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Sample records for hepatic glycogen synthesis

  1. Use of deuterium labelled glucose in evaluating the pathway of hepatic glycogen synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, M.N.; Masuoka, L.K.; deRopp, J.S.; Jones, A.D.

    1989-01-01

    Deuterium labelled glucose has been used to study the pathway of hepatic glycogen synthesis during the fasted-refed transition in rats. Deuterium enrichment of liver glycogen was determined using nuclear magnetic resonance as well as mass spectroscopy. Sixty minutes after oral administration of deuterated glucose to fasted rats, the portal vein blood was fully enriched with deuterated glucose. Despite this, less than half of the glucose molecules incorporated into liver glycogen contained deuterium. The loss of deuterium label from glucose is consistent with hepatic glycogen synthesis by an indirect pathway requiring prior metabolism of glucose. The use of deuterium labelled glucose may prove to be a useful probe to study hepatic glycogen metabolism. Its use may also find application in the study of liver glycogen metabolism in humans by a noninvasive means

  2. Hepatic glycogen synthesis in the fetal mouse: An ultrastructural, morphometric, and autoradiographic investigation of the relationship between the smooth endoplasmic reticulum and glycogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breslin, J.S.

    1989-01-01

    Fetal rodent hepatocytes undergo a rapid and significant accumulation of glycogen prior to birth. The distinct association of the smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER) with glycogen during glycogen synthesis documented in the adult hepatocyte has not been clearly demonstrated in the fetus. The experiments described in this dissertation tested the hypothesis that SER is present and functions in the synthesis of fetal hepatic glycogen. Biochemical analysis, light microscopic (LM) histochemistry and electron microscope (EM) morphometry demonstrated that fetal hepatic glycogen synthesis began on day 15, with maximum accumulation occurring between days 17-19. Glycogen accumulation began in a small population of cells. Both the number of cells containing glycogen and the quantity of glycogen per cell increased as glycogen accumulated. Smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER) was observed on day 14 of gestation and throughout fetal hepatic glycogen synthesis, primarily as dilated ribosome-free terminal extensions of rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER), frequently associated with glycogen. SER was in close proximity to isolated particles of glycogen and at the periphery of large compact glycogen deposits. Morphometry demonstrated that the membrane surface of SER in the average fetal hepatocyte increased as glycogen accumulated through day 18 and dropped significantly as glycogen levels peaked on day 19. Parallel alterations in RER membrane surface, indicated overall increases in ER membrane surface. Autoradiography following administration of 3 H-galactose demonstrated that newly synthesized glycogen was deposited near profiles of SER at day 16 and at day 18; however, at day 18 the majority of label was uniformly distributed over glycogen remote from profiles of SER

  3. Brain insulin action augments hepatic glycogen synthesis without suppressing glucose production or gluconeogenesis in dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramnanan, Christopher J.; Saraswathi, Viswanathan; Smith, Marta S.; Donahue, E. Patrick; Farmer, Ben; Farmer, Tiffany D.; Neal, Doss; Williams, Philip E.; Lautz, Margaret; Mari, Andrea; Cherrington, Alan D.; Edgerton, Dale S.

    2011-01-01

    In rodents, acute brain insulin action reduces blood glucose levels by suppressing the expression of enzymes in the hepatic gluconeogenic pathway, thereby reducing gluconeogenesis and endogenous glucose production (EGP). Whether a similar mechanism is functional in large animals, including humans, is unknown. Here, we demonstrated that in canines, physiologic brain hyperinsulinemia brought about by infusion of insulin into the head arteries (during a pancreatic clamp to maintain basal hepatic insulin and glucagon levels) activated hypothalamic Akt, altered STAT3 signaling in the liver, and suppressed hepatic gluconeogenic gene expression without altering EGP or gluconeogenesis. Rather, brain hyperinsulinemia slowly caused a modest reduction in net hepatic glucose output (NHGO) that was attributable to increased net hepatic glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis. This was associated with decreased levels of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) protein and mRNA and with decreased glycogen synthase phosphorylation, changes that were blocked by hypothalamic PI3K inhibition. Therefore, we conclude that the canine brain senses physiologic elevations in plasma insulin, and that this in turn regulates genetic events in the liver. In the context of basal insulin and glucagon levels at the liver, this input augments hepatic glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis, reducing NHGO without altering EGP. PMID:21865644

  4. Direct vs. indirect pathway of hepatic glycogen synthesis as a function of glucose infusion rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagby, G.J.; Lang, C.H.; Johnson, J.L.; Blakesly, H.L.; Spitzer, J.J.

    1986-01-01

    This study was initiated to determine the influence of the rate of exogenous glucose administration on liver glycogen synthesis by the direct (glucose uptake and incorporation into glycogen) vs the indirect pathway (glucose degradation to 3-carbon intermediates, e.g., lactate, prior to incorporation into glycogen). Catheterized rats were fasted 2 days prior to receiving a 3 hr infusion of glucose at rates of 0 to 230 μmol/min/kg containing tracer [6- 3 H]- and [U- 14 C]-glucose. Plasma glucose (r = 0.80), insulin (r = 0.90) and lactate (r = 0.84) were correlated with glucose infusion rate. The rate of liver glycogen deposition (0.46 +/- 0.03 μmol/min/g) did not differ between a glucose infusion rate of 20 and 230 μmol/min/kg. At the lowest and highest glucose infusion rates hepatic glycogenesis accounted for 87 +/- 6 and 9 +/- 1% of the total glucose load, respectively. The percent contribution of the direct pathways to glycogen deposition ([ 3 H] specific activity in hepatic glycogen/[ 3 H] specific activity in plasma glucose) increased from 16 +/- 3 to 83 +/- 5% from lowest to highest glucose infusion rates (prevailing plasma glucose concentrations: 9 +/- 1 and 21 +/- 2 mM, respectively). The results indicate that the relative contribution of the direct and indirect pathways of glucogen synthesis are dependent upon the glucose load or plasma glucose concentration

  5. The glucose-galactose paradox in neonatal murine hepatic glycogen synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunst, C.; Kliegman, R.; Trindade, C.

    1989-01-01

    In adults glucose incorporation to glycogen is indirect after recycling from lactate. In neonates galactose entry to glycogen exceeds that for glucose, but the pathway is unknown. The pathway of hexose incorporation to glycogen was studied in 5-7-day-old rats and 6-h-old rats injected intraperitoneally (IP) with either double-labeled [6-3H]glucose (nonrecycling), [U-14C]glucose (recycling), or [6-3H]glucose and [U-14C]galactose in saline. In another group of pups, 1 g/kg of glucose or galactose was administered in addition to tracers to determine glycemia and net glycogen synthesis between 15 and 180 min after injection. Blood glucose increased from 3.4 +/- 0.4 to 8.5 +/- 1.5 mM in 5-7-day-old pups in response to IP glucose; there was no glycemic response to galactose, although galactose levels increased from 0.5 to 6.3 mM at 15 min. Hepatic glycogen increased after IP glucose from 14 +/- 2 at 15 min to 30 +/- 3 at 120 min (P less than 0.01), whereas after IP galactose glycogen was 44 +/- 6 mumol/g at 120 min (P less than 0.05). After IP glucose, 3H and 14C disintegration per minute in glycogen increased slowly with 14C exceeding 3H at 120 and 180 min. In contrast IP [14C]galactose resulted in a much greater peak of 14C incorporation into glycogen. The ratio of 3H to 14C in glycogen relative to the injectate after IP glucose decreased from 0.69 +/- 0.12 to 0.36 +/- 0.03 (P less than 0.01) between 15 to 180 min, whereas the ratio after galactose was 0.20 +/- 0.007 to 0.15 +/- 0.02 at these times. The 6-h-old pups also demonstrated augmented incorporation of [14C]galactose in glycogen relative to [3H-14C]glucose. In contrast to 5-7-day-old pups there was no evidence of glucose recycling in 6-h-old pups. In conclusion galactose entry into glycogen exceeds that for glucose and is not dependent on recycling

  6. In vivo hepatic glycogen metabolism in the baboon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jehenson, P.; Canioni, P.; Hantraye, P.; Gueron, M.; Syrota, A.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes hepatic glycogen synthesis from glucose studied in the baboon by C-13 MR spectroscopy at 2 T. Glycogen synthesis was followed for 3 hours on natural abundance spectra during glucose infusion. (1-C-13)-glucose (3g) was then injected. It produced a ten times larger rate of increase of glycogen-C 1 , which is much lower than expected, suggesting that glycogen synthesis mainly occurred from unlabeled gluconeogenic substrates. Signal-to-noise ratio was 50 for glycogen-C 1 on 2-minute H-1 decoupled spectra. Labeling of C 1 but also C 2 , C 5 and C 6 of glycogen indicated a 15% contribution of indirect pathways to its synthesis from glucose

  7. Labeling of hepatic glycogen after short- and long-term stimulation of glycogen synthesis in rats injected with 3H-galactose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michaels, J.E.; Garfield, S.A.; Hung, J.T.; Cardell, R.R. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of short- and long-term stimulation of glycogen synthesis elicited by dexamethasone were studied by light (LM) and electron (EM) microscopic radioautography (RAG) and biochemical analysis. Adrenalectomized rats were fasted overnight and pretreated for short- (3 hr) or long-term (14 hr) periods with dexamethasone prior to intravenous injection of tracer doses of 3H-galactose. Analysis of LM-RAGs from short-term rats revealed that about equal percentages (44%) of hepatocytes became heavily or lightly labeled 1 hr after labeling. The percentage of heavily labeled cells increased slightly 6 hr after labeling, and unlabeled glycogen became apparent in some hepatocytes. The percentage of heavily labeled cells had decreased somewhat 12 hr after labeling, and more unlabeled glycogen was evident. In the long-term rats 1 hr after labeling, a higher percentage of heavily labeled cells (76%) was observed compared to short-term rats, and most glycogen was labeled. In spite of the high amount of labeling seen initially, the percentage of heavily labeled hepatocytes had decreased considerably to 55% by 12 hr after injection; and sparsely labeled and unlabeled glycogen was prevalent. The EM-RAGs of both short- and long-term rats were similar. Silver grains were associated with glycogen patches 1 hr after labeling; 12 hr after labeling, the glycogen patches had enlarged; and label, where present, was dispersed over the enlarged glycogen clumps. Analysis of DPM/mg tissue corroborated the observed decrease in label 12 hr after administration in the long-term animals. The loss of label observed 12 hr after injection in the long-term pretreated rats suggests that turnover of glycogen occurred during this interval despite the net accumulation of glycogen that was visible morphologically and evident from biochemical measurement

  8. Dietary Methionine Restriction Alleviates Hyperglycemia in Pigs with Intrauterine Growth Restriction by Enhancing Hepatic Protein Kinase B Signaling and Glycogen Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Zhixiong; Zhang, Hao; Su, Weipeng; Zhou, Le; Wang, Fei; Li, Yue; Zhang, Lili; Wang, Tian

    2017-10-01

    Background: Individuals with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) are prone to developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Dietary methionine restriction (MR) improves insulin sensitivity and glucose homeostasis in individuals with normal birth weight (NBW). Objective: This study investigated the effects of MR on plasma glucose concentration and hepatic and muscle glucose metabolism in pigs with IUGR. Methods: Thirty female NBW and 60 same-sex spontaneous IUGR piglets (Landrace × Yorkshire) were selected. After weaning (day 21), the piglets were fed diets with adequate methionine (NBW-CON and IUGR-CON) or 30% less methionine (IUGR-MR) ( n = 6). At day 180, 1 pig with a body weight near the mean of each replication was selected for biochemical analysis. Results: The IUGR-CON group showed 41.6%, 68.6%, and 67.1% higher plasma glucose concentration, hepatic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase activity, and glucose-6-phosphatase activity, respectively, than the NBW-CON group ( P glycogen content and glycogen synthase activity were 36.9% and 38.8% lower, respectively, in the IUGR-CON than the NBW-CON group ( P glycogen content and glycogen synthase activity of the IUGR-MR pigs were 62.9% and 50.8% higher than those of the IUGR-CON pigs ( P glycogen synthesis, implying a potential nutritional strategy to prevent type 2 diabetes mellitus in IUGR offspring. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  9. Hepatic protein phosphatase 1 regulatory subunit 3B (Ppp1r3b) promotes hepatic glycogen synthesis and thereby regulates fasting energy homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Minal B; Shewale, Swapnil V; Sequeira, Raymond N; Millar, John S; Hand, Nicholas J; Rader, Daniel J

    2017-06-23

    Maintenance of whole-body glucose homeostasis is critical to glycemic function. Genetic variants mapping to chromosome 8p23.1 in genome-wide association studies have been linked to glycemic traits in humans. The gene of known function closest to the mapped region, PPP1R3B (protein phosphatase 1 regulatory subunit 3B), encodes a protein (G L ) that regulates glycogen metabolism in the liver. We therefore sought to test the hypothesis that hepatic PPP1R3B is associated with glycemic traits. We generated mice with either liver-specific deletion ( Ppp1r3b Δ hep ) or liver-specific overexpression of Ppp1r3b The Ppp1r3b deletion significantly reduced glycogen synthase protein abundance, and the remaining protein was predominantly phosphorylated and inactive. As a consequence, glucose incorporation into hepatic glycogen was significantly impaired, total hepatic glycogen content was substantially decreased, and mice lacking hepatic Ppp1r3b had lower fasting plasma glucose than controls. The concomitant loss of liver glycogen impaired whole-body glucose homeostasis and increased hepatic expression of glycolytic enzymes in Ppp1r3b Δ hep mice relative to controls in the postprandial state. Eight hours of fasting significantly increased the expression of two critical gluconeogenic enzymes, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and glucose-6-phosphatase, above the levels in control livers. Conversely, the liver-specific overexpression of Ppp1r3b enhanced hepatic glycogen storage above that of controls and, as a result, delayed the onset of fasting-induced hypoglycemia. Moreover, mice overexpressing hepatic Ppp1r3b upon long-term fasting (12-36 h) were protected from blood ketone-body accumulation, unlike control and Ppp1r3b Δ hep mice. These findings indicate a major role for Ppp1r3b in regulating hepatic glycogen stores and whole-body glucose/energy homeostasis. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Is Glycogenin Essential for Glycogen Synthesis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldfors, Anders

    2017-07-05

    Glycogen synthesis requires a priming oligosaccharide, formed by autoglucosylation of glycogenin, a core protein in glycogen particles. In this edition of Cell Metabolism, Testoni et al. (2017) challenge this generally accepted concept by demonstrating that glycogenin inactivation in mice results in an increased amount of glycogen and not glycogen depletion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Regulation of glycogen synthesis in rat skeletal muscle after glycogen-depleting contractile activity: effects of adrenaline on glycogen synthesis and activation of glycogen synthase and glycogen phosphorylase.

    OpenAIRE

    Franch, J; Aslesen, R; Jensen, J

    1999-01-01

    We investigated the effects of insulin and adrenaline on the rate of glycogen synthesis in skeletal muscles after electrical stimulation in vitro. The contractile activity decreased the glycogen concentration by 62%. After contractile activity, the glycogen stores were fully replenished at a constant and high rate for 3 h when 10 m-i.u./ml insulin was present. In the absence of insulin, only 65% of the initial glycogen stores was replenished. Adrenaline decreased insulin-stimulated glycogen s...

  12. Swelling of rat hepatocytes stimulates glycogen synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baquet, A.; Hue, L.; Meijer, A. J.; van Woerkom, G. M.; Plomp, P. J.

    1990-01-01

    In hepatocytes from fasted rats, several amino acids are known to stimulate glycogen synthesis via activation of glycogen synthase. The hypothesis that an increase in cell volume resulting from amino acid uptake may be involved in the stimulation of glycogen synthesis is supported by the following

  13. Protein targeting to glycogen is a master regulator of glycogen synthesis in astrocytes

    KAUST Repository

    Ruchti, E.; Roach, P.J.; DePaoli-Roach, A.A.; Magistretti, Pierre J.; Allaman, I.

    2016-01-01

    to induce glycogen synthesis and accumulation. In contrast, siRNA-mediated downregulation of PTG resulted in a 2-fold decrease in glycogen levels. Interestingly, PTG downregulation strongly impaired long-term astrocytic glycogen synthesis induced by insulin

  14. Activation of Basal Gluconeogenesis by Coactivator p300 Maintains Hepatic Glycogen Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jia; Meng, Shumei; Ma, Anlin; Radovick, Sally; Wondisford, Fredric E.

    2013-01-01

    Because hepatic glycogenolysis maintains euglycemia during early fasting, proper hepatic glycogen synthesis in the fed/postprandial states is critical. It has been known for decades that gluconeogenesis is essential for hepatic glycogen synthesis; however, the molecular mechanism remains unknown. In this report, we show that depletion of hepatic p300 reduces glycogen synthesis, decreases hepatic glycogen storage, and leads to relative hypoglycemia. We previously reported that insulin suppressed gluconeogenesis by phosphorylating cAMP response element binding protein-binding protein (CBP) at S436 and disassembling the cAMP response element-binding protein-CBP complex. However, p300, which is closely related to CBP, lacks the corresponding S436 phosphorylation site found on CBP. In a phosphorylation-competent p300G422S knock-in mouse model, we found that mutant mice exhibited reduced hepatic glycogen content and produced significantly less glycogen in a tracer incorporation assay in the postprandial state. Our study demonstrates the important and unique role of p300 in glycogen synthesis through maintaining basal gluconeogenesis. PMID:23770612

  15. Protein targeting to glycogen is a master regulator of glycogen synthesis in astrocytes

    OpenAIRE

    E. Ruchti; P.J. Roach; A.A. DePaoli-Roach; P.J. Magistretti; I. Allaman

    2016-01-01

    The storage and use of glycogen, the main energy reserve in the brain, is a metabolic feature of astrocytes. Glycogen synthesis is regulated by Protein Targeting to Glycogen (PTG), a member of specific glycogen-binding subunits of protein phosphatase-1 (PPP1). It positively regulates glycogen synthesis through de-phosphorylation of both glycogen synthase (activation) and glycogen phosphorylase (inactivation). In cultured astrocytes, PTG mRNA levels were previously shown to be enhanced by the ...

  16. Glycogen synthesis in glycogenin 1-deficient patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, Thomas O.; Ruiz-Ruiz, Cristina; Vissing, John

    2017-01-01

    Context: Glycogen storage disease (GSD) type XV is a rare disease caused by mutations in the GYG1 gene that codes for the core molecule of muscle glycogen, glycogenin 1. Nonetheless, glycogen is present in muscles of glycogenin 1-deficient patients, suggesting an alternative for glycogen buildup....... A likely candidate is glycogenin 2, an isoform expressed in the liver and heart but not in healthy skeletal muscle. Objective: We wanted to investigate the formation of glycogen and changes in glycogen metabolism in patients with GSD type XV. Design, Setting, and Patients: Two patients with mutations...... in the GYG1 gene were investigated for histopathology, ultrastructure, and expression of proteins involved in glycogen synthesis and metabolism. Results: Apart from occurrence of polyglucosan (PG) bodies in few fibers, glycogen appeared normal in most cells, and the concentration was normal in patients...

  17. Muscle glycogen synthesis before and after exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivy, J L

    1991-01-01

    The importance of carbohydrates as a fuel source during endurance exercise has been known for 60 years. With the advent of the muscle biopsy needle in the 1960s, it was determined that the major source of carbohydrate during exercise was the muscle glycogen stores. It was demonstrated that the capacity to exercise at intensities between 65 to 75% VO2max was related to the pre-exercise level of muscle glycogen, i.e. the greater the muscle glycogen stores, the longer the exercise time to exhaustion. Because of the paramount importance of muscle glycogen during prolonged, intense exercise, a considerable amount of research has been conducted in an attempt to design the best regimen to elevate the muscle's glycogen stores prior to competition and to determine the most effective means of rapidly replenishing the muscle glycogen stores after exercise. The rate-limiting step in glycogen synthesis is the transfer of glucose from uridine diphosphate-glucose to an amylose chain. This reaction is catalysed by the enzyme glycogen synthase which can exist in a glucose-6-phosphate-dependent, inactive form (D-form) and a glucose-6-phosphate-independent, active form (I-form). The conversion of glycogen synthase from one form to the other is controlled by phosphorylation-dephosphorylation reactions. The muscle glycogen concentration can vary greatly depending on training status, exercise routines and diet. The pattern of muscle glycogen resynthesis following exercise-induced depletion is biphasic. Following the cessation of exercise and with adequate carbohydrate consumption, muscle glycogen is rapidly resynthesised to near pre-exercise levels within 24 hours. Muscle glycogen then increases very gradually to above-normal levels over the next few days. Contributing to the rapid phase of glycogen resynthesis is an increase in the percentage of glycogen synthase I, an increase in the muscle cell membrane permeability to glucose, and an increase in the muscle's sensitivity to insulin

  18. Free fatty acids increase hepatic glycogen content in obese males

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allick, G.; Sprangers, F.; Weverling, G. J.; Ackermans, M. T.; Meijer, A. J.; Romijn, J. A.; Endert, E.; Bisschop, P. H.; Sauerwein, H. P.

    2004-01-01

    Obesity is associated with increased hepatic glycogen content. In vivo and in vitro data suggest that plasma free fatty acids (FFA) may cause this increase. In this study we investigated the effect of physiological plasma FFA levels on hepatic glycogen metabolism by studying intrahepatic glucose

  19. 13C MRS Studies of the Control of Hepatic Glycogen Metabolism at High Magnetic Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corin O. Miller

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Glycogen is the primary intracellular storage form of carbohydrates. In contrast to most tissues where stored glycogen can only supply the local tissue with energy, hepatic glycogen is mobilized and released into the blood to maintain appropriate circulating glucose levels, and is delivered to other tissues as glucose in response to energetic demands. Insulin and glucagon, two current targets of high interest in the pharmaceutical industry, are well-known glucose-regulating hormones whose primary effect in liver is to modulate glycogen synthesis and breakdown. The purpose of these studies was to develop methods to measure glycogen metabolism in real time non-invasively both in isolated mouse livers, and in non-human primates (NHPs using 13C MRS.Methods: Livers were harvested from C57/Bl6 mice and perfused with [1-13C] Glucose. To demonstrate the ability to measure acute changes in glycogen metabolism ex-vivo, fructose, glucagon, and insulin were administered to the liver ex-vivo. The C1 resonance of glycogen was measured in real time with 13C MRS using an 11.7T (500 MHz NMR spectrometer. To demonstrate the translatability of this approach, NHPs (male rhesus monkeys were studied in a 7 T Philips MRI using a partial volume 1H/13C imaging coil. NPHs were subjected to a variable IV infusion of [1-13C] glucose (to maintain blood glucose at 3-4x basal, along with a constant 1 mg/kg/min infusion of fructose. The C1 resonance of glycogen was again measured in real time with 13C MRS. To demonstrate the ability to measure changes in glycogen metabolism in vivo, animals received a glucagon infusion (1 μg/kg bolus followed by 40 ng/kg/min constant infusion half way through the study on the second study session.Results: In both perfused mouse livers and in NHPs, hepatic 13C-glycogen synthesis (i.e., monotonic increases in the 13C-glycogen NMR signal was readily detected. In both paradigms, addition of glucagon resulted in cessation of glycogen

  20. Protein targeting to glycogen is a master regulator of glycogen synthesis in astrocytes

    KAUST Repository

    Ruchti, E.

    2016-10-08

    The storage and use of glycogen, the main energy reserve in the brain, is a metabolic feature of astrocytes. Glycogen synthesis is regulated by Protein Targeting to Glycogen (PTG), a member of specific glycogen-binding subunits of protein phosphatase-1 (PPP1). It positively regulates glycogen synthesis through de-phosphorylation of both glycogen synthase (activation) and glycogen phosphorylase (inactivation). In cultured astrocytes, PTG mRNA levels were previously shown to be enhanced by the neurotransmitter noradrenaline. To achieve further insight into the role of PTG in the regulation of astrocytic glycogen, its levels of expression were manipulated in primary cultures of mouse cortical astrocytes using adenovirus-mediated overexpression of tagged-PTG or siRNA to downregulate its expression. Infection of astrocytes with adenovirus led to a strong increase in PTG expression and was associated with massive glycogen accumulation (>100 fold), demonstrating that increased PTG expression is sufficient to induce glycogen synthesis and accumulation. In contrast, siRNA-mediated downregulation of PTG resulted in a 2-fold decrease in glycogen levels. Interestingly, PTG downregulation strongly impaired long-term astrocytic glycogen synthesis induced by insulin or noradrenaline. Finally, these effects of PTG downregulation on glycogen metabolism could also be observed in cultured astrocytes isolated from PTG-KO mice. Collectively, these observations point to a major role of PTG in the regulation of glycogen synthesis in astrocytes and indicate that conditions leading to changes in PTG expression will directly impact glycogen levels in this cell type.

  1. 13C Mrs Studies of the Control of Hepatic Glycogen Metabolism at High Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Corin O.; Cao, Jin; Zhu, He; Chen, Li M.; Wilson, George; Kennan, Richard; Gore, John C.

    2017-06-01

    Introduction: Glycogen is the primary intracellular storage form of carbohydrates. In contrast to most tissues where stored glycogen can only supply the local tissue with energy, hepatic glycogen is mobilized and released into the blood to maintain appropriate circulating glucose levels, and is delivered to other tissues as glucose in response to energetic demands. Insulin and glucagon, two current targets of high interest in the pharmaceutical industry, are well known glucose-regulating hormones whose primary effect in liver is to modulate glycogen synthesis and breakdown. The purpose of these studies was to develop methods to measure glycogen metabolism in real time non-invasively both in isolated mouse livers, and in non-human primates (NHPs) using 13C MRS. Methods: Livers were harvested from C57/Bl6 mice and perfused with [1-13C] Glucose. To demonstrate the ability to measure acute changes in glycogen metabolism ex-vivo, fructose, glucagon, and insulin were administered to the liver ex-vivo. The C1 resonance of glycogen was measured in real time with 13C MRS using an 11.7T (500 MHz) NMR spectrometer. To demonstrate the translatability of this approach, NHPs (male rhesus monkeys) were studied in a 7 T Philips MRI using a partial volume 1H/13C imaging coil. NPHs were subjected to a variable IV infusion of [1-13C] glucose (to maintain blood glucose at 3-4x basal), along with a constant 1 mg/kg/min infusion of fructose. The C1 resonance of glycogen was again measured in real time with 13C MRS. To demonstrate the ability to measure changes in glycogen metabolism in vivo, animals received a glucagon infusion (1 μg/kg bolus followed by 40 ng/kg/min constant infusion) half way through the study on the second study session. Results: In both perfused mouse livers and in NHPs, hepatic 13C-glycogen synthesis (i.e. monotonic increases in the 13C-glycogen NMR signal) was readily detected. In both paradigms, addition of glucagon resulted in cessation of glycogen synthesis

  2. Somatomedin-C stimulates glycogen synthesis in fetal rat hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freemark, M.; D'Ercole, A.J.; Handwerger, S.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of somatomedin-C/insulin-like growth factor I (Sm-C) on glycogen metabolism in cultured hepatocytes from 20-day-old rat fetuses have been examined and compared with the effects of insulin. Sm-C (25-375 ng/ml; 3.25-50 nM) stimulated dose-dependent increases in [ 14 C]glucose incorporation into glycogen (14.4-72.9% and total cell glycogen content (10.6-34.3%. Maximal stimulation of glycogen synthesis by Sm-C occurred at 2-4 h of incubation. Insulin (10 nM to 10 microM) also stimulated [ 14 C]glucose incorporation but its potency was only 1/20th that of Sm-C. The time course of stimulation of glucose incorporation by insulin was identical to that of Sm-C, the dose-response curves of the two hormones were parallel, and the maximal effects of insulin were not enhanced by simultaneous exposure of cells to Sm-C. These findings suggest that Sm-C and insulin stimulate glycogenesis in fetal liver through similar or identical mechanisms. Since the potency of Sm-C was 20 times greater than that of insulin, the glycogenic action of insulin in fetal liver may be mediated through binding to a hepatic receptor which also binds Sm-C. In addition to having mitogenic effects on fetal tissues, Sm-C may have direct anabolic effects on fetal carbohydrate metabolism

  3. Neuronal glycogen synthesis contributes to physiological aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinadinos, Christopher; Valles-Ortega, Jordi; Boulan, Laura; Solsona, Estel; Tevy, Maria F; Marquez, Mercedes; Duran, Jordi; Lopez-Iglesias, Carmen; Calbó, Joaquim; Blasco, Ester; Pumarola, Marti; Milán, Marco; Guinovart, Joan J

    2014-10-01

    Glycogen is a branched polymer of glucose and the carbohydrate energy store for animal cells. In the brain, it is essentially found in glial cells, although it is also present in minute amounts in neurons. In humans, loss-of-function mutations in laforin and malin, proteins involved in suppressing glycogen synthesis, induce the presence of high numbers of insoluble polyglucosan bodies in neuronal cells. Known as Lafora bodies (LBs), these deposits result in the aggressive neurodegeneration seen in Lafora's disease. Polysaccharide-based aggregates, called corpora amylacea (CA), are also present in the neurons of aged human brains. Despite the similarity of CA to LBs, the mechanisms and functional consequences of CA formation are yet unknown. Here, we show that wild-type laboratory mice also accumulate glycogen-based aggregates in the brain as they age. These structures are immunopositive for an array of metabolic and stress-response proteins, some of which were previously shown to aggregate in correlation with age in the human brain and are also present in LBs. Remarkably, these structures and their associated protein aggregates are not present in the aged mouse brain upon genetic ablation of glycogen synthase. Similar genetic intervention in Drosophila prevents the accumulation of glycogen clusters in the neuronal processes of aged flies. Most interestingly, targeted reduction of Drosophila glycogen synthase in neurons improves neurological function with age and extends lifespan. These results demonstrate that neuronal glycogen accumulation contributes to physiological aging and may therefore constitute a key factor regulating age-related neurological decline in humans. © 2014 The Authors. Aging cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Irisin inhibits hepatic gluconeogenesis and increases glycogen synthesis via the PI3K/Akt pathway in type 2 diabetic mice and hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tong-Yan; Shi, Chang-Xiang; Gao, Run; Sun, Hai-Jian; Xiong, Xiao-Qing; Ding, Lei; Chen, Qi; Li, Yue-Hua; Wang, Jue-Jin; Kang, Yu-Ming; Zhu, Guo-Qing

    2015-11-01

    Increased glucose production and reduced hepatic glycogen storage contribute to metabolic abnormalities in diabetes. Irisin, a newly identified myokine, induces the browning of white adipose tissue, but its effects on gluconeogenesis and glycogenesis are unknown. In the present study, we investigated the effects and underlying mechanisms of irisin on gluconeogenesis and glycogenesis in hepatocytes with insulin resistance, and its therapeutic role in type 2 diabetic mice. Insulin resistance was induced by glucosamine (GlcN) or palmitate in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells and mouse primary hepatocytes. Type 2 diabetes was induced by streptozotocin/high-fat diet (STZ/HFD) in mice. In HepG2 cells, irisin ameliorated the GlcN-induced increases in glucose production, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) expression, and glycogen synthase (GS) phosphorylation; it prevented GlcN-induced decreases in glycogen content and the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) p110α subunit level, and the phosphorylation of Akt/protein kinase B, forkhead box transcription factor O1 (FOXO1) and glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3). These effects of irisin were abolished by the inhibition of PI3K or Akt. The effects of irisin were confirmed in mouse primary hepatocytes with GlcN-induced insulin resistance and in human HepG2 cells with palmitate-induced insulin resistance. In diabetic mice, persistent subcutaneous perfusion of irisin improved the insulin sensitivity, reduced fasting blood glucose, increased GSK3 and Akt phosphorylation, glycogen content and irisin level, and suppressed GS phosphorylation and PEPCK and G6Pase expression in the liver. Irisin improves glucose homoeostasis by reducing gluconeogenesis via PI3K/Akt/FOXO1-mediated PEPCK and G6Pase down-regulation and increasing glycogenesis via PI3K/Akt/GSK3-mediated GS activation. Irisin may be regarded as a novel therapeutic strategy for insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. © 2015

  5. Glycogen synthesis in liver and skeletal muscle after exercise: participation of the gluconeogenic pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    Hepatic glycogenesis occurs by both the uptake of plasma glucose (direct pathway) as well as from gluconeogenesis (indirect pathway). In vitro studies suggest that skeletal muscle can also synthesize glycogen from lactate. The purpose of the present studies was to assess the contribution of the indirect pathway to liver and muscle glycogen synthesis after exercise with various substrata infusions. The authors hypothesis was the contribution of the indirect pathway of hepatic glycogenesis would increase after exercise. To this end, fasted rats were depleted of glycogen by exhaustive exercise; a second group of fasted rats remained rested. Both groups were then infused intravenously with glucose containing tracer quantities of [6- 3 H] and [U- 14 C] glucose for 4 hrs. The ensuing hyperglycemic response was exaggerated in post-exercised rats; whereas, plasma lactate levels were lower than those of nonexercised rats. The percent of hepatic glycogen synthesized from gluconeogenic precursors did not differ between exercised (39%) and nonexercised (36%) rats

  6. Investigation and management of the hepatic glycogen storage diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Kaustuv

    2015-07-01

    The glycogen storage diseases (GSD) comprise a group of disorders that involve the disruption of metabolism of glycogen. Glycogen is stored in various organs including skeletal muscle, the kidneys and liver. The liver stores glycogen to supply the rest of the body with glucose when required. Therefore, disruption of this process can lead to hypoglycaemia. If glycogen is not broken down effectively, this can lead to hepatomegaly. Glycogen synthase deficiency leads to impaired glycogen synthesis and consequently the liver is small. Glycogen brancher deficiency can lead to abnormal glycogen being stored in the liver leading to a quite different disorder of progressive liver dysfunction. Understanding the physiology of GSD I, III, VI and IX guides dietary treatments and the provision of appropriate amounts and types of carbohydrates. There has been recent re-emergence in the literature of the use of ketones in therapy, either in the form of the salt D,L-3-hydroxybutyrate or medium chain triglyceride (MCT). High protein diets have also been advocated. Alternative waxy maize based starches seem to show promising early data of efficacy. There are many complications of each of these disorders and they need to be prospectively surveyed and managed. Liver and kidney transplantation is still indicated in severe refractory disease.

  7. Ordered synthesis and mobilization of glycogen in the perfused heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brainard, J.R.; Hutson, J.Y.; Hoekenga, D.E.; Lenhoff, R.

    1989-01-01

    The molecular order of synthesis and mobilization of glycogen in the perfused heart was studied by 13 C NMR. By varying the glucose isotopomer ([1- 13 C]glucose or [2- 13 C]glucose) supplied to the heart, glycogen synthesized at different times during the perfusion was labeled at different carbon sites. Subsequently, the in situ mobilization of glycogen during ischemia was observed by detection of labeled lactate derived from glycolysis of the glucosyl monomers. When [1- 13 C]glucose was given initially in the perfusion and [2- 13 C]glucose was given second, [2- 13 C]lactate was detected first during ischemia and [3- 13 C]lactate second. This result, and the equivalent result when the glucose labels were given in the reverse order, demonstrates that glycogen synthesis and mobilization are ordered in the heart, where glycogen is found morphologically only as β particles. Previous studies of glycogen synthesis and mobilization in liver and adipocytes have suggested that the organization of β particles into α particles was partially responsible for ordered synthesis and mobilization. The observations reported here for cardiac glycogen suggest that another mechanism is responsible. In addition to examine the ordered synthesis and mobilization of cardiac glycogen, the authors have selectively monitored the NMR properties of 13 C-labeled glycogen synthesized early in the perfusion during further glycogen synthesis from a second, differently labeled substrate. During synthesis from the second labeled glucose monomer, the glycogen resonance from the first label decreased in integrated intensity and increased in line width. These results suggest either that there is significant isotopic exchange of glucosyl monomers in glycogen during net synthesis or that glucosyl residues incorporated into glycogen undergo motional restrictions as further glycogen synthesis occurs

  8. Lack of liver glycogen causes hepatic insulin resistance and steatosis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irimia, Jose M; Meyer, Catalina M; Segvich, Dyann M; Surendran, Sneha; DePaoli-Roach, Anna A; Morral, Nuria; Roach, Peter J

    2017-06-23

    Disruption of the Gys2 gene encoding the liver isoform of glycogen synthase generates a mouse strain (LGSKO) that almost completely lacks hepatic glycogen, has impaired glucose disposal, and is pre-disposed to entering the fasted state. This study investigated how the lack of liver glycogen increases fat accumulation and the development of liver insulin resistance. Insulin signaling in LGSKO mice was reduced in liver, but not muscle, suggesting an organ-specific defect. Phosphorylation of components of the hepatic insulin-signaling pathway, namely IRS1, Akt, and GSK3, was decreased in LGSKO mice. Moreover, insulin stimulation of their phosphorylation was significantly suppressed, both temporally and in an insulin dose response. Phosphorylation of the insulin-regulated transcription factor FoxO1 was somewhat reduced and insulin treatment did not elicit normal translocation of FoxO1 out of the nucleus. Fat overaccumulated in LGSKO livers, showing an aberrant distribution in the acinus, an increase not explained by a reduction in hepatic triglyceride export. Rather, when administered orally to fasted mice, glucose was directed toward hepatic lipogenesis as judged by the activity, protein levels, and expression of several fatty acid synthesis genes, namely, acetyl-CoA carboxylase, fatty acid synthase, SREBP1c, chREBP, glucokinase, and pyruvate kinase. Furthermore, using cultured primary hepatocytes, we found that lipogenesis was increased by 40% in LGSKO cells compared with controls. Of note, the hepatic insulin resistance was not associated with increased levels of pro-inflammatory markers. Our results suggest that loss of liver glycogen synthesis diverts glucose toward fat synthesis, correlating with impaired hepatic insulin signaling and glucose disposal. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Increased hepatic glycogen synthetase and decreased phosphorylase in trained rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galbo, H; Saugmann, P; Richter, Erik

    1979-01-01

    Rats were either physically trained by a 12 wk swimming program or were freely eating or weight matched, sedentary controls. Trained rats had a higher relative liver weight and total hepatic glycogen synthetase (EC 2.4.1.11) activity and a lower phosphorylase (EC 2.4.1.1) activity than the other...

  10. Glycogen synthesis in human gastrocnemius muscle is not representative of whole-body muscle glycogen synthesis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serlie, M.J.; Haan, J.H.A. de; Tack, C.J.J.; Verberne, H.J.; Ackermans, M.T.; Heerschap, A.; Sauerwein, H.P.

    2005-01-01

    The introduction of 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has enabled noninvasive measurement of muscle glycogen synthesis in humans. Conclusions based on measurements by the MRS technique assume that glucose metabolism in gastrocnemius muscle is representative for all skeletal muscles and thus

  11. Glycogen synthesis in human gastrocnemius muscle is not representative of whole-body muscle glycogen synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serlie, Mireille J. M.; de Haan, Jacco H.; Tack, Cees J.; Verberne, Hein J.; Ackermans, Mariette T.; Heerschap, Arend; Sauerwein, Hans P.

    2005-01-01

    The introduction of C-13 magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has enabled noninvasive measurement of muscle glycogen synthesis in humans. Conclusions based on measurements by the MRS technique assume that glucose metabolism in gastrocnemius muscle is representative for all skeletal muscles and thus

  12. Quantitative comparison of pathways of hepatic glycogen repletion in fed and fasted humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shulman, G.I.; Cline, G.; Schumann, W.C.; Chandramouli, V.; Kumaran, K.; Landau, B.R.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of fasting vs. refeeding on hepatic glycogen repletion by the direct pathway, i.e., glucose----glucose 6-phosphate (G-6-P)----glycogen, was determined. Acetaminophen was administered during an infusion of glucose labeled with [1-13C]- and [6-14C]glucose into four healthy volunteers after an overnight fast and into the same subjects 4 h after breakfast. 13C enrichments in C-1 and C-6 of glucose formed from urinary acetaminophen glucuronide compared with enrichments in C-1 and C-6 of plasma glucose provided an estimate of glycogen formation by the direct pathway. The specific activity of glucose from the glucuronide compared with the specific activity of the plasma glucose, along with the percentages of 14C in C-1 and C-6 of the glucose from the glucuronide, also provided an estimate of the amount of glycogen formed by the direct pathway. The estimates were similar. Those from [6-14C]glucose would have been higher than from [1-13C]glucose if the pentose cycle contribution to overall glucose utilization had been significant. After an overnight fast, during the last hour of infusion, 49 +/- 3% of the glycogen formed was formed via the direct pathway. After breakfast, at similar plasma glucose and insulin concentrations, the percentage increased to 69 +/- 7% (P less than 0.02). Thus the contributions of the pathways to hepatic glycogen formation depend on the dietary state of the individual. For a dietary regimen in which individuals consume multiple meals per day containing at least a moderate amount of carbohydrates most glycogen synthesis occurs by the direct pathway

  13. Role of Maltose Enzymes in Glycogen Synthesis by Escherichia coli▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong-Tae; Shim, Jae-Hoon; Tran, Phuong Lan; Hong, In-Hee; Yong, Hwan-Ung; Oktavina, Ershita Fitria; Nguyen, Hai Dang; Kim, Jung-Wan; Lee, Tae Soo; Park, Sung-Hoon; Boos, Winfried; Park, Kwan-Hwa

    2011-01-01

    Mutants with deletion mutations in the glg and mal gene clusters of Escherichia coli MC4100 were used to gain insight into glycogen and maltodextrin metabolism. Glycogen content, molecular mass, and branch chain distribution were analyzed in the wild type and in ΔmalP (encoding maltodextrin phosphorylase), ΔmalQ (encoding amylomaltase), ΔglgA (encoding glycogen synthase), and ΔglgA ΔmalP derivatives. The wild type showed increasing amounts of glycogen when grown on glucose, maltose, or maltodextrin. When strains were grown on maltose, the glycogen content was 20 times higher in the ΔmalP strain (0.97 mg/mg protein) than in the wild type (0.05 mg/mg protein). When strains were grown on glucose, the ΔmalP strain and the wild type had similar glycogen contents (0.04 mg/mg and 0.03 mg/mg protein, respectively). The ΔmalQ mutant did not grow on maltose but showed wild-type amounts of glycogen when grown on glucose, demonstrating the exclusive function of GlgA for glycogen synthesis in the absence of maltose metabolism. No glycogen was found in the ΔglgA and ΔglgA ΔmalP strains grown on glucose, but substantial amounts (0.18 and 1.0 mg/mg protein, respectively) were found when they were grown on maltodextrin. This demonstrates that the action of MalQ on maltose or maltodextrin can lead to the formation of glycogen and that MalP controls (inhibits) this pathway. In vitro, MalQ in the presence of GlgB (a branching enzyme) was able to form glycogen from maltose or linear maltodextrins. We propose a model of maltodextrin utilization for the formation of glycogen in the absence of glycogen synthase. PMID:21421758

  14. Tyrosine glycosylation is involved in muscle-glycogen synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, I.R.; Tandecarz, J.S.; Kirkman, B.R.; Whelan, W.J.

    1986-01-01

    Rabbit-muscle glycogen contains a covalently bound protein having Mr 37,000 that the authors will henceforth refer to as glycogenin. It is completely insoluble in water at pH 5, and may be generated as a precipitate as a result of the combined action on glycogen of α-amylase and glucoamylase, or by treatment with anhydrous hydrogen fluoride. In the former case the protein still carries some of the glucose residues of glycogen (10-30 per mole of glycogenin). The linkage between glycogen and glycogenin has been identified as a novel glycosidic-amino acid bond. The authors demonstrated glucosylation with UDP[/sup 14/C]glucose by a muscle extract of two rabbit-muscle proteins contained in the same extract. The relation of these proteins to glycogenin, and whether the amino acid undergoing glucosylation is tyrosine, remains to be explored. The discovery of glycogenin is, the authors believe, an important clue to the mechanism of biogenesis of glycogen and may represent a previously unsuspected means of metabolic control of the glycogen content of the cell and the location of glycogen within the cell. The facts that the linkage between glycogen and glycogenin is via tyrosine, that insulin stimulates glycogen synthesis, and acts on its receptor by causing it to become an active tyrosine kinase, may be linked by a common thread

  15. Interleukin 6 stimulates hepatic glucose release from prelabeled glycogen pools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritchie, D.G.

    1990-01-01

    Cytokines, derived from a wide variety of cell types, are now believed to initiate many of the physiological responses accompanying the inflammatory phase that follows either Gram-negative septicemia or thermal injury. Because hypoglycemia (after endotoxic challenge) and hyperglycemia (after thermal injury) represent well-characterized responses to these injuries, we sought to determine whether hepatic glycogen metabolism could be altered by specific cytokines. Cultured adult rat hepatocytes were prelabeled with [ 14 C]glucose for 24 h, a procedure that resulted in the labeling of hepatic glycogen pools that subsequently could be depleted (with concomitant [ 14 C]glucose release) by either glucagon or norepinephrine. After the addition of a highly concentrated human monocyte-conditioned medium (MCM) or various cytokines to these prelabeled cells, [ 14 C]glucose release was stimulated by MCM and recombinant human interleukin 6 (IL-6) but was not stimulated by other cytokines tested. Furthermore, only antisera to IL-6 were capable of reducing the glucose-releasing factor activity found in MCM. These data therefore suggest a novel glucoregulatory role for IL-6

  16. Carcass glycogen repletion on carbohydrate re-feeding after starvation.

    OpenAIRE

    Cox, D J; Palmer, T N

    1987-01-01

    In mice, the response of carcass glycogen to glucose re-feeding after starvation is biphasic. The initial repletive phase is followed by partial (greater than 50%) glycogen mobilization. This turnover of carcass glycogen in response to carbohydrate re-feeding may play an important role in the provision of C3 precursors for hepatic glycogen synthesis.

  17. Role of the direct and indirect pathways for glycogen synthesis in rat liver in the postprandial state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, M.T.; Veech, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    The pathway for hepatic glycogen synthesis in the postprandial state was studied in meal-fed rats chronically cannulated in the portal vein. Plasma glucose concentration in the portal vein was found to be 4.50 +/- 1.01 mM (mean +/- SE; n = 3) before a meal and 11.54 +/- 0.70 mM (mean +/- SE; n = 4) after a meal in rats meal-fed a diet consisting of 100% commercial rat chow for 7 d. The hepatic-portal difference of plasma glucose concentration showed that liver released glucose in the fasted state and either extracted or released glucose after feeding depending on plasma glucose concentration in the portal vein. The concentration of portal vein glucose at which liver changes from glucose releasing to glucose uptake was 8 mM, the Km of glucokinase. The rate of glycogen synthesis in liver during meal-feeding was found to be approximately 1 mumol glucosyl U/g wet wt/min in rats meal-fed a 50% glucose supplemented chow diet. The relative importance of the direct vs. indirect pathway for the replenishment of hepatic glycogen was determined by the incorporation of [3- 3 H,U- 14 C]glucose into liver glycogen. Labeled glucose was injected into the portal vein at the end of meal-feeding. The ratio of 3 H/ 14 C in the glucosyl units of glycogen was found to be 83-92% of the ratio in liver free glucose six minutes after the injection, indicating that the majority of exogenous glucose incorporated into glycogen did not go through glycolysis. The percent contribution of the direct versus indirect pathway was quantitated from the difference in the relative specific activity (RSA) of [ 3 H] and [ 14 C]-glycogen in rats infused with [3- 3 H,U- 14 C]glucose. No significant difference was found between the RSA of [ 3 H]glycogen and [ 14 C]glycogen, indicating further that the pathway for glycogen synthesis in liver from exogenous glucose is from the direct pathway

  18. Impaired glycogen breakdown and synthesis in phosphoglucomutase 1 deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preisler, Nicolai; Cohen, Jonathan; Vissing, Christoffer Rasmus

    2017-01-01

    contracture. Comparable to patients with McArdle disease, the patient developed a 'second wind' with a spontaneous fall in exercise heart rate and perceived exertion. Like in McArdle disease, this was attributable to an increase in muscle oxidative capacity. Carbohydrate oxidation was blocked during exercise......, and the patient had exaggerated oxidation of fat to fuel exercise. Exercise heart rate and perceived exertion were lower after IV glucose and oral sucrose. Muscle glycogen level was low normal. CONCLUSIONS: The second wind phenomenon has been considered to be pathognomonic for McArdle disease, but we demonstrate...... that it can also be present in PGM1 deficiency. We show that severe loss of PGM1 activity causes blocked muscle glycogenolysis that mimics McArdle disease, but may also limit glycogen synthesis, which broadens the phenotypic spectrum of this disorder....

  19. Apelin ameliorates TNF-α-induced reduction of glycogen synthesis in the hepatocytes through G protein-coupled receptor APJ.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaojiao Chu

    Full Text Available Apelin, a novel adipokine, is the specific endogenous ligand of G protein-coupled receptor APJ. Consistent with its putative role as an adipokine, apelin has been linked to states of insulin resistance. However, the function of apelin in hepatic insulin resistance, a vital part of insulin resistance, and its underlying mechanisms still remains unclear. Here we define the impacts of apelin on TNF-α-induced reduction of glycogen synthesis in the hepatocytes. Our studies indicate that apelin reversed TNF-α-induced reduction of glycogen synthesis in HepG2 cells, mouse primary hepatocytes and liver tissues of C57BL/6J mice by improving JNK-IRS1-AKT-GSK pathway. Moreover, Western blot revealed that APJ, but not apelin, expressed in the hepatocytes and liver tissues of mice. We found that F13A, a competitive antagonist for G protein-coupled receptor APJ, suppressed the effects of apelin on TNF-α-induced reduction of glycogen synthesis in the hepatocytes, suggesting APJ is involved in the function of apelin. In conclusion, we show novel evidence suggesting that apelin ameliorates TNF-α-induced reduction of glycogen synthesis in the hepatocytes through G protein-coupled receptor APJ. Apelin appears as a beneficial adipokine with anti-insulin resistance properties, and thus as a promising therapeutic target in metabolic disorders.

  20. Lobular and cellular patterns of early hepatic glycogen deposition in the rat as observed by light and electron microscopic radioautography after injection of 3H-galactose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michaels, J.E.; Hung, J.T.; Garfield, S.A.; Cardell, R.R. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Very low hepatic glycogen levels are achieved by overnight fasting of adrenalectomized (ADX) rats. Subsequent injection of dexamethasone (DEX), a synthetic glucocorticoid, stimulates marked increases in glycogen synthesis. Using this system and injecting 3 H-galactose as a glycogen precursor 1 hr prior to sacrifice, the intralobular and intracellular patterns of labeled glycogen deposition were studied by light (LM) and electron (EM) microscopic radioautography. LM radioautography revealed that 1 hr after DEX treatment, labeling patterns for both periportal and centrilobular hepatocytes resembled those in rats with no DEX treatment: 18% of the hepatocytes were unlabeled, and 82% showed light labeling. Two hours after treatment with DEX, 14% of the hepatocytes remained unlabeled, and 78% were lightly labeled; however, 8% of the cells, located randomly throughout the lobule, were intensely labeled. An increased number of heavily labeled cells (26%) appeared 3 hr after DEX treatment; and by 5 hr 91% of the hepatocytes were intensely labeled. Label over the periportal cells at this time was aggregated, whereas centrilobular cells displayed dispersed label. EM radioautographs showed that 2 to 3 hr after DEX injection initial labeling of hepatocytes, regardless of their intralobular location, occurred over foci of smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER) and small electron-dense particles of presumptive glycogen, and in areas of SER and distinct glycogen particles. After 5 hrs of treatment with DEX, the intracellular distribution of label reflected the glycogen patterns characteristic of periportal or centrilobular regions

  1. Partly ordered synthesis and degradation of glycogen in cultured rat myotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elsner, Peter; Quistorff, Bjørn; Hansen, Gert H

    2001-01-01

    The following questions concerning glycogen synthesis and degradation were examined in cultured rat myotubes. 1) Is synthesis and degradation of the individual glycogen molecule a strictly ordered process, with the last glucosyl unit incorporated into the molecule being the first to be released...

  2. Variations in Glycogen Synthesis in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells with Altered Pluripotent States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Richard J.; Zhang, Guofeng; Garfield, Susan H.; Shi, Yi-Jun; Chen, Kevin G.; Robey, Pamela G.; Leapman, Richard D.

    2015-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) represent very promising resources for cell-based regenerative medicine. It is essential to determine the biological implications of some fundamental physiological processes (such as glycogen metabolism) in these stem cells. In this report, we employ electron, immunofluorescence microscopy, and biochemical methods to study glycogen synthesis in hPSCs. Our results indicate that there is a high level of glycogen synthesis (0.28 to 0.62 μg/μg proteins) in undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) compared with the glycogen levels (0 to 0.25 μg/μg proteins) reported in human cancer cell lines. Moreover, we found that glycogen synthesis was regulated by bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP-4) and the glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) pathway. Our observation of glycogen bodies and sustained expression of the pluripotent factor Oct-4 mediated by the potent GSK-3 inhibitor CHIR-99021 reveals an altered pluripotent state in hPSC culture. We further confirmed glycogen variations under different naïve pluripotent cell growth conditions based on the addition of the GSK-3 inhibitor BIO. Our data suggest that primed hPSCs treated with naïve growth conditions acquire altered pluripotent states, similar to those naïve-like hPSCs, with increased glycogen synthesis. Furthermore, we found that suppression of phosphorylated glycogen synthase was an underlying mechanism responsible for altered glycogen synthesis. Thus, our novel findings regarding the dynamic changes in glycogen metabolism provide new markers to assess the energetic and various pluripotent states in hPSCs. The components of glycogen metabolic pathways offer new assays to delineate previously unrecognized properties of hPSCs under different growth conditions. PMID:26565809

  3. Glycogen Synthesis in Glycogenin 1-Deficient Patients: A Role for Glycogenin 2 in Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krag, Thomas O; Ruiz-Ruiz, Cristina; Vissing, John

    2017-08-01

    Glycogen storage disease (GSD) type XV is a rare disease caused by mutations in the GYG1 gene that codes for the core molecule of muscle glycogen, glycogenin 1. Nonetheless, glycogen is present in muscles of glycogenin 1-deficient patients, suggesting an alternative for glycogen buildup. A likely candidate is glycogenin 2, an isoform expressed in the liver and heart but not in healthy skeletal muscle. We wanted to investigate the formation of glycogen and changes in glycogen metabolism in patients with GSD type XV. Two patients with mutations in the GYG1 gene were investigated for histopathology, ultrastructure, and expression of proteins involved in glycogen synthesis and metabolism. Apart from occurrence of polyglucosan (PG) bodies in few fibers, glycogen appeared normal in most cells, and the concentration was normal in patients with GSD type XV. We found that glycogenin 1 was absent, but glycogenin 2 was present in the patients, whereas the opposite was the case in healthy controls. Electron microscopy revealed that glycogen was present between and not inside myofibrils in type II fibers, compromising the ultrastructure of these fibers, and only type I fibers contained PG bodies. We also found significant changes to the expression levels of several enzymes directly involved in glycogen and glucose metabolism. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating expression of glycogenin 2 in glycogenin 1-deficient patients, suggesting that glycogenin 2 rescues the formation of glycogen in patients with glycogenin 1 deficiency. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society

  4. Estradiol stimulates glycogen synthesis whereas progesterone promotes glycogen catabolism in the uterus of the American mink (Neovison vison).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Kole; Rose, Jack

    2017-01-01

    Glycogen synthesis by mink uterine glandular and luminal epithelia (GE and LE) is stimulated by estradiol (E 2 ) during estrus. Subsequently, the glycogen deposits are mobilized to near completion to meet the energy requirements of pre-embryonic development and implantation by as yet undetermined mechanisms. We hypothesized that progesterone (P 4 ) was responsible for catabolism of uterine glycogen reserves as one of its actions to ensure reproductive success. Mink were treated with E 2 , P 4 or vehicle (controls) for 3 days and uteri collected 24 h (E 2 , P 4 and vehicle) and 96 h (E 2 ) later. To evaluate E 2 priming, mink were treated with E 2 for 3 days, then P 4 for an additional 3 days (E 2 →P 4 ) and uteri collected 24 h later. Percent glycogen content of uterine epithelia was greater at E 2 + 96 h (GE = 5.71 ± 0.55; LE = 11.54 ± 2.32) than E 2 +24 h (GE = 3.63 ± 0.71; LE = 2.82 ± 1.03), and both were higher than controls (GE = 0.27 ± 0.15; LE = 0.54 ± 0.30; P glycogen content (GE = 0.61 ± 0.16; LE = 0.51 ± 0.13), to levels not different from controls, while concomitantly increasing catabolic enzyme (glycogen phosphorylase m and glucose-6-phosphatase) gene expression and amount of phospho-glycogen synthase protein (inactive) in uterine homogenates. Interestingly, E 2 →P 4 increased glycogen synthase 1 messenger RNA (mRNA) and hexokinase 1mRNA and protein. Our findings suggest to us that while E 2 promotes glycogen accumulation by the mink uterus during estrus and pregnancy, it is P 4 that induces uterine glycogen catabolism, releasing the glucose that is essential to support pre-embryonic survival and implantation. © 2016 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  5. A Ketone Ester Drink Increases Postexercise Muscle Glycogen Synthesis in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdsworth, David A; Cox, Peter J; Kirk, Tom; Stradling, Huw; Impey, Samuel G; Clarke, Kieran

    2017-09-01

    Physical endurance can be limited by muscle glycogen stores, in that glycogen depletion markedly reduces external work. During carbohydrate restriction, the liver synthesizes the ketone bodies, D-β-hydroxybutyrate, and acetoacetate from fatty acids. In animals and in the presence of glucose, D-β-hydroxybutyrate promotes insulin secretion and increases glycogen synthesis. Here we determined whether a dietary ketone ester, combined with plentiful glucose, can increase postexercise glycogen synthesis in human skeletal muscle. After an interval-based glycogen depletion exercise protocol, 12 well-trained male athletes completed a randomized, three-arm, blinded crossover recovery study that consisted of consumption of either a taste-matched, zero-calorie control or a ketone monoester drink, followed by a 10-mM glucose clamp or saline infusion for 2 h. The three postexercise conditions were control drink then saline infusion, control drink then hyperglycemic clamp, or ketone ester drink then hyperglycemic clamp. Skeletal muscle glycogen content was determined in muscle biopsies of vastus lateralis taken before and after the 2-h clamps. The ketone ester drink increased blood D-β-hydroxybutyrate concentrations to a maximum of 5.3 versus 0.7 mM for the control drink (P glycogen was 50% higher (246 vs 164 mmol glycosyl units per kilogram dry weight, P glycogen synthesis.

  6. Short and long-term effects of internal irradiation on the murine hepatic glycogen and its metabolizing enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, N.K.

    1990-01-01

    Glycogen content and the activities of phosphorylase, phosphorhexose isomerase, glucose 6-phosphatase, glycogen synthesis' phosphorylase and succinate dehydrogenase have been biochemically determined in the liver of Swiss albino mice after radiocalcium internal irradiation up to 225 days posttreatment. Increase in the glycogen content and glycogen synthesis phosphorylase with a concomitant decrease in the activities of phosphorylase, glucose 6-phosphatase, phosphohexose isomerase and succinate dehydrogenase reveals inhibited glycolysis in the presence of normal glyogenesis and inhibited Kreb's cycle in the liver during early intervals. Decrease in the glycogen content at later stages along with decrease in the activities of all these enzymes is probably because of an inhibited glycogen biosynthesis and its catabolism through HMP shunt. (orig.)

  7. Hepatic glycogen levels in female rats submitted to aquatic therapy after muscle disuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jefferson Pacheco Amaral Fortes

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to analyse the changes in liver glycogen content in rats subjected to aquatic therapy post-disuse of the paw. 32 wistar adult female rats were equally divided: Control (C, kept in the cage for two weeks without interventions; Disuse (D had the right paw immobilized with hip extension, knee and plantar flexion for two weeks; Aquatic Therapy (AT underwent aquatic therapy with increments of 3 minutes daily for two weeks, totalizing 36 minutes of training; Disused Aquatic Therapy (DTA was first subjected to immobilization for two weeks and 24 hours after withdrawal of immobilization aquatic therapy was started for two more weeks, in same protocols of D and AT groups. At the end of the experiment, the animals were sacrificed, and tissues were dissected, weighed and stored. The liver tissues were referred analysis of glycogen content. It was observed that the blood glucose levels of the AT group (104 mg/dL were different from the C group (86 mg/dL; p = 0.0213. Regarding hepatic glycogen, the D (2.35mg±0.07 and AT (2.73mg±0.07 groups had hepatic glycogen reduction by 22% and 15%, relative to C (2.51mg±0.03; p <0.0001. The DTA group presented no differences when compared to the control, suggesting the normalization of the finding. Muscle disuse by two weeks promoted changes in glycogen levels, however, two weeks after disuse condition, the aquatic therapy were able to correct the energetic reserve in liver.

  8. Lipids in hepatic glycogen storage diseases: pathophysiology, monitoring of dietary management and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derks, Terry G J; van Rijn, Margreet

    2015-05-01

    Hepatic glycogen storage diseases (GSD) underscore the intimate relationship between carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. The hyperlipidemias in hepatic GSD reflect perturbed intracellular metabolism, providing biomarkers in blood to monitor dietary management. In different types of GSD, hyperlipidemias are of a different origin. Hypertriglyceridemia is most prominent in GSD type Ia and associated with long-term outcome morbidity, like pancreatitis and hepatic adenomas. In the ketotic subtypes of GSD, hypertriglyceridemia reflects the age-dependent fasting intolerance, secondary lipolysis and increased mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation. The role of high protein diets is established for ketotic types of GSD, but non-traditional dietary interventions (like medium-chain triglycerides and the ketogenic diet) in hepatic GSD are still controversial and necessitate further studies. Patients with these rare inherited disorders of carbohydrate metabolism meet several criteria of the metabolic syndrome, therefore close monitoring for cardiovascular diseases in ageing GSD patients may be justified.

  9. Glucose 6-phosphate compartmentation and the control of glycogen synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Alfred

    2002-01-01

    Using adenovirus-mediated gene transfer into FTO-2B cells, a rat hepatoma cell line, we have overexpressed hexokinase I, (HK I), glucokinase (GK), liver glycogen synthase (LGS), muscle glycogen synthase (MGS), and combinations of each of the two glucose phosphorylating enzymes with each one of the

  10. Glycogen synthesis from lactate in a chronically active muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talmadge, R.J.; Scheide, J.I.; Silverman, H.

    1989-01-01

    In response to neural overactivity (pseudomyotonia), gastrocnemius muscle fibers from C57Bl/6Jdy2J/dy2J mice have different metabolic profiles compared with normal mice. A population of fibers in the fast-twitch superficial region of the dy2J gastrocnemius stores unusually high amounts of glycogen, leading to an increased glycogen storage in the whole muscle. The dy2J muscle also contains twice as much lactate as normal muscle. A [ 14 C]lactate intraperitoneal injection leads to preferential 14 C incorporation into glycogen in the dy2J muscle compared with normal muscle. To determine whether skeletal muscles were incorporating lactate into glycogen without body organ (liver, kidney) input, gastrocnemius muscles were bathed in 10 mM [ 14 C]lactate with intact neural and arterial supply but with impeded venous return. The contralateral gastrocnemius serves as a control for body organ input. By using this in situ procedure, we demonstrate that under conditions of high lactate both normal and dy2J muscle can directly synthesize glycogen from lactate. In this case, normal whole muscle incorporates [14C] lactate into glycogen at a higher rate than dy2J whole muscle. Autoradiography, however, suggests that the high-glycogen-containing muscle fibers in the dy2J muscle incorporate lactate into glycogen at nearly four times the rate of normal or surrounding muscle fibers

  11. Direct observation of glycogen synthesis in human muscle with 13C NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jue, T.; Rothman, D.L.; Shulman, G.I.; Tavitian, B.A.; DeFronzo, R.A.; Shulman, R.G.

    1989-01-01

    On the basis of previous indirect measurements, skeletal muscle has been implicated as the major site of glucose uptake and it has been suggested that muscle glycogen formation is the dominant pathway. However, direct measurements of the rates of glycogen synthesis have not been possible by previous techniques. The authors have developed 13 C NMR methods to measure directly the rate of human muscle glycogen formation from infused, isotopically labeled [1- 13 C]glucose. They show that under conditions of imposed hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia, a majority of the infused glucose was converted to muscle glycogen in a normal man. This directly shows that muscle is the major site of glucose disposal under these conditions, and provides quantitation of the glucose flux to muscle glycogen

  12. Green Tea Polyphenol Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate Enhance Glycogen Synthesis and Inhibit Lipogenesis in Hepatocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane J. Y. Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The beneficial effects of green tea polyphenols (GTP against metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes by suppressing appetite and nutrient absorption have been well reported. However the direct effects and mechanisms of GTP on glucose and lipid metabolism remain to be elucidated. Since the liver is an important organ involved in glucose and lipid metabolism, we examined the effects and mechanisms of GTP on glycogen synthesis and lipogenesis in HepG2 cells. Concentrations of GTP containing 68% naturally occurring (−-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG were incubated in HepG2 cells with high glucose (30 mM under 100 nM of insulin stimulation for 24 h. GTP enhanced glycogen synthesis in a dose-dependent manner. 10 μM of EGCG significantly increased glycogen synthesis by 2fold (P<0.05 compared with insulin alone. Western blotting revealed that phosphorylation of Ser9 glycogen synthase kinase 3β and Ser641 glycogen synthase was significantly increased in GTP-treated HepG2 cells compared with nontreated cells. 10 μM of EGCG also significantly inhibited lipogenesis (P<0.01. We further demonstrated that this mechanism involves enhanced expression of phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase α and acetyl-CoA carboxylase in HepG2 cells. Our results showed that GTP is capable of enhancing insulin-mediated glucose and lipid metabolism by regulating enzymes involved in glycogen synthesis and lipogenesis.

  13. The extracellular redox state modulates mitochondrial function, gluconeogenesis, and glycogen synthesis in murine hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocito, Laura; Kleckner, Amber S; Yoo, Elsia J; Jones Iv, Albert R; Liesa, Marc; Corkey, Barbara E

    2015-01-01

    Circulating redox state changes, determined by the ratio of reduced/oxidized pairs of different metabolites, have been associated with metabolic diseases. However, the pathogenic contribution of these changes and whether they modulate normal tissue function is unclear. As alterations in hepatic gluconeogenesis and glycogen metabolism are hallmarks that characterize insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, we tested whether imposed changes in the extracellular redox state could modulate these processes. Thus, primary hepatocytes were treated with different ratios of the following physiological extracellular redox couples: β-hydroxybutyrate (βOHB)/acetoacetate (Acoc), reduced glutathione (GSH)/oxidized glutathione (GSSG), and cysteine/cystine. Exposure to a more oxidized ratio via extracellular βOHB/Acoc, GSH/GSSG, and cysteine/cystine in hepatocytes from fed mice increased intracellular hydrogen peroxide without causing oxidative damage. On the other hand, addition of more reduced ratios of extracellular βOHB/Acoc led to increased NAD(P)H and maximal mitochondrial respiratory capacity in hepatocytes. Greater βOHB/Acoc ratios were also associated with decreased β-oxidation, as expected with enhanced lipogenesis. In hepatocytes from fasted mice, a more extracellular reduced state of βOHB/Acoc led to increased alanine-stimulated gluconeogenesis and enhanced glycogen synthesis capacity from added glucose. Thus, we demonstrated for the first time that the extracellular redox state regulates the major metabolic functions of the liver and involves changes in intracellular NADH, hydrogen peroxide, and mitochondrial respiration. Because redox state in the blood can be communicated to all metabolically sensitive tissues, this work confirms the hypothesis that circulating redox state may be an important regulator of whole body metabolism and contribute to alterations associated with metabolic diseases.

  14. The extracellular redox state modulates mitochondrial function, gluconeogenesis, and glycogen synthesis in murine hepatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Nocito

    Full Text Available Circulating redox state changes, determined by the ratio of reduced/oxidized pairs of different metabolites, have been associated with metabolic diseases. However, the pathogenic contribution of these changes and whether they modulate normal tissue function is unclear. As alterations in hepatic gluconeogenesis and glycogen metabolism are hallmarks that characterize insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, we tested whether imposed changes in the extracellular redox state could modulate these processes. Thus, primary hepatocytes were treated with different ratios of the following physiological extracellular redox couples: β-hydroxybutyrate (βOHB/acetoacetate (Acoc, reduced glutathione (GSH/oxidized glutathione (GSSG, and cysteine/cystine. Exposure to a more oxidized ratio via extracellular βOHB/Acoc, GSH/GSSG, and cysteine/cystine in hepatocytes from fed mice increased intracellular hydrogen peroxide without causing oxidative damage. On the other hand, addition of more reduced ratios of extracellular βOHB/Acoc led to increased NAD(PH and maximal mitochondrial respiratory capacity in hepatocytes. Greater βOHB/Acoc ratios were also associated with decreased β-oxidation, as expected with enhanced lipogenesis. In hepatocytes from fasted mice, a more extracellular reduced state of βOHB/Acoc led to increased alanine-stimulated gluconeogenesis and enhanced glycogen synthesis capacity from added glucose. Thus, we demonstrated for the first time that the extracellular redox state regulates the major metabolic functions of the liver and involves changes in intracellular NADH, hydrogen peroxide, and mitochondrial respiration. Because redox state in the blood can be communicated to all metabolically sensitive tissues, this work confirms the hypothesis that circulating redox state may be an important regulator of whole body metabolism and contribute to alterations associated with metabolic diseases.

  15. Identification and Functional Characterization of the Glycogen Synthesis Related Gene Glycogenin in Pacific Oysters (Crassostrea gigas).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Busu; Meng, Jie; Li, Li; Liu, Sheng; Wang, Ting; Zhang, Guofan

    2017-09-06

    High glycogen levels in the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) contribute to its flavor, quality, and hardiness. Glycogenin (CgGN) is the priming glucosyltransferase that initiates glycogen biosynthesis. We characterized the full sequence and function of C. gigas CgGN. Three CgGN isoforms (CgGN-α, β, and γ) containing alternative exon regions were isolated. CgGN expression varied seasonally in the adductor muscle and gonadal area and was the highest in the adductor muscle. Autoglycosylation of CgGN can interact with glycogen synthase (CgGS) to complete glycogen synthesis. Subcellular localization analysis showed that CgGN isoforms and CgGS were located in the cytoplasm. Additionally, a site-directed mutagenesis experiment revealed that the Tyr200Phe and Tyr202Phe mutations could affect CgGN autoglycosylation. This is the first study of glycogenin function in marine bivalves. These findings will improve our understanding of glycogen synthesis and accumulation mechanisms in mollusks. The data are potentially useful for breeding high-glycogen oysters.

  16. 13C NMR relaxation times of hepatic glycogen in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zang, Lihsin; Laughlin, M.R.; Rothman, D.L.; Shulman, R.G.

    1990-01-01

    The field dependence of relaxation times of the C-1 carbon of glycogen was studied in vitro by natural-abundance 13 C NMR. T 1 is strongly field dependent, while T 2 does not change significantly with magnetic field. T 1 and T 2 were also measured for rat hepatic glycogen enriched with [1- 13 C]glucose in vivo at 4.7 T, and similar relaxation times were observed as those obtained in vitro at the same field. The in vitro values of T 1 were 65 ± 5 ms at 2.1 T, 142 ± 10 ms at 4.7 T, and 300 ± 10 ms at 8.4 T, while T 2 values were 6.7 ± 1 ms at 2.1 T, 9.4 ± 1 ms at 4.7 T, and 9.5 ± 1 ms at 8.4 T. Calculations based on the rigid-rotor nearest-neighbor model give qualitatively good agreement with the T 1 field dependence with a best-fit correlation time of 6.4 x 10 -9 s, which is significantly smaller than τ M , the estimated overall correlation time for the glycogen molecule (ca. 10 -5 s). A more accurate fit of T 1 data using a modified Lipari and Szabo approach indicates that internal fast motions dominate the T 1 relaxation in glycogen. On the other hand, the T 2 relaxation is dominated by the overall correlation time τ M while the internal motions are almost but not completely unrestricted

  17. Enantioselective synthesis of the novel chiral sulfoxide derivative as a glycogen synthase kinase 3beta inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitoh, Morihisa; Kunitomo, Jun; Kimura, Eiji; Yamano, Toru; Itoh, Fumio; Kori, Masakuni

    2010-09-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase 3beta (GSK-3beta) inhibitors are expected to be attractive therapeutic agents for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recently we discovered sulfoxides (S)-1 as a novel GSK-3beta inhibitor having in vivo efficacy. We investigated practical asymmetric preparation methods for the scale-up synthesis of (S)-1. The highly enantioselective synthesis of (S)-1 (94% ee) was achieved by titanium-mediated oxidation with D-(-)-diethyl tartrate on gram scale.

  18. Pathways of hepatic glycogen formation in humans following ingestion of a glucose load in the fed state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnusson, I.; Chandramouli, V.; Schumann, W.C.; Kumaran, K.; Wahren, J.; Landau, B.R.

    1989-01-01

    The relative contributions of the direct and the indirect pathways to hepatic glycogen formation following a glucose load given to humans four hours after a substantial breakfast have been examined. Glucose loads labeled with [6-( 14 )C]glucose were given to six healthy volunteers along with diflunisal (1 g) or acetaminophen (1.5 g), drugs excreted in urine as glucuronides. Distribution of 14 C in the glucose unit of the glucuronide was taken as a measure of the extent to which glucose was deposited directly in liver glycogen (ie, glucose----glucose-6-phosphate----glycogen) rather than indirectly (ie, glucose----C3-compound----glucose-6-phosphate----glycogen). The maximum contribution to glycogen formation by the direct pathway was estimated to be 77% +/- 4%, which is somewhat higher than previous estimates in humans fasted overnight (65% +/- 1%, P less than 0.05). Thus, the indirect pathway of liver glycogen formation following a glucose load is operative in both the overnight fasted and the fed state, although its contribution may be somewhat less in the fed state

  19. Hepatic Glucose Production Increases in Response to Metformin Treatment in the Glycogen-depleted State

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mette Marie Hougaard; Højlund, Kurt; Hother-Nielsen, Ole

    with two reduced-function alleles) were fasted for 42 h twice. In one of the periods, before the fasting, the volunteers were titrated to steady-state with 1 g metformin twice daily for seven days. Parameters of whole-body glucose metabolism were assessed using [3-3^H] glucose, indirect calorimetry......Metformin is believed to reduce glucose levels primarily by inhibiting hepatic glucose production, but at the same time do not cause hypoglycemia. Recent data indicate that metformin antagonizes the major glucose counterregulatory hormone, glucagon suggesting that other mechanisms protect against...... hypoglycemia. Here, we examined the effect of metformin on whole-body glucose metabolism after a glycogen-depleting 40 h fast and the role of reduced-function alleles in OCT1. In a randomized cross-over trial, 34 healthy volunteers with known OCT1 genotypes (12 with two wild-type alleles, 13 with one and 9...

  20. Hepatic glycogen in humans. I. Direct formation after oral and intravenous glucose or after a 24-h fast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radziuk, J.

    1989-01-01

    The formation of hepatic glycogen by the direct pathway is assessed in humans after a 12-h fast and oral loading (100 g) or intravenous infusion (90 g) and after a 24-h fast and the same oral glucose load. The methodology used is based on the double tracer method. [3- 3 H]glucose is infused at a constant rate for the determination of the metabolic clearance of glucose. [1- 14 C]glucose is administered with the glucose load. One hour after absorption or the intravenous glucose infusion is terminated, a glucagon infusion is initiated to mobilize the glycogen labeled with [1- 14 C]glucose and formed during the absorptive period. At this time a third tracer, [6- 3 H]glucose, is administered to measure glucose clearance. It was found that after the 12-h fast and oral glucose loading 7.2 +/- 1.1 g of hepatic glycogen appears to be formed directly from glucose compared with 8.4 +/- 1.0 g after the same load and a 24-h fast and 8.5 +/- 0.4 g after a 12-h fast and an equivalent intravenous glucose infusion. When the amount of label ([ 14 C]glucose) mobilized that was not corrected for metabolic recycling was calculated, the data suggested that the amount of glycogen formed by gluconeogenic pathways was probably at least equal to that formed by direct uptake. It was also approximately 60% greater after a 24-h fast. It can be concluded that the amount of hepatic glycogen formed directly from glucose during glucose loading is not significantly altered by the route of entry or the extension of the fasting period to 24 h. The data suggest, however, that gluconeogenetic formation of glycogen increases with fasting

  1. Characterization of the growth and degradation of glycogen in the liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youn, J.; Bergman, R.

    1986-01-01

    The patterns of the growth and degradation of hepatic glycogen were studied using a computer model. The database was that of Devos and Hers on the distribution of label in glycogen from [1- 14 C] galactose injected at different times after the start of refeeding 40 h fasted mice. The data was simulated to examine the following hypotheses (H): Glycogen Synthesis H.S1: all glycogen molecules grow simultaneously. H.S2: at each moment of synthesis only a fixed number of molecules grow. H.S3: the number of growing molecules increases linearly with respect to time. H.S4: increase in the number of growing molecules is accelerated as glycogen is synthesized. Glycogen Degradation H.D1: glycogen molecules to be attacked by degrading enzymes are randomly chosen. H.D2: glycogen molecules are degraded sequentially in the reverse order of synthesis. H.D3: glycogen molecules have different probabilities of degradation depending upon the time of synthesis. The growth and degradation according to hypotheses S4 and D3, respectively, could best account for the data. The modelling study predicts that, at the beginning of refeeding, only a small number of molecules grow. But, as glycogen is synthesized, the rate of seeding of new glycogen molecules increases with time, causing a nonlinear proliferation of the number of growing molecules. During degradation glycogen molecules synthesized later have a greater chance to be degraded first, a characteristic which may be explained by the rosette structure of liver glycogen

  2. Synthesis of glycogen from fructose in the presence of elevated levels of glycogen phosphorylase a in rat hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciudad, C J; Massagué, J; Salavert, A; Guinovart, J J

    1980-03-20

    Incubation of hepatocytes with glucose promoted the increase in the glycogen synthase (-glucose 6-phosphate/+glucose 6-phosphate) activity ratio, the decrease in the levels of phosphorylase a and a marked increase in the intracellular glycogen level. Incubation with fructose alone promoted the simultaneous activation of glycogen synthase and increase in the levels of phosphorylase a. Strikingly, glycogen deposition occurred in spite of the elevated levels of phosphorylase a. When glucose and fructose were added to the media the activation of glycogen synthase was always higher than when the hexoses were added separately. On the other hand the effects on glycogen phosphorylase were a function of the relative concentrations of both sugars. Inactivation of glycogen phosphorylase occurred when the fructose to glucose ratio was low while activation took place when the ratio was high. The simultaneous presence of glucose and fructose resulted, in all cases, in an enhancement in the deposition of glycogen. The effects described were not limited to fructose as D-glyceraldehyde, dihydroxyacetone, L-sorbose, D-tagatose and sorbitol, compounds metabolically related to fructose, provoked the same behaviour.

  3. Black Seed Thymoquinone Improved Insulin Secretion, Hepatic Glycogen Storage, and Oxidative Stress in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Male Wistar Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heba M. A. Abdelrazek

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is one of the metabolic diseases having several complications. Nigella sativa oil (NSO might have beneficial effects in the treatment of diabetic complications. Thirty-two mature male Wistar rats were equally divided into four experimental groups: control, control NSO 2 mL/kg, streptozotocin- (STZ- induced diabetic, and diabetic (STZ-induced treated with oral NSO 2 mg/kg for 30 days. Fasting blood glucose (FBG, insulin, and lipid profile levels were determined. Pancreatic and hepatic tissues were used for catalase and GSH. Histopathology, hepatic glycogen contents, insulin immunohistochemistry, and pancreatic islet morphometry were performed. NSO 2 mL/kg was noticed to decrease (P<0.05 FBG and increase (P<0.05 insulin levels in diabetic rats than in diabetic nontreated animals. Lipid profile showed significant (P<0.5 improvement in diabetic rats that received NSO 2 mL/kg than in the diabetic group. Both pancreatic and hepatic catalase and GSH activities revealed a significant (P<0.05 increment in the diabetic group treated with NSO than in the diabetic animals. NSO improved the histopathological picture and hepatic glycogen contents of the diabetic group as well as increased (P<0.05 insulin immunoreactive parts % and mean pancreatic islet diameter. NSO exerts ameliorative and therapeutic effects on the STZ-induced diabetic male Wistar rats.

  4. Glycogen metabolism in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Adeva-Andany, María M.; González-Lucán, Manuel; Donapetry-García, Cristóbal; Fernández-Fernández, Carlos; Ameneiros-Rodríguez, Eva

    2016-01-01

    In the human body, glycogen is a branched polymer of glucose stored mainly in the liver and the skeletal muscle that supplies glucose to the blood stream during fasting periods and to the muscle cells during muscle contraction. Glycogen has been identified in other tissues such as brain, heart, kidney, adipose tissue, and erythrocytes, but glycogen function in these tissues is mostly unknown. Glycogen synthesis requires a series of reactions that include glucose entrance into the cell through...

  5. Metformin normalizes the structural changes in glycogen preceding prediabetes in mice overexpressing neuropeptide Y in noradrenergic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ailanen, Liisa; Bezborodkina, Natalia N; Virtanen, Laura; Ruohonen, Suvi T; Malova, Anastasia V; Okovityi, Sergey V; Chistyakova, Elizaveta Y; Savontaus, Eriika

    2018-04-01

    Hepatic insulin resistance and increased gluconeogenesis are known therapeutic targets of metformin, but the role of hepatic glycogen in the pathogenesis of diabetes is less clear. Mouse model of neuropeptide Y (NPY) overexpression in noradrenergic neurons (OE-NPY D βH ) with a phenotype of late onset obesity, hepatosteatosis, and prediabetes was used to study early changes in glycogen structure and metabolism preceding prediabetes. Furthermore, the effect of the anti-hyperglycemic agent, metformin (300 mg/kg/day/4 weeks in drinking water), was assessed on changes in glycogen metabolism, body weight, fat mass, and glucose tolerance. Glycogen structure was characterized by cytofluorometric analysis in isolated hepatocytes and mRNA expression of key enzymes by qPCR. OE-NPY D βH mice displayed decreased labile glycogen fraction relative to stabile fraction (the intermediate form of glycogen) suggesting enhanced glycogen cycling. This was supported by decreased filling of glucose residues in the 10th outer tier of the glycogen molecule, which suggests accelerated glycogen phosphorylation. Metformin reduced fat mass gain in both genotypes, but glucose tolerance was improved mostly in wild-type mice. However, metformin inhibited glycogen accumulation and normalized the ratio between glycogen structures in OE-NPY D βH mice indicating decreased glycogen synthesis. Furthermore, the presence of glucose residues in the 11th tier together with decreased glycogen phosphorylase expression suggested inhibition of glycogen degradation. In conclusion, structural changes in glycogen of OE-NPY D βH mice point to increased glycogen metabolism, which may predispose them to prediabetes. Metformin treatment normalizes these changes and suppresses both glycogen synthesis and phosphorylation, which may contribute to its preventive effect on the onset of diabetes.

  6. Hepatic glucose-6-phosphatase-α deficiency leads to metabolic reprogramming in glycogen storage disease type Ia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jun-Ho; Kim, Goo-Young; Mansfield, Brian C; Chou, Janice Y

    2018-04-15

    Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia) is caused by a deficiency in glucose-6-phosphatase-α (G6Pase-α or G6PC), a key enzyme in endogenous glucose production. This autosomal recessive disorder is characterized by impaired glucose homeostasis and long-term complications of hepatocellular adenoma/carcinoma (HCA/HCC). We have shown that hepatic G6Pase-α deficiency-mediated steatosis leads to defective autophagy that is frequently associated with carcinogenesis. We now show that hepatic G6Pase-α deficiency also leads to enhancement of hepatic glycolysis and hexose monophosphate shunt (HMS) that can contribute to hepatocarcinogenesis. The enhanced hepatic glycolysis is reflected by increased lactate accumulation, increased expression of many glycolytic enzymes, and elevated expression of c-Myc that stimulates glycolysis. The increased HMS is reflected by increased glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity and elevated production of NADPH and the reduced glutathione. We have previously shown that restoration of hepatic G6Pase-α expression in G6Pase-α-deficient liver corrects metabolic abnormalities, normalizes autophagy, and prevents HCA/HCC development in GSD-Ia. We now show that restoration of hepatic G6Pase-α expression normalizes both glycolysis and HMS in GSD-Ia. Moreover, the HCA/HCC lesions in L-G6pc-/- mice exhibit elevated levels of hexokinase 2 (HK2) and the M2 isoform of pyruvate kinase (PKM2) which play an important role in aerobic glycolysis and cancer cell proliferation. Taken together, hepatic G6Pase-α deficiency causes metabolic reprogramming, leading to enhanced glycolysis and elevated HMS that along with impaired autophagy can contribute to HCA/HCC development in GSD-Ia. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Stimulation of glycogen synthesis in hepatocytes by added amino acids is related to the total intracellular content of amino acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plomp, P. J.; Boon, L.; Caro, L. H.; van Woekom, G. M.; Meijer, A. J.

    1990-01-01

    Katz et al. [Katz, J., Golden, S. & Wals, P.A. (1976) Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 73, 3433-3437] were the first to report that in hepatocytes isolated from fasted rats and incubated with either dihydroxyacetone, glucose or other sugars, glycogen synthesis was greatly accelerated by addition of amino

  8. Comparison of 3H-galactose and 3H-glucose as precursors of hepatic glycogen in control-fed rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michaels, J.E.; Garfield, S.A.; Hung, J.T.; Cardell, R.R. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Labeling of hepatic glycogen derived from 3H-galactose and 3H-glucose was compared shortly after intravenous injection in control-fed rats. The rats were allowed to accumulate 5-8% glycogen prior to receiving label. Fifteen minutes to 2 hours after labeling, liver was excised and processed for routine light (LM) and electron microscopic (EM) radioautography (RAG) or biochemical analysis. After injection of 3H-galactose, LM-RAGs revealed that the percentage of heavily labeled hepatocytes increased from 37% after 15 minutes to 68% after 1 hour but showed no further increase after 2 hours. alpha-Amylase treatment removed most glycogen and incorporated label; thus few silver grains were observed, indicating little incorporation of label except into glycogen. EM-RAGs demonstrated that most label occurred where glycogen was located. Biochemical analysis showed initially a high blood level of label that rapidly plateaued at a reduced level by 5 minutes. Concomitantly, glycogen labeling determined by liquid scintillation counting reflected the increases observed in the RAGs. After injection of 3H-glucose, LM-RAGs revealed that only 12% of the hepatocytes were heavily labeled at 1 hour and 20% at 2 hours. In tissue treated with alpha-amylase, glycogen was depleted and label was close to background level at each interval observed. EM-RAGs showed most grains associated with glycogen deposits. Biochemically, blood levels of label persisted at a high level for 30 minutes and tissue levels increased slowly over the 2-hour period. This study shows that incorporation from 3H-galactose was more rapid than incorporation of 3H-glucose; however, label derived from both carbohydrates appeared to be incorporated mainly into glycogen

  9. Hepatic glycogen in humans. II. Gluconeogenetic formation after oral and intravenous glucose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radziuk, J.

    1989-01-01

    The amount of glycogen that is formed by gluconeogenetic pathways during glucose loading was quantitated in human subjects. Oral glucose loading was compared with its intravenous administration. Overnight-fasted subjects received a constant infusion or [3- 3 H]glucose and a marker for gluconeogenesis, [U- 14 C]lactate or sodium [ 14 C]bicarbonate [ 14 C]bicarbonate. An unlabeled glucose load was then administered. Postabsorptively, or after glucose infusion was terminated, a third tracer ([6- 3 H]glucose) infusion was initiated along with a three-step glucagon infusion. Without correcting for background stimulation of [ 14 C]glucose production or for dilution of 14 C with citric acid cycle carbon in the oxaloacetate pool, the amount of glycogen mobilized by the glucagon infusion that was produced by gluconeogenesis during oral glucose loading was 2.9 +/- 0.7 g calculated from [U- 14 C]-lactate incorporation and 7.4 +/- 1.3 g calculated using [ 14 C]bicarbonate as a gluconeogenetic marker. During intravenous glucose administration the latter measurement also yielded 7.2 +/- 1.1 g. When the two corrections above are applied, the respective quantities became 5.3 +/- 1.7 g for [U- 14 C]lactate as tracer and 14.7 +/- 4.3 and 13.9 +/- 3.6 g for oral and intravenous glucose with [ 14 C]bicarbonate as tracer (P less than 0.05, vs. [ 14 C]-lactate as tracer). When [2- 14 C]acetate was infused, the same amount of label was incorporated into mobilized glycogen regardless of which route of glucose administration was used. Comparison with previous data also suggests that 14 CO 2 is a potentially useful marker for the gluconeogenetic process in vivo

  10. Imidazopyridine-based inhibitors of glycogen synthase kinase 3: synthesis and evaluation of amide isostere replacements of the carboxamide scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yngve, Ulrika; Söderman, Peter; Svensson, Mats; Rosqvist, Susanne; Arvidsson, Per I

    2012-11-01

    In this study, we explored the effect of bioisostere replacement in a series of glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) inhibitors based on the imidazopyridine core. The synthesis and biological evaluation of a number of novel sulfonamide, 1,2,4-oxadiazole, and thiazole derivates as amide bioisosteres, as well as a computational rationalization of the obtained results are reported. Copyright © 2012 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  11. Glycogen synthesis is induced in hypoxia by the hypoxia-inducible factor and promotes cancer cell survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joffrey ePelletier

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1, in addition to genetic and epigenetic changes, is largely responsible for alterations in cell metabolism in hypoxic tumor cells. This transcription factor not only favors cell proliferation through the metabolic shift from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis and lactic acid production but also stimulates nutrient supply by mediating adaptive survival mechanisms. In this study we showed that glycogen synthesis is enhanced in non-cancer and cancer cells when exposed to hypoxia, resulting in a large increase in glycogen stores. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the mRNA and protein levels of the first enzyme of glycogenesis, phosphoglucomutase1 (PGM1, were increased in hypoxia. We showed that induction of glycogen storage as well as PGM1 expression were dependent on HIF-1 and HIF-2. We established that hypoxia-induced glycogen stores are rapidly mobilized in cells that are starved of glucose. Glycogenolysis allows these hypoxia-preconditioned cells to confront and survive glucose deprivation. In contrast normoxic control cells exhibit a high rate of cell death following glucose removal. These findings point to the important role of hypoxia and HIF in inducing mechanisms of rapid adaptation and survival in response to a decrease in oxygen tension. We propose that a decrease in pO2 acts as an alarm that prepares the cells to face subsequent nutrient depletion and to survive.

  12. Glycogen Synthesis is Induced in Hypoxia by the Hypoxia-Inducible Factor and Promotes Cancer Cell Survival

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelletier, Joffrey; Bellot, Grégory [Institute of Developmental Biology and Cancer Research, CNRS-UMR 6543, Centre Antoine Lacassagne, University of Nice-Sophia Antipolis, Nice (France); Gounon, Pierre; Lacas-Gervais, Sandra [Centre Commun de Microscopie Appliquée, University of Nice-Sophia Antipolis, Nice (France); Pouysségur, Jacques; Mazure, Nathalie M., E-mail: mazure@unice.fr [Institute of Developmental Biology and Cancer Research, CNRS-UMR 6543, Centre Antoine Lacassagne, University of Nice-Sophia Antipolis, Nice (France)

    2012-02-28

    The hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1), in addition to genetic and epigenetic changes, is largely responsible for alterations in cell metabolism in hypoxic tumor cells. This transcription factor not only favors cell proliferation through the metabolic shift from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis and lactic acid production but also stimulates nutrient supply by mediating adaptive survival mechanisms. In this study we showed that glycogen synthesis is enhanced in non-cancer and cancer cells when exposed to hypoxia, resulting in a large increase in glycogen stores. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the mRNA and protein levels of the first enzyme of glycogenesis, phosphoglucomutase1 (PGM1), were increased in hypoxia. We showed that induction of glycogen storage as well as PGM1 expression were dependent on HIF-1 and HIF-2. We established that hypoxia-induced glycogen stores are rapidly mobilized in cells that are starved of glucose. Glycogenolysis allows these “hypoxia-preconditioned” cells to confront and survive glucose deprivation. In contrast normoxic control cells exhibit a high rate of cell death following glucose removal. These findings point to the important role of hypoxia and HIF in inducing mechanisms of rapid adaptation and survival in response to a decrease in oxygen tension. We propose that a decrease in pO{sub 2} acts as an “alarm” that prepares the cells to face subsequent nutrient depletion and to survive.

  13. Glycogen Synthesis is Induced in Hypoxia by the Hypoxia-Inducible Factor and Promotes Cancer Cell Survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelletier, Joffrey; Bellot, Grégory; Gounon, Pierre; Lacas-Gervais, Sandra; Pouysségur, Jacques; Mazure, Nathalie M.

    2012-01-01

    The hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1), in addition to genetic and epigenetic changes, is largely responsible for alterations in cell metabolism in hypoxic tumor cells. This transcription factor not only favors cell proliferation through the metabolic shift from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis and lactic acid production but also stimulates nutrient supply by mediating adaptive survival mechanisms. In this study we showed that glycogen synthesis is enhanced in non-cancer and cancer cells when exposed to hypoxia, resulting in a large increase in glycogen stores. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the mRNA and protein levels of the first enzyme of glycogenesis, phosphoglucomutase1 (PGM1), were increased in hypoxia. We showed that induction of glycogen storage as well as PGM1 expression were dependent on HIF-1 and HIF-2. We established that hypoxia-induced glycogen stores are rapidly mobilized in cells that are starved of glucose. Glycogenolysis allows these “hypoxia-preconditioned” cells to confront and survive glucose deprivation. In contrast normoxic control cells exhibit a high rate of cell death following glucose removal. These findings point to the important role of hypoxia and HIF in inducing mechanisms of rapid adaptation and survival in response to a decrease in oxygen tension. We propose that a decrease in pO 2 acts as an “alarm” that prepares the cells to face subsequent nutrient depletion and to survive.

  14. Effects of hypothyroidism on the sensitivity of glycolysis and glycogen synthesis to insulin in the soleus muscle of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitriadis, G D; Leighton, B; Parry-Billings, M; West, D; Newsholme, E A

    1989-01-01

    1. The effects of hypothyroidism on the sensitivity of glycolysis and glycogen synthesis to insulin were investigated in the isolated, incubated soleus muscle of the rat. 2. Hypothyroidism, which was induced by administration of propylthiouracil to the rats, decreased fasting plasma levels of free fatty acids and increased plasma levels of glucose but did not significantly change plasma levels of insulin. 3. The sensitivity of the rates of glycogen synthesis to insulin was increased at physiological, but decreased at supraphysiological, concentrations of insulin. 4. The rates of glycolysis in the hypothyroid muscles were decreased at all insulin concentrations studied and the EC50 for insulin was increased more than 8-fold; the latter indicates decreased sensitivity of this process to insulin. However, at physiological concentrations of insulin, the rates of glucose phosphorylation in the soleus muscles of hypothyroid rats were not different from controls. This suggests that hypothyroidism affects glucose metabolism in muscle not by affecting glucose transport but by decreasing the rate of glucose 6-phosphate conversion to lactate and increasing the rate of conversion of glucose 6-phosphate to glycogen. 5. The rates of glucose oxidation were decreased in the hypothyroid muscles at all insulin concentrations. PMID:2649073

  15. Natural dendrimers: Synthesis and in vitro characterization of glycogen-cysteamine conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone, Mara; Lopedota, Angela; Liberati, Elisa; Russo, Vincenzo; Cutrignelli, Annalisa; Laquintana, Valentino; de Sousa, Irene Pereira; Franco, Massimo; Tongiani, Serena; Denora, Nunzio; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to synthesize, characterize and evaluate the mucoadhesive properties of the first thiolated hyperbranched natural polysaccharide with biodegradability and biocompatibility features. In detail, glycogen-cysteamine conjugates were synthesized through a first step of oxidative ring opening applying increasing concentrations of sodium periodate, to obtain polymers with different degrees of oxidation, and a second step of reductive amination with a constant amount of cysteamine. The obtained glycogen-cysteamine conjugates were characterized regarding their content of free and total thiol groups by Ellman's assay, biocompatibility, swelling/erosion behavior, rheological synergism and mucoadhesive properties in comparison to the unmodified glycogen. The higher the concentration of periodate was, the higher was the content of total thiol groups being in the range of 255.7±12-1194.5±82μmol/g, biocompatibility remained unaffected by these structural changes. On the contrary, the mucoadhesive properties, evaluated by tensile, rheological synergism and rotating cylinder studies, appear to be influenced by the thiol groups concentration on the glycogen. In particular the glycogen-cysteamine conjugate exhibiting the highest degree of thiolation showed a 79-fold increase in viscosity over a time period of 8h, as well as, remained attached on freshly excised porcine mucosa 32-fold longer than the unmodified polymer. The higher was the amount of conjugated thiol groups, the higher was the water absorption capacity of glycogen-cysteamine tablets in Simulated Intestinal Fluid pH 6.8 (SIF). The introduction of thiol moieties on polymer changed the characteristics of the polysaccharide by improving mucoadhesion properties. Therefore, this work represents the first study describing thiolated natural dendrimers as potential platform useful to realize appropriate mucoadhesive nanocarrier systems suitable to prolong mucosal residence time. Copyright © 2017

  16. Testicular Metabolic Reprogramming in Neonatal Streptozotocin-Induced Type 2 Diabetic Rats Impairs Glycolytic Flux and Promotes Glycogen Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rato, L.; Alves, M. G.; Dias, T. R.; Cavaco, J. E.; Oliveira, Pedro F.

    2015-01-01

    Defects in testicular metabolism are directly implicated with male infertility, but most of the mechanisms associated with type 2 diabetes- (T2DM) induced male infertility remain unknown. We aimed to evaluate the effects of T2DM on testicular glucose metabolism by using a neonatal-streptozotocin- (n-STZ) T2DM animal model. Plasma and testicular hormonal levels were evaluated using specific kits. mRNA and protein expression levels were assessed by real-time PCR and Western Blot, respectively. Testicular metabolic profile was assessed by 1H-NMR spectroscopy. T2DM rats showed increased glycemic levels, impaired glucose tolerance and hyperinsulinemia. Both testicular and serum testosterone levels were decreased, whereas those of 17β-estradiol were not altered. Testicular glycolytic flux was not favored in testicles of T2DM rats, since, despite the increased expression of both glucose transporters 1 and 3 and the enzyme phosphofructokinase 1, lactate dehydrogenase activity was severely decreased contributing to lower testicular lactate content. However, T2DM enhanced testicular glycogen accumulation, by modulating the availability of the precursors for its synthesis. T2DM also affected the reproductive sperm parameters. Taken together these results indicate that T2DM is able to reprogram testicular metabolism by enhancing alternative metabolic pathways, particularly glycogen synthesis, and such alterations are associated with impaired sperm parameters. PMID:26064993

  17. Sci—Fri AM: Mountain — 04: Label-free Raman spectroscopy of single tumour cells detects early radiation-induced glycogen synthesis associated with increased radiation resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, Q; Lum, JJ; Isabelle, M; Harder, S; Jirasek, A; Brolo, AG

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To use label-free Raman spectroscopy (RS) for early treatment monitoring of tumour cell radioresistance. Methods: Three human tumour cell lines, two radioresistant (H460, SF 2 = 0.57 and MCF7, SF 2 = 0.70) and one radiosensitive (LNCaP, SF 2 = 0.36), were irradiated with single fractions of 2, 4, 6, 8 or 10 Gy. In additional experiments, H460 and MCF7 cells were irradiated under co-treatment with the anti-diabetic drug metformin, a known radiosensitizing agent. Treated and control cultures were analyzed with RS daily for 3 days post-treatment. Single-cell Raman spectra were acquired from 20 live cells per sample, and experiments were repeated in triplicate. The combined data sets were analyzed with principal component analysis using standard algorithms. Cells from each culture were also subjected to standard assays for viability, proliferation, cell cycle, and radiation clonogenic survival. Results: The radioresistant cells (H460, MCF7) exhibited a RS molecular radiation response signature, detectable as early as 1 day post-treatment, of which radiation-induced glycogen synthesis is a significant contributor. The radiosensitive cells (LNCaP) exhibited negligible glycogen synthesis. Co-treatment with metformin in MCF7 cells blocked glycogen synthesis, reduced viability and proliferation, and increased radiosensitivity. Conversely, metformin co-treatment in H460 cells did not produce these same effects; importantly, both radiation-induced synthesis of glycogen and radiosensitivity were unaffected. Conclusions: Label-free RS can detect early glycogen synthesis post-irradiation, a previously undocumented metabolic mechanism associated with tumour cell radioresistance that can be targeted to increase radiosensitivity. RS monitoring of intratumoral glycogen may provide new opportunities for personalized combined modality radiotherapy treatments

  18. Sci—Fri AM: Mountain — 04: Label-free Raman spectroscopy of single tumour cells detects early radiation-induced glycogen synthesis associated with increased radiation resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, Q; Lum, JJ [BC Cancer Agency — Vancouver Island Centre (Canada); Isabelle, M; Harder, S; Jirasek, A [Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria (Australia); Brolo, AG [Chemistry, University of Victoria (Australia)

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To use label-free Raman spectroscopy (RS) for early treatment monitoring of tumour cell radioresistance. Methods: Three human tumour cell lines, two radioresistant (H460, SF{sub 2} = 0.57 and MCF7, SF{sub 2} = 0.70) and one radiosensitive (LNCaP, SF{sub 2} = 0.36), were irradiated with single fractions of 2, 4, 6, 8 or 10 Gy. In additional experiments, H460 and MCF7 cells were irradiated under co-treatment with the anti-diabetic drug metformin, a known radiosensitizing agent. Treated and control cultures were analyzed with RS daily for 3 days post-treatment. Single-cell Raman spectra were acquired from 20 live cells per sample, and experiments were repeated in triplicate. The combined data sets were analyzed with principal component analysis using standard algorithms. Cells from each culture were also subjected to standard assays for viability, proliferation, cell cycle, and radiation clonogenic survival. Results: The radioresistant cells (H460, MCF7) exhibited a RS molecular radiation response signature, detectable as early as 1 day post-treatment, of which radiation-induced glycogen synthesis is a significant contributor. The radiosensitive cells (LNCaP) exhibited negligible glycogen synthesis. Co-treatment with metformin in MCF7 cells blocked glycogen synthesis, reduced viability and proliferation, and increased radiosensitivity. Conversely, metformin co-treatment in H460 cells did not produce these same effects; importantly, both radiation-induced synthesis of glycogen and radiosensitivity were unaffected. Conclusions: Label-free RS can detect early glycogen synthesis post-irradiation, a previously undocumented metabolic mechanism associated with tumour cell radioresistance that can be targeted to increase radiosensitivity. RS monitoring of intratumoral glycogen may provide new opportunities for personalized combined modality radiotherapy treatments.

  19. Monitoring of liver glycogen synthesis in diabetic patients using carbon-13 MR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomiyasu, Moyoko; Obata, Takayuki; Nishi, Yukio; Nakamoto, Hiromitsu; Nonaka, Hiroi; Takayama, Yukihisa; Autio, Joonas; Ikehira, Hiroo; Kanno, Iwao

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between liver glucose, glycogen, and plasma glucose in diabetic patients, in vivo liver carbon-13 magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 13 C MRS) with a clinical 3.0 T MR system was performed. Subjects were healthy male volunteers (n = 5) and male type-2 diabetic patients (n = 5). Pre- and during oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT), 13 C MR spectra without proton decoupling were acquired in a monitoring period of over 6 h, and in total seven spectra were obtained from each subject. For OGTT, 75 g of glucose, including 5 g of [1- 13 C]glucose, was administered. The MR signals of liver [1- 13 C]glucose and glycogen were detected and their time-course changes were assessed in comparison with the plasma data obtained at screening. The correlations between the fasting plasma glucose level and liver glycogen/glucose rate (Spearman: ρ = -0.68, p 13 C MRS can perform noninvasive measurement of glycogen storage/degradation ability in the liver individually and can assist in tailor-made therapy for diabetes. In conclusion, 13 C MRS has a potential to become a powerful tool in diagnosing diabetes multilaterally.

  20. Glycogen Synthesis and Metabolite Overflow Contribute to Energy Balancing in Cyanobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Cano

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Understanding how living cells manage high-energy metabolites such as ATP and NADPH is essential for understanding energy transformations in the biosphere. Using light as the energy input, we find that energy charge (ratio of ATP over ADP+ATP in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 varies in different growth stages, with a peak upon entry into the rapid growth phase, as well as a positive correlation with light intensity. In contrast, a mutant that can no longer synthesize the main carbon storage compound glycogen showed higher energy charge. The overflow of organic acids in this mutant under nitrogen depletion could also be triggered under high light in nitrogen-replete conditions, with an energy input level dependency. These findings suggest that energy charge in cyanobacteria is tightly linked to growth and carbon partition and that energy management is of key significance for their application as photosynthetic carbon dioxide-assimilating cell factories. : Cano et al. find that ATP levels in a cyanobacterium are dynamic in growth phases and respond to intracellular and environmental conditions. A glycogen mutant excretes organic acids and adjusts photosynthesis as alternative strategies to maintain energy homeostasis. Keywords: cyanobacteria, synechocystis, energy charge, glycogen, overflow metabolism, photosynthesis

  1. Alcoholic Hepatitis Markedly Decreases the Capacity for Urea Synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Glavind

    Full Text Available Data on quantitative metabolic liver functions in the life-threatening disease alcoholic hepatitis are scarce. Urea synthesis is an essential metabolic liver function that plays a key regulatory role in nitrogen homeostasis. The urea synthesis capacity decreases in patients with compromised liver function, whereas it increases in patients with inflammation. Alcoholic hepatitis involves both mechanisms, but how these opposite effects are balanced remains unclear. Our aim was to investigate how alcoholic hepatitis affects the capacity for urea synthesis. We related these findings to another measure of metabolic liver function, the galactose elimination capacity (GEC, as well as to clinical disease severity.We included 20 patients with alcoholic hepatitis and 7 healthy controls. The urea synthesis capacity was quantified by the functional hepatic nitrogen clearance (FHNC, i.e., the slope of the linear relationship between the blood α-amino nitrogen concentration and urea nitrogen synthesis rate during alanine infusion. The GEC was determined using blood concentration decay curves after intravenous bolus injection of galactose. Clinical disease severity was assessed by the Glasgow Alcoholic Hepatitis Score and Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD score.The FHNC was markedly decreased in the alcoholic hepatitis patients compared with the healthy controls (7.2±4.9 L/h vs. 37.4±6.8 L/h, P<0.01, and the largest decrease was observed in those with severe alcoholic hepatitis (4.9±3.6 L/h vs. 9.9±4.9 L/h, P<0.05. The GEC was less markedly reduced than the FHNC. A negative correlation was detected between the FHNC and MELD score (rho = -0.49, P<0.05.Alcoholic hepatitis markedly decreases the urea synthesis capacity. This decrease is associated with an increase in clinical disease severity. Thus, the metabolic failure in alcoholic hepatitis prevails such that the liver cannot adequately perform the metabolic up-regulation observed in other stressful

  2. Synthesis of (benzimidazol-2-yl)aniline derivatives as glycogen phosphorylase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galal, Shadia A; Khattab, Muhammad; Andreadaki, Fotini; Chrysina, Evangelia D; Praly, Jean-Pierre; Ragab, Fatma A F; El Diwani, Hoda I

    2016-11-01

    A series of (benzimidazol-2-yl)-aniline (1) derivatives has been synthesized and evaluated as glycogen phosphorylase (GP) inhibitors. Kinetics studies revealed that compounds displaying a lateral heterocyclic residue with several heteroatoms (series 3 and 5) exhibited modest inhibitory properties with IC 50 values in the 400-600μM range. Arylsulfonyl derivatives 7 (Ar: phenyl) and 9 (Ar: o-nitrophenyl) of 1 exhibited the highest activity (series 2) among the studied compounds (IC 50 324μM and 357μM, respectively) with stronger effect than the p-tolyl analogue 8. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Ethanolic Extract of Butea monosperma Leaves Elevate Blood Insulin Level in Type 2 Diabetic Rats, Stimulate Insulin Secretion in Isolated Rat Islets, and Enhance Hepatic Glycogen Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Bin Samad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We measured a vast range of parameters, in an attempt to further elucidate previously claimed antihyperglycemic activity of Butea monosperma. Our study clearly negates the possibility of antidiabetic activity by inhibited gastrointestinal enzyme action or by reduced glucose absorption. Reduction of fasting and postprandial glucose level was reconfirmed (P<0.05. Improved serum lipid profile via reduced low density lipoprotein (LDL, cholesterol, triglycerides (TG, and increased high density lipoprotein (HDL was also reestablished (P<0.05. Significant insulin secretagogue activity of B. monosperma was found in serum insulin assay of B. monosperma treated type 2 diabetic rats (P<0.01. This was further ascertained by our study on insulin secretion on isolated rat islets (P<0.05. Improved sensitivity of glucose was shown by the significant increase in hepatic glycogen deposition (P<0.05. Hence, we concluded that antihyperglycemic activity of B. monosperma was mediated by enhanced insulin secretion and enhanced glycogen formation in the liver.

  4. In vivo hepatic lipid quantification using MRS at 7 Tesla in a mouse model of glycogen storage disease type 1a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramamonjisoa, Nirilanto; Ratiney, Helene; Mutel, Elodie; Guillou, Herve; Mithieux, Gilles; Pilleul, Frank; Rajas, Fabienne; Beuf, Olivier; Cavassila, Sophie

    2013-07-01

    The assessment of liver lipid content and composition is needed in preclinical research to investigate steatosis and steatosis-related disorders. The purpose of this study was to quantify in vivo hepatic fatty acid content and composition using a method based on short echo time proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) at 7 Tesla. A mouse model of glycogen storage disease type 1a with inducible liver-specific deletion of the glucose-6-phosphatase gene (L-G6pc(-/-)) mice and control mice were fed a standard diet or a high-fat/high-sucrose (HF/HS) diet for 9 months. In control mice, hepatic lipid content was found significantly higher with the HF/HS diet than with the standard diet. As expected, hepatic lipid content was already elevated in L-G6pc(-/-) mice fed a standard diet compared with control mice. L-G6pc(-/-) mice rapidly developed steatosis which was not modified by the HF/HS diet. On the standard diet, estimated amplitudes from olefinic protons were found significantly higher in L-G6pc(-/-) mice compared with that in control mice. L-G6pc(-/-) mice showed no noticeable polyunsaturation from diallylic protons. Total unsaturated fatty acid indexes measured by gas chromatography were in agreement with MRS measurements. These results showed the great potential of high magnetic field MRS to follow the diet impact and lipid alterations in mouse liver.

  5. Effect of oral D-tagatose on liver volume and hepatic glycogen accumulation in healthy male volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boesch, C; Ith, M; Jung, B; Bruegger, K; Erban, S; Diamantis, I; Kreis, R; Bär, A

    2001-04-01

    Standard toxicity tests with high levels of D-tagatose showed a reversible enlargement of the liver in Sprague-Dawley rats without increase of liver enzymes. The present study tests the hypotheses that partial substitution of dietary sucrose by D-tagatose for 28 days increases the volume of human liver and the concentration of liver glycogen. Twelve healthy, male volunteers were studied in a double-blind crossover study with ingestion of D-tagatose (3x15 g daily) and placebo (sucrose, 3x15 g daily) for periods of 28 days each. Liver volume and glycogen concentration have been determined by magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and spectroscopy, which were accompanied by routine medical examinations. MR examinations before and after the treatments revealed no effects (P>0.05) of treatment, period, or subject for changes in liver volume or glycogen concentration. A steady increase of liver volumes, independent of the D-tagatose or placebo intake, has been observed over the study in parallel with a slight increase in body weight. The treatment with D-tagatose was not associated with clinically relevant changes of the examined clinico-chemical and hematological parameters, including liver enzymes and uric acid. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  6. Carbon Monoxide Protects against Hepatic Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury via ROS-Dependent Akt Signaling and Inhibition of Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3β

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyo Jeong Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide (CO may exert important roles in physiological and pathophysiological states through the regulation of cellular signaling pathways. CO can protect organ tissues from ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury by modulating intracellular redox status and by inhibiting inflammatory, apoptotic, and proliferative responses. However, the cellular mechanisms underlying the protective effects of CO in organ I/R injury remain incompletely understood. In this study, a murine model of hepatic warm I/R injury was employed to assess the role of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3 and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K-dependent signaling pathways in the protective effects of CO against inflammation and injury. Inhibition of GSK3 through the PI3K/Akt pathway played a crucial role in CO-mediated protection. CO treatment increased the phosphorylation of Akt and GSK3-beta (GSK3β in the liver after I/R injury. Furthermore, administration of LY294002, an inhibitor of PI3K, compromised the protective effect of CO and decreased the level of phospho-GSK3β after I/R injury. These results suggest that CO protects against liver damage by maintaining GSK3β phosphorylation, which may be mediated by the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Our study provides additional support for the therapeutic potential of CO in organ injury and identifies GSK3β as a therapeutic target for CO in the amelioration of hepatic injury.

  7. Carbon monoxide protects against hepatic ischemia/reperfusion injury via ROS-dependent Akt signaling and inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase 3β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyo Jeong; Joe, Yeonsoo; Kong, Jin Sun; Jeong, Sun-Oh; Cho, Gyeong Jae; Ryter, Stefan W; Chung, Hun Taeg

    2013-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) may exert important roles in physiological and pathophysiological states through the regulation of cellular signaling pathways. CO can protect organ tissues from ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury by modulating intracellular redox status and by inhibiting inflammatory, apoptotic, and proliferative responses. However, the cellular mechanisms underlying the protective effects of CO in organ I/R injury remain incompletely understood. In this study, a murine model of hepatic warm I/R injury was employed to assess the role of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-dependent signaling pathways in the protective effects of CO against inflammation and injury. Inhibition of GSK3 through the PI3K/Akt pathway played a crucial role in CO-mediated protection. CO treatment increased the phosphorylation of Akt and GSK3-beta (GSK3β) in the liver after I/R injury. Furthermore, administration of LY294002, an inhibitor of PI3K, compromised the protective effect of CO and decreased the level of phospho-GSK3β after I/R injury. These results suggest that CO protects against liver damage by maintaining GSK3β phosphorylation, which may be mediated by the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Our study provides additional support for the therapeutic potential of CO in organ injury and identifies GSK3β as a therapeutic target for CO in the amelioration of hepatic injury.

  8. Dietary iron controls circadian hepatic glucose metabolism through heme synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simcox, Judith A; Mitchell, Thomas Creighton; Gao, Yan; Just, Steven F; Cooksey, Robert; Cox, James; Ajioka, Richard; Jones, Deborah; Lee, Soh-Hyun; King, Daniel; Huang, Jingyu; McClain, Donald A

    2015-04-01

    The circadian rhythm of the liver maintains glucose homeostasis, and disruption of this rhythm is associated with type 2 diabetes. Feeding is one factor that sets the circadian clock in peripheral tissues, but relatively little is known about the role of specific dietary components in that regard. We assessed the effects of dietary iron on circadian gluconeogenesis. Dietary iron affects circadian glucose metabolism through heme-mediated regulation of the interaction of nuclear receptor subfamily 1 group d member 1 (Rev-Erbα) with its cosuppressor nuclear receptor corepressor 1 (NCOR). Loss of regulated heme synthesis was achieved by aminolevulinic acid (ALA) treatment of mice or cultured cells to bypass the rate-limiting enzyme in hepatic heme synthesis, ALA synthase 1 (ALAS1). ALA treatment abolishes differences in hepatic glucose production and in the expression of gluconeogenic enzymes seen with variation of dietary iron. The differences among diets are also lost with inhibition of heme synthesis with isonicotinylhydrazine. Dietary iron modulates levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α), a transcriptional activator of ALAS1, to affect hepatic heme. Treatment of mice with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine diminishes PGC-1α variation observed among the iron diets, suggesting that iron is acting through reactive oxygen species signaling. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  9. Brain glycogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obel, Linea Lykke Frimodt; Müller, Margit S; Walls, Anne B

    2012-01-01

    Glycogen is a complex glucose polymer found in a variety of tissues, including brain, where it is localized primarily in astrocytes. The small quantity found in brain compared to e.g., liver has led to the understanding that brain glycogen is merely used during hypoglycemia or ischemia....... In this review evidence is brought forward highlighting what has been an emerging understanding in brain energy metabolism: that glycogen is more than just a convenient way to store energy for use in emergencies-it is a highly dynamic molecule with versatile implications in brain function, i.e., synaptic...... activity and memory formation. In line with the great spatiotemporal complexity of the brain and thereof derived focus on the basis for ensuring the availability of the right amount of energy at the right time and place, we here encourage a closer look into the molecular and subcellular mechanisms...

  10. [Effect of nutritional status of the donor on the quality of hepatic graft. Value of restoration of glycogenic reserves of the donor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattou, F; Boudjema, K; Kerr-Conte, J; Wolf, P; Jaeck, D; Cinqualbre, J

    1992-01-01

    Initial function of the graft is an essential factor for successful liver transplantation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the nutritional status of the donor on hepatic graft quality at reperfusion. Livers (n = 41) were taken from pigs normally fed or fasted for 24 h or fasted for 24 h and conditioned for 2 hours with a solution containing glucose, fructose and glutamine. The quality of liver grafts was evaluated using an original, blood-free isolated perfusion model, after 8 h cold storage, or after 15 min warm ischemia performed prior to harvesting. The hepatic concentration of glycogen and ATP, measured from in vivo biopsies, was decreased in fasted animals (P less than 0.05 vs fed) and restored by nutritional conditioning (P less than 0.05 vs fasted). At the time of reperfusion following 8 h cold ischemia, the liberation of aminotransferases and lactate dehydrogenase was elevated in livers coming from fasted animals (P less than 0.05 vs fed) and restored to fed levels after nutritional conditioning (P less than 0.01 vs fasted). After 15 min of warm ischemia, the bile secretion during the reperfusion period was decreased in the 24 h fasted livers (P less than 0.01 vs fed) and reestablished after nutritional conditioning (P less than 0.01 vs fasted). Perfusion of the donor liver, in the 2 h preceding harvest, with a solution of glucose plus neoglucogenic precursors enhances the quality of the liver graft at the time of reperfusion.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Postexercise muscle glycogen resynthesis in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Louise M; van Loon, Luc J C; Hawley, John A

    2017-05-01

    Since the pioneering studies conducted in the 1960s in which glycogen status was investigated using the muscle biopsy technique, sports scientists have developed a sophisticated appreciation of the role of glycogen in cellular adaptation and exercise performance, as well as sites of storage of this important metabolic fuel. While sports nutrition guidelines have evolved during the past decade to incorporate sport-specific and periodized manipulation of carbohydrate (CHO) availability, athletes attempt to maximize muscle glycogen synthesis between important workouts or competitive events so that fuel stores closely match the demands of the prescribed exercise. Therefore, it is important to understand the factors that enhance or impair this biphasic process. In the early postexercise period (0-4 h), glycogen depletion provides a strong drive for its own resynthesis, with the provision of CHO (~1 g/kg body mass) optimizing this process. During the later phase of recovery (4-24 h), CHO intake should meet the anticipated fuel needs of the training/competition, with the type, form, and pattern of intake being less important than total intake. Dietary strategies that can enhance glycogen synthesis from suboptimal amounts of CHO or energy intake are of practical interest to many athletes; in this scenario, the coingestion of protein with CHO can assist glycogen storage. Future research should identify other factors that enhance the rate of synthesis of glycogen storage in a limited time frame, improve glycogen storage from a limited CHO intake, or increase muscle glycogen supercompensation. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Biomarker for Glycogen Storage Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-03

    Fructose Metabolism, Inborn Errors; Glycogen Storage Disease; Glycogen Storage Disease Type I; Glycogen Storage Disease Type II; Glycogen Storage Disease Type III; Glycogen Storage Disease Type IV; Glycogen Storage Disease Type V; Glycogen Storage Disease Type VI; Glycogen Storage Disease Type VII; Glycogen Storage Disease Type VIII

  13. Mechanism of activation of liver glycogen synthase by swelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, A. J.; Baquet, A.; Gustafson, L.; van Woerkom, G. M.; Hue, L.

    1992-01-01

    The mechanism linking the stimulation of liver glycogen synthesis to swelling induced either by amino acids or hypotonicity was studied in hepatocytes, in gel-filtered liver extracts, and in purified preparations of particulate glycogen to which glycogen-metabolizing enzymes are bound. High

  14. Revisiting Glycogen Content in the Human Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öz, Gülin; DiNuzzo, Mauro; Kumar, Anjali; Moheet, Amir; Seaquist, Elizabeth R

    2015-12-01

    Glycogen provides an important glucose reservoir in the brain since the concentration of glucosyl units stored in glycogen is several fold higher than free glucose available in brain tissue. We have previously reported 3-4 µmol/g brain glycogen content using in vivo (13)C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in conjunction with [1-(13)C]glucose administration in healthy humans, while higher levels were reported in the rodent brain. Due to the slow turnover of bulk brain glycogen in humans, complete turnover of the glycogen pool, estimated to take 3-5 days, was not observed in these prior studies. In an attempt to reach complete turnover and thereby steady state (13)C labeling in glycogen, here we administered [1-(13)C]glucose to healthy volunteers for 80 h. To eliminate any net glycogen synthesis during this period and thereby achieve an accurate estimate of glycogen concentration, volunteers were maintained at euglycemic blood glucose levels during [1-(13)C]glucose administration and (13)C-glycogen levels in the occipital lobe were measured by (13)C MRS approximately every 12 h. Finally, we fitted the data with a biophysical model that was recently developed to take into account the tiered structure of the glycogen molecule and additionally incorporated blood glucose levels and isotopic enrichments as input function in the model. We obtained excellent fits of the model to the (13)C-glycogen data, and glycogen content in the healthy human brain tissue was found to be 7.8 ± 0.3 µmol/g, a value substantially higher than previous estimates of glycogen content in the human brain.

  15. Hepatic and cerebral energy metabolism after neonatal canine alimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliegman, R M; Miettinen, E L; Morton, S K

    1983-04-01

    Intrahepatic and intracerebral metabolic responses to neonatal fasting or enteric carbohydrate alimentation were investigated among newborn dogs. Pups were either fasted or given an intravenous glucose infusion (alimented) before an enteric feeding of physiologic quantities of either glucose or galactose. These pups were also compared to another group which was completely starved throughout the study period. Gastrointestinal carbohydrate feeding resulted in enhanced hepatic glycogen content among pups after a prior state of fasting. Though there were no differences of glycogen content between glucose or galactose feeding in this previously fasted group, combined intravenous glucose and enteric galactose administration produced the greatest effect on hepatic glycogen synthesis. Intrahepatic fructose 1, 6-diphosphate and phosphoenolpyruvate levels were increased among previously fasted pups fed enteric monosaccharides compared to completely starved control pups, whereas intrahepatic phosphoenolpyruvate and pyruvate levels were elevated after combined intravenous and enteric carbohydrate administration. Of greater interest was the observation that hepatic levels of ATP were significantly elevated among all groups given exogenous carbohydrates compared to the completely starved control group. In contrast to the augmented hepatic glycogen and ATP levels, there were no alterations of cerebral glycogen or ATP after alimentation. Nevertheless, cerebral pyruvate and/or phosphoenolpyruvate concentrations were elevated after enteric or combined intravenous and enteric alimentation compared to the totally starved control pups.

  16. Lack of Glycogenin Causes Glycogen Accumulation and Muscle Function Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testoni, Giorgia; Duran, Jordi; García-Rocha, Mar; Vilaplana, Francisco; Serrano, Antonio L; Sebastián, David; López-Soldado, Iliana; Sullivan, Mitchell A; Slebe, Felipe; Vilaseca, Marta; Muñoz-Cánoves, Pura; Guinovart, Joan J

    2017-07-05

    Glycogenin is considered essential for glycogen synthesis, as it acts as a primer for the initiation of the polysaccharide chain. Against expectations, glycogenin-deficient mice (Gyg KO) accumulate high amounts of glycogen in striated muscle. Furthermore, this glycogen contains no covalently bound protein, thereby demonstrating that a protein primer is not strictly necessary for the synthesis of the polysaccharide in vivo. Strikingly, in spite of the higher glycogen content, Gyg KO mice showed lower resting energy expenditure and less resistance than control animals when subjected to endurance exercise. These observations can be attributed to a switch of oxidative myofibers toward glycolytic metabolism. Mice overexpressing glycogen synthase in the muscle showed similar alterations, thus indicating that this switch is caused by the excess of glycogen. These results may explain the muscular defects of GSD XV patients, who lack glycogenin-1 and show high glycogen accumulation in muscle. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Patterns of glycogen turnover in liver characterized by computer modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youn, J.H.; Bergman, R.N.

    1987-01-01

    The authors used a computer model of liver glycogen turnover to reexamine the data of Devos and Hers, who reported the time course of accumulation in and loss from glycogen of label originating in [1- 14 C]galactose injected at different times after the start of refeeding of 40-h fasted mice or rats. In the present study computer representation of individual glycogen molecules was utilized to account for growth and degradation of glycogen according to specific hypothetical patterns. Using this model they could predict the accumulation and localization within glycogen of labeled glucose residues and compare the predictions with the previously published data. They considered three specific hypotheses of glycogen accumulation during refeeding: (1) simultaneous, (2) sequential, and (3) accelerating growth. Hypothetical patterns of glycogen degradation were (1) ordered and (2) random degradation. The pattern of glycogen synthesis consistent with experimental data was a steadily increasing number of growing glycogen molecules, whereas during degradation glycogen molecules are exposed to degrading enzymes randomly, rather than in a specific reverse order of synthesis. These patterns predict the existence of a specific mechanism for the steadily increasing seeding of new glycogen molecules during synthesis

  18. Massive intestinal resection in rats fed up on glutamine: hepatic glycogen content valuation Ressecção intestinal extensa em ratos tratados com oferta oral de glutamina: avaliação do conteúdo hepático de glicogênio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariney Costa de Miranda

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Glutamine has been widely used in treatment of small bowel syndrome and its metabolic effects on the small intestine are well known, however, it has been little studied its effects on hepatic metabolism under this condition. AIM: To verify through experimental model, a glutamine based supplemental diet, administered via oral to rats submitted to massive intestinal resection, evaluating weight evolution and hepatic glycogen content. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Male rats, Wistar, were allocated into three groups to undergo enterectomy. Following diets were applied: with glutamine (G group, without glutamine (NG group, and standard diet from the laboratory (R group. All animals had massive small intestine resection including ileocecal valve removal. After 20 days, all animals were sacrificed. The liver was removed to histological analysis by light microscopy. Slides were stained by periodic acid of Schiff with diastasis. RESULTS: All animals lost weight from the beginning to the end of experiment. Comparing weight loss average expressed in percentage, there was no difference statistically significant on this variance. In analyzed groups, the hepatic glycogen content did not differ statistically, in the histological method evaluated. CONCLUSION: Glutamine feeding via oral did not influence weight loss reduction of animal submitted to massive intestinal resection and did not stimulate glycogen synthesis and storage into hepatocytes.RACIONAL: A glutamina tem sido utilizada amplamente no tratamento da síndrome do intestino curto e seus efeitos metabólicos são bem conhecidos no intestino delgado, porém pouco se tem relatado sobre seus efeitos no metabolismo hepático nessa condição. OBJETIVO: Verificar em modelo experimental, o efeito de dieta suplementada com glutamina administrada por via oral, em ratos submetidos a ressecção intestinal extensa, na evolução ponderal e no conteúdo de glicogênio hepático. MATERIAL E MÉTODOS: Ratos

  19. Synthesis of substituted 2-(β-D-glucopyranosyl)-benzimidazoles and their evaluation as inhibitors of glycogen phosphorylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokor, Éva; Szilágyi, Enikő; Docsa, Tibor; Gergely, Pál; Somsák, László

    2013-11-15

    Microwave assisted condensation of O-perbenzoylated C-(β-d-glucopyranosyl)formic acid with 1,2-diaminobenzenes in the presence of triphenylphosphite gave the corresponding O-protected 2-(β-d-glucopyranosyl)-benzimidazoles in moderate yields. O-Perbenzoylated C-(β-d-glucopyranosyl)formamide and -thioformamide were transformed into the corresponding ethyl C-(β-d-glucopyranosyl)formimidate and -thioformimidate, respectively, by Et3O·BF4. Treatment of the formimidate with 1,2-diaminobenzenes afforded O-protected 2-(β-d-glucopyranosyl)-benzimidazoles in good to excellent yields. Similar reaction of the thioformimidate gave these compounds in lower yields. The O-benzoyl protecting groups were removed by the Zemplén protocol. These test compounds were assayed against rabbit muscle glycogen phosphorylase (GP) b, the prototype of liver GP, the rate limiting enzyme of glycogen degradation. The best inhibitors were 2-(β-d-glucopyranosyl)-4-methyl-benzimidazole (Ki=2.8μM) and 2-(β-d-glucopyranosyl)-naphtho[2,3-d]imidazole (Ki=2.1μM) exhibiting a ∼3-4 times stronger binding than the unsubstituted parent compound. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Muscle Glycogen Remodeling and Glycogen Phosphate Metabolism following Exhaustive Exercise of Wild Type and Laforin Knockout Mice*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irimia, Jose M.; Tagliabracci, Vincent S.; Meyer, Catalina M.; Segvich, Dyann M.; DePaoli-Roach, Anna A.; Roach, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Glycogen, the repository of glucose in many cell types, contains small amounts of covalent phosphate, of uncertain function and poorly understood metabolism. Loss-of-function mutations in the laforin gene cause the fatal neurodegenerative disorder, Lafora disease, characterized by increased glycogen phosphorylation and the formation of abnormal deposits of glycogen-like material called Lafora bodies. It is generally accepted that the phosphate is removed by the laforin phosphatase. To study the dynamics of skeletal muscle glycogen phosphorylation in vivo under physiological conditions, mice were subjected to glycogen-depleting exercise and then monitored while they resynthesized glycogen. Depletion of glycogen by exercise was associated with a substantial reduction in total glycogen phosphate and the newly resynthesized glycogen was less branched and less phosphorylated. Branching returned to normal on a time frame of days, whereas phosphorylation remained suppressed over a longer period of time. We observed no change in markers of autophagy. Exercise of 3-month-old laforin knock-out mice caused a similar depletion of glycogen but no loss of glycogen phosphate. Furthermore, remodeling of glycogen to restore the basal branching pattern was delayed in the knock-out animals. From these results, we infer that 1) laforin is responsible for glycogen dephosphorylation during exercise and acts during the cytosolic degradation of glycogen, 2) excess glycogen phosphorylation in the absence of laforin delays the normal remodeling of the branching structure, and 3) the accumulation of glycogen phosphate is a relatively slow process involving multiple cycles of glycogen synthesis-degradation, consistent with the slow onset of the symptoms of Lafora disease. PMID:26216881

  1. Synthesis of Hyperbranched Glycoconjugates by the Combined Action of Potato Phosphorylase and Glycogen Branching Enzyme from Deinococcus geothermalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Loos

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Potato phosphorylase is able to synthesize linear polyglucans from maltoheptaose primers. By coupling maltoheptaose to butane diamine, tris(2-aminoethylamine and amine functionalized amine functionalized poly ethyleneglycol (PEG, new primer molecules became available. The resulting di-, tri- and macro-primers were incubated with potato phosphorylase and glycogen branching enzyme from Deinococcus geothermalis. Due to the action of both enzymes, hyperbranched polyglucan arms were grown from the maltoheptaose derivatives with a maximum degree of branching of 11%. The size of the synthesized hyperbranched polyglucans could be controlled by the ratio monomer over primer. About 60%–80% of the monomers were incorporated in the glycoconjugates. The resulting hyperbranched glycoconjugates were subjected to Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS measurements in order to determine the hydrodynamic radius and it became obvious that the structures formed agglomerates in the range of 14–32 nm.

  2. Introduction to the Thematic Minireview Series: Brain glycogen metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Gerald M; Dienel, Gerald A; Colbran, Roger J

    2018-05-11

    The synthesis of glycogen allows for efficient intracellular storage of glucose molecules in a soluble form that can be rapidly released to enter glycolysis in response to energy demand. Intensive studies of glucose and glycogen metabolism, predominantly in skeletal muscle and liver, have produced innumerable insights into the mechanisms of hormone action, resulting in the award of several Nobel Prizes over the last one hundred years. Glycogen is actually present in all cells and tissues, albeit at much lower levels than found in muscle or liver. However, metabolic and physiological roles of glycogen in other tissues are poorly understood. This series of Minireviews summarizes what is known about the enzymes involved in brain glycogen metabolism and studies that have linked glycogen metabolism to multiple brain functions involving metabolic communication between astrocytes and neurons. Recent studies unexpectedly linking some forms of epilepsy to mutations in two poorly understood proteins involved in glycogen metabolism are also reviewed. © 2018 Carlson et al.

  3. Effect of irradiation with fast electrons on the uridindiphosphateglucose mechanism of glycogen synthesis in NKly tumours, spleen and liver of mice having tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goryukhina, T.A.; Misheneva, V.S.; Burova, T.M.; Seits, I.F.

    1976-01-01

    A marked and stable decrease in the glycogen content of the liver has been observed within the entire 96-hour period after a single exposure to fast electrons (1000 rads) of mice having NKly tumour. Tumour cells maintain a low glycogen level that is peculiar for them. Activity of enzymes (UDPG-pyrophosphorylase, phosphoglucomutase and UDPG-glycogensynthetase) considerably changes but, in most cases, there is no parallelism between the glycogen content and glycogensynthetase activity

  4. Inhibition of autophagic proteolysis by inhibitors of phosphoinositide 3-kinase can interfere with the regulation of glycogen synthesis in isolated hepatocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubbelhuis, Peter F.; van Sluijters, Daphne A.; Blommaart, Edward F. C.; Gustafson, Lori A.; van Woerkom, George M.; Herling, Andreas W.; Burger, Hans-Joerg; Meijer, Alfred J.

    2002-01-01

    Amino acid-induced cell swelling stimulates conversion of glucose into glycogen in isolated hepatocytes. Activation of glycogen synthase (GS) phosphatase, caused by the fall in intracellular chloride accompanying regulatory volume decrease, and activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase),

  5. Synthesis and biological evaluation of glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) inhibitors: an fast and atom efficient access to 1-aryl-3-benzylureas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monte, Fabio Lo; Kramer, Thomas; Boländer, Alexander; Plotkin, Batya; Eldar-Finkelman, Hagit; Fuertes, Ana; Dominguez, Juan; Schmidt, Boris

    2011-09-15

    The glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) is implicated in multiple cellular processes and has been linked to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In the course of our research topic we synthesized a library of potent GSK-3 inhibitors. We utilized the urea scaffold present in the potent and highly selective GSK-3 inhibitor AR-A014418 (AstraZeneca). This moiety suits both (a) a convergent approach utilizing readily accessible building blocks and (b) a divergent approach based on a microwave heating assisted Suzuki coupling. We established a chromatography-free purification method to generate products with sufficient purity for the biological assays. The structure-activity relationship of the library provided the rationale for the synthesis of the benzothiazolylurea 66 (IC(50)=140 nM) and the pyridylurea 62 (IC(50)=98 nM), which displayed two to threefold enhanced activity versus the reference compound 18 (AR-A014418: IC(50)=330 nM) in our assays. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Photoperiodic regulation of glycogen metabolism, glycolysis, and glutamine synthesis in tanycytes of the Siberian hamster suggests novel roles of tanycytes in hypothalamic function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilaweera, Kanishka; Herwig, Annika; Bolborea, Matei; Campbell, Gill; Mayer, Claus D; Morgan, Peter J; Ebling, Francis J P; Barrett, Perry

    2011-11-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the impact of photoperiod on the temporal and spatial expression of genes involved in glucose metabolism in the brain of the seasonal mammal Phodopus sungorus (Siberian hamster). In situ hybridization was performed on brain sections obtained from male hamsters held in long photoperiod (high body weight and developed testes) or short photoperiod (reduced body weight with testicular regression). This analysis revealed upregulation in expression of genes involved in glycogen and glucose metabolism in short photoperiod and localized to the tanycyte layer of the third ventricle. On the basis of these data and a previously identified photoperiod-dependent increase in activity of neighboring hypothalamic neurons, we hypothesized that the observed expression changes may reflect alteration in either metabolic fuel or precursor neurotransmitter supply to surrounding neurons. Gene expression analysis was performed for genes involved in lactate and glutamate transport. This analysis showed that the gene for the lactate transporter MCT2 and glutamate transporter GLAST was decreased in the tanycyte layer in short photoperiod. Expression of mRNA for glutamine synthetase, the final enzyme in the synthesis of the neuronal neurotransmitter precursor, glutamine, was also decreased in short photoperiod. These data suggest a role for tanycytes in modulating glutamate concentrations and neurotransmitter supply in the hypothalamic environment. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... most common types of viral hepatitis. What Is Hepatitis A? For kids, hep A is the most common ... they recover, it does not come back. Can Hepatitis A Be Prevented? The following will help keep people ...

  8. Differences between glycogen biogenesis in fast- and slow-twitch rabbit muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cussó, R; Lerner, L R; Cadefau, J

    2003-01-01

    Skeletal muscle glycogen is an essential energy substrate for muscular activity. The biochemical properties of the enzymes involved in de novo synthesis of glycogen were analysed in two types of rabbit skeletal muscle fiber (fast- and slow-twitch). Glycogen concentration was higher in fast...

  9. Partial recovery of erythrocyte glycogen in diabetic rats treated with phenobarbital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    da-Silva C.A.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Erythrocytes may play a role in glucose homeostasis during the postprandial period. Erythrocytes from diabetic patients are defective in glucose transport and metabolism, functions that may affect glycogen storage. Phenobarbital, a hepatic enzyme inducer, has been used in the treatment of patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM, increasing the insulin-mediated glucose disposal. We studied the effects of phenobarbital treatment in vivo on glycemia and erythrocyte glycogen content in control and alloxan-diabetic rats during the postprandial period. In control rats (blood glucose, 73 to 111 mg/dl in femoral and suprahepatic veins the erythrocyte glycogen content was 45.4 ± 1.1 and 39.1 ± 0.8 µg/g Hb (mean ± SEM, N = 4-6 in the femoral artery and vein, respectively, and 37.9 ± 1.1 in the portal vein and 47.5 ± 0.9 in the suprahepatic vein. Diabetic rats (blood glucose, 300-350 mg/dl presented low (P<0.05 erythrocyte glycogen content, i.e., 9.6 ± 0.1 and 7.1 ± 0.7 µg/g Hb in the femoral artery and vein, respectively, and 10.0 ± 0.7 and 10.7 ± 0.5 in the portal and suprahepatic veins, respectively. After 10 days of treatment, phenobarbital (0.5 mg/ml in the drinking water did not change blood glucose or erythrocyte glycogen content in control rats. In diabetic rats, however, it lowered (P<0.05 blood glucose in the femoral artery (from 305 ± 18 to 204 ± 45 mg/dl and femoral vein (from 300 ± 11 to 174 ± 48 mg/dl and suprahepatic vein (from 350 ± 10 to 174 ± 42 mg/dl, but the reduction was not sufficient for complete recovery. Phenobarbital also stimulated the glycogen synthesis, leading to a partial recovery of glycogen stores in erythrocytes. In treated rats, erythrocyte glycogen content increased to 20.7 ± 3.8 µg/g Hb in the femoral artery and 30.9 ± 0.9 µg/g Hb in the suprahepatic vein (P<0.05. These data indicate that phenobarbital activated some of the insulin-stimulated glucose metabolism steps which were

  10. Insulin induces a positive relationship between the rates of ATP and glycogen changes in isolated rat liver in presence of glucose; a 31P and 13C NMR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillet-Blanco, Laurence; Beauvieux, Marie-Christine; Gin, Henri; Rigalleau, Vincent; Gallis, Jean-Louis

    2005-11-21

    There is an emerging theory suggesting that insulin, which is known to be the predominant postprandial anabolic hormone, is also a major regulator of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in human skeletal muscle. However, little is known about its effects in the liver. Since there is a theoretical relationship between glycogen metabolism and energy status, a simultaneous and continuous investigation of hepatic ATP and glycogen content was performed in intact and isolated perfused liver by 31P and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) The hepatic rates of ATP and glycogen changes were evaluated with different concentrations of insulin and glucose during continuous and short-term supply. Liver from rats fed ad libitum were perfused with Krebs-Henseleit Buffer (KHB)(controls) or KHB containing 6 mM glucose, 30 mM glucose, insulin alone, insulin + 6 mM glucose, insulin + 30 mM glucose. In the control, glycogenolysis occurred at a rate of -0.53 +/- 0.021 % x min(-1) and ATP content decreased at a rate of -0.28 +/- 0.029 % x min(-1). In the absence of insulin, there was a close proportional relationship between the glycogen flux and the glucose concentration, whereas ATP rates never varied. With insulin + glucose, both glycogen and ATP rates were strongly related to the glucose concentration; the magnitude of net glycogen flux was linearly correlated to the magnitude of net ATP flux: flux(glycogen) = 72.543(fluxATP) + 172.08, R2 = 0.98. Only the co-infusion of 30 mM glucose and insulin led to (i) a net glycogen synthesis, (ii) the maintenance of the hepatic ATP content, and a strong positive correlation between their net fluxes. This has never previously been reported. The specific effect of insulin on ATP change is likely related to a rapid stimulation of the hepatic mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. We propose that variations in the correlation between rates of ATP and glycogen changes could be a probe for insulin resistance due to the action of substrates

  11. Significant modulation of the hepatic proteome induced by exposure to low temperature in Xenopus laevis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazumichi Nagasawa

    2013-08-01

    The African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis, is an ectothermic vertebrate that can survive at low environmental temperatures. To gain insight into the molecular events induced by low body temperature, liver proteins were evaluated at the standard laboratory rearing temperature (22°C, control and a low environmental temperature (5°C, cold exposure. Using nano-flow liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry, we identified 58 proteins that differed in abundance. A subsequent Gene Ontology analysis revealed that the tyrosine and phenylalanine catabolic processes were modulated by cold exposure, which resulted in decreases in hepatic tyrosine and phenylalanine, respectively. Similarly, levels of pyruvate kinase and enolase, which are involved in glycolysis and glycogen synthesis, were also decreased, whereas levels of glycogen phosphorylase, which participates in glycogenolysis, were increased. Therefore, we measured metabolites in the respective pathways and found that levels of hepatic glycogen and glucose were decreased. Although the liver was under oxidative stress because of iron accumulation caused by hepatic erythrocyte destruction, the hepatic NADPH/NADP ratio was not changed. Thus, glycogen is probably utilized mainly for NADPH supply rather than for energy or glucose production. In conclusion, X. laevis responds to low body temperature by modulating its hepatic proteome, which results in altered carbohydrate metabolism.

  12. Fructose effect to enhance liver glycogen deposition is due to inhibition of glycogenolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youn, J.; Kaslow, H.; Bergman, R.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of fructose on glycogen degradation was examined by measuring flux of [ 14 C] from prelabeled glycogen in perfused rat livers. During 2 h refeeding of fasted rats hepatic glycogen was labeled by injection of [U 14 C] galactose (0.1 mg and 0.02 μCi/g of body weight). Refed livers were perfused for 30 min with glucose only (10 mM) and for 60 min with glucose (10 mM) without (n=5) or with fructose (1, 2, 10 mM; n=5 for each). With fructose, label production immediately declined and remained suppressed through the end of perfusion (P < 0.05). Suppression was dose-dependent: steady state label production was suppressed 45, 64, and 72% by 1, 2, and 10 mM fructose (P < 0.0001), without significant changes in glycogen synthase or phosphorylase. These results suggest the existence of allosteric inhibition of phosphorylase in the presence of fructose. Fructose 1-phosphate (F1P) accumulated in proportion to fructose (0.11 +/- 0.01 without fructose, 0.86 +/- 0.03, 1.81 +/- 0.18, and 8.23 +/- 0.6 μmoles/g of liver with 1, 2, and 10 mM fructose. Maximum inhibition of phosphorylase was 82%; FIP concentration for half inhibition was 0.57 μmoles/g of liver, well within the concentration of F1P attained in refeeding. Fructose enhances net glycogen synthesis in liver by suppressing glycogenolysis and the suppression is presumably caused by allosteric inhibition of phosphorylase by F1P

  13. Effect of carbon tetrachloride on glycogen metabolism in fasted and refed mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pushpendran, C.K.; Shenoy, B.V.; Eapen, J.

    1977-01-01

    Hepatic glycogen was depleted rapidly in fasted mice treated with CCl 4 . Glycogen breakdown was slow when CCl 4 was administered after 1 hr of refeeding. There was an initial increase and then a reduction in liver glycogen of mice refed for 2 hr prior to CCl 4 injection. The incorporation of glucose-U- 14 C into glycogen was higher in mice which were refed before CCl 4 administration than in fasted mice treated with the hepatotoxin. The specific activity of lactate was higher in CCl 4 treated mice. The data suggested differences in glycogen metabolism of fasted and refed mice in response to CCl 4 treatment. (author)

  14. Glutamate Cysteine Ligase—Modulatory Subunit Knockout Mouse Shows Normal Insulin Sensitivity but Reduced Liver Glycogen Storage

    KAUST Repository

    Lavoie, Suzie

    2016-04-21

    Glutathione (GSH) deficits have been observed in several mental or degenerative illness, and so has the metabolic syndrome. The impact of a decreased glucose metabolism on the GSH system is well-known, but the effect of decreased GSH levels on the energy metabolism is unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the sensitivity to insulin in the mouse knockout (KO) for the modulatory subunit of the glutamate cysteine ligase (GCLM), the rate-limiting enzyme of GSH synthesis. Compared to wildtype (WT) mice, GCLM-KO mice presented with reduced basal plasma glucose and insulin levels. During an insulin tolerance test, GCLM-KO mice showed a normal fall in glycemia, indicating normal insulin secretion. However, during the recovery phase, plasma glucose levels remained lower for longer in KO mice despite normal plasma glucagon levels. This is consistent with a normal counterregulatory hormonal response but impaired mobilization of glucose from endogenous stores. Following a resident-intruder stress, during which stress hormones mobilize glucose from hepatic glycogen stores, KO mice showed a lower hyperglycemic level despite higher plasma cortisol levels when compared to WT mice. The lower hepatic glycogen levels observed in GCLM-KO mice could explain the impaired glycogen mobilization following induced hypoglycemia. Altogether, our results indicate that reduced liver glycogen availability, as observed in GCLM-KO mice, could be at the origin of their lower basal and challenged glycemia. Further studies will be necessary to understand how a GSH deficit, typically observed in GCLM-KO mice, leads to a deficit in liver glycogen storage.

  15. Glutamate Cysteine Ligase—Modulatory Subunit Knockout Mouse Shows Normal Insulin Sensitivity but Reduced Liver Glycogen Storage

    KAUST Repository

    Lavoie, Suzie; Steullet, Pascal; Kulak, Anita; Preitner, Frederic; Do, Kim Q.; Magistretti, Pierre J.

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) deficits have been observed in several mental or degenerative illness, and so has the metabolic syndrome. The impact of a decreased glucose metabolism on the GSH system is well-known, but the effect of decreased GSH levels on the energy metabolism is unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the sensitivity to insulin in the mouse knockout (KO) for the modulatory subunit of the glutamate cysteine ligase (GCLM), the rate-limiting enzyme of GSH synthesis. Compared to wildtype (WT) mice, GCLM-KO mice presented with reduced basal plasma glucose and insulin levels. During an insulin tolerance test, GCLM-KO mice showed a normal fall in glycemia, indicating normal insulin secretion. However, during the recovery phase, plasma glucose levels remained lower for longer in KO mice despite normal plasma glucagon levels. This is consistent with a normal counterregulatory hormonal response but impaired mobilization of glucose from endogenous stores. Following a resident-intruder stress, during which stress hormones mobilize glucose from hepatic glycogen stores, KO mice showed a lower hyperglycemic level despite higher plasma cortisol levels when compared to WT mice. The lower hepatic glycogen levels observed in GCLM-KO mice could explain the impaired glycogen mobilization following induced hypoglycemia. Altogether, our results indicate that reduced liver glycogen availability, as observed in GCLM-KO mice, could be at the origin of their lower basal and challenged glycemia. Further studies will be necessary to understand how a GSH deficit, typically observed in GCLM-KO mice, leads to a deficit in liver glycogen storage.

  16. Novel method for detection of glycogen in cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skurat, Alexander V; Segvich, Dyann M; DePaoli-Roach, Anna A; Roach, Peter J

    2017-05-01

    Glycogen, a branched polymer of glucose, functions as an energy reserve in many living organisms. Abnormalities in glycogen metabolism, usually excessive accumulation, can be caused genetically, most often through mutation of the enzymes directly involved in synthesis and degradation of the polymer leading to a variety of glycogen storage diseases (GSDs). Microscopic visualization of glycogen deposits in cells and tissues is important for the study of normal glycogen metabolism as well as diagnosis of GSDs. Here, we describe a method for the detection of glycogen using a renewable, recombinant protein which contains the carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) from starch-binding domain containing protein 1 (Stbd1). We generated a fusion protein containing g lutathione S-transferase, a cM c eptitope and the tbd1 BM (GYSC) for use as a glycogen-binding probe, which can be detected with secondary antibodies against glutathione S-transferase or cMyc. By enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we demonstrate that GYSC binds glycogen and two other polymers of glucose, amylopectin and amylose. Immunofluorescence staining of cultured cells indicate a GYSC-specific signal that is co-localized with signals obtained with anti-glycogen or anti-glycogen synthase antibodies. GYSC-positive staining inside of lysosomes is observed in individual muscle fibers isolated from mice deficient in lysosomal enzyme acid alpha-glucosidase, a well-characterized model of GSD II (Pompe disease). Co-localized GYSC and glycogen signals are also found in muscle fibers isolated from mice deficient in malin, a model for Lafora disease. These data indicate that GYSC is a novel probe that can be used to study glycogen metabolism under normal and pathological conditions. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  17. Insulin induces a positive relationship between the rates of ATP and glycogen changes in isolated rat liver in presence of glucose; a 31P and 13C NMR study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gin Henri

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is an emerging theory suggesting that insulin, which is known to be the predominant postprandial anabolic hormone, is also a major regulator of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in human skeletal muscle. However, little is known about its effects in the liver. Since there is a theoretical relationship between glycogen metabolism and energy status, a simultaneous and continuous investigation of hepatic ATP and glycogen content was performed in intact and isolated perfused liver by 31P and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR The hepatic rates of ATP and glycogen changes were evaluated with different concentrations of insulin and glucose during continuous and short-term supply. Results Liver from rats fed ad libitum were perfused with Krebs-Henseleit Buffer (KHB(controls or KHB containing 6 mM glucose, 30 mM glucose, insulin alone, insulin + 6 mM glucose, insulin + 30 mM glucose. In the control, glycogenolysis occurred at a rate of -0.53 ± 0.021 %·min-1 and ATP content decreased at a rate of -0.28 ± 0.029 %·min-1. In the absence of insulin, there was a close proportional relationship between the glycogen flux and the glucose concentration, whereas ATP rates never varied. With insulin + glucose, both glycogen and ATP rates were strongly related to the glucose concentration; the magnitude of net glycogen flux was linearly correlated to the magnitude of net ATP flux: fluxglycogen = 72.543(fluxATP + 172.08, R2 = 0.98. Conclusion Only the co-infusion of 30 mM glucose and insulin led to (i a net glycogen synthesis, (ii the maintenance of the hepatic ATP content, and a strong positive correlation between their net fluxes. This has never previously been reported. The specific effect of insulin on ATP change is likely related to a rapid stimulation of the hepatic mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. We propose that variations in the correlation between rates of ATP and glycogen changes could be a probe for insulin

  18. Structural mechanism of laforin function in glycogen dephosphorylation and lafora disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raththagala, Madushi; Brewer, M Kathryn; Parker, Matthew W; Sherwood, Amanda R; Wong, Brian K; Hsu, Simon; Bridges, Travis M; Paasch, Bradley C; Hellman, Lance M; Husodo, Satrio; Meekins, David A; Taylor, Adam O; Turner, Benjamin D; Auger, Kyle D; Dukhande, Vikas V; Chakravarthy, Srinivas; Sanz, Pascual; Woods, Virgil L; Li, Sheng; Vander Kooi, Craig W; Gentry, Matthew S

    2015-01-22

    Glycogen is the major mammalian glucose storage cache and is critical for energy homeostasis. Glycogen synthesis in neurons must be tightly controlled due to neuronal sensitivity to perturbations in glycogen metabolism. Lafora disease (LD) is a fatal, congenital, neurodegenerative epilepsy. Mutations in the gene encoding the glycogen phosphatase laforin result in hyperphosphorylated glycogen that forms water-insoluble inclusions called Lafora bodies (LBs). LBs induce neuronal apoptosis and are the causative agent of LD. The mechanism of glycogen dephosphorylation by laforin and dysfunction in LD is unknown. We report the crystal structure of laforin bound to phosphoglucan product, revealing its unique integrated tertiary and quaternary structure. Structure-guided mutagenesis combined with biophysical and biochemical analyses reveal the basis for normal function of laforin in glycogen metabolism. Analyses of LD patient mutations define the mechanism by which subsets of mutations disrupt laforin function. These data provide fundamental insights connecting glycogen metabolism to neurodegenerative disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Valproate induced hepatic steatosis by enhanced fatty acid uptake and triglyceride synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, Xupeng; Hong, Weipeng; Cai, Peiheng; Chen, Yibei; Xu, Chuncao; Cao, Di; Yu, Weibang; Zhao, Zhongxiang; Huang, Min; Jin, Jing

    2017-01-01

    Steatosis is the characteristic type of VPA-induced hepatotoxicity and may result in life-threatening hepatic lesion. Approximately 61% of patients treated with VPA have been diagnosed with hepatic steatosis through ultrasound examination. However, the mechanisms underlying VPA-induced intracellular fat accumulation are not yet fully understood. Here we demonstrated the involvement of fatty acid uptake and lipogenesis in VPA-induced hepatic steatosis in vitro and in vivo by using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis, western blotting analysis, fatty acid uptake assays, Nile Red staining assays, and Oil Red O staining assays. Specifically, we found that the expression of cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36), an important fatty acid transport, and diacylglycerol acyltransferase 2 (DGAT2) were significantly up-regulated in HepG2 cells and livers of C57B/6J mice after treatment with VPA. Furthermore, VPA treatment remarkably enhanced the efficiency of fatty acid uptake mediated by CD36, while this effect was abolished by the interference with CD36-specific siRNA. Also, VPA treatment significantly increased DGAT2 expression as a result of the inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) – extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) pathway; however, DGAT2 knockdown significantly alleviated VPA-induced intracellular lipid accumulation. Additionally, we also found that sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c)-mediated fatty acid synthesis may be not involved in VPA-induced hepatic steatosis. Overall, VPA-triggered over-regulation of CD36 and DGAT2 could be helpful for a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying VPA-induced hepatic steatosis and may offer novel therapeutic strategies to combat VPA-induced hepatotoxicity. - Highlights: • VPA induced hepatic steatosis and modulated genes associated with lipid metabolism. • CD36-mediated fatty acid uptake contributed to VPA-induced lipid accumulation. • PA increased the hepatic

  20. Valproate induced hepatic steatosis by enhanced fatty acid uptake and triglyceride synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Xupeng; Hong, Weipeng; Cai, Peiheng; Chen, Yibei; Xu, Chuncao [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Cao, Di [School of Chinese Materia Medica, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou (China); Yu, Weibang [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Zhao, Zhongxiang [School of Chinese Materia Medica, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou (China); Huang, Min [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Jin, Jing, E-mail: jinjing@mail.sysu.edu.cn [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China)

    2017-06-01

    Steatosis is the characteristic type of VPA-induced hepatotoxicity and may result in life-threatening hepatic lesion. Approximately 61% of patients treated with VPA have been diagnosed with hepatic steatosis through ultrasound examination. However, the mechanisms underlying VPA-induced intracellular fat accumulation are not yet fully understood. Here we demonstrated the involvement of fatty acid uptake and lipogenesis in VPA-induced hepatic steatosis in vitro and in vivo by using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis, western blotting analysis, fatty acid uptake assays, Nile Red staining assays, and Oil Red O staining assays. Specifically, we found that the expression of cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36), an important fatty acid transport, and diacylglycerol acyltransferase 2 (DGAT2) were significantly up-regulated in HepG2 cells and livers of C57B/6J mice after treatment with VPA. Furthermore, VPA treatment remarkably enhanced the efficiency of fatty acid uptake mediated by CD36, while this effect was abolished by the interference with CD36-specific siRNA. Also, VPA treatment significantly increased DGAT2 expression as a result of the inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) – extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) pathway; however, DGAT2 knockdown significantly alleviated VPA-induced intracellular lipid accumulation. Additionally, we also found that sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c)-mediated fatty acid synthesis may be not involved in VPA-induced hepatic steatosis. Overall, VPA-triggered over-regulation of CD36 and DGAT2 could be helpful for a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying VPA-induced hepatic steatosis and may offer novel therapeutic strategies to combat VPA-induced hepatotoxicity. - Highlights: • VPA induced hepatic steatosis and modulated genes associated with lipid metabolism. • CD36-mediated fatty acid uptake contributed to VPA-induced lipid accumulation. • PA increased the hepatic

  1. Volume I. Glycogen: A historical overview, an adjunct to thesis. Volume II. Non-glucose components of glycogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkman, B.R.

    1988-01-01

    Investigations have been carried out on three non-glucose components of native glycogen: protein, glucosamine, and phosphate. The protein, glycogenin, appears to serve as the primer upon which new molecules of glycogen are synthesized. When cell extracts are incubated with ( 14 C)UDPG, ( 14 C)glucose becomes transferred onto pre-existing chains of alpha-1,4 linked glucose associated with free glycogenin. The transferase and glycogenin remain associated during various purification steps. Liver glycogen appears to contain less than 0.02% protein which may correspond to the presence of one molecule of glycogenin (37 kDa) per alpha particle of liver glycogen. The core beta particle within each alpha particle may be synthesized upon glycogenin, while the remaining 20-40 beta particles may arise from each other. The author has demonstrated the natural occurrence of glucosamine in liver glycogen (but not muscle glycogen) from various species in an amount of about one molecule per molecule of glycogen. The glucosamine is underivatized, appears to be randomly scattered in the glycogen, and may be derived from dietary galactosamine. Similar to Fontana (1980), the author observed that native liver glycogen could be fractionated on DEAE-cellulose apparently on the basis of phosphate content. The more strongly bound glycogen possessed a greater molecular weight and content of glucosamine and phosphate. Possible explanations for these subfractions are considered. The phosphate appears to be concentrated near the center of the glycogen molecules. About 30% appears to be associated with glucose-6P and the remainder with an unidentified phosphodiester. The phosphate may stimulate glycogen synthesis. How the phosphate becomes incorporated is unknown

  2. A functional glycogen biosynthesis pathway in Lactobacillus acidophilus: expression and analysis of the glg operon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Yong Jun; Klaenhammer, Todd R

    2013-01-01

    Glycogen metabolism contributes to energy storage and various physiological functions in some prokaryotes, including colonization persistence. A role for glycogen metabolism is proposed on the survival and fitness of Lactobacillus acidophilus, a probiotic microbe, in the human gastrointestinal environment. L. acidophilus NCFM possesses a glycogen metabolism (glg) operon consisting of glgBCDAP-amy-pgm genes. Expression of the glg operon and glycogen accumulation were carbon source- and growth phase-dependent, and were repressed by glucose. The highest intracellular glycogen content was observed in early log-phase cells grown on trehalose, which was followed by a drastic decrease of glycogen content prior to entering stationary phase. In raffinose-grown cells, however, glycogen accumulation gradually declined following early log phase and was maintained at stable levels throughout stationary phase. Raffinose also induced an overall higher temporal glg expression throughout growth compared with trehalose. Isogenic ΔglgA (glycogen synthase) and ΔglgB (glycogen-branching enzyme) mutants are glycogen-deficient and exhibited growth defects on raffinose. The latter observation suggests a reciprocal relationship between glycogen synthesis and raffinose metabolism. Deletion of glgB or glgP (glycogen phosphorylase) resulted in defective growth and increased bile sensitivity. The data indicate that glycogen metabolism is involved in growth maintenance, bile tolerance and complex carbohydrate utilization in L. acidophilus. PMID:23879596

  3. Inhibiting Glycosphingolipid Synthesis Ameliorates Hepatic Steatosis in Obese Mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Hongmei; Przybylska, Malgorzata; Wu, I.-Huan; Zhang, Jinhua; Maniatis, Panagiotis; Pacheco, Joshua; Piepenhagen, Peter; Copeland, Diane; Arbeeny, Cynthia; Shayman, James A.; Aerts, Johannes M.; Jiang, Canwen; Cheng, Seng H.; Yew, Nelson S.

    2009-01-01

    Steatosis in the liver is a common feature of obesity and type 2 diabetes and the precursor to the development of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), cirrhosis, and liver failure. It has been shown previously that inhibiting glycosphingolipid (GSL) synthesis increases insulin sensitivity and lowers

  4. IMPACT OF ANTIVIRAL THERAPY FOR CHRONIC HEPATITIS C ON CYTOKINE SYNTHESIS AND HEPATIC FIBROSING PROCESSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Shchekotov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to estimate the time course of changes in the levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, interleukin-4 (IL-4, IL-6, and the hepatic fibrosis indicators hyaluronic acid (HA and liver elasticity index during combined antiviral therapy (AVT with interferon alpha-2b and ribavirin in patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC. Subjects and methods. Fifty patients with CHC were examined. Serum TNF-α, IL-6, IL-4, and HA were estimated using an enzyme immunoassay. The stage of hepatic fibrosis was determined by fibroelastography with the liver elastic index being measured; the time course of changes in the indicators was assessed in 20 patients at the end of AVT. A virological response was monitored at therapy completion and 6 months later. Results. The patients with CHC in the reactivation phase were found to have enhanced TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-4 activities in 84, 60, and 100 % of the cases, respectively (р < 0.001, р = 0.01, р < 0.001, respectively. The median serum concentration of HA in CHC was 1.8-fold higher than that in the control group (p = 0.03; the liver elastic index averaged 6.5 kPa. TNF-α and IL-6 levels correlated with viremia, transaminases, and hepatic fibrosis indicators. At combined AVT completion, the virological response rate was as high as 85 %, which was attended by a considerable reduction in cytolysis, HA concentrations, and liver density index to 5.4 kPa (3.6–6.8 kPa (p < 0.04, and in the activity of the examined cytokines. The sustained virological response rate was 80 %. Only IL-4 levels decreased and TNF-α and IL-6 concentration remained at the baseline level in patients unresponsive to AVT. Conclusion. It is expedient to monitor TNF-α, IL-4, IL-6, and HA to evaluate the severity of liver involvement in CHC and to predict the efficiency of AVT.

  5. The cellular origin of the hepatic cholesterol synthesis (1961)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevallier, F.

    1961-01-01

    If rats are sacrificed within minutes after an injection of acetate 1 - 14 C the specific radioactivities of sterols precipitable with digitonine, extracted from liver parenchyma cells and from Kupffer cells are very close to each other, whatever the duration of the experiment may be. It follows that cholesterol synthesis probably occurs in both types of cells. A validation of this conclusion requires that the validity of certain assumptions be established. (authors) [fr

  6. Enhanced Glycogen Storage of a Subcellular Hot Spot in Human Skeletal Muscle during Early Recovery from Eccentric Contractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Joachim; Farup, Jean; Rahbek, Stine Klejs

    2015-01-01

    Unaccustomed eccentric exercise is accompanied by muscle damage and impaired glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis during subsequent recovery. Recently, it was shown that the role and regulation of glycogen in skeletal muscle are dependent on its subcellular localization, and that glycogen synthe...

  7. A widespread amino acid polymorphism at codon 905 of the glycogen-associated regulatory subunit of protein phosphatase-1 is associated with insulin resistance and hypersecretion of insulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, L; Hansen, T; Vestergaard, H

    1995-01-01

    The regulatory G-subunit of the glycogen-associated form of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) plays a crucial part in muscle tissue glycogen synthesis and breakdown. As impaired insulin stimulated glycogen synthesis in peripheral tissues is considered to be a pathogenic factor in subsets of non-insulin...

  8. Impact of high altitude on the hepatic fatty acid oxidation and synthesis in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ni, Qian [Department of General Surgery, Hepatic-biliary-pancreatic Institute, Lanzhou University Second Hospital, Lanzhou (China); Department of Pediatrics, Lanzhou University Second Hospital, Lanzhou (China); Shao, Yuan; Wang, Ying Zhen [Department of General Surgery, Hepatic-biliary-pancreatic Institute, Lanzhou University Second Hospital, Lanzhou (China); Jing, Yu Hong [Institute of Anatomy, School of Basic Medicine, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou (China); Zhang, You Cheng, E-mail: zhangychmd@126.com [Department of General Surgery, Hepatic-biliary-pancreatic Institute, Lanzhou University Second Hospital, Lanzhou (China)

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • Acute exposure to high altitude (HA) increased hepatic fatty acid (FA) β-oxidation. • Acute exposure of rats to HA increased hepatic FA synthesis. • PPARα and AMPK can regulate the FA metabolism. • FA may be a key energy fuel and a compensation for CHO during acute exposure to HA. • The acute changes of FA metabolism may be a mechanism of acclimatization. - Abstract: High altitude (HA) affects energy metabolism. The impact of acute and chronic HA acclimatization on the major metabolic pathways is still controversial. In this study, we aimed to unveil the impact of HA on the key enzymes involved in the fatty acid (FA) metabolism in liver. Rats were exposed to an altitude of 4300 m for 30 days and the expressions of two key proteins involved in FA β-oxidation (carnitine palmitoyl transferase I, CPT-I; and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha, PPARα), two proteins involved in FA synthesis (acetyl CoA carboxylase-1, ACC-1; and AMP-activated protein kinase, AMPK), as well as the total ketone body in the liver and the plasma FFAs were examined. Rats without HA exposure were used as controls. We observed that the acute exposure of rats to HA (3 days) led to a significant increase in the expressions of CPT-I and PPARα and in the total hepatic ketone body. Longer exposure (15 days) caused a marked decrease in the expression of CPT-I and PPARα. By 30 days after HA exposure, the expression levels of CPT-I and PPARα returned to the control level. The hepatic ACC-1 level showed a significant increase in rats exposed to HA for 1 and 3 days. In contrast, the hepatic level of AMPK showed a significant reduction throughout the experimental period. Plasma FFA concentrations did not show any significant changes following HA exposure. Thus, increased hepatic FA oxidation and synthesis in the early phase of HA exposure may be among the important mechanisms for the rats to respond to the hypoxic stress in order to acclimatize themselves to the

  9. Impact of high altitude on the hepatic fatty acid oxidation and synthesis in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni, Qian; Shao, Yuan; Wang, Ying Zhen; Jing, Yu Hong; Zhang, You Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Acute exposure to high altitude (HA) increased hepatic fatty acid (FA) β-oxidation. • Acute exposure of rats to HA increased hepatic FA synthesis. • PPARα and AMPK can regulate the FA metabolism. • FA may be a key energy fuel and a compensation for CHO during acute exposure to HA. • The acute changes of FA metabolism may be a mechanism of acclimatization. - Abstract: High altitude (HA) affects energy metabolism. The impact of acute and chronic HA acclimatization on the major metabolic pathways is still controversial. In this study, we aimed to unveil the impact of HA on the key enzymes involved in the fatty acid (FA) metabolism in liver. Rats were exposed to an altitude of 4300 m for 30 days and the expressions of two key proteins involved in FA β-oxidation (carnitine palmitoyl transferase I, CPT-I; and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha, PPARα), two proteins involved in FA synthesis (acetyl CoA carboxylase-1, ACC-1; and AMP-activated protein kinase, AMPK), as well as the total ketone body in the liver and the plasma FFAs were examined. Rats without HA exposure were used as controls. We observed that the acute exposure of rats to HA (3 days) led to a significant increase in the expressions of CPT-I and PPARα and in the total hepatic ketone body. Longer exposure (15 days) caused a marked decrease in the expression of CPT-I and PPARα. By 30 days after HA exposure, the expression levels of CPT-I and PPARα returned to the control level. The hepatic ACC-1 level showed a significant increase in rats exposed to HA for 1 and 3 days. In contrast, the hepatic level of AMPK showed a significant reduction throughout the experimental period. Plasma FFA concentrations did not show any significant changes following HA exposure. Thus, increased hepatic FA oxidation and synthesis in the early phase of HA exposure may be among the important mechanisms for the rats to respond to the hypoxic stress in order to acclimatize themselves to the

  10. Oxidation of glucose-U-/sup 14/C and synthesis of glycogen in different tissues of the garden snail, Cryptozona ligulata with reference to aestivation and starvation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krupanidhi, S; Raghavaiah, K; Padmanabha Naidu, B; Ramamurthi, R [Sri Venkateswara Univ., Tirupati (India). Dept. of Zoology

    1978-03-01

    The percent decrease of glycogen content in all the tissues investigated is more in 20-days starved snails than the 4-months aestivated snails when compared to active snails. Recovery of administered glucose-U/sup 14/C in the respiratory CO/sub 2/ is 42.27 % in active snails, whereas it is 8.81 % and 26.09 % in aestivated and starved snails respectively. Maximum levels of incorporation labelled glucose were found at 18 hr in all the tissues and the rate of incorporation was greatly elevated in the tissues of aestivated and starved snails. The causes for the difference in the rates of incorporation and the utilization of glycogen in active, aestivated and starved snails are discussed.

  11. Valproate induced hepatic steatosis by enhanced fatty acid uptake and triglyceride synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xupeng; Hong, Weipeng; Cai, Peiheng; Chen, Yibei; Xu, Chuncao; Cao, Di; Yu, Weibang; Zhao, Zhongxiang; Huang, Min; Jin, Jing

    2017-06-01

    Steatosis is the characteristic type of VPA-induced hepatotoxicity and may result in life-threatening hepatic lesion. Approximately 61% of patients treated with VPA have been diagnosed with hepatic steatosis through ultrasound examination. However, the mechanisms underlying VPA-induced intracellular fat accumulation are not yet fully understood. Here we demonstrated the involvement of fatty acid uptake and lipogenesis in VPA-induced hepatic steatosis in vitro and in vivo by using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis, western blotting analysis, fatty acid uptake assays, Nile Red staining assays, and Oil Red O staining assays. Specifically, we found that the expression of cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36), an important fatty acid transport, and diacylglycerol acyltransferase 2 (DGAT2) were significantly up-regulated in HepG2 cells and livers of C57B/6J mice after treatment with VPA. Furthermore, VPA treatment remarkably enhanced the efficiency of fatty acid uptake mediated by CD36, while this effect was abolished by the interference with CD36-specific siRNA. Also, VPA treatment significantly increased DGAT2 expression as a result of the inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) - extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) pathway; however, DGAT2 knockdown significantly alleviated VPA-induced intracellular lipid accumulation. Additionally, we also found that sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c)-mediated fatty acid synthesis may be not involved in VPA-induced hepatic steatosis. Overall, VPA-triggered over-regulation of CD36 and DGAT2 could be helpful for a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying VPA-induced hepatic steatosis and may offer novel therapeutic strategies to combat VPA-induced hepatotoxicity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Incorporation of phosphate into glycogen by glycogen synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Christopher J; Segvich, Dyann M; Mahalingan, Krishna; Chikwana, Vimbai M; Kirley, Terence L; Hurley, Thomas D; DePaoli-Roach, Anna A; Roach, Peter J

    2016-05-01

    The storage polymer glycogen normally contains small amounts of covalently attached phosphate as phosphomonoesters at C2, C3 and C6 atoms of glucose residues. In the absence of the laforin phosphatase, as in the rare childhood epilepsy Lafora disease, the phosphorylation level is elevated and is associated with abnormal glycogen structure that contributes to the pathology. Laforin therefore likely functions in vivo as a glycogen phosphatase. The mechanism of glycogen phosphorylation is less well-understood. We have reported that glycogen synthase incorporates phosphate into glycogen via a rare side reaction in which glucose-phosphate rather than glucose is transferred to a growing polyglucose chain (Tagliabracci et al. (2011) Cell Metab13, 274-282). We proposed a mechanism to account for phosphorylation at C2 and possibly at C3. Our results have since been challenged (Nitschke et al. (2013) Cell Metab17, 756-767). Here we extend the evidence supporting our conclusion, validating the assay used for the detection of glycogen phosphorylation, measurement of the transfer of (32)P from [β-(32)P]UDP-glucose to glycogen by glycogen synthase. The (32)P associated with the glycogen fraction was stable to ethanol precipitation, SDS-PAGE and gel filtration on Sephadex G50. The (32)P-signal was not affected by inclusion of excess unlabeled UDP before analysis or by treatment with a UDPase, arguing against the signal being due to contaminating [β-(32)P]UDP generated in the reaction. Furthermore, [(32)P]UDP did not bind non-covalently to glycogen. The (32)P associated with glycogen was released by laforin treatment, suggesting that it was present as a phosphomonoester. The conclusion is that glycogen synthase can mediate the introduction of phosphate into glycogen, thereby providing a possible mechanism for C2, and perhaps C3, phosphorylation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Quantification of the glycogen cascade system: the ultrasensitive responses of liver glycogen synthase and muscle phosphorylase are due to distinctive regulatory designs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatesh KV

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Signaling pathways include intricate networks of reversible covalent modification cycles. Such multicyclic enzyme cascades amplify the input stimulus, cause integration of multiple signals and exhibit sensitive output responses. Regulation of glycogen synthase and phosphorylase by reversible covalent modification cycles exemplifies signal transduction by enzyme cascades. Although this system for regulating glycogen synthesis and breakdown appears similar in all tissues, subtle differences have been identified. For example, phosphatase-1, a dephosphorylating enzyme of the system, is regulated quite differently in muscle and liver. Do these small differences in regulatory architecture affect the overall performance of the glycogen cascade in a specific tissue? We address this question by analyzing the regulatory structure of the glycogen cascade system in liver and muscle cells at steady state. Results The glycogen cascade system in liver and muscle cells was analyzed at steady state and the results were compared with literature data. We found that the cascade system exhibits highly sensitive switch-like responses to changes in cyclic AMP concentration and the outputs are surprisingly different in the two tissues. In muscle, glycogen phosphorylase is more sensitive than glycogen synthase to cyclic AMP, while the opposite is observed in liver. Furthermore, when the liver undergoes a transition from starved to fed-state, the futile cycle of simultaneous glycogen synthesis and degradation switches to reciprocal regulation. Under such a transition, different proportions of active glycogen synthase and phosphorylase can coexist due to the varying inhibition of glycogen-synthase phosphatase by active phosphorylase. Conclusion The highly sensitive responses of glycogen synthase in liver and phosphorylase in muscle to primary stimuli can be attributed to distinctive regulatory designs in the glycogen cascade system. The different

  14. Impaired glycogen synthase activity and mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund, Kurt; Beck-Nielsen, Henning

    2006-01-01

    Insulin resistance in skeletal muscle is a major hallmark of type 2 diabetes and an early detectable abnormality in the development of this disease. The cellular mechanisms of insulin resistance include impaired insulin-mediated muscle glycogen synthesis and increased intramyocellular lipid content......, whereas impaired insulin activation of muscle glycogen synthase represents a consistent, molecular defect found in both type 2 diabetic and high-risk individuals. Despite several studies of the insulin signaling pathway believed to mediate dephosphorylation and hence activation of glycogen synthase......, the molecular mechanisms responsible for this defect remain unknown. Recently, the use of phospho-specific antibodies in human diabetic muscle has revealed hyperphosphorylation of glycogen synthase at sites not regulated by the classical insulin signaling pathway. In addition, novel approaches such as gene...

  15. Glycogen phosphorylation and Lafora disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Peter J

    2015-12-01

    Covalent phosphorylation of glycogen, first described 35 years ago, was put on firm ground through the work of the Whelan laboratory in the 1990s. But glycogen phosphorylation lay fallow until interest was rekindled in the mid 2000s by the finding that it could be removed by a glycogen-binding phosphatase, laforin, and that mutations in laforin cause a fatal teenage-onset epilepsy, called Lafora disease. Glycogen phosphorylation is due to phosphomonoesters at C2, C3 and C6 of glucose residues. Phosphate is rare, ranging from 1:500 to 1:5000 phosphates/glucose depending on the glycogen source. The mechanisms of glycogen phosphorylation remain under investigation but one hypothesis to explain C2 and perhaps C3 phosphate is that it results from a rare side reaction of the normal synthetic enzyme glycogen synthase. Lafora disease is likely caused by over-accumulation of abnormal glycogen in insoluble deposits termed Lafora bodies in neurons. The abnormality in the glycogen correlates with elevated phosphorylation (at C2, C3 and C6), reduced branching, insolubility and an enhanced tendency to aggregate and become insoluble. Hyperphosphorylation of glycogen is emerging as an important feature of this deadly childhood disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A whole-body model for glycogen regulation reveals a critical role for substrate cycling in maintaining blood glucose homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Xu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Timely, and sometimes rapid, metabolic adaptation to changes in food supply is critical for survival as an organism moves from the fasted to the fed state, and vice versa. These transitions necessitate major metabolic changes to maintain energy homeostasis as the source of blood glucose moves away from ingested carbohydrates, through hepatic glycogen stores, towards gluconeogenesis. The integration of hepatic glycogen regulation with extra-hepatic energetics is a key aspect of these adaptive mechanisms. Here we use computational modeling to explore hepatic glycogen regulation under fed and fasting conditions in the context of a whole-body model. The model was validated against previous experimental results concerning glycogen phosphorylase a (active and glycogen synthase a dynamics. The model qualitatively reproduced physiological changes that occur during transition from the fed to the fasted state. Analysis of the model reveals a critical role for the inhibition of glycogen synthase phosphatase by glycogen phosphorylase a. This negative regulation leads to high levels of glycogen synthase activity during fasting conditions, which in turn increases substrate (futile cycling, priming the system for a rapid response once an external source of glucose is restored. This work demonstrates that a mechanistic understanding of the design principles used by metabolic control circuits to maintain homeostasis can benefit from the incorporation of mathematical descriptions of these networks into "whole-body" contextual models that mimic in vivo conditions.

  17. Estradiol inhibits hepatic stellate cell area and collagen synthesis in the chicken liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Shotaro; Teshima, Akifumi; Kawabata, Fuminori; Tabata, Shoji

    2017-11-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are the main collagen-producing cells in the liver. The HSC area and amount of collagen fibers are different between male and female chickens. This study was performed to confirm the effect of estradiol on collagen synthesis in the growing chicken liver. Blood estradiol levels in chicks were compared at 4 and 8 weeks of age, and the collagen fibril network in liver tissue was observed at 8 weeks by scanning electron microscopy. Intraperitoneal administrations of estradiol and tamoxifen to male and female chicks, respectively, were performed daily from 5 to 8 weeks of age. The areas of HSCs and collagen contents were measured in the liver tissue. The blood estradiol level was higher in females than in males, and the collagen fibril network was denser in males than in females at 8 weeks of age. Estradiol administration in males induced decreases in the HSC area and collagen content of the liver. Conversely, tamoxifen administration in females induced an increase in the HSC area but did not facilitate collagen synthesis. Based on these results, estradiol inhibits the area and collagen synthesis of HSCs in the growing chicken liver under normal physiological conditions. © 2017 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  18. Role of Autophagy in Glycogen Breakdown and Its Relevance to Chloroquine Myopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirin, Jonathan; Nieuwenhuis, Joppe; Perrimon, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    Several myopathies are associated with defects in autophagic and lysosomal degradation of glycogen, but it remains unclear how glycogen is targeted to the lysosome and what significance this process has for muscle cells. We have established a Drosophila melanogaster model to study glycogen autophagy in skeletal muscles, using chloroquine (CQ) to simulate a vacuolar myopathy that is completely dependent on the core autophagy genes. We show that autophagy is required for the most efficient degradation of glycogen in response to starvation. Furthermore, we show that CQ-induced myopathy can be improved by reduction of either autophagy or glycogen synthesis, the latter possibly due to a direct role of Glycogen Synthase in regulating autophagy through its interaction with Atg8. PMID:24265594

  19. Technical and experimental features of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of brain glycogen metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Ana Francisca; Gruetter, Rolf; Lei, Hongxia

    2017-07-15

    In the brain, glycogen is a source of glucose not only in emergency situations but also during normal brain activity. Altered brain glycogen metabolism is associated with energetic dysregulation in pathological conditions, such as diabetes or epilepsy. Both in humans and animals, brain glycogen levels have been assessed non-invasively by Carbon-13 Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy ( 13 C-MRS) in vivo. With this approach, glycogen synthesis and degradation may be followed in real time, thereby providing valuable insights into brain glycogen dynamics. However, compared to the liver and muscle, where glycogen is abundant, the sensitivity for detection of brain glycogen by 13 C-MRS is inherently low. In this review we focus on strategies used to optimize the sensitivity for 13 C-MRS detection of glycogen. Namely, we explore several technical perspectives, such as magnetic field strength, field homogeneity, coil design, decoupling, and localization methods. Furthermore, we also address basic principles underlying the use of 13 C-labeled precursors to enhance the detectable glycogen signal, emphasizing specific experimental aspects relevant for obtaining kinetic information on brain glycogen. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Induction of hepatic protein synthesis by a peptide in blood plasma of patients with sepsis and trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loda, M; Clowes, G H; Dinarello, C A; George, B C; Lane, B; Richardson, W

    1984-08-01

    Accelerated release of amino acids from muscle and their uptake for protein synthesis by liver and other visceral tissues are characteristic of trauma or sepsis. Experimentally, this response is induced by interleukin-1 (IL-1) generated by activated macrophages in vitro. However, IL-1 has not been demonstrated in human blood. A small 4000-dalton peptide recently isolated from plasma of patients with sepsis and trauma induces muscle proteolysis and is called "proteolysis-inducing factor" (PIF). To test whether this agent has the ability also to induce hepatic protein synthesis, a series of animal experiments and clinical observations were undertaken. The structural and secretory (acute-phase reactants) in vitro protein synthesis in livers of normal rats injected intraperitoneally with IL-1 or PIF was significantly greater than that of normal rats or those injected with Ringer's lactate (p less than 0.01). In patients with sepsis and trauma the central plasma clearance rate of amino acids, a measure of visceral (principally hepatic) amino acid uptake, was elevated and correlated with the rates of protein synthesis in incubated liver slices obtained by biopsy at operation from the same patients (p less than 0.05). Both in vivo measured central plasma clearance rate of amino acids and in vitro measured hepatic protein synthesis correlated with plasma levels of PIF in the same patients (p less than 0.01 and p less than 0.05, respectively). We conclude that since PIF, and not IL-1, is present in human plasma and both are produced by activated macrophages, PIF seems to be the stable circulating cleavage product of IL-1, which induces not only muscle proteolysis but also hepatic protein synthesis, principally in the form of acute-phase reactants during infection and other states in which inflammation is present.

  1. Sugar versus fat: elimination of glycogen storage improves lipid accumulation in Yarrowia lipolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhutada, Govindprasad; Kavšcek, Martin; Ledesma-Amaro, Rodrigo; Thomas, Stéphane; Rechberger, Gerald N; Nicaud, Jean-Marc; Natter, Klaus

    2017-05-01

    Triacylglycerol (TAG) and glycogen are the two major metabolites for carbon storage in most eukaryotic organisms. We investigated the glycogen metabolism of the oleaginous Yarrowia lipolytica and found that this yeast accumulates up to 16% glycogen in its biomass. Assuming that elimination of glycogen synthesis would result in an improvement of lipid accumulation, we characterized and deleted the single gene coding for glycogen synthase, YlGSY1. The mutant was grown under lipogenic conditions with glucose and glycerol as substrates and we obtained up to 60% improvement in TAG accumulation compared to the wild-type strain. Additionally, YlGSY1 was deleted in a background that was already engineered for high lipid accumulation. In this obese background, TAG accumulation was also further increased. The highest lipid content of 52% was found after 3 days of cultivation in nitrogen-limited glycerol medium. Furthermore, we constructed mutants of Y. lipolytica and Saccharomyces cerevisiae that are deleted for both glycogen and TAG synthesis, demonstrating that the ability to store carbon is not essential. Overall, this work showed that glycogen synthesis is a competing pathway for TAG accumulation in oleaginous yeasts and that deletion of the glycogen synthase has beneficial effects on neutral lipid storage. © FEMS 2017.

  2. Natural products, an important resource for discovery of multitarget drugs and functional food for regulation of hepatic glucose metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Yu, Haiyang; Wang, Sijian; Wang, Wei; Chen, Qian; Ma, Yanmin; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Tao

    2018-01-01

    Imbalanced hepatic glucose homeostasis is one of the critical pathologic events in the development of metabolic syndromes (MSs). Therefore, regulation of imbalanced hepatic glucose homeostasis is important in drug development for MS treatment. In this review, we discuss the major targets that regulate hepatic glucose homeostasis in human physiologic and pathophysiologic processes, involving hepatic glucose uptake, glycolysis and glycogen synthesis, and summarize their changes in MSs. Recent literature suggests the necessity of multitarget drugs in the management of MS disorder for regulation of imbalanced glucose homeostasis in both experimental models and MS patients. Here, we highlight the potential bioactive compounds from natural products with medicinal or health care values, and focus on polypharmacologic and multitarget natural products with effects on various signaling pathways in hepatic glucose metabolism. This review shows the advantage and feasibility of discovering multicompound-multitarget drugs from natural products, and providing a new perspective of ways on drug and functional food development for MSs.

  3. Dual regulation of muscle glycogen synthase during exercise by activation and compartmentalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prats, Clara; Helge, Jørn W; Nordby, Pernille

    2009-01-01

    Glycogen synthase (GS) is considered the rate-limiting enzyme in glycogenesis but still today there is a lack of understanding on its regulation. We have previously shown phosphorylation-dependent GS intracellular redistribution at the start of glycogen re-synthesis in rabbit skeletal muscle (Prats......, C., Cadefau, J. A., Cussó, R., Qvortrup, K., Nielsen, J. N., Wojtaszewki, J. F., Wojtaszewki, J. F., Hardie, D. G., Stewart, G., Hansen, B. F., and Ploug, T. (2005) J. Biol. Chem. 280, 23165-23172). In the present study we investigate the regulation of human muscle GS activity by glycogen, exercise......, and insulin. Using immunocytochemistry we investigate the existence and relevance of GS intracellular compartmentalization during exercise and during glycogen re-synthesis. The results show that GS intrinsic activity is strongly dependent on glycogen levels and that such regulation involves associated...

  4. Enzymatic regulation of seasonal glycogen cycling in the freeze-tolerant wood frog, Rana sylvatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Amaral, M Clara F; Lee, Richard E; Costanzo, Jon P

    2016-12-01

    Liver glycogen is an important energy store in vertebrates, and in the freeze-tolerant wood frog, Rana sylvatica, this carbohydrate also serves as a major source of the cryoprotectant glucose. We investigated how variation in the levels of the catalytic subunit of protein kinase A (PKAc), glycogen phosphorylase (GP), and glycogen synthase (GS) relates to seasonal glycogen cycling in a temperate (Ohioan) and subarctic (Alaskan) populations of this species. In spring, Ohioan frogs had reduced potential for glycogen synthesis, as evidenced by low GS activity and high PKAc protein levels. In addition, glycogen levels in spring were the lowest of four seasonal samples, as energy input was likely directed towards metabolism and somatic growth during this period. Near-maximal glycogen levels were reached by mid-summer, and remained unchanged in fall and winter, suggesting that glycogenesis was curtailed during this period. Ohioan frogs had a high potential for glycogenolysis and glycogenesis in winter, as evidenced by large glycogen reserves, high levels of GP and GS proteins, and high GS activity, which likely allows for rapid mobilization of cryoprotectant during freezing and replenishing of glycogen reserves during thawing. Alaskan frogs also achieved a near-maximal liver glycogen concentration by summer and displayed high glycogenic and glycogenolytic potential in winter, but, unlike Ohioan frogs, started replenishing their energy reserves early in spring. We conclude that variation in levels of both glycogenolytic and glycogenic enzymes likely happens in response to seasonal changes in energetic strategies and demands, with winter survival being a key component to understanding the regulation of glycogen cycling in this species.

  5. Effect of carbon tetrachloride on glycogen metabolism in fasted and refed mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pushpendran, C K; Shenoy, B V; Eapen, J [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India). Biochemistry and Food Technology Div.

    1977-11-01

    Hepatic glycogen was depleted rapidly in fasted mice treated with CCl/sub 4/. Glycogen breakdown was slow when CCl/sub 4/ was administered after 1 hr of refeeding. There was an initial increase and then a reduction in liver glycogen of mice refed for 2 hr prior to CCl/sub 4/ injection. The incorporation of glucose-U-/sup 14/C into glycogen was higher in mice which were refed before CCl/sub 4/ administration than in fasted mice treated with the hepatotoxin. The specific activity of lactate was higher in CCl/sub 4/ treated mice. The data suggested differences in glycogen metabolism of fasted and refed mice in response to CCl/sub 4/ treatment.

  6. Glycogen Storage Disease Type IV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendroth-Asmussen, Lisa; Aksglaede, Lise; Gernow, Anne B

    2016-01-01

    molecular genetic analyses confirmed glycogen storage disease Type IV with the finding of compound heterozygosity for 2 mutations (c.691+2T>C and c.1570C>T, p.R524X) in the GBE1 gene. We conclude that glycogen storage disease Type IV can cause early miscarriage and that diagnosis can initially be made...

  7. Insights into Brain Glycogen Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Cécile; de la Sierra-Gallay, Ines Li; Duval, Romain; Xu, Ximing; Cocaign, Angélique; Léger, Thibaut; Woffendin, Gary; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Etchebest, Catherine; Haouz, Ahmed; Dupret, Jean-Marie; Rodrigues-Lima, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Brain glycogen metabolism plays a critical role in major brain functions such as learning or memory consolidation. However, alteration of glycogen metabolism and glycogen accumulation in the brain contributes to neurodegeneration as observed in Lafora disease. Glycogen phosphorylase (GP), a key enzyme in glycogen metabolism, catalyzes the rate-limiting step of glycogen mobilization. Moreover, the allosteric regulation of the three GP isozymes (muscle, liver, and brain) by metabolites and phosphorylation, in response to hormonal signaling, fine-tunes glycogenolysis to fulfill energetic and metabolic requirements. Whereas the structures of muscle and liver GPs have been known for decades, the structure of brain GP (bGP) has remained elusive despite its critical role in brain glycogen metabolism. Here, we report the crystal structure of human bGP in complex with PEG 400 (2.5 Å) and in complex with its allosteric activator AMP (3.4 Å). These structures demonstrate that bGP has a closer structural relationship with muscle GP, which is also activated by AMP, contrary to liver GP, which is not. Importantly, despite the structural similarities between human bGP and the two other mammalian isozymes, the bGP structures reveal molecular features unique to the brain isozyme that provide a deeper understanding of the differences in the activation properties of these allosteric enzymes by the allosteric effector AMP. Overall, our study further supports that the distinct structural and regulatory properties of GP isozymes contribute to the different functions of muscle, liver, and brain glycogen. PMID:27402852

  8. Low birth weight and zygosity status is associated with defective muscle glycogen and glycogen synthase regulation in elderly twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Pernille; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen; Richter, Erik

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: An adverse intrauterine environment indicated by both low birth weight and monozygosity is associated with an age- or time-dependent reduction in glucose disposal and nonoxidative glucose metabolism in twins, suggesting impaired regulation of muscle glycogen synthesis. RESEARCH DESIGN ...

  9. Muscle glycogen stores and fatigue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørtenblad, Niels; Westerblad, Håkan; Nielsen, Joachim

    2013-01-01

      Studies performed at the beginning of the last century revealed the importance of carbohydrate as a fuel during exercise, and the importance of muscle glycogen on performance has subsequently been confirmed in numerous studies. However, the link between glycogen depletion and impaired muscle...... function during fatigue is not well understood and a direct cause-and-effect relationship between glycogen and muscle function remains to be established. The use of electron microscopy has revealed that glycogen is not homogeneously distributed in skeletal muscle fibres, but rather localized in distinct...... pools. Furthermore, each glycogen granule has its own metabolic machinery with glycolytic enzymes and regulating proteins. One pool of such glycogenolytic complexes is localized within the myofibrils in close contact with key proteins involved in the excitation-contraction coupling and Ca2+ release from...

  10. Influence of vinyl chloride monomer and vinyl chloride monomer derivatives on hepatic DNA synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenner, E.A.

    1982-01-01

    Vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) is used extensively in the chemical industry, mainly in the production of polyvinyl chloride. It has recently been found to cause hepatic angiosarcoma. As VCM has also been shown to be mutagenic after metabolic activation the effect of VCM on DNA synthesis was investigated. [ 3 H]Thymidine incorporation into DNA was used to measure the rate of DNA synthesis in regenerating rat liver. A possible direct toxic effect of VCM or its metabolites on liver cell metabolism was examined by two unrelated techniques, viz. the measurement of adenine nucleotide concentrations in regenerating livers and the influence on transmembrane potentials in hepatocytes. The distribution of radioactivity in subcellular fractions following [ 14 C]VCM administration suggested microsomal conversion of VCM to an active form which was selectively retained in the nuclear fraction. Measurement of the activities of thymidine kinase and DNA polymerase in regenerating liver indicated that the induction of these enzymes which normally occurs after partial hepatectomy was not prevented by VCM treatment. Three techniques were used to test the hypothesis that the retardation in DNA synthesis was due to DNA damage: the prophage lambda induction test for DNA damage, autoradiographic detection of unscheduled thymidine incorporation into DNA, and detection of DNA strand breaks in alkaline sucrose gradients. All three provided evidence of DNA damage and led to the development of a novel technique to confirm these findings. This involved centrifugation in neutral sucrose gradients on intact double-stranded DNA contained in hepatocyte nucleoids and showed conclusively that VCM administration causes DNA strand breaks. Subsequent repair of DNA was also assessed by this technique. The site of the VCM/metabolite: DNA reaction was characterized by DNA thermal denaturation and renaturation studies

  11. A multidisciplinary study of 3-(β-d-glucopyranosyl)-5-substituted-1,2,4-triazole derivatives as glycogen phosphorylase inhibitors: Computation, synthesis, crystallography and kinetics reveal new potent inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kun, Sándor; Begum, Jaida; Kyriakis, Efthimios; Stamati, Evgenia C V; Barkas, Thomas A; Szennyes, Eszter; Bokor, Éva; Szabó, Katalin E; Stravodimos, George A; Sipos, Ádám; Docsa, Tibor; Gergely, Pál; Moffatt, Colin; Patraskaki, Myrto S; Kokolaki, Maria C; Gkerdi, Alkistis; Skamnaki, Vassiliki T; Leonidas, Demetres D; Somsák, László; Hayes, Joseph M

    2018-03-10

    3-(β-d-Glucopyranosyl)-5-substituted-1,2,4-triazoles have been revealed as an effective scaffold for the development of potent glycogen phosphorylase (GP) inhibitors but with the potency very sensitive to the nature of the alkyl/aryl 5-substituent (Kun et al., Eur. J. Med. Chem. 2014, 76, 567). For a training set of these ligands, quantum mechanics-polarized ligand docking (QM-PLD) demonstrated good potential to identify larger differences in potencies (predictive index PI = 0.82) and potent inhibitors with K i 's synthesis. The compounds were prepared in O-perbenzoylated forms by either ring transformation of 5-β-d-glucopyranosyl tetrazole by N-benzyl-arenecarboximidoyl chlorides, ring closure of C-(β-d-glucopyranosyl)formamidrazone with aroyl chlorides, or that of N-(β-d-glucopyranosylcarbonyl)arenethiocarboxamides by hydrazine, followed by deprotections. Kinetics experiments against rabbit muscle GPb (rmGPb) and human liver GPa (hlGPa) revealed five compounds as potent low μM inhibitors with three of these on the submicromolar range for rmGPa. X-ray crystallographic analysis sourced the potency to a combination of favorable interactions from the 1,2,4-triazole and suitable aryl substituents in the GP catalytic site. The compounds also revealed promising calculated pharmacokinetic profiles. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Differential effects of safflower oil versus fish oil feeding on insulin-stimulated glycogen synthesis, glycolysis, and pyruvate dehydrogenase flux in skeletal muscle: a 13C nuclear magnetic resonance study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jucker, B M; Cline, G W; Barucci, N; Shulman, G I

    1999-01-01

    To examine the effects of safflower oil versus fish oil feeding on in vivo intramuscular glucose metabolism and relative pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) versus tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle flux, rats were pair-fed on diets consisting of 1) 59% safflower oil, 2) 59% menhaden fish oil, or 3) 59% carbohydrate (control) in calories. Rates of glycolysis and glycogen synthesis were assessed by monitoring [1-(13)C]glucose label incorporation into [1-(13)C]glycogen, [3-(13)C]lactate, and [3-(13)C]alanine in the hindlimb of awake rats via 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy during a euglycemic (approximately 6 mmol/l) hyperinsulinemic (approximately 180 microU/ml) clamp. A steady-state isotopic analysis of lactate, alanine, and glutamate was used to determine the relative PDH versus TCA cycle flux present in muscle under these conditions. The safflower oil-fed rats were insulin resistant compared with control and fish oil-fed rats, as reflected by a markedly reduced glucose infusion rate (Ginf) during the clamp (21.4 +/- 2.3 vs. 31.6 +/- 2.8 and 31.7 +/- 1.9 mg x kg(-1) x min(-1) in safflower oil versus control and fish oil groups, respectively, P safflower oil group was associated with a lower rate of glycolysis (21.7 +/- 2.2 nmol x g(-1) x min(-1)) versus control (62.1 +/- 10.3 nmol x g(-1) x min(-1), P safflower oil, fish oil, and control, respectively) was detected. The intramuscular triglyceride (TG) content was increased in the safflower oil group (7.3 +/- 0.8 micromol/g) compared with the control group (5.2 +/- 0.8 micromol/g, P safflower oil (43 +/- 8%) versus the control (73 +/- 8%, P safflower oil feeding was a consequence of reduced glycolytic flux associated with an increase in relative free fatty acid/ketone oxidation versus TCA cycle flux, whereas fish oil feeding did not alter glucose metabolism and may in part be protective of insulin-stimulated glucose disposal by limiting intramuscular TG deposition.

  13. The nutritional status of Methanosarcina acetivorans regulates glycogen metabolism and gluconeogenesis and glycolysis fluxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago-Martínez, Michel Geovanni; Encalada, Rusely; Lira-Silva, Elizabeth; Pineda, Erika; Gallardo-Pérez, Juan Carlos; Reyes-García, Marco Antonio; Saavedra, Emma; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael; Marín-Hernández, Alvaro; Jasso-Chávez, Ricardo

    2016-05-01

    Gluconeogenesis is an essential pathway in methanogens because they are unable to use exogenous hexoses as carbon source for cell growth. With the aim of understanding the regulatory mechanisms of central carbon metabolism in Methanosarcina acetivorans, the present study investigated gene expression, the activities and metabolic regulation of key enzymes, metabolite contents and fluxes of gluconeogenesis, as well as glycolysis and glycogen synthesis/degradation pathways. Cells were grown with methanol as a carbon source. Key enzymes were kinetically characterized at physiological pH/temperature. Active consumption of methanol during exponential cell growth correlated with significant methanogenesis, gluconeogenic flux and steady glycogen synthesis. After methanol exhaustion, cells reached the stationary growth phase, which correlated with the rise in glycogen consumption and glycolytic flux, decreased methanogenesis, negligible acetate production and an absence of gluconeogenesis. Elevated activities of carbon monoxide dehydrogenase/acetyl-CoA synthetase complex and pyruvate: ferredoxin oxidoreductase suggested the generation of acetyl-CoA and pyruvate for glycogen synthesis. In the early stationary growth phase, the transcript contents and activities of pyruvate phosphate dikinase, fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase and glycogen synthase decreased, whereas those of glycogen phosphorylase, ADP-phosphofructokinase and pyruvate kinase increased. Therefore, glycogen and gluconeogenic metabolites were synthesized when an external carbon source was provided. Once such a carbon source became depleted, glycolysis and methanogenesis fed by glycogen degradation provided the ATP supply. Weak inhibition of key enzymes by metabolites suggested that the pathways evaluated were mainly transcriptionally regulated. Because glycogen metabolism and glycolysis/gluconeogenesis are not present in all methanogens, the overall data suggest that glycogen storage might represent an environmental

  14. Effects of 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane on hepatic heme synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moody, D.E.; Clawson, G.A.; Piper, W.N.; Smuckler, E.A.

    1984-01-01

    Previous studies showed that 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane (DBCP) caused a decrease in hepatic microsomal cytochrome P-450 suggesting that hepatic heme metabolism may be affected by DBCP treatment. Various parameters of hepatic heme synthesis were measured at intervals ranging from 0 to 72 hr in male Sprague-Dawley rats given a single oral dose (200 mg/kg) of DBCP. Incorporation of the radiolabeled heme precursor [delta-14C]aminolevulinic acid (14C-ALA) into liver, protein, extracted heme, and subcellular fractions of liver homogenates was significantly decreased to 75, 58, and 81% of controls, respectively, at 24 hr. At 48 and 72 hr after DBCP treatment, the accumulation of 14C-ALA label after 4 hr in liver homogenates and subcellular fractions was significantly increased in comparison to controls. These changes in 14C-ALA uptake were accompanied by decreases in total liver and microsomal heme, but not mitochondrial heme. Decreases were found in the spectral content of two heme proteins, cytochromes P-450 and b5, and the activity of another heme protein, catalase. Heme oxygenase activity increased to 130, 151, 209, and 186% of control values at 12, 24, 48, and 72 hr after DBCP, respectively. A slight, but significant, increase in ALA-synthetase to 112% of controls occurred at 24 hr, and slight, but significant, decreases in ALA-dehydratase to 90 and 80% of control occurred at 12 and 24 hr, respectively. No significant changes in uroporphyrinogen-1-synthetase or ferrochelatase at the time points tested was noted. The porphyrin content of liver was increased to 130% of control, while the serum and urine porphyrin levels were decreased to 30% of the control values at 24 hr. Liver ALA content was not significantly altered through the time period studied, but serum and urine levels were increased at 24 hr to 176 and 130% of the control values, respectively. In conclusion, the decreases in liver heme proteins following a single oral dose of DBCP are accompanied by

  15. Putative role of glycogen as a peripheral biomarker of GSK3β activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frizzo, Marcos Emilio

    2013-09-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase 3-β (GSK3β) has a pivotal role in several intracellular signaling cascades that are involved in gene transcription, cytoskeletal reorganization, energy metabolism, cell cycle regulation, and apoptosis. This kinase has pleiotropic functions, and the importance of its activity has recently been shown in neurons and platelets. In addition to its regulatory function in several physiological events, changes in GSK3β activity have been associated with many psychiatric and neurodegenerative illnesses, such as Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia and autism-spectrum disorders. Beside the reports of its involvement in several pathologies, it has become increasingly apparent that GSK3β might be a common therapeutic target for different classes of psychiatric drugs, and also that the GSK3β ratio may be a useful parameter to determine the biochemical changes that might occur during antidepressant treatment. Although GSK3β is commonly described as a key enzyme in a plethora of signaling cascades, originally it was identified as playing an important role in the regulation of glycogen synthesis, given its ability to inactivate glycogen synthase (GS) by phosphorylation. Acting as a constitutively active kinase, GSK3β phosphorylates GS, which results in a decrease of glycogen production. GSK3β phosphorylation increases glycogen synthesis and storage, while its dephosphorylation decreases glycogen synthesis. Inactivation of GSK3β leads to dephosphorylation of GS and increase in glycogen synthesis in the adipose tissue, muscle and liver. Glycogen levels are reduced by antidepressant treatment, and this effect seems to be related to an effect of drugs on GSK3β activity. Peripherally, glycogen is also abundantly found in platelets, where it is considered a major energy source, required for a variety of its functions, including the release reaction. Recently, analysis of platelets from patients with late-life major depression showed that active forms of

  16. Type I Glycogen Storage Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Legacy Society Make Gifts of Stock Donate Your Car Personal Fundraising Partnership & Support Share Your Story Spread the Word Give While You Shop Contact Us Donate Now Glycogen Storage Disease Type ...

  17. Type I Glycogen Storage Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the most common form of glycogen storage disease, accounting for 25% of all cases. It is an ... Links Videos Webinars About ALF OVERVIEW Programs About Liver Disease Ask the Experts People ALF ...

  18. Non-invasive measurement of brain glycogen by NMR spectroscopy and its application to the study of brain metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesfaye, Nolawit; Seaquist, Elizabeth R.; Öz, Gülin

    2011-01-01

    Glycogen is the reservoir for glucose in the brain. Beyond the general agreement that glycogen serves as an energy source in the central nervous system, its exact role in brain energy metabolism has yet to be elucidated. Experiments performed in cell and tissue culture and animals have shown that glycogen content is affected by several factors including glucose, insulin, neurotransmitters, and neuronal activation. The study of in vivo glycogen metabolism has been hindered by the inability to measure glycogen non-invasively, but in the past several years, the development of a non-invasive localized 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy method has enabled the study of glycogen metabolism in the conscious human. With this technique, 13C-glucose is administered intravenously and its incorporation into and wash-out from brain glycogen is tracked. One application of this method has been to the study of brain glycogen metabolism in humans during hypoglycemia: data have shown that mobilization of brain glycogen is augmented during hypoglycemia and, after a single episode of hypoglycemia, glycogen synthesis rate is increased, suggesting that glycogen stores rebound to levels greater than baseline. Such studies suggest glycogen may serve as a potential energy reservoir in hypoglycemia and may participate in the brain's adaptation to recurrent hypoglycemia and eventual development of hypoglycemia unawareness. Beyond this focused area of study, 13C NMR spectroscopy has a broad potential for application in the study of brain glycogen metabolism and carries the promise of a better understanding of the role of brain glycogen in diabetes and other conditions. PMID:21732401

  19. POST-EXERCISE MUSCLE GLYCOGEN REPLETION IN THE EXTREME: EFFECT OF FOOD ABSENCE AND ACTIVE RECOVERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul A. Fournier

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Glycogen plays a major role in supporting the energy demands of skeletal muscles during high intensity exercise. Despite its importance, the amount of glycogen stored in skeletal muscles is so small that a large fraction of it can be depleted in response to a single bout of high intensity exercise. For this reason, it is generally recommended to ingest food after exercise to replenish rapidly muscle glycogen stores, otherwise one's ability to engage in high intensity activity might be compromised. But what if food is not available? It is now well established that, even in the absence of food intake, skeletal muscles have the capacity to replenish some of their glycogen at the expense of endogenous carbon sources such as lactate. This is facilitated, in part, by the transient dephosphorylation-mediated activation of glycogen synthase and inhibition of glycogen phosphorylase. There is also evidence that muscle glycogen synthesis occurs even under conditions conducive to an increased oxidation of lactate post-exercise, such as during active recovery from high intensity exercise. Indeed, although during active recovery glycogen resynthesis is impaired in skeletal muscle as a whole because of increased lactate oxidation, muscle glycogen stores are replenished in Type IIa and IIb fibers while being broken down in Type I fibers of active muscles. This unique ability of Type II fibers to replenish their glycogen stores during exercise should not come as a surprise given the advantages in maintaining adequate muscle glycogen stores in those fibers that play a major role in fight or flight responses

  20. Characterization of Function of the GlgA2 Glycogen/Starch Synthase in Cyanobacterium sp. Clg1 Highlights Convergent Evolution of Glycogen Metabolism into Starch Granule Aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadouche, Derifa; Ducatez, Mathieu; Cenci, Ugo; Tirtiaux, Catherine; Suzuki, Eiji; Nakamura, Yasunori; Putaux, Jean-Luc; Terrasson, Amandine Durand; Diaz-Troya, Sandra; Florencio, Francisco Javier; Arias, Maria Cecilia; Striebeck, Alexander; Palcic, Monica; Ball, Steven G; Colleoni, Christophe

    2016-07-01

    At variance with the starch-accumulating plants and most of the glycogen-accumulating cyanobacteria, Cyanobacterium sp. CLg1 synthesizes both glycogen and starch. We now report the selection of a starchless mutant of this cyanobacterium that retains wild-type amounts of glycogen. Unlike other mutants of this type found in plants and cyanobacteria, this mutant proved to be selectively defective for one of the two types of glycogen/starch synthase: GlgA2. This enzyme is phylogenetically related to the previously reported SSIII/SSIV starch synthase that is thought to be involved in starch granule seeding in plants. This suggests that, in addition to the selective polysaccharide debranching demonstrated to be responsible for starch rather than glycogen synthesis, the nature and properties of the elongation enzyme define a novel determinant of starch versus glycogen accumulation. We show that the phylogenies of GlgA2 and of 16S ribosomal RNA display significant congruence. This suggests that this enzyme evolved together with cyanobacteria when they diversified over 2 billion years ago. However, cyanobacteria can be ruled out as direct progenitors of the SSIII/SSIV ancestral gene found in Archaeplastida. Hence, both cyanobacteria and plants recruited similar enzymes independently to perform analogous tasks, further emphasizing the importance of convergent evolution in the appearance of starch from a preexisting glycogen metabolism network. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Molecular cloning and characterization of glycogen synthase in Eriocheir sinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ran; Zhu, Li-Na; Ren, Li-Qi; Weng, Jie-Yang; Sun, Jin-Sheng

    2017-12-01

    Glycogen plays an important role in glucose and energy homeostasis at cellular and organismal levels. In glycogen synthesis, glycogen synthase (GS) is a rate-limiting enzyme catalysing the addition of α-1,4-linked glucose units from (UDP) 3 -glucose to a nascent glycogen chain using glycogenin (GN) as a primer. While studies on mammalian liver GS (GYS2) are numerous, enzymes from crustaceans, which also use glycogen and glucose as their main energy source, have received less attention. In the present study, we amplified full-length GS cDNA from Eriocheir sinensis. Tissue expression profiling revealed the highest expression of GS in the hepatopancreas. During moulting, GS expression and activity declined, and glycogen levels in the hepatopancreas were reduced. Recombinant GS was expressed in Escherichia coli Rosetta (DE3), and induction at 37°C or 16°C yielded EsGS in insoluble inclusion bodies (EsGS-I) or in soluble form (EsGS-S), respectively. Enzyme activity was measured in a cell-free system containing glucose-6-phosphate (G6P), and both forms possessed glycosyltransferase activity, but refolded EsGS-I was more active. Enzyme activity of both GS and EsGS-I in the hepatopancreas was optimum at 25°C, which is coincident with the optimum growth temperature of Chinese mitten crab, and higher (37°C) or lower (16°C) temperatures resulted in lower enzyme activity. Taken together, the results suggest that GS may be important for maintaining normal physiological functions such as growth and reproduction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Physiological effects of γ-linolenic acid and sesamin on hepatic fatty acid synthesis and oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ide, Takashi; Iwase, Haruka; Amano, Saaya; Sunahara, Saki; Tachihara, Ayuka; Yagi, Minako; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi

    2017-03-01

    Interrelated effects of γ-linolenic acid (GLA) and sesamin, a sesame lignan, on hepatic fatty acid synthesis and oxidation were examined. Rats were fed experimental diets supplemented with 0 or 2 g/kg sesamin (1:1 mixture of sesamin and episesamin) and containing 100 g/kg of palm oil (saturated fat), safflower oil rich in linoleic acid, or oil of evening primrose origin containing 43% GLA (GLA oil) for 18 days. In rats fed sesamin-free diets, GLA oil, compared with other oils, increased the activity and mRNA levels of various enzymes involved in fatty acid oxidation, except for some instances. Sesamin greatly increased these parameters, and the enhancing effects of sesamin on peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation rate and acyl-CoA oxidase, enoyl-CoA hydratase and acyl-CoA thioesterase activities were more exaggerated in rats fed GLA oil than in the animals fed other oils. The combination of sesamin and GLA oil also synergistically increased the mRNA levels of some peroxisomal fatty acid oxidation enzymes and of several enzymes involved in fatty acid metabolism located in other cell organelles. In the groups fed sesamin-free diets, GLA oil, compared with other oils, markedly reduced the activity and mRNA levels of various lipogenic enzymes. Sesamin reduced all these parameters, except for malic enzyme, in rats fed palm and safflower oils, but the effects were attenuated in the animals fed GLA oil. These changes by sesamin and fat type accompanied profound alterations in serum lipid levels. This may be ascribable to the changes in apolipoprotein-B-containing lipoproteins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Co-ordinate induction of hepatic mitochondrial and peroxisomal carnitine acyltransferase synthesis by diet and drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, P S; Marine, K A; Brady, L J; Ramsay, R R

    1989-01-01

    The present studies examined the effect of agents that induce peroxisomal and mitochondrial beta-oxidation on hepatic mitochondrial carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) and peroxisomal carnitine acyltransferase [CPTs of Ramsay (1988) Biochem. J. 249, 239-245; COT of Farrell & Bieber (1983) Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 222, 123-132 and Miyazawa, Ozasa, Osumi & Hashimoto (1983) J. Biochem. 94, 529-542]. In the first studies, high fat diets containing corn oil or fish oil were used to induce peroxisomal and mitochondrial enzymes. Rats were fed one of three diets for 4 weeks: (1) low fat, with corn oil as 11% of energy (kJ); (2) high fat, with corn oil as 45% of kJ; (3) high fat, with fish oil as 45% of kJ. At the end of 4 weeks, both mitochondrial CPT and peroxisomal CPTs exhibited increases in activity, immunoreactive protein, mRNA levels and transcription rates in livers of rats fed either high-fat diet compared to the low fat diet. Riboflavin deficiency or starvation for 48 h also increased the peroxisomal CPTs mRNA. A second set of studies used the plasticizer 2-(diethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP), 0.5% clofibrate or 1% acetylsalicylic acid (fed for 3 weeks) to alter peroxisomal and mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation. With DEHP, the mitochondrial CPT and peroxisomal CPTs activity, immunoreactive protein, mRNA levels and and transcription rate were all increased by 3-5-fold. The peroxisomal CPTs activity, immunoreactive protein, mRNA levels and transcription rate were increased 2-3-fold by clofibrate and acetylsalicylic acid, again similar to mitochondrial CPT. The results of the combined studies using both diet and drugs to cause enzyme induction suggest that the synthesis of the carnitine acyltransferases (mitochondrial CPT and peroxisomal CPTs) may be co-ordinated with each other; however, the co-ordinate regulatory factors have not yet been identified. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:2775196

  4. Relationship Between Hepatic Albumin and Sulphate Synthesis and its Use in Measurement of the Absolute Rate of Synthesis of Liver-Produced Plasma Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awwad, H. K.; Sheraki, A. S. [Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Cancer Institute, University of Cairo, Cairo (Egypt); Radioisotope Unit, Medical Research Institute, Alexandria (Egypt)

    1971-02-15

    A model is proposed whereby serum albumin synthesis is expressed in terms of production of inorganic sulphate in the liver and the entire organism, following the administration of {sup 35}S-L-cystine. The basis assumption involved is that the precursor amino acid pool for albumin synthesis in the liver is either identical with that of inorganic sulphate synthesis or that the two pools concerned are in rapid equilibrium with each other so that they can be treated as a single pool. The feasibility of the proposed model was tested by comparing the synthesis rate of rat serum albumin with the catabolic rate of the radioiodinated protein measured in the same animal. A good agreement between the two rates was noted in a group of adult rats, whereas an excess of anabolism was noted in young growing animals. In rats fed low-protein diet, the synthesis rate exceeded the catabolic rate; both being subnormal. The equilibrium between hepatic and plasma radiosulphate concentration was complete within four hours following the injection of {sup 35}S-cystine. The total radiosulphate production could then be evaluated after such an interval from the urinary excretion and serum concentration multiplied by the volume of the sulphate space. Lack of significant re-utilization was demonstrated following the injection of radiosulphate. This is a decided advantage of the proposed method. However, extensive re-utilization of selenate selenium in the synthesis of the seleno-analogues of sulphur-amino acids was shown. This could explain the poor yield of radioselenate following the injection of {sup 75}Se-selenocystine and precludes the use of the latter agent as a tracer for measurement of synthesis of plasma proteins. (author)

  5. Effects of feeding grains naturally contaminated with Fusarium mycotoxins on hepatic fractional protein synthesis rates of laying hens and the efficacy of a polymeric glucomannan mycotoxin adsorbent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, S R; Smith, T K

    2005-11-01

    Experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of feeding grains naturally contaminated with a combination of Fusarium mycotoxins on hepatic fractional protein synthesis rates (FSR) of laying hens. Thirty-six 32-wk-old laying hens were fed diets formulated with 1) uncontaminated grains, 2) contaminated grains, or 3) contaminated grains + 0.2% polymeric glucomannan mycotoxin adsorbent for a period of 4 wk. Hepatic FSR were measured in vivo by the flooding-dose method. The feeding of contaminated grains decreased hepatic FSR in laying hens compared with controls after 4 wk. The hepatic FSR of birds fed contaminated grains and contaminated grains + glucomannan mycotoxin adsorbent were not different. It was concluded that the in vivo hepatic FSR of laying hens was inhibited by the feeding of grains naturally contaminated with Fusarium mycotoxins and that this may explain some of the adverse effects seen when contaminated grains were fed to laying hens.

  6. Hexokinase 2, glycogen synthase and phosphorylase play a key role in muscle glycogen supercompensation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Irimia, José M; Rovira, Jordi; Nielsen, Jakob N

    2012-01-01

    Glycogen-depleting exercise can lead to supercompensation of muscle glycogen stores, but the biochemical mechanisms of this phenomenon are still not completely understood.......Glycogen-depleting exercise can lead to supercompensation of muscle glycogen stores, but the biochemical mechanisms of this phenomenon are still not completely understood....

  7. Salinity Effects on Strategies of Glycogen Utilization in Livers of Euryhaline Milkfish (Chanos chanos under Hypothermal Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Hao Chang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The fluctuation of temperature affects many physiological responses in ectothermic organisms, including feed intake, growth, reproduction, and behavior. Changes in environmental temperatures affect the acquisition of energy, whereas hepatic glycogen plays a central role in energy supply for the homeostasis of the entire body. Glycogen phosphorylase (GP, which catalyzes the rate-limiting step in glycogenolysis, is also an indicator of environmental stress. Here, we examined the effects of salinity on glycogen metabolism in milkfish livers under cold stress. A reduction of feed intake was observed in both freshwater (FW and seawater (SW milkfish under cold adaptation. At normal temperature (28°C, compared to the FW milkfish, the SW milkfish exhibited greater mRNA abundance of the liver isoform of GP (Ccpygl, higher GP activity, and less glycogen content in the livers. Upon hypothermal (18°C stress, hepatic Ccpygl mRNA expression of FW milkfish surged at 3 h, declined at 6 and 12 h, increased again at 24 h, and increased significantly after 96 h. Increases in GP protein, GP activity, and the phosphorylation state and the breakdown of glycogen were also found in FW milkfish livers after 12 h of exposure at 18°C. Conversely, the Ccpygl transcript levels in SW milkfish were downregulated after 1 h of exposure at 18°C, whereas the protein abundance of GP, GP activity, and glycogen content were not significantly altered. Taken together, under 18°C cold stress, FW milkfish exhibited an acute response with the breakdown of hepatic glycogen for maintaining energy homeostasis of the entire body, whereas no change was observed in the hepatic glycogen content and GP activity of SW milkfish because of their greater tolerance to cold conditions.

  8. Dysfunctional Muscle and Liver Glycogen Metabolism in mdx Dystrophic Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapleton, David I.; Lau, Xianzhong; Flores, Marcelo; Trieu, Jennifer; Gehrig, Stefan M.; Chee, Annabel; Naim, Timur; Lynch, Gordon S.; Koopman, René

    2014-01-01

    Background Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe, genetic muscle wasting disorder characterised by progressive muscle weakness. DMD is caused by mutations in the dystrophin (dmd) gene resulting in very low levels or a complete absence of the dystrophin protein, a key structural element of muscle fibres which is responsible for the proper transmission of force. In the absence of dystrophin, muscle fibres become damaged easily during contraction resulting in their degeneration. DMD patients and mdx mice (an animal model of DMD) exhibit altered metabolic disturbances that cannot be attributed to the loss of dystrophin directly. We tested the hypothesis that glycogen metabolism is defective in mdx dystrophic mice. Results Dystrophic mdx mice had increased skeletal muscle glycogen (79%, (Pglycogen synthesis is initiated by glycogenin, the expression of which was increased by 50% in mdx mice (PGlycogen synthase activity was 12% higher (Pglycogen branching enzyme activity was 70% lower (Pglycogen breakdown, glycogen phosphorylase, had 62% lower activity (Pglycogen debranching enzyme expression was 50% higher (Pglycogen (Pglycogen metabolism in mdx mice identified reduced glycogenin protein expression (46% less; Pglycogen but reduced amounts of liver glycogen. PMID:24626262

  9. The subcellular localization of yeast glycogen synthase is dependent upon glycogen content

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Wayne A.; Boyer, Michael P.; Davis, Keri D.; Burke, Michael; Roach, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    The budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, accumulates the storage polysaccharide glycogen in response to nutrient limitation. Glycogen synthase, the major form of which is encoded by the GSY2 gene, catalyzes the key regulated step in glycogen storage. Here, we utilize Gsy2p fusions to green fluorescent protein (GFP) to determine where glycogen synthase is located within cells. We demonstrate that the localization pattern of Gsy2-GFP depends upon the glycogen content of the cell. When glyco...

  10. Enhanced hepatic insulin signaling in the livers of high altitude native rats under basal conditions and in the livers of low altitude native rats under insulin stimulation: a mechanistic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Dera, Hussain; Eleawa, Samy M; Al-Hashem, Fahaid H; Mahzari, Moeber M; Hoja, Ibrahim; Al Khateeb, Mahmoud

    2017-07-01

    This study was designed to investigate the role of the liver in lowering fasting blood glucose levels (FBG) in rats native to high (HA) and low altitude (LA) areas. As compared with LA natives, besides the improved insulin and glucose tolerance, HA native rats had lower FBG, at least mediated by inhibition of hepatic gluconeogenesis and activation of glycogen synthesis. An effect that is mediated by the enhancement of hepatic insulin signaling mediated by the decreased phosphorylation of TSC induced inhibition of mTOR function. Such effect was independent of activation of AMPK nor stabilization of HIF1α, but most probably due to oxidative stress induced REDD1 expression. However, under insulin stimulation, and in spite of the less activated mTOR function in HA native rats, LA native rats had higher glycogen content and reduced levels of gluconeogenic enzymes with a more enhanced insulin signaling, mainly due to higher levels of p-IRS1 (tyr612).

  11. Acute inhibition of hepatic glucose-6-phosphatase does not affect gluconeogenesis but directs gluconeogenic flux toward glycogen in fasted rats. A pharmacological study with the chlorogenic acid derivative S4048

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, T. H.; van der Sluijs, F. H.; Wiegman, C. H.; Baller, J. F.; Gustafson, L. A.; Burger, H. J.; Herling, A. W.; Kuipers, F.; Meijer, A. J.; Reijngoud, D. J.

    2001-01-01

    Effects of acute inhibition of glucose-6-phosphatase activity by the chlorogenic acid derivative S4048 on hepatic carbohydrate fluxes were examined in isolated rat hepatocytes and in vivo in rats. Fluxes were calculated using tracer dilution techniques and mass isotopomer distribution analysis in

  12. Acute inhibition of hepatic glucose-6-phosphatase does not affect gluconeogenesis but directs gluconeogenic flux toward glycogen in fasted rats - A pharmacological study with the chlorogenic acid derivative S4048

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, TH; van der Sluijs, FH; Wiegman, CH; Baller, JFW; Gustafson, LA; Burger, HJ; Herling, AW; Kuipers, F; Meijer, AJ; Reijngoud, DJ

    2001-01-01

    Effects of acute inhibition of glucose-6-phosphatase activity by the chlorogenic acid derivative S4048 on hepatic carbohydrate fluxes were examined in isolated rat hepatocytes and in vivo in rats. Fluxes were calculated using tracer dilution techniques and mass isotopomer distribution analysis in

  13. The glycogen metabolism via Akt signaling is important for the secretion of enamel matrix in tooth development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ida-Yonemochi, Hiroko; Otsu, Keishi; Ohshima, Hayato; Harada, Hidemitsu

    2016-02-01

    Cells alter their energy metabolism depending on the stage of differentiation or various environments. In the ameloblast differentiation of continuous growing mouse incisors, we found temporary glycogen storage in preameloblasts before the start of enamel matrix secretion and investigated the relationship between enamel matrix secretion and glycogen metabolism. Immunohistochemistry showed that in the transitional stage from preameloblasts to secretory ameloblasts, the glycogen synthase changed from the inactive form to the active form, the expression of glycogen phosphorylase increased, and further, the levels of IGF-1, IGF-1 receptor and activated Akt increased. These results suggested that the activation of Akt signaling via IGF is linked to the onset of both glycogen metabolism and enamel matrix deposition. In the experiments using organ culture and ameloblast cell line, the activation of Akt signaling by IGF-1 stimulated glycogen metabolism through the up-regulation of Glut-1,-4 and Gsk-3β and the dephosphorylation of glycogen synthase. Subsequently, they resulted in increased enamel matrix secretion. In contrast, some inhibitors of Akt signals and glycogen synthesis/degradation down-regulated enamel matrix secretion. Taking these findings together, glycogen metabolism via Akt signaling is an essential system for the secretion of enamel matrix in ameloblast differentiation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Enhanced Glycogen Storage of a Subcellular Hot Spot in Human Skeletal Muscle during Early Recovery from Eccentric Contractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Joachim; Farup, Jean; Rahbek, Stine Klejs; de Paoli, Frank Vincenzo; Vissing, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    Unaccustomed eccentric exercise is accompanied by muscle damage and impaired glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis during subsequent recovery. Recently, it was shown that the role and regulation of glycogen in skeletal muscle are dependent on its subcellular localization, and that glycogen synthesis, as described by the product of glycogen particle size and number, is dependent on the time course of recovery after exercise and carbohydrate availability. In the present study, we investigated the subcellular distribution of glycogen in fibers with high (type I) and low (type II) mitochondrial content during post-exercise recovery from eccentric contractions. Analysis was completed on five male subjects performing an exercise bout consisting of 15 x 10 maximal eccentric contractions. Carbohydrate-rich drinks were subsequently ingested throughout a 48 h recovery period and muscle biopsies for analysis included time points 3, 24 and 48 h post exercise from the exercising leg, whereas biopsies corresponding to prior to and at 48 h after the exercise bout were collected from the non-exercising, control leg. Quantitative imaging by transmission electron microscopy revealed an early (post 3 and 24 h) enhanced storage of intramyofibrillar glycogen (defined as glycogen particles located within the myofibrils) of type I fibers, which was associated with an increase in the number of particles. In contrast, late in recovery (post 48 h), intermyofibrillar, intramyofibrillar and subsarcolemmal glycogen in both type I and II fibers were lower in the exercise leg compared with the control leg, and this was associated with a smaller size of the glycogen particles. We conclude that in the carbohydrate-supplemented state, the effect of eccentric contractions on glycogen metabolism depends on the subcellular localization, muscle fiber’s oxidative capacity, and the time course of recovery. The early enhanced storage of intramyofibrillar glycogen after the eccentric contractions may

  15. Increased Laforin and Laforin Binding to Glycogen Underlie Lafora Body Formation in Malin-deficient Lafora Disease*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiberia, Erica; Turnbull, Julie; Wang, Tony; Ruggieri, Alessandra; Zhao, Xiao-Chu; Pencea, Nela; Israelian, Johan; Wang, Yin; Ackerley, Cameron A.; Wang, Peixiang; Liu, Yan; Minassian, Berge A.

    2012-01-01

    The solubility of glycogen, essential to its metabolism, is a property of its shape, a sphere generated through extensive branching during synthesis. Lafora disease (LD) is a severe teenage-onset neurodegenerative epilepsy and results from multiorgan accumulations, termed Lafora bodies (LB), of abnormally structured aggregation-prone and digestion-resistant glycogen. LD is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the EPM2A or EPM2B gene, encoding the interacting laforin phosphatase and malin E3 ubiquitin ligase enzymes, respectively. The substrate and function of malin are unknown; an early counterintuitive observation in cell culture experiments that it targets laforin to proteasomal degradation was not pursued until now. The substrate and function of laforin have recently been elucidated. Laforin dephosphorylates glycogen during synthesis, without which phosphate ions interfere with and distort glycogen construction, leading to LB. We hypothesized that laforin in excess or not removed following its action on glycogen also interferes with glycogen formation. We show in malin-deficient mice that the absence of malin results in massively increased laforin preceding the appearance of LB and that laforin gradually accumulates in glycogen, which corresponds to progressive LB generation. We show that increasing the amounts of laforin in cell culture causes LB formation and that this occurs only with glycogen binding-competent laforin. In summary, malin deficiency causes increased laforin, increased laforin binding to glycogen, and LB formation. Furthermore, increased levels of laforin, when it can bind glycogen, causes LB. We conclude that malin functions to regulate laforin and that malin deficiency at least in part causes LB and LD through increased laforin binding to glycogen. PMID:22669944

  16. Glycogen Synthase in Sertoli Cells: More Than Glycogenesis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Rodrigo; Mancilla, Héctor; Villarroel-Espíndola, Franz; Slebe, Felipe; Slebe, Juan Carlos; Méndez, Raúl; Guinovart, Joan J; Concha, Ilona I

    2016-11-01

    Sertoli cell metabolism actively maintains the nutritional needs of germ cells. It has been described that after glucose incorporation in Sertoli cells, less than 1% is converted to glycogen suggesting low levels of glycogen synthase activity. Phosphorylation of muscle glycogen synthase (MGS) at serine 640 (pS640MGS) decreases its activity, and this form of the enzyme was discovered as a non-ribosomal protein that modulates the translation of a subset of transcripts in HeLa cells. The aim of our study was to functionally characterize MGS in cultured Sertoli cells, as well as to explore this new feature related to RNA molecules. We detected MGS in the cytoplasm of Sertoli cells as well as in the nuclei. The activity rates of the enzyme were extremely low indicating that MGS is expressed but almost inactive. Protein targeting to glycogen (PTG) overexpression was performed to activate MGS by dephosphorylation. PTG induced glycogen synthesis massively, confirming that this enzyme is present but inactive. This finding correlates with high levels of pS640MGS, which were assayed by phosphatase treatment. To explore a putative new function for MGS in Sertoli cells, we performed RNA immunoprecipitation coupled to microarray studies. The results revealed that MGS co-immunoprecipitated with the several mRNAs and also rRNAs. These findings indicate that MGS is expressed Sertoli cells but in an inactive form, and also support a possibly novel feature of this metabolic enzyme associated with RNA-related molecules. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2597-2607, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Synthesis of neurotransmitter GABA via the neuronal tricarboxylic acid cycle is elevated in rats with liver cirrhosis consistent with a high GABAergic tone in chronic hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leke, Renata; Bak, Lasse Kristoffer; Iversen, Peter

    2011-01-01

    J. Neurochem. (2011) 117, 824-832. ABSTRACT: Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a neuropsychiatric complication to liver disease. It is known that ammonia plays a role in the pathogenesis of HE and disturbances in the GABAergic system have been related to HE. Synthesis of GABA occurs by decarboxylation...

  18. Dietary Management of the Ketogenic Glycogen Storage Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaustuv Bhattacharya MBBS, MRCPCH, FRACP, MD

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The glycogen storage diseases (GSDs comprise a group of rare inherited disorders of glycogen metabolism. The hepatic glycogenolytic forms of these disorders are typically associated with hypoglycemia and hepatomegaly. For GSD I, secondary metabolic disturbances include fasting hyperlactatemia, hyperuricemia, and hyperlipidemia. Glycogen storage disease III is caused by reduced activity of the debrancher enzyme, GSD VI by phosphorylase, and GSD IX by phosphorylase kinase. It has often been reported that the non-GSD I group of disorders have a benign course. However, myopathy, cardiomyopathy, and cirrhosis have been reported significant clinical morbidities associated with GSD III and IX in particular. There have been a range of reports indicating high-protein diets, high-fat diets, medium chain triglyceride (MCT, modified Atkins diet, and therapeutic ketones as rescuing severe phenotypes of GSD III in particular. The etiology of these severe phenotypes has not been defined. Cases presented in this report indicate potential harm from excessive simple sugar use in GSD IX C. Review of the literature indicates that most interventions have reduced the glycemic load and provide alternate substrates for energy in rescue situations. Prevention of complications is most likely to occur with a mixed balanced low glycemic index diet potentially with relative increases in protein.

  19. Glycogen resynthesis rate following cross-country skiing is closely correlated to skeletal muscle glycogen content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørtenblad, Niels; Nielsen, Joachim; Saltin, Bengt

    on an optimal glycogen resynthesis rate before a subsequent exercise session. The purpose of present study was to evaluate the glycogen resynthesis rate in elite cross-country (cc) skiers, following exhaustive exercise, and to examine the role of muscular glycogen content on the resynthesis rate. METHOD: Ten...... as 4h and 22h after the race and analyzed for glycogen content. Figure 1. Correlation between muscle glycogen resynthesis rate and glycogen content after and in the rocery period after exercise. Line indicate best fit of all the data points (r2 = 0.41, p

  20. The diabetic phenotype is conserved in myotubes established from diabetic subjects: evidence for primary defects in glucose transport and glycogen synthase activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaster, Michael; Petersen, Ingrid; Højlund, Kurt

    2002-01-01

    The most well-described defect in the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes is reduced insulin-mediated glycogen synthesis in skeletal muscles. It is unclear whether this defect is primary or acquired secondary to dyslipidemia, hyperinsulinemia, or hyperglycemia. We determined the glycogen synthase...

  1. Brain glycogen in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, Jordi; Guinovart, Joan J

    2015-12-01

    Glycogen is present in the brain at much lower concentrations than in muscle or liver. However, by characterizing an animal depleted of brain glycogen, we have shown that the polysaccharide plays a key role in learning capacity and in activity-dependent changes in hippocampal synapse strength. Since glycogen is essentially found in astrocytes, the diverse roles proposed for this polysaccharide in the brain have been attributed exclusively to these cells. However, we have demonstrated that neurons have an active glycogen metabolism that contributes to tolerance to hypoxia. However, these cells can store only minute amounts of glycogen, since the progressive accumulation of this molecule leads to neuronal loss. Loss-of-function mutations in laforin and malin cause Lafora disease. This condition is characterized by the presence of high numbers of insoluble polyglucosan bodies, known as Lafora bodies, in neuronal cells. Our findings reveal that the accumulation of this aberrant glycogen accounts for the neurodegeneration and functional consequences, as well as the impaired autophagy, observed in models of this disease. Similarly glycogen synthase is responsible for the accumulation of corpora amylacea, which are polysaccharide-based aggregates present in the neurons of aged human brains. Our findings change the current view of the role of glycogen in the brain and reveal that endogenous neuronal glycogen metabolism is important under stress conditions and that neuronal glycogen accumulation contributes to neurodegenerative diseases and to aging-related corpora amylacea formation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The Action of Antidiabetic Plants of the Canadian James Bay Cree Traditional Pharmacopeia on Key Enzymes of Hepatic Glucose Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abir Nachar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We determined the capacity of putative antidiabetic plants used by the Eastern James Bay Cree (Canada to modulate key enzymes of gluconeogenesis and glycogen synthesis and key regulating kinases. Glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase and glycogen synthase (GS activities were assessed in cultured hepatocytes treated with crude extracts of seventeen plant species. Phosphorylation of AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK, Akt, and Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3 were probed by Western blot. Seven of the seventeen plant extracts significantly decreased G6Pase activity, Abies balsamea and Picea glauca, exerting an effect similar to insulin. This action involved both Akt and AMPK phosphorylation. On the other hand, several plant extracts activated GS, Larix laricina and A. balsamea, far exceeding the action of insulin. We also found a significant correlation between GS stimulation and GSK-3 phosphorylation induced by plant extract treatments. In summary, three Cree plants stand out for marked effects on hepatic glucose homeostasis. P. glauca affects glucose production whereas L. laricina rather acts on glucose storage. However, A. balsamea has the most promising profile, simultaneously and powerfully reducing G6Pase and stimulating GS. Our studies thus confirm that the reduction of hepatic glucose production likely contributes to the therapeutic potential of several antidiabetic Cree traditional medicines.

  3. Lafora disease offers a unique window into neuronal glycogen metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentry, Matthew S; Guinovart, Joan J; Minassian, Berge A; Roach, Peter J; Serratosa, Jose M

    2018-05-11

    Lafora disease (LD) is a fatal, autosomal recessive, glycogen-storage disorder that manifests as severe epilepsy. LD results from mutations in the gene encoding either the glycogen phosphatase laforin or the E3 ubiquitin ligase malin. Individuals with LD develop cytoplasmic, aberrant glycogen inclusions in nearly all tissues that more closely resemble plant starch than human glycogen. This Minireview discusses the unique window into glycogen metabolism that LD research offers. It also highlights recent discoveries, including that glycogen contains covalently bound phosphate and that neurons synthesize glycogen and express both glycogen synthase and glycogen phosphorylase. © 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Genetic models rule out a major role of beta cell glycogen in the control of glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir-Coll, Joan; Duran, Jordi; Slebe, Felipe; García-Rocha, Mar; Gomis, Ramon; Gasa, Rosa; Guinovart, Joan J

    2016-05-01

    Glycogen accumulation occurs in beta cells of diabetic patients and has been proposed to partly mediate glucotoxicity-induced beta cell dysfunction. However, the role of glycogen metabolism in beta cell function and its contribution to diabetes pathophysiology remain poorly understood. We investigated the function of beta cell glycogen by studying glucose homeostasis in mice with (1) defective glycogen synthesis in the pancreas; and (2) excessive glycogen accumulation in beta cells. Conditional deletion of the Gys1 gene and overexpression of protein targeting to glycogen (PTG) was accomplished by Cre-lox recombination using pancreas-specific Cre lines. Glucose homeostasis was assessed by determining fasting glycaemia, insulinaemia and glucose tolerance. Beta cell mass was determined by morphometry. Glycogen was detected histologically by periodic acid-Schiff's reagent staining. Isolated islets were used for the determination of glycogen and insulin content, insulin secretion, immunoblots and gene expression assays. Gys1 knockout (Gys1 (KO)) mice did not exhibit differences in glucose tolerance or basal glycaemia and insulinaemia relative to controls. Insulin secretion and gene expression in isolated islets was also indistinguishable between Gys1 (KO) and controls. Conversely, despite effective glycogen overaccumulation in islets, mice with PTG overexpression (PTG(OE)) presented similar glucose tolerance to controls. However, under fasting conditions they exhibited lower glycaemia and higher insulinaemia. Importantly, neither young nor aged PTG(OE) mice showed differences in beta cell mass relative to age-matched controls. Finally, a high-fat diet did not reveal a beta cell-autonomous phenotype in either model. Glycogen metabolism is not required for the maintenance of beta cell function. Glycogen accumulation in beta cells alone is not sufficient to trigger the dysfunction or loss of these cells, or progression to diabetes.

  5. Statins increase hepatic cholesterol synthesis and stimulate fecal cholesterol elimination in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schonewille, Marleen; de Boer, Jan Freark; Mele, Laura; Wolters, Henk; Bloks, Vincent W.; Wolters, Justina C.; Kuivenhoven, Jan A.; Tietge, Uwe J. F.; Brufau, Gemma; Groen, Albert K.

    Statins are competitive inhibitors of HMG-CoA reductase, the rate-limiting enzyme of cholesterol synthesis. Statins reduce plasma cholesterol levels, but whether this is actually caused by inhibition of de novo cholesterol synthesis has not been clearly established. Using three different statins, we

  6. Statins increase hepatic cholesterol synthesis and stimulate fecal cholesterol elimination in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schonewille, Marleen; de Boer, Jan Freark; Mele, Laura; Wolters, Henk; Bloks, Vincent W.; Wolters, Justina C.; Kuivenhoven, Jan A.; Tietge, Uwe J. F.; Brufau, Gemma; Groen, Albert K.

    2016-01-01

    Statins are competitive inhibitors of HMG-CoA reductase, the rate-limiting enzyme of cholesterol synthesis. Statins reduce plasma cholesterol levels, but whether this is actually caused by inhibition of de novo cholesterol synthesis has not been clearly established. Using three different statins, we

  7. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Disease Type 1 (von Gierke) Hemochromatosis Hepatic Encephalopathy Hepatitis A Hepatitis B Hepatitis C Intrahepatic Cholestasis of Pregnancy ( ... Disease Type 1 (von Gierke) Hemochromatosis Hepatic Encephalopathy Hepatitis A Hepatitis B Hepatitis C Intrahepatic Cholestasis of Pregnancy ( ...

  8. Ablation of PPP1R3G reduces glycogen deposition and mitigates high-fat diet induced obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongxian; Gu, Jin; Wang, Lin; Zhao, Zilong; Pan, Yi; Chen, Yan

    2017-01-05

    Glycogen and triglyceride are two major forms of energy storage in the body and provide the fuel during different phases of food deprivation. However, how glycogen metabolism is linked to fat deposition in adipose tissue has not been clearly characterized. We generated a mouse model with whole-body deletion of PPP1R3G, a glycogen-targeting subunit of protein phosphatase-1 required for glycogen synthesis. Upon feeding with high-fat diet, the body weight and fat composition are significantly reduced in the PPP1R3G -/- mice compared to the wild type controls. The metabolic rate of the mice as measured by O 2 consumption and CO 2 production is accelerated by PPP1R3G deletion. The high-fat diet-induced liver steatosis is also slightly relieved by PPP1R3G deletion. The glycogen level in adipose tissue is reduced by PPP1R3G deletion. In 3T3L1 cells, overexpression of PPP1R3G leads to increases of both glycogen and triglyceride levels. In conclusion, our study indicates that glycogen is actively involved in fat accumulation in adipose tissue and obesity development upon high-fat diet. Our study also suggests that PPP1R3G is an important player that links glycogen metabolism to lipid metabolism in vivo. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Ultrastructure and cytochemistry of cardiac intramitochondrial glycogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sótonyi, P; Somogyi, E; Nemes, A; Juhász-Nagy, S

    1976-01-01

    Authors have observed abnormalities of glycogen localization in cardiac muscle, after normothermic cardiac arrest. The identification of these intramitrochondrial particles as glycogen was confirmed by selective staining with periodic acid-lead citrat, periodic acid-thiosemicarbazide protein methods and by their selective removal from tissue sections by alfa-amylase. The intramitochondrial glycogen particles were of beta-type. Some intramitochondrial particles were surrounded by paired membranes which resulted from protrusion of parts of mitochondrial membrane.

  10. Determination of the Glycogen Content in Cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Porcellinis, Alice; Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Sakuragi, Yumiko

    2017-07-17

    Cyanobacteria accumulate glycogen as a major intracellular carbon and energy storage during photosynthesis. Recent developments in research have highlighted complex mechanisms of glycogen metabolism, including the diel cycle of biosynthesis and catabolism, redox regulation, and the involvement of non-coding RNA. At the same time, efforts are being made to redirect carbon from glycogen to desirable products in genetically engineered cyanobacteria to enhance product yields. Several methods are used to determine the glycogen contents in cyanobacteria, with variable accuracies and technical complexities. Here, we provide a detailed protocol for the reliable determination of the glycogen content in cyanobacteria that can be performed in a standard life science laboratory. The protocol entails the selective precipitation of glycogen from the cell lysate and the enzymatic depolymerization of glycogen to generate glucose monomers, which are detected by a glucose oxidase-peroxidase (GOD-POD) enzyme coupled assay. The method has been applied to Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, two model cyanobacterial species that are widely used in metabolic engineering. Moreover, the method successfully showed differences in the glycogen contents between the wildtype and mutants defective in regulatory elements or glycogen biosynthetic genes.

  11. Liver glycogen reduces food intake and attenuates obesity in a high-fat diet-fed mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Soldado, Iliana; Zafra, Delia; Duran, Jordi; Adrover, Anna; Calbó, Joaquim; Guinovart, Joan J

    2015-03-01

    We generated mice that overexpress protein targeting to glycogen (PTG) in the liver (PTG(OE)), which results in an increase in liver glycogen. When fed a high-fat diet (HFD), these animals reduced their food intake. The resulting effect was a lower body weight, decreased fat mass, and reduced leptin levels. Furthermore, PTG overexpression reversed the glucose intolerance and hyperinsulinemia caused by the HFD and protected against HFD-induced hepatic steatosis. Of note, when fed an HFD, PTG(OE) mice did not show the decrease in hepatic ATP content observed in control animals and had lower expression of neuropeptide Y and higher expression of proopiomelanocortin in the hypothalamus. Additionally, after an overnight fast, PTG(OE) animals presented high liver glycogen content, lower liver triacylglycerol content, and lower serum concentrations of fatty acids and β-hydroxybutyrate than control mice, regardless of whether they were fed an HFD or a standard diet. In conclusion, liver glycogen accumulation caused a reduced food intake, protected against the deleterious effects of an HFD, and diminished the metabolic impact of fasting. Therefore, we propose that hepatic glycogen content be considered a potential target for the pharmacological manipulation of diabetes and obesity. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  12. Potent Inhibitors of the Hepatitis C Virus NS3 Protease: Design and Synthesis of Macrocyclic Substrate-Based [beta]-Strand Mimics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goudreau, Nathalie; Brochu, Christian; Cameron, Dale R.; Duceppe, Jean-Simon; Faucher, Anne-Marie; Ferland, Jean-Marie; Grand-Maître, Chantal; Poirier, Martin; Simoneau, Bruno; Tsantrizos, Youla S. (Boehringer)

    2008-06-30

    The virally encoded NS3 protease is essential to the life cycle of the hepatitis C virus (HCV), an important human pathogen causing chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis of the liver, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The design and synthesis of 15-membered ring {beta}-strand mimics which are capable of inhibiting the interactions between the HCV NS3 protease enzyme and its polyprotein substrate will be described. The binding interactions between a macrocyclic ligand and the enzyme were explored by NMR and molecular dynamics, and a model of the ligand/enzyme complex was developed.

  13. AJS1669, a novel small-molecule muscle glycogen synthase activator, improves glucose metabolism and reduces body fat mass in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Kazuhiro; Takeshita, Sen; Kawasaki, Noriko; Miyanaga, Wataru; Okamatsu, Yoriko; Dohi, Mizuki; Nakagawa, Tadakiyo

    2017-01-01

    Impaired glycogen synthesis and turnover are common in insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. As glycogen synthase (GS) is a key enzyme involved in the synthetic process, it presents a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. In the present study, we identified a novel, potent and orally available GS activator AJS1669 {sodium 2-[[5-[[4-(4,5-difluoro-2-methylsulfanyl-phenyl) phenoxy] methyl]furan-2-carbonyl]-(2-furylmethyl)amino] acetate}. In vitro, we performed a glycogen synthase 1 (GYS1) activation assay for screening GS activators and identified that the activity of AJS1669 was further potentiated in the presence of glucose-6-phosphate (G6P). In vivo, we used ob/ob mice to evaluate the novel anti-diabetic effects of AJS1669 by measuring basal blood glucose levels, glucose tolerance and body fat mass index. Repeated administration of AJS1669 over 4 weeks reduced blood glucose and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels in ob/ob mice. AJS1669 also improved glucose tolerance in a dose-dependent manner, and decreased body fat mass. The mRNA levels of genes involved in mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation and mitochondrial biogenesis were elevated in skeletal muscle tissue following AJS1669 treatment. Hepatic tissue of treated mice also exhibited elevated expression of genes associated with fatty acid oxidation. In contrast to ob/ob mice, in C57Bl/6 mice AJS1669 administration did not alter body weight or reduce glucose levels. These results demonstrate that pharmacological agents that activate GYS1, the main GS subtype found in skeletal muscle, have potential for use as novel treatments for diabetes that improve glucose metabolism in skeletal muscle. PMID:28290602

  14. Maternal resveratrol intake during lactation attenuates hepatic triglyceride and fatty acid synthesis in adult male rat offspring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masato Tanaka

    2017-03-01

    regulates the lipogenic pathway by activating genes involved in triglyceride and fatty acid synthesis. The present study showed significant downregulation of hepatic fatty acid synthase (FAS and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC levels in the CR group. These results indicated that maternal resveratrol intake during lactation suppressed SREBP-1c cleavage and nuclear translocation and repressed SREBP-1c target gene expression such as FAS and ACC in the livers of adult male offspring. These changes attenuate hepatic triacylglycerol and fatty acid synthesis in adult male offspring.

  15. Genetics Home Reference: glycogen storage disease type VII

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions Glycogen storage disease type VII Glycogen storage disease type VII Printable PDF Open All ... Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Glycogen storage disease type VII (GSDVII) is an inherited ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: glycogen storage disease type IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions Glycogen storage disease type IV Glycogen storage disease type IV Printable PDF Open All ... Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Glycogen storage disease type IV (GSD IV) is an ...

  17. Exposures to arsenite and methylarsonite produce insulin resistance and impair insulin-dependent glycogen metabolism in hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chongben; Fennel, Emily M J; Douillet, Christelle; Stýblo, Miroslav

    2017-12-01

    Environmental exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs) has been shown to disturb glucose homeostasis, leading to diabetes. Previous laboratory studies have suggested several mechanisms that may underlie the diabetogenic effects of iAs exposure, including (i) inhibition of insulin signaling (leading to insulin resistance) in glucose metabolizing peripheral tissues, (ii) inhibition of insulin secretion by pancreatic β cells, and (iii) dysregulation of the methylation or expression of genes involved in maintenance of glucose or insulin metabolism and function. Published studies have also shown that acute or chronic iAs exposures may result in depletion of hepatic glycogen stores. However, effects of iAs on pathways and mechanisms that regulate glycogen metabolism in the liver have never been studied. The present study examined glycogen metabolism in primary murine hepatocytes exposed in vitro to arsenite (iAs 3+ ) or its methylated metabolite, methylarsonite (MAs 3+ ). The results show that 4-h exposures to iAs 3+ and MAs 3+ at concentrations as low as 0.5 and 0.2 µM, respectively, decreased glycogen content in insulin-stimulated hepatocytes by inhibiting insulin-dependent activation of glycogen synthase (GS) and by inducing activity of glycogen phosphorylase (GP). Further investigation revealed that both iAs 3+ and MAs 3+ inhibit insulin-dependent phosphorylation of protein kinase B/Akt, one of the mechanisms involved in the regulation of GS and GP by insulin. Thus, inhibition of insulin signaling (i.e., insulin resistance) is likely responsible for the dysregulation of glycogen metabolism in hepatocytes exposed to iAs 3+ and MAs 3+ . This study provides novel information about the mechanisms by which iAs exposure impairs glucose homeostasis, pointing to hepatic metabolism of glycogen as one of the targets.

  18. Glucose phosphorylation is not rate limiting for accumulation of glycogen from glucose in perfused livers from fasted rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youn, J.H.; Ader, M.; Bergman, R.N.

    1989-01-01

    Incorporation of Glc and Fru into glycogen was measured in perfused livers from 24-h fasted rats using [6-3H]Glc and [U-14C]Fru. For the initial 20 min, livers were perfused with low Glc (2 mM) to deplete hepatic glycogen and were perfused for the following 30 min with various combinations of Glc and Fru. With constant Fru (2 mM), increasing perfusate Glc increased the relative contribution of Glc carbons to glycogen (7.2 +/- 0.4, 34.9 +/- 2.8, and 59.1 +/- 2.7% at 2, 10, and 20 mM Glc, respectively; n = 5 for each). During perfusion with substrate levels seen during refeeding (10 mM Glc, 1.8 mumol/g/min gluconeogenic flux from 2 mM Fru), Fru provided 54.7 +/- 2.7% of the carbons for glycogen, while Glc provided only 34.9 +/- 2.8%, consistent with in vivo estimations. However, the estimated rate of Glc phosphorylation was at least 1.10 +/- 0.11 mumol/g/min, which exceeded by at least 4-fold the glycogen accumulation rate (0.28 +/- 0.04 mumol of glucose/g/min). The total rate of glucose 6-phosphate supply via Glc phosphorylation and gluconeogenesis (2.9 mumol/g/min) exceeded reported in vivo rates of glycogen accumulation during refeeding. Thus, in perfused livers of 24-h fasted rats there is an apparent redundancy in glucose 6-phosphate supply. These results suggest that the rate-limiting step for hepatic glycogen accumulation during refeeding is located between glucose 6-phosphate and glycogen, rather than at the step of Glc phosphorylation or in the gluconeogenic pathway

  19. High-fat feeding increases hepatic vitamin C synthesis and its circulatory mobilization in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Britt Tranberg; Hansen, Axel Jacob Kornerup; Lykkesfeldt, Jens

    2014-01-01

    , glucose and vitC concentrations. Hepatic vitC concentration and gulonolactone oxidase (GLO) capacity, as a measure of vitC de novo biosynthesis, were analyzed in liver homogenates. RESULTS: HF diet significantly increased plasma concentrations of vitC compared with a control diet low in fat (P ... to modulate their vitC homeostasis during high-fat (HF) feeding. METHODS: Twenty-five male 5-week-old C57BL/6 mice were fed high- or low-fat diets for 14 weeks. An oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed after 12 weeks of intervention. Terminal fasting plasma samples were analyzed for insulin.......05). Hepatic de novo biosynthesis of vitC was upregulated (P glucose and insulin concentrations...

  20. Glycogen synthase kinase 3: more than a namesake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayasam, Geetha Vani; Tulasi, Vamshi Krishna; Sodhi, Reena; Davis, Joseph Alex; Ray, Abhijit

    2009-03-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3), a constitutively acting multi-functional serine threonine kinase is involved in diverse physiological pathways ranging from metabolism, cell cycle, gene expression, development and oncogenesis to neuroprotection. These diverse multiple functions attributed to GSK3 can be explained by variety of substrates like glycogen synthase, tau protein and beta catenin that are phosphorylated leading to their inactivation. GSK3 has been implicated in various diseases such as diabetes, inflammation, cancer, Alzheimer's and bipolar disorder. GSK3 negatively regulates insulin-mediated glycogen synthesis and glucose homeostasis, and increased expression and activity of GSK3 has been reported in type II diabetics and obese animal models. Consequently, inhibitors of GSK3 have been demonstrated to have anti-diabetic effects in vitro and in animal models. However, inhibition of GSK3 poses a challenge as achieving selectivity of an over achieving kinase involved in various pathways with multiple substrates may lead to side effects and toxicity. The primary concern is developing inhibitors of GSK3 that are anti-diabetic but do not lead to up-regulation of oncogenes. The focus of this review is the recent advances and the challenges surrounding GSK3 as an anti-diabetic therapeutic target.

  1. Amaryllidaceae Alkaloids as Potential Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Hulcová

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β is a multifunctional serine/threonine protein kinase that was originally identified as an enzyme involved in the control of glycogen metabolism. It plays a key role in diverse physiological processes including metabolism, the cell cycle, and gene expression by regulating a wide variety of well-known substances like glycogen synthase, tau-protein, and β-catenin. Recent studies have identified GSK-3β as a potential therapeutic target in Alzheimer´s disease, bipolar disorder, stroke, more than 15 types of cancer, and diabetes. GSK-3β is one of the most attractive targets for medicinal chemists in the discovery, design, and synthesis of new selective potent inhibitors. In the current study, twenty-eight Amaryllidaceae alkaloids of various structural types were studied for their potency to inhibit GSK-3β. Promising results have been demonstrated by alkaloids of the homolycorine-{9-O-demethylhomolycorine (IC50 = 30.00 ± 0.71 µM, masonine (IC50 = 27.81 ± 0.01 μM}, and lycorine-types {caranine (IC50 = 30.75 ± 0.04 μM}.

  2. Chiral gold(I vs chiral silver complexes as catalysts for the enantioselective synthesis of the second generation GSK-hepatitis C virus inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Martín-Rodríguez

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of a GSK 2nd generation inhibitor of the hepatitis C virus, by enantioselective 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition between a leucine derived iminoester and tert-butyl acrylate, was studied. The comparison between silver(I and gold(I catalysts in this reaction was established by working with chiral phosphoramidites or with chiral BINAP. The best reaction conditions were used for the total synthesis of the hepatitis C virus inhibitor by a four step procedure affording this product in 99% ee and in 63% overall yield. The origin of the enantioselectivity of the chiral gold(I catalyst was justified according to DFT calculations, the stabilizing coulombic interaction between the nitrogen atom of the thiazole moiety and one of the gold atoms being crucial.

  3. Relationship between the rate of hepatic sterol synthesis and the incorporation of [3H]water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pullinger, C.R.; Gibbons, G.F.

    1983-01-01

    The true rate of sterol synthesis in liver cells was determined by measurement of the weight of desmosterol produced over a given time period during incubations in the presence of triparanol. The simultaneous presence of tritiated water ( 3 H 2 O) during the incubations permitted a direct observation of the weight of tritium incorporated into a given mass of newly synthesized sterol. The incorporation of tritium per atom of sterol carbon (H/C ratio) was lower than some previously reported values and suggests that a sizeable proportion of the reducing equivalents (NADPH) required for sterol synthesis arises via the pentose phosphate pathway. The H/C ratio changed significantly with length of the incubation period. The value of the ratio was also dependent upon whether the acetyl-CoA units utilized for sterol synthesis were derived predominantly from a carbohydrate or a fatty acid source

  4. Threonine phosphorylation of rat liver glycogen synthase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arino, J.; Arro, M.; Guinovart, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    32 P-labeled glycogen synthase specifically immunoprecipitated from 32 P-phosphate incubated rat hepatocytes contains, in addition to [ 32 P] phosphoserine, significant levels of [ 32 P] phosphothreonine. When the 32 P-immunoprecipitate was cleaved with CNBr, the [ 32 P] phosphothreonine was recovered in the large CNBr fragment (CB-2, Mapp 28 Kd). Homogeneous rat liver glycogen synthase was phosphorylated by all the protein kinases able to phosphorylate CB-2 in vitro. After analysis of the immunoprecipitated enzyme for phosphoaminoacids, it was observed that only casein kinase II was able to phosphorylate on threonine and 32 P-phosphate was only found in CB-2. These results demonstrate that rat liver glycogen synthase is phosphorylated at threonine site(s) contained in CB-2 and strongly indicate that casein kinase II may play a role in the ''in vivo'' phosphorylation of liver glycogen synthase. This is the first protein kinase reported to phosphorylate threonine residues in liver glycogen synthase

  5. Synthesis of stable isotopically labeled peptides with filter-assisted enzymatic labeling for the diagnosis of hepatitis B virus infection utilizing mass spectrometry-based proteomics strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, Hsing-Fen; Hsiao, He-Hsuan

    2017-01-01

    A facile method for the preparation of stable isotopically labeled peptides was developed by means of filter-assisted tryptic "1"6O/"1"8O water labeling, which could be directly applied to the determination of hepatitis B virus infection from human serum with tandem mass spectrometry. Tryptic peptides of hepatitis B surface antigen or hepatitis B e antigen from different subtypes of hepatitis B virus were synthesized with traditional solid-phase peptide synthesis as potential biomarkers. Trypsin catalyzed oxygen-18 exchange at their amidated c-terminus of arginine or lysine residue. The protease catalyzed oxygen-18 to oxygen-16 back exchange reaction was eliminated due to the complete removal of trypsin by the centrifugal filter containing a thin membrane associated with molecular weight cut-off of 10 KDa. The synthetic isotopic peptides were spiked into trichloroacetic acid/acetone precipitated human serum as internal standards and were selectively detected with multiplexed parallel reaction monitoring on a hybrid quadrupole-orbitrap mass spectrometer. The limit of detection for all synthetic peptides were in the range of 0.09 fmol–1.13 fmol. The results indicated that the peptide YLWEWASVR derived from hepatitis B surface antigen was quantified approximately 200 fmol per μl serum and may serve as a diagnostic biomarker for the detection of hepatitis B virus infected disease. - Highlights: • Facile synthesis of an inexpensive and highly reproducible stable isotopically labeled peptides. • Complete incorporation of two "1"8O atoms into synthesized peptides with filter-assisted enzymatic labeling. • Targeted analysis with parallel reaction monitoring assay for the disease diagnosis.

  6. Synthesis of stable isotopically labeled peptides with filter-assisted enzymatic labeling for the diagnosis of hepatitis B virus infection utilizing mass spectrometry-based proteomics strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, Hsing-Fen; Hsiao, He-Hsuan, E-mail: hhhsiao@dragon.nchu.edu.tw

    2017-03-01

    A facile method for the preparation of stable isotopically labeled peptides was developed by means of filter-assisted tryptic {sup 16}O/{sup 18}O water labeling, which could be directly applied to the determination of hepatitis B virus infection from human serum with tandem mass spectrometry. Tryptic peptides of hepatitis B surface antigen or hepatitis B e antigen from different subtypes of hepatitis B virus were synthesized with traditional solid-phase peptide synthesis as potential biomarkers. Trypsin catalyzed oxygen-18 exchange at their amidated c-terminus of arginine or lysine residue. The protease catalyzed oxygen-18 to oxygen-16 back exchange reaction was eliminated due to the complete removal of trypsin by the centrifugal filter containing a thin membrane associated with molecular weight cut-off of 10 KDa. The synthetic isotopic peptides were spiked into trichloroacetic acid/acetone precipitated human serum as internal standards and were selectively detected with multiplexed parallel reaction monitoring on a hybrid quadrupole-orbitrap mass spectrometer. The limit of detection for all synthetic peptides were in the range of 0.09 fmol–1.13 fmol. The results indicated that the peptide YLWEWASVR derived from hepatitis B surface antigen was quantified approximately 200 fmol per μl serum and may serve as a diagnostic biomarker for the detection of hepatitis B virus infected disease. - Highlights: • Facile synthesis of an inexpensive and highly reproducible stable isotopically labeled peptides. • Complete incorporation of two {sup 18}O atoms into synthesized peptides with filter-assisted enzymatic labeling. • Targeted analysis with parallel reaction monitoring assay for the disease diagnosis.

  7. Momordica charantia ameliorates insulin resistance and dyslipidemia with altered hepatic glucose production and fatty acid synthesis and AMPK phosphorylation in high-fat-fed mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Chun-Ching; Shlau, Min-Tzong; Lin, Cheng-Hsiu; Wu, Jin-Bin

    2014-03-01

    Momordica charantia Linn. (Cucurbitaceae) fruit is commonly known as bitter melon. C57BL/6J mice were firstly divided randomly into two groups: the control (CON) group was fed with a low-fat diet, whereas the experimental group was fed a 45% high-fat (HF) diet for 8 weeks. Afterwards, the CON group was treated with vehicle, whereas the HF group was subdivided into five groups and still on HF diet and was given orally M. charantia extract (MCE) or rosiglitazone (Rosi) or not for 4 weeks. M. charantia decreased the weights of visceral fat and caused glucose lowering. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a major cellular regulator of lipid and glucose metabolism. MCE significantly increases the hepatic protein contents of AMPK phosphorylation by 126.2-297.3% and reduces expression of phosphenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose production. Most importantly, MCE decreased expression of hepatic 11beta hydroxysteroid dehydroxygenase (11beta-HSD1) gene, which contributed in attenuating diabetic state. Furthermore, MCE lowered serum triglycerides (TGs) by inhibition of hepatic fatty acid synthesis by dampening sterol response element binding protein 1c and fatty acid synthase mRNA leading to reduction in TGs synthesis. This study demonstrates M. charantia ameliorates diabetic and hyperlipidemic state in HF-fed mice occurred by regulation of hepatic PEPCK, 11beta-HSD1 and AMPK phosphorylation. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Induction of hepatic and renal metallothionein synthesis by ferric nitrilotriacetate in mice: the role of MT as an antioxidant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Kyong-Son; Morishita, Fumio; Tetsuchikawahara, Noriko; Onosaka, Satomi

    2005-01-01

    Metallothionein (MT) demonstrates strong antioxidant properties, yet the physiological relevance of its antioxidant action is not clear. Injection of mice with ferric nitrilotriacetate (Fe-NTA) caused a dose-dependent increase in hepatic and renal MT. Fe-NTA caused a greater increase in hepatic and renal MT concentration (2.5- and 4-fold) compared with FeCl 3 at the same dose of ferric ion. MT mRNA levels were markedly elevated in both of tissues. Thiobarbituric acid (TBA) values in both tissues reached a maximum after 2-4 h. The MT concentrations were significantly increased after 2-4 h in liver and after 8-16 h in kidneys. Plasma concentrations of cytokines such as IL-6 and TNFα were elevated by 4 h; IL-6 levels were 24 times higher after Fe-NTA than that after injection of FeCl 3 . Pretreatment of mice with ZnSO 4 attenuated nephrotoxicity induced by Fe-NTA after 2 h, but was not effective 4 h after injection. After a Fe-NTA injection, a loss of Cd-binding properties of preinduced MT was observed only in kidneys of Zn-pretreated mice but not in liver. Treatment with BSO, glutathione (GSH) depletor, intensified a loss of its Cd-binding properties after a Fe-NTA injection. These results indicate that induction of MT synthesis may result from reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by Fe-NTA, and MT may act in vivo as a complementary antioxidant

  9. Characterization of Function of the GlgA2 Glycogen/Starch Synthase in Cyanobacterium sp. Clg1 Highlights Convergent Evolution of Glycogen Metabolism into Starch Granule Aggregation1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadouche, Derifa; Arias, Maria Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    At variance with the starch-accumulating plants and most of the glycogen-accumulating cyanobacteria, Cyanobacterium sp. CLg1 synthesizes both glycogen and starch. We now report the selection of a starchless mutant of this cyanobacterium that retains wild-type amounts of glycogen. Unlike other mutants of this type found in plants and cyanobacteria, this mutant proved to be selectively defective for one of the two types of glycogen/starch synthase: GlgA2. This enzyme is phylogenetically related to the previously reported SSIII/SSIV starch synthase that is thought to be involved in starch granule seeding in plants. This suggests that, in addition to the selective polysaccharide debranching demonstrated to be responsible for starch rather than glycogen synthesis, the nature and properties of the elongation enzyme define a novel determinant of starch versus glycogen accumulation. We show that the phylogenies of GlgA2 and of 16S ribosomal RNA display significant congruence. This suggests that this enzyme evolved together with cyanobacteria when they diversified over 2 billion years ago. However, cyanobacteria can be ruled out as direct progenitors of the SSIII/SSIV ancestral gene found in Archaeplastida. Hence, both cyanobacteria and plants recruited similar enzymes independently to perform analogous tasks, further emphasizing the importance of convergent evolution in the appearance of starch from a preexisting glycogen metabolism network. PMID:27208262

  10. Testosterone suppresses the expression of regulatory enzymes of fatty acid synthesis and protects against hepatic steatosis in cholesterol-fed androgen deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Daniel M; Nettleship, Joanne E; Akhtar, Samia; Muraleedharan, Vakkat; Sellers, Donna J; Brooke, Jonathan C; McLaren, David S; Channer, Kevin S; Jones, T Hugh

    2014-07-30

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and its precursor hepatic steatosis is common in obesity and type-2 diabetes and is associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Men with type-2 diabetes and/or CVD have a high prevalence of testosterone deficiency. Testosterone replacement improves key cardiovascular risk factors. The effects of testosterone on hepatic steatosis are not fully understood. Testicular feminised (Tfm) mice, which have a non-functional androgen receptor (AR) and very low serum testosterone levels, were used to investigate testosterone effects on high-cholesterol diet-induced hepatic steatosis. Hepatic lipid deposition was increased in Tfm mice and orchidectomised wild-type littermates versus intact wild-type littermate controls with normal androgen physiology. Lipid deposition was reduced in Tfm mice receiving testosterone treatment compared to placebo. Oestrogen receptor blockade significantly, but only partially, reduced the beneficial effects of testosterone treatment on hepatic lipid accumulation. Expression of key regulatory enzymes of fatty acid synthesis, acetyl-CoA carboxylase alpha (ACACA) and fatty acid synthase (FASN) were elevated in placebo-treated Tfm mice versus placebo-treated littermates and Tfm mice receiving testosterone treatment. Tfm mice on normal diet had increased lipid accumulation compared to littermates but significantly less than cholesterol-fed Tfm mice and demonstrated increased gene expression of hormone sensitive lipase, stearyl-CoA desaturase-1 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma but FASN and ACACA were not altered. An action of testosterone on hepatic lipid deposition which is independent of the classic AR is implicated. Testosterone may act in part via an effect on the key regulatory lipogenic enzymes to protect against hepatic steatosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Lowering Temperature is the Trigger for Glycogen Build-Up and Winter Fasting in Crucian Carp (Carassius carassius).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varis, Joonas; Haverinen, Jaakko; Vornanen, Matti

    2016-02-01

    Seasonal changes in physiology of vertebrate animals are triggered by environmental cues including temperature, day-length and oxygen availability. Crucian carp (Carassius carassius) tolerate prolonged anoxia in winter by using several physiological adaptations that are seasonally activated. This study examines which environmental cues are required to trigger physiological adjustments for winter dormancy in crucian carp. To this end, crucian carp were exposed to changing environmental factors under laboratory conditions: effects of declining water temperature, shortening day-length and reduced oxygen availability, separately and in different combinations, were examined on glycogen content and enzyme activities involved in feeding (alkaline phosphatase, AP) and glycogen metabolism (glycogen synthase, GyS; glycogen phosphorylase, GP). Lowering temperature induced a fall in activity of AP and a rise in glycogen content and rate of glycogen synthesis. Relative mass of the liver, and glycogen concentration of liver, muscle and brain increased with lowering temperature. Similarly activity of GyS in muscle and expression of GyS transcripts in brain were up-regulated by lowering temperature. Shortened day-length and oxygen availability had practically no effects on measured variables. We conclude that lowering temperature is the main trigger in preparation for winter anoxia in crucian carp.

  12. Astrocyte glycogen and brain energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Angus M; Ransom, Bruce R

    2007-09-01

    The brain contains glycogen but at low concentration compared with liver and muscle. In the adult brain, glycogen is found predominantly in astrocytes. Astrocyte glycogen content is modulated by a number of factors including some neurotransmitters and ambient glucose concentration. Compelling evidence indicates that astrocyte glycogen breaks down during hypoglycemia to lactate that is transferred to adjacent neurons or axons where it is used aerobically as fuel. In the case of CNS white matter, this source of energy can extend axon function for 20 min or longer. Likewise, during periods of intense neural activity when energy demand exceeds glucose supply, astrocyte glycogen is degraded to lactate, a portion of which is transferred to axons for fuel. Astrocyte glycogen, therefore, offers some protection against hypoglycemic neural injury and ensures that neurons and axons can maintain their function during very intense periods of activation. These emerging principles about the roles of astrocyte glycogen contradict the long held belief that this metabolic pool has little or no functional significance.

  13. Bridging the data gaps in the epidemiology of hepatitis C virus infection in Malaysia using multi-parameter evidence synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Scott A; Mohamed, Rosmawati; Dahlui, Maznah; Naning, Herlianna; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba

    2014-11-07

    Collecting adequate information on key epidemiological indicators is a prerequisite to informing a public health response to reduce the impact of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in Malaysia. Our goal was to overcome the acute data shortage typical of low/middle income countries using statistical modelling to estimate the national HCV prevalence and the distribution over transmission pathways as of the end of 2009. Multi-parameter evidence synthesis methods were applied to combine all available relevant data sources - both direct and indirect - that inform the epidemiological parameters of interest. An estimated 454,000 (95% credible interval [CrI]: 392,000 to 535,000) HCV antibody-positive individuals were living in Malaysia in 2009; this represents 2.5% (95% CrI: 2.2-3.0%) of the population aged 15-64 years. Among males of Malay ethnicity, for 77% (95% CrI: 69-85%) the route of probable transmission was active or a previous history of injecting drugs. The corresponding proportions were smaller for male Chinese and Indian/other ethnic groups (40% and 71%, respectively). The estimated prevalence in females of all ethnicities was 1% (95% CrI: 0.6 to 1.4%); 92% (95% CrI: 88 to 95%) of infections were attributable to non-drug injecting routes of transmission. The prevalent number of persons living with HCV infection in Malaysia is estimated to be very high. Low/middle income countries often lack a comprehensive evidence base; however, evidence synthesis methods can assist in filling the data gaps required for the development of effective policy to address the future public health and economic burden due to HCV.

  14. Nuclear Glycogen Inclusions in Canine Parietal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestri, S; Lepri, E; Dall'Aglio, C; Marchesi, M C; Vitellozzi, G

    2017-05-01

    Nuclear glycogen inclusions occur infrequently in pathologic conditions but also in normal human and animal tissues. Their function or significance is unclear. To the best of the authors' knowledge, no reports of nuclear glycogen inclusions in canine parietal cells exist. After initial observations of nuclear inclusions/pseudoinclusions during routine histopathology, the authors retrospectively examined samples of gastric mucosa from dogs presenting with gastrointestinal signs for the presence of intranuclear inclusions/pseudoinclusions and determined their composition using histologic and electron-microscopic methods. In 24 of 108 cases (22%), the authors observed various numbers of intranuclear inclusions/pseudoinclusions within scattered parietal cells. Nuclei were characterized by marked karyomegaly and chromatin margination around a central optically empty or slightly eosinophilic area. The intranuclear inclusions/pseudoinclusions stained positive with periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) and were diastase sensitive, consistent with glycogen. Several PAS-positive/diastase-sensitive sections were further examined by transmission electron microscopy, also using periodic acid-thiocarbohydrazide-silver proteinate (PA-TCH-SP) staining to identify polysaccharides. Ultrastructurally, the nuclear inclusions were composed of electron-dense particles that were not membrane bound, without evidence of nuclear membrane invaginations or cytoplasmic organelles in the nuclei, and positive staining with PA-TCH-SP, confirming a glycogen composition. No cytoplasmic glycogen deposits were observed, suggesting that the intranuclear glycogen inclusions were probably synthesized in loco. Nuclear glycogen inclusions were not associated with gastritis or colonization by Helicobacter-like organisms ( P > .05). Our findings suggest that nuclear glycogen inclusions in canine parietal cells could be an incidental finding. Nevertheless, since nuclear glycogen is present in several pathologic

  15. Identification of differentially expressed genes in chickens differing in muscle glycogen content and meat quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marthey Sylvain

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The processing ability of poultry meat is highly related to its ultimate pH, the latter being mainly determined by the amount of glycogen in the muscle at death. The genetic determinism of glycogen and related meat quality traits has been established in the chicken but the molecular mechanisms involved in variations in these traits remain to be fully described. In this study, Chicken Genome Arrays (20 K were used to compare muscle gene expression profiles of chickens from Fat (F and Lean (L lines that exhibited high and low muscle glycogen content, respectively, and of individuals exhibiting extremely high (G+ or low (G- muscle glycogen content originating from the F2 cross between the Fat and Lean lines. Real-time RT-PCR was subsequently performed to validate the differential expression of genes either selected from the microarray analysis or whose function in regulating glycogen metabolism was well known. Results Among the genes found to be expressed in chicken P. major muscle, 197 and 254 transcripts appeared to be differentially expressed on microarrays for the F vs. L and the G+ vs. G- comparisons, respectively. Some involved particularly in lipid and carbohydrate metabolism were selected for further validation studies by real-time RT-PCR. We confirmed that, as in mammals, the down-regulation of CEBPB and RGS2 coincides with a decrease in peripheral adiposity in the chicken, but these genes are also suggested to affect muscle glycogen turnover through their role in the cAMP-dependent signalling pathway. Several other genes were suggested to have roles in the regulation of glycogen storage in chicken muscle. PDK4 may act as a glycogen sensor in muscle, UGDH may compete for glycogen synthesis by using UDP-glucose for glucoronidation, and PRKAB1, PRKAG2, and PHKD may impact on glycogen turnover in muscle, through AMP-activated signalling pathways. Conclusions This study is the first stage in the understanding of molecular

  16. Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munkholm, Klaus; Lenskjold, Toke; Jacoby, Anne Sophie

    2016-01-01

    cells were quantitated using enzyme immunometric assays. The activity of GSK-3β (serine-9-phosphorylated GSK-3β/total GSK-3β) was lower at baseline compared with follow-up. No significant mean change over time was observed in levels of total GSK-3β and serine-9-phosphorylated GSK-3β. Exploratory......Evidence indicates a role for glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) in the pathophysiology of mood disorders and in cognitive disturbances; however, the natural variation in GSK-3β activity over time is unknown. We aimed to investigate GSK-3β activity over time and its possible correlation...... with emotional lability, subjective mood fluctuations and cognitive function in healthy individuals. Thirty-seven healthy subjects were evaluated with neuropsychological tests and blood samples at baseline and 12-week follow-up. Total GSK-3β and serine-9-phosphorylated GSK-3β in peripheral blood mononuclear...

  17. Trehalose, glycogen and ethanol metabolism in the gcr1 mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seker, Tamay; Hamamci, H.

    2003-01-01

    Since Gcr1p is pivotal in controlling the transcription of glycolytic enzymes and trehalose metabolism seems to be one of the control points of glycolysis, we examined trehalose and glycogen synthesis in response to 2 % glucose pulse during batch growth in gcr1 (glucose regulation-1) mutant lacking...... fully functional glycolytic pathway and in the wild-type strain. An increase in both trehalose and glycogen stores was observed 1 and 2 h after the pulse followed by a steady decrease in both the wild-type and the gcr1 mutant. The accumulation was faster while the following degradation was slower in gcr......1 cells compared to wild-type ones. Although there was no distinct glucose consumption in the mutant cells it seemed that the glucose repression mechanism is similar in gcr1 mutant and in wild-type strain at least with respect to trehalose and glycogen metabolism....

  18. Does abnormal glycogen structure contribute to increased susceptibility to seizures in epilepsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiNuzzo, Mauro; Mangia, Silvia; Maraviglia, Bruno; Giove, Federico

    2015-02-01

    Epilepsy is a family of brain disorders with a largely unknown etiology and high percentage of pharmacoresistance. The clinical manifestations of epilepsy are seizures, which originate from aberrant neuronal synchronization and hyperexcitability. Reactive astrocytosis, a hallmark of the epileptic tissue, develops into loss-of-function of glutamine synthetase, impairment of glutamate-glutamine cycle and increase in extracellular and astrocytic glutamate concentration. Here, we argue that chronically elevated intracellular glutamate level in astrocytes is instrumental to alterations in the metabolism of glycogen and leads to the synthesis of polyglucosans. Unaccessibility of glycogen-degrading enzymes to these insoluble molecules compromises the glycogenolysis-dependent reuptake of extracellular K(+) by astrocytes, thereby leading to increased extracellular K(+) and associated membrane depolarization. Based on current knowledge, we propose that the deterioration in structural homogeneity of glycogen particles is relevant to disruption of brain K(+) homeostasis and increased susceptibility to seizures in epilepsy.

  19. Malin decreases glycogen accumulation by promoting the degradation of protein targeting to glycogen (PTG)

    OpenAIRE

    Worby, Carolyn A.; Gentry, Matthew S.; Dixon, Jack E.

    2007-01-01

    Lafora disease (LD) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disease that results in progressive myoclonus epilepsy and death. LD is caused by mutations in either the E3 ubiquitin ligase malin or the dual-specificity phosphatase laforin. A hallmark of LD is the accumulation of insoluble glycogen in the cytoplasm of cells from most tissues. Glycogen metabolism is regulated by phosphorylation of key metabolic enzymes. One regulator of this phosphorylation is protein targeting to glycogen (PT...

  20. Capsular glucan and intracellular glycogen of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: biosynthesis and impact on the persistence in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sambou, Tounkang; Dinadayala, Premkumar; Stadthagen, Gustavo

    2008-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other pathogenic mycobacterial species produce large amounts of a glycogen-like alpha-glucan that represents the major polysaccharide of their outermost capsular layer. To determine the role of the surface-exposed glucan in the physiology and virulence of these bact......Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other pathogenic mycobacterial species produce large amounts of a glycogen-like alpha-glucan that represents the major polysaccharide of their outermost capsular layer. To determine the role of the surface-exposed glucan in the physiology and virulence...... of these bacteria, orthologues of the glg genes involved in the biosynthesis of glycogen in Escherichia coli were identified in M. tuberculosis H37Rv and inactivated by allelic replacement. Biochemical analyses of the mutants and complemented strains indicated that the synthesis of glucan and glycogen involves...... the alpha-1,4-glucosyltransferases Rv3032 and GlgA (Rv1212c), the ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase GlgC (Rv1213) and the branching enzyme GlgB (Rv1326c). Disruption of glgC reduced by half the glucan and glycogen contents of M. tuberculosis, whereas the inactivation of glgA and Rv3032 affected the production...

  1. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) stimulates glycogen synthase activity in 3T3 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, C.P.; Bowen-Pope, D.F.; Ross, R.; Krebs, E.G.

    1986-01-01

    Hormonal regulation of glycogen synthase, an enzyme that can be phosphorylated on multiple sites, is often associated with changes in its phosphorylation state. Enzyme activation is conventionally monitored by determining the synthase activity ratio [(activity in the absence of glucose 6-P)/(activity in the presence of glucose 6-P)]. Insulin causes an activation of glycogen synthase with a concomitant decrease in its phosphate content. In a previous report, the authors showed that epidermal growth factor (EGF) increases the glycogen synthase activity ratio in Swiss 3T3 cells. The time and dose-dependency of this response was similar to that of insulin. Their recent results indicate that PDGF also stimulates glycogen synthase activity. Enzyme activation was maximal after 30 min. of incubation with PDGF; the time course observed was very similar to that with insulin and EGF. At 1 ng/ml (0.03nM), PDGF caused a maximal stimulation of 4-fold in synthase activity ratio. Half-maximal stimulation was observed at 0.2 ng/ml (6 pM). The time course of changes in enzyme activity ratio closely followed that of 125 I-PDGF binding. The authors data suggest that PDGF, as well as EFG and insulin, may be important in regulating glycogen synthesis through phosphorylation/dephosphorylation mechanisms

  2. Diffuse reticuloendothelial system involvement in type IV glycogen storage disease with a novel GBE1 mutation: a case report and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magoulas, Pilar L; El-Hattab, Ayman W; Roy, Angshumoy; Bali, Deeksha S; Finegold, Milton J; Craigen, William J

    2012-06-01

    Glycogen storage disease type IV is a rare autosomal recessive disorder of glycogen metabolism caused by mutations in the GBE1 gene that encodes the 1,4-alpha-glucan-branching enzyme 1. Its clinical presentation is variable, with the most common form presenting in early childhood with primary hepatic involvement. Histologic manifestations in glycogen storage disease type IV typically consist of intracytoplasmic non-membrane-bound inclusions containing abnormally branched glycogen (polyglucosan bodies) within hepatocytes and myocytes. We report a female infant with classic hepatic form of glycogen storage disease type IV who demonstrated diffuse reticuloendothelial system involvement with the spleen, bone marrow, and lymph nodes infiltrated by foamy histiocytes with intracytoplasmic polyglucosan deposits. Sequence analysis of the GBE1 gene revealed compound heterozygosity for a previously described frameshift mutation (c.1239delT) and a novel missense mutation (c.1279G>A) that is predicted to alter a conserved glycine residue. GBE enzyme analysis revealed no detectable activity. A review of the literature for glycogen storage disease type IV patients with characterized molecular defects and deficient enzyme activity reveals most GBE1 mutations to be missense mutations clustering in the catalytic enzyme domain. Individuals with the classic hepatic form of glycogen storage disease type IV tend to be compound heterozygotes for null and missense mutations. Although the extensive reticuloendothelial system involvement that was observed in our patient is not typical of glycogen storage disease type IV, it may be associated with severe enzymatic deficiency and a poor outcome. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Refeeding-induced brown adipose tissue glycogen hyper-accumulation in mice is mediated by insulin and catecholamines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M Carmean

    Full Text Available Brown adipose tissue (BAT generates heat during adaptive thermogenesis through a combination of oxidative metabolism and uncoupling protein 1-mediated electron transport chain uncoupling, using both free-fatty acids and glucose as substrate. Previous rat-based work in 1942 showed that prolonged partial fasting followed by refeeding led to a dramatic, transient increase in glycogen stores in multiple fat depots. In the present study, the protocol was replicated in male CD1 mice, resulting in a 2000-fold increase in interscapular BAT (IBAT glycogen levels within 4-12 hours (hr of refeeding, with IBAT glycogen stores reaching levels comparable to fed liver glycogen. Lesser effects occurred in white adipose tissues (WAT. Over the next 36 hr, glycogen levels dissipated and histological analysis revealed an over-accumulation of lipid droplets, suggesting a potential metabolic connection between glycogenolysis and lipid synthesis. 24 hr of total starvation followed by refeeding induced a robust and consistent glycogen over-accumulation similar in magnitude and time course to the prolonged partial fast. Experimentation demonstrated that hyperglycemia was not sufficient to drive glycogen accumulation in IBAT, but that elevated circulating insulin was sufficient. Additionally, pharmacological inhibition of catecholamine production reduced refeeding-induced IBAT glycogen storage, providing evidence of a contribution from the central nervous system. These findings highlight IBAT as a tissue that integrates both canonically-anabolic and catabolic stimulation for the promotion of glycogen storage during recovery from caloric deficit. The preservation of this robust response through many generations of animals not subjected to food deprivation suggests that the over-accumulation phenomenon plays a critical role in IBAT physiology.

  4. Refeeding-Induced Brown Adipose Tissue Glycogen Hyper-Accumulation in Mice Is Mediated by Insulin and Catecholamines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmean, Christopher M.; Bobe, Alexandria M.; Yu, Justin C.; Volden, Paul A.; Brady, Matthew J.

    2013-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) generates heat during adaptive thermogenesis through a combination of oxidative metabolism and uncoupling protein 1-mediated electron transport chain uncoupling, using both free-fatty acids and glucose as substrate. Previous rat-based work in 1942 showed that prolonged partial fasting followed by refeeding led to a dramatic, transient increase in glycogen stores in multiple fat depots. In the present study, the protocol was replicated in male CD1 mice, resulting in a 2000-fold increase in interscapular BAT (IBAT) glycogen levels within 4–12 hours (hr) of refeeding, with IBAT glycogen stores reaching levels comparable to fed liver glycogen. Lesser effects occurred in white adipose tissues (WAT). Over the next 36 hr, glycogen levels dissipated and histological analysis revealed an over-accumulation of lipid droplets, suggesting a potential metabolic connection between glycogenolysis and lipid synthesis. 24 hr of total starvation followed by refeeding induced a robust and consistent glycogen over-accumulation similar in magnitude and time course to the prolonged partial fast. Experimentation demonstrated that hyperglycemia was not sufficient to drive glycogen accumulation in IBAT, but that elevated circulating insulin was sufficient. Additionally, pharmacological inhibition of catecholamine production reduced refeeding-induced IBAT glycogen storage, providing evidence of a contribution from the central nervous system. These findings highlight IBAT as a tissue that integrates both canonically-anabolic and catabolic stimulation for the promotion of glycogen storage during recovery from caloric deficit. The preservation of this robust response through many generations of animals not subjected to food deprivation suggests that the over-accumulation phenomenon plays a critical role in IBAT physiology. PMID:23861810

  5. Hepatitis C

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Workshops Follow Us Home Health Information Liver Disease Hepatitis (Viral) Hepatitis C Related Topics English English Español Section Navigation Hepatitis (Viral) What Is Viral Hepatitis? Hepatitis A Hepatitis B ...

  6. The muscle-specific protein phosphatase PP1G/R(GL)(G(M))is essential for activation of glycogen synthase by exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aschenbach, W G; Suzuki, Y; Breeden, K

    2001-01-01

    In skeletal muscle both insulin and contractile activity are physiological stimuli for glycogen synthesis, which is thought to result in part from the dephosphorylation and activation of glycogen synthase (GS). PP1G/R(GL)(G(M)) is a glycogen/sarcoplasmic reticulum-associated type 1 phosphatase...... that was originally postulated to mediate insulin control of glycogen metabolism. However, we recently showed (Suzuki, Y., Lanner, C., Kim, J.-H., Vilardo, P. G., Zhang, H., Jie Yang, J., Cooper, L. D., Steele, M., Kennedy, A., Bock, C., Scrimgeour, A., Lawrence, J. C. Jr., L., and DePaoli-Roach, A. A. (2001) Mol....... Cell. Biol. 21, 2683-2694) that insulin activates GS in muscle of R(GL)(G(M)) knockout (KO) mice similarly to the wild type (WT). To determine whether PP1G is involved in glycogen metabolism during muscle contractions, R(GL) KO and overexpressors (OE) were subjected to two models of contraction...

  7. Estimation of glucose carbon recycling in children with glycogen storage disease: A 13C NMR study using [U-13C]glucose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalderon, B.; Korman, S.H.; Gutman, A.; Lapidot, A.

    1989-01-01

    A stable isotope procedure to estimate hepatic glucose carbon recycling and thereby elucidate the mechanism by which glucose is produced in patients lacking glucose 6-phosphatase is described. A total of 10 studies was performed in children with glycogen storage disease type I (GSD-I) and type III (GSD-III) and control subjects. A primed dose-constant nasogastric infusion of D-[U- 13 C]glucose or an infusion diluted with nonlabeled glucose solution was administered following different periods of fasting. Hepatic glucose carbon recycling was estimated from 13 C NMR spectra. The values obtained for GSD-I patients coincided with the standard [U- 13 C]glucose dilution curve. These results indicate that the plasma glucose of GSD-I subjects comprises only a mixture of 99% 13 C-enriched D-[U- 13 C]glucose and unlabeled glucose but lacks any recycled glucose. Significantly different glucose carbon recycling values were obtained for two GSD-III patients in comparison to GSD-I patients. The results eliminate a mechanism for glucose production in GSD-I children involving gluconeogenesis. However, glucose release by amylo-1,6-glucosidase activity would result in endogenous glucose production of non- 13 C-labeled and nonrecycled glucose carbon, as was found in this study. In GSD-III patients gluconeogenesis is suggested as the major route for endogenous glucose synthesis. The contribution of the triose-phosphate pathway in these patients has been determined

  8. Low transformation growth factor-β1 production and collagen synthesis correlate with the lack of hepatic periportal fibrosis development in undernourished mice infected with Schistosoma mansoni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreia Ferreira Barros

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Undernourished mice infected (UI submitted to low and long-lasting infections by Schistosoma mansoni are unable to develop the hepatic periportal fibrosis that is equivalent to Symmers’ fibrosis in humans. In this report, the effects of the host’s nutritional status on parasite (worm load, egg viability and maturation and host (growth curves, biology, collagen synthesis and characteristics of the immunological response were studied and these are considered as interdependent factors influencing the amount and distribution of fibrous tissue in hepatic periovular granulomas and portal spaces. The nutritional status of the host influenced the low body weight and low parasite burden detected in UI mice as well as the number, viability and maturation of released eggs. The reduced oviposition and increased number of degenerated or dead eggs were associated with low protein synthesis detected in deficient hosts, which likely induced the observed decrease in transformation growth factor (TGF-β1 and liver collagen. Despite the reduced number of mature eggs in UI mice, the activation of TGF-β1 and hepatic stellate cells occurred regardless of the unviability of most miracidia, due to stimulation by fibrogenic proteins and eggshell glycoproteins. However, changes in the repair mechanisms influenced by the nutritional status in deficient animals may account for the decreased liver collagen detected in the present study.

  9. The Multiple Functions of Common Microbial Carbon Polymers, Glycogen and PHB, during Stress Responses in the Non-Diazotrophic Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damrow, Ramon; Maldener, Iris; Zilliges, Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    Classical microbial carbon polymers such as glycogen and polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) have a crucial impact as both a sink and a reserve under macronutrient stress conditions. Most microbial species exclusively synthesize and degrade either glycogen or PHB. A few bacteria such as the phototrophic model organism Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 surprisingly produce both physico-chemically different polymers under conditions of high C to N ratios. For the first time, the function and interrelation of both carbon polymers in non-diazotrophic cyanobacteria are analyzed in a comparative physiological study of single- and double-knockout mutants (ΔglgC; ΔphaC; ΔglgC/ΔphaC), respectively. Most of the observed phenotypes are explicitly related to the knockout of glycogen synthesis, highlighting the metabolic, energetic, and structural impact of this process whenever cells switch from an active, photosynthetic 'protein status' to a dormant 'glycogen status'. The carbon flux regulation into glycogen granules is apparently crucial for both phycobilisome degradation and thylakoid layer disassembly in the presence of light. In contrast, PHB synthesis is definitely not involved in this primary acclimation response. Moreover, the very weak interrelations between the two carbon-polymer syntheses indicate that the regulation and role of PHB synthesis in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is different from glycogen synthesis.

  10. Compartmentation of glycogen metabolism revealed from 13C isotopologue distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marin de Mas Igor

    2011-10-01

    phosphates in cytosol. In contrast, the observed distribution indicates the presence of a separate pool of hexose phosphates that is channeled towards glycogen synthesis.

  11. Hyper-hippocampal glycogen induced by glycogen loading with exhaustive exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soya, Mariko; Matsui, Takashi; Shima, Takeru; Jesmin, Subrina; Omi, Naomi; Soya, Hideaki

    2018-01-19

    Glycogen loading (GL), a well-known type of sports conditioning, in combination with exercise and a high carbohydrate diet (HCD) for 1 week enhances individual endurance capacity through muscle glycogen supercompensation. This exercise-diet combination is necessary for successful GL. Glycogen in the brain contributes to hippocampus-related memory functions and endurance capacity. Although the effect of HCD on the brain remains unknown, brain supercompensation occurs following exhaustive exercise (EE), a component of GL. We thus employed a rat model of GL and examined whether GL increases glycogen levels in the brain as well as in muscle, and found that GL increased glycogen levels in the hippocampus and hypothalamus, as well as in muscle. We further explored the essential components of GL (exercise and/or diet conditions) to establish a minimal model of GL focusing on the brain. Exercise, rather than a HCD, was found to be crucial for GL-induced hyper-glycogen in muscle, the hippocampus and the hypothalamus. Moreover, EE was essential for hyper-glycogen only in the hippocampus even without HCD. Here we propose the EE component of GL without HCD as a condition that enhances brain glycogen stores especially in the hippocampus, implicating a physiological strategy to enhance hippocampal functions.

  12. High glycogen levels enhance glycogen breakdown in isolated contracting skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Galbo, H

    1986-01-01

    and after 15 min of intermittent electrical muscle stimulation. Before stimulation, glycogen was higher in rats that swam on the preceding day (supercompensated rats) compared with controls. During muscle contractions, glycogen breakdown in fast-twitch red and white fibers was larger in supercompensated...

  13. RNA synthesis is modulated by G-quadruplex formation in Hepatitis C virus negative RNA strand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chloé, Jaubert; Amina, Bedrat; Laura, Bartolucci; Carmelo, Di Primo; Michel, Ventura; Jean-Louis, Mergny; Samir, Amrane; Marie-Line, Andreola

    2018-05-25

    DNA and RNA guanine-rich oligonucleotides can form non-canonical structures called G-quadruplexes or "G4" that are based on the stacking of G-quartets. The role of DNA and RNA G4 is documented in eukaryotic cells and in pathogens such as viruses. Yet, G4 have been identified only in a few RNA viruses, including the Flaviviridae family. In this study, we analysed the last 157 nucleotides at the 3'end of the HCV (-) strand. This sequence is known to be the minimal sequence required for an efficient RNA replication. Using bioinformatics and biophysics, we identified a highly conserved G4-prone sequence located in the stem-loop IIy' of the negative strand. We also showed that the formation of this G-quadruplex inhibits the in vitro RNA synthesis by the RdRp. Furthermore, Phen-DC3, a specific G-quadruplex binder, is able to inhibit HCV viral replication in cells in conditions where no cytotoxicity was measured. Considering that this domain of the negative RNA strand is well conserved among HCV genotypes, G4 ligands could be of interest for new antiviral therapies.

  14. Phosphorylation-dependent translocation of glycogen synthase to a novel structure during glycogen resynthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prats, Clara; Cadefau, Joan A; Cussó, Roser

    2005-01-01

    Glycogen metabolism has been the subject of extensive research, but the mechanisms by which it is regulated are still not fully understood. It is well accepted that the rate-limiting enzymes in glycogenesis and glycogenolysis are glycogen synthase (GS) and glycogen phosphorylase (GPh), respectively....... Both enzymes are regulated by reversible phosphorylation and by allosteric effectors. However, evidence in the literature indicates that changes in muscle GS and GPh intracellular distribution may constitute a new regulatory mechanism of glycogen metabolism. Already in the 1960s, it was proposed...... that glycogen was present in dynamic cellular organelles that were termed glycosomas but no such cellular entities have ever been demonstrated. The aim of this study was to characterize muscle GS and GPh intracellular distribution and to identify possible translocation processes of both enzymes. Using in situ...

  15. Relationship between single nucleotide polymorphism of glycogen synthase gene of Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas and its glycogen content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Siwei; Li, Qi; Yu, Hong; Kong, Lingfeng

    2017-02-01

    Glycogen is important not only for the energy supplementary of oysters, but also for human consumption. High glycogen content can improve the stress survival of oyster. A key enzyme in glycogenesis is glycogen synthase that is encoded by glycogen synthase gene GYS. In this study, the relationship between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in coding regions of Crassostrea gigas GYS (Cg-GYS) and individual glycogen content was investigated with 321 individuals from five full-sib families. Single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) procedure was combined with sequencing to confirm individual SNP genotypes of Cg-GYS. Least-square analysis of variance was performed to assess the relationship of variation in glycogen content of C. gigas with single SNP genotype and SNP haplotype. As a consequence, six SNPs were found in coding regions to be significantly associated with glycogen content ( P glycogen content ( P glycogen content and provided molecular biological information for the selective breeding of good quality traits of C. gigas.

  16. Inherent lipid metabolic dysfunction in glycogen storage disease IIIa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin-Hua; Gong, Qi-Ming; Ling, Yun; Huang, Chong; Yu, De-Min; Gu, Lei-Lei; Liao, Xiang-Wei; Zhang, Dong-Hua; Hu, Xi-Qi; Han, Yue; Kong, Xiao-Fei; Zhang, Xin-Xin

    2014-12-05

    We studied two patients from a nonconsanguineous family with life-long abnormal liver function, hepatomegaly and abnormal fatty acid profiles. Abnormal liver function, hypoglycemia and muscle weakness are observed in various genetic diseases, including medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) deficiency and glycogen storage diseases. The proband showed increased free fatty acids, mainly C8 and C10, resembling fatty acid oxidation disorder. However, no mutation was found in ACADM and ACADL gene. Sequencing of theamylo-alpha-1, 6-glucosidase, 4-alpha-glucanotransferase (AGL) gene showed that both patients were compound heterozygotes for c.118C > T (p.Gln40X) and c.753_756 del CAGA (p.Asp251Glufsx29), whereas their parents were each heterozygous for one of these mutations. The AGL protein was undetectable in EBV-B cells from the two patients. Transcriptome analysis demonstrated a significant different pattern of gene expression in both of patients’ cells, including genes involving in the PPAR signaling pathway, fatty acid biosynthesis, lipid synthesis and visceral fat deposition and metabolic syndrome. This unique gene expression pattern is probably due to the absence of AGL, which potentially accounts for the observed clinical phenotypes of hyperlipidemia and hepatocyte steatosis in glycogen storage disease type IIIa.

  17. Exercise in muscle glycogen storage diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preisler, Nicolai; Haller, Ronald G; Vissing, John

    2015-05-01

    Glycogen storage diseases (GSD) are inborn errors of glycogen or glucose metabolism. In the GSDs that affect muscle, the consequence of a block in skeletal muscle glycogen breakdown or glucose use, is an impairment of muscular performance and exercise intolerance, owing to 1) an increase in glycogen storage that disrupts contractile function and/or 2) a reduced substrate turnover below the block, which inhibits skeletal muscle ATP production. Immobility is associated with metabolic alterations in muscle leading to an increased dependence on glycogen use and a reduced capacity for fatty acid oxidation. Such changes may be detrimental for persons with GSD from a metabolic perspective. However, exercise may alter skeletal muscle substrate metabolism in ways that are beneficial for patients with GSD, such as improving exercise tolerance and increasing fatty acid oxidation. In addition, a regular exercise program has the potential to improve general health and fitness and improve quality of life, if executed properly. In this review, we describe skeletal muscle substrate use during exercise in GSDs, and how blocks in metabolic pathways affect exercise tolerance in GSDs. We review the studies that have examined the effect of regular exercise training in different types of GSD. Finally, we consider how oral substrate supplementation can improve exercise tolerance and we discuss the precautions that apply to persons with GSD that engage in exercise.

  18. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Related Liver Disease Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Autoimmune Hepatitis Benign Liver Tumors Biliary Atresia Cirrhosis of the ... Disease Type 1 (von Gierke) Hemochromatosis Hepatic Encephalopathy Hepatitis A Hepatitis B Hepatitis C Intrahepatic Cholestasis of ...

  19. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Hemochromatosis Hepatic Encephalopathy Hepatitis A Hepatitis B Hepatitis C Intrahepatic Cholestasis of Pregnancy (ICP) Jaundice In Newborns ... are the common causes of cirrhosis? Hepatitis B & C Alcohol-related Liver Disease Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver ...

  20. Increased lipogenesis and resistance of lipoproteins to oxidative modification in two patients with glycogen storage disease type 1a

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bandsma, RHJ; Rake, JP; Visser, G; Neese, RA; Hellerstein, MK; van Duyvenvoorde, W; Princen, HMG; Stellaard, F; Smit, GPA; Kuipers, F

    We describe 2 patients with glycogen storage disease type la and severe hyperlipidemia without premature atherosclerosis. Susceptibility of low-density lipoproteins to oxidation was decreased, possibly related to the similar to40-fold increase in palmitate synthesis altering lipoprotein saturated

  1. Measurement of hepatic sterol synthesis in the Mongolian gerbil in vivo using [3H]water: diurnal variation and effect of type of dietary fat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercer, N.J.; Holub, B.J.

    1981-01-01

    The hepatic synthesis of sterol was measured in the male Mongolian gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus) in vivo following the administration of [ 3 H]water by monitoring the incorporation of radioactivity into digitonin-precipitable sterol. A diurnal rhythm in cholesterol synthesis was exhibited under conditions of ad libitum feeding with alternating 12-hour periods of light (0200 to 1400 hr) and dark (1400 to 0200 hr). The zenith was reached between 1500 and 2100 hr and the nadir approximately 10-12 hours later between 0200 and 0400 hr, which provided a zenith/nadir ratio of 9.6 to 1.0. The in vivo rates of hepatic sterol synthesis and plasma cholesterol levels were measured in gerbils fed semi-purified diets containing either 19.5% beef tallow + 0.5% safflower, 20% lard, or 20% safflower oil and widely differing ratios of polyunsaturated: saturated fatty acids. All diets were equalized to contain 0.01% cholesterol and 0.05% plant sterol. After 3 days on the experimental diets, the mean rates of cholesterol synthesis (nmol/g liver per hr) were 41.5, 26.6, and 13.8 for animals fed the diets containing beef tallow, lard, and safflower oil, respectively. After 7 and 14 days, synthetic rates were lowest in the gerbils fed safflower oil as were also the plasma cholesterol levels. These results indicate that the type of dietary lipid can significantly influence the in vivo rate of sterol biosynthesis in gerbil liver. This response may contribute, at least in part, to the observed differences in plasma cholesterol levels

  2. Exercise in muscle glycogen storage diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preisler, Nicolai Rasmus; Haller, Ronald G; Vissing, John

    2015-01-01

    exercise program has the potential to improve general health and fitness and improve quality of life, if executed properly. In this review, we describe skeletal muscle substrate use during exercise in GSDs, and how blocks in metabolic pathways affect exercise tolerance in GSDs. We review the studies...... that have examined the effect of regular exercise training in different types of GSD. Finally, we consider how oral substrate supplementation can improve exercise tolerance and we discuss the precautions that apply to persons with GSD that engage in exercise.......Glycogen storage diseases (GSD) are inborn errors of glycogen or glucose metabolism. In the GSDs that affect muscle, the consequence of a block in skeletal muscle glycogen breakdown or glucose use, is an impairment of muscular performance and exercise intolerance, owing to 1) an increase...

  3. Increased de novo lipogenesis and delayed conversion of large VLDL into intermediate density lipoprotein particles contribute to Hyperlipidemia in glycogen storage disease type 1a

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bandsma, Robert H. J.; Prinsen, Berthil H.; Van Der Velden, Monique De Sain; Rake, Jan-Peter; Boer, Theo; Smit, G. Peter A.; Reijngoud, Dirk-Jan; Kuipers, Folkert

    Glycogen storage disease type 1a (GSD-1a) is a metabolic disorder characterized by fasting-induced hypoglycemia, hepatic steatosis, and hyperlipidemia. The mechanisms underlying the lipid abnormalities are largely unknown. To investigate these mechanisms seven GSD-1a patients and four healthy

  4. No effect of glycogen level on glycogen metabolism during high intensity exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandenberghe, Katleen; Hespel, P.; Eynde, Bart Vanden

    1995-01-01

    , either for 1 min 45 s (protocol 1; N = 18) or to exhaustion (protocol 2; N = 14). The exercise tests were preceded by either 5 d on a controlled normal (N) diet, or by 2 d of glycogen-depleting exercise accompanied by the normal diet followed by 3 d on a carbohydrate-rich (CHR) diet. In protocol 1......This study examined the effect of glycogen supercompensation on glycogen breakdown, muscle and blood lactate accumulation, blood-pH, and performance during short-term high-intensity exercise. Young healthy volunteers performed two supramaximal (125% of VO2max) exercise tests on a bicycle ergometer...

  5. Glycogen metabolism in aerobic mixed cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dircks, Klaus; Beun, J.J.; van Loosdrecht, M.C.M.

    2001-01-01

    In this study, the metabolism of glycogen storage and consumption in mixed cultures under aerobic conditions is described. The experimental results are used to calibrate a metabolic model, which as sole stoichiometric variables has the efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation (delta) and maintenance...... of glycogen and subsequent growth occur without significant loss of energy, as compared with direct growth on glucose. For kinetic modeling, Monod kinetics is used most commonly in activated sludge models to describe the rate of microbial transformation. Monod kinetics, however, does not provide a good...

  6. Cell swelling and glycogen metabolism in hepatocytes from fasted rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gustafson, L. A.; Jumelle-Laclau, M. N.; van Woerkom, G. M.; van Kuilenburg, A. B.; Meijer, A. J.

    1997-01-01

    Cell swelling is known to increase net glycogen production from glucose in hepatocytes from fasted rats by activating glycogen synthase. Since both active glycogen synthase and phosphorylase are present in hepatocytes, suppression of flux through phosphorylase may also contribute to the net increase

  7. Farnesoid X receptor induces Takeda G-protein receptor 5 cross-talk to regulate bile acid synthesis and hepatic metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Preeti; Liu, Hailiang; Boehme, Shannon; Xie, Cen; Krausz, Kristopher W; Gonzalez, Frank; Chiang, John Y L

    2017-06-30

    The bile acid-activated receptors, nuclear farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and the membrane Takeda G-protein receptor 5 (TGR5), are known to improve glucose and insulin sensitivity in obese and diabetic mice. However, the metabolic roles of these two receptors and the underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood. Here, we studied the effects of the dual FXR and TGR5 agonist INT-767 on hepatic bile acid synthesis and intestinal secretion of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) in wild-type, Fxr -/- , and Tgr5 -/- mice. INT-767 efficaciously stimulated intracellular Ca 2+ levels, cAMP activity, and GLP-1 secretion and improved glucose and lipid metabolism more than did the FXR-selective obeticholic acid and TGR5-selective INT-777 agonists. Interestingly, INT-767 reduced expression of the genes in the classic bile acid synthesis pathway but induced those in the alternative pathway, which is consistent with decreased taurocholic acid and increased tauromuricholic acids in bile. Furthermore, FXR activation induced expression of FXR target genes, including fibroblast growth factor 15, and unexpectedly Tgr5 and prohormone convertase 1/3 gene expression in the ileum. We identified an FXR-responsive element on the Tgr5 gene promoter. Fxr -/- and Tgr5 -/- mice exhibited reduced GLP-1 secretion, which was stimulated by INT-767 in the Tgr5 -/- mice but not in the Fxr -/- mice. Our findings uncovered a novel mechanism in which INT-767 activation of FXR induces Tgr5 gene expression and increases Ca 2+ levels and cAMP activity to stimulate GLP-1 secretion and improve hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism in high-fat diet-induced obese mice. Activation of both FXR and TGR5 may therefore represent an effective therapy for managing hepatic steatosis, obesity, and diabetes. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Glycogen Shunt Activity and Glycolytic Supercompensation in Astrocytes May Be Distinctly Mediated via the Muscle Form of Glycogen Phosphorylase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Emil; Bak, Lasse K; Walls, Anne B

    2017-01-01

    Glycogen is the main storage form of glucose in the brain. In contrast with previous beliefs, brain glycogen has recently been shown to play important roles in several brain functions. A fraction of metabolized glucose molecules are being shunted through glycogen before reentering the glycolytic ...

  9. A Bayesian evidence synthesis approach to estimate disease prevalence in hard-to-reach populations: hepatitis C in New York City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Tan

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Existing methods to estimate the prevalence of chronic hepatitis C (HCV in New York City (NYC are limited in scope and fail to assess hard-to-reach subpopulations with highest risk such as injecting drug users (IDUs. To address these limitations, we employ a Bayesian multi-parameter evidence synthesis model to systematically combine multiple sources of data, account for bias in certain data sources, and provide unbiased HCV prevalence estimates with associated uncertainty. Our approach improves on previous estimates by explicitly accounting for injecting drug use and including data from high-risk subpopulations such as the incarcerated, and is more inclusive, utilizing ten NYC data sources. In addition, we derive two new equations to allow age at first injecting drug use data for former and current IDUs to be incorporated into the Bayesian evidence synthesis, a first for this type of model. Our estimated overall HCV prevalence as of 2012 among NYC adults aged 20–59 years is 2.78% (95% CI 2.61–2.94%, which represents between 124,900 and 140,000 chronic HCV cases. These estimates suggest that HCV prevalence in NYC is higher than previously indicated from household surveys (2.2% and the surveillance system (2.37%, and that HCV transmission is increasing among young injecting adults in NYC. An ancillary benefit from our results is an estimate of current IDUs aged 20–59 in NYC: 0.58% or 27,600 individuals. Keywords: Bayesian evidence synthesis, Disease prevalence estimation, Hard-to-reach populations, Injecting drug use, hepatitis C in New York City

  10. Insights into Brain Glycogen Metabolism: THE STRUCTURE OF HUMAN BRAIN GLYCOGEN PHOSPHORYLASE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Cécile; Li de la Sierra-Gallay, Ines; Duval, Romain; Xu, Ximing; Cocaign, Angélique; Léger, Thibaut; Woffendin, Gary; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Etchebest, Catherine; Haouz, Ahmed; Dupret, Jean-Marie; Rodrigues-Lima, Fernando

    2016-08-26

    Brain glycogen metabolism plays a critical role in major brain functions such as learning or memory consolidation. However, alteration of glycogen metabolism and glycogen accumulation in the brain contributes to neurodegeneration as observed in Lafora disease. Glycogen phosphorylase (GP), a key enzyme in glycogen metabolism, catalyzes the rate-limiting step of glycogen mobilization. Moreover, the allosteric regulation of the three GP isozymes (muscle, liver, and brain) by metabolites and phosphorylation, in response to hormonal signaling, fine-tunes glycogenolysis to fulfill energetic and metabolic requirements. Whereas the structures of muscle and liver GPs have been known for decades, the structure of brain GP (bGP) has remained elusive despite its critical role in brain glycogen metabolism. Here, we report the crystal structure of human bGP in complex with PEG 400 (2.5 Å) and in complex with its allosteric activator AMP (3.4 Å). These structures demonstrate that bGP has a closer structural relationship with muscle GP, which is also activated by AMP, contrary to liver GP, which is not. Importantly, despite the structural similarities between human bGP and the two other mammalian isozymes, the bGP structures reveal molecular features unique to the brain isozyme that provide a deeper understanding of the differences in the activation properties of these allosteric enzymes by the allosteric effector AMP. Overall, our study further supports that the distinct structural and regulatory properties of GP isozymes contribute to the different functions of muscle, liver, and brain glycogen. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Determination of the glycogen content in cyanobacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porcellinis, Alice De; Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Sakuragi, Yumiko

    2017-01-01

    of glycogen to generate glucose monomers, which are detected by a glucose oxidase-peroxidase (GOD-POD) enzyme coupled assay. The method has been applied to Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, two model cyanobacterial species that are widely used in metabolic engineering. Moreover...

  12. Pregnancies in glycogen storage disease type Ia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, Danielle H. J.; Rake, Jan Peter; Schwarz, Martin; Ullrich, Kurt; Weinstein, David A.; Merkel, Martin; Sauer, Pieter J. J.; Smit, G. Peter A.

    OBJECTIVE: Reports on pregnancies in women with glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia) are scarce. Because of improved life expectancy, pregnancy is becoming an important issue. We describe 15 pregnancies by focusing on dietary treatment, biochemical parameters, and GSD-Ia complications. STUDY

  13. Molecular Structure of Human-Liver Glycogen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Deng

    Full Text Available Glycogen is a highly branched glucose polymer which is involved in maintaining blood-sugar homeostasis. Liver glycogen contains large composite α particles made up of linked β particles. Previous studies have shown that the binding which links β particles into α particles is impaired in diabetic mice. The present study reports the first molecular structural characterization of human-liver glycogen from non-diabetic patients, using transmission electron microscopy for morphology and size-exclusion chromatography for the molecular size distribution; the latter is also studied as a function of time during acid hydrolysis in vitro, which is sensitive to certain structural features, particularly glycosidic vs. proteinaceous linkages. The results are compared with those seen in mice and pigs. The molecular structural change during acid hydrolysis is similar in each case, and indicates that the linkage of β into α particles is not glycosidic. This result, and the similar morphology in each case, together imply that human liver glycogen has similar molecular structure to those of mice and pigs. This knowledge will be useful for future diabetes drug targets.

  14. Why does the brain (not) have glycogen?

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiNuzzo, Mauro; Maraviglia, Bruno; Giove, Federico

    2011-05-01

    In the present paper we formulate the hypothesis that brain glycogen is a critical determinant in the modulation of carbohydrate supply at the cellular level. Specifically, we propose that mobilization of astrocytic glycogen after an increase in AMP levels during enhanced neuronal activity controls the concentration of glucose phosphates in astrocytes. This would result in modulation of glucose phosphorylation by hexokinase and upstream cell glucose uptake. This mechanism would favor glucose channeling to activated neurons, supplementing the already rich neuron-astrocyte metabolic and functional partnership with important implications for the energy compounds used to sustain neuronal activity. The hypothesis is based on recent modeling evidence suggesting that rapid glycogen breakdown can profoundly alter the short-term kinetics of glucose delivery to neurons and astrocytes. It is also based on review of the literature relevant to glycogen metabolism during physiological brain activity, with an emphasis on the metabolic pathways identifying both the origin and the fate of this glucose reserve. Copyright © 2011 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Can glycogen be measured by in vivo neutron activation analysis?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutcliffe, J.F.; Smith, A.H.; King, R.F.G.H.; Smith, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    The object of this note is to examine the feasibility of measuring liver glycogen using in vivo neutron activation analysis. The authors present equations which allow the mass of glycogen to be expressed in terms of the masses of oxygen, hydrogen, carbon and nitrogen. Using the most precise, published measurements of these elements, the standard deviation in the estimate of liver glycogen was 34 g. The magnitude of this error precluded observing changes in liver glycogen which are normally in the range 16 g to 72 g. However, this technique might be useful in detecting transient high concentrations of liver glycogen.(UK)

  16. Glycogen with short average chain length enhances bacterial durability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liang; Wise, Michael J.

    2011-09-01

    Glycogen is conventionally viewed as an energy reserve that can be rapidly mobilized for ATP production in higher organisms. However, several studies have noted that glycogen with short average chain length in some bacteria is degraded very slowly. In addition, slow utilization of glycogen is correlated with bacterial viability, that is, the slower the glycogen breakdown rate, the longer the bacterial survival time in the external environment under starvation conditions. We call that a durable energy storage mechanism (DESM). In this review, evidence from microbiology, biochemistry, and molecular biology will be assembled to support the hypothesis of glycogen as a durable energy storage compound. One method for testing the DESM hypothesis is proposed.

  17. Radiometric assays for glycerol, glucose, and glycogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, D.C.; Kaslow, H.R.

    1989-01-01

    We have developed radiometric assays for small quantities of glycerol, glucose and glycogen, based on a technique described by Thorner and Paulus for the measurement of glycerokinase activity. In the glycerol assay, glycerol is phosphorylated with [32P]ATP and glycerokinase, residual [32P]ATP is hydrolyzed by heating in acid, and free [32P]phosphate is removed by precipitation with ammonium molybdate and triethylamine. Standard dose-response curves were linear from 50 to 3000 pmol glycerol with less than 3% SD in triplicate measurements. Of the substances tested for interference, only dihydroxyacetone gave a slight false positive signal at high concentration. When used to measure glycerol concentrations in serum and in media from incubated adipose tissue, the radiometric glycerol assay correlated well with a commonly used spectrophotometric assay. The radiometric glucose assay is similar to the glycerol assay, except that glucokinase is used instead of glycerokinase. Dose response was linear from 5 to 3000 pmol glucose with less than 3% SD in triplicate measurements. Glucosamine and N-acetylglucosamine gave false positive signals when equimolar to glucose. When glucose concentrations in serum were measured, the radiometric glucose assay agreed well with hexokinase/glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (H/GDH)-based and glucose oxidase/H2O2-based glucose assays. The radiometric method for glycogen measurement incorporates previously described isolation and digestion techniques, followed by the radiometric assay of free glucose. When used to measure glycogen in mouse epididymal fat pads, the radiometric glycogen assay correlated well with the H/GDH-based glycogen assay. All three radiometric assays offer several practical advantages over spectral assays

  18. Glycogen dynamics of crucian carp (Carassius carassius) in prolonged anoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vornanen, Matti; Haverinen, Jaakko

    2016-12-01

    Mobilization of glycogen stores was examined in the anoxic crucian carp (Carassius carassius Linnaeus). Winter-acclimatized fish were exposed to anoxia for 1, 3, or 6 weeks at 2 °C, and changes in the size of glycogen deposits were followed. After 1 week of anoxia, a major part of the glycogen stores was mobilized in liver (79.5 %) and heart (75.6 %), and large decreases occurred in gill (46.7 %) and muscle (45.1 %). Brain was an exception in that its glycogen content remained unchanged. The amount of glycogen degraded during the first anoxic week was sufficient for the anaerobic ethanol production for more than 6 weeks of anoxia. After 3 and 6 weeks of anoxia, there was little further degradation of glycogen in other tissues except the brain where the stores were reduced by 30.1 and 49.9 % after 3 and 6 weeks of anoxia, respectively. One week of normoxic recovery following the 6-week anoxia was associated with a complete replenishment of the brain glycogen and partial recovery of liver, heart, and gill glycogen stores. Notably, the resynthesis of glycogen occurred at the expense of the existing energy reserves of the body in fasting fish. These findings indicate that in crucian carp, glycogen stores are quickly mobilized after the onset of anoxia, with the exception of the brain whose glycogen stores may be saved for putative emergency situations.

  19. Schwann Cell Glycogen Selectively Supports Myelinated Axon Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Angus M; Evans, Richard D; Black, Joel; Ransom, Bruce R

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Interruption of energy supply to peripheral axons is a cause of axon loss. We determined if glycogen was present in mammalian peripheral nerve, and if it supported axon conduction during aglycemia. Methods We used biochemical assay and electron microscopy to determine the presence of glycogen, and electrophysiology to monitor axon function. Results Glycogen was present in sciatic nerve, its concentration varying directly with ambient [glucose]. Electron microscopy detected glycogen granules primarily in myelinating Schwann cell cytoplasm and these diminished after exposure to aglycemia. During aglycemia, conduction failure in large myelinated axons (A fibers) mirrored the time-course of glycogen loss. Latency to CAP failure was directly related to nerve glycogen content at aglycemia onset. Glycogen did not benefit the function of slow-conducting, small diameter unmyelinated axons (C fibers) during aglycemia. Blocking glycogen breakdown pharmacologically accelerated CAP failure during aglycemia in A fibers, but not in C fibers. Lactate was as effective as glucose in supporting sciatic nerve function, and was continuously released into the extracellular space in the presence of glucose and fell rapidly during aglycemia. Interpretation Our findings indicated that glycogen is present in peripheral nerve, primarily in myelinating Schwann cells, and exclusively supports large diameter, myelinated axon conduction during aglycemia. Available evidence suggests that peripheral nerve glycogen breaks down during aglycemia and is passed, probably as lactate, to myelinated axons to support function. Unmyelinated axons are not protected by glycogen and are more vulnerable to dysfunction during periods of hypoglycemia. PMID:23034913

  20. Glycogen and its metabolism: some new developments and old themes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Peter J.; Depaoli-Roach, Anna A.; Hurley, Thomas D.; Tagliabracci, Vincent S.

    2016-01-01

    Glycogen is a branched polymer of glucose that acts as a store of energy in times of nutritional sufficiency for utilization in times of need. Its metabolism has been the subject of extensive investigation and much is known about its regulation by hormones such as insulin, glucagon and adrenaline (epinephrine). There has been debate over the relative importance of allosteric compared with covalent control of the key biosynthetic enzyme, glycogen synthase, as well as the relative importance of glucose entry into cells compared with glycogen synthase regulation in determining glycogen accumulation. Significant new developments in eukaryotic glycogen metabolism over the last decade or so include: (i) three-dimensional structures of the biosynthetic enzymes glycogenin and glycogen synthase, with associated implications for mechanism and control; (ii) analyses of several genetically engineered mice with altered glycogen metabolism that shed light on the mechanism of control; (iii) greater appreciation of the spatial aspects of glycogen metabolism, including more focus on the lysosomal degradation of glycogen; and (iv) glycogen phosphorylation and advances in the study of Lafora disease, which is emerging as a glycogen storage disease. PMID:22248338

  1. Incorporation of 14C glucose into glycogen and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in rat brain following carbon monoxide intoxication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sikorska, M.; Gorzkowski, B.; Szumanska, G.; Smialek, M.

    1975-01-01

    Incorporation of 14 C glucose into glycogen and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in rat brain following carbon monoxide intoxication was studied. In brains of rats tested on the 20, 30 and 60th minute of exposure to CO and immediately after removal from the chamber the enzyme activity showed no essential deviation from the control level. In the group of rats tested 1 hour after taking them out from the chamber increase of the enzyme activity was noticed, amounting to about 33% of the control value. The brains tested 24 hours after exposure showed the largest increase of the enzyme activity by about 94%. In the next time periods, 48 and 72 hours after intoxication, the enzyme activity was decreasing. The glycogen content in brains of control animals increased 3 hours after CO intoxication by about 69%. The increase of glycogen synthesis was expressed by increase of the total radioactivity, which amounted to 160% of the control value. (Z.M.)

  2. THE EFFECT OF INSULIN AND CARBOHYDRATE SUPPLEMENTATION ON GLYCOGEN REPLENISHMENT AMONG DIFFERENT HINDLIMB MUSCLES IN RATS FOLLOWING PROLONGED SWIMMING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Chich Hsu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present study we investigated the interactive effects of insulin and carbohydrate on glycogen replenishment in different rat hindlimb muscles. Forty male Sprague Dawley rats were assigned to 5 groups, including 1 sedentary control with carbohydrate supplement (2 g glucose · kg body wt-1, 2 sedentary rats with 16 hours recovery, carbohydrate and insulin (0.5 U · kg body wt-1, 3 swimming without recovery, 4 swimming with 16 hours recovery and carbohydrate supplement, and 5 swimming with 16 hours recovery, carbohydrate and insulin. The swimming protocol consisted of two 3 h swimming sections, which were separated by a 45 min rest. The insulin and carbohydrate were administered to the rats immediately after exercise. At the end of the experiment, the soleus (S, plantaris (P, quadriceps (Q and gastrocnemius (G were surgically excised to evaluate glycogen utilization and replenishment. We observed that glycogen utilization was significantly lower in G and Q than S and P during swimming (p <0.05, and S showed the greatest capacity of glycogen resynthesis after post-exercise recovery (p <0.05. In the sedentary state, the glycogen synthesis did not differ among hindlimb muscles during insulin and carbohydrate treatments. Interestingly, with insulin and carbohydrate, the glycogen resynthesis in S and P were significantly greater than in Q and G following post-exercise recovery (p <0.05. We therefore concluded that the soleus and plantaris are the primary working muscles during swimming, and the greatest glycogen replenishment capacity of the soleus during post-exercise recovery is likely due to its highest insulin sensitivity.

  3. Characterization of the highly branched glycogen from the thermoacidophilic red microalga Galdieria sulphuraria and comparison with other glycogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Garcia, Marta; Stuart, Marc C A; van der Maarel, Marc J E C

    2016-08-01

    The thermoacidophilic red microalga Galdieria sulphuraria synthesizes glycogen when growing under heterotrophic conditions. Structural characterization revealed that G. sulphuraria glycogen is the most highly branched glycogen described to date, with 18% of α-(1→6) linkages. Moreover, it differs from other glycogens because it is composed of short chains only and has a substantially smaller molecular weight and particle size. The physiological role of this highly branched glycogen in G. sulphuraria is discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Processivity and Subcellular Localization of Glycogen Synthase Depend on a Non-catalytic High Affinity Glycogen-binding Site*

    OpenAIRE

    Díaz, Adelaida; Martínez-Pons, Carlos; Fita, Ignacio; Ferrer, Juan C.; Guinovart, Joan J.

    2011-01-01

    Glycogen synthase, a central enzyme in glucose metabolism, catalyzes the successive addition of α-1,4-linked glucose residues to the non-reducing end of a growing glycogen molecule. A non-catalytic glycogen-binding site, identified by x-ray crystallography on the surface of the glycogen synthase from the archaeon Pyrococcus abyssi, has been found to be functionally conserved in the eukaryotic enzymes. The disruption of this binding site in both the archaeal and the human muscle glycogen synth...

  5. Synthesis of deleobuvir, a potent hepatitis C virus polymerase inhibitor, and its major metabolites labeled with carbon-13 and carbon-14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latli, Bachir; Hrapchak, Matt; Chevliakov, Maxim; Li, Guisheng; Campbell, Scot; Busacca, Carl A; Senanayake, Chris H

    2015-05-30

    Deleobuvir, (2E)-3-(2-{1-[2-(5-bromopyrimidin-2-yl)-3-cyclopentyl-1-methyl-1H-indole-6-carboxamido]cyclobutyl}-1-methyl-1H-benzimidazol-6-yl)prop-2-enoic acid (1), is a non-nucleoside, potent, and selective inhibitor of hepatitis C virus NS5B polymerase. Herein, we describe the detailed synthesis of this compound labeled with carbon-13 and carbon-14. The synthesis of its three major metabolites, namely, the reduced double bond metabolite (2) and the acyl glucuronide derivatives of (1) and (2), is also reported. Aniline-(13) C6 was the starting material to prepare butyl (E)-3-(3-methylamino-4-nitrophenyl-(13) C6 )acrylate [(13) C6 ]-(11) in six steps. This intermediate was then used to obtain [(13) C6 ]-(1) and [(13) C6 ]-(2) in five and four more steps, respectively. For the radioactive synthesis, potassium cyanide-(14) C was used to prepare 1-cylobutylaminoacid [(14) C]-(23) via Buchrer-Bergs reaction. The carbonyl chloride of this acid was then used to access both [(14) C]-(1) and [(14) C]-(2) in four steps. The acyl glucuronide derivatives [(13) C6 ]-(3), [(13) C6 ]-(4) and [(14) C]-(3) were synthesized in three steps from the acids [(13) C6 ]-(1), [(13) C6 ]-(2) and [(14) C]-(1) using known procedures. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Parallel evolution of the glycogen synthase 1 (muscle) gene Gys1 between Old World and New World fruit bats (Order: Chiroptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Lu; Shen, Bin; Irwin, David M; Zhang, Shuyi

    2014-10-01

    Glycogen synthase, which catalyzes the synthesis of glycogen, is especially important for Old World (Pteropodidae) and New World (Phyllostomidae) fruit bats that ingest high-carbohydrate diets. Glycogen synthase 1, encoded by the Gys1 gene, is the glycogen synthase isozyme that functions in muscles. To determine whether Gys1 has undergone adaptive evolution in bats with carbohydrate-rich diets, in comparison to insect-eating sister bat taxa, we sequenced the coding region of the Gys1 gene from 10 species of bats, including two Old World fruit bats (Pteropodidae) and a New World fruit bat (Phyllostomidae). Our results show no evidence for positive selection in the Gys1 coding sequence on the ancestral Old World and the New World Artibeus lituratus branches. Tests for convergent evolution indicated convergence of the sequences and one parallel amino acid substitution (T395A) was detected on these branches, which was likely driven by natural selection.

  7. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... A Hepatitis B Hepatitis C Intrahepatic Cholestasis of Pregnancy (ICP) Jaundice In Newborns Diseases of the Liver ... A Hepatitis B Hepatitis C Intrahepatic Cholestasis of Pregnancy (ICP) Jaundice In Newborns Diseases of the Liver ...

  8. Viral Hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home A-Z Health Topics Viral hepatitis Viral hepatitis > A-Z Health Topics Viral hepatitis (PDF, 90 ... liver. Source: National Cancer Institute Learn more about hepatitis Watch a video. Learn who is at risk ...

  9. Hepatitis B

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... B Entire Lesson Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For Veterans and the Public Veterans ... in their blood (sometimes referred to as the hepatitis B viral load) and an unusually high level of a ...

  10. Epinephrine-stimulated glycogen breakdown activates glycogen synthase and increases insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in epitrochlearis muscles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolnes, Anders J; Birk, Jesper Bratz; Eilertsen, Einar

    2015-01-01

    Adrenaline increases glycogen synthase (GS) phosphorylation and decreases GS activity but also stimulates glycogen breakdown and low glycogen content normally activates GS. To test the hypothesis that glycogen content directly regulates GS phosphorylation, glycogen breakdown was stimulated...... in condition with decreased GS activation. Saline or adrenaline (0.02mg/100g rat) was injected subcutaneously in Wistar rats (~130 g) with low (24 h fasted), normal (normal diet) and high glycogen content (fasted-refed) and epitrochlearis muscles were removed after 3 h and incubated ex vivo eliminating...... adrenaline action. Adrenaline injection reduced glycogen content in epitrochlearis muscles with high (120.7±17.8 vs 204.6±14.5 mmol•kg(-1); pglycogen (89.5±7.6 vs 152.6±8.1 mmol•kg(-1); pglycogen (90.0±5.0 vs 102.8±7.8 mmol•kg(-1); p=0...

  11. Inhibitory properties of 1,4-dideoxy-1,4-imino-d-arabinitol (DAB) derivatives acting on glycogen metabolising enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Lobo, Mireia; Concia, Alda Lisa; Gómez, Livia; Clapés, Pere; Fita, Ignacio; Guinovart, Joan J; Ferrer, Joan C

    2016-09-26

    Glycogen synthase (GS) and glycogen phosphorylase (GP) are the key enzymes that control, respectively, the synthesis and degradation of glycogen, a multi-branched glucose polymer that serves as a form of energy storage in bacteria, fungi and animals. An abnormal glycogen metabolism is associated with several human diseases. Thus, GS and GP constitute adequate pharmacological targets to modulate cellular glycogen levels by means of their selective inhibition. The compound 1,4-dideoxy-1,4-imino-d-arabinitol (DAB) is a known potent inhibitor of GP. We studied the inhibitory effect of DAB, its enantiomer LAB, and 29 DAB derivatives on the activity of rat muscle glycogen phosphorylase (RMGP) and E. coli glycogen synthase (EcGS). The isoform 4 of sucrose synthase (SuSy4) from Solanum tuberosum L. was also included in the study for comparative purposes. Although these three enzymes possess highly conserved catalytic site architectures, the DAB derivatives analysed showed extremely diverse inhibitory potential. Subtle changes in the positions of crucial residues in their active sites are sufficient to discriminate among the structural differences of the tested inhibitors. For the two Leloir-type enzymes, EcGS and SuSy4, which use sugar nucleotides as donors, the inhibitory potency of the compounds analysed was synergistically enhanced by more than three orders of magnitude in the presence of ADP and UDP, respectively. Our results are consistent with a model in which these compounds bind to the subsite in the active centre of the enzymes that is normally occupied by the glucosyl residue which is transferred between donor and acceptor substrates. The ability to selectively inhibit the catalytic activity of the key enzymes of the glycogen metabolism may represent a new approach for the treatment of disorders of the glycogen metabolism.

  12. Hepatitis C virus E2 protein involve in insulin resistance through an impairment of Akt/PKB and GSK3β signaling in hepatocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsieh Ming-Ju

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection may cause liver diseases of various severities ranging from primary acute infection to life-threatening diseases, such as cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma with poor prognosis. According to clinical findings, HCV infection may also lead to some extra-hepatic symptoms, including type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM. Since insulin resistance is the major etiology for type 2 DM and numerous evidences showed that HCV infection associated with insulin resistance, the involvement of E2 in the pathogenesis of type 2 DM and underlying mechanisms were investigated in this study. Methods Reverse transcription and real-time PCR, Western blot assay, Immunoprecipitation, Glucose uptake assay and analysis of cellular glycogen content. Results Results showed that E2 influenced on protein levels of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1 and impaired insulin-induced Ser308 phosphorylation of Akt/PKB and Ser9 phosphorylation of GSK3β in Huh7 cells, leading to an inhibition of glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis, respectively, and eventually insulin resistance. Conclusions Therefore, HCV E2 protein indeed involved in the pathogenesis of type 2 DM by inducing insulin resistance.

  13. Interrelationship of glyocen metabolism and lactose synthesis in mammary epithelial cells of mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emerman, J T; Bartley, J C; Bissell, M J

    1980-01-01

    Glycogen metabolism in mammary epithelial cells was investigated (i) by studying the conversion of glucose into glycogen and other cellular products in these cells from virgin, pregnant and lactating mice and (ii) by assaying the enzymes directly involved with glycogen metabolism. We find that: (1) mammary epithelial cells synthesized glycogen at rates up to over 60% that of the whole gland; (2) the rate of this synthesis was modulated greatly during the reproductive cycle, reaching a peak in late pregnancy and decreasing rapidly at parturition, when abundant synthesis of lactose was initiated. We propose that glycogen bynthesis restricts lactose synthesis during late pregnancy by competing successfully for the shared UDP-glucose pool. The physiological advantage of glycogen accumulation during late pregnancy is discussed.

  14. Glycogen storage disease type III: modified Atkins diet improves myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayorandan, Sebene; Meyer, Uta; Hartmann, Hans; Das, Anibh Martin

    2014-11-28

    Frequent feeds with carbohydrate-rich meals or continuous enteral feeding has been the therapy of choice in glycogen storage disease (Glycogenosis) type III. Recent guidelines on diagnosis and management recommend frequent feedings with high complex carbohydrates or cornstarch avoiding fasting in children, while in adults a low-carb-high-protein-diet is recommended. While this regimen can prevent hypoglycaemia in children it does not improve skeletal and heart muscle function, which are compromised in patients with glycogenosis IIIa. Administration of carbohydrates may elicit reactive hyperinsulinism, resulting in suppression of lipolysis, ketogenesis, gluconeogenesis, and activation of glycogen synthesis. Thus, heart and skeletal muscle are depleted of energy substrates. Modified Atkins diet leads to increased blood levels of ketone bodies and fatty acids. We hypothesize that this health care intervention improves the energetic balance of muscles. We treated 2 boys with glycogenosis IIIa aged 9 and 11 years with a modified Atkins diet (10 g carbohydrate per day, protein and fatty acids ad libitum) over a period of 32 and 26 months, respectively. In both patients, creatine kinase levels in blood dropped in response to Atkins diet. When diet was withdrawn in one of the patients he complained of chest pain, reduced physical strength and creatine kinase levels rapidly increased. This was reversed when Atkins diet was reintroduced. One patient suffered from severe cardiomyopathy which significantly improved under diet. Patients with glycogenosis IIIa benefit from an improved energetic state of heart and skeletal muscle by introduction of Atkins diet both on a biochemical and clinical level. Apart from transient hypoglycaemia no serious adverse effects were observed.

  15. A snapshot of the hepatic transcriptome: ad libitum alcohol intake suppresses expression of cholesterol synthesis genes in alcohol-preferring (P rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathon D Klein

    Full Text Available Research is uncovering the genetic and biochemical effects of consuming large quantities of alcohol. One prime example is the J- or U-shaped relationship between the levels of alcohol consumption and the risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Moderate alcohol consumption in humans (about 30 g ethanol/d is associated with reduced risk of coronary heart disease, while abstinence and heavier alcohol intake is linked to increased risk. However, the hepatic consequences of moderate alcohol drinking are largely unknown. Previous data from alcohol-preferring (P rats showed that chronic consumption does not produce significant hepatic steatosis in this well-established model. Therefore, free-choice alcohol drinking in P rats may mimic low risk or nonhazardous drinking in humans, and chronic exposure in P animals can illuminate the molecular underpinnings of free-choice drinking in the liver. To address this gap, we captured the global, steady-state liver transcriptome following a 23 week free-choice, moderate alcohol consumption regimen (∼ 7.43 g ethanol/kg/day in inbred alcohol-preferring (iP10a rats. Chronic consumption led to down-regulation of nine genes in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway, including HMG-CoA reductase, the rate-limiting step for cholesterol synthesis. These findings corroborate our phenotypic analyses, which indicate that this paradigm produced animals whose hepatic triglyceride levels, cholesterol levels and liver histology were indistinguishable from controls. These findings explain, at least in part, the J- or U-shaped relationship between cardiovascular risk and alcohol intake, and provide outstanding candidates for future studies aimed at understanding the mechanisms that underlie the salutary cardiovascular benefits of chronic low risk and nonhazardous alcohol intake.

  16. A snapshot of the hepatic transcriptome: ad libitum alcohol intake suppresses expression of cholesterol synthesis genes in alcohol-preferring (P) rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Jonathon D; Sherrill, Jeremy B; Morello, Gabriella M; San Miguel, Phillip J; Ding, Zhenming; Liangpunsakul, Suthat; Liang, Tiebing; Muir, William M; Lumeng, Lawrence; Lossie, Amy C

    2014-01-01

    Research is uncovering the genetic and biochemical effects of consuming large quantities of alcohol. One prime example is the J- or U-shaped relationship between the levels of alcohol consumption and the risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Moderate alcohol consumption in humans (about 30 g ethanol/d) is associated with reduced risk of coronary heart disease, while abstinence and heavier alcohol intake is linked to increased risk. However, the hepatic consequences of moderate alcohol drinking are largely unknown. Previous data from alcohol-preferring (P) rats showed that chronic consumption does not produce significant hepatic steatosis in this well-established model. Therefore, free-choice alcohol drinking in P rats may mimic low risk or nonhazardous drinking in humans, and chronic exposure in P animals can illuminate the molecular underpinnings of free-choice drinking in the liver. To address this gap, we captured the global, steady-state liver transcriptome following a 23 week free-choice, moderate alcohol consumption regimen (∼ 7.43 g ethanol/kg/day) in inbred alcohol-preferring (iP10a) rats. Chronic consumption led to down-regulation of nine genes in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway, including HMG-CoA reductase, the rate-limiting step for cholesterol synthesis. These findings corroborate our phenotypic analyses, which indicate that this paradigm produced animals whose hepatic triglyceride levels, cholesterol levels and liver histology were indistinguishable from controls. These findings explain, at least in part, the J- or U-shaped relationship between cardiovascular risk and alcohol intake, and provide outstanding candidates for future studies aimed at understanding the mechanisms that underlie the salutary cardiovascular benefits of chronic low risk and nonhazardous alcohol intake.

  17. Functional significance of brain glycogen in sustaining glutamatergic neurotransmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sickmann, Helle M; Walls, Anne B; Schousboe, Arne; Bouman, Stephan D; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2009-05-01

    The involvement of brain glycogen in sustaining neuronal activity has previously been demonstrated. However, to what extent energy derived from glycogen is consumed by astrocytes themselves or is transferred to the neurons in the form of lactate for oxidative metabolism to proceed is at present unclear. The significance of glycogen in fueling glutamate uptake into astrocytes was specifically addressed in cultured astrocytes. Moreover, the objective was to elucidate whether glycogen derived energy is important for maintaining glutamatergic neurotransmission, induced by repetitive exposure to NMDA in co-cultures of cerebellar neurons and astrocytes. In the astrocytes it was shown that uptake of the glutamate analogue D-[3H]aspartate was impaired when glycogen degradation was inhibited irrespective of the presence of glucose, signifying that energy derived from glycogen degradation is important for the astrocytic compartment. By inhibiting glycogen degradation in co-cultures it was evident that glycogen provides energy to sustain glutamatergic neurotransmission, i.e. release and uptake of glutamate. The relocation of glycogen derived lactate to the neuronal compartment was investigated by employing d-lactate, a competitive substrate for the monocarboxylate transporters. Neurotransmitter release was affected by the presence of d-lactate indicating that glycogen derived energy is important not only in the astrocytic but also in the neuronal compartment.

  18. Prolactin is a major inhibitor of hepatic Leptin A synthesis and secretion: studies utilizing a homologous Leptin A ELISA in the tilapia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douros, Jonathan D; Baltzegar, David A; Breves, Jason P; Lerner, Darren T; Seale, Andre P; Gordon Grau, E; Borski, Russell J

    2014-10-01

    The present study identifies regulatory interactions between leptin A (LepA) and the pituitary hormone prolactin (PRL). In order to measure tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) LepA, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) utilizing a rabbit polyclonal antibody specific to tilapia LepA was first developed. The antibody shows strong cross reactivity to recombinant tilapia LepA (rtLepA), and a corresponding 16kDa protein in both tilapia and striped bass plasma, but not to recombinant human leptin (rhLep). The assay has a linear detection range of 0.25-1000nM, with intra- and interassay variability of 9% and 16%, respectively. Plasma LepA levels measured in tilapia ranged from 0.8 to 3.9nM, similar to that found for other vertebrates. Hypophysectomy (Hx) increased circulating LepA and lepa mRNA levels in the liver, the dominant source of hormone production. Adminstration of ovine PRL (oPRL, 5μg/g BW) to Hx fish restored circulating LepA and hepatic lepa mRNA levels to those of control fish. Additionally, oPRL reduced lepa mRNA levels in a dose-dependent fashion in cultured hepatocytes following an 18h incubation. Previous work in our lab indicates that rhLep stimulates PRL release in vitro from tilapia pituitaries. Here, both rtLepA and rhLep (0.5μg/g BW) increased mRNA expression of tilapia prolactin mRNAs (prl1, prl2) in the pituitary in vivo. These results demonstrate that LepA enhances pituitary prolactin synthesis and release, while PRL in turn inhibits hepatic leptin secretion and synthesis in teleosts. We postulate this regulatory interaction may be necessary for mobilizing energy reserves during acute hyperosmotic adaptation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Insulin Induces an Increase in Cytosolic Glucose Levels in 3T3-L1 Cells with Inhibited Glycogen Synthase Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena H. Chowdhury

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Glucose is an important source of energy for mammalian cells and enters the cytosol via glucose transporters. It has been thought for a long time that glucose entering the cytosol is swiftly phosphorylated in most cell types; hence the levels of free glucose are very low, beyond the detection level. However, the introduction of new fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based glucose nanosensors has made it possible to measure intracellular glucose more accurately. Here, we used the fluorescent indicator protein (FLIPglu-600µ to monitor cytosolic glucose dynamics in mouse 3T3-L1 cells in which glucose utilization for glycogen synthesis was inhibited. The results show that cells exhibit a low resting cytosolic glucose concentration. However, in cells with inhibited glycogen synthase activation, insulin induced a robust increase in cytosolic free glucose. The insulin-induced increase in cytosolic glucose in these cells is due to an imbalance between the glucose transported into the cytosol and the use of glucose in the cytosol. In untreated cells with sensitive glycogen synthase activation, insulin stimulation did not result in a change in the cytosolic glucose level. This is the first report of dynamic measurements of cytosolic glucose levels in cells devoid of the glycogen synthesis pathway.

  20. 1H NMR visibility of mammalian glycogen in solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zang, L.H.; Rothman, D.L.; Shulman, R.G.

    1990-01-01

    High-resolution 1 H NMR spectra of rabbit liver glycogen in 2 H 2 O were obtained at 500 MHz, and several resonances were assigned by comparison with the chemical shifts of α-linked diglucose molecules. The NMR relaxation times T 1 and T 2 of glycogen in 2 H 2 O were determined to be 1.1 and 0.029 s, respectively. The measured natural linewidth of the carbon-1 proton is in excellent agreement with that calculated from T 2 . The visibility measurements made by digesting glycogen and comparing glucose and glycogen signal intensities demonstrate that in spite of the very high molecular weight, all of the proton nuclei in glycogen contribute to the NMR spectrum. The result is not unexpected, since 100% NMR visibility was previously observed from the carbon nuclei of glycogen, due to the rapid intramolecular motions

  1. Analysis of genes involved in glycogen degradation in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strydom, Lindi; Jewell, Jonathan; Meier, Michael A; George, Gavin M; Pfister, Barbara; Zeeman, Samuel; Kossmann, Jens; Lloyd, James R

    2017-02-01

    Escherichia coli accumulate or degrade glycogen depending on environmental carbon supply. Glycogen phosphorylase (GlgP) and glycogen debranching enzyme (GlgX) are known to act on the glycogen polymer, while maltodextrin phosphorylase (MalP) is thought to remove maltodextrins released by GlgX. To examine the roles of these enzymes in more detail, single, double and triple mutants lacking all their activities were produced. GlgX and GlgP were shown to act directly on the glycogen polymer, while MalP most likely catabolised soluble malto-oligosaccharides. Interestingly, analysis of a triple mutant lacking all three enzymes indicates the presence of another enzyme that can release maltodextrins from glycogen. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Qualitative and Quantitative Analyses of Glycogen in Human Milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui-Yatsuhashi, Hiroko; Furuyashiki, Takashi; Takata, Hiroki; Ishida, Miyuki; Takumi, Hiroko; Kakutani, Ryo; Kamasaka, Hiroshi; Nagao, Saeko; Hirose, Junko; Kuriki, Takashi

    2017-02-22

    Identification as well as a detailed analysis of glycogen in human milk has not been shown yet. The present study confirmed that glycogen is contained in human milk by qualitative and quantitative analyses. High-performance anion exchange chromatography (HPAEC) and high-performance size exclusion chromatography with a multiangle laser light scattering detector (HPSEC-MALLS) were used for qualitative analysis of glycogen in human milk. Quantitative analysis was carried out by using samples obtained from the individual milks. The result revealed that the concentration of human milk glycogen varied depending on the mother's condition-such as the period postpartum and inflammation. The amounts of glycogen in human milk collected at 0 and 1-2 months postpartum were higher than in milk collected at 3-14 months postpartum. In the milk from mothers with severe mastitis, the concentration of glycogen was about 40 times higher than that in normal milk.

  3. Glycogen distribution in adult and geriatric mice brains

    KAUST Repository

    Alrabeh, Rana

    2017-05-01

    Astrocytes, the most abundant glial cell type in the brain, undergo a number of roles in brain physiology; among them, the energetic support of neurons is the best characterized. Contained within astrocytes is the brain’s obligate energy store, glycogen. Through glycogenolysis, glycogen, a storage form of glucose, is converted to pyruvate that is further reduced to lactate and transferred to neurons as an energy source via MCTs. Glycogen is a multi-branched polysaccharide synthesized from the glucose uptaken in astrocytes. It has been shown that glycogen accumulates with age and contributes to the physiological ageing process in the brain. In this study, we compared glycogen distribution between young adults and geriatric mice to understand the energy consumption of synaptic terminals during ageing using computational tools. We segmented and densely reconstructed neuropil and glycogen granules within six (three 4 month old old and three 24 month old) volumes of Layer 1 somatosensory cortex mice brains from FIB-SEM stacks, using a combination of semi-automated and manual tools, ilastik and TrakEM2. Finally, the 3D visualization software, Blender, was used to analyze the dataset using the DBSCAN and KDTree Nearest neighbor algorithms to study the distribution of glycogen granules compared to synapses, using a plugin that was developed for this purpose. The Nearest Neighbors and clustering results of 6 datasets show that glycogen clusters around excitatory synapses more than inhibitory synapses and that, in general, glycogen is found around axonal boutons more than dendritic spines. There was no significant accumulation of glycogen with ageing within our admittedly small dataset. However, there was a homogenization of glycogen distribution with age and that is consistent with published literature. We conclude that glycogen distribution in the brain is not a random process but follows a function distribution.

  4. Hepatic Complications of Anorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Elissa; Bakshi, Neeru; Watters, Ashlie; Rosen, Hugo R; Mehler, Philip S

    2017-11-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) has the highest mortality rate of all psychiatric illnesses due to the widespread organ dysfunction caused by the underlying severe malnutrition. Starvation causes hepatocyte injury and death leading to a rise in aminotransferases. Malnutrition-induced hepatitis is common among individuals with AN especially as body mass index decreases. Acute liver failure associated with coagulopathy and encephalopathy can rarely occur. Liver enzymes may also less commonly increase as part of the refeeding process due to hepatic steatosis and can be distinguished from starvation hepatitis by the finding of a fatty liver on ultrasonography. Individuals with AN and starvation-induced hepatitis are at increased risk of hypoglycemia due to depleted glycogen stores and impaired gluconeogenesis. Gastroenterology and hepatology consultations are often requested when patients with AN and signs of hepatitis are hospitalized. It should be noted that additional laboratory testing, imaging, or liver biopsy all have low diagnostic yield, are costly, and potentially invasive, therefore, not generally recommended for diagnostic purposes. While the hepatitis of AN can reach severe levels, a supervised increase in caloric intake and a return to a healthy body weight often quickly lead to normalization of elevated aminotransferases caused by starvation.

  5. Ontogeny of the rat hepatic adrenoceptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMillian, M.K.

    1985-01-01

    Hepatic alpha-1, alpha-2, and beta-2 adrenoceptors were characterized during development of the rat through Scatchard analysis of ( 3 H)-prazosin, ( 3 H)-rauwolscine and ( 125 I)-pindolol binding to washed particle membrane preparations. Major changes in adrenoceptor number occur shortly before birth and at weaning. The fetal rat liver is characterized by a large number of alpha-2 adrenoceptors which falls 10-20 fold at birth. The number of hepatic beta adrenoceptors decreases 30-50% during the third week after birth increases slightly at weaning, then decreases gradually in the adult. Hepatic alpha-1 adrenoceptor number increases 3-5 fold at weaning to become the predominant adrenoceptor in the adult rat liver. The basis for the fall in alpha-2 number at birth remains unclear. The fall in beta receptor number at the end of the second week post-natally appears dependent on increased insulin and corticosterone secretion as well as increased NE release form nerve terminals. The basis for the increase in beta number at weaning and the sex-dependent loss of beta function but not receptor number in the adult rat remains unknown. The dramatic increases in alpha-1 number and function at weaning are dependent on increased adrenocortical secretion, adrenalectomy prevents the normal. This effect of adrenocorticoids might be mediated through glycogen, as glycogen depletion during fasting decreases alpha-1 receptor number and function at weaning are dependent on increased adrenocortical secretion, adrenalectomy prevents the normal. This effect of adrenocorticoids might be mediated through glycogen, as glycogen depletion during fasting decreases alpha-1 receptor number and function. These findings suggest that hepatic adrenoceptor number adapts from the low carbohydrate diet of the suckling rat to the high carbohydrate diet of the adult at weaning

  6. High glycogen levels in the hippocampus of patients with epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Mads K; Madsen, Flemming F; Secher, Niels H

    2006-01-01

    During intense cerebral activation approximately half of the glucose plus lactate taken up by the human brain is not oxidized and could replenish glycogen deposits, but the human brain glycogen concentration is unknown. In patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, undergoing curative surgery, brain......, glycogen was similarly higher than in grey and white matter. Consequently, in human grey and white matter and, particularly, in the hippocampus of patients with temporal lope epilepsy, glycogen constitutes a large, active energy reserve, which may be of importance for energy provision during sustained...

  7. Drug induced exocytosis of glycogen in Pompe disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Christopher T; Fuller, Maria; Hopwood, John J; Meikle, Peter J; Brooks, Doug A

    2016-10-28

    Pompe disease is caused by a deficiency in the lysosomal enzyme α-glucosidase, and this leads to glycogen accumulation in the autolysosomes of patient cells. Glycogen storage material is exocytosed at a basal rate in cultured Pompe cells, with one study showing up to 80% is released under specific culture conditions. Critically, exocytosis induction may reduce glycogen storage in Pompe patients, providing the basis for a therapeutic strategy whereby stored glycogen is redirected to an extracellular location and subsequently degraded by circulating amylases. The focus of the current study was to identify compounds capable of inducing rapid glycogen exocytosis in cultured Pompe cells. Here, calcimycin, lysophosphatidylcholine and α-l-iduronidase each significantly increased glycogen exocytosis compared to vehicle-treated controls. The most effective compound, calcimycin, induced exocytosis through a Ca 2+ -dependent mechanism, although was unable to release a pool of vesicular glycogen larger than the calcimycin-induced exocytic pore. There was reduced glycogen release from Pompe compared to unaffected cells, primarily due to increased granule size in Pompe cells. Drug induced exocytosis therefore shows promise as a therapeutic approach for Pompe patients but strategies are required to enhance the release of large molecular weight glycogen granules. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Extraction of glycogen on mild condition lacks AIG fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghafouri, Z; Rasouli, M

    2016-12-01

    Extraction of animal tissues with cold water or perchloric acid yields less glycogen than is obtained with hot-alkaline. Extraction with acid and alkaline gives two fractions, acid soluble (ASG) and insoluble glycogen (AIG). The aim of this work is to examine the hypothesis that not all liver glycogen is extractable by Tris-buffer using current techniques. Rat liver was homogenized with Tris-buffer pH 8.3 and extracted for the glycogen fractions, ASG and AIG. The degree of homogenization was changed to remove all glycogen. The content of glycogen was 47.7 ± 1.2 and 11.6 ± 0.8 mg/g wet liver in the supernatant and pellet of the first extraction respectively. About 24% of total glycogen is lost through the first pellet. Increasing the extent of homogenization from 30 to 180 sec and from 15000 to 20000 rpm followed with 30 sec ultrasonication did not improve the extraction. ASG and AIG constitute about 77% and 23% of the pellet glycogen respectively. Extraction with cold Tris-buffer failed to extract glycogen completely.  Increasing the extent of homogenization followed with ultrasonication also did not improve the extraction. Thus it is necessary to re-examine the previous findings obtained by extraction with cold Tris-buffer.

  9. Abnormal Glycogen Storage by Retinal Neurons in Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, Tom A; Canning, Paul; Tipping, Nuala; Archer, Desmond B; Stitt, Alan W

    2015-12-01

    It is widely held that neurons of the central nervous system do not store glycogen and that accumulation of the polysaccharide may cause neurodegeneration. Since primary neural injury occurs in diabetic retinopathy, we examined neuronal glycogen status in the retina of streptozotocin-induced diabetic and control rats. Glycogen was localized in eyes of streptozotocin-induced diabetic and control rats using light microscopic histochemistry and electron microscopy, and correlated with immunohistochemical staining for glycogen phosphorylase and phosphorylated glycogen synthase (pGS). Electron microscopy of 2-month-old diabetic rats (n = 6) showed massive accumulations of glycogen in the perinuclear cytoplasm of many amacrine neurons. In 4-month-old diabetic rats (n = 11), quantification of glycogen-engorged amacrine cells showed a mean of 26 cells/mm of central retina (SD ± 5), compared to 0.5 (SD ± 0.2) in controls (n = 8). Immunohistochemical staining for glycogen phosphorylase revealed strong expression in amacrine and ganglion cells of control retina, and increased staining in cell processes of the inner plexiform layer in diabetic retina. In control retina, the inactive pGS was consistently sequestered within the cell nuclei of all retinal neurons and the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), but in diabetics nuclear pGS was reduced or lost in all classes of retinal cell except the ganglion cells and cone photoreceptors. The present study identifies a large population of retinal neurons that normally utilize glycogen metabolism but show pathologic storage of the polysaccharide during uncontrolled diabetes.

  10. Glycogen Metabolic Genes Are Involved in Trehalose-6-Phosphate Synthase-Mediated Regulation of Pathogenicity by the Rice Blast Fungus Magnaporthe oryzae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Richard A.; Wang, Zheng-Yi; Kershaw, Michael J.; Talbot, Nicholas J.

    2013-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Magnaporthe oryzae is the causal agent of rice blast disease. Here we show that glycogen metabolic genes play an important role in plant infection by M. oryzae. Targeted deletion of AGL1 and GPH1, which encode amyloglucosidase and glycogen phosphorylase, respectively, prevented mobilisation of glycogen stores during appressorium development and caused a significant reduction in the ability of M. oryzae to cause rice blast disease. By contrast, targeted mutation of GSN1, which encodes glycogen synthase, significantly reduced the synthesis of intracellular glycogen, but had no effect on fungal pathogenicity. We found that loss of AGL1 and GPH1 led to a reduction in expression of TPS1 and TPS3, which encode components of the trehalose-6-phosphate synthase complex, that acts as a genetic switch in M. oryzae. Tps1 responds to glucose-6-phosphate levels and the balance of NADP/NADPH to regulate virulence-associated gene expression, in association with Nmr transcriptional inhibitors. We show that deletion of the NMR3 transcriptional inhibitor gene partially restores virulence to a Δagl1Δgph1 mutant, suggesting that glycogen metabolic genes are necessary for operation of the NADPH-dependent genetic switch in M. oryzae. PMID:24098112

  11. Sirtuin signaling controls mitochondrial function in glycogen storage disease type Ia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jun-Ho; Kim, Goo-Young; Mansfield, Brian C; Chou, Janice Y

    2018-05-08

    Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia) deficient in glucose-6-phosphatase-α (G6Pase-α) is a metabolic disorder characterized by impaired glucose homeostasis and a long-term complication of hepatocellular adenoma/carcinoma (HCA/HCC). Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in GSD-Ia but the underlying mechanism and its contribution to HCA/HCC development remain unclear. We have shown that hepatic G6Pase-α deficiency leads to downregulation of sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) signaling that underlies defective hepatic autophagy in GSD-Ia. SIRT1 is a NAD + -dependent deacetylase that can deacetylate and activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α), a master regulator of mitochondrial integrity, biogenesis, and function. We hypothesized that downregulation of hepatic SIRT1 signaling in G6Pase-α-deficient livers impairs PGC-1α activity, leading to mitochondrial dysfunction. Here we show that the G6Pase-α-deficient livers display defective PGC-1α signaling, reduced numbers of functional mitochondria, and impaired oxidative phosphorylation. Overexpression of hepatic SIRT1 restores PGC-1α activity, normalizes the expression of electron transport chain components, and increases mitochondrial complex IV activity. We have previously shown that restoration of hepatic G6Pase-α expression normalized SIRT1 signaling. We now show that restoration of hepatic G6Pase-α expression also restores PGC-1α activity and mitochondrial function. Finally, we show that HCA/HCC lesions found in G6Pase-α-deficient livers contain marked mitochondrial and oxidative DNA damage. Taken together, our study shows that downregulation of hepatic SIRT1/PGC-1α signaling underlies mitochondrial dysfunction and that oxidative DNA damage incurred by damaged mitochondria may contribute to HCA/HCC development in GSD-Ia.

  12. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 1 (von Gierke) Hemochromatosis Hepatic Encephalopathy Hepatitis A Hepatitis B Hepatitis C Intrahepatic Cholestasis of Pregnancy (ICP) Jaundice ... diseases. What are the common causes of cirrhosis? Hepatitis B & C Alcohol-related Liver Disease Non-alcoholic Fatty ...

  13. Diurnal variation in glycogen phosphorylase activity in rat liver. A quantitative histochemical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frederiks, W. M.; Marx, F.; Bosch, K. S.

    1987-01-01

    The diurnal variations of the glycogen content and of glycogen phosphorylase activity in periportal and pericentral areas of rat liver parenchyma have been analyzed in periodic acid Schiff (PAS)-stained cryostat sections using quantitative microdensitometry. Glycogen content and phosphorylase

  14. A highly prevalent equine glycogen storage disease is explained by constitutive activation of a mutant glycogen synthase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maile, C A; Hingst, Janne Rasmuss; Mahalingan, K K

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Equine type 1 polysaccharide storage myopathy (PSSM1) is associated with a missense mutation (R309H) in the glycogen synthase (GYS1) gene, enhanced glycogen synthase (GS) activity and excessive glycogen and amylopectate inclusions in muscle. METHODS: Equine muscle biochemical...... had significantly higher glycogen content than control horse muscle despite no difference in GS expression. GS activity was significantly higher in muscle from homozygous mutants than from heterozygote and control horses, in the absence and presence of the allosteric regulator, glucose 6 phosphate (G6...

  15. Contributions of Glycogen to Astrocytic Energetics during Brain Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dienel, Gerald A.; Cruz, Nancy F.

    2014-01-01

    Glycogen is the major store of glucose in brain and is mainly in astrocytes. Brain glycogen levels in unstimulated, carefully-handled rats are 10-12 mol/g, and assuming that astrocytes account for half the brain mass, astrocytic glycogen content is twice as high. Glycogen turnover is slow under basal conditions, but it is mobilized during activation. There is no net increase in incorporation of label from glucose during activation, whereas label release from pre-labeled glycogen exceeds net glycogen consumption, which increases during stronger stimuli. Because glycogen level is restored by non-oxidative metabolism, astrocytes can influence the global ratio of oxygen to glucose utilization. Compensatory increases in utilization of blood glucose during inhibition of glycogen phosphorylase are large and approximate glycogenolysis rates during sensory stimulation. In contrast, glycogenolysis rates during hypoglycemia are low due to continued glucose delivery and oxidation of endogenous substrates; rates that preserve neuronal function in the absence of glucose are also low, probably due to metabolite oxidation. Modeling studies predict that glycogenolysis maintains a high level of glucose-6-phosphate in astrocytes to maintain feedback inhibition of hexokinase, thereby diverting glucose for use by neurons. The fate of glycogen carbon in vivo is not known, but lactate efflux from brain best accounts for the major metabolic characteristics during activation of living brain. Substantial shuttling coupled with oxidation of glycogen-derived lactate is inconsistent with available evidence. Glycogen has important roles in astrocytic energetics, including glucose sparing, control of extracellular K+ level, oxidative stress management, and memory consolidation; it is a multi-functional compound. PMID:24515302

  16. Contributions of glycogen to astrocytic energetics during brain activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dienel, Gerald A; Cruz, Nancy F

    2015-02-01

    Glycogen is the major store of glucose in brain and is mainly in astrocytes. Brain glycogen levels in unstimulated, carefully-handled rats are 10-12 μmol/g, and assuming that astrocytes account for half the brain mass, astrocytic glycogen content is twice as high. Glycogen turnover is slow under basal conditions, but it is mobilized during activation. There is no net increase in incorporation of label from glucose during activation, whereas label release from pre-labeled glycogen exceeds net glycogen consumption, which increases during stronger stimuli. Because glycogen level is restored by non-oxidative metabolism, astrocytes can influence the global ratio of oxygen to glucose utilization. Compensatory increases in utilization of blood glucose during inhibition of glycogen phosphorylase are large and approximate glycogenolysis rates during sensory stimulation. In contrast, glycogenolysis rates during hypoglycemia are low due to continued glucose delivery and oxidation of endogenous substrates; rates that preserve neuronal function in the absence of glucose are also low, probably due to metabolite oxidation. Modeling studies predict that glycogenolysis maintains a high level of glucose-6-phosphate in astrocytes to maintain feedback inhibition of hexokinase, thereby diverting glucose for use by neurons. The fate of glycogen carbon in vivo is not known, but lactate efflux from brain best accounts for the major metabolic characteristics during activation of living brain. Substantial shuttling coupled with oxidation of glycogen-derived lactate is inconsistent with available evidence. Glycogen has important roles in astrocytic energetics, including glucose sparing, control of extracellular K(+) level, oxidative stress management, and memory consolidation; it is a multi-functional compound.

  17. Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 is involved in glycogen metabolism control and embryogenesis of Rhodnius prolixus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mury, Flávia B; Lugon, Magda D; DA Fonseca, Rodrigo Nunes; Silva, Jose R; Berni, Mateus; Araujo, Helena M; Fontenele, Marcio Ribeiro; Abreu, Leonardo Araujo DE; Dansa, Marílvia; Braz, Glória; Masuda, Hatisaburo; Logullo, Carlos

    2016-10-01

    Rhodnius prolixus is a blood-feeding insect that transmits Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma rangeli to vertebrate hosts. Rhodnius prolixus is also a classical model in insect physiology, and the recent availability of R. prolixus genome has opened new avenues on triatomine research. Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) is classically described as a key enzyme involved in glycogen metabolism, also acting as a downstream component of the Wnt pathway during embryogenesis. GSK-3 has been shown to be highly conserved among several organisms, mainly in the catalytic domain region. Meanwhile, the role of GSK-3 during R. prolixus embryogenesis or glycogen metabolism has not been investigated. Here we show that chemical inhibition of GSK-3 by alsterpaullone, an ATP-competitive inhibitor of GSK3, does not affect adult survival rate, though it alters oviposition and egg hatching. Specific GSK-3 gene silencing by dsRNA injection in adult females showed a similar phenotype. Furthermore, bright field and 4'-6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining analysis revealed that ovaries and eggs from dsGSK-3 injected females exhibited specific morphological defects. We also demonstrate that glycogen content was inversely related to activity and transcription levels of GSK-3 during embryogenesis. Lastly, after GSK-3 knockdown, we observed changes in the expression of the Wingless (Wnt) downstream target β-catenin as well as in members of other pathways such as the receptor Notch. Taken together, our results show that GSK-3 regulation is essential for R. prolixus oogenesis and embryogenesis.

  18. Muscular glycogen storage diseases without increased glycogen content on histoplathological examination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeksma, M.; den Dunnen, W. F. A.; Niezen-Koning, K. E.; van Diggelen, O. P.; van Spronsen, F. J.

    Histopathological findings of muscle biopsies from five patients with two different muscular glycogen storage diseases (mGSD) were presented. From these investigations it emerged that the yield of histopathology in mGSD is low. In only one of five patients histopathological findings gave a clue

  19. Hepatitis Vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Ogholikhan, Sina; Schwarz, Kathleen B.

    2016-01-01

    Viral hepatitis is a serious health problem all over the world. However, the reduction of the morbidity and mortality due to vaccinations against hepatitis A and hepatitis B has been a major component in the overall reduction in vaccine preventable diseases. We will discuss the epidemiology, vaccine development, and post-vaccination effects of the hepatitis A and B virus. In addition, we discuss attempts to provide hepatitis D vaccine for the 350 million individuals infected with hepatitis B ...

  20. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Donate Today Enroll in 123 What is Hepatic Encephalopathy? Hepatic Encephalopathy, sometimes referred to as portosystemic encephalopathy or PSE, is a condition that causes temporary ...

  1. Functional significance of brain glycogen in sustaining glutamatergic neurotransmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sickmann, Helle M; Walls, Anne B; Schousboe, Arne

    2009-01-01

    The involvement of brain glycogen in sustaining neuronal activity has previously been demonstrated. However, to what extent energy derived from glycogen is consumed by astrocytes themselves or is transferred to the neurons in the form of lactate for oxidative metabolism to proceed is at present u...

  2. Glycogen metabolism and the homeostatic regulation of sleep

    KAUST Repository

    Petit, Jean-Marie; Burlet-Godinot, Sophie; Magistretti, Pierre J.; Allaman, Igor

    2014-01-01

    In 1995 Benington and Heller formulated an energy hypothesis of sleep centered on a key role of glycogen. It was postulated that a major function of sleep is to replenish glycogen stores in the brain that have been depleted during wakefulness which

  3. Muscle glycogen and cell function--Location, location, location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ørtenblad, N; Nielsen, J

    2015-12-01

    The importance of glycogen, as a fuel during exercise, is a fundamental concept in exercise physiology. The use of electron microscopy has revealed that glycogen is not evenly distributed in skeletal muscle fibers, but rather localized in distinct pools. In this review, we present the available evidence regarding the subcellular localization of glycogen in skeletal muscle and discuss this from the perspective of skeletal muscle fiber function. The distribution of glycogen in the defined pools within the skeletal muscle varies depending on exercise intensity, fiber phenotype, training status, and immobilization. Furthermore, these defined pools may serve specific functions in the cell. Specifically, reduced levels of these pools of glycogen are associated with reduced SR Ca(2+) release, muscle relaxation rate, and membrane excitability. Collectively, the available literature strongly demonstrates that the subcellular localization of glycogen has to be considered to fully understand the role of glycogen metabolism and signaling in skeletal muscle function. Here, we propose that the effect of low muscle glycogen on excitation-contraction coupling may serve as a built-in mechanism, which links the energetic state of the muscle fiber to energy utilization. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Exercise intolerance in Glycogen Storage Disease Type III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preisler, Nicolai; Pradel, Agnès; Husu, Edith

    2013-01-01

    Myopathic symptoms in Glycogen Storage Disease Type IIIa (GSD IIIa) are generally ascribed to the muscle wasting that these patients suffer in adult life, but an inability to debranch glycogen likely also has an impact on muscle energy metabolism. We hypothesized that patients with GSD IIIa can...

  5. Muscle glycogen and cell function - Location, location, location

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørtenblad, N; Nielsen, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    The importance of glycogen, as a fuel during exercise, is a fundamental concept in exercise physiology. The use of electron microscopy has revealed that glycogen is not evenly distributed in skeletal muscle fibers, but rather localized in distinct pools. In this review, we present the available...... evidence regarding the subcellular localization of glycogen in skeletal muscle and discuss this from the perspective of skeletal muscle fiber function. The distribution of glycogen in the defined pools within the skeletal muscle varies depending on exercise intensity, fiber phenotype, training status......, and immobilization. Furthermore, these defined pools may serve specific functions in the cell. Specifically, reduced levels of these pools of glycogen are associated with reduced SR Ca(2+) release, muscle relaxation rate, and membrane excitability. Collectively, the available literature strongly demonstrates...

  6. Muscle and liver glycogen, protein, and triglyceride in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Sonne, Bente; Joensen Mikines, Kari

    1984-01-01

    in skeletal muscle was accompanied by increased breakdown of triglyceride and/or protein. Thus, the effect of exhausting swimming and of running on concentrations of glycogen, protein, and triglyceride in skeletal muscle and liver were studied in rats with and without deficiencies of the sympatho......-adrenal system. In control rats, both swimming and running decreased the concentration of glycogen in fast-twitch red and slow-twitch red muscle whereas concentrations of protein and triglyceride did not decrease. In the liver, swimming depleted glycogen stores but protein and triglyceride concentrations did...... not decrease. In exercising rats, muscle glycogen breakdown was impaired by adrenodemedullation and restored by infusion of epinephrine. However, impaired glycogen breakdown during exercise was not accompanied by a significant net breakdown of protein or triglyceride. Surgical sympathectomy of the muscles did...

  7. GLYCOGEN IN BACILLUS-SUBTILIS - MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION OF AN OPERON ENCODING ENZYMES INVOLVED IN GLYCOGEN BIOSYNTHESIS AND DEGRADATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KIEL, JAKW; BOELS, JM; BELDMAN, G; VENEMA, G

    Although it has never been reported that Bacillus subtilis is capable of accumulating glycogen, we have isolated a region from the chromosome of B. subtilis containing a glycogen operon. The operon is located directly downstream from trnB, which maps at 275 degrees on the B. subtilis chromosome. It

  8. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Induced Synthesis of a Novel Viral Factor Mediates Efficient Replication of Genotype-1 Hepatitis E Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidya P Nair

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis E virus (HEV causes acute hepatitis in many parts of the world including Asia, Africa and Latin America. Though self-limiting in normal individuals, it results in ~30% mortality in infected pregnant women. It has also been reported to cause acute and chronic hepatitis in organ transplant patients. Of the seven viral genotypes, genotype-1 virus infects humans and is a major public health concern in South Asian countries. Sporadic cases of genotype-3 and 4 infection in human and animals such as pigs, deer, mongeese have been reported primarily from industrialized countries. Genotype-5, 6 and 7 viruses are known to infect animals such as wild boar and camel, respectively. Genotype-3 and 4 viruses have been successfully propagated in the laboratory in mammalian cell culture. However, genotype-1 virus replicates poorly in mammalian cell culture and no other efficient model exists to study its life cycle. Here, we report that endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress promotes genotype-1 HEV replication by inducing cap-independent, internal initiation mediated translation of a novel viral protein (named ORF4. Importantly, ORF4 expression and stimulatory effect of ER stress inducers on viral replication is specific to genotype-1. ORF4 protein sequence is mostly conserved among genotype-1 HEV isolates and ORF4 specific antibodies were detected in genotype-1 HEV patient serum. ORF4 interacted with multiple viral and host proteins and assembled a protein complex consisting of viral helicase, RNA dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp, X, host eEF1α1 (eukaryotic elongation factor 1 isoform-1 and tubulinβ. In association with eEF1α1, ORF4 stimulated viral RdRp activity. Furthermore, human hepatoma cells that stably express ORF4 or engineered proteasome resistant ORF4 mutant genome permitted enhanced viral replication. These findings reveal a positive role of ER stress in promoting genotype-1 HEV replication and pave the way towards development of an efficient

  9. A Bayesian evidence synthesis approach to estimate disease prevalence in hard-to-reach populations: hepatitis C in New York City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Sarah; Makela, Susanna; Heller, Daliah; Konty, Kevin; Balter, Sharon; Zheng, Tian; Stark, James H

    2018-06-01

    Existing methods to estimate the prevalence of chronic hepatitis C (HCV) in New York City (NYC) are limited in scope and fail to assess hard-to-reach subpopulations with highest risk such as injecting drug users (IDUs). To address these limitations, we employ a Bayesian multi-parameter evidence synthesis model to systematically combine multiple sources of data, account for bias in certain data sources, and provide unbiased HCV prevalence estimates with associated uncertainty. Our approach improves on previous estimates by explicitly accounting for injecting drug use and including data from high-risk subpopulations such as the incarcerated, and is more inclusive, utilizing ten NYC data sources. In addition, we derive two new equations to allow age at first injecting drug use data for former and current IDUs to be incorporated into the Bayesian evidence synthesis, a first for this type of model. Our estimated overall HCV prevalence as of 2012 among NYC adults aged 20-59 years is 2.78% (95% CI 2.61-2.94%), which represents between 124,900 and 140,000 chronic HCV cases. These estimates suggest that HCV prevalence in NYC is higher than previously indicated from household surveys (2.2%) and the surveillance system (2.37%), and that HCV transmission is increasing among young injecting adults in NYC. An ancillary benefit from our results is an estimate of current IDUs aged 20-59 in NYC: 0.58% or 27,600 individuals. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Akt2 influences glycogen synthase activity in human skeletal muscle through regulation of NH2-terminal (sites 2+2a) phosphorylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friedrichsen, Martin; Birk, Jesper Bratz; Richter, Erik

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is characterized by reduced muscle glycogen synthesis. The key enzyme in this process, glycogen synthase (GS), is activated via proximal insulin signaling, but the exact molecular events remain unknown. We previously demonstrated that phosphorylation of Threonine-308 on Akt (p......Akt-T308), Akt2 activity, and GS activity in muscle were positivity associated with insulin sensitivity. Now, in the same study population, we determined the influence of several upstream elements in the canonical PI3K signaling on muscle GS activation. 181 non-diabetic twins were examined...

  11. In vitro incorporation of 14C-hexose-6-phosphat in mannan, β-glucan and glycogen of Candida spec. H and their mutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roeber, B.; Reuter, G.

    1982-01-01

    Mannose-6-P is an activator of 14 C-mannose incorporation from GDP- 14 C-mannose in mono- and oligosaccharides and in mannopolymers of the cell wall proteophosphomannan produced by the food protein yeast Candida spec. H. Moreover, mannose-6-P is a precursor of proteophosphomannan: 14 C-mannose-6-P has been incorporated in absence of GTP. Corresponding behavior shows glucose-6-P by synthesis of β-glucan and glycogen. Mutants of Candida spec. H with different efficiency in the biosynthesis of mannan, β-glucan and glycogen incorporate hexose-6-P in a different extent. (author)

  12. Hepatitis C: Managing Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pain: Entire Lesson Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For Veterans and the Public Veterans and the Public Home Hepatitis A Hepatitis B Hepatitis C Hepatitis C Home Getting ...

  13. Glycogen synthase from the parabasalian parasite Trichomonas vaginalis: An unusual member of the starch/glycogen synthase family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Wayne A; Pradhan, Prajakta; Madhan, Nayasha; Gist, Galen C; Brittingham, Andrew

    2017-07-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis, a parasitic protist, is the causative agent of the common sexually-transmitted infection trichomoniasis. The organism has long been known to synthesize substantial glycogen as a storage polysaccharide, presumably mobilizing this compound during periods of carbohydrate limitation, such as might be encountered during transmission between hosts. However, little is known regarding the enzymes of glycogen metabolism in T. vaginalis. We had previously described the identification and characterization of two forms of glycogen phosphorylase in the organism. Here, we measure UDP-glucose-dependent glycogen synthase activity in cell-free extracts of T. vaginalis. We then demonstrate that the TVAG_258220 open reading frame encodes a glycosyltransferase that is presumably responsible for this synthetic activity. We show that expression of TVAG_258220 in a yeast strain lacking endogenous glycogen synthase activity is sufficient to restore glycogen accumulation. Furthermore, when TVAG_258220 is expressed in bacteria, the resulting recombinant protein has glycogen synthase activity in vitro, transferring glucose from either UDP-glucose or ADP-glucose to glycogen and using both substrates with similar affinity. This protein is also able to transfer glucose from UDP-glucose or ADP-glucose to maltose and longer oligomers of glucose but not to glucose itself. However, with these substrates, there is no evidence of processivity and sugar transfer is limited to between one and three glucose residues. Taken together with our earlier work on glycogen phosphorylase, we are now well positioned to define both how T. vaginalis synthesizes and utilizes glycogen, and how these processes are regulated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  14. Glucose Uptake and Glycogen Synthesis in Recovery from Exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hingst, Janne Rasmuss

    Perifer insulin resistens, som er forbundet med nedsat insulin-stimuleret glukoseoptagelse, anses som en af de væsentligste defekter i sygdomsforløbet af type 2 diabetes (T2D). Dette tilskrives primært nedsat glykogensyntese i skeletmuskulaturen, og en række studier har fundet lavere insulinstimu...

  15. Nitric oxide inhibits glycogen synthesis in isolated rat hepatocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprangers, F.; Sauerwein, H. P.; Romijn, J. A.; van Woerkom, G. M.; Meijer, A. J.

    1998-01-01

    There is increasing evidence for the existence of intrahepatic regulation of glucose metabolism by Kupffer cell products. Nitric oxide (NO) is known to inhibit gluconeogenic flux through pyruvate carboxylase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase. However, NO may also influence glucose metabolism at

  16. An efficient nonviral gene-delivery vector based on hyperbranched cationic glycogen derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang X

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Xuan Liang,1,* Xianyue Ren,2,* Zhenzhen Liu,1 Yingliang Liu,1 Jue Wang,2 Jingnan Wang,2 Li-Ming Zhang,1 David YB Deng,2 Daping Quan,1 Liqun Yang1 1Institute of Polymer Science, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Key Laboratory of Designed Synthesis and Application of Polymer Material, Key Laboratory for Polymeric Composite and Functional Materials of Ministry of Education, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, People's Republic of China; 2Research Center of Translational Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, People's Republic of China *Both these authors contributed equally to this work Background: The purpose of this study was to synthesize and evaluate hyperbranched cationic glycogen derivatives as an efficient nonviral gene-delivery vector. Methods: A series of hyperbranched cationic glycogen derivatives conjugated with 3-(dimethylamino-1-propylamine (DMAPA-Glyp and 1-(2-aminoethyl piperazine (AEPZ-Glyp residues were synthesized and characterized by Fourier-transform infrared and hydrogen-1 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Their buffer capacity was assessed by acid–base titration in aqueous NaCl solution. Plasmid deoxyribonucleic acid (pDNA condensation ability and protection against DNase I degradation of the glycogen derivatives were assessed using agarose gel electrophoresis. The zeta potentials and particle sizes of the glycogen derivative/pDNA complexes were measured, and the images of the complexes were observed using atomic force microscopy. Blood compatibility and cytotoxicity were evaluated by hemolysis assay and MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, respectively. pDNA transfection efficiency mediated by the cationic glycogen derivatives was evaluated by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy in the 293T (human embryonic kidney and the CNE2 (human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell lines. In vivo delivery of pDNA in model animals (Sprague Dawley

  17. Glycogen metabolism and the homeostatic regulation of sleep

    KAUST Repository

    Petit, Jean-Marie

    2014-11-16

    In 1995 Benington and Heller formulated an energy hypothesis of sleep centered on a key role of glycogen. It was postulated that a major function of sleep is to replenish glycogen stores in the brain that have been depleted during wakefulness which is associated to an increased energy demand. Astrocytic glycogen depletion participates to an increase of extracellular adenosine release which influences sleep homeostasis. Here, we will review some evidence obtained by studies addressing the question of a key role played by glycogen metabolism in sleep regulation as proposed by this hypothesis or by an alternative hypothesis named “glycogenetic” hypothesis as well as the importance of the confounding effect of glucocorticoïds. Even though actual collected data argue in favor of a role of sleep in brain energy balance-homeostasis, they do not support a critical and direct involvement of glycogen metabolism on sleep regulation. For instance, glycogen levels during the sleep-wake cycle are driven by different physiological signals and therefore appear more as a marker-integrator of brain energy status than a direct regulator of sleep homeostasis. In support of this we provide evidence that blockade of glycogen mobilization does not induce more sleep episodes during the active period while locomotor activity is reduced. These observations do not invalidate the energy hypothesis of sleep but indicate that underlying cellular mechanisms are more complex than postulated by Benington and Heller.

  18. Heteropoly acid catalyzed hydrolysis of glycogen to glucose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, Miri; Pulidindi, Indra Neel; Perkas, Nina; Gedanken, Aharon

    2015-01-01

    Complete conversion of glycogen to glucose is achieved by using H 3 PW 12 O 40 ·nH 2 O (HPW) and H 4 SiW 12 O 40 ·nH 2 O (HSiW) as catalysts for the hydrolysis under optimized hydrothermal conditions (mass fraction of catalyst 2.4%, 373 K and 2 h reaction time). The reusability of the catalyst (HPW) was demonstrated. In addition to carrying out the glycogen hydrolysis in an autoclave, other novel methods such as microwave irradiation and sonication have also been investigated. At higher mass fraction of the heteropoly acids (10.5%), glycogen could be completely converted to glucose under microwave irradiation. Sonication of an aqueous solution of glycogen in the presence of HPW and HSiW also yielded glucose. Thus, heteropoly acids are efficient, environmentally friendly and reusable catalysts for the conversion of glycogen to glucose. - Highlights: • Hydrothermal, microwave and sonication based methods of hydrolysis. • Heteropoly acids are green catalysts for glycogen hydrolysis. • Glycogen from cyanobacteria is demonstrated as a potential feedstock for glucose

  19. Glycogen branching enzyme (GBE1) mutation causing equine glycogen storage disease IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Tara L; Valberg, Stephanie J; Adelson, David L; Abbey, Colette A; Binns, Matthew M; Mickelson, James R

    2004-07-01

    Comparative biochemical and histopathological evidence suggests that a deficiency in the glycogen branching enzyme, encoded by the GBE1 gene, is responsible for a recently identified recessive fatal fetal and neonatal glycogen storage disease (GSD) in American Quarter Horses termed GSD IV. We have now derived the complete GBE1 cDNA sequences for control horses and affected foals, and identified a C to A substitution at base 102 that results in a tyrosine (Y) to stop (X) mutation in codon 34 of exon 1. All 11 affected foals were homozygous for the X34 allele, their 11 available dams and sires were heterozygous, and all 16 control horses were homozygous for the Y34 allele. The previous findings of poorly branched glycogen, abnormal polysaccharide accumulation, lack of measurable GBE1 enzyme activity and immunodetectable GBE1 protein, coupled with the present observation of abundant GBE1 mRNA in affected foals, are all consistent with the nonsense mutation in the 699 amino acid GBE1 protein. The affected foal pedigrees have a common ancestor and contain prolific stallions that are likely carriers of the recessive X34 allele. Defining the molecular basis of equine GSD IV will allow for accurate DNA testing and the ability to prevent occurrence of this devastating disease affecting American Quarter Horses and related breeds.

  20. Preactivated thiolated glycogen as mucoadhesive polymer for drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone, Mara; Lopalco, Antonio; Lopedota, Angela; Cutrignelli, Annalisa; Laquintana, Valentino; Douglas, Justin; Franco, Massimo; Liberati, Elisa; Russo, Vincenzo; Tongiani, Serena; Denora, Nunzio; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to synthesize and characterize a novel thiolated glycogen, so-named S-preactivated thiolated glycogen, as a mucosal drug delivery systems and the assessment of its mucoadhesive properties. In this regard, glycogen-cysteine and glycogen-cysteine-2-mercaptonicotinic acid conjugates were synthesized. Glycogen was activated by an oxidative ring opening with sodium periodate resulting in reactive aldehyde groups to which cysteine was bound via reductive amination. The obtained thiolated polymer displayed 2203.09±200μmol thiol groups per gram polymer. In a second step, the thiol moieties of thiolated glycogen were protected by disulfide bond formation with the thiolated aromatic residue 2-mercaptonicotinic acid (2MNA). In vitro screening of mucoadhesive properties was performed on porcine intestinal mucosa using different methods. In particular, in terms of rheology investigations of mucus/polymer mixtures, the S-preactivated thiolated glycogen showed a 4.7-fold increase in dynamic viscosity over a time period of 5h, in comparison to mucus/Simulated Intestinal Fluid control. The S-preactivated polymer remained attached on freshly excised porcine mucosa for 45h. Analogous results were obtained with tensile studies demonstrating a 2.7-fold increase in maximum detachment force and 3.1- fold increase in total work of adhesion for the S-preactivated polymer compared to unmodified glycogen. Moreover, water-uptake studies showed an over 4h continuing weight gain for the S-preactivated polymer, whereas disintegration took place for the unmodified polymer within the first hour. Furthermore, even in the highest tested concentration of 2mg/ml the new conjugates did not show any cytotoxicity on Caco-2 cell monolayer using an MTT assay. According to these results, S-preactivated glycogen represents a promising type of mucoadhesive polymers useful for the development of various mucosal drug delivery systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  1. Glycogen synthase activation by sugars in isolated hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciudad, C J; Carabaza, A; Bosch, F; Gòmez I Foix, A M; Guinovart, J J

    1988-07-01

    We have investigated the activation by sugars of glycogen synthase in relation to (i) phosphorylase a activity and (ii) changes in the intracellular concentration of glucose 6-phosphate and adenine nucleotides. All the sugars tested in this work present the common denominator of activating glycogen synthase. On the other hand, phosphorylase a activity is decreased by mannose and glucose, unchanged by galactose and xylitol, and increased by tagatose, glyceraldehyde, and fructose. Dihydroxyacetone exerts a biphasic effect on phosphorylase. These findings provide additional evidence proving that glycogen synthase can be activated regardless of the levels of phosphorylase a, clearly establishing that a nonsequential mechanism for the activation of glycogen synthase occurs in liver cells. The glycogen synthase activation state is related to the concentrations of glucose 6-phosphate and adenine nucleotides. In this respect, tagatose, glyceraldehyde, and fructose deplete ATP and increase AMP contents, whereas glucose, mannose, galactose, xylitol, and dihydroxyacetone do not alter the concentration of these nucleotides. In addition, all these sugars, except glyceraldehyde, increase the intracellular content of glucose 6-phosphate. The activation of glycogen synthase by sugars is reflected in decreases on both kinetic constants of the enzyme, M0.5 (for glucose 6-phosphate) and S0.5 (for UDP-glucose). We propose that hepatocyte glycogen synthase is activated by monosaccharides by a mechanism triggered by changes in glucose 6-phosphate and adenine nucleotide concentrations which have been described to modify glycogen synthase phosphatase activity. This mechanism represents a metabolite control of the sugar-induced activation of hepatocyte glycogen synthase.

  2. Incorporation of /sup 14/C glucose into glycogen and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in rat brain following carbon monoxide intoxication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikorska, M; Gorzkowski, B; Szumanska, G; Smialek, M [Polska Akademia Nauk, Warsaw. Centrum Medycyny Doswiadczalnej i Klinicznej; Panstwowy Zaklad Higieny, Warsaw (Poland))

    1975-01-01

    Incorporation of /sup 14/C glucose into glycogen and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in rat brain following carbon monoxide intoxication was studied. In brains of rats tested on the 20, 30 and 60th minute of exposure to CO and immediately after removal from the chamber the enzyme activity showed no essential deviation from the control level. In the group of rats tested 1 hour after taking them out from the chamber increase of the enzyme activity was noticed, amounting to about 33% of the control value. The brains tested 24 hours after exposure showed the largest increase of the enzyme activity by about 94%. In the next time periods, 48 and 72 hours after intoxication, the enzyme activity was decreasing. The glycogen content in brains of control animals increased 3 hours after CO intoxication by about 69%. The increase of glycogen synthesis was expressed by increase of the total radioactivity, which amounted to 160% of the control value.

  3. Functional consequences of brain glycogen deficiency on the sleep-wake cycle regulation in PTG-KO mice

    KAUST Repository

    Burlet-Godinot, S.

    2017-12-31

    Introduction: In the CNS, glycogen is mainly localized in astrocytes where its levels are linked to neuronal activity. Astrocytic glycogen synthesis is regulated by glycogen synthase (GS) activity that is positively controlled by protein targeting to glycogen (PTG) expression levels. Although the role of glycogen in sleep/wake regulation is still poorly understood, we have previously demonstrated that, following a 6 hour gentle sleep deprivation (GSD), PTG mRNA expression and GS activity increased in the brain in mice while glycogen levels were paradoxically maintained and not affected. In order to gain further insight on the role of PTG in this process, we studied the sleep/wake cycle parameters in PTG knockout (PTG-KO) mice under baseline conditions and after a 6 hour GSD. Glycogen levels as well as mRNAs expression of genes related to energy metabolism were also determined in several brain areas. Materials and methods: Adult male C57BL/6J (WT) and PTG-KO mice were sleep-recorded under baseline conditions (24 h recordings, 12 h light/dark cycle) and following 6 hours GSD from ZT00 to ZT06. Vigilance states were visually scored (4 s temporal window). Spectral analysis of the EEG signal was performed using a discrete Fourier transformation. Glycogen measurements and gene expression analysis were assessed using a biochemical assay and quantitative RT-PCR respectively, on separate cohorts in WT vs PTG-KO mice at the end of the 6 hours GSD or in control animals (CTL) in different brain structures. Results: Quantitative analysis of the sleep/wake cycle under baseline conditions did not reveal major differences between the WT and the PTG-KO mice. However, during the dark period, the PTG-KO mice showed a significant increase in the number of wake and slow wave sleep episodes (respectively +26.5±8% and +26.1±8%; p< 0.05) together with a significant shortening in their duration (-21.6±7.2% and -14.3±2.8%; p< 0.01). No such quantitative changes were observed during

  4. Mechanisms limiting glycogen storage in muscle during prolonged insulin stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Hansen, S A; Hansen, B F

    1988-01-01

    increased muscle glycogen concentrations to maximal values 2, 3, and 3.5 times above normal fed levels in fast-twitch white, slow-twitch red, and fast-twitch red fibers, respectively. Glucose uptake decreased (mean +/- SE) from 34.9 +/- 1.2 mumol.g-1.h-1 at 0 h to 7.5 +/- 0.7 after 7 h of perfusion. During...... compared with initial values. Total muscle water concentration decreased during glycogen loading of the muscles. Mechanisms limiting glycogen storage under maximal insulin stimulation include impaired insulin-stimulated membrane transport of glucose as well as impaired intracellular glucose disposal....

  5. Metabolic demands and replenishment of muscle glycogen after a rugby league match simulation protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Warren J; Hannon, Marcus P; Benford, Victoria; Morehen, James C; Twist, Craig; Shepherd, Sam; Cocks, Matthew; Impey, Samuel G; Cooper, Robert G; Morton, James P; Close, Graeme L

    2017-09-01

    The metabolic requirements of a rugby league match simulation protocol and the timing of carbohydrate provision on glycogen re-synthesis in damaged muscle were examined. Fifteen (mean±SD: age 20.9±2.9 year, body-mass 87.3±14.1kg, height 177.4±6.0cm) rugby league (RL) players consumed a 6gkgday-1 CHO diet for 7-days, completed a time to exhaustion test (TTE) and a glycogen depletion protocol on day-3, a RL simulated-match protocol (RLMSP) on day-5 and a TTE on day-7. Players were prescribed an immediate or delayed (2-h-post) re-feed post-simulation. Muscle biopsies and blood samples were obtained post-depletion, before and after simulated match-play, and 48-h after match-play with PlayerLoad and heart-rate collected throughout the simulation. Data were analysed using effects sizes±90% CI and magnitude-based inferences. PlayerLoad (8.0±0.7 AUmin-1) and %HRpeak (83±4.9%) during the simulation were similar to values reported for RL match-play. Muscle glycogen very likely increased from immediately after to 48-h post-simulation (272±97 cf. 416±162mmolkg-1d.w.; ES±90%CI) after immediate re-feed, but changes were unclear (283±68 cf. 361±144mmolkg-1d.w.; ES±90%CI) after delayed re-feed. CK almost certainly increased by 77.9±25.4% (0.75±0.19) post-simulation for all players. The RLMSP presents a replication of the internal loads associated with professional RL match-play, although difficulties in replicating the collision reduced the metabolic demands and glycogen utilisation. Further, it is possible to replete muscle glycogen in damaged muscle employing an immediate re-feed strategy. Copyright © 2017 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Anti-IL-17 Antibody Improves Hepatic Steatosis by Suppressing Interleukin-17-Related Fatty Acid Synthesis and Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weidong Shi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the relationship between interleukin-17 and proteins involved in fatty acid metabolism with respect to alcoholic liver disease, male ICR mice were randomized into five groups: control, alcoholic liver disease (ALD at 4 weeks, 8 weeks, and 12 weeks, and anti-IL-17 antibody treated ALD. A proteomic approach was adopted to investigate changes in liver proteins between control and ALD groups. The proteomic analysis was performed by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis. Spots of interest were subsequently subjected to nanospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS for protein identification. Additionally, expression levels of selected proteins were confirmed by western blot. Transcriptional levels of some selected proteins were determined by RT-PCR. Expression levels of 95 protein spots changed significantly (ratio >1.5, P<0.05 during the development of ALD. Sterol regulatory element-binding protein-lc (SREBP-1c, carbohydrate response element binding protein (ChREBP, enoyl-coenzyme A hydratase (ECHS1, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR-α were identified by MS/MS among the proteins shown to vary the most; increased IL-17 elevated the transcription of SREBP-1c and ChREBP but suppressed ECHS1 and PPAR-α. The interleukin-17 signaling pathway is involved in ALD development; anti-IL-17 antibody improved hepatic steatosis by suppressing interleukin-17-related fatty acid metabolism.

  7. Molecular diagnosis of glycogen storage disease and disorders with overlapping clinical symptoms by massive parallel sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Ana I; Medrano, Celia; Navarrete, Rosa; Desviat, Lourdes R; Merinero, Begoña; Rodríguez-Pombo, Pilar; Vitoria, Isidro; Ugarte, Magdalena; Pérez-Cerdá, Celia; Pérez, Belen

    2016-10-01

    Glycogen storage disease (GSD) is an umbrella term for a group of genetic disorders that involve the abnormal metabolism of glycogen; to date, 23 types of GSD have been identified. The nonspecific clinical presentation of GSD and the lack of specific biomarkers mean that Sanger sequencing is now widely relied on for making a diagnosis. However, this gene-by-gene sequencing technique is both laborious and costly, which is a consequence of the number of genes to be sequenced and the large size of some genes. This work reports the use of massive parallel sequencing to diagnose patients at our laboratory in Spain using either a customized gene panel (targeted exome sequencing) or the Illumina Clinical-Exome TruSight One Gene Panel (clinical exome sequencing (CES)). Sequence variants were matched against biochemical and clinical hallmarks. Pathogenic mutations were detected in 23 patients. Twenty-two mutations were recognized (mostly loss-of-function mutations), including 11 that were novel in GSD-associated genes. In addition, CES detected five patients with mutations in ALDOB, LIPA, NKX2-5, CPT2, or ANO5. Although these genes are not involved in GSD, they are associated with overlapping phenotypic characteristics such as hepatic, muscular, and cardiac dysfunction. These results show that next-generation sequencing, in combination with the detection of biochemical and clinical hallmarks, provides an accurate, high-throughput means of making genetic diagnoses of GSD and related diseases.Genet Med 18 10, 1037-1043.

  8. Glycogenolysis in astrocytes supports blood-borne glucose channeling not glycogen-derived lactate shuttling to neurons: evidence from mathematical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiNuzzo, Mauro; Mangia, Silvia; Maraviglia, Bruno; Giove, Federico

    2010-12-01

    In this article, we examined theoretically the role of human cerebral glycogen in buffering the metabolic requirement of a 360-second brain stimulation, expanding our previous modeling study of neurometabolic coupling. We found that glycogen synthesis and degradation affects the relative amount of glucose taken up by neurons versus astrocytes. Under conditions of 175:115 mmol/L (∼1.5:1) neuronal versus astrocytic activation-induced Na(+) influx ratio, ∼12% of astrocytic glycogen is mobilized. This results in the rapid increase of intracellular glucose-6-phosphate level on stimulation and nearly 40% mean decrease of glucose flow through hexokinase (HK) in astrocytes via product inhibition. The suppression of astrocytic glucose phosphorylation, in turn, favors the channeling of glucose from interstitium to nearby activated neurons, without a critical effect on the concurrent intercellular lactate trafficking. Under conditions of increased neuronal versus astrocytic activation-induced Na(+) influx ratio to 190:65 mmol/L (∼3:1), glycogen is not significantly degraded and blood glucose is primarily taken up by neurons. These results support a role for astrocytic glycogen in preserving extracellular glucose for neuronal utilization, rather than providing lactate to neurons as is commonly accepted by the current 'thinking paradigm'. This might be critical in subcellular domains during functional conditions associated with fast energetic demands.

  9. Deleterious effects of neuronal accumulation of glycogen in flies and mice

    OpenAIRE

    Duran, Jordi; Tevy, María Florencia; Garcia-Rocha, Mar; Calbó, Joaquim; Milán, Marco; Guinovart, Joan J

    2012-01-01

    Under physiological conditions, most neurons keep glycogen synthase (GS) in an inactive form and do not show detectable levels of glycogen. Nevertheless, aberrant glycogen accumulation in neurons is a hallmark of patients suffering from Lafora disease or other polyglucosan disorders. Although these diseases are associated with mutations in genes involved in glycogen metabolism, the role of glycogen accumulation remains elusive. Here, we generated mouse and fly models expressing an active form...

  10. Glycogen storage disease type Ia in canines: a model for human metabolic and genetic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Specht, Andrew; Fiske, Laurie; Erger, Kirsten; Cossette, Travis; Verstegen, John; Campbell-Thompson, Martha; Struck, Maggie B; Lee, Young Mok; Chou, Janice Y; Byrne, Barry J; Correia, Catherine E; Mah, Cathryn S; Weinstein, David A; Conlon, Thomas J

    2011-01-01

    A canine model of Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSDIa) is described. Affected dogs are homozygous for a previously described M121I mutation resulting in a deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase-α. Metabolic, clinicopathologic, pathologic, and clinical manifestations of GSDIa observed in this model are described and compared to those observed in humans. The canine model shows more complete recapitulation of the clinical manifestations seen in humans including "lactic acidosis", larger size, and longer lifespan compared to other animal models. Use of this model in preclinical trials of gene therapy is described and briefly compared to the murine model. Although the canine model offers a number of advantages for evaluating potential therapies for GSDIa, there are also some significant challenges involved in its use. Despite these challenges, the canine model of GSDIa should continue to provide valuable information about the potential for generating curative therapies for GSDIa as well as other genetic hepatic diseases.

  11. Glycogen Storage Disease Type Ia in Canines: A Model for Human Metabolic and Genetic Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Specht

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A canine model of Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSDIa is described. Affected dogs are homozygous for a previously described M121I mutation resulting in a deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase-α. Metabolic, clinicopathologic, pathologic, and clinical manifestations of GSDIa observed in this model are described and compared to those observed in humans. The canine model shows more complete recapitulation of the clinical manifestations seen in humans including “lactic acidosis”, larger size, and longer lifespan compared to other animal models. Use of this model in preclinical trials of gene therapy is described and briefly compared to the murine model. Although the canine model offers a number of advantages for evaluating potential therapies for GSDIa, there are also some significant challenges involved in its use. Despite these challenges, the canine model of GSDIa should continue to provide valuable information about the potential for generating curative therapies for GSDIa as well as other genetic hepatic diseases.

  12. Genetics Home Reference: glycogen storage disease type 0

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... skeletal muscle, glycogen stored in muscle cells is broken down to supply the cells with energy. The ... that is stored in the liver can be broken down rapidly when glucose is needed to maintain ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: glycogen storage disease type VI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or elevated levels of ketones in the blood (ketosis). Ketones are molecules produced during the breakdown of ... and may use fats for energy, resulting in ketosis. Glycogen accumulates within liver cells, causing these cells ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: glycogen storage disease type IX

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or elevated levels of ketones in the blood (ketosis). Ketones are molecules produced during the breakdown of ... down glycogen for glucose contributes to hypoglycemia and ketosis. Reduced energy production in muscle cells leads to ...

  15. Human skeletal muscle glycogen utilization in exhaustive exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Joachim; Holmberg, Hans-Christer; Schrøder, Henrik Daa

    2011-01-01

    Although glycogen is known to be heterogeneously distributed within skeletal muscle cells, there is presently little information available about the role of fibre types, utilization and resynthesis during and after exercise with respect to glycogen localization. Here, we tested the hypothesis...... to be influenced by fibre type prior to exercise, as well as carbohydrate availability during the subsequent period of recovery. These findings provide insight into the significance of fibre type-specific compartmentalization of glycogen metabolism in skeletal muscle during exercise and subsequent recovery. ....... that utilization of glycogen with different subcellular localizations during exhaustive arm and leg exercise differs and examined the influence of fibre type and carbohydrate availability on its subsequent resynthesis. When 10 elite endurance athletes (22 ± 1 years, VO2 max = 68 ± 5 ml kg-1 min-1, mean ± SD...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: glycogen storage disease type V

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with GSDV experience mild symptoms such as poor stamina; others do not experience any symptoms. Related Information ... myophosphorylase. This enzyme is found only in muscle cells, where it breaks down glycogen into a simpler ...

  17. Intracellular compartmentalization of skeletal muscle glycogen metabolism and insulin signalling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prats Gavalda, Clara; Gomez-Cabello, Alba; Vigelsø Hansen, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    The interest in skeletal muscle metabolism and insulin signalling has increased exponentially in recent years as a consequence of their role in the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Despite this, the exact mechanisms involved in the regulation of skeletal muscle glycogen metabolism...... and insulin signalling transduction remain elusive. We believe that one of the reasons is that the role of intracellular compartmentalization as a regulator of metabolic pathways and signalling transduction has been rather ignored. This paper briefly reviews the literature to discuss the role of intracellular...... compartmentalization in the regulation of skeletal muscle glycogen metabolism and insulin signalling. As a result, a hypothetical regulatory mechanism is proposed by which cells could direct glycogen resynthesis towards different pools of glycogen particles depending on the metabolic needs. Furthermore, we discuss...

  18. The effect of glycogen phosphorolysis on basal glutaminergic transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozrzymas, Jerzy; Szczęsny, Tomasz; Rakus, Darek

    2011-01-14

    Astrocytic glycogen metabolism sustains neuronal activity but its impact on basal glutamatergic synaptic transmission is not clear. To address this issue, we have compared the effect of glycogen breakdown inhibition on miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) in rat hippocampal pure neuronal culture (PNC) and in astrocyte-neuronal co-cultures (ANCC). Amplitudes of mEPSC in ANCC were nearly twice as large as in PNC with no difference in current kinetics. Inhibition of glycogen phosphorylase reduced mEPSC amplitude by roughly 40% in ANCC being ineffective in PNC. Altogether, these data indicate that astrocyte-neuronal interaction enhances basal mEPSCs in ANCC mainly due to astrocytic glycogen metabolism. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Dietary Karaya Saponin and Rhodobacter capsulatus Exert Hypocholesterolemic Effects by Suppression of Hepatic Cholesterol Synthesis and Promotion of Bile Acid Synthesis in Laying Hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadia Afrose

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to elucidate the mechanism underlying the hypolipidemic action of karaya saponin or Rhodobacter (R. capsulatus. A total of 40 laying hens (20-week-old were assigned into four dietary treatment groups and fed a basal diet (as a control or basal diets supplemented with either karaya saponin, R. capsulatus, or both for 60 days. The level of serum low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol and the levels of cholesterol and triglycerides in the serum, liver, and egg yolk were reduced by all the supplementations (<.05. Liver bile acid concentration and fecal concentrations of cholesterol, triacylglycerol, and bile acid were simultaneously increased by the supplementation of karaya saponin, R. capsulatus, and the combination of karaya saponin and R. capsulatus (<.05. The supplementation of karaya saponin, R. capsulatus, and the combination of karaya saponin and R. capsulatus suppressed the incorporation of 14C from 1-14C-palmitic acid into the fractions of total lipids, phospholipids, triacylglycerol, and cholesterol in the liver in vitro (<.05. These findings suggest that the hypocholesterolemic effects of karaya saponin and R. capsulatus are caused by the suppression of the cholesterol synthesis and the promotion of cholesterol catabolism in the liver.

  20. Canonical Wnt signaling maintains the quiescent stage of hepatic stellate cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kordes, Claus; Sawitza, Iris; Haeussinger, Dieter

    2008-01-01

    It is well known that hepatic stellate cells (HSC) develop into cells, which are thought to contribute to liver fibrogenesis. Recent data suggest that HSC are progenitor cells with the capacity to differentiate into cells of endothelial and hepatocyte lineages. The present study shows that β-catenin-dependent canonical Wnt signaling is active in freshly isolated HSC of rats. Mimicking of the canonical Wnt pathway in cultured HSC by TWS119, an inhibitor of the glycogen synthase kinase 3β, led to reduced β-catenin phosphorylation, induced nuclear translocation of β-catenin, elevated glutamine synthetase production, impeded synthesis of α-smooth muscle actin and Wnt5a, but promoted the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein, Wnt10b, and paired-like homeodomain transcription factor 2c. In addition, canonical Wnt signaling lowered DNA synthesis and hindered HSC from entering the cell cycle. The findings demonstrate that β-catenin-dependent Wnt signaling maintains the quiescent state of HSC and, similar to stem and progenitor cells, influences their developmental fate

  1. Evolution of hepatic glucose metabolism: liver-specific glucokinase deficiency explained by parallel loss of the gene for glucokinase regulatory protein (GCKR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Yang Wang

    Full Text Available Glucokinase (GCK plays an important role in the regulation of carbohydrate metabolism. In the liver, phosphorylation of glucose to glucose-6-phosphate by GCK is the first step for both glycolysis and glycogen synthesis. However, some vertebrate species are deficient in GCK activity in the liver, despite containing GCK genes that appear to be compatible with function in their genomes. Glucokinase regulatory protein (GCKR is the most important post-transcriptional regulator of GCK in the liver; it participates in the modulation of GCK activity and location depending upon changes in glucose levels. In experimental models, loss of GCKR has been shown to associate with reduced hepatic GCK protein levels and activity.GCKR genes and GCKR-like sequences were identified in the genomes of all vertebrate species with available genome sequences. The coding sequences of GCKR and GCKR-like genes were identified and aligned; base changes likely to disrupt coding potential or splicing were also identified.GCKR genes could not be found in the genomes of 9 vertebrate species, including all birds. In addition, in multiple mammalian genomes, whereas GCKR-like gene sequences could be identified, these genes could not predict a functional protein. Vertebrate species that were previously reported to be deficient in hepatic GCK activity were found to have deleted (birds and lizard or mutated (mammals GCKR genes. Our results suggest that mutation of the GCKR gene leads to hepatic GCK deficiency due to the loss of the stabilizing effect of GCKR.

  2. Glycogen-bound polyphosphate kinase from the archaebacterium Sulfolobus acidocaldarius.

    OpenAIRE

    Skórko, R; Osipiuk, J; Stetter, K O

    1989-01-01

    Glycogen-bound polyphosphate kinase has been isolated from a crude extract of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius by isopycnic centrifugation in CsCl. Divalent cations (Mn2+ greater than Mg2+) stimulated the reaction. The enzyme does not require the presence of histones for its activity; it is inhibited strongly by phosphate and slightly by fluoride. The protein from the glycogen complex migrated in a sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel as a 57-kilodalton protein band; after isoelectric focusing ...

  3. Inadequate Brain Glycogen or Sleep Increases Spreading Depression Susceptibility

    KAUST Repository

    Kilic, Kivilcim; Karatas, Hulya; Donmez-Demir, Buket; Eren-Kocak, Emine; Gursoy-Ozdemir, Yasemin; Can, Alp; Petit, Jean-Marie; Magistretti, Pierre J.; Dalkara, Turgay

    2017-01-01

    Glycogen in astrocyte endfeet contributes to maintenance of low extracellular glutamate and K+ concentrations around synapses. Sleep deprivation (SD), a common migraine trigger induces transcriptional changes in astrocytes reducing glycogen breakdown. We hypothesize that when glycogen utilization cannot match synaptic energy demand, extracellular K+ can rise to levels that activate neuronal pannexin-1 channels and downstream inflammatory pathway, which might be one of the mechanisms initiating migraine headaches.We suppressed glycogen breakdown by inhibiting glycogen phosphorylation with 1,4-dideoxy-1,4-imino-D-arabinitol (DAB) and by SD.DAB caused neuronal pannexin-1 large-pore opening and activation of the downstream inflammatory pathway as shown by procaspase-1 cleavage and HMGB1 release from neurons. Six-hour SD induced pannexin-1 mRNA. DAB and SD also lowered the cortical spreading depression (CSD) induction threshold, which was reversed by glucose or lactate supplement, suggesting that glycogen-derived energy substrates are needed to prevent CSD generation. Supporting this, knocking-down neuronal lactate transporter, MCT2 with an anti-sense oligonucleotide or inhibiting glucose transport from vessels to astrocytes with intracerebroventricularly given phloretin reduced the CSD threshold. In vivo recordings with a K+ -sensitive/selective fluoroprobe, APG-4 disclosed that DAB treatment or SD caused significant rise in extracellular K+ during whisker-stimulation, illustrating the critical role of glycogen in extracellular K+ clearance.Synaptic metabolic stress caused by insufficient glycogen-derived energy substrate supply can activate neuronal pannexin-1 channels as well as lowering the CSD threshold. Therefore, conditions that limit energy supply to synapse (e.g. SD) may predispose to migraine attacks as suggested by genetic studies associating glucose or lactate transporter deficiency with migraine. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Inadequate Brain Glycogen or Sleep Increases Spreading Depression Susceptibility

    KAUST Repository

    Kilic, Kivilcim

    2017-12-16

    Glycogen in astrocyte endfeet contributes to maintenance of low extracellular glutamate and K+ concentrations around synapses. Sleep deprivation (SD), a common migraine trigger induces transcriptional changes in astrocytes reducing glycogen breakdown. We hypothesize that when glycogen utilization cannot match synaptic energy demand, extracellular K+ can rise to levels that activate neuronal pannexin-1 channels and downstream inflammatory pathway, which might be one of the mechanisms initiating migraine headaches.We suppressed glycogen breakdown by inhibiting glycogen phosphorylation with 1,4-dideoxy-1,4-imino-D-arabinitol (DAB) and by SD.DAB caused neuronal pannexin-1 large-pore opening and activation of the downstream inflammatory pathway as shown by procaspase-1 cleavage and HMGB1 release from neurons. Six-hour SD induced pannexin-1 mRNA. DAB and SD also lowered the cortical spreading depression (CSD) induction threshold, which was reversed by glucose or lactate supplement, suggesting that glycogen-derived energy substrates are needed to prevent CSD generation. Supporting this, knocking-down neuronal lactate transporter, MCT2 with an anti-sense oligonucleotide or inhibiting glucose transport from vessels to astrocytes with intracerebroventricularly given phloretin reduced the CSD threshold. In vivo recordings with a K+ -sensitive/selective fluoroprobe, APG-4 disclosed that DAB treatment or SD caused significant rise in extracellular K+ during whisker-stimulation, illustrating the critical role of glycogen in extracellular K+ clearance.Synaptic metabolic stress caused by insufficient glycogen-derived energy substrate supply can activate neuronal pannexin-1 channels as well as lowering the CSD threshold. Therefore, conditions that limit energy supply to synapse (e.g. SD) may predispose to migraine attacks as suggested by genetic studies associating glucose or lactate transporter deficiency with migraine. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. In vitro variation of glycogen content in three sheep nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premvati, G; Chopra, A K

    1979-06-01

    In vitro variation of glycogen content under aerobic conditions was measured on fresh weight basis in 3 sheep nematodes inhabiting different niches; Haemonchus contortus, Oesophagostomum columbianum and Trichuris ovis. The parasites were saparated into species and then sexes and starved for varying periods of time up to 24 h in glucose-free physiological saline. The differences between females and males and among the species with respect to glycogen content and its rate of change with time are discussed.

  6. Muscle glycogen metabolism changes in rats fed early postnatal a fructose-rich diet after maternal protein malnutrition: effects of acute physical exercise at the maximal lactate steady-state intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambri, Lucieli T; Ribeiro, Carla; Botezelli, José D; Ghezzi, Ana C; Mello, Maria Ar

    2014-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate the muscle glucose metabolism in rats fed a fructose-rich diet after fetal protein malnutrition, at rest and after acute physical exercise at maximal lactate steady-state intensity. The male offspring born of mothers fed on a balanced or low-protein diet were split in four groups until 60 days: Balanced (B): balanced diet during the whole period; Balanced/Fructose (BF): balanced diet in utero and fructose-rich diet after birth; Low protein/Balanced (LB): low-protein diet in utero and balanced diet after birth; Low protein/Fructose (LF): low protein diet in utero and fructose-rich diet after birth. Acute physical exercise reduced the muscle glycogen concentrations in all groups, although the LF group showed higher concentrations at rest. There was no difference among the groups in the glucose uptake and oxidation rates in the isolated soleus muscle neither at rest nor after acute exercise. However, glycogen synthesis was higher in the LF muscle than in the others at rest. Acute physical exercise increased glycogen synthesis in all groups, and the LF group showed the highest values. The fructose-rich diet administered in rats after fetal protein malnutrition alters muscle glycogen concentrations and glycogen synthesis in the rest and after acute exercise at maximal lactate steady-state intensity.

  7. Hepatic erythropoietin response in cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risør, Louise M; Fenger, Mogens; Olsen, Niels Vidiendal

    2016-01-01

    The main function of erythropoietin (EPO) is to maintain red blood cell mass, but in recent years, increasing evidence has suggested a wider biological role not solely related to erythropoiesis, e.g. angiogenesis and tissue protection. EPO is produced in the liver during fetal life, but the main...... production shifts to the kidney after birth. The liver maintains a production capacity of up to 10% of the total EPO synthesis in healthy controls, but can be up-regulated to 90-100%. However, the hepatic EPO synthesis has been shown not to be adequate for correction of anemia in the absence of renal......, which lead to arterial hypotension, hepatic nephropathy and anemia. An increase in EPO due to renal hypoperfusion, hypoxia and anemia or an EPO-mediated hepato-protective and regenerative mechanism is plausible. However, poor hepatic synthesis capacity, a decreasing co-factor level and inflammatory...

  8. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... friend, spouse, life partner, parent, sibling or other family member. What is HE? Hepatic Encephalopathy, sometimes referred ... disease is. It’s important for you and your family to become familiar with the signs of Hepatic ...

  9. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Your Story Spread the Word Give While You Shop Contact Us Donate Now Hepatic Encephalopathy Back Hepatic ... Your Story Spread the Word Give While You Shop Contact Us Donate Now Help ALF Improve This ...

  10. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Now Hepatic Encephalopathy Back Hepatic Encephalopathy is a brain disorder that develops in some individuals with liver ... is a condition that causes temporary worsening of brain function in people with advanced liver disease. When ...

  11. Alcohol and Hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home » Living with Hepatitis » Daily Living: Alcohol Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... heavy drinking, most heavy drinkers have developed cirrhosis. Hepatitis C and cirrhosis In general, someone with hepatitis ...

  12. Hepatitis C: Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Public Home » Hepatitis C » Hepatitis C Treatment Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... Enter ZIP code here Enter ZIP code here Hepatitis C Treatment for Veterans and the Public Treatment ...

  13. The cellular origin of the hepatic cholesterol synthesis (1961); Origine cellulaire du cholesterol hepatique de synthese (1961)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chevallier, F [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-07-01

    If rats are sacrificed within minutes after an injection of acetate 1 - {sup 14}C the specific radioactivities of sterols precipitable with digitonine, extracted from liver parenchyma cells and from Kupffer cells are very close to each other, whatever the duration of the experiment may be. It follows that cholesterol synthesis probably occurs in both types of cells. A validation of this conclusion requires that the validity of certain assumptions be established. (authors) [French] Si l'on sacrifie des rats dans les minutes qui suivent une injection d'acetate 1- {sup 14}C, les valeurs des radioactivites specifiques des sterols, precipitables par la digitonine, extraits des cellules parenchymateuses du foie et des cellules de Kupffer sont tres proches l'une de l'autre quelle que soit la duree de l'experience. On en deduit que la synthese du cholesterol s'effectue probablement dans les deux types de cellules. Cette conclusion pour etre valable, exige que le bien fonde de certaines hypotheses soit verifie. (auteurs)

  14. Hepatitis C

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an inflammation of the liver. One type, hepatitis C, is caused by the hepatitis C virus (HCV). It usually spreads through contact with ... childbirth. Most people who are infected with hepatitis C don't have any symptoms for years. If ...

  15. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Caregiver Support Caregiver Stories Home › What is Hepatic Encephalopathy? Why Your Liver is Important The Connection Between HE and Liver ... Why it’s Important to Treat HE Symptoms of Liver Failure Glossary of terms ... is Hepatic Encephalopathy? Hepatic Encephalopathy, sometimes referred to as portosystemic encephalopathy ...

  16. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Caregiver Support Caregiver Stories Home › What is Hepatic Encephalopathy? Why Your Liver is Important The Connection Between HE and Liver ... Why it’s Important to Treat HE Symptoms of Liver Failure Glossary of terms ... is Hepatic Encephalopathy? Hepatic Encephalopathy, sometimes referred to as portosystemic encephalopathy ...

  17. Hepatitis A

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is an inflammation of the liver. One type, hepatitis A, is caused by the hepatitis A virus (HAV). The disease spreads through contact with ... suggest medicines to help relieve your symptoms. The hepatitis A vaccine can prevent HAV. Good hygiene can also ...

  18. [13C] GC-C-IRMS analysis of methylboronic acid derivatives of glucose from liver glycogen after the ingestion of [13C] labeled tracers in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luengo, Catherine; Azzout-Marniche, Dalila; Fromentin, Claire; Piedcoq, Julien; Lemosquet, Sophie; Tomé, Daniel; Gaudichon, Claire

    2009-11-01

    We developed a complete method to measure low [(13)C] enrichments in glycogen. Fourteen rats were fed a control diet. Six of them also ingested either [U-(13)C] glucose (n=2) or a mixture of 20 [U-(13)C] amino acids (n=4). Hepatic glycogen was extracted, digested to glucose and purified on anion-cation exchange resins. After the optimization of methylboronic acid derivatization using GC-MS, [(13)C] enrichment of extracted glucose was measured by GC-C-IRMS. The accuracy was addressed by measuring the enrichment excess of a calibration curve, which observed values were in good agreement with the expected values (R=0.9979). Corrected delta values were -15.6+/-1.6 delta(13)C (per thousand) for control rats (n=8) and increased to -5 to 8 delta(13)C (per thousand) per thousand and 12-14 delta(13)C (per thousand) per thousand after the ingestion of [U-(13)C] amino acids or [U-(13)C] glucose as oral tracers, respectively. The method enabled the determination of dietary substrate transfer into glycogen. The sequestration of dietary glucose in liver glycogen 4 h after the meal was 35% of the ingested dose whereas the transfer of carbon skeletons from amino acids was only 0.25 to 1%.

  19. Homogenization versus homogenization-free method to measure muscle glycogen fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojibi, N; Rasouli, M

    2016-12-01

    The glycogen is extracted from animal tissues with or without homogenization using cold perchloric acid. Three methods were compared for determination of glycogen in rat muscle at different physiological states. Two groups of five rats were kept at rest or 45 minutes muscular activity. The glycogen fractions were extracted and measured by using three methods. The data of homogenization method shows that total glycogen decreased following 45 min physical activity and the change occurred entirely in acid soluble glycogen (ASG), while AIG did not change significantly. Similar results were obtained by using "total-glycogen-fractionation methods". The findings of "homogenization-free method" indicate that the acid insoluble fraction (AIG) was the main portion of muscle glycogen and the majority of changes occurred in AIG fraction. The results of "homogenization method" are identical with "total glycogen fractionation", but differ with "homogenization-free" protocol. The ASG fraction is the major portion of muscle glycogen and is more metabolically active form.

  20. Neurons have an active glycogen metabolism that contributes to tolerance to hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saez, Isabel; Duran, Jordi; Sinadinos, Christopher; Beltran, Antoni; Yanes, Oscar; Tevy, María F; Martínez-Pons, Carlos; Milán, Marco; Guinovart, Joan J

    2014-01-01

    Glycogen is present in the brain, where it has been found mainly in glial cells but not in neurons. Therefore, all physiologic roles of brain glycogen have been attributed exclusively to astrocytic glycogen. Working with primary cultured neurons, as well as with genetically modified mice and flies, here we report that—against general belief—neurons contain a low but measurable amount of glycogen. Moreover, we also show that these cells express the brain isoform of glycogen phosphorylase, allowing glycogen to be fully metabolized. Most importantly, we show an active neuronal glycogen metabolism that protects cultured neurons from hypoxia-induced death and flies from hypoxia-induced stupor. Our findings change the current view of the role of glycogen in the brain and reveal that endogenous neuronal glycogen metabolism participates in the neuronal tolerance to hypoxic stress. PMID:24569689

  1. Glucose uptake and transport in contracting, perfused rat muscle with different pre-contraction glycogen concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hespel, P; Richter, Erik

    1990-01-01

    1. Glucose uptake and transport, muscle glycogen, free glucose and glucose-6-phosphate concentrations were studied in perfused resting and contracting rat skeletal muscle with different pre-contraction glycogen concentrations. Rats were pre-conditioned by a combination of swimming exercise and diet......, resulting in either low (glycogen-depleted rats), normal (control rats) or high (supercompensated rats) muscle glycogen concentrations at the time their hindlimbs were perfused. 2. Compared with control rats, pre-contraction muscle glycogen concentration was approximately 40% lower in glycogen-depleted rats......, whereas it was 40% higher in supercompensated rats. Muscle glycogen break-down correlated positively (r = 0.76; P less than 0.001) with pre-contraction muscle glycogen concentration. 3. Glucose uptake during contractions was approximately 50% higher in glycogen-depleted hindquarters than in control...

  2. Neurons have an active glycogen metabolism that contributes to tolerance to hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saez, Isabel; Duran, Jordi; Sinadinos, Christopher; Beltran, Antoni; Yanes, Oscar; Tevy, María F; Martínez-Pons, Carlos; Milán, Marco; Guinovart, Joan J

    2014-06-01

    Glycogen is present in the brain, where it has been found mainly in glial cells but not in neurons. Therefore, all physiologic roles of brain glycogen have been attributed exclusively to astrocytic glycogen. Working with primary cultured neurons, as well as with genetically modified mice and flies, here we report that-against general belief-neurons contain a low but measurable amount of glycogen. Moreover, we also show that these cells express the brain isoform of glycogen phosphorylase, allowing glycogen to be fully metabolized. Most importantly, we show an active neuronal glycogen metabolism that protects cultured neurons from hypoxia-induced death and flies from hypoxia-induced stupor. Our findings change the current view of the role of glycogen in the brain and reveal that endogenous neuronal glycogen metabolism participates in the neuronal tolerance to hypoxic stress.

  3. Acid hydrolysis and molecular density of phytoglycogen and liver glycogen helps understand the bonding in glycogen α (composite particles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prudence O Powell

    Full Text Available Phytoglycogen (from certain mutant plants and animal glycogen are highly branched glucose polymers with similarities in structural features and molecular size range. Both appear to form composite α particles from smaller β particles. The molecular size distribution of liver glycogen is bimodal, with distinct α and β components, while that of phytoglycogen is monomodal. This study aims to enhance our understanding of the nature of the link between liver-glycogen β particles resulting in the formation of large α particles. It examines the time evolution of the size distribution of these molecules during acid hydrolysis, and the size dependence of the molecular density of both glucans. The monomodal distribution of phytoglycogen decreases uniformly in time with hydrolysis, while with glycogen, the large particles degrade significantly more quickly. The size dependence of the molecular density shows qualitatively different shapes for these two types of molecules. The data, combined with a quantitative model for the evolution of the distribution during degradation, suggest that the bonding between β into α particles is different between phytoglycogen and liver glycogen, with the formation of a glycosidic linkage for phytoglycogen and a covalent or strong non-covalent linkage, most probably involving a protein, for glycogen as most likely. This finding is of importance for diabetes, where α-particle structure is impaired.

  4. Acid Hydrolysis and Molecular Density of Phytoglycogen and Liver Glycogen Helps Understand the Bonding in Glycogen α (Composite) Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Prudence O.; Sullivan, Mitchell A.; Sheehy, Joshua J.; Schulz, Benjamin L.; Warren, Frederick J.; Gilbert, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    Phytoglycogen (from certain mutant plants) and animal glycogen are highly branched glucose polymers with similarities in structural features and molecular size range. Both appear to form composite α particles from smaller β particles. The molecular size distribution of liver glycogen is bimodal, with distinct α and β components, while that of phytoglycogen is monomodal. This study aims to enhance our understanding of the nature of the link between liver-glycogen β particles resulting in the formation of large α particles. It examines the time evolution of the size distribution of these molecules during acid hydrolysis, and the size dependence of the molecular density of both glucans. The monomodal distribution of phytoglycogen decreases uniformly in time with hydrolysis, while with glycogen, the large particles degrade significantly more quickly. The size dependence of the molecular density shows qualitatively different shapes for these two types of molecules. The data, combined with a quantitative model for the evolution of the distribution during degradation, suggest that the bonding between β into α particles is different between phytoglycogen and liver glycogen, with the formation of a glycosidic linkage for phytoglycogen and a covalent or strong non-covalent linkage, most probably involving a protein, for glycogen as most likely. This finding is of importance for diabetes, where α-particle structure is impaired. PMID:25799321

  5. Inhibited Carnitine Synthesis Causes Systemic Alteration of Nutrient Metabolism in Zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia-Min; Li, Ling-Yu; Qin, Xuan; Degrace, Pascal; Demizieux, Laurent; Limbu, Samwel M; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Mei-Ling; Li, Dong-Liang; Du, Zhen-Yu

    2018-01-01

    Impaired mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation has been correlated with many metabolic syndromes, and the metabolic characteristics of the mammalian models of mitochondrial dysfunction have also been intensively studied. However, the effects of the impaired mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation on systemic metabolism in teleost have never been investigated. In the present study, we established a low-carnitine zebrafish model by feeding fish with mildronate as a specific carnitine synthesis inhibitor [0.05% body weight (BW)/d] for 7 weeks, and the systemically changed nutrient metabolism, including carnitine and triglyceride (TG) concentrations, fatty acid (FA) β-oxidation capability, and other molecular and biochemical assays of lipid, glucose, and protein metabolism, were measured. The results indicated that mildronate markedly decreased hepatic carnitine concentrations while it had no effect in muscle. Liver TG concentrations increased by more than 50% in mildronate-treated fish. Mildronate decreased the efficiency of liver mitochondrial β-oxidation, increased the hepatic mRNA expression of genes related to FA β-oxidation and lipolysis, and decreased the expression of lipogenesis genes. Mildronate decreased whole body glycogen content, increased glucose metabolism rate, and upregulated the expression of glucose uptake and glycolysis genes. Mildronate also increased whole body protein content and hepatic mRNA expression of mechanistic target of rapamycin ( mtor ), and decreased the expression of a protein catabolism-related gene. Liver, rather than muscle, was the primary organ targeted by mildronate. In short, mildronate-induced hepatic inhibited carnitine synthesis in zebrafish caused decreased mitochondrial FA β-oxidation efficiency, greater lipid accumulation, and altered glucose and protein metabolism. This reveals the key roles of mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation in nutrient metabolism in fish, and this low-carnitine zebrafish model could also be

  6. Inhibited Carnitine Synthesis Causes Systemic Alteration of Nutrient Metabolism in Zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Min Li

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Impaired mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation has been correlated with many metabolic syndromes, and the metabolic characteristics of the mammalian models of mitochondrial dysfunction have also been intensively studied. However, the effects of the impaired mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation on systemic metabolism in teleost have never been investigated. In the present study, we established a low-carnitine zebrafish model by feeding fish with mildronate as a specific carnitine synthesis inhibitor [0.05% body weight (BW/d] for 7 weeks, and the systemically changed nutrient metabolism, including carnitine and triglyceride (TG concentrations, fatty acid (FA β-oxidation capability, and other molecular and biochemical assays of lipid, glucose, and protein metabolism, were measured. The results indicated that mildronate markedly decreased hepatic carnitine concentrations while it had no effect in muscle. Liver TG concentrations increased by more than 50% in mildronate-treated fish. Mildronate decreased the efficiency of liver mitochondrial β-oxidation, increased the hepatic mRNA expression of genes related to FA β-oxidation and lipolysis, and decreased the expression of lipogenesis genes. Mildronate decreased whole body glycogen content, increased glucose metabolism rate, and upregulated the expression of glucose uptake and glycolysis genes. Mildronate also increased whole body protein content and hepatic mRNA expression of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mtor, and decreased the expression of a protein catabolism-related gene. Liver, rather than muscle, was the primary organ targeted by mildronate. In short, mildronate-induced hepatic inhibited carnitine synthesis in zebrafish caused decreased mitochondrial FA β-oxidation efficiency, greater lipid accumulation, and altered glucose and protein metabolism. This reveals the key roles of mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation in nutrient metabolism in fish, and this low-carnitine zebrafish model

  7. Hypoksisk hepatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amadid, Hanan; Schiødt, Frank Vinholt

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxic hepatitis (HH), also known as ischaemic hepatitis or shock liver, is an acute liver injury caused by hepatic hypoxia. Cardiac failure, respiratory failure and septic shock are the main underlying conditions. In each of these conditions, several haemodynamic mechanisms lead to hepatic...... hypoxia. A shock state is observed in only 50% of cases. Thus, shock liver and ischaemic hepatitis are misnomers. HH can be a diagnostic pitfall but the diagnosis can be established when three criteria are met. Prognosis is poor and prompt identification and treatment of the underlying conditions...

  8. Exendin-4 Inhibits Hepatic Lipogenesis by Increasing β-Catenin Signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Hae Seo

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate whether the beneficial effect of exendin-4 on hepatic steatosis is mediated by β-catenin signaling. After the HepG2 human hepatoma cells were treated with PA for 24 hours, total triglycerides levels were increased in a dose-dependent manner, and the expression levels of perilipin family members were upregulated in cells treated with 400 μM PA. For our in vitro model of hepatic steatosis, HepG2 cells were treated with 400 μM palmitic acid (PA in the presence or absence of 100 nM exendin-4 for 24 hours. PA increased the expression of lipogenic genes, such as sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c (SREBP-1c, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ, stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 (SCD1, fatty acid synthase (FAS, and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC and triglyceride synthesis-involved genes, such as diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1 and diacylglycerol acyltransferase 2 (DGAT2 in HepG2 cells, whereas exendin-4 treatment significantly prevented the upregulation of SREBP-1c, PPARγ, SCD1, FAS, ACC, DGAT1 and DGAT2. Moreover, exendin-4 treatment increased the expression of phosphorylated glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta (GSK-3β in the cytosolic fraction and the expression of β-catenin and transcription factor 4 (TCF4 in the nuclear fraction. In addition, siRNA-mediated inhibition of β-catenin upregulated the expression of lipogenic transcription factors. The protective effects of exendin-4 on intracellular triglyceride content and total triglyceride levels were not observed in cells treated with the β-catenin inhibitor IWR-1. These data suggest that exendin-4 treatment improves hepatic steatosis by inhibiting lipogenesis via activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

  9. Glycogen storage disease type Ia: linkage of glucose, glycogen, lactic acid, triglyceride, and uric acid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sever, Sakine; Weinstein, David A; Wolfsdorf, Joseph I; Gedik, Reyhan; Schaefer, Ernst J

    2012-01-01

    A female presented in infancy with hypotonia, undetectable serum glucose, lactic acidosis, and triglycerides >5000 mg/dL. The diagnosis of type 1A glycogen storage disease was made via the result of a liver biopsy, which showed increased glycogen and absent glucose-6-phosphatase enzyme activity. The patient was treated with dextrose administered orally, which was replaced by frequent feedings of cornstarch, which resulted in an improvement of her metabolic parameters. At age 18 years of age, she had marked hypertriglyceridemia (3860 mg/dL) and eruptive xanthomas and was treated with fenofibrate, atorvastatin, and fish oil. At age 29 years she was noted to have multiple liver adenomas, severe anemia, and hyperuricemia. Aggressive cornstarch therapy was commenced with a goal of maintaining her blood glucose levels >75 mg/dL and lactate levels triglycerides 179, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol 32, and calculated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol 154. Her weight was stable with a body mass index of 24.8 kg/m(2). Her liver adenomas had decreased in size, and her anemia and hyperuricemia had improved. She was homozygous for the R83C missense mutation in G6PC. Our data indicate that optimized metabolic control to maintain blood glucose levels >75 mg/dL is critical in the management of this disease. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Glycogen metabolism in radiation induced hepatocellular carcinoma in Swiss albino mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, N.K.; Kumar, Ashok

    1988-01-01

    Glycogen content and the activities of phosphorylase, glycogen sythetase (GS), glucose 6-phosphatase (G6Pase), phosphohexose isomerase (PHI), glucose 6-phosphodehydrogenase were biochemically determined in the heparocellular carcinoma induced in swiss albino mice following radiocalcium internal irradiation. The content glycogen and the activities of phosphorylase, glycogen synthetase, G6Pase, PHI, GPT and GOT are considerably reduced in the hepatocellular carcinoma compared to that in control liver. However, the activity of G6PDH shows an increased activity. Results indicate that the decreas ed glycogen content in the hepatocellular carcinoma is due to the reduced glycogen synthetase activity and utilization of glucose by HMP pathway. (author). 2 tabs., 24 refs

  11. Control of Hepatic Glucose Metabolism by the Oral Hypoglycemic Sulfonylureas

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-05-11

    diphosphate, 0.2 mM; 2,3 diphosphoglycerate , 0.1 mM; NADH, 0.2 mM; and 0.60 ml of deprotelnized sample. Pyruvate was measured by following the oxidation...J,; Rodgrlgues, L,M,; Whitton, P,A, and Hems, D,A, (1980) Control mechanisms in the acceleration of hepatic glycogen degradation during anoxia

  12. Redox Switch for the Inhibited State of Yeast Glycogen Synthase Mimics Regulation by Phosphorylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahalingan, Krishna K.; Baskaran†, Sulochanadevi; DePaoli-Roach, Anna A.; Roach, Peter J.; Hurley, Thomas D. (Indiana-Med)

    2017-01-10

    Glycogen synthase (GS) is the rate limiting enzyme in the synthesis of glycogen. Eukaryotic GS is negatively regulated by covalent phosphorylation and allosterically activated by glucose-6-phosphate (G-6-P). To gain structural insights into the inhibited state of the enzyme, we solved the crystal structure of yGsy2-R589A/R592A to a resolution of 3.3 Å. The double mutant has an activity ratio similar to the phosphorylated enzyme and also retains the ability to be activated by G-6-P. When compared to the 2.88 Å structure of the wild-type G-6-P activated enzyme, the crystal structure of the low-activity mutant showed that the N-terminal domain of the inhibited state is tightly held against the dimer-related interface thereby hindering acceptor access to the catalytic cleft. On the basis of these two structural observations, we developed a reversible redox regulatory feature in yeast GS by substituting cysteine residues for two highly conserved arginine residues. When oxidized, the cysteine mutant enzyme exhibits activity levels similar to the phosphorylated enzyme but cannot be activated by G-6-P. Upon reduction, the cysteine mutant enzyme regains normal activity levels and regulatory response to G-6-P activation.

  13. Hepatitis A through E (Viral Hepatitis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Eating, Diet, & Nutrition Clinical Trials Wilson Disease Hepatitis (Viral) View or Print All Sections What is Viral Hepatitis? Viral hepatitis is an infection that causes liver inflammation ...

  14. Abnormal metabolism of glycogen phosphate as a cause for Lafora disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagliabracci, Vincent S; Girard, Jean Marie; Segvich, Dyann; Meyer, Catalina; Turnbull, Julie; Zhao, Xiaochu; Minassian, Berge A; Depaoli-Roach, Anna A; Roach, Peter J

    2008-12-05

    Lafora disease is a progressive myoclonus epilepsy with onset in the teenage years followed by neurodegeneration and death within 10 years. A characteristic is the widespread formation of poorly branched, insoluble glycogen-like polymers (polyglucosan) known as Lafora bodies, which accumulate in neurons, muscle, liver, and other tissues. Approximately half of the cases of Lafora disease result from mutations in the EPM2A gene, which encodes laforin, a member of the dual specificity protein phosphatase family that is able to release the small amount of covalent phosphate normally present in glycogen. In studies of Epm2a(-/-) mice that lack laforin, we observed a progressive change in the properties and structure of glycogen that paralleled the formation of Lafora bodies. At three months, glycogen metabolism remained essentially normal, even though the phosphorylation of glycogen has increased 4-fold and causes altered physical properties of the polysaccharide. By 9 months, the glycogen has overaccumulated by 3-fold, has become somewhat more phosphorylated, but, more notably, is now poorly branched, is insoluble in water, and has acquired an abnormal morphology visible by electron microscopy. These glycogen molecules have a tendency to aggregate and can be recovered in the pellet after low speed centrifugation of tissue extracts. The aggregation requires the phosphorylation of glycogen. The aggregrated glycogen sequesters glycogen synthase but not other glycogen metabolizing enzymes. We propose that laforin functions to suppress excessive glycogen phosphorylation and is an essential component of the metabolism of normally structured glycogen.

  15. Hepatitis Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sina Ogholikhan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Viral hepatitis is a serious health problem all over the world. However, the reduction of the morbidity and mortality due to vaccinations against hepatitis A and hepatitis B has been a major component in the overall reduction in vaccine preventable diseases. We will discuss the epidemiology, vaccine development, and post-vaccination effects of the hepatitis A and B virus. In addition, we discuss attempts to provide hepatitis D vaccine for the 350 million individuals infected with hepatitis B globally. Given the lack of a hepatitis C vaccine, the many challenges facing the production of a hepatitis C vaccine will be shown, along with current and former vaccination trials. As there is no current FDA-approved hepatitis E vaccine, we will present vaccination data that is available in the rest of the world. Finally, we will discuss the existing challenges and questions facing future endeavors for each of the hepatitis viruses, with efforts continuing to focus on dramatically reducing the morbidity and mortality associated with these serious infections of the liver.

  16. Hepatitis Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogholikhan, Sina; Schwarz, Kathleen B.

    2016-01-01

    Viral hepatitis is a serious health problem all over the world. However, the reduction of the morbidity and mortality due to vaccinations against hepatitis A and hepatitis B has been a major component in the overall reduction in vaccine preventable diseases. We will discuss the epidemiology, vaccine development, and post-vaccination effects of the hepatitis A and B virus. In addition, we discuss attempts to provide hepatitis D vaccine for the 350 million individuals infected with hepatitis B globally. Given the lack of a hepatitis C vaccine, the many challenges facing the production of a hepatitis C vaccine will be shown, along with current and former vaccination trials. As there is no current FDA-approved hepatitis E vaccine, we will present vaccination data that is available in the rest of the world. Finally, we will discuss the existing challenges and questions facing future endeavors for each of the hepatitis viruses, with efforts continuing to focus on dramatically reducing the morbidity and mortality associated with these serious infections of the liver. PMID:26978406

  17. Adenosine diphosphate sugar pyrophosphatase prevents glycogen biosynthesis in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Bruna, Beatriz; Baroja-Fernández, Edurne; Muñoz, Francisco José; Bastarrica-Berasategui, Ainara; Zandueta-Criado, Aitor; Rodríguez-López, Milagros; Lasa, Iñigo; Akazawa, Takashi; Pozueta-Romero, Javier

    2001-01-01

    An adenosine diphosphate sugar pyrophosphatase (ASPPase, EC 3.6.1.21) has been characterized by using Escherichia coli. This enzyme, whose activities in the cell are inversely correlated with the intracellular glycogen content and the glucose concentration in the culture medium, hydrolyzes ADP-glucose, the precursor molecule of glycogen biosynthesis. ASPPase was purified to apparent homogeneity (over 3,000-fold), and sequence analyses revealed that it is a member of the ubiquitously distributed group of nucleotide pyrophosphatases designated as “nudix” hydrolases. Insertional mutagenesis experiments leading to the inactivation of the ASPPase encoding gene, aspP, produced cells with marginally low enzymatic activities and higher glycogen content than wild-type bacteria. aspP was cloned into an expression vector and introduced into E. coli. Transformed cells were shown to contain a dramatically reduced amount of glycogen, as compared with the untransformed bacteria. No pleiotropic changes in the bacterial growth occurred in both the aspP-overexpressing and aspP-deficient strains. The overall results pinpoint the reaction catalyzed by ASPPase as a potential step of regulating glycogen biosynthesis in E. coli. PMID:11416161

  18. Mechanisms limiting glycogen storage in muscle during prolonged insulin stimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, E.A.; Hansen, S.A.; Hansen, B.F.

    1988-01-01

    The extent to which muscle glycogen concentrations can be increased during exposure to maximal insulin concentrations and abundant glucose was investigated in the isolated perfused rat hindquarter preparation. Perfusion for 7 h in the presence of 20,000 μU/ml insulin and 11-13 mM glucose increased muscle glycogen concentrations to maximal values 2, 3, and 3.5 times above normal fed levels in fast-twitch white, slow-twitch red, and fast-twitch red fibers, respectively. Glucose uptake decreased from 34.9 μmol·g -1 ·h -1 at 0 h to 7.5 after 7 h of perfusion. During the perfusion muscle glycogen synthase activity decreased and free intracellular glucose and glucose 6-phosphate increased indicating that glucose disposal was impaired. However, glucose transport as measured by the uptake of 3-O-[ 14 C]methyl-D-glucose was also markedly decreased after 5 and 7 h of perfusion compared with initial values. Total muscle water concentration decreased during glycogen loading of the muscles. Mechanisms limiting glycogen storage under maximal insulin stimulation include impaired insulin-stimulated membrane transport of glucose as well as impaired intracellular glucose disposal

  19. A new non-degradative method to purify glycogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xinle; Sullivan, Mitchell A; Gao, Fei; Li, Shihan; Schulz, Benjamin L; Gilbert, Robert G

    2016-08-20

    Liver glycogen, a complex branched glucose polymer containing a small amount of protein, is important for maintaining glucose homeostasis (blood-sugar control) in humans. It has recently been found that glycogen molecular structure is impaired in diabetes. Isolating the carbohydrate polymer and any intrinsically-attached protein(s) is an essential prerequisite for studying this structural impairment. This requires an effective, non-degradative and efficient purification method to exclude the many other proteins present in liver. Proteins and glycogen have different ranges of molecular sizes. Despite the plethora of proteins that might still be present in significant abundance after other isolation techniques, SEC (size exclusion chromatography, also known as GPC), which separates by molecular size, should separate those extraneous to glycogen from glycogen with any intrinsically associated protein(s). A novel purification method is developed for this, based on preparative SEC following sucrose gradient centrifugation. Proteomics is used to show that the new method compares favourably with current methods in the literature. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Tissue glycogen and blood glucose in irradiated rats. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlersova, E.; Ahlers, I.; Paulikova, E.; Praslicka, M.

    1980-01-01

    Fed and starved (overnight) male rats of the Wistar strain were exposed to whole-body irradiation with 14.35 Gy (1500 R) of X-rays. After irradiation and sham-irradiation all animals were starved until examination performed 1, 6, 24, 48 and 72 h after treatment. The concentration of glucose in the blood and the concentration of glycogen in the liver, heart, skeletal muscle, brown and white adipose tissue were determined. The concentrations of blood glucose and liver glycogen were found to increase between 1 and 6 h after irradiation of the starved animals. The most pronounced increase in glycogen concentration in the liver and heart muscle was observed 24 and 48 h after irradiation. A similar increase in the concentration of blood glucose was found between 48 and 72 h after irradiation. The fed and starved irradiated rats reacted differently, particularly between 48 and 72 h; the liver glycogen concentration decreased in the fed animals and remained elevated in the starved ones. Very high values of terminal glycemia were observed in both groups. The accumulation of glycogen in the heart muscle indicates that this organ is sensitive to ionizing radiation. (author)

  1. Tissue glycogen and blood glucose in irradiated rats. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlersova, E.; Ahlers, I.; Praslicka, M.

    1980-01-01

    Male rats of the Wistar strain were continuously irradiated with 0.57 Gy (60 R) of gamma rays from a 60 Co source. Irradiation lasted from 1 to 50 days in an experimental field where also control animals shielded from radiation were placed. After a 16 h starvation, the concentration of glucose in the blood and of glycogen in the liver and the heart was determined 1, 3, 7, 14, 21, 25, 32, 39 and 50 days after the beginning of irradiation. The concentration of blood glucose in irradiated rats did not practically differ from that of control animals during the whole period of investigation. The concentration of liver glycogen in irradiated animals was higher than that in the controls during all time intervals, except for day 1. The values of glycogen in the heart muscle were approximately identical in the irradiated and control rats, except for day 21 when they sharply increased in the irradiated animals. In addition to the investigation of blood glucose and tissue glycogen during continuous irradiation, these parameters were studied immediately, and 1, 6 and 12 months after continuous irradiation with a daily exposure of 0.57 Gy (60 R) up to a total exposure of 14.35 Gy (1500 R) of gamma rays. Considerably higher values of liver glycogen were detected in the irradiated rats immediately, and 1 and 6 months after the end of irradiation. (author)

  2. Mutational analysis of the coding regions of the genes encoding protein kinase B-alpha and -beta, phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1, phosphatase targeting to glycogen, protein phosphatase inhibitor-1, and glycogenin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, L; Fjordvang, H; Rasmussen, S K

    1999-01-01

    The finding of a reduced insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis in the skeletal muscle of glucose-tolerant first-degree relatives of patients with NIDDM, as well as in cultured fibroblasts and skeletal muscle cells isolated from NIDDM patients, has been interpreted as evidence f...

  3. A widespread amino acid polymorphism at codon 905 of the glycogen-associated regulatory subunit of protein phosphatase-1 is associated with insulin resistance and hypersecretion of insulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars; Hansen, Torben; Vestergaard, Henrik

    1995-01-01

    with indirect calorimetry in order to elucidate the potential impact of the Tyr905 substitution on the whole body glucose metabolism. Interestingly, the Tyr905 variant was associated with altered routing of glucose: a decreased insulin stimulated non-oxidative glucose metabolism of peripheral tissues (glycogen...... synthesis) (p population-based sample of 380 unrelated young healthy Caucasians was examined during a combined intravenous glucose and tolbutamide test to address whether the Asp905/Tyr905 polymorphism...

  4. Glycogen availability and skeletal muscle adaptations with endurance and resistance exercise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knuiman, Pim; Hopman, Maria T.E.; Mensink, Marco

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that glycogen depletion affects endurance exercise performance negatively. Moreover, numerous studies have demonstrated that post-exercise carbohydrate ingestion improves exercise recovery by increasing glycogen resynthesis. However, recent research into the effects of

  5. Mountain-bike racing – the influence of prior glycogen- reducing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    bout of glycogen-reducing exercise on the general stress and immune response to ..... interaction effect of glutamine supplementation and glycogen reduction on the .... Hammarqvist F, Ejesson B, Wernerman J. Stress hormones initiate pro-.

  6. Deleterious effects of neuronal accumulation of glycogen in flies and mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, Jordi; Tevy, María Florencia; Garcia-Rocha, Mar; Calbó, Joaquim; Milán, Marco; Guinovart, Joan J

    2012-08-01

    Under physiological conditions, most neurons keep glycogen synthase (GS) in an inactive form and do not show detectable levels of glycogen. Nevertheless, aberrant glycogen accumulation in neurons is a hallmark of patients suffering from Lafora disease or other polyglucosan disorders. Although these diseases are associated with mutations in genes involved in glycogen metabolism, the role of glycogen accumulation remains elusive. Here, we generated mouse and fly models expressing an active form of GS to force neuronal accumulation of glycogen. We present evidence that the progressive accumulation of glycogen in mouse and Drosophila neurons leads to neuronal loss, locomotion defects and reduced lifespan. Our results highlight glycogen accumulation in neurons as a direct cause of neurodegeneration. Copyright © 2012 EMBO Molecular Medicine.

  7. Ursolic acid and luteolin-7-glucoside improve lipid profiles and increase liver glycogen content through glycogen synthase kinase-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Marisa F; Camsari, Cagri; Sá, Carla M; Lima, Cristovao F; Fernandes-Ferreira, Manuel; Pereira-Wilson, Cristina

    2010-06-01

    In the present study, two phytochemicals - ursolic acid (UA) and luteolin-7-glucoside (L7G) - were assessed in vivo in healthy rats regarding effects on plasma glucose and lipid profile (total cholesterol, HDL and LDL), as well as liver glycogen content, in view of their importance in the aetiology of diabetes and associated complications. Both UA and L7G significantly decreased plasma glucose concentration. UA also significantly increased liver glycogen levels accompanied by phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3). The increase in glycogen deposition induced by UA (mediated by GSK3) could have contributed to the lower plasma glucose levels observed. Both compounds significantly lowered total plasma cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein levels, and, in addition, UA increased plasma high-density lipoprotein levels. Our results show that UA particularly may be useful in preventable strategies for people at risk of developing diabetes and associated cardiovascular complications by improving plasma glucose levels and lipid profile, as well as by promoting liver glycogen deposition.

  8. Modified glycogen as construction material for functional biomimetic microfibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabyk, Mariia; Hruby, Martin; Vetrik, Miroslav; Kucka, Jan; Proks, Vladimir; Parizek, Martin; Konefal, Rafal; Krist, Pavel; Chvatil, David; Bacakova, Lucie; Slouf, Miroslav; Stepanek, Petr

    2016-11-05

    We describe a conceptually new, microfibrous, biodegradable functional material prepared from a modified storage polysaccharide also present in humans (glycogen) showing strong potential as direct-contact dressing/interface material for wound healing. Double bonds were introduced into glycogen via allylation and were further exploited for crosslinking of the microfibers. Triple bonds were introduced by propargylation and served for further click functionalization of the microfibers with bioactive peptide. A simple solvent-free method allowing the preparation of thick layers was used to produce microfibers (diameter ca 2μm) from allylated and/or propargylated glycogen. Crosslinking of the samples was performed by microtron beta-irradiation, and the irradiation dose was optimized to 2kGy. The results from biological testing showed that these highly porous, hydrophilic, readily functionalizable materials were completely nontoxic to cells growing in their presence. The fibers were gradually degraded in the presence of cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Serum glucose and liver glycogen in gamma irradiated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlersova, E.; Ahlers, I.; Molcanova, A.

    1988-01-01

    Overnight fasted male rats of Wistar strain were irradiated with single whole-body doses of 4.78-7.17-9.57 and 14.35 Gy of gamma rays. After decapitation at intervals 1-28 d (4.78 and 7.17 Gy), 1-7 d (9.57 Gy) and 1-3 d (14.35 Gy) glucose concentration in serum and glycogen concentration in liver of irradiated and non-irradiated animals were determined. The higher was radiation dose the more expressive extent and depth of changes (hyperglycemia, accumulation of glycogen) occured. Blood glucose and liver glycogen may serve as a reliable and dose-dependent biological indicators of metabolic changes in irradiated rats. (author)

  10. Muscle glycogen depletion and lactate concentration during downhill skiing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesch, P; Larsson, L; Eriksson, A; Karlsson, J

    1978-01-01

    Skilled and unskilled skiers were studied during downhill skiing. Muscle glycogen and muscle lactate concentrations in the vastus lateralis muscle were determined following different skiing conditions. Heavy glycogen utilization was found in the groups studied during a day of skiing. The skilled and unskilled skiers differed with respect to selective glycogen depletion pattern and the skilled subjects demonstrated greater depletion of slow twitch fibers than the unskilled subjects. Lactate concentrations ranged from approximately 5-26 mmoles x kg-1 wet muscle after approximately one minute of maximal skiing. This wide range was not found to be related to the level of skiing proficiency. However, skiing with varyingly angled boots, resulting in different knee angles, did affect lactate concentration. Lactate concentration was positively correlated to individual muscle fiber composition expressed as a percent of fast twitch fibers. The results suggest more pronounced involvement of aerobic energy metabolism in skilled skiers than in unskilled skiers.

  11. Feature Hepatitis: Hepatitis Can Strike Anyone

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Feature Hepatitis Hepatitis Can Strike Anyone Past Issues / Spring 2009 Table ... from all walks of life are affected by hepatitis, especially hepatitis C, the most common form of ...

  12. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Plan Long-Term Considerations Patient Support Finding Support Services Peer Support Groups Financial Assistance Support for My ... is Hepatic Encephalopathy? Why Your Liver is ...

  13. Travelers' Health: Hepatitis C

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Chapter 3 - Hepatitis B Chapter 3 - Hepatitis E Hepatitis C Deborah Holtzman INFECTIOUS AGENT Hepatitis C virus ( ... mother to child. Map 3-05. Prevalence of hepatitis C virus infection 1 PDF Version (printable) 1 ...

  14. Travelers' Health: Hepatitis A

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 3 - Helminths, Soil-Transmitted Chapter 3 - Hepatitis B Hepatitis A Noele P. Nelson INFECTIOUS AGENT Hepatitis A ... hepatitis/HAV Table 3-02. Vaccines to prevent hepatitis A VACCINE TRADE NAME (MANUFACTURER) AGE (Y) DOSE ...

  15. Hepatitis (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Hepatitis KidsHealth / For Parents / Hepatitis Print en español Hepatitis What Is Hepatitis? Hepatitis is an inflammation of the liver. The ...

  16. Travelers' Health: Hepatitis B

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Chapter 3 - Hepatitis A Chapter 3 - Hepatitis C Hepatitis B Francisco Averhoff INFECTIOUS AGENT Hepatitis B virus ( ... progression of disease. Map 3-04. Prevalence of hepatitis B virus infection 1 PDF Version (printable) 1 ...

  17. Hepatitis C: Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Public Home » Hepatitis C » Treatment Decisions Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... can I find out about participating in a hepatitis C clinical trial? Many trials are being conducted ...

  18. Hepatitis C: Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Public Home Hepatitis A Hepatitis B Hepatitis C Hepatitis C Home Getting Tested Just Diagnosed Treatment Choice Program ... Pain Mental Health Sex and Sexuality (for Hepatitis C) Success Stories FAQs For Health Care Providers Provider ...

  19. A functional glycogen biosynthesis pathway in Lactobacillus acidophilus: expression and analysis of the glg operon

    OpenAIRE

    Goh, Yong Jun; Klaenhammer, Todd R

    2013-01-01

    Glycogen metabolism contributes to energy storage and various physiological functions in some prokaryotes, including colonization persistence. A role for glycogen metabolism is proposed on the survival and fitness of Lactobacillus acidophilus, a probiotic microbe, in the human gastrointestinal environment. L.?acidophilus?NCFM possesses a glycogen metabolism (glg) operon consisting of glgBCDAP - amy - pgm genes. Expression of the glg operon and glycogen accumulation were carbon source- and gro...

  20. Molecular Basis of Impaired Glycogen Metabolism during Ischemic Stroke and Hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Mohammed Iqbal; Roulston, Carli Lorraine; Stapleton, David Ian

    2014-01-01

    Background Ischemic stroke is the combinatorial effect of many pathological processes including the loss of energy supplies, excessive intracellular calcium accumulation, oxidative stress, and inflammatory responses. The brain's ability to maintain energy demand through this process involves metabolism of glycogen, which is critical for release of stored glucose. However, regulation of glycogen metabolism in ischemic stroke remains unknown. In the present study, we investigate the role and regulation of glycogen metabolizing enzymes and their effects on the fate of glycogen during ischemic stroke. Results Ischemic stroke was induced in rats by peri-vascular application of the vasoconstrictor endothelin-1 and forebrains were collected at 1, 3, 6 and 24 hours post-stroke. Glycogen levels and the expression and activity of enzymes involved in glycogen metabolism were analyzed. We found elevated glycogen levels in the ipsilateral hemispheres compared with contralateral hemispheres at 6 and 24 hours (25% and 39% increase respectively; PGlycogen synthase activity and glycogen branching enzyme expression were found to be similar between the ipsilateral, contralateral, and sham control hemispheres. In contrast, the rate-limiting enzyme for glycogen breakdown, glycogen phosphorylase, had 58% lower activity (Pglycogen debranching enzyme expression 24 hours post-stroke was 77% (Pglycogen phosphorylase activity and increased glycogen accumulation but did not alter glycogen synthase activity. Furthermore, elevated glycogen levels provided metabolic support to astrocytes during hypoxia. Conclusion Our study has identified that glycogen breakdown is impaired during ischemic stroke, the molecular basis of which includes reduced glycogen debranching enzyme expression level together with reduced glycogen phosphorylase and PKA activity. PMID:24858129

  1. Chardonnay grape seed flour ameliorates hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance via altered hepatic gene expression for oxidative stress, inflammation, and lipid and ceramide synthesis in diet-induced obese mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diet-induced obese (DIO) mice were fed high-fat (HF) diets containing either partially defatted flavonoid-rich Chardonnay grape seed flour (ChrSd) or microcrystalline cellulose (MCC, control) for 5 weeks in order to determine whether ChrSd improved insulin resistance and the pathogenesis of hepatic ...

  2. Glycogen-bound polyphosphate kinase from the archaebacterium Sulfolobus acidocaldarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skórko, R; Osipiuk, J; Stetter, K O

    1989-09-01

    Glycogen-bound polyphosphate kinase has been isolated from a crude extract of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius by isopycnic centrifugation in CsCl. Divalent cations (Mn2+ greater than Mg2+) stimulated the reaction. The enzyme does not require the presence of histones for its activity; it is inhibited strongly by phosphate and slightly by fluoride. The protein from the glycogen complex migrated in a sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel as a 57-kilodalton protein band; after isoelectric focusing it separated into several spots in the pH range of 5.6 to 6.7.

  3. Glycogen storage disease type III. A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Waal, A; Röhm, G F; Hoek, B B; Potgieter, G M; Oosthuysen, W T

    1984-01-07

    A 5-year-old Black boy presented with massive hepatomegaly and muscle weakness. Liver biopsy revealed the presence of glycogen pools in the cytoplasm and nuclei of hepatocytes. Erythrocyte glycogen levels, identified as limit dextrin, were grossly increased. The galactose tolerance test as well as the two-stage glucagon stimulation test suggested a decrease in activity of both amylo-1,6-glucosidase and glucose-6-phosphatase enzymes. This was confirmed by direct assays performed on liver tissue and erythrocytes. The decrease in glucose-6-phosphatase activity was attributed to a secondary effect of limit dextrin.

  4. Enzymatic description of the anhydrofructose pathway of glycogen degradation. I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Shukun; Refdahl, Charlotte; Lundt, Inge

    2004-01-01

    The anhydrofructose pathway describes the degradation of glycogen and starch to metabolites via 1,5-anhydro-D-fructose (1,5AnFru). The enzyme catalyzing the first reaction step of this pathway, i.e., a-1,4-glucan lyase (EC 4.2.1.13), has been purified, cloned and characterized from fungi and red...... possessed all enzymes needed for conversion of glycogen to APP, an a-1,4-glucan lyase from this fungus was isolated and partially sequenced. Based on this work, a scheme of the enzymatic description of the anhydrofructose pathway in A. melaloma was proposed. Keywords: Anhydrofructose pathway; Anthracobia...

  5. Glycogen metabolism in Schistosoma mansoni worms after their isolation from the host

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiolens, A.G.M.; Bergh, S.G. van den

    Adult Schistosoma mansoni worms rapidly degrade their endogenous glycogen stores immediately after isolation from the host. In NCTC 109 or in a diphasic culture medium the glycogen levels slowly recovered again after the initial decrease. The rapid degradation of glycogen could be prevented, even in

  6. CREBH Maintains Circadian Glucose Homeostasis by Regulating Hepatic Glycogenolysis and Gluconeogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyunbae; Zheng, Ze; Walker, Paul D; Kapatos, Gregory; Zhang, Kezhong

    2017-07-15

    Cyclic AMP-responsive element binding protein, hepatocyte specific (CREBH), is a liver-enriched, endoplasmic reticulum-tethered transcription factor known to regulate the hepatic acute-phase response and lipid homeostasis. In this study, we demonstrate that CREBH functions as a circadian transcriptional regulator that plays major roles in maintaining glucose homeostasis. The proteolytic cleavage and posttranslational acetylation modification of CREBH are regulated by the circadian clock. Functionally, CREBH is required in order to maintain circadian homeostasis of hepatic glycogen storage and blood glucose levels. CREBH regulates the rhythmic expression of the genes encoding the rate-limiting enzymes for glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis, including liver glycogen phosphorylase (PYGL), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 1 (PCK1), and the glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunit (G6PC). CREBH interacts with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) to synergize its transcriptional activities in hepatic gluconeogenesis. The acetylation of CREBH at lysine residue 294 controls CREBH-PPARα interaction and synergy in regulating hepatic glucose metabolism in mice. CREBH deficiency leads to reduced blood glucose levels but increases hepatic glycogen levels during the daytime or upon fasting. In summary, our studies revealed that CREBH functions as a key metabolic regulator that controls glucose homeostasis across the circadian cycle or under metabolic stress. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  7. Alcoholic Hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... yellow color. Confusion, drowsiness and slurred speech (hepatic encephalopathy). A damaged liver has trouble removing toxins from your body. The ... of toxins can damage your brain. Severe hepatic encephalopathy can result in ... of the liver frequently leads to liver failure. Kidney failure. A ...

  8. An oligonucleotide complementary to the SL-B1 domain in the 3'-end of the minus-strand RNA of the hepatitis C virus inhibits in vitro initiation of RNA synthesis by the viral polymerase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reigadas, Sandrine; Ventura, Michel; Andreola, Marie-Line; Michel, Justine; Gryaznov, Sergei; Tarrago-Litvak, Laura; Litvak, Simon; Astier-Gin, Therese

    2003-01-01

    We describe oligonucleotides (ODNs) that inhibit hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA synthesis in vitro. From a series of 13 ODNs complementary to the 3'-end of the minus-strand HCV RNA, only 4 inhibited RNA synthesis with IC 50 values lower than 1 μM. The inhibition was sequence-specific, since no effect was observed when the ODNs were used with a noncomplementary template. The introduction of a 2'-O-methyl modification increased the inhibitor activity 11-fold (IC 50 = 50 nM) in just 1 (ODN7) of the 4 inhibitory ODNs. ODNs did not inhibit RNA synthesis by interfering with the elongation process as no short RNAs products were detected. We also show that ODN7 did not prevent binding of NS5B to the template or cause polymerase trapping by the duplex RNA/ODN. Our data demonstrate that ODN7 inhibits the initiation process, most probably by modifying structural features present at the 3'-end of the minus-strand RNA

  9. Examination of liver and muscle glycogen and blood glucose levels ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-09-05

    Sep 5, 2011 ... changes in fish affect the conversion of liver glycogen into blood ... province, altitude 1248 m and surface area of 86 km2, 20 km in length 4.5 km in width ... alcohol (95% pure) were added, followed by boiling for a further 15 min. ..... water temperature on the blood glucose level of chub (Leuciscus cephalus ...

  10. Regulation of glucose and glycogen metabolism during and after exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thomas Elbenhardt; Richter, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Utilization of carbohydrate in the form of intramuscular glycogen stores and glucose delivered from plasma becomes an increasingly important energy substrate to the working muscle with increasing exercise intensity. This review gives an update on the molecular signals by which glucose transport...

  11. Mountain bike racing - the influence of prior glycogen-inducing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To investigate the effect of pre-exercise glutamine supplementation and the influence of a prior acute bout of glycogen-reducing exercise on the general stress and immune response to acute high-intensity cycling. Design. Randomised, double-blind, cross-over supplementation study. Setting and intervention.

  12. Muscle glycogen depletion patterns during draught work in Standardbred horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, M

    1989-03-01

    Muscle fibre recruitment was investigated during draught loaded exercise by studying glycogen depletion patterns from histochemical stains of muscle biopsies from the gluteus and semitendinosus muscles. Three Standardbred trotters performed several intervals of draught loaded exercise on a treadmill with 34 kp at a trot (7 m/sec) and with 34 and 80 kp, respectively at a walk (2m/sec). Exercise was continued until the horses were unwilling to continue. Glycogen depletion was seen in all three fibre types when trotting with 34 kp for 5 or 10 mins. When an equal weight resistance was pulled at a walk, glycogen depletion was first seen in type I fibres only, then followed by a small percentage of type IIA fibres after at least 1 h. When 80 kp was pulled at a walk both type I and IIA fibres showed glycogen depletion, and after at least 30 mins exercise a small percentage of type IIB fibres was also depleted. These results indicate that the muscle fibres are depleted, in order, from type I through IIA to IIB as the intensity or duration of draught work increases.

  13. Changes in hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism-related parameters in domestic pigeon (Columba livia) during incubation and chick rearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, X P; Xie, P; Bu, Z; Zou, X T

    2018-04-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the hepatic glucose and lipid metabolism-related parameters of adult male and female White King pigeons (Columba livia) during incubation and chick rearing. At day 4 (I4), 10 (I10) and 17 (I17) of incubation and day 1 (R1), 7 (R7), 15 (R15) and 25 (R25) of chick rearing, livers were sampled from six pigeons for each sex. Glycogen and fat contents, activities of glycolytic enzymes (hexokinase, HK; 6-phosphofructokinase, 6-PFK), and genes expressions of key enzymes involved in glycolysis (pyruvate kinase, PK; glucokinase, GK), gluconeogenesis (phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase cytosolic, PCK1; fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase, FBP1; glucose-6-phosphatase, G6Pase), fatty acid synthesis (fatty acid synthase, FAS; acetyl-CoA carboxylase, ACC) and fatty acid β-oxidation (carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1, CPT1; acyl-CoA 1, ACO) were measured. In male and female pigeon livers, glycogen content and HK activity dramatically increased after I17 and after R1, respectively; expressions of FBP1 and G6Pase genes were maximized at R15; activity of 6-PFK and expressions of PK and CPT1 genes were highest at R7; fat content and expressions of FAS and ACC genes steeply increased from I10 to R1. In females, hepatic expressions of GK and PCK1 genes were greatest at R7 and I17, respectively; however, in males, both of them were maximized at R15. Hepatic expression of ACO gene was significantly enhanced at R1 compared to I17 and R7 in males, whereas it was notably up-regulated at I17 and R7 in females. Furthermore, expressions of PCK1, GK, FAS and ACC genes were in significant relation to fat content in the livers of female pigeons, while fat content in male pigeons was highly correlated with expression of PCK1, ACC, CPT1 and ACO genes. In conclusion, regulations of glucose and lipid metabolic processes were enhanced in parent pigeon livers from terminal phases of incubation to mid phase of chick rearing with sexual effects. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  14. Carbohydrate supercompensation and muscle glycogen utilization during exhaustive running in highly trained athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, K; Pedersen, P K; Rose, P

    1990-01-01

    regimen (Norm), the other after a diet and training programme intended to increase muscle glycogen levels (Carb). Muscle glycogen concentration in the gastrocnemius muscle increased by 25% (P less than 0.05) from 581 mmol.kg-1 dry weight, SEM 50 to 722 mmol.kg-1 dry weight, SEM 34 after Carb. Running time...... (0.92, SEM 0.01 vs 0.89, SEM 0.01; P less than 0.05). Since muscle glycogen utilization was identical in the two tests, the indication of higher utilization of total carbohydrate appears to be related to a higher utilization of liver glycogen. We have concluded that glycogen depletion...

  15. Role of glycogen availability in sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ kinetics in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørtenblad, Niels; Nielsen, Joachim; Saltin, Bengt

    2011-01-01

    Glucose is stored as glycogen in skeletal muscle. The importance of glycogen as a fuel during exercise has been recognized since the 1960s; however, little is known about the precise mechanism that relates skeletal muscle glycogen to muscle fatigue. We show that low muscle glycogen is associated...... with an impairment of muscle ability to release Ca(2+), which is an important signal in the muscle activation. Thus, depletion of glycogen during prolonged, exhausting exercise may contribute to muscle fatigue by causing decreased Ca(2+) release inside the muscle. These data provide indications of a signal...

  16. A Role for Mitochondrial Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase (PEPCK-M) in the Regulation of Hepatic Gluconeogenesis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Romana; Guebre-Egziabher, Fitsum; Zhao, Xiaojian; Feriod, Colleen; Dong, Jianying; Alves, Tiago C.; Ioja, Simona; Pongratz, Rebecca L.; Bhanot, Sanjay; Roden, Michael; Cline, Gary W.; Shulman, Gerald I.; Kibbey, Richard G.

    2014-01-01

    Synthesis of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) from oxaloacetate is an absolute requirement for gluconeogenesis from mitochondrial substrates. Generally, this reaction has solely been attributed to the cytosolic isoform of PEPCK (PEPCK-C), although loss of the mitochondrial isoform (PEPCK-M) has never been assessed. Despite catalyzing the same reaction, to date the only significant role reported in mammals for the mitochondrial isoform is as a glucose sensor necessary for insulin secretion. We hypothesized that this nutrient-sensing mitochondrial GTP-dependent pathway contributes importantly to gluconeogenesis. PEPCK-M was acutely silenced in gluconeogenic tissues of rats using antisense oligonucleotides both in vivo and in isolated hepatocytes. Silencing PEPCK-M lowers plasma glucose, insulin, and triglycerides, reduces white adipose, and depletes hepatic glycogen, but raises lactate. There is a switch of gluconeogenic substrate preference to glycerol that quantitatively accounts for a third of glucose production. In contrast to the severe mitochondrial deficiency characteristic of PEPCK-C knock-out livers, hepatocytes from PEPCK-M-deficient livers maintained normal oxidative function. Consistent with its predicted role, gluconeogenesis rates from hepatocytes lacking PEPCK-M are severely reduced for lactate, alanine, and glutamine, but not for pyruvate and glycerol. Thus, PEPCK-M has a direct role in fasted and fed glucose homeostasis, and this mitochondrial GTP-dependent pathway should be reconsidered for its involvement in both normal and diabetic metabolism. PMID:24497630

  17. A role for mitochondrial phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK-M) in the regulation of hepatic gluconeogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Romana; Guebre-Egziabher, Fitsum; Zhao, Xiaojian; Feriod, Colleen; Dong, Jianying; Alves, Tiago C; Ioja, Simona; Pongratz, Rebecca L; Bhanot, Sanjay; Roden, Michael; Cline, Gary W; Shulman, Gerald I; Kibbey, Richard G

    2014-03-14

    Synthesis of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) from oxaloacetate is an absolute requirement for gluconeogenesis from mitochondrial substrates. Generally, this reaction has solely been attributed to the cytosolic isoform of PEPCK (PEPCK-C), although loss of the mitochondrial isoform (PEPCK-M) has never been assessed. Despite catalyzing the same reaction, to date the only significant role reported in mammals for the mitochondrial isoform is as a glucose sensor necessary for insulin secretion. We hypothesized that this nutrient-sensing mitochondrial GTP-dependent pathway contributes importantly to gluconeogenesis. PEPCK-M was acutely silenced in gluconeogenic tissues of rats using antisense oligonucleotides both in vivo and in isolated hepatocytes. Silencing PEPCK-M lowers plasma glucose, insulin, and triglycerides, reduces white adipose, and depletes hepatic glycogen, but raises lactate. There is a switch of gluconeogenic substrate preference to glycerol that quantitatively accounts for a third of glucose production. In contrast to the severe mitochondrial deficiency characteristic of PEPCK-C knock-out livers, hepatocytes from PEPCK-M-deficient livers maintained normal oxidative function. Consistent with its predicted role, gluconeogenesis rates from hepatocytes lacking PEPCK-M are severely reduced for lactate, alanine, and glutamine, but not for pyruvate and glycerol. Thus, PEPCK-M has a direct role in fasted and fed glucose homeostasis, and this mitochondrial GTP-dependent pathway should be reconsidered for its involvement in both normal and diabetic metabolism.

  18. Effect of long-term intraperitoneal zinc administration on liver glycogen levels in diabetic rats subjected to acute forced swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicer, Mursel; Gunay, Mehmet; Akil, Mustafa; Avunduk, Mustafa Cihat; Mogulkoc, Rasim; Baltaci, Abdulkerim Kasim

    2011-03-01

    This study aims to examine the effect of zinc administration on liver glycogen levels of rats in which diabetes was induced with streptozotocin and which were subjected to acute swimming exercise. The study was conducted on 80 adult Sprague-Dawley male rats, which were equally allocated to eight groups: group 1, general control; group 2, zinc-administrated control; group 3, zinc-administrated diabetic control; group 4, swimming control; group 5, zinc-administrated swimming; group 6, zinc-administrated diabetic swimming; group 7, diabetic swimming; group 8, diabetic control group. In order to induce diabetes, animals were injected with 40 mg/kg intraperitoneal (ip) streptozotocin. The injections were repeated in the same dose after 24 h. Animals which had blood glucose at or above 300 mg/dl 6 days after the last injections were accepted as diabetic. Zinc was administrated ip for 4 weeks as 6 mg/kg/day per rat. Hepatic tissue samples taken from the animals at the end of the study were fixed in 95% ethyl alcohol. Cross sections of 5 µm thickness, taken by the help of a microtome from the tissue samples buried in paraffin, were placed on a microscope slide and stained with periodic acid-Schiff and evaluated by light microscope. All microscopic images were transferred to a PC and assessed with the help of Clemex PE3.5 image analysis software. The lowest liver glycogen levels in the study were obtained in groups 3, 4, 6, 7, and 8. Liver glycogen levels in group 5 were higher than groups 3, 4, 6, 7, and 8, but lower than groups 1 and 2 (p swimming exercise were restored by zinc administration and that diabetes induced in rats prevented the protective effect of zinc.

  19. Glycogen distribution in the microwave-fixed mouse brain reveals heterogeneous astrocytic patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oe, Yuki; Baba, Otto; Ashida, Hitoshi; Nakamura, Kouichi C; Hirase, Hajime

    2016-09-01

    In the brain, glycogen metabolism has been implied in synaptic plasticity and learning, yet the distribution of this molecule has not been fully described. We investigated cerebral glycogen of the mouse by immunohistochemistry (IHC) using two monoclonal antibodies that have different affinities depending on the glycogen size. The use of focused microwave irradiation yielded well-defined glycogen immunoreactive signals compared with the conventional periodic acid-Schiff method. The IHC signals displayed a punctate distribution localized predominantly in astrocytic processes. Glycogen immunoreactivity (IR) was high in the hippocampus, striatum, cortex, and cerebellar molecular layer, whereas it was low in the white matter and most of the subcortical structures. Additionally, glycogen distribution in the hippocampal CA3-CA1 and striatum had a 'patchy' appearance with glycogen-rich and glycogen-poor astrocytes appearing in alternation. The glycogen patches were more evident with large-molecule glycogen in young adult mice but they were hardly observable in aged mice (1-2 years old). Our results reveal brain region-dependent glycogen accumulation and possibly metabolic heterogeneity of astrocytes. GLIA 2016;64:1532-1545. © 2016 The Authors. Glia Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Insoluble glycogen, a metabolizable internal adsorbent, decreases the lethality of endotoxin shock in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sipka

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Insoluble glycogen is an enzymatically modified form of naturally occurring soluble glycogen with a great adsorbing capacity. It can be metabolized by phagocytes to glucose. In this study we used insoluble glycogen intravenously in the experimental endotoxin shock of rats. Wistar male rats were sensitized to endotoxin by Pb acetate. The survival of rats were compared in groups of animals endotoxin shock treated and non-treated with insoluble glycogen. Furthermore, we have determined in vitro the binding capacity of insoluble glycogen for endotoxin, tumour necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1 and secretable phospholipase A2. Use of 10 mg/kg dose of insoluble glycogen could completely prevent the lethality of shock induced by LD50 quantity of endotoxin in rats. All animals treated survived. Insoluble glycogen is a form of ‘metabolizable internal adsorbents’. It can potentially be used for treatment of septic shock.

  1. Glycogen in the Nervous System. I; Methods for Light and Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estable, Rosita F. De; Estable-Puig, J. F.; Miquel, J.

    1964-01-01

    'l'he relative value of different methods for combined light and electron microscopical studies of glycogen in the nervous tissue was investigated. Picroalcoholic fixatives preserve glycogen in a considerable amount but give an inadequate morphological image of glycogen distribution and are unsuitable for ultrastructural studies. Fixation by perfusion, with Dalton's chromeosmic fluid seems adequate for ultrastructural cytochemistry of glycogen. Furthermore it permits routine paraffin embedding of brain slices adjacent to those used for electron microscopy. Dimedone blocking is a necessary step for a selective staining of glycogen with PAS after osmic fixation. Enzymatic removal of glycogen in osmic fixed nervous tissue can be done In paraffin-embedded tissue. It can also be performed in glycolmethacrylate-embedded tissue without removal of the embedding medium. Paraphenylenediamine stains glycogen following periodic acid oxidation.

  2. Glycogen metabolism in the glucose-sensing and supply-driven β-cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Lotta E; Nicholas, Lisa M; Filipsson, Karin; Sun, Jiangming; Medina, Anya; Al-Majdoub, Mahmoud; Fex, Malin; Mulder, Hindrik; Spégel, Peter

    2016-12-01

    Glycogen metabolism in β-cells may affect downstream metabolic pathways controlling insulin release. We examined glycogen metabolism in human islets and in the rodent-derived INS-1 832/13 β-cells and found them to express the same isoforms of key enzymes required for glycogen metabolism. Our findings indicate that glycogenesis is insulin-independent but influenced by extracellular glucose concentrations. Levels of glycogen synthase decrease with increasing glucose concentrations, paralleling accumulation of glycogen. We did not find cAMP-elicited glycogenolysis and insulin secretion to be causally related. In conclusion, our results reveal regulated glycogen metabolism in human islets and insulin-secreting cells. Whether glycogen metabolism affects insulin secretion under physiological conditions remains to be determined. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  3. Consensus guidelines for management of glycogen storage disease type 1b - European Study on Glycogen Storage Disease Type 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, G; Rake, JP; Labrune, P; Leonard, JV; Moses, S; Ullrich, K; Wendel, U; Smit, GPA

    2002-01-01

    Life expectancy in glycogen storage disease type 1 (GSD-1) has improved considerably. Its relative rarity implies that no metabolic centre has experience of large series of patients and therefore experience with long-term management and follow-up at each centre is limited. There is wide variation in

  4. Guidelines for management of glycogen storage disease type I - European study on glycogen storage disease type I (ESGSD I)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rake, JP; Visser, G; Labrune, P; Leonard, JV; Ullrich, K; Smit, GPA

    2002-01-01

    Life-expectancy in glycogen storage disease type I (GSD I) has improved considerably. Its relative rarity implies that no metabolic centre has experience of large series of patients and experience with long-term management and follow-up at each centre is limited. There is wide variation in methods

  5. Developmental changes of protein, RNA, DNA, lipid, and glycogen in the liver, skeletal muscle, and brain of the piglet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakkarainen, J.

    1975-01-01

    A scheme for the sequential quantitative separation and determination of protein, RNA, DNA, lipid, and glycogen from rat-liver homogenate is modified for application to frozen tissues of the piglet. The biochemical methods, including the biuret method, used in the present investigation are described and thoroughly checked. The effects of freezing and storage on the recovery of major tissue constituents are recorded. The modified scheme is applied to the determination of protein, RNA, DNA, lipid, and glycogen in the liver, skeletal muscle, and brain of the developing piglet. Developmental changes for these major tissue constituents, including the biuret protein, are described with special reference to protein synthesis and physiology of growth at the cellular level from 45 days of foetal age to 35-42 days of postnatal age for liver and skeletal muscle, and from birth to 31-40 days of postnatal age for the cerebrum and cerebellum. The uniformly labelled amino acid, 14 C-L-leucine, is used to study protein synthesis. Developmental patterns of labelling of protein and lipid in the liver, skeletal muscle, cerebrum, and cerebellum of the piglet from birth up to the age of two weeks are described. The results of the methodological, developmental, and experimental studies are thoroughly discussed in the light of the relevant literature and compared with those obtained in developmental and experimental studies on rats and other mammal species. (author)

  6. Exercise Training-Induced Adaptations Associated with Increases in Skeletal Muscle Glycogen Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manabe, Yasuko; Gollisch, Katja S.C.; Holton, Laura; Kim, Young–Bum; Brandauer, Josef; Fujii, Nobuharu L.; Hirshman, Michael F.; Goodyear, Laurie J.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic exercise training results in numerous skeletal muscle adaptations, including increases in insulin sensitivity and glycogen content. To understand the mechanism for increased muscle glycogen, we studied the effects of exercise training on glycogen regulatory proteins in rat skeletal muscle. Female Sprague Dawley rats performed voluntary wheel running for 1, 4, or 7 weeks. After 7 weeks of training, insulin-stimulated glucose uptake was increased in epitrochlearis muscle. Compared to sedentary control rats, muscle glycogen did not change after 1 week of training, but increased significantly after 4 and 7 weeks. The increases in muscle glycogen were accompanied by elevated glycogen synthase activity and protein expression. To assess the regulation of glycogen synthase, we examined its major activator, protein phosphatase 1 (PP1), and its major deactivator, glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3). Consistent with glycogen synthase activity, PP1 activity was unchanged after 1 week of training but significantly increased after 4 and 7 weeks of training. Protein expression of RGL(GM), another regulatory PP1 subunit, significantly decreased after 4 and 7 weeks of training. Unlike PP1, GSK3 phosphorylation did not follow the pattern of glycogen synthase activity. The ~40% decrease in GSK-3α phosphorylation after 1 week of exercise training persisted until 7 weeks and may function as a negative feedback to elevated glycogen. Our findings suggest that exercise training-induced increases in muscle glycogen content could be regulated by multiple mechanisms including enhanced insulin sensitivity, glycogen synthase expression, allosteric activation of glycogen synthase and PP1activity. PMID:23206309

  7. Body mass dependence of glycogen stores in the anoxia-tolerant crucian carp ( Carassius carassius L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vornanen, Matti; Asikainen, Juha; Haverinen, Jaakko

    2011-03-01

    Glycogen is a vital energy substrate for anaerobic organisms, and the size of glycogen stores can be a limiting factor for anoxia tolerance of animals. To this end, glycogen stores in 12 different tissues of the crucian carp ( Carassius carassius L.), an anoxia-tolerant fish species, were examined. Glycogen content of different tissues was 2-10 times higher in winter (0.68-18.20% of tissue wet weight) than in summer (0.12-4.23%). In scale, bone and brain glycogen stores were strongly dependent on body mass (range between 0.6 and 785 g), small fish having significantly more glycogen than large fish ( p glycogen reserves, measured as a sum of glycogen from different tissues, varied from 6.1% of the body mass in the 1-g fish to 2.0% in the 800-g fish. Since anaerobic metabolic rate scales down with body size, the whole body glycogen reserves could provide energy for approximately 79 and 88 days of anoxia in small and large fish, respectively. There was, however, a drastic difference in tissue distribution of glycogen between large and small fish: in the small fish, the liver was the major glycogen store (68% of the stores), while in the large fish, the white myotomal muscle was the principal deposit of glycogen (57%). Since muscle glycogen is considered to be unavailable for blood glucose regulation, its usefulness in anoxia tolerance of the large crucian carp might be limited, although not excluded. Therefore, mobilization of muscle glycogen under anoxia needs to be rigorously tested.

  8. Rerouting of carbon flux in a glycogen mutant of cyanobacteria assessed via isotopically non-stationary 13 C metabolic flux analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, John I; Prasannan, Charulata; Ma, Fangfang; Möllers, K Benedikt; Jaiswal, Damini; Digmurti, Madhuri; Allen, Doug K; Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Dasgupta, Santanu; Wangikar, Pramod P

    2017-10-01

    Cyanobacteria, which constitute a quantitatively dominant phylum, have attracted attention in biofuel applications due to favorable physiological characteristics, high photosynthetic efficiency and amenability to genetic manipulations. However, quantitative aspects of cyanobacterial metabolism have received limited attention. In the present study, we have performed isotopically non-stationary 13 C metabolic flux analysis (INST- 13 C-MFA) to analyze rerouting of carbon in a glycogen synthase deficient mutant strain (glgA-I glgA-II) of the model cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. During balanced photoautotrophic growth, 10-20% of the fixed carbon is stored in the form of glycogen via a pathway that is conserved across the cyanobacterial phylum. Our results show that deletion of glycogen synthase gene orchestrates cascading effects on carbon distribution in various parts of the metabolic network. Carbon that was originally destined to be incorporated into glycogen gets partially diverted toward alternate storage molecules such as glucosylglycerol and sucrose. The rest is partitioned within the metabolic network, primarily via glycolysis and tricarboxylic acid cycle. A lowered flux toward carbohydrate synthesis and an altered distribution at the glucose-1-phosphate node indicate flexibility in the network. Further, reversibility of glycogen biosynthesis reactions points toward the presence of futile cycles. Similar redistribution of carbon was also predicted by Flux Balance Analysis. The results are significant to metabolic engineering efforts with cyanobacteria where fixed carbon needs to be re-routed to products of interest. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 2298-2308. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to continue to work to my full capacity? Will I be able to drive? Patient Stories Angie M. Caregiver for Brother Charles DiAngelo Hepatic Encephalopathy Jason Dedmon Alcohol-related Cirrhosis ...

  10. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... your body when your liver isn’t working well, it may affect your brain and cause HE. ... it apparent that the liver is not doing well. These could be the symptoms of Hepatic Encephalopathy ( ...

  11. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... bad. It sends the good things – such as vitamins and nutrients – into your bloodstream for your body ... for Wife Joyce O. Caregiver for Mother Lynette K. Hepatic Encephalopathy Samantha W. Caregiver for Husband Stan ...

  12. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... Get Worse? How is HE Diagnosed? Prior to Treatment Who treats HE? Preparing for your Medical Appointment Hepatic Encephalopathy Treatment Options Treatment Basics Treatment Medications Importance of Adhering ...

  13. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... become familiar with the signs of Hepatic Encephalopathy so you can tell your doctor right away if ... with continuous treatment, HE can usually be controlled. So it’s important to tell your doctor about any ...

  14. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... build-up and painful swelling of the legs (edema) and abdomen (ascites) or hepatic encephalopathy. For more ... build up and painful swelling of the legs (edema) and abdomen (ascites) Bruising and bleeding easily Enlarged ...

  15. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... to Treatment Who treats HE? Preparing for your Medical Appointment Hepatic Encephalopathy Treatment Options Treatment Basics Treatment ... treatment. Being a fully-informed participant in your medical care is an important factor in staying as ...

  16. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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  17. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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  18. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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  19. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... responsible for the daily needs of another person. Caregivers can be a friend, spouse, life partner, parent, sibling or other family member. What is HE? Hepatic Encephalopathy, sometimes referred to as ...

  20. Hepatitis C

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... viral load (the amount of HCV in your blood), imaging tests, and biopsy results. Treatment is especially important for people who are showing signs liver fibrosis or scarring. Medicines used to treat hepatitis C ...

  1. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... that can be corrected . It may also occur as part of a chronic problem from liver disease ... worse over time. Hepatic Encephalopathy, sometimes referred to as portosystemic encephalopathy or PSE, is a condition that ...

  2. Hepatitis A

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    ... Acute liver failure requires a stay in the hospital for monitoring and treatment. Some people with acute liver failure may need a liver transplant. Prevention The hepatitis A vaccine can prevent infection with the virus. The vaccine is typically given ...

  3. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... OVERVIEW Donate Now Join an Event Volunteer Your Time The Legacy Society Make Gifts of Stock Donate ... problem from liver disease that gets worse over time. Hepatic Encephalopathy, sometimes referred to as portosystemic encephalopathy ...

  4. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... Patient Advisory Council Media Center Careers How You Can Help OVERVIEW Donate Now Join an Event Volunteer ... Hepatic Encephalopathy is a short-term problem that can be corrected . It may also occur as part ...

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    Full Text Available ... People ALF Near You Events ALF Blogs Financial Information Policies Advocacy Patient Advisory Council Media Center Careers ... and abdomen (ascites) or hepatic encephalopathy. For more information about cirrhosis of the liver and symptoms, call ...

  6. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... Disease (NAFLD) & Non-alcoholic Steatohepatitis (NASH) Autoimmune Hepatitis Bile duct disease such as Primary Biliary Cirrhosis (PBC) ... spleen (splenomegaly) Stone-like particles in gallbladder and bile duct (gallstones) Liver cancer (hepatocellular carcinoma) Chronic liver ...

  7. Autoimmune Hepatitis

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    ... hepatitis is the most common form in North America. Type 1 can occur at any age; however, ... eastern time, M-F Follow Us NIH… Turning Discovery Into Health ® Research & Funding Current Funding Opportunities Research ...

  8. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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  10. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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  11. Effect of acute exercise on glycogen synthase in muscle from obese and diabetic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Jørgen; Tantiwong, Puntip; Stuenæs, Jorid T; Molina-Carrion, Marjorie; DeFronzo, Ralph A; Sakamoto, Kei; Musi, Nicolas

    2012-07-01

    Insulin stimulates glycogen synthase (GS) through dephosphorylation of serine residues, and this effect is impaired in skeletal muscle from insulin-resistant [obese and type 2 diabetic (T2DM)] subjects. Exercise also increases GS activity, yet it is not known whether the ability of exercise to affect GS is impaired in insulin-resistant subjects. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of acute exercise on GS phosphorylation and enzyme kinetic properties in muscle from insulin-resistant individuals. Lean normal glucose-tolerant (NGT), obese NGT, and obese T2DM subjects performed 40 min of moderate-intensity cycle exercise (70% of Vo(2max)). GS kinetic properties and phosphorylation were measured in vastus lateralis muscle before exercise, immediately after exercise, and 3.5 h postexercise. In lean subjects, GS fractional activity increased twofold after 40 min of exercise, and it remained elevated after the 3.5-h rest period. Importantly, exercise also decreased GS K(m) for UDP-glucose from ≈0.5 to ≈0.2 mM. In lean subjects, exercise caused significant dephosphorylation of GS by 50-70% (Ser(641), Ser(645), and Ser(645,649,653,657)), and phosphorylation of these sites remained decreased after 3.5 h; Ser⁷ phosphorylation was not regulated by exercise. In obese NGT and T2DM subjects, exercise increased GS fractional activity, decreased K(m) for UDP-glucose, and decreased GS phosphorylation as effectively as in lean NGT subjects. We conclude that the molecular regulatory process by which exercise promotes glycogen synthesis in muscle is preserved in insulin-resistant subjects.

  12. Hepatitis B Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... worldwide 2 Billion People have been infected with Hepatitis B Worldwide The Hepatitis B Foundation is working ... of people living with hepatitis B. Learn About Hepatitis B in 11 Other Languages . Resource Video See ...

  13. What Is Hepatitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Alt+1 Content Alt+2 What is hepatitis? Online Q&A Reviewed July 2016 Q: What ... Question and answer archives Submit a question World Hepatitis Day Posters: Eliminate hepatitis World Hepatitis Day 2017 ...

  14. Free Glycogen in Vaginal Fluids Is Associated with Lactobacillus Colonization and Low Vaginal pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirmonsef, Paria; Hotton, Anna L.; Gilbert, Douglas; Burgad, Derick; Landay, Alan; Weber, Kathleen M.; Cohen, Mardge; Ravel, Jacques; Spear, Gregory T.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Lactobacillus dominates the lower genital tract microbiota of many women, producing a low vaginal pH, and is important for healthy pregnancy outcomes and protection against several sexually transmitted pathogens. Yet, factors that promote Lactobacillus remain poorly understood. We hypothesized that the amount of free glycogen in the lumen of the lower genital tract is an important determinant of Lactobacillus colonization and a low vaginal pH. Methods Free glycogen in lavage samples was quantified. Pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene was used to identify microbiota from 21 African American women collected over 8–11 years. Results Free glycogen levels varied greatly between women and even in the same woman. Samples with the highest free glycogen had a corresponding median genital pH that was significantly lower (pH 4.4) than those with low glycogen (pH 5.8; pglycogen versus those with low glycogen (median = 0.97 vs. 0.05, pglycogen. High concentrations of glycogen corresponded to higher levels of L. crispatus and L. jensenii, but not L. iners. Conclusion These findings show that free glycogen in genital fluid is associated with a genital microbiota dominated by Lactobacillus, suggesting glycogen is important for maintaining genital health. Treatments aimed at increasing genital free glycogen might impact Lactobacillus colonization. PMID:25033265

  15. Cerebral glycogen in humans following acute and recurrent hypoglycemia: Implications on a role in hypoglycemia unawareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öz, Gülin; DiNuzzo, Mauro; Kumar, Anjali; Moheet, Amir; Khowaja, Ameer; Kubisiak, Kristine; Eberly, Lynn E; Seaquist, Elizabeth R

    2017-08-01

    Supercompensated brain glycogen levels may contribute to the development of hypoglycemia-associated autonomic failure (HAAF) following recurrent hypoglycemia (RH) by providing energy for the brain during subsequent periods of hypoglycemia. To assess the role of glycogen supercompensation in the generation of HAAF, we estimated the level of brain glycogen following RH and acute hypoglycemia (AH). After undergoing 3 hyperinsulinemic, euglycemic and 3 hyperinsulinemic, hypoglycemic clamps (RH) on separate occasions at least 1 month apart, five healthy volunteers received [1- 13 C]glucose intravenously over 80+ h while maintaining euglycemia. 13 C-glycogen levels in the occipital lobe were measured by 13 C magnetic resonance spectroscopy at ∼8, 20, 32, 44, 56, 68 and 80 h at 4 T and glycogen levels estimated by fitting the data with a biophysical model that takes into account the tiered glycogen structure. Similarly, prior 13 C-glycogen data obtained following a single hypoglycemic episode (AH) were fitted with the same model. Glycogen levels did not significantly increase after RH relative to after euglycemia, while they increased by ∼16% after AH relative to after euglycemia. These data suggest that glycogen supercompensation may be blunted with repeated hypoglycemic episodes. A causal relationship between glycogen supercompensation and generation of HAAF remains to be established.

  16. The primary defect in glycogen synthase activity is not based on increased glycogen synthase kinase-3a activity in diabetic myotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaster, Michael; Brusgaard, Klaus; Handberg, Aa.

    2004-01-01

    The mechanism responsible for the diminished activation of glycogen synthase (GS) in diabetic myotubes remains unclear, but may involve increased activity and/or expression of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3). In myotubes established from type 2 diabetic and healthy control subjects we determined...

  17. Glycogenolysis during short-term fasting in malaria and healthy subjects - the potential regulatory role of glycogen content on glycogen breakdown: a hypothesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprangers, F.; Thien, H. V.; Ackermans, M. T.; Endert, E.; Sauerwein, H. P.

    2004-01-01

    Background & aims: During short-term starvation ( <24h), glucose production decreases 10-20% due to a decrease in glycogenolysis. In the fed state glycogen regulates its rate of breakdown, in order to limit glycogen accumulation. Whether in the fasted state a similar mechanism exists to preserve

  18. Feature Hepatitis: Hepatitis Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment & Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Feature Hepatitis Hepatitis: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment & Prevention Past Issues / Spring 2009 ... No appetite Fever Headaches Diagnosis To check for hepatitis viruses, your doctor will test your blood. You ...

  19. Muscle glycogen storage after different amounts of carbohydrate ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivy, J L; Lee, M C; Brozinick, J T; Reed, M J

    1988-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the rate of muscle glycogen storage could be enhanced during the initial 4-h period postexercise by substantially increasing the amount of the carbohydrate consumed. Eight subjects cycled for 2 h on three separate occasions to deplete their muscle glycogen stores. Immediately and 2 h after exercise they consumed either 0 (P), 1.5 (L), or 3.0 g glucose/kg body wt (H) from a 50% glucose polymer solution. Blood samples were drawn from an antecubital vein before exercise, during exercise, and throughout recovery. Muscle biopsies were taken from the vastus lateralis immediately, 2 h, and 4 h after exercise. Blood glucose and insulin declined significantly during exercise in each of the three treatments. They remained below the preexercise concentrations during recovery in the P treatment but increased significantly above the preexercise concentrations during the L and H treatments. By the end of the 4 h-recovery period, blood glucose and insulin were still significantly above the preexercise concentrations in both treatments. Muscle glycogen storage was significantly increased above the basal rate (P, 0.5 mumol.g wet wt-1.h-1) after ingestion of either glucose polymer supplement. The rates of muscle glycogen storage, however, were not different between the L and H treatments during the first 2 h (L, 5.2 +/- 0.9 vs. H, 5.8 +/- 0.7 mumol.g wet wt-1.h-1) or the second 2 h of recovery (L, 4.0 +/- 0.9 vs. H, 4.5 +/- 0.6 mumol.g wet wt-1. h-1).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Ultrastructural hepatocellular features associated with severe hepatic lipidosis in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center, S A; Guida, L; Zanelli, M J; Dougherty, E; Cummings, J; King, J

    1993-05-01

    In this study, we compared hepatic ultrastructure in healthy cats, in cats with severe hepatic lipidosis, and in cats with experimentally induced, chronic, extrahepatic bile duct occlusion. Ultrastructural features unique to the lipidosis syndrome included an apparent reduction in number of peroxisomes and alteration in their morphologic features. The quantity of endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi complexes, and lysosomes was subjectively reduced, and paucity of cytosolic glycogen was observed. Bile canaliculi appeared collapsed because of cytosolic distention with lipid. Mitochondria were reduced in number and were markedly pleomorphic. Cristae assumed a variety of shapes, lengths, and orientations. Ultrastructural features of bile duct occlusion were similar to those described in other species and differed from those in cats with hepatic lipidosis.

  1. A Snapshot of the Hepatic Transcriptome: Ad Libitum Alcohol Intake Suppresses Expression of Cholesterol Synthesis Genes in Alcohol-Preferring (P) Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Klein, Jonathon D.; Sherrill, Jeremy B.; Morello, Gabriella M.; San Miguel, Phillip J.; Ding, Zhenming; Liangpunsakul, Suthat; Liang, Tiebing; Muir, William M.; Lumeng, Lawrence; Lossie, Amy C.

    2014-01-01

    Research is uncovering the genetic and biochemical effects of consuming large quantities of alcohol. One prime example is the J- or U-shaped relationship between the levels of alcohol consumption and the risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Moderate alcohol consumption in humans (about 30 g ethanol/d) is associated with reduced risk of coronary heart disease, while abstinence and heavier alcohol intake is linked to increased risk. However, the hepatic consequences of moderate alcoh...

  2. Liver Cancer and Hepatitis B

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Clinical Trials Physician Directory HBV Meeting What Is Hepatitis B? What Is Hepatitis B? The ABCs of Viral Hepatitis Liver Cancer and Hepatitis B Hepatitis Delta Coinfection Hepatitis C Coinfection HIV/AIDS ...

  3. Hepatitis C: Sex and Sexuality

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with Hepatitis » Sex and Sexuality: Entire Lesson Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... hepatitis C virus through sex. Can you pass hepatitis C to a sex partner? Yes, but it ...

  4. Hepatitis C: Diet and Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with Hepatitis » Daily Living: Diet and Nutrition Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... have high cholesterol and have fatty liver. How hepatitis C affects diet If you have hepatitis, you ...

  5. Hepatitis B & C and HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find Services HIV SERVICES LOCATOR Locator Search Search Hepatitis B & C Topics Hepatitis B Hepatitis C Hepatitis ... Infections Sexually Transmitted Diseases Smoking Women's Health Issues Hepatitis B Virus and Hepatitis C Virus Infection People ...

  6. Effect of D-tagatose on liver weight and glycogen content of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bär, A; Lina, B A; de Groot, D M; de Bie, B; Appel, M J

    1999-04-01

    examination. Livers of 6 rats/group were analyzed for acyl-CoA oxidase and laurate 12-hydroxylase (cytochrome P450 4A1) activity, DNA synthesis (Ki-67 index), and number of nuclei per unit area of tissue. Liver weights were significantly increased in linear relation to the D-tagatose intake. Plasma transaminases (but not glutamyl transferase and alkaline phosphatase) were increased in the high-dose group. Except for glycogen accumulation, no ultrastructural changes were seen on electron microscopic examination of livers of the control and high-dose groups. Morphometric analysis confirmed the increase of glycogen and the absence of alterations of endoplasmatic reticulum, mitochondria, and Golgi apparatus. The Ki-67 index did not differ between the groups. A dose-related decrease of the number of nuclei per unit area signified some hepatocellular hypertrophy. Acyl-CoA oxidase and CYP4A1 activity were significantly increased in the mid- and high-dose groups, but these increases were small and not accompanied by electron-microscopic evidence of peroxisome proliferation. In the third study, four groups received SDS diet (groups A and C) or SDS diet with 5% D-tagatose (groups B and D). All animals were killed on day 28. Groups A and B were fasted for 24 h before sacrifice; groups C and D had food available until sacrifice. Liver weights and liver composition were measured as in Study 1. Relative wet and dry liver weights were increased in response to the treatment in rats killed under the fed condition, but not in rats killed under the fasted condition. The livers of the treated rats (group D) had an increased glycogen content in comparison to the controls (group C). Taken together, these results demonstrate that D-tagatose at dietary levels of 5-20% increases liver glycogen deposition and relative liver weights in nonfasting rats. In fasted rats the 5% dose level is the no-effect level. (ABSTRACT TRUNCATED)

  7. Possible mechanism for changes in glycogen metabolism in unloaded soleus muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, E. J.; Tischler, M. E.

    1985-01-01

    Carbohydrate metabolism has been shown to be affected in a number of ways by different models of hypokinesia. In vivo glycogen levels in the soleus muscle are known to be increased by short-term denervation and harness suspension. In addition, exposure to 7 days of hypogravity also caused a dramatic increase in glycogen concentration in this muscle. The biochemical alterations caused by unloading that may bring about these increases in glycogen storage in the soleus were sought.

  8. Free glycogen in vaginal fluids is associated with Lactobacillus colonization and low vaginal pH.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paria Mirmonsef

    Full Text Available Lactobacillus dominates the lower genital tract microbiota of many women, producing a low vaginal pH, and is important for healthy pregnancy outcomes and protection against several sexually transmitted pathogens. Yet, factors that promote Lactobacillus remain poorly understood. We hypothesized that the amount of free glycogen in the lumen of the lower genital tract is an important determinant of Lactobacillus colonization and a low vaginal pH.Free glycogen in lavage samples was quantified. Pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene was used to identify microbiota from 21 African American women collected over 8-11 years.Free glycogen levels varied greatly between women and even in the same woman. Samples with the highest free glycogen had a corresponding median genital pH that was significantly lower (pH 4.4 than those with low glycogen (pH 5.8; p<0.001. The fraction of the microbiota consisting of Lactobacillus was highest in samples with high glycogen versus those with low glycogen (median = 0.97 vs. 0.05, p<0.001. In multivariable analysis, having 1 vs. 0 male sexual partner in the past 6 months was negatively associated, while BMI ≥30 was positively associated with glycogen. High concentrations of glycogen corresponded to higher levels of L. crispatus and L. jensenii, but not L. iners.These findings show that free glycogen in genital fluid is associated with a genital microbiota dominated by Lactobacillus, suggesting glycogen is important for maintaining genital health. Treatments aimed at increasing genital free glycogen might impact Lactobacillus colonization.

  9. Glycogen Phosphomonoester Distribution in Mouse Models of the Progressive Myoclonic Epilepsy, Lafora Disease*

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePaoli-Roach, Anna A.; Contreras, Christopher J.; Segvich, Dyann M.; Heiss, Christian; Ishihara, Mayumi; Azadi, Parastoo; Roach, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Glycogen is a branched polymer of glucose that acts as an energy reserve in many cell types. Glycogen contains trace amounts of covalent phosphate, in the range of 1 phosphate per 500–2000 glucose residues depending on the source. The function, if any, is unknown, but in at least one genetic disease, the progressive myoclonic epilepsy Lafora disease, excessive phosphorylation of glycogen has been implicated in the pathology by disturbing glycogen structure. Some 90% of Lafora cases are attributed to mutations of the EPM2A or EPM2B genes, and mice with either gene disrupted accumulate hyperphosphorylated glycogen. It is, therefore, of importance to understand the chemistry of glycogen phosphorylation. Rabbit skeletal muscle glycogen contained covalent phosphate as monoesters of C2, C3, and C6 carbons of glucose residues based on analyses of phospho-oligosaccharides by NMR. Furthermore, using a sensitive assay for glucose 6-P in hydrolysates of glycogen coupled with measurement of total phosphate, we determined the proportion of C6 phosphorylation in rabbit muscle glycogen to be ∼20%. C6 phosphorylation also accounted for ∼20% of the covalent phosphate in wild type mouse muscle glycogen. Glycogen phosphorylation in Epm2a−/− and Epm2b−/− mice was increased 8- and 4-fold compared with wild type mice, but the proportion of C6 phosphorylation remained unchanged at ∼20%. Therefore, our results suggest that C2, C3, and/or C6 phosphate could all contribute to abnormal glycogen structure or to Lafora disease. PMID:25416783

  10. Human skeletal muscle glycogen utilization in exhaustive exercise: role of subcellular localization and fibre type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Joachim; Holmberg, Hans-Christer; Schrøder, Henrik D; Saltin, Bengt; Ørtenblad, Niels

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Although glycogen is known to be heterogeneously distributed within skeletal muscle cells, there is presently little information available about the role of fibre types, utilization and resynthesis during and after exercise with respect to glycogen localization. Here, we tested the hypothesis that utilization of glycogen with different subcellular localizations during exhaustive arm and leg exercise differs and examined the influence of fibre type and carbohydrate availability on its subsequent resynthesis. When 10 elite endurance athletes (22 ± 1 years, = 68 ± 5 ml kg−1 min−1, mean ± SD) performed one hour of exhaustive arm and leg exercise, transmission electron microscopy revealed more pronounced depletion of intramyofibrillar than of intermyofibrillar and subsarcolemmal glycogen. This phenomenon was the same for type I and II fibres, although at rest prior to exercise, the former contained more intramyofibrillar and subsarcolemmal glycogen than the latter. In highly glycogen-depleted fibres, the remaining small intermyofibrillar and subsarcolemmal glycogen particles were often found to cluster in groupings. In the recovery period, when the athletes received either a carbohydrate-rich meal or only water the impaired resynthesis of glycogen with water alone was associated primarily with intramyofibrillar glycogen. In conclusion, after prolonged high-intensity exercise the depletion of glycogen is dependent on subcellular localization. In addition, the localization of glycogen appears to be influenced by fibre type prior to exercise, as well as carbohydrate availability during the subsequent period of recovery. These findings provide insight into the significance of fibre type-specific compartmentalization of glycogen metabolism in skeletal muscle during exercise and subsequent recovery. PMID:21486810

  11. Detection of human muscle glycogen by natural abundance 13C NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avison, M.J.; Rothman, D.L.; Nadel, E.; Shulman, R.G.

    1988-01-01

    Natural abundance 13 C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to detect signals from glycogen in the human gastrocnemius muscle. The reproducibility of the measurement was demonstrated, and the ability to detect dynamic changes was confirmed by measuring a decrease in muscle glycogen levels after exercise and its subsequent repletion. Single frequency gated 1 H decoupling was used to obtain decoupled natural abundance 13 C NMR spectra of the C-1 position of muscle glycogen

  12. Glycogen accumulation in normal and irradiated minced muscle autografts on frog gastrocnemius

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malhotra, R.K.; Kaul, R.; Malhotra, N.

    1989-01-01

    Alterations induced in glycogen content and phosphorylase activity have been studied in normal and irradiated minced muscle autografts on frog gastrocnemius at days 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, 15 and 30 postgrafting. The changes observed in the glycogen content and phosphorylase activity conform to the degeneration and regeneration phases of muscle repair. An attempt has been made to explain the altered glycogen utilizing capacities of the frog skeletal muscle during its repair and regeneration. (author)

  13. [Autoimmune hepatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Färkkilä, Martti

    2013-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis is chronic liver disease with two subtypes, type 1 with anti nuclear or smooth muscle antibodies and type 2 with LKM1 or LC1 antibodies, and both with hypergammaglobulinemia and typical histology. Prevalence of AIH is between 10 to 17 per 100000 in Europe. Up to 20-40 % of cases present with acute hepatitis. Budesonide can be used as a first line induction therapy in non-cirrhotic patients, and tiopurines, mercaptopurine or mycophenolic acid as maintenance therapies. Patients not responding to conventional therapy can be treated with ciclosporin, tacrolimus or rituximab or finally with liver transplantation.

  14. Maternal chocolate and sucrose soft drink intake induces hepatic steatosis in rat offspring associated with altered lipid gene expression profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Maj; Nilsson, C.; Rosendal, A.

    2014-01-01

    weight gain and adiposity in offspring born to chow-fed dams. Conclusion: Our results suggest that supplementation of chocolate and soft drink during gestation and lactation contributes to early onset of hepatic steatosis associated with changes in hepatic gene expression and lipid handling....... until weaning, giving four dietary groups. Results: At postnatal day 1, offspring from high-fat/high-sucrose-fed dams were heavier and had increased hepatic triglycerides (TG), hepatic glycogen, blood glucose and plasma insulin compared with offspring from chow-fed dams. Hepatic genes involved in lipid...... oxidation, VLDL transport and insulin receptor were down-regulated, whereas FGF21 expression was up-regulated. Independent of postnatal litter size, offspring from high-fat/high-sucrose-fed dams aged 21 days had still increased hepatic TG and up-regulated FGF21 expression, while plasma insulin started...

  15. Local depletion of glycogen with supramaximal exercise in human skeletal muscle fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gejl, Kasper D; Ørtenblad, Niels; Andersson, Erik; Plomgaard, Peter; Holmberg, Hans-Christer; Nielsen, Joachim

    2017-05-01

    Glycogen is stored in local spatially distinct compartments within skeletal muscle fibres and is the main energy source during supramaximal exercise. Using quantitative electron microscopy, we show that supramaximal exercise induces a differential depletion of glycogen from these compartments and also demonstrate how this varies with fibre types. Repeated exercise alters this compartmentalized glycogen depletion. The results obtained in the present study help us understand the muscle metabolic dynamics of whole body repeated supramaximal exercise, and suggest that the muscle has a compartmentalized local adaptation to repeated exercise, which affects glycogen depletion. Skeletal muscle glycogen is heterogeneously distributed in three separated compartments (intramyofibrillar, intermyofibrillar and subsarcolemmal). Although only constituting 3-13% of the total glycogen volume, the availability of intramyofibrillar glycogen is of particular importance to muscle function. The present study aimed to investigate the depletion of these three subcellular glycogen compartments during repeated supramaximal exercise in elite athletes. Ten elite cross-country skiers (aged 25 ± 4 years, V̇O2 max : 65 ± 4 ml kg -1  min -1 ; mean ± SD) performed four ∼4 min supramaximal sprint time trials (STT 1-4) with 45 min of recovery. The subcellular glycogen volumes in musculus triceps brachii were quantified from electron microscopy images before and after both STT 1 and 4. During STT 1, the depletion of intramyofibrillar glycogen was higher in type 1 fibres [-52%; (-89:-15%)] than type 2 fibres [-15% (-52:22%)] (P = 0.02), whereas the depletion of intermyofibrillar glycogen [main effect: -19% (-33:0%), P = 0.006] and subsarcolemmal glycogen [main effect: -35% (-66:0%), P = 0.03] was similar between fibre types. By contrast, only intermyofibrillar glycogen volume was significantly reduced during STT 4, in both fibre types [main effect: -31% (-50:-11%), P = 0

  16. Glycogen supercompensation in rat soleus muscle during recovery from nonweight bearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, Erik J.; Kirby, Christopher R.; Tischler, Marc E.

    1989-01-01

    Events leading to the normalization of the glycogen metabolism in the soleus muscle of rat, altered by 72-h three days of hind-limb suspension, were investigated during the 72-h recovery period when the animals were allowed to bear weight on all four limbs. Relative importance of the factors affecting glycogen metabolism in skeletal muscle during the recovery period was also examined. Glycogen concentration was found to decrease within 15 min and up to 2 h of recovery, while muscle glucose 6-phosphate, and the fractional activities of glycogen phosphorylase and glycogen synthase increased. From 2 to 4 h, when the glycogen synthase activity remained elevated and the phosphorylase activity declined, glycogen concentration increased, until it reached maximum values at about 24 h, after which it started to decrease, reaching control values by 72 h. At 12 and 24 h, the inverse relationship between glycogen concentration and the synthase activity ratio was lost, indicating that the reloading transiently uncoupled glycogen control of this enzyme.

  17. Glycogen distribution in the microwave‐fixed mouse brain reveals heterogeneous astrocytic patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Otto; Ashida, Hitoshi; Nakamura, Kouichi C.

    2016-01-01

    In the brain, glycogen metabolism has been implied in synaptic plasticity and learning, yet the distribution of this molecule has not been fully described. We investigated cerebral glycogen of the mouse by immunohistochemistry (IHC) using two monoclonal antibodies that have different affinities depending on the glycogen size. The use of focused microwave irradiation yielded well‐defined glycogen immunoreactive signals compared with the conventional periodic acid‐Schiff method. The IHC signals displayed a punctate distribution localized predominantly in astrocytic processes. Glycogen immunoreactivity (IR) was high in the hippocampus, striatum, cortex, and cerebellar molecular layer, whereas it was low in the white matter and most of the subcortical structures. Additionally, glycogen distribution in the hippocampal CA3‐CA1 and striatum had a ‘patchy’ appearance with glycogen‐rich and glycogen‐poor astrocytes appearing in alternation. The glycogen patches were more evident with large‐molecule glycogen in young adult mice but they were hardly observable in aged mice (1–2 years old). Our results reveal brain region‐dependent glycogen accumulation and possibly metabolic heterogeneity of astrocytes. GLIA 2016;64:1532–1545 PMID:27353480

  18. Significance of glucagon for insulin secretion and hepatic glycogenolysis during exercise in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Galbo, H; Holst, J J

    1981-01-01

    The significance of glucagon and of the sympatho-adrenal system for insulin secretion and hepatic glycogen depletion during exercise was studied. Male rats were either adrenodemedullated and chemically sympathectomized with 6-hydroxydopamine (SX) or sham-treated (C). During light ether anesthesia......, cardiac blood for glucose analysis and a biopsy of the liver were obtained, and either antigen-stripped glucagon antibodies (A) or control gamma globulins (N) in saline were injected through the cardiac cannula. Subsequently, the rats swam in tepid water (33-34 degree C) for 100 minutes with a tail weight...... attached (2% of body weight). Then cardiac blood was drawn for analysis of glucose, insulin and glucagon, and a sample of the liver was collected. In both CA and CN rats, the blood glucose concentration tended to increase (p less than 0.1) during exercise, whereas hepatic glycogen depletion and the plasma...

  19. Clinical presentation and biochemical findings children with glycogen storage disease type 1A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeed, A.; Suleman, H.; Arshad, H.

    2015-01-01

    To determine the clinical pattern of presentation and biochemical characteristics of glycogen storage disease (GSD) type 1a in children at a tertiary referral centre. Study Design: Descriptive/ cross sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Pediatric, division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology of the Children's hospital, Lahore over a period of 11 years. Patients and Methods: Confirmed cases of glycogen storage disease (clinical plus biochemical findings consistent with GSD 1a and proven on liver biopsy) were enrolled in this study from neonatal age till 18 years. Data was retrieved from files and electronic record for these cases. Diagnosis was made on the basis of history, clinical findings including hepatomegaly, hypertriglyceridemia, hypercholesterolemia, hypoglycemia and hyperuricemia (if present). Diagnosis was confirmed on liver biopsy. Patients with other storage disorders and benign and malignant tumours were excluded from the study. Results: Total patients included in the study were 360 with male to female ratio of 1.25:1. Median age at the time of diagnosis was 25.6 months (age range from one month to 18 years). Most common presentation was abdominal distension (83%) followed by failure to thrive (69%) and recurrent wheezing and diarrhoea (44%) each. Seizures were present in only 1/3rd of children. Other presentations included vomiting, respiratory distress, altered sensorium, nephrocalcinosis, epistaxis and hypothyroidism. Few patients around 11% presented with acute hepatitis and later were diagnosed as GSD. Significant hepatomegaly was evident in almost all patients but nephromegaly was present in only 5.5% patients. All children had marked hypertriglyceridemia but cholesterol levels were raised in 1/3rd of children. A large majority of children had deranged ALT more than 2 times of normal and around 38% children had marked anemia. Significant hypoglycemia and metabolic acidosis was documented in around 1/3rd of children

  20. Metallothionein induction, antioxidative responses, glycogen and growth changes in Tubifex tubifex (Oligochaete) exposed to the fungicide, fenhexamid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosleh, Yahia Y.; Paris-Palacios, Severine; Couderchet, Michel; Biagianti-Risbourg, Sylvie; Vernet, Guy

    2005-01-01

    Laboratory studies were conducted to determine the effects of different concentrations of fenhexamid (0.1, 1, and 10 mg L -1 ) on growth, oxidative stress, protein, glycogen, and metallothionein (MT) contents in Tubifex tubifex after an exposure of 2, 4, and 7 days. In addition, residues of the fungicide were followed in water and in the worms. In water, fenhexamid concentration decreased slowly (maximum - 2±0.03% after 2 days for 1 mg L -1 ). In the worms, it increased after 4 days and decreased thereafter, confirming that the worms were exposed to the fungicide and not to a degradation product. LC 50 values were between 95.22±5.36 and 32.11±1.8 mg L -1 depending on exposure time. Exposure to fenhexamid had a negative effect on T. tubifex growth (maximum effect -12.2±0.8% after 7 days with 10 mg L -1 ) demonstrating the toxic effect of the pesticide. This growth rate decrease was accompanied by a reduction in protein and glycogen contents. The activity of catalase (CAT), and glutathione reductase (GR) increased in response to the fungicide demonstrating an oxidative stress in the worms. In contrast glutathion-S-transferase activity (GST) decreased. Exposure to fenhexamid also induced synthesis of MT (maximum +78±8% after 2 days for 10 mg L -1 ). The specificity of MT concentration increase in response to metals is discussed. - Exposure to the fungicide fenhexamid increased metallothionein levels in Tubifex tubifex

  1. Hepatitis E

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... room/fact-sheets/detail/hepatitis-e","@context":"http://schema.org","@type":"Article"}; العربية 中文 français русский español ... E: recognition, investigation and control”. The manual gives information about the epidemiology, clinical manifestations of the disease, ...

  2. Hepatic haemangioma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hp 630 Dual Core

    successful usage of transhepatic compression sutures using polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) pledgets and selective ligation of large feeding vessels from right hepatic artery. Surgical resection may not be technically safe or possible in certain cases due to the massive or diffuse nature of the lesion, proximity to vascular ...

  3. Hepatitis B

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... which can lower your chances of developing serious health problems. Your doctor may recommend screening for hepatitis B if you ... see a doctor who specializes in liver diseases. Doctors can treat the health problems related to cirrhosis with medicines, surgery, and other ...

  4. Chronic hepatitis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    infection by four diagnostic systems: first generation and second generation. ELlSA, second generation recombinant immunoblot assay and nested polymerase chain reaction analysis. HepatoJogy 1992; 16: 300-305. 14. Van der Poel CL, ... Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency. Alcoholic hepatitis. Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis.

  5. Radiogenic hepatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rey, G; Woellgens, P; Haase, W [Katharinenhospital, Stuttgart (F.R. Germany). Strahlenklinik

    1976-08-01

    The article is about a patient who developed hepatitis after post-operative radiotherapy of a hypernephroma on the right side with /sup 60/Co ..gamma.. radiation. The scintigraph showed a normal-sized liver with parenchymal defects. Therapy consisted of anti-emetics and vitamin preparations.

  6. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Lipase Deficiency Liver Cancer Liver Cysts Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Primary Biliary Cholangitis Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis What ... B & C Alcohol-related Liver Disease Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) & Non-alcoholic Steatohepatitis (NASH) Autoimmune Hepatitis ...

  7. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of brain function in people with advanced liver disease. When your liver is damaged it can no longer remove toxic substances from your blood. These toxins build up and can travel through your body until they reach your brain, causing mental and physical symptoms of HE. Hepatic Encephalopathy often ...

  8. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... damages your liver over many years – such as long-term alcohol abuse or chronic hepatitis – can cause ... treated. It’s important to continue treatment for as long as necessary to keep HE from coming back. ...

  9. Hepatic amebiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salles José Maria

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Amebiasis can be considered the most aggressive disease of the human intestine, responsible in its invasive form for clinical syndromes, ranging from the classic dysentery of acute colitis to extra-intestinal disease, with emphasis on hepatic amebiasis, unsuitably named amebic liver abscess. Found worldwide, with a high incidence in India, tropical regions of Africa, Mexico and other areas of Central America, it has been frequently reported in Amazonia. The trophozoite reaches the liver through the portal system, provoking enzymatic focal necrosis of hepatocytes and multiple micro-abscesses that coalesce to develop a single lesion whose central cavity contains a homogeneous thick liquid, with typically reddish brown and yellow color similar to "anchovy paste". Right upper quadrant pain, fever and hepatomegaly are the predominant symptoms of hepatic amebiasis. Jaundice is reported in cases with multiple lesions or a very large abscess, and it affects the prognosis adversely. Besides chest radiography, ultrasonography and computerized tomography have brought remarkable contributions to the diagnosis of hepatic abscesses. The conclusive diagnosis is made however by the finding of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites in the pus and by the detection of serum antibodies to the amoeba. During the evolution of hepatic amebiasis, in spite of the availability of highly effective drugs, some important complications may occur with regularity and are a result of local perforation with extension into the pleural and pericardium cavities, causing pulmonary abscesses and purulent pericarditis, respectively The ruptures into the abdominal cavity may lead to subphrenic abscesses and peritonitis. The treatment of hepatic amebiasis is made by medical therapy, with metronidazole as the initial drug, followed by a luminal amebicide. In patients with large abscesses, showing signs of imminent rupture, and especially those who do not respond to medical treatment, a

  10. Hepatic amebiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Maria Salles

    Full Text Available Amebiasis can be considered the most aggressive disease of the human intestine, responsible in its invasive form for clinical syndromes, ranging from the classic dysentery of acute colitis to extra-intestinal disease, with emphasis on hepatic amebiasis, unsuitably named amebic liver abscess. Found worldwide, with a high incidence in India, tropical regions of Africa, Mexico and other areas of Central America, it has been frequently reported in Amazonia. The trophozoite reaches the liver through the portal system, provoking enzymatic focal necrosis of hepatocytes and multiple micro-abscesses that coalesce to develop a single lesion whose central cavity contains a homogeneous thick liquid, with typically reddish brown and yellow color similar to "anchovy paste". Right upper quadrant pain, fever and hepatomegaly are the predominant symptoms of hepatic amebiasis. Jaundice is reported in cases with multiple lesions or a very large abscess, and it affects the prognosis adversely. Besides chest radiography, ultrasonography and computerized tomography have brought remarkable contributions to the diagnosis of hepatic abscesses. The conclusive diagnosis is made however by the finding of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites in the pus and by the detection of serum antibodies to the amoeba. During the evolution of hepatic amebiasis, in spite of the availability of highly effective drugs, some important complications may occur with regularity and are a result of local perforation with extension into the pleural and pericardium cavities, causing pulmonary abscesses and purulent pericarditis, respectively The ruptures into the abdominal cavity may lead to subphrenic abscesses and peritonitis. The treatment of hepatic amebiasis is made by medical therapy, with metronidazole as the initial drug, followed by a luminal amebicide. In patients with large abscesses, showing signs of imminent rupture, and especially those who do not respond to medical treatment, a

  11. The small delta antigen of hepatitis delta virus is an acetylated protein and acetylation of lysine 72 may influence its cellular localization and viral RNA synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mu, J.-J.; Tsay, Y.-G.; Juan, L.-J.; Fu, T.-F.; Huang, W.-H.; Chen, D.-S.; Chen, P.-J.

    2004-01-01

    Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is a single-stranded RNA virus that encodes two viral nucleocapsid proteins named small and large form hepatitis delta antigen (S-HDAg and L-HDAg). The S-HDAg is essential for viral RNA replication while the L-HDAg is required for viral assembly. In this study, we demonstrated that HDAg are acetylated proteins. Metabolic labeling with [ 3 H]acetate revealed that both forms of HDAg could be acetylated in vivo. The histone acetyltransferase (HAT) domain of cellular acetyltransferase p300 could acetylate the full-length and the N-terminal 88 amino acids of S-HDAg in vitro. By mass spectrometric analysis of the modified protein, Lys-72 of S-HDAg was identified as one of the acetylation sites. Substitution of Lys-72 to Arg caused the mutant S-HDAg to redistribute from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. The mutant reduced viral RNA accumulation and resulted in the earlier appearance of L-HDAg. These results demonstrated that HDAg is an acetylated protein and mutation of HDAg at Lys-72 modulates HDAg subcellular localization and may participate in viral RNA nucleocytoplasmic shuttling and replication

  12. Counter-attack on viral hepatitis. [Hepatitis A; Hepatitis B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prozesky, O W [Pretoria Univ. (South Africa). Dept. of Medical Virology; Jupp, P G; Joubert, J J; Taylor, M B; Grabow, W O.K.

    1985-07-01

    The most highly developed radioimmunoassay test system in medical virology is proving of exceptional value in research aimed at controlling and eventually eradicating the scourge of human hepatitis. The use of radioimmunoassay in detecting hepatitis A (HAV) and hepatitis B (HBV) viruses is discussed. The hepatitis A virus is an enterovirus which infects the gastrointestinal tract and is usually transmitted by contaminated food, milk or water. Hepatitis B spreads mainly by the parenteral rate. Bedbugs and ticks are considered as possible transmitters of HBV. Another important contribution of radioimmunoassay is the ability to monitor the immune response of persons at risk who are vaccinated against hepatitis B.

  13. Glycogen storage disease type II (Pompe disease in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Semyachkina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives the data available in the literature, which reflect the manifestations, diagnosis, and current treatments of the rare (orphan inherited disease glycogen storage disease type II or Pomp disease in children, as well as its classification. The infant form is shown to be most severe, resulting in death from cardiovascular or pulmonary failure generally within the first year of a child’s life. Emphasis is laid on major difficulties in the differential and true diagnosis of this severe disease. Much attention is given to the new pathogenetic treatment — genetically engineered enzyme replacement drug Myozyme®. The authors describe their clinical case of a child with the juvenile form of glycogen storage disease type II (late-onset Pompe disease. Particular emphasis is laid on the clinical symptoms of the disease and its diagnostic methods, among which the morphological analysis of a muscle biopsy specimen by light and electron microscopies, and enzyme and DNA diagnoses are of most importance. The proband was found to have significant lysosomal glycogen accumulation in the muscle biopsy specimen, reduced lymphocyte acid α-1,4-glucosidase activity to 4,2 nM/mg/h (normal value, 13,0—53,6 nM/mg/h, described in the HGMD missense mutation database from 1000 G>A p.Gly334er of the GAA in homozygous state, which verified the diagnosis of Pompe disease. 

  14. Muscle glycogen storage postexercise: effect of mode of carbohydrate administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, M J; Brozinick, J T; Lee, M C; Ivy, J L

    1989-02-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to determine whether gastric emptying limits the rate of muscle glycogen storage during the initial 4 h after exercise when a carbohydrate supplement is provided. A secondary purpose was to determine whether liquid (L) and solid (S) carbohydrate (CHO) feedings result in different rates of muscle glycogen storage after exercise. Eight subjects cycled for 2 h on three separate occasions to deplete their muscle glycogen stores. After each exercise bout they received 3 g CHO/kg body wt in L (50% glucose polymer) or S (rice/banana cake) form or by intravenous infusion (I; 20% sterile glucose). The L and S supplements were divided into two equal doses and administered immediately after and 120 min after exercise, whereas the I supplement was administered continuously during the first 235 min of the 240-min recovery period. Blood samples were drawn from an antecubital vein before exercise, during exercise, and throughout recovery. Muscle biopsies were taken from the vastus lateralis immediately after and 120 and 240 min after exercise. Blood glucose and insulin declined during exercise and increased significantly above preexercise levels during recovery in all treatments. The increase in blood glucose during the I treatment, however, was three times greater than during the L or S treatments. The average insulin response of the L treatment (61.7 +/- 4.9 microU/ml) was significantly greater than that of the S treatment (47.5 +/- 4.2 microU/ml) but not that of the I (55.3 +/- 4.5 microU/ml) treatment.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Hepatitis B (HBV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Hepatitis B KidsHealth / For Teens / Hepatitis B What's in ... Prevented? Print en español Hepatitis B What Is Hepatitis B? Hepatitis B is an infection of the ...

  16. Hepatitis A Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twinrix® (as a combination product containing Hepatitis A Vaccine, Hepatitis B Vaccine) ... Why get vaccinated against hepatitis A?Hepatitis A is a serious liver disease. It is caused by the hepatitis A virus (HAV). HAV is spread from ...

  17. Sequence of the human glycogen-associated regulatory subunit of type 1 protein phosphatase and analysis of its coding region and mRNA level in muscle from patients with NIDDM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Y H; Hansen, L; Chen, Min

    1994-01-01

    Impaired insulin-stimulated glycogen synthesis of peripheral tissues is a characteristic feature of many patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) and their first-degree relatives with normal glucose tolerance, suggesting putative inherited defects in this metabolic pathway...... showed a C to A transversion on one allele at base position 2792. This change predicts an amino acid substitution from alanine to glutamic acid.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)...

  18. Glycogen as a biodegradable construction nanomaterial for in vivo use

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Filippov, Sergey K.; Sedláček, Ondřej; Bogomolova, Anna; Vetrík, Miroslav; Jirák, D.; Kovář, J.; Kučka, Jan; Bals, S.; Turner, S.; Štěpánek, Petr; Hrubý, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 12 (2012), s. 1731-1738 ISSN 1616-5187 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/09/2078; GA ČR GAP108/12/0640; GA ČR GAP208/10/1600; GA ČR GPP207/10/P054 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : nanoparticles * in vivo imaging * glycogen Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 3.742, year: 2012

  19. Modified glycogen as construction material for functional biomimetic microfibers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rabyk, Mariia; Hrubý, Martin; Vetrík, Miroslav; Kučka, Jan; Proks, Vladimír; Pařízek, Martin; Konefal, Rafal; Krist, Pavel; Chvátil, David; Bačáková, Lucie; Šlouf, Miroslav; Štěpánek, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 152, 5 November (2016), s. 271-279 ISSN 0144-8617 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-08336S; GA MZd(CZ) NV15-25781A; GA MZd(CZ) NV15-32497A; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015064 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 ; RVO:67985823 ; RVO:61389005 Keywords : glycogen * fibers * irradiation crosslinking Subject RIV: FR - Pharmacology ; Medidal Chemistry; FJ - Surgery incl. Transplants (FGU-C); BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders (UJF-V) Impact factor: 4.811, year: 2016

  20. Human acid alpha-glucosidase from rabbit milk has therapeutic effect in mice with glycogen storage disease type II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.G.A. Bijvoet (Agnes); A.J.J. Reuser (Arnold); H. van Hirtum (Hans); M.A. Kroos (Marian); E.H. van de Kamp; O. Schoneveld; P. Visser (Pim); J.P. Brakenhoff (Just); M. Weggeman (Miranda); E.J.J.M. van Corven (Emiel); A.T. van der Ploeg (Ans)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractPompe's disease or glycogen storage disease type II (GSDII) belongs to the family of inherited lysosomal storage diseases. The underlying deficiency of acid alpha-glucosidase leads in different degrees of severity to glycogen storage in heart, skeletal