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Sample records for hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme

  1. Involvement of tristetraprolin in transcriptional activation of hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase by insulin

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    Ness, Gene C., E-mail: gness@hsc.usf.edu [Department of Molecular Medicine, College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33612 (United States); Edelman, Jeffrey L.; Brooks, Patricia A. [Department of Molecular Medicine, College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33612 (United States)

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer siRNAs to tristetraprolin blocks transcription of HMGR in vivo in rat liver. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer siRNAs to tristetraprolin inhibits insulin activation of HMGR transcription. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Insulin acts to rapidly increase tristetraprolin in liver nuclear extracts. -- Abstract: Several AU-rich RNA binding element (ARE) proteins were investigated for their possible effects on transcription of hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methyglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) in normal rats. Using in vivo electroporation, four different siRNAs to each ARE protein were introduced together with HMGR promoter (-325 to +20) luciferase construct and compared to saline controls. All four siRNAs to tristetraprolin (TTP) completely eliminated transcription from the HMGR promoter construct. Since insulin acts to rapidly increase hepatic HMGR transcription, the effect of TTP siRNA on induction by insulin was tested. The 3-fold stimulation by insulin was eliminated by this treatment. In comparison, siRNA to AU RNA binding protein/enoyl coenzyme A hydratase (AUH) had no effect. These findings indicate a role for TTP in the insulin-mediated activation of hepatic HMGR transcription.

  2. Hypercholesterolemia and 3-Hydroxy 3-Methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase Regulation during Ageing

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    Laura Trapani

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We present here a brief description of the path that cholesterol covers from its intestinal absorption to its effect exerted on some enzyme regulation. Some mechanisms underlying hypercholesterolemia onset and, in particular, the role and the regulation of 3-hydroxy 3-methylglutaryl Coenzyme A reductase (HMGR during adult life and during aging, have been described. In addition some pharmacological interventions to control proper HMGR regulation and, in turn, cholesterol homeostasis maintenance will be introduced.

  3. Inhibition of 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase (Ex Vivo by Morus indica (Mulberry

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    Vanitha Reddy Palvai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Phytochemicals are the bioactive components that contribute to the prevention of cardiovascular and other degenerative diseases. Inhibition of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA reductase would be an effective means of lowering plasma cholesterol in humans. The present study explores the HMG CoA reductase inhibitory effect of extracts from leaves of Morus indica varieties, M5, V1, and S36, compared with the statin, using an ex vivo method. The assay is based on the stoichiometric formation of coenzyme A during the reduction of microsomal HMG CoA to mevalonate. Dechlorophyllised extract of three varieties was studied at 300 µg. The coenzyme A released at the end of assay in control (100.31 nmoles and statins (94.46 nm was higher than the dechlorphyllised extracts of the samples. The coenzyme A released during the reduction of HMG CoA to mevalonate in dechlorophyllised extracts of the samples was as follows: S36 < M5 < V1. The results indicated that the samples were highly effective in inhibiting the enzyme compared to statins (standard drug. The results indicate the role of Morus varieties extracts in modulating the cholesterol metabolism by inhibiting the activity of HMG CoA reductase. These results provide scope for designing in vivo animal studies to confirm their effect.

  4. Thermodynamic and Structure Guided Design of Statin Based Inhibitors of 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase

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    Sarver, Ronald W.; Bills, Elizabeth; Bolton, Gary; Bratton, Larry D.; Caspers, Nicole L.; Dunbar, James B.; Harris, Melissa S.; Hutchings, Richard H.; Kennedy, Robert M.; Larsen, Scott D.; Pavlovsky, Alexander; Pfefferkorn, Jeffrey A.; Bainbridge, Graeme (Pfizer)

    2008-10-02

    Clinical studies have demonstrated that statins, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) inhibitors, are effective at lowering mortality levels associated with cardiovascular disease; however, 2--7% of patients may experience statin-induced myalgia that limits compliance with a treatment regimen. High resolution crystal structures, thermodynamic binding parameters, and biochemical data were used to design statin inhibitors with improved HMGR affinity and therapeutic index relative to statin-induced myalgia. These studies facilitated the identification of imidazole 1 as a potent (IC{sub 50} = 7.9 nM) inhibitor with excellent hepatoselectivity (>1000-fold) and good in vivo efficacy. The binding of 1 to HMGR was found to be enthalpically driven with a {Delta}H of -17.7 kcal/M. Additionally, a second novel series of bicyclic pyrrole-based inhibitors was identified that induced order in a protein flap of HMGR. Similar ordering was detected in a substrate complex, but has not been reported in previous statin inhibitor complexes with HMGR.

  5. Overexpressing 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR in the lactococcal mevalonate pathway for heterologous plant sesquiterpene production.

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    Adelene Ai-Lian Song

    Full Text Available Isoprenoids are a large and diverse group of metabolites with interesting properties such as flavour, fragrance and therapeutic properties. They are produced via two pathways, the mevalonate pathway or the 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol-4-phosphate (MEP pathway. While plants are the richest source of isoprenoids, they are not the most efficient producers. Escherichia coli and yeasts have been extensively studied as heterologous hosts for plant isoprenoids production. In the current study, we describe the usage of the food grade Lactococcus lactis as a potential heterologous host for the production of sesquiterpenes from a local herbaceous Malaysian plant, Persicaria minor (synonym Polygonum minus. A sesquiterpene synthase gene from P. minor was successfully cloned and expressed in L. lactis. The expressed protein was identified to be a β-sesquiphellandrene synthase as it was demonstrated to be functional in producing β-sesquiphellandrene at 85.4% of the total sesquiterpenes produced based on in vitro enzymatic assays. The recombinant L. lactis strain developed in this study was also capable of producing β-sesquiphellandrene in vivo without exogenous substrates supplementation. In addition, overexpression of the strain's endogenous 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme-A reductase (HMGR, an established rate-limiting enzyme in the eukaryotic mevalonate pathway, increased the production level of β-sesquiphellandrene by 1.25-1.60 fold. The highest amount achieved was 33 nM at 2 h post-induction.

  6. Molecular cloning, characterization and expression analysis of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase gene from Centella asiatica L.

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    Kalita, Ratna; Patar, Lochana; Shasany, Ajit Kumar; Modi, Mahendra K; Sen, Priyabrata

    2015-09-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductases (HMGR) plays an important role in catalyzing the first committed step of isoprenoid biosynthesis in the mevelonic (MVA) pathway (catalyzes the conversion of HMG-CoA to MVA) in plants. The present manuscript reports the full length cDNA cloning of HMGR (CaHMGR, GenBank accession number: KJ939450.2) and its characterization from Centella asiatica. Sequence analysis indicated that the cDNA was of 1965 bp, which had an open reading frame of 1617 bp and encoded a protein containing 539 amino-acids with a mol wt of 57.9 kDa. A BLASTp search against non-redundant (nr) protein sequence showed that C. asiatica HMGR (CaHMGR) has 65-81% identity with HMGRs from different plant species and multi-alignment comparison analysis showed the presence of two motif each corresponding to HMG-CoA-binding and NADP(H)-binding. The Conserved Domain Database analysis predicted that CaHMGR belongs to Class I hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase. Three-dimensional modeling confirmed the novelty of CaHMGR with a spatial structure similar to Homo sapiens (PDB id: 1IDQ8_A). Tissue Expression analysis indicates that CaHMGR is ubiquitous albeit differentially expressed among different tissues analysed, Strong expression was recorded in the nodes and leaves and low in the roots. The present investigation confirmed that nodes are vital to terpenoid synthesis in C. asiatica. Thus, the cloning of full length CDS, characterization and structure-function analysis of HMGR gene in Centella facilitate to understand the HMGR's functions and regulatory mechanisms involved in mevalonate pathway in C. asiatica at genetic level.

  7. Autoantibodies against 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase in patients with statin-associated autoimmune myopathy.

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    Mammen, Andrew L; Chung, Tae; Christopher-Stine, Lisa; Rosen, Paul; Rosen, Antony; Doering, Kimberly R; Casciola-Rosen, Livia A

    2011-03-01

    In addition to inducing a self-limited myopathy, statin use is associated with an immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy (IMNM), with autoantibodies that recognize ∼200-kd and ∼100-kd autoantigens. The purpose of this study was to identify these molecules to help clarify the disease mechanism and facilitate diagnosis. The effect of statin treatment on autoantigen expression was addressed by immunoprecipitation using sera from patients. The identity of the ∼100-kd autoantigen was confirmed by immunoprecipitation of in vitro-translated 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR) protein. HMGCR expression in muscle was analyzed by immunofluorescence. A cohort of myopathy patients was screened for anti-HMGCR autoantibodies by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and genotyped for the rs4149056 C allele, a predictor of self-limited statin myopathy. Statin exposure induced expression of the ∼200-kd/∼100-kd autoantigens in cultured cells. HMGCR was identified as the ∼100-kd autoantigen. Competition experiments demonstrated no distinct autoantibodies recognizing the ∼200-kd protein. In muscle biopsy tissues from anti-HMGCR-positive patients, HMGCR expression was up-regulated in cells expressing neural cell adhesion molecule, a marker of muscle regeneration. Anti-HMGCR autoantibodies were found in 45 of 750 patients presenting to the Johns Hopkins Myositis Center (6%). Among patients ages 50 years and older, 92.3% had taken statins. The prevalence of the rs4149056 C allele was not increased in patients with anti-HMGCR. Statins up-regulate the expression of HMGCR, the major target of autoantibodies in statin-associated IMNM. Regenerating muscle cells express high levels of HMGCR, which may sustain the immune response even after statins are discontinued. These studies demonstrate a mechanistic link between an environmental trigger and the development of sustained autoimmunity. Detection of anti-HMGCR autoantibodies may facilitate diagnosis and direct

  8. Statin (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitor-based therapy for hepatitis C virus (HCV infection-related diseases in the era of direct-acting antiviral agents [version 3; referees: 2 approved

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    Sara Sobhy Kishta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent improvements have been made in the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV infection with the introduction of direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs. However, despite successful viral clearance, many patients continue to have HCV-related disease progression. Therefore, new treatments must be developed to achieve viral clearance and prevent the risk of HCV-related diseases. In particular, the use of pitavastatin together with DAAs may improve the antiviral efficacy as well as decrease the progression of liver fibrosis and the incidence of HCV-related hepatocellular carcinoma. To investigate the management methods for HCV-related diseases using pitavastatin and DAAs, clinical trials should be undertaken. However, concerns have been raised about potential drug interactions between statins and DAAs. Therefore, pre-clinical trials using a replicon system, human hepatocyte-like cells, human neurons and human cardiomyocytes from human-induced pluripotent stem cells should be conducted. Based on these pre-clinical trials, an optimal direct-acting antiviral agent could be selected for combination with pitavastatin and DAAs. Following the pre-clinical trial, the combination of pitavastatin and the optimal direct-acting antiviral agent should be compared to other combinations of DAAs (e.g., sofosbuvir and velpatasvir according to the antiviral effect on HCV infection, HCV-related diseases and cost-effectiveness.

  9. Arachidonic acid alters tomato HMG expression and fruit growth and induces 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase-independent lycopene accumulation

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    Rodriguez-Concepcion, M.; Gruissem, W. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Plant and Microbial Biology

    1999-01-01

    Regulation of isoprenoid end-product synthesis required for normal growth and development in plants is not well understood. To investigate the extent to which specific genes for the enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) are involved in end-product regulation, the authors manipulated expression of the HMG1 and HMG2 genes in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) fruit using arachidonic acid (AA). In developing young fruit AA blocked fruit growth, inhibited HMG1, and activated HMG2 expression. These results are consistent with other reports indicating that HMG1 expression is closely correlated with growth processes requiring phytosterol production. In mature-green fruit AA strongly induced the expression of HMG2, PSY1 (the gene for phytoene synthase), and lycopene accumulation before the normal onset of carotenoid synthesis and ripening. The induction of lycopene synthesis was not blocked by inhibition of HMGR activity using mevinolin, suggesting that cytoplasmic HMGR is not required for carotenoid synthesis. Their results are consistent with the function of an alternative plastid isoprenoid pathway (the Rohmer pathway) that appears to direct the production of carotenoids during tomato fruit ripening.

  10. Species-specific expansion and molecular evolution of the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR gene family in plants.

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    Wei Li

    Full Text Available The terpene compounds represent the largest and most diverse class of plant secondary metabolites which are important in plant growth and development. The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR; EC 1.1.1.34 is one of the key enzymes contributed to terpene biosynthesis. To better understand the basic characteristics and evolutionary history of the HMGR gene family in plants, a genome-wide analysis of HMGR genes from 20 representative species was carried out. A total of 56 HMGR genes in the 14 land plant genomes were identified, but no genes were found in all 6 algal genomes. The gene structure and protein architecture of all plant HMGR genes were highly conserved. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that the plant HMGRs were derived from one ancestor gene and finally developed into four distinct groups, two in the monocot plants and two in dicot plants. Species-specific gene duplications, caused mainly by segmental duplication, led to the limited expansion of HMGR genes in Zea mays, Gossypium raimondii, Populus trichocarpa and Glycine max after the species diverged. The analysis of Ka/Ks ratios and expression profiles indicated that functional divergence after the gene duplications was restricted. The results suggested that the function and evolution of HMGR gene family were dramatically conserved throughout the plant kingdom.

  11. Flavonoids from the buds of Rosa damascena inhibit the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme a reductase and angiotensin I-converting enzyme.

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    Kwon, Eun-Kyung; Lee, Dae-Young; Lee, Hyungjae; Kim, Dae-Ok; Baek, Nam-In; Kim, Young-Eon; Kim, Hae-Yeong

    2010-01-27

    Rosa damascena has been manufactured as various food products, including tea, in Korea. A new flavonoid glycoside, kaempferol-3-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl(1-->4)-beta-D-xylopyranoside, named roxyloside A was isolated from the buds of this plant, along with four known compounds, isoquercitrin, afzelin, cyanidin-3-O-beta-glucoside, and quercetin gentiobioside. The chemical structures of these compounds were determined by spectroscopic analyses, including FAB-MS, UV, IR, (1)H and (13)C NMR, DEPT, and 2D NMR (COSY, HSQC, and HMBC). All the isolated compounds except cyanidin-3-O-beta-glucoside exhibited high levels of inhibitory activity against 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase with IC(50) values ranging from 47.1 to 80.6 microM. Cyanidin-3-O-beta-glucoside significantly suppressed angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) activity, with an IC(50) value of 138.8 microM, while the other four compounds were ineffective. These results indicate that R. damascena and its flavonoids may be effective to improve the cardiovascular system.

  12. Overexpression of the Squalene Epoxidase Gene Alone and in Combination with the 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Gene Increases Ganoderic Acid Production in Ganoderma lingzhi.

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    Zhang, De-Huai; Jiang, Lu-Xi; Li, Na; Yu, Xuya; Zhao, Peng; Li, Tao; Xu, Jun-Wei

    2017-06-14

    The squalene epoxidase (SE) gene from the biosynthetic pathway of ganoderic acid (GA) was cloned and overexpressed in Ganoderma lingzhi. The strain that overexpressed the SE produced approximately 2 times more GA molecules than the wild-type (WT) strain. Moreover, SE overexpression upregulated lanosterol synthase gene expression in the biosynthetic pathway. These results indicated that SE stimulates GA accumulation. Then, the SE and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMGR) genes were simultaneously overexpressed in G. lingzhi. Compared with the individual overexpression of SE or HMGR, the combined overexpression of the two genes further enhanced individual GA production. The overexpressing strain produced maximum GA-T, GA-S, GA-Mk, and GA-Me contents of 90.4 ± 7.5, 35.9 ± 5.4, 6.2 ± 0.5, and 61.8 ± 5.8 μg/100 mg dry weight, respectively. These values were 5.9, 4.5, 2.4, and 5.8 times higher than those produced by the WT strain. This is the first example of the successful manipulation of multiple biosynthetic genes to improve GA content in G. lingzhi.

  13. Cloning, Expression Profiling and Functional Analysis of CnHMGS, a Gene Encoding 3-hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Synthase from Chamaemelum nobile

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    Shuiyuan Cheng

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Roman chamomile (Chamaemelum nobile L. is renowned for its production of essential oils, which major components are sesquiterpenoids. As the important enzyme in the sesquiterpenoid biosynthesis pathway, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A synthase (HMGS catalyze the crucial step in the mevalonate pathway in plants. To isolate and identify the functional genes involved in the sesquiterpene biosynthesis of C. nobile L., a HMGS gene designated as CnHMGS (GenBank Accession No. KU529969 was cloned from C. nobile. The cDNA sequence of CnHMGS contained a 1377 bp open reading frame encoding a 458-amino-acid protein. The sequence of the CnHMGS protein was highly homologous to those of HMGS proteins from other plant species. Phylogenetic tree analysis revealed that CnHMGS clustered with the HMGS of Asteraceae in the dicotyledon clade. Further functional complementation of CnHMGS in the mutant yeast strain YSC6274 lacking HMGS activity demonstrated that the cloned CnHMGS cDNA encodes a functional HMGS. Transcript profile analysis indicated that CnHMGS was preferentially expressed in flowers and roots of C. nobile. The expression of CnHMGS could be upregulated by exogenous elicitors, including methyl jasmonate and salicylic acid, suggesting that CnHMGS was elicitor-responsive. The characterization and expression analysis of CnHMGS is helpful to understand the biosynthesis of sesquiterpenoid in C. nobile at the molecular level and also provides molecular wealth for the biotechnological improvement of this important medicinal plant.

  14. Genome-Wide Identification and Comparative Analysis of the 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase (HMGR Gene Family in Gossypium

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    Wei Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Terpenes are the largest and most diverse class of secondary metabolites in plants and play a very important role in plant adaptation to environment. 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR is a rate-limiting enzyme in the process of terpene biosynthesis in the cytosol. Previous study found the HMGR genes underwent gene expansion in Gossypium raimondii, but the characteristics and evolution of the HMGR gene family in Gossypium genus are unclear. In this study, genome-wide identification and comparative study of HMGR gene family were carried out in three Gossypium species with genome sequences, i.e., G. raimondii, Gossypium arboreum, and Gossypium hirsutum. In total, nine, nine and 18 HMGR genes were identified in G. raimondii, G. arboreum, and G. hirsutum, respectively. The results indicated that the HMGR genes underwent gene expansion and a unique gene cluster containing four HMGR genes was found in all the three Gossypium species. The phylogenetic analysis suggested that the expansion of HMGR genes had occurred in their common ancestor. There was a pseudogene that had a 10-bp deletion resulting in a frameshift mutation and could not be translated into functional proteins in G. arboreum and the A-subgenome of G. hirsutum. The expression profiles of the two pseudogenes showed that they had tissue-specific expression. Additionally, the expression pattern of the pseudogene in the A-subgenome of G. hirsutum was similar to its paralogous gene in the D-subgenome of G. hirsutum. Our results provide useful information for understanding cytosolic terpene biosynthesis in Gossypium species.

  15. Differential induction and suppression of potato 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase genes in response to Phytophthora infestans and to its elicitor arachidonic acid.

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    Choi, D; Ward, B L; Bostock, R M

    1992-10-01

    Induction of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) is essential for the biosynthesis of sesquiterpenoid phytoalexins and steroid derivatives in Solanaceous plants following stresses imposed by wounding and pathogen infection. To better understand this complex step in stress-responsive isoprenoid synthesis, we isolated three classes of cDNAS encoding HMGR (hmg1, hmg2, and hmg3) from a potato tuber library using a probe derived from an Arabidopsis HMGR cDNA. The potato cDNAs had extensive homology in portions of the protein coding regions but had low homology in the 3' untranslated regions. RNA gel blot analyses using gene-specific probes showed that hmg1 was strongly induced in tuber tissue by wounding, but the wound induction was strongly suppressed by treatment of the tissue with the fungal elicitor arachidonic acid or by inoculation with an incompatible or compatible race of the fungal pathogen Phytophtora infestans. The hmg2 and hmg3 mRNAs also accumulated in response to wounding, but in contrast to hmg1, these mRNAs were strongly enhanced by arachidonic acid or inoculation. Inoculation with a compatible race of P. infestans resulted in similar patterns in HMGR gene expression of hmg2 and hmg3 except that the magnitude and rate of the changes in mRNA levels were reduced relative to the incompatible interaction. The differential regulation of members of the HMGR gene family may explain in part the previously reported changes in HMGR enzyme activities following wounding and elicitor treatment. The suppression of hmg1 and the enhancement of hmg2 and hmg3 transcript levels following elicitor treatment or inoculation with the incompatible race parallel the suppression in steroid and stimulation of sesquiterpenoid accumulations observed in earlier investigations. The results are discussed in relation to the hypothesis that there are discrete organizational channels for sterol and sesquiterpene biosynthesis in potato and other Solanaceous species.

  16. Proliferation and Morphogenesis of the Endoplasmic Reticulum Driven by the Membrane Domain of 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase in Plant Cells.

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    Ferrero, Sergi; Grados-Torrez, Ricardo Enrique; Leivar, Pablo; Antolín-Llovera, Meritxell; López-Iglesias, Carmen; Cortadellas, Nuria; Ferrer, Joan Carles; Campos, Narciso

    2015-07-01

    The enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) has a key regulatory role in the mevalonate pathway for isoprenoid biosynthesis and is composed of an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-anchoring membrane domain with low sequence similarity among eukaryotic kingdoms and a conserved cytosolic catalytic domain. Organized smooth endoplasmic reticulum (OSER) structures are common formations of hypertrophied tightly packed ER membranes devoted to specific biosynthetic and secretory functions, the biogenesis of which remains largely unexplored. We show that the membrane domain of plant HMGR suffices to trigger ER proliferation and OSER biogenesis. The proliferating membranes become highly enriched in HMGR protein, but they do not accumulate sterols, indicating a morphogenetic rather than a metabolic role for HMGR. The N-terminal MDVRRRPP motif present in most plant HMGR isoforms is not required for retention in the ER, which was previously proposed, but functions as an ER morphogenic signal. Plant OSER structures are morphologically similar to those of animal cells, emerge from tripartite ER junctions, and mainly build up beside the nuclear envelope, indicating conserved OSER biogenesis in high eukaryotes. Factors other than the OSER-inducing HMGR construct mediate the tight apposition of the proliferating membranes, implying separate ER proliferation and membrane association steps. Overexpression of the membrane domain of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) HMGR leads to ER hypertrophy in every tested cell type and plant species, whereas the knockout of the HMG1 gene from Arabidopsis, encoding its major HMGR isoform, causes ER aggregation at the nuclear envelope. Our results show that the membrane domain of HMGR contributes to ER morphogenesis in plant cells. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  17. The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme-A reductases from fungi: a proposal as a therapeutic target and as a study model.

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    Andrade-Pavón, Dulce; Sánchez-Sandoval, Eugenia; Rosales-Acosta, Blanca; Ibarra, José Antonio; Tamariz, Joaquín; Hernández-Rodríguez, César; Villa-Tanaca, Lourdes

    2014-01-01

    The enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme-A reductase (HMGR) catalyzes the conversion of HMG-Co-A into mevalonate. This step is the limiting point for the synthesis of cholesterol in mammals and ergosterol in fungi. We describe in this article the genome organization of HMGR coding genes and those deduced from different fungi, recount the evidence showing statins as HMGR inhibitors for ergosterol synthesis and its effect in yeast viability, and propose fungal HMGR (HMGRf) as a model to study the use of pharmaceutical compounds to inhibit cholesterol and ergosterol synthesis. Bibliographical search and bioinformatic analyses were performed and discussed. HMGRfs belong to the class I with a high homology in the catalytic region. The sterol biosynthetic pathway in humans and fungi share many enzymes in the initial steps (such as the HMGR enzyme), but in the last steps enzymes are different rendering the two final products: cholesterol in mammals and ergosterol in fungi. With regards to inhibitors such as statins and other compounds, these affect also fungal viability. Since HMGR from Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Ustilago maydis are very similar to the human HMGR in the catalytic regions, we propose that fungal enzymes can be used to test inhibitors for a potential use in humans. We consider that HMGRf is a good therapeutic target to design and test new antifungal compounds. This manuscript is part of the series of works presented at the "V International Workshop: Molecular genetic approaches to the study of human pathogenic fungi" (Oaxaca, Mexico, 2012). Copyright © 2013 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. Regulation of low-density lipoprotein receptor and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase expression by Zingiber officinale in the liver of high-fat diet-fed rats.

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    Nammi, Srinivas; Kim, Moon S; Gavande, Navnath S; Li, George Q; Roufogalis, Basil D

    2010-05-01

    Zingiber officinale has been used to control lipid disorders and reported to possess remarkable cholesterol-lowering activity in experimental hyperlipidaemia. In the present study, the effect of a characterized and standardized extract of Zingiber officinale on the hepatic lipid levels as well as on the hepatic mRNA and protein expression of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase was investigated in a high-fat diet-fed rat model. Rats were treated with an ethanol extract of Zingiber officinale (400 mg/kg) extract along with a high-fat diet for 6 weeks. The extract of Zingiber officinale significantly decreased hepatic triglyceride and tended to decrease hepatic cholesterol levels when administered over 6 weeks to the rats fed a high-fat diet. We found that in parallel, the extract up-regulated both LDL receptor mRNA and protein level and down-regulated HMG-CoA reductase protein expression in the liver of these rats. The metabolic control of body lipid homeostasis is in part due to enhanced cholesterol biosynthesis and reduced expression of LDL receptor sites following long-term consumption of high-fat diets. The present results show restoration of transcriptional and post-transcriptional changes in low-density lipoprotein and HMG CoA reductase by Zingiber officinale administration with a high-fat diet and provide a rational explanation for the effect of ginger in the treatment of hyperlipidaemia.

  19. Two SNF1-Related Protein Kinases from Spinach Leaf Phosphorylate and Inactivate 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl-Coenzyme A Reductase, Nitrate Reductase, and Sucrose Phosphate Synthase in Vitro1

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    Sugden, Christopher; Donaghy, Paul G.; Halford, Nigel G.; Hardie, D. Grahame

    1999-01-01

    We resolved from spinach (Spinacia oleracea) leaf extracts four Ca2+-independent protein kinase activities that phosphorylate the AMARAASAAALARRR (AMARA) and HMRSAMSGLHLVKRR (SAMS) peptides, originally designed as specific substrates for mammalian AMP-activated protein kinase and its yeast homolog, SNF1. The two major activities, HRK-A and HRK-C (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase kinase A and C) were extensively purified and shown to be members of the plant SnRK1 (SNF1-related protein kinase 1) family using the following criteria: (a) They contain 58-kD polypeptides that cross-react with an antibody against a peptide sequence characteristic of the SnRK1 family; (b) they have similar native molecular masses and specificity for peptide substrates to mammalian AMP-activated protein kinase and the cauliflower homolog; (c) they are inactivated by homogeneous protein phosphatases and can be reactivated using the mammalian upstream kinase; and (d) they phosphorylate 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase from Arabidopsis at the inactivating site, serine (Ser)-577. We propose that HRK-A and HRK-C represent either distinct SnRK1 isoforms or the same catalytic subunit complexed with different regulatory subunits. Both kinases also rapidly phosphorylate nitrate reductase purified from spinach, which is associated with inactivation of the enzyme that is observed only in the presence of 14-3-3 protein, a characteristic of phosphorylation at Ser-543. Both kinases also inactivate spinach sucrose phosphate synthase via phosphorylation at Ser-158. The SNF1-related kinases therefore potentially regulate several major biosynthetic pathways in plants: isoprenoid synthesis, sucrose synthesis, and nitrogen assimilation for the synthesis of amino acids and nucleotides. PMID:10318703

  20. 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase kinase and sucrose-phosphate synthase kinase activities in cauliflower florets: Ca2+ dependence and substrate specificities.

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    Toroser, D; Huber, S C

    1998-07-15

    Plant 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase(HMGR; EC 1.1.1.34) and sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPS; EC 2.4.1.14) and synthetic peptides designed from the known phosphorylation sites of plant HMGR (SAMS*: KSHMKYNRSTKDVK), rat acetyl-CoA carboxylase (SAMS: HMRSAMSGLHLVKRR), spinach SPS (SP2: GRRJRRISSVEJJDKK), and spinach NADH:nitrate reductase (NR6: GPTLKRTASTPFJNTTSK) were used to characterize kinase activities from cauliflower (Brassica oleracea L. ) inflorescences. The three major peaks of protein kinase activity resolved by anion-exchange FPLC are homologs of those observed previously in spinach leaves and thus are designated PKI, PKIV, and PKIII, listed in order of elution. PKIV was the most active in terms of phosphorylation and inactivation of recombinant Nicotiana HMGR and was also strictly Ca2+ dependent. The novel aspects are that PKIII has not been detected in previous cauliflower studies, that SAMS* is a more specific peptide substrate to identify potential HMGR kinases, and that the major HMGR kinase in cauliflower is Ca2+ dependent. Of the three major kinases that phosphorylated the SP2 peptide only PKI (partially Ca2+ sensitive) and PKIII (Ca2+ insensitive) inactivated native spinach leaf SPS. Cauliflower extracts contained endogenous SPS that was inactivated by endogenous kinase(s) in an ATP-dependent manner and this may be one of the substrate target proteins for PKI and/or PKIII. The substrate specificity of the three kinase peaks was studied using synthetic peptide variants of the SP2 sequence. All three kinases had a strong preference for peptides with a basic residue at P-6 (as in SP2 and SAMS*; SAMS has a free amino terminus at this position) or a Pro at P-7 (as in NR6). This requirement for certain residues at P-6 or P-7 was not recognized in earlier studies but appears to be a general requirement. In plant HMGR, a conserved His residue at P-6 is involved directly in catalysis and this may explain why substrates reduced HMGR phosphorylation

  1. DIETARY-CHOLESTEROL INDUCED DOWN-REGULATION OF INTESTINAL 3-HYDROXY-3-METHYLGLUTARYL COENZYME-A REDUCTASE-ACTIVITY IS DIMINISHED IN RABBITS WITH HYPERRESPONSE OF SERUM-CHOLESTEROL TO DIETARY-CHOLESTEROL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MEIJER, GW; SMIT, MJ; VANDERPALEN, JGP; KUIPERS, F; VONK, RJ; VANZUTPHEN, BFM; BEYNEN, AC

    Key enzymes of cholesterol metabolism were studied in two inbred strains of rabbits with hyper- or hyporesponse of serum cholesterol to dietary cholesterol. Baseline 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl (HMG)CoA reductase activity in liver was similar in hypo- and hyperresponders, but that in intestine was

  2. Acyl-CoA: cholesterol acyltransferase and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase in carp-liver microsomes: effect of cold acclimation on enzyme activities and on hepatic and plasma lipid composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichert, T; Wodtke, E

    1992-12-02

    Hepatic microsomal activities of acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase, rate-limiting enzymes in cholesterol esterification and cholesterol synthesis, and the concentration sand compartmentalization of esterified and unesterified cholesterol, were studied in carp acclimated to 10 and 30 degrees C. Irrespective of acclimation temperature, carp-liver ACAT is characterized by an apparent Km-value for oleoyl-CoA of 11-15 microM and displays an optimum activity at pH 7.4. The enzyme activity is reduced approx. 2-fold upon preincubation of microsomes with alkaline phosphatase. Arrhenius plots of ACAT-activity are curvilinear, with curvatures considerably affected by the acclimation temperature of the fish. Carp HMG-CoA reductase has been characterized previously by Teichert and Wodtke ((1987) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 920, 161-170). When measured at 30 degrees C, ACAT activities from 30 degrees C- and 10 degrees C-acclimated carp are identical (approx. 6 pmol/min per mg protein), whilst 'expressed' HMG-CoA reductase activity (18.1 +/- 12.2 pmol/min per mg protein for 30 degrees C-acclimated carp vs. 159.8 +/- 106.6 pmol/min per mg protein for 10 degrees C-acclimated carp) is enhanced 9-fold in the cold environment. This disparity indicates that cold-acclimation results in a massive increase in the capacity for hepatic cholesterol synthesis relative to hepatic cholesterol esterification. At the same time, hepatic compositional analysis reveals identical contents of unesterified cholesterol in either groups of carp but significantly decreased (3-fold) amounts in cholesterol ester (and also in triacylglycerol, 4-fold) in cold-acclimated carp. Moreover, microsomal fractions display lower cholesterol to phospholipid ratios in the cold. In contrast, concentrations of either cholesterol fractions (and of triacylglycerols) in plasma--the mobile compartment for lipoprotein transport--do not differ in cold- and warm

  3. Kinetic properties and inhibition of Trypanosoma cruzi 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hurtado-Guerrrero, Ramón; Pena Diaz, Javier; Montalvetti, Andrea

    2002-01-01

    A detailed kinetic analysis of the recombinant soluble enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase (HMGR) from Trypanosoma cruzi has been performed. The enzyme catalyzes the normal anabolic reaction and the reductant is NADPH. It also catalyzes the oxidation of mevalonate but at a lower...

  4. A soluble 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase in the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena Diaz, Javier; Montalvetti, A; Camacho, A

    1997-01-01

    We report the isolation and characterization of a genomic clone containing the open reading frame sequence for 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase from Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas' disease. The protozoan gene encoded for a smaller polypeptide than the rest...... sensitive to proteolytic inactivation. Furthermore the enzyme can be efficiently overexpressed in a highly active form by using the expression vector pET-11c. Thus Trypanosoma cruzi HMG-CoA reductase is unique in the sense that it totally lacks the membrane-spanning sequences present in all eukaryotic HMG...... cellular distribution of enzymic activity was investigated after differential centrifugation of Trypanosoma cell extracts. Reductase activity was primarily associated with the cellular soluble fraction because 95% of the total cellular activity was recovered in the supernatant and was particularly...

  5. 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl flavone glycosides from the leaves of Turpinia arguta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shuang-Gang; Yuan, Shao-Peng; Liu, Yun-Bao; Qu, Jing; Li, Yong; Wang, Xiao-Jing; Wang, Ru-Bing; Xu, Song; Hou, Qi; Yu, Shi-Shan

    2018-01-01

    Three new 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl (HMG) flavone 7-O-diglycosides, argutosides A-C (1-3); two new flavone 7-O-triglycosides, argutosides D-E (4-5); and one known apigenin 7-O-triglycoside (6), were isolated from the leaves of Turpinia arguta. The structures of these compounds were elucidated by spectroscopic and chemical techniques. The NO inhibitory activities of compounds 1-6 were evaluated using lipopolysaccharide-induced RAW264.7 cells. Only compound 2 showed a moderate inhibitory effect on NO production with an IC 50 value of 25.74μM. Compounds 1-6 were not cytotoxic to RAW264.7 cells at 10μM. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Mutations underlying 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl CoA Lyase deficiency in the Saudi population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashed Mohammed S

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaric aciduria (3HMG, McKusick: 246450 is an autosomal recessive branched chain organic aciduria caused by deficiency of the enzyme 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl CoA lyase (HL, HMGCL, EC 4.1.3.4. HL is encoded by HMGCL gene and many mutations have been reported. 3HMG is commonly observed in Saudi Arabia. Methods We utilized Whole Genome Amplification (WGA, PCR and direct sequencing to identify mutations underlying 3HMG in the Saudi population. Two patients from two unrelated families and thirty-four 3HMG positive dried blood spots (DBS were included. Results We detected the common missense mutation R41Q in 89% of the tested alleles (64 alleles. 2 alleles carried the frame shift mutation F305fs (-2 and the last two alleles had a novel splice site donor IVS6+1G>A mutation which was confirmed by its absence in more than 100 chromosomes from the normal population. All mutations were present in a homozygous state, reflecting extensive consanguinity. The high frequency of R41Q is consistent with a founder effect. Together the three mutations described account for >94% of the pathogenic mutations underlying 3HMG in Saudi Arabia. Conclusion Our study provides the most extensive genotype analysis on 3HMG patients from Saudi Arabia. Our findings have direct implications on rapid molecular diagnosis, prenatal and pre-implantation diagnosis and population based prevention programs directed towards 3HMG.

  7. Characterization, Function, and Transcriptional Profiling Analysis of 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA Synthase Gene (GbHMGS1) towards Stresses and Exogenous Hormone Treatments in Ginkgo biloba

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xiangxiang Meng; Qiling Song; Jiabao Ye; Lanlan Wang; Feng Xu

    2017-01-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase (HMGS) is one of the rate-limiting enzymes in the mevalonate pathway as it catalyzes the condensation of acetoacetyl-CoA to form 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA...

  8. Cloning and Characterisation of the Gene Encoding 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl-CoA Synthase in Tripterygium wilfordii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jia Liu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Tripterygium wilfordii is a traditional Chinese medical plant used to treat rheumatoid arthritis and cancer. The main bioactive compounds of the plant are diterpenoids and triterpenoids. 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase (HMGS catalyses the reaction of acetoacetyl-CoA to 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA, which is the first committed enzyme in the mevalonate (MVA pathway. The sequence information of HMGS in Tripterygium wilfordii is a basic resource necessary for studying the terpenoids in the plant. In this paper, full-length cDNA encoding HMGS was isolated from Tripterygium wilfordii (abbreviated TwHMGS, GenBank accession number: KM978213. The full length of TwHMGS is 1814 bp, and the gene encodes a protein with 465 amino acids. Sequence comparison revealed that TwHMGS exhibits high similarity to HMGSs of other plants. The tissue expression patterns revealed that the expression level of TwHMGS is highest in the stems and lowest in the roots. Induced expression of TwHMGS can be induced by MeJA, and the expression level is highest 4 h after induction. The functional complement assays in the YML126C knockout yeast demonstrated that TwHMGS participates in yeast terpenoid biosynthesis.

  9. Differential interaction of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coa reductase inhibitors with ABCB1, ABCC2, and OATP1B1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cuiping; Mireles, Rouchelle J; Campbell, Scott D; Lin, Jian; Mills, Jessica B; Xu, Jinghai J; Smolarek, Teresa A

    2005-04-01

    The present study examined the interaction of four 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (atorvastatin, lovastatin, and simvastatin in acid and lactone forms, and pravastatin in acid form only) with multidrug resistance gene 1 (MDR1, ABCB1) P-glycoprotein, multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2, ABCC2), and organic anion-transporting polypeptide 1B1 (OATP1B1, SLCO21A6). P-glycoprotein substrate assays were performed using Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells expressing MDR1, and the efflux ratios [the ratio of the ratio of basolateral-to-apical apparent permeability and apical-to-basolateral permeability between MDR1 and MDCK] were 1.87, 2.32/4.46, 2.17/3.17, and 0.93/2.00 for pravastatin, atorvastatin (lactone/acid), lovastatin (lactone/acid), and simvastatin (lactone/acid), respectively, indicating that these compounds are weak or moderate substrates of P-glycoprotein. In the inhibition assays (MDR1, MRP2, Mrp2, and OATP1B1), the IC50 values for efflux transporters (MDR1, MRP2, and Mrp2) were >100 microM for all statins in acid form except lovastatin acid (>33 microM), and the IC50 values were up to 10-fold lower for the corresponding lactone forms. In contrast, the IC50 values for the uptake transporter OATP1B1 were 3- to 7-fold lower for statins in the acid form compared with the corresponding lactone form. These data demonstrate that lactone and acid forms of statins exhibit differential substrate and inhibitor activities toward efflux and uptake transporters. The interconversion between the lactone and acid forms of most statins exists in the body and will potentially influence drug-transporter interactions, and may ultimately contribute to the differences in pharmacokinetic profiles observed between statins.

  10. Mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase deficiency: urinary organic acid profiles and expanded spectrum of mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitt, James J; Peters, Heidi; Boneh, Avihu; Yaplito-Lee, Joy; Wieser, Stefanie; Hinderhofer, Katrin; Johnson, David; Zschocke, Johannes

    2015-05-01

    Mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA synthase (HMCS2) deficiency results in episodes of hypoglycemia and increases in fatty acid metabolites. Metabolite abnormalities described to date in HMCS2 deficiency are nonspecific and overlap with other inborn errors of metabolism, making the biochemical diagnosis of HMCS2 deficiency difficult. Urinary organic acid profiles from periods of metabolic decompensation were studied in detail in HMCS2-deficient patients from four families. An additional six unrelated patients were identified from clinical presentation and/or qualitative identification of abnormal organic acids. The diagnosis was confirmed by sequencing and deletion/duplication analysis of the HMGCS2 gene. Seven related novel organic acids were identified in urine profiles. Five of them (3,5-dihydroxyhexanoic 1,5 lactone; trans-5-hydroxyhex-2-enoate; 4-hydroxy-6-methyl-2-pyrone; 5-hydroxy-3-ketohexanoate; 3,5-dihydroxyhexanoate) were identified by comparison with synthesized or commercial authentic compounds. We provisionally identified trans-3-hydroxyhex-4-enoate and 3-hydroxy-5-ketohexanoate by their mass spectral characteristics. These metabolites were found in samples taken during periods of decompensation and normalized when patients recovered. When cutoffs of adipic >200 and 4-hydroxy-6-methyl-2-pyrone >20 μmol/mmol creatinine were applied, all eight samples taken from five HMCS2-deficient patients during episodes of decompensation were flagged with a positive predictive value of 80% (95% confidence interval 35-100%). Some ketotic patients had increased 4-hydroxy-6-methyl-2-pyrone. Molecular studies identified a total of 12 novel mutations, including a large deletion of HMGCS2 exon 1 in two families, highlighting the need to perform quantitative gene analyses. There are now 26 known HMGCS2 mutations, which are reviewed in the text. 4-Hydroxy-6-methyl-2-pyrone and related metabolites are markers for HMCS2 deficiency. Detection of these metabolites

  11. Different effects of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors on sterol synthesis in various human cell types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, A.K. van; Thiel, G.C.F. van; Huisman, R.H.; Moshage, H.; Yap, S.H.; Cohen, L.H.

    1995-01-01

    The three vastatins examined, lovastatin, simvastatin and pravastatin, are equally strong inhibitors of the sterol synthesis in human hepatocytes in culture with IC50-values of 4.1, 8.0 and 2.0 nM, respectively. However, in the human extrahepatic cells: umbilical vascular endothelial cells, retinal

  12. Enhancing production of ergosterol in Pichia pastoris GS115 by over-expression of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase from Glycyrrhiza uralensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Zhu, Xiaoqing; Li, Wendong; Wen, Hao; Gao, Ya; Liu, Yong; Liu, Chunsheng

    2014-04-01

    The rate-limiting enzyme in the mevalonic acid (MVA) pathway which can lead to triterpenoid saponin glycyrrhizic acid (GA) is 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR). In order to reveal the effect of copy number variation in the HMGR gene on the MVA pathway, the HMGR gene from Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch. (GuHMGR) was cloned and over-expressed in Pichia pastoris GS115. Six recombinant P. pastoris strains containing different copy numbers of the GuHMGR gene were obtained and the content of ergosterol was analyzed by HPLC. The results showed that all the recombinant P. pastoris strains contained more ergosterol than the negative control and the strains with 8 and 44 copies contained significantly more ergosterol than the other strains. However, as the copy number increased, the content of ergosterol showed an increasing-decreasing-increasing pattern. This study provides a rationale for increasing the content of GA through over-expressing the GuHMGR gene in cultivars of G. uralensis.

  13. The GATA and SORLIP motifs in the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase promoter of Picrorhiza kurrooa for the control of light-mediated expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawoosa, Tabasum; Gahlan, Parul; Devi, Aribam Surbala; Kumar, Sanjay

    2014-03-01

    Light upregulates the expression of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR) in Picrorhiza kurrooa, an endangered medicinal herb. Upstream sequences of HMGR of P. kurrooa (PropkHMGR) were analyzed in relation to its role in light-mediated regulation of gene expression. GATA motif in PropkHMGR exhibited stronger DNA-protein interaction with the nuclear extract of dark-exposed plants in contrast to SORLIP that exhibited stronger binding with the nuclear extract of light-exposed plants. Analysis of PropkHMGR (PropkHMGR-D1, -1,059/-1) and its deletion fragments PropkHMGR-D2 (-825/-1), PropkHMGR-D3 (-651/-1), PropkHMGR-D4 (-452/-1), and PropkHMGR-D5 (-101/-1) in Arabidopsis thaliana showed PropkHMGR to regulate gene expression [β-glucuronidase (GUS) was used as a reporter gene] at all the developmental stages but only in actively dividing tissues, excluding anthers. Whereas, PropkHMGR-D2 regulated GUS expression in relatively older seedlings but the expression was observed only in shoot apical meristem, root tips, and anthers. PropkHMGR-mediated gene expression was higher in dark as compared to that in the light in Arabidopsis across four temperatures studied. As opposed to the results in P. kurrooa, GATA motifs exhibited DNA-protein interaction with nuclear extract of light-exposed plants of Arabidopsis. SORLIP motifs in Arabidopsis also exhibited DNA-protein interaction with nuclear extract of light-exposed plants as in P. kurrooa. Data showed that (1) PropkHMGR regulated light-mediated gene expression and (2) GATA motif exhibited an inverse relationship between strength of DNA-protein interaction and the gene expression whereas the relationship was species specific for SORLIP.

  14. The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR) pathway regulates developmental cerebral-vascular stability via prenylation-dependent signalling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisa-Beygi, Shahram; Hatch, Gary; Noble, Sandra; Ekker, Marc; Moon, Thomas W

    2013-01-15

    Spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage is a debilitating form of stroke, often leading to death or permanent cognitive impairment. Many of the causative genes and the underlying mechanisms implicated in developmental cerebral-vascular malformations are unknown. Recent in vitro and in vivo studies in mice have shown inhibition of the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR) pathway to be effective in stabilizing cranial vessels. Using a combination of pharmacological and genetic approaches to specifically inhibit the HMGCR pathway in zebrafish (Danio rerio), we demonstrate a requirement for this metabolic pathway in developmental vascular stability. Here we report that inhibition of HMGCR function perturbs cerebral-vascular stability, resulting in progressive dilation of blood vessels, followed by vessel rupture, mimicking cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM)-like lesions in humans and murine models. The hemorrhages in the brain are rescued by prior exogenous supplementation with geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP), a 20-carbon metabolite of the HMGCR pathway, required for the membrane localization and activation of Rho GTPases. Consistent with this observation, morpholino-induced depletion of the β-subunit of geranylgeranyltransferase I (GGTase I), an enzyme that facilitates the post-translational transfer of the GGPP moiety to the C-terminus of Rho family of GTPases, mimics the cerebral hemorrhaging induced by the pharmacological and genetic ablation of HMGCR. In embryos with cerebral hemorrhage, the endothelial-specific expression of cdc42, a Rho GTPase involved in the regulation of vascular permeability, was significantly reduced. Taken together, our data reveal a metabolic contribution to the stabilization of nascent cranial vessels, requiring protein geranylgeranylation acting downstream of the HMGCR pathway. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Crystal Structures of Two Bacterial 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA Lyases Suggest a Common Catalytic Mechanism among a Family of TIM Barrel Metalloenzymes Cleaving Carbon-Carbon Bonds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forouhar,F.; Hussain, M.; Farid, R.; Benach, J.; Abashidze, M.; Edstrom, W.; Vorobiev, S.; Montelione, G.; Hunt, J.; et al.

    2006-01-01

    The enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) lyase catalyzes the terminal steps in ketone body generation and leucine degradation. Mutations in this enzyme cause a human autosomal recessive disorder called primary metabolic aciduria, which typically kills victims because of an inability to tolerate hypoglycemia. Here we present crystal structures of the HMG-CoA lyases from Bacillus subtilis and Brucella melitensis at 2.7 and 2.3 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. These enzymes share greater than 45% sequence identity with the human orthologue. Although the enzyme has the anticipated triose-phosphate isomerase (TIM) barrel fold, the catalytic center contains a divalent cation-binding site formed by a cluster of invariant residues that cap the core of the barrel, contrary to the predictions of homology models. Surprisingly, the residues forming this cation-binding site and most of their interaction partners are shared with three other TIM barrel enzymes that catalyze diverse carbon-carbon bond cleavage reactions believed to proceed through enolate intermediates (4-hydroxy-2-ketovalerate aldolase, 2-isopropylmalate synthase, and transcarboxylase 5S). We propose the name 'DRE-TIM metallolyases' for this newly identified enzyme family likely to employ a common catalytic reaction mechanism involving an invariant Asp-Arg-Glu (DRE) triplet. The Asp ligates the divalent cation, while the Arg probably stabilizes charge accumulation in the enolate intermediate, and the Glu maintains the precise structural alignment of the Asp and Arg. We propose a detailed model for the catalytic reaction mechanism of HMG-CoA lyase based on the examination of previously reported product complexes of other DRE-TIM metallolyases and induced fit substrate docking studies conducted using the crystal structure of human HMG-CoA lyase (reported in the accompanying paper by Fu, et al. (2006) J. Biol. Chem. 281, 7526-7532). Our model is consistent with extensive mutagenesis

  16. Characterization, Function, and Transcriptional Profiling Analysis of 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA Synthase Gene (GbHMGS1 towards Stresses and Exogenous Hormone Treatments in Ginkgo biloba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangxiang Meng

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase (HMGS is one of the rate-limiting enzymes in the mevalonate pathway as it catalyzes the condensation of acetoacetyl-CoA to form 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA. In this study, A HMGS gene (designated as GbHMGS1 was cloned from Ginkgo biloba for the first time. GbHMGS1 contained a 1422-bp open-reading frame encoding 474 amino acids. Comparative and bioinformatics analysis revealed that GbHMGS1 was extensively homologous to HMGSs from other plant species. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the GbHMGS1 belonged to the plant HMGS superfamily, sharing a common evolutionary ancestor with other HMGSs, and had a further relationship with other gymnosperm species. The yeast complement assay of GbHMGS1 in HMGS-deficient Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain YSC6274 demonstrated that GbHMGS1 gene encodes a functional HMGS enzyme. The recombinant protein of GbHMGS1 was successfully expressed in E. coli. The in vitro enzyme activity assay showed that the kcat and Km values of GbHMGS1 were 195.4 min−1 and 689 μM, respectively. GbHMGS1 was constitutively expressed in all tested tissues, including the roots, stems, leaves, female flowers, male flowers and fruits. The transcript accumulation for GbHMGS1 was highest in the leaves. Expression profiling analyses revealed that GbHMGS1 expression was induced by abiotic stresses (ultraviolet B and cold and hormone treatments (salicylic acid, methyl jasmonate, and ethephon in G. biloba, indicating that GbHMGS1 gene was involved in the response to environmental stresses and plant hormones.

  17. Pathogenic role of anti-signal recognition protein and anti-3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase antibodies in necrotizing myopathies: Myofiber atrophy and impairment of muscle regeneration in necrotizing autoimmune myopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arouche-Delaperche, Louiza; Allenbach, Yves; Amelin, Damien; Preusse, Corinna; Mouly, Vincent; Mauhin, Wladimir; Tchoupou, Gaelle Dzangue; Drouot, Laurent; Boyer, Olivier; Stenzel, Werner; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Benveniste, Olivier

    2017-04-01

    Immune-mediated necrotizing myopathies (IMNM) may be associated with either anti-signal recognition protein (SRP) or anti-3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR) antibodies (Abs), and the titer of these Abs is correlated with disease activity. We investigated whether anti-SRP and anti-HMGCR Abs could be involved in muscle damage. Muscle biopsies of patients were analyzed for atrophy and regeneration by measuring fiber size and by performing immunostaining of neonatal myosin heavy chain. To further understand the role of the Abs in the pathology, we performed muscle cell coculture with the Abs. Atrophy and regeneration were evaluated based on the myotube surface area as well as gene and cytokine profiles. In muscle biopsies of patients with anti-SRP+ and anti-HMGCR+ Abs, a large number of small fibers corresponding to both atrophic and regenerating fibers were observed. In vitro, anti-SRP and anti-HMGCR Abs induced muscle fiber atrophy and increased the transcription of MAFbx and TRIM63. In addition, the muscle fiber atrophy was associated with high levels of inflammatory cytokines: tumor necrosis factor, interleukin (IL)-6, and reactive oxygen species. In the presence of anti-SRP or anti-HMGCR Abs, mechanisms involved in muscle regeneration were also impaired due to a defect of myoblast fusion. This defect was associated with a decreased production of IL-4 and IL-13. The addition of IL-4 and/or IL-13 totally rescued fusion capacity. These data show that molecular mechanisms of atrophy and regeneration are affected and contribute to loss of muscle function occurring in IMNM. This emphasizes the potential interest of targeted therapies addressing these mechanisms. Ann Neurol 2017;81:538-548. © 2017 American Neurological Association.

  18. Expression of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, p-hydroxybenzoate-m-geranyltransferase and genes of phenylpropanoid pathway exhibits positive correlation with shikonins content in arnebia [Arnebia euchroma (Royle Johnston

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Madhu

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Geranyl pyrophosphate (GPP and p-hydroxybenzoate (PHB are the basic precursors involved in shikonins biosynthesis. GPP is derived from mevalonate (MVA and/or 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP pathway(s, depending upon the metabolite and the plant system under consideration. PHB, however, is synthesized by only phenylpropanoid (PP pathway. GPP and PHB are central moieties to yield shikonins through the synthesis of m-geranyl-p-hydroxybenzoate (GHB. Enzyme p-hydroxybenzoate-m-geranyltransferase (PGT catalyses the coupling of GPP and PHB to yield GHB. The present research was carried out in shikonins yielding plant arnebia [Arnebia euchroma (Royle Johnston], wherein no molecular work has been reported so far. The objective of the work was to identify the preferred GPP synthesizing pathway for shikonins biosynthesis, and to determine the regulatory genes involved in the biosynthesis of GPP, PHB and GHB. Results A cell suspension culture-based, low and high shikonins production systems were developed to facilitate pathway identification and finding the regulatory gene. Studies with mevinolin and fosmidomycin, inhibitors of MVA and MEP pathway, respectively suggested MVA as a preferred route of GPP supply for shikonins biosynthesis in arnebia. Accordingly, genes of MVA pathway (eight genes, PP pathway (three genes, and GHB biosynthesis were cloned. Expression studies showed down-regulation of all the genes in response to mevinolin treatment, whereas gene expression was not influenced by fosmidomycin. Expression of all the twelve genes vis-à-vis shikonins content in low and high shikonins production system, over a period of twelve days at frequent intervals, identified critical genes of shikonins biosynthesis in arnebia. Conclusion A positive correlation between shikonins content and expression of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (AeHMGR and AePGT suggested critical role played by these genes in shikonins

  19. Ethanol extract of Zhongtian hawthorn lowers serum cholesterol in mice by inhibiting transcription of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase via nuclear factor-kappa B signal pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hai-Jie; Luo, Xue-Gang; Dong, Qing-Qing; Mu, Ai; Shi, Guo-Long; Wang, Qiu-Tong; Chen, Xiao-Ying; Zhou, Hao; Zhang, Tong-Cun; Pan, Li-Wen

    2016-03-01

    Hawthorn is a berry-like fruit from the species of Crataegus. In China, it has another more famous name, Shan-Zha, which has been used to improve digestion as a traditional Chinese medicine or food for thousands of years. Moreover, during the last decades, hawthorn has received more attention because of its potential to treat cardiovascular diseases. However, currently, only fruits of C. pinnatifida and C. pinnatifida var. major are included as Shan-Zha in the Chinese Pharmacopoeia. In this study, our results showed that the ethanol extract of Zhongtian hawthorn, a novel grafted cultivar of C. cuneata (wild Shan-Zha), could markedly reduce body weight and levels of serum total cholesterol, triglyceride, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and liver cholesterol of hyperlipidemia mice. It could suppress the stimulation effect of high-fat diet on the transcription of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR) and p65, and counteract the downregulation of CYP7A1 and LDLR. In addition, the results of luciferase reporter assay and Western blot showed that the transcriptional activity of HMGCR promoter was inhibited by Zhongtian hawthorn ethanol extract in a dose-dependent manner, while overexpression of p65 could reverse this transcriptional repression effect. These results suggested that Zhongtian hawthorn could provide health benefits by counteracting the high-fat diet-induced hypercholesteolemic and hyperlipidemic effects in vivo, and the mechanism underlying this event was mainly dependent on the suppressive effect of Zhongtian hawthorn ethanol extract on the transcription of HMGCR via nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) signal pathway. Therefore, this novel cultivar of hawthorn cultivar which has much bigger fruits, early bearing, high yield, cold resistance, and drought resistance, might be considered as a good alternative to Shan-Zha and has great value in the food and medicine industry. In addition, to our best knowledge, this is also the first report that the

  20. Inhibition of carnitine palmitoyltransferase leads to induction of 3-hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase activity in rat liver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Jansen (Hans); N. Hoogerbrugge van der Linden (N.); W.C. Hülsmann (William)

    1990-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract The relation between carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) activity and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase activity was investigated. Rats were treated with aminocarnitine or 1-carnitine overnight. In rats, in which CPT activity was inhibited by

  1. Deficiência da 3-OH-3-metil-glutaril-CoA-liase como causa de coma no período neonatal: relato de caso 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA-lyase deficiency as coma etiology in the neonatal period: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ERASMO BARBANTE CASELLA

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available Estudamos um paciente que apresentou dois episódios de coma no primeiro mês de vida, com descompensação metabólica, nos quais se observou hipoglicemia e acidose metabólica acentuada, sem cetonúria. O estudo dos ácidos orgânicos urinários demonstrou elevação acentuada de 3-OH-3-metil-glutárico, 3-metil-glutacônico, 3-metil-glutárico e 3-OH-isovalérico. Os sinais e sintomas clínicos associados às alterações metabólicas citadas permitiram o diagnóstico da deficiência da 3-OH-3-metil-glutaril-CoA-liase, entidade de origem autossômica recessiva, passível de ser tratada, como no caso estudado, com dieta hipoproteica, restrita em leucina, hipogordurosa e rica em carboidratos, associada a L-carnitina e evitando-se períodos prolongados de jejum.We report a patient that presented two episodes of coma in the neonatal period, with severe metabolic acidosis and hypoglycemia, without ketosis. The urinary organic acid analysis showed increased amounts of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaric, 3-methylglutaconic, 3-methylglutaric and 3-hydroxyisovaleric acid. The deficiency of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase was diagnosed by the clinical and metabolic features. This disease shows autosomal recessive inheritance and the treatment is done by a diet with restriction of protein (mainly leucine and lipids, high in carbohydrate content, and the avoidance of fasting and carnitine supplementation.

  2. Polyunsaturated fatty acyl-coenzyme As are inhibitors of cholesterol biosynthesis in zebrafish and mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santhosh Karanth

    2013-11-01

    Lipid disorders pose therapeutic challenges. Previously we discovered that mutation of the hepatocyte β-hydroxybutyrate transporter Slc16a6a in zebrafish causes hepatic steatosis during fasting, marked by increased hepatic triacylglycerol, but not cholesterol. This selective diversion of trapped ketogenic carbon atoms is surprising because acetate and acetoacetate can exit mitochondria and can be incorporated into both fatty acids and cholesterol in normal hepatocytes. To elucidate the mechanism of this selective diversion of carbon atoms to fatty acids, we fed wild-type and slc16a6a mutant animals high-protein ketogenic diets. We find that slc16a6a mutants have decreased activity of the rate-limiting enzyme of cholesterol biosynthesis, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (Hmgcr, despite increased Hmgcr protein abundance and relative incorporation of mevalonate into cholesterol. These observations suggest the presence of an endogenous Hmgcr inhibitor. We took a candidate approach to identify such inhibitors. First, we found that mutant livers accumulate multiple polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs and PUFA-CoAs, and we showed that human HMGCR is inhibited by PUFA-CoAs in vitro. Second, we injected mice with an ethyl ester of the PUFA eicosapentaenoic acid and observed an acute decrease in hepatic Hmgcr activity, without alteration in Hmgcr protein abundance. These results elucidate a mechanism for PUFA-mediated cholesterol lowering through direct inhibition of Hmgcr.

  3. Up-regulation of acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) in nephrotic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaziri, Nosratola D; Liang, Kaihui

    2002-05-01

    We have previously demonstrated that hypercholesterolemia in rats with puromycin-induced nephrotic syndrome (NS) is associated with up-regulation of hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase and relative down-regulation of cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (Ch-7alpha), which represent the rate-limiting steps in cholesterol biosynthesis and catabolism. Expression of HMG-CoA reductase is inhibited and Ch-7alpha is augmented by intracellular free cholesterol, which is avidly esterified by acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT). Therefore, we hypothesized that NS may result in up-regulation of hepatic ACAT. Hepatic tissue ACAT mRNA (Northern blot), protein (Western blot) and enzymatic activity were determined in rats with puromycin-induced NS, placebo-treated control rats and Nagase hypoalbuminemic (NAG) rats. The NS group exhibited heavy proteinuria, hypoalbuminemia, normal creatinine clearance, severe hypercholesterolemia and hypertriglyceridemia. Despite severe hypoalbuminemia, NAG rats with inherited hypoalbuminemia exhibited only a mild elevation of plasma cholesterol and triglycerides. Severe hypercholesterolemia in the NS group was coupled with depressed liver tissue free cholesterol concentration and marked increases in hepatic ACAT mRNA, protein and enzymatic activity. In contrast, ACAT mRNA and protein contents of the liver were normal and ACAT activity was mildly elevated in the NAG group. NS results in marked up-regulation of hepatic ACAT, which is primarily due to proteinuria and not hypoalbuminemia, since the latter alone, as seen in NAG rats, does not significantly impact ACAT expression. Elevated ACAT in NS can contribute to dysregulation of cholesterol biosynthesis and catabolism by limiting the normal cholesterol signaling involved in regulation of these processes.

  4. Efficacy of Acetylshikonin in Preventing Obesity and Hepatic Steatosis in db/db Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Ling Su

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Zicao (Lithospermum erythrorhizon has been used in clinics as a traditional Chinese medicine for thousands of years. Acetylshikonin (AS is the main ingredient of Zicao, Xinjiang, China. The objective of this study was to investigate the anti-obesity and anti-nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD efficacy of AS in a model of spontaneous obese db/db mice. Mice were divided into Wild Type (WT groups and db/db groups, which received no treatment or treatment with 100 mg/kg/day clenbuterol (CL hydrochloride or 540 mg/kg/day AS by oral gavage for eight weeks. The results provided the evidence that AS prevented obesity and NAFLD including reduction in body weight, food efficiency ratio, serum triglyceride (TG and free fatty acid (FFA levels in db/db mice. Administration of AS markedly suppressed the levels of hepatic alanine aminotransferase (ALT, aspartate aminotransferase (AST and pro-inflammatory cytokines in treated groups when compared with that of db/db groups. Further investigation of the lipid synthesis-related protein using Western blotting revealed that hepatic protein expression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 (SREBP-1, fatty acid synthetase (FAS and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR were significantly downregulated by AS treatment. These findings suggest that AS exerts anti-obesity and anti-NAFLD effects through the regulation of lipid metabolism and anti-inflammatory effects.

  5. Regulation of hepatic 7 alpha-hydroxylase expression by dietary psyllium in the hamster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, J D; Cuthbert, J A; Spady, D K

    1994-01-01

    Soluble fiber consistently lowers plasma total and low density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol concentrations in humans and various animal models including the hamster; however, the mechanism of this effect remains incompletely defined. We performed studies to determine the activity of dietary psyllium on hepatic 7 alpha-hydroxylase, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA) reductase and LDL receptor expression in the hamster. In animals fed a cholesterol-free semisynthetic diet containing 7.5% cellulose (avicel) as a fiber source, substitution of psyllium for avicel increased hepatic 7 alpha-hydroxylase activity and mRNA levels by 3-4-fold. Comparable effects on 7 alpha-hydroxylase expression were observed with 1% cholestyramine. Psyllium also increased hepatic 7 alpha-hydroxylase activity and mRNA in animals fed a diet enriched with cholesterol and triglyceride. Activation of 7 alpha-hydroxylase was associated with an increase in hepatic cholesterol synthesis that was apparently not fully compensatory since the cholesterol content of the liver declined. Although dietary psyllium did not increase hepatic LDL receptor expression in animals fed the cholesterol-free, very-low-fat diet, it did increase (or at least restore) receptor expression that had been downregulated by dietary cholesterol and triglyceride. Thus, 7.5% dietary psyllium produced effects on hepatic 7 alpha-hydroxylase and LDL metabolism that were similar to those of 1% cholestyramine. Induction of hepatic 7 alpha-hydroxylase activity by dietary psyllium may account, in large part, for the hypocholesterolemic effect of this soluble fiber. Images PMID:8182140

  6. Altered expression patterns of lipid metabolism genes in an animal model of HCV core-related, nonobese, modest hepatic steatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Ming-Ling

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Because the gene expression patterns of nonobese hepatic steatosis in affected patients remain unclear, we sought to explore these patterns using an animal model of nonobese hepatic steatosis. Methods We developed mice that conditionally express the hepatitis C virus (HCV core protein regulated by the tetracycline transactivator (tTA. Microarray analyses and reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction were performed using liver samples of both the double transgenic mice (DTM, which express both the HCV core and tTA, and single transgenic mice (STM, which express tTA alone, at 2 months of age. Functional categories of genes with altered expression were classified using gene ontology programs. Serum glucose, lipid levels, and systemic blood pressure were also measured. Results Approximately 20–30% of hepatocytes from the DTM were steatotic. No significant differences were observed in the serum glucose, lipid content, or blood pressure levels between the DTM and STM. Gene expression analyses revealed Sterol-regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP pathway activation and dysregulation of the following genes involved in lipid metabolism: 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase 1, Apolipoprotein AII, Apolipoprotein CI, acyl-CoA thioesterase I, and fatty acid binding protein 1; in mitochondrial function: solute carrier family 25 member 25 and cytochrome c oxidase subunit II; in immune reaction: complement component 3, lymphocyte antigen 6 complex, locus A, lymphocyte antigen 6 complex, locus C, lymphocyte antigen 6 complex, locus D, and lymphocyte antigen 6 complex, locus E. Conclusion Some genes of lipid metabolism, mitochondrial function, and immune reaction and the SREBP pathway are involved in HCV core-related, nonobese, modest hepatic steatosis.

  7. Characterization and regulation of Leishmania major 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montalvetti, A; Pena Diaz, Javier; Hurtado, R

    2000-01-01

    Leishmania lacks the membrane domain characteristic of eukaryotic cells but exhibits sequence similarity with eukaryotic reductases. Highly purified protein was achieved by ammonium sulphate precipitation followed by chromatography on hydroxyapatite. Kinetic parameters were determined for the protozoan...... reductase, obtaining K(m) values for the overall reaction of 40.3+/-5.8 microM for (R,S)-HMG-CoA and 81.4+/-5.3 microM for NADPH; V(max) was 33.55+/-1.8 units x mg(-1). Gel-filtration experiments suggested an apparent molecular mass of 184 kDa with subunits of 46 kDa. Finally, in order to achieve a better...... understanding of the role of this enzyme in trypanosomatids, the effect of possible regulators of isoprenoid biosynthesis in cultured promastigote cells was studied. Neither mevalonic acid nor serum sterols appear to modulate enzyme activity whereas incubation with lovastatin results in significant increases...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cause the blood to become too acidic (metabolic acidosis). If untreated, the disorder can lead to breathing ... byproducts called organic acids can result in metabolic acidosis. A shortage of ketones often leads to hypoglycemia. ...

  9. Coenzyme Q10 and statin-related myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Statins inhibit the enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, which is involved in the production of mevalonic acid in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway. This pathway also results in the production of other bioactive molecules including coenzyme Q10 (also known as ubiquinone or ubidecarenone). Coenzyme Q10 is a naturally-occurring coenzyme with antioxidant effects that is involved in electron transport in mitochondria and is thought to play a role in energy transfer in skeletal muscle. Muscle-related problems are a frequently reported adverse effect of statins, and it has been hypothesised that a reduced endogenous coenzyme Q10 concentration is a cause of statin-induced myopathy. Coenzyme Q10 supplementation has therefore been proposed to reduce the adverse muscular effects sometimes seen with statins. Here, we consider whether coenzyme Q10 has a place in the management of statin-induced myopathy. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  10. Statin Drugs Markedly Inhibit Testosterone Production by Rat Leydig Cells In Vitro: Implications for Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statin drugs lower blood cholesterol by inhibiting hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-Coenzyme-A reductase. During drug development it was shown that statins inhibit production of cholesterol in the testis. We evaluated testosterone production in vitro, using highly purified rat ...

  11. Sequential effects of a high-fiber diet with psyllium husks on the expression levels of hepatic genes and plasma lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Mei-Yen; Heng, Chew-Kiat

    2008-01-01

    We studied the sequential effects of a high-fiber diet using psyllium husks on hepatic gene expression and plasma lipid levels. C57BL/6J mice were randomly assigned to a control diet or a high-fiber diet containing 10% psyllium husks for 3 weeks (PE-3wk) and 10 weeks (PE-10wk). Oligonucleotide microarrays were used to screen the transcriptional response at both time points. Genes encoding enzymes regulating key steps of lipid metabolism were then selected for further validation by quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and their protein expression by western blot assays. Plasma cholesterol and triacylglycerol levels were reduced in both high-fiber groups. Three weeks of high-fiber feeding downregulated genes involved in lipogenesis, whereas those involved in cholesterol and bile acid synthesis were upregulated. With prolonged high-fiber feeding, genes involved in lipogenesis such as fatty acid synthase (Fasn) were then upregulated. Additional genes in cholesterol synthesis such as 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (Hmgcr) were also upregulated. At week 3, protein expression levels of Fasn were significantly lower in the high-fiber group but increased at week 10. Protein levels of Hmgcr were significantly increased in PE-10wk mice. The high-fiber diet containing psyllium husks reduced plasma total cholesterol and triacylglycerol levels. Cholesterol lowering was most likely mediated by increased bile acid synthesis. The increased transcript levels of genes related to cholesterol synthesis throughout the entire feeding period and the subsequent increased lipogenic gene transcript levels could likely suggest a regulatory mechanism to restore the lowered plasma cholesterol and triacylglycerol levels.

  12. Effects of dietary inulin, statin, and their co-treatment on hyperlipidemia, hepatic steatosis and changes in drug-metabolizing enzymes in rats fed a high-fat and high-sucrose diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugatani Junko

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rats fed a high-fat and high-sucrose (HF diet develop hepatic steatosis and hyperlipidemia. There are several reports that a change in nutritional status affects hepatic levels of drug-metabolizing enzymes. Synthetic inulin is a dietary component that completely evades glucide digestion. Supplementing a HF diet with inulin ameliorates hypertriglycemia and hepatic steatosis, but not hypercholesterolemia. This study aimed at distinguishing the effects of synthetic inulin and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitor (statin, which inhibit cholesterol biosynthesis. Methods We examined effects of co-treatment with synthetic inulin (5% and fluvastatin (0, 4, and 8 mg/kg, per os on body weight, epidydimal white adipose tissue weight, serum and hepatic lipid profiles, and hepatic cytochrome P450 (CYP mRNA and protein profiles in rats fed a standard diet or a HF diet for 3 weeks. Results Treatment with the synthetic inulin (5% or fluvastatin at 4 mg/kg (lethal dose in rats fed the HF diet, 8 mg/kg ameliorated the elevation in hepatic triacylglycerol and total cholesterol levels in rats fed the HF diet. Whereas co-treatment with the inulin (5% and fluvastatin (4 mg/kg had a tendency to more strongly suppress the elevation in serum levels of very low density lipoprotein triacylglycerol than either treatment alone, no additive or synergistic effect was found in decrease in hepatic lipid levels. Hepatic levels of CYP1A1/2 and CYP2E1 mRNA and protein and methoxyresorufin O-demethylase and ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase activities were reduced in rats fed the HF diet. The synthetic inulin alleviated the reduction in hepatic levels of CYP1A1/2 and CYP2E1 mRNA and protein more strongly than fluvastatin, and no synergistic effects were observed on co-treatment. Furthermore, hepatic levels of aryl hydrocarbon receptor mRNA were decreased in rats fed the HF diet and recovered to near normal values with the intake of dietary inulin

  13. Hepatic gene expression involved in glucose and lipid metabolism in transition cows: effects of fat mobilization during early lactation in relation to milk performance and metabolic changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, C; Hametner, C; Tuchscherer, A; Losand, B; Kanitz, E; Otten, W; Sauerwein, H; Bruckmaier, R M; Becker, F; Kanitz, W; Hammon, H M

    2013-09-01

    Insufficient feed intake during early lactation results in elevated body fat mobilization to meet energy demands for milk production. Hepatic energy metabolism is involved by increasing endogenous glucose production and hepatic glucose output for milk synthesis and by adaptation of postcalving fuel oxidation. Given that cows differ in their degree of fat mobilization around parturition, indicated by variable total liver fat concentration (LFC), the study investigated the influence of peripartum fat mobilization on hepatic gene expression involved in gluconeogenesis, fatty acid oxidation, ketogenesis, and cholesterol synthesis, as well as transcriptional factors referring to energy metabolism. German Holstein cows were grouped according to mean total LFC on d 1, 14, and 28 after parturition as low [300 mg of total fat/g of DM; n=7), indicating fat mobilization during early lactation. Cows were fed total mixed rations ad libitum and held under equal conditions. Liver biopsies were taken at d 56 and 15 before and d 1, 14, 28, and 49 after parturition to measure mRNA abundances of pyruvate carboxylase (PC); phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase; glucose-6-phosphatase; propionyl-coenzyme A (CoA) carboxylase α; carnitine palmitoyl-transferase 1A (CPT1A); acyl-CoA synthetase, long chain 1 (ASCL1); acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, very long chain; 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase 1 and 2; sterol regulatory element-binding factor 1; and peroxisome proliferator-activated factor α. Total LFC postpartum differed greatly among cows, and the mRNA abundance of most enzymes and transcription factors changed with time during the experimental period. Abundance of PC mRNA increased at parturition to a greater extent in high- and medium-LFC groups than in the low-LFC group. Significant LFC × time interactions for ACSL1 and CPT1A during the experimental period indicated variable gene expression depending on LFC after parturition. Correlations between hepatic gene expression and

  14. Simvastatin improves final visual outcome in acute optic neuritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsakiri, Anna; Kallenbach, Klaus; Fuglø, Dan

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, small-scale clinical trials have indicated that statins or 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMGCoA) reductase inhibitors exert pleiotropic immunomodulatory effects, with potential therapeutic implications in multiple sclerosis (MS)....

  15. Cholesterol metabolism, transport, and hepatic regulation in dairy cows during transition and early lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, E C; Gross, J J; Bruckmaier, R M; Albrecht, C

    2014-09-01

    The transition from the nonlactating to the lactating state represents a critical period for dairy cow lipid metabolism because body reserves have to be mobilized to meet the increasing energy requirements for the initiation of milk production. The purpose of this study was to provide a comprehensive overview on cholesterol homeostasis in transition dairy cows by assessing in parallel plasma, milk, and hepatic tissue for key factors of cholesterol metabolism, transport, and regulation. Blood samples and liver biopsies were taken from 50 multiparous Holstein dairy cows in wk 3 antepartum (a.p.), wk 1 postpartum (p.p.), wk 4 p.p., and wk 14 p.p. Milk sampling was performed in wk 1, 4, and 14 p.p. Blood and milk lipid concentrations [triglycerides (TG), cholesterol, and lipoproteins], enzyme activities (phospholipid transfer protein and lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase) were analyzed using enzymatic assays. Hepatic gene expression patterns of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMGC) synthase 1 (HMGCS1) and HMGC reductase (HMGCR), sterol regulatory element-binding factor (SREBF)-1 and -2, microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTTP), ATP-binding cassette transporter (ABC) A1 and ABCG1, liver X receptor (LXR) α and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) α and γ were measured using quantitative RT-PCR. Plasma TG, cholesterol, and lipoprotein concentrations decreased from wk 3 a.p. to a minimum in wk 1 p.p., and then gradually increased until wk 14 p.p. Compared with wk 4 p.p., phospholipid transfer protein activity was increased in wk 1 p.p., whereas lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase activity was lowest at this period. Total cholesterol concentration and mass, and cholesterol concentration in the milk fat fraction decreased from wk 1 p.p. to wk 4 p.p. Both total and milk fat cholesterol concentration were decreased in wk 4 p.p. compared with wk 1 and 14 p.p. The mRNA abundance of genes involved in cholesterol synthesis (SREBF-2, HMGCS1, and

  16. Statins: 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors demonstrate anti-atherosclerotic character due to their antioxidant capacity

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Puttananjaiah, M.H.; Dhale, M.A.; Gaonkar, V.; Keni, S.

    induced oxidative damage to biological molecules [9]. It is now recognized that free radical species are responsible for numerous types of cell damage, membrane peroxidation, DNA modification, enzyme inactivation and oxidation of proteins [10]. Free... - ). Uncontrolled, generated free radicals are very unstable and react rapidly with other chemical groups or substances in the body, leading to cell or tissue injury. Moreover, uncontrolled lipid peroxidation is involved in the occurrence of numerous chronic...

  17. Dyslipidaemia--hepatic and intestinal cross-talk.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tomkin, Gerald H

    2010-06-01

    Cholesterol metabolism is tightly regulated with the majority of de novo cholesterol synthesis occurring in the liver and intestine. 3 Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, a major enzyme involved in cholesterol synthesis, is raised in both liver and intestine in diabetic animals. Niemann PickC1-like1 protein regulates cholesterol absorption in the intestine and facilitates cholesterol transport through the liver. There is evidence to suggest that the effect of inhibition of Niemann PickC1-like1 lowers cholesterol through its effect not only in the intestine but also in the liver. ATP binding cassette proteins G5\\/G8 regulate cholesterol re-excretion in the intestine and in the liver, cholesterol excretion into the bile. Diabetes is associated with reduced ATP binding cassette protein G5\\/G8 expression in both the liver and intestine in animal models. Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein is central to the formation of the chylomicron in the intestine and VLDL in the liver. Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein mRNA is increased in diabetes in both the intestine and liver. Cross-talk between the intestine and liver is poorly documented in humans due to the difficulty in obtaining liver biopsies but animal studies are fairly consistent in showing relationships that explain in part mechanisms involved in cholesterol homeostasis.

  18. HMG-coenzyme A reductase inhibition, type 2 diabetes, and bodyweight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swerdlow, Daniel I; Preiss, David; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Statins increase the risk of new-onset type 2 diabetes mellitus. We aimed to assess whether this increase in risk is a consequence of inhibition of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR), the intended drug target. METHODS: We used single nucleotide polymorphisms in the HMGCR...

  19. HMG-coenzyme A reductase inhibition, type 2 diabetes, and bodyweight : evidence from genetic analysis and randomised trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swerdlow, Daniel I; Preiss, David; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Holmes, Michael V; Engmann, Jorgen E L; Shah, Tina; Sofat, Reecha; Stender, Stefan; Johnson, Paul C D; Scott, Robert A; Leusink, Maarten|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/357581164; Verweij, Niek; Sharp, Stephen J; Guo, Yiran; Giambartolomei, Claudia; Chung, Christina; Peasey, Anne; Amuzu, Antoinette; Li, KaWah; Palmen, Jutta; Howard, Philip; Cooper, Jackie A; Drenos, Fotios; Li, Yun R; Lowe, Gordon; Gallacher, John; Stewart, Marlene C W; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Buxbaum, Sarah G; van der A, Daphne L; Forouhi, Nita G; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Schnabel, Renate B; Hubacek, Jaroslav A; Kubinova, Ruzena; Baceviciene, Migle; Tamosiunas, Abdonas; Pajak, Andrzej; Topor-Madry, Romanvan; Stepaniak, Urszula; Malyutina, Sofia; Baldassarre, Damiano; Sennblad, Bengt; Tremoli, Elena; de Faire, Ulf; Veglia, Fabrizio; Ford, Ian; Jukema, J Wouter; Westendorp, Rudi G J; de Borst, Gert Jan; de Jong, Pim A; Algra, Ale; Spiering, Wilko; der Zee, Anke H Maitland-van|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/255164688; Klungel, Olaf H|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/181447649; de Boer, Anthonius|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/075097346; Doevendans, Pieter A; Eaton, Charles B; Robinson, Jennifer G; Duggan, David; Kjekshus, John; Downs, John R; Gotto, Antonio M; Keech, Anthony C; Marchioli, Roberto; Tognoni, Gianni; Sever, Peter S; Poulter, Neil R; Waters, David D; Pedersen, Terje R; Amarenco, Pierre; Nakamura, Haruo; McMurray, John J V; Lewsey, James D; Chasman, Daniel I; Ridker, Paul M; Maggioni, Aldo P; Tavazzi, Luigi; Ray, Kausik K; Seshasai, Sreenivasa Rao Kondapally; Manson, JoAnn E; Price, Jackie F; Whincup, Peter H; Morris, Richard W; Lawlor, Debbie A; Smith, George Davey; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Schreiner, Pamela J; Fornage, Myriam; Siscovick, David S; Cushman, Mary; Kumari, Meena; Wareham, Nick J; Verschuren, W M Monique; Redline, Susan; Patel, Sanjay R; Whittaker, John C; Hamsten, Anders; Delaney, Joseph A; Dale, Caroline; Gaunt, Tom R; Wong, Andrew; Kuh, Diana; Hardy, Rebecca; Kathiresan, Sekar; Castillo, Berta A; van der Harst, Pim; Brunner, Eric J; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Marmot, Michael G; Krauss, Ronald M; Tsai, Michael; Coresh, Josef; Hoogeveen, Ronald C; Psaty, Bruce M; Lange, Leslie A; Hakonarson, Hakon; Dudbridge, Frank; Humphries, Steve E; Talmud, Philippa J; Kivimäki, Mika; Timpson, Nicholas J; Langenberg, Claudia; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Voevoda, Mikhail; Bobak, Martin; Pikhart, Hynek; Wilson, James G; Reiner, Alex P; Keating, Brendan J; Hingorani, Aroon D; Sattar, Naveed; DIAGRAM Consortium, MAGIC Consortium, InterAct Consortium

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Statins increase the risk of new-onset type 2 diabetes mellitus. We aimed to assess whether this increase in risk is a consequence of inhibition of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR), the intended drug target. METHODS: We used single nucleotide polymorphisms in the HMGCR

  20. HMG-coenzyme A reductase inhibition, type 2 diabetes, and bodyweight : evidence from genetic analysis and randomised trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swerdlow, Daniel I.; Preiss, David; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Holmes, Michael V.; Engmann, Jorgen E. L.; Shah, Tina; Sofat, Reecha; Stender, Stefan; Johnson, Paul C. D.; Scott, Robert A.; Leusink, Maarten; Verweij, Niek; Sharp, Stephen J.; Guo, Yiran; Giambartolomei, Claudia; Chung, Christina; Peasey, Anne; Amuzu, Antoinette; Li, Kawah; Palmen, Jutta; Howard, Philip; Cooper, Jackie A.; Drenos, Fotios; Li, Yun R.; Lowe, Gordon; Gallacher, John; Stewart, Marlene C. W.; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Buxbaum, Sarah G.; Daphne, L. van der A.; Forouhi, Nita G.; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Schnabel, Renate B.; Hubacek, Jaroslav A.; Kubinova, Ruzena; Baceviciene, Migle; Tamosiunas, Abdonas; Pajak, Andrzej; Topor-Madry, Roman; Stepaniak, Urszula; Malyutina, Sofi A.; Baldassarre, Damiano; Sennblad, Bengt; Tremoli, Elena; de Faire, Ulf; Veglia, Fabrizio; Ford, Ian; Jukema, J. Wouter; Westendorp, Rudi G. J.; de Borst, Gert Jan; de Jong, Pim A.; Algra, Ale; Spiering, Wilko; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke H.; Klungel, Olaf H.; de Boer, Anthonius; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Eaton, Charles B.; Robinson, Jennifer G.; Duggan, David; Kjekshus, John; Downs, John R.; Gotto, Antonio M.; Keech, Anthony C.; Marchioli, Roberto; Tognoni, Gianni; Sever, Peter S.; Poulter, Neil R.; Waters, David D.; Pedersen, Terje R.; Amarenco, Pierre; Nakamura, Haruo; McMurray, John J. V.; Lewsey, James D.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Ridker, Paul M.; Maggioni, Aldo P.; Tavazzi, Luigi; Ray, Kausik K.; Seshasai, Sreenivasa Rao Kondapally; Manson, Joann E.; Price, Jackie F.; Whincup, Peter H.; Morris, Richard W.; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Smith, George Davey; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Schreiner, Pamela J.; Fornage, Myriam; Siscovick, David S.; Cushman, Mary; Kumari, Meena; Wareham, Nick J.; Verschuren, W. M. Monique; Redline, Susan; Patel, Sanjay R.; Whittaker, John C.; Hamsten, Anders; Delaney, Joseph A.; Dale, Caroline; Gaunt, Tom R.; Wong, Andrew; Kuh, Diana; Hardy, Rebecca; Kathiresan, Sekar; Castillo, Berta A.; van der Harst, Pim; Brunner, Eric J.; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Marmot, Michael G.; Krauss, Ronald M.; Tsai, Michael; Coresh, Josef; Hoogeveen, Ronald C.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Lange, Leslie A.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Dudbridge, Frank; Humphries, Steve E.; Talmud, Philippa J.; Kivimaeki, Mika; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Langenberg, Claudia; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Voevoda, Mikhail; Bobak, Martin; Pikhart, Hynek; Wilson, James G.; Reiner, Alex P.; Keating, Brendan J.; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Sattar, Naveed; Wijmenga, T. N.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Statins increase the risk of new-onset type 2 diabetes mellitus. We aimed to assess whether this increase in risk is a consequence of inhibition of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR), the intended drug target. METHODS: We used single nucleotide polymorphisms in the HMGCR

  1. HMG-coenzyme A reductase inhibition, type 2 diabetes, and bodyweight : Evidence from genetic analysis and randomised trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swerdlow, Daniel I.; Preiss, David; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Holmes, Michael V.; Engmann, Jorgen E L; Shah, Tina; Sofat, Reecha; Stender, Stefan; Johnson, Paul C D; Scott, Robert A.; Leusink, Maarten; Verweij, Niek; Sharp, Stephen J.; Guo, Yiran; Giambartolomei, Claudia; Chung, Christina; Peasey, Anne; Amuzu, Antoinette; Li, Kawah; Palmen, Jutta; Howard, Philip; Cooper, Jackie A.; Drenos, Fotios; Li, Yun R.; Lowe, Gordon; Gallacher, John; Stewart, Marlene C W; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Buxbaum, Sarah G.; Van Der A, Daphne L.; Forouhi, Nita G.; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/26504362X; Van Der Schouw, Yvonne T.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073449253; Schnabel, Renate B.; Hubacek, Jaroslav A.; Kubinova, Ruzena; Baceviciene, Migle; Tamosiunas, Abdonas; Pajak, Andrzej; Topor-Madry, Romanvan; Stepaniak, Urszula; Malyutina, Sofia; Baldassarre, Damiano; Sennblad, Bengt; Tremoli, Elena; De Faire, Ulf; Veglia, Fabrizio; Ford, Ian; Jukema, J. Wouter; Westendorp, Rudi G J; De Borst, Gert Jan|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/237108151; De Jong, Pim A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/287955672; Algra, Ale|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/07483472X; Spiering, Wilko|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/269114173; Der Zee, Anke H Maitland Van; Klungel, Olaf H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/181447649; De Boer, Anthonius; Doevendans, Pieter A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/164248366; Eaton, Charles B.; Robinson, Jennifer G.; Duggan, David; Kjekshus, John; Downs, John R.; Gotto, Antonio M.; Keech, Anthony C.; Marchioli, Roberto; Tognoni, Gianni; Sever, Peter S.; Poulter, Neil R.; Waters, David D.; Pedersen, Terje R.; Amarenco, Pierre; Nakamura, Haruo; McMurray, John J V; Lewsey, James D.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Ridker, Paul M.; Maggioni, Aldo P.; Tavazzi, Luigi; Ray, Kausik K.; Seshasai, Sreenivasa Rao Kondapally; Manson, Joann E.; Price, Jackie F.; Whincup, Peter H.; Morris, Richard W.; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Smith, George Davey; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Schreiner, Pamela J.; Fornage, Myriam; Siscovick, David S.; Cushman, Mary; Kumari, Meena; Wareham, Nick J.; Verschuren, W. M Monique|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/071858849; Redline, Susan; Patel, Sanjay R.; Whittaker, John C.; Hamsten, Anders; Delaney, Joseph A.; Dale, Caroline; Gaunt, Tom R.; Wong, Andrew; Kuh, Diana; Hardy, Rebecca; Kathiresan, Sekar; Castillo, Berta A.; Van Der Harst, Pim; Brunner, Eric J.; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Marmot, Michael G.; Krauss, Ronald M.; Tsai, Michael; Coresh, Josef; Hoogeveen, Ronald C.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Lange, Leslie A.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Dudbridge, Frank; Humphries, Steve E.; Talmud, Philippa J.; Kivimäki, Mika; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Langenberg, Claudia; Asselbergs, Folkert W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/270752137; Voevoda, Mikhail; Bobak, Martin; Pikhart, Hynek; Wilson, James G.; Reiner, Alex P.; Keating, Brendan J.; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Sattar, Naveed

    2015-01-01

    Background Statins increase the risk of new-onset type 2 diabetes mellitus. We aimed to assess whether this increase in risk is a consequence of inhibition of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR), the intended drug target. Methods We used single nucleotide polymorphisms in the HMGCR

  2. Stearoyl coenzyme A desaturase 1 is associated with hepatitis C virus replication complex and regulates viral replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, LN; Lim, YS; Pham, Long

    2014-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) life cycle is tightly regulated by lipid metabolism of host cells. In order to identify host factors involved in HCV propagation, we have recently screened a small interfering RNA (siRNA) library targeting host genes that control lipid metabolism and lipid droplet...... formation using cell culture-grown HCV (HCVcc)-infected cells. We selected and characterized the gene encoding stearoyl coenzyme A (CoA) desaturase 1 (SCD1). siRNA-mediated knockdown or pharmacological inhibition of SCD1 abrogated HCV replication in both subgenomic replicon and Jc1-infected cells, while...... exogenous supplementation of either oleate or palmitoleate, products of SCD1 activity, resurrected HCV replication in SCD1 knockdown cells. SCD1 was coimmunoprecipitated with HCV nonstructural proteins and colocalized with both double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) and HCV nonstructural proteins, indicating that SCD1...

  3. Properties of R-Citramalyl-Coenzyme A Lyase and Its Role in the Autotrophic 3-Hydroxypropionate Cycle of Chloroflexus aurantiacus▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedmann, Silke; Alber, Birgit E.; Fuchs, Georg

    2007-01-01

    The autotrophic CO2 fixation pathway (3-hydroxypropionate cycle) in Chloroflexus aurantiacus results in the fixation of two molecules of bicarbonate into one molecule of glyoxylate. Glyoxylate conversion to the CO2 acceptor molecule acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) requires condensation with propionyl-CoA (derived from one molecule of acetyl-CoA and one molecule of CO2) to β-methylmalyl-CoA, which is converted to citramalyl-CoA. Extracts of autotrophically grown cells contained both S- and R-citramalyl-CoA lyase activities, which formed acetyl-CoA and pyruvate. Pyruvate is taken out of the cycle and used for cellular carbon biosynthesis. Both the S- and R-citramalyl-CoA lyases were up-regulated severalfold during autotrophic growth. S-Citramalyl-CoA lyase activity was found to be due to l-malyl-CoA lyase/β-methylmalyl-CoA lyase. This promiscuous enzyme is involved in the CO2 fixation pathway, forms acetyl-CoA and glyoxylate from l-malyl-CoA, and condenses glyoxylate with propionyl-CoA to β-methylmalyl-CoA. R-Citramalyl-CoA lyase was further studied. Its putative gene was expressed and the recombinant protein was purified. This new enzyme belongs to the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase family and is a homodimer with 34-kDa subunits that was 10-fold stimulated by adding Mg2 or Mn2+ ions and dithioerythritol. The up-regulation under autotrophic conditions suggests that the enzyme functions in the ultimate step of the acetyl-CoA regeneration route in C. aurantiacus. Genes similar to those involved in CO2 fixation in C. aurantiacus, including an R-citramalyl-CoA lyase gene, were found in Roseiflexus sp., suggesting the operation of the 3-hydroxypropionate cycle in this bacterium. Incomplete sets of genes were found in aerobic phototrophic bacteria and in the γ-proteobacterium Congregibacter litoralis. This may indicate that part of the reactions may be involved in a different metabolic process. PMID:17259315

  4. Properties of R-citramalyl-coenzyme A lyase and its role in the autotrophic 3-hydroxypropionate cycle of Chloroflexus aurantiacus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedmann, Silke; Alber, Birgit E; Fuchs, Georg

    2007-04-01

    The autotrophic CO(2) fixation pathway (3-hydroxypropionate cycle) in Chloroflexus aurantiacus results in the fixation of two molecules of bicarbonate into one molecule of glyoxylate. Glyoxylate conversion to the CO(2) acceptor molecule acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) requires condensation with propionyl-CoA (derived from one molecule of acetyl-CoA and one molecule of CO(2)) to beta-methylmalyl-CoA, which is converted to citramalyl-CoA. Extracts of autotrophically grown cells contained both S- and R-citramalyl-CoA lyase activities, which formed acetyl-CoA and pyruvate. Pyruvate is taken out of the cycle and used for cellular carbon biosynthesis. Both the S- and R-citramalyl-CoA lyases were up-regulated severalfold during autotrophic growth. S-Citramalyl-CoA lyase activity was found to be due to l-malyl-CoA lyase/beta-methylmalyl-CoA lyase. This promiscuous enzyme is involved in the CO(2) fixation pathway, forms acetyl-CoA and glyoxylate from l-malyl-CoA, and condenses glyoxylate with propionyl-CoA to beta-methylmalyl-CoA. R-Citramalyl-CoA lyase was further studied. Its putative gene was expressed and the recombinant protein was purified. This new enzyme belongs to the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase family and is a homodimer with 34-kDa subunits that was 10-fold stimulated by adding Mg(2) or Mn(2+) ions and dithioerythritol. The up-regulation under autotrophic conditions suggests that the enzyme functions in the ultimate step of the acetyl-CoA regeneration route in C. aurantiacus. Genes similar to those involved in CO(2) fixation in C. aurantiacus, including an R-citramalyl-CoA lyase gene, were found in Roseiflexus sp., suggesting the operation of the 3-hydroxypropionate cycle in this bacterium. Incomplete sets of genes were found in aerobic phototrophic bacteria and in the gamma-proteobacterium Congregibacter litoralis. This may indicate that part of the reactions may be involved in a different metabolic process.

  5. Osthol regulates hepatic PPAR alpha-mediated lipogenic gene expression in alcoholic fatty liver murine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fan; Xie, Mei-lin; Xue, Jie; Wang, Heng-bin

    2010-07-01

    Our previous studies found that osthol, an active constituent isolated from Cnidium monnieri (L.) Cusson (Apiaceae), could ameliorate the accumulation of lipids and decrease the lipid levels in serum and hepatic tissue in alcohol-induced fatty liver mice and rats. The objective of this study was to investigate its possible mechanism of the lipid-lowering effect. A mouse model with alcoholic fatty liver was induced by orally feeding 52% erguotou wine by gavage when they were simultaneously treated with osthol 10, 20, 40 mg/kg for 4 weeks. The BRL cells (rat hepatocyte line) were cultured and treated with osthol at 25, 50, 100, 200 microg/ml for 24h. The mRNA expressions of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) alpha, diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT), 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase and cholesterol 7 alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A) in mouse hepatic tissue or cultured hepatocytes were determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). After treatment with osthol, the PPAR alpha mRNA expression in mouse liver and cultured hepatocytes was increased in dose dependent manner, while its related target genes for mRNA expression, e.g., DGAT and HMG-CoA reductase, were decreased, the CYP7A was inversely increased. And osthol-regulated mRNA expressions of DGAT, HMG-CoA reductase and CYP7A in the cultured hepatocytes were abrogated after pretreatment with specific inhibitor of PPAR alpha, MK886. It was concluded that osthol might regulate the gene expressions of DGAT, HMG-CoA reductase and CYP7A via increasing the PPAR alpha mRNA expression. (c) 2009 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Een vergelijking tussen de HMG-CoA reductaseremmende geneesmiddelen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Touw, D.J.; Schalekamp, T.; Van der Kuy, A.; Van Loenen, A.C.

    2000-01-01

    There are significant differences between the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme-A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors with regards to drug-drug interactions. The most important enzyme involved in these interactions is the cytochrome P450 isoenzyme CYP3A4. The major adverse affect due to drug-drug

  7. Lovastatin inhibits proliferation and differentiation and causes apoptosis in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated murine B cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reedquist, K. A.; Pope, T. K.; Roess, D. A.

    1995-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide-stimulated murine B lymphocytes were incubated with the pharmacologic drug lovastatin, a competitive inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase at concentrations ranging from 10(-5)-10(-8) M. After 48 hr, treatment with 10(-5)M lovastatin inhibited [3H]thymidine

  8. Early statin initiation and outcomes in patients with acute coronary syndromes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Newby, L.K.; Kristinsson, A.; Weaver, W.D.; Verheugt, F.W.A.; Aylward, P.; Dimas, A.P.; Moliterno, D.J.; McGuire, D.K.; Bhapkar, M.V.; Klein, W.W.; Califf, R.M.

    2002-01-01

    CONTEXT: The secondary prevention benefit of therapy with 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) has been clearly demonstrated; however, the role of early initiation of statins after acute coronary syndromes (ACSs) is unknown. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association of

  9. Haploid Mammalian Genetic Screen Identifies UBXD8 as a Key Determinant of HMGCR Degradation and Cholesterol Biosynthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loregger, Anke; Raaben, Matthijs; Tan, Josephine; Scheij, Saskia; Moeton, Martina; van den Berg, Marlene; Gelberg-Etel, Hila; Stickel, Elmer; Roitelman, Joseph; Brummelkamp, Thijn; Zelcer, Noam

    2017-01-01

    Objective-The cellular demand for cholesterol requires control of its biosynthesis by the mevalonate pathway. Regulation of HMGCR (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase), a rate-limiting enzyme in this pathway and the target of statins, is a key control point herein. Accordingly, HMGCR is

  10. Atorvastatin prevents hypoxia-induced inhibition of endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression but does not affect heme oxygenase-1 in human microvascular endothelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loboda, Agnieszka; Jazwa, Agnieszka; Jozkowicz, Alicj A.; Dorosz, Jerzy; Balla, Jozsef; Molema, Grietje; Dulak, Jozef

    Beneficial cardiovascular effects of statins, the inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, are particularly assigned to the modulation of inflammation. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) are listed among the crucial protective,

  11. Monechma ciliatum methanolic extract regulates low density ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ONOS

    2010-09-06

    Sep 6, 2010 ... Monechma ciliatum methanolic extract (MCME) obtained from Monechma ciliatum seedcake showed high total phenolic compounds with high antioxidant activity. The regulatory effects of MCME at 10, 20 and 50 µg/ml on low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A.

  12. An Onion Byproduct Affects Plasma Lipids in Healthy Rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roldan-Marin, E.; Jensen, R. I.; Krath, Britta

    2010-01-01

    lipids and on factors affecting cholesterol metabolism in healthy rats have been investigated. The OBP or its fractions did not significantly reduce cholesterol or down-regulate hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (Hmgcr) gene expression. The OR even had the effect of increasing...... that the controls could be completely separated from OBP, OE, and OR groups in the scores plot and also that OE and OR groups were separated. Plasma lipids and bile acid excretion were the discriminating loading factors for separating OE and OR but also contributed to the separation of onion-fed animals...... and controls. It was concluded that the onion byproduct did not present significant beneficial effects on individual markers related to plasma lipid transport in this healthy rat model but that onion byproduct contains factors with the ability to modulate plasma lipids and lipoprotein levels....

  13. Effects of dietary plant meal and soya-saponin supplementation on intestinal and hepatic lipid droplet accumulation and lipoprotein and sterol metabolism in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Min; Kortner, Trond M; Penn, Michael; Hansen, Anne Kristine; Krogdahl, Åshild

    2014-02-01

    Altered lipid metabolism has been shown in fish fed plant protein sources. The present study aimed to gain further insights into how intestinal and hepatic lipid absorption and metabolism are modulated by plant meal (PM) and soya-saponin (SA) inclusion in salmon feed. Post-smolt Atlantic salmon were fed for 10 weeks one of four diets based on fishmeal or PM, with or without 10 g/kg SA. PM inclusion resulted in decreased growth performance, excessive lipid droplet accumulation in the pyloric caeca and liver, and reduced plasma cholesterol levels. Intestinal and hepatic gene expression profiling revealed an up-regulation of the expression of genes involved in lipid absorption and lipoprotein (LP) synthesis (apo, fatty acid transporters, microsomal TAG transfer protein, acyl-CoA cholesterol acyltransferase, choline kinase and choline-phosphate cytidylyltransferase A), cholesterol synthesis (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase) and associated transcription factors (sterol regulatory element-binding protein 2 and PPARγ). SA inclusion resulted in reduced body pools of cholesterol and bile salts. The hepatic gene expression of the rate-limiting enzyme in bile acid biosynthesis (cytochrome P450 7A1 (cyp7a1)) as well as the transcription factor liver X receptor and the bile acid transporter abcb11 (ATP-binding cassette B11) was down-regulated by SA inclusion. A significant interaction was observed between PM inclusion and SA inclusion for plasma cholesterol levels. In conclusion, gene expression profiling suggested that the capacity for LP assembly and cholesterol synthesis was up-regulated by PM exposure, probably as a compensatory mechanism for excessive lipid droplet accumulation and reduced plasma cholesterol levels. SA inclusion had hypocholesterolaemic effects on Atlantic salmon, accompanied by decreased bile salt metabolism.

  14. Response of the cholesterol metabolism to a negative energy balance in dairy cows depends on the lactational stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Josef J; Kessler, Evelyne C; Albrecht, Christiane; Bruckmaier, Rupert M

    2015-01-01

    The response of cholesterol metabolism to a negative energy balance (NEB) induced by feed restriction for 3 weeks starting at 100 days in milk (DIM) compared to the physiologically occurring NEB in week 1 postpartum (p.p.) was investigated in 50 dairy cows (25 control (CON) and 25 feed-restricted (RES)). Blood samples, liver biopsies and milk samples were taken in week 1 p.p., and in weeks 0 and 3 of feed restriction. Plasma concentrations of total cholesterol (C), phospholipids (PL), triglycerides (TAG), very low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (VLDL-C) and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) increased in RES cows from week 0 to 3 during feed restriction and were higher in week 3 compared to CON cows. In contrast, during the physiologically occurring NEB in week 1 p.p., C, PL, TAG and lipoprotein concentrations were at a minimum. Plasma phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) and lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) activities did not differ between week 0 and 3 for both groups, whereas during NEB in week 1 p.p. PLTP activity was increased and LCAT activity was decreased. Milk C concentration was not affected by feed restriction in both groups, whereas milk C mass was decreased in week 3 for RES cows. In comparison, C concentration and mass in milk were elevated in week 1 p.p. Hepatic mRNA abundance of sterol regulatory element-binding factor-2 (SREBF-2), 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase 1 (HMGCS1), 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), and ATP-binding cassette transporter (ABCA1) were similar in CON and RES cows during feed restriction, but were upregulated during NEB in week 1 p.p. compared to the non-lactating stage without a NEB. In conclusion, cholesterol metabolism in dairy cows is affected by nutrient and energy deficiency depending on the stage of lactation.

  15. Cooked rice prevents hyperlipidemia in hamsters fed a high-fat/cholesterol diet by the regulation of the expression of hepatic genes involved in lipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Won Hee; Gwon, So Young; Ahn, Jiyun; Jung, Chang Hwa; Ha, Tae Youl

    2013-07-01

    Rice has many health-beneficial components for ameliorating obesity, diabetes, and dyslipidemia. However, the effect of cooked rice as a useful carbohydrate source has not been investigated yet; so we hypothesized that cooked rice may have hypolipidemic effects. In the present study, we investigated the effect of cooked rice on hyperlipidemia and on the expression of hepatic genes involved in lipid metabolism. Golden Syrian hamsters were divided into 2 groups and fed a high-fat (15%, wt/wt)/cholesterol (0.5%, wt/wt) diet supplemented with either corn starch (HFD, 54.5% wt/wt) or cooked rice (HFD-CR, 54.5% wt/wt) as the main carbohydrate source for 8 weeks. In the HFD-CR group, the triglyceride and total cholesterol levels in the serum and liver were decreased, and the total lipid, total cholesterol, and bile acid levels in the feces were increased, compared with the HFD group. In the cooked-rice group, the messenger RNA and protein levels of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase were significantly downregulated; and the messenger RNA and protein levels of the low-density lipoprotein receptor and cholesterol-7α-hydroxylase were upregulated. Furthermore, the expressions of lipogenic genes such as sterol response element binding protein-1, fatty acid synthase, acetyl CoA carboxylase, and stearoyl CoA desaturase-1 were downregulated, whereas the β-oxidation related genes (carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1, acyl CoA oxidase, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α) were upregulated, in the cooked-rice group. Our results suggest that the hypolipidemic effect of cooked rice is partially mediated by the regulation of hepatic genes involved in lipid metabolism, which results in the suppression of cholesterol and fatty acid synthesis and the enhancement of cholesterol excretion and fatty acid β-oxidation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Coenzyme Q10 prevents hepatic fibrosis, inflammation, and oxidative stress in a male rat model of poor maternal nutrition and accelerated postnatal growth1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarry-Adkins, Jane L; Fernandez-Twinn, Denise S; Hargreaves, Iain P; Neergheen, Viruna; Aiken, Catherine E; Martin-Gronert, Malgorzata S; McConnell, Josie M; Ozanne, Susan E

    2016-01-01

    Background: It is well established that low birth weight and accelerated postnatal growth increase the risk of liver dysfunction in later life. However, molecular mechanisms underlying such developmental programming are not well characterized, and potential intervention strategies are poorly defined. Objectives: We tested the hypotheses that poor maternal nutrition and accelerated postnatal growth would lead to increased hepatic fibrosis (a pathological marker of liver dysfunction) and that postnatal supplementation with the antioxidant coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) would prevent this programmed phenotype. Design: A rat model of maternal protein restriction was used to generate low-birth-weight offspring that underwent accelerated postnatal growth (termed “recuperated”). These were compared with control rats. Offspring were weaned onto standard feed pellets with or without dietary CoQ10 (1 mg/kg body weight per day) supplementation. At 12 mo, hepatic fibrosis, indexes of inflammation, oxidative stress, and insulin signaling were measured by histology, Western blot, ELISA, and reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction. Results: Hepatic collagen deposition (diameter of deposit) was greater in recuperated offspring (mean ± SEM: 12 ± 2 μm) than in controls (5 ± 0.5 μm) (P supplementation increased (P adulthood, which was associated with higher indexes of oxidative stress and inflammation and hyperinsulinemia. CoQ10 supplementation prevented liver fibrosis accompanied by downregulation of oxidative stress, inflammation, and hyperinsulinemia. PMID:26718412

  17. Coenzyme Q10 prevents hepatic fibrosis, inflammation, and oxidative stress in a male rat model of poor maternal nutrition and accelerated postnatal growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarry-Adkins, Jane L; Fernandez-Twinn, Denise S; Hargreaves, Iain P; Neergheen, Viruna; Aiken, Catherine E; Martin-Gronert, Malgorzata S; McConnell, Josie M; Ozanne, Susan E

    2016-02-01

    It is well established that low birth weight and accelerated postnatal growth increase the risk of liver dysfunction in later life. However, molecular mechanisms underlying such developmental programming are not well characterized, and potential intervention strategies are poorly defined. We tested the hypotheses that poor maternal nutrition and accelerated postnatal growth would lead to increased hepatic fibrosis (a pathological marker of liver dysfunction) and that postnatal supplementation with the antioxidant coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) would prevent this programmed phenotype. A rat model of maternal protein restriction was used to generate low-birth-weight offspring that underwent accelerated postnatal growth (termed "recuperated"). These were compared with control rats. Offspring were weaned onto standard feed pellets with or without dietary CoQ10 (1 mg/kg body weight per day) supplementation. At 12 mo, hepatic fibrosis, indexes of inflammation, oxidative stress, and insulin signaling were measured by histology, Western blot, ELISA, and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Hepatic collagen deposition (diameter of deposit) was greater in recuperated offspring (mean ± SEM: 12 ± 2 μm) than in controls (5 ± 0.5 μm) (P supplementation increased (P adulthood, which was associated with higher indexes of oxidative stress and inflammation and hyperinsulinemia. CoQ10 supplementation prevented liver fibrosis accompanied by downregulation of oxidative stress, inflammation, and hyperinsulinemia.

  18. Voriconazole-Induced Hepatitis via Simvastatin- and Lansoprazole-Mediated Drug Interactions: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Jose Luis; Tayek, John A

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic voriconazole concentrations have a narrow window of effectiveness before causing cholestatic hepatitis. After undergoing 1 year of voriconazole therapy for pulmonary aspergillosis, a 44-year-old man began treatment with 30 mg lansoprazole for gastroesophageal reflux symptoms. Within 5 days of starting treatment with lansoprazole, the patient presented with fatigue, jaundice, and cholestatic hepatitis. The hepatitis promptly resolved after stopping lansoprazole treatment. Sixteen months later, the patient was given simvastatin therapy, as recommended by the American Diabetes Association to prevent cardiovascular disease for patients with diabetes who are aged >40 years and have one additional risk factor. Within 2 weeks of taking simvastatin, a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase (statin) therapy, the patient redeveloped fatigue, jaundice, and cholestatic hepatitis. He described both episodes of fatigue and jaundice similarly in terms of onset and intensity. Voriconazole is metabolized by both CYP2C19 and CYP3A4 isoenzymes. Lansoprazole is an inhibitor of the CYP2C19 isoenzyme. Competition between voriconazole and lansoprazole likely led to increased voriconazole serum concentration and acute cholestatic hepatitis in this patient. Simvastatin inhibits the CYP3A4 isoenzyme. After the patient took 10 mg simvastatin daily for 2 weeks, cholestatic hepatitis occurred. The voriconazole concentration remained elevated (4.1 μg/ml) when measured 15 days after stopping simvastatin. The patient's Naranjo Adverse Drug Reaction Probability Scale score of 7 revealed that the cholestatic hepatitis was probably precipitated by lansoprazole. Likewise, the patient's Naranjo score of 9 also revealed that cholestatic hepatitis was attributable to a definite adverse drug reaction precipitated by the addition of simvastatin to the stable baseline regimen of voriconazole. In a single patient, two different inhibitors of the cytochrome P450 pathway stimulated voriconazole

  19. Mangiferin treatment inhibits hepatic expression of acyl-coenzyme A:diacylglycerol acyltransferase-2 in fructose-fed spontaneously hypertensive rats: a link to amelioration of fatty liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xing, Xiaomang; Li, Danyang; Chen, Dilong; Zhou, Liang [Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 China (China); Chonan, Ritsu [Koei Kogyo Co., Ltd., Tokyo, 101-0063 Japan (Japan); Yamahara, Johji [Pharmafood Institute, Kyoto, 602-8136 Japan (Japan); Wang, Jianwei, E-mail: wangjianwei1968@gmail.com [Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 China (China); Li, Yuhao, E-mail: yuhao@sitcm.edu.au [Endocrinology and Metabolism Group, Sydney Institute of Health Sciences/Sydney Institute of Traditional Chinese Medicine, NSW 2000 Australia (Australia)

    2014-10-15

    Mangiferin, a xanthone glucoside, and its associated traditional herbs have been demonstrated to improve abnormalities of lipid metabolism. However, its underlying mechanisms remain largely unclear. This study investigated the anti-steatotic effect of mangiferin in fructose-fed spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR)s that have a mutation in sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)-1. The results showed that co-administration of mangiferin (15 mg/kg, once daily, by oral gavage) over 7 weeks dramatically diminished fructose-induced increases in hepatic triglyceride content and Oil Red O-stained area in SHRs. However, blood pressure, fructose and chow intakes, white adipose tissue weight and metabolic parameters (plasma concentrations of glucose, insulin, triglyceride, total cholesterol and non-esterified fatty acids) were unaffected by mangiferin treatment. Mechanistically, mangiferin treatment suppressed acyl-coenzyme A:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT)-2 expression at the mRNA and protein levels in the liver. In contrast, mangiferin treatment was without effect on hepatic mRNA and/or protein expression of SREBP-1/1c, carbohydrate response element binding protein, liver pyruvate kinase, fatty acid synthase, acetyl-CoA carboxylase-1, stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1, DGAT-1, monoacyglycerol acyltransferase-2, microsomal triglyceride transfer protein, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha, carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 and acyl-CoA oxidase. Collectively, our results suggest that mangiferin treatment ameliorates fatty liver in fructose-fed SHRs by inhibiting hepatic DGAT-2 that catalyzes the final step in triglyceride biosynthesis. The anti-steatotic effect of mangiferin may occur independently of the hepatic signals associated with de novo fatty acid synthesis and oxidation. - Highlights: • We investigated the anti-steatotic effect of mangiferin (MA) in fructose-fed SHR. • MA (15 mg/kg/day for 7 weeks) ameliorated fructose-induced fatty liver in

  20. High-dose statin use does not impair aerobic capacity or skeletal muscle function in older adults

    OpenAIRE

    Traustadóttir, Tinna; Stock, Anthoney A.; Harman, S. Mitchell

    2008-01-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors (statins) are lipid-lowering agents widely employed for atherosclerosis prevention. HMG-CoA reductase blockade reduces skeletal muscle coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) levels and mitochondrial respiratory chain activities and may produce mild to severe skeletal muscle myopathy. This study investigated whether high-dose statin treatment would result in measurably decreased exercise capacity in older men and women. Maximal oxygen consumpt...

  1. Impact of subdermal norgestrel on hepatic acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol- acyltransferase (ACAT) activity: possible antiatherogenic effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letterie, G S

    2000-06-01

    The impact of subdermally placed ethinyl estradiol, norgestrel, and the combination of the two on cholesterol metabolism as measured by hepatic acyl:cholesterol-acyltransferase (ACAT) activity was examined in the rat model. A total of 48 rats were assigned to one of 6 groups, receiving either 0.1 mg or 1.0 mg of ethinyl estradiol daily, 1.0 or 10 mg of norgestrel daily, and combinations of either 0.1 mg ethinyl estradiol/1.0 mg norgestrel or 1.0 mg ethinyl estradiol/10 mg norgestrel daily. All drugs were administered through subdermally placed time release capsules. The administration of norgestrel only in either 1.0 mg or 10 mg resulted in significantly lower rates of ACAT activity (0.77 +/- 0.566 and 0.91 +/- 0.239 pmol/mg/min, respectively). The combination of 1.0 ethinyl estradiol and 10 mg norgestrel resulted in a significant increase in ACAT activity to 2.17 +/- 0.873. This combination also resulted in significantly greater weight loss at the conclusion of treatment [247.83 +/- 6.2 g (pre) vs. 205.50 +/- 10.6 (post)]. There were no other differences in ACAT activity between groups and no other differences in weight, both between groups and pre- and post-treatment within groups. In summary, subdermally placed norgestrel resulted in a significant lowering of ACAT activity not seen with either administration of ethinyl estradiol alone or the combination of ethinyl estradiol and norgestrel in doses ranging from 0.1 to 1.0 mg of ethinyl estradiol and 1.0 to 10.0 mg of norgestrel. Significantly increased ACAT activity for the combination of 1.0 ethinyl estradiol and 10 mg norgestrel over either ethinyl estradiol or norgestrel alone or a lower dose combination suggests a dose-related threshold and drug-drug interaction for this effect. These results suggest that subdermally placed norgestrel may result in significantly lower ACAT activity and may have a potential role as an antiatherogenic treatment.

  2. Toward onset prevention of cognitive decline in adults with Down syndrome (the TOP-COG study): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Cooper, Sally-Ann; Caslake, Muriel; Evans, Jonathan; Hassiotis, Angela; Jahoda, Andrew; McConnachie, Alex; Morrison, Jillian; Ring, Howard; Starr, John; Stiles, Ciara; Sullivan, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Background Early-onset dementia is common in Down syndrome adults, who have trisomy 21. The amyloid precursor protein gene is on chromosome 21, and so is over-expressed in Down syndrome, leading to amyloid β (Aβ) over-production, a major upstream pathway leading to Alzheimer disease (AD). Statins (microsomal 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors), have pleiotropic effects including potentially increasing brain amyloid clearance, making them plausible agents to reduce AD r...

  3. Rhabdomyolysis associated with cerivastatin: six cases within 3 months at one hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Robert A; Weathersby, B Blake; Rocco, Vito K; Pepper, J Michael; Butler, Kerry L

    2002-06-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is an uncommon complication associated with 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors. We observed six cases of cerivastatin-associated rhabdomyolysis: two patients developed acute renal failure requiring hemodialysis, and one patient died. Four of the patients had impaired renal function, and five were prescribed drugs with the potential to interact with cerivastatin. Also, five of the six patients presented with symptoms of rhabdomyolysis 3-4 weeks after starting cerivastatin therapy.

  4. Effects of osthol on blood pressure and lipid metabolism in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Hiroshi; Sasai, Noriko; Kamisako, Toshinori; Baba, Kimiye

    2007-05-30

    Osthol, a coumarin compound, was isolated from the dried fruits of Cnidium monnieri (Umbelliferae) and the effect of dietary osthol on hypertension and lipid metabolism was examined in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP). Six-week-old male SHRSP were fed the experimental diet containing 0.05% osthol by weight for 4 weeks with free access to the diet and water. Elevation of systolic blood pressure was significantly suppressed on and after 3 weeks. In addition, significant decreases in cholesterol and triglyceride contents in the liver were recognized without any significant changes in serum lipids profiles. A comparative study on hepatic mRNA expression indicated that osthol induced a significant increase in 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzymeA (HMG-CoA) reductase mRNA expression, which may lead to decrease in hepatic cholesterol pool through inhibition of the enzyme activity. Moreover, osthol induced a significant increase in acyl-CoA oxidase mRNA expression associated with an increase in carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1a mRNA expression, which suggests the acceleration of beta-oxidation of hepatic fatty acids. This may be responsible, at least in part, for the reduction of hepatic triglyceride content in SHRSP. These beneficial effects of osthol could be useful for both prevention of atherosclerosis and suppression of hepatic lipid accumulation.

  5. Butyrate inhibits seeding and growth of colorectal metastases to the liver in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velázquez, O C; Jabbar, A; DeMatteo, R P; Rombeau, J L

    1996-08-01

    The short-chain fatty acid butyrate inhibits growth of colorectal carcinoma cells in vitro. Mevalonate, a short-chain fatty acid structurally and metabolically related to butyrate, is important in signal transduction and is essential for cell growth. We investigated butyrate's effects on seeding and growth of colorectal tumor cells metastatic to the liver in vivo and hypothesized that butyrate's antiproliferative effects are associated with inhibition of mevalonate-mediated cell growth. Hepatic metastases were induced by injecting 1 x 10(5) MC-26 (N-methyl-N-nitrosourea-induced murine colorectal carcinoma) cells into the spleen of BALB/c mice. Mice were treated with a continuous intravenous infusion of butyrate (2 gm/kg/day) for 7 days starting 24 hours before tumor cells were injected. Study variables included liver weight and number of hepatic surface metastases. Proliferation studies on MC-26 cells were performed in vitro to examine the effects of butyrate alone or combined with mevalonate or mevastatin (an inhibitor of mevalonate synthesis). Butyrate reduced seeding and growth of colorectal tumor cells in vivo. Mevalonate diminished butyrate's antiproliferative action in vitro, whereas mevastatin potentiated this effect. These studies (1) show that butyrate inhibits seeding and growth of hepatic colorectal metastases in vivo, (2) associate butyrate's antiproliferative effects with inhibition of mevalonate-mediated cell growth, and (3) indicate that 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors may have synergistic antiproliferative effects when combined with butyrate.

  6. Alleviative effects of s-allyl cysteine and s-ethyl cysteine on MCD diet-induced hepatotoxicity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chun-che; Yin, Mei-chin; Liu, Wen-hu

    2008-11-01

    Alleviative effects of s-allyl cysteine (SAC) and s-ethyl cysteine (SEC) upon methionine and choline deficient (MCD) diet-induced hepatotoxicity in mice were examined. SAC or SEC at 1g/L was added into drinking water for 7 weeks with MCD diet. MCD feeding significantly increased hepatic triglyceride and cholesterol levels, and elevated the activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH), malic enzyme, fatty acid synthase (FAS) and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (P MCD feeding significantly lowered serum and hepatic glutathione (GSH) levels, increased malondialdehyde (MDA) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) formation, and suppressed the activity and mRNA expression of glutathione peroxidase (GPX), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (P MCD feeding significantly enhanced the mRNA expression of interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1, matrix metalloproteinases-9 (MMP-9) and collagen-alpha1 (P MCD-induced hepatotoxicity.

  7. Mechanisms and assessment of statin-related muscular adverse effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moßhammer, Dirk; Schaeffeler, Elke; Schwab, Matthias; Mörike, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Statin-associated muscular adverse effects cover a wide range of symptoms, including asymptomatic increase of creatine kinase serum activity and life-threatening rhabdomyolysis. Different underlying pathomechanisms have been proposed. However, a unifying concept of the pathogenesis of statin-related muscular adverse effects has not emerged so far. In this review, we attempt to categorize these mechanisms along three levels. Firstly, among pharmacokinetic factors, it has been shown for some statins that inhibition of cytochrome P450-mediated hepatic biotransformation and hepatic uptake by transporter proteins contribute to an increase of systemic statin concentrations. Secondly, at the myocyte membrane level, cell membrane uptake transporters affect intracellular statin concentrations. Thirdly, at the intracellular level, inhibition of the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase results in decreased intracellular concentrations of downstream metabolites (e.g. selenoproteins, ubiquinone, cholesterol) and alteration of gene expression (e.g. ryanodine receptor 3, glycine amidinotransferase). We also review current recommendations for prescribers. PMID:25069381

  8. The oleic acid esterification of policosanol increases its bioavailability and hypocholesterolemic action in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hain, D.; Valenzuela, A.; Branes, M. C.; Fuenzalida, M.; Videla, L. A.

    2012-07-01

    Policosanol comprises a mixture of long-chain aliphatic alcohols from sugarcane wax. More than 50 studies indicate that policosanol decreases serum cholesterol, while others failed to reproduce this effect. The objective of this investigation was to assess the bioavailability of esterified policosanol and non-esterified policosanol (NEP), in relation to their hypocholesterolemic effects. Sprague Dawley rats were given a daily oral dose of 100 mg/kg of NEP, 117 mg kg1 of butyric acid esterified policosanol (BAEP), or 164 mg kg1 of oleic acid esterified policosanol (OAEP). Policosanol absorption was evaluated in plasma between 0 and 3 hours after ingestion. To assess changes in total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, HDLcholesterol and triacylglycerols in plasma and liver 3-hydroxy- 3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMG- CoA red) phosphorylation, the rats were supplemented with nonesterified or esterified policosanol for 5 weeks. The results indicate that policosanol absorption was significantly greater in OAEP-treated rats than in those subjected to NEP or BAEP administration. OAEP significantly reduced plasma total and LDL-cholesterol in rats, in addition to a 5.6-fold increase (P < 0.05) in the hepatic content of phosphorylated HMG-CoA red over the control values. In conclusion, esterification of policosanol with oleic acid enhances policosanol bioavailability, and significantly improves the serum lipid profile in normocholesterolemic rats in association with the inactivation of HMG-CoA red controlling cholesterogenesis. (Author) 49 refs.

  9. A novel therapeutic effect of statins on nephrogenic diabetes insipidus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfrate, Leonilde; Procino, Giuseppe; Wang, David Q-H; Svelto, Maria; Portincasa, Piero

    2015-01-01

    Statins competitively inhibit hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, resulting in reduced plasma total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Recently, it has been shown that statins exert additional ‘pleiotropic’ effects by increasing expression levels of the membrane water channels aquaporin 2 (AQP2). AQP2 is localized mainly in the kidney and plays a critical role in determining cellular water content. This additional effect is independent of cholesterol homoeostasis, and depends on depletion of mevalonate-derived intermediates of sterol synthetic pathways, i.e. farnesylpyrophosphate and geranylgeranylpyrophosphate. By up-regulating the expression levels of AQP2, statins increase water reabsorption by the kidney, thus opening up a new avenue in treating patients with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI), a hereditary disease that yet lacks high-powered and limited side effects therapy. Aspects related to water balance determined by AQP2 in the kidney, as well as standard and novel therapeutic strategies of NDI are discussed. PMID:25594563

  10. Pleiotropic effects of statins: A boulevard to cardioprotection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankur Rohilla

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, referred to as “statins” have been extensively reported to possess lipid lowering effects by inhibiting the synthesis of cholesterol by liver and thereby increasing hepatic cholesterol uptake and reducing circulating lipid levels. Growing body of evidences have shown that apart from lipid lowering effects, statins possess various pleiotropic effects that include improvement in endothelial dysfunction, increased expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS, enhanced bioavailability of nitric oxide (NO, potent antioxidant potential and anti-inflammatory properties. In relation to cardiovascular pathologies, statins have been shown to inhibit atrial myocardial remodeling, prevent atrial fibrillation, conserve NO production in heart failure, reduce activity of small G-proteins in cardiac hypertrophy and protect the myocardium from lethal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury. The mechanisms underlying the cardioprotective potential include phosphatidyl inositol (PI3-kinase/Akt/eNOS pathway, subsequent activation of ATP sensitive potassium (KATP channels by NO resulting in improved myocardial metabolism, release of endogenous adenosine by increasing the activity of adenosine forming enzyme ecto-5V-nucleotidase, inhibition of reactive oxygen species (ROS production, decrease in oxidative stress and attenuation of apoptosis. The present review article demonstrates the pleiotropic effects of statins beyond their lipid lowering effects. Moreover, the underlying mechanisms involved in stain-induced cardioprotection have been delineated.

  11. HMG-CoA reductase, cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase, LDL receptor, SR-B1, and ACAT in diet-induced syndrome X.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Christian K; Liang, Kaihui; Barnard, R James; Kim, Choong H; Vaziri, Nosratola D

    2004-10-01

    Long-term consumption of Western diets can lead to acquired syndrome X, which presents with obesity, insulin resistance, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. While plasma lipid abnormalities in syndrome X have been well characterized, their molecular basis remains unclear. This study explored potential mechanisms of hypercholesterolemia in diet-induced syndrome X. Female Fischer rats were fed a high-fat, refined-carbohydrate (sucrose) diet (HFS) or standard rat chow (low-fat, complex carbohydrate, LFCC) for 20 months. Plasma lipids and hepatic tissue mRNA, protein, and/or activities of the key enzymes and receptors involved in cholesterol metabolism were determined. The HFS group exhibited hypertension, hyperlipidemia, insulin resistance, obesity, significant down-regulation of hepatic cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (the rate-limiting step in cholesterol catabolism) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor (LDL-R, the primary pathway of LDL clearance). In contrast, hepatic tissue acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT-2, the primary enzyme involved in intracellular esterification of cholesterol) and scavenger-receptor class B, type 1 (SR-B1 or HDL receptor) were up-regulated. While 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase mRNA expression was increased, its protein abundance and activity were unchanged, and HMG-CoA reductase-to-cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase ratio was increased in HFS-fed animals. Hypercholesterolemia in diet-induced syndrome X is associated with depressed cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase, diminished LDL-R, elevated ACAT, and increased HMG-CoA reductase-to-cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase ratio. These findings point to impaired hepatic catabolism and uptake of cholesterol and inappropriate cholesterol production capacity as the underlying causes of hypercholesterolemia in rats with diet-induced syndrome X.

  12. Hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... yourself against hepatitis A is by vaccination. Other ways to protect yourself include avoiding rimming and other anal and oral contact. While condom use is essential in preventing the spread of HIV, hepatitis B and other STDs, it does not ...

  13. SREBP-2, a second basic-helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper protein that stimulates transcription by binding to a sterol regulatory element.

    OpenAIRE

    Hua, X; Yokoyama, C; Wu, J; Briggs, M R; Brown, M S; Goldstein, J L; Wang, X

    1993-01-01

    We report the cDNA cloning of SREBP-2, the second member of a family of basic-helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper (bHLH-Zip) transcription factors that recognize sterol regulatory element 1 (SRE-1). SRE-1, a conditional enhancer in the promoters for the low density lipoprotein receptor and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase genes, increases transcription in the absence of sterols and is inactivated when sterols accumulate. Human SREBP-2 contains 1141 amino acids and is 47% identical t...

  14. The efflux pump MlcE from the Penicillium solitum compactin biosynthetic gene cluster increases Saccharomyces cerevisiae resistance to natural statins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ley, Ana; Frandsen, Rasmus John Normand

    The use of statins as cholesterol-lowering drugs is based on their ability to inhibit 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR), the key enzyme in the mevalonate pathway, which is responsible for the production of ergosterol in fungi and cholesterol in human. Industrial scale...... integrated a putative efflux pump-encoding gene mlcE from the P. solitum compactin biosynthetic gene cluster into S. cerevisiae genome. The resulting strain was tested for susceptibility to statins by growing the strain on media containing statins. The constructed strain showed an increased resistance...

  15. Rosuvastatin-induced pemphigoid.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murad, Aizuri A

    2012-01-01

    Statins are widely prescribed medications and very well tolerated. Rosuvastatin is another member of this drug used to treat dyslipidaemia. It is a competitive inhibitor of the enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase. Immunobullous disease is usually idiopathic but can be drug-induced. Both idiopathic and iatrogenic forms share common clinical and immunohistological features. The authors report a case of pemphigoid induced by rosuvastatin, a commonly prescribed medication. To our knowledge, there is limited report on rosuvastatin associated with pemphigoid in the literature.

  16. The food supplement coenzyme Q10 and suppression of antitubercular drug-induced hepatic injury in rats: the role of antioxidant defence system, anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskaran, Udhaya Lavinya; Sabina, Evan Prince

    2015-10-01

    Isoniazid (INH) and rifampicin (RIF), the most common anti-tubercular therapy, causes hepatotoxicity through a multi-step mechanism in certain individuals. The present study was an attempt to evaluate the hepatoprotective effect of coenzyme Q10 against INH + RIF-induced hepatotoxicity in Wistar albino rats. Hepatotoxicity was induced by the oral administration of INH + RIF (50 mg/kg b.w. each/day) in normal saline water for 28 days. The hepatoprotective effect of coenzyme Q10 (10 mg/kg b.w./day) was compared with that of the standard drug silymarin (25 mg/kg b.w./day). Animals were sacrificed at the end of the study period, and blood and liver were collected for biochemical, immunological and histological analyses. Evaluation of biochemical parameters showed that coenzyme Q10 treatment caused significant (P coenzyme Q10 was able to restore normal levels of enzymic antioxidants, reduced glutathione and lipid peroxidation in the INH + RIF-treated rats. Coenzyme Q10 was found to effectively reduce the extent of liver damage caused due to INH + RIF. In addition, the levels of IL-10 and IL-6 were significantly elevated in the INH + RIF-induced rats treated with CoQ10. Our study indicates the protective role of coenzyme Q10 in attenuating the hepatotoxic effects of INH + RIF in a rat model and that it could be used as a food supplement during anti-tubercular therapy.

  17. HMG-CoA reductase, cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase, LCAT, ACAT, LDL receptor, and SRB-1 in hereditary analbuminemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Kaihui; Vaziri, Nosratola D

    2003-07-01

    Hereditary analbuminemia is associated with hypercholesterolemia, which has been shown to be primarily caused by increased extrahepatic production of cholesterol. Nagase rats with hereditary analbuminemia (NAR) have been used as a model to dissect the effect of primary hypoalbuminemia from that caused by proteinuria in nephrotic syndrome. The present study was undertaken to explore the effect of hereditary analbuminemia on protein expression of the key factors involved in cholesterol metabolism. Hepatic tissue protein abundance of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (a rate-limiting enzyme in cholesterol catabolism), low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor, high density lipoprotein (HDL) receptor (SRB-1), acyl-coA cholesterol acyltransferase-2 (ACAT-2), and plasma concentration of lecithin cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT), as well as HMG-CoA reductase, ACAT, and LCAT activities were determined in fasting male NAR and Sprague-Dawley control rats. The NAR group exhibited significant up-regulation of HMG-CoA reductase protein abundance but normal HMG-CoA reductase enzymatic activity. This was coupled with a significant up-regulation of cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase and a mild up-regulation of ACAT protein abundance and activity. However, hepatic LDL receptor and HDL receptor and plasma LCAT protein concentration and activity were normal in NAR. Hypercholesterolemia in NAR is associated with elevated hepatic HMG-CoA reductase protein abundance, but normal HMG-CoA reductase activity. These findings point to post-translational regulation of this enzyme and favor an extrahepatic origin of hypercholesterolemia in NAR. The observed up-regulation of cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase represents a compensatory response to the associated hypercholesterolemia. Unlike nephrotic syndrome, which causes severe LDL receptor, HDL receptor, and LCAT deficiencies, hereditary analbuminemia does not affect these proteins.

  18. Effects of Karela (Bitter Melon; Momordica charantia) on genes of lipids and carbohydrates metabolism in experimental hypercholesterolemia: biochemical, molecular and histopathological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Dalia Yossri; Soliman, Mohamed Mohamed; Baiomy, Ahmed A; Yassin, Magdy Hassan; El-Sawy, Hanan Basiouni

    2017-06-17

    Hypercholesterolemia is a serious diseases associated with type-2 diabetes, atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disorders and liver diseases. Humans seek for safe herbal medication such as karela (Momordica charantia/bitter melon) to treat such disorders to avoid side effect of pharmacotherapies widely used. Forty male Wistar rats were divided into four equal groups; control group with free access to food and water, cholesterol administered group (40 mg/kg BW orally); karela administered group (5 g /kg BW orally) and mixture of cholesterol and karela. The treatments continued for 10 weeks. Karela was given for hypercholesterolemic rats after 6 weeks of cholesterol administration. Serum, liver and epididymal adipose tissues were taken for biochemical, histopathological and genetic assessments. Hypercholesterolemia induced a decrease in serum superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, reduced glutathione (GSH) and an increase in malondialdehyde (MDA) levels that were ameliorated by karela administration. Hypercholesterolemia up regulated antioxidants mRNA expression and altered the expression of carbohydrate metabolism genes. In parallel, hypercholesterolemic groups showed significant changes in the expression of PPAR-alpha and gamma, lipolysis, lipogenesis and cholesterol metabolism such as carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 (CPT-1). Acyl CoA oxidase (ACO), fatty acids synthase (FAS), sterol responsible element binding protein-1c (SREBP1c), 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMG-CoAR) and cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) at hepatic and adipose tissue levels. Interestingly, Karela ameliorated all altered genes confirming its hypocholesterolemic effect. Histopathological and immunohistochemical findings revealed that hypercholesterolemia induced hepatic tissue changes compared with control. These changes include cholesterol clefts, necrosis, karyolysis and sever congestion of portal blood vessel. Caspase-3 immunoreactivity showed positive expression in

  19. Dietary fenugreek and onion attenuate cholesterol gallstone formation in lithogenic diet–fed mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Raghunatha R L; Srinivasan, Krishnapura

    2011-01-01

    An animal study was conducted to evaluate the antilithogenic effect of a combination of dietary fenugreek seeds and onion. Lithogenic conditions were induced in mice by feeding them a high (0.5%) cholesterol diet (HCD) for 10 weeks. Fenugreek (12%) and onion (2%) were included individually and in combination in this HCD. Fenugreek, onion and their combination reduced the incidence of cholesterol gallstones by 75%, 27% and 76%, respectively, with attendant reduction in total cholesterol content by 38–42%, 50–72% and 61–80% in serum, liver and bile respectively. Consequently, the cholesterol/phospholipid ratio was reduced significantly in serum, liver and bile. The cholesterol saturation index of bile was reduced from 4.14 to 1.38 by the combination of fenugreek and onion and to 2.33 by onion alone. The phospholipid and bile acid contents of the bile were also increased. Changes in the hepatic enzyme activities (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl Coenzyme A reductase, cholesterol-7α-hydroxylase and cholesterol-27-hydroxylase) induced by HCD were countered by fenugreek, onion and their combination. Hepatic lipid peroxides were reduced by 19–22% and 39–45% with fenugreek, onion and their combination included in the diet along with the HCD. Increased accumulation of fat in the liver and inflammation of the gallbladder membrane produced by HCD were reduced by fenugreek, onion and their combination. The antilithogenic influence was highest with fenugreek alone, and the presence of onion along with it did not further increase this effect. There was also no additive effect of the two spices in the recovery of antioxidant molecules or in the antioxidant enzyme activities. PMID:21756271

  20. Hypocholesterolemic effect of physically refined rice bran oil: studies of cholesterol metabolism and early atherosclerosis in hypercholesterolemic hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausman, Lynne M; Rong, Ni; Nicolosi, Robert J

    2005-09-01

    Physically refined rice bran oil containing 2-4% nontriglyceride components as compared to other vegetable oils appears to be associated with lipid lowering and antiinflammatory properties in several rodent, primate and human models. These experiments were designed to investigate possible mechanisms for the hypocholesterolemic effect of the physically refined rice bran oil and to examine its effect on aortic fatty streak formation. In the first experiment, 30 hamsters were fed, for 8 weeks, chow-based diets plus 0.03% added cholesterol and 5% (wt/wt) coconut, canola, or physically refined rice bran oil (COCO, CANOLA or PRBO animal groups, respectively). Both plasma total cholesterol (TC) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) were significantly reduced in PRBO but not in CANOLA relative to COCO. PRBO also showed a significant 15-17% reduction in cholesterol absorption and significant 30% increase in neutral sterol (NS) excretion with no effect on bile acid (BA) excretion. Both CANOLA and PRBO showed a significant 300-500% increase in intestinal 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase and significant (>25%) decrease in hepatic HMG-CoA reductase activities with respect to COCO. In a second experiment, 36 hamsters were fed chow-based diets with 0.05% added cholesterol, 10% coconut oil and 4% additional COCO, CANOLA or PRBO. Relative to COCO and CANOLA, plasma TC and LDL-C were significantly reduced in PRBO. Early atherosclerosis (fatty streak formation) was significantly reduced (48%) only in PRBO, relative to the other two. These results suggest that the lipid lowering found in PRBO is associated with decreased cholesterol absorption, but not hepatic cholesterol synthesis, and that the decrease in fatty streak formation with this oil may be associated with its nontriglyceride components not present in the other two diets.

  1. Effects of Long-Term Supplementation of Blue-Green Algae on Lipid Metabolism in C57BL/6J mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yue; Kim, Bohkyung; Park, Young-Ki; Lee, Ji-Young

    Dyslipidemia is a primary risk factor for cardiovascular disease. In this study, we investigated the effect of long-term supplementation of two blue-green algae (BGA) species, i.e., Nostoc commune var. sphaeroides Kützing (NO) and Spirulina platensis (SP), on lipid metabolism in vivo. Male C57BL/6J mice were fed an AIN-93G/M diet supplemented with 2.5 or 5% (wt/wt) NO or SP for 6 months. Mice fed NO and SP showed lower plasma total cholesterol (TC) and triglyceride (TG) concentrations than control at certain months during 6 month experimental period. Both BGA supplementation for 6 months significantly increased hepatic TC contents whereas SP-fed groups had significantly less TG levels in the liver compared with control and NO groups. None of BGA-fed animals showed significantly different mRNA levels of sterol regulatory element binding protein 2, while 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase and low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) expression was higher in NO groups than the other groups in the liver. Furthermore, NO supplementation increased the hepatic expression of acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1, stearoyl CoA desaturase 1, carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1α, and acyl-CoA oxidase 1 but SP did not elicit any significant changes in mRNA levels of the genes compared with control. LDLR protein level was significantly higher in NO 2.5% and SP 5%, as compared to the control and NO 5% groups; while the level of fatty acid synthase protein in the liver was significantly higher in NO 5% and SP 5%, than that in the control group. In conclusion, our results suggest that long-term supplementation of NO and SP decreased plasma TC and TG concentrations. Therefore, supplementation of NO and SP may be potentially beneficial for preventing dyslipidemia-associated chronic diseases.

  2. Antrodia cinnamomea Prevents Obesity, Dyslipidemia, and the Derived Fatty Liver via Regulating AMPK and SREBP Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Chiung-Huei; Yang, Mon-Yuan; Yang, Yi-Sun; Yu, Chieh-Chou; Wang, Chau-Jong

    2017-01-01

    Antrodia cinnamomea (AC), a protogenic fungus that only grows on the heartwood of endemic Cinnamomum kanehirae Hayata in Taiwan, is used to treat a variety of illness including liver disease. However, little is known about the benefit of AC against obesity and the related hepatic disorder. Using high-fat-diet (HFD) feed mice, we aimed to investigate whether the extract of AC (ACE) could reduce excessive weight, body fat, and serum lipids and prevent the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver (NAFLD). C57BL/6 mice were divided into five groups fed with different diets: control, HFD, and HFD with 0.5%, 1%, or 2% of ACE, respectively. After 10 weeks the animals were sacrificed, with serum and liver collected. HFD-induced elevation of body weight gain, body fat deposition, and serum free fatty acid (FFA), triacylglycerol (TGs), total cholesterol, and ratio of LDL cholesterol (LDL-C)/HDL cholesterol (HDL-C), were significantly restored by ACE. ACE reduced aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and hepatic lipid deposits increased by HFD. ACE increased p-AMP activated protein kinase (pAMPK) but decreased Sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP), fatty acid synthase (FAS), 1-acylglycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (AGPAT), and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMGCoA) reductase. The chemical analysis reveals ACE is full of triterpenes, the most abundant of which is Antcin K, followed by sulphurenic acid, eburicoic acid, antcin C, dehydrosulphurenic acid, antcin B, and propanoic acid. In conclusion, ACE should be used to prevent obesity and derived fatty liver. The applicability of ACE on NAFLD deserves further investigation.

  3. Hypocholesterolemic Effects of the Cauliflower Culinary-Medicinal Mushroom, Sparassis crispa (Higher Basidiomycetes), in Diet-Induced Hypercholesterolemic Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ki Bae; Hong, Sung-Yong; Joung, Eun Young; Kim, Byung Hee; Bae, Song-Hwan; Park, Yooheon; Suh, Hyung Joo

    2015-01-01

    The cauliflower culinary-medicinal mushroom, Sparassis crispa, possesses various biological activities that have been widely reported to have therapeutic applications. We examined the effects of S. crispa on serum cholesterol, hepatic enzymes related to cholesterol metabolism, and fecal sterol excretion in rats fed a cholesterol-rich diet for 4 weeks. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (8 weeks old) were randomly divided into 5 groups (n = 6 mice per group): normal diet (normal control [NC]), cholesterol-rich diet (cholesterol control [CC]), cholesterol-rich diet plus S. crispa fruiting body (SC), cholesterol-rich diet plus S. crispa extract (SCE), and cholesterol-rich diet plus S. crispa residue (SCR). SCE supplementation significantly enhanced hepatic cholesterol catabolism through the upregulation of cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) messenger RNA (mRNA) expression (2.55-fold compared with that in the NC group; P < 0.05) and the downregulation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase mRNA expression (0.57-fold compared with that in the NC group; P < 0.05). Additionally, the SCE diet resulted in the highest fecal excretion of cholesterol and bile acid in hypercholesterolemic rats. In conclusion, mRNA expression of CYP7A1 and HMG-CoA reductase were significantly modulated by the absorption of SCE samples. Also, SCE samples had a significant effect on fecal bile acid and cholesterol excretion. These results suggest that SCE samples can induce hypocholesterolic effects through cholesterol metabolism and the reduction of circulating cholesterol levels.

  4. Coenzyme Q10 Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido-Maraver, Juan; Cordero, Mario D.; Oropesa-Ávila, Manuel; Fernández Vega, Alejandro; de la Mata, Mario; Delgado Pavón, Ana; de Miguel, Manuel; Pérez Calero, Carmen; Villanueva Paz, Marina; Cotán, David; Sánchez-Alcázar, José A.

    2014-01-01

    For a number of years, coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) was known for its key role in mitochondrial bioenergetics; later studies demonstrated its presence in other subcellular fractions and in blood plasma, and extensively investigated its antioxidant role. These 2 functions constitute the basis for supporting the clinical use of CoQ10. Also, at the inner mitochondrial membrane level, CoQ10 is recognized as an obligatory cofactor for the function of uncoupling proteins and a modulator of the mitochondrial transition pore. Furthermore, recent data indicate that CoQ10 affects the expression of genes involved in human cell signaling, metabolism and transport, and some of the effects of CoQ10 supplementation may be due to this property. CoQ10 deficiencies are due to autosomal recessive mutations, mitochondrial diseases, aging-related oxidative stress and carcinogenesis processes, and also statin treatment. Many neurodegenerative disorders, diabetes, cancer, and muscular and cardiovascular diseases have been associated with low CoQ10 levels as well as different ataxias and encephalomyopathies. CoQ10 treatment does not cause serious adverse effects in humans and new formulations have been developed that increase CoQ10 absorption and tissue distribution. Oral administration of CoQ10 is a frequent antioxidant strategy in many diseases that may provide a significant symptomatic benefit. PMID:25126052

  5. Simvastatin Hydroxy Acid Fails to Attain Sufficient Central Nervous System Tumor Exposure to Achieve a Cytotoxic Effect: Results of a Preclinical Cerebral Microdialysis Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Yogesh T; Jacus, Megan O; Davis, Abigail D; Boulos, Nidal; Turner, David C; Vuppala, Pradeep K; Freeman, Burgess B; Gilbertson, Richard J; Stewart, Clinton F

    2016-04-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors were potent hits against a mouse ependymoma cell line, but their effectiveness against central nervous system tumors will depend on their ability to cross the blood-brain barrier and attain a sufficient exposure at the tumor. Among 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A inhibitors that had activity in vitro, we prioritized simvastatin (SV) as the lead compound for preclinical pharmacokinetic studies based on its potential for central nervous system penetration as determined from in silico models. Furthermore, we performed systemic plasma disposition and cerebral microdialysis studies of SV (100 mg/kg, p.o.) in a murine model of ependymoma to characterize plasma and tumor extracellular fluid (tECF) pharmacokinetic properties. The murine dosage of SV (100 mg/kg, p.o.) was equivalent to the maximum tolerated dose in patients (7.5 mg/kg, p.o.) based on equivalent plasma exposure of simvastatin acid (SVA) between the two species. SV is rapidly metabolized in murine plasma with 15 times lower exposure compared with human plasma. SVA exposure in tECF was tumor to plasma partition coefficient of SVA was tumor growth inhibition; therefore, SV was not carried forward in subsequent preclinical efficacy studies. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  6. An onion byproduct affects plasma lipids in healthy rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldán-Marín, Eduvigis; Jensen, Runa I; Krath, Britta N; Kristensen, Mette; Poulsen, Morten; Cano, M Pilar; Sánchez-Moreno, Concepción; Dragsted, Lars O

    2010-05-12

    Onion may contribute to the health effects associated with high fruit and vegetable consumption. A considerable amount of onion production ends up as waste that might find use in foods. Onion byproduct has not yet been explored for potential health benefits. The aim of this study is to elucidate the safety and potential role of onion byproducts in affecting risk markers of cardiovascular disease (CVD). For that purpose, the effects of an onion byproduct, Allium cepa L. cepa 'Recas' (OBP), and its two derived fractions, an ethanolic extract (OE) and a residue (OR), on the distribution of plasma lipids and on factors affecting cholesterol metabolism in healthy rats have been investigated. The OBP or its fractions did not significantly reduce cholesterol or down-regulate hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (Hmgcr) gene expression. The OR even had the effect of increasing plasma triacylglycerides (TAG) and cholesterol in the very low density lipoprotein (VLDL-C) fraction. Neither total bile acids nor total primary or secondary bile acids were significantly affected by feeding rats the OBP or its fractions. Principal component analysis combining all markers revealed that the controls could be completely separated from OBP, OE, and OR groups in the scores plot and also that OE and OR groups were separated. Plasma lipids and bile acid excretion were the discriminating loading factors for separating OE and OR but also contributed to the separation of onion-fed animals and controls. It was concluded that the onion byproduct did not present significant beneficial effects on individual markers related to plasma lipid transport in this healthy rat model but that onion byproduct contains factors with the ability to modulate plasma lipids and lipoprotein levels.

  7. Possible role of intestinal fatty acid oxidation in the eating-inhibitory effect of the PPAR-α agonist Wy-14643 in high-fat diet fed rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elnaz Karimian Azari

    Full Text Available PPAR-α plays a key role in lipid metabolism; it enhances fatty acid oxidation (FAO and ketogenesis. Pharmacological PPAR-α activation improves insulin sensitivity and reduces food intake, but its mechanisms of action remain unknown. We here report that intraperitoneal (IP administration of the PPAR-α agonist Wy-14643 (40 mg/kg BW reduced food intake in adult male rats fed a high-fat diet (HFD, 49% of the energy mainly through an increase in the latency to eat after injection, and without inducing a conditioned taste avoidance. Also, IP administered Wy-14643 caused an acute (the first 60 min decrease in the respiratory quotient (RQ and an increase in hepatic portal vein β-hydroxybutyrate level (at 35 min without affecting plasma non-esterified fatty acids. Given the known stimulatory effect of PPAR-α on FAO and ketogenesis, we measured the protein expression level of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 (CPT 1A and mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase (HMG-CoAS2, two key enzymes for FAO and ketogenesis, respectively, in liver, duodenum and jejunum. Wy-14643 induced a significant increase in the expression of CPT 1A in the jejunum and duodenum and of HMG-CoAS2 in the jejunum, but neither CPT 1A nor HMG-CoAS2 expression was increased in the liver. The induction of CPT 1A and HMG-CoAS2 expression was associated with a decrease in the lipid droplet content selectively in the jejunum. Our findings indicate that Wy-14643 stimulates FAO and ketogenesis in the intestine, in particular in the jejunum, rather than in the liver, thus supporting the hypothesis that PPAR-α activation inhibits eating by stimulating intestinal FAO.

  8. Genetics Home Reference: primary coenzyme Q10 deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions Primary coenzyme Q10 deficiency Primary coenzyme Q10 deficiency Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Primary coenzyme Q10 deficiency is a disorder that can affect many ...

  9. Coenzyme Q10 and Statin-Induced Mitochondrial Dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Deichmann, Richard; Lavie, Carl; Andrews, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 is an important factor in mitochondrial respiration. Primary and secondary deficiencies of coenzyme Q10 result in a number of neurologic and myopathic syndromes. Hydroxyl-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors or statins interfere with the production of mevalonic acid, which is a precursor in the synthesis of coenzyme Q10. The statin medications routinely result in lower coenzyme Q10 levels in the serum. Some studies have also shown reduction of coenzyme Q10 in muscle tis...

  10. Coenzyme q 10 : a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Deependra; Jain, Vandana; Saraf, Swarnlata; Saraf, S

    2002-10-01

    Ubiquinone or Co Q(10) is essentially a vitamin like substance and is a cofactor of an enzyme. It is an integral part of the memberanes of mitocondria where it is involved in the energy production. It is a nutrient necessary for the function of every cell of the body especially vital organs of the body like heart, liver, brain etc. Studies have shown that coenzyme Q(10) alters the natural history of cardiovascular illness and has the potential of prevention of cardiovascular diseases through the inhibition of LDL cholesterol oxidation by maintenance of optimal cellular and mitochondrial function throughout the ravages of time internal and external stress.

  11. Human Coenzyme Q10 Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinzii, Catarina M.; DiMauro, Salvatore

    2006-01-01

    Ubiquinone (coenzyme Q10 or CoQ10) is a lipid-soluble component of virtually all cell membranes and has multiple metabolic functions. Deficiency of CoQ10 (MIM 607426) has been associated with five different clinical presentations that suggest genetic heterogeneity, which may be related to the multiple steps in CoQ10 biosynthesis. Patients with all forms of CoQ10 deficiency have shown clinical improvements after initiating oral CoQ10 supplementation. Thus, early diagnosis is of critical importance in the management of these patients. This year, the first molecular defect causing the infantile form of primary human CoQ10 deficiency has been reported. The availability of genetic testing will allow for a better understanding of the pathogenesis of this disease and early initiation of therapy (even presymptomatically in siblings of patients) in this otherwise life-threatening infantile encephalomyopathy. PMID:17094036

  12. Wheat alkylresorcinols suppress high-fat, high-sucrose diet-induced obesity and glucose intolerance by increasing insulin sensitivity and cholesterol excretion in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Katsutaka; Yamamoto, Saori; Itoh, Nanako; Nakao, Reiko; Yasumoto, Yuki; Tanaka, Keiko; Kikuchi, Yosuke; Fukudome, Shin-ichi; Okita, Kimiko; Takano-Ishikawa, Yuko

    2015-02-01

    synthetic genes such as sterol regulatory element binding protein 2 (Srebf2) and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-Coenzyme A synthase 1 (Hmgcs1). These findings suggest that wheat alkylresorcinols increase glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity by suppressing hepatic lipid accumulation and intestinal cholesterol absorption, which subsequently suppresses diet-induced obesity in mice. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  13. Development of a Simvastatin Selection Marker for a Hyperthermophilic Acidophile, Sulfolobus islandicus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Tao; Huang, Qihong; Zhang, Changyi

    2012-01-01

    We report here a novel selectable marker for the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon Sulfolobus islandicus. The marker cassette is composed of the sac7d promoter and the hmg gene coding for the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase (P(sac7d)-hmg), which confers simvastatin resistance....... islandicus was constructed using pyrEF marker and used as the host to obtain pSSRNherA transformant with simvastatin selection. While the gene knockout (¿herA) cells generated from the herA merodiploid cells failed to form colonies in the presence of 5-fluoroorotic acid (5-FOA), the mutant cells could...... be rescued by expression of the gene from a plasmid (pSSRNherA), because their transformants formed colonies on a solid medium containing 5-FOA and simvastatin. This demonstrates that HerA is essential for cell viability of S. islandicus. To our knowledge, this is the first application of an antibiotic...

  14. Statin use and Parkinson's disease in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritz, Beate; Manthripragada, Angelika D; Qian, Lei

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether statin (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitor) use is associated with risk of Parkinson's disease (PD) in Denmark. We identified 1,931 patients with a first time diagnosis of PD reported in hospital or outpatient clinic...... records between 2001 and 2006. We density matched to these patients 9,651 population controls by birth year and sex relying on the Danish population register. For every participant, we identified pharmacy records of statin and anti-Parkinson drug prescriptions since 1995 and before index date from...... a prescription medication use database for all Danish residents. Whenever applicable, the index dates for cases and their corresponding controls were advanced to the date of first recorded prescription for anti-Parkinson drugs. In our primary analyses, we excluded all statin prescriptions 2-years before PD...

  15. Statin Resistance and Export

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ley, Ana

    Statins are inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), the key enzyme in the mevalonate pathway that leads to the synthesis of cholesterol and ergosterol in animal and fungal cells, respectively. Their extensiveuse in treatment and prevention of cardiovascular diseases....... and Aspergillus sp.. Production limitations associated with the unique physiology and morphology of the natural producers can be overcome by heterologous expression of the pathway in a fast-growing host, such as S. cerevisiae. Future construction of S. cerevisiae cell factory for the production of high....... RFP-tagging of MlcE showed that it was localized to the plasma and vacuolar membranes in yeast. Collectively these results indicate that mlcE encodes for a transmembrane transporter, and thus likely provides the resistance to statins by secreting the compounds outside of the cells. Further testing...

  16. Alginate-gelatin formulation to modify lovastatin release profile from red yeast rice for hypercholesterolemia therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Gemma; Consumi, Marco; Pepi, Simone; Lamponi, Stefania; Bonechi, Claudia; Tamasi, Gabriella; Donati, Alessandro; Rossi, Claudio; Magnani, Agnese

    2017-10-01

    The preparation of a delivery system able to guarantee a delayed release of lovastatin from red yeast rice (RYR) is mandatory to counteract cholesterol biosynthesis effectively. Polymeric formulations were prepared mixing alginate and gelatin, in different ratios, with RYR. The effect of different composition on stiffness, viscosity, swelling behavior and mesostructure of matrices was analyzed. Formulations obtained combining polymers in comparable amount (i.e., 60/40 and 50/50) guaranteed a delayed release of lovastatin from RYR, a prolonged inhibitory activity toward 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase and a decreased cholesterol synthesis. The formulation obtained combining 60% gelatin and 40% of alginate showed physicochemical properties suitable to lead a lovastatin release profile compatible with cholesterol biosynthesis.

  17. Clinical efficacy and safety of statins in managing cardiovascular risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navin K Kapur

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Navin K Kapur1, Kiran Musunuru21Division of Cardiology, Tufts University – New England Medical Center; Boston, MA, USA; 2Division of Cardiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USAAbstract: Since their introduction in the 1980s, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins have emerged as the one of the best-selling medication classes to date, with numerous trials demonstrating powerful efficacy in preventing cardiovascular outcomes. As our understanding of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C and atherosclerosis continues to grow, the concept of ‘lower is better’ has corresponded with a ‘more is better’ approach to statin-based therapy. This review provides a detailed understanding of the clinical efficacy and safety of statins with a particular emphasis on the third generation drug, rosuvastatin.Keywords: low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C, efficacy, safety, HMGCo-A reductase inhibitors, rosuvastatin

  18. Mixed effects of OATP1B1, BCRP and NTCP polymorphisms on the population pharmacokinetics of pravastatin in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xue-Feng; Zhou, Yang; Bi, Kai-Shun; Chen, Xiao-Hui

    2016-09-01

    1. Pravastatin is a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitor used for the treatment of hyperlipidaemia. This study aims to investigate the effects of genetic polymorphisms in OATP1B1, BCRP and NTCP on pravastatin population pharmacokinetics in healthy Chinese volunteers using a non-linear mixed-effect modelling (NONMEM) approach. A two-compartment model with a first-order absorption and elimination described plasma pravastatin concentrations well. 2. Genetic polymorphisms of rs4149056 (OATP1B1) and rs2306283 (OATP1B1) were found to be associated with a significant (p  0.05). 4. The current data suggest that the combination of rs4149056, rs2306283 and rs2296651 polymorphisms is an important determinant of pravastatin pharmacokinetics.

  19. Screening of autoantibodies associated with necrotizing myopathy among undiagnosed chronic myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuru, Satoshi; Suzuki, Shigeaki; Ogata, Katsuhisa; Kobayashi, Michio; Ishida, Chiho; Watanabe, Chigusa; Matsumura, Tsuyoshi

    2017-10-27

    We screened anti-signal recognition particle (SRP) and anti-3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR) antibodies among 42 patients who had undiagnosed chronic myopathy from six national hospitals. Anti-SRP and anti-HMGCR antibodies were determined by RNA immuneprecipitation and enzyme-linked immune-sorbent assay (ELISA), respectively. We identified two patients with anti-SRP antibodies (4.7%) and, two with anti-HMGCR antibodies (4.7%). Both of anti-SRP-positive patients showed dysphagia with a high level of creatine kinase. Anti-HMGCR antibodies were associated with mild muscle weakness with a relatively late disease onset. Our study suggests the importance of autoantibody testing among undiagnosed chronic myopathy.

  20. Heterologous expression of MlcE in Saccharomyces cerevisiae provides resistance to natural and semi-synthetic statins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ley, Ana; Coumou, Hilde Cornelijne; Frandsen, Rasmus John Normand

    2015-01-01

    Statins are inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, the key enzyme in cholesterol biosynthesis. Their extensive use in treatment and prevention of cardiovascular diseases placed statins among the best selling drugs. Construction of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell factory...... for the production of high concentrations of natural statins will require establishment of a non-destructive self-resistance mechanism to overcome the undesirable growth inhibition effects of statins. To establish active export of statins from yeast, and thereby detoxification, we integrated a putative efflux pump......-encoding gene mlcE from the mevastatin-producing Penicillium citrinum into the S. cerevisiae genome. The resulting strain showed increased resistance to both natural statins (mevastatin and lovastatin) and semi-synthetic statin (simvastatin) when compared to the wild type strain. Expression of RFP-tagged mlc...

  1. Coenzyme Q10 and Statin-Induced Mitochondrial Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deichmann, Richard; Lavie, Carl; Andrews, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 is an important factor in mitochondrial respiration. Primary and secondary deficiencies of coenzyme Q10 result in a number of neurologic and myopathic syndromes. Hydroxyl-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors or statins interfere with the production of mevalonic acid, which is a precursor in the synthesis of coenzyme Q10. The statin medications routinely result in lower coenzyme Q10 levels in the serum. Some studies have also shown reduction of coenzyme Q10 in muscle tissue. Such coenzyme Q10 deficiency may be one mechanism for statin-induced myopathies. However, coenzyme Q10 supplements have not been shown to routinely improve muscle function. Additional research in this area is warranted and discussed in this review. PMID:21603349

  2. An overview of the non-mevalonate pathway for terpenoid ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    methyl-2-(E)-butenyl-4-diphosphate; HMG-CoA, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA; HMGR, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase ... functional roles in plants, human health and commerce. ... done in E. coli and demonstration of orthologous genes in various plants, encoding such enzymes that catalyze the same reaction.

  3. [Antitoxic action of cobamamide in experimental hepatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tebenchuk, G M; Lukashuk, V D; Lipkan, G N; Stepanenko, V V

    1984-01-01

    Antitoxic properties of cobamamide, a coenzymic form of vitamin B12, were studied in experimental toxic hepatitis induced by CCl4. The data obtained as a result of the assessment of the bromosulfalene test and activity of sorbitol dehydrogenase and alanine aminotransferase point to a demonstrable hepatoprotective action of cobamamide. Normalization of the indicators studied evidences that the drug intensifies the recovery processes occurring in the liver of rabbits with toxic hepatitis.

  4. Acyl-coenzyme A binding protein (ACBP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, B B; Knudsen, J; Poulsen, F M

    1999-01-01

    Acyl-coenzyme A binding proteins are known from a large group of eukaryote species and to bind a long chain length acyl-CoA ester with very high affinity. Detailed biochemical mapping of ligand binding properties has been obtained as well as in-depth structural studies on the bovine apo-protein a...

  5. Coenzyme and effector binding to glutamate dehydrogenase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zantema, Alt

    1979-01-01

    Glutamaat-dehydrogenase is een enzym dat de reactie katalyseert van 2-oxoglutaraat (substraat), NAD(P)H (co-enzym) en ammonia naar L-glutaminezuur en NAD(P)+. Het enzym is opgebouwd uit 6 identieke subeenheden. Dit proefschrift beschrijft de bestudering van twee aspecten van dit enzym, nl. 1. de

  6. Coenzyme Q10 for heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madmani, Mohammed E; Yusuf Solaiman, Ahmad; Tamr Agha, Khalil; Madmani, Yasser; Shahrour, Yasser; Essali, Adib; Kadro, Waleed

    2014-06-02

    Coenzyme Q10, or ubiquinone, is a non-prescription nutritional supplement. It is a fat-soluble molecule that acts as an electron carrier in mitochondria and as a coenzyme for mitochondrial enzymes. Coenzyme Q10 deficiency may be associated with a multitude of diseases including heart failure. The severity of heart failure correlates with the severity of coenzyme Q10 deficiency. Emerging data suggest that the harmful effects of reactive oxygen species are increased in patients with heart failure and coenzyme Q10 may help to reduce these toxic effects because of its antioxidant activity. Coenzyme Q10 may also have a role in stabilising myocardial calcium-dependent ion channels and preventing the consumption of metabolites essential for adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) synthesis. Coenzyme Q10, although not a primary recommended treatment, could be beneficial to patients with heart failure. Several randomised controlled trials have compared coenzyme Q10 to other therapeutic modalities, but no systematic review of existing randomised trials has been conducted. To review the safety and efficacy of coenzyme Q10 in heart failure. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2012, Issue 12); MEDLINE OVID (1950 to January Week 3 2013) and EMBASE OVID (1980 to 2013 Week 03) on 24 January 2013; Web of Science with Conference Proceedings (1970 to January 2013) and CINAHL Plus (1981 to January 2013) on 25 January 2013; and AMED (Allied and Complementary Medicine) (1985 to January 2013) on 28 January 2013. We applied no language restrictions. We included randomised controlled trials of either parallel or cross-over design that assessed the beneficial and harmful effects of coenzyme Q10 in patients with heart failure. When cross-over studies were identified, we considered data only from the first phase. Two authors independently extracted data from the included studies onto a pre-designed data extraction form. We then entered the data into Review

  7. Cholesterol can modulate mitochondrial aquaporin-8 expression in human hepatic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielli, Mauro; Capiglioni, Alejo M; Marrone, Julieta; Calamita, Giuseppe; Marinelli, Raúl A

    2017-05-01

    Hepatocyte mitochondrial aquaporin-8 (mtAQP8) works as a multifunctional membrane channel protein that facilitates the uptake of ammonia for its detoxification to urea as well as the mitochondrial release of hydrogen peroxide. Since early oligonucleotide microarray studies in liver of cholesterol-fed mice showed an AQP8 downregulation, we tested whether alterations of cholesterol content per se modulate mtAQP8 expression in human hepatocyte-derived Huh-7 cells. Cholesterol loading with methyl-β-cyclodextrin (mβCD):cholesterol complexes downregulated the proteolytic activation of cholesterol-responsive sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) transcriptions factors 1 and 2, and the expression of the target gene 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR). Under such conditions, mtAQP8 mRNA and protein expressions were significantly reduced. In contrast, cholesterol depletion using mβCD alone increased SREBP-1 and 2 activation and upregulated HMGCR and mtAQP8 mRNA and protein expressions. The results suggest that cholesterol can regulate transcriptionally human hepatocyte mtAQP8 expression likely via SREBPs. The functional implications of our findings are discussed. © 2017 IUBMB Life, 69(5):341-346, 2017. © 2017 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  8. Long-term safety and efficacy of combination gemfibrozil and HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors for the treatment of mixed lipid disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdock, D K; Murdock, A K; Murdock, R W; Olson, K J; Frane, A M; Kersten, M E; Joyce, D M; Gantner, S E

    1999-07-01

    Combinations of gemfibrozil and a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl (HMG) coenzyme A reductase inhibitor show promise in treating mixed lipid abnormalities. However, concern regarding the risk of myopathy and hepatic toxicity has limited the use of this combination. To determine the long-term safety and efficacy of this combination, we prospectively identified all patients placed on a combination of gemfibrozil and any HMG reductase inhibitor. Pravastatin, simvastatin, fluvastatin, lovastatin, or atorvastatin at incremental doses was combined with gemfibrozil (600 mg twice daily). Lipid profiles, creatine kinase levels, and aminotransferase levels were monitored. Two hundred fifty-two patients with established atherosclerosis receiving combination therapy for a mean of 2.36 +/- 1.52 years spanning a total of 593.6 patient-years were monitored. In 148 patients, gemfibrozil was started before an HMG was added. The pretreatment total cholesterol level fell from 222 +/- 34 mg/dL to 181 +/- 26 mg/dL (P <.001) on combination therapy. HDL cholesterol level rose from 30 +/- 5 mg/dL to 36 +/- 7 mg/dL (P <.01), triglyceride level fell from 361 +/- 141 mg/dL to 212 +/- 101 mg/dL (P <.03). The ratio of total cholesterol to HDL fell from 7.6 +/- 1. 7 to 5.3 +/- 1.6 (P <.001). In 104 patients an HMG was begun before gemfibrozil was added. Pretreatment total cholesterol level fell from 246 +/- 54 mg/dL to 192 +/- 40 mg/dL on combination therapy (P <.01). HDL level rose from 33 +/- 9 mg/dL to 38 +/- 9 mg/dL (P <.03) and triglyceride level fell from 314 +/- 183 mg/dL to 183 +/- 93 mg/dL (P <.001). The ratio of total cholesterol to HDL fell from 7.9 +/- 3.6 to 5.2 +/- 1.4 (P <.001). In both groups the lipid profile on combination therapy was significantly better than that obtained on single-agent therapy. One episode of myopathy (0.4%) and one episode of aminotransferase level elevation (0.4%) of greater than 3 times upper limit of normal occurred. Both resolved with cessation of therapy

  9. Coenzyme Q10 for Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia; Wang, Luning; Zhan, Si-Yan; Xia, Yinyin

    2011-12-07

    A number of preclinical studies in both in vitro and in vivo models of Parkinson's disease have demonstrated that coenzyme Q10 can protect the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system. Some clinical trials have looked at the neuroprotective effects of coenzyme Q10 in patients with early and midstage Parkinson's disease. To assess the evidence from randomized controlled trials on the efficacy and safety of treatment with coenzyme Q10 compared to placebo in patients with early and midstage Parkinson's disease. We searched the Cochrane Movment Disorders Group Trials Register, CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2009, Issue 4), MEDLINE (January 1966 to March 2011), and EMBASE (January 1985 to March 2011). We handsearched the references quoted in the identified trials, congress reports from the most important neurological association and movement disorder societies in Europe and America (March 2011), checked reference lists of relevant studies and contacted other researchers. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared coenzyme Q10 to placebo for patients who suffered early and midstage primary Parkinson's disease. Studies in which the method of randomization or concealment were unknown were included. Cross-over studies were excluded. Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. All disagreements were resolved by consensus between authors and were explained. We attempted to contact the authors of studies for further details if any data were missing and to establish the characteristics of unpublished trials through correspondence with the trial coordinator or principal investigator. Adverse effects information was collected from the trials. Four randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials with a total of 452 patients met the inclusion criteria and were included in the review. In overall, there were improvements in activities of daily living (ADL) UPDRS (WMD -3.12, 95% CI -5.88 to -0.36) and Schwab and England (WMD 4.43, 95% CI

  10. WITHDRAWN: Coenzyme Q10 for Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia; Wang, Lu-Ning; Zhan, Si-Yan; Xia, Yinyin

    2012-05-16

    A number of preclinical studies in both in vitro and in vivo models of Parkinson's disease have demonstrated that coenzyme Q10 can protect the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system. Some clinical trials have looked at the neuroprotective effects of coenzyme Q10 in patients with early and midstage Parkinson's disease. To assess the evidence from randomized controlled trials on the efficacy and safety of treatment with coenzyme Q10 compared to placebo in patients with early and midstage Parkinson's disease. We searched the Cochrane Movment Disorders Group Trials Register, CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2009, Issue 4), MEDLINE (January 1966 to March 2011), and EMBASE (January 1985 to March 2011). We handsearched the references quoted in the identified trials, congress reports from the most important neurological association and movement disorder societies in Europe and America (March 2011), checked reference lists of relevant studies and contacted other researchers. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared coenzyme Q10 to placebo for patients who suffered early and midstage primary Parkinson's disease. Studies in which the method of randomization or concealment were unknown were included. Cross-over studies were excluded. Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. All disagreements were resolved by consensus between authors and were explained. We attempted to contact the authors of studies for further details if any data were missing and to establish the characteristics of unpublished trials through correspondence with the trial coordinator or principal investigator. Adverse effects information was collected from the trials. Four randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials with a total of 452 patients met the inclusion criteria and were included in the review. In overall, there were improvements in activities of daily living (ADL) UPDRS (WMD -3.12, 95% CI -5.88 to -0.36) and Schwab and England (WMD 4.43, 95% CI

  11. Organometallic chemistry of b(12) coenzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kräutler, Bernhard

    2009-01-01

    When coenzyme B(12) was identified as organometallic derivative of vitamin B(12), metal-carbon bonds were revealed to be relevant in life processes. Vitamin B(12), the "antipernicious anaemia factor" required for human health, was isolated earlier as a crystallizable cyano-Co(III)-complex. B(12) cofactors and other cobalt corrinoids play important roles not only in humans, but in the metabolism of archaea and other microorganisms, in particular. Indeed, the microorganisms are the only natural sources of the B(12) derivatives. For other B(12)-requiring organisms the corrinoids are thus "vitamins". However, vitamin B(12) also needs to be converted into organometallic B(12)-forms, which are the typical coenzymes in metabolically important enzymes. One of these, methionine synthase, catalyzes the transfer of a methyl group and its corrinoid cofactor is methylcobalamin. Another one, methylmalonyl-CoA mutase uses a reversible radical process, and coenzyme B(12) (adenosylcobalamin) as its cofactor, to transform methylmalonyl-CoA into succinyl-CoA. In such enzymes, the bound B(12) derivatives engage (or are formed) in exceptional organometallic enzymatic reactions, which depend upon the organometallic reactivity of the B(12) cofactors. Clearly, organometallic B(12) derivatives hold an important position in life and have thus attracted particular interest from the medical sciences, biology, and chemistry. This chapter outlines the unique structures of B(12) derivatives and recapitulates their redox properties and their organometallic chemistry, relevant in the context of the metabolic transformation of B(12) derivatives into the relevant coenzyme forms and for their use in B(12)-dependent enzymes.

  12. Primary coenzyme Q10 deficiency presenting as fatal neonatal multiorgan failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desbats, Maria Andrea; Vetro, Annalisa; Limongelli, Ivan; Lunardi, Giada; Casarin, Alberto; Doimo, Mara; Spinazzi, Marco; Angelini, Corrado; Cenacchi, Giovanna; Burlina, Alberto; Rodriguez Hernandez, Maria Angeles; Chiandetti, Lino; Clementi, Maurizio; Trevisson, Eva; Navas, Placido; Zuffardi, Orsetta; Salviati, Leonardo

    2015-09-01

    Coenzyme Q10 deficiency is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder, with manifestations that may range from fatal neonatal multisystem failure, to adult-onset encephalopathy. We report a patient who presented at birth with severe lactic acidosis, proteinuria, dicarboxylic aciduria, and hepatic insufficiency. She also had dilation of left ventricle on echocardiography. Her neurological condition rapidly worsened and despite aggressive care she died at 23 h of life. Muscle histology displayed lipid accumulation. Electron microscopy showed markedly swollen mitochondria with fragmented cristae. Respiratory-chain enzymatic assays showed a reduction of combined activities of complex I+III and II+III with normal activities of isolated complexes. The defect was confirmed in fibroblasts, where it could be rescued by supplementing the culture medium with 10 μM coenzyme Q10. Coenzyme Q10 levels were reduced (28% of controls) in these cells. We performed exome sequencing and focused the analysis on genes involved in coenzyme Q10 biosynthesis. The patient harbored a homozygous c.545T>G, p.(Met182Arg) alteration in COQ2, which was validated by functional complementation in yeast. In this case the biochemical and morphological features were essential to direct the genetic diagnosis. The parents had another pregnancy after the biochemical diagnosis was established, but before the identification of the genetic defect. Because of the potentially high recurrence risk, and given the importance of early CoQ10 supplementation, we decided to treat with CoQ10 the newborn child pending the results of the biochemical assays. Clinicians should consider a similar management in siblings of patients with CoQ10 deficiency without a genetic diagnosis.

  13. The production of coenzyme Q10 in microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cluis, Corinne P; Pinel, Dominic; Martin, Vincent J

    2012-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 has emerged as a valuable molecule for pharmaceutical and cosmetic applications. Therefore, research into producing and optimizing coenzyme Q10 via microbial fermentation is ongoing. There are two major paths being explored for maximizing production of this molecule to commercially advantageous levels. The first entails using microbes that naturally produce coenzyme Q10 as fermentation biocatalysts and optimizing the fermentation parameters in order to reach industrial levels of production. However, the natural coenzyme Q10-producing microbes tend to be intractable for industrial fermentation settings. The second path to coenzyme Q10 production being explored is to engineer Escherichia coli with the ability to biosynthesize this molecule in order to take advantage of its more favourable fermentation characteristics and the well-understood array of genetic tools available for this bacteria. Although many studies have attempted to over-produce coenzyme Q10 in E. coli through genetic engineering, production titres still remain below those of the natural coenzyme Q10-producing microorganisms. Current research is providing the knowledge needed to alleviate the bottlenecks involved in producing coenzyme Q10 from an E. coli strain platform and the fermentation parameters that could dramatically increase production titres from natural microbial producers. Synthesizing the lessons learned from both approaches may be the key towards a more cost-effective coenzyme Q10 industry.

  14. Acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferases

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Ta-Yuan; Li, Bo-Liang; Chang, Catherine C. Y.; Urano, Yasuomi

    2009-01-01

    The enzymes acyl-coenzyme A (CoA):cholesterol acyltransferases (ACATs) are membrane-bound proteins that utilize long-chain fatty acyl-CoA and cholesterol as substrates to form cholesteryl esters. In mammals, two isoenzymes, ACAT1 and ACAT2, encoded by two different genes, exist. ACATs play important roles in cellular cholesterol homeostasis in various tissues. This chapter summarizes the current knowledge on ACAT-related research in two areas: 1) ACAT genes and proteins and 2) ACAT enzymes as...

  15. Coenzyme Q10: Can It Prevent Statin Side Effects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Q10: Can it prevent statin side effects? Can coenzyme Q10 reduce the risk of side effects from statins? ... Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, M.D. At this time, coenzyme Q10 isn't universally recommended for preventing side effects ...

  16. Coenzyme Q10 effects in neurodegenerative disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith Spindler

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Meredith Spindler1, M Flint Beal1,2, Claire Henchcliffe1,21Department of Neurology, 2Department of Neuroscience, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY, USAAbstract: Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 is an essential cofactor in the mitochondrial respiratory chain, and as a dietary supplement it has recently gained attention for its potential role in the treatment of neurodegenerative disease. Evidence for mitochondrial dysfunction in neurodegenerative disorders derives from animal models, studies of mitochondria from patients, identification of genetic defects in patients with neurodegenerative disease, and measurements of markers of oxidative stress. Studies of in vitro models of neuronal toxicity and animal models of neurodegenerative disorders have demonstrated potential neuroprotective effects of CoQ10. With this data in mind, several clinical trials of CoQ10 have been performed in Parkinson’s disease and atypical Parkinson’s syndromes, Huntington’s disease, Alzheimer disease, Friedreich’s ataxia, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, with equivocal findings. CoQ10 is widely available in multiple formulations and is very well tolerated with minimal adverse effects, making it an attractive potential therapy. Phase III trials of high-dose CoQ10 in large sample sizes are needed to further ascertain the effects of CoQ10 in neurodegenerative diseases.Keywords: coenzyme Q10, neurodegenerative disease, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, mitochondrial dysfunction

  17. Coenzyme Q in pregnant women and rats with intrahepatic cholestasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinefski, Manuela R; Contin, Mario D; Rodriguez, Myrian R; Geréz, Estefanía M; Galleano, Mónica L; Lucangioli, Silvia E; Bianciotti, Liliana G; Tripodi, Valeria P

    2014-08-01

    Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy is a high-risk liver disease given the eventual deleterious consequences that may occur in the foetus. It is accepted that the abnormal accumulation of hydrophobic bile acids in maternal serum are responsible for the disease development. Hydrophobic bile acids induce oxidative stress and apoptosis leading to the damage of the hepatic parenchyma and eventually extrahepatic tissues. As coenzyme Q (CoQ) is considered an early marker of oxidative stress in this study, we sought to assess CoQ levels, bile acid profile and oxidative stress status in intrahepatic cholestasis. CoQ, vitamin E and malondialdehyde were measured in plasma and/or tissues by HPLC-UV method whereas serum bile acids by capillary electrophoresis in rats with ethinyl estradiol-induced cholestasis and women with pregnancy cholestasis. CoQ and vitamin E plasma levels were diminished in both rats and women with intrahepatic cholestasis. Furthermore, reduced CoQ was also found in muscle and brain of cholestatic rats but no changes were observed in heart or liver. In addition, a positive correlation between CoQ and ursodeoxycholic/lithocholic acid ratio was found in intrahepatic cholestasis suggesting that increased plasma lithocholic acid may be intimately related to CoQ depletion in blood and tissues. Significant CoQ and vitamin E depletion occur in both animals and humans with intrahepatic cholestasis likely as the result of increased hydrophobic bile acids known to produce significant oxidative stress. Present findings further suggest that antioxidant supplementation complementary to traditional treatment may improve cholestasis outcome. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Hepatitis E

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sheets Fact files Questions & answers Features Multimedia Contacts Hepatitis E Fact sheet Updated July 2017 Key facts ... in 2005 . Report Global hepatitis report, 2017 World Hepatitis Day Know hepatitis - Act now Event notice Key ...

  19. Viral Hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home A-Z Health Topics Viral hepatitis Viral hepatitis > A-Z Health Topics Viral hepatitis (PDF, 90 ... liver. Source: National Cancer Institute Learn more about hepatitis Watch a video. Learn who is at risk ...

  20. Hepatitis A

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or care for someone who has hepatitis A People who travel to developing countries are more likely to get hepatitis A. What are the complications of hepatitis A? People typically recover from hepatitis A without complications. In ...

  1. HMG-coenzyme A reductase inhibition, type 2 diabetes, and bodyweight: evidence from genetic analysis and randomised trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swerdlow, Daniel I; Preiss, David; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Holmes, Michael V; Engmann, Jorgen E L; Shah, Tina; Sofat, Reecha; Stender, Stefan; Johnson, Paul C D; Scott, Robert A; Leusink, Maarten; Verweij, Niek; Sharp, Stephen J; Guo, Yiran; Giambartolomei, Claudia; Chung, Christina; Peasey, Anne; Amuzu, Antoinette; Li, KaWah; Palmen, Jutta; Howard, Philip; Cooper, Jackie A; Drenos, Fotios; Li, Yun R; Lowe, Gordon; Gallacher, John; Stewart, Marlene C W; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Buxbaum, Sarah G; van der A, Daphne L; Forouhi, Nita G; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Schnabel, Renate B; Hubacek, Jaroslav A; Kubinova, Ruzena; Baceviciene, Migle; Tamosiunas, Abdonas; Pajak, Andrzej; Topor-Madry, Romanvan; Stepaniak, Urszula; Malyutina, Sofia; Baldassarre, Damiano; Sennblad, Bengt; Tremoli, Elena; de Faire, Ulf; Veglia, Fabrizio; Ford, Ian; Jukema, J Wouter; Westendorp, Rudi G J; de Borst, Gert Jan; de Jong, Pim A; Algra, Ale; Spiering, Wilko; der Zee, Anke H Maitland-van; Klungel, Olaf H; de Boer, Anthonius; Doevendans, Pieter A; Eaton, Charles B; Robinson, Jennifer G; Duggan, David; Kjekshus, John; Downs, John R; Gotto, Antonio M; Keech, Anthony C; Marchioli, Roberto; Tognoni, Gianni; Sever, Peter S; Poulter, Neil R; Waters, David D; Pedersen, Terje R; Amarenco, Pierre; Nakamura, Haruo; McMurray, John J V; Lewsey, James D; Chasman, Daniel I; Ridker, Paul M; Maggioni, Aldo P; Tavazzi, Luigi; Ray, Kausik K; Seshasai, Sreenivasa Rao Kondapally; Manson, JoAnn E; Price, Jackie F; Whincup, Peter H; Morris, Richard W; Lawlor, Debbie A; Smith, George Davey; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Schreiner, Pamela J; Fornage, Myriam; Siscovick, David S; Cushman, Mary; Kumari, Meena; Wareham, Nick J; Verschuren, W M Monique; Redline, Susan; Patel, Sanjay R; Whittaker, John C; Hamsten, Anders; Delaney, Joseph A; Dale, Caroline; Gaunt, Tom R; Wong, Andrew; Kuh, Diana; Hardy, Rebecca; Kathiresan, Sekar; Castillo, Berta A; van der Harst, Pim; Brunner, Eric J; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Marmot, Michael G; Krauss, Ronald M; Tsai, Michael; Coresh, Josef; Hoogeveen, Ronald C; Psaty, Bruce M; Lange, Leslie A; Hakonarson, Hakon; Dudbridge, Frank; Humphries, Steve E; Talmud, Philippa J; Kivimäki, Mika; Timpson, Nicholas J; Langenberg, Claudia; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Voevoda, Mikhail; Bobak, Martin; Pikhart, Hynek; Wilson, James G; Reiner, Alex P; Keating, Brendan J; Hingorani, Aroon D; Sattar, Naveed

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Statins increase the risk of new-onset type 2 diabetes mellitus. We aimed to assess whether this increase in risk is a consequence of inhibition of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR), the intended drug target. Methods We used single nucleotide polymorphisms in the HMGCR gene, rs17238484 (for the main analysis) and rs12916 (for a subsidiary analysis) as proxies for HMGCR inhibition by statins. We examined associations of these variants with plasma lipid, glucose, and insulin concentrations; bodyweight; waist circumference; and prevalent and incident type 2 diabetes. Study-specific effect estimates per copy of each LDL-lowering allele were pooled by meta-analysis. These findings were compared with a meta-analysis of new-onset type 2 diabetes and bodyweight change data from randomised trials of statin drugs. The effects of statins in each randomised trial were assessed using meta-analysis. Findings Data were available for up to 223 463 individuals from 43 genetic studies. Each additional rs17238484-G allele was associated with a mean 0·06 mmol/L (95% CI 0·05–0·07) lower LDL cholesterol and higher body weight (0·30 kg, 0·18–0·43), waist circumference (0·32 cm, 0·16–0·47), plasma insulin concentration (1·62%, 0·53–2·72), and plasma glucose concentration (0·23%, 0·02–0·44). The rs12916 SNP had similar effects on LDL cholesterol, bodyweight, and waist circumference. The rs17238484-G allele seemed to be associated with higher risk of type 2 diabetes (odds ratio [OR] per allele 1·02, 95% CI 1·00–1·05); the rs12916-T allele association was consistent (1·06, 1·03–1·09). In 129 170 individuals in randomised trials, statins lowered LDL cholesterol by 0·92 mmol/L (95% CI 0·18–1·67) at 1-year of follow-up, increased bodyweight by 0·24 kg (95% CI 0·10–0·38 in all trials; 0·33 kg, 95% CI 0·24–0·42 in placebo or standard care controlled trials and −0·15 kg, 95% CI −0·39 to 0·08 in intensive

  2. Spinach Leaf Acetyl-Coenzyme a Synthetase: Purification and Characterization

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carolyn A. Zeiher; Douglas D. Randall

    1991-01-01

    Acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) synthetase was purified 364-fold from leaves of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) using ammonium sulfate fractionation followed by ion exchange, dye-ligand, and gel permeation chromatography...

  3. Better than Nature: Nicotinamide Biomimetics That Outperform Natural Coenzymes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knaus, T.; Paul, C.E.; Levy, C.W.; de Vries, S.; Mutti, F.G.; Hollmann, F.; Scrutton, N.S.

    2016-01-01

    The search for affordable, green biocatalytic processes is a challenge for chemicals manufacture. Redox biotransformations are potentially attractive, but they rely on unstable and expensive nicotinamide coenzymes that have prevented their widespread exploitation. Stoichiometric use of natural

  4. Effect of coenzyme Q10 on organ damage in sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abitagaoglu, S; Akinci, S B; Saricaoglu, F; Akinci, M; Zeybek, N D; Muftuoglu, S; Aypar, U

    2015-01-01

    Investigating the effects of coenzyme Q10 on organ damage and survival on mice in cecal ligation perforation (CLP) model in sepsis. Coenzyme Q10 is an antioxidant molecule playing an important role in mitochondria. Mitochondrial dysfunction is an important mechanism in sepsis pathophysiology. Nintyfour Swiss Albino male mice were divided into 8 groups. CLP was performed in Group I. Coenzyme Q10, 100 mg/kg subcutaneously, was given 5 hours after CLP to Group II and 20 hours after CLP to Group III. Sham operation was performed in Group IV, 100 mg/kg coenzyme Q10 subcutaneously was given 5 hours after sham operation to Group V and 20 hours after sham operation to Group VI. No operation was performed in Group VII; coenzyme Q10, 100 mg/kg subcutaneously, was given to Group VIII. Antibiotics and fluid replacement were applied for 3 days. The mice still living were sacrificed at 576th hour. The organ damages were scored under light microscopy. The survival of Group I and Group II was lower than that of the control groups, but the survival in the Group III was similar to control groups. It was established that spleen, kidney, heart damage and total organ damage were decreased when compared to CLP group. Coenzyme Q10 is effective in decreasing histological organ damage in sepsis (Tab. 3. Fig. 1, Ref. 30).

  5. Intestinal absorption of coenzyme Q(10) administered in a meal or as capsules to healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Christine; Bysted, Anette; Hølmer, Gunhild Kofoed

    1997-01-01

    A randomized cross-over study by supplementation with single doses of coenzyme Q(10) (30 mg/person), administered either as a meal consisting of cooked pork heart or as 30 mg coenzyme Q(10) capsules was performed to investigate the bioavailability of dietary coenzyme Q(10) in humans. The increase...... in serum coenzyme Q(10) concentration was used as an index of the absorption, and reached a maximum six hours after the ingestion of either meal or capsules. Following intake of coenzyme Q(10) capsules, the serum coenzyme Q(10) concentrations increased significantly (p...

  6. Biochemical Assessment of Coenzyme Q10 Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Rodríguez-Aguilera

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 deficiency syndrome includes clinically heterogeneous mitochondrial diseases that show a variety of severe and debilitating symptoms. A multiprotein complex encoded by nuclear genes carries out CoQ10 biosynthesis. Mutations in any of these genes are responsible for the primary CoQ10 deficiency, but there are also different conditions that induce secondary CoQ10 deficiency including mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA depletion and mutations in genes involved in the fatty acid β-oxidation pathway. The diagnosis of CoQ10 deficiencies is determined by the decrease of its content in skeletal muscle and/or dermal skin fibroblasts. Dietary CoQ10 supplementation is the only available treatment for these deficiencies that require a rapid and distinct diagnosis. Here we review methods for determining CoQ10 content by HPLC separation and identification using alternative approaches including electrochemical detection and mass spectrometry. Also, we review procedures to determine the CoQ10 biosynthesis rate using labeled precursors.

  7. Coenzyme Q10 and Neurological Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Siciliano

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10, or ubiquinone is a small electron carrier of the mitochondrial respiratory chain with antioxidant properties. CoQ10 supplementation has been widely used for mitochondrial disorders. The rationale for using CoQ10 is very powerful when this compound is primary decreased because of defective synthesis. Primary CoQ10 deficiency is a treatable condition, so heightened “clinical awareness” about this diagnosis is essential. CoQ10 and its analogue, idebenone, have also been widely used in the treatment of other neurodegenerative disorders. These compounds could potentially play a therapeutic role in Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Friedreich’s ataxia, and other conditions which have been linked to mitochondrial dysfunction. This article reviews the physiological roles of CoQ10, as well as the rationale and the role in clinical practice of CoQ10 supplementation in different neurological diseases, from primary CoQ10 deficiency to neurodegenerative disorders.

  8. Hepatitis B

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are 2 vaccines for hepatitis B on the market. There is 1 combination vaccine on the market for hepatitis A and B together. Vaccination Schedule ... hepatitis B vaccine with no risk to their babies. Resources Products and Publications Hepatitis B Fact Sheets ...

  9. Regulation of autophagy by cytosolic acetyl-coenzyme A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mariño, Guillermo; Pietrocola, Federico; Eisenberg, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Acetyl-coenzyme A (AcCoA) is a major integrator of the nutritional status at the crossroads of fat, sugar, and protein catabolism. Here we show that nutrient starvation causes rapid depletion of AcCoA. AcCoA depletion entailed the commensurate reduction in the overall acetylation of cytoplasmic p...

  10. Bioavailability of four oral Coenzyme Q formulations in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weis, M.; Mortensen, S.A.; Rassing, M.R.

    1994-01-01

    The bioavailability of four different Coenzyme Q (CoQ) formulations was compared in ten healthy volunteers in a four-way randomised cross-over trial. The included formulations were: A hard gelatine capsule containing 100 mg of CoQ and 400 mg of Emcompress. Three soft gelatine capsules containing...

  11. Coenzyme A : to make it or uptake it?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sibon, Ody C. M.; Strauss, Erick

    2016-01-01

    The consensus has been that intracellular coenzyme A (CoA) is obtained exclusively by de novo biosynthesis via a universal, conserved five-step pathway in the cell cytosol. However, old and new evidence suggest that cells (and some microorganisms) have several strategies to obtain CoA, with

  12. Acyl-coenzyme A organizes laterally in membranes and is recognized specifically by acyl-coenzyme A binding protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cohen Simonsen, A; Bernchou Jensen, U; Færgeman, Nils J.

    2003-01-01

    Long chain acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) is a biochemically important amphiphilic molecule that is known to partition strongly into membranes by insertion of the acyl chain. At present, microscopically resolved evidence is lacking on how acyl-CoA influences and organizes laterally in membranes. By a...

  13. Hepatitis A

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an inflammation of the liver. One type, hepatitis A, is caused by the hepatitis A virus (HAV). The disease spreads through contact with ... washed in untreated water Putting into your mouth a finger or object that came into contact with ...

  14. Hepatitis C

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Weight loss Confusion, drowsiness and slurred speech (hepatic encephalopathy) Spider-like blood vessels on your skin (spider angiomas) Every chronic hepatitis C infection starts with an acute phase. ...

  15. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Hepatic Encephalopathy Treatment Options Treatment Basics Treatment Medications Importance of Adhering to Your Treatment Plan Long-Term ... disease is. It’s important for you and your family to become familiar with the signs of Hepatic ...

  16. Hepatitis C

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... especially important for people who are showing signs liver fibrosis or scarring. Medicines used to treat hepatitis C ... Association for the Study of Liver Diseases. Diagnosis, management, and treatment of hepatitis C: an update. Hepatology . ...

  17. Hepatitis C

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Doctors treat hepatitis C with antiviral medicines that attack the virus and can cure the disease in most cases. ... Doctors treat hepatitis C with antiviral medicines that attack the virus. You may need to take medicines for 12 ...

  18. Hepatitis C: Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Public Home » Hepatitis C » Hepatitis C Treatment Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... Enter ZIP code here Enter ZIP code here Hepatitis C Treatment for Veterans and the Public Treatment ...

  19. Alcohol and Hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home » Living with Hepatitis » Daily Living: Alcohol Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... heavy drinking, most heavy drinkers have developed cirrhosis. Hepatitis C and cirrhosis In general, someone with hepatitis ...

  20. [Lupus hepatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Hadj, Yahia Chiraz; Chaabouni, Lilia; Montacer, Kchir Mohamed; Abid, Feriel; Zouari, Rafik

    2002-07-01

    We report the case of 42 year-old man who presents an acute polyarthritis associated with systemic manifestation and immunologic disorders related to systemic lupus erythematosus. Hepatic tests show cholostase and cytolysis. Hepatic involvement is linked with systemic lupus erythematosus after exclusion of hepatotoxic drugs, viral hepatitis and absence of anti mitochondrial and anti muscle antibodies. Lupus hepatitis seems to be correlated with autoantibodies to ribosomal P protein. Its treatment remains to be defined.

  1. Hepatitis C

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an inflammation of the liver. One type, hepatitis C, is caused by the hepatitis C virus (HCV). It usually spreads through contact with ... childbirth. Most people who are infected with hepatitis C don't have any symptoms for years. If ...

  2. Hypoksisk hepatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amadid, Hanan; Schiødt, Frank Vinholt

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxic hepatitis (HH), also known as ischaemic hepatitis or shock liver, is an acute liver injury caused by hepatic hypoxia. Cardiac failure, respiratory failure and septic shock are the main underlying conditions. In each of these conditions, several haemodynamic mechanisms lead to hepatic...... hypoxia. A shock state is observed in only 50% of cases. Thus, shock liver and ischaemic hepatitis are misnomers. HH can be a diagnostic pitfall but the diagnosis can be established when three criteria are met. Prognosis is poor and prompt identification and treatment of the underlying conditions...

  3. Thermophilic archaea activate butane via alkyl-coenzyme M formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laso-Pérez, Rafael; Wegener, Gunter; Knittel, Katrin; Widdel, Friedrich; Harding, Katie J; Krukenberg, Viola; Meier, Dimitri V; Richter, Michael; Tegetmeyer, Halina E; Riedel, Dietmar; Richnow, Hans-Hermann; Adrian, Lorenz; Reemtsma, Thorsten; Lechtenfeld, Oliver J; Musat, Florin

    2016-11-17

    The anaerobic formation and oxidation of methane involve unique enzymatic mechanisms and cofactors, all of which are believed to be specific for C1-compounds. Here we show that an anaerobic thermophilic enrichment culture composed of dense consortia of archaea and bacteria apparently uses partly similar pathways to oxidize the C4 hydrocarbon butane. The archaea, proposed genus 'Candidatus Syntrophoarchaeum', show the characteristic autofluorescence of methanogens, and contain highly expressed genes encoding enzymes similar to methyl-coenzyme M reductase. We detect butyl-coenzyme M, indicating archaeal butane activation analogous to the first step in anaerobic methane oxidation. In addition, Ca. Syntrophoarchaeum expresses the genes encoding β-oxidation enzymes, carbon monoxide dehydrogenase and reversible C1 methanogenesis enzymes. This allows for the complete oxidation of butane. Reducing equivalents are seemingly channelled to HotSeep-1, a thermophilic sulfate-reducing partner bacterium known from the anaerobic oxidation of methane. Genes encoding 16S rRNA and methyl-coenzyme M reductase similar to those identifying Ca. Syntrophoarchaeum were repeatedly retrieved from marine subsurface sediments, suggesting that the presented activation mechanism is naturally widespread in the anaerobic oxidation of short-chain hydrocarbons.

  4. Breeding of Coenzyme Q10 Produced Strain by Low-Energy Ion Implantation and Optimization of Coenzyme Q10 Fermentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dejun; Zheng, Zhiming; Wang, Peng; Wang, Li; Yuan, Hang; Yu, Zengliang

    2008-12-01

    In order to increase the production efficiency of coenzyme Q10, the original strain Agrobacterium tumefaciens ATCC 4452 was mutated by means of Nitrogen ions implantation. A mutant strain, ATX 12, with high contents of coenzyme Q10 was selected. Subsequently, the conditions such as carbohydrate concentration, nitrogen source concentration, inoculum's size, seed age, aeration and temperature which might affect the production of CoQ10 were investigated in detail. Under optimal conditions, the maximum concentration of the intracellular CoQ10 reached 200.3 mg/L after 80 h fed-batch fermentation, about 245% increasing in CoQ10 production after ion implantation, compared to the original strain.

  5. Potential role of coenzyme Q10 in facilitating recovery from statin-induced rhabdomyolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L W; Jabbour, A; Hayward, C S; Furlong, T J; Girgis, L; Macdonald, P S; Keogh, A M

    2015-04-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a rare, but serious complication of statin therapy, and represents the most severe end of the spectrum of statin-induced myotoxicity. We report a case where coenzyme Q10 facilitated recovery from statin-induced rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure, which had initially persisted despite statin cessation and haemodialysis. This observation is biologically plausible due to the recognised importance of coenzyme Q10 in mitochondrial bioenergetics within myocytes, and the fact that statins inhibit farnesyl pyrophosphate production, a biochemical step crucial for coenzyme Q10 synthesis. Coenzyme Q10 is generally well tolerated, and may potentially benefit patients with statin-induced rhabdomyolysis. © 2015 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  6. Feature Hepatitis: Hepatitis Can Strike Anyone

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Feature Hepatitis Hepatitis Can Strike Anyone Past Issues / Spring 2009 Table ... from all walks of life are affected by hepatitis, especially hepatitis C, the most common form of ...

  7. Hepatitis A through E (Viral Hepatitis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hepatitis B Hepatitis C Hepatitis D Hepatitis E Liver Transplant Definition & Facts Transplant Process Transplant Surgery Living with a Liver Transplant Clinical Trials Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease & NASH Definition & ...

  8. Travelers' Health: Hepatitis C

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Chapter 3 - Hepatitis B Chapter 3 - Hepatitis E Hepatitis C Deborah Holtzman INFECTIOUS AGENT Hepatitis C virus ( ... mother to child. Map 3-05. Prevalence of hepatitis C virus infection 1 PDF Version (printable) 1 ...

  9. Travelers' Health: Hepatitis B

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Chapter 3 - Hepatitis A Chapter 3 - Hepatitis C Hepatitis B Francisco Averhoff INFECTIOUS AGENT Hepatitis B virus ( ... progression of disease. Map 3-04. Prevalence of hepatitis B virus infection 1 PDF Version (printable) 1 ...

  10. Travelers' Health: Hepatitis A

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 3 - Helminths, Soil-Transmitted Chapter 3 - Hepatitis B Hepatitis A Noele P. Nelson INFECTIOUS AGENT Hepatitis A ... hepatitis/HAV Table 3-02. Vaccines to prevent hepatitis A VACCINE TRADE NAME (MANUFACTURER) AGE (Y) DOSE ...

  11. Hepatitis C: Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Public Home » Hepatitis C » Treatment Decisions Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... can I find out about participating in a hepatitis C clinical trial? Many trials are being conducted ...

  12. Hepatitis (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Hepatitis KidsHealth / For Parents / Hepatitis Print en español Hepatitis What Is Hepatitis? Hepatitis is an inflammation of the liver. The ...

  13. 7-Dehydrocholesterol–dependent proteolysis of HMG-CoA reductase suppresses sterol biosynthesis in a mouse model of Smith-Lemli-Opitz/RSH syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzky, Barbara U.; Moebius, Fabian F.; Asaoka, Hitoshi; Waage-Baudet, Heather; Xu, Liwen; Xu, Guorong; Maeda, Nobuyo; Kluckman, Kimberly; Hiller, Sylvia; Yu, Hongwei; Batta, Ashok K.; Shefer, Sarah; Chen, Thomas; Salen, Gerald; Sulik, Kathleen; Simoni, Robert D.; Ness, Gene C.; Glossmann, Hartmut; Patel, Shailendra B.; Tint, G.S.

    2001-01-01

    Smith-Lemli-Opitz/RSH syndrome (SLOS), a relatively common birth-defect mental-retardation syndrome, is caused by mutations in DHCR7, whose product catalyzes an obligate step in cholesterol biosynthesis, the conversion of 7-dehydrocholesterol to cholesterol. A null mutation in the murine Dhcr7 causes an identical biochemical defect to that seen in SLOS, including markedly reduced tissue cholesterol and total sterol levels, and 30- to 40-fold elevated concentrations of 7-dehydrocholesterol. Prenatal lethality was not noted, but newborn homozygotes breathed with difficulty, did not suckle, and died soon after birth with immature lungs, enlarged bladders, and, frequently, cleft palates. Despite reduced sterol concentrations in Dhcr7–/– mice, mRNA levels for 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, the rate-controlling enzyme for sterol biosynthesis, the LDL receptor, and SREBP-2 appeared neither elevated nor repressed. In contrast to mRNA, protein levels and activities of HMG-CoA reductase were markedly reduced. Consistent with this finding, 7-dehydrocholesterol accelerates proteolysis of HMG-CoA reductase while sparing other key proteins. These results demonstrate that in mice without Dhcr7 activity, accumulated 7-dehydrocholesterol suppresses sterol biosynthesis posttranslationally. This effect might exacerbate abnormal development in SLOS by increasing the fetal cholesterol deficiency. PMID:11560960

  14. Exploration of natural product ingredients as inhibitors of human HMG-CoA reductase through structure-based virtual screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shih-Hung; Huang, Kao-Jean; Weng, Ching-Feng; Shiuan, David

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol plays an important role in living cells. However, a very high level of cholesterol may lead to atherosclerosis. HMG-CoA (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A) reductase is the key enzyme in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway, and the statin-like drugs are inhibitors of human HMG-CoA reductase (hHMGR). The present study aimed to virtually screen for potential hHMGR inhibitors from natural product to discover hypolipidemic drug candidates with fewer side effects and lesser toxicities. We used the 3D structure 1HWK from the PDB (Protein Data Bank) database of hHMGR as the target to screen for the strongly bound compounds from the traditional Chinese medicine database. Many interesting molecules including polyphenolic compounds, polisubstituted heterocyclics, and linear lipophilic alcohols were identified and their ADMET (absorption, disrtibution, metabolism, excretion, toxicity) properties were predicted. Finally, four compounds were obtained for the in vitro validation experiments. The results indicated that curcumin and salvianolic acid C can effectively inhibit hHMGR, with IC50 (half maximal inhibitory concentration) values of 4.3 µM and 8 µM, respectively. The present study also demonstrated the feasibility of discovering new drug candidates through structure-based virtual screening.

  15. Negative feedback loop of cholesterol regulation is impaired in the livers of patients with Alagille syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyahara, Yuki; Bessho, Kazuhiko; Kondou, Hiroki; Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Yasuda, Kie; Ida, Shinobu; Ihara, Yoshiyuki; Mizuta, Koichi; Miyoshi, Yoko; Ozono, Keiichi

    2015-02-02

    To characterize cholesterol regulation in the liver of patients with Alagille syndrome (AGS). Serum total cholesterol (TC) and total bile acid (TBA) levels were measured in 23 AGS patients. The expressions of genes involved in cholesterol regulation, including low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI), 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1), ATP-binding cassette transporter (ABC) A1, and ABCG1/5/8, were measured in liver tissues from five of these patients. Expression of regulators for these genes, including farnesoid X receptor/small heterodimer partner (SHP), liver X receptor α (LXRα) and mature Sterol regulatory element-binding protein 2 (SREBP2) was measured. The expression of mature SREBP2 protein was also examined. Serum TC and TBA levels were correlated in the AGS patients. Liver cholesterol was also increased compared with controls, and correlated with bile acid contents. LDLR, SR-BI, HMGCR, and ABCGs mRNA expression were upregulated, while CYP7A1 mRNA expression was downregulated in AGS livers. SHP and LXRα mRNA expression was also increased, but maturation of SREBP2 was not suppressed in the patients. The major upregulators of liver cholesterol might be increased in AGS patients, indicating an impaired negative feedback mechanism and accelerated liver cholesterol accumulation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Robotic inhibition assay for determination of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors in human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Wei; Liu, Lida; Hsieh, John Y-K; Zhao, Jamie; Matuszewski, Bogdan K; Rogers, John D; Dobrinska, Michael R

    2002-01-01

    The cholesterol-lowering drug simvastatin (SIMV, Zocor reduced heart attacks by 42% in patients who had high cholesterol levels and suffered from heart disease. Upon oral administration, SIMV is quickly hydrolyzed to its beta-hydroxyacid and other acid metabolites, which are potent inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase. A Tecan-based enzyme inhibition assay has been developed to improve the existing Zymark-based assay for the determination of both active and total concentrations of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors in human plasma. A Tecan Genesis 200 robotic workstation equipped with eight probes and customized hardware was utilized to achieve higher sample throughput and improve assay reproducibility and mechanical stability. The developed enzyme inhibition assay was validated over two concentration ranges of 0.4-20 ng equivalent/mL, and 2-50 ng equivalent/mL. Intra- and interday precision data (coefficient of variation (CV)) for both concentration ranges were less than 9%, with an accuracy of 93-107%. The interday precision for the determination of quality control (QC) samples was less than 2% and 8%, respectively. The respective interday QC accuracy values were 93-103% and 97-104%. Good linearity across the two concentration ranges was observed, with acceptable reproducibility. This improved enzyme inhibition assay has been utilized to analyze human plasma samples from several clinical studies. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Simvastatin Does Not Affect Vitamin D Status, but Low Vitamin D Levels Are Associated with Dyslipidemia: Results from a Randomised, Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Rejnmark

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Statin drugs act as inhibitors of the 3-hydroxy-3methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA reductase enzyme early in the mevalonate pathway, thereby reducing the endogenous cholesterol synthesis. In recent studies, it has been suggested from epidemiological data that statins also may improve vitamin D status, as measured by increased plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD levels. We now report the results from a randomised controlled trial on effects of simvastatin on plasma 25OHD levels. Design and Methods. We randomised 82 healthy postmenopausal women to one year of treatment with either simvastatin 40 mg/d or placebo and performed measurement at baseline and after 26 and 52 weeks of treatment. The study was completed by 77 subjects. Results. Compared with placebo, plasma levels of cholesterol and low-density lipoproteins decreased in response to treatment with simvastatin, but our study showed no effect of simvastatin on vitamin D status. However, plasma levels of triglycerides were inversely associated with tertiles of plasma 25OHD levels and changes in plasma triglycerides levels correlated inversely with seasonal changes in vitamin D status. Conclusion. Our data do not support a pharmacological effect of statins on vitamin D status, but do suggest that vitamin D may influence plasma lipid profile and thus be of importance to cardiovascular health.

  18. Chronic psychosocial stress in male mice causes an up-regulation of scavenger receptor class B type 1 protein in the adrenal glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Füchsl, Andrea M; Uschold-Schmidt, Nicole; Reber, Stefan O

    2013-07-01

    Mice exposed to chronic subordinate colony housing (CSC, 19 days) show an exaggerated adrenal corticosterone response to an acute heterotypic stressor (elevated platform (EPF), 5 min) despite no difference from EPF-exposed single-housed control (SHC) mice in corticotropin (ACTH) secretion. In the present study, we asked the question whether this CSC-induced increase in adrenal capability to produce and secrete corticosterone is paralleled by an enhanced adrenal availability and/or mobilization capacity of the corticosterone precursor molecule cholesterol. Employing oil-red staining and western blot analysis we revealed comparable relative density of cortical lipid droplets and relative protein expression of hormone-sensitive lipase, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase and low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R) between CSC and SHC mice. However, relative protein expression of the scavenger receptor class B type 1 (SR-BI) was increased following CSC exposure. Moreover, analysis of plasma high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) and LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) revealed increased LDL-C levels in CSC mice. Together with the pronounced increase in adrenal weight, evidently mediated by hyperplasia of adrenocortical cells, these data strongly indicate an enhanced adrenal availability of and capacity to mobilize cholesterol in chronic psychosocially-stressed mice, contributing to their increased in vivo corticosterone response during acute heterotypic stressor exposure.

  19. Physicians' responses to computerized drug interaction alerts with password overrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasuhara, Yasuyuki; Sakushima, Ken; Endoh, Akira; Umeki, Reona; Oki, Hiromitsu; Yamada, Takehiro; Iseki, Ken; Ishikawa, Makoto

    2015-08-28

    Although evidence has suggested that computerized drug-drug interaction alert systems may reduce the occurrence of drug-drug interactions, the numerous reminders and alerts generated by such systems could represent an excessive burden for clinicians, resulting in a high override rate of not only unimportant, but also important alerts. We analyzed physicians' responses to alerts of relative contraindications and contraindications for coadministration in a computerized drug-drug interaction alert system at Hokkaido University Hospital. In this system, the physician must enter a password to override an alert and continue an order. All of the drug-drug interaction alerts generated between December 2011 and November 2012 at Hokkaido University Hospital were included in this study. The system generated a total of 170 alerts of relative contraindications and contraindication for coadministration; 59 (34.7 %) of the corresponding orders were cancelled after the alert was accepted, and 111 (65.3 %) were overridden. The most frequent contraindication alert was for the combination of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors and fibrates. No incidents involving drug-drug interactions were reported among patients who were prescribed contraindicated drug pairs after an override. Although computerized drug-drug interaction alert systems that require password overrides appear useful for promoting medication safety, having to enter passwords to override alerts may represent an excessive burden for the prescribing physician. Therefore, both patient safety and physicians' workloads should be taken into consideration in future designs of computerized drug-drug interaction alert systems.

  20. Development of an expression plasmid and its use in genetic manipulation of Lingzhi or Reishi medicinal mushroom, Ganoderma lucidum (higher Basidiomycetes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xuya; Ji, Sen-Lin; He, Yi-Long; Ren, Meng-Fei; Xu, Jun-Wei

    2014-01-01

    We report the construction of a plasmid, pJW-EXP, designed for the expression of homologous and heterologous genes in Ganoderma lucidum. pJW-EXP was generated from the plasmid pMD19-T by inserting the G. lucidum glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene promoter, the G. lucidum iron-sulfur protein subunit of succinate dehydrogenase gene terminator and the homologous carboxin-resistance gene as selection marker. This expression plasmid can be efficiently transformed into Ganoderma through polyethylene glycol-mediated protoplast transformation. Southern blot analysis showed that most of the integrated DNA appeared as multiple copies in the genome. The applicability of the constructed plasmid was tested by expression of the truncated G. lucidum 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) gene that encodes the catalytic domain of HMGR. Overexpression of the truncated HMGR gene, which is a key gene in the biosynthetic pathway of the antitumor compounds, ganoderic acids, increased the transcription of the HMGR gene and enhanced ganoderic acid accumulation. pJW-EXP can serve as a useful tool in the genetic improvement and metabolic engineering of Ganoderma.

  1. Crude Ethanol Extract of Pithecellobium ellipticum as a Potential Lipid-Lowering Treatment for Hypercholesterolaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet P.-C. Wong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available If left untreated, hypercholesterolaemia can lead to atherosclerosis, given time. Plants from the Fabaceae family have shown the ability to significantly suppress atherosclerosis progression. We selected four extracts from Pithecellobium ellipticum, from the Fabaceae family, to be screened in a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMG-CoA reductase assay. The ethanol extract, at a concentration of 500 μg/mL, exhibited superior inhibition properties over the other extracts by demonstrating 80.9% inhibition, while 0.223 μg/mL of pravastatin (control showed 78.1% inhibition towards enzymatic activity. These findings led to the fractionation of the ethanol extract using ethyl acetate : methanol (95 : 5, gradually increasing polarity and produced seven fractions (1A to 7A. Fraction 7A at 150 μg/mL emerged as being the most promising bioactive fraction with 78.7% inhibition. FRAP, beta carotene, and DPPH assays supported the findings from the ethanol extract as it exhibited good overall antioxidant activity. The antioxidant properties have been said to reduce free radicals that are able to oxidize lipoproteins which are the cause of atherosclerosis. Phytochemical screenings revealed the presence of terpenoid, steroid, flavonoid, and phenolic compounds as the responsible group of compound(s, working individually or synergistically, within the extract to prevent binding of HMG-CoA to HMG-CoA reductase.

  2. Iron overload potentiates diet-induced hypercholesterolemia and reduces liver PPAR-α expression in hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonomo, Larissa de Freitas; Silva, Maísa; Oliveira, Riva de Paula; Silva, Marcelo Eustáquio; Pedrosa, Maria Lucia

    2012-06-01

    Iron stores and lipids are related to the development of cardiovascular disease. Given that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR-α) regulates important physiological processes that impact lipid and glucose homeostasis, we decided to investigate the effects of iron overload on serum lipids and the liver expression of PPAR-α, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, and cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase. Hamsters were divided into four groups. The standard group (S) was fed the AIN-93M diet, the SI group was fed the diet and iron injections, the hypercholesterolemic group (H) was fed a standard diet containing cholesterol, and the HI group was fed a high-cholesterol diet and iron injections. Serum cholesterol in the HI group was higher than in the H group. Gene expression analysis of PPAR-α showed that the HI group had a lower PPAR-α expression than H. These data show that iron, when associated with a high-fat diet, can cause increased serum cholesterol levels, possibly due to a reduction in PPAR-α expression. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Effects of Pravastatin on Human Placenta, Endothelium, and Women With Severe Preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownfoot, Fiona C; Tong, Stephen; Hannan, Natalie J; Binder, Natalie K; Walker, Susan P; Cannon, Ping; Hastie, Roxanne; Onda, Kenji; Kaitu'u-Lino, Tu'uhevaha J

    2015-09-01

    Preeclampsia is a major pregnancy complication where excess placental release of soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt-1) and soluble endoglin causes maternal endothelial and multisystem organ injury. Clinical trials have commenced examining whether pravastatin can be used to treat preeclampsia. However, the preclinical evidence supporting pravastatin as a treatment is limited to animal models, with almost no studies in human tissues. Therefore, we examined whether pravastatin reduced sFlt-1 and soluble endoglin secretion and decreased endothelial dysfunction in primary human tissues. Pravastatin reduced sFlt-1 secretion from primary endothelial cells, purified cytotrophoblast cells, and placental explants obtained from women with preterm preeclampsia. It increased soluble endoglin secretion from endothelial cells but did not change secretion from placental explants. The regulation of sFlt-1 by pravastatin seemed to be mediated via the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase cholesterol synthesis pathway. Pravastatin also reduced markers of endothelial dysfunction, including vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression and leukocyte adhesion on endothelial cells and increased endothelial cell migration and invasion. We also treated 4 patients with preterm preeclampsia presenting at preeclampsia. Our data obtained in human tissues support the concept that pravastatin is a candidate therapeutic for preeclampsia. URL: http://www.anzctr.org.au. Unique identifier: ACTRN12613000268741. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Deciphering Molecular Mechanism Underlying Hypolipidemic Activity of Echinocystic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Han

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Our previous study showed that a triterpene mixture, consisting of echinocystic acid (EA and oleanolic acid (OA at a ratio of 4 : 1, dose-dependently ameliorated the hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis in rabbits fed with high fat/high cholesterol diets. This study was aimed at exploring the mechanisms underlying antihyperlipidemic effect of EA. Molecular docking simulation of EA was performed using Molegro Virtual Docker (version: 4.3.0 to investigate the potential targets related to lipid metabolism. Based on the molecular docking information, isotope labeling method or spectrophotometry was applied to examine the effect of EA on the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA reductase, acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT, and diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT in rat liver microsomes. Our results revealed a strong affinity of EA towards ACAT and DGAT in molecular docking analysis, while low binding affinity existed between EA and HMG-CoA reductase as well as between EA and cholesteryl ester transfer protein. Consistent with the results of molecular docking, in vitro enzyme activity assays showed that EA inhibited ACAT and DGAT, with IC50 values of 103 and 139 μM, respectively, and exhibited no significant effect on HMG-CoA reductase activity. The present findings suggest that EA may exert hypolipidemic effect by inhibiting the activity of ACAT and DGAT.

  5. Light and temperature regulated terpene biosynthesis: hepatoprotective monoterpene picroside accumulation in Picrorhiza kurrooa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawoosa, Tabasum; Singh, Harsharan; Kumar, Amit; Sharma, Sunil Kumar; Devi, Kiran; Dutt, Som; Vats, Surender Kumar; Sharma, Madhu; Ahuja, Paramvir Singh; Kumar, Sanjay

    2010-08-01

    Picrorhiza (Picrorhiza kurrooa) is an endangered medicinal plant with well-known hepatoprotective activity attributed to monoterpenoid picrosides. The present article details on regulatory genes of terpenoid metabolism, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (pkhmgr) and 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate synthase (pkdxs) from picrorhiza. Since no molecular information was available, these genes were cloned to full-length by degenerate primers and rapid amplification of cDNA ends, followed by cloning of the upstream sequences that showed the presence of core sequences for light and temperature responsiveness. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay confirmed binding of protein to these motifs. Expression of pkhmgr and pkdxs was up-regulated at 15 degrees C as compared to at 25 degrees C as well as under light as compared to dark conditions. Picrosides content exhibited the trend similar to gene expression. To rule out the possible limitation of carbon pool under dark condition, plantlets of picrorhiza were raised in vitro in Murashige and Skoog medium supplemented with 3% sucrose. Results showed similar up-regulation of both the genes and the higher picrosides content in in vitro raised plantlets in the presence of light. Data suggested the important roles played by light and temperature in regulating pkhmgr and pkdxs, and the picrosides level in picrorhiza.

  6. Cloning and expression analysis of ten genes associated with picrosides biosynthesis in Picrorhiza kurrooa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harsharan; Gahlan, Parul; Kumar, Sanjay

    2013-02-25

    Picrorhiza kurrooa Royle ex Benth. is an economically important medicinal plant known to yield picrosides which have high medicinal value. Picroside I and picroside II are major picrosides associated with various bioactivities. The present work analyzed the expression of various genes of the picrosides biosynthesis pathway in different tissues of the plant in relation to the picrosides content. Eight full-length cDNA sequences namely, 1-deoxy-d-xylulose-5-phosphate synthase (2.317 kb), 1-deoxy-d-xylulose-5-phosphate reductoisomerase (1.767 kb), 4-diphosphocytidyl-2-C-methyl-d-erythritol kinase (1.674 kb), 4-hydroxy-3-methylbut-2-enyl diphosphate reductase (1.701 kb), acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase (1.545 kb), 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (2.241 kb), isopentenyl pyrophosphate isomerase (987 bp) and geranyl diphosphate synthase (1.434 kb), were cloned to full-length followed by expression analysis of ten genes vis-à-vis picrosides content analysis. There is maximum accumulation of picrosides in leaf tissue followed by the rhizome and root, and a similar pattern of expression was found in all the ten genes. The genes responded to the modulators of the picrosides biosynthesis. Picrosides accumulation was enhanced by application of hydrogen peroxide and abscisic acid, whereas methyl jasmonate and salicylic acid treatment decreased the content. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Simvastatin Ameliorates Matrix Stiffness-Mediated Endothelial Monolayer Disruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampi, Marsha C.; Faber, Courtney J.; Huynh, John; Bordeleau, Francois; Zanotelli, Matthew R.; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A.

    2016-01-01

    Arterial stiffening accompanies both aging and atherosclerosis, and age-related stiffening of the arterial intima increases RhoA activity and cell contractility contributing to increased endothelium permeability. Notably, statins are 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors whose pleiotropic effects include disrupting small GTPase activity; therefore, we hypothesized the statin simvastatin could be used to attenuate RhoA activity and inhibit the deleterious effects of increased age-related matrix stiffness on endothelial barrier function. Using polyacrylamide gels with stiffnesses of 2.5, 5, and 10 kPa to mimic the physiological stiffness of young and aged arteries, endothelial cells were grown to confluence and treated with simvastatin. Our data indicate that RhoA and phosphorylated myosin light chain activity increase with matrix stiffness but are attenuated when treated with the statin. Increases in cell contractility, cell-cell junction size, and indirect measurements of intercellular tension that increase with matrix stiffness, and are correlated with matrix stiffness-dependent increases in monolayer permeability, also decrease with statin treatment. Furthermore, we report that simvastatin increases activated Rac1 levels that contribute to endothelial barrier enhancing cytoskeletal reorganization. Simvastatin, which is prescribed clinically due to its ability to lower cholesterol, alters the endothelial cell response to increased matrix stiffness to restore endothelial monolayer barrier function, and therefore, presents a possible therapeutic intervention to prevent atherogenesis initiated by age-related arterial stiffening. PMID:26761203

  8. Entendendo o processo químico de bioativação da sinvastatina por métodos experimentais e computacionais: uma aula prática

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurício Temotheo Tavares

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol is a lipid which in high concentration can be an important risk factor for coronary diseases and atherosclerotic lesions. This lipid presents an endogenous biosynthesis that involves several steps; one of them is modulated by the enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMG-CoA reductase. HMG-CoA reductase is inhibited by statins, such as simvastatin, in order to reduce seric become active. The structure of simvastatin has a lactone ring that undergoes enzymatic hydrolysis giving the 3,5-dihydroxy-heptanoate metabolite. This group is essential for simvastatin antilipemic activity, but significantly increases their water solubility. Make students understand the influence of chemical groups and organic functions on physicochemical properties and pharmacokinetic profiles of drugs, as simvastatin, is not an easy task. In this context, combine practical strategies and theoretical presentations of the concepts involved on drug biotransformation certainly could improve the teaching learning process. This manuscript correlates organic strategies and in silico techniques throught simvastatin hydrolysis followed by comparative ClogP measurement. This approach intends to allow students to have contact with a cross-platform and multidisciplinary learning, making it ludic, easier and more interesting than theoretical classes.

  9. Simvastatin Ameliorates Matrix Stiffness-Mediated Endothelial Monolayer Disruption.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marsha C Lampi

    Full Text Available Arterial stiffening accompanies both aging and atherosclerosis, and age-related stiffening of the arterial intima increases RhoA activity and cell contractility contributing to increased endothelium permeability. Notably, statins are 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors whose pleiotropic effects include disrupting small GTPase activity; therefore, we hypothesized the statin simvastatin could be used to attenuate RhoA activity and inhibit the deleterious effects of increased age-related matrix stiffness on endothelial barrier function. Using polyacrylamide gels with stiffnesses of 2.5, 5, and 10 kPa to mimic the physiological stiffness of young and aged arteries, endothelial cells were grown to confluence and treated with simvastatin. Our data indicate that RhoA and phosphorylated myosin light chain activity increase with matrix stiffness but are attenuated when treated with the statin. Increases in cell contractility, cell-cell junction size, and indirect measurements of intercellular tension that increase with matrix stiffness, and are correlated with matrix stiffness-dependent increases in monolayer permeability, also decrease with statin treatment. Furthermore, we report that simvastatin increases activated Rac1 levels that contribute to endothelial barrier enhancing cytoskeletal reorganization. Simvastatin, which is prescribed clinically due to its ability to lower cholesterol, alters the endothelial cell response to increased matrix stiffness to restore endothelial monolayer barrier function, and therefore, presents a possible therapeutic intervention to prevent atherogenesis initiated by age-related arterial stiffening.

  10. Tocotrienols for bone health: a translational approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chwan-Li; Klein, Annika; Chin, Kok-Yong; Mo, Huanbiao; Tsai, Peihsuan; Yang, Rong-Sen; Chyu, Ming-Chien; Ima-Nirwana, Soelaiman

    2017-08-01

    Osteoporosis, a degenerative bone disease, is characterized by low bone mass and microstructural deterioration of bone tissue resulting in aggravated bone fragility and susceptibility to fractures. The trend of extended life expectancy is accompanied by a rise in the prevalence of osteoporosis and concomitant complications in the elderly population. Epidemiological evidence has shown an association between vitamin E consumption and the prevention of age-related bone loss in elderly women and men. Animal studies show that ingestion of vitamin E, especially tocotrienols, may benefit bone health in terms of maintaining higher bone mineral density and improving bone microstructure and quality. The beneficial effects of tocotrienols on bone health appear to be mediated via antioxidant/anti-inflammatory pathways and/or 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A mechanisms. We discuss (1) an overview of the prevalence and etiology of osteoporosis, (2) types of vitamin E (tocopherols versus tocotrienols), (3) findings of tocotrienols and bone health from published in vitro and animal studies, (4) possible mechanisms involved in bone protection, and (5) challenges and future direction for research. © 2017 New York Academy of Sciences.

  11. Defining specific goals of therapy in treating dyslipidemia in the patient with low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belalcazar, L M; Ballantyne, C M

    1998-01-01

    Because patients with low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (HDL-C) are at high risk for clinical coronary artery disease (CAD) events, these patients require aggressive treatment with lifestyle modifications-increased exercise, smoking cessation, and weight loss in overweight patients-and available pharmacological agents. Drugs that raise HDL-C include nicotinic acid, fibric acid derivatives, estrogens, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins), alpha-blockers, and alcohol. However, all agents that increase HDL-C may not have the same clinical benefit, just as, as shown in genetic studies in humans and mice, genetic causes of high HDL-C do not always protect against CAD, nor do genetic causes of low HDL-C always increase risk for CAD. Better understanding of the complexities of HDL metabolism and the mechanisms by which HDL protects against CAD is needed to enable the development of new therapeutic strategies--novel drugs or gene delivery systems--to increase HDL-C and reduce CAD events. The statins are the agents with the greatest evidence for slowing progression of CAD and reducing clinical events in patients with low HDL-C, but additional research is needed to determine the potential benefits of additional interventions that increase HDL-C, including combination therapy, which may provide greater improvements in the entire lipid profile.

  12. Mutations that affect vacuole biogenesis inhibit proliferation of the endoplasmic reticulum in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koning, Ann J; Larson, Lynnelle L; Cadera, Emily J; Parrish, Mark L; Wright, Robin L

    2002-01-01

    In yeast, increased levels of the sterol biosynthetic enzyme, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase isozyme, Hmg1p, induce assembly of nuclear-associated ER membranes called karmellae. To identify additional genes involved in karmellae assembly, we screened temperature-sensitive mutants for karmellae assembly defects. Two independently isolated, temperature-sensitive strains that were also defective for karmellae biogenesis carried mutations in VPS16, a gene involved in vacuolar protein sorting. Karmellae biogenesis was defective in all 13 other vacuole biogenesis mutants tested, although the severity of the karmellae assembly defect varied depending on the particular mutation. The hypersensitivity of 14 vacuole biogenesis mutants to tunicamycin was well correlated with pronounced defects in karmellae assembly, suggesting that the karmellae assembly defect reflected alteration of ER structure or function. Consistent with this hypothesis, seven of eight mutations causing defects in secretion also affected karmellae assembly. However, the vacuole biogenesis mutants were able to proliferate their ER in response to Hmg2p, indicating that the mutants did not have a global defect in the process of ER biogenesis. PMID:11973291

  13. Mutations that affect vacuole biogenesis inhibit proliferation of the endoplasmic reticulum in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koning, Ann J; Larson, Lynnelle L; Cadera, Emily J; Parrish, Mark L; Wright, Robin L

    2002-04-01

    In yeast, increased levels of the sterol biosynthetic enzyme, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase isozyme, Hmg1p, induce assembly of nuclear-associated ER membranes called karmellae. To identify additional genes involved in karmellae assembly, we screened temperature-sensitive mutants for karmellae assembly defects. Two independently isolated, temperature-sensitive strains that were also defective for karmellae biogenesis carried mutations in VPS16, a gene involved in vacuolar protein sorting. Karmellae biogenesis was defective in all 13 other vacuole biogenesis mutants tested, although the severity of the karmellae assembly defect varied depending on the particular mutation. The hypersensitivity of 14 vacuole biogenesis mutants to tunicamycin was well correlated with pronounced defects in karmellae assembly, suggesting that the karmellae assembly defect reflected alteration of ER structure or function. Consistent with this hypothesis, seven of eight mutations causing defects in secretion also affected karmellae assembly. However, the vacuole biogenesis mutants were able to proliferate their ER in response to Hmg2p, indicating that the mutants did not have a global defect in the process of ER biogenesis.

  14. High-fat diet-induced obesity stimulates ketone body utilization in osteoclasts of the mouse bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Masahiro; Hasegawa, Shinya; Imai, Masahiko; Takahashi, Noriko; Fukui, Tetsuya

    2016-04-29

    Previous studies have shown that high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity increases the acetoacetyl-CoA synthetase (AACS) gene expression in lipogenic tissue. To investigate the effect of obesity on the AACS gene in other tissues, we examined the alteration of AACS mRNA levels in HFD-fed mice. In situ hybridization revealed that AACS was observed in several regions of the embryo, including the backbone region (especially in the somite), and in the epiphysis of the adult femur. AACS mRNA expression in the adult femur was higher in HFD-fed mice than in normal-diet fed mice, but this increase was not observed in high sucrose diet (HSD)-induced obese mice. In addition, HFD-specific increases were observed in the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR) and interleukin (IL)-6 genes. Moreover, we detected higher AACS mRNA expression in the differentiated osteoclast cells (RAW 264), and found that AACS mRNA expression was significantly up-regulated by IL-6 treatment only in osteoclasts. These results indicate the novel function of the ketone body in bone metabolism. Because the abnormal activation of osteoclasts by IL-6 induces bone resorption, our data suggest that AACS and ketone bodies are important factors in the relationship between obesity and osteoporosis. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Extraction of bioactive compounds against cardiovascular diseases from Lentinula edodes using a sequential extraction method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Diego; Piris, Adriana J; Ruiz-Rodriguez, Alejandro; Prodanov, Marin; Soler-Rivas, Cristina

    2018-02-01

    Three extraction methods were sequentially combined to obtain fractions from Lentinula edodes (shiitake mushrooms) containing bioactive compounds against cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). Fruiting bodies were first extracted with plain water, obtained residue was then submitted to supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) and remaining residue submitted to hot water extraction. Sequential design allowed re-utilization of the non-extracted material as raw material for the successive extractions increasing extraction yields and separating interesting compounds. Obtained fractions contained different amounts of ß-glucans, chitins, eritadenine, lenthionine, ergosterol, proteins/peptides and phenolic compounds conferring them different bioactivities. Water soluble fractions showed high antioxidant activities (ABTS+• and DPPH• scavenging capacity and reducing power), they were also able to inhibit one of the main enzymes involved in hypertension (angiotensin-I converting enzyme) and the key enzyme of cholesterol metabolism (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase). The latter inhibitory activity was also noticed in SFE extracts although ergosterol and other lipid-like molecules were isolated. Dietary fibers were separated in the third extraction. Therefore, with this sequential extraction procedure bioactive compounds against CVDs can be selectively separated from a single batch of shiitake powder. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  16. Outcomes from intracerebral hemorrhage among patients pre-treated with statins

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    Flávio Ramalho Romero

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, or statins, have been associated with improved clinical outcomes after ischemic stroke and subarachnoid hemorrhage, but with an increased risk of incidental spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH. We investigated whether the statin use before ICH, was associated with functional independence, 90 days after treatment. METHOD: We analyzed 124 consecutive ICH patients with 90-day outcome data who were enrolled in a prospective cohort study between 2006 and 2009. Eighty-three patients were included in this study. Among ICH survivors, univariate Cox regression models and Kaplan-Meier plots were used to determine subject characteristics that were associated with an increased risk of recurrence. Statin usage was determined through interviewing the patient at the time of ICH and confirmed by reviewing their medical records. Independent status was defined as Glasgow Outcome Scale grades 4 or 5. RESULTS: Statins were used by 20 out of 83 patients (24% before ICH onset. There was no effect from pre-ICH statin use on functional independence rates (28% versus 29%, P=0.84 or mortality (46% versus 45%, P=0.93. CONCLUSION: Pre-ICH statin use is not associated with changes to ICH functional outcome or mortality.

  17. Effect of food on the pharmacokinetics of rosuvastatin after administration of a single oral dose in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, I-H; Kwon, K-I; Kim, M-S

    2013-03-01

    Rosuvastatin is a highly effective inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase and is used for the treatment of patients with hyperlipidemia. We examined the effect of food on the pharmacokinetics of rosuvastatin by administering it while fasting and after intake of low-fat and high-fat meals. We administered a single 10-mg oral dose of rosuvastatin while fasting and after intake of a low-fat and high-fat meal in a parallel design. The plasma concentrations of rosuvastatin were measured using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), and the pharmacokinetics of rosuvastatin was analyzed using both noncompartmental and compartmental models. The values of area under the curve at 24 h (AUC 24 h ) and peak plasma concentration (C max) in fed conditions were significantly lower than the corresponding values in the fasting conditions. In addition, consumption of a high-fat meal significantly delayed the time required to achieve the maximum concentration (T max) of rosuvastatin. Both the models sufficiently explained the effect of food on the pharmacokinetics of rosuvastatin and showed that the volume of distribution (V c) was increased and absorption rate constant (K a) was decreased in fed dogs. These findings suggest that food intake affects both the rate and extent of absorption of rosuvastatin, and that rosuvastatin should be administered on an empty stomach to avoid food effect. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Neuroprotective Effect of Simvastatin via Inducing the Autophagy on Spinal Cord Injury in the Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Gao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Simvastatin, an inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, is invariably used to treat cardiovascular diseases. Simvastatin has been recently demonstrated to have a neuroprotective effect in nervous system diseases. The present study aimed to further verify the neuroprotection and molecular mechanism of simvastatin on rats after spinal cord injury (SCI. The expression of Beclin-1 and LC3-B was evidently enhanced at postoperation days 3 and 5, respectively. However, the reduction of the mTOR protein and ribosomal protein S6 kinase p70 subtype (p70S6K phosphorylation level occurred at the same time after SCI. Simvastatin significantly increased the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF. Meanwhile, immunofluorescence results indicated that the expression of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG and caspase-3 protein was obviously reduced by simvastatin. Furthermore, Nissl staining and Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB scores showed that the quantity and function of motor neurons were visibly preserved by simvastatin after SCI. The findings of this study showed that simvastatin induced autophagy by inhibiting the mTOR signaling pathway and contributed to neuroprotection after SCI.

  19. Fenofibric acid for hyperlipidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saurav, Alok; Kaushik, Manu; Mohiuddin, Syed M

    2012-04-01

    3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors (i.e., statins) are the mainstay of therapy for hyperlipidemia, as per the current National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) recommendation. However, the role of other agents, such as the fibrates, is continually being debated in the context of incremental risk reduction, especially in the setting of mixed dyslipidemia. Results from the ACCORD Trial have further added to the confusion. Fibrates also have a role to play in familial hyperlipidemias and in hypertriglyceridemia. Fenofibric acid is one of the newly approved forms of fenofibrate with enhanced bioavailability and was recently approved by the Food and Drug Administation (FDA) for the treatment of various types of hyperlipidemia, in conjunction with statins. This article reviews the role of fenofibric acid in the context of results from recent randomized trials on fenofibrate, including the ACCORD Trial. It discusses the current status of fenofibric acid in the management of dyslipidemia, especially in combination with statins, and also addresses the comparative efficacy and safety profile of this new molecule against other agents in its class. Fenofibric acid in combination with low- to moderate-dose statins is an effective and safe option in the treatment of mixed dyslipidemia, although the long-term effects on cardiovascular risk reduction need to be explored further.

  20. The Vitamin E Analog Gamma-Tocotrienol (GT3 and Statins Synergistically Up-Regulate Endothelial Thrombomodulin (TM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupak Pathak

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Statins; a class of routinely prescribed cholesterol-lowering drugs; inhibit 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzymeA reductase (HMGCR and strongly induce endothelial thrombomodulin (TM; which is known to have anti-inflammatory; anti-coagulation; anti-oxidant; and radioprotective properties. However; high-dose toxicity limits the clinical use of statins. The vitamin E family member gamma-tocotrienol (GT3 also suppresses HMGCR activity and induces TM expression without causing significant adverse side effects; even at high concentrations. To investigate the synergistic effect of statins and GT3 on TM; a low dose of atorvastatin and GT3 was used to treat human primary endothelial cells. Protein-level TM expression was measured by flow cytometry. TM functional activity was determined by activated protein C (APC generation assay. Expression of Kruppel-like factor 2 (KLF2, one of the key transcription factors of TM, was measured by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR. TM expression increased in a dose-dependent manner after both atorvastatin and GT3 treatment. A combined treatment of a low-dose of atorvastatin and GT3 synergistically up-regulated TM expression and functional activity. Finally; atorvastatin and GT3 synergistically increased KLF2 expression. These findings suggest that combined treatment of statins with GT3 may provide significant health benefits in treating a number of pathophysiological conditions; including inflammatory and cardiovascular diseases.

  1. Acetone Formation in the Vibrio Family: a New Pathway for Bacterial Leucine Catabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemecek-Marshall, Michele; Wojciechowski, Cheryl; Wagner, William P.; Fall, Ray

    1999-01-01

    There is current interest in biological sources of acetone, a volatile organic compound that impacts atmospheric chemistry. Here, we determined that leucine-dependent acetone formation is widespread in the Vibrionaceae. Sixteen Vibrio isolates, two Listonella species, and two Photobacterium angustum isolates produced acetone in the presence of l-leucine. Shewanella isolates produced much less acetone. Growth of Vibrio splendidus and P. angustum in a fermentor with controlled aeration revealed that acetone was produced after a lag in late logarithmic or stationary phase of growth, depending on the medium, and was not derived from acetoacetate by nonenzymatic decarboxylation in the medium. l-Leucine, but not d-leucine, was converted to acetone with a stoichiometry of approximately 0.61 mol of acetone per mol of l-leucine. Testing various potential leucine catabolites as precursors of acetone showed that only α-ketoisocaproate was efficiently converted by whole cells to acetone. Acetone production was blocked by a nitrogen atmosphere but not by electron transport inhibitors, suggesting that an oxygen-dependent reaction is required for leucine catabolism. Metabolic labeling with deuterated (isopropyl-d7)-l-leucine revealed that the isopropyl carbons give rise to acetone with full retention of deuterium in each methyl group. These results suggest the operation of a new catabolic pathway for leucine in vibrios that is distinct from the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A pathway seen in pseudomonads. PMID:10601206

  2. Rising statin use and effect on ischemic stroke outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haymore Joseph

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Statins (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors have neuroprotective effects in experimental stroke models and are commonly prescribed in clinical practice. The aim of this study was to determine if patients taking statins before hospital admission for stroke had an improved clinical outcome. Methods This was an observational study of 436 patients admitted to the National Institutes of Health Suburban Hospital Stroke Program between July 2000 and December 2002. Self-reported risk factors for stroke were obtained on admission. Stroke severity was determined by the admission National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score. Good outcome was defined as a Rankin score Results There were 436 patients with a final diagnosis of ischemic stroke; statin data were available for 433 of them. A total of 95/433 (22% of patients were taking a statin when they were admitted, rising from 16% in 2000 to 26% in 2002. Fifty-one percent of patients taking statins had a good outcome compared to 38% of patients not taking statins (p = 0.03. After adjustment for confounding factors, statin pretreatment was associated with a 2.9 odds (95% CI: 1.2–6.7 of a good outcome at the time of hospital discharge. Conclusions The proportion of patients taking statins when they are admitted with stroke is rising rapidly. Statin pretreatment was significantly associated with an improved functional outcome at discharge. This finding could support the early initiation of statin therapy after stroke.

  3. Insight into the mechanism of polyphenols on the activity of HMGR by molecular docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Barira; Sharma, Charu; Adem, Abdu; Aburawi, Elhadi; Ojha, Shreesh

    2015-01-01

    Statins are hypolipidemic drugs that are effective in the treatment of hypercholesterolemia by attenuating cholesterol synthesis in the liver via competitive inhibition of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase. Recently, dietary changes associated with drug therapy have garnered attention as novel drugs to mitigate or ameliorate hypercholesterolemia. The present study was undertaken to observe different dietary polyphenols that can bind to the active site of HMGR and inhibit it. Results from the 12 dietary polyphenols tested reveal that polyphenols can bind to HMGR and block the binding of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP(+)). We observed that the rigidity of phenolic rings prevents the polyphenols from docking to the enzyme activity site. The presence of an ester linkage between the phenolic rings in (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) and the alkyl chain in curcumin allows them to orient in the active site of the HMGR and bind to the catalytic residues. EGCG and curcumin showed binding to the active site residues with a low GRID score, which may be a potential inhibitor of HMGR. Kaempferol showed binding to HMG-CoA, but with low binding affinity. These observations provide a rationale for the consistent hypolipidemic effect of EGCG and curcumin, which has been previously reported in several epidemiological and animal studies. Therefore, this study substantiates the mechanism of polyphenols on the activity of HMGR by molecular docking and provides the impetus for drug design involving further structure-function relationship studies.

  4. Statin-induced changes in mitochondrial respiration in blood platelets in rats and human with dyslipidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vevera, J; Fišar, Z; Nekovářová, T; Vrablík, M; Zlatohlávek, L; Hroudová, J; Singh, N; Raboch, J; Valeš, K

    2016-11-23

    3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors (statins) are widely used drugs for lowering blood lipid levels and preventing cardiovascular diseases. However, statins can have serious adverse effects, which may be related to development of mitochondrial dysfunctions. The aim of study was to demonstrate the in vivo effect of high and therapeutic doses of statins on mitochondrial respiration in blood platelets. Model approach was used in the study. Simvastatin was administered to rats at a high dose for 4 weeks. Humans were treated with therapeutic doses of rosuvastatin or atorvastatin for 6 weeks. Platelet mitochondrial respiration was measured using high-resolution respirometry. In rats, a significantly lower physiological respiratory rate was found in intact platelets of simvastatin-treated rats compared to controls. In humans, no significant changes in mitochondrial respiration were detected in intact platelets; however, decreased complex I-linked respiration was observed after statin treatment in permeabilized platelets. We propose that the small in vivo effect of statins on platelet energy metabolism can be attributed to drug effects on complex I of the electron transport system. Both intact and permeabilized platelets can be used as a readily available biological model to study changes in cellular energy metabolism in patients treated with statins.

  5. Inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase by MFS, a purified extract from the fermentation of marine fungus Fusarium solani FG319, and optimization of MFS production using response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yu; Wu, Wen-Hui; Zhao, Qing-Bo; Wang, Xiao-Yu; Bao, Bin

    2015-05-01

    The present study was designed to isolate and characterize a purified extract from Fusarium solani FG319, termed MFS (Metabolite of Fusarium solani FG319) that showed anti-atherosclerosis activity by inhibiting 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase. Response surface methodology (RSM) was employed to achieve an improved yield from the fermentation medium. The inhibiting effect of the isolate, MFS, on HMG-CoA reductase was greater than that of the positive control, lovastatin. The average recovery of MFS and the relative standard deviation (RSD) ranged between 99.75% to 101.18%, and 0.31% to 0.74%, respectively. The RSDs intra- and inter-assay of the three samples ranged from 0.288% to 2.438%, and from 0.934% to 2.383%, respectively. From the RSM, the concentration of inducer, cultivation time, and culture temperatures had significant effects on the MFS production, with the effect of inducer concentration being more pronounced that other factors. In conclusion, the optimal conditions for the MFS production were achieved using RSM and that MFS could be explored as an anti-atherosclerosis agent based on its ability to inhibit HMG-CoA reductase. Copyright © 2015 China Pharmaceutical University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The new dyslipidemia guidelines: what is the debate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Todd J; Mancini, G B John; Genest, Jacques; Grégoire, Jean; Lonn, Eva M; Hegele, Robert A

    2015-05-01

    Dyslipidemia is a major risk factor for the development of atherosclerotic disease. Therefore, lifestyle interventions and pharmacological approaches to decrease cholesterol are widely used in cardiovascular disease prevention. The introduction and widespread use of 3-hydroxy-3 methylglutaryl coenzyme A inhibitors (statins) for individuals at risk of atherosclerotic disease has been an important advance in cardiovascular care. There can be no doubt that better control of dyslipidemia, even in subjects whose low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level is not particularly high, has reduced overall event rates. On a background of lifestyle interventions, statins are routinely used to decrease risk along with aspirin and interventions to control hypertension and diabetes. More than other risk factors, the approach to the identification and treatment of dyslipidemia has been heterogeneous and widely debated. The recent release of the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association dyslipidemia guidelines has reignited the controversy over the best approach for risk stratification and treatment. In this article we review the importance of statin therapy for global cardiovascular risk reduction, compare the Canadian Cardiovascular Society dyslipidemia guidelines with other standards, and discuss the points of debate. Despite the seeming variety of recommendations, their common link is a systematic approach to risk stratification and treatment, which will continue to benefit our patients at risk. Copyright © 2015 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Analysis of endocrine disruption effect of Roundup® in adrenal gland of male rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aparamita Pandey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of Roundup® on adrenal gland steroidogenesis and signaling pathway associated with steroid production was investigated. Doses of 10, 50, 100 and 250 mg/kg bw/d Roundup® were administered for two weeks to adult male rats. The 10 mg/kg bw/d dose which reduced circulatory corticosterone levels, but did not change food consumption and body weight, was selected for further study. The expression of cholesterol receptor (low density lipoprotein receptor, de novo cholesterol synthesis enzyme (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase, hormone-sensitive lipase, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR mRNA and phosphorylated form was decreased. Adrenocorticotropic hormone receptor (ACTH, melanocortin-2 receptor, expression was not changed but circulatory ACTH levels and adrenal cortex protein kinase A (PKA activity were reduced. Surprisingly, exogenous ACTH treatment rescued steroidogenesis in Roundup®-treated animals. Apoptosis was evident at 250 mg/kg bw/d, but not at 10 mg/kg bw/d dose. These results suggest that Roundup® may be inhibitory to hypothalamic–pituitary axis leading to reduction in cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP/PKA pathway, StAR phosphorylation and corticosterone synthesis in the adrenal tissue.

  8. Role of membrane sterols and cortical microtubules in gravity resistance in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoson, T.; Koizumi, T.; Matsumoto, S.; Kumasaki, S.; Soga, K.; Wakabayashi, K.; Sakaki, T.

    Resistance to the gravitational force is a principal graviresponse in plants comparable to gravitropism Nevertheless only limited information has been obtained for this graviresponse We have examined mechanisms of signal perception transformation and transduction of the perceived signal and response to the transduced signal in gravity resistance using hypergravity conditions produced by centrifugation In Arabidopsis hypocotyls hypergravity treatment greatly increased the expression level of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-Coenzyme A reductase HMGR which catalyzes a reaction producing mevalonic acid a key precursor of terpenoids such as membrane sterols Geranyl diphosphate synthase gene was also up-regulated by hypergravity whereas the expression of other genes involved in membrane lipid metabolism was not influenced Hypergravity caused an increase in sterol content in azuki bean epicotyls but not in phospholipid glycolipid or fatty acid content Also hypergravity did not influence fatty acid composition in any lipid class Thus the effect of hypergravity on membrane lipid metabolism was specific for sterol synthesis On the other hand alpha- and beta-tubulin genes were up-regulated by hypergravity treatment in Arabidopsis hypocotyls Hypergravity also induced reorientation of cortical microtubules in azuki epicotyls the percentage of epidermal cells with transverse microtubles was decreased whereas that with longitudinal microtubules was increased Inhibitors of HMGR action and microtubule-disrupting agents completely prevented the gravity resistance

  9. Potato steroidal glycoalkaloid levels and the expression of key isoprenoid metabolic genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krits, Pinchas; Fogelman, Edna; Ginzberg, Idit

    2007-12-01

    The potato steroidal glycoalkaloids (SGA) are toxic secondary metabolites, and their total content in tubers should not exceed 20 mg/100 g fresh weight. The two major SGA in cultivated potato (Solanum tuberosum) are alpha-chaconine and alpha-solanine. SGA biosynthetic genes and the genetic factors that control their expression have not yet been determined. In the present study, potato genotypes exhibiting different levels of SGA content showed an association between high SGA levels in their leaves and tubers and high expression of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase 1 (hmg1) and squalene synthase 1 (pss1), genes of the mevalonic/isoprenoid pathway. Transcripts of other key enzymes of branches of the isoprenoid pathway, vetispiradiene/sesquiterpene synthase (pvs1) and sterol C24-methyltransferase type1 (smt1), were undetectable or exhibited stable expression regardless of SGA content, respectively, suggesting facilitated precursor flow to the SGA biosynthetic branch. The transcript ratio of solanidine glucosyltransferase (sgt2) to solanidine galactosyltransferase (sgt1) was correlated to the documented chaconine-to-solanine ratio in the tested genotypes. Significantly higher expression of hmg1, pss1, smt1, sgt1 and sgt2 was monitored in the tuber phelloderm than in the parenchyma of the tuber's flesh, targeting the former as the main SGA-producing tissue in the tuber, in agreement with the known high SGA content in the layers directly under the tuber skin.

  10. Cholesterol assimilation by Lactobacillus probiotic bacteria: an in vitro investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaro-Duchesneau, Catherine; Jones, Mitchell L; Shah, Divya; Jain, Poonam; Saha, Shyamali; Prakash, Satya

    2014-01-01

    Excess cholesterol is associated with cardiovascular diseases (CVD), an important cause of mortality worldwide. Current CVD therapeutic measures, lifestyle and dietary interventions, and pharmaceutical agents for regulating cholesterol levels are inadequate. Probiotic bacteria have demonstrated potential to lower cholesterol levels by different mechanisms, including bile salt hydrolase activity, production of compounds that inhibit enzymes such as 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A, and cholesterol assimilation. This work investigates 11 Lactobacillus strains for cholesterol assimilation. Probiotic strains for investigation were selected from the literature: Lactobacillus reuteri NCIMB 11951, L. reuteri NCIMB 701359, L. reuteri NCIMB 702655, L. reuteri NCIMB 701089, L. reuteri NCIMB 702656, Lactobacillus fermentum NCIMB 5221, L. fermentum NCIMB 8829, L. fermentum NCIMB 2797, Lactobacillus rhamnosus ATCC 53103 GG, Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 314, and Lactobacillus plantarum ATCC 14917. Cholesterol assimilation was investigated in culture media and under simulated intestinal conditions. The best cholesterol assimilator was L. plantarum ATCC 14917 (15.18±0.55 mg/10(10) cfu) in MRS broth. L. reuteri NCIMB 701089 assimilated over 67% (2254.70±63.33 mg/10(10) cfu) of cholesterol, the most of all the strains, under intestinal conditions. This work demonstrates that probiotic bacteria can assimilate cholesterol under intestinal conditions, with L. reuteri NCIMB 701089 showing great potential as a CVD therapeutic.

  11. Comparison of alternate-day atorvastatin treatment to daily treatment in maintaining LDL-cholesterol targets in patients with variable coronary risk profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattanaik, Smita; Malhotra, Samir; Sharma, Yash Paul; Pandhi, Promila

    2012-05-01

    3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitory activity of atorvastatin lasts upto 20-30 hours. This study aimed at comparing the maintenance of National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATPIII) goal by the alternate-day therapy to daily treatment. This randomized, open-label trial included 300 patients of dyslipidemia or coronary artery disease on stable doses of atorvastatin. These patients met their respective NCEP-ATPIII cholesterol goals and were randomized to receive the same doses of atorvastatin every day (QD) or every other day (QOD) in a 1:1 ratio for 12 weeks. The efficacy criteria were (1) proportion of patients maintaining the low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) goal, (2) comparison of changes in the total cholesterol, LDL-C, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglyceride levels from baseline. The proportions of patients maintaining their LDL-C goals in QD and QOD groups at 6 weeks were 83.9% (60.3-97.5) versus 70.9% (59.3-82.5) (P ATPIII goal.

  12. Transgenic mouse model reveals an unsuspected role of the acetylcholine receptor in statin-induced neuromuscular adverse drug reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grajales-Reyes, G E; Báez-Pagán, C A; Zhu, H; Grajales-Reyes, J G; Delgado-Vélez, M; García-Beltrán, W F; Luciano, C A; Quesada, O; Ramírez, R; Gómez, C M; Lasalde-Dominicci, J A

    2013-08-01

    High cholesterol levels are an established risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD), the world's leading cause of death. Inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (statins) are prescribed to lower serum cholesterol levels and reduce the risk of CVD. Despite the success of statins, many patients abandon treatment owing to neuromuscular adverse drug reactions (ADRs). Genome-wide association studies have identified the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs4149056 in the SLCO1B1 gene as being associated with an increased risk for statin-induced ADRs. By studying slow-channel syndrome transgenic mouse models, we determined that statins trigger ADRs in mice expressing the mutant allele of the rs137852808 SNP in the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) α-subunit gene CHRNA1. Mice expressing this allele show a remarkable contamination of end-plates with caveolin-1 and develop early signs of neuromuscular degeneration upon statin treatment. This study demonstrates that genes coding for nAChR subunits may contain variants associated with statin-induced ADRs.

  13. Mitochondrial protein thiol modifications in acetaminophen hepatotoxicity: effect on HMG-CoA synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andringa, Kelly K; Bajt, Mary Lynn; Jaeschke, Hartmut; Bailey, Shannon M

    2008-04-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the leading cause of drug related liver failure in many countries. N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI) is a reactive metabolite that is formed by the metabolism of APAP. NAPQI preferentially binds to glutathione and then cellular proteins. NAPQI binding is considered an upstream event in the pathophysiology, especially when binding to mitochondrial proteins and therefore leads to mitochondrial toxicity. APAP caused a significant increase in liver toxicity 3h post-APAP administration as measured by increased serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels. Using high-resolution mitochondrial proteomics techniques to measure thiol and protein changes, no significant change in global thiol levels was observed. However, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A synthase 2 (HMG-CoA synthase) had significantly decreased levels of reduced thiols and activity after APAP treatment. HMG-CoA synthase is a key regulatory enzyme in ketogenesis and possesses a number of critical cysteines in the active site. Similarly, catalase, a key enzyme in hydrogen peroxide metabolism, also showed modification in protein thiol content. These data indicate post-translational modifications of a few selected proteins involved in mitochondrial and cellular regulation of metabolism during liver toxicity after APAP overdose. The pathophysiological relevance of these limited changes in protein thiols remains to be investigated.

  14. Methyl farnesoate synthesis in the lobster mandibular organ: The roles of HMG-CoA reductase and farnesoic acid-O-methyltransferase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sheng; Friesen, Jon A.; Holford, Kenneth C.; Borst, David W.

    2009-01-01

    Eyestalk ablation (ESA) increases crustacean production of methyl farnesoate (MF), a juvenile hormone-like compound, but the biochemical steps involved are not completely understood. We measured the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) and farnesoic acid-O-methyl transferase (FAOMeT), an early step and the last step in MF synthesis. ESA elevated hemolymph levels of MF in male lobsters. Enzyme activity suggested that increased MF production on day one was due largely to elevated HMGR activity while changes in FAOMeT activity closely paralleled changes in MF levels on day 14. Transcript levels for HMGR and FAOMeT changed little on day one, but both increased substantially on day 14. We treated ESA males with a partially purified mandibular organ inhibiting hormone (MOIH) and observed a significant decline in MF levels, FAOMeT activity, and FAOMeT-mRNA levels after 5 hours. However, no effect was observed on HMGR activity or its mRNA indicating that they must be regulated by a separate sinus gland peptide. We confirmed that lobster HMGR was not a phosphoprotein and was not regulated by reversible phosphorylation, an important mechanism for regulating other HMGRs. Nevertheless, molecular modeling indicated that the catalytic mechanisms of lobster and mammalian HMGR were similar. PMID:19778626

  15. Atorvastatin Attenuates Bleomycin-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis via Suppressing iNOS Expression and the CTGF (CCN2/ERK Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Zhu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary fibrosis is a progressive and fatal lung disorder with high mortality rate. To date, despite the fact that extensive research trials are ongoing, pulmonary fibrosis continues to have a poor response to available medical therapy. Statins, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, known for its broad pharmacological activities, remains a remedy against multiple diseases. The present study investigated the antifibrotic potential of atorvastatin against bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis and to further explore the possible underlying mechanisms. Our results showed that atorvastatin administration significantly ameliorated the bleomycin mediated histological alterations and blocked collagen deposition with parallel reduction in the hydroxyproline level. Atorvastatin reduced malondialdehyde (MDA level and lung indices. Atorvastatin also markedly decreased the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS in lung tissues and, thus, prevented nitric oxide (NO release in response to bleomycin challenge. Furthermore, atorvastatin exhibited target down-regulation of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF (CCN2 and phosphorylation extracellular regulated protein kinases (p-ERK expression. Taken together, atorvastatin significantly ameliorated bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats, via the inhibition of iNOS expression and the CTGF (CCN2/ERK signaling pathway. The present study provides evidence that atorvastatin may be a potential therapeutic reagent for the treatment of lung fibrosis.

  16. Ruminal acidosis and the rapid onset of ruminal parakeratosis in a mature dairy cow: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Michael A; AlZahal, Ousama; Hook, Sarah E; Croom, Jim; McBride, Brian W

    2009-10-19

    A mature dairy cow was transitioned from a high forage (100% forage) to a high-grain (79% grain) diet over seven days. Continuous ruminal pH recordings were utilized to diagnose the severity of ruminal acidosis. Additionally, blood and rumen papillae biopsies were collected to describe the structural and functional adaptations of the rumen epithelium. On the final day of the grain challenge, the daily mean ruminal pH was 5.41+/-0.09 with a minimum of 4.89 and a maximum of 6.31. Ruminal pH was under 5.0 for 130 minutes (2.17 hours) which is characterized as the acute form of ruminal acidosis in cattle. The grain challenge increased blood beta-hydroxybutyrate by 1.8 times and rumen papillae mRNA expression of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase by 1.6 times. Ultrastructural and histological adaptations of the rumen epithelium were imaged by scanning electron and light microscopy. Rumen papillae from the high grain diet displayed extensive sloughing of the stratum corneum and compromised cell adhesion as large gaps were apparent between cells throughout the strata. This case report represents a rare documentation of how the rumen epithelium alters its function and structure during the initial stage of acute acidosis.

  17. Heterologous expression of MlcE in Saccharomyces cerevisiae provides resistance to natural and semi-synthetic statins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Ley

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Statins are inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, the key enzyme in cholesterol biosynthesis. Their extensive use in treatment and prevention of cardiovascular diseases placed statins among the best selling drugs. Construction of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell factory for the production of high concentrations of natural statins will require establishment of a non-destructive self-resistance mechanism to overcome the undesirable growth inhibition effects of statins. To establish active export of statins from yeast, and thereby detoxification, we integrated a putative efflux pump-encoding gene mlcE from the mevastatin-producing Penicillium citrinum into the S. cerevisiae genome. The resulting strain showed increased resistance to both natural statins (mevastatin and lovastatin and semi-synthetic statin (simvastatin when compared to the wild type strain. Expression of RFP-tagged mlcE showed that MlcE is localized to the yeast plasma and vacuolar membranes. We provide a possible engineering strategy for improvement of future yeast based production of natural and semi-synthetic statins.

  18. Transgenic Cotton Plants Expressing Double-stranded RNAs Target HMG-CoA Reductase (HMGR) Gene Inhibits the Growth, Development and Survival of Cotton Bollworms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Geng; Cheng, Linlin; Qi, Xuewei; Ge, Zonghe; Niu, Changying; Zhang, Xianlong; Jin, Shuangxia

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has been developed as a powerful technique in the research of functional genomics as well as plant pest control. In this report, double-stranded RNAs (dsRNA) targeting 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) gene, which catalyze a rate-limiting enzymatic reaction in the mevalonate pathway of juvenile hormone (JH) synthesis in cotton bollworm, was expressed in cotton plants via Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. PCR and Sothern analysis revealed the integration of HMGR gene into cotton genome. RT-PCR and qRT-PCR confirmed the high transcription level of dsHMGR in transgenic cotton lines. The HMGR expression both in transcription and translation level was significantly downregulated in cotton bollworms (helicoverpa armigera) larvae after feeding on the leaves of HMGR transgenic plants. The transcription level of HMGR gene in larvae reared on transgenic cotton leaves was as much as 80.68% lower than that of wild type. In addition, the relative expression level of vitellogenin (Vg, crucial source of nourishment for offspring embryo development) gene was also reduced by 76.86% when the insect larvae were fed with transgenic leaves. The result of insect bioassays showed that the transgenic plant harboring dsHMGR not only inhibited net weight gain but also delayed the growth of cotton bollworm larvae. Taken together, transgenic cotton plant expressing dsRNAs successfully downregulated HMGR gene and impaired the development and survival of target insect, which provided more option for plant pest control.

  19. Ruminal acidosis and the rapid onset of ruminal parakeratosis in a mature dairy cow: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Croom Jim

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A mature dairy cow was transitioned from a high forage (100% forage to a high-grain (79% grain diet over seven days. Continuous ruminal pH recordings were utilized to diagnose the severity of ruminal acidosis. Additionally, blood and rumen papillae biopsies were collected to describe the structural and functional adaptations of the rumen epithelium. On the final day of the grain challenge, the daily mean ruminal pH was 5.41 ± 0.09 with a minimum of 4.89 and a maximum of 6.31. Ruminal pH was under 5.0 for 130 minutes (2.17 hours which is characterized as the acute form of ruminal acidosis in cattle. The grain challenge increased blood beta-hydroxybutyrate by 1.8 times and rumen papillae mRNA expression of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase by 1.6 times. Ultrastructural and histological adaptations of the rumen epithelium were imaged by scanning electron and light microscopy. Rumen papillae from the high grain diet displayed extensive sloughing of the stratum corneum and compromised cell adhesion as large gaps were apparent between cells throughout the strata. This case report represents a rare documentation of how the rumen epithelium alters its function and structure during the initial stage of acute acidosis.

  20. Obesity Is Associated With Progression of Atherosclerosis During Statin Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandfort, Veit; Lai, Shenghan; Ahlman, Mark A; Mallek, Marissa; Liu, Songtao; Sibley, Christopher T; Turkbey, Evrim B; Lima, João A C; Bluemke, David A

    2016-07-13

    This study aimed to determine the relationship of statin therapy and cardiovascular risk factors to changes in atherosclerosis in the carotid artery. Carotid magnetic resonance imaging was used to evaluate 106 hyperlipidemic participants at baseline and after 12 months of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitor (statin) treatment. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine factors associated with progression (change in carotid wall volume >0) or regression (change ≤0) of carotid atherosclerosis. Computed tomography coronary calcium scores were obtained at baseline for all participants. The median age was 65 years (interquartile range 60-69 years), and 63% of the participants were male. Body mass index >30, elevated C-reactive protein, and hypertension were associated with increased carotid wall volume (obesity: odds ratio for progression 4.6, 95% CI 1.8-12.4, Pobesity remained associated with progression (Pobese participants was +4.8% versus -4.2% in nonobese participants (Pobese participants. In a population with hyperlipidemia, obese patients showed atheroma progression despite optimized statin therapy. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01212900. © 2016 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  1. Interaction between Glucose and Lipid Metabolism: More than Diabetic Dyslipidemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus G. Parhofer

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Glucose and lipid metabolism are linked to each other in many ways. The most important clinical manifestation of this interaction is diabetic dyslipidemia, characterized by elevated triglycerides, low high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, and predominance of small-dense LDL particles. However, in the last decade we have learned that the interaction is much more complex. Hypertriglyceridemia and low HDL-C cannot only be the consequence but also the cause of a disturbed glucose metabolism. Furthermore, it is now well established that statins are associated with a small but significant increase in the risk for new onset diabetes. The underlying mechanisms are not completely understood but modulation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG CoA-reductase may play a central role as genetic data indicate that mutations resulting in lower HMG CoA-reductase activity are also associated with obesity, higher glucose concentrations and diabetes. Very interestingly, this statin induced increased risk for new onset type 2 diabetes is not detectable in subjects with familial hypercholesterolemia. Furthermore, patients with familial hypercholesterolemia seem to have a lower risk for type 2 diabetes, a phenomenon which seems to be dose-dependent (the higher the low density lipoprotein cholesterol, the lower the risk. Whether there is also an interaction between lipoprotein(a and diabetes is still a matter of debate.

  2. Bayesian statistic methods and theri application in probabilistic simulation models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orietta Zaniolo

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Significant advances in the management of hypercholesterolemia have been made possible by the development of statins, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA reductase inhibitors. More recently, statins have demonstrated benefit in primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease also in patients without hypercholesterolemia. Therefore statins help to reduce the impact of cardiovascular disease on morbility, mortality and social costs. Statins inhibit HMG-CoA reductase competitively, reduce LDL levels more than other cholesterol-lowering drugs, and lower triglyceride levels in hypertriglyceridemic patients. Prescribing statins as first line therapy in management of hypercholesterolemia as a part of a more comprehensive prevention program of cardiovascular disease is widely recommended by international guidelines (e.g. National Cholesterol Education Program - NCEP - Adult Treatment Panel - ATP- III reports. Currently in Italy there are five available statins: atorvastatin, fluvastatin, pravastatin, rosuvastatin and simvastatin; each of them presents some differences in physical and chemical characteristics (solubility, pharmacokinetics (absorption, proteic binding, metabolism and excretion and pharmacodinamics (pleiotropic effects. Compared to other statins, fluvastatin extended-release (RP 80 mg provides an equal efficacy in lowering total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C, with an important action on triglyceride (TG levels and superior increases in HDL-C levels, reducing the incidence of major adverse cardiac events (MACE. Aim of this study is to outline an updated therapeutic and pharmacoeconomic profile of fluvastatin, particularly regarding extended-release (RP 80 mg formulation.

  3. Development of predictive quantitative retention-activity relationship models of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors by biopartitioning micellar chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shu-Rong; Chen, Yu; Wu, Li-Ping; Miao, Wen-Juan; Xiong, Mei-Jin; Chen, Cong; Zhong, Zhi-Rong; Ye, Li-Ming

    2008-01-22

    Biological fluid cell membranes are barriers for the uptake of many kinds of drugs and their metabolites, along with passive transport across membranes and bioaccumulation. Biopartitioning micellar chromatography (BMC) is a mode of micellar liquid chromatography that uses micellar mobile phases of Brij35 under adequate experimental conditions and can be useful to simulate the drug's passive absorption and the transport in biological systems. The use of micellar aqueous solutions of Brij35 as mobile phases in reversed-phase liquid chromatography has proven to be valid to predict the biological activities of barbiturates, benzodiazepines, catecholamines, local anesthetics, non-steriodal anti-inflammatory drugs and tricyclic antidepressants. In this study, the relationships between the capacity factor in BMC and some pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors are studied. Predictive quantitative retention-activity relationship (QRAR) models describing some of the biological activities and pharmacokinetic properties of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors are obtained. The results indicate that QRAR model may be a useful tool during the drug discovery process.

  4. Coenzyme O*U1*UO, Alpha-Tocopherol and Free Cholesterol in HDL and LDL Fractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Kurt; Theorell, Henning; Karlsson, Jan

    1991-01-01

    Farmakologi, Alpha-tocopherol, Coenzyme Q*U1*U0, free cholesterol, LDL, Antioxidants, Lipoproteins, HDL......Farmakologi, Alpha-tocopherol, Coenzyme Q*U1*U0, free cholesterol, LDL, Antioxidants, Lipoproteins, HDL...

  5. Coenzyme Q10 therapy in current clinical practice

    OpenAIRE

    Abhishek Soni; Monica Verma; Vivek Kaushal; Veena S. Ghalaut

    2015-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is a naturally occurring, lipid soluble, essential compound and is also known as ubiquinone. CoQ10 acts as an intermediate of the electron transport chain situated in membrane of mitochondria and vital for ATP production and cellular respiration. CoQ10 also serves as an intercellular antioxidant. All the clinical use of CoQ10 are based upon these two functions. CoQ10 levels are altered in a number of oncological as well as non-oncological diseases. Furthermore, recent dat...

  6. Coenzyme Q10 deficiency in septic shock patients

    OpenAIRE

    Dupic, Laurent; Huet, Olivier; Duranteau, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    Donnino and colleagues provide new insights into the field of oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction during septic shock. These authors suggest a coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) deficiency in patients with septic shock. Larger prospective observational trials measuring CoQ10 in patients with septic shock are required to confirm the possibility of CoQ10 depletion. This study is a new step toward a study testing CoQ10 as a potential therapeutic agent for patients with septic shock.

  7. The complete coenzyme B12 biosynthesis gene cluster of Lactobacillus reuteri CRL 1098

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos, dos F.; Vera, J.L.; Heijden, van der R.; Valdez, G.F.; Vos, de W.M.; Sesma, F.; Hugenholtz, J.

    2008-01-01

    The coenzyme B12 production pathway in Lactobacillus reuteri has been deduced using a combination of genetic, biochemical and bioinformatics approaches. The coenzyme B12 gene cluster of Lb. reuteri CRL1098 has the unique feature of clustering together the cbi, cob and hem genes. It consists of 29

  8. Hepatitis amebiana

    OpenAIRE

    Cortés Mendoza, Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    Se ha considerado habitualmente la hepatitis amebiana como una inflamación del parénquima hepático causada por localización del parásito mismo en el hígado, distinguiéndose la forma supurada o absceso y el estado presupurativo o hepatitis aguda.

  9. Impaired Coenzyme A metabolism affects histone and tubulin acetylation in Drosophila and human cell models of pantothenate kinase associated neurodegeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siudeja, Katarzyna; Srinivasan, Balaji; Xu, Lanjun; Rana, Anil; de Jong, Jannie; Nollen, Ellen A. A.; Jackowski, Suzanne; Sanford, Lynn; Hayflick, Susan; Sibon, Ody C. M.

    2011-01-01

    Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN is a neurodegenerative disease with unresolved pathophysiology. Previously, we observed reduced Coenzyme A levels in a Drosophila model for PKAN. Coenzyme A is required for acetyl-Coenzyme A synthesis and acyl groups from the latter are

  10. 76 FR 42729 - Certain Coenzyme Q10 Products and Methods of Making Same; Notice of Institution of Investigation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-19

    ... COMMISSION Certain Coenzyme Q10 Products and Methods of Making Same; Notice of Institution of Investigation... importation, and the sale within the United States after importation of certain coenzyme Q10 products and... importation, or the sale within the United States after importation of certain coenzyme Q10 products and...

  11. Cerebrospinal fluid levels of coenzyme Q10 are reduced in multiple system atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compta, Yaroslau; Giraldo, Darly M; Muñoz, Esteban; Antonelli, Francesca; Fernández, Manel; Bravo, Paloma; Soto, Marta; Cámara, Ana; Torres, Ferran; Martí, María José

    2018-01-01

    The finding of mutations of the COQ2 gene and reduced coenzyme Q10 levels in the cerebellum in multiple system atrophy (MSA) suggest that coenzyme Q10 is relevant to MSA pathophysiology. Two recent studies have reported reduced coenzyme Q10 levels in plasma and serum (respectively) of MSA patients compared to Parkinson's disease and/or control subjects, but with largely overlapping values, limited comparison with other parkinsonisms, or dependence on cholesterol levels. We hypothesized that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is reliable to assess reductions in coenzyme Q10 as a candidate biomarker of MSA. In this preliminary cross-sectional study we assessed CSF coenzyme Q10 levels in 20 patients with MSA from the multicenter Catalan MSA Registry and of 15 PD patients, 10 patients with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), and 15 control subjects from the Movement Disorders Unit Biosample Collection of Hospital Clinic de Barcelona. A specific ELISA kit was used to determine CSF coenzyme Q10 levels. CSF coenzyme Q10 levels were compared in MSA vs. the other groups globally, pair-wise, and by binary logistic regression models adjusted for age, sex, disease severity, disease duration, and dopaminergic treatment. CSF coenzyme Q10 levels were significantly lower in MSA than in other groups in global and pair-wise comparisons, as well as in multivariate regression models. Receiver operating characteristic curve analyses yielded significant areas under the curve for MSA vs. PD, PSP and controls. These findings support coenzyme Q10 relevance in MSA. Low CSF coenzyme Q10 levels deserve further consideration as a biomarker of MSA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Coenzyme B12 can be produced by engineered Escherichia coli under both anaerobic and aerobic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Yeounjoo; Ashok, Somasundar; Ainala, Satish Kumar; Sankaranarayanan, Mugesh; Chun, Ah Yeong; Jung, Gyoo Yeol; Park, Sunghoon

    2014-12-01

    Coenzyme B12 (Vitamin B12 ) is one of the most complex biomolecules and an essential cofactor required for the catalytic activity of many enzymes. Pseudomonas denitrificans synthesizes coenzyme B12 in an oxygen-dependent manner using a pathway encoded by more than 25 genes that are located in six different operons. Escherichia coli, a robust and suitable host for metabolic engineering was used to produce coenzyme B12 . These genes were cloned into three compatible plasmids and expressed heterologously in E. coli BL21 (DE3). Real-time PCR, SDS-PAGE analysis and bioassay showed that the recombinant E. coli expressed the coenzyme B12 synthetic genes and successfully produced coenzyme B12 . However, according to the quantitative determination by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, the amount of coenzyme B12 produced by the recombinant E. coli (0.21 ± 0.02 μg/g cdw) was approximately 13-fold lower than that by P. denitrificans (2.75 ± 0.22 μg/g cdw). Optimization of the culture conditions to improve the production of coenzyme B12 by the recombinant E. coli was successful, and the highest titer (0.65 ± 0.03 μg/g cdw) of coenzyme B12 was obtained. Interestingly, although the synthesis of coenzyme B12 in P. denitrificans is strictly oxygen-dependent, the recombinant E. coli could produce coenzyme B12 under anaerobic conditions. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Addition of omega-3 fatty acid and coenzyme Q10 to statin therapy in patients with combined dyslipidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, Štefan; Šajty, Matej; Pekárová, Tímea; Mughees, Adil; Štefanič, Peter; Katz, Matan; Spišáková, Katarína; Pella, Jozef; Pella, Daniel

    2017-07-26

    Statins represent a group of drugs that are currently indicated in the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular events. Their administration can be associated with side effects and the insufficient reduction of triacylglyceride (TAG) levels. This study aimed to assess the effect of the triple combination of statins with omega-3 fatty acids and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) on parameters associated with atherogenesis and statin side effects. In this pilot randomized double-blind trial, 105 subjects who met the criteria of combined dislipidemia and elevated TAG levels were randomly divided into three groups. In the control group, unaltered statin therapy was indicated. In the second and third groups, omega-3 PUFA 2.52 g/day (Zennix fa Pleuran) and omega-3 PUFA 2.52 g+CoQ10 200 mg/day (Pharma Nord ApS) were added, res//. At the end of the 3-month period (±1 week), all patients were evaluated. Significant reduction of hepatic enzymes activity, systolic blood preasure, inflammatory markers and TAG levels were detected in both groups in comparison to the control group. Activity of SOD and GPx increased significantly after additive therapy. Coenzyme Q10 addition significantly reduced most of the abovementioned parameters (systolic blood preasure, total cholesterol, LDL, hsCRP, IL-6, SOD) in comparison with the statin+omega-3 PUFA group. The intensity of statin adverse effects were significantly reduced in the group with the addition of CoQ10. The results of this pilot study suggest the possible beneficial effects of triple combination on the lipid and non-lipid parameters related to atherogenesis and side effects of statin treatment.

  14. Diagnostic value of blood coenzyme Qlo levels in children with mitochondrial diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Nikolaeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available То establish the diagnostic value of a change in the indicator coenzyme Qlo, its blood levels were tested in 15 children with mitochondrial diseases (Group 1. A comparison group consisted of 13 children with neurodegenerative diseases (Group 2. A control group included 29 healthy children of the same age. In Group 1 patients, the mean coenzyme Qlo level (0,56+0,06 mcmol/1 did not differ from that in the control group. However, these patients had a considerably lower coenzyme Q10/cholesterol ratio (0,10+0,01; /K0,001. The patients in the older age subgroup were found to have a significantly lower coenzyme Qlo level, which seems to reflect the progressive nature of the abnormality. There was a trend for the coenzyme Q10/cholesterol ratio to decline with age. Group 2 children had higher blood coenzyme Qlo levels (1,53+0,23; /K0,001 than Group 1 and an increased Q10/cholesterol ratio (0,31+0,04; /K0,001. It is advisable to continue the investigation to provide a rationale for using low coenzyme values as an additional criterion for the differential diagnosis of mitochondrial diseases.

  15. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is a condition that causes temporary worsening of brain function in people with advanced liver disease. When ... travel through your body until they reach your brain, causing mental and physical symptoms of HE. Hepatic ...

  16. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... the Stages of Hepatic Encephalopathy? What Triggers or Can Cause HE to Get Worse? How is HE ... liver disease. When your liver is damaged it can no longer remove toxic substances from your blood. ...

  17. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... Hepatic Encephalopathy so you can tell your doctor right away if you think you may have it. ... American Liver Foundation © 2018 American Liver Foundation. All rights reserved. Funding for the HE123 - Diagnosis, Treatment and ...

  18. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... Get Worse? How is HE Diagnosed? Prior to Treatment Who treats HE? Preparing for your Medical Appointment Hepatic Encephalopathy Treatment Options Treatment Basics Treatment Medications Importance of Adhering ...

  19. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... Hepatic Encephalopathy so you can tell your doctor right away if you think you may have it. ... American Liver Foundation © 2017 American Liver Foundation. All rights reserved. Funding for the HE123 - Diagnosis, Treatment and ...

  20. Viral Hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Us FAQs Ask a Question Toll Free Numbers Homeless Veterans Chat VA » Health Care » Viral Hepatitis » Veterans and ... Vet Centers) War Related Illness & Injury Study Center Homeless Veterans Returning Service Members Rural Veterans Seniors & Aging Veterans ...

  1. Hepatitis B

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chemotherapy medicines have worked or lived in a prison had a blood transfusion or organ transplant before ... can lower your chances of developing serious health problems. Your doctor may recommend screening for hepatitis B ...

  2. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... to Treatment Who treats HE? Preparing for your Medical Appointment Hepatic Encephalopathy Treatment Options Treatment Basics Treatment ... treatment. Being a fully-informed participant in your medical care is an important factor in staying as ...

  3. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... Symptoms to look for Caregiver Support Caregiver Stories Home › What is Hepatic Encephalopathy? Why Your Liver is ... questions about HE, one step at a time. Home About Us Ways to Give Contact Us Privacy ...

  4. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... Stages of Hepatic Encephalopathy? What Triggers or Can Cause HE to Get Worse? How is HE Diagnosed? ... portosystemic encephalopathy or PSE, is a condition that causes temporary worsening of brain function in people with ...

  5. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... Reading Webinars Caregivers The Role of a Caregiver Signs and Symptoms to look for Caregiver Support Caregiver ... and your family to become familiar with the signs of Hepatic Encephalopathy so you can tell your ...

  6. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... Are the Symptoms of HE? What Are the Stages of Hepatic Encephalopathy? What Triggers or Can Cause ... may not be aware you have it. The stages of HE span from mild to severe and ...

  7. Autoimmune Hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... person usually needs blood tests for an exact diagnosis because a person with autoimmune hepatitis can have the same symptoms as those of other liver diseases or metabolic disorders. Blood tests. A blood test involves drawing ...

  8. Hepatic hemangioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Hepatic hemangioma URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/ ...

  9. Hepatic ischemia

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    ... MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Hepatic ischemia URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/ ...

  10. Hepatitis B

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you need the vaccine The ABCs of Viral Hepatitis Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC): Fact Sheet ... Suite 750 Bethesda, MD 20814 T: (301) 656-0003 | F: (301) 907-0878 Privacy Policy Disclaimer Link to ...

  11. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cirrhosis of the Liver & Symptoms Why it’s Important to Treat HE Symptoms of Liver Failure Glossary of ... Hepatic Encephalopathy? What Triggers or Can Cause HE to Get Worse? How is HE Diagnosed? Prior to ...

  12. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... liver is damaged it can no longer remove toxic substances from your blood. These toxins build up ... disease is. It’s important for you and your family to become familiar with the signs of Hepatic ...

  13. Hepatic Encephalopathy

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    Full Text Available ... ALF HE Materials Suggested Reading Webinars Caregivers The Role of a Caregiver Signs and Symptoms to look ... disease is. It’s important for you and your family to become familiar with the signs of Hepatic ...

  14. Beneficial effect of coenzyme Q10 injection on nitric oxide -related dilation of the rat aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozaeva, Larisa P; Gorodetskaya, Evgeniya A; Ruuge, Enno K; Kalenikova, Elena I; Medvedev, Oleg S

    2017-01-05

    This study examined whether coenzyme Q10 can improve nitric oxide (NO)-dependent vasodilatation in the rat aorta after pre-incubation or intravenous administration. In initial experiments, intact isolated aortic rings were incubated with coenzyme Q10 or L-arginine. In further experiments, coenzyme Q10 was administered intravenously in anesthetized rats, then in 2h aorta was isolated. In both cases, after preliminary preparation the isolated aortic rings were tested for acetylcholine-induced NO-dependent relaxation. Acetylcholine elicited concentration-dependent relaxation of phenylephine precontracted aortic rings. Relaxant responses to acetylcholine were markedly potentiated after pre-incubation with coenzyme Q10 or L-arginine. The maximum relaxant responses (%) were significantly increased from 64.1±5.3 (control) to 89.8±3.0 and 83.6±3.0 (coenzyme Q10 and L-arginine, respectively). pD2 (-lgEC50) value in control study was 5.81±0.28, after pretreatment with coenzyme Q10 or L-arginine were 7.59±0.16 and 7.26±0.32, respectively. There was no difference between coenzyme Q10 and L-arginine groups. After intravenous administration, the relaxant responses to acetylcholine were significantly increased in coenzyme Q10-treated group (94.2±2.0) compared with controls (68.1±4.4). pD2 values were also different between control and treatment groups (5.79±0.29 vs. 8.14±0.65, respectively). Thus, coenzyme Q10 improved NO-mediated vasodilation in rat aorta in magnitude close to the effects of L-arginine - substrate for eNOS. Our data first show that exogenous coenzyme Q10 through intravenous administration is able to improve rapidly NO-dependent vasodilation in rat aorta, likely due to accumulation of coenzyme Q10 in the vessel wall. Improvement of endothelial function can contribute, at least in part, to beneficial effects of coenzyme Q10 in cardiovascular diseases associated with endothelial dysfunction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The Value of Coenzyme Q10 Determination in Mitochondrial Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delia Yubero

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ is a lipid that is ubiquitously synthesized in tissues and has a key role in mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Its biochemical determination provides insight into the CoQ status of tissues and may detect CoQ deficiency that can result from either an inherited primary deficiency of CoQ metabolism or may be secondary to different genetic and environmental conditions. Rapid identification of CoQ deficiency can also allow potentially beneficial treatment to be initiated as early as possible. CoQ may be measured in different specimens, including plasma, blood mononuclear cells, platelets, urine, muscle, and cultured skin fibroblasts. Blood and urinary CoQ also have good utility for CoQ treatment monitoring.

  16. Sodium 2-mercaptoethanesulfonate monohydrate (coenzyme M sodium salt monohydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Mayr

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The 2-thioethanesulfonate anion is the smallest known coenzyme in nature (HS–CoM and plays a key role in methanogenesis by anaerobic archaea, as well as in the oxidation of alkenes by Gram-negative and Gram-positive eubacteria. The title compound, Na+·C2H5O3S2−·H2O, is the Na+ salt of HS–CoM crystallized as the monohydrate. Six O atoms form a distorted octahedral coordination geometry around the Na atom, at distances in the range 2.312 (4–2.517 (3 Å. Two O atoms of the sulfonate group, one O atom of each of three other symmetry-related sulfonate groups plus the water O atom form the coordination environment of the Na+ ion. This arrangement forms Na–O–Na layers in the crystal structure, parallel to (100.

  17. Hepatitis B Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... worldwide 2 Billion People have been infected with Hepatitis B Worldwide The Hepatitis B Foundation is working ... of people living with hepatitis B. Learn About Hepatitis B in 11 Other Languages . Resource Video See ...

  18. Hepatitis A FAQs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professional Resources Patient Education Resources Quick Links to Hepatitis … A | B | C | D | E Viral Hepatitis Home ... Grantees Policy and Programs Resource Center Viral Hepatitis Hepatitis A Questions and Answers for the Public Recommend ...

  19. Coenzyme world model of the origin of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharov, Alexei A

    2016-06-01

    The origin of life means the emergence of heritable and evolvable self-reproduction. However the mechanisms of primordial heredity were different from those in contemporary cells. Here I argue that primordial life had no nucleic acids; instead heritable signs were represented by isolated catalytically active self-reproducing molecules, similar to extant coenzymes, which presumably colonized surfaces of oil droplets in water. The model further assumes that coenzyme-like molecules (CLMs) changed surface properties of oil droplets (e.g., by oxidizing terminal carbons), and in this way created and sustained favorable conditions for their own self-reproduction. Such niche-dependent self-reproduction is a necessary condition for cooperation between different kinds of CLMs because they have to coexist in the same oil droplets and either succeed or perish together. Additional kinds of hereditary molecules were acquired via coalescence of oil droplets carrying different kinds of CLMs or via modification of already existing CLMs. Eventually, polymerization of CLMs became controlled by other polymers used as templates; and this kind of template-based synthesis eventually resulted in the emergence of RNA-like replicons. Apparently, oil droplets transformed into the outer membrane of cells via engulfing water, stabilization of the surface, and osmoregulation. In result, the metabolism was internalized allowing cells to accumulate free-floating resources (e.g., animoacids, ATP), which was a necessary condition for the development of protein synthesis. Thus, life originated from simple but already functional molecules, and its gradual evolution towards higher complexity was driven by cooperation and natural selection. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  20. Feature Hepatitis: Hepatitis Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment & Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Feature Hepatitis Hepatitis: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment & Prevention Past Issues / Spring 2009 ... No appetite Fever Headaches Diagnosis To check for hepatitis viruses, your doctor will test your blood. You ...

  1. Effect of phlebodium decumanum and coenzyme Q10 on sports performance in professional volleyball players

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    García Verazaluce, Juan José; Vargas Corzo, María Del Carmen; Aguilar Cordero, María José; Ocaña Peinado, Francisco; Sarmiento Ramírez, Álvaro; Guisado Barrilao, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    ... the athlete's medium-long term performance. The administration of nutritional supplements with antioxidant and immunomodulatory properties, such as Phlebodium decumanum and coenzyme Q10, can be a very advantageous means of achieving recovery...

  2. Coenzyme Q10 Supplementation Modulates NFκB and Nrf2 Pathways in Exercise Training

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pala, Ragip; Orhan, Cemal; Tuzcu, Mehmet; Sahin, Nurhan; Ali, Shakir; Cinar, Vedat; Atalay, Mustafa; Sahin, Kazim

    2016-01-01

    This study reports the effects of Q10, coenzyme Q10 or ubiquinone, a component of the electron transport chain in mitochondria, on nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB...

  3. Supplementation of Coenzyme Q10 among Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiuhua Shen

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is a major cause of morbidity and mortality with ever increasing prevalence in the United States and worldwide. There is growing body of evidence suggesting that mitochondrial dysfunction secondary to oxidative stress plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of T2DM. Coenzyme Q10 is an important micronutrient acting on the electron transport chain of the mitochondria with two major functions: (1 synthesis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP; and (2 a potent antioxidant. Deficiency in coenzyme Q10 is often seen in patients with T2DM. Whether restoration of coenzyme Q10 will help alleviate oxidative stress, preserve mitochondrial function, and thus improve glycemic control in T2DM is unclear. This article reviews the relationships among oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and T2DM and examines the evidence for potential use of coenzyme Q10 as a supplement for the treatment of T2DM.

  4. The effects of coenzyme Q10 on seizures in mice: the involvement of nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattarinezhad, Elahe; Shafaroodi, Hamed; Sheikhnouri, Kiandokht; Mousavi, Zahra; Moezi, Leila

    2014-08-01

    Coenzyme Q10 is a potent antioxidant in both mitochondria and lipid membranes. It has also been recognized to have an effect on gene expression. This study was designed to investigate whether acute or subchronic treatment with coenzyme Q10 altered the seizures induced by pentylenetetrazole or electroshock in mice. We also evaluated the involvement of nitric oxide in the effects of coenzyme Q10 in pentylenetetrazole-induced seizure models. Acute oral treatment with different doses of coenzyme Q10 did not affect the seizure in intraperitoneal pentylenetetrazole, intravenous pentylenetetrazole, and electroshock models in mice. Subchronic oral administration of coenzyme Q10 (100 mg/kg or more) increased time latencies to the onset of myoclonic jerks and clonic seizures induced by intraperitoneal pentylenetetrazole and at the doses of 25 mg/kg or more increased the seizure threshold induced by intravenous infusion of pentylenetetrazole. Subchronic doses of coenzyme Q10 (50 mg/kg or more) also decreased the incidence of tonic seizures in the electroshock-induced seizure model. Moreover, acute treatment with the precursor of nitric oxide synthesis, L-arginine (60 mg/kg), led to a significant potentiation of the antiseizure effects of subchronic administration of coenzyme Q10 (400 mg/kg in intraperitoneal and 6.25 mg/kg in intravenous pentylenetetrazole tests). Acute treatment with l-NAME (5 mg/kg), a nonspecific nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, significantly attenuated the antiseizure effects of subchronic doses of coenzyme Q10 in both seizure models induced by pentylenetetrazole. On the other hand, acute administration of aminoguanidine (100 mg/kg), a specific inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, did not affect the seizures in mice treated with subchronic doses of coenzyme Q10 in both intraperitoneal and intravenous pentylenetetrazole tests. In conclusion, only subchronic and not acute administration of coenzyme Q10 attenuated seizures induced by pentylenetetrazole

  5. Liver Cancer and Hepatitis B

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Clinical Trials Physician Directory HBV Meeting What Is Hepatitis B? What Is Hepatitis B? The ABCs of Viral Hepatitis Liver Cancer and Hepatitis B Hepatitis Delta Coinfection Hepatitis C Coinfection HIV/AIDS ...

  6. Hepatitis B & C and HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find Services HIV SERVICES LOCATOR Locator Search Search Hepatitis B & C Topics Hepatitis B Hepatitis C Hepatitis ... Infections Sexually Transmitted Diseases Smoking Women's Health Issues Hepatitis B Virus and Hepatitis C Virus Infection People ...

  7. Hepatitis C: Sex and Sexuality

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with Hepatitis » Sex and Sexuality: Entire Lesson Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... hepatitis C virus through sex. Can you pass hepatitis C to a sex partner? Yes, but it ...

  8. Hepatitis C: Diet and Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with Hepatitis » Daily Living: Diet and Nutrition Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... have high cholesterol and have fatty liver. How hepatitis C affects diet If you have hepatitis, you ...

  9. Probing reversible chemistry in coenzyme B12-dependent ethanolamine ammonia lyase with kinetic isotope effects

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Alex R; Rentergent, Julius; Scrutton, NS; Hay, S

    2015-01-01

    Coenzyme B12-dependent enzymes such as ethanolamine ammonia lyase have remarkable catalytic power and some unique properties that enable detailed analysis of the reaction chemistry and associated dynamics. By selectively deuterating the substrate (ethanolamine) and/or the ?-carbon of the 5?-deoxyadenosyl moiety of the intrinsic coenzyme B12, it was possible to experimentally probe both the forward and reverse hydrogen atom transfers between the 5?-deoxyadenosyl radical and substrate during si...

  10. Coenzyme Q10 and Oxidative Stress: Inflammation Status in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Patients after Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiao-Tien Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available (1 Background: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is the second leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide, and surgical resection is the main treatment for HCC. To date, no published study has examined the status of coenzyme Q10 in patients with HCC after surgery. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate the correlations between the level of coenzyme Q10, oxidative stress, and inflammation in patients with HCC after surgery; (2 Methods: 71 primary HCC patients were recruited. Levels of coenzyme Q10, vitamin E, oxidative stress (malondialdehyde, antioxidant enzymes activity (superoxidase dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase, and inflammatory markers (high sensitivity C-reactive protein; tumor necrosis factor-α; and interleukin-6 were measured; (3 Results: Patients with HCC had a significantly lower levels of coenzyme Q10 (p = 0.01 and oxidative stress (p < 0.01, and significantly higher levels of antioxidant enzymes activities and inflammation after surgery (p < 0.05. The level of coenzyme Q10 was significantly positively correlated with antioxidant capacity (vitamin E and glutathione peroxidase activity and negatively correlated with inflammation markers after surgery; (4 Conclusion: Hepatocarcinogenesis is associated with oxidative stress, and coenzyme Q10 may be considered an antioxidant therapy for patients with HCC, particularly those with higher inflammation after surgery.

  11. The Relationship between Coenzyme Q10, Oxidative Stress, and Antioxidant Enzymes Activities and Coronary Artery Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bor-Jen; Lin, Yi-Chin; Huang, Yi-Chia; Ko, Ya-Wen; Hsia, Simon; Lin, Ping-Ting

    2012-01-01

    A higher oxidative stress may contribute to the pathogenesis of coronary artery disease (CAD). The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between coenzyme Q10 concentration and lipid peroxidation, antioxidant enzymes activities and the risk of CAD. Patients who were identified by cardiac catheterization as having at least 50% stenosis of one major coronary artery were assigned to the case group (n = 51). The control group (n = 102) comprised healthy individuals with normal blood biochemical values. The plasma coenzyme Q10, malondialdehyde (MDA) and antioxidant enzymes activities (catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx)) were measured. Subjects with CAD had significant lower plasma coenzyme Q10, CAT and GPx activities and higher MDA and SOD levels compared to those of the control group. The plasma coenzyme Q10 was positively correlated with CAT and GPx activities and negatively correlated with MDA and SOD. However, the correlations were not significant after adjusting for the potential confounders of CAD with the exception of SOD. A higher level of plasma coenzyme Q10 (≥0.52 μmol/L) was significantly associated with reducing the risk of CAD. Our results support the potential cardioprotective impact of coenzyme Q10. PMID:22645453

  12. Coenzyme Q10 and Oxidative Stress: Inflammation Status in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Patients after Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hsiao-Tien; Cheng, Shao-Bin; Huang, Yi-Chia; Huang, Yin-Tzu; Lin, Ping-Ting

    2017-01-04

    (1) Background: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the second leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide, and surgical resection is the main treatment for HCC. To date, no published study has examined the status of coenzyme Q10 in patients with HCC after surgery. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate the correlations between the level of coenzyme Q10, oxidative stress, and inflammation in patients with HCC after surgery; (2) Methods: 71 primary HCC patients were recruited. Levels of coenzyme Q10, vitamin E, oxidative stress (malondialdehyde), antioxidant enzymes activity (superoxidase dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase), and inflammatory markers (high sensitivity C-reactive protein; tumor necrosis factor-α; and interleukin-6) were measured; (3) Results: Patients with HCC had a significantly lower levels of coenzyme Q10 (p = 0.01) and oxidative stress (p coenzyme Q10 was significantly positively correlated with antioxidant capacity (vitamin E and glutathione peroxidase activity) and negatively correlated with inflammation markers after surgery; (4) Conclusion: Hepatocarcinogenesis is associated with oxidative stress, and coenzyme Q10 may be considered an antioxidant therapy for patients with HCC, particularly those with higher inflammation after surgery.

  13. Behavioral Improvement after Chronic Administration of Coenzyme Q10 in P301S Transgenic Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elipenahli, Ceyhan; Stack, Cliona; Jainuddin, Shari; Gerges, Meri; Yang, Lichuan; Starkov, Anatoly; Beal, M. Flint; Dumont, Magali

    2012-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 is a key component of the electron transport chain which plays an essential role in ATP production and also has antioxidant effects. Neuroprotective effects of coenzyme Q10 have been reported in both in vitro and in vivo models of neurodegenerative diseases. However, its effects have not been studied in cells or in animals with tau induced pathology. In this report, we administered coenzyme Q10 to transgenic mice with the P301S tau mutation, which causes fronto-temporal dementia in man. These mice develop tau hyperphosphorylation and neurofibrillary tangles in the brain. Coenzyme Q10 improved survival and behavioral deficits in the P301S mice. There was a modest reduction in phosphorylated tau in the cortex of P301S mice. We also examined the effects of coenzyme Q10 treatment on the electron transport chain enzymes, the mitochondrial antioxidant enzymes, and the tricarboxylic acid cycle. There was a significant increase in complex I activity and protein levels, and a reduction in lipid peroxidation. Our data show that coenzyme Q10 significantly improved behavioral deficits and survival in transgenic mice with the P301S tau mutation, upregulated key enzymes of the electron transport chain, and reduced oxidative stress. PMID:21971408

  14. Serum coenzyme Q10 and risk of disabling dementia: the Circulatory Risk in Communities Study (CIRCS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, Kazumasa; Ikeda, Ai; Moriyama, Yuri; Chei, Choy-Lye; Noda, Hiroyuki; Umesawa, Mitsumasa; Cui, Renzhe; Nagao, Masanori; Kitamura, Akihiko; Yamamoto, Yorihiro; Asada, Takashi; Iso, Hiroyasu

    2014-12-01

    To examine whether coenzyme Q10, a potent antioxidant, is associated with risk of dementia, which has not yet been elucidated. We performed a case-control study nested in a community-based cohort of approximately 6000 Japanese aged 40-69 years at baseline (1984-1994). Serum coenzyme Q10 was measured in 65 incident cases of disabling dementia with dementia-related behavioral disturbance or cognitive impairment incident between 1999 and 2004, and in 130 age-, sex- and baseline year-matched controls. Serum coenzyme Q10 was inversely associated with dementia: the multivariate odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) were 0.68 (0.26-1.78), 0.92 (0.33-2.56), and 0.23 (0.06-0.86) for individuals with the second, third, and highest quartiles of coenzyme Q10, respectively, as compared with the lowest quartile (P for trend = 0.05). A similar association was found for the coenzyme Q10/total cholesterol ratio: the respective ORs were 0.67 (0.25-1.78), 0.73 (0.28-1.92), and 0.21 (0.05-0.90) (P for trend = 0.04). Serum coenzyme Q10 levels were inversely associated with risk of disabling dementia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Therapeutic effect of coenzyme Q10 against experimentally-induced hepatocellular carcinoma in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouad, Amr A; Al-Mulhim, Abdulruhman S; Jresat, Iyad

    2013-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of coenzyme Q10 was investigated in rats with hepatocellular carcinoma induced by trichloroacetic acid (0.5g/kg/day, p.o., for five days). Coenzyme Q10 treatment (0.4mg/kg/day, i.p.) was applied for four weeks following trichloroacetic acid administration. Coenzyme Q10 significantly suppressed lipid peroxidation, prevented the depletion of reduced glutathione and superoxide dismutase activity, and decreased the elevations of tumor necrosis factor-α and nitric oxide in liver tissue of rats with hepatocellular carcinoma. Also, the histopathological dysplastic changes induced by trichloroacetic acid in liver tissue were ameliorated by coenzyme Q10. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that coenzyme Q10 significantly decreased the expression of hepPar-1, alpha-fetoprotein, inducible nitric oxide synthase, cyclooxygenase-2 and nuclear factor-κB in liver tissue of rats with hepatocellular carcinoma. It was concluded that coenzyme Q10 may represent a potential therapeutic option for liver carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Hypocholesterolemic effect of capsaicinoids by increased bile acids excretion in ovariectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Zhou, Min; Fang, Guoshan; Tang, Yan; Chen, Zongdao; Liu, Xiong

    2013-06-01

    This study investigated the interaction of dietary capsaicinoids with the mRNA and protein expressions of key receptors and enzymes involved in cholesterol metabolism in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to sham operation or ovariectomy. The sham group and OVX control group were fed with high-cholesterol diets, whereas the treatment group (control diet containing 0.01% capsaicinoids) was fed with high-cholesterol plus 0.01% capsaicinoids diet for 21 days. Capsaicinoids significantly decreased the body weight gain, plasma total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triacylglycerol without affecting the high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in the OVX rats. The change in plasma lipoprotein profile was accompanied by a greater excretion of total bile acid in feces and small intestinal contents. Western blot and real-time PCR analyses revealed that capsaicinoids significantly enhanced the expressions of hepatic cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase and transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 but did not affect the expression of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase in the OVX rats. Capsaicinoids have cholesterol-lowering effects in OVX rats. The hypocholesterolemic activity of capsaicinoids is caused by the stimulating conversion of cholesterol to bile acids by upregulation of cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase expression and the increase in fecal total bile acid excretion. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Hypolipidemic activity of okra is mediated through inhibition of lipogenesis and upregulation of cholesterol degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong; Chen, Gu; Ren, Dandan; Yang, Shang-Tian

    2014-02-01

    Little is known about the hypolipidemic activity of okra; therefore, we investigated the hypolipidemic activity of okra and its interaction with gene expression of several key components involved in lipid homeostasis. Male C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into three groups and fed with hyperlipidemic diet or two hyperlipidemic diets supplemented with 1% or 2% okra powder for eight weeks. Results demonstrated that okra dose-dependently decreased serum and hepatic total cholesterol and triglyceride, and enhanced fecal excretion of bile acids. Gene expression analysis revealed that okra upregulated cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) expression, downregulated expression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c (SREBP1c) and fatty acid synthase (FAS), with no effect on sterol regulatory element-binding protein 2 (SREBP2), 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR), low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1A (CPT1A). It was suggested that hypolipidemic activity of okra was mediated most likely by upregulation of cholesterol degradation through CYP7A1 and by inhibition of lipogenesis through SREBP1c and FAS. Okra raw and fractionated polysaccharide showed strong bile acid binding capacity in vitro, which may contribute to the hypolipidemic activity observed. In conclusion, okra has potential application in the management of hyperlipidemia and its associated metabolic disorders. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... toxic substances from your blood. These toxins build up and can travel through your body until they reach your brain, causing mental and physical symptoms of HE. Hepatic Encephalopathy often starts slowly, and at first you may not be ...

  19. Alcoholic Hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... stop drinking alcohol. People who continue to drink alcohol face a high risk of serious liver damage and death. Symptoms The ... amount of alcohol you consume. The amount of alcohol intake that puts a person at risk of alcoholic hepatitis isn't known. But most ...

  20. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Triggers or Can Cause HE to Get Worse? How is HE Diagnosed? Prior to Treatment Who treats HE? Preparing for your Medical ... mild to severe and symptoms vary depending on how bad your liver disease is. It’s important for you and your family to become familiar with the signs of Hepatic Encephalopathy ...

  1. Hepatitis C

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... liver diseases like hepatitis C. An occasional alcoholic drink may be okay, but check with your doctor first.What are the side ... family doctor to find out if this information applies to you and to get more information on ... Urticaria Check Your Symptoms Find out what else could be ...

  2. Hepatic autoregulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staehr, Peter; Hother-Nielsen, Ole; Beck-Nielsen, Henning

    2007-01-01

    The effect of increased glycogenolysis, simulated by galactose's conversion to glucose, on the contribution of gluconeogenesis (GNG) to hepatic glucose production (GP) was determined. The conversion of galactose to glucose is by the same pathway as glycogen's conversion to glucose, i.e., glucose 1...

  3. Chronic hepatitis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lemon SM, Brown CO, Brookes OS, et al. Specific IgM response to hepatitis A virus determined by solid-phase radioimmunoassay. Infect Immun 1980 ..... benefit from review by a specialist centre interested in liver disease. It is our experience that many patients referred to the Liver Clinic of the University of Cape Town for.

  4. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Caregiver Signs and Symptoms to look for Caregiver Support Caregiver Stories Home › What is Hepatic Encephalopathy? Why Your Liver is ... questions about HE, one step at a time. Home About Us Ways to ... Funding for the HE123 - Diagnosis, Treatment and Support program is provided by Salix Pharmaceuticals

  5. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is a condition that causes temporary worsening of brain function in people with advanced liver disease. When your liver is damaged it can no longer remove toxic substances from your blood. ... reach your brain, causing mental and physical symptoms of HE. Hepatic ...

  6. Hepatoprotective effect of taurine and coenzyme Q10 and their ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The levels of reduced glutathione. (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) in liver homogenate were also performed. Results: TA or CoQ10 significantly decreased (p < 0.05) the elevation of hepatic markers (LDH, AST and ALT) induced by AA in rats. Reduction of serum proinflammatory cytokines ...

  7. Acute administration of red yeast rice (Monascus purpureus) depletes tissue coenzyme Q(10) levels in ICR mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui-Ting; Lin, Shyh-Hsiang; Huang, Shih-Yi; Chou, Hsin-Ju

    2005-01-01

    In this study, we attempted to evaluate the effect of administration of a high quantity of red yeast rice on coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) synthesis in the tissues of ICR mice. Eighty-eight adult male ICR mice were housed and divided into control and experimental groups for red yeast rice treatment. Animals were gavaged with a low (1 g/kg body weight) or a high dose (5 g/kg body weight, approximately five times the typical recommended human dose) of red yeast rice dissolved in soyabean oil. After gavagement, animals of the control group were immediately killed; mice of the experimental groups (eight for each subgroup) were killed at different time intervals of 0.5, 1, 1.5, 4 and 24 h. The liver, heart and kidney were taken for analysis of monacolin K (liver only) and CoQ10 analysis. Liver and heart CoQ10 levels declined dramatically in both groups administered red yeast rice, especially in the high-dose group, within 30 min. After 24 h, the levels of hepatic and cardiac CoQ10 were still reduced. A similar trend was also observed in the heart, but the inhibitory effect began after 90 min. The higher dose of red yeast rice presented a greater suppressive effect than did the lower dose on tissue CoQ10 levels. In conclusion, acute red yeast rice gavage suppressed hepatic and cardiac CoQ10 levels in rodents; furthermore, the inhibitory effect was responsive to the doses administered.

  8. Protein acetylation and acetyl coenzyme a metabolism in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galdieri, Luciano; Zhang, Tiantian; Rogerson, Daniella; Lleshi, Rron; Vancura, Ales

    2014-12-01

    Cells sense and appropriately respond to the physical conditions and availability of nutrients in their environment. This sensing of the environment and consequent cellular responses are orchestrated by a multitude of signaling pathways and typically involve changes in transcription and metabolism. Recent discoveries suggest that the signaling and transcription machineries are regulated by signals which are derived from metabolism and reflect the metabolic state of the cell. Acetyl coenzyme A (CoA) is a key metabolite that links metabolism with signaling, chromatin structure, and transcription. Acetyl-CoA is produced by glycolysis as well as other catabolic pathways and used as a substrate for the citric acid cycle and as a precursor in synthesis of fatty acids and steroids and in other anabolic pathways. This central position in metabolism endows acetyl-CoA with an important regulatory role. Acetyl-CoA serves as a substrate for lysine acetyltransferases (KATs), which catalyze the transfer of acetyl groups to the epsilon-amino groups of lysines in histones and many other proteins. Fluctuations in the concentration of acetyl-CoA, reflecting the metabolic state of the cell, are translated into dynamic protein acetylations that regulate a variety of cell functions, including transcription, replication, DNA repair, cell cycle progression, and aging. This review highlights the synthesis and homeostasis of acetyl-CoA and the regulation of transcriptional and signaling machineries in yeast by acetylation. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Increase of bioavailability of coenzyme Q(10) and vitamin E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wajda, Rudi; Zirkel, Jürgen; Schaffer, Tanja

    2007-12-01

    Commercial coenzyme Q(10) (CoQ(10)) and alpha-tocopherol (vitamin E) formulations often show poor intestinal absorption. Delivery of CoQ(10) and vitamin E was enhanced when used with a new formulation, NanoSolve (Lipoid GmbH, Ludwigshafen, Germany), as shown by an open, comparative monocenter, crossover study of 24 volunteers. Plasma CoQ(10) and vitamin E were determined from predose until +14 hours. To compare bioavailability, corrected maximum concentration, time to reach maximum concentration, and area under the curve from 0 to 14 hours were assessed. The NanoSolve test formulation contained 100 mg of CoQ(10) and 120 mg of vitamin E. The pure substances in hard gelatin capsules served as the reference. Although identical amounts of CoQ(10) and vitamin E were administered, absolutely higher serum concentrations of the active ingredients were achieved by the NanoSolve formulation than by the pure materials in gelatin capsules. The bioavailability of CoQ(10) increased fivefold after administration of the NanoSolve formulation, and the bioavailability of vitamin E was enhanced 10-fold both compared to the pure substances.

  10. Voltammetric determination of coenzyme Q10 in pharmaceutical dosage forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalkiewicz, Slawomir

    2008-06-01

    A simple and rapid voltammetric method has been developed for the quantitative determination of coenzyme Q(10) (CoQ(10)) in pharmaceutical preparations. Studies with differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) were carried out using a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) in a mixed solvent containing 80 vol.% acetic acid and 20 vol.% acetonitrile. A well-defined reduction peak of CoQ(10) was obtained at -20 mV vs. Ag/AgCl. The voltammetric technique applied provides a precise determination of CoQ(10) using the multiple standard addition method. The statistical parameters and the recovery study data clearly indicate good reproducibility and accuracy of the method. The accuracy of the results assessed by recovery trials was observed to be within the range of 101.1% to 102.5%. The detection and quantification limits were found to be 0.014 mM (12 mg L(-1)) and 0.046 mM (40 mg L(-1)), respectively. An analysis of real samples containing CoQ(10) showed no interferences with common additives and excipients, such as unsaturated fatty acids and soya lecithin. The method proposed does not require any pretreatment of the pharmaceutical dosage forms. A spectrophotometric determination of CoQ(10) in real samples diluted in mixtures containing ethanol and n-hexane was also performed for comparison.

  11. Hormonal Influence on Coenzyme Q10 Levels in Blood Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Pontecorvi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10, also known as ubiquinone for its presence in all body cells, is an essential part of the cell energy-producing system. However, it is also a powerful lipophilic antioxidant protecting lipoproteins and cell membranes. Due to these two actions, CoQ10 is commonly used in clinical practice in chronic heart failure, male infertility, and neurodegenerative disease. However, it is also taken as an anti-aging substance by healthy people aiming for long-term neuroprotection and by sportsmen to improve endurance. Many hormones are known to be involved in body energy regulation, in terms of production, consumption and dissipation, and their influence on CoQ10 body content or blood values may represent an important pathophysiological mechanism. We summarize the main findings of the literature about the link between hormonal systems and circulating CoQ10 levels. In particular the role of thyroid hormones, directly involved in the regulation of energy homeostasis, is discussed. There is also a link with gonadal and adrenal hormones, partially due to the common biosynthetic pathway with CoQ10, but also to the increased oxidative stress found in hypogonadism and hypoadrenalism.

  12. Coenzyme Q10 Supplementation in Aging and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan D. Hernández-Camacho

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Coenzyme Q (CoQ is an essential component of the mitochondrial electron transport chain and an antioxidant in plasma membranes and lipoproteins. It is endogenously produced in all cells by a highly regulated pathway that involves a mitochondrial multiprotein complex. Defects in either the structural and/or regulatory components of CoQ complex or in non-CoQ biosynthetic mitochondrial proteins can result in a decrease in CoQ concentration and/or an increase in oxidative stress. Besides CoQ10 deficiency syndrome and aging, there are chronic diseases in which lower levels of CoQ10 are detected in tissues and organs providing the hypothesis that CoQ10 supplementation could alleviate aging symptoms and/or retard the onset of these diseases. Here, we review the current knowledge of CoQ10 biosynthesis and primary CoQ10 deficiency syndrome, and have collected published results from clinical trials based on CoQ10 supplementation. There is evidence that supplementation positively affects mitochondrial deficiency syndrome and the symptoms of aging based mainly on improvements in bioenergetics. Cardiovascular disease and inflammation are alleviated by the antioxidant effect of CoQ10. There is a need for further studies and clinical trials involving a greater number of participants undergoing longer treatments in order to assess the benefits of CoQ10 treatment in metabolic syndrome and diabetes, neurodegenerative disorders, kidney diseases, and human fertility.

  13. Coenzyme Q10 Protects Hair Cells against Aminoglycoside

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugahara, Kazuma; Hirose, Yoshinobu; Mikuriya, Takefumi; Hashimoto, Makoto; Kanagawa, Eiju; Hara, Hirotaka; Shimogori, Hiroaki; Yamashita, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that the production of free radicals is associated with sensory cell death induced by an aminoglycoside. Many researchers have reported that antioxidant reagents protect sensory cells in the inner ear, and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is an antioxidant that is consumed as a health food in many countries. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of CoQ10 in mammalian vestibular hair cell death induced by aminoglycoside. Cultured utricles of CBA/CaN mice were divided into three groups (control group, neomycin group, and neomycin + CoQ10 group). In the neomycin group, utricles were cultured with neomycin (1 mM) to induce hair cell death. In the neomycin + CoQ10 group, utricles were cultured with neomycin and water-soluble CoQ10 (30–0.3 µM). Twenty-four hours after exposure to neomycin, the cultured tissues were fixed, and vestibular hair cells were labeled using an anti-calmodulin antibody. Significantly more hair cells survived in the neomycin + CoQ10 group than in the neomycin group. These data indicate that CoQ10 protects sensory hair cells against neomycin-induced death in the mammalian vestibular epithelium; therefore, CoQ10 may be useful as a protective drug in the inner ear. PMID:25265538

  14. Synthesis of the Key Intermediate of Coenzyme Q10

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Gang Zu

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available (2’E-1-(3-methyl-4-p-toluenesulfonyl-2-butene-6-methyl-2,3,4,5-tetramethoxybenzene (4 is the key intermediate in the synthesis of coenzyme Q10 via a coupling reaction with solanesyl bromide. In this paper, we report a simple and effective synthesis of compound 4, starting with the readily available and inexpensive precursors p-toluenesulfonyl chloride (TsCl and isoprene to obtain (2E-1-p-toluenesulfonyl-2-methyl-4-hydroxy-2-butene (3 by addition, esterification and hydrolysis. Application of the Friedel-Crafts alkylation to compound 3, followed by the addition of 2,3,4,5-tetramethoxytoluene (TeMT, assembled the two parts into compound 4. The key parameters of each reaction were optimized at the same time, and the four total operations needed to produced compound 4 had a 27.9% overall yield under the optimized conditions. The structures of the compounds were characterized by 1H-NMR, IR and MS. This alternative process has the potential to be used for large-scale process.

  15. Coenzyme Q10 protects hair cells against aminoglycoside.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuma Sugahara

    Full Text Available It is well known that the production of free radicals is associated with sensory cell death induced by an aminoglycoside. Many researchers have reported that antioxidant reagents protect sensory cells in the inner ear, and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 is an antioxidant that is consumed as a health food in many countries. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of CoQ10 in mammalian vestibular hair cell death induced by aminoglycoside. Cultured utricles of CBA/CaN mice were divided into three groups (control group, neomycin group, and neomycin + CoQ10 group. In the neomycin group, utricles were cultured with neomycin (1 mM to induce hair cell death. In the neomycin + CoQ10 group, utricles were cultured with neomycin and water-soluble CoQ10 (30-0.3 µM. Twenty-four hours after exposure to neomycin, the cultured tissues were fixed, and vestibular hair cells were labeled using an anti-calmodulin antibody. Significantly more hair cells survived in the neomycin + CoQ10 group than in the neomycin group. These data indicate that CoQ10 protects sensory hair cells against neomycin-induced death in the mammalian vestibular epithelium; therefore, CoQ10 may be useful as a protective drug in the inner ear.

  16. Decreased Coenzyme Q10 Levels in Multiple System Atrophy Cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barca, Emanuele; Kleiner, Giulio; Tang, Guomei; Ziosi, Marcello; Tadesse, Saba; Masliah, Eliezer; Louis, Elan D; Faust, Phyllis; Kang, Un J; Torres, Jose; Cortes, Etty P; Vonsattel, Jean-Paul G; Kuo, Sheng-Han; Quinzii, Catarina M

    2016-07-01

    In familial and sporadic multiple system atrophy (MSA) patients, deficiency of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) has been associated with mutations in COQ2, which encodes the second enzyme in the CoQ10 biosynthetic pathway. Cerebellar ataxia is the most common presentation of CoQ10 deficiency, suggesting that the cerebellum might be selectively vulnerable to low levels of CoQ10 To investigate whether CoQ10 deficiency represents a common feature in the brains of MSA patients independent of the presence of COQ2 mutations, we studied CoQ10 levels in postmortem brains of 12 MSA, 9 Parkinson disease (PD), 9 essential tremor (ET) patients, and 12 controls. We also assessed mitochondrial respiratory chain enzyme activities, oxidative stress, mitochondrial mass, and levels of enzymes involved in CoQ biosynthesis. Our studies revealed CoQ10 deficiency in MSA cerebellum, which was associated with impaired CoQ biosynthesis and increased oxidative stress in the absence of COQ2 mutations. The levels of CoQ10 in the cerebella of ET and PD patients were comparable or higher than in controls. These findings suggest that CoQ10 deficiency may contribute to the pathogenesis of MSA. Because no disease modifying therapies are currently available, increasing CoQ10 levels by supplementation or upregulation of its biosynthesis may represent a novel treatment strategy for MSA patients. © 2016 American Association of Neuropathologists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Formation and Metabolism of Methylmalonyl Coenzyme A in Corynebacterium glutamicum▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botella, Laure; Lindley, Nic D.; Eggeling, Lothar

    2009-01-01

    Genome sequence information suggests that B12-dependent mutases are present in a number of bacteria, including members of the suborder Corynebacterineae like Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Corynebacterium glutamicum. We here functionally identify a methylmalonyl coenzyme A (CoA) mutase in C. glutamicum that is retained in all of the members of the suborder Corynebacterineae and is encoded by NCgl1471, NCgl1472, and NCgl1470. In addition, we observe the presence of methylmalonate in C. glutamicum, reaching concentrations of up to 757 nmol g (dry weight)−1 in propionate-grown cells, whereas in Escherichia coli no methylmalonate was detectable. As demonstrated with a mutase deletion mutant, the presence of methylmalonate in C. glutamicum is independent of mutase activity but possibly due to propionyl-CoA carboxylase activity. During growth on propionate, increased mutase activity has severe cellular consequences, resulting in growth arrest and excretion of succinate. The physiological context of the mutase present in members of the suborder Corynebacterineae is discussed. PMID:19233926

  18. Acyl coenzyme A carboxylase of Propionibacterium shermanii: detection and properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirling, L A; Ahmad, P M; Ahmad, F

    1981-01-01

    An acyl coenzyme A (CoA) carboxylase, which catalyzes the adenosine triphosphate-dependent fixation of CO2 into acetyl-, propionyl-, and butyryl-CoA, was detected in fractionated cell extracts of Propionibacterium shermanii. Catalytic activity was inhibited by avidin but was unaffected by avidin pretreated with excess biotin. The carboxylase levels detected were relatively small and were related to cellular growth. Maximal carboxylase activity was detected in cells grown for about 96 h. Thereafter, the activity declined rapidly. Optimal CO2 fixation occurred at pH 7.5. Other parameters of the assay system were optimized, and the apparent Km values for substrates were determined. The end product of the reaction (with acetyl-CoA as the substrate) was identified as malonyl-CoA. The stoichiometry of the reaction was such that, for every mole of acetyl-CoA and adenosine triphosphate consumed, 1 mol each of malonyl-CoA, adenosine diphosphate, and orthophosphate was formed. These data provide the first evidence for the presence of another biotin-containing enzyme, an acyl-CoA carboxylase, in these bacteria in addition to the well-characterized methylmalonyl-CoA carboxyltransferase. PMID:6796564

  19. Effect of reduced form of coenzyme Q10 on cyclosporine nephrotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Toshikazu; Ishikawa, Akira; Homma, Yukio

    2013-02-01

    Cyclosporine, a potent immunosuppressant, has nephrotoxic adverse effects that may be mediated by oxidative stress. The reduced form of coenzyme Q10 has antioxidant effects. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of the reduced form of coenzyme Q10 on cyclosporine nephrotoxicity. Six-week-old male Wistar rats were divided into 3 groups (10 animals each). Group 1 (control) received olive oil only. Group 2 received cyclosporine (30 mg/kg/d, which is an experimentally nephrotoxic dose). Group 3 received cyclosporine (30 mg/kg/d) and the reduced form of coenzyme Q10 (600 mg/kg/d). The cyclosporine and the reduced form of coenzyme Q10 were given orally for 4 weeks. Daily urinary albumin excretion, serum creatinine level, and urinary 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine level were measured, and renal tissue was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. In rats treated with cyclosporine and the reduced form of coenzyme Q10 (group 3), there were significantly less abnormalities in mean urinary albumin excretion (group 1: 2.8 ± 0.5; group 2: 41 ± 7; group 3: 21 ± 4 μg/d), serum creatinine (group 1: 1.0 ± 0.2; group 2: 1.8 ± 0.4; group 3: 1.4 ± 0.3 mg/dL), and urine 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine levels (group 1: 7 ± 3; group 2: 10 ± 3; group 3: 7 ± 1 mg/mL creatinine) than rats treated with cyclosporine alone (group 2). There were 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine deposits seen in the proximal tubular cells of group 2 that were not present in rats treated with the reduced form of coenzyme Q10 (group 3). The reduced form of coenzyme Q10 may prevent or minimize cyclosporine nephrotoxicity by an antioxidant effect.

  20. The antioxidant status of coenzyme Q10 and vitamin E in children with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkholy, Usama M; Abdalmonem, Nermin; Zaki, Ahmed; Elkoumi, Mohamed A; Hashim, Mustafa I Abu; Basset, Maha A A; Salah, Hossam E

    2018-02-07

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antioxidant status of plasma vitamin E and plasma and intracellular coenzyme Q10 in children with type 1 diabetes. This case-control study was conducted on 72 children with type 1 diabetes and compared to 48 healthy children, who were age, sex, and ethnicity-matched. The diabetic children were divided according to their glycosylated hemoglobin (A1c %) into two groups: poor and good glycemic control groups. All children underwent full history taking, clinical examination, and laboratory measurement of complete blood count, A1c %, plasma cholesterol, triglycerides, and vitamin E levels and coenzyme Q10 levels in plasma, erythrocytes, and platelets. Children with poor glycemic control showed significantly higher plasma vitamin E, coenzyme Q10, triglycerides, low-density lipoproteins, waist circumference/height ratio, cholesterol levels, and lower high-density lipoproteins and platelet coenzyme Q10 redox status in comparison to those with good glycemic control and the control group (p<0.05). Plasma coenzyme Q10 showed a positive correlation with the duration of type 1 diabetes, triglycerides, cholesterol, vitamin E, and A1c %, and negative correlation with the age of the diabetic group (p<0.05). The platelet redox status showed a negative correlation with the A1c % levels (r=-0.31; p=0.022) and the duration of type 1 diabetes (r=-0.35, p=0.012). Patients with type 1 diabetes, especially poorly controlled, had elevation of plasma vitamin E and coenzyme Q10 levels and decreased platelet redox status of coenzyme Q10, which may be an indicator of increased oxidative stress. Copyright © 2018 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  1. Hepatitis B (HBV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Hepatitis B KidsHealth / For Teens / Hepatitis B What's in ... Prevented? Print en español Hepatitis B What Is Hepatitis B? Hepatitis B is an infection of the ...

  2. Properties of succinyl-coenzyme A:D-citramalate coenzyme A transferase and its role in the autotrophic 3-hydroxypropionate cycle of Chloroflexus aurantiacus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedmann, Silke; Alber, Birgit E; Fuchs, Georg

    2006-09-01

    The phototrophic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus uses the 3-hydroxypropionate cycle for autotrophic CO(2) fixation. This cycle starts with acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) and produces glyoxylate. Glyoxylate is an unconventional cell carbon precursor that needs special enzymes for assimilation. Glyoxylate is combined with propionyl-CoA to beta-methylmalyl-CoA, which is converted to citramalate. Cell extracts catalyzed the succinyl-CoA-dependent conversion of citramalate to acetyl-CoA and pyruvate, the central cell carbon precursor. This reaction is due to the combined action of enzymes that were upregulated during autotrophic growth, a coenzyme A transferase with the use of succinyl-CoA as the CoA donor and a lyase cleaving citramalyl-CoA to acetyl-CoA and pyruvate. Genomic analysis identified a gene coding for a putative coenzyme A transferase. The gene was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli and shown to code for succinyl-CoA:d-citramalate coenzyme A transferase. This enzyme, which catalyzes the reaction d-citramalate + succinyl-CoA --> d-citramalyl-CoA + succinate, was purified and studied. It belongs to class III of the coenzyme A transferase enzyme family, with an aspartate residue in the active site. The homodimeric enzyme composed of 44-kDa subunits was specific for succinyl-CoA as a CoA donor but also accepted d-malate and itaconate instead of d-citramalate. The CoA transferase gene is part of a cluster of genes which are cotranscribed, including the gene for d-citramalyl-CoA lyase. It is proposed that the CoA transferase and the lyase catalyze the last two steps in the glyoxylate assimilation route.

  3. Formation of D-3-hydroxybutyryl-coenzyme A by an acetoacetyl-coenzyme A reductase in Syntrophomonas wolfei subsp. wolfei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amos, D.A.; McInerney, M.J. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). Dept. of Botany and Microbiology

    1993-12-31

    Cell-free extracts of Syntrophomonas wolfei subsp. wolfei synthesized D-({minus})-3-hydroxybutyryl-coenzyme A (CoA) (the stereoisomer required for the synthesis of poly-{beta}-hydroxyalkanoate) from acetoacetyl-CoA, but not crotonyl-CoA, and NAD(P)H. Ammonium sulfate fractionation and ion exchange chromatography separated an acetoacetyl-CoA reductase activity that formed D-({minus})-3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA from the {beta}-oxidation enzyme activity, L-(+)-3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase. The former activity was further purified by hydroxylapatite and affinity chromatography. The most pure acetoacetyl-CoA reductase preparations formed D-({minus})-3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA from acetoacetyl-CoA and had high specific activity using either NADH or NADPH as the electron donor. Thus, S. wolfei makes D-({minus})-3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA by an acetoacetyl-CoA reductase rather than by a D-isomer specific enoyl-CoA hydratase and the reducing equivalents required for PHA synthesis from acetoacetyl-CoA can be supplied from the NADH made during {beta}-oxidation.

  4. AUTOIMMUNE HEPATITIS

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    Yusri Dianne Jurnalis

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakHepatitis autoimun merupakan penyakit inflamasi hati yang berat dengan penyebab pasti yang tidak diketahui yang mengakibatkan morbiditas dan mortalitas yang tinggi. Semua usia dan jenis kelamin dapat dikenai dengan insiden tertinggi pada anak perempuan usia prepubertas, meskipun dapat didiagnosis pada usia 6 bulan. Hepatitis autoimun dapat diklasifikasikan menjadi 2 bagian berdasarkan adanya antibodi spesifik: Smooth Muscle Antibody (SMA dengan anti-actin specificity dan/atau Anti Nuclear Antibody (ANA pada tipe 1 dan Liver-Kidney Microsome antibody (LKM1 dan/atau anti-liver cytosol pada tipe 2. Gambaran histologisnya berupa “interface hepatitis”, dengan infiltrasi sel mononuklear pada saluran portal, berbagai tingkat nekrosis, dan fibrosis yang progresf. Penyakit berjalan secara kronik tetapi keadaan yang berat biasanya menjadi sirosis dan gagal hati.Tipe onset yang paling sering sama dengan hepatitis virus akut dengan gagal hati akut pada beberapa pasien; sekitar sepertiga pasien dengan onset tersembunyi dengan kelemahan dan ikterik progresif ketika 10-15% asimptomatik dan mendadak ditemukan hepatomegali dan/atau peningkatan kadar aminotransferase serum. Adanya predominasi perempuan pada kedua tipe. Pasien LKM1 positif menunjukkan keadaan lebih akut, pada usia yang lebih muda, dan biasanya dengan defisiensi Immunoglobulin A (IgA, dengan durasi gejala sebelum diagnosis, tanda klinis, riwayat penyakit autoimun pada keluarga, adanya kaitan dengan gangguan autoimun, respon pengobatan dan prognosis jangka panjang sama pada kedua tipe.Kortikosteroid yang digunakan secara tunggal atau kombinasi azathioprine merupakan terapi pilihan yang dapat menimbulkan remisi pada lebih dari 90% kasus. Strategi terapi alternatif adalah cyclosporine. Penurunan imunosupresi dikaitkan dengan tingginya relap. Transplantasi hati dianjurkan pada penyakit hati dekom-pensata yang tidak respon dengan pengobatan medis lainnya.Kata kunci : hepatitis Autoimmune

  5. Hepatitis B virus (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepatitis B is also known as serum hepatitis and is spread through blood and sexual contact. It is ... population. This photograph is an electronmicroscopic image of hepatitis B virus particles. (Image courtesy of the Centers for ...

  6. Hepatic (Liver) Function Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Educators Search English Español Blood Test: Hepatic (Liver) Function Panel KidsHealth / For Parents / Blood Test: Hepatic ( ... or kidneys ) is working. What Is a Hepatic (Liver) Function Panel? A liver function panel is a ...

  7. Hepatitis Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... visit this page: About CDC.gov . Hepatitis Risk Assessment Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Viral Hepatitis. ... at risk? Take this 5 minute Hepatitis Risk Assessment developed by the CDC and get a personalized ...

  8. Preventing hepatitis A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepatitis A is inflammation (irritation and swelling) of the liver caused by the hepatitis A virus. You can take several steps to ... reduce your risk of spreading or catching the hepatitis A virus: Always wash your hands thoroughly after ...

  9. The antioxidant status and concentrations of coenzyme Q10 and vitamin E in metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Chi-Hua; Yang, Nae-Cherng; Lee, Bor-Jen; Lin, Jui-Yuan; Hsia, Simon; Lin, Ping-Ting

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the levels of coenzyme Q10 and vitamin E and the antioxidant status in subjects with metabolic syndrome (MS). Subjects with MS (n = 72) were included according to the criteria for MS. The non-MS group (n = 105) was comprised of healthy individuals with normal blood biochemical values. The plasma coenzyme Q10, vitamin E concentrations, lipid profiles, and antioxidant enzymes levels (catalase, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase) were measured. The subjects with MS had significantly higher concentrations of plasma coenzyme Q10 and vitamin E than those in the non-MS group, but these differences were not significant after being normalized for triglyceride level. The levels of antioxidant enzymes were significantly lower in the MS group than in the non-MS group. The subjects with the higher antioxidant enzymes activities had significant reductions in the risk of MS (P coenzyme Q10 and vitamin E. In conclusion, the subjects with MS might be under higher oxidative stress resulting in low levels of antioxidant enzyme activities. A higher level of antioxidant enzymes activities was significantly associated with a reduction in the risk of MS independent of the levels of coenzyme Q10 and vitamin E.

  10. The Antioxidant Status and Concentrations of Coenzyme Q10 and Vitamin E in Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Hua Yen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the levels of coenzyme Q10 and vitamin E and the antioxidant status in subjects with metabolic syndrome (MS. Subjects with MS (n=72 were included according to the criteria for MS. The non-MS group (n=105 was comprised of healthy individuals with normal blood biochemical values. The plasma coenzyme Q10, vitamin E concentrations, lipid profiles, and antioxidant enzymes levels (catalase, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase were measured. The subjects with MS had significantly higher concentrations of plasma coenzyme Q10 and vitamin E than those in the non-MS group, but these differences were not significant after being normalized for triglyceride level. The levels of antioxidant enzymes were significantly lower in the MS group than in the non-MS group. The subjects with the higher antioxidant enzymes activities had significant reductions in the risk of MS (P<0.01 after being adjusted for coenzyme Q10 and vitamin E. In conclusion, the subjects with MS might be under higher oxidative stress resulting in low levels of antioxidant enzyme activities. A higher level of antioxidant enzymes activities was significantly associated with a reduction in the risk of MS independent of the levels of coenzyme Q10 and vitamin E.

  11. Hepatitis in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Tsuji, Yoshiro; Doi, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Yasuharu; Tohya, Yoshikazu; Yanagi, Tadamichi

    1986-01-01

    115 patients (71 male and 44 female) with infectious hepatitis were hospitalized in Nagasaki University Hospital during 1974-1984. They were all the hospitalized patients in our pediatric department. The total patient was 8150 and that of hepatitis was 115, that is 1.4%. On the classification of hepatitis, infectious mononucleosis patients were the most. Next was HB hepatitis. HA hepatitis were less than we had expected. Generally in Japan, childrens HA hepatitis patients are less usual than ...

  12. Hepatitis A: Questions and Answers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepatitis A: Questions and Answers Information about the disease and vaccines What causes hepatitis A? Hepatitis A is an infectious liver disease caused by hepatitis A virus (HAV). How does hepatitis A virus ...

  13. Cardiofaciocutaneous (CFC) syndrome associated with muscular coenzyme Q10 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aeby, A; Sznajer, Y; Cavé, H; Rebuffat, E; Van Coster, R; Rigal, O; Van Bogaert, P

    2007-10-01

    The cardiofaciocutaneous (CFC) syndrome is characterized by congenital heart defect, developmental delay, peculiar facial appearance with bitemporal constriction, prominent forehead, downslanting palpebral fissures, curly sparse hair and abnormalities of the skin. CFC syndrome phenotypically overlaps with Noonan and Costello syndromes. Mutations of several genes (PTPN11, HRAS, KRAS, BRAF, MEK1 and MEK2), involved in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, have been identified in CFC-Costello-Noonan patients. Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), a lipophilic molecule present in all cell membranes, functions as an electron carrier in the mitochondrial respiratory chain, where it transports electrons from complexes I and II to complex III. CoQ10 deficiency is a rare treatable mitochondrial disorder with various neurological (cerebellar ataxia, myopathy, epilepsy, mental retardation) and extraneurological (cardiomyopathy, nephropathy) signs that are responsive to CoQ10 supplementation. We report the case of a 4-year-old girl who presented a CFC syndrome, confirmed by the presence of a pathogenic R257Q BRAF gene mutation, together with a muscular CoQ10 deficiency. Her psychomotor development was severely impaired, hindered by muscular hypotonia and ataxia, both improving remarkably after CoQ10 treatment. This case suggests that there is a functional connection between the MAPK pathway and the mitochondria. This could be through the phosphorylation of a nuclear receptor essential for CoQ10 biosynthesis. Another hypothesis is that K-Ras, one of the proteins composing the MAPK pathway, might be recruited into the mitochondria to promote apoptosis. This case highlights that CoQ10 might contribute to the pathogenesis of CFC syndrome.

  14. Acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase inhibition ameliorates proteinuria, hyperlipidemia, lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase, SRB-1, and low-denisty lipoprotein receptor deficiencies in nephrotic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaziri, N D; Liang, K H

    2004-07-27

    Nephrotic syndrome (NS) is associated with hyperlipidemia, altered lipid regulatory enzymes and receptors, and increased risk of progressive renal and cardiovascular diseases. Acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) catalyzes intracellular esterification of cholesterol and plays an important role in production of apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins, regulation of cholesterol-responsive proteins, and formation of foam cells. Because hepatic ACAT-2 is markedly upregulated in NS, we tested the hypothesis that inhibition of ACAT may improve cholesterol metabolism in NS. Rats with puromycin-induced NS were treated with either the ACAT inhibitor CI-976 or placebo for 2 weeks. Normal rats served as controls. Plasma lipids, renal function, and key lipid regulatory factors were measured. Untreated NS rats showed heavy proteinuria; hypoalbuminemia; elevated plasma cholesterol, triglyceride, LDL, VLDL, and total cholesterol-to-HDL cholesterol ratio; increased hepatic ACAT activity, ACAT-2 mRNA, and ACAT-2 protein; and reduced LDL receptor, HDL receptor, otherwise known as scavenger receptor B-1 (SRB-1) and plasma lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT). ACAT inhibitor reduced plasma cholesterol and triglycerides, normalized total cholesterol-to-HDL cholesterol ratio, and lowered hepatic ACAT activity without changing ACAT-2 mRNA or protein. This was accompanied by near normalizations of plasma LCAT, hepatic SRB-1, and LDL receptor and a significant amelioration of proteinuria and hypoalbuminemia. Pharmacological inhibition of ACAT reverses NS-induced LDL receptor, HDL receptor, and LCAT deficiencies; improves plasma lipid profile; and ameliorates proteinuria in nephrotic animals. Further studies are needed to explore the effect of ACAT inhibition in nephrotic humans.

  15. Hepatitis B Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a combination product containing Haemophilus influenzae type b, Hepatitis B Vaccine) ... combination product containing Diphtheria, Tetanus Toxoids, Acellular Pertussis, Hepatitis B, Polio Vaccine)

  16. Coenzyme Q10 - A new player in the treatment of heart failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowski, Jerzy; Korzeniowska, Katarzyna; Cieślewicz, Artur; Jabłecka, Anna

    2016-10-01

    Coenzyme Q10 is the only endogenously synthesized lipid with a redox function which exhibits broad tissue and intracellular distribution in mammals. Beneficial effects of Coenzyme Q10 supplementation were observed in several age-related diseases including heart failure. CoQ10 (coenzyme Q10) level is significantly decreased in patients with this disease, which correlates with severity of clinical symptoms. Supplementation with various pharmaceutical formulations of CoQ10 improves impaired cardiac function and clinical course of heart failure. Current data from clinical trials indicate that CoQ10 can significantly reduce morbidity and mortality of heart failure patients in addition to guideline recommended pharmacotherapy. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o.

  17. 77 FR 72385 - Certain Coenzyme Q10 Products and Methods of Making Same; Commission Determination (1) To Review...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Certain Coenzyme Q10 Products and Methods of Making Same; Commission Determination (1) To Review... into the United States of certain coenzyme Q10 products by reason of infringement of certain claims of...

  18. Continuous recording of long-chain acyl-coenzyme A synthetase activity using fluorescently labeled bovine serum albumin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demant, Erland J.F.; Nystrøm, Birthe T.

    2001-01-01

    acyl-Coenzyme A, synthetase, activity assay, fluorescence recording, fatty acid probe, serum albumin, hydroxycoumarin, detergent, micelles, Pseudomonas fragi, rat liver microsomes......acyl-Coenzyme A, synthetase, activity assay, fluorescence recording, fatty acid probe, serum albumin, hydroxycoumarin, detergent, micelles, Pseudomonas fragi, rat liver microsomes...

  19. Effects of fluvastatin and coenzyme Q10 on skeletal muscle in normo- and hypercholesterolaemic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincze, J; Jenes, Á; Füzi, M; Almássy, J; Németh, R; Szigeti, G; Dienes, B; Gaál, Z; Szentesi, P; Jóna, I; Kertai, P; Paragh, G; Csernoch, L

    2015-06-01

    Myalgia and muscle weakness may appreciably contribute to the poor adherence to statin therapy. Although the pathomechanism of statin-induced myopathy is not completely understood, changes in calcium homeostasis and reduced coenzyme Q10 levels are hypothesized to play important roles. In our experiments, fluvastatin and/or coenzyme Q10 was administered chronically to normocholesterolaemic or hypercholaestherolaemic rats, and the modifications of the calcium homeostasis and the strength of their muscles were investigated. While hypercholesterolaemia did not change the frequency of sparks, fluvastatin increased it on muscles both from normocholesterolaemic and from hypercholesterolaemic rats. This effect, however, was not mediated by a chronic modification of the ryanodine receptor as shown by the unchanged ryanodine binding in the latter group. While coenzyme Q10 supplementation significantly reduced the frequency of the spontaneous calcium release events, it did not affect their amplitude and spatial spread in muscles from fluvastatin-treated rats. This indicates that coenzyme Q10 supplementation prevented the spark frequency increasing effect of fluvastatin without having a major effect on the amount of calcium released during individual sparks. In conclusion, we have found that fluvastatin, independently of the cholesterol level in the blood, consistently and specifically increased the frequency of calcium sparks in skeletal muscle cells, an effect which could be prevented by the addition of coenzyme Q10 to the diet. These results support theories favouring the role of calcium handling in the pathophysiology of statin-induced myopathy and provide a possible pathway for the protective effect of coenzyme Q10 in statin treated patients symptomatic of this condition.

  20. Association between coenzyme Q10 and glucose transporter (GLUT1) deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yubero, Delia; O'Callaghan, Mar; Montero, Raquel; Ormazabal, Aida; Armstrong, Judith; Espinos, Carmina; Rodríguez, Maria A; Jou, Cristina; Castejon, Esperanza; Aracil, Maria A; Cascajo, Maria V; Gavilan, Angela; Briones, Paz; Jimenez-Mallebrera, Cecilia; Pineda, Mercedes; Navas, Plácido; Artuch, Rafael

    2014-11-08

    It has been demonstrated that glucose transporter (GLUT1) deficiency in a mouse model causes a diminished cerebral lipid synthesis. This deficient lipid biosynthesis could contribute to secondary CoQ deficiency. We report here, for the first time an association between GLUT1 and coenzyme Q10 deficiency in a pediatric patient. We report a 15 year-old girl with truncal ataxia, nystagmus, dysarthria and myoclonic epilepsy as the main clinical features. Blood lactate and alanine values were increased, and coenzyme Q10 was deficient both in muscle and fibroblasts. Coenzyme Q10 supplementation was initiated, improving ataxia and nystagmus. Since dysarthria and myoclonic epilepsy persisted, a lumbar puncture was performed at 12 years of age disclosing diminished cerebrospinal glucose concentrations. Diagnosis of GLUT1 deficiency was confirmed by the presence of a de novo heterozygous variant (c.18+2T>G) in the SLC2A1 gene. No mutations were found in coenzyme Q10 biosynthesis related genes. A ketogenic diet was initiated with an excellent clinical outcome. Functional studies in fibroblasts supported the potential pathogenicity of coenzyme Q10 deficiency in GLUT1 mutant cells when compared with controls. Our results suggest that coenzyme Q10 deficiency might be a new factor in the pathogenesis of G1D, although this deficiency needs to be confirmed in a larger group of G1D patients as well as in animal models. Although ketogenic diet seems to correct the clinical consequences of CoQ deficiency, adjuvant treatment with CoQ could be trialled in this condition if our findings are confirmed in further G1D patients.

  1. Plasma concentrations of coenzyme Q10 and tocopherols in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palan, P R; Mikhail, M S; Shaban, D W; Romney, S L

    2003-08-01

    Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) may, at times, unpredictably progress to invasive carcinoma of the cervix. Epidemiological nutritional studies suggest that higher dietary consumption and circulating levels of certain micronutrients may be protective against cervical cancer. However, a preventive role of dietary antioxidants in CIN is not well established. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the comparative plasma concentrations of three potent antioxidants, coenzyme Q(10,) alpha-tocopherol and gamma-tocopherol, in women with normal Pap smears and patients with a biopsy-confirmed histopathological lesion diagnosed as CIN or cervical cancer. Plasma concentrations of coenzyme Q(10,) alpha-tocopherol and gamma-tocopherol were measured by high-pressure liquid chromatography in both normal women without any history of abnormal Pap smears (n=48), and patients with histopathologically confirmed diagnoses of: (a) CIN I, n=98; (b) CIN II, n=49; (c) CIN III, n=10; and (d) cervical cancer, n=25. The mean plasma levels of coenzyme Q(10), alpha-tocopherol and gamma-tocopherol were significantly lower (P<0.001,<0.001, and<0.001, respectively by Kruskal-Wallis test) in patients with various grades of CIN and cervical cancer compared with controls. After controlling for age and smoking, an inverse association between histological grades of epithelial lesions and both plasma coenzyme Q(10) and alpha-tocopherol concentrations was observed. The low plasma concentrations of coenzyme Q(10) may be due to deficient dietary intake or a decrease in endogenous coenzyme Q(10) biosynthesis that may reflect increased utilization as a result of free radical reactive oxygen species induced oxidative stress. Further molecular studies on the mechanistic role of antioxidants in women with precancer cervical lesions are needed.

  2. Determination of hydrophobic coenzyme a esters and other lipids using a biosensor comprising a modified coenzyme a- and acyl-coa binding protein (acbp)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2002-01-01

    The invention relates to a biochemical assay for wide class of hydrophobic Coenzyme A esters wherein the analyte is caused to react with a specifically binding, modified protein, and thereby causing a detectable signal. A one step assay for hydrophobic carboxylic acid esters in whole blood, serum...... an assay, a kit for assaying hydrophobic CoA esters, hydrophobic carboxylic acids, triacylglycerides, phospholipids, and cholesterolesters....

  3. What Is Hepatitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... сский Español What is hepatitis? Online Q&A Reviewed July 2016 Q: What ... Question and answer archives Submit a question World Hepatitis Day Posters: Eliminate hepatitis World Hepatitis Day 2017 ...

  4. Hepatitis B in pregnancy.

    OpenAIRE

    Arevalo, J A

    1989-01-01

    Chronic infection with the hepatitis B virus can result in the development of serious liver disease such as chronic active hepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Vertical transmission from infected mothers to infants is thought to be partially responsible for the high prevalence of infection in certain high-risk groups. Immunoprophylaxis using hepatitis B vaccine and hepatitis immune globulin has been highly effective in decreasing the probability of chronic hepatitis B virus inf...

  5. Evidence for acetyl coenzyme A and cinnamoyl coenzyme A in the anaerobic toluene mineralization pathway in Azoarcus tolulyticus Tol-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee-Sanford, J C; Frost, J W; Fries, M R; Zhou, J; Tiedje, J M

    1996-03-01

    A toluene-degrading denitrifier, Azoarcus tolulyticus Tol-4, was one of eight similar strains isolated from three petroleum-contaminated aquifer sediments. When the strain was grown anaerobically on toluene, 68% of the carbon from toluene was found as CO2 and 30% was found as biomass. Strain Tol-4 had a doubling time of 4.3 h, a Vmax of 50 micromol x min-1 x g of protein-1, and a cellular yield of 49.6 g x mol of toluene-1. Benzoate appeared to be an intermediate, since F-benzoates accumulated from F-toluenes and [14C]benzoate was produced from [14C]toluene in the presence of excess benzoate. Two metabolites, E-phenylitaconic acid (1 to 2%) and benzylsuccinic acid (toluene metabolism. These same products were also produced when cells were grown on hydrocinnamic acid and trans-cinnamic acid but were not produced from benzylalcohol, benzaldehyde, benzoate, p-cresol, or their hydroxylated analogs. The evidence supports an anaerobic toluene degradation pathway involving an initial acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) attack in strain Tol-4, as proposed by Evans and coworkers (P. J. Evans, W. Ling, B. Goldschmidt, E. R. Ritter, and L. Y. Young, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 58:496-501, 1992) for another toluene-degrading denitrifier, strain T1. Our findings support a modification of the proposed pathway in which cinnamoyl-CoA follows the oxidation of hydrocinnamoyl-CoA, analogous to the presumed oxidation of benzylsuccinic acid to form E-phenylitaconic acid. Cinnamic acid was detected in Tol-4 cultures growing in the presence of toluene and [14C]acetate. We further propose a second acetyl-CoA addition to cinnamoyl-CoA as the source of benzylsuccinic acid and E-phenylitaconic acid. This pathway is supported by the finding that monofluoroacetate added to toluene-growing cultures resulted in a significant increase in production of benzylsuccinic acid and E-phenylitaconic acid and by the finding that [14C]benzylsuccinic acid was detected after incubation of cells with toluene, [14C

  6. Structural insights into substrate and coenzyme preference by SDR family protein Gox2253 from Gluconobater oxydans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Bo; Cui, Dongbing; Zhang, Lujia; Jiang, Shuiqin; Machida, Satoru; Yuan, Y Adam; Wei, Dongzhi

    2014-11-01

    Gox2253 from Gluconobacter oxydans belongs to the short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases family, and catalyzes the reduction of heptanal, octanal, nonanal, and decanal with NADPH. To develop a robust working platform to engineer novel G. oxydans oxidoreductases with designed coenzyme preference, we adopted a structure based rational design strategy using computational predictions that considers the number of hydrogen bonds formed between enzyme and docked coenzyme. We report the crystal structure of Gox2253 at 2.6 Å resolution, ternary models of Gox2253 mutants in complex with NADH/short-chain aldehydes, and propose a structural mechanism of substrate selection. Molecular dynamics simulation shows that hydrogen bonds could form between 2'-hydroxyl group in the adenosine moiety of NADH and the side chain of Gox2253 mutant after arginine at position 42 is replaced with tyrosine or lysine. Consistent with the molecular dynamics prediction, Gox2253-R42Y/K mutants can use both NADH and NADPH as a coenzyme. Hence, the strategies here could provide a practical platform to engineer coenzyme selectivity for any given oxidoreductase and could serve as an additional consideration to engineer substrate-binding pockets. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. And then there were acyl coenzyme A:cholesterol acyl transferase inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meuwese, Marijn C.; Franssen, Remco; Stroes, Erik S. G.; Kastelein, John J. P.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The reputation of acyl coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) inhibitors has changed profoundly from promising new drugs for cardiovascular prevention to drugs without clinical benefits or possibly even with adverse effects. RECENT FINDINGS: ACAT inhibitors decrease the

  8. Coenzyme Q10 supplementation and exercise-induced oxidative stress in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Östman, Bengt; Sjödin, Anders Mikael; Michaëlsson, Karl

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The theoretically beneficial effects of coenzyme Q10 (Q10) on exercise-related oxidative stress and physical capacity have not been confirmed to our knowledge by interventional supplementation studies. Our aim was to investigate further whether Q10 supplementation at a dose recommended...... that such effects exist after supplementation with a recommended dose....

  9. Nano-encapsulation of coenzyme Q10 using octenyl succinic anhydride modified starch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Octenyl succinic anhydride modified starch (OSA-ST) was used to encapsulate Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10). CoQ10 was dissolved in rice bran oil (RBO), and incorporated into an aqueous OSA-ST solution. High pressure homogenization (HPH) of the mixture was conducted at 170 MPa for 5-6 cycles. The resulting ...

  10. Effects of ubiquinone (coenzyme Q10) on myopathy in statin users.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaars, C.F.; Stalenhoef, A.F.H.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Statins are associated with muscle complaints, including myositis. The mechanism through which statin use causes muscle toxicity is unknown. One of the theories is that statin therapy reduces coenzyme Q10 levels in muscle mitochondria, which leads to muscle injury and myopathy.

  11. Coenzyme B12 model studies: An HSAB approach to the equilibria ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Coenzyme B12 model studies: An HSAB approach to the equilibria and kinetics of axial ligation of alkyl(aquo)-cobaloximes by imidazole and cyanide. Vaddeboina Sridhar S Satyanarayana. Inorganic ... Keywords. Alkyl cobaloximes; association constants; hand and soft acids and bases; rhodoximes; dissociation constants.

  12. Coenzyme B12 model studies: Equilibrium constants for the pH ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 114; Issue 1. Coenzyme B12 model studies: Equilibrium constants for the H-dependent axial ligation of benzyl(aquo)cobaloxime by various N- and S-donor ligands. D Sudarshan Reddy N Ravi Kumar Reddy V Sridhar S Satyanarayana. Inorganic and Analytical ...

  13. Decreased coenzyme Q10 concentration in plasma of children with cystic fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudshoorn, J.H.; Lecluse, A.L.Y.; Berg, R. van den; Vaes, W.H.J.; Laag, J. van der; Houwen, R.H.J.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is an effective lipophilic antioxidant and protects against lipid peroxidation by scavenging radicals. Patients with cystic fibrosis generally have fat malabsorption; thus, we hypothesized that overall plasma CoQ10 concentration in pediatric patients with cystic

  14. Conformational Mobility of GOx Coenzyme Complex on Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Kang

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A critical issue in bioelectrochemical applications that use electrodes modified by Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNTs is to ensure high activity of the catalytic site of an immobilized enzyme protein interacting with nanomaterials. Since Flavin Adenine Dinucleotide (FAD, a coenzyme of glucose oxidase (GOx, is the active center of the catalytic site, conformation of which could determine the activity of enzyme, it is important to understand the dynamic mechanism of its conformational mobility while GOx is adsorbed on SWCNTs with multiple orientations. However, this dynamic mechanism still remains unclear at the atomic level due to the coenzyme being embedded in the apo-GOx and the limitations of appropriate experimental methods. In this study, a molecular dynamics (MD simulation was performed to investigate the conformational mobility mechanism of the coenzyme. The trajectory and the interaction energy clearly indicate that the adsorption of GOx onto SWCNTs plays an important role in the conformational mobility of the coenzyme, and its mobility is greatly affected by the distribution of water molecules due to it being hydrophobic.

  15. A STD-NMR Study of the Interaction of the Anabaena Ferredoxin-NADP+ Reductase with the Coenzyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara V. Antonini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase (FNR catalyzes the electron transfer from ferredoxin to NADP+ via its flavin FAD cofactor. To get further insights in the architecture of the transient complexes produced during the hydride transfer event between the enzyme and the NADP+ coenzyme we have applied NMR spectroscopy using Saturation Transfer Difference (STD techniques to analyze the interaction between FNRox and the oxidized state of its NADP+ coenzyme. We have found that STD NMR, together with the use of selected mutations on FNR and of the non-FNR reacting coenzyme analogue NAD+, are appropriate tools to provide further information about the the interaction epitope.

  16. Coenzyme Autocatalytic Network on the Surface of Oil Microspheres as a Model for the Origin of Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexei A. Sharov

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Coenzymes are often considered as remnants of primordial metabolism, but not as hereditary molecules. I suggest that coenzyme-like molecules (CLMs performed hereditary functions before the emergence of nucleic acids. Autocatalytic CLMs modified (encoded surface properties of hydrocarbon microspheres, to which they were anchored, and these changes enhanced autocatalysis and propagation of CLMs. Heredity started from a single kind of self-reproducing CLM, and then evolved into more complex coenzyme autocatalytic networks containing multiple kinds of CLMs. Polymerization of CLMs on the surface of microspheres and development of template-based synthesis is a potential evolutionary path towards the emergence of nucleic acids.

  17. Immunoglobulins for preventing hepatitis A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Jian Ping; Nikolova, Dimitrinka; Fei, Yutong

    2009-01-01

    Hepatitis A (infectious hepatitis) is a common epidemic disease. Immunoglobulins for passive immunisation are used as prevention.......Hepatitis A (infectious hepatitis) is a common epidemic disease. Immunoglobulins for passive immunisation are used as prevention....

  18. Hepatitis Information for the Public

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hepatitis Contact Us Anonymous Feedback Quick Links to Hepatitis … A | B | C | D | E Viral Hepatitis Home ... Local Partners & Grantees Policy and Programs Resource Center Hepatitis Information for the Public Recommend on Facebook Tweet ...

  19. Microbiological diagnostics of viral hepatitis

    OpenAIRE

    HASDEMİR, Ufuk

    2016-01-01

    Viral hepatitis is an infection that primarily affects the liverbut may also have systemic clinical manifestations. The vastmajority of viral hepatitis are caused by one of five hepatotropicviruses: hepatitis A virus (HAV), hepatitis B virus (HBV),hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepatitis D (delta) virus (HDV), andhepatitis E virus (HEV) (Table I) [1]. HBV, HCV, and HDValso cause chronic hepatitis, whereas HAV does not. HEVcauses acute hepatitis in normal hosts but can cause protractedand chronic he...

  20. Acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase inhibition reduces de novo lipogenesis in overweight male subjects: A randomized, double-blind, crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiede, Kathryn; Miao, Wenyan; Blanchette, Heather S; Beysen, Carine; Harriman, Geraldine; Harwood, H James; Kelley, Heather; Kapeller, Rosana; Schmalbach, Tess; Westlin, William F

    2017-08-01

    NDI-010976, an allosteric inhibitor of acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylases (ACC) ACC1 and ACC2, reduces hepatic de novo lipogenesis (DNL) and favorably affects steatosis, inflammation, and fibrosis in animal models of fatty liver disease. This study was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial evaluating the pharmacodynamic effects of a single oral dose of NDI-010976 on hepatic DNL in overweight and/or obese but otherwise healthy adult male subjects. Subjects were randomized to receive either NDI-010976 (20, 50, or 200 mg) or matching placebo in period 1, followed by the alternate treatment in period 2; and hepatic lipogenesis was stimulated with oral fructose administration. Fractional DNL was quantified by infusing a stable isotope tracer, [1-13 C]acetate, and monitoring 13 C incorporation into palmitate of circulating very low-density lipoprotein triglyceride. Single-dose administration of NDI-010976 was well tolerated at doses up to and including 200 mg. Fructose administration over a 10-hour period stimulated hepatic fractional DNL an average of 30.9 ± 6.7% (mean ± standard deviation) above fasting DNL values in placebo-treated subjects. Subjects administered single doses of NDI-010976 at 20, 50, or 200 mg had significant inhibition of DNL compared to placebo (mean inhibition relative to placebo was 70%, 85%, and 104%, respectively). An inverse relationship between fractional DNL and NDI-010976 exposure was observed with >90% inhibition of fractional DNL associated with plasma concentrations of NDI-010976 >4 ng/mL. ACC inhibition with a single dose of NDI-010976 is well tolerated and results in a profound dose-dependent inhibition of hepatic DNL in overweight adult male subjects. Therefore, NDI-010976 could contribute considerable value to the treatment algorithm of metabolic disorders characterized by dysregulated fatty acid metabolism, including nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. (Hepatology 2017;66:324-334). © 2017 Nimbus Discovery, Inc

  1. Protein: FEA6 [TP Atlas

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FEA6 Subatrates of SIRT3 HMGCL 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA_lyase Hydroxymethylgl...utaryl-CoA lyase, mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutarate-CoA lyase 9606 Homo sapiens P35914 3155 3MP4, 3MP5, 3MP3, 2CW6 3155 P35914 ...

  2. [Viral hepatitis in travellers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Cândida

    2007-01-01

    Considering the geographical asymmetric distribution of viral hepatitis A, B and E, having a much higher prevalence in the less developed world, travellers from developed countries are exposed to a considerable and often underestimated risk of hepatitis infection. In fact a significant percentage of viral hepatitis occurring in developed countries is travel related. This results from globalization and increased mobility from tourism, international work, humanitarian and religious missions or other travel related activities. Several studies published in Europe and North America shown that more than 50% of reported cases of hepatitis A are travel related. On the other hand frequent outbreaks of hepatitis A and E in specific geographic areas raise the risk of infection in these restricted zones and that should be clearly identified. Selected aspects related with the distribution of hepatitis A, B and E are reviewed, particularly the situation in Portugal according to the published studies, as well as relevant clinical manifestations and differential diagnosis of viral hepatitis. Basic prevention rules considering enteric transmitted hepatitis (hepatitis A and hepatitis E) and parenteral transmitted (hepatitis B) are reviewed as well as hepatitis A and B immunoprophylaxis. Common clinical situations and daily practice "pre travel" advice issues are discussed according to WHO/CDC recommendations and the Portuguese National Vaccination Program. Implications from near future availability of a hepatitis E vaccine, a currently in phase 2 trial, are highlighted. Potential indications for travellers to endemic countries like India, Nepal and some regions of China, where up to 30% of sporadic cases of acute viral hepatitis are caused by hepatitis E virus, are considered. Continued epidemiological surveillance for viral hepatitis is essential to recognize and control possible outbreaks, but also to identify new viral hepatitis agents that may emerge as important global health

  3. Haploid Mammalian Genetic Screen Identifies UBXD8 as a Key Determinant of HMGCR Degradation and Cholesterol Biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loregger, Anke; Raaben, Matthijs; Tan, Josephine; Scheij, Saskia; Moeton, Martina; van den Berg, Marlene; Gelberg-Etel, Hila; Stickel, Elmer; Roitelman, Joseph; Brummelkamp, Thijn; Zelcer, Noam

    2017-11-01

    The cellular demand for cholesterol requires control of its biosynthesis by the mevalonate pathway. Regulation of HMGCR (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase), a rate-limiting enzyme in this pathway and the target of statins, is a key control point herein. Accordingly, HMGCR is subject to negative and positive regulation. In particular, the ability of oxysterols and intermediates of the mevalonate pathway to stimulate its proteasomal degradation is an exquisite example of metabolically controlled feedback regulation. To define the genetic determinants that govern this process, we conducted an unbiased haploid mammalian genetic screen. We generated human haploid cells with mNeon fused to endogenous HMGCR using CRISPR/Cas9 and used these cells to interrogate regulation of HMGCR abundance in live cells. This resulted in identification of known and new regulators of HMGCR, and among the latter, UBXD8 (ubiquitin regulatory X domain-containing protein 8), a gene that has not been previously implicated in this process. We demonstrate that UBXD8 is an essential determinant of metabolically stimulated degradation of HMGCR and of cholesterol biosynthesis in multiple cell types. Accordingly, UBXD8 ablation leads to aberrant cholesterol synthesis due to loss of feedback control. Mechanistically, we show that UBXD8 is necessary for sterol-stimulated dislocation of ubiquitylated HMGCR from the endoplasmic reticulum membrane en route to proteasomal degradation, a function dependent on its UBX domain. We establish UBXD8 as a previously unrecognized determinant that couples flux across the mevalonate pathway to control of cholesterol synthesis and demonstrate the feasibility of applying mammalian haploid genetics to study metabolic traits. © 2017 The Authors.

  4. Long Non-coding RNAs Expression Profile in HepG2 Cells Reveals the Potential Role of Long Non-coding RNAs in the Cholesterol Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Green tea has been shown to improve cholesterol metabolism in animal studies, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this function have not been fully understood. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs have recently emerged as a major class of regulatory molecules involved in a broad range of biological processes and complex diseases. Our aim was to identify important lncRNAs that might play an important role in contributing to the benefits of epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG on cholesterol metabolism. Methods: Microarrays was used to reveal the lncRNA and mRNA profiles in green tea polyphenol(--epigallocatechin gallate in cultured human liver (HepG2 hepatocytes treated with EGCG and bioinformatic analyses of the predicted target genes were performed to identify lncRNA-mRNA targeting relationships. RNA interference was used to investigate the role of lncRNAs in cholesterol metabolism. Results: The expression levels of 15 genes related to cholesterol metabolism and 285 lncRNAs were changed by EGCG treatment. Bioinformatic analysis found five matched lncRNA-mRNA pairs for five differentially expressed lncRNAs and four differentially expressed mRNA. In particular, the lncRNA AT102202 and its potential targets mRNA-3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR were identified. Using a real-time polymerase chain reaction technique, we confirmed that EGCG down-regulated mRNA expression level of the HMGCR and up-regulated expression of AT102202. After AT102202 knockdown in HepG2, we observed that the level of HMGCR expression was significantly increased relative to the scrambled small interfering RNA control (P < 0.05. Conclusions: Our results indicated that EGCG improved cholesterol metabolism and meanwhile changed the lncRNAs expression profile in HepG2 cells. LncRNAs may play an important role in the cholesterol metabolism.

  5. Fibrillar collagen inhibits cholesterol biosynthesis in human aortic smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Nicola; Roncalli, Elisa; Arnaboldi, Lorenzo; Fenu, Simone; Andrukhova, Olena; Aharinejad, Seyedhossein; Camera, Marina; Tremoli, Elena; Corsini, Alberto

    2009-10-01

    Integrin-mediated cell adhesion to type I fibrillar collagen regulates gene and protein expression, whereas little is known of its effect on lipid metabolism. In the present study, we examined the effect of type I fibrillar collagen on cholesterol biosynthesis in human aortic smooth muscle cells (SMCs). SMCs were cultured on either fibrillar or monomer collagen for 48 hours and [(14)C]-acetate incorporation into cholesterol was evaluated. Fibrillar collagen reduced by 72.9+/-2.6% cholesterol biosynthesis without affecting cellular cholesterol levels. Fibrillar collagen also reduced 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMG-CoA) promoter activity (-72.6+/-7.3%), mRNA (-58.7+/-6.4%), protein levels (-35.5+/-8.5%), and enzyme activity (-37.7+/-2.2%). Intracellular levels of the active form of sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBP) 1a was decreased by 60.7+/-21.7% in SMCs cultured on fibrillar collagen, whereas SREBP2 was not significantly affected (+12.1+/-7.1%). The overexpression of the active form of SREBP1a rescued the downregulation of fibrillar collagen on HMG-CoA reductase levels. Blocking antibody to alpha2 integrin partially reversed the downregulation of HMG-CoA reductase mRNA expression. Finally, fibrillar collagen led to an intracellular accumulation of unprenylated Ras. Our study demonstrated that alpha2 beta 1 integrin interaction with fibrillar collagen affected the expression of HMG-CoA reductase, which led to the inhibition of cholesterol biosynthesis in human SMCs.

  6. Effect of statins on chronic inflammation and nutrition status in renal dialysis patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jin; Wu, Qiaoyuan; Liao, Yunhua; Huo, Dongmei; Yang, Zhenhua

    2012-08-01

    3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors (statins) may have an adjunctive effect on chronic inflammation and nutrition status in renal dialysis patients. Therefore, we performed a systematic review of randomized controlled trials to assess the effect of statins on chronic inflammation and nutrition status in dialysis patients. The randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of statins versus placebo or no treatment for renal dialysis patients were searched from PubMed, EMbase and Cochran Central Register of Controlled Trials. We screened relevant studies according to predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria, evaluated the quality of the included studies, and performed meta-analyses by using the Cochrane Collaboration's Revman 5.1 software. We identified nine trials including 3098 patients. Meta-analysis showed statins can significantly decrease the serum C-reactive protein (CRP) (SMD, -0.54; 95% confidence interval (CI), -1.04 to -0.05; P = 0.03) and high sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP) level (SMD, -0.72; 95% CI, -1.14 to -0.31; P = 0.0007) of dialysis patients compared with that of the control group. However, statins did not differ significantly from the control group in increasing the serum Alb level (SMD, -0.13; 95% CI, -0.42 to 0.15; P = 0.37). Statins can improve the chronic inflammation status reflected by the decreasing of serum CRP and hs-CRP levels, whereas there is no conclusive evidence that it can improve the nutrition status. However, this result needs to be further confirmed in more high-quality randomized clinical trials. © 2012 The Authors. Nephrology © 2012 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  7. Anti-Obesity Effect of Bombus ignitus Queen Glycosaminoglycans in Rats on a High-Fat Diet.

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    Ahn, Mi Young; Kim, Ban Ji; Kim, Ha Jeong; Yoon, Hyung Joo; Jee, Sang Duck; Hwang, Jae Sam; Park, Kun-Koo

    2017-03-22

    The mechanism of functional insect glycosaminoglycan (GAG) on obesity caused a high fat diet has not yet been elucidated. Therefore, insect glycosaminoglycans derived from Isaria sinclairii , Bombus ignitus (a type of bumblebee) queen, and Gryllus bimaculatus were purified and investigated as a potential functional food. 14-week old male Wistar rats were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) for 6 weeks. There were five groups that received daily intraperitoneal administration of phosphate buffered saline (PBS, control), GbG (GAG from Gryllus bimaculatus ) 10 mg/kg, ISG (GAG from Isaria sinclairii ) 10 mg/kg, IQG (GAG from Bombus ignites ) 10 mg/kg, or Pravastatin (2 mg/kg). All treatments were performed for one month. IQG produced a potential anti-inflammatory effect with the inhibition of c-reactive protein and sero-biochemical parameters of phospholipids and free fatty acids indicative of an anti-hyperlipidemic effect. Abdominal and epididymidal fat weight were reduced in conjunction with a mild increase in body weight. The level of laminin in HMVEC-C cells or fibronectin in HFD rat hepatocytes was significantly affected by these GAG treatments, which regulated adipogenesis and adipocyte function. Compared to the control rats, IQG-treated rats displayed up-regulation of 87 genes (test:control ratio >2.0) including fatty acid synthase and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, with the down-regulation of 47 genes including the uridine diphosphate (UDP) glycosyltransferase 2 families, polypeptidase B, and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 1. The data suggest that IQG could potentially prevent or treat fatty liver or hyperlipidemia.

  8. Temperature influences β-carotene production in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing carotenogenic genes from Phaffia rhodozyma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Feng; Zhan, Wubing; Li, Yongfu; Wang, Xiaoyuan

    2014-01-01

    Red yeast Phaffia rhodozyma is a prominent microorganism able to synthesize carotenoid. Here, three carotenogenic cDNAs of P. rhodozyma CGMCC 2.1557, crtE, crtYB and crtI, were cloned and introduced into Saccharomyces cerevisiae INVSc1. The recombinant Sc-EYBI cells could synthesize 258.8 ± 43.8 μg g(-1) dry cell weight (DCW) of β-carotene when growing at 20 °C, about 59-fold higher than in those growing at 30 °C. Additional expression of the catalytic domain of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase from S. cerevisiae (Sc-EYBIH) increased the β-carotene level to 528.8 ± 13.3 μg g(-1) DCW as cells growing at 20 °C, 27-fold higher than cells growing at 30 °C, although cells grew faster at 30 °C than at 20 °C. Consistent with the much higher β-carotene level in cells growing at 20 °C, transcription level of three crt genes and cHMG1 gene in cells growing at 20 °C was a little higher than in those growing at 30 °C. Meanwhile, expression of three carotenogenic genes and accumulation of β-carotene promoted cell growth. These results reveal the influence of temperature on β-carotene biosynthesis and may be helpful for improving β-carotene production in recombinant S. cerevisiae.

  9. Effects of combined olmesartan and pravastatin on glucose intolerance and cardiovascular remodeling in a metabolic-syndrome model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizukawa, Mizuki; Ohmori, Koji; Obayashi, Ayumi; Ishihara, Yasuhiro; Yoshida, Junji; Noma, Takahisa; Yukiiri, Kazushi; Kosaka, Hiroaki; Kohno, Masakazu

    2009-07-01

    Hypertension and dyslipidemia frequently coexist in patients with progressive insulin resistance and thus constitute metabolic syndrome. We sought to determine the merits of combining an angiotensin II receptor blocker and a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitor in treating this pathological condition. Five-week-old Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats, a model of metabolic syndrome, were untreated or treated with olmesartan 3 mg kg(-1) per day, pravastatin 30 mg kg(-1) per day or their combination for 25 weeks. Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka rats served as normal controls. The antihypertensive effect of olmesartan and the lipid-lowering properties of pravastatin were both augmented by the combination. The oral glucose tolerance test revealed that only the combined treatment significantly reduced the area under the time-glucose curve, which was accompanied by augmented adiponectin messenger RNA expression in epididymal adipose tissue. Although the total cardiac endothelial nitric oxide synthetase (eNOS) content did not significantly differ among the groups, the combined treatment significantly increased the content of dihydrofolate reductase, a key eNOS coupler. Dihydroethidium staining of the aorta showed that the combination most significantly attenuated superoxide production. Moreover, Azan-Mallory staining revealed that the combination most significantly limited the perivascular fibrosis and wall thickening of intramyocardial coronary arteries. In conclusion, the combination of olmesartan and pravastatin augmented adiponectin expression in white adipose tissue and improved glucose tolerance in a rat model of metabolic syndrome, which was associated with more significant ameliorations of cardiovascular redox state and remodeling than those by treatments with either agent alone.

  10. The mechanisms underlying the hypolipidaemic effects of Grifola frondosa in the liver of rats

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    Yinrun Ding

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the hypolipidaemic effects of Grifola frondosa and its regulation mechanism involved in lipid metabolism in liver of rats fed a high-cholesterol diet. The body weights and serum lipid levels of control rats, of hyperlipidaemic rats and of hyperlipidaemic rats treated with oral Grifola frondosa were determined. mRNA expression and concentration of key lipid metabolism enzymes were investigated. Serum cholesterol, triacylglycerol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were markedly decreased in hyperlipidaemic rats treated with Grifola frondosa compared with untreated hyperlipidaemic rats. mRNA expression of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR, acyl-coenzyme A: cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT2, apolipoprotein B (ApoB, fatty acid synthase (FAS and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC1 were significantly down-regulated, while expression of cholesterol 7-alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1 was significantly up-regulated in the livers of treated rats compared with untreated hyperlipidaemic rats. The concentrations of these enzymes also paralleled the observed changes in mRNA expression. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-DE and Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS were used to identify twenty proteins differentially expressed in livers of rats treated with Grifola frondosa compared with untreated hyperlipidemic rats. Of these twenty proteins, seven proteins were down-regulated and thirteen proteins were up-regulated. These findings indicate that the hypolipidaemic effects of Grifola frondosa reflected its modulation of key enzymes involved in cholesterol and triacylglycerol biosynthesis, absorption and catabolic pathways. Grifola frondosa may exert anti-atherosclerotic effects by inhibiting LDL oxidation through down-regulation and up-regulating proteins expression in the liver of rats. Therefore, Grifola frondosa may produce both hypolipidaemic

  11. Early dengue virus protein synthesis induces extensive rearrangement of the endoplasmic reticulum independent of the UPR and SREBP-2 pathway.

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    José Peña

    Full Text Available The rearrangement of intracellular membranes has been long reported to be a common feature in diseased cells. In this study, we used dengue virus (DENV to study the role of the unfolded protein response (UPR and sterol-regulatory-element-binding-protein-2 (SREBP-2 pathway in the rearrangement and expansion of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER early after infection. Using laser scanning confocal and differential interference contrast microscopy, we demonstrate that rearrangement and expansion of the ER occurs early after DENV-2 infection. Through the use of mouse embryonic fibroblast cells deficient in XBP1 and ATF6, we show that ER rearrangement early after DENV infection is independent of the UPR. We then demonstrate that enlargement of the ER is independent of the SREBP-2 activation and upregulation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-Coenzyme-A reductase, the rate-limiting enzyme in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway. We further show that this ER rearrangement is not inhibited by the treatment of DENV-infected cells with the cholesterol-inhibiting drug lovastatin. Using the transcription inhibitor actinomycin D and the translation elongation inhibitor cycloheximide, we show that de novo viral protein synthesis but not host transcription is necessary for expansion and rearrangement of the ER. Lastly, we demonstrate that viral infection induces the reabsorption of lipid droplets into the ER. Together, these results demonstrate that modulation of intracellular membrane architecture of the cell early after DENV-2 infection is driven by viral protein expression and does not require the induction of the UPR and SREBP-2 pathways. This work paves the way for further study of virally-induced membrane rearrangements and formation of cubic membranes.

  12. Microarray and Biochemical Analysis of Lovastatin-induced Apoptosis of Squamous Cell Carcinomas

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    Jim Dimitroulakos

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We recently identified 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA reductase, the rate-limiting enzyme of the mevalonate pathway, as a potential therapeutic target of the head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC and cervical carcinomas (CC. The products of this complex biochemical pathway, including de novo cholesterol, are vital for a variety of key cellular functions affecting membrane integrity, cell signaling, protein synthesis, and cell cycle progression. Lovastatin, a specific inhibitor of HMG-CoA reductase, induces a pronounced apoptotic response in a specific subset of tumor types, including HNSCC and CC. The mediators of this response are not well established. Identification of differentially expressed genes represents a feasible approach to delineate these mediators as lovastatin has the potential to modulate transcription indirectly by perturbing levels of sterols and other mevalonate metabolites. Expression analysis following treatment of the HNSCC cell lines SCC9 or SCC25 with 10 μM lovastatin for 1 day showed that less than 2% (9 cDNAs of the 588 cDNAs on this microarray were affected in both cell lines. These included diazepam-binding inhibitor/acyl-CoA-binding protein, the activated transcription factor 4 and rhoA. Because the biosynthesis of mevalonate leads to its incorporation into more than a dozen classes of end products, their role in lovastatin-induced apoptosis was also evaluated. Addition of the metabolites of all the major branches of the mevalonate pathway indicated that only the nonsterol moiety, geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP, significantly inhibited the apoptotic effects of lovastatin in HNSCC and CC cells. Because rhoA requires GGPP for its function, this links the microarray and biochemical data and identifies rhoA as a potential mediator of the anticancer properties of lovastatin. Our data suggest that the depletion of nonsterol mevalonate metabolites, particularly GGPP, can be potential mediators of

  13. Simvastatin Release from Poly(lactide-co-glycolide Membrane Scaffolds

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    Julian B. Chaudhuri

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Statins, a group of potent inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl Coenzyme A reductase in cholesterol biosynthesis pathway, have been widely used as a cholesterol lowering drug. The plieotrophic effect of statins on bone metabolism in long-term usage has been begun to be studied during recent years and several in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated the ability of statins to promote expression of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2, inhibition of osteoclast differentiation and reduction of osteoporotic fractures risk. The high liver specificity and low oral bioavailability of statins, leading to poor peripheral distribution, are the main obstacles to benefit anabolic effects of hydrophobic statins on bone formation. Therefore, developing new administration roots for direct delivery to achieve optimum concentration in the bone microenvironment is of interest. Here we present and compare two approaches of combining statins with bone tissue engineering scaffolds. Simvastatin was combined with a poly(lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA membrane scaffold for diffusion-controlled release by dissolving simvastatin (dis-sim in the membrane casting dope, and for degradation-controlled release by covalently bonding saponifiedsimvastatin (sap-sim to the PLGA in the spinning dope. Rheological and concentration-dependent membrane morphology changes were observed with saponifiedsimvastatin, suggesting ester bond cleavage and covalent bonding of the statin to the PLGA, but not with dissolved simvastatin. Dissolved simvastatin membranes showed a logarithmic decay release profile while the saponifiedsimvastatin membranes showed constant release. It can be concluded that the covalent bonding of simvastatinto PLGA scaffolds is showing potential for use as a controlled releasescaffold for bone tissue engineering.

  14. Parthenolide accumulation and expression of genes related to parthenolide biosynthesis affected by exogenous application of methyl jasmonate and salicylic acid in Tanacetum parthenium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majdi, Mohammad; Abdollahi, Mohammad Reza; Maroufi, Asad

    2015-11-01

    Up-regulation of germacrene A synthase and down-regulation of parthenolide hydroxylase genes play key role in parthenolide accumulation of feverfew plants treated with methyl jasmonate and salicylic acid. Parthenolide is an important sesquiterpene lactone due to its anti-migraine and anti-cancer properties. Parthenolide amount was quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography after foliar application of methyl jasmonate (100 µM) or salicylic acid (1.0 mM) on feverfew leaves in time course experiment (3-96 h). Results indicate that exogenous application of methyl jasmonate or salicylic acid activated parthenolide biosynthesis. Parthenolide content reached its highest amount at 24 h after methyl jasmonate or salicylic acid treatments, which were 3.1- and 1.96-fold higher than control plants, respectively. Parthenolide transiently increased due to methyl jasmonate or salicylic acid treatments until 24 h, but did not show significant difference compared with control plants at 48 and 96 h time points in both treatments. Also, the transcript levels of early pathway (upstream) genes of terpene biosynthesis including 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate reductoisomerase and hydroxy-2-methyl-2-(E)-butenyl 4-diphosphate reductase and the biosynthetic genes of parthenolide including germacrene A synthase, germacrene A oxidase, costunolide synthase and parthenolide synthase were increased by methyl jasmonate and salicylic acid treatments, but with different intensity. The transcriptional levels of these genes were higher in methyl jasmonate-treated plants than salicylic acid-treated plants. Parthenolide content measurements along with expression pattern analysis of the aforementioned genes and parthenolide hydroxylase as side branch gene of parthenolide suggest that the expression patterns of early pathway genes were not directly consistent with parthenolide accumulation pattern; hence, parthenolide accumulation is

  15. Adherence to statin therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes: An important dilemma

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    Shadi Farsaei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite the importance of patients′ adherence to their drug treatments for achieving desired therapeutic goals and the proven role 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A inhibitors (statins for the health status of patients with cardiovascular diseases, there is not enough information regarding diabetic patients′ adherence to statin therapy in developing countries. In this clinical study we aimed to assess the adherence of diabetes type 2 patients to statin therapy in a research based community clinic in Iran. Materials and Methods: In this prospective clinical study which was done at Isfahan Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Center, 204 diabetic type 2 patients under treatment with statin were interviewed twice and their demographic data (age, gender, body mass index, education, statin information (type, dose and their serum lipid profile were recorded. Three months after the initial visits, patients were assessed using pill counting method and according to patients′ self-reporting and also assessed low-density lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol goal attainment <100 mg/dl. Results: Adherence rate was 79.7% and 69% according to pill counting and self-reporting among study population. Moreover, 68.4% of patients achieved their LDL cholesterol goal of <100 mg/dl and adherent patients reached therapeutic goal significantly more than those who were considered non-adherence to statin therapy (P < 0.01. Conclusion: Adherence to statin therapy, as reflected by pill count method, is significantly related to LDL cholesterol goal achievement in patients with diabetes and dyslipidemia. Pill count method can be used to identify patients who are nonadherent to statin therapy and at high risk for failure to attain LDL cholesterol goals.

  16. Statins meditate anti-atherosclerotic action in smooth muscle cells by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, Kazuki [Department of Metabolic Medicine, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Matsumura, Takeshi, E-mail: takeshim@gpo.kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Metabolic Medicine, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Senokuchi, Takafumi; Ishii, Norio; Kinoshita, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Sarie; Murakami, Saiko [Department of Metabolic Medicine, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Nakao, Saya [Department of Environmental & Symbiotic Sciences, Prefectural University of Kumamoto, Kumamoto (Japan); Motoshima, Hiroyuki; Kondo, Tatsuya; Kukidome, Daisuke; Kawasaki, Shuji [Department of Metabolic Medicine, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Kawada, Teruo [Laboratory of Nutrition Chemistry, Division of Food Science and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Nishikawa, Takeshi; Araki, Eiichi [Department of Metabolic Medicine, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan)

    2015-01-30

    Highlights: • Statins induce PPARγ activation in vascular smooth muscle cells. • Statin-induced PPARγ activation is mediated by COX-2 expression. • Statins suppress cell migration and proliferation in vascular smooth muscle cells. • Statins inhibit LPS-induced inflammatory responses by PPARγ activation. • Fluvastatin suppress the progression of atherosclerosis and induces PPARγ activation in the aorta of apoE-deficient mice. - Abstract: The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) is an important regulator of lipid and glucose metabolism, and its activation is reported to suppress the progression of atherosclerosis. We have reported that 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) activate PPARγ in macrophages. However, it is not yet known whether statins activate PPARγ in other vascular cells. In the present study, we investigated whether statins activate PPARγ in smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and endothelial cells (ECs) and thus mediate anti-atherosclerotic effects. Human aortic SMCs (HASMCs) and human umbilical vein ECs (HUVECs) were used in this study. Fluvastatin and pitavastatin activated PPARγ in HASMCs, but not in HUVECs. Statins induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in HASMCs, but not in HUVECs. Moreover, treatment with COX-2-siRNA abrogated statin-mediated PPARγ activation in HASMCs. Statins suppressed migration and proliferation of HASMCs, and inhibited lipopolysaccharide-induced expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in HASMCs. These effects of statins were abrogated by treatment with PPARγ-siRNA. Treatment with statins suppressed atherosclerotic lesion formation in Apoe{sup −/−} mice. In addition, transcriptional activity of PPARγ and CD36 expression were increased, and the expression of MCP-1 and TNF-α was decreased, in the aorta of statin-treated Apoe{sup −/−} mice. In conclusion, statins mediate anti-atherogenic effects

  17. Laminar shear stress prevents simvastatin-induced adhesion molecule expression in cytokine activated endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Joanna; Rouleau, Leonie; Emmott, Alexander; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Leask, Richard L

    2010-12-15

    In addition to lowering cholesterol, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors, or statins, have been shown to modulate gene expression in endothelial cells. The effect of statins on cell adhesion molecule expression is unclear and largely unexplored in endothelial cells exposed to shear stress, an important regulator of endothelial cell function. In this study, the effect of simvastatin on vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression was evaluated in human abdominal aortic endothelial cells (HAAEC) conditioned with various levels of laminar wall shear stress with or without tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα). As expected, TNFα alone greatly enhanced both VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 mRNA and protein. In static culture, simvastatin potentiated the TNFα-induced increase in VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 mRNA but not total protein at 24 h. Mevalonate, a precursor to cholesterol biosynthesis, eliminated the effect of simvastatin. Exposure of endothelial cells to elevated levels of laminar shear stress during simvastatin treatment prevented the potentiating effect of simvastatin on cell adhesion molecule mRNA. A shear stress of 12.5 dyn/cm² eliminated the increase in VCAM-1 by simvastatin, while 25 dyn/cm² was needed for ICAM-1. We conclude that simvastatin enhances VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 gene expression in TNFα-activated endothelial cells through inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase. High levels of laminar shear stress prevented the upregulation of VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 by simvastatin suggesting that an induction of cell adhesion molecules by statins may not occur in endothelial cells exposed to shear stress from blood flow. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Interconnection of Estrogen/Testosterone Metabolism and Mevalonate Pathway in Breast and Prostate Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokarram, Pooneh; Alizadeh, Javad; Razban, Vahid; Barazeh, Mahdi; Solomon, Claudia; Kavousipour, Soudabeh

    2017-01-01

    The metabolic steroid hormones, 17β stradiol (E2) and testosterone play key roles in several functions including carbohydrate, lipid and protein metabolism, cellular signaling, cell proliferation, and cancer promotion. Steroid hormones have long been characterized as cell proliferation and differentiation regulators and are closely related to the development of breast and prostate cancers. Moreover, cholesterol metabolism, mainly in adipose tissue, leads to the production of steroids and cytokines, thus increasing the risk of metabolic syndrome, obesity, and ER+ breast cancer in postmenopausal women. Recent studies also shown that testosterone and E2 increase the levels of key enzymes of the mevalonate pathway, leading to post-translational prenylation and farnesylation of numerous proteins in RAS signaling in several cancers, including breast and prostate cancers. There is accumulating evidence both clinically and experimentally suggesting that changes in the metabolism of cholesterol may also have an important role in carcinogenesis. In this regard, the cells treated with mevalonate in culture showed elevated proliferation. Therefore, investigation on cholesterol as a precursor of steroid hormones has confirmed the effects cholesterol metabolite on breast and prostate cancers. Indeed, recent evidence strongly suggests that the MVA pathway and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCOA) have a crucial regulatory role in cellular proliferation and transformation. Therefore, the use of mevalonate inhibitors decreases the production of several biologically active downstream products of the mevalonate pathway, including cholesterol. Although for approximately 20 years statins have been identified as anticancer agents, recent studies have sparked some controversy. Therefore, further investigation to evaluate mevalonate- dependent therapeutic agents per se and in combination with other agents is merited. The current review is an attempt to elucidate the

  19. Effects of fumonisin B1 alone and combined with deoxynivalenol or zearalenone on porcine granulosa cell proliferation and steroid production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortinovis, Cristina; Caloni, Francesca; Schreiber, Nicole B; Spicer, Leon J

    2014-05-01

    Fumonisin B1 (FB1) is a Fusarium mycotoxin frequently occurring in corn in combination with deoxynivalenol (DON) and zearalenone. The aim of this study was to determine if FB1, alone and combined with DON or α-zearalenol (ZEA), zearalenone major active metabolite, can affect granulosa cell proliferation, steroid production, and gene expression in swine. Porcine granulosa cells were cultured for 2 days in serum-containing medium followed by 1 or 2 days in serum-free medium with or without added treatments. Fumonisin B1 had inhibitory effects on granulosa cell proliferation. Deoxynivalenol strongly inhibited cell growth, and no significant difference was detected in combination with FB1. α-Zearalenol showed a stimulatory effect on granulosa cell numbers even in combination with FB1. Regarding steroid production, FB1 increased progesterone production, and FB1 had no effect on estradiol production. Deoxynivalenol strongly inhibited progesterone and estradiol production, and FB1 had no significant effect on this response. α-Zearalenol increased progesterone production, and its combination with FB1 produced additive effects. α-Zearalenol had no effect on estradiol production, whereas it decreased estradiol production when co-treated with FB1. Fumonisin B1 was found to decrease CYP11A1 messenger RNA abundance, and the stimulatory effect of FB1 on progesterone production was found to be not dependent on 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase activity suggesting that FB1 increases progesterone production through a different mechanism. The results show that these Fusarium mycotoxins can influence porcine granulosa cell proliferation and steroid production, thereby demonstrating their potential reproductive effects on swine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of Omeprazole on the Pharmacokinetics of Rosuvastatin in Healthy Male Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Yasar; Iqbal, Zafar; Ahmad, Lateef; Khuda, Fazli; Khan, Abad; Khan, Abbas; Khan, Muhammad Imran; Ismail

    The current study aimed at the evaluation of, in vivo, the effect of omeprazole on the pharmacokinetics of rosuvastatin, a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitor. Omeprazole is an acid suppressant and CYP2C9, CYP3A4, and CYP2C19 substrate and inhibitor, as well as inhibitor of transporters (like P-gp). This was a randomized, open-label, 2-period, crossover study. Healthy male volunteers (N = 20), divided into 2 groups, were given single oral doses of rosuvastatin 40 mg either alone (treatment period I) or concomitantly with omeprazole 40-mg capsule (treatment period II). Plasma concentrations of rosuvastatin (rosuva) and its metabolite N-desmethyl rosuvastatin (NDM-rosuva) were quantified by a validated liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method developed in our laboratory. An insignificant decrease (P > 0.05) has been observed in the values of maximum plasma concentrations, clearance, and half-life of rosuva, whereas an insignificant increase (P > 0.05) has been observed in the area under the plasma concentration-time curves from zero time to the last measurable concentration(Equation is included in full-text article.), that extrapolated to infinity (Equation is included in full-text article.), and mean residence time values after concomitant administration with omeprazole. Although omeprazole concomitant administration altered the pharmacokinetics of NDM-rosuva metabolite significantly, rosuva's very little metabolism (10%) suggests that these changes are of no clinical significance. Concomitant administration of omeprazole with rosuva did not alter the pharmacokinetics of rosuva in healthy volunteers. These data are consistent with other reported studies, indicating that rosuva is not a good candidate for metabolism-based drug-drug interactions. Therefore, rosuva can be administered safely along with omeprazole.

  1. Long Non-coding RNAs Expression Profile in HepG2 Cells Reveals the Potential Role of Long Non-coding RNAs in the Cholesterol Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang; Zheng, Xinxin; Xu, Yanlu; Lu, Jie; Chen, Jingzhou; Huang, Xiaohong

    2015-01-01

    Background: Green tea has been shown to improve cholesterol metabolism in animal studies, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this function have not been fully understood. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have recently emerged as a major class of regulatory molecules involved in a broad range of biological processes and complex diseases. Our aim was to identify important lncRNAs that might play an important role in contributing to the benefits of epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) on cholesterol metabolism. Methods: Microarrays was used to reveal the lncRNA and mRNA profiles in green tea polyphenol(-)-epigallocatechin gallate in cultured human liver (HepG2) hepatocytes treated with EGCG and bioinformatic analyses of the predicted target genes were performed to identify lncRNA-mRNA targeting relationships. RNA interference was used to investigate the role of lncRNAs in cholesterol metabolism. Results: The expression levels of 15 genes related to cholesterol metabolism and 285 lncRNAs were changed by EGCG treatment. Bioinformatic analysis found five matched lncRNA-mRNA pairs for five differentially expressed lncRNAs and four differentially expressed mRNA. In particular, the lncRNA AT102202 and its potential targets mRNA-3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR) were identified. Using a real-time polymerase chain reaction technique, we confirmed that EGCG down-regulated mRNA expression level of the HMGCR and up-regulated expression of AT102202. After AT102202 knockdown in HepG2, we observed that the level of HMGCR expression was significantly increased relative to the scrambled small interfering RNA control (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Our results indicated that EGCG improved cholesterol metabolism and meanwhile changed the lncRNAs expression profile in HepG2 cells. LncRNAs may play an important role in the cholesterol metabolism. PMID:25563320

  2. Statin-associated muscular and renal adverse events: data mining of the public version of the FDA adverse event reporting system.

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    Toshiyuki Sakaeda

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Adverse event reports (AERs submitted to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA were reviewed to assess the muscular and renal adverse events induced by the administration of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins and to attempt to determine the rank-order of the association. METHODS: After a revision of arbitrary drug names and the deletion of duplicated submissions, AERs involving pravastatin, simvastatin, atorvastatin, or rosuvastatin were analyzed. Authorized pharmacovigilance tools were used for quantitative detection of signals, i.e., drug-associated adverse events, including the proportional reporting ratio, the reporting odds ratio, the information component given by a Bayesian confidence propagation neural network, and the empirical Bayes geometric mean. Myalgia, rhabdomyolysis and an increase in creatine phosphokinase level were focused on as the muscular adverse events, and acute renal failure, non-acute renal failure, and an increase in blood creatinine level as the renal adverse events. RESULTS: Based on 1,644,220 AERs from 2004 to 2009, signals were detected for 4 statins with respect to myalgia, rhabdomyolysis, and an increase in creatine phosphokinase level, but these signals were stronger for rosuvastatin than pravastatin and atorvastatin. Signals were also detected for acute renal failure, though in the case of atorvastatin, the association was marginal, and furthermore, a signal was not detected for non-acute renal failure or for an increase in blood creatinine level. CONCLUSIONS: Data mining of the FDA's adverse event reporting system, AERS, is useful for examining statin-associated muscular and renal adverse events. The data strongly suggest the necessity of well-organized clinical studies with respect to statin-associated adverse events.

  3. Polyphenol-rich black chokeberry (Aronia melanocarpa) extract regulates the expression of genes critical for intestinal cholesterol flux in Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bohkyung; Park, Youngki; Wegner, Casey J; Bolling, Bradley W; Lee, Jiyoung

    2013-09-01

    Black chokeberry (Aronia melanocarpa) is a rich source of polyphenols. The hypolipidemic effects of polyphenol-rich black chokeberry extract (CBE) have been reported, but underlying mechanisms have not been well characterized. We investigated the effect of CBE on the expression of genes involved in intestinal lipid metabolism. Caco-2 cells were incubated with 50 or 100 μg/ml of CBE for 24 h for quantitative realtime polymerase chain reaction analysis. Expression of genes for cholesterol synthesis (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase and sterol regulatory element binding protein 2), apical cholesterol uptake (Niemann-Pick C1 Like 1 and scavenger receptor class B Type 1) and basolateral cholesterol efflux [ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1)] was significantly decreased by CBE compared with control. Western blot analysis confirmed that CBE inhibited expression of these proteins. In contrast, CBE markedly induced mRNA and/or protein levels of ABCG5 and ABCG8 that mediate apical cholesterol efflux to the intestinal lumen. Furthermore, CBE significantly increased mRNA and protein levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor, and cellular LDL uptake. Expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism and lipoprotein assembly, including sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c, fatty acid synthase and acyl-CoA oxidase 1, was significantly decreased by CBE in a dose-dependent manner. Concomitantly, CBE significantly increased sirtuin 1, 3 and 5 mRNA levels, while it decreased SIRT-2. Our data suggest that hypolipidemic effects of CBE may be attributed, at least in part, to increased apical efflux of LDL-derived cholesterol and to decreased chylomicron formation in the intestine; and specific isoforms of SIRT may play an important role in this process. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Efficacy and safety of atorvastatin in South Asian patients with dyslipidemia: an open label noncomparative pilot study

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    Jeetesh V Patel

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Jeetesh V Patel1, Sandeep Gupta2, Frank Lie3, Elizabeth A Hughes11Sandwell and West Birmingham Hospitals NHS Trust, West Bromwich, UK; 2Whipps Cross and St Bartholomew’s Hospitals; and 3Whipps Cross University Hospital, London, UKBackground: Rates of coronary heart disease (CHD mortality are 40% higher amongst South Asian men and women living in the UK compared with the general UK population. Despite an established excess CHD risk, little is known of the efficacy and safety of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins amongst South Asian migrants.Methods and results: Hyperlipidemic South Asian patients (raised or uncontrolled lowdensity lipoprotein cholesterol [LDL-C] were recruited from two UK centers (n = 33. After a five-week period, which included dietary advice, patients received atorvastatin 10 mg/d for five weeks to achieve a target LDL-C goal of < 3.0 mmol/L, titrated to 20 mg, 40 mg, or 80 mg for a further 12 weeks as required. Significant reductions in LDL-C levels from baseline were observed after 4 weeks’ and 17 weeks’ treatment with atorvastatin (≥ 33.6%; 26.0, 41.2. Overall, 81% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 62.5, 92.6% achieved the target LDL-C after 4 weeks’ treatment with 10 mg atorvastatin. Titration to a dose of more than 20 mg was required in only one patient (40 mg at any point during the study. Nineteen patients reported at least one adverse event during the study; the majority were mild in severity and considered unrelated to atorvastatin.Conclusions: Atorvastatin was effective in achieving target lipid levels and was well tolerated. Statin therapy for high-risk South Asian individuals is likely to benefit CHD outcomes, although further and larger prospective trials are required.Keywords: hyperlipidemia, lipids, cholesterol, dyslipidemia, statins, coronary heart disease, South Asians

  5. Simvastatin rescues homocysteine-induced apoptosis of osteocytic MLO-Y4 cells by decreasing the expressions of NADPH oxidase 1 and 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeno, Ayumu; Kanazawa, Ippei; Tanaka, Ken-Ichiro; Notsu, Masakazu; Yokomoto-Umakoshi, Maki; Sugimoto, Toshitsugu

    2016-04-25

    Clinical studies have shown that hyperhomocysteinemia is associated with bone fragility. Homocysteine (Hcy) induces apoptosis of osteoblastic cell lineage by increasing oxidative stress, which may contribute to Hcy-induced bone fragility. Statins, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, ameliorate oxidative stress by regulating oxidant and anti-oxidant enzymes. However, the effects of statins on Hcy-induced apoptosis of osteocytes are unknown. This study was thus aimed to investigate whether or not statins prevent Hcy-induced apoptosis of osteocytic MLO-Y4 cells and regulate NADPH oxidase (Nox) expression. TUNEL staining showed that 5 mM Hcy induced apoptosis of MLO-Y4 cells, and that co-incubation of 10(-9) or 10(-8) M simvastatin significantly suppressed the apoptotic effect. Moreover, we confirmed the beneficial effect of simvastatin against Hcy's apoptotic effect by using a DNA fragment ELISA assay. However, TUNEL staining showed no significant effects of pravastatin, a hydrophilic statin, on the Hcy-induced apoptosis. Real-time PCR showed that Hcy increased the mRNA expressions of Nox1 and Nox2, whereas simvastatin inhibited the stimulation of Nox1 and Nox2 expressions by Hcy. In contrast, neither Hcy nor simvastatin had any effect on Nox4 expression. These findings indicate that simvastatin prevents the detrimental effects of Hcy on the apoptosis of osteocytes by regulating the expressions of Nox1 and Nox2, suggesting that statins may be beneficial for preventing Hcy-induced osteocyte apoptosis and the resulting bone fragility.

  6. Synergistic Effect of Simvastatin Plus Radiation in Gastric Cancer and Colorectal Cancer: Implications of BIRC5 and Connective Tissue Growth Factor

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    Lim, Taekyu [Division of Hematology-Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, VHS Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Inkyoung [Biomedical Research Institute, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jungmin [Changduk Girls' High School, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Won Ki, E-mail: wonki.kang@samsung.com [Division of Hematology-Oncology, Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: We investigated the synergistic effect of simvastatin, a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitor plus radiation therapy, on the proliferation and survival of gastric cancer (GC) and colorectal cancer (CRC) cells. We also studied several genes involved in the simvastatin/radiation-induced effects. Methods and Materials: Gastric cancer (AGS, SNU601, MKN1, and MKN28) and CRC (CoLo320, SW48, HT29, and HCT8) cell lines were treated with 0.2 μM simvastatin alone, or in combination with 0 to 4 Gy of radiation, and subjected to clonogenic survival and proliferation assays in vitro. To assess the molecular mechanism of the combination treatment, we performed microarray analysis, immunoblot assays, small interfering RNA knockdown experiments, and plasmid rescue assays. The antitumoral effects of simvastatin and radiation were evaluated in vivo using xenograft models. Results: The combination therapy of simvastatin plus radiation inhibited basal clonogenic survival and proliferation of GC and CRC cells in vitro. Simvastatin suppressed the expression of BIRC5 and CTGF genes in these cancer cells. In vivo, the combined treatment with simvastatin and radiation significantly reduced the growth of xenograft tumors compared with treatment with radiation alone. Conclusion: We suggest that simvastatin has a synergistic effect with radiation on GC and CRC through the induction of apoptosis, which may be mediated by a simultaneous inhibition of BIRC5 and CTGF expression. A clinical trial of simvastatin in combination with radiation in patients with GC or CRC is warranted.

  7. Rationale and Design of the Standard Versus Intensive Statin Therapy for Hypercholesterolemic Patients with Diabetic Retinopathy (EMPATHY) Study: a Randomized Controlled Trial.

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    Ueshima, Kenji; Itoh, Hiroshi; Kanazawa, Nobuaki; Komuro, Issei; Nagai, Ryozo; Takeuchi, Masahiro; Yamazaki, Tsutomu

    2016-08-01

    Hyperlipidemia and diabetic retinopathy increase the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The standard versus intEnsive statin therapy for hypercholesteroleMic Patients with diAbetic retinopaTHY (EMPATHY) study examines whether intensive lipid-lowering therapy is superior to standard therapy in reducing the incidence of cardiovascular events in patients with hyperlipidemia and diabetic retinopathy, but without a history of coronary artery disease. Patients who had elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and diabetic retinopathy without a history of coronary artery disease were eligible for the study. Patients were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive intensive or standard therapy. Patients are being treated with monotherapy with 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitor (statin) for a maximum of 5.5 years to achieve the following LDL-C target: <70 mg/dL for the intensive therapy group or ≥100 and <120 mg/dL for the standard therapy group. The primary endpoint is a composite of incidence of CVD and death from CVD. Between May 2010 and October 2013, 5,995 patients were assessed for eligibility, and 5,144 were assigned to the study treatment (2,571 and 2,573 in the intensive and standard therapy groups, respectively), and baseline data were analyzed from 5,107 (2,550 in the intensive therapy group and 2,557 in the standard therapy group). This is the first study assessing the benefits of intensive statin therapy in patients with hypercholesterolemia and diabetic retinopathy in a primary prevention setting. Furthermore, this study evaluates the appropriateness of the treat-to-target approach because all patients are treated to achieve specific LDL-C targets by titrating statin therapy. UMIN000003486.

  8. Possible effects of rosuvastatin on noise-induced oxidative stress in rat brain

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    Alevtina Ersoy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of noise has recently gained more attention as it has become an integral part of our daily lives. However, its influence has yet to be fully elucidated. Other than being an unpleasant stimulus, noise may cause health disorders through annoyance and stress, including oxidative stress. Rosuvastatin, a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitor, may possess antioxidant properties. Based on rat models, our project investigates the effect of rosuvastatin on noise-induced oxidative stress in the brain tissue. Thirty-two male Wistar albino rats were used. The rats were divided into four groups: Noise exposure plus rosuvastatin usage, only noise exposure, only rosuvastatin usage, and control. After the data had been collected, oxidant and antioxidant parameters were analyzed in the cerebral cortex, brain stem, and cerebellum. Results indicated that superoxide dismutase values were significantly decreased in the cerebral cortex, while malondialdehyde values in the brainstem and cerebellum were significantly increased in the group with only noise exposure. Superoxide dismutase values in the brainstem were significantly increased, but nitric oxide values in the cerebellum and brainstem and malondialdehyde values in the cerebellum and cerebral cortex were significantly decreased in the group where only rosuvastatin was used. During noise exposure, the use of rosuvastatin caused significantly increased superoxide dismutase values in the cerebral cortex and brainstem, but significantly reduced malondialdehyde values in the brain stem. Consequently, our data show that brain tissue was affected by oxidative stress due to continued exposure to noise. This noise-induced stress decreases with rosuvastatin therapy.

  9. Botrydial and botcinins produced by Botrytis cinerea regulate the expression of Trichoderma arundinaceum genes involved in trichothecene biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmierca, Mónica G; Izquierdo-Bueno, Inmaculada; Mccormick, Susan P; Cardoza, Rosa E; Alexander, Nancy J; Moraga, Javier; Gomes, Eriston V; Proctor, Robert H; Collado, Isidro G; Monte, Enrique; Gutiérrez, Santiago

    2016-09-01

    Trichoderma arundinaceum IBT 40837 (Ta37) and Botrytis cinerea produce the sesquiterpenes harzianum A (HA) and botrydial (BOT), respectively, and also the polyketides aspinolides and botcinins (Botcs), respectively. We analysed the role of BOT and Botcs in the Ta37-B. cinerea interaction, including the transcriptomic changes in the genes involved in HA (tri) and ergosterol biosynthesis, as well as changes in the level of HA and squalene-ergosterol. We found that, when confronted with B. cinerea, the tri biosynthetic genes were up-regulated in all dual cultures analysed, but at higher levels when Ta37 was confronted with the BOT non-producer mutant bcbot2Δ. The production of HA was also higher in the interaction area with this mutant. In Ta37-bcbot2Δ confrontation experiments, the expression of the hmgR gene, encoding the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, which is the first enzyme of the terpene biosynthetic pathway, was also up-regulated, resulting in an increase in squalene production compared with the confrontation with B. cinerea B05.10. Botcs had an up-regulatory effect on the tri biosynthetic genes, with BotcA having a stronger effect than BotcB. The results indicate that the interaction between Ta37 and B. cinerea exerts a stimulatory effect on the expression of the tri biosynthetic genes, which, in the interaction zone, can be attenuated by BOT produced by B. cinerea B05.10. The present work provides evidence for a metabolic dialogue between T. arundinaceum and B. cinerea that is mediated by sesquiterpenes and polyketides, and that affects the outcome of the interaction of these fungi with each other and their environment. © 2015 BSPP and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Dietary olive oil and corn oil differentially affect experimental breast cancer through distinct modulation of the p21Ras signaling and the proliferation-apoptosis balance.

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    Solanas, Montserrat; Grau, Laura; Moral, Raquel; Vela, Elena; Escrich, Raquel; Escrich, Eduard

    2010-05-01

    Extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO) has been hypothesized to have chemopreventive effects on breast cancer, unlike high corn oil (HCO) diets that stimulate it. We have investigated mechanisms of these differential modulatory actions on experimental mammary cancer. In 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene adenocarcinomas of rats fed a high EVOO, HCO and control diets (n = 20 for each group), we have analyzed the expression and activity of ErbB receptors, p21Ras and its extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2, Akt and RalA/B effectors by immunoblotting analyses. We explored the Ha-ras1 mutation status by Southern blot, mismatch amplification mutation assay and sequencing, and the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase and squalene synthase messenger RNA expression by real-time polymerase chain reaction. We analyzed the tumor mitotic index, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) levels, and apoptosis through Caspase-3 analysis and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick end labeling assays. Finally, we measured the 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine levels. Non-parametrical statistics were used. The EVOO diet decreased Ras activation, downregulated the Ras/phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase/Akt pathway and upregulated the Raf/Erk pathway, compared with the control. In contrast, the HCO diet did not modify Ras activity but rather enhanced the Raf/Erk pathway. The EVOO diet decreased the cleaved ErbB4 levels, compared with the HCO diet, increased apoptosis and diminished the mono-ubiquitylated PCNA levels, which is related to DNA damage. Tumors from rats fed the EVOO diet displayed a more benign phenotype, whereas those from rats fed the HCO diet were biologically more aggressive. In conclusion, high EVOO and corn oil diets exert their modulatory effects on breast cancer through a different combination of Ras signaling pathways, a different proliferation-apoptosis balance and probably distinct levels of DNA damage.

  11. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of simvastatin to treat Alzheimer disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, K.L.; Galasko, D.; Galvin, J.E.; Thomas, R.G.; van Dyck, C.H.; Aisen, P.S.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Lowering cholesterol is associated with reduced CNS amyloid deposition and increased dietary cholesterol increases amyloid accumulation in animal studies. Epidemiologic data suggest that use of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors (statins) may decrease the risk of Alzheimer disease (AD) and a single-site trial suggested possible benefit in cognition with statin treatment in AD, supporting the hypothesis that statin therapy is useful in the treatment of AD. Objective: To determine if the lipid-lowering agent simvastatin slows the progression of symptoms in AD. Methods: This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of simvastatin was conducted in individuals with mild to moderate AD and normal lipid levels. Participants were randomly assigned to receive simvastatin, 20 mg/day, for 6 weeks then 40 mg per day for the remainder of 18 months or identical placebo. The primary outcome was the rate of change in the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale–cognitive portion (ADAS-Cog). Secondary outcomes measured clinical global change, cognition, function, and behavior. Results: A total of 406 individuals were randomized: 204 to simvastatin and 202 to placebo. Simvastatin lowered lipid levels but had no effect on change in ADAS-Cog score or the secondary outcome measures. There was no evidence of increased adverse events with simvastatin treatment. Conclusion: Simvastatin had no benefit on the progression of symptoms in individuals with mild to moderate AD despite significant lowering of cholesterol. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class I evidence that simvastatin 40 mg/day does not slow decline on the ADAS-Cog. PMID:21795660

  12. Kinetics of corneal epithelium turnover in vivo. Studies of lovastatin

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    Cenedella, R.J.; Fleschner, C.R. (Kirksville College of Osteopathic Medicine, MO (USA))

    1990-10-01

    The authors developed a direct chemical approach for estimating the rate of turnover of the corneal epithelium in vivo. The method was used to examine the effects of lovastatin, a potent inhibitor of cholesterol biosynthesis, on proliferation and turnover of the epithelium. Corneal DNA was labeled by pulse injection (IP) of the rat with 3H-thymidine, and 3H-labeled DNA was recovered from peripheral and central corneas over the next 15 days. Only the epithelium became labeled, and the loss of label by cell desquamation began 3 days after injection. The loss of 3H-DNA from the cornea (peripheral plus central region) followed first-order kinetics. The half-life of the disappearance was about 3 days. The peripheral cornea became more highly labeled than the central cornea and began to lose 3H-DNA before the central cornea. These observations support the possibility of a higher mitotic rate in the peripheral region and the centripetal movement of a population of peripheral epithelial cells in the normal cornea. The half-lives of the disappearance of 3H-DNA from peripheral and central corneas measured between days 5 and 15 postinjection were identical, both at 3 days. Complete turnover of the corneal epithelium would, therefore, require about 2 weeks (4-5 half-lives). Treatment of the rat with lovastatin had no obvious effects upon the proliferation or turnover of the corneal epithelium. Although lovastatin inhibited corneal 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, the key regulatory enzyme of cholesterol synthesis, the cornea compensated by induction of this enzyme so that there was no net inhibition of cholesterol synthesis in the cornea.

  13. Antihyperlipidemic and Antioxidant Effects of C-phycocyanin in Golden Syrian Hamsters Fed with a Hypercholesterolemic Diet

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    Ming-Jyh Sheu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperlipidemia and oxidation play major roles upon cardiovascular diseases (CVDs. C-phycocyanin (CPC, the major component in blue-green algae, possesses antiinflammatory and radical scavenging properties. Herein we aimed to investigate the effect of CPC upon lipid metabolism and its antioxidant effects. Golden Syrian hamsters were randomly assigned to five groups: (1 control; (2 0.2% cholesterol; (3 0.2% cholesterol+1% lopid; (4 0.2% cholesterol+0.25% CPC; and (5 0.2% cholesterol+1.25% CPC. All animals were sacrificed after 8-week feeding. Serum cholesterol, triglyceride (TG, low-density lipoprotein (LDL, glutamate-oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT, and glutamate-pyruvate transaminase (GPT were examined. The diene conjugation in the Cu2+-mediated oxidation of LDL was measured. The protein levels of several antioxidative enzymes including catalase (CAT, superoxide dismutases (SOD, and glutathione peroxidase (GPx of liver were assayed. HepG2 cells were cultured in medium containing various concentrations of CPC (0, 1, 15, and 30 μM. The mRNA concentrations of LDL receptor, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG CoA reductase, SOD-1 and GPx of HepG2 cells in each group were analyzed. CPC was effective in lowering serum cholesterol, total cholesterol (TC, TG, LDL, GOT, and GPT. CPC was found to decrease the malondialdehyde (MDA equivalents and delay the diene conjugation in the Cu2+-mediated oxidation of LDL. CPC increase the enzyme expressions of CAT, SOD, and GPx. CPC concentrations were positively correlated with the mRNA level of LDL receptor while the mRNA levels of HMG CoA reductase, SOD-1, and GPx in HepG2 cells were not affected. The lipid-lowering and antioxidation effects of CPC suggest its roles in prevention of CVD and atherosclerotic formation.

  14. Atorvastatin Calcium Inhibits PDGF-ββ-Induced Proliferation and Migration of VSMCs Through the G0/G1 Cell Cycle Arrest and Suppression of Activated PDGFRβ-PI3K-Akt Signaling Cascade

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    Shuang Chen

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Abnormal proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs is a hallmark of vascular lesions, such as atherosclerosis and restenosis. PDGF-ββ, an isoform of PDGF (platelet-derived growth factor, has been demonstrated to induce proliferation and migration of VSMCs. Atorvastatin calcium, a selective inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA reductase, has favorable protective effects on VSMCs. This study examined the effects of atorvastatin calcium on the proliferation and migration of PDGF-ββ-treated VSMCs, as well as its underlying mechanisms. Methods: MTT assays, Edu imaging, cell cycle analysis, wound healing assays, transwell migration assays, and western blot analysis were performed. Results: Atorvastatin calcium significantly inhibited cell proliferation, DNA synthesis and cell migration of PDGF-ββ-treated VSMCs. We demonstrated that atorvastatin calcium induced cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 phase in response to PDGF-ββ stimulation and decreased the expression of G0/G1-specific regulatory proteins, including proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, CDK2, cyclin D1, cyclin E and CDK4 in PDGF-ββ-treated VSMCs. Moreover, pretreatment with atorvastatin calcium inhibited the PDGF-ββ-treated phosphorylation of PDGFRβ and Akt, whereas atorvastatin calcium did not affect the phosphorylation of PLC-γ1 or (ERK 1/2. Conclusion: Our data suggested that atorvastatin calcium inhibited abnormal proliferation and migration of VSMCs through G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and suppression of the PDGFRβ-Akt signaling cascade.

  15. The effect of statin therapy on thyroid autoimmunity in patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krysiak, Robert; Kowalcze, Karolina; Okopień, Bogusław

    2016-04-01

    Statins have been found to exert antiinflammatory and immunomodulatory properties. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of intensive and less aggressive statin treatment on thyroid autoimmunity and hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis activity in patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. The study included 38 adult women with Hashimoto's thyroiditis, who required statin therapy and were allocated into one of two groups. Patients at very high cardiovascular risk (n=16) received intensive statin treatment (rosuvastatin 20-40mg daily), while patients at moderate or moderately high cardiovascular risk (n=22) were treated with simvastatin (20-40mg daily) for the following 6 months. Serum levels of thyrotropin, total and free thyroid hormones, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), as well as titers of thyroid peroxidase and thyroglobulin antibodies were measured at the beginning and at the end of the study. Thirty-six individuals completed the study and were included in the final analyses. Apart from improving plasma lipids and reducing circulating levels of hsCRP, intensive, but not less aggressive, statin therapy reduced thyroid peroxidase and thyroglobulin antibody titers, as well as tended to reduce circulating levels of thyrotropin. The effect of intensive statin therapy on thyroid antibody titers was lipid-independent but correlated with treatment-induced changes in thyrotropin and hsCRP. Although 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors are able to reduce thyroid autoimmunity in women with Hashimoto's thyroiditis, intensive statin therapy is required to produce this effect. Copyright © 2015 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of Saponin from Trigonella Foenum-Graecum Seeds on Dyslipidemia

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    Zhi Chen

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Saponins identified from fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum seeds are reported effective on dyslipidemia. However, the definite mechanism is still not elucidated systematically. In this study, we evaluate the effects of saponin extract on cholesterol absorption, metabolism, synthesis, and reverse cholesterol transport in vivo. Methods: Saponin extract was prepared according to a craft established in our previous study. After the establishment of dyslipidemia model, 40 male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into five groups, namely the control group (normal diet plus normal saline, HFD group (high fat diet plus normal saline, Lipitor group (high fat diet plus Lipitor (2 mg/kg, and L, M, and H-saponin groups (high fat diet plus saponin in dosages of 6, 12, and 24 mg/kg, respectively. Rats were sacrificed at the end of the 9th week after treatment. Biochemical characteristics of rats were tested, histopathological sections of liver tissue were observed, and the protein and mRNA expression of related factors of cholesterol in the intestine and liver were determined. One-way ANOVA test (SPSS software version 11.5, Chicago, IL, USA was used to determine statistically significant differences between the HFD and other groups. Results: In saponin groups, the serum lipid, bile acid efflux, anti-peroxide activities, and lipid area of liver tissue improved. Cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase and scavenger receptor class B type I elevated in the liver. 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase levels were suppressed in both the serum and liver. However, significant cholesterol efflux was not found and Niemann-Pick C1-Like 1 levels elevated in the intestine. Conclusion: The mechanisms of saponin in Fenugreek effect on ameliorating dyslipidemia are probably related to accelerated cholesterol metabolism, inhibited cholesterol synthesis, and facilitated reverse cholesterol transport, but not cholesterol absorption.

  17. Insight into the mechanism of polyphenols on the activity of HMGR by molecular docking

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    Islam B

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Barira Islam,1,* Charu Sharma,2,* Abdu Adem,3 Elhadi Aburawi,1 Shreesh Ojha3 1Department of Paediatrics, 2Department of Internal Medicine, 3Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, Al-Ain, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Statins are hypolipidemic drugs that are effective in the treatment of hypercholesterolemia by attenuating cholesterol synthesis in the liver via competitive inhibition of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA reductase. Recently, dietary changes associated with drug therapy have garnered attention as novel drugs to mitigate or ameliorate hypercholesterolemia. The present study was undertaken to observe different dietary polyphenols that can bind to the active site of HMGR and inhibit it. Results from the 12 dietary polyphenols tested reveal that polyphenols can bind to HMGR and block the binding of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP+. We observed that the rigidity of phenolic rings prevents the polyphenols from docking to the enzyme activity site. The presence of an ester linkage between the phenolic rings in (–-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG and the alkyl chain in curcumin allows them to orient in the active site of the HMGR and bind to the catalytic residues. EGCG and curcumin showed binding to the active site residues with a low GRID score, which may be a potential inhibitor of HMGR. Kaempferol showed binding to HMG-CoA, but with low binding affinity. These observations provide a rationale for the consistent hypolipidemic effect of EGCG and curcumin, which has been previously reported in several epidemiological and animal studies. Therefore, this study substantiates the mechanism of polyphenols on the activity of HMGR by molecular docking and provides the impetus for drug design involving further structure–function relationship studies. Keywords: polyphenols

  18. The Mechanisms Underlying the Hypolipidaemic Effects of Grifola frondosa in the Liver of Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yinrun; Xiao, Chun; Wu, Qingping; Xie, Yizhen; Li, Xiangmin; Hu, Huiping; Li, Liangqiu

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the hypolipidaemic effects of Grifola frondosa and its regulation mechanism involved in lipid metabolism in liver of rats fed a high-cholesterol diet. The body weights and serum lipid levels of control rats, of hyperlipidaemic rats, and of hyperlipidaemic rats treated with oral G. frondosa were determined. mRNA expression and concentration of key lipid metabolism enzymes were investigated. Serum cholesterol, triacylglycerol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were markedly decreased in hyperlipidaemic rats treated with G. frondosa compared with untreated hyperlipidaemic rats. mRNA expression of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR), acyl-coenzyme A: cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT2), apolipoprotein B (ApoB), fatty acid synthase (FAS), and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC1) were significantly down-regulated, while expression of cholesterol 7-alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) was significantly up-regulated in the livers of treated rats compared with untreated hyperlipidaemic rats. The concentrations of these enzymes also paralleled the observed changes in mRNA expression. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) were used to identify 20 proteins differentially expressed in livers of rats treated with G. frondosa compared with untreated hyperlipidemic rats. Of these 20 proteins, seven proteins were down-regulated, and 13 proteins were up-regulated. These findings indicate that the hypolipidaemic effects of G. frondosa reflected its modulation of key enzymes involved in cholesterol and triacylglycerol biosynthesis, absorption, and catabolic pathways. G. frondosa may exert anti-atherosclerotic effects by inhibiting LDL oxidation through down-regulation and up-regulating proteins expression in the liver of rats. Therefore, G. frondosa may produce both hypolipidaemic and anti-atherosclerotic effects, and potentially

  19. The effect of a combination antacid preparation containing aluminium hydroxide and magnesium hydroxide on rosuvastatin pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Paul D; Schneck, Dennis W; Dane, Aaron L; Warwick, Michael J

    2008-04-01

    Rosuvastatin, a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitor used for the treatment of dyslipidaemia, may be co-administered with antacids in clinical practice. This trial assessed the effect of simultaneous and separated administration of an antacid preparation containing aluminium hydroxide 220 mg/5 mL and magnesium hydroxide 195 mg/5 mL (co-magaldrox 195/220) on the pharmacokinetics of rosuvastatin. A randomised, open-label, three-way crossover trial was performed. Healthy male volunteers (n = 14) received a single dose of rosuvastatin 40 mg alone, rosuvastatin 40 mg plus 20 mL antacid suspension taken simultaneously, and rosuvastatin 40 mg plus 20 mL antacid suspension taken 2 h after rosuvastatin on three separate occasions with a washout of > or = 7 days between each. The primary parameters were area under the rosuvastatin plasma concentration-time curve from time zero to the last quantifiable concentration (AUC(0-t)) and maximum observed rosuvastatin plasma concentration (C(max)) in the absence and presence of antacid. When rosuvastatin and antacid were given simultaneously, the antacid reduced the rosuvastatin AUC(0-t) by 54% (90% confidence interval [CI] for the treatment 0.40-0.53) and C(max) by 50% (90% CI 0.41-0.60). When the antacid was given 2 h after rosuvastatin, the antacid reduced the rosuvastatin AUC(0-t) by 22% (90% CI 0.68-0.90) and the C(max) by 16% (90% CI 0.70-1.01). The effect of repeated antacid administration was not studied and it cannot be discounted that this may have resulted in a stronger interaction than that observed here. Simultaneous dosing with rosuvastatin and antacid resulted in a decrease in rosuvastatin systemic exposure of approximately 50%. This effect was mitigated when antacid was administered 2 h after rosuvastatin.

  20. Statins and pulmonary fibrosis: the potential role of NLRP3 inflammasome activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jin-Fu; Washko, George R; Nakahira, Kiichi; Hatabu, Hiroto; Patel, Avignat S; Fernandez, Isis E; Nishino, Mizuki; Okajima, Yuka; Yamashiro, Tsuneo; Ross, James C; Estépar, Raúl San José; Diaz, Alejandro A; Li, Hui-Ping; Qu, Jie-Ming; Himes, Blanca E; Come, Carolyn E; D'Aco, Katherine; Martinez, Fernando J; Han, MeiLan K; Lynch, David A; Crapo, James D; Morse, Danielle; Ryter, Stefan W; Silverman, Edwin K; Rosas, Ivan O; Choi, Augustine M K; Hunninghake, Gary M

    2012-03-01

    The role of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) in the development or progression of interstitial lung disease (ILD) is controversial. To evaluate the association between statin use and ILD. We used regression analyses to evaluate the association between statin use and interstitial lung abnormalities (ILA) in a large cohort of smokers from COPDGene. Next, we evaluated the effect of statin pretreatment on bleomycin-induced fibrosis in mice and explored the mechanism behind these observations in vitro. In COPDGene, 38% of subjects with ILA were taking statins compared with 27% of subjects without ILA. Statin use was positively associated in ILA (odds ratio, 1.60; 95% confidence interval, 1.03-2.50; P = 0.04) after adjustment for covariates including a history of high cholesterol or coronary artery disease. This association was modified by the hydrophilicity of statin and the age of the subject. Next, we demonstrate that statin administration aggravates lung injury and fibrosis in bleomycin-treated mice. Statin pretreatment enhances caspase-1-mediated immune responses in vivo and in vitro; the latter responses were abolished in bone marrow-derived macrophages isolated from Nlrp3(-/-) and Casp1(-/-) mice. Finally, we provide further insights by demonstrating that statins enhance NLRP3-inflammasome activation by increasing mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generation in macrophages. Statin use is associated with ILA among smokers in the COPDGene study and enhances bleomycin-induced lung inflammation and fibrosis in the mouse through a mechanism involving enhanced NLRP3-inflammasome activation. Our findings suggest that statins may influence the susceptibility to, or progression of, ILD. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT 00608764).

  1. Chromatin remodeling by rosuvastatin normalizes TSC2-/meth cell phenotype through the expression of tuberin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesma, Elena; Ancona, Silvia; Orpianesi, Emanuela; Grande, Vera; Di Giulio, Anna Maria; Gorio, Alfredo

    2013-05-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a multi-systemic syndrome caused by mutations in TSC1 or TSC2 gene. In TSC2-null cells, Rheb, a member of the Ras family of GTPases, is constitutively activated. Statins inhibit 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase and block the synthesis of isoprenoid lipids with inhibition of Rheb farnesylation and RhoA geranylgeranylation. The effects of rosuvastatin on the function of human TSC2(-/-) and TSC2(-/meth) α-actin smooth muscle (ASM) cells have been investigated. The TSC2(-/-) and TSC2(-/meth) ASM cells, previously isolated in our laboratory from the renal angiomyolipoma of two TSC patients, do not express tuberin and bear loss of heterozigosity caused by a double hit on TSC2 and methylation of TSC2 promoter, respectively. Exposure to rosuvastatin affected TSC2(-/meth) ASM cell growth and promoted tuberin expression by acting as a demethylating agent. This occurred without changes in interleukin release. Rosuvastatin also reduced RhoA activation in TSC2(-/meth) ASM cells, and it required coadministration with the specific mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) inhibitor rapamycin to be effective in TSC2(-/-) ASM cells. Rapamycin enhanced rosuvastatin effect in inhibiting cell proliferation in TSC2(-/-) and TSC2(-/meth) ASM cells. Rosuvastatin alone did not alter phosphorylation of S6 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and at the higher concentration, rosuvastatin and rapamycin slightly decreased ERK phosphorylation. These results suggest that rosuvastatin may potentially represent a treatment adjunct to the therapy with mTOR inhibitors now in clinical development for TSC. In particular, rosuvastatin appears useful when the disease is originated by epigenetic defects.

  2. Identification of new therapeutic targets by genome-wide analysis of gene expression in the ipsilateral cortex of aged rats after stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Maria Buga

    Full Text Available Because most human stroke victims are elderly, studies of experimental stroke in the aged rather than the young rat model may be optimal for identifying clinically relevant cellular responses, as well for pinpointing beneficial interventions.We employed the Affymetrix platform to analyze the whole-gene transcriptome following temporary ligation of the middle cerebral artery in aged and young rats. The correspondence, heat map, and dendrogram analyses independently suggest a differential, age-group-specific behaviour of major gene clusters after stroke. Overall, the pattern of gene expression strongly suggests that the response of the aged rat brain is qualitatively rather than quantitatively different from the young, i.e. the total number of regulated genes is comparable in the two age groups, but the aged rats had great difficulty in mounting a timely response to stroke. Our study indicates that four genes related to neuropathic syndrome, stress, anxiety disorders and depression (Acvr1c, Cort, Htr2b and Pnoc may have impaired response to stroke in aged rats. New therapeutic options in aged rats may also include Calcrl, Cyp11b1, Prcp, Cebpa, Cfd, Gpnmb, Fcgr2b, Fcgr3a, Tnfrsf26, Adam 17 and Mmp14. An unexpected target is the enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-Coenzyme A synthase 1 in aged rats, a key enzyme in the cholesterol synthesis pathway. Post-stroke axonal growth was compromised in both age groups.We suggest that a multi-stage, multimodal treatment in aged animals may be more likely to produce positive results. Such a therapeutic approach should be focused on tissue restoration but should also address other aspects of patient post-stroke therapy such as neuropathic syndrome, stress, anxiety disorders, depression, neurotransmission and blood pressure.

  3. Exploration of natural product ingredients as inhibitors of human HMG-CoA reductase through structure-based virtual screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin SH

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Shih-Hung Lin,1 Kao-Jean Huang,1,2 Ching-Feng Weng,1 David Shiuan1 1Department of Life Science and Institute of Biotechnology, National Dong Hwa University, Hualien, Taiwan, Republic of China; 2Development Center of Biotechnology, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China Abstract: Cholesterol plays an important role in living cells. However, a very high level of cholesterol may lead to atherosclerosis. HMG-CoA (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase is the key enzyme in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway, and the statin-like drugs are inhibitors of human HMG-CoA reductase (hHMGR. The present study aimed to virtually screen for potential hHMGR inhibitors from natural product to discover hypolipidemic drug candidates with fewer side effects and lesser toxicities. We used the 3D structure 1HWK from the PDB (Protein Data Bank database of hHMGR as the target to screen for the strongly bound compounds from the traditional Chinese medicine database. Many interesting molecules including polyphenolic compounds, polisubstituted heterocyclics, and linear lipophilic alcohols were identified and their ADMET (absorption, disrtibution, metabolism, excretion, toxicity properties were predicted. Finally, four compounds were obtained for the in vitro validation experiments. The results indicated that curcumin and salvianolic acid C can effectively inhibit hHMGR, with IC50 (half maximal inhibitory concentration values of 4.3 µM and 8 µM, respectively. The present study also demonstrated the feasibility of discovering new drug candidates through structure-based virtual screening. Keywords: HMG-CoA reductase, virtual screening, curcumin, salvianolic acid C

  4. Atorvastatin suppresses inflammatory response induced by oxLDL through inhibition of ERK phosphorylation, IκBα degradation, and COX-2 expression in murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Qin; Shen, Ling-Hong; Hu, Liu-Hua; Pu, Jun; Jing, Qing; He, Ben

    2012-02-01

    Macrophages crosstalk with oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL), play a critical role in the initiation, progression, and subsequently stability of atherosclerotic plaques. Statins, inhibitors of HMG CoA (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A) reductase, reduce the expression of inflammatory proteins in addition to their lipid-lowering action. However, the effect and detailed anti-inflammation mechanisms of statins in macrophages induced by oxLDL remain unclearly. In the present study, we investigated the effect of atorvastatin on inflammatory response upon oxLDL stimulation in murine macrophages and analyzed the underlying mechanisms. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) mRNA levels were assayed by real-time PCR. The expression of cyclooxygenases-2 (COX-2) was detected by real-time PCR and Western blotting. While mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation and IκBα degradation were determined by Western blotting. Our results showed that exposure of RAW264.7 cells to oxLDL, substantially changed the morphology of the cells and increased TNFα and MCP-1 secretion. While pretreatment with atorvastatin resulted in a significant inhibition of oxLDL-induced morphological alteration and inflammatory cytokines expression in a dose-dependent fashion. Further investigation of the molecular mechanism revealed that oxLDL upregulated the transcription and protein expression of COX-2 in a time-dependent manner. Whereas, pretreatment with atorvastatin suppressed COX-2 expression, MAPK activation and IκBα degradation. Thus, we conclude that the anti-inflammatory effect of atorvastatin is mediated through the inhibition of proinflammatory COX-2. Furthermore, suppression of ERK phosphorylation and IκBα degradation is involved in this regulation. Our findings provide a novel evidence that statins suppress inflammatory response, exert its anti-atherogenic actions via against inflammation beyond cholesterol-lowing effect

  5. Camphene, a Plant-Derived Monoterpene, Reduces Plasma Cholesterol and Triglycerides in Hyperlipidemic Rats Independently of HMG-CoA Reductase Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallianou, Ioanna; Peroulis, Nikolaos; Pantazis, Panayotis; Hadzopoulou-Cladaras, Margarita

    2011-01-01

    Background Central to the pathology of coronary heart disease is the accumulation of lipids, cholesterol and triglycerides, within the intima of arterial blood vessels. The search for drugs to treat dislipidemia, remains a major pharmaceutical focus. In this study, we evaluated the hypolipidemic properties of the essential oil from Chios mastic gum (MGO). Methodology/Principal Findings The hypolipidemic effect of MGO was investigated in naïve as well as in rats susceptible to detergent-induced hyperlipidemia. Serum cholesterol and triglycerides were determined using commercial kits. HMG-CoA (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A) reductase activity was measured in HepG2 cell extracts using a radioactive assay; cellular cholesterol and cholesterol esters were assessed using gas chromatography. MGO administration into naïve rats resulted in a dose-dependent reduction in the constitutive synthesis of serum cholesterol and triglycerides. In hyperlipidemic rats, MGO treatment had also a strong hypolipidemic effect. By testing various components of MGO, we show for the first time that the hypolipidemic action is associated with camphene. Administration of camphene at a dose of 30 µg/gr of body weight in hyperlipidemic rats resulted in a 54.5% reduction of total cholesterol (p<0.001), 54% of Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol (p<0.001) and 34.5% of triglycerides (p<0.001). Treatment of HepG2 cells with camphene led to a decrease in cellular cholesterol content to the same extend as mevinolin, a known HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor. The hypolipidemic action of camphene is independent of HMG-CoA reductase activity, suggesting that its hypocholesterolemic and hypotriglyceridemic effects are associated with a mechanism of action different than that of statins. Conclusions Given the critical role that the control of hyperlipidemia plays in cardiovascular disease, the results of our study provide insights into the use of camphene as an alternative lipid lowering agent

  6. Different roles of the mevalonate and methylerythritol phosphate pathways in cell growth and tanshinone production of Salvia miltiorrhiza hairy roots.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongfeng Yang

    Full Text Available Salvia miltiorrhiza has been widely used in the treatment of coronary heart disease. Tanshinones, a group of diterpenoids are the main active ingredients in S. miltiorrhiza. Two biosynthetic pathways were involved in tanshinone biosynthesis in plants: the mevalonate (MVA pathway in the cytosol and the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP pathway in the plastids. The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR is the rate-limiting enzyme of the MVA pathway. The 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS and 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR are the key enzymes of the MEP pathway. In this study, to reveal roles of the MVA and the MEP pathways in cell growth and tanshinone production of S. miltiorrhiza hairy roots, specific inhibitors of the two pathways were used to perturb metabolic flux. The results showed that the MVA pathway inhibitor (mevinolin, MEV was more powerful to inhibit the hairy root growth than the MEP pathway inhibitor (fosmidomycin, FOS. Both MEV and FOS could significantly inhibit tanshinone production, and FOS was more powerful than MEV. An inhibitor (D, L-glyceraldehyde, DLG of IPP translocation strengthened the inhibitory effects of MEV and FOS on cell growth and tanshinone production. Application of MEV resulted in a significant increase of expression and activity of HMGR at 6 h, and a sharp decrease at 24 h. FOS treatment resulted in a significant increase of DXR and DXS expression and DXS activity at 6 h, and a sharp decrease at 24 h. Our results suggested that the MVA pathway played a major role in cell growth, while the MEP pathway was the main source of tanshinone biosynthesis. Both cell growth and tanshinone production could partially depend on the crosstalk between the two pathways. The inhibitor-mediated changes of tanshinone production were reflected in transcript and protein levels of genes of the MVA and MEP pathways.

  7. PEG and ABA trigger methyl jasmonate accumulation to induce the MEP pathway and increase tanshinone production in Salvia miltiorrhiza hairy roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dongfeng; Ma, Pengda; Liang, Xiao; Wei, Zheng; Liang, Zongsuo; Liu, Yan; Liu, Fenghua

    2012-10-01

    Tanshinones, a group of active ingredients in Salvia miltiorrhiza, are derived from at least two biosynthetic pathways, which are the mevalonate (MVA) pathway in the cytosol and the 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol-4-phosphate (MEP) pathway in the plastids. Abscisic acid (ABA) and methyl jasmonate (MJ) are two well-known plant hormones induced by water stress. In this study, effects of polyethylene glycol (PEG), ABA and MJ on tanshinone production in S. miltiorrhiza hairy roots were investigated, and the role of MJ in PEG- and ABA-induced tanshinone production was further elucidated. The results showed that tanshinone production was significantly enhanced by treatments with PEG, ABA and MJ. The mRNA levels of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl co-enzyme A reductase (HMGR), 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR) and 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS), as well as the enzyme activities of HMGR and DXS were stimulated by all three treatments. PEG and ABA triggered MJ accumulation. Effects of PEG and ABA on tanshinone production were completely abolished by the ABA biosynthesis inhibitor [tungstate (TUN)] and the MJ biosynthesis inhibitor [ibuprofen (IBU)], while effects of MJ were almost unaffected by TUN. In addition, MJ-induced tanshinone production was completely abolished by the MEP pathway inhibitor [fosmidomycin (FOS)], but was just partially arrested by the MVA pathway inhibitor [mevinolin (MEV)]. In conclusion, a signal transduction model was proposed that exogenous applications of PEG and ABA triggered endogenous MJ accumulation by activating ABA signaling pathway to stimulate tanshinone production, while exogenous MJ could directly induce tanshinone production mainly via the MEP pathway in S. miltiorrhiza hairy roots. Copyright © Physiologia Plantarum 2012.

  8. Synergistic Cardioprotective Effects of Combined Chromium Picolinate and Atorvastatin Treatment in Triton X-100-Induced Hyperlipidemia in Rats: Impact on Some Biochemical Markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafik, Noha M; Baalash, Amal; Ebeid, Abla M

    2017-12-01

    Hyperlipidemia is one of the major risk factors for atherosclerosis and ischemic heart disease. Chromium (Cr) mineral is playing a crucial role in glucose and lipid homeostasis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the protective effects of combined chromium picolinate (CrPic) and atorvastatin treatment against hyperlipidemia-induced cardiac injury. Seventy-five male albino rats were divided into five groups (15 rats each). Hyperlipidemia was induced by intraperitoneal injection of a single dose of Triton X-100 (300 mg/kg body weight (b.w) (group ІІ). Treatment of hyperlipidemic rats was induced by daily administration of CrPic at a dose of 200 μg/kg b.w/day (group ІІІ), atorvastatin at a dose of 10 mg/kg/day (group IV), and combined treatment with both (group V) by gavage for 7 days. At the end of experiment, serum and heart tissues were obtained. Hyperlipidemia was confirmed by histopathology of heart tissues, marked serum dyslipidemia, increased atherogenic indices, and values of ischemia-modified albumin. In addition to increased values of proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9, activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase enzyme and high relative expression levels of pentraxin-3 were observed. However, paraoxonase-1 activity was markedly decreased in the hyperlipidemic group. Significant improvement in all assessed parameters was observed in the rat group treated with both CrPic and atorvastatin. It can be concluded that combined CrPic and atorvastatin treatments had synergistic cardioprotective effects against hyperlipidemia which may be through modulating atherosclerosis as well as cardiac and aortic damage and/or activation of anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant pathways, thus reversing endothelial dysfunction.

  9. Toward "pain-free" statin prescribing: clinical algorithm for diagnosis and management of myalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Terry A

    2008-06-01

    Myalgia, which often manifests as pain or soreness in skeletal muscles, is among the most salient adverse events associated with 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins). Clinical issues related to statin-associated myotoxicity include (1) incidence in randomized controlled trials and occurrence in postmarketing surveillance databases; (2) potential differences between statins in their associations with such adverse events; and (3) diagnostic and treatment strategies to prevent, recognize, and manage these events. Data from systematic reviews, meta-analyses, clinical and observational trials, and post-marketing surveillance indicate that statin-associated myalgia typically affects approximately 5.0% of patients, as myopathy in 0.1% and as rhabdomyolysis in 0.01%. However, studies also suggest that myalgia is among the leading reasons patients discontinue statins (particularly high-dose statin monotherapy) and that treatment with certain statins (eg, fluvastatin) is unlikely to result in such adverse events. This review presents a clinical algorithm for monitoring and managing statin-associated myotoxicity. The algorithm highlights risk factors for muscle toxicity and provides recommendations for (1) creatine kinase measurements and monitoring; (2) statin dosage reduction, discontinuation, and rechallenge; and (3) treatment alternatives, such as extended-release fluvastatin with or without ezetimibe, low-dose or alternate-day rosuvastatin, or ezetimibe with or without colesevelam. The algorithm should help to inform and enhance patient care and reduce the risk of myalgia and other potentially treatment-limiting muscle effects that might undermine patient adherence and compromise the overall cardioprotective benefits of statins.

  10. Overexpression of the homologous lanosterol synthase gene in ganoderic acid biosynthesis in Ganoderma lingzhi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, De-Huai; Li, Na; Yu, Xuya; Zhao, Peng; Li, Tao; Xu, Jun-Wei

    2017-02-01

    Ganoderic acids (GAs) in Ganoderma lingzhi exhibit anticancer and antimetastatic activities. GA yields can be potentially improved by manipulating G. lingzhi through genetic engineering. In this study, a putative lanosterol synthase (LS) gene was cloned and overexpressed in G. lingzhi. Results showed that its overexpression (OE) increased the ganoderic acid (GA) content and the accumulation of lanosterol and ergosterol in a submerged G. lingzhi culture. The maximum contents of GA-O, GA-Mk, GA-T, GA-S, GA-Mf, and GA-Me in transgenic strains were 46.6 ± 4.8, 24.3 ± 3.5, 69.8 ± 8.2, 28.9 ± 1.4, 15.4 ± 1.2, and 26.7 ± 3.1 μg/100 mg dry weight, respectively, these values being 6.1-, 2.2-, 3.2-, 4.8-, 2.0-, and 1.9-times higher than those in wild-type strains. In addition, accumulated amounts of lanosterol and ergosterol in transgenic strains were 2.3 and 1.4-fold higher than those in the control strains, respectively. The transcription level of LS was also increased by more than five times in the presence of the G. lingzhi glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene promoter, whereas transcription levels of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A enzyme and squalene synthase did not change significantly in transgenic strains. This study demonstrated that OE of the homologous LS gene can enhance lanosterol accumulation. A large precursor supply promotes GA biosynthesis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Anti-inflammatory Nanomedicine for Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunsuke Katsuki

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery disease, in the development of which inflammation mediated by innate immune cells plays a critical role, is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins are a widely used lipid-lowering drug that has lipid-independent vasculoprotective effects, such as improvement of endothelial dysfunction, antioxidant properties, and inhibitory effects on inflammation. Despite recent advances in lipid-lowering therapy, clinical trials of statins suggest that anti-inflammatory therapy beyond lipid-lowering therapy is indispensible to further reduce cardiovascular events. One possible therapeutic option to the residual risk is to directly intervene in the inflammatory process by utilizing a nanotechnology-based drug delivery system (nano-DDS. Various nano-sized materials are currently developed as DDS, including micelles, liposomes, polymeric nanoparticles, dendrimers, carbon nanotubes, and metallic nanoparticles. The application of nano-DDS to coronary artery disease is a feasible strategy since the inflammatory milieu enhances incorporation of nano-sized materials into mononuclear phagocytic system and permeability of target lesions, which confers nano-DDS on “passive-targeting” property. Recently, we have developed a polymeric nanoparticle-incorporating statin to maximize its anti-inflammatory property. This statin nanoparticle has been tested in various disease models, including plaque destabilization and rupture, myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury, and ventricular remodeling after acute myocardial infarction, and its clinical application is in progress. In this review, we present current development of DDS and future perspective on the application of anti-inflammatory nanomedicine to treat life-threatening cardiovascular diseases.

  12. Postprandial antioxidant gene expression is modified by Mediterranean diet supplemented with coenzyme Q10 in elderly men and women

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yubero-Serrano, Elena M; Gonzalez-Guardia, Lorena; Rangel-Zuñiga, Oriol; Delgado-Casado, Nieves; Delgado-Lista, Javier; Perez-Martinez, Pablo; Garcia-Rios, Antonio; Caballero, Javier; Marin, Carmen; Gutierrez-Mariscal, Francisco M; Tinahones, Francisco J; Villalba, Jose M; Tunez, Isaac; Perez-Jimenez, Francisco; Lopez-Miranda, Jose

    2013-01-01

    .... We have investigated whether the quality of dietary fat alters postprandial gene expression and protein levels involved in oxidative stress and whether the supplementation with coenzyme Q10 (CoQ...

  13. Coenzyme Q10 supplementation in infertile men with low-grade varicocele: an open, uncontrolled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Festa, R; Giacchi, E; Raimondo, S; Tiano, L; Zuccarelli, P; Silvestrini, A; Meucci, E; Littarru, G P; Mancini, A

    2014-09-01

    Many conditions associated with male infertility are inducers of oxidative stress, including varicocele. Antioxidants, such as coenzyme Q10, may be useful in this case. To evaluate the antioxidant capacity of seminal plasma of infertile men with varicocele before and after an oral supplementation with coenzyme Q10 , 38 patients were recruited from a pilot clinical trial. A standard semen analysis was also performed at baseline and 3 months after an oral supplementation with exogenous coenzyme Q10 100 mg per die. Seminal plasma antioxidant capacity was measured using a spectroscopic method. Coenzyme Q10 therapy improved semen parameters and antioxidant status. This study highlights the importance of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of male infertility, namely in varicocele, and strengthens the possibility of the usefulness of the antioxidant therapy. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  14. Hepatitis virus panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003558.htm Hepatitis virus panel To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The hepatitis virus panel is a series of blood tests used ...

  15. Hepatitis A - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... attends day care: Make sure the children and staff at the day care center have had their hepatitis A vaccine. Inspect the area where diapers are changed to ensure that proper hygiene is followed. If your child gets hepatitis A, ...

  16. Delta agent (Hepatitis D)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000216.htm Hepatitis D (Delta agent) To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hepatitis D is a viral infection caused by the ...

  17. Hepatitis B Vaccination Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fact Sheet Hepatitis B Vaccination Protection Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a pathogenic microorganism that can cause potentially life- threatening disease in humans. HBV infection is transmitted through exposure ...

  18. Coenzyme Q10 supplementation reduces oxidative stress and increases antioxidant enzyme activity in patients with coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bor-Jen; Huang, Yi-Chia; Chen, Shu-Ju; Lin, Ping-Ting

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of coenzyme Q10 supplementation on oxidative stress and antioxidant enzyme activity in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). This was an intervention study. Patients who were identified by cardiac catheterization as having at least 50% stenosis of one major coronary artery or receiving percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (n = 51) were randomly assigned to the placebo group (n = 14) or one of the two coenzyme Q10-supplemented groups (60 mg/d, n = 19 [Q10-60 group]; 150 mg/d, n = 18 [Q10-150 group]). Intervention was administered for 12 wk. Patients' blood samples were analyzed every 4 wk for plasma coenzyme Q10 concentrations, malondialdehyde (MDA), and antioxidant enzyme (catalase [CAT], superoxide dismutase [SOD], glutathione peroxidase) activity. Forty-three subjects with CAD completed intervention study. Plasma coenzyme Q10 concentration increased significantly after coenzyme the Q10-150 intervention (P Q10-150 group at week 4 (P = 0.03). The Q10-150 group had significantly lower MDA levels than the placebo group at week 8 (P = 0.03). With respect to antioxidant enzyme activity, subjects in the Q10-150 group had significantly higher CAT (P = 0.03) and SOD (P = 0.03) activity than the placebo group at week 12. The plasma coenzyme Q10 concentration was significantly correlated with MDA levels (r = -0.35, P = 0.02) and CAT (r = 0.43, P = 0.01) and SOD activity (r = 0.39, P = 0.01). The ratio of plasma coenzyme Q10 to total cholesterol was significantly correlated with SOD activity (r = 0.39, P = 0.02). The ratio of plasma coenzyme Q10 to low-density lipoprotein was significantly correlated with CAT (r = 0.35, P = 0.04) and SOD (r = 0.45, P = 0.01) activity. However, there was no relation between coenzyme Q10 concentration and glutathione peroxidase activity. Coenzyme Q10 supplements at a dose of 150 mg can decrease oxidative stress and increase antioxidant enzyme activity in patients with

  19. Hepatitis B Foundation Newsletter: B Informed

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Clinical Trials Physician Directory HBV Meeting What Is Hepatitis B? What Is Hepatitis B? The ABCs of Viral Hepatitis Liver Cancer and Hepatitis B Hepatitis Delta Coinfection Hepatitis C Coinfection HIV/AIDS ...

  20. Amelioration of altered antioxidant enzymes activity and glomerulosclerosis by coenzyme Q10 in alloxan-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadvand, Hassan; Tavafi, Majid; Khosrowbeygi, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 is a natural antioxidant and scavenging free radicals. In the present study, we examined antioxidative activities of coenzyme Q10 and possible protective effect of coenzyme Q10 on in vivo and in vitro lipid peroxidation, antioxidant enzymes activity and glomerulosclerosis in alloxan-induced type 1 diabetic rats. Thirty Sprague-Dawley male rats were divided into three groups randomly: group 1 as control, group 2 as diabetic untreatment, and group 3 as treatments with coenzyme Q10 by 15 mg/kg i.p. daily, respectively. Diabetes was induced in the second and third groups by alloxan injection subcutaneously. After 8 weeks, animals were anaesthetized, liver and kidney were then removed immediately and used fresh or kept frozen until their lipid peroxidation analysis. Blood samples were also collected before killing to measure the lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes activity. Kidney paraffin sections were prepared and stained by periodic acid-Schiff method. Glomerular volume and leukocyte infiltration were estimated by stereological rules and glomerular sclerosis was studied semi-quantitatively. Coenzyme Q10 significantly inhibited leukocyte infiltration, glomerulosclerosis and the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) serum and kidney content in treated group compared with the diabetic untreated group. Coenzyme Q10 significantly inhibited LDL oxidation in vitro. Coenzyme Q10 significantly increased the serum levels of glutathione (GSH) and serum activity of catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) in treated group compared with the diabetic untreated group. Coenzyme Q10 alleviates leukocyte infiltration and glomerulosclerosis and exerts beneficial effects on the lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes activity in alloxan-induced type 1 diabetic rats. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Elucidation of molecular mechanism involved in neuroprotective effect of Coenzyme Q10 in alcohol-induced neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandhare, Amit D; Ghosh, Pinaki; Ghule, Arvindkumar E; Bodhankar, Subhash L

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to evaluate the effect of Coenzyme Q10 and its combination with vitamin E in alcohol-induced chronic neuropathic pain. Male Wistar rats were orally treated with alcohol (10 g/kg, 35% v/v, b.i.d.) for 10 weeks. Coenzyme Q10 (25, 50, and 100 mg/kg) and vitamin E (100 mg/kg) were coadministered orally for 1 h after ethanol administration for 10 weeks. Various nerve functions, biochemical, and molecular parameters were assessed. Chronic administration of ethanol for 10 weeks resulted significant development of neuropathic pain. Treatment with Coenzyme Q10 (50 and 100 mg/kg) for 10 weeks showed significant and dose dependently increased in level of nociceptive threshold, endogenous antioxidant, and Na,K-ATPase enzyme. Coenzyme Q10 (50 and 100 mg/kg) significantly restored the levels of motor nerve conduction velocity and sensory nerve conduction velocity. It also showed significant decrease in levels of endogenous calcium, oxidative-nitrosative stress, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-4 level. Alteration in protein expression of polymerase gamma (pol γ) was significantly restored the Coenzyme Q10 treatment. The important finding of the study is that, Coenzyme Q10 (100 mg/kg) and α-tocopherol (100 mg/kg) combination-treated rats showed more significant prevention of behavioral, biochemical, and molecular neurotoxic effect of alcohol administration than Coenzyme Q10 or α-tocopherol alone treated group. It is evident from the finding of present investigation that plethora of mechanism including inhibition of oxido-nitrosative stress, release of pro-inflammatory cytokine, modulation of endogenous biomarker, and protection of pol γ protein expression simultaneously orchestrate to exhibits neuroprotective effect of Coenzyme Q10, vitamin E and their combination. © 2012 The Authors Fundamental and Clinical Pharmacology © 2012 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  2. Hepatitis viruses overview

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hepatitis is major cause of morbidity or mortality worldwide, particularly in the developing world. The major causes of infective hepatitis are hepatitis viruses. A, B, C, D or E. In the acute phase, there are no clinical features that can reliably differentiate between these viruses. Infection may be asymptomatic or can present as.

  3. Know More Hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... death. In fact, Hepatitis C is a leading cause of liver cancer and the #1 cause of liver transplants. Many people can get lifesaving care and treatment. Knowing you have Hepatitis C can help you make important decisions about your health. Successful treatments can eliminate the ... “Hepatitis C: Did You Know?” Watch this video ...

  4. Hepatitis E Virus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is the most common cause of acute viral hepatitis in the developing world. It is a waterborne virus that can cause epidemics in the face of overcrowding and poor sanitation. Although the hepatitis illness is usually self-limiting, it has a high mortality in pregnant women and can become a ...

  5. Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C in Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... who are infected never get rid of the hepatitis B virus. This is called chronic infection. These people keep the virus for the rest of their lives. They are known as carriers . Most carriers do not have ... and early death. Can hepatitis B virus infection be cured? There is no ...

  6. Protective effects of coenzyme Q10 against angiotensin II-induced oxidative stress in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuneki, Hiroshi; Tokai, Emi; Suzuki, Takashi; Seki, Takayuki; Okubo, Kyosuke; Wada, Tsutomu; Okamoto, Tadashi; Koya, Sakuji; Kimura, Ikuko; Sasaoka, Toshiyasu

    2013-02-15

    Angiotensin II is the major effector in the renin-angiotensin system, and angiotensin II-induced oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction are profoundly implicated in the pathogenesis of hypertension and cardiovascular disease. In the present study, we investigated the effect of an antioxidant reagent, coenzyme Q10, on angiotensin II-induced oxidative stress in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) to assess its potential usefulness for antioxidant therapy. Treatment of HUVEC with coenzyme Q10 (1-10μM) increased its intracellular levels in a concentration-dependent manner. Coenzyme Q10 (10μM) prevented the actions of angiotensin II (100nM): overproduction of reactive oxygen species, increases in expression of p22(phox) and Nox2 subunits of NADPH oxidase, and inhibition of insulin-induced nitric oxide production. In addition, coenzyme Q10 prevented angiotensin II-induced upregulation of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) in HUVEC, and inhibited their adhesion to U937 monocytic cells. Moreover, treatment of HUVEC with coenzyme Q10 effectively ameliorated angiotensin II-induced increases in expression of Nox2 subunit of NADPH oxidase, ICAM-1, and VCAM-1. These results provide the first in vitro evidence that coenzyme Q10 is an efficient antioxidant reagent to improve angiotensin II-induced oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction, possibly relevant to the causes of cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Exogenous coenzyme Q10 modulates MMP-2 activity in MCF-7 cell line as a breast cancer cellular model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirmiranpour Hossein

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background/Aims Matrix Metalloproteinases 2 is a key molecule in cellular invasion and metastasis. Mitochondrial ROS has been established as a mediator of MMP activity. Coenzyme Q10 contributes to intracellular ROS regulation. Coenzyme Q10 beneficial effects on cancer are still in controversy but there are indications of Coenzyme Q10 complementing effect on tamoxifen receiving breast cancer patients. Methods In this study we aimed to investigate the correlation of the effects of co-incubation of coenzyme Q10 and N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC on intracellular H2O2 content and Matrix Metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2 activity in MCF-7 cell line. Results and Discussion Our experiment was designed to assess the effect in a time and dose related manner. Gelatin zymography and Flowcytometric measurement of H2O2 by 2'7',-dichlorofluorescin-diacetate probe were employed. The results showed that both coenzyme Q10 and N-acetyl-L-cysteine reduce MMP-2 activity along with the pro-oxidant capacity of the MCF-7 cell in a dose proportionate manner. Conclusions Collectively, the present study highlights the significance of Coenzyme Q10 effect on the cell invasion/metastasis effecter molecules.

  8. Coenzyme Q10 Supplementation in Orthostatic Hypotension and Multiple-System Atrophy: A Report on 7 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rembold, Christopher M

    2017-12-11

    Multiple-system atrophy is a neurologic disorder characterized by orthostatic hypotension, Parkinsonian signs, and cerebellar signs. Mutations in COQ2, an enzyme involved in coenzyme Q10 synthesis, were recently associated with familial and sporadic cases of multiple-system atrophy. I hypothesized that people with orthostatic hypotension with or without other symptoms of multiple-system atrophy might benefit from oral coenzyme Q10 administration. Seven patients with symptomatic orthostatic hypotension were treated in an unrandomized manner with 257 ± 37 mg coenzyme Q10 daily for 10 ± 3 months. Before starting coenzyme Q10, patients' systolic blood pressure fell 30 ± 4 mm Hg upon standing from a sitting position. After treatment with coenzyme Q10, their systolic blood pressure decreased 7 ± 5 mm Hg upon standing from a sitting position (P = .007 for change in systolic blood pressure decrease by paired t test). These data suggest that orthostatic hypotension could improve with coenzyme Q10 administration and that a randomized clinical trial to test this hypothesis should be begun. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Improved photostability and cytotoxic effect of coenzyme Q10 by its association with vitamin E acetate in polymeric nanocapsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegoraro, Natháli S; Mattiazzi, Juliane; da Silveira, Elita F; Azambuja, Juliana H; Braganhol, Elizandra; Cruz, Letícia

    2017-06-07

    The present study showed the development of nanocapsules containing the association of the coenzyme Q10 and vitamin E acetate and the evaluation of their effect on in vitro cells culture of malignant glioma and melanoma. In order to investigate if nanocapsules are able to protect coenzyme Q10 from degradation under UVC radiation, a photostability study was carried out. For this, three concentrations of vitamin E acetate were evaluated (1%, 2%, or 3%). Nanocapsules presented suitable physicochemical characteristics and were able to protect coenzyme Q10 from photodegradation. In addition, this protection was influenced by higher vitamin E acetate concentrations, attributing to this oil an important role on coenzyme Q10 photostabilization. Regarding to in vitro citotoxicity assay, nanocapsules containing coenzyme Q10 and 2% vitamin E significantly reduced glioma and melanoma cell viability in 61% and 66%, respectively. In this sense, these formulations represent interesting platforms for the delivery of coenzyme Q10 and vitamin E acetate, presenting effect on the reduction of malignant cells viability.

  10. Atorvastatin reduces the myocardial content of coenzyme Q10 in isoproterenol-induced heart failure in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andalib, S; Shayanfar, A; Khorrami, A; Maleki-Dijazi, N; Garjani, A

    2014-05-01

    The present study was aimed to study the effects of different doses of atorvastatin on Co Q10 content in the myocardium tissue in rats. A subcutaneous injection of isoproterenol (5 mg/kg/day) for 10 days was used for the induction of heart failure. Rats were randomly assigned to control, treatment with atorvastatin (5, 10, 20 mg/kg/day) and treatment with atorvastatin plus coenzyme Q10 (10 mg/kg/day). Coenzyme Q10 content of myocardium was measured using HPLC method with UV detector after hemodynamic parameters measurements. The malondialdehyde (MDA) content of the myocardium was evaluated in order to determine coenzyme Q10 antioxidative effect. A high dose of atorvastatin (20 mg/kg/day) was significantly reduced the myocardium content of coenzyme Q10 as compared with isoproterenol treated group (pcoenzyme Q10 with atorvastatin was improved the level of coenzyme Q10 in the myocardium (pcoenzyme Q10 content of the myocardium and increase lipid peroxidation in myocardium which is reversed by coenzyme Q10 co-administration. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Very long chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency with adult onset

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smelt, A H; Poorthuis, B J; Onkenhout, W

    1998-01-01

    Very long chain acyl-coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) dehydrogenase (VLCAD) deficiency is a severe disorder of mitochondrial beta-oxidation in infants. We report adult onset of attacks of painful rhabdomyolysis. Gas chromatography identified strongly elevated levels of tetradecenoic acid, 14:1(n-9), tetrade...... be due to residual enzyme activity as a consequence of the two missense mutations. Treatment with L-carnitine and medium chain triglycerides in the diet did not reduce the attacks of rhabdomyolysis....

  12. Coenzyme Q10 Levels Are Decreased in the Cerebellum of Multiple-System Atrophy Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Schottlaender, Lucia V.; Conceição Bettencourt; Kiely, Aoife P; Annapurna Chalasani; Viruna Neergheen; Holton, Janice L.; Iain Hargreaves; Henry Houlden

    2016-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to evaluate whether the levels of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) in brain tissue of multiple system atrophy (MSA) patients differ from those in elderly controls and in patients with other neurodegenerative diseases. Methods Flash frozen brain tissue of a series of 20 pathologically confirmed MSA patients [9 olivopontocerebellar atrophy (OPCA) type, 6 striatonigral degeneration (SND) type, and 5 mixed type] was used for this study. Elderly controls (n = 37) as ...

  13. Effect of coenzyme Q10 on glycaemic control, oxidative stress and adiponectin in type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moazen, Mahsa; Mazloom, Zohreh; Ahmadi, Afsane; Dabbaghmanesh, Mohammad Hossein; Roosta, Sareh

    2015-04-01

    To assess the effects of Coenzyme Q10 supplementation on glycaemic control, oxidative stress and adiponectin levels in people with type 2 diabetes. The randomised, single-blind, placebo-controlled study was conducted in the city of Shiraz, Iran, in 2012 and comprised type 2 diabetes subjects recruited from various health facilities. Subjects and controls received 100mg Coenzyme Q10 or placebo twice a day for eight weeks respectively. A variety of measurements were made at baseline and at the end of the intervention. These included measuring markers of glycaemic control (fasting blood glucose and glycated haemoglobin); a marker of oxidative stress (malondialdehyde); and an anti-inflammatory marker (adiponectin). SPSS 15 was used for statistical analysis. Of the 52 patients, 28(54%) were male and 24(46%) were female, with an overall mean age of 51.73±7.34 years. There were 16(62% male and 10(39%) females in the intervention group, and 12(46%) male and 14(54%) female subjects in the control group. Among the cases, Coenzyme Q10 resulted in a significant reduction in malondialdehyde levels (p=0.04). However, the difference within the controls for this factor was not significant (p>-0.05). Moreover, fasting blood glucose, glycated haemoglobin and adiponectin levels showed no significant differences within or between the groups (p>0.05 each). Coenzyme supplementation may reduce oxidative stress in type 2 diabetics. However, it may not have any effects on glycaemic control and adiponectin levels.

  14. Border between natural product and drug: Comparison of the related benzoquinones idebenone and coenzyme Q10

    OpenAIRE

    Gueven, Nuri; Woolley, Krystel; Smith, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 is a ubiquitous component of cellular membranes and belongs to the class of benzoquinones that mainly differ with regards to the length and composition of their hydrophobic tail. The characteristic quinone group can accept electrons from various biological sources and is converted by a one electron transfer to the unstable semiquinone or by a two electron transfer to the more stable hydroquinone. This feature makes CoQ10 the bona fide cellular electron transfer molecule within th...

  15. Modeling the Reactions Catalyzed by Coenzyme B12 Dependent Enzymes: Accuracy and Cost-Quality Balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wick, Christian R; Smith, David M

    2018-02-07

    The reactions catalyzed by coenzyme B12 dependent enzymes are formally initiated by the homolytic cleavage of a carbon-cobalt bond and a subsequent or concerted H-atom-transfer reaction. A reasonable model chemistry for describing those reactions should, therefore, account for an accurate description of both reactions. The inherent limitation due to the necessary system size renders the coenzyme B12 system a suitable candidate for DFT or hybrid QM/MM methods; however, the accurate description of both homolytic Co-C cleavage and H-atom-transfer reactions within this framework is challenging and can lead to controversial results with varying accuracy. We present an assessment study of 16 common density functionals applied to prototypical model systems for both reactions. H-abstraction reactions were modeled on the basis of four reference reactions designed to resemble a broad range of coenzyme B12 reactions. The Co-C cleavage reaction is treated by an ONIOM(QM/MM) setup that is in excellent agreement with solution-phase experimental data and is as accurate as full DFT calculations on the complete model system. We find that the meta-GGAs TPSS-D3 and M06L-D3 and the meta-hybrid M06-D3 give the best overall performance with MUEs for both types of reactions below 10 kJ mol-1. Our recommended model chemistry allows for a fast and accurate description of coenzyme B12 chemistry that is readily applicable to study the reactions in an enzymatic framework.

  16. Antioxidant treatment with coenzyme Q-ter in prevention of gentamycin ototoxicity in an animal model

    OpenAIRE

    Fetoni, A. R.; Eramo, S L M; Rolesi, R; TROIANI, D.; PALUDETTI, G.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Aminoglycosides, such as gentamycin, are well known ototoxic agents. Toxicity occurs via an activation process involving the formation of an iron-gentamycin complex with free radical production. Antioxidants like Q-ter (a soluble formulation of coenzyme Q10, CoQ10), can limit or prevent cellular ototoxic damage. The present study was designed to investigate the possible protective effects of Q-ter on gentamycin ototoxicity in albino guinea pigs (250-300 g). Animals were divided into f...

  17. Alcoholic hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damgaard Sandahl, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Alcoholic hepatitis (AH) is an acute inflammatory syndrome causing significant morbidity and mortality. The prognosis is strongly dependent on disease severity, as assessed by clinical scoring systems. Reliable epidemiological data as well as knowledge of the clinical course of AH are essential for planning and resource allocation within the health care system. Likewise, individual evaluation of risk is desirable in the clinical handling of patients with AH as it can guide treatment, improve patient information, and serve as strata in clinical trials. The present PhD thesis is based on three studies using a cohort of nearly 2000 patients diagnosed with AH in Denmark from 1999 to 2008 as a cohort, in a population-based study design. The aims of this thesis were as follows. (1) To describe the incidence and short- and long-term mortality, of AH in Denmark (Study I). (2) To validate and compare the ability of the currently available prognostic scores to predict mortality in AH (Study II). (3) To investigate the short- and long-term causes of death of patients with AH (Study III). During the study decade, the annual incidence rate in the Danish population rose from 37 to 46 per 106 for men and from 24 to 34 per 106 for women. Both short- and long-term mortality rose for men and women, and the increase in short-term mortality was attributable to increasing patient age and prevalence of cirrhosis. Our evaluation of the most commonly used prognostic scores for predicting the mortality of patients with AH showed that all scores performed similarly, with Area under the Receiver Operator Characteristics curves giving values between 0.74 and 0.78 for 28-day mortality assessed on admission. Our study on causes of death showed that in the short-term (information about AH that shows increasing incidence and mortality rates. Consequently, it reiterates the fact that AH is a life-threatening disease and suggests that AH is an increasing public health concern. The most widely used

  18. Pathogenesis of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Ciećko-Michalska

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic encephalopathy can be a serious complication of acute liver failure and chronic liver diseases, predominantly liver cirrhosis. Hyperammonemia plays the most important role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. The brain-blood barrier disturbances, changes in neurotransmission, neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, GABA-ergic or benzodiazepine pathway abnormalities, manganese neurotoxicity, brain energetic disturbances, and brain blood flow abnormalities are considered to be involved in the development of hepatic encephalopathy. The influence of small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO on the induction of minimal hepatic encephalopathy is recently emphasized. The aim of this paper is to present the current views on the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy.

  19. Pathogenesis of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciećko-Michalska, Irena; Szczepanek, Małgorzata; Słowik, Agnieszka; Mach, Tomasz

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy can be a serious complication of acute liver failure and chronic liver diseases, predominantly liver cirrhosis. Hyperammonemia plays the most important role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. The brain-blood barrier disturbances, changes in neurotransmission, neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, GABA-ergic or benzodiazepine pathway abnormalities, manganese neurotoxicity, brain energetic disturbances, and brain blood flow abnormalities are considered to be involved in the development of hepatic encephalopathy. The influence of small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) on the induction of minimal hepatic encephalopathy is recently emphasized. The aim of this paper is to present the current views on the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:23316223

  20. Reversal of statin-induced memory dysfunction by co-enzyme Q10: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okeahialam BN

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Basil N Okeahialam Cardiology Sub-Unit 1, Department of Medicine, Jos University Teaching Hospital, Jos, Nigeria Abstract: Statins are useful in the armamentarium of the clinician dealing with dyslipidemia, which increases cardiovascular morbi-mortality in hypertensive and diabetic patients among others. Dyslipidemia commonly exists as a comorbidity factor in the development of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Use of statins is however associated with side effects which at times are so disabling as to interfere with activities of daily living. There are various ways of dealing with this, including use of more water-soluble varieties, intermittent dosing, or use of statin alternatives. Of late, use of co-enzyme Q10 has become acceptable for the muscle side effects. Only one report of any benefit on the rarely reported memory side effect was encountered by the author in the search of English medical literature. This is a report of a documented case of a Nigerian woman with history of statin intolerance in this case, memory dysfunction despite persisting dyslipidemia comorbidity. Her memory dysfunction side effect which interfered with activities of daily living and background muscle pain cleared when coenzyme Q10 was administered alongside low dose statin. Her lipid profile normalized and has remained normal. It is being recommended for use when statin side effects (muscle- and memory-related impair quality of life and leave patient at dyslipidemia-induced cardiovascular morbi-mortality. Keywords: statin, memory dysfunction, co-enzyme Q10, improvement

  1. Cessation of daily exercise dramatically alters precursors of hepatic steatosis in Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rector, R Scott; Thyfault, John P; Laye, Matthew J; Morris, R Tyler; Borengasser, Sarah J; Uptergrove, Grace M; Chakravarthy, Manu V; Booth, Frank W; Ibdah, Jamal A

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to delineate potential mechanisms initiating the onset of hepatic steatosis following the cessation of daily physical activity. Four-week-old, hyperphagic/obese Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats were given access to voluntary running wheels for 16 weeks to prevent the development of hepatic steatosis. The animals were then suddenly transitioned to a sedentary condition as wheels were locked (wheel lock; WL) for 5 h (WL5), 53 h (WL53) or 173 h (WL173). Importantly after the cessation of daily exercise (5-173 h), no changes occurred in body weight, fat pad mass (omental and retroperitoneal), food intake, serum insulin, hepatic triglycerides or in the exercise-suppressed hepatic stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma protein content. However, complete hepatic fatty acid oxidation and mitochondrial enzyme activities were highest at WL5 and WL53 and dropped significantly to SED levels by WL173. In addition, cessation of daily exercise quickly increased the hepatic protein contents of fatty acid synthase and acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACC), reduced ACC phosphorylation status, and dramatically increased hepatic malonyl-CoA concentration. This study is the first to show that the sudden cessation of daily exercise in a hyperphagic/obese model activates a subgroup of precursors and processes known to initiate hepatic steatosis, including decreased hepatic mitochondrial oxidative capacity, increased hepatic expression of de novo lipogenesis proteins, and increased hepatic malonyl CoA levels; each probably increasing the susceptibility to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

  2. [Regulation of the expression of coenzyme Q-synthesis complex during ageing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Silva, Carmen; Reyes-Torres, Iván; Rivera, Maximiliano; Meza-Torres, Catherine; Hernández-Camacho, Juan Diego; Rodríguez-Bies, Elisabet; Navas, Plácido; López-Lluch, Guillermo

    Coenzyme Q is an essential component in the activity of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Its synthesis involves, at least, a complex of ten different proteins. In this study, an attempt is made to determine the evolution of the expression of the genes involved in coenzyme Q synthesis during mouse ageing. The messenger RNA (mRNA) of different organs, such as brain, liver, kidney and skeletal muscle from young (8 months), mature (18 months), and old (24 months) mice was extracted by using Trizol and was then analysed by real time PCR (qPCR) using specific primers for all the known components of the coenzyme Q-synthesis complex (COQ genes). Liver showed the highest age-dependent changes in mRNA levels of the different components of Q-synthesis complex, affecting the extent of the variation as well as the significance of the change. In most of the cases, mRNA levels of the different components were higher in mature animals compared to young and old animals. When mRNAs of young and old animals were compared, only minor reductions of mRNA levels were found. Kidney showed a pattern similar to that found in liver as regards the changes in expression, although with lower increases in mature animals than those observed in the liver. Brain and skeletal muscle showed low variations, with muscle being the tissue with less changes, although a pattern similar to that found in liver and kidney was found, with slight increases in mature animals. The results of this study indicate that ageing is an important factor affecting COQ gene expression, but its effect depends on the organ, and that mature animals show higher levels of mRNA than young and old animals. Taken into consideration the importance of coenzyme Q in cell metabolism and ageing, a more detailed study is needed to understand the gene regulation of the coenzyme Q-synthesis mechanisms during ageing. Copyright © 2017 SEGG. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Coenzyme Q10 Supplementation Modulates NFκB and Nrf2 Pathways in Exercise Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pala, Ragip; Orhan, Cemal; Tuzcu, Mehmet; Sahin, Nurhan; Ali, Shakir; Cinar, Vedat; Atalay, Mustafa; Sahin, Kazim

    2016-03-01

    This study reports the effects of Q10, coenzyme Q10 or ubiquinone, a component of the electron transport chain in mitochondria, on nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB), inhibitors of kappa B (IκB), nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) and hemeoxygenase 1 (HO-1) in rats after chronic exercise training for 6 weeks. 8-week old male Wistar rats were assigned randomly to one of four treatments planned in a 2 x 2 factorial arrangement of two condition (sedentary vs. exercise training), and two coenzyme Q10 levels (0 and 300 mg/kg per day for 6 weeks). The expression levels of the target proteins were determined in the heart, liver and muscle, and biochemical parameters including creatinine, urea, glucose and lipid profile were investigated in plasma. When compared with sedentary group, significant decreases in heart, liver and muscle NFκB levels by 45%, 26% and 44% were observed in Q10 supplemented rats after exercise training, respectively, while the inhibitory protein IκB increased by 179%, 111% and 127% in heart, liver and muscle tissues. Q10 supplementation caused an increase in Nrf2 (167%, 165% and 90%) and HO-1 (107%, 156% and 114%) after exercise training in heart, liver and muscle tissues (p Q10. In conclusion, these results suggest that Q10 modulates the expression of NFκB, IκB, Nrf2 and HO-1 in exercise training, indicating an anti-inflammatory effect of Q10 and emphasizes its role in antioxidant defense. Key pointsCoenzyme Q10 is a component of the electron transport chain in mitochondria which is linked to the generation of energy in the cell.Coenzyme Q10 may inhibit the peroxidation of lipids, thus acting as an antioxidant and protects tissue against oxidative injury.Using of coenzyme Q10 can significantly elevate IκB, Nrf2 and HO-1 and reduce NFκB during exercise training.

  4. Coenzyme Q10 Supplementation Modulates NFκB and Nrf2 Pathways in Exercise Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pala, Ragip; Orhan, Cemal; Tuzcu, Mehmet; Sahin, Nurhan; Ali, Shakir; Cinar, Vedat; Atalay, Mustafa; Sahin, Kazim

    2016-01-01

    This study reports the effects of Q10, coenzyme Q10 or ubiquinone, a component of the electron transport chain in mitochondria, on nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB), inhibitors of kappa B (IκB), nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) and hemeoxygenase 1 (HO-1) in rats after chronic exercise training for 6 weeks. 8-week old male Wistar rats were assigned randomly to one of four treatments planned in a 2 x 2 factorial arrangement of two condition (sedentary vs. exercise training), and two coenzyme Q10 levels (0 and 300 mg/kg per day for 6 weeks). The expression levels of the target proteins were determined in the heart, liver and muscle, and biochemical parameters including creatinine, urea, glucose and lipid profile were investigated in plasma. When compared with sedentary group, significant decreases in heart, liver and muscle NFκB levels by 45%, 26% and 44% were observed in Q10 supplemented rats after exercise training, respectively, while the inhibitory protein IκB increased by 179%, 111% and 127% in heart, liver and muscle tissues. Q10 supplementation caused an increase in Nrf2 (167%, 165% and 90%) and HO-1 (107%, 156% and 114%) after exercise training in heart, liver and muscle tissues (p < 0.05). No significant change was observed in any of the parameters associated with protein, carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, except that exercise caused a decrease in plasma triglyceride, which was further decreased by Q10. In conclusion, these results suggest that Q10 modulates the expression of NFκB, IκB, Nrf2 and HO-1 in exercise training, indicating an anti-inflammatory effect of Q10 and emphasizes its role in antioxidant defense. Key points Coenzyme Q10 is a component of the electron transport chain in mitochondria which is linked to the generation of energy in the cell. Coenzyme Q10 may inhibit the peroxidation of lipids, thus acting as an antioxidant and protects tissue against oxidative injury. Using of coenzyme

  5. Thermodynamics of various F420 coenzyme models as sources of electrons, hydride ions, hydrogen atoms and protons in acetonitrile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Ke; Shen, Guang-Bin; Zhu, Xiao-Qing

    2015-06-14

    32 F420 coenzyme models with alkylation of the three different N atoms (N1, N3 and N10) in the core structure (XFH(-)) were designed and synthesized and the thermodynamic driving forces (defined in terms of the molar enthalpy changes or the standard redox potentials in this work) of the 32 XFH(-) releasing hydride ions, hydrogen atoms and electrons, the thermodynamic driving forces of the 32 XFH˙ releasing protons and hydrogen atoms and the thermodynamic driving forces of XF(-)˙ releasing electrons in acetonitrile were determined using titration calorimetry and electrochemical methods. The effects of the methyl group at N1, N3 and N10 and a negative charge on N1 and N10 atoms on the six thermodynamic driving forces of the F420 coenzyme models and their related reaction intermediates were examined; the results show that seating arrangements of the methyl group and the negative charge have remarkably different effects on the thermodynamic properties of the F420 coenzyme models and their related reaction intermediates. The effects of the substituents at C7 and C8 on the six thermodynamic driving forces of the F420 coenzyme models and their related reaction intermediates were also examined; the results show that the substituents at C7 and C8 have good Hammett linear free energy relationships with the six thermodynamic parameters. Meanwhile, a reasonable determination of possible reactions between members of the F420 family and NADH family in vivo was given according to a thermodynamic analysis platform constructed using the elementary step thermodynamic parameter of F420 coenzyme model 2FH(-) and NADH model MNAH releasing hydride ions in acetonitrile. The information disclosed in this work can not only fill a gap in the chemical thermodynamics of F420 coenzyme models as a class of very important organic sources of electrons, hydride ions, hydrogen atoms and protons, but also strongly promote the fast development of the chemistry and applications of F420 coenzyme.

  6. Effects of coenzyme Q10 on bladder dysfunction induced by chronic bladder ischemia in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Wook; Jang, Hoon Ah; Bae, Jae Hyun; Lee, Jeong Gu

    2013-06-01

    We investigated the protective effects of coenzyme Q10 on bladder dysfunction in a rat model of atherosclerosis induced chronic bladder ischemia. A total of 24 male Sprague-Dawley® rats at age 16 weeks were divided into 4 groups of 6 each, including group 1--untreated, sham operated rats, group 2--coenzyme Q10 treated, sham operated rats, group 3--untreated rats with chronic bladder ischemia and group 4--coenzyme Q10 treated rats with chronic bladder ischemia. Groups 3 and 4 received an endothelial injury to the iliac arteries and were fed a 2% cholesterol diet for 8 weeks. Groups 2 and 4 were treated with coenzyme Q10 and the others were treated with vehicle for 4 weeks. Eight weeks postoperatively we performed continuous in vivo cystometry, an in vitro detrusor muscle strip study and a malondialdehyde assay. Histological examination of the bladder walls and iliac arteries was also done. In vivo cystometry revealed that coenzyme Q10 administration after the induction of chronic bladder ischemia prolonged micturition frequency and the intercontraction interval, and increased bladder capacity compared to those in untreated rats with chronic bladder ischemia. In the detrusor muscle strip study coenzyme Q10 administration after the induction of chronic bladder ischemia increased contractile responses compared to those in untreated rats with chronic bladder ischemia. Rats with chronic bladder ischemia also showed higher malondialdehyde in bladder tissue and serum than the other groups. Chronic bladder ischemia induced submucosal fibrosis of the bladder walls and a degenerative change in the blood vessel tunical media, as shown on histological examination. Our study suggests that coenzyme Q10 acts as an antioxidant to protect bladder function in this chronic bladder ischemia model. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Whole Blood Metabolomics by (1)H NMR Spectroscopy Provides a New Opportunity To Evaluate Coenzymes and Antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagana Gowda, G A; Raftery, Daniel

    2017-04-18

    Conventional human blood metabolomics employs serum or plasma and provides a wealth of metabolic information therein. However, this approach lacks the ability to measure and evaluate important metabolites such as coenzymes and antioxidants that are present at high concentrations in red blood cells. As an important alternative to serum/plasma metabolomics, we show here that a simple (1)H NMR experiment can simultaneously measure coenzymes and antioxidants in extracts of whole human blood, in addition to the nearly 70 metabolites that were shown to be quantitated in serum/plasma recently [ Anal. Chem. 2015 , 87 , 706 - 715 ]. Coenzymes of redox reactions: oxidized/reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+) and NADH) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP(+) and NADPH); coenzymes of energy including adenosine triphosphate (ATP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP), and adenosine monophosphate (AMP); and antioxidants, the sum of oxidized and reduced glutathione (GSSG and GSH) can be measured with essentially no additional effort. A new method was developed for detecting many of these unstable species without affecting other blood/blood plasma metabolites. The identities of coenzymes and antioxidants in blood NMR spectra were established combining 1D/2D NMR techniques, chemical shift databases, pH measurements and, finally, spiking with authentic compounds. This is the first study to report identification of major coenzymes and antioxidants and quantify them, simultaneously, with the large pool of other metabolites in human blood using NMR spectroscopy. Considering that the levels of coenzymes and antioxidants represent a sensitive measure of cellular functions in health and numerous diseases, the NMR method presented here potentially opens a new chapter in the metabolomics of blood.

  8. Jiao Tai Wan Attenuates Hepatic Lipid Accumulation in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

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    Zhaoyi Huang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Jiao Tai Wan (JTW, a Chinese herbal formula containing Rhizoma Coptidis and Cortex Cinnamomi, has been used for diabetic treatment for many years. The aim of this study was to determine the main components in JTW and to investigate the effects of JTW on hepatic lipid accumulation in diabetic rats and humans. JTW extract was prepared and the main components were assayed by HPLC. An animal model of diabetes mellitus was established and JTW was administered intragastrically. In the clinical study, diabetic patients with poor glycemic control were treated with JTW. Blood glucose and lipid parameters, liver histology, hepatic triglyceride content and lipogenic gene expression were examined. Our data demonstrated that JTW significantly improved hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia and hepatic lipid accumulation in diabetic rats. This was accompanied by the down-regulation of acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase (ACC and fatty acid synthase (FAS protein expressions, and the up-regulation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK and phosphorylated-ACC (pACC protein expressions in the liver tissues. Diabetic patients also exhibited decreases in their hepatic triglyceride content. The results suggest that JTW attenuates hepatic lipid accumulation in diabetic rats and humans. These beneficial effects are possibly associated with the inhibition of lipogenic gene expression in the liver.

  9. Thyroxine mimetics

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    Randa F Salam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid hormones influence heart rate, serum lipids, metabolic rate, body weight, and multiple aspects of lipid, carbohydrate, protein, and mineral metabolism. Although increased thyroid hormone levels can improve serum lipid profiles and reduce fat, these positive effects are counterbalanced by the harmful effects on the heart, muscle, and bone. Thus, attempts to use thyroid hormones for cholesterol-lowering and weight loss purposes have so far been limited. However, over the past decade, thyroid hormone analogs that are capable of uncoupling the beneficial effects from the deleterious effects have been developed. Such drugs could serve as powerful new tools to address two of the largest medical problems, namely atherosclerosis and obesity. Aggressive reduction in LDL-cholesterol by the use of statins is a cornerstone of preventive cardiovascular risk, but additional therapies to prevent atherosclerosis and its clinical sequelae are still needed. Thyromimetics selective for the liver or the thyroid hormone receptor isoform β1 constitute a novel approach to treat dyslipidemia. In preclinical studies, selective thyromimetics were clearly shown to reduce plasma cholesterol and protect from atherosclerosis through the upregulation of hepatic LDL receptor and promotion of the so-called reverse cholesterol transport. Notably, there is the first evidence from on-going clinical trials that selective thyromimetics may reduce plasma cholesterol in humans also. Most importantly, thyromimetics has a synergistic action when used in combination with 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase inhibitors. Animal data have further suggested that thyromimetics might be useful in the treatment of obesity, hepatic steatosis, and atherosclerosis.

  10. Hepatic sarcoidosis complicating treatment-naive viral hepatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Aravinthan, Aloysious; Gelson, William; Limbu, Anita; Brais, Rebecca; Richardson, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic sarcoidosis is usually asymptomatic but rarely leads to adverse liver-related outcome. Co-existence of viral hepatitis and hepatic sarcoidosis is a rare, but recognised phenomenon. Obtaining a balance between immune suppression and anti-viral therapy may be problematic. Immunosuppression in the presence of viral hepatitis can lead to rapid deterioration of liver disease. Similarly, anti-viral therapy may exacerbate granulomatous hepatitis. Here we present two cases of viral hepatitis ...

  11. Autophagy in Hepatic Fibrosis

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    Yang Song

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic fibrosis is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Hepatic fibrosis is usually associated with chronic liver diseases caused by infection, drugs, metabolic disorders, or autoimmune imbalances. Effective clinical therapies are still lacking. Autophagy is a cellular process that degrades damaged organelles or protein aggregation, which participates in many pathological processes including liver diseases. Autophagy participates in hepatic fibrosis by activating hepatic stellate cells and may participate as well through influencing other fibrogenic cells. Besides that, autophagy can induce some liver diseases to develop while it may play a protective role in hepatocellular abnormal aggregates related liver diseases and reduces fibrosis. With a better understanding of the potential effects of autophagy on hepatic fibrosis, targeting autophagy might be a novel therapeutic strategy for hepatic fibrosis in the near future.

  12. Hepatitis isquémica Ischemic hepatitis

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    Marcos Amuchástegui (h

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available La hepatitis isquémica es una complicación sumamente infrecuente de cirugía cardiovascular. Las biopsias muestran necrosis centrolobulillar. El término de "hepatitis" fue propuesto debido al aumento de transaminasas similar a aquellas de origen infeccioso, e "isquémica" por falla en la perfusión hepática. Posteriormente se definió el término de hepatitis isquémica como cuadro de elevación aguda y reversible (dentro de las 72 horas de transaminasas de hasta 20 veces el valor normal, asociado a trastornos en la perfusión hepática, luego de haber excluido otras causas de hepatitis aguda o daño hepatocelular. Se describe el caso de un paciente de 53 años que consulta por dolor epigástrico de 12 h de evolución sin fiebre, náuseas ni vómitos, resistente a la medicación. Tenía antecedentes inmediatos de reemplazo de válvula aórtica, y estaba anticoagulado. Evolucionó con shock y fallo multiorgánico. El examen evidenció marcada ictericia y signos de taponamiento pericárdico, asociado a un aumento considerable de enzimas hepáticas. Un ecocardiograma informó signos de taponamiento cardíaco y ausencia de disección aórtica. Se decidió pericardiocentesis, extrayéndose 970 cc. de líquido sanguinolento, y hemodiálisis, con notable mejoría de su estado hemodinámico. Los valores enzimáticos disminuyeron. Los marcadores virales fueron negativos.Ischemic hepatitis is an uncommon cardiovascular surgery complication. Hepatic biopsies show centrolobulillar necrosis. The term "hepatitis" was proposed because of a raise in hepatic enzymes similar with infectious disease, and "ischemic" because of failure in hepatic perfusion. Ischemic hepatitis was then defined as an acute and reversible elevation of hepatic enzymes (within 72 h, associated with disturbance in hepatic perfusion after excluding other causes of acute hepatitis. A 53 year-old male presented complaining of a 12 h epigastric pain, without nausea or vomiting, resistant

  13. Hepatitis E Virus

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    Christina Levick

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis E virus (HEV is the most common cause of acute viral hepatitis in the developing world. It is a waterborne virus that can cause epidemics in the face of overcrowding and poor sanitation. Although the hepatitis illness is usually self-limiting, it has a high mortality in pregnant women and can become a chronic infection in the immunosuppressed. Treatment is mostly supportive and prevention is by good water hygiene.

  14. Effects of L-carnitine and coenzyme q10 on impaired spermatogenesis caused by isoproterenol in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbarzadeh, S; Garjani, A; Ziaee, M; Khorrami, A

    2014-09-01

    Nowadays, cardiovascular diseases and male infertility are two big health problems in industrial countries.The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective role of coenzyme Q10 and L-Carnitine pretreatment in the impaired spermatogenesis caused by isoproterenol (ISO) in male rats.Thirty-two male Wistar rats were allocated in 4 groups. ISO was injected for 2 consecutive days (100 mg/kg) in ISO treated groups. Before ISO administration, pretreatment with Coenzyme Q10 (10 mg/kg/day) and L-Carnitine (350 mg/kg/day) were conducted for 20 consecutive days. Sex hormones level, malondialdehyde (MDA) and total antioxidant concentration as well as testis, epididymis and seminal vesicle weight were investigated.Increase in the concentration of MDA and decrease in total antioxidant level was observed following ISO administration. Accordingly, the sperm viability as well as testis, epididymis and seminal vesicle weights were decreased. In the case of sex hormones, the testosterone and LH levels were decreased and the concentration of FSH was increased. Pretreatment with L-carnitine and Coenzyme Q10 significantly decreased the MDA level and increased total antioxidant, LH and testosterone levels. Pretreatment with L-carnitine and Coenzyme Q10 also improved semen parameters and organs weight which were impaired by ISO administration.L-carnitine and Coenzyme Q10 pretreatment could protect spermatogenesis in male rats with ISO administration. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Effect of concomitant administration of coenzyme Q10 with sitagliptin on experimentally induced diabetic nephropathy in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheshwari, Rajesh; Balaraman, Ramachandran; Sen, Ashim Kumar; Shukla, Disha; Seth, Avinash

    2017-11-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the therapeutic potential of coenzyme Q10 and its combination with sitagliptin in experimentally induced diabetic nephropathy. The diabetic rats were treated with coenzyme Q10 or sitagliptin and their concomitant administration. Various parameters of renal function like serum creatinine, urea, uric acid and markers of oxidative stress such as renal malondialdehyde content (MDA), glutathione (GSH) level and superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase activities were measured. TNF-α, TGF-β, MPO activity and nitrite content were estimated in renal tissue with histopathological observation. Diabetic rats showed a significant reduction in renal function, which was reflected with an increase in serum creatinine, urea and uric acid levels. Streptozotocin-nicotinamide caused renal tubular damage with a higher MDA level, depletion of SOD and CAT activity and GSH level. In addition, TNF-α, TGF- β, MPO activity and nitrite content were significantly increased in diabetic rats. Treatment with coenzyme Q10 or sitagliptin and their co-administration ameliorated STZ-nicotinamide-induced renal damage which was reflected by decreased oxidative stress, TNF-α, TGF-β, MPO activity, nitrite content along with histopathological changes. To conclude, concomitant administration of coenzyme Q10 and sitagliptin showed a better renoprotective effect than coenzyme Q10 or sitagliptin when given alone.

  16. Preventing hepatitis B or C

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000401.htm Preventing hepatitis B or C To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hepatitis B and hepatitis C infections cause irritation and ...

  17. The use of coenzyme Q0 as a template in the development of a molecularly imprinted polymer for the selective recognition of coenzyme Q10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contin, Mario; Flor, Sabrina; Martinefski, Manuela; Lucangioli, Silvia; Tripodi, Valeria

    2014-01-07

    In this work, a novel molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) for use as a solid phase extraction sorbent was developed for the determination of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) in liver extract. CoQ10 is an essential cofactor in mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and a powerful antioxidant agent found in low concentrations in biological samples. This fact and its high hydrophobicity make the analysis of CoQ10 technically challenging. Accordingly, a MIP was synthesised using coenzyme Q0 as the template, methacrylic acid as the functional monomer, acetonitrile as the porogen, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as the crosslinker and benzoyl peroxide as the initiator. Various parameters affecting the polymer preparation and extraction efficiency were evaluated. Morphological characterisation of the MIP and its proper comparison with C18 as a sorbent in solid phase extraction were performed. The optimal conditions for the molecularly imprinted solid phase extraction (MISPE) consisted of 400 μL of sample mixed with 30 mg of MIP and 600 μL of water to reach the optimum solution loading. The loading was followed by a washing step consisting of 1 mL of a 1-propanol solution (1-propanol:water, 30:70,v/v) and elution with 1 mL of 1-propanol. After clean-up, the CoQ10 in the samples was analysed by high performance liquid chromatography. The extraction recoveries were higher than 73.7% with good precision (3.6-8.3%). The limits of detection and quantification were 2.4 and 7.5 μg g(-1), respectively, and a linear range between 7.5 and 150 μg g(-1) of tissue was achieved. The new MISPE procedure provided a successful clean-up for the determination of CoQ10 in a complex matrix. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Properties of succinyl-coenzyme A:L-malate coenzyme A transferase and its role in the autotrophic 3-hydroxypropionate cycle of Chloroflexus aurantiacus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedmann, Silke; Steindorf, Astrid; Alber, Birgit E; Fuchs, Georg

    2006-04-01

    The 3-hydroxypropionate cycle has been proposed to operate as the autotrophic CO2 fixation pathway in the phototrophic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus. In this pathway, acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) and two bicarbonate molecules are converted to malate. Acetyl-CoA is regenerated from malyl-CoA by L-malyl-CoA lyase. The enzyme forming malyl-CoA, succinyl-CoA:L-malate coenzyme A transferase, was purified. Based on the N-terminal amino acid sequence of its two subunits, the corresponding genes were identified on a gene cluster which also contains the gene for L-malyl-CoA lyase, the subsequent enzyme in the pathway. Both enzymes were severalfold up-regulated under autotrophic conditions, which is in line with their proposed function in CO2 fixation. The two CoA transferase genes were cloned and heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, and the recombinant enzyme was purified and studied. Succinyl-CoA:L-malate CoA transferase forms a large (alphabeta)n complex consisting of 46- and 44-kDa subunits and catalyzes the reversible reaction succinyl-CoA + L-malate --> succinate + L-malyl-CoA. It is specific for succinyl-CoA as the CoA donor but accepts L-citramalate instead of L-malate as the CoA acceptor; the corresponding d-stereoisomers are not accepted. The enzyme is a member of the class III of the CoA transferase family. The demonstration of the missing CoA transferase closes the last gap in the proposed 3-hydroxypropionate cycle.

  19. Hepatitis C: Information on Testing and Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    HEPATITIS C Information on Testing & Diagnosis What is Hepatitis C? Hepatitis C is a serious liver disease that results from infection with the Hepatitis C virus. Hepatitis C has been called a silent ...

  20. Genetic Susceptibility to Chronic Hepatitis Is Inherited Codominantly in Helicobacter hepaticus-Infected AB6F1 and B6AF1 Hybrid Male Mice, and Progression to Hepatocellular Carcinoma Is Linked to Hepatic Expression of Lipogenic Genes and Immune Function-Associated Networks▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Alexis; Ihrig, Melanie M.; Fry, Rebecca C.; Feng, Yan; Xu, Sandy; Boutin, Samuel R.; Rogers, Arlin B.; Muthupalani, Suresh; Samson, Leona D.; Fox, James G.

    2008-01-01

    Helicobacter hepaticus causes hepatitis in susceptible strains of mice. Previous studies indicated that A/JCr mice are susceptible and C57BL/6NCr mice are resistant to H. hepaticus-induced hepatitis. We used F1 hybrid mice derived from A/J and C57BL/6 matings to investigate their phenotype and determine their hepatic gene expression profile in response to H. hepaticus infection. F1 hybrid mice, as well as parental A/J and C57BL/6 mice, were divided equally into control and H. hepaticus-infected groups and euthanized at 18 months postinoculation. Hepatic lesions were evaluated histologically and the differential hepatic gene expression in F1 mice was determined by microarray-based global gene expression profiling analysis. H. hepaticus-infected parental strains including A/J and C57BL/6 mice, as well as F1 mice, developed significant hepatitis. Overall, hepatocellular carcinomas or dysplastic liver lesions were observed in 69% of H. hepaticus-infected F1 male mice and H. hepaticus was isolated from hepatic tissues of all F1 mice with liver tumors. Liver tumors, characterized by hepatic steatosis, developed in livers with high hepatitis scores. To identify gene expression specific to H. hepaticus-induced hepatitis and progression to hepatocellular carcinoma in F1 mice, a method using comparative group transcriptome analysis was utilized. The canonical pathway most significantly enriched was immunological disease. Fatty acid synthase and steaoryl-coenzyme A desaturase, the two rate-limiting enzymes in lipogenesis, were upregulated in neoplastic relative to dysplastic livers. This study suggests a synergistic interaction between hepatic steatosis and infectious hepatitis leading to hepatocellular carcinoma. The use of AB6F1 and B6AF1 mice, as well as genetically engineered mice, on a C57BL/6 background will allow studies investigating the role of chronic microbial hepatitis and steatohepatitis in the pathogenesis of liver cancer. PMID:18285497

  1. The effects of CoenzymeQ10 on gentamicin induced nephrotoxicity

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    Zeinab Hameidi Zad

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Gentamicin (GM is one the aminoglycoside antibiotics which isroutinelyused to treatinfections gram-negative, either alone or insynergistic withbeta-lactamantibioticsused. However, frequent useleads toserious side effectssuch asrenal toxicity, ototoxicity. Coenzyme Q10 has antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and vasodilatory properties. According to these properties of Coenzyme Q10 and tissue damage mechanism in GM induced-nephrotoxicity, in this study, the effects of these two substances for the co-treatment and post -treatment on renal injury induced by gentamicin were investigated. Materials and Methods: Experiments has been done on 77 male Wistar rats in weight range of 200 to 250 g. Animals were divided randomly into 5 groups of 7 numbers. Renal nephrotoxicity induced by i.p injection of gentamicin (100mg/kg Therapeutic effect of coenzyme Q10 (10mg/kgin the two protocols co-treatment and post-treatmentwas investigated.The animals after the last injectionon the ninth day of co-treatment andthe seventeenth day of post-treatmentwere placed into individual metabolic cages so as to collection urine and urine volume was measured gravimetrically. Afteranesthesia, systolic blood pressure and renal blood flow was measured. Then blood sampling was done. Amount of urea, creatinin, sodium, potassium and osmolarity was measured in plasma and urine samples. Left kidney, for doing histological experiments in 10% buffered formaldehyde and right kidney for biochemical experiments in fluid nitrogen was preserved. Results: Co-treatment with Coenzyme Q10 significantly decreased fractional excretion of sodium (6.37±1.33 %; p<0.001 and decreased fractional excretion of potassium(219.14±83.8 %; p<0.001 MDA levels (2.13 ±0.24µmol/gkw; p<0.001, and significantly increased renal blood flow (6.38 ±0.1ml/min: p<0.01 and FRAP levels (24.44±0.42mmol/gkw; p<0.001. Post-treatment with coenzyme Q10 significantly decreased fractional excretion of sodium

  2. Ubisol-Aqua: coenzyme Q10 prevents antiretroviral toxic neuropathy in an in vitro model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Catherine L; Mobarok, Masqura; Wesselingh, Steven L; Fain, Randi; Weinstock, Shelley; Tachedjian, Gilda; Srivastava, Seema; Tyssen, David P; Glass, Jonathan D; Hooker, David J

    2010-04-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is the dose-limiting toxicity of stavudine and didanosine (nucleoside analogs used in HIV treatment) and is attributed to mitochondrial toxicity from these drugs. Acetyl L-carnitine (ALC) and co-enzyme Q(10) are proposed as neuropathy treatments, but evidence to support these is limited. We examined ALC and a water-soluble formulation of co-enzyme Q(10) (H(Q)O) for the prevention of d4T and ddI neurotoxicity using cultured fetal rat DRG as an in vitro model. DdI (33microM) and d4T (50microM) caused clear toxicity (impaired neurite growth) by day 8 of DRG culture. H(Q)O at concentrations 1-100microM completely prevented the toxicity of 33microM ddI in vitro and ALC at concentrations 1-100 microM substantially (but incompletely) prevented ddI toxicity in this model. In contrast, ALC was ineffective at all concentrations tested for preventing the toxicity of 50microM d4T. H(Q)O showed dose-dependent efficacy for preventing d4T toxicity. H(Q)O (1microM) partially prevented d4T toxicity while 10 and 100microM H(Q)O completely prevented d4T toxicity in this model. We find H(Q)O is superior to ALC for preventing the neurotoxicity of d4T (the HIV treatment most associated with neuropathy) and ddI in vitro. Further study is needed to clarify any clinical role for co-enzyme Q(10) co-administration with d4T and ddI and to assess whether this compound may have a role in treating established cases of neuropathy.

  3. Coenzyme Q10 Therapy in Hereditary Motor Sensory Neuropathy Type VI with Novel Mitofusin 2 Mutation

    OpenAIRE

    Takahashi, Ryoichi; Ikeda, Tokuhei; Hamaguchi, Ayumi; Iwasa, Kazuo; Yamada, Masahito

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary motor sensory neuropathy type VI (HMSN VI) is hereditary neuropathy accompanied by optic neuropathy. The feasibility of Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) as a treatment for subacute visual impairment of HMSN VI was examined. A 37-year-old patient with HMSN VI with a novel mitofusin 2 mutation was treated with high dose of CoQ10 (200 mg/day) for eight months. Visual impairment was partially resolved after CoQ10 therapy. High dose CoQ10 therapy may improve the prognosis of subacute visual impairm...

  4. MicroCommentary: A New Role for Coenzyme F420 in Aflatoxin Reduction by Soil Mycobacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, David E [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Hepatotoxic aflatoxins have found a worthy adversary in two new families of bacterial oxidoreductases. These enzymes use the reduced coenzyme F420 to initiate the degradation of furanocoumarin compounds, including the major mycotoxin products of Aspergillus flavus. Along with pyridoxalamine 5 -phosphate oxidases and aryl nitroreductases, these proteins form a large and versatile superfamily of flavin and deazaflavin-dependent oxidoreductases. F420-dependent members of this family appear to share a common mechanism of hydride transfer from the reduced deazaflavin to the electron-deficient ring systems of their substrates.

  5. [Effect of phlebodium decumanum and coenzyme Q10 on sports performance in professional volleyball players].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Verazaluce, Juan José; Vargas Corzo, María Del Carmen; Aguilar Cordero, María José; Ocaña Peinado, Francisco; Sarmiento Ramírez, Álvaro; Guisado Barrilao, Rafael

    2014-10-03

    Physical training programmes are based on provoking transitory states of fatigue in order to induce super compensation by the biological systems involved in the activity, in order to improve the athlete's medium-long term performance. The administration of nutritional supplements with antioxidant and immunomodulatory properties, such as Phlebodium decumanum and coenzyme Q10, can be a very advantageous means of achieving recovery from the inflammation and tissue damage caused by the stress of prolonged, intense exercise. An experimental, longitudinal, double- blind experiment was conducted, with three randomised groups obtained from a sample of 30 male volleyball players (aged 22-32 years) at the University of Granada, with a high level of training (17 hours a week during the 6 months preceding the study). The effects were then evaluated of a month-long physical training programme, common to all the study groups, associated with the simultaneous administration of the following nutritional supplements: Phlebodium decumanum (4 capsules of 400 mg/capsule, daily), Experimental Group 1; Phlebodium decumanum (same dose and schedule as Group 1) plus coenzyme Q10 (4 capsules of 30 mg/ capsule, daily), Experimental Group 2; a placebo substance, Control Group. The following dependent blood variables were examined to assess the effects of the intervention on the basal immune and endocrine-metabolic profile: cortisol and interleukin-6, both related to the axis of exercise-induced stress; and lactic acid and ammonium, related essentially to the anaerobic metabolism of energy. All the study groups presented favourable adaptive changes with respect to the endocrine-metabolic and immune profile, as reflected by a significant decrease in the post-test concentrations of cortisol, interleukin 6, lactic acid and ammonium, compared to the values recorded before the physical activity with/without nutritional supplement, per protocol. The groups that achieved the most favourable profile

  6. Effectiveness of Coenzyme Q10 on echocardiographic parameters of patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Forod; Zeinaloo, Aliakbar; Riasi, Hamid Reza; Shamloo, Alireza Sepehri

    2017-03-01

    Myocardial damage is a common complication in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) that occurs due to myocardial replacement by fat and fibrosis. In recent years, efforts have been made toward finding new pharmacological agents with fewer complications which can be used as prophylactic before the symptoms. Coenzyme Q10 plays a central role in production of bioenergy in heart muscle and antioxidant in reperfusion condition of myocardial damaged muscle and leads to membrane stability and prevents cell death. This study aimed at comparing the Effectiveness of coenzyme Q10 on echocardiographic parameters of pediatric patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. This randomized clinical trial study (RCT) was carried out on 25 pediatric patients with pre-diagnosed DMD who attended the Children's Medical Center (CMC), Tehran, Iran from February 2013 to 2015. The patients were randomly divided into two groups. Group-1; (n=12) was treated with coenzyme Q10 for six months and group-2 ;(n=13) received placebo for the same time. The primary aim was to compare the myocardial performance index (MPI), between the two groups at the end of six months. Data were analyzed by SPSS software (ver-16) and using T-Test. Twenty-five patients under study were divided into two groups of (Q10=12) and (placebo=13). Mean ages were 8.9±1.7 and 8.6±1.4 in Q10 and placebo groups (P=0.66). No significant difference was detected in MPI at all three views of mitral and tricuspid and septum respectively in two groups after the end of treatment (0.41±0.13, and 0.43±0.6; P=0.59), (0.45±0.12, and 0.46±0.1; P=0.05), and (0.45±0.06, and 0.45±0.1; P=0.31). According to the results obtained from this study, coenzyme Q10 had no significant effect on improving the performance of echocardiographic parameters in patients with DMD. The trial is registered at the Iranian Clinical Trial Registry (IRCT.ir) with the IRCT identification number IRCT2015070223018N1. This research has been financially

  7. [Effects of milk and coenzyme Q10 on the interference of acrylonitrile on vascular endothelial functions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jin; Wang, Wei-qun; Gong, Hui

    2011-04-26

    To explore the influences of milk or coenzyme Q(10) pretreatment to acrylonitrile on vascular endothelial functions in rats. A total of 80 rats were randomly divided into 4 groups: control group (Con), acrylonitrile exposure group (ACN), milk pretreatment group (M + ACN) and coenzyme Q(10) pretreatment group (Q(10) + ACN). The experiment was conducted by the method of gavage exposure in rats. Control group was exposed to corn oil; acrylonitrile was administered to other three groups at the doses of 25 mg/kg. The M + ACN and Q(10) + ACN groups were pretreated by milk or coenzyme Q(10) at 30 minutes before acrylonitrile exposure. After a 12-week exposure, the activities of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) were measured in serum and aortal tissues. As compared with Con group [(21.9 ± 1.6) U/ml], the activity of blood serum iNOS was higher in ACN, M + ACN and Q(10) + ACN groups [(42.9 ± 2.5) U/ml, (26.5 ± 4.4) U/ml, (26.7 ± 3.3) U/ml, P < 0.05]. As compared with Con group [(0.540 ± 0.028) U/mg protein], the activity of aortal iNOS was higher in ACN, M + ACN and Q(10) + ACN groups [(0.812 ± 0.008), (0.773 ± 0.019), (0.622 ± 0.013) U/mg protein, (P < 0.05)]. Furthermore the activity of aortal eNOS in Q(10) + ACN group [(0.471 ± 0.011) U/mg protein] was higher than Con, ACN or M + ACN group [(0.371 ± 0.029), (0.380 ± 0.016), (0.425 ± 0.020) U/mg protein, P < 0.05]. Chronic administration of ACN by gavages results in vascular endothelial dysfunctions. Milk and coenzyme Q(10) pretreatment reduce this effect in rats.

  8. An Improvement of Oxidative Stress in Diabetic Rats by Ubiquinone-10 and Ubiquinol-10 and Bioavailability after Short- and Long-Term Coenzyme Q10 Supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prangthip, Pattaneeya; Kettawan, Aikkarach; Posuwan, Juthathip; Okuno, Masaaki; Okamoto, Tadashi

    2016-11-01

    This study explored effects of ubiquinol-10 and ubiquinone-10, two different forms of coenzyme Q10, in diabetic rats. Oxidative stress is characterized by the depletion of antioxidant defenses and overproduction of free radicals that might contribute to, and even accelerate, the development of diabetes mellitus (DM) complications. Coenzyme Q10 was administered orally to diabetic rats and oxidative stress markers were then assessed. Bioavailability in normal rats was additionally assessed in various tissues and subcellular fractions after short-term and long-term coenzyme Q10 supplementation. Elevated nonfasting blood glucose and blood pressure in diabetic rats were decreased by ubiquinone-10. Both ubiquinol-10 and ubiquinone-10 ameliorated oxidative stress, based on assays for reactive oxygen metabolites and malondialdehyde. Coenzyme Q10 levels increased with both treatments and liver nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) coenzyme Q reductase with ubiquinone-10. Ubiquinol-10 was better absorbed in the liver and pancreas than ubiquinone-10, though both were similarly effective. In bioavailability study, a longer period of coenzyme Q10 supplementation did not lead to its accumulation in tissues or organelles. Both forms of coenzyme Q10 reduced oxidative stress in diabetic rats. Long-term supplementation of coenzyme Q10 appeared to be safe.

  9. Effects of coenzyme Q10 supplementation on antioxidant capacity and inflammation in hepatocellular carcinoma patients after surgery: a randomized, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hsiao-Tien; Huang, Yi-Chia; Cheng, Shao-Bin; Huang, Yin-Tzu; Lin, Ping-Ting

    2016-10-06

    It has been reported that higher levels of oxidative stress and inflammation play a key role in the progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) after surgery. Coenzyme Q10 is an endogenous lipid-soluble antioxidant. To date, no intervention study has investigated coenzyme Q10 supplementation in HCC patients after surgery. The purpose of this study was to investigate oxidative stress, antioxidant enzymes activity, and inflammation levels in HCC patients after surgery following administration of coenzyme Q10 (300 mg/day). This study was designed as a single-blinded, randomized, parallel, placebo-controlled study. Patients who were diagnosed with primary HCC (n = 41) and were randomly assign to a placebo (n = 20) or coenzyme Q10 (300 mg/day, n = 21) group after surgery. The intervention lasted for 12 weeks. Plasma coenzyme Q10, vitamin E, oxidative stress antioxidant enzymes activity and inflammatory markers levels were measured. The oxidative stress (p = 0.04) and inflammatory markers (hs-CRP and IL-6, p coenzyme Q10 supplementation. In addition, the coenzyme Q10 level was significantly negatively correlated with the oxidative stress (p = 0.01), and positively correlated with antioxidant enzymes activity (SOD, p = 0.01; CAT, p coenzyme Q10 supplementation significantly increased the antioxidant capacity and reduced the oxidative stress and inflammation levels in HCC patients after surgery. Clinical Trials.gov Identifier: NCT01964001.

  10. Effects of Oral, Vaginal, and Transdermal Hormonal Contraception on Serum Levels of Coenzyme Q10, Vitamin E, and Total Antioxidant Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhudas R. Palan

    2010-01-01

    coenzyme Q10 levels compared with normal subjects. Serum TAOC levels were significantly lower (P<.05 among the contraceptive user groups. Alterations in coenzyme Q10 and α-tocopherol induced by hormonal contraception and the potential effect(s of exogenous ovarian hormones should be taken into consideration in future antioxidant research.

  11. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of alterations to cellular metabolism by domain 2 of the hepatitis C virus core protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirmal Mazumder

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV co-opts hepatic lipid pathways to facilitate its pathogenesis. The virus alters cellular lipid biosynthesis and trafficking, and causes an accumulation of lipid droplets (LDs that gives rise to hepatic steatosis. Little is known about how these changes are controlled at the molecular level, and how they are related to the underlying metabolic states of the infected cell. The HCV core protein has previously been shown to independently induce alterations in hepatic lipid homeostasis. Herein, we demonstrate, using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS microscopy, that expression of domain 2 of the HCV core protein (D2 fused to GFP is sufficient to induce an accumulation of larger lipid droplets (LDs in the perinuclear region. Additionally, we performed fluorescence lifetime imaging of endogenous reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotides [NAD(PH], a key coenzyme in cellular metabolic processes, to monitor changes in the cofactor's abundance and conformational state in D2-GFP transfected cells. When expressed in Huh-7 human hepatoma cells, we observed that the D2-GFP induced accumulation of LDs correlated with an increase in total NAD(PH fluorescence and an increase in the ratio of free to bound NAD(PH. This is consistent with an approximate 10 fold increase in cellular NAD(PH levels. Furthermore, the lifetimes of bound and free NAD(PH were both significantly reduced--indicating viral protein-induced alterations in the cofactors' binding and microenvironment. Interestingly, the D2-expressing cells showed a more diffuse localization of NAD(PH fluorescence signal, consistent with an accumulation of the co-factor outside the mitochondria. These observations suggest that HCV causes a shift of metabolic control away from the use of the coenzyme in mitochondrial electron transport and towards glycolysis, lipid biosynthesis, and building of new biomass. Overall, our findings demonstrate that HCV induced alterations in hepatic

  12. Effect of coenzyme Q10 alone and its combination with metformin on streptozotocin-nicotinamide-induced diabetic nephropathy in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheshwari, Rajesh A; Balaraman, R; Sen, Ashim K; Seth, A K

    2014-01-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the therapeutic potential of coenzyme Q10 and its combination with metformin on streptozotocin (STZ)-nicotinamide-induced diabetic nephropathy (DN). Type 2 diabetes in rats was induced with STZ-nicotinamide. The diabetic rats were treated with coenzyme Q10 (10 mg/kg, p.o.) alone or coenzyme Q10 + metformin. Various parameters of renal function tests such as serum creatinine, urea, uric acid, and markers of oxidative stress such as renal malondialdehyde (MDA) level, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT) activities were measured. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), and nitrite content were estimated in renal tissues. All treated animal were subjected to histopathological changes of kidney. Diabetic rats showed a significant reduction in renal function, which was reflected with an increase in serum urea, serum creatinine, uric acid. In addition, STZ-nicotinamide caused renal tubular damage with a higher MDA level, depletion of SOD and CAT activity and glutathione (GSH) level. Moreover, TNF-α, MPO activity, TGF-β, and nitrite content were significantly increased in diabetic rats, while treatment with coenzyme Q10 or metformin or their combination ameliorate STZ-nicotinamide induced renal damage due to improvement in renal function, oxidative stress, suppression of TNF-α, MPO activity, TGF-β and nitrite content along with histopathological changes. This finding suggests that the treatment with coenzyme Q10 or metformin showed significant renoprotective effect against STZ-nicotinamide-induced DN. However, concomitant administration of both showed a better renoprotective effect than coenzyme Q10 or metformin alone treatment.

  13. Effects of menopause and hormone replacement therapy on serum levels of coenzyme Q10 and other lipid-soluble antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palan, Prabhudas R; Connell, Kathleen; Ramirez, Elizabeth; Inegbenijie, Christian; Gavara, Rachana Y; Ouseph, Jacob A; Mikhail, Magdy S

    2005-01-01

    The present study examines the influence of menopause and hormone replacement therapy (HRT) on serum levels of coenzyme Q(10) and other lipid-soluble antioxidants in normal women. Serum levels of coenzyme Q(10), alpha-tocopherol, gamma-tocopherol, beta-carotene and lycopene in 50 premenopausal women (not using oral contraceptives), 33 healthy postmenopausal and 15 postmenopausal women on HRT ("Prempo"; combination of 0.625 mg conjugated estrogen and 2.5 mg medroxyprogesterone acetate) were measured by high-pressure liquid chromatography. Lipid profiles were also analyzed. Significantly higher serum coenzyme Q(10) and alpha-tocopherol levels were detected in postmenopausal compared with premenopausal women (P < 0.05, and < 0.001); whereas, in postmenopausal subjects on HRT, we detected a significant decrease in coenzyme Q(10) and gamma-tocopherol levels (P < 0.001, and < 0.05) and increased alpha-tocopherol levels (P < 0.05). Serum levels of beta-carotene, lycopene, LDL, HDL, cholesterol and triglyceride were comparable among the study groups. Coenzyme Q(10) is postulated to be involved in preventing cardiovascular disease (CVD) because of its bioenergetics role in the mitochondrial respiratory chain and its antioxidant properties at the mitochondrial and extramitochondrial levels. The decrease in serum concentrations of coenzyme Q(10), produced by HRT, may promote oxygen free radical-induced membrane damage and may, thus alter cardiovascular risk in postmenopausal women. HRT-induced reductions in lipid-soluble antioxidant(s) levels, and its potential consequences on CVD, needs to be further investigated.

  14. Hepatitis E og graviditet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mannheimer, Ebba Elisabeth; Harritshøj, Lene Holm; Katzenstein, Terese Lea

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection among pregnant women is severe, often leading to fulminant hepatic failure and death, with mortality rates up to 15-25%. Studies suggest that differences in genotypes/subgenotypes, hormonal and immunological changes during pregnancy may contribute to the severe...

  15. hy viral hepatitis?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    randomized, controlled trial of interferon alfa-2b alone and after prednisone withdrawal for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B. The Hepatitis Interventional. Therapy Group. N Engl J Med 1990; 323: 295-301. 14. Ncayiyana DJ. Coming to grips with the future of health care - the ANC National. Health Plan. 5 Air Med J 1994; ...

  16. Cytomegalovirus Hepatitis During Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Chan

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although cytomegalovirus (CMV is an uncommon cause of viral hepatitis during pregnancy, a definitive diagnosis is important because of the potential for congenital CMV. In the case reported here, a diagnosis of hepatitis caused by CMV was made after the more common viral pathogens had been ruled out.

  17. Hepatitis - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/hepatitis.html Other topics A-Z Expand Section A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W XYZ List of All Topics All Hepatitis - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  18. Hepatitis B Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for IV drug use or through unprotected sex. People who live in or travel to areas of the world where hepatitis B ... patients, people with chronic liver or kidney disease , people with ... drug treatment, and those who travel to countries where hepatitis B is common. Unless ...

  19. Hepatitis C and Incarceration

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hepatitis C virus can be spread when tattoo, body art, or piercing equipment has tiny amounts of blood on it. Many people get tattoos, piercings, or other marks ... if the Hepatitis C virus is still in the body. If this test is positive, it means a ...

  20. Effect of coenzyme Q10 supplementation on exercise-induced response of inflammatory indicators and blood lactate in male runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armanfar, Mostafa; Jafari, Afshar; Dehghan, Gholam Reza; Abdizadeh, Leila

    2015-01-01

    Heavy exercise cause muscle damage associated with production of inflammatory agents. The purpose of present study was to determine the effect of acute and 14-day Coenzyme Q10 supplementation on inflammatory, blood lactate and muscle damage in male middle-distance runners. Eighteen male middle-distance runners in a randomized and quasi experimental study were allocated into two equal groups: supplement group (n=9, Coenzyme Q10: 5mg/kg/day) and placebo group (n= 9, Dextrose: 5mg/kg/day). After acute (1day) and 14-day supplementation, all subjects were participated in a training like running (competitive 3000 meters). Blood samples were obtained in the four phases: one hour before and 18-24 hours after two running protocols. Lactate, serum interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), C-reactive protein (CRP) and creatine kinase (CK) were analyzed. Repeated ANOVA and Bonferuni as a post hoc tests were used to determine the changes in four stages. Differences between groups were determined by t-test. The results showed that acute and short-term Coenzyme Q10 supplementation had not significant effect on basal parameters. The acute coenzyme Q10 supplementation attenuated only the exercise-induced increase in response of the plasma CRP. The short-term (14-day) coenzyme Q10 supplementation attenuated the exercise-induced increase in response of the lactate, serum interleukin- 6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and CRP in male middle-distance runners. However, the acute and short-term coenzyme Q10 supplementation had not any significant effect on the exerciseinduced increase response of total serum creatine kinase. Based on the present results, it can be concluded that the 14-day coenzyme Q10 supplementation (5mg.kg-1.day-1) is more effective than the acute supplementation to overcome the exercise-induced adverse responses in some oxidative, inflammatory and biochemical parameters. Therefore, short-term coenzyme Q10 supplementation is recommended to reduce

  1. Efficacy of coenzyme Q10 in patients with cardiac failure: a meta-analysis of clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Li; Liu, Yan

    2017-07-24

    The therapeutic efficacy of coenzyme Q10 on patients with cardiac failure remains controversial. We pooled previous clinical studies to re-evaluate the efficacy of coenzyme Q10 in patients with cardiac failure. We searched PubMed, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, and Clinical Trials.gov databases for controlled trials. The endpoints were death, left heart ejection fraction, exercise capacity, and New York Heart Association (NYHA) cardiac function classification after treatment. The pooled risk ratios (RRs) and standardized mean difference (SMD) were used to assess the efficacy of coenzyme Q10. A total of 14 RCTs with 2149 patients met the inclusion criteria and were included in the analysis. Coenzyme Q10 decreased the mortality compared with placebo (RR = 0.69; 95% CI = 0.50-0.95; P = 0.02; I 2  = 0%). A greater improvement in exercise capacity was established in patients who used coenzyme Q10 than in those who used placebo (SMD = 0.62; 95% CI = 0.02-0.30; P = 0.04; I 2  = 54%). No significant difference was observed in the endpoints of left heart ejection fraction between patients who received coenzyme Q10 and the patients in whom placebo was administered (SMD = 0.62; 95% CI = 0.02-1.12; P = 0.04; I 2  = 75%). The two types of treatment resulted in obtaining similar NYHA classification results (SMD = -0.70; 95% CI = -1.92-0.51; P = 0.26; I 2  = 89%). Patients with heart failure who used coenzyme Q10 had lower mortality and a higher exercise capacity improvement than the placebo-treated patients with heart failure. No significant differences between the efficacy of the administration of coenzyme Q10 and placebo in the endpoints of left heart ejection fraction and NYHA classification were observed.

  2. Pentoxifylline for alcoholic hepatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whitfield, Kate; Rambaldi, Andrea; Wetterslev, Jørn

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Alcoholic hepatitis is a life-threatening disease, with an average mortality of approximately 40%. There is no widely accepted, effective treatment for alcoholic hepatitis. Pentoxifylline is used to treat alcoholic hepatitis, but there has been no systematic review to assess its effects....... OBJECTIVES: To assess the benefits and harms of pentoxifylline in alcoholic hepatitis. SEARCH STRATEGY: The Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group Controlled Trials Register, The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Science Citation Index Expanded, LILACS......, clinicaltrials.gov, and full text searches were conducted until August 2009. Manufacturers and authors were contacted. SELECTION CRITERIA: All randomised clinical trials of pentoxifylline in participants with alcoholic hepatitis compared to control were selected for inclusion. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two...

  3. Serum Hepatitis C virus and hepatitis B surface antigenaemia in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Summary. Acute hepatitis is common in Nigeria and hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection has been a major aetiological factor. However, the role of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infection is yet undetermined. Forty-five consecutive Nigerian patients with. Acute Icteric hepatitis (AIH) attending the Medical Clinic of the University College ...

  4. Effects of ingredients of Korean brown rice cookies on attenuation of cholesterol level and oxidative stress in high-fat diet-fed mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sun Hee; Kim, Mijeong; Woo, Minji; Song, Yeong Ok

    2017-10-01

    Owing to health concerns related to the consumption of traditional snacks high in sugars and fats, much effort has been made to develop functional snacks with low calorie content. In this study, a new recipe for Korean rice cookie, dasik, was developed and its antioxidative, lipid-lowering, and anti-inflammatory effects and related mechanisms were elucidated. The effects were compared with those of traditional rice cake dasik (RCD), the lipid-lowering effect of which is greater than that of traditional western-style cookies. Ginseng-added brown rice dasik (GBRD) was prepared with brown rice flour, fructooligosaccharide, red ginseng extract, and propolis. Mice were grouped (n = 7 per group) into those fed a normal AIN-76 diet, a high-fat diet (HFD), and HFD supplemented with RCD or GBRD. Dasik in the HFD accounted for 7% of the total calories. The lipid, reactive oxygen species, and peroxynitrite levels, and degree of lipid peroxidation in the plasma or liver were determined. The expression levels of proteins involved in lipid metabolism and inflammation, and those of antioxidant enzymes were determined by western blot analysis. The plasma and hepatic total cholesterol concentrations in the GBRD group were significantly decreased via downregulation of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-2 and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (P level was significantly lower, whereas glutathione was higher, in the GBRD group than in the RCD group. Among the antioxidant enzymes, catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were significantly upregulated in the GBRD group (P levels by downregulating cholesterol synthesis. This new dasik recipe also improves the antioxidative and anti-inflammatory status in HFD-fed mice via CAT and GPx upregulation and NF-κB downregulation. These effects were significantly higher than those of RCD.

  5. Soy Protein Compared with Milk Protein in a Western Diet Increases Gut Microbial Diversity and Reduces Serum Lipids in Golden Syrian Hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butteiger, Dustie N; Hibberd, Ashley A; McGraw, Nancy J; Napawan, Nida; Hall-Porter, Janine M; Krul, Elaine S

    2016-04-01

    Diet is a major factor influencing the composition and metabolic activity of the gut microbiota. This study investigated the effect of soy compared with dairy protein on the gut microbiota of hamsters to determine whether changes in microbiota could account for soy protein's lipid lowering properties. Thirty-two 6- to 8-wk-old, male Golden Syrian hamsters were fed a Western diet containing 22% (%wt) milk protein isolate (MPI) as the single protein source for 3 wk followed by 6 wk of one of 4 diets containing either [22% protein (%wt)]: MPI, soy protein concentrate (SPC), partially hydrolyzed soy protein isolate (SPI1), or intact soy protein isolate. Serum lipids, hepatic gene expression, and gut microbial populations were evaluated. Serum total and LDL-cholesterol concentrations were lower in the SPC-fed group (183 ± 9.0 and 50 ± 4.2 mg/dL, respectively) than in the MPI group (238 ± 8.7 and 72 ± 3.9 mg/dL, respectively) (Psoy-fed groups than in the MPI-fed group (Psoy-fed group than in the MPI-fed group (Psoy protein was associated with higher expression of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (Hmgcr), lanosterol synthase (Lss), and farnesyl-diphosphosphate farnesyl-transferase 1 (Fdft1) (1.6-2.5-fold higher), and lower steroyl-CoA desaturase-1 (Scd1) expression (37-46% lower) in all soy-fed groups (Psoy protein may reduce lipogenesis through alterations of the gut microbial community. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  6. Improved HPLC column-switching determination of Coenzyme Q and Vitamin E in plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bompadre, Stefano; Tulipani, Sara; Romandini, Stefania; Giorgetti, Raffaele; Battino, Maurizio

    2008-01-01

    A novel isocratic modified column-switching HPLC method for automated quantitative analysis of Vitamin E and Coenzyme Q, in the reduced and oxidized form, is described. Many column-switching HPLC methods are found in the literature, also for determining antioxidant substances, but we developed a different system of column-switching. An empty column, 5 cm long, was connected to the switching valve, before the sample loop and the extraction column. The sample loop was connected directly after the empty column. The inserted column, containing about 1.4 ml of the extraction eluent simulated a gradient elution, enhancing sensitivity and resolution. When switching the columns, the empty column is placed right before the extraction column and acts as a static mixer for the extraction phase and the incoming analytical phase. Samples were cleaned from interfering compounds by transfer onto a extraction-column, using a C-8 silica. Separation was performed onto an analytical column C18 3 m icrom, 150 mm x 4.6 mm at a flow rate of 1.0 ml/min with 20 mmol/l lithium perchlorate/perchloric acid, pH3.0 in Ethanol as analytical eluent. Detection was performed with a ESA Coulochem 5100 A model. The method was found to be suitable for automated analysis of Coenzyme Q, reduced and oxidized form, and Vitamin E in serum.

  7. Biochemical Characterization and Complete Conversion of Coenzyme Specificity of Isocitrate Dehydrogenase from Bifidobacterium longum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shi-Ping; Cheng, Hong-Mei; Wang, Peng; Zhu, Guo-Ping

    2016-02-26

    Bifidobacterium longum is a very important gram-positive non-pathogenic bacterium in the human gastrointestinal tract for keeping the digestive and immune system healthy. Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) from B. longum (BlIDH), a novel member in Type II subfamily, was overexpressed, purified and biochemically characterized in detail. The active form of BlIDH was an 83-kDa homodimer. Kinetic analysis showed BlIDH was a NADP⁺-dependent IDH (NADP-IDH), with a 567- and 193-fold preference for NADP⁺ over NAD⁺ in the presence of Mg(2+) and Mn(2+), respectively. The maximal activity for BlIDH occurred at 60 °C (with Mn(2+)) and 65 °C (with Mg(2+)), and pH 7.5 (with Mn(2+)) and pH 8.0 (with Mg(2+)). Heat-inactivation profiles revealed that BlIDH retained 50% of maximal activity after incubation at 45 °C for 20 min with either Mn(2+) or Mg(2+). Furthermore, the coenzyme specificity of BlIDH can be completely reversed from NADP⁺ to NAD⁺ by a factor of 2387 by replacing six residues. This current work, the first report on the coenzyme specificity conversion of Type II NADP-IDHs, would provide better insight into the evolution of NADP⁺ use by the IDH family.

  8. Probing Reversible Chemistry in Coenzyme B12-Dependent Ethanolamine Ammonia Lyase with Kinetic Isotope Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Alex R; Rentergent, Julius; Scrutton, Nigel S; Hay, Sam

    2015-01-01

    Coenzyme B12-dependent enzymes such as ethanolamine ammonia lyase have remarkable catalytic power and some unique properties that enable detailed analysis of the reaction chemistry and associated dynamics. By selectively deuterating the substrate (ethanolamine) and/or the β-carbon of the 5′-deoxyadenosyl moiety of the intrinsic coenzyme B12, it was possible to experimentally probe both the forward and reverse hydrogen atom transfers between the 5′-deoxyadenosyl radical and substrate during single-turnover stopped-flow measurements. These data are interpreted within the context of a kinetic model where the 5′-deoxyadenosyl radical intermediate may be quasi-stable and rearrangement of the substrate radical is essentially irreversible. Global fitting of these data allows estimation of the intrinsic rate constants associated with CoC homolysis and initial H-abstraction steps. In contrast to previous stopped-flow studies, the apparent kinetic isotope effects are found to be relatively small. PMID:25950663

  9. Probing reversible chemistry in coenzyme B12 -dependent ethanolamine ammonia lyase with kinetic isotope effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Alex R; Rentergent, Julius; Scrutton, Nigel S; Hay, Sam

    2015-06-08

    Coenzyme B12 -dependent enzymes such as ethanolamine ammonia lyase have remarkable catalytic power and some unique properties that enable detailed analysis of the reaction chemistry and associated dynamics. By selectively deuterating the substrate (ethanolamine) and/or the β-carbon of the 5'-deoxyadenosyl moiety of the intrinsic coenzyme B12 , it was possible to experimentally probe both the forward and reverse hydrogen atom transfers between the 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical and substrate during single-turnover stopped-flow measurements. These data are interpreted within the context of a kinetic model where the 5'-deoxyadenosyl radical intermediate may be quasi-stable and rearrangement of the substrate radical is essentially irreversible. Global fitting of these data allows estimation of the intrinsic rate constants associated with CoC homolysis and initial H-abstraction steps. In contrast to previous stopped-flow studies, the apparent kinetic isotope effects are found to be relatively small. © 2015 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

  10. Selenium and coenzyme Q10 interrelationship in cardiovascular diseases--A clinician's point of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alehagen, Urban; Aaseth, Jan

    2015-01-01

    A short review is given of the potential role of selenium deficiency and selenium intervention trials in atherosclerotic heart disease. Selenium is an essential constituent of several proteins, including the glutathione peroxidases and selenoprotein P. The selenium intake in Europe is generally in the lower margin of recommendations from authorities. Segments of populations in Europe may thus have a deficient intake that may be presented by a deficient anti-oxidative capacity in various illnesses, in particular atherosclerotic disease, and this may influence the prognosis of the disease. Ischemic heart disease and heart failure are two conditions where increased oxidative stress has been convincingly demonstrated. Some of the intervention studies of anti-oxidative substances that have focused on selenium are discussed in this review. The interrelationship between selenium and coenzyme Q10, another anti-oxidant, is presented, pointing to a theoretical advantage in using both substances in an intervention if there are deficiencies within the population. Clinical results from an intervention study using both selenium and coenzyme Q10 in an elderly population are discussed, where reduction in cardiovascular mortality, a better cardiac function according to echocardiography, and finally a lower concentration of the biomarker NT-proBNP as a sign of lower myocardial wall tension could be seen in those on active treatment, compared to placebo. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. The effect of coenzyme Q10 on morbidity and mortality in chronic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Svend A; Rosenfeldt, Franklin; Kumar, Adarsh

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This randomized controlled multicenter trial evaluated coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) as adjunctive treatment in chronic heart failure (HF). BACKGROUND: CoQ10 is an essential cofactor for energy production and is also a powerful antioxidant. A low level of myocardial CoQ10 is related...... = 0.033). In addition, a significant improvement of NYHA class was found in the CoQ10 group after 2 years (p = 0.028). CONCLUSIONS: Long-term CoQ10 treatment of patients with chronic HF is safe, improves symptoms, and reduces major adverse cardiovascular events. (Coenzyme Q10 as adjunctive treatment...... to the severity of HF. Previous randomized controlled trials of CoQ10 in HF were underpowered to address major clinical endpoints. METHODS: Patients with moderate to severe HF were randomly assigned in a 2-year prospective trial to either CoQ10 100 mg 3 times daily or placebo, in addition to standard therapy...

  12. Inhibition of acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase by two classes of grass-selective herbicides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rendina, A.R.; Craig-Kennard, A.C.; Beaudoin, J.D.; Breen, M.K. (Chevron Chemical Company, Richmond, CA (USA))

    1990-05-01

    The selective grass herbicides diclofop, haloxyfop, and trifop (((aryloxy)phenoxy)propionic acids) and alloxydim, sethoxydim, and clethodim (cyclohexanediones) are potent, reversible inhibitors of acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACC) partially purified from barley, corn, and wheat. Although inhibition of the wheat enzyme by clethodim and diclofop is noncompetitive versus each of the substrates adenosine triphosphate (ATP), HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, and acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA), diclofop and clethodim are nearly competitive versus acetyl-CoA since the level of inhibition is most sensitive to the concentration of acetyl-CoA (K{sub is} < K{sub ii}). To conclusively show whether the herbicides interact at the biotin carboxylation site or the carboxyl transfer site, the inhibition of isotope exchange and partial reactions catalyzed at each site was studied with the wheat enzyme. Only the ({sup 14}C)acetyl-CoA-malonyl-CoA exchange and decarboxylation of ({sup 14}C)malonyl-CoA reactions are strongly inhibited by clethodim and diclofop, suggesting that the herbicides interfere with the carboxyl transfer site rather than the biotin carboxylation site of the enzyme. Double-inhibition studies with diclofop and clethodim suggest that the ((aryloxy)phenoxy)propionic acid and cyclohexanedione herbicides may bind to the same region of the enzyme.

  13. Malonyl coenzyme A affects insulin-stimulated glucose transport in myotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, P B; Minteer, S D; Mielke, A A; Lewis, L R; Casmaer, C A; Barrientos, E J; Ju, J-S; Smith, J L; Fisher, J S

    2007-02-01

    There seems to be an association between increased concentrations of malonyl coenzyme A (malonyl CoA) in skeletal muscle and diabetes and/or insulin resistance. The purpose of the current study was to test the hypothesis that treatments designed to manipulate malonyl CoA concentrations would affect insulin-stimulated glucose transport in cultured C2C12 myotubes. We assessed glucose transport after polyamine-mediated delivery of malonyl CoA to myotubes, after incubation with dichloroacetate (which reportedly increases malonyl CoA levels), or after exposure of myotubes to 2-bromopalmitate, a carnitine palmitoyl transferase I inhibitor. All three of these treatments prevented stimulation of glucose transport by insulin. We also assayed glucose transport after 30 min of inhibition of acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase (ACC), the enzyme which catalyzes the production of malonyl CoA. Three unrelated ACC inhibitors (diclofop, clethodim, and Pfizer CP-640186) all enhanced insulin-stimulated glucose transport. However, none of the treatments designed to manipulate malonyl CoA concentrations altered markers of proximal insulin signaling through Akt. The findings support the hypothesis that acute changes in malonyl CoA concentrations affect insulin action in muscle cells but suggest that the effects do not involve alterations in proximal insulin signaling.

  14. Effect of pH on coenzyme binding to liver alcohol dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvassman, J; Pettersson, G

    1979-10-01

    1. The transient-state kinetics of ligand-displacement reactions have been analyzed. Methods based on this analysis have been used to obtain reliable estimates of on-velocity and off-velocity constants for coenzyme binding to liver alcohol dehydrogenase at different pH values between 6 and 10. 2. The rate of NADH dissociation from the enzyme shows no pronounced dependence on pH. The rate of NAD+ dissociation is controlled by a group with a pKa of 7.6, agreeing with the pKa reported to regulate the binding of certain inhibitory substrate analogues to the enzyme . NAD+ complex. 3. Critical experiments have been performed to test a recent proposal that on-velocity constants for the binding of NADH and NAD+ are controlled by proton equilibria exhibiting different pKa values. The results show that association rates for NADH and NAD+ exhibit the same pH dependence corresponding to a pKa of 9.2. Titrimetric evidence is presented indicating that the latter effect of pH derives from ionization of a group which affects the anion-binding capacity of the coenzyme-binding site.

  15. New developments in hepatitis C

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reesink, H. W.; Bresters, D.; van der Poel, C. L.; Cuypers, H. T.; Lelie, P. N.

    1992-01-01

    Since the detection of hepatitis B virus (HBV) in the 1960s and hepatitis A virus in the 1970s, a considerable proportion of infections of (probably viral) hepatitis could not be classified. About 90% of transfusion-related hepatitis was identified as non-A/non-B. In 1988 investigators from the

  16. Glucocorticosteroids for viral hepatitis C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brok, J; Mellerup, M T; Krogsgaard, K

    2004-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus may cause liver inflammation and fibrosis. It is not known whether glucocorticosteroids are beneficial or harmful for patients with hepatitis C infection.......Hepatitis C virus may cause liver inflammation and fibrosis. It is not known whether glucocorticosteroids are beneficial or harmful for patients with hepatitis C infection....

  17. Viral Hepatitis: Information for Gay and Bisexual Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    VIRAL HEPATITIS Information for Gay and Bisexual Men What is viral hepatitis? Viral hepatitis is an infection of the liver caused by ... United States, the most common types of viral hepatitis are Hepatitis A, Hepatitis B, and Hepatitis C. ...

  18. Production of a Brassica napus low-molecular mass acyl-coenzyme A-binding protein in Arabidopsis alters the acyl-coenzyme A pool and acyl composition of oil in seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low-molecular mass (10 kD) cytosolic acyl-coenzyme A-binding protein (ACBP) has a substantial influence over fatty acid (FA) composition in oilseeds, possibly via an effect on the partitioning of acyl groups between elongation and desaturation pathways. Previously, we demonstrated that the expressio...

  19. Magnetic-Resonance Studies of the Geometry of Bound Substrate, Coenzyme and Activator on Bovine-Liver Glutamate Dehydrogenase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zantema, Alt; de Smet, Marie-José; Robillard, George T.

    ADP and ATP with a spin-label linked to the terminal phosphate are activators of glutamate dehydrogenase and bind to the same site as the activator ADP. There is hardly any interaction with the coenzyme site. Glutamate dehydrogenase can be modified with a ketone spin-label at a site in the active

  20. Conserved residues and their role in the structure, function, and stability of acyl-coenzyme A binding protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, B B; Poulsen, K; Andersen, K V

    1999-01-01

    In the family of acyl-coenzyme A binding proteins, a subset of 26 sequence sites are identical in all eukaryotes and conserved throughout evolution of the eukaryotic kingdoms. In the context of the bovine protein, the importance of these 26 sequence positions for structure, function, stability, a...

  1. Coenzyme Q(10) is decreased in fibroblasts of patients with methylmalonic aciduria but not in mevalonic aciduria.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haas, D.; Niklowitz, P.; Horster, F.; Baumgartner, E.R.; Prasad, C.; Rodenburg, R.J.T.; Hoffmann, G.F.; Menke, T.; Okun, J.G.

    2009-01-01

    The content of coenzyme Q(10) (CoQ(10)) was examined in skin fibroblasts of 10 patients with mevalonic aciduria (MVA) and of 22 patients with methylmalonic aciduria (MMA). Patients with these inborn errors of metabolism are thought to be at risk for CoQ(10) depletion either by direct inhibition of

  2. Lithium carbonate and coenzyme Q10 reduce cell death in a cell model of Machado-Joseph disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.M. Lopes-Ramos

    Full Text Available Machado-Joseph disease (MJD or spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3 is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by expansion of the polyglutamine domain of the ataxin-3 (ATX3 protein. MJD/SCA3 is the most frequent autosomal dominant ataxia in many countries. The mechanism underlying MJD/SCA3 is thought to be mainly related to protein misfolding and aggregation leading to neuronal dysfunction followed by cell death. Currently, there are no effective treatments for patients with MJD/SCA3. Here, we report on the potential use of lithium carbonate and coenzyme Q10 to reduce cell death caused by the expanded ATX3 in cell culture. Cell viability and apoptosis were evaluated by MTT assay and by flow cytometry after staining with annexin V-FITC/propidium iodide. Treatment with lithium carbonate and coenzyme Q10 led to a significant increase in viability of cells expressing expanded ATX3 (Q84. In addition, we found that the increase in cell viability resulted from a significant reduction in the proportion of apoptotic cells. Furthermore, there was a significant change in the expanded ATX3 monomer/aggregate ratio after lithium carbonate and coenzyme Q10 treatment, with an increase in the monomer fraction and decrease in aggregates. The safety and tolerance of both drugs are well established; thus, our results indicate that lithium carbonate and coenzyme Q10 are good candidates for further in vivo therapeutic trials.

  3. Novel Hydroxycinnamoyl-Coenzyme A Quinate Transferase Genes from Artichoke Are Involved in the Synthesis of Chlorogenic Acid1[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnante, Gabriella; D'Amore, Rosalinda; Blanco, Emanuela; Pierri, Ciro L.; De Palma, Monica; Luo, Jie; Tucci, Marina; Martin, Cathie

    2010-01-01

    Artichoke (Cynara cardunculus subsp. scolymus) extracts have high antioxidant capacity, due primarily to flavonoids and phenolic acids, particularly chlorogenic acid (5-caffeoylquinic acid [CGA]), dicaffeoylquinic acids, and caffeic acid, which are abundant in flower bracts and bioavailable to humans in the diet. The synthesis of CGA can occur following different routes in plant species, and hydroxycinnamoyl-coenzyme A transferases are important enzymes in these pathways. Here, we report on the isolation and characterization of two novel genes both encoding hydroxycinnamoyl-coenzyme A quinate transferases (HQT) from artichoke. The recombinant proteins (HQT1 and HQT2) were assayed after expression in Escherichia coli, and both showed higher affinity for quinate over shikimate. Their preferences for acyl donors, caffeoyl-coenzyme A or p-coumaroyl-coenzyme A, were examined. Modeling and docking analyses were used to propose possible pockets and residues involved in determining substrate specificities in the HQT enzyme family. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis of gene expression indicated that HQT1 might be more directly associated with CGA content. Transient and stable expression of HQT1 in Nicotiana resulted in a higher production of CGA and cynarin (1,3-dicaffeoylquinic acid). These findings suggest that several isoforms of HQT contribute to the synthesis of CGA in artichoke according to physiological needs and possibly following various metabolic routes. PMID:20431089

  4. Amelioratory effect of coenzyme Q10 on potential human carcinogen Microcystin-LR induced toxicity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lone, Yaqoob; Bhide, Mangla; Koiri, Raj Kumar

    2017-04-01

    Microcystins are a group of cyclic heptapeptide toxins produced by cyanobacteria. More than 100 microcystin analogues have been detected, among which microcystin-LR is the most abundant and toxic variant. Present study was designed to reveal whether potential human carcinogen microcystin-LR could imbalance the glycolytic-oxidative-nitrosative status of heart, kidney and spleen of mice and also to explore the amelioratory effect of coenzyme Q10 on microcystin-LR induced toxicity. Microcystin-LR was administered at a dose of 10 μg/kg bw/day, ip for 14 days in male mice. In microcystin-LR treated mice as compared to control, significant increase in the level of lipid peroxidation, hydrogen peroxide, lactate dehydrogenase, nitric oxide with a concomitant decrease in the level of glutathione was observed, suggesting microcystin-LR induced toxicity via induction of oxidative-nitrosative-glycolytic pathway. Although several studies have evaluated numerous antioxidants but still there is no effective chemoprotectant against microcystin-LR induced toxicity. When microcystin-LR treated mice were co-administered coenzyme Q10 (10 mg/kg bw/day, im) for 14 days, it was observed that coenzyme Q10 ameliorates microcystin-LR induced toxicity via modulation of glycolytic-oxidative-nitrosative stress pathway. Thus, the results suggest that coenzyme Q10 has a potential to be developed as preventive agent against microcystin-LR induced toxicity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Coenzyme Q10 and pro-inflammatory markers in children with Down syndrome: clinical and biochemical aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moushira E. Zaki

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor α levels in young children with Down syndrome may be used as biomarkers reflecting the neurodegenerative process in them. Coenzyme Q10 might have a role as a good supplement in young children with Down syndrome to ameliorate the neurological symptoms.

  6. Beneficial Effects of Coenzyme Q10 in Reduction of Testicular Tissue Alteration Following Induction of Diabetes in Adult Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kianifard Davoud

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Various types of infertility are associated with uncontrolled hyperglycemia and diabetes. Development of oxidative stress is one the most important factors in the alteration of spermatogenesis in diabetic conditions. Consequently, the reduction of oxidative stress with antioxidant compounds can be effective in the reduction of tissue alterations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of coenzyme Q10 in improvement of spermatogenesis in adult diabetic rats. Material and Methods: 32 adult rats were divided into four groups of control and treatment. Coenzyme Q10 (10 mg/kg body weight - b.w. was administrated to one control and one diabetic (intraperitoneal injection of 45 mg/kg b.w. of Streptozotocin groups. Blood concentrations of FSH, LH and Testosterone were measured. Histology of testicular tissue and sperm analysis were considered for evaluation of spermatogenesis. Results: Administration of Coenzyme Q10 led to increase of pituitary gonadotropins levels in diabetic rats. Testosterone levels were not changed significantly. Testicular morphology, spermatogenic indices and sperm analysis were improved in treated diabetic rats. Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that the use of Coenzyme Q10 has positive effects in reduction of spermatogenic alterations following induction of experimental diabetes in rats.

  7. Lithium carbonate and coenzyme Q10 reduce cell death in a cell model of Machado-Joseph disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes-Ramos, C M; Pereira, T C; Dogini, D B; Gilioli, R; Lopes-Cendes, I

    2016-11-21

    Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) or spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by expansion of the polyglutamine domain of the ataxin-3 (ATX3) protein. MJD/SCA3 is the most frequent autosomal dominant ataxia in many countries. The mechanism underlying MJD/SCA3 is thought to be mainly related to protein misfolding and aggregation leading to neuronal dysfunction followed by cell death. Currently, there are no effective treatments for patients with MJD/SCA3. Here, we report on the potential use of lithium carbonate and coenzyme Q10 to reduce cell death caused by the expanded ATX3 in cell culture. Cell viability and apoptosis were evaluated by MTT assay and by flow cytometry after staining with annexin V-FITC/propidium iodide. Treatment with lithium carbonate and coenzyme Q10 led to a significant increase in viability of cells expressing expanded ATX3 (Q84). In addition, we found that the increase in cell viability resulted from a significant reduction in the proportion of apoptotic cells. Furthermore, there was a significant change in the expanded ATX3 monomer/aggregate ratio after lithium carbonate and coenzyme Q10 treatment, with an increase in the monomer fraction and decrease in aggregates. The safety and tolerance of both drugs are well established; thus, our results indicate that lithium carbonate and coenzyme Q10 are good candidates for further in vivo therapeutic trials.

  8. Engineering acetyl coenzyme A supply : Functional expression of a bacterial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex in the cytosol of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kozak, B.U.; Van Rossum, M.H.; Luttik, M.A.; Akeroyd, M.; Benjamin, K.R.; Wu, L.; De Vries, S.; Daran, J.M.; Pronk, J.T.; Van Maris, A.J.A.

    2014-01-01

    The energetic (ATP) cost of biochemical pathways critically determines the maximum yield of metabolites of vital or commercial relevance. Cytosolic acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) is a key precursor for biosynthesis in eukaryotes and for many industrially relevant product pathways that have been

  9. Engineering Acetyl Coenzyme A Supply : Functional Expression of a Bacterial Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex in the Cytosol of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kozak, B.U.; Van Rossum, H.M.; Luttik, M.A.H.; Akeroyd, M.; Benjamin, K.R.; Wu, L.; De Vries, S.; Daran, J.M.; Pronk, J.T.; Van Maris, A.J.A.

    2014-01-01

    The energetic (ATP) cost of biochemical pathways critically determines the maximum yield of metabolites of vital or commercial relevance. Cytosolic acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) is a key precursor for biosynthesis in eukaryotes and for many industrially relevant product pathways that have been

  10. The Role of Coenzymes on Mercury (Hg2+ Bioremediation by Isolates Pseudomonas aeruginosa KHY2 and Klebsiella pneumonia KHY3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liswara Neneng

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Mercury pollution is dangerous to health. Previous research was found two potential Gram-negative bacteria for mercury bioremediation, from gold mining in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia.  These isolates were identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa KHY2 and Klebsiella pneumonia KHY3. Mechanisms of mercury bioremediation had not known yet by these isolates.  This study purposed to test the role of coenzymes on mercury bioremediation by these isolate and to determine the coenzymes best level of mercury bioremediation. Experimental design was Completely Randomized Design in a laboratory.  Treatment factors were coenzymes obtained from vitamins B1, B6, B12, with 6 levels of treatments, included 1 control.  All treatments were done in Luria Broth media that contain 12 ppm of mercury. Mercury was measured by AAS Shimadzu AA-6200. The results showed that coenzymes effect was very significant to improve mercury bioremediation by P. aeruginosa KHY2 and K. pneumonia KHY3.  Supplementation of vitamin B12 in culture media, more enhance of mercury bioremediation compared with vitamin B1 and B6. These result above, indicated the mechanism of mercury bioremediation in both isolates, were the enzymatic process.

  11. The Impact of Coenzyme Q[subscript10] Supplement on the Indicators of Muscle Damage in Young Male Skiing Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirci, Nevzat

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted in order to know the impact of coenzyme Q[subscript 10] (CoQ[subscript 10]) supplement on the muscle damage and total oxidant (TOS) enzyme levels of young skiing athletes during exercise. 15 male athletes were used for two weeks in the study. The athletes were divided into three groups: the control group and two subject…

  12. Rosuvastatin lowers coenzyme Q10 levels, but not mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate synthesis, in children with familial hypercholesterolemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avis, Hans J.; Hargreaves, Ian P.; Ruiter, Jos P. N.; Land, John M.; Wanders, Ronald J.; Wijburg, Frits A.

    2011-01-01

    To investigate whether statin therapy affects coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) status in children with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (FH). Samples were obtained at baseline (treatment naïve) and after dose titration with rosuvastatin, aiming for a low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level of 110

  13. Viral hepatitis and hepatitis B antigen: recent advances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krugman, Saul

    1974-01-01

    Recent advances in hepatitis research have shed new light on the etiology, pathogenesis, epidemiology and prevention of type B hepatitis infection. The so-called ‘Dane’ particle is probably the complete hepatitis B virion; its outer coat is the hepatitis B (Australia) antigen (HB Ag) and its inner core is an immunologically distinct particle. Subtypes of HB Ag (a, d, y, w and r) are useful indices for epidemiological surveys. Concepts of epidemiology have changed: type B hepatitis is transmissible by contact as well as by inoculation. The presence of HB Ag in blood is indicative of the presence of hepatitis B virus. Tests to detect antigen and use of voluntary blood donors have played a major role in the decreased incidence of post transfusion hepatitis. A special hepatitis B gammaglobulin preparation and a heat-inactivated hepatitis B vaccine have proved to be effective in preliminary studies. PMID:4219230

  14. Feature Hepatitis: The Dangers of Hepatitis: What you should know from A to E

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Feature Hepatitis The Dangers of Hepatitis: What you should know from A to E ... drugs. In some cases, hepatitis lasts a lifetime. Hepatitis: Acute or Chronic? Acute hepatitis is the initial ...

  15. Cardiac dysfunction and peri-weaning mortality in malonyl-coenzyme A decarboxylase (MCD) knockout mice as a consequence of restricting substrate plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksentijević, Dunja; McAndrew, Debra J; Karlstädt, Anja; Zervou, Sevasti; Sebag-Montefiore, Liam; Cross, Rebecca; Douglas, Gillian; Regitz-Zagrosek, Vera; Lopaschuk, Gary D; Neubauer, Stefan; Lygate, Craig A

    2014-10-01

    Inhibition of malonyl-coenzyme A decarboxylase (MCD) shifts metabolism from fatty acid towards glucose oxidation, which has therapeutic potential for obesity and myocardial ischemic injury. However, ~40% of patients with MCD deficiency are diagnosed with cardiomyopathy during infancy. To clarify the link between MCD deficiency and cardiac dysfunction in early life and to determine the contributing systemic and cardiac metabolic perturbations. MCD knockout mice ((-/-)) exhibited non-Mendelian genotype ratios (31% fewer MCD(-/-)) with deaths clustered around weaning. Immediately prior to weaning (18days) MCD(-/-) mice had lower body weights, elevated body fat, hepatic steatosis and glycogen depletion compared to wild-type littermates. MCD(-/-) plasma was hyperketonemic, hyperlipidemic, had 60% lower lactate levels and markers of cellular damage were elevated. MCD(-/-) hearts exhibited hypertrophy, impaired ejection fraction and were energetically compromised (32% lower total adenine nucleotide pool). However differences between WT and MCD(-/-) converged with age, suggesting that, in surviving MCD(-/-) mice, early cardiac dysfunction resolves over time. These observations were corroborated by in silico modelling of cardiomyocyte metabolism, which indicated improvement of the MCD(-/-) metabolic phenotype and improved cardiac efficiency when switched from a high-fat diet (representative of suckling) to a standard post-weaning diet, independent of any developmental changes. MCD(-/-) mice consistently exhibited cardiac dysfunction and severe metabolic perturbations while on a high-fat, low carbohydrate diet of maternal milk and these gradually resolved post-weaning. This suggests that dysfunction is a common feature of MCD deficiency during early development, but that severity is dependent on composition of dietary substrates. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Hepatitis B - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the blood. This test shows how well your child's treatment is working. ... Acute hepatitis B does not need any special treatment. Your child's immune system will fight the disease. If there is no sign of the HBV infection after ...

  17. Hepatitis C: Managing Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Us FAQs Ask a Question Toll Free Numbers Homeless Veterans Chat VA » Health Care » Viral Hepatitis » Veterans and ... Vet Centers) War Related Illness & Injury Study Center Homeless Veterans Returning Service Members Rural Veterans Seniors & Aging Veterans ...

  18. HIV and Hepatitis B

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AIDS Drugs Clinical Trials Apps skip to content HIV and Opportunistic Infections, Coinfections, and Conditions Home Understanding ... 4 p.m. ET) Send us an email HIV and Hepatitis B Last Reviewed: July 24, 2017 ...

  19. XTC-induced hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oranje, W A; von Pol, P; vd Wurff, A; Zeijen, R N; Stockbrügger, R W; Arends, J W

    1994-02-01

    An increasing number of severe complications associated with the use of XTC is being reported. After 11 earlier case reports we describe an acute hepatitis due to occasional use of XTC in a 25-year-old woman.

  20. Imaging of hepatic infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doyle, D.J. [Department of Medical Imaging, University Health Network and Mount Sinai Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont. (Canada)]. E-mail: doyledj@hotmail.com; Hanbidge, A.E. [Department of Medical Imaging, University Health Network and Mount Sinai Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont. (Canada); O' Malley, M.E. [Department of Medical Imaging, University Health Network and Mount Sinai Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont. (Canada)

    2006-09-15

    Imaging plays a significant role in the detection, characterization and treatment of hepatic infections. Infectious diseases of the liver include pyogenic and amoebic abscesses and parasitic, fungal, viral and granulomatous infections. With increases in worldwide travel, immunosuppression and changing population demographics, identification of cases of hepatic infection is becoming more common in daily practice. Knowledge of the imaging features seen with hepatic infections can assist in early diagnosis and timely initiation of appropriate therapy. This review presents the imaging appearances of hepatic infections, emphasizing specific features that may contribute to the diagnosis. Examples of the imaging findings seen with pyogenic and amoebic abscesses, infection with Echinococcus granulosus (Hydatid), schistosomiasis, candidiasis and tuberculosis (TB) are presented.