (SVaD) have been suggested to define a more homogeneous subgroup of vascular dementia. Hippocampal (Hc) atrophy is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD), but it also occurs in other dementia disorders including vascular

  18. Sensorimotor gating deficits in multiple system atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zoetmulder, Marielle; Biernat, Heidi Bryde; Nikolic, Miki

    2014-01-01

    Prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the auditory blink reflex is a measure of sensorimotor gating, which reflects an organism's ability to filter out irrelevant sensory information. PPI has never been studied in patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA), although sensorimotor deficits are frequently...

  19. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis of spinal muscular atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dreesen, JCFM; Bras, M; de Die-Smulders, C; Dumoulin, JCM; Cobben, JM; Evers, JLH; Smeets, HJM; Geraedts, JPM

    After Duchenne muscular dystrophy, spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is the most common severe neuromuscular disease in childhood. Since 1995, homozygous deletions in exon 7 of the survival motor neuron (SMN) gene have been described in >90-95% of SMA patients. However, the presence of a highly

  20. An unusual cause of optic atrophy in a child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishant Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 13-year-old child presenting with gross visual impairment was diagnosed as a case of optic atrophy. However, radiological investigations revealed osteopetrosis, which, though rare, can result in optic atrophy. The aim of this case report is to highlight this possibility while evaluating cases of optic atrophy in young patients.

  1. Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia: Beyond Clinical Phenotypes toward a Unified Pattern of Central Nervous System Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosta, Federica; Scarlato, Marina; Spinelli, Edoardo G; Canu, Elisa; Benedetti, Sara; Bassi, Maria Teresa; Casali, Carlo; Sessa, Maria; Copetti, Massimiliano; Pagani, Elisabetta; Comi, Giancarlo; Ferrari, Maurizio; Falini, Andrea; Filippi, Massimo

    2015-07-01

    To investigate whether specific patterns of brain gray matter (GM) regional volumes and white matter (WM) microstructural abnormalities and spinal cord atrophy occur in patients with pure and complicated hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs). Relationships between clinical and cognitive features of patients with HSP who had brain and cervical cord damage were also investigated. This study was approved by the local ethical committees on human studies, and written informed consent from all subjects was obtained prior to enrollment. Forty-four patients with HSP (20 genetically defined cases and 24 without genetic diagnosis) and 19 healthy control subjects underwent clinical, neuropsychological, and advanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging evaluations. Patterns of GM atrophy and WM microstructural damage obtained by using structural and diffusion-tensor MR imaging were compared between groups. Cervical cord atrophy was also assessed by using an active surface method. Correlations between clinical, cognitive, and diffusion-tensor MR imaging measures were evaluated. Clinical data showed that spastic paraplegia is accompanied by a number of other features, including sensory disturbances, and verbal and spatial memory deficits, not only in complicated HSP but also in pure HSP. MR imaging demonstrated a similar involvement of motor, association, and cerebellar WM pathways (P spasticity (P < .05, family-wise error corrected) and cognitive impairment (r values, -0.39 to 0.51; P values, .001-.05) in both pure and complicated HSP. The detection of a distributed pattern of central nervous system damage in patients with pure and complicated HSP suggests that the "primary" corticospinal tract involvement known to occur in these patients may be associated with a neurodegenerative process, which spreads out to extramotor regions, likely via anatomic connections. This observation is in line with emerging pieces of evidence that, independent of the clinical phenotype, there is a

  2. Novel De Novo Mutations in KIF1A as a Cause of Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia With Progressive Central Nervous System Involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotchkiss, Leslie; Donkervoort, Sandra; Leach, Meganne E; Mohassel, Payam; Bharucha-Goebel, Diana X; Bradley, Nathaniel; Nguyen, David; Hu, Ying; Gurgel-Giannetti, Juliana; Bönnemann, Carsten G

    2016-08-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegias are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by lower extremity spasticity and weakness. Recently, the first de novo mutations in KIF1A were identified in patients with an early-onset severe form of complicated hereditary spastic paraplegia. We report two additional patients with novel de novo mutations in KIF1A, hereby expanding the genetic spectrum of KIF1A-related hereditary spastic paraplegia. Both children presented with spastic paraplegia and additional findings of optic nerve atrophy, structural brain abnormalities, peripheral neuropathy, cognitive/language impairment, and never achieved ambulation. In particular, we highlight the progressive nature of cerebellar involvement as captured on sequential magnetic resonance images (MRIs), thus linking the neurodegenerative and spastic paraplegia phenotypes. Exome sequencing in patient 1 and patient 2 identified novel heterozygous missense mutations in KIF1A at c.902G>A (p.R307Q) and c.595G>A (p.G199 R), respectively. Therefore, our report contributes to expanding the genotypic and phenotypic spectrum of hereditary spastic paraplegia caused by mutations in KIF1A. © The Author(s) 2016.

  3. Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia: Clinical and Genetic Hallmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Paulo Victor Sgobbi; de Rezende Pinto, Wladimir Bocca Vieira; de Rezende Batistella, Gabriel Novaes; Bortholin, Thiago; Oliveira, Acary Souza Bulle

    2017-04-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia comprises a wide and heterogeneous group of inherited neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental disorders resulting from primary retrograde dysfunction of the long descending fibers of the corticospinal tract. Although spastic paraparesis and urinary dysfunction represent the most common clinical presentation, a complex group of different neurological and systemic compromise has been recognized recently and a growing number of new genetic subtypes were described in the last decade. Clinical characterization of individual and familial history represents the main step during diagnostic workup; however, frequently, few and unspecific data allows a low rate of definite diagnosis based solely in clinical and neuroimaging basis. Likewise, a wide group of neurological acquired and inherited disorders should be included in the differential diagnosis and properly excluded after a complete laboratorial, neuroimaging, and genetic evaluation. The aim of this review article is to provide an extensive overview regarding the main clinical and genetic features of the classical and recently described subtypes of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP).

  4. Hereditary spastic paraplegia with cerebellar ataxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J E; Johnsen, B; Koefoed, P

    2004-01-01

    Complex forms of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) are rare and usually transmitted in an autosomal recessive pattern. A family of four generations with autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (AD-HSP) and a complex phenotype with variably expressed co-existing ataxia, dysarthria...... in those individuals who were clinically affected by a complex phenotype consisting of HSP and cerebellar ataxia. Other features noted in this kindred including epilepsy, cognitive impairment, depression, and migraine did not segregate with the HSP phenotype or mutation, and therefore the significance...... relatively decreased regional cerebral blood flow in most of the cerebellum. We conclude that this kindred demonstrates a considerable overlap between cerebellar ataxia and spastic paraplegia, emphasizing the marked clinical heterogeneity of HSP associated with spastin mutations....

  5. [Hereditary angioedema: strange cause of abdominal pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas-Lozano, Nereo Guillermo; Meza-Cardona, Javier; González-Fernández, Coty; Pineda-Figueroa, Laura; de Ariño-Suárez, Mauricio

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema is an episodic swelling disorder with autosomal dominant inheritance characterized by sudden attacks of peripheral swelling. Patients also commonly have episodic swelling of the wall of hollow viscera, including the bowel. We present a 33-year-old previously healthy male with a complaint of acute-onset intense abdominal pain localized in the epigastrium. Pain irradiated to the right lower quadrant and was associated with five episodes of vomiting. Computed tomography showed thickening of the duodenal wall with liquid in the subphrenic space. Complementary laboratory tests showed low C4 complement levels (5.5 mg/dl) and 30% complement C1 inhibitor activity. Hereditary angioedema is caused by a deficiency (type I) or dysfunction (type II) in complement C1 inhibitor. Abdominal associated with angioedema may manifest as severe acute-onset abdominal pain or as moderately severe chronic recurrent abdominal pain. Two medications are currently FDA-approved for the treatment of these patients.

  6. Disease expression in women with hereditary angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouillet, Laurence; Longhurst, Hilary; Boccon-Gibod, Isabelle

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Fluctuations in sex hormones can trigger angioedema attacks in women with hereditary angioedema. Combined oral contraceptive therapies, as well as pregnancy, can induce severe attacks. The course of angioedema may be very variable in different women. STUDY DESIGN: Within the PREHAEAT...... project launched by the European Union, data on 150 postpubertal women with hereditary angioedema were collected in 8 countries, using a patient-based questionnaire. RESULTS: Puberty worsened the disease for 62%. Combined oral contraceptives worsened the disease for 79%, whereas progestogen-only pills...... improved it for 64%. During pregnancies, 38% of women had more attacks, but 30% had fewer attacks. Vaginal delivery was usually uncomplicated. Attacks occurred within 48 hours in only 6% of cases. Those more severely affected during menses had more symptoms during pregnancies, suggesting a hormone...

  7. [Asymptomatic classical hereditary xanthinuria type 1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakubov, Renata; Nir, Vered; Kassem, Eiass; Klein-Kremer, Adi

    2012-06-01

    We report on a girl who was diagnosed with classical hereditary xanthinuria due to an incidental finding of extremely low Levels of uric acid in the blood. The girl is compLetely asymptomatic. Hereditary xanthinuria is a rare autosomal recessive disease that usually causes early urolithiasis but may cause rheumatoid arthritis-like disease and even be associated with defects in the formation of bone, hair and teeth. In Israel it has mostly been described in patients of Bedouin origin. Throughout the world, only about 150 cases have been described; about two thirds of these patients were asymptomatic. Since the clinical presentation and age of symptom appearance are diverse, the case raises questions as to the required follow-up of these patients and as to whether a low oxalate diet should be initiated.

  8. HEREDITARY FRUCTOSE INTOLERANCE – CASE REPORT

    OpenAIRE

    Jernej Brecelj; Gordana Logar-Car; Henrik Peče

    2002-01-01

    Background. Hereditary fructose intolerance is a rare inborn error of carbohydrate metabolism that presents with hypoglicemia, metabolic acidosis and liver decompensation when the patient is exposed to fructose. Diagnosis was established by fructose tolerance test in the past and nowadays mostly by determination of deficient enzyme fructose-1phosphate aldolase (aldolase B) activity in hepatic tissue or by molecular genetic means if the mutation is known. Treatment involves elimination (in inf...

  9. [Hereditary xanthinuria. A clinical case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessano, B; Davì, S; La Brocca, A; Leone, L

    1989-05-01

    A case of hereditary xanthinuria in a 68-year-old man with congestive heart failure and alcoholic liver disease is presented. Urolithiasis and muscular symptoms were absent, and the metabolic error was revealed by hypouricemia, hypouricosuria and excess of xanthine and hypoxanthine excretion in urine. Xanthine oxidase (EC 1.2.3.2) activity in liver tissue was absent, confirming the diagnosis of xanthinuria.

  10. Hereditary cerebral small vessel disease and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søndergaard, Christian Baastrup; Nielsen, Jørgen Erik; Hansen, Christine Krarup; Christensen, Hanne

    2017-04-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease is considered hereditary in about 5% of patients and is characterized by lacunar infarcts and white matter hyperintensities on MRI. Several monogenic hereditary diseases causing cerebral small vessel disease and stroke have been identified. The purpose of this systematic review is to provide a guide for determining when to consider molecular genetic testing in patients presenting with small vessel disease and stroke. CADASIL, CARASIL, collagen type IV mutations (including PADMAL), retinal vasculopathy with cerebral leukodystrophy, Fabry disease, hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis, and forkhead box C1 mutations are described in terms of genetics, pathology, clinical manifestation, imaging, and diagnosis. These monogenic disorders are often characterized by early-age stroke, but also by migraine, mood disturbances, vascular dementia and often gait disturbances. Some also present with extra-cerebral manifestations such as microangiopathy of the eyes and kidneys. Many present with clinically recognizable syndromes. Investigations include a thorough family medical history, medical history, neurological examination, neuroimaging, often supplemented by specific examinations e.g of the of vision, retinal changes, as well as kidney and heart function. However molecular genetic analysis is the final gold standard of diagnosis. There are increasing numbers of reports on new monogenic syndromes causing cerebral small vessel disease. Genetic counseling is important. Enzyme replacement therapy is possible in Fabry disease, but treatment options remain overall very limited. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Hereditary Risk Evaluation for Borderline Ovarian Tumors Based on Immunohistochemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Jung Min; Kim, Min Kyu

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Borderline ovarian tumors (BOT) are premalignant lesions. Approximately 10% of all epithelial ovarian cancers are known to be hereditary with hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) accounting for approximately 90% of cases; the remaining 10% are attributable to Lynch syndrome, also known as hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). The aim of our study is to estimate this risk based on screening immunohistochemistry (IHC). Methods Thirty-four patients diagnosed with B...

  12. Genetic and phenotypic characterization of complex hereditary spastic paraplegia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kara, Eleanna; Tucci, Arianna; Manzoni, Claudia; Lynch, David S; Elpidorou, Marilena; Bettencourt, Conceicao; Chelban, Viorica; Manole, Andreea; Hamed, Sherifa A; Haridy, Nourelhoda A; Federoff, Monica; Preza, Elisavet; Hughes, Deborah; Pittman, Alan; Jaunmuktane, Zane; Brandner, Sebastian; Xiromerisiou, Georgia; Wiethoff, Sarah; Schottlaender, Lucia; Proukakis, Christos; Morris, Huw; Warner, Tom; Bhatia, Kailash P; Korlipara, L V Prasad; Singleton, Andrew B; Hardy, John; Wood, Nicholas W; Lewis, Patrick A; Houlden, Henry

    2016-01-01

    The hereditary spastic paraplegias are a heterogeneous group of degenerative disorders that are clinically classified as either pure with predominant lower limb spasticity, or complex where spastic...

  13. HEREDITARY COLORECTAL CANCER REGISTRY: A CLEVELAND CLINIC FOUNDATION EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Church, MBCHB

    2017-07-01

    SUMMARY: the Cleveland Clinic approach to hereditary colorectal cancer is described. This is multidisciplinary, involving several specialties and both genetic counseling and mental health services within the registry.

  14. Oestrogens ameliorate mitochondrial dysfunction in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Giordano, Carla; Montopoli, Monica; Perli, Elena; Orlandi, Maurizia; Fantin, Marianna; Ross-Cisneros, Fred N; Caparrotta, Laura; Martinuzzi, Andrea; Ragazzi, Eugenio; Ghelli, Anna; Sadun, Alfredo A; d'Amati, Giulia; Carelli, Valerio

    2011-01-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy, the most frequent mitochondrial disease due to mitochondrial DNA point mutations in complex I, is characterized by the selective degeneration of retinal ganglion...

  15. Antiretroviral therapy-induced Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moodley, A; Bhola, S; Omar, F; Mogambery, J

    2014-01-01

    .... Individuals with the mutation for Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON), a mitochondrial disorder, are usually asymptomatic but develop visual loss when exposed to external triggers such as smoking...

  16. Oxyntic atrophy, metaplasia and gastric cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenring, James R.; Nam, Ki Taek

    2015-01-01

    The process of gastric carcinogenesis involves the loss of parietal cells (oxyntic atrophy) and subsequent replacement of the normal gastric lineages with metaplastic lineages. In humans, two metaplastic lineages develop as sequelae of chronic Helicobacter pylori infection: intestinal metaplasia and Spasmolytic Polypeptide-expressing Metaplasia (SPEM). Mouse models of both chronic Helicobacter infection and acute pharmacological oxyntic atrophy have led to the recognition that SPEM arises from transdifferentiation of mature chief cells. The presence of inflammation promotes the expansion of SPEM in mice. Furthermore, studies in Mongolian gerbils as well as increasing evidence from human studies indicates that SPEM likely represents a precursor for development of intestinal metaplasia. These findings indicate that loss of parietal cells, augmented by chronic inflammation, leads to a cascade of metaplastic events. Identification of specific biomarkers for SPEM and intestinal metaplasia hold promise for providing both early detection of pre-neoplasia as well as information on prognostic outcome following curative resection. PMID:21075342

  17. [Posterior cortical atrophy with progressive visual agnosia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarranz, J J; Lasa, A; Fernández, M; Lezcano, E; Pérez Bas, M; Varona, L; Ruiz, J; Beristain, X

    1995-03-01

    Interest in progressive focal cerebral syndromes associated with classical degenerative diseases has increased in recent years. Descriptions of posterior cortical atrophy with progressive visual agnosia are relatively rare. We present 5 patients (2 women) ranging in age between 57 and 72 years old. In all cases symptoms began and progressed with no known etiology. All cases were sporadic. The main clinical signs are difficulty in recognizing objects, colors, persons or places; topographical disorientation and visual memory alterations; alexia, simultagnosia, loss of ocular fixing and optic ataxia. Some patients presented other disturbances of praxis or memory and 2 progressed to global dementia. Language function was preserved and behavioral disturbances did not develop. The amplitude of the P100 visual evoked potential was low but latency was normal in 4 patients and prolonged in 1. Brain images showed atrophy and hypoperfusion in the parieto-occipital area. The neuropathology status of these patients is unknown.

  18. [Posterior cortical atrophy. Report of five cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado D, Carolina; Donoso S, Archibaldo

    2009-11-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a neurodegenerative syndrome, usually due to Alzheimer's disease. The first symptoms are progressive impairment of visuo spatial (Balint's and Gertsmann's syndromes) or visuo perceptive (visual agnosia, alexia) function. Episodic memory and executive function are spared until later stages. We report two males aged 51 and 55years and three females aged 50, 54 and 56 years, with posterior cortical atrophy. Ophthalmologic study was normal in all. Presenting signs and symptoms were visual ataxia, simultagnosia, agraphia, acalculia, spatial disorientation and unilateral neglect (Balint's and Gerstmann's syndromes). Apperceptive visual agnosia, aphasia, apraxia and alexia were also observed. One female had cortical blindness. Structural images were inconclusive, but PET scan and SPECT disclosed functional impairments in occipitotemporal or occipitoparietal areas.

  19. Space travel directly induces skeletal muscle atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenburgh, H.; Chromiak, J.; Shansky, J.; Del Tatto, M.; Lemaire, J.

    1999-01-01

    Space travel causes rapid and pronounced skeletal muscle wasting in humans that reduces their long-term flight capabilities. To develop effective countermeasures, the basis of this atrophy needs to be better understood. Space travel may cause muscle atrophy indirectly by altering circulating levels of factors such as growth hormone, glucocorticoids, and anabolic steroids and/or by a direct effect on the muscle fibers themselves. To determine whether skeletal muscle cells are directly affected by space travel, tissue-cultured avian skeletal muscle cells were tissue engineered into bioartificial muscles and flown in perfusion bioreactors for 9 to 10 days aboard the Space Transportation System (STS, i.e., Space Shuttle). Significant muscle fiber atrophy occurred due to a decrease in protein synthesis rates without alterations in protein degradation. Return of the muscle cells to Earth stimulated protein synthesis rates of both muscle-specific and extracellular matrix proteins relative to ground controls. These results show for the first time that skeletal muscle fibers are directly responsive to space travel and should be a target for countermeasure development.

  20. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of muscle atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Bonaldo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle is a plastic organ that is maintained by multiple pathways regulating cell and protein turnover. During muscle atrophy, proteolytic systems are activated, and contractile proteins and organelles are removed, resulting in the shrinkage of muscle fibers. Excessive loss of muscle mass is associated with poor prognosis in several diseases, including myopathies and muscular dystrophies, as well as in systemic disorders such as cancer, diabetes, sepsis and heart failure. Muscle loss also occurs during aging. In this paper, we review the key mechanisms that regulate the turnover of contractile proteins and organelles in muscle tissue, and discuss how impairments in these mechanisms can contribute to muscle atrophy. We also discuss how protein synthesis and degradation are coordinately regulated by signaling pathways that are influenced by mechanical stress, physical activity, and the availability of nutrients and growth factors. Understanding how these pathways regulate muscle mass will provide new therapeutic targets for the prevention and treatment of muscle atrophy in metabolic and neuromuscular diseases.

  1. Huntington disease and Huntington disease-like in a case series from Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilhos, R M; Souza, A F D; Furtado, G V; Gheno, T C; Silva, A L; Vargas, F R; Lima, M-A F D; Barsottini, O; Pedroso, J L; Godeiro, C; Salarini, D; Pereira, E T; Lin, K; Toralles, M-B; Saute, J A M; Rieder, C R; Quintas, M; Sequeiros, J; Alonso, I; Saraiva-Pereira, M L; Jardim, L B

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the relative frequency of Huntington's disease (HD) and HD-like (HDL) disorders HDL1, HDL2, spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2), SCA17, dentatorubral-pallidoluysian degeneration (DRPLA), benign hereditary chorea, neuroferritinopathy and chorea-acanthocytosis (CHAC), in a series of Brazilian families. Patients were recruited in seven centers if they or their relatives presented at least chorea, besides other findings. Molecular studies of HTT, ATXN2, TBP, ATN1, JPH3, FTL, NKX2-1/TITF1 and VPS13A genes were performed. A total of 104 families were ascertained from 2001 to 2012: 71 families from South, 25 from Southeast and 8 from Northeast Brazil. There were 93 HD, 4 HDL2 and 1 SCA2 families. Eleven of 104 index cases did not have a family history: 10 with HD. Clinical characteristics were similar between HD and non-HD cases. In HD, the median expanded (CAG)n (range) was 44 (40-81) units; R(2) between expanded HTT and age-at-onset (AO) was 0.55 (p=0.0001, Pearson). HDL2 was found in Rio de Janeiro (2 of 9 families) and Rio Grande do Sul states (2 of 68 families). We detected HD in 89.4%, HDL2 in 3.8% and SCA2 in 1% of 104 Brazilian families. There were no cases of HDL1, SCA17, DRPLA, neuroferritinopathy, benign hereditary chorea or CHAC. Only six families (5.8%) remained without diagnosis. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. [Genetic testing in hereditary spastic paraplegia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadzsiev, Kinga; Balikó, László; Komlósi, Katalin; Lőcsei-Fekete, Anett; Csábi, Györgyi; Bene, Judit; Kisfali, Péter; Melegh, Béla

    2015-01-18

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia is the overall term for clinically and genetically diverse disorders characterized with progressive and variable severe lower extremity spasticity. The most common causes of autosomal dominantly inherited hereditary spastic paraplegias are different mutations of the spastin gene with variable incidence in different ethnic groups, ranging between 15-40%. Mutations in the spastin gene lead to loss of spastins function, causing progressive neuronal failure, which results in axon degeneration finally. The molecular testing of spastin gene is available in the institution of the authors since January, 2014. The experience gained with the examination of the first eleven patients is described in this article. After polymerase chain reaction, Sanger sequencing was performed to examine the 17 exons of the spastin gene. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification was performed to detect greater rearrangements in the spastin gene. Eight of the patients were examined in the genetic counseling clinic of the authors and after detailed phenotype assessment spastin gene testing was obtained. The other three patients were referred to the laboratory from different outpatient clinics. Out of the 11 examined patients, four different pathogenic mutations were found in 5 patients. The first Hungarian data, gained with the examination of spastin gene are presented in this article. The five patients, in whom mutations were detected, represent 45.5% of all tested patients with hereditary spastic paraplegia, which is similar to those published in the international literature. Molecular testing and subsequent detailed genotype-phenotype correlations of the Hungarian patients may serve valuable new information about the disease, which later on may influence our therapeutic possibilities and decisions.

  3. Hereditary Colorectal Cancer (CRC Program in Latvia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irmejs Arvids

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The aim of the study is to evaluate the incidence and phenotype - genotype characteristics of hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes in Latvia in order to develop the basis of clinical management for patients and their relatives affected by these syndromes. Materials and methods From 02/1999-09/2002 in several hospitals in Latvia cancer family histories were collected from 865 patients with CRC. In families suspected of having a history consistent with a hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome, DNA testing for MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 genes was performed. In addition immunohistochemical (IH examination of the normal and cancer tissue from large bowel tumors for MSH2 and MSH6 protein expression was performed prior to DNA analysis. Results From the 865 CRC cases only 3 (0.35% pedigrees fulfilled the Amsterdam II criteria of Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC and 15 cases (1.73% were suspected of HNPCC. In 69 cases (8% with a cancer family aggregation (CFA were identified. Thus far 27 IH analyses have been performed and in 3 cancers homogenous lack of MSH2 or MSH6 protein expression was found. In one of these cases a mutation in MSH6 was identified. In 18 patients suspected of HNPCC or of matching the Amsterdam II criteria, denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC followed by DNA sequencing of any heteroduplexes of the 35 exons comprising both MLH1 and MSH2 was performed revealing 3 mutations. For all of kindreds diagnosed definitively or with a high probability of being an HNPCC family appropriate recommendations concerning prophylactic measures, surveillance and treatment were provided in written form. Conclusions Existing pedigree/clinical data suggest that in Latvia the frequency of HNPCC is around 2% of consecutive colorectal cancer patients. It is crucial that genetic counseling is an integral part of cancer family syndrome management.

  4. Genetic heterogeneity in hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porteous, M E; Curtis, A; Williams, O; Marchuk, D; Bhattacharya, S S; Burn, J

    1994-01-01

    A locus causing hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) has recently been mapped to 9q34 in four families and designated HHT1. In this paper, the results of a linkage study showing genetic heterogeneity in four families in whom HHT is segregating are reported. All the previously reported 9q34 linked families contain at least one affected member with a symptomatic pulmonary arteriovenous malformation. We postulate that clinical heterogeneity may also be a feature of HHT with a significantly higher predisposition to symptomatic PAVMs associated with the HHT1 linked families. PMID:7891373

  5. Hereditary xanthinuria. Evidence for enhanced hypoxanthine salvage.

    OpenAIRE

    Mateos, F A; Puig, J G; Jiménez, M L; Fox, I H

    1987-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that there is an enhanced rate of hypoxanthine salvage in two siblings with hereditary xanthinuria. We radiolabeled the adenine nucleotide pool with [8-14C]adenine and examined purine nucleotide degradation after intravenous fructose. The cumulative excretion of radioactivity during a 5-d period was 9.7% and 9.1% of infused radioactivity in the enzyme-deficient patients and 6.0 +/- 0.7% (mean +/- SE) in four normal subjects. Fructose infusion increased urinary radioac...

  6. Asymptomatic hereditary xanthinuria: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagae, A; Murakami, E; Hiwada, K; Sato, Y; Kawachi, M; Kono, N

    1990-01-01

    A 22-year-old man with hereditary xanthinuria is reported. A biochemical study of the patient showed elevated serum levels of xanthine and hypoxanthine with concomitant increases in urinary excretion of xanthine and hypoxanthine. The xanthine oxidase activity in the duodenal mucosa of the patient was about 1.5% of normal value. Urinary excretion of xanthine and hypoxanthine of his parents and his eldest brother were significantly higher than the corresponding normal values, but the values were much less than those of the patient. The results suggested that the patient was homozygote, and his parents and his eldest brother were heterozygotes.

  7. Hereditary mucoepithelial dysplasia and severe respiratory distress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Halawa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary mucoepithelial dysplasia (HMD is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by mucoepithelial disruption of the skin, hair and mucous membranes. It results from defective gap junction formation and leads to non-scarring alopecia, mucosal erythema, perineal erythematous intertrigo, involvement of the conjunctival mucosa, and pulmonary disease. We present a case of severe respiratory distress in an initially healthy full term infant born to a mother with HMD. This infant later developed signs and symptoms of HMD. A high index of suspicion for pulmonary infection with atypical organism is essential in infants with a family history of HMD who present with respiratory distress.

  8. Attitude towards pre-implantation genetic diagnosis for hereditary cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammens, Chantal; Bleiker, Eveline; Aaronson, Neil; Vriends, Annette; Ausems, Margreet; Jansweijer, Maaike; Wagner, Anja; Sijmons, Rolf; van den Ouweland, Ans; van der Luijt, Rob; Spruijt, Liesbeth; Garcia, Encarna Gomez; Ruijs, Marielle; Verhoef, Senno

    2009-01-01

    The use of pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for hereditary cancer is subject to on-going debate, particularly among professionals. This study evaluates the attitude towards PGD and attitude-associated characteristics of those concerned: family members with a hereditary cancer predisposition.

  9. Cerebral abscesses among Danish patients with hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, A D; Tørring, P M; Nissen, H

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a dominantly inherited disease characterized by a wide variety of clinical manifestations, including pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs), which due to paradoxical embolization may cause cerebral abscess.......Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a dominantly inherited disease characterized by a wide variety of clinical manifestations, including pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs), which due to paradoxical embolization may cause cerebral abscess....

  10. Learning Hereditary and Reductive Prolog Programs from Entailment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Shahid; Rao, M. R. K. Krishna

    In this paper we study exact learning of Prolog programs from entailment and present an algorithm to learn two rich classes of Prolog programs namely hereditary and reductive Prolog programs. These classes contain standard Prolog programs with and without recursion like append, merge, split, delete, member, prefix, suffix, length, add, etc. Additionally our algorithm learns the hereditary Prolog programs in polynomial time.

  11. Review: Clinical aspects of hereditary DNA Mismatch repair gene mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijmons, Rolf H.; Hofstra, Robert M. W.

    Inherited mutations of the DNA Mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2 can result in two hereditary tumor syndromes: the adult-onset autosomal dominant Lynch syndrome, previously referred to as Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC) and the childhood-onset autosomal recessive

  12. Methylation profiles of hereditary and sporadic ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bol, Guus M.; Suijkerbuijk, Karijn P. M.; Bart, Joost; Vooijs, Marc; van der Wall, Elsken; van Diest, Paul J.

    Aims: Tumour suppressor gene silencing through promoter hypermethylation plays an important role in oncogenesis. Carcinogenesis of hereditary cancers usually differs from that of their sporadic counterparts, but methylation has hardly been studied in hereditary ovarian cancer. The aim of this study

  13. Genetic profiles distinguish different types of hereditary ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanska, Katarina; Malander, Susanne; Staaf, Johan

    2010-01-01

    Heredity represents the strongest risk factor for ovarian cancer with disease predisposing mutations identified in 15% of the tumors. With the aim to identify genetic classifiers for hereditary ovarian cancer, we profiled hereditary ovarian cancers linked to the hereditary breast and ovarian cancer...... that HBOC and HNPCC associated ovarian cancer develop along distinct genetic pathways and genetic profiles can thus be applied to distinguish between different types of hereditary ovarian cancer....... (HBOC) syndrome and the hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) syndrome. Genome-wide array comparative genomic hybridization was applied to 12 HBOC associated tumors with BRCA1 mutations and 8 HNPCC associated tumors with mismatch repair gene mutations with 24 sporadic ovarian cancers...

  14. Genetic profiles distinguish different types of hereditary ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanska, Katarina; Malander, Susanne; Staaf, Johan

    2010-01-01

    (HBOC) syndrome and the hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) syndrome. Genome-wide array comparative genomic hybridization was applied to 12 HBOC associated tumors with BRCA1 mutations and 8 HNPCC associated tumors with mismatch repair gene mutations with 24 sporadic ovarian cancers......Heredity represents the strongest risk factor for ovarian cancer with disease predisposing mutations identified in 15% of the tumors. With the aim to identify genetic classifiers for hereditary ovarian cancer, we profiled hereditary ovarian cancers linked to the hereditary breast and ovarian cancer...... that HBOC and HNPCC associated ovarian cancer develop along distinct genetic pathways and genetic profiles can thus be applied to distinguish between different types of hereditary ovarian cancer....

  15. Hereditary ovarian cancer: beyond the usual suspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, Kathryn P; Swisher, Elizabeth M

    2012-02-01

    In the past, hereditary ovarian carcinoma was attributed almost entirely to mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2, with a much smaller contribution from mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes. Recently, three new ovarian cancer susceptibility genes have been identified: RAD51C, RAD51D, and BRIP1. In addition, germline mutations in women with ovarian carcinoma have been recently identified in many of the previously identified breast cancer genes in the Fanconi anemia (FA)-BRCA pathway. While mutations in genes other than BRCA1 and BRCA2 are each individually rare, together they make up a significant proportion of cases. With at least 16 genes implicated in hereditary ovarian cancer to date, comprehensive testing for ovarian cancer risk will require assessment of many genes. As the cost of genomic sequencing continues to fall, the practice of evaluating cancer susceptibility one gene at a time is rapidly becoming obsolete. New advances in genomic technologies will likely accelerate the discovery of additional cancer susceptibility genes and increase the feasibility of comprehensive evaluation of multiple genes simultaneously at low cost. Improved recognition of inherited risk will identify individuals who are candidates for targeted prevention. In addition, identifying inherited mutations in a variety of FA-BRCA pathway genes may aid in identifying individuals who will selectively benefit from PARP inhibitors. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Genetics of hereditary head and neck paragangliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boedeker, Carsten C; Hensen, Erik F; Neumann, Hartmut P H; Maier, Wolfgang; van Nederveen, Francien H; Suárez, Carlos; Kunst, Henricus P; Rodrigo, Juan P; Takes, Robert P; Pellitteri, Phillip K; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Ferlito, Alfio

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to give an overview on hereditary syndromes associated with head and neck paragangliomas (HNPGs). Our methods were the review and discussion of the pertinent literature. About one third of all patients with HNPGs are carriers of germline mutations. Hereditary HNPGs have been described in association with mutations of 10 different genes. Mutations of the genes succinate dehydrogenase subunit D (SDHD), succinate dehydrogenase complex assembly factor 2 gene (SDHAF2), succinate dehydrogenase subunit C (SDHC), and succinate dehydrogenase subunit B (SDHB) are the cause of paraganglioma syndromes (PGLs) 1, 2, 3, and 4. Succinate dehydrogenase subunit A (SDHA), von Hippel-Lindau (VHL), and transmembrane protein 127 (TMEM127) gene mutations also harbor the risk for HNPG development. HNPGs in patients with rearranged during transfection (RET), neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), and MYC-associated factor X (MAX) gene mutations have been described very infrequently. All patients with HNPGs should be offered a molecular genetic screening. This screening may usually be restricted to mutations of the genes SDHD, SDHB, and SDHC. Certain clinical parameters can help to set up the order in which those genes should be tested. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Recommendations regarding splenectomy in hereditary hemolytic anemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iolascon, Achille; Andolfo, Immacolata; Barcellini, Wilma; Corcione, Francesco; Garçon, Loïc; De Franceschi, Lucia; Pignata, Claudio; Graziadei, Giovanna; Pospisilova, Dagmar; Rees, David C; de Montalembert, Mariane; Rivella, Stefano; Gambale, Antonella; Russo, Roberta; Ribeiro, Leticia; Vives-Corrons, Jules; Martinez, Patricia Aguilar; Kattamis, Antonis; Gulbis, Beatrice; Cappellini, Maria Domenica; Roberts, Irene; Tamary, Hannah

    2017-08-01

    Hereditary hemolytic anemias are a group of disorders with a variety of causes, including red cell membrane defects, red blood cell enzyme disorders, congenital dyserythropoietic anemias, thalassemia syndromes and hemoglobinopathies. As damaged red blood cells passing through the red pulp of the spleen are removed by splenic macrophages, splenectomy is one possible therapeutic approach to the management of severely affected patients. However, except for hereditary spherocytosis for which the effectiveness of splenectomy has been well documented, the efficacy of splenectomy in other anemias within this group has yet to be determined and there are concerns regarding short- and long-term infectious and thrombotic complications. In light of the priorities identified by the European Hematology Association Roadmap we generated specific recommendations for each disorder, except thalassemia syndromes for which there are other, recent guidelines. Our recommendations are intended to enable clinicians to achieve better informed decisions on disease management by splenectomy, on the type of splenectomy and the possible consequences. As no randomized clinical trials, case control or cohort studies regarding splenectomy in these disorders were found in the literature, recommendations for each disease were based on expert opinion and were subsequently critically revised and modified by the Splenectomy in Rare Anemias Study Group, which includes hematologists caring for both adults and children. Copyright© 2017 Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  18. HEREDITARY FRUCTOSE INTOLERANCE – CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jernej Brecelj

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hereditary fructose intolerance is a rare inborn error of carbohydrate metabolism that presents with hypoglicemia, metabolic acidosis and liver decompensation when the patient is exposed to fructose. Diagnosis was established by fructose tolerance test in the past and nowadays mostly by determination of deficient enzyme fructose-1phosphate aldolase (aldolase B activity in hepatic tissue or by molecular genetic means if the mutation is known. Treatment involves elimination (in infants or reduction of fructose and sucrose from the diet and results in improvement in the patient’s clinical status and liver disease.Results. This article presents a patient with hereditary fructose intolerance who was diagnosed 18 years ago on the Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Ljubljana Children’s Hospital. At that time oral fructose tolerance test was used to diagnose the disorder. When she was 17 we performed liver biopsy. The enzyme determination showed the absence of aldolase B activity.Conclusions. Only cooperation of different experts enables recognition of rare metabolic disorders which must be prompt to prevent further damage.

  19. Recommendations regarding splenectomy in hereditary hemolytic anemias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iolascon, Achille; Andolfo, Immacolata; Barcellini, Wilma; Corcione, Francesco; Garçon, Loïc; De Franceschi, Lucia; Pignata, Claudio; Graziadei, Giovanna; Pospisilova, Dagmar; Rees, David C.; de Montalembert, Mariane; Rivella, Stefano; Gambale, Antonella; Russo, Roberta; Ribeiro, Leticia; Vives-Corrons, Jules; Martinez, Patricia Aguilar; Kattamis, Antonis; Gulbis, Beatrice; Cappellini, Maria Domenica; Roberts, Irene; Tamary, Hannah

    2017-01-01

    Hereditary hemolytic anemias are a group of disorders with a variety of causes, including red cell membrane defects, red blood cell enzyme disorders, congenital dyserythropoietic anemias, thalassemia syndromes and hemoglobinopathies. As damaged red blood cells passing through the red pulp of the spleen are removed by splenic macrophages, splenectomy is one possible therapeutic approach to the management of severely affected patients. However, except for hereditary spherocytosis for which the effectiveness of splenectomy has been well documented, the efficacy of splenectomy in other anemias within this group has yet to be determined and there are concerns regarding short- and long-term infectious and thrombotic complications. In light of the priorities identified by the European Hematology Association Roadmap we generated specific recommendations for each disorder, except thalassemia syndromes for which there are other, recent guidelines. Our recommendations are intended to enable clinicians to achieve better informed decisions on disease management by splenectomy, on the type of splenectomy and the possible consequences. As no randomized clinical trials, case control or cohort studies regarding splenectomy in these disorders were found in the literature, recommendations for each disease were based on expert opinion and were subsequently critically revised and modified by the Splenectomy in Rare Anemias Study Group, which includes hematologists caring for both adults and children. PMID:28550188

  20. Leber hereditary optic neuropathy: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyerson C

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cherise Meyerson, Greg Van Stavern, Collin McClelland Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, USA Abstract: Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON is one of the most common inherited optic neuropathies causing bilateral central vision loss. The disorder results from point mutations in mitochondrial DNA and subsequent mitochondrial dysfunction. The primary cell type that is lost in LHON is the retinal ganglion cell, which is highly susceptible to disrupted ATP production and oxidative stress. Inheritance of LHON follows that of mitochondrial genetics, and it has a highly variable clinical phenotype, as other genetic and environmental factors also play a role. Although LHON usually presents with isolated vision loss, some patients suffer other neurological sequelae. For ill-defined reasons, male LHON mutation carriers are more affected than females. Most LHON patients remain legally blind, but a small proportion can experience spontaneous partial recovery, often within the first year of symptom onset. Unfortunately, at this time there are no established curative interventions and treatment is largely supportive. Patients should be offered low vision services and counseled on mitigating risk factors for additional vision loss, such as smoking and consuming alcohol. Encouraging treatments currently undergoing investigation includes ubiquinone analogs, such as idebenone, as well as gene therapy and stem cells to restore ATP synthesis and provide neuroprotection to surviving retinal ganglion cells. Keywords: Leber hereditary optic neuropathy, mitochondria, neuro-ophthalmology, mitochondrial DNA

  1. Hereditary xanthinuria: report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, T S

    1993-05-01

    Hereditary xanthinuria is a rare disorder characterized by the replacement of uric acid by xanthine and hypoxanthine in urine. Two cases of classic hereditary xanthinuria in Taiwan are herein reported. Case 1: a 30-year-old woman was by chance found to have hypouricemia. Urine and plasma purines were checked through the use of high performance liquid chromatography. Urine excretion of uric acid was 0.029 mumol (0.005 mg)/mg creatinine (30 mumol/24 hr); xanthine 1.9 mumol/mg creatinine (1935 mumol/24 hr); and hypoxanthine 0.58 mumol/mg creatinine (587 mumol/24 hr). Plasma xanthine was 9.3 mumol/L; hypoxanthine 5.8 mumol/L; and uric acid 0.5 mumol/L (0.001 mg/dL). Case 2: a brother of case 1 had a previous history of urolithiasis. Urine excretion of uric acid was 0.15 mumol (0.025 mg)/mg creatinine (189 mumol/24 hr); xanthine 1.3 mumol/mg creatinine (1620 mumol/24 hr); and hypoxanthine 0.22 mumol/mg creatinine (276 mumol/24 hr).

  2. Hereditary xanthinuria. Evidence for enhanced hypoxanthine salvage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateos, F A; Puig, J G; Jiménez, M L; Fox, I H

    1987-03-01

    We tested the hypothesis that there is an enhanced rate of hypoxanthine salvage in two siblings with hereditary xanthinuria. We radiolabeled the adenine nucleotide pool with [8-14C]adenine and examined purine nucleotide degradation after intravenous fructose. The cumulative excretion of radioactivity during a 5-d period was 9.7% and 9.1% of infused radioactivity in the enzyme-deficient patients and 6.0 +/- 0.7% (mean +/- SE) in four normal subjects. Fructose infusion increased urinary radioactivity to 7.96 and 9.16 X 10(6) cpm/g creatinine in both patients and to 4.73 +/- 0.69 X 10(6) cpm/g creatinine in controls. The infusion of fructose increased total urinary purine excretion to a mean of 487% from low-normal baseline values in the patients and to 398 +/- 86% in control subjects. In the enzyme-deficient patients, the infusion of fructose elicited an increase of plasma guanosine from undetectable values to 0.7 and 0.9 microM. With adjustments made for intestinal purine loss, these data support the hypothesis that there is enhanced hypoxanthine salvage in hereditary xanthinuria. Degradation of guanine nucleotides to xanthine bypasses the hypoxanthine salvage pathway and may explain the predominance of this urinary purine compound in xanthinuria.

  3. Ocular features of multiple system atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Maria D; Pulido, Jose S; Coon, Elizabeth A; Chen, John J

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to gain better understanding of the ocular manifestations of multiple system atrophy (MSA), a neurodegenerative disorder rarely studied in terms of its ophthalmologic features. We performed a retrospective case series (1/1/05-12/31/14) to search for patients seen at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, who had mention of MSA in the medical record and an eye examination, which yielded 285 cases. Of the 285, we identified 39 cases of true MSA. Each of these 39 patients was further reviewed for ocular abnormalities potentially related to MSA. Ocular findings potentially attributable to MSA were found in 64% of patients. Most common were dry eye (N = 14), conjugate eye movement abnormalities (N = 13), and ocular misalignment (N = 7). One patient had dry eye and monocular diplopia from trichiasis due to cicatricial pemphigoid, one had bilateral optic atrophy, and one had Adie's tonic pupil. Conjugate eye movement abnormalities (33%) and ocular misalignment (18%) were more common in patients with MSA-C. Patients with ocular findings, excluding dry eye, had a significantly shorter lifespan from time of initial neurologic symptoms to death. Our study confirms conjugate eye movement abnormalities and misalignment are common ocular findings in patients with MSA. Bilateral optic atrophy and cicatricial pemphigoid are possibly attributable to the disease. Ocular manifestations in MSA predict a poor prognosis as these patients have a significantly shorter lifespan. Therefore, we recommend patients with MSA have a comprehensive neuro-ophthalmologic exam at time of diagnosis, and thereafter, to screen for eye findings that may indicate a shorter lifespan. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. [Homonymous hemianopia and posterior cortical atrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formaglio, M; Krolak-Salmon, P; Tilikete, C; Bernard, M; Croisile, B; Vighetto, A

    2009-03-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a clinically and radiologically defined syndrome, in which predominant symptoms focus on higher visual dysfunction with progressive course and association with cortical atrophy or hypometabolism that predominates in the posterior part of the hemispheres. Homonymous hemianopia (HH) has rarely been described in this syndrome. We report on six patients (four females, two males, aged 63 to 80) referred for visual disorder which led to demonstration of HH using perimetry testing. These patients were followed for 1 to 5 years after discovery of HH. Brain imaging with MRI or CT scan was obtained in the six cases and a SPECT scan was performed in four cases. HH was left-sided in four cases and right-sided in two cases. Associated symptoms related to higher visual dysfunction were simultagnosia, alone or as part of a full Balint's syndrome, alexia, constructional apraxia, dressing apraxia, visual form agnosia, prosopagnosia and hemispatial neglect. These symptoms were mild at onset but invariably worsened with disease progression. Dementia eventually developed in all cases. The clinical diagnosis was probable Alzheimer's disease in five cases and corticobasal degeneration in one case. Radiology showed posterior cortex atrophy in all cases as well as reduced cerebral blood flow in the same region, with an asymmetrical pattern compatible with the side of HH. Elementary cortical lesions in PCA can develop mainly in the associative visual areas and even in the primary visual area, resulting in HH. HH has rarely been documented in PCA, but its prevalence would probably be higher if systematic search was conducted. Apparently isolated HH of insidious onset should suggest PCA and lead to neuropsychological testing and search for discrete atrophic changes of the posterior cortex on MRI as well as for metabolic alterations with SPECT or PET.

  5. Skin lightening cream induced dermatitis and atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremmer, Matthew; Gardner, James; Driscoll, Marcia

    2011-03-15

    We present the case of a Malian woman who had been using skin-lightening creams for an excess of 5 years. On presentation to our clinic she had multiple areas of atrophy and striae with erythema. She had been using a topical estrogen cream over all effected areas for two weeks. We present this case to draw attention to the serious problem of widespread and unregulated use of skin lightening creams in Africa. Herein we include a review of the literature on the prevalence of the problem as well as associated side effects of commonly implicated medications.

  6. A new mouse allele of glutamate receptor delta 2 with cerebellar atrophy and progressive ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Yuka; Yoshioka, Yoshichika; Suzuki, Kinuko; Miyazaki, Taisuke; Koura, Minako; Saigoh, Kazumasa; Kajimura, Naoko; Monobe, Yoko; Kusunoki, Susumu; Matsuda, Junichiro; Watanabe, Masahiko; Hayasaka, Naoto

    2014-01-01

    Spinocerebellar degenerations (SCDs) are a large class of sporadic or hereditary neurodegenerative disorders characterized by progressive motion defects and degenerative changes in the cerebellum and other parts of the CNS. Here we report the identification and establishment from a C57BL/6J mouse colony of a novel mouse line developing spontaneous progressive ataxia, which we refer to as ts3. Frequency of the phenotypic expression was consistent with an autosomal recessive Mendelian trait of inheritance, suggesting that a single gene mutation is responsible for the ataxic phenotype of this line. The onset of ataxia was observed at about three weeks of age, which slowly progressed until the hind limbs became entirely paralyzed in many cases. Micro-MRI study revealed significant cerebellar atrophy in all the ataxic mice, although individual variations were observed. Detailed histological analyses demonstrated significant atrophy of the anterior folia with reduced granule cells (GC) and abnormal morphology of cerebellar Purkinje cells (PC). Study by ultra-high voltage electron microscopy (UHVEM) further indicated aberrant morphology of PC dendrites and their spines, suggesting both morphological and functional abnormalities of the PC in the mutants. Immunohistochemical studies also revealed defects in parallel fiber (PF)-PC synapse formation and abnormal distal extension of climbing fibers (CF). Based on the phenotypic similarities of the ts3 mutant with other known ataxic mutants, we performed immunohistological analyses and found that expression levels of two genes and their products, glutamate receptor delta2 (grid2) and its ligand, cerebellin1 (Cbln1), are significantly reduced or undetectable. Finally, we sequenced the candidate genes and detected a large deletion in the coding region of the grid2 gene. Our present study suggests that ts3 is a new allele of the grid2 gene, which causes similar but different phenotypes as compared to other grid2 mutants.

  7. Loss-of-function mutations in the ATP13A2/PARK9 gene cause complicated hereditary spastic paraplegia (SPG78).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada-Cuzcano, Alejandro; Martin, Shaun; Chamova, Teodora; Synofzik, Matthis; Timmann, Dagmar; Holemans, Tine; Andreeva, Albena; Reichbauer, Jennifer; De Rycke, Riet; Chang, Dae-In; van Veen, Sarah; Samuel, Jean; Schöls, Ludger; Pöppel, Thorsten; Mollerup Sørensen, Danny; Asselbergh, Bob; Klein, Christine; Zuchner, Stephan; Jordanova, Albena; Vangheluwe, Peter; Tournev, Ivailo; Schüle, Rebecca

    2017-02-01

    spastic paraparesis. Cognitive impairment was present in most of the cases and ranged from very mild deficits to advanced dementia with fronto-temporal characteristics. Nerve conduction studies revealed involvement of the peripheral motor and sensory nerves. Only one of five patients with hereditary spastic paraplegia showed clinical indication of extrapyramidal involvement in the form of subtle bradykinesia and slight resting tremor. Neuroimaging cranial investigations revealed pronounced vermian and hemispheric cerebellar atrophy. Notably, reduced striatal dopamine was apparent in the brain of one of the patients, who had no clinical signs or symptoms of extrapyramidal involvement. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Abnormal pain perception in patients with Multiple System Atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ory-Magne, F; Pellaprat, J; Harroch, E; Galitzsky, M; Rousseau, V; Pavy-Le Traon, A; Rascol, O; Gerdelat, A; Brefel-Courbon, C

    2018-03-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease or Multiple System Atrophy frequently experience painful sensations. The few studies investigating pain mechanisms in Multiple System Atrophy patients have reported contradictory results. In our study, we compared pain thresholds in Multiple System Atrophy and Parkinson's disease patients and healthy controls and evaluated the effect of l-DOPA on pain thresholds. We assessed subjective and objective pain thresholds (using a thermotest and RIII reflex), and pain tolerance in OFF and ON conditions, clinical pain, motor and psychological evaluation. Pain was reported in 78.6% of Multiple System Atrophy patients and in 37.5% of Parkinson's disease patients. In the OFF condition, subjective and objective pain thresholds were significantly lower in Multiple System Atrophy patients than in healthy controls (43.8 °C ± 1.3 vs 45.7 °C ± 0.8; p = 0.0005 and 7.4 mA ± 3.8 vs 13.7 mA ± 2.8; p = 0.002, respectively). They were also significantly reduced in Multiple System Atrophy compared to Parkinson's disease patients. No significant difference was found in pain tolerance for the 3 groups and in the effect of l-DOPA on pain thresholds in Multiple System Atrophy and Parkinson's disease patients. In the ON condition, pain tolerance tended to be reduced in Multiple System Atrophy versus Parkinson's disease patients (p = 0.05). Multiple System Atrophy patients had an increase in pain perception compared to Parkinson's disease patients and healthy controls. The l-DOPA effect was similar for pain thresholds in Multiple System Atrophy and Parkinson's disease patients, but tended to worsen pain tolerance in Multiple System Atrophy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of muscle atrophy on motor control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, D. G.

    1985-01-01

    As a biological tissue, muscle adapts to the demands of usage. One traditional way of assessing the extent of this adaptation has been to examine the effects of an altered-activity protocol on the physiological properties of muscles. However, in order to accurately interpret the changes associated with an activity pattern, it is necessary to employ an appropriate control model. A substantial literature exists which reports altered-use effects by comparing experimental observations with those from animals raised in small laboratory cages. Some evidence suggests that small-cage-reared animals actually represent a model of reduced use. For example, laboratory animals subjected to limited physical activity have shown resistance to insulin-induced glucose uptake which can be altered by exercise training. This project concerned itself with the basic mechanisms underlying muscle atrophy. Specifically, the project addressed the issue of the appropriateness of rats raised in conventional-sized cages as experimental models to examine this phenomenon. The project hypothesis was that rats raised in small cages are inappropriate models for the study of muscle atrophy. The experimental protocol involved: 1) raising two populations of rats, one group in conventional (small)-sized cages and the other group in a much larger (133x) cage, from weanling age (21 days) through to young adulthood (125 days); 2) comparison of size- and force-related characteristics of selected test muscles in an acute terminal paradigm.

  10. Bringing CLARITY to Gray Matter Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Rory D.; Kurth, Florian; Itoh, Noriko; Mongerson, Chandler R.L.; Wailes, Shannon H.; Peng, Mavis S.; MacKenzie-Graham, Allan J.

    2015-01-01

    Gray matter atrophy has been shown to be a strong correlate to clinical disability in multiple sclerosis (MS) and its most commonly used animal model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). However, the relationship between gray mater atrophy and the spinal cord pathology often observed in EAE has never been established. Here EAE was induced in Thy1.1-YFP mice and their brains imaged using in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The brains and spinal cords were subsequently optically cleared using Clear Lipid-exchanged Acrylamide-hybridized Rigid Imaging-compatible Tissue-hYdrogel (CLARITY). Axons were followed 5 mm longitudinally in three dimensions in intact spinal cords revealing that 61% of the axons exhibited a mean of 22 axonal ovoids and 8% of the axons terminating in axonal end bulbs. In the cerebral cortex, we observed a decrease in the mean number of layer V pyramidal neurons and a decrease in the mean length of the apical dendrites of the remaining neurons, compared to healthy controls. MRI analysis demonstrated decreased cortical volumes in EAE. Cross-modality correlations revealed a direct relationship between cortical volume loss and axonal end bulb number in the spinal cord, but not ovoid number. This is the first report of the use of CLARITY in an animal model of disease and the first report of the use of both CLARITY and MRI. PMID:25038439

  11. Oats induced villous atrophy in coeliac disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundin, K E A; Nilsen, E M; Scott, H G; Løberg, E M; Gjøen, A; Bratlie, J; Skar, V; Mendez, E; Løvik, A; Kett, K

    2003-01-01

    The current trend is to allow coeliac disease (CD) patients to introduce oats to their gluten free diet. We sought further data from the clinical setting with regards to oats consumption by coeliac patients. Several oat products were tested for wheat contamination using a commercial enzyme linked immunoassay (ELISA) kit, and six samples were examined by an ELISA using a cocktail of monoclonal antibodies, mass spectrometry, and western blot analysis. Nineteen adult CD patients on a gluten free diet were challenged with 50 g of oats per day for 12 weeks. Serological testing and gastroduodenoscopy was performed before and after the challenge. Biopsies were scored histologically and levels of mRNA specific for interferon γ were determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis. Oats were well tolerated by most patients but several reported initial abdominal discomfort and bloating. One of the patients developed partial villous atrophy and a rash during the first oats challenge. She subsequently improved on an oats free diet but developed subtotal villous atrophy and dramatic dermatitis during a second challenge. Five of the patients showed positive levels of interferon γ mRNA after challenge. Some concerns therefore remain with respect to the safety of oats for coeliacs. PMID:14570737

  12. Gait evolution in a family with hereditary spastic paraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armand, Stéphane; Turcot, Katia; Bonnefoy-Mazure, Alice; Lascombes, Pierre; De Coulon, Geraldo

    2015-01-01

    The degree of disability in patients with hereditary spastic paraplegia has been reported variable even in members of the same family (same gene mutation). Moreover, it has been established that patients with hereditary spastic paraplegia should be treated differently from cerebral palsy patients due to the progressive nature of this disease. However, the gait evolution of hereditary spastic paraplegia showing onset symptoms at an early age has been described as stable. Therefore, this study aims to evaluate the walking ability and the influence of treatments on gait evolution in a family with hereditary spastic paraplegia. Clinical gait analyses were performed in six hereditary spastic paraplegia patients from the same family with a follow-up of 4-15 years. Based on the gait deviation index, results showed a large variation of walking ability in these patients and no statistical difference between the first and last examination. In fact, three patients have improved their gait (from childhood to adolescence) whereas three patients worsened their gait. Gait alterations in a family with hereditary spastic paraplegia are heterogeneous. Gait evolution in hereditary spastic paraplegia with early symptoms had a tendency to improve gait until adolescence with adapted treatments and to decline in the adulthood. Copyright © 2014 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Committee opinion no. 634: Hereditary cancer syndromes and risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    A hereditary cancer syndrome is a genetic predisposition to certain types of cancer, often with onset at an early age, caused by inherited mutations in one or more genes. Cases of cancer commonly encountered by obstetrician-gynecologists or other obstetric-gynecologic providers--such as breast cancer, ovarian cancer, and endometrial cancer--are features of specific hereditary cancer syndromes. The most common hereditary cancer syndromes related to gynecologic cancer include hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome, Lynch syndrome, Li-Fraumeni syndrome, Cowden syndrome, and Peutz-Jeghers syndrome. A hereditary cancer risk assessment is the key to identifying patients and families who may be at increased risk of developing certain types of cancer. Screening should include, at minimum, a personal cancer history and a first- and second-degree relative cancer history that includes a description of the type of primary cancer, the age of onset, and the lineage (paternal versus maternal) of the family member. In addition, a patient's ethnic background can influence her genetic risk. If a hereditary cancer risk assessment suggests an increased risk of a hereditary cancer syndrome, referral to a specialist in cancer genetics or a health care provider with expertise in genetics is recommended for expanded gathering of family history information, risk assessment, education, and counseling, which may lead to genetic testing.

  14. Genes and SNPs associated with non-hereditary and hereditary colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassiri, Mohammadreza; Kooshyar, Mohammad Mahdi; Roudbar, Zahra; Mahdavi, Morteza; Doosti, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in both men and women in the world and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths. The incidence of colorectal cancer has increased in Iran in the past three decades and is now considered as a serious problem for our society. This cancer has two types hereditary and non-hereditary, 80% of cases being the latter. Considering that the relationship between SNPs with diseases is a concern, many researchers believed that they offer valuable markers for identifying genes responsible for susceptibility to common diseases. In some cases, they are direct causes of human disease. One SNP can increase risk of cancer, but when considering the rate of overlap and frequency of DNA repair pathways, it might be expected that SNP alone cannot affect the final result of cancer, although several SNPs together can exert a significant influence. Therefore identification of these SNPs is very important. The most important loci which include mutations are: MLH1, MSH2, PMS2, APC, MUTYH, SMAD7, STK11, XRCC3, DNMT1, MTHFR, Exo1, XRCC1 and VDR. Presence of SNPs in these genes decreases or increases risk of colorectal cancer. In this article we reviewed the Genes and SNPs associated with non-hereditary and hereditary of colorectal cancer that recently were reported from candidate gene y, meta-analysis and GWAS studies. As with other cancers, colorectal cancer is associated with SNPs in gene loci. Generally, by exploring SNPs, it is feasible to predict the risk of developing colorectal cancer and thus establishing proper preventive measures. SNPs of genes associated with colorectal cancer can be used as a marker SNP panel as a potential tool for improving cancer diagnosis and treatment planning.

  15. Home mechanical ventilation in childhood-onset hereditary neuromuscular diseases: 13 years' experience at a single center in Korea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Joo Han

    Full Text Available Children with hereditary neuromuscular diseases (NMDs are at a high risk of morbidity and mortality related to respiratory failure. The use of home mechanical ventilation (HMV has saved the lives of many children with NMD but, due to a lack of studies, dependable guidelines are not available. We drew upon our experience to compare the various underlying NMDs and to evaluate HMV with regard to respiratory morbidity, the proper indications and timing for its use, and to develop a policy to improve the quality of home noninvasive ventilation (NIV.We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of 57 children with childhood-onset hereditary NMDs in whom HMV was initiated between January 2000 and May 2013 at Seoul National University Children's Hospital. The degree of respiratory morbidity was estimated by the frequency and duration of hospitalizations caused by respiratory distress.The most common NMD was spinal muscular atrophy (SMA, n = 33. Emergent mechanical ventilation was initiated in 44% of the patients before the confirmed diagnosis, and the indicators of pre-HMV respiratory morbidity (e.g., extubation trials, hypoxia, hospitalizations, and intensive care unit stay were greater in these patients than in others. The proportion of post-HMV hospitalizations (range, 0.00-0.52; median, 0.01 was lower than that of pre-HMV hospitalizations (0.02-1.00; 0.99 (P < 0.001. Eight patients were able to maintain home NIV. The main causes of NIV failure were air leakage and a large amount of airway secretions.The application of HMV helped reduce respiratory morbidity in children with childhood-onset hereditary NMD. Patients with SMA type I can benefit from an early diagnosis and the timely application of HMV. The choice between invasive and noninvasive HMV should be based on the patient's age and NIV trial tolerance. Systematic follow-up guidelines provided by a multidisciplinary team are needed.

  16. [The broad phenotypic spectrum of SCA-3: hereditary spastic paraplegia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Quiroga, Sergio A; González-Morón, Dolores; Arakaki, Tomoko; Garreto, Nélida; Kauffman, Marcelo A

    2013-01-01

    Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) is the most frequent dominantly inherited spinocerebellar ataxia. A marked phenotypic variability is a characteristic of this disorder that could involve non-cerebellar presentations. Based on several case reports describing pyramidal dysfunction as the main symptom at onset, a clinical form resembling hereditary spastic paraplegia has been proposed. We report here two further cases of MJD patients whose initial clinical presentation suggested hereditary spastic paraplegia, and a summary of the main findings of previously similar published reports. Our findings lent support to the proposal of a MJD subtype distinguished by a marked pyramidal dysfunction at onset, simulating a clinical picture of hereditary spastic paraplegia.

  17. Diagnosis and Management of Hereditary Renal Cell Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menko, Fred H; Maher, Eamonn R

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell cancer (RCC) is the common denominator for a heterogeneous group of diseases. The subclassification of these tumours is based on histological type and molecular pathogenesis. Insight into molecular pathogenesis has led to the development of targeted systemic therapies. Genetic susceptibility is the principal cause of RCC in about 2-4% of cases. Hereditary RCC is the umbrella term for about a dozen different conditions, the most frequent of which is von Hippel-Lindau disease . Here, we describe the main hereditary RCC syndromes, consider criteria for referral of RCC patients for clinical genetic assessment and discuss management options for patients with hereditary RCC and their at-risk relatives.

  18. Consensus Definition for Atrophy Associated with Age-Related Macular Degeneration on OCT: Classification of Atrophy Report 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadda, Srinivas R; Guymer, Robyn; Holz, Frank G; Schmitz-Valckenberg, Steffen; Curcio, Christine A; Bird, Alan C; Blodi, Barbara A; Bottoni, Ferdinando; Chakravarthy, Usha; Chew, Emily Y; Csaky, Karl; Danis, Ronald P; Fleckenstein, Monika; Freund, K Bailey; Grunwald, Juan; Hoyng, Carel B; Jaffe, Glenn J; Liakopoulos, Sandra; Monés, Jordi M; Pauleikhoff, Daniel; Rosenfeld, Philip J; Sarraf, David; Spaide, Richard F; Tadayoni, Ramin; Tufail, Adnan; Wolf, Sebastian; Staurenghi, Giovanni

    2017-11-02

    To develop consensus terminology and criteria for defining atrophy based on OCT findings in the setting of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Consensus meeting. Panel of retina specialists, image reading center experts, retinal histologists, and optics engineers. As part of the Classification of Atrophy Meetings (CAM) program, an international group of experts surveyed the existing literature, performed a masked analysis of longitudinal multimodal imaging for a series of eyes with AMD, and reviewed the results of this analysis to define areas of agreement and disagreement. Through consensus discussions at 3 meetings over 12 months, a classification system based on OCT was proposed for atrophy secondary to AMD. Specific criteria were defined to establish the presence of atrophy. A consensus classification system for atrophy and OCT-based criteria to identify atrophy. OCT was proposed as the reference standard or base imaging method to diagnose and stage atrophy. Other methods, including fundus autofluorescence, near-infrared reflectance, and color imaging, provided complementary and confirmatory information. Recognizing that photoreceptor atrophy can occur without retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) atrophy and that atrophy can undergo an evolution of different stages, 4 terms and histologic candidates were proposed: complete RPE and outer retinal atrophy (cRORA), incomplete RPE and outer retinal atrophy, complete outer retinal atrophy, and incomplete outer retinal atrophy. Specific OCT criteria to diagnose cRORA were proposed: (1) a region of hypertransmission of at least 250 μm in diameter, (2) a zone of attenuation or disruption of the RPE of at least 250 μm in diameter, (3) evidence of overlying photoreceptor degeneration, and (4) absence of scrolled RPE or other signs of an RPE tear. A classification system and criteria for OCT-defined atrophy in the setting of AMD has been proposed based on an international consensus. This classification is a more complete

  19. Corpus callosum atrophy in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Kristian Steen; Garde, Ellen; Skimminge, Arnold

    2011-01-01

    Several studies have found atrophy of the corpus callosum (CC) in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, it remains unclear whether callosal atrophy is already present in the early stages of AD, and to what extent it may be associated with other structural changes in the brain, such as ...

  20. Carrier screening for spinal muscular atrophy in Italian population

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal-recessive neuromuscular disorder characterized by motor neuron degeneration in the anterior horn of the spinal cord and brain stem, resulting in progressive muscle weakness and atrophy. The responsible survival motor neuron gene (SMN1; HGNC: 11117) is localized in ...

  1. A case of spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 mimicking olivopontocerebellar atrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagawa, N.; Katayama, T.; Makita, Y.; Kuroda, K.; Aizawa, H.; Kikuchi, K. [First Dept. of Internal Medicine, Asahikawa Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1999-07-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) is an autosomal dominant, slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia without multisystem involvement. We report a 57-year-old woman with genetically confirmed SCA6 who showed clinical features of olivopontocerebellar atrophy. Conventional T2-weighted and FLAIR MRI demonstrated high signal in the middle cerebellar peduncles, in addition to mild atrophy of the pons and cerebellum. (orig.)

  2. Molecular aspects of hereditary spastic paraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noreau, Anne; Dion, Patrick A; Rouleau, Guy A

    2014-07-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders characterized by progressive lower limbs spasticity and weakness. What was first thought to be a small group of rare Mendelian disorder has now become a large group that includes many complex syndromes. While large families with defined modes of inheritance were used for the initial HSP gene discovery, new sequencing technologies have recently allowed the study of small families, with the identification of many new disease causative genes. These discoveries are slowly leading to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying HSP with the identification of precise disease pathways. These insights may lead to new therapeutic strategies for what is a group of largely untreatable diseases. This review looks at the key players involved in HSP and where they act in their specific pathways. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Dementia in hereditary cystatin C amyloidosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blöndal, H; Guomundsson, G; Benedikz, Eirikur

    1989-01-01

    Nineteen cases with verified Hereditary Cystatin C Amyloid Angiopathy are presented. All of the cases had one or more cerebrovascular insults starting at the age of 20-41 years and survived from 10 days to 23 years after the first insult. Progressive dementia was a prominent clinical feature...... in seventeen cases of whom two presented with dementia. At the last examination the majority had severe dementia and severely abnormal EEG. Anti-cystatin C positive amyloid vascular and perivascular infiltrates were found. The resulting damage to the microvasculature of the brain and secondary hemorrhages...... and infarctions were considered to be an adequate explanation for the dementia in these cases. Skin biopsies can now probably be used to demonstrate cystatin C positive amyloid deposits conclusively in the tissues of these patients....

  4. Genetics of hereditary large vessel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morisaki, Takayuki; Morisaki, Hiroko

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress in the study of hereditary large vessel diseases such as Marfan syndrome (MFS) have not only identified responsible genes but also provided better understanding of the pathophysiology and revealed possible new therapeutic targets. Genes identified for these diseases include FBN1, TGFBR1, TGFBR2, SMAD3, TGFB2, TGFB3, SKI, EFEMP2, COL3A1, FLNA, ACTA2, MYH11, MYLK and SLC2A10, as well as others. Their dysfunction disrupts the function of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling pathways, as well as that of the extracellular matrix and smooth muscle contractile apparatus, resulting in progression of structural damage to large vessels, including aortic aneurysms and dissections. Notably, it has been shown that the TGF-β signaling pathway has a key role in the pathogenesis of MFS and related disorders, which may be important for development of strategies for medical and surgical treatment of thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections.

  5. Skin deposits in hereditary cystatin C amyloidosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benedikz, Eirikur; Blöndal, H; Gudmundsson, G

    1990-01-01

    . Skin from 12 individuals who served as controls and skin from 14 close relatives of the patients was negative for amyloid. Punch biopsy of the skin is a simple procedure which is of value for the diagnosis of HCCA, even before the appearance of clinical symptoms. This method might also be of use......Clinically normal skin from 47 individuals aged 9-70 years was investigated. Cystatin C amyloid deposits were found in various locations of the skin by light and/or electron microscopy, in all 12 patients with a clinical history of hereditary cystatin C amyloidosis (HCCA). Six asymptomatic...... individuals, who had the Alu 1 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) marker reported to cosegregate with the disease, also had cystatin C amyloid deposits in the skin. Three asymptomatic individuals (age 17-46) belonging to the HCCA families were without amyloid in the skin but had Alu 1 RFLP marker...

  6. [Hereditary ichthyosis: A diagnostic and therapeutic challenge].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega Almendra, Nadia; Aranibar Duran, Ligia

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary ichthyoses are a group of genetic disorders of cornification, which are characterised by hyperkeratosis and scaling. The new classification identifies 36 types of ichthyosis, which are subdivided according to their frequency, pattern of inheritance and extracutaneous involvement. The diagnosis is mainly based on clinical features, since genetic studies are not available in our setting. Treatment is symptomatic and management should be performed by a multidisciplinary team. In this article, the diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of different types of ichthyosis are reviewed, taking into account the nomenclature and modifications presented in the new classification. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Wu Chang

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON is a maternally inherited mitochondrial disease that primarily affects the optic nerve, causing bilateral vision loss in juveniles and young adults. A 12-year-old boy had complained of blurred vision in both eyes for more than 1 year. His best-corrected visual acuity was 0.08 in the right eye and 0.1 in the left. Ophthalmologic examination showed bilateral optic disc hyperemia and margin blurring, peripapillary telangiectasis, and a relative afferent pupil defect in his right eye. Fluorescein angiography showed no stain or leakage around the optic disc in the late phase. Visual field analysis showed central scotoma in the left eye and a near-total defect in the right. Upon examination of the patient's mitochondrial DNA, a point mutation at nucleotide position 11778 was found, and the diagnosis of LHON was confirmed. Coenzyme Q10 was used to treat the patient.

  8. Pulmonary vascular complications of hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Circo, Sebastian; Gossage, James R

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to present the latest advances and recommendations in the diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary vascular complications associated with hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT): pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs), pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), pulmonary hypertension associated with high output cardiac failure or liver vascular malformations, haemoptysis, haemothorax and thromboembolic disease. Transthoracic contrast echocardiography has been validated as a screening tool for PAVM in patients with suspected HHT. Advancements in genetic testing support its use in family members at risk as a cost-effective measure. Therapy with bevacizumab in patients with high output cardiac failure and severe liver AVMs showed promising results. PAH tends to be more aggressive in HHT type 2 patients. Patients suffering from this elusive disease should be referred to HHT specialized centres to ensure a standardized and timely approach to diagnosis and management.

  9. Surgical treatment of gastrointestinal hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Min-Hsuan; Chen, Chiung-Nien

    2016-04-01

    A 48-year-old man with a history of gastrointestinal bleeding from Osler-Weber-Rendu disease presented with recurrent hematemesis and tarry stool. He received repeated endoscopic therapy, but profound component therapy was still needed. Because repeated gastrointestinal bleeding was caused by same bleeder, tattoo-assisted laparoscopic gastric wedge resection was carried out. The pathology showed vascular abnormalities that involved gastric mucosal and submucosal layers. After surgery, the blood transfusion for the patient is not seen. Osler-Weber-Rendu is a hereditary disease characterized by vascular abnormalities of the nose, skin, lung, brain, and gastrointestinal tract. Management of gastrointestinal bleeding requires medical treatment first, and there are rare reports of surgical treatment. Our pathology findings showed a transmucosal vessel lesion, which had poor response to endoscopic treatment. Surgical intervention may be considered in the patient with gastrointestinal bleeding refractory to endoscopic therapy.

  10. [Hereditary porphyrias and heme related disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puy, Hervé; Gouya, Laurent; Deybach, Jean-charles

    2014-06-01

    Hereditary porphyrias comprise a group of eight metabolic disorders of the haem biosynthesis pathway, characterised by acute neurovisceral symptoms and/or skin lesions. Each porphyria is caused by abnormal functioning of a particular enzymatic step, resulting in specific accumulation of heme precursors. Seven porphyrias are due to a partial enzyme deficiency, while a gain-of-function mechanism has recently been identify in a novel porphyria. Acute porphyrias present with severe abdominal pain, nausea, constipation and confusion, and are sometimes complicated by seizures and severe neurological disorders, which may be life-threatening. Cutaneous porphyrias can also be present, with either acute painful photosensitivity or skin fragility and blisters. Rare recessive porphyrias usually manifest in early childhood with either severe chronic neurological symptoms or chronic haemolysis and severe cutaneous photosensitivity. Porphyrias are still under-diagnosed, but recent advances in the pathogenesis and genetics of human porphyrias are leading to better care of these patients and their families.

  11. Mania associated with complicated hereditary spastic paraparesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghavendra B Nayak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary spastic paraparesis (HSP is an inherited group of neurological disorders with progressive lower limb spasticity. HSP can be clinically grouped into pure and complicated forms. Pure HSP is one without any associated neurological/psychiatric comorbidity. Depression is the most common psychiatric comorbidity. Presence of mania or bipolar affective illness with HSP is a rare phenomenon. We report a case of a 17-year-old boy who presented with classical features of HSP with complaints of excessive happiness, irritability, increased self-esteem and decreased sleep since 1 month. The patient also had complex partial seizure ever since he had features of HSP. The patient′s father and younger sister suffer from pure HSP. The patient was diagnosed to have first episode mania with complicated HSP. The details of treatment and possible neurobiology are discussed in this case report.

  12. [Hereditary spastic paraplegia: up to date].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takiyama, Yoshihisa

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders that are clinically characterized by progressive spasticity and weakness of the lower limbs. HSP genetic loci are designated SPG1-72 in order of their discovery. In 206 Japanese families with autosomal dominant HSP, SPG4 was the most common form, accounting for 38%, followed by SPG3A (5%), SPG31 (5%), SPG10 (2%), and SPG8 (1%). We have identified novel mutations in the C12orf65 gene and the LYST gene in several Japanese families with autosomal recessive HSP. JASPAC will facilitate gene discovery and mechanistic understanding of HSP. The future challenge will be the establishment of treatment of HSP.

  13. Recurrent IVF failure and hereditary thrombophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safdarian, Leila; Najmi, Zahra; Aleyasin, Ashraf; Aghahosseini, Marzieh; Rashidi, Mandana; Asadollah, Sara

    2014-07-01

    The largest percentage of failed invitro fertilization (IVF (cycles, are due to lack of implantation. As hereditary thrombophilia can cause in placentation failure, it may have a role in recurrent IVF failure. Aim of this case-control study was to determine whether hereditary thrombophilia is more prevalent in women with recurrent IVF failures. Case group comprised 96 infertile women, with a history of recurrent IVF failure. Control group was comprised of 95 healthy women with proven fertility who had conceived spontaneously. All participants were assessed for the presence of inherited thrombophilias including: factor V Leiden, methilen tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) mutation, prothrombin mutation, homocystein level, protein S and C deficiency, antithrombin III (AT-III) deficiency and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) mutation. Presence of thrombophilia was compared between groups. Having at least one thrombophilia known as a risk factor for recurrent IVF failure (95% CI=1.74-5.70, OR=3.15, p=0.00). Mutation of factor V Leiden (95% CI=1.26-10.27, OR=3.06, P=0.01) and homozygote form of MTHFR mutation (95% CI=1.55-97.86, OR=12.33, p=0.05) were also risk factors for recurrent IVF failure. However, we could not find significant difference in other inherited thrombophilia's. Inherited thrombophilia is more prevalent in women with recurrent IVF failure compared with healthy women. Having at least one thrombophilia, mutation of factor V Leiden and homozygote form of MTHFR mutation were risk factors for recurrent IVF failure.

  14. Quantitative assessment of gastric atrophy using the syntactic structure analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitoun, A M; al Mardini, H; Record, C O

    1998-12-01

    To assess the topographical relation between gastric glands, using the minimum spanning tree (MST), to derive both a model of neighbourhood and quantitative representation of the tissue's architecture, to assess the characteristic features of gastric atrophy, and to assess the grades of gastric atrophy. Haematoxylin and eosin stained sections from corporal and antral biopsy specimens (n = 139) from normal patients and from patients with nonatrophic gastritis and atrophic gastritis of grades 1, 2, and 3 (Sydney system) were assessed by image analysis system (Prodit 5.2) and 11 syntactic structure features were derived. These included both line and connectivity features. Syntactic structure analysis was correlated with the semiquantitative grading system of gastric atrophy. The study showed significant reductions in the number of points and the length of MST in both body and antrum. The standard deviation of the length of MST was significantly increased in all grades of atrophy. The connectivity to two glands was the highest and most affected by the increased grade of atrophy. The reciprocal values of the Wiener, Randic, and Balaban indices showed significant changes in the volume of gland, abnormality in the shape of glands, and changes in irregularity and branching of the glands in both types of gastric mucosa. There was a complete separation in the MST, connectivity, and index values between low grade and high grade gastric atrophy. (1) Gastric atrophy was characterised by loss of the gland, variation in the volume, reduction in the neighbourhood, irregularity in spacing, and abnormality in the shape of the glands. (2) Syntactic structure analysis significantly differentiated minor changes in gastric gland (low grade atrophy) from high grade atrophy of clinical significance. (3) Syntactic structure analysis is a simple, fast, and highly reproducible technique and appears a promising method for quantitative assessment of atrophy.

  15. Teres minor innervation in the context of isolated muscle atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friend, Jikol; Francis, Sarah; McCulloch, Jane; Ecker, Jeff; Breidahl, William; McMenamin, Paul

    2010-03-01

    Teres minor atrophy occurs either in isolation, associated with other rotator cuff muscle pathologies or in quadrilateral space syndrome. In the latter condition, compression of the axillary nerve is the likely cause; however, the anatomy of the nerve to teres minor and how this may relate to isolated teres minor atrophy have not been extensively investigated. In light of the significance of teres minor atrophy in shoulder pathology, we performed a combined radiological and anatomical study of teres minor and its nerve supply. Cadaveric dissection of nine shoulder specimens from eight cadavers was performed to investigate the anatomical variability in course, length and branching pattern of both the teres minor nerve and the axillary nerve. Radiological imaging and reports were analysed on all shoulder magnetic resonance images performed over a 1-week period at four radiology clinic locations in an attempt to identify the incidence of isolated teres minor atrophy and review teres minor atrophy in association with other shoulder pathology. Finally, we studied a case of isolated teres minor atrophy identified during a routine undergraduate dissection class. Considerable anatomical variation was noticed in cadaver dissections in the nerve(s) supplying teres minor muscle revealing several various points where it may be vulnerable to impingement or injury at along its course. Analysis of 61 shoulder MR images revealed two patients with shoulder complaints that had isolated teres minor atrophy. Case-based study of these two male patients revealed other associated shoulder injury but the presentation was markedly different and clinically distinct from quadrilateral space syndrome. Isolated teres minor atrophy is a relatively common shoulder pathology which appears to be clinically distinct from other syndromes with rotator cuff muscle atrophy including quadrilateral space syndrome. The exact aetiology is unknown but cadaveric dissection in this study suggests the

  16. Posterior cerebral atrophy in the absence of medial temporal lobe atrophy in pathologically-confirmed Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lehmann, M.; Koedam, E.L.G.E.; Barnes, J.; Bartlett, J.W.; Ryan, N.S.; Pijnenburg, Y.A.L.; Barkhof, F.; Wattjes, M.P.; Scheltens, P.; Fox, N.C.

    2012-01-01

    Medial temporal lobe atrophy (MTA) is a recognized marker of Alzheimer's disease (AD), however, it can be prominent in frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). There is an increasing awareness that posterior atrophy (PA) is important in AD and may aid the differentiation of AD from FTLD. Visual

  17. Muscle Atrophy Reversed by Growth Factor Activation of Satellite Cells in a Mouse Muscle Atrophy Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauerslev, Simon; Vissing, John; Krag, Thomas O

    2014-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies comprise a large group of inherited disorders that lead to progressive muscle wasting. We wanted to investigate if targeting satellite cells can enhance muscle regeneration and thus increase muscle mass. We treated mice with hepatocyte growth factor and leukemia inhibitory...... factor under three conditions: normoxia, hypoxia and during myostatin deficiency. We found that hepatocyte growth factor treatment led to activation of the Akt/mTOR/p70S6K protein synthesis pathway, up-regulation of the myognic transcription factors MyoD and myogenin, and subsequently the negative growth...... control factor, myostatin and atrophy markers MAFbx and MuRF1. Hypoxia-induced atrophy was partially restored by hepatocyte growth factor combined with leukemia inhibitory factor treatment. Dividing satellite cells were three-fold increased in the treatment group compared to control. Finally, we...

  18. Fluid biomarkers in multiple system atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurens, Brice; Constantinescu, Radu; Freeman, Roy

    2015-01-01

    Despite growing research efforts, no reliable biomarker currently exists for the diagnosis and prognosis of multiple system atrophy (MSA). Such biomarkers are urgently needed to improve diagnostic accuracy, prognostic guidance and also to serve as efficacy measures or surrogates of target...... engagement for future clinical trials. We here review candidate fluid biomarkers for MSA and provide considerations for further developments and harmonization of standard operating procedures. A PubMed search was performed until April 24, 2015 to review the literature with regard to candidate blood...... and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers for MSA. Abstracts of 1760 studies were retrieved and screened for eligibility. The final list included 60 studies assessing fluid biomarkers in patients with MSA. Most studies have focused on alpha-synuclein, markers of axonal degeneration or catecholamines. Their results...

  19. Visual Dysfunction in Posterior Cortical Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia da Silva, Mari N.; Millington, Rebecca S.; Bridge, Holly; James-Galton, Merle; Plant, Gordon T.

    2017-01-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a syndromic diagnosis. It is characterized by progressive impairment of higher (cortical) visual function with imaging evidence of degeneration affecting the occipital, parietal, and posterior temporal lobes bilaterally. Most cases will prove to have Alzheimer pathology. The aim of this review is to summarize the development of the concept of this disorder since it was first introduced. A critical discussion of the evolving diagnostic criteria is presented and the differential diagnosis with regard to the underlying pathology is reviewed. Emphasis is given to the visual dysfunction that defines the disorder, and the classical deficits, such as simultanagnosia and visual agnosia, as well as the more recently recognized visual field defects, are reviewed, along with the evidence on their neural correlates. The latest developments on the imaging of PCA are summarized, with special attention to its role on the differential diagnosis with related conditions. PMID:28861031

  20. New therapeutic approaches to spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewelt, Aga; Newcomb, Tara M; Swoboda, Kathryn J

    2012-02-01

    Bench to bedside progress has been widely anticipated for a growing number of neurodegenerative disorders. Of these, spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is perhaps the best poised to capitalize on advances in targeted therapeutics development over the next few years. Several laboratories have achieved compelling success in SMA animal models using sophisticated methods for targeted delivery, repair, or increased expression of the survival motor neuron protein, SMN. The clinical community is actively collaborating to identify, develop, and validate outcome measures and biomarkers in parallel with laboratory efforts. Innovative trial design and synergistic approaches to maximize proactive care in conjunction with treatment with one or more of the promising pharmacologic and biologic therapies currently in the pipeline will maximize our chances to achieve meaningful outcomes for patients. This review highlights recent promising scientific and clinical advances bringing us ever closer to effective treatment(s) for our patients with SMA.

  1. Visual Dysfunction in Posterior Cortical Atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia da Silva, Mari N; Millington, Rebecca S; Bridge, Holly; James-Galton, Merle; Plant, Gordon T

    2017-01-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a syndromic diagnosis. It is characterized by progressive impairment of higher (cortical) visual function with imaging evidence of degeneration affecting the occipital, parietal, and posterior temporal lobes bilaterally. Most cases will prove to have Alzheimer pathology. The aim of this review is to summarize the development of the concept of this disorder since it was first introduced. A critical discussion of the evolving diagnostic criteria is presented and the differential diagnosis with regard to the underlying pathology is reviewed. Emphasis is given to the visual dysfunction that defines the disorder, and the classical deficits, such as simultanagnosia and visual agnosia, as well as the more recently recognized visual field defects, are reviewed, along with the evidence on their neural correlates. The latest developments on the imaging of PCA are summarized, with special attention to its role on the differential diagnosis with related conditions.

  2. Visual Dysfunction in Posterior Cortical Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari N. Maia da Silva

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA is a syndromic diagnosis. It is characterized by progressive impairment of higher (cortical visual function with imaging evidence of degeneration affecting the occipital, parietal, and posterior temporal lobes bilaterally. Most cases will prove to have Alzheimer pathology. The aim of this review is to summarize the development of the concept of this disorder since it was first introduced. A critical discussion of the evolving diagnostic criteria is presented and the differential diagnosis with regard to the underlying pathology is reviewed. Emphasis is given to the visual dysfunction that defines the disorder, and the classical deficits, such as simultanagnosia and visual agnosia, as well as the more recently recognized visual field defects, are reviewed, along with the evidence on their neural correlates. The latest developments on the imaging of PCA are summarized, with special attention to its role on the differential diagnosis with related conditions.

  3. Valproate and spinal muscular atrophy (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natasha, Gemma; Brandom, Kevin G; Young, Elizabeth C; Young, Philip J

    2008-01-01

    Childhood spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the survival motor neuron (SMN) gene. The severity of the disease is dictated by the copy number of a second copy of the gene, known as SMN2, with higher copy numbers associated with milder forms of SMA. This is because the level of SMN protein produced by patients dictates the severity of the disease. As all patients retain at least one copy of the SMN2 gene, therapeutic strategies are geared towards increasing full-length SMN protein expression from SMN2. One of the identified therapeutic compounds is valproic acid, or valproate (VPA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACI) that has been used since the 1970s as an anti-convulsant. Here, we discuss VPA's modes of action and potential side effects in the treatment of SMA.

  4. Distinct Neurochemical Profiles of Spinocerebellar Ataxias 1, 2, 6, and Cerebellar Multiple System Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öz, Gülin; Iltis, Isabelle; Hutter, Diane; Thomas, William; Bushara, Khalaf O.; Gomez, Christopher M.

    2011-01-01

    Hereditary and sporadic neurodegenerative ataxias are movement disorders that affect the cerebellum. Robust and objective biomarkers are critical for treatment trials of ataxias. In addition, such biomarkers may help discriminate between ataxia subtypes because these diseases display substantial overlap in clinical presentation and conventional MRI. Profiles of 10–13 neurochemical concentrations obtained in vivo by high field proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) can potentially provide ataxia-type specific biomarkers. We compared cerebellar and brainstem neurochemical profiles measured at 4 T from 26 patients with spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA1, N=9; SCA2, N=7; SCA6, N=5) or cerebellar multiple system atrophy (MSA-C, N=5) and 15 age-matched healthy controls. The Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA) was used to assess disease severity. The patterns of neurochemical alterations relative to controls differed between ataxia types. Myo-inositol levels in the vermis, myo-inositol, total N-acetylaspartate, total creatine, glutamate, glutamine in the cerebellar hemispheres and myo-inositol, total N-acetylaspartate, glutamate in the pons were significantly different between patient groups (Bonferroni corrected pataxia types. Studies with higher numbers of patients and other ataxias are warranted to further investigate the clinical utility of neurochemical levels as measured by high-field MRS as ataxia biomarkers. PMID:20838948

  5. Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer: Cutaneous lesions & atypical fibroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Bortoletto

    2017-07-01

    Precis: 27-year-old woman with multiple cutaneous lesions is found to have uterine leiomyomas and undergoes robotic myomectomy. Genetic testing of uterine leiomyomas reveals mutation in fumarate hydratase, etiologic in hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC.

  6. Hereditary Lymphedema of the Leg – A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit Heinig

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Primary of hereditary lymphedema is a rare but progressive disease. It is yet not curable. We present a 48-year-old male patient with hereditary lymphedema of his left leg, that was realised by minor trauma (able twist when he was seven years old. He had never been treated for lymphedema but experienced multiple erysipelas during his life. After diagnostic procedures to exclude other causes of leg swelling, the diagnosis of hereditary lymphedema of the leg, stage III was confirmed. We initialized complex decongestive therapy. During two weeks of intensive treatment, the circumference of the left leg could be reduced by 10 cm. This case illustrates the "natural course" hereditary lymphedema. But it raises the hope that even after decades of ignorance, the patients benefits from complex decongestive treatment. Therapeutic nihilism is unnecessary and poses lymphedema patients to risks of infection and secondary malignancies like Stewart-Trewes syndrome.

  7. Relapsing Acute Axonal Neuropathy in Hereditary Fructose Intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maitre, Anna; Maw, Anna; Ramaswami, Uma; Morley, Sarah L

    2016-11-01

    A severe neurological abnormality has not been previously described in individuals with hereditary fructose intolerance, which typically presents early in childhood with severe metabolic acidosis and hypoglycemia. We describe a boy who by age five years had required multiple admissions to the pediatric intensive care unit for an aggressive and atypical, relapsing and remitting neuropathy with features of acute motor axonal neuropathy (AMAN). It was later discovered that he also had undiagnosed hereditary fructose intolerance, and the severity and frequency of his neurological episodes diminished following an exclusion diet. His asymptomatic younger brother was diagnosed with hereditary fructose intolerance on screening. He is on a fructose-free diet and has not developed neurological symptoms. Ongoing low-level exposure to fructose prior to diagnosis may have contributed to our patient's neurological dysfunction. Early diagnosis and treatment may prevent neurological complications of hereditary fructose intolerance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Antiretroviral therapy-induced Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) such as zidovudine and stavudine have known mitochondrial toxicity and can cause mitochondrial myopathies, neuropathies, hyperlactataemia, and can induce mitochondrial genetic disorders. Individuals with the mutation for Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON), ...

  9. Allelic variants of hereditary prions: The bimodularity principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhodeyev, Oleg N; Tarasov, Oleg V; Bondarev, Stanislav A

    2017-01-02

    Modern biology requires modern genetic concepts equally valid for all discovered mechanisms of inheritance, either "canonical" (mediated by DNA sequences) or epigenetic. Applying basic genetic terms such as "gene" and "allele" to protein hereditary factors is one of the necessary steps toward these concepts. The basic idea that different variants of the same prion protein can be considered as alleles has been previously proposed by Chernoff and Tuite. In this paper, the notion of prion allele is further developed. We propose the idea that any prion allele is a bimodular hereditary system that depends on a certain DNA sequence (DNA determinant) and a certain epigenetic mark (epigenetic determinant). Alteration of any of these 2 determinants may lead to establishment of a new prion allele. The bimodularity principle is valid not only for hereditary prions; it seems to be universal for any epigenetic hereditary factor.

  10. Identification of a hereditary system with distributed delay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bagchi, Arunabha

    1985-01-01

    We study the identification problem that arises in a linear hereditary system with distributed delay. This involves estimating an infinite-dimensional parameter and we use the method of sieves, proposed by Grenander, to solve this problem.

  11. Different atrophy-hypertrophy transcription pathways in muscles affected by severe and mild spinal muscular atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Millino Caterina

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is a neurodegenerative disorder associated with mutations of the survival motor neuron gene SMN and is characterized by muscle weakness and atrophy caused by degeneration of spinal motor neurons. SMN has a role in neurons but its deficiency may have a direct effect on muscle tissue. Methods We applied microarray and quantitative real-time PCR to study at transcriptional level the effects of a defective SMN gene in skeletal muscles affected by the two forms of SMA: the most severe type I and the mild type III. Results The two forms of SMA generated distinct expression signatures: the SMA III muscle transcriptome is close to that found under normal conditions, whereas in SMA I there is strong alteration of gene expression. Genes implicated in signal transduction were up-regulated in SMA III whereas those of energy metabolism and muscle contraction were consistently down-regulated in SMA I. The expression pattern of gene networks involved in atrophy signaling was completed by qRT-PCR, showing that specific pathways are involved, namely IGF/PI3K/Akt, TNF-α/p38 MAPK and Ras/ERK pathways. Conclusion Our study suggests a different picture of atrophy pathways in each of the two forms of SMA. In particular, p38 may be the regulator of protein synthesis in SMA I. The SMA III profile appears as the result of the concurrent presence of atrophic and hypertrophic fibers. This more favorable condition might be due to the over-expression of MTOR that, given its role in the activation of protein synthesis, could lead to compensatory hypertrophy in SMA III muscle fibers.

  12. Mosaic dominant TUBB4A mutation in an inbred family with complicated hereditary spastic paraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kancheva, Dahlia; Chamova, Teodora; Guergueltcheva, Velina; Mitev, Vanio; Azmanov, Dimitar N; Kalaydjieva, Luba; Tournev, Ivailo; Jordanova, Albena

    2015-05-01

    Mutations in TUBB4A have been associated with a spectrum of neurological conditions, ranging from the severe hypomyelination with atrophy of the basal ganglia and cerebellum syndrome to the clinically milder dystonia type 4. The presence of movement abnormalities was considered the common hallmark of these disorders. Clinical, neurological, and neuroimaging examinations, followed by whole exome sequencing and mutation analysis, were performed in a highly consanguineous pedigree with five affected children. We identified a novel c.568C>T (p.H190Y) TUBB4A mutation that originated de novo in the asymptomatic mother. The affected subjects presented with an early-onset, slowly progressive spastic paraparesis of the lower limbs, ataxia, and brain hypomyelination, in the absence of dystonia or rigidity. Our study adds complicated hereditary spastic paraplegia to the clinical spectrum of TUBB4A-associated neurological disorders. We establish genotype-phenotype correlations with mutations located in the same region in the tertiary structure of the protein. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  13. Clinical and genetic analysis of Taiwanese patients with hereditary spastic paraplegia type 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, M-Y; Yeh, T-H; Chang, Y-Y; Kuo, H-C; Sun, H S; Lai, S-C; Lu, C-S

    2015-01-01

    Spastic paraplegia type 5 (SPG5) is an autosomal recessive (AR) hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) associated with pure or complicated phenotypes. This study aimed to screen SPG5 in Taiwanese HSP patients. Sequencing of the SPG5 gene, CYP7B1, was performed in a cohort of 25 ethnic Han Taiwanese patients with AR or sporadic HSP. Clinical information and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were analyzed in confirmed SPG5 patients. One (33%) AR kindred and four (18%) sporadic cases had CYP7B1 mutations. All of the SPG5 cases carried the mutation c.334 C>T (R112X). Haplotype analysis suggested a 'founder effect' in ethnic Hans for this mutation. The phenotype was either pure or complicated by cerebellar ataxia. For the primary HSP phenotype, there were profound dorsal column sensory deficits in all patients. Spine MRI showed thoraco-lumbar cord atrophy in some patients. Spastic paraplegia type 5 is a common cause of AR and sporadic HSPs that has a higher frequency in Taiwanese than in other ethnic groups. It is associated with a CYP7B1 founder mutation and its phenotype is characterized by pronounced dorsal column sensory loss, with cerebellar ataxia in some patients. © 2014 The Author(s) European Journal of Neurology © 2014 EAN.

  14. Cells bearing mutations causing Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy are sensitized to Fas-Induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielson, Steven R; Wong, Alice; Carelli, Valerio; Martinuzzi, Andrea; Schapira, Anthony H V; Cortopassi, Gino A

    2002-02-22

    Three prevalent mitochondrial DNA pathogenic mutations at positions 11778, 3460, and 14484, which affect different subunits of Complex I, cause retinal ganglion cell death and optic nerve atrophy in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). The cell death is painless and without inflammation, consistent with an apoptotic mechanism. We have investigated the possibility that the LHON mutation confers a pro-apoptotic stimulus and have tested the sensitivity of osteosarcoma-derived cybrid cells carrying the most common and severe mutations (11778 and 3460) to cell death induced by Fas. We observed that LHON cybrids were sensitized to Fas-dependent death. Control cells that bear the same mitochondrial genetic background (the J haplogroup) without the pathogenic 11778 mutation are no more sensitive than other controls, indicating that increased Fas-dependent death in LHON cybrids was induced by the LHON pathogenic mutations. The type of death was apoptotic by several criteria, including induction by Fas, inhibition by the caspase inhibitor zVAD-fmk (zVal-Ala-Asp-fluoro-methyl ketone), activation of DEVDase activity (Asp-Glu-Val-Asp protease), specific cleavage of caspase-3, DNA fragmentation, and increased Annexin-V labeling. These data indicate that the most common and severe LHON pathogenic mutations 11778 and 3460 predispose cells to apoptosis, which may be relevant for the pathophysiology of cell death in LHON, and potential therapy.

  15. Changes in Choroidal Thickness follow the RNFL Changes in Leber’s Hereditary Optic Neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrelli, Enrico; Triolo, Giacinto; Cascavilla, Maria Lucia; La Morgia, Chiara; Rizzo, Giovanni; Savini, Giacomo; Balducci, Nicole; Nucci, Paolo; Giglio, Rosa; Darvizeh, Fatemeh; Parisi, Vincenzo; Bandello, Francesco; Sadun, Alfredo A.; Carelli, Valerio; Barboni, Piero

    2016-01-01

    Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is typically characterized by vascular alterations in the acute phase. The aim of this study was to evaluate choroidal changes occurring in asymptomatic, acute and chronic stages of LHON. We enrolled 49 patients with LHON, 19 with Dominant Optic Atrophy (DOA) and 22 healthy controls. Spectral Domain-Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT) scans of macular and peripapillary regions were performed in all subjects, to evaluate macular and peripapillary choroidal thickness, and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thicknes. Macular and peripapillary choroidal thicknesses were significantly increased in the acute LHON stage. On the contrary, macular choroidal thickness was significantly reduced in the chronic stage. Furthermore, peripapillary choroidal thickness was decreased in chronic LHON and in DOA. Both RNFL and choroid had the same trend (increased thickness, followed by thinning), but RNFL changes preceded those affecting the choroid. In conclusion, our study quantitatively demonstrated the involvement of the choroid in LHON pathology. The increase in choroidal thickness is a feature of the LHON acute stage, which follows the thickening of RNFL. Conversely, thinning of the choroid is the common outcome in chronic LHON and in DOA. PMID:27853297

  16. Changes in Choroidal Thickness follow the RNFL Changes in Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrelli, Enrico; Triolo, Giacinto; Cascavilla, Maria Lucia; La Morgia, Chiara; Rizzo, Giovanni; Savini, Giacomo; Balducci, Nicole; Nucci, Paolo; Giglio, Rosa; Darvizeh, Fatemeh; Parisi, Vincenzo; Bandello, Francesco; Sadun, Alfredo A; Carelli, Valerio; Barboni, Piero

    2016-11-17

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is typically characterized by vascular alterations in the acute phase. The aim of this study was to evaluate choroidal changes occurring in asymptomatic, acute and chronic stages of LHON. We enrolled 49 patients with LHON, 19 with Dominant Optic Atrophy (DOA) and 22 healthy controls. Spectral Domain-Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT) scans of macular and peripapillary regions were performed in all subjects, to evaluate macular and peripapillary choroidal thickness, and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thicknes. Macular and peripapillary choroidal thicknesses were significantly increased in the acute LHON stage. On the contrary, macular choroidal thickness was significantly reduced in the chronic stage. Furthermore, peripapillary choroidal thickness was decreased in chronic LHON and in DOA. Both RNFL and choroid had the same trend (increased thickness, followed by thinning), but RNFL changes preceded those affecting the choroid. In conclusion, our study quantitatively demonstrated the involvement of the choroid in LHON pathology. The increase in choroidal thickness is a feature of the LHON acute stage, which follows the thickening of RNFL. Conversely, thinning of the choroid is the common outcome in chronic LHON and in DOA.

  17. Leber′s hereditary optic neuropathy with molecular characterization in two Indian families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verma I

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Leber′s hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON presents in early adulthood with painless progressive blindness of one or both eyes. Usually there is a positive family history of similar disease on the maternal side. Definitive diagnosis can be established by finding the change in the mitochondrial gene. No molecular studies have been reported from India. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Clinical, ophthalmologic and molecular studies were carried out in two patients from different families and available first degree relatives. The subjects were tested for the three common mutations seen in LHON by molecular techniques of polymerase chain reaction using mutation specific primers. RESULTS: The mutations G3460A and G11778A in the mitochondrial genes MTND1 and MTND4, known to be causative for LHON, were found in one family each. CONCLUSION: Diagnosis of LHON should be considered in familial cases and in young adults with optic atrophy. Confirmation of diagnosis should be sought by molecular gene analysis. Genetic counselling should be offered to all ′at risk′ relatives of a patient harbouring the mutation.

  18. Retinal nerve fibre layer loss in hereditary spastic paraplegias is restricted to complex phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiethoff Sarah

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reduction of retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL thickness was shown as part of the neurodegenerative process in a range of different neurodegenerative pathologies including Alzheimer′s disease (AD, idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (PD, spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA and multiple system atrophy (MSA. To further clarify the specificity of RNFL thinning as a potential marker of neurodegenerative diseases we investigated RNFL thickness in Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia (HSP, an axonal, length-dependent neurodegenerative pathology of the upper motor neurons. Methods Spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT was performed in 28 HSP patients (clinically: pure HSP = 22, complicated HSP = 6; genetic subtypes: SPG4 = 13, SPG5 = 1, SPG7 = 3, genetically unclassified: 11 to quantify peripapillary RNFL thickness. Standardized examination assessed duration of disease, dependency on assistive walking aids and severity of symptoms quantified with Spastic Paraplegia Rating Scale (SPRS. Results HSP patients demonstrated no significant thinning of global RNFL (pglobal = 0.61. Subgroup analysis revealed significant reduction in temporal and temporal inferior sectors for patients with complex (p Conclusion Clinically pure HSP patients feature no significant reduction in RNFL, whereas complex phenotypes display an abnormal thinning of temporal and temporal inferior RNFL. Our data indicate that RNFL thinning does not occur unspecifically in all neurodegenerative diseases but is in HSP restricted to subtypes with multisystemic degeneration.

  19. Targeted high throughput sequencing in hereditary ataxia and spastic paraplegia

    OpenAIRE

    Iqbal, Zafar; Rydning, Siri L.; Wedding, Iselin M.; Koht, Jeanette; Pihlstr?m, Lasse; Rengmark, Aina H.; Henriksen, Sandra P.; Tallaksen, Chantal M. E.; Toft, Mathias

    2017-01-01

    Hereditary ataxia and spastic paraplegia are heterogeneous monogenic neurodegenerative disorders. To date, a large number of individuals with such disorders remain undiagnosed. Here, we have assessed molecular diagnosis by gene panel sequencing in 105 early and late-onset hereditary ataxia and spastic paraplegia probands, in whom extensive previous investigations had failed to identify the genetic cause of disease. Pathogenic and likely-pathogenic variants were identified in 20 probands (19%)...

  20. Nucleation of protein aggregation kinetics as a basis for genotype-phenotype correlations in polyglutamine diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsubara Shiro

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recent studies of inherited neurodegenerative disorders have suggested a linkage between the propensity toward aggregation of mutant protein and disease onset. This is particularly apparent for polyglutamine (polyQ diseases caused by expansion of CAG-trinucleotide repeats. However, a quantitative framework for relating aggregation kinetics with molecular mechanisms of neurodegeneration initiation is lacking. Here, using the repeat-length-dependent age-of-onset in polyQ diseases, we derived a mathematical model based on nucleation of aggregation kinetics to describe genotype-phenotype correlations, and validated the model using both in vitro data and clinical data. Instead of describing polyQ aggregation kinetics with a derivative equation, our model divided age-of-onset (equivalent to the time required for aggregation into two processes: nucleation lag time (a first-order exponential function of CAG-repeat length and elongation time. With the exception of spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA 3, the relation between CAG-repeat length and age-of-onset in all examined polyQ diseases, including Huntington's disease, dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy and SCA1, -2, -6 and -7, could be well explained by three parameters derived from linear regression analysis based on the nucleated growth polymerization model. These parameters composed of probability of nucleation at an individual repeat, a protein concentration associated factor, and elongation time predict the overall features of neurodegeneration initiation, including constant risk for cell death, toxic polyQ species, main pathological subcellular site and the contribution of cellular factors. Our model also presents an alternative therapeutic strategy according to the distinct subcellular loci by the finding that nuclear localization of soluble mutant protein monomers itself has great impact on disease onset.

  1. Hereditary neuropathies: systematization and diagnostics (clinical case of hereditary motor and sensor neuropathy of the IA type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolokolova A.M.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to study the value of routine methods (clinical symptoms, electrophysiological findings and results of DNA analysis in diagnostics of hereditary motor sensory neuropathy type IA in outpatient clinics. Material and Methods. The review of foreign literature is represented. The phenotypic polymorphism, genetic heterogeneity and the difficulties of diagnostics are identified. A family with hereditary motor sensory neuropathy of lAtype is presented, which was diagnosed on the base of available methods in outpatient practice (clinical symptoms, genealogical method, electro-physiological findings and DNA analysis results. Results. Routine algorithm (consistent valuation of clinical symptoms, neurophysiologic findings and the results of DNA analysis helped to verify the diagnosis of hereditary motor sensory neuropathy of lAtype in outpatient practice after more than 20 years of the onset of the disease. Conclusion. The neurologists of outpatient clinics and other specialists must be informed about the availability of diagnostics of hereditary diseases of nervous system.

  2. Orbital hydrocephalus: a proven cause for optic atrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Towbin, R.; Garcia-Revillo, J.; Fitz, C. [Department of Radiology, Children`s Hospital of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1998-12-01

    A 4-year-old boy with bilateral optic sheath enlargement and progressive optic atrophy and blindness is presented. Computed tomography demonstrated hydrocephalus and enlargement of the optic nerve sheath complex. The child died during an attempted repair of hypoplastic atrioventricular valves. Autopsy demonstrated a patulous perioptic subarachnoid space and optic atrophy. This condition has been described in the literature but has not had radiologic-pathologic correlation. With the availability of magnetic resonance imaging, this diagnosis may be made prospectively, thus, it is important for the radiologist to be aware of this entity because optic atrophy and blindness may be prevented by early diagnosis and surgery. (orig.) With 3 figs., 10 refs.

  3. Brain atrophy in multiple sclerosis: therapeutic, cognitive and clinical impact

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    Juan Ignacio Rojas

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Multiple sclerosis (MS was always considered as a white matter inflammatory disease. Today, there is an important body of evidence that supports the hypothesis that gray matter involvement and the neurodegenerative mechanism are at least partially independent from inflammation. Gray matter atrophy develops faster than white matter atrophy, and predominates in the initial stages of the disease. The neurodegenerative mechanism creates permanent damage and correlates with physical and cognitive disability. In this review we describe the current available evidence regarding brain atrophy and its consequence in MS patients.

  4. Deformation-Based Atrophy Estimation for Alzheimer’s Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pai, Akshay Sadananda Uppinakudru

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) - the most common form of dementia, is a term used for accelerated memory loss and cognitive abilities enough to severely hamper day-to-day activities. One of the most globally accepted markers for AD is atrophy, in mainly the brain parenchyma. The goal of the PhD project...... and a new way to estimate atrophy from a deformation field. We demonstrate the performance of the proposed solution but applying it on the publicly available Alzheimer’s disease neuroimaging data (ADNI) initiative and compare to existing state-of-art atrophy estimation methods....

  5. Mechanisms of cisplatin-induced muscle atrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, Hiroyasu, E-mail: sakai@hoshi.ac.jp [Department of Pharmacology, Hoshi University, 2-4-41 Ebara, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 1428501 (Japan); Division of Pharmacy Professional Development and Research, Hoshi University, 2-4-41 Ebara, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 1428501 (Japan); Sagara, Atsunobu; Arakawa, Kazuhiko; Sugiyama, Ryoto; Hirosaki, Akiko; Takase, Kazuhide; Jo, Ara [Department of Pharmacology, Hoshi University, 2-4-41 Ebara, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 1428501 (Japan); Sato, Ken [Department of Pharmacology, Hoshi University, 2-4-41 Ebara, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 1428501 (Japan); Division of Pharmacy Professional Development and Research, Hoshi University, 2-4-41 Ebara, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 1428501 (Japan); Chiba, Yoshihiko [Department of Biology, Hoshi University, 2-4-41 Ebara, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 1428501 (Japan); Yamazaki, Mitsuaki [Department of Anesthesiology, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama-shi, Toyama 9300194 (Japan); Matoba, Motohiro [Department of Palliative Medicine and Psychooncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 1040045 (Japan); Narita, Minoru, E-mail: narita@hoshi.ac.jp [Department of Pharmacology, Hoshi University, 2-4-41 Ebara, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 1428501 (Japan)

    2014-07-15

    Fatigue is the most common side effect of chemotherapy. However, the mechanisms of “muscle fatigue” induced by anti-cancer drugs are not fully understood. We therefore investigated the muscle-atrophic effect of cisplatin, a platinum-based anti-cancer drug, in mice. C57BL/6J mice were treated with cisplatin (3 mg/kg, i.p.) or saline for 4 consecutive days. On Day 5, hindlimb and quadriceps muscles were isolated from mice. The loss of body weight and food intake under the administration of cisplatin was the same as those in a dietary restriction (DR) group. Under the present conditions, the administration of cisplatin significantly decreased not only the muscle mass of the hindlimb and quadriceps but also the myofiber diameter, compared to those in the DR group. The mRNA expression levels of muscle atrophy F-box (MAFbx), muscle RING finger-1 (MuRF1) and forkhead box O3 (FOXO3) were significantly and further increased by cisplatin treated group, compared to DR. Furthermore, the mRNA levels of myostatin and p21 were significantly upregulated by the administration of cisplatin, compared to DR. On the other hand, the phosphorylation of Akt and FOXO3a, which leads to the blockade of the upregulation of MuRF1 and MAFbx, was significantly and dramatically decreased by cisplatin. These findings suggest that the administration of cisplatin increases atrophic gene expression, and may lead to an imbalance between protein synthesis and protein degradation pathways, which would lead to muscle atrophy. This phenomenon could, at least in part, explain the mechanism of cisplatin-induced muscle fatigue. - Highlights: • Cisplatin decreased mass and myofiber diameter in quadriceps muscle. • The mRNA of MAFbx, MuRF1 and FOXO3 were increased by the cisplatin. • The mRNA of myostatin and p21 were upregulated by cisplatin. • The phosphorylation of Akt and FOXO3a was decreased by cisplatin.

  6. [Hereditary factors in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fliers, E A; Franke, B; Buitelaar, J K

    2005-07-30

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by concentration problems, hyperactivity and impulsivity. Disturbances in dopamine and/or noradrenalin neurotransmission are probably the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of ADHD. Around 80% of variants of the phenotype can be ascribed to hereditary factors. There are various chromosomal loci containing ADHD genes. They partially overlap the loci found in linkage studies on dyslexia and autism. It seems likely that a number of genetic variants, each with a small effect size, in combination with gene-environment interactions predispose to ADHD. There is a high degree of phenotypical heterogeneity among people with ADHD. Finding endophenotypes may improve the power of genetic studies. Endophenotypes are specific expressions of the underlying pathophysiology, intermediate between gene and phenotype. Neuro-imaging studies in children with ADHD have indicated abnormalities in frontostriatal, temporal and cerebellar volume. Unaffected brothers and sisters show the same cerebral abnormalities, but not the cerebellar abnormalities. These brain abnormalities together with specific neuropsychological features could be ADHD endophenotypes.

  7. Automated reticulocyte parameters for hereditary spherocytosis screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarova, Elena; Pradier, Olivier; Cotton, Frédéric; Gulbis, Béatrice

    2014-11-01

    The laboratory diagnosis of hereditary spherocytosis (HS) is based on several screening and confirmatory tests; our algorithm includes clinical features, red blood cell morphology analysis and cryohaemolysis test, and, in case of positive screening, sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis as a diagnostic test. Using the UniCel DxH800 (Beckman Coulter) haematology analyser, we investigated automated reticulocyte parameters as HS screening tool, i.e. mean reticulocyte volume (MRV), immature reticulocyte fraction (IRF) and mean sphered cell volume (MSCV). A total of 410 samples were screened. Gel electrophoresis was applied to 159 samples that were positive for the screening tests. A total of 48 patients were diagnosed as HS, and seven were diagnosed as acquired autoimmune haemolytic anaemia (AIHA). Some other 31 anaemic conditions were also studied. From the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, both delta (mean cell volume (MCV)-MSCV) and MRV presented an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.98. At the diagnostic cut-off of 100 % sensitivity, MRV showed the best specificity of 88 % and a positive likelihood ratio of 8.7. The parameters IRF, MRV and MSCV discriminated HS not only from controls and other tested pathologies but also from AIHA contrary to the cryohaemolysis test. In conclusion, automated reticulocyte parameters might be helpful for haemolytic anaemia diagnostic orientation even for general laboratories. In combination with cryohaemolysis, they ensure an effective and time-saving screening for HS for more specialised laboratories.

  8. Leber hereditary optic neuropathy: current perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyerson, Cherise; Van Stavern, Greg; McClelland, Collin

    2015-01-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is one of the most common inherited optic neuropathies causing bilateral central vision loss. The disorder results from point mutations in mitochondrial DNA and subsequent mitochondrial dysfunction. The primary cell type that is lost in LHON is the retinal ganglion cell, which is highly susceptible to disrupted ATP production and oxidative stress. Inheritance of LHON follows that of mitochondrial genetics, and it has a highly variable clinical phenotype, as other genetic and environmental factors also play a role. Although LHON usually presents with isolated vision loss, some patients suffer other neurological sequelae. For ill-defined reasons, male LHON mutation carriers are more affected than females. Most LHON patients remain legally blind, but a small proportion can experience spontaneous partial recovery, often within the first year of symptom onset. Unfortunately, at this time there are no established curative interventions and treatment is largely supportive. Patients should be offered low vision services and counseled on mitigating risk factors for additional vision loss, such as smoking and consuming alcohol. Encouraging treatments currently undergoing investigation includes ubiquinone analogs, such as idebenone, as well as gene therapy and stem cells to restore ATP synthesis and provide neuroprotection to surviving retinal ganglion cells. PMID:26170609

  9. Molecular Diagnostic and Pathogenesis of Hereditary Hemochromatosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Paulo C. J. L.; Krieger, Jose E.; Pereira, Alexandre C.

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by enhanced intestinal absorption of dietary iron. Without therapeutic intervention, iron overload leads to multiple organ damage such as liver cirrhosis, cardiomyopathy, diabetes, arthritis, hypogonadism and skin pigmentation. Most HH patients carry HFE mutant genotypes: homozygosity for p.Cys282Tyr or p.Cys282Tyr/p.His63Asp compound heterozygosity. In addition to HFE gene, mutations in the genes that encode hemojuvelin (HJV), hepcidin (HAMP), transferrin receptor 2 (TFR2) and ferroportin (SLC40A1) have been associated with regulation of iron homeostasis and development of HH. The aim of this review was to identify the main gene mutations involved in the pathogenesis of type 1, 2, 3 and 4 HH and their genetic testing indication. HFE testing for the two main mutations (p.Cys282Tyr and p.His63Asp) should be performed in all patients with primary iron overload and unexplained increased transferrin saturation and/or serum ferritin values. The evaluation of the HJV p.Gly320Val mutation must be the molecular test of choice in suspected patients with juvenile hemochromatosis with less than 30 years and cardiac or endocrine manifestations. In conclusion, HH is an example that genetic testing can, in addition to performing the differential diagnostic with secondary iron overload, lead to more adequate and faster treatment. PMID:22408404

  10. Molecular Diagnostic and Pathogenesis of Hereditary Hemochromatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo C. J. L. Santos

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by enhanced intestinal absorption of dietary iron. Without therapeutic intervention, iron overload leads to multiple organ damage such as liver cirrhosis, cardiomyopathy, diabetes, arthritis, hypogonadism and skin pigmentation. Most HH patients carry HFE mutant genotypes: homozygosity for p.Cys282Tyr or p.Cys282Tyr/p.His63Asp compound heterozygosity. In addition to HFE gene, mutations in the genes that encode hemojuvelin (HJV, hepcidin (HAMP, transferrin receptor 2 (TFR2 and ferroportin (SLC40A1 have been associated with regulation of iron homeostasis and development of HH. The aim of this review was to identify the main gene mutations involved in the pathogenesis of type 1, 2, 3 and 4 HH and their genetic testing indication. HFE testing for the two main mutations (p.Cys282Tyr and p.His63Asp should be performed in all patients with primary iron overload and unexplained increased transferrin saturation and/or serum ferritin values. The evaluation of the HJV p.Gly320Val mutation must be the molecular test of choice in suspected patients with juvenile hemochromatosis with less than 30 years and cardiac or endocrine manifestations. In conclusion, HH is an example that genetic testing can, in addition to performing the differential diagnostic with secondary iron overload, lead to more adequate and faster treatment.

  11. Pathogenesis and laboratory diagnosis of hereditary angioedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuraw, Bruce L; Christiansen, Sandra C

    2009-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) was first described in the 19th century. Over the past 50 years, many details of the pathophysiology and molecular biology of HAE have been elucidated. Two types of HAE, type I and type II, result from mutations in the gene for the broad-spectrum protease inhibitor C1 inhibitor (C1INH). Type I HAE is characterized by low antigenic and functional C1INH levels and type II HAE has normal antigenic but low functional C1INH levels. Type III HAE, by contrast, has normal antigenic and functional C1INH levels. In some families, type III HAE has been linked to mutations in Hageman factor. C1INH is the primary inhibitor of the complement proteases C1r and C1s as well as the contact system proteases activated Hageman factor (coagulation factor XIIa and XIIf) and plasma kallikrein. It is also an inhibitor of plasmin and coagulation factor XIa. The primary mediator of swelling in HAE has now been unequivocally shown to be bradykinin, generated from activation of the plasma contact system. The knowledge gained concerning the underlying mechanisms of the different types of HAE allow the clinician to approach the laboratory diagnosis with confidence and provides opportunities for novel therapeutic strategies.

  12. Consanguinity and hereditary hearing loss in Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girotto, Giorgia; Mezzavilla, Massimo; Abdulhadi, Khalid; Vuckovic, Dragana; Vozzi, Diego; Khalifa Alkowari, Moza; Gasparini, Paolo; Badii, Ramin

    2014-01-01

    Qatar is a sovereign state located on the Eastern coast of the Arabian Peninsula in the Persian Gulf. Its native population consists of 3 major subgroups: people of Arabian origin or Bedouins, those from an Eastern or Persian ancestry and individuals with African admixture. Historically, all types of consanguineous marriages have been and still are common in the Qatari population, particularly among first and double-first cousins. Thus, there is a higher risk for most inherited diseases including hereditary hearing loss (HHL). In particular, a hearing loss prevalence of 5.2% has been reported in Qatar, with parental consanguinity being more common among affected individuals as compared with unaffected ones. Our recent molecular results confirm a high homogeneity and level of inbreeding in Qatari HHL patients. Among all HHL genes, GJB2, the major player worldwide, accounts for a minor proportion of cases and at least 3 additional genes have been found to be mutated in Qatari patients. Interestingly, one gene, BDP1, has been described to cause HHL only in this country. These results point towards an unexpected level of genetic heterogeneity despite the high level of inbreeding. This review provides an up-to-date picture of HHL in Qatar and of the impact of consanguinity on this disease. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Hereditary Ovarian Cancer and Risk Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Lesley; Mutch, David G

    2017-05-01

    Mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 account for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome in a majority of families and 14% of epithelial ovarian cancer cases. Despite next-generation sequencing, other identified genes (Lynch Syndrome, RAD51C, RAD51D, and BRIP1) account for only a small proportion of cases. The risk of ovarian cancer by age 70 is approximately 40% for BRCA1 and 18% for BRCA2. Most of these cancers are high-grade serous cancers that predominantly arise in the fimbriae of the fallopian tube. Ovarian screening does not improve outcomes, so women at high risk are recommended to undergo risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy around the age of 40, followed by hormone replacement therapy (HRT). Specimens should be carefully examined for occult malignancy. Mutation carriers may benefit from newly developed poly ADP ribose polymerase inhibitors. Genetic testing should only be performed after careful counseling, particularly if testing involves the testing of panels of genes that may identify unsuspected disease predisposition or confusing variants of uncertain significance. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Hereditary multiple exostoses of the hip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Fiky, Tarek A M; Chow, Wang; Li, Yun Hoi; To, Michael

    2009-08-01

    To assess the radiographic features of 36 hips with hereditary multiple exostoses (HME). Hip parameters of 12 males and 6 females (36 hips) aged 2 to 28 years with HME were assessed using anteroposterior radiographs. The recorded features included the sites of osteochondromas, the femoral head/neck ratio, the Reimer's migration percentage, Sharp's acetabular angle, the centre edge angle, the femoral neck-shaft angle, and degenerative changes. 15 of the 18 patients were asymptomatic; 3 complained of pain (2 underwent excision or bone biopsy); no lesion was malignant. Osteochondromas were most commonly located in the femur followed by the ilium; only one was intra-articular. 32 hips had coxa valga; 26 had an abnormal Reimer's migration percentage; 17 had an abnormal Sharp's acetabular angle; 12 had an abnormal centre edge angle; 32 had an abnormal femoral neck-shaft angle; and 6 had degenerative changes. Acetabular and femoral dysplasia as well as subluxation are common in patients with HME. Borderline subluxated hips and those with marked coxa valga and/or acetabular dysplasia should be closely monitored to determine the need for surgery in the future. Subluxated hips should be operated on early, particularly in children and symptomatic adults.

  15. The hip in hereditary multiple exostoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, D E; Benson, M K; Hosney, G A

    2001-09-01

    We defined the characteristics of dysplasia and coxa valga in hereditary multiple exostoses (HME) by radiological analysis of 24 hips in 12 patients. The degree and effect of the 'osteochondroma load' around the hip were quantified. We investigated the pathology of the labrum and the incidence of osteoarthritis and of malignant change in these patients. Coxa valga and dysplasia were common with a median neck-shaft angle of 156 degrees, a median centre-edge angle of 23 degrees and Sharp's acetabular angle of 44 degrees. There was overgrowth of the femoral neck with a significantly greater ratio of the neck/shaft diameter in HME than in the control hips (p coxa valga (p coxa valga. No correlation was found between dysplasia and coxa valga. These data suggest that HME may cause anomalies of the hip as a reflection of a generalised inherited defect, but also support the theory that osteochondromas may themselves precipitate some of the characteristic features of HME around the hip.

  16. Modern diagnostic approach to hereditary xanthinuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mraz, Martin; Hurba, Olha; Bartl, Josef; Dolezel, Zdenek; Marinaki, Anthony; Fairbanks, Lynette; Stiburkova, Blanka

    2015-02-01

    Hereditary xanthinuria (HX) is a rare inherited disorder caused by a deficiency of xanthine dehydrogenase/oxidase (XDH/XO). Missing XDH/XO activity leads to undetectable levels of uric acid excessively replaced by xanthine in serum/urine. The allopurinol loading test has been traditionally used to differentiate between HX types I and II. Final confirmation of HX has been based on the biopsy finding of the absent XDH/XO activity in the small intestine or liver. We present the clinical, biochemical, ultrasound and molecular genetics findings in three new patients with HX and suggest a simple three-step approach to be used for diagnosis, typing and confirmation of HX. In the first step, the diagnosis of HX is determined by extremely low serum/urinary uric acid excessively replaced by xanthine. Second, HX is typed using urinary metabolomics. Finally, the results are confirmed by molecular genetics. We advocate for this safe and non-invasive diagnostic algorithm instead of the traditional allopurinol loading test and intestinal or liver biopsy used in the past.

  17. Mimic syndromes in sporadic cases of progressive spinal muscular atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, J.; van den Berg-Vos, R. M.; Franssen, H.; van den Berg, L. H.; Vogels, O. J.; Wokke, J. H. J.; de Jong, J. M. B. V.; de Visser, M.

    2002-01-01

    Described are patients initially diagnosed with progressive spinal muscular atrophy (PSMA), in whom further evaluation established another diagnosis. The authors prospectively investigated incident and prevalent cases of PSMA. Seventeen of 89 patients, after initial registration, were later excluded

  18. Perspectives on Clinical Trials in Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swoboda, Kathryn J.; Kissel, John T.; Crawford, Thomas O.; Bromberg, Mark B.; Acsadi, Gyula; D'Anjou, Guy; Krosschell, Kristin J.; Reyna, Sandra P.; Schroth, Mary K.; Scott, Charles B.; Simard, Louise R.

    2011-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy is one of the most heterogeneous of the single-gene neuromuscular disorders. The broad spectrum of severity, with onset from the prenatal period to adulthood, presents unique challenges in the design and implementation of clinical trials. The clinical classification of subjects into severe (type 1), intermediate (type 2), and mild (type 3) subtypes has proved useful both in enhancing communication among clinicians internationally and in forging the collaborative development of outcome measures for clinical trials. Ideally, clinical trial design in spinal muscular atrophy must take into account the spinal muscular atrophy type, patient age, severity-of-affection status, nature of the therapeutic approach, timing of the proposed intervention relative to disease progression, and relative homogeneity of the cohort to be studied. Following is an overview of the challenges and opportunities, current and future therapeutic strategies, and progress to date in clinical trials in spinal muscular atrophy. PMID:17761650

  19. Redox homeostasis, oxidative stress and disuse muscle atrophy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pellegrino, Maria Antonietta; Desaphy, Jean‐François; Brocca, Lorenza; Pierno, Sabata; Camerino, Diana Conte; Bottinelli, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Abstract  A pivotal role has been ascribed to oxidative stress in determining the imbalance between protein synthesis and degradation leading to muscle atrophy in many pathological conditions and in disuse...

  20. Acquired alopecia, mental retardation, short stature, microcephaly, and optic atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hennekam, R. C.; Renckens-Wennen, E. G.

    1990-01-01

    We report on a female patient who had acquired total alopecia, short stature, microcephaly, optic atrophy, severe myopia, and mental retardation. A survey of published reports failed to show an identical patient, despite various similar cases

  1. Mechanisms of muscle growth and atrophy in mammals and Drosophila

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Piccirillo, Rosanna; Demontis, Fabio; Perrimon, Norbert; Goldberg, Alfred L

    2014-01-01

    .... Although the pathogenesis of this condition has been primarily studied in mammals, Drosophila is emerging as an attractive system to investigate some of the mechanisms involved in muscle growth and atrophy. Results...

  2. Biochemical adaptations of antigravity muscle fibers to disuse atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, F. W.

    1978-01-01

    Studies are presented in four parts of this report. The four parts include; (1) studies to gain information on the molecular basis of atrophy by antigravity muscle; (2) studies on the work capacity of antigravity muscles during atrophy and during recovery from atrophy; (3) studies on recovery of degenerated antigravity fibers after removal of hind-limb casts; and (4) studies on the atrophy and recovery of bone. The philosophy of these studies was to identify the time sequence of events in the soleus muscle of the rat following immobilization of the hind limbs, so that the length of the soleus muscle within the fixed limb is less than its resting length. In two separate studies, no decline in the weight of the soleus muscle could be detected during the first 72 hours of limb immobilization.

  3. Disease-Induced Skeletal Muscle Atrophy and Fatigue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Powers, Scott K.; Lynch, Gordon S.; Murphy, Kate T.; Reid, Michael B.; Zijdewind, Inge

    2016-01-01

    Numerous health problems including acute critical illness, cancer, diseases associated with chronic inflammation, and neurological disorders often result in skeletal muscle weakness and fatigue. Disease-related muscle atrophy and fatigue is an important clinical problem because acquired skeletal

  4. Hereditary Spherocytosis and Hereditary Elliptocytosis: Aberrant Protein Sorting during Erythroblast Enucleation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salomao, Marcela; Chen, Ke; Villalobos, Jonathan; Mohandas, Narla; An, Xiuli; Chasis, Joel Anne

    2010-02-08

    During erythroblast enucleation, membrane proteins distribute between extruded nuclei and reticulocytes. In hereditary spherocytosis (HS) and hereditary elliptocytosis (HE), deficiencies of membrane proteins, in addition to those encoded by the mutant gene, occur. Elliptocytes, resulting from protein 4.1R gene mutations, lack not only 4.1R but also glycophorin C, which links the cytoskeleton and bilayer. In HS resulting from ankyrin-1 mutations, band 3, Rh-associated antigen, and glycophorin A are deficient. The current study was undertaken to explore whether aberrant protein sorting, during enucleation, creates these membrane-spanning protein deficiencies. We found that although glycophorin C sorts to reticulocytes normally, it distributes to nuclei in 4.1R-deficient HE cells. Further, glycophorin A and Rh-associated antigen, which normally partition predominantly to reticulocytes, distribute to both nuclei and reticulocytes in an ankyrin-1-deficient murine model of HS. We conclude that aberrant protein sorting is one mechanistic basis for protein deficiencies in HE and HS.

  5. Risk factors for cancer in hereditary pancreatitis. International Hereditary Pancreatitis Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowenfels, A B; Maisonneuve, P; Whitcomb, D C

    2000-05-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis is a rare form of pancreatitis, accounting for approximately 1% of all types of pancreatitis. It is inherited as an autosomal dominant disease, with incomplete penetrance. The genetic defect is believed to be caused by mutations in the trypsinogen gene. Patients who inherit the disorder suffer from a form of pancreatitis that resembles other types of pancreatitis, but the age of onset is much earlier. Sixteen biopsy-proven pancreatic cancers have developed in a cohort of 412 patients with a median follow-up period of 18 years (interquartile range, 7 to 30 years) since the onset of symptoms. Compared with the background population, the risk of pancreatic cancer is approximately 50 to 60 times greater than expected. Smoking appears to be an additional risk factor in these patients: Smoking increases the risk of developing pancreatic cancer and lowers the age of onset by approximately 20 years. Patients with hereditary pancreatitis are urged to avoid smoking because it greatly increases the risk of pancreatic cancer and to avoid alcohol, a known risk factor for all forms of pancreatitis.

  6. Quantitative study of the physiological cerebral atrophy with aging. A statistical analysis of the normal range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagata, K.; Basugi, N.; Fukushima, T.; Tango, T.; Suzuki, I.; Kaminuma, T.; Kurashina, S.

    1987-07-01

    A new method of discriminating pathological cerebral atrophy from physiological atrophy during aging is reported. The authors advocate a pixel counting method using a minicomputer for the quantitative measurement of cerebral atrophy. Five hundred cases were studied with this quantitative method and the normal range of the physiological atrophy was determined statistically. In order to estimate the degree of cerebral atrophy easily, the conventional linear measurement methods were compared with the pixel counting method using multivariant analysis, and a simple formula for the calculation of the degree of cerebral atrophy is proposed. Using this formula and the normal range, pathological cerebral atrophy is easily detectable.

  7. Facilitating text reading in posterior cortical atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Keir X X; Rajdev, Kishan; Shakespeare, Timothy J; Leff, Alexander P; Crutch, Sebastian J

    2015-07-28

    We report (1) the quantitative investigation of text reading in posterior cortical atrophy (PCA), and (2) the effects of 2 novel software-based reading aids that result in dramatic improvements in the reading ability of patients with PCA. Reading performance, eye movements, and fixations were assessed in patients with PCA and typical Alzheimer disease and in healthy controls (experiment 1). Two reading aids (single- and double-word) were evaluated based on the notion that reducing the spatial and oculomotor demands of text reading might support reading in PCA (experiment 2). Mean reading accuracy in patients with PCA was significantly worse (57%) compared with both patients with typical Alzheimer disease (98%) and healthy controls (99%); spatial aspects of passages were the primary determinants of text reading ability in PCA. Both aids led to considerable gains in reading accuracy (PCA mean reading accuracy: single-word reading aid = 96%; individual patient improvement range: 6%-270%) and self-rated measures of reading. Data suggest a greater efficiency of fixations and eye movements under the single-word reading aid in patients with PCA. These findings demonstrate how neurologic characterization of a neurodegenerative syndrome (PCA) and detailed cognitive analysis of an important everyday skill (reading) can combine to yield aids capable of supporting important everyday functional abilities. This study provides Class III evidence that for patients with PCA, 2 software-based reading aids (single-word and double-word) improve reading accuracy. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  8. Forced oscillation technique in spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauld, Leanne M; Keeling, Lucy A; Shackleton, Claire E; Sly, Peter D

    2014-09-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) causes respiratory compromise that is difficult to assess in young children. The forced oscillation technique (FOT) is commercially available for children as young as 2 years of age and is nonvolitional. The aim of this study was to assess the usefulness of FOT in young children with SMA. Children with SMA aged resistance at 8 Hz (Rrs8) (mean z score, +0.66; SD, 1.34; P = .12) were abnormal. Four children performed spirometry. Linear relationships to Xrs8 exist: FVC (R2, 0.54), unassisted PCF (R2, 0.33), assisted PCF (R2, 0.43), and AHI (R2, 0.32). Over 12 months, Xrs8z score worsened (rate of change of +1.08, P change +0.51, P .05) was found between clinical characteristics and FOT values. FOT is feasible in young children with SMA, with abnormal values of reactance and resistance on grouped data, worsening over 12 months. Xrs8 is related to respiratory tests used to monitor progress in SMA (FVC, PCF, AHI). Further research on the value of FOT in managing individuals is warranted.

  9. Photoreceptor atrophy in acute zonal occult outer retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zibrandtsen, N.; Munch, I.C.; Klemp, K.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To assess retinal morphology in acute zonal occult outer retinopathy (AZOOR). Methods: Three patients with a normal ophthalmoscopic fundus appearance, a history of photopsia, and visual field loss compatible with AZOOR were examined using optical coherence tomography, automated perimetry...... and multifocal electroretinography. Results: All three patients demonstrated partial or complete photoreceptor atrophy corresponding to partial or complete scotomata of retinal origin. Conclusion: Photoreceptor atrophy can be demonstrated early in the course of AZOOR, before ophthalmoscopically visible changes...

  10. Steroid-induced Kager's fat pad atrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taneja, Atul K. [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Musculoskeletal Radiology Division, Imaging Department, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Musculoskeletal Imaging, Diagnostic Center, Hospital do Coracao (HCor) and Teleimagem, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Santos, Durval C.B. [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Musculoskeletal Radiology Division, Imaging Department, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    We report a rare case of Kager's fat pad atrophy and fibrosis in a 60-year-old woman 1 year after a steroid injection for Achilles tendinopathy. There are few published reports of steroid-induced atrophy affecting deeper layers of fat tissue. To our knowledge, this case report is the first to illustrate its features using magnetic resonance imaging. A review of the scientific literature is also presented. (orig.)

  11. FGFR1 inhibits skeletal muscle atrophy associated with hindlimb suspension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerrard Dave

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Skeletal muscle atrophy can occur under many different conditions, including prolonged disuse or immobilization, cachexia, cushingoid conditions, secondary to surgery, or with advanced age. The mechanisms by which unloading of muscle is sensed and translated into signals controlling tissue reduction remains a major question in the field of musculoskeletal research. While the fibroblast growth factors (FGFs and their receptors are synthesized by, and intimately involved in, embryonic skeletal muscle growth and repair, their role maintaining adult muscle status has not been examined. Methods We examined the effects of ectopic expression of FGFR1 during disuse-mediated skeletal muscle atrophy, utilizing hindlimb suspension and DNA electroporation in mice. Results We found skeletal muscle FGF4 and FGFR1 mRNA expression to be modified by hind limb suspension,. In addition, we found FGFR1 protein localized in muscle fibers within atrophying mouse muscle which appeared to be resistant to atrophy. Electroporation and ectopic expression of FGFR1 significantly inhibited the decrease in muscle fiber area within skeletal muscles of mice undergoing suspension induced muscle atrophy. Ectopic FGFR1 expression in muscle also significantly stimulated protein synthesis in muscle fibers, and increased protein degradation in weight bearing muscle fibers. Conclusion These results support the theory that FGF signaling can play a role in regulation of postnatal skeletal muscle maintenance, and could offer potentially novel and efficient therapeutic options for attenuating muscle atrophy during aging, illness and spaceflight.

  12. [Significance of ophthalmological imaging in common hereditary retinal diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortüm, K; Kernt, M; Reznicek, L

    2013-03-01

    Over the past years, a significant progress in genetic, functional and imaging diagnostics in hereditary retinal diseases has been made. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) as well as fundus autofluorescence (FAF) allow for high-resolution, non-invasive imaging - from various perspectives - of retinal and choroidal layers of the posterior fundus. Both techniques have gained more and more significance in the diagnosis of hereditary retinal diseases. Of all patients presented in this review, extensive family history was taken and a clinical ophthalmological examination performed. OCT scans as well as FAF images were acquired and compared to results of other functional and molecular genetic tests in the context of each disease. The presented cases in this review addressing hereditary retinal diseases (Best's disease, Stargardt's disease, cone-rod dystrophy, retinitis pigmentosa, achromatopsia, and X-linked retinoschisis) show the significance of ophthalmic imaging (OCT + FAF) for a targeted diagnosis of hereditary retinal diseases. The described imaging techniques (OCT + FAF) are becoming more and more important in the diagnosis of hereditary retinal diseases. Due to increasing availability of the devices, earlier detection of typical morphological changes not seen in clinical fundoscopy is feasible. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Contribution of white matter hyperintensities, medial temporal lobe atrophy and cortical atrophy on outcome, seven to twelve years after ECT in severely depressed geriatric patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudega, M.L.; Dols, A.; Adelerhof, I.; Rozing, M.; Wattjes, M.P.; Comijs, H.C.; Barkhof, F.; Eikelenboom, P.; Stek, M.L.; van Exel, E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Depression and cognitive decline are highly prevalent and often coexisting, however, the association between depression and dementia remains unclear. White matter hyperintensities (WMH), medial temporal lobe atrophy (MTA) and global cortical atrophy (GCA) are associated with depression,

  14. Childhood-onset Leber hereditary optic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majander, Anna; Bowman, Richard; Poulton, Joanna; Antcliff, Richard J; Reddy, M Ashwin; Michaelides, Michel; Webster, Andrew R; Chinnery, Patrick F; Votruba, Marcela; Moore, Anthony T; Yu-Wai-Man, Patrick

    2017-11-01

    The onset of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is relatively rare in childhood. This study describes the clinical and molecular genetic features observed in this specific LHON subgroup. Our retrospective study consisted of a UK paediatric LHON cohort of 27 patients and 69 additional cases identified from a systematic review of the literature. Patients were included if visual loss occurred at the age of 12 years or younger with a confirmed pathogenic mitochondrial DNA mutation: m.3460G>A, m.11778G>A or m.14484T>C. In the UK paediatric LHON cohort, three patterns of visual loss and progression were observed: (1) classical acute (17/27, 63%); (2) slowly progressive (4/27, 15%); and (3) insidious or subclinical (6/27, 22%). Diagnostic delays of 3-15 years occurred in children with an insidious mode of onset. Spontaneous visual recovery was more common in patients carrying the m.3460G>A and m.14484T>C mutations compared with the m.11778G>A mutation. Based a meta-analysis of 67 patients with available visual acuity data, 26 (39%) patients achieved a final best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) ≥0.5 Snellen decimal in at least one eye, whereas 13 (19%) patients had a final BCVA <0.05 in their better seeing eye. Although childhood-onset LHON carries a relatively better visual prognosis, approximately 1 in 5 patients will remain within the visual acuity criteria for legal blindness in the UK. The clinical presentation can be insidious and LHON should be considered in the differential diagnosis when faced with a child with unexplained subnormal vision and optic disc pallor. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  15. Hereditary gingival fibromatosis and growth retardation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowmick, S K; Gidvani, V K; Rettig, K R

    2001-01-01

    To describe two patients with hereditary gingival fibromatosis (HGF) and growth hormone deficiency and to review the literature on HGF and related endocrine abnormalities. We present case reports of two patients (first cousins)-an 8-year-old girl and a 13-year-old boy-with an existing diagnosis of HGF, who were assessed because of presumed growth failure. Both patients underwent growth hormone stimulation testing and more in-depth endocrine evaluation, including measurement of morning cortisol, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), and prolactin levels as well as thyroid function tests. An ACTH stimulation test was also performed. Radiologic evaluation included assessment of bone age and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain. In addition to HGF, both patients had short stature, subnormal growth velocity, and delayed bone age but no abnormalities on magnetic resonance imaging of the brain. Serum prolactin levels and results of thyroid function tests were normal. Subnormal growth hormone response was noted during hypoglycemia and pharmacologic stimuli with clonidine and levodopa. The female patient, who also had recurrent hypoglycemic episodes, had a suboptimal cortisol and ACTH response during hypoglycemia. On the ACTH stimulation test, she showed an inadequate cortisol response at 30 minutes but a normal response at 60 minutes. The male patient had normal morning cortisol and ACTH levels plus a normal response to ACTH stimulation. Both patients are responding well to treatment with growth hormone. The girl is also receiving cortisol replacement and has had no further episodes of hypoglycemia. Although HGF has been described as an isolated finding, it can occur as part of a syndrome, including infrequent endocrine abnormalities such as growth hormone insufficiency. The cause of the growth hormone deficiency remains unclear in these two patients. We believe that patients with HGF should be monitored carefully for a prolonged period for growth as well as other

  16. Hereditary Hemochromatosis and Transferrin Receptor 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Juxing

    2011-01-01

    Background Multicellular organisms regulate the uptake of calories, trace elements, and other nutrients by complex feedback mechanisms. In the case of iron, the body senses internal iron stores, iron requirements for hematopoiesis, and inflammatory status, and regulates iron uptake by modulating the uptake of dietary iron from the intestine. Both the liver and the intestine participate in the coordination of iron uptake and distribution in the body. The liver senses inflammatory signals and iron status of the organism and secretes a peptide hormone, hepcidin. Under high iron or inflammatory conditions hepcidin levels increase. Hepcidin binds to the iron transport protein, ferroportin (FPN), promoting FPN internalization and degradation. Decreased FPN levels reduce iron efflux out of intestinal epithelial cells and macrophages into the circulation. Derangements in iron metabolism result in either the abnormal accumulation of iron in the body, or in anemias. The identification of the mutations that cause the iron overload disease, hereditary hemochromatosis (HH), or iron-refractory iron-deficiencey anemia has revealed many of the proteins used to regulate iron uptake. Scope of the review In this review we discuss recent data concerning the regulation of iron homeostasis in the body by the liver and how transferrin receptor 2 (TfR2) affects this process. Major conclusions TfR2 plays a key role in regulating iron homeostasis in the body. General significance The regulation of iron homeostasis is important. One third of the people in the world are anemic. HH is the most common inherited disease in people of Northern European origin and can lead to severe health complications if left untreated. PMID:21864651

  17. Optimal management of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garg N

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Neetika Garg,1 Monica Khunger,2 Arjun Gupta,3 Nilay Kumar4 1Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA; 2Department of Medicine, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India; 3Department of Medicine, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA; 4Department of Medicine, Cambridge Health Alliance/Harvard Medical School, Cambridge, MA, USA Abstract: Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT, also known by the eponym Osler–Weber–Rendu syndrome, is a group of related disorders inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion and characterized by the development of arteriovenous malformations (AVM in the skin, mucous membranes, and/or internal organs such as brain, lungs, and liver. Its prevalence is currently estimated at one in 5,000 to 8,000. Most cases are due to mutations in the endoglin (HHT1 or ACVRLK1 (HHT2 genes. Telangiectasias in nasal and gastrointestinal mucosa generally present with recurrent/chronic bleeding and iron deficiency anemia. Larger AVMs occur in lungs (~40%–60% of affected individuals, liver (~40%–70%, brain (~10%, and spine (~1%. Due to the devastating and potentially fatal complications of some of these lesions (for example, strokes and brain abscesses with pulmonary AVMs, presymptomatic screening and treatment are of utmost importance. However, due to the rarity of this condition, many providers lack an appreciation for the whole gamut of its manifestations and complications, age-dependent penetrance, and marked intrafamilial variation. As a result, HHT remains frequently underdiagnosed and many families do not receive the appropriate screening and treatments. This article provides an overview of the clinical features of HHT, discusses the clinical and genetic diagnostic strategies, and presents an up-to-date review of literature and detailed considerations regarding screening for visceral AVMs, preventive modalities, and treatment options. Keywords: arteriovenous

  18. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary fibrosing poikiloderma with tendon contractures, myopathy, and pulmonary fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hereditary fibrosing poikiloderma with tendon contractures, myopathy, and pulmonary fibrosis Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... Hereditary fibrosing poikiloderma with tendon contractures, myopathy, and pulmonary fibrosis (abbreviated POIKTMP ), is a disorder that affects many ...

  19. Cancer risk in families with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer diagnosed by mutation analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasen, HFA; Wijnen, JT; Menko, FH; Kleibeuker, JH; Taal, BG; Griffioen, G; Nagengast, FM; MeijersHeijboer, EH; Bertario, L; Varesco, L; Bisgaard, ML; Mohr, J; Fodde, R; Khan, PM

    Background & Aims: Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer is characterized by early-onset colorectal cancer and the occurrence of various other cancers, The recent isolation of four mismatch repair genes responsible for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer allows for the identification of

  20. Cancer risk in families with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer diagnosed by mutation analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasen, H. F.; Wijnen, J. T.; Menko, F. H.; Kleibeuker, J. H.; Taal, B. G.; Griffioen, G.; Nagengast, F. M.; Meijers-Heijboer, E. H.; Bertario, L.; Varesco, L.; Bisgaard, M. L.; Mohr, J.; Fodde, R.; Khan, P. M.

    1996-01-01

    Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer is characterized by early-onset colorectal cancer and the occurrence of various other cancers. The recent isolation of four mismatch repair genes responsible for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer allows for the identification of carriers within

  1. Muscle atrophy reversed by growth factor activation of satellite cells in a mouse muscle atrophy model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Hauerslev

    Full Text Available Muscular dystrophies comprise a large group of inherited disorders that lead to progressive muscle wasting. We wanted to investigate if targeting satellite cells can enhance muscle regeneration and thus increase muscle mass. We treated mice with hepatocyte growth factor and leukemia inhibitory factor under three conditions: normoxia, hypoxia and during myostatin deficiency. We found that hepatocyte growth factor treatment led to activation of the Akt/mTOR/p70S6K protein synthesis pathway, up-regulation of the myognic transcription factors MyoD and myogenin, and subsequently the negative growth control factor, myostatin and atrophy markers MAFbx and MuRF1. Hypoxia-induced atrophy was partially restored by hepatocyte growth factor combined with leukemia inhibitory factor treatment. Dividing satellite cells were three-fold increased in the treatment group compared to control. Finally, we demonstrated that myostatin regulates satellite cell activation and myogenesis in vivo following treatment, consistent with previous findings in vitro. Our results suggest, not only a novel in vivo pharmacological treatment directed specifically at activating the satellite cells, but also a myostatin dependent mechanism that may contribute to the progressive muscle wasting seen in severely affected patients with muscular dystrophy and significant on-going regeneration. This treatment could potentially be applied to many conditions that feature muscle wasting to increase muscle bulk and strength.

  2. Phenotypic heterogeneity of hereditary gynecologic cancers: a report from the Creighton hereditary cancer registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Murray Joseph; Bewtra, Chhanda; Lynch, Henry T; Snyder, Carrie; Stacy, Mark; Watson, Patrice

    2013-12-01

    To determine the validity of observations suggesting a significant dichotomy of gynecologic cancers determined by linkage to specific genetic defects associated with two major autosomal dominant hereditary cancer syndromes; the Creighton University Hereditary Cancer Registry was searched for female carriers of germ line mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2, associated with the Hereditary Breast Ovarian Cancer syndrome, and in the mismatch repair (MMR) genes MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6, associated with Lynch syndrome, who were registered with invasive uterine, ovarian, fallopian tube or peritoneal cancers between January 1, 1959 and December 31, 2010. From 217 such cases, a total of 174 subjects, consisting of 95 BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers and 79 carriers of mutations in MMR genes, were identified who had current signed Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act forms and complete primary diagnostic pathology reports and clinical records. Data meticulously extracted from these cases were categorized and statistically analyzed. There were highly significant differences between carriers of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations and carriers of MMR gene mutations in the proportion of serous carcinomas compared with endometrioid carcinomas of the uterus, including cervix and endometium (p cancers (p cancer, and endometrioid carcinoma was found in two of four MMR gene mutation carriers with fallopian tube cancers. All other fallopian tube cancers were serous carcinomas. Seven BRCA1 and one BRCA2 mutation carriers were diagnosed with primary peritoneal serous carcinoma; no peritoneal carcinomas were registered in MMR gene mutation carriers. Nine of 14 gynecologic cancers with associated endometriosis in mutation carriers were endometrioid or endometrioid mixed carcinomas compared with just three of other histologic types. Primary breast cancers, that characterize the HBOC syndrome, were much more frequent in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers; while multiple gynecologic cancers and

  3. High prevalence of hereditary thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura in central Norway: from clinical observation to evidence.

    OpenAIRE

    von Krogh A S; Quist-Paulsen P; Waage A; Langseth Ø O; Thorstensen K; Brudevold R; Tjønnfjord G E; Largiadèr C R; Lämmle B; Kremer Hovinga J A

    2016-01-01

    Essentials The population prevalence of hereditary thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is unknown. We studied the prevalence of hereditary TTP and population frequencies of two ADAMTS 13 mutations. A high frequency of hereditary TTP related to ADAMTS 13 mutation c.4143_4144dupA was found. Vicinity of ABO blood group and ADAMTS 13 loci may facilitate screening of ADAMTS 13 mutations. Background Hereditary thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) caused by ADAMTS 13 mutations is a rare b...

  4. Spinal Muscular Atrophy and Its Molecular Genetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabriye Kocaturk Sel

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is one of the most common autosomal recessive diseases, affecting aproximately 1 in 6,000 - 10,000 live births, and with a carrier frequency of aproximately 1 in 40- 60. The childhood SMAs can be classified clinically into three groups. Type I (Werdnig-Hoffmann is the most severe form, with onset at ‹ 6 months of age and with death typically at ‹2 years of age. Type II SMA patients display an intermediate severity, with onset at ‹18 months of age and with an inability to walk. Type III (Kugelberg –Walender individuals are able to walk independently and have a relatively mild phenotype, with onset at ›18 months of age. The gene involved in type I–III SMA has been mapped to 5q12-q13 by linkage analysis, and refined to a region of about 500 kb. The region contains a large inverted duplication consisting of at least four genes, which are present in a telomeric (t and a centromeric (c copy: survival motor neuron gene (SMN1 or SMNt and SMN2 or SMNc; neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein gene (NAIP; basal transcription factor subunit p44 (BTFp44t and BTFp44c; and a novel protein with unknown function H4F5. Although homozygous deletions encompassing all these genes are found in SMA patients, it is now well established that mutations or deletions of SMN1 (MIM#600354 cause the disease. SMN2 (MIM# 601627 gene, however, does not prevent the disease but attenuates disease severity. Therefore, upregulating functional SMN protein level via inducing gene expression and/or restoring splicing is an important therapeutic approach such as use of histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2012; 21(1.000: 1-26

  5. Neuromyelitis optica antibody in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simão, Luciano Mesquita

    2012-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica antibody (or aquaporin-4 antibody) is a well established serum marker associated to high-risk neuromyelitis optica syndrome that presents as an inflammatory demyelinating disease characterized by the occurrence of bilateral and simultaneous optic neuritis without complete visual recovery or it occurs as an isolated episode of transverse myelitis accompanied by longitudinally extensive spinal cord lesions. On the other hand, Leber hereditary optic neuropathy is a primarily hereditary disorder that affects all tissues of the body and its clinical presentation is tissue-specific for the optic nerve and, eventually, it might reach the spinal cord. Overlapping clinical features of neuromyelitis optica and Leber hereditary optic neuropathy may suggest common target organ diseases. The case report described herein emphasizes the coexistence of serum markers of both diseases, and suggests that further investigation of this challenging clinical presentation is warranted to confirm or rule out this association.

  6. Hereditary stomatocytosis: First case report from Valley of Kashmir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javid Rasool

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Stomatocytes are erythrocytes with a central slit or mouth-shaped (stoma area of central pallor when examined on dried smears. In wet preparations, they are uniconcave rather than biconcave, giving them a bowllike appearance. In vitro, stomatocytes are produced by drugs that intercalate into the inner half of the lipid bilayer, thereby expanding the inner lipid surface area relative to that of the outer half of the bilayer. Hereditary stomatocytosis (also known as hereditary hydrocytosis, or overhydrated stomatocytosis refers to a heterogeneous group of autosomal dominant hemolytic anemias caused by altered sodium permeability of the red cell membrane. We present the first case report of hereditary stomatocytosis in a 10-year-old male from the valley of Kashmir. Only eight families with this condition have been described worldwide.

  7. Neuromyelitis optica antibody in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Mesquita Simão

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Neuromyelitis optica antibody (or aquaporin-4 antibody is a well stablished serum marker associated to high-risk neuromyelitis optica syndrome that presents as an inflammatory demyelinating disease characterized by the occurrence of bilateral and simultaneous optic neuritis without complete visual recovery or it occurs as an isolated episode of transverse myelitis accompanied by longitudinally extensive spinal cord lesions. On the other hand, Leber hereditary optic neuropathy is a primarily hereditary disorder that affects all tissues of the body and its clinical presentation is tissue-specific for the optic nerve and, eventually, it might reach the spinal cord. Overlapping clinical features of neuromyelitis optica and Leber hereditary optic neuropathy may suggest common target organ diseases. The case report described herein emphasizes the coexistence of serum markers of both diseases, and suggests that further investigation of this challenging clinical presentation is warranted to confirm or rule out this association.

  8. [Hereditary hemachromatosis: clinical case report and literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochazka, Ricardo; Tagle, Martín

    2006-01-01

    Hemachromatosis is a hereditary condition, producing progressive iron overload as a result of the mutation in proteins that regulate intestinal iron absorption. It is a systemic disease with several manifestations including cirrhosis, diabetes mellitus, cardiomyopathy, joint disease and a proportion of asymptomatic patients. When it is diagnosed and treatment with phlebotomies is initiated before any organ damage is developed, the prognosis is very good, with normal survival free of manifestations. This condition is common in European populations. We report the case of a Peruvian patient of European ancestry who is asymptomatic, but has high levels of aminotransferases and elevated iron markers. Genetic testing confirmed the patient's diagnosis of hereditary hemachromatosis.

  9. [Efficiency of color vision tests in hereditary dyschromatopsia: case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Luciene Chaves; Urbano, Lúcia Carvalho de Ventura

    2008-01-01

    The authors describe two cases of hereditary dyschromatopsia and discuss the efficiency of the color vision tests. The patients were disapproved in different federal public examinations because Ishihara's test diagnosed hereditary dyschromatopsia. Ophthalmological evaluation was normal. No symptoms related to dyschromatopsia were presented. Panels D15 and Roth D 28 were normal. Desaturated D 15 showed deuteranomaly in case one. In the second case the comparative color vision tests showed nonspecific disorder. The diagnosis of dyschromatopsia is complex. The authors recommend comparative color vision tests to complement the Ishihara test for a better understanding of the color deficiency.

  10. Mutator gene and hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Chapelle, Albert [Helsingfors, FI; Vogelstein, Bert [Baltimore, MD; Kinzler, Kenneth W [Baltimore, MD

    2008-02-05

    The human MSH2 gene, responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, was identified by virtue of its homology to the MutS class of genes, which are involved in DNA mismatch repair. The sequence of cDNA clones of the human gene are provided, and the sequence of the gene can be used to demonstrate the existence of germ line mutations in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) kindreds, as well as in replication error.sup.+ (RER.sup.+) tumor cells.

  11. HSMNR belongs to the most frequent types of hereditary neuropathy in the Czech Republic and is twice more frequent than HMSNL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šafka Brožková, D; Haberlová, J; Mazanec, R; Laštůvková, J; Seeman, P

    2016-08-01

    Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy type Russe (HMSNR), also called CMT4G, is an autosomal recessive inherited peripheral neuropathy (IPN) caused by a founder mutation in the HK1 gene. HMSNR affects only patients with Roma origin, similar to the better known HMSN type Lom clarified earlier. By testing IPN patients with Roma origin, we realized that HMSNR affects surprisingly many patients in the Czech Republic. HMSNR is one of the most frequent types of IPN in this country and appears to be twice more frequent than HMSNL. Pronounced lower limb atrophies and severe deformities often lead to walking inability in even young patients, but hands are usually only mildly affected even after many years of disease duration. The group of 20 patients with HMSNR presented here is the first report about the prevalence of HMSNR from central Europe. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. A mitochondrial mutation at nt 9101 in the ATP synthase 6 gene associated with deficient oxidative phosphorylation in a family with leber hereditary optic neuroretinopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamninen, T.; Junoven, V.; Aula, P.; Savontaus, M.L. [Univ. of Turku (Finland); Majander, A.; Wikstroem, M. [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland)

    1995-05-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuroretinopathy (LHON) is a maternally inherited ocular disease resulting in bilateral optic atrophy in young adults. Several mtDNA point mutations have been proposed as being causative for LHON, all in complex I, III, or IV of the respiratory chain. The ND4/11778 mutation accounts for {approximately}50% of all LHON families, the ND1/3460 mutation is detected in {approximately}15% of cases, and {approximately}10% of LHON families have the ND6/14484 mutation. All these mutations are restricted to LHON families, and they change evolutionary conserved amino acids. Furthermore, these primary mutations have never been observed to occur simultaneously. Besides the primary mutations, several other replacement mutations have been found in LHON families. These mutations are also detected at low frequency in control individuals, and they change evolutionarily less conserved amino acids. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Electrical impedance myography in the assessment of disuse atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarulli, Andrew W; Duggal, Naven; Esper, Gregory J; Garmirian, Lindsay P; Fogerson, Patricia M; Lin, Connie H; Rutkove, Seward B

    2009-10-01

    Tarulli AW, Duggal N, Esper GJ, Garmirian LP, Fogerson PM, Lin CH, Rutkove SB. Electrical impedance myography in the assessment of disuse atrophy. To quantify disuse atrophy using electrical impedance myography (EIM), a noninvasive technique that we have used successfully to study neurogenic and myopathic atrophy. We performed EIM of the tibialis anterior of subjects with disuse atrophy secondary to cast immobilization and in their contralateral normal leg. Subjects were studied shortly after cast removal and again several weeks to months after the cast was removed and normal mobility was restored. Outpatient neurology and orthopedic practices at a tertiary care medical center. Otherwise healthy subjects (N=10) with unilateral leg fracture. Not applicable. Resistance, reactance, and phase measured at 50kHz. The main EIM outcome parameter, phase at 50kHz, was lower in the immobilized leg in 9 of 10 cases. Additionally, when normal mobility was restored, the phase of the casted leg increased relative to its initial measurement in all 10 cases, while it increased inconsistently in the contralateral leg. EIM may be a powerful tool for the assessment of disuse atrophy.

  14. Targeted therapy for hereditary cancer syndromes: hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome, Lynch syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis, and Li-Fraumeni syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Rishi; Liebe, Sarah; Turski, Michelle L; Vidwans, Smruti J; Janku, Filip; Garrido-Laguna, Ignacio; Munoz, Javier; Schwab, Richard; Rodon, Jordi; Kurzrock, Razelle; Subbiah, Vivek

    2014-12-01

    Cancer genetics has rapidly evolved in the last two decades. Understanding and exploring the several genetic pathways in the cancer cell is the foundation of targeted therapy. Several genomic aberrations have been identified and their role in carcinogenesis is being explored. In contrast to most cancers where these mutations are acquired, patients with hereditary cancer syndromes have inherited genomic aberrations. The understanding of the molecular pathobiology in hereditary cancer syndromes has advanced dramatically. In addition, many molecularly targeted therapies have been developed that could have potential roles in the treatment of patients with hereditary cancer syndromes. In this review, we outline the presentation, molecular biology, and possible targeted therapies for two of the most widely recognized hereditary cancer syndromes -- hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome and hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer syndrome (Lynch syndrome). We will also discuss other syndromes such as familial adenomatous polyposis and Li-Fraumeni syndrome (TP53).

  15. Global Cerebral Atrophy Detected by Routine Imaging: Relationship with Age, Hippocampal Atrophy, and White Matter Hyperintensities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Janabi, Omar M; Panuganti, Pradeep; Abner, Erin L; Bahrani, Ahmed A; Murphy, Ronan; Bardach, Shoshana H; Caban-Holt, Allison; Nelson, Peter T; Gold, Brian T; Smith, Charles D; Wilcock, Donna M; Jicha, Gregory A

    2018-01-05

    Interpreting the clinical significance of moderate-to-severe global cerebral atrophy (GCA) is a conundrum for many clinicians, who visually interpret brain imaging studies in routine clinical practice. GCA may be attributed to normal aging, Alzheimer's disease (AD), or cerebrovascular disease (CVD). Understanding the relationships of GCA with aging, AD, and CVD is important for accurate diagnosis and treatment decisions for cognitive complaints. To elucidate the relative associations of age, moderate-to-severe white matter hyperintensities (WMHs), and moderate-to-severe medial temporal lobe atrophy (MTA), with moderate-to-severe GCA, we visually rated clinical brain imaging studies of 325 participants from a community based sample. Logistic regression analysis was conducted to assess the relations of GCA with age, WMH, and MTA. The mean age was 76.2 (±9.6) years, 40.6% were male, and the mean educational attainment was 15.1 (±3.7) years. Logistic regression results demonstrated that while a 1-year increase in age was associated with GCA (OR = 1.04; P = .04), MTA (OR = 3.7; P < .001), and WMH (OR = 8.80; P < .001) were strongly associated with GCA in our study population. Partial correlation analysis showed that the variance of GCA explained by age is less than the variance attributed to MTA and WMH (r = .13, .21, and .43, respectively). Moderate-to-severe GCA is most likely to occur in the presence of AD or CVD and should not be solely attributed to age when evaluating clinical imaging findings in the workup of cognitive complaints. Developing optimal diagnostic and treatment strategies for cognitive decline in the setting of GCA requires an understanding of its risk factors in the aging population. Copyright © 2018 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  16. Organization and Running of the First Comprehensive Hereditary Cancer Clinic in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajkumar T

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hereditary cancers are thought to account for around 5% of cancers, particularly breast/ovarian and colorectal cancers. In India there is a paucity of data on hereditary cancers and the mutations in some of the common genes linked to hereditary cancers, such as BRCA1, BRCA2, hMSH2 and hMLH1. The country's first comprehensive hereditary cancer clinic was established in February 2002. The article describes the organization and running of the Clinic. It also discusses some of the social issues relevant to the given population in running the Hereditary Cancer Clinic.

  17. A CASE OF PERSISTANT INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION IN A 7 YEARS OLD GIRL WITH MULTIPLE HEREDITARY EXOSTOSIS AND CRANIOSTENOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.M. Kuzenkova

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The article demonstrates a case of rare hereditary syndrome observation — with the multiple hereditary exostosis (MHE syndrome in a 7 years old girl. The article covers hereditary and clinical features and life prognosis of the syndrome.Key words: intracranial hypertension, multiple hereditary exostosis (MHE syndrome, craniostenosis, children.

  18. Multiple hereditary exostoses and ischiofemoral impingement: a case-control study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoong, Philip; Mansour, Ramy; Teh, James L. [Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Radiology, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-15

    To assess whether there is a significant difference in the ischiofemoral space in patients with multiple hereditary exostoses affecting the proximal femora compared to normal patients. Ischiofemoral impingement is an increasingly recognized cause of hip and buttock pain. This causes narrowing of the ischiofemoral space resulting in an abnormal quadratus femoris muscle. We performed a retrospective search for individuals with MHE with proximal femoral involvement on pelvic MRI over a 7-year period (2006-2013). Suitable patients were age- and sex-matched with a control group. The minimum ischiofemoral space (MIFS) was recorded in each hip, as was the presence of edema and atrophy of quadratus femoris and concomitant hip osteoarthrosis. MRI features suggestive of ischiofemoral impingement were defined as MIFS less than 10 mm or an abnormal quadratus femoris muscle. Twenty-one hips in 11 individuals with MHE were included in the study. A total of 42 hips were analyzed. The mean age was 37 years (range, 13-72 years) and 55 % were male. There was a significant difference (p < 0.05) in the MIHS in individuals with MHE (mean, 10.7 mm, range, 0-21 mm) compared to a control group (mean, 18.1 mm, range, 10.5-26.5 mm). MRI features suggestive of ischiofemoral impingement were seen in 13/21 (62 %) hips in the MHE group and 0/21 (0 %) in the control group. The reduced ischiofemoral space and associated quadratus femoris abnormalities in patients with MHE involving the proximal femora may account for hip/buttock symptoms in the absence of significant degenerative change. (orig.)

  19. Pathogenic mitochondrial DNA mutations and associated clinical features in Korean patients with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yum, Hae Ri; Chae, Hyojin; Shin, Sun Young; Kim, Yonggoo; Kim, Myungshin; Park, Shin Hae

    2014-10-23

    To identify the spectrum of pathogenic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations and clinical features in Korean patients with genetically confirmed Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). The medical records of 34 unrelated, genetically confirmed LHON patients were reviewed. Total genomic DNA was isolated from the peripheral blood leukocytes of the patients with suspected LHON, and primary or secondary mtDNA mutations were identified by direct sequencing. We analyzed the visual acuity (VA), color vision, RNFL thickness, and visual field (VF) at the final visit from 20 patients who were followed-up for more than 6 months after the onset of LHON. Among 34 patients, 21 (61.8%) had the homoplasmic primary mutation, 11 (32.4%) had the homoplasmic secondary mutation, and 2 (5.9%) had the heteroplasmic primary mutation along with the homoplasmic secondary mutation. Analysis of mtDNA sequences revealed six different types of LHON-associated mutations: two primary LHON-associated primary mutations, m.11778G>A (20 patients, 58.8%) and m.14484T>C (3 patients, 8.8%), and four secondary LHON-associated mutations, which were m.3394T>C (3 patients, 8.8%), m.3497C>T (4 patients, 11.8%), m.11696G>A (4 patients, 11.8%), and m.14502T>C (2 patients, 5.9%). Secondary mutation-carrying patients demonstrated a decreased in RNFL thickness, similar to those in primary mutation-carrying LHON patients. These patients had a higher female ratio (P = 0.019), better VA (P = 0.043) and color vision (P = 0.005), as well as better VF. In addition to common primary LHON-associated mutations, our study identified secondary mtDNA mutations, which should be considered when evaluating patients with optic atrophy. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  20. Targeting estrogen receptor β as preventive therapeutic strategy for Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisano, Annalinda; Preziuso, Carmela; Iommarini, Luisa; Perli, Elena; Grazioli, Paola; Campese, Antonio F; Maresca, Alessandra; Montopoli, Monica; Masuelli, Laura; Sadun, Alfredo A; d'Amati, Giulia; Carelli, Valerio; Ghelli, Anna; Giordano, Carla

    2015-12-15

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a maternally inherited blinding disease characterized by degeneration of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and consequent optic nerve atrophy. Peculiar features of LHON are incomplete penetrance and gender bias, with a marked male prevalence. Based on the different hormonal metabolism between genders, we proposed that estrogens play a protective role in females and showed that these hormones ameliorate mitochondrial dysfunction in LHON through the estrogen receptors (ERs). We also showed that ERβ localize to the mitochondria of RGCs. Thus, targeting ERβ may become a therapeutic strategy for LHON specifically aimed at avoiding or delaying the onset of disease in mutation carriers. Here, we tested the effects of ERβ targeting on LHON mitochondrial defective metabolism by treating LHON cybrid cells carrying the m.11778G>A mutation with a combination of natural estrogen-like compounds that bind ERβ with high selectivity. We demonstrated that these molecules improve cell viability by reducing apoptosis, inducing mitochondrial biogenesis and strongly reducing the levels of reactive oxygen species in LHON cells. These effects were abolished in cells with ERβ knockdown by silencing receptor expression or by using specific receptor antagonists. Our observations support the hypothesis that estrogen-like molecules may be useful in LHON prophylactic therapy. This is particularly important for lifelong disease prevention in unaffected LHON mutation carriers. Current strategies attempting to combat degeneration of RGCs during the acute phase of LHON have not been very effective. Implementing a different and preemptive approach with a low risk profile may be very helpful. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Sulindac treatment in hereditary non-pollyposis colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijcken, Fleur E. M.; Hollema, Harry; van der Zee, Ate G. J.; van der Sluis, Tineke; Ek, Wytske Boersma-van; Kleibeuker, Jan H.

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, e.g. sulindac have been extensively studied for chemoprevention in familial adenomatous polyposis, but not in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). We evaluated these effects in HNPCC using surrogate end-points for cancer risk. In a randomised

  2. Benefits and risks of danazol in hereditary angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bork, Konrad; Bygum, Anette; Hardt, Jochen

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hereditary angioedema (HAE) due to C1 inhibitor deficiency is clinically characterized by relapsing skin swellings, abdominal pain attacks, and life-threatening upper airway obstruction. Treatment with androgens prevents attacks for those with this condition. OBJECTIVE: To examine the...

  3. Dementia with non-hereditary cystatin C angiopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benedikz, Eirikur; Blöndal, H; Jóhannesson, G

    1989-01-01

    Brain biopsies from two patients with non-hereditary cerebral hemorrhages and eighty autopsied cases with the clinical diagnosis of dementia are presented. The biopsied cases, both males aged 64 and 59, had a sudden onset of cerebral hemorrhage, mild progressive dementia and cystatin C cerebral...

  4. Visual Rehabilitation of Persons with Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudanko, S.-L.

    1995-01-01

    This article presents results of a noncontrolled clinical study of 20 persons with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy who were treated from 1976 to 1990 at the Low Vision Centre of the Finnish Federation of the Visually Handicapped. The importance of early functional visual rehabilitation is emphasized, as is the use of low vision aids to help…

  5. REVIEW ARTICLE Therapeutic avenues for hereditary forms of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    chitra

    Key words: retinal disease; retinitis pigmentosa; gene therapy; retinoid; clinical trial; stem cell; cell therapy. Abstract. Hereditary retinal diseases, known as retinal degenerations or dystrophies, are a large group of inherited eye disorders resulting in irreversible visual loss and blindness. They develop due to mutations in one ...

  6. Guidelines for the genetic diagnosis of hereditary recurrent fevers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shinar, Y; Obici, L; Aksentijevich, I

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary recurrent fevers (HRFs) are a group of monogenic autoinflammatory diseases characterised by recurrent bouts of fever and serosal inflammation that are caused by pathogenic variants in genes important for the regulation of innate immunity. Discovery of the molecular defects responsible ...

  7. Study of glycolytic intermediates in hereditary elliptocytosis with thalassemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavri Roshan

    1977-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycolytic intermediates like ATP, DPG and GSH have been studied in a family with. hereditary elliptocytosis and thalassemia. Results indicate a fall in ATP with a concomitant rise in DPG in the Patient. Findings are discussed in relation to other data.

  8. Report of hereditary gingival fibromatosis in two Nigerian siblings ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Hereditary Gingival Fibromatosis (HGF) is a rare condition with a prevalence of 1:750,000, and can present as an isolated disorder or more rarely as a syndrome component. It is characterised by a slow and progressive enlargement of both maxillary and mandibular 28rganiza with varying severity between ...

  9. Mitochondrial processes are impaired in hereditary inclusion body myopathy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisenberg, I.; Novershtern, N.; Itzhaki, Z.; Becker-Cohen, M.; Sadeh, M.; Willems, P.H.G.M.; Friedman, N.; Koopman, W.J.H.; Mitrani-Rosenbaum, S.

    2008-01-01

    Hereditary inclusion body myopathy (HIBM) is an adult onset, slowly progressive distal and proximal myopathy. Although the causing gene, GNE, encodes for a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of sialic acid, its primary function in HIBM remains unknown. To elucidate the pathological mechanisms leading

  10. Longitudinal Cerebral Blood Flow Changes during Speech in Hereditary Ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidtis, John J.; Strother, Stephen C.; Naoum, Ansam; Rottenberg, David A.; Gomez, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    The hereditary ataxias constitute a group of degenerative diseases that progress over years or decades. With principal pathology involving the cerebellum, dysarthria is an early feature of many of the ataxias. Positron emission tomography was used to study regional cerebral blood flow changes during speech production over a 21 month period in a…

  11. Managing oral bleeding in children with hereditary bleeding disorders

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The prevention of traumatic and infective dental conditions is an important part of oral health care in individuals with hereditary bleeding disorders. This would reduce the need for treatment and should reduce the number of emergency visits. Key words: Haemophilia, von Willebrand disease, gingival bleeding, dental ...

  12. RECRUITMENT OF PATIENTS WITH HEREDITARY HAEMOCHROMATOSIS AS BLOOD DONORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Cukjati

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hereditary haemochromatosis is the most common inherited disorder in white persons with prevalence of about 1 in 200. Therapeutic phlebotomy is an effective treatment for the disease and prevents its sequele. In addition to their altruism, patients with hereditary haemochromatosis have also medical and monetary incentives for blood donation. Current guidelines do not allow haemochromatosis patients to donate blood. About two thirds of patients are eligible as blood donors and about two thirds of therapeutically drawn blood is suitable for transfusion. Therapeutically drawn blood could increase the blood supply by 1.5 to 30%.Conclusions. The number of states that already accept patients with hereditary haemochromatosis as blood donors is increasing. To avoid monetary incentives they offer free phlebotomies for all patients with hereditary haemochromatosis. There have been no reports about higher incidence of transfusion reactions. In Slovenia the number of therapeutic phlebotomy is increasing. We should evaluate the possibilities for recruitment of haemochromatosis patients as blood donors also in our country. It is necessary to modify regulatory restrictions and to ensure that there is no other incentives than altruism for blood donation.

  13. Gene-environment interactions in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Kirkman; P. Yu-Wai-Man (Patrick); A. Korsten (Alex); M. Leonhardt (Miriam); K. Dimitriadis (Konstantin); I.F.M. de Coo (René); T. Klopstock (Thomas); P.F. Chinnery

    2009-01-01

    textabstractLeber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a genetic disorder primarily due to mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Environmental factors are thought to precipitate the visual failure and explain the marked incomplete penetrance of LHON, but previous small studies have failed to

  14. Intragenic duplication: a novel mutational mechanism in hereditary pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joergensen, Maiken T; Geisz, Andrea; Brusgaard, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    In a hereditary pancreatitis family from Denmark, we identified a novel intragenic duplication of 9 nucleotides in exon-2 of the human cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1) gene (c.63_71dup) which at the amino-acid level resulted in the insertion of 3 amino acids within the activation peptide of cationic...

  15. Alterations of red blood cell metabolome in overhydrated hereditary stomatocytosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Darghouth, D.; Koehl, B.; Heilier, J.F.; Madalinski, G.; Bovee, P.H.; Bosman, G.J.C.G.M.; Delaunay, J.; Junot, C.; Romeo, P.H.

    2011-01-01

    Overhydrated hereditary stomatocytosis, clinically characterized by hemolytic anemia, is a rare disorder of the erythrocyte membrane permeability to monovalent cations, associated with mutations in the Rh-associated glycoprotein gene. We assessed the red blood cell metabolome of 4 patients with this

  16. Hereditary gingival fibromatosis: report of family case series ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hereditary gingival hyperplasia (HGF) is a rare condition characterised by hyperplastic, dense fibrous connective tissue with acanthotic gingival epithelium. A family presented at the School of Dental Sciences, University of Nairobi with a complaint that some of the children developed swollen gums very early in life and that ...

  17. Hereditary primary open angle glaucoma: case study of a Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To present a case of hereditary primary open angle glaucoma in a Nigerian family. Method: Six members of an Ibo family from Delta State, Nigeria were interviewed and examined by the authors. Information on age, gender, tribe, history of blindness, eye disease and other medical conditions was recorded.

  18. Hereditary atypical retinitis pigmentosa: case report | Omoti | Annals ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This report presents four generations of hereditary atypical (pericentric) retinitis pigmentosa in an Itsekiri family of Warri, Delta state of Nigeria. The patients presented with nyctalopia, waxy disc pallor, arteriolar attenuation, pigment deposits around the optic nerve and visual field loss. The cases were typically mild with ...

  19. Hereditary hemochromatosis and risk of ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellervik, Christina; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Grande, Peer

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We tested the hypothesis that the hereditary hemochromatosis genotypes C282Y/C282Y, C282Y/H63D, or C282Y/wild-type are risk factors for ischemic heart disease (IHD) and myocardial infarction (MI). METHODS AND RESULTS: We performed a prospective study of 9178 individuals from the Danish...

  20. Mutations in TITF-1 are associated with benign hereditary chorea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.J. Breedveld (Guido); A. Guala (Andrea); B.A. Oostra (Ben); A.K. Percy; L.S. Dure; P. Harper; W.F.M. Arts (Willem Frans); L.P. Lazarou; H. van der Linde; B.B.A. de Vries (Bert); M. Joosse (Marijke); M.E. MacDonald; H. Krude; A. Grüters (Annette); J.W.F. van Dongen (Jeroen); C. Danesino (Cesare); P. Heutink (Peter)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractBenign hereditary chorea (BHC) (MIM 118700) is an autosomal dominant movement disorder. The early onset of symptoms (usually before the age of 5 years) and the observation that in some BHC families the symptoms tend to decrease in adulthood suggests that the disorder

  1. Mutations in TITF-1 are associated with benign hereditary chorea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breedveld, GJ; van Dongen, JWF; Danesino, C; Guala, A; Percy, AK; Dure, LS; Harper, P; Lazarou, LP; van der Linde, H; Joosse, M; Gruters, A; MacDonald, ME; de Vries, BBA; Arts, WFM; Oostra, BA; Krude, H; Heutink, P

    2002-01-01

    Benign hereditary chorea (BHC) (MIM 118700) is an autosomal dominant movement disorder. The early onset of symptoms (usually before the age of 5 years) and the observation that in some BHC families the symptoms tend to decrease in adulthood suggests that the disorder results from a developmental

  2. Mutations in TITF-1 are associated with benign hereditary chorea.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breedveld, G.J.; Dongen, J.W. van; Danesino, C.; Guala, A.; Percy, A.K.; Dure, L.S.; Harper, P.; Lazarou, L.P.; Linde, H. van der; Joosse, M.; Gruters, A.; MacDonald, M.E.; Vries, L.B.A. de; Arts, P.J.W.; Oostra, B.A.; Krude, H.; Heutink, P.

    2002-01-01

    Benign hereditary chorea (BHC) (MIM 118700) is an autosomal dominant movement disorder. The early onset of symptoms (usually before the age of 5 years) and the observation that in some BHC families the symptoms tend to decrease in adulthood suggests that the disorder results from a developmental

  3. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary sensory neuropathy type IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hereditary sensory neuropathy type IA typically get open sores (ulcers) on their feet or hands or infections of the soft tissue of the fingertips (whitlows) that are slow to heal. Because affected ... of these sores, they may not seek immediate treatment. Without treatment, ...

  4. Hereditary Ovarian Cancer: Not Only BRCA 1 and 2 Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Toss

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available More than one-fifth of ovarian tumors have hereditary susceptibility and, in about 65–85% of these cases, the genetic abnormality is a germline mutation in BRCA genes. Nevertheless, several other suppressor genes and oncogenes have been associated with hereditary ovarian cancers, including the mismatch repair (MMR genes in Lynch syndrome, the tumor suppressor gene, TP53, in the Li-Fraumeni syndrome, and several other genes involved in the double-strand breaks repair system, such as CHEK2, RAD51, BRIP1, and PALB2. The study of genetic discriminators and deregulated pathways involved in hereditary ovarian syndromes is relevant for the future development of molecular diagnostic strategies and targeted therapeutic approaches. The recent development and implementation of next-generation sequencing technologies have provided the opportunity to simultaneously analyze multiple cancer susceptibility genes, reduce the delay and costs, and optimize the molecular diagnosis of hereditary tumors. Particularly, the identification of mutations in ovarian cancer susceptibility genes in healthy women may result in a more personalized cancer risk management with tailored clinical and radiological surveillance, chemopreventive approaches, and/or prophylactic surgeries. On the other hand, for ovarian cancer patients, the identification of mutations may provide potential targets for biologic agents and guide treatment decision-making.

  5. Hereditary ovarian cancer: not only BRCA 1 and 2 genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toss, Angela; Tomasello, Chiara; Razzaboni, Elisabetta; Contu, Giannina; Grandi, Giovanni; Cagnacci, Angelo; Schilder, Russell J; Cortesi, Laura

    2015-01-01

    More than one-fifth of ovarian tumors have hereditary susceptibility and, in about 65-85% of these cases, the genetic abnormality is a germline mutation in BRCA genes. Nevertheless, several other suppressor genes and oncogenes have been associated with hereditary ovarian cancers, including the mismatch repair (MMR) genes in Lynch syndrome, the tumor suppressor gene, TP53, in the Li-Fraumeni syndrome, and several other genes involved in the double-strand breaks repair system, such as CHEK2, RAD51, BRIP1, and PALB2. The study of genetic discriminators and deregulated pathways involved in hereditary ovarian syndromes is relevant for the future development of molecular diagnostic strategies and targeted therapeutic approaches. The recent development and implementation of next-generation sequencing technologies have provided the opportunity to simultaneously analyze multiple cancer susceptibility genes, reduce the delay and costs, and optimize the molecular diagnosis of hereditary tumors. Particularly, the identification of mutations in ovarian cancer susceptibility genes in healthy women may result in a more personalized cancer risk management with tailored clinical and radiological surveillance, chemopreventive approaches, and/or prophylactic surgeries. On the other hand, for ovarian cancer patients, the identification of mutations may provide potential targets for biologic agents and guide treatment decision-making.

  6. Non-recurrent SEPT9 duplications cause hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collie, A.M.; Landsverk, M.L.; Ruzzo, E.; Mefford, H.C.; Buysse, K.; Adkins, J.R.; Knutzen, D.M.; Barnett, K.; Brown Jr., R.H.; Parry, G.J.; Yum, S.W.; Simpson, D.A.; Olney, R.K.; Chinnery, P.F.; Eichler, E.E.; Chance, P.F.; Hannibal, M.C.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genomic copy number variants have been shown to be responsible for multiple genetic diseases. Recently, a duplication in septin 9 (SEPT9) was shown to be causal for hereditary neuralgic amyotrophy (HNA), an episodic peripheral neuropathy with autosomal dominant inheritance. This

  7. RB1 mutations and second primary malignancies after hereditary retinoblastoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dommering, Charlotte J.; Marees, Tamara; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Imhof, Saskia M.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Ringens, Peter J.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Moll, Annette C.

    Survivors of hereditary retinoblastoma have a high risk of second primary malignancies, but it has not been investigated whether specific RB1 germline mutations are associated with greater risk of second primary malignancies in a large cohort. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 199

  8. RB1 mutations and second primary malignancies after hereditary retinoblastoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dommering, Charlotte J.; Marees, Tamara; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Imhof, Saskia M.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Ringens, Peter J.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Moll, Annette C.

    2012-01-01

    Survivors of hereditary retinoblastoma have a high risk of second primary malignancies, but it has not been investigated whether specific RB1 germline mutations are associated with greater risk of second primary malignancies in a large cohort. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 199

  9. On the many faces of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostra, R. J.; Tijmes, N. T.; Cobben, J. M.; Bolhuis, P. A.; van Nesselrooij, B. P.; Houtman, W. A.; de Kok-Nazaruk, M. M.; Bleeker-Wagemakers, E. M.

    1997-01-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a maternally inherited disorder, associated with mutations in the mitochondrial DNA, which is notorious for its aspecific presentations. Two pedigrees are described with cases that are atypical for LHON with respect to sex, age of onset, interval between

  10. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy: case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélio Afonso Ghizoni Teive

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is an important cause of progressive painless visual loss among young male patients. OBJECTIVE: To report on a case of a young patient with a clinical and neurophysiological condition suggestive of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy, confirmed by genetic testing. CASE REPORT: We describe a 17-year-old male with progressive bilateral visual loss. Two maternal uncles had had similar patterns of visual loss. The patient had a history of smoking and alcohol abuse. Neuro-ophthalmological examination revealed visual acuity of 20/800 in both eyes, with decreased direct and consensual pupillary light reflexes. Fundus examination demonstrated pale optic discs. The visual evoked potential test showed signs of conduction disturbances in both optic nerves and campimetric study showed complete visual loss in all fields of both eyes. A diagnosis of bilateral optic neuropathy with a clinical suspicion of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy was made. A blood sample was submitted to genetic analysis in relation to the principal mutations of this disorder, and homoplasmic mutation in 11778 was detected, thereby confirming the diagnosis of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

  11. On the many faces of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostra, RJ; Tijmes, NT; Cobben, JM; Bolhuis, PA; vanNesselrooij, BPM; Houtman, WA; deKokNazaruk, MM; BleekerWagemakers, EM

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a maternally inherited disorder, associated with mutations in the mitochondrial DNA, which is notorious for its aspecific presentations. Two pedigrees are described with cases that are atypical for LHON with respect to sex, age of onset, interval between

  12. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy and vitamin B12 deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pott, Jan Willem R.; Wong, Kwok H.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a maternally inherited optic neuropathy caused by mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). It is also believed that several epigenetic factors have an influence on the development of LHON. Methods: A case series was observed. Results: Three

  13. Hereditary hemochromatosis: genetic complexity and new diagnostic approaches.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swinkels, D.W.; Janssen, M.C.H.; Bergmans, J.; Marx, J.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Since the discovery of the hemochromatosis gene (HFE) in 1996, several novel gene defects have been detected, explaining the mechanism and diversity of iron-overload diseases. At least 4 main types of hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) have been identified. Surprisingly, genes involved in HH encode for

  14. [Intrathecal baclofen in hereditary spastic paraparesis: benefits and limitations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrecq, V; Muller, F; Joseph, P-A; Cuny, E; Mazaux, J-M; Barat, M

    2007-10-01

    Chronic intrathecal delivery of baclofen has been introduced for treatment of severe spinal spasticity. Very little is known about this treatment in hereditary spastic paraparesis. Here we review the benefits and limitations of pump implantation for baclofen delivery in this population. Consecutive patients presenting with hereditary spastic paraparesis were assessed for spasticity (Ashworth and Penn scores), muscular strength and walking (speed, comfort and perimeter length). The effect of intrathecal delivery of baclofen was judged after progressive bolus injections or chronic administration by electrical syringe. The pump implantation was proposed when spasticity scores decreased by 2 or more points, with muscular strength preserved and walking area increased. We investigated 6 patients (3 males; mean age 48 years) with hereditary spastic paraparesis. The mean follow-up was 19 years; for 4 patients who received pump implantation, the mean follow-up was 6.2 years. The mean baclofen daily dose was 75 mug. Satisfaction was high for patients who received implantation early instead of waiting for the natural course of the disease. Some patients with hereditary spastic paraparesis have good functional improvement with chronic intrathecal delivery of baclofen if walking is still possible. Despite the natural history of the disease, functional results are stable during the first 5 years of treatment. The data indicate a possible compromise between decreased spasticity and muscular strengthening with the treatment.

  15. Gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, A D; Kjeldsen, J

    2000-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding occurs in a number of patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) and may lead to a high transfusion need. The aim of this study was to estimate the occurrence and severity of gastrointestinal bleeding in a geographically well defined HHT population....

  16. Can endurance exercise preconditioning prevention disuse muscle atrophy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P Wiggs

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence suggests that exercise training can provide a level of protection against disuse muscle atrophy. Endurance exercise training imposes oxidative, metabolic, and heat stress on skeletal muscle which activates a variety of cellular signaling pathways that ultimately leads to the increased expression of proteins that have been demonstrated to protect muscle from inactivity –induced atrophy. This review will highlight the effect of exercise-induced oxidative stress on endogenous enzymatic antioxidant capacity (i.e., superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase, the role of oxidative and metabolic stress on PGC1-α, and finally highlight the effect heat stress and HSP70 induction. Finally, this review will discuss the supporting scientific evidence that these proteins can attenuate muscle atrophy through exercise preconditioning.

  17. Disease-Induced Skeletal Muscle Atrophy and Fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Scott K; Lynch, Gordon S; Murphy, Kate T; Reid, Michael B; Zijdewind, Inge

    2016-11-01

    Numerous health problems, including acute critical illness, cancer, diseases associated with chronic inflammation, and neurological disorders, often result in skeletal muscle weakness and fatigue. Disease-related muscle atrophy and fatigue is an important clinical problem because acquired skeletal muscle weakness can increase the duration of hospitalization, result in exercise limitation, and contribute to a poor quality of life. Importantly, skeletal muscle atrophy is also associated with increased morbidity and mortality of patients. Therefore, improving our understanding of the mechanism(s) responsible for skeletal muscle weakness and fatigue in patients is a required first step to develop clinical protocols to prevent these skeletal muscle problems. This review will highlight the consequences and potential mechanisms responsible for skeletal muscle atrophy and fatigue in patients experiencing acute critical illness, cancer, chronic inflammatory diseases, and neurological disorders.

  18. Small bowel villous atrophy: celiac disease and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elli, Luca; Branchi, Federica; Sidhu, Reena; Guandalini, Stefano; Assiri, Asaad; Rinawi, Firas; Shamir, Raanan; Das, Prasenjit; Makharia, Govind K

    2017-02-01

    Small bowel villous atrophy can represent a diagnostic challenge for gastroenterologists and pathologists. In Western countries small bowel atrophy and mild non-atrophic alterations are frequently caused by celiac disease. However, other pathology can mimic celiac disease microscopically, widening the differential diagnosis. The several novelties on this topic and the introduction of the device-assisted enteroscopy in the diagnostic flowchart make an update of the literature necessary. Areas covered: In this review, a description of the different clinical scenarios when facing with small bowel mucosal damage, particularly small bowel atrophy, is described. The published literature on this subject has been summarized and reviewed. Expert commentary: When an intestinal mucosal alteration is histologically demonstrated, the pathology report forms part of a more complex workup including serological data, clinical presentation and clinical history. A multidisciplinary team, including pathologists and enteroscopy-devoted endoscopists, is frequently required to manage patients with small bowel alterations, especially in cases of severe malabsorption syndrome.

  19. Disease-Induced Skeletal Muscle Atrophy and Fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Scott K.; Lynch, Gordon S.; Murphy, Kate T.; Reid, Michael B.; Zijdewind, Inge

    2016-01-01

    Numerous health problems including acute critical illness, cancer, diseases associated with chronic inflammation, and neurological disorders often result in skeletal muscle weakness and fatigue. Disease-related muscle atrophy and fatigue is an important clinical problem because acquired skeletal muscle weakness can increase the duration of hospitalization, result in exercise limitation, and contribute to a poor quality of life. Importantly, skeletal muscle atrophy is also associated with increased morbidity and mortality of patients. Therefore, improving our understanding of the mechanism(s) responsible for skeletal muscle weakness and fatigue in patients is a required first step to develop clinical protocols to prevent these skeletal muscle problems. This review will highlight the consequences and potential mechanisms responsible for skeletal muscle atrophy and fatigue in patients suffering from acute critical illness, cancer, chronic inflammatory diseases, and neurological disorders. PMID:27128663

  20. Associations with Meibomian Gland Atrophy in Daily Contact Lens Wearers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucker, Andrew D; Jones-Jordan, Lisa A; Li, Wing; Kwan, Justin T; Lin, Meng C; Sickenberger, Wolfgang; Marx, Sebastian; Srinivasan, Sruthi; Jones, Lyndon W

    2015-09-01

    To determine associations for contact lenses (CLs) and meibomian gland atrophy in a matched-pair study. Contact lens wearers (case) and age- and sex-matched non-contact lens (NCL) wearers with no history of CL use (control) were recruited for a multicenter study. All subjects were administered the Ocular Surface Disease Index questionnaire and a comprehensive battery of clinical tests (e.g., tear breakup time, bulbar and limbal redness, meibography, etc.) were performed. Upper and lower eyelid meibomian gland atrophy were graded with both digital meibography (percent gland atrophy) and visual meiboscore methods. Conditional logistic regression analyses were then used to determine relationships among CL use, meibomian gland atrophy, and ocular surface signs and symptoms. A total of 70 matched pairs were analyzed. The mean (± SD) age of the CL group was 30.6 (± 12.4) years, and that of the NCL group was 30.1 (± 12.2) years. The subjects were 63% female. The association between CL wear and meiboscore was not significant univariately, but the best-fitting multivariate regression model showed that higher meiboscores were associated with being a CL wearer (odds ratio [OR], 2.45) in a model that included eyelid margin erythema (OR, 0.25) and lissamine green staining (OR, 1.25). Percent gland atrophy was not associated with CL wear in regression analysis (p = 0.31). This study determined inconclusive associations with CLs and meibomian gland atrophy. This study also provided a comprehensive assessment of differences between CL and NCL wearers.

  1. Atrophy of the corpus callosum correlates with white matter lesions in patients with cerebral ischaemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meguro, K.; Yamadori, A. [Section of Neuropsychology, Division of Disability Science, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1, Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, 980-8575 Sendai (Japan); Constans, J.M.; Courtheoux, P.; Theron, J. [MR Unit, University of Caen School of Medicine, Caen (France); Viader, F. [Department of Neuroradiology, University of Caen School of Medicine, Caen (France)

    2000-06-01

    Many studies of white matter high signal (WMHS) on T2-weighted MRI have disclosed that it is related to cerebral ischaemia and to brain atrophy. Atrophy of the corpus callosum (CC) has also been studied in relation to ischaemia. Our objective was to test the hypothesis that CC atrophy could be due to ischaemia. We therefore assessed CC, WMHS and brain atrophy in patients with risk factors without strokes (the risk factor group) and in those with infarcts (the infarct group), to investigate the relationships between these factors. We studied 30 patients in the infarct group, 14 in the risk factor group, and 29 normal subjects. Using axial T1-weighted MRI, cortical atrophy and ventricular enlargement (brain atrophy) were visually rated. Using axial T2-weighted MRI, WMHS was assessed in three categories: periventricular symmetrical, periventricular asymmetrical and subcortical. Using the mid-sagittal T1-weighted image, the CC was measured in its anterior, posterior, midanterior and midposterior portions. In the normal group, no correlations were noted between parameters. In the infarct group, there were significant correlations between CC and brain atrophy, and between CC atrophy and WMHS. After removing the effects of age, gender and brain atrophy, significant correlations were noted between some CC measures and subcortical WMHS. In the risk factor group, there were significant correlations between CC and brain atrophy and between CC atrophy and WMHS. After allowance for age, gender and brain atrophy, significant correlations between some CC measures and periventricular WMHS remained. The hypothesis that CC atrophy could be due to cerebral ischaemia was supported by other analyses. Namely, for correlations between the extent of infarcts and partial CC atrophy in patients with anterior middle cerebral artery (MCA) and with posterior MCA infarcts, there were significant correlations between the extent of infarct and midanterior CC atrophy in the former, and posterior

  2. Red blood cell vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amr eAlaarg

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary hemolytic anemia encompasses a heterogeneous group of anemias characterised by decreased red blood cell survival because of inherited membrane, enzyme, or hemoglobin disorders. Affected red blood cells are more fragile, less deformable, and more susceptible to shear stress and oxidative damage, and show increased vesiculation. Red blood cells, as essentially all cells, constitutively release phospholipid extracellular vesicles in vivo and in vitro in a process known as vesiculation. These extracellular vesicles comprise a heterogeneous group of vesicles of different sizes and intracellular origins. They are described in literature as exosomes if they originate from multi-vesicular bodies, or as microvesicles when formed by a one-step budding process directly from the plasma membrane. Extracellular vesicles contain a multitude of bioactive molecules that are implicated in intercellular communication and in different biological and pathophysiological processes. Mature red blood cells release in principle only microvesicles. In hereditary hemolytic anemias, the underlying molecular defect affects and determines red blood cell vesiculation, resulting in shedding microvesicles of different compositions and concentrations. Despite extensive research into red blood cell biochemistry and physiology, little is known about red cell deformability and vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemias, and the associated pathophysiological role is incompletely asessed. In this review, we discuss recent progress in understanding extracellular vesicles biology, with focus on red blood cell vesiculation. Also, we review recent scientific findings on the molecular defects of hereditary hemolytic anemias, and their correlation with red blood cell deformability and vesiculation. Integrating bio-analytical findings on abnormalities of red blood cells and their microvesicles will be critical for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of hereditary

  3. Red blood cell vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaarg, Amr; Schiffelers, Raymond M.; van Solinge, Wouter W.; van Wijk, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary hemolytic anemia encompasses a heterogeneous group of anemias characterized by decreased red blood cell survival because of inherited membrane, enzyme, or hemoglobin disorders. Affected red blood cells are more fragile, less deformable, and more susceptible to shear stress and oxidative damage, and show increased vesiculation. Red blood cells, as essentially all cells, constitutively release phospholipid extracellular vesicles in vivo and in vitro in a process known as vesiculation. These extracellular vesicles comprise a heterogeneous group of vesicles of different sizes and intracellular origins. They are described in literature as exosomes if they originate from multi-vesicular bodies, or as microvesicles when formed by a one-step budding process directly from the plasma membrane. Extracellular vesicles contain a multitude of bioactive molecules that are implicated in intercellular communication and in different biological and pathophysiological processes. Mature red blood cells release in principle only microvesicles. In hereditary hemolytic anemias, the underlying molecular defect affects and determines red blood cell vesiculation, resulting in shedding microvesicles of different compositions and concentrations. Despite extensive research into red blood cell biochemistry and physiology, little is known about red cell deformability and vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemias, and the associated pathophysiological role is incompletely assessed. In this review, we discuss recent progress in understanding extracellular vesicles biology, with focus on red blood cell vesiculation. Also, we review recent scientific findings on the molecular defects of hereditary hemolytic anemias, and their correlation with red blood cell deformability and vesiculation. Integrating bio-analytical findings on abnormalities of red blood cells and their microvesicles will be critical for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of hereditary hemolytic anemias. PMID

  4. Accelerating regional atrophy rates in the progression from normal aging to Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sluimer, Jasper D. [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Alzheimer Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Image Analysis Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Alzheimer Centre, PO Box 7057, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Flier, Wiesje M. van der; Scheltens, Philip [VU University Medical Centre, Alzheimer Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Department of Neurology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Karas, Giorgos B.; Barkhof, Frederik [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Alzheimer Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Image Analysis Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Schijndel, Ronald van [VU University Medical Centre, Image Analysis Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Department of Informatics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Barnes, Josephine; Boyes, Richard G. [UCL, Institute of Neurology, Dementia Research Centre, London (United Kingdom); Cover, Keith S. [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Physics and Medical Technology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Olabarriaga, Silvia D. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Fox, Nick C. [VU University Medical Centre, Department of Neurology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); UCL, Institute of Neurology, Dementia Research Centre, London (United Kingdom); Vrenken, Hugo [VU University Medical Centre, Alzheimer Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Image Analysis Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Centre, Department of Physics and Medical Technology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2009-12-15

    We investigated progression of atrophy in vivo, in Alzheimer's disease (AD), and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). We included 64 patients with AD, 44 with MCI and 34 controls with serial MRI examinations (interval 1.8 {+-} 0.7 years). A nonlinear registration algorithm (fluid) was used to calculate atrophy rates in six regions: frontal, medial temporal, temporal (extramedial), parietal, occipital lobes and insular cortex. In MCI, the highest atrophy rate was observed in the medial temporal lobe, comparable with AD. AD patients showed even higher atrophy rates in the extramedial temporal lobe. Additionally, atrophy rates in frontal, parietal and occipital lobes were increased. Cox proportional hazard models showed that all regional atrophy rates predicted conversion to AD. Hazard ratios varied between 2.6 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.1-6.2) for occipital atrophy and 15.8 (95% CI = 3.5-71.8) for medial temporal lobe atrophy. In conclusion, atrophy spreads through the brain with development of AD. MCI is marked by temporal lobe atrophy. In AD, atrophy rate in the extramedial temporal lobe was even higher. Moreover, atrophy rates also accelerated in parietal, frontal, insular and occipital lobes. Finally, in nondemented elderly, medial temporal lobe atrophy was most predictive of progression to AD, demonstrating the involvement of this region in the development of AD. (orig.)

  5. Recommendations for the management of postmenopausal vaginal atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sturdee, D W; Panay, N; Ulrich, Lian

    2010-01-01

    for hormone replacement therapy (HRT) over recent years that has suggested an increased risk of breast cancer, heart disease and stroke. But, regardless of whether these scares are justified, local treatment of vaginal atrophy is not associated with these possible risks of systemic HRT. Other reasons...... dryness can be helped by simple lubricants but the best and most logical treatment for urogenital atrophy is to use local estrogen. This is safe, effective and with few contraindications. It is hoped that these guidelines and recommendations, produced to coincide with World Menopause Day 2010, will help...

  6. Dyke–Davidoff–Masson syndrome with crossed cerebellar atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay M. Khaladkar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Dyke–Davidoff–Masson syndrome is a rare condition with classical, clinical and radiological changes – mental retardation, hemiparesis, facial asymmetry, seizures and cerebral hemiatrophy with calvarial changes. Contralateral cerebellar atrophy is rare and occurs if insult occurs after 1 month of age. We report a case of a 6-year-old female child presenting with right-sided hemiparesis, convulsions and left cerebral hemiatrophy with an old infarct in left middle cerebral artery (MCA territory, ipsilateral calvarial thickening and right (crossed cerebellar atrophy.

  7. [Anatomoclinical correlations of spinal muscular atrophy in infancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rufo Campos, M; Chinchón Lara, I; Arias León, E; Martínez López, A; Gómez de Terreros, I

    1993-03-01

    Forty-three cases of infantile spinal muscular atrophy diagnosed in our department between 1977 to 1991 are presented. Following clinical-pathologic evaluation, 27 cases were included in type I, 7 in type II and 9 cases in type III. The most frequent pathologic finding was the presence of large groups of atrophic fibers and hypertrophy of isolated fibers in muscle biopsy. Enzyme study showed higher mean levels of CPK and aldolase in type I with respect to the other two. Likewise, a significant statistical difference was found in the age of onset of the different groups. Finally, the clinical classification of spinal muscular atrophies in infancy is discussed.

  8. Cortical atrophy in patients with cerebral amyloid angiopathy: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotiadis, Panagiotis; van Rooden, Sanneke; van der Grond, Jeroen; Schultz, Aaron; Martinez-Ramirez, Sergi; Auriel, Eitan; Reijmer, Yael; van Opstal, Anna M; Ayres, Alison; Schwab, Kristin M; Hedden, Trey; Rosand, Jonathan; Viswanathan, Anand; Wermer, Marieke; Terwindt, Gisela; Sperling, Reisa A; Polimeni, Jonathan R; Johnson, Keith A; van Buchem, Mark A; Greenberg, Steven M; Gurol, M Edip

    2016-07-01

    Loss of cortical grey matter is a diagnostic marker of many neurodegenerative diseases, and is a key mediator of cognitive impairment. We postulated that cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), characterised by cortical vascular amyloid deposits, is associated with cortical tissue loss independent of parenchymal Alzheimer's disease pathology. We tested this hypothesis in patients with hereditary cerebral haemorrhage with amyloidosis-Dutch type (HCHWA-D), a monogenetic disease with minimal or no concomitant Alzheimer's disease pathology, as well as in patients with sporadic CAA and healthy and Alzheimer's disease controls. In this observational case-control study, we included six groups of participants: patients diagnosed with HCHWA-D using genetic testing; healthy controls age-matched to the HCHWA-D group; patients with probable sporadic CAA without dementia; two independent cohorts of healthy controls age-matched to the CAA group; and patients with Alzheimer's disease age-matched to the CAA group. De-identified (but unmasked) demographic, clinical, radiological, and genetic data were collected at Massachusetts General Hospital (Boston, MA, USA), at Leiden University (Leiden, Netherlands), and at sites contributing to Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). The primary outcome measure was cortical thickness. The correlations between cortical thickness and structural lesions, and blood-oxygen-level-dependent time-to-peak (BOLD-TTP; a physiological measure of vascular dysfunction) were analysed to understand the potential mechanistic link between vascular amyloid and cortical thickness. The radiological variables of interest were quantified using previously validated computer-assisted tools, and all results were visually reviewed to ensure their accuracy. Between March 15, 2006, and Dec 1, 2014, we recruited 369 individuals (26 patients with HCHWA-D and 28 age-matched, healthy controls; 63 patients with sporadic CAA without dementia; two healthy control

  9. A Mouse Model Study for the Villous Atrophy of the Early Weaning Piglets

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    TSUKAHARA, Takamitsu; INOUE, Ryo; YAMADA, Kaori; YAJIMA, Takaji

    2010-01-01

    Early weaning induces villous atrophy in the small intestine of piglets. We evaluated an influence of early weaning at 16 days old in mice for the use of villous atrophy model observed in early-weaned piglets...

  10. Quantitative assessment of gastric antrum atrophy shows restitution to normal histology after Helicobacter pylori eradication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Grieken, Nicole C. T.; Meijer, Gerrit A.; Kale, Ilse; Bloemena, Elisabeth; Lindeman, Jan; Offerhaus, G. Johan A.; Meuwissen, Stefan G. M.; Baak, Jan P. A.; Kuipers, Ernst J.

    2004-01-01

    Background/Aims: Grading gastric mucosal atrophy in antrum biopsy specimens remains a controversial subject because of limitations in interobserver agreement. We previously described a reliable, quantitative method for grading atrophy of the corpus mucosa with excellent reproducibility and good

  11. Brain atrophy and lesion load predict long term disability in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popescu, Veronica; Agosta, Federica; Hulst, Hanneke E

    2013-01-01

    To determine whether brain atrophy and lesion volumes predict subsequent 10 year clinical evolution in multiple sclerosis (MS).......To determine whether brain atrophy and lesion volumes predict subsequent 10 year clinical evolution in multiple sclerosis (MS)....

  12. Role of detection of microsatellite instability in Chinese with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer or ordinary hereditary colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen-Zhi; Jin, Feng; Zhang, Zhen-Hai; Wang, Shu-Bao

    2006-08-07

    To detect microsatellite instability (MSI) in patients with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer or ordinary hereditary colorectal cancer and to provide criteria for screening the kindreds with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer at molecular level. MSI was detected in the specimens from 20 cases with HNPCC, 20 cases with ordinary hereditary colorectal cancer and 20 cases with sporadic colorectal cancer by means of polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism. The positive rate of MSI was 85% (17/20) in HNPCC group, 40% (8/20) in ordinary hereditary colorectal cancer group and 10% (2/20) in the sporadic colorectal cancer group respectively. The differences were significant. The mean ages of the three groups were 43.6, 52.2, and 61.8 years respectively, which increased gradually. The incidence of right hemicolon cancer was 64.7%, 37.5%, and 0% respectively, which decreased gradually and had significant difference. The expression ratio of BAT26 and BAT25 was 94.1% respectively, which was highest in the 5 gene sites studied. The incidence of poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma was 70.6% in HNPCC group among high frequency microsatellite instability (MSI-H), which was higher than the other two groups, which had 50% and 50% respectively. The incidence of MSI-H is higher in HNPCC group. The detection of MSI is simple and economical and has high correlation with the clinicopathologic feature of HNPCC and can be used as a screening method to detect the germ line mutation of the mismatch repair gene.

  13. Neuroprotective effect of non-viral gene therapy treatment based on tetanus toxin C-fragment in a severe mouse model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Olivan Garcia

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is a hereditary childhood disease that causes paralysis and progressive degeneration of skeletal muscles and spinal motor neurons. SMA is associated with reduced levels of full-length Survival of Motor Neuron (SMN protein, due to mutations in the Survival of Motor Neuron 1 gene. Nowadays there are no effective therapies available to treat patients with SMA, so our aim was to test whether the non-toxic carboxy-terminal fragment of tetanus toxin heavy chain (TTC, which exhibits neurotrophic properties, might have a therapeutic role or benefit in SMA. In this manuscript, we have demonstrated that TTC enhance the SMN expression in motor neurons in vitro and evaluated the effect of intramuscular injection of TTC-encoding plasmid in the spinal cord and the skeletal muscle of SMNdelta7 mice. For this purpose, we studied the weight and the survival time, as well as, the survival and cell death pathways and muscular atrophy. Our results showed that TTC treatment reduced the expression of autophagy markers (Becn1, Atg5, Lc3 and p62 and pro-apoptotic genes such as Bax and Casp3 in spinal cord. In skeletal muscle, TTC was able to downregulate the expression of the main marker of autophagy, Lc3, to wild type levels and the expression of the apoptosis effector protein, Casp3. Regarding the genes related to muscular atrophy (Ankrd1, Calm1, Col19a1, Fbox32, Mt2, Myod1, NogoA, Pax7, Rrad, and Sln, TTC suggest a compensatory effect for muscle damage response, diminished oxidative stress and modulated calcium homeostasis. These preliminary findings suggest the need for further experiments to depth study the effect of TTC in SMA disease.

  14. Causative mutations for progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) in the dog

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dostál, Jaromír; Horák, Pavel; Bechyňová, Renata; Přibáňová, M.; Stratil, Antonín; Schröffelová, D.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 1 (2008), s. 55-58 ISSN 1803-4403. [Genetické dny /23./. České Budějovice, 10.09.2008-12.09.2008] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : progressive retinal atrophy * dog Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  15. Frontal Cortical Atrophy as a Predictor of Poststroke Apathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalov, Ján; Mikula, Peter; Budiš, Jaroslav; Valkovič, Peter

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the study was to identify associations between the symptoms of poststroke apathy and sociodemographic, stroke-related (severity of stroke, degree of disability, and performance in activities of daily living), and radiological correlates. We determined the degree of cortical and subcortical brain atrophy, the severity of white matter and basal ganglia lesions on baseline computed tomography (CT) scans, and the localization of acute ischemia on control CT or magnetic resonance imaging scans in subacute stages of stroke. During follow-up examinations, in addition to the assessment of apathy symptoms using the Apathy Scale, we also evaluated symptoms of depression and anxiety using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. The study included 47 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke. Correlates significantly associated with apathy, determined at baseline and during follow-up, were entered into the "predictive" and "associative" multiple regression models, respectively. Frontal cortical atrophy and symptoms of depression were most strongly associated with poststroke apathy symptoms. In order to model an interrelation between both cortical atrophy and white matter lesions and aging, we supplemented 2 additional "predictive" models using interaction variables, whereby we confirmed the role of frontal cortical atrophy as a predictor of poststroke apathy also as a function of the increasing age of patients. © The Author(s) 2016.

  16. Rapid quantitative assessment of gastric corpus atrophy in tissue sections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Grieken, N. C.; Weiss, M. M.; Meijer, G. A.; Bloemena, E.; Lindeman, J.; Offerhaus, G. J.; Meuwissen, S. G.; Baak, J. P.; Kuipers, E. J.

    2001-01-01

    Grading of Helicobacter pylori induced atrophic gastritis using the updated Sydney system is severely limited by high interobserver variability. The aim of this study was to set up a quantitative test of gastric corpus mucosal atrophy in tissue sections and test its reproducibility and correlation

  17. Skeletal muscle training for spinal muscular atrophy type 3 (Protocol).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartels, B.; Montes, J.; Pol, W.L. van der; Groot, J.F. de

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disease caused by a genetic mutation in the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene (5q11.2-q13.3) (Lefebvre 1995). With an incidence of one in 10,000 live births, it is the leading genetic cause of infant death (Lunn 2008;

  18. Atrophy of the parietal lobe in preclinical dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, H.I.L.; van Boxtel, M.P.J.; Uylings, H.B.M.; Gronenschild, E.H.B.M.; Verhey, F.R.; Jolles, J.

    2011-01-01

    Cortical grey matter atrophy patterns have been reported in healthy ageing and Alzheimer disease (AD), but less consistently in the parietal regions of the brain. We investigated cortical grey matter volume patterns in parietal areas. The grey matter of the somatosensory cortex, superior and

  19. Physical complaints in ageing persons with spinal muscular atrophy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, I.J.M. de; Witte, L.P de

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: While life expectancy is improving for persons with spinal muscular atrophy, new physical complaints may arise. To investigate this, we studied persons with a long duration and severe course (high functional limitations) of the disease. DESIGN: Cross-sectional descriptive study.

  20. Anaesthetic management of a patient with multiple system atrophy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a rare adult-onset neurodegenerative disease. Symptoms vary from autonomic dysfunction to Parkinsonism and cerebellar ataxia, in any combination. MSA affects many organ systems with many possible complications and makes perioperative management of a patient with this condition ...

  1. Ataxia-telangiectasia: the pattern of cerebellar atrophy on MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavani, F. [Department of Radiology, University of Modena (Italy); Zimmerman, R.A.; Gatti, R.; Bingham, P. [Department of Radiology, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, 34th Street and Civic Center Boulevard, PA 19104, Philadelphia (United States); Berry, G.T. [Department of Endocrinology, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, 34th Street and Civic Center Boulevard, PA 19104, Philadelphia (United States); Sullivan, K. [Department of Immunology, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, 34th Street and Civic Center Boulevard, PA 19104, Philadelphia (United States)

    2003-05-01

    We describe MRI of the brain in 19 patients with ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) and correlate the appearances with the degree of neurologic deficit. We examined 10 male and nine female patients; 17 were aged between 2 and 12 years (mean 8 years) but a woman and her brother were 35 and 38 years old, and had a variant of AT. Ataxia was the first recognized sign of the disease in every patient. We detected the following patterns of cerebellar atrophy: in the youngest patient, aged 2 years, the study was normal; in the five next youngest patients 3-7 years of age, the lateral cerebellum and superior vermis showed the earliest changes of atrophy; and all but one of the other patients had moderate to marked diffuse atrophy of vermis and cerebellar hemispheres. There were 12 patients aged 9 years and above; one, who was normal, was 9 years old. The five patients who at the time of examination were unable to walk all had diffuse atrophy involving both vermis and cerebellar hemispheres. (orig.)

  2. Clinico-epidemiologic characteristics of spinal muscular atrophy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rabah M. Shawky

    Abstract Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is characterized by progressive hypotonia and muscular weakness because of progressive degeneration of alpha motor neuron from anterior horn cells in the spinal cord. It is inherited by an autosomal recessive pattern. The precise frequency of SMA in Egypt has not been ...

  3. Clinico-epidemiologic characteristics of spinal muscular atrophy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is characterized by progressive hypotonia and muscular weakness because of progressive degeneration of alpha motor neuron from anterior horn cells in the spinal cord. It is inherited by an autosomal recessive pattern. The precise frequency of SMA in Egypt has not been determined.

  4. Photoreceptor atrophy in acute zonal occult outer retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zibrandtsen, N.; Munch, I.C.; Klemp, K.

    2008-01-01

    To assess retinal morphology in acute zonal occult outer retinopathy (AZOOR) without ophthalmoscopically visible fundus changes. Retrospective case series. Two consecutive patients with bilateral AZOOR with photopsia corresponding to areas of visual field loss and a normal fundus appearance were...... loss was more extensive than the area of photoreceptor loss. Photoreceptor atrophy can be demonstrated in AZOOR without ophthalmoscopically visible fundus lesions....

  5. Carrier screening for spinal muscular atrophy in Italian population

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Carrier screening for spinal muscular atrophy in Italian population. Francesco Calì Giuseppa Ruggeri Valeria Chiavetta Carmela Scuderi Sebastiano Bianca Chiara Barone Alda Ragalmuto Pietro Schinocca Girolamo Aurelio Vitello Valentino Romano Sebastiano Musumeci. Research Note Volume 93 Issue 1 April 2014 pp ...

  6. Anaesthetic Management of Spinal Muscular Atrophy For Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. E. Argyra / Dr. C. Staikou / Dr. G. Polymeneas / Dr. C. M. Markatou

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the anaesthetic management of a female patient with Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA presented for laparoscopic cholecystectomy. In order to avoid prolonged recovery; we chose to use total intravenous anaesthesia (TIVA with propofol and remifentanil. No neuromuscular blocking agent was used.

  7. Epidural anaesthesia in a child with possible spinal muscular atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, A; Molenbuur, B; Richardson, FJ

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a rare lower motor neurone disease in which anaesthetic management is often difficult as a result of muscle weakness and hypersensitivity to neuromuscular blocking agents. Neuraxial anaesthesia is controversial in these patients; however, some cases have been

  8. Pigmented paravenous chorioretinal atrophy with Coat′s like response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Tandon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pigmented paravenous chorioretinal atrophy (PPCRA is an uncommon retinal disorder of unknown etiology that is neither well understood nor classified. We report an atypical case of PPCRA, associated with Coat′s like response (CLR in a 64-year-old man of Asian origin. Both the eyes were involved, though asymmetrically.

  9. Automated measurement of medial temporal lobe atrophy by computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hattori, Masumi [Tokai Memorial Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kasugai-shi, Aichi (Japan); Koyama, Shuji; Kodera, Yoshie [Nagoya University School of Health Sciences, Department of Radiological Technology, Higashi-ku, Nagoya (Japan); Kogure, Yosuke [Tokyo Metropolitan Koto Geriatric Medical Center, Department of Radiology, 3-3-20 Shinsuna, Koutou-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Ido, Yasushi; Asano, Hirofumi [Kizawa Memorial Hospital, Department of Radiology, Minokamo-shi, Gifu (Japan)

    2007-04-15

    Objects Evaluation of medial temporal lobe (MTL) atrophy is usually performed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In Japan, however, the availability of computed tomography (CT) is much higher than that of MRI. The evaluation of MTL atrophy using CT may be useful when MRI is unavailable. This project developed a technique to automatically measure MTL atrophy using axial CT imaging and assessed the sensitivity of this method for diagnosing dementia of Alzheimer type (DAT). Materials and methods Linear measurements were taken for the width of the temporal horn, the width of the MTL, and the interuncal distance and the area of the temporal horn were measured. The algorithm developed employs the gray level threshold and the snake technique to process axial CT images. The algorithm was evaluated on 85 patients. Results The efficacy of this automated method was verified by a quantitative comparison of computerdetermined and manually obtained MTL measures, and based on its sensitivity and specificity in differentiating patients with DAT from control subjects. Conclusions This fully automated method of measuring MTL atrophy using CT is feasible and effective in DAT diagnosis, and simple to perform clinically. This method may be a practical alternative for MRI in some settings. (orig.)

  10. Axonal loss occurs early in dominant optic atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milea, Dan; Sander, Birgit; Wegener, Marianne

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This study set out to investigate retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) thickness and best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) in relation to age in healthy subjects and patients with OPA1 autosomal dominant optic atrophy (DOA). Methods: We carried out a cross-sectional investigation of RNFL...

  11. Benefits of Laser Therapy in Postmenopausal Vaginal Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brînzan, Daniela; Pǎiuşan, Lucian; Daşcǎu, Voicu; Furǎu, Gheorghe

    2011-08-01

    Maybe the worst aspect of menopause is the decline of the quality of the sexual life. The aim of the study is to demonstrate the beneficial effects of laser therapy in comparison with topical application of estrogen preparations, for the treatment of vaginal atrophy and sexual dysfunctions induced by menopause. A total of 50 menopausal patients were examined during a one year period. The methods used for objectifying vaginal atrophy and sexual dysfunctions were history taking, local clinical exam and PAP smear. From this group, 40 patients had vaginal atrophy with sexual dysfunctions. They have been treated differently, being included in four groups: patients treated with local estrogens, patients treated with intravaginal laser therapy, patients treated with both laser therapy and estrogens, patients treated with estrogens and placebo laser therapy. Therapeutic benefit, improvement of vaginal atrophy and quality of sexual life, were objectified by anamnesis (questionnaire), local and general clinical examination and PAP smear. The best results have been obtained, by far, in the 3rd group, followed by the women treated only with laser. In conclusion, we can say that laser therapy is the best way for solving the sexual inconveniences of menopause.

  12. Excessive daytime sleepiness in multiple system atrophy (SLEEMSA study)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moreno-Lopez, C.; Santamaria, J.; Salamero, M.; Del Sorbo, F.; Albanese, A.; Pellecchia, M.T.; Barone, P.; Overeem, S.; Bloem, B.R.; Aarden, W.C.C.A.; Canesi, M.; Antonini, A.; Duerr, S.; Wenning, G.K.; Poewe, W.; Rubino, A.; Meco, G.; Schneider, S.A.; Bhatia, K.P.; Djaldetti, R.; Coelho, M.; Sampaio, C.; Cochen, V.; Hellriegel, H.; Deuschl, G.; Colosimo, C.; Marsili, L.; Gasser, T.; Tolosa, E.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sleep disorders are common in multiple system atrophy (MSA), but the prevalence of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) is not well known. OBJECTIVE: To assess the frequency and associations of EDS in MSA. DESIGN: Survey of EDS in consecutive patients with MSA and comparison with patients

  13. Acylated and unacylated ghrelin impair skeletal muscle atrophy in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cachexia is a wasting syndrome associated with cancer, AIDS, multiple sclerosis, and several other disease states. It is characterized by weight loss, fatigue, loss of appetite, and skeletal muscle atrophy and is associated with poor patient prognosis, making it an important treatment target. Ghreli...

  14. Brain atrophy at onset and physical disability in multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Ignacio Rojas

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate if brain atrophy in multiple sclerosis (MS patients during the disease onset predicts long term disability. METHODS: MS patients with follow-up time of at least 7 years from disease onset and with baseline and second magnetic resonance 12 months later were included to measure brain atrophy. Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS was categorized in three groups, EDSS=0, EDSS=1 and 2.5 and EDSS>2.5, and used as disability measure. RESULTS: Twenty-six patients were included. Mean atrophy during the first year in patients that reached an EDSS≥3 was -0.76±0.45 %, in patients with an EDSS between 1 and 2.5 was -0.59±0.56, while in patients with an EDSS of 0 it was -0.38±0.42 (p=0.003. DISCUSSION: Brain atrophy rates during the first year of disease were predictive of disease progression in our population.

  15. Spinal Cord Gray Matter Atrophy in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquin, M-Ê; El Mendili, M M; Gros, C; Dupont, S M; Cohen-Adad, J; Pradat, P-F

    2018-01-01

    There is an emerging need for biomarkers to better categorize clinical phenotypes and predict progression in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. This study aimed to quantify cervical spinal gray matter atrophy in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and investigate its association with clinical disability at baseline and after 1 year. Twenty-nine patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and 22 healthy controls were scanned with 3T MR imaging. Standard functional scale was recorded at the time of MR imaging and after 1 year. MR imaging data were processed automatically to measure the spinal cord, gray matter, and white matter cross-sectional areas. A statistical analysis assessed the difference in cross-sectional areas between patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and controls, correlations between spinal cord and gray matter atrophy to clinical disability at baseline and at 1 year, and prediction of clinical disability at 1 year. Gray matter atrophy was more sensitive to discriminate patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis from controls (P = .004) compared with spinal cord atrophy (P = .02). Gray matter and spinal cord cross-sectional areas showed good correlations with clinical scores at baseline (R = 0.56 for gray matter and R = 0.55 for spinal cord; P amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. © 2018 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  16. Characterization of disuse skeletal muscle atrophy and the efficacy of a novel muscle atrophy countermeasure during spaceflight and simulated microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Andrea Marie

    Humans are an integral part of the engineered systems that will enable return to the Moon and eventually travel to Mars. Major advancements in countermeasure development addressing deleterious effects of microgravity and reduced gravity on the musculoskeletal system need to be made to ensure mission safety and success. The primary objectives of this dissertation are to advance the knowledge and understanding of skeletal muscle atrophy, and support development of novel countermeasures for disuse atrophy to enable healthy long-duration human spaceflight. Models simulating microgravity and actual spaceflight were used to examine the musculoskeletal adaptations during periods of unloading. Myostatin inhibition, a novel anti-atrophy drug therapy, and exercise were examined as a means of preventing and recovering from disuse atrophy. A combination of assays was used to quantify adaptation responses to unloading and examine efficacy of the countermeasures. Body and muscle masses were collected to analyze systemic changes due to treatments. Hindlimb strength and individual muscle forces were measured to demonstrate functional adaptations to treatments. Muscle fiber morphology and myosin heavy chain (MHC) expression was examined to identify adaptations at the cellular level. Protein synthesis signals insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), Akt, and p70s6 kinase; and the degradation signals Atrogin-1 and MuRF-1 were examined to identify adaptations at the molecular level that ultimately lead to muscle hypertrophy and atrophy. A time course study provided a thorough characterization of the adaptation of skeletal muscle during unloading in C57BL/6 mice, and baseline data for comparison to and evaluation of subsequent studies. Time points defining the on-set and endpoints of disuse muscle atrophy were identified to enable characterization of rapid vs. long-term responses of skeletal muscle to hindlimb suspension. Unloading-induced atrophy primarily resulted from increased protein

  17. New treatments addressing the pathophysiology of hereditary angioedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Alvin E

    2008-04-14

    Hereditary angioedema is a serious medical condition caused by a deficiency of C1-inhibitor. The condition is the result of a defect in the gene controlling the synthesis of C1-inhibitor, which regulates the activity of a number of plasma cascade systems. Although the prevalence of hereditary angioedema is low - between 1:10,000 to 1:50,000 - the condition can result in considerable pain, debilitation, reduced quality of life, and even death in those afflicted. Hereditary angioedema presents clinically as cutaneous swelling of the extremities, face, genitals, and trunk, or painful swelling of the gastrointestinal mucosa. Angioedema of the upper airways is extremely serious and has resulted in death by asphyxiation.Subnormal levels of C1-inhibitor are associated with the inappropriate activation of a number of pathways - including, in particular, the complement and contact systems, and to some extent, the fibrinolysis and coagulation systems.Current findings indicate bradykinin, a product of contact system activation, as the primary mediator of angioedema in patients with C1-inhibitor deficiency. However, other systems may play a role in bradykinin's rapid and excessive generation by depleting available levels of C1-inhibitor.There are currently no effective therapies in the United States to treat acute attacks of hereditary angioedema, and currently available agents used to treat hereditary angioedema prophylactically are suboptimal. Five new agents are, however, in Phase III development. Three of these agents replace C1-inhibitor, directly addressing the underlying cause of hereditary angioedema and re-establishing regulatory control of all pathways and proteases involved in its pathogenesis. These agents include a nano-filtered C1-inhibitor replacement therapy, a pasteurized C1-inhibitor, and a recombinant C1-inhibitor isolated from the milk of transgenic rabbits. All C1-inhibitors are being investigated for acute angioedema attacks; the nano-filtered C1

  18. Survival of motor neuron protein downregulates miR-9 expression in patients with spinal muscular atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Ting Wang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is a lethal hereditary disease caused by homozygous absence of the survival of the motor neuron (SMN 1 gene (SMN1, and it is the leading genetic cause of infant mortality. The severity of SMA is directly correlated with SMN protein levels in affected patients; however, the cellular regulatory mechanisms for SMN protein expression are not completely understood. In this study, we investigated the regulatory effects between SMN expression and miR-9a, a downstream noncoding small RNA. Using an inducible SMN short hairpin RNA interference (shRNAi system in NSC 34 and human skin fibroblast cells, cellular miR-9 levels and SMN protein repression were time-dependently upregulated. Conversely, cellular miR-9 levels decreased when HeLa cells were transfected with SMN protein fused with green fluorescent protein. In SMA-like mice spinal cords and human primary skin fibroblasts isolated from patients with different degrees of SMA, human SMN exhibited a disease severity-dependent decrease, whereas cellular miR-9 levels increased. These results clearly suggested that cellular SMN proteins regulated miR-9 expression and that miR-9 expression was related to SMA severity. Thus, miR-9 may be a marker for SMA prognosis.

  19. SDOCT Thickness Measurements of Various Retinal Layers in Patients with Autosomal Dominant Optic Atrophy due to OPA1 Mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea M. Schild

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To specify thickness values of various retinal layers on macular spectral domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SDOCT scans in patients with autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA compared to healthy controls. Methods. SDOCT volume scans of 7 patients with ADOA (OPA-1 mutation and 14 healthy controls were quantitatively analyzed using manual grading software. Mean thickness values for the ETDRS grid subfields 5–8 were calculated for the spaces neurosensory retina, retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL, ganglion cell layer (GCL, a combined space of inner plexiform layer/outer plexiform layer/inner nuclear layer (IPL+INL+OPL, and a combined space of outer nuclear layer/photoreceptor layers (ONL+PL. Results. ADOA patients showed statistically significant lower retinal thickness values than controls (. RNFL ( and GCL thicknesses ( were significantly lower in ADOA patients. There was no difference in IPL+INL+OPL and in ONL+PL thickness. Conclusion. Manual subanalysis of macular SDOCT volume scans allowed detailed subanalysis of various retinal layers. Not only RNFL but also GCL thicknesses are reduced in the macular area of ADOA patients whereas subjacent layers are not involved. Together with clinical findings, macular SDOCT helps to identify patients with suspicion for hereditary optic neuropathy before genetic analysis confirms the diagnosis.

  20. Small molecule suppressors of Drosophila kinesin deficiency rescue motor axon development in a zebrafish model of spinal muscular atrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Gassman

    Full Text Available Proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is the most common inherited motor neuropathy and the leading hereditary cause of infant mortality. Currently there is no effective treatment for the disease, reflecting a need for pharmacologic interventions that restore performance of dysfunctional motor neurons or suppress the consequences of their dysfunction. In a series of assays relevant to motor neuron biology, we explored the activities of a collection of tetrahydroindoles that were reported to alter the metabolism of amyloid precursor protein (APP. In Drosophila larvae the compounds suppressed aberrant larval locomotion due to mutations in the Khc and Klc genes, which respectively encode the heavy and light chains of kinesin-1. A representative compound of this class also suppressed the appearance of axonal swellings (alternatively termed axonal spheroids or neuritic beads in the segmental nerves of the kinesin-deficient Drosophila larvae. Given the importance of kinesin-dependent transport for extension and maintenance of axons and their growth cones, three members of the class were tested for neurotrophic effects on isolated rat spinal motor neurons. Each compound stimulated neurite outgrowth. In addition, consistent with SMA being an axonopathy of motor neurons, the three axonotrophic compounds rescued motor axon development in a zebrafish model of SMA. The results introduce a collection of small molecules as pharmacologic suppressors of SMA-associated phenotypes and nominate specific members of the collection for development as candidate SMA therapeutics. More generally, the results reinforce the perception of SMA as an axonopathy and suggest novel approaches to treating the disease.

  1. Increasing the Diagnostic Accuracy of Medial Temporal Lobe Atrophy in Alzheimer's Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, H. I. L.; van Boxtel, M.P.J.; van der Elst, W.; Burgmans, S.; Smeets, F.; Gronenschild, E.H.B.M.; Verhey, F.R.J.; Uylings, H.B.M.; Jolles, J.

    2011-01-01

    Medial temporal lobe (MTL) atrophy is considered to be one of the most important predictors of Alzheimer's disease (AD). This study investigates whether atrophy in parietal and prefrontal areas increases the predictive value of MTL atrophy in three groups of different cognitive status. Seventy-five

  2. [Liver Atrophy and Failure Associated with Paclitaxel and Bevacizumab Combination Therapy for Metastatic Breast Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Mari; Ikeda, Masahiko; Kubo, Shinichiro; Tsukioki, Takahiro; Nakamoto, Shougo

    2016-07-01

    We managed 6 cases of severe liver atrophy and failure associated with paclitaxel and bevacizumab combination therapy (PB therapy)for HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer. In this case-controlstudy, we examined the records of these 6 patients to investigate past treatment, medication history, and degree of atrophy, and compared their data with that of 67 patients without liver atrophy. The degree of the liver atrophy used SYNAPSE VINCENT®of the image analysis software. The results showed that patients with liver atrophy had a longer pretreatment period than those without liver atrophy(33.5 months vs 15.5 months), and they also experienced a longer median time to treatment failure with PB therapy than other patients(11 months vs 6 months). The ratio of individuals presenting with diffuse liver metastasis among patients with liver metastasis was 80% with liver atrophy, compared to 8% without liver atrophy. The degree of liver atrophy was an average of 67%in terms of volume ratio before/after PB therapy(57-82%). The individualwith the greatest extent of liver atrophy died of liver failure, not as a result of breast cancer progression. The direct causal link between bevacizumab and liver atrophy and failure is unclear, but the individuals in this study had a long previous history of treatment, and diffuse liver metastases may develop in patients undergoing long periods of PB therapy, which may also cause liver atrophy; therefore, the possibility of liver failure should be considered in such cases.

  3. Solving a 50 year mystery of a missing OPA1 mutation: more insights from the first family diagnosed with autosomal dominant optic atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zrenner Eberhart

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Up to the 1950s, there was an ongoing debate about the diversity of hereditary optic neuropathies, in particular as to whether all inherited optic atrophies can be ascribed to Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON or represent different disease entities. In 1954 W. Jaeger published a detailed clinical and genealogical investigation of a large family with explicit autosomal dominant segregation of optic atrophy thus proving the existence of a discrete disease different from LHON, which is nowadays known as autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA. Since the year 2000 ADOA is associated with genomic mutations in the OPA1 gene, which codes for a protein that is imported into mitochondria where it is required for mitochondrial fusion. Interestingly enough, the underlying mutation in this family has not been identified since then. Results We have reinvestigated this family with the aim to identify the mutation and to further clarify the underlying pathomechanism. Patients showed a classical non-syndromic ADOA. The long term deterioration in vision in the two teenagers examined 50 years later is of particular note 5/20 to 6/120. Multiplex ligation probe amplification revealed a duplication of the OPA1 exons 7-9 which was confirmed by long distance PCR and cDNA analysis, resulting in an in-frame duplication of 102 amino acids. Segregation was verified in 53 available members of the updated pedigree and a penetrance of 88% was calculated. Fibroblast cultures from skin biopsies were established to assess the mitochondrial network integrity and to qualitatively and quantitatively study the consequences of the mutation on transcript and protein level. Fibroblast cultures demonstrated a fragmented mitochondrial network. Processing of the OPA1 protein was altered. There was no correlation of the OPA1 transcript levels and the OPA1 protein levels in the fibroblasts. Intriguingly an overall decrease of mitochondrial proteins was observed

  4. Genetic and biochemical impairment of mitochondrial complex I activity in a family with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy and hereditary spastic dystonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DeVries, DD; Went, LN; Bruyn, GW; Scholte, HR; Hofstra, RMW; Bolhuis, PA; vanOost, BA

    A rare form of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) that is associated with hereditary spastic dystonia has been studied in a large Dutch family. Neuropathy and ophthalmological lesions were present together in some family members, whereas only one type of abnormality was found in others. mtDNA

  5. Gene therapy for mitochondrial diseases: Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy as the first candidate for a clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cwerman-Thibault, Hélène; Augustin, Sébastien; Ellouze, Sami; Sahel, José-Alain; Corral-Debrinski, Marisol

    2014-03-01

    Mitochondrial disorders cannot be ignored anymore in most medical disciplines; indeed their minimum estimated prevalence is superior to 1 in 5000 births. Despite the progress made in the last 25 years on the identification of gene mutations causing mitochondrial pathologies, only slow progress was made towards their effective treatments. Ocular involvement is a frequent feature in mitochondrial diseases and corresponds to severe and irreversible visual handicap due to retinal neuron loss and optic atrophy. Interestingly, three clinical trials for Leber Congenital Amaurosis due to RPE65 mutations are ongoing since 2007. Overall, the feasibility and safety of ocular Adeno-Associated Virus delivery in adult and younger patients and consistent visual function improvements have been demonstrated. The success of gene-replacement therapy for RPE65 opens the way for the development of similar approaches for a broad range of eye disorders, including those with mitochondrial etiology such as Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON). Copyright © 2013 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Assessment of hereditary retinal degeneration in the English springer spaniel dog and disease relationship to an RPGRIP1 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narfström, Kristina; Jeong, Manbok; Hyman, Jennifer; Madsen, Richard W; Bergström, Tomas F

    2012-01-01

    Intensive breeding and selection on desired traits have produced high rates of inherited diseases in dogs. Hereditary retinal degeneration, often called progressive retinal atrophy (PRA), is prevalent in dogs with disease entities comparable to human retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and Leber's congenital amaurosis (LCA). Recent molecular studies in the English Springer Spaniel (ESS) dog have shown that PRA cases are often homozygous for a mutation in the RPGRIP1 gene, the defect also causing human RP, LCA, and cone rod dystrophies. The present study characterizes the disease in a group of affected ESS in USA, using clinical, functional, and morphological studies. An objective evaluation of retinal function using electroretinography (ERG) is further performed in a masked fashion in a group of American ESS dogs, with the examiner masked to the genetic status of the dogs. Only 4 of 6 homozygous animals showed clinical signs of disease, emphasizing the need and importance for more precise studies on the clinical expression of molecular defects before utilizing animal models for translational research, such as when using stem cells for therapeutic intervention.

  7. Assessment of Hereditary Retinal Degeneration in the English Springer Spaniel Dog and Disease Relationship to an RPGRIP1 Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Narfström

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Intensive breeding and selection on desired traits have produced high rates of inherited diseases in dogs. Hereditary retinal degeneration, often called progressive retinal atrophy (PRA, is prevalent in dogs with disease entities comparable to human retinitis pigmentosa (RP and Leber’s congenital amaurosis (LCA. Recent molecular studies in the English Springer Spaniel (ESS dog have shown that PRA cases are often homozygous for a mutation in the RPGRIP1 gene, the defect also causing human RP, LCA, and cone rod dystrophies. The present study characterizes the disease in a group of affected ESS in USA, using clinical, functional, and morphological studies. An objective evaluation of retinal function using electroretinography (ERG is further performed in a masked fashion in a group of American ESS dogs, with the examiner masked to the genetic status of the dogs. Only 4 of 6 homozygous animals showed clinical signs of disease, emphasizing the need and importance for more precise studies on the clinical expression of molecular defects before utilizing animal models for translational research, such as when using stem cells for therapeutic intervention.

  8. Genotype-phenotype correlations and expansion of the molecular spectrum of AP4M1-related hereditary spastic paraplegia

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    Conceição Bettencourt

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autosomal recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP due to AP4M1 mutations is a very rare neurodevelopmental disorder reported for only a few patients. Methods We investigated a Greek HSP family using whole exome sequencing (WES. Results A novel AP4M1A frameshift insertion, and a very rare missense variant were identified in all three affected siblings in the compound heterozygous state (p.V174fs and p.C319R; the unaffected parents were carriers of only one variant. Patients were affected with a combination of: (a febrile seizures with onset in the first year of life (followed by epileptic non-febrile seizures; (b distinctive facial appearance (e.g., coarse features, bulbous nose and hypomimia; (c developmental delay and intellectual disability; (d early-onset spastic weakness of the lower limbs; and (e cerebellar hypoplasia/atrophy on brain MRI. Conclusions We review genotype-phenotype correlations and discuss clinical overlaps between different AP4-related diseases. The AP4M1 belongs to a complex that mediates vesicle trafficking of glutamate receptors, being likely involved in brain development and neurotransmission.

  9. Leber's hereditary optic neuroretinopathy (LHON) associated with mitochondrial DNA point mutation G11778A in two Croatian families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Kleiner, Irena; Gabrilovac, Jelka; Bradvica, Mario; Vidović, Tomislav; Cerovski, Branimir; Fumić, Ksenija; Boranić, Milivoj

    2006-03-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuroretinopathy (LHON) is manifested as a bilateral acute or subacute loss of central vision due to optic atrophy. It is linked to point mutations of mitochondrial DNA, which is inherited maternally. The most common mitochondrial DNA point mutations associated with LHON are G3460A, G11778A and T14484C. These mutations are linked with the defects of subunits of the complex I (NADH-dehydrogenase-ubiquinone reductase) in mitochondria. The G11778A mitochondrial DNA point mutation is manifested by a severe visual impairment. In this paper two Croatian families with the LHON G11778A mutation are presented. Three LHON patients from two families were younger males which had the visual acuity of 0.1 or below, the ophthalmoscopy revealed telangiectatic microangiopathy and papilloedema, while Goldmann kinetic perimetry showed a central scotoma. The mothers and female relatives were LHON mutants without symptoms, whereas their sons suffered from a severe visual impairment. Molecular diagnosis helps to explain the cause of LHON disease.

  10. Idebenone protects against retinal damage and loss of vision in a mouse model of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrice D Heitz

    Full Text Available Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON is an inherited disease caused by mutations in complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. The disease is characterized by loss of central vision due to retinal ganglion cell (RGC dysfunction and optic nerve atrophy. Despite progress towards a better understanding of the disease, no therapeutic treatment is currently approved for this devastating disease. Idebenone, a short-chain benzoquinone, has shown promising evidence of efficacy in protecting vision loss and in accelerating recovery of visual acuity in patients with LHON. It was therefore of interest to study suitable LHON models in vitro and in vivo to identify anatomical correlates for this protective activity. At nanomolar concentrations, idebenone protected the rodent RGC cell line RGC-5 against complex I dysfunction in vitro. Consistent with the reported dosing and observed effects in LHON patients, we describe that in mice, idebenone penetrated into the eye at concentrations equivalent to those which protected RGC-5 cells from complex I dysfunction in vitro. Consequently, we next investigated the protective effect of idebenone in a mouse model of LHON, whereby mitochondrial complex I dysfunction was caused by exposure to rotenone. In this model, idebenone protected against the loss of retinal ganglion cells, reduction in retinal thickness and gliosis. Furthermore, consistent with this protection of retinal integrity, idebenone restored the functional loss of vision in this disease model. These results support the pharmacological activity of idebenone and indicate that idebenone holds potential as an effective treatment for vision loss in LHON patients.

  11. NIPA1 mutation in complex hereditary spastic paraplegia with epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenstrup, K; Møller, R S; Christensen, J

    2011-01-01

    reported missense mutation c.316G>A, p.Gly106Arg, was identified in a complex HSP patient with spastic dysarthria, facial dystonia, atrophy of the small hand muscles, upper limb spasticity, and presumably IGE. The epilepsy co-segregated with HSP in the family. Conclusion: NIPA1 mutations were rare in our...

  12. Hereditary Hemochromatosis Restores the Virulence of Plague Vaccine Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quenee, Lauriane E.; Hermanas, Timothy M.; Ciletti, Nancy; Louvel, Helene; Miller, Nathan C.; Elli, Derek; Blaylock, Bill; Mitchell, Anthony; Schroeder, Jay; Krausz, Thomas; Kanabrocki, Joseph; Schneewind, Olaf

    2012-01-01

    Nonpigmented Yersinia pestis (pgm) strains are defective in scavenging host iron and have been used in live-attenuated vaccines to combat plague epidemics. Recently, a Y. pestis pgm strain was isolated from a researcher with hereditary hemochromatosis who died from laboratory-acquired plague. We used hemojuvelin-knockout (Hjv−/−) mice to examine whether iron-storage disease restores the virulence defects of nonpigmented Y. pestis. Unlike wild-type mice, Hjv−/− mice developed lethal plague when challenged with Y. pestis pgm strains. Immunization of Hjv−/− mice with a subunit vaccine that blocks Y. pestis type III secretion generated protection against plague. Thus, individuals with hereditary hemochromatosis may be protected with subunit vaccines but should not be exposed to live-attenuated plague vaccines. PMID:22896664

  13. Genetics and Genetic Testing in Hereditary Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoffel, Elena M; Boland, C Richard

    2015-10-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains the third most common cancer affecting men and women in the United States. Approximately one-third of CRCs are diagnosed in individuals who have family members also affected with the disease. Although the vast majority of colorectal neoplasms develop as a consequence of somatic genomic alterations arising in individual cells, approximately 5% of all CRCs arise in the setting of germline mutations in genes involved in key cellular processes. To date, multiple genes have been implicated in single-gene hereditary cancer syndromes, many of which are associated with increased risk for CRC, as well as other tumor types. This review outlines the clinical, pathologic, and genetic features of the hereditary cancer syndromes known to be associated with increased risk for CRC and delineates strategies for implementing genetic risk assessments in clinical settings. Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Working the endless puzzle of hereditary autoinflammatory disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caso, Francesco; Cantarini, Luca; Lucherini, Orso Maria; Sfriso, Paolo; Fioretti, Maria; Costa, Luisa; Vitale, Antonio; Atteno, Mariangela; Galeazzi, Mauro; Muscari, Isabella; Magnotti, Flora; Frediani, Bruno; Punzi, Leonardo; Rigante, Donato

    2014-05-01

    Hereditary autoinflammatory disorders encompass manifold dysfunctions of innate immunity caused by mutations in genes coding for the main characters of the inflammatory scene: most of these conditions have an early onset, ranging from the first days of life to the first decades, and include hereditary periodic fevers, NLRP-related diseases, granulomatous and pyogenic syndromes, which are basically characterized by upturned inflammasome activity and overproduction of bioactive interleukin (IL)-1β and other proinflammatory cytokines. The discovery of a causative link between autoinflammation and IL-1β release has improved our understanding of the intimate mechanisms of innate immunity, and has likewise led to the identification of extraordinary treatments for many of these disorders.

  15. Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia: A Primer for Critical Care Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacco, Kathleen M; Barkley, Thomas W

    2016-06-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia is a rare, autosomal dominant genetic disease that causes abnormal growth of blood vessels and, subsequently, life-threatening arteriovenous malformations in vital organs. Epistaxis may be one of the initial clues that a patient has more serious, generalized arteriovenous malformations. Recommended treatment involves careful evaluation to determine the severity and risk of spontaneous rupture of the malformations and the management of various signs and symptoms. The disease remains undiagnosed in many patients, and health care providers may miss the diagnosis until catastrophic events happen in multiple family members. Prompt recognition of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia and early intervention can halt the dangerous course of the disease. Critical care nurses can assist with early diagnosis within families with this genetic disease, thus preventing early death and disability. ©2016 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  16. Management of Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer. The Asian Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ava Kwong

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations are the most common high penetrant genes associated with an increased lifetime risk for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC. Although genetic testing is standard of care in Western developed countries, there are still variations in availability of genetic testing and risk assessment for HBOC in Asia. Depending on the countries, there are variations in the clinical strategies and cancer management. The Asian BRCA Consortium has grouped together 14 Asian countries and reviewed genetic counselling/testing uptake rates and clinical management options in these countries. Moreover economic factors, healthcare and legal frameworks, and cultural issues affecting the genetic service availability in Asia were discussed. Mutation spectrum, and VUS rates and the increase use of NGS gene panel testing poses more decisional issues in the clinical management of Hereditary Breast cancer in Asia. These will be discussed. Keywords: BRCA1/BRCA2, germline, HBOC, Asia BRCA Consortium, NGS

  17. The role of the complement system in hereditary angioedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csuka, Dorottya; Veszeli, Nóra; Varga, Lilian; Prohászka, Zoltán; Farkas, Henriette

    2017-09-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare, but potentially life-threatening disorder, characterized by acute, recurring, and self-limiting edematous episodes of the face, extremities, trunk, genitals, upper airways, or the gastrointestinal tract. HAE may be caused by the deficiency of C1-inhibitor (C1-INH-HAE) but another type of the disease, hereditary angioedema with normal C1-INH function (nC1-INH-HAE) was also described. The patient population is quite heterogeneous as regards the location, frequency, and severity of edematous attacks, presenting large intra- and inter-individual variation. Here, we review the role of the complement system in the pathomechanism of HAE and also present an overview on the complement parameters having an importance in the diagnosis or in predicting the severity of HAE. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. CLINICAL AND MORPHOLOGICAL FEATURES OF HEREDITARY OVARIAN CANCER

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    K. B. Kotiv

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Germ-line mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are the most established risk factors for hereditary breast and ovarian cancers. The purpose of the study was to analyze BRCA1/2 testing in ovarian cancer patients. Materials and methods. We analyzed 222 patients with ovarian cancer (OC who underwent genetic testing. Results. Recurrent Slavic mutations in these genes were detected in 60/222 (27% patients.104 patients lacked any clinical signs of hereditary form of the disease, however BRCA1/2 genetic defects were identified among 11 (11% of these women. BRCA1/2-associated carcinomas were characterized by more advanced stage at diagnosis and predominance of high-grade serous histological tumor subtype. Conclusion. These results emphasize the need for BRCA1/2 testing for all patients with OC. BRCA1/2-associated carcinomas have clinical and pathological cgaracteristics, which should be considered while planning therapy. 

  19. [An aged case of hereditary xanthinuria with xanthine urinary calculi].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kario, K; Matsuo, T; Nakao, K

    1991-01-01

    A 74-year-old female with hereditary xanthinuria and xanthine stones is reported. She has a family history of consanguineous parents and a past history of right side nephrectomy due to a xanthine renal stone and vesicolithotomy of 3 bladder stones approximately 5 X 4 X 4 cm in size at the age of 58 and 71, respectively. Her young brother exhibited a slightly elevated urinary excretion of oxypurines. Laboratory examination showed a low serum level (0.3 mg/dl) and urinary excretion (1.56 mg/day) of uric acid, and high plasma and urine levels of oxypurines. No xanthine oxidase activity was detectably in duodenal mucosa by biopsy specimen obtained by duodenofiberscopy. Now she has another stone approximately 5 X 4 X 4 cm in her bladder. There have been are few elderly cases of hereditary xanthinuria with recurrent giant urolithiasis.

  20. Could Ossification of the Achilles Tendon Have a Hereditary Component?

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    Chawki Cortbaoui

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ossification of the Achilles tendon (OTA is an unusual clinical condition. It is characterized by the presence of an ossified mass within the fibrocartilaginous substance of the Achilles tendon. The etiology of the ossification of the Achilles tendon is unknown. Review of the literature suggests that its etiology is multifactorial. The major contributing factors are trauma and surgery with other minor causes such as systemic diseases, metabolic conditions, and infections. To our knowledge, no previous reports suggest any genetic/hereditary predisposition in OAT. We report 3 siblings who have OAT with no history of any of the aforementioned predisposing factors. Could OAT have a hereditary component as one of its etiologies?

  1. Alteration of the erythrocyte membrane skeletal ultrastructure in hereditary spherocytosis, hereditary elliptocytosis, and pyropoikilocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, S C; Derick, L H; Agre, P; Palek, J

    1990-07-01

    The membrane skeleton of normal erythrocytes is largely organized into a hexagonal lattice of junctional complexes (JC) crosslinked by spectrin tetramers, and occasional double tetramers and hexamers. To explore possible skeletal alterations in hereditary spherocytosis (HS), elliptocytosis (HE), and pyropoikilocytosis (HPP), we have studied the ultrastructure of the spread membrane skeletons from a subpopulation of HS patients with a partial spectrin deficiency ranging from 43% to 86% of normal levels, and in patients with HPP who, in addition to a mild spectrin deficiency, also carried a mutant spectrin that was dysfunctional, thus reducing the ability of spectrin dimers to assemble into tetramers. Membrane skeletons derived from Triton-treated erythrocyte ghosts were examined by negative staining electron microscopy. HS membrane skeletons contained structural elements, consisting of JC and spectrin filaments similar to the normal skeleton. However, less spectrin filaments interconnected the JC, and the decrease of spectrin filaments attached to JC appeared to correlate with the severity of spectrin deficiency. Only in severe HS associated with severe spectrin deficiency was the loss of spectrin sufficient enough to disrupt the overall skeletal architecture. In contrast, membrane skeletons prepared from red blood cells (RBCs) of subjects with HPP were strikingly different from HS RBCs with a comparable degree of spectrin deficiency. Although HPP RBCs were only mildly deficient in spectrin, their skeletal lattice was grossly disrupted, in contrast to only mild ultrastructural abnormalities of HS membrane skeletons with a nearly identical degree of spectrin deficiency. Skeletons from patients with common mild HE or asymptomatic carriers, carrying the mutant spectrin but having normal spectrin content, exhibited a moderate disruption of the skeletal lattice. We propose that the above differences in skeletal ultrastructure may underlie differences in the biomechanical

  2. Hereditary Renal Cystic Disorders: Imaging of the Kidneys and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillman, Jonathan R; Trout, Andrew T; Smith, Ethan A; Towbin, Alexander J

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the hereditary renal cystic diseases that can manifest in children and adults, with specific attention to pathogenesis and imaging features. Various common and uncommon hereditary renal cystic diseases are reviewed in terms of their underlying etiology, including the involved genetic mutations and the affected proteins and cellular structures. Focus is placed on the morphologic findings in each condition and the features that distinguish one disorder from another. The two most common categories of hereditary renal cystic disease are (a) the ciliopathic disorders, which are related to mutations affecting the primary cilia (called "ciliopathies"), and (b) the phakomatoses. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease, and the "medullary cystic disease complex" are all ciliopathies but have different phenotypes. Tuberous sclerosis complex and the associated "contiguous gene syndrome," as well as von Hippel-Lindau syndrome, are phakomatoses that can manifest with cystic renal lesions but have uniquely different extrarenal manifestations. Finally, DICER1 mutations can manifest with renal cystic lesions (typically, cystic nephromas) in patients predisposed to other malignancies in the chest, ovaries, and thyroid. Although some overlap exists in the appearance of the renal cysts associated with each of these diseases, there are clear morphologic differences (eg, cyst size, location, and complexity) that are emphasized in this review. To improve patient outcomes, it is important for the radiologist to recognize the various hereditary renal cystic diseases so that a correct diagnosis is assigned and so that the patient is adequately evaluated and followed up. ©RSNA, 2017.

  3. Blood pressure follows the kidney: Perinatal influences on hereditary hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Koeners, Maarten P; Braam, Branko; Joles, Jaap A

    2008-01-01

    Epidemiological and experimental data strongly suggest that cardiovascular diseases can originate from an aberrant environment during fetal development, a phenomenon referred to as perinatal programming. This review will focus on the role of the kidneys in determining blood pressure, and how (re)programming the renal development can persistently ameliorate hereditary hypertension. By combining physiologic and genomic studies we have discovered some candidate pathways suited for (re)programmin...

  4. HEREDITARY INTRAVENTRICULAR CONDUCTION DISORDERS IN THE FAMILY FROM KRASNOYARSK

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    A. A. Chernova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pedigree of the family from Krasnoyarsk city with hereditary disorders of intracardiac conduction was studied. The diagnosis of each family member was verified by electrocardiography (ECG, echocardiography , bicycle ergometry , ECG Holter monitoring. The family 10-year follow-up showed familial aggregation of intracardiac conduction disorders in grandson, niece, son of the proband niece, ie, in the III-degree relatives. Family history of III-degree relatives with intracardiac conduction disorders and discordant pathology is identified.

  5. Hereditary spastic paraplegia caused by the PLP1 'rumpshaker mutation'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenstrup, Kirsten; Giraud, Geneviève; Boespflug-Tanguy, Odile

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous neurodegenerative disorders characterised by progressive spasticity and weakness in the lower limbs. Mutations in PLP1 on the X chromosome cause spastic paraplegia type 2 (SPG2) or the allelic....... No definite symptoms in the female carriers could be ascribed to the mutation. These data suggest the pathology to be an underlying dysmyelinating disorder in combination with a central axonal degeneration....

  6. The diagnostic quandary of hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia vs. CREST syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J B; Ben-Aviv, D; Covello, S P

    2001-10-01

    The distribution and clinical appearance of the telangiectasia in the CREST syndrome (calcinosis, Raynaud's phenomenon, oesophageal involvement, sclerodactyly, telangiectasia) and hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) are very similar. Several previously reported cases of the CREST syndrome simulating HHT illustrate this diagnostic quandary. We report a patient who met the diagnostic criteria for both the CREST syndrome and HHT, and discuss the distinguishing features of the two diseases, including the distinctive histopathological findings of telangiectasia in HHT.

  7. The molecular basis of hereditary enamel defects in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, J T; Carrion, I A; Morris, C

    2015-01-01

    The formation of human enamel is highly regulated at the molecular level and involves thousands of genes. Requisites for development of this highly mineralized tissue include cell differentiation; production of a unique extracellular matrix; processing of the extracellular matrix; altering of cell function during different stages of enamel formation; cell movement and attachment; regulation of ion and protein movement; and regulation of hydration, pH, and other conditions of the microenvironment, to name just a few. Not surprising, there is a plethora of hereditary conditions with an enamel phenotype. The objective of this review was to identify the hereditary conditions listed on Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) that have an associated enamel phenotype and whether a causative gene has been identified. The OMIM database was searched with the terms amelogenesis, enamel, dental, and tooth, and all results were screened by 2 individuals to determine if an enamel phenotype was identified. Gene and gene product function was reviewed on OMIM and from publications identified in PubMed. The search strategy revealed 91 conditions listed in OMIM as having an enamel phenotype, and of those, 71 have a known molecular etiology or linked genetic loci. The purported protein function of those conditions with a known genetic basis included enzymes, regulatory proteins, extracellular matrix proteins, transcription factors, and transmembrane proteins. The most common enamel phenotype was a deficient amount of enamel, or enamel hypoplasia, with hypomineralization defects being reported less frequently. Knowing these molecular defects allows an initial cataloging of molecular pathways that lead to hereditary enamel defects in humans. This knowledge provides insight into the diverse molecular pathways involved in enamel formation and can be useful when searching for the genetic etiology of hereditary conditions that involve enamel. © International & American Associations for

  8. Hereditary spastic paraplegia with a thin corpus callosum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somasundaram, Sivaraman; Kesavadas, Chandrasekharan [Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Department of Imaging Sciences and Interventional Radiology, Trivandrum (India); Raghavendra, Seetharam; Singh, Atampreet; Nair, Muraleedharan [Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Department of Neurology, Trivandrum (India)

    2007-05-15

    We report a 15-year-old boy with autosomal recessive complicated hereditary spastic paraplegia with a thin corpus callosum (HSP-TCC). The involvement of the corpus callosum was characteristic with the genu and body predominantly affected with relative sparing of the splenium. HSP-TCC is being increasingly recognized over a wider geographical area than earlier believed. We now report a case of HSP-TCC from the Indian subcontinent. (orig.)

  9. Factors Associated with Changes in Brain Atrophy during a Three-Year Observation in Elderly Diabetic Patients: Effect of Renal Impairment on Hippocampal Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiko Kawamura

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: We conducted a 3-year longitudinal study concerning factors associated with changes in brain atrophy in elderly diabetic patients. Methods: We evaluated hippocampal and global brain atrophy using automatic voxel-based morphometry of structural magnetic resonance images, 4 cognitive function tests, and cerebral small vessel disease (SVD in 66 diabetic patients. Results: During the 3-year follow-up, hippocampal and global brain atrophy advanced, and cognitive functions worsened. For changes in hippocampal atrophy, changes in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, albuminuria, and being an ApoE ε4 carrier were independent factors; change in the number of silent brain infarctions was an independent factor for changes in global brain atrophy. A significant association of changes in eGFR and albuminuria with hippocampal atrophy remained after adjusting for confounders including SVD. Both types of brain atrophy at baseline were significantly correlated with cognitive impairment at baseline and especially associated with changes in delayed word recall during the follow-up after adjusting for confounders. Conclusion: Changes in eGFR and albuminuria during follow-up were independent risk factors for hippocampal atrophy, which was associated with decline in delayed word recall, suggesting that management of chronic kidney disease may prevent the progression of hippocampal atrophy.

  10. Hereditary spherocytosis, elliptocytosis, and other red cell membrane disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Costa, Lydie; Galimand, Julie; Fenneteau, Odile; Mohandas, Narla

    2013-07-01

    Hereditary spherocytosis and elliptocytosis are the two most common inherited red cell membrane disorders resulting from mutations in genes encoding various red cell membrane and skeletal proteins. Red cell membrane, a composite structure composed of lipid bilayer linked to spectrin-based membrane skeleton is responsible for the unique features of flexibility and mechanical stability of the cell. Defects in various proteins involved in linking the lipid bilayer to membrane skeleton result in loss in membrane cohesion leading to surface area loss and hereditary spherocytosis while defects in proteins involved in lateral interactions of the spectrin-based skeleton lead to decreased mechanical stability, membrane fragmentation and hereditary elliptocytosis. The disease severity is primarily dependent on the extent of membrane surface area loss. Both these diseases can be readily diagnosed by various laboratory approaches that include red blood cell cytology, flow cytometry, ektacytometry, electrophoresis of the red cell membrane proteins, and mutational analysis of gene encoding red cell membrane proteins. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Hereditary myopathies with early respiratory insufficiency in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naddaf, Elie; Milone, Margherita

    2017-11-01

    Hereditary myopathies with early respiratory insufficiency as a predominant feature of the clinical phenotype are uncommon and underestimated in adults. We reviewed the clinical and laboratory data of patients with hereditary myopathies who demonstrated early respiratory insufficiency before the need for ambulatory assistance. Only patients with disease-causing mutations or a specific histopathological diagnosis were included. Patients with cardiomyopathy were excluded. We identified 22 patients; half had isolated respiratory symptoms at onset. The diagnosis of the myopathy was often delayed, resulting in delayed ventilatory support. The most common myopathies were adult-onset Pompe disease, myofibrillar myopathy, multi-minicore disease, and myotonic dystrophy type 1. Single cases of laminopathy, MELAS (mitochondrial encephalomyopathy with lactic acidosis and strokelike events), centronuclear myopathy, and cytoplasmic body myopathy were identified. We highlighted the most common hereditary myopathies associated with early respiratory insufficiency as the predominant clinical feature, and underscored the importance of a timely diagnosis for patient care. Muscle Nerve 56: 881-886, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Practice Bulletin No 182: Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome is an inherited cancer-susceptibility syndrome characterized by multiple family members with breast cancer, ovarian cancer, or both. Based on the contemporary understanding of the origins and management of ovarian cancer and for simplicity in this document, ovarian cancer also refers to fallopian tube cancer and primary peritoneal cancer. Clinical genetic testing for gene mutations allows more precise identification of those women who are at an increased risk of inherited breast cancer and ovarian cancer. For these individuals, screening and prevention strategies can be instituted to reduce their risks. Obstetrician-gynecologists play an important role in the identification and management of women with hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome. If an obstetrician-gynecologist or other gynecologic care provider does not have the necessary knowledge or expertise in cancer genetics to counsel a patient appropriately, referral to a genetic counselor, gynecologic or medical oncologist, or other genetics specialist should be considered (1). More genes are being discovered that impart varying risks of breast cancer, ovarian cancer, and other types of cancer, and new technologies are being developed for genetic testing. This Practice Bulletin focuses on the primary genetic mutations associated with hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome, BRCA1 and BRCA2, but also will briefly discuss some of the other genes that have been implicated.

  13. Pharmacological Inhibitors of the Proteosome in Atrophying Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Alfred

    1999-01-01

    It is now clear that the marked loss of muscle mass that occurs with disuse, denervation or in many systemic diseases (cancer cachexia, sepsis, acidosis, various endocrine disorders) is due primarily to accelerated degradation of muscle proteins, especially myofibrillar components. Recent work primarily in Dr. Goldberg's laboratory had suggested that in these diverse conditions, the enhancement of muscle proteolysis results mainly from activation of the Ub-proteasome degradative pathway. In various experimental models of atrophy, rat muscles show a common series of changes indicative of activation of this pathway, including increases in MRNA for Ub and proteasome subunits, content of ubiquitinated proteins, and sensitivity to inhibitors of the proteasome. In order to understand the muscle atrophy seen in weightlessness, Dr. Goldberg's laboratory is collaborating with Dr. Baldwin in studies to define the changes in these parameters upon hind-limb suspension. Related experiments will explore the effects on this degradative system of exercise regimens and also of glucocorticoids, which are known to rise in space personnel and to promote muscle, especially in inactive muscles. The main goals will be: (A) to define the enzymatic changes leading to enhanced activity of the Ub-proteasome pathway in inactive muscles upon hind-limb suspension, and the effects on this system of exposure to glucocorticoids or exercise; and (B) to learn whether inhibitors of the Ub-proteasome pathway may be useful in retarding the excessive proteolysis in atrophying muscles. Using muscle extracts, Dr. Goldberg's group hopes to define the rate-limiting, enzymatic changes that lead to the accelerated Ub-conjugation and protein degradation. They have recently developed cell-free preparations from atrophying rat muscles, in which Ub-conjugation to muscle proteins is increased above control levels. Because these new preparations seem to reproduce the changes occurring in vivo, they will analyze in

  14. A novel method of quantifying brain atrophy associated with age-related hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Jason Qian

    2017-01-01

    Audiometric evaluations and mini-mental state exams were obtained in 34 subjects over the age of 80 who have had brain MRIs in the past 6 years. CSF and parenchymal brain volumes (whole brain and by lobe were obtained through a novel, fully automated algorithm. Atrophy was calculated by taking the ratio of CSF to parenchyma. High frequency hearing loss was associated with disproportional temporal lobe atrophy relative to whole brain atrophy independent of age (r = 0.471, p = 0.005. Mental state was associated with frontoparietal atrophy but not to temporal lobe atrophy, which is consistent with known results. Our method demonstrates that hearing loss is associated with temporal lobe atrophy and generalized whole brain atrophy. Our algorithm is efficient, fully automated, and able to detect significant associations in a small cohort.

  15. Organization and Running of the First Comprehensive Hereditary Cancer Clinic in India

    OpenAIRE

    Rajkumar, T; Soumittra, N; Vidubala, E; Sridevi, V; Mahajan, V; Ramanan, SG; Vijaya, S

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Hereditary cancers are thought to account for around 5% of cancers, particularly breast/ovarian and colorectal cancers. In India there is a paucity of data on hereditary cancers and the mutations in some of the common genes linked to hereditary cancers, such as BRCA1, BRCA2, hMSH2 and hMLH1. The country's first comprehensive hereditary cancer clinic was established in February 2002. The article describes the organization and running of the Clinic. It also discusses some of the social...

  16. Revised Bethesda Guidelines for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (Lynch syndrome) and microsatellite instability

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Umar, Asad; Boland, C Richard; Terdiman, Jonathan P; Syngal, Sapna; de la Chapelle, Albert; Rüschoff, Josef; Fishel, Richard; Lindor, Noralane M; Burgart, Lawrence J; Hamelin, Richard; Hamilton, Stanley R; Hiatt, Robert A; Jass, Jeremy; Lindblom, Annika; Lynch, Henry T; Peltomaki, Païvi; Ramsey, Scott D; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A; Vasen, Hans F A; Hawk, Ernest T; Barrett, J Carl; Freedman, Andrew N; Srivastava, Sudhir

    2004-01-01

    Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), also known as Lynch syndrome, is a common autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by early age at onset, neoplastic lesions, and microsatellite instability (MSI...

  17. Retinal structure, function, and molecular pathologic features in gyrate atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergouniotis, Panagiotis I; Davidson, Alice E; Lenassi, Eva; Devery, Sophie R; Moore, Anthony T; Webster, Andrew R

    2012-03-01

    To describe phenotypic variability and to report novel mutational data in patients with gyrate atrophy. Retrospective case series. Seven unrelated patients (10 to 52 years of age) with clinical and biochemical evidence of gyrate atrophy. Detailed ophthalmologic examination, fundus photography, fundus autofluorescence (FAF) imaging, spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, and microperimetry testing were performed. The coding region and intron-exon boundaries of ornithine aminotransferase (OAT) were analyzed. OAT mRNA was isolated from peripheral blood leucocytes of 1 patient and analyzed. OAT mutation status and resultant clinical, structural, and functional characteristics. Funduscopy revealed circular areas of chorioretinal atrophy, and FAF imaging showed sharply demarcated areas of increased or preserved signal in all 7 patients. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography revealed multiple intraretinal cystic spaces and hyperreflective deposit in the ganglion cell layer of all study subjects. Round tubular, rosette-like structures located in the outer nuclear layer of the retinae of the 4 older patients were observed (termed outer retinal tubulation). Thickening was evident in the foveolae of younger patients, despite the posterior pole appearing relatively preserved. Macular function, assessed by microperimetry, was preserved over areas of normal or increased autofluorescence. However, sensitivity was reduced even in structurally intact parts of the retina. The molecular pathologic features were determined in all study subjects: 9 mutations, 4 novel, were detected in the OAT gene. OAT mRNA was isolated from blood leukocytes, and monoallelic expression of a mutated allele was demonstrated in 1 patient. Fundus autofluorescence imaging can reveal the extent of neurosensory dysfunction in gyrate atrophy patients. Macular edema is a uniform finding; the fovea is relatively thick in early stages of disease and retinal tubulation is present in advanced disease

  18. Olmesartan-Induced Enteropathy: An Unusual Cause of Villous Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Eusébio

    2016-03-01

    Olmesartan is an angiotensin receptor blocker commonly prescribed for the management of hypertension. Spruelike enteropathy associated with this drug is a recently described entity with few cases reported. It presents with chronic diarrhea and intestinal villous atrophy and should be included in its differential diagnosis. This case intends to alert clinicians for the possibility of this event in a patient on treatment with this drug.

  19. Masticatory muscles of mouse do not undergo atrophy in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippou, Anastassios; Minozzo, Fabio C.; Spinazzola, Janelle M.; Smith, Lucas R.; Lei, Hanqin; Rassier, Dilson E.; Barton, Elisabeth R.

    2015-01-01

    Muscle loading is important for maintaining muscle mass; when load is removed, atrophy is inevitable. However, in clinical situations such as critical care myopathy, masticatory muscles do not lose mass. Thus, their properties may be harnessed to preserve mass. We compared masticatory and appendicular muscles responses to microgravity, using mice aboard the space shuttle Space Transportation System-135. Age- and sex-matched controls remained on the ground. After 13 days of space flight, 1 masseter (MA) and tibialis anterior (TA) were frozen rapidly for biochemical and functional measurements, and the contralateral MA was processed for morphologic measurements. Flight TA muscles exhibited 20 ± 3% decreased muscle mass, 2-fold decreased phosphorylated (P)-Akt, and 4- to 12-fold increased atrogene expression. In contrast, MAs had no significant change in mass but a 3-fold increase in P-focal adhesion kinase, 1.5-fold increase in P-Akt, and 50–90% lower atrogene expression compared with limb muscles, which were unaltered in microgravity. Myofibril force measurements revealed that microgravity caused a 3-fold decrease in specific force and maximal shortening velocity in TA muscles. It is surprising that myofibril-specific force from both control and flight MAs were similar to flight TA muscles, yet power was compromised by 40% following flight. Continued loading in microgravity prevents atrophy, but masticatory muscles have a different set point that mimics disuse atrophy in the appendicular muscle.—Philippou, A., Minozzo, F. C., Spinazzola, J. M., Smith, L. R., Lei, H., Rassier, D. E., Barton, E. R. Masticatory muscles of mouse do not undergo atrophy in space. PMID:25795455

  20. Potential role of lampalizumab for treatment of geographic atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoades, William; Dickson, Drew; Do, Diana V

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the pathways underlying age-related macular degeneration and potential therapeutic targets, focusing on the complement pathway and the recent MAHALO Phase II trial of the investigational drug lampalizumab. This trial was the first to have shown positive results for the treatment of geographic atrophy in age-related macular degeneration. It has potential as a future treatment, and is currently undergoing a Phase III trial.

  1. Subretinal Glial Membranes in Eyes With Geographic Atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Malia M; McLeod, D Scott; Bhutto, Imran A; Grebe, Rhonda; Duffy, Maeve; Lutty, Gerard A

    2017-03-01

    Müller cells create the external limiting membrane (ELM) by forming junctions with photoreceptor cells. This study evaluated the relationship between focal photoreceptors and RPE loss in geographic atrophy (GA) and Müller cell extension into the subretinal space. Human donor eyes with no retinal disease or geographic atrophy (GA) were fixed and the eye cups imaged. The retinal posterior pole was stained for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP; astrocytes and activated Müller cells) and vimentin (Müller cells) while the submacular choroids were labeled with Ulex Europaeus Agglutinin lectin (blood vessels). Choroids and retinas were imaged using a Zeiss 710 confocal microscope. Additional eyes were cryopreserved or processed for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to better visualize the Müller cells. Vimentin staining of aged control retinas (n = 4) revealed a panretinal cobblestone-like ELM. While this pattern was also observed in the GA retinas (n = 7), each also had a distinct area in which vimentin+ and vimentin+/GFAP+ processes created a subretinal membrane. Subretinal glial membranes closely matched areas of RPE atrophy in the gross photos. Choroidal vascular loss was also evident in these atrophic areas. Smaller glial projections were noted, which correlated with drusen in gross photos. The presence of glia in the subretinal space was confirmed by TEM and cross cross-section immunohistochemistry. In eyes with GA, subretinal Müller cell membranes present in areas of RPE atrophy may be a Müller cell attempt to replace the ELM. These membranes could interfere with treatments such as stem cell therapy.

  2. Quantification of spinal cord atrophy in magnetic resonance images

    OpenAIRE

    Pezold, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Quantifying the volume of the spinal cord is of vital interest for studying and understanding diseases of the central nervous system such as multiple sclerosis (MS). In this thesis, which is motivated by MS research, we propose methods for measuring the spinal cord cross-sectional area and volume in magnetic resonance (MR) images. These measurements are used for determining neural atrophy and for performing both longitudinal and cross-sectional comparisons in clinical trials. We present th...

  3. Vascular perfusion abnormalities in infants with spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Alexandra prufer de Queiroz Campos; Araujo, Mario; Swoboda, Kathryn J

    2009-08-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an important cause of death in children and SMA type I, also known as Werdnig-Hoffman disease, is the most severe form of this disease. We report 2 cases of infants with SMA I in whom a distal necrosis developed, a feature not previously reported. Poor perfusion, autonomic dysfunction, and position-dependent factors may all play a role in the development of this complication.

  4. Brain atrophy in clinically early relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chard, D T; Griffin, C M; Parker, G J M; Kapoor, R; Thompson, A J; Miller, D H

    2002-02-01

    Brain atrophy measured by MRI is a potentially useful tool for monitoring disease progression in multiple sclerosis. The location, extent and mechanisms of brain atrophy in early disease are not well documented. Using quantitative MRI, this study investigated whole brain, grey and white matter atrophy in clinically early relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis and its relationship to lesion measures. Data came from 27 normal control subjects (14 females and 13 males, mean age 36.1 years) and 26 subjects with clinically definite multiple sclerosis (18 females and eight males, mean age 35.1 years, mean delay from first symptom to scan 1.8 years, median Expanded Disability Status Scale score 1.0). All had three-dimensional fast spoiled gradient recall (3D FSPGR), T(1)-weighted pre- and post-gadolinium-enhanced and T(2)-weighted scans. The 3D FSPGR images were automatically segmented into grey and white matter and cerebrospinal fluid using SPM99. 3D FSPGR hypo-intense, T(2) hyper-intense, T(1) hypo-intense and T(1) post-gadolinium-enhancing lesion volumes were determined by semi-automatic lesion segmentation. The SPM99 output was combined with the 3D FSPGR lesion segmentations to quantify tissue volumes as fractions of total intracranial volumes, producing values for the brain parenchymal fraction (BPF), white matter fraction (WMF) and grey matter fraction (GMF). Comparing multiple sclerosis with control subjects, BPF, GMF and WMF were significantly reduced (P lesion volumes were inversely related to BPF (T(2) r = -0.78, P lesion volumes were not correlated with any fractional volumes. These results indicate that significant brain atrophy, affecting both grey and white matter, occurs early in the clinical course of multiple sclerosis. The lack of correlation between lesion load measures and WMF suggests that pathological changes in white matter may occur by mechanisms which are at least partly independent from overt lesion genesis in early multiple sclerosis.

  5. Photoreceptor atrophy in acute zonal occult outer retinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zibrandtsen, N.; Munch, I.C.; Klemp, K.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess retinal morphology in acute zonal occult outer retinopathy (AZOOR) without ophthalmoscopically visible fundus changes. METHODS: Retrospective case series. Two consecutive patients with bilateral AZOOR with photopsia corresponding to areas of visual field loss and a normal fundus...... dysfunction. The field loss was more extensive than the area of photoreceptor loss. CONCLUSION: Photoreceptor atrophy can be demonstrated in AZOOR without ophthalmoscopically visible fundus lesions Udgivelsesdato: 2008/12...

  6. Serological assessment of gastric mucosal atrophy in gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bornschein Jan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-invasive tools for gastric cancer screening and diagnosis are lacking. Serological testing with the detection of pepsinogen 1 (PG1, pepsinogen 2 (PG2 and gastrin 17 (G17 offers the possibility to detect preneoplastic gastric mucosal conditions. Aim of this study was to assess the performance of these serological tests in the presence of gastric neoplasia. Methods Histological and serological samples of 118 patients with gastric cancer have been assessed for tumor specific characteristics (Laurén type, localisation, degree of mucosal abnormalities (intestinal metaplasia, atrophy and serological parameters (PG1, PG2, PG1/2-ratio, G17, H. pylori IgG, CagA status. Association of the general factors to the different serological values have been statistically analyzed. Results Patients with intestinal type gastric cancer had lower PG1 levels and a lower PG1/2-ratio compared to those with diffuse type cancer (p = 0.003. The serum levels of PG2 itself and G17 were not significantly altered. H. pylori infection in general had no influence on the levels of PG1, PG2 and G17 in the serum of gastric cancer patients. There was a trend towards lower PG1 levels in case of positive CagA-status (p = 0.058. The degree of both intestinal metaplasia and atrophy correlated inversely with serum levels for PG1 and the PG1/2-ratio (p Conclusions Glandular atrophy and a positive CagA status are determinant factors for decreased pepsinogen 1 levels in the serum of patients with gastric cancer. The serological assessment of gastric atrophy by analysis of serum pepsinogen is only adequate for patients with intestinal type cancer.

  7. Clinical, FDG and amyloid PET imaging in posterior cortical atrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Tarun D.; Josephs, Keith A.; Machulda, Mary M.; Drubach, Daniel A.; Apostolova, Liana G.; Lowe, Val J.; Whitwell, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the clinical, [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and amyloid-PET findings in a large cohort of posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) patients, to examine the neural correlates of the classic features of PCA, and to better understand the features associated with early PCA. We prospectively recruited 25 patients who presented to the Mayo Clinic between March 2013 and August 2014 and met diagnostic criteria for PCA. All patients u...

  8. [Posterior cortical atrophy with incomplete Bálint's syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iizuka, O; Soma, Y; Otsuki, M; Endo, K; Tanno, Y; Tsuji, S

    1997-09-01

    We report a patient of posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) with progressive memory disturbance and incomplete Bálint's syndrome consisting of optic ataxie (ataxie optique type) and visual inattention without psychic paralysis of fixation of gaze. The patients is a 58-year-old woman who noticed memory disturbance at 53 years old. Neurological deficit at 54 years old was detected only in the domain of memory, and mild diffuse brain atrophy was revealed on MRI. Memory disturbance progressed gradually, and at the age of 58 she was noticed to have visual disorder. Neuropsychological examination revealed severe memory disorder, incomplete Bálint's syndrome, transcortical sensory aphasia, mild ideational apraxia, and severe constructional apraxia. Visual inattention was too severe to evaluate visual acuity and visual field. MRI showed moderate dilatation of bilateral lateral ventricles, especially in their posterior horns, with atrophy of bilateral temporo-parieto-occipital lobes and hippocampus. IMP-SPECT revealed a diffuse decrease of cerebral blood flow in the bilateral temporo-parieto-occipital region, predominantly in the parietal regions. We believe that she is still in the early phase of PCA, and that psychic paralysis of fixation of gaze, visual agnosia will be noted in several years. Our patient represents an example of early stage PCA from neuropsychological and MRI findings.

  9. Preprosthetic and implantological surgery in patients with severe maxillary atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-García, Raúl; Naval-Gías, Luís; Muñoz-Guerra, Mario Fernando; Sastre-Pérez, Jesús; Rodríguez-Campo, Francisco José; Gil-Díez-Usandizaga, José Luís

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the success of the osseointegration of dental implants in patients with severe maxillary atrophy after sinus lift augmentation and onlay graft surgery with autologous bone grafts. A descriptive and analytic study of 27 patients with severe maxillary atrophy and partial or total edentulism, after 4 years follow-up. All cases underwent to autologous bone graft sinus lift augmentation with or without onlay grafts in the anterior maxillae. After this, reconstruction with osseointegrated implants was performed. After the follow-up period, 89.1% of implants were osseointegrated and loaded. Anterior iliac crest bone graft provides good results with respect to implant osseointegration. The achievement of two surgical procedures for bone grafts surgery and implants surgery, separated 2 or more months, provides better results for osseointegration in comparison to a sole surgical procedure (p<0.01). Implants survival predictability is greater when a second surgical procedure is performed, once bone grafts have experimented an appropriate consolidation. The use of onlay graft and sinus lift augmentation techniques is useful in the resolution of complex problems such as the severe maxillary atrophy.

  10. Counteracting Muscle Atrophy using Galvanic Stimulation of the Vestibular System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Robert A.; Polyakov, Igor

    1999-01-01

    The unloading of weight bearing from antigravity muscles during space flight produces significant muscle atrophy and is one of the most serious health problems facing the space program. Various exercise regimens have been developed and used either alone or in combination with pharmacological techniques to ameliorate this atrophy, but no effective countermeasure exists for this problem. The research in this project was conducted to evaluate the potential use of vestibular galvanic stimulation (VGS) to prevent muscle atrophy resulting from unloading of weight bearing from antigravity muscles. This approach was developed based on two concepts related to the process of maintaining the status of the anti-gravity neuromuscular system. These two premises are: (1) The "tone," or bias on spinal motorneurons is affected by vestibular projections that contribute importantly to maintaining muscle health and status. (2) VGS can be used to modify the excitability, or 'tone' of motorneuron of antigravity muscles. Thus, the strategy is to use VGS to modify the gain of vestibular projections to antigravity muscles and thereby change the general status of these muscles.

  11. Redox homeostasis, oxidative stress and disuse muscle atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrino, Maria Antonietta; Desaphy, Jean-François; Brocca, Lorenza; Pierno, Sabata; Camerino, Diana Conte; Bottinelli, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Abstract A pivotal role has been ascribed to oxidative stress in determining the imbalance between protein synthesis and degradation leading to muscle atrophy in many pathological conditions and in disuse. However, a large variability in disuse-induced alteration of redox homeostasis through muscles, models and species emerges from the literature. Whereas the causal role of oxidative stress appears well established in the mechanical ventilation model, findings are less compelling in the hindlimb unloaded mice and very limited in humans. The mere coexistence of muscle atrophy, indirect indexes of increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and impairment of antioxidant defence systems, in fact, does not unequivocally support a causal role of oxidative stress in the phenomenon. We hypothesise that in some muscles, models and species only, due to a large redox imbalance, the leading phenomena are activation of proteolysis and massive oxidation of proteins, which would become more susceptible to degradation. In other conditions, due to a lower extent and variable time course of ROS production, different ROS-dependent, but also -independent intracellular pathways might dominate determining the variable extent of atrophy and even dispensable protein oxidation. The ROS production and removal are complex and finely tuned phenomena. They are indeed important intracellular signals and redox balance maintains normal muscle homeostasis and can underlie either positive or negative adaptations to exercise. A precise approach to determine the levels of ROS in living cells in various conditions appears to be of paramount importance to define and support such hypotheses. PMID:21320887

  12. Clinical case of dentato-rubro-pallido-luysian atrophy (DRPLA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katsube, Tomoko; Kobayashi, Shotai; Yamaguchi, Shuhei; Tsunematsu, Tokugoro; Shimada, Yasuo

    1987-06-01

    Dentato-rubro-pallido-luysian atrophy (DRPLA) has been described as an atypical type of spino-cerebellar degeneration by J.K. Smith (1958). Choreo-athetoid movement characterizes the DRPLA. We here report a case of DRPLA that was suspected from clinical symptoms and CT brain examinations. Case report: A 36-year-old man was admitted to the hospital because of involuntary movements of the extremities in July, 1978. He had epileptic seizures since the age of 25. Since then, his intelligence had gradually been getting worse. At the same time, dysarthria (slow and slurred speech) also appeared. The neurological examination on admission revealed choreo-athetoid movements, with ataxia of the extremities, trancal ataxia, ataxic speech, moderate dementia, and a disturbance of the smooth-pursuit eye movements. He could not maintain his eye position in a steady gaze, but nystagmus was absent. A brain CT scan revealed a marked atrophy of the upper brain stem and cerebellar peduncle. The cerebral atrophy was mild, and caudate nuclei were spared. The electroencephalograph showed a slow, diffuse, high-voltage wave, with an associated spike and waves. The cerebrospinal fluid examination was normal. An electrophysiological examination revealed no myoclonus in the extremities. These clinical findings suggested that this case is a pseudo-Huntington form of DRPLA.

  13. The pathogenesis and treatment of cardiac atrophy in cancer cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kate T

    2016-02-15

    Cancer cachexia is a multifactorial syndrome characterized by a progressive loss of skeletal muscle mass associated with significant functional impairment. In addition to a loss of skeletal muscle mass and function, many patients with cancer cachexia also experience cardiac atrophy, remodeling, and dysfunction, which in the field of cancer cachexia is described as cardiac cachexia. The cardiac alterations may be due to underlying heart disease, the cancer itself, or problems initiated by the cancer treatment and, unfortunately, remains largely underappreciated by clinicians and basic scientists. Despite recent major advances in the treatment of cancer, little progress has been made in the treatment of cardiac cachexia in cancer, and much of this is due to lack of information regarding the mechanisms. This review focuses on the cardiac atrophy associated with cancer cachexia, describing some of the known mechanisms and discussing the current and future therapeutic strategies to treat this condition. Above all else, improved awareness of the condition and an increased focus on identification of mechanisms and therapeutic targets will facilitate the eventual development of an effective treatment for cardiac atrophy in cancer cachexia. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Excessive fatty acid oxidation induces muscle atrophy in cancer cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukawa, Tomoya; Yan-Jiang, Benjamin Chua; Min-Wen, Jason Chua; Jun-Hao, Elwin Tan; Huang, Dan; Qian, Chao-Nan; Ong, Pauline; Li, Zhimei; Chen, Shuwen; Mak, Shi Ya; Lim, Wan Jun; Kanayama, Hiro-Omi; Mohan, Rosmin Elsa; Wang, Ruiqi Rachel; Lai, Jiunn Herng; Chua, Clarinda; Ong, Hock Soo; Tan, Ker-Kan; Ho, Ying Swan; Tan, Iain Beehuat; Teh, Bin Tean; Shyh-Chang, Ng

    2016-06-01

    Cachexia is a devastating muscle-wasting syndrome that occurs in patients who have chronic diseases. It is most commonly observed in individuals with advanced cancer, presenting in 80% of these patients, and it is one of the primary causes of morbidity and mortality associated with cancer. Additionally, although many people with cachexia show hypermetabolism, the causative role of metabolism in muscle atrophy has been unclear. To understand the molecular basis of cachexia-associated muscle atrophy, it is necessary to develop accurate models of the condition. By using transcriptomics and cytokine profiling of human muscle stem cell-based models and human cancer-induced cachexia models in mice, we found that cachectic cancer cells secreted many inflammatory factors that rapidly led to high levels of fatty acid metabolism and to the activation of a p38 stress-response signature in skeletal muscles, before manifestation of cachectic muscle atrophy occurred. Metabolomics profiling revealed that factors secreted by cachectic cancer cells rapidly induce excessive fatty acid oxidation in human myotubes, which leads to oxidative stress, p38 activation and impaired muscle growth. Pharmacological blockade of fatty acid oxidation not only rescued human myotubes, but also improved muscle mass and body weight in cancer cachexia models in vivo. Therefore, fatty acid-induced oxidative stress could be targeted to prevent cancer-induced cachexia.

  15. Religious factors and hippocampal atrophy in late life.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy D Owen

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite a growing interest in the ways spiritual beliefs and practices are reflected in brain activity, there have been relatively few studies using neuroimaging data to assess potential relationships between religious factors and structural neuroanatomy. This study examined prospective relationships between religious factors and hippocampal volume change using high-resolution MRI data of a sample of 268 older adults. Religious factors assessed included life-changing religious experiences, spiritual practices, and religious group membership. Hippocampal volumes were analyzed using the GRID program, which is based on a manual point-counting method and allows for semi-automated determination of region of interest volumes. Significantly greater hippocampal atrophy was observed for participants reporting a life-changing religious experience. Significantly greater hippocampal atrophy was also observed from baseline to final assessment among born-again Protestants, Catholics, and those with no religious affiliation, compared with Protestants not identifying as born-again. These associations were not explained by psychosocial or demographic factors, or baseline cerebral volume. Hippocampal volume has been linked to clinical outcomes, such as depression, dementia, and Alzheimer's Disease. The findings of this study indicate that hippocampal atrophy in late life may be uniquely influenced by certain types of religious factors.

  16. Muscle Atrophy at Presentation of Cubital Tunnel Syndrome: Demographics and Duration of Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Matthew L; Hensley, Dana T; Chen, Wei C; Taylor, Kenneth F

    2017-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study is to describe the demographics and duration of symptoms of patients with cubital tunnel syndrome who present with muscle atrophy. Methods: We identified 146 patients who presented to the hand surgery clinic at a single institution over a 5-year period with an initial diagnosis of cubital tunnel syndrome based on history and physical examination. Medical records were retrospectively reviewed to determine if there was a difference in demographic data, physical examination findings, and duration of symptoms in patients who presented with muscle atrophy from those with sensory complaints alone. Results: A total of 17/146 (11.6%) of patients presented with muscle atrophy, all of which were men. In all, 17.2% of men presented with atrophy. Age by itself was not a predictor of presentation with atrophy; however, younger patients with atrophy presented with significantly shorter duration of symptoms. Patients under the age of 29 years presenting with muscle atrophy on average had symptoms for 2.4 months compared with 16.2 months of symptoms for those over 55 years of age. Conclusions: Men with cubital tunnel syndrome are more likely to present with muscle atrophy than women. Age is not necessarily a predictor of presentation with atrophy. There is a subset population of younger patients who presents with extremely short duration of symptoms that rapidly develops muscle atrophy.

  17. Feasibility of the Medial Temporal lobe Atrophy index (MTAi and derived methods for measuring atrophy of the medial temporal lobe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco eConejo Bayón

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: the Medial Temporal-lobe Atrophy index (MTAi, 2D-Medial Temporal Atrophy (2D-MTA, yearly rate of MTA (yrRMTA and yearly rate of relative MTA (yrRMTA are simple protocols for measuring the relative extent of atrophy in the MTL in relation to the global brain atrophy. Albeit preliminary studies showed interest of these methods in the diagnosis of AD, FTLD and correlation with cognitive impairment in PD, formal feasibility and validity studies remained pending. As a first step, we aimed to assess the feasibility. Mainly, we aimed to assess the reproducibility of measuring the areas needed to compute these indices. We also aimed to assess the efforts needed to start using these methods correctly. Methods: a series of 290 1.5T-MRI studies from 230 subjects ranging 65-85 years old who had been studied for cognitive impairment were used in this study. Six inexperienced tracers (IT plus one experienced tracer (ET traced the three areas needed to compute the indices. Finally, tracers underwent a short survey on their experience learning to compute the MTAi and experience of usage, including items relative to training time needed to understand and apply the MTAi, time to perform a study after training and overall satisfaction. Results: learning to trace the areas needed to compute the MTAi and derived methods is quick and easy. Results indicate very good intrarater ICC for the MTAi, good intrarater ICC for the 2D-MTA, yrMTA and yrRMTA and also good interrater ICC for the MTAi, 2D-MTA, yrMTA and yrRMTA.Conclusion: our data support that MTAi and derived methods (2D-MTA, yrMTA and yrRTMA have good to very good intrarater and interrater reproducibility and may be easily implemented in clinical practice even if new users have no experience tracing the area of regions of interest.

  18. Inflammatory atrophy on prostate needle biopsies: is there topographic relationship to cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanase Billis

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Chronic inflammation of longstanding duration has been linked to the development of carcinoma in several organ systems. It is controversial whether there is any relationship of inflammatory atrophy to prostate cancer. It has been suggested that the proliferative epithelium in inflammatory atrophy may progress to high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia and/or adenocarcinoma. The objective of our study is to compare on needle prostate biopsies of patients showing cancer the topographical relation of inflammatory atrophy and atrophy with no inflammation to adenocarcinoma. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The frequency and extent of the lesions were studied on 172 needle biopsies of patients with prostate cancer. In cores showing both lesions, the foci of atrophy were counted. Clinicopathological features were compared according to presence or absence of inflammation. RESULTS: Considering only cores showing adenocarcinoma, atrophy was seen in 116/172 (67.44% biopsies; 70/116 (60.34% biopsies showed atrophy and no inflammation and 46/116 (39.66% biopsies showed inflammatory atrophy. From a total of 481 cores in 72 biopsies with inflammatory atrophy 184/481 (38.25% cores showed no atrophy; 166/481 (34.51% cores showed atrophy and no inflammation; 111/481 (23.08% cores showed both lesions; and 20/481 (4.16% showed only inflammatory atrophy. There was no statistically significant difference for the clinicopathological features studied. CONCLUSION: The result of our study seems not to favor the model of prostatic carcinogenesis in which there is a topographical relation of inflammatory atrophy to adenocarcinoma.

  19. Sporadic diffuse segmental interstitial cell of Cajal hyperplasia harbouring two gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST mimicking hereditary GIST syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mafalda Costa Neves

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: We describe a diffuse form of sporadic ICC hyperplasia harbouring multifocal GISTs, mimicking diffuse ICC hyperplasia in hereditary GIST syndromes. Detection of somatic c-KIT exon 11 mutation ruled out a hereditary disorder.

  20. Atypical Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy: 18 Year Interval Between Eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohden, Kaitlyn L; Tang, Peter H; Lilley, Chrystia C; Lee, Michael S

    2016-09-01

    A 5-year-old boy developed profound loss of vision in his right eye and was found to have a 11778 mitochondrial point mutation consistent with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). He maintained 20/20 vision in the left eye for 18 years until age 23, when he experienced loss of vision in that eye. This 18 year interval between eye involvement in LHON is the longest reported to date and reinforces the variability in presentation and progression seen in this disease.