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Sample records for hereditary cardiac diseases

  1. [Hereditary kidney diseases in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan-qin; Ding, Jie; Wang, Fang; Zhang, Hong-wen

    2013-04-18

    About 10 to 15 percent of kidney diseases are inherited or related to genetic factors. While, hereditary kidney diseases have no specific clinical manifestations and react poorly to the therapy, as a result, about 30 percent of hospitalized children with chronic renal failure is due to hereditary kidney diseases in our country. Hereditary kidney diseases are related to many genes. Molecular genetic analysis plays an important role in the diagnosis and prenatal diagnosis of hereditary kidney diseases. Our group have made a series of research in hereditary kidney diseases for nearly 30 years. Here we review the research work and the main results in hereditary kidney diseases of our group.

  2. [Hereditary systemic autoinflammatory diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aróstegui, Juan I

    2011-01-01

    Systemic autoinflammatory diseases encompass different rare clinical entities characterized by recurrent acute inflammatory episodes secondary to a dysregulated inflammatory process. Since their first clinical descriptions, the Mendelian hereditary nature of some of them became evident, with their genetic and molecular basis being recently elucidated. There are disease-causing mutations in genes encoding for different proteins involved in the innate immune response and inflammation. Herein, we will introduce the reader to an updated review of the main clinical, physiopathological and therapeutic features of the different hereditary systemic autoinflammatory diseases. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  3. Hereditary Renal Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Lakshmi; Jim, Belinda

    2017-07-01

    Hereditary kidney disease comprises approximately 10% of adults and nearly all children who require renal replacement therapy. Technologic advances have improved our ability to perform genetic diagnosis and enhanced our understanding of renal and syndromic diseases. In this article, we review the genetics of renal diseases, including common monogenic diseases such as polycystic kidney disease, Alport syndrome, and Fabry disease, as well as complex disorders such as congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract. We provide the nephrologist with a general strategy to approach hereditary disorders, which includes a discussion of commonly used genetic tests, a guide to genetic counseling, and reproductive options such as prenatal diagnosis or pre-implantation genetic diagnosis for at-risk couples. Finally, we review pregnancy outcomes in certain renal diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Hereditary neuromuscular diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oezsarlak, O. E-mail: ozkan.ozsarlak@uza.be; Schepens, E.; Parizel, P.M.; Goethem, J.W. van; Vanhoenacker, F.; Schepper, A.M. de; Martin, J.J

    2001-12-01

    This article presents the actual classification of neuromuscular diseases based on present expansion of our knowledge and understanding due to genetic developments. It summarizes the genetic and clinical presentations of each disorder together with CT findings, which we studied in a large group of patients with neuromuscular diseases. The muscular dystrophies as the largest and most common group of hereditary muscle diseases will be highlighted by giving detailed information about the role of CT and MRI in the differential diagnosis. The radiological features of neuromuscular diseases are atrophy, hypertrophy, pseudohypertrophy and fatty infiltration of muscles on a selective basis. Although the patterns and distribution of involvement are characteristic in some of the diseases, the definition of the type of disease based on CT scan only is not always possible.

  5. Fasciculations in human hereditary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterer, Josef; Aliyev, Rahim

    2015-06-01

    Fasciculations are a manifestation of peripheral nerve hyperexcitability in addition to myokymia, neuromyotonia, cramps, or tetany. Fasciculations occur in hereditary and non-hereditary diseases. Among the hereditary diseases, fasciculations are most frequently reported in familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS), and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). Among the non-hereditary diseases, fasciculations occur most frequently in peripheral nerve hyperexcitability syndromes (Isaac's syndrome, voltage-gated potassium channelopathy, cramp fasciculation syndrome, Morvan syndrome). If the cause of fasciculations remains unknown, they are called benign. Systematically reviewing the literature about fasciculations in hereditary disease shows that fasciculations can be a phenotypic feature in bulbospinal muscular atrophy (BSMA), GM2-gangliosidosis, triple-A syndrome, or hereditary neuropathy. Additionally, fasciculations have been reported in familial amyloidosis, spinocerebellar ataxias, Huntington's disease, Rett syndrome, central nervous system disease due to L1-cell adhesion molecule (L1CAM) mutations, Fabry's disease, or Gerstmann-Sträussler disease. Rarely, fasciculations may be a phenotypic feature in patients with mitochondrial disorders or other myopathies. Fasciculations are part of the phenotype in much more genetic disorders than commonly assumed. Fasciculations not only occur in motor neuron disease, but also in hereditary neuropathy, spinocerebellar ataxia, GM2-gangliosidosis, Huntington's disease, Rett syndrome, Fabry's disease, Gerstmann-Sträussler disease, mitochondrial disorders, or muscular dystrophies.

  6. [Peroxisomal hereditary diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandoga, J; Tomková, M; Hlavatá, A

    1997-01-01

    Nearly two tens of diseases are known to be caused by impairment of several metabolic functions of peroxisomes, or by deficiency in individual peroxisomal enzymes. With the exception of X-bound adrenoleukodystrophy, all diseases are based on autosomally recessive type of inheritance and a majority of them are characteristic by specific neurologic symptoms. The group of diseases in which patients develop a generalised loss of peroxisomal functions includes: Zellweger's cerebro-hepato-renal syndrome, neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy, infantile Refsum's disease, hyperpipecolic acidaemia. Other diseases, such as rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata and Zellweger-like syndrome are accompanied by a deficiency in several enzymatic activities. X-bound adrenoleukodystrophy, pseudo-Zellweger's syndrome, hyperoxaluria 1, adult form of Refsum's disease and acatalasaemia are peroxisomal diseases with a deficiency of a single enzyme. In clinically most severe diseases (generalised loss of peroxisomal functions), the impairment of peroxisomal biogenesis is caused assumedly due to the defect in some of the peroxisomal membrane proteins. The biochemical findings are brought about by insufficiency in such metabolic functions as oxidation of fatty acids with very long chains, oxidation of the phytanic and pipecolic acids, synthesis of cholesterol, bile salts and plasmalogenes. Rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata and Zellweger's syndrome are more moderate forms which are dominantly biochemically manifestant by an impairment in the synthesis of plasmalogenes. Among the diseases characterised by a deficiency in individual peroxisomal enzymes, most frequent is the X-bound andrenoleukodystrophy which has several clinical phenotypes manifestant in childhood, as well as a clinically less severe form manifestant in adulthood-adrenomyeloneuropathy. The diagnosis of peroxisomal diseases is performed by use of a wide range of methods (morphological, biochemical, immunochemical and molecular

  7. Hereditary cerebral small vessel disease and stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Christian Baastrup; Nielsen, Jørgen Erik; Hansen, Christine Krarup

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease is considered hereditary in about 5% of patients and is characterized by lacunar infarcts and white matter hyperintensities on MRI. Several monogenic hereditary diseases causing cerebral small vessel disease and stroke have been identified. The purpose of this system...

  8. The molecular classification of hereditary endocrine diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Lei; Ning, Guang

    2015-12-01

    Hereditary endocrine diseases are an important group of diseases with great heterogeneity. The current classification for hereditary endocrine disease is mostly based upon anatomy, which is helpful for pathophysiological interpretation, but does not address the pathogenic variability associated with different underlying genetic causes. Identification of an endocrinopathy-associated genetic alteration provides evidence for differential diagnosis, discovery of non-classical disease, and the potential for earlier diagnosis and targeted therapy. Molecular diagnosis should be routinely applied when managing patients with suspicion of hereditary disease. To enhance the accurate diagnosis and treatment of patients with hereditary endocrine diseases, we propose categorization of endocrine diseases into three groups based upon the function of the mutant gene: cell differentiation, hormone synthesis and action, and tumorigenesis. Each category was further grouped according to the specific gene function. We believe that this format would facilitate practice of precision medicine in the field of hereditary endocrine diseases.

  9. Cardiac Dysautonomia in Huntington's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abildtrup, Mads; Shattock, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Huntington's disease is a fatal, hereditary, neurodegenerative disorder best known for its clinical triad of progressive motor impairment, cognitive deficits and psychiatric disturbances. Although a disease of the central nervous system, mortality surveys indicate that heart disease is a leading cause of death. The nature of such cardiac abnormalities remains unknown. Clinical findings indicate a high prevalence of autonomic nervous system dysfunction - dysautonomia - which may be a result of pathology of the central autonomic network. Dysautonomia can have profound effects on cardiac health, and pronounced autonomic dysfunction can be associated with neurogenic arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. Significant advances in the knowledge of neural mechanisms in cardiac disease have recently been made which further aid our understanding of cardiac mortality in Huntington's disease. Even so, despite the evidence of aberrant autonomic activity the potential cardiac consequences of autonomic dysfunction have been somewhat ignored. In fact, underlying cardiac abnormalities such as arrhythmias have been part of the exclusion criteria in clinical autonomic Huntington's disease research. A comprehensive analysis of cardiac function in Huntington's disease patients is warranted. Further experimental and clinical studies are needed to clarify how the autonomic nervous system is controlled and regulated in higher, central areas of the brain - and how these regions may be altered in neurological pathology, such as Huntington's disease. Ultimately, research will hopefully result in an improvement of management with the aim of preventing early death in Huntington's disease from cardiac causes.

  10. The influence of coping styles and perceived control on emotional distress in persons at risk for a hereditary heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoedemaekers, Ehy; Jaspers, Jan P. C.; Van Tintelen, J. Peter

    2007-01-01

    This prospective study investigates the influence of two coping styles (monitoring and blunting) and perceived control (health loci-is of control and mastery) on emotional distress in persons at risk of a hereditary cardiac disease. Emotional distress in people at risk for a hereditary cardiac

  11. [Quality control of DNA testing in hereditary diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouweland, A.M.W. van den; Scheffer, H.

    2001-01-01

    The laboratories performing diagnostic studies regarding hereditary diseases and the specialists providing hereditary counselling are housed in clinical genetic centres. The laboratories are subject to the Special Medical Performances Act and have had licenses from the Ministry. The DNA diagnostic

  12. Hereditary cerebral small vessel disease and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søndergaard, Christian Baastrup; Nielsen, Jørgen Erik; Hansen, Christine Krarup; Christensen, Hanne

    2017-04-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease is considered hereditary in about 5% of patients and is characterized by lacunar infarcts and white matter hyperintensities on MRI. Several monogenic hereditary diseases causing cerebral small vessel disease and stroke have been identified. The purpose of this systematic review is to provide a guide for determining when to consider molecular genetic testing in patients presenting with small vessel disease and stroke. CADASIL, CARASIL, collagen type IV mutations (including PADMAL), retinal vasculopathy with cerebral leukodystrophy, Fabry disease, hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis, and forkhead box C1 mutations are described in terms of genetics, pathology, clinical manifestation, imaging, and diagnosis. These monogenic disorders are often characterized by early-age stroke, but also by migraine, mood disturbances, vascular dementia and often gait disturbances. Some also present with extra-cerebral manifestations such as microangiopathy of the eyes and kidneys. Many present with clinically recognizable syndromes. Investigations include a thorough family medical history, medical history, neurological examination, neuroimaging, often supplemented by specific examinations e.g of the of vision, retinal changes, as well as kidney and heart function. However molecular genetic analysis is the final gold standard of diagnosis. There are increasing numbers of reports on new monogenic syndromes causing cerebral small vessel disease. Genetic counseling is important. Enzyme replacement therapy is possible in Fabry disease, but treatment options remain overall very limited. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Nuclear matrix proteins and hereditary diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjakste, N; Sjakste, T

    2005-03-01

    The review summarizes literature data on alterations of structure or expression of different nuclear matrix proteins in hereditary syndromes. From the point of view of involvement of nuclear matrix proteins in etiology and pathogenesis of the disease hereditary pathologies can be classified in pathologies with pathogenesis associated with defects of nuclear matrix proteins and pathologies associated to changes of the nuclear matrix protein spectrum. The first group includes laminopathies, hereditary diseases with abnormal nuclear-matrix associated proteins and triplet extension diseases associated with accumulation of abnormal proteins in the nuclear matrix. Laminopathies are hereditary diseases coupled to structural defects of the nuclear lamina. These diseases include Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy, limb girdle muscular dystrophy, dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) with conduction system disease, familial partial lipodystrophy (FPLD), autosomal recessive axonal neuropathy (Charcot-Marie-Tooth disorder type 2, CMT2), mandibuloacral dysplasia (MAD), Hutchison Gilford Progeria syndrome (HGS), Greenberg Skeletal Dysplasia, and Pelger-Huet anomaly (PHA). Most of them are due to mutations in the lamin A/C gene, one - to mutations in emerin gene, some are associated with mutations in Lamin B receptor gene. In Werner's, Bloom's, Cockayne's syndromes, Fanconi anemia, multiple carboxylase deficiency mutations in nuclear matrix protein or enzyme gene lead to deficient DNA repair, abnormal regulation of cell growth and differentiation or other specific metabolic functions. Proteins with a long polyglutamic tract synthesized in the cells of patients with dentato-rubral and pallido-luysian atrophy, myotonic dystrophy and Huntington disease interfere with transcription on the nuclear matrix. Down's syndrome is a representative of the group of diseases with altered nuclear matrix protein spectrum.

  14. Disease expression in women with hereditary angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouillet, Laurence; Longhurst, Hilary; Boccon-Gibod, Isabelle

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Fluctuations in sex hormones can trigger angioedema attacks in women with hereditary angioedema. Combined oral contraceptive therapies, as well as pregnancy, can induce severe attacks. The course of angioedema may be very variable in different women. STUDY DESIGN: Within the PREHAEAT...... project launched by the European Union, data on 150 postpubertal women with hereditary angioedema were collected in 8 countries, using a patient-based questionnaire. RESULTS: Puberty worsened the disease for 62%. Combined oral contraceptives worsened the disease for 79%, whereas progestogen-only pills...... improved it for 64%. During pregnancies, 38% of women had more attacks, but 30% had fewer attacks. Vaginal delivery was usually uncomplicated. Attacks occurred within 48 hours in only 6% of cases. Those more severely affected during menses had more symptoms during pregnancies, suggesting a hormone...

  15. Next generation sequencing for molecular confirmation of hereditary sudden cardiac death syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez, Manlio F; Cruz-Robles, David; Ines-Real, Selene; Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Cárdenas, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary sudden cardiac death syndromes comprise a wide range of diseases resulting from alteration in cardiac ion channels. Genes involved in these syndromes represent diverse mutations that cause the altered encoding of the diverse proteins constituting these channels, thus affecting directly the currents of the corresponding ions. In the present article we will briefly review how to arrive to a clinical diagnosis and we will present the results of molecular genetic studies made in Mexican subjects attending the SCD Syndromes Clinic of the National Institute of Cardiology of Mexico City. Copyright © 2014 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  16. Genetics of hereditary large vessel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morisaki, Takayuki; Morisaki, Hiroko

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress in the study of hereditary large vessel diseases such as Marfan syndrome (MFS) have not only identified responsible genes but also provided better understanding of the pathophysiology and revealed possible new therapeutic targets. Genes identified for these diseases include FBN1, TGFBR1, TGFBR2, SMAD3, TGFB2, TGFB3, SKI, EFEMP2, COL3A1, FLNA, ACTA2, MYH11, MYLK and SLC2A10, as well as others. Their dysfunction disrupts the function of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling pathways, as well as that of the extracellular matrix and smooth muscle contractile apparatus, resulting in progression of structural damage to large vessels, including aortic aneurysms and dissections. Notably, it has been shown that the TGF-β signaling pathway has a key role in the pathogenesis of MFS and related disorders, which may be important for development of strategies for medical and surgical treatment of thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections.

  17. Pregnancy and cardiac disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diagnosing cardiac disease. History and examination. Many disorders can be identified by a clinical examination and a patient's history, but in the majority, if not all cases, an echocardiogram is required to confirm clinical suspicions. ARTICLE. Pregnancy and cardiac disease. C Elliott,1 MB ChB, FCOG (SA), MMed; K Sliwa ...

  18. Cardiac arrest after anesthetic management in a patient with hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy type IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ergül Yakup

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy type IV is a rare disorder with an autosomal recessive transmission and characterized by self-mutilation due to a lack in pain and heat sensation. Recurrent hyperpyrexia and anhydrosis are seen in patients as a result of a lack of sweat gland innervation. Self-mutilation and insensitivity to pain result in orthopedic complications and patients undergone recurrent surgical interventions with anesthesia. However, these patients are prone to perioperative complications such as hyperthermia, hypothermia, and cardiac complications like bradycardia and hypotension. We report a 5-year-old boy with hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy type IV, developing hyperpyrexia and cardiac arrest after anesthesia.

  19. Incidence of cardiac arrhythmias in asymptomatic hereditary hemochromatosis subjects with C282Y homozygosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shizukuda, Yukitaka; Tripodi, Dorothy J; Zalos, Gloria; Bolan, Charles D; Yau, Yu-Ying; Leitman, Susan F; Waclawiw, Myron A; Rosing, Douglas R

    2012-03-15

    It is not well known whether systemic iron overload per se in hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is associated with cardiac arrhythmias before other signs and symptoms of cardiovascular disease occur. In the present study, we examined the incidence of cardiac arrhythmia in cardiac asymptomatic subjects with HH (New York Heart Association functional class I) and compared it to that in age- and gender-matched normal volunteers. The 42 subjects with HH and the 19 normal control subjects were recruited through the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute-sponsored "Heart Study of Hemochromatosis." They completed 48-hour Holter electrocardiography ambulatory monitoring at the baseline evaluation. The subjects with HH were classified as newly diagnosed (group A) and chronically treated (group B) subjects. All subjects with HH had C282Y homozygosity, and the normal volunteers lacked any HFE gene mutations known to cause HH. Although statistically insignificant, the incidence of ventricular and supraventricular ectopy tended to be greater in the combined HH groups than in the controls. Supraventricular ectopy was more frequently noted in group B compared to in the controls (ectopy rate per hour 11.1 ± 29.9 vs 1.5 ± 3.5, p cardiac arrhythmias was not significantly reduced after 6 months of intensive iron removal therapy in the group A subjects. No life-threatening arrhythmias were observed in our subjects with HH. In conclusion, our data suggest that the incidence of cardiac arrhythmias is, at most, marginally increased in asymptomatic subjects with HH. A larger clinical study is warranted to further clarify our observation. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. [Significance of ophthalmological imaging in common hereditary retinal diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortüm, K; Kernt, M; Reznicek, L

    2013-03-01

    Over the past years, a significant progress in genetic, functional and imaging diagnostics in hereditary retinal diseases has been made. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) as well as fundus autofluorescence (FAF) allow for high-resolution, non-invasive imaging - from various perspectives - of retinal and choroidal layers of the posterior fundus. Both techniques have gained more and more significance in the diagnosis of hereditary retinal diseases. Of all patients presented in this review, extensive family history was taken and a clinical ophthalmological examination performed. OCT scans as well as FAF images were acquired and compared to results of other functional and molecular genetic tests in the context of each disease. The presented cases in this review addressing hereditary retinal diseases (Best's disease, Stargardt's disease, cone-rod dystrophy, retinitis pigmentosa, achromatopsia, and X-linked retinoschisis) show the significance of ophthalmic imaging (OCT + FAF) for a targeted diagnosis of hereditary retinal diseases. The described imaging techniques (OCT + FAF) are becoming more and more important in the diagnosis of hereditary retinal diseases. Due to increasing availability of the devices, earlier detection of typical morphological changes not seen in clinical fundoscopy is feasible. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Hereditary hemochromatosis and risk of ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellervik, Christina; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Grande, Peer

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We tested the hypothesis that the hereditary hemochromatosis genotypes C282Y/C282Y, C282Y/H63D, or C282Y/wild-type are risk factors for ischemic heart disease (IHD) and myocardial infarction (MI). METHODS AND RESULTS: We performed a prospective study of 9178 individuals from the Danish...

  2. [Frequency of hereditary neurologic diseases. A clinical study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, M; Baldini, S; Voltolin, G; Norat, M; Bottacchi, E

    1993-09-01

    The nervous system is affected in 30% of hereditary monogenic disorders and as many as 500 single-gene disorders display major neurologic symptoms. We have studied the frequency of hereditary neurological diseases to assess their importance in daily hospital activity. Only single-gene hereditary diseases with central or peripheral nervous system involvement were considered; thus chromosomal diseases and diseases with multifactorial etiology were excluded. We surveyed admission to in- and out-patient departments of Neurology, Pediatrics, and Dermatology of the Aosta Regional Hospital for the calendar years 1982-1991, collecting 229 cases, 95 women and 134 men. Out-patient departments held 126 patients, the others came from in-patient departments. Admission to the neurological in-patient department were 1.8% of total neurological admissions in the same period. Each diagnosis was assigned to the code number of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-IX Revision, 1975). We found 33 different phenotypes. Most frequent diagnoses were: essential tremor (89 patients), hereditary sensory-motor neuropathy (HSMN) type I (28), Huntington's chorea (13), progressive muscular dystrophy limb-girdle type (8), neurofibromatosis type I (9), HSMN type II (9), spinocerebellar ataxia (9), hereditary spastic paraplegia (7), spinal muscular atrophy type IV (5), myotonic dystrophy (5), cerebellar ataxia (4), HSMN type III (4), spinal muscular atrophy type II and III (3), tuberous sclerosis (3). Essential tremor mostly affected persons in the over-50 age groups. On the contrary, the other neurologic monogenic diseases were diagnosed in all ages with the following age-group breakdown: 0-9, 11%; 10-19, 16%; 20-29, 15%; 30-39, 8%; 40-49, 11%; 50-59, 19%; 60-69, 14%, 70+, 7%. Consistently with the general rule, autosomic recessive diseases have the earliest onset and autosomic dominant ones the latest; HSMN, spinal muscular atrophy and Huntington's chorea were the disorders diagnosed

  3. Hereditary Parkinson s Disease Natural History Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-18

    Parkinson Disease 6, Early-Onset; Parkinson Disease (Autosomal Recessive, Early Onset) 7, Human; Parkinson Disease Autosomal Recessive, Early Onset; Parkinson Disease, Autosomal Recessive Early-Onset, Digenic, Pink1/Dj1

  4. [Complex hereditary diseases with psychiatric symptoms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetterberg, L

    1999-02-28

    Family and adoption studies indicate that genetic factors play a role in the development of many psychiatric disorders. A variable number of possible interacting genes giving a predisposition to the diseases is likely. The genetic dissection has been hampered by genetic complexity as well as by difficulties in defining the phenotypes. Genetic mapping efforts using sib pairs, twins and individual large families have revealed preliminary or tentative evidence of susceptibility loci for a number of psychiatric disorders. Illnesses described in this article include the prion disease familial fatal insomnia (FFI), alcoholism, anorexia nervosa, autism, bipolar affective disorder, dyslexia, enuresis nocturna, epilepsia, obsessive-compulsive disorders (OCD), schizophrenia, and the dementias, Alzheimer's disease and frontal lobe dementia. The genes and proteins related to the newly discovered transmitter in the central nervous system, nitric oxide (NO), and its genes and proteins are also reviewed. The number of mapped human genes now exceeds 30,000 of the estimated total number of 60,000 to 100,000 genes. This rapid development will facilitate gene mapping and efforts to isolate and identify the genes responsible for symptom susceptibility in many of the aetiologically unclear psychiatric diseases with complex genetic origin.

  5. Hereditary kidney diseases: highlighting the importance of classical Mendelian phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Geneviève; Machuca, Eduardo; Heidet, Laurence; Antignac, Corinne

    2010-12-01

    A Mendelian inheritance underlies a nonnegligible proportion of hereditary kidney diseases, suggesting that the encoded proteins are essential for maintenance of the renal function. The identification of genes involved in congenital anomalies of the kidney and in familial forms of nephrotic syndrome significantly increased our understanding of the renal development and kidney filtration barrier physiology. This review will focus on the classical phenotype and clinical heterogeneity observed in the monogenic forms of these disorders. In addition, the role of susceptibility genes in kidney diseases with a complex inheritance will also be discussed. © 2010 New York Academy of Sciences.

  6. Moyamoya disease in a patient with hereditary spherocytosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holz, A.; Woldenberg, R.; Miller, D.; Kalina, P.; Black, K.; Lane, E. [Department of Radiology, North Shore University Hospital, New York University School of Medicine, 300 Community Drive, Manhasset, NY 11030 (United States)

    1998-02-01

    Moyamoya disease (MMD) is a rare cerebral vasculopathy characterized by occlusion of the supraclinoid portion of the internal carotid artery and proximal portions of the anterior and middle cerebral arteries. Patients develop an extensive collateral network of parenchymal, transdural and leptomeningeal vessels to supply the compromised brain. These collateral channels, also known as ``moyamoya vessels,`` may be seen in a number of disorders which lead to intracranial vascular occlusion. We report a case of MMD in a child with hereditary spherocytosis. (orig.) With 4 figs., 5 refs.

  7. Machado-Joseph disease versus hereditary spastic paraplegia: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teive Hélio A. Ghizoni

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Machado-Joseph disease (MJD is the most common autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia and presents great phenotypic variability. MJD presenting with spastic paraparesis was recently described in Japanese patients. We report the case of 41-year-old woman with the phenotype of complicated hereditary spastic paraplegia. Her father died at the age of 56 years due to an undiagnosed progressive neurological disease that presented parkinsonism. She had an expanded allele with 66 CAG repeats and a normal allele with 22 repeats in the gene of MJD. MJD should be considered in the differential diagnosis of autosomal dominant complicated HSP. A patient with the phenotype of complicated HSP and relatives with other clinical features of a neurodegenerative disease should raise the suspicion of MJD.

  8. [Gene therapy for hereditary ophthalmological diseases: Advances and future perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacón-Camacho, Óscar Francisco; Astorga-Carballo, Aline; Zenteno, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Gene therapy is a promising new therapeutic strategy that could provide a novel and more effective way of targeting hereditary ophthalmological diseases. The eye is easily accessible, highly compartmentalized, and an immune-privileged organ that gives advantages as an ideal gene therapy target. Recently, important advances in the availability of various intraocular vector delivery routes and viral vectors that are able to efficiently transduce specific ocular cell types have been described. Gene therapy has advanced in some retinal inherited dystrophies; in this way, preliminary success is now being reported for the treatment of Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA). This review will provide an update in the field of gene therapy for the treatment of ocular inherited diseases.

  9. [Epidemiology of monogenic hereditary diseases in Rostov oblast: population dynamic factors determining the differentiation of the load of hereditary diseases in eight districts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinchenko, R A; Amelina, S S; Shokarev, R A; Val'kov, R A; Val'kova, T I; Vetrova, N V; Kriventsova, N V; El'chinova, G I; Petrova, N V; Khlebnikova, O V

    2009-04-01

    Analysis of the diversity of monogenic hereditary diseases in eight raions (districts) of Rostov oblast (region) of Russia (Tsimlyansk, Volgodonskoi, Tselina, Egorlykskaya, Millerovo, Tarasovskaya, Rodionovo-Nesvetaiskaya, and Matveevo-Kurgan raions) has been summarized. The total sample size was 320925 subjects. The spectrum of hereditary diseases detected in the eight districts comprises 187 diseases, including 99 autosomal dominant (AD), 72 autosomal recessive (AR), and 16 X-linked diseases. The mean prevalence rate of each disease in the total population has been calculated. Accumulation of individual diseases in different regions of Rostov oblast has been calculated; the disease accumulation has been compared with that in some populations of Russia examined earlier. Cluster analysis using the data on the frequencies of genes of hereditary diseases has shown the gene geographic position of the Rostov oblast population among the following ethnic populations of Russia: Russians (Kostroma, Kirov, and Rostov oblasts and Krasnodar krai), Chuvashes (Chuvashia), Adygeans (Adygea), Maris (Marii El), and Udmurts (Udmurtia).

  10. Association of celiac disease and hereditary angioedema due to C1-inhibitor deficiency. Screening patients with hereditary angioedema for celiac disease: is it worth the effort?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csuka, Dorottya; Kelemen, Zsuzsanna; Czaller, Ibolya; Molnár, Katalin; Füst, George; Varga, Lilian; Rajczy, Katalin; Szabó, Zsófia; Miklós, Kata; Bors, András; Farkas, Henriette

    2011-03-01

    Hereditary angioedema due to C1-inhibitor deficiency is a life-threatening condition, which manifests as edematous attacks involving subcutaneous tissues and/or the upper airway/gastrointestinal mucosa. Celiac disease is a gluten-sensitive small intestinal disorder that can lead to severe villous atrophy, malabsorption, and malignancy. Both hereditary angioedema and celiac disease may present with abdominal symptoms. Our aim was to study the occurrence of celiac disease in the hereditary angioedema population, as well as to analyze the clinical course of cases with both diseases. One hundred and twenty-eight patients with hereditary angioedema were screened for celiac disease, using serological methods [antiendomysial antibodies-immunoglobulin A (IgA), antiendomysial antibodies-IgG and tissue transglutaminase-IgA, tissue transglutaminase-IgG]. Clinical data of a child with hereditary angioedema and celiac disease diagnosed earlier were added to the dataset to be analyzed. Thus, the total number of patients was 129, comprising 107 adults and 22 pediatric patients. In patients with celiac disease, molecular genetics analysis (human leukocyte antigen-DQA1, human leukocyte antigen-DQB1) was carried out along with the introduction of a gluten-free diet and regular follow-up. Four out of the 22 children were diagnosed with celiac disease in our hereditary angioedema population. The prevalence of celiac disease among our pediatric patients with hereditary angioedema (22 children) was higher than in the general population (18.1 vs. 1.2%). Switching from the wheat starch-containing tranexamic acid product to danazol and introducing a gluten-free diet mitigated abdominal symptoms of hereditary angioedema. Similarities between the symptoms of hereditary angioedema and celiac disease may cause difficulties in differential diagnosis, as well as in choosing the appropriate therapy. In our opinion, screening hereditary angioedema patients for celiac disease is warranted if

  11. [Application of whole exome sequencing in the diagnosis of hereditary neurological diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilinsky, V V; Korneeva, V A; Shatalov, P A

    2015-01-01

    Whole Exome Sequencing (WES) is a promising method in human genetics. Because the majority of pathogenic mutations that lead to the development of diseases are localized in exons and splice sites, WES could become a major tool for the diagnosis of diseases with a complex hereditary nature. This tool appears to be particularly useful for hereditary neurological diseases, such as autism spectrum disorders, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease and others. In our review, we discuss the clinical application of WES, with special emphasis on the diagnosis of hereditary neurological diseases.

  12. Depressive symptoms associated with hereditary Alzheimer's disease: a case description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Mónica Yicette Sánchez; Vargas, Paula Alejandra Osorio; Ramos, Lucero Rengifo; Velandia, Rafael Alarcón

    The authors describe a family group studied by the Centro de Biología Molecular y Biotecnología, and the Clínica de la Memoria, las Demencias y el Envejecimiento (Universidad Tecnológica de Pereira, Colombia), and evaluate the association of depressive symptoms with Alzheimer's disease (AD). This family presented a hereditary pattern for AD characterized by an early onset of dementia symptoms, a long preclinical depressive course, and, once the first symptoms of dementia appeared, a rapid progression to severe cognitive function impairment. The authors found a high prevalence of depressive symptoms in this family and propose that the symptoms could be an important risk factor for developing AD in the presence of other risk factors such as the APOE E4 allele.

  13. Hereditary fructose intolerance and celiac disease: a novel genetic association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciacci, Carolina; Gennarelli, Daniela; Esposito, Gabriella; Tortora, Raffaella; Salvatore, Francesco; Sacchetti, Lucia

    2006-05-01

    Celiac disease (CD) has been associated with several genetic disorders, but has not been associated with hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI). We identified CD in 4 female patients affected by HFI from among 38 Italian HFI patients. Three of these patients were children in whom the CD-associated signs were hypertransaminasemia, failure to thrive, low weight, and short stature, whereas the adult patient had protracted diarrhea notwithstanding a fructose-free diet. The incidence of CD in our group of HFI patients was higher (>10%) than in the general population (1%-3%) (P<.02). The possibility of an association between these 2 gastrointestinal disorders is important, particularly in the management of HFI patients with persisting symptoms.

  14. Hereditary interstitial lung diseases manifesting in early childhood in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akimoto, Takuma; Cho, Kazutoshi; Hayasaka, Itaru; Morioka, Keita; Kaneshi, Yosuke; Furuta, Itsuko; Yamada, Masafumi; Ariga, Tadashi; Minakami, Hisanori

    2014-11-01

    Genetic variations associated with interstitial lung diseases (ILD) have not been extensively studied in Japanese infants. Forty-three infants with unexplained lung dysfunction were studied. All 43, 22, and 17 infants underwent analyses of surfactant protein (SP)-C gene (SFTPC) and ATP-binding cassette A3 gene (ABCA3), SP-B gene (SFTPB), and SP-B western blotting, respectively. Two and four underwent assessment of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor-stimulating phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription-5 (pSTAT-5) and analyses of FOXF1 gene (FOXF1), respectively. ILD were diagnosed clinically in nine infants: four, three, and two had interstitial pneumonitis, hereditary pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (hPAP), and alveolar capillary dysplasia with misalignment of pulmonary veins (ACD/MPV), respectively. Genetic variations considered responsible were detected in six (67%) of the nine infants with ILD: three with hPAP (SFTPC p.Leu45Arg and p.Gln145fs, and ABCA3 p.Arg1583Trp/p.Val1495CysfsX21), two with interstitial pneumonitis (SFTPC p.Lys63Glu and p.Ser72Asn/p.Gly100Ala), and one with ACD/MPV (FOXF1 p.Leu300ArgfsX79). None showed SFTPB mutations or defects in pSTAT-5. The 17 bronchoalveolar lavage or tracheal aspirates contained enough SP-B protein. The SP-C abnormality was most prevalent, and SP-B deficiency was rare in Japanese infants with hereditary ILD.

  15. A web resource on DNA tests for canine and feline hereditary diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slutsky, Jeffrey; Raj, Karthik; Yuhnke, Scott; Bell, Jerold; Fretwell, Neale; Hedhammar, Ake; Wade, Claire; Giger, Urs

    2013-08-01

    Following the first identification of a disease-causing mutation in dogs in 1989 and the more recent completion of canine and feline genome sequences, much progress has been made in the molecular characterization of hereditary diseases in dogs and cats. To increase access to information on diagnosing hereditary diseases in dogs and cats, a web application has been developed to collect, organize and display information on available DNA tests and other supporting information, including gene and chromosomal locations, mutations, primary research citations and disease descriptions. The DNA testing information can be accessed at the URL: http://research.vet.upenn.edu/WSAVA-LabSearch. There are currently 131 molecular genetic tests available for hereditary diseases in dogs and cats offered by 43 laboratories worldwide. This tool should provide clinicians, researchers, breeders and companion animal owners with a single comprehensive, up-to-date and readily searchable webpage for information on hereditary disease testing. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Incidence of hereditary amyloidosis and autoinflammatory diseases in Sweden: endemic and imported diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Hemminki, Kari; Li, Xinjun; Försti, Asta; Sundquist, Jan; Sundquist, Kristina

    2013-01-01

    Background: Amyloidoses are a heterogeneous group of progressive diseases caused by tissue deposition of misfolded proteins. According to the International Classification of Diseases, hereditary amyloidosis is divided into neuropathic and non-neuropathic forms. In Sweden, neuropathic heredofamilial amyloidosis has been identified as familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy (FAP), a fatal disease that is treated by liver transplantation. The non-neuropathic form includes familial autoinflammatory d...

  17. Hereditary spastic paraplegia: More than an upper motor neuron disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parodi, L; Fenu, S; Stevanin, G; Durr, A

    2017-05-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) are a group of rare inherited neurological diseases characterized by extreme heterogeneity in both their clinical manifestations and genetic backgrounds. Based on symptoms, HSPs can be divided into pure forms, presenting with pyramidal signs leading to lower-limb spasticity, and complex forms, when additional neurological or extraneurological symptoms are detected. The clinical diversity of HSPs partially reflects their underlying genetic backgrounds. To date, 76 loci and 58 corresponding genes [spastic paraplegia genes (SPGs)] have been linked to HSPs. The genetic diagnosis is further complicated by the fact that causative mutations of HSP can be inherited through all possible modes of transmission (autosomal-dominant and -recessive, X-linked, maternal), with some genes showing multiple inheritance patterns. The pathogenic mutations of SPGs primarily lead to progressive degeneration of the upper motor neurons (UMNs) comprising corticospinal tracts. However, it is possible to observe lower-limb muscle atrophy and fasciculations on clinical examination that are clear signs of lower motor neuron (LMN) involvement. The purpose of this review is to classify HSPs based on their degree of motor neuron involvement, distinguishing forms in which only UMNs are affected from those involving both UMN and LMN degeneration, and to describe their differential diagnosis from diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Disease-modifying factors in hereditary angioedema: an RNA expression-based screening

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    López-Lera, Alberto; Cabo, Fátima Sánchez; Garrido, Sofía; Dopazo, Ana; López-Trascasa, Margarita

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary Angioedema due to C1-Inhibitor deficiency (HAE types I and II) is a monogenic disease characterized by sudden, self-limited episodes of cutaneous and mucosal swelling due to local deregulation of vascular permeability...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary angioedema

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... named? Additional Information & Resources MedlinePlus (2 links) Encyclopedia: Hereditary angioedema Health Topic: Vascular Diseases Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) Hereditary ...

  20. Reduced life expectancy seen in hereditary diseases which predispose to early-onset tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evans DGR

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available D Gareth R Evans,1 Sarah Louise Ingham21Genetic Medicine, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Central Manchester Foundation Trust, St Mary's Hospital, Manchester, UK; 2Centre for Health Informatics, Institute of Population Health, The University of Manchester, Manchester, UKAbstract: There are several hereditary diseases that are a predisposition to early-onset tumors. These include syndromic conditions like neurofibromatosis 1 and 2, von Hippel–Lindau syndrome, Gorlin syndrome, multiple endocrine neoplasia, and familial adenomatous polyposis; and conditions which are usually not possible to diagnose clinically in a single individual, such as Lynch syndrome and BRCA1/2. Understanding of the mortality in hereditary cancer predisposing diseases is important for developing effective disease treatment programs. A number of studies have been undertaken to investigate the genetic predictors, prevalence and incidence, and treatment outcomes of these diseases; however, the majority examine only the most common of these diseases (eg, neurofibromatosis or BRCA, or look into postoperative survival. The mortality of individuals who are diagnosed with one of these hereditary diseases remains an area for investigation. This review is the first to attempt identification of studies investigating life expectancy in hereditary diseases which predispose to early-onset tumors.Keywords: mortality, survival, life expectancy, early-onset, tumors

  1. Localized cystic disease of the kidney: distinction from cystic neoplasms and hereditary polycystic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yi; Chen, Longwen; Deng, Fang-Ming; Melamed, Jonathan; Fan, Rong; Bonsib, Stephen; Zhou, Ming

    2013-04-01

    Cystic changes are common in both neoplastic and non-neoplastic kidney diseases. The most important diagnostic consideration is to rule out cystic neoplasms and hereditary polycystic kidney disease for patient management. Localized cystic disease of the kidney is a rare, nongenetic and nonprogressive cystic disease that may mimic cystic neoplasms or hereditary polycystic disease. However, reports in the literature on its pathologic characteristics are scarce, and most surgical pathologists are unfamiliar with this entity. We report the clinicopathologic characteristics of 9 such cases that mimicked renal neoplasms and were treated surgically. Nine patients, including 5 men and 4 women, had a mean age of 33.3 years (range, 18 to 56 y) at diagnosis. Two patients presented with gross hematuria. In the remaining 7 patients, localized cystic disease was discovered incidentally. None had a personal history of cystic disease of the kidney or other organs or a family history of cystic renal disease. On imaging studies, solitary multilocular cystic lesions were identified in all patients with a mean size of 2.9 cm (range, 0.8 to 6 cm). Of 7 patients with documented Bosniak classification, 4 lesions were class III, and 3 lesions were class II. Follow-up was available in 5 patients, with a mean follow-up time of 14.6 months (range, 5 to 31 mo). No cysts were observed in the ipsilateral and contralateral kidneys during follow-up. Partial and total nephrectomy was performed in 8 and 1 patient, respectively. Grossly, the cystic lesions were not discrete and merged imperceptibly with the adjacent renal parenchyma without a discrete margin or capsule. Microscopically, cystic lesions involved renal papillae in all cases, and the cystic space was continuous with dilated collecting ducts. Cysts were lined with cuboidal or flat epithelial cells identical to those lining the collecting ducts. Significant inflammation was absent. The surrounding renal parenchyma was normal. With this

  2. Cardiac biology and disease in invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David

    2009-01-01

    It may seem ridiculous to consider cardiac diseases in sub-vertebrate animals; when on earth is a tarantula, a butterfly or a snail going to be presented as a clinical case with heart failure or a congenital cardiac abnormality? This article examines the work of research groups investigating invertebrates as valuable models of heart disease in man. Examining invertebrates with gene defects similar to those in human patients with heart disease, congenital or acquired, allows us to probe deeply into the aetiopathogenesis of many cardiac conditions.

  3. Distinctions in sensitivity and repair of cells of children with some hereditary diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zasukhina, G.D.; Barashnev, Yu.I.; Vasil' eva, I.M.; Sdirkova, N.I.; Semyachkina, A.N. (AN SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Obshchej Genetiki)

    A study was made of blood cell sensitivity of children with some hereditary diseases, to ..gamma..-radiation and 4-nitro-quinoline-1-oxide. Using the host cell reactivation and chromatographic methods we revealed the increase in the sensitivity to the above mentioned agents and inhibition of the repair function in cells of patients with the following diseases: Marfan's disease, histidinemia, osteogenesis imperfecta, Sylvere-Russelle, Laurence, Franchescetti, and Losch-Nychane syndromes.

  4. Bioethical issues of preventing hereditary diseases with late onset in the Sakha Republic (Yakutia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kononova, Sardana K; Sidorova, Oksana G; Fedorova, Sardana A; Platonov, Fedor A; Izhevskaya, Vera L; Khusnutdinova, Elza K

    2014-01-01

    Prenatal diagnosis of congenital and hereditary diseases is a priority for the development of medical technologies in Russia. However, there are not many published research results on bioethical issues of prenatal DNA testing. The main goal of the article is to describe some of the bioethical aspects of prenatal DNA diagnosis of hereditary diseases with late onset in genetic counselling practice in the Sakha Republic (Yakutia) - a far north-eastern region of Russia. The methods used in the research are genetic counselling, invasive chorionic villus biopsy procedures, molecular diagnosis, social and demographic characteristics of patients. In 10 years, 48 (76%) pregnant women from families tainted with hereditary spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 and 15 pregnant women from families with myotonic dystrophy have applied for medical and genetic counselling in order to undergo prenatal DNA testing. The average number of applications is 7-8 per year. There are differences in prenatal genetic counselling approaches. It is necessary to develop differentiated ethical approaches depending on the mode of inheritance, age of manifestation, and clinical polymorphism of hereditary disease.

  5. Protein tyrosine phosphatase variants in human hereditary disorders and disease susceptibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, Wiljan J A J; Pulido, Rafael

    2013-10-01

    Reversible tyrosine phosphorylation of proteins is a key regulatory mechanism to steer normal development and physiological functioning of multicellular organisms. Phosphotyrosine dephosphorylation is exerted by members of the super-family of protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) enzymes and many play such essential roles that a wide variety of hereditary disorders and disease susceptibilities in man are caused by PTP alleles. More than two decades of PTP research has resulted in a collection of PTP genetic variants with corresponding consequences at the molecular, cellular and physiological level. Here we present a comprehensive overview of these PTP gene variants that have been linked to disease states in man. Although the findings have direct bearing for disease diagnostics and for research on disease etiology, more work is necessary to translate this into therapies that alleviate the burden of these hereditary disorders and disease susceptibilities in man. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. [Medico-genetic study of isolates in Uzbekistan. IV. Clinico-biochemical diagnosis of hereditary diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlova, S I; Diachenko, S S; Khannanova, F K; Kuleshov, N P; Khodzhaeva, G K

    1976-01-01

    An exhaustive clinico-biochemical examination of the population of two kishlaks of the Samarkand Region, viz. Karakent (210 persons) and Ishan (248 persons) was carried out. The program of this examination permitted to exclude over 160 forms of hereditary pathology. A total of 45 persons affected with diseases belonging to 12 nosological forms were revealed in the course of the examination. Among the diseases observed only 5 are hereditary sensu stricto, viz. myoclonus-epilepsy, Bonevi-Ulrich's syndrome, imperfect osteogenesis, pigment choreoretinite and Down's syndrome, others belong to diseases with a pronounced hereditary predisposition. The main part of this group comprises neuro-psychic diseases, such as non-differentiated olygophreny (5.0%), epilepsy (1.3%), schizophreny; many of these cases have a familial character, particularly in Karakent. Besides the persons suffering from diseases, 20 heterozygous carriers of beta-thalassemia and 17 heterozygous carriers of G6PD-deficiency were discovered in the kishlaks examined. On the whole the frequency of the diseases revealed did not exceed the level in the general population. Despite the different degree of isolation of the kishlaks examined (Karakent is isolated on a religious basis, F = 0.0064; while Ishan is a desintagrated isolate, F = = 0.0014), no substantial differences between them in the distribution of pathological phenomena were observed. On the basis of the experience of this expedition recomendations are proposed concerning the origination and accomplishment of medico-genetic expeditions. A scheme is proposed for the performance of medico-genetic examination through several stages. The first stage in the composition of tentative maps of the distribution of hereditary diseases within a region on the basis of the information obtained from the medical personnel and from the examination of the documents of district and regional hospitals. Subsequently the primary information is specified, the regions to

  7. Cardiac catheterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catheterization - cardiac; Heart catheterization; Angina - cardiac catheterization; CAD - cardiac catheterization; Coronary artery disease - cardiac catheterization; Heart valve - cardiac catheterization; ...

  8. Congenital cardiac disease in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronson, E; McCaw, D

    1984-09-01

    Aortic stenosis is a heritable cardiac anomaly most common in German Shepherds, Boxers and Newfoundlands, and less common in Pugs, English Bulldogs, Boston Terriers, Fox Terriers, Schnauzers and Bassets. Clinical signs are associated with secondary left-sided heart failure and include coughing, moist rales, exercise intolerance, arrhythmias and a weak femoral pulse. It causes an ejection-type crescendo-decrescendo, systolic murmur best heard on the left side near the elbow. The ECG may be normal or may show signs of left ventricular hypertrophy, including an axis of less than 40 degrees, a QRS complex of greater than 60 seconds in duration, R waves greater than 3 mv in amplitude, ST segment slurring or depression, or T waves of an amplitude greater than 25% of that of R waves. A LAT radiograph usually reveals an enlarged cardiac silhouette, loss of the cranial cardiac waist, and normal pulmonary vasculature, while DV projections show an elongated cardiac silhouette, rounding of the left ventricular border, and a normal descending aorta. Nonselective angiocardiography reveals poststenotic dilatation of the aorta. Treatment of severely affected dogs involves surgical correction.

  9. Genetic analysis of Iranian family with hereditary cardiac arrhythmias by next generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi, Marzieh; Foo, Roger; Samienasab, Mohammad Reza; Salehi, Ahmad Reza; Kheirollahi, Majid; Khanahmad, Hossein; Salehi, Rasoul

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias are responsible for several cases of syncope and sudden cardiac death annually worldwide. Due to overlapping clinical symptoms in some cardiac arrhythmias genetic studies would help to confirm the primary clinical diagnosis made on the basis of solely clinical findings. In addition clinical management of the patient, family screening and provide appropriate counseling and risk assessment for the family members are other advantages of genetic study. Totally nine patients from a family included in this study. The primary diagnosis on the basis of clinical findings was second-degree atrioventricular (AV) block for this family. Mutation in SCN5A gene is frequently reported for second-degree AV block and hence the gene was analyzed using whole gene sequencing but no mutation was detected. Subsequently, the samples were subjected to customized Ampliseq 77 gene panel using next generation sequencing to detect the underlying molecular defects. We found c. 5570T>A missense mutation in ANK2 gene for this family. Based on the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man, ANK2 gene and the mutation detected correspond to long QT syndrome type 4. This mutation, although already known in other populations, but is reported for the first time in Iranian patients with cardiac arrhythmias. As the case with this family, genetic analysis of patients with cardiac arrhythmias would be helpful in reassessment of clinical diagnosis and therefore would help for patients' management and in some cases re-evaluation of ongoing treatment may be needed.

  10. Comparative Analysis of Human Tissue Interactomes Reveals Factors Leading to Tissue-Specific Manifestation of Hereditary Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Barshir, Ruth; Shwartz, Omer; Smoly, Ilan Y.; Yeger-Lotem, Esti

    2014-01-01

    An open question in human genetics is what underlies the tissue-specific manifestation of hereditary diseases, which are caused by genomic aberrations that are present in cells across the human body. Here we analyzed this phenomenon for over 300 hereditary diseases by using comparative network analysis. We created an extensive resource of protein expression and interactions in 16 main human tissues, by integrating recent data of gene and protein expression across tissues with data of protein-...

  11. Comparative analysis of human tissue interactomes reveals factors leading to tissue-specific manifestation of hereditary diseases.

    OpenAIRE

    Ruth Barshir; Omer Shwartz; Smoly, Ilan Y.; Esti Yeger-Lotem

    2014-01-01

    An open question in human genetics is what underlies the tissue-specific manifestation of hereditary diseases, which are caused by genomic aberrations that are present in cells across the human body. Here we analyzed this phenomenon for over 300 hereditary diseases by using comparative network analysis. We created an extensive resource of protein expression and interactions in 16 main human tissues, by integrating recent data of gene and protein expression across tissues with data of protein-...

  12. Morphometric analysis of progressive changes in hereditary cerebellar cortical degenerative disease (abiotrophy) in rabbits caused by abnormal synaptogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Sato, Junko; Yamada, Naoaki; Kobayashi, Ryosuke; Tsuchitani, Minoru; Kobayashi, Yoshiyasu

    2015-01-01

    We previously investigated rabbit hereditary cerebellar cortical degenerative disease, called cerebellar cortical abiotrophy in the veterinary field, and determined that the pathogenesis of this disease is the result of failed synaptogenesis between parallel fibers and Purkinje cells. In this study, longitudinal changes in the development and atrophy of the cerebellum of rabbits with hereditary abiotrophy after birth were morphometrically examined (postnatal day [PD] 15 and 42) using image an...

  13. Reduced life expectancy seen in hereditary diseases which predispose to early-onset tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Evans DGR; Ingham SL

    2013-01-01

    D Gareth R Evans,1 Sarah Louise Ingham21Genetic Medicine, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Central Manchester Foundation Trust, St Mary's Hospital, Manchester, UK; 2Centre for Health Informatics, Institute of Population Health, The University of Manchester, Manchester, UKAbstract: There are several hereditary diseases that are a predisposition to early-onset tumors. These include syndromic conditions like neurofibromatosis 1 and 2, von Hippel–Lindau syndrome, Gorli...

  14. Hereditary Causes of Kidney Stones and Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edvardsson, Vidar O.; Goldfarb, David S.; Lieske, John C.; Beara-Lasic, Lada; Anglani, Franca; Milliner, Dawn S.; Palsson, Runolfur

    2013-01-01

    Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) deficiency, cystinuria, Dent disease, familial hypomagnesemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis (FHHNC) and primary hyperoxaluria (PH) are rare but important causes of severe kidney stone disease and/or chronic kidney disease in children. Recurrent kidney stone disease and nephrocalcinosis, particularly in pre-pubertal children, should alert the physician to the possibility of an inborn error of metabolism as the underlying cause. Unfortunately, the lack of recognition and knowledge of the five disorders has frequently resulted in an unacceptable delay in diagnosis and treatment, sometimes with grave consequences. A high index of suspicion coupled with early diagnosis may reduce or even prevent the serious long-term complications of these diseases. In this paper, we review the epidemiology, clinical features, diagnosis, treatment and outcome of patients with APRT deficiency, cystinuria, Dent disease, FHHNC and PH with emphasis on childhood manifestations. PMID:23334384

  15. Comparative analysis of human tissue interactomes reveals factors leading to tissue-specific manifestation of hereditary diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Barshir

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available An open question in human genetics is what underlies the tissue-specific manifestation of hereditary diseases, which are caused by genomic aberrations that are present in cells across the human body. Here we analyzed this phenomenon for over 300 hereditary diseases by using comparative network analysis. We created an extensive resource of protein expression and interactions in 16 main human tissues, by integrating recent data of gene and protein expression across tissues with data of protein-protein interactions (PPIs. The resulting tissue interaction networks (interactomes shared a large fraction of their proteins and PPIs, and only a small fraction of them were tissue-specific. Applying this resource to hereditary diseases, we first show that most of the disease-causing genes are widely expressed across tissues, yet, enigmatically, cause disease phenotypes in few tissues only. Upon testing for factors that could lead to tissue-specific vulnerability, we find that disease-causing genes tend to have elevated transcript levels and increased number of tissue-specific PPIs in their disease tissues compared to unaffected tissues. We demonstrate through several examples that these tissue-specific PPIs can highlight disease mechanisms, and thus, owing to their small number, provide a powerful filter for interrogating disease etiologies. As two thirds of the hereditary diseases are associated with these factors, comparative tissue analysis offers a meaningful and efficient framework for enhancing the understanding of the molecular basis of hereditary diseases.

  16. Comparative analysis of human tissue interactomes reveals factors leading to tissue-specific manifestation of hereditary diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barshir, Ruth; Shwartz, Omer; Smoly, Ilan Y; Yeger-Lotem, Esti

    2014-06-01

    An open question in human genetics is what underlies the tissue-specific manifestation of hereditary diseases, which are caused by genomic aberrations that are present in cells across the human body. Here we analyzed this phenomenon for over 300 hereditary diseases by using comparative network analysis. We created an extensive resource of protein expression and interactions in 16 main human tissues, by integrating recent data of gene and protein expression across tissues with data of protein-protein interactions (PPIs). The resulting tissue interaction networks (interactomes) shared a large fraction of their proteins and PPIs, and only a small fraction of them were tissue-specific. Applying this resource to hereditary diseases, we first show that most of the disease-causing genes are widely expressed across tissues, yet, enigmatically, cause disease phenotypes in few tissues only. Upon testing for factors that could lead to tissue-specific vulnerability, we find that disease-causing genes tend to have elevated transcript levels and increased number of tissue-specific PPIs in their disease tissues compared to unaffected tissues. We demonstrate through several examples that these tissue-specific PPIs can highlight disease mechanisms, and thus, owing to their small number, provide a powerful filter for interrogating disease etiologies. As two thirds of the hereditary diseases are associated with these factors, comparative tissue analysis offers a meaningful and efficient framework for enhancing the understanding of the molecular basis of hereditary diseases.

  17. Preconception Counseling for Women With Cardiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapp, Mark A; Bernstein, Sarah N

    2017-09-01

    All providers who care for reproductive-aged women with cardiac disease should assess these patients' desires and plans for pregnancy at every encounter. For those considering pregnancy, preconception counseling, often performed by a maternal-fetal medicine specialist, can help patients understand the potential implications of pregnancy on their health and estimate the risks of an adverse cardiac event prior to conceiving. There are cardiac conditions, such as pulmonary hypertension and aortic stenosis, in which pregnancy may be contraindicated given the high morbidity and mortality; there are tools available to help quantify a patient's risk. Furthermore, some cardiac lesions may be inherited, which may warrant parental testing or a discussion of strategies to reduce the risk of an affected child, such as the use of assisted reproductive technologies. Preconception counseling is also important to identify other maternal risk factors, such as obesity, hypertension, and tobacco use, which are associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes and develop a strategy to mitigate their potential risks, ideally before pregnancy. For women on medications for their heart disease or other comorbidities, a thorough review of these medications can potentially avoid an exposure to a teratogen during conception and pregnancy. Once pregnant, a patient's obstetrical provider and cardiologist should work together to outline a plan to monitor a patient's cardiac status as the normal physiologic changes of pregnancy, such as increased blood volume and cardiac output, may challenge a patient's functional status and increase the risk for an adverse outcome. Labor and delivery planning are essential to ensure patients with cardiac disease deliver at the appropriate hospital, equipped with the staff and resources to care for women with complex conditions. In summary, preconception counseling aims to stratify a patient's risk in pregnancy, inform patients of possible complications, and discuss

  18. hiPSC Disease Modeling of Rare Hereditary Cerebellar Ataxias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukovic, Dunja; Moreno-Manzano, Victoria; Rodriguez-Jimenez, Francisco Javier; Vilches, Angel; Sykova, Eva; Jendelova, Pavla; Stojkovic, Miodrag; Erceg, Slaven

    2016-10-01

    Cerebellar ataxias are clinically and genetically heterogeneous diseases affecting primary cerebellar cells. The lack of availability of affected tissue from cerebellar ataxias patients is the main obstacle in investigating the pathogenicity of these diseases. The landmark discovery of human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) has permitted the derivation of patient-specific cells with an unlimited self-renewing capacity. Additionally, their potential to differentiate into virtually any cell type of the human organism allows for large amounts of affected cells to be generated in culture, converting this hiPSC technology into a revolutionary tool in the study of the mechanisms of disease, drug discovery, and gene correction. In this review, we will summarize the current studies in which hiPSC were utilized to study cerebellar ataxias. Describing the currently available 2D and 3D hiPSC-based cellular models, and due to the fact that extracerebellar cells were used to model these diseases, we will discuss whether or not they represent a faithful cellular model and whether they have contributed to a better understanding of disease mechanisms.

  19. the pattern of cardiac diseases at the cardiac clinic of jimma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    the pattern of cardiac diseases among adult patients on follow-up at the cardiac follow-up clinic of. Jimma University ... version 12.0. RESULTS: Rheumatic heart disease was the diagnosis in 256 (32.8%) of the cardiac cases on follow-up followed by ..... The global burden of group A streptococcal diseases. Lancet Infect Dis ...

  20. A rare hereditary disease: Muckle-Wells syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitya Ramreddy

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Cryopyrin associated periodic syndrome (CAPS is a dominantly-inherited autoinflammatory disease, which is included in the group of periodic fever syndromes. It is caused by a defect in the regulation of inflammatory cytokines, particularly interleukin-1β. CAPS encompasses a spectrum of three phenotypes of increasing severity: familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome, Muckle-Wells syndrome (MWS and neonatal onset multisystem inflammatory disease. We report the case of a 58-year-old male, who had migratory joint pains, daily urticaria, chills, and episodic conjunctivitis since childhood and hearing loss in his 20s with a family history of similar symptoms. He was diagnosed with MWS after being found to have a R262W gene mutation in NLRP3 gene and successfully treated with canakinumab. After his discovery, other 1st and 2nd degree family members with similar complaints were found to have the same genetic mutation and were also successfully treated with canakinumab.

  1. Hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis in patients of Dutch origin is related to Alzheimer disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Duinen, S.G.; Castano, E.M.; Prelli, F.; Bots, G.T.A.B.; Luyendijk, W.; Frangione, B.

    1987-08-01

    Hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis in Dutch patients is an autosomal dominant form of vascular amyloidosis restricted to the leptomeninges and cerebral cortex. Clinically the disease is characterized by cerebral hemorrhages leading to an early death. Immunohistochemical studies of five patients revealed that the vascular amyloid deposits reacted intensely with an antiserum raised against a synthetic peptide homologous to the Alzheimer disease-related ..beta..-protein. Silver stain-positive, senile plaque-like structures were also labeled by the antiserum, yet these lesions lacked the dense amyloid cores present in typical plaques of Alzheimer disease. No neurofibrillary tangles were present. Amyloid fibrils were purified from the leptomeningeal vessels of one patient who clinically had no signs of dementia. The protein had a molecular weight of approx. 4000 and its partial amino acid sequence to position 21 showed homology to the ..beta..-protein of Alzheimer disease and Down syndrome. These results suggest that hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis of Dutch origin is pathogenetically related to Alzheimer disease and support the concept that the initial amyloid deposition in this disorder occurs in the vessel walls before damaging the brain parenchyma. Thus, deposition of ..beta..-protein in brain tissue seems to be related to a spectrum of diseases involving vascular syndromes, progressive dementia, or both.

  2. Cardiac Biomarkers in Adult Congenital Heart Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Eindhoven (Jannet)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Congenital heart disease (ConHD) is the most common congenital abnormality in newborns, with a birth prevalence of 9 per 1000 live births.2 ConHD comprises a number of cardiac abnormalities with varying aetiology which can be divided into simple, moderate and

  3. Dermatoglyphic’s in Congenital Cardiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Brijendra

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Various dermatoglyphic parameters like finger print pattern, atd angle, absolute ridge count & ab, bc ,cd, and ad ridge counts were observed in 150 cases of congenital cardiac disease, comprising of 72 cases of Ventricular Septal Defects (VSD, 60 cases of Atrial Septal Defects (ASD, 9 cases of Coarctation of Aorta (COA & 9 cases of Tetralogy of Fallot’s (TOF. Same dermatoglyphic parameters were also studied in 300 controls and statistical comparison of cases and controls was done. In our study it was observed that the congenital cardiac disease cases exhibited preponderance of whorls (55.8% with decrease in loop pattern (36.2% as compared to those of controls and the difference was highly significant (P<0.001. The difference in the mean total finger ridge count (TFRC of the controls and of the cases of Congenital Cardiac Diseases (CCD was found to be highly significant (P<0.001, while the  mean atd angle in the cases of Congenital Cardiac Disease (CCD was widen up and was statistically significant too. The mean ab, the mean bc ridge, the mean cd ridge and the mean ad ridge counts were also higher in the various type of CCD as compared to that controls and on statistical comparison, the difference was found to be highly significant.

  4. Spleen histology in children with sickle cell disease and hereditary spherocytosis: hints on the disease pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzi, Marco; Fuligni, Fabio; Santoro, Luisa; Sabattini, Elena; Ichino, Martina; De Vito, Rita; Zucchetta, Pietro; Colombatti, Raffaella; Sainati, Laura; Gamba, Piergiorgio; Alaggio, Rita

    2017-02-01

    Hereditary spherocytosis (HS) and sickle cell disease (SCD) are associated with splenomegaly and spleen dysfunction in pediatric patients. Scant data exist on possible correlations between spleen morphology and function in HS and SCD. This study aimed to assess the histologic and morphometric features of HS and SCD spleens, to get possible correlations with disease pathophysiology. In a large series of spleens from SCD, HS, and control patients, the following parameters were considered: (i) macroscopic features, (ii) lymphoid follicle (LF) density, (iii) presence of perifollicular marginal zones, (iv) presence of Gamna-Gandy bodies, (v) density of CD8-positive sinusoids, (vi) density of CD34-positive microvessels, (vii) presence/distribution of fibrosis and smooth muscle actin (SMA)-positive myoid cells, and (viii) density of CD68-positive macrophages. SCD and HS spleens had similar macroscopic features. SCD spleens had lower LF density and fewer marginal zones than did HS spleens and controls. SCD also showed lower CD8-positive sinusoid density, increased CD34-positive microvessel density and SMA-positive myoid cells, and higher prevalence of fibrosis and Gamna-Gandy bodies. HS had lower LF and CD8-positive sinusoid density than did controls. No significant differences were noted in red pulp macrophages. By multivariate analysis, most HS spleens clustered with controls, whereas SCD grouped separately. A multiparametric score could predict the degree of spleen changes irrespective of the underlying disease. In conclusion, SCD spleens display greater histologic effacement than HS, and SCD-related changes suggest impaired function due to vascular damage. These observations may contribute to guide the clinical management of patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Benign Cardiac Effects of Hemoglobin H Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheeran, Claire; Bowden, Donald K; Pasricha, Sant-Rayn; Cheng, Ken; Romanelli, Giovanni; Peverill, Roger E

    2016-01-01

    Hemoglobin H (HbH) disease is associated with iron overload, but whether this results in serious cardiac or vascular sequelae is unresolved. We identified 39 adult subjects (age 42 ± 12 years, 13 men) with HbH disease who had undergone echocardiography, 27 of whom had also undergone cardiac and liver magnetic resonance assessment of iron loading using T2*-weighted imaging. None of the subjects had a history of heart failure or arrhythmias. There were 13/39 subjects with a ferritin level within the sex-based normal range and only 4/39 had ferritin >1,000 ng/ml. Left ventricular (LV) and left atrial dilatation was common, but LV ejection fraction was normal (≥55%) in all subjects. Age was positively correlated with log ferritin in the 27 nontransfused subjects (r = 0.43) and was inversely correlated with the transmitral E wave and E/A ratio (r = -0.69 and r = -0.79, respectively), but no relation of log ferritin with E or E/A was evident. The peak tricuspid regurgitation velocity was normal in 24/29 subjects for whom this was obtained, and it was no more than mildly elevated in the other 5. None of the tested subjects had an abnormal cardiac T2* reading, but half had evidence of liver iron loading. No myocardial iron loading or serious cardiac or vascular sequelae were identified in this cohort with HbH disease. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. [Genetic epidemiological study of Bashkortostan Republic: the diversity of monogenic hereditary diseases in five districts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinchenko, R A; Murzabaeva, S Sh; Grinberg, Ia I; Galkina, V A; Khlebnikova, O V; Dadali, E L; Fedotov, V P; Khidiiatova, I M; Khusnutdinova, E K; Ginter, E K

    2009-05-01

    The diversity of monogenic hereditary diseases (HDs) (autosomal dominant (AD), autosomal recessive (AR), and X-linked diseases) has been studied in five districts of Bashkortostan Republic: Burzyanskii, Abzelilovskii, Baimak, Salavatskii, and Arkhangel'skoe raions. The spectrum of HDs comprised 144 diseases, including 83, 48, and 13 Ad, AR, and X-linked diseases. Most of them were found earlier during studies in ten other regions of Russia (Kirov, Kostroma, Tver', Bryansk, and Rostov oblasts, and Krasnodar krai, and the republics of Adygea, Marii El, Udmurtia, and Chuvashia). Foci of local accumulation of some AD, AR, and X-linked diseases have been found in individual districts. Data on the gene frequencies for the HDs have been used for cluster analysis, which has shown the gene geographic position of Bashkirs among nine ethnic populations of Russia: Russians (Kostroma, Kirov, and Rostov oblasts and Krasnodar krai), Chuvashes (Chuvashia), Adygeans (Adygea), Maris (Marii El), Udmurts (Udmurtia), and Bashkirs (Bashkortostan).

  7. Recent advance in the molecular genetics of Wilson disease and hereditary hemochromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Tingxia; Li, Xiaojin; Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Xinyan; Ou, Xiaojuan; Huang, Jian

    2016-10-01

    Metabolic liver diseases such as Wilson disease (WD) and hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) possess complicated pathogenesis and typical hereditary characteristics with the hallmarks of a deficiency in metal metabolism. Mutations in genes encoding ATPase, Cu + transporting, beta polypeptide (ATP7B) and hemochromatosis (HFE) or several non-HFE genes are considered to be causative for WD and HH, respectively. Although the identification of novel mutations in ATP7B for WD and HFE or the non-HFE genes for HH has increased, especially with the application of whole genome sequencing technology in recent years, the biological function of the identified mutations, as well as genotype-phenotype correlations remain to be explored. Further analysis of the causative gene mutation would be critical to clarify the mechanisms underlying specific disease phenotypes. In this review, we therefore summarize the recent advances in the molecular genetics of WD and HH including the updated mutation spectrums and the correlation between genotype and phenotype, with an emphasis on biological functional studies of the individual mutations identified in WD and HH. The weakness of the current functional studies and analysis for the clinical association of the individual mutation was also discussed. These works are essential for the understanding of the association between genotypes and phenotypes of these inherited metabolic liver diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Microvascular pathology and morphometrics of sporadic and hereditary small vessel diseases of the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craggs, Lucinda J L; Yamamoto, Yumi; Deramecourt, Vincent; Kalaria, Raj N

    2014-09-01

    Small vessel diseases (SVDs) of the brain are likely to become increasingly common in tandem with the rise in the aging population. In recent years, neuroimaging and pathological studies have informed on the pathogenesis of sporadic SVD and several single gene (monogenic) disorders predisposing to subcortical strokes and diffuse white matter disease. However, one of the limitations toward studying SVD lies in the lack of consistent assessment criteria and lesion burden for both clinical and pathological measures. Arteriolosclerosis and diffuse white matter changes are the hallmark features of both sporadic and hereditary SVDs. The pathogenesis of the arteriopathy is the key to understanding the differential progression of disease in various SVDs. Remarkably, quantification of microvascular abnormalities in sporadic and hereditary SVDs has shown that qualitatively the processes involved in arteriolar degeneration are largely similar in sporadic SVD compared with hereditary disorders such as cerebral autosomal arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL). Important significant regional differences in lesion location within the brain may enable one to distinguish SVDs, where frontal lobe involvement appears consistently with almost every SVD, but others bear specific pathologies in other lobes, such as the temporal pole in CADASIL and the pons in pontine autosomal dominant microangiopathy and leukoencephalopathy or PADMAL. Additionally, degenerative changes in the vascular smooth muscle cells, the cerebral endothelium and the basal lamina are often rapid and more aggressive in genetic disorders. Further quantification of other microvascular elements and even neuronal cells is needed to fully characterize SVD pathogenesis and to differentiate the usefulness of vascular interventions and treatments on the resulting pathology. © 2014 International Society of Neuropathology.

  9. Contemporary genetic testing in inherited cardiac disease: tools, ethical issues, and clinical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girolami, Francesca; Frisso, Giulia; Benelli, Matteo; Crotti, Lia; Iascone, Maria; Mango, Ruggiero; Mazzaccara, Cristina; Pilichou, Kalliope; Arbustini, Eloisa; Tomberli, Benedetta; Limongelli, Giuseppe; Basso, Cristina; Olivotto, Iacopo

    2018-01-01

    Inherited cardiac diseases comprise a wide and heterogeneous spectrum of diseases of the heart, including the cardiomyopathies and the arrhythmic diseases in structurally normal hearts, that is, channelopathies. With a combined estimated prevalence of 3% in the general population, these conditions represent a relevant epidemiological entity worldwide, and are a major cause of cardiac morbidity and mortality in the young. The extraordinary progress achieved in molecular genetics over the last three decades has unveiled the complex molecular basis of many familial cardiac conditions, paving the way for routine use of gene testing in clinical practice. In current practice, genetic testing can be used in a clinically affected patient to confirm diagnosis, or to formulate a differential diagnosis among overlapping phenotypes or between hereditary and acquired (nongenetic) forms of disease. Although genotype–phenotype correlations are generally unpredictable, a precise molecular diagnosis can help predict prognosis in specific patient subsets and may guide management. In clinically unaffected relatives, genetic cascade testing is recommended, after the initial identification of a pathogenic variation, with the aim of identifying asymptomatic relatives who might be at risk of disease-related complications, including unexpected sudden cardiac death. Future implications include the identification of novel therapeutic targets and development of tailored treatments including gene therapy. This document reflects the multidisciplinary, ‘real-world’ experience required when implementing genetic testing in cardiomyopathies and arrhythmic syndromes, along the recommendations of various guidelines. PMID:29176389

  10. [The CRISPR system can correct or modify the expression of genes responsible for hereditary diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Jacques P

    2015-11-01

    A new technology, called CRISPR, derived from the immune system of bacteria, uses a Cas9 nuclease and a guided RNA complementary to a 20 nucleotides sequence of a gene to induce double strand DNA breaks. This permits to modify specifically the targeted gene in plant, animal and human cells. Variants of the technique also permit to reduce or increase the expression of a selected gene. This technology may thus be used not only to understand the role of a gene but also to develop therapies for hereditary and acquired diseases. © 2015 médecine/sciences – Inserm.

  11. A novel hypothesis for the gene expression for the control of atopic and other hereditary diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirokazu Okudaira

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The requirement of RNA polymerase proteins and transcription factor proteins for the expression of genetic information in DNA clearly indicates that the process is influenced by certain proteins in the body and/or in the environment, which is totally opposite to the 'central dogma' of Crick. In this article, we present a working hypothesis (helical hypothesis that may explain the programmed nature of various biological events simply and naturally. Future investigations on the factors that regulate the gene transcription of cytokine clusters, including intereukin (IL-4 and IL-5, may provide an answer for controlling atopic as well as other hereditary (genetic diseases.

  12. Prematurity, small for gestational age and perinatal parameters in children with congenital, hereditary and acquired chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, Doris; Völker, Sina; Haase, Sanny; Pavicic, Leo; Querfeld, Uwe; Ehrich, Jochen H H; Zivicnjak, Miroslav

    2010-12-01

    Low birth weight has been identified as a risk factor for chronic kidney disease (CKD). We analysed perinatal parameters taken from the National Birth Certificates of 435 children with CKD stages 3-5 of different aetiology and time of onset of CKD. Diseases were classified as congenital with onset of renal disease during fetal life (n = 260; 60%), hereditary as genetically determined with onset after 3 months of life (n = 93; 21%) and acquired CKD (n = 82; 19%). The rates of prematurity and small for gestational age (SGA) were elevated in children with congenital (39.3% and 29.2%), hereditary (24.7% and 22.6%) and acquired CKD (15.5% and 29.3%); these compared to 8% (for both) in the normal population. Newborns with congenital CKD had a significantly lower gestational age [median 38 weeks, interquartile range (IQR) 36-40 weeks] than those with hereditary (39.9 weeks, IQR 37.5-40 weeks) or acquired CKD (40 weeks, IQR 38-40 weeks; P hereditary and acquired diseases [2975 g (IQR 2460-3420 g) versus 3250 g (IQR 2740-3580 g) and 3260 g (IQR 2858-3685 g) (P diseases than in hereditary and acquired diseases. Children with congenital CKD had the highest rate of prematurity, a significantly lower birth weight, length, head circumference and Apgar score than newborns with hereditary or acquired CKD. Irrespective of the aetiology of CKD, all of the children had a significantly higher rate of SGA and prematurity than the reference population. We conclude that both SGA and prematurity predispose for advanced renal disease in childhood and that fetal kidney disease impairs fetal growth.

  13. Hereditary Multiple Cerebral Cavernous Malformations Associated with Wilson Disease and Multiple Lipomatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belousova, Olga B; Okishev, Dmitry N; Ignatova, Tatyana M; Balashova, Maria S; Boulygina, Eugenia S

    2017-09-01

    We report on a patient with 2 Mendelian diseases-symptomatic multiple familial cerebral cavernous malformations (FCCMs) and Wilson disease. Genetic analysis revealed single nucleotide polymorphisms in genes CCM2 and CCM3, associated with cavernous malformations, and homozygote mutation in the ATP7B gene, responsible for Wilson disease. FCCMs were symptomatic in 3 generations. The patient also had multiple lipomatosis, which is suggested to be a familial syndrome. In recent years there has been an increasing amount of publications linking FCCMs with other pathology, predominantly with extracranial and intracranial mesenchymal anomalies. The present study is the description of an unusual association between 2 independent hereditary diseases of confirmed genetic origin-a combination that has not been described previously. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Hereditary Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... E-News Sign-Up Home Hereditary Pancreatitis Hereditary Pancreatitis Hereditary Pancreatitis (HP) is a rare genetic condition characterized by ... of pancreatic attacks, which can progress to chronic pancreatitis . Symptoms include abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. Onset ...

  15. The educational needs and professional roles of Canadian physicians and nurses regarding genetic testing and adult onset hereditary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottorff, Joan L; Blaine, Sean; Carroll, June C; Esplen, Mary Jane; Evans, Jane; Nicolson Klimek, Mary Lou; Meschino, Wendy; Ritvo, Paul

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the knowledge, professional involvement and confidence of Canadian nurses and physicians in providing genetic services for adult onset hereditary disease. 1,425 physicians and 1,425 nurses received a mailed questionnaire with reminders. The response rates were 50% (n = 543) and 79% (n = 975), respectively. Forty-eight percent of physicians and 31% of nurses lacked formal education in genetics. Respondents reported being involved in caring for people at risk for adult onset hereditary disease. Their levels of confidence that they could perform tasks, such as counselling about predictive genetic tests, however, were lower than their levels of expectation that it would be important for them to provide these services. The expected roles and educational needs of Canadian nurses and physicians have broad areas of overlap suggesting the possibility of combined professional education programs and multiple ways of organizing teams to provide genetic services to people at risk for adult onset hereditary disease. Copyright 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Matricellular Proteins in Cardiac Adaptation and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frangogiannis, Nikolaos G.

    2015-01-01

    The term “matricellular proteins” describes a family of structurally unrelated extracellular macromolecules that, unlike structural matrix proteins, do not play a primary role in tissue architecture, but are induced following injury and modulate cell:cell and cell:matrix interactions. When released to the matrix, matricellular proteins associate with growth factors, cytokines and other bioactive effectors and bind to cell surface receptors transducing signaling cascades. Matricellular proteins are upregulated in the injured and remodeling heart and play an important role in regulation of inflammatory, reparative, fibrotic and angiogenic pathways. Thrombospondins (TSP)-1, -2 and -4, tenascin-C and –X, secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC), osteopontin, periostin and members of the CCN family (including CCN1 and CCN2/Connective Tissue Growth Factor) are involved in a variety of cardiac pathophysiologic conditions, including myocardial infarction, cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis, aging-associated myocardial remodeling, myocarditis, diabetic cardiomyopathy and valvular disease. This review manuscript discusses the properties and characteristics of the matricellular proteins and presents our current knowledge on their role in cardiac adaptation and disease. Understanding the role of matricellular proteins in myocardial pathophysiology and identification of the functional domains responsible for their actions may lead to design of peptides with therapeutic potential for patients with heart disease. PMID:22535894

  17. HEREDITARY DISEASES AND SYNDROMES ACCOMPANIED BY FEBRILE CONVULSIONS: CLINICAL AND GENETIC CHARACTERISTICS AND DIAGNOSTIC PROCEDURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. L. Dadali

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors provide a review of the clinical and genetic characteristics of hereditary diseases and syndromes accompanied by febrile convulsions, which is illustrated by examples of their own observations. The paper sets forth the possibilities and limitations of using current methods for the molecular genetic diagnosis of idiopathic and symptomatic epilepsies. The most effective and less expensive technique of molecular genetic analysis is shown to be an exome sequencing test using the panels of genes responsible for the occurrence of diseases with simi1ar clinical symptoms. The paper also presents the structure of the panel of genes responsible for the occurrence of monogenic epilepsies, which has been designed at the Genomed Clinic and includes 448 genetic variants. It also determines the significance of using a chromosomal microarray analysis to diagnose both chromosomal and monogenic diseases accompanied by convulsions. 

  18. the pattern of cardiac diseases at the cardiac clinic of jimma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    BACKGROUND: Rheumatic heart disease is the commonest cardiac disease in most sub-Saharan. African countries, followed by hypertensive heart disease which is rising along with the other non- communicable diseases. However the pattern in our setting is not known. This study aimed to determine the pattern of cardiac ...

  19. Therapeutic Cardiac Catheterizations for Children with Congenital Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therapeutic Cardiac Catheterizations for Children with Congenital Heart Disease Introduction A therapeutic cardiac catheterization is a procedure performed to treat your child’s heart defect. A doctor will use special techniques and ...

  20. Android Mobile Informatics Application for some Hereditary Diseases and Disorders (AMAHD: A complementary framework for medical practitioners and patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olugbenga Oluwagbemi

    Full Text Available Hereditary diseases and disorders constitute a public health problem. Many people in rural communities of developing countries of the world are particularly ignorant about the cause, modes of transmissions and the treatment plans for such diseases. In some cases, some people lack essential knowledge between common and rare hereditary diseases.It is therefore appropriate and essential to develop a mobile application that will act as an educative resource and a good knowledge base for common and rare hereditary diseases.The aim of this research is to develop AMAHD (Android Mobile Informatics Application for some Hereditary Diseases and Disorders.The objectives of this research are to create an android mobile application that will act as a reference point and provide useful information about various hereditary diseases to medical personnel and professionals; provide additional educational resource to biological and bioinformatics researchers in different higher institutions; and provide a pedagogical, diagnostic and complementary foundational learning tool for African research students in biosciences, bioinformatics, and all other categories of students that currently engage in multidisciplinary research in the aspect of hereditary diseases.Essential data was sourced from relevant literature. We developed AMAHD through an integration of programming languages in Java and XML (Extended Markup Language. SQLite was used to implement the database. We developed a Logical Disjunction Rule-based Algorithm (LDRA for the AMAHD’s diagnosis module.A comparative analysis between existing commercial hereditary mobile applications and AMAHD was conducted and the results presented. A world-wide online survey (spanning Africa, Asia, Europe, America and Australia was conducted to sample the opinion of individuals across the globe on the classification of hereditary diseases as either rare or common, within their respective regions. In addition, an evaluation of

  1. Bone mineral density in patients with multiple sclerosis, hereditary ataxia or hereditary spastic paraplegia after at least 10 years of disease - a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonsen, Cecilia Smith; Celius, Elisabeth Gulowsen; Brunborg, Cathrine; Tallaksen, Chantal; Eriksen, Erik Fink; Holmøy, Trygve; Moen, Stine Marit

    2016-12-05

    Although disability is considered the main cause of low bone mineral density (BMD) in multiple sclerosis (MS), other factors related to the disease process or treatment could also be involved. The aim of this study was to assess whether patients with MS are more likely to develop low BMD (osteopenia or osteoporosis) than patients with the non-inflammatory neurological diseases Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia (HSP) and Hereditary Ataxia (HA). We performed a case control study comparing BMD (spine, hip and total body) and biochemical measures of bone metabolism in 91 MS patients and 77 patients with HSP or HA, matched for age, gender and disability. Both patient groups had lived with the disease for at least 10 years. In total 74.7% of the patients with MS and 75.3% of the patients with HSP or HA had osteopenia (-2.5 < T- score < -1.0) or osteoporosis (T- score ≤ -2.5) in one or more sites. Osteoporosis was more common in patients with MS than with HSP/HA (44.0 vs 20.8%, p =0.001). This difference was not significant after correction for confounders (p = 0.07), nor were any of the biochemical markers. Most patients with disabling neurological diseases like MS and HSP/HA develop osteopenia or osteoporosis. MS patients had osteoporosis more frequently than HA/HSP patients, though the difference was not significant after adjusting for confounders. Osteoporosis and bone health should be considered in all patients with both inflammatory and degenerative chronic neurological diseases.

  2. PMP22 related neuropathies: Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A and Hereditary Neuropathy with liability to Pressure Palsies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Paassen, Barbara W.; van der Kooi, Anneke J.; van Spaendonck-Zwarts, Karin Y.; Verhamme, Camiel; Baas, Frank; de Visser, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    PMP22 related neuropathies comprise (1) PMP22 duplications leading to Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A), (2) PMP22 deletions, leading to Hereditary Neuropathy with liability to Pressure Palsies (HNPP), and (3) PMP22 point mutations, causing both phenotypes. Overall prevalence of CMT is

  3. The hereditary basis of bicuspid aortic valve disease: a role for screening?

    OpenAIRE

    Gharibeh L; Nemer M

    2014-01-01

    Lara Gharibeh, Mona Nemer Molecular Genetics and Cardiac Regeneration Laboratory, Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Immunology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada Abstract: Over the past years, human and molecular genetic studies have provided new understanding of valve development and the molecular pathogenesis of bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) disease. BAV is an autosomal dominant disease with incomplete penetrance and is found to affect 1%–2% of the population. It ...

  4. Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy: A Mitochondrial Disease Unique in Many Ways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Rui; Logan, Ian; Yao, Yong-Gang

    2017-01-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) was the first mitochondrial disease to be identified as being caused by mutations in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). This disease has been studied extensively in the past two decades, particularly in Brazilian, Chinese and European populations; and many primary mutations have been reported. However, the disease is enigmatic with many unique features, and there still are several important questions to be resolved. The incomplete penetrance, the male-biased disease expression and the prevalence in young adults all defy a proper explanation. It has been reported that the development of LHON is affected by the interaction between mtDNA mutations, mtDNA haplogroup background, nuclear genes, environmental factors and epigenetics. Furthermore, with the help of new animal models for LHON that have been created in recent years, we are continuing to learn more about the mechanism of this disease. The stage has now been reached at which there is a good understanding of both the genetic basis of the disease and its epidemiology, but just how the blindness that follows from the death of cells in the optic nerve can be prevented remains to be a pharmacological challenge. In this chapter, we summarize the progress that has been made in various recent studies on LHON, focusing on the molecular pathogenic mechanisms, clinical features, biochemical effects, the pharmacology and its treatment.

  5. Molecular and Genetic Basis of Hereditary Connective-Tissue Diseases Accompanied by Frequent Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. T. Yakhyaeva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Frequent bone fractures in infancy require the elimination of a large number (> 100 of genetic disorders. The modern diagnostic method of hereditary diseases characterized by debilitating course is a new generation sequencing. The article presents the results of molecular-genetic study conducted in 18 patients with clinical symptoms of connective tissue disorders. 10 (56% patients had mutations in the genes encoding type I collagen chains, leading to the development of osteogenesis imperfecta, 5 (28% — mutations in IV and V type collagen genes that are responsible for the development of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. 3 (17% patients had mutations in the gene encoding fibrillin-1 protein, deficiency of which is manifested by Marfan syndrome. However, the correlation between patient's phenotype and discovered mutations in the investigated gene is established not in all cases.

  6. Hereditary Sensory Autonomic Neuropathy II, a rare disease in a large Pakistani family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arain, Fazal Manzoor; Chand, Prem

    2015-10-01

    Hereditary Sensory Autonomic Neuropathy II (HSAN II) is a rare genetic disorder, characterized by severe loss of pain, temperature and touch sensation. Injuries in these patients can progress to necrosis and shedding of digits and limbs. Here we report two cases of HSAN II belonging to a Pakistani family. Individual 1, a forty five year old man, had complete loss of pain sensation since birth. Self-mutilation and complication of injuries resulted in the shedding of all the digits and right foot and surgical amputation of left leg. Individual 2, a five year old girl,had delay in healing of wounds and self-mutilation. Examination showed a complete lack of pain sensation throughout her body and hyporeflexia. As the genetic cause of HSAN II is unknown, identification of more patients will allow further research on this disease and possibly develop a cure.

  7. Review: molecular genetics and pathology of hereditary small vessel diseases of the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Y; Craggs, L; Baumann, M; Kalimo, H; Kalaria, R N

    2011-02-01

    Advances in molecular genetics have enabled identification of several monogenic conditions involving small vessels predisposing to ischaemic and haemorrhagic strokes and diffuse white matter disease. With emphasis on cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL), we review the molecular pathogenesis of recently characterized disorders including cerebral autosomal recessive arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CARASIL), retinal vasculopathy with cerebral leukodystrophy (RVCL) and the Collagen type IV, alpha 1 (COL4A1)-related disorders. CADASIL remains the most common hereditary small vessel disease (SVD) caused by >190 different mutations in the NOTCH3 gene, which encodes a cell-signalling receptor. Mutant NOTCH3 instigates degeneration of vascular smooth muscle cells in small arteries and arterioles leading to recurrent lacunar infarcts. Mutations in the serine protease HTRA1 gene are associated with CARASIL. Aberrant HTRA1 activity results in increased transforming growth factor-β signalling provoking multiple actions including vascular fibrosis and extracellular matrix synthesis. The RVCL disorders characterized by profound retinopathy are associated with mutations in TREX1, which encodes an abundant 3'-5' DNA-specific exonuclease. TREX1 mutations lead to detrimental gain-of-function or insufficient quantities of enzyme. The COL4A1-related disorders are highly variable comprising four major phenotypes with overlapping systemic and central nervous system features including SVD with cerebral haemorrhages in children and adults. Mutant COL4A1 likely disrupts the extracellular matrix resulting in fragile vessel walls. The hereditary SVDs albeit with variable phenotypes demonstrate how effects of different defective genes converge to produce the characteristic arteriopathy and microvascular disintegration leading to vascular cognitive impairment. © 2011 The Authors. Neuropathology and

  8. [Hereditary ovarian cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zikán, M; Foretová, L; Cibula, D; Kotlas, J; Pohlreich, P

    2006-05-01

    This article reviews the topic of hereditary ovarian cancer, describes persons at risk of hereditary disposition to cancer and gives instructions for genetic counselling and molecular analysis, including contacts to specialized centres in the Czech Republic. Review. Institute of Biochemistry and Experimental Oncology, Charles University in Prague. Hereditary ovarian cancer occurs in three autosomal dominant syndromes: appropriate hereditary ovarian cancer (HOC), hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) and hereditary non-poliposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). Physician in practice or specialist at the clinic should focus interest on patients form families with frequent occurrence of breast and/or ovarian cancer, patients with early onset disease or tumour duplicity (breast and ovarian cancer). Hereditary disposition to ovarian (and breast) cancer could be assessed by molecular genetic analysis of two main susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, or other genes in families with diverse tumours. Molecular genetic analysis should be in any cases indicated by experienced clinical genetic. In the Czech Republic, the consensus of genetic and clinical care of risk patients was published and specialized centres for families with hereditary predisposition were settled in Prague and Brno. Persons with hereditary susceptibility to cancer constitute noted group where painstaking dispensarisation and preventive care may prevent malignancy or detect it in the early stage.

  9. Validation of the Auto-Inflammatory Diseases Activity Index (AIDAI) for hereditary recurrent fever syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piram, Maryam; Koné-Paut, Isabelle; Lachmann, Helen J; Frenkel, Joost; Ozen, Seza; Kuemmerle-Deschner, Jasmin; Stojanov, Silvia; Simon, Anna; Finetti, Martina; Sormani, Maria Pia; Martini, Alberto; Gattorno, Marco; Ruperto, Nicolino

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To validate the Auto-Inflammatory Diseases Activity Index (AIDAI) in the four major hereditary recurrent fever syndromes (HRFs): familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD), tumour necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS) and cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS). Methods In 2010, an international collaboration established the content of a disease activity tool for HRFs. Patients completed a 1-month prospective diary with 12 yes/no items before a clinical appointment during which their physician assessed their disease activity by a questionnaire. Eight international experts in auto-inflammatory diseases evaluated the patient's disease activity by a blinded web evaluation and a nominal group technique consensus conference, with their consensus judgement considered the gold standard. Sensitivity/specificity/accuracy measures and the ability of the score to discriminate active from inactive patients via the best cut-off score were calculated by a receiver operating characteristic analysis. Results Consensus was achieved for 98/106 (92%) cases (39 FMF, 35 CAPS, 14 TRAPS and 10 MKD), with 26 patients declared as having inactive disease and 72 as having active disease. The median total AIDAI score was 14 (range=0–175). An AIDAI cut-off score ≥9 discriminated active from inactive patients, with sensitivity/specificity/accuracy of 89%/92%/90%, respectively, and an area under the curve of 98% (95% CI 96% to 100%). Conclusions The AIDAI score is a valid and simple tool for assessing disease activity in FMF/MKD/TRAPS/CAPS. This tool is easy to use in clinical practice and has the potential to be used as the standard efficacy measure in future clinical trials. PMID:24026675

  10. [Genetic epidemiological study of monogenic hereditary diseases in the Republic of Tatarstan: population dynamic factors determining the differentiation of the load of hereditary diseases in five districts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginter, E K; El'chinova, G I; Petrin, A N; Bessonova, L A; Kadyshev, V V; Gavrilina, S G; Vafina, Z I; Zinchenko, R A

    2012-09-01

    A genetic epidemiological study has been performed in five districts of the Republic of Tatarstan, Russia: Arsky, Atninsky, Kukmorsky, Buinsky and Drozhzhanovsky raions. The total size of the population surveyed is 188 397 people. Tatars accounted for 77.13% of the population analyzed (145466 people) and were represented by two main ethnic groups: Kazan Tatars and Mishars. The medical genetic study encompassed the total population of the districts, irrespective of ethnicity, and was carried out according to the standard protocol developed in the Laboratory of Genetic Epidemiology of the Research Center for Medical Genetics of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences. After segregation analysis, the prevalence rates of the main types of monogenic hereditary disorders (MHDs), i.e., autosomal dominant (AD), autosomal recessive (AR), and X-linked diseases, have been calculated for the total population of the five districts and for Tatars alone. The prevalence rates ofAD, AR, and X-linked diseases considerably vary in different subpopulations. The largest difference in the MHD prevalence rate has been found between the rural and urban populations. The overall prevalence rate of MHDs was one patient per 293 urban residents and populations and one patient per 134 rural residents, with a wide variation between subpopulations, from 1 : 83 people in the rural population of Atninsky raion to 1: 351 people in the town of Kukmor. Comparison of the MHD prevalence rate in Tatars with those in populations surveyed earlier has shown that the characteristics of the load of MHDs in the Tatar population are similar to those in some districts of the republics of Bashkortostan, Udmurtia, Mari El, and Chuvachia. In Russian populations of European Russia, the MHD prevalence rates are substantially lower. Correlation analysis has shown high (r = 0.5-0.9) significant correlations between the local inbreeding (a), the im index, the random inbreeding (F(ST)), and the AD and AR prevalence rates

  11. Management of sickle cell disease in patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Todd C; Carter, Michael V; Patel, Rina K; Suarez-Pierre, Alejandro; Lin, Sophie Z; Magruder, Jonathan Trent; Grimm, Joshua C; Cameron, Duke E; Baumgartner, William A; Mandal, Kaushik

    2017-02-01

    Sickle cell disease is a life-limiting inherited hemoglobinopathy that poses inherent risk for surgical complications following cardiac operations. In this review, we discuss preoperative considerations, intraoperative decision-making, and postoperative strategies to optimize the care of a patient with sickle cell disease undergoing cardiac surgery. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Mortality in inherited cardiac diseases: directing care in affected families

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nannenberg, E.A.

    2014-01-01

    Many patients with an inherited cardiac disease face a substantial mortality risk, due to arrhythmias (sudden cardiac death), heart failure or embolic stroke. Knowledge about the mortality of diseases can help doctors and patients to make decisions on (timing of) treatment, screening strategies,

  13. Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy: Exemplar of an mtDNA Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Douglas C; Lott, Marie T

    2017-01-01

    The report in 1988 that Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON) was the product of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations provided the first demonstration of the clinical relevance of inherited mtDNA variation. From LHON studies, the medical importance was demonstrated for the mtDNA showing its coding for the most important energy genes, its maternal inheritance, its high mutation rate, its presence in hundreds to thousands of copies per cell, its quantitatively segregation of biallelic genotypes during both mitosis and meiosis, its preferential effect on the most energetic tissues including the eye and brain, its wide range of functional polymorphisms that predispose to common diseases, and its accumulation of mutations within somatic tissues providing the aging clock. These features of mtDNA genetics, in combination with the genetics of the 1-2000 nuclear DNA (nDNA) coded mitochondrial genes, is not only explaining the genetics of LHON but also providing a model for understanding the complexity of many common diseases. With the maturation of LHON biology and genetics, novel animal models for complex disease have been developed and new therapeutic targets and strategies envisioned, both pharmacological and genetic. Multiple somatic gene therapy approaches are being developed for LHON which are applicable to other mtDNA diseases. Moreover, the unique cytoplasmic genetics of the mtDNA has permitted the first successful human germline gene therapy via spindle nDNA transfer from mtDNA mutant oocytes to enucleated normal mtDNA oocytes. Such LHON lessons are actively being applied to common ophthalmological diseases like glaucoma and neurological diseases like Parkinsonism.

  14. Hereditary chorea - what else to consider when the Huntington's disease genetics test is negative?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malek, N; Newman, E J

    2017-01-01

    Chorea, cognitive, behavioural and psychiatric disturbance occur in varying combinations in Huntington's disease (HD). This is often easy to recognise particularly in the presence of an autosomal dominant history. Whilst HD may be the most common aetiology of such a presentation, several HD phenocopies should be considered if genetic testing for HD is negative. We searched PubMed and the Cochrane Database from January 1, 1946 up to January 1, 2016, combining the search terms: 'chorea', 'Huntington's disease', 'HDL' and 'phenocopies'. HD phenocopies frequently display additional movement disorders such as myoclonus, dystonia, parkinsonism and tics. Here, we discuss the phenotypes, and investigations of HD-like disorders where the combination of progressive chorea and cognitive impairment is obvious, but HD gene test result is negative. Conditions presenting with sudden onset chorea such as vascular, infectious and autoimmune causes are not the primary focus of our discussion, but we will make a passing reference to these as some of these conditions are potentially treatable. Hereditary forms of chorea are a heterogeneous group of conditions and this number is increasing. While most of these conditions are not curable, molecular genetic testing has enabled many of these disorders to be distinguished from HD. Getting a precise diagnosis may enable patients and their families to better understand the nature of their condition. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Human extraocular muscles in mitochondrial diseases: comparing chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carta, A; Carelli, V; D'Adda, T; Ross-Cisneros, F N; Sadun, A A

    2005-07-01

    To compare the ultrastructural aspects of human extraocular muscles in two types of mitochondrial disease: chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO) and Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). Muscle samples of the medial rectus obtained from surgery in a sporadic case of CPEO associated with deleted mitochondrial DNA, and post mortem in a case of 3460/ND1 LHON were processed for electron microscopy (EM). The medial rectus from an autoptic time to fixation matched control was used to exclude postmortem artefacts. The CPEO specimen revealed focal areas of disruption and abnormalities of mitochondria in some muscle fibres, creating a "mosaic-like" pattern. In the LHON specimen a diffuse increase in both number and size of mitochondria (mean diameter 0.85 mum v 0.65 mum of control, pCPEO and LHON reveals marked differences. A "mosaic-like" pattern caused by a selective damage of muscle fibres was evident in CPEO, whereas a diffuse increase in mitochondria with preservation of myofibrils characterised the LHON case. These ultrastructural changes may relate to the different expression of the two diseases, resulting in ophthalmoplegia in CPEO and normal eye movements in LHON.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary hyperekplexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Neuromuscular Disorders Health Topic: Sudden Infant Death Syndrome Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) Hereditary hyperekplexia Additional NIH Resources (1 link) National Institute ...

  17. Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies or Charcot-Marie-Tooth diseases: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tazir, Meriem; Hamadouche, Tarik; Nouioua, Sonia; Mathis, Stephane; Vallat, Jean-Michel

    2014-12-15

    Hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies (HMSN) or Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) diseases are the most common degenerative disorders of the peripheral nervous system. However, the frequency of the different subtypes varies within distinct populations. Although more than seventy clinical and genetic forms are known to date, more than 80% of CMT patients in Western countries have genetic abnormalities associated with PMP22, MPZ, MFN2 and GJB1. Given the considerable genetic heterogeneity of CMT, we emphasize the interest of both clinical and pathological specific features such that focused genetic testing could be performed. In this regard, peripheral nerve lesions in GDAP1 mutations (AR CMT1A), such as mitochondrial abnormalities, have been newly demonstrated. Otherwise, while demyelinating autosomal recessive CMT used to be classified as CMT4 (A, B, C …), we propose a simplified classification such as AR CMT1 (A, B, C …), and AR CMT2 for axonal forms. Also, we stress that next generation sequencing techniques, now considered to be the most efficient methods of genetic testing in CMT, will be helpful in molecular diagnosis and research of new genes involved. Finally, while no effective therapy is known to date, ongoing new therapeutic trials such as PXT3003 (a low dose combination of the three already approved drugs baclofen, naltrexone, and D-sorbitol) give hopes for potential curative treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Modeling non-hereditary mechanisms of Alzheimer disease during apoptosis in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Ralf J; Sommer, Cornelia; Leibiger, Christine; Gentier, Romina J; Dumit, Verónica I; Paduch, Katrin; Eisenberg, Tobias; Habernig, Lukas; Trausinger, Gert; Magnes, Christoph; Pieber, Thomas; Sinner, Frank; Dengjel, Jörn; Leeuwen, Fred W V; Kroemer, Guido; Madeo, Frank

    2015-03-20

    Impaired protein degradation and mitochondrial dysfunction are believed to contribute to neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer disease (AD). In patients suffering from non-hereditary AD, UBB +1 , the frameshift variant of ubiquitin B, accumulated in neurons affected by neurofibrillary tangles, which is a pathological hallmark. We established a yeast model expressing high levels of UBB +1 , and could demonstrate that UBB +1 interfered with both the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and mitochondrial function. More precisely, UBB +1 promoted the mitochondrion-localized production of the basic amino acids arginine, ornithine, and lysine, which we identified as the decisive toxic event culminating in apoptosis. Inducing the UPS activity at mitochondria prevented the lethal basic amino acid accumulation and avoided UBB +1 -triggered cell loss. The arginine/ornithine metabolism is altered in brains of AD patients, and VMS1, the mitochondrion-specific UPS component, co-existed with UBB +1 in neurofibrillary tangles. Therefore, our data suggest that aberrant basic amino acid synthesis is a crucial link between UPS dysfunction and mitochondrial damage during AD progression.

  19. Concise Review: Cardiac Disease Modeling Using Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chunbo; Al-Aama, Jumana; Stojkovic, Miodrag; Keavney, Bernard; Trafford, Andrew; Lako, Majlinda; Armstrong, Lyle

    2015-09-01

    Genetic cardiac diseases are major causes of morbidity and mortality. Although animal models have been created to provide some useful insights into the pathogenesis of genetic cardiac diseases, the significant species differences and the lack of genetic information for complex genetic diseases markedly attenuate the application values of such data. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from patient-specific specimens and subsequent derivation of cardiomyocytes offer novel avenues to study the mechanisms underlying cardiac diseases, to identify new causative genes, and to provide insights into the disease aetiology. In recent years, the list of human iPSC-based models for genetic cardiac diseases has been expanding rapidly, although there are still remaining concerns on the level of functionality of iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes and their ability to be used for modeling complex cardiac diseases in adults. This review focuses on the development of cardiomyocyte induction from pluripotent stem cells, the recent progress in heart disease modeling using iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes, and the challenges associated with understanding complex genetic diseases. To address these issues, we examine the similarity between iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes and their ex vivo counterparts and how this relates to the method used to differentiate the pluripotent stem cells into a cardiomyocyte phenotype. We progress to examine categories of congenital cardiac abnormalities that are suitable for iPSC-based disease modeling. © AlphaMed Press.

  20. [Hereditary optic neuropathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milea, D; Verny, C

    2012-10-01

    Hereditary optic neuropathies are a group of heterogeneous conditions affecting both optic nerves, with an autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, X-related or mitochondrial transmission. The two most common non-syndromic hereditary optic neuropathies (Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy and autosomal dominant optic atrophy) are very different in their clinical presentation and their genetic transmission, leading however to a common, non-specific optic nerve atrophy. Beyond the optic atrophy-related visual loss, which is the clinical hallmark of this group of diseases, other associated neurological signs are increasingly recognized. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  1. ORIGINAL ARTICLES Cardiac disease in pregnancy: A 4-year audit ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-06-19

    Jun 19, 2008 ... adolescence. The high maternal morbidity and mortality is due to compromised cardiac function and inability to cope with the physiological adaptations of pregnancy, stress of labour and haemodynamic changes of the puerperium. Eighty per cent of cardiac disease in pregnancy in the developed world is.

  2. Advances in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, Mieke M P; Breur, Johannes M. P. J.; Budde, Ricardo P J; van Oorschot, Joep W M; van Kimmenade, Roland R J; Sieswerda, Gertjan Tj.; Meijboom, Folkert J; Leiner, Tim

    Due to advances in cardiac surgery, survival of patients with congenital heart disease has increased considerably during the past decades. Many of these patients require repeated cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to assess cardiac anatomy and function. In the past decade, technological

  3. Advances in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, M.M.; Breur, J.M.; Budde, R.P.; Oorschot, J.W. van; Kimmenade, R.R. van; Sieswerda, G.T.; Meijboom, F.J.; Leiner, T.

    2015-01-01

    Due to advances in cardiac surgery, survival of patients with congenital heart disease has increased considerably during the past decades. Many of these patients require repeated cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to assess cardiac anatomy and function. In the past decade, technological

  4. Surgical Critical Care for the Trauma Patient with Cardiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woll, Michael M; Maerz, Linda L

    2016-12-01

    The elderly population is rapidly increasing in number. Therefore, geriatric trauma is becoming more prevalent. All practitioners caring for geriatric trauma patients should be familiar with the structural and functional changes naturally occurring in the aging heart, as well as common preexisting cardiac diseases in the geriatric population. Identification of the shock state related to cardiac dysfunction and targeted assessment of perfusion and resuscitation are important when managing elderly patients. Finally, management of cardiac dysfunction in the trauma patient includes an appreciation of the inherent effects of trauma on cardiac function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The Pattern of Cardiac Diseases at the Cardiac Clinic of Jimma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RESULTS: Rheumatic heart disease was the diagnosis in 256 (32.8%) of the cardiac cases on follow-up followed by hypertensive heart disease and cardiomyopathy accounting for 189 (24.2%) and 158 (20.2%) of cases, respectively. Among Rheumatic heart disease patients; male to female ratio was 0.86:1 and the mean ...

  6. Cardiac CT angiography in children with congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siripornpitak, Suvipaporn, E-mail: ssiripornpitak@yahoo.com [Division of Diagnostic Radiology, Department of Diagnostic and Therapeutic Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Pornkul, Ratanaporn [Division of Diagnostic Radiology, Department of Diagnostic and Therapeutic Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Khowsathit, Pongsak [Pediatric Cardiac Unit, Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Layangool, Thanarat; Promphan, Worakan [Pediatric Cardiology Unit, Queen Sirikit National Institute of Child Health, Bangkok (Thailand); Pongpanich, Boonchob [Pediatric Cardiac Unit, Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand)

    2013-07-15

    Cardiac imaging plays an important role in both congenital and acquired heart diseases. Cardiac computed tomography (angiography) cCT(A) is a non-invasive, increasingly popular, complementary modality to echocardiography in evaluation of congenital heart diseases (CHD) in children. Despite radiation exposure, cCT(A) is now commonly used for evaluation of the complex CHD, giving information of both intra-cardiac and extra-cardiac anatomy, coronary arteries, and vascular structures. This review article will focus on the fundamentals and essentials for performing cCT(A) in children, including radiation dose awareness, basic techniques, and strengths and weaknesses of cCT(A) compared with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI), and applications. The limitations of this modality will also be discussed, including the CHD for which cMRI may be substituted.

  7. The hereditary basis of bicuspid aortic valve disease: a role for screening?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gharibeh L

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Lara Gharibeh, Mona Nemer Molecular Genetics and Cardiac Regeneration Laboratory, Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Immunology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada Abstract: Over the past years, human and molecular genetic studies have provided new understanding of valve development and the molecular pathogenesis of bicuspid aortic valve (BAV disease. BAV is an autosomal dominant disease with incomplete penetrance and is found to affect 1%–2% of the population. It can occur in isolation or coexists with other congenital heart diseases such as ventricular septal defect and tetralogy of fallot. BAV is a risk factor for premature cardiovascular disease and can lead to severe complications affecting the aorta and the valves. To date, NOTCH1 and GATA5 are the only genes linked to human BAV, and the genetic basis for most BAVs remains unidentified. Large-scale screening as well as whole exome sequencing studies hold promise for uncovering BAV-causing genes. Similarly, molecular analysis of valve development in animal models is needed for better insight of normal and pathologic valve formation. Together, these approaches will undoubtedly accelerate discovery of disease-causing genes opening the way for early diagnosis of BAV and prevention of valve degeneration and cardiovascular complications. Keywords: congenital heart disease, valvulogenesis, genetic screening

  8. Cortical excitability changes distinguish the motor neuron disease phenotypes from hereditary spastic paraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geevasinga, N; Menon, P; Sue, C M; Kumar, K R; Ng, K; Yiannikas, C; Kiernan, M C; Vucic, S

    2015-05-01

    Cortical hyperexcitability has been identified as an important pathogenic mechanism in motor neuron disease (MND). The issue as to whether cortical hyperexcitability is a common process across the MND phenotypes, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and primary lateral sclerosis (PLS), remains unresolved. Separately, the clinical distinction between PLS and 'mimic disorders' such as hereditary spastic paraparesis (HSP) may be difficult, potentially delaying diagnosis. Consequently, the aim of the present study was to determine the nature and spectrum of cortical excitability changes across the MND phenotypes, and to determine whether the presence of cortical dysfunction distinguishes PLS from HSP. Cortical excitability studies were undertaken on a cohort of 14 PLS, 82 ALS and 13 HSP patients with mutations in the spastin gene. Cortical hyperexcitability, as heralded by reduction of short interval intracortical inhibition (PLS 0.26%, -3.8% to 1.4%; ALS -0.15%, -3.6% to 7.0%; P < 0.01) and cortical silent period duration (CSPPLS 172.2 ± 5.4 ms; CSPALS 178.1 ± 5.1 ms; P < 0.001), along with an increase in intracortical facilitation was evident in ALS and PLS phenotypes, although appeared more frequently in ALS. Inexcitability of the motor cortex was more frequent in PLS (PLS 71%, ALS 24%, P < 0.0001). Cortical excitability was preserved in HSP. Cortical dysfunction appears to be an intrinsic process across the MND phenotypes, with cortical inexcitability predominating in PLS and cortical hyperexcitability predominating in ALS. Importantly, cortical excitability was preserved in HSP, thereby suggesting that the presence of cortical dysfunction could help differentiate PLS from HSP in a clinical setting. © 2015 EAN.

  9. Hereditary Neuropathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the appearance of an inverted champagne glass) or scoliosis (curvature of the spine). The symptoms of hereditary neuropathies may be apparent ... the appearance of an inverted champagne glass) or scoliosis (curvature of the spine). The symptoms of hereditary neuropathies may be apparent ...

  10. Hereditary spastic paraplegia SPG4: what is known and not known about the disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solowska, Joanna M; Baas, Peter W

    2015-09-01

    Mutations in more than 70 distinct loci and more than 50 mutated gene products have been identified in patients with hereditary spastic paraplegias, a diverse group of neurological disorders characterized predominantly, but not exclusively, by progressive lower limb spasticity and weakness resulting from distal degeneration of corticospinal tract axons. Mutations in the SPAST (previously known as SPG4) gene that encodes the microtubule-severing protein called spastin, are the most common cause of the disease. The aetiology of the disease is poorly understood, but partial loss of microtubule-severing activity resulting from inactivating mutations in one SPAST allele is the most postulated explanation. Microtubule severing is important for regulating various aspects of the microtubule array, including microtubule number, length, and mobility. In addition, higher numbers of dynamic plus-ends of microtubules, resulting from microtubule-severing events, may play a role in endosomal tubulation and fission. Even so, there is growing evidence that decreased severing of microtubules does not fully explain HSP-SPG4. The presence of two translation initiation codons in SPAST allows synthesis of two spastin isoforms: a full-length isoform called M1 and a slightly shorter isoform called M87. M87 is more abundant in both neuronal and non-neuronal tissues. Studies on rodents suggest that M1 is only readily detected in adult spinal cord, which is where nerve degeneration mainly occurs in humans with HSP-SPG4. M1, due to its hydrophobic N-terminal domain not shared by M87, may insert into endoplasmic reticulum membrane, and together with reticulons, atlastin and REEP1, may play a role in the morphogenesis of this organelle. Some mutated spastins may act in dominant-negative fashion to lower microtubule-severing activity, but others have detrimental effects on neurons without further lowering microtubule severing. The observed adverse effects on microtubule dynamics, axonal

  11. Hereditary spastic paraplegia SPG4: what is known and not known about the disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solowska, Joanna M.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in more than 70 distinct loci and more than 50 mutated gene products have been identified in patients with hereditary spastic paraplegias, a diverse group of neurological disorders characterized predominantly, but not exclusively, by progressive lower limb spasticity and weakness resulting from distal degeneration of corticospinal tract axons. Mutations in the SPAST (previously known as SPG4) gene that encodes the microtubule-severing protein called spastin, are the most common cause of the disease. The aetiology of the disease is poorly understood, but partial loss of microtubule-severing activity resulting from inactivating mutations in one SPAST allele is the most postulated explanation. Microtubule severing is important for regulating various aspects of the microtubule array, including microtubule number, length, and mobility. In addition, higher numbers of dynamic plus-ends of microtubules, resulting from microtubule-severing events, may play a role in endosomal tubulation and fission. Even so, there is growing evidence that decreased severing of microtubules does not fully explain HSP-SPG4. The presence of two translation initiation codons in SPAST allows synthesis of two spastin isoforms: a full-length isoform called M1 and a slightly shorter isoform called M87. M87 is more abundant in both neuronal and non-neuronal tissues. Studies on rodents suggest that M1 is only readily detected in adult spinal cord, which is where nerve degeneration mainly occurs in humans with HSP-SPG4. M1, due to its hydrophobic N-terminal domain not shared by M87, may insert into endoplasmic reticulum membrane, and together with reticulons, atlastin and REEP1, may play a role in the morphogenesis of this organelle. Some mutated spastins may act in dominant-negative fashion to lower microtubule-severing activity, but others have detrimental effects on neurons without further lowering microtubule severing. The observed adverse effects on microtubule dynamics, axonal

  12. Preoperative Feeding Neonates With Cardiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scahill, Carly J; Graham, Eric M; Atz, Andrew M; Bradley, Scott M; Kavarana, Minoo N; Zyblewski, Sinai C

    2017-01-01

    The potential for necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) in neonates requiring cardiac surgery has contributed largely to wide feeding practice variations and a hesitation to initiate enteral feeding during the preoperative period, specifically those patients with hypoplastic left heart syndrome. A retrospective chart review of neonates undergoing cardiac surgery at a single institution between July 2011 and July 2013 was performed. The primary objective of this study was to determine if preoperative feeding was associated with NEC in neonates requiring cardiac surgery. Univariable and multivariable analyses were performed to evaluate the relationship between preoperative feeding and NEC. Secondary outcomes including growth failure, total ventilator days, total length of stay, and tube-assisted feeds at discharge were analyzed. One hundred thirty consecutive neonates who required cardiac surgery were included in the analysis. Preoperative feeding occurred in 61% (n = 79). The overall prevalence of NEC was 9% (12/130), including three neonates with surgical NEC. There was no difference in the prevalence of NEC between the preoperative feeding and nil per os (NPO) groups. Preoperative NPO status was associated with longer ventilator-dependent days ( P = .01) but was not associated with worsened growth failure, longer length of stay, or increased prevalence of tube-assisted feeds at discharge. In this study cohort, preoperative feeding was associated with a low prevalence of NEC. Larger prospective studies evaluating the safety and benefits of preoperative feeding in cardiac neonates are warranted.

  13. Cardiac and renal dysfunction is associated with progressive hearing loss in patients with Fabry disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Köping

    Full Text Available Fabry disease (FD is an X-linked recessive hereditary lysosomal storage disorder which results in the accumulation of globotriaosylceramid (Gb3 in tissues of kidney and heart as well as central and peripheral nervous system. Besides prominent renal and cardiac organ involvement, cochlear symptoms like high-frequency hearing loss and tinnitus are frequently found with yet no comprehensive data available in the literature.To examine hearing loss in patients with FD depending on cardiac and renal function.Single-center study with 68 FD patients enrolled between 2012 and 2016 at the Department of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Plastic, Aesthetic and Reconstructive Head and Neck Surgery of the University of Würzburg. Every subject underwent an oto-rhino-laryngological examination as well as behavioral, electrophysiological and electroacoustical audiological testing. High-frequency thresholds were evaluated by using a modified PTA6 (0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8 and HF-PTA (6, 8 kHz. Renal function was measured by eGFR, cardiac impairment was graduated by NYHA class.Sensorineural hearing loss was detected in 58.8% of the cohort, which occurred typically in sudden episodes and affected especially high frequencies. Hearing loss is asymmetric, beginning unilaterally and affecting the contralateral ear later. Tinnitus was reported by 41.2%. Renal and cardiac impairment influenced the severity of hearing loss (p < 0.05.High frequency hearing loss is a common problem in patients with FD. Although not life-threatening, it can seriously reduce quality of life and should be taken into account in diagnosis and therapy. Optimized extensive hearing assessment including higher frequency thresholds should be used.

  14. Hereditary hemochromatosis (HFE) genotypes in heart failure: relation to etiology and prognosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Daniel Vega; Pecini, Redi; Gustafsson, Finn

    2010-01-01

    It is believed that hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) might play a role in cardiac disease (heart failure (HF) and ischemia). Mutations within several genes are HH-associated, the most common being the HFE gene. In a large cohort of HF patients, we sought to determine the etiological role...

  15. Hereditary hemochromatosis (HFE) genotypes in heart failure: relation to etiology and prognosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Daniel Vega; Pecini, Redi; Gustafsson, Finn

    2010-01-01

    It is believed that hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) might play a role in cardiac disease (heart failure (HF) and ischemia). Mutations within several genes are HH-associated, the most common being the HFE gene. In a large cohort of HF patients, we sought to determine the etiological role and the p...

  16. ["Euthanasia" operation by Nazis on patients with psychiatric or hereditary diseases, and Bishop von Galen of Münster].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Hyonosuke

    2003-07-01

    In so-called "euthanasia" operations, Nazis murdered patients with psychiatric or hereditary diseases in large numbers. Psychiatric patients in Germany were sent to six institutions, where they were deprived of their lives in gas chambers. In his sermon delivered on 3rd August, 1941, at St Lambert's Church in Münster, Bishop von Galen of Münster intensely condemned this cruel operation in public. Quoting the fifth commandment, "Thou shall not kill", he said it was sinful to kill innocent people on account of their unproductiveness. By the influence of this brave sermon, Hitler had to order the closure of the institutions, though the "euthanasia" operation itself was secretly continued.

  17. Basic Concepts in Metastatic Cardiac Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Vlachostergios, Panagiotis J.; Daliani, Danai D.; Papandreou, Christos N.

    2012-01-01

    The involvement of the heart in metastatic cancer is a rare clinical diagnosis, as it may be asymptomatic or symptoms, when present, may be attributed to other causes. Issues regarding incidence, intracardiac location, clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment of metastatic cardiac tumors will be discussed here.

  18. Conceptual Foundations of Systems Biology Explaining Complex Cardiac Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louridas, George E; Lourida, Katerina G

    2017-02-21

    Systems biology is an important concept that connects molecular biology and genomics with computing science, mathematics and engineering. An endeavor is made in this paper to associate basic conceptual ideas of systems biology with clinical medicine. Complex cardiac diseases are clinical phenotypes generated by integration of genetic, molecular and environmental factors. Basic concepts of systems biology like network construction, modular thinking, biological constraints (downward biological direction) and emergence (upward biological direction) could be applied to clinical medicine. Especially, in the field of cardiology, these concepts can be used to explain complex clinical cardiac phenotypes like chronic heart failure and coronary artery disease. Cardiac diseases are biological complex entities which like other biological phenomena can be explained by a systems biology approach. The above powerful biological tools of systems biology can explain robustness growth and stability during disease process from modulation to phenotype. The purpose of the present review paper is to implement systems biology strategy and incorporate some conceptual issues raised by this approach into the clinical field of complex cardiac diseases. Cardiac disease process and progression can be addressed by the holistic realistic approach of systems biology in order to define in better terms earlier diagnosis and more effective therapy.

  19. Conceptual Foundations of Systems Biology Explaining Complex Cardiac Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George E. Louridas

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Systems biology is an important concept that connects molecular biology and genomics with computing science, mathematics and engineering. An endeavor is made in this paper to associate basic conceptual ideas of systems biology with clinical medicine. Complex cardiac diseases are clinical phenotypes generated by integration of genetic, molecular and environmental factors. Basic concepts of systems biology like network construction, modular thinking, biological constraints (downward biological direction and emergence (upward biological direction could be applied to clinical medicine. Especially, in the field of cardiology, these concepts can be used to explain complex clinical cardiac phenotypes like chronic heart failure and coronary artery disease. Cardiac diseases are biological complex entities which like other biological phenomena can be explained by a systems biology approach. The above powerful biological tools of systems biology can explain robustness growth and stability during disease process from modulation to phenotype. The purpose of the present review paper is to implement systems biology strategy and incorporate some conceptual issues raised by this approach into the clinical field of complex cardiac diseases. Cardiac disease process and progression can be addressed by the holistic realistic approach of systems biology in order to define in better terms earlier diagnosis and more effective therapy.

  20. Buerger's Disease and Anaesthesia: The Neglected Cardiac Angle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shagun Bhatia Shah

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Distal limb amputations and respiratory complications are common in patients with Buerger’s disease. Nicotine in cigarette is arrhythmogenic as it blocks cardiac potassium channels. Preoperative Holter ECG monitoring may be useful if preoperative electrocardiogram is normal. If the patient is undergoing major surgery, preservative free lignocaine & amiodarone infusions and a cardioverter defibrillator should be available for the intraoperative cardiac rhythm disturbances.

  1. Pulmonary vascular complications of hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Circo, Sebastian; Gossage, James R

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to present the latest advances and recommendations in the diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary vascular complications associated with hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT): pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs), pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), pulmonary hypertension associated with high output cardiac failure or liver vascular malformations, haemoptysis, haemothorax and thromboembolic disease. Transthoracic contrast echocardiography has been validated as a screening tool for PAVM in patients with suspected HHT. Advancements in genetic testing support its use in family members at risk as a cost-effective measure. Therapy with bevacizumab in patients with high output cardiac failure and severe liver AVMs showed promising results. PAH tends to be more aggressive in HHT type 2 patients. Patients suffering from this elusive disease should be referred to HHT specialized centres to ensure a standardized and timely approach to diagnosis and management.

  2. Morphometric analysis of progressive changes in hereditary cerebellar cortical degenerative disease (abiotrophy) in rabbits caused by abnormal synaptogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Junko; Yamada, Naoaki; Kobayashi, Ryosuke; Tsuchitani, Minoru; Kobayashi, Yoshiyasu

    2015-01-01

    We previously investigated rabbit hereditary cerebellar cortical degenerative disease, called cerebellar cortical abiotrophy in the veterinary field, and determined that the pathogenesis of this disease is the result of failed synaptogenesis between parallel fibers and Purkinje cells. In this study, longitudinal changes in the development and atrophy of the cerebellum of rabbits with hereditary abiotrophy after birth were morphometrically examined (postnatal day [PD] 15 and 42) using image analysis. Although development of the cerebellum in rabbits with abiotrophy was observed from PD 15 to PD 42, the growth rate of the cerebellum was less than that in normal rabbits. In rabbits with abiotrophy, the number of granular cells undergoing apoptosis was significantly higher at PD 15 and dramatically decreased at PD 42. The number of granular cells did not increase from PD 15 to 42. The synaptogenesis peak at PD 15 occurred when the largest number of apoptotic granular cells in rabbits with abiotrophy was observed. Although 26% to 36% of parallel fiber terminals formed synaptic junctions with Purkinje cell spines, the remainder did not at PD 15 and 42. The rate of failure of synaptogenesis in the present study might be specific to this case of abiotrophy. Morphometric analysis revealed detailed changes in development and atrophy in animals with postnatal cerebellar disease occurring soon after birth. PMID:26028816

  3. Hereditary iron and copper deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaseth, Jan; Flaten, Trond Peder; Andersen, Ole

    2007-01-01

    Hereditary deposition of iron (primary haemochromatosis) or copper (Wilson's disease) are autosomal recessive metabolic disease characterized by progressive liver pathology and subsequent involvement of various other organs. The prevalence of primary haemochromatosis is approximately 0.5%, about...

  4. High-Risk Cardiac Disease in Pregnancy Part I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elkayam, Uri; Goland, Sorel; Pieper, Petronella G.; Silverside, Candice K.

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of pregnancy in women with cardiovascular disease is rising, primarily due to the increased number of women with congenital heart disease reaching childbearing age and the changing demographics associated with advancing maternal age. Although most cardiac conditions are well tolerated

  5. Candesartan restored cardiac Hsp72 expression and tolerance against reperfusion injury in hereditary insulin-resistant rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Yayoi; Takahashi, Naohiko; Fukui, Akira; Nagano-Torigoe, Yasuko; Thuc, Luong Cong; Teshima, Yasushi; Shinohara, Tetsuji; Wakisaka, Osamu; Ooie, Tatsuhiko; Murozono, Yukichi; Yufu, Kunio; Nakagawa, Mikiko; Hara, Masahide; Yoshimatsu, Hironobu; Saikawa, Tetsunori

    2011-12-01

    We tested the hypothesis that candesartan, an angiotensin II (AII) type 1 receptor antagonist, would restore the depressed phosphatidylinositol 3 (PI3) kinase-dependent Akt phosphorylation, an essential signal to induce heat-shock protein 72 (Hsp72) in response to hyperthermia, in Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima fatty (OLETF) rats. At 14 weeks of age, male OLETF rats and Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka (LETO) rats were treated with candesartan (0.25 mg/kg/day) for 2 weeks. Thereafter, hyperthermia (43°C for 20 min) was applied. We observed the following: (i) Candesartan did not improve insulin sensitivity in OLETF rats. (ii) Candesartan restored depressed PI3 kinase-dependent Akt phosphorylation and Hsp72 expression in OLETF rat hearts. (iii) Cardiac ventricular tissue contents of AII were greater in OLETF rats, which were suppressed by candesartan. (iv) Cardiac levels of phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) phosphorylation were greater in OLETF rats, which were suppressed by candesartan. In cultured cardiomyocytes, application of AII induced PTEN phosphorylation, which was suppressed by candesartan. (v) In high-fat diet insulin-resistant rats, similar results were observed with respect to Hsp72 expression, Akt phosphorylation and PTEN phosphorylation. (vi) In isolated, perfused heart experiments, reperfusion-induced cardiac functional recovery was suppressed in OLETF rat hearts, which was improved by candesartan. Our results suggest that the depression of PI3 kinase-dependent Akt activation in response to hyperthermia in OLETF rats can be restored by candesartan. Substantial activation of the renin-angiotensin system, represented by increased myocardial AII content and subsequent PTEN phosphorylation, may underlie the pathogenesis which is ameliorated by candesartan.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary multiple osteochondromas

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Topic: Benign Tumors Health Topic: Bone Diseases Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) Hereditary multiple osteochondromas Educational Resources (6 links) Cleveland Clinic: ...

  7. Genetic heterogeneity of hereditary diseases of nervous system: problems and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. L. Dadali

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A hereditary disorders of the nervous system is one of the largest group of human monogenic disorders with high-grade genetic heterogeneity and clinical polymorphism. The main types of genetic heterogeneity and their possible causes are explained by giving typical examples of different nosological forms. The basic problems and feasible solution of medico-genetic counseling and education of high-risk families in case of genetic heterogeneity are discussed.

  8. Overview of cardiac markers in heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarolim, Petr

    2014-03-01

    Cardiac troponins I and T have been the cornerstone of diagnostics of acute coronary syndrome for almost 20 years. Natriuretic peptides have established themselves in heart failure during the last decade. These and additional promising biomarkers, such as ST-2, galectin-3, GDF-15, copeptin, midregional proadrenomedullin, and the markers of glomerular filtration rate and kidney injury, are reviewed in groups corresponding to the pathophysiological processes they probe--cardiomyocyte injury, myocyte stress, inflammation, oxidative stress, plaque instability, extracellular-matrix remodeling, or those markers grouped in the neurohormone category. Biomarkers linking the renal and cardiac functions and microRNAs and metabolomic markers are addressed as well. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Depression and Cardiac Disease: Epidemiology, Mechanisms, and Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeff C. Huffman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD, depression is common, persistent, and associated with worse health-related quality of life, recurrent cardiac events, and mortality. Both physiological and behavioral factors—including endothelial dysfunction, platelet abnormalities, inflammation, autonomic nervous system dysfunction, and reduced engagement in health-promoting activities—may link depression with adverse cardiac outcomes. Because of the potential impact of depression on quality of life and cardiac outcomes, the American Heart Association has recommended routine depression screening of all cardiac patients with the 2- and 9-item Patient Health Questionnaires. However, despite the availability of these easy-to-use screening tools and effective treatments, depression is underrecognized and undertreated in patients with CVD. In this paper, we review the literature on epidemiology, phenomenology, comorbid conditions, and risk factors for depression in cardiac disease. We outline the associations between depression and cardiac outcomes, as well as the mechanisms that may mediate these links. Finally, we discuss the evidence for and against routine depression screening in patients with CVD and make specific recommendations for when and how to assess for depression in this high-risk population.

  10. Home mechanical ventilation in childhood-onset hereditary neuromuscular diseases: 13 years' experience at a single center in Korea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Joo Han

    Full Text Available Children with hereditary neuromuscular diseases (NMDs are at a high risk of morbidity and mortality related to respiratory failure. The use of home mechanical ventilation (HMV has saved the lives of many children with NMD but, due to a lack of studies, dependable guidelines are not available. We drew upon our experience to compare the various underlying NMDs and to evaluate HMV with regard to respiratory morbidity, the proper indications and timing for its use, and to develop a policy to improve the quality of home noninvasive ventilation (NIV.We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of 57 children with childhood-onset hereditary NMDs in whom HMV was initiated between January 2000 and May 2013 at Seoul National University Children's Hospital. The degree of respiratory morbidity was estimated by the frequency and duration of hospitalizations caused by respiratory distress.The most common NMD was spinal muscular atrophy (SMA, n = 33. Emergent mechanical ventilation was initiated in 44% of the patients before the confirmed diagnosis, and the indicators of pre-HMV respiratory morbidity (e.g., extubation trials, hypoxia, hospitalizations, and intensive care unit stay were greater in these patients than in others. The proportion of post-HMV hospitalizations (range, 0.00-0.52; median, 0.01 was lower than that of pre-HMV hospitalizations (0.02-1.00; 0.99 (P < 0.001. Eight patients were able to maintain home NIV. The main causes of NIV failure were air leakage and a large amount of airway secretions.The application of HMV helped reduce respiratory morbidity in children with childhood-onset hereditary NMD. Patients with SMA type I can benefit from an early diagnosis and the timely application of HMV. The choice between invasive and noninvasive HMV should be based on the patient's age and NIV trial tolerance. Systematic follow-up guidelines provided by a multidisciplinary team are needed.

  11. High-Risk Cardiac Disease in Pregnancy: Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkayam, Uri; Goland, Sorel; Pieper, Petronella G; Silverside, Candice K

    2016-07-26

    The incidence of pregnancy in women with cardiovascular disease is rising, primarily due to the increased number of women with congenital heart disease reaching childbearing age and the changing demographics associated with advancing maternal age. Although most cardiac conditions are well tolerated during pregnancy and women can deliver safely with favorable outcomes, there are some cardiac conditions that have significant maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this paper is to review the available published reports and provide recommendations on the management of women with high-risk cardiovascular conditions during pregnancy. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Eosinophilic cardiac disease: Molecular, clinical and imaging aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Séguéla, Pierre-Emmanuel; Iriart, Xavier; Acar, Philippe; Montaudon, Michel; Roudaut, Raymond; Thambo, Jean-Benoit

    2015-04-01

    Eosinophilia may be responsible for cardiac injuries of widely varying severity, from acute myocarditis to endomyocardial fibrosis. In this review, we present both the molecular mechanisms that are responsible for these lesions and their clinical and paraclinical aspects. Numerous aetiologies can lead to severe eosinophilia, but these are mainly represented by hypersensitivity reactions, rheumatological diseases and hypereosinophilic syndrome. Because cardiac involvement may be extremely severe, echocardiography should be always performed in the context of eosinophilia and appropriate therapeutics should be started rapidly in order to limit the progression of the disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Advances in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Driessen, Mieke M.P. [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); The Interuniversity Cardiology Institute of the Netherlands (ICIN) - Netherlands Heart Institute, PO Box 19258, Utrecht (Netherlands); Breur, Johannes M.P.J. [Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Budde, Ricardo P.J.; Oorschot, Joep W.M. van; Leiner, Tim [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kimmenade, Roland R.J. van; Sieswerda, Gertjan Tj [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Meijboom, Folkert J. [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2015-01-01

    Due to advances in cardiac surgery, survival of patients with congenital heart disease has increased considerably during the past decades. Many of these patients require repeated cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to assess cardiac anatomy and function. In the past decade, technological advances have enabled faster and more robust cardiovascular magnetic resonance with improved image quality and spatial as well as temporal resolution. This review aims to provide an overview of advances in cardiovascular magnetic resonance hardware and acquisition techniques relevant to both pediatric and adult patients with congenital heart disease and discusses the techniques used to assess function, anatomy, flow and tissue characterization. (orig.)

  14. Mapping arginine methylation in the human body and cardiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onwuli, Donatus O; Rigau-Roca, Laura; Cawthorne, Chris; Beltran-Alvarez, Pedro

    2017-01-01

    Arginine methylation (ArgMe) is one of the most ubiquitous PTMs, and hundreds of proteins undergo ArgMe in, for example, brain. However, the scope of ArgMe in many tissues, including the heart, is currently underexplored. Here, we aimed to (i) identify proteins undergoing ArgMe in human organs, and (ii) expose the relevance of ArgMe in cardiac disease. The publicly available proteomic data is used to search for ArgMe in 13 human tissues. To induce H9c2 cardiac-like cell hypertrophy glucose is used. The results show that ArgMe is mainly tissue-specific; nevertheless, the authors suggest an embryonic origin of core ArgMe events. In the heart, 103 mostly novel ArgMe sites in 58 nonhistone proteins are found. The authors provide compelling evidence that cardiac protein ArgMe is relevant to cardiomyocyte ontology, and important for proper cardiac function. This is highlighted by the fact that genetic mutations affecting methylated arginine positions are often associated with cardiac disease, including hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The pilot experimental data suggesting significant changes in ArgMe profiles of H9c2 cells upon induction of cell hypertrophy using glucose is provided. The work calls for in-depth investigation of ArgMe in normal and diseased tissues using methods including clinical proteomics. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. ORGANIZATION OF PSYCHOLOGY AND PEDAGOGICAL CARE IN CHILDREN WITH SEVERE CHRONIC HEREDITARY METABOLIC DISEASES REHABILITATION (AT THE MODEL OF MUCOPOLYSACCHARIDOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. B. Lazurenko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The article contains the issue of correction-pedagogical influence, depending on severity and duration of the disease, structure of the health disorders, grade of the cognitive impairment, type of the emotional reactions and behavioral characteristics of the child, that means independence on the child’s age. The stages of corrective and pedagogical care, ways of work with family, organization of the education and training process for children with hereditary metabolic diseases (at the model of mucopolysaccharidosis are described. It is proved, that including of the corrective and pedagogical care into the rehabilitation provides the observation by the specialists the psychic development dynamics as one of the most significant indicators of children health, increases efficacy of enormous financial costs by means of children socialization and psychological potential of the able-bodied family members preserving. 

  16. [Cardiac reserve in Parkinson's disease and exercise therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirayama, Masaaki; Nakamura, Tomohiko; Sobue, Gen

    2013-01-01

    The clinical feature of Parkinson's disease (PD) is not based on the identification of the extrapyramidal symptom such as bradykinesia, restinbg tremor, rigidity, but also other non-motor symptom (REM sleep disorder, autonomic dysfunction, hyposmia etc). According to the cardio-sympathetic dysfunction, it is well known abnormal MIBG and orthostatic hypotension finding was seen in early disease stage. Furthermore denervation supersensitivity using β1 stimulant correlates the severity of MIBG image, so that this abnormal cardiac function induces inadequate cardiac capacity for exercise. Inadequate cardiac capacity makes easy fatigability, which correlates the abnormal MIBG image and cardio-sympathetic damage. So it is difficult to prescribe a specific exercise program to meet individual PD patients needs. Music therapy and trunk exercise (for example Tai-Chi exercise) are better suited for PD patients.

  17. Sudden cardiac death and coronary disease in the young

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zachariasardóttir, Sára; Risgaard, Bjarke; Ågesen, Frederik Nybye

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sudden cardiac death caused by coronary artery disease (CAD-SCD) is the most frequent cause of SCD in persons ... have previously identified all sudden cardiac deaths in Denmark through review of death certificates and autopsy reports including all deaths between 2000 and 2006 in individuals aged 18-35years and all deaths between 2007 and 2009 in individuals aged 18-49years. In this study we included the 197...... to death. CONCLUSION: This nationwide study found several differences in the pathologic lesions of the heart in victims aged 18-35 and 36-49years, which might be associated with different disease progression leading to death in these age groups. We also report a high frequency of cardiac symptoms prior...

  18. Hereditary retinal eye diseases in childhood and youth affecting the central retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin M Nentwich

    2013-01-01

    Classic examinations for patients suffering from hereditary retinal dystrophies of the central retina are funduscopy - also using red-free light - visual-field tests, electrophysiologic tests as electro-retinogram [ERG] and multifocal ERG and tests evaluating color vision. Recently, new imaging modalities have been introduced into the clinical practice. The significance of these new methods such as high-resolution spectral-domain optic coherence tomography [SD-OCT] and fundus autofluorescence will be discussed as well as "next generation sequencing" as a new method for the analysis of genetic mutations in a larger number of patients.

  19. Hereditary gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Carla; Seruca, Raquel; Carneiro, Fátima

    2009-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a heterogeneous and highly prevalent disease, being the fourth most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer associated death worldwide. Most cases are sporadic and familial clustering is observed in about 10% of the cases. Hereditary gastric cancer accounts for a very low percentage of cases (1-3%) and a single hereditary syndrome - Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer (HDGC) - has been characterised. Among families that fulfil the clinical criteria for HDGC, about 40% carry CDH1 germline mutations, the genetic cause of the others being unknown. The management options for CDH1 asymptomatic germline carriers are intensive endoscopic surveillance and prophylactic gastrectomy. In this chapter we review the pathophysiology and clinicopathological features of HDGC and discuss issues related with genetic testing and management of family members.

  20. Hereditary Angioedema in Childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, Line; Bygum, Anette

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare inherited disease that is often difficult to diagnose. We report a case of a 9-year-old boy with a spontaneous mutation causing HAE, diagnosed after a life-threatening episode of angioedema of the head and upper respiratory tract after a 5-year history of r...

  1. Update on ischemic heart disease and intensive cardiac care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sionis, Alessandro; Ruiz-Nodar, Juan Miguel; Fernández-Ortiz, Antonio; Marín, Francisco; Abu-Assi, Emad; Díaz-Castro, Oscar; Nuñez-Gil, Ivan J; Lidón, Rosa-Maria

    2015-03-01

    This article summarizes the main developments reported in 2014 on ischemic heart disease, together with the most important innovations in intensive cardiac care. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Exercise-Based Cardiac Rehabilitation for Coronary Heart Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderson, Lindsey; Oldridge, Neil; Thompson, David R

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although recommended in guidelines for the management of coronary heart disease (CHD), concerns have been raised about the applicability of evidence from existing meta-analyses of exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR). OBJECTIVES: The goal of this study is to update the Cochrane...

  3. Extracellular matrix modulator lysyl oxidase colocalizes with amyloid-beta pathology in Alzheimer's disease and hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis-Dutch type

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilhelmus, M.M.M.; Bol, J.G.J.M.; van Duinen, S.G.; Drukarch, B.

    2013-01-01

    Accumulation of amyloid-beta (Aβ) in brain vessel walls and parenchyma, known as cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) and senile plaques (SPs), respectively, plays a key role in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis of the Dutch type (HCHWA-D) pathogenesis.

  4. Increased risk of sudden cardiac arrest in obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warnier, Miriam Jacoba; Blom, Marieke Tabo; Bardai, Abdennasser

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We aimed to determine whether (1) patients with obstructive pulmonary disease (OPD) have an increased risk of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) due to ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation (VT/VF), and (2) the SCA risk is mediated by cardiovascular risk-profile and/or respiratory drug use....... METHODS: A community-based case-control study was performed, with 1310 cases of SCA of the ARREST study and 5793 age, sex and SCA-date matched non-SCA controls from the PHARMO database. Only incident SCA cases, age older than 40 years, that resulted from unequivocal cardiac causes...

  5. Mitochondrial DNA Mutation Associated with Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Douglas C.; Singh, Gurparkash; Lott, Marie T.; Hodge, Judy A.; Schurr, Theodore G.; Lezza, Angela M. S.; Elsas, Louis J.; Nikoskelainen, Eeva K.

    1988-12-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is a maternally inherited disease resulting in optic nerve degeneration and cardiac dysrhythmia. A mitochondrial DNA replacement mutation was identified that correlated with this disease in multiple families. This mutation converted a highly conserved arginine to a histidine at codon 340 in the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 gene and eliminated an Sfa NI site, thus providing a simple diagnostic test. This finding demonstrated that a nucleotide change in a mitochondrial DNA energy production gene can result in a neurological disease.

  6. Genetics and Genomics of Single-Gene Cardiovascular Diseases: Common Hereditary Cardiomyopathies as Prototypes of Single-Gene Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marian, Ali J; van Rooij, Eva; Roberts, Robert

    2016-12-27

    This is the first of 2 review papers on genetics and genomics appearing as part of the series on "omics." Genomics pertains to all components of an organism's genes, whereas genetics involves analysis of a specific gene or genes in the context of heredity. The paper provides introductory comments, describes the basis of human genetic diversity, and addresses the phenotypic consequences of genetic variants. Rare variants with large effect sizes are responsible for single-gene disorders, whereas complex polygenic diseases are typically due to multiple genetic variants, each exerting a modest effect size. To illustrate the clinical implications of genetic variants with large effect sizes, 3 common forms of hereditary cardiomyopathies are discussed as prototypic examples of single-gene disorders, including their genetics, clinical manifestations, pathogenesis, and treatment. The genetic basis of complex traits is discussed in a separate paper. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Neuropsychological functioning following cardiac transplant in Danon disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salisbury, David; Meredith, Katherine

    2017-06-08

    To present a unique case involving a 31-year-old male with Danon disease (diagnosed at 14) who received cardiac transplant and subsequent cardiac re-transplant. Brief report/case study. Serial neuropsychological assessment across a 23-year span along with a review of school records and prior psychoeducational assessment. A consistent pattern of higher level cognitive impairment from childhood through adulthood was found. This pattern is interpreted in light of the sparse literature regarding cognitive and adaptive functioning related to Danon disease. The noteworthy aspects of this case include the preservation of some academic abilities and an unexpected level of functional independence given cognitive concerns. This case study further explores the nature of the deficits related to Danon disease and highlights the benefits of neuropsychological evaluation to guide functional interventions and maximize level of independence across the life span.

  8. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Osler-Weber-Rendu syndrome Health Topic: Arteriovenous Malformations Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia Additional NIH Resources (1 link) National ...

  9. The Domestic Cat as a Large Animal Model for Characterization of Disease and Therapeutic Intervention in Hereditary Retinal Blindness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Narfström

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Large mammals, including canids and felids, are affected by spontaneously occurring hereditary retinal diseases with similarities to those of humans. The large mammal models may be used for thorough clinical characterization of disease processes, understanding the effects of specific mutations, elucidation of disease mechanisms, and for development of therapeutic intervention. Two well-characterized feline models are addressed in this paper. The first model is the autosomal recessive, slowly progressive, late-onset, rod-cone degenerative disease caused by a mutation in the CEP290 gene. The second model addressed in this paper is the autosomal dominant early onset rod cone dysplasia, putatively caused by the mutation found in the CRX gene. Therapeutic trials have been performed mainly in the former type including stem cell therapy, retinal transplantation, and development of ocular prosthetics. Domestic cats, having large human-like eyes with comparable spontaneous retinal diseases, are also considered useful for gene replacement therapy, thus functioning as effective model systems for further research.

  10. Multiple Roles of Pitx2 in Cardiac Development and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Franco

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac development is a complex morphogenetic process initiated as bilateral cardiogenic mesoderm is specified at both sides of the gastrulating embryo. Soon thereafter, these cardiogenic cells fuse at the embryonic midline configuring a symmetrical linear cardiac tube. Left/right bilateral asymmetry is first detected in the forming heart as the cardiac tube bends to the right, and subsequently, atrial and ventricular chambers develop. Molecular signals emanating from the node confer distinct left/right signalling pathways that ultimately lead to activation of the homeobox transcription factor Pitx2 in the left side of distinct embryonic organ anlagen, including the developing heart. Asymmetric expression of Pitx2 has therefore been reported during different cardiac developmental stages, and genetic deletion of Pitx2 provided evidence of key regulatory roles of this transcription factor during cardiogenesis and thus congenital heart diseases. More recently, impaired Pitx2 function has also been linked to arrhythmogenic processes, providing novel roles in the adult heart. In this manuscript, we provide a state-of-the-art review of the fundamental roles of Pitx2 during cardiogenesis, arrhythmogenesis and its contribution to congenital heart diseases.

  11. Multiple Roles of Pitx2 in Cardiac Development and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Diego; Sedmera, David; Lozano-Velasco, Estefanía

    2017-10-11

    Cardiac development is a complex morphogenetic process initiated as bilateral cardiogenic mesoderm is specified at both sides of the gastrulating embryo. Soon thereafter, these cardiogenic cells fuse at the embryonic midline configuring a symmetrical linear cardiac tube. Left/right bilateral asymmetry is first detected in the forming heart as the cardiac tube bends to the right, and subsequently, atrial and ventricular chambers develop. Molecular signals emanating from the node confer distinct left/right signalling pathways that ultimately lead to activation of the homeobox transcription factor Pitx2 in the left side of distinct embryonic organ anlagen, including the developing heart. Asymmetric expression of Pitx2 has therefore been reported during different cardiac developmental stages, and genetic deletion of Pitx2 provided evidence of key regulatory roles of this transcription factor during cardiogenesis and thus congenital heart diseases. More recently, impaired Pitx2 function has also been linked to arrhythmogenic processes, providing novel roles in the adult heart. In this manuscript, we provide a state-of-the-art review of the fundamental roles of Pitx2 during cardiogenesis, arrhythmogenesis and its contribution to congenital heart diseases.

  12. Assessment of hereditary retinal degeneration in the English springer spaniel dog and disease relationship to an RPGRIP1 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narfström, Kristina; Jeong, Manbok; Hyman, Jennifer; Madsen, Richard W; Bergström, Tomas F

    2012-01-01

    Intensive breeding and selection on desired traits have produced high rates of inherited diseases in dogs. Hereditary retinal degeneration, often called progressive retinal atrophy (PRA), is prevalent in dogs with disease entities comparable to human retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and Leber's congenital amaurosis (LCA). Recent molecular studies in the English Springer Spaniel (ESS) dog have shown that PRA cases are often homozygous for a mutation in the RPGRIP1 gene, the defect also causing human RP, LCA, and cone rod dystrophies. The present study characterizes the disease in a group of affected ESS in USA, using clinical, functional, and morphological studies. An objective evaluation of retinal function using electroretinography (ERG) is further performed in a masked fashion in a group of American ESS dogs, with the examiner masked to the genetic status of the dogs. Only 4 of 6 homozygous animals showed clinical signs of disease, emphasizing the need and importance for more precise studies on the clinical expression of molecular defects before utilizing animal models for translational research, such as when using stem cells for therapeutic intervention.

  13. [Population genetics of hereditary diseases in the child population of the Republic of Bashkortostan, Chuvashia, and Udmurtia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessonova, L A; El'chinova, G I; Zinchenko, R A

    2012-05-01

    The results of integrated study of the genetic structure and prevalence of monogenic hereditary diseases (MHDs) in the child population of three republics of Russia are summarized. Eight raions (districts) of the Republic of Bashkortostan and six districts of each Republic of Chuvashia and Republic of Udmurtia has been surveyed. The total population surveyed was 782184 people, with children accounting for 24.67% of them (192992 children). The loads of autosomal dominant (AD), autosomal recessive (AR), and X-linked MHDs have been calculated separately for urban and rural populations; differences between individual populations in the MHD load have been found. The differentiation of subpopulations with respect to MHD prevalence is explained by differences in the degree of subdivision. The MHD spectrum in the child population of the three republics comprises 222 disease entities, including 121 AD, 83 AR, and 18 X-linked diseases. Group of highly prevalent MHDs in regional child populations have been determined. The mean fitness of MHD patients in Bashkortostan has been calculated; it is 0.87, 0.04 and 0.16 for AD, AR, and X-linked diseases, respectively. Analysis has demonstrated that the prevalence rates of MHDs in the child populations of the republics of Chuvashia, Udmurtia, and Bashkortostan are 1, 1.2, and 1.4%, respectively.

  14. Assessment of Hereditary Retinal Degeneration in the English Springer Spaniel Dog and Disease Relationship to an RPGRIP1 Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Narfström

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Intensive breeding and selection on desired traits have produced high rates of inherited diseases in dogs. Hereditary retinal degeneration, often called progressive retinal atrophy (PRA, is prevalent in dogs with disease entities comparable to human retinitis pigmentosa (RP and Leber’s congenital amaurosis (LCA. Recent molecular studies in the English Springer Spaniel (ESS dog have shown that PRA cases are often homozygous for a mutation in the RPGRIP1 gene, the defect also causing human RP, LCA, and cone rod dystrophies. The present study characterizes the disease in a group of affected ESS in USA, using clinical, functional, and morphological studies. An objective evaluation of retinal function using electroretinography (ERG is further performed in a masked fashion in a group of American ESS dogs, with the examiner masked to the genetic status of the dogs. Only 4 of 6 homozygous animals showed clinical signs of disease, emphasizing the need and importance for more precise studies on the clinical expression of molecular defects before utilizing animal models for translational research, such as when using stem cells for therapeutic intervention.

  15. Focused cardiac ultrasound is feasible in the general practice setting and alters diagnosis and management of cardiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Yates

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ultrasound-assisted examination of the cardiovascular system with focused cardiac ultrasound by the treating physician is non-invasive and changes diagnosis and management of patient’s with suspected cardiac disease. This has not been reported in a general practice setting. Aim: To determine whether focused cardiac ultrasound performed on patients aged over 50 years changes the diagnosis and management of cardiac disease by a general practitioner. Design and setting: A prospective observational study of 80 patients aged over 50 years and who had not received echocardiography or chest CT within 12 months presenting to a general practice. Method: Clinical assessment and management of significant cardiac disorders in patients presenting to general practitioners were recorded before and after focused cardiac ultrasound. Echocardiography was performed by a medical student with sufficient training, which was verified by an expert. Differences in diagnosis and management between conventional and ultrasound-assisted assessment were recorded. Results and conclusion: Echocardiography and interpretation were acceptable in all patients. Significant cardiac disease was detected in 16 (20% patients, including aortic stenosis in 9 (11% and cardiac failure in 7 (9%, which were missed by clinical examination in 10 (62.5% of these patients. Changes in management occurred in 12 patients (15% overall and 75% of those found to have significant cardiac disease including referral for diagnostic echocardiography in 8 (10%, commencement of heart failure treatment in 3 (4% and referral to a cardiologist in 1 patient (1%. Routine focused cardiac ultrasound is feasible and frequently alters the diagnosis and management of cardiac disease in patients aged over 50 years presenting to a general practice.

  16. Appetite Suppressants, Cardiac Valve Disease and Combination Pharmacotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, Richard B.; Baumann, Michael H.

    2009-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity in the United States is a major health problem associated with significant morbidity, mortality and economic burden. Although obesity and drug addiction are typically considered distinct clinical entities, both diseases involve dysregulation of biogenic amine neuron systems in the brain. Thus, research efforts to develop medications for treating drug addiction can contribute insights into the pharmacotherapy for obesity. Here we review the neurochemical mechanisms of selected stimulant medications used in the treatment of obesity, as well as issues related to fenfluramine-associated cardiac valvulopathy. In particular, we discuss the evidence that cardiac valve disease involves activation of mitogenic 5-HT2B receptors by norfenfluramine, the major metabolite of fenfluramine. Advances in medication discovery suggest that novel molecular entities that target two different neurochemical mechanisms, i.e. “combination pharmacotherapy”, will yield efficacious anti-obesity medications with reduced adverse side-effects. PMID:19092640

  17. Hereditary hyperbilirubinemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radlović Nedeljko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Inherited disorders of bilirubin metabolism involve four autosomal recessive syndromes: Gilbert, Crigler- Najjar, Dubin-Johnson and Rotor, among which the first two are characterized by unconjugated and the second two by conjugated hyperbilirubinemia. Gilbert syndrome occurs in 2%-10% of general population, while others are rare. Except for Crigler-Najjar syndrome, hereditary hyperbilirubinemias belong to benign disorders and thus no treatment is required.

  18. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) in hereditary retinal degenerations: Layer-by-layer analyses in normal and diseased retinas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yijun

    OCT is a new technique for non-invasive, non-contact, cross-sectional imaging of biological tissues with micrometer longitudinal resolution. As it applies to the field of ophthalmology, OCT can delineate retinal sublayers based on their backscattering characteristics, and permit quantitative measurement of the structure of retina in vivo. This dissertation intended to clarify the basis of the OCT signals and whether this procedure has potential for diagnosis and monitoring of human retinal degenerative diseases. Key to this goal are quantitation of OCT signal features and accurate, layer-by-layer correlation of these features with underlying retinal microanatomy. In normal and degenerate avian and swine retinas, OCT signal features were quantified using custom computer programs, and were correlated with cryosections of unfixed retinas obtained at the same retinal location. The results suggested a definable and quantifiable relationship between OCT signal components and retinal microanatomy. The correlation in the outer retina indicated that the OCT posterior highly reflective band, or the outer- retina-choroid complex (ORCC), is attributable to the photoreceptor layer, RPE, and anterior choroid. Further evidence of OCT signal origin was provided by the rd chicken and the rhodopsin P347L mutant transgenic swine. In these animals where photoreceptors had degenerated, OCT abnormalities were observed at the level of and vitreal to the ORCC, consistent with the hypothesis that photoreceptors contribute to the ORCC. Studies of quantitative OCT analysis in man were also performed. In selected hereditary retinal degenerative diseases in which there was regional difference in retinal function, frequently observed OCT abnormalities that were associated with visual dysfunction were reduced OCT thickness, reduced ORCC thickness, increased reflectivity posterior to ORCC, and abnormal OCT signal lamination. These preliminary results suggested that OCT abnormalities at the level

  19. Mitochondrial-Targeted Molecular Imaging in Cardiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhui Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to discuss the role of mitochondrion in cardiac function and disease. The mitochondrion plays a fundamental role in cellular processes ranging from metabolism to apoptosis. The mitochondrial-targeted molecular imaging could potentially illustrate changes in global and regional cardiac dysfunction. The collective changes that occur in mitochondrial-targeted molecular imaging probes have been widely explored and developed. As probes currently used in the preclinical setting still have a lot of shortcomings, the development of myocardial metabolic activity, viability, perfusion, and blood flow molecular imaging probes holds great potential for accurately evaluating the myocardial viability and functional reserve. The advantages of molecular imaging provide a perspective on investigating the mitochondrial function of the myocardium in vivo noninvasively and quantitatively. The molecular imaging tracers of single-photon emission computed tomography and positron emission tomography could give more detailed information on myocardial metabolism and restoration. In this study, series mitochondrial-targeted 99mTc-, 123I-, and 18F-labeled tracers displayed broad applications because they could provide a direct link between mitochondrial dysfunction and cardiac disease.

  20. Human extraocular muscles in mitochondrial diseases: comparing chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia with Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carta, A; Carelli, V; D’Adda, T; Ross-Cisneros, F N; Sadun, A A

    2005-01-01

    Aims: To compare the ultrastructural aspects of human extraocular muscles in two types of mitochondrial disease: chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO) and Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). Methods: Muscle samples of the medial rectus obtained from surgery in a sporadic case of CPEO associated with deleted mitochondrial DNA, and post mortem in a case of 3460/ND1 LHON were processed for electron microscopy (EM). The medial rectus from an autoptic time to fixation matched control was used to exclude postmortem artefacts. Results: The CPEO specimen revealed focal areas of disruption and abnormalities of mitochondria in some muscle fibres, creating a “mosaic-like” pattern. In the LHON specimen a diffuse increase in both number and size of mitochondria (mean diameter 0.85 μm v 0.65 μm of control, pCPEO and LHON reveals marked differences. A “mosaic-like” pattern caused by a selective damage of muscle fibres was evident in CPEO, whereas a diffuse increase in mitochondria with preservation of myofibrils characterised the LHON case. These ultrastructural changes may relate to the different expression of the two diseases, resulting in ophthalmoplegia in CPEO and normal eye movements in LHON. PMID:15965159

  1. Boldine attenuates cholestasis associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in hereditary hypertriglyceridemic rats fed by high-sucrose diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagorova, M; Prasnicka, A; Kadova, Z; Dolezelova, E; Kazdova, L; Cermanova, J; Rozkydalova, L; Hroch, M; Mokry, J; Micuda, S

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to clarify the effect of high sucrose diet (HSD) on bile formation (BF) in rats with hereditary hypertriglyceridemia (HHTg). Potentially positive effects were studied for boldine, a natural choleretic agent. Administration of HSD to HHTg rats led to increased triglyceride deposition in the liver. HSD reduced BF as a consequence of decreased biliary secretion of bile acids (BA) and glutathione. Responsible mechanism was down-regulation of hepatic transporters for BA and glutathione, Bsep and Mrp2, respectively. Moreover, gene expressions of transporters for other constituents of bile, namely Abcg5/8 for cholesterol, Abcb4 for phospholipids, and Oatp1a4 for xenobiotics, were also reduced by HSD. Boldine partially attenuated cholestatic effect of HSD by promotion of biliary secretion of BA through up-regulation of Bsep and Ntcp, and by increase in biliary secretion of glutathione as a consequence of its increased hepatic disposition. This study demonstrates mechanisms of impaired BF during nonalcoholic fatty liver disease induced by HSD. Altered function of responsible transporters suggests also potential for changes in kinetics of drugs, which may complicate pharmacotherapy in subjects with high intake of sucrose, and with fatty liver disease. Sucrose induced alterations in BF may be alleviated by administration of boldine.

  2. The Role of Cardiac Tissue Macrophages in Homeostasis and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilinykh, Alexei; Pinto, Alexander R

    2017-01-01

    Macrophages are principally recognized as an important cell type for removal of tissue debris and as sentinels for tissue damage and foreign antigens. However, macrophages also participate in a diverse range of biological processes including angiogenesis, fibrosis, immune modulation, cell survival, and stem cell mobilization. Cardiac tissue macrophages (cTMs) are a heterogeneous population of phagocytic cells with distinct ontogenetic, phenotypic, and functional characteristics. While our understanding of cTMs has increased substantially over the last 5 years, large gaps in our knowledge regarding the cell biology of cTMs exist, in particular, the development of their unique phenotype and their roles in cardiac homeostasis and tissue stress. This review aims to discuss the current knowledge regarding cTMs and identify key questions that must be addressed to gain a better understanding of the role of cTMs in tissue development, homeostasis, and disease.

  3. [Stress cardiac MRI in management of ischemic heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russel, S; Darmon, S; Vermillet, A; Haziza, F

    2014-11-01

    Stress magnetic cardiac resonance imaging (MRI) development is in progress. Many cardiac imaging technics already known are completed by this safe radiation free exam with a short time acquisition (30minutes) and a good diagnostic performance in particular for patients with three vessels coronary artery diseases. Best indication concerns symptomatic patients unable to exercise with intermediate or high pretest probability. Pharmacological heart stress can be induced with vasodilatators or dobutamine to identify the presence and extent of myocardial ischemia, with high precision to guide coronary vessels revascularization. MRI gives many other interesting informations like heart anatomy, left ventricular function. Myocardial viability can be assessed with study of late gadolinium enhancement or analysis of contractile reserve with low dose of dobutamine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Assessment of Targeted Next-Generation Sequencing as a Tool for the Diagnosis of Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease and Hereditary Motor Neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupo, Vincenzo; García-García, Francisco; Sancho, Paula; Tello, Cristina; García-Romero, Mar; Villarreal, Liliana; Alberti, Antonia; Sivera, Rafael; Dopazo, Joaquín; Pascual-Pascual, Samuel I; Márquez-Infante, Celedonio; Casasnovas, Carlos; Sevilla, Teresa; Espinós, Carmen

    2016-03-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease is characterized by broad genetic heterogeneity with >50 known disease-associated genes. Mutations in some of these genes can cause a pure motor form of hereditary motor neuropathy, the genetics of which are poorly characterized. We designed a panel comprising 56 genes associated with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease/hereditary motor neuropathy. We validated this diagnostic tool by first testing 11 patients with pathological mutations. A cohort of 33 affected subjects was selected for this study. The DNAJB2 c.352+1G>A mutation was detected in two cases; novel changes and/or variants with low frequency (A mutation was also detected in three additional families. On haplotype analysis, all of the patients from these five families shared the same haplotype; therefore, the DNAJB2 c.352+1G>A mutation may be a founder event. Our gene panel allowed us to perform a very rapid and cost-effective screening of genes involved in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease/hereditary motor neuropathy. Our diagnostic strategy was robust in terms of both coverage and read depth for all of the genes and patient samples. These findings demonstrate the difficulty in achieving a definitive molecular diagnosis because of the complexity of interpreting new variants and the genetic heterogeneity that is associated with these neuropathies. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Glucose transporters in healthy heart and in cardiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szablewski, Leszek

    2017-03-01

    Heart consumes more energy than any other organ. It can utilize various metabolic substrates as a source of energy. The primary substrates are free fatty acids, especially long-chain fatty acids and glucose. The lipid bilayer of plasmalemma is impermeable for glucose. Therefore, glucose transport across the plasma membrane is mediated via glucose transporters. In human, cardiac cells are expressed as 2 families of glucose transporters: GLUTs and SGLTs. These transport proteins are GLUT1, GLUT3, GLUT8, GLUT10, GLUT11, GLUT12 and SGLT1. In human heart, GLUT4 is the major isoform that represents approximately 70% of the total glucose transporters. The changes observed in diabetic heart showed that type 1 diabetes mellitus alters the expression and translocation of GLUT4 and GLUT8 in the atria. In diabetic atria, the content in cell surface of these glucose transporters is downregulated. Expression of SGLT1, is increased in patients with end-stage cardiomyopathy secondary to type 2 diabetes. Increased expression of SGLT1 is a compensatory mechanism to the reduction in cardiac GLUT1 and GLUT4 expression. In animal model of type 1 diabetes, the expression of Sglt1 transporter is significantly decreased, and in the animal model of type 2 diabetes it is significantly increased. In heart diseases, such as cardiac hypertrophy (that is similar to fetal heart), heart failure and myocardial ischemia different perturbations in expression of glucose transporters are observed, especially in GLUT1 and GLUT4, due to changes in heart glucose metabolism. In this article, the functions of glucose transporters in healthy heart and in cardiac diseases are reviewed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Cardiac autonomic testing and treating heart disease. 'A clinical perspective'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas L. DePace

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Coronary heart disease (CHD is a major health concern, affecting nearly half the middle-age population and responsible for nearly one-third of all deaths. Clinicians have several major responsibilities beyond diagnosing CHD, such as risk stratification of patients for major adverse cardiac events (MACE and treating risks, as well as the patient. This second of a two-part review series discusses treating risk factors, including autonomic dysfunction, and expected outcomes. Methods Therapies for treating cardiac mortality risks including cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN, are discussed. Results While risk factors effectively target high-risk patients, a large number of individuals who will develop complications from heart disease are not identified by current scoring systems. Many patients with heart conditions, who appear to be well-managed by traditional therapies, experience MACE. Parasympathetic and Sympathetic (P&S function testing provides more information and has the potential to further aid doctors in individualizing and titrating therapy to minimize risk. Advanced autonomic dysfunction (AAD and its more severe form cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy have been strongly associated with an elevated risk of cardiac mortality and are diagnosable through autonomic testing. This additional information includes patient-specific physiologic measures, such as sympathovagal balance (SB. Studies have shown that establishing and maintaining proper SB minimizes morbidity and mortality risk. Conclusions P&S testing promotes primary prevention, treating subclinical disease states, as well as secondary prevention, thereby improving patient outcomes through (1 maintaining wellness, (2 preventing symptoms and disorder and (3 treating subclinical manifestations (autonomic dysfunction, as well as (4 disease and symptoms (autonomic neuropathy.

  7. Anesthesia and Databases: Pediatric Cardiac Disease as a Role Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vener, David F; Pasquali, Sara K; Mossad, Emad B

    2017-02-01

    Large data sets have now become ubiquitous in clinical medicine; they are particularly useful in high-acuity, low-volume conditions such as congenital heart disease where data must be collected from many centers. These data fall into 2 categories: administrative data arising from hospital admissions and charges and clinical data relating to specific diseases or procedures. In congenital cardiac diseases, there are now over a dozen of these data sets or registries focusing on various elements of patient care. Using probabilistic statistic matching, it is possible to marry administrative and clinical data post hoc using common elements to determine valuable information about care patterns, outcomes, and costs. These data sets can also be used in a collaborative fashion between institutions to drive quality improvement (QI). Because these data may include protected health information (PHI), care must be taken to adhere to federal guidelines on their use. A fundamental principle of large data management is the use of a common language and definition (nomenclature) to be effective. In addition, research derived from these information sources must be appropriately balanced to ensure that risk adjustments for preoperative and surgical factors are taken into consideration during the analysis. Care of patients with cardiac disease both in the United States and abroad consistently shows wide variability in mortality, morbidity, and costs, and there has been a tremendous amount of discussion about the benefits of regionalization of care based on center volume and outcome measurements. In the absence of regionalization, collaborative learning techniques have consistently been shown to minimize this variability and improve care at all centers, but before changes can be made it is necessary to accurately measure accurately current patient outcomes. Outcomes measurement generally falls under hospital-based QI initiatives, but more detailed analysis and research require

  8. Simultaneous surgery in patients with both cardiac and noncardiac diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Y

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Yang Yang,1 Feng Xiao,1 Jin Wang,1 Bo Song,1 Xi-Hui Li,1 Jian Li,2 Zhi-Song He,3 Huan Zhang,4 Ling Yin5 1Department of Cardiac Surgery, 2Department of Thoracic Surgery, 3Department of Urology Surgery, 4Department of General Surgery, 5Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Peking University First Hospital, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Background: To investigate the possibility and feasibility of simultaneous cardiac and noncardiac surgery.Methods: From August 2000 to March 2015, 64 patients suffering from cardiac and noncardiac diseases have been treated by simultaneous surgeries.Results: Two patients died after operations in hospital; thus, the hospital mortality rate was 3.1%. One patient with coronary heart disease, acute myocardial infarction, and a recurrence of bladder cancer accepted emergency simultaneous coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG, bladder cystectomy, and ureterostomy. He died of acute cerebral infarction complicated with multiple organ failure on the 153rd day after operation. The other patient with chronic constrictive pericarditis and right lung cancer underwent pericardial stripping and right lung lower lobectomy, which resulted in multiple organ failure, and the patient died on the tenth day postoperatively. The remaining 62 patients recovered and were discharged. The total operative morbidity was 17.2%: postoperative hemorrhage (n, % [1, 1.6%], pulmonary infection and hypoxemia (2, 3.1%, hemorrhage of upper digestive tract (1, 1.6%, incisional infection (3, 4.7%, subphrenic abscess (1, 1.6%, and postoperative acute renal failure and hemofiltration (3, 4.7%. Of the 62 patients discharged, 61 patients were followed up. Eleven patients died with 10 months to 10 years during the follow-up. The mean survival time is 116.2±12.4 months. The cumulative survival rate is 50.8%.Conclusion: Simultaneous surgeries in patients suffering from both cardiac and noncardiac benign or malignant diseases are safe and possible

  9. Hereditary angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peterson, M P; Bygum, A

    2016-01-01

    We report a 64-year-old man who suffered from recurrent visible swelling attacks since the age of 20 as well as episodes with severe upper airway edema, resulting in 4 emergency tracheotomies. Eventually after 44 years he was diagnosed with hereditary angioedema (HAE) type II. The aims of this re...... of this report is to emphasize the importance of awareness concerning HAE, which does not respond to traditional anti-allergic therapy, and remind physicians to test for functional C1-INH deficiency....

  10. Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura Misdiagnosed as Hereditary Angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Michelle Fog; Bygum, Anette

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema is a rare, but potentially life-threatening genetic disorder that results from an autosomal dominant trait. It is characterized by acute, recurrent attacks of severe local edema, most commonly affecting the skin and mucosa. Swelling in hereditary angioedema patients does how...... of hereditary angioedema. The case illustrates how clinicians can have difficulties in handling patients with rare diseases, especially in the emergency care setting....

  11. Prenatal ultrasound, genotype, and outcome in a large cohort of prenatally affected patients with autosomal-recessive polycystic kidney disease and other hereditary cystic kidney diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erger, Florian; Brüchle, Nadina Ortiz; Gembruch, Ulrich; Zerres, Klaus

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the sonographic and clinical genotype-phenotype correlations in autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) and other cystic kidney diseases (CKD) in a large cohort of prenatally detected fetuses with hereditary CKD. We retrospectively studied the clinical and diagnostic data of 398 patients referred with prenatal ultrasound findings suggestive of CKD between 1994 and 2010. Cases with confirmed hereditary CKD (n = 130) were analyzed as to their prenatal ultrasound findings, genotype, and possible predictors of clinical outcome. ARPKD was most common in our non-representative sample. Truncating PKHD1 mutations led to a significantly reduced neonatal prognosis, with two such mutations being invariably lethal. Sonographically visible kidney cysts occurred in only 3% of ARPKD cases. Renal abnormalities in Meckel syndrome (MKS) appeared earlier than in ADPKD (19.6 ± 3.7 vs. 29.8 ± 5.1 GW) or ARPKD (19.6 ± 3.7 vs. 30.2 ± 1.2 GW). Additional CNS malformations were not found in ARPKD, but were highly sensitive for MKS. Pulmonary hypoplasia, oligo/anhydramnios (OAH), and kidney enlargement were associated with a significantly worse neonatal prognosis. Genotype, sonographic signs of OAH, enlarged kidney size, and pulmonary hypoplasia can be useful predictors of neonatal survival. We propose sonographic morphological criteria for ARPKD, ADPKD, MKS, and renal cyst and diabetes syndrome (RCAD). We further propose a clinical diagnostic algorithm for differentiating cystic kidney diseases.

  12. Disease-Causing Variants in the ATL1 Gene Are a Rare Cause of Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia among Czech Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mészárosová, Anna Uhrová; Grečmalová, Dagmar; Brázdilová, Michaela; Dvořáčková, Nina; Kalina, Zdeněk; Čermáková, Marie; Vávrová, Dagmar; Smetanová, Irena; Staněk, David; Seeman, Pavel

    2017-11-01

    Variants in the ATL1 gene have been repeatedly described as the second most frequent cause of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP), a motor neuron disease manifested by progressive lower limb spasticity and weakness. Variants in ATL1 have been described mainly in patients with early onset HSP. We performed Sanger sequencing of all coding exons and adjacent intron regions of the ALT1 gene in 111 Czech patients with pure form of HSP and additional Multiplex-Ligation Probe Analysis (MLPA) testing targeting the ATL1 gene in 56 of them. All patients except seven were previously tested by Sanger sequencing of the SPAST gene with negative results. ATL1 diagnostic testing revealed only five missense variants in the ATL1 gene. Four of them are novel, but we suppose only two of them to be pathogenic and causal. The remaining variants are assumed to be benign. MLPA testing in 56 of sequence variant negative patients revealed no gross deletion in the ATL1 gene. Variants in the ATL1 gene are more frequent in patients with early onset HSP, but in general the occurrence of pathogenic variants in the ATL1 gene is low in our cohort, less than 4.5% and less than 11.1% in patients with onset before the age of ten. Variants in the ATL1 gene are a less frequent cause of HSP among Czech patients than has been previously reported among other populations. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/University College London.

  13. Gene therapy for mitochondrial diseases: Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy as the first candidate for a clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cwerman-Thibault, Hélène; Augustin, Sébastien; Ellouze, Sami; Sahel, José-Alain; Corral-Debrinski, Marisol

    2014-03-01

    Mitochondrial disorders cannot be ignored anymore in most medical disciplines; indeed their minimum estimated prevalence is superior to 1 in 5000 births. Despite the progress made in the last 25 years on the identification of gene mutations causing mitochondrial pathologies, only slow progress was made towards their effective treatments. Ocular involvement is a frequent feature in mitochondrial diseases and corresponds to severe and irreversible visual handicap due to retinal neuron loss and optic atrophy. Interestingly, three clinical trials for Leber Congenital Amaurosis due to RPE65 mutations are ongoing since 2007. Overall, the feasibility and safety of ocular Adeno-Associated Virus delivery in adult and younger patients and consistent visual function improvements have been demonstrated. The success of gene-replacement therapy for RPE65 opens the way for the development of similar approaches for a broad range of eye disorders, including those with mitochondrial etiology such as Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON). Copyright © 2013 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Hereditary Persistence of Fetal Hemoglobin Caused by Single Nucleotide Promoter Mutations in Sickle Cell Trait and Hb SC Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinbami, Anthony O; Campbell, Andrew D; Han, Zeqiu J; Luo, Hong-Yuan; Chui, David H K; Steinberg, Martin H

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin (HPFH) can be caused by point mutations in the γ-globin gene promoters. We report three rare cases: a child compound heterozygous for Hb S (HBB: c.20A > T) and HPFH with a novel point mutation in the (A)γ-globin gene promoter who had 42.0% Hb S, 17.0% Hb A and 38.0% Hb F; a man with Hb SC (HBB: c.19G > A) disease and a point mutation in the (G)γ-globin gene promoter who had 54.0% Hb S, 18.0% Hb C and 25.0% Hb F; a child heterozygous for Hb S and HPFH due to mutations in both the (A)γ- and (G)γ-globin gene promoters in cis [(G)γ(A)γ(β(+)) HPFH], with 67.0% Hb A, 6.5% Hb S and 25.0% Hb F.

  15. Left-right asymmetry and cardiac looping: implications for cardiac development and congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathiriya, I S; Srivastava, D

    2000-01-01

    Proper morphogenesis and positioning of internal organs requires delivery and interpretation of precise signals along the anterior-posterior, dorsal-ventral, and left-right axes. An elegant signaling cascade determines left- versus right-sided identity in visceral organs in a concordant fashion, resulting in a predictable left-right (LR) organ asymmetry in all vertebrates. The complex morphogenesis of the heart and its connections to the vasculature are particularly dependent upon coordinated LR signaling pathways. Disorganization of LR signals can result in myriad congenital heart defects that are a consequence of abnormal looping and remodeling of the primitive heart tube into a multi-chambered organ. A framework for understanding how LR asymmetric signals contribute to normal organogenesis has emerged and begins to explain the basis of many human diseases of LR asymmetry. Here we review the impact of LR signaling pathways on cardiac development and congenital heart disease.

  16. Hereditary breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Martin J; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 are only detected in 25% of families with a strong history of breast cancer, though hereditary factors are expected to be involved in the remaining families with no recognized mutation. Molecular characterization is expected to provide new insight...... into the tumor biology to guide the search of new high-risk alleles and provide better classification of the growing number of BRCA1/2 variants of unknown significance (VUS). In this review, we provide an overview of hereditary breast cancer, its genetic background, and clinical implications, before focusing...... on the pathologically and molecular features associated with the disease. Recent transcriptome and genome profiling studies of tumor series from BRCA1/2 mutation carriers as well as familial non-BRCA1/2 will be discussed. Special attention is paid to its association with molecular breast cancer subtypes as well...

  17. Hereditary neuropathies: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojkovic, T

    2016-12-01

    Hereditary neuropathies are the most common inherited neuromuscular diseases. Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease represents the most common form with an average prevalence ranging from 1/2500 to 1/1200, depending on the studies. To date and with the advances of the latest generation sequencing, more than 80 genes have been identified. Although the common clinical phenotype comprises a progressive distal muscle weakness and sensory loss, foot deformities and decreased or absent tendon reflexes, clinical and electrophysiological phenotypes exhibit great variability. Moreover, atypical phenotypes are arising, overlapping with spastic paraplegia, hereditary sensory neuropathies or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The causative genes are involved in various biological processes such as myelin development and maintenance, biosynthesis and degradation of proteins, neuronal structural maintenance, axonal transport, endocytosis, membrane dynamics, ion-channel function and the mitochondrial network. An accurate genetic diagnosis is important for appropriate genetic counselling and treatment options. Therapeutic advances, particularly small interfering RNA therapy, are encouraging in hereditary transthyretin amyloid neuropathy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. X-Linked Hereditary Nephropathy in Navasota Dogs: Clinical Pathology, Morphology, and Gene Expression During Disease Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benali, S L; Lees, G E; Nabity, M B; Aricò, A; Drigo, M; Gallo, E; Giantin, M; Aresu, L

    2016-07-01

    X-linked hereditary nephropathy (XLHN) in Navasota dogs is a spontaneously occurring disease caused by a mutation resulting in defective production of type IV collagen and juvenile-onset renal failure. The study was aimed at examining the evolution of renal damage and the expression of selected molecules potentially involved in the pathogenesis of XLHN. Clinical data and renal samples were obtained in 10 XLHN male dogs and 5 controls at 4 (T0), 6 (T1), and 9 (T2) months of age. Glomerular and tubulointerstitial lesions were scored by light microscopy, and the expression of 21 molecules was investigated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction with selected proteins evaluated by immunohistochemistry. No significant histologic lesions or clinicopathologic abnormalities were identified in controls at any time-point. XLHN dogs had progressive proteinuria starting at T0. At T1, XLHN dogs had a mesangioproliferative glomerulopathy with glomerular loss, tubular necrosis, and interstitial fibrosis. At T2, glomerular and tubulointerstitial lesions were more severe, particularly glomerular loss, interstitial fibrosis, and inflammation. At T0, transforming growth factor β, connective tissue growth factor, and platelet-derived growth factor α mRNA were overexpressed in XLHN dogs compared with controls. Clusterin and TIMP1 transcripts were upregulated in later stages of the disease. Transforming growth factor β, connective tissue growth factor, and platelet-derived growth factor α should be considered as key players in the initial events of XHLN. Clusterin and TIMP1 appear to be more associated with the progression rather than initiation of tubulointerstitial damage in chronic renal disease. © The Author(s) 2016.

  19. Contemporary cardiac surgery for adults with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beurtheret, Sylvain; Tutarel, Oktay; Diller, Gerhard Paul; West, Cathy; Ntalarizou, Evangelia; Resseguier, Noémie; Papaioannou, Vasileios; Jabbour, Richard; Simpkin, Victoria; Bastin, Anthony J; Babu-Narayan, Sonya V; Bonello, Beatrice; Li, Wei; Sethia, Babulal; Uemura, Hideki; Gatzoulis, Michael A; Shore, Darryl

    2017-08-01

    Advances in early management of congenital heart disease (CHD) have led to an exponential growth in adults with CHD (ACHD). Many of these patients require cardiac surgery. This study sought to examine outcome and its predictors for ACHD cardiac surgery. This is an observational cohort study of prospectively collected data on 1090 consecutive adult patients with CHD, undergoing 1130 cardiac operations for CHD at the Royal Brompton Hospital between 2002 and 2011. Early mortality was the primary outcome measure. Midterm to longer-term survival, cumulative incidence of reoperation, other interventions and/or new-onset arrhythmia were secondary outcome measures. Predictors of early/total mortality were identified. Age at surgery was 35±15 years, 53% male, 52.3% were in New York Heart Association (NYHA) class I, 37.2% in class II and 10.4% in class III/IV. Early mortality was 1.77% with independent predictors NYHA class ≥ III, tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE) <15 mm and female gender. Over a mean follow-up of 2.8±2.6 years, 46 patients died. Baseline predictors of total mortality were NYHA class ≥ III, TAPSE <15 mm and non-elective surgery. The number of sternotomies was not independently associated with neither early nor total mortality. At 10 years, probability of survival was 94%. NYHA class among survivors was significantly improved, compared with baseline. Contemporary cardiac surgery for ACHD performed at a single, tertiary reference centre with a multidisciplinary approach is associated with low mortality and improved functional status. Also, our findings emphasise the point that surgery should not be delayed because of reluctance to reoperate only. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  20. Electrocardiographic abnormalities and cardiac arrhythmias in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudis, Christos A; Konstantinidis, Athanasios K; Ntalas, Ioannis V; Korantzopoulos, Panagiotis

    2015-11-15

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is independently associated with an increased burden of cardiovascular disease. Besides coronary artery disease (CAD) and congestive heart failure (CHF), specific electrocardiographic (ECG) abnormalities and cardiac arrhythmias seem to have a significant impact on cardiovascular prognosis of COPD patients. Disturbances of heart rhythm include premature atrial contractions (PACs), premature ventricular contractions (PVCs), atrial fibrillation (AF), atrial flutter (AFL), multifocal atrial tachycardia (MAT), and ventricular tachycardia (VT). Of note, the identification of ECG abnormalities and the evaluation of the arrhythmic risk may have significant implications in the management and outcome of patients with COPD. This article provides a concise overview of the available data regarding ECG abnormalities and arrhythmias in these patients, including an elaborated description of the underlying arrhythmogenic mechanisms. The clinical impact and prognostic significance of ECG abnormalities and arrhythmias in COPD as well as the appropriate antiarrhythmic therapy and interventions in this setting are also discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Familial cardiac valvulopathy due to filamin A mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Jonathan A; Bernstein, Daniel; Hehr, Ute; Hudgins, Louanne

    2011-09-01

    We report on the clinical findings in siblings affected by the recently characterized X-linked form of hereditary cardiac valvular dystrophy or cardiac valve disease (OMIM 314400) due to mutations in the FLNA gene and review the literature on this condition. Although FLNA related cardiac valve disease is presumed to be a rare disorder, it is likely underdiagnosed. Several features of this condition may aid in its identification. FLNA related valvular disease can be recognized on the basis of its distinctive inheritance, early age of onset, and frequent multi-valve involvement. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. SEOM clinical guidelines for hereditary cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graña, Begoña; Lastra, Enrique; Llort, Gemma; Brunet, Joan; Isla, Dolores

    2011-08-01

    Research in genetics has facilitated the identification of highly penetrant genes responsible for a large number of diseases. In the oncology field, genetic counselling and gene testing are focused on the two most common syndromes in familial cancer: hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome (HBOC) and hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer or Lynch syndrome (LS). The objective of this guideline in hereditary cancer is to summarise the current state of knowledge and make recommendations in the areas of diagnosis, prevention and treatment of hereditary cancer.

  3. Nonlinear mathematical model for predicting long term cardiac remodeling in Chagas' heart disease: introducing the concepts of 'limiting cardiac function' and 'cardiac function deterioration period'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benchimol-Barbosa, Paulo Roberto

    2010-11-19

    Cardiac remodeling has been recently investigated in long term follow-up introducing a simple exponential model to describe the time course of cardiac function and dimension changes in Chagas' disease. In the present study, an improved mathematical model to equate time course and cardiac functional changes has been proposed. Present model has been derived from previously validated intuitive assumptions and tested on data set of outpatients with chronic Chagas' disease (51.3±9.4 years old), followed for up to 10 years in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The variables representing cardiac status at admission were plotted against respective time derivative, which appropriately fit a second order polynomial (adjusted r(2)=0.956; pconstants: a time-function (2.0·10(-3)±5.4·10(-4) months(-1)·%(-1); p<0.001) and an inferior limit for left ventricular ejection fraction (19.0±0.9%; p<0.001), standing for a limit beyond life expectation is unsustainable, in Chagas' disease. Cardiac function deterioration period was promptly derived from the model, representing the period of time following indeterminate stages of the disease when cardiac function start deteriorating, and ranged from 3 to 15.8 years. An example of data of left ventricular ejection fraction of a subject followed during 10 years illustrated the model, further validating its robustness. Present data confirms that, in chronic Chagas' disease, initial insult is connected to the progression of myocardial remodeling and introduces the concepts of limiting cardiac function and cardiac deterioration period. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Cardiac Troponin I: A Valuable Biomarker Indicating the Cardiac Involvement in Fabry Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Tanislav

    Full Text Available Assessment of the clinical severity of Fabry disease (FD, an X-linked, rare, progressive disorder based on a genetic defect in alpha-galactosidase is challenging, especially regarding cardiac involvement. The aim of the study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of cardiac troponin I (cTnI in discriminating FD patients with cardiac involvement in a large FD patient cohort.cTnI levels were measured with a contemporary sensitive assay in plasma samples taken routinely from FD patients. The assay was calibrated to measure cTnI levels ≥0.01 ng/ml. Elevated cTnI values (cut-off ≥0.04 ng/ml were correlated with clinical data.cTnI was assessed in 62 FD patients (median age: 47 years, males: 36%. Elevated cTnI levels were detected in 23 (37% patients. Patients with a cTnI elevation were older (median 55 years versus 36 years, p<0.001. Elevated cTnI levels were associated with the presence of a LVH (16/23 versus 1/39; OR 65.81, CI: 6.747-641.859; p<0.001. In almost all patients with a left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH elevated cTnI levels were detected (16/17, 94%. Absolute cTnI levels in patients with LVH were higher than in those without (median 0.23 ng/ml versus 0.02 ng/ml; p<0.001. A cTnI level <0.04ng/ml had a high negative predictive value regarding the presence of a LVH (38/39, 97%. In a control group of non-FD patients (n = 17 with LVH (due to hypertension none showed cTnI levels ≥0.01 ng/ml.Elevated cTnI levels are common in FD patients, reflecting cardiac involvement. FD patients might benefit from a continuous cTnI monitoring.

  5. Hereditary hemochromatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen A. Geller

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary hemochromatosis (HH is the most commonly identified autosomal recessive genetic disorder in the white population, characterized by increased intestinal iron absorption and secondary abnormal accumulation in parenchymal organs, not infrequently accompanied by functional impairment. This entity is associated with mutations of the HFE gene (located on the short arm of chromosome 6 at location 6p22.2; closely linked to the HLA-A3 locus, which encodes the HFE protein, a membrane protein thought to regulate iron absorption by affecting the interaction between transferrin receptor and transferrin.

  6. Hereditary spherocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenakshi Kalyan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary spherocytosis (HS is a familial hemolytic disorder with marked heterogeneity of clinical features, ranging from an asymptomatic condition to a fulminant hemolytic anemia. In severe cases, the disorder may present in early childhood, but in some cases it may go unnoticed until later in adult life. We present a 32-year-old male who presented with anemia, jaundice, splenomegaly, and gallstones. Seven of his family members had similar illness in the past. The Mother died of similar illness at the age of 40. The Blood film showed spherocytosis and reticulocytosis. There was increased osmotic fragility and a negative direct coomb′s test. He was given folic acid supplements and was advised for splenectomy and cholecystectomy. This case is reported due to its rarity in Indian population.

  7. Cardiac magnetic resonance feature tracking in Kawasaki disease convalescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratis, Konstantinos; Hachmann, Pauline; Child, Nicholas; Krasemann, Thomas; Hussain, Tarique; Mavrogeni, Sophie; Botnar, Rene; Razavi, Reza; Greil, Gerald

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether left ventricular (LV) myocardial deformation indices can detect subclinical abnormalities in Kawasaki disease convalescence. We hypothesized that subclinical myocardial abnormalities due to inflammation represent an early manifestation of the disease that persists in convalescence. Myocardial inflammation has been described as a global finding in the acute phase of Kawasaki disease. Despite normal systolic function by routine functional measurements, reduced longitudinal strain and strain rate have been detected by echocardiography in the acute phase. Peak systolic LV myocardial longitudinal, radial, and circumferential strain and strain rate were examined in 29 Kawasaki disease convalescent patients (15 males; mean [standard deviation] age: 11 [6.6] years; median interval from disease onset: 5.8 [5.4] years) and 10 healthy volunteers (5 males; mean age: 14 [3.8] years) with the use of cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) feature tracking. Routine indices of LV systolic function were normal in both groups. Comparisons were made between normal controls and (i) the entire Kawasaki disease group, (ii) Kawasaki disease subgroup divided by coronary artery involvement. Average longitudinal and circumferential strain at all levels was lower in patients compared to normal controls. In subgroup analysis, both Kawasaki disease patients with and without a history of coronary involvement had similar longitudinal and circumferential strain at all levels and lower when compared to controls. There were lower circumferential and longitudinal values in Kawasaki disease patients with persisting coronary artery lesions when compared to those with regressed ones. In this CMR study in Kawasaki disease convalescent patients with preserved routine functional indices, we detected lower circumferential and longitudinal strain values compared to normal controls, irrespective of the coronary artery status.

  8. Evaluation of ischemic heart disease and viability by cardiac MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Bhatia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In ischemic heart disease, cardiac MRI, besides being the gold standard for evaluation of quantitative ventricular function, enables evaluation of myocardial wall thickness, T2-weighted imaging for myocardial edema and infarct quantification and transmurality. Delayed hyperenhancement sequences are highly predictive of scar formation, being associated with myocyte necrosis. The extent and transmurality of delayed hyperenhancement has prognostic implications and is inversely proportional to the degree of functional recovery after acute myocardial infarction. A greater transmural extent of infarction (eg, hyperenhancement involving >50% of the wall thickness can predict regions that are less likely to improve in function after therapy. The ultimate focus of MRI in ischemic heart disease is in diagnosis, quantification of myocardium at risk, salvageable myocardium, perfusion defects and differentiation of viable myocardium from non viable myocardium to enable prognostication.

  9. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation for coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderson, Lindsey; Thompson, David R; Oldridge, Neil

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the single most common cause of death globally. However, with falling CHD mortality rates, an increasing number of people live with CHD and may need support to manage their symptoms and prognosis. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) aims to improve......-based interventions with at least six months' follow-up, compared with a no exercise control. The study population comprised men and women of all ages who have had a myocardial infarction (MI), coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), or who have angina pectoris, or coronary...... artery disease. We included RCTs that reported at least one of the following outcomes: mortality, MI, revascularisations, hospitalisations, health-related quality of life (HRQL), or costs. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently screened all identified references for inclusion...

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF ANALYTICAL METHODS IN METABOLOMICS FOR THE STUDY OF HEREDITARY AND ACQUIRED GENETIC DISEASE

    OpenAIRE

    Arvonio, Raffaele

    2011-01-01

    METABOLOMICS AND MASS SPECTROMETRY The research project take place in the branch of metabolomics, which involves the systematic study of the metabolites present in a cell and in this area MS, thanks to its potential to carry out controlled experiments of fragmentation, plays a role as a key methodology for identification of various metabolites. The work of thesis project is focused on the analytical methods development for the diagnosis of metabolic diseases and is divided as follows: ...

  11. Pedigree and BRCA gene analysis in breast cancer patients to identify hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome to prevent morbidity and mortality of disease in Indian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darooei, Mina; Poornima, Subhadra; Salma, Bibi Umae; Iyer, Gayatri R; Pujar, Akhilesh N; Annapurna, Srirambhatla; Shah, Ashwin; Maddali, Srinivas; Hasan, Qurratulain

    2017-02-01

    Global burden of breast cancer is expected to increase to >2 million new cases every year by 2030 and 10% of these are likely to have hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome. Identifying these individuals by pedigree and BRCA1/2 mutation analyses will enable us to offer targeted mutation testing and appropriate counseling. This study from a tertiary care hospital showed that of the 127 breast cancer patients on treatment during 2014-2015, 24 of them fulfilled the criteria of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome after detailed verbal autopsy and pedigree analysis, and BRCA1 and 2 next-generation sequencing done after pre-test counseling revealed mutations in 13 cases (54%), these included 9 BRCA1 mutations (69%) and 4 BRCA2 mutation (31%). Subsequent post-test counseling recommended targeted mutation analysis for 64 high-risk members in these 13 families with pathogenic mutations, which will help in surveillance for early detection, appropriate management, and prevention of the disease by decreasing the burden to both family and nation. Results from this preliminary study highlight the importance of genetic counseling, pedigree analysis, and genetic testing. It can be recommended that all oncology units should have a genetic counseling service for providing appropriate support to oncologists, patients, and families to prevent unnecessary testing; however, breast cancer screening program is incomplete without evaluating for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome.

  12. Concise review: cell therapies for hereditary metabolic liver diseases-concepts, clinical results, and future developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantz, Tobias; Sharma, Amar Deep; Ott, Michael

    2015-04-01

    The concept of cell-based therapies for inherited metabolic liver diseases has been introduced for now more than 40 years in animal experiments, but controlled clinical data in humans are still not available. In the era of dynamic developments in stem cell science, the "right" cell for transplantation is considered as an important key for successful treatment. Do we aim to transplant mature hepatocytes or do we consider the liver as a stem/progenitor-driven organ and replenish the diseased liver with genetically normal stem/progenitor cells? Although conflicting results from cell tracing and transplantation experiments have recently emerged about the existence and role of stem/progenitor cells in the liver, their overall contribution to parenchymal cell homeostasis and tissue repair is limited. Accordingly, engraftment and repopulation efficacies of extrahepatic and liver-derived stem/progenitor cell types are considered to be lower compared to mature hepatocytes. On the basis of these results, we will discuss the current clinical cell transplantation programs for inherited metabolic liver diseases and future developments in liver cell therapy. © 2014 AlphaMed Press.

  13. [Ataxias and hereditary spastic paraplegias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüle, R; Schöls, L

    2017-07-01

    Hereditary ataxias and spastic paraplegias are genetic disorders with age-dependent nearly complete penetrance. The mostly monogenetic etiology allows one to establish the diagnosis, study pathogenesis and to develop new causative therapeutic approaches for these diseases. Both the causative genes as well as the clinical presentation overlap considerably between hereditary ataxias and spastic paraplegias. This strongly argues towards a united classification for these two groups of diseases. Next generation sequencing technologies have greatly expanded the number of genes known to be causative for hereditary ataxias and spastic paraplegias and allow simultaneous time- and cost-effective diagnostic testing of > 200 genes. However, repeat expansions and large genomic deletions must be considered separately. Here, we suggest a pragmatic algorithm for genetic testing in hereditary ataxias and spastic paraplegias that we have developed in our specialized outpatient clinics. Detailed phenotyping remains crucial to interpret the multitude of genetic variants discovered by high throughput sequencing techniques. Despite recent technical advances, a substantial proportion of ataxia and spastic paraplegia families are still without a molecular diagnosis. Beside new and so far undetected ataxia and spasticity genes, unusual mutation types including noncoding variants and polygenic inheritance patterns may contribute. Because of these clinical, genetic, and technological challenges, patients with hereditary ataxias and spastic paraplegias should be referred to specialized centers offering research and clinical studies. This will also help to recruit representative patient cohorts for upcoming interventional trials.

  14. [Cardiac markers in different degrees of chronic kidney disease: influence of inflammation and previous heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroga, Borja; Goicoechea, Marian; García de Vinuesa, Soledad; Verde, Eduardo; Verdalles, Ursula; Yuste, Claudia; Reque, Javier; Luño, José

    2012-06-30

    Troponin T (TnT), brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and its precursor (NT-proBNP) are useful markers of acute coronary events and heart failure. The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of chronic renal failure, inflammation and heart disease in these biomarkers. In 266 patients with different stages of chronic renal diseases, the following parameters were measured: cardiac markers (TnT, BNP and NT-proBNP), renal function, inflammatory markers (hsCRP, fibrinogen, albumin, uric acid and white blood cells). We recorded the cardiovascular history. Ventricular dysfunction and left ventricular hypertrophy were assessed by echocardiography. A significant correlation between cardiac markers and inflammatory parameters such as fibrinogen, hsCRP and albumin was found. Age (OR 1.05, P = .021), serum albumin (OR: 0.06, P=.006), ischemic heart disease (OR: 8.17, P=.0092) and renal failure (OR: 1.67, P=.05) were predictors of higher BNP levels. Age (OR 1.05, P=.0097), serum albumin (OR: 0.12, P=.001), ischemic heart disease (OR: 3.43, P=.034), renal failure (OR: 1, 65, P=.036) and heart failure (OR: 4.33, P=.0312) were predictors of elevated NT-proBNP. Previous ischemic heart disease alone increased TnT levels (OR: 6.51, P=.0012). Age, previous cardiac disease and inflammation increase cardiac marker levels in patients with different stages of renal disease, but the degree of renal failure is an important factor influencing NT-proBNP levels. However, ischemic heart disease alone increases the levels of TnT. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  15. Cardiac metastases of melanoma as first manifestation of the disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Adriana; Eshja, Esmeralda; Dallavalle, Silvia; Bassi, Emilio Maria; Turco, Annalisa

    2014-04-01

    Cardiac metastases are rare, but more common than primary cardiac tumours, and metastatic melanoma involves heart or pericardium in greater than 50% of the cases, although cardiac metastasis are rarely diagnosed ante mortem because of the lack of symptoms. A multimodality approach may help to obtain a more timely diagnosis and in some cases a quicker and better diagnosis can enable a surgical resection to prevent cardiac failure or to reduce the tumour before chemotherapy. We present a case of a patient with cardiac metastasis as first evidence of a malignant melanoma: in this case the patient underwent echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance and computed tomography. This case underlines the importance of advanced diagnostic techniques, such as cardiac magnetic resonance, not only for the detection of cardiac masses, but also for a better anatomic definition and tissue characterization, to enable a quick and accurate diagnosis which can be followed by appropriate treatment.

  16. The mechanobiology of drug-induced cardiac valve disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Ngoc Thien; Balachandran, Kartik

    2015-01-01

    Drug-related adverse reactions leading to valve disease or valvulopathy were first identified in the 1960s. These were associated with patients taking anti-migraine ergot-derivative drugs, anti-anorectics, anti-Parkinson's drugs, or other anti-depressant drugs. In general, these drugs have serotonergic, dopaminergic, or β-adrenergic activity, being either agonists or reuptake inhibitors of the aforementioned neurotransmitter pathways. Recent work has focused on several possible mechanisms for valvulopathy, specifically highlighting the serotonin or 5-hydroxy-trypta-mine-2B (5-HT2B) receptor subtype and the 5-HT transporter as mediators that cause expression of myofibroblast phenotype, excessive cell proliferation, leading to valve fibrosis. Most of these studies and reviews, however, were not reported in the context of the mechanical environment of the valve, which by itself is an important factor in the initiation and progression of valve disease. It is also not known whether patients who have altered mechanical environments in their cardiovascular system, such as those who are hypertensive or have functional cardiac disease, such as ischemic ventricular dilation, or those who have an increased propensity for developing drug-induced valvulopathy. In the present review, we highlight the potential role of hemodynamics and the mechanical environment in influencing these drug-induced valvulopathies, focusing on serotonin-mediated disease and the need for further study of this topic.

  17. Inflammatory and Cardiac Biomarkers are Differentially Expressed in Chagas Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, SM; Deng, X; Fernandes, F; Cunha-Neto, E; Ribeiro, AL; Adesina, B; Beyer, AI; Contestable, P; Custer, B; Busch, MP; Sabino, EC

    2016-01-01

    Background Chagas disease has a long clinically silent period following Trypanosoma cruzi infection and before development of overt clinical pathology; detectable biomarkers of infection and pathogenesis are urgently needed. We tested 22 biomarkers known to be associated with cardiomyopathy to evaluate if a biomarker signature could successfully classify T. cruzi seropositive subjects into clinical Chagas disease stage groups. Methods This cross-sectional retrospective case-control study enrolled T. cruzi seropositive blood donors (BD) that were further characterized as having chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CC-BD) or not (nonCC-BD) and seronegative (SN) control donors; we also included clinically diagnosed Chagas cardiomyopathy (CC-P). All subjects underwent a health history questionnaire, medical examination, electro- and echocardiograms (ECG and Echo) and phlebotomy. Biomarkers were measured on blinded samples by luminex bead array and Ortho VITROS. Results A clear biomarker pattern was observed only in more severe cardiac disease; this pattern included significantly elevated levels of inflammatory cytokines IFN-γ IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α and soluble cardiovascular disease biomarkers CK-MB, troponin, myoglobin, VCAM and NTproBNP while there were lower levels of MPO, PAI-1, and MCP-1. The markers determined to be most predictive of disease by ROC curve analysis were NTproBNP and T. cruzi PCR status. Conclusions Although many biomarkers demonstrated increased or decreased concentrations among the clinical forms of Chagas disease, NTproBNP and T. cruzi PCR were the only tests that would independently be of clinical value for disease staging, in concert with ECG, Echo and clinical assessments. PMID:26277551

  18. Supravalvular aortic stenosis with sudden cardiac death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep Vaideeswar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sudden cardiac death (SCD most commonly results from previously undiagnosed congenital, acquired, or hereditary cardiac diseases. Congenital aortic valvular, subvalvular, and supravalvular disease with left ventricular outflow tract obstruction is an important preventable cause of sudden death. This report documents sudden death presumably due to acute myocardial ischemia in a young male with an undiagnosed supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS due to a rare association of isolation of coronary sinuses of Valsalva. Congenital supravalvular pulmonary stenosis and mitral valvular dysplasia were also present.

  19. Reviving the protein quality control system : Therapeutic target for cardiac disease in the elderly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijering, Roelien A M; Henning, Robert H; Brundel, Bianca J J M

    It has been firmly established that ageing constitutes a principal risk factor for cardiac disease. Currently, the underlying mechanisms of ageing that contribute to the initiation or acceleration of cardiac disease are essentially unresolved. Prevailing theories of ageing center on the loss of

  20. Molecular basis of hereditary C1q deficiency-revisited: identification of several novel disease-causing mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schejbel, L; Skattum, L; Hagelberg, S

    2011-01-01

    C1q is the central pattern-recognition molecule in the classical pathway of the complement system and is known to have a key role in the crossroads between adaptive and innate immunity. Hereditary C1q deficiency is a rare genetic condition strongly associated with systemic lupus erythematosus and...

  1. Molecular basis of hereditary C1q deficiency-revisited: identification of several novel disease-causing mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schejbel, L; Skattum, L; Hagelberg, S

    2011-01-01

    C1q is the central pattern-recognition molecule in the classical pathway of the complement system and is known to have a key role in the crossroads between adaptive and innate immunity. Hereditary C1q deficiency is a rare genetic condition strongly associated with systemic lupus erythematosus...

  2. Canine hereditary ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urkasemsin, Ganokon; Olby, Natasha J

    2014-11-01

    The hereditary ataxias are a group of neurodegenerative diseases that cause a progressive (or episodic) cerebellar ataxia. A large number of different disorders have been described in different breeds of purebred dog, and in some instances, more than one disorder occurs in a single breed, creating a confusing clinical picture. The mutations associated with these disorders are being described at a rapid rate, potentially changing our ability to prevent, diagnose, and treat affected dogs. A breed-related neurodegenerative process should be suspected in any pure bred dog with slowly progressive, symmetric signs of ataxia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Usefulness of cardiac MRI in the prognosis and follow-up of ischemic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, A; Pons-Lladó, G

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an important tool that makes it possible to evaluate patients with cardiovascular disease; in addition to infarction and alterations in myocardial perfusion, cardiac MRI is useful for evaluating other phenomena such as microvascular obstruction and ischemia. The main prognostic factors in cardiac MRI are ventricular dysfunction, necrosis in late enhancement sequences, and ischemia in stress sequences. In acute myocardial infarction, cardiac MRI can evaluate the peri-infarct zone and quantify the size of the infarct. Furthermore, cardiac MRI's ability to detect and evaluate microvascular obstruction makes it a fundamental tool for establishing the prognosis of ischemic heart disease. In patients with chronic ischemic heart disease, cardiac MRI can detect ischemia induced by pharmacological stress and can diagnose infarcts that can be missed on other techniques. Copyright © 2014 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Cardiac safety of donepezil in elderly patients with Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isik, Ahmet Turan; Yildiz, Gulsen Babacan; Bozoglu, Ergun; Yay, Adnan; Aydemir, Emine

    2012-01-01

    Donepezil is a widely used cholinesterase inhibitor for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD), however its cholinergic adverse side effects on the cardiovascular system are still unclear. In this study, we aimed to examine the adverse side effects caused by donepezil on cardiac rhythm and postural blood pressure changes in elderly patients with Alzheimer Disease. The ECG parameters including heart rate, PR, QT, QTc interval and QRS duration and postural blood pressure changes were recorded at the baseline and at each donepezil dose level (5 and 10 mg/d). Patients Seventy-one consecutive patients who were referred by primary care centers to a Geriatric Clinic were enrolled and underwent comprehensive geriatric assessment. Fifty-two subjects completed the study. There were no significant changes relative to the baseline in any of the ECG parameters or arterial blood pressure at any of the investigated dosages of donepezil. It was demonstrated that donepezil was not associated with increased negative chronotropic, arrhythmogenic or hypotensive effects for elderly patients with Alzheimer's disease.

  5. [Sudden cardiac death in athletes is usually caused by undiagnosed heart disease. Cardiac screening of young athletes under discussion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Börjesson, Mats; Nylander, Eva

    Sudden death during exercise in young athletes is usually caused by previously undiagnosed heart disease. The most frequent underlying diseases are hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, coronary artery anomalies and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy. The possibility of carrying out screening to prevent these tragic cardiac deaths in young athletes has been discussed. A history of sudden cardiac death at a young age among relatives and/or the occurrence of exercise related symptoms in the active sportsperson may identify some of the individuals at risk. A pathological ECG is also a risk factor, especially in combination with a history of abnormal findings upon physical examination. For a correct evaluation of the young athlete, it is important to be aware of the normal variation of cardiac findings in athletes ("athlete's heart").

  6. Is Pancreatic Cancer Hereditary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Board Patient Education / Basics of Pancreatic Cancer Is pancreatic cancer hereditary? Cancer of the pancreas is a genetic ... found in cigarette smoke. The genetics of hereditary pancreatic cancer is a focus of research at Johns Hopkins. ...

  7. Cardiac Biomarkers of Low Cardiac Output Syndrome in the Postoperative Period After Congenital Heart Disease Surgery in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Navero, Juan L; de la Torre-Aguilar, María José; Ibarra de la Rosa, Ignacio; Gil-Campos, Mercedes; Gómez-Guzmán, Elena; Merino-Cejas, Carlos; Muñoz-Villanueva, María C; Llorente-Cantarero, Francisco J

    2017-04-01

    To assess the predictive value of atrial natriuretic peptide, β-type natriuretic peptide, copeptin, mid-regional pro-adrenomedullin (MR-proADM) and cardiac troponin I (cTn-I) as indicators of low cardiac output syndrome in children with congenital heart disease undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). After corrective surgery for congenital heart disease under CPB, 117 children (aged 10 days to 180 months) were enrolled in a prospective observational pilot study during a 2-year period. The patients were classified according to whether they developed low cardiac output syndrome. Biomarker levels were measured at 2, 12, 24, and 48 hours post-CPB. The clinical data and outcome variables were analyzed by a multiple logistic regression model. Thirty-three (29%) patients developed low cardiac output syndrome (group 1) and the remaining 84 (71%) patients were included in group 2. cTn-I levels >14 ng/mL at 2hours after CPB (OR, 4.05; 95%CI, 1.29-12.64; P=.016) and MR-proADM levels>1.5 nmol/L at 24hours following CPB (OR, 15.54; 95%CI, 4.41-54.71; P<.001) were independent predictors of low cardiac output syndrome. Our results suggest that cTn-I at 2hours post-CPB is, by itself, an evident independent early predictor of low cardiac output syndrome. This predictive capacity is, moreover, reinforced when cTn-I is combined with MR-proADM levels at 24hours following CPB. These 2 cardiac biomarkers would aid in therapeutic decision-making in clinical practice and would also enable clinicians to modify the type of support to be used in the pediatric intensive care unit. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Adenylyl cyclase type 5 in cardiac disease, metabolism, and aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Misun; Yan, Lin; Lee, Grace J.; Lai, Lo; Iwatsubo, Kousaku; Ishikawa, Yoshihiro; Pessin, Jeffrey; Vatner, Dorothy E.

    2013-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor/adenylyl cyclase (AC)/cAMP signaling is crucial for all cellular responses to physiological and pathophysiological stimuli. There are nine isoforms of membrane-bound AC, with type 5 being one of the two major isoforms in the heart. Since the role of AC in the heart in regulating cAMP and acute changes in inotropic and chronotropic state are well known, this review will address our current understanding of the distinct regulatory role of the AC5 isoform in response to chronic stress. Transgenic overexpression of AC5 in cardiomyocytes of the heart (AC5-Tg) improves baseline cardiac function but impairs the ability of the heart to withstand stress. For example, chronic catecholamine stimulation induces cardiomyopathy, which is more severe in AC5-Tg mice, mediated through the AC5/sirtuin 1/forkhead box O3a pathway. Conversely, disrupting AC5, i.e., AC5 knockout, protects the heart from chronic catecholamine cardiomyopathy as well as the cardiomyopathies resulting from chronic pressure overload or aging. Moreover, AC5 knockout results in a 30% increase in a healthy life span, resembling the most widely studied model of longevity, i.e., calorie restriction. These two models of longevity share similar gene regulation in the heart, muscle, liver, and brain in that they are both protected against diabetes, obesity, and diabetic and aging cardiomyopathy. A pharmacological inhibitor of AC5 also provides protection against cardiac stress, diabetes, and obesity. Thus AC5 inhibition has novel, potential therapeutic applicability to several diseases not only in the heart but also in aging, diabetes, and obesity. PMID:23624627

  9. Deciphering cardiac involvement in systemic inflammatory diseases: noninvasive tissue characterisation using cardiac magnetic resonance is key to improved patients' care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerster, Martin; Peker, Elif; Nagel, Eike; Puntmann, Valentina O

    2016-11-01

    Cardiac involvement in systemic inflammatory diseases (SID) has a major impact on patients' morbidity and mortality, yet the pathways to its recognition and management remain poorly established. Areas covered: Overall clinical management in SID patients is primarily guided by systemic symptoms. Cardiovascular disease goes largely undetected, as it evolves through years of a protracted and subclinical course. Despite the increased awareness and insights into the mechanistic role of the inflammatory pathways, clinical management of cardiac involvement continues to rely on diagnostic means, which are frequently insensitive, invasive and rely on radiation exposure. Advanced tissue characterisation with cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) offers an accurate, non-invasive and radiation-free diagnostic method with obvious advantages: it is able to inform on a range of cardiovascular pathophysiology, as well as support safe serial examinations, informing on the disease presence, progress and response to treatment. Expert commentary: We summarise the recent advances in non-invasive imaging, and bridge the novel insights into pathophysiology with future posibilities in diagnosis and manangement of SID patients. We propose an interdisciplinary framework to screening of cardiac involvement in SID using an indepth phenotyping of evolution of cardiovascular disease, to decipher the opportunities to improve patients' cardiac care.

  10. Modeling dynamics in diseased cardiac tissue: Impact of model choice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokhale, Tanmay A.; Medvescek, Eli; Henriquez, Craig S.

    2017-09-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias have been traditionally simulated using continuous models that assume tissue homogeneity and use a relatively large spatial discretization. However, it is believed that the tissue fibrosis and collagen deposition, which occur on a micron-level, are critical factors in arrhythmogenesis in diseased tissues. Consequently, it remains unclear how well continuous models, which use averaged electrical properties, are able to accurately capture complex conduction behaviors such as re-entry in fibrotic tissues. The objective of this study was to compare re-entrant behavior in discrete microstructural models of fibrosis and in two types of equivalent continuous models, a homogenous continuous model and a hybrid continuous model with distinct heterogeneities. In the discrete model, increasing levels of tissue fibrosis lead to a substantial increase in the re-entrant cycle length which is inadequately reflected in the homogenous continuous models. These cycle length increases appear to be primarily due to increases in the tip path length and to altered restitution behavior, and suggest that it is critical to consider the discrete effects of fibrosis on conduction when studying arrhythmogenesis in fibrotic myocardium. Hybrid models are able to accurately capture some aspects of re-entry and, if carefully tuned, may provide a framework for simulating conduction in diseased tissues with both accuracy and efficiency.

  11. Chronic Kidney Disease is a New Target of Cardiac Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Kohzuki

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Chronic heart failure is increasingly prevalent worldwide and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The Cochrane review demonstrated that cardiac rehabilitation (CR resulted in improvements in QOL and a reduction in long-term mortality. Chronic kidney disease (CKD is another worldwide public health problem. This review focuses on the importance and efficacy of rehabilitation for CKD patients as a new target of CR. Patients with CKD on hemodialysis (HD have a high mortality rate, with cardiovascular diseases, such as chronic heart failure. A new systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials reported that exercise-based renal rehabilitation improved aerobic capacity, muscular functioning, cardiovascular function, walking capacity, and QOL in CKD patients with HD. Moreover, exercise training may have renal protective effects, not only in some animal models of pre-HD CKD, but also in pre-HD CKD patients. Exercise therapy could be an effective clinical strategy in improving renal function, lowering the need for renal replacement therapy, such as HD, and reducing renal transplant risk in pre-HD CKD patients. This led the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare of Japan to extend renal rehabilitation partial coverage to stage 4 pre-HD CKD patients for the first time in the world in 2016.

  12. Molecular regulation of mitochondrial dynamics in cardiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, Jinliang; Zhu, Wei; Rahman, M S; Liu, Mingfei; Li, Dan; Su, Shengan; Zhang, Na; Hu, Xinyang; Yu, Hong; Gupta, Mahesh P; Wang, Jian'an

    2017-07-01

    Mitochondrial homeostasis is critical for keeping functional heart in response to metabolic or environmental stresses. Mitochondrial fission and fusion (mitochondrial dynamics) play essential roles in maintaining mitochondrial homeostasis, defects in mitochondrial dynamics lead to cardiac diseases such as ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI), heart failure and diabetic cardiomyopathy. Mitochondrial dynamics is determined by mitochondrial fission and fusion proteins, including OPA1, mitofusins and Drp1. These proteins are tightly regulated by a series of signaling pathways through different aspects such as transcription, post translation modifications (PTMs) and proteasome-dependent protein degradation. By modulating these mitochondrial fission and fusion proteins, mitochondria fine-tune their metabolic status to meet the energy demands of the heart. Moreover, these mitochondrial fission and fusion proteins are essential for mediating mitochondrial autophagy (mitophagy), leading to clearance of damaged mitochondria to maintain a healthy population of mitochondria in heart under stressed conditions. Mitochondrial dynamics dependent improvement in mitochondrial metabolism and quality could partially reverse the pathological conditions of heart. This review describes an overview of mechanisms on mitochondrial dynamics regulation and provides potential therapeutic targets for treating cardiovascular diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Children with heart disease: Risk stratification for non-cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saettele, Angela K; Christensen, Jacob L; Chilson, Kelly L; Murray, David J

    2016-12-01

    Children with congenital or acquired heart disease have an increased risk of anesthesia related morbidity and mortality. The child's anesthetic risk is related to the severity of their underlying cardiac disease, associated comorbidities, and surgical procedure. The goal of this project was to determine the ease of use of a preoperative risk stratification tool for assigning pediatric cardiac staff and to determine the relative frequency that children with low, moderate, and high risk cardiac disease present for non-cardiac surgery at a tertiary pediatric hospital. A risk-stratification tool was prospectively applied to children with congenital heart disease who presented for non-cardiac surgery. Perioperative. We identified a subset of 100 children with congenital heart disease out of 2200 children who required general anesthesia for surgical or radiological procedures over a 6 week period. A risk stratification tool was utilized to place the patient into low, moderate, or high risk categories to help predict anticipated anesthetic risk. Each grouping specified assignment of staff caring for the patient, clarified preoperative expectations for cardiac assessment, and determined if patient care could be performed at our freestanding ambulatory surgical center. Electronic perioperative records were reviewed to obtain demographic information, the underlying heart disease, prior cardiac surgery, associated conditions, anesthetic management, complications, and provider type. Approximately 4.5% of children presented with cardiac disease over a 6 week period. In 100 consecutive children with cardiac disease, 23 of the children were classified as low risk, 66 patients were classified as moderate risk, and 11 of the patients were classified as high risk. Pediatric cardiac anesthesiologists provided care to all high risk patients. There were no serious adverse events. We found this risk stratification method an effective method to differentiate children into low, moderate

  14. Dietary soya protein during pregnancy and lactation in rats with hereditary kidney disease attenuates disease progression in offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Leah E; Peng, Claudia Yu-Chen; Bankovic-Calic, Neda; Sankaran, Deepa; Ogborn, Malcolm R; Aukema, Harold M

    2007-01-01

    Dietary soya protein substitution for casein initiated at weaning slows disease progression in animal models of chronic renal disease. As there is increasing evidence that fetal programming can have a significant impact on kidney physiology and function in offspring, the objective of the current study was to determine whether exposure to soya protein in the diet earlier than weaning would have further benefits. Han:SPRD-cy (cy/+) breeder rats were fed a casein-based or soya protein-based diet 2 weeks prior to mating, throughout pregnancy and during lactation. Following this maternal period, 3-week-old pups were given either the same or the alternate diet for a 7-week weaning period. Dietary soya protein compared with casein in the maternal or weaning period both independently resulted in less renal inflammation (macrophage infiltration lower by 24% (P=0.0003) and 32% (Ppregnancy and lactation represents a potential preventative approach in treating for those with congenital kidney diseases.

  15. The Genetics Of Blood Disorders: Hereditary Hemoglobinopathies.

    OpenAIRE

    Sonati M.F.; Costa F.F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To summarize recently published data on the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of sickle cell diseases and β-Thalassemias, the most relevant hereditary hemoglobinopathies in the global population. Sources: Searches were run on the MEDLINE and SCIELO databases, limited to the period from 2003 to May 2008, using the terms hereditary hemoglobinopathies, sickle cell diseases and β-thalassemia. Two books and two chapters were also included. Summary of the findings: More than 2,000...

  16. A Study on Oral Health of Children with Cardiac Diseases in Mashhad, Iran in 2004

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Mahmoudi; Maryam Khordi Mood; Maryam Talebi; Shaili Alidad

    2007-01-01

    Background and aims. Preventing oral disease is the most desirable way of ensuring good dental health for children with heart disease. Dental and gingival infections in patients with cardiac problems may lead to infective endocarditis. The aim of this study was to evaluate oral and dental health status in children with heart disease referred to a cardiac center compared with the control group.

    Materials and Methods.

  17. Cardiac troponin testing in idiopathic inflammatory myopathies and systemic sclerosis-spectrum disorders: biomarkers to distinguish between primary cardiac involvement and low-grade skeletal muscle disease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Michael; Lilleker, James B; Herrick, Ariane L; Chinoy, Hector

    2015-05-01

    Primary cardiac involvement, an under-recognised manifestation of the idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM) and systemic sclerosis (SSc)-spectrum disorders, is associated with significant mortality. Within these two conditions, traditional skeletal muscle enzyme testing may not effectively distinguish between skeletal and cardiac muscle involvement, especially in patients with subclinical cardiac disease. Accurate biomarkers are thus required to screen for cardiac disease, to better inform both therapeutic decision-making and treatment response. The widespread uptake of cardiac troponin testing has revolutionised the management of acute coronary syndromes. While cardiac troponin I (cTnI) appears specific to the myocardium, cardiac troponin T (cTnT) is also expressed by skeletal muscle, including regenerating skeletal muscle tissue. There is increasing interest about the role of cardiac troponins as a putative biomarker of primary cardiac involvement in IIM and SSc-spectrum disorders. Herewith we discuss subclinical cardiac disease in IIM and SSc-spectrum disorders, the respective roles of cTnI and cTnT testing, and the re-expression of cTnT within regenerating skeletal muscle tissue. There remains wide variation in access to cardiac troponin testing nationally and internationally. We propose two pragmatic clinical pathways using cardiac troponins, preferably measuring concomitant cTnT followed by confirmatory (cardiac) cTnI to screen patients for subclinical cardiac disease and/or low-grade skeletal muscle disease activity, and also an agenda for future research. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  18. Contribution of inherited heart disease to sudden cardiac death in childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofman, Nynke; Tan, Hanno L.; Clur, Sally-Ann; Alders, Mariel; van Langen, Irene M.; Wilde, Arthur A. M.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND. In children aged 1 to 18 years, the causes of sudden cardiac death may remain unresolved when autopsy results are negative. Because inherited cardiac diseases are likely, cardiologic and genetic investigations of relatives may still yield the diagnosis in these cases. Moreover, these

  19. Cardiac surgery and percutaneous intervention in pregnant women with heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieper, P. G.; Hoendermis, E. S.; Drijver, Y. N.

    In pregnant women with heart disease, complications can arise due to the haemodynamic burden of pregnancy and to hypercoagulation. Most problems can be managed medically, but sometimes cardiac surgery or percutaneous intervention is unavoidable. Cardiac surgery has similar maternal mortality to that

  20. Right ventricular function declines after cardiac surgery in adult patients with congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuuring, Mark J.; Bolmers, Pauline P. M.; Mulder, Barbara J. M.; de Bruin-Bon, Rianne H. A. C. M.; Koolbergen, Dave R.; Hazekamp, Mark G.; Lagrand, Wim K.; de Hert, Stefan G.; de Beaumont, E. M. F. H.; Bouma, Berto J.

    2012-01-01

    Right ventricular function (RVF) is often selectively declined after coronary artery bypass graft surgery. In adult patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) the incidence and persistence of declined RVF after cardiac surgery is unknown. The current study aimed to describe RVF after cardiac

  1. Cardiac imaging in patients with chronic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiese, Signe; Hove, Jens D; Møller, Søren

    2017-01-01

    to be involved in the development of hepatic nephropathy and is associated with an impaired survival. In the field of cardiac imaging, CCM is not yet a well-characterized entity, hence various modalities of cardiac imaging have been applied. Stress testing with either physiologically or pharmacologically induced...

  2. Oestrogens ameliorate mitochondrial dysfunction in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Giordano, Carla; Montopoli, Monica; Perli, Elena; Orlandi, Maurizia; Fantin, Marianna; Ross-Cisneros, Fred N; Caparrotta, Laura; Martinuzzi, Andrea; Ragazzi, Eugenio; Ghelli, Anna; Sadun, Alfredo A; d'Amati, Giulia; Carelli, Valerio

    2011-01-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy, the most frequent mitochondrial disease due to mitochondrial DNA point mutations in complex I, is characterized by the selective degeneration of retinal ganglion...

  3. Genetic counseling and cardiac care in predictively tested hypertrophic cardiomyopathy mutation carriers: The patients' perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Christiaans, Imke; Van Langen, Irene M.; Birnie, Erwin; Bonsel, Gouke J.; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Smets, Ellen M. A.

    2009-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a common hereditary heart disease associated with sudden cardiac death. Predictive genetic counseling and testing are performed using adapted Huntington guidelines, that is, psychosocial care and time for reflection are not obligatory and the test result can be

  4. T2-weighted cardiovascular magnetic resonance in acute cardiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eitel, Ingo; Friedrich, Matthias G

    2011-02-18

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) using T2-weighted sequences can visualize myocardial edema. When compared to previous protocols, newer pulse sequences with substantially improved image quality have increased its clinical utility. The assessment of myocardial edema provides useful incremental diagnostic and prognostic information in a variety of clinical settings associated with acute myocardial injury. In patients with acute chest pain, T2-weighted CMR is able to identify acute or recent myocardial ischemic injury and has been employed to distinguish acute coronary syndrome (ACS) from non-ACS as well as acute from chronic myocardial infarction.T2-weighted CMR can also be used to determine the area at risk in reperfused and non-reperfused infarction. When combined with contrast-enhanced imaging, the salvaged area and thus the success of early coronary revascularization can be quantified. Strong evidence for the prognostic value of myocardial salvage has enabled its use as a primary endpoint in clinical trials. The present article reviews the current evidence and clinical applications for T2-weighted CMR in acute cardiac disease and gives an outlook on future developments."The principle of all things is water"Thales of Miletus (624 BC - 546 BC). © 2011 Eitel and Friedrich; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  5. Hereditary Fructose Intolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Nagornaya

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary fructose intolerance, the prevalence of which is 1 : 20,000 population, is diagnosed much less frequently than is found in child and adult populations. Presented pathology is caused by a deficiency in ferment aldolase B and block of fructose transformation in the gastrointestinal tract with the accumulation of unprocessed fructose in the intestine, manifesting by characteristic symptom and numerous biochemical changes in the body. The disease is asymptomatic until a person begins to use fructose, sucrose or sorbitol. This article describes the fructose metabolism, genetic aspects of the discussing disease, the diversity of its clinical manifestations. The authors presented modern diagnostic criteria and international approaches to diet therapy.

  6. Recreating the Cardiac Microenvironment in Pluripotent Stem Cell Models of Human Physiology and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atmanli, Ayhan; Domian, Ibrahim John

    2017-05-01

    The advent of human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) biology has opened unprecedented opportunities for the use of tissue engineering to generate human cardiac tissue for in vitro study. Engineering cardiac constructs that recapitulate human development and disease requires faithful recreation of the cardiac niche in vitro. Here we discuss recent progress in translating the in vivo cardiac microenvironment into PSC models of the human heart. We review three key physiologic features required to recreate the cardiac niche and facilitate normal cardiac differentiation and maturation: the biochemical, biophysical, and bioelectrical signaling cues. Finally, we discuss key barriers that must be overcome to fulfill the promise of stem cell biology in preclinical applications and ultimately in clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Cardiac misconceptions: comparisons among nurses, nursing students and people with heart disease in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Ping; Furze, Gill; Spilsbury, Karen; Lewin, Robert J P

    2008-11-01

    This paper is a report of a study to examine the misconceived and potentially maladaptive beliefs (cardiac misconceptions) about heart disease held by nurses, nursing students and people with heart disease in Taiwan. Research suggests that misconceived and maladaptive beliefs about heart disease influence outcomes in people with heart disease, and that eliciting and dispelling incorrect beliefs can reduce disability in this population. However, nurses do not routinely elicit maladaptive beliefs or attempt to dispel them. Between October 2005 and March 2006, a survey was conducted using version 1 of the York Cardiac Beliefs Questionnaire to measure cardiac misconceptions in 64 hospital-based nurses (13 of whom were cardiac nurses), 134 nursing students and 238 people with heart disease. Nursing students held fewer cardiac misconceptions than nurses (P = 0.042). There were no statistically significant differences in the numbers of misconceptions between cardiac and general nurses, and no statistically significant associations between level of qualification, years of nursing experience and number of misconceptions. Nurses with higher levels of education were more likely to hold fewer misconceptions (P = 0.24). Patients held statistically significantly more misconceptions about heart problems than nurses (P misconceptions about their condition, and therefore continuing professional education is required to develop this clinical expertise. Future research should focus on methods of dispelling cardiac misconceptions in both nursing and patient education.

  8. Neurological and cardiac complications in a cohort of children with end-stage renal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jumana H Albaramki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult patients with chronic kidney disease are at risk of major neurologic and cardiac complications. The purpose of this study is to review the neurological and cardiac complications in children with end-stage renal disease (ESRD. A retrospective review of medical records of children with ESRD at Jordan University Hospital was performed. All neurological and cardiac events were recorded and analyzed. Data of a total of 68 children with ESRD presenting between 2002 and 2013 were reviewed. Neurological complications occurred in 32.4%; seizures were the most common event. Uncontrolled hypertension was the leading cause of neurological events. Cardiac complications occurred in 39.7%, the most common being pericardial effusion. Mortality from neurological complications was 45%. Neurological and cardiac complications occurred in around a third of children with ESRD with a high mortality rate. More effective control of hypertension, anemia, and intensive and gentle dialysis are needed.

  9. New disease allele and de novo mutation indicate mutational vulnerability of titin exon 343 in hereditary myopathy with early respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Dongyue; Gao, Mingshi; Zhu, Wenhua; Luo, Sushan; Xi, Jianying; Wang, Bei; Li, Ying; Cai, Shuang; Li, Jin; Wang, Yin; Lu, Jiahong; Zhao, Chongbo

    2015-02-01

    We report two patients of Chinese ancestry with hereditary myopathy with early respiratory failure, one sporadic with atypical onset as rigid spine syndrome, the other familial with 10 years' history of hyperCKemia. Muscle biopsy was either nonspecific or typical with cytoplasmic bodies and rimmed vacuoles. Despite the phenotypic variety, both patients showed fatty infiltration of semitendinosus on muscle magnetic resonance imaging. Genetic analysis of case 1 disclosed de novo heterozygous missense mutations in the 119th fibronectin 3 domain of titin [c.90272C>T, p.P30091L]. Haplotype analysis of case 2 revealed a heterozygous missense mutation [c.90211T>C, p.C30071R] on a new disease allele incompatible with the British common haplotype. These findings suggest that hereditary myopathy with early respiratory failure is a worldwide distributed disorder and indicate the mutational vulnerability of TTN exon 343 in which de novo mutations could occur on different haplotype backgrounds. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. A study on oral health of children with cardiac diseases in mashhad, iran in 2004

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Talebi, Maryam; Khordi Mood, Maryam; Mahmoudi, Mohammad; Alidad, Shaili

    2007-01-01

    .... In this descriptive cross-sectional study, case group consisting of 100 patients 2-12 years old with heart disease were examined for oral and dental status in Pediatric Cardiac Center in Mashhad, Iran, in 2004...

  11. Uteroplacental Blood Flow, Cardiac Function, and Pregnancy Outcome in Women With Congenital Heart Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieper, Petronella G.; Balci, Ali; Aarnoudse, Jan G.; Kampman, Marlies A. M.; Sollie, Krystyna M.; Groen, Henk; Mulder, Barbara J. M.; Oudijk, Martijn A.; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W.; Cornette, Jerome; van Dijk, Arie P. J.; Spaanderman, Marc E.; Drenthen, Willem; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Pregnant women with congenital heart disease (CHD) are susceptible to cardiovascular, obstetric, and offspring complications. In women with CHD, cardiac dysfunction may compromise uteroplacental flow and contribute to the increased incidence of obstetric and offspring events. Methods and

  12. Nanoparticles as magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents for vascular and cardiac diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Wei; Cormode, David P.; Fayad, Zahi A.; Mulder, Willem J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Advances in nanoparticle contrast agents for molecular imaging have made magnetic resonance imaging a promising modality for noninvasive visualization and assessment of vascular and cardiac disease processes. This review provides a description of the various nanoparticles exploited for imaging

  13. Hyperpolarized metabolic MR in the study of cardiac function and disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, M. H.; Søgaard, L. V.; Madsen, Pia Lisbeth

    2014-01-01

    the technique into clinical practice. Hyperpolarized MR has the prospect of transforming diagnostic cardiology by offering new insights into cardiac disease and potentially even to contribute to personalized therapy based on a thorough understanding of the individual intracellular metabolism....

  14. Role of echocardiography in the management of cardiac disease in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Wan Joo

    2014-12-01

    The widespread use of echocardiography has contributed to the early recognition of several distinct cardiac diseases in women. During pregnancy, safe monitoring of the disease process, as well as a better understanding of hemodynamics, is possible. During the use of potentially cardiotoxic drugs for breast cancer chemotherapy, echocardiographic patient monitoring is vital. Compared to men, the addition of an imaging modality to routine electrocardiogram monitoring during stress testing is more informative for diagnosing coronary disease in women. This review briefly discusses the role of echocardiography in the management of several women-specific cardiac diseases where echocardiography plays a pivotal role in disease management.

  15. Insights into the clinical and functional significance of cardiac autonomic dysfunction in Chagas disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Fernando Junqueira Junior

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Exclusive or associated lesions in various structures of the autonomic nervous system occur in the chronic forms of Chagas disease. In the indeterminate form, the lesions are absent or mild, whereas in the exclusive or combined heart and digestive disease forms, they are often more pronounced. Depending on their severity these lesions can result mainly in cardiac parasympathetic dysfunction but also in sympathetic dysfunction of variable degrees. Despite the key autonomic effect on cardiovascular functioning, the pathophysiological and clinical significance of the cardiac autonomic dysfunction in Chagas disease remains unknown. METHODS: Review of data on the cardiac autonomic dysfunction in Chagas disease and their potential consequences, and considerations supporting the possible relationship between this disturbance and general or cardiovascular clinical and functional adverse outcomes. RESULTS: We hypothesise that possible consequences that cardiac dysautonomia might variably occasion or predispose in Chagas disease include: transient or sustained arrhythmias, sudden cardiac death, adverse overall and cardiovascular prognosis with enhanced morbidity and mortality, an inability of the cardiovascular system to adjust to functional demands and/or respond to internal or external stimuli by adjusting heart rate and other hemodynamic variables, and immunomodulatory and cognitive disturbances. CONCLUSIONS: Impaired cardiac autonomic modulation in Chagas disease might not be a mere epiphenomenon without significance. Indirect evidences point for a likely important role of this alteration as a primary predisposing or triggering cause or mediator favouring the development of subtle or evident secondary cardiovascular functional disturbances and clinical consequences, and influencing adverse outcomes.

  16. Insights into the clinical and functional significance of cardiac autonomic dysfunction in Chagas disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junqueira, Luiz Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Exclusive or associated lesions in various structures of the autonomic nervous system occur in the chronic forms of Chagas disease. In the indeterminate form, the lesions are absent or mild, whereas in the exclusive or combined heart and digestive disease forms, they are often more pronounced. Depending on their severity these lesions can result mainly in cardiac parasympathetic dysfunction but also in sympathetic dysfunction of variable degrees. Despite the key autonomic effect on cardiovascular functioning, the pathophysiological and clinical significance of the cardiac autonomic dysfunction in Chagas disease remains unknown. Review of data on the cardiac autonomic dysfunction in Chagas disease and their potential consequences, and considerations supporting the possible relationship between this disturbance and general or cardiovascular clinical and functional adverse outcomes. We hypothesise that possible consequences that cardiac dysautonomia might variably occasion or predispose in Chagas disease include: transient or sustained arrhythmias, sudden cardiac death, adverse overall and cardiovascular prognosis with enhanced morbidity and mortality, an inability of the cardiovascular system to adjust to functional demands and/or respond to internal or external stimuli by adjusting heart rate and other hemodynamic variables, and immunomodulatory and cognitive disturbances. Impaired cardiac autonomic modulation in Chagas disease might not be a mere epiphenomenon without significance. Indirect evidences point for a likely important role of this alteration as a primary predisposing or triggering cause or mediator favouring the development of subtle or evident secondary cardiovascular functional disturbances and clinical consequences, and influencing adverse outcomes.

  17. Cardiac Arrhythmias in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease: Implications of Renal Failure for Antiarrhythmic Drug Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potpara, Tatjana S; Jokic, Vera; Dagres, Nikolaos; Marin, Francisco; Prostran, Milica S; Blomstrom-Lundqvist, Carina; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2016-01-01

    The kidney has numerous complex interactions with the heart, including shared risk factors (e.g., hypertension, dyslipidemia, etc.) and mutual amplification of morbidity and mortality. Both cardiovascular diseases and chronic kidney disease (CKD) may cause various alterations in cardiovascular system, metabolic homeostasis and autonomic nervous system that may facilitate the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias. Also, pre-existent or incident cardiac arrhythmias such as atrial fibrillation (AF) may accelerate the progression of CKD. Patients with CKD may experience various cardiac rhythm disturbances including sudden cardiac death. Contemporary management of cardiac arrhythmias includes the use of antiarrhythmic drugs (AADs), catheter ablation and cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs). Importantly, AADs are not used only as the principal treatment strategy, but also as an adjunct therapy in combination with CIEDs, to facilitate their effects or to minimize inappropriate device activation in selected patients. Along with their principal antiarrhythmic effect, AADs may also induce cardiac arrhythmias and the risk for such proarrhythmic effect(s) is particularly increased in patients with reduced left ventricular systolic function or in the setting of electrolyte imbalance. Moreover, CKD itself can induce profound alterations in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of many drugs including AADs, thus facilitating the drug accumulation and increased exposure. Hence, the use of AADs in patients with CKD may be challenging. In this review article, we provide an overview of the characteristics of arrhythmogenesis in patients with CKD with special emphasis on the complexity of pharmacokinetics and risk for proarrhythmias when using AADs in patients with cardiac arrhythmias and CKD.

  18. A Review of Hereditary Fructose Intolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mogoş Tiberius

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Fructose intolerance is a metabolic disorder with hereditary determinism, clinically manifested on terms of fructose intake. Untreated, hereditary fructose intolerance may result in renal and hepatic failure. Unfortunately, there are no formal diagnostic and surveillance guidelines for this disease. If identified and treated before the occurrence of permanent organ damage, patients can improve their symptoms and self-rated health. Implementation and adherence to a strict fructose free diet is often difficult, but not impossible.

  19. A Review of Hereditary Fructose Intolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Mogoş Tiberius; Iacobini Andra Evelin

    2016-01-01

    Fructose intolerance is a metabolic disorder with hereditary determinism, clinically manifested on terms of fructose intake. Untreated, hereditary fructose intolerance may result in renal and hepatic failure. Unfortunately, there are no formal diagnostic and surveillance guidelines for this disease. If identified and treated before the occurrence of permanent organ damage, patients can improve their symptoms and self-rated health. Implementation and adherence to a strict fructose free diet is...

  20. Hereditary colorectal cancer diagnostics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarskov, Louise; Holck, Susanne; Bernstein, Inge

    2012-01-01

    BackgroundThe hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) subset of tumours can broadly be divided into tumours caused by an underlying mismatch-repair gene mutation, referred to as Lynch syndrome, and those that develop in families with similar patterns of heredity but without disease......-predisposing germline mismatch repair mutations, referred to as familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX). Recognition of HNPCC-associated colorectal cancers is central since surveillance programmes effectively reduce morbidity and mortality. The characteristic morphological features linked to Lynch syndrome can aid...... in the identification of this subset, whereas the possibility to use morphological features as an indicator of FCCTX is uncertain.Objective and methodsTo perform a detailed morphological evaluation of HNPCC-associated colorectal cancers and demonstrate significant differences between tumours associated with FCCTX...

  1. Clinical features and peripartum outcomes in pregnant women with cardiac disease: a nationwide retrospective cohort study in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isogai, Toshiaki; Matsui, Hiroki; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Kohyama, Akira; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Yasunaga, Hideo

    2018-02-17

    Although the number of pregnancies in women with cardiac disease is increasing worldwide, there are few data concerning their clinical characteristics and peripartum outcomes. Using the Diagnosis Procedure Combination database between 2008 and 2014 in Japan, we retrospectively identified pregnant women who underwent high-risk delivery due to obstetric or non-obstetric comorbidities. We classified eligible women into those with pre-existing cardiac disease (cardiac disease group) and those with non-cardiac comorbidities (non-cardiac disease group) and compared their characteristics and peripartum outcomes. Of 94,364 women undergoing high-risk delivery at 556 hospitals, 857 (0.91%) had pre-existing cardiac disease (302, congenital heart disease; 190, arrhythmia; 176, valvular heart disease; 120, ischemic heart disease; 65, cardiomyopathy; 4, pericardial disease). Women in the cardiac disease group were more likely to be treated at university hospitals (51.1 versus 28.6%; p women with congenital heart disease (12.3%), valvular heart disease (12.5%), or cardiomyopathy (12.3%) than in women with arrhythmia (6.3%) or ischemic heart disease (5.8%). Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed a significant positive association between pre-existing cardiac disease and risk of heart failure (adjusted odds ratio, 24.7; 95% confidence interval, 17.6-34.6; p woman in the cardiac disease group died, whereas 18 women (0.02%) in the non-cardiac disease group did (p = 1.000). These findings suggest that pregnant women with pre-existing cardiac disease are at a higher risk of heart failure during the peripartum period than those with non-cardiac comorbidities.

  2. GM-CSF primes cardiac inflammation in a mouse model of Kawasaki disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Brent S.

    2016-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is the leading cause of pediatric heart disease in developed countries. KD patients develop cardiac inflammation, characterized by an early infiltrate of neutrophils and monocytes that precipitates coronary arteritis. Although the early inflammatory processes are linked to cardiac pathology, the factors that regulate cardiac inflammation and immune cell recruitment to the heart remain obscure. In this study, using a mouse model of KD (induced by a cell wall Candida albicans water-soluble fraction [CAWS]), we identify an essential role for granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in orchestrating these events. GM-CSF is rapidly produced by cardiac fibroblasts after CAWS challenge, precipitating cardiac inflammation. Mechanistically, GM-CSF acts upon the local macrophage compartment, driving the expression of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, whereas therapeutically, GM-CSF blockade markedly reduces cardiac disease. Our findings describe a novel role for GM-CSF as an essential initiating cytokine in cardiac inflammation and implicate GM-CSF as a potential target for therapeutic intervention in KD. PMID:27595596

  3. Genetics of Hereditary Angioedema Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germenis, Anastasios E; Speletas, Matthaios

    2016-10-01

    Contemporary genetic research has provided evidences that angioedema represents a diverse family of disorders related to kinin metabolism, with a much greater genetic complexity than was initially considered. Convincing data have also recently been published indicating that the clinical heterogeneity of hereditary angioedema due to C1 inhibitor deficiency (classified as C1-INH-HAE) could be attributed at least in part, either to the type of SERPING1 mutations or to mutations in genes encoding for enzymes involved in the metabolism and function of bradykinin. Alterations detected in at least one more gene (F12) are nowadays considered responsible for 25 % of cases of hereditary angioedema with normal C1-INH (type III hereditary angioedema (HAE), nlC1-INH-HAE). Interesting data derived from genetic approaches of non-hereditary angioedemas indicate that other immune pathways might be implicated in the pathogenesis of HAE. More than 125 years after the recognition of the hereditary nature of HAE by Osler, the heterogeneity of clinical expressions, the genetics of this disorder, and the genotype-phenotype relationships, still presents a challenge that will be discussed in this review. Large scale, in-depth genetic studies are expected not only to answer these emerging questions but also to further elucidate many of the unmet aspects of angioedema pathogenesis. Uncovering genetic biomarkers affecting the severity of the disease and/or the effectiveness of the various treatment modalities might lead to the prevention of attacks and the optimization of C1-INH-HAE management that is expected to provide a valuable benefit to the sufferers of angioedema.

  4. Spectrum of paediatric cardiac diseases: a study of 15,066 children undergoing cardiac intervention at a tertiary care centre in India with special emphasis on gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiran, Viralam S; Nath, Parrimala P; Maheshwari, Sunita

    2011-02-01

    To analyse the relative frequency and gender ratios in the procedures (both surgical and catheter-based interventions) performed for cardiac diseases in Indian children. Not many studies are available in the developing countries with regard to the prevalence, relative frequency, or gender distribution of cardiac diseases in children. As universal newborn screening is not carried out for congenital cardiac diseases, the statistics are difficult to ascertain. Do female and male children with cardiac disease get equal parental preference in terms of surgical correction and catheter interventions in India? This question is also unanswered. Analysis of 15,066 consecutive Indian children aged ratios of cardiac lesions in these children were determined and compared with the studies in literature. Overall male/female ratio in the study was 1.4:1. Ventricular septal defect was the most common lesion (24.2%) with male/female ratio of 1.5:1, followed by tetralogy of Fallot (18.7%, 1.6:1), atrial septal defect (14.4%, 0.9:1) and so on. Male children dominated the total number of procedures performed. In most of the individual cardiac lesions, the relative frequency was different from that of international studies. The gender ratio for the majority of the individual type of cardiac problems was different from that of international references. These findings may suggest a preference for the male child in the treatment of cardiac diseases in India, which could possibly be related to social causes.

  5. Imaging findings of arteriovenous malformations involving lung and liver in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia(Osler-weber-rendu disease): two cases report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Jeong Geun; Lee, Joo Hyuk; Seong, Su Ok [Cheongju St. Mary' s Hospital, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-09-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) or Osler-Weber-Rendu disease is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by repeated episodes of bleeding. Multiple telangiectases consisting of thin-walled, dilated vascular channels with arteriovenous communication may involve, for example, mucocutaneous tissue, the gastrointestinal tract, and the liver, lung, and brain. We report the imaging findings of two cases of HHT involving arteriovenous malformation of both the lungs and liver, a rare condition. Chest radiography revealed a round mass, while helical CT showed a feeding artery and draining vein with arteriovenous malformation in the lung. Color Doppler sonography revealed an enlarged and tortuous hepatic artery with high systolic velocity. CT demonstrated an enlarged hepatic artery, arteriovenous shunt, and early draining hepatic vein in the liver. Celiac angiography showed arteriovenous malformation.

  6. Preventing Long-Term Cardiac Damage in Pediatric Patients With Kawasaki Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Kelly

    Kawasaki disease is currently the leading cause of long-term cardiac damage in pediatric patients in the United States. Kawasaki disease is diagnosed based on symptomatology and by ruling out other etiology. There is a significant need for an improved, standardized treatment protocol for patients diagnosed with Kawasaki disease and a more rapid initiation of treatment for these patients. Decreasing the cardiac damage caused by Kawasaki disease with timely diagnosis and treatment needs be a principal goal. Copyright © 2016 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Cardiac Catheterization and Intervention in Pediatric Cardiac Disease: A Narrative Review of Current Indications, Techniques, and Complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahram Pishgoo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Context In the past 20 to 30 years, the area of pediatric interventional cardiology has had noteworthy development. Technological revolutions have significantly progressed management of cardiovascular disease in both children and adults with congenital heart disease (CHD. This article reviews the current indications, techniques and complications of interventional therapy for CHD. Evidence Acquisition Training and publications in this field are rare. Overall, 64 article from January 1953 to February 2014 were studied. A total of 26 articles were involved in pediatric evaluation. Results There have been several catheter-based interventions for congenital heart disease. Percutaneous intervention in pediatric cardiac disease has been established in the past 2 to 3 decades. There are currently devices accepted for percutaneous closure of ASDs, patent ductus arteriosus (PDAs, and muscular ventricular septal defects (VSDs. The period of percutaneous valve implantation is just beginning, and the next few years may bring about advances in miniaturized valve distribution methods to allow insertion in smaller children. Conclusions Completely prepared catheterization laboratory, surgical holdup, and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support capabilities must be accessible at any center to achieve interventional cardiac catheterization. Additional understanding of normal history of interventions more than 2 decade post process, novel strategies and methods will certainly lead to an increase in the methods for managing of congenital heart disease.

  8. Cost-effectiveness of new cardiac and vascular rehabilitation strategies for patients with coronary artery disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Spronk

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Peripheral arterial disease (PAD often hinders the cardiac rehabilitation program. The aim of this study was evaluating the relative cost-effectiveness of new rehabilitation strategies which include the diagnosis and treatment of PAD in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD undergoing cardiac rehabilitation. DATA SOURCES: Best-available evidence was retrieved from literature and combined with primary data from 231 patients. METHODS: We developed a markov decision model to compare the following treatment strategies: 1. cardiac rehabilitation only; 2. ankle-brachial index (ABI if cardiac rehabilitation fails followed by diagnostic work-up and revascularization for PAD if needed; 3. ABI prior to cardiac rehabilitation followed by diagnostic work-up and revascularization for PAD if needed. Quality-adjusted-life years (QALYs, life-time costs (US $, incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICER, and gain in net health benefits (NHB in QALY equivalents were calculated. A threshold willingness-to-pay of $75,000 was used. RESULTS: ABI if cardiac rehabilitation fails was the most favorable strategy with an ICER of $44,251 per QALY gained and an incremental NHB compared to cardiac rehabilitation only of 0.03 QALYs (95% CI: -0.17, 0.29 at a threshold willingness-to-pay of $75,000/QALY. After sensitivity analysis, a combined cardiac and vascular rehabilitation program increased the success rate and would dominate the other two strategies with total lifetime costs of $30,246 a quality-adjusted life expectancy of 3.84 years, and an incremental NHB of 0.06 QALYs (95%CI:-0.24, 0.46 compared to current practice. The results were robust for other different input parameters. CONCLUSION: ABI measurement if cardiac rehabilitation fails followed by a diagnostic work-up and revascularization for PAD if needed are potentially cost-effective compared to cardiac rehabilitation only.

  9. Management of Cardiac Involvement Associated With Neuromuscular Diseases: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feingold, Brian; Mahle, William T; Auerbach, Scott; Clemens, Paula; Domenighetti, Andrea A; Jefferies, John L; Judge, Daniel P; Lal, Ashwin K; Markham, Larry W; Parks, W James; Tsuda, Takeshi; Wang, Paul J; Yoo, Shi-Joon

    2017-09-26

    For many neuromuscular diseases (NMDs), cardiac disease represents a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The management of cardiac disease in NMDs is made challenging by the broad clinical heterogeneity that exists among many NMDs and by limited knowledge about disease-specific cardiovascular pathogenesis and course-modifying interventions. The overlay of compromise in peripheral muscle function and other organ systems, such as the lungs, also makes the simple application of endorsed adult or pediatric heart failure guidelines to the NMD population problematic. In this statement, we provide background on several NMDs in which there is cardiac involvement, highlighting unique features of NMD-associated myocardial disease that require clinicians to tailor their approach to prevention and treatment of heart failure. Undoubtedly, further investigations are required to best inform future guidelines on NMD-specific cardiovascular health risks, treatments, and outcomes. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Cardiac Hemodynamics in the Pathogenesis of Congenital Heart Disease and Aortic Valve Calcification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigam, Vishal

    2011-11-01

    An improved understanding of the roles of hemodynamic forces play in cardiac development and the pathogenesis of cardiac disease will have significant scientific and clinical impact. I will focus on the role of fluid dynamics in congenital heart disease and aortic valve calcification. Congenital heart defects are the most common form of birth defect. Aortic valve calcification/stenosis is the third leading cause of adult heart disease and the most common form of acquired valvular disease in developed countries. Given the high incidence of these diseases and their associated morbidity and mortality, the potential translational impact of an improved understanding of cardiac hemodynamic forces is very large. Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Rady Children's Hospital, San Diego

  11. Diagnosis and treatment of fetal cardiac disease: a scientific statement from the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donofrio, Mary T; Moon-Grady, Anita J; Hornberger, Lisa K; Copel, Joshua A; Sklansky, Mark S; Abuhamad, Alfred; Cuneo, Bettina F; Huhta, James C; Jonas, Richard A; Krishnan, Anita; Lacey, Stephanie; Lee, Wesley; Michelfelder, Erik C; Rempel, Gwen R; Silverman, Norman H; Spray, Thomas L; Strasburger, Janette F; Tworetzky, Wayne; Rychik, Jack

    2014-05-27

    The goal of this statement is to review available literature and to put forth a scientific statement on the current practice of fetal cardiac medicine, including the diagnosis and management of fetal cardiovascular disease. A writing group appointed by the American Heart Association reviewed the available literature pertaining to topics relevant to fetal cardiac medicine, including the diagnosis of congenital heart disease and arrhythmias, assessment of cardiac function and the cardiovascular system, and available treatment options. The American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association classification of recommendations and level of evidence for practice guidelines were applied to the current practice of fetal cardiac medicine. Recommendations relating to the specifics of fetal diagnosis, including the timing of referral for study, indications for referral, and experience suggested for performance and interpretation of studies, are presented. The components of a fetal echocardiogram are described in detail, including descriptions of the assessment of cardiac anatomy, cardiac function, and rhythm. Complementary modalities for fetal cardiac assessment are reviewed, including the use of advanced ultrasound techniques, fetal magnetic resonance imaging, and fetal magnetocardiography and electrocardiography for rhythm assessment. Models for parental counseling and a discussion of parental stress and depression assessments are reviewed. Available fetal therapies, including medical management for arrhythmias or heart failure and closed or open intervention for diseases affecting the cardiovascular system such as twin-twin transfusion syndrome, lung masses, and vascular tumors, are highlighted. Catheter-based intervention strategies to prevent the progression of disease in utero are also discussed. Recommendations for delivery planning strategies for fetuses with congenital heart disease including models based on classification of disease severity and delivery room

  12. Cerebral abscesses among Danish patients with hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, A D; Tørring, P M; Nissen, H

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a dominantly inherited disease characterized by a wide variety of clinical manifestations, including pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs), which due to paradoxical embolization may cause cerebral abscess.......Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a dominantly inherited disease characterized by a wide variety of clinical manifestations, including pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs), which due to paradoxical embolization may cause cerebral abscess....

  13. Difference in Risk Factors for Subtypes of Acute Cardiac Lesions Resulting from Kawasaki Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Maho; Ae, Ryusuke; Yashiro, Mayumi; Aoyama, Yasuko; Sano, Takashi; Makino, Nobuko; Nakamura, Yosikazu

    2017-02-01

    Few studies discuss the risk factors for acute cardiac lesions (within 30 days) resulting from Kawasaki disease (KD). We aimed to clarify the characteristics of patients with cardiac lesions within 30 days and determine the risk factors for acute cardiac lesion subtypes. Using the 23rd nationwide survey of KD in Japan, we analyzed data from patients with or without acute cardiac lesions resulting from KD (n = 31,380). We subdivided patients with acute cardiac lesions into three types: acute valvular lesions, coronary aneurysms, and giant coronary aneurysms (GCA), and calculated the odds ratios of potential risk factors for acute cardiac lesion subtypes. The prevalence of acute cardiac lesions was 8.6%, and these lesions were more prevalent among males than females (1.98:1). Male sex, age valvular lesions differed from the risk factors for CALs, but GCA risk factors were similar to CAL risk factors: age acute GCA. We found differences in cardiac lesion risk factors within 30 days of diagnosing KD between acute CAL and valvular lesions resulting from KD. In particular, pediatricians should consider atypical definite cases and resistance to initial IVIG when assessing the risk of acute-phase GCA.

  14. Paediatric cardiac anaesthesia in sickle cell disease: a case series ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Paediatric patients with SCD and congenital heart defects may require anaesthesia for corrective cardiac surgery on cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). During the perioperative period these high-risk patients may suffer significant complications when exposed to the conditions that favour erythrocyte sickling. This case series ...

  15. The heart of the matter: Cardiac manifestations of endocrine disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditya John Binu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Endocrine disorders manifest as a disturbance in the milieu of multiple organ systems. The cardiovascular system may be directly affected or alter its function to maintain the state of homeostasis. In this article, we aim to review the pathophysiology, diagnosis, clinical features and management of cardiac manifestations of various endocrine disorders.

  16. Systematic review: effectiveness of expanded cardiac rehabilitation in coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Momsen, Anne-Mette Hedeager; Hald, Kathrine; Nielsen, Claus Vinther

    2017-01-01

    REVIEW OBJECTIVE/QUESTION: The objective of this review is to identify the effectiveness of expanded cardiac rehabilitation (CR) in patients diagnosed with coronary heart disease (CHD). Specifically, the review question is: What is the effectiveness of expanded CR compared to standard CR in adult...... patients diagnosed with CHD? Effectiveness will be assessed by the effect on mortality and readmissions due to all causes or any cardiac event, systolic blood pressure, cholesterol levels and adherence to recommendations in secondary prevention guidelines....

  17. Validity of Type D personality in Iceland: association with disease severity and risk markers in cardiac patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Svansdottir (Erla); H.D. Karlsson (Hrobjartur); T. Gudnason (Thorarinn); D.T. Olason (Daniel); H. Thorgilsson (Hordur); U. Sigtryggsdottir (Unnur); E.J.G. Sijbrands (Eric); S.S. Pedersen (Susanne); J. Denollet (Johan)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractType D personality has been associated with poor prognosis in cardiac patients. This study investigated the validity of the Type D construct in Iceland and its association with disease severity and health-related risk markers in cardiac patients. A sample of 1,452 cardiac patients

  18. HEREDITARY BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Bit-Sava

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary breast cancer occurs in 5–20 % of cases and it is associated with inherited mutations in particular genes, such as BRCA1 и BRCA2 in most cases. The CHEK2, PTEN, TP53, ATM, RAD51, BLM, PALB2, Nbs genes are associated with low and median risks ofdeveloping breast cancer. Molecular genetic studies identify germinal mutations underlying hereditary breast cancer. In most cases hereditary breast cancer refers to triple-negative phenotype, which is the most aggressive type of breast cancer, that does not express the genes for estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2. The review presents the diagnostic and treatment methods of hereditary breast cancer. Clinical-morphological aspects allow the new diagnostic and treatment methods of hereditary breast cancer to be identified. Poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP inhibitors demonstrate the potential for effective treatment of BRCA-associated breast cancer.

  19. Murine iPSC-Derived Macrophages as a Tool for Disease Modeling of Hereditary Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis due to Csf2rb Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adele Mucci

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs represent an innovative source for the standardized in vitro generation of macrophages (Mφ. We here describe a robust and efficient protocol to obtain mature and functional Mφ from healthy as well as disease-specific murine iPSCs. With regard to morphology, surface phenotype, and function, our iPSC-derived Mφ (iPSC-Mφ closely resemble their counterparts generated in vitro from bone marrow cells. Moreover, when we investigated the feasibility of our differentiation system to serve as a model for rare congenital diseases associated with Mφ malfunction, we were able to faithfully recapitulate the pathognomonic defects in GM-CSF signaling and Mφ function present in hereditary pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (herPAP. Thus, our studies may help to overcome the limitations placed on research into certain rare disease entities by the lack of an adequate supply of disease-specific primary cells, and may aid the development of novel therapeutic approaches for herPAP patients.

  20. Role for the Unfolded Protein Response in Heart Disease and Cardiac Arrhythmias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Man; Dudley, Samuel C

    2015-12-31

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) has been extensively investigated in neurological diseases and diabetes, while its function in heart disease is less well understood. Activated UPR participates in multiple cardiac conditions and can either protect or impair heart function. Recently, the UPR has been found to play a role in arrhythmogenesis during human heart failure by affecting cardiac ion channels expression, and blocking UPR has an antiarrhythmic effect. This review will discuss the rationale for and challenges to targeting UPR in heart disease for treatment of arrhythmias.

  1. Anti-cardiac troponin antibodies in clinical human disease: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilela, Eduardo M; Bettencourt-Silva, Rita; da Costa, J Torres; Barbosa, Ana Raquel; Silva, Marisa P; Teixeira, Madalena; Primo, João; Gama Ribeiro, Vasco; Nunes, José Pedro L

    2017-08-01

    Anti-cardiac troponin antibodies have been studied in different types of clinical diseases and in healthy populations. A systematic review of published data on anti-troponin antibodies was carried out (search performed on PubMed, ISI Web of Knowledge and Scopus databases). From title and abstract analysis, thirty-three articles were included that met the pre-specified criteria; after full-text analysis, nine articles were excluded. Most studies assessed anti-troponin I antibodies. The prevalence of anti-cardiac troponin antibodies in healthy individuals ranged from 0.0% to 20.0%. The prevalence of anti-troponin I autoantibodies in dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) ranged from 7.0% to 22.2%. Other conditions under study were myocardial infarction, ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM), peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM), Chagas disease, Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD) and renal transplantation. In the different patient populations studied, anti-cardiac troponin antibodies have been shown to be either positively or negatively associated with prognostic and clinical features. In what concerns a possible value as biomarkers, these assays have not emerged up to the present moment as important aids for practical clinical decisions in cardiac or other types of patients. In what concerns pathophysiology, anti-cardiac troponin autoantibodies may play a role in different diseases. It can be speculated that these antibodies could be involved in perpetuating some degree of cardiac injury after an event, such as myocardial infarction or PPCM.

  2. Cardiac involvement in total generalized lipodystrophy (Berardinelli- Seip syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viégas Ruy Felipe Melo

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Total generalized lipodystrophy (Berardinelli--Seip Syndrome is a rare hereditary disease characterized by insulin-resistant diabetes mellitus and a small quantity of adipose tissue and is of unknown origin. Common cardiovascular alterations related to this syndrome are cardiac hypertrophy and arterial hypertension. This article reports a case of Berardinelli--Seip syndrome and reviews the literature with special emphasis on the cardiovascular manifestations of this syndrome.

  3. Hereditary Renal Cancer Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Naomi B.

    2013-01-01

    Inherited susceptibility to kidney cancer is a fascinating and complex topic. Our knowledge about types of genetic syndromes associated with an increased risk of disease is continually expanding. Currently, there are 10 syndromes associated with an increased risk of all types of renal cancer, which are reviewed herein. Clear cell renal cancer is associated with von Hippel Lindau disease, chromosome 3 translocations, PTEN hamartomatous syndrome and mutations in BAP1, as well as several of the genes encoding the proteins comprising the succinate dehydrogenase complex (SDHB/C/D). Type 1 papillary renal cancers arise in conjunction with germline mutations in MET and type 2 as part of Hereditary Leiomyomatosis and Renal Cell Cancer (FH mutations). Chromophone and oncocytic renal cancers are predominantly associated with Birt Hogg Dubé syndrome. Angiomyolipomas are commonly and their malignant counterpart epitheliod angiomyolipomas rarely are found in patients with Tuberous Sclerosis Complex. The targeted therapeutic options for the renal cancer associated with these diseases are just starting to expand, and are an area of active clinical research. PMID:24359990

  4. Cardiac Repolarization Abnormalities and Potential Evidence for Loss of Cardiac Sodium Currents on ECGs of Patients with Chagas' Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegel, T. T.; Medina, R.; Jugo, D.; Nunez, T. J.; Borrego, A.; Arellano, E.; Arenare, B.; DePalma, J. L.; Greco, E. C.; Starc, V.

    2007-01-01

    Some individuals with Chagas disease develop right precordial lead ST segment elevation in response to an ajmaline challenge test, and the prevalence of right bundle branch block (RBBB) is also high in Chagas disease. Because these same electrocardiographic abnormalities occur in the Brugada syndrome, which involves genetically defective cardiac sodium channels, acquired damage to cardiac sodium channels may also occur in Chagas disease. We studied several conventional and advanced resting 12-lead/derived Frank-lead ECG parameters in 34 patients with Chagas -related heart disease (mean age 39 14 years) and in 34 age-/gender-matched healthy controls. All ECG recordings were of 5-10 min duration, obtained in the supine position using high fidelity hardware/software (CardioSoft, Houston, TX). Even after excluding those Chagas patients who had resting BBBs, tachycardia and/or pathologic arrhythmia (n=8), significant differences remained in multiple conventional and advanced ECG parameters between the Chagas and control groups (n=26/group), especially in their respective QT interval variability indices, maximal spatial QRS-T angles and low frequency HRV powers (p=0.0006, p=0.0015 and p=0.0314 respectively). In relation to the issue of potential damage to cardiac sodium channels, the Chagas patients had: 1) greater than or equal to twice the incidence of resting ST segment elevation in leads V1-V3 (n=10/26 vs. n=5/26) and of both leftward (n=5/26 versus n=0/26) and rightward (n=7/26 versus n=3/26) QRS axis deviation than controls; 2) significantly increased filtered (40-250 Hz) QRS interval durations (92.1 8.5 versus 85.3 plus or minus 9.0 ms, p=0.022) versus controls; and 3) significantly decreased QT and especially JT interval durations versus controls (QT interval: 387.5 plus or minus 26.4 versus 408.9 plus or minus 34.6 ms, p=0.013; JT interval: 290.5 plus or minus 26.3 versus 314.8 plus or minus 31.3 ms; p=0.0029). Heart rates and Bazett-corrected QTc/JTc intervals

  5. Functional Relevance of Coronary Artery Disease by Cardiac Magnetic Resonance and Cardiac Computed Tomography: Myocardial Perfusion and Fractional Flow Reserve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Pontone

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery disease (CAD is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality and it is responsible for an increasing resource burden. The identification of patients at high risk for adverse events is crucial to select those who will receive the greatest benefit from revascularization. To this aim, several non-invasive functional imaging modalities are usually used as gatekeeper to invasive coronary angiography, but the diagnostic yield of elective invasive coronary angiography remains unfortunately low. Stress myocardial perfusion imaging by cardiac magnetic resonance (stress-CMR has emerged as an accurate technique for diagnosis and prognostic stratification of the patients with known or suspected CAD thanks to high spatial and temporal resolution, absence of ionizing radiation, and the multiparametric value including the assessment of cardiac anatomy, function, and viability. On the other side, cardiac computed tomography (CCT has emerged as unique technique providing coronary arteries anatomy and more recently, due to the introduction of stress-CCT and noninvasive fractional flow reserve (FFR-CT, functional relevance of CAD in a single shot scan. The current review evaluates the technical aspects and clinical experience of stress-CMR and CCT in the evaluation of functional relevance of CAD discussing the strength and weakness of each approach.

  6. Cost-effectiveness of new cardiac and vascular rehabilitation strategies for patients with coronary artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Spronk (Sandra); J.L.H.R. Bosch (Ruud); C. Ryjewski (Connie); J. Rosenblum (Judy); G.C. Kaandorp (Guido); J.V. White (John); M.G.M. Hunink (Myriam)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractObjective: Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) often hinders the cardiac rehabilitation program. The aim of this study was evaluating the relative cost-effectiveness of new rehabilitation strategies which include the diagnosis and treatment of PAD in patients with coronary artery disease

  7. Molecular mechanisms of cardiac electromechanical remodeling during Chagas disease: Role of TNF and TGF-β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Jader Santos; Machado, Fabiana Simão; Ropert, Catherine; Roman-Campos, Danilo

    2017-02-01

    Chagas disease is caused by the trypanosomatid Trypanosoma cruzi, which chronically causes heart problems in up to 30% of infected patients. Chagas disease was initially restricted to Latin America. However, due to migratory events, this disease may become a serious worldwide health problem. During Chagas disease, many patients die of cardiac arrhythmia despite the apparent benefits of anti-arrhythmic therapy (e.g., amiodarone). Here, we assimilate the cardiac form of Chagas disease to an inflammatory cardiac disease. Evidence from the literature, mostly provided using experimental models, supports this view and argues in favor of new strategies for treating cardiac arrhythmias in Chagas disease by modulating cytokine production and/or action. But the complex nature of myocardial inflammation underlies the need to better understand the molecular mechanisms of the inflammatory response during Chagas disease. Here, particular attention has been paid to tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF) and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) although other cytokines may be involved in the chagasic cardiomyopathy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Echocardiography as an approach for canine cardiac disease diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Singh

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the study was to establish the methods for diagnosis various canine cardiac ailments using echocardiography. Materials and Methods: M-mode, two-dimensional echocardiography and Doppler studies were performed on 10 cases. Dogs showing signs of cardiac ailment either clinically, radiographic or via electrocardiographic examination were selected for study. Right parasternal short axis view was used for echocardiographic measurements. Right parasternal long axis and left parasternal apical views were used for Doppler studies. Doppler studies were performed at the level of aortic valve and atrioventricular valves for semi quantitative diagnosis of regurgitation. Results: Dogs were found affected with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM (n=5, pericardial effusion (PE (n=1, combined PE and DCM (n=2 and remaining two showed abnormality on radiographic or electrographically evaluation but were found out to be normal echocardiographically (n=2. Conclusion: Echocardiography is an effective tool for diagnosis of various heart ailments.

  9. N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide levels in infants and children with acute non-cardiac diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevo, Inbar; Erlichman, Mati; Algur, Nurit; Nir, Amiram

    2011-07-01

    Cardiac patients express elevated levels of B-type natriuretic peptide and the amino terminal segment of its prohormone (NT-proBNP). However, there are non-cardiac causes of NT-proBNP level elevation. To determine the upper limit of NT-proBNP for pediatric patients with acute non-cardiac disease. We compared NT-proBNP concentrations in children with acute non-cardiac, mostly febrile disease with concentrations in children with acute cardiac disease and in healthy children. We used the Student t-test and Mann-Whitney test for group comparisons, and Pearson's and Spearman's correlation coefficients to test relationships between variables. In 138 patients with acute non-cardiac diseases (mean age 3.7 years, 53% male), median NT-proBNP concentration was 162 pg/ml, upper limit (95% percentile) 1049 pg/ml. The level did not vary significantly by disease category; was negatively correlated with weight, weight percentile, age and hemoglobin level; and positively correlated with creatinine level. Multivariant analysis showed weight to be the only factor influencing NT-proBNP level. Levels were higher in children with acute non-cardiac diseases versus healthy children (median 88 pg/ml, P < 0.001, n = 59), and lower than levels in patients with acute cardiac disease (median 29,986 pg/ml, P < 0.001, n=30). Receiver operating characteristic analysis showed good NT-proBNP performance for differentiation between children with acute cardiac versus non-cardiac disease (area under the curve 0.958), at a cutoff of 415 pg/ml. NT-proBNP levels are higher in children with acute non-cardiac diseases than in healthy children, but lower than in children with acute cardiac disease. NT-proBNP negatively correlated with weight and weight percentile.

  10. Age variance of left ventricular diameters in dogs with cardiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerkhof, P L; Roos, A; ter Haar, G; Kocsis, S; Pijnenburg, H L; Stokhof, A A

    1998-01-01

    Ventricular size increases during growth, but often due to cardiac disease. This study aims to describe left ventricular dimension interrelations using a representation that is applicable to patients with cardiac disease, and subsequently to statistically study possible age and gender influences in a large population. In retrospect we analyzed echocardiographically obtained diameters of the left ventricle in 442 dogs of various breeds with congenital or acquired heart disease. Also, we compared our findings with published data on humans and other animals. Multivariate regression analysis was applied to assess possible influences of age and gender. A high correlation was found for end-systolic diameter (ESD) versus end-diastolic diameter (EDD): ESD (cm) = -1.01 cm + 0.93 x EDD (cm) with r = 0.94, p framework for studies on cardiac volume regulation and performance in the cardiopathological spectrum, while permitting incorporation of modulating effects related to age.

  11. Evaluation of platelet function in dogs with cardiac disease using the PFA-100 platelet function analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancey, Noel; Burton, Shelley; Horney, Barbara; Mackenzie, Allan; Nicastro, Andrea; Côté, Etienne

    2009-09-01

    Cardiac disease has the potential to alter platelet function in dogs. Evaluation of platelet function using the PFA-100 analyzer in dogs of multiple breeds and with a broad range of cardiac conditions would help clarify the effect of cardiac disease on platelets. The objective of this study was to assess differences in closure time (CT) in dogs with cardiac disease associated with murmurs, when compared with that of healthy dogs. Thirty-nine dogs with cardiac murmurs and turbulent blood flow as determined echocardiographically were included in the study. The dogs represented 23 different breeds. Dogs with murmurs were further divided into those with atrioventricular valvular insufficiency (n=23) and subaortic stenosis (n=9). Fifty-eight clinically healthy dogs were used as controls. CTs were determined in duplicate on a PFA-100 analyzer using collagen/ADP cartridges. Compared with CTs in the control group (mean+/-SD, 57.6+/-5.9 seconds; median, 56.5 seconds; reference interval, 48.0-77.0 seconds), dogs with valvular insufficiency (mean+/-SD, 81.9+/-26.3 seconds; median, 78.0 seconds; range, 52.5-187 seconds), subaortic stenosis (71.4+/-16.5 seconds; median, 66.0 seconds; range, 51.5-95.0 seconds), and all dogs with murmurs combined (79.6+/-24.1 seconds; median, 74.0 seconds; range, 48.0-187 seconds) had significantly prolonged CTs (P<.01). The PFA-100 analyzer is useful in detecting platelet function defects in dogs with cardiac murmurs, most notably those caused by mitral and/or tricuspid valvular insufficiency or subaortic stenosis. The form of turbulent blood flow does not appear to be an important factor in platelet hypofunction in these forms of cardiac disease.

  12. Current Roles and Future Applications of Cardiac CT: Risk Stratification of Coronary Artery Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Yeonyee Elizabeth [Department of Cardiology, Cardiovascular Center, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam 463-707 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Tae-Hwan [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-01

    Cardiac computed tomography (CT) has emerged as a noninvasive modality for the assessment of coronary artery disease (CAD), and has been rapidly integrated into clinical cares. CT has changed the traditional risk stratification based on clinical risk to image-based identification of patient risk. Cardiac CT, including coronary artery calcium score and coronary CT angiography, can provide prognostic information and is expected to improve risk stratification of CAD. Currently used conventional cardiac CT, provides accurate anatomic information but not functional significance of CAD, and it may not be sufficient to guide treatments such as revascularization. Recently, myocardial CT perfusion imaging, intracoronary luminal attenuation gradient, and CT-derived computed fractional flow reserve were developed to combine anatomical and functional data. Although at present, the diagnostic and prognostic value of these novel technologies needs to be evaluated further, it is expected that all-in-one cardiac CT can guide treatment and improve patient outcomes in the near future.

  13. Management of the Low Cardiac Output Syndrome Following Surgery for Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Heather K; Kirsch, Roxanne

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to discuss the management of the low cardiac output syndrome (LCOS) following surgery for congenital heart disease. The LCOS is a well-recognized, frequent post-operative complication with an accepted collection of hemodynamic and physiologic aberrations. Approximately 25% of children experience a decrease in cardiac index of less than 2 L/min/m2 within 6-18 hours after cardiac surgery. Post-operative strategies that may be used to manage patients as risk for or in a state of low cardiac output include the use of hemodynamic monitoring, enabling a timely and accurate assessment of cardiovascular function and tissue oxygenation; optimization of ventricular loading conditions; the judicious use of inotropic agents; an appreciation of and the utilization of positive pressure ventilation for circulatory support; and, in some circumstances, mechanical circulatory support. All interventions and strategies should culminate in improving the relationship between oxygen supply and demand, ensuring adequate tissue oxygenation.

  14. Variability in Non-Cardiac Surgical Procedures in Children with Congenital Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulkowski, Jason P.; Cooper, Jennifer N.; McConnell, Patrick I.; Pasquali, Sara K.; Shah, Samir S.; Minneci, Peter C.; Deans, Katherine J.

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to examine the volume and variability of non-cardiac surgeries performed in children with congenital heart disease (CHD) requiring cardiac surgery in the first year of life. Methods Patients who underwent cardiac surgery by 1 year of age and had a minimum 5-year follow-up at 22 of the hospitals contributing to the Pediatric Health Information System database between 2004–2012 were included. Frequencies of non-cardiac surgical procedures by age 5 years were determined and categorized by subspecialty. Patients were stratified according to their maximum RACHS-1 (Risk Adjustment in Congenital Heart Surgery) category. The proportions of patients across hospitals who had a non-cardiac surgical procedure for each subspecialty were compared using logistic mixed effects models. Results 8,857 patients underwent congenital heart surgery during the first year of life, 3,621 (41%) of whom had 13,894 non-cardiac surgical procedures by 5 years. Over half of all procedures were in general surgery (4,432; 31.9%) or otolaryngology (4,002; 28.8%). There was significant variation among hospitals in the proportion of CHD patients having non-cardiac surgical procedures. Compared to children in the low risk group (RACHS-1 categories 1–3), children in the high-risk group (categories 4–6) were more likely to have general, dental, orthopedic, and thoracic procedures. Conclusions Children with CHD requiring cardiac surgery frequently also undergo non-cardiac surgical procedures; however, considerable variability in the frequency of these procedures exists across hospitals. This suggests a lack of uniformity in indications used for surgical intervention. Further research should aim to better standardize care for this complex patient population. PMID:25475794

  15. Location of cardiac arrest and impact of pre-arrest chronic disease and medication use on survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granfeldt, Asger; Wissenberg, Mads; Hansen, Steen Møller

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Cardiac arrest in a private location is associated with a higher mortality when compared to public location. Past studies have not accounted for pre-arrest factors such as chronic disease and medication. AIM: To investigate whether the association between cardiac arrest in a private...... location and a higher mortality can be explained by differences in chronic diseases and medication. METHODS: We identified 27,771 out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients ≥18 years old from the Danish Cardiac Arrest Registry (2001-2012). Using National Registries, we identified pre-arrest chronic disease...... and medication. To investigate the importance of cardiac arrest related factors and chronic disease and medication use we performed adjusted Cox regression analyses during day 0-7 and day 8-365 following cardiac arrest to calculate hazard ratios (HR) for death. RESULTS: Day 0-7: Un-adjusted HR for death day 0...

  16. Case Report of Cardiac Arrest After Succinylcholine in a Child With Muscle-Eye-Brain Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackmann, Thomas; Skidmore, David L; MacManus, Brian

    2017-10-15

    Muscle-eye-brain disease is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by congenital muscular dystrophy, ocular abnormalities, and brain malformation. We report an intraoperative hyperkalemic cardiac arrest following the administration of succinylcholine in a child with muscle-eye-brain disease. The disease was diagnosed only after this event. Our experience suggests that preoperative determinations of serum concentrations of lactate and creatine kinase may be useful if clinical signs consistent with myopathy are present.

  17. Risk of cardiovascular, cardiac and arrhythmic complications in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballestri, Stefano; Lonardo, Amedeo; Bonapace, Stefano; Byrne, Christopher D; Loria, Paola; Targher, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has emerged as a public health problem of epidemic proportions worldwide. Accumulating clinical and epidemiological evidence indicates that NAFLD is not only associated with liver-related morbidity and mortality but also with an increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), abnormalities of cardiac function and structure (e.g., left ventricular dysfunction and hypertrophy, and heart failure), valvular heart disease (e.g., aortic valve sclerosis) and arrhythmias (e.g., atrial fibrillation). Experimental evidence suggests that NAFLD itself, especially in its more severe forms, exacerbates systemic/hepatic insulin resistance, causes atherogenic dyslipidemia, and releases a variety of pro-inflammatory, pro-coagulant and pro-fibrogenic mediators that may play important roles in the pathophysiology of cardiac and arrhythmic complications. Collectively, these findings suggest that patients with NAFLD may benefit from more intensive surveillance and early treatment interventions to decrease the risk for CHD and other cardiac/arrhythmic complications. The purpose of this clinical review is to summarize the rapidly expanding body of evidence that supports a strong association between NAFLD and cardiovascular, cardiac and arrhythmic complications, to briefly examine the putative biological mechanisms underlying this association, and to discuss some of the current treatment options that may influence both NAFLD and its related cardiac and arrhythmic complications. PMID:24587651

  18. A novel homozygous p.R1105X mutation of the AP4E1 gene in twins with hereditary spastic paraplegia and mycobacterial disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Fei Kong

    Full Text Available We report identical twins with intellectual disability, progressive spastic paraplegia and short stature, born to a consanguineous family. Intriguingly, both children presented with lymphadenitis caused by the live Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG vaccine. Two syndromes - hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP and mycobacterial disease - thus occurred simultaneously. Whole-exome sequencing (WES revealed a homozygous nonsense mutation (p.R1105X of the AP4E1 gene, which was confirmed by Sanger sequencing. The p.R1105X mutation has no effect on AP4E1 mRNA levels, but results in lower levels of AP-4ε protein and of the other components of the AP-4 complex, as shown by western blotting, immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence. Thus, the C-terminal part of the AP-4ε subunit plays an important role in maintaining the integrity of the AP-4 complex. No abnormalities of the IL-12/IFN-γ axis or oxidative burst pathways were identified. In conclusion, we identified twins with autosomal recessive AP-4 deficiency associated with HSP and mycobacterial disease, suggesting that AP-4 may play important role in the neurological and immunological systems.

  19. Cardiac symptoms before sudden cardiac death caused by coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jabbari, Reza; Risgaard, Bjarke; Holst, Anders G

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this nationwide case-control study was to identify and characterise symptoms before sudden death of young persons who had died due to coronary artery disease (CAD).......The aim of this nationwide case-control study was to identify and characterise symptoms before sudden death of young persons who had died due to coronary artery disease (CAD)....

  20. A study on oral health of children with cardiac diseases in mashhad, iran in 2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talebi, Maryam; Khordi Mood, Maryam; Mahmoudi, Mohammad; Alidad, Shaili

    2007-01-01

    Preventing oral disease is the most desirable way of ensuring good dental health for children with heart disease. Dental and gingival infections in patients with cardiac problems may lead to infective endocarditis. The aim of this study was to evaluate oral and dental health status in children with heart disease referred to a cardiac center compared with the control group. In this descriptive cross-sectional study, case group consisting of 100 patients 2-12 years old with heart disease were examined for oral and dental status in Pediatric Cardiac Center in Mashhad, Iran, in 2004. Fifty healthy children with the same age as the case group referring to the Department of Pedodontics, Mashhad Faculty of Dentistry served as the control group. For each patient, dental and medical history, dmft, DMFT, debris index, tooth brushing status as well as parental knowledge of infective endocarditis and their economic status was registered on a questionnaire. Statistical analysis was performed using Kruskal-Wallis, chi-square and t-tests. There were no significant differences between case and control groups in dmft (3.92 ± 3.99 and 3.54 ± 3.33, respectively), DMFT (3.7 ± 4 and 1.47 ± 1.72, respectively) and their components. Tooth brushing status and debris index were significantly worse in the study group (P = 0.001 and P = 0.008, respectively). 35% of parents were aware of the importance of good oral health in cardiac children although none of them knew about infective endocarditis. Most of the parents in study group had low (30%) to medium (53%) economic status. In this study, the children with cardiac disease did not have a good oral and dental health status. Developing strategies toward preventive dental care of children with cardiac problems and informing their parents is suggested.

  1. Structural and functional cardiac analyses using modern and sensitive myocardial techniques in adult Pompe disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Daniel A; Blaschke, Daniela; Krebs, Alice; Canaan-Kühl, Sima; Plöckinger, Ursula; Knobloch, Gesine; Walter, Thula C; Kühnle, York; Boldt, Leif-Hendrik; Kraigher-Krainer, Elisabeth; Pieske, Burkert; Haverkamp, Wilhelm

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze comprehensively the heart using modern and sensitive myocardial techniques in order to determine if structural or functional cardiac alterations are present in adult Pompe disease. Twelve patients with adult Pompe disease and a control group of 187 healthy subjects of similar age and gender were included. Structural and functional cardiac characteristics were analyzed by conventional and 2D speckle-tracking echocardiography. In addition, in a subgroup of adult Pompe patients, we analyzed the myocardial and musculoskeletal features by means of cardiac and whole-body muscle magnetic resonance imaging. Patients with Pompe disease had significant structural and functional musculoskeletal alterations such as atrophy with fatty replacement and weakness in trunk and extremities. In contrast, Pompe patients had similar structural and functional myocardial features to healthy subjects (LV strain -20.7 ± 1.9 vs. -21.3 ± 2.1%; RV strain -24.2 ± 5.3 vs. -24.8 ± 3.8%; LA strain 41.5 ± 10.3 vs. 44.8 ± 11.0%; P > 0.05; and no evidence of LV and RV hypertrophy or LA enlargement). In addition, there was no evidence of valvular cardiac alterations, electrocardiographic abnormalities, or myocardial fibrosis in Pompe patients. In the current study analyzing the heart with modern and sensitive myocardial techniques, we evidenced that functional and structural cardiac alterations are not present when Pompe disease begins in adulthood. Therefore, these findings suggest that adult Pompe disease should not be taken into consideration in the differential diagnostic of structural or functional cardiac disorders.

  2. Learning about Hereditary Hemochromatosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Learning About Hereditary Hemochromatosis Enter Search Term(s): Español Research Funding An Overview Bioinformatics Current Grants Education and Training Funding Extramural Research ...

  3. Hereditary fructose intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fructosemia; Fructose intolerance; Fructose aldolase B-deficiency; Fructose-1, 6-bisphosphate aldolase deficiency ... substances build up in the liver. Hereditary fructose intolerance is inherited, which means it can be passed ...

  4. Elevated Plasma Cardiac Troponin T Levels Caused by Skeletal Muscle Damage in Pompe Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wens, Stephan C A; Schaaf, Gerben J; Michels, Michelle; Kruijshaar, Michelle E; van Gestel, Tom J M; In 't Groen, Stijn; Pijnenburg, Joon; Dekkers, Dick H W; Demmers, Jeroen A A; Verdijk, Lex B; Brusse, Esther; van Schaik, Ron H N; van der Ploeg, Ans T; van Doorn, Pieter A; Pijnappel, W W M Pim

    2016-02-01

    Elevated plasma cardiac troponin T (cTnT) levels in patients with neuromuscular disorders may erroneously lead to the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction or myocardial injury. In 122 patients with Pompe disease, the relationship between cTnT, cardiac troponin I, creatine kinase (CK), CK-myocardial band levels, and skeletal muscle damage was assessed. ECG and echocardiography were used to evaluate possible cardiac disease. Patients were divided into classic infantile, childhood-onset, and adult-onset patients. cTnT levels were elevated in 82% of patients (median 27 ng/L, normal values skeletal muscle was not detectable in controls but was strongly induced in patients with Pompe disease. cTnT protein was identified by mass spectrometry in patient-derived skeletal muscle tissue. Elevated plasma cTnT levels in patients with Pompe disease are associated with skeletal muscle damage, rather than acute myocardial injury. Increased cTnT levels in Pompe disease and likely other neuromuscular disorders should be interpreted with caution to avoid unnecessary cardiac interventions. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. A New Face of Cardiac Emergencies: Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Related Cardiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsabedze, Nqoba; Vachiat, Ahmed; Zachariah, Don; Manga, Pravin

    2018-02-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus epidemic is a major health challenge of the twenty-first century as the transition from infectious complications to noncommunicable disease becomes more evident. These patients may present to the emergency department with a variety of cardiovascular diseases, such as acute coronary syndromes, heart failure, pericardial disease, infective endocarditis, venothromboembolism, and other conditions. Increased awareness is needed among health care professionals to enhance adequate identification and promote prompt management of these patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Inherited Cardiac Diseases Caused by Mutations in the Nav1.5 Sodium Channel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tfelt-Hansen, Jacob; Winkel, Bo Gregers; Grunnet, Morten

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac Diseases Caused by SCN5A Mutations. A prerequisite for a normal cardiac function is a proper generation and propagation of electrical impulses. Contraction of the heart is obtained through a delicate matched transmission of the electrical impulses. A pivotal element of the impulse...... propagation is the depolarizing sodium current, responsible for the initial depolarization of the cardiomyocytes. Recent research has shown that mutations in the SCN5A gene, encoding the cardiac sodium channel Nav1.5, are associated with both rare forms of ventricular arrhythmia, as well as the most frequent...... form of arrhythmia, atrial fibrillation (AF). In this comprehensive review, we describe the functional role of Nav1.5 and its associated proteins in propagation and depolarization both in a normal- and in a pathophysiological setting. Furthermore, several of the arrhythmogenic diseases, such as long...

  7. Dysfunctional Hyperpolarization-Activated Cyclic Nucleotide-gated Ion Channels in Cardiac Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqi Zhao

    Full Text Available Abstract Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN channels are reverse voltage-dependent, and their activation depends on the hyperpolarization of the membrane and may be directly or indirectly regulated by the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP or other signal-transduction cascades. The distribution, quantity and activation states of HCN channels differ in tissues throughout the body. Evidence exhibits that HCN channels play critical roles in the generation and conduction of the electrical impulse and the physiopathological process of some cardiac diseases. They may constitute promising drug targets in the treatment of these cardiac diseases. Pharmacological treatment targeting HCN channels is of benefit to these cardiac conditions.

  8. The roles of neuregulin-1 in cardiac development, homeostasis, and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupert, Cassady E; Coulombe, Kareen Lk

    2015-01-01

    Neuregulin-1 (NRG-1) and its signaling receptors, erythroblastic leukemia viral oncogene homologs (ErbB) 2, 3, and 4, have been implicated in both cardiomyocyte development and disease, as well as in homeostatic cardiac function. NRG-1/ErbB signaling is involved in a multitude of cardiac processes ranging from myocardial and cardiac conduction system development to angiogenic support of cardiomyocytes, to cardioprotective effects upon injury. Numerous studies of NRG-1 employ a variety of platforms, including in vitro assays, animal models, and human clinical trials, with equally varying and, sometimes, contradictory outcomes. NRG-1 has the potential to be used as a therapeutic tool in stem cell therapies, tissue engineering applications, and clinical diagnostics and treatment. This review presents a concise summary of the growing body of literature to highlight the temporally persistent significance of NRG-1/ErbB signaling throughout development, homeostasis, and disease in the heart, specifically in cardiomyocytes.

  9. Nutritional status of pediatric patients with congenital heart disease: pre- and post cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratanachu-Ek, Suntaree; Pongdara, Aujjimavadee

    2011-08-01

    Malnutrition is common in infants and children with congenital heart disease (CHD). Cardiac surgery has improved patient survival and nutritional status. To evaluate the impact of cardiac surgery on nutritional status of pediatric patients with CHD. A prospective cohort study was conducted in pediatric patients with CHD, admitted for cardiac surgery at Queen Sirikit National Institute of Child Health (QSNICH), Bangkok, from August 1st, 2002 to 2003. Demographic data, cardiac and related problems were obtained before operation. Anthropometry was performed at the presentation and post cardiac surgery. Nutritional status was assessed by Z-score of weight for age (ZWA), weight for height (ZWH) and height for age (ZHA). Malnutrition was defined as Z-score nutritional status of the patients before surgery was defined as normal 57%, malnutrition 40% and over-nutrition 3%. Malnutrition included underweight 28%, wasting 22% and stunting 16%. Post cardiac surgery, the means of ZWA, ZWH and ZHA were significantly increased and the prevalence of underweight and wasting were decreased to 17% and 6% respectively, with statistically significant from the baseline (p nutritional status.

  10. Creating a lesion-specific "roadmap" for ambulatory care following surgery for complex congenital cardiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernovsky, Gil; Lihn, Stacey L; Olen, Melissa M

    2017-05-01

    Over the past 20 years, the successes of neonatal and infant surgery have resulted in dramatically changed demographics in ambulatory cardiology. These school-aged children and young adults have complex and, in some cases, previously unexpected cardiac and non-cardiac consequences of their surgical and/or transcatheter procedures. There is a growing need for additional cardiac and non-cardiac subspecialists, and coordination of care may be quite challenging. In contrast to hospital-based care, where inpatient care protocols are common, and perioperative expectations are more or less predictable for most children, ambulatory cardiologists have evolved strategies of care more or less independently, based on their education, training, experience, and individual styles, resulting in highly variable follow-up strategies. We have proposed a combination proactive-reactive collaborative model with a patient's primary cardiologist, primary-care provider, and subspecialists, along with the patient and their family. The goal is to help standardise data collection in the ambulatory setting, reduce patient and family anxiety, increase health literacy, measure and address the non-cardiac consequences of complex cardiac disease, and aid in the transition to self-care as an adult.

  11. Serial measurements of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T after exercise stress test in stable coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsson, Anna; Ruwald, Martin Huth; Dalsgaard, Morten

    2013-01-01

    The aim was to assess serial measurements of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs-cTNT) post-exercise in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD).......The aim was to assess serial measurements of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs-cTNT) post-exercise in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD)....

  12. Gut microbiome composition is associated with cardiac disease in zoo-housed western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krynak, Katherine L; Burke, David J; Martin, Ryan A; Dennis, Patricia M

    2017-08-15

    Cardiac disease is a leading cause of mortality in zoo-housed western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla). The gut microbiome is associated with cardiac disease in humans and similarly the gut microbiome may be associated with cardiac diseases in close relatives of humans, such as gorillas. We assessed the relationship between cardiac disease and gut bacterial composition in eight zoo-housed male western lowland gorillas (N = 4 with and N = 4 without cardiac disease) utilizing 16S rRNA gene analysis on the Illumina MiSeq sequencing platform. We found bacterial composition differences between gorillas with and without cardiac disease. Bacterial operational taxonomic units from phyla Bacteroidetes, Spirochaetes, Proteobacteria and Firmicutes were significant indicators of cardiac disease. Our results suggest that further investigations between diet and cardiac disease could improve the management and health of zoo-housed populations of this endangered species. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. CLINICAL AND EPIDEMIOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF KAWASAKI DISEASE WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO CARDIAC INVOLVEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayanta Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Kawasaki disease (KD is an acute medium vessel vasculitis with multisystem involvement especially in young children of unknown etiology and present as acute febrile illness. It is the leading cause of acquired heart disease in children across the globe. OBJECTIVES We aimed to evaluate the epidemiological characteristics, clinical manifestations and cardiac involvement of KD in children residing in Tripura, a North Eastern State of India. MATERIALS AND METHODS In this retrospective study, we reviewed the medical records of all children with KD who had been admitted in Pediatric ward of Tripura Medical College & DR BRAM Teaching Hospital, Agartala from March 2007 to February 2015. Data regarding clinical, epidemiological characteristics, Cardiac involvement, laboratory parameter, management, and the outcome of disease for each patient were obtained. The patients were divided into cardiac and non-cardiac groups based on echocardiographic results. RESULTS In total, 30 patients with KD (18boys and 12 girls were enrolled in this study. The male to female ratio was 1.5:1. The median age at diagnosis was 15 months, and the diagnosis was made after a mean of 8.1 days of fever. A seasonal peak during the winter-spring months was observed. 23 (76.6% had classical presentation of KD. Fever, polymorphs, skin rash, conjunctivitis, changes in the oropharynx were the most common manifestations. Cardiac involvement was detected in 7(23.3%%, with coronary artery abnormalities (CAA and 26(86.5% patient showed ECG abnormality. Patients were treated with immunoglobulin and aspirin. The CAA regressed in all patients but one persisted even after 12 months. CONCLUSION Kawasaki disease is not rare in Tripura. The age, gender distribution and clinical findings are similar to that of other reports. Patients with cardiac abnormalities had delayed treatment and prolonged hospital stays

  14. Passive ventricular remodeling in cardiac disease: Focus on heterogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elise L Kessler

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Passive ventricular remodeling is defined by the process of molecular ventricular adaptation to different forms of cardiac pathophysiology. It includes changes in tissue architecture, such as hypertrophy, fiber disarray, alterations in cell size and fibrosis. Besides that, it also includes molecular remodeling of gap junctions, especially those composed by Connexin43 proteins (Cx43 in the ventricles that affect cell-to-cell propagation of the electrical impulse, and changes in the sodium channels that modify excitability. All those alterations appear mainly in a heterogeneous manner, creating irregular and inhomogeneous electrical and mechanical coupling throughout the heart. This can predispose to reentry arrhythmias and adds to a further deterioration into heart failure. In this review, passive ventricular remodeling is described in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM, Dilated Cardiomyopathy (DCM, Ischemic Cardiomyopathy (ICM, and Arrhythmogenic Cardiomyopathy (ACM, with a main focus on the heterogeneity of those alterations mentioned above.

  15. Multimodality Cardiac Imaging in a Patient with Kawasaki Disease and Giant Aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Ranjini; Weller, Rachel; Einstein, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Kawasaki disease is a well-known cause of acquired cardiac disease in the pediatric and adult population, most prevalent in Japan but also seen commonly in the United States. In the era of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) treatment, the morbidity associated with this disease has decreased, but it remains a serious illness. Here we present the case of an adolescent, initially diagnosed with Kawasaki disease as an infant, that progressed to giant aneurysm formation and calcification of the coronary arteries. We review his case and the literature, focusing on the integral role of multimodality imaging in managing Kawasaki disease. PMID:27872783

  16. Psychosocial Working Environment and Risk of Adverse Cardiac Events in Patients Treated for Coronary Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biering, Karin; Andersen, Johan Hviid; Lund, Thomas; Hjollund, Niels Henrik

    2015-12-01

    During the last decades a possible association between psychosocial working environment and increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) has been debated and moderate evidence supports that high psychological demands, lack of social support and iso-strain (the combination of high job strain and lack of social support) is associated with primary CHD. Whether psychosocial working environment plays a role as risk factor for new cardiac events and readmissions in patients with existing cardiovascular disease is less studied. A cohort of patients psychosocial working environment. Patients were followed in the Danish National Patient Registry and the Danish Civil Registration System for 3+ years to identify adverse cardiac events and death. We analysed the association between psychosocial working environment and adverse cardiac events by Cox Regression. A number of 528 patients had returned to work 12 weeks after PCI, while 97 were still sick-listed. We identified 12 deaths and 211 other events during follow-up. We found no statistically significant associations between psychosocial working environment and risk of adverse cardiac events and readmissions or mortality. The psychosocial working environment was not associated with adverse cardiac events.

  17. Cardiac lesions and initial laboratory data in Kawasaki disease: a nationwide survey in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwabara, Masanari; Yashiro, Mayumi; Kotani, Kazuhiko; Tsuboi, Satoshi; Ae, Ryusuke; Nakamura, Yosikazu; Yanagawa, Hiroshi; Kawasaki, Tomisaku

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac lesions, such as coronary dilatation, aneurysms, narrowing, myocardial infarction, and valvular lesions, sometimes occur in Kawasaki disease, but most studies have only evaluated cardiac lesions in the later phase of the disease. This study was undertaken to clarify the related factors between cardiac lesions and laboratory data in the initial phase of Kawasaki disease. We conducted a cross-sectional study using data for 26 691 patients from the 22nd nationwide survey of Kawasaki disease in Japan, the observation period of which was from January 2011 through December 2012. We excluded patients with recurrent Kawasaki disease and who were more than seven days from the start of symptoms at admission. We analyzed 23 155 cases (13 353 boys; mean age: 923 ± 734 days) with available laboratory data for white blood cell count, platelet count, serum albumin, and C-reactive protein (CRP). Cardiac lesions were detected in 984 cases (656 boys and 328 girls); lesions were classified as coronary dilatation (764 cases), coronary aneurysm (40), giant coronary aneurysm (6), coronary narrowing (3), and valvular lesions (204). The significant related factors of initial coronary dilatation were male sex (odds ratio [OR] 1.73), older age (OR per 100 days increase 1.03), higher platelet count (OR per 10 000 cells/µL increase 1.006), lower albumin (OR per 1 g/dL increase 0.66), and higher CRP (OR per 1 mg/dL increase 1.02). The factors related to coronary aneurysm were higher platelet count (OR 1.01) and lower albumin (OR 0.34). No factors were significantly related to giant coronary aneurysm. The related factors of valvular lesions were age (OR 0.98), and higher CRP (OR 1.05). Clinicians should consider male sex, older age, higher platelet count, lower albumin levels, and higher CRP levels when assessing risk of cardiac lesions in the initial phase of Kawasaki disease.

  18. Maladaptive Kinase Signaling and Protein-Protein Interactions in Cardiac Diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soni, S.

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of cardiac diseases has been on the rise in the past decades and both academic and industrial institutions are still heavily involved in the development of new drugs. Discovery of suitable targets and highly efficient compounds relies on a better understanding of the cellular

  19. Pulse methylprednisolone therapy for impending cardiac tamponade in immunoglobulin-resistant Kawasaki disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dahlem, P. G.; von Rosenstiel, I. A.; Lam, J.; Kuijpers, T. W.

    1999-01-01

    We describe a boy with Kawasaki disease (KD) whose clinical course was marked by a rapid improvement upon treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and oral aspirin, which - within 14 days - was followed by the development of a large pericardial effusion with symptoms of impending cardiac

  20. Global outbreak of severe Mycobacterium chimaera disease after cardiac surgery: a molecular epidemiological study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingen, J. van; Kohl, T.A.; Kranzer, K.; Hasse, B.; Keller, P.M.; Szafranska, A.K.; Hillemann, D.; Chand, M.; Schreiber, P.W.; Sommerstein, R.; Berger, C.; Genoni, M.; Ruegg, C.; Troillet, N.; Widmer, A.F.; Becker, S.L.; Herrmann, M.; Eckmanns, T.; Haller, S.; Holler, C.; Debast, S.B.; Wolfhagen, M.J.; Hopman, J.; Kluytmans, J.; Langelaar, M.; Notermans, D.W.; Oever, J. ten; Barselaar, P. van den; Vonk, A.B.; Vos, M.C.; Ahmed, N.; Brown, T.; Crook, D.; Lamagni, T.; Phin, N.; Smith, E.G.; Zambon, M.; Serr, A.; Gotting, T.; Ebner, W.; Thurmer, A.; Utpatel, C.; Sproer, C.; Bunk, B.; Nubel, U.; Bloemberg, G.V.; Bottger, E.C.; Niemann, S.; Wagner, D.; Sax, H.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Since 2013, over 100 cases of Mycobacterium chimaera prosthetic valve endocarditis and disseminated disease were notified in Europe and the USA, linked to contaminated heater-cooler units (HCUs) used during cardiac surgery. We did a molecular epidemiological investigation to establish

  1. Risk of cardiovascular disease in family members of young sudden cardiac death victims

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ranthe, Mattis Flyvholm; Winkel, Bo Gregers; Andersen, Elisabeth Wreford

    2012-01-01

    AimsDescriptive and genetic studies suggest that relatives of sudden cardiac death (SCD) victims have an increased risk of several cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). Given the severe consequences of undiagnosed CVD and the availability of effective treatment, the potential for prevention in this gro...

  2. The evolving impact of g protein-coupled receptor kinases in cardiac health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Priscila Y; Chuprun, J Kurt; Schwartz, Mathew; Koch, Walter J

    2015-04-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are important regulators of various cellular functions via activation of intracellular signaling events. Active GPCR signaling is shut down by GPCR kinases (GRKs) and subsequent β-arrestin-mediated mechanisms including phosphorylation, internalization, and either receptor degradation or resensitization. The seven-member GRK family varies in their structural composition, cellular localization, function, and mechanism of action (see sect. II). Here, we focus our attention on GRKs in particular canonical and novel roles of the GRKs found in the cardiovascular system (see sects. III and IV). Paramount to overall cardiac function is GPCR-mediated signaling provided by the adrenergic system. Overstimulation of the adrenergic system has been highly implicated in various etiologies of cardiovascular disease including hypertension and heart failure. GRKs acting downstream of heightened adrenergic signaling appear to be key players in cardiac homeostasis and disease progression, and herein we review the current data on GRKs related to cardiac disease and discuss their potential in the development of novel therapeutic strategies in cardiac diseases including heart failure. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Non-cardiac Surgery in a Child with Major Congenital Heart Disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Surgery in children with congenital heart disease poses an increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Ideally such children should be managed in specialist cardiac centres. However, it is not unusual in developing countries for the patients to present in non-specialist centres. This was the case with a 5 month old baby who ...

  4. Effectiveness of expanded cardiac rehabilitation in patients diagnosed with coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Momsen, Anne-Mette Hedeager; Hald, Kathrine; Nielsen, Claus Vinther

    2017-01-01

    REVIEW OBJECTIVE/QUESTION: The objective of this review is to identify the effectiveness of expanded cardiac rehabilitation (CR) in patients diagnosed with coronary heart disease (CHD). Specifically, the review question is: What is the effectiveness of expanded CR compared to standard CR in adult...

  5. Cardiac diseases and metabolic syndrome in HIV infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olusegun Adesola Busari

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available HIV infection remains a pandemic and a leading cause of morbidity and mortality particularly in sub Sahara Africa. Although highly active antiretroviral therapy has brought about a marked reduction in morbidity and mortality, there are growing concerns on increasing non-communicable complications particularly cardiovascular and metabolic diseases in HIV disease. The objective was to do a systematic review of the clinical entities and pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases and metabolic syndrome in HIV disease. The result shows that HIV infection and the resultant chronic immune activation; HAAR; opportunistic infections and some of the drugs use for them; and traditional cardiovascular risk factors are some of the conditions associated with cardiovascular diseases and metabolic syndrome in HIV infection. Standard cardiovascular disease screening and risk-reducing interventions should be routinely undertaken for HIV-infected persons. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(3.000: 377-392

  6. Cardiac complications in children with Kawasaki disease in our own experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowin, Ewelina; Małecka, Ilona; Stryczyńska-Kazubska, Joanna; Michalak, Michał; Wysocki, Jacek; Górzna-Kamińska, Hanna

    2016-01-01

    Kawasaki disease is the most common cause of acquired heart disease in children in developed countries. The incidence of Kawasaki disease varies from 180 in Japan through 20 in United States to 5-8 in the European countries per 100,000 children younger than 5 years of age. To evaluate cardiac complications in children hospitalised with Kawasaki disease. Retrospective analysis of the medical records of patients hospitalised with Kawasaki disease in the Specialist Mother and Child Healthcare Facility in Poznan (Poland) in 2008-2014. The diagnosis was based on the American Heart Association criteria. Study group included 30 patients (25 boys and 5 girls). The mean age was 49 months; 21 (70%) children were younger than 5 years of age. All patients had oral mucosal lesions, while an elevated leukocyte count was observed in a minority of patients. Cardiac involvement was detected in 18 (60%) patients, aneurysms in 4 (13.3%) patients, coronary artery dilatation in 6 patients, pericarditis in 6 patients, mitral regurgitation in 3 patients, and aortic regurgitation in 2 patients. In 5 children, more than 1 cardiac abnormality was detected. During 12 months of follow-up, coronary artery dilatation resolved in 5 children, and 1 patient developed aneurysm. Our findings suggest that Kawasaki disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis of children with prolonged fever. During the acute stage of the disease, children with Kawasaki disease require regular cardiac evaluation, and long-term care is needed when cardiovascular complications occur. A central case reporting system to monitor all cases of Kawasaki disease in the Polish paediatric population should be introduced.

  7. Transgenic expression of neuronal dystonin isoform 2 partially rescues the disease phenotype of the dystonia musculorum mouse model of hereditary sensory autonomic neuropathy VI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrier, Andrew; Sato, Tadasu; De Repentigny, Yves; Gibeault, Sabrina; Bhanot, Kunal; O'Meara, Ryan W.; Lynch-Godrei, Anisha; Kornfeld, Samantha F.; Young, Kevin G.; Kothary, Rashmi

    2014-01-01

    A newly identified lethal form of hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy (HSAN), designated HSAN-VI, is caused by a homozygous mutation in the bullous pemphigoid antigen 1 (BPAG1)/dystonin gene (DST). The HSAN-VI mutation impacts all major neuronal BPAG1/dystonin protein isoforms: dystonin-a1, -a2 and -a3. Homozygous mutations in the murine Dst gene cause a severe sensory neuropathy termed dystonia musculorum (dt). Phenotypically, dt mice are similar to HSAN-VI patients, manifesting progressive limb contractures, dystonia, dysautonomia and early postnatal death. To obtain a better molecular understanding of disease pathogenesis in HSAN-VI patients and the dt disorder, we generated transgenic mice expressing a myc-tagged dystonin-a2 protein under the regulation of the neuronal prion protein promoter on the dtTg4/Tg4 background, which is devoid of endogenous dystonin-a1 and -a2, but does express dystonin-a3. Restoring dystonin-a2 expression in the nervous system, particularly within sensory neurons, prevented the disorganization of organelle membranes and microtubule networks, attenuated the degeneration of sensory neuron subtypes and ameliorated the phenotype and increased life span in these mice. Despite these improvements, complete rescue was not observed likely because of inadequate expression of the transgene. Taken together, this study provides needed insight into the molecular basis of the dt disorder and other peripheral neuropathies including HSAN-VI. PMID:24381311

  8. Postnatal Cardiac Autonomic Nervous Control in Pediatric Congenital Heart Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nederend, I.; Jongbloed, M.R.M.; de Geus, J.C.N.; Blom, N.A.; ten Harkel, A.D.J.

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart disease is the most common congenital defect. During childhood, survival is generally good but, in adulthood, late complications are not uncommon. Abnormal autonomic control in children with congenital heart disease may contribute considerably to the pathophysiology of these long

  9. Nomenclature for congenital and paediatric cardiac disease: the International Paediatric and Congenital Cardiac Code (IPCCC) and the Eleventh Iteration of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Rodney C G; Béland, Marie J; Colan, Steven D; Walters, Henry L; Aiello, Vera D; Anderson, Robert H; Bailliard, Frédérique; Boris, Jeffrey R; Cohen, Meryl S; Gaynor, J William; Guleserian, Kristine J; Houyel, Lucile; Jacobs, Marshall L; Juraszek, Amy L; Krogmann, Otto N; Kurosawa, Hiromi; Lopez, Leo; Maruszewski, Bohdan J; St Louis, James D; Seslar, Stephen P; Srivastava, Shubhika; Stellin, Giovanni; Tchervenkov, Christo I; Weinberg, Paul M; Jacobs, Jeffrey P

    2017-12-01

    An internationally approved and globally used classification scheme for the diagnosis of CHD has long been sought. The International Paediatric and Congenital Cardiac Code (IPCCC), which was produced and has been maintained by the International Society for Nomenclature of Paediatric and Congenital Heart Disease (the International Nomenclature Society), is used widely, but has spawned many "short list" versions that differ in content depending on the user. Thus, efforts to have a uniform identification of patients with CHD using a single up-to-date and coordinated nomenclature system continue to be thwarted, even if a common nomenclature has been used as a basis for composing various "short lists". In an attempt to solve this problem, the International Nomenclature Society has linked its efforts with those of the World Health Organization to obtain a globally accepted nomenclature tree for CHD within the 11th iteration of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11). The International Nomenclature Society has submitted a hierarchical nomenclature tree for CHD to the World Health Organization that is expected to serve increasingly as the "short list" for all communities interested in coding for congenital cardiology. This article reviews the history of the International Classification of Diseases and of the IPCCC, and outlines the process used in developing the ICD-11 congenital cardiac disease diagnostic list and the definitions for each term on the list. An overview of the content of the congenital heart anomaly section of the Foundation Component of ICD-11, published herein in its entirety, is also included. Future plans for the International Nomenclature Society include linking again with the World Health Organization to tackle procedural nomenclature as it relates to cardiac malformations. By doing so, the Society will continue its role in standardising nomenclature for CHD across the globe, thereby promoting research and better outcomes for fetuses

  10. Role of Echocardiography in the Management of Cardiac Disease in Women

    OpenAIRE

    Shim, Wan Joo

    2014-01-01

    The widespread use of echocardiography has contributed to the early recognition of several distinct cardiac diseases in women. During pregnancy, safe monitoring of the disease process, as well as a better understanding of hemodynamics, is possible. During the use of potentially cardiotoxic drugs for breast cancer chemotherapy, echocardiographic patient monitoring is vital. Compared to men, the addition of an imaging modality to routine electrocardiogram monitoring during stress testing is mor...

  11. Metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty is not associated with cardiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodnough, L H; Bala, A; Huddleston, J; Goodman, S B; Maloney, W J; Amanatullah, D F

    2018-01-01

    Many case reports and small studies have suggested that cobalt ions are a potential cause of cardiac complications, specifically cardiomyopathy, after metal-on-metal (MoM) total hip arthroplasty (THA). The impact of metal ions on the incidence of cardiac disease after MoM THA has not been evaluated in large studies. The aim of this study was to compare the rate of onset of new cardiac symptoms in patients who have undergone MoM THA with those who have undergone metal-on-polyethylene (MoP) THA. Data were extracted from the Standard Analytics Files database for patients who underwent MoM THA between 2005 and 2012. Bearing surface was selected using International Classification of Diseases ninth revision codes. Patients with a minimum five-year follow-up were selected. An age and gender-matched cohort of patients who underwent MoP THA served as a comparison group. New diagnoses of cardiac disease were collected during the follow-up period. Comorbidities and demographics were identified and routine descriptive statistics were used. We identified 29 483 patients who underwent MoM THA and 24 175 matched patients who underwent MoP THA. Both groups had a mean Charlson comorbidity index score of 4. There were no statistically significant differences in 30 of 31 pre-existing comorbidities. Patients undergoing MoM THA had a slightly lower incidence of cardiac failure compared with those undergoing MoP THA at three years (6.60% versus 7.06%, odds ratio (OR) 0.93, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.87 to 0.99) and four years (8.73% versus 9.49%, OR 0.91, 95% CI 0.86 to 0.97) postoperatively, with no difference in the incidence of new cardiac failure in between the groups at five years. There was no statistically significant difference in the incidence of arrhythmia, myocardial infarction and cardiomyopathy at any time between the two groups. MoM THA is not associated with cardiac complications. Initial reports may have represented individual instances of cardiac disease in patients

  12. Hyperpolarized Metabolic MR in the Study of Cardiac Function and Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, M H; Sogaard, L V; Madsen, P L

    2014-01-01

    signal from a biological molecule of interest by more than 10,000 times, making it possible to measure its cellular uptake and conversion in specific enzymatic pathways in real time. We review the role of hyperpolarized MR in identifying changes in cardiac metabolism in vivo, and present the extensive...... the technique into clinical practice. Hyperpolarized MR has the prospect of transforming diagnostic cardiology by offering new insights into cardiac disease and potentially even to contribute to personalized therapy based on a thorough understanding of the individual intracellular metabolism....

  13. The utility of cardiac CT beyond the assessment of suspected coronary artery disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakouros, N. [Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD (United States); Giles, J.; Crundwell, N.B. [Conquest Hospital, St Leonards-on-Sea, East Sussex (United Kingdom); McWilliams, E.T.M., E-mail: eric.mcwilliams@esht.nhs.uk [Conquest Hospital, St Leonards-on-Sea, East Sussex (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-15

    Extensive work has been done over recent years to improve the spatial and temporal resolution of electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated cardiac computed tomography (CT). Advances in both hardware and software analysis have enabled the development of non-invasive coronary angiography. However, these high-quality examinations lend themselves to multiple additional applications beyond coronary angiography. In this review, we illustrate and discuss some established and some emerging applications of ECG-gated cardiac CT beyond the assessment of suspected coronary disease, particularly in light of recent recommendations on the appropriate use of this technology.

  14. Is there an association between Fahr′s disease and cardiac conduction system disease?: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashanth Panduranga

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fahr′s disease is a rare neurodegenerative disorder of unknown cause characterized by idiopathic basal ganglia calcification that is associated with neuropsychiatric and cognitive impairment. No case of Fahr′s disease with associated cardiac conduction disease has been described in the literature to date. The objective of this case report was to describe a young female with various cardiac conduction system abnormalities and bilateral basal ganglia calcifica-tion suggestive of Fahr′s disease. Case Report: A 19-year-old female was transferred to our hospital for a pacemaker insertion. Her past medical history included cognitive impairment and asymptomatic congenital complete heart block since birth. Her manifestations in-cluded cognitive impairment, tremors, rigidity, ataxia, bilateral basal ganglia calcification without clinical manifesta-tions of mitochondrial cytopathy. She also had right bundle branch block, left anterior fascicular block, intermittent complete heart block, atrial arrhythmias with advanced atrioventricular blocks and ventricular asystole manifested by Stokes-Adams seizures, which was diagnosed as epilepsy. Conclusions: According to our knowledge, this was the first case report of a su spected association between Fahr′s disease and isolated cardiac conduction system disease. In addition, this case illustrated that in patients with heart blocks and seizures, a diagnosis of epilepsy needs to be made with caution and such patients need further evaluations by a cardiologist or electrophysiologist to consider pacing and prevent future catastrophic events.

  15. Chronic Chagas disease with advanced cardiac complications in Japan: Case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Kazuo; Maeda, Takuya; Sayama, Yusuke; Osa, Morichika; Mikita, Kei; Kurane, Ichiro; Miyahira, Yasushi; Kawana, Akihiko; Miura, Sachio

    2015-10-01

    Due to the unprecedented recent increases in global migration, Chagas disease has become a global health threat and its epidemiology has drastically changed. Here we describe the first case in Japan of benznidazole treatment for chronic Chagas disease characterized by advanced cardiac complications. A 55-year-old Japanese-Brazilian woman who had previously presented with chronic heart failure was diagnosed as having Chagas disease and treated with benznidazole to prevent aggravation of her cardiac complications. However, benznidazole administration was stopped on day 56 due to severe drug-induced peripheral neuritis. Sixteen months later, her serologic test for Trypanosoma cruzi is still positive and she is being followed regularly by cardiology. Despite an estimated prevalence of over 4000 cases in Japan, only a few cases of Chagas disease have been reported. A Medline search revealed only 7 cases identified between 1995 and 2014 in Japan: in 6 cases, complications of chronic Chagas disease were apparent at the time of presentation, and sudden death occurred in 2 of these cases due to cardiac complications. This clinical case and literature review re-emphasize the urgent need to establish a surveillance network and improve the diagnostic methods and treatment framework for Chagas disease in Japan. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effectiveness of mild therapeutic hypothermia following cardiac arrest in adult patients with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Michael N; Hollenbeck, Ryan D; Pollock, Jeremy S; McPherson, John A; Fredi, Joseph L; Piana, Robert N; Mah, May L; Fish, Frank A; Markham, Larry

    2014-07-01

    Mild therapeutic hypothermia (TH) is an established therapy to improve survival and reduce neurologic injury after cardiac arrest. Adult patients with congenital heart disease (ACHD) are at increased risk of sudden cardiac death. The use of TH in this population has not been extensively studied. The aim of this study is to report our institutional experience using this treatment modality in patients with ACHD after cardiac arrest. We performed a retrospective observational study of a cohort of 245 consecutive patients treated with TH after cardiac arrest from 2007 to 2013. Five patients were identified as having complex ACHD with a mean age of 28 years. All were treated with TH according to an institutional protocol utilizing active surface cooling to maintain a core body temperature of 32°C to 34°C for 24 hours after cardiac arrest. Congenital lesions in these 5 patients included anomalous left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery; l-transposition of the great arteries; d-transposition of the great arteries status post atrial switch; unoperated tricuspid atresia, atrial septal defect, and ventricular septal defect with Eisenmenger's physiology; and surgically corrected atrial septal defect, cleft mitral valve, and subaortic membrane. All 5 patients suffered cardiac arrest due to ventricular arrhythmia and all survived to discharge without significant neurologic impairment. Therapeutic interventions included anomalous left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery ligation, percutaneous coronary intervention, and defibrillator implantation. In conclusion, in 5 patients with ACHD, the use of TH after cardiac arrest resulted in 100% survival to hospital discharge with good neurologic outcome postresuscitation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Prospective association between phobic anxiety and cardiac mortality in individuals with coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Lana L.; Blumenthal, James A.; Babyak, Michael A.; Davidson, Jonathan R.T.; McCants, Charles B.; O’Connor, Christopher; Sketch, Michael H.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Previous findings suggest that phobic anxiety may pose increased risk of cardiac mortality in medically healthy cohorts. The present study evaluated whether phobic anxiety is associated with increased risk of cardiac mortality in individuals with established coronary heart disease (CHD) and examined the role of reduced heart rate variability (HRV) in mediating this risk. Methods We performed a prospective cohort study in 947 CHD patients recruited during hospitalization for coronary angiography. At baseline, supine recordings of heart rate for HRV were collected, and participants completed the Crown-Crisp phobic anxiety scale. Fatal cardiac events were identified over an average period of 3 years. Results Female CHD patients reported significantly elevated levels of phobic anxiety when compared with male patients (p phobic anxiety in the prediction of cardiac mortality (p =.058) and sudden cardiac death (SCD) (p=.03). In women, phobic anxiety was associated with a 1.6-fold increased risk of cardiac mortality (HR, 1.56; 95% CI, 1.15–2.11; p=.004) and a 2.0-fold increased risk of SCD (HR, 2.02; 95% CI, 1.16–3.52; p=.01) and was unassociated with increased mortality risk in men (p=.56). Phobic anxiety was weakly associated with reduced high frequency HRV in female patients (r=−.14, p=.02), but reduced HRV did not alter the association between phobic anxiety on mortality. Conclusions Phobic anxiety levels are high in women with CHD and may be a risk factor for cardiac-related mortality in women diagnosed with CHD. Reduced HRV measured during rest does not appear to mediate phobic anxiety-related risk. PMID:20639390

  18. Cardiac MR Imaging in the Evaluation of Rheumatic Valvular Heart Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutnuru, Phani Chakravarty; Singh, S N; D'Souza, John; Perubhotla, Lakshmi Manasa

    2016-03-01

    Rheumatic heart disease is the most common cause of valvular heart disease throughout the world. Echocardiography is the dominant imaging investigation in the assessment of cardiac valvular disease and the role of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is so far limited. However, due to rapid improvements in the cardiac MRI technology in past few years, this non invasive technique is gaining interest in the examination of cardiac valves. Our study was undertaken to define the role of MRI in the evaluation of Rheumatic valvular heart disease and to compare the role of MRI with transthoracic echocardiography with regard to quantity of stenosis and volume regurgitation. ECG gated Cardiac MRI was performed with a 1.5-Tesla system (MAGNETOM SYMPHONY- Model 2005) using basic cardiac software (Argus viewer) by a phased-array multicoil on 50 subjects who were known cases of Rheumatic valvular heart disease. A chest radiograph and echocardiography were done in all patients before MR examination. Informed consent was taken from all patients. Mitral stenosis either as an isolated valvular abnormality or in combination with other valvular abnormalities constituted the major bulk of Rheumatic valvular heart disease in our study population. The average ejection fraction by ECHO is 64.94±7.11 and by MRI 67.52±7.84. The average mitral valve area by ECHO is 1.79±0.43 cm(2) and by MRI 1.82±0.47 cm(2). The average aortic valve area by ECHO is 1.10±0.21 cm(2) and by MRI 1.12±0.25 cm(2). The Coefficient of Correlation (r) is 0.82 for ejection fraction, 0.98 for mitral valve area and 0.92 for aortic valve area which means a strong positive association between the results by ECHO and MRI. In all instances, the p-value is <0.00001, suggesting that the test is highly significant. In our study echocardiography was found to be the gold standard for the diagnosis of Rheumatic valvular heart disease and the role of MRI remained only complimentary to Echocardiography. However with advanced

  19. Hereditary cancer syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahner, Nils; Steinke, Verena

    2008-10-01

    Persons carrying mutations for hereditary cancer syndromes are at high risk for the development of tumors at an early age, as well as the synchronous or metachronous development of multiple tumors of the corresponding tumor spectrum. The genetic causes of many hereditary cancer syndromes have already been identified. About 5% of all cancers are part of a hereditary cancer syndrome. Selective literature review, including evidence-based guidelines and recommendations. Clinical criteria are currently available according to which many hereditary cancer syndromes can be diagnosed or suspected and which point the way to further molecular genetic analysis. A physician can easily determine whether these criteria are met by directed questioning about the patient's personal and family medical history. The identification of the causative germ line mutation in the family allows confirmation of the diagnosis in the affected individual and opens up the option of predictive testing in healthy relatives. Mutation carriers for hereditary cancer syndromes need long-term medical surveillance in a specialized center. It is important that these persons should be identified in the primary care setting and then referred for genetic counseling if molecular genetic testing is to be performed in a targeted, rational manner.

  20. [Recurrent urinary lithiasis revealing hereditary xanthinuria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahlous, Afef; Gasmi, Manef; Mohsni, Amira; Abdelmoula, Jaouida

    2007-09-01

    Hereditary xanthinuria, due to a purine metabolism disorder, is a rare cause of urinary lithiasis in children. We report the case of a child aged 3 and a half years, who presented recurrent urinary lithiasis that led to destruction of the right kidney. Infrared spectrophotometric analysis of the calculus concluded that it was composed of 100% xanthine. Laboratory tests showed hypouricemia and hypouricosuria with elevated urinary excretion of oxypurines. These findings led to a diagnosis of hereditary xanthinuria. Early diagnosis of this rare disease is essential to avoid its complications. Metabolic causes must be sought in children with lithiasis.

  1. Functional Status, Anxiety, Cardiac Self-Efficacy, and Health Beliefs of Patients with Coronary Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Allahverdipour

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Beliefs and emotions could effect on functional status, quality of life, and mortality amongst patients who are suffering coronary heart disease (CHD. Current study examined the role of anxiety: trait/ state, self-efficacy, health beliefs, and functional status among patient with history of CHD. Method: In this correlational study, 105 hospitalized and outpatients patients suffering CHD in Tehran Heart Center Hospital participated by using convenience sampling method in 2012. Cardiac self-efficacy, Seattle Angina, and research- designed health beliefs questionnaires were used to gather data. Results: The functional status in CHD patients showed significant relationships with gender, job, and type of medical insurance of the participants (All ps<0.05. In addition , perceived vulnerability to face again cardiac attack in the future, perceived severity of next cardiac attack, anxiety, state anxiety and trait anxiety (All ps<0.05 had significant and negative relationships with functional status. Conversely, the cardiac self-efficacy had a positive and significant relationship (P<0.001 with functional status. Conclusion: Psychological factors have important role in functional status and quality of life of patients who suffering CHD. Therefore, it is necessary to emphasize on supportive and complementary programs to promote Cardiac Rehabilitation Programs.

  2. Activated Met signalling in the developing mouse heart leads to cardiac disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Leo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF is a pleiotropic cytokine involved in many physiological processes, including skeletal muscle, placenta and liver development. Little is known about its role and that of Met tyrosine kinase receptor in cardiac development. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we generated two transgenic mice with cardiac-specific, tetracycline-suppressible expression of either Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF or the constitutively activated Tpr-Met kinase to explore: i the effect of stimulation of the endogenous Met receptor by autocrine production of HGF and ii the consequence of sustained activation of Met signalling in the heart. We first showed that Met is present in the neonatal cardiomyocytes and is responsive to exogenous HGF. Exogenous HGF starting from prenatal stage enhanced cardiac proliferation and reduced sarcomeric proteins and Connexin43 (Cx43 in newborn mice. As adults, these transgenics developed systolic contractile dysfunction. Conversely, prenatal Tpr-Met expression was lethal after birth. Inducing Tpr-Met expression during postnatal life caused early-onset heart failure, characterized by decreased Cx43, upregulation of fetal genes and hypertrophy. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, our data show that excessive activation of the HGF/Met system in development may result in cardiac damage and suggest that Met signalling may be implicated in the pathogenesis of cardiac disease.

  3. Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy of Patients with Cardiac Disease in Our Clinic; Retrospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ömer Faruk Şavluk

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The application of laparoscopic cholecystectomy is investigated to effected on patients with cardiac surgery or examination of patients that were identified with cardiac problem.Patients and Methods: Between 2008-2010 total of 233 patients with laporoscopiccholecystectomy were retrospectively analyzed follow up papers. Systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, heart rate, X-rays and ECGs were evaluated in preoperative examination in all patients. ECG, SpO2 monitoring was performed to all patients in the operating room. In all patients systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, heart rate and SpO2 values before the operation and during the operation were recorded. End-tidal CO2 was monitored during the operation. Additional disease duration of surgery, duration of intubation, preoperative, perioperative and postoperative need to inotropic support were recorded. Results: One hundred and one (43% patients were men and 132 (57% female. Forty five of 233 patients with cardiac problems are sick. Twenty five patients of these patients had coronary bypass surgery and eight patients underwent prosthetic valve surgery. As a result of preoperative transthoracic echocardiography in 12 patients were diagnosed with valve insufficiency. Demographic characteristics were similar than between the two groups. The mean operation time, insuflation time, extubation time, staying hospital time and hemodynamic data were similar than between the two groups. Conclusion: Laparoscopic cholecystectomy safely and easily can apply for application of the balanced anesthesia, low-pressure pneumoperitoneum after being stable cardiac status in patients with cardiac problem.

  4. Loss of spastin function results in disease-specific axonal defects in human pluripotent stem cell-based models of hereditary spastic paraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, Kyle R; Lei, Ling; Grenier, Jeremy; Rodionov, Vladimir; Blackstone, Craig; Li, Xue-Jun

    2014-02-01

    Human neuronal models of hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSP) that recapitulate disease-specific axonal pathology hold the key to understanding why certain axons degenerate in patients and to developing therapies. SPG4, the most common form of HSP, is caused by autosomal dominant mutations in the SPAST gene, which encodes the microtubule-severing ATPase spastin. Here, we have generated a human neuronal model of SPG4 by establishing induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from an SPG4 patient and differentiating these cells into telencephalic glutamatergic neurons. The SPG4 neurons displayed a significant increase in axonal swellings, which stained strongly for mitochondria and tau, indicating the accumulation of axonal transport cargoes. In addition, mitochondrial transport was decreased in SPG4 neurons, revealing that these patient iPSC-derived neurons recapitulate disease-specific axonal phenotypes. Interestingly, spastin protein levels were significantly decreased in SPG4 neurons, supporting a haploinsufficiency mechanism. Furthermore, cortical neurons derived from spastin-knockdown human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) exhibited similar axonal swellings, confirming that the axonal defects can be caused by loss of spastin function. These spastin-knockdown hESCs serve as an additional model for studying HSP. Finally, levels of stabilized acetylated-tubulin were significantly increased in SPG4 neurons. Vinblastine, a microtubule-destabilizing drug, rescued this axonal swelling phenotype in neurons derived from both SPG4 iPSCs and spastin-knockdown hESCs. Thus, this study demonstrates the successful establishment of human pluripotent stem cell-based neuronal models of SPG4, which will be valuable for dissecting the pathogenic cellular mechanisms and screening compounds to rescue the axonal degeneration in HSP. © AlphaMed Press.

  5. Mutation analysis of PMP22 in Slovak patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resko, Peter; Radvansky, Jan; Odnogova, Zuzana; Baldovic, Marian; Minarik, Gabriel; Polakova, Helena; Palffy, Roland; Kadasi, Ludevit

    2011-12-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) and related peripheral neuropathies are the most commonly inherited neurological disorders in humans, characterized by clinical and genetic heterogeneity. The most prevalent clinical entities belonging to this group of disorders are CMT type 1A (CMT1A) and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP). CMT1A and HNPP are predominantly caused by a 1.5 Mb duplication and deletion in the chromosomal region 17p11.2, respectively, and less frequently by other mutations in the peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) gene. Despite being relatively common diseases, they haven't been previously studied in the Slovak population. Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify the spectrum and frequency of PMP22 mutations in the Slovak population by screening 119 families with CMT and 2 families with HNPP for causative mutations in this gene. The copy number determination of PMP22 resulted in the detection of CMT1A duplication in 40 families and the detection of HNPP deletion in 7 families, 6 of which were originally diagnosed as CMT. Consequent mutation screening of families without duplication or deletion using dHPLC and sequencing identified 6 single base changes (3 unpublished to date), from which only c.327C>A (Cys109X) present in one family was provably causative. These results confirm the leading role of PMP22 mutation analysis in the differential diagnosis of CMT and show that the spectrum and frequency of PMP22 mutations in the Slovak population is comparable to that seen in the global population.

  6. Identification of Two Disease-causing Genes TJP2 and GJB2 in a Chinese Family with Unconditional Autosomal Dominant Nonsyndromic Hereditary Hearing Impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Yang Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are more than 300 genetic loci that have been found to be related to hereditary hearing impairment (HHI, including 92 causative genes for nonsyndromic hearing loss, among which 34 genes are related to autosomal dominant nonsyndromic HHI (ADNSHHI. Traditional linkage analysis and candidate gene sequencing are not effective at detecting the ADNSHHI, especially for the unconditional families that may have more than one pathogenic cause. This study identified two disease-causing genes TJP2 and GJB2 in a Chinese family with unconditional ADNSHHI. Methods: To decipher the genetic code of a Chinese family (family 686 with ADNSHHI, different gene screening techniques have been performed, including linkage analysis, candidate genes screening, high-throughput sequencing and Sanger sequencing. These techniques were done on samples obtained from this family over a period of 10 years. Results: We identified a pathogenic missense mutation, c. 2081G>A (p.G694E, in TJP2, a gene that plays a crucial role in apoptosis and age-related hearing loss (ARHL. The mutation was co-segregated in this pedigree in all, but not in the two patients who presented with different phenotypes from the other affected family members. In one of the two patients, we confirmed that the compound heterozygosity for p.Y136FNx01 and p.G45E in the GJB2 gene may account for the phenotype shown in this patient. Conclusions: We identified the co-occurrence of two genetic causes in family 686. The possible disease-causing missense mutation of TJP2 in family 686 presents an opportunity for further investigation into ARHL. It is necessary to combine various genes screening methods, especially for some unconventional cases.

  7. Mechanical Concepts Applied in Congenital Heart Disease and Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrah, Rabin; Haller, Stephen J; George, Isaac

    2017-06-01

    All biological processes are governed by principles of physics that dictate the pathophysiology and even the treatment of congenital heart diseases. In this review, basic concepts such as flow, pressure, resistance, and velocity are introduced, followed by more complex laws that describe the relationship between these variables and the disease processes. Finally, physical phenomena such as turbulence, steal and runoff phenomenon, and energy loss are discussed. By application of these principles, one can accurately quantify modifications undertaken to treat diseases, for example, the size of a patch that augments a vessel and the angle of an anastomosis to allow a certain flow. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Postnatal Cardiac Autonomic Nervous Control in Pediatric Congenital Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ineke Nederend

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Congenital heart disease is the most common congenital defect. During childhood, survival is generally good but, in adulthood, late complications are not uncommon. Abnormal autonomic control in children with congenital heart disease may contribute considerably to the pathophysiology of these long term sequelae. This narrative review of 34 studies aims to summarize current knowledge on function of the autonomic nervous system in children with a congenital heart defect. Large scale studies that measure both branches of the nervous system for prolonged periods of time in well-defined patient cohorts in various phases of childhood and adolescence are currently lacking. Pending such studies, there is not yet a good grasp on the extent and direction of sympathetic and parasympathetic autonomic function in pediatric congenital heart disease. Longitudinal studies in homogenous patient groups linking autonomic nervous system function and clinical outcome are warranted.

  9. Postnatal Cardiac Autonomic Nervous Control in Pediatric Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nederend, Ineke; Jongbloed, Monique R M; de Geus, Eco J C; Blom, Nico A; Ten Harkel, Arend D J

    2016-04-15

    Congenital heart disease is the most common congenital defect. During childhood, survival is generally good but, in adulthood, late complications are not uncommon. Abnormal autonomic control in children with congenital heart disease may contribute considerably to the pathophysiology of these long term sequelae. This narrative review of 34 studies aims to summarize current knowledge on function of the autonomic nervous system in children with a congenital heart defect. Large scale studies that measure both branches of the nervous system for prolonged periods of time in well-defined patient cohorts in various phases of childhood and adolescence are currently lacking. Pending such studies, there is not yet a good grasp on the extent and direction of sympathetic and parasympathetic autonomic function in pediatric congenital heart disease. Longitudinal studies in homogenous patient groups linking autonomic nervous system function and clinical outcome are warranted.

  10. Association of Cardiac Galectin-3 Expression, Myocarditis, and Fibrosis in Chronic Chagas Disease Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Bruno Solano de Freitas; Silva, Daniela Nascimento; Carvalho, Rejane Hughes; Sampaio, Gabriela Louise de Almeida; Paredes, Bruno Diaz; Aragão França, Luciana; Azevedo, Carine Machado; Vasconcelos, Juliana Fraga; Meira, Cassio Santana; Neto, Paulo Chenaud; Macambira, Simone Garcia; da Silva, Kátia Nunes; Allahdadi, Kyan James; Tavora, Fabio; de Souza Neto, João David; Dos Santos, Ricardo Ribeiro; Soares, Milena Botelho Pereira

    2017-05-01

    Chronic Chagas disease cardiomyopathy, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi infection, is a major cause of heart failure in Latin America. Galectin-3 (Gal-3) has been linked to cardiac remodeling and poor prognosis in heart failure of different etiologies. Herein, we investigated the involvement of Gal-3 in the disease pathogenesis and its role as a target for disease intervention. Gal-3 expression in mouse hearts was evaluated during T. cruzi infection by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry analysis, showing a high expression in macrophages, T cells, and fibroblasts. In vitro studies using Gal-3 knockdown in cardiac fibroblasts demonstrated that Gal-3 regulates cell survival, proliferation, and type I collagen synthesis. In vivo blockade of Gal-3 with N-acetyl-d-lactosamine in T. cruzi-infected mice led to a significant reduction of cardiac fibrosis and inflammation in the heart. Moreover, a modulation in the expression of proinflammatory genes in the heart was observed. Finally, histological analysis in human heart samples obtained from subjects with Chagas disease who underwent heart transplantation showed the expression of Gal-3 in areas of inflammation, similar to the mouse model. Our results indicate that Gal-3 plays a role in the pathogenesis of experimental chronic Chagas disease, favoring inflammation and fibrogenesis. Moreover, by demonstrating Gal-3 expression in human hearts, our finding reinforces that this protein could be a novel target for drug development for Chagas cardiomyopathy. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Genetic profiles distinguish different types of hereditary ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanska, Katarina; Malander, Susanne; Staaf, Johan

    2010-01-01

    Heredity represents the strongest risk factor for ovarian cancer with disease predisposing mutations identified in 15% of the tumors. With the aim to identify genetic classifiers for hereditary ovarian cancer, we profiled hereditary ovarian cancers linked to the hereditary breast and ovarian cancer...... that HBOC and HNPCC associated ovarian cancer develop along distinct genetic pathways and genetic profiles can thus be applied to distinguish between different types of hereditary ovarian cancer....... (HBOC) syndrome and the hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) syndrome. Genome-wide array comparative genomic hybridization was applied to 12 HBOC associated tumors with BRCA1 mutations and 8 HNPCC associated tumors with mismatch repair gene mutations with 24 sporadic ovarian cancers...

  12. Genetic profiles distinguish different types of hereditary ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanska, Katarina; Malander, Susanne; Staaf, Johan

    2010-01-01

    (HBOC) syndrome and the hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) syndrome. Genome-wide array comparative genomic hybridization was applied to 12 HBOC associated tumors with BRCA1 mutations and 8 HNPCC associated tumors with mismatch repair gene mutations with 24 sporadic ovarian cancers......Heredity represents the strongest risk factor for ovarian cancer with disease predisposing mutations identified in 15% of the tumors. With the aim to identify genetic classifiers for hereditary ovarian cancer, we profiled hereditary ovarian cancers linked to the hereditary breast and ovarian cancer...... that HBOC and HNPCC associated ovarian cancer develop along distinct genetic pathways and genetic profiles can thus be applied to distinguish between different types of hereditary ovarian cancer....

  13. Paediatric cardiac anaesthesia in sickle cell disease: a case series

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stem cell transplant and gene therapy are reserved for selected cases, usually when other treatment modalities have failed.12,23. Perioperative considerations. Preoperative assessment and preparation. A thorough history and examination to evaluate disease severity and the extent of end-organ damage is essential.

  14. High-Risk Cardiac Disease in Pregnancy Part II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elkayam, Uri; Goland, Sorel; Pieper, Petronella G.; Silverside, Candice K.

    2016-01-01

    Heart disease continues to be the leading cause of nonobstetric maternal morbidity and mortality. Early diagnosis and appropriate care can lead to prevention of complications and improvement of pregnancy outcome. This paper continues the review and provides recommendations for the approach to

  15. Hereditary pancreatitis: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael KL

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Kara L Raphael, Field F Willingham Division of Digestive Diseases, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA Abstract: Hereditary pancreatitis (HP is a rare cause of acute, recurrent acute, and chronic pancreatitis. It may present similarly to other causes of acute and chronic pancreatitis, and often there has been a protracted evaluation prior to the diagnosis of HP. Since it was first described in 1952, multiple genetic defects that affect the action of digestive enzymes in the pancreas have been implicated. The most common mutations involve the PRSS1, CFTR, SPINK1, and CTRC genes. New mutations in these genes and previously unrecognized mutations in other genes are being discovered due to the increasing use of next-generation genomic sequencing. While the inheritance pathways of these genetic mutations may be variable and complex, sometimes involving coinheritance of other mutations, the clinical presentation of patients tends to be similar. Interactions with environmental triggers often play a role. Patients tend to present at an early age (prior to the second decade of life and have a significantly increased risk for the development of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Patients with HP may develop sequelae of chronic pancreatitis such as strictures and fluid collections as well as exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. Management of patients with HP involves avoidance of environmental triggers, surveillance for pancreatic adenocarcinoma, medical therapy for endocrine and exocrine insufficiency, pain management, and endoscopic or surgical treatment for complications. Care for affected patients should be individualized, with an emphasis on early diagnosis and multidisciplinary involvement to develop a comprehensive treatment strategy. Keywords: pancreatic cancer, chronic pancreatitis, idiopathic pancreatitis, pancreatitis, familial pancreatitis, genetic mutations

  16. Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Myocarditis Reveals Persistent Disease Activity Despite Normalization of Cardiac Enzymes and Inflammatory Parameters at 3-Month Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Jan; Kottwitz, Jan; Baltensperger, Nora; Kissel, Christine K; Lovrinovic, Marina; Mehra, Tarun; Scherff, Frank; Schmied, Christian; Templin, Christian; Lüscher, Thomas F; Heidecker, Bettina; Manka, Robert

    2017-11-01

    There is a major unmet need to identify high-risk patients in myocarditis. Although decreasing cardiac and inflammatory markers are commonly interpreted as resolving myocarditis, this assumption has not been confirmed as of today. We sought to evaluate whether routine laboratory parameters at diagnosis predict dynamic of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) as persistent LGE has been shown to be a risk marker in myocarditis. Myocarditis was diagnosed based on clinical presentation, high-sensitivity troponin T, and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, after exclusion of obstructive coronary artery disease by angiography. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging was repeated at 3 months. LGE extent was analyzed with the software GT Volume. Change in LGE >20% was considered significant. Investigated cardiac and inflammatory markers included high-sensitivity troponin T, creatine kinase, myoglobin, N-terminal B-type natriuretic peptide, C-reactive protein, and leukocyte count. Twenty-four patients were enrolled. Absolute levels of cardiac enzymes and inflammatory markers at baseline did not predict change in LGE at 3 months. Cardiac and inflammatory markers had normalized in 21 patients (88%). LGE significantly improved in 16 patients (67%); however, it persisted to a lesser degree in 17 of them (71%) and increased in a small percentage (21%) despite normalization of cardiac enzymes. This is the first study reporting that cardiac enzymes and inflammatory parameters do not sufficiently reflect LGE in myocarditis. Although a majority of patients with normalizing laboratory markers experienced improved LGE, in a small percentage LGE worsened. These data suggest that cardiac magnetic resonance imaging might add value to currently existing diagnostic tools for risk assessment in myocarditis. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Diagnosis and Management of Hereditary Renal Cell Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menko, Fred H; Maher, Eamonn R

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell cancer (RCC) is the common denominator for a heterogeneous group of diseases. The subclassification of these tumours is based on histological type and molecular pathogenesis. Insight into molecular pathogenesis has led to the development of targeted systemic therapies. Genetic susceptibility is the principal cause of RCC in about 2-4% of cases. Hereditary RCC is the umbrella term for about a dozen different conditions, the most frequent of which is von Hippel-Lindau disease . Here, we describe the main hereditary RCC syndromes, consider criteria for referral of RCC patients for clinical genetic assessment and discuss management options for patients with hereditary RCC and their at-risk relatives.

  18. Oral health status of normal children and those affiliated with cardiac diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suma, G; Usha, Mohan Das; Ambika, G; Jairanganath

    2011-01-01

    If a child's general health is compromised, care for his/her oral and dental health becomes an absolute necessity. Children with heart diseases require special dental care because of the risk of developing infective endocarditis. Was to evaluate the oral health status, parental oral health care knowledge of the pediatric cardiac patients and non cardiac group and infective endocarditis awareness among the parents of the cardiac group. Include a total of 50 children with heart diseases and 50 non-cardiac children aged 2-12 years were examined for dental caries index and simplified debris index. A structured, administered questionnaire for parents/caregivers about knowledge of infective endocarditis and oral health were used for data collection. Showed no statistically significant differences between the caries experience score for the two groups and oral health knowledge. Knowledge about Infective Endocarditis in parents of study group was very poor. Simplified Debris Index of age group 6-12 years was higher in study groups compared to the controls. Improvements should be made in educating parents and children on the importance of caries prevention and maintaining a good oral hygiene in prevention of infective endocarditis.

  19. Cardiac Autonomic Dysfunction in Type 2 Diabetes – Effect of Hyperglycemia and Disease Duration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mika P. Tarvainen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Heart rate variability (HRV is reduced in diabetes mellitus (DM patients, suggesting dysfunction of cardiac autonomic regulation and an increased risk for cardiac events. The aim of this paper was to examine the associations of blood glucose level (BGL, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c and duration of diabetes with cardiac autonomic regulation assessed by HRV analysis. Resting electrocardiogram (ECG, recorded over 20 minutes in supine position, and clinical measurements of 189 healthy controls and 93 type 2 DM (T2DM patients were analyzed. HRV was assessed using several time-domain, frequency-domain and nonlinear methods. HRV parameters showed a clear difference between healthy controls and T2DM patients. Hyperglycemia was associated with increase in mean heart rate and decrease in HRV, indicated by negative correlations of BGL and HbA1c with mean RR interval and most of the HRV parameters. Duration of diabetes was strongly associated with decrease in HRV, the most significant decrease in HRV was found within the first 5-10 years of the disease. In conclusion, elevated blood glucose levels have an unfavorable effect on cardiac autonomic function and this effect is pronounced in long-term T2DM patients. The most significant decrease in HRV related to diabetes and thus presence of autonomic neuropathy was observed within the first 5-10 years of disease progression.

  20. HAND proteins: molecular mediators of cardiac development and congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, D

    1999-01-01

    Congenital heart defects are the clinical manifestation of anomalies in embryonic cardiac development. Such defects occur in distinct regions or chambers of the heart. A molecular framework in which to consider cardiac development and congenital heart disease in a segmental fashion has begun to emerge. dHAND and eHAND are two related basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors that are expressed in a complementary fashion in the developing right and left ventricles, respectively. They are also expressed in the neural crest-derived cardiac outflow tract and aortic arch arteries. Targeted mutations of dHAND and eHAND in mice have revealed novel pathways of organogenesis in mesodermal and neural crest derivatives. dHAND mutants exhibit hypoplasia of the right ventricle, branchial arches, and aortic arch arteries. The distinct nature of cardiac defects in dHAND mutants provides an entry into dissecting molecular pathways governing morphogenesis of specific components of the heart. Congenital heart disease is considered as a defect in segmental development of the heart and the role of dHAND and eHAND in regulating such developmental pathways in normal and abnormal cardiogenesis is examined.

  1. Genotype–phenotype correlations in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tońska, Katarzyna; Kodroń, Agata; Bartnik, Ewa

    2010-01-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON), acute or subacute vision loss due to retinal ganglion cell death which in the long run leads to optic nerve atrophy is one of the most widely studied maternally inherited diseases caused...

  2. Cardiac troponin I is associated with severity of myxomatous mitral valve disease, age, and C-reactive protein in dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ljungvall, L.; Höglund, K.; Tidholm, A.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Concentrations of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) and C-reactive protein (CRP) might be associated with cardiac remodeling in dogs with myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD). Age- and sex-dependent variations in cTnI concentration have been described. OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether plas...

  3. Relationship between epicardial adipose tissue and subclinical coronary artery disease in patients with extra-cardiac arterial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Dekker, M A M; Takashima, R; van den Heuvel, E R; van den Dungen, J J A M; Tio, R A; Oudkerk, M; Vliegenthart, R

    2014-01-01

    Epicardial adipose tissue (EAT) and mediastinal adipose tissue (MAT) are linked to coronary artery disease (CAD). The association between EAT, MAT, and severity of CAD in known extra-cardiac arterial disease was investigated. Sixty-five cardiac asymptomatic patients (mean age 65 ± 8 years, 69% male) with peripheral arterial disease, carotid stenosis, or aortic aneurysm underwent coronary computed tomography angiography. Patients were divided into non-significant (cardiovascular risk factors. Median EAT was 99.5, 98.0, and 112.0 cm(3) (P = 0.38) and median MAT was 66.0, 90.0, and 81.0 cm(3) (P = 0.53) for non-significant, single vessel, and multi-vessel CAD, respectively. In age- and gender-adjusted analysis, only EAT was significantly associated with CAD (odds ratio [OR] 1.12 [95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.25] per 10 cm(3) increase in EAT; P = 0.04). This remained in multivariate-adjusted analysis (OR 1.21 [1.04-1.39]; P = 0.01). In patients with known extra-cardiac arterial disease, CAD is correlated with EAT, but not with MAT. These results suggest that EAT has a local effect on coronary atherosclerosis, apart from the endocrine effect of visceral fat. © 2013 The Obesity Society.

  4. Stress, anxiety and depression in heart disease patients: A major challenge for cardiac rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvet-Gelinier, Jean-Christophe; Bonin, Bernard

    2017-01-01

    Cardiovascular events and emotional disorders share a common epidemiology, thus suggesting fundamental pathways linking these different diseases. Growing evidence in the literature highlights the influence of psychological determinants in somatic diseases. A patient's socio-economic aspects, personality traits, health behavior and even biological pathways may contribute to the course of cardiovascular disease. Cardiac events often occur suddenly and the episode can be traumatic for people not prepared for such an event. In this review of the literature, the authors tackle the question of psychobiological mechanisms of stress, in a pathophysiological approach to fundamental pathways linking the brain to the heart. Various psychological, biological and genetic arguments are presented in support of the hypothesis that various etiological mechanisms may be involved. The authors finally deal with biological and psychological strategies in a context of cardiovascular disease. Indeed, in this context, cardiac rehabilitation, with its global approach, seems to be a good time to diagnose emotional disorders like anxiety and depression, and to help people to cope with stressful events. In this field, cardiac rehabilitation seems to be a crucial step in order to improve patients' outcomes, by helping them to understand the influence of psychobiological risk factors, and to build strategies in order to manage daily stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Tai Chi Chuan for Cardiac Rehabilitation in Patients with Coronary Arterial Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosane Maria Nery

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Several studies have shown that Tai Chi Chuan can improve cardiac function in patients with heart disease. Objective: To conduct a systematic review of the literature to assess the effects of Tai Chi Chuan on cardiac rehabilitation for patients with coronary artery disease. Methods: We performed a search for studies published in English, Portuguese and Spanish in the following databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS and Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials. Data were extracted in a standardized manner by three independent investigators, who were responsible for assessing the methodological quality of the manuscripts. Results: The initial search found 201 studies that, after review of titles and abstracts, resulted in a selection of 12 manuscripts. They were fully analyzed and of these, nine were excluded. As a final result, three randomized controlled trials remained. The studies analyzed in this systematic review included patients with a confirmed diagnosis of coronary artery disease, all were clinically stable and able to exercise. The three experiments had a control group that practiced structured exercise training or received counseling for exercise. Follow-up ranged from 2 to 12 months. Conclusion: Preliminary evidence suggests that Tai Chi Chuan can be an unconventional form of cardiac rehabilitation, being an adjunctive therapy in the treatment of patients with stable coronary artery disease. However, the methodological quality of the included articles and the small sample sizes clearly indicate that new randomized controlled trials are needed in this regard.

  6. Development and evaluation of a questionnaire for assessment of health-related quality of life in cats with cardiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Lisa M; Rush, John E; Oyama, Mark A; MacDonald, Kristin A; Cunningham, Suzanne M; Bulmer, Barret; MacGregor, John M; Laste, Nancy J; Malakoff, Rebecca L; Hall, Daniel J; Trafny, Dennis J

    2012-05-15

    To develop, validate, and evaluate a questionnaire (Cats' Assessment Tool for Cardiac Health [CATCH] questionnaire) for assessing health-related quality of life in cats with cardiac disease. Prospective study. 275 cats with cardiac disease. The questionnaire was developed on the basis of clinical signs of cardiac disease in cats. A CATCH score was calculated by summing responses to questionnaire items; possible scores ranged from 0 to 80. For questionnaire validation, owners of 75 cats were asked to complete the questionnaire (10 owners completed the questionnaire twice). Disease severity was assessed with the International Small Animal Cardiac Health Council (ISACHC) classification for cardiac disease. Following validation, the final questionnaire was administered to owners of the remaining 200 cats. Internal consistency of the questionnaire was good, and the CATCH score was significantly correlated with ISACHC classification. For owners that completed the questionnaire twice, scores were significantly correlated. During the second phase of the study, the CATCH score ranged from 0 to 74 (median, 7) and was significantly correlated with ISACHC classification. Results suggested that the CATCH questionnaire is a valid and reliable method for assessing health-related quality of life in cats with cardiac disease. Further research is warranted to test the tool's sensitivity to changes in medical treatment and its potential role as a clinical and research tool.

  7. [Lipids and apoproteins in the blood plasma of children with a hereditary disposition to ischemic heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aĭngorn, E D; Metel'skaia, V A; Chernysheva, N P; Dorofeeva, T G; Grigor'eva, I V

    1985-05-01

    An investigation of children with aggravated heredity (coronary disease), and those with vegetovascular dystonia whose parents had no clinically apparent coronary disease demonstrated unidirectional shifts in the lipoprotein system of the two samples as compared to the controls: increased cholesterol levels in low-density lipoproteins and lowered cholesterol in high-density lipoproteins and apoprotein A1. In children with aggravated heredity, these changes are also associated with vegetovascular dystonia, whereas in the absence of the latter they are not apparent or minimal. At the same time, certain differences in cholesterol distribution over lipoprotein fractions and protein/lipid ratios suggest that mechanisms of changes are not identical in children with aggravated heredity and those free from it.

  8. A Study on Oral Health of Children with Cardiac Diseases in Mashhad, Iran in 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mahmoudi

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available

    Background and aims. Preventing oral disease is the most desirable way of ensuring good dental health for children with heart disease. Dental and gingival infections in patients with cardiac problems may lead to infective endocarditis. The aim of this study was to evaluate oral and dental health status in children with heart disease referred to a cardiac center compared with the control group.

    Materials and Methods. In this descriptive cross-sectional study, case group consisting of 100 patients 2-12 years old with heart disease were examined for oral and dental status in Pediatric Cardiac Center in Mashhad, Iran, in 2004. Fifty healthy children with the same age as the case group referring to the Department of Pedodontics, Mashhad Faculty of Dentistry served as the control group. For each patient, dental and medical history, dmft, DMFT, debris index, tooth brushing status as well as parental knowledge of infective endocarditis and their economic status was registered on a questionnaire. Statistical analysis was performed using Kruskal-Wallis, chi-square and t-tests.

    Results. There were no significant differences between case and control groups in dmft (3.92 ± 3.99 and 3.54 ± 3.33, respectively, DMFT (3.7 ± 4 and 1.47 ± 1.72, respectively and their components. Tooth brushing status and debris index were significantly worse in the study group (P = 0.001 and P = 0.008, respectively. 35% of parents were aware of the importance of good oral health in cardiac children although none of them knew about infective endocarditis. Most of the parents in study group had low (30% to medium (53% economic status.

    Conclusion. In this study, the children with cardiac disease did not have a good oral and dental health status. Developing strategies toward preventive dental care of children with cardiac problems and informing their parents is suggested.

  9. Cardiac Events and the Maximum Diameter of Coronary Artery Aneurysms in Kawasaki Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, Etsuko; Tsujii, Nobuyuki; Hayama, Yosuke

    2017-09-01

    To clarify the occurrence of cardiac events based on the maximal diameter of the maximal coronary artery aneurysm (CAA) in Kawasaki disease (KD). Two hundred fourteen patients (160 male and 54 female) who had had at least 1 CAA in the selective coronary angiogram less than 100 days after the onset of KD were studied. We measured the maximal CAA diameters in the major branches of the initial coronary angiograms. Death, myocardial infarction and coronary artery revascularization were included as cardiac events in this study. We divided the patients into three groups based on the maximal CAA diameter (large ≥8.0 mm; medium ≥6.0 mm and events based on laterality of maximal CAA (bilateral, unilateral) and body surface area (BSA). Cardiac events occurred in 44 patients (21%). For BSA event-free survival in the large and medium groups was 66% (n = 38, 95% CI, 49-80) and 62% (n = 27, 95% CI, 38-81), respectively. For BSA ≥ 0.50 m2, that in large group was 54% (n = 58, 95% CI, 40-67). There were no cardiac events in the medium group for BSA ≥0.50 m2 (n = 36) and the small group (n = 56). In the large analyzed group, the 30-year cardiac event-free survival in the bilateral and unilateral groups was 40% (n = 48, 95% CI, 27-55) and 78% (n = 48, 95% CI, 63-89), respectively (P events was the patient group with the maximal CAA diameter ≥6.0 mm with BSA event-free survival was about 60%. Given the high rate of cardiac events in this patient population, life-long cardiovascular surveillance is advised. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Cardiac surgery in octogenarians--a better prognosis in coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrah, Rabin; Izhar, Uzi; Elami, Amir; Milgalter, Eli; Rudis, Ehud; Merin, Gideon

    2003-10-01

    Cardiac surgery is being performed with increasing frequency in patients aged 80 years and older. To examine the long and short-term results of surgery in this age group. We retrospectively investigated 202 consecutive patients aged 80 years or older who underwent cardiac surgery between 1991 and 1999, Ninety-six operations (48%) were urgent. The study group comprised 140 men (69%) and 62 women (31%) with a mean age of 82.1 years (range 80-89). Preoperatively, 120 patients (59%) had unstable angina, 37 (18%) had left main coronary artery disease, 22 (11%) had renal failure, 17 (8.5%) had a history of stroke and 13 (6.5%) had previous cardiac surgery. Hospital mortality for the whole group was 7.4%. Postoperative complications included: re-exploration for bleeding in 15 (7.4%), stroke in 8 (4%), sternal wound infection in 3 (1.5%), low cardiac output in 17 (8.4%), new Q wave myocardial infarction in 5 (2.5%), renal failure in 17 (8.5%), and atrial fibrillation in 71 (35%). The actuarial survival for patients discharged from the hospital was 66% at 5 years and 46% at 8 years. The type of surgical procedure was significantly associated with increased early mortality (coronary artery bypass grafting only in 2.9%, CABG + valve in 16.1%, valve only in 16.7%; P = 0.01). Significant predictors (P < 0.05) for late mortality included type of surgical procedure, congestive heart failure, and postoperative low cardiac output. When appropriately applied in selected octogenarians, cardiac surgery can be performed with acceptable mortality and good long-term results.

  11. PROGNOSTIC VALUE OF SOLUBLE CD40 LIGAND AFTER LIVER TRANSPLANTATION IN CHILDREN WITH CONGENITAL AND HEREDITARY DISEASES OF HEPATOBILIARY SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. P. Shevchenko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate plasma levels of sCD40L in children before and after living donor liver transplantation (LDLT and its prognostic value with postoperative course. The study included 67 children with end-stage liver disease (ESLD, aged from 4 to 36 months before and after LDLT, 25 healthy children aged from 7 to 24 months and 38 adult living-related liver donors, aged from 18 to 56 years. In children with ESLD pre-transplant plasma level of sCD40L (3.3 ± 2.2 ng/ml did not differ in children with and without liver disease but were significantly higher in patients with end-stage liver disease than in donors (4.1 ± 2.3 ng/ml and 1.07 ± 1.1 ng/ml, resp., p < 0.01. Graft dysfunction frequency was significantly higher in recipients with high sCD40L level (≥3.3 ng/ml. A mea- surement of pre-transplant sCD40L concentrations might be useful to identify patients with ESLD at high risk for graft dysfunction development. 

  12. Distribution of beta/A4 protein and amyloid precursor protein in hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis-Dutch type and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozemuller, A J; Roos, R A; Bots, G T; Kamphorst, W; Eikelenboom, P; Van Nostrand, W E

    1993-05-01

    Brain amyloidosis with abundant beta/A4 protein deposition in plaques and cortical and meningeal vessels is found in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis-Dutch type (HCHWA-D). In contrast to AD, no neuritic pathology or classical congophilic plaques are found in HCHWA-D. Unlike most AD cases, the congophilic angiopathy in HCHWA-D is very severe. It is still unknown whether beta/A4 deposits in plaques and vessels have the same origin. In this study, we have used frozen cortical tissue of HCHWA-D and AD patients to investigate the beta/A4 amyloid protein and the amyloid precursor protein (APP) in different types of plaques and congophilic angiopathy. Immunohistochemical staining was conducted using antibodies against synthetic beta/A4 proteins and antibodies against APP including MAbP2-1, a monoclonal antibody against purified protease nexin-2, which is the secreted form of APP. In contrast to immunohistochemical studies on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue, frozen tissue of HCHWA-D patients revealed a very high number of beta/A4 plaques resembling AD. All plaques were of the diffuse type. Double-staining with MabP2-1 and beta/A4 antisera revealed: 1) the presence of APP immunoreactivity in classical plaques and transitional forms; 2) the absence of APP immunoreactivity in diffuse plaques in HCHWA-D and AD; and 3) pronounced APP immunoreactivity in congophilic vessels in HCHWA-D in contrast to weak APP staining in congophilic vessels in AD. Together these findings suggest that: a) the presence of APP in plaques is related to neuritic changes; b) different processes occur in amyloid formation in plaques and vessels; and c) differences exist between the process of amyloid formation in HCHWA-D and AD.

  13. Cardiac surgery in patients with end-stage renal disease on dialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bäck, Caroline; Hornum, Mads; Møller, Christian Joost Holdflod

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Over the past decade, the number of patients on dialysis and with cardiovascular diseases has steadily increased. This retrospective analysis compares the postoperative mortality after cardiac surgery between patients on hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis. METHODS: Between 1998...... and 2015, 136 patients with end-stage renal disease initiating dialysis more than one month before surgery underwent cardiac surgery. Demographics, preoperative hemodynamic and biochemical data were collected from the patient records. Vital status and date of death was retrieved from a national register....... RESULTS: Hemodialysis was undertaken in 73% and peritoneal dialysis in 22% of patients aged 59.7 ± 12.9 years, mean EuroSCORE 8.6% ± 3.5. Isolated coronary artery bypass graft was performed in 46%, isolated valve procedure in 29% and combined procedures in 24% with no significant statistical difference...

  14. Sumoylation in gene regulation and cardiac disease: potential for drug discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beketaev I

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Ilimbek Beketaev, Jun Wang Center for Stem Cell Engineering, Department of Basic Research Laboratories, Texas Heart Institute at St Luke’s Episcopal Hospital, Houston, TX, USA Abstract: Small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO proteins are members of ubiquitin-like super-family proteins that can be covalently conjugated to their targets through multistep enzymatic reactions. Sumoylation has caught much attention due to its versatility, wide involvement in cellular events, and disease association. Sumoylation has been well studied at cellular and molecular levels. A newly emerging role that SUMO conjugation plays is in cardiac pathophysiology. In this review we will update new advances in the study of implications of the sumoylation pathway in the pathogenesis of cardiac diseases, discuss promise of the SUMO pathway as a potential therapeutic target, and conclude with future directions for SUMO research in the heart field. Keywords: posttranslational modification, SUMO, SENP, heart

  15. Managing hereditary ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mourits, M. J.; de Bock, G. H.

    2009-01-01

    In this review we present an overview of recent developments in the management of hereditary ovarian cancer. Until recently, intensive screening of the ovaries was recommended to mutation carriers and their first-degree female relatives. However, since screening is not effective in detecting

  16. Hereditary periodic fever syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McDermott, MF; Frenkel, J

    Hereditary periodic fever syndromes are defined by recurrent attacks of generalised inflammation for which no infectious or auto-immune cause can be identified. For most of these disorders, the molecular basis has recently been elucidated. This has opened the prospect of novel therapeutic

  17. Innovations in management of cardiac disease: drugs, treatment strategies and technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foëx, P

    2017-12-01

    Within the last generation, the management of patients with heart disease has been transformed by advances in drug treatments, interventions and diagnostic technologies. The management of arterial hypertension saw beta-blockers demoted from first- to third-line treatment. Recent studies suggest that the goal of treatment may have to change to lower systolic blood pressures to prevent long-term organ damage. Today less than 15% of coronary revascularizations are surgical and more than 85% are done by interventional cardiologists inserting coronary stents. Thus, managing patients on dual antiplatelet therapy has become an important issue. With new generations of coronary stents, recommendations are changing fast. In the past, decisions concerning non-cardiac surgery after acute myocardial infarction were based on the delay between infarction and non-cardiac surgery. Today, the main concern is the patient's status in respect of dual antiplatelet therapy after primary percutaneous intervention. There have been advances in the management of heart failure but new drugs (ivabradine, sacubitril/valsartan) and cardiac resynchronization are recommended only in patients with an ejection fraction below 35% on optimal medication. Heart failure remains a major perioperative risk factor. Prospective studies have shown that troponin elevations represent myocardial injury (not necessarily myocardial infarction), are mostly silent and are associated with increased 30-day mortality. Monitoring (troponin assays) for myocardial injury in non-cardiac surgery (MINS) seems increasingly justified. The treatment of MINS needs further research. Technological advances, such as intelligent, portable monitors benefit not only patients with cardiac disease but all patients who have undergone major surgery and are on the wards postoperatively. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please

  18. Treatment with Fenofibrate plus a low dose of Benznidazole attenuates cardiac dysfunction in experimental Chagas disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ágata C. Cevey

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi induces serious cardiac alterations during the chronic infection. Intense inflammatory response observed from the beginning of infection, is critical for the control of parasite proliferation and evolution of Chagas disease. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR-α, are known to modulate inflammation.In this study we investigated whether a PPAR-α agonist, Fenofibrate, improves cardiac function and inflammatory parameters in a murine model of T. cruzi infection. BALB/c mice were sequentially infected with two T. cruzi strains of different genetic background. Benznidazole, commonly used as trypanocidal drug, cleared parasites but did not preclude cardiac pathology, resembling what is found in human chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy. Fenofibrate treatment restored to normal values the ejection and shortening fractions, left ventricular end-diastolic, left ventricular end-systolic diameter, and isovolumic relaxation time. Moreover, it reduced cardiac inflammation and fibrosis, decreased the expression of pro-inflammatory (IL-6, TNF-α and NOS2 and heart remodeling mediators (MMP-9 and CTGF, and reduced serum creatine kinase activity. The fact that Fenofibrate partially inhibited NOS2 expression and NO release in the presence of a PPAR-α non-competitive inhibitor, suggested it also acted through PPAR-α-independent pathways. Since IκBα cytosolic degradation was inhibited by Fenofibrate, it can be concluded that the NFκB pathway has a role in its effects. Thus, we demonstrate that Fenofibrate acts through PPAR-α-dependent and -independent pathways.Our study shows that combined treatment with Fenofibrate plus Benznidazole is able both to reverse the cardiac dysfunction associated with the ongoing inflammatory response and fibrosis and to attain parasite clearance in an experimental model of Chagas disease. Keywords: Trypanosoma cruzi, Heart dysfunction, PPAR-α, Fenofibrate treatment, Inflammatory

  19. Evaluation of Right Ventricular Systolic Function in Chagas Disease Using Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Henrique T; Volpe, Gustavo J; Marin-Neto, José A; Ambale-Venkatesh, Bharath; Nwabuo, Chike C; Trad, Henrique S; Romano, Minna M D; Pazin-Filho, Antonio; Maciel, Benedito C; Lima, João A C; Schmidt, André

    2017-03-01

    Right ventricular (RV) impairment is postulated to be responsible for prominent systemic congestion in Chagas disease. However, occurrence of primary RV dysfunction in Chagas disease remains controversial. We aimed to study RV systolic function in patients with Chagas disease using cardiac magnetic resonance. This cross-sectional study included 158 individuals with chronic Chagas disease who underwent cardiac magnetic resonance. RV systolic dysfunction was defined as reduced RV ejection fraction based on predefined cutoffs accounting for age and sex. Multivariable logistic regression was used to verify the relationship of RV systolic dysfunction with age, sex, functional class, use of medications for heart failure, atrial fibrillation, and left ventricular systolic dysfunction. Mean age was 54±13 years, 51.2% men. RV systolic dysfunction was identified in 58 (37%) individuals. Although usually associated with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction, isolated RV systolic dysfunction was found in 7 (4.4%) patients, 2 of them in early stages of Chagas disease. Presence of RV dysfunction was not significantly different in patients with indeterminate/digestive form of Chagas disease (35.7%) compared with those with Chagas cardiomyopathy (36.8%) ( P =1.000). In chronic Chagas disease, RV systolic dysfunction is more commonly associated with left ventricular systolic dysfunction, although isolated and early RV dysfunction can also be identified. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Location of cardiac arrest and impact of pre-arrest chronic disease and medication use on survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granfeldt, Asger; Wissenberg, Mads; Hansen, Steen Møller; Lippert, Freddy K; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Christensen, Erika Frischknecht; Christiansen, Christian Fynbo

    2017-05-01

    Cardiac arrest in a private location is associated with a higher mortality when compared to public location. Past studies have not accounted for pre-arrest factors such as chronic disease and medication. To investigate whether the association between cardiac arrest in a private location and a higher mortality can be explained by differences in chronic diseases and medication. We identified 27,771 out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients ≥18 years old from the Danish Cardiac Arrest Registry (2001-2012). Using National Registries, we identified pre-arrest chronic disease and medication. To investigate the importance of cardiac arrest related factors and chronic disease and medication use we performed adjusted Cox regression analyses during day 0-7 and day 8-365 following cardiac arrest to calculate hazard ratios (HR) for death. Day 0-7: Un-adjusted HR for death day 0-7 was 1.21 (95%CI:1.18-1.25) in private compared to public location. When including cardiac arrest related factors HR for death was 1.09 (95%CI:1.06-1.12). Adding chronic disease and medication to the analysis changed HR for death to 1.08 (95%CI:1.05-1.12). 8-365 day: The un-adjusted HR for death day 8-365 was 1.70 (95% CI: 1.43-2.02) in private compared to public location. When including cardiac arrest related factors the HR decreased to 1.39 (95% CI: 1.14-1.68). Adding chronic disease and medication to the analysis changed HR for death to 1.27 (95% CI:1.04-1.54). The higher mortality following cardiac arrest in a private location is partly explained by a higher prevalence of chronic disease and medication use in patients surviving until day 8. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Cardiac MR imaging in arrhythmogenic heart diseases; Kardiale MRT in der Diagnostik arrhythmogener Herzerkrankungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehm, C.K.; Dinter, D.J.; Diehl, S.J.; Neff, K.W. [Universitaetsklinikum Mannheim, Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Mannheim (Germany); Papavassiliu, T.; Borggrefe, M. [Universitaetsklinikum Mannheim, Medizinische Klinik, Mannheim (Germany)

    2007-04-15

    Cardiac arrhythmias are assessed with a combination of history, clinical examination, electrocardiogram, Holter monitor, if necessary supplemented by invasive cardiac electrophysiology. In ischemic heart disease (IHD) coronary angiography is performed in addition. Echocardiography is usually the primary imaging modality. MRI is increasingly recognized as an important investigation allowing more accurate cardiac morphological and functional assessment. Approximately one-fifth of deaths in Western countries are due to sudden cardiac death, 80% of which are caused by arrhythmias. Typical causes range from diseases with high prevalence (IHD in men 30%) to myocarditis (prevalence 1-9%) and rare cardiomyopathies (prevalence HCM 0.2%, ARVC 0.02%, Brugada syndrome approx. 0.5%). The characteristic MRI features of arrhythmogenic diseases and the new aspects of characteristic distribution of late enhancement allow etiologic classification and differential diagnosis. MRI represents an important tool for detection of the underlying cause and for risk stratification in many diseases associated with arrhythmias. (orig.) [German] Herzrhythmusstoerungen werden durch die Zusammenschau von Anamnese, klinischer Untersuchung, Elektrokardiogramm, Langzeit-EKG sowie ggf. einer invasiven elektrophysiologischen Untersuchung beurteilt. Bei der koronaren Herzerkrankung (KHK) erfolgt zusaetzlich eine Koronarangiographie. Die Echokardiographie stellt das primaere bildgebende Verfahren dar. Die MRT des Herzens ermoeglicht eine genauere morphologische und funktionelle Darstellung des Herzens und gewinnt damit zunehmend an Bedeutung. Etwa jeder 5. Todesfall in westlichen Industriestaaten ist auf einen ploetzlichen Herztod zurueckzufuehren, davon sind ca. 80% durch Herzrhythmusstoerungen verursacht. Typische Ursachen reichen von Krankheiten mit hoher Praevalenz (KHK bei Maennern 30%) ueber Myokarditiden (Praevalenz 1-9%) bis zu selteneren Kardiomyopathien (Praevalenz HCM 0,2%, ARVC 0,02%, Brugada

  2. Exercise Training and Cardiac Rehabilitation in Primary and Secondary Prevention of Coronary Heart Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Lavie, Carl J.; Thomas, Randal J.; Squires, Ray W.; Allison, Thomas G.; Milani, Richard V.

    2009-01-01

    Substantial data have established a sedentary lifestyle as a major modifiable risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD). Increased levels of physical activity, exercise training, and overall cardiorespiratory fitness have provided protection in the primary and secondary prevention of CHD. This review surveys data from observational studies supporting the benefits of physical activity, exercise training, and overall cardiorespiratory fitness in primary prevention. Clearly, cardiac rehabilit...

  3. The left ventricular eccentricity as a predictor of postoperative cardiac performance in valvular heart diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teramoto, S; Sano, S; Aokage, K; Shigenobu, M; Murakami, T; Kawakami, S; Nawa, S; Senoo, Y

    1982-04-01

    A clear correlation expressed by the following equation was observed between the preoperative left ventricular end-systolic eccentricity (epsilon s) and the percentage change of the left ventricular dimension (% delta D) in chronic valvular heart diseases: % delta D = 88.37 epsilon s - 48.16 (r = 0.66, p less than 0.001). Therefore, epsilon s may function as an index for predicting the postoperative cardiac performance independent of the affected valvular locations and the morphology of the lesions.

  4. The Impact of Cardiac Diseases during Pregnancy on Severe Maternal Morbidity and Mortality in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanharo, Felipe F; Cecatti, Jose G; Haddad, Samira M; Parpinelli, Mary A; Born, Daniel; Costa, Maria L; Mattar, Rosiane

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate maternal heart disease as a cause or complicating factor for severe morbidity in the setting of the Brazilian Network for Surveillance of Severe Maternal Morbidity. Secondary data analysis of this multicenter cross-sectional study was implemented in 27 referral obstetric units in Brazil. From July 2009 to June 2010, a prospective surveillance was conducted among all delivery hospitalizations to identify cases of severe maternal morbidity (SMM), including Potentially Life-Threatening Conditions (PLTC) and Maternal Near Miss (MNM), using the new criteria established by the WHO. The variables studied included: sociodemographic characteristics, clinical and obstetric history of the women; perinatal outcome and the occurrence of maternal outcomes (PLTC, MNM, MD) between groups of cardiac and non-cardiac patients. Only heart conditions with hemodynamic impact characterizing severity of maternal morbidity were considered. 9555 women were included in the Network with severe pregnancy-related complications: 770 maternal near miss cases and 140 maternal death cases. A total of 293 (3.6%) cases were related to heart disease and the condition was known before pregnancy in 82.6% of cases. Maternal near miss occurred in 15% of cardiac disease patients (most due to clinical-surgical causes, pmorbidity.

  5. Assessment of coronary artery disease by post-mortem cardiac MR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruder, Thomas D., E-mail: thomas.ruder@irm.uzh.ch [Center of Forensic Imaging and Virtopsy, Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Bern, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland); Forensic Medicine and Radiology, Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Zuerich, CH-8057 Zuerich (Switzerland); Bauer-Kreutz, Regula [Department of Forensic Pathology, Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Bern, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland); Ampanozi, Garyfalia [Forensic Medicine and Radiology, Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Zuerich, CH-8057 Zuerich (Switzerland); Rosskopf, Andrea B. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital, CH-3010 Bern (Switzerland); Pilgrim, Thomas M. [Swiss Cardiovascular Center Bern, University Hospital, CH-3010 Bern (Switzerland); Weber, Oliver M. [Siemens Switzerland AG, Healthcare Sector, CH-3007 Bern (Switzerland); Thali, Michael J. [Forensic Medicine and Radiology, Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Zuerich, CH-8057 Zuerich (Switzerland); Hatch, Gary M. [Center of Forensic Imaging and Virtopsy, Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Bern, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland)

    2012-09-15

    Objectives: Minimally invasive or virtual autopsies are being advocated as alternative to traditional autopsy, but have limited abilities to detect coronary artery disease. It was the objective of this study to assess if the occurrence of chemical shift artifacts (CSA) along the coronary arteries on non-contrast, post-mortem cardiac MR may be used to investigate coronary artery disease. Methods: We retrospectively compared autopsy and CT findings of 30 cases with significant (≥75%), insignificant (<75%), or absent coronary artery stenosis to post-mortem cardiac MR findings. The chi-square test was used to investigate if the occurrence of CSA depends on the presence or absence of stenosis. Sensitivity, specificity and predictive values were calculated for each finding. Results: CSA indicates the absence of (significant) stenosis (p < 0.001). The occurrence of paired dark bands in lieu of CSA on post-mortem cardiac MR suggests (significant) coronary arteries stenosis (p < 0.001). Both findings have a high specificity but low sensitivity. Conclusions: CSA is a marker of vessel patency. The presence of paired dark bands indicates stenosis. These criteria improve the ability of minimally invasive or virtual autopsy to detect coronary artery disease related deaths.

  6. Home-based cardiac rehabilitation is an attractive alternative to no cardiac rehabilitation for elderly patients with coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oerkild, Bodil; Frederiksen, Marianne; Hansen, Jorgen Fischer

    2012-01-01

    To compare home-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) with usual care (control group with no rehabilitation) in elderly patients who declined participation in centre-based CR.......To compare home-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) with usual care (control group with no rehabilitation) in elderly patients who declined participation in centre-based CR....

  7. Top-down Mass Spectrometry of Cardiac Myofilament Proteins in Health and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Peng; Serife, Ayaz-Guner; Deyang, Yu; Ying, Ge

    2014-01-01

    Myofilaments are composed of thin and thick filaments which coordinate with each other to regulate muscle contraction and relaxation. Posttranslational modifications (PTMs) together with genetic variations and alternative splicing of the myofilament proteins play essential roles in regulating cardiac contractility in health and disease. Therefore, a comprehensive characterization of the myofilament proteins in physiological and pathological conditions is essential for better understanding the molecular basis of cardiac function and dysfunction. Due to the vast complexity and dynamic nature of proteins, it is challenging to obtain a holistic view of myofilament protein modifications. In recent years, top-down mass spectrometry (MS) has emerged as a powerful approach to study isoform composition and PTMs of proteins owing to its advantage of complete sequence coverage and its ability to identify PTMs and sequence variants without a priori knowledge. In this review, we will discuss the application of top-down MS to study cardiac myofilaments and highlight the insights it provides into the understanding of molecular mechanisms in contractile dysfunction of heart failure. Particularly, recent results of cardiac troponin and tropomyosin modifications will be elaborated. The limitations and perspectives on the use of top-down MS for myofilament protein characterization will also be briefly discussed. PMID:24945106

  8. MicroRNAs Association in the Cardiac Hypertrophy Secondary to Complex Congenital Heart Disease in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Gómez, Ma C; García-Mejía, K A; Pérez-Díaz Conti, M; Díaz-Rosas, G; Palma-Lara, I; Sánchez-Urbina, R; Klünder-Klünder, M; Botello-Flores, J A; Balderrábano-Saucedo, N A; Contreras-Ramos, A

    2017-06-01

    Complex congenital heart disease (CHD) affects cardiac blood flow, generating a pressure overload in the compromised ventricles and provoking hypertrophy that over time will induce myocardial dysfunction and cause a potential risk of imminent death. Therefore, the early diagnosis of complex CHD is paramount during the first year of life, with surgical treatment of patients favoring survival. In the present study, we analyzed cardiac tissue and plasma of children with cardiac hypertrophy (CH) secondary to CHD for the expression of 11 miRNAs specific to CH in adults. The results were compared with the miRNA expression patterns in tissue and blood of healthy children. In this way, we determined that miRNAs 1, 18b, 21, 23b, 133a, 195, and 208b constitute the expression profile of the cardiac tissue of children with CHD. Meanwhile, miRNAs 21, 23a, 23b, and 24 can be considered specific biomarkers for the diagnosis of CH in infants with CHD. These results suggest that CH secondary to CHD in children differs in its mechanism from that described for adult hypertrophy, offering a new perspective to study the development of this pathology and to determine the potential of hypertrophic miRNAs to be biomarkers for early CH.

  9. Top-down mass spectrometry of cardiac myofilament proteins in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ying; Ayaz-Guner, Serife; Yu, Deyang; Ge, Ying

    2014-08-01

    Myofilaments are composed of thin and thick filaments that coordinate with each other to regulate muscle contraction and relaxation. PTMs together with genetic variations and alternative splicing of the myofilament proteins play essential roles in regulating cardiac contractility in health and disease. Therefore, a comprehensive characterization of the myofilament proteins in physiological and pathological conditions is essential for better understanding the molecular basis of cardiac function and dysfunction. Due to the vast complexity and dynamic nature of proteins, it is challenging to obtain a holistic view of myofilament protein modifications. In recent years, top-down MS has emerged as a powerful approach to study isoform composition and PTMs of proteins owing to its advantage of complete sequence coverage and its ability to identify PTMs and sequence variants without a priori knowledge. In this review, we will discuss the application of top-down MS to the study of cardiac myofilaments and highlight the insights it provides into the understanding of molecular mechanisms in contractile dysfunction of heart failure. Particularly, recent results of cardiac troponin and tropomyosin modifications will be elaborated. The limitations and perspectives on the use of top-down MS for myofilament protein characterization will also be briefly discussed. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Rare Titin (TTN Variants in Diseases Associated with Sudden Cardiac Death

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    Oscar Campuzano

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A leading cause of death in western countries is sudden cardiac death, and can be associated with genetic disease. Next-generation sequencing has allowed thorough analysis of genes associated with this entity, including, most recently, titin. We aimed to identify potentially pathogenic genetic variants in titin. A total of 1126 samples were analyzed using a custom sequencing panel including major genes related to sudden cardiac death. Our cohort was divided into three groups: 432 cases from patients with cardiomyopathies, 130 cases from patients with channelopathies, and 564 post-mortem samples from individuals showing anatomical healthy hearts and non-conclusive causes of death after comprehensive autopsy. None of the patients included had definite pathogenic variants in the genes analyzed by our custom cardio-panel. Retrospective analysis comparing the in-house database and available public databases also was performed. We identified 554 rare variants in titin, 282 of which were novel. Seven were previously reported as pathogenic. Of these 554 variants, 493 were missense variants, 233 of which were novel. Of all variants identified, 399 were unique and 155 were identified at least twice. No definite pathogenic variants were identified in any of genes analyzed. We identified rare, mostly novel, titin variants that seem to play a potentially pathogenic role in sudden cardiac death. Additional studies should be performed to clarify the role of these variants in sudden cardiac death.

  11. Cardiac resynchronisation therapy in paediatric and congenital heart disease : differential effects in various anatomical and functional substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janousek, J.; Gebauer, R. A.; Abdul-Khaliq, H.; Turner, M.; Kornyei, L.; Grollmuss, O.; Rosenthal, E.; Villain, E.; Frueh, A.; Paul, T.; Blom, N. A.; Happonen, J-M; Bauersfeld, U.; Jacobsen, J. R.; van den Heuvel, F.; Delhaas, T.; Papagiannis, J.; Trigo, C.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) is increasingly used in children in a variety of anatomical and pathophysiological conditions, but published data are scarce. Objective: To record current practice and results of CRT in paediatric and congenital heart disease. Design: Retrospective

  12. Screening for Ischemic Heart Disease with Cardiac CT: Current Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J. Budoff

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of mortality in the US and worldwide, and no widespread screening for this number one killer has been implemented. Traditional risk factor assessment does not fully account for the coronary risk and underestimates the prediction of risk even in patients with established risk factors for atherosclerosis. Coronary artery calcium (CAC represents calcified atherosclerosis in the coronary arteries. It has been shown to be the strongest predictor of adverse future cardiovascular events and provides incremental information to the traditional risk factors. CAC consistently outperforms traditional risk factors, including models such as Framingham risk to predict future CV events. It has been incorporated into both the European and American guidelines for risk assessment. CAC is the most robust test today to reclassify individuals based on traditional risk factor assessment and provides the opportunity to better strategize the treatments for these subjects (converting patients from intermediate to high or low risk. CAC progression has also been identified as a risk for future cardiovascular events, with markedly increased events occurring in those patients exhibiting increases in calcifications over time. The exact intervals for rescanning is still being evaluated.

  13. Association between Smokefree Legislation and Hospitalizations for Cardiac, Cerebrovascular and Respiratory Diseases: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Crystal E.; Glantz, Stanton A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Secondhand smoke causes cardiovascular and respiratory disease. Smokefree legislation is associated with a lower risk of hospitalization and death from these diseases. Methods and Results Random effects meta-analysis was conducted by law comprehensiveness to determine the relationship between smokefree legislation and hospital admission or death from cardiac, cerebrovascular, and respiratory diseases. Studies were identified using a systematic search for studies published before November 30, 2011 using Science Citation Index, Google Scholar, PubMed, and Embase and references in identified papers. Change in hospital admissions (or deaths) in the presence of a smokefree law, duration of follow-up, and law comprehensiveness (workplaces only; workplaces and restaurants; or workplaces, restaurants, and bars) were recorded. Forty-five studies of 33 smokefree laws with median follow-up of 24 months (range 2–57 months) were included. Comprehensive smokefree legislation was associated with significantly lower rates of hospital admissions (or deaths) for all 4 diagnostic groups: coronary events (RR .848, 95% CI .816–.881), other heart disease (RR .610, 95% CI .440–.847), cerebrovascular accidents (RR .840, 95% CI .753–.936), and respiratory disease (RR .760, 95% CI .682–.846). The difference in risk following comprehensive smokefree laws does not change with longer follow-up. More comprehensive laws were associated with larger changes in risk. Conclusions Smokefree legislation was associated with a lower risk of smoking-related cardiac, cerebrovascular, and respiratory diseases, with more comprehensive laws associated with greater changes in risk. PMID:23109514

  14. [The broad phenotypic spectrum of SCA-3: hereditary spastic paraplegia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Quiroga, Sergio A; González-Morón, Dolores; Arakaki, Tomoko; Garreto, Nélida; Kauffman, Marcelo A

    2013-01-01

    Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) is the most frequent dominantly inherited spinocerebellar ataxia. A marked phenotypic variability is a characteristic of this disorder that could involve non-cerebellar presentations. Based on several case reports describing pyramidal dysfunction as the main symptom at onset, a clinical form resembling hereditary spastic paraplegia has been proposed. We report here two further cases of MJD patients whose initial clinical presentation suggested hereditary spastic paraplegia, and a summary of the main findings of previously similar published reports. Our findings lent support to the proposal of a MJD subtype distinguished by a marked pyramidal dysfunction at onset, simulating a clinical picture of hereditary spastic paraplegia.

  15. Outcome of cardiac surgery in patients with congenital heart disease in England between 1997 and 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimopoulos, Konstantinos; Uebing, Anselm; Diller, Gerhard-Paul; Rosendahl, Ulrich; Belitsis, George

    2017-01-01

    Background The number of patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) is increasing worldwide and most of them will require cardiac surgery, once or more, during their lifetime. The total volume of cardiac surgery in CHD patients at a national level and the associated mortality and predictors of death associated with surgery are not known. We aimed to investigate the surgical volume and associated mortality in CHD patients in England. Methods Using a national hospital episode statistics database, we identified all CHD patients undergoing cardiac surgery in England between 1997 and 2015. Results We evaluated 57,293 patients (median age 11.9years, 46.7% being adult, 56.7% female). There was a linear increase in the number of operations performed per year from 1,717 in 1997 to 5,299 performed in 2014. The most common intervention at the last surgical event was an aortic valve procedure (9,276; 16.2%), followed by repair of atrial septal defect (9,154; 16.0%), ventricular septal defect (7,746; 13.5%), tetralogy of Fallot (3,523; 6.1%) and atrioventricular septal defect (3,330; 5.8%) repair. Associated mortality remained raised up to six months following cardiac surgery. Several parameters were predictive of post-operative mortality, including age, complexity of surgery, need for emergency surgery and socioeconomic status. The relationship of age with mortality was “U”-shaped, and mortality was highest amongst youngest children and adults above 60 years of age. Conclusions The number of cardiac operations performed in CHD patients in England has been increasing, particularly in adults. Mortality remains raised up to 6-months after surgery and was highest amongst young children and seniors. PMID:28628610

  16. Outcome of cardiac surgery in patients with congenital heart disease in England between 1997 and 2015.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksander Kempny

    Full Text Available The number of patients with congenital heart disease (CHD is increasing worldwide and most of them will require cardiac surgery, once or more, during their lifetime. The total volume of cardiac surgery in CHD patients at a national level and the associated mortality and predictors of death associated with surgery are not known. We aimed to investigate the surgical volume and associated mortality in CHD patients in England.Using a national hospital episode statistics database, we identified all CHD patients undergoing cardiac surgery in England between 1997 and 2015.We evaluated 57,293 patients (median age 11.9years, 46.7% being adult, 56.7% female. There was a linear increase in the number of operations performed per year from 1,717 in 1997 to 5,299 performed in 2014. The most common intervention at the last surgical event was an aortic valve procedure (9,276; 16.2%, followed by repair of atrial septal defect (9,154; 16.0%, ventricular septal defect (7,746; 13.5%, tetralogy of Fallot (3,523; 6.1% and atrioventricular septal defect (3,330; 5.8% repair. Associated mortality remained raised up to six months following cardiac surgery. Several parameters were predictive of post-operative mortality, including age, complexity of surgery, need for emergency surgery and socioeconomic status. The relationship of age with mortality was "U"-shaped, and mortality was highest amongst youngest children and adults above 60 years of age.The number of cardiac operations performed in CHD patients in England has been increasing, particularly in adults. Mortality remains raised up to 6-months after surgery and was highest amongst young children and seniors.

  17. Contractile reserve of valvular heart diseases echocardiographically evaluated by epinephrine loading before and after cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Y; Matsuzawa, H; Otani, S; Sato, Y; Hayashi, J; Yazawa, M; Imaizumi, K; Okazaki, H; Eguchi, S

    1985-10-01

    In order to evaluate cardiac contractile reserve, echocardiographic studies were performed on 59 patients with acquired valvular heart disease and 13 patients with atrial septal defect. After epinephrine loading, the 59 patients were classified into three groups. In group I, echocardiographically-obtained left ventricular posterior wall excursion (PWE) remained below 10 mm after the administration of 2 microgram/min epinephrine. This group included patients with PWE below 10 mm after 1 microgram/min epinephrine loading but who could not endure the 2 microgram/min infusion because of significant adverse effects. In group II, PWE was less than 10 mm before the loading, but exceeded 10 mm after the administration of 1 or 2 microgram/min epinephrine loading. In group III, PWE exceeded 10 mm without stress. The conclusions derived from our data are as follows: The PWE and mean left ventricular posterior wall velocity (mPWV) obtained by echocardiography reflect the stroke volume derived from the thermodilution technique. It is possible to estimate the cardiac contractile force in patients who have a paradoxical motion of the interventricular septum, in the preoperative and even in the early postoperative periods. Patients whose PWE and mPWV are less than 10 mm and 35 mm/sec, respectively, after 2 microgram/min loading of epinephrine (group I), are likely to have severe cardiac failure after surgery. Inotropic stimulation is considered to be a very useful indicator for prediction of cardiac contractile reserve. Patients having decreased PWE, mPWV, mVcf and EF before surgery may have arrested recovery in both short- or long-term follow-up. However, surgical treatment is recommended for these patients with low cardiac function, because some improvement can be expected after surgery.

  18. Psychometric properties of the cardiac depression scale in patients with coronary heart disease

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    Kiropoulos Litza A

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study examined the psychometric properties of the Cardiac Depression Scale (CDS in a sample of coronary heart disease (CHD patients. Methods A total of 152 patients were diagnosed with coronary heart disease and were administered the CDS along with the Beck Depression Inventory- 2 (BDI-2 and the State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI 3.5-months after cardiac hospitalization. Results The CDS’s factorial composition in the current sample was similar to that observed in the original scale. Varimax-rotated principal-components analyses extracted six factors, corresponding to mood, anhedonia, cognition, fear, sleep and suicide. Reliability analyses yielded internal consistency α - coefficients for the six subscales ranging from 0.62 to 0.82. The CDS showed strong concurrent validity with the BDI-II (r = 0.64. More patients were classified as severely depressed using the CDS. Both the CDS and the BDI-2 displayed significantly strong correlations with the STAI (r = 0.61 and r = 0.64, respectively. Conclusions These findings encourage the use of the CDS for measuring the range of depressive symptoms in those with CHD 3.5 months after cardiac hospitalization.

  19. Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Arrest (SCA) Back to Heart Diseases & Disorders Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Sudden Cardiac Arrest ( SCA ) occurs when the heart stops beating, abruptly ... to saving someone who is having a sudden cardiac arrest , it is important to understand the difference. The ...

  20. Current Interventional and Surgical Management of Congenital Heart Disease: Specific Focus on Valvular Disease and Cardiac Arrhythmias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holst, Kimberly A; Said, Sameh M; Nelson, Timothy J; Cannon, Bryan C; Dearani, Joseph A

    2017-03-17

    Successful outcome in the care of patients with congenital heart disease depends on a comprehensive multidisciplinary team. Surgery is offered for almost every heart defect, despite complexity. Early mortality for cardiac surgery in the neonatal period is ≈10% and beyond infancy is heart failure are the most common late complications for the majority of defects, and reoperation for valvar problems is common. Lifelong surveillance for monitoring of recurrent or residual structural heart defects, as well as periodic assessment of cardiac function and arrhythmia monitoring, is essential for all patients. The field of congenital heart surgery is poised to incorporate new innovations such as bioengineered cells and scaffolds that will iteratively move toward bioengineered patches, conduits, valves, and even whole organs. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Audio-visual relaxation training for anxiety, sleep, and relaxation among Chinese adults with cardiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Sing-Ling

    2004-12-01

    The long-term effect of an audio-visual relaxation training (RT) treatment involving deep breathing, exercise, muscle relaxation, guided imagery, and meditation was compared with routine nursing care for reducing anxiety, improving sleep, and promoting relaxation in Chinese adults with cardiac disease. This research was a quasi-experimental, two-group, pretest-posttest study. A convenience sample of 100 cardiology patients (41 treatment, 59 control) admitted to one large medical center hospital in the Republic of China (ROC) was studied for 1 year. The hypothesized relationships were supported. RT significantly (p anxiety, sleep, and relaxation in the treatment group as compared to the control group. It appears audio-visual RT might be a beneficial adjunctive therapy for adult cardiac patients. However, considerable further work using stronger research designs is needed to determine the most appropriate instructional methods and the factors that contribute to long-term consistent practice of RT with Chinese populations.

  2. Cabergoline and cardiac valve disease in prolactinoma patients: additional studies during long-term treatment are required

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kars, M.; Pereira, A. M.; Bax, J. J.; Romijn, J. A.

    2008-01-01

    The increased risk of cardiac valve disease in patients treated for Parkinson's disease with cabergoline has raised concerns about the safety of treatment with ergot-derived dopamine agonists in patients with endocrine diseases, especially prolactinoma. Six cross-sectional studies have been

  3. Hospital utilization in adults with single ventricle congenital heart disease and cardiac arrhythmias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, R Thomas; Fram, Ricki Y; Tang, Xinyu; Robbins, James M; St John Sutton, Martin

    2014-02-01

    The study sought to identify the impact of cardiac arrhythmias on hospitalizations in adults with single ventricle (SV) congenital heart disease (CHD). Surgical advances have dramatically improved survival in patients with CHD. Cardiac arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death are common in adults with CHD. Data from 43 pediatric hospitals in the 2004 to 2011 Pediatric Health Information System database were used to identify patients ≥18 years of age admitted with International Classification of Diseases-9th Revision codes for a diagnosis of either hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS), tricuspid atresia (TA) or common ventricle (CV), and a cardiac arrhythmia. Primary and secondary diagnoses, length of stay (LOS), hospital charges, and interventional procedures were determined. Multilevel models were used to evaluate differences in demographics, diagnoses, and clinical outcomes among the 3 subgroups (HLHS, TA, and CV). Interactions of charges with arrhythmia and admission year were examined using ANOVA. There were 642 admissions in 424 patients with SV CHD and an arrhythmia diagnosis. A single arrhythmia diagnosis was present in 454 admissions (71%). Total hospital charges were $80.7 million with mean charge per admission of $127,296 ± 243,094. The mean charge per hospital day was $16,653 ± 17,516 and increased across the study period (P < 0.01). Arrhythmia distributions were impacted by SV anatomic subtype (P < 0.001). Hospital resource utilization was significantly different among arrhythmia groups (P < 0.001). In adults with SV CHD, arrhythmias are affected by SV anatomic subtype and impact adversely upon hospital resource utilization. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Predictors of Prolonged Mechanical Ventilation in Pediatric Patients After Cardiac Surgery for Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabib, Avisa; Abrishami, Seyed Ehsan; Mahdavi, Mohammad; Mortezaeian, Hojjat; Totonchi, Ziae

    2016-08-01

    The duration of mechanical ventilation (MV) is one of the most important clinical factors which predict outcomes in pediatric cardiac surgery. The prolonged mechanical ventilation (PMV) following cardiac surgery is a multifactorial phenomenon and there are conflicts regarding its predictors in pediatric population between different centers. The current study aimed to describe PMV predictors in patients undergoing cardiac surgery for congenital heart disease in a tertiary center for pediatric cardiovascular diseases in Iran. From May to December 2014, all pediatric patients (less than a month - 15 years old) admitted to pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) after congenital heart surgeries were consecutively included. The PMV was defined as mechanical ventilation duration more than 72 hours as medium PMV and more than seven days as extended PMV. The demographic data and variables probably related to PMV were recorded during the PICU stay. A total of 300 patients, 56.7% male, were enrolled in this study. Their mean age was 32 ± 40 months .The median duration (IQR) of MV was 18 hours (8.6 - 48 hours). The incidence of PMV more than 72 hours and seven days was 20% and 10.7%, respectively. Younger age, lower weight, heart failure, higher doses of inotropes, pulmonary hypertension, respiratory infections and delayed sternal closure were independent predictors of PMV in multivariate analyses. The results of this study indicated that PMV predictors could be specific for each center and a good administration program is needed for each pediatric cardiac surgery center for the preoperative management of patients undergoing congenital heart surgeries.

  5. Global outbreak of severe Mycobacterium chimaera disease after cardiac surgery: a molecular epidemiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ingen, Jakko; Kohl, Thomas A; Kranzer, Katharina; Hasse, Barbara; Keller, Peter M; Katarzyna Szafrańska, Anna; Hillemann, Doris; Chand, Meera; Schreiber, Peter Werner; Sommerstein, Rami; Berger, Christoph; Genoni, Michele; Rüegg, Christian; Troillet, Nicolas; Widmer, Andreas F; Becker, Sören L; Herrmann, Mathias; Eckmanns, Tim; Haller, Sebastian; Höller, Christiane; Debast, Sylvia B; Wolfhagen, Maurice J; Hopman, Joost; Kluytmans, Jan; Langelaar, Merel; Notermans, Daan W; Ten Oever, Jaap; van den Barselaar, Peter; Vonk, Alexander B A; Vos, Margreet C; Ahmed, Nada; Brown, Timothy; Crook, Derrick; Lamagni, Theresa; Phin, Nick; Smith, E Grace; Zambon, Maria; Serr, Annerose; Götting, Tim; Ebner, Winfried; Thürmer, Alexander; Utpatel, Christian; Spröer, Cathrin; Bunk, Boyke; Nübel, Ulrich; Bloemberg, Guido V; Böttger, Erik C; Niemann, Stefan; Wagner, Dirk; Sax, Hugo

    2017-10-01

    Since 2013, over 100 cases of Mycobacterium chimaera prosthetic valve endocarditis and disseminated disease were notified in Europe and the USA, linked to contaminated heater-cooler units (HCUs) used during cardiac surgery. We did a molecular epidemiological investigation to establish the source of these patients' disease. We included 24 M chimaera isolates from 21 cardiac surgery-related patients in Switzerland, Germany, the Netherlands, and the UK, 218 M chimaera isolates from various types of HCUs in hospitals, from LivaNova (formerly Sorin; London, UK) and Maquet (Rastatt, Germany) brand HCU production sites, and unrelated environmental sources and patients, as well as eight Mycobacterium intracellulare isolates. Isolates were analysed by next-generation whole-genome sequencing using Illumina and Pacific Biosciences technologies, and compared with published M chimaera genomes. Phylogenetic analysis based on whole-genome sequencing of 250 isolates revealed two major M chimaera groups. Cardiac surgery-related patient isolates were all classified into group 1, in which all, except one, formed a distinct subgroup. This subgroup also comprised isolates from 11 cardiac surgery-related patients reported from the USA, most isolates from LivaNova HCUs, and one from their production site. Isolates from other HCUs and unrelated patients were more widely distributed in the phylogenetic tree. HCU contamination with M chimaera at the LivaNova factory seems a likely source for cardiothoracic surgery-related severe M chimaera infections diagnosed in Switzerland, Germany, the Netherlands, the UK, the USA, and Australia. Protective measures and heightened clinician awareness are essential to guarantee patient safety. Partly funded by the EU Horizon 2020 programme, its FP7 programme, the German Center for Infection Research (DZIF), the Swiss National Science Foundation, the Swiss Federal Office of Public Health, and National Institute of Health Research Oxford Health Protection

  6. Effect of Hereditary Hemochromatosis Gene H63D and C282Y Mutations on Iron Overload in Sickle Cell Disease Patients

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    Yunus Kasım Terzi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Hemochromatosis is an autosomal recessive disease that is one of the most important reasons for iron overload. Sickle cell disease is a hemoglobinopathy that occurs as a result of a homozygous mutation in the hemoglobin gene. Erythrocyte transfusion is frequently used in the treatment of this disease. Iron overload as a result of transfusion is important in the mortality and morbidity of sickle cell anemia patients as well as in other hemoglobinopathies. In this study, the effect of hemochromatosis gene (HFE p.H63D and p.C282Y mutations on transfusion-related cardiac and liver iron overload in sickle cell disease patients who carry homozygous hemoglobin S mutation has been investigated. Materials and Methods: This is a prospective single-center crosssectional study in patients with homozygous hemoglobin S mutation between the years 2008 and 2013. The patients were divided into two groups. The first group (group A, n=31 was receiving chelation therapy and the second group (group B, n=13 was not. Direct and indirect iron loads were analyzed by magnetic resonance imaging and biochemically, respectively. HFE gene mutations were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method. Statistical analyses were performed by independent samples t-test. Results: p.H63D mutation was detected in 10 (32.3% patients in group A and in only 1 patient (7.7% in group B. When the 2 groups were compared for iron overload, iron deposition in the liver was significantly higher in group B (p=0.046. In addition, in group A, iron deposition was significantly higher in HFE mutation carriers compared to patients without the mutation (p=0.05. Conclusion: Results of this study showed that HFE gene mutations are important in iron deposition in the liver in patients with sickle cell disease.

  7. Anaesthetic management of patients with congenital heart disease presenting for non-cardiac surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohindra R

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of congenital heart disease is about one percent of all live births in the United States. Treatment is being performed at a younger age and these children are showing improved survival. It is not unusual for children with congenital heart disease to present for non-cardiac surgery. Their management depends on their age, type of lesion, extent of corrective procedure, the presence of complications and other congenital anomalies. Each patient needs a detailed pre-operative evaluation to understand the abnormal anatomy and physiology, and related anaesthetic implications. No anaesthetic agent is an absolute contraindication, although drugs beneficial for one lesion may be detrimental for another. Regional anaesthesia has also been safely used in children with congenital heart disease. However the anaesthesiologist must have a detailed understanding of the pathophysiology of the lesion and the pharmacology of drugs being used to be able to provide safe anaesthesia for children with congenital heart disease.

  8. Analysis of outcomes for congenital cardiac disease: can we do better?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Wernovsky, Gil; Elliott, Martin J

    2007-09-01

    This review discusses the historical aspects, current state of the art, and potential future advances in the areas of nomenclature and databases for the analysis of outcomes of treatments for patients with congenitally malformed hearts. We will consider the current state of analysis of outcomes, lay out some principles which might make it possible to achieve life-long monitoring and follow-up using our databases, and describe the next steps those involved in the care of these patients need to take in order to achieve these objectives. In order to perform meaningful multi-institutional analyses, we suggest that any database must incorporate the following six essential elements: use of a common language and nomenclature, use of an established uniform core dataset for collection of information, incorporation of a mechanism of evaluating case complexity, availability of a mechanism to assure and verify the completeness and accuracy of the data collected, collaboration between medical and surgical subspecialties, and standardised protocols for life-long follow-up. During the 1990s, both The European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery and The Society of Thoracic Surgeons created databases to assess the outcomes of congenital cardiac surgery. Beginning in 1998, these two organizations collaborated to create the International Congenital Heart Surgery Nomenclature and Database Project. By 2000, a common nomenclature, along with a common core minimal dataset, were adopted by The European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery and The Society of Thoracic Surgeons, and published in the Annals of Thoracic Surgery. In 2000, The International Nomenclature Committee for Pediatric and Congenital Heart Disease was established. This committee eventually evolved into the International Society for Nomenclature of Paediatric and Congenital Heart Disease. The working component of this international nomenclature society has been The International Working Group for Mapping and Coding

  9. Gait evolution in a family with hereditary spastic paraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armand, Stéphane; Turcot, Katia; Bonnefoy-Mazure, Alice; Lascombes, Pierre; De Coulon, Geraldo

    2015-01-01

    The degree of disability in patients with hereditary spastic paraplegia has been reported variable even in members of the same family (same gene mutation). Moreover, it has been established that patients with hereditary spastic paraplegia should be treated differently from cerebral palsy patients due to the progressive nature of this disease. However, the gait evolution of hereditary spastic paraplegia showing onset symptoms at an early age has been described as stable. Therefore, this study aims to evaluate the walking ability and the influence of treatments on gait evolution in a family with hereditary spastic paraplegia. Clinical gait analyses were performed in six hereditary spastic paraplegia patients from the same family with a follow-up of 4-15 years. Based on the gait deviation index, results showed a large variation of walking ability in these patients and no statistical difference between the first and last examination. In fact, three patients have improved their gait (from childhood to adolescence) whereas three patients worsened their gait. Gait alterations in a family with hereditary spastic paraplegia are heterogeneous. Gait evolution in hereditary spastic paraplegia with early symptoms had a tendency to improve gait until adolescence with adapted treatments and to decline in the adulthood. Copyright © 2014 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Targeted high throughput sequencing in hereditary ataxia and spastic paraplegia

    OpenAIRE

    Iqbal, Zafar; Rydning, Siri L.; Wedding, Iselin M.; Koht, Jeanette; Pihlstr?m, Lasse; Rengmark, Aina H.; Henriksen, Sandra P.; Tallaksen, Chantal M. E.; Toft, Mathias

    2017-01-01

    Hereditary ataxia and spastic paraplegia are heterogeneous monogenic neurodegenerative disorders. To date, a large number of individuals with such disorders remain undiagnosed. Here, we have assessed molecular diagnosis by gene panel sequencing in 105 early and late-onset hereditary ataxia and spastic paraplegia probands, in whom extensive previous investigations had failed to identify the genetic cause of disease. Pathogenic and likely-pathogenic variants were identified in 20 probands (19%)...

  11. Cardiac valvular abnormalities are frequent in systemic lupus erythematosus patients with manifest arterial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen-Urstad, K; Svenungsson, E; de Faire, U; Silveira, A; Witztum, J L; Hamsten, A; Frostegård, J

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to study cardiac valve morphology and function and ventricular function in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients with and without co-existing cardiovascular disease (CVD) and in population controls. Twenty-six women (52 +/- 8.2 years) with SLE (SLE cases) and a history of CVD (angina pectoris, myocardial infarction, cerebral infarction or intermittent claudication) were compared with 26age-matched women with SLE but without manifest CVD (SLE controls) and 26 age-matched control women (population controls). Echocardiographywas performed to assess valvular abnormalities and manifestations of ischaemic heart disease. Thirteen of the 26 SLE cases but only one of the SLE controls and one of the population controls had cardiac valvular abnormalities. Three of the SLE cases had already undergone valve replacement and another had significant aortic insufficiency; the other nine had thickening of mainly mitral leaflets without hemodynamic significance. Among SLE cases, patients with valvular abnormalities had higher homocysteine (P valvular disease. In contrast atherosclerosis as determined by IMT, oxidized LDL as measured by the monoclonal antibody E06, autoantibodies against epitopes of OxLDL (aOxLDL) or phospholipids (aPL), disease duration or activity, or acute phase reactants did not differ between SLE cases with or without valvular abnormalities. Valvular abnormalities were not more common in SLE cases with stroke as compared to those with myocardial infarction, angina or claudication. In conclusion, valvular abnormalities are strongly associated with CVD in SLE. Raised levels of homocysteine and triglycerides characterize patients with cardiac valve abnormalities.

  12. Effective pre-hospital care for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest caused by respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Tatsuma; Fukuda-Ohashi, Naoko; Doi, Kent; Matsubara, Takehiro; Yahagi, Naoki

    2015-03-01

    The relationship between pre-hospital care and the prognosis of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) caused by respiratory disease is unclear. This study aimed to assess the impact of pre-hospital care on the prognosis of OHCA caused by respiratory disease. In a nationwide, population-based, observational study, we enrolled 121,081 adults aged ≥18 years who experienced OHCA from January 1, 2010, to December 31, 2010. The primary endpoint was favourable neurological outcomes. Of the 120,256 eligible adult OHCA patients, 7,071 (5.9%) experienced OHCA caused by respiratory disease. Of these 7,071 patients, 3,911 (55.3%) received no cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), 2,403 (34.0%) received chest-compression-only CPR, and 757 (10.7%) received conventional CPR by a bystander. There was no significant difference between the three types of bystander CPR with regard to the neurological outcome (no CPR: OR 0.68, 95%CI 0.39-1.24, p=0.1951; chest-compression-only CPR: OR 0.68, 95%CI 0.37-1.29, p=0.2295; and conventional CPR: as a reference). Pre-hospital administration of epinephrine (OR 0.37, 95%CI 0.13-0.85, p=0.0170) and the implementation of advanced airway management (OR 0.32, 95%CI 0.19-0.52, prespiratory disease, not only pre-hospital epinephrine administration but also pre-hospital advanced airway management and rescue breathing in bystander CPR may not be critical. Copyright © 2014 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A Heart for Travel: Travel Health Considerations for Patients with Heart Disease and Cardiac Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaherty, G; De Freitas, S

    2016-12-12

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in adult international travellers. Patients living with heart disease should receive specific, individualised pre-travel health advice. The purpose of this article is to provide evidence-based advice to physicians who are consulted by travellers with cardiovascular disease. Fitness-to-travel evaluation will often be conducted by the general practitioner but other medical specialists may also be consulted for advice. Patients with chronic medical conditions should purchase travel health insurance. The general pre-travel health consultation addresses food and water safety, insect and animal bite avoidance, malaria chemoprophylaxis, and travel vaccinations. Patients with devices such as cardiac pacemakers should be familiar with how these may be affected by travel. Cardiac medications may cause adverse effects in cold or hot environments, and specific precautions must be followed by anticoagulated travellers. The physician should be aware of how to access medical care abroad, and of the potential for imported tropical diseases in returned travellers.

  14. Behaviour problems in adolescents with cardiac disease: an exploratory study in a paediatric cardiology outpatient clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Maria M; Schoen-Ferreira, Teresa H; Diógenes, Maria S B; Carvalho, Antonio C

    2013-06-01

    To assess behavioural problems in adolescents with congenital and acquired heart disease in comparison with healthy controls. The perception of behavioural problems by the patients' parents was also assessed and compared. A cross-sectional study was carried out in 130 adolescents with congenital and acquired heart disease and 246 healthy controls. The second part of the Youth Self-Report was applied to the patients and controls, and the Child Behavior Checklist to the patients' parents. Male patients showed significantly fewer behavioural problems compared with male controls. No significant difference was found in the female gender. Healthy male adolescents scored significantly higher in the Internalising, Externalising, and in the Total Problems scales. Patients scored significantly higher only on the Social Problems subscale. Female patients in middle and late adolescence and male patients in early adolescence displayed more problems. No significant difference was found between the diagnostic groups. Operated patients did not differ from the non-operated ones. Patients scored significantly lower than did their parents. Male adolescents with cardiac disease reported fewer behavioural problems when compared with healthy controls, but no difference was observed in the female gender. Patients also reported fewer behavioural problems than did their parents. Adolescents with cardiac disease scored higher than did controls only on the Social Problems subscale. Analysing the patients' behavioural profile, female patients in middle and late adolescence and male patients in early adolescence were the most problematic ones. No difference was observed between the diagnostic groups, nor between operated and non-operated patients.

  15. Influenza Vaccination Rate and Reasons for Nonvaccination in Children With Cardiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livni, Gilat; Wainstein, Alina; Birk, Einat; Chodick, Gabriel; Levy, Itzhak

    2017-11-01

    Influenza is a major cause of respiratory morbidity worldwide. It poses a risk of complications in children with cardiac disease. Influenza vaccine is considered the most effective and safe means of preventing the disease. The aims of this study were to determine the rate of influenza vaccination in children with cardiac disease and to identify the reasons for failure to vaccinate in this patient population. The study group included 186 children and their parents who attended the cardiology institute of a tertiary pediatric medical center between September and October 2012. Parents were asked to complete a questionnaire covering demographics, clinical features, influenza vaccination, receipt of advice from medical professionals regarding vaccination and personal knowledge about and attitude toward the influenza vaccine. Median age of the children was 7.6 years. Thirty-six percent had been vaccinated in the previous influenza season. Vaccination was unrelated to the child's age or sex or the parents' education. Factors significantly affecting the decision of the parents to have their child vaccinated were their knowledge, beliefs and conceptions about the vaccine and their receipt of a recommendation to do so from the pediatrician or cardiologist (P vaccination against influenza is low in children with heart disease. Major factors encouraging vaccination are proper parental knowledge and the recommendation of the primary physician or cardiologist. Medical professionals caring for this patient population should be alerted to the need to routinely counsel parents on the importance of influenza vaccination.

  16. Hereditary neuropathies: systematization and diagnostics (clinical case of hereditary motor and sensor neuropathy of the IA type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolokolova A.M.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to study the value of routine methods (clinical symptoms, electrophysiological findings and results of DNA analysis in diagnostics of hereditary motor sensory neuropathy type IA in outpatient clinics. Material and Methods. The review of foreign literature is represented. The phenotypic polymorphism, genetic heterogeneity and the difficulties of diagnostics are identified. A family with hereditary motor sensory neuropathy of lAtype is presented, which was diagnosed on the base of available methods in outpatient practice (clinical symptoms, genealogical method, electro-physiological findings and DNA analysis results. Results. Routine algorithm (consistent valuation of clinical symptoms, neurophysiologic findings and the results of DNA analysis helped to verify the diagnosis of hereditary motor sensory neuropathy of lAtype in outpatient practice after more than 20 years of the onset of the disease. Conclusion. The neurologists of outpatient clinics and other specialists must be informed about the availability of diagnostics of hereditary diseases of nervous system.

  17. Cardiac Syndrome X

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stroke Sudden Cardiac Arrest Valve Disease Vulnerable Plaque Coronary Microvascular Disease (CMD) Related terms: angina, cardiac syndrome X, CMD, MVD, microvascular angina Coronary Microvascular Disease (CMD or MVD) is a type of heart ...

  18. HFE-Associated Hereditary Haemochromatosis

    OpenAIRE

    Eijkelkamp, Emmeke J; Yapp, Thomas R; Powell, Lawrie W

    2000-01-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis is a common inherited disorder of the iron metabolism. Screening studies indicate that it has a prevalence of one in 200 to 400, depending on the population studied, and a carrier rate of about one in seven to one in 10. Feder et al identified the hereditary hemochromatosis gene (HFE) in 1996 and two candidate mutations; the C282Y mutation has been shown to be responsible for the majority of the hereditary hemochromatosis cases worldwide. The gene discovery has led ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary fructose intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions Hereditary fructose intolerance Hereditary fructose intolerance Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Hereditary fructose intolerance is a condition that affects a person's ability ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary diffuse gastric cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Conditions Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) is an inherited disorder that greatly increases ...

  1. Diagnosis and Prognosis in Sudden Cardiac Arrest Survivors Without Coronary Artery Disease: Utility of a Clinical Approach Using Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Patricia; Joshi, Abhishek; Williams, Howell; Westwood, Mark; Petersen, Steffen E; Zemrak, Filip; Schilling, Richard J; Kirkby, Claire; Wragg, Andrew; Manisty, Charlotte; Mohiddin, Saidi

    2017-12-01

    Determining the pathogenesis of sudden cardiac arrest or periarrest without significant coronary artery disease is crucial for management and prognosis. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) can detect morphological, functional, or tissue abnormalities, and we sought to evaluate the role of CMR in determining sudden cardiac arrest pathogenesis and prognosis in survivors. We retrospectively reviewed cardiac investigations and clinical outcomes in consecutive survivors of potentially fatal arrhythmias without coronary artery disease admitted to our institutions from 2008 to 2014. After coronary angiography and echocardiography, all underwent CMR and, when indicated, electrophysiology studies. Major adverse cardiac events (MACE), comprising significant nonfatal ventricular arrhythmia or death, was the primary outcome. Of 164 included subjects (65% men; mean age 48 [18-80] years), CMR contributed to the diagnosis in 80 (49%) and was decisive in 50 cases (30%). Dilated cardiomyopathy (n=27), myocarditis or sarcoidosis (n=22), occult myocardial infarction (n=13), and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (n=9) were most frequent. Arrhythmic causes were found in 14% while no cause was identified in 36%. MACE occurred in 31% of subjects during a median follow-up of 32 months. MACE associated with presence of a CMR diagnosis, extent of late gadolinium enhancement, and left and right ventricular ejection fractions. Right ventricular ejection fraction was an independent predictor of MACE. CMR identified a likely pathogenesis for sudden cardiac arrest in nearly half of survivors in whom coronary artery disease had been excluded. One in 3 subjects had MACE; risk doubled in those with a CMR diagnosis and some CMR parameters-late gadolinium enhancement, left ventricular ejection fraction, and especially right ventricular ejection fraction-associated with prognosis. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Pulmonary Arterial Capacitance Predicts Cardiac Events in Pulmonary Hypertension Due to Left Heart Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichi Sugimoto

    Full Text Available Although pulmonary hypertension due to left heart disease (LHD-PH accounts for the largest proportion of pulmonary hypertension, few reports on the epidemiological analysis of LHD-PH exist. Recently, pulmonary arterial capacitance (PAC has attracted attention as a possible factor of right ventricular afterload along with pulmonary vascular resistance. We therefore investigated the clinical significance of PAC in LHD-PH.The subject consisted of 252 LHD-PH patients (145 men, mean age 63.4 ± 14.7 years diagnosed by right heart catheterization. PAC was estimated by the ratio between stroke volume and pulmonary arterial pulse pressure. Patients were classified into four groups according to the PAC (1st quartile was 0.74 to 1.76 ml/mmHg, the 2nd quartile 1.77 to 2.53 ml/mmHg, the 3rd quartile 2.54 to 3.59 ml/mmHg, and the 4th quartile 3.61 to 12.14 ml/mmHg. The end-points were defined as rehospitalization due to worsening heart failure and/or cardiac death. The Cox proportional hazard regression model was used to determine what variables were associated with cardiac events.The patients in the 1st quartile had the lowest cardiac index and stroke volume index, and the highest mean pulmonary arterial pressure, mean pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, and pulmonary vascular resistance compared with the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th quartiles. Fifty-four patients experienced cardiac events during the follow-up period (median 943 days. The event-free rate of the 1st quartile was significantly lower than that of the 3rd and 4th quartiles (66.7% vs 82.5% [3rd quartile], P = 0.008; and 92.1% [4th quartile], P < 0.001. The Cox hazard analysis revealed that PAC was significantly associated with cardiac events (HR 0.556, 95% CI 0.424-0.730, P < 0.001.PAC is useful in the prediction of cardiac event risk in LHD-PH patients.

  3. [Asymptomatic classical hereditary xanthinuria type 1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakubov, Renata; Nir, Vered; Kassem, Eiass; Klein-Kremer, Adi

    2012-06-01

    We report on a girl who was diagnosed with classical hereditary xanthinuria due to an incidental finding of extremely low Levels of uric acid in the blood. The girl is compLetely asymptomatic. Hereditary xanthinuria is a rare autosomal recessive disease that usually causes early urolithiasis but may cause rheumatoid arthritis-like disease and even be associated with defects in the formation of bone, hair and teeth. In Israel it has mostly been described in patients of Bedouin origin. Throughout the world, only about 150 cases have been described; about two thirds of these patients were asymptomatic. Since the clinical presentation and age of symptom appearance are diverse, the case raises questions as to the required follow-up of these patients and as to whether a low oxalate diet should be initiated.

  4. The association between HERG gene expression and cardiac arrhythmia disease in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Mingyu; Li, Chunli; Wang, Qingwen; Wang, Yan; An, Xinjiang

    2016-12-01

    We explored the possible link between the expression of HERG gene and cardiomyopathy in children. From April 2013 to April 2015, 73 children with cardiac arrhythmia who were treated were enrolled in the present study to serve as the observation group. At the same time, 76 normal individuals were also enrolled as the control group. HERG expression level in the observation group was compared with the control group. To determine the level of HERG gene expression we used fluorescent directional PCR, enzyme immunoassay and western blot analysis. The results showed that HERG mRNA level in the observation group was significantly higher than that of the control group. The level of HERG protein in the observation group was significantly higher as well. In the observation group, HERG expression gradually increased with time during the course of the disease. This result suggested that HERG gene expression was associated with the severity of cardiac arrhythmia in children. HERG expression may be the cause of deterioration in cardiomyopathy. The results have provided a theoretical and practical basis for the diagnosis and treatment of children cardiomyopathy. Thus, we established a correlation between HERG expression and cardiac arrhythmia in children.

  5. Arterial aging and arterial disease : interplay between central hemodynamics, cardiac work, and organ flow-implications for CKD and cardiovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    London, Gerard; Covic, Adrian; Goldsmith, David; Wiecek, Andrzej; Suleymanlar, Gultekin; Ortiz, Alberto; Massy, Ziad; Lindholm, Bengt; Martinez-Castelao, Alberto; Fliser, Danilo; Agarwal, Rajiv; Jager, Kitty J.; Dekker, Friedo W.; Blankestijn, Peter J.; Zoccali, Carmine

    Cardiovascular disease is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). All epidemiological studies have clearly shown that accelerated arterial and cardiac aging is characteristic of these populations. Arterial

  6. [Hereditary xanthinuria. A clinical case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessano, B; Davì, S; La Brocca, A; Leone, L

    1989-05-01

    A case of hereditary xanthinuria in a 68-year-old man with congestive heart failure and alcoholic liver disease is presented. Urolithiasis and muscular symptoms were absent, and the metabolic error was revealed by hypouricemia, hypouricosuria and excess of xanthine and hypoxanthine excretion in urine. Xanthine oxidase (EC 1.2.3.2) activity in liver tissue was absent, confirming the diagnosis of xanthinuria.

  7. The potential impact of new generation transgenic methods on creating rabbit models of cardiac diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bősze, Z; Major, P; Baczkó, I; Odening, K E; Bodrogi, L; Hiripi, L; Varró, A

    2016-07-01

    Since the creation of the first transgenic rabbit thirty years ago, pronuclear microinjection remained the single applied method and resulted in numerous important rabbit models of human diseases, including cardiac deficiencies, albeit with low efficiency. For additive transgenesis a novel transposon mediated method, e.g., the Sleeping Beauty transgenesis, increased the efficiency, and its application to create cardiac disease models is expected in the near future. The targeted genome engineering nuclease family, e.g., the zink finger nuclease (ZFN), the transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) and the newest, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) with the CRISPR associated effector protein (CAS), revolutionized the non-mouse transgenesis. The latest gene-targeting technology, the CRISPR/CAS system, was proven to be efficient in rabbit to create multi-gene knockout models. In the future, the number of tailor-made rabbit models produced with one of the above mentioned methods is expected to exponentially increase and to provide adequate models of heart diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The role of cardiac surgery in adult patients with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padalino, Massimo A; Vida, Vladimiro L; Lo Rito, Mauro; Daliento, Luciano; Stellin, Giovanni

    2013-05-01

    The number of adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) has constantly increased as medical and surgical treatment of CHD - either simple or complex - continues to improve. Over the past half century, advances in surgical techniques have continued with the evolution of traditional surgical repair and introduction of new surgical procedures for complex lesions which were previously considered to be irreparable. We sought to analyze the current role of cardiac surgery in the treatment of congenital anomalies of the heart in those patients who have reached adulthood with or without surgical repair or palliation, with particular attention to future directions and perspectives.

  9. Beta-blocker therapy and cardiac events among patients with newly diagnosed coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Charlotte; Shilane, David; Go, Alan S

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The effectiveness of beta-blockers for preventing cardiac events has been questioned for patients who have coronary heart disease (CHD) without a prior myocardial infarction (MI). OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to assess the association of beta-blockers with outcomes among...... patients with new-onset CHD. METHODS: We studied consecutive patients discharged after the first CHD event (acute coronary syndrome or coronary revascularization) between 2000 and 2008 in an integrated healthcare delivery system who did not use beta-blockers in the year before entry. We used time...

  10. About Cardiac Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More About Cardiac Arrest Updated:Mar 10,2017 What is cardiac arrest? ... and procedures related to heart disease and stroke. Cardiac Arrest • Home • About Cardiac Arrest • Understand Your Risk for ...

  11. Patient management after noninvasive cardiac imaging results from SPARC (Study of myocardial perfusion and coronary anatomy imaging roles in coronary artery disease).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hachamovitch, R.; Nutter, B.; Hlatky, M.A.; Shaw, L.J.; Ridner, M.L.; Dorbala, S.; Beanlands, R.S.; Chow, B.J.; Branscomb, E.; Chareonthaitawee, P.; Weigold, W.G.; Voros, S.; Abbara, S.; Yasuda, T.; Jacobs, J.E.; Lesser, J.; Berman, D.S.; Thomson, L.E.; Raman, S.; Heller, G.V.; Schussheim, A.; Brunken, R.; Williams, K.A.; Farkas, S.; Delbeke, D.; Schoepf, U.J.; Reichek, N.; Rabinowitz, S.; Sigman, S.R.; Patterson, R.; Corn, C.R.; White, R.; Kazerooni, E.; Corbett, J.; Bokhari, S.; Machac, J.; Guarneri, E.; Borges-Neto, S.; Millstine, J.W.; Caldwell, J.; Arrighi, J.; Hoffmann, U.; Budoff, M.; Lima, J.; Johnson, J.R.; Johnson, B.; Gaber, M.; Williams, J.A.; Foster, C.; Hainer, J.; Carli, M.F. Di

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study examined short-term cardiac catheterization rates and medication changes after cardiac imaging. BACKGROUND: Noninvasive cardiac imaging is widely used in coronary artery disease, but its effects on subsequent patient management are unclear. METHODS: We assessed the 90-day

  12. Hereditary xanthinuria: report on three patients and short review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frayha, R A; Salti, I S; Arnaout, A; Khatchadurian, A; Uthman, S M

    1977-01-01

    Three patients with hereditary xanthinuria are presented and the pertinent literature is reviewed. In two siblings the disease has been asymptomatic; in the third urolithiasis has developed. Xanthine stone formation is the clinical hallmark of the disease. Hereditary xanthinuria seems to be relatively prevalent in Lebanon.

  13. Hereditary Lymphedema of the Leg – A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit Heinig

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Primary of hereditary lymphedema is a rare but progressive disease. It is yet not curable. We present a 48-year-old male patient with hereditary lymphedema of his left leg, that was realised by minor trauma (able twist when he was seven years old. He had never been treated for lymphedema but experienced multiple erysipelas during his life. After diagnostic procedures to exclude other causes of leg swelling, the diagnosis of hereditary lymphedema of the leg, stage III was confirmed. We initialized complex decongestive therapy. During two weeks of intensive treatment, the circumference of the left leg could be reduced by 10 cm. This case illustrates the "natural course" hereditary lymphedema. But it raises the hope that even after decades of ignorance, the patients benefits from complex decongestive treatment. Therapeutic nihilism is unnecessary and poses lymphedema patients to risks of infection and secondary malignancies like Stewart-Trewes syndrome.

  14. Quantitative evaluation of myocardial fibrosis by cardiac integrated backscatter analysis in Kawasaki disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Lijian; Wang, Renjian; Huang, Min; Zhang, Yongwei; Shen, Jie; Xiao, Tingting

    2016-01-12

    Kawasaki disease is an acute, systemic vasculitis that affects the coronary arteries. However, the relationship between myocardial fibrosis and Kawasaki disease has been completely unknown until now. We aimed to provide quantitative information about myocardial fibrosis using cardiac integrated backscatter in Han race Kawasaki disease patients. Ninety Kawasaki disease patients and 90 healthy control subjects were recruited. Based on Kawasaki disease status, the patients were categorized into 3 groups: acute, subacute, and convalescence phase. Based on coronary artery status, the Kawasaki disease patients were categorized into 3 groups: without coronary artery lesions, with coronary artery dilation, and with coronary artery aneurysms. All subjects underwent two-dimensional and Doppler examinations to measure clinical echocardiographic parameters. Myocardial fibrosis was detected with calibrated integrated backscatter imaging. Left ventricle systolic functions were normal in both the Kawasaki disease and control participants. The myocardial calibrated integrated backscatter values of the left ventricles of the acute (p Kawasaki disease patients were significantly greater than those of the healthy controls. The left ventricle myocardial calibrated integrated backscatter values were significantly smaller in the Kawasaki disease patients without coronary artery lesions than in the Kawasaki disease patients with coronary artery dilations and coronary artery aneurysms in different phases. The left ventricle myocardial calibrated integrated backscatter results were positively correlated with coronary artery status in the acute (r = 0.331, p Kawasaki disease. Our findings may suggest that myocardial fibrosis occurs during early episodes of Kawasaki disease given uncertainties that exist regarding correlations of calibrated integrated backscatter and myocardial fibrosis.

  15. Hereditary angioedema in women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouillet Laurence

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Women with hereditary angioedema (HAE are more likely to be symptomatic that men. Hormonal factors (puberty, contraception, pregnancy,.... play a significant role in the precipitation or worsening of the condition in women. So, combined contraceptive pills are not indicated and progestogen pill must be preferred. During pregnancy, attack rate can increase (38-48% of women. C1Inhibitor concentrate and tranexamic acid can be used during pregnancy. Attenuated androgens for long term prophylaxis are effective but side effects appear more often in female patients. These side effects are dose dependant and can be attenuated by titrating the dose down the lowest effective level.

  16. HFE-associated hereditary hemochromatosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijkelkamp, EJ; Yapp, TR; Powell, LW

    Hereditary hemochromatosis is a common inherited disorder of the iron metabolism Screening studies indicate that it has a prevalence of one in 200 to 400, depending on the population studied, and a carrier rate of about one in seven to one in 10. Feder et al identified the hereditary hemochromatosis

  17. EAMJ Oct Hereditary.indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HEREDITARY GINGIVAL FIBROMATOSIS: REPORT OF FAMILY CASE SERIES. E. G. WAGAIYU, R. N. NG'ANG'A and A. M. KEMOLI. SUMMARY. Hereditary gingival hyperplasia (HGF) is a rare condition characterised by hyperplastic, dense fibrous connective tissue with acanthotic gingival epithelium. A family presented.

  18. Effect of Intense Lifestyle Modification and Cardiac Rehabilitation on Psychosocial Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors and Quality of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldana, Steven G.; Whitmer, William R.; Greenlaw, Roger; Avins, Andrew L.; Thomas, Dean; Salberg, Audrey; Greenwell, Andrea; Lipsenthal, Lee; Fellingham, Gill W.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the effect of the Ornish Program for Reversing Heart Disease and cardiac rehabilitation(CR) on psychosocial risk factors and quality of life in patients with confirmed coronary artery disease. Participants had previously undergone a revascularization procedure. The 84 patients self-selected to participate in the Ornish Program…

  19. Safety of long-term treatment with cabergoline on cardiac valve disease in patients with prolactinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auriemma, Renata S; Pivonello, Rosario; Perone, Ylenia; Grasso, Ludovica F S; Ferreri, Lucia; Simeoli, Chiara; Iacuaniello, Davide; Gasperi, Maurizio; Colao, Annamaria

    2013-09-01

    Cabergoline (CAB) has been found to be associated with increased risk of cardiac valve regurgitation in Parkinson's disease, whereas several retrospective analyses failed to detect a similar relation in hyperprolactinemic patients. The current study aimed at investigating cardiac valve disease before and after 24 and 60 months of continuous treatment with CAB only in patients with hyperprolactinemia. Forty patients (11 men and 29 women, aged 38.7 ± 12.5 years) newly diagnosed with hyperprolactinemia entered the study. Cumulative CAB dose ranged from 12 to 588 mg (median 48 mg) at 24 months and 48-1260 mg (median 149 mg) at 60 months. All patients underwent a complete trans-thoracic echocardiographic examination. Valve regurgitation was assessed according to the American Society of Echocardiography. At baseline, the prevalence of trace mitral, aortic, pulmonic, and tricuspid regurgitations was 20, 2.5, 10, and 40% respectively, with no patient showing clinically relevant valvulopathy. After 24 months, no change in the prevalence of trace mitral (P=0.78) and pulmonic (P=0.89) regurgitations and of mild aortic (P=0.89) and tricuspid (P=0.89) regurgitations was found when compared with baseline. After 60 months, the prevalence of trace tricuspid regurgitation was only slightly increased when compared with that after 24 months (37.5%; P=0.82), but none of the patients developed significant valvulopathy. No correlation was found between cumulative dose and prevalence or grade of valve regurgitation at both evaluations. Prolactin levels normalized in all patients but one. CAB does not increase the risk of significant cardiac valve regurgitation in prolactinomas after the first 5 years of treatment.

  20. Respiratory syncytial virus prophylaxis in children with cardiac disease: a retrospective single-centre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, Michelle; Symington, Amanda; Janes, Marianne; Steele, Susan; Elliott, Louann; Chant-Gambacort, Catherine; Mondal, Tapas; Paes, Bosco

    2014-04-01

    To examine the characteristics of congenital heart disease patients hospitalised with respiratory syncytial virus infection after prophylaxis and determine the associated comorbidities and the incidence of breakthrough respiratory syncytial virus infections. This is a retrospective, single-centre study that was conducted over a period of 7 years. Respiratory syncytial virus infection was identified by classification codes and confirmed by virological tests. Data on baseline demographics, cardiac anomalies, other underlying disease, criteria for hospitalisation, type of respiratory illness and management, complications, and palivizumab prophylaxis were analysed by standard descriptive methods and comparative statistics. A total of 30 patients were enrolled. The majority were ≤ 2 years (n = 24). The mean admission age was 15.1 months (standard deviation = 18.3). In all, 90% were acyanotic, 40% had haemodynamically significant disease, and 60% had ≥ 1 underlying medical illness. Patients were admitted with: respiratory distress (86.7%), hypoxaemia (66.7%), fever (60%), inability to maintain oral intake (36.7%), and apnoea (16.7%). More than 50% required mechanical ventilation and intensive care with a median stay of 11 days (range: 1-43); the length of hospital stay for all children was 10 days (range: 1-65). Complications included: concurrent bacterial sepsis (20%), electrolyte abnormalities (16.7%), and worsening pulmonary hypertension (13.3%). Of 10 infants ≤ 2 years with haemodynamically significant heart disease, four had received prophylaxis. There was one death, which was attributed to respiratory syncytial virus infection. Overall, 185 infants ≤ 2 years with haemodynamically significant cardiac disease received prophylaxis. In all, six qualifying infants missed immunisation and were hospitalised. Breakthrough respiratory syncytial virus infections occurred in 2.2%, demonstrating good efficacy of palivizumab in this population compared with the original

  1. ATP-Sensitive K+ Channel Knockout Induces Cardiac Proteome Remodeling Predictive of Heart Disease Susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrell, D. Kent; Zlatkovic, Jelena; Kane, Garvan C.; Yamada, Satsuki; Terzic, Andre

    2010-01-01

    Forecasting disease susceptibility requires detection of maladaptive signatures prior to onset of overt symptoms. A case-in-point are cardiac ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channelopathies, for which the substrate underlying disease vulnerability remains to be identified. Resolving molecular pathobiology, even for single genetic defects, mandates a systems platform to reliably diagnose disease predisposition. High-throughput proteomic analysis was here integrated with network biology to decode consequences of Kir6.2 KATP channel pore deletion. Differential two-dimensional gel electrophoresis reproducibly resolved > 800 protein species from hearts of asymptomatic wild-type and Kir6.2-knockout counterparts. KATP channel ablation remodeled the cardiac proteome, significantly altering 71 protein spots, from which 102 unique identities were assigned following hybrid linear ion trap quadrupole-Orbitrap tandem mass spectrometry. Ontological annotation stratified the KATP channel-dependent protein cohort into a predominant bioenergetic module (63 resolved identities), with additional focused sets representing signaling molecules (6), oxidoreductases (8), chaperones (6), and proteins involved in catabolism (6), cytostructure (8), and transcription and translation (5). Protein interaction mapping, in conjunction with expression level changes, localized a KATP channel-associated subproteome within a nonstochastic scale-free network. Global assessment of the KATP channel deficient environment verified the primary impact on metabolic pathways and revealed overrepresentation of markers associated with cardiovascular disease. Experimental imposition of graded stress precipitated exaggerated structural and functional myocardial defects in the Kir6.2-knockout, decreasing survivorship and validating the forecast of disease susceptibility. Proteomic cartography thus provides an integral view of molecular remodeling in the heart induced by KATP channel deletion, establishing a systems

  2. Fluorescent Reporters in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells: Contributions to Cardiac Differentiation and Their Applications in Cardiac Disease and Toxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Hartogh, Sabine C.; Passier, Petrus Christianus Johannes Josephus

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade, since the first report of induced pluripotent stem cells, the stem cell field has made remarkable progress in the differentiation to specialized cell-types of various tissues and organs, including the heart. Cardiac lineage- and tissue-specific human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC)

  3. Positron emission tomography (PET) utilizing Pittsburgh compound B (PIB) for detection of amyloid heart deposits in hereditary transthyretin amyloidosis (ATTR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilebro, Björn; Arvidsson, Sandra; Lindqvist, Per; Sundström, Torbjörn; Westermark, Per; Antoni, Gunnar; Suhr, Ole; Sörensen, Jens

    2018-02-01

    DPD scintigraphy has been advocated for imaging cardiac amyloid in ATTR amyloidosis. PET utilizing 11 C-Pittsburgh compound B (PIB) is the gold standard for imaging brain amyloid in Alzheimer's disease. PIB was recently shown to identify cardiac amyloidosis in both AL and ATTR amyloidosis. In the ATTR population, two types of amyloid fibrils exist, one containing fragmented and full-length TTR (type A) and the other only full-length TTR (type B). The aim of this study was to further evaluate PIB-PET in patients with hereditary ATTR amyloidosis. Ten patients with biopsy-proven V30M ATTR amyloidosis and discrete or no signs of cardiac involvement were included. Patients were grouped according to TTR-fragmentation. All underwent DPD scintigraphy, echocardiography, and PIB-PET. A left ventricular PIB-retention index (PIB-RI) was established and compared to five normal volunteers. PIB-RI was increased in all patients (P < 0.001), but was significantly higher in type B than in type A (0.129 ± 0.041 vs 0.040 ± 0.006 min -1 , P = 0.009). Cardiac DPD uptake was elevated in group A and absent in group B. PIB-PET, in contrast to DPD scintigraphy, has the potential to specifically identify cardiac amyloid depositions irrespective of amyloid fibril composition. The heart appears to be a target organ for amyloid deposition in ATTR amyloidosis.

  4. Mechanistic molecular imaging of cardiac cell therapy for ischemic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qiujun; Fan, Weiwei; Cao, Feng

    2013-10-01

    Cell-based myocardial regeneration has emerged as a promising therapeutic option for ischemic heart disease, though not yet at the level of routine clinical utility. Despite the encouraging results from initial preclinical studies that have demonstrated improved function and reduced infarct size of the ischemic myocardium following several candidate cell transplantation, the beneficial effects and molecular mechanisms of cardiac cell therapy are still unclear in clinical applications to date, and much remains to be optimized. To improve engraftment, accurate methods are required for tracking cell fate and quantifying functional outcome. In the present review, we summarized the current status and challenges of cardiac cell therapy for ischemic heart disease and discussed the strengths and limitations of currently available in vivo imaging techniques with special focus on the newly developed multimodality approaches for assessing the efficacy of engrafted donor cells. We also addressed the hurdles these imaging modalities are facing, including issues regarding immunogenicity and tumorigenicity of transplanted stem cells, and provided some the future perspectives on stem cell imaging.

  5. INFLUENCE OF MUSIC THERAPY AND BREATHING EXERCISES ON ANXIETY IN POST-OPERATIVE CARDIAC DISEASED INDIVIDUALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Janardan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Asian Indians have a higher operative and overall increased mortality following coronary bypass surgery. They also have higher rates of post operative complications and repeat surgeries. Apart from physiological complications like post-operative pain, atelectasis, deep vein thrombosis, the psychological disorders are like anxiety and stress also predominantly play a major role in the morbidity of the post-surgical conditions. The aim of study is to know the influence of music therapy and breathing exercises on post-surgical cardiac diseased individuals. To evaluate the influence of music therapy and breathing exercises on physiological parameters(BP,HR,RR in post surgical cardiac diseased individuals by using electro cardio monitor and state-trait anxiety scale. Methods: Subjects were randomly divided into two groups. Experimental group, where the subjects received music therapy and breathing exercises. Control group, where the subjects received breathing exercises. All the participants were assessed with STAI scale and physiological parameters like blood pressure, heart rate and respiration rate for both groups before and after the treatment. Paired sample t-test was used to compare the STAI scale and physiological parameters within the groups. Result: Results showed a significant improvement in both the groups but, more improvement was seen in experimental group compared to control group. Conclusion: Results suggested that music therapy and breathing exercises influences more effective than breathing exercises alone.

  6. Mutations in MYH7 cause Multi-minicore Disease (MmD) with variable cardiac involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullup, T; Lamont, P J; Cirak, S; Damian, M S; Wallefeld, W; Gooding, R; Tan, S V; Sheehan, J; Muntoni, F; Abbs, S; Sewry, C A; Dubowitz, V; Laing, N G; Jungbluth, H

    2012-12-01

    Central Core Disease (CCD) and Multi-minicore Disease (MmD) (the "core myopathies") have been mainly associated with mutations in the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor (RYR1) and the selenoprotein N (SEPN1) gene. A proportion of cases remain unresolved. Mutations in MYH7 encoding the beta myosin heavy chain protein have been implicated in cardiac and, less frequently, skeletal muscle disorders. Here we report four patients from two families with a histopathological diagnosis of MmD, presenting in childhood with slowly progressive muscle weakness, more proximal in Family 1 and more distal in Family 2, and variable degrees of cardiorespiratory impairment evolving later in life. There was also a strong family history of sudden death in the first family. Muscle biopsies obtained in early childhood showed multiple minicores as the most prominent feature. Sequencing of the MYH7 gene revealed heterozygous missense mutations, c.4399C>G; p.Leu1467Val (exon 32) in Family 1 and c.4763G>C; p.Arg1588Pro (exon 34) in Family 2. These findings suggest MYH7 mutations as another cause of a myopathy with multiple cores, in particular if associated with dominant inheritance and cardiac involvement. However, clinical features previously associated with this genetic background, namely a more distal distribution of weakness and an associated cardiomyopathy, may only evolve over time. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Sudden Cardiac Death and Coronary Artery Disease —Pathophysiology and Risk Stratification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabil EI-Sherif, MD

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Management of Sudden Cardiac Death (SCD is undergoing a radical change in direction. It is becoming increasingly appreciated that besides depressed left ventricular systolic function and the conventional risk stratification tools, new markers for plaque vulnerability, enhanced thrombogenesis, specific genetic alterations of the autonomic nervous system, cardiac sarcolemmal and contractile proteins, and familial clustering may better segregate patients with atherosclerotic coronary artery disease who are at high risk for SCD from those who may suffer from nonfatal ischemic events. Better understanding of pathophysiological processes, such as postmyocardial infarction remodeling, the transition from compensated hypertrophy to heart failure, and the increased cardiovascular risk of coronary artery disease in the presence of diabetes or even a prediabetic state will help to improve both risk stratification and management. The rapidly developing fields of microchips technology and proteomics may allow rapid and cost-effective mass screening of multiple risk factors for SCD. The ultimate goal is to identify novel methods for risk stratification, risk modification, and prevention of SCD that could be applied to the general public at large.

  8. [Reliability of nursing outcomes classification label "Knowledge: cardiac disease management (1830)" in outpatients with heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañón-Montañez, Wilson; Oróstegui-Arenas, Myriam

    2015-01-01

    To determine the reliability (internal consistency, inter-rater reproducibility and level of agreement) of nursing outcome: "Knowledge: cardiac disease management (1830)" of the version published in Spanish, in outpatients with heart failure. A reliability study was conducted on 116 outpatients with heart failure. Six indicators of nursing outcome were operationalized. All participants were assessed simultaneously by two evaluators. Three evaluation periods were defined: initial (at baseline), final (a month later), and follow-up (two months later). Internal consistency by Cronbach alpha coefficient, inter-rater reproducibility with intraclass correlation coefficient of reproducibility or agreement and level agreement using the 95% limits of Bland and Altman. Cronbach's alpha was 0.83 (95% CI: 0.77 - 0.89) in the final evaluation, and follow-up values of 0.85 (95% CI: 0.82-0.89) and 0.83 (95% CI: 0.78 - 0.88) were found for the first and second evaluator, respectively. The intraclass correlation coefficient showed values greater 0.9 in the three evaluation periods in both the random and mixed model. The Bland-Altman 95% limits of agreement were close to zero in the three evaluations performed. The questionnaire operationalized to assess the nursing outcome: "Knowledge: cardiac disease management (1830)" in its Spanish version, is a reliable method to measure skills and knowledge in outpatients with heart failure in the Colombian context. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Cardiac tamponade 7 years after radiotherapy in a child with Hodgkin's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, Minoru; Horibe, Keizo; Miyajima, Yuji; Matsumoto, Kimikazu; Goto, Masahiko; Nishibata, Kenji; Nagashima, Masami (Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine); Tauchi, Akira

    1994-11-01

    A 12-year-old boy with massive pericardial effusion which developed 7 years after radiotherapy was reported. In May 1986, he had stage I Hodgkin's disease of the right axillary lymph nodes. He received 40 Gy mantle field radiotherapy without chemotherapy following complete resection of the tumor. Seven years later, he was admitted with symptoms of dyspnea and facial edema. Chest X-ray films showed pleural effusion and echocardiography showed cardiac tamponade. Cytologic examinations of the pleural and pericardial effusion, computed tomography of chest, and gallium scintigraphy showed no signs of malignancy. He was diagnosed as suffering from acute pericarditis and cardiac tamponade, most likely due to radiotherapy. Following initial improvement by pericardiocentesis, dyspnea reappeared with an increase in pericardial effusion. The effusion subsided in response to prednisolone following the second pericadiocentesis. Although pericarditis following radiotherapy is rarely reported in Japan, partly because of the low incidence of Hodgkin's disease, it should be emphasized as a major sequela of radiotherapy. (author).

  10. Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer-Grumbach, Michaela

    2008-01-01

    Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I (HSN I) is a slowly progressive neurological disorder characterised by prominent predominantly distal sensory loss, autonomic disturbances, autosomal dominant inheritance, and juvenile or adulthood disease onset. The exact prevalence is unknown, but is estimated as very low. Disease onset varies between the 2nd and 5th decade of life. The main clinical feature of HSN I is the reduction of sensation sense mainly distributed to the distal parts of the upper and lower limbs. Variable distal muscle weakness and wasting, and chronic skin ulcers are characteristic. Autonomic features (usually sweating disturbances) are invariably observed. Serious and common complications are spontaneous fractures, osteomyelitis and necrosis, as well as neuropathic arthropathy which may even necessitate amputations. Some patients suffer from severe pain attacks. Hypacusis or deafness, or cough and gastrooesophageal reflux have been observed in rare cases. HSN I is a genetically heterogenous condition with three loci and mutations in two genes (SPTLC1 and RAB7) identified so far. Diagnosis is based on the clinical observation and is supported by a family history. Nerve conduction studies confirm a sensory and motor neuropathy predominantly affecting the lower limbs. Radiological studies, including magnetic resonance imaging, are useful when bone infections or necrosis are suspected. Definitive diagnosis is based on the detection of mutations by direct sequencing of the SPTLC1 and RAB7 genes. Correct clinical assessment and genetic confirmation of the diagnosis are important for appropriate genetic counselling and prognosis. Differential diagnosis includes the other hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN), especially HSAN II, as well as diabetic foot syndrome, alcoholic neuropathy, neuropathies caused by other neurotoxins/drugs, immune mediated neuropathy, amyloidosis, spinal cord diseases, tabes dorsalis, lepra neuropathy, or decaying skin

  11. Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auer-Grumbach Michaela

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hereditary sensory neuropathy type I (HSN I is a slowly progressive neurological disorder characterised by prominent predominantly distal sensory loss, autonomic disturbances, autosomal dominant inheritance, and juvenile or adulthood disease onset. The exact prevalence is unknown, but is estimated as very low. Disease onset varies between the 2nd and 5th decade of life. The main clinical feature of HSN I is the reduction of sensation sense mainly distributed to the distal parts of the upper and lower limbs. Variable distal muscle weakness and wasting, and chronic skin ulcers are characteristic. Autonomic features (usually sweating disturbances are invariably observed. Serious and common complications are spontaneous fractures, osteomyelitis and necrosis, as well as neuropathic arthropathy which may even necessitate amputations. Some patients suffer from severe pain attacks. Hypacusis or deafness, or cough and gastrooesophageal reflux have been observed in rare cases. HSN I is a genetically heterogenous condition with three loci and mutations in two genes (SPTLC1 and RAB7 identified so far. Diagnosis is based on the clinical observation and is supported by a family history. Nerve conduction studies confirm a sensory and motor neuropathy predominantly affecting the lower limbs. Radiological studies, including magnetic resonance imaging, are useful when bone infections or necrosis are suspected. Definitive diagnosis is based on the detection of mutations by direct sequencing of the SPTLC1 and RAB7 genes. Correct clinical assessment and genetic confirmation of the diagnosis are important for appropriate genetic counselling and prognosis. Differential diagnosis includes the other hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN, especially HSAN II, as well as diabetic foot syndrome, alcoholic neuropathy, neuropathies caused by other neurotoxins/drugs, immune mediated neuropathy, amyloidosis, spinal cord diseases, tabes dorsalis, lepra

  12. Fetal cardiac circumference derived by spatiotemporal image correlation as a predictor of fetal hemoglobin Bart disease at midpregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siwawong, Woralak; Tongprasert, Fuanglada; Srisupundit, Kasemsri; Luewan, Suchaya; Tongsong, Theera

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the fetal cardiac circumference derived by spatiotemporal image correlation (STIC) for predicting fetal hemoglobin (Hb) Bart disease. Pregnancies at risk of fetal Hb Bart disease at 17 to 22 weeks' gestation were enrolled. All underwent STIC volume acquisition for analysis of fetal cardiac dimensions and cordocentesis for Hb level and Hb typing analysis. Spatiotemporal image correlation volume data sets were subsequently analyzed offline for cardiac circumference measurements, which were used to evaluate the efficacy in predicting fetal anemia and fetal Hb Bart disease. A total of 88 pregnancies at risk of fetal Hb Bart disease at 17 to 22 weeks were recruited into the study. The cardiac circumference was significantly higher in fetuses with Hb Bart disease than in unaffected fetuses (1.33 and 1.02 multiples of the median [MoM], respectively; P Hb Bart disease (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, 0.85; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.73-0.97), with sensitivity of 86.4% (95% CI, 72.0%-100%) and specificity of 78.1% (95% CI, 68.0%-88.3%) using a cutoff point of greater than 1.17 MoM, whereas the cardiothoracic ratio had better efficacy, with sensitivity of 90.9% (95% CI, 78.9%-100%) and specificity of 85.9% (95% CI, 77.4%-94.5%) using a cutoff point of greater than 0.50. At midpregnancy, a cardiac circumference of greater than 1.17 MoM can be used as an alternative sonographic marker for predicting fetal Hb Bart disease, although not perfectly. However, the cardiothoracic ratio seems to be more accurate than the cardiac circumference for such a purpose.

  13. Hereditary muscular dystrophies and the heart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermans, M. C. E.; Pinto, Y. M.; Merkies, I. S. J.; de Die-Smulders, C. E. M.; Crijns, H. J. G. M.; Faber, C. G.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac disease is a common clinical manifestation of neuromuscular disorders, particularly of muscular dystrophies. Heart muscle cells as well as specialized conducting myocardial fibres may be affected by the dystrophic process. The incidence and nature of cardiac involvement vary with different

  14. Prevalence of autoantibodies in a group of hereditary angioedema patients Prevalência de autoanticorpos em uma população com angioedema hereditário

    OpenAIRE

    Sergio Duarte Dortas Junior; Solange Oliveira Rodrigues Valle; Soloni Afra Pires Levy; Rosangela P. Tortora; Augusto Tiaqui Abe; Gisele Viana Pires; José Angelo de Souza Papi; Alfeu Tavares França

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary Angioedema is a dominantly inherited disease. Routine screening of autoantibodies (AAB) is not recommended for individuals with Hereditary Angioedema; however, prevalence of these antibodies in Hereditary Angioedema patients is not well documented. We aim to determine the prevalence of AAB so that individuals at risk of developing autoimmune diseases can be identified. Fifteen patients with Hereditary Angioedema attended at Clementino Fraga Filho University Hospital accepted to par...

  15. Predictors of Elevated Cardiac Enzyme Levels in Hospitalized Patients with Atrial Fibrillation and No Known Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinales, Karyne L; Najib, Mohammad Q; Marella, Punnaiah C; Katayama, Minako; Chaliki, Hari P

    2016-02-01

    We retrospectively studied the predictive capabilities of elevated cardiac enzyme levels in terms of the prognosis of patients who were hospitalized with atrial fibrillation and who had no known coronary artery disease. Among 321 patients with atrial fibrillation, 60 without known coronary artery disease had their cardiac enzyme concentrations measured during hospitalization and underwent stress testing or cardiac catheterization within 12 months before or after hospitalization. We then compared the clinical and electrocardiographic characteristics of the 20 patients who had elevated cardiac enzyme levels and the 40 patients who had normal levels. Age, sex, and comorbidities did not differ between the groups. In the patients with elevated cardiac enzyme levels, the mean concentrations of troponin T and creatine kinase-MB isoenzymes were 0.08 ± 0.08 ng/mL and 6.49 ± 4.94 ng/mL, respectively. In univariate analyses, only peak heart rate during atrial tachyarrhythmia was predictive of elevated enzyme levels (P <0.0001). Mean heart rate was higher in the elevated-level patients (146 ± 22 vs 117 ± 29 beats/min; P=0.0007). Upon multivariate analysis, heart rate was the only independent predictor of elevated levels. Coronary artery disease was found in only 2 patients who had elevated levels and in one patient who had normal levels (P=0.26). Increased myocardial demand is probably why the presenting heart rate was predictive of elevated cardiac enzyme levels. Most patients with elevated enzyme levels did not have coronary artery disease, and none died of cardiac causes during the 6-month follow-up period. To validate our findings, larger studies are warranted.

  16. Cardiac gene defects can cause sudden cardiac death in young people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauferstein, Silke; Kiehne, Nadine; Neumann, Thomas; Pitschner, Heinz-Friedrich; Bratzke, Hansjürgen

    2009-01-01

    In Europe, sudden cardiac death (SCD) is one of the most common causes of death. Although sudden cardiac death usually happens in older people, 5% to 10% of the affected individuals are young and apparently healthy. Sudden death in infants, children, and young adults is relatively rare, with an incidence of 1 to 5 per 100 000 persons per year. Nonetheless, up to 7000 asymptomatic children die in the USA each year, almost half of them without any warning signs or symptoms. Selective literature review. Although structural cardiovascular abnormalities explain most cases of sudden cardiac death in young people, the cause of death remains unexplained after autopsy in 10% to 30% of cases. Potentially lethal ion channel disorders (channelopathies) such as the long QT syndromes (LQTS), catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT), and the Brugada syndrome (BrS) may account for at least one-third of these unexplained cases. Most of these diseases are hereditary with autosomal-dominant transmission, i.e., there is a 50% chance that the children of affected individuals will be affected themselves. Post-mortem genetic screening for sequence variations in cardiac ion channel genes has become an important forensic tool for elucidating the cause of sudden cardiac death. Moreover, it allows the identification of other family members bearing the previously undiagnosed gene defect, who can then undergo a cardiological evaluation if indicated by their clinical history.

  17. Cardiac Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) is a medically supervised program to help people who have A heart attack Angioplasty or coronary artery bypass grafting for coronary heart disease A heart valve repair or replacement A ...

  18. Instrument to assess educational programs for parents of children with congenital heart disease undergoing cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pino Armijo, Paola; Ramírez León, Muriel; Clavería Rodríguez, Cristian

    2017-10-01

    To design and validate an instrument to assess the relevance of educational programs for parents of children with congenital heart disease (CHD) undergoing cardiac surgery. In October 2011, an instrument was designed based on Kaufman's model and on the bibliography, and a survey was developed in the form of a checklist with 32 close-ended questions about received education and desired education, categorized into 5 items: educator, time, place, means, and content. The survey was reviewed by 4 academic professionals and 9 experts in the care of children with CHD, and the checklist was extended to include 42 close-ended questions and 5 open questions. The instrument was administered on the day before discharge to the parents of children with CHD undergoing cardiac surgery at the Department of Pediatrics between February and August 2013. The survey was self-administered by the first participants and administered by the investigator among the remaining participants. Fifty-five children met inclusion criteria; a total of 60 parents took part in the study. Agreement was observed between received education and desired education, which was statistically significant only in terms of education provided by a cardiologist (p= 0.000, K= 0.659) and in the hall (p= 0.000, K= 0.655). Statistically significant differences were observed between the 19 self-administered surveys and the 41 surveys administered by the investigator. Among the latter, a greater level of completion was observed for all items. A validated instrument was developed to assess the relevance of educational programs for parents of children with CHD undergoing cardiac surgery. This survey should be administered by a health care provider for a better understanding of information.

  19. Quality of life in children with congenital heart disease after cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sindy Atmadja

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Major achievements in congenital heart disease (CHD treatment over the past 20 years have altered the course and prognosis of CHD. Improvement of quality of life (QoL is now a major goal of CHD treatment. Objective To assess the QoL in children after cardiac surgery for CHD. Methods A cross-sectional study was performed in children aged 2 to 18 years. The case group had 20 children with a history of corrective heart surgery in the 12 months prior to the study. The control group had 20 healthy children, age-matched  to the case group. The QoL of both groups was assessed by Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL Generic Core Scales. The same post-operative children were also assessed with the PedsQL Cardiac Module. Data were analyzed using T-test with P < 0.05 as the level of significance. Results This study recruited 40 subjects: 20 post-operative and 20 healthy children. PedsQL Generic Core Scales assessment showed significant differences between groups in the physical function parameter of QoL (P<0.05 in children aged 13-18 years, but there were no significant differences in the social, emotional, and school function parameters. In children aged 2-12 years, there were no significant differences in physical, social, emotional, or school parameters. The PedsQL Cardiac Module assessment revealed that 35% of post-operative children was at risk for physical appearance problems, 80% was at risk for anxiety problems, 40% was at risk for cognitive problems, and 80% was at risk for communication problems. Conclusion Thirteen to 18-year-old children with non complex CHD have poorer physical function than healthy children. Post operative children are at risk for physical appearance, anxiety, cognitive, and communication problems.

  20. Epicardial, pericardial and total cardiac fat and cardiovascular disease in type 2 diabetic patients with elevated urinary albumin excretion rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Regitse Hoejgaard; Hansen, Christian S; Heywood, Sarah E

    2017-01-01

    thickness and inflammatory markers were measured at baseline. Cardiac adipose tissue was investigated as continuous and binary variable. Analyses were performed unadjusted (model 1), and adjusted for age, sex (model 2), body mass index, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, smoking, glycated haemoglobin......, and systolic blood pressure (model 3). Results Patients were followed-up after 6.1 years for non-fatal cardiovascular disease ( n = 29) or mortality ( n = 23). Cardiac adipose tissue ( p = 0.049) and epicardial adipose tissue ( p = 0.029) were associated with cardiovascular disease and mortality in model 1...

  1. Fibromatosis gingival hereditaria una inusual enfermedad genética: reporte de caso Hereditary gingival fibromatosis a rare genetic disease: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Harris Ricardo

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Asociada a factores genéticos, que se caracterizada por aumento en el tamaño del tejido gingival, el cual genera dificultades emocionales, estéticas y funcionales. En el presente artículo se reporta un caso de una paciente femenina de 13 años con aumento generalizado en el volumen de la encía, que cubre casi todos los dientes, la historia familiar fue muy importante para el diagnóstico de fibromatosis gingival hereditaria, ya que la madre y un hermano presentaron la misma manifestación.Hereditary gingival fibromatosis is a rare disorder, associated with genetic factors, characterized by various degrees of attached gingival overgrowth, which generates emotional, aesthetic and functional disorders. This article reports the case of a 13-year-old female who presented a generalized severe gingival overgrowth, involving the maxillary and mandibular arches and covering almost the whole dentition. The family history was very important for the diagnosis of hereditary gingival fibromatosis, as the mother and a brother had the same disorder.

  2. Impact of thoracic surgery on cardiac morphology and function in small animal models of heart disease: a cardiac MRI study in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Nordbeck

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Surgical procedures in small animal models of heart disease might evoke alterations in cardiac morphology and function. The aim of this study was to reveal and quantify such potential artificial early or long term effects in vivo, which might account for a significant bias in basic cardiovascular research, and, therefore, could potentially question the meaning of respective studies. METHODS: Female Wistar rats (n = 6 per group were matched for weight and assorted for sham left coronary artery ligation or control. Cardiac morphology and function was then investigated in vivo by cine magnetic resonance imaging at 7 Tesla 1 and 8 weeks after the surgical procedure. The time course of metabolic and inflammatory blood parameters was determined in addition. RESULTS: Compared to healthy controls, rats after sham surgery showed a lower body weight both 1 week (267.5±10.6 vs. 317.0±11.3 g, n<0.05 and 8 weeks (317.0±21.1 vs. 358.7±22.4 g, n<0.05 after the intervention. Left and right ventricular morphology and function were not different in absolute measures in both groups 1 week after surgery. However, there was a confined difference in several cardiac parameters normalized to the body weight (bw, such as myocardial mass (2.19±0.30/0.83±0.13 vs. 1.85±0.22/0.70±0.07 mg left/right per g bw, p<0.05, or enddiastolic ventricular volume (1.31±0.36/1.21±0.31 vs. 1.14±0.20/1.07±0.17 µl left/right per g bw, p<0.05. Vice versa, after 8 weeks, cardiac masses, volumes, and output showed a trend for lower values in sham operated rats compared to controls in absolute measures (782.2±57.2/260.2±33.2 vs. 805.9±84.8/310.4±48.5 mg, p<0.05 for left/right ventricular mass, but not normalized to body weight. Matching these findings, blood testing revealed only minor inflammatory but prolonged metabolic changes after surgery not related to cardiac disease. CONCLUSION: Cardio-thoracic surgical procedures in experimental myocardial infarction

  3. Chronic diseases and natural hazards: impact of disasters on diabetic, renal, and cardiac patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Andrew C; Arquilla, Bonnie

    2008-01-01

    Inadequately controlled chronic diseases may present a threat to life and well-being during the emergency response phase of disasters. Chronic disease exacerbations (CDE) account for one of the largest patient populations during disasters, and patients are at increased risk for adverse outcomes. The objective of this study was to assess the burden of chronic renal failure, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease during disasters due to natural hazards, identify impediments to care, and propose solutions to improve the disaster preparation and management of CDE. A thorough search of the PubMed, Ovid, and Medline databases was performed. Dr. Miller's personal international experiences treating CDE after disasters due to natural hazards, such as the 2005 Kashmir earthquake, are included. Chronic disease exacerbations comprise a sizable disease burden during disasters related to natural hazards. Surveys estimate that 25-40% of those living in the regions affected by hurricanes Katrina and Rita lived with at least one chronic disease. Chronic illness accounted for 33% of visits, peaking 10 days after hurricane landfall. The international nephrology community has responded to dialysis needs by forming a well-organized and effective organization called the Renal Disaster Relief Task Force (RDRTF). The response to the needs of diabetic and cardiac patients has been less vigorous. Patients must be familiar with emergency diet and renal fluid restriction plans, possible modification of dialysis schedules and methods, and rescue treatments such as the administration of kayexalate. Facilities may consider investing in water-independent extracorporeal dialysis techniques as a rescue treatment. In addition to patient databases and medical alert identification, diabetics should maintain an emergency medical kit. Diabetic patients must be taught and practice the carbohydrate counting technique. In addition to improved planning, responding agencies and organizations must bring

  4. A prospective examination of disease management program use by complex cardiac outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravely, Shannon; Reid, Robert D; Oh, Paul; Ross, Heather; Stewart, Donna E; Grace, Sherry L

    2012-01-01

    The use of disease management programs (DMPs) by patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD) is associated with improved outcomes. Although rates of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) use are well established, less is known about other DMPs. The objectives of this study were to describe the degree of DMP utilization by CVD outpatients, and examine factors related to use. This study represents a secondary analysis of a larger prospective cohort study. In hospital, 2635 CVD inpatients from 11 hospitals in Ontario Canada completed a survey that assessed factors affecting DMP utilization. One year later, 1803 participants completed a mailed survey that assessed DMP utilization. One thousand seventy-three (59.5%) participants reported using at least 1 DMP. Overall, 951 (52.7%) reported participating in cardiac rehabilitation, and among participants with a comorbid indication, 212 (41.2%) reported attending a diabetes education centre, 28 (25.9%) attended stroke rehabilitation, 35 (12.9%) used a heart failure clinic, and 13 (11.7%) attended a smoking cessation program. A multinomial logistic regression analysis showed that compared with no DMP use, participants that attended 1 or multiple programs were younger, married, diagnosed with a myocardial infarction, less likely to have had a percutaneous coronary intervention and had higher perceptions of personal control over their heart condition. There were few differences between participants that used 1 vs multiple DMPs, however, having diabetes or comorbid stroke significantly increased the likelihood of multiple DMP use. Approximately 40% of CVD outpatients do not access DMPs. An integrated approach to vascular disease management appears warranted. Copyright © 2012 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Health status of cardiac genetic disease patients and their at-risk relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingles, Jodie; Yeates, Laura; Hunt, Lauren; McGaughran, Julie; Scuffham, Paul A; Atherton, John; Semsarian, Christopher

    2013-05-25

    Health status is an important outcome measure that incorporates multiple dimensions of health, including symptoms, functional status, and psychosocial factors. While health status has been shown to be a predictor for hospital readmission, morbidity and mortality in the heart failure setting, there are limited data in cardiac genetic disease. We examined health status in a number of cardiac genetic disease groups compared to the general Australian population. A total of 409 individuals were assessed. Individuals with inherited cardiomyopathies [hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), familial dilated cardiomyopathy (FDC), arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC)] and primary arrhythmogenic disorders [long QT syndrome (LQTS), catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT)], as well as their first-degree relatives, completed the Medical Outcomes Survey Short Form-36 (SF-36). The physical and mental component scores (PCS and MCS) and SF-6D utility score were assessed. Patients with HCM (p<0.001), FDC (p<0.05), and CPVT (p<0.05) were found to have a significantly lower PCS, while patients with LQTS (p<0.01) had a lower MCS. Individuals at risk of HCM (p<0.0001) and genotype positive-phenotype negative HCM patients (p<0.01) both had a higher PCS and utility scores compared to the clinically affected HCM population. Individuals at risk of LQTS had significantly higher PCS than those with a clinical diagnosis of LQTS (p<0.05) and similarly individuals at risk of FDC had significantly higher PCS than FDC patients (p<0.05). In HCM, female gender (p=0.002), presence of co-morbidities (p<0.0001) and higher NYHA functional class (p<0.0001) were predictors of a lower PCS. Patients with a clinical diagnosis of a genetic heart disease have an impaired health status, related to both physical and mental function. Clinical management strategies in such patient groups need to consider health status as an important outcome measure. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier

  6. Beating and insulting children as a risk for adult cancer, cardiac disease and asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyland, Michael E; Alkhalaf, Ahmed M; Whalley, Ben

    2013-12-01

    The use of physical punishment for children is associated with poor psychological and behavioral outcomes, but the causal pathway is controversial, and the effects on later physical health unknown. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of asthma, cancer, and cardiac patients (150 in each category, 75 male) recruited from outpatient clinics and 250 healthy controls (125 male). All participants were 40-60 years old and citizens of Saudi Arabia, where the use of beating and insults is an acceptable parenting style. Demographic data and recalled frequency of beatings and insults as a child were assessed on an 8-point scale. Beating and insults were highly correlated (ρ = 0.846). Propensity score matching was used to control for demographic differences between the disease and healthy groups. After controlling for differences, more frequent beating (once or more per month) and insults were associated with a significantly increased risk for cancer (RR = 1.7), cardiac disease (RR = 1.3) and asthma (RR = 1.6), with evidence of increased risk for cancer and asthma with beating frequency of once every 6 months or more. Our results show that a threatening parenting style of beating and insults is associated with increased risk for somatic disease, possibly because this form of parenting induces stress. Our findings are consistent with previous research showing that child abuse and other early life stressors adversely affect adult somatic health, but provide evidence that the pathogenic effects occur also with chronic minor stress. A stress-inducing parenting style, even when normative, has long term adverse health consequences.

  7. Cardiac surgery in patients with end-stage renal disease on dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäck, Caroline; Hornum, Mads; Møller, Christian Joost Holdflod; Olsen, Peter Skov

    2017-12-01

    Over the past decade, the number of patients on dialysis and with cardiovascular diseases has steadily increased. This retrospective analysis compares the postoperative mortality after cardiac surgery between patients on hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis. Between 1998 and 2015, 136 patients with end-stage renal disease initiating dialysis more than one month before surgery underwent cardiac surgery. Demographics, preoperative hemodynamic and biochemical data were collected from the patient records. Vital status and date of death was retrieved from a national register. Hemodialysis was undertaken in 73% and peritoneal dialysis in 22% of patients aged 59.7 ± 12.9 years, mean EuroSCORE 8.6% ± 3.5. Isolated coronary artery bypass graft was performed in 46%, isolated valve procedure in 29% and combined procedures in 24% with no significant statistical difference between groups. The 30-day mortality was 14% for hemodialysis patients and 3% for peritoneal dialysis patients (p = .056). One-year and 5-year mortality were, 30% and 59% in the hemodialysis group, 30% and 57% in the peritoneal dialysis group (p = .975, p = .852). Independent predictors of total mortality were age (p = .001), diabetes (p = .017) and active endocarditis (p = .012). No statistically significant difference in mortality was found between patients in hemo- or peritoneal dialysis. However, we observed that patients with end-stage renal disease on dialysis have two times higher mortality rate than estimated by EuroSCORE.

  8. Hereditary pancreatitis for the endoscopist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Milan R.; Eppolito, Amanda L.

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis shares a majority of clinical and morphologic features with chronic alcoholic pancreatitis, but may present at an earlier age. The term hereditary pancreatitis has primarily been associated with mutations in the serine protease 1 gene (PRSS1) which encodes for cationic trypsinogen. PRSS1 mutations account for approximately 68–81% of hereditary pancreatitis. Mutations in other genes, primarily serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 1 (SPINK1) and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) are also associated with hereditary pancreatitis. While chronic alcoholic pancreatitis may develop in the fourth or fifth decades, patients with hereditary pancreatitis may develop symptoms in the first or second decades of life. Hereditary pancreatitis is diagnosed either by detecting a causative gene mutation or by the presence of chronic pancreatitis in two first-degree or three second-degree relatives, in two or more generations, without precipitating factors and with a negative workup for known causes. Patients with hereditary pancreatitis may have recurrent acute pancreatitis and may develop pancreatic exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. Hereditary pancreatitis may involve premature trypsinogen activation or decreased control of trypsin. Recurrent inflammation can lead to acute pancreatitis and subsequently to chronic pancreatitis with parenchymal calcification. There is a markedly increased risk of pancreatic carcinoma compared with the general population. Patients are often referred for evaluation of pancreatitis, biliary or pancreatic ductal dilatation, jaundice, biliary obstruction, pancreatic duct stone or stricture, pancreatic pseudocysts, and for evaluation for malignancy. Medical treatment includes pancreatic enzyme supplementation, nutritional supplementation, diabetes management, and palliation of pain. Patients should avoid tobacco use and alcohol exposure. Hereditary pancreatitis is reviewed and recommendations for

  9. Relationship of disease-associated gene expression to cardiac phenotype is buffered by genetic diversity and chromatin regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbassi, Elaheh; Monte, Emma; Chapski, Douglas J; Lopez, Rachel; Rosa Garrido, Manuel; Kim, Joseph; Wisniewski, Nicholas; Rau, Christoph D; Wang, Jessica J; Weiss, James N; Wang, Yibin; Lusis, Aldons J; Vondriska, Thomas M

    2016-08-01

    Expression of a cohort of disease-associated genes, some of which are active in fetal myocardium, is considered a hallmark of transcriptional change in cardiac hypertrophy models. How this transcriptome remodeling is affected by the common genetic variation present in populations is unknown. We examined the role of genetics, as well as contributions of chromatin proteins, to regulate cardiac gene expression and heart failure susceptibility. We examined gene expression in 84 genetically distinct inbred strains of control and isoproterenol-treated mice, which exhibited varying degrees of disease. Unexpectedly, fetal gene expression was not correlated with hypertrophic phenotypes. Unbiased modeling identified 74 predictors of heart mass after isoproterenol-induced stress, but these predictors did not enrich for any cardiac pathways. However, expanded analysis of fetal genes and chromatin remodelers as groups correlated significantly with individual systemic phenotypes. Yet, cardiac transcription factors and genes shown by gain-/loss-of-function studies to contribute to hypertrophic signaling did not correlate with cardiac mass or function in disease. Because the relationship between gene expression and phenotype was strain specific, we examined genetic contribution to expression. Strikingly, strains with similar transcriptomes in the basal heart did not cluster together in the isoproterenol state, providing comprehensive evidence that there are different genetic contributors to physiological and pathological gene expression. Furthermore, the divergence in transcriptome similarity versus genetic similarity between strains is organ specific and genome-wide, suggesting chromatin is a critical buffer between genetics and gene expression. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  10. A multi-region assessment of population rates of cardiac catheterization and yield of high-risk coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clement Fiona M

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is variation in cardiac catheterization utilization across jurisdictions. Previous work from Alberta, Canada, showed no evidence of a plateau in the yield of high-risk disease at cardiac catheterization rates as high as 600 per 100,000 population suggesting that the optimal rate is higher. This work aims 1 To determine if a previously demonstrated linear relationship between the yield of high-risk coronary disease and cardiac catheterization rates persists with contemporary data and 2 to explore whether the linear relationship exists in other jurisdictions. Methods Detailed clinical information on all patients undergoing cardiac catheterization in 3 Canadian provinces was available through the Alberta Provincial Project for Outcomes Assessment in Coronary Heart (APPROACH disease and partner initiatives in British Columbia and Nova Scotia. Population rates of catheterization and high-risk coronary disease detection for each health region in these three provinces, and age-adjusted rates produced using direct standardization. A mixed effects regression analysis was performed to assess the relationship between catheterization rate and high-risk coronary disease detection. Results In the contemporary Alberta data, we found a linear relationship between the population catheterization rate and the high-risk yield. Although the yield was slightly less in time period 2 (2002-2006 than in time period 1(1995-2001, there was no statistical evidence of a plateau. The linear relationship between catheterization rate and high-risk yield was similarly demonstrated in British Columbia and Nova Scotia and appears to extend, without a plateau in yield, to rates over 800 procedures per 100,000 population. Conclusions Our study demonstrates a consistent finding, over time and across jurisdictions, of linearly increasing detection of high-risk CAD as population rates of cardiac catheterization increase. This internationally-relevant finding

  11. Neuromyelitis optica antibody in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simão, Luciano Mesquita

    2012-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica antibody (or aquaporin-4 antibody) is a well established serum marker associated to high-risk neuromyelitis optica syndrome that presents as an inflammatory demyelinating disease characterized by the occurrence of bilateral and simultaneous optic neuritis without complete visual recovery or it occurs as an isolated episode of transverse myelitis accompanied by longitudinally extensive spinal cord lesions. On the other hand, Leber hereditary optic neuropathy is a primarily hereditary disorder that affects all tissues of the body and its clinical presentation is tissue-specific for the optic nerve and, eventually, it might reach the spinal cord. Overlapping clinical features of neuromyelitis optica and Leber hereditary optic neuropathy may suggest common target organ diseases. The case report described herein emphasizes the coexistence of serum markers of both diseases, and suggests that further investigation of this challenging clinical presentation is warranted to confirm or rule out this association.

  12. Neuromyelitis optica antibody in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Mesquita Simão

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Neuromyelitis optica antibody (or aquaporin-4 antibody is a well stablished serum marker associated to high-risk neuromyelitis optica syndrome that presents as an inflammatory demyelinating disease characterized by the occurrence of bilateral and simultaneous optic neuritis without complete visual recovery or it occurs as an isolated episode of transverse myelitis accompanied by longitudinally extensive spinal cord lesions. On the other hand, Leber hereditary optic neuropathy is a primarily hereditary disorder that affects all tissues of the body and its clinical presentation is tissue-specific for the optic nerve and, eventually, it might reach the spinal cord. Overlapping clinical features of neuromyelitis optica and Leber hereditary optic neuropathy may suggest common target organ diseases. The case report described herein emphasizes the coexistence of serum markers of both diseases, and suggests that further investigation of this challenging clinical presentation is warranted to confirm or rule out this association.

  13. [Hereditary and familial colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaguer, Francesc

    2014-09-01

    Up to 5% of all colorectal cancer cases are caused by a known hereditary syndrome. These hereditary types often need a higher degree of clinical suspicion to be diagnosed and require specific and specialized management. In addition, diagnosing hereditary colorectal cancer has significant consequences not only for the patient, for whom there are effective preventative measures, but also for their families, who could be carriers of the condition. The most significant advances in the field of colorectal cancer have come from the diagnosis and characterization of these syndromes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Incremental diagnostic yield of pediatric cardiac assessment after fetal echocardiography in the offspring of women with congenital heart disease: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangaroopan, Molly; Wald, Rachel M; Silversides, Candice K; Mason, Jennifer; Smallhorn, Jeffrey F; Sermer, Mathew; Colman, Jack M; Siu, Samuel C

    2008-03-01

    We sought to determine the incremental diagnostic utility of pediatric cardiac assessment in the offspring of women with congenital heart disease who have had previous fetal echocardiography. We prospectively followed pregnant women with congenital heart disease who were receiving care at 2 obstetric and cardiac centers and identified 276 infants who underwent both fetal echocardiography and pediatric cardiac assessment. All of the infants with abnormal fetal echocardiography findings or abnormal pediatric cardiac assessments underwent subsequent confirmatory pediatric echocardiography. In this cohort, congenital heart disease was detected in 22 (8%) of 276 offspring born to women with congenital heart disease. There was concordance between the results of fetal echocardiography and pediatric cardiac assessment in 235 (85%) of 276 offspring (231, both normal; 4, both abnormal) and discordance between the results of fetal echocardiography and pediatric cardiac assessment in 41 (15%) of 276 infants. In the 41 subjects with discordant results, there were normal fetal echocardiography findings but abnormal pediatric cardiac assessments in 35 of 41 (pediatric echocardiography revealed congenital heart disease in 18 of 35 and normal anatomy in 17 of 35) and abnormal fetal echocardiography findings but normal pediatric cardiac assessments in 6 of 41 (pediatric echocardiography findings normal in all 6 of the infants). Fetal echocardiography detected all of the major forms of congenital heart disease. Lesions missed by fetal echocardiography but detected on pediatric cardiac assessment included shunt lesions and minor valvular abnormalities. Although fetal echocardiography can reliably exclude major forms of congenital heart disease, minor congenital heart disease lesions can be missed on fetal echocardiography; however, these can be diagnosed with careful pediatric cardiac assessment. Postnatal pediatric cardiac assessment has incremental diagnostic utility for the

  15. Mouse models of SCN5A-related cardiac arrhythmias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavien eCharpentier

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Mutations of SCN5A gene, which encodes the α-subunit of the voltage-gated Na+ channel NaV1.5, underlie hereditary cardiac arrhythmic syndromes such as the type 3 long QT syndrome, cardiac conduction diseases, the Brugada syndrome, the sick sinus syndrome, atrial standstill and numerous overlap syndromes. Patch-clamp studies in heterologous expression systems have provided important information to understand the genotype-phenotype relationships of these diseases. However, they could not clarify how SCN5A mutations can be responsible for such a large spectrum of diseases, for the late age of onset or the progressiveness of some of these diseases and for the overlapping syndromes. Genetically modified mice rapidly appeared as promising tools for understanding the pathophysiological mechanisms of cardiac SCN5A-related arrhythmic syndromes and several mouse models have been established. This paper reviews some of the results obtained on these models that, for most of them, recapitulate the clinical phenotypes of the patients. It also points out that these models also have their own limitations. Overall, mouse models appear as powerful tools to elucidate the pathophysiological mechanisms of SCN5A-related diseases and offer the opportunity to investigate the secondary cellular consequences of SCN5A mutations such as the expression remodelling of other genes that might participate to the overall phenotype. Finally, they constitute useful tools for addressing the role of genetic and environmental modifiers on cardiac electrical activity.

  16. Prevalence of Cardiac Arrhythmias During and After Pregnancy in Women with Chagas' Disease without Apparent Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achá Renato Enrique Sologuren

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate cardiac arrhythmias during and after pregnancy in women with Chagas' disease without apparent heart disease using dynamic electrocardiography. METHODS: Twenty pregnant women with Chagas' disease without apparent heart disease aged 19 to 42 years (26.96 ± 3.6 and a control group of 20 non-chagasic pregnant patients aged 16 to 34 years (22.5 ± 4.8. The patients were submitted to passive hemagglutination and indirect immunofluorescence for the detection of Trypanosoma cruzi evaluation, and electrocardiography, echocardiography and 24-h dynamic electrocardiography. RESULTS: Supraventricular premature depolarizations were observed in 18 (90% patients and ventricular premature depolarization in 11 (55% patients of both groups during pregnancy. After delivery, supraventricular premature depolarizations were present in 13 (60% chagasic patients and in 16 (89.4% control patients (P<=0.05. Ventricular premature depolarization were observed in 9 (45% chagasic patients and 11 (57.8% control patients. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of ventricular premature depolarization was similar for the chagasic and control groups during and after pregnancy. The incidence of supraventricular premature depolarizations was similar in the two groups during pregnancy, while after delivery a predominance was observed in the control group compared to the chagasic group.

  17. Cardiac autonomic neuropathy: The hidden cardiovascular comorbidity in elderly patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease attending primary care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasheedy, Doha; Taha, Hend M

    2016-03-01

    To quantify the prevalence of chronic comorbidities including cardiac autonomic neuropathy among elderly patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). A cross-sectional study was carried out on 175 elderly male patients with COPD attending Ain Shams University Hospital, Cairo, Egypt. The comorbidities that might alter cardiac autonomic function in patients with COPD were identified. The patients without reported comorbidities underwent arterial blood gas analysis, pulmonary function tests and autonomic function assessment using cardiovascular reflexes. A total of 69.14% of the participants presented with comorbidities (group 1), whereas 30.85% of the participants reported no comorbidity (group 2). Among the participants, the most prevalent comorbid diseases were hypertension (34.20%), cor pulmonale (31.42%), ischemic heart disease (20.00%), diabetes (18.28%) and congestive heart failure (13.70%). In group 2, 29.60% and 22.20% of the patients had early and definite cardiac autonomic neuropathy (CAN) respectively. CAN occurred early in the course of the disease with 40.90% of mild COPD cases being affected. The patients with definite CAN had the highest resting heart rate. The presence of CAN was related to hypercapnia, but not hypoxemia or COPD severity. COPD has a complex spectrum of comorbidities. Cardiac autonomic neuropathy in elderly male patients with COPD correlated with hypercapnia, but not hypoxemia or the disease severity. © 2015 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  18. Trends in the utilization of computed tomography and cardiac catheterization among children with congenital heart disease

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    Justin Cheng-Ta Yang

    2015-11-01

    Conclusion: The use of noninvasive CT in children with selected heart conditions might reduce the use of diagnostic cardiac catheterization. This may release time and facilities within the catheterization laboratory to meet the increasing demand for cardiac interventions.

  19. Diagnosis of Coronary Heart Diseases Using Gene Expression Profiling; Stable Coronary Artery Disease, Cardiac Ischemia with and without Myocardial Necrosis.

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    Nabila Kazmi

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease (including coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction is one of the leading causes of death in Europe, and is influenced by both environmental and genetic factors. With the recent advances in genomic tools and technologies there is potential to predict and diagnose heart disease using molecular data from analysis of blood cells. We analyzed gene expression data from blood samples taken from normal people (n = 21, non-significant coronary artery disease (n = 93, patients with unstable angina (n = 16, stable coronary artery disease (n = 14 and myocardial infarction (MI; n = 207. We used a feature selection approach to identify a set of gene expression variables which successfully differentiate different cardiovascular diseases. The initial features were discovered by fitting a linear model for each probe set across all arrays of normal individuals and patients with myocardial infarction. Three different feature optimisation algorithms were devised which identified two discriminating sets of genes, one using MI and normal controls (total genes = 6 and another one using MI and unstable angina patients (total genes = 7. In all our classification approaches we used a non-parametric k-nearest neighbour (KNN classification method (k = 3. The results proved the diagnostic robustness of the final feature sets in discriminating patients with myocardial infarction from healthy controls. Interestingly it also showed efficacy in discriminating myocardial infarction patients from patients with clinical symptoms of cardiac ischemia but no myocardial necrosis or stable coronary artery disease, despite the influence of batch effects and different microarray gene chips and platforms.

  20. Medical Management of Hereditary Optic Neuropathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Morgia, Chiara; Carbonelli, Michele; Barboni, Piero; Sadun, Alfredo Arrigo; Carelli, Valerio

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary optic neuropathies are diseases affecting the optic nerve. The most common are mitochondrial hereditary optic neuropathies, i.e., the maternally inherited Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and dominant optic atrophy (DOA). They both share a mitochondrial pathogenesis that leads to the selective loss of retinal ganglion cells and axons, in particular of the papillo-macular bundle. Typically, LHON is characterized by an acute/subacute loss of central vision associated with impairment of color vision and swelling of retinal nerve fibers followed by optic atrophy. DOA, instead, is characterized by a childhood-onset and slowly progressive loss of central vision, worsening over the years, leading to optic atrophy. The diagnostic workup includes neuro-ophthalmologic evaluation and genetic testing of the three most common mitochondrial DNA mutations affecting complex I (11778/ND4, 3460/ND1, and 14484/ND6) for LHON and sequencing of the nuclear gene OPA1 for DOA. Therapeutic strategies are still limited including agents that bypass the complex I defect and exert an antioxidant effect (idebenone). Further strategies are aimed at stimulating compensatory mitochondrial biogenesis. Gene therapy is also a promising avenue that still needs to be validated. PMID:25132831

  1. Medical management of hereditary optic neuropathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara eLa Morgia

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary optic neuropathies are diseases of the optic nerve. The most common are mitochondrial hereditary optic neuropathies, i.e. the maternally inherited Leber’s Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON and Dominant Optic Atrophy (DOA. They both share a mitochondrial pathogenesis that leads to the selective loss of retinal ganglion cells and axons, in particular of the papillo-macular bundle. Typically, LHON is an acute/subacute loss of central vision associated with impairment of color vision and swelling of retinal nerve fibers followed by optic atrophy. DOA, instead, is characterized by a childhood-onset and slowly progressive loss of central vision, worsening over the years, leading to optic atrophy. The diagnostic workup includes neuro-ophthalmologic evaluation and genetic testing of the three most common mitochondrial DNA mutations affecting complex I (11778/ND4, 3460/ND1 and 14484/ND6 for LHON and sequencing of the nuclear gene OPA1 for DOA. Therapeutic strategies are limited including agents that bypass the complex I defect and exert an antioxidant effect (idebenone. Further strategies are aimed at stimulating compensatory mitochondrial biogenesis. Gene therapy is also a promising venue that still needs to be validated.

  2. Thrombospondin-1 and CD47 regulation of cardiac, pulmonary and vascular responses in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Natasha M; Sharifi-Sanjani, Maryam; Csányi, Gábor; Pagano, Patrick J; Isenberg, Jeffrey S

    2014-07-01

    Cardiovascular homeostasis and health is maintained through the balanced interactions of cardiac generated blood flow and cross-talk between the cellular components that comprise blood vessels. Central to this cross-talk is endothelial generated nitric oxide (NO) that stimulates relaxation of the contractile vascular smooth muscle (VSMC) layer of blood vessels. In cardiovascular disease this balanced interaction is disrupted and NO signaling is lost. Work over the last several years indicates that regulation of NO is much more complex than previously believed. It is now apparent that the secreted protein thrombospondin-1 (TSP1), that is upregulated in cardiovascular disease and animal models of the same, on activating cell surface receptor CD47, redundantly inhibits NO production and NO signaling. This inhibitory event has implications for baseline and disease-related responses mediated by NO. Further work has identified that TSP1-CD47 signaling stimulates enzymatic reactive oxygen species (ROS) production to further limit blood flow and promote vascular disease. Herein consideration is given to the most recent discoveries in this regard which identify the TSP1-CD47 axis as a major proximate governor of cardiovascular health. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. REVIEW ARTICLE Therapeutic avenues for hereditary forms of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    chitra

    Key words: retinal disease; retinitis pigmentosa; gene therapy; retinoid; clinical trial; stem cell; cell therapy. Abstract. Hereditary retinal diseases, known as retinal degenerations or dystrophies, are a large group of inherited eye disorders resulting in irreversible visual loss and blindness. They develop due to mutations in one ...

  4. Inflammatory and cardiac biomarkers are differentially expressed in clinical stages of Chagas disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, S M; Deng, X; Fernandes, F; Cunha-Neto, E; Ribeiro, A L; Adesina, B; Beyer, A I; Contestable, P; Custer, B; Busch, M P; Sabino, E C

    2015-11-15

    Chagas disease has a long clinically silent period following Trypanosoma cruzi infection and before development of overt clinical pathology; detectable biomarkers of infection and pathogenesis are urgently needed. We tested 22 biomarkers known to be associated with cardiomyopathy to evaluate if a biomarker signature could successfully classify T. cruzi seropositive subjects into clinical Chagas disease stage groups. This cross-sectional retrospective case-control study enrolled T. cruzi seropositive blood donors (BD) who were further characterized as having chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CC-BD) or not (nonCC-BD) and seronegative (SN) control donors; we also included clinically diagnosed Chagas cardiomyopathy patients (CC-P). All subjects underwent a health history questionnaire, medical examination, electro- and echocardiograms (ECG and Echo) and phlebotomy. Biomarkers were measured on blinded samples by luminex bead array and Ortho VITROS. A clear biomarker pattern was observed only in more severe cardiac disease; this pattern included significantly elevated levels of inflammatory cytokines IFN-γ, IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α and soluble cardiovascular disease biomarkers CK-MB, troponin, myoglobin, VCAM and NTproBNP while there were lower levels of MPO, PAI-1, and MCP-1. The markers determined to be the most predictive of disease by ROC curve analysis were NTproBNP and T. cruzi PCR status. Although many biomarkers demonstrated increased or decreased concentrations among the clinical forms of Chagas disease, NTproBNP and T. cruzi PCR were the only tests that would independently be of clinical value for disease staging, in concert with ECG, Echo and clinical assessments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Endothelial Function as a Possible Significant Determinant of Cardiac Function during Exercise in Patients with Structural Heart Disease

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    Bonpei Takase

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was investigated the role that endothelial function and systemic vascular resistance (SVR play in determining cardiac function reserve during exercise by a new ambulatory radionuclide monitoring system (VEST in patients with heart disease. The study population consisted of 32 patients. The patients had cardiopulmonary stress testing using the treadmill Ramp protocol and the VEST. The anaerobic threshold (AT was autodetermined using the V-slope method. The SVR was calculated by determining the mean blood pressure/cardiac output. Flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD was measured in the brachial artery to evaluate endotheilial function. FMD and the percent change f'rom rest to AT in SVR correlated with those from rest to AT in ejection fraction and peak ejection ratio by VEST, respectively. Our findings suggest that FMD in the brachial artery and the SVR determined by VEST in patients with heart disease can possibly reflect cardiac function reserve during aerobic exercise.

  6. Drug- and disease-induced changes of human cardiac beta 1- and beta 2-adrenoceptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brodde, O. E.; Zerkowski, H. R.; Borst, H. G.; Maier, W.; Michel, M. C.

    1989-01-01

    Cardiac beta-adrenoceptor density and subtype distribution has been determined in different kinds of heart failure. A decrease in cardiac beta-adrenoceptor function appears to be a general phenomenon in all kinds of heart failure. However, cardiac beta 1- and beta 2-adrenoceptors seem to be

  7. Canine hereditary nephropathies : Molecular genetic studies in Norwegian Elkhounds and English Cocker Spaniels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiersma, A.C.

    2007-01-01

    Hereditary nephropathies have been described in a variety of dog breeds. The causative mutation has been identified in a minority of canine renal diseases, and these provide useful animal models to study in order to gain knowledge on human nephropathies. In this thesis, canine hereditary

  8. Impact of cardiac rehabilitation and exercise training programs in coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachur, Sergey; Chongthammakun, Vasutakarn; Lavie, Carl J; De Schutter, Alban; Arena, Ross; Milani, Richard V; Franklin, Barry A

    Cardiovascular rehabilitation (CR) is the process of developing and maintaining an optimal level of physical, social, and psychological well-being in order to promote recovery from cardiovascular (CV) illness. It is a multi-disciplinary approach encompassing supervised exercise training, patient counseling, education and nutritional guidance that may also enhance quality of life. Beneficial CV effects may include improving coronary heart disease risk factors; particularly exercise capacity, reversing cardiac remodeling, and favorably modifying metabolism and systemic oxygen transport. We review the historical basis for contemporary CR, the indications and critical components of CR, as well as the potential salutary physiological and clinical effects of exercise-based CR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Do We Need More Than a Transthoracic Echocardiography When Evaluating Children with Congenital Heart Disease before Cardiac Surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghamdi, Mohammed H; Ismail, Muna I; Yelbuz, Talat Mesud; Alhabshan, Fahad

    2016-05-01

    To determine if a transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) can be used as the sole diagnostic imaging modality to evaluate children with congenital heart disease (CHD) undergoing cardiac surgery. A retrospective study was carried out at the King Abdulaziz Cardiac Center. We reviewed all pediatric patients who underwent cardiac surgery during the period January 2011 to December 2011. Three hundred ninety-two pediatric patients with CHD fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Of these patients, 287 (73%) underwent surgical interventions based on a TTE alone, while 105 (27%) required additional diagnostic imaging modalities, including a cardiac catheterization (68/105; 65%), cardiac computed tomography angiography (36/105; 34%), or cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (1/105; 1%). A TTE was not enough for all the patients who underwent a cardiac catheterization to find out additional anatomical information (22%), either to directly measure pulmonary artery pressures (62%) or to study vascular reactivity in patients with pulmonary hypertension (16%). Of 36 patients who underwent a cardiac computed tomography angiography, five (14%) had additional information to be added to TTE findings. Of all the patients, 81% had enough information using only the TTE compared to 19% in whom the TTE was not enough to provide all needed information. Only (7/392; 1.8%) patients had additional minor intraoperative findings that did not affect the surgical decision. Despite the emergence of other imaging modalities, a TTE can be used as the sole diagnostic imaging modality for a preoperative assessment in the majority of children with CHD. Other imaging modalities can be employed with limited indications. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Cardiac Risk Markers and Response to Depression Treatment in Patients With Coronary Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Robert M; Freedland, Kenneth E; Steinmeyer, Brian; Rubin, Eugene H; Mann, Douglas L; Rich, Michael W

    2016-01-01

    Depression is associated with an increased risk of mortality in patients with coronary heart disease. There is evidence that this risk may be reduced in patients who respond to depression treatment. The purpose of this study was to determine whether cardiac risk markers predict poor response to depression treatment and, second, whether they improve with successful treatment. One hundred fifty-seven patients with stable coronary heart disease who met the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, criteria for a moderate to severe major depressive episode were treated with cognitive behavior therapy, either alone or combined with an antidepressant, for up to 16 weeks. Depression, physical activity, sleep quality, thyroid hormones (total thyroxine [T4] and free T4), and inflammatory blood markers (C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor) were assessed at baseline and after 16 weeks of treatment. The mean (SD) Beck Depression Inventory scores were 30.2 (8.5) at baseline and 8.5 (7.8) at 16 weeks. More than 50% of the participants met the criteria for depression remission (17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression ≤ 7) at 16 weeks. Only free T4 thyroid hormone at baseline predicted poor response to depression treatment after adjustment for potential confounders (p = .004). Improvement in sleep quality (p = .012) and physical activity level (p = .041) correlated with improvement in depression. None of the inflammatory markers predicted posttreatment depression or changed with depression. Thyroid hormone (T4) level predicted depression treatment outcome, and improvement in depression correlated with improvement in sleep and physical activity. More detailed studies of thyroid function and objective assessments of sleep and physical activity in relation to depression improvement and cardiac outcomes are needed.

  11. Long-term effects of cardiac rehabilitation in elderly individuals with stable coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandic, Sandra; Stevens, Emily; Hodge, Claire; Brown, Casey; Walker, Robert; Body, Dianne; Barclay, Leanne; Nye, Edwin R; Williams, Michael J A

    2016-01-01

    To compare exercise capacity and cardiovascular response to exercise in elderly individuals with coronary artery disease (CAD) who attend ongoing community-based maintenance cardiac rehabilitation (CR) versus age- and gender-matched healthy "very active" (HVA; ≥ 2000 kcal/week) and healthy "less active" (HLA; cardiovascular function during exercise; (2) walking tests; (3) physical function; (4) anthropometry and (5) 12-month physical activity recall. The CR group achieved 98% (range: 73-154%) of age- and gender-predicted peak oxygen consumption for healthy individuals. Peak oxygen consumption was lower in CR compared to HVA but not HLA group (VO2peak: CR: 19.0 ± 4.5, HVA: 23.7 ± 2.9, HLA: 20.7 ± 4.7 ml ·kg(-1)ċmin(-1), p = 0.001 versus HVA; p = 0.390 versus HLA). Peak heart rate was lower in CR compared to both HVA and HLA. Walking test results and cardiovascular and physical function were not different between the groups. Elderly individuals with CAD participating in maintenance CR have similar exercise capacity and cardiorespiratory response to exercise compared to their age- and gender-matched less active healthy peers. The findings support referral of elderly patients to community-based CR. Fitness benefits of long-term maintenance cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programs remain unknown. Elderly individuals with coronary artery disease participating in maintenance CR have exercise capacity and cardiorespiratory response to exercise similar to their less active healthy peers. Maintenance CR may play an important role prolonging independent living in elderly individuals.

  12. Radiation dose benchmarks during cardiac catheterization for congenital heart disease in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghelani, Sunil J; Glatz, Andrew C; David, Sthuthi; Leahy, Ryan; Hirsch, Russel; Armsby, Laurie B; Trucco, Sara M; Holzer, Ralf J; Bergersen, Lisa

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to define age-stratified, procedure-specific benchmark radiation dose levels during interventional catheterization for congenital heart disease. There is a paucity of published literature with regard to radiation dose levels during catheterization for congenital heart disease. Obtaining benchmark radiation data is essential for assessing the impact of quality improvement initiatives for radiation safety. Data were obtained retrospectively from 7 laboratories participating in the Congenital Cardiac Catheterization Project on Outcomes collaborative. Total air kerma, dose area product, and total fluoroscopy time were obtained for the following procedures: 1) patent ductus arteriosus closure; 2) atrial septal defect closure; 3) pulmonary valvuloplasty; 4) aortic valvuloplasty; 5) treatment of coarctation of aorta; and 6) transcatheter pulmonary valve placement. Between January 2009 and July 2013, 2,713 cases were identified. Radiation dose benchmarks are presented including median, 75th percentile, and 95th percentile. Radiation doses varied widely between age groups and procedure types. Radiation exposure was lowest in patent ductus arteriosus closure and highest in transcatheter pulmonary valve placement. Total fluoroscopy time was a poor marker of radiation exposure and did not correlate well with total air kerma and dose area product. This study presents age-stratified radiation dose values for 6 common congenital heart interventional catheterization procedures. Fluoroscopy time alone is not an adequate measure for monitoring radiation exposure. These values will be used as baseline for measuring the effectiveness of future quality improvement activities by the Congenital Cardiac Catheterization Project on Outcomes collaborative. Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Successful cardiac transplantation outcomes in patients with adult congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menachem, Jonathan N; Golbus, Jessica R; Molina, Maria; Mazurek, Jeremy A; Hornsby, Nicole; Atluri, Pavan; Fuller, Stephanie; Birati, Edo Y; Kim, Yuli Y; Goldberg, Lee R; Wald, Joyce W

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of our study is (1) to characterise patients with congenital heart disease undergoing heart transplantation by adult cardiac surgeons in a large academic medical centre and (2) to describe successful outcomes associated with our multidisciplinary approach to the evaluation and treatment of adults with congenital heart disease (ACHD) undergoing orthotopic heart transplantation (OHT). Heart failure is the leading cause of death in patients with ACHD leading to increasing referrals for OHT. The Penn Congenital Transplant Database comprises a cohort of patients with ACHD who underwent OHT between March 2010 and April 2016. We performed a retrospective cohort study of the 20 consecutive patients. Original cardiac diagnoses include single ventricle palliated with Fontan (n=8), dextro-transposition of the great arteries after atrial switch (n=4), tetralogy of Fallot (n=4), pulmonary atresia (n=1), Ebstein anomaly (n=1), unrepaired ventricular septal defect (n=1) and Noonan syndrome with coarctation of the aorta (n=1). Eight patients required pretransplant inotropes and two required pretransplant mechanical support. Nine patients underwent heart-liver transplant and three underwent heart-lung transplant. Three patients required postoperative mechanical circulatory support. Patients were followed for an average of 38 months as of April 2016, with 100% survival at 30 days and 1 year and 94% overall survival (19/20 patients). ACHD-OHT patients require highly specialised, complex and multidisciplinary healthcare. The success of our programme is attributed to using team-based, patient-centred care including our multidisciplinary staff and specialists across programmes and departments. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  14. Plasma cytokine expression is associated with cardiac morbidity in chagas disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovane Rodrigo Sousa

    Full Text Available The expression of immune response appears to be associated with morbidity in Chagas disease. However, the studies in this field have usually employed small samples of patients and statistical analyses that do not consider the wide dispersion of cytokine production observed in these patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the plasma cytokine levels in well-defined clinical polar groups of chagasic patients divided into categories that better reflect the wide cytokine profile and its relationship with morbidity. Patients infected with Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi were grouped as indeterminate (IND and cardiac (CARD forms ranging from 23 to 69 years of age (mean of 45.6±11.25. The IND group included 82 individuals, ranging from 24 to 66 years of age (mean of 39.6±10.3. The CARD group included 94 patients ranging from 23 to 69 years of age (mean of 48±12.52 presenting dilated cardiomyopathy. None of the patients have undergone chemotherapeutic treatment, nor had been previously treated for T. cruzi infection. Healthy non-chagasic individuals, ranging from 29 to 55 years of age (mean of 42.6±8.8 were included as a control group (NI. IND patients have a higher intensity of interleukin 10 (IL-10 expression when compared with individuals in the other groups. By contrast, inflammatory cytokine expression, such as interferon gamma (IFN-γ, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α, interleukin 6 (IL-6, and interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β, proved to be the highest in the CARD group. Correlation analysis showed that higher IL-10 expression was associated with better cardiac function, as determined by left ventricular ejection fraction and left ventricular diastolic diameter values. Altogether, these findings reinforce the concept that a fine balance between regulatory and inflammatory cytokines represents a key element in the establishment of distinct forms of chronic Chagas disease.

  15. Plasma Cytokine Expression Is Associated with Cardiac Morbidity in Chagas Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Giovane Rodrigo; Gomes, Juliana Assis Silva; Fares, Rafaelle Christine Gomes; Damásio, Marcos Paulo de Souza; Chaves, Ana Thereza; Ferreira, Karine Silvestre; Nunes, Maria Carmo Pereira; Medeiros, Nayara Ingrid; Valente, Vanessa Alves Azevedo; Corrêa-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Rocha, Manoel Otávio da Costa

    2014-01-01

    The expression of immune response appears to be associated with morbidity in Chagas disease. However, the studies in this field have usually employed small samples of patients and statistical analyses that do not consider the wide dispersion of cytokine production observed in these patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the plasma cytokine levels in well-defined clinical polar groups of chagasic patients divided into categories that better reflect the wide cytokine profile and its relationship with morbidity. Patients infected with Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi) were grouped as indeterminate (IND) and cardiac (CARD) forms ranging from 23 to 69 years of age (mean of 45.6±11.25). The IND group included 82 individuals, ranging from 24 to 66 years of age (mean of 39.6±10.3). The CARD group included 94 patients ranging from 23 to 69 years of age (mean of 48±12.52) presenting dilated cardiomyopathy. None of the patients have undergone chemotherapeutic treatment, nor had been previously treated for T. cruzi infection. Healthy non-chagasic individuals, ranging from 29 to 55 years of age (mean of 42.6±8.8) were included as a control group (NI). IND patients have a higher intensity of interleukin 10 (IL-10) expression when compared with individuals in the other groups. By contrast, inflammatory cytokine expression, such as interferon gamma (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin 6 (IL-6), and interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β), proved to be the highest in the CARD group. Correlation analysis showed that higher IL-10 expression was associated with better cardiac function, as determined by left ventricular ejection fraction and left ventricular diastolic diameter values. Altogether, these findings reinforce the concept that a fine balance between regulatory and inflammatory cytokines represents a key element in the establishment of distinct forms of chronic Chagas disease. PMID:24603474

  16. [Hereditary hemachromatosis: clinical case report and literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochazka, Ricardo; Tagle, Martín

    2006-01-01

    Hemachromatosis is a hereditary condition, producing progressive iron overload as a result of the mutation in proteins that regulate intestinal iron absorption. It is a systemic disease with several manifestations including cirrhosis, diabetes mellitus, cardiomyopathy, joint disease and a proportion of asymptomatic patients. When it is diagnosed and treatment with phlebotomies is initiated before any organ damage is developed, the prognosis is very good, with normal survival free of manifestations. This condition is common in European populations. We report the case of a Peruvian patient of European ancestry who is asymptomatic, but has high levels of aminotransferases and elevated iron markers. Genetic testing confirmed the patient's diagnosis of hereditary hemachromatosis.

  17. Cardiac sarcoidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costello BT

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Benedict T Costello,1,2 James Nadel,3 Andrew J Taylor,1,21Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, The Alfred Hospital, 2Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Research Institute, Melbourne, VIC, 3School of Medicine, University of Notre Dame, Sydney, NSW, Australia Abstract: Cardiac sarcoidosis is a rare but life-threatening condition, requiring a high degree of clinical suspicion and low threshold for investigation to make the diagnosis. The cardiac manifestations include heart failure, conducting system disease, and arrhythmias predisposing to sudden cardiac death. A number of investigations are available to assist in making the diagnosis. The diagnosis may be made from the clinical history and evidence of inflammation on imaging modalities in the active phase and evidence of myocardial scarring in the chronic phase. Keywords: cardiac magnetic resonance, positron emission tomography, sarcoidosis, sudden cardiac death

  18. Major depression and first-time hospitalization with ischemic heart disease, cardiac procedures and mortality in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gasse, Christiane; Laursen, Thomas M; Baune, Bernhard T

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We investigated the association between unipolar depression and incident hospital admissions due to ischemic heart disease, invasive cardiac procedures and mortality independent of other medical illnesses.Methods: A population-based cohort of 4.6 million persons aged 15 years or older ...

  19. Pericardial effusion and cardiac tamponade: clinical manifestation of chronic graft-versus-host disease after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Cavalcanti Ferreira

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The authors report a case with pericardial effusion and cardiac tamponade as a rare clinical manifestation of chronic graft-versus-host disease in a young man with acute myelogenous leukemia submitted to an allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from a related donor.

  20. Use of natriuretic peptides for detecting cardiac dysfunction in long-term disease-free breast cancer survivors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perik, PJ; De Vries, EGE; Boomsma, F; Van Der Graaf, WTA; Sleijfer, DT; Van Veldhuisen, DJ; Gietema, JA

    2005-01-01

    Background: Plasma natriuretic peptides are increased in patients with cardiac dysfunction. N-terminal (NT-ANP) and B-type (BNP) natriuretic peptides were measured in disease-free breast cancer survivors, during long-term follow-up after epirubicin (360 mg/m(2) or 450 mg/m(2) cumulatively) and chest

  1. Plasma concentrations of CCL3 and CCL4 in the cardiac and digestive clinical forms of chronic Chagas disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Amanda Priscila; Ayo, Christiane Maria; Mimura, Kallyne Kioko Oliveira; Oliani, Sonia Maria; Bernardo, Cássia Rubia; Camargo, Ana Vitória Silveira; Ronchi, Luís Sérgio; Borim, Aldenis Albaneze; de Campos Júnior, Eumildo; Brandão de Mattos, Cinara Cássia; Castiglioni, Lilian; Bestetti, Reinaldo Bulgarelli; Cavasini, Carlos Eugênio; de Mattos, Luiz Carlos

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the plasma levels of the CCL3 and CCL4 chemokines in patients with the cardiac and digestive clinical forms of chronic Chagas disease and in cardiac patients with and without left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVSD). Plasma samples from 75 patients were evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to confirm infection by T. cruzi. Plasma levels of the CCL3 and CCL4 chemokines were measured using Milliplex® MAP assay (Millipore). There were no significant differences in the levels of CCL3 and CCL4 between patients with the digestive and cardiac clinical forms of Chagas disease. Moreover, no significant differences were found between patients without LVSD and those with LVSD. Higher CCL3 and CCL4 plasma levels were found in patients with LVSD compared to those with the digestive form of the disease. The CCL3 and CCL4 chemokines might not be involved in differential susceptibility to the digestive and cardiac clinical forms of chronic Chagas disease, and it seems they do not influence the development of LVSD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. From teeth, skin, blood to heart : induced pluripotent stem cells as an in vitro model for cardiac disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dambrot, Cheryl Susan

    2014-01-01

    Since the first reports of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC), the field of pluripotent stem cell (PSC) research has grown in leap and bounds, particularly in the area of (cardiac) disease modeling. This is in part because it is fairly easy to produce cardiomyocytes from hPSC and also

  3. 81. Upper body arterio-central venous PCO2 gap (UBCO2G in monitoring sick children with cardiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Mohammad Hijazi

    2015-10-01

    Conclusion: Upper is higher than lower body PCO2gap. UBPCO2G ⩾9.65 was associated with higher LA, BUN, creatinine, serum glucose and PRISM and lower urine output. Patients with UBPCO2G ⩾9.65 were sicker. UBPCO2G can be used as a biomarker in monitoring children with cardiac disease.

  4. Novel miniature mobile cardiac catheterization laboratory for critical cardiovascular disease following natural disasters: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ya-ling; Liang, Zhuo; Yao, Tian-ming; Sun, Jing-yang; Liang, Ming; Huo, Yu; Wang, Geng; Wang, Xiao-zeng; Liang, Yan-chun; Meng, Wei-hong

    2012-03-01

    Natural disasters have been frequent in recent years. Effective treatment of patients with cardiovascular disease following natural disasters is an unsolved problem. We aimed to develop a novel miniature mobile cardiac catheterization laboratory (Mini Mobile Cath Lab) to provide emergency interventional services for patients with critical cardiovascular disease following natural disasters. A feasibility study was performed by testing the Mini Mobile Cath Lab on dogs with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) model in a hypothetical natural-disaster-stricken area. The Mini Mobile Cath Lab was transported to the hypothetical natural-disaster-stricken area by truck. Coronary angiography and primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) were performed on six dogs with STEMI model. The transportation and transformation of the Mini Mobile Cath Lab were monitored and its functioning was evaluated through the results of animal experiments. The Mini Mobile Cath Lab could be transported by truck at an average speed of 80 km/h on mountain roads during daytime in the winter, under conditions of light snow (-15°C to -20°C/-68°F to -59°F). The average time required to prepare the Mini Mobile Cath Lab after transportation, in a wetland area, was 30 minutes. Coronary angiography, and primary PCI were performed successfully. This preliminary feasibility study of the use of the Mini Mobile Cath Lab for emergency interventional treatment of dogs with STEMI indicated that it may perform well in the rescue of critical cardiovascular disease following natural disasters.

  5. [Lung function influenced the prognosis of cardiac surgery in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, C T; Zhao, J H; Wei, D; Shi, Y X; Zhu, G F

    2017-02-12

    Objective: To investigate the value of lung function for the prognosis of cardiac surgery in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease(COPD). Methods: A retrospective analysis was conducted on the hospitalized patients with coronary heart disease or valvular heart disease in Beijing Anzhen hospital during Janury 2013 to December 2015. The relationship between lung function and extubation time, time of staying in ICU, second time tracheal incubation, tracheotomy and mortality rate were analyzed. Results: There were 355 patients without surgery in a total 1 729 of patients, of which 65 (18.31%)suffered from severe pulmonary dysfunction. There were 242 patients with obstructive ventilation dysfunction, 75 with mild, 127 with moderate, and 40 with severe and very severe obstructive ventilation dysfunction. There were significant differences in the rates of planned extubation and late extubation between patients with normal lung function (81.6% and 10.7%) and those with abnormal lung function(74.4% and 12.8%). In patients with different GOLD classification (Ⅰ, Ⅱ, and Ⅲ-Ⅳ), there were significant differences in the rates of early extubation 14.7%, 14.2% and 5%, planned extubation (80%, 74% and 65%) and late extubation (5.3%, 11.8% and 30%). By comparison with patients without COPD, the extubation time of COPD patients increased by 20.3%, the time of staying in ICU prolonged by 14.2%, and the mortality rate increased to 180%(Ppulmonary dysfunction.

  6. Matrix Metalloproteinases 2 and 9 Are Differentially Expressed in Patients with Indeterminate and Cardiac Clinical Forms of Chagas Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fares, Rafaelle Christine Gomes; Gomes, Juliana de Assis Silva; Garzoni, Luciana Ribeiro; Waghabi, Mariana Caldas; Saraiva, Roberto Magalhães; Medeiros, Nayara Ingrid; Oliveira-Prado, Roberta; Sangenis, Luiz Henrique Conde; Chambela, Mayara da Costa; de Araújo, Fernanda Fortes; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Damásio, Marcos Paulo; Valente, Vanessa Azevedo; Ferreira, Karine Silvestre; Sousa, Giovane Rodrigo; Rocha, Manoel Otávio da Costa

    2013-01-01

    Dilated chronic cardiomyopathy (DCC) from Chagas disease is associated with myocardial remodeling and interstitial fibrosis, resulting in extracellular matrix (ECM) changes. In this study, we characterized for the first time the serum matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) and MMP-9 levels, as well as their main cell sources in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients presenting with the indeterminate (IND) or cardiac (CARD) clinical form of Chagas disease. Our results showed that serum levels of MMP-9 are associated with the severity of Chagas disease. The analysis of MMP production by T lymphocytes showed that CD8+ T cells are the main mononuclear leukocyte source of both MMP-2 and MMP-9 molecules. Using a new 3-dimensional model of fibrosis, we observed that sera from patients with Chagas disease induced an increase in the extracellular matrix components in cardiac spheroids. Furthermore, MMP-2 and MMP-9 showed different correlations with matrix proteins and inflammatory cytokines in patients with Chagas disease. Our results suggest that MMP-2 and MMP-9 show distinct activities in Chagas disease pathogenesis. While MMP-9 seems to be involved in the inflammation and cardiac remodeling of Chagas disease, MMP-2 does not correlate with inflammatory molecules. PMID:23856618

  7. Matrix Metalloproteinases 2 and 9 Are Differentially Expressed in Patients with Indeterminate and Cardiac Clinical Forms of Chagas Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Fares, Rafaelle Christine Gomes; Gomes, Juliana de Assis Silva; Garzoni, Luciana Ribeiro; Waghabi, Mariana Caldas; Saraiva, Roberto Magalhães; Medeiros, Nayara Ingrid; Oliveira-Prado, Roberta; SANGENIS,Luiz Henrique Conde; Chambela, Mayara da Costa; de Araújo, Fernanda Fortes; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Damásio, Marcos Paulo; Valente, Vanessa Azevedo; Ferreira, Karine Silvestre; Sousa, Giovane Rodrigo

    2013-01-01

    Dilated chronic cardiomyopathy (DCC) from Chagas disease is associated with myocardial remodeling and interstitial fibrosis, resulting in extracellular matrix (ECM) changes. In this study, we characterized for the first time the serum matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) and MMP-9 levels, as well as their main cell sources in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients presenting with the indeterminate (IND) or cardiac (CARD) clinical form of Chagas disease. Our results showed that serum l...

  8. Genes and SNPs associated with non-hereditary and hereditary colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassiri, Mohammadreza; Kooshyar, Mohammad Mahdi; Roudbar, Zahra; Mahdavi, Morteza; Doosti, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in both men and women in the world and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths. The incidence of colorectal cancer has increased in Iran in the past three decades and is now considered as a serious problem for our society. This cancer has two types hereditary and non-hereditary, 80% of cases being the latter. Considering that the relationship between SNPs with diseases is a concern, many researchers believed that they offer valuable markers for identifying genes responsible for susceptibility to common diseases. In some cases, they are direct causes of human disease. One SNP can increase risk of cancer, but when considering the rate of overlap and frequency of DNA repair pathways, it might be expected that SNP alone cannot affect the final result of cancer, although several SNPs together can exert a significant influence. Therefore identification of these SNPs is very important. The most important loci which include mutations are: MLH1, MSH2, PMS2, APC, MUTYH, SMAD7, STK11, XRCC3, DNMT1, MTHFR, Exo1, XRCC1 and VDR. Presence of SNPs in these genes decreases or increases risk of colorectal cancer. In this article we reviewed the Genes and SNPs associated with non-hereditary and hereditary of colorectal cancer that recently were reported from candidate gene y, meta-analysis and GWAS studies. As with other cancers, colorectal cancer is associated with SNPs in gene loci. Generally, by exploring SNPs, it is feasible to predict the risk of developing colorectal cancer and thus establishing proper preventive measures. SNPs of genes associated with colorectal cancer can be used as a marker SNP panel as a potential tool for improving cancer diagnosis and treatment planning.

  9. [Age and effects of long-term cardiac training in patients with ischemic heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kałka, Dariusz; Sobieszczańska, Małgorzata; Marciniak, Wojciech; Markuszewski, Leszek; Popielewicz-Kautz, Aleksandra; Bak, Arystofanes; Korzeniowska, Jolanta; Rusiecki, Lesław; Janczak, Jacek; Adamus, Jerzy

    2007-02-01

    Ongoing with age decline of physical capacity reflects permanent processes of aging occurring in organism. It leads to a successive reduction of physical activity level, resulting with time in restrictions of independent life ability, which then causes anxiety and progressing social isolation. Evaluation of relation between age and effort tolerance in patients with chronic ischemic heart disease and comparison of cardiac rehabilitation effects in two patient groups at significantly various age. The study comprised 103 patients (69 males and 34 females) at the mean age of 61.2 +/- 0,8 years. The patients were referred to rehabilitation because of undergone invasive treatment of IHD, using CABG (44 pts) and PTCA (48 pts), or acute coronary syndromes (11 pts). The study group was divided to the two subgroups, "A" and "B", differing significantly (p B" group comprised 30 the oldest patients, with the mean age of 70.9 +/- 0.6 yrs. The examined groups were comparable as to the drug treatment, clinical status, echocardiographic parameters and BMI values. During the observation period no changes in treatment and diet were made. The all patients were subjected to six-month cardiac rehabilitation, consisting of cycle ergometer training (3 times/week) and generally improving exercises (2 times/week). The parameters analyzed were the values of metabolic equivalent (MET) obtained at the initial and the final exercise treadmill test, likewise the delta of MET. For a population of 103 patients with IHD, the negative, statistically significant correlation Pearson's coefficient between age and MET values of initial and final exercise tests and insignificant Pearson's coefficient between age and values of MET delta were obtained. Comparison analysis of the mean MET of initial and final exercise test and the mean MET delta did not show any significant differences between the both examined "A" (young) and "B" (old) groups. In the examined patients with IHD, there were observed a

  10. Tumor Necrosis Factor Is a Therapeutic Target for Immunological Unbalance and Cardiac Abnormalities in Chronic Experimental Chagas’ Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabela Resende Pereira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Chagas disease (CD is characterized by parasite persistence and immunological unbalance favoring systemic inflammatory profile. Chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy, the main manifestation of CD, occurs in a TNF-enriched milieu and frequently progresses to heart failure. Aim of the Study. To challenge the hypothesis that TNF plays a key role in Trypanosoma cruzi-induced immune deregulation and cardiac abnormalities, we tested the effect of the anti-TNF antibody Infliximab in chronically T. cruzi-infected C57BL/6 mice, a model with immunological, electrical, and histopathological abnormalities resembling Chagas’ heart disease. Results. Infliximab therapy did not reactivate parasite but reshaped the immune response as reduced TNF mRNA expression in the cardiac tissue and plasma TNF and IFNγ levels; diminished the frequency of IL-17A+ but increased IL-10+ CD4+ T-cells; reduced TNF+ but augmented IL-10+ Ly6C+ and F4/80+ cells. Further, anti-TNF therapy decreased cytotoxic activity but preserved IFNγ-producing VNHRFTLV-specific CD8+ T-cells in spleen and reduced the number of perforin+ cells infiltrating the myocardium. Importantly, Infliximab reduced the frequency of mice afflicted by arrhythmias and second degree atrioventricular blocks and decreased fibronectin deposition in the cardiac tissue. Conclusions. Our data support that TNF is a crucial player in the pathogenesis of Chagas’ heart disease fueling immunological unbalance which contributes to cardiac abnormalities.

  11. Incidence and risk factors of nosocomial infections after cardiac surgery in Georgian population with congenital heart diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomtadze, M; Chkhaidze, M; Mgeladze, E; Metreveli, I; Tsintsadze, A

    2010-01-01

    Nosocomial infections still remain a serious problem in patients undergoing open heart surgery. The aim of the study was to determine the incidence, etiology and main risk factors of nosocomial infections (NI) following cardiac surgery in congenital heart diseases population. Retrospective case study was conducted. 387 patients with congenital heart disease (CHD), who underwent cardiac surgery from January 2007 to December 2008 were studied. The age of the most patients varied between 1 day to 15 years, 73 patients (18,8%) were older than 15 years. All 387 patients underwent cardiac surgery. The rate of NI was 16%. The most common infections were bloodstream infections (BSI) (7,75%) and respiratory tract infections (7%) respectively. The rate of NI was higher in patients under 1 year of age, after urgent surgery and urgent reoperation, long cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and aortic cross-clamp time, also in patients with prolonged mechanical ventilation, massive haemotransfusion, with open heart bone after surgery, reintubation, hospitalization in another hospital during last three month. It was concluded that the most common nosocomial infection after cardiac surgery congenital heart diseases in Georgian population was blood stream infection. The main risk factors of NI in the same setting were age under 1 year, urgent surgery, urgent reoperation, long CPB and aortic cross-clamp time, long duration of mechanical ventilation, massive haemotransfusion, open heart bone after surgery, reintubation, hospitalization in another hospital during last three month.

  12. QT interval derived measurements in patients with cardiac syndrome X compared to coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Faisal Lutfi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies assessing effect of ischemia on ventricular repolarization are mostly directed towards patients with coronary artery disease (CAD; however, similar reports on cardiac syndrome X (CSX are scarce. Whether microvascular dysfunction of CSX and ischemia induced by CAD produce comparable effect on ventricular repolarization is unclear and deserve further studies. In the present study, ECG measures of ventricular repolarization were compared between CAD and CSX patients (40 subjects in each group. Following evaluation of sociodemographic characteristics, medical and past medical history, a resting ECG was used to assess measurements of ventricular repolarization in each patient, namely, QT interval (QT, corrected QT interval (QTc, QT dispersion (QTd, corrected QT dispersion (QTcd, adjacent QT dispersion (AdQTd, QT dispersion ratio (QTdR, JT dispersion (JTd and Corrected JT dispersion (JTcd. Results showed comparable QT intervals and QTd in CAD and CSX patients even after adjustment for the possible variations in gender, age and body mass index of the studied groups. Although JTd was increased in CSX subjects (26.6±7.2 ms compared with CAD patients (22.7±6.5 ms, p = 0.019, statistical significance disappeared after correcting JT for variations in heart rate. QT and QTc were significantly below 440 ms in CAD as well as CSX patients (p < 0.001. In contrast, maximum QTd, maximum QTcd and AdQTd of CAD and CSX patients were significantly above 440 ms (p < 0.001. The means of JTd and JTcd were significantly above 22 ms and 24 ms respectively (p < 0.001, p = 0.001 in CSX but not CAD patients (p = 0.529, p = 0.281. The present findings clearly demonstrate comparable measures of ventricular repolarization in CAD and CSX patients and consequently the risk of cardiac events.

  13. Predictors of Medical Management in Patients Undergoing Elective Cardiac Catheterization for Chronic Ischemic Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atreya, Auras R; Sivalingam, Senthil K; Arora, Sonali; Kashef, Mohammad Amin; Fitzgerald, Janice; Visintainer, Paul; Lotfi, Amir; Rothberg, Michael B

    2016-04-01

    Compared with medical therapy, percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) does not reduce mortality or myocardial infarction in patients with stable angina. Therefore, PCI should be guided by refractory anginal symptoms and not just lesion characteristics. We hypothesized that angiographic lesion characteristics and stress test results would have a greater role in the decision to proceed with PCI than would symptom severity. We performed a retrospective cohort study of patients undergoing elective cardiac catheterization and possible PCI at an academic medical center. Anginal symptoms, optimal medical therapy, antianginal therapy, stress test results, and angiographic lesions (including American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association [ACC/AHA] lesion type) were analyzed. Logistic regression was used to determine predictors of medical management among patients not referred for coronary artery bypass surgery. Of the 207 patients with obstructive lesions amenable to PCI, 163 underwent PCI and 44 were referred to medical therapy. In the multivariable logistic model, the following variables were associated with medical management: advancing age (odds ratio [OR] per 1 year: 0.94, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.91-0.98), chronic kidney disease (OR: 0.23, 95% CI: 0.06-0.95), distal location (OR: 0.21, 95% CI: 0.09-0.48), and ACC/AHA type C lesion (OR: 0.08, 95% CI: 0.03-0.22). There was no association with sex, race, symptoms, optimal medical therapy, maximal antianginal therapy, referral status, or type of interventional cardiologist (academic vs private practice). For patients undergoing cardiac catheterization for stable angina, the decision to proceed to PCI vs medical management appears to depend largely on patient and angiographic characteristics, but not on symptoms or ischemia. Distal and high-risk lesions (ACC/AHA type C) are more often referred for medical therapy. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Congenital cardiac disease in childhood x socioeconomic conditions: a relationship to be considered in public health?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thayanny Lopes do Vale Barros

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Congenital heart defects, cardiac malformations that occur in the embryonic period, constitute a serious health problem. They cover a proportion of 8-10 per 1000 live births and contribute to infant mortality. Objective: To identify the socioeconomic status of children undergoing cardiac surgery at the Hospital Universitário da Universidade Federal do Maranhão, in São Luis, the existence of material elements that contribute to worsening conditions. Methods: We conducted a retrospective study with a quantitative approach, descriptive and reflective, from the interviews conducted by the Social Service Social with families of children with heart disease from January 2011 to July 2012. Results: A total of 95 interviews, the results reveal that (75.79% of children have elements that suggest poor socioeconomic conditions. It also shows that only 66.33% lived in brick house, while (31.73% in mud, adobe and straw houses. With regard to income, it showed that only 4.08% received 1-2 minimum wages, while the remaining (95.9% with benchmarks oscillating half the minimum wage (27.55%, 1/4 of the minimum wage and (24.48% and income below 70 dollars per person, featuring extreme poverty. On the social security situation prevailing at children with no ties to 61.22%. With respect to benefits, we found that only (12.24% of children were in the enjoyment of the Continuous Cash Benefit - CCB. Conclusion: Poor socioeconomic conditions listed as major obstacles in meeting the needs, resulting in the maintenance of health conditions and even allowing the aggravation of an existing pathology.

  15. QT Interval Derived Measurements in Patients with Cardiac Syndrome X Compared to Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutfi, Mohamed F

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies assessing effect of ischemia on ventricular repolarization are mostly directed toward patients with coronary artery disease (CAD); however, similar reports on cardiac syndrome X (CSX) are scarce. Whether microvascular dysfunction of CSX and ischemia induced by CAD produce comparable effect on ventricular repolarization is unclear and deserve further studies. In the present study, ECG measures of ventricular repolarization were compared between CAD and CSX patients (40 subjects in each group). Following evaluation of sociodemographic characteristics, medical and past medical history, a resting ECG was used to assess measurements of ventricular repolarization in each patient, namely, QT interval (QT), corrected QT interval (QTc), QT dispersion (QTd), corrected QT dispersion (QTcd), adjacent QT dispersion (AdQTd), QT dispersion ratio (QTdR), JT dispersion (JTd), and Corrected JT dispersion (JTcd). Results showed comparable QT intervals and QTd in CAD and CSX patients even after adjustment for the possible variations in gender, age and body mass index of the studied groups. Although JTd was increased in CSX subjects (26.6 ± 7.2 ms) compared with CAD patients (22.7 ± 6.5 ms, p = 0.019), statistical significance disappeared after correcting JT for variations in heart rate. QT and QTc were significantly below 440 ms in CAD as well as CSX patients (p < 0.001). In contrast, maximum QTd, maximum QTcd and AdQTd of CAD and CSX patients were significantly above 440 ms (p < 0.001). The means of JTd and JTcd were significantly above 22 ms and 24 ms respectively (p < 0.001, p = 0.001) in CSX but not CAD patients (p = 0.529, p = 0.281). The present findings clearly demonstrate comparable measures of ventricular repolarization in CAD and CSX patients and consequently an equal risk of cardiac events in both groups.

  16. Galectin-3 in cardiac muscle and circulation of dogs with degenerative mitral valve disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakarin, S; Rungsipipat, A; Surachetpong, S D

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to determine the association of cardiac fibrosis with the galectin-3 (Gal-3) expression, a fibrosis marker in the myocardium and to compare plasma Gal-3 levels in normal and degenerative mitral valve disease (DMVD) dogs. Studies of muscle expression and plasma levels of Gal-3 were performed in separate groups of dogs. The tissue study was performed on cardiac tissues collected from 22 dogs. The plasma study was performed on 46 client-owned dogs. Papillary muscle and left ventricular (LV) wall obtained from 10 normal and 12 DMVD dogs were stained with Masson trichrome and Gal-3 immunohistochemistry to determine fibrosis areas and Gal-3 expression. Plasma samples were collected from 19 normal and 27 DMVD dogs for Gal-3 measurement by ELISA. Percentage of fibrosis was higher in papillary muscle and LV wall of DMVD dogs (66.13 ± 5.58%; 52.98 ± 8.45%) than in normal dogs (35.40 ± 8.46%; 27.41 ± 7.91%; p dogs (27.95 ± 6.94%; 17.25 ± 8.76%) than in normal dogs (1.08 ± 0.67%; 0.52 ± 0.42%; p dogs (1.50; 0.87-2.36 ng/mL) compared to normal dogs (0.42; 0.27-0.63 ng/mL; p dogs than in normal dogs. DMVD dogs had higher plasma Gal-3 concentrations than normal dogs. Tissue Gal-3 is a candidate of fibrosis biomarker in DMVD; however, further investigation of associations between plasma Gal-3 and myocardial fibrosis is necessary. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Anxiety associations with cardiac symptoms, angiographic disease severity, and healthcare utilization: the NHLBI-sponsored Women's Ischemia Syndrome Evaluation.

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    Rutledge, Thomas; Kenkre, Tanya S; Bittner, Vera; Krantz, David S; Thompson, Diane V; Linke, Sarah E; Eastwood, Jo-Ann; Eteiba, Wafia; Cornell, Carol E; Vaccarino, Viola; Pepine, Carl J; Johnson, B Delia; Bairey Merz, C Noel

    2013-10-03

    Anxiety is common among patients presenting with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD). In a sample of women with signs and symptoms of ischemia, we examined three anxiety markers as predictors of CAD endpoints including: 1) cardiac symptom indicators; 2) angiographic CAD severity; and 3) healthcare utilization (cardiac hospitalizations and 5-year cardiovascular [CVD] healthcare costs). Participants completed a baseline protocol including coronary angiogram, cardiac symptoms, psychosocial measures and a median 5.9-year follow-up to track hospitalizations. We calculated CVD costs based on cardiac hospitalizations, treatment visits, and CVD medications. Anxiety measures included anxiolytic medication use, Spielberger Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) scores, and anxiety disorder treatment history. The sample numbered 514 women with anxiety measure data and covariates (mean age=57.5 [11.1]). One in five (20.4%) women reported using anxiolytic agents. Anxiety correlated with cardiac symptom indicators (anxiolytic use with nighttime angina and nitroglycerine use; STAI scores and anxiety disorder treatment history with nighttime angina, shortness of breath, and angina frequency). Anxiety disorder treatment history (but not STAI scores or anxiolytics) predicted less severe CAD. Anxiolytic use (but not STAI scores or anxiety disorder treatment history) predicted hospitalizations for chest pain and coronary catheterization (HRs=2.0, 95% CIs=1.1-4.7). Anxiety measures predicted higher 5-year CVD costs (+9.0-42.7%) irrespective of CAD severity. Among women with signs and symptoms of myocardial ischemia, anxiety measures predict cardiac endpoints ranging from cardiac symptom severity to healthcare utilization. Based on these findings, anxiety may warrant greater consideration among women with suspected CAD. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  18. Anxiety Associations with Cardiac Symptoms, Angiographic Disease Severity, & Healthcare Utilization: The NHLBI-Sponsored Women’s Ischemia Syndrome Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutledge, Thomas; Kenkre, Tanya S.; Bittner, Vera; Krantz, David S.; Thompson, Diane V.; Linke, Sarah E.; Eastwood, Jo-Ann; Eteiba, Wafia; Cornell, Carol E.; Vaccarino, Viola; Pepine, Carl J.; Johnson, B. Delia; Merz, C. Noel Bairey

    2013-01-01

    Background Anxiety is common among patients presenting with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD). In a sample of women with signs and symptoms of ischemia, we examined three anxiety markers as predictors of CAD endpoints including: 1) cardiac symptom indicators; 2) angiographic CAD severity; and 3) healthcare utilization (cardiac hospitalizations & 5-year cardiovascular [CVD] healthcare costs). Methods Participants completed a baseline protocol including coronary angiogram, cardiac symptoms, psychosocial measures and a median 5.9-year follow-up to track hospitalizations. We calculated CVD costs based on cardiac hospitalizations, treatment visits, and CVD medications. Anxiety measures included anxiolytic medication use, Spielberger Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) scores, and anxiety disorder treatment history. Results The sample numbered 514 women with anxiety measure data and covariates (mean age=57.5[11.1]). One in five (20.4%) women reported using anxiolytic agents. Anxiety correlated with cardiac symptom indicators (anxiolytic use with nighttime angina & nitroglycerine use; STAI scores & anxiety disorder treatment history with nighttime angina, shortness of breath, & angina frequency). Anxiety disorder treatment history (but not STAI scores or anxiolytics) predicted less severe CAD. Anxiolytic use (but not STAI scores or anxiety disorder treatment history) predicted hospitalizations for chest pain and coronary catheterization (HR’s=2.0, 95% CI’s=1.1–4.7). Anxiety measures predicted higher 5-year CVD costs (+9.0–42.7%) irrespective of CAD severity. Conclusions Among women with signs and symptoms of myocardial ischemia, anxiety measures predict cardiac endpoints ranging from cardiac symptom severity to healthcare utilization. Based on these findings, anxiety may warrant greater consideration among women with suspected CAD. PMID:23410495

  19. Hereditary mucoepithelial dysplasia and severe respiratory distress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Halawa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary mucoepithelial dysplasia (HMD is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by mucoepithelial disruption of the skin, hair and mucous membranes. It results from defective gap junction formation and leads to non-scarring alopecia, mucosal erythema, perineal erythematous intertrigo, involvement of the conjunctival mucosa, and pulmonary disease. We present a case of severe respiratory distress in an initially healthy full term infant born to a mother with HMD. This infant later developed signs and symptoms of HMD. A high index of suspicion for pulmonary infection with atypical organism is essential in infants with a family history of HMD who present with respiratory distress.

  20. Mitochondria as Key Targets of Cardioprotection in Cardiac Ischemic Disease: Role of Thyroid Hormone Triiodothyronine

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    Francesca Forini

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic heart disease is the major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Early reperfusion after acute myocardial ischemia has reduced short-term mortality, but it is also responsible for additional myocardial damage, which in the long run favors adverse cardiac remodeling and heart failure evolution. A growing body of experimental and clinical evidence show that the mitochondrion is an essential end effector of ischemia/ reperfusion injury and a major trigger of cell death in the acute ischemic phase (up to 48–72 h after the insult, the subacute phase (from 72 h to 7–10 days and chronic stage (from 10–14 days to one month after the insult. As such, in recent years scientific efforts have focused on mitochondria as a target for cardioprotective strategies in ischemic heart disease and cardiomyopathy. The present review discusses recent advances in this field, with special emphasis on the emerging role of the biologically active thyroid hormone triiodothyronine (T3.