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Sample records for hepatitis virus infections

  1. Hepatitis Virus Infections in Poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yugo, Danielle M; Hauck, Ruediger; Shivaprasad, H L; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2016-09-01

    Viral hepatitis in poultry is a complex disease syndrome caused by several viruses belonging to different families including avian hepatitis E virus (HEV), duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV), duck hepatitis A virus (DHAV-1, -2, -3), duck hepatitis virus Types 2 and 3, fowl adenoviruses (FAdV), and turkey hepatitis virus (THV). While these hepatitis viruses share the same target organ, the liver, they each possess unique clinical and biological features. In this article, we aim to review the common and unique features of major poultry hepatitis viruses in an effort to identify the knowledge gaps and aid the prevention and control of poultry viral hepatitis. Avian HEV is an Orthohepevirus B in the family Hepeviridae that naturally infects chickens and consists of three distinct genotypes worldwide. Avian HEV is associated with hepatitis-splenomegaly syndrome or big liver and spleen disease in chickens, although the majority of the infected birds are subclinical. Avihepadnaviruses in the family of Hepadnaviridae have been isolated from ducks, snow geese, white storks, grey herons, cranes, and parrots. DHBV evolved with the host as a noncytopathic form without clinical signs and rarely progressed to chronicity. The outcome for DHBV infection varies by the host's ability to elicit an immune response and is dose and age dependent in ducks, thus mimicking the pathogenesis of human hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections and providing an excellent animal model for human HBV. DHAV is a picornavirus that causes a highly contagious virus infection in ducks with up to 100% flock mortality in ducklings under 6 wk of age, while older birds remain unaffected. The high morbidity and mortality has an economic impact on intensive duck production farming. Duck hepatitis virus Types 2 and 3 are astroviruses in the family of Astroviridae with similarity phylogenetically to turkey astroviruses, implicating the potential for cross-species infections between strains. Duck astrovirus (DAstV) causes

  2. Epidemiology of Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C Virus infections among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hepatitis B and hepatitis C virus infection are common in Nigeria; where they are a major cause of both acute and chronic liver disease, as well as hepatocellular cancer. Persons at risk of acquisition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection are also at risk of acquisition of infection with Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and ...

  3. Medicinal herbs for hepatitis C virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Jianping; Manheimer, Eric; Tsutani, Kiichiro

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess beneficial and harmful effects of medicinal herbs for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection.......The aim of this study was to assess beneficial and harmful effects of medicinal herbs for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection....

  4. Hepatitis C Virus and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Co-Infection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections are major health problems worldwide. HCV/HIV co-infection has been shown to increase the frequency of liver disease and also maternal-fetal transmission of HCV. Little data exist on the prevalence of co-infection of these viruses in ...

  5. Persistent hepatitis virus infection and immune homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Yun

    2014-01-01

    Homeostasis between the host and viruses is naturally maintained. On the one hand, the immune system activates the immune response to kill or eliminate viruses; on the other hand, the immune system controls the immune response to maintain immune homeostasis. The cause of persistent infections with hepatitis viruses such as HBV and HCV is that viral molecules damage the immune system of the host and their variants escape immune clearance. Long-term coexistence of the host and viruses is the pr...

  6. Persistent hepatitis virus infection and immune homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHOU Yun

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Homeostasis between the host and viruses is naturally maintained. On the one hand, the immune system activates the immune response to kill or eliminate viruses; on the other hand, the immune system controls the immune response to maintain immune homeostasis. The cause of persistent infections with hepatitis viruses such as HBV and HCV is that viral molecules damage the immune system of the host and their variants escape immune clearance. Long-term coexistence of the host and viruses is the process involving various immune cells and molecules and is the result of homeostasis maintenance in antiviral immune response. The immune homeostasis maintained during persistent infections with hepatitis viruses is analyzed by the cellular and molecular mechanisms.

  7. Cognitive dysfunction and hepatitis C virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Solinas, Antonio; Piras, Maria Rita; Deplano, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive dysfunction in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a distinct form of minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE). In fact, the majority of HCV-positive patients, irrespective of the grading of liver fibrosis, display alterations of verbal learning, attention, executive function, and memory when they are evaluated by suitable neuropsychological tests. Similarities between the cognitive dysfunction of HCV patients and MHE of patients with different etiologies are uncl...

  8. Hepatitis C Virus Infection In Nigerianswith Diabetesmellitus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background/Aims: Studies from mainly Caucasian populations have shown epidemiological evidence of an association between diabetes mellitus and Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. The aim of this study was to determine whether any such association exists in a black African population with diabetes mellitus. Method: ...

  9. Hepatitis C Virus Infection in Nigerians | Ejiofor | Nigerian Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Hepatitis C virus is a chronic life long infection in the majority of patients who are infected with the virus. Not much is known and written/published about this virus in Nigeria. Objective: To asses the status of hepatitis C virus infection in Nigeria. Materials and method: Sources of information were mainly from ...

  10. Clinical studies on hepatitis B, C, and E virus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemse, S.B.

    2017-01-01

    Chronic viral hepatitis is a major cause of liver-related morbidity and mortality. This thesis describes clinical aspects of hepatitis B, C, and E virus infection. Part I focuses on hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. This part describes immune responses of patients with acute HBV-infection,

  11. Diagnosis and Management of Paediatric Hepatitis C Virus Infection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diagnosis and Management of Paediatric Hepatitis C Virus Infection. ... Without accurate diagnosis and follow up, these children cannot be offered optimal care, and are at risk ... Keywords:Acute infective hepatitis;Catalase; LiverFunction Tests ...

  12. Seroprevalence of hepatitis B virus infection among pregnant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-06-03

    Jun 3, 2015 ... Objectives: The objectives were to determine the seroprevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and assess the major risk factors among ... Key words: Hepatitis B surface antigen, hepatitis B virus, infectivity, Lagos, Nigeria, seroprevalence .... Z is the unit normal deviate corresponding to the desired.

  13. Hepatitis C virus infection of cholangiocarcinoma cell lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fletcher, Nicola F.; Humphreys, Elizabeth; Jennings, Elliott; Osburn, William; Lissauer, Samantha; Wilson, Garrick K.; van Ijzendoorn, Sven C. D.; Baumert, Thomas F.; Balfe, Peter; Afford, Simon; McKeating, Jane A.

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects the liver and hepatocytes are the major cell type supporting viral replication. Hepatocytes and cholangiocytes derive from a common hepatic progenitor cell that proliferates during inflammatory conditions, raising the possibility that cholangiocytes may support HCV

  14. Hepatitis B virus infection in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Yoshihiko; Utsumi, Takako; Lusida, Maria Inge; Hayashi, Yoshitake

    2015-10-14

    Approximately 240 million people are chronically infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV), 75% of whom reside in Asia. Approximately 600000 of infected patients die each year due to HBV-related diseases or hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The endemicity of hepatitis surface antigen in Indonesia is intermediate to high with a geographical difference. The risk of HBV infection is high in hemodialysis (HD) patients, men having sex with men, and health care workers. Occult HBV infection has been detected in various groups such as blood donors, HD patients, and HIV-infected individuals and children. The most common HBV subgenotype in Indonesia is B3 followed by C1. Various novel subgenotypes of HBV have been identified throughout Indonesia, with the novel HBV subgenotypes C6-C16 and D6 being successfully isolated. Although a number of HBV subgenotypes have been discovered in Indonesia, genotype-related pathogenicity has not yet been elucidated in detail. Therefore, genotype-related differences in the prognosis of liver disease and their effects on treatments need to be determined. A previous study conducted in Indonesia revealed that hepatic steatosis was associated with disease progression. Pre-S2 mutations and mutations at C1638T and T1753V in HBV/B3 have been associated with advanced liver diseases including HCC. However, drug resistance to lamivudine, which is prominent in Indonesia, remains obscure. Although the number of studies on HBV in Indonesia has been increasing, adequate databases on HBV infection are limited. We herein provided an overview of the epidemiology and clinical characteristics of HBV infection in Indonesia.

  15. Hepatitis C virus infection and the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissenborn, Karin; Tryc, Anita B; Heeren, Meike; Worthmann, Hans; Pflugrad, Henning; Berding, Georg; Bokemeyer, Martin; Tillmann, Hans L; Goldbecker, Annemarie

    2009-03-01

    There is growing evidence that hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infection may affect the brain. About half of the HCV-infected patients complain of chronic fatigue irrespective of their stage of liver disease or virus replication rate. Even after successful antiviral therapy fatigue persists in about one third of the patients. Many patients, in addition, report of deficits in attention, concentration and memory, some also of depression. Psychometric testing revealed deficits in attention and verbal learning ability as characteristic for HCV-afflicted patients with normal liver function. Magnetic resonance spectroscopic studies showed alterations of the cerebral choline, N-acetyl-aspartate, and creatine content in the basal ganglia, white matter and frontal cortex, respectively. Recently, pathologic cerebral serotonin and dopamine transporter binding and regional alterations of the cerebral glucose utilisation compatible with alterations of the dopaminergic attentional system were observed. Several studies detected HCV in brain samples or cerebro-spinal fluid. Interestingly, viral sequences in the brain often differed from those in the liver, but were closely related to those found in lymphoid tissue. Therefore, the Trojan horse hypothesis emerged: HCV-infected mononuclear blood cells enter the brain, enabling the virus to reside within the brain (probably in microglia) and to infect brain cells, especially astrocytes.

  16. The prevalence of hepatitis B virus infection in Nigerian children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Hepatitis B virus infection is a major global health problem of public health importance. In a bid to control the infection, the Nigerian government in 2004 introduced hepatitis B vaccine into the National Program on Immunization. There are no studies on the prevalence of hepatitis B in adolescent prior to 2004.

  17. Hepatitis C virus infection and risk of coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roed, Torsten; Lebech, Anne-Mette; Kjaer, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Several chronic infections have been associated with cardiovascular diseases, including Chlamydia pneumoniae, human immunodeficiency virus and viral hepatitis. This review evaluates the literature on the association between chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and the risk of coronary artery...... disease (CAD)....

  18. Phyllanthus species for chronic hepatitis B virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yun, Xia; Luo, Hui; Liu, Jian Ping

    2011-01-01

    Phyllanthus species for patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection have been assessed in clinical trials, but no consensus regarding their usefulness exists.......Phyllanthus species for patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection have been assessed in clinical trials, but no consensus regarding their usefulness exists....

  19. Oral manifestations of hepatitis C virus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrozzo, Marco; Scally, Kara

    2014-01-01

    Extrahepatic manifestations (EHMs) of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection can affect a variety of organ systems with significant morbidity and mortality. Some of the most frequently reported EHM of HCV infection, involve the oral region predominantly or exclusively. Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a chronic inflammatory condition that is potentially malignant and represents cell-mediated reaction to a variety of extrinsic antigens, altered self-antigens, or super antigens. Robust epidemiological evidence support the link between OLP and HCV. As the virus may replicate in the oral mucosa and attract HCV-specific T lymphocytes, HCV may be implicated in OLP pathogenesis. Sjögren syndrome (SjS) is an autoimmune exocrinopathy, characterized by dryness of the mouth and eyes and a multitude of other systemic signs and symptoms. SjS patients have also an increased risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Patients with chronic hepatitis C do frequently have histological signs of Sjögren-like sialadenitis with mild or even absent clinical symptoms. However, it is still unclear if HCV may cause a disease mimicking SjS or it is directly responsible for the development of SjS in a specific subset of patients. Oral squamous cell carcinoma is the most common oral malignant tumour and at least in some part of the world could be linked to HCV. PMID:24976694

  20. Hepatitis E Virus (HEV) Infection in Ireland

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hickey, C

    2016-09-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a single stranded RNA virus causing infection worldwide. In developing countries HEV genotypes 1 and 2 spread faeco-orally via water. Recently, infections with HEV have been detected in Europe and North America in patients with no travel history. These are food-borne HEV genotypes 3 and 4, a pig-associated zoonosis. Most infections are asymptomatic but morbidity and chronic infection may occur with prior liver disease or immunosuppression. International seroprevalence rates vary and with improved diagnostics have increased. To determine the current prevalence in this region we studied anonymised serum samples submitted in 2015 for routine testing. We detected anti-HEV IgG in 16\\/198 (8%) individuals, highest rate in 40-59 year olds (43.8%). This is higher than reported for the same region in 1995 (0.4%) using a previous generation assay. This study provides evidence of HEV circulation in Ireland and reinforces the need for ongoing surveillance.

  1. Hepatitis B virus infection in children.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Gorman, C S

    2012-02-01

    Recent increases in Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection prompted us to characterize HBV-infected children in Ireland and to audit management, by reviewing prospectively gathered data. Of 46 children (29 [63%] male), median age at presentation was 8.1 years (range 0.6-17.6), monitoring duration was 22.5 months (range 1-101), 23\\/46 (50%) were European (including 9 [19.6%] Irish), 15 (32.6%) African and 9 (19.6%) Asian. Acquisition was vertical (25\\/46 [54.3%]), horizontal (5\\/46 [10.9%]), unknown (16\\/46 [34.8%]). HBV-DNA was >100,000,000 cpm in 20\\/32 (62.5%) with chronic infection. Hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) was detected in 32\\/44 (72.7%). We estimate that universal neonatal vaccination (UNV-HBV) could have prevented 22% of cases, and could limit further horizontal HBV spread. This supports the recent introduction of UNV-HBV.

  2. Noninvasive Monitoring of Hepatic Damage from Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Alavez-Ramírez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The mathematical model for the dynamics of the hepatitis C proposed in Avendaño et al. (2002, with four populations (healthy and unhealthy hepatocytes, the viral load of the hepatitis C virus, and T killer cells, is revised. Showing that the reduced model obtained by considering only the first three of these populations, known as basic model, has two possible equilibrium states: the uninfected one where viruses are not present in the individual, and the endemic one where viruses and infected cells are present. A threshold parameter (the basic reproductive virus number is introduced, and in terms of it, the global stability of both two possible equilibrium states is established. Other central result consists in showing, by model numerical simulations, the feasibility of monitoring liver damage caused by HCV, avoiding unnecessary biopsies and the undesirable related inconveniences/imponderables to the patient; another result gives a mathematical modelling basis to recently developed techniques for the disease assessment based essentially on viral load measurements.

  3. Hepatitis delta virus infection: open issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niro, Grazia Anna; Gioffreda, Domenica; Fontana, Rosanna

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) consists of a circular single-stranded RNA genome which assembles two viral proteins and acquires a lipid envelope in which the hepatitis B surface antigens (HBsAg) are embedded. HDV does not encode its own polymerase, but exploits a cellular enzyme for its replication. A better understanding of the mechanisms of HDV replication mechanism would provide new insights for antiviral strategies. Based on genomic variability, eight major genotypes of HDV have been identified, which differ as much as 40% in the nucleotide sequence. The cloning of HDV-RNA has provided genetic probes for the measurement of HDV-RNA in serum and liver; the sensitivity of HDV-RNA detection improved significantly when the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique was introduced. As no commercial test is standardized for viral load detection, home-made assays have been developed in the different referral centers, which may not be comparable. Quantification of HDV in serum by real-time PCR has been recently proposed in the management of chronically infected patients. No specific inhibitors of HDV are available at present and, in spite of the crucial relationship between HDV and HBV, drugs that block HBV have only a theoretical but no sound effect on HDV replication. Copyright © 2011 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Cognitive dysfunction and hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solinas, Antonio; Piras, Maria Rita; Deplano, Angelo

    2015-05-08

    Cognitive dysfunction in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a distinct form of minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE). In fact, the majority of HCV-positive patients, irrespective of the grading of liver fibrosis, display alterations of verbal learning, attention, executive function, and memory when they are evaluated by suitable neuropsychological tests. Similarities between the cognitive dysfunction of HCV patients and MHE of patients with different etiologies are unclear. It is also unknown how the metabolic alterations of advanced liver diseases interact with the HCV-induced cognitive dysfunction, and whether these alterations are reversed by antiviral therapies. HCV replication in the brain may play a role in the pathogenesis of neuroinflammation. HCV-related brain dysfunction may be associated with white matter neuronal loss, alterations of association tracts and perfusion. It is unclear to what extent, in patients with cirrhosis, HCV triggers an irreversible neurodegenerative brain damage. New insights on this issue will be provided by longitudinal studies using the protocols established by the diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders fifth edition for cognitive disorders. The domains to be evaluated are complex attention; executive functions; learning and memory; perceptual motor functions; social cognition. These evaluations should be associated with fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocols for major cognitive disorders including magnetic resonance spectroscopy, diffusion tensor imaging, magnetic resonance perfusion, and functional MRI. Also, the characteristics of portal hypertension, including the extent of liver blood flow and the type of portal shunts, should be evaluated.

  5. Distribution of hepatitis B virus infection in Namibia | Mhata | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Namibia regards hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection as a public health problem and introduced hepatitis B vaccinations for infants during 2009. However, information on HBV infection in the country remains limited, and effective public health interventions may be compromised in the absence of adequate ...

  6. Hepatitis C virus infection in patients with oral lichen planus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Lichen planus (LP) is a chronic mucocutaneous disease of uncertain etiology. Recent reports suggest that LP is an extrahepatic manifestation of Hepatitis C infection. Objective: To determine the association of Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection with oral LP and to study the tests of liver function in patients with ...

  7. Alpha-Fetoprotein in Asymptomatic Hepatitis B Virus Infected Subjects

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is high in sub-Saharan Africa. A great number of the infected individuals are asymptomatic and are commonly diagnosed by chance. Alpha-fetoprotein and liver function tests were evaluated in asymptomatic hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) positive subjects to ascertain ...

  8. Hepatitis C virus infection in Saudi Arabian recipients of renal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    conclusions in regard to the clinical impact of hepatitis C virus [HCV] infection. ... HCV infection and assessed its effect on patient and graft survival and occurrence of chronic hepatitis in renal transplant ... at the time of censorship was compared with the rates in 99 hemodialyzed patients, 400 healthy volunteers and 113

  9. Genus Phyllanthus for chronic hepatitis B virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, J; Lin, Haili; McIntosh, H

    2001-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of genus Phyllanthus for chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection we performed a systematic review of randomized clinical trials. Randomized trials comparing genus Phyllanthus vs. placebo, no intervention, general nonspecific treatment, other herbal medicine...

  10. Hepatitis A virus infection: Epidemiology and genetic diversity

    OpenAIRE

    Báez Triana, Paula Andrea; Navas Navas, María Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis A virus infection is a global public health problem. The virus has a wide range of distribution and it is the main cause of acute hepatitis transmitted by the enteric route in Latin America. The viral particle is stable under environmental conditions and conserves its infectivity for several weeks, enabling its transmission by contaminated water and food. Worldwide, different epidemiological patterns have been identified, which may change over time by modification of social and e...

  11. Hepatitis C virus infection in the human immunodeficiency virus infected patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Louise Nygaard; Lundbo, Lene Fogt; Benfield, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) share the same transmission routes; therefore, coinfection is frequent. An estimated 5-10 million individuals alone in the western world are infected with both viruses. The majority of people acquire HCV by injection drug use and...

  12. Seroprevalence and Risk Factors of Hepatitis Delta Virus in Chronic Hepatitis B Virus Infection in Zahedan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Bakhshipour

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis delta virus (HDV infection results in more severe and even fulminant form of hepatitis B in co-infected cases. This study was designed to estimate the prevalence of anti-HDV positivity and the associated risk factors in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection in Zahedan (Iran. In this cross-sectional study a total of 440 consecutive patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV infection attending the Zahedan Gastroenterology and Hepatology clinics from 2008 to 2011 were included. We performed test for HDV serum marker, using commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit. Patients were split into two groups according to their HDV antibody status as HDV positive or negative. The collected data were coded, and the statistical analyses were conducted. Four hundred and forty patients with various forms of chronic HBV-related liver diseases enrolled in the study. 200 (45.5% patients were carrier for HBV. 196 (44.5% patients had chronic active hepatitis and 44 (10% patients suffered from cirrhosis. Anti-HDV was demonstrated in 75 patients (17%. The prevalence of HDV was 7%, 16.3% and 65.9% in carriers, patients with chronic active hepatitis and cirrhosis, respectively. HDV infection is still an important public health problem in Zahedan and appears a major cause of progression of liver disease induced by HBV.

  13. Serological evidence of hepatitis E virus infection among volunteer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection causes as an acute, self-limiting hepatitis that is associated with high mortality, especially in pregnant women. We previously reported high sero-prevalence of HEV among pregnant women and persons who worked with pigs. Therefore we evaluated the prevalence of anti-HEV IgM and ...

  14. Prevalence of Hepatitis B virus infection amongst parturients in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is endemic in Nigeria and indeed the whole of Sub-Saharan Africa. The Society of Gastroenterology and Hepatology in Nigeria (SOGHIN) recommends HBV screening for all Nigerians to pave way for early detection and treatment of the infection in those who are infected and ...

  15. Unfolded protein response in hepatitis C virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiu-Wan eChan

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV is a single-stranded, positive-sense RNA virus of clinical importance. The virus establishes a chronic infection and can progress from chronic hepatitis, steatosis to fibrosis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The mechanisms of viral persistence and pathogenesis are poorly understood. Recently the unfolded protein response (UPR, a cellular homeostatic response to endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress, has emerged to be a major contributing factor in many human diseases. It is also evident that viruses interact with the host UPR in many different ways and the outcome could be pro-viral, anti-viral or pathogenic, depending on the particular type of infection. Here we present evidence for the elicitation of chronic ER stress in HCV infection. We analyze the UPR signaling pathways involved in HCV infection, the various levels of UPR regulation by different viral proteins and finally, we propose several mechanisms by which the virus provokes the UPR.

  16. Experimental infection of pregnant gilts with swine hepatitis E virus

    OpenAIRE

    Kasorndorkbua, Chaiyan; Thacker, Brad J.; Halbur, Patrick G.; Guenette, Denis K.; Buitenwerf, Ryan M.; Royer, Ryan L.; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2003-01-01

    To determine the effect of swine hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection on pregnant gilts, their fetuses, and offspring, 12 gilts were intravenously inoculated with swine HEV. Six gilts, who were not inoculated, served as controls. All inoculated gilts became actively infected and shed HEV in feces, but vertical transmission was not detected in the fetuses. There was no evidence of clinical disease in the gilts or their offspring. Mild multifocal lymphohistiocytic hepatitis was observed in 4 of 12...

  17. Humanized chimeric mouse models of hepatitis B virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suwan Sun

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B virus (HBV infection is associated with an increased risk of hepatic cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, fulminant hepatitis and end-stage hepatic failure. Despite the availability of anti-HBV therapies, HBV infection remains a major global public health problem. Developing an ideal animal model of HBV infection to clarify the details of the HBV replication process, the viral life cycle, the resulting immunoresponse and the precise pathogenesis of HBV is difficult because HBV has an extremely narrow host range and almost exclusively infects humans. In this review, we summarize and evaluate animal models available for studying HBV infection, especially focusing on humanized chimeric mouse models, and we discuss future development trends regarding immunocompetent humanized mouse models that can delineate the natural history and immunopathophysiology of HBV infection.

  18. Interleukin 28B genetic polymorphism and hepatitis B virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Toru

    2014-09-14

    Interleukin (IL) 28B genetic polymorphism is significantly associated with the sustained virological response rate in patients with chronic hepatitis C treated with pegylated interferon-α (PEG-IFN) plus ribavirin and with spontaneous hepatitis C virus clearance. However, a consensus on the relationship between IL28B genetic polymorphism and the favorable outcome of chronic hepatitis B virus infection defined by hepatitis B e antigen seroconversion, and/or hepatitis B surface antigen seroclearance in patients treated with interferon or PEG-IFN has not been reached. Several reports failed to show a positive association, while some studies demonstrated a positive association in certain subject settings. More prospective studies including large cohorts are needed to determine the possible association between IL28B genetic polymorphism and the outcome of interferon or PEG-IFN treatment for chronic hepatitis B.

  19. Hepatitis B virus infection in dentistry: a forgotten topic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahboobi, N; Agha-Hosseini, F; Mahboobi, N; Safari, S; Lavanchy, D; Alavian, S-M

    2010-05-01

    More than two billion people have been infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV). Globally, 350-400 million suffer from chronic HBV infection. It is postulated that dentists and dental staff are infected and transmit the virus to their patients more than any other occupation. The aim of this article is to review the HBV incidence in dental society, the points of view of dentists and their patients regarding transmission of the virus during dental procedures, the occurrence of HBV outbreaks in dental clinics and the importance of methods of preventing HBV infection in dentistry.

  20. Liver histology in co-infection of hepatitis C virus (HCV and Hepatitis G virus (HGV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    STRAUSS Edna

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available As little is known about liver histology in the co-infection of hepatitis C virus (HCV and hepatitis G virus (HGV, HGV RNA was investigated in 46 blood donors with hepatitis C, 22 of them with liver biopsy: co-infection HCV / HGV (n = 6 and HCV isolated infection (n = 16. Besides staging and grading of inflammation at portal, peri-portal and lobular areas (Brazilian Consensus, the fibrosis progression index was also calculated. All patients had no symptoms or signs of liver disease and prevalence of HGV / HCV co-infection was 15.2%. Most patients had mild liver disease and fibrosis progression index, calculated only in patients with known duration of infection, was 0.110 for co-infection and 0.130 for isolated HCV infection, characterizing these patients as "slow fibrosers". No statistical differences could be found between the groups, although a lesser degree of inflammation was always present in co-infection. In conclusion co-infection HCV / HGV does not induce a more aggressive liver disease, supporting the hypothesis that HGV is not pathogenic.

  1. Prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection among Makerere ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Background: Medical students in the course of their clinical work are at risk of acquiring hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection or transmitting it to their patients. ... Risk factors associated HBV infection included having a sexual relationship, accidental needlestick injuries, and unprotected exposure to patients' body fluids.

  2. Fracture risk in hepatitis C virus infected persons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ann-Brit Eg; Omland, Lars Haukali; Krarup, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: The association between Hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infection and fracture risk is not well characterized. We compared fracture risk between HCV-seropositive (HCV-exposed) patients and the general population and between patients with cleared and chronic HCV-infection. METHODS...

  3. Seroprevalence and Correlates of Hepatitis C Virus Infection in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a hepatotropic virus and the cause of the majority of the cases of the formerly called. “transfusion – related non-A, non-B hepatitis” with profound effect in the liver.[1,2] HCV infection is one of the leading public health challenges globally accounting for about 115 million infections; 11 million of whom ...

  4. [Epidemiology of hepatitis E virus infection in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echevarría, José Manuel; Fogeda, Marta; Avellón, Ana

    2015-04-01

    The general features of the epidemiology and ecology of hepatitis E virus in Spain are already known after 20 years of investigations. Genotype 3 strains, mainly from sub-genotype 3f, circulated among swine livestock and certain wild mammals, and would be sporadically transmitted to humans through direct contact with the reservoirs or by consumption of foods derived from them. Bivalve shellfish contaminated by hepatitis E virus from sewage could also play a role in transmission. Although the interpretation of results from seroprevalence studies in low endemic settings is still controversial, antibody to hepatitis E virus displays an overall prevalence less than 10% among the population of Spain, increasing significantly with age. From the, approximately, 150 cases of acute hepatitis E recorded in the international literature, males older than 40 years, suffering a mild, locally acquired disease predominate. In addition, hepatitis E might be more frequent in the North of the country than in other regions. Although the disease does not usually have a great clinical relevance, the occasional finding of cases of fulminant hepatitis, and of ribavirin-resistant, chronic hepatitis E virus infections among the immunocompromised would recommend the surveillance of the infection by the public health authority and a better implementation of specific diagnostic procedures in clinical laboratories. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  5. Immune regulation in chronic hepatitis C virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartling, Hans Jakob; Ballegaard, Vibe Cecilie; Nielsen, Nick Schou

    2016-01-01

    The immunological result of infection with Hepatitis C virus (HCV) depends on the delicate balance between a vigorous immune response that may clear the infection, but with a risk of unspecific inflammation and, or a less inflammatory response that leads to chronic infection. In general, exhaustion...... of epigenetic changes in chronic HCV infection. A vast amount of studies have revealed the complexity of immune regulation in chronic HCV infection, but the interplay between immune regulation in virus and host remains incompletely understood. This review provides an overview of regulatory functions of HCV...

  6. Prevalence of hepatitis d virus infection among hepatitis B virus infected patients in qom province, center of iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadir, Mohammad-Reza; Belbasi, Mojtaba; Heidari, Akram; Sarkeshikian, Seyed Saeid; Kabiri, Alireza; Ghanooni, Amir Hossein; Iranikhah, Abolfazl; Vaez-Javadi, Maryam; Alavian, Seyed Moayed

    2012-03-01

    Hepatitis D virus (HDV) is a defective RNA virus that depends on the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) of hepatitis B virus for its replication, developing exclusively in patients with acute or chronic hepatitis B. There are little data regarding the routes of HDV transmission in Iran. The risk factors for HDV infection in Iran are blood transfusion, surgery, family history, Hejamat wet cupping (traditional phlebotomy), tattooing, war injury, dental interventions, and endoscopy. We performed this study to determine the prevalence of hepatitis D in the general population of Qom province and the potential risk factors for acquiring HDV. This cross-sectional study collected 3690 samples from 7 rural clusters and 116 urban clusters. HBs antigen was measured, and if the test was positive, anti-HDV was measured. Ten teams, each consisting of 2 trained members, were assigned to conduct the sampling and administer the questionnaires. The data were analyzed using SPSS. Forty-eight subjects (1.3%) suffered from hepatitis B, and 1 HBsAg-positive case had HDV infection. The prevalence of hepatitis D infection in Qom Province was 0.03%. The prevalence of hepatitis D infection in HBsAg-positive cases was 2%. Our anti-HDV-positive case had a history of tattooing, surgery, and dental surgery. There was no significant relationship between tattooing, surgery history, or dental surgery and hepatitis D infection. The prevalence of hepatitis D in Qom is the the lowest in Iran, similar to a study in Babol (north of Iran).

  7. Acute hepatitis A virus infections in British Gurkha soldiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Chris A; Ross, D A; Bailey, M S

    2013-09-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) and hepatitis E virus (HEV) infections are endemic in most developing countries, including Nepal and Afghanistan, and may cause outbreaks in military personnel. Previously, more than 99% of new British Gurkha recruits were already immune to HAV because of prior infection, but this may be declining due to improved living conditions in their countries of origin. Acute HAV infections have occurred in Gurkha soldiers serving in Afghanistan, which made them unfit for duty for 2-3 months. In one case, early serological diagnosis was impeded by IgM results against both HAV and HEV that were caused by cross-reactivity or persistence from a previous infection. These cases have led to a policy change whereby all Gurkha recruits are now tested for previous HAV infection and if negative they are offered vaccination. Meanwhile, HEV infection remains a significant threat in Nepal and Afghanistan with low levels of background immunity and no commercially available vaccine.

  8. 77 FR 30293 - Recommendations for the Identification of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Chronic Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-22

    ... Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Chronic Infection AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC... an email to [email protected] . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Hepatitis C virus infection is a contagious... illness. It results from infection with the hepatitis C virus (HCV), which is spread primarily through...

  9. Chronic hepatitis C virus infection, a new cardiovascular risk factor?

    OpenAIRE

    Domont, Fanny; Cacoub, Patrice

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Among the large scope of extrahepatic manifestations related to hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, many studies recently evaluated the frequency and characteristics of cardiovascular involvement. To assess the current published data on HCV infection and cardiovascular diseases. Published studies on cardiovascular disease, i.e. cerebrovascular accident and ischaemic heart disease in subjects with HCV infection were analysed from literature databases. Subjects with HCV c...

  10. Hepatitis C Virus Infection and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ayten Kadanali; Ahmet Ozbek; Leyla Saglam; Serpill Erol

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims: A growing pile of evidence supports the notion that pulmonary involvement is one of the extrahepatic manifestations of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of HCV infection in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and vice versa.Methods: Two cross-sectional studies were performed: 1. A prevalence study of HCV infection among patients with COPD; 2. A prevalence study of COPD among patie...

  11. Hepatitis B Virus Infection In Patients With Homozygous Sickle Cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nnebe-Agumadu U H, and Abiodun P O. Hepatitis B Virus Infection in Patients with Homozygous Sickle Cell Disease (HbSS): Need for Intervention. Annals Biomedical Sciences 2002; 1:79-87. This is a prospective study of 213 patients with sickle cell anaemia (SCA) (112 males and 101 females) aged 6 months to 18 years ...

  12. Hepatitis B virus infection among pregnant women delivering at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) carrier and infectivity status among women delivering at Harare Maternity Hospital. Design: A serological survey study of pregnant women admitted for labour and delivery. Setting: Harare Maternity Hospital, Harare, Zimbabwe between June 1996 and June ...

  13. Hepatitis C Virus Infection in Nigerians | Ejiofor | Nigerian Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Others include those who are exposed to the common risk factors like Blood transfusion, haemodialyisis, recycling of syringes and needles, sexual promiscuity. Conclusion: Reduction in the Hepatitis C virus infection could be achieved by Health education campaign of the general public and by support from government ...

  14. Hepatitis b virus (hbv) infection among pregnant women in makurdi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The prevalence of Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) carrier and infectivity status among three hundred (300) pregnant women in Makurdi were determined through random anonymous testing of volunteers attending antenatal clinics of different Hospitals within the metropolis. HBV carriage status was determined by the presence of ...

  15. Seroprevalence and Correlates of Hepatitis C Virus Infection in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Seroprevalence and Correlates of Hepatitis C Virus Infection in Secondary School Children in Enugu, Nigeria. ... Journal Home > Vol 6, No 3 (2016) > ... The PDF file you selected should load here if your Web browser has a PDF reader plug-in ...

  16. Regulatory T Cells in Chronic Hepatitis B Virus Infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.N. Stoop (Jeroen Nicolaas)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractWorldwide 400 million people suffer from chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and approximately 1 million people die annually from HBV-related disease. To clear HBV, an effective immune response, in which several cell types and cytokines play a role, is important. It is known that

  17. Mathematical solutions for Hepatitis B virus infection in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper is an analysis of the transmission dynamics and control of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in Nigeria using mathematical model Rc was obtained as the effective basic reproduction number, and its values computed using 6 different control strategies. Result shows that with 25 years waning rate of vaccine, HBV ...

  18. Hepatitis B and C viruses Infections and Their association with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Since the introduction of Highly Active Anti-Retroviral Therapy and the dramatic improvement in the prognosis of individuals with Human Immunodeficiency Virus, liver disease due to chronic viral hepatitis has become as important cause of morbidity and mortality in co-infected individuals. The objective of ...

  19. Infection of hepatitis C virus genotypes in hepatocellular carcinoma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate the infection of hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients from rural areas of Faisalabad region. Among 179 HCC subjects, men and women were 51 and 49%, respectively. All samples positive for HCV RNA by qualitative PCR were ...

  20. Increased mortality among persons infected with hepatitis C virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Omland, Lars Haukali Hvass; Jepsen, Peter; Krarup, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Background & Aims The long-term mortality of patients infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is not known; few studies have controlled for potential confounders, investigated how mortality changes with age at diagnosis and length of follow-up period, provided absolute risk estimates of death...

  1. 1 Seroprevalence of hepatitis B virus infection among antenatal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Seroprevalence of hepatitis B virus infection among antenatal clinic attendees at a tertiary hospital in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. SABRIA RASHID1*, CHARLES KILEWO2 and SAID ABOUD3. 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Muhimbili National Hospital, P.O. Box 65000, Dar es Salaam,. Tanzania. 2Department ...

  2. Chronic hepatitis B virus infection: review of current status and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chronic Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, is endemic in Nigeria. Efforts to curtail the spread by way of prevention, diagnosis and treatment, have been inadequate and the disease has continued to pose great challenge to the third world as evidenced by its endemicity in Nigeria. The current review highlights the clinical ...

  3. Medicinal herbs for hepatitis C virus infection. Protokol for a Cochrane Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, J P; Manheimer, E; Tsutani, K

    2001-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a serious health problem world-wide. Medicinal herbs are increasingly being used for hepatitis C.......Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a serious health problem world-wide. Medicinal herbs are increasingly being used for hepatitis C....

  4. Impact of occult hepatitis B virus infection on antiviral therapy in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gamal El Din Ahmed Elsawaf

    2015-01-07

    Jan 7, 2015 ... C virus; Anti-HBc, anti-hepatitis B core; HBsAg, hepatitis B surface antigen; PCR, polymerase chain reaction; OBI, occult HBV infection; CHC, chronic hepatitis ... an overall antibody to hepatitis C virus (anti-HCV) prevalence of 14.7% with an ..... Iman Z. Detection of occult HBV infection by nested PCR assay.

  5. Cluster of cases of acute hepatitis associated with hepatitis E virus infection acquired in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Widdowson, MA; Jaspers, WJ; Poel, van der WH; Verschoor, F.; Husman, AM de Roda; Winter, HL; Zaaijer, H.L.; Koopmans, M

    2003-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection may occur in developed countries and that swine may act as a reservoir. We report a cluster of 2 confirmed cases and 1 presumptive case of hepatitis associated with HEV. The typed strain from 1 case was related to HEV strains found

  6. Molecular Biology and Infection of Hepatitis E Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuchen Nan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis E virus (HEV is a viral pathogen transmitted primarily via fecal-oral route. In humans, HEV mainly causes acute hepatitis and is responsible for large outbreaks of hepatitis across the world. The case fatality rate of HEV-induced hepatitis ranges from 0.5 to 3% in young adults and up to 30% in infected pregnant women. HEV strains infecting humans are classified into four genotypes. HEV strains from genotype 3 and 4 are zoonotic, whereas those from genotype 1 and 2 have no known animal reservoirs. Recently, notable progress has been accomplished for better understanding of HEV biology and infection, such as chronic HEV infection, in vitro cell culture system, quasi-enveloped HEV virions, functions of the HEV proteins, mechanism of HEV antagonizing host innate immunity, HEV pathogenesis and vaccine development. However, further investigation on the cross-species HEV infection, host tropism, vaccine efficacy and HEV-specific antiviral strategy is still needed. This review mainly focuses on molecular biology and infection of HEV and offers perspective new insight of this enigmatic virus.

  7. Clinical significance of occult hepatitis B virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Miriam; Madejón, Antonio; Fernández-Rodríguez, Conrado; García-Samaniego, Javier

    2011-03-28

    Occult hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection (OBI) is defined as the presence of HBV DNA in the liver (with or without detectable HBV DNA in serum) for individuals testing HBV surface antigen negative. Until recently, the clinical effect of OBI was unclear on the progression of liver disease; on the development of hepatocellular carcinoma; and on the risk for reactivation or transmission of HBV infection. Several studies suggest a high prevalence of OBI among patients with cryptogenic chronic liver disease, but its role in the progression to cirrhosis remains unclear. Although OBI has been well documented in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients, especially among those coinfected with hepatitis C virus, further studies are needed to determine its current clinical impact in HIV setting.

  8. Epidemiology of hepatitis E virus infection during pregnancy in Benin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Paschale, Massimo; Ceriani, Cristina; Romanò, Luisa; Cerulli, Teresa; Cagnin, Debora; Cavallari, Serena; Ndayake, Joseph; Zaongo, Dieudonné; Diombo, Kouma; Priuli, Gianbattista; Viganò, Paolo; Clerici, Pierangelo

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is the cause of enterically transmitted non-A, non-C hepatitis (an infection that is particularly severe during pregnancy) in tropical and subtropical countries. As there are no published data concerning the prevalence of HEV antibodies in Benin, their presence was investigated in pregnant women undergoing routine HIV screening in a rural area in northern Benin and in pregnant women with acute non-A, non-C hepatitis. A total of 278 serum samples were collected from asymptomatic pregnant women in 2011 were tested for HEV and hepatitis A virus (HAV) antibodies, and the HEV IgM-positive samples were further tested for HEV-RNA. A further seven samples of pregnant women with acute non-A, non-C hepatitis collected during episodes of acute hepatitis in 2005 were also analysed. Of the 278 samples collected in 2011, 16.19% were positive for HEV IgG and 1.44% for HEV IgM (none positive for HEV-RNA), and 99.64% were positive for total HAV antibodies (none positive for HAV IgM). Six of the seven samples collected in 2005 were positive for HEV IgG and IgM, and two were also positive for HEV-RNA. The circulation of HEV infection is significant among pregnant women in Benin, in whom the consequences may be fatal. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Frequency of Hepatitis B Virus, Hepatitis C Virus and HIV Infections in Cannabis and Opioid Addicts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuran KARABULUT

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: There are very few data about the epidemiology of hepatitis B virus (HBV, hepatitis C virus (HCV and HIV infections in drug addicts in Turkey, whereas several countries have a developed surveillance systems to monitor the spread of HBV, HCV and HIV infections in drug users. In this study, HBV, HCV and HIV prevalence in cannabis and opioid addicts were investigated. Materials and Methods: Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg, anti-HBs, anti-HCV and anti-HIV tests were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The cannabis and opioid metabolites in urine samples of drug addicts were analyzed by cloned enzyme donor immunoassay. Results: This retrospective study was conducted on 276 individuals with a mean age of 28.89±10.49 years. HBsAg, anti-HBs and anti-HCV prevalence in drug addicts was found to be 4%, 52.3% and 7.9%, respectively. In all the drug addicts, anti-HIV test was negative. Whereas the rate of HBsAg among cannabis users (8.8% was higher than opioid (4.1% and both cannabis and opioid users (1.4%, the difference was not statistically significant. Although anti-HCV positivity among cannabis users was not detected, 6.4% of opioid users and 15.9% of both cannabis and opioid users were anti-HCV positive (p=0.009. Conclusion: This study showed that HCV infection among especially opioid users and both cannabis and opioid users was a problem. Understanding of local status in HBV, HCV and HIV infections is crucial for developing prevention and geographical strategies for these infections.

  10. Occult hepatitis B virus infection in immunocompromised patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Nogueira Cordeiro Moraes Jardim

    Full Text Available Occult hepatitis B infection is characterized by hepatitis B virus (HBV DNA in the serum in the absence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg. We assessed occult HBV infection prevalence in two groups of immunocompromised patients (maintenance hemodialysis patients and HIV-positive patients presenting HBsAg-negative and anti-HBc positive serological patterns, co-infected or not by HCV. Thirty-four hemodialysis anti-HIV negative patients, 159 HIV-positive patients and 150 blood donors who were anti-HBc positive (control group were selected. HBV-DNA was detected by nested-PCR. Occult hepatitis B infection was not observed in the hemodialysis patients group but was found in 5% of the HIV-patients and in 4% of the blood donors. Immunosuppression in HIV positive patients was not a determining factor for occult HBV infection. In addition, no significant relationship between HBV-DNA and HCV co-infection in the HIV-positive patient group was found. A lack of significant associations was also observed between positivity for HBV-DNA and CD4 count, viral load and previous lamivudine treatment in these HIV-positive patients.

  11. Epidemiology of hepatitis A virus infections, Germany, 2007-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, Mirko S; Stark, Klaus; Behnke, Susanne C; Schreier, Eckart; Frank, Christina

    2009-11-01

    Approximately 60% of hepatitis A virus infections in Germany occur in persons without a travel history to disease-endemic areas and for whom sources of infection are unknown. Recommendation of pretravel vaccination fails to prevent the remaining imported infections. Using enhanced surveillance in 2007-2008, we analyzed epidemiologic patterns of hepatitis A in Germany and appropriateness and adequacy of current immunization recommendations. Young patients with a migration background who had visited friends and family in their ancestral countries accounted for most imported cases. Phylogenetic analysis showed high diversity of sequence data and clustering of strains with similar regions of origin or patient migration backgrounds. Virologic findings are compatible with those of low-incidence countries, where virtually all infections are directly or indirectly imported from other regions. Germans with a migration background are seen as a special risk group so far insufficiently reached by pretravel vaccination advice.

  12. Hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus infection in healthcare workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppola, Nicola; De Pascalis, Stefania; Onorato, Lorenzo; Calò, Federica; Sagnelli, Caterina; Sagnelli, Evangelista

    2016-02-18

    Approximately 3 million healthcare workers per year receive an injury with an occupational instrument, with around 2000000 exposures to hepatitis B virus (HBV) and 1000000 to hepatitis C virus (HCV). Although an effective HBV vaccine has been available since the early eighties, and despite the worldwide application of universal vaccination programs started in the early nineties, HBV still remains a prominent agent of morbidity and mortality. There is no vaccine to limit the diffusion of HCV infection, which progresses to chronicity in the majority of cases and is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide due to a chronic liver disease. Healthcare workers are frequently exposed by a mucosal-cutaneous or percutaneous route to accidental contact with human blood and other potentially infectious biological materials while carrying out their occupational duties. Mucosal-cutaneous exposure occurs when the biological material of a potentially infected patient accidentally comes in contact with the mucous membranes of the eyes or mouth or with the skin of a healthcare worker. Percutaneous exposure occurs when an operator accidentally injures himself with a sharp contaminated object, like a needle, blade or other sharp medical instrument. About 75% of the total occupational exposure is percutaneous and 25% mucosal-cutaneous, the risk of infecting a healthcare worker being higher in percutaneous than in mucosal-cutaneous exposure. All healthcare workers should be considered for HBV vaccination and should meticulously apply the universal prophylactic measures to prevent exposure to HBV and HCV.

  13. Hepatitis A virus infection during pregnancy in Korea: Hepatitis A infection on pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Geum Joon; Kim, Yoon Byoung; Kim, Seong Min; Hong, Hye Ri; Kim, Ji Hoon; Seol, Hyun-Joo; Hong, Soon Cheol; Oh, Min-Jeong; Kim, Hai Joong

    2013-11-01

    Although there is a large body of data on acute hepatitis A virus (HAV) worldwide, data regarding the occurrence of HAV during pregnancy is limited. It is commonly acknowledged that HAV is not associated with severe outcomes or complications during pregnancy. In contrast, there are several reported cases of vertical HAV transmission. Moreover, it has been recently reported that HAV infection during pregnancy is associated with gestational complications. In Korea, the incidence of HAV infection has increased from 317 cases in 2002 to 13,117 cases in 2009. However, HAV infection during pregnancy is rarely reported in Korea. This study was conducted as a retrospective cohort series of pregnant women presenting to Korea University Medical Center between January 2000 and October 2009 in whom a diagnosis of HAV infection was made. During study period, there were 12 cases of HAV in pregnant women, including two cases with preterm contraction, two cases with cholestatic hepatitis, and one case with fetal ascites and intra-abdominal calcification. HAV infection during pregnancy is associated with high prevalence of maternal and fetal complications. Because the incidence of HAV infection in women of reproductive age is increasing, a further focus on preventing HAV infection during pregnancy is warranted.

  14. Liver fibrosis progression in hepatitis C virus infection after seroconversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, Adeel A; Yan, Peng; Lo Re, Vincent; Rimland, David; Goetz, Matthew B; Leaf, David; Freiberg, Matthew S; Klein, Marina B; Justice, Amy C; Sherman, Kenneth E

    2015-02-01

    Knowing the rate of liver fibrosis progression in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected persons can help inform patients and providers (clinicians, medical institutions or organizations, and third-party payers) in making treatment decisions. To determine the rate and factors associated with liver fibrosis progression and hepatic decompensation in persons after acquiring HCV infection. Secondary data analysis of persons in the Electronically Retrieved Cohort of HCV Infected Veterans (ERCHIVES), a national Veterans Affairs (VA) database, between 2002 and 2012. Among 610 514 persons in ERCHIVES (half were HCV positive), we identified those with an initial negative and subsequent positive test result for HCV antibody and positive HCV RNA test result (HCV+). Controls had 2 negative HCV antibody test results (HCV-) in a comparable time frame and were matched 1:1 on age (in 5-year blocks), race, and sex. We excluded persons with human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B, less than 24 months of follow-up, hepatocellular carcinoma, and cirrhosis at baseline. Progression of liver fibrosis as estimated by the Fibrosis-4 (FIB-4) index; development of cirrhosis, defined by a FIB-4 score greater than 3.5; and development of hepatic decompensation. The evaluable data set consisted of 1840 persons who were HCV+ and 1840 HCV- controls. The HCV+ persons were younger and had a lower mean (SD) body mass index (27.39 [5.51] vs 29.49 [6.16]; P vs 6.1%). Nine years after diagnosis of cirrhosis, hepatic decompensation events were uncommon but had a higher rate in the HCV+ group (1.79% vs 0.33%). Persons who seroconverted for HCV have a more rapid progression of liver fibrosis and accelerated time to development of cirrhosis after seroconversion compared with HCV- controls. Fibrosis progression occurs early after infection; however, hepatic decompensation is uncommon after diagnosis of cirrhosis.

  15. Rapid Hepatitis C Virus Divergence among Chronically Infected Individuals

    OpenAIRE

    Cruz-Rivera, Mayra; Carpio-Pedroza, Juan Carlos; Escobar-Gutiérrez, Alejandro; Lozano, Daniela; Vergara-Castaneda, Arely; Rivera-Osorio, Pilar; Martinez-Guarneros, Armando; Chacon, Carlos A. Vazquez; Fonseca-Coronado, Salvador; Vaughan, Gilberto

    2013-01-01

    Here, we analyze the viral divergence among hepatitis C virus (HCV) chronic cases infected with genotype 1. The intrahost viral evolution was assessed by deep sequencing using the 454 Genome Sequencer platform. The results showed a rapid nucleotide sequence divergence. This notorious short-term viral evolution is of the utmost importance for the study of HCV transmission, because direct links between related samples were virtually lost. Thus, rapid divergence of HCV significantly affects gene...

  16. Deep sequencing in the management of hepatitis virus infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quer, Josep; Rodríguez-Frias, Francisco; Gregori, Josep; Tabernero, David; Soria, Maria Eugenia; García-Cehic, Damir; Homs, Maria; Bosch, Albert; Pintó, Rosa María; Esteban, Juan Ignacio; Domingo, Esteban; Perales, Celia

    2017-07-15

    The hepatitis viruses represent a major public health problem worldwide. Procedures for characterization of the genomic composition of their populations, accurate diagnosis, identification of multiple infections, and information on inhibitor-escape mutants for treatment decisions are needed. Deep sequencing methodologies are extremely useful for these viruses since they replicate as complex and dynamic quasispecies swarms whose complexity and mutant composition are biologically relevant traits. Population complexity is a major challenge for disease prevention and control, but also an opportunity to distinguish among related but phenotypically distinct variants that might anticipate disease progression and treatment outcome. Detailed characterization of mutant spectra should permit choosing better treatment options, given the increasing number of new antiviral inhibitors available. In the present review we briefly summarize our experience on the use of deep sequencing for the management of hepatitis virus infections, particularly for hepatitis B and C viruses, and outline some possible new applications of deep sequencing for these important human pathogens. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Hepatitis E virus infection in Latin America: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echevarría, J M; González, J E; Lewis-Ximenez, L L; Dos Santos, D R Lopes; Munné, M S; Pinto, M A; Pujol, F H; Rodríguez-Lay, L A

    2013-06-01

    Data reported during recent years reveal the complex picture of the epidemiology of hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection in Latin America. Whereas in countries like Argentina and Brazil is almost identical to the characteristic of most countries from North America and Europe, HEV in the Caribbean and Mexico involves the water-borne, non-zoonotic viral genotypes responsible for epidemics in Asia and Africa. Nevertheless, Latin America has been considered a highly endemic region for hepatitis E in the scientific literature, a generalization that ignores the above complexity. In addition, reports from isolated Amerindian communities, which display well known, important and very specific epidemiological features for hepatitis B and D virus infections are neither taken into account when considering the epidemiology of hepatitis E in the region. This review updates compilation of the available information for the HEV infection, both among humans and other mammals, in Latin America, discusses the strengths and the weaknesses of our current knowledge, and identifies future areas of research. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. High prevalence of occult hepatitis B virus genotype H infection among children with clinical hepatitis in west Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Escobedo-Melendez, Griselda; Panduro, Arturo; Fierro, Nora A; Roman, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Studies on the prevalence of infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) among children are scarce in Latin American countries, especially in Mexico. This study was aimed to investigate the prevalence of HBV infection, occult hepatitis B infection (OBI) and HBV genotypes among children with clinical hepatitis. In total, 215 children with clinical hepatitis were evaluated for HBV infection. HBV serological markers and HBV DNA were analysed. OBI diagnosis and HBV genotyping was performed. HBV infect...

  19. Hepatitis A virus infection: Epidemiology and genetic diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Báez Triana, Paula Andrea

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis A virus infection is a global public health problem. The virus has a wide range of distribution and it is the main cause of acute hepatitis transmitted by the enteric route in Latin America. The viral particle is stable under environmental conditions and conserves its infectivity for several weeks, enabling its transmission by contaminated water and food. Worldwide, different epidemiological patterns have been identified, which may change over time by modification of social and economic variables in the population such as vaccination and the improvement of hygiene and primary health conditions. This leaves new populations susceptible to infection. In Latin America the circulation of genotype I and subgenotypes A and B has been described, but more research is needed to provide the knowledge needed to manage the prevention and control plans for the worldwide reduction of the prevalence of infection. For this paper, a literature review was performed on the SciELO, PubMed and ScienceDirect databases under the search terms "Hepatitis A", "Epidemiology," "Seroprevalence" and "Infection." From the results obtained, only papers published in English and Spanish to describe epidemiological and molecular studies of interest in Latin America were included.

  20. Treatment of liver transplant recipients who have chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz, Murat

    2014-03-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus infection is the most common cause of chronic liver disease and indication for liver transplant in Western countries. Viral infection may recur after transplant in most patients. The diagnosis of histologic recurrence of hepatitis C virus infection after liver transplant may be difficult and may be confused with acute cellular graft rejection. Characteristics of the recipient, donor, virus, and transplant may be associated with disease progression. Treatment of hepatitis C virus infection has a positive effect on the outcome of liver transplant. There are 3 approaches used to minimize recurrent hepatitis C virus infection after liver transplant: antiviral therapy before transplant, antiviral preventive and preemptive treatment after transplant, and treatment of established reinfection. Protease inhibitors are being evaluated in patients who have severe hepatitis C virus recurrence after liver transplant. Liver graft survival is less frequent after revision transplant. Several new drugs currently are being evaluated in clinical trials for treatment of hepatitis C virus infection.

  1. Acute exacerbation in chronic hepatitis B virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio Vieira Santos

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available A case of an acute exacerbation of liver injury in a chronic HBV infected young male is reported. The correlation between the severe symptomatic hepatitis is done with the histopathologic findings of extense areas of bridging necrosis on the Iwer biopsy. The serological pattern for markers of HBV (HBsAg +, anti HBs g -, HBeAg -, anti HBe +, anti HBcIgG + and IgM - confirm a chronic infection, ana the authors propose that the episode of severe hepatitis relates to the recent spontaneous seroconvertion of HBe Ag to anti HBe. Other causes of hepatitis were excluded, and the control liver biopsy (6 months later showed normalization of hepatic architecture and absence of markers of viral replication in tissue and serum. A review of literature is done in an attempt to elucidate the diagnostic possibilities in this case, with emphasis on new immunoassays useful in differentiating between acute hepatitis B and acute exacerbation of a chronic hepatitis by the same virus.

  2. Hepatitis B and C virus infections and liver function in AIDS patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Impaired liver function tests and co-infection with hepatitis viruses in AIDS patients are common in western countries. Objective: To assess liver function and prevalence of co-infection with hepatitis B and hepatitis C viruses in AIDS patients at Chris Hani Baragwanath Hospital. Design: A prospective study.

  3. Hepatitis B and C virus infection and liver function in aids patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hepatitis B and C virus infection and liver function in aids patients: research. ... in aids patients: research. H Lodenyo, B Schoub, R Ally, S Kairu, L Segal ... Objective: To asses liver function and prevalence of co-infection with hepatitis B and hepatitis C viruses in AIDS patients at Chris Hani Baragwanath Hospital. Design: A ...

  4. Occult hepatitis B virus infection among people with a family history of chronic hepatitis B virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenhua; Zhang, Ling; Dai, Yu; Jin, Lei; Sun, Binghu; Su, Qian; Li, Xu

    2015-11-01

    The prevalence of occult hepatitis B virus infection (OBI) among people with a family history of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is unclear. Serum samples were collected from 747 hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-negative people with a family history of HBV infection and 579 HBsAg-negative volunteer blood donors. The presence of HBV DNA was evaluated using nested PCR with primers specific for the X, S, and C regions of HBV. The Pre-S1/Pre-S2/ S region PCR products for the OBI group and their family members with chronic HBV infection (control group) were sequenced and compared. The prevalence of OBI was 8.0% (60/747) among HBsAg-negative people with a family history of chronic HBV infection, compared to 2.6% (15/579) among the blood donors (P Chinese blood donors. However, S region mutations and the escape mechanism are not likely to be the major causes of increased prevalence of OBI. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Hepatitis D virus and hepatitis B virus infection in Amerindian communities of the Amazonas state, Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Filippo Villa, Diana; Cortes-Mancera, Fabian; Payares, Edra; Montes, Neyla; de la Hoz, Fernando; Arbelaez, Maria Patricia; Correa, Gonzalo; Navas, Maria-Cristina

    2015-10-24

    In Colombia, cases of Hepatitis D virus (HDV) infection have been officially described since 1985 mainly in Amerindian population from Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta (North Caribbean Coast), Uraba (North West), and Amazon (South East). The last official report of a clinical case of HDV infection in Colombia was registered in 2005. The aims of this study were to identify cases of HDV and/or Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in asymptomatic Amerindians from Amazonas state, South East Colombia, and to describe the circulating viral genotypes in this population. The study population was recruited in 19 Amerindian communities in the Amazonas state. Individuals over 18 years old were screened by rapid test for Hepatitis B surface Antigen (HBsAg). Blood samples obtained from individuals positives for HBsAg in the rapid-test assay were analyzed for HBsAg, anti-HBc, anti-HDV IgM/IgG by ELISA. The detection of HBV DNA and HDV RNA was performed by PCR amplification. The viral genotype was determined by sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. A total of 23/861 individuals were positive for HBsAg detection by rapid test. Serological and/or molecular markers of HDV infection were demonstrated in 43.5 % (10/23) of samples from Amerindians. The phylogenetic analysis demonstrated the exclusive circulation of HBV subgenotype F1b of and HDV 3 in this population. A high frequency of HBV/HDV infection was found in Amerindian population from Amazonas State, Colombia (43.5 %, 10/23). Nine cases were identified in a population of 861 asymptomatic Amerindian individuals; one symptomatic case (with diagnosis of end-stage hepatic disease) was also identified in the study. The circulation of HDV 3 and HBV subgenotype F1b suggests a constant flow of these viral genotypes as a result of the interaction of the Amerindian populations from Amazon basin. Further studies are necessary to confirm whether HBV subgenotype F1b is the prevalent in the population from South East region in Colombia.

  6. Progression of hepatic histopathology in kidney transplant recipients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection and effect of immunosuppression on the course of hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz, Murat; Fakı, Sevgül; Öcal, Serkan; Harmancı, Özgür; Selçuk, Haldun; Haberal, Mehmet

    2015-04-01

    There is no correlation between alanine aminotransferase levels, viral load, and histologic findings at dialysis in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection. Identification of the severity of hepatitis C-related liver disease before transplant could provide valuable data about the risk for liverrelated mortality after transplant. In this study, we aimed to identify the severity of liver disease in endstage renal disease patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection, the progression of hepatic histopathology after kidney transplant, and whether immunosuppressive therapy affected posttransplant viral replication and hepatic histology. Antihepatitis C viruspositive kidney transplant recipients (45 patients) enrolled in the study. Liver biopsy was performed in 45 patients before and 16 patients after kidney transplant. Interferon was given to 28 of 45 patients before kidney transplant. Biopsy before and after kidney transplant was performed in 5 of 14 patients. Patients had higher viral load, with genotype 1 predominancy (91%). Sustained viral response was achieved in 14 of 28 patients (50%). The histopathologic features of 45 patients who had pretransplant liver biopsy were as follows: 22 patients had mild hepatocellular injury, 17 patients had mild chronic hepatitis, 5 patients had moderate chronic hepatitis, and 1 patient had serious hepatitis. Follow-up biopsy after kidney transplant (mean, 2 y) in 16 of 45 patients showed that 3 of 16 patients had mild hepatocellular injury, 4 of 16 patients had mild hepatitis, 6 of 16 patients had moderate hepatitis, 2 of 16 patients had serious hepatitis, and 1 patient had cirrhosis. Patients showed neither progression, regression, nor stable liver histology. Even with worse genotype profiles, chronic hepatitis C virus infection has an indolent progression in patients with end-stage renal disease and kidney transplant. Follow-up biopsies of kidney transplant recipients show reasonable progression during the first 2

  7. Profile of hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, hepatitis d virus and human immunodeficiency virus infections in hemodialysis patients of a tertiary care hospital in uttarakhand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Garima; Gupta, Pratima; Thakuria, Bhaskar; Mukhiya, Gulshan K; Mittal, Manish

    2013-03-01

    Viral hepatitis and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection are important causes of morbidity and mortality in hemodialysis (HD) patients. The present study was performed to assess the prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepatitis D virus (HDV) and HIV infections in hemodialysis patients of a tertiary care hospital in Uttarakhand. All patients undergoing maintenance HD at our center were screened for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), antibody to HCV (anti-HCV), antibody to HDV (anti-HDV) and HIV antibody by ELISA. Detailed history regarding age, sex, duration of dialysis, blood transfusions, number of dialysis centers, dialyzer reuse and laboratory data was recorded. A total of 118 patients (79 males and 39 females) were followed for 18 months with screening for the presence of HBV, HCV and HIV infections. At baseline, 12 (10.2%) patients were positive for HBsAg, 19 (16.1%) for anti-HCV and 2 (1.7%) for HIV antibody. Over 18 months, one additional patient became HBsAg positive and an additional 17 became anti-HCV-positive to give a total of 36 HCV-positive patients. Dual HBV and HCV infection was seen in 5 (4.2%) and anti-HDV antibodies were found in 1 (0.9%) patient. History of blood transfusions, duration of HD, dialyzer reuse and dialysis at multiple centers were found to be important risk factors for anti-HCV positivity. Implementation and adherence to universal work precautions by dialysis staff is imperative to prevent transmission of these infections.

  8. Hepatitis C virus infection in chronic liver disease in Natal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this cross-sectional seroprevalence study was to determine the prevalence of antibodies to hepatitis C virus (HCV) (anti-HCV) in patients with cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and chronic active hepatitis (CAH) attending a referral hospital in a hepatitis B virus (HBV)-endemic area in South Africa One ...

  9. Hepatitis C Virus Infection and Rheumatic Diseases: The Impact of Direct-Acting Antiviral Agents

    OpenAIRE

    Cacoub, Patrice; Commarmond, Cloé; Sadoun, David; Desbois, Anne claire

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Hepatitis C virus infection is associated with many extrahepatic manifestations, includingrheumatic disorders such as arthralgia, myalgia, cryoglobulinemia vasculitis, and siccasyndrome.The treatment of hepatitis C virus infection has long been based on interferon alfa, whichwas contraindicated in many autoimmune/inflammatory disorders.The emergence of new oral interferon-free combinations now offers an opportunity for patients infected with hepatitis C virus with extr...

  10. [Hepatitis E virus infection in patients with clinical diagnosis of viral hepatitis in Colombia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peláez, Dioselina; Hoyos, María Cristina; Rendón, Julio César; Mantilla, Carolina; Ospina, Martha Cecilia; Cortés-Mancera, Fabián; Pérez, Olga Lucía; Contreras, Lady; Estepa, Yaneth; Arbeláez, María Patricia; Navas, María Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is an emergent virus of global importance; it is the etiological agent of sporadic cases and outbreaks of hepatitis. The epidemiology of this infection in Colombia is unknown. To determine the seropositivity for hepatitis E virus in Colombia in cases with clinical diagnosis of viral hepatitis. Serum samples from patients that were sent to the Instituto Nacional de Salud during the period 2005-2010 (group 1) and samples sent to the Laboratorio Departamental de Salud Pública de Antioquia during the 2008-2009 period were included in this study (group 2). Serum samples were analyzed by immunoassay with commercial kits. From the 344 analyzed samples, 8.7% were positive for anti-HEV; the frequency of anti-HEV IgM was 1.74% (6/344) and the frequency of anti-HEV IgG was 7.5% (26/344). A difference in frequency of anti-HEV between group 1 (6.3%) and group 2 (1.3%) was observed. The cases were identified in nine departments of Colombia. This is the first study of hepatitis E virus infection in patients with diagnosis of hepatitis in Colombia. The frequency of anti-HEV described in this population of patients in Colombia is similar to that described in other Latin American countries like Brazil, Perú and Uruguay. Considering the results of this study, it could be necessary to include hepatitis E virus infection serological markers in the differential diagnosis of viral hepatitis in Colombia.

  11. Immunopathogenesis of Hepatitis B Virus Infection and Related Complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mankgopo M. Kgatle

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Chronic hepatitis B (CHB is a serious consequence of hepatitis B virus (HBV, which infects and replicates in the liver. It is characterised by prolonged hepatitis B surface antigen seropositivity; this can lead to both cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. The infection begins when HBV binds its only known functional receptor, sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP, which was identified recently. The discovery of NTCP was a significant breakthrough in the field of HBV research, and has facilitated the establishment of a susceptible hepatoma cell line model for studying the mechanisms underlying HBV pathogenesis. Following productive HBV infection, both cellular and humoral immune cells and molecules, such as T cells and chemokines, are activated to resolve infection by destroying HBV-infected hepatocytes. However, host immunity to HBV is not always protective, most likely due to immune evasion mechanisms employed by HBV. These mechanisms may result in viral persistence, accumulation of mutations, and aberrant epigenetic alterations that lead to HCC. Here we highlight our current understanding of the HBV replication cycle, immunopathogenesis, and related mechanisms underlying the progression of CHB to advanced liver disease, along with the attendant complications.

  12. Hepatitis B Virus and Human Immunodeficiency Virus co-infection in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hepatitis B Virus(HBV) and Human Immunodeficiency Virus(HIV) share similar properties such as modes of transmission. This study was therefore designed to find out the prevalence of HBV/HIV co-infection in Zawan village. Three hundred subjects were recruited into the study through simple random sampling method ...

  13. Hepatitis B Virus infection in Nigeria – a review | Emechebe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In Nigeria, the transmission of hepatitis B virus occurs mainly during childhood and all the risk factors (like blood transfusion, sexual promiscuity, lower socioecomic status etc) implicated elsewhere in the spread of the virus in the general population also play role in Nigeria. Conclusion: Reduction in the of hepatitis B virus ...

  14. Health care-associated hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzetto, Bruno; Memmi, Meriam; Garraud, Olivier; Roblin, Xavier; Berthelot, Philippe

    2014-12-14

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a blood-borne pathogen that has a worldwide distribution and infects millions of people. Care-associated HCV infections represented a huge part of hepatitis C burden in the past via contaminated blood and unsafe injections and continue to be a serious problem of public health. The present review proposes a panorama of health care-associated HCV infections via the three mode of contamination that have been identified: (1) infected patient to non-infected patient; (2) infected patient to non-infected health care worker (HCW); and (3) infected HCW to non infected patient. For each condition, the circumstances of contamination are described together with the means to prevent them. As a whole, the more important risk is represented by unsafe practices regarding injections, notably with the improper use of multidose vials used for multiple patients. The questions of occupational exposures and infected HCWs are also discussed. In terms of prevention and surveillance, the main arm for combating care-associated HCV infections is the implementation of standard precautions in all the fields of cares, with training programs and audits to verify their good application. HCWs must be sensitized to the risk of blood-borne pathogens, notably by the use of safety devices for injections and good hygiene practices in the operating theatre and in all the invasive procedures. The providers performing exposed-prone procedures must monitor their HCV serology regularly in order to detect early any primary infection and to treat it without delay. With the need to stay vigilant because HCV infection is often a hidden risk, it can be hoped that the number of people infected by HCV via health care will decrease very significantly in the next years.

  15. Chronic hepatitis E virus infection in a patient with leukemia and elevated transaminases: a case report

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    Gauss Annika

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Acute hepatitis E virus infection may cause mild, self-limiting hepatitis, either as epidemic outbreaks or sporadic cases, the latter of which have been reported in industrialized countries. Chronic infections are uncommon and have been reported in immunosuppressed patients, patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection, and patients with hematological malignancies. Case presentation A 46-year-old Caucasian man was admitted to the gastroenterology clinic with a history of increasing transaminases, persistent exhaustion, and occasional right-side abdominal pain over the course of a 6-month period. B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia had been diagnosed several years earlier, and the patient was treated with rituximab, pentostatin, and cyclophosphamide. A diagnostic workup ruled out autoimmune and metabolic liver disease, hepatitis A-C, and herpes virus infection. A physical examination revealed enlarged axillary lymph nodes. The results of an abdominal ultrasound examination were otherwise unremarkable. Hepatitis E virus infection was diagnosed by detection of hepatitis E virus-specific antibodies. Blood samples were positive for hepatitis E virus ribonucleic acid with high viral loads for at least 8 months, demonstrating a rare chronic hepatitis E virus infection. Sequencing and phylogenetic analysis revealed hepatitis E virus genotype 3c with homologies to other European isolates from humans and swine, indicating an autochthonous infection. Conclusions Usually, hepatitis E virus infection appears as an acute infection; rare chronic infections have been reported for transplant patients, patients with human immunodeficiency virus, and patients with hematological malignancies. The chronic nature of hepatitis E infection in our patient was most likely induced by the immunosuppressive B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia treatment. The differential diagnosis in patients with unexplained hepatitis should include hepatitis E

  16. Neutralizing Antibodies and Pathogenesis of Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Françoise Stoll-Keller

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is a major cause of chronic liver disease worldwide. The interplay between the virus and host innate and adaptive immune responses determines the outcome of infection. There is increasing evidence that host neutralizing responses play a relevant role in the resulting pathogenesis. Furthermore, viral evasion from host neutralizing antibodies has been revealed to be an important contributor in leading both to viral persistence in acute liver graft infection following liver transplantation, and to chronic viral infection. The development of novel model systems to study HCV entry and neutralization has allowed a detailed understanding of the molecular mechanisms of virus-host interactions during antibody-mediated neutralization. The understanding of these mechanisms will ultimately contribute to the development of novel antiviral preventive strategies for liver graft infection and an urgently needed vaccine. This review summarizes recent concepts of the role of neutralizing antibodies in viral clearance and protection, and highlights consequences of viral escape from neutralizing antibodies in the pathogenesis of HCV infection.

  17. Clinical Features of Adult Patients with Acute Hepatitis B Virus Infection Progressing to Chronic Infection

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    Kojiro Michitaka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Information regarding the progression of acute hepatitis B virus (HBV infection to chronic infection in adults is scarce. Methods. Twenty-five adult patients with acute HBV infection (14 men and 11 women, 18–84 years old, whose clinical features progressed to those of chronic infection (group A or did not (group B, were studied retrospectively. Results. There were 3 and 22 patients in groups A and B, respectively. Two of the 3 patients of group A lacked the typical symptoms of acute hepatitis. No differences were found between groups with respect to age, sex, or HBV genotypes. However, total bilirubin and alanine aminotransaminase levels were significantly lower in group A. Conclusions. Three of the 25 adult patients with acute HBV infection progressed to chronic infection. Hepatitis was mild in these patients. Patients with mild acute hepatitis B or unapparent HBV infection may have a higher risk of progressing to chronic infection.

  18. Morphologic Features of Extrahepatic Manifestations of Hepatitis C Virus Infection

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    Huaibin M. Ko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma are the prototypic complications of chronic hepatitis C virus infection in the liver. However, hepatitis C virus also affects a variety of other organs that may lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Extrahepatic manifestations of hepatitis C infection include a multitude of disease processes affecting the small vessels, skin, kidneys, salivary gland, eyes, thyroid, and immunologic system. The majority of these conditions are thought to be immune mediated. The most documented of these entities is mixed cryoglobulinemia. Morphologically, immune complex depositions can be identified in small vessels and glomerular capillary walls, leading to leukoclastic vasculitis in the skin and membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis in the kidney. Other HCV-associated entities include porphyria cutanea tarda, lichen planus, necrolytic acral erythema, membranous glomerulonephritis, diabetic nephropathy, B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas, insulin resistance, sialadenitis, sicca syndrome, and autoimmune thyroiditis. This paper highlights the histomorphologic features of these processes, which are typically characterized by chronic inflammation, immune complex deposition, and immunoproliferative disease in the affected organ.

  19. High-Risk Behaviour among Hepatitis B Virus-Infected Patients in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    -risk behaviour for hepatitis B virus (HBV) transmission among HBV-infected Nigerian adults in order to provide clues for intensifying HBV prevention and control. Methodology: 200 hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) positive patients attending ...

  20. Host Immune Status and Response to Hepatitis E Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krain, Lisa J.; Nelson, Kenrad E.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Hepatitis E virus (HEV), identified over 30 years ago, remains a serious threat to life, health, and productivity in developing countries where access to clean water is limited. Recognition that HEV also circulates as a zoonotic and food-borne pathogen in developed countries is more recent. Even without treatment, most cases of HEV-related acute viral hepatitis (with or without jaundice) resolve within 1 to 2 months. However, HEV sometimes leads to acute liver failure, chronic infection, or extrahepatic symptoms. The mechanisms of pathogenesis appear to be substantially immune mediated. This review covers the epidemiology of HEV infection worldwide, the humoral and cellular immune responses to HEV, and the persistence and protection of antibodies produced in response to both natural infection and vaccines. We focus on the contributions of altered immune states (associated with pregnancy, human immunodeficiency virus [HIV], and immunosuppressive agents used in cancer and transplant medicine) to the elevated risks of chronic infection (in immunosuppressed/immunocompromised patients) and acute liver failure and mortality (among pregnant women). We conclude by discussing outstanding questions about the immune response to HEV and interactions with hormones and comorbid conditions. These questions take on heightened importance now that a vaccine is available. PMID:24396140

  1. Treatment for hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection - Danish national guidelines 2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Peer Brehm; Clausen, Mette Rye; Krarup, Henrik Bygum

    2012-01-01

    is not common in Denmark. The prevalence has not been determined by national surveys, but it is estimated that 10,000-15,000 patients are chronically infected with hepatitis B and 15,000-20,000 with chronic hepatitis C. The majority of patients with HBV infection in Denmark are emigrants from high endemic...

  2. Hepatitis viruses overview

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hepatitis is major cause of morbidity or mortality worldwide, particularly in the developing world. The major causes of infective hepatitis are hepatitis viruses. A, B, C, D or E. In the acute phase, there are no clinical features that can reliably differentiate between these viruses. Infection may be asymptomatic or can present as.

  3. HEPATITIS B VIRUS INFECTION PROFILE IN CENTRAL BRAZILIAN HEMODIALYSIS POPULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TELES Sheila A.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B has proved to be a major health hazard in hemodialysis patients. In order to investigate the hepatitis B virus (HBV infection profile in the hemodialysis population of Goiânia city - Central Brazil, all dialysis patients (N=282 were studied. The prevalence of any HBV marker (HBsAg, anti-HBs, and anti-HBc was 56.7% (95% CI: 51.1-62.7, ranging from 33.3% to 77.7% depending on dialysis unit. HBV-DNA was detected in 67.6% and 88.2% of the HBsAg-positive serum samples, in 91.3% and 100% of the HBsAg/HBeAg-positive samples, and in 18.2% and 63.6% of the HBsAg/anti-HBe-reactive sera by hybridization and PCR, respectively. The length of time on hemodialysis was significantly associated with HBV seropositivity. Only 10% of the patients reported received hepatitis B vaccination. The findings of a high HBV infection prevalence in this population and the increased risk for HBV infection on long-term hemodialysis suggest the environmental transmission, emphasizing the urgent need to evaluate strategies of control and prevention followed in these units.

  4. Antiviral Treatment for Hepatitis C Virus Infection after Liver Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiko Sugawara

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A significant proportion of patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection develop liver cirrhosis and complications of end-stage liver disease over two to three decades and require liver transplantation, however, reinfection is common and leads to further adverse events under immunosuppression. Pretransplant antiviral or preemptive therapy is limited to mildly decompensated patients due to poor tolerance. The mainstay of management represents directed antiviral therapy after evidence of recurrence of chronic hepatitis C. Combined pegylated interferon and ribavirin therapy is the current standard treatment with sustained viral response rates of 25% to 45%. The rate is lower than that in the immunocompetent population, partly due to the high prevalence of intolerability. To date, there is no general consensus regarding the antiviral treatment modality, timing, or dosing for HCV in patients with advanced liver disease and after liver transplantation. New anti-HCV drugs to delay disease progression or to enhance viral clearance are necessary.

  5. Extrahepatic manifestations associated with Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Flores-Chávez

    Full Text Available Summary Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection has been associated with both organ-specific and systemic autoimmune diseases, with cryoglobulinemia being the most frequent associated disease. Experimental, virologic, and clinical evidence have demon-strated a close association between HCV infection and some systemic autoimmune diseases, especially Sjögren’s syndrome, but also rheumatoid arthritis and lupus. A higher prevalence of hematological processes has also been described in patients with HCV infection, including cytopenias and lymphoproliferative disorders (B-cell lymphoma. In addition, patients with chronic HCV infection have a higher frequency of other extrahepatic manifestations including endocrine, metabolic and cardiovascular disorders that may worse the prognosis of patients, along with neuropsychiatric manifestations and general symptoms that have a significant influence on the quality of life of the patient. Direct-acting antiviral therapies (DAAs that have recently begun to be used are providing the opportunity to effectively cure chronic HCV infection and reduce the burden of both hepatic and extrahepatic complications.

  6. [Hepatitis B virus infection in pregnancy and the immunosuppressed patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riveiro-Barciela, Mar; Buti, María

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection continues to be a major public health problem worldwide. Although treatment indications are well established in clinical practice guidelines, there are some risk groups, such as pregnant women and immunosuppressed patients, who require different and specific management of HBV infection. In pregnant women, treatment indication should be individualized and the risk of HBV transmission to the newborn evaluated because cases of vertical transmission continue to be reported, despite active and passive immunoprophylaxis. In patients receiving immunosuppressive therapy, HBV reactivation is associated with high morbidity and mortality, even in patients with past HBV infection, highlighting the importance of screening and the need to evaluate prophylactic therapy in some cases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  7. Autonomic evaluation of hepatitis C virus infected patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Mattos Coutinho

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available There are few studies reporting the association between hepatitis C virus (HCV infection and disautonomia. We have evaluated the autonomic cardiovascular function in 12 patients with sensory small-fiber polyneuropathy infected by HCV. The mean age was 49±13 years old. The mean infection time was 9.6 years in six (50% patients. Thermal and pinprick hypoesthesia was observed in distal legs in all patients. Autonomic symptoms were referred by eight (66.7% patients. Among patients with abnormal autonomic cardiovascular test, five (41.7% showed abnormal results in two or more tests. Valsalva maneuver was abnormal in seven (58.3% patients. We can consider that there is an association of both parasympathetic and sympathetic efferent cardiovascular dysfunction in this group of patients.

  8. Hepatitis C virus infection in hemodialysis patients in Maracaibo, Venezuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisca Monsalve-Castillo

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Over a two year period, the incidence of hepatitis C virus (HCV infection was evaluated in 29 hemodialysis patients, aged between 15 and 75 years (mean ± SD: 45 ± 39.5 years, from the University Hospital Hemodyalisis Unit, Maracaibo, Zulia State, Venezuela. Anti-HCV antibodies were determined using a fourth generation ELISA (Innotest HCV Ab IV kit and positive blood samples were tested using a recombinant assay kit (Inno-LIA HCV Ab III, both kits from Innogenetics N.V., Belgium. The findings indicate a lack of HCV seroconversion in the hemodialysis patients over the study period, confirmed by the recombinant assay. Risk factors for HCV infection were 0.3270 (95% confidence interval: 0.01323-8.080 in patients undergoing hemodialysis. The findings suggest a lack of significant sources for HCV infection due to the preventive measures to avoid its transmission in the hemodialysis unit.

  9. Epidemiology of hepatitis B virus infection in Albania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resuli, Bashkim; Prifti, Skerdi; Kraja, Bledar; Nurka, Tatjana; Basho, Mimoza; Sadiku, Edita

    2009-02-21

    To assess the prevalence and socio-demographic distribution of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in Albania. Blood samples from 410 unselected schoolboys, 666 students, 500 military personnel, 1286 casual blood donors, 378 voluntary blood donors and 640 pregnant women (total 3880 non-vaccinated residents of rural and metropolitan areas from all over Albania; 2354 (60.7%) male and 1526 (39.3%) female; mean age of 26.3 years) were tested during 2004-2006 for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and antibodies to hepatitis B virus (anti-HBs) by ELISA. The HBsAg and anti-HBs prevalence were 9.5% and 28.7%, respectively. The highest HBsAg prevalence was evident in the younger age group, such as in schoolchildren (11.8%) and the military (10.6%). Consequently, the anti-HBs prevalence increased with age, from 21.2% in schoolchildren (mean age: 15.7 years), to 36.3% in pregnant women (mean age: 26.3 years) and 29.7% in voluntary blood donors (mean age: 40.1 years). There were no significant differences between males and females. Despite the estimated two-fold reduction of HBsAg prevalence in the general population from about 18%-19% to 9.5%, Albania remains a highly endemic country (i.e. over 8% of HBsAg prevalence rate).

  10. Simeprevir for the treatment of hepatitis C virus infection

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    Izquierdo L

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Laure Izquierdo,1 François Helle,1 Catherine François,1,2 Sandrine Castelain,1,2 Gilles Duverlie,1,2 Etienne Brochot1,2 1Virology Research Unit, Jules Verne University of Picardie, 2Department of Virology, Amiens University Hospital, Amiens, France Abstract: Simeprevir (TMC435, Olysio™, a second-generation hepatitis C virus (HCV protease inhibitor, has been recently approved for the treatment of genotype 1 chronic hepatitis C in combination with pegylated interferon and ribavirin. This molecule has very different characteristics from first-generation protease inhibitors. Results from trials show that simeprevir is highly effective and safe, with few adverse events. We discuss the specific features of this new treatment option for HCV infection, in terms of in vitro data, pharmacological data, and clinical trials. We also discuss the impact of Q80K polymorphism at baseline. Studies evaluating interferon-free regimens with simeprevir are ongoing. Future combinations of two or more direct-acting antiviral agents, targeting different viral enzymes and with synergistic antiviral effects, will be approved, allowing treatment of pan-genotypic HCV with optimized sustained virologic responses. Simeprevir will undoubtedly be part of future treatment strategies. Keywords: simeprevir, protease inhibitor, direct-acting antiviral agent, hepatitis C virus

  11. Distribution of hepatitis B virus infection in Namibia

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    P Mhata

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. Namibia regards hepatitis B virus (HBV infection as a public health problem and introduced hepatitis B vaccinations for infants during 2009. However, information on HBV infection in the country remains limited, and effective public health interventions may be compromised in the absence of adequate evidence-based data. Available data from the World Health Organization (WHO estimate that 15 - 60% of the normal population in many African countries may be positive for one or more of the HBV serological markers. Objective. To investigate the distribution of HBV infection in Namibia, using available laboratory data for 2013. Methods. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted using pre-existing electronic laboratory data on HBV infection. The data were retrieved from the central Namibia Institute of Pathology laboratory in Windhoek during January - December 2013. Tests were done on the following three main groups: (i pregnant women during routine antenatal care (ANC visits; (ii patients with HIV/AIDS during antiretroviral therapy clinic visits; and (iii any other individual suspected of having HBV infection. Results. Of a total of 77 238 hepatitis B surface antigen test results retrieved countrywide, 9 087 (11.8% were positive. Of the positive results, 246/9 087 (2.7% were in children aged 0 - 14 years, with the sexes equally affected. HBV infections increased markedly, particularly among females, in the age group 15 - 39 years, reaching a peak in the age group 30 - 34 years. Routine screening of pregnant women for HBV during ANC visits was found to be systematically conducted in only two regions, Ohangwena and Khomas. Conclusions. This study showed high proportions of positive results in pregnant women, patients with HIV/AIDS and individuals suspected of having HBV infection. The Ministry of Health and Social Services and stakeholders may wish to consider improving the routine and surveillance reporting systems for viral hepatitis

  12. Predictors of hepatitis B virus genotype and viraemia in HIV-infected patients with chronic hepatitis B in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soriano, Vincent; Mocroft, Amanda; Peters, Lars

    2010-01-01

    Both natural history and treatment outcome of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection are influenced by genotypes and viral load. Information about factors determining HBV genotype distribution and viraemia in HIV/HBV-co-infected patients is scarce.......Both natural history and treatment outcome of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection are influenced by genotypes and viral load. Information about factors determining HBV genotype distribution and viraemia in HIV/HBV-co-infected patients is scarce....

  13. Hepatic steatosis associated with hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornianu, Marioara; Dema, Alis; Tăban, Sorina; Lazăr, Daniela; Lazăr, Elena; Costi, Simona

    2005-01-01

    Hepatic steatosis (including microvesicular and macrovesicular fat) is a significant histologic feature associated to the chronic hepatitis C (HCV). The purpose of this paper was to analyze the incidence of hepatocyte steatosis in patients with HCV and the potential role of some the known variables as risk factors possibly involved in the occurrence of steatosis: age, sex, obesity, biological parameters, diabetes mellitus, degree of necroinflammation (NI) and stage of fibrosis. 96 of 125 (76.8%) patients had hepatic steatosis (mild 76%, moderate and severe 24%); in comparison with patients without steatosis, those with HCV and steatosis were more frequently women (males/females: 1/1.9) of older age (49.97 vs. 47.7 years), with a greater ICM (index of corporal mass) (26.55 sqm vs. 23.52 sqm), with raised glycemic values (13 of the 14 patients with HCV and diabetes mellitus had steatosis), an average value of serum ALT significantly raised (95.38 U/l vs. 78.96 U/l), and an average score of NI activity significantly higher (9.39 vs. 6.75).

  14. Infectivity of blood products from donors with occult hepatitis B virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allain, Jean-Pierre; Mihaljevic, Ivanka; Gonzalez-Fraile, Maria Isabel

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Occult hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection (OBI) is identified in 1:1000 to 1:50,000 European blood donations. This study intended to determine the infectivity of blood products from OBI donors. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Recipients of previous donations from OBI donors were investigated...

  15. Occult hepatitis B virus infection among Mexican human immunodeficiency virus-1-infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Muñoz, Ma Teresa; Maldonado-Rodriguez, Angelica; Rojas-Montes, Othon; Torres-Ibarra, Rocio; Gutierrez-Escolano, Fernanda; Vazquez-Rosales, Guillermo; Gomez, Alejandro; Muñoz, Onofre; Torres, Javier; Lira, Rosalia

    2014-10-07

    To determine the frequency of occult hepatitis B infection (OHBI) in a group of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1+/ hepatitis B surface antigen negative (HBsAg)- patients from Mexico. We investigated the presence of OHBI in 49 HIV-1+/HBsAg- patients. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA was analyzed using nested PCR to amplify the Core (C) region and by real-time PCR to amplify a region of the S and X genes. The possible associations between the variables and OHBI were investigated using Pearson's χ(2) and/or Fisher's exact test. We found that the frequency of OHBI was 49% among the group of 49 HIV-1+/HBsAg- patients studied. The presence of OHBI was significantly associated with the HIV-1 RNA viral load [odds ratio (OR) = 8.75; P = 0.001; 95%CI: 2.26-33.79] and with HIV-antiretroviral treatment with drugs that interfere with HBV replication (lamivudine, tenofovir or emtricitabine) (OR = 0.25; P = 0.05; 95%CI: 0.08-1.05). The OHBI frequency is high among 49 Mexican HIV-1+/HBsAg- patients and it was more frequent in patients with detectable HIV RNA, and less frequent in patients who are undergoing HIV-ARV treatment with drugs active against HBV.

  16. Prevalence and risk of hepatitis e virus infection in the HIV population of Nepal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shrestha, A. (Ananta); Adhikari, A. (Anurag); Bhattarai, M. (Manjula); Rauniyar, R. (Ramanuj); J.D. Debes; P.A. Boonstra (André); Lama, T.K. (Thupten K.); Al Mahtab, M. (Mamun); Butt, A.S. (Amna Subhan); Akbar, S.M.F. (Sheikh Mohammad Fazle); Aryal, N. (Nirmal); Karn, S. (Sapana); Manandhar, K.D. (Krishna Das); Gupta, B.P. (Birendra Prasad)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Infection with the hepatitis E virus (HEV) can cause acute hepatitis in endemic areas in immune-competent hosts, as well as chronic infection in immune-compromised subjects in non-endemic areas. Most studies assessing HEV infection in HIV-infected populations have been

  17. Perspectives and control of hepatitis B virus infection in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Lin Lin

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B virus (HBV infection is endemic in Taiwan. After the implementation of universal hepatitis B vaccination, there was a significant reduction of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg seropositivity and HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC incidence in children, teenagers, and young adults. However, the incidence of HBV-related HCC in adults remains high. Through several community- and hospital-based cohort studies, the viral factors affecting the prognosis of HBV carriers have been illustrated. Serum HBV DNA level > 2000 IU/mL at study entry starts to increase the risks of cirrhosis and HCC in adult patients with chronic HBV infection. In addition, serum HBsAg level > 1000 IU/mL is associated with a higher risk of HCC in HBeAg-negative patients with low viral load. Virologically, HBV genotype C/D and core promote/pre-S mutations correlate with an increased HCC risk. Recently, a risk calculator has been developed to predict HCC in noncirrhotic patients with external validation. Therapeutically, hospital-based cohort and population-based nationwide studies indicated that interferon and nucleos(tide analogue treatments could reduce the incidence of HCC over time. Towards the ultimate goal of HBV eradication, several novel agents aiming at viral and host targets are under development. In addition, the immune therapy may play a key role in HBV cure in the foreseeable future.

  18. Occult hepatitis B virus infection: influence of S protein variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenhua; Zhang, Ling; Dai, Yu; Zhang, Yafei; Li, Jun; Li, Xu

    2016-01-19

    In occult hepatitis B viral infection (OBI), the persistence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA is associated with a lack of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). To assess the possible role of HBsAg immune escape variants in OBI patients, variability in the HBV S gene was evaluated for OBI patients as well as chronic HBV infection patients from the same families. We selected 17 HBV DNA-positive/HBsAg-negative patients (OBI group) and 15 HBV DNA- and HBsAg-positive patients from OBI families (control group). The S gene was amplified and cloned, and at least 15 clones per patient were sequenced and analyzed. Although the incidence of stop codon mutations within the S region was higher in the OBI group (13.6 %) than in the control group (1.5 %, P type of mutation, together with insertion and deletion mutations, was prevalent in only three OBI patients. In the major hydrophilic region (MHR), a median of 0.75 residues were altered in every 100 residues for the OBI patients, whereas 0.95 out of 100 residues were changed in the control group (P = 0.428). Furthermore, some variants that are generally considered immune escape variants, such as mutations at positions s145, s147, and s123, were only observed in less than 5 % of all the clones sequenced, in either OBI or control group. Our data suggest that HBsAg variants may not play a major role in OBI pathogenesis.

  19. Host-virus interactions in hepatitis B and hepatitis C infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshio, Sachiyo; Kanto, Tatsuya

    2016-05-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) are among the most endemic pathogens worldwide, with more than 500 million people globally currently infected with these viruses. These pathogens can cause acute and chronic hepatitis that progress to liver cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma. Both viruses utilize multifaceted strategies to evade the host surveillance system and fall below the immunological radar. HBV has developed specific strategies to evade recognition by the innate immune system and is acknowledged to be a stealth virus. However, extensive research has revealed that HBV is recognized by dendritic cells (DCs) and natural killer (NK) cells. Indoleamine-2, 3-dioxygenase is an enforcer of sequential immune reactions in acute hepatitis B, and this molecule has been shown to be induced by the interaction of HBV-infected hepatocytes, DCs, and NK cells. The interleukin-28B genotype has been reported to influence HCV eradication either therapeutically or spontaneously, but the biological function of its gene product, a type-III interferon (IFN-λ3), remains to be elucidated. Human BDCA3(+)DCs have also been shown to be a potent producer of IFN-λ3 in HCV infection, suggesting the possibility that BDCA3(+)DCs could play a key role in developing therapeutic HCV vaccine. Here we review the current state of research on immune responses against HBV and HCV infection, with a specific focus on innate immunity. A comprehensive study based on clinical samples is urgently needed to improve our understanding of the immune mechanisms associated with viral control and thus to develop novel immune modulatory therapies to cure chronic HBV and HCV infection.

  20. Hepatitis A Virus Infection, Vaccination and Iranian Healthcare Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaee-Zavareh, Mohammad Saeid; Karimi-Sari, Hamidreza; Dolatimehr, Fardin; Alavian, Seyed Moayed

    2015-12-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection is an important public health problem. It is estimated that about 1.4 million cases of HAV infection occur every year worldwide. Non-immune healthcare workers (HCWs) can be at higher risk of HAV infection in comparison to general population and an appropriate preventive method should be considered for them. For finding related articles, a comprehensive search was performed in Scopus, PubMed and Google Scholar and all appropriate combinations of following keywords were considered; "healthcare provider", "healthcare personnel", "healthcare worker", "nurse" "medical students", "Iran", "Hepatitis A" and "vaccination". Also we did a search in Persian language in Google scholar and scientific information database (SID) to find related Persian literature. A gradual shift in age of HAV infection has been seen from childhood toward adulthood. Data about HAV seropositivity among Iranian HCWs are very limited. However based on the recent studies, it seems that HAV seropositivity has been reduced among HCWs in comparison with the past. All recent studies have suggested HAV vaccination for HCWs. Available limited studies show that Iranian healthcare personnel need HAV vaccination. However, for selecting an appropriate preventive method for this high risk group, more original studies are still needed.

  1. Molecular epidemiology of hepatitis A virus infection in Northeast India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Moumita; Bose, Sujoy; Saikia, Anjan; Medhi, Subhash; Deka, Manab

    2015-07-01

    The present study was undertaken to screen the molecular epidemiology of Hepatitis A virus (HAV) in Northeast India (NEI) who are ethnically distinct, tribal dominated and of lower socio-economic status with almost no information available from NEI on these aspects. Briefly, 3 ml blood was collected from 324 random liver disease cases with jaundice, receiving care at Central Hospital, N.F. Railway, Guwahati, Assam with informed consent. The patients detected with HAV-IgM positive status were included and were stratified as acute viral hepatitis (AVH) and fulminant hepatitis (FHF) based on clinical profile. Viral RNA was isolated and HAV-RNA was detected by Real-time PCR using primers for the VP3-VP1 region. HAV genotyping was studied by PCR-direct sequencing-phylogenetic analysis approach using the VP1/2A region of HAV isolates. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS13.0 software. A total of 69 cases were HAV infected with two HBV co-infected cases (n = 69 + 2 = 71), 62 cases and two co-infected cases were AVH and others were FHF cases. HAV infection was predominant in especially in the young and adult age group. HAV-RNA was detected in 28 cases, out of which 19 cases could be genotyped (12 AVH, 7 FHF); which showed the prevalence of genotype IIIA or IA only. Although HAV genotype IIIA was the major genotype in both the AVH (10/12, 83.33%) and FHF (5/7, 71.43%) group, but the difference in distribution of genotypes in AVH and FHF cases was statistically non-significant (P = 0.550). HAV genotype IIIA is associated with the majority of HAV infected cases and severity in NEI. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Etiological spectrum of viral hepatitis and prevalence of markers of hepatitis A and B virus infection in north India*

    OpenAIRE

    Tandon, B. N.; Gandhi, B. M.; Joshi, Y. K.

    1984-01-01

    The etiological spectrum of viral hepatitis and the prevalence of serological markers of hepatitis A and B virus infection in healthy persons in north India were studied. Hepatitis A virus was found to be the most common cause of acute hepatitis in children (67%). It was a less frequent cause of this disease in adults (14%). Hepatitis A virus was only rarely the cause of acute (12%) and subacute (4%) liver failure. It was recorded as the etiological agent in an epidemic among schoolchildren. ...

  3. Hepatitis E Virus infection in HIV-infected patients with elevated serum transaminases levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanson-Le-Pors Marie-Jose

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Increases in aminotransferases levels are frequently encountered in HIV-positive patients and often remain unexplained. The role in this setting and natural history of hepatitis E in HIV-infected patients are unknown. The aim of the study was to assess HEV infection in HIV-infected patients attending a Parisian hospital, with a current or previous cryptogenic hepatitis.191 plasma samples collected from 108 HIV-infected patients with elevated aminotransferases levels were retrospectively tested for the presence of hepatitis E virus (HEV infection markers: anti-HEV IgM antibodies, anti-HEV IgG antibodies, anti-HEV IgG avidity index and plasma HEV RNA.One acute infection, documented by positive tests for anti-HEV IgM antibody, low anti-HEV IgG avidity index and plasma HEV RNA (genotype 3e, and three past infections were diagnosed, without any observed case of persistent infection. The acute hepatitis was benign and resolved spontaneously within two weeks. This infection was probably contracted locally. Acute HEV hepatitis can occur in HIV-infected patients but rarely explains cryptogenic hepatitis, at least in an urban HIV population, regardless geographic origin and CD4 counts.

  4. Daclatasvir for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temesgen, Z; Rizza, S A

    2015-05-01

    Daclatasvir is a nonstructural protein 5A (NS5A) replication complex inhibitor that has shown potent in vitro activity against multiple hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes (GT). It is currently in advanced clinical development as a component of combination treatment regimens in a variety of HCV-infected patient populations. In studies conducted thus far, it has been generally well tolerated. It has been approved for the treatment of HCV GTs 1-4 in the European Union. The combination of daclatasvir and asunaprevir (an HCV NS3/4A protease inhibitor) has been approved in Japan for the treatment of patients with GT1 HCV infection. Here we review the available literature on daclatasvir, including its information on its discovery, mechanism of action, pharmacology, preclinical and clinical activity, resistance and safety. Copyright 2015 Prous Science, S.A.U. or its licensors. All rights reserved.

  5. Prevention of hepatitis B virus infection and liver cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Mei-Hwei

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the five leading causes of cancer death in human. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is the most common etiologic agent of HCC in the world, particularly in areas prevalent for HBV infection such as Asia, Africa, southern part of Eastern and Central Europe, and the Middle East. Risk factors of HBV-related HCC include (1) viral factors-persistent high viral replication, HBV genotype C or D, pre-S2 or core promoter mutants; (2) host factors-older age (>40 years old) at HBeAg seroconversion, male gender; (3) mother-to-infant transmission; and (4) other carcinogenic factors-smoking, habitual use of alcohol, etc. Prevention is the best way to control cancer. There are three levels of liver cancer prevention, i.e., primary prevention by HBV vaccination targeting the general population, secondary prevention by antiviral agent for high-risk subjects with chronic HBV infection, and tertiary prevention by antiviral agent to prevent recurrence for patients who have been successfully treated for liver cancer. Primary prevention by hepatitis B vaccination is most cost effective. Its cancer preventive efficacy supports it as the first successful example of cancer preventive vaccine in human. This experience can be extended to the development of other cancer preventive vaccine. Careful basic and clinical research is needed to develop ideal vaccines to induce adequate protection. Understanding the main transmission route and age at primary infection may help to set the optimal target age to start a new cancer preventive vaccination program. Besides timely HBV vaccination, the earlier administration of hepatitis B immunoglobulin immediately after birth, and even antiviral agent during the third trimester of pregnancy to block mother-to-infant transmission of HBV are possible strategies to enhance the prevention efficacy of HBV infection and its related liver cancer.

  6. The Challenge of Treating Children With Hepatitis C Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indolfi, Giuseppe; Thorne, Claire; El Sayed, Manal H; Giaquinto, Carlo; Gonzalez-Peralta, Regino P

    2017-06-01

    The development of oral hepatitis C virus (HCV) direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) has revolutionized the therapeutic field. Nowadays, multiple safe and highly effective antiviral regimens are commercially available to treat adults with hepatitis C infection. These new regimens for the first time genuinely raise the prospects of eradicating HCV. Many challenges, however, remain from identifying infected individuals to optimizing treatment and ensuring global access to antiviral therapy to all population groups, including children. Recently, in April 2017, the association of sofosbuvir with ribavirin and the fixed-dose combination sofosbuvir/ledipasvir have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for treatment of children with chronic HCV infection 12 years of age and older. The only drugs currently approved for children younger than 12 years are pegylated interferon and ribavirin. There are 6 registered ongoing pediatric trials assessing safety and efficacy of DAAs, but their current completion timelines are years away. Herein, we summarize the state of the art of DAAs' development for adult and children and highlight the crucial importance of overcoming barriers to treating children with HCV.

  7. Recent advances in understanding and diagnosing hepatitis B virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourati, Slim; Pawlotsky, Jean-Michel

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infects approximately 240 million individuals worldwide. Recent advances in the virology, immunopathogenesis, and diagnosis of HBV infection are summarized in this review article. The identification of a hepatocyte-specific cellular receptor for HBV, the sodium taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NTCP), made it possible to develop reliable cell culture systems and better understand the early steps of the viral lifecycle. Viral and host factors involved in covalently closed circular DNA synthesis, stability, and transcriptional regulation have also been identified and provide potential targets for new drugs. Based on recent evidence showing trained immunity in immune-tolerant patients, the immune tolerance and immune clearance phases have been renamed the non-inflammatory and inflammatory phases, respectively. New diagnostic and monitoring tools are now available, including rapid diagnostic tests for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) detection, HBsAg quantification assays, anti-HBc antibody quantification assays, an HBV core-related antigen (HBcrAg) quantification test, new HBV DNA detection and quantification assays, and an HBV RNA quantification test. Their clinical utility is under study. Finally, new antiviral and immune modulation approaches are in the preclinical or early clinical developmental stages, with the goal to achieve functional cure or ideally (if possible) eradication of HBV infection.

  8. Management strategies for hepatitis C virus infection in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, Suzanne M; Kelly, Deirdre A

    2008-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Progression to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma occurs in 20% of infected adults. The natural history following childhood infection is less well defined, although cirrhosis in children is described. Since blood product screening for HCV infection was introduced in 1990, most children who acquire HCV do so by vertical transmission from an infected mother. Transmission to offspring occurs in approximately 5%. Most children with HCV infection are asymptomatic. Diagnosis is made by testing those at risk for HCV RNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and HCV antibody (anti-HCV) by enzyme immunoassay (EIA). The clinical impact of HCV infection is assessed by monitoring symptoms and signs, blood testing of liver enzymes, ultrasound imaging, and by liver biopsy. Improved efficacy and tolerability of treatment strategies in adults have had a significant impact on the management of children with HCV infection. The emphasis is now on promoting awareness, early diagnosis, and treatment. Treatment strategies have evolved from monotherapy with interferon alfa (IFNalpha), to combination therapy with ribavirin. Pegylated IFNalpha is superior to conventional IFNalpha, and forms the basis of current recommendations. The genotype of HCV influences treatment efficacy. Treatment is generally well tolerated in children, although adverse effects are common. Preparation and support throughout treatment for the whole family is needed. A proportion of children with HCV infection have co-morbidity, including viral co-infection or hematologic disease. Although treatment may be contraindicated, risks and benefits must be considered before denying treatment. Anemia is more common in those with HIV co-infection, renal insufficiency, thalassemia, or cirrhosis, and may be aggravated by treatment. Children with thalassemia may have iron overload, and transfusion requirements may increase during

  9. HIV co-infection with hepatitis B and C viruses among Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    infection was 5.2%. No child was co-infected with all three viruses. Children who were co-infected with HCV were more likely to be older than 5 years. There was no significant association between co-infection with either of the hepatitis viruses and ...

  10. Immunologic, metabolic and genetic factors in hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierro, Nora A; Gonzalez-Aldaco, Karina; Torres-Valadez, Rafael; Martinez-Lopez, Erika; Roman, Sonia; Panduro, Arturo

    2014-04-07

    The mechanisms that regulate disease progression during hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and the response to treatment are not clearly identified. Numerous studies have demonstrated that a strong host immune response against HCV favors HCV clearance. In addition, genetic factors and metabolic machinery, particularly cholesterol modulation, are involved in HCV infection. It is likely that the interplay between all of these factors contributes to the outcome of HCV infection. In recent years, the world has experienced its largest epidemic of obesity. Mexico and the United States are the leading sufferers from this epidemic at the global level. Obesity is associated with the development of numerous pathologies including hypercholesterolemia which is one of the eight most important risk factors for mortality in Mexico. This may be related to the course of HCV infection in this population. Here, we focus on the urgent need to study the progression of HCV infection in relation to ethnic characteristics. Discoveries are discussed that hold promise in identifying immune, metabolic and genetic factors that, in conjunction, could be therapeutic targets or predictors of the progression of HCV infection.

  11. Virus-host interplay in hepatitis B virus infection and epigenetic treatment strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hensel, Kai O.; Rendon, Julio C.; Navas, Maria-Cristina; Rots, Marianne G.; Postberg, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Worldwide, chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major health problem and no cure exists. Importantly, hepatocyte intrusion by HBV particles results in a complex deregulation of both viral and host cellular genetic and epigenetic processes. Among the attempts to develop novel therapeutic

  12. Virus-host-interplay in hepatitis B virus infection and epigenetic treatment strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hensel, Kai O; Rendon, Julio C.; Navas, Maria-Cristina; Rots, Marianne G; Postberg, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Worldwide, chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major health problem and no cure exists. Importantly, hepatocyte intrusion by HBV particles results in a complex deregulation of both viral and host cellular genetic and epigenetic processes. Among the attempts to develop novel therapeutic

  13. Synthetic peptides for the immunodiagnosis of hepatitis A virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauna, A; Losada, S; Lorenzo, M; Bermúdez, H; Toledo, M; Pérez, H; Chacón, E; Noya, O

    2015-12-01

    VP1, VP2 and VP3 molecules of hepatitis A virus are exposed capsid proteins that have shown to be antigenic and are used for diagnosis in recombinant-antigen commercial kits. In this study, we developed a sequence analysis in order to predict diagnostic peptide epitopes, followed by their spot synthesis on functionalized cellulose paper (Pepscan). This paper with synthetic peptides was tested against a sera pool of hepatitis A patients. Two peptide sequences, that have shown an antigenic recognition, were selected for greater scale synthesis on resin. A dimeric form of one of these peptides (IMT-1996), located in the C-Terminus region of protein VP1, was antigenic with a recognition frequency of 87-100% of anti-IgG antibodies and 100% of anti-IgM antibodies employing the immunological assays MABA and ELISA. We propose peptide IMT-1996, with less than twenty residues, as a cheaper alternative for prevalence studies and diagnosis of hepatitis A infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Chronic Hepatitis B and C Virus Infection and Risk for Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma in HIV-Infected Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Qing; De Luca, Andrea; Smith, Colette

    2017-01-01

    Background: Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is the most common AIDS-defining condition in the era of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Whether chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection promote NHL in HIV-infected patients is unclear. Objective: To investigate whether chronic HBV...

  15. Hepatitis E virus infection: an emerging occupational risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Schryver, A; De Schrijver, K; François, G; Hambach, R; van Sprundel, M; Tabibi, R; Colosio, C

    2015-11-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection is endemic in many developing countries, causing substantial morbidity. Transmission is primarily faeco-oral and is associated with both sporadic infections and epidemics in areas where poor sanitation and weak public health infrastructures exist. Recently, it has become clear that HEV is also an endemic disease in industrialized countries. Moreover, a porcine reservoir and growing evidence of zoonotic transmission have been reported in these countries, suggesting the possibility of occupational transmission to man. To summarize the current knowledge on the epidemiology and prevention of transmission of HEV infection in occupational settings. The following key words were used to explore PubMed: hepatitis E, disease, epidemiology, profession(al), occupation(al). After screening of the results, 107 publications were retained. In non-endemic regions, seroprevalence varied from a few per cent (2-7.8%) in Europe, Japan and South America to 18.2-20.6% in the USA, Russia, UK, southern France and Asia. A meta-analysis of 12 cross-sectional studies evaluating HEV immunoglobulin G (IgG) seroprevalence in individuals occupationally exposed to swine showed greater odds of seropositivity in the exposed group but also a high degree of heterogeneity. A funnel plot suggested publication bias. There was a significant association between occupational exposure to swine and HEV IgG seroprevalence, but the level of prevalence detected depended also on the type of HEV IgG kits used. Further research, including on mechanisms and risk factors for infection, as well as the development of better serological tests for identification of infection, is required. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Hepatitis C virus infection in the Maghreb region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzikouri, Sayeh; Pineau, Pascal; Benjelloun, Soumaya

    2013-09-01

    Hepatitis C is a global health problem with a worldwide prevalence of about 3% (around 170 million people). Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is major concern in the Maghreb countries, Algeria, Libya, Mauritania, Morocco, and Tunisia, but no detailed description of its epidemiology in the region is available. In the present review, a systematic search was undertaken covering HCV data available in peer-reviewed databases as well as institutional reports and regional conference meeting abstracts from the Maghreb countries. Reports written in English and French were included in this analysis. Estimates of national and regional prevalence of HCV infection (based on anti-HCV antibody) and of the size of patient populations were performed. In addition, the molecular features of the circulating viral strains in the region are discussed. A substantial proportion, 1.2-1.9% of the Maghreb inhabitants, have anti-HCV antibodies. Genotype 1b predominates among viral strains in all countries except in Libya, where genotype 4 is dominant as in neighboring Egypt. This epidemiological situation is of significant concern, and requires urgent, broad, and active intervention for the prevention and control of HCV. More specifically, the application of state-of-the-art hygiene procedures and rigorous controls in medical disciplines such as hemodialysis, transfusion, endoscopic procedures, and dentistry is necessary to reduce significantly the number of new infections in the region. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Seroepidemiology of hepatitis e virus infection in mennonites in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Sanchez-Anguiano, Luis Francisco; Hernandez-Tinoco, Jesus

    2015-02-01

    The seroepidemiology of hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection in Mennonites has not been studied. We aimed to determine the seroprevalence of anti-HEV IgG antibodies in Mennonites in Durango, Mexico, and to compare it with the seroprevalence in general population in rural Durango. The socio-demographic, clinical and behavioral characteristics of Mennonites associated with HEV seropositivity were also investigated. We performed a case-control study to determine the frequency of anti-HEV IgG antibodies in 150 Mennonites (mean age 38.40 ± 15.53 years old) and 150 age- and gender-matched non-Mennonites controls using an enzyme-linked immunoassay. We used a standardized questionnaire to obtain the socio-demographic, clinical and behavioral characteristics of the Mennonites. Anti-HEV IgG antibodies were detected in 10 (6.7%) of 150 Mennonites and in 61 (40.7%) of 150 controls. Seroprevalence of anti-HEV IgG antibodies was significantly lower in Mennonites than in controls (odds ratio (OR) = 0.009; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.0006 - 0.15; P hepatitis. RESULTS DEMONSTRATE: 1) serological evidence of HEV exposure in Mennonites; however, Mennonites have a lower seroprevalence of HEV antibodies than controls from the rural general population; 2) seroprevalence in Mennonites increased with age. Further studies with a larger sample size to determine more contributing factors for HEV infection in Mennonites are needed.

  18. Hepatitis B Virus Infection, Genetic Susceptibility and Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Wen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Liver cancer is a sever cancer burden in the world, especially in developing countries. Its late diagnosis and high mortality rate urges early prediction. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is the major histopathological type of liver cancer. Chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV is a well-established risk factor for HCC. On one side, HBV sequence variation may influence the outcome of HBV infection and the development of HCC. At least ten HBV genotypes (A to J are identified. Several HBV genotypes and mutations in pre-S and pre-core/core promoter regions are closely associated with HCC pathogenesis, and have been regarded as biomarkers to predict the occurrence of HCC. On the other side, only a small fraction of chronic hepatitis B patients developed HCC, and some HCC cases were diagnosed with no known predisposing risk factors, suggesting host genetic variations may also play important roles in the carcinogenesis. In this review, we summarized current findings of HBV genotypes and mutations, host genetic variations and their interactions involved in HCC carcinogenesis. Understanding the key viral and host genetic variations is essential for generating effective predictive biomarkers for HCC development.

  19. Treatment for hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection - Danish national guidelines 2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Peer Brehm; Clausen, Mette Rye; Krarup, Henrik Bygum

    2012-01-01

    The Danish Society of Infectious Diseases and Danish Society of Gastroenterology and Hepatology set up a committee in 2007 to produce national guidelines for treatment of viral hepatitis B and C. The 2011 version of the guidelines have been endorsed by the scientific societies and are presented...... below. Annual updates will be available at the websites of the societies. As this present English version has been written six months after the Danish 2011 version, it contains minor changes that will be integrated in the Danish 2012 version, available at the end this year. Epidemiology: Viral hepatitis...... is not common in Denmark. The prevalence has not been determined by national surveys, but it is estimated that 10,000-15,000 patients are chronically infected with hepatitis B and 15,000-20,000 with chronic hepatitis C. The majority of patients with HBV infection in Denmark are emigrants from high endemic...

  20. Treatment for hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection - Danish national guidelines 2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Peer Brehm; Clausen, Mette Rye; Krarup, Henrik Bygum

    2012-01-01

    The Danish Society of Infectious Diseases and Danish Society of Gastroenterology and Hepatology set up a committee in 2007 to produce national guidelines for treatment of viral hepatitis B and C. The 2011 version of the guidelines have been endorsed by the scientific societies and are presented...... below. Annual updates will be available at the websites of the societies. As this present English version has been written six months after the Danish 2011 version, it contains minor changes that will be integrated in the Danish 2012 version, available at the end this year. EPIDEMIOLOGY: Viral hepatitis...... is not common in Denmark. The prevalence has not been determined by national surveys, but it is estimated that 10,000-15,000 patients are chronically infected with hepatitis B and 15,000-20,000 with chronic hepatitis C. The majority of patients with HBV infection in Denmark are emigrants from high endemic...

  1. Hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus infection among HIV-1-infected injection drug users in Dali, China: prevalence and infection status in a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yuan; Qiu, Chao; Xia, Xueshan; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Haiyan; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Xu, Jianqing

    2015-04-01

    To assess the prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and to investigate their mutual influences on infection status among human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-seropositive injection drug users (IDUs). A cross-sectional study was conducted among HIV infected IDUs in Dali, China. The participants were tested for serological markers of HBV and HCV infection, alanine transaminase (ALT) activity and CD4(+) T cell count. HCV genotype was determined by sequencing. Of 529 patients, 498 (94.1 %) HIV infected IDUs agreed to participate. The overall prevalence of HCV infection (anti-HCV antibody positive) and spontaneous HCV clearance were 90.8 % (452/498) and 21.5 % (97/452), respectively. Of 411 subjects who had not received HBV vaccine, 296 (72.0 %) were positive for antibody against HBV core antigen (HBcAb), while 274 (66.7 %) were positive for both HCV antibody and HBcAb. HBV antigens were detected in 52 of the HBV-infected subjects (17.6 %). HCV clearance was associated with HBV antigenemia (p = 0.0002) and higher CD4(+) T cell count (p = 0.0294). Resolved HBV infection was associated with HCV genotype 3 (p = 0.0365). HBV and HCV infection are highly prevalent and mutually influence infection status in HIV-1 infected IDUs in Dali, China.

  2. Hepatitis B and C Viruses Infections and Their Association with Human Immunodeficiency Virus: A Cross-Sectional Study among Blood Donors in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yami, Alemeshet; Alemseged, Fissehaye; Hassen, Alima

    2011-03-01

    Since the introduction of Highly Active Anti-Retroviral Therapy and the dramatic improvement in the prognosis of individuals with Human Immunodeficiency Virus, liver disease due to chronic viral hepatitis has become as important cause of morbidity and mortality in co-infected individuals. The objective of the study was to determine the Sero-prevalence of Hepatitis B Virus, Hepatitis C Virus and Human Immunodeficiency Virus and the association of the virus with Hepatitis B Virus and Hepatitis C Virus infection. As Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Hepatitis B Virus infections are highly prevalent and they are among the major public health concern in developing countries including Ethiopia investigating this problem is of paramount benefit. Although studies on co-infection of Hepatitis C Virus and Human Immunodeficiency Virus have clearly identified adverse effects of co-infection, the prevalence of Hepatitis C Virus infection and the association with Human Immunodeficiency Virus in developing countries including Ethiopia has not been know for sure. A cross sectional study was conducted from January 1 to 31, 2010, in Jimma University specialized hospital Blood Bank. The inclusion criteria of the study was adult who donated blood to Jimma University specialized hospital blood bank any time from establishment of the unit until January 2010 and whose record was retrieved. Accordingly 9,204 adults were included of which 6,063 were selected by lottery method. Data on socio-demographic variables (age and sex), laboratory test result for Hepatitis B surface Antigen, anti-Hepatitis C Virus antibody, anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 antibody, and Rapid Plasma Reagin tests were collected using structured questionnaire. After the data were collected, they were entered into a computer and analyzed using SPSS -16 for windows. P-Value of Virus, Hepatitis C Virus, Human Immunodeficiency Virus and syphilis infection were 2.1%, 0.2%, 2.1% and 0.7%, respectively. Sex and age had

  3. The course of hepatitis E virus infection in pigs after contact-infection and intravenous inoculation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwknegt, M.; Rutjes, S.A.; Reusken, C.B.E.M.; Stockhofe-Zurwieden, N.; Frankena, K.; Jong, de M.C.M.; Roda Husman, de A.M.; Poel, van der W.H.M.

    2009-01-01

    Background - Worldwide, hepatitis E virus (HEV) genotype 3 is observed in pigs and transmission to humans is implied. To be able to estimate public health risks from e.g. contact with pigs or consumption of pork products, the transmission routes and dynamics of infection should be identified. Hence,

  4. Hepatitis B Virus Infection and Immunizations among Asian American College Students: Infection, Exposure, and Immunity Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Haeok; Kiang, Peter; Watanabe, Paul; Halon, Patricia; Shi, Ling; Church, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, exposure, and immunity among Asian American college students as a basis for evaluating HBV screening and vaccination policy. Participants and Methods: Self-identified Asian American college students aged 18 years or older were examined. Serological tests of HBV surface…

  5. Interferon Response in Hepatitis C Virus (HCV Infection: Lessons from Cell Culture Systems of HCV Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pil Soo Sung

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV is a positive-stranded RNA virus that infects approximately 130–170 million people worldwide. In 2005, the first HCV infection system in cell culture was established using clone JFH-1, which was isolated from a Japanese patient with fulminant HCV infection. JFH-1 replicates efficiently in hepatoma cells and infectious virion particles are released into the culture supernatant. The development of cell culture-derived HCV (HCVcc systems has allowed us to understand how hosts respond to HCV infection and how HCV evades host responses. Although the mechanisms underlying the different outcomes of HCV infection are not fully understood, innate immune responses seem to have a critical impact on the outcome of HCV infection, as demonstrated by the prognostic value of IFN-λ gene polymorphisms among patients with chronic HCV infection. Herein, we review recent research on interferon response in HCV infection, particularly studies using HCVcc infection systems.

  6. Screening for Hepatitis B Virus Infection in Pregnancy : US Preventive Services Task Force Reaffirmation Recommendation Statement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calonge, Ned; Petitti, Diana B.; DeWitt, Thomas G.; Dietrich, Allen J.; Gregory, Kimberly D.; Grossman, David; Isham, George; LeFevre, Michael L.; Leipzig, Rosanne M.; Marion, Lucy N.; Melnyk, Bernadette; Moyer, Virginia A.; Ockene, Judith K.; Sawaya, George F.; Schwartz, J. Sanford; Wilt, Timothy

    2009-01-01

    Description: Reaffirmation of the 2004 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on screening for hepatitis B virus hepatitis B virus infection in pregnancy. Methods: The USPSTF performed a brief literature update, including a search for new and substantial evidence on the benefits

  7. Hepatitis C and B viruses: the new opportunists in HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Raymond T

    2006-01-01

    Coinfection with HIV accelerates disease progression in both hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Management of coinfected patients is complicated by a number of factors, including disease characteristics, drug-drug interactions, and augmented toxicity. Results of HCV and HBV treatment trials in HIV-coinfected patients and strategies for patient management are discussed herein.

  8. Incidence and characteristics of hepatitis E virus infection in children in Assiut, Upper Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Gamal; Assiri, Asaad; Marzuuk, Naglaa; Daef, Enas; Abdelwahab, Sayed; Ahmed, Ahmed; Mohamad, Ismail; Al-Eyadhy, Ayman; Alhaboob, Ali; Temsah, Mohamad-Hani

    2016-10-01

    Objective To describe the characteristics of hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection in a cohort of children from Upper Egypt using data from a large multicentre prospective study of acute viral hepatitis (AVH). Methods Data from subjects aged 2-18 years with AVH or close contacts of those with AVH found to have asymptomatic AVH were included in the analysis. Information concerning medical history, clinical examination, liver function tests and screening for hepatotropic viruses was recorded and analysed. Results A total of 123 patients (73 boys, 50 girls) were included in the analysis. Of these, 33 (26.8%) had HEV infection, 17 (13.8%) had hepatitis A virus infection, 10 (8.1%) had hepatitis B virus infection, 14 (11.4%) had cytomegalovirus hepatitis, five (4.1%) had autoimmune hepatitis, 11 (8.9%) had hepatitis due to mixed viral infections and 33 (26.8%) had non A-E hepatitis. Overall, 38 (30.9%) had infection with HEV. HEV infection was significantly higher among those using underground wells as a water source compared with tap water. Liver enzymes were significantly raised in patients with non-HEV infection compared with those with HEV infection. Conclusions HEV is a significant cause of AVH among children in Upper Egypt. Contamination of drinking water appears to be a major source of infection. Screening for HEV should be considered in all Egyptian children with AVH.

  9. Hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus infections in United States-bound refugees from Asia and Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mixson-Hayden, Tonya; Lee, Deborah; Ganova-Raeva, Lilia; Drobeniuc, Jan; Stauffer, William M; Teshale, Eyasu; Kamili, Saleem

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of active hepatitis B and C virus infections among refugees from various countries in Africa and Asia. Pre-admission serum samples collected during 2002-2007 from refugees originating from Bhutan (N = 755), Myanmar (N = 1076), Iraq (N = 1137), Laos (N = 593), Thailand (N = 622), and Somalia (N = 707) were tested for hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA and hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA. The HBV DNA (genotypes A, B, C, and G) was detected in 12.1% of samples negative for anti-HBs. Highest HBV prevalence was found among Hmong; lowest among Bhutanese. The HCV RNA (genotypes 1a, 1b, 1c, 3b, 6n, and 6m) was detected in 1.3% of the samples. Highest HCV prevalence was found among Hmong from Thailand; lowest among Iraqis. Screening specific refugee groups at high risk for viral hepatitis infections will identify infected individuals who could benefit from referral to care and treatment and prevent further transmissions. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  10. Hepatitis A virus infection and hepatitis A vaccination in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kuan-Yin; Chen, Guan-Jhou; Lee, Yu-Lin; Huang, Yi-Chia; Cheng, Aristine; Sun, Hsin-Yun; Chang, Sui-Yuan; Liu, Chun-Eng; Hung, Chien-Ching

    2017-01-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) is one of the most common infectious etiologies of acute hepatitis worldwide. The virus is known to be transmitted fecal-orally, resulting in symptoms ranging from asymptomatic infection to fulminant hepatitis. HAV can also be transmitted through oral-anal sex. Residents from regions of low endemicity for HAV infection often remain susceptible in their adulthood. Therefore, clustered HAV infections or outbreaks of acute hepatitis A among men who have sex with men and injecting drug users have been reported in countries of low endemicity for HAV infection. The duration of HAV viremia and stool shedding of HAV may be longer in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive individuals compared to HIV-negative individuals with acute hepatitis A. Current guidelines recommend HAV vaccination for individuals with increased risks of exposure to HAV (such as from injecting drug use, oral-anal sex, travel to or residence in endemic areas, frequent clotting factor or blood transfusions) or with increased risks of fulminant disease (such as those with chronic hepatitis). The seroconversion rates following the recommended standard adult dosing schedule (2 doses of HAVRIX 1440 U or VAQTA 50 U administered 6-12 mo apart) are lower among HIV-positive individuals compared to HIV-negative individuals. While the response rates may be augmented by adding a booster dose at week 4 sandwiched between the first dose and the 6-mo dose, the need of booster vaccination remain less clear among HIV-positive individuals who have lost anti-HAV antibodies. PMID:28611512

  11. Hepatitis A virus infection and hepatitis A vaccination in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kuan-Yin; Chen, Guan-Jhou; Lee, Yu-Lin; Huang, Yi-Chia; Cheng, Aristine; Sun, Hsin-Yun; Chang, Sui-Yuan; Liu, Chun-Eng; Hung, Chien-Ching

    2017-05-28

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) is one of the most common infectious etiologies of acute hepatitis worldwide. The virus is known to be transmitted fecal-orally, resulting in symptoms ranging from asymptomatic infection to fulminant hepatitis. HAV can also be transmitted through oral-anal sex. Residents from regions of low endemicity for HAV infection often remain susceptible in their adulthood. Therefore, clustered HAV infections or outbreaks of acute hepatitis A among men who have sex with men and injecting drug users have been reported in countries of low endemicity for HAV infection. The duration of HAV viremia and stool shedding of HAV may be longer in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive individuals compared to HIV-negative individuals with acute hepatitis A. Current guidelines recommend HAV vaccination for individuals with increased risks of exposure to HAV (such as from injecting drug use, oral-anal sex, travel to or residence in endemic areas, frequent clotting factor or blood transfusions) or with increased risks of fulminant disease (such as those with chronic hepatitis). The seroconversion rates following the recommended standard adult dosing schedule (2 doses of HAVRIX 1440 U or VAQTA 50 U administered 6-12 mo apart) are lower among HIV-positive individuals compared to HIV-negative individuals. While the response rates may be augmented by adding a booster dose at week 4 sandwiched between the first dose and the 6-mo dose, the need of booster vaccination remain less clear among HIV-positive individuals who have lost anti-HAV antibodies.

  12. Immune responses in hepatitis B and C virus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stelma, F.

    2017-01-01

    Het hepatitis B en C virus zijn virussen die chronische infectie van de lever kunnen veroorzaken. Zulke langdurige ontsteking van de lever kan leiden tot leverschade, met als gevolg het ontstaan van cirrose en hepatocellulair carcinoom. Naar de behandeling van deze chronische virus infecties wordt

  13. Different outcomes of nosocomial infection with hepatitis C virus from the same origin

    OpenAIRE

    Kakizaki, Satoru; Takagi, Hitoshi; Yamazaki, Yuichi; Sohara, Naondo; Sato, Ken; Nagamine, Takeaki; Mori, Masatomo

    2006-01-01

    The outcome of infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) varies substantially from self-limiting infection to chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma among the individuals. The mechanisms that determine the clearance or the persistence of HCV have not yet been clarified. Here, we experienced two cases of hospital-related infection with HCV from the same origin but with quite different outcomes. One case resolved after an episode of acute hepatitis, while the other case d...

  14. Treatment for hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection - Danish national guidelines 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Peer Brehm; Clausen, Mette Rye; Krarup, Henrik; Laursen, Alex Lund; Schlichting, Poul; Weis, Nina

    2012-06-01

    The Danish Society of Infectious Diseases and Danish Society of Gastroenterology and Hepatology set up a committee in 2007 to produce national guidelines for treatment of viral hepatitis B and C. The 2011 version of the guidelines have been endorsed by the scientific societies and are presented below. Annual updates will be available at the websites of the societies. As this present English version has been written six months after the Danish 2011 version, it contains minor changes that will be integrated in the Danish 2012 version, available at the end this year. Viral hepatitis is not common in Denmark. The prevalence has not been determined by national surveys, but it is estimated that 10,000-15,000 patients are chronically infected with hepatitis B and 15,000-20,000 with chronic hepatitis C. The majority of patients with HBV infection in Denmark are emigrants from high endemic countries, probably infected at birth or early childhood in their country of origin, while the majority of patients with HCV infection have been infected by drug use. For both groups it is estimated that only half of the patients have been diagnosed, of whom only 20% attends specialized care for their chronic viral hepatitis. According to the Danish National Board of Health, patients with chronic viral hepatitis should be followed with regular intervals, at clinics specialized in either infectious diseases or gastroenterology/hepatology. The primary aim is to identify patients with significant liver disease to initiate treatment in order to prevent development of cirrhosis and death. This is primarily done by liver biopsy, but screening for fibrosis with non-invasive methods such as elastography may be sufficient in some patients. Patients with established cirrhosis should enter screening programs for complications such as esophageal varices and hepatocellular carcinoma.

  15. Prevalence of hepatitis D virus infection in sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander J Stockdale, MRes; Mas Chaponda, PhD; Apostolos Beloukas, PhD; Richard Odame Phillips, PhD; Philippa C Matthews, PhD; Athanasios Papadimitropoulos, MSc; Simon King, PhD; Laura Bonnett, PhD; Prof Anna Maria Geretti, PhD

    2017-01-01

    Summary Background Hepatitis D virus (also known as hepatitis delta virus) can establish a persistent infection in people with chronic hepatitis B, leading to accelerated progression of liver disease. In sub-Saharan Africa, where HBsAg prevalence is higher than 8%, hepatitis D virus might represent an important additive cause of chronic liver disease. We aimed to establish the prevalence of hepatitis D virus among HBsAg-positive populations in sub-Saharan Africa. Methods We systematically rev...

  16. Pattern recognition receptor responses in children with chronic hepatitis B virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiberg, Ida Louise; Winther, Thilde Nordmann; Paludan, Søren Riis

    2012-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that hepatitis B virus (HBV) affects the expression and function of Toll like receptors (TLRs), but data on TLR function in HBV infection are mainly from adult patients. The natural history of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) infection is distinctly different in children...

  17. Infection of a Japanese patient by genotype 4 hepatitis e virus while traveling in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, Yuko; Isoda, Norio; Sato, Yukihiro; Iwaki, Takaaki; Ono, Kazunori; Ido, Kenichi; Sugano, Kentaro; Takahashi, Masaharu; Nishizawa, Tsutomu; Okamoto, Hiroaki

    2004-08-01

    Cases of imported hepatitis E in industrialized countries infected with a genotype 1 hepatitis E virus (HEV) have been identified. We report a 56-year-old Japanese man who acquired infection with a genotype 4 HEV with 98.8% identity to a Vietnamese isolate after ingestion of uncooked shellfish while traveling in Vietnam.

  18. Hepatitis B and Delta Virus Are Prevalent but Often Subclinical Co-Infections among HIV Infected Patients in Guinea-Bissau, West Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hønge, Bo Langhoff; Jespersen, Sanne; Medina, Candida

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Co-infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) may lead to accelerated hepatic disease progression with higher rates of liver cirrhosis and liver-related mortality compared with HBV mono-infection. Co or super-infection with hepatitis Delta virus (HDV...

  19. Multi-agent model of hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasik, Szymon; Jackowiak, Paulina; Figlerowicz, Marek; Blazewicz, Jacek

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this study is to design a method for modeling hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection using multi-agent simulation and to verify it in practice. In this paper, first, the modeling of HCV infection using a multi-agent system is compared with the most commonly used model type, which is based on differential equations. Then, the implementation and results of the model using a multi-agent simulation is presented. To find the values of the parameters used in the model, a method using inverted simulation flow and genetic algorithm is proposed. All of the data regarding HCV infection are taken from the paper describing the model based on the differential equation to which the proposed method is compared. Important advantages of the proposed method are noted and demonstrated: these include flexibility, clarity, re-usability and the possibility to model more complex dependencies. Then, the simulation framework that uses the proposed approach is successfully implemented in C++ and is verified by comparing it to the approach based on differential equations. The verification proves that an objective function that performs the best is the function that minimizes the maximal differences in the data. Finally, an analysis of one of the already known models is performed, and it is proved that it incorrectly models a decay in the hepatocytes number by 40%. The proposed method has many advantages in comparison to the currently used model types and can be used successfully for analyzing HCV infection. With almost no modifications, it can also be used for other types of viral infections. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Molecular epidemiology of hepatitis B virus infections in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisker, Niels; Pedersen, Court; Lange, Marianne

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Denmark has a low incidence of acute hepatitis B (HBV) infections but the impact of an increasing number of immigrants with chronic HBV infection on HBV transmission is unknown. OBJECTIVES: To characterise individuals with chronic and acute HBV infection in a defined region and to exa...

  1. Virus evolution during chronic hepatitis B virus infection as revealed by ultradeep sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Leandro R; Sede, Mariano; Manrique, Julieta M; Quarleri, Jorge

    2016-02-01

    Despite chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection (CHB) being a leading cause of liver cirrhosis and cancer, HBV evolution during CHB is not fully understood. Recent studies have indicated that virus diversity progressively increases along the course of CHB and that some virus mutations correlate with severe liver conditions such as chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Using ultradeep sequencing (UDS) data from an intrafamilial case, we detected such mutations at low frequencies among three immunotolerant patients and at high frequencies in an inactive carrier. Furthermore, our analyses indicated that the HBV population from the seroconverter patient underwent many genetic changes in response to virus clearance. Together, these data indicate a potential use of UDS for developing non-invasive biomarkers for monitoring disease changes over time or in response to specific therapies. In addition, our analyses revealed that virus clearance seemed not to require the virus effective population size to decline. A detailed genetic analysis of the viral lineages arising during and after the clearance suggested that mutations at or close to critical elements of the core promoter (enhancer II, epsilon encapsidation signal, TA2, TA3 and direct repeat 1-hormone response element) might be responsible for a sustained replication. This hypothesis requires the decline in virus load to be explained by constant clearance of virus-producing hepatocytes, consistent with the sustained progress towards serious liver conditions experienced by many CHB patients.

  2. Liver mortality attributable to chronic hepatitis C virus infection in Denmark and Scotland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Innes, Hamish; Hutchinson, Sharon J; Obel, Niels

    2016-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Liver mortality among individuals with chronic hepatitis C (CHC) infection is common, but the relative contribution of CHC per se versus adverse health behaviors is uncertain. We explored data on spontaneous resolvers of hepatitis C virus (HCV) as a benchmark group to uncover the inde......UNLABELLED: Liver mortality among individuals with chronic hepatitis C (CHC) infection is common, but the relative contribution of CHC per se versus adverse health behaviors is uncertain. We explored data on spontaneous resolvers of hepatitis C virus (HCV) as a benchmark group to uncover...

  3. Prevalence of HIV and hepatitis C virus infections among inmates of Ontario remand facilities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Calzavara, Liviana; Ramuscak, Nancy; Burchell, Ann N; Swantee, Carol; Myers, Ted; Ford, Peter; Fearon, Margaret; Raymond, Sue

    2007-01-01

    ... (jails, detention centres and youth centres). The prevalence of HIV infection in Ontario remand facilities was last measured over a decade ago, and no research on the prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV...

  4. Screening for Hepatitis B Virus Infection in Nonpregnant Adolescents and Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding Task Force Recommendations Screening for Hepatitis B Virus Infection in Nonpregnant Adolescents and Adults The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) has issued a final recommendation statement ...

  5. Molecular epidemiology of hepatitis B virus infections in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisker, N.; Pedersen, C.; Lange, Marianne

    2004-01-01

    with available sequence data. Among 83 ethnic Danes who acquired their HBV infection in Denmark, no new cases of transmission from immigrants were detected. Conclusion: Injecting drug use was the single most important factor for hepatitis B transmission in Denmark. The current Danish vaccination strategy......Denmark has a low incidence of acute hepatitis B (HBV) infections but the impact of an increasing number of immigrants with chronic HBV infection on HBV transmission is unknown. Objectives: To characterise individuals with chronic and acute HBV infection in a defined region and to examine...

  6. Effect of Hepatitis B Virus Co-Infection on CD4 Cell Count and Liver ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background:Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and Hepatitis B virus (HBV) share similar routes of transmission, making it possible for an individual to have a co-infection. HBV infection is well known to be a major cause of chronic liver diseases worldwide. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of HBV ...

  7. Effect of hepatitis C virus infection on selected laboratory values in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of hepatitis C virus infection on selected laboratory values in pregnant women with human immunodeficiency virus infection. O.A. Adesina, J.O. Akinyemi, O.S. Michael, S.A. Fayemiwo, O.A. Awolude, B.O. Ogunbosi, M.A. Kuti, I.F. Adewole ...

  8. effect of hepatitis b virus co-infection on cd4 cell count and liver ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-03-01

    Mar 1, 2015 ... SUMMARY. Background:Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and Hepatitis B virus (HBV) share similar routes of transmission, making it possible for an individual to have a co-infection. HBV infection is well known to be a major cause of chronic liver diseases worldwide. The aim of this study was to ...

  9. Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Hepatitis C Virus Co-infection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of 36 HIV/HCV co-infected isolates (22 from volunteer blood donors and 14 from people living with HIV/AIDS not yet on antiretroviral treatment) were analyzed using molecular biology techniques that involved RT-PCR, gene/TOPO cloning, DNA sequencing, and bioinformatics tools for sequence management and ...

  10. A Kap Study Of Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) Infection Among Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Hepatitis B virus infection which is the world's most common blood borne viral infection is highly endemic in Nigeria. Health care workers including medical students are at risk of acquiring the infection while at work. Objective: To assess the knowledge, attitude and practice of HBV infection among medical ...

  11. High prevalence of occult hepatitis B virus genotype H infection among children with clinical hepatitis in west Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobedo-Melendez, Griselda; Panduro, Arturo; Fierro, Nora A; Roman, Sonia

    2014-09-01

    Studies on the prevalence of infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) among children are scarce in Latin American countries, especially in Mexico. This study was aimed to investigate the prevalence of HBV infection, occult hepatitis B infection (OBI) and HBV genotypes among children with clinical hepatitis. In total, 215 children with clinical hepatitis were evaluated for HBV infection. HBV serological markers and HBV DNA were analysed. OBI diagnosis and HBV genotyping was performed. HBV infection was found in 11.2% of children with clinical hepatitis. Among these HBV DNA positive-infected children, OBI was identified in 87.5% (n = 21/24) of the cases and 12.5% (n = 3/24) were positive for both HBV DNA and hepatitis B surface antigen. OBI was more frequent among children who had not been vaccinated against hepatitis B (p hepatitis and is associated with HBV genotype H. The results show the importance of the molecular diagnosis of HBV infection in Mexican paediatric patients with clinical hepatitis and emphasise the necessity of reinforcing hepatitis B vaccination in children.

  12. High prevalence of occult hepatitis B virus genotype H infection among children with clinical hepatitis in west Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Griselda Escobedo-Melendez

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Studies on the prevalence of infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV among children are scarce in Latin American countries, especially in Mexico. This study was aimed to investigate the prevalence of HBV infection, occult hepatitis B infection (OBI and HBV genotypes among children with clinical hepatitis. In total, 215 children with clinical hepatitis were evaluated for HBV infection. HBV serological markers and HBV DNA were analysed. OBI diagnosis and HBV genotyping was performed. HBV infection was found in 11.2% of children with clinical hepatitis. Among these HBV DNA positive-infected children, OBI was identified in 87.5% (n = 21/24 of the cases and 12.5% (n = 3/24 were positive for both HBV DNA and hepatitis B surface antigen. OBI was more frequent among children who had not been vaccinated against hepatitis B (p < 0.05 than in those who had been vaccinated. HBV genotype H was prevalent in 71% of the children followed by genotype G (8% and genotype A (4%. In conclusion, OBI is common among Mexican children with clinical hepatitis and is associated with HBV genotype H. The results show the importance of the molecular diagnosis of HBV infection in Mexican paediatric patients with clinical hepatitis and emphasise the necessity of reinforcing hepatitis B vaccination in children.

  13. Replication Inhibition of Hepatitis B Virus and Hepatitis C Virus in Co-Infected Patients in Chinese Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ge Yu

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B virus (HBV and hepatitis C virus (HCV co-infections contributes to a substantial proportion of liver disease worldwide. The aim of this study was to assess the clinical and virological features of HBV-HCV co-infection.Demographic data were collected for 3238 high-risk people from an HCV-endemic region in China. Laboratory tests included HCV antibody and HBV serological markers, liver function tests, and routine blood analysis. Anti-HCV positive samples were analyzed for HCV RNA levels and subgenotypes. HBsAg-positive samples were tested for HBV DNA.A total of 1468 patients had chronic HCV and/or HBV infections. Among them, 1200 individuals were classified as HCV mono-infected, 161 were classified as HBV mono-infected, and 107 were classified as co-infected. The HBV-HCV co-infected patients not only had a lower HBV DNA positive rate compared to HBV mono-infected patients (84.1% versus 94.4%, respectively; P < 0.001. The median HCV RNA levels in HBV-HCV co-infected patients were significantly lower than those in the HCV mono-infected patients (1.18[Interquartile range (IQR 0-5.57] versus 5.87[IQR, 3.54-6.71] Log10 IU/mL, respectively; P < 0.001. Furthermore, co-infected patients were less likely to have detectable HCV RNA levels than HCV mono-infected patients (23.4% versus 56.5%, respectively; P < 0.001. Those HBV-HCV co-infected patients had significantly lower median HBV DNA levels than those mono-infected with HBV (1.97[IQR, 1.3-3.43] versus 3.06[IQR, 2-4.28] Log10 IU/mL, respectively; P < 0.001. The HBV-HCV co-infection group had higher ALT, AST, ALP, GGT, APRI and FIB-4 levels, but lower ALB and total platelet compared to the HBV mono-infection group, and similar to that of the HCV mono-infected group.These results suggest that co-infection with HCV and HBV inhibits the replication of both viruses. The serologic results of HBV-HCV co-infection in patients suggests more liver injury compared to HBV mono-infected patients, but is

  14. Co occurrence of Hepatitis B Virus Infection and Autoimmune Hepatitis with Marked Hepatitis B Virus Replication Following Treatment of Autoimmune Hepatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyagi I

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Children have different natural history of Hepatitis B virus (HBV infection. They commonly develop asymptomatic chronic carrier state which is less frequently seen in adults. We describe a rare case of acute on chronic liver failure (ACLF in the course of concurrent autoimmune hepatitis (AIH and HBV infection and replication of HBV following the treatment for autoimmune hepatitis. Case Report: A 15 year old male child presented with jaundice and altered sensorium. Physical examination showed hepatosplenomegaly. The liver function tests were markedly altered. Serology was positive for anti liver kidney microsomal antibody (LKM, hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg and immunoglobulin M (IgM anti hepatitis B core antigen (HBc Ag. Liver biopsy showed chronic hepatitis with features of acute exacerbation. Patient was started on treatment with azathioprine and prednisolone for AIH following which clinical and biochmemical improvement was noted. After two years of continued treatment a repeat biopsy performed showed fairly reduced histological activity, but marked replication of the HBV (immunohistochemistry for HBsAg and anti HBcAg showed diffuse cytoplasmic and nuclear positivity respectively. These findings suggest viral replication although the patient was clinically stable. At six months follow-up after the second biopsy and cessation of azathioprine and prednisolone, there were raised liver enzymes and viral load, hence the patient was started on antiviral drug Entecavir to which there was good response and the patient is presently doing well. Conclusion: We describethe rare co occurrence of HBV infection and AIH with marked HBV replication following the treatment for AIH

  15. Molecular epidemiology of hepatitis E virus infections in Shanghai, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Yumin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis E virus (HEV causes acute or fulminant hepatitis in humans and is an important public health concern in many developing countries. China has a high incidence of HEV epidemics, with at least three genotypes (1, 3 and 4 and nine subtypes (1b, 1c, 3b, 4a, 4b, 4d, 4g, 4h and 4i so far identified. Since genotype 3 and the newly identified subtype 4i have been exclusively limited geographically to Shanghai and its neighboring provinces, the epidemiology of HEV infections within the municipality, a major industrial and commercial center, deserves closer attention. Findings A total of 65 sequences, 60 located within the HEV SH-SW-zs1 genome [GenBank:EF570133], together with five full-length swine and human HEV genomic sequences, all emanating from Shanghai, were retrieved from GenBank. Consistent with the primary role of genotype 4 in China overall, analysis of the sequences revealed this to have been the dominant genotype (58/65 in Shanghai. Six HEV subtypes (3b, 4a, 4b, 4d, 4h and 4i were also represented. However, although subtype 4a is the dominant subtype throughout China, subtype 4i (29/65 was the most prevalent subtype among the Shanghai sequences, followed by subtypes 4d (10/65 and 4h (9/65. Subtypes 4h, 4i and 4d were found in both swine and humans, whereas 4b was found only in swine and subtype 4a only in humans. Conclusions Six different swine and human HEV subtypes have so far been documented in Shanghai. More molecular epidemiological investigations of HEV in swine, and particularly among the human population, should be undertaken.

  16. Hepatitis B virus and HIV infection among patients with primary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is the commonest cause of primary hepatocellular (PHC) carcinoma worldwide. Coinfection with the HIV leads to more rapid progression of liver disease. Objectives: We described prevalence of HBV and HIV among patients with PHC admitted to Mulago Hospital, Kampala, Uganda.

  17. Prevalence of hepatitis B virus infection among pregnant women in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    natal clinic in Braithwaite Memorial Hospital, Port Harcourt, Nigeria were screened between January 2000 to December 2004 for the possible occurrence of hepatitis B virus using HBV paper strips. The results showed that a total of 290 (2.89%) ...

  18. A genetically humanized mouse model for hepatitis C virus infection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorner, M.; Horwitz, J.A.; Robbins, J.B.; Barry, W.T.; Feng, Q.; Mu, K.; Jones, C.T.; Schoggins, J.W.; Catanese, M.T.; Burton, D.R.; Law, M.; Rice, C.M.; Ploss, A.

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) remains a major medical problem. Antiviral treatment is only partially effective and a vaccine does not exist. Development of more effective therapies has been hampered by the lack of a suitable small animal model. Although xenotransplantation of immunodeficient mice with

  19. Seroprevalence of hepatitis b virus infection amongst pregnant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study emphasises the public health importance of HBV in subjects screened, indicating that blood should be well screened before transfusion, while the populace should abstain from sharing sharp and body piercing objects in order to reduce the rate of transmission. Keywords: Hepatitis B virus antigen, pregnant ...

  20. Epidemiology of hepatitis C virus in HIV-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Lars; Klein, Marina B

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review will give an update on the prevalence of HIV/hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection, and describe recent trends in all-cause and cause-specific mortality. The focus is mainly on patients followed in clinics in high-income countries and their heterogeneity in terms...

  1. 78 FR 63218 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection: Developing Direct-Acting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry on Chronic Hepatitis C Virus... availability of a draft guidance for industry entitled ``Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection: Developing Direct... guidance revises and replaces a previous draft guidance for industry entitled ``Chronic Hepatitis C Virus...

  2. Type III Interferons in Hepatitis C Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisvert, Maude; Shoukry, Naglaa H

    2016-01-01

    The interferon (IFN)-λ family of type III cytokines includes the closely related interleukin (IL)-28A (IFN-λ2), IL-28B (IFN-λ3), and IL-29 (IFN-λ1). They signal through the Janus kinases (JAK)-signal transducers and activators of transcription pathway and promote an antiviral state by the induction of expression of several interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs). Contrary to type I IFNs, the effect of IFN-λ cytokines is largely limited to epithelial cells due to the restricted pattern of expression of their specific receptor. Several genome-wide association studies have established a strong correlation between polymorphism in the region of IL-28B gene (encoding for IFN-λ3) and both spontaneous and therapeutic IFN-mediated clearance of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, but the mechanism(s) underlying this enhanced viral clearance are not fully understood. IFN-λ3 directly inhibits HCV replication, and in vitro studies suggest that polymorphism in the IFN-λ3 and its recently identified overlapping IFN-λ4 govern the pattern of ISGs induced upon HCV infection of hepatocytes. IFN-λ can also be produced by dendritic cells, and apart from its antiviral action on hepatocytes, it can regulate the inflammatory response of monocytes/macrophages, thus acting at the interface between innate and adaptive immunity. Here, we review the current state of knowledge about the role of IFN-λ cytokines in mediating and regulating the immune response during acute and chronic HCV infections.

  3. Hepatitis C virus infection and increased risk of cerebrovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mei-Hsuan; Yang, Hwai-I; Wang, Chih-Hao; Jen, Chin-Lan; Yeh, Shiou-Hwei; Liu, Chun-Jen; You, San-Lin; Chen, Wei J; Chen, Chien-Jen

    2010-12-01

    The association between hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and cerebrovascular disease remains controversial. This study aimed to assess the risk of lethal cerebrovascular diseases associated with chronic HCV infection. In this community-based prospective cohort study, 23 665 residents (aged 30 to 65 years) were enrolled in 1991 to 1992. They were personally interviewed using structured questionnaires and provided blood samples for various serological and biochemical tests at study entry. Serum HCV RNA level and HCV genotype were tested for participants seropositive for antibodies against HCV (anti-HCV). Deaths from cerebrovascular disease during follow-up were ascertained by computerized linkage with National Death Certification profiles from 1991 to 2008 (International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision 430 to 438). Multivariate-adjusted hazard ratio with 95% CI was estimated for each risk predictor. There were 255 cerebrovascular deaths during 382 011 person-years of follow-up. The cumulative risk of cerebrovascular deaths was 1.0% and 2.7% for seronegatives and seropositives of anti-HCV, respectively (P<0.001). The hazard ratio (95% CI) of cerebrovascular death was 2.18 (1.50 to 3.16) for anti-HCV seropositives after adjustment for several conventional risk factors of cerebrovascular disease. Compared with participants seronegative for anti-HCV as the referent, the multivariate-adjusted hazard ratio (95% CI) was 1.40 (0.62 to 3.16), 2.36 (1.42 to 3.93), and 2.82 (1.25 to 6.37), respectively, for anti-HCV-seropositive participants with undetectable, low, and high serum levels of HCV RNA (P<0.001 for trend). However, no significant association was observed between HCV genotype and cerebrovascular death. Chronic HCV infection is an independent risk predictor of cerebrovascular deaths showing a biological gradient of cerebrovascular mortality with increasing serum HCV RNA level.

  4. Undetectable hepatitis C virus RNA during syphilis infection in two HIV/HCV-co-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salado-Rasmussen, Kirsten; Knudsen, Andreas; Krarup, Henrik Bygum

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treponema pallidum, the causative agent of syphilis, elicits a vigorous immune response in the infected host. This study sought to describe the impact of syphilis infection on hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA levels in patients with HIV and chronic HCV infection. METHODS: Patients...... with chronic HIV/HCV and syphilis co-infection were identified by their treating physicians from 1 October 2010 to 31 December 2013. Stored plasma samples obtained before, during, and after syphilis infection were analysed for interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF......-α), interferon gamma (IFN-γ), and IFN-γ-inducible protein 10 kDa (IP-10). RESULTS: Undetectable HCV RNA at the time of early latent syphilis infection was observed in 2 patients with HIV and chronic HCV infection. After treatment of the syphilis infection, HCV RNA levels increased again in patient 1, whereas...

  5. Acute viral hepatitis morbidity and mortality associated with hepatitis E virus infection: Uzbekistan surveillance data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharapov, Makhmudkhan B; Favorov, Michael O; Yashina, Tatiana L; Brown, Matthew S; Onischenko, Gennady G; Margolis, Harold S; Chorba, Terence L

    2009-03-25

    In Uzbekistan, routine serologic testing has not been available to differentiate etiologies of acute viral hepatitis (AVH). To determine the age groups most affected by hepatitis E virus (HEV) during documented AVH epidemics, trends in AVH-associated mortality rate (MR) per 100,000 over a 15-year period and reported incidence of AVH over a 35-year period were examined. Reported AVH incidence data from 1971 to 2005 and AVH-associated mortality data from 1981 to 1995 were examined. Serologic markers for infection with hepatitis viruses A, B, D, and E were determined from a sample of hospitalized patients with AVH from an epidemic period (1987) and from a sample of pregnant women with AVH from a non-epidemic period (1992). Two multi-year AVH outbreaks were identified: one during 1975-1976, and one during 1985-1987. During 1985-1987, AVH-associated MRs were 12.3-17.8 per 100,000 for the general population. Highest AVH-associated MRs occurred among children in the first 3 years of life (40-190 per 100,000) and among women aged 20-29 (15-21 per 100,000). During 1988-1995 when reported AVH morbidity was much lower in the general population, AVH-associated MRs were markedly lower among these same age groups. In 1988, AVH-associated MRs were higher in rural (21 per 100,000) than in urban (8 per 100,000) populations (RR 2.6; 95% CI 1.16-5.93; p Uzbekistan during 1985-1987. High mortality among pregnant women but not among children less than 3 years has been observed in previous descriptions of epidemic hepatitis E. The high mortality among younger children observed in an AVH outbreak associated with hepatitis E merits corroboration in future outbreaks.

  6. Hepatitis delta virus and GBV-C infection in two neighboring hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus-endemic villages in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chang-Jung; Chiang, Jui-Chin; Lu, Sheng-Nan; Wang, Jing-Houng

    2010-01-01

    Previous reports in Taiwan have shown that the hepatitis B virus (HBV)- and hepatitis C virus (HCV)-endemic areas are also endemic for hepatitis D virus (HDV), GBV-C and TT virus. This study aimed to elucidate the epidemiology of HDV and GBV-C infection in two neighboring HBV- and HCV-endemic villages, to deduce the epidemiological characteristics of multiple viral infections in communities. A total of 74 adult residents of Wukwai (W) village and 95 adults residents of Haipu (H) village were studied. Laboratory tests for all subjects included alanine transaminase (ALT), hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), anti-HCV, HCV RNA, genotype of HCV, GBV-C RNA, and anti-GBV-C E2. Anti- HDV was checked only in HBsAg-positive subjects. Subjects from W village were older than those from H village (61.7 +/- 11.8 vs 56.6 +/- 16.4 years, p = 0.02). The prevalence of ALT elevation (37.8% vs 15.8%, p = 0.006), anti-HCV (67.6% vs 34.7%, p GBV-C infection (39.2% vs 24.2%, p = 0.054), and the distribution of HCV genotype 1b (37.8% vs 70.4%, p = 0.01) were different in W and H villages, respectively. Among anti-HCV-positive subjects, HCV RNA-positive rates were 75.9% (63/83), and were higher for men (88.2%) than women (67.3%). Only one HBsAg-positive subject was positive for anti-HDV, and one anti-HCVnegative subject was positive for HCV RNA. In multivariate analyses, GBVC infection correlated with HCV infection or HCV endemicity, and HCV RNA was the only determining factor in ALT elevation. In HBV and HCV-endemic areas, GBV-C was more prevalent in areas with a higher prevalence of anti-HCV. Positive HCV-RNA, but not GBV-C infection, was associated with ALT elevation.

  7. The fatigue impact scale for daily use in patients with hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus chronic infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda-Pettersen, Karine; Morais-de-Jesus, Mychelle; Daltro-Oliveira, Renato; Dantas Duarte Dias, Adriana; Teles, Carlos; Schinoni, Maria Isabel; Miranda-Scippa, Ângela; Paraná, Raymundo; Quarantini, Lucas C

    2015-01-01

    Fatigue is an important clinical finding in the hepatitis virus chronic infection. However, the absence of scales to measure fatigue, translated and validated for Brazilian Portuguese, prevents access to information essential in clarifying specific clinical conditions in this population. The aim of this study was to determine the psychometric properties of the fatigue impact scale for daily use (D-FIS), in Brazilian Portuguese, for patients with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) chronic infection. In this cross-sectional study, the authors evaluated the D-FIS in 101 outpatients, followed at the reference hospital. The Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview Brazilian (MINI PLUS) was used to identify psychiatric disorders, and the Short Form Health Survey 36-item (SF-36) to evaluate the self-reported quality of life. We also examined the impact of fatigue on the quality of life of this group of patients. Relevant psychometric D-FIS results were: floor effect proved to be 1%; skewness was 0.46; item homogeneity was 0.59 and SEM (SD = 8.51) was 2.4. The Cronbach's alpha was 0.920 and item total correlation yielded coefficients ranging from 0.65 (item 1) to 0.85 (item 3). In a linear regression model, fatigue and depression influenced the self-reported quality of life. This study presents that the fatigue scale for daily use in Brazilian Portuguese can be considered a useful tool to verify the presence of fatigue in patients with the hepatitis viruses B and C.

  8. Humoral Immune Response in Japanese Acute Hepatitis Patients with Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Yamaguchi

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The humoral immune response to acute infection by hepatitis C virus (HCV is not yet perfectly clear in terms of immunoglobulin (Ig response, diversity of HCV antigen, and the relation with hepatitis severity and antibody response.  Serum IgM and IgG anti-HCV levels in patients with HCV and either acute hepatitis (AH or fulminant hepatitis (FH were investigated; the diversity of HCV antigen was investigated by RIBA test III.  Of 22 AH patients, 12 (54.5% were positive for IgM anti-HCV, mainly reacting to HCV core protein. The mean interval until the appearance of IgM anti-HCV after onset was 24.1±26.2 days. IgG anti-HCV mainly reacted to both core and NS-3 antigen, appearing 42.6±42.1 days after onset.  From a serial study of 15 AH patients, it was considered that in seven AH patients (46.7%, the IgM response would precede the IgG response. In another two AH patients, IgM anti-HCV was not detected during the acute disease phase. Of 48 chronic hepatitis patients with HCV-RNA, 40 patients were positive for IgM anti-HCV.  Therefore, IgM anti-HCV was useful for diagnosis in some of the AH patients, but it was difficult to use for distinguishing between acute and chronic infection. All four FH patients with HCV-RNA were positive for both IgM and IgG antibody to HCV at onset. Their antibody titres were higher than those of AH patients. These results suggested that, as in FH due to HBV, FH due to HCV could induce strong and rapid humoral immunity.

  9. Prevalence of HepatitisB virus infections among HIV infected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Setting: Kenya Medical Research Institute HBV Laboratory, Nairobi, Kenya Subjects: A total of four hundred HIV infected patients randomised from a Nairobi HIV comprehensive care centre between June and October 2015. Results: Of the 400 subjects screened; (27.75%) had HBV immunisation, (3%) had acute disease, ...

  10. risk factors for hepatitis b virus infection during pregnancy in south ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-11-06

    Nov 6, 2013 ... RISK FACTORS FOR HEPATITIS B VIRUS INFECTION DURING PREGNANCY IN SOUTH EASTERN NIGERIA. S.Onwere, MBChB ... Objective: To determine the seroprevalence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and possible risk factors in .... America, Japan and Australia (8). The wide variations in ...

  11. Prevention of perinatal hepatitis B virus infection : implications for mother and child : policy for the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.M. Grosheide (Pia Maria)

    1993-01-01

    textabstracthepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) to their newborn infants is an important cause for the development of hepatitis B infections and for the maintenance of the hepatitis B virus reservoir in the world (l-3). Immunization of infants born to HBsAg-positive women has been shown to almost

  12. Treponema pallidum and Hepatitis B virus co-infection among HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Co infection of T.pallidum and hepatitis B virus occurred in 2/130 (1.5%) of participants. There were no any factors that significantly associated with positive hepatitis B surface antigen while multiple sexual partners and history of sexually transmitted diseases were significantly associated with positive syphilis test (P= 0.023 ...

  13. Dengue Infection in a Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 Positive Patient Chronically Infected with Hepatitis B Virus in Western Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Enciso, Iván; Espinoza-Gómez, Francisco; Ochoa-Jiménez, Rodolfo; Valle-Reyes, Salvador; Vásquez, Clemente; López-Lemus, Uriel A

    2017-01-11

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and dengue coinfection has not been extensively studied. We report herein a case of dengue serotype 1 infection in an HIV-1-positive patient coinfected with hepatitis B virus (HBV) in Colima State, Mexico. CD4+ cells and HIV-1 viremia remained at normal levels, and no severe complications were observed during this multiple viral infection. The alanine transaminase and aspartate transaminase values were elevated before and during dengue infection. Surprisingly, these parameters were significantly reduced 2 months later. Because of the lack of evidence regarding this multiple viral interaction, further research is required to understand the biologic and clinical course of dengue infection in HIV-1/HBV coinfected patients, especially in tropical regions where dengue virus transmission is highly active. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  14. Acute viral hepatitis morbidity and mortality associated with hepatitis E virus infection: Uzbekistan surveillance data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margolis Harold S

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Uzbekistan, routine serologic testing has not been available to differentiate etiologies of acute viral hepatitis (AVH. To determine the age groups most affected by hepatitis E virus (HEV during documented AVH epidemics, trends in AVH-associated mortality rate (MR per 100,000 over a 15-year period and reported incidence of AVH over a 35-year period were examined. Methods Reported AVH incidence data from 1971 to 2005 and AVH-associated mortality data from 1981 to 1995 were examined. Serologic markers for infection with hepatitis viruses A, B, D, and E were determined from a sample of hospitalized patients with AVH from an epidemic period (1987 and from a sample of pregnant women with AVH from a non-epidemic period (1992. Results Two multi-year AVH outbreaks were identified: one during 1975–1976, and one during 1985–1987. During 1985–1987, AVH-associated MRs were 12.3–17.8 per 100,000 for the general population. Highest AVH-associated MRs occurred among children in the first 3 years of life (40–190 per 100,000 and among women aged 20–29 (15–21 per 100,000. During 1988–1995 when reported AVH morbidity was much lower in the general population, AVH-associated MRs were markedly lower among these same age groups. In 1988, AVH-associated MRs were higher in rural (21 per 100,000 than in urban (8 per 100,000 populations (RR 2.6; 95% CI 1.16–5.93; p Conclusion In the absence of the availability of confirmatory testing, inferences regarding probable hepatitis epidemic etiologies can sometimes be made using surveillance data, comparing AVH incidence with AVH-associated mortality with an eye to population-based viral hepatitis control measures. Data presented here implicate HEV as the probable etiology of high mortality observed in pregnant women and in children less than 3 years of age in Uzbekistan during 1985–1987. High mortality among pregnant women but not among children less than 3 years has been observed in

  15. Hepatitis E Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Levick

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis E virus (HEV is the most common cause of acute viral hepatitis in the developing world. It is a waterborne virus that can cause epidemics in the face of overcrowding and poor sanitation. Although the hepatitis illness is usually self-limiting, it has a high mortality in pregnant women and can become a chronic infection in the immunosuppressed. Treatment is mostly supportive and prevention is by good water hygiene.

  16. The present and future disease burden of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection with today's treatment paradigm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Razavi, H; Waked, I; Sarrazin, C

    2014-01-01

    The disease burden of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is expected to increase as the infected population ages. A modelling approach was used to estimate the total number of viremic infections, diagnosed, treated and new infections in 2013. In addition, the model was used to estimate the change in the tot...

  17. Emerging co-infection of HIV and hepatitis B virus in far western Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poudel, Krishna C; Jimba, Masamine; Okumura, Junko; Wakai, Susumu

    2006-07-01

    We detected a prevalence (11%) of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection among male adult villagers (n = 149) in far western Nepal where migration to India is common. Although only one migrant-returnee was infected with both HBV and HIV, co-infection may occur more frequently in future as the HIV prevalence is high (8%).

  18. Phyllanthus species versus antiviral drugs for chronic hepatitis B virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yun, Xia; Luo, Hui; Liu, Jian Ping

    2013-01-01

    Phyllanthus species for patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection have been assessed in clinical trials, but no consensus regarding their usefulness exists. When compared with placebo or no intervention, we were unable to identify convincing evidence that phyllanthus species are ben...... are beneficial in patients with chronic hepatitis B. Some randomised clinical trials have compared phyllanthus species versus antiviral drugs.......Phyllanthus species for patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection have been assessed in clinical trials, but no consensus regarding their usefulness exists. When compared with placebo or no intervention, we were unable to identify convincing evidence that phyllanthus species...

  19. Hepatitis C virus infections among HIV-infected men who have sex with men: an expanding epidemic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Urbanus, Anouk T.; van de Laar, Thijs J.; Stolte, Ineke G.; Schinkel, Janke; Heijman, Titia; Coutinho, Roel A.; Prins, Maria

    2009-01-01

    Background: Since 2000 outbreaks of sexually transmitted hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infections have been reported among HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM). We studied the prevalence and determinants of HCV-infection among MSM attending a large sexually transmitted infection (STI) clinic in

  20. Seroprevalence of Human Immunodeficiency Virus, Hepatitis B ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigeria is also endemic for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, ... of HIV, hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), syphilis, and co‑infections among ..... Hou J, Liu Z, Gu F. Epidemiology and prevention of hepatitis. B virus infection. Int J Med Sci 2005;2:50‑7. 9. Ogunro PS, Adekanle DA, Fadero FF, Ogungbamigbe TO,.

  1. Committee Opinion No. 655: Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C, and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infections in Obstetrician-Gynecologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    To prevent transmission of bloodborne pathogens, it is important that health care providers adhere to standard precautions, follow fundamental infection-control principles, and use appropriate procedural techniques. All obstetrician-gynecologists who provide clinical care should receive the hepatitis B virus vaccine series. The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America has established guidelines for the management of health care providers who are infected with hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The guidelines categorize representative obstetric and gynecologic procedures according to level of risk of bloodborne pathogen transmission and include recommendations for health care provider clinical activities, based on these categories and viral burden. It is important to note that when no restrictions are recommended, careful supervision should be carried out as highlighted. These recommendations provide a framework within which to consider such cases; however, each case should be independently considered in context by the expert review panel.

  2. Committee Opinion No. 655 Summary: Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C, and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infections in Obstetrician-Gynecologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    To prevent transmission of bloodborne pathogens, it is important that health care providers adhere to standard precautions, follow fundamental infection-control principles, and use appropriate procedural techniques. All obstetrician-gynecologists who provide clinical care should receive the hepatitis B virus vaccine series. The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America has established guidelines for the management of health care providers who are infected with hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The guidelines categorize representative obstetric and gynecologic procedures according to level of risk of bloodborne pathogen transmission and include recommendations for health care provider clinical activities, based on these categories and viral burden. It is important to note that when no restrictions are recommended, careful supervision should be carried out as highlighted. These recommendations provide a framework within which to consider such cases; however, each case should be independently considered in context by the expert review panel.

  3. Seroprevalence of Hepatitis A virus infection in non-human primates in Assam, India

    OpenAIRE

    B.G. NATH; Chakraborty, A.; Sarma, D. K.; Rahman, T; P.K. Boro

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigated 37 serum samples of non-human primates in Assam State Zoo and the Department of Forest and Environment, Govt. of Assam for seroprevalence of hepatitis A virus infection during the period from December, 2007 to November, 2009. Four serum samples were also collected from animal keepers of the zoo to investigate transmission of the disease to the attendants working with these primates. Competitive ELISA was performed using hepatitis A virus ELISA kit (Wanti Hep. AV...

  4. Seroprevalence of Hepatitis A virus infection in non-human primates in Assam, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.G. Nath

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated 37 serum samples of non-human primates in Assam State Zoo and the Department of Forest and Environment, Govt. of Assam for seroprevalence of hepatitis A virus infection during the period from December, 2007 to November, 2009. Four serum samples were also collected from animal keepers of the zoo to investigate transmission of the disease to the attendants working with these primates. Competitive ELISA was performed using hepatitis A virus ELISA kit (Wanti Hep. AV to detect hepatitis A virus antibody in serum samples. Ten (27.21% of the non-human primate samples and three (75% human samples had detectable anti-hepatitis A virus antibodies. Living status of the non-human primates (Free living was a high potential risk for hepatitis A virus infection. Seroprevalence of hepatitis A virus infection had significant difference between free living non-human primates and captive non-human primates (P less than 0.05. No significant difference (p=0.86 was seen between male and female non-human primates

  5. Lipoprotein lipase inhibits hepatitis C virus (HCV infection by blocking virus cell entry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Maillard

    Full Text Available A distinctive feature of HCV is that its life cycle depends on lipoprotein metabolism. Viral morphogenesis and secretion follow the very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL biogenesis pathway and, consequently, infectious HCV in the serum is associated with triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRL. Lipoprotein lipase (LPL hydrolyzes TRL within chylomicrons and VLDL but, independently of its catalytic activity, it has a bridging activity, mediating the hepatic uptake of chylomicrons and VLDL remnants. We previously showed that exogenously added LPL increases HCV binding to hepatoma cells by acting as a bridge between virus-associated lipoproteins and cell surface heparan sulfate, while simultaneously decreasing infection levels. We show here that LPL efficiently inhibits cell infection with two HCV strains produced in hepatoma cells or in primary human hepatocytes transplanted into uPA-SCID mice with fully functional human ApoB-lipoprotein profiles. Viruses produced in vitro or in vivo were separated on iodixanol gradients into low and higher density populations, and the infection of Huh 7.5 cells by both virus populations was inhibited by LPL. The effect of LPL depended on its enzymatic activity. However, the lipase inhibitor tetrahydrolipstatin restored only a minor part of HCV infectivity, suggesting an important role of the LPL bridging function in the inhibition of infection. We followed HCV cell entry by immunoelectron microscopy with anti-envelope and anti-core antibodies. These analyses demonstrated the internalization of virus particles into hepatoma cells and their presence in intracellular vesicles and associated with lipid droplets. In the presence of LPL, HCV was retained at the cell surface. We conclude that LPL efficiently inhibits HCV infection by acting on TRL associated with HCV particles through mechanisms involving its lipolytic function, but mostly its bridging function. These mechanisms lead to immobilization of the virus at the cell

  6. Infection with Hepatitis C Virus among HIV-Infected Pregnant Women in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise J. Jamieson

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The purpose of this study was to describe the epidemiology of coinfection with hepatitis C virus (HCV and HIV among a cohort of pregnant Thai women. Methods. Samples from 1771 pregnant women enrolled in three vertical transmission of HIV studies in Bangkok, Thailand, were tested for HCV. Results. Among HIV-infected pregnant women, HCV seroprevelance was 3.8% and the active HCV infection rate was 3.0%. Among HIV-uninfected pregnant women, 0.3% were HCV-infected. Intravenous drug use by the woman was the factor most strongly associated with HCV seropositivity. Among 48 infants tested for HCV who were born to HIV/HCV coinfected women, two infants were HCV infected for an HCV transmission rate of 4.2% (95% 0.51–14.25%. Conclusions. HCV seroprevalence and perinatal transmission rates were low among this Thai cohort of HIV-infected pregnant women.

  7. HIV co-infection with hepatitis B and C viruses among Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Result. The prevalence of HIV/HBV co-infection was 7.7%, while that of HIV/HCV co-infection was 5.2%. No child was co-infected with all three viruses. Children who were co-infected with HCV were more likely to be older than 5 years. There was no significant association between co-infection with either of the hepatitis ...

  8. Chronic hepatitis virus infection in patients with multiple myeloma: clinical characteristics and outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Jen Teng

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Cytotoxic agents and steroids are used to treat lymphoid malignancies, but these compounds may exacerbate chronic viral hepatitis. For patients with multiple myeloma, the impact of preexisting hepatitis virus infection is unclear. The aim of this study is to explore the characteristics and outcomes of myeloma patients with chronic hepatitis virus infection. METHODS: From 2003 to 2008, 155 myeloma patients were examined to determine their chronic hepatitis virus infection statuses using serologic tests for the hepatitis B (HBV and C viruses (HCV. Clinical parameters and outcome variables were retrieved via a medical chart review. RESULTS: The estimated prevalences of chronic HBV and HCV infections were 11.0% (n = 17 and 9.0% (n = 14, respectively. The characteristics of patients who were hepatitis virus carriers and those who were not were similar. However, carrier patients had a higher prevalence of conventional cytogenetic abnormalities (64.3% vs. 25.0%. The cumulative incidences of grade 3-4 elevation of the level of alanine transaminase, 30.0% vs. 12.0%, and hyperbilirubinemia, 20.0% vs. 1.6%, were higher in carriers as well. In a Kaplan-Meier analysis, carrier patients had worse overall survival (median: 16.0 vs. 42.4 months. The prognostic value of carrier status was not statistically significant in the multivariate analysis, but an age of more than 65 years old, the presence of cytogenetic abnormalities, a beta-2-microglobulin level of more than 3.5 mg/L, and a serum creatinine level of more than 2 mg/ dL were independent factors associated with poor prognosis. CONCLUSION: Myeloma patients with chronic hepatitis virus infections might be a distinct subgroup, and close monitoring of hepatic adverse events should be mandatory.

  9. Outcome of Hepatitis B Virus Infection After Living-Donor Liver Transplant: A Single-center Experience Over 20 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafady-Hego, Hanaa; Elgendy, Hamed; Nafady, Asmaa; Uemoto, Shinji

    2016-04-01

    Despite living-donor liver transplant being a life-saving therapy for patients with hepatitis B virus with or without hepatocellular carcinoma, outcomes for patients with these diseases are worse. Hepatitis B virus recurrence or relapse of hepatocellular carcinoma can result in subsequent graft loss or patient death. In this study, we discuss the postoperative outcomes of patients with hepatitis B virus infection after living-donor liver transplant. We retrospectively analyzed 125 patients with hepatitis B virus-related end-stage liver disease, comparing results with 1228 control patients who had other pathologies, including hepatitis C virus, combined hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus, and neither virus. Survival rates of patients with hepatitis B virus did not differ from the control groups (P > .05). Patients with concurrent hepatitis B virus and hepatocellular carcinoma were significantly older (P virus recurrence after living-donor liver transplant, Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score was significantly higher than those who did not have recurrence (P = .015). In addition, 2 patients had hepatocellular carcinoma recurrence in the form of peritoneal metastasis, with both patients having high preoperative alpha-fetoprotein levels. Our study provides details on long-term outcomes of patients with hepatitis B virus infection who had undergone living-donor liver transplant. Based on our results, we suggest that prolonged antiviral prophylactic therapy in the form of hepatitis B immunoglobulin with either lamivudine or entecavir be considered for patients who associated with risk factors to prevent postoperative recurrence.

  10. Fulminant hepatitis B virus : recurrence after liver transplantation in two patients also infected with hepatitis delta virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marsman, W A; Wiesner, R H; Batts, K P; Poterucha, J J; Porayko, M K; Niesters, H G; Zondervan, P E; Krom, R A

    Liver transplantation for hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related liver disease is complicated by HBV recurrence and, consequently, poor patient and graft survival. Patients transplanted for hepatitis delta virus (HDV)-related cirrhosis are reported to have a diminished incidence of HBV recurrence and

  11. Hepatic transcriptome analysis of hepatitis C virus infection in chimpanzees defines unique gene expression patterns associated with viral clearance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Nanda

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus infection leads to a high rate of chronicity. Mechanisms of viral clearance and persistence are still poorly understood. In this study, hepatic gene expression analysis was performed to identify any molecular signature associated with the outcome of hepatitis C virus (HCV infection in chimpanzees. Acutely HCV-infected chimpanzees with self-limited infection or progression to chronicity were studied. Interferon stimulated genes were induced irrespective of the outcome of infection. Early induction of a set of genes associated with cell proliferation and immune activation was associated with subsequent viral clearance. Specifically, two of the genes: interleukin binding factor 3 (ILF3 and cytotoxic granule-associated RNA binding protein (TIA1, associated with robust T-cell response, were highly induced early in chimpanzees with self-limited infection. Up-regulation of genes associated with CD8+ T cell response was evident only during the clearance phase of the acute self-limited infection. The induction of these genes may represent an initial response of cellular injury and proliferation that successfully translates to a "danger signal" leading to induction of adaptive immunity to control viral infection. This primary difference in hepatic gene expression between self-limited and chronic infections supports the concept that successful activation of HCV-specific T-cell response is critical in clearance of acute HCV infection.

  12. Impact of lipids and lipoproteins on hepatitis C virus infection and virus neutralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercauteren, Koen; Mesalam, Ahmed Atef; Leroux-Roels, Geert; Meuleman, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections represent a major global health problem. End-stage liver disease caused by chronic HCV infection is a major indication for liver transplantation. However, after transplantation the engrafted liver inevitably becomes infected by the circulating virus. Direct acting antivirals are not yet approved for use in liver transplant patients, and limited efficacy and severe side effects hamper the use of pegylated interferon combined with ribavirin in a post-transplant setting. Therefore, alternative therapeutic options need to be explored. Viral entry represents an attractive target for such therapeutic intervention. Understanding the mechanisms of viral entry is essential to define the viral and cellular factors involved. The HCV life cycle is dependent of and associated with lipoprotein physiology and the presence of lipoproteins has been correlated with altered antiviral efficacy of entry inhibitors. In this review, we summarise the current knowledge on how lipoprotein physiology influences the HCV life cycle. We focus especially on the influence of lipoproteins on antibodies that target HCV envelope proteins or antibodies that target the cellular receptors of the virus. This information can be particularly relevant for the prevention of HCV re-infection after liver transplantation. PMID:25473151

  13. A weak neutralizing antibody response to hepatitis C virus envelope glycoprotein enhances virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith Meyer

    Full Text Available We have completed a phase 1 safety and immunogenicity trial with hepatitis C virus (HCV envelope glycoproteins, E1 and E2, with MF59 adjuvant as a candidate vaccine. Neutralizing activity to HCV genotype 1a was detected in approximately 25% of the vaccinee sera. In this study, we evaluated vaccinee sera from poor responders as a potential source of antibody dependent enhancement (ADE of HCV infection. Sera with poor neutralizing activity enhanced cell culture grown HCV genotype 1a or 2a, and surrogate VSV/HCV pseudotype infection titer, in a dilution dependent manner. Surrogate pseudotypes generated from individual HCV glycoproteins suggested that antibody to the E2 glycoprotein; but not the E1 glycoprotein, was the principle target for enhancing infection. Antibody specific to FcRII expressed on the hepatic cell surface or to the Fc portion of Ig blocked enhancement of HCV infection by vaccinee sera. Together, the results from in vitro studies suggested that enhancement of viral infectivity may occur in the absence of a strong antibody response to HCV envelope glycoproteins.

  14. Chronic Hepatitis E Virus Infection in a Pediatric Female Liver Transplant Recipient

    OpenAIRE

    Passos-Castilho, Ana Maria; Porta, Gilda; Miura, Irene K.; Pugliese, Renata P. S.; Danesi, Vera L. B.; Porta, Adriana; Guimarães, Teresa; Seda, João; Antunes, Eduardo; Granato, Celso F. H.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a case of chronic hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection in a 13-year-old female liver transplant recipient with recurrent increased aminotransferase levels and acute cellular rejection. This finding demonstrates that chronic HEV infection can occur and should be further investigated in immunocompromised patients in Latin America.

  15. Hepatitis C virus infection rate in volunteer blood donors from the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. Hepatitis G virus (HGV) antibody seroprevalence studies overestimate the true infection rate. No data exist on the incidence of HCV or its clinical features in blood donors of sub-Saharan Africa. Aims. To establish the true incidence of HCV infection in volunteer blood donors in the Western Gape, and compare.

  16. Interferon-alpha treatment rapidly clears Hepatitis e virus infection in humanized mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.D.B. van de Garde (Martijn D.B.); S.D. Pas (Suzan); G.W. van Oord (Gertine); L. Gama (Lucio); Choi, Y. (Youkyung); R.A. de Man (Robert); P.A. Boonstra (André); T. Vanwolleghem (Thomas)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractAntiviral treatment options for chronic Hepatitis E Virus (HEV) infections are limited and immunological determinants of viral persistence remain largely unexplored. We studied the antiviral potency of pegylated interferon-α (pegIFNα) against HEV infections in humanized mice and modelled

  17. Antenatal screening for hepatitis B virus in HIV-infected and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and its compli cations cause substantial medical and financial burdens to the healthcare system, and have become a major global public health concern.[1] A global estimate is that 240 million individuals are chronically infected with HBV.[2] South Africa (SA) had an estimated 10%.

  18. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA levels and the management of HBV-infected health care workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Eijk, A A; de Man, R A; Niesters, H G M; Schalm, S W; Zaaijer, H L

    Different guidelines exist for the management of hepatitis B virus (HBV)-infected health care workers (HCWs). Various HBV DNA levels are used as a cutoff level to determine whether an HBV-infected HCW is allowed to perform exposure-prone procedures (EPPs) or not. In this paper we discuss the factors

  19. Surface antigen-negative hepatitis B virus infection in Dutch blood donors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lieshout-Krikke, R. W.; Molenaar-de Backer, M. W. A.; van Swieten, P.; Zaaijer, H. L.

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface antigen (HBsAg) is a reliable marker for HBV infection, but HBsAg-negative forms of HBV infection occur. The introduction of HBV DNA screening of Dutch blood donors, which were not preselected for absence of HBV core antibodies, enabled the characterization of

  20. Impaired Thymic Output in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartling, Hans Jakob; Gaardbo, Julie Christine; Ronit, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Altered T cell homeostasis in chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has been demonstrated. However, it is unknown if fibrosis is associated with more perturbed T cell homeostasis in chronic HCV infection. The aim of the present study was to examine and compare T cell subsets including recent...

  1. Chronic hepatitis E virus infection in a pediatric female liver transplant recipient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passos-Castilho, Ana Maria; Porta, Gilda; Miura, Irene K; Pugliese, Renata P S; Danesi, Vera L B; Porta, Adriana; Guimarães, Teresa; Seda, João; Antunes, Eduardo; Granato, Celso F H

    2014-12-01

    We describe a case of chronic hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection in a 13-year-old female liver transplant recipient with recurrent increased aminotransferase levels and acute cellular rejection. This finding demonstrates that chronic HEV infection can occur and should be further investigated in immunocompromised patients in Latin America. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Prevalence of Hepatitis C virus in HIV infected persons in a tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To assess the prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection among HIV/AIDS patients in a tertiary hospital inNigeria. All infected persons confirmed by Elisa and aged 15 years and above seen at theUniversity of Benin Teaching Hospital were included in the study. The subjects were recruited over a period of one year.

  3. Outbreak of hepatitis C virus infections at an outpatient hemodialysis facility: the importance of infection control competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Agam K; Luckman, Emily; Wise, Matthew E; MacCannell, Taranisia; Blythe, David; Lin, Yulin; Xia, Guoliang; Drobeniuc, Jan; Noble-Wang, Judith; Arduino, Matthew J; Thompson, Nicola D; Patel, Priti R; Wilson, Lucy E

    2013-01-01

    In the United States, the prevalence of hepatitis C virus infection among patients treated in hemodialysis facilities is five times higher than among the general population. This study investigated eight new hepatitis C virus infections among patients treated at an outpatient hemodialysis facility. Epidemiologic investigation and viral sequencing demonstrated that transmission likely occurred between patients typically treated during the same or consecutive shifts at the same or a nearby station. Several infection control breaches were observed including lapses involving the preparation, handling, and administration of parenteral medications. Improved infection control education and training for all hemodialysis facility staff is an important component of assuring adherence to appropriate procedures and preventing future outbreaks.

  4. Hepatitis D virus infections among injecting drug users with and without human immunodeficiency virus infection in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Hsuan Hsieh

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In Taiwan, injecting drug use has been the main route of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV transmission since 2005, with hepatitis B virus (HBV and hepatitis D virus (HDV also having similar transmission routes. This has now become an important public health issue. The aim of this study is to explore the conditions of HDV infections between injecting drug users (IDUs with and without HIV infection in Southern Taiwan. In this study, 87 IDUs were enrolled, including 27 anti-HDV seronegative IDUs and 60 anti-HDV seropositive IDUs, and the results of their liver function tests, CD4 cell counts, and anti-HIV and HIV RNA levels were analyzed. The prevalence of anti-HDV seropositivity among hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg seropositive IDUs in this study was 68.9% (60/87. The prevalence rate of anti-HDV seropositive IDUs among anti-HIV seronegative and anti-HIV seropositive cases was 40.0% (12/30 and 84.2% (48/57, respectively. Anti-HIV seropositivity was related to anti-HDV seropositivity (odds ratio = 9.34, 95% confidence interval = 2.67–31.59, p < 0.001. Among IDUs with HIV infection, there was no significant difference in CD4 cell counts and HIV RNA viral load between HBsAg-positive patients with anti-HDV seronegativity and those with anti-HDV seropositivity. In conclusion, the prevalence of HDV infection among IDUs is higher among IDUs with HIV infection. Because anti-HIV seropositivity is significantly related to anti-HDV seropositivity, HDV infection among IDUs is still important. We suggest that for IDUs, HBsAg and anti-HDV should be monitored closely.

  5. Hepatitis B virus infection in Latin America: A genomic medicine approach

    OpenAIRE

    Roman, Sonia; Jose-Abrego, Alexis; Fierro, Nora Alma; Escobedo-Melendez, Griselda; Ojeda-Granados, Claudia; Martinez-Lopez, Erika; Panduro, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is the leading cause of severe chronic liver disease. This article provides a critical view of the importance of genomic medicine for the study of HBV infection and its clinical outcomes in Latin America. Three levels of evolutionary adaptation may correlate with the clinical outcomes of HBV infection. Infections in Latin America are predominantly of genotype H in Mexico and genotype F in Central and South America; these strains have historically circulated a...

  6. Serum alphafetoprotein levels in subjects infected with hepatitis B virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitau, M J; Grint, P C; Heath, R B; Chard, T

    1988-12-01

    Serum alphafetoprotein (AFP) levels were measured using a sensitive radioimmunoassay in 108 hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-positive subjects and 695 controls. The concentrations were significantly higher in the HBsAg-positives. Within this group, the highest levels were found in those with active HBV infection. In those without evidence of acute infection, the levels were higher in the high-risk than in the low-risk subjects. It is concluded: 1) that measurement of serum AFP might be a useful additional index of infectivity and prognosis in HBsAg-positive subjects; and 2) that in the light of the association between chronic HBV infection, hepatocellular carcinoma, and raised AFP in non-European populations, consideration should be given to regular monitoring of AFP levels in HBsAg-positive subjects in the United Kingdom.

  7. Hepatitis B or Hepatitis C Virus Infection Is a Risk Factor for Severe Hepatic Cytolysis after Initiation of a Protease Inhibitor-Containing Antiretroviral Regimen in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savès, Marianne; Raffi, François; Clevenbergh, Philippe; Marchou, Bruno; Waldner-Combernoux, Anne; Morlat, Philippe; Le Moing, Vincent; Rivière, Catherine; Chêne, Geneviève; Leport, Catherine

    2000-01-01

    In a cohort of 1,047 human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected patients started on protease inhibitors (PIs), the incidence of severe hepatic cytolysis (alanine aminotransferase concentration five times or more above the upper limit of the normal level ≥ 5N) was 5% patient-years after a mean follow-up of 5 months. Only positivity for hepatitis C virus antibodies (hazard ratio [HR], 7.95; P < 10−3) or hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HR, 6.67; P < 10−3) was associated with severe cytolysis. Before starting patients on PIs, assessment of liver enzyme levels and viral coinfections is necessary. PMID:11083658

  8. Hepatitis C virus infection of a Vero cell clone displaying efficient virus-cell binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valli, M B; Carloni, G; Manzin, A; Nasorri, F; Ponzetto, A; Clementi, M

    1997-01-01

    The susceptibility of Vero cells and derivative cell clones to hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection was assayed by qualitative and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods. Cell extracts from Vero cells inoculated with HCV were tested for the presence of both positive and negative strands of HCV RNA; in parallel, cell-free HCV genomes were assayed in culture supernatant fluids. Quantitation of genomic HCV RNA molecules in infected cells by competitive reverse transcription PCR (cRT-PCR) indicated that HCV replication was more efficient in a derivative clone (named clone 10) than in parental Vero cells or other clones under study. Analysis of HCV-binding to cell receptors, performed by cRT-PCR quantitation of viral particles adsorbed to the cell surface, demonstrated a 10-fold higher virus-binding level of clone 10 than that of parental Vero cells. The results shown here indicate that the Vero clone 10 may constitute an efficient model system for analysing early events in HCV infection as well as a source of virus for diagnostic and biotechnological applications.

  9. Completeness of reporting of chronic hepatitis B and C virus infections--Michigan, 1995-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) and chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections are leading causes of death from cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma in the United States. Because underreporting has complicated the understanding of disease burden, in 2010 the Institute of Medicine requested that CDC perform a comprehensive evaluation of national viral hepatitis surveillance. Hepatitis surveillance data rely on local and state estimates, and a better understanding of reporting at these levels can inform strategies to improve national data quality. As an initial assessment, CDC partnered with the Michigan Department of Community Health (MDCH) and an urban health-care system in southeastern Michigan to evaluate the completeness of reporting (including case status, demographic, and risk factor information) of cases of chronic HBV and HCV infection among persons who were enrolled in a multicenter chronic hepatitis cohort study to the MDCH viral hepatitis registry. This report summarizes the results of that assessment. Among clinically confirmed chronic hepatitis infections, 82% of HBV infections and 65% of HCV infections were reported. Completeness of reporting of chronic HBV and HCV infections was significantly improved for those with more recent clinical diagnoses, but reporting still remained incomplete. The completeness of reporting varied significantly by demographic characteristics of patients with HCV infection. Few reports of either HBV or HCV infection included risk factors. Improving surveillance of chronic hepatitis in Michigan will require exploration of more efficient methods for the transfer of laboratory and clinical data and evaluation of the most appropriate sources for risk factor information to aid in the prevention of viral hepatitis transmission. Similar collaborations with health-care institutions that use electronic International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) codes and laboratory data can provide local and state health

  10. Impact of hepatitis C virus infection on lifestyle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scognamiglio, Paola; Galati, Vincenzo; Navarra, Assunta; Longo, Maria Antonella; Aloisi, Maria Stella; Antonini, Maria Giulia; Puoti, Massimo; Almasio, Piero Luigi; Ippolito, Giuseppe; Girardi, Enrico

    2007-05-21

    To evaluate the impact of the diagnosis of hepatitis C infection on lifestyle habits such as smoking, drinking, sports activity and diet. A self-administered, anonymous questionnaire was offered to out-patients with HCV infection consecutively attending three clinical centres in Italy. Of the 275 respondents, 62.2% (171) were male. Mean age was 51 (range 20-80) years. Overall, after the diagnosis of hepatitis C, 74.5% of drinkers had modified (giving up or reducing) alcohol consumption, 21.3% of smokers had modified their habits and 32.3% of subjects who reported sports activity had either stopped or reduced frequency of activity or chose a less fatiguing sport. Sixty-four percent of the respondents reported having modified their diet, most of them on physician's advice. After the diagnosis of hepatitis C many patients correctly modified their alcohol consumption and a minority their smoking habits. The reason for reported changes in diet and physical activity needs further investigations.

  11. Neutralizing antibodies to hepatitis C virus in perinatally infected children followed up prospectively

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meunier, Jean-Christophe; Bukh, Jens; Diaz, Giacomo

    2011-01-01

    reactive NtAbs of maternal origin did not prevent vertical HCV transmission or progression to chronicity. NtAbs against homologous genotype or subtype appeared during the chronic phase and were more abundant and sustained in children with acute hepatitis. Cross-reactive NtAbs were present in both groups......Little is known about the presence and role of neutralizing antibodies (NtAbs) in perinatal hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Using HCV pseudoparticles, NtAbs were studied longitudinally in 12 HCV-infected children with or without evidence of acute hepatitis during the first year of life. Broadly...

  12. Epidemiology and transmission of hepatitis G virus infection in dialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fallahian Farahnaz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis G virus (HGV or GB-virus type C (GBV-C is distributed globally and is present in the volunteer blood donor population. For epidemiological studies, HGV is of interest in hemodialysis patients who are at risk of parenterally transmitted infections. The role of HGV in producing illness and hepatic disease has yet to be determined. A review of literature was performed in 2009 to summarize scientific reports on epidemiology and pathogenesis of the HGV infection and its exposure through hemodialysis.

  13. Hepatitis C virus infection and risk of cancer: a population-based cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Omland, Lars; Farkas, Dora Körmendiné; Jepsen, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is associated with an increased risk of primary liver cancer; however, 5- and 10-year risk estimates are needed. The association of HCV with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is uncertain and the association with other cancers is unknown.......Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is associated with an increased risk of primary liver cancer; however, 5- and 10-year risk estimates are needed. The association of HCV with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is uncertain and the association with other cancers is unknown....

  14. Cirrhosis, liver transplantation and HIV infection are risk factors associated with hepatitis E virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mar Riveiro-Barciela

    Full Text Available Acute and chronic hepatitis E have been associated with high mortality and development of cirrhosis, particularly in solid-organ recipients and patients infected by human immunodeficiency virus. However, data regarding the epidemiology of hepatitis E in special populations is still limited.Investigate seroprevalence and possible factors associated with HEV infection in a large cohort of immunosuppressed patients.Cross-sectional study testing IgG anti-HEV in serum samples from 1373 consecutive individuals: 332 liver-transplant, 296 kidney-transplant, 6 dual organ recipients, 301 non-transplanted patients with chronic liver disease, 238 HIV-infected patients and 200 healthy controls.IgG anti-HEV was detected in 3.5% controls, 3.7% kidney recipients, 7.4% liver transplant without cirrhosis and 32.1% patients who developed post-transplant cirrhosis (p<0.01. In patients with chronic liver disease, IgG anti-HEV was also statistically higher in those with liver cirrhosis (2% vs 17.5%, p<0.01. HIV-infected patients showed an IgG anti-HEV rate of 9.2%, higher than those patients without HIV infection (p<0.03. Multivariate analysis showed that the factors independently associated with anti-HEV detection were liver cirrhosis, liver transplantation and HIV infection (OR: 7.6, 3.1 and 2.4. HCV infection was a protective factor for HEV infection (OR: 0.4.HEV seroprevalence was high in liver transplant recipients, particularly those with liver cirrhosis. The difference in anti-HEV prevalence between Liver and Kidney transplanted cases suggests an association with advanced liver disease. Further research is needed to ascertain whether cirrhosis is a predisposing factor for HEV infection or whether HEV infection may play a role in the pathogeneses of cirrhosis.

  15. Clinical features and prognosis of patients with primary biliary cholangitis complicated by hepatitis virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHAO Dantong

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate the clinical features and prognosis of patients with primary biliary cholangitis(PBC complicated by hepatitis virus infection. MethodsA total of 16 patients who were admitted to Beijing YouAn Hospital from October 2004 to October 2012 and diagnosed with PBC complicated by hepatitis virus infection were enrolled, among whom 7 had chronic hepatitis B virus infection, 3 had hepatitis C, 4 had hepatitis E, 1 had hepatitis B and hepatitis C, and 1 had hepatitis A. A total of 76 hospitalized patients with PBC alone were enrolled as controls. The two groups were compared in terms of clinical features, laboratory markers, and autoantibodies, and follow-up visits were performed to investigate prognostic features. The independent samples t-test was used for comparison of normally distributed continuous data, and the Mann-Whitney U rank sum test was used for comparison of non-normally distributed continuous data; the chi-square test or Fisher′s exact test was used for comparison of categorical data. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to calculate survival rates and the log-rank test was used to compare survival rates between groups. ResultsCompared with the control group, the PBC-hepatitis virus infection group had significantly lower proportion of female patients (χ2=12.22, P=0.002, alkaline phosphatase (U=225.00, P<0.001, CHO (U=363.50, P=0.036, and IgG level (t=2.79, P=0.007, and no patients in the PBC-hepatitis virus infection group experienced abdominal wall varices, upper gastrointestinal bleeding, or hepatic encephalopathy. The PBC-hepatitis virus infection group had various autoantibodies including anti-nuclear antibody, smooth muscle antibody, anti-parietal cell antibody (APCA, anti-liver specific protein antibody, and anti-myocardial antibody, as well as a significantly higher APCA positive rate than the control group (25% vs 3.9%, χ2=5.608, P=0.016. The median follow-up time was 49.5 months (2-312 months. The PBC-hepatitis

  16. Linking hepatitis C virus infection to pre-1994 blood transfusions in female patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos Flores, Christian; Echeagaray, Ernesto; Castañeda, Guadalupe; Vargas, Maria de Lourdes; Montes-González, Raúl; Luna, Susana; Díaz, Laura; Torres, Oscar

    2017-03-15

    Most blood transfusions occur in female patients. The introduction of serologic screening practices by blood banks reduced the transfusion-related rate of infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV). In Mexico patients with pre-1994 transfusion history are at high risk of being detected with HCV infection. We aimed at establishing an interrelationship between two variables: pre-1994 transfusion history and rate of infection in women treated in the Guadalajara Metropolitan Area hospitals, in Mexico. Analytical observational case-control study which included both non-infected women and patients diagnosed with hepatitis C virus infection, in whom the pre-1994 transfusion history was determined. The cases were 150 women with confirmed hepatitis C virus serologic diagnosis. The controls were 150 women whose hepatitis C virus-detection serologic tests had yielded negative results. An odds ratio of 9.07 (95% CI: 5.37 – 15.3; p< 0.001) was found where the rate of infection for the case group was 0.72 while the control group had a ratio of 0.22; population attributable risk (PAR) was 0.64 (95% CI: 0.53 – 0.73), while etiologic fraction was 0.88 (95% CI: 0.81 – 0.93). Among women, having been exposed to pre-1994 blood transfusion means a risk 9.07 times higher than not being exposed to blood transfusion in the same time frame.

  17. A consensus for occupational health management of healthcare workers infected with human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B virus, and / or hepatitis C virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimaru, Tomohiro; Wada, Koji; Smith, Derek R

    2017-05-25

    Occupational health management plays an important role in the prevention of provider-to-patient transmission in healthcare workers infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), and/or hepatitis C virus (HCV). Therefore, the Japan Society for Occupational Health's Research Group on Occupational Health for Health Care Workers has proposed a consensus for the management of healthcare workers infected with HIV, HBV, and/or HCV based on recent evidence for each concerned group. The consensus recommends that: (1) employers in medical institutions should establish a policy of respecting the human rights of healthcare workers, management strategies for occupational blood exposure, and occupational health consultation; (2) occupational health staff should appropriately assess the risk of provider-to-patient transmission of HIV, HBV, and/or HCV infection and rearrange their tasks if necessary. When conducting risk assessment, occupational health staff should obtain informed consent and then cooperate with the physician in charge as well as infection control experts in the workplace; (3) healthcare workers infected with HIV, HBV, and/or HCV should disclose their employment to their treating physician and consult with their doctor regarding the need for special considerations at work; and (4) supervisors and colleagues in medical institutions should correctly understand the risks of HIV, HBV, and HCV infection and should not engage in any behavior that leads to discrimination against colleagues infected with HIV, HBV, and/or HCV.

  18. Hepatitis virus infection and chronic liver disease among atomic-bomb survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, Saeko; Cologne, John; Akahoshi, Masazumi [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan); Kusumi, Shizuyo [Institute of Radiation Epidemiology, Radiation Effects Association, Tokyo (Japan); Kodama, Kazunori; Yoshizawa, Hiroshi [Hiroshima University School of Medicine, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2000-05-01

    Hepatitis C and B virus (HCV, HBV) infection plays a crucial role in the etiology of chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma, which have been reported to increase with radiation dose among the atomic bomb survivors. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether radiation exposure altered the prevalence of hepatitis virus infection or accelerated the progress toward chronic hepatitis after hepatitis virus infection. Levels of serum antibody to hepatitis C virus (anti-HCV), HBs antigen (HBsAg), and anti-HBs antibody (anti-HBs) were measured for 6,121 participants in the Adult Health Study of atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. No relationship was found between anti-HCV prevalence and radiation dose, after adjusting for age, sex, city, history of blood transfusion, acupuncture, and family history, but prevalence of anti-HCV was significantly lower overall among the radiation-exposed people (relative prevalence 0.84, p=0.022) compared to people with estimated radiation dose 0 Gy. No significant interaction was found between any of the above mentioned risk factors and radiation dose. People with anti-HCV positive had 13 times higher prevalence of chronic liver disease than those without anti-HCV. However, the radiation dose response for chronic liver disease among anti-HCV positive survivors may be greater than that among anti-HCV negative survivors (slope ratio 20), but the difference was marginally significant (p=0.097). Prevalence of HBsAg increased with whole-body kerma. However, no trend with radiation dose was found in the anti-HBs prevalence. In the background, prevalence of chronic liver disease in people with HBsAg-positive was approximately three times higher that in those without HBsAg. No difference in slope of the dose was found among HBsAg positive and negative individuals (slope: HBsAg positive 0.91/Gy, HBsAg negative 0.11/Gy, difference p=0.66). In conclusion, no dose-response relationship was found between

  19. Significance of hepatitis virus infection in the oncogenic initiation of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukowati, Caecilia H C; El-Khobar, Korri E; Ie, Susan I; Anfuso, Beatrice; Muljono, David H; Tiribelli, Claudio

    2016-01-28

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common causes of cancer-related death worldwide. Chronic infection of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and/or hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major risk factor in the development of the HCC, independently from excessive alcohol abuse and metabolic disease. Since the biology of HBV and HCV is different, their oncogenic effect may go through different mechanisms, direct and/or indirect. Viral hepatitis infection is associated with cellular inflammation, oxidative stress, and DNA damage, that may lead to subsequent hepatic injuries such as chronic hepatitis, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and finally HCC. Direct oncogenic properties of these viruses are related with their genotypic characteristics and the ability of viral proteins to interact with host proteins, thus altering the molecular pathways balance of the cells. In addition, the integration of HBV DNA, especially the gene S and X, in a particular site of the host genome can disrupt chromosomal stability and may activate various oncogenic mechanisms, including those in hematopoietic cells. Recently, several studies also had demonstrated that viral hepatitis could trigger the population of hepatic cancer stem cells. This review summarize available pre-clinical and clinical data in literature regarding oncogenic properties of HBV and HCV in the early initiation of HCC.

  20. [Detection of serum anti-F antibody in hepatitis C virus infected patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xiao-zhao; Jiang, Churn-mei; Xu, Ke; Wang, Zhong-can; Ding, Wei-liang; Yu, Rong-bin; Wang, Jie; Wu, Chao; Zhang, Yun

    2007-11-01

    To assess the prevalence of serum anti-F in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and the distribution of anti-F. The recombinant protein (HCV-F/GST) was coated onto micro titer plates as antigen. Sera of 120 patients with hepatitis C virus infection, 15 patients with hepatitis B, 3 patients with hepatitis E and 10 normal sera were tested by indirect ELISA for detecting anti-F. 82 samples out of the 120 (68%) HCV infected patients exhibited a positive anti-F reaction, showing significant difference from the controls with no HCV infection (P F was higher in patients over 50 year olds (OR = 6.675, 95% CI: 2.407-19.071). Patients of midrange, severe phase and hepatic cirrhosis had higher rate than the others (OR = 2.749, 95% CI: 1.470-5.141). Prevalence and distribution of anti-F in Yixing hepatitis C patients was reported and which might be related to the progression of HCV infection.

  1. Treatment for hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection - Danish national guidelines 2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Peer Brehm; Clausen, Mette Rye; Krarup, Henrik Bygum

    2012-01-01

    The Danish Society of Infectious Diseases and Danish Society of Gastroenterology and Hepatology set up a committee in 2007 to produce national guidelines for treatment of viral hepatitis B and C. The 2011 version of the guidelines have been endorsed by the scientific societies and are presented...... for their chronic viral hepatitis. Clinical care: According to the Danish National Board of Health, patients with chronic viral hepatitis should be followed with regular intervals, at clinics specialized in either infectious diseases or gastroenterology/hepatology. The primary aim is to identify patients...... screening programs for complications such as esophageal varices and hepatocellular carcinoma....

  2. Treatment for hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection - Danish national guidelines 2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Peer Brehm; Clausen, Mette Rye; Krarup, Henrik Bygum

    2012-01-01

    The Danish Society of Infectious Diseases and Danish Society of Gastroenterology and Hepatology set up a committee in 2007 to produce national guidelines for treatment of viral hepatitis B and C. The 2011 version of the guidelines have been endorsed by the scientific societies and are presented...... for their chronic viral hepatitis. CLINICAL CARE: According to the Danish National Board of Health, patients with chronic viral hepatitis should be followed with regular intervals, at clinics specialized in either infectious diseases or gastroenterology/hepatology. The primary aim is to identify patients...... screening programs for complications such as esophageal varices and hepatocellular carcinoma....

  3. Efficacy and safety of rilpivirine in treatment-naive, HIV-1-infected patients with hepatitis B virus/hepatitis C virus coinfection enrolled in the Phase III randomized, double-blind ECHO and THRIVE trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nelson, Mark Jason; Amaya, Gerardo; Clumeck, Nathan

    2012-01-01

    The efficacy and hepatic safety of the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors rilpivirine (TMC278) and efavirenz were compared in treatment-naive, HIV-infected adults with concurrent hepatitis B virus (HBV) and/or hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in the pooled week 48 analysis...

  4. Hepatitis C virus infections in oral lichen planus: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaizari, N A; Al-Maweri, S A; Al-Shamiri, H M; Tarakji, B; Shugaa-Addin, B

    2016-09-01

    A role for hepatitis C virus in oral lichen planus has been postulated. This systematic review and meta-analysis of the existing epidemiological studies was conducted to determine if there is a correlation between oral lichen planus and hepatitis C virus infection. We examined the association between hepatitis C virus and oral lichen planus by conducting a systematic review and meta-analysis of case-control studies that examined the prevalence of anti-HCV antibodies in the serum of cases and controls. We searched PubMed, Embase and The Cochrane Library databases from 2005 to January 2015. Associations were measured using random-effect odds ratios (ORs) combined with 95% confidence intervals. Nineteen eligible studies, encompassing 1807 cases of OLP and 2519 controls, were retrieved and included in this review. The summary estimate OR for all studies was 6.07 (95% CI: 2.73-13.48), showing a statistically significant difference in the proportion of HCV seropositivity among oral lichen planus patients, compared with controls and substantial heterogeneity between studies (I(2) = 65%) as a result of a variety of geographical distributions. The association of hepatitis C virus infection with oral lichen planus emphasizes the importance of hepatitis C virus screening in oral lichen planus patients. © 2015 Australian Dental Association.

  5. Cancer risk in patients with hepatitis C virus infection: a?population?based study in Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Xiangdong; Chen, Yanqing; Wang, Youxin; Dong, Xiaohua; Wang, Junming; Tang, Jianhua; Sundquist, Kristina; Sundquist, Jan; Ji, Jianguang

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Increased risks of certain cancers have been observed in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. However, data on other cancer sites/types are lacking. We analyzed systematically the risk of developing 35 common cancers in patients with HCV infection using a nationwide Swedish database. Patients with HCV infection were identified from the Swedish Hospital Inpatient and Outpatient Register and Primary Health Care Database, and followed until the diagnosis of cancer. Standardi...

  6. Does hepatitis C virus infection increase risk for stroke? A population-based cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Chang Liao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The relationship between hepatitis C virus infection and risk of stroke remains inconsistent. This study evaluates the risk of stroke in association with chronic hepatitis C infection in a longitudinal population-based cohort. METHODS: We identified 4,094 adults newly diagnosed with hepatitis C infection in 2002-2004 from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. Comparison group consisted of 16,376 adults without hepatitis C infection randomly selected from the same dataset, frequency matched by age and sex. Events of stroke from 2002-2008 were ascertained from medical claims (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification, ICD-9-CM, codes 430-438. Multivariate adjusted hazard ratios (HRs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs were estimated for potential associated factors including HCV infection, age, sex, low-income status, urbanization, cessation of cigarette smoking, alcohol-related illness, obesity, history of chronic diseases and medication use. FINDINGS: During 96,752 person-years of follow-up, there were 1981 newly diagnosed stroke cases. The HRs of stroke associated with medical conditions such as hypertension, diabetes and heart disease were 1.48 (95% CI 1.33 to 1.65, 1.23 (95% CI 1.11 to 1.36 and 1.17 (95% CI 1.06 to 1.30, respectively, after adjustment for covariates. The cumulative risk of stroke for people with hepatitis C and without hepatitis C infections was 2.5% and 1.9%, respectively (p<0.0001. Compared with people without hepatitis C infection, the adjusted HR of stroke was 1.27 (95% CI 1.14 to 1.41 for people with hepatitis C infection. CONCLUSION: Chronic hepatitis C infection increases stroke risk and should be considered an important and independent risk factor.

  7. The natural history of hepatitis C virus infection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kenny-Walsh, E

    2012-02-03

    The natural history of HCV infection remains ill-defined. The knowledge accumulated on the progression of HCV to date is important, however. It is now abundantly clear that the progression of disease is generally slow, and the development of cirrhosis and its complications is a possibility, not a probability as hitherto thought. Predicting the outcome remains a quandary for clinicians. Ultimately it will be possible to define the natural history of hepatitis C infection through a combination of research in the fields of virology, immunology, and molecular biology and by monitoring the biochemical and histologic progress of the disease. Only then will it be possible to intervene appropriately and develop new therapies to prevent the progression to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma.

  8. Hepatitis B virus surface antigen and anti-hepatitis C virus rapid tests underestimate hepatitis prevalence among HIV-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hønge, Bl; Jespersen, S; Medina, C

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In the case of coinfection with HIV and hepatitis B virus (HBV) and/or hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepatic disease progression is often accelerated, with higher rates of liver cirrhosis and liver-related mortality. We aimed to evaluate the performance of the rapid tests used routinely...

  9. Prevalence of hepatitis C Virus infection among hemophiliacs in Central Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana P Barbosa

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the hepatitis C virus (HCV infection prevalence and risk factors in hemophiliacs in Central Brazil, 90 patients were interviewed and serum samples tested for HCV RNA and anti-HCV antibodies. An overall prevalence of 63.3% (CI 95%: 53.0-72.7 was found. Multivariate analysis of risk factors showed that number of blood transfusions was significantly associated with this infection. Most hemophiliacs received locally produced cryoprecipitate. All infected patients were transfused before the screening of blood units for anti-HCV. However, hemophiliacs who received exclusively screened cryoprecipitate were HCV negative. It confirms the expected decline in transfusion-acquired hepatitis C.

  10. Molecular evolution of GB virus B hepatitis virus during acute resolving and persistent infections in experimentally infected tamarins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takikawa, Shingo; Engle, Ronald E; Faulk, Kristina N

    2010-01-01

    GB virus B (GBV-B) causes acute hepatitis in experimentally infected tamarins. We compared evolutionary features in acute resolving and persistent GBV-B infection. We detected no evidence of evolution in four animals with clearance during weeks 9-12, whereas three animals with clearance during......(-3) substitutions per site year(-1) during weeks 1-52 and 53-104, respectively. Thus, there was a significant decrease in evolution over time, as found for hepatitis C virus. The rate of non-synonymous substitution per non-synonymous site compared with that of synonymous substitution per synonymous site decreased...... weeks 13-26 had several substitutions in their polyprotein sequence. A single tamarin had long-term GBV-B viraemia; analysis of virus recovered at weeks 2, 5, 12, 20, 26, 52 and 104 demonstrated that mutations accumulated over time. Overall, the amino acid substitution rate was 3.5x10(-3) and 1.1x10...

  11. Virus-host interplay in hepatitis B virus infection and epigenetic treatment strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensel, Kai O; Rendon, Julio C; Navas, Maria-Cristina; Rots, Marianne G; Postberg, Jan

    2017-11-01

    Worldwide, chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major health problem and no cure exists. Importantly, hepatocyte intrusion by HBV particles results in a complex deregulation of both viral and host cellular genetic and epigenetic processes. Among the attempts to develop novel therapeutic approaches against HBV infection, several options targeting the epigenomic regulation of HBV replication are gaining attention. These include the experimental treatment with 'epidrugs'. Moreover, as a targeted approach, the principle of 'epigenetic editing' recently is being exploited to control viral replication. Silencing of HBV by specific rewriting of epigenetic marks might diminish viral replication, viremia, and infectivity, eventually controlling the disease and its complications. Additionally, epigenetic editing can be used as an experimental tool to increase our limited understanding regarding the role of epigenetic modifications in viral infections. Aiming for permanent epigenetic reprogramming of the viral genome without unspecific side effects, this breakthrough may pave the roads for an ambitious technological pursuit: to start designing a curative approach utilizing manipulative molecular therapies for viral infections in vivo. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  12. Lipoprotein Receptors and Lipid Enzymes in Hepatitis C Virus Entry and Early Steps of Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eve-Isabelle Pécheur

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Viruses are obligate intracellular agents that depend on host cells for successful propagation, hijacking cellular machineries to their own profit. The molecular interplay between host factors and invading viruses is a continuous coevolutionary process that determines viral host range and pathogenesis. The hepatitis C virus (HCV is a strictly human pathogen, causing chronic liver injuries accompanied by lipid disorders. Upon infection, in addition to protein-protein and protein-RNA interactions usual for such a positive-strand RNA virus, HCV relies on protein-lipid interactions at multiple steps of its life cycle to establish persistent infection, making use of hepatic lipid pathways. This paper focuses on lipoproteins in HCV entry and on receptors and enzymes involved in lipid metabolism that HCV exploits to enter hepatocytes.

  13. Prevalence and determinants of antibodies to hepatitis C virus and markers for hepatitis B virus infection in patients with HIV infection in Aquitaine. Groupe d'Epidémiologie Clinique du SIDA en Aquitaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saillour, F.; Dabis, F.; Dupon, M.; Lacoste, D.; Trimoulet, P.; Rispal, P.; Monlun, E.; Ragnaud, J. M.; Morlat, P.; Pellegrin, J. L.; Fleury, H.; Couzigou, P.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the prevalence of antibodies to hepatitis C virus and serological markers for hepatitis B virus infection in patients with HIV. DESIGN: Cross sectional survey. SETTING: Aquitaine, southwestern France, 1991-94. SUBJECTS: 1935 HIV positive patients seen at least once since June 1991. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Presence of antibodies to hepatitis C virus were detected by second or third generation enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and recombinant immunoblot assay (RIBA) and markers for hepatitis B virus detected by ELISA. RESULTS: The prevalence was 42.5% (823) for antibodies to hepatitis C virus, 56.4 (507) for antibodies to hepatitis B core antigen, 6.9% (133) for hepatitis B surface antigen, 30.2% (584) for antibodies to hepatitis B core and surface antigen with no detectable surface antigen, 26.2% (507) for antibodies to core antigen only, and 4.8% (92) for antibodies to surface antigen only. The prevalence of antibodies to hepatitis C virus was 86.1% (726/843) in subjects who had bloodborne HIV infection and 7.3% (66/899) in those with sexually acquired infection. The prevalence of markers for hepatitis B was higher among homosexuals than in the other groups of patients, except for antibodies to surface antigen alone. The relation between markers for hepatitis B and hepatitis C virus was negative among men but positive among women. CONCLUSIONS: The results favour the hypothesis that hepatitis C virus is sexually transmitted much less commonly than either HIV or hepatitis B virus. PMID:8776313

  14. Prevalence and risk factors for hepatitis B virus infections among visitors to an STD clinic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y.T.H.P. van Duynhoven; M.J.W. van de Laar; W.A. Schop; Ph.H. Rothbarth (Philip); W.I. van der Meijden (Willem); A.M. van Loon (Anton); M.J.W. Sprenger (Marc)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractObjective: To determine the prevalence and risk factors for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections among individuals attending an STD clinic in a low endemic region. Study design: A total of 1228 women and 1648 men attending the STD clinic at the University Hospital Rotterdam, Netherlands,

  15. Rhabdomyolysis in a hepatitis C virus infected patient treated with telaprevir and simvastatin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kanter, C.T.M.M. de; Luin, M. van; Solas, C.; Burger, D.M.; Vrolijk, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    A 46-year old man with a chronic hepatitis C virus infection received triple therapy with ribavirin, pegylated interferon and telaprevir. The patient also received simvastatin. One month after starting the antiviral therapy, the patient was admitted to the hospital because he developed

  16. Immunological changes in different patient populations with chronic hepatitis C virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Szereday, Laszlo; Meggyes, Matyas; Halasz, Melinda; Szekeres-Bartho, Julia; Par, Alajos; Par, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate killer inhibitory and activating receptor expression by natural killer (NK), natural killer T-like (NKT-like) and CD8+ T lymphocytes in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection with elevated and with persistently normal alanine aminotransferase (PNALT).

  17. Epidemiology of Hepatitis B Virus Infection in The Netherlands and Beyond

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hahné, S.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    This Thesis resulted from a decade of studying the epidemiology of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in the Netherlands, England and Wales and at a European level, starting in 2003. The studies aimed to improve the knowledge of the local epidemiology of HBV and to assess the effectiveness of HBV

  18. Hepatitis C virus screening to reveal a better picture of infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medici, Maria Cristina; Galli, Claudio; Calderaro, Adriana

    2015-06-01

    Antiviral therapy for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection will be the next revolution in clinical virology. Sensible planning for treatment is needed, starting with population-screening policies ideally using the HCV core antigen. This will result in a more defined picture of the silent spread of HCV. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Chinese medicinal herbs for asymptomatic carriers of hepatitis B virus infection. Protocol for a Cochrane Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, J P; Lin, Haili; McIntosh, H

    2000-01-01

    About 350 million people are chronically infected carriers of hepatitis B virus and are at a higher risk of serious illness and death from cirrhosis of the liver and liver cancer. Chinese medicinal herbs have been used widely for more than 2000 years to treat chronic liver disease....

  20. MSM starting preexposure prophylaxis are at risk of hepatitis C virus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoornenborg, Elske; Achterbergh, Roel C. A.; Schim van der Loeff, Maarten F.; Davidovich, Udi; Hogewoning, Arjan; de Vries, Henry J. C.; Schinkel, Janke; Prins, Maria; van de Laar, Thijs J. W.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives and design:Hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been recognized as an emerging sexually transmitted infection (STI) among HIV-positive MSM. However, HIV-negative MSM at high risk for HIV might also be at increased risk for HCV. We studied the HCV prevalence in HIV-negative MSM who start

  1. MSM starting preexposure prophylaxis are at risk of hepatitis C virus infection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoornenborg, Elske; Achterbergh, Roel C A; Schim van der Loeff, Maarten F; Davidovich, Udi; Hogewoning, Arjan; de Vries, Henry J C; Schinkel, Janke; Prins, Maria; van de Laar, Thijs J W

    2017-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been recognized as an emerging sexually transmitted infection (STI) among HIV-positive MSM. However, HIV-negative MSM at high risk for HIV might also be at increased risk for HCV. We studied the HCV prevalence in HIV-negative MSM who start preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP)

  2. Global prevalence and genotype distribution of hepatitis C virus infection in 2015

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Peer Brehm

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The 69th World Health Assembly approved the Global Health Sector Strategy to eliminate hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection by 2030, which can become a reality with the recent launch of direct acting antiviral therapies. Reliable disease burden estimates are required for national...

  3. Diversity and origin of hepatitis C virus infection among unpaid blood donors in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Laar, Thijs J. W.; Koppelman, Marco H. G. M.; van der Bij, Akke K.; Zaaijer, Hans L.; Cuijpers, H. Theo M.; van der Poel, Cees L.; Coutinho, Roel A.; Bruisten, Sylvia M.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To improve transfusion policy and to increase understanding of the spread of hepatitis C virus (HCV) in the general population, HCV infections among voluntary Dutch blood donors were examined with molecular epidemiologic techniques. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: During 6 years, 1997 through

  4. Prevalence and epidemiology of hepatitis D among patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection: a report from Northern Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordieres, Carlos; Navascués, Carmen A; González-Diéguez, María L; Rodríguez, Mercedes; Cadahía, Valle; Varela, María; Rodrigo, Luis; Rodríguez, Manuel

    2017-03-01

    The incidence of hepatitis delta virus (HDV) infection has decreased during the last decades. However, an increasing trend has been reported recently. We carried out a case-control study to analyze changes in its prevalence in 1215 chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) patients, diagnosed consecutively in a tertiary center, between 1983 and 2012. According to the year of diagnosis, patients were distributed into two groups: A [1983-1997 (n=786)] and B [1998-2012 (n=429)]. The prevalence of anti-HDV was 8.2% (9.4% in group A and 6.1% in group B) (P=0.04). Multivariate regression revealed that intravenous drug use [odds ratio (OR) 261.0; 95% confidence interval (CI), 28.7-2368.5; Pprevalence of HDV infection has been observed, it is still above 5%. Immigration and sexual transmission have emerged as new risk factors for HDV infection.

  5. Prenatal invasive procedures in women with hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and/or human immunodeficiency virus infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Alain; Davies, Gregory; Wilson, R Douglas

    2014-07-01

    To review the risk of in utero infection through prenatal invasive procedures in women with hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and/or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections. Fetal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. Published literature was retrieved through searches of Medline, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Library using appropriate controlled vocabulary (amniocentesis, chorionic villus sampling, cordocentesis, fetal and neonatal infection) and key words (hepatitis B, hepatitis C, HIV). Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized control trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies from 2002 to 2012 published in English or French. (Studies from 1966 to 2002 were previously reviewed in Clinical Practice Guideline No. 123.) Searches were updated on a regular basis and incorporated in the guideline to February 2014. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the websites of health technology assessment and health technology-related agencies, clinical practice guideline collections, clinical trial registries, and national and international medical specialty societies. The quality of evidence in this document was rated using the criteria described in the Report of the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care (Table). Recommendations 1. For women infected with hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and/or human immunodeficiency virus, the use of non-invasive methods of prenatal risk assessment is recommended, using tests with high sensitivity and low false-positive rates, such as serum screening combined (or not) with nuchal translucency, anatomic ultrasound, and non-invasive molecular prenatal testing. (III-B) 2. For women infected with hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and/or human immunodeficiency virus undergoing an amniocentesis, every effort should be made to avoid inserting the needle through, or very close to, the placenta. (II-2B) 3. Little information is available on other prenatal diagnostic and therapeutic invasive procedures

  6. Does hepatitis C virus infection increase risk for stroke? A population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Chien-Chang; Su, Ta-Chen; Sung, Fung-Chang; Chou, Wan-Hsin; Chen, Ta-Liang

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between hepatitis C virus infection and risk of stroke remains inconsistent. This study evaluates the risk of stroke in association with chronic hepatitis C infection in a longitudinal population-based cohort. We identified 4,094 adults newly diagnosed with hepatitis C infection in 2002-2004 from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. Comparison group consisted of 16,376 adults without hepatitis C infection randomly selected from the same dataset, frequency matched by age and sex. Events of stroke from 2002-2008 were ascertained from medical claims (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification, ICD-9-CM, codes 430-438). Multivariate adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated for potential associated factors including HCV infection, age, sex, low-income status, urbanization, cessation of cigarette smoking, alcohol-related illness, obesity, history of chronic diseases and medication use. During 96,752 person-years of follow-up, there were 1981 newly diagnosed stroke cases. The HRs of stroke associated with medical conditions such as hypertension, diabetes and heart disease were 1.48 (95% CI 1.33 to 1.65), 1.23 (95% CI 1.11 to 1.36) and 1.17 (95% CI 1.06 to 1.30), respectively, after adjustment for covariates. The cumulative risk of stroke for people with hepatitis C and without hepatitis C infections was 2.5% and 1.9%, respectively (phepatitis C infection, the adjusted HR of stroke was 1.27 (95% CI 1.14 to 1.41) for people with hepatitis C infection. Chronic hepatitis C infection increases stroke risk and should be considered an important and independent risk factor.

  7. Clinical features of hepatitis E virus infection in Ibaraki, Japan: autochthonous hepatitis E and acute-on-chronic liver failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, Yuki; Oshiro, Yukio; Hasegawa, Naoyuki; Fukuda, Kuniaki; Abei, Masato; Nishi, Masaaki; Okamoto, Hiroaki; Ohkohchi, Nobuhiro

    2015-04-01

    Hepatitis E caused by hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a serious public health concern in developing countries where HEV is mainly transmitted through contaminated water. Recently, in industrialized countries, autochthonous hepatitis E, a porcine zoonosis, has been increasingly recognized. In Japan, the number of national notifications of acute hepatitis E has increased since the introduction of anti-HEV IgA antibody measurement, covered by the national health insurance program, in 2011. In the past three years, we examined five patients of acute hepatitis or acute-on-chronic liver failure caused by HEV infection who presented various clinical courses in the southern area of Ibaraki prefecture in Japan. Of these patients, 78-year-old and 63-year-old male patients presented acute hepatitis E and recovered by only bed rest. The latter patient had a history of consuming grilled or undercooked pork and shellfish prior to the onset of hepatitis E. Among the five patients examined, the infection route was detected only in this patient. Of note, a 65-year-old female patient presented severe hepatitis associated with painless thyroiditis. The patient was diagnosed with probable autoimmune hepatitis and was successfully treated with prednisolone (40 mg/day). Lastly, 58-year-old and 62-year-old male patients, both of whom had a history of diabetes mellitus and alcoholic liver disease, developed acute-on-chronic liver failure, and the latter patient with pre-existing liver cirrhosis died due to liver failure. Thus, patients with clinical HEV infection who display multiple underlying diseases can develop acute-on-chronic liver failure. In conclusion, HEV infection manifests the diverse clinical courses.

  8. Earlier Detection of Hepatitis C Virus Infection Through Routine Hepatitis C Virus Antibody Screening of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Positive Men Who Have Sex With Men Attending A Sexually Transmitted Infection Outpatient Clinic: A Longitudinal Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rooijen, Martijn; Heijman, Titia; de Vrieze, Nynke; Urbanus, Anouk; Speksnijder, Arjen; van Leeuwen, Petra; de Vries, Henry; Prins, Maria

    2016-01-01

    In 2007, routine hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibody testing was introduced for men who have sex with men (MSM) with a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive or unknown status attending a Dutch sexually transmitted infection (STI) outpatient clinic. We evaluated whether this screening resulted in

  9. Molecular epidemiology of chronic hepatitis B virus infection in northern Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielawski, Krzysztof Piotr; Stalke, Piotr

    2005-12-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a global health problem, with more than 350 million people chronically infected worldwide. The chronic HBV infection in Poland is also an essential medical and social problem. Starting from 1993, a steady decline of the incidence of HBV has been observed, reaching the estimated rate of 4.5 per 100 000 in 2004. Nothing is known about the genetic variability of HBV in Poland, the occurrence and spreading of genetic variants and mutants of hepatitis B virus in the population of Polish patients during the course of the disease and in relation to antiviral treatment. It is very interesting to study the molecular epidemiology of the Polish population regarding hepatitis B virus infection as Poland is still ethnically a uniform country, with no more than 3-4% of ethnic minorities. The first results regarding distribution of HBV genotypes and serotypes in northern Poland have been published by our group in 2003 and 2004. This work was part of a scientific project supported by the Fifth Framework Programme initiative of the European Union, entitled "Emerging variants of hepatitis B virus: new tools for epidemiological survey, diagnosis of infection, and monitoring of drug resistance". In the course of the project more than 200 hepatitis B infected patients from the northern part of Poland have been enrolled, diagnosed and - if the viral load of HBV was suitable for analysis - genotyped by sequencing of the HBV pol/S gene fragment. This review presents the main characteristics and some interesting aspects of the studied cohort of chronically infected patients from northern Poland as well as the molecular epidemiology.

  10. Cutthroat trout virus as a surrogate in vitro infection model for testing inhibitors of hepatitis E virus replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debing, Yannick; Winton, James; Neyts, Johan; Dallmeier, Kai

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is one of the most important causes of acute hepatitis worldwide. Although most infections are self-limiting, mortality is particularly high in pregnant women. Chronic infections can occur in transplant and other immune-compromised patients. Successful treatment of chronic hepatitis E has been reported with ribavirin and pegylated interferon-alpha, however severe side effects were observed. We employed the cutthroat trout virus (CTV), a non-pathogenic fish virus with remarkable similarities to HEV, as a potential surrogate for HEV and established an antiviral assay against this virus using the Chinook salmon embryo (CHSE-214) cell line. Ribavirin and the respective trout interferon were found to efficiently inhibit CTV replication. Other known broad-spectrum inhibitors of RNA virus replication such as the nucleoside analog 2′-C-methylcytidine resulted only in a moderate antiviral activity. In its natural fish host, CTV levels largely fluctuate during the reproductive cycle with the virus detected mainly during spawning. We wondered whether this aspect of CTV infection may serve as a surrogate model for the peculiar pathogenesis of HEV in pregnant women. To that end the effect of three sex steroids on in vitro CTV replication was evaluated. Whereas progesterone resulted in marked inhibition of virus replication, testosterone and 17β-estradiol stimulated viral growth. Our data thus indicate that CTV may serve as a surrogate model for HEV, both for antiviral experiments and studies on the replication biology of the Hepeviridae.

  11. Perinatal hepatitis B virus detection by hepatitis B virus-DNA analysis.

    OpenAIRE

    de Virgiliis, S; Frau, F; G. Sanna; Turco, M P; Figus, A L; Cornacchia, G; Cao, A.

    1985-01-01

    Maternal transmission of hepatitis B virus infection in relation to the hepatitis B e antigen/antibody system and serum hepatitis B virus-DNA were evaluated. Results indicate that hepatitis B virus-DNA analysis can identify hepatitis B serum antigen positive mothers who may transmit infection to their offspring.

  12. How Hepatitis D Virus Can Hinder the Control of Hepatitis B Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Xiridou; Barbara Borkent-Raven; Joost Hulshof; Jacco Wallinga

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hepatitis D (or hepatitis delta) virus is a defective virus that relies on hepatitis B virus (HBV) for transmission; infection with hepatitis D can occur only as coinfection with HBV or superinfection of an existing HBV infection. Because of the bond between the two viruses, control measures for HBV may have also affected the spread of hepatitis D, as evidenced by the decline of hepatitis D in recent years. Since the presence of hepatitis D is associated with suppressed HBV replic...

  13. The Prevalence of Hepatitis B Virus Infection in Mashhad, Iran: A Population-Based Study

    OpenAIRE

    Shakeri, Mohammad Taghi; Foghanian, Bahareh; NOMANI, Hosein; Ghayour-Mobarhan, Majid; Nabavinia, Maryam Sadat; Rostami, Sina; Ahadi, Mitra; Meshkat, Zahra

    2013-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is the most common and serious liver infection in the world. An estimated 350 million people are chronic carriers of this virus, of whom, more than 620,000 die from liver-related diseases annually. Due to the vaccination program, prevalence of HBV, particularly among the younger generation, is reported to have declined in recent years in Iran. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of HBV infection in Mashhad, North-East of...

  14. Hepatitis E virus and fulminant hepatitis - a virus or host-specific pathology?

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Donald B; Simmonds, Peter

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fulminant hepatitis is a rare outcome of infection with hepatitis E virus. Several recent reports suggest that virus variation is an important determinant of disease progression.AIMS: To critically examine the evidence that virus-specific factors underlie the development of fulminant hepatitis following hepatitis E virus infection.METHODS: Published sequence information of hepatitis E virus isolates from patients with and without fulminant hepatitis was collected and analysed usin...

  15. CHRONIC HEPATITIS B VIRUS INFECTION IN PREGNANCY: STRATEGIES OF ANTIVIRAL THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. O. Bogomolov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of chronic hepatitis B during pregnancy is an extremely complicated issue. Despite  implementation of immune prophylaxis, a significant proportion of babies born by mothers with  high viral load are infected by hepatitis B virus.  Cumulative data suggest that antiviral therapy in  the 3  trimester of pregnancy is an effective intervention in the event of unsuccessful immune prord phylaxis. To minimize fetal effects of nucleoside  and nucleotide analogues, antiviral therapy during  pregnancy should be administered to mothers with high risk of disease progression and/or uncontrolled hepatitis B virus infection. The safety  data obtained indicate that telbivudine and tenofovir can be used during pregnancy. Nevertheless,  antiviral therapy requires a  thorough assessment of the risk to benefit ratio.

  16. Strategies to manage hepatitis C virus infection disease burden-Volume 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, D S; Hamoudi, W; Mustapha, B; Layden, J; Nersesov, A; Reic, T; Garcia, V; Rios, C; Mateva, L; Njoya, O; Al-Busafi, S A; Abdelmageed, M K; Abdulla, M; Adda, D; Akin, O; Al Baqali, A; Al Dweik, N; Al Ejji, K; Al Ghazzawi, I; Al Kaabi, S; Al Naamani, K; Al Qamish, J; Al Sadadi, M; Al Salman, J; AlBadri, M; Al-Romaihi, H E; Ampofo, W; Antonov, K; Anyaike, C; Arome, F; Bane, A; Blach, S; Borodo, M M; Brandon, S M; Bright, B; Butt, M T; Cardenas, I; Chan, H L Y; Chen, C J; Chen, P J; Chien, R N; Chuang, W L; Cuellar, D; Derbala, M; Elbardiny, A A; Estes, C; Farag, E; Fung, J; Gamkrelidze, I; Genov, J; Ghandour, Z; Ghuloom, M; Gomez, B; Gunter, J; Habeeb, J; Hajelssedig, O; Himatt, S M; Hrstic, I; Hu, C C; Huang, C F; Hui, Y T; Jahis, R; Jelev, D; John, A K; Kaliaskarova, K S; Kamel, Y; Kao, J H; Khamis, J; Khattabi, H; Khoudri, I; Konysbekova, A; Kotzev, I; Lai, M S; Lao, W C; Lee, M H; Lesi, O; Li, M; Lo, A; Loo, C K; Lukšić, B; Maaroufi, A; Malu, A O; Mitova, R; Mohamed, R; Morović, M; Murphy, K; Nde, H; Ngige, E; Njouom, R; Nonković, D; Obekpa, S; Oguche, S; Okolo, E E; Omede, O; Omuemu, C; Ondoa, P; Opare-Sem, O; Owusu-Ofori, S; Phillips, R O; Prokopenko, Y N; Razavi, H; Razavi-Shearer, D; Razavi-Shearer, K; Redae, B; Rinke de Wit, T; Robbins, S; Roberts, L R; Sanad, S J; Sharma, M; Simonova, M; Su, T H; Sultan, K; Tan, S S; Tchernev, K; Tsang, O T Y; Tsang, S; Tzeuton, C; Ugoeze, S; Uzochukwu, B; Vi, R; Vince, A; Wani, H U; Wong, V W S; Workneh, A; Yacoub, R; Yesmembetov, K I; Youbi, M; Yuen, M F; Schmelzer, J D

    2017-10-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) epidemic was forecasted through 2030 for 17 countries in Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America and the Middle East, and interventions for achieving the Global Health Sector Strategy on viral hepatitis targets-"WHO Targets" (65% reduction in HCV-related deaths, 90% reduction in new infections and 90% of infections diagnosed by 2030) were considered. Scaling up treatment and diagnosis rates over time would be required to achieve these targets in all but one country, even with the introduction of high SVR therapies. The scenarios developed to achieve the WHO Targets in all countries studied assumed the implementation of national policies to prevent new infections and to diagnose current infections through screening. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Viral Hepatitis Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. How Hepatitis D Virus Can Hinder the Control of Hepatitis B Virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xiridiou, M.; Borkent-Raven, B.; Hulshof, J.; Wallinga, J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Hepatitis D (or hepatitis delta) virus is a defective virus that relies on hepatitis B virus (HBV) for transmission; infection with hepatitis D can occur only as coinfection with HBV or superinfection of an existing HBV infection. Because of the bond between the two viruses, control

  18. Selection pressure from neutralizing antibodies drives sequence evolution during acute infection with hepatitis C virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowd, Kimberly A; Netski, Dale M; Wang, Xiao-Hong; Cox, Andrea L; Ray, Stuart C

    2009-06-01

    Despite recent characterization of hepatitis C virus-specific neutralizing antibodies, it is not clear to what extent immune pressure from neutralizing antibodies drives viral sequence evolution in vivo. This lack of understanding is particularly evident in acute infection, the phase when elimination or persistence of viral replication is determined and during which the importance of the humoral immune response has been largely discounted. We analyzed envelope glycoprotein sequence evolution and neutralization of sequential autologous hepatitis C virus pseudoparticles in 8 individuals throughout acute infection. Amino acid substitutions occurred throughout the envelope genes, primarily within the hypervariable region 1 of E2. When individualized pseudoparticles expressing sequential envelope sequences were used to measure neutralization by autologous sera, antibodies neutralizing earlier sequence variants were detected at earlier time points than antibodies neutralizing later variants, indicating clearance and evolution of viral variants in response to pressure from neutralizing antibodies. To demonstrate the effects of amino acid substitution on neutralization, site-directed mutagenesis of a pseudoparticle envelope sequence revealed amino acid substitutions in hypervariable region 1 that were responsible for a dramatic decrease in neutralization sensitivity over time. In addition, high-titer neutralizing antibodies peaked at the time of viral clearance in all spontaneous resolvers, whereas chronically evolving subjects displayed low-titer or absent neutralizing antibodies throughout early acute infection. These findings indicate that, during acute hepatitis C virus infection in vivo, virus-specific neutralizing antibodies drive sequence evolution and, in some individuals, play a role in determining the outcome of infection.

  19. Increased hepatitis E virus seroprevalence correlates with lower CD4+ cell counts in HIV-infected persons in Argentina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.D. Debes; Martínez Wassaf, M. (Maribel); Pisano, M.B. (María Belén); Isa, M.B. (María Beatriz); Lotto, M. (Martin); Marianelli, L.G. (Leonardo G.); Frassone, N. (Natalia); Ballari, E. (Estefania); Bohjanen, P.R. (Paul R.); B.E. Hansen (Bettina); Ré, V. (Viviana)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractHepatitis E virus (HEV) is a single-stranded RNA virus that can cause hepatitis in an epidemic fashion. HEV usually causes asymptomatic or limited acute infections in immunocompetent individuals, whereas in immunosuppressed individuals such as transplant recipients, HEV can cause chronic

  20. Hepatitis C and hepatitis B virus infection in different hemodialysis units in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Busek Solange U

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence, virological and epidemilogical aspects of the hepatitis C virus (HCV and the hepatitis B virus (HBV infections vary among hemodialysis patients in different countries. Aiming at analyzing these aspects of HCV and HBV infections in hemodialysis patients in Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil, we studied three hemodialysis units including 434 patients. Serology was used to detect anti-HCV and HBsAg. Reverse trancriptase nested polymerase chain reaction (RT-nested-PCR of the 5'-noncoding region was used to detect circulating HCV RNA and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis for genotyping. Seroprevalence varied from 26.5% to 11.1% for hepatitis C and from 5.9% to 0% for hepatitis B. Risk factors observed for HBV and/or HCV infections were the number of patients per dialysis unit, duration of treatment, number of clinics attended, number of blood units transfused, and lower level scholarity. Alanine aminotransferase levels were altered with a higher frequency in HBV or HCV seropositive patients. Half of ten patients, negative for anti-HCV, had detectable viremia by RT-nested-PCR, indicating that this technique should be used to confirm infections in this group of patients. The HCV genotype 1 was the most frequently observed, followed by the genotype 2, but no correlation was detected between genotype and clinical or epidemiological data.

  1. New Insights Into the Relationships Among Alcohol Consumption, Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabouri Ghannad

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Context Viral hepatitis and the consumption of alcohol are recognized as important reasons for the development of liver disease throughout the world. It would also seem that chronic alcoholism causes more severe and rapid progression of liver disease in patients with chronic hepatitis C, leading to more frequent liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Evidence Acquisition The data for this article were obtained through an initial Medline search and from the references of relevant articles, and used to provide updated information on the relationship between alcohol consumption and the hepatitis C virus. Results Excessive alcohol consumption among patients with chronic hepatitis C is likely to result in more severe hepatic injuries, promote pathologic progression to cirrhosis, and increase the risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma. Although the exact mechanisms involved in the progression of chronic hepatitis C in alcoholic patients have not been definitely established, possible alcohol-induced enhancement of viral replication, iron overload, immunologic suppression, the role of NF-kappa B, and the signaling pathways involved in its activation, have been suggested. Significant correlations have been reported between hepatitis C virus RNA levels and the amount of alcohol consumed by an individual. Interferon therapy is less effective for alcohol patients, than non-alcoholic patients, even after a period of abstinence. The obtained data suggest that a hepatitis C virus infection is an important cofactor in the pathogenesis of liver disease among patients with an alcohol problem. Conclusions In light of a possible synergistic effect between alcohol and hepatitis C virus replication, total abstention ought to be recommended, and due to alcohol's inhibitory effect on interferon therapy, patients with alcohol problems should not be treated until they stop drinking.

  2. Experimental Infection of Rabbits with Rabbit and Genotypes 1 and 4 Hepatitis E Viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, H. X.; Zheng, L.; Liu, Y. B.; Zhao, C. Y.; Harrison, T. J.; Ma, Y. Y.; Sun, S. H.; Zhang, J. G.; Wang, Y. C.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A recent study provided evidence that farmed rabbits in China harbor a novel hepatitis E virus (HEV) genotype. Although the rabbit HEV isolate had 77-79% nucleotide identity to the mammalian HEV genotypes 1 to 4, their genomic organization is very similar. Since rabbits are used widely experimentally, including as models of infection, we investigated whether they constitute an appropriate animal model for human HEV infection. METHODS: Forty-two SPF rabbits were divided randomly in...

  3. effect of hepatitis-b virus co-infection on cd4 cell count and liver ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-06-01

    Jun 1, 2014 ... 1). Effect of Hepatitis B virus co-infection on CD4 cell count and liver function of HIV infected patients. The mean CD4 count of all the patients was 212. ±188/µl. The mean serum levels for ALT, AST, ALP, total protein and albumin for the study population were. 17±23IU/L, 25± 24IU/L, 56± 64IU/L, 75±9g/l and.

  4. Hepatitis E virus co-infection in HIV-infected patients in Foggia and Naples in southern Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotto, Gaetano; Grisorio, Benvenuto; Filippini, Pietro; Ferrara, Sergio; Massa, Salvatore; Bulla, Fabio; Martini, Salvatore; Filippini, Alberico; Tartaglia, Alessandra; Lo Muzio, Lorenzo; Fazio, Vincenzina

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection represents an emerging infection in developed countries and is thought to be a zoonotic infection. It has recently been described as a new causative agent of acute and chronic hepatitis in immunosuppressed subjects, including HIV-infected patients. The aim of this study was to assess the sero-virological prevalence of HEV in HIV patients and in the general population as control group. A prospective and observational cohort study was carried out in two hospitals in southern Italy. The seroprevalence of HEV was determined in a cohort of 959 subjects, 509 (53%) of whom were HIV-positive patients and 450 were from the general population. Serum samples were tested for anti-HEV antibodies; repeatedly positive results were confirmed by a Western blot assay. In positive patients HEV RNA and genotypes were also determined. A total of 46 (4.8%) of the 959 serum samples examined were reactive to anti-HEV Ig and confirmed by Western blotting. The prevalence of HEV antibodies (IgG and/or IgM) was 2.7% in the control group and 6.7% in HIV-infected patients. Anti-HEV IgM was found in 6/46 (13.0%) of the anti-HEV Ig-positive serum samples, in 5/34 HIV patients and in 1/12 of the general population. No HIV-infected patient presented chronic hepatitis with HEV infection alone. This study indicates a higher circulation of HEV in HIV-infected patients, whereas a low prevalence of HEV antibodies in the general Italian population was shown. Chronic hepatitis with HEV alone was absent, while it was present in subjects with HIV-HEV, co-infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV) and/or hepatitis C virus (HCV).

  5. [Genotyping and mutational analysis of occult hepatitis B virus infection in blood donors of Shaoxing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Lie-Yong; Fu, Li-Qiang; Fang, Fang; Zhuang, Pei-Fen

    2011-12-01

    To assess the molecular biological characteristics of occult hepatitis B virus (HBV) infected blood donors in Shaoxing. 8692 blood donors were screened using ELISA. The occult HBV infection was determined by DNA analysis among the HBsAg negative subjects. DNA sequencing and mutational analysis were further performed in the HBV DNA positive samples. The overall situation of occult HBV infection was hereby evaluated and the possible underlying mechanisms discussed. Among the 8644 HBsAg negative subjects out of 8692 blood donors, 8 were HBV DNA positive. The occult HBV infection rate was 0.92 per thousand (8/8692). Among the 8 samples, 6 were genotype C (75%) and 2 genotype B (25%). In addition, a specific mutation in "a" epitope was observed in 7 OBI virus strains by amino acid analysis. There were occult HBV infected among blood donors in Shaoxing, which is probably associated with the gene mutation of HBV virus.

  6. NK cells in hepatitis B virus infection: a potent target for immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabani, Ziba; Bagheri, Masomeh; Zare-Bidaki, Mohammad; Hassanshahi, Gholamhossein; Arababadi, Mohammad Kazemi; Mohammadi Nejad, Mozafar; Kennedy, Derek

    2014-07-01

    Viruses, including hepatitis B virus (HBV), are the most prevalent and infectious agents that lead to liver disease in humans. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and cirrhosis of the liver are the most serious complications arising from prolonged forms of hepatitis B. Previous studies demonstrated that patients suffering from long-term HBV infections are unable to eradicate HBV from hepatocytes completely. The mechanisms responsible for progression of these forms of infection have not yet been clarified. However, it seems that there are differences in genetic and immunological parameters when comparing patients to subjects who successfully clear HBV infections, and these may represent the causes of long-term infection. Natural killer (NK) cells, the main innate immune cells that target viral infections, play important roles in the eradication of HBV from hepatocytes. NK cells carry several stimulatory and inhibitor receptors, and binding of receptors with their ligands results in activation and suppression of NK cells, respectively. The aim of this review is to address the recent information regarding NK cell phenotype, functions and modifications in hepatitis B. This review addresses the recent data regarding the roles of NK cells as novel targets for immunotherapies that target hepatitis B infection. It also discusses the potential to reduce the risk of HCC or cirrhosis of the liver by targeting NK cells.

  7. Hepatitis B virus and its sexually transmitted infection – an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takako Inoue

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiology, incidence and prevalence: About 5% of the world’s population has chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV infection, and nearly 25% of carriers develop chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. The prevalence of chronic HBV infection in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-infected individuals is 5%-15%; HIV/HBV coinfected individuals have a higher level of HBV replication, with higher rates of chronicity, reactivation, occult infection, and HCC than individuals with HBV only. The prevalence of HBV genotype A is significantly higher among men who have sex with men (MSM, compared with the rest of the population. Molecular mechanisms of infection, pathology, and symptomatology: HBV replication begins with entry into the hepatocyte. Sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide was identified in 2012 as the entry receptor of HBV. Although chronic hepatitis B develops slowly, HIV/HBV coinfected individuals show more rapid progression to cirrhosis and HCC. Transmission and protection: The most common sources of HBV infection are body fluids. Hepatitis B (HB vaccination is recommended for all children and adolescents, and all unvaccinated adults at risk for HBV infection (sexually active individuals such as MSM, individuals with occupational risk, and immunosuppressed individuals. Although HB vaccination can prevent clinical infections (hepatitis, it cannot prevent 100% of subclinical infections. Treatment and curability: The goal of treatment is reducing the risk of complications (cirrhosis and HCC. Pegylated interferon alfa and nucleos(tide analogues (NAs are the current treatments for chronic HBV infection. NAs have improved the outcomes of patients with cirrhosis and HCC, and decreased the incidence of acute liver failure.

  8. Prevalence of type 2 diabetes in Algerian patients with hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouabhia, Samir; Malek, Rachid; Bounecer, Hocine; Dekaken, Aoulia; Bendali Amor, Fouzia; Sadelaoud, Mourad; Benouar, Abderrahmene

    2010-07-21

    To investigate the prevalence of, and risk factors for, diabetes mellitus (DM) in Algerian patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and in a control group. A cross-sectional study was undertaken. A total of 416 consecutive patients with viral chronic hepatitis attending the Internal Medicine Department of the University Hospital Center Touhami Benflis in Batna [290 HCV-infected and 126 hepatitis B virus (HBV)-infected patients] were prospectively recruited. The prevalence of DM was higher in HCV-infected patients in comparison with HBV-infected patients (39.1% vs 5%, P < 0.0001). Among patients without cirrhosis, diabetes was more prevalent in HCV-infected patients than in HBV-infected patients (33.5% vs 4.3%, P < 0.0001). Among patients with cirrhosis, diabetes was more prevalent in HCV-infected patients, but the difference was not significant (67.4% vs 20%, P = 0.058). The logistic regression analysis showed that HCV infection [odds ratio (OR) 4.73, 95% CI: 1.7-13.2], metabolic syndrome (OR 12.35, 95% CI: 6.18-24.67), family history of diabetes (OR 3.2, 95% CI: 1.67-6.13) and increased hepatic enzymes (OR 2.22, 95% CI: 1.1-4.5) were independently related to DM in these patients. The high prevalence of diabetes in HCV-infected patients, and its occurrence at early stages of hepatic disease, suggest that screening for glucose abnormalities should be indicated in these patients.

  9. Serum Hepatitis C virus and hepatitis B surface antigenaemia in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Summary. Acute hepatitis is common in Nigeria and hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection has been a major aetiological factor. However, the role of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infection is yet undetermined. Forty-five consecutive Nigerian patients with. Acute Icteric hepatitis (AIH) attending the Medical Clinic of the University College ...

  10. Comparison of type 2 diabetes mellitus incidence in different phases of hepatitis B virus infection: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yi; Zhang, Sheng; Wang, Xulin; Wang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Jian; Qin, Gang; Li, Wenchao; Ding, Kun; Zhang, Lei; Liang, Feng

    2017-10-01

    Because whether hepatitis B virus infection increases the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus has been a controversial topic, pair-wise and network meta-analyses of published literature were carried out to accurately evaluate the association between different phases of hepatitis B virus infection and the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus. A comprehensive literature retrieval was conducted from the PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library and Chinese Database to identify epidemiological studies on the association between hepatitis B virus infection and the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus that were published from 1999 to 2015. A pair-wise meta-analysis of direct evidence was performed to estimate the pooled odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. A network meta-analysis was conducted, including the construction of a network plot, inconsistency plot, predictive interval plot, comparison-adjusted funnel plot and rank diagram, to graphically link the direct and indirect comparisons between different hepatitis B virus infective phases. Eighteen publications (n=113 639) describing 32 studies were included in this meta-analysis. In the pair-wise meta-analysis, the pooled odds ratio for type 2 diabetes mellitus in chronic hepatitis B cirrhosis patients was 1.76 (95% confidence interval: 1.44-2.14) when compared with non-cirrhotic chronic hepatitis B patients. In the network meta-analysis, six comparisons of four hepatitis B virus infectious states indicated the following descending order for the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus: hepatitis B cirrhosis patients, non-cirrhotic chronic hepatitis B patients, hepatitis B virus carriers and non-hepatitis B virus controls. This study suggests that hepatitis B virus infection is not an independent risk factor for type 2 diabetes mellitus, but the development of cirrhosis may increase the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus cirrhosis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Diabetes mellitus, insulin resistance and hepatitis C virus infection: A contemporary review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desbois, Anne-Claire; Cacoub, Patrice

    2017-03-07

    To summarise the literature data on hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients concerning the prevalence of glucose abnormalities and associated risk. We conducted a PubMed search and selected all studies found with the key words "HCV" or "hepatitis C virus" and "diabetes" or "insulin resistance". We included only comparative studies written in English or in French, published from January 2000 to April 2015. We collected the literature data on HCV-infected patients concerning the prevalence of glucose abnormalities [diabetes mellitus (DM) and insulin resistance (IR)] and associated risk [ i.e ., severe liver fibrosis, response to antivirals, and the occurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)]. HCV infection is significantly associated with DM/IR compared with healthy volunteers and patients with hepatitis B virus infection. Glucose abnormalities were associated with advanced liver fibrosis, lack of sustained virologic response to interferon alfa-based treatment and with a higher risk of HCC development. As new antiviral therapies may offer a cure for HCV infection, such data should be taken into account, from a therapeutic and preventive point of view, for liver and non-liver consequences of HCV disease. The efficacy of antidiabetic treatment in improving the response to antiviral treatment and in decreasing the risk of HCC has been reported by some studies but not by others. Thus, the effects of glucose abnormalities correction in reducing liver events need further studies. Glucose abnormalities are strongly associated with HCV infection and show a negative impact on the main liver related outcomes.

  12. Factors associated with the intensity of liver fibrosis in renal transplant patients with hepatitis B virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, Carla A L; Perez, Renata M; Lemos, Lara B; Medina-Pestana, José O; Lanzoni, Valeria P; Alberto, Fernando L; Moreira, Eloísa S; Silva, Antonio Eduardo B; Ferraz, Maria Lucia G

    2007-08-01

    Hepatitis B may show a more aggressive course after kidney transplantation, but the factors associated with the progression of fibrosis in this group have not been identified. To determine the influence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) viral load and host-related factors on the progression of hepatic fibrosis in hepatitis B virus-infected renal transplant recipients. Renal transplant patients positive for HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) and submitted to a liver biopsy because of evidence of viral replication were included. Patients with advanced fibrosis (METAVIR F3-F4) were compared with patients with mild fibrosis (F0-F2) regarding sex, age, estimated time since infection, post-transplant time, donor type, history of renal transplantation, alanine aminotransferase, anti-hepatitis C virus, HBeAg and quantitative hepatitis B virus-DNA. Logistic regression analysis was applied to identify variables independently associated with more advanced fibrosis. Fifty-five patients (75% men, 41+/-11 years) with a mean post-transplant time of 5+/-4 years were included. HBeAg was detected in 67% of the patients and anti-hepatitis C virus in 35%. The median hepatitis B virus-DNA level was 2.8 x 10(8) copies/ml. Seventeen (31%) patients had advanced fibrosis. Using logistic regression analysis, the only variable that showed an independent association with more advanced stages of fibrosis was post-transplant time (P=0.03, odds ratio: 1.2, 95% confidence interval: 1.02-1.45). Hepatitis B virus viral load, although very high, and hepatitis B virus/hepatitis C virus coinfection are not related to the intensity of liver fibrosis in renal transplant patients infected with hepatitis B virus. Post-transplant time was the only factor independently associated with more advanced liver fibrosis, suggesting the influence of immunosuppression on the progression of liver disease in these patients.

  13. Mechanism of cell infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV)--a new paradigm in virus-cell interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budkowska, Agata

    2009-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is an enveloped, single-stranded RNA virus, belonging to the Flaviviridae family. HCV infection is a major cause of chronic hepatitis worldwide, leading to steatosis, liver cirrosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Significant advances in understanding the mechanisms of HCV infection have been made since the development of a cell culture system reproducing the complete HCV cell cycle in vitro. HCV represents a new paradigm in interactions between the virus and its target cell, the human hepatocyte, due to the central role of lipoproteins in the HCV life cycle. Very low density lipoproteins are required for virus particle assembly and secretion. Upon the release, the infectious virus circulates in the blood as triglyceride-rich particles and infects cells using lipoprotein-receptor dependent mechanisms. HCV cell entry is a multi-step process: heparan sulphate and/or low-density lipoprotein receptor are cell surface factors mediating an initial virus attachment; subsequent virus interaction with tetraspanin CD81 and the human scavenger receptor SR-BI, the main HCV receptors, triggers virus movement to the tight junctions and its uptake via Claudin-1 and occludin. Another originality of HCV is that initiation of productive infection requires dynamic microtubules. Whereas other viruses use kinesin or dynein-dependent transport, HCV exploits mechanisms driven by microtubule polymerization to efficiently infect its target cell, in which virus nucleocapsid protein might play a particular role. An improved of understanding of the cellular events involved in HCV cell entry and transport, leading to the initiation of productive HCV infection, may reveal novel targets for anti-viral interventions.

  14. Increased frequency of micronuclei in the lymphocytes of patients chronically infected with hepatitis B or hepatitis C virus

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    Samantha Therezinha Almeida Pereira Leite

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we analysed the frequency of micronuclei (MN, nucleoplasmic bridges (NPBs and nuclear buds (NBUDs and evaluated mutagen-induced sensitivity in the lymphocytes of patients chronically infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV or hepatitis C virus (HCV. In total, 49 patients with chronic viral hepatitis (28 HBV-infected and 21 HCV-infected patients and 33 healthy, non-infected blood donor controls were investigated. The frequencies (‰ of MN, NPBs and NBUDs in the controls were 4.41 ± 2.15, 1.15 ± 0.97 and 2.98 ± 1.31, respectively. The frequencies of MN and NPBs were significantly increased (p < 0.0001 in the patient group (7.01 ± 3.23 and 2.76 ± 2.08, respectively compared with the control group. When considered separately, the HBV-infected patients (7.18 ± 3.57 and HCV-infected patients (3.27 ± 2.40 each had greater numbers of MN than did the controls (p < 0.0001. The HCV-infected patients displayed high numbers of NPBs (2.09 ± 1.33 and NBUDs (4.38 ± 3.28, but only the HBV-infected patients exhibited a significant difference (NPBs = 3.27 ± 2.40, p < 0.0001 and NBUDs = 4.71 ± 2.79, p = 0.03 in comparison with the controls. Similar results were obtained for males, but not for females, when all patients or the HBV-infected group was compared with the controls. The lymphocytes of the infected patients did not exhibit sensitivity to mutagen in comparison with the lymphocytes of the controls (p = 0.06. These results showed that the lymphocytes of patients who were chronically infected with HBV or HCV presented greater chromosomal instability.

  15. The course of hepatitis E virus infection in pigs after contact-infection and intravenous inoculation

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    de Jong Mart CM

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Worldwide, hepatitis E virus (HEV genotype 3 is observed in pigs and transmission to humans is implied. To be able to estimate public health risks from e.g. contact with pigs or consumption of pork products, the transmission routes and dynamics of infection should be identified. Hence, the course of HEV-infection in naturally infected pigs should be studied. Results To resemble natural transmission, 24 HEV-susceptible pigs were infected either by one-to-one exposure to intravenously inoculated pigs (C1-pigs; n = 10, by one-to-one exposure to contact-infected pigs (C2-pigs: n = 7; C3-pigs: n = 5 or due to an unknown non-intravenous infection route (one C2-pig and one C3-pig. The course of HEV-infection for contact-infected pigs was characterized by: faecal HEV RNA excretion that started at day 7 (95% confidence interval: 5–10 postexposure and lasted 23 (19–28 days; viremia that started after 13 (8–17 days of faecal HEV RNA excretion and lasted 11 (8–13 days; antibody development that was detected after 13 (10–16 days of faecal HEV RNA excretion. The time until onset of faecal HEV RNA excretion and onset of viremia was significantly shorter for iv-pigs compared to contact-infected pigs, whereas the duration of faecal HEV RNA excretion was significantly longer. At 28 days postinfection HEV RNA was detected less frequently in organs of contact-infected pigs compared to iv-pigs. For contact-infected pigs, HEV RNA was detected in 20 of 39 muscle samples that were proxies for pork at retail and in 4 of 7 urine samples. Conclusion The course of infection differed between infection routes, suggesting that contact-infection could be a better model for natural transmission than iv inoculation. Urine and meat were identified as possible HEV-sources for pig-to-pig and pig-to-human HEV transmission.

  16. Incidence and seroprevalence of hepatitis E virus infection in pregnant women infected with hepatitis B virus and antibody placental transfer in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hongyu; Xu, Chenyu; Zhou, Xuan; Liu, Lanhua; Dai, Yimin; Xu, Biao; Yang, Jishi; Chen, Tingmei; Hu, Yali; Zhou, Yi-Hua

    2016-09-01

    Hepatitis E has poor outcomes in pregnant women. Superinfection of hepatitis E virus (HEV) in patients infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV) may worsen liver disease. To estimate the incidence and seroprevalence of HEV infection among HBV-infected pregnant women, to investigate the transplacental transfer of maternal anti-HEV IgG, and to compare the maternal and neonatal outcomes in anti-HEV positive and negative pregnant women. Totally 391 HBV-infected pregnant women were recruited from April 2012 to October 2014. Paired mothers and infants were followed up at an average 9.8 months postpartum. Anti-HEV IgG and IgM were tested by ELISA. Of the pregnant women, none was anti-HEV IgM positive and 42 (10.7%) were IgG positive. At the follow-up, 3 seronegative women converted to anti-HEV IgG positive, with an estimated incidence of 17 per 1000 person-years. No significant differences of gestational age, preterm birth rate, Apgar score and birthweight were observed between newborns of anti-HEV IgG positive and negative mothers. Of the 42 neonates born to anti-HEV IgG positive mothers, 38 (90.5%) had anti-HEV IgG in their cord blood. The neonatal and maternal anti-HEV IgG levels were positively correlated (r=0.827, ppregnant women rarely have novel HEV infection during late pregnancy in Jiangsu, China. Maternal anti-HEV IgG efficiently transfers into the fetuses, and disappears in infants before 10 months old. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Diagnosis and Management of Occult Hepatitis B Virus Infection: A Short Review

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    Javier Martínez González

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Occult hepatitis B virus infection (OBI is a challenging clinical entity. It is defined as the presence of viral DNA in the liver or serum of subjects who test negative for the hepatitis B surface antigen. Molecular evidence of OBI consists of covalently closed circular DNA persisting in the nuclei of hepatocytes after infection. Immunocompetent individuals have a lower risk of complications than immunosuppressed subjects. However, under certain scenarios, OBI acquires clinical manifestations that include transmission of the infection via blood or organ transplantation, chronic liver disease progression, hepatocellular carcinoma, and virus reactivation when a state of immunosuppression develops. This review updates the clinical aspects of the diagnosis and management of OBI.

  18. Graves' hyperthyroidism accompanied with acute hepatitis B virus infection: an extrahepatic manifestation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Wei; Deng, Baocheng; Wang, Wen; Liu, Pei

    2016-05-20

    Although hepatitis B virus (HBV) primarily affects hepatocytes, it has also been shown to cause complications in the skin, joints, muscles, and kidneys. Thyroid dysfunction is uncommon in cases of acute HBV infection. In this report, we describe a case of a 46-year-old woman with incipient acute hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection who presented clinically with Graves' hyperthyroidism. She showed typical symptoms of hyperthyroidism, and laboratory tests revealed high levels of HBV DNA and alanine transaminase (ALT). The patient was not administered with antithyroid medicine or radioiodine, but she was given antiviral therapy and symptomatic treatment with propranolol. Follow-up studies showed that as the HBV DNA levels decreased, the thyroid function recovered. Graves' disease maybe an extrahepatic manifestation of acute HBV infection. Antiviral therapy is likely to be beneficial for this condition as without severe thyrotoxicosis.

  19. Dengue and hepatitis E virus infection in pregnant women in Eastern Sudan, a challenge for diagnosis in an endemic area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elduma, Adel Hussein; Osman, Waleed Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    Dengue fever and hepatitis E virus infection are both a public health problem in developing countries due to poor sanitation. Infection with viral hepatitis and dengue fever can present with similar clinical such and fever, headache and abortion. This study was conducted in Port-Sudan city in the eastern part of the country. ELISA and Real Time PCR tests were used to detect the infection. A total number of 39 pregnant women with a mean age 26 ±7.8 were included in the study. All of them had fever, 32 (92.3%) admitted with headache, 11 (28.2%) of them had vomiting, and abortion was reported in two cases (5.1%). The study showed that 4 (10.3%) of pregnant women were positive for the Hepatitis E virus, 5 (12.8%) positive for Dengue virus IgG, and only one sample (2.6%) was positive for IgM capture ELISA and real time PCR. Death due to hepatitis E infection was reported in one case with 7(th) month of pregnancy. Most of hepatitis cases were reported in the central sector of the Portsudan city. The diagnosis of hepatitis E virus and dengue virus in an endemic area is a great challenge for health care staff working in these areas. Both Dengue virus and Hepatitis E virus infection should be considered in pregnant women especially in similar settings.

  20. A case of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis associated with hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Jae Eun; Lee, Jun-Bum; Cho, Yu Na; Suh, Sang Hyun; Kim, Ja Kyung; Lee, Kyung-Yul

    2012-07-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is a monophasic autoimmune demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, which typically follows acute viral or bacterial infection or vaccination. We report a case of ADEM associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection with positive serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) anti-HCV antibody. After steroid treatment, neurologic symptoms were improved. Virus triggers autoimmunity or direct viral invasion plays a part in the genesis of ADEM. This is the first reported case of ADEM with anti-HCV antibody in the CSF.

  1. Hepatitis D virus infection in the Western Brazilian Amazon - far from a vanishing disease

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    Wornei Silva Miranda Braga

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: A decline in hepatitis D virus (HDV occurrence was described in Europe and Asia. We estimated HDV prevalence in the Brazilian Amazon following hepatitis B vaccination. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional survey of HDV measured by total antibodies to HDV (anti-HD T. RESULTS: HDV prevalence was 41.9% whiting HBsAg carries and was associated with age (PR = 1.96; 95% CI 1.12-3.42; p = 0.01, hepatitis B virus (HBV infection (PR = 4.38; 95% CI 3.12-6.13; p < 0.001, and clinical hepatitis (PR =1.44; 95% CI 1.03-2.00; p = 0.03. Risk factors were related to HDV biology, clinical or demographic aspects such as underlying HBV infection, clinical hepatitis and age. CONCLUSIONS: Our study demonstrated that HDV infection continues to be an important health issue in the Brazilian Amazon and that the implementation of the HBV vaccination in rural Lábrea had little or no impact on the spread of HDV. This shows that HDV has not yet disappeared from HBV hyperendemic areas and reminding that it is far from being a vanishing disease in the Amazon basin.

  2. High Prevalence of Hepatitis B Virus Infection in Young Adults in Ternate, Eastern Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ie, Susan Irawati; Turyadi; Sidarta, Erick; Sadhewa, Arkasha; Purnomo, Gludhug Ariyo; Soedarmono, Yuyun S. M.; Pattiiha, Mochtar Zein; Thedja, Meta Dewi; Harahap, Alida R.; Muljono, David H.

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection has been declining thanks to the universal hepatitis B infant immunization program. Nevertheless, young adults born before the program implementation might have acquired HBV in early childhood or remain susceptible to infection. This study aimed to evaluate hepatitis B epidemiology in asymptomatic young adult population in Ternate, eastern Indonesia. Serum samples of 376 subjects (aged 17–25, mean 19.82 ± 1.69 years; male/female 138/238) were screened for HBV parameters serologically (HBV surface antigen [HBsAg]; its antibody [anti-HBs]; anti-core antigen [anti-HBc]), and molecularly (HBV DNA). HBsAg, anti-HBc, anti-HBs, and HBV DNA prevalence were 15.7%, 36.2%, 24.2%, and 27.9%, respectively, with male predominance. Of all subjects, 13.0% were HBsAg negative with detectable HBV DNA (occult hepatitis B [OHB]), and 56.4% showed negativity for all seromarkers. This population showed high hepatitis B prevalence with substantial occurrence of OHB. However, a high percentage of the population were still susceptible and at risk of HBV infection. This study emphasizes the necessity to improve prevention strategies to screen and manage HBV carriers, including the adoption of catch-up or booster vaccination targeted to young adult populations. Investigations on the roles of host-virus interactions associated with OHB and its implications are warranted. PMID:26392157

  3. Hepatitis C Virus Infection Induces Autophagy as a Prosurvival Mechanism to Alleviate Hepatic ER-Stress Response

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    Srikanta Dash

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection frequently leads to chronic liver disease, liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. The molecular mechanisms by which HCV infection leads to chronic liver disease and HCC are not well understood. The infection cycle of HCV is initiated by the attachment and entry of virus particles into a hepatocyte. Replication of the HCV genome inside hepatocytes leads to accumulation of large amounts of viral proteins and RNA replication intermediates in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER, resulting in production of thousands of new virus particles. HCV-infected hepatocytes mount a substantial stress response. How the infected hepatocyte integrates the viral-induced stress response with chronic infection is unknown. The unfolded protein response (UPR, an ER-associated cellular transcriptional response, is activated in HCV infected hepatocytes. Over the past several years, research performed by a number of laboratories, including ours, has shown that HCV induced UPR robustly activates autophagy to sustain viral replication in the infected hepatocyte. Induction of the cellular autophagy response is required to improve survival of infected cells by inhibition of cellular apoptosis. The autophagy response also inhibits the cellular innate antiviral program that usually inhibits HCV replication. In this review, we discuss the physiological implications of the HCV-induced chronic ER-stress response in the liver disease progression.

  4. Adverse fetal outcomes in pregnant rabbits experimentally infected with rabbit hepatitis E virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Hee-Seop; Han, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Yong-Hyun; Park, Byung-Joo; Kim, Dong-Hwi; Lee, Joong-Bok; Park, Seung-Yong; Song, Chang-Seon; Lee, Sang-Won; Choi, Changsun; Myoung, Jinjong; Choi, In-Soo

    2017-12-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) causes severe hepatitis in pregnant women, with associated poor fetal outcomes. To study HEV viral pathogenesis, pregnant rabbits were infected with low- and high-dose rabbit HEV at 2 weeks gestation. HEV was identified in the serum, feces, and liver tissue of infected rabbits, and dose-dependent fetal mortality rates ranging from 67% to 80% were observed. The aspartate transaminase (AST)/alanine transaminase ratio was significantly higher (P rabbits than low-dose infected and negative control rabbits 14 days post infection (dpi). Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) was significantly higher in low-dose (P rabbits (P rabbits produced significantly more interferon-γ (IFN-γ; P rabbits at 7 and 14 dpi. High levels of AST, TNF-α, and IFN-γ may substantially influence adverse fetal outcomes in pregnant rabbits infected with high-dose HEV. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Seroprevalence of hepatitis B virus infection among antenatal clinic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Saharan Africa. The risk of vertical transmission increases if the mother is hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) positive and more so when she is also hepatitis B envelope antigen (HBeAg) positive. Since 2000, the World Health Organization ...

  6. Alginate hydrogel protects encapsulated hepatic HuH-7 cells against hepatitis C virus and other viral infections.

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    Nhu-Mai Tran

    Full Text Available Cell microencapsulation in alginate hydrogel has shown interesting applications in regenerative medicine and the biomedical field through implantation of encapsulated tissue or for bioartificial organ development. Although alginate solution is known to have low antiviral activity, the same property regarding alginate gel has not yet been studied. The aim of this work is to investigate the potential protective effect of alginate encapsulation against hepatitis C virus (HCV infection for a hepatic cell line (HuH-7 normally permissive to the virus. Our results showed that alginate hydrogel protects HuH-7 cells against HCV when the supernatant was loaded with HCV. In addition, alginate hydrogel blocked HCV particle release out of the beads when the HuH-7 cells were previously infected and encapsulated. There was evidence of interaction between the molecules of alginate hydrogel and HCV, which was dose- and incubation time-dependent. The protective efficiency of alginate hydrogel towards HCV infection was confirmed against a variety of viruses, whether or not they were enveloped. This promising interaction between an alginate matrix and viruses, whose chemical mechanisms are discussed, is of great interest for further medical therapeutic applications based on tissue engineering.

  7. Hepatitis A and hepatitis C viruses: divergent infection outcomes marked by similarities in induction and evasion of interferon responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Lin; Lemon, Stanley M

    2010-11-01

    Hepatitis A and hepatitis C viruses (HAV and HCV) are both positive-strand ribonucleic acid (RNA) viruses with hepatotropic lifestyles. Despite several important differences, they share many biological and molecular features and similar genome replication schemes. Despite this, HAV infections are usually effectively controlled by the host with elimination of the virus, whereas HCV most often is able to establish lifelong persistent infection. The mechanisms underlying this difference are unknown. The cellular helicases RIG-I and MDA5, and Toll-like receptor 3, are pattern recognition receptors that sense virus-derived RNAs within hepatocytes in the liver. Activation of these receptors leads to their interaction with specific adaptor proteins, mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS) and TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (TRIF), respectively, which engage downstream kinases to activate two crucial transcription factors, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3). This results in the induction of interferons (IFNs) and IFN-stimulated genes that ultimately establish an antiviral state. These signaling pathways are central to host antiviral defense and thus frequent targets for viral interference. Both HAV and HCV express proteases that target signal transduction through these pathways and that block the induction of IFNs upon sensing of viral RNA by these receptors. An understanding of the differences and similarities in the early innate immune responses to these infections is likely to provide important insights into the mechanism underlying the long-term persistence of HCV. © Thieme Medical Publishers.

  8. High frequency of hepatitis E virus infection in swine from South Brazil and close similarity to human HEV isolates

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    Ana Maria Passos-Castilho

    Full Text Available Abstract Hepatitis E virus is responsible for acute and chronic liver infections worldwide. Swine hepatitis E virus has been isolated in Brazil, and a probable zoonotic transmission has been described, although data are still scarce. The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of hepatitis E virus infection in pigs from a small-scale farm in the rural area of Paraná State, South Brazil. Fecal samples were collected from 170 pigs and screened for hepatitis E virus RNA using a duplex real-time RT-PCR targeting a highly conserved 70 nt long sequence within overlapping parts of ORF2 and ORF3 as well as a 113 nt sequence of ORF2. Positive samples with high viral loads were subjected to direct sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. hepatitis E virus RNA was detected in 34 (20.0% of the 170 pigs following positive results in at least one set of screening real-time RT-PCR primers and probes. The swine hepatitis E virus strains clustered with the genotype hepatitis E virus-3b reference sequences in the phylogenetic analysis and showed close similarity to human hepatitis E virus isolates previously reported in Brazil.

  9. Hepatitis viruses infection and risk of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma: evidence from a meta-analysis

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    Zhou Yanming

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies investigating the association between Hepatitis B virus (HBV and hepatitis C virus (HCV infections and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC have reported inconsistent findings. We conducted a meta-analysis of epidemiological studies to explore this relationship. Methods A comprehensive search was conducted to identify the eligible studies of hepatitis infections and ICC risk up to September 2011. Summary odds ratios (OR with their 95% confidence intervals (95% CI were calculated with random-effects models using Review Manager version 5.0. Results Thirteen case–control studies and 3 cohort studies were included in the final analysis. The combined risk estimate of all studies showed statistically significant increased risk of ICC incidence with HBV and HCV infection (OR = 3.17, 95% CI, 1.88-5.34, and OR = 3.42, 95% CI, 1.96-5.99, respectively. For case–control studies alone, the combined OR of infection with HBV and HCV were 2.86 (95% CI, 1.60-5.11 and 3.63 (95% CI, 1.86-7.05, respectively, and for cohort studies alone, the OR of HBV and HCV infection were 5.39 (95% CI, 2.34-12.44 and 2.60 (95% CI, 1.36-4.97, respectively. Conclusions This study suggests that both HBV and HCV infection are associated with an increased risk of ICC.

  10. Rare inborn errors associated with chronic hepatitis B virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Qiang; Peng, Liang; Huang, Weijun

    2012-01-01

    who were healthy and hepatitis B surface antibody-positive, but had never received hepatitis B vaccination. We selected six rare variant alleles and followed up their association with disease status by Sanger sequencing in a case-control study comprising 1,728 CHB patients and 1,636 healthy controls......Chronic hepatitis B (CHB) is a major global health issue. The role of rare genetic variants in CHB has not been elucidated. We aimed to identify rare allelic variants predisposing to CHB. We performed exome sequencing in 50 CHB patients who had no identifiable risk factors for CHB and 40 controls...

  11. Efficacy and Safety of Rituximab in the Treatment of Vasculitic Leg Ulcers Associated with Hepatitis C Virus Infection

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    Fabio Bonilla-Abadía

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Vasculitic leg ulcers are a cutaneous manifestation of hepatitis C virus (HCV infection often associated with cryoglobulinemia. Their treatment is difficult and is based on steroids and immunosuppressive drugs with an erratic response and a high probability of adverse reaction. We report three patients with vasculitic leg ulcers associated with hepatitis C virus infection who were treated successfully with rituximab. The pain control and healing were achieved quickly. No adverse effects with rituximab in these patients were presented.

  12. Successful pregnancy in a kidney transplant recipient with chronic hepatitis B virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashif, Waqar; Yaqub, Sonia; Ahmed, Hina; Khan, Nauman; Subhan, Amna; Hussain, Syed Ather

    2013-09-01

    Overall success rate of pregnancies in kidney transplant recipients is higher than 90% if pregnancy goes beyond the 1st trimester. Risks to mother include hypertension, preeclampsia, infections, and worsening proteinuria, and those to the fetus are prematurity, intrauterine growth retardation, and low birth weight. Hepatitis B infection is associated with progressive liver disease and diminished survival in kidney transplant recipients. A 32-year-old woman had undergone living unrelated donor kidney transplant. Two years after transplantation, she presented with live gestation of 6 weeks. She was also found positive for hepatitis B surface antigen and extracellular antigen. Liver enzymes were normal and ultrasonography findings were normal. Cyclosporine dose was reduced and lamivudine was started. She was monitored closely until 33 weeks, when she gave birth to a healthy female baby through spontaneous vaginal delivery. The newborn received vaccination and immunoglobulins for hepatitis B virus. Mother's kidney allograft function remained stable throughout pregnancy.

  13. Management of Advanced Fibrosis in the Context of Hepatitis C Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verna, Elizabeth C

    Advanced fibrosis may be present in a substantial proportion of individuals with asymptomatic, chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, including those who have been newly diagnosed. HCV treatment improves all-cause and liver-related mortality in individuals with advanced fibrosis, and there is some evidence that reversal of decompensated liver disease may occur in those with a sustained virologic response. HCV treatment is also crucial for individuals undergoing liver transplantation, as recurrent HCV infection posttransplantation is associated with accelerated fibrosis progression and increased risk of poor outcomes. This article summarizes a presentation by Elizabeth C. Verna, MD, at the IAS-USA continuing education program, Management of Hepatitis C Virus in the New Era: Small Molecules Bring Big Changes, held in New York, New York, in September 2015.

  14. Cytomegalovirus-Driven Adaptive-Like Natural Killer Cell Expansions Are Unaffected by Concurrent Chronic Hepatitis Virus Infections

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    David F. G. Malone

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive-like expansions of natural killer (NK cell subsets are known to occur in response to human cytomegalovirus (CMV infection. These expansions are typically made up of NKG2C+ NK cells with particular killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR expression patterns. Such NK cell expansion patterns are also seen in patients with viral hepatitis infection. Yet, it is not known if the viral hepatitis infection promotes the appearance of such expansions or if effects are solely attributed to underlying CMV infection. In sizeable cohorts of CMV seropositive hepatitis B virus (HBV, hepatitis C virus (HCV, and hepatitis delta virus (HDV infected patients, we analyzed NK cells for expression of NKG2A, NKG2C, CD57, and inhibitory KIRs to assess the appearance of NK cell expansions characteristic of what has been seen in CMV seropositive healthy individuals. Adaptive-like NK cell expansions observed in viral hepatitis patients were strongly associated with CMV seropositivity. The number of subjects with these expansions did not differ between CMV seropositive viral hepatitis patients and corresponding healthy controls. Hence, we conclude that adaptive-like NK cell expansions observed in HBV, HCV, and/or HDV infected individuals are not caused by the chronic hepatitis infections per se, but rather are a consequence of underlying CMV infection.

  15. A population-based study examining hepatitis B virus infection and immunization rates in Northwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Zhaohua; Wang, Tingcai; Shao, Zhongjun; Huang, Dahong; Wang, Anhui; Guo, Zhiwen; Long, Yong; Zhang, Lei; Su, Haixia; Zhang, Qi; Yan, Yongping; Fan, Daiming

    2014-01-01

    Current baseline data regarding the prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections and the immune status in hyperendemic areas is necessary in evaluating the effectiveness of ongoing HBV prevention and control programs in northwest China. This study aims to determine the prevalence of chronic HBV infections, past exposure rates, and immune response profiles in Wuwei City, northwest China in 2010. Cross-sectional household survey representative of the Wuwei City population. 28,579 participants were interviewed in the seroepidemiological survey ≥1 year of age. House to house screening was conducted using a standard questionnaire. All serum samples were screened by enzyme-linked immunoassays for the presence of hepatitis B surface antigen, antibodies against HBV surface antigen, and antibodies to the hepatitis B core antigen. Among individuals ≥1 year of age, 7.2% (95%CI: 6.3-8.1%) had chronic HBV infections, 43.9% (CI: 40.4-47.4%) had been exposed to HBV, and 23.49% (CI: 21.6-25.3%) had vaccine-induced immunity. Multi-factor weighted logistic regression analysis showed that having household contact with HBV carriers (OR = 2.6, 95%CI: 2.3-3.0) and beauty treatments in public places (OR = 1.2, 95%CI: 1.1-1.3) were the risk factors of HBV infection in whole population. Having household contact with HBV carriers (OR = 3.8, 95% CI: 2.2-6.5) and lack of hepatitis vaccination (OR = 2.0, 95% CI: 1.4-3.3) were the risk factors for HBV infection in children aged 1-14 years. Hepatitis B infection remains a serious public health problem in northwest China. Having household contact with HBV carriers and beauty treatments in public places represented HBV infection risk factors. Hepatitis B vaccine immunization strategies need further improvement, particularly by targeting the immunization of rural migrant workers.

  16. The role of triple infection with hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV type-1 on CD4+ lymphocyte levels in the highly HIV infected population of North-Central Nigeria

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    JC Forbi

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available We set out to determine the seroprevalence of hepatitis B and C among human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1 infected individuals in North-Central Nigeria to define the influence of these infections on CD4+ lymphocytes cells among our patients as access to antiretroviral therapy improves across the Nigerian nation. The CD4+ values of 180 confirmed HIV-1 infected individuals were enumerated using a superior fluorescence-activated cell sorter system. These patients were tested for the presence of hepatitis B surface antigen and anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV using third generation enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Fifty (27.8% patients had active hepatitis B virus (HBV infection while 33 (18.3% tested positive for anti-HCV antibody. Of these infections, 110 (61.1%, 37 (20.6%, and 20 (11.1% had HIV only, HBV/HIV-only, and HCV/HIV-only respectively. A HBV/HCV/HIV coinfection prevalence of 7.2% (13 patients was recorded. Patients coinfected with HIV/HBV/HCV appeared to have lower CD4+ counts (mean = 107 cells/µl; AIDS defining when compared to HBV/HIV-only (mean = 377 cells/µl, HCV/HIV-only (mean = 373 cells/µl and patients with mono HIV infection (mean = 478 cells/µl. Coinfection with HBV or HCV is relatively common among HIV-infected patients in Nigeria and should be a big consideration in the initiation and choice of therapy.

  17. The role of triple infection with hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type-1 on CD4+ lymphocyte levels in the highly HIV infected population of North-Central Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbi, J C; Gabadi, S; Alabi, R; Iperepolu, H O; Pam, C R; Entonu, P E; Agwale, S M

    2007-06-01

    We set out to determine the seroprevalence of hepatitis B and C among human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infected individuals in North-Central Nigeria to define the influence of these infections on CD4+ lymphocytes cells among our patients as access to antiretroviral therapy improves across the Nigerian nation. The CD4+ values of 180 confirmed HIV-1 infected individuals were enumerated using a superior fluorescence-activated cell sorter system. These patients were tested for the presence of hepatitis B surface antigen and anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) using third generation enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Fifty (27.8%) patients had active hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection while 33 (18.3%) tested positive for anti-HCV antibody. Of these infections, 110 (61.1%), 37 (20.6%), and 20 (11.1%) had HIV only, HBV/HIV-only, and HCV/HIV-only respectively. A HBV/HCV/HIV coinfection prevalence of 7.2% (13 patients) was recorded. Patients coinfected with HIV/HBV/HCV appeared to have lower CD4+ counts (mean = 107 cells/microl; AIDS defining) when compared to HBV/HIV-only (mean = 377 cells/microl), HCV/HIV-only (mean = 373 cells/microl) and patients with mono HIV infection (mean = 478 cells/microl). Coinfection with HBV or HCV is relatively common among HIV-infected patients in Nigeria and should be a big consideration in the initiation and choice of therapy.

  18. Research advances in immune tolerance in chronic hepatitis B virus infection

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    WU Fengping

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Immune tolerance refers to the specific non-response or negative response of T and B lymphocytes to antigens. According to the period of formation, immune tolerance can be classified into central tolerance and peripheral tolerance. Immune tolerance to hepatitis B virus (HBV after HBV infection is considered a major cause of chronic HBV infection. This article briefly reviews the roles of HBeAg, functional defects of dendritic cells, low response of cytotoxic T lymphocytes, T helper cells and cytokines, variations of HBV genotype and genome, and host gene polymorphisms in the development of immune tolerance in chronic HBV infection, as well as related research advances.

  19. Acute hepatitis C virus infection assessment among chronic hemodialysis patients in the Southwest Parana State, Brazil

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    Ono-Nita Suzane K

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic hemodialysis patients are at higher risk for acquiring hepatitis C virus (HCV. The prevalence varies among different countries and hemodialysis centers. Although guidelines for a comprehensive infection control program exist, the nosocomial transmission still accounts for the new cases of infection. The aim of this study was analyze the follow up of newly acquired acute hepatitis C cases, during the period from January 2002 to May 2005, in the Hemodialysis Center, located in the Southwest region of Parana State, Brazil and to analyze the effectiveness of the measures to restrain the appearance of new cases of acute hepatitis C. Methods Patients were analyzed monthly with anti-HCV tests and ALT measurements. Patients with ALT elevations were monitored for possible acute hepatitis C. Results During this period, 32 new cases were identified with acute hepatitis C virus infection. Blood screening showed variable ALT levels preceding the anti-HCV seroconversion. HCV RNA viremia by PCR analysis was intermittently and even negative in some cases. Ten out of 32 patients received 1 mcg/kg dose of pegylated interferon alfa-2b treatment for 24 weeks. All dialysis personnel were re-trained to strictly follow the regulations and recommendations regarding infection control, proper methods to clean and disinfect equipment were reviewed and HCV-positive patients were isolated. Conclusion Laboratory tests results showed variable ALT preceding anti-HCV seroconversion and intermittent viremia. The applied recommendations contributed importantly to restrain the appearance of new cases of acute hepatitis C in this center and the last case was diagnosed in May 2004.

  20. Need of righteous attitudes towards eradication of hepatitis C virus infection in Latin America

    OpenAIRE

    Panduro, Arturo; Roman, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Over the last few years, we have expanded our knowledge on numerous facets of the hepatitis C virus (HCV). Beginning with its discovery and viral life cycle, its impact on health, the development of liver disease and currently, effective antiviral treatments. The latter point has become of great interest throughout the developed world, where the possible eradication of HCV through specific strategies to reach all HCV-infected people has been announced. However, this scenario is very different...

  1. [Divergence Analysis of Hepatitis Virus Infection between Aggressive and Indolent B Cell Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Wen-Jie; Li, Heng; Liu, Hui-Min; Yi, Shu-Hua; Li, Zeng-Jun; Lu, Rui; Liu, Wei; Zou, De-Hui; Qiu, Lu-Gui

    2016-12-01

    To investigate the prevalence rate of hepatitis B virus(HBV)and hepatitis C virus(HCV)between aggressive and indolent B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (B-NHL), and to compare the different infection rate of Hepatifis Virus between the 2 groups. Integrated clinical information of 733 newly diagnosed indolent B-NHL patients and 148 aggressive B-NHL patients from January 1994 to January 2014 was retrospectively analyzed. The difference of hepatitis virus infection was compared between the 2 groups. The positive rate of HCV-Ab was 1.8% in 881 newly diagnosed B-NHL patients. The HCV prevalence was 1.9% and 1.35% in the indolent and aggressive B-NHL group respecitvely. Compared with general population, the HCV positive rate was significantly higher in the whole B-NHL group and the indolent group(1.8% vs 0.4%,1.9% vs 1.4%)(P0.05).In the aggressive B-NHL group,the co-expression of HBs-Ag,HBe-Ag and anti-HBc-Ab was 4.4%, which was higher than that in the indolent one (4.7% vs 1.2%)(P0.05). The HCV is more relevant with indolent B-NHL, the HBV has more relevance with the aggressive patients.

  2. Prevalence of Hepatitis C Virus Infection in General Population of Mashhad, Northeastern Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi Ghezeldasht, Sanaz; Hedayati-Moghaddam, Mohammad Reza; Shamsian, Khosro; Fathimoghadam, Farhad; Bidkhori, Hamid Reza; Rezaee, Seyed Abdolrahim

    2017-03-01

    Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infection is one of the major blood-borne infections worldwide. HCV carriers may develop chronic hepatitis leading to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). There is no overall estimate of the infection prevalence in the northeast of Iran. We have performed this research in order to determine accurately the prevalence and risk factors of HCV infection among general population in Mashhad. During 2009, 1678 people between 1 to 90 yr old with the mean age of 29.1±18.5 yr were selected randomly by multistage sampling from different geographical regions of the city proportionate to sex and age distribution of population in 2006 census. ELISA was used to screen for antibodies and RT-PCR tested the positive samples. HCV infection was detected in 7/1654 cases; overall prevalence of the infection was 0.42% (95%CI: 0.17-0.87%), 0.80% and 0.11% among males and females, respectively (P= 0.051). One HCV-infected subject was also positive for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), however, no cases showed HIV or HTLV seropositivity. In comparison with similar studies, the prevalence of HCV infection in Mashhad is low.

  3. Analysis of occult hepatitis B virus infection among blood donors in Tangshan, China

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    CAO Xiao

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate the prevalence of occult hepatitis B virus (HBV infection (OBI among the volunteer blood donors in Tangshan, China. MethodsEnzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect serum HBV markers in the blood donors. Nucleic acid test (NAT was performed in the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg-negative blood samples to detect HBV DNA, and Roche reagent was used to measure the viral load of HBV DNA in NAT-positive samples. ResultsAmong the HBsAg-negative blood samples of 116 741 blood donors, 39 (0.033% had positive results in NAT, and 35 (0.029% were confirmed with OBI. The viral load of HBV DNA was less than 102 IU/ml in 97.1% of the blood donors with OBI. Of the blood donors with OBI, 27 (77.1% were positive for at least one of hepatitis B surface antibody (HBsAb, hepatitis B e antigen, hepatitis B e antibody, and hepatitis B core antibody (HBcAb, and 8 (22.9% were negative for all serum HBV markers. Of the 27 positive blood donors, 22 (81.5% were positive for HBcAb, and 15 (55.6% were positive for HBsAb. ConclusionOBI occurs in some HBsAg-negative blood donors in Tangshan, and the viral load of HBV DNA is low. NAT is effective in increasing the detection rate of HBV infection.

  4. Hepatitis B virus infection and the risk of male infertility: a population-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Fu-Hsiung; Chang, Shih-Ni; Sung, Fung-Chang; Su, Chien-Tien; Shieh, Ying-Hua; Lin, Cheng-Chieh; Yeh, Chih-Ching

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the risk of male infertility among patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. A nationwide, population-based cohort study. Not applicable. Men infected with HBV (n = 5,138) and men without HBV infection (n = 25,690). None. Male infertility, as defined by the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification. The incidence of infertility was 1.59 times higher in patients with HBV infection than in those without HBV infection (2.21 vs. 1.39 per 1,000 person-years). The risk of developing infertility remained significant among patients with HBV infection (hazard ratio 1.52, 95% confidence interval 1.20-1.92) after adjusting for covariates in a multivariate Cox proportional hazards model. The data show an increased incidence and risk of infertility among men with HBV infection compared with men without HBV. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Acute risk for hepatitis E virus infection among HIV-1-positive pregnant women in central Africa

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    Caron Mélanie

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis E virus (HEV, an enterically transmitted pathogen, is highly endemic in several African countries. Pregnant women are at particularly high risk for acute or severe hepatitis E. In Gabon, a central African country, the prevalence of antibodies to HEV among pregnant women is 14.1%. Recent studies have demonstrated unusual patterns of hepatitis E (chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis among immunodeficient patients. Findings We investigated the prevalence of antibodies to HEV among pregnant women infected with HIV-1 or HTLV-1 in Gabon. Of 243 samples collected, 183 were positive for HIV-1 and 60 for HTLV-1; 16 women (6.6% had IgG antibodies to HEV. The seroprevalence was higher among HIV-1-infected women (7.1% than HTLV-1-infected women (5.0%. Moreover, the HIV-1 viral load was significantly increased (p ≤ 0.02 among women with past-HEV exposure (1.3E+05 vs 5.7E+04 copies per ml, whereas no difference was found in HTLV-1 proviral load (9.0E+01 vs 1.1E+03 copies per ml. Conclusions These data provide evidence that HIV-1-infected women are at risk for acute or severe infection if they are exposed to HEV during pregnancy, with an increased viral load.

  6. Acute pancreatitis complicating acute hepatitis A virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sayed, Rokaya; El-Karaksy, Hanaa

    2012-12-01

    Acute pancreatitis complicating acute hepatitis A is very rare especially in children. We report here an 11 year old female patient with picture of acute hepatitis proved to be caused by hepatitis A. One week later patient's condition worsened, she was jaundiced, with persistent vomiting and looked acutely ill and uncomfortable with severe steady abdominal pain mainly in the epigastrium and upper quadrants. Acute pancreatitis was suspected and proved by a clinical picture associated with elevated serum amylase and serum lipase and by MRCP. The patient was managed conservatively with gradual clinical and laboratory improvement, and she was discharged after one week in a good clinical condition. Copyright © 2012 Arab Journal of Gastroenterology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Hepatitis B virus infection among pregnant women in Haiti: A cross-sectional serosurvey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohme, Rania A; Andre-Alboth, Jocelyne; Tejada-Strop, Alexandra; Shi, Ran; Boncy, Jacques; François, Jeannot; Domercant, Jean Wysler; Griswold, Mark; Hyppolite, Erlantz; Adrien, Paul; Kamili, Saleem

    2016-03-01

    Hepatitis B vaccine administered shortly after birth is highly effective in preventing mother to child transmission (MTCT) of infection. While hepatitis B vaccine was introduced in Haiti as part of a combined pentavalent vaccine in 2012, a birth dose is not yet included in the immunization schedule. Determine the seroprevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection among pregnant women to evaluate the risk of MTCT. We selected 1364 residual serum specimens collected during a 2012 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) sentinel serosurvey among pregnant women attending antenatal care clinics. Haiti was stratified into two regions: West, which includes metropolitan Port-au-Prince, and non-West, which includes all other departments. We evaluated the association between demographic and socioeconomic characteristics and HIV infection with HBV infection. Of 1364 selected specimens, 1307 (96%) were available for testing. A total of 422 specimens (32.7%) tested positive for total anti-HBc (38.2% in West vs. 27% in non-West, pWomen aged 30 and older had more than double the odds of positive total anti-HBc than women aged 15-19 years (pWomen with secondary (adjusted odds ratio (aOR)=0.54; 95% CI: 0.36-0.81) and post-secondary education (aOR=0.40, 95% CI: 0.19-0.79) had lower odds of total anti-HBc positivity compared with women with no education. HIV-status was not associated with HBV infection. Haiti has an intermediate endemicity of chronic HBV infection with high prevalence of positive HBV DNA among chronically infected women. Introduction of a universal birth dose of hepatitis B vaccine might help prevent perinatal HBV transmission. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Experimental Infection of Rabbits with Rabbit and Genotypes 1 and 4 Hepatitis E Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hongxia; Zheng, Lin; Liu, Yunbo; Zhao, Chenyan; Harrison, Tim J.; Ma, Yuyuan; Sun, Shuhua; Zhang, Jingang; Wang, Youchun

    2010-01-01

    Background A recent study provided evidence that farmed rabbits in China harbor a novel hepatitis E virus (HEV) genotype. Although the rabbit HEV isolate had 77–79% nucleotide identity to the mammalian HEV genotypes 1 to 4, their genomic organization is very similar. Since rabbits are used widely experimentally, including as models of infection, we investigated whether they constitute an appropriate animal model for human HEV infection. Methods Forty-two SPF rabbits were divided randomly into eleven groups and inoculated with six different isolates of rabbit HEV, two different doses of a second-passage rabbit HEV, and with genotype 1 and 4 HEV. Sera and feces were collected weekly after inoculation. HEV antigen, RNA, antibody and alanine aminotransferase in sera and HEV RNA in feces were detected. The liver samples were collected during necropsy subject to histopathological examination. Findings Rabbits inoculated with rabbit HEV became infected with HEV, with viremia, fecal virus shedding and high serum levels of viral antigens, and developed hepatitis, with elevation of the liver enzyme, ALT. The severity of disease corresponded to the infectious dose (genome equivalents), with the most severe hepatic disease caused by strain GDC54-18. However, only two of nine rabbits infected with HEV genotype 4, and none infected with genotype 1, developed hepatitis although six of nine rabbits inoculated with the genotype 1 HEV and in all rabbits inoculated with the genotype 4 HEV seroconverted to be positive for anti-HEV IgG antibody by 14 weeks post-inoculation. Conclusions These data indicate that rabbits are an appropriate model for rabbit HEV infection but are not likely to be useful for the study of human HEV. The rabbit HEV infection of rabbits may provide an appropriate parallel animal model to study HEV pathogenesis. PMID:20161794

  9. Experimental infection of rabbits with rabbit and genotypes 1 and 4 hepatitis E viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hongxia; Zheng, Lin; Liu, Yunbo; Zhao, Chenyan; Harrison, Tim J; Ma, Yuyuan; Sun, Shuhua; Zhang, Jingang; Wang, Youchun

    2010-02-11

    A recent study provided evidence that farmed rabbits in China harbor a novel hepatitis E virus (HEV) genotype. Although the rabbit HEV isolate had 77-79% nucleotide identity to the mammalian HEV genotypes 1 to 4, their genomic organization is very similar. Since rabbits are used widely experimentally, including as models of infection, we investigated whether they constitute an appropriate animal model for human HEV infection. Forty-two SPF rabbits were divided randomly into eleven groups and inoculated with six different isolates of rabbit HEV, two different doses of a second-passage rabbit HEV, and with genotype 1 and 4 HEV. Sera and feces were collected weekly after inoculation. HEV antigen, RNA, antibody and alanine aminotransferase in sera and HEV RNA in feces were detected. The liver samples were collected during necropsy subject to histopathological examination. Rabbits inoculated with rabbit HEV became infected with HEV, with viremia, fecal virus shedding and high serum levels of viral antigens, and developed hepatitis, with elevation of the liver enzyme, ALT. The severity of disease corresponded to the infectious dose (genome equivalents), with the most severe hepatic disease caused by strain GDC54-18. However, only two of nine rabbits infected with HEV genotype 4, and none infected with genotype 1, developed hepatitis although six of nine rabbits inoculated with the genotype 1 HEV and in all rabbits inoculated with the genotype 4 HEV seroconverted to be positive for anti-HEV IgG antibody by 14 weeks post-inoculation. These data indicate that rabbits are an appropriate model for rabbit HEV infection but are not likely to be useful for the study of human HEV. The rabbit HEV infection of rabbits may provide an appropriate parallel animal model to study HEV pathogenesis.

  10. Experimental infection of rabbits with rabbit and genotypes 1 and 4 hepatitis E viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxia Ma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A recent study provided evidence that farmed rabbits in China harbor a novel hepatitis E virus (HEV genotype. Although the rabbit HEV isolate had 77-79% nucleotide identity to the mammalian HEV genotypes 1 to 4, their genomic organization is very similar. Since rabbits are used widely experimentally, including as models of infection, we investigated whether they constitute an appropriate animal model for human HEV infection. METHODS: Forty-two SPF rabbits were divided randomly into eleven groups and inoculated with six different isolates of rabbit HEV, two different doses of a second-passage rabbit HEV, and with genotype 1 and 4 HEV. Sera and feces were collected weekly after inoculation. HEV antigen, RNA, antibody and alanine aminotransferase in sera and HEV RNA in feces were detected. The liver samples were collected during necropsy subject to histopathological examination. FINDINGS: Rabbits inoculated with rabbit HEV became infected with HEV, with viremia, fecal virus shedding and high serum levels of viral antigens, and developed hepatitis, with elevation of the liver enzyme, ALT. The severity of disease corresponded to the infectious dose (genome equivalents, with the most severe hepatic disease caused by strain GDC54-18. However, only two of nine rabbits infected with HEV genotype 4, and none infected with genotype 1, developed hepatitis although six of nine rabbits inoculated with the genotype 1 HEV and in all rabbits inoculated with the genotype 4 HEV seroconverted to be positive for anti-HEV IgG antibody by 14 weeks post-inoculation. CONCLUSIONS: These data indicate that rabbits are an appropriate model for rabbit HEV infection but are not likely to be useful for the study of human HEV. The rabbit HEV infection of rabbits may provide an appropriate parallel animal model to study HEV pathogenesis.

  11. Immunosuppression reactivates viral replication long after resolution of woodchuck hepatitis virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menne, Stephan; Cote, Paul J; Butler, Scott D; Toshkov, Ilia A; Gerin, John L; Tennant, Bud C

    2007-03-01

    Resolution of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is characterized by coordinated humoral and cellular immune responses. Immunity is durable over decades, protecting the host from reinfection and potential activation of residual HBV. Woodchucks infected at birth with woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) cleared viremia and developed antibodies to surface antigen (anti-WHs). Woodchucks became seronegative for anti-WHs 3-6 years later, but in some, WHV DNA was detected in serum, liver, and/or peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Those with WHV DNA had increased in vitro cellular immune responses to viral antigens, CD4 and CD8 markers, and Th1-type cytokines, suggesting active WHV-specific T lymphocytes. Immunosuppression for 12 weeks using cyclosporine A in such woodchucks resulted in transient reactivation of WHV replication. Serum of 1 woodchuck that became positive for WHV DNA during immunosuppression was inoculated into WHV-susceptible woodchucks, and a productive infection was demonstrated. The results indicate that after infection durable cellular immunity to WHV is essential for the long-term control of viral replication and is probably maintained by continuous priming from residual virus. These experimental observations demonstrate the potential of immunosuppression to reactivate HBV after resolution of infection.

  12. Polyclonal immunoglobulins from a chronic hepatitis C virus patient protect human liver-chimeric mice from infection with a homologous hepatitis C virus strain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vanwolleghem, Thomas; Bukh, Jens; Meuleman, Philip

    2008-01-01

    The role of the humoral immune response in the natural course of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is widely debated. Most chronically infected patients have immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies capable of neutralizing HCV pseudoparticles (HCVpp) in vitro. It is, however, not clear whether these Ig...... were loaded with chronic phase polyclonal IgG and challenged 3 days later with a 100% infectious dose of the acute phase H77C virus, both originating from patient H. Passive immunization induced sterilizing immunity in five of eight challenged animals. In the three nonprotected animals, the HCV...

  13. Hepatitis E and hepatitis C virus infections among French soldiers with non-A, non-B hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coursaget, P; Krawczynski, K; Buisson, Y; Nizou, C; Molinié, C

    1993-02-01

    Serologic markers of HCV and HEV were investigated in 74 French soldiers with non-A, non-B hepatitis and in 18 patients involved in an outbreak of non-A,non-B hepatitis in Algeria. Moreover, anti-HCV antibodies were detected in 13 patients with non-A,non-B hepatitis of parenteral origin. HEV antibodies were investigated in 61-65% of patients involved in the 2 enterically transmitted outbreaks of non-A,non-B hepatitis observed in Algeria and Chad. The third cluster of non-A,non-B hepatitis observed in French soldiers serving in French Guyana is more likely to be attributed to malaria prophylactic treatment with Amodiaquine than to a viral origin. HCV infection was observed in 93% of acute or chronic cases associated with blood transfusion or parenteral drug abuse. Among acute cases, none of the soldiers who contracted the disease in Africa or in French Guyana was found to be anti-HCV positive compared to 78% of those who contracted the disease in France. HCV infections resulted in chronic hepatitis in 61% of cases.

  14. Therapeutic strategies for a functional cure of chronic hepatitis B virus infection

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    Jinhong Chang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV infection with the viral DNA polymerase inhibitors or pegylated alpha-interferon has led to a significant retardation in HBV-related disease progression and reduction in mortality related to chronic hepatitis B associated liver decompensation and hepatocellular carcinoma. However, chronic HBV infection remains not cured. The reasons for the failure to eradicate HBV infection by long-term antiviral therapy are not completely understood. However, clinical studies suggest that the intrinsic stability of the nuclear form of viral genome, the covalently closed circular (ccc DNA, sustained low level viral replication under antiviral therapy and homeostatic proliferation of hepatocytes are the critical virological and pathophysiological factors that affect the persistence and therapeutic outcomes of HBV infection. More importantly, despite potent suppression of HBV replication in livers of the treated patients, the dysfunction of HBV-specific antiviral immunity persists. The inability of the immune system to recognize cells harboring HBV infection and to cure or eliminate cells actively producing virus is the biggest challenge to finding a cure. Unraveling the complex virus–host interactions that lead to persistent infection should facilitate the rational design of antivirals and immunotherapeutics to cure chronic HBV infection.

  15. Characterization of hepatitis C virus isolates from chronically infected patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.E.M. Kleter (Bernhard)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractThe function of the liver is to keep the human body in physiological equilibrium. This equilibrium is regulated by several metabolic pathways such as the production of plasma proteins and detoxification. Inflammation of the liver is known as hepatitis and as entity it has been recognized

  16. If You Have Chronic Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... liver disease should also receive pneumococcal polysaccharide vac- cine.  Get vaccinated against hepatitis A. Hepati- tis A ... viduals with liver disease. Approximately 40% of these cases are fatal. How to protect others ... blood tests, or other studies to make sure there is no evidence of ...

  17. Rare inborn errors associated with chronic hepatitis B virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Qiang; Peng, Liang; Huang, Weijun

    2012-01-01

    who were healthy and hepatitis B surface antibody-positive, but had never received hepatitis B vaccination. We selected six rare variant alleles and followed up their association with disease status by Sanger sequencing in a case-control study comprising 1,728 CHB patients and 1,636 healthy controls....... The latter had either not been immunized with hepatitis B vaccine or had uncertain vaccination status. Our results showed that transmembrane protein 2 p.Ser1254Asn, interferon alpha 2 p.Ala120Thr, its regulator NLR family member X1 p.Arg707Cys, and complement component 2 p.Glu318Asp were associated with CHB......Chronic hepatitis B (CHB) is a major global health issue. The role of rare genetic variants in CHB has not been elucidated. We aimed to identify rare allelic variants predisposing to CHB. We performed exome sequencing in 50 CHB patients who had no identifiable risk factors for CHB and 40 controls...

  18. Impact of the novel hepatotropic viruslike agent NV-F during chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chau-Ting; Hsu, Chao-Wei; Chang, Ming-Ling; Tsao, Mei-Ling

    2008-12-15

    NV-F is a novel hepatotropic viruslike agent. To investigate the impact of the NV-F agent during chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, 101 consecutive patients with chronic HCV infection were evaluated. NV-F DNA in serum samples and NV-F antigen expression in liver tissues were assessed. All patients subsequently received a 6-month course of interferon-based antiviral therapy. Of the 101 patients, 30 (29.7%) were positive for serum NV-F DNA. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed positive NV-F antigen expression in the liver in 14 of these 30 patients. Patients positive for serum NV-F DNA had significantly higher serum aminotransferase levels (P F DNA. In conclusion, coinfection of the NV-F agent in chronic HCV infection is associated with more severe hepatitis activity.

  19. PROPHYLACTIC MEASURES AGAINST INFECTION WITH HEPATITIS C VIRUS AND HIV IN INFANTS

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    Gorazd Lešničar

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Background. The World Health Organization estimates that every year more then 500,000 infants get infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and 10,000– 60,000 with hepatitis C virus (HCV worldwide.Rapid and early diagnosis of HCV and HIV infection in exposed infants is rendered difficult because of transplacental passage of maternal IgG antibodies to the virus that are present in infants up to 18 months of age. Mother-to-infant transmission of HCV is comparatively uncommon. Furthermore, chronic hepatitis C does not appear to worsen the outcome of pregnancy or predispose fetal abnormalities.The rate of mother-to-infant transmission is 4 to 7% per pregnancy in women with HCV viremia. Perinatal infection with HCV is usually asymptomatic. Concomitant infection in pregnant women with HIV increases the rate of transmission of HCV infection 4 to 5 fold. Cesarean section is not recommended and current available medications against HCV infection are contraindicated because of fetal toxicity. Breast-feeding poses no relevant risk of HCV transmission.Conclusions. Perinatal transmission of HIV from mother to child accounts to 5 to 10% of acquired HIV infections worldwide. It is by far the major source of infection and represents more that 90% of all infections in children. Transmission of HIV occurs either before birth, during delivery or through breastfeeding.Recently, zidovudine and some other antiretrovirals administered during pregnancy, at delivery, and in the first 6 weeks of life to the infant have reduced transmission by more than two thirds (from 25 to less than 5%. The experts have also recommended elective cesarean section and dissuaded HIV positive mothers from breastfeeding.Experts must also test strategies to further decrease the risk for perinatal HCV and HIV infection. Significant progress in the area of new safe and effective vaccines is eagerly expected.

  20. Hepatitis C virus liver disease in women infected with contaminated anti-D immunoglobulin.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sheehan, M M

    2012-02-03

    Screening for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is carried out by detection of antibodies to the virus (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and recombinant immunoblot assay (RIBA)) with confirmation by identification of HCV RNA genome in serum (polymerase chain reaction (PCR)). We describe the histological features on liver biopsy in 88 women with chronic HCV infection (serum positive on ELISA, RIBA and PCR) acquired from virus contaminated anti-D immunoglobulin. For the majority of these patients the time interval from virus infection to presentation was between 17 and 18 years. We separately assessed necroinflammatory disease activity and architectural features on liver biopsy and applied a scoring system which permitted semi-quantitative documentation of abnormal features. Only three women showed liver biopsies within normal limits (+\\/-focal steatosis). The remaining 85 cases showed a predominantly mild or moderate degree of disease activity with interface hepatitis (56.8% of cases), spotty necrosis, apoptosis and focal inflammation (88.6% of cases) and portal inflammation (90.9% of cases). Confluent necrosis was an uncommon finding (2.3% of cases). Assessment of architectural features showed normal appearance in 35.2% of biopsies. The predominant architectural abnormality noted was portal tract fibrosis. Ten per cent of cases, however, showed significant fibrous band and\\/or nodule formation.

  1. Fatal acute hepatic failure in a family infected with the hepatitis A virus subgenotype IB: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Yuichi; Okada, Yohei; Suzuki, Akiko; Kakisaka, Keisuke; Miyamoto, Yasuhiro; Miyasaka, Akio; Takikawa, Yasuhiro; Nishizawa, Tsutomu; Okamoto, Hiroaki

    2017-09-01

    Hepatitis A viral infection is a well-known cause of subclinical or acute self-limited hepatitis. Few cases of hepatitis A virus (HAV)-associated acute liver failure (ALF) have been reported in low HAV endemic countries annually. To investigate the possible factors that affected the severity of HAV infection, a family cluster infected with the HAV subgenotype IB strain, which is not common in Japan, was described. This family consisted of five members who all were infected with HAV. Four of the five patients hospitalized except for an asymptomatic patient. Two of the five patients, men in their 50s and 60s, developed ALF, and one patient died. Various host factors, including sex (male), age, and a high bilirubin level, may affect the outcomes. Based on viral factors, HAV RNA was higher in the fatal case compared with others, and it decreased within a short period of time. The similarity of the nucleotide sequences was 99.9% among the HAV isolates based on an entire genomic sequence. Deletions and/or insertions on the HAV protein-coding sequences that caused a frameshift were found in surviving cases but not in the fatal case. The rapid clearance of increased HAV and the absence of defective HAV might be closely associated with the onset of liver failure.

  2. Immunogenicity and safety of a plasma-derived heat-inactivated hepatitis B vaccine (CLB). Studies in volunteers at a low risk of infection with hepatitis B virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lelie, P. N.; Reesink, H. W.; de Jong-van Manen, S. T.; Dees, P. J.; Reerink-Brongers, E. E.

    1984-01-01

    The safety and immunogenicity of a plasma-derived heat-inactivated hepatitis B vaccine (CLB) were evaluated in 471 healthy human volunteers, who, both in their occupations and in their private lives, had been at minimal risk of being infected with hepatitis B virus. The first 202 individuals

  3. Hepatitis C virus infection may lead to slower emergence of P. falciparum in blood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odile Ouwe-Missi-Oukem-Boyer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Areas endemic for Plasmodium falciparum, hepatitis B virus (HBV and hepatitis C virus (HCV overlap in many parts of sub-Saharan Africa. HBV and HCV infections develop in the liver, where takes place the first development stage of P. falciparum before its further spread in blood. The complex mechanisms involved in the development of hepatitis may potentially influence the development of the liver stage of malaria parasites. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of these interactions could provide new pathophysiological insights for treatment strategies in Malaria. METHODOLOGY: We studied a cohort of 319 individuals living in a village where the three infections are prevalent. The patients were initially given a curative antimalarial treatment and were then monitored for the emergence of asexual P. falciparum forms in blood, fortnightly for one year, by microscopy and polymerase chain reaction. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: At inclusion, 65 (20.4% subjects had detectable malaria parasites in blood, 36 (11.3% were HBV chronic carriers, and 61 (18.9% were HCV chronic carriers. During follow-up, asexual P. falciparum forms were detected in the blood of 203 patients. The median time to P. falciparum emergence in blood was respectively 140 and 120 days in HBV- and HBV+ individuals, and 135 and 224 days in HCV- and HCV+ individuals. HCV carriage was associated with delayed emergence of asexual P. falciparum forms in blood relative to patients without HCV infection. CONCLUSIONS: This pilot study represents first tentative evidence of a potential epidemiological interaction between HBV, HCV and P. falciparum infections. Age is an important confounding factor in this setting however multivariate analysis points to an interaction between P. falciparum and HCV at the hepatic level with a slower emergence of P. falciparum in HCV chronic carriers. More in depth analysis are necessary to unravel the basis of hepatic interactions between these two pathogens

  4. [Prevalence and genotype distribution changes in hepatitis C virus co-infection among human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifuentes, Celia; Mancebo-Hernández, María; Pérez-Navarro, Elisabet; Recio, Eva; Monje-Agudo, Patricia; Valiente, Adoración; Pineda, Juan A

    2015-02-01

    The prevalence of hepatitisC is decreasing among new diagnoses of HIV/HCV coinfection in Spain. The increasing use of the HCV treatment could have changed the HCV genotype distribution. The aim of this study is to analyze changes in the prevalence of HCV coinfection and in HCV genotype distribution among HIV-infected patients. A serial cross-sectional study was conducted that included all HIV-infected patients who attended the Outpatient Clinic of a hospital in Andalusia, between September 2008 and February 2009 (first period), and between January 2013 and June 2013 (second period). A total of 520 and 651 patients were included in the first and second period, respectively. The risk factors of HCV infection in the first vs. second period were: IDU, 319 (61%) vs. 348 (53%); heterosexual contact, 111 (21%) vs. 135 (21%); homosexual men, 76 (15%) vs. 114 (22%) (P=.006). The prevalence of HCV antibody per period was: 358 (69%) vs. 380 (58%) (P=<.001), and for the HCV-RNA was 255 (49%) vs. 240 (37%) (P=<.001). In both periods, the HCV genotype distribution was: 1, 137 (60%) vs. 138 (59%); 3, 45 (20%) vs. 42 (18%); 4, 42 (18%) vs. 47 (20%) (P=.881). The prevalence of HCV infection in HIV-infected patients has decreased in our area, including overall exposure to HCV virus and active infection during the last 5 years. However, the HCV genotype distribution has not changed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  5. Role of interleukin-10 in prognosis of hepatitis B virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WU Changhui

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Multiple etiological factors are integrally involved in the development of hepatitis B virus (HBV infection. Interleukin-10 (IL-10 is an essential cytokine of immune regulation, and IL-10 gene promoter polymorphism affects its mRNA transcription and serum level. IL-10 is related to the prognosis of HBV infection. This review briefly discusses the association of IL-10 gene polymorphism and its serum level with the prognosis of HBV infection, and summarizes the role of IL-10, as an anti-inflammatory cytokine, in host immune function, the prognosis and progression of HBV infection, and HBV-related complications. IL-10 gene polymorphism and its serum level are closely associated with inflammatory response after HBV infection, influence HBV clearance, and are related to the severity of HBV-related liver injury, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The determination of IL-10 gene and serum levels may provide a predictive marker for the prognosis of HBV infection.

  6. Dual Infection with Hepatitis B and Epstein-Barr Virus Presenting with Severe Jaundice, Coagulopathy, and Hepatitis B Virus Chronicity Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Sirish C; Ashraf, Imran; Mir, Fazia; Samiullah, Sami; Ibdah, Jamal A; Tahan, Veysel

    2017-02-16

    BACKGROUND Hepatitis B virus (HBV) has been reported as a coinfection with hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepatitis D virus (HDV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). CASE REPORT A 34-year-old female presented to our clinic with epigastric pain and severe acute hepatitis manifested as jaundice associated with hyperbilirubinemia, elevated transaminases, and coagulopathy. The patient was diagnosed with acute HBV with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) coinfection leading to subsequent chronic hepatitis B. CONCLUSIONS To our knowledge, this patient case is the first reported case of HBV and EBV coinfection reported in the literature. HBV and EBV coinfection may cause severe acute hepatitis with HBV chronicity.

  7. Cytokine Signatures Discriminate Highly Frequent Acute Hepatitis a Virus and Hepatitis E Virus Coinfections from Monoinfections in Mexican Pediatric Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Realpe-Quintero, Mauricio; Copado-Villagrana, Edgar Daniel; Trujillo-Ochoa, Jorge Luis; Alvarez, Angel Hilario; Panduro, Arturo; Fierro, Nora Alma

    2017-07-01

    The frequency of hepatitis A virus and hepatitis E virus infections and their cytokine profiles were analyzed in Mexican pediatric patients with acute hepatitis. A high frequency of coinfections was found. Significant overexpression of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-12, IL-13 and interferon-gamma during hepatitis A virus monoinfections and limited secretion of cytokines in hepatitis E virus infections were observed.

  8. Injection drug use facilitates hepatitis C virus infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resti, Massimo; Azzari, Chiara; Moriondo, Maria; Betti, Letizia; Sforzi, Idanna; Novembre, Elio; Vierucci, Alberto

    2002-08-01

    Infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been demonstrated and has been found to play a role in relapse of HCV disease and vertical transmission of HCV. Injection drug use is thought to impair function of the immune system and induce tolerance to viruses; therefore, HCV infection of PBMCs could be more likely to occur in injection drug users (IDUs) with HCV infection. Of 108 women who tested negative for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and positive for HCV RNA, 51 had a history of injection drug use and 57 had no known risk factor for HCV infection. HCV infection was found, by nested reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis, in the PBMCs of 33 IDUs and of 13 non-IDUs (P=.00003). No correlation was found between infection of the PBMCs and HCV genotype or virus load. Route of transmission and viral factors, as well as immunologic dysfunction, may play a role in viral tropism.

  9. Prevalence, risk factors, and impact of isolated antibody to hepatitis B core antigen and occult hepatitis B virus infection in HIV-1-infected pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamduang, Woottichai; Ngo-Giang-Huong, Nicole; Gaudy-Graffin, Catherine; Jourdain, Gonzague; Suwankornsakul, Weerapong; Jarupanich, Tapnarong; Chalermpolprapa, Veeradate; Nanta, Sirisak; Puarattana-Aroonkorn, Noossara; Tonmat, Sakchai; Lallemant, Marc; Goudeau, Alain; Sirirungsi, Wasna

    2013-06-01

    Prevalence and risk factors for isolated antibody to hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc) and occult hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection are not well known in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected pregnant women. It is unclear if women with occult infections are at risk of transmitting HBV to their infants. HIV-1-infected and HBV surface antigen (HBsAg)-negative pregnant women were tested for antibody to HBsAg (anti-HBs) and anti-HBc using enzyme immunoassay. Women with isolated anti-HBc were assessed for occult HBV infection, defined as HBV DNA levels >15 IU/mL, using the Abbott RealTime HBV DNA assay. Infants born to women with isolated anti-HBc and detectable HBV DNA were tested at 4 months of age for HBV DNA. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with isolated anti-HBc and occult HBV infection. Among 1812 HIV-infected pregnant women, 1682 were HBsAg negative. Fourteen percent (95% confidence interval [CI], 12%-15%) of HBsAg-negative women had an isolated anti-HBc that was independently associated with low CD4 count, age >35 years, birth in northern Thailand, and positive anti-hepatitis C virus serology. Occult HBV infection was identified in 24% (95% CI, 18%-30%) of women with isolated anti-HBc, representing 2.6% (95% CI, 1.9%-3.5%) of HIV-1-infected pregnant women, and was inversely associated with HIV RNA levels. None of the women with isolated anti-HBc and occult HBV infection transmitted HBV to their infants. HIV-1-infected pregnant women with isolated anti-HBc and occult HBV infection have very low HBV DNA levels and are thus at very low risk to transmit HBV to their infants.

  10. Analysis of antiviral response in human epithelial cells infected with hepatitis E virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradip B Devhare

    Full Text Available Hepatitis E virus (HEV is a major cause of enterically transmitted acute hepatitis in developing nations and occurs in sporadic and epidemic forms. The disease may become severe with high mortality (20% among pregnant women. Due to lack of efficient cell culture system and small animal model, early molecular events of HEV infection are not yet known. In the present study, human lung epithelial cells, A549, were infected with HEV to monitor expression levels of genes/proteins in antiviral pathways. Both live and UV inactivated virus elicited robust induction of inflammatory cytokines/chemokines such as IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, and RANTES within 12 h of infection. Cells exposed to soluble capsid protein showed no induction suggesting the capsid structure and not the protein being detected as the pathogen pattern by cells. A delayed up-regulation of type I interferon genes only by the live virus at 48 h post HEV infection indicated the need of virus replication. However, absence of secreted interferons till 96 h suggested possible involvement of post-transcriptional regulation of type I IFN expression. HEV infected cells showed activation of both NF-κB and IRF3 transcription factors when seen at protein levels; however, reporter gene assays showed predominant expression via NF-κB promoter as compared to IRF3 promoter. Knockdown experiments done using siRNAs showed involvement of MyD88 and TRIF adaptors in generating antiviral response thus indicating role of TLR2, TLR4 and TLR3 in sensing viral molecules. MAVS knockdown surprisingly enhanced only proinflammatory cytokines and not type I IFNs. This suggested that HEV not only down-regulates RIG-I helicase like receptor mediated IFN induction but also employs MAVS in curtailing host inflammatory response. Our findings uncover an early cellular response in HEV infection and associated molecular mechanisms suggesting the potential role of inflammatory response triggered by HEV infection in host immune

  11. Chronic hepatitis C virus infection and neurological and psychiatric disorders: An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adinolfi, Luigi Elio; Nevola, Riccardo; Lus, Giacomo; Restivo, Luciano; Guerrera, Barbara; Romano, Ciro; Zampino, Rosa; Rinaldi, Luca; Sellitto, Ausilia; Giordano, Mauro; Marrone, Aldo

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is considered a systemic disease because of involvement of other organs and tissues concomitantly with liver disease. Among the extrahepatic manifestations, neuropsychiatric disorders have been reported in up to 50% of chronic HCV infected patients. Both the central and peripheral nervous system may be involved with a wide variety of clinical manifestations. Main HCV-associated neurological conditions include cerebrovascular events, encephalopathy, myelitis, encephalomyelitis, and cognitive impairment, whereas “brain fog”, depression, anxiety, and fatigue are at the top of the list of psychiatric disorders. Moreover, HCV infection is known to cause both motor and sensory peripheral neuropathy in the context of mixed cryoglobulinemia, and has also been recently recognized as an independent risk factor for stroke. These extrahepatic manifestations are independent of severity of the underlying chronic liver disease and hepatic encephalopathy. The brain is a suitable site for HCV replication, where the virus may directly exert neurotoxicity; other mechanisms proposed to explain the pathogenesis of neuropsychiatric disorders in chronic HCV infection include derangement of metabolic pathways of infected cells, alterations in neurotransmitter circuits, autoimmune disorders, and cerebral or systemic inflammation. A pathogenic role for HCV is also suggested by improvement of neurological and psychiatric symptoms in patients achieving a sustained virologic response following interferon treatment; however, further ad hoc trials are needed to fully assess the impact of HCV infection and specific antiviral treatments on associated neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:25741133

  12. Differential gene expression analysis of in vitro duck hepatitis B virus infected primary duck hepatocyte cultures

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    Issac Aneesh

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human hepatitis B virus (HBV, a member of the hepadna viridae, causes acute or chronic hepatitis B, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. The duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV infection, a dependable and reproducible model for hepadna viral studies, does not result in HCC unlike chronic HBV infection. Information on differential gene expression in DHBV infection might help to compare corresponding changes during HBV infection, and to delineate the reasons for this difference. Findings A subtractive hybridization cDNA library screening of in vitro DHBV infected, cultured primary duck hepatocytes (PDH identified cDNAs of 42 up-regulated and 36 down-regulated genes coding for proteins associated with signal transduction, cellular respiration, transcription, translation, ubiquitin/proteasome pathway, apoptosis, and membrane and cytoskeletal organization. Those coding for both novel as well as previously reported proteins in HBV/DHBV infection were present in the library. An inverse modulation of the cDNAs of ten proteins, reported to play role in human HCC, such as that of Y-box binding protein1, Platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase isoform 1B, ribosomal protein L35a, Ferritin, α-enolase, Acid α-glucosidase and Caspase 3, copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD, Filamin and Pyruvate dehydrogenase, was also observed in this in vitro study. Conclusions The present study identified cDNAs of a number of genes that are differentially modulated in in vitro DHBV infection of primary duck hepatocytes. Further correlation of this differential gene expression in in vivo infection models would be valuable to understand the little known aspects of the hepadnavirus biology.

  13. Economic evaluation of screening programs for hepatitis C virus infection: evidence from literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coretti S

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Silvia Coretti,1 Federica Romano,1 Valentina Orlando,2 Paola Codella,1 Sabrina Prete,1 Eugenio Di Brino,1 Matteo Ruggeri1 1Post-Graduate School of Economics and Management (ALTEMS, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome, Italy; 2Center of Pharmacoeconomics (CIRFF, Department of Pharmacy, Federico II University, Naples, Italy Background: Hepatitis C is a liver infection caused by hepatitis C virus. Its main complications are cirrhosis and liver cancer. According to the World Health Organization (WHO, more than 185 million people worldwide are infected with hepatitis C virus and, of these, 350,000 die every year. Due to the high disease prevalence and the existence of effective (and expensive medical treatments able to dramatically change the prognosis, early detection programs can potentially prevent the development of serious chronic conditions, improve health, and save resources. Objective: To summarize the available evidence on the cost-effectiveness of screening programs for hepatitis C. Methods: A literature search was performed on PubMed and Scopus search engines. Trip database was queried to identify reports produced by the major Health Technology Assessment (HTA agencies. Three reviewers dealt with study selection and data extraction blindly. Results: Ten papers eventually met the inclusion criteria. In studies focusing on asymptomatic cohorts of individuals at general risk the cost/quality adjusted life year of screening programs ranged between US $4,200 and $50,000/quality adjusted life year gained, while in those focusing on specific risk factors the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio ranged between $848 and $128,424/quality adjusted life year gained. Age of the target population and disease prevalence were the main cost-effectiveness drivers. Conclusion: Our results suggest that, especially in the long run, screening programs represent a cost-effective strategy for the management of hepatitis C. Keywords: hepatitis C, screening

  14. Animal models for the study of hepatitis C virus infection and related liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bukh, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) causes liver-related death in more than 300,000 people annually. Treatments for patients with chronic HCV are suboptimal, despite the introduction of directly acting antiviral agents. There is no vaccine that prevents HCV infection. Relevant animal models are important...... for HCV research and development of drugs and vaccines. Chimpanzees are the best model for studies of HCV infection and related innate and adaptive host immune responses. They can be used in immunogenicity and efficacy studies of HCV vaccines. The only small animal models of robust HCV infection are T......- and B- cell deficient mice with human chimeric livers. Although these mice cannot be used in studies of adaptive immunity, they have provided new insights into HCV neutralization, interactions between virus and receptors, innate host responses, and therapeutic approaches. Recent progress in developing...

  15. Co-infection of syphilis and hepatitis B with carcinoma penis in a human immunodeficiency virus male.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindan, Balaji; Subramanian, Kalaivani; Karunakaran, Maduravasagam

    2017-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections have a high probability of co-infections with Syphilis and hepatitis B virus since they share the common routes of transmission. We report a 41-year-old HIV male (on antiretroviral therapy for the past 6 years) admitted for a complaint of penile ulcer for 2 months. Serology for syphilis and hepatitis B were positive. Skin biopsy of the penile ulcer confirmed squamous cell carcinoma. Henceforth, the patient was referred to oncology department for further management. We present this rare combination of syphilis and hepatitis B with carcinoma penis in an HIV patient.

  16. Challenges to mapping the health risk of hepatitis A virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiersma Steven T

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background World maps are among the most effective ways to convey public health messages such as recommended vaccinations, but creating a useful and valid map requires careful deliberation. The changing epidemiology of hepatitis A virus (HAV in many world regions heightens the need for up-to-date risk maps. HAV infection is usually asymptomatic in children, so low-income areas with high incidence rates usually have a low burden of disease. In higher-income areas, many adults remain susceptible to the virus and, if infected, often experience severe disease. Results Several challenges associated with presenting hepatitis A risk using maps were identified, including the need to decide whether prior infection or continued susceptibility more aptly indicates risk, whether to display incidence or prevalence, how to distinguish between different levels of risk, how to display changes in risk over time, how to present complex information to target audiences, and how to handle missing or obsolete data. Conclusion For future maps to be comparable across place and time, we propose the use of the age at midpoint of population susceptibility as a standard indicator for the level of hepatitis A endemicity within a world region. We also call for the creation of an accessible active database for population-based age-specific HAV seroprevalence and incidence studies. Health risk maps for other conditions with rapidly changing epidemiology would benefit from similar strategies.

  17. Hepatitis C virus infection in pregnant women in Southeastern Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Intravenous drug use, tattooing or jaundice in the past and Human Immunodeficiency Virus positivity did not show any association with HCV seropositivity. Conclusion: HCV seropositive pregnant women in the study were asymptomatic and showed no association with the medical and sociodemographic characteristics ...

  18. Vertically acquired hepatitis C virus infection: Correlates of transmission and disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovo, Pier-Angelo; Calitri, Carmelina; Scolfaro, Carlo; Gabiano, Clara; Garazzino, Silvia

    2016-01-28

    The worldwide prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in children is 0.05%-0.4% in developed countries and 2%-5% in resource-limited settings, where inadequately tested blood products or un-sterile medical injections still remain important routes of infection. After the screening of blood donors, mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HCV has become the leading cause of pediatric infection, at a rate of 5%. Maternal HIV co-infection is a significant risk factor for MTCT and anti-HIV therapy during pregnancy seemingly can reduce the transmission rate of both viruses. Conversely, a high maternal viral load is an important, but not preventable risk factor, because at present no anti-HCV treatment can be administered to pregnant women to block viral replication. Caution is needed in adopting obstetric procedures, such as amniocentesis or internal fetal monitoring, that can favor fetal exposure to HCV contaminated maternal blood, though evidence is lacking on the real risk of single obstetric practices. Mode of delivery and type of feeding do not represent significant risk factors for MTCT. Therefore, there is no reason to offer elective caesarean section or discourage breast-feeding to HCV infected parturients. Information on the natural history of vertical HCV infection is limited. The primary infection is asymptomatic in infants. At least one quarter of infected children shows a spontaneous viral clearance (SVC) that usually occurs within 6 years of life. IL-28B polymorphims and genotype 3 infection have been associated with greater chances of SVC. In general, HCV progression is mild or moderate in children with chronic infection who grow regularly, though cases with marked liver fibrosis or hepatic failure have been described. Non-organ specific autoantibodies and cryoglobulins are frequently found in children with chronic infection, but autoimmune diseases or HCV associated extrahepatic manifestations are rare.

  19. Hepatitis B Virus Infection in Tanzania: Current Status and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semvua B. Kilonzo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B is one of the most common infectious diseases in the world with high prevalence in most of sub-Saharan Africa countries. The complexity in its diagnosis and treatment poses a significant management challenge in the resource-limited settings including Tanzania, where most of the tests and drugs are either unavailable or unaffordable. This mini review aims at demonstrating the current status of the disease in the country and discussing the concomitant challenges in diagnosis, treatment, and prevention.

  20. HIV infection and hepatitis C virus genotype 1a are associated with phylogenetic clustering among people with recently acquired hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Sofia R; Jacka, Brendan; Bull, Rowena A; Luciani, Fabio; Matthews, Gail V; Lamoury, Francois M J; Hellard, Margaret E; Hajarizadeh, Behzad; Teutsch, Suzy; White, Bethany; Maher, Lisa; Dore, Gregory J; Lloyd, Andrew R; Grebely, Jason; Applegate, Tanya L

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify factors associated with phylogenetic clustering among people with recently acquired hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Participants with available sample at time of HCV detection were selected from three studies; the Australian Trial in Acute Hepatitis C, the Hepatitis C Incidence and Transmission Study - Prison and Community. HCV RNA was extracted and Core to E2 region of HCV sequenced. Clusters were identified from maximum likelihood trees with 1000 bootstrap replicates using 90% bootstrap and 5% genetic distance threshold. Among 225 participants with available Core-E2 sequence (ATAHC, n=113; HITS-p, n=90; and HITS-c, n=22), HCV genotype prevalence was: G1a: 38% (n=86), G1b: 5% (n=12), G2a: 1% (n=2), G2b: 5% (n=11), G3a: 48% (n=109), G6a: 1% (n=2) and G6l 1% (n=3). Of participants included in phylogenetic trees, 22% of participants were in a pair/cluster (G1a-35%, 30/85, mean maximum genetic distance=0.031; G3a-11%, 12/106, mean maximum genetic distance=0.021; other genotypes-21%, 6/28, mean maximum genetic distance=0.023). Among HCV/HIV co-infected participants, 50% (18/36) were in a pair/cluster, compared to 16% (30/183) with HCV mono-infection (P=HIV co-infection [vs. HCV mono-infection; adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 4.24; 95%CI 1.91, 9.39], and HCV G1a infection (vs. other HCV genotypes; AOR 3.33, 95%CI 0.14, 0.61).HCV treatment and prevention strategies, including enhanced antiviral therapy, should be optimised. The impact of targeting of HCV treatment as prevention to populations with higher phylogenetic clustering, such as those with HIV co-infection, could be explored through mathematical modelling. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Hepatitis B or hepatitis C co-infection in individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus and effect of anti-tuberculosis drugs on liver function

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    Padmapriyadarsini C

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tuberculosis (TB and hepatitis are the two common co-infections in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. Anti-tuberculosis treatment (ATT may have an effect on the liver enzymes in these co-infected HIV patients. Aims: To determine the prevalence of Hepatitis B and C virus coinfection in HIV infected patients in Tamilnadu and assess effects of anti-tuberculosis drugs on their liver function. Settings: HIV positive subjects referred to the Tuberculosis Research Centre, Chennai Materials and Methods: All HIV infected patients referred to the Tuberculosis Research centre, from March 2000 to May 2004, were screened for Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg & Hepatitis C virus (HCV antibodies by enzyme linked immunoabsorbent assay (ELISA. HIV infection was confirmed using two rapid tests and one ELISA. Patients were given either short- course anti-tuberculosis treatment or preventive therapy for tuberculosis, depending on the presence or absence of active TB, if their baseline liver functions were within normal limits. None of these patients were on antiretroviral therapy during the study period. Statistical Analysis: Paired t-test was used to find the significance between baseline and end of treatment liver enzymes levels, while logistic regression was done for assessing various associations. Results: Of the 951 HIV-infected patients, 61 patients (6.4% were HBsAg positive, 20 (2.1% had demonstrable anti HCV antibodies in their blood. Serial estimation of liver enzymes in 140 HIV patients (81 being co-infected with either HBV or HCV showed that 95% did not develop any liver toxicity while they were on anti-tuberculosis treatment or prophylaxis. Conclusions: The prevalence of hepatitis B and C coinfection was fairly high in this largely heterosexually infected population supporting the use of more careful screening for these viruses in HIV positive persons in this region. Anti-tuberculosis therapy as well as TB preventive

  2. Effective treatment of injecting drug users with recently acquired hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dore, Gregory J; Hellard, Margaret; Matthews, Gail V; Grebely, Jason; Haber, Paul S; Petoumenos, Kathy; Yeung, Barbara; Marks, Philippa; van Beek, Ingrid; McCaughan, Geoffrey; White, Peter; French, Rosemary; Rawlinson, William; Lloyd, Andrew R; Kaldor, John M

    2010-01-01

    Patients with acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection who receive treatment achieve high rates of sustained virologic response (SVR), but few studies have examined outcomes among injecting drug users (IDUs). We evaluated the efficacy of treatment of recent HCV infection in IDUs with acute and early chronic HCV. We analyzed data from the Australian Trial in Acute Hepatitis C-a prospective study of the natural history and treatment outcomes of patients with recent HCV infection. Participants eligible for the study had their first anti-HCV antibody-positive test result within the past 6 months and either acute clinical HCV within the past 12 months or documented anti-HCV seroconversion within 24 months. Participants with HCV received pegylated interferon-alfa-2a (180 microg/wk, n = 74); those with HCV/human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infection received pegylated interferon-alfa-2a (180 microg/wk) with ribavirin (n = 35) for 24 weeks. From June 2004 to February 2008, 167 participants were enrolled in the Australian Trial in Acute Hepatitis C; 79% had injected drugs in the previous 6 months. Among 74 with only HCV, the SVRs were 55% and 72% by intention-to-treat and per-protocol analysis, respectively. In multivariate analyses, baseline factors independently associated with lower SVR included decreased social functioning and current opiate pharmacotherapy. Adherent participants had higher SVR rates (63% vs 29%; P = .025). Of the 35 participants with HCV/HIV co-infection, the SVRs were 74% and 75% by intention-to-treat and per-protocol analysis, respectively. Treatment of recent HCV infection among IDUs, including those with HIV co-infection, is effective. Strategies to engage socially marginalized individuals and increase adherence should improve treatment outcomes in this population. Copyright 2010 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Hepatitis C virus infection: Are there still specific problems with genotype 3?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondeau, Claire; Pageaux, Georges Philippe; Larrey, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is one of the most common causes of chronic liver disease and the main indication for liver transplantation worldwide. As promising specific treatments have been introduced for genotype 1, clinicians and researchers are now focusing on patients infected by non-genotype 1 HCV, particularly genotype 3. Indeed, in the golden era of direct-acting antiviral drugs, genotype 3 infections are no longer considered as easy to treat and are associated with higher risk of developing severe liver injuries, such as cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Moreover, HCV genotype 3 accounts for 40% of all HCV infections in Asia and is the most frequent genotype among HCV-positive injecting drug users in several countries. Here, we review recent data on HCV genotype 3 infection/treatment, including clinical aspects and the underlying genotype-specific molecular mechanisms. PMID:26576095

  4. Extrahepatic Manifestations and Autoantibodies in Patients with Hepatitis C Virus Infection

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    Takashi Himoto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection frequently have many extrahepatic manifestations, as persistent HCV infection often triggers lymphoproliferative disorders and metabolic abnormalities. These manifestations primarily include autoimmune disorders such as cryoglobulinemia, Sjögren’s syndrome, and autoimmune thyroid disorders. It has been well established that chronic HCV infection plays important roles in the production of non-organ-specific autoantibodies, including antinuclear antibodies and smooth muscle antibodies, and organ-specific autoantibodies such as thyroid autoantibodies. However, the clinical significance of autoantibodies associated with the extrahepatic manifestations caused by HCV infection has not been fully recognized. In this paper, we mainly focus on the relationship between extrahepatic manifestations and the emergence of autoantibodies in patients with HCV infection and discuss the clinical relevance of the autoantibodies in the extrahepatic disorders.

  5. Strategies to prevent hepatitis B virus infection in China: immunization, screening, and standard medical practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunyu; Zhong, Yuesi; Guo, Liping

    2013-02-01

    China has one of the world's highest rates of hepatitis B infection. Over the past 20 years, a series of strategies have been implemented to prevent infection with the hepatitis B virus (HBV) in China. These strategies include hepatitis B (hepB) immunization for susceptible populations such as infants and young children and for high-risk populations such as health care workers and patients, premarital health care for couples of childbearing age, and standard medical practices. A series of measures implemented by the Chinese government caused the HBV infection rate in China to decrease from 9.75% in 1992 to 7.2% in 2006. However, a report on infectious diseases indicated that more than 1 million people in China were infected with hepB in 2011. There is room for improvement. The current work analyzed the current status of and challenges for strategies to prevent HBV infection in China. This work also recommends clear guidance regarding hepB immunization for parents in rural areas, more flexible premarital health care, health education for both patients and health care workers, and routine HBV screening for high-risk health care workers.

  6. Hepatitis B virus (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepatitis B is also known as serum hepatitis and is spread through blood and sexual contact. It is ... population. This photograph is an electronmicroscopic image of hepatitis B virus particles. (Image courtesy of the Centers for ...

  7. Relationship between HLA-DQ Gene Polymorphism and Hepatitis B Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Xu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B virus (HBV infection is the predominant risk factor for chronic hepatitis B (CHB. The association between HBV infection and human leukocyte antigen- (HLA- DQ polymorphism (rs2856718 and rs7453920 has been demonstrated in other studies; however, the results were controversial or inconclusive. Therefore, to derive a more precise estimation of the association, a meta-analysis was performed. Crude odds ratios (ORs and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs were used to assess the strength of association between HLA-DQ polymorphism (rs2856718 and rs7453920 and HBV infection risk. A total of 11 articles were used to evaluate the effect of the two polymorphisms on risk of HBV infection. The pooled data showed that HLA-DQ rs2856718-G polymorphism showed protection against HBV infection, and rs2856718-A was a risk factor for chronic HBV infection. The pooled risk estimates indicated that HLA-DQ rs7453920-A polymorphism was associated with decreased risk of HBV infection, and rs7453920-G serves as a risk factor in HBV infection. However, these stratified analyses were lacking credibility due to the limitation of correlational study numbers; further investigation on a large population and different ethnicities is warranted.

  8. Exploitation of lipid components by viral and host proteins for hepatitis C virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohji eMoriishi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV, which is a major causative agent of blood-borne hepatitis, has chronically infected about 170 million individuals worldwide and leads to chronic infection, resulting in development of steatosis, cirrhosis and eventually hepatocellular carcinoma. Hepatocellular carcinoma associated with HCV infection is not only caused by chronic inflammation, but also by the biological activity of HCV proteins. HCV core protein is known as a main component of the viral nucleocapsid. It cooperates with host factors and possesses biological activity causing lipid alteration, oxidative stress and progression of cell growth, while other viral proteins also interact with host proteins including molecular chaperones, membrane-anchoring proteins and enzymes associated with lipid metabolism to maintain the efficiency of viral replication and production. HCV core protein is localized on the surface of lipid droplets in infected cells. However, the role of lipid droplets in HCV infection has not yet been elucidated. Several groups recently reported that other viral proteins also support viral infection by regulation of lipid droplets and core localization in infected cells. Furthermore, lipid components are required for modification of host factors and the intracellular membrane to maintain or up-regulate viral replication. In this review, we summarize the current status of knowledge regarding the exploitation of lipid components by viral and host proteins in HCV infection.

  9. Hepatitis virus panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003558.htm Hepatitis virus panel To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The hepatitis virus panel is a series of blood tests used ...

  10. Natural Killer Cell Function and Dysfunction in Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayla A. Holder

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Viruses must continually adapt against dynamic innate and adaptive responses of the host immune system to establish chronic infection. Only a small minority (~20% of those exposed to hepatitis C virus (HCV spontaneously clear infection, leaving approximately 200 million people worldwide chronically infected with HCV. A number of recent research studies suggest that establishment and maintenance of chronic HCV infection involve natural killer (NK cell dysfunction. This relationship is illustrated in vitro by disruption of typical NK cell responses including both cell-mediated cytotoxicity and cytokine production. Expression of a number of activating NK cell receptors in vivo is also affected in chronic HCV infection. Thus, direct in vivo and in vitro evidence of compromised NK function in chronic HCV infection in conjunction with significant epidemiological associations between the outcome of HCV infection and certain combinations of NK cell regulatory receptor and class I human histocompatibility linked antigen (HLA genotypes indicate that NK cells are important in the immune response against HCV infection. In this review, we highlight evidence suggesting that selective impairment of NK cell activity is related to establishment of chronic HCV infection.

  11. How do persistent infections with hepatitis C virus cause liver cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Jonathan K; Lemon, Stanley M; McGivern, David R

    2015-10-01

    Persistent infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is associated with an increased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Cancer typically develops in a setting of chronic hepatic inflammation and advanced fibrosis or cirrhosis, and such tissue represents a pre-neoplastic 'cancer field'. However, not all persistent infections progress to HCC and a combination of viral and host immune factors likely contributes to carcinogenesis. HCV may disrupt cellular pathways involved in detecting and responding to DNA damage, potentially adding to the risk of cancer. Efforts to unravel how HCV promotes HCC are hindered by lack of a robust small animal model, but a better understanding of molecular mechanisms could identify novel biomarkers for early detection and allow for development of improved therapies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Knowledge of hepatitis B virus infection among traders | Okonkwo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    % of its general population having evidence of a previous or current infection. Lack of awareness of HBV, its risk factors, and its consequences are recognized as major deterrents to adopting positive preventive behavior including immunization ...

  13. Novel microRNA-like viral small regulatory RNAs arising during human hepatitis A virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jiandong; Sun, Jing; Wang, Bin; Wu, Meini; Zhang, Jing; Duan, Zhiqing; Wang, Haixuan; Hu, Ningzhu; Hu, Yunzhang

    2014-10-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), including host miRNAs and viral miRNAs, play vital roles in regulating host-virus interactions. DNA viruses encode miRNAs that regulate the viral life cycle. However, it is generally believed that cytoplasmic RNA viruses do not encode miRNAs, owing to inaccessible cellular miRNA processing machinery. Here, we provide a comprehensive genome-wide analysis and identification of miRNAs that were derived from hepatitis A virus (HAV; Hu/China/H2/1982), which is a typical cytoplasmic RNA virus. Using deep-sequencing and in silico approaches, we identified 2 novel virally encoded miRNAs, named hav-miR-1-5p and hav-miR-2-5p. Both of the novel virally encoded miRNAs were clearly detected in infected cells. Analysis of Dicer enzyme silencing demonstrated that HAV-derived miRNA biogenesis is Dicer dependent. Furthermore, we confirmed that HAV mature miRNAs were generated from viral miRNA precursors (pre-miRNAs) in host cells. Notably, naturally derived HAV miRNAs were biologically and functionally active and induced post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS). Genomic location analysis revealed novel miRNAs located in the coding region of the viral genome. Overall, our results show that HAV naturally generates functional miRNA-like small regulatory RNAs during infection. This is the first report of miRNAs derived from the coding region of genomic RNA of a cytoplasmic RNA virus. These observations demonstrate that a cytoplasmic RNA virus can naturally generate functional miRNAs, as DNA viruses do. These findings also contribute to improved understanding of host-RNA virus interactions mediated by RNA virus-derived miRNAs. © FASEB.

  14. Carcinoma hepatocelular, alcoholismo y virus de la hepatitis C Hepatocellular carcinoma, alcoholism and hepatitis C virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Jairo Orrego B.

    1994-02-01

    Full Text Available Presentamos el caso de un paciente de 64 años, con el antecedente de consumo excesivo de alcohol, quien consulta por dolor localizado en el cuadrante superior derecho, de varios meses de evolución. En la laparoscopia se aprecian cirrosis macronodular y una masa localizada en el lóbulo Izquierdo del hígado, previamente detectada por ecografía. El estudio histológico demostró un carcinoma hepatocelular. Los estudios metabólicos, Inmunológicos y sexológicos permitieron documentar solamente la asociación con anticuerpos contra el virus de la Hepatitis C.

    We report on the case of a sixty-four year old man who drank alcohol chronically. For several months he had suffered pain in his right upper abdominal quadrant. At laparoscopy macronodular cirrhosis and a mass 10-calized on the left hepatic lobe were observed; the mass had previously been identified by ultrasound examination. Histologic examination of the lesion established the presence of a hepatocellular carcinoma. Metabolic, Immunologic and serologic studies documented only the association with antibodies to hepatitis C virus.

  15. Management of chronic hepatitis C virus infection: a new era of disease control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teoh, N C; Farrell, G C

    2004-06-01

    The management of chronic viral hepatitis has changed significantly with the availability of effective antiviral agents. There is now a high probability that timely intervention can arrest development of cirrhosis, thereby preventing mortality from portal hypertension, liver failure and liver cancer. This two-part review discusses the implications of this new era of antiviral therapy for physicians. The present review is about chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV); a similar review that considers the treatment of hepatitis B virus will be published in a later issue of the Internal Medicine Journal. Chronic HCV infection is common, but fibrotic progression of liver disease is slow and variable; many infected persons never develop cirrhosis. Case selection for antiviral therapy is crucial. The most effective therapy is a pegylated (long-acting) interferon with ribavirin. Sustained viral response (SVR) (absent viraemia 6 months after completing treatment) can be obtained in 40-60% of individuals infected with genotype 1 and in approximately 67% with genotype 4 after 12 months of treatment. Response rates are higher (75-85%) with genotypes 2 and 3 after only 6 months of treatment. Late relapse is negligible after SVR. This viral cure reverses hepatic fibrosis, reduces the risk of liver failure and of hepato-cellular carcinoma. Combination therapy requires a supportive setting to minimize the impact of side-effects and maximize therapeutic effectiveness. Overall management of HCV-infected persons must also embrace measures to improve quality of life by preventing or dealing with psychosocial issues and advocating lifestyle changes to counter comorbidity from alcohol, central obesity and insulin resistance. These latter factors favour fibrotic disease progression, complications of cirrhosis (such as hepatocellular carcinoma) and development of type 2 diabetes mellitus, as well as eroding the chances of SVR with antiviral therapy.

  16. Hepatitis G virus infection in Egyptian children with chronic renal failure (single centre study

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    Zaghloul Mohammad

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis G virus (HGV is an RNA virus. It is mainly transmitted through exposure to contaminated blood although other routes may also exist. Patients with chronic renal failure (CRF are at high risk of acquiring HGV because they require frequent blood transfusions. Ongoing HGV infection can be only diagnosed by demonstrating viremia in patient sample by reverse transcriptase (RT PCR. Antibodies to the envelop protein E2 (anti E2 of HGV is an indicator of virus clearance and testify past HGV contact. This cross sectional study was done to assess the frequency of HGV exposure (ongoing and past infection in Egyptian children with CRF and to study the possible risk factors of infection. Methods This study included 100 children with CRF [34 on regular haemodialysis (HD and 66 before the start of dialysis (predialysis]. All patients sera were tested for HGV RNA by RT-PCR, anti E2, hepatitis C virus (HCV antibody, hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg, and hepatitis B core antibody (HBcAB. Twenty five healthy children of matched age & sex were used as controls. Results HGV RNA was positive in 9 (26.5% of HD and 9 (13.6% of predialysis children. Anti E2 was positive in 14 (41.2% of HD and 19 (28.8% of predialysis children. In comparison to controls; CRF (n = 100; HD and predialysis children had significantly higher prevalence of anti E2 [4% VS 33% for all CRF cases; (p = 0.002& 41.2% (p = 0.002 and 28.8% (p = 0.01; for HD and predialysis groups; respectively]. HGV RNA was significantly more prevalent only in HD children in comparison to controls (p = 0.03. HD and predialysis children did not have significant difference in the prevalence of HGV RNA (p = 0.16 or anti E2 (p = 0.26. HGV exposure was not correlated with positivity of anti HCV (p = 0.32, HCV RNA (0.09, HBsAg/HBcAB (p = 1, age (p = 0.06, or gender (p = 0.83. It was significantly correlated with duration of the disease (p Conclusions The frequency of HGV exposure in Egyptian

  17. Seroprevalence of Human Immunodeficiency Virus, Hepatitis B Virus, Hepatitis C Virus, and Treponema pallidum Infections among Blood Donors on Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea.

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    Dong-De Xie

    Full Text Available Regular screening of transfusion-transmissible infections (TTIs, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, hepatitis B and hepatitis C virus (HBV and HCV, respectively, and Treponema pallidum, in blood donors is essential to guaranteeing clinical transfusion safety. This study aimed to determine the seroprevalence of four TTIs among blood donors on Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea (EG.A retrospective survey of blood donors from January 2011 to April 2013 was conducted to assess the presence of HIV, HBV, HCV and T. pallidum. The medical records were analyzed to verify the seroprevalence of these TTIs among blood donations stratified by gender, age and geographical region.Of the total 2937 consecutive blood donors, 1098 (37.39% had a minimum of one TTI and 185 (6.29% harbored co-infections. The general seroprevalence of HIV, HBV, HCV and T. pallidum were 7.83%, 10.01%, 3.71% and 21.51%, respectively. The most frequent TTI co-infections were HBV-T. pallidum 60 (2.04% and HIV-T. pallidum 46 (1.57%. The seroprevalence of HIV, HBV, HCV and T. pallidum were highest among blood donors 38 to 47 years, 18 to 27 years and ≥ 48 years age, respectively (P<0.05. The seroprevalence of TTIs varied according to the population from which the blood was collected on Bioko Island.Our results firstly provide a comprehensive overview of TTIs among blood donors on Bioko Island. Strict screening of blood donors and improved hematological examinations using standard operating procedures are recommended.

  18. Seroprevalence of Human Immunodeficiency Virus, Hepatitis B Virus, Hepatitis C Virus, and Treponema pallidum Infections among Blood Donors on Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Dong-De; Li, Jian; Chen, Jiang-Tao; Eyi, Urbano Monsuy; Matesa, Rocio Apicante; Obono, Maximo Miko Ondo; Ehapo, Carlos Sala; Yang, Li-Ye; Yang, Hui; Yang, Hui-Tian; Lin, Min

    2015-01-01

    Regular screening of transfusion-transmissible infections (TTIs), such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B and hepatitis C virus (HBV and HCV, respectively), and Treponema pallidum, in blood donors is essential to guaranteeing clinical transfusion safety. This study aimed to determine the seroprevalence of four TTIs among blood donors on Bioko Island, Equatorial Guinea (EG). A retrospective survey of blood donors from January 2011 to April 2013 was conducted to assess the presence of HIV, HBV, HCV and T. pallidum. The medical records were analyzed to verify the seroprevalence of these TTIs among blood donations stratified by gender, age and geographical region. Of the total 2937 consecutive blood donors, 1098 (37.39%) had a minimum of one TTI and 185 (6.29%) harbored co-infections. The general seroprevalence of HIV, HBV, HCV and T. pallidum were 7.83%, 10.01%, 3.71% and 21.51%, respectively. The most frequent TTI co-infections were HBV-T. pallidum 60 (2.04%) and HIV-T. pallidum 46 (1.57%). The seroprevalence of HIV, HBV, HCV and T. pallidum were highest among blood donors 38 to 47 years, 18 to 27 years and ≥ 48 years age, respectively (P<0.05). The seroprevalence of TTIs varied according to the population from which the blood was collected on Bioko Island. Our results firstly provide a comprehensive overview of TTIs among blood donors on Bioko Island. Strict screening of blood donors and improved hematological examinations using standard operating procedures are recommended.

  19. Neonatal Exposure to Hepatitis C Virus Antigens in Uninfected Children Born to Infected Mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psaros Einberg, Afrodite; Brenndörfer, Erwin Daniel; Frelin, Lars; Hallberg, Lena; Sällberg, Matti; Fischler, Björn

    2017-09-26

    Vertical transmission of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is uncommon and occurs in around 5% of births from HCV infected mothers. The reason for the low transmission rate is unclear. We aimed to investigate if there is evidence of HCV exposure also in the non-infected children born to HCV infected mothers by the presence of a detectable immune response. Serum and peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 9 HCV vertically infected children, 32 uninfected children born to HCV infected mothers, and 15 HCV chronically infected mothers, were analyzed. HCV-RNA negative adults and children were used as controls. HCV specific T cell responses were analyzed by interferon gamma (IFN-γ) using an enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISpot) assay and 3H-thymidine incorporation assay. HCV antibodies were also analyzed. An HCV specific T cell response was detected in 73% (11/15) of the HCV infected mothers, 67% (6/9) of the vertically infected children, 56% (18/32) of the exposed but uninfected children and in 10% and 20% of the control groups, respectively. The two groups of HCV exposed children both had a significantly higher proportion of HCV specific T cell responders compared to pediatric controls (p = 0.01 and p = 0.02). HCV specific immune responses were more common in children born to HCV infected mothers, regardless of the presence of HCV RNA. We conclude that non-infected children born to HCV infected mothers may have been exposed to HCV antigens.

  20. [Occult hepatitis B virus infection in normal population, Xiamen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shuizhen; Su, Chenghao; Shen, Litong; Niu, Jianjun

    2015-02-01

    To investigate the prevalence of occult HBV infection in the normal population in Xiamen. 4 437 registered permanent residents, aged 1-59 years old, were selected in Xiamen using stratified random sampling method from September to October in 2006. Serum samples were obtained, the basic characteristics, inoculation of HBV vaccine, and liver disease were surveyed. The serum samples were tested five HBV seroimmunological markers. The HBsAg-negative specimens were subjected to HBV-DNA detection by nested PCR targeting for multiple gene segments. The amplified products were sequenced and the sequence was used for determination of HBV genotype and mutation analysis of amino acids located in HBsAg "a" epitope. Subjects with serum detectable HBV-DNA and negative result of HBsAg were considered as occult HBV infection. Among the 4 437 subjects, 482 individuals were observed HBsAg positive and 3 944 were observed negative. Of the 3 955 HBsAg- negative specimens, 27 occult HBV infections were determined with the positive rate of 0.68% (27/3 955). There were 16 samples with genotype B and 11 with genotype C. 3 types of amino acid (AA) mutation (M133T, T140I, G145R) that influence "a" epitope conformation were observed in 9 subjects with occult HBV infection. S region was successfully sequenced in 312 of the 482 HBsAg positive samples. In subjects with occult HBV infection, the infection rate of genotype C HBV (40.74%, 11/27), inoculation rate of HBV vaccine (62.96%, 17/27), positive rate of HBsAb (51.85%, 14/27), and mutation rate of critical amino acid of "a" epitope (33.33%, 9/27) were higher than HBsAg positive individuals (22.76% (71/312), 13.78% (43/312),0.32% (1/312),0.99% (31/312), respectively), and all the difference were significant (χ(2) = 4.29, 41.26, 156.00, 13.07, respectively, and P value = 0.038, occult HBV infection (18.3 ± 16.2) were lower than that in HBsAg positive infection (34.4 ± 11.6), and the difference was significant (t = 6.67, P occult HBV

  1. POSSIBLE ORAL MANIFESTATIONS IN HEPATITIS VIRUS C-INFECTED PATIENTS: AN ASSESSMENT OF THE LITERATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Vasile OLTEANU

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic liver disease secondary to hepatitis virus C (HVC infection still represents a worldwide health issue, mainly because of the chronic liver sequelae and of their systemic impact - especially in cirrhotic patients. Nevertheless, a variety of extrahepatic manifestations are associated with HVC infection, among which some also involving the oral cavity. The aim of the present literature assessment is to highlight such possible oral manifestations in patients with chronic HVC infection, given the scarce recent and current findings of the field. Among other systemic manifestations, two oral cavity conditions are mainly associated to recent studies with HVC infection: lichen planus and Sjögren-like Sialadenitis. HCV-infected patients may frequently suffer mildly clinically manifested Sjögren-like sialadenitis, however few significant data on lachrymal and salivary flow in such patients is available. Lichen planus of the oral cavity is considered significantly associated with HCV infection, especially in some geographical areas, otherwise independently on the level of endemism of HCV in the general population. Conclusions: Oral lichen planus and sialadenitis may be associated with HCV infection, the pathogenesis of both diseases being related to the virus-related immune response. Given the high global prevalence of HCV infection, a more thorough oral screening may help life quality improvement in a significant number of patients.

  2. Fetal Ascites and Second Trimester Maternal Hepatitis C Virus Infection

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    Pei-Ying Ling

    2006-09-01

    Conclusion: Second trimester perinatal HCV infection with possible CMV coinfection associated with fetal ascites is a rare event. Fetal therapy resulting in a successful outcome has not been reported. Prompt fetal therapy with paracentesis in this case led to the delivery of a healthy term liveborn baby with anti-HCV seropositivity.

  3. Seroprevalence of Hepatitis C Virus Infection in Nigerians with Type ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Design and Methods: A total of 115 diabetic patients were compared with 2,301 blood donors matched by recognized risk factors to acquire HCV infection. Serologic testing for anti HCV was done using a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits. Results: Sixty (60) type 2 diabetic patients were males ...

  4. Current laboratory diagnosis of hepatitis b virus infection including 8 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    such as liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. These complications can be prevented or delayed with therapy, but not all carriers are candidates for therapy, and a precise diagnosis is important for proper patient management. Natural history of HBV infection. The small envelope protein, HBsAg, is the first viral marker ...

  5. Prevalence of hepatitis C virus infection among patients undergoing haemodialysis in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Gutiérrez, Cristina; Chávez-Tapia, Norberto C; Ponciano-Rodríguez, Guadalupe; Uribe, Misael; Méndez-Sánchez, Nahum

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C infection is a worldwide problem. The global prevalence of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) averages 3%. Moreover, its prevalence among patients undergoing haemodialysis (HD) varies worldwide, ranging from as low as 1% to up to 70%. There are few data on its prevalence in developing countries, and even less information is available on HD patients. A literature review revealed that the prevalence of HCV infection among patients undergoing HD in Latin America ranges from 4.2 to 83.9%, with most data stemming from Argentina, Brazil, Mexico, Peru, Chile, Venezuela and Cuba. The most common genotype was genotype 1, and subtype 1b was the most frequent. The risk factors associated with this condition were the duration of the HD treatment and blood transfusion before hepatitis C screening. In addition, HCV RNA detection by polymerase chain reaction is crucial for the diagnosis of HCV infection in HD patients. Trials using combinations of new oral antiviral drugs, such as sofosbuvir and combo (ombitasvir, paritaprevir, ritonavir and dasabuvir), should be the next step in the improvement of care among HD patients with HCV, because these therapeutic agents apparently do not require dose adjustment according to renal function. Finally, information on this subgroup of patients remains unavailable in some countries; therefore, additional studies are needed to determine the prevalence trend of HCV infection in these populations.

  6. Serology based disease status of Pakistani population infected with Hepatitis B virus

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    Sharif Salmaan

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The infection rate of hepatitis B virus is continuously increasing in Pakistan. Therefore, a comprehensive study of epidemiological data is the need of time. Methods A total of 1300 individuals were screened for HBV infection markers including HBsAg, anti-HBsAg, HBeAg and anti-HBcAg. The association of these disease indicators was compared with patients' epidemiological characteristics like age, socio-economic status and residential area to analyze and find out the possible correlation among these variables and the patients disease status. Results 52 (4% individuals were found positive for HBsAg with mean age 23.5 ± 3.7 years. 9.30%, 33.47% and 12% individuals had HBeAg, antibodies for HBsAg, and antibodies for HBcAg respectively. HBsAg seropositivity rate was significantly associated (p = 0.03 with the residing locality indicating high infection in rural areas. Antibodies titer against HBsAg decreased with the increasing age reflecting an inverse correlation. Conclusion Our results indicate high prevalence rate of Hepatitis B virus infection and nationwide vaccination campaigns along with public awareness and educational programs are needed to be practiced urgently.

  7. Liver-related death among HIV/hepatitis C virus-co-infected individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grint, Daniel; Peters, Lars; Rockstroh, Juergen K

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Potent, less toxic, directly acting antivirals (DAAs) for treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection promise to improve HCV cure rates among HIV/HCV-co-infected individuals. However, the costs of treatment will necessitate prioritization of those at greatest risk of liver-related ......BACKGROUND: Potent, less toxic, directly acting antivirals (DAAs) for treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection promise to improve HCV cure rates among HIV/HCV-co-infected individuals. However, the costs of treatment will necessitate prioritization of those at greatest risk of liver.......7-2.9), but substantial in those with F2/F3 and F4 fibrosis (sHR 10.3%, 95% CI 7.6-13.5; and sHR 14.0%, 95% CI 10.3-18.3, respectively). CONCLUSION: Treatment with DAAs should be prioritized for those with at least F2 fibrosis. Early initiation of cART with the aim of avoiding low CD4 cell counts should be considered...

  8. Low prevalence of hepatitis B virus, hepatitis D virus and hepatitis C virus among patients with human immunodeficiency virus or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in the Brazilian Amazon basin

    OpenAIRE

    Braga,Wornei Silva Miranda; Castilho,Márcia da Costa; Santos,Isabelle Cristina Vale dos; Moura,Marco Antônio Sabóia; Segurado,Aluisio Cotrim

    2006-01-01

    Comorbidities in human immunodeficiency virus infection are of great interest due to their association with unfavorable outcomes and failure of antiretroviral therapy. This study evaluated the prevalence of coinfection by human immunodeficiency virus and viral hepatitis in an endemic area for hepatitis B in the Western Amazon basin. Serological markers for hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus and hepatitis D virus were tested in a consecutive sample of all patients referred for treatment of h...

  9. Recovery, persistence, and sequelae in hepatitis C virus infection: a perspective on long-term outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alter, H J; Seeff, L B

    2000-01-01

    -threatening, progressive liver disease clearly occurs in a sizable minority (perhaps 30%) of chronically infected persons but speculate that fibrosis progression is neither linear or inevitable and hence that most hepatitis C virus carriers will have either a stable nonprogressive course or such indolent progression that they will die from an unrelated disease before the severe sequelae of hepatitis C become manifest or will have a sustained "curative" response to therapy. Although this view provides reasonable hope to the hepatitis C virus-infected individual, it does not deny the enormous burden this infection presents as the result of its high prevalence and global distribution. The sheer magnitude of the infected population will result in a large number with severe life-threatening liver disease even if the proportion of infected individuals that develop progressive disease is relatively small.

  10. Serological survey of hepatitis E virus infection in farmed and pet rabbits in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Bartolo, Ilaria; De Sabato, L; Marata, A; Martinelli, N; Magistrali, C F; Monini, M; Ponterio, E; Ostanello, F; Ruggeri, F M

    2016-05-01

    The recent identification in rabbits of hepatitis E viruses (HEV) related to viruses infecting humans raises the question of the role of this species as possible HEV reservoir. A serological survey on rabbit HEV infection was conducted in Italy during 2013-2014, including both farmed and pet rabbits. We found an anti-HEV antibody seroprevalence of 3.40 % in 206 farmed rabbits (collected on 7 farms) and 6.56 % in 122 pets. RNA was extracted from IgG-positive sera and analyzed by HEV-specific real-time RT-PCR. None of the samples were positive, confirming that no viremia was present in the presence of IgG. Only one serum sample from a farmed rabbit was positive for IgM, but no HEV RNA was detected in it. Pet rabbit feces were also tested for HEV RNA, with negative results. This finding suggests that HEV is circulating in rabbits in Italy.

  11. Clinical profile of hepatitis C virus infection in a developing country- India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Ramit; Midha, Vandana; Goyal, Omesh; Mehta, Varun; Narang, Vikram; Kaur, Kirandeep; Singh, Arshdeep; Singh, Dharmatma; Bhanot, Rishu; Sood, Ajit

    2017-09-18

    The epidemiology and clinical profile of hepatitis C virus (HCV) varies worldwide and data from developing countries is sparse. To study the clinical profile of HCV infection in a developing country in South East Asia (India). This observational study assessed patient demographics, viral characteristics, risk factors for virus acquisition and disease characteristics in HCV patients diagnosed between January 2004 and December 2015. Of 8,035 patients were diagnosed with HCV infection, a majority were males (68.3%), middle aged (52.2%), from low (34%) and middle (46%) socioeconomic status and rural population (69.8%). Eighty two percent had identifiable risk factors, commonest being history of dental treatment (52%) and therapeutic injections with reusable syringes/needles (45%). Household contacts of index patients had high prevalence of HCV (15.3%). Common genotypes were genotype 3 (70.4%) and genotype 1 (19.3%). Though a majority of patients were either asymptomatic (54.8%) or had non-specific symptoms (6.7%) at presentation, a significant proportion (9.3%) had advanced liver disease. Presentation with cirrhosis (38.8%) was associated with male gender, higher age at time of virus detection, rural residence, alcohol or opium intake and coinfections with hepatitis B virus (HBV) or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). HCV infection in northern India is seen more commonly in males, middle aged, rural background from low-middle socioeconomic status. The common possible risk factors are dental treatment and exposure to reused syringes and needles. Though the commonest presentation is incidental detection, a large number of patients present with advanced liver disease. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Role of Host Genetic Factors in the Outcome of Hepatitis C Virus Infection

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    Hubert E. Blum

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The natural history of hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is determined by a complex interplay between host genetic, immunological and viral factors. This review highlights genes involved in innate and adaptive immune responses associated with different outcomes of HCV infection. For example, an association of HCV clearance with certain HLA alleles has been demonstrated. The mechanisms responsible for these associations have been linked to specific T cell responses for some particular alleles (e.g., HLA-B27. Genetic associations involved in T cell regulation and function further underline the role of the adaptive immune response in the natural history of HCV infection. In addition, some genes involved in innate NK cell responses demonstrate the complex interplay between components of the immune system necessary for a successful host response to HCV infection.

  13. Medical and Behavioral Approaches to Engage People Who Inject Drugs Into Care for Hepatitis C Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Stevan A; Fierer, Daniel S; Talal, Andrew H

    2017-06-01

    Direct-acting antivirals for hepatitis C virus infection may revolutionize treatment among persons with substance use disorders. Despite persons with substance use disorders having the highest hepatitis C virus prevalence and incidence, the vast majority have not engaged into care for the infection. Previously, interferon-based treatments, with substantial side effects and the propensity to exacerbate mental health conditions, were major disincentives to pursuit of care for the infection. Direct-acting antivirals with viral eradication rates of >90%, significantly improved side effect profiles, and shorter treatment duration are dramatic improvements over prior treatment regimens that should promote widespread hepatitis C virus care among persons with substance use disorders. The major unmet need is strategies to promote persons with substance use disorders engagement into care for hepatitis C virus. Although physical integration of treatment for substance use and co-occurring conditions has been widely advocated, it has been difficult to achieve. Telemedicine offers an opportunity for virtual integration of behavioral and medical treatments that could be supplemented by conventional interventions such as hepatitis C virus education, case management, and peer navigation. Furthermore, harm reduction and strategies to reduce viral transmission are important to cease reinfection among persons with substance use disorders. Widespread prescription of therapy for hepatitis C virus infection to substance users will be required to achieve the ultimate goal of global virus elimination. Combinations of medical and behavioral interventions should be used to promote persons with substance use disorders engagement into and adherence with direct-acting antiviral-based treatment approaches. Ultimately, either physical or virtual colocation of hepatitis C virus and substance use treatment has the potential to improve adherence and consequently treatment efficacy.

  14. The effect of highly active antiretroviral therapy on liver function in human immunodeficiency virus-infected pediatric patients with or without hepatitis virus co-infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijuan Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Co-infection of hepatitis virus is common in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infected adults in China. But little is known about hepatitis virus co-infection in pediatric HIV-infected subjects. The study aimed to investigate the impact of hepatitis B virus (HBV and/or hepatitis C virus (HCV co-infection and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART on liver function of pediatric HIV-infected subjects. Materials and Methods: A cohort study including 101 pediatric HIV-infected subjects with HBV/HCV co-infection and 44 pediatric comparators with HIV mono-infection was carried out in Henan Province of China from September 2011 to September 2012. All patients received HAART for 1-year. HBV and HCV infection was determined by antibody tests. HIV RNA load, CD4 + T-cell counts and liver function were determined before and after HAART. The Student′s t-test or a one-way ANOVA was used for normally distributed values and A Mann-Whitney U-test was performed for values without normal distribution using SPSS statistical package 18.0 (SPSS Inc.. Results: After HAART for 1-year, the median levels of viral load were decreased to lower limit of detection in 90.34% pediatric HIV-infected subjects with/without HBV/HCV co-infection (P < 0.001, and CD4 + T-cell counts increased significantly (P < 0.001. Compared with the pre-HAART, mean level of alanine aminotransferase (ALT in each group had a significant increase after HAART (P < 0.01. The mean levels of ALT and aspartate aminotransferase (AST in nevirapine (NVP based HAART group increased significantly after HAART (P < 0.01. Mean change values of ALT and AST were significantly higher in the NVP based regimen group than in the efavirenz (EFV based regimen group (P < 0.01. For HIV/HBV/HCV co-infected patients, mean change values of ALT and AST in NVP-based HAART group was significantly higher than that in EFV-based HAART group (P < 0.01. Conclusion: Highly active antiretroviral therapy can damage

  15. Virus de hepatitis C en poblaciones de riesgo a adquirir la infección: Venezuela Hepatitis C virus in populations at risk for infection: Venezuela

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    F. Monsalve-Castillo

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: conocer la prevalencia del virus de hepatitis C en diferentes poblaciones de riesgo a adquirir la infección de la ciudad de Maracaibo, Venezuela. Método: la presente investigación comprendió un estudio de tipo descriptivo y transversal, cuyas variables fueron evaluadas por el análisis de correlación de Pearson. Se seleccionaron 100 drogadictos, 47 trabajadoras sexuales y 50 hemodializados, para un total de 197 individuos. Como único criterio de inclusión se tomó el hecho de presentar riesgo de contraer la infección por el virus de hepatitis C. Para la detección de anticuerpos contra el virus se utilizó la técnica de inmunoensayo enzimático de cuarta generación (Innotest HCV Ab IV. Toda muestra reactiva se confirmó por el método de inmunoblot recombinante de tercera generación (INNO-LIA HCV Ab III , ambos de Innogenetics Lab (Bélgica. La detección del genoma viral (ARN se realizó en aquellas muestras reactivas por ELISA e INNO-LIA por la técnica de reacción en cadena de la polimerasa, HCV-fast de Pharma Gen. Resultados: se encontró uno por ciento de prevalencia de hepatitis C en la población de drogadictos y ausencia de infección o contacto previo con el virus en trabajadoras sexuales y pacientes en hemodiálisis. Conclusiones: en el presente estudio se señala la baja prevalencia de la infección por el virus de hepatitis C en poblaciones de riesgo a adquirir la infección, por lo que se considera que esta infección no representa un problema de salud en estas poblaciones de la ciudad de Maracaibo, Venezuela.Objective: the aim of this study was to establish the prevalence of hepatitis C virus infection in different populations at risk for infection. Method: this was a descriptive, transversal study whose variables were evaluated by Pearson...s correlation analysis. Different populations were selected: 100 drug users, 47 sex workers, and 50 hemodialysis patients for a total of 197 individuals. The only

  16. Reducing the risk of hepatitis B virus transfusion-transmitted infection

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    Niederhauser C

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Christoph NiederhauserBlood Transfusion Service SRC, Bern, SwitzerlandAbstract: Before 1970, approximately 6% of multi-transfused recipients acquired a transfusion-transmitted Hepatitis B virus (HBV infection. The safety improvements since then have been tremendous. From a level of a few infections per 1000 donations, the risk today, depending on the screening algorithm and additional measurements performed, has decreased to around 1:500,000 to 1:1,000,000, an improvement greater than 1000-fold compared to 50 years ago. This enormous gain in safety has been achieved through many factors, including development of increasingly more sensitive Hepatitis B antigen (HBsAg assays; the adoption in some countries of hepatitis B core antibody (anti-HBc screening; an improved donor selection procedure; HBV vaccination programs; and finally the introduction of HBV nucleic acid testing (NAT. Because there is a tendency in transfusion medicine to add one safety measure on top of another to approach the ultimate goal of zero risks, costs become increasingly a matter of debate. It is obvious that any new measure in addition to existing methods or measures will have very poor cost effectiveness. Therefore each country needs to perform its own calculation based on the country's own epidemiology, resources, political and public awareness of the risks, in order to choose the correct and most cost-efficient measures. Ideally, each country would make decisions regarding implementation of additional blood safety measures in the context of both the perceived benefit and the allocation of overall health care resources.Keywords: hepatitis B virus, transfusion-transmitted infection, HBsAg, anti-HBc, NAT

  17. The Impact of Hepatitis B Vaccine Failure on Long-term Natural Course of Chronic Hepatitis B Virus Infection in Hepatitis B e Antigen-Seropositive Children.

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    Tai, Chi-San; Wu, Jia-Feng; Chen, Huey-Ling; Ni, Yen-Hsuan; Hsu, Hong-Yuan; Chang, Mei-Hwei

    2017-09-15

    Vaccine failure with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection still develops in children after universal hepatitis B immunization. This study aimed to investigate the natural course of chronic HBV infection in children with vaccine failure and compare it with that of nonvaccinated children. Three hundred fifty-six hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg)-seropositive, hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) carrier children, who were followed for at least 1 year without antiviral therapy, were enrolled. These comprised 105 vaccine failure subjects who received 3 doses of HBV vaccine in infancy and 251 nonvaccinated subjects. The clinical, serologic, and virologic features were compared between the 2 groups. The cumulative HBeAg seroconversion rate was significantly lower in the vaccine failure group than in the nonvaccinated group (30.5% vs 77.7%, P failure group (33.7% vs 13.4%, P failure, genotype C infection, and maternal HBsAg positivity were significantly associated with delayed HBeAg seroconversion. HBeAg-seropositive vaccine failure HBV-carrier children were associated with delayed HBeAg seroconversion during long-term follow-up, and more HBV genotype C infection and maternal HBsAg seropositivity.

  18. Potential Approaches to Assess the Infectivity of Hepatitis E Virus in Pork Products: A Review.

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    Cook, Nigel; D'Agostino, Martin; Johne, Reimar

    2017-09-01

    The zoonotic transmission of hepatitis E, caused by the hepatitis E virus (HEV), is an emerging issue. HEV appears common in pigs (although infected pigs do not show clinical signs), and evidence suggests that a number of hepatitis E cases have been associated with the consumption of undercooked pork meat and products. Little information is available on whether cooking can eliminate HEV, since there is currently no robust method for measuring its infectivity. HEV infectivity can be clearly demonstrated by monitoring for signs of infection (e.g., shedding of virus) in an animal model. However, this approach has several disadvantages, such as lack of reproducibility and unsuitability for performing large numbers of tests, high costs, and not least ethical considerations. Growth in cell culture can unambiguously show that a virus is infectious and has the potential for replication, without the disadvantages of using animals. Large numbers of tests can also be performed, which can make the results more amenable to statistical interpretation. However, no HEV cell culture system has been shown to be applicable to all HEV strains, none has been standardized, and few studies have demonstrated their use for measurement of HEV infectivity in food samples. Nonetheless, cell culture remains the most promising approach, and the main recommendation of this review is that there should be an extensive research effort to develop and validate a cell culture-based method for assessing HEV infectivity in pork products. Systems comprising promising cell lines and HEV strains which can grow well in cell culture should be tested to select an assay for effective and reliable measurement of HEV infectivity over a wide range of virus concentrations. The assay should then be harnessed to a procedure which can extract HEV from pork products, to produce a method suitable for further use. The method can then be used to determine the effect of heat or other elimination processes on HEV in pork

  19. Anti-adipogenic and antiviral effects of l-carnitine on hepatitis C virus infection.

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    Tsukuda, Yoko; Suda, Goki; Tsunematsu, Seiji; Ito, Jun; Sato, Fumiyuki; Terashita, Katsumi; Nakai, Masato; Sho, Takuya; Maehara, Osamu; Shimazaki, Tomoe; Kimura, Megumi; Morikawa, Kenichi; Natsuizaka, Mitsuteru; Ogawa, Koji; Ohnishi, Shunsuke; Chuma, Makoto; Sakamoto, Naoya

    2017-05-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been reported to hijack fatty acid metabolism in infected hepatocytes, taking advantage of lipid droplets for virus assembly. In this study, we analyzed the anti-HCV activity of l-carnitine, a substance involved in the transport of fatty acids into mitochondria. JFH-1 or HCV replicon-transfected Huh7.5.1 cells were treated with or without l-carnitine to examine its anti-HCV effects. The effects of l-carnitine on HCV entry, HCV-induced adipogenesis and lipid droplet formation, and HCV-induced oxidative stress were examined. Treatment of JFH-1-infected cells with l-carnitine inhibited HCV propagation in a concentration-dependent manner. In contrast, l-carnitine had no anti-HCV activity in the HCV replicon system, which is lacking viral assembly. In addition, l-carnitine did not affect HCV entry. However, l-carnitine treatment decreased intracellular lipid droplets, which are crucial for HCV assembly in JFH-1-infected cells. The expression level of CPT-1 was decreased in JFH-1-infected cells, and l-carnitine treatment restored this expression. HCV-infected cells exhibited increased production of reactive oxygen species and glutathione oxidation. l-carnitine decreased oxidative stress induced by JFH-1-infection, as shown by glutathione/glutathione disulfide assays and MitoSOX staining. l-carnitine exhibited anti-HCV activity, possibly by inhibiting HCV assembly and through its anti-adipogenic activity in HCV-infected cells. Moreover, l-carnitine has antioxidant properties in HCV-infected hepatocytes. Overall, these results indicated that l-carnitine may be an effective adjunctive agent in antiviral therapies to treat chronic hepatitis C. J. Med. Virol. 89:857-866, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Combination ledipasvir-sofosbuvir for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus infection: a review and clinical perspective.

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    Nkuize, Marcel; Sersté, Thomas; Buset, Michel; Mulkay, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C treatment has continued to evolve, and interferon-free, oral treatment with direct-acting antiviral agents is the current standard of care. Recently, a new treatment, which is a combination of two direct-acting antiviral agents, ledipasvir 90 mg (anti-NS5A) and sofosbuvir 400 mg (anti-NS5B), has been approved in the US and the European Union for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C viral infection. In Phase III trials among chronic hepatitis C virus genotype 1 monoinfected (treatment-naïve, treatment-experienced, and with advanced liver disease or posttransplant) patients and HIV-hepatitis C virus coinfected patients, the ledipasvir-sofosbuvir fixed-dose combination is associated with a higher rate of sustained virologic response at 12 weeks after therapy has ceased. According to preliminary data, the ledipasvir-sofosbuvir combination also may be effective against hepatitis C genotype 4 virus infection. The ledipasvir-sofosbuvir combination taken orally is generally well-tolerated. Moreover, the combination treatment may suppress the effect of predictive factors of chronic hepatitis C that have historically been known to be associated with treatment failure. Thus, the fixed-dose single-tablet combination of ledipasvir-sofosbuvir offers a new era for the effective treatment of a variety of patients suffering from chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

  1. A population-based study examining hepatitis B virus infection and immunization rates in Northwest China.

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    Zhaohua Ji

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIM: Current baseline data regarding the prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV infections and the immune status in hyperendemic areas is necessary in evaluating the effectiveness of ongoing HBV prevention and control programs in northwest China. This study aims to determine the prevalence of chronic HBV infections, past exposure rates, and immune response profiles in Wuwei City, northwest China in 2010. METHODS: Cross-sectional household survey representative of the Wuwei City population. 28,579 participants were interviewed in the seroepidemiological survey ≥1 year of age. House to house screening was conducted using a standard questionnaire. All serum samples were screened by enzyme-linked immunoassays for the presence of hepatitis B surface antigen, antibodies against HBV surface antigen, and antibodies to the hepatitis B core antigen. RESULTS: Among individuals ≥1 year of age, 7.2% (95%CI: 6.3-8.1% had chronic HBV infections, 43.9% (CI: 40.4-47.4% had been exposed to HBV, and 23.49% (CI: 21.6-25.3% had vaccine-induced immunity. Multi-factor weighted logistic regression analysis showed that having household contact with HBV carriers (OR = 2.6, 95%CI: 2.3-3.0 and beauty treatments in public places (OR = 1.2, 95%CI: 1.1-1.3 were the risk factors of HBV infection in whole population. Having household contact with HBV carriers (OR = 3.8, 95% CI: 2.2-6.5 and lack of hepatitis vaccination (OR = 2.0, 95% CI: 1.4-3.3 were the risk factors for HBV infection in children aged 1-14 years. CONCLUSIONS: Hepatitis B infection remains a serious public health problem in northwest China. Having household contact with HBV carriers and beauty treatments in public places represented HBV infection risk factors. Hepatitis B vaccine immunization strategies need further improvement, particularly by targeting the immunization of rural migrant workers.

  2. Hepatitis G virus co-infection may affect the elimination of hepatitis C virus RNA from the peripheral blood of hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Januszkiewicz-Lewandowska, D; Wysocki, J; Rembowska, J; Lewandowski, K; Nowak, T; Pernak, M; Nowak, J

    2001-01-01

    Hemodialysis patients are at risk for hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis G virus (HGV) infection. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible influence of HGV co-infection on HCV RNA elimination from the peripheral blood of hemodialysis patients. The study involved 144 persons, all with HCV antibodies and HCV RNA. Among 144 patients 24 (16.7%) were positive for HGV RNA. After 2.5 years of observation 80 patients (55.6%) were still HCV RNA-positive. In the latter group 18 patients were co-infected with HGV and 62 were HGV RNA-negative. During 2.5 years of the follow-up study 64 patients eliminated HCV RNA from the serum. In this group only 6 patients were HGV co-infected. None of the HGV-positive patients eliminated HGV RNA from the serum. The higher incidence of HGV co-infection in the group of patients who remained HCV RNA-positive (18/80, 22.5%), in comparison to the group of HCV antibodies-positive patients who lost HCV in the blood (6/64, 9.4%, P < 0.0001) suggests, that the co-infection with HGV may delay the spontaneous elimination of HCV RNA from the blood.

  3. Persistence of hepatitis E virus in the liver of non-viremic naturally infected wild boar.

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    María A Risalde

    Full Text Available Hepatitis E virus (HEV is an emerging zoonotic pathogen with pigs and wild boar serving as reservoirs for human infection through direct contact with infected animals or the consumption of raw or undercooked pork products. The liver is considered the main target site of HEV replication in swine and an important organ in the pathogenesis of the disease. The aim of this study was to characterize the target liver cells for HEV entry in naturally infected wild boar and to evaluate the type and severity of the pathological changes in order to reach a better understanding of the hepatic pathogenic mechanisms involved in hepatitis E. In total, 58 livers from hunted wild boar were histopathologically evaluated. The presence of specific HEV antibodies in serum was determined by indirect ELISA. Immunohistochemistry was used for the detection of HEV antigen and Real time RT-PCR to detect HEV RNA in liver and serum. HEV seroprevalence in these animals was of 5.197% (CI95%: 1.77-14.14. By Real time RT-PCR, HEV was detected in the liver tissue of four wild boar (6.8%; CI95%: 2.7-16.4 and only one animal was also positive in serum (1.7%; CI95%: 0.3-9.1. The non-viremic animals naturally infected with HEV presented evidence of liver infection, mainly in Kupffer cells and liver sinusoidal endothelial cells, without apparent associated hepatitis lesions. This study supports the hypothesis that low viral titers may persist in the liver of non-viremic individuals, giving thus the possibility of consumption of contaminated liver of animals diagnosed as HEV-negative in serum. Further immunopathogenic studies are necessary to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for this process and to evaluate the protocols of HEV diagnosis in animals destined for human consumption.

  4. Association of hepatitis C virus infection with risk of ESRD: a population-based study.

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    Su, Fu-Hsiung; Su, Chien-Tien; Chang, Shih-Ni; Chen, Pei-Chun; Sung, Fung-Chang; Lin, Cheng-Chieh; Yeh, Chih-Ching

    2012-10-01

    The association between chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) has been widely debated. National population-based cohort study. Insurance claims data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database in 2000-2005. Chronic HCV infection as defined by the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification. ESRD as defined by the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification. We identified 6,291 adults with chronic HCV infection. The control group included 31,455 sex- and age-matched individuals without evidence of chronic hepatitis. The incidence of ESRD was 2.14-fold higher in patients with chronic HCV infection (HR, 1.53; 95% CI, 1.17-2.01; P = 0.002) than in patients without HCV infection. Age stratification analysis showed that patients aged 50-59 years with chronic HCV infection (HR, 7.77; 95% CI, 4.23-14.3; P < 0.001) had the highest risk of developing ESRD relative to patients aged 20-49 years without chronic HCV infection (interaction P < 0.001). Lack of clinical data. Patients with chronic HCV infection are at greater risk of developing ESRD than individuals without chronic HCV infection. In addition, the risk of developing ESRD is highest in younger patients with HCV infection. Early renal screening programs should be initiated for this high-risk group of young individuals with chronic HCV infection. Copyright © 2012 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. INTERMEDIATE ENDEMICITY OF HEPATITIS A VIRUS INFECTION IN RURAL SETTLEMENT PROJECTS OF SOUTHWEST GOIÁS, BRAZIL.

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    Pinheiro, Raquel Silva; Araújo, Lyriane Apolinário de; Caetano, Karlla Antonieta Amorim; Matos, Marcos André de; Carneiro, Megmar Aparecida dos Santos; Teles, Sheila Araújo

    2015-01-01

    Rural populations present an elevated risk of exposure to hepatitis A virus. The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence and risk factors associated with hepatitis A virus infection among residents of rural settlement projects of southwest Goiás, Central Brazil. A total of 466 residents were interviewed and tested for the detection of anti- hepatitis A virus antibodies by ELISA. The global prevalence of anti- hepatitis A virus was 82.2%. In individuals aged 5-9 years and 10-19 years, the prevalence was 15% and 58.8%, respectively. Persons in the 10-19 age group, with a history of life in encampments, with more than five people per residence consuming well water, were predictors for exposure to hepatitis A virus. Our results suggest that the hepatitis A virus endemicity in rural settlements in southwest Goiás similar to that found in the urban population of the Midwest Region, confirming the implementation of universal hepatitis A vaccination in children.

  6. Occult hepatitis B virus infection in liver transplant patients in a Brazilian referral center

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    T.C.A. Ferrari

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Estimates of occult hepatitis B virus (HBV infection prevalence varies among different studies depending on the prevalence of HBV infection in the study population and on the sensitivity of the assay used to detect HBV DNA. We investigated the prevalence of occult HBV infection in cirrhotic patients undergoing liver transplantation in a Brazilian referral center. Frozen liver samples from 68 adults were analyzed using a nested polymerase chain reaction assay for HBV DNA. The specificity of the amplified HBV sequences was confirmed by direct sequencing of the amplicons. The patient population comprised 49 (72.1% males and 19 (27.9% females with a median age of 53 years (range=18-67 years. Occult HBV infection was diagnosed in three (4.4% patients. The etiologies of the underlying chronic liver disease in these cases were alcohol abuse, HBV infection, and cryptogenic cirrhosis. Two of the patients with cryptic HBV infection also presented hepatocellular carcinoma. Markers of previous HBV infection were available in two patients with occult HBV infection and were negative in both. In conclusion, using a sensitive nested polymerase chain reaction assay to detect HBV DNA in frozen liver tissue, we found a low prevalence of occult HBV infection in cirrhotic patients undergoing liver transplant, probably due to the low prevalence of HBV infection in our population.

  7. Daclatasvir for the treatment of hepatitis C virus infection.

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    Adler, Hugh; Lambert, John S

    2014-09-01

    Daclatasvir was pivotal to the trial that established proof-of-concept that an interferon-free regimen could induce a sustained virologic response in patients with chronic HCV infection. This NS5A inhibitor is not currently licensed for the treatment of HCV, but has shown promising efficacy and minimal side-effects in clinical trials to date, where it has been tested in combination with a variety of different HCV therapies. An all-oral, interferon-free curative combination therapy for HCV is now tantalizingly close to becoming part of routine clinical practice, with multiple highly-efficacious direct-acting antiviral agents emerging virtually simultaneously. In this article we will discuss daclatasvir's background and review the clinical trials published to date, concluding with our predictions regarding its future place in the treatment armamentarium against HCV.

  8. Hepatitis B virus prevalence, risk factors and genotype distribution in HIV infected patients from West Java, Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fibriani, A.; Wisaksana, R.; Alisjahbana, B.; Indrati, A.; Schutten, M.; Crevel, R. van; Ven, A. van der; Boucher, C.A.B.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Indonesia currently faces both an increasing HIV incidence and a high hepatitis B virus (HBV) burden. OBJECTIVE: The objective of our study is to examine the prevalence, risk factors, and genotypic distribution of HBV infection among HIV infected patients in West Java, Indonesia. STUDY

  9. Patterns of hepatitis B virus infection in Brazilian human immunodeficiency virus infected patients: high prevalence of occult infection and low frequency of lamivudine resistant mutations

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    Michel VF Sucupira

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B virus (HBV molecular profiles were determined for 44 patients who were infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV type 1 and had antibodies to the hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc, with and without other HBV serological markers. In this population, 70% of the patients were under lamivudine treatment as a component of antiretroviral therapy. HBV DNA was detected in 14 (32% patients. Eight out of 12 (67% HBsAg positive samples, 3/10 (30% anti-HBc only samples, and 3/22 (14% anti-HBs positive samples were HBV DNA positive. HBV DNA loads, measured by real time polymerase chain reaction, were much higher in the HBsAg positive patients (mean, 2.5 × 10(9 copies/ml than in the negative ones (HBV occult infection; mean, 2.7 × 10(5 copies/ml. Nine out of the 14 HBV DNA positive patients were under lamivudine treatment. Lamivudine resistant mutations in the polymerase gene were detected in only three patients, all of them belonging to the subgroup of five HBsAg positive, HBV DNA positive patients. A low mean HBV load (2.7 × 10(5 copies/ml and an absence of lamivudine resistant mutations were observed among the cases of HBV occult infection.

  10. Prevalence of hepatitis virus infection in association with oral diseases requiring surgery.

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    Takata, Yutaka; Takahashi, Tetsu; Fukuda, Jinichi

    2002-03-01

    We evaluated the prevalence of hepatitis virus infection in a large population of patients in terms of diseases requiring oral surgery. Retrospective case survey. Prevalence of hepatitis B and C virus (HBV, HCV) infection were compared between oral diseases such as inflammation, cysts, cancer, trauma, benign tumors, impacted teeth, or jaw deformity in dental inpatients (n = 5830) with adjustment for age, gender, and history of surgery. Of 4402 inpatients, 94 had HB surface(s) antigen (2.1%), while 151 of 2613 were seropositive for HCV (5.8%). Prevalences of HBs antigen and HCV antibody exceeded those in the general population. HBs antigen was more prevalent in patients with benign oral tumors than in patients with impacted teeth, whether or not adjustment was made for age (odds ratios, 4.246 and 5.055 with and without age adjustment, respectively; P oral cancer than in those with impacted teeth before adjustment for age (odds ratios, 2.433; P oral tumors, while HCV antibody was higher in patients with oral cancer. However, this increased incidence of HCV antibody apparently was a reflection of age. HCV infection may not have an etiologically important association with oral cancer.

  11. Hepatitis C virus infection and risk of cancer: a population-based cohort study

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    Lars Haukali Omland

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Lars Haukali Omland1, Dora Körmendiné Farkas2, Peter Jepsen2,3, Niels Obel1, Lars Pedersen21Department of Infectious Diseases, Rigshospitalet, Denmark; 2Department of Clinical Epidemiology, 3Department of Medicine V (Hepatology and Gastroenterology, Aarhus University Hospital, DenmarkBackground: Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is associated with an increased risk of primary liver cancer; however, 5- and 10-year risk estimates are needed. The association of HCV with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL is uncertain and the association with other cancers is unknown.Method: We conducted a nationwide, population-based cohort study of 4,349 HCV-infected patients in Denmark, computing standardized incidence ratios (SIR of cancer incidence in HCV infected patients compared with cancer incidence of the general population. We calculated 5-and 10-year risks of developing cancer, stratifying our analyses based on the presence of HIV coinfection and cirrhosis.Results: We recorded an increased risk of primary liver cancer (SIR: 76.63 [95% CI: 51.69–109.40], NHL (SIR: 1.89 [95% CI: 0.39–5.52], and several smoking- and alcohol-related cancers in HCV infected patients without HIV coinfection. HCV-infected patients without HIV coinfection had a 6.3% (95% CI: 4.6%–8.7% risk of developing cancer and 2.0% (95% CI: 1.1%–3.8% risk of developing primary liver cancer within 10 years.Conclusion: We confirmed the association of HCV infection with primary liver cancer and NHL. We also observed an association between HCV infection and alcohol- and smoking-related cancers.Keywords: hepatitis C virus, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, standardized incidence ratio, cancer

  12. Liver X receptors agonists impede hepatitis C virus infection in an Idol-dependent manner.

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    Zeng, Jing; Wu, Yang; Liao, Qingjiao; Li, Lixia; Chen, Xinwen; Chen, Xulin

    2012-09-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major human pathogen that causes many serious diseases, including acute and chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Treatments for this virus are inadequate, and improved antiviral therapies are necessary. Although the precise mechanisms regulating HCV entry into hepatic cells are still unknown, the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) has been shown to be essential for entry of infectious HCV particles. Liver X receptors (LXR) were recently reported to control LDLR expression through the regulation of the expression of the Idol (inducible degrader of the LDLR) protein, which could trigger the ubiquitination and degradation of LDLR. In this study, we analyzed the antiviral effect of Idol in vitro. The results demonstrated that Huh7.5.1 cells that exogenously expressed Idol were resistant to HCV infection. Next, the treatment of HCV-infected Huh7.5.1 cells with either synthetic LXR agonists (GW3965 or T0901317) or the natural LXR ligand 24(S),25-epoxycholesterol inhibited HCV infection in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, a combination of LXR agonists and HCV RNA replication inhibitors exerted additive effects against HCV, as revealed by isobologram analysis. In conclusion, our data indicate that molecules such as LXR agonists, which could stimulate the expression of Idol, represent a new class of potential anti-HCV compounds, and these compounds could be developed for therapeutic use against HCV infection, either as a monotherapy, or in combination with other anti-HCV drugs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Possible autoimmune hepatitis induced after chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection.

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    Wada, Yoshiko; Sato, Chikako; Tomita, Kyoko; Ishii-Aso, Rika; Haga, Hiroaki; Okumoto, Kazuo; Nishise, Yuko; Watanabe, Hisayoshi; Saito, Takafumi; Ueno, Yoshiyuki

    2014-02-01

    Chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection (CAEBV) can be manifested in a variety of systemic conditions, including interstitial pneumonia, malignant lymphoma, and coronary aneurysm. Sometimes it may be associated with hepatic failure, although the mechanism underlying CAEBV-related hepatotoxicity remains unclear. We encountered a case of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) associated with CAEBV. A 61-year-old male was referred to our hospital because of abnormal liver enzyme levels after initial diagnosis of CAEBV had been made by laboratory tests and liver biopsy. On admission, positivity for anti-nuclear antibody was evident, and examination of the liver biopsy specimen showed findings compatible with AIH. Steroid administration was initiated, and the liver function parameters subsequently improved. Although phenotypic changes in liver biopsy specimens are rare in this condition, the present case could provide clues to the possible pathogenesis of AIH.

  14. The oncologic burden of hepatitis C virus infection: A clinical perspective.

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    Torres, Harrys A; Shigle, Terri Lynn; Hammoudi, Nassim; Link, James T; Samaniego, Felipe; Kaseb, Ahmed; Mallet, Vincent

    2017-09-01

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection affects millions of people worldwide and is associated with cancer. Direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) have changed HCV treatment paradigms, but little is known about the management of HCV infection in patients with cancer. The substantial burden of HCV infection and the inconclusive evidence regarding its detection and management in patients with cancer prompted the authors to review the literature and formulate recommendations. Patients for whom HCV screening is recommended included all patients with hematologic malignancies, hematopoietic cell transplantation candidates, and patients with liver cancer. There is a lack of consensus-based recommendations for the identification of HCV-infected patients with other types of cancer, but physicians may at least consider screening patients who belong to groups at heightened risk of HCV infection, including those born during 1945 through 1965 and those at high risk for infection. Patients with evidence of HCV infection should be assessed by an expert to evaluate liver disease severity, comorbidities associated with HCV infection, and treatment opportunities. DAA therapy should be tailored on the basis of patient prognosis, type of cancer, cancer treatment plan, and hepatic and virologic parameters. HCV-infected patients with cancer who have cirrhosis (or even advanced fibrosis) and those at risk for liver disease progression, especially patients with HCV-associated comorbidities, should have ongoing follow-up, regardless of whether there is a sustained virologic response, to ensure timely detection and treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma. HCV infection and its treatment should not be considered contraindications to cancer treatment and should not delay the initiation of an urgent cancer therapy. CA Cancer J Clin 2017. © 2017 American Cancer Society. CA Cancer J Clin 2017;67:411-431. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  15. Hepatitis C virus infection in the immunocompromised host: a complex scenario with variable clinical impact

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    Zignego Anna

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The relationship between Hepatitis C Virus (HCV infection and immunosuppression is complex and multifaceted. Although HCV-related hepatocytolysis is classically interpreted as secondary to the attack by cytotoxic T lymphocytes against infected cells, the liver disease is usually exacerbated and more rapidly evolutive in immunosuppressed patients. This generally occurs during the immunosuppression state, and not at the reconstitution of the host response after immunosuppressive therapy discontinuation. The field of immunosuppression and HCV infection is complicated both by the different outcome observed in different situations and/or by contrasting data obtained in the same conditions, with several still unanswered questions, such as the opportunity to modify treatment schedules in the setting of post-transplant follow-up. The complexity of this field is further complicated by the intrinsic tendency of HCV infection in itself to lead to disorders of the immune system. This review will briefly outline the current knowledge about the pathogenesis of both hepatic and extrahepatic HCV-related disorders and the principal available data concerning HCV infection in a condition of impairment of the immune system. Attention will be especially focused on some conditions - liver or kidney transplantation, the use of biologic drugs and cancer chemotherapy - for which more abundant and interesting data exist.

  16. Pharyngeal-cervical-brachial variant of pediatric Guillain-Barré syndrome with antecedent acute hepatitis A virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa, Rajoo; Biswas, Biawajit; Mallick, Debkrishna; Mukherjee, Swapan

    2009-07-01

    Pharyngeal-cervical-brachial weakness is considered a variant of Guillain-Barré syndrome with limited oropharyngeal, neck, and upper limb muscle involvement. The authors report on a 7-year-old boy, who developed pharyngeal-cervical-brachial type of Guillain-Barré syndrome following an antecedent episode of acute hepatitis A virus infection, 2 weeks prior to admission. The presentation was characterized by acute onset dysphagia, loss of head control, and bilateral arm weakness. The diagnosis was confirmed by acute motor axonal changes in the arm and albuminocytologic dissociation of the cerebrospinal fluid. The child was treated with intravenous immunoglobulin, which resulted in gradual improvement over 3 weeks. Documented instances of this form of Guillain-Barré syndrome remain rare in the pediatric age group, with none existing following antecedent hepatitis A virus infection. The authors emphasize that acute hepatitis A virus infection be included in the triggers responsible for Guillain-Barré syndrome in children.

  17. Hepatitis A virus infections and outbreaks in asylum seekers arriving to Germany, September 2015 to March 2016.

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    Michaelis, Kai; Wenzel, Jürgen J; Stark, Klaus; Faber, Mirko

    2017-04-26

    From September 2015 to March 2016, hepatitis A notifications in Germany increased by 45% to 699 cases compared to 482 cases in the same period of the previous year. Children aged five to nine years were predominantly affected (22% of all cases in this period). We hypothesized that this increase could be explained by the marked influx of asylum seekers in this time period. We analysed national surveillance data and estimated the number of imported and autochthonous hepatitis A cases in asylum seekers. We also investigated molecular signatures of hepatitis A viruses sampled from asylum seekers to identify chains of transmission. We found that 40% (278 cases) of all 699 hepatitis A cases notified between September 2015 and March 2016 in Germany concerned asylum seekers. Most infections were acquired abroad, but at least 24% accounted for autochthonous infections. Among asylum seekers, children aged five to nine years were overrepresented with 97 of 278 (35%) notified cases. The analysed hepatitis A virus sequences were primarily subgenotype IB strains and clustered with previously isolated samples from the Middle East, Turkey, Pakistan and East Africa. Except one transmission from an asymptomatic child to a nursery nurse working in a mass accommodation, we are not aware of infection chains involving asylum seekers and German residents. We conclude that asylum-seeking children and adolescents are susceptible to hepatitis A virus infections, particularly children aged five to nine years. Measures to prevent secondary infections in asylum seekers such as extended hygiene measures and post-exposure prophylaxis seem advisable.

  18. Treatment of Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection in Dialysis Patients: An Update

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    Hugo Weclawiak

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is a blood-borne infection and its prevalence used to be elevated in hemodialysis (HD patients. Its main mode of contamination relies on nosocomial transmission. HCV infection is frequently associated in HD patients with normal liver enzymes whereas liver histology can display some degree of HCV-related lesions. The assessment of HCV-related lesions, even in HD dialysis patients, can be done via noninvasive tests. After kidney transplantation, HCV-related lesions can worsen; however, in this setting antiviral treatment harbors the risk of acute rejection. Therefore, it is recommended to implement antiviral treatment while the patient is receiving dialysis therapy. In this setting, the rate of viral clearance is usually high. In case of sustained virological response, no relapse occurs after kidney transplantation, despite heavy immunosuppression.

  19. Prevalence of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Hepatitis C Virus Infected Population: A Southeast Asian Study

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    Muhammad Sadik Memon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The study was aimed to investigate the frequency of diabetes mellitus type 2 in patients infected with chronic hepatitis C virus and its association with cirrhosis. Patients and Methods. This prospective case series was conducted at Section of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Isra University Hospital, Hyderabad, over a period of 4 months from June 2009 to October 2009. Hepatitis C virus seropositive patients who were older than 18 years, diabetic or nondiabetic, were included. Basic demographic data collected by questionnaire and laboratory investigations including fasting blood glucose levels, serum cholesterol, and liver function tests were done. A logistic regression model was used to explore the association between diabetic and nondiabetic HCV seropositives and type 2 diabetes mellitus with cirrhosis. Results. A total of 361 patients with hepatitis C were analyzed; the prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus in HCV patients was 31.5%. Out of the total number of the participants, 58.4% (n = 211 were cirrhotics, while 41.6% (n = 150 were noncirrhotic HCV seropositives. In multivariate analysis, cirrhotic patients appeared significantly more likely (P = 0.01 to be diabetic as compared with noncirrhotic patients (OR = 2.005, 95% CI: 1.15, 3.43. Conclusion. Advancing age, increased weight, and HCV genotype 3 are independent predictors of type 2 diabetes in HCV seropositive patients, and there is a statistically significant association of cirrhosis observed with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  20. Knowledge gaps and research priorities in the prevention and control of hepatitis E virus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poel, Van der W.H.M.; Dalton, H.R.; Johne, R.; Pavio, N.; Bouwknegt, M.; Wu, T.; Cook, N.; Meng, X.J.

    2018-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV), family Hepeviridae, is a main cause of epidemic hepatitis in developing countries and sporadic and cluster cases of hepatitis in industrialized countries. There are an increasing number of reported cases in humans especially in industrialized countries, and there is a high

  1. High Prevalence and Predominance of Hepatitis Delta Virus Genotype 1 Infection in Cameroon▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foupouapouognigni, Yacouba; Noah, Dominique Noah; Sartre, Michèle Tagni; Njouom, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Antibodies to the hepatitis delta virus (HDV) were found in 17.6% of 233 hepatitis B virus surface antigen-positive subjects in Cameroon. Phylogenetic analyses showed the presence of HDV-1, HDV-5, HDV-6, and HDV-7 genotypes. These results enrich the limited data on HDV prevalence and molecular diversity in Cameroon. PMID:21209162

  2. High prevalence and predominance of hepatitis delta virus genotype 1 infection in Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foupouapouognigni, Yacouba; Noah, Dominique Noah; Sartre, Michèle Tagni; Njouom, Richard

    2011-03-01

    Antibodies to the hepatitis delta virus (HDV) were found in 17.6% of 233 hepatitis B virus surface antigen-positive subjects in Cameroon. Phylogenetic analyses showed the presence of HDV-1, HDV-5, HDV-6, and HDV-7 genotypes. These results enrich the limited data on HDV prevalence and molecular diversity in Cameroon.

  3. Does infection by the hepatitis C virus decrease the response of immunization against the hepatitis B virus in individuals undergoing dialysis?

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    Tarcila Maria Bonfim Ferreira

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Vaccination is the most effective tool in preventing transmission of Hepatitis B Virus (HBV. The patient with chronic kidney disease (CKD on dialysis appear to be at greater risk of becoming infected with this virus and does not show the same vaccine response when compared to patients without uremia. Objectives: To evaluate the results related to the HBV vaccine and identify factors associated with the response in patients with CKD on hemodialysis. Methods: Individuals with HBsAG and negative anti-HBC, under hemodialysis were assessed in two units of São Luis, Maranhão and were undergone full vaccination schedule for HBV. They were divided in groups: anti-HBs10 mUI/mL and compared as to age, gender, presence of diabetes mellitus (DM, time on dialysis and anti-HCV status. Logistic regression analysis was performed to identify factors independently associated with the vaccine response. p10mUI/Ml (or = 5.239 IC: 1.279-21.459, p = 0.021. Conclusion: The rate of vaccine response to HBV in patients with CKD on dialysis was 70% and the lack of anti-HCV infection was associated with seroconversion of anti-HBs suggesting that infection by the hepatitis C virus may be a factor that decreases the response of the HBV vaccine in dialysis CKD patients.

  4. Occupational coke oven emissions exposure and risk of abnormal liver function: modifications of body mass index and hepatitis virus infection

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    Y. Hu; B. Chen; J. Qian; L. Jin; T. Jin; D. Lu [Fudan University, Shanghai (China). Department of Occupational and Environmental Health

    2010-03-15

    Occupational coke oven emissions (COEs) have been considered an important health issue. However, there are no conclusive data on human hepatic injury due to COE exposure. The association of COE exposure with liver function was explored and the effects of modification of potential non-occupational factors were assessed. 705 coke oven workers and 247 referents were investigated. Individual cumulative COE exposure was quantitatively estimated. Serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), {gamma}-glutamyl transferase, alkaline phosphatase, hepatitis B surface antigen and anti-hepatitis C antibody were measured. Among those with high COE exposure, the adjusted ORs of abnormal ALT and AST were 5.23 (95% CI 2.66 to 10.27) and 1.95 (95% CI 1.18 to 3.52), respectively. Overweight individuals (body mass index (BMI) {>=}25 kg/m{sup 2}) with high COE exposure had elevated risks of abnormal ALT (adjusted OR 23.93, 95% CI 8.73 to 65.62) and AST (adjusted OR 5.18, 95% CI 2.32 to 11.58). Risk of liver damage in hepatitis B virus- or hepatitis C virus-positive individuals with COE exposure was also elevated. Long-term exposure to COE increases the risk of liver dysfunction, which is more prominent among those with higher BMI and hepatitis virus infection. The risk assessment of liver damage associated with COE exposure should take BMI and hepatitis virus infection into consideration.

  5. Ledipasvir/sofosbuvir without ribavirin is effective in the treatment of recurrent hepatitis C virus infection post-liver transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoreibah, Mohamed; Orr, Jordan; Jones, DeAnn; Zhang, Jie; Venkata, Krishna; Massoud, Omar

    2017-09-01

    Recurrent hepatitis C virus infection is a challenging complication post-liver transplant. Current guidelines recommend the combination of ribavirin and ledipasvir/sofosbuvir for 12 weeks for the treatment of recurrent HCV genotype 1 post-liver transplant. Data are limited on the use of ledipasvir/sofosbuvir without ribavirin. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of ledipasvir/sofosbuvir without ribavirin for the treatment of recurrent hepatitis C virus post-liver transplant. This is a retrospective study of liver transplant patients who received ledipasvir/sofosbuvir without ribavirin for the treatment of recurrent hepatitis C virus in our liver center from 2014 to 2016. A total of 60 patients were enrolled of which 70% were male, 88% Caucasian, age 60 ± 7 years, 15% cirrhotic, and 45% treatment-experienced with recurrent hepatitis C virus infection genotype 1 post-liver transplant. Treatment duration varied from 8 to 24 weeks. There were no serious adverse events and no discontinuation of treatment. A total of 71% of patients had undetectable serum hepatitis C virus at 4 weeks. However, irrespective of treatment duration, 100% of patients had undetectable serum hepatitis C virus at the end of treatment and 100% of patients achieved sustained viral response at 12 weeks. Ledipasvir/sofosbuvir without ribavirin is an effective treatment of recurrent hepatitis C virus infection post-liver transplant. The entire group achieved sustained viral response at 12 weeks irrespective of the length of treatment. The combination of ledipasvir/sofosbuvir was well tolerated without serious adverse effects or discontinuation.

  6. Intrafamilial transmission of hepatitis C virus: infection of the father predicts the risk of perinatal transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indolfi, Giuseppe; Bartolini, Elisa; Azzari, Chiara; Becciolini, Laura; Moriondo, Maria; de Martino, Maurizio; Resti, Massimo

    2008-11-01

    The aims of the present study were to evaluate in a cohort of mothers infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) the prevalence of HCV infection of their sexual partners, the influence of infection of the partners on perinatal transmission, and whether this influence is mediated by other well known risk factors for perinatal transmission. Forty-nine consecutive mothers infected with HCV who transmitted infection to their offspring and, as a control group, 557 consecutive mothers infected with HCV who did not transmit infection, together with their children and the fathers of the children who were also the sexual partners of the mothers were evaluated. History of intravenous drug use was significantly more frequent in women with partners infected with HCV than in women with partners not infected [115/180 (63.9%) vs. 87/401 (21.7%); relative risk (RR): 6.38, 95% confidence intervals (CI): 4.34-9.39, P < 10(-3)]. HCV infection was more frequent in the partners of mothers who transmitted perinatally HCV [23/49 (46.9%) vs. 174/557 (31.2%); RR: 1.95, 95%CI: 1.08-3.51, P = 0.03]. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that paternal HCV infection is not a risk factor per se for perinatal HCV transmission, but its role is dependent on maternal intravenous drug use [adjusted RR: 1.23 (95%CI: 0.44-3.39, P = 0.6)]. In conclusion, the present study shows that partners of mothers infected with HCV with a history of intravenous drug use were at a higher risk of HCV infection. HCV infection of the father seems to be associated with perinatal transmission but this relationship is dependent on maternal history of intravenous drug use. 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. In Vitro Systems for the Study of Hepatitis C Virus Infection

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    Garrick K. Wilson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of a virus is made possible by the availability of culture systems in which the viral lifecycle can be realized. Such systems support robust virus entry, replication, assembly, and secretion of nascent virions. Furthermore, culture models provide a platform in which therapeutic interventions can be devised or monitored. Hepatitis C virus (HCV has a restricted tropism to human and chimpanzees; thus investigations of HCV biology have been hindered for many years due to a lack of small animal models. Nevertheless, significant efforts have been directed at developing cell culture models to elucidate the viral lifecycle in vitro. HCV primarily infects liver parenchymal cells commonly known as hepatocytes. The liver is a highly specialized and complex organ and the development of in vitro systems that reflects this complexity has proven difficult. Consequently, host cell receptor molecules that potentiate HCV infection were identified over a decade after the virus was discovered. A summary of the various HCV in vitro culture models, their advantages, and disadvantages are described.

  8. Hepatitis E Virus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is the most common cause of acute viral hepatitis in the developing world. It is a waterborne virus that can cause epidemics in the face of overcrowding and poor sanitation. Although the hepatitis illness is usually self-limiting, it has a high mortality in pregnant women and can become a ...

  9. Detection of high biliary and fecal viral loads in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monrroy, Hugo; Angulo, Jenniffer; Pino, Karla; Labbé, Pilar; Miquel, Juan Francisco; López-Lastra, Marcelo; Soza, Alejandro

    2017-05-01

    The life cycle of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) is closely associated with lipid metabolism. Recently, NPC1L1 (a cholesterol transporter) has been reported to function as an HCV receptor. This receptor is expressed in the hepatocyte canalicular membrane and in the intestine; serving as a key transporter for the cholesterol enterohepatic cycle. We hypothesized that HCV might have a similar cycle, so we aimed to study the presence of HCV in bile and stools of infected patients. Blood, feces, and duodenal bile samples were collected from patients infected with HCV. The biliary viral load was normalized to the bile salt concentration of each sample and the presence of HCV core protein was also evaluated. A total of 12 patients were recruited. HCV RNA was detected in the bile from ten patients. The mean viral load was 2.5log10IU/60mg bile salt. In the stool samples, HCV RNA was detected in ten patients (mean concentration 2.7log10IU/g of feces). HCV RNA is readily detectable and is present at relatively high concentrations in the bile and stool samples of infected patients. This may be relevant as a source of infection in men who have sex with men. Biliary HCV secretion may perhaps play a role in the persistence of viral infection via an enterohepatic cycle of the virus or intrahepatic spread. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U., AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  10. Crosstalk between HIV and hepatitis C virus during co-infection

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    Rider Paul J

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract An estimated one-third of individuals positive for HIV are also infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV. Chronic infection with HCV can lead to serious liver disease including cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Liver-related disease is among the leading causes of death in patients with HIV, and individuals with HIV and HCV co-infection are found to progress more rapidly to serious liver disease than mono-infected individuals. The mechanism by which HIV affects HCV infection in the absence of immunosuppression by HIV is currently unknown. In a recent article published in BMC Immunology, Qu et al. demonstrated that HIV tat is capable of inducing IP-10 expression. Further, they were able to show that HIV tat, when added to cells, was able to enhance the replication of HCV. Importantly, the increase in HCV replication by tat was found to be dependent on IP-10. This work has important implications for understanding the effect HIV has on the outcome of HCV infection in co-infected individuals. The findings of Qu et al. may inform the design of intervention and treatment strategies for co-infected individuals. Please see related article: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2172/13/15.

  11. Genomic variability associated with the presence of occult hepatitis B virus in HIV co-infected individuals

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    Martin, C. M.; Welge, J.A.; Shire, N. J.; Rouster, S. D.; SHATA, M. T.; Sherman, K E; Blackard, J. T.

    2009-01-01

    Occult hepatitis B virus (O-HBV) infection is characterized by the presence of HBV DNA without detectable hepatitis B surface antigen (HBV DNA+/HBsAg−) in the serum. Although O-HBV is more prevalent during HBV/HIV co-infection, analysis of HBV mutations in co-infected patients is limited. In this preliminary study, HBV PreSurface (PreS) and surface (S) regions were amplified from 33 HIV-positive patient serum samples − 27 chronic HBV (C-HBV) and six O-HBV infections. HBV genotype was determin...

  12. In vitro-induced antibody production in chronic hepatitis C virus infection

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    Oliveira Jr. E.B.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of the present study were to assess the in vitro-induced anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV antibody production (IVIAP in relation to the clinical, biochemical, virologic and histologic variables of patients with HCV infection. The study included 57 patients (60% males with HCV infection (anti-HCV and HCV-RNA positive. Alanine aminotransferase (ALT was elevated in 89% of the patients. Mean viral load was 542,241 copies/ml and histology of the liver showed chronic hepatitis in 27/52 (52% and cirrhosis in 11/52 (21% patients. IVIAP levels were determined by immunoenzymatic assay at median absorbance of 0.781 at 450 nm. IVIAP was negative in 14% of the patients. When groups with IVIAP levels above and below the median were compared, high IVIAP levels were associated with the male sex, elevated ALT levels and more advanced disease stage. After logistic regression analysis, advanced histologic damage to the liver remained as the only independent variable associated with elevated IVIAP levels. Using a receiver operator characteristic curve, the best cut-off level for IVIAP was established (= 1.540, with 71% sensitivity and 94% specificity for the detection of more advanced disease stages (grades 3 and 4. These findings are consistent with the participation of immunological mechanisms in the genesis of the hepatic lesions induced by HCV and indicate that the IVIAP test may be useful as a noninvasive marker of liver damage either alone or in combination with other markers.

  13. Need of righteous attitudes towards eradication of hepatitis C virus infection in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panduro, Arturo; Roman, Sonia

    2016-06-14

    Over the last few years, we have expanded our knowledge on numerous facets of the hepatitis C virus (HCV). Beginning with its discovery and viral life cycle, its impact on health, the development of liver disease and currently, effective antiviral treatments. The latter point has become of great interest throughout the developed world, where the possible eradication of HCV through specific strategies to reach all HCV-infected people has been announced. However, this scenario is very different in the countries of Latin America (LA), in which Latin Americans may be infected with HCV. Despite the numbers, viral hepatitis does not seem to be considered a health problem in this region of the world. This reality poses a challenge for politicians and governments of these countries, as well as to the pharmaceutical industry, the medical practitioners, and academics in LA. In this editorial, we state the need for alterations in the attitudes of the integral players involved in this situation. A recognition shift could help to create preventive strategies of viral hepatitis and to advocate for accessibility to new HCV treatments.

  14. Hepatitis C virus infection in blood donors from the state of Puebla, Mexico

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    Contreras-Mioni Laura

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Worldwide, 130 million persons are estimated to be infected with HCV. Puebla is the Mexican state with the highest mortality due to hepatic cirrhosis. Therefore, it is imperative to obtain epidemiological data on HCV infection in asymptomatic people of this region. The objective of present study was to analyze the prevalence of antibodies and genotypes of hepatitis C virus (HCV in blood donors from Puebla, Mexico. Results The overall prevalence was 0.84% (515/61553. Distribution by region was: North, 0.86% (54/6270; Southeast, 1.04% (75/7197; Southwest, 0.93% (36/3852; and Central, 0.79% (350/44234. Ninety-six donors were enrolled for detection and genotyping of virus, from which 37 (38.5% were HCV-RNA positive. Detected subtypes were: 1a (40.5%, 1b (27.0%, mixed 1a/1b (18.9%, undetermined genotype 1 (5.4%, 2a (2.7%, 2b (2.7%, and mixed 1a/2a (2.7%. All recovered donors with S/CO > 39 were HCV-RNA positive (11/11 and presented elevated ALT; in donors with S/CO Conclusions HCV prevalence of donors in Puebla is similar to other Mexican states. The most prevalent genotype is 1, of which subtype 1a is the most frequent.

  15. Prevalence of Occult Hepatitis C Virus Infection among Blood Donors in Jiangsu, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hong; Chen, Xian; Zhu, Shaowen; Mao, Ping; Zhu, Shanshan; Liu, Yanchun; Huang, Chengyin; Sun, Jun; Zhu, Jin

    2016-01-01

    In 2010, only 1 donor blood sample was found to be anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) negative and HCV RNA positive, as detected by nucleic acid testing. In occult HCV infection (OCI), HCV RNA is found in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). We investigated the prevalence of OCI among blood donors. We collected 513 samples from 334 eligible and 179 deferred donors, including 55 anti-HCV-positive, 113 alanine aminotransferase (ALT)-elevated, and 11 hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg)-positive blood donors. PBMCs were isolated, the 5'-untranslated region of HCV RNA was amplified by reverse transcription nested PCR, and the genotype of the core region was determined. No HCV RNA was detected among the eligible samples. Among the deferred donors, 15 (27.2%) had detectable HCV RNA in 55 anti-HCV PBMC specimens. HCV RNA was detected in 1 (9.1%) HBsAg-positive and 9 (8%) ALT-elevated samples. The prevalence of OCI in the blood donors was 2.2% (10/458). HCV genotypes were determined in 10 subjects, indicating that 2 (20.0%) were subtype 2a, 7 (70.0%) were 1b, and 1 (10%) was 6a. This study showed that OCI does exist among Chinese blood donors. However, to determine the epidemiology and outcome of this HCV infection, further follow-up with more participants and patients receiving blood components with OCI is needed. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus infection in Japan: update on therapy and guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chayama, Kazuaki; Hayes, C Nelson; Ohishi, Waka; Kawakami, Yoshiiku

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a serious health problem leading to cirrhosis, liver failure and hepatocellular carcinoma. The recent introduction of telaprevir, which was approved in November 2011, in combination with peg-interferon and ribavirin is expected to markedly improve the eradication rate of the virus. However, side effects of triple therapy may be severe. In a phase three III clinical trial, 2250 mg of telaprevir, which is the same dosage used in clinical trials in Western countries, was given to Japanese patients. As this dosage is considered to be relatively high for Japanese patients, who typically have lower weight than patients in Western countries, reduction of telaprevir is recommended in the 2012 revision of the guidelines established by the Study Group for the Standardization of Treatment of Viral Hepatitis Including Cirrhosis published by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare of Japan. Other protease inhibitors with fewer side effects are now in clinical trials in Japan. Alternatively, treatment of patients with combination of direct acting antivirals without interferon has been reported. In this review we summarize current treatment options in Japan and discuss how we treat patients with chronic HCV infection.

  17. Hepatitis C virus infection, cryoglobulinemia, and peripheral neuropathy: a case report

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    Vigani A.G.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV is essentially hepatotropic but its manifestations can extend beyond the liver. It can be associated with autoimmune diseases, such as mixed cryoglobulinemia, membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, autoimmune thyroiditis, and lymphoproliferative disorders. The mechanisms that trigger these manifestations are not completely understood. We describe a 48-year-old man with chronic HCV infection (circulating HCV RNA and moderate hepatitis as indicated by liver biopsy, cryoglobulinemia, and sensory and motor peripheral neuropathy. The diagnosis of multineuropathy was confirmed by clinical examination and electromyographic tests. A nerve biopsy revealed an inflammatory infiltrate in the perineurial space and signs of demyelination and axonal degeneration. The patient had no improvement of neurological symptoms with the use of analgesics and neuro-modulators. He was then treated with interferon-alpha (3 million units subcutaneously, 3 times per week and ribavirin (500 mg orally, twice a day for 48 weeks. Six months after the end of therapy, the patient had sustained viral response (negative HCV RNA and remission of neurological symptoms, but cryoglobulins remained positive. A review of the literature on the pathogenesis and treatment of neurological manifestations associated with HCV infection is presented. This report underscores the need for a thorough evaluation of HCV-infected patients because of the possibility of extrahepatic manifestations. Antiviral treatment with interferon and ribavirin can be effective and should be considered in patients with neurological complications associated with HCV infection.

  18. Shared Alterations in NK Cell Frequency, Phenotype, and Function in Chronic Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Hepatitis C Virus Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Ute-Christiane; Owen, Rachel E.; Taylor, Elizabeth; Worth, Andrew; Naoumov, Nikolai; Willberg, Christian; Tang, Kwok; Newton, Phillipa; Pellegrino, Pierre; Williams, Ian; Klenerman, Paul; Borrow, Persephone

    2005-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) cause clinically important persistent infections. The effects of virus persistence on innate immunity, including NK cell responses, and the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. We examined the frequency, phenotype, and function of peripheral blood CD3− CD56+ NK subsets in HIV+ and HCV+ patients and identified significantly reduced numbers of total NK cells and a striking shift in NK subsets, with a marked decrease in the CD56dim cell fraction compared to CD56bright cells, in both infections. This shift influenced the phenotype and functional capacity (gamma interferon production, killing) of the total NK pool. In addition, abnormalities in the functional capacity of the CD56dim NK subset were observed in HIV+ patients. The shared NK alterations were found to be associated with a significant reduction in serum levels of the innate cytokine interleukin 15 (IL-15). In vitro stimulation with IL-15 rescued NK cells of HIV+ and HCV+ patients from apoptosis and enhanced proliferation and functional activity. We hypothesize that the reduced levels of IL-15 present in the serum during HIV and HCV infections might impact NK cell homeostasis, contributing to the common alterations of the NK pool observed in these unrelated infections. PMID:16160163

  19. Epidemiology of hepatitis B virus infection among recyclable waste collectors in central Brazil

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    Tamíris Augusto Marinho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The collection of recyclable waste materials is a widespread activity among the urban poor. Today, this occupation attracts an increasingly large number of individuals. Despite its economic and environmental importance, this activity is associated with unsafe and unhealthy working conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate the seroepidemiological profile of hepatitis B virus (HBV infection in a population of recyclable waste collectors in central Brazil. Methods: Recyclable waste collectors from all 15 recycling cooperatives in Goiânia City were invited to participate in the study. The participants (n = 431 were interviewed and screened for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg and antibodies against HBsAg (anti-HBs and hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. HBsAg- and anti-HBc-positive samples were tested for HBV DNA and genotyped. Results: The overall prevalence of HBV infection (HBsAg- and/or anti-HBc-positive was 12.8%. An age over 40 years and illicit drug use were associated with HBV infection. HBV DNA was detected in 2/3 HBsAg-positive samples and in 1/52 anti-HBc-positive/HBsAg-negative samples (an occult HBV infection rate of 1.9%, in which the genotypes/subgenotypes A/A1, D/D3 and F/F2 were identified. Only 12.3% of the recyclable waste collectors had serological evidence of previous HBV vaccination. Conclusions: These findings highlight the vulnerability of recyclable waste collectors to HBV infection and reinforce the importance of public health policies that address the health and safety of this socially vulnerable population.

  20. Overt and occult hepatitis B virus infection among community children in Northwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, H; Shao, Z; Pu, Z; Wang, Y; Zhang, L; Zhang, W; Wang, B; Wang, A; Ji, Z; Yan, Y; Zhang, Y

    2017-09-01

    Although a universal newborn hepatitis B (HB) immunization programme has been implemented in China, hepatitis B virus (HBV) breakthrough infection, including HB surface antigen (HBsAg)-positive infection and occult HBV infection (OBI), still occurs during infancy or childhood. Obtaining the actual prevalence of HBV infection in general children is important for preventing and controlling the spread of HB. Accordingly, we investigated the prevalence of overt infection and OBI in community children and compared the serological and virological characteristics of OBI and HBsAg carrier children to clarify the mechanisms related to OBI. In total, 6 706 community children <12 years of age were included from a population-based HBV seroepidemiological investigation in Northwest China. The HBsAg carrier rate in community children was 1.60% (107/6706), and the anti-HBs positive rate was 57.35% (3846/6706). Additionally, 1192 HBsAg-negative children were examined for OBI using nested PCR. The prevalence of OBI in local children was 1.26% (15/1192), and the predominant OBI genotypes were C and D. The 15 OBI children and 29 HBsAg-positive children from the same population did not have a statistical significant difference in age, gender, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), proportion of anti-HBs or anti-HBc, viral genotypes or mutations. Children with chronic overt infection had higher viral loads than OBI children (P=.004). These results suggested that HBV overt and occult infection of children was more serious in underdeveloped north-west regions. HBV neonatal immunization and catch-up programmes should be strengthened and supplemented. None of specific viral mutations or genotypes related to OBI were found. OBI may be a specific stage of HBV infection. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Risk of hepatitis-related mortality increased among hepatitis C virus/HIV-coinfected drug users compared with drug users infected only with hepatitis C virus : a 20-year prospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Colette; van den Berg, Charlotte; Geskus, Ronald; Berkhout, Ben; Coutinho, Roel; Prins, Maria

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Progression of liver-related disease is accelerated in individuals coinfected with HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV). Because the life expectancy of HIV-infected drug users (DUs) improved after the widespread use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), HCV-related death is likely

  2. Risk of hepatitis-related mortality increased among hepatitis C virus/HIV-coinfected drug users compared with drug users infected only with hepatitis C virus: a 20-year prospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Colette; van den Berg, Charlotte; Geskus, Ronald; Berkhout, Ben; Coutinho, Roel; Prins, Maria

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Progression of liver-related disease is accelerated in individuals coinfected with HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV). Because the life expectancy of HIV-infected drug users (DUs) improved after the widespread use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), HCV-related death is likely

  3. Hepatitis B virus infection among different sex and age groups in Pakistani Punjab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Hayat

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV infection is a serious health problem in the developing countries including Pakistan. Various risk factors are responsible for the spread of this infectious disease. Prevalence of HBV infection in apparently suspected individual of Punjab province of Pakistan was analyzed during January 2008 to December 2010. Current study was aimed to investigate the epidemiology and risk factors of HBV infection. Methodology Four thousand eight hundred and ninety patients suffering from chronic liver disease were screened for the presence of HBV DNA using qualitative Real Time PCR methodology to confirm their status of infection. A predesigned standard questionnaire was filled for all the patients that included information about the possible risk factors. Results A total of 4890 ELISA positive patients were screened for Hepatitis B virus infection. Of these 3143 were positive for HBV, includes 68.15% males and 31.85% females. Male were observed to be more frequently infected as compared to the female with a positivity ratio of 2.14: 1. The rate of infection increases with the passage of time in the course of three years. Highest frequency of infection was found in the age of 21-30 was 34.93% followed by 23.83% in 31-40. Only (13.39% were belonging to the age group 11-20 year. The rate of infection declines with increasing age as shown by age groups 41-50 (16.13% and 51-60 (7.09%. While children aged 0-10 and very old >60 age groups were very less frequently 1.49% and 1.65% infected respectively. Important risk factors contributing to HBV spread include barber risk (23.60%, blood transfusion (4.04%, History of injection 26.19%, Reuse of syringes 26.60%, dental risk (11.20% and surgical procedure (4.26%. Among the entire respondents trend sharing personal items was very common. History of injection, barber risk, surgery and dental procedure and reuse of syringes appear as major risk factors for the transmission

  4. Human leukocyte antigen-e alleles are associated with hepatitis c virus, torque teno virus, and toxoplasma co-infections but are not associated with hepatitis b virus, hepatitis d virus, and GB virus c co-infections in human immunodeficiency virus patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afiono Agung Prasetyo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Data regarding the distribution of Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA-E alleles and their association with blood-borne pathogen infections/co-infections are limited for many populations, including Indonesia. Aims: The aim of this study was to analyze the association between HLA-E allelic variants and infection with blood-borne pathogens such as hepatitis B virus (HBV, hepatitis C virus (HCV, hepatitis D virus (HDV, torque teno virus (TTV, GB virus C (GBV-C, and Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii in Indonesian Javanese human immunodeficiency virus (HIV patients. Settings and Design: A total of 320 anti-HIV-positive blood samples were analyzed for HBV, HCV, HDV, TTV, GBV-C, and T. gondii infection status and its association with HLA-E allelic variants. Materials and Methods: Nucleic acid was extracted from plasma samples and used for the molecular detection of HBV DNA, HCV RNA, HDV RNA, TTV DNA, and GBV-C RNA, whereas hepatitis B surface antigen, anti-HCV, immunoglobulin M and G (IgM and IgG anti-T. gondii were detected through serological testing. The blood samples were genotyped for HLA-E loci using a sequence-specific primer-polymerase chain reaction. Statistical Analysis Used: Either the Chi-square or Fisher′s exact test was performed to analyze the frequency of HLA-E alleles and blood-borne pathogen infections in the population. Odds ratios (ORs were calculated to measure the association between the antibodies found and the participants′ possible risk behaviors. A logistic regression analysis was used to assess the associations. Results: HLA-EFNx010101/0101 was associated with HCV/TTV co-infection (adjusted OR [aOR]: 3.5; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.156-10.734; P = 0.027 and IgM/IgG anti-Toxo positivity (aOR: 27.0; 95% CI: 3.626-200.472; P = 0.001. HLA-EFNx010103/0103 was associated with TTV co-infection (aOR: 2.7; 95% CI: 1.509-4.796; P = 0.001. Conclusions: HLA-E alleles in Indonesian Javanese HIV patients were found to be associated

  5. The role of anti-core antibody response in the detection of occult hepatitis B virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbani, Simona; Fagnoni, Francesco; Missale, Gabriele; Franchini, Massimo

    2010-01-01

    Occult hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is characterized by the presence of HBV DNA in serum and/or in the liver of patients negative for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). Occult infection may impact in several different clinical contexts including the risk of HBV transmission with transfusion or transplantation, and endogenous viral reactivation. The gold standard test for detection of occult infection is the amplification of HBV DNA. However, the serological assay for the long-lasting antibody response to the highly immunogenic HBV core antigen (anti-HBc) represents a qualified candidate as a surrogate for DNA amplification, or for increasing overall sensitivity when assessing the risk of occult hepatitis in peripheral blood. The risk of occult hepatitis associated with anti-HBc seropositivity has been demonstrated extensively, and the presence of antibody response to HBc can be considered a sentinel marker of occult HBV infection.

  6. Hepatitis B virus and HIV co-infection among pregnant women in Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutagoma, Mwumvaneza; Balisanga, Helene; Malamba, Samuel S; Sebuhoro, Dieudonné; Remera, Eric; Riedel, David J; Kanters, Steve; Nsanzimana, Sabin

    2017-09-11

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) affects people worldwide but the local burden especially in pregnant women and their new born babies is unknown. In Rwanda HIV-infected individuals who are also infected with HBV are supposed to be initiated on ART immediately. HBV is easily transmitted from mother to child during delivery. We sought to estimate the prevalence of chronic HBV infection among pregnant women attending ante-natal clinic (ANC) in Rwanda and to determine factors associated with HBV and HIV co-infection. This study used a cross-sectional survey, targeting pregnant women in sentinel sites. Pregnant women were tested for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and HIV infection. A series of tests were done to ensure high sensitivity. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify independent predictors of HBV-HIV co-infection among those collected during ANC sentinel surveillance, these included: age, marital status, education level, occupation, residence, pregnancy and syphilis infection. The prevalence of HBsAg among 13,121 pregnant women was 3.7% (95% CI: 3.4-4.0%) and was similar among different socio-demographic characteristics that were assessed. The proportion of HIV-infection among HBsAg-positive pregnant women was 4.1% [95% CI: 2.5-6.3%]. The prevalence of HBV-HIV co-infection was higher among women aged 15-24 years compared to those women aged 25-49 years [aOR = 6.9 (95% CI: 1.8-27.0)]. Women residing in urban areas seemed having HBV-HIV co-infection compared with women residing in rural areas [aOR = 4.3 (95% CI: 1.2-16.4)]. Women with more than two pregnancies were potentially having the co-infection compared to those with two or less (aOR = 6.9 (95% CI: 1.7-27.8). Women with RPR-positive test were seemed associated with HBV-HIV co-infection (aOR = 24.9 (95% CI: 5.0-122.9). Chronic HBV infection is a public health problem among pregnant women in Rwanda. Understanding that HBV-HIV co-infection may be more prominent in younger women from urban

  7. Differential reactivity of putative genotype 2 hepatitis C virus F protein between chronic and recovered infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Wing Chia-Ming; Allain, Jean-Pierre

    2008-08-01

    To date, all studies regarding hepatitis C virus (HCV) F protein have been based on expression in vitro/in vivo of recombinant protein or monoclonal antibodies derived from genotype 1a or 1b sequences, but not from other genotypes. The objective of this study was to prepare a putative genotype 2 recombinant F protein and evaluate its reactivity in plasma from individuals with chronic HCV infection or who had recovered from infection. One genotype 2 strain was selected for F protein (F-2) and core expression in bacterial culture. An ELISA was developed and applied to samples from patients with chronic infection or recovered infection of various genotypes. The anti-F-2 response in 117 samples showed a significantly higher reactivity in chronic than in recovered HCV-infected blood donors (PF and anti-core was more significant in genotypes 1 and 2 than in genotype 3. Anti-F-2 titres were also significantly higher in chronic than in recovered individuals (PF-2 end-point antibody titre. This study thus demonstrated the antigenicity of genotype 2 HCV F protein, although the exact location of the natural frameshift position remains unknown. The difference in anti-F-2 response between chronic and recovered infection, the cross-reactivity irrespective of genotype and the correlation of antibody response with structural and non-structural antigens suggest that the immune response to F protein is an integral part of the natural HCV infection.

  8. Prevalence of HIV and hepatitis C virus infections among inmates of Quebec provincial prisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulin, Céline; Alary, Michel; Lambert, Gilles; Godin, Gaston; Landry, Suzanne; Gagnon, Hélène; Demers, Eric; Morarescu, Elena; Rochefort, Jean; Claessens, Christiane

    2007-07-31

    To determine the prevalence of HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections and examine risk factors for these infections among inmates in Quebec provincial prisons. Anonymous cross-sectional data were collected from January to June 2003 for men (n = 1357) and women (n = 250) who agreed to participate in the study and who completed a self-administrated questionnaire and provided saliva samples. The prevalence of HIV infection was 2.3% among the male participants and 8.8% among the female participants. The corresponding prevalence of HCV infection was 16.6% and 29.2%, respectively. The most important risk factor was injection drug use. The prevalence of HIV infection was 7.2% among the male injection drug users and 0.5% among the male non-users. Among the women, the rate was 20.6% among the injection drug users, whereas none of the non-users was HIV positive. The prevalence of HCV infection was 53.3% among the male injection drug users and 2.6% among the male non-users; the corresponding values among the women were 63.6% and 3.5%. HIV and HCV infections constitute an important public health problem in prison, where the prevalence is affected mainly by a high percentage of injection drug use among inmates.

  9. Applicability of Metal Nanoparticles in the Detection and Monitoring of Hepatitis B Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim Shevtsov

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Chronic infection with the hepatitis B virus (HBV can lead to liver failure and can cause liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Reliable means for detecting and monitoring HBV infection are essential to identify patients in need of therapy and to prevent HBV transmission. Nanomaterials with defined electrical, optical, and mechanical properties have been developed to detect and quantify viral antigens. In this review, we discuss the challenges in applying nanoparticles to HBV antigen detection and in realizing the bio-analytical potential of such nanoparticles. We discuss recent developments in generating detection platforms based on gold and iron oxide nanoparticles. Such platforms increase biological material detection efficiency by the targeted capture and concentration of HBV antigens, but the unique properties of nanoparticles can also be exploited for direct, sensitive, and specific antigen detection. We discuss several studies that show that nanomaterial-based platforms enable ultrasensitive HBV antigen detection.

  10. Risk factors for retrovirus and hepatitis virus infections in accepted blood donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custer, Brian; Kessler, Debra; Vahidnia, Farnaz; Leparc, German; Krysztof, David E; Shaz, Beth; Kamel, Hany; Glynn, Simone; Dodd, Roger Y; Stramer, Susan L

    2015-05-01

    Risk factor surveillance among infected blood donors provides information on the effectiveness of eligibility assessment and is critical for reducing risk of transfusion-transmitted infection. American Red Cross, Blood Systems, Inc., New York Blood Center, and OneBlood participated in a case-control study from 2010 to 2013. Donors with serologic and nucleic acid testing (NAT) or NAT-only confirmed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), or serology-confirmed human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV) infections (cases) and donors with false-positive results (controls) were interviewed for putative behavioral and demographic risks. Frequencies and adjusted odds ratios (AORs) from multivariable logistic regression analyses for each exposure in cases compared to controls are reported. In the study, 196 HIV, 292 HBV, 316 HCV, and 198 HTLV cases, and 1587 controls were interviewed. For HIV, sex with an HIV+ person (AOR, 132; 95% confidence interval [CI], 27-650) and male-male sex (AOR, 62; 95% CI, 27-140) were primary risk factors. For HBV, first-time donor status (AOR, 16; 95% CI, 10-27), sex with an injection drug user (IDU; AOR, 11; 95% CI, 5-28), and black race (AOR, 11; 95% CI, 6-19) were primary. For HCV, IDU (AOR, 42; 95% CI, 13-136), first time (AOR, 18; 95% CI, 10-30), and a family member with hepatitis (AOR, 15; 95% CI, 6-40) were primary. For HTLV, sex with an IDU (AOR, 22; 95% CI, 10-48), 55 years old or more (AOR, 21; 95% CI, 8-52], and first time (AOR, 15; 95% CI, 9-24) were primary. Despite education efforts and risk screening, individuals with deferrable risks still donate; they may fail to understand or ignore or do not believe they have risk. Recipients have potential transfusion-transmitted infection risk because of nondisclosure by donors. © 2014 AABB.

  11. Dynamics of HCV RNA levels during acute hepatitis C virus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajarizadeh, Behzad; Grebely, Jason; Applegate, Tanya; Matthews, Gail V; Amin, Janaki; Petoumenos, Kathy; Hellard, Margaret; Rawlinson, William; Lloyd, Andrew; Kaldor, John; Dore, Gregory J

    2014-01-01

    Understanding viral dynamics during acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection can provide important insights into immunopathogenesis and guide early treatment. The aim of this study was investigating the dynamics of HCV RNA and alanine transaminase (ALT) levels during recent HCV infection in the Australian Trial in Acute Hepatitis C (ATAHC). ATAHC was a prospective study of the natural history of recently acquired HCV infection. Longitudinal HCV RNA and ALT levels were compared among individuals with ultimately persistent infection and spontaneous clearance outcomes. Among those with HCV persistence (n=104) and HCV clearance (n=30), median HCV RNA (5.2 vs. 4.1 log IU/mL, respectively) and ALT levels (779 vs. 1765 IU/L, respectively) were high during month two following infection, and then declined during months three and four in both groups. Among those with HCV persistence, median HCV RNA was 2.9 log IU/mL during months four, increased to 5.5 log IU/mL during month five, and remained subsequently relatively stable. Among those with HCV clearance, median HCV RNA was undetectable by month five. Median HCV RNA levels were comparable between individuals with HCV persistence and HCV clearance during month three following infection (3.2 vs. 3.5 log IU/mL, respectively; P=0.935), but markedly different during month five (5.5 vs. 1.0 log IU/mL, respectively; P<0.001). In conclusion, dynamics of HCV RNA levels in those with HCV clearance and HCV persistence diverged between months three and five following infection, with the latter time-point being potentially useful for commencing early treatment. PMID:25042465

  12. Ledipasvir + sofosbuvir (Harvoni). A therapeutic advance in genotype 1 hepatitis C virus infection, despite uncertainties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Treatment for chronic hepatitis C depends on the hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype and the patient's clinical characteristics. A fixed-dose combination of ledipasvir + sofosbuvir has been authorised in the European Union for adults with HCV genotype 1 (HCV-1), HCV-3 or HCV-4 infection. Ledipasvir targets the HCV protein NS5A, while sofosbuvir inhibits the HCV RNA polymerase NS5B. The ledipasvir+ sofosbuvircombination has not been compared directly with other antiviral drugs. No information is available on its ability to prevent hepatic complications, even in patients with cirrhosis. In four trials including over 1800 treatment-naive patients infected with HCV-1, a 12-week course of ledipasvir + sofosbuviryielded a sustained virological response in nearly every case. This is better than that reported with peginterferon alfa-based protocols. In four trials including more than 900 HCV-1-infected patients in whom treatments including peginterferon alfa had failed, a 24-week course of ledipasvir+ sofosbuvir yielded a sustained virological response in nearly every case, which is far better than reported with peginterferon alfa + ribavirin + protease inhibitor combinations, based on indirect comparison. In these trials, a 24-week course of the ledipasvir + sofosbuvir combination was effective in almost all patients with compensated cirrhosis. The same treatment also showed major efficacy in a non-comparative trial in 337 HCV-1-infected patients with decompensated cirrhosis or who had undergone liver transplantation. In mid-2015, very few data are available on the ledipasvir + sofosbuvir combination in HCV-1-infected patients in whom sofosbuvir combination therapy has failed, or in patients with HCV-3 or HCV-4 infection. Comparative data on the adverse effects of the ledipasvir + sofosbuvir combination are mainly based on a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in 155 patients. Overall, serious adverse effects were infrequent in this and other trials. The main adverse

  13. Molecular epidemiology of hepatitis B virus infection in Switzerland: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirzel, Cédric; Wandeler, Gilles; Owczarek, Marta; Gorgievski-Hrisoho, Meri; Dufour, Jean-Francois; Semmo, Nasser; Zürcher, Samuel

    2015-10-30

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection affects up to 7% of the European population. Specific HBV genotypes are associated with rapid progression to end-stage liver disease and sub-optimal interferon treatment responses. Although the geographic distribution of HBV genotypes differs between regions, it has not been studied in Switzerland, which lies at the crossroads of Europe. In a retrospective analysis of 465 HBV samples collected between 2002 and 2013, we evaluated the HBV genotype distribution and phylogenetic determinants, as well as the prevalence of serological evidence of hepatitis delta, hepatitis C and HIV infections in Switzerland. Baseline characteristics of patients were compared across their region of origin using Fisher's exact test and ANOVA, and risk factors for HBeAg positivity were assessed using logistic regression. The Swiss native population represented 15.7% of HBV-infected patients living in Switzerland. In the overall population, genotype D was most prevalent (58.3%), whereas genotype A (58.9%) was the predominant genotype among the Swiss native population. The prevalence of patients with anti-HDV antibodies was 4.4%. Patients of Swiss origin were most likely to be HBeAg-positive (38.1%). HBV genotypes of patients living in Switzerland but sharing the same original region of origin were consistent with their place of birth. The molecular epidemiology of HBV infection in Switzerland is driven by migration patterns and not by the genotype distribution of the native population. The prevalence of positive anti-HDV antibodies in our cohort was very low.

  14. Prevalence of hepatitis B virus among immunocompromised ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hepatitis B is an infectious inflammatory illness of the liver caused by the hepatitis B virus (HBV) which is transmitted to a large population through blood transfusion or by exposure to other body fluids. HBV is a member of the family Hepadnaviridae and also a DNA virus. In this study, the prevalence of hepatitis B infection ...

  15. Hepatitis B virus infection profile in hemodialysis patients in Central Brazil: prevalence, risk factors, and genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata C Ferreira

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Hemodialysis patients are at high risk for hepatitis B virus (HBV infection. A survey was conducted in the hemodialysis population of the state of Goiás, Central Brazil, aiming to assess the prevalence of HBV infection, to analyse associated risk factors, and also to investigate HBV genotypes distribution. A total of 1095 patients were interviewed in 15 dialysis units. Serum samples were screened for HBV serological markers by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg positive samples were tested for HBV DNA by polymerase chain reaction and genotyped by restriction fragment length polymorphism. Global HBV infection prevalence was 29.8% (95% CI: 27.1-32.5. Multivariate analysis of risk factors showed that male gender, length of time on hemodialysis, and blood transfusion before 1993 were associated with HBV positivity. HBV DNA was detected in 65.4% (17/26 of the HBsAg-positive samples. Thirteen of 17 HBV DNA positive samples were genotyped. Genotype D (61.5% was predominant, followed by A (30.8%, while genotype F was detected in only one (7.7% sample.

  16. Hepatitis C virus infection and type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonelli, Alessandro; Ferrari, Silvia Martina; Giuggioli, Dilia; Di Domenicantonio, Andrea; Ruffilli, Ilaria; Corrado, Alda; Fabiani, Silvia; Marchi, Santino; Ferri, Clodoveo; Ferrannini, Ele; Fallahi, Poupak

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and diabetes mellitus are two major public health problems that cause devastating health and financial burdens worldwide. Diabetes can be classified into two major types: type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and T2DM. T2DM is a common endocrine disorder that encompasses multifactorial mechanisms, and T1DM is an immunologically mediated disease. Many epidemiological studies have shown an association between T2DM and chronic hepatitis C (CHC) infection. The processes through which CHC is associated with T2DM seem to involve direct viral effects, insulin resistance, proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and other immune-mediated mechanisms. Few data have been reported on the association of CHC and T1DM and reports on the potential association between T1DM and acute HCV infection are even rarer. A small number of studies indicate that interferon-α therapy can stimulate pancreatic autoimmunity and in certain cases lead to the development of T1DM. Diabetes and CHC have important interactions. Diabetic CHC patients have an increased risk of developing cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma compared with non-diabetic CHC subjects. However, clinical trials on HCV-positive patients have reported improvements in glucose metabolism after antiviral treatment. Further studies are needed to improve prevention policies and to foster adequate and cost-effective programmes for the surveillance and treatment of diabetic CHC patients. PMID:25317237

  17. Recent advances in understanding and diagnosing hepatitis B virus infection [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slim Fourati

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B virus (HBV infects approximately 240 million individuals worldwide. Recent advances in the virology, immunopathogenesis, and diagnosis of HBV infection are summarized in this review article. The identification of a hepatocyte-specific cellular receptor for HBV, the sodium taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NTCP, made it possible to develop reliable cell culture systems and better understand the early steps of the viral lifecycle. Viral and host factors involved in covalently closed circular DNA synthesis, stability, and transcriptional regulation have also been identified and provide potential targets for new drugs. Based on recent evidence showing trained immunity in immune-tolerant patients, the immune tolerance and immune clearance phases have been renamed the non-inflammatory and inflammatory phases, respectively. New diagnostic and monitoring tools are now available, including rapid diagnostic tests for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg detection, HBsAg quantification assays, anti-HBc antibody quantification assays, an HBV core-related antigen (HBcrAg quantification test, new HBV DNA detection and quantification assays, and an HBV RNA quantification test. Their clinical utility is under study. Finally, new antiviral and immune modulation approaches are in the preclinical or early clinical developmental stages, with the goal to achieve functional cure or ideally (if possible eradication of HBV infection.

  18. Occult hepatitis B virus infection in Chinese cryptogenic intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma patient population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, YuQiong; Wang, Hui; Li, DaPeng; Hu, JingYi; Wang, Hao; Zhou, DongXun; Li, QiaoMei; Jiang, XiaoLan; Zhou, HuaBang; Hu, HePing

    2014-01-01

    There is no information available about occult hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection (OBI) in individuals with intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC). To investigate the correlation between OBI and ICC. A retrospective case-control study was conducted. The cases were 183 cryptogenic ICC patients (group I), and the controls were 549 healthy individuals (group II). The cases and controls were matched for age, sex, and inhabitancy. Adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Intrahepatic total HBV DNA in 63 paraffin-embedded samples was collected from patients in group I (n=44), HBV-associated ICC patients (n=3), and hepatic cavernous hemangioma patients with seronegative HBsAg (hepatitis B S antigen) (group III; n=16). We determined the levels of serum and intrahepatic HBV DNA and compared the level of intrahepatic HBV DNA in 44 cryptogenic patients from group I with the level in the patients from group III. Compared with group II, group I had a lower prevalence of anti-HBs (antibody against HBsAg) and a higher prevalence of anti-HBe (antibody against hepatitis B e antigen) and anti-HBc (antibody against hepatitis B c antigen). Multivariate analysis confirmed that anti-HBe and anti-HBc positivity were associated with ICC. The odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for anti-HBe and anti-HBc were 2.482 and 1.482-4.158, 4.556 and 2.938-7.066, respectively. Compared with group III, cryptogenic ICC cases showed more frequent detection of intrahepatic total HBV DNA (63.64% vs. 18.75%, P=0.002). OBI may represent an important risk factor for ICC. HBsAg seroclearance does not signify eradication of HBV and may not entirely prevent the development of ICC.

  19. NS5A Sequence Heterogeneity and Mechanisms of Daclatasvir Resistance in Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 4 Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Nannan; Hernandez, Dennis; Ueland, Joseph; Yang, Xiaoyan; Yu, Fei; Sims, Karen; Yin, Philip D.; McPhee, Fiona

    2015-01-01

    Background. ?Daclatasvir is an NS5A inhibitor approved for treatment of infection due to hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes (GTs) 1?4. To support daclatasvir use in HCV genotype 4 infection, we examined a diverse genotype 4?infected population for HCV genotype 4 subtype prevalence, NS5A polymorphisms at residues associated with daclatasvir resistance (positions 28, 30, 31, or 93), and their effects on daclatasvir activity in vitro and clinically. Methods. ?We performed phylogenetic analysis of...

  20. Low prevalence of hepatitis B virus infection in patients with autoimmune diseases in a Chinese patient population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, M; Wu, R; Hu, X; Zhang, H; Jiang, J; Yang, Y; Niu, J

    2014-12-01

    Hepatitis B is a very common communicable disease in China but the prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in patients with autoimmune diseases is unknown. We retrospectively investigated the prevalence of autoimmune diseases in patients with HBV infection. The medical records of 4060 patients with autoimmune or nonautoimmune diseases were reviewed. A positive test result for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) was used to indicate the presence of HBV infection. Autoimmune diseases included autoimmune hepatitis, primary biliary cirrhosis, systemic lupus erythematosus and ulcerative colitis. Nonautoimmune conditions included inguinal hernia, appendicitis and pregnant or postpartum women. The proportion of autoimmune disease patients who were HBsAg positive (2.24%) was significantly lower than that of nonautoimmune disease patients who were HBsAg positive (4.58%; P = 0.0014). Regarding hepatic autoimmune diseases, the positivity rates for HBsAg in autoimmune hepatitis patients (0.83%) and primary biliary cirrhosis patients (1.02%) were both significantly lower than in nonautoimmune patients (4.58%; P = 0.006 and 0.004, respectively). Patients with hepatic autoimmune disease were significantly less likely to be HBsAg positive (0.93%) than patients with non-hepatic autoimmune disease (3.99%; P = 0.002). Patients with autoimmune diseases, especially those with hepatic autoimmune disease, may more efficiently clear HBV than patients with nonautoimmune diseases. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Different operating conditions affect risk of hepatitis B virus infection at two residential institutions for the mentally disabled.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrillo, R P; Strang, S; Lowry, O H

    1986-04-01

    The prevalence of hepatitis B virus markers was determined in two residential institutions for the mentally disabled which exhibited major differences in operating policies. Eighty per cent of 91 clients and 16% of 92 employees at institution A had positive tests for hepatitis B virus markers, including two staff members and one client with serologic evidence of recent infection (immunoglobulin M antibody to hepatitis B core antigen). In contrast, 34% of 395 clients and 8% of 294 workers at institution B were positive for hepatitis B virus markers, and none of the staff demonstrated evidence of recent infection. The observed differences in seroprevalence were likely to have been influenced by substantial disparities in living conditions, staff-to-client ratios in critical areas, and level of employee experience. In addition to significant institutional differences, seroprevalence was associated with severity of mental retardation in clients and duration of employment in staff. This study emphasizes the importance of local policies in the prevention of hepatitis B virus infection at residential institutions for the mentally disabled.

  2. Nosocomial outbreak of hepatitis B virus infection involving two hospitals in the Republic of Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burns, K

    2012-02-01

    The routes of nosocomial hepatitis B virus (HBV) transmission have changed over the years. Initiatives to prevent transfusion-associated HBV and healthcare worker-to-patient transmission have had a positive impact on these transmission routes. Recent reports of outbreaks of nosocomial HBV have implicated breaches in standard precautions as important causes of HBV transmission. This report describes a nosocomial outbreak of HBV infection in the Republic of Ireland, which occurred between January 2005 and March 2006. The outbreak was detected following identification of a case of acute HBV infection in a patient whose only risk factor was a recent surgical procedure. The extensive multi-agency investigation that followed revealed that the patient was one of five cases of acute HBV infection and that four separate transmission events between infectious cases had occurred in two different hospitals over a 15-month period. A definitive cause for each transmission event was not identified, although lapses in adherence to standard precautions, safe injection and phlebotomy practices could not be ruled out. Two secondary cases of acute HBV infection in community contacts of two of the nosocomial cases were identified. Phylogenetic analysis proved a useful tool in confirming infection with a pre-core HBV mutant and viral transmission between the seven patients. A patient notification exercise involving 1028 potentially exposed patients found no evidence of additional cases of nosocomial HBV infection. These findings highlight the importance of consistent application of standard precautions.

  3. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D status in pregnant women with chronic hepatitis B virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xue-Ren; Wang, Cui-Min; Wang, Wen-Jun; Han, Guo-Rong; Zhang, Jian-Qiong

    2016-08-31

    Maternal 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] deficiency has a negative influence on the health of the mother and the developing fetus. The aim of this study was to assess serum 25(OH)D status and its relationship to virologic and biochemical parameters in pregnant women with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Serum 25(OH)D levels among 142 pregnant women with chronic HBV infection and 251 healthy pregnant women were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The mean±SD values for serum 25(OH)D levels were 13.63±5.5 ng/mL in healthy pregnant women and 12.05±3.3 ng/mL in pregnant women with chronic HBV infection (p pregnant women (p = 0.01); however, similar results were not observed in pregnant women with chronic HBV infection (p = 0.10). Furthermore, multivariate analysis indicated that only ALT level was independently associated with severe vitamin D deficiency (p = 0.01). A significant positive correlation was found between serum 25(OH)D level and ALT level in pregnant women with chronic HBV infection (r = 0.32; p pregnant women with chronic HBV infection compared with healthy pregnant women. Vitamin D supplementation can be routinely recommended for pregnant women in China.

  4. A p7 Ion Channel-derived Peptide Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus Infection in Vitro*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Wei; Lang, Yange; Li, Tian; Zeng, Zhengyang; Song, Yu; Wu, Yingliang; Li, Wenxin; Cao, Zhijian

    2015-01-01

    Viral infection is an early stage of its life cycle and represents a promising target for antiviral drug development. Here we designed and characterized three peptide inhibitors of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection based on the structural features of the membrane-associated p7 polypeptide of HCV. The three peptides exhibited low toxicity and high stability while potently inhibiting initial HCV infection and suppressed established HCV infection at non-cytotoxic concentrations in vitro. The most efficient peptide (designated H2-3), which is derived from the H2 helical region of HCV p7 ion channel, inhibited HCV infection by inactivating both intracellular and extracellular viral particles. The H2-3 peptide inactivated free HCV with an EC50 (50% effective concentration) of 82.11 nm, which is >1000-fold lower than the CC50 (50% cytotoxic concentration) of Huh7.5.1 cells. H2-3 peptide also bound to cell membrane and protected host cells from viral infection. The peptide H2-3 did not alter the normal electrophysiological profile of the p7 ion channel or block viral release from Huh7.5.1 cells. Our work highlights a new anti-viral peptide design strategy based on ion channel, giving the possibility that ion channels are potential resources to generate antiviral peptides. PMID:26251517

  5. Application of viability PCR to discriminate the infectivity of hepatitis A virus in food samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, L; Aznar, R; Sánchez, G

    2015-05-18

    Transmitted through the fecal-oral route, the hepatitis A virus (HAV) is acquired primarily through close personal contact and foodborne transmission. HAV detection in food is mainly carried out by quantitative RT-PCR (RT-qPCR). The discrimination of infectious and inactivated viruses remains a key obstacle when using RT-qPCR to quantify enteric viruses in food samples. Initially, viability dyes, propidium monoazide (PMA) and ethidium monoazide (EMA), were evaluated for the detection and quantification of infectious HAV in lettuce wash water. Results showed that PMA combined with 0.5% Triton X-100 (Triton) was the best pretreatment to assess HAV infectivity and completely eliminated the signal of thermally inactivated HAV in lettuce wash water. This procedure was further evaluated in artificially inoculated foods (at concentrations of ca. 6×10(4), 6×10(3) and 6×10(2)TCID50) including lettuce, parsley, spinach, cockles and coquina clams. The PMA-0.5% Triton pretreatment reduced the signal of thermally inactivated HAV between 0.5 and 2 logs, in lettuce and spinach concentrates. Moreover, this pretreatment reduced the signal of inactivated HAV by more than 1.5 logs, in parsley and ten-fold diluted shellfish samples inoculated at the lowest concentration. Overall, this pretreatment (50 μM PMA-0.5% Triton) significantly reduced the detection of thermally inactivated HAV, depending on the initial virus concentration and the food matrix. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Higher risk of hepatitis C virus perinatal transmission from drug user mothers is mediated by peripheral blood mononuclear cell infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzari, Chiara; Moriondo, Maria; Indolfi, Giuseppe; Betti, Letizia; Gambineri, Eleonora; de Martino, Maurizio; Resti, Massimo

    2008-01-01

    Maternal injection drug use and peripheral blood mononuclear cell infection by hepatitis C virus are important risk factors for perinatal transmission of the virus. The aim of present study was to evaluate the independent association of these two factors on perinatal transmission. Forty-eight consecutive mothers who transmitted infection to their offspring and 122 consecutive mothers who did not, together with their children, were examined. Both maternal injection drug use and peripheral blood mononuclear cell infection were significantly more frequent in infected than in uninfected children (respectively P = 0.04; odds ratio 2.33, 95% confidence intervals 1.02-5.42 and P < 10(-6); odds ratio and 95% confidence intervals not calculable due to zero values). Multivariate analysis confirmed the link between maternal peripheral blood mononuclear cell infection and perinatal transmission (P < 10(-6); odds ratio and 95% confidence intervals not calculable due to zero values) but no association was found with maternal injection drug use. The high risk of perinatal transmission found in injection drug use mothers is dependent on maternal peripheral blood mononuclear cell infection by hepatitis C virus. Peripheral blood mononuclear cell infection represents one of the most important risk factors for hepatitis C virus perinatal transmission. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Critical issues in the treatment of hepatitis C virus infection in methadone maintenance patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novick, David M; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2008-06-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a common chronic complication of injection drug use. Methadone maintenance programs contain large numbers of patients infected with HCV. This paper reviews HCV infection with emphasis on the medical care of HCV-infected, or HCV and human immunodeficiency virus co-infected, patients on methadone or buprenorphine maintenance. Literature searches using PubMed, PsycINFO and SocINDEX were used to identify papers from 1990-present on antiviral therapy for HCV in methadone maintenance patients and on liver transplantation in methadone maintenance patients. Injection drug use is the most significant risk factor for HCV infection in most western countries. The prevalence of HCV antibody is high in injection drug users (53-96%) and in patients enrolled in methadone maintenance programs (67-96%). Studies of antiviral therapy for HCV in methadone maintenance patients show rates of sustained virological response (SVR), defined as negative HCV-RNA 24 weeks after the end of treatment, of 28-94%. In studies with contrast groups, no significant differences in SVR between methadone and contrast groups were found. Excellent completion rates of antiviral therapy (72-100%) were found in five of six studies. There are many barriers to methadone maintenance patients' receiving antiviral therapy, and research on overcoming barriers is discussed. Liver transplantation has been successful in methadone maintenance patients but has not been utilized widely. High quality medical care for all aspects of HCV infection can be provided to methadone maintenance patients. The literature supports the effectiveness of such services, but the reality is that most patients do not receive them.

  8. Role of assessing liver fibrosis in management of chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona, I; Cordero, P; Ampuero, J; Rojas, A; Romero-Gómez, M

    2016-10-01

    Fibrosis progression is common in hepatitis C. Both host and viral factors influence its natural history. Liver fibrosis is a key predictive factor for advanced disease including endpoints such as liver failure, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). METAVIR fibrosis stages F3-F4 have been considered as the threshold for antiviral therapy. However, this aspect is controversial after the advent of new direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) because they show an excellent efficacy and safety profile. Moreover, in the DAA era, fibrosis stage seems not to be a predictive factor of a sustained virological response (SVR). Viral eradication decreases liver damage by improving the inflammation, as well as by regressing fibrosis irrespective of the treatment regimen. Non-invasive methods are useful in the assessment of liver fibrosis, replacing liver biopsy in clinical practice; but their usefulness for monitoring fibrosis after SVR needs to be demonstrated. Fibrosis regression has been demonstrated after the eradication of hepatitis C virus infection and is associated with a lower risk of hepatic cirrhosis and liver cancer. However, patients showing advanced fibrosis and cirrhosis must be followed-up after SVR, as risks of portal hypertension and HCC remain. Copyright © 2016 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Assessment of hepatitis C virus infection in two adjacent Thai provinces with drastically different seroprevalence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rujipat Wasitthankasem

    Full Text Available Improved awareness of the hepatitis C virus (HCV transmission has contributed to the overall decline in the HCV infection rate in some developing countries including Thailand. Chronic HCV infection in some rural Thai communities, however, presents a challenge in the efforts to treat and manage HCV-related diseases. Published and unpublished studies have suggested an unusually high incidence of HCV infection in a Thai province of Phetchabun compared to elsewhere in Thailand. To determine the magnitude of HCV infection and identify potential factors contributing to the higher rate of HCV infection in this province, we performed a population-based study in Phetchabun (n = 1667 and the neighboring Khon Kaen province (n = 1410 where HCV prevalence is much lower. Individuals between 30 and 64 years old completed detailed questionnaires designed to identify HCV risk factors and provided blood samples for anti-HCV antibody screening. The anti-HCV seropositive rates were 15.5% (259/1667 in Phetchabun and 3.6% (51/1410 in Khon Kaen. Positive samples were subsequently genotyped for HCV core gene sequence and assessed for the hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg and human immunodeficiency virus antigen/antibody (HIV Ag/Ab. More individuals in Phetchabun possessed the combined presence of HBsAg (5.0% and HIV Ag/Ab (0.4% than those in Khon Kaen (3.9% HBsAg and 0.0% HIV Ag/Ab. While male gender, intravenous drug use (IVDU and tattoos were significant HCV risk factors in both provinces (p <0.05, education less than high school and agriculture-related occupation were additionally associated with HCV in Phetchabun. HCV genotypes 6, 3, and 1 were identified in similar frequency in both provinces. We estimated that prevalence of HCV seropositivity and viremic carriers were higher in Phetchabun (143 and 111 per 1000 than in Khon Kaen (34 and 22 per 1000. Finally, we derived a simple risk factor-based scoring system as a useful preclinical tool to screen

  10. Expression Profile of Interferon Regulatory Factor 1 in Chronic Hepatitis B Virus-Infected Liver Transplant Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janfeshan, Sahar; Yaghobi, Ramin; Eidi, Akram; Karimi, Mohammad Hossein; Geramizadeh, Bita; Malekhosseini, Seyed Ali; Kafilzadeh, Farshid

    2017-12-01

    Hepatitis B virus, which mainly affects normal liver function, leads to severe acute and chronic hepatitis, resulting in cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, but can be safely treated after liver transplant. Evaluation of determinative biomarkers may facilitate more effective treatment of posttransplant rejection. Therefore, we investigated interferon regulatory factor 1 expression in hepatitis B virus-infected liver transplant patients with and without previous rejection compared with controls. Hepatitis B virus-infected liver recipients were divided into those with (20 patients) and without a rejection (26 patients), confirmed by pathologic analyses in those who had a rejection. In addition, a healthy control group composed of 13 individuals was included. Expression levels of interferon regulatory factor 1 were evaluated during 3 follow-ups after transplant using an in-house comparative SYBR green real-time polymerase chain reaction method. Statistical analyses were performed with SPSS software (SPSS: An IBM Company, version 16.0, IBM Corporation, Armonk, NY, USA). Modifications of interferon regulatory factor 1 gene expression levels in patient groups with and without rejection were not significant between days 1, 4, and 7 after liver transplant. Interferon regulatory factor 1 mRNA expression levels were down-regulated in patients without rejection versus patients with rejection, although not significantly at day 1 (P = .234) and day 4 (P = .302) but significantly at day 7 (P = .004) after liver transplant. Down-regulation of interferon regulatory factor 1 gene expression in hepatitis B virus patients without rejection emphasized counteraction between hepatitis B virus replication and interferon regulatory factor 1 production. On the other hand, interferon regulatory factor 1 gene overexpression in patients with rejection may result in inflammatory reactions and ischemic-reperfusion injury. Therefore, a better understanding of the association between

  11. Discovery of a Novel Human Pegivirus in Blood Associated with Hepatitis C Virus Co-Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G Berg

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV and human pegivirus (HPgV, formerly GBV-C, are the only known human viruses in the Hepacivirus and Pegivirus genera, respectively, of the family Flaviviridae. We present the discovery of a second pegivirus, provisionally designated human pegivirus 2 (HPgV-2, by next-generation sequencing of plasma from an HCV-infected patient with multiple bloodborne exposures who died from sepsis of unknown etiology. HPgV-2 is highly divergent, situated on a deep phylogenetic branch in a clade that includes rodent and bat pegiviruses, with which it shares <32% amino acid identity. Molecular and serological tools were developed and validated for high-throughput screening of plasma samples, and a panel of 3 independent serological markers strongly correlated antibody responses with viral RNA positivity (99.9% negative predictive value. Discovery of 11 additional RNA-positive samples from a total of 2440 screened (0.45% revealed 93-94% nucleotide identity between HPgV-2 strains. All 12 HPgV-2 RNA-positive cases were identified in individuals also testing positive for HCV RNA (12 of 983; 1.22%, including 2 samples co-infected with HIV, but HPgV-2 RNA was not detected in non-HCV-infected individuals (p<0.0001, including those singly infected by HIV (p = 0.0075 or HBV (p = 0.0077, nor in volunteer blood donors (p = 0.0082. Nine of the 12 (75% HPgV-2 RNA positive samples were reactive for antibodies to viral serologic markers, whereas only 28 of 2,429 (1.15% HPgV-2 RNA negative samples were seropositive. Longitudinal sampling in two individuals revealed that active HPgV-2 infection can persist in blood for at least 7 weeks, despite the presence of virus-specific antibodies. One individual harboring both HPgV-2 and HCV RNA was found to be seronegative for both viruses, suggesting a high likelihood of simultaneous acquisition of HCV and HPgV-2 infection from an acute co-transmission event. Taken together, our results indicate that HPgV-2 is a

  12. Meat consumption is a major risk factor for hepatitis E virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ed Slot

    Full Text Available The incidence of autochthonous hepatitis E virus genotype 3 (HEV gt3 infections in Western Europe is high. Although pigs are a major reservoir of the virus, the exact sources and transmission route(s of HEV gt3 to humans remain unclear.To determine the role of meat consumption at a population level, the seroprevalence of anti-HEV IgG antibodies was compared between Dutch blood donors with a vegetarian lifestyle and donors who consume meat on a daily basis.The age-weighted anti-HEV IgG seroprevalence among donors not eating meat was significantly lower than among meat-eating donors (12.4% vs 20.5%, p = 0.002. For both groups the prevalence strongly increased with age and the difference in prevalence was apparent for all age groups.Compared with meat-eating donors, the incidence of HEV infection is significantly lower among donors not eating meat, indicating that meat consumption is a major risk factor for HEV infection.

  13. Living donor liver transplantation for neonatal fulminant hepatitis due to herpes simplex virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincenzi, Rodrigo; Fonseca, Eduardo A; Roda, Karina M O; Porta, Gilda; Candido, Helry L; Benavides, Marcel R; Leite, Katia R M; Afonso, Rogerio C; Turine-Neto, Plinio; Ribeiro, Cristiane M F; Chapchap, Paulo; Seda-Neto, João

    2017-11-01

    Although rare, ALF caused by disseminated HSV infection is associated with high mortality in the neonatal population. This condition is often diagnosed relatively late due to the absence of specific signs. We present a case involving a neonate with ALF submitted to living donor liver transplantation without a prior diagnosis. The patient had no skin or mucosal lesions, and IgM serology was negative for HSV-1 and HSV-2. Immunohistochemical staining of the liver explant was positive for herpes virus infection, and the patient subsequently received antiviral drug treatment, with a good outcome. Due to organ shortages and the rarity of the aforementioned condition, LT has seldom been reported for the treatment of ALF caused by herpes virus infection; however, LT may be the only option for neonates with fulminant hepatitis. The use of living donors in an urgent scenario is well established in Eastern countries and safely applicable for pediatric patients with ALF. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Adherence to hepatitis A virus vaccination in HIV-infected men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourkounti, Sofia; Paparizos, Vassilios; Leuow, Kirsten; Paparizou, Eleni; Antoniou, Christina

    2015-10-01

    Although vaccination against hepatitis A virus (HAV) is essential for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients, the uptake of HAV vaccine is reported to be very low. From 2007 to 2012, 912 HIV-infected men in Athens, Greece were screened for exposure to HAV. Two doses of an HAV vaccine were recommended to 569 eligible patients. Reminder cards with scheduled vaccination visits were given to each patient. Among eligible patients, 62.2% (354/569) received both doses. Patients who were fully vaccinated compared with non-adherent patients were natives, older, had undetectable HIV viral load, higher CD4 T cell counts and lower nadir CD4 T cell counts. Multivariate logistic regression revealed that the patient's country of origin (p = 0.024; OR = 2.712; 95% CI, 1.139-6.457), CD4 T cell count (p < 0.001) and nadir CD4 T cell count (p < 0.001) were factors directly associated with adherence. In conclusion, adherence to HAV vaccination was better than in previously published data. Because many of the factors related to vaccination completion are parameters of HIV infection, it appears that physician interest in HIV care and vaccination planning is crucial to enhancing vaccine uptake. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. Prevalence of hepatitis b virus surface antigens (HBsag) and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The prevalences of hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibodies were determined in 560 blood donors sera using ELISA kits (DIALAB., Austria). Forty eight (8.57%) of these were positive for hepatitis B virus infection, while 33(5.89%) were positive to hepatitis C virus antibodies. The sex ...

  16. Case control study to identify risk factors for acute hepatitis C virus infection in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kandeel Amr M

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identification of risk factors of acute hepatitis C virus (HCV infection in Egypt is crucial to develop appropriate prevention strategies. Methods We conducted a case–control study, June 2007-September 2008, to investigate risk factors for acute HCV infection in Egypt among 86 patients and 287 age and gender matched controls identified in two infectious disease hospitals in Cairo and Alexandria. Case-patients were defined as: any patient with symptoms of acute hepatitis; lab tested positive for HCV antibodies and negative for HBsAg, HBc IgM, HAV IgM; and 7-fold increase in the upper limit of transaminase levels. Controls were selected from patients’ visitors with negative viral hepatitis markers. Subjects were interviewed about previous exposures within six months, including community-acquired and health-care associated practices. Results Case-patients were more likely than controls to have received injection with a reused syringe (OR=23.1, CI 4.7-153, to have been in prison (OR=21.5, CI 2.5-479.6, to have received IV fluids in a hospital (OR=13.8, CI 5.3-37.2, to have been an IV drug user (OR=12.1, CI 4.6-33.1, to have had minimal surgical procedures (OR=9.7, CI 4.2-22.4, to have received IV fluid as an outpatient (OR=8, CI 4–16.2, or to have been admitted to hospital (OR=7.9, CI 4.2-15 within the last 6 months. Multivariate analysis indicated that unsafe health facility practices are the main risk factors associated with transmission of HCV infection in Egypt. Conclusion In Egypt, focusing acute HCV prevention measures on health-care settings would have a beneficial impact.

  17. Community-Based Seroepidemiological Survey of Hepatitis E Virus Infection in Catalonia, Spain▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buti, Maria; Domínguez, Àngela; Plans, Pere; Jardí, Rossend; Schaper, Mélani; Espuñes, Jordi; Cardeñosa, Neus; Rodríguez-Frías, Francisco; Esteban, Rafael; Plasència, Antoni; Salleras, Luis

    2006-01-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the prevalence of immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies to hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection in a population sample from Catalonia and to analyze the demographic and clinical variables associated with the presence of these antibodies. A total of 1,280 subjects between 15 and 74 years of age were selected randomly from urban and rural areas. Data for sociodemographic and clinical variables were collected by using a questionnaire. IgG antibodies to HEV were determined by an immunoenzymatic method. The odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated for studied variables. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to determine which variables were independently associated with the prevalence of HEV infection. Anti-HEV antibodies were detected in 96 (7.3%) of the 1,280 samples analyzed. The prevalence of antibodies was greater among males (7.8%) than among women (7%) and increased with age for both sexes, from 3% among subjects 15 to 24 years of age to 12% among subjects ≥65 years of age. Bivariate analysis of the sociodemographic and clinical variables showed an association between the prevalence of hepatitis E virus infection and minor surgery (OR, 1.96; 95% CI, 1.24 to 3.11), abdominal surgery (OR, 1.74; 95% CI, 1.12 to 2.73), and, for women, being uniparous or multiparous (OR, 2.84; 95% CI, 1.19 to 6.79). The multivariate analysis showed an association with minor surgery only (OR, 1.68; 95% CI, 1.03 to 2.70). In conclusion, anti-HEV antibodies were detected in 7.3% of the Catalan population. The seroprevalence of anti-HEV antibodies increased with age and was associated with previous minor surgery. PMID:17050741

  18. Liver cancer and non-hodgkin lymphoma in hepatitis C virus-infected patients: results from the danvir cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Omland, Lars Haukali; Jepsen, Peter; Krarup, Henrik Bygum

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infection can cause hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and most likely non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). No studies have compared the risk of these cancers between patients with chronic and cleared HCV-infection. The aim of this study was to estimate the 10-year risk of HCC and NHL...... in HCV-infected patients and to compare the risk of these cancers between HCV-infected patients and the general population in Denmark and between patients with chronic and cleared HCV-infection. Nationwide cohorts were used: 11,975 HCV-infected patients in the DANVIR cohort and 71,850 individuals from...

  19. Population-Attributable Risk of Dietary Aflatoxins and Hepatitis B Virus Infection with Respect to Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hadi Omer, El R.; Kuijsten, A.; Kadaru, A.M.Y.; Kok, F.J.; Idris, M.O.; Khidir, I.M.E.; Veer, van 't P.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Aflatoxins and hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections are important risk factors of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). This study assesses the population-attributable risk of these two factors, both jointly and separately, with respect to HCC. Methods: A case-control study was conducted in

  20. Neutralizing monoclonal antibodies against hepatitis C virus E2 protein bind discontinuous epitopes and inhibit infection at a postattachment step

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabo, Michelle C; Luca, Vincent C; Prentoe, Jannick

    2011-01-01

    The E2 glycoprotein of hepatitis C virus (HCV) mediates viral attachment and entry into target hepatocytes and elicits neutralizing antibodies in infected patients. To characterize the structural and functional basis of HCV neutralization, we generated a novel panel of 78 monoclonal antibodies (M...

  1. Seroprevalence of Human Immunodeficiency Virus, Hepatitis B ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gonçales FL Jr, Pereira JS, Da Silva C, Thomaz GR, Pavan MH,. Fais VC, et al. Hepatitis B virus DNA in sera of blood donors and of patients infected with hepatitis C virus and human immunodeficiency virus. Clin Diagn Lab Immunol. 2003;10:718‑20. 25. Bahaf F, Tanomand A, Montazam H, Sany AA. Seroprevalence.

  2. The prevalence of hepatitis B virus infection in mashhad, iran: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakeri, Mohammad Taghi; Foghanian, Bahareh; Nomani, Hosein; Ghayour-Mobarhan, Majid; Nabavinia, Maryam Sadat; Rostami, Sina; Ahadi, Mitra; Meshkat, Zahra

    2013-03-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is the most common and serious liver infection in the world. An estimated 350 million people are chronic carriers of this virus, of whom, more than 620,000 die from liver-related diseases annually. Due to the vaccination program, prevalence of HBV, particularly among the younger generation, is reported to have declined in recent years in Iran. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of HBV infection in Mashhad, North-East of Iran. Three thousand one hundred and ninety eight (3198) individuals living in Mashhad were studied using cluster sampling method. HBV infection was determined by HBsAg ELISA commercial kit. Positive results were subjected for PCR using HBV-specific primers. HBeAg, HBeAb, and HBcAb-IgM ELISA tests were performed for HBsAg-positive samples. Patients' age ranged from 15 to 65 years (Mean = 35.54 ± 14.85). Thirty four (1.0%) of the subjects were positive for HBsAg, of whom, 2.9 % (1 of 34 cases) were also positive in PCR-based screening. ELISA tests for HBeAg, HBeAb, and HBcAb IgM were positive in one (2.9 %), 27 (79.4%) and one (2.9 %) cases, respectively. According to our results, HBsAg was positive in 0.53 of the total population. The prevalence of HBV infection was seemingly low in Mashhad; however, an upward trend was observed in older subjects probably due to successful HBV vaccination coverage in the younger generation. Continuous surveillance and periodic population-based studies are essential to monitor the prevalence of HBV infection in Mashhad in the future.

  3. Prevalence of hepatitis C virus infection among pregnant women in a rural district in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamis, Hossam Hassan; Farghaly, Azza Galal; Shatat, Hanan Zakaria; El-Ghitany, Engy Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Egypt has the highest prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in the world. Screening of HCV during pregnancy is not as routinely done in Egypt compared with many other countries, although pregnancy is an important period where screening of HCV infection is important owing to low immunity, the possibility of vertical transmission and possible horizontal transmission to the baby or other household contacts at a later stage. To determine the seroprevalence of HCV antibodies (HCV-Ab) and risk factors associated with infection among pregnant women in Egypt. A total of 360 pregnant women visiting the healthcare units for routine antenatal care were tested using third generation ELISA test for detection of HCV-Ab. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was done for seropositive cases. A total of 6.1% (22/360) of pregnant women were HCV seropositive; of them only 45% (9/20) had viraemia. Risk factors were their age, the age of their husband and the presence of chronic liver disease in the husband. The prevalence of HCV infection in pregnant women in Egypt appears to be lower than previously reported. The detected risk factors are old age of the pregnant women and their husbands, and chronic liver disease in the husbands. None of the other known risk factors was found to be significantly associated with HCV infection in pregnant women. © The Author(s) 2014.

  4. Hepatitis B virus infection in Latin America: a genomic medicine approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Sonia; Jose-Abrego, Alexis; Fierro, Nora Alma; Escobedo-Melendez, Griselda; Ojeda-Granados, Claudia; Martinez-Lopez, Erika; Panduro, Arturo

    2014-06-21

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is the leading cause of severe chronic liver disease. This article provides a critical view of the importance of genomic medicine for the study of HBV infection and its clinical outcomes in Latin America. Three levels of evolutionary adaptation may correlate with the clinical outcomes of HBV infection. Infections in Latin America are predominantly of genotype H in Mexico and genotype F in Central and South America; these strains have historically circulated among the indigenous population. Both genotypes appear to be linked to a benign course of disease among the native and mestizo Mexicans and native South Americans. In contrast, genotypes F, A and D are common in acute and chronic infections among mestizos with Caucasian ancestry. Hepatocellular carcinoma is rare in Mexicans, but it has been associated with genotype F1b among Argentineans. This observation illustrates the significance of ascertaining the genetic and environmental factors involved in the development of HBV-related liver disease in Latin America, which contrast with those reported in other regions of the world.

  5. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) interaction with astrocytes: nonproductive infection and induction of IL-18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ziqing; Zhao, Fang; He, Johnny J

    2014-06-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection causes the central nervous system (CNS) abnormalities in more than 50 % of chronically infected subjects. However, the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. In this study, we characterized the HCV interactions with astrocytes, one of the putative HCV target cells in the brain. We demonstrated that primary human astrocytes (PHA) were very inefficiently infected by HCV, either in the cell-free form or through cell-cell contact. We then determined the potential restriction steps of HCV infection and replication in these cells. PHA expressed all known HCV receptors but failed to support HCV entry. HCV IRES-mediated RNA translation was functional in PHA and further enhanced by miR122 expression. Nevertheless, PHA did not support HCV replication regardless of miR122 expression. To our great surprise, we found that HCV exposure induced robust IL-18 expression in PHA and exhibited direct neurotoxicity. Taken together, these results showed that astrocytes did not support productive HCV infection and replication, but HCV interactions with astrocytes and neurons alone might be sufficient to cause CNS dysfunction.

  6. Quantification and functional analysis of plasmacytoid dendritic cells in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goutagny, Nadege; Vieux, Claude; Decullier, Evelyne; Ligeoix, Benoit; Epstein, Alberto; Trepo, Christian; Couzigou, Patrice; Inchauspe, Genevieve; Bain, Christine

    2004-05-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (PDCs) are the major producers of interferon (IFN)- alpha within peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). We analyzed whether chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection could be linked to a defective function or number of PDCs. We evaluated the capacity of PBMCs from 5 cohorts of subjects to produce IFN- alpha after viral stimulation. We concomitantly analyzed the frequency of PDCs and the levels of IFN- alpha transcripts within the PBMCs from the same cohorts. PBMCs from patients with chronic HCV infection receiving antiviral therapy displayed a reduced capacity to release IFN- alpha, compared with those from healthy individuals, those from long-term responders to therapy, and those from nontreated patients. This defect was significantly correlated with the percentage of PDCs. In addition, PDCs from patients with chronic HCV infection receiving therapy displayed a reduced intrinsic capacity to produce IFN- alpha, which could be linked to the level of IFN- alpha transcripts. Our observations point to an effect of the therapy on either the survival or the localization of PDCs, rather than a direct detrimental effect due to the viral infection during chronic HCV infection.

  7. Estimating the prevalence of chronic hepatitis B virus infection--New York City, 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, Anne Marie; Bornschlegel, Katherine; Lazaroff, Julie; Kennedy, Joseph; Balter, Sharon

    2012-04-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a preventable cause of liver failure, cirrhosis, and liver cancer; estimated chronic HBV infection prevalence is 0.3-0.5% in the U.S.A. Prevalence in New York City (NYC) is likely higher because foreign-born persons, who represent 36% of NYC's population versus 11% nationwide, bear a disproportionate burden of chronic HBV infection. However, because no comprehensive, population-based survey of chronic HBV infection has been conducted in NYC, a reliable prevalence estimate is unavailable. We used two approaches to estimate chronic HBV infection prevalence in NYC: (1) a census-based estimate, combining local and national prevalence data for specific populations, and (2) a surveillance-based estimate, using data from NYC's Department of Health and Mental Hygiene Hepatitis B Surveillance Registry and adjusting for out-migration and deaths. Results from both the census-based estimate and the surveillance-based estimate were similar, with an estimated prevalence of chronic HBV in NYC of 1.2%. This estimate is two to four times the estimated prevalence for the U.S.A. as a whole. According to the census-based estimate, >93% of all cases in NYC are among persons who are foreign-born, and approximately half of those are among persons born in China. These findings underscore the importance of local data for tailoring programmatic efforts to specific foreign-born populations in NYC. In particular, Chinese-language programs and health education materials are critical. Reliable estimates are important for policymakers in local jurisdictions to better understand their own population's needs and can help target primary care services, prevention materials, and education.

  8. Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy with concomitant hepatitis C virus infection, Joan C. Edwards SOM, Marshall University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belay, Tilahun; Woldegiorgis, Hailegiorgis; Gress, Todd; Rayyan, Yaser

    2015-04-01

    Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) is characterized by pruritus, otherwise unexplained deranged liver enzyme levels, and elevated levels of serum bile acid. ICP has been observed more commonly in hepatitis C virus (HCV) infected women than in women with no HCV infection, and some experts advocate testing for HCV infection in all patients with ICP. The aim of our study was to examine the clinical characteristics of pregnant women with ICP and HCV infection. We reviewed the records of pregnant women between 18 and 45 years of age over a period of 6 years with an International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) diagnosis of HCV infection, ICP, or both. We collected demographic, clinical, and financial data on all the patients and compared them with and without a diagnosis of ICP. There were 91 pregnant women with a diagnosis of HCV, and 41 (45%) of these women were diagnosed with ICP. HCV-infected patients with ICP had a significantly higher median viral load compared with those without ICP (495,000 vs. 8000 copies/ml, P<0.001). The median total financial charges spent for the care of ICP patients with HCV infection was significantly higher than that spent on ICP patients without HCV infection ($12,753.00 vs. $8970.00, P=0.01). We found a high prevalence of ICP among pregnant women infected with HCV, and those with ICP had a higher HCV viral load. Women with suspected ICP should be tested for the presence of HCV.

  9. [Characterization of patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection without indication for treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planas, Ramon

    2014-07-01

    Chronic infection by the hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a dynamic process that results from the interaction between HBV replication and the host's immune response. In accordance with the consensus document of the European Association for the Study of the Liver, treatment is not indicated for the immune tolerant and inactive carrier phases. However, there are situations in the 2 phases (which we could call gray areas of chronic HBV infection) in which the correct categorization of patients is not easy and in which the start of treatment can be proposed. In the immune tolerant phase, treatment could be indicated for health professionals whose responsibilities require their participation in invasive procedures. Treatment could also be indicated for pregnant women who are HBeAg-positive, ALT normal and have high HBV DNA values and for whom oral antiviral treatment is indicated during the last trimester of pregnancy to reduce the risk of vertical HBV transmission from mother to child. For patients in the inactive carrier phase who are HBeAg-negative with persistent normal ALT levels and HBV DNA ≥ 2000 IU/mL, the intensity of the hepatic lesion will determine the indication for treatment. If these patients already have established cirrhosis then treatment is indicated if the HBV DNA is detectable, regardless of the ALT level. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  10. [A Case of Severe Chronic Active Epstein-Barr Virus Infection with Aplastic Anemia and Hepatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ja In; Lee, Sung Won; Han, Nam Ik; Ro, Sang Mi; Noh, Yong-Sun; Jang, Jeong Won; Bae, Si Hyun; Choi, Jong Young; Yoon, Seung Kew

    2016-01-25

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) causes various acute and chronic diseases. Chronic active EBV infection (CAEBV) is characterized by infectious mononucleosis-like symptoms that persist for more than 6 months with high viral loads in peripheral blood and/or an unusual pattern of anti-EBV antibodies. Severe CAEBV is associated with poor prognosis with severe symptoms, an extremely high EBV-related antibody titer, and hematologic complications that often include hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. However, CAEBV which led to the development of aplastic anemia (AA) has not been reported yet. A 73-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with intermittent fever, general weakness and elevated liver enzymes. In the serologic test, EBV-related antibody titer was elevated, and real-time quantitative-PCR in peripheral blood showed viral loads exceeding 10(4) copies/μg DNA. Liver biopsy showed characteristic histopathological changes of EBV hepatitis and in situ hybridization with EBV-encoded RNA-1 was positive for EBV. Pancytopenia was detected in peripheral blood, and the bone marrow aspiration biopsy showed hypocellularity with replacement by adipocytes. AA progressed and the patient was treated with prednisolone but deceased 8 months after the diagnosis due to multiple organ failure and opportunistic infection. Herein, we report a rare case of severe CAEBV in an adult patient accompanied by AA and persistent hepatitis.

  11. Serological evidence of hepatitis E virus infection in pigs and jaundice among pig handlers in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, N; Khan, M S U; Hossain, M B; Sazzad, H M S; Rahman, M Z; Ahmed, F; Zeidner, N S

    2017-11-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is the most common cause of viral hepatitis in humans. Pigs may act as a reservoir of HEV, and pig handlers were frequently identified with a higher prevalence of antibodies to HEV. The objectives of this study were to identify evidence of HEV infection in pigs and compare the history of jaundice between pig handlers and people not exposed to pigs and pork. Blood and faecal samples were collected from 100 pigs derived from three slaughterhouses in the Gazipur district of Bangladesh from January to June, 2011. We also interviewed 200 pig handlers and 250 non-exposed people who did not eat pork or handled pigs in the past 2 years. We tested the pig sera for HEV-specific antibodies using a competitive ELISA and pig faecal samples for HEV RNA using real-time RT-PCR. Of 100 pig sera, 82% (n = 82) had detectable antibody against HEV. Of the 200 pig handlers, 28% (56/200) demonstrated jaundice within the past 2 years, whereas only 17% (43/250) of controls had a history of jaundice (p Bangladesh demonstrated evidence of HEV infection, and a history of jaundice was significantly more frequent in pig handlers. Identifying and genotyping HEV in pigs and pig handlers may provide further evidence of the pig's role in zoonotic HEV transmission in Bangladesh. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  12. Molecular Assay and Genotyping of Hepatitis C Virus among Infected Egyptian and Saudi Arabian Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed M.S. Farag

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is a major health problem recognized globally. HCV is a common cause of liver fibrosis that may lead to liver cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of HCV infection and genotyping among Egyptian and Saudi Arabian chronic patients using different molecular techniques. HCV RNA viral load was assessed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR technology. For HCV genotyping, RT-PCR hybridization fluorescence-based method and reverse hybridization line probe assay (INNO-LiPA were used. A total of 40 anti-HCV-positive patients with chronic hepatitis C were examined for HCV RNA, genotyping, and different laboratory investigations. In the present study, HCV genotypes 4, mixed 4.1b, and 1 were detected in patients of both countries, while genotype 2 was only detected in Saudi Arabian patients. Genotyping methods for HCV showed no difference in the classification at the genotype level. With regard to HCV subtypes, INNO-LiPA assay was a reliable test in HCV genotyping for the detection of major genotypes and subtypes, while RT-PCR-based assay was a good test at the genotype level only. HCV genotype 4 was found to be the predominant genotype among Egyptian and Saudi Arabian chronic patients. In conclusion, data analysis for detecting and genotyping HCV was an important factor for understanding the epidemiology and treatment strategies of HCV among Egyptian and Saudi Arabian chronic patients.

  13. GB virus C/hepatitis G virus infection in dialysis patients and kidney transplant recipients in central Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon Ramos Filho

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the prevalence of GB virus C (GBV-C/hepatitis G virus (HGV infection in dialysis patients and kidney transplant recipients in Central Brazil and also to analyze the virus genotypes distribution, a total of 123 patients including 98 on hemodialysis, 13 on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis treatment, and 12 who received kidney transplantation were interviewed in one unit of dialysis treatment in Goiânia city. Blood samples were collected and serum samples tested for GBV-C/HGV RNA by polymerase chain reaction. Genotypes were determined by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP analysis. Eighteen samples were GBV-C/HGV RNA-positive, resulting in an overall prevalence of 14.6% (95% CI: 9.2-21.7. A high positivity for GBV-C/HGV RNA was observed in patients who had received kidney transplant (16.7%, followed by those on hemodialysis (15.3%, and peritoneal dialysis (7.7%. RFLP analysis revealed the presence of genotypes 1, 2, and 3 of GBV-C/HGV; more precisely, 9 (50% samples were found belonging to the 2b subtype, 4 (22% to the 2a subtype, 3 (17% to genotype 1, and 2 (11% to genotype 3. The present data indicate an intermediate prevalence of GBV-C/HGV infection among dialysis patients and kidney transplant recipients in Central Brazil. Genotype 2 (subtype 2b seems to be the most prevalent GBV-C/HGV genotype in our region.

  14. Rheumatologic manifestations associated with Hepatitis C virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infection is a worldwide burden whose seroprevalence is higher in developing countries with Cameroon being the third most affected country in Africa. HCV both a hepatotropic and lymphotropic infection is responsible for a great number of hepatic and extra hepatic disorders some of ...

  15. Association between hepatitis B virus/hepatitis C virus infection and primary hepatocellular carcinoma risk: A meta-analysis based on Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Libo; Lan, Xiaolin

    2016-12-01

    To assess the relationship between hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and HBV/HCV double infection and hepatocellular carcinoma risk in Chinese population. The databases of PubMed and CNKI were electronic searched by reviewers according to the searching words of HBV, HCV, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The related case-control studies or cohort studies were included. The association between virus infection and hepatocellular carcinoma risk was demonstrated by odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (95% CI). The data were pooled by fixed or random effects model according to the statistical heterogeneity. The publication bias was assessed by Begg's funnel plot and Egger's linear regression test. Finally, 13 publications were included in this meta-analysis. For significant statistical heterogeneity (I2 = 99.8%,P = 0.00), the OR was pooled by random effects model. The pooled results showed that HBV infection can significantly increase the risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma (OR = 58.01, 95% CI: 44.27-71.75); statistical heterogeneity analysis showed that significant heterogeneity existed in evaluation of HCV infection and hepatocellular carcinoma risk across the included 13 studies I2 = 77.78%, P = 0.00). The OR was pooled by random effects model. The pooled results showed that HCV infection can significantly increase the risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma (OR = 2.34, 95% CI: 1.20-3.47); significant heterogeneity did not exist in evaluation HBV/HCV double infection and hepatocellular carcinoma risk for the included 13 studies (I2 = 0.00%,P = 0.80). The OR was pooled by fixed effects model. The pooled results showed that HBV/HCV double infection can significantly increase the risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma (OR = 11.39, 95% CI: 4.58-18.20). No publication bias was found in the aspects of HBV, HCV, and HBV/HCV double infection and hepatocellular carcinoma. For Chinese population, HBV, HCV or HBV/HCV double infection can

  16. Hepatitis C virus viremia increases the incidence of chronic kidney disease in HIV-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Lars; Grint, Daniel; Lundgren, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Several studies have reported on an association between hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibody status and the development of chronic kidney disease (CKD), but the role of HCV viremia and genotype are not well defined.......Several studies have reported on an association between hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibody status and the development of chronic kidney disease (CKD), but the role of HCV viremia and genotype are not well defined....

  17. ORAL MANIFESTATIONS OF HEPATITIS C VIRUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir E. Panov

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is a serious public health problem. New infections continue to occur, and morbidity and mortality are increasing. The date reported that 3% of infected world population are affected.Morbidity associated with hepatitis C virus infection can involve a variety of extrahepatic conditions including the oral region. Some of the oral manifestation are oral disease like lichen planus and Sjögren-like sialadenitis , other affects the dental status, and side effect of the virus therapy. The aim of this review is to summarize the oral sings, accompanying hepatitis C virus.

  18. Hepatitis A virus-encoded miRNAs attenuate the accumulation of viral genomic RNAs in infected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jiandong; Sun, Jing; Wu, Meini; Hu, Ningzhu; Hu, Yunzhang

    2016-06-01

    The establishment of persistent infection with hepatitis A virus (HAV) is the common result of most HAV/cell culture systems. Previous observations show that the synthesis of viral RNAs is reduced during infection. However, the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. We characterized three HAV-encoded miRNAs in our previous study. In this study, we aim to investigate the impact of these miRNAs on the accumulation of viral RNAs. The results indicated that the synthesis of viral genomic RNAs was dramatically reduced (more than 75 % reduction, P virus-derived miRNA could serve as a self-mediated feedback regulator during infection.

  19. Association of Hepatitis C Virus Infection with Proteinuria and Glomerular Filtration Rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurbanova, Nargiza; Qayyum, Rehan

    2015-10-01

    Despite several studies, the extent to which hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD) remains controversial. Thus, we examined the relationship between HCV and CKD using the continuous National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1999-2012). Specimens positive for anti-HCV antibodies were retested and confirmed with recombinant immunoblot assay (RIBA). Proteinuria was defined as urine albumin creatinine ratio > 30 mg/g. CKD was defined as estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) proteinuria (OR = 1.40, p = 0.01 and OR = 1.50, p = 0.02, respectively). In both unadjusted and adjusted analyses, individuals with HCV had significantly higher GFR than individuals without (1.4 mL/min, p = 0.04 and 2.7 mL/min, p proteinuria and high GFR but not with CKD. The biological mechanism of the observed association needs further study. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Evidence of recombination in Hepatitis C Virus populations infecting a hemophiliac patient

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    Cristina Juan

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background/Aim Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients affected by hereditary bleeding disorders. HCV, as others RNA virus, exploit all possible mechanisms of genetic variation to ensure their survival, such as recombination and mutation. In order to gain insight into the genetic variability of HCV virus strains circulating in hemophiliac patients, we have performed a phylogenetic analysis of HCV strains isolated from 10 patients with this kind of pathology. Methods Putative recombinant sequence was identified with the use of GARD program. Statistical support for the presence of a recombination event was done by the use of LARD program. Results A new intragenotypic recombinant strain (1b/1a was detected in 1 out of the 10 hemophiliac patient studied. The recombination event was located at position 387 of the HCV genome (relative to strain AF009606, sub-type 1a corresponding to the core gene region. Conclusion Although recombination may not appear to be common among natural populations of HCV it should be considered as a possible mechanism for generating genetic diversity in hemophiliacs patients.