WorldWideScience

Sample records for hep technology transfer

  1. HEP technologies to address medical imaging challenges

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    Developments in detector technologies aimed at solving challenges in present and future CERN experiments, particularly at the LHC, have triggered exceptional advances in the performance of medical imaging devices, allowing for a spectacular progress in in-vivo molecular imaging procedures, which are opening the way for tailored therapies of major diseases. This talk will briefly review the recent history of this prime example of technology transfer from HEP experiments to society, will describe the technical challenges being addressed by some ongoing projects, and will present a few new ideas for further developments and their foreseeable impact.

  2. A study of B$0\\atop{s}$ → J/ΨΦ in the D0 experiment and an example of HEP technology transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Daniela Ursula [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom)

    2002-08-01

    After years of preparation, data taking with the upgraded D0 detector at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider has begun. The large amount of data produced in a p$\\bar{p}$-collider requires sophisticated triggers to filter out the interesting events. Described in this thesis is the development of trigger software for the newly implemented Silicon Microstrip Tracker. D0 is a multi-purpose detector with a broad physics program. one area being studied at D0 is B mesons. An algorithm for reconstructing the B$0\\atop{s}$ and B$0\\atop{d}$ mesons and for measuring their lifetimes has been developed and is described in this thesis. The results suggest that an improvement of the current lifetime measurements can be achieved within the next two years. The reconstruction of a J/Ψ meson forms the basis for a wide range of b-physics. Data taken with the muon system during the commissioning period of the detector has been analyzed and a signal for the J/Ψ meson has been found. Systematic transfer of HEP technologies into other areas and their commercial exploitation plays an important role in the future of particle physics. An area of particular interest is DNA sequencing as shown by the recent completion of the sequencing of the human genome. The final part of this thesis details the development of a simulation for a high throughput sequencing device which is currently being developed at Imperial College.

  3. Technology transfer for adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagini, Bonizella; Kuhl, Laura; Gallagher, Kelly Sims; Ortiz, Claudia

    2014-09-01

    Technology alone will not be able to solve adaptation challenges, but it is likely to play an important role. As a result of the role of technology in adaptation and the importance of international collaboration for climate change, technology transfer for adaptation is a critical but understudied issue. Through an analysis of Global Environment Facility-managed adaptation projects, we find there is significantly more technology transfer occurring in adaptation projects than might be expected given the pessimistic rhetoric surrounding technology transfer for adaptation. Most projects focused on demonstration and early deployment/niche formation for existing technologies rather than earlier stages of innovation, which is understandable considering the pilot nature of the projects. Key challenges for the transfer process, including technology selection and appropriateness under climate change, markets and access to technology, and diffusion strategies are discussed in more detail.

  4. Technology Transfer and Technology Transfer Intermediaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Stephen M.; Flagg, Jennifer L.

    2010-01-01

    A standard and comprehensive model is needed to evaluate and compare technology transfer systems and the stakeholders within these systems. The principle systems considered include federal laboratories, U.S. universities, the rehabilitation engineering research centers (RERCs), and large small business innovation research programs. An earlier…

  5. Technology transfer 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-01

    This document, Technology Transfer 94, is intended to communicate that there are many opportunities available to US industry and academic institutions to work with DOE and its laboratories and facilities in the vital activity of improving technology transfer to meet national needs. It has seven major sections: Introduction, Technology Transfer Activities, Access to Laboratories and Facilities, Laboratories and Facilities, DOE Office, Technologies, and an Index. Technology Transfer Activities highlights DOE`s recent developments in technology transfer and describes plans for the future. Access to Laboratories and Facilities describes the many avenues for cooperative interaction between DOE laboratories or facilities and industry, academia, and other government agencies. Laboratories and Facilities profiles the DOE laboratories and facilities involved in technology transfer and presents information on their missions, programs, expertise, facilities, and equipment, along with data on whom to contact for additional information on technology transfer. DOE Offices summarizes the major research and development programs within DOE. It also contains information on how to access DOE scientific and technical information. Technologies provides descriptions of some of the new technologies developed at DOE laboratories and facilities.

  6. Screening of α-Tocopherol Transfer Protein Sensitive Genes in Human Hepatoma Cells (HepG2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang-Hua Qu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available α-Tocopherol transfer protein (α-TTP is a ~32 kDa protein expressed mainly in hepatocytes. The major function of the protein is to bind specifically to α-tocopherol and, together, the complex transfers from late lysosomes to the cell membrane. A previous study indicated that some factors might be required in the transferring process. However, there is little information available about the potential transferring factors. In addition, there remains much to learn about other physiological processes which α-TTP might participate in. Thus, in this study a human α-TTP eukaryotic expression vector was successfully constructed and expressed in human hepatoma cells (HepG2. The sensitive genes related to α-TTP were then screened by microarray technology. Results showed that expression of the vector in HepG2 cells led to the identification of 323 genes showing differential expression. The differentially expressed transcripts were divided into four main categories, including (1 cell inflammation; (2 cell cycle and cell apoptosis; (3 cell signaling and gene regulation; and (4 cellular movement. A few cellular movement related transcripts were selected and verified by quantitative real-time PCR. Expressions of some were significantly increased in α-TTP-expressed group, which indicated that these factors were likely to play a role in the transferring process.

  7. Technology Transfer: Marketing Tomorrow's Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tcheng, Erene

    1995-01-01

    The globalization of the economy and the end of the Cold War have triggered many changes in the traditional practices of U.S. industry. To effectively apply the resources available to the United States, the federal government has firmly advocated a policy of technology transfer between private industry and government labs, in this case the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). NASA Administrator Daniel Goldin is a strong proponent of this policy and has organized technology transfer or commercialization programs at each of the NASA field centers. Here at Langley Research Center, the Technology Applications Group (TAG) is responsible for facilitating the transfer of Langley developed research and technology to U.S. industry. Entering the program, I had many objectives for my summer research with TAG. Certainly, I wanted to gain a more thorough understanding of the concept of technology transfer and Langley's implementation of a system to promote it to both the Langley community and the community at large. Also, I hoped to become more familiar with Langley's research capabilities and technology inventory available to the public. More specifically, I wanted to learn about the technology transfer process at Langley. Because my mentor is a member of Materials and Manufacturing marketing sector of the Technology Transfer Team, another overriding objective for my research was to take advantage of his work and experience in materials research to learn about the Advanced Materials Research agency wide and help market these developments to private industry. Through the various projects I have been assigned to work on in TAG, I have successfully satisfied the majority of these objectives. Work on the Problem Statement Process for TAG as well as the development of the Advanced Materials Research Brochure have provided me with the opportunity to learn about the technology transfer process from the outside looking in and the inside looking out. Because TAG covers

  8. Robotic technology evolution and transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzwell, Neville I.

    1992-01-01

    A report concerning technology transfer in the area of robotics is presented in vugraph form. The following topics are discussed: definition of technology innovation and tech-transfer; concepts relevant for understanding tech-transfer; models advanced to portray tech-transfer process; factors identified as promoting tech-transfer; factors identified as impeding tech-transfer; what important roles do individuals fulfill in tech-transfer; federal infrastructure for promoting tech-transfer; federal infrastructure for promoting tech-transfer; robotic technology evolution; robotic technology transferred; and recommendations for successful robotics tech-transfer.

  9. Technology Transfer Network and Affiliations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    The NASA Technology Transfer Partnership program sponsors a number of organizations around the country that are designed to assist U.S. businesses in accessing, utilizing, and commercializing NASA-funded research and technology. These organizations work closely with the Technology Transfer Offices, located at each of the 10 NASA field centers, providing a full range of technology transfer and commercialization services and assistance.

  10. Technology diversification, product innovations, and technology transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Woerter, Martin

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates the relationship between technology specialization and innovation performance of firms emphasizing technology transfer activities with universities as an important knowledge source in order to attenuate the opportunity costs of technological specialization. Based on an econometric analysis combining patent data and survey data on technology transfer activities of firms it was found that technology transfer is positively related with the sales share of innovative produc...

  11. What Is Technology Transfer? | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI Technology Transfer Center (TTC) facilitates partnerships between NIH research laboratories and external partners. With a team of technology transfer specialists, NCI TTC guides interactions from discovery to patenting, as well as from collaboration and invention development to licensing.

  12. Technology transfer 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1995-01-01

    Technology Transfer 1995 is intended to inform the US industrial and academic sectors about the many opportunities they have to form partnerships with the US Department of Energy (DOE) for the mutual advantage of the individual institutions, DOE, and the nation as a whole. It also describes some of the growing number of remarkable achievements resulting from such partnerships. These partnership success stories offer ample evidence that Americans are learning how to work together to secure major benefits for the nation--by combining the technological, scientific, and human resources resident in national laboratories with those in industry and academia. The benefits include more and better jobs for Americans, improved productivity and global competitiveness for technology-based industries, and a more efficient government laboratory system.

  13. High-Performance Secure Database Access Technologies for HEP Grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthew Vranicar; John Weicher

    2006-04-17

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the CERN Laboratory will become the largest scientific instrument in the world when it starts operations in 2007. Large Scale Analysis Computer Systems (computational grids) are required to extract rare signals of new physics from petabytes of LHC detector data. In addition to file-based event data, LHC data processing applications require access to large amounts of data in relational databases: detector conditions, calibrations, etc. U.S. high energy physicists demand efficient performance of grid computing applications in LHC physics research where world-wide remote participation is vital to their success. To empower physicists with data-intensive analysis capabilities a whole hyperinfrastructure of distributed databases cross-cuts a multi-tier hierarchy of computational grids. The crosscutting allows separation of concerns across both the global environment of a federation of computational grids and the local environment of a physicist’s computer used for analysis. Very few efforts are on-going in the area of database and grid integration research. Most of these are outside of the U.S. and rely on traditional approaches to secure database access via an extraneous security layer separate from the database system core, preventing efficient data transfers. Our findings are shared by the Database Access and Integration Services Working Group of the Global Grid Forum, who states that "Research and development activities relating to the Grid have generally focused on applications where data is stored in files. However, in many scientific and commercial domains, database management systems have a central role in data storage, access, organization, authorization, etc, for numerous applications.” There is a clear opportunity for a technological breakthrough, requiring innovative steps to provide high-performance secure database access technologies for grid computing. We believe that an innovative database architecture where the

  14. Managerial technology transfer

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Organisations need to think globally, but act locally - with a full appreciation of the diversity of local cultures. Major global companies must recognise that policies need to be managed with the broad context of business strategy and integrated into the work culture with the support of all elements of human resources management. Most currently, companies are accommodating national cultural differences while preserving work culture principals that encourage people to effectively execute the company's strategic objectives. Even to the casual observer, it is apparent that culture- a society's programming of the mind- has both a pervasive and changing influence on each national business environment. Global managers must recognise the influence of culture and be prepared to either respond to it or change it. This book examines current research in the study of managerial technology transfer.

  15. Technological inductive power transfer systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nikolay D. Madzharov; Valentin S. Nemkov

    2017-01-01

    Inductive power transfer is a very fast expanding technology with multiple design principles and practical implementations ranging from charging phones and computers to bionic systems, car chargers...

  16. Search Technologies | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our team of technology transfer specialists has specialized training in invention reporting, patenting, patent strategy, executing technology transfer agreements and marketing. TTC is comprised of professionals with diverse legal, scientific, and business/marketing expertise. Most of our staff hold doctorate-level technical and/or legal training.

  17. Available Technologies | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our team of technology transfer specialists has specialized training in invention reporting, patenting, patent strategy, executing technology transfer agreements and marketing. TTC is comprised of professionals with diverse legal, scientific, and business/marketing expertise. Most of our staff hold doctorate-level technical and/or legal training.

  18. SHARED TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GRIFFIN, JOHN M. HAUT, RICHARD C.

    2008-03-07

    The program established a collaborative process with domestic industries for the purpose of sharing Navy-developed technology. Private sector businesses were educated so as to increase their awareness of the vast amount of technologies that are available, with an initial focus on technology applications that are related to the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies (Hydrogen) Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. Specifically, the project worked to increase industry awareness of the vast technology resources available to them that have been developed with taxpayer funding. NAVSEA-Carderock and the Houston Advanced Research Center teamed with Nicholls State University to catalog NAVSEA-Carderock unclassified technologies, rated the level of readiness of the technologies and established a web based catalog of the technologies. In particular, the catalog contains technology descriptions, including testing summaries and overviews of related presentations.

  19. Options for Technology Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Richard E.; Sugarman, Barry

    1989-01-01

    Structural means by which institutions of higher education can tap technology are explored with an examination of the licensing of technological discoveries as well as the creation of start-up companies based upon university-developed technology. Additionally, the corporate structures that are being formed so that institutions can more easily hold…

  20. Technological inductive power transfer systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madzharov, Nikolay D.; Nemkov, Valentin S.

    2017-05-01

    Inductive power transfer is a very fast expanding technology with multiple design principles and practical implementations ranging from charging phones and computers to bionic systems, car chargers and continuous power transfer in technological lines. Only a group of devices working in near magnetic field is considered. This article is devoted to overview of different inductive power transfer (IPT) devices. The review of literature in this area showed that industrial IPT are not much discussed and examined. The authors have experience in design and implementation of several types of IPTs belonging to wireless automotive chargers and to industrial application group. Main attention in the article is paid to principles and design of technological IPTs

  1. Ethical Considerations in Technology Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froehlich, Thomas J.

    1991-01-01

    Examines ethical considerations involved in the transfer of appropriate information technology to less developed countries. Approaches to technology are considered; two philosophical frameworks for studying ethical considerations are discussed, i.e., the Kantian approach and the utilitarian perspective by John Stuart Mill; and integration of the…

  2. Macroeconomic level of technology transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smirnova Nadezhda

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available World practice of economic management has proved that the best indicator of competitiveness is achieved by that economic system, the economic units of which timely and adequately update the resource and technical base, thus achieving higher financial and economic indicators. Ensuring that sustainable development becomes possible due to the transfer of technological innovations, namely the diffusion from the developer to the customer on both commercial and free of charge basis. The article focuses on functioning of technology transfer at the macro level, namely the creation of its domestic models.

  3. Innovative technology transfer of nondestructive evaluation research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian Brashaw; Robert J. Ross; Xiping Wang

    2008-01-01

    Technology transfer is often an afterthought for many nondestructive evaluation (NDE) researchers. Effective technology transfer should be considered during the planning and execution of research projects. This paper outlines strategies for using technology transfer in NDE research and presents a wide variety of technology transfer methods used by a cooperative...

  4. Total Ionizing Dose effects in 130-nm commercial CMOS technologies for HEP experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Gonella, L; Silvestri, M; Gerardin, S; Pantano, D; Re, V; Manghisoni, M; Ratti, L; Ranieri, A

    2007-01-01

    The impact of foundry-to-foundry variability and bias conditions during irradiation on the Total Ionizing Dose (TID) response of commercial 130-nm CMOS technologies have been investigated for applications in High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments. n- and p-channel MOSFETs from three different manufacturers have been irradiated with X-rays up to more than 100 Mrad (SiO2). Even though the effects of TID are qualitatively similar, the amount of degradation is shown to vary considerably from foundry to foundry, probably depending on the processing of the STI oxide and/or doping profile in the substrate. The bias during irradiation showed to have a strong impact as well on the TID response, proving that exposure at worst case bias conditions largely overestimates the degradation a device may experience during its lifetime. Overall, our results increase the confidence that 130-nm CMOS technologies can be used in future HEP experiments even without Hardness-By-Design solutions, provided that constant monitoring of th...

  5. Technology Transfer and Technology Management in Strategic Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Prashant Salwan

    2005-01-01

    In a knowledge-based economy, the issues of technology transfer and management of technology, especially in sensitive strategic industries, are of major concern. The transfer of technology is a complex multidisciplinary area of technology management involving technology transfers from overseas developing agencies and internal technology transfers. Technology isa combination of four basic com~onents-facilities, abilities, facts, and frameworks. Economics of scale and complexities in technologi...

  6. The Hurdles of Technology Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitten, William B., II

    1992-01-01

    Potential problems in transferring technology from an idea to a product used by an organization occur in the areas of sponsorship, organization, and timing. Strategies for overcoming barriers include cultivating support, planning, education, cost-benefit analysis, understanding organizational structure, facilitating change, being sensitive to the…

  7. WILGA Photonics and Web Engineering, January 2012; EuCARD Sessions on HEP and Accelerator Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Romaniuk, R S

    2012-01-01

    Wilga Sessions on HEP experiments and accelerator technology were organized under the umbrella of the EU FP7 Project EuCARD – European Coordination for Accelerator Research and Development. The paper presents a digest of chosen technical work results shown by young researchers from technical universities during the SPIE-IEEE Wilga January 2012 Symposium on Photonics and Web Engineering. Topical tracks of the symposium embraced, among others, new technologies for photonics, sensory and nonlinear optical fibers, object oriented design of hardware, photonic metrology, optoelectronics and photonics applications, photonics-electronics co-design, optoelectronic and electronic systems for astronomy and high energy physics experiments, JET and pi-of-the sky experiments development. The symposium held two times a year is a summary in the development of numerable Ph.D. theses carried out in this country in the area of advanced electronic and photonic systems. It is also a great occasion for SPIE, IEEE, OSA and PSP st...

  8. Perspectives on Innovation and Technology Transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Dubickis, M; Gaile-Sarkane, E

    2015-01-01

    In an effort to understand development of economics, research fields such as innovation and technology transfer have emerged. Growing competition determines the importance of innovation and technology transfer. The purpose of the Paper is to identify qualitative relationships between innovation and technology transfer. The review of innovation, technology and technology transfer definitions and focus group discussion were used to formulate the research question: What are the relationships bet...

  9. NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute’s Technology Transfer Center (TTC) facilitates partnerships between the NIH research laboratories and external partners. With specialized teams, TTC guides the interactions of our partners from the point of discovery to patenting, from invention development to licensing. We play a key role in helping to accelerate development of cutting-edge research by connecting our partners to NIH’s world-class researchers, facilities, and knowledge.

  10. Gas turbine heat transfer and cooling technology

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Je-Chin; Ekkad, Srinath

    2012-01-01

    FundamentalsNeed for Turbine Blade CoolingTurbine-Cooling TechnologyTurbine Heat Transfer and Cooling IssuesStructure of the BookReview Articles and Book Chapters on Turbine Cooling and Heat TransferNew Information from 2000 to 2010ReferencesTurbine Heat TransferIntroductionTurbine-Stage Heat TransferCascade Vane Heat-Transfer ExperimentsCascade Blade Heat TransferAirfoil Endwall Heat TransferTurbine Rotor Blade Tip Heat TransferLeading-Edge Region Heat TransferFlat-Surface Heat TransferNew Information from 2000 to 20102.10 ClosureReferencesTurbine Film CoolingIntroductionFilm Cooling on Rotat

  11. Technological transfer to the education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Melamed-Varela

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the most efficient strategies related to generation of differentiation factors which contribute to stability and sustainability in time as well as the  momentum of technological development in different territories is represented by the growth in scientific, technological and innovative development based on the structure of economic systems. Education is considered a fundamental element because it is the essence in the formation and fortification of the capacities, skills and competencies in human capital. This is needed for the management of research projects, development and innovation that will contribute to technology transfer and the progress of scientific knowledge that is encouraged from the inside of the organizational structures of the national economic sectors One of the most influential and conceptual tendencies of economic thinking in the countries (Gomez, Ibagón& Forero, 2014 are represented by the theories based on endogenous development in Latin America.  In addition,  the scientific development of a nation brewing from a process of internal learning and strengthening of the technical and technological capabilities that support the processes of education and research as generators of knowledge (Amar &Diazgranados, 2006, this principle is supported by Mazzucato´s (2014 theory,  who considers states as  capable of generating a platform for enabling capabilities of resources for the scientific and technological development entrepreneurs ;fact that are continuously supported by education. Starting from this series of concepts, the following question arises: do different levels of modern educational institutions use technological access? It must be taken into account that the scientific and technological progress results of the research, development and innovation (RDI is not indifferent for educational organizations, an activity that is mostly awarded to the universities and technological development centers (Ortiz, 2012

  12. Analysis of relationship between apoptosis and change of Ca2+ in HepG-2 induced by CSA with laser scanning confocal technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yu-bin; Yu, Lei

    2008-12-01

    Laser scanning confoncal technology was used to study relationship between apoptosis and change of Ca2+ induced by CSA (Capparis spinosa L. total alkaloid, CSA) on human heptocarcinoma cell HepG-2. Killing effect of CSA on human heptocarcinoma cell HepG-2 was measured by MTT method, while morphological observation of HepG-2 cells was completed by fluorescence microscope. Apoptosis induced by CSA on HepG-2 cells was measured by flowcytometry. In addition, change of intracellular Ca2+ level of CSA on HepG-2 cells was observed by laser scanning confocal microscope. As a result, CSA had obvious cytotoxicity on HepG-2 in a dose-dependent manner, and its IC50 was 162.4μg/ml. CSA could induce characteristic apoptosic morphology of HepG-2 cells, and apoptosis percentage was significantly higher than control one. Migration of cells cycle from S phase to G2 phase had been blocked by CSA. Concentration of Ca2+ in HepG-2 had been increased by CSA, which was positive correlation with drug dosage. CSA had obvious effect of killing and inducing apoptosis on human heptocarcinoma cell HepG-2, and overload of Ca2+ might be invovled in these events.

  13. Transfer of technology; communicating helps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poolman, M. I.

    2009-04-01

    How water resources technology and knowledge can or should be transferred has been subject to a number of paradigm shifts. There were shifts between believing that water-users were ignorant to believing in the need to stimulate water-users' participation in water-system design. Participation in design is viewed to enhance water-users' competence in and willingness to maintain water resources infrastructure. However, there are many different parties involved in design, all with different interests and backgrounds. This research therefore focuses on developing a methodology with which water-users, local supporting institutions and researchers could develop a basis for common dialogue when discussing redesign of small water systems. During the development of this methodology discussions between the stakeholders showed that one obstacle towards using the water to its full potential is caused by infrastructural problems that hinder water storage and transportation. Assessment of a water resource should therefore not look only at the (potential) value of water, but also at the (potential) value of the storage and transportation infrastructure that enables use of water. Results so far also show that redesign of water systems to enhance the productivity of water was not necessarily related to the viewed value of water by stakeholders, but to the possibility of stakeholders to invest in or to find ways to stimulate investment in the infrastructure. Thereby it was also concluded that investments in transferring understanding about use and maintenance of the infrastructure means investing in stakeholder communication that enable all stakeholders to express their views about the use of, maintenance of and investment in technology.

  14. FY 2004 Technology Transfer Network and Affiliations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Innovative Partnerships Program sponsors a number of organizations around the country that are designed to assist U.S. businesses in accessing, utilizing, and commercializing NASA-funded research and technology. These organizations work closely with the Technology Transfer Offices, located at each of the 10 NASA field centers, providing a full range of technology transfer and commercialization services and assistance.

  15. Uplifting developing communities through sustained technology transfer

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mashiri, M

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available are considered pivotal for the successful performance and adoption of technologies. A final conclusion is also evident - in order to ensure sustained impact from technology transfer and adoption activities, the ultimate metric is participation as encapsulated...

  16. An integrated approach towards technology transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wal, L.F. van der; Eldering, C.J.J.; Putten, N.J. van

    2010-01-01

    In 2001 the European Space Agency (ESA), the Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs and the Netherlands Organisation of applied scientific research TNO initiated the Dutch Technology Transfer Programme (DTTP). Since then, 'technology transfer' has been a relevant part of Dutch space policy. The DTTP

  17. Advancing Green Economy through Technology Transfer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The transfer of green technologies to developing countries is often touted as a key green economy measure for alleviating poverty and improving welfare. This qualitative study explores the transfer of renewable energy technologies in Malawi with a view to (i) evaluating how green economy principles have been integrated ...

  18. Partnering Events | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our team of technology transfer specialists has specialized training in invention reporting, patenting, patent strategy, executing technology transfer agreements and marketing. TTC is comprised of professionals with diverse legal, scientific, and business/marketing expertise. Most of our staff hold doctorate-level technical and/or legal training.

  19. Technology Transfer brochure (Swedish version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2008-01-01

    A brief overview of how CERN's pioneering technologies for scientific research have branched out into various fields. Medicine, industrial processes, information and communication technology, as well as environment and energy fields make use of these innovative developments.

  20. Technology Transfer brochure (Polish version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2008-01-01

    A brief overview of how CERN's pioneering technologies for scientific research have branched out into various fields. Medicine, industrial processes, information and communication technology, as well as environment and energy fields make use of these innovative developments.

  1. Technology Transfer brochure (English version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Lefevre, C

    2007-01-01

    A brief overview of how CERN's pioneering technologies for scientific research have branched out into various fields. Medicine, industrial processes, information and communication technology, as well as environment and energy fields make use of these innovative developments.

  2. Distance technology transfer course content development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    The Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT) offers multiple technology transfer courses for engineering, : project design, and safety training for state and local agency personnel. These courses are often essential to the : agency mission. Becau...

  3. Technology transfers, foreign investment and productivity spillovers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Newman, Carol; Rand, John; Talbot, Theodore Purdendu

    2015-01-01

    transfers of knowledge/technology between linked firms) from productivity effects through indirect FDI spillovers. In addition to identifying indirect vertical productivity spillovers from FDI, our results show that there are productivity gains associated with direct linkages between foreign...

  4. EPA's Technology Transfer: Now Geared to Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Science and Technology, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Through capsule reports, seminars, and design manuals, Environmental Protection Agency has activated its industrial technology transfer program for marketing the products of federal research, development, and demonstration activities. Its purpose is to disseminate information to industry on available technology for control and treatment of air,…

  5. Technology Transfer: A Third World Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akubue, Anthony I.

    2002-01-01

    Technology transfer models are based on assumptions that do not reflect Third-World realities. Obstacles to building indigenous technology capacity include multinational corporations' control of innovations, strings attached to foreign aid, and indigenous reluctance to undertake research. Four areas of development include foreign direct…

  6. Development of Technology Transfer Economic Growth Metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastrangelo, Christina M.

    1998-01-01

    The primary objective of this project is to determine the feasibility of producing technology transfer metrics that answer the question: Do NASA/MSFC technical assistance activities impact economic growth? The data for this project resides in a 7800-record database maintained by Tec-Masters, Incorporated. The technology assistance data results from survey responses from companies and individuals who have interacted with NASA via a Technology Transfer Agreement, or TTA. The goal of this project was to determine if the existing data could provide indications of increased wealth. This work demonstrates that there is evidence that companies that used NASA technology transfer have a higher job growth rate than the rest of the economy. It also shows that the jobs being supported are jobs in higher wage SIC codes, and this indicates improvements in personal wealth. Finally, this work suggests that with correct data, the wealth issue may be addressed.

  7. Targeted Technology Transfer to US Independents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donald F. Duttlinger; E. Lance Cole

    2006-09-29

    The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) was established by domestic crude oil and natural gas producers in 1994 as a national not-for-profit organization to address the increasingly urgent need to improve the technology-transfer process in the U.S. upstream petroleum industry. Coordinated from a Headquarters (HQ) office in Houston, PTTC maintains an active grassroots program executed by 10 Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs) and two satellite offices (Figure 1). Regional Directors interact with domestic oil and gas producers through technology workshops, resource centers, websites, newsletters, technical publications and cooperative outreach efforts. HQ facilitates inter-regional technology transfer and implements a comprehensive communications program. Active volunteers on the National Board and in Producer Advisory Groups (PAGs) in each of the 10 regions focus effort in areas that will create the most impact for domestic producers. Focused effort by dedicated individuals across the country has enabled PTTC to achieve the milestones outlined in Appendix A.

  8. Technology Transfer and Commercialization Annual Report 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelle R. Blacker

    2008-12-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is a Department of Energy (DOE) multi-program national laboratory that conducts research and development in all DOE mission areas. Like all other federal laboratories, INL has a statutory, technology transfer mission to make its capabilities and technologies available to all federal agencies, to state and local governments, and to universities and industry. To fulfill this mission, INL encourages its scientific, engineering, and technical staff to disclose new inventions and creations to ensure the resulting intellectual property is captured, protected, and made available to others who might benefit from it. As part of the mission, intellectual property is licensed to industrial partners for commercialization, creating jobs and delivering the benefits of federally funded technology to consumers. In other cases, unique capabilities are made available to other federal agencies or to regional small businesses to solve specific technical challenges. In other interactions, INL employees work cooperatively with researchers and other technical staff of our partners to further develop emerging technologies. This report is a catalog of selected INL technology transfer and commercialization transactions during this past year. The size and diversity of INL technical resources, coupled with the large number of relationships with other organizations, virtually ensures that a report of this nature will fail to capture all interactions. Recognizing this limitation, this report focuses on transactions that are specifically authorized by technology transfer legislation (and corresponding contractual provisions) or involve the transfer of legal rights to technology to other parties. This report was compiled from primary records, which were readily available to the INL’s Office of Technology Transfer & Commercialization. The accomplishments cataloged in the report, however, reflect the achievements and creativity of the highly skilled researchers

  9. Clean Cast Steel Technology - Machinability and Technology Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. E. Bates; J. A. Griffin

    2000-05-01

    There were two main tasks in the Clean Cast Steel Technology - Machinability and Technology Transfer Project. These were (1) determine the processing facts that control the machinability of cast steel and (2) determine the ability of ladle stirring to homogenize ladle temperature, reduce the tap and pouring temperatures, and reduce casting scrap.

  10. Technology Transfer Annual Report Fiscal Year 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skinner, Wendy Lee [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is a Department of Energy (DOE) multi-program national laboratory that conducts research and development in all DOE mission areas. Like all other federal laboratories, INL has a statutory, technology transfer mission to make its capabilities and technologies available to federal agencies, state and local governments, universities, and industry. To fulfill this mission, INL encourages its scientific, engineering, and technical staff to disclose new inventions and creations to ensure the resulting intellectual property is captured, protected, and available to others who might benefit from it. As part of the mission, intellectual property is licensed to industrial partners for commercialization, job creation, and delivering the benefits of federally funded technology to consumers. In some cases, unique capabilities are made available to other federal agencies, international organizations, domestic and foreign commercial entities, or small businesses to solve specific technical challenges. INL employees work cooperatively with researchers and technical staff from the university and industrial sectors to further development of emerging technologies. In this multinational global economy, INL is contributing to the development of the next generation of engineers and scientists by licensing software to educational institutions throughout the world. This report is a catalog of select INL technology transfer and commercialization transactions and research agreements that were executed during this past year. The size and diversity of INL technical resources, coupled with the large number of relationships with other organizations, virtually ensures that a report of this nature will fail to capture all interactions. Recognizing this limitation, this report focuses on transactions that are specifically authorized by technology transfer legislation (and corresponding contractual provisions) or involve the transfer of legal rights to technology to

  11. Support and Technology Transfer: Results and Accomplishments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    concerns are addressed. The CAFT/ FMT Staff also maintains an extensive information database system for technology transfer that is accessible on...to assure that manufacturability concerns are addressed. The CAFT/ FMT Staff also maintains an extensive information database system for technology...19 12/15/08 No cost extension to June 30, 2009 3 Short Term Project Activities 3.1 Process Action Teams and Industry Forums CAFT/ FMT Staff

  12. Technology Transfer, Foreign Direct Investment and Economic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study is to investigate the long-run equilibrium relationship between various international factors and economic growth, as well as to assess the short-term impact of inward FDI, trade and economic growth on international technology transfer to Nigeria. To achieve this, the study used a time series data from ...

  13. Climate change scenarios and technology transfer protocols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kypreos, Socrates; Turton, Hal [Energy Economics Group, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen PSI, CH-5232 (Switzerland)

    2011-02-15

    We apply a specific version of MERGE-ETL, an integrated assessment model, to study global climate policies supported by Technology Transfer Protocols (TTPs). We model a specific formulation of such a TTP where donor countries finance via carbon tax revenues, the diffusion of carbon-free technologies in developing countries (DCs) and quantify its benefits. Industrialized countries profit from increased technology exports, global diffusion of advanced technology (leading to additional technology learning and cost reductions) and reduced climate damages through the likelihood of greater global participation in a new international agreement. DCs experience increased welfare from access to subsidized technology, and profit from the reduction of damages related to climate change and expected secondary benefits of carbon abatement (such as reduced local and regional air pollution). The analysis identifies potential candidate technologies that could be supported under a TTP, and the impact of a TTP on economic development (including the flow of transfer subsidies) and global emissions. Although a TTP may encourage additional participation, such a proposal is only likely to be successful if an increased willingness to pay to avoid climate damages is accepted, first by the present and future generations of the industrialized world and later on, when sufficient economic growth is accumulated, by today's developing countries. (author)

  14. Applications of aerospace technology in industry. A technology transfer profile: Food technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, D. M.

    1971-01-01

    Food processing and preservation technologies are reviewed, expected technological advances are considered including processing and market factors. NASA contributions to food technology and nutrition are presented with examples of transfer from NASA to industry.

  15. Green Technology Transfers and Border Tax Adjustments

    OpenAIRE

    Alain-Désiré Nimubona; Horatiu Rus

    2011-01-01

    We develop a two-country general equilibrium model of foreign assistance tied to environmental clean-up in the presence of transboundary pollution. The recipient country generates pollution as a by-product in the production of a ‘dirty’ good, which it consumes as well as exports to the donor country. In contrast to the literature which typically treats aid as a monetary transfer, we assume that foreign aid consists in a transfer of environmental technology that lowers the cost of public clean...

  16. Tropical medicine: Telecommunications and technology transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legters, Llewellyn J.

    1991-01-01

    The potential for global outbreaks of tropical infectious diseases, and our ability to identify and respond to such outbreaks is a major concern. Rapid, efficient telecommunications is viewed as part of the solution to this set of problems - the means to link a network of epidemiological field stations via satellite with U.S. academic institutions and government agencies, for purposes of research, training in tropical medicine, and observation of and response to epidemic emergencies. At a workshop, telecommunications and technology transfer were addressed and applications of telecommunications technology in long-distance consultation, teaching and disaster relief were demonstrated. Applications in teaching and consultation in tropical infectious diseases is discussed.

  17. Local R&D and Technology Transfers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aggarwal, Aradhna

    This study examines how inter-firm heterogeneities in technology modes and intensities are linked to ownership of firms in India, using a panel dataset of 2000 odd Bombay Stock Exchange listed firms for the period from 2003 to 2014 drawn from the PROWESS database of CMIE. For the analysis, foreign......-2014. The propensity score matching (PSM) analysis reveals that the majority owned foreign companies spend less on R&D and more on technology transfers than their local counterparts. Overall, threshold equity holding and global conditions matter. A panel data regression analysis on matched sample confirms the findings...

  18. Standards. Volume 1. Report (Technology Transfer Program)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-06-30

    program presently in operation in the Ishikawajima - Harima Heavy Industries (IHI) of Japan. Administration. the study of the shipyards of Information...following paragraphs: THE TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER PROGRAM (TTP) The U. S. shipbuilding industry is well aware of the significant shipbuilding cost...appli- cation of the TTP results to the American shipbuilding industry , Lev- ingston initiated a cost-sharing contract with MarAd to provide docu

  19. Mission & Role | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI TTC serves as the focal point for implementing the Federal Technology Transfer Act to utilize patents as incentive for commercial development of technologies and to establish research collaborations and licensing among academia, federal laboratories, non-profit organizations, and industry. The TTC supports technology development activities for the National Cancer Institute and nine other NIH Institutes and Centers. TTC staff negotiate co-development agreements and licenses with universities, non-profit organizations, and pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies to ensure compliance with Federal statutes, regulations and the policies of the National Institutes of Health. TTC also reviews employee invention reports and makes recommendations concerning filing of domestic and foreign patent applications. | [google6f4cd5334ac394ab.html

  20. The Change Book: A Blueprint for Technology Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addiction Technology Transfer Centers.

    This document was developed by the Addiction Technology Transfer Center (ATTC) National Network to improve understanding about how valuable effective technology transfer is to the fields of substance abuse treatment and prevention. Technology transfer involves creating a mechanism by which a desired change is accepted, incorporated, and reinforced…

  1. TARGETED TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO US INDEPENDENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donald F. Duttlinger; E. Lance Cole

    2005-01-01

    The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of assisting U.S. independent oil and gas producers with timely, informed technology decisions during Fiscal Year 2004 (FY04). PTTC has active grassroots programs through its 10 Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs) and 2 satellite offices. They bring research and academia to the table via their association with geological surveys and engineering departments. The regional directors interact with independent oil and gas producers through technology workshops, resource centers, websites, newsletters, technical publications and other cooperative outreach efforts. PTTC's Headquarters (HQ) staff receives direction from a National Board of Directors predominantly comprised of American natural gas and oil producers to plan and manage the overall technology transfer program. PTTC HQ implements a comprehensive communications program by interconnecting the talents of the National Board, 10 Regional Producer Advisory Groups (PAG) and the RLOs with industry across the U.S. PTTC effectively combines federal funding through the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy, namely the Strategic Center for Natural Gas and Oil with state and industry contributions to share application of upstream technologies. Ultimately, these efforts factor in to provide a safe, secure and reliable energy supply for American consumers. This integrated resource base, combined with industry volunteers guiding PTTC's activities and the dedication of national and regional staff, are achieving notable results regarding domestic production figures. PTTC is increasingly recognized as a critical resource for information and access to technologies by providing direct contact with research, development and demonstration (RD&D) results. A key to the program is demonstrating proven technologies that can be applied broadly and rapidly. This technical progress report summarizes PTTC's accomplishments during

  2. Technology transfer from the space exploration initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buden, D.

    1991-06-14

    Space exploration has demonstrated that it stimulates the national economy by creating new and improved products, increased employment, and provides a stimulus to education. The exploration of the Moon and Mars under the Space Exploration Initiative has the potential of accelerating this stimulates to the economy. It is difficult to identify all of the concrete ways this will be accomplished. However, many areas can be identified. The space exploration building blocks of power, propulsion, spacecraft, robotics, rovers, mining and manufacturing, communications, navigation, habitats, life support and infrastructures are reviewed to identify possible technology areas. For example, better means for working in hazardous areas and handling hazardous waste are potential outcomes of this initiative. Methods to produce higher quality goods and improve America`s competitiveness in manufacturing will undoubtedly evolve from the need to produce products that must last many years in the harsh environments of space and planetary surfaces. Some ideas for technology transfer are covered in this paper.

  3. Technology transfer from the space exploration initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buden, D.

    1991-06-14

    Space exploration has demonstrated that it stimulates the national economy by creating new and improved products, increased employment, and provides a stimulus to education. The exploration of the Moon and Mars under the Space Exploration Initiative has the potential of accelerating this stimulates to the economy. It is difficult to identify all of the concrete ways this will be accomplished. However, many areas can be identified. The space exploration building blocks of power, propulsion, spacecraft, robotics, rovers, mining and manufacturing, communications, navigation, habitats, life support and infrastructures are reviewed to identify possible technology areas. For example, better means for working in hazardous areas and handling hazardous waste are potential outcomes of this initiative. Methods to produce higher quality goods and improve America's competitiveness in manufacturing will undoubtedly evolve from the need to produce products that must last many years in the harsh environments of space and planetary surfaces. Some ideas for technology transfer are covered in this paper.

  4. Orbit transfer rocket engine technology program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, N. B.; Harmon, T. J.

    1993-10-01

    An advanced near term (1990's) space-based Orbit Transfer Vehicle Engine (OTVE) system was designed, and the technologies applicable to its construction, maintenance, and operations were developed under Tasks A through F of the Orbit Transfer Rocket Engine Technology Program. Task A was a reporting task. In Task B, promising OTV turbomachinery technologies were explored: two stage partial admission turbines, high velocity ratio diffusing crossovers, soft wear ring seals, advanced bearing concepts, and a rotordynamic analysis. In Task C, a ribbed combustor design was developed. Possible rib and channel geometries were chosen analytically. Rib candidates were hot air tested and laser velocimeter boundary layer analyses were conducted. A channel geometry was also chosen on the basis of laser velocimeter data. To verify the predicted heat enhancement effects, a ribbed calorimeter spool was hot fire tested. Under Task D, the optimum expander cycle engine thrust, performance and envelope were established for a set of OTV missions. Optimal nozzle contours and quick disconnects for modularity were developed. Failure Modes and Effects Analyses, maintenance and reliability studies and component study results were incorporated into the engine system. Parametric trades on engine thrust, mixture ratio, and area ratio were also generated. A control system and the health monitoring and maintenance operations necessary for a space-based engine were outlined in Task E. In addition, combustor wall thickness measuring devices and a fiberoptic shaft monitor were developed. These monitoring devices were incorporated into preflight engine readiness checkout procedures. In Task F, the Integrated Component Evaluator (I.C.E.) was used to demonstrate performance and operational characteristics of an advanced expander cycle engine system and its component technologies. Sub-system checkouts and a system blowdown were performed. Short transitions were then made into main combustor ignition and

  5. Composite fabrication via resin transfer molding technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamison, G.M.; Domeier, L.A.

    1996-04-01

    The IMPReS (Integrated Modeling and Processing of Resin-based Structures) Program was funded in FY95 to consolidate, evaluate and enhance Sandia`s capabilities in the design and fabrication of composite structures. A key driver of this and related programs was the need for more agile product development processes and for model based design and fabrication tools across all of Sandia`s material technologies. A team of polymer, composite and modeling personnel was assembled to benchmark Sandia`s existing expertise in this area relative to industrial and academic programs and to initiate the tasks required to meet Sandia`s future needs. RTM (Resin Transfer Molding) was selected as the focus composite fabrication technology due to its versatility and growing use in industry. Modeling efforts focused on the prediction of composite mechanical properties and failure/damage mechanisms and also on the uncured resin flow processes typical of RTM. Appropriate molds and test composites were fabricated and model validation studies begun. This report summarizes and archives the modeling and fabrication studies carried out under IMPReS and evaluates the status of composite technology within Sandia. It should provide a complete and convenient baseline for future composite technology efforts within Sandia.

  6. A model technology transfer program for independent operators: Kansas Technology Transfer Model (KTTM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoeling, L.G.

    1993-09-01

    This report describes the development and testing of the Kansas Technology Transfer Model (KTTM) which is to be utilized as a regional model for the development of other technology transfer programs for independent operators throughout oil-producing regions in the US. It describes the linkage of the regional model with a proposed national technology transfer plan, an evaluation technique for improving and assessing the model, and the methodology which makes it adaptable on a regional basis. The report also describes management concepts helpful in managing a technology transfer program. The original Tertiary Oil Recovery Project (TORP) activities, upon which the KTTM is based, were developed and tested for Kansas and have proved to be effective in assisting independent operators in utilizing technology. Through joint activities of TORP and the Kansas Geological Survey (KGS), the KTTM was developed and documented for application in other oil-producing regions. During the course of developing this model, twelve documents describing the implementation of the KTTM were developed as deliverables to DOE. These include: (1) a problem identification (PI) manual describing the format and results of six PI workshops conducted in different areas of Kansas, (2) three technology workshop participant manuals on advanced waterflooding, reservoir description, and personal computer applications, (3) three technology workshop instructor manuals which provides instructor material for all three workshops, (4) three technologies were documented as demonstration projects which included reservoir management, permeability modification, and utilization of a liquid-level acoustic measuring device, (5) a bibliography of all literature utilized in the documents, and (6) a document which describes the KTTM.

  7. Global climate change, technology transfer and trade with complete specialization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, V. [Jadavpur Univ., Calcutta (India). Dept. of Economics; Ruebbelke, D.T.G. [Chemnitz Univ. of Technology (Germany). Dept. of Economics

    2007-07-01

    The paper develops a model in which a country with better technology for abatement of greenhouse gas (GHG) emission (the North) commits to an international protocol to keep the global GHG emission with a specified limit while it helps the mitigation effort in the other country (the South) with unconditional transfer of abatement technology. It finds out in the autarkic ('no trade') equilibrium that the technology transfer offer from the North is always accepted by the South. The North may offer either a partial or a complete technology transfer. If partial technology transfer is offered it finds out the determinants of the extent of technology transfer. Then it compares the autarkic equilibrium with the equilibrium where tradw with complete specialization occurs and finds out that trade limits the scope of technology transfer as an instrument for mitigation of global GHG emission.

  8. UK-India CBM technology transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creedy, D.P.; Garner, K.; Vrolijk, C. [Wardell Armstrong, Newcastle-under-Lyme (United Kingdom)

    2005-12-15

    The aim of this UK-India coalbed methane (CBM) technology transfer project was to promote the development of CBM gas extraction and utilisation techniques appropriate to the geological and mining conditions in India, focusing on coal mine methane (CMM) and abandoned mine methane (AMM) needs. The potential use of environmental support mechanism under the Kyoto Agreement to project development was also explored. Two of the most advanced, gassy coal mines in India were selected as case study sites: Moonidih coal mine and North Amlabad coal mine. Background data were gathered on the two mines and supplemented by observations made during the UK team visit to India in December 2004. The report concludes that opportunities exist for UK companies in VCBM, CMM and DMM in India. 12 refs., 4 figs., 2 apps.

  9. Transfer of terrestrial technology for lunar mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Robert A.; Green, Patricia A.

    The functions, operational procedures, and major items of equipment that comprise the terrestrial mining process are characterized. These data are used to synthesize a similar activity on the lunar surface. Functions, operations, and types of equipment that can be suitably transferred to lunar operation are identified. Shortfalls, enhancements, and technology development needs are described. The lunar mining process and what is required to adapt terrestrial equipment are highlighted. It is concluded that translation of terrestrial mining equipment and operational processes to perform similar functions on the lunar surface is practical. Adequate attention must be given to the harsh environment and logistical constraints of the lunar setting. By using earth-based equipment as a forcing function, near- and long-term benefits are derived (i.e., improved terrestrial mining in the near term vis-a-vis commercial production of helium-3 in the long term.

  10. Technology transfer at NASA - A librarian's view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchan, Ronald L.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA programs, publications, and services promoting the transfer and utilization of aerospace technology developed by and for NASA are briefly surveyed. Topics addressed include the corporate sources of NASA technical information and its interest for corporate users of information services; the IAA and STAR abstract journals; NASA/RECON, NTIS, and the AIAA Aerospace Database; the RECON Space Commercialization file; the Computer Software Management and Information Center file; company information in the RECON database; and services to small businesses. Also discussed are the NASA publications Tech Briefs and Spinoff, the Industrial Applications Centers, NASA continuing bibliographies on management and patent abstracts (indexed using the NASA Thesaurus), the Index to NASA News Releases and Speeches, and the Aerospace Research Information Network (ARIN).

  11. Targeted Technology Transfer to US Independents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. Lance Cole

    2009-09-30

    The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) was established by domestic crude oil and natural gas producers, working in conjunction with the Independent Petroleum Association of America (IPAA), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and selected universities, in 1994 as a national not-for-profit organization. Its goal is to transfer Exploration and Production (E&P) technology to the domestic upstream petroleum industry, in particular to the small independent operators. PTTC connects producers, technology providers and innovators, academia, and university/industry/government research and development (R&D) groups. From inception PTTC has received federal funding through DOE's oil and natural gas program managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). With higher funding available in its early years, PTTC was able to deliver well more than 100 workshops per year, drawing 6,000 or more attendees per year. Facing the reality of little or no federal funding in the 2006-2007 time frame, PTTC and the American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG) worked together for PTTC to become a subsidiary organization of AAPG. This change brings additional organizational and financial resources to bear for PTTC's benefit. PTTC has now been 'powered by AAPG' for two full fiscal years. There is a clear sense that PTTC has stabilized and is strengthening its regional workshop and national technology transfer programs and is becoming more entrepreneurial in exploring technology transfer opportunities beyond its primary DOE contract. Quantitative accomplishments: PTTC has maintained its unique structure of a national organization working through Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs) to deliver local, affordable workshops. During the contract period PTTC consolidated from 10 to six regions efficiency and alignment with AAPG sections. The number of workshops delivered by its RLOs during the contract period is shown below. Combined attendance over the

  12. A planning framework for transferring building energy technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farhar, B C; Brown, M A; Mohler, B L; Wilde, M; Abel, F H

    1990-07-01

    Accelerating the adoption of new and existing cost-effective technologies has significant potential to reduce the energy consumed in US buildings. This report presents key results of an interlaboratory technology transfer planning effort in support of the US Department of Energy's Office of Building Technologies (OBT). A guiding assumption for planning was that OBT's R D program should forge linkages with existing programs whose goals involved enhancing energy efficiency in buildings. An ad hoc Technology Transfer Advisory Group reviewed the existing analysis and technology transfer program, brainstormed technology transfer approaches, interviewed DOE program managers, identified applicable research results, and developed a framework that management could use in deciding on the best investments of technology transfer resources. Representatives of 22 organizations were interviewed on their views of the potential for transferring energy efficiency technologies through active linking with OBT. The report describes these programs and interview results; outlines OBT tools, technologies, and practices to be transferred; defines OBT audiences; identifies technology transfer functions and presents a framework devised using functions and audiences; presents some 60 example technology transfer activities; and documents the Advisory Group's recommendations. 37 refs., 3 figs., 12 tabs.

  13. HEP Science Network Requirements--Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakken, Jon; Barczyk, Artur; Blatecky, Alan; Boehnlein, Amber; Carlson, Rich; Chekanov, Sergei; Cotter, Steve; Cottrell, Les; Crawford, Glen; Crawford, Matt; Dart, Eli; Dattoria, Vince; Ernst, Michael; Fisk, Ian; Gardner, Rob; Johnston, Bill; Kent, Steve; Lammel, Stephan; Loken, Stewart; Metzger, Joe; Mount, Richard; Ndousse-Fetter, Thomas; Newman, Harvey; Schopf, Jennifer; Sekine, Yukiko; Stone, Alan; Tierney, Brian; Tull, Craig; Zurawski, Jason

    2010-04-27

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the US Department of Energy Office of Science, the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of the Office of Science programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 20 years. In August 2009 ESnet and the Office of High Energy Physics (HEP), of the DOE Office of Science, organized a workshop to characterize the networking requirements of the programs funded by HEP. The International HEP community has been a leader in data intensive science from the beginning. HEP data sets have historically been the largest of all scientific data sets, and the communty of interest the most distributed. The HEP community was also the first to embrace Grid technologies. The requirements identified at the workshop are summarized below, and described in more detail in the case studies and the Findings section: (1) There will be more LHC Tier-3 sites than orginally thought, and likely more Tier-2 to Tier-2 traffic than was envisioned. It it not yet known what the impact of this will be on ESnet, but we will need to keep an eye on this traffic. (2) The LHC Tier-1 sites (BNL and FNAL) predict the need for 40-50 Gbps of data movement capacity in 2-5 years, and 100-200 Gbps in 5-10 years for HEP program related traffic. Other key HEP sites include LHC Tier-2 and Tier-3 sites, many of which are located at universities. To support the LHC, ESnet must continue its collaborations with university and international networks. (3) While in all cases the deployed 'raw' network bandwidth must exceed the user requirements in order to meet the data transfer and reliability requirements, network engineering for trans

  14. Geo energy research and development: technology transfer update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traeger, R.K.; Dugan, V.L.

    1983-01-01

    Sandia Geo Energy Programs in geothermal, coal, oil and gas, and synfuel technologies have been effective in transferring research concepts to applications in private industry. This report updates the previous summary (SAND82-0211, March 1982) to include recent technology transfers and to reflect recent changes in philosophy on technology transfer. Over 40 items transferred to industry have been identified in the areas of Hardware, Risk Removal and Understanding. Successful transfer is due largely to personal interactions between Sandia engineers and the technical staffs of private industry.

  15. An examination of technology transfer as a tool for management.

    OpenAIRE

    McCorkendale, Don Berton

    1986-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited An examination of the technology transfer process as it relates to contemporary management practice. The objective is to acquaint the reader with the concept of technology transfer and the mechanism of information flow within business organizations. Includes an in-depth analysis of the predictive model of technology transfer with an emphasis on the interrelationship between management and the factors effecting info...

  16. Targeted Technology Transfer to US Independents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schatzinger, Viola [Petroleum Tech. Transfer Council, Tulsa, OK (United States); Chapman, Kathy [Petroleum Tech. Transfer Council, Tulsa, OK (United States); Lovendahl, Kristi [Petroleum Tech. Transfer Council, Tulsa, OK (United States)

    2014-09-30

    The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) is a unique not-for-profit network that focuses on transferring Exploration and Production (E&P) technology to the domestic oil and natural gas producing industry. PTTC connects producers, technology providers and innovators, academia, research and development (R&D) consortiums and governments. Local affordable workshops delivered by Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs), which are typically a university or geological survey, are a primary tool. PTTC also maintains a website network, issues a national newsletter, provides a column in a major trade publication, and exhibits at major industry events. It also encourages industry to ask technology-related questions, striving to find relevant answers that will save questioners significant time. Working since late 1993, the PTTC network has a proven track record of providing industry with technology insights they can apply. Volunteers at the regional and national level provide key guidance regarding where to focus technical effort and help connect PTTC with industry. At historical funding levels, PTTC had been able to hold well more than 100 workshops per year, drawing 6,000+ attendees. As funding decreased in the early 2000s, the level of activity decreased and PTTC sought a merger with the American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG), becoming an AAPG-managed organization at the start of FY08. This relationship with AAPG was terminated by mutual consent in May 2011 and PTTC once again operates independently. Chris Hall, California continued to serve as Chairman of the Board of Directors until December 2013. At the time PTTC reorganized into a RLO led organization with Mary Carr and Jeremy Viscomi as co-Executive Directors. Jerry Anderson became the Chairman of the PTTC Board of Directors and Chris Hall continues to serve on the Board. Workshop activity stabilized at 55-65 workshops per year averaging 3,100 attendees. FY14 represented the fifth year in a multi

  17. Summary of the National Technology Transfer and Advancement Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provides a summary of the National Technology Transfer and Advancement Act which pomote economic, environmental, and social well-being by bringing technology and industrial innovation to the marketplace

  18. Brookhaven National Laboratory technology transfer report, fiscal year 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    An increase in the activities of the Office of Research and Technology Applications (ORTA) is reported. Most of the additional effort has been directed to the regional electric utility initiative, but intensive efforts have been applied to the commercialization of a compact synchrotron storage ring for x-ray lithography applications. At least six laboratory technologies are reported as having been transferred or being in the process of transfer. Laboratory accelerator technology is being applied to study radiation effects, and reactor technology is being applied for designing space reactors. Technologies being transferred and emerging technologies are described. The role of the ORTA and the technology transfer process are briefly described, and application assessment records are given for a number of technologies. A mini-incubator facility is also described. (LEW)

  19. Climate Change and Requirement of Transfer of Environmentally Sound Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uddin, Mahatab

    Technology and policy play a twofold role in international environmental laws. Stronger environmental policies encourage new green technologies and likewise, better technologies make it easier to regulate. “Technology transfer” refers to the transfer from one party, an association or institution...... that developed the technology, to another that adopts, adapts, and uses it. As different kinds of threats posed by climate change are continuously increasing all over the world the issue of “technology transfer” especially the transfer of environmentally sound technologies has become one of the key topics...... of international environmental debates. This thesis addresses, firstly, the possible methods of technology transfer and secondly, how current international environmental laws play its role to facilitate the transfer. Accordingly, I have focused on the concerned provisions of Kyoto Protocol and its subsequent...

  20. How technology transfer issues are managed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sink, C.H. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Easley, K.R. [Waste Policy Inst. (United States)

    1991-12-31

    In 1989, Secretary of Energy James Watkins made a commitment to accelerate DOE compliance with all applicable laws and standards aimed at protecting human health and the environment. At a minimum, this pledge requires the remediation of the 1989 inventory of chemical, radioactive, and mixed wastes at DOE production sites by 2019. The 1989 Complex inventory consisted of more than 3,700 sites, encompassing more than 26,000 acres contaminated with radioactive, hazardous, and mixed wastes. In addition, over 500 surplus sites are awaiting decontamination and decommissioning (D and D), and approximately 5,000 peripheral properties have contaminated soils (e.g., uranium tailings). Moreover, these problems exist at both inactive sites, where the primary focus is on environmental restoration, and at active sites, where the major emphasis is on improved waste management techniques. Although some of DOE`s problems are considered unique due to radioactivity, most forms of contamination resident in the Complex are not; rather, contaminants such as waste chemicals (e.g., inorganics), organics (e.g., fuels and solvents), halogenated organics (e.g., PCBs) and heavy metals commonly result in conventional industrial processes. Although certain other forms of contamination are more unique to DOE operations (e.g., radioactive materials, explosives, and pyrophorics), they are not exclusive to DOE. As DOE develops innovative solutions to these and related waste problems, it is imperative that technology systems and lessons learned be transferred from DOE sites and its R and D laboratories to private industry to maximize the nation`s return on environmental management technology investments.

  1. Bystander effect in human hepatoma HepG2 cells caused by medium transfers at different times after high-LET carbon ion irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qingfeng; Li, Qiang; Jin, Xiaodong; Liu, Xinguo; Dai, Zhongying

    2011-01-01

    Although radiation-induced bystander effects have been well documented in a variety of biological systems, whether irradiated cells have the ability to generate bystander signaling persistently is still unclear and the clinical relevance of bystander effects in radiotherapy remains to be elucidated. This study examines tumor cellular bystander response to autologous medium from cell culture irradiated with high-linear energy transfer (LET) heavy ions at a therapeutically relevant dose in terms of clonogenic cell survival. In vitro experiments were performed using human hepatoma HepG2 cell line exposed to 100 keV/μm carbon ions at a dose of 2 Gy. Two different periods (2 and 12 h) after irradiation, irradiated cell conditioned medium (ICCM) and replenished fresh medium were harvested and then transferred to unirradiated bystander cells. Cellular bystander responses were measured with the different medium transfer protocols. Significant higher survival fractions of unirradiated cells receiving the media from the irradiated cultures at the different times post-irradiation than those of the control were observed. Even replenishing fresh medium for unirradiated cells which had been exposed to the ICCM for 12 h could not prevent the bystander cells from the increased survival fraction. These results suggest that the irradiated cells could release unidentified signal factor(s), which induced the increase in survival fraction for the unirradiated bystander cells, into the media sustainedly and the carbon ions triggered a cascade of signaling events in the irradiated cells rather than secreting the soluble signal factor(s) just at a short period after irradiation. Based on the observations in this study, the importance of bystander effect in clinical radiotherapy was discussed and incorporating the bystander effect into the current radiobiological models, which are applicable to heavy ion radiotherapy, is needed urgently.

  2. Bystander effect in human hepatoma HepG2 cells caused by medium transfers at different times after high-LET carbon ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Qingfeng [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Radiation Biology and Medicine of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Li Qiang, E-mail: liqiang@impcas.ac.c [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Radiation Biology and Medicine of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Jin Xiaodong; Liu Xinguo [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Radiation Biology and Medicine of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Dai Zhongying [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Radiation Biology and Medicine of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China)

    2011-01-15

    Although radiation-induced bystander effects have been well documented in a variety of biological systems, whether irradiated cells have the ability to generate bystander signaling persistently is still unclear and the clinical relevance of bystander effects in radiotherapy remains to be elucidated. This study examines tumor cellular bystander response to autologous medium from cell culture irradiated with high-linear energy transfer (LET) heavy ions at a therapeutically relevant dose in terms of clonogenic cell survival. In vitro experiments were performed using human hepatoma HepG2 cell line exposed to 100 keV/{mu}m carbon ions at a dose of 2 Gy. Two different periods (2 and 12 h) after irradiation, irradiated cell conditioned medium (ICCM) and replenished fresh medium were harvested and then transferred to unirradiated bystander cells. Cellular bystander responses were measured with the different medium transfer protocols. Significant higher survival fractions of unirradiated cells receiving the media from the irradiated cultures at the different times post-irradiation than those of the control were observed. Even replenishing fresh medium for unirradiated cells which had been exposed to the ICCM for 12 h could not prevent the bystander cells from the increased survival fraction. These results suggest that the irradiated cells could release unidentified signal factor(s), which induced the increase in survival fraction for the unirradiated bystander cells, into the media sustainedly and the carbon ions triggered a cascade of signaling events in the irradiated cells rather than secreting the soluble signal factor(s) just at a short period after irradiation. Based on the observations in this study, the importance of bystander effect in clinical radiotherapy was discussed and incorporating the bystander effect into the current radiobiological models, which are applicable to heavy ion radiotherapy, is needed urgently.

  3. Overcoming Barriers to the Transfer and Diffusion of Climate Technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Nygaard, Ivan; Hansen, Ulrich Elmer

    2015-01-01

    This guidebook provides practical and operational guidance on how to assess and overcome barriersfacing the transfer and diffusion of technologies for climate change mitigation and adaptation.The guidebook is designed to support the analysis of specific technologies, rather than pursuing asectoral (e.g. transport) or technology group (e.g. renewable energy) approach.Given that there is no single solution to enhancing technology transfer and diffusion policies needbe tailored to country-specif...

  4. OPTIMIZING OUTCOME IN THE UNIVERSITY-INDUSTRY TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER PROJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed ALAVI

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Transferring inventions of academic scientists to private enterprises for the purpose of commercialization is long known as University-Industry (firm Technology Transfer While the importance of this phenomenon is simultaneously raising in public and private sector, only a part of patented academic inventions succeed in passing the process of commercialization. Despite the fact that formal Technology Transfer process and licencing of patented innovations to third party is the main legal tool for safeguarding rights of academic inventors in commercialization of their inventions, it is not sufficient for transmitting tacit knowledge which is necessary in exploitation of transferred technology. Existence of reciprocal and complementary relations between formal and informal technology transfer process has resulted in formation of different models for university-industry organizational collaboration or even integration where licensee firms keep contact with academic inventors after gaining legal right for commercialization of their patented invention. Current paper argues that despite necessity for patents to legally pass the right of commercialization of an invention, they are not sufficient for complete knowledge transmission in the process of technology transfer. Lack of efficiency of formal mechanism to end the Technology Transfer loop makes an opportunity to create innovative interpersonal and organizational connections among patentee and licensee company. With emphasize on need for further elaboration of informal mechanisms as critical and underappreciated aspect of technology transfer process, article will try to answer the questions of how to optimize knowledge transmission process in the framework of University-Industry Technology Transfer Projects? What is the theoretical basis for university-industry technology transfer process? What are organization collaborative models which can enhance overall performance by improving transmission of

  5. Technology Transfer and the Innovative Process in Biomedical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Some of these mechanisms include turnkey operations, the technological enclave, licensing, joint ventures, patents, in house transfers to foreign subsidiaries, simple emulation of a product or a process, direct purchase of naked technology, embodied technology/technological services, education abroad, site-visits and on ...

  6. Introduction to the workshop on technology transfer in software engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harrison, Warren; Wieringa, Roelf J.

    The goal of the Workshop on Technology Transfer in Software Engineering is to increase our understanding of technology transfer in software engineering, and to learn from successful case studies. We wanted to bring researchers and practitioners together to create an inventory of problems in software

  7. A southern region conference on technology transfer and extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarah F. Ashton; William G. Hubbard; H. Michael Rauscher

    2009-01-01

    Forest landowners and managers have different education and technology transfer needs and preferences. To be effective it is important to use a multi-faceted science delivery/technology transfer program to reach them. Multi-faceted science delivery programs can provide similar content over a wide range of mechanisms including printed publications, face-to-face...

  8. Climate Change and Requirement of Transfer of Environmentally Sound Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Uddin, Mahatab

    2011-01-01

    Technology and policy play a twofold role in international environmental laws. Stronger environmental policies encourage new green technologies and likewise, better technologies make it easier to regulate. “Technology transfer” refers to the transfer from one party, an association or institution that developed the technology, to another that adopts, adapts, and uses it. As different kinds of threats posed by climate change are continuously increasing all over the world the issue of “technolog...

  9. A model technology transfer program for independent operators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoeling, L.G.

    1996-08-01

    In August 1992, the Energy Research Center (ERC) at the University of Kansas was awarded a contract by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop a technology transfer regional model. This report describes the development and testing of the Kansas Technology Transfer Model (KTTM) which is to be utilized as a regional model for the development of other technology transfer programs for independent operators throughout oil-producing regions in the US. It describes the linkage of the regional model with a proposed national technology transfer plan, an evaluation technique for improving and assessing the model, and the methodology which makes it adaptable on a regional basis. The report also describes management concepts helpful in managing a technology transfer program.

  10. Toward equality of biodiversity knowledge through technology transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, Monika; Collen, Ben

    2015-10-01

    To help stem the continuing decline of biodiversity, effective transfer of technology from resource-rich to biodiversity-rich countries is required. Biodiversity technology as defined by the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) is a complex term, encompassing a wide variety of activities and interest groups. As yet, there is no robust framework by which to monitor the extent to which technology transfer might benefit biodiversity. We devised a definition of biodiversity technology and a framework for the monitoring of technology transfer between CBD signatories. Biodiversity technology within the scope of the CBD encompasses hard and soft technologies that are relevant to the conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity, or make use of genetic resources, and that relate to all aspects of the CBD, with a particular focus on technology transfer from resource-rich to biodiversity-rich countries. Our proposed framework introduces technology transfer as a response indicator: technology transfer is increased to stem pressures on biodiversity. We suggest an initial approach of tracking technology flow between countries; charting this flow is likely to be a one-to-many relationship (i.e., the flow of a specific technology from one country to multiple countries). Future developments should then focus on integrating biodiversity technology transfer into the current pressure-state-response indicator framework favored by the CBD (i.e., measuring the influence of technology transfer on changes in state and pressure variables). Structured national reporting is important to obtaining metrics relevant to technology and knowledge transfer. Interim measures, that can be used to assess biodiversity technology or knowledge status while more in-depth indicators are being developed, include the number of species inventories, threatened species lists, or national red lists; databases on publications and project funding may provide measures of international cooperation. Such a

  11. Techonology transfer and technology assessmentAn approach to the age of technology management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyoki, Yasuyoshi

    How small and middle size corporations should be armed technologically is the important strategy under the era of technology management such as today. However, it seems difficult that small companies promote technology or new product development by their own technology and human resources. Thus they are likely to expect technology transfer much more than ever. It is pointed out that if we proceed into technology transfer, we need to have such systems that technological information is available any time, and technology transfer is assessed whether or not it is preferable. Nikkan Kogyo Industrial Research Institute has developed general-purposed technology assessment system of which major aim is to promote technology transfer, and has carried on the business of it. This paper describes thinking about technology assessment, and outlines the technology assessment system.

  12. Trade Versus Security: How Countries Balance Technology Transfers with China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    relevant technology and knowledge transfers. KEY- WORDS: China, Israel, Japan, technology transfer, export control regimes, trade-security trade-off...symposium explore these commonsense propositions and provide some evidence for them. First, for large countries and groupings such as the European Union that...these issues fit into existing political cleavages—and the emergent challenges inherent in controlling militarily relevant technology and knowledge

  13. Computers and terminals as an aid to international technology transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, W. T.

    1974-01-01

    As technology transfer becomes more popular and proves to be an economical method for companies of all sizes to take advantage of a tremendous amount of new and available technology from sources all over the world, the introduction of computers and terminals into the international technology transfer process is proving to be a successful method for companies to take part in this beneficial approach to new business opportunities.

  14. An ISM approach for analyzing the factors in technology transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mahdavi Mazdeh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Technology transfer, from research and technology organizations (RTOs toward local industries, is considered as one of important and significant strategies for countries' industrial development. In addition to recover the enormous costs of research and development for RTOs, successful technology transfer from RTOs toward local firms forms technological foundations and develops the ability to enhance the competitiveness of firms. Better understanding of factors influencing process of technology transfer helps RTOs and local firms prioritize and manage their resources in an effective and efficient way to maximize the success of technology transfer. This paper aims to identify important effective factors in technology transfer from Iranian RTOs and provides a comprehensive model, which indicate the interactions of these factors. In this regard, first, research background is reviewed and Cummings and Teng’s model (2003 [Cummings, J. L., & Teng, B.-S. (2003. Transferring R&D knowledge: The key factors affecting knowledge transfer success. Journal of Engineering and Technology Management, 20(1-2, 39-68.] was selected as the basic model in this study and it was modified through suggesting new factors identified from literature of inter-organizational knowledge and technology transfer and finally a Delphi method was applied for validation of modified model. Then, research conducted used Interpretive Structural Modeling (ISM to evaluate the relationship between the factors of final proposed model. Results indicate that there were twelve factors influencing on technology transfer process from Iranian RTOs to local firms and also the intensity of absorption capability in transferee could influence on the intensity of desorption capability in transferor.

  15. How to conclude a successful technology transfer agreement under license

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillemette, R. [AAER Systems Inc., Bromont, PQ (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    This presentation examined some of the advantages gained by AAER Systems through its active pursuit of technology transfer agreements. AAER Systems recently signed a technology transfer agreement with the German company Furhlaender AG involving 3 wind turbines, and has recently entered the Toronto Stock Exchange. In 2006, the company signed memorandums of understanding (MOUs) with the Austrian company Windtec for technology transfer on a 2 MW wind turbine, as well as with the German company Euros Gmbh for technology transfer on turbine blades. Experience with these technology transfers has led the company to ascertain that technology transfer can be part of a successful business strategy, but may require adaptation in order to meet a company's needs. However, it is imperative that technical teams have the ability to receive technology transfers, and good communications with international partners are important. Before negotiating a technology transfer, a solid market analysis is required to determine needs. The identification of technologies requires time and patience, and the ideal technology for an organization may not always be the most advanced technology. Good partnerships for technology transfers are often formed with companies who have a similar market, and are of a similar size. Milestones should be established before negotiations, and a follow-up procedure should be planned. Disputes should be solved by management and not by legal advisors. Royalty payments should represent between 2 to 3 per cent of the sale price and payments should be spread over a number of units across time. Product functionalities will need to be aligned to local standards, and technical specifications may also need to be modified. Technology transfer often requires that products require adaptation for local manufacturing standards, local electrical standards; and climate conditions. Budgets should accommodate the need for adaptation, and technical and sales teams should meet

  16. Technology transfer and technology audit in the process of determination of technology strategies: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luani Back

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This article describes how the technological audit and transfers of technologies contribute to trace the technological strategies to be adopted by the furniture industry of western Paraná. The research began with a literature review and subsequently used the qualitative approach to conduct the investigation. The research universe consists of furniture industry in Paraná, where they held a multicase study. We used the interview as an instrument for data collection and the interpretation occurred through the technique of content analysis. It was found that the studied companies use technology transfer as technology strategy to ensure competitiveness through the acquisition of technologies and activities all around. To identify existing technologies in the industry, and its efficiency, managers do not make use of audit technology and yes we analyze the process and identify bottlenecks and opportunities for improvement. This way of identifying the technologies, despite achieving corporate goals, does not achieve the results of an audit technology. This occurs because audit examines both the external and internal environment of the company and identifies the relationship of human resources for the company's performance.

  17. HPCC technology awareness program: Improved economic competitiveness through technology awareness, transfer and application. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-01

    A need has been defined by Congress for the DOE National Laboratories to participate in various dual use and technology transfer programs. This requirement has spawned several technology transfer approaches at the DOE laboratories. These programs are designed to encourage large and small business to bring their problems and needs forward, and to allow the labs to transfer effective high performance computing technology to the commercial marketplace. This IG Technologies grant from the DOE was undertaken to address the issues and problems associated with technology transfer between the DOE National Laboratories and commercial industry. The key focus is to gain an understanding of how DOE and industry independently and collectively view the requirements and the missing elements that could allow DOE to facilitate HPCC technology transfer. At issue is HPCC Technology Transfer for the High Performance Computing industry and its relationship to the DOE National Laboratories. Several observations on this are addressed. The issue of a ``Technology Utilization Gap`` between the National Laboratories and Independent Software Vendors is discussed. This study addressed the HPCC Technology Transfer plans of all six DOE National Labs. Study team members briefed numerous industrial users of HPCC technology as to the feasibility of technology transfer for various applications. Significant findings of the effort are that the resistance to technology transfer is much higher than anticipated for both the National Labs and industry. Also, HPCC Technology Transfer is observed to be a large company`s dominion. Small businesses have a difficult time in addressing the requirements of technology transfer using Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADA`s). Large businesses and the DOE National Labs however, often have requirements and objectives which are at cross purposes, making effective technology transfer difficult.

  18. The Evolutionary Business Valuation of Technology Transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leloux, M.S.; van der Sijde, Peter; Groen, Arend J.; Oakey, R.; Groen, A.; Cook, G.; van der Sijde, P.

    2009-01-01

    Conventional models for the business valuation of technology are usually financially oriented and only measure economic value. Several of these financially oriented approaches have been reviewed by Leloux and Groen (2007). Current monetary (financial) valuation methods for technology include

  19. Technology Transfer at CERN (french version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Marcastel, F

    2007-01-01

    Abrief overview of how CERN's pioneering technologies for scientific research have branched out into various fields. Medicine, industrial processes, information and communication technology, as well as environment and energy fields make use of these innovative developments.

  20. Technology Transfer at CERN (english version)

    CERN Multimedia

    Marcastel, F

    2006-01-01

    A brief overview of how CERN's pioneering technologies for scientific research have branched out into various fields. Medicine, industrial processes, information and communication technology, as well as environment and energy fields make use of these innovative developments.

  1. Food irradiation: technology transfer in Asia, practical experiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunstadt, P. (Nordion International Inc., Kanata, ON (Canada))

    Nordion International Inc., in cooperation with the Thai Office of Atomic Energy for Peace (OAEP) and the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) recently completed a unique food irradiation technology transfer project in Thailand. This complete food irradiation technology transfer project included the design and construction of an automatic multipurpose irradiation facility as well as the services of construction and installation management and experts in facility operation, maintenance and training. This paper provides an insight into the many events that led to the successful conclusion of the world's first complete food irradiation technology transfer project. (Author).

  2. Food irradiation: Technology transfer in Asia, practical experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunstadt, Peter; Eng, P.

    1993-10-01

    Nordion International Inc., in cooperation with the Thai Office of Atomic Energy for Peace (OAEP) and the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) recently completed a unique food irradiation technology transfer project in Thailand. This complete food irradiation technology transfer project included the design and construction of an automatic multipurpose irradiation facility as well as the services of construction and installation management and experts in facility operation, maintenance and training. This paper provides an insight into the many events that led to the succesful conclusion of the world's first complete food irradiation technology transfer project.

  3. Creation of a European network dedicated to technology transfer

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    The CERN Council recently approved the creation of a technology transfer network, whose aim will be to improve European industry’s access to the technologies developed by the particle physics community in the Member States. The gas detectors for the TOTEM experiment (GEM) offer potential for fruitful collaboration within the framework of the TT network. Many other technologies are going down the same road.The desire to set up a technology transfer network follows on from the European Strategy for Particle Physics, approved by the CERN Council on 14 July 2006 in Lisbon. In this context, special emphasis was laid on European industry’s participation in the implementation of particle physics programmes and, in particular, its access to the new technologies developed by the scientific community. It was recognised that effort needs to be put into improving the efficiency of technology transfer...

  4. Technology Transfer and Agricultural Mechanization in Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    Agyei-Holmes, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Recent economic growth in Tanzania has been biased towards industry and services, denying farmers potential distributional benefits. Correcting this anomaly requires in part appropriate technologies to raise agricultural productivity. Attempts to either develop local tools or import advanced country technologies had limited benefits. Recent studies suggest that for poor producers in Tanzania, mechanization technologies from emerging economies are more appropriate in relation to their producti...

  5. Evaluation of FHWA Technology Transfer Program at HERPICC, Purdue University

    OpenAIRE

    Whitford, Robert K

    1984-01-01

    An evaluation of the FHWA technology transfer program at HERPICC, Purdue University based on a questionnaire sent to operation and management personnel of the highway road system. Future courses of action are also suggested.

  6. Research Tools and Materials | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research Tools can be found in TTC's Available Technologies and in scientific publications. They are freely available to non-profits and universities through a Material Transfer Agreement (or other appropriate mechanism), and available via licensing to companies.

  7. Japan acts to speed technology transfer from universities

    CERN Multimedia

    Saegusa, A

    1999-01-01

    A Japanese law will take effect in the autumn to promote technology transfer from universities and laboratories. The new measures aim to encourage collaborations with the commercial sector and allow industrial research partners to retain title to inventions (1 page).

  8. Applications of aerospace technology in industry: A technology transfer profile, nondestructive testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    The development of nondestructive testing procedures by NASA and the transfer of nondestructive testing to technology to civilian industry are discussed. The subjects presented are: (1) an overview of the nondestructive testing field, (2) NASA contributions to the field of nondestructive testing, (3) dissemination of NASA contributions, and (4) a transfer profile. Attachments are included which provide a brief description of common nondestructive testing methods and summarize the technology transfer reports involving NASA generated nondestructive testing technology.

  9. Overcoming Barriers to the Transfer and Diffusion of Climate Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Ivan; Hansen, Ulrich Elmer

    This guidebook provides practical and operational guidance on how to assess and overcome barriersfacing the transfer and diffusion of technologies for climate change mitigation and adaptation.The guidebook is designed to support the analysis of specific technologies, rather than pursuing asectoral...... (e.g. transport) or technology group (e.g. renewable energy) approach.Given that there is no single solution to enhancing technology transfer and diffusion policies needbe tailored to country-specific context and interests. Therefore, the guidebook presents a flexibleapproach, identifying various...

  10. globalization, technology transfer and the knowledge gap

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2011-06-10

    Jun 10, 2011 ... oligopolistic research has given rise to patent monopoly and an international property rights industry dominated by the ... Centralization encourages intra-firm trade and profit maximization through over-invoicing and transfer pricing. For ruling out ... stages of production to areas with the most obvious ...

  11. Technology Transfer, Foreign Direct Investment and Economic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-05-29

    May 29, 2015 ... (2004), spillovers are usually generated by non-market transactions, especially when knowledge is transferred to host country firms without any contractual relationship with the foreign MNEs. The theory of the effect of trade policy regime on FDI, trade and growth in a given host country was first presented ...

  12. Societal and economic valuation of technology-transfer deals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Joseph S., Jr.

    2009-09-01

    The industrial adoption of concepts such as open innovation brings new legitimacy to activities technology-transfer professionals have conducted for over 20 years. This movement highlights the need for an increased understanding of the valuation of intellectual property (IP) and technology-transfer deals. Valuation, though a centerpiece of corporate finance, is more challenging when applied to the inherent uncertainty surrounding innovation. Technology-transfer professionals are often overwhelmed by the complexity and data requirements of valuation techniques and skeptical of their applicability to and utility for technology transfer. The market longs for an approach which bridges the gap between valuation fundamentals and technology-transfer realities. This paper presents the foundations of a simple, flexible, precise/accurate, and useful framework for considering the valuation of technology-transfer deals. The approach is predicated on a 12-factor model—a 3×4 value matrix predicated on categories of economic, societal, and strategic value. Each of these three categories consists of three core subcategories followed by a fourth "other" category to facilitate inevitable special considerations. This 12-factor value matrix provides a framework for harvesting data during deals and for the application of best-of-breed valuation techniques which can be employed on a per-factor basis. Future work will include framework implementation within a database platform.

  13. 2017 Technology Showcase | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The 2017 Technology Showcase is an inaugural, half-day event showcased technologies developed by the National Cancer Institute's Center for Cancer Research (CCR) and the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNLCR).

  14. Technology and knowledge transfer for development

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Chakwizira, J

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available policy makers, higher education and research (HER) communities, production entrepreneurs, funding agencies and consumers associations should be given priority. More emphasis on technological education and training as well as on the ability to acquire... Universities, Higher Education and Research & Development Institutions, Ministries of Education, Science & Technology in collaboration and partnership with other Ministries such as Ministry of Health, Ministry of Environment & Tourism, Ministry of Mining...

  15. On transferring the grid technology to the biomedical community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Yassene; Sax, Ulrich; Dickmann, Frank; Lippert, Joerg; Solodenko, Juri; von Voigt, Gabriele; Smith, Matthew; Rienhoff, Otto

    2010-01-01

    Natural scientists such as physicists pioneered the sharing of computing resources, which resulted in the Grid. The inter domain transfer process of this technology has been an intuitive process. Some difficulties facing the life science community can be understood using the Bozeman's "Effectiveness Model of Technology Transfer". Bozeman's and classical technology transfer approaches deal with technologies that have achieved certain stability. Grid and Cloud solutions are technologies that are still in flux. We illustrate how Grid computing creates new difficulties for the technology transfer process that are not considered in Bozeman's model. We show why the success of health Grids should be measured by the qualified scientific human capital and opportunities created, and not primarily by the market impact. With two examples we show how the Grid technology transfer theory corresponds to the reality. We conclude with recommendations that can help improve the adoption of Grid solutions into the biomedical community. These results give a more concise explanation of the difficulties most life science IT projects are facing in the late funding periods, and show some leveraging steps which can help to overcome the "vale of tears".

  16. Technology Transfer and the Challenges of Local Content ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The latter programme is thus an attempt at circumventing both the capitalist and the critical social theories of technology transfer and developing an indigenous technology initiative. Physical infrastructure and social macroeconomic environment, institutional framework as well as attitudinal changes are identified as critical to ...

  17. University Technology Transfer Factors as Predictors of Entrepreneurial Orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkman, Dorothy M.

    2011-01-01

    University technology transfer is a collaborative effort between academia and industry involving knowledge sharing and learning. Working closely with their university partners affords biotechnology firms the opportunity to successfully develop licensed inventions and gain access to novel scientific and technological discoveries. These factors may…

  18. The Technology Transfer of the ICT Curriculum in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Teng

    2015-01-01

    Focusing on the process of "technology transfer", this paper aims to critically examine the production and usage of the information and communication technology (ICT) curriculum, and discusses its possibilities. It is found that the goals in both of the two stages of the ICT curriculum in Taiwan were rather "rhetorical". Three…

  19. Technology transfer and international development: Materials and manufacturing technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    Policy oriented studies on technological development in several relatively advanced developing countries were conducted. Priority sectors defined in terms of technological sophistication, capital intensity, value added, and export potential were studied in Brazil, Venezuela, Israel, and Korea. The development of technological policy alternatives for the sponsoring country is assessed. Much emphasis is placed on understanding the dynamics of the sectors through structured interviews with a large sample of firms in the leading manufacturing and materials processing sectors.

  20. Accelerating the transfer of improved production technologies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Since 1988, epidemics of African cassava mosaic disease (ACMD) caused by a whitefly-transmitted geminivirus have caused severe devastation in Uganda resulting in food shortages and famine in some areas. In order to control the disease and restore food security in the country, appropriate technologies had to be ...

  1. The Microcomputer: Technological Innovation and Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-12-16

    p.. .... . , mlm the Issue has not yet surfaced, it Is Inevitable that the microprocessor/ microcomputer technology will be the subject...similar but related vein, distributors (e.g., Cramer, Schweber), who traditionally serve the industry as the middlemen to interface with small- and

  2. Low-carbon innovation and technology transfer in latecomer countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lema, Adrian; Lema, Rasmus

    2016-01-01

    organizational arrangements for technology transfer which reflect the overall industry maturity in the solar PV sectors in these countries. This has great potential for long-term climate change mitigation efforts. However, the initiation of these new organizational arrangements often preceded the supply...... the future of the global climate regime. Technology transfer does not become less important as developing countries' capabilities mature, but the nature of technology transfer changes over time. This suggests a need to differentiate between countries at different levels of development. Lower middle......-income countries may have greater needs for building technological capabilities whereas cooperative activities may be suitable for upper middle-income countries that already have capabilities to address climate change...

  3. Applications of aerospace technology in industry, a technology transfer profile: Lubrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottenstette, J. P.; Freeman, J. E.; Heins, C. R.; Hildred, W. M.; Johnson, F. D.; Staskin, E. R.

    1971-01-01

    Technology transfer in the lubrication field is discussed in terms of the movement of NASA-generated lubrication technology into the private sector as affected by evolving industrial requirements. An overview of the field is presented, and NASA technical contributions to lubrication technology are described. Specific examples in which these technologies have been used in the private sector are summarized.

  4. Transferability of economic evaluations of medical technologies: a new technology for orthopedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steuten, Lotte; Vallejo-Torres, Laura; Young, Terry; Buxton, Martin

    2008-05-01

    Transferring results of economic evaluations across countries or jurisdictions can potentially save scarce evaluation resources while helping to make market access and reimbursement decisions in a timely fashion. This article points out why transferring results of economic evaluations is particularly important in the field of medical technologies. It then provides an overview of factors that are previously identified in the literature as affecting transferability of economic evaluations, as well as methods for transferring results in a scientifically sound way. As the current literature almost exclusively relates to transferability of pharmacoeconomic evaluations, this article highlights those factors and methodologies that are of particular relevance to transferring medical technology assessments. Considering the state-of-the-art literature and a worked, real life, example of transferring an economic evaluation of a product used in orthopedic surgery, we provide recommendations for future work in this important area of medical technology assessment.

  5. Development of a nationwide network for technology transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Louis B. C.; Brockman, Paul R.

    1987-01-01

    The winter and spring of 1987 saw the cooperative nationwide network for technology transfer translated from concept to reality. The most obvious of the network relationships which were developed or which are anticipated are summarized. The objective was to help assure that every U.S. business which has the capacity to exploit, or the need to obtain new technology in any form, has access to the technology it needs or can use.

  6. A Program Office Guide to Technology Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-11-01

    technology tiansfer risk, the program office considers the following: 10.7 THE TECNOLOGY TRANSFERPLAN * Schedule intensity and concurrency The...so that the Air Force to educate Raytheon on the configuration, opera- could exercise it later in the program, yet receiving a tion, and construction...8217 pre-LRIP, noncontractual effort will begin the workforce. Unique assistance proposed by the lead- process of educating the followers in the subsystem

  7. A framework for evaluation of technology transfer programs. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-07-01

    The objective of this volume is to describe a framework with which DOE can develop a program specific methodology to evaluate it`s technology transfer efforts. This approach could also be applied to an integrated private sector technology transfer organization. Several benefits will be realized from the application of this work. While the immediate effect will be to assist program managers in evaluating and improving program performance, the ultimate benefits will accrue to the producing industry, the states, and the nation in the form of sustained or increased domestic oil production. This benefit depends also, of course, on the effectiveness of the technology being transferred. The managers of the Technology Transfer program, and the larger federal oil and gas R&D programs, will be provided with a means to design and assess the effectiveness of program efforts as they are developed, tested and performed. The framework allows deficiencies in critical aspects of the program to be quickly identified, allowing for timely corrections and improvements. The actual process of developing the evaluation also gives the staff of the Oil R&D Program or Technology Transfer subprogram the opportunity to become oriented to the overall program goals. The structure and focus imposed by the evaluation paradigm will guide program staff in selecting activities which are consistent with achieving the goals of the overall R&D program.

  8. Technology transfer? The rise of China and India in green technology sectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lema, Rasmus; Lema, Adrian

    2012-01-01

    for these countries? This paper seeks insights from three green technology sectors in both countries: wind power, solar energy and electric and hybrid vehicles. We find that, conventional technology transfer mechanisms such as foreign direct investments and licensing, were important for industry formation and take......International technology transfer is central to the debate about how to curb the carbon emissions from rapid economic growth in China and India. But given China and India's great progress in building innovation capabilities and green industries, how relevant is technology transfer...

  9. 2017 Technology Showcase Presentations | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presentations from the 2017 Technology Showcase by NIH Intramural Research Program scientists held at Frederick National Laboratories for Cancer Research on June 7, 2017. | [google6f4cd5334ac394ab.html

  10. Sub-Committee on Advanced Technology and Technology Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-11-01

    Plasma Technology, a British supplier of chi king equpment revealed that it had been refused an export licence by COCON to ship an order to China . Yet...an American competitor operating from a Swedish subsidiary had sold identical equipment to China . John Bradburn Computer Services was denied further...exports to pon- comunist counules where diversion of technology to the Eastern bloc is thought ’to be most prevalent. These new measures do not grant

  11. A case study of technology transfer: Cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, G.

    1974-01-01

    Research advancements in cardiology instrumentation and techniques are summarized. Emphasis is placed upon the following techniques: (1) development of electrodes which show good skin compatibility and wearer comfort; (2) contourography - a real time display system for showing the results of EKGs; (3) detection of arteriosclerosis by digital computer processing of X-ray photos; (4) automated, noninvasive systems for blood pressure measurement; (5) ultrasonoscope - a noninvasive device for use in diagnosis of aortic, mitral, and tricuspid valve disease; and (6) rechargable cardiac pacemakers. The formation of a biomedical applications team which is an interdisciplinary team to bridge the gap between the developers and users of technology is described.

  12. A DYNAMICAL SYSTEM APPROACH IN MODELING TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hennie Husniah

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we discuss a mathematical model of two parties technology transfer from a leader to a follower. The model is reconstructed via dynamical system approach from a known standard Raz and Assa model and we found some important conclusion which have not been discussed in the original model. The model assumes that in the absence of technology transfer from a leader to a follower, both the leader and the follower have a capability to grow independently with a known upper limit of the development. We obtain a rich mathematical structure of the steady state solution of the model. We discuss a special situation in which the upper limit of the technological development of the follower is higher than that of the leader, but the leader has started earlier than the follower in implementing the technology. In this case we show a paradox stating that the follower is unable to reach its original upper limit of the technological development could appear whenever the transfer rate is sufficiently high.  We propose a new model to increase realism so that any technological transfer rate could only has a positive effect in accelerating the rate of growth of the follower in reaching its original upper limit of the development.

  13. MORE THAN MONEY: THE EXPONENTIAL IMPACT OF ACADEMIC TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDevitt, Valerie Landrio; Mendez-Hinds, Joelle; Winwood, David; Nijhawan, Vinit; Sherer, Todd; Ritter, John F; Sanberg, Paul R

    2014-11-01

    Academic technology transfer in its current form began with the passage of the Bayh-Dole Act in 1980, which allowed universities to retain ownership of federally funded intellectual property. Since that time, a profession has evolved that has transformed how inventions arising in universities are treated, resulting in significant impact to US society. While there have been a number of articles highlighting benefits of technology transfer, now, more than at any other time since the Bayh-Dole Act was passed, the profession and the impacts of this groundbreaking legislation have come under intense scrutiny. This article serves as an examination of the many positive benefits and evolution, both financial and intrinsic, provided by academic invention and technology transfer, summarized in Table 1.

  14. Technology transfer and technological learning through CERN's procurement activity

    CERN Document Server

    Autio, Erkko; Hameri, Ari-Pekka; CERN. Geneva

    2003-01-01

    This report analyses the technological learning and innovation benefits derived from CERN's procurement activity during the period 1997-2001. The base population of our study, the technology-intensive suppliers to CERN, consisted of 629 companies out of 6806 companies during the same period, representing 1197 MCHF in procurement. The main findings from the study can be summarized as follows: the various learning and innovation benefits (e.g., technological learning, organizational capability development, market learning) tend to occur together. Learning and innovation benefits appear to be regulated by the quality of the supplier's relationship with CERN: the greater the amount of social capital built into the relationship, the greater the learning and innovation benefits. Regardless of relationship quality, virtually all suppliers derived significant marketing reference benefits from CERN. Many corollary benefits are associated with procurement activity. As an example, as many as 38% of the respondents devel...

  15. Transboundary Pollution and Welfare Effects of Technology Transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Takarada, Yasuhiro

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the welfare effects of pollution abatement technology transfer in a two-good two-country model with transboundary pollution. In each country, one industry emits pollution as a joint product of output and the sum of domestic and cross-border pollution decreases productivity of the other industry. Then, we show that technology transfer can bene?t the recipient country regardless of the level of cross-border pollution. Moreover, the donor country gains fro...

  16. Space technology transfer to developing countries: opportunities and difficulties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leloglu, U. M.; Kocaoglan, E.

    Space technology, with its implications on science, economy and security, is mostly chosen as one of the priority areas for technological development by developing countries. Most nations aspiring to begin playing in the space league prefer technology transfer programs as a first step. Decreasing initial costs by small satellite technology made this affordable for many countries. However, there is a long way from this first step to establishment of a reliable space industry that can both survive in the long term with limited financial support from the government and meet national needs. This is especially difficult when major defense companies of industrialized countries are merging to sustain their competitiveness. The prerequisites for the success are implementation of a well-planned space program and existence of industrialization that can support basic testing and manufacturing activities and supply qualified manpower. In this study, the difficulties to be negotiated and the vicious circles to be broken for latecomers, that is, developing countries that invest on space technologies are discussed. Especially, difficulties in the technology transfer process itself, brain drain from developing countries to industrialized countries, strong competition from big space companies for domestic needs, costs of establishing and maintaining an infrastructure necessary for manufacturing and testing activities, and finally, the impact of export control will be emphasized. We will also try to address how and to what extent collaboration can solve or minimize these problems. In discussing the ideas mentioned above, lessons learned from the BILSAT Project, a technology transfer program from the UK, will be referred.

  17. Biomedical technology transfer. Applications of NASA science and technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, D. C.

    1980-01-01

    Ongoing projects described address: (1) intracranial pressure monitoring; (2) versatile portable speech prosthesis; (3) cardiovascular magnetic measurements; (4) improved EMG biotelemetry for pediatrics; (5) ultrasonic kidney stone disintegration; (6) pediatric roentgen densitometry; (7) X-ray spatial frequency multiplexing; (8) mechanical impedance determination of bone strength; (9) visual-to-tactile mobility aid for the blind; (10) Purkinje image eyetracker and stabilized photocoalqulator; (11) neurological applications of NASA-SRI eyetracker; (12) ICU synthesized speech alarm; (13) NANOPHOR: microelectrophoresis instrument; (14) WRISTCOM: tactile communication system for the deaf-blind; (15) medical applications of NASA liquid-circulating garments; and (16) hip prosthesis with biotelemetry. Potential transfer projects include a person-portable versatile speech prosthesis, a critical care transport sytem, a clinical information system for cardiology, a programmable biofeedback orthosis for scoliosis a pediatric long-bone reconstruction, and spinal immobilization apparatus.

  18. Parts-on-Demand: Manufacturing Technology and Technology Transfer Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-31

    This will mesh perfectly with the current rise in information technology: office automation, CAD, CAM, CAE, numerical control, robotics , and inte...Nippon Denso : from a suits of 40 models, batchc; *.f one to 40,000 can be made on one day’s notice. "Design for POD manufacture and POD assembly" do not...being applied to non-metal fabrication like composite Iayup and textile products assembly. Here, robots and oth- er programmable equipment can handle a

  19. Building Sustainable Development through Technology Transfer in a Romanian University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calin S. Vac

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available To improve university and commercial ties with industry, many universities operate a technology transfer office (TTO as a vehicle to support the creation of spin-off companies. Run effectively, the TTO can define roles and responsibilities, structures and processes that support the creation and development of new ventures. The challenge for universities is to create TTOs with the right skill set. This paper aims to analyze the TTO activities to support transforming research outputs into commercialization in the context of the University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine from Cluj-Napoca, Romania (UASVMCN. Throughout this paper, different commercialization channels, the roles of technology transfer offices and multiple associative structures are further discussed with a special focus on agricultural open innovations and technologies. This study contributes to sustainable development of both Academia and agricultural Industry research, development and commercialization activities by illustrating current innovation and technology transfer activities produced by UASVMCN and its own TTO as a catalyst entity, a new model in Romania, so that the Academia-TTO-Economy partners association draw a functional and productive triple helix. In order to assess the sustainability of using the above-mentioned TTO, the methodological tools involving analysis are implemented. Finally, this paper states that correct operating of a university TTO is a real opportunity for technology transfer, both from the perspective of an alternative to research funding or entrepreneurship, and from the cultural perspective of the university correlation to the current trends in research, innovation and technology transfer, on a unique and entrepreneurial European market.

  20. Adaptation in the context of technology development and transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olhoff, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Starting from a summary of key developments under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) related to adaptation and technologies, the commentary provides an initial review of the available literature relevant to adaptation in the context of technology development and tr......, there is a need for coordination and exchange of information between the work under the Cancun Adaptation Framework and under the Technology Mechanism of the UNFCCC.......Starting from a summary of key developments under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) related to adaptation and technologies, the commentary provides an initial review of the available literature relevant to adaptation in the context of technology development...... and transfer. It summarizes what technologies for adaptation are, how they relate to development, and what their role is in adaptation. It subsequently highlights a number of policy and research issues that could be important to inform future policy. The commentary has two key messages. First, it argues...

  1. Venture Creation Programs: Bridging Entrepreneurship Education and Technology Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackéus, Martin; Williams Middleton, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore how university-based entrepreneurship programs, incorporating real-life venture creation into educational design and delivery, can bridge the gap between entrepreneurship education and technology transfer within the university environment. Design/methodology/approach: Based on a literature review…

  2. Space spin-offs: is technology transfer worth it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Lance B.

    Dual-uses, spin-offs, and technology transfer have all become part of the space lexicon, creating a cultural attitude toward space activity justification. From the very beginning of space activities in the late 1950's, this idea of secondary benefits became a major part of the space culture and its beliefs system. Technology transfer has played a central role in public and political debates of funding for space activities. Over the years, several studies of the benefits of space activities have been performed, with some estimates reaching as high as a 60:1 return to the economy for each dollar spent in space activities. Though many of these models claiming high returns have been roundly criticized. More recent studies of technology transfer from federal laboratories to private sector are showing a return on investment of 2.8:1, with little evidence of jobs increases. Yet, a purely quantitative analysis is not sufficient as there exist cultural and social benefits attainable only through case studies. Space projects tend to have a long life cycle, making it difficult to track metrics on their secondary benefits. Recent studies have begun to make inroads towards a better understanding of the benefits and drawbacks of investing in technology transfer activities related to space, but there remains significant analyses to be performed which must include a combination of quantitative and qualitative analyses.

  3. Transfer And Adoption Of Labour Saving Technologies | Idu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was carried out to assess the transfer and adoption of labour saving technologies in Apa Local Government area of BenueState. A total sample size One Hundred and Twenty was used in the study. Interview schedule was used to collect the data from respondents. The results revealed that herbicide was adopted ...

  4. Technology transfer for cucumber ( Cucumis sativus L.) production ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Technology transfer for cucumber ( Cucumis sativus L.) production under protected agriculture in uplands Balochistan, Pakistan. ... The cucumbers so harvested were of higher quality (no insect damage) and were sold at premium prices during the whole production cycle. Proper crop sequencing by considering the market ...

  5. Technology Transfer in Integrated Forest Pest Management in the South

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerard D. Hertel; Susan J. Branham; Kenneth M. Swain; [Editors

    1985-01-01

    A synopsis of the technology transfer activities of the Forest Service's Integrated Pest Management Research, Development and Applications Program for Bark Beetles of Southern Pines, and the Southern Region, 1980-85, with emphasis on State demonstration projects and user involvement.

  6. Agile manufacturing and technology transfer to industrialising countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenhuis, H.J.; de Boer, S.J.

    2003-01-01

    One of the requirements of agile manufacturing, the necessity to gain flexibility, can be reached by using a supplier network. A possible way to develop a supplier network is by subcontracting to parties in industrialising countries. In most cases, it is necessary to transfer technology. The

  7. Technology transfer: A cooperative agreement and success story

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reno, H.W.; McNeel, K. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Armstrong, A.T. [USDOE Idaho Operations Office, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Vance, J.K. [Envirocare of Utah, Inc., Salt Lake City, UT (UNited States)

    1996-08-01

    This paper describes the cooperative agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy and Envirocare of Utah, Inc., wherein the former transferred macroencapsulative technology to the latter for purposes of demonstrating commercialization of treatment and disposal of 225, 000 Kg of radioactive lead stored at departmental installations.

  8. Strategic Evaluation of University Knowledge and Technology Transfer Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Thien Anh

    2013-01-01

    Academic knowledge and technology transfer has been growing in importance both in academic research and practice. A critical question in managing this activity is how to evaluate its effectiveness. The literature shows an increasing number of studies done to address this question; however, it also reveals important gaps that need more research.…

  9. Transfer bonding technology for batch fabrication of SMA microactuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grund, T.; Guerre, R.; Despont, M.; Kohl, M.

    2008-05-01

    Currently, the broad market introduction of shape memory alloy (SMA) microactuators and sensors is hampered by technological barriers, since batch fabrication methods common to electronics industry are not available. The present study intends to overcome these barriers by introducing a wafer scale transfer process that allows the selective transfer of heat-treated and micromachined shape memory alloy (SMA) film or foil microactuators to randomly selected receiving sites on a target substrate. The technology relies on a temporary adhesive bonding layer between SMA film/foil and an auxiliary substrate, which can be removed by laser ablation. The transfer technology was tested for microactuators of a cold-rolled NiTi foil of 20 μm thickness, which were heat-treated in free-standing condition, then micromachined on an auxiliary substrate of glass, and finally selectively transferred to different target substrates of a polymer. For demonstration, the new technology was used for batch-fabrication of SMA-actuated polymer microvalves.

  10. The Role of Education in Technology Transfer and Poverty ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The variations in the extent of its severity across countries depend on many economic and social variables prominent among which is the educational structure, which often determine people's vulnerability to poverty. This paper therefore reports on the role of education in technology transfer and highlights strategic options ...

  11. Taxation and the transfer of technology by multinational firms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huizinga, H.P.

    1995-01-01

    This paper analyzes a multinational's transfer of technology to a foreign subsidiary for the case where there is a risk of expropriation. An expropriation is assumed to give rise to competition between the parts of the previous multinational enterprise. To reduce the benefit of expropriation, the

  12. The Employee Invention Report (EIR) | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    After making a unique, non-obvious, and useful discovery, NIH researchers must immediately contact their Laboratory or Branch Chief and inform him or her of a possible invention, and then consult with your NCI TTC Technology Transfer Manager about submitting an Employee Invention Report (EIR) Form. | [google6f4cd5334ac394ab.html

  13. Building technology transfer within research universities an entrepreneurial approach

    CERN Document Server

    O'Shea, Rory P

    2014-01-01

    For the past number of years, academic entrepreneurship has become one of the most widely studied topics in the entrepreneurship literature. Yet, despite all the research that has been conducted to date, there has not been a systematic attempt to analyze critically the factors which lie behind successful business spin-offs from university research. In this book, a group of academic thought-leaders in the field of technology transfer examine a number of areas critical to the promotion of start-ups on campus. Through a series of case studies, they examine current policies, structures, program initiatives and practices of fourteen international universities to develop a theory of successful academic entrepreneurship, with the aim of helping other universities to enhance the quality of their university transfer programs. This book is a valuable resource for researchers and graduate students working on innovation, entrepreneurship and technology transfer, as well as senior managers and policymakers.

  14. Thermal Transfer Compared To The Fourteen Other Imaging Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, John W.

    1989-07-01

    A quiet revolution in the world of imaging has been underway for the past few years. The older technologies of dot matrix, daisy wheel, thermal paper and pen plotters have been increasingly displaced by laser, ink jet and thermal transfer. The net result of this revolution is improved technologies that afford superior imaging, quiet operation, plain paper usage, instant operation, and solid state components. Thermal transfer is one of the processes that incorporates these benefits. Among the imaging application for thermal transfer are: 1. Bar code labeling and scanning. 2. New systems for airline ticketing, boarding passes, reservations, etc. 3. Color computer graphics and imaging. 4. Copying machines that copy in color. 5. Fast growing communications media such as facsimile. 6. Low cost word processors and computer printers. 7. New devices that print pictures from video cameras or television sets. 8. Cameras utilizing computer chips in place of film.

  15. Applications of aerospace technology in industry. A technology transfer profile: Cryogenics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1971-01-01

    Cryogenics is especially interesting when viewed from the perspective of technology transfer. Its recent rapid growth has been due to demands of both industry and aerospace. This environment provides an unusual opportunity to identify some of the forces active during a period of broad technological change and at the same time further the understanding of the technology transfer process. That process is specifically defined here as the ways in which technology, generated in NASA programs, contributes to technological change. In addition to presenting a brief overview of the cryogenics field and describing certain representative examples of the transfer of NASA-generated technology to the private sector, this presentation explores a singular relationship between NASA and another federal agency, the National Bureau of Standards. The relationship has operated both to generate and disseminate information fundamental to the broad growth of the cryogenics field.

  16. Biomedical technology transfer: Applications of NASA science and technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    The major efforts of the Stanford Biomedical Applications Team Program at the Stanford University School of Medicine for the period from October 1, 1975 to September 31, 1976 are covered. A completed EMG biotelemetry system which monitors the physiological signals of man and animals in space related research is discussed. The results of a pilot study involving lower body negative pressure testing in cardiac patients has been completed as well as the design and construction of a new leg negative pressure unit for evaluating heart patients. This technology utilizes vacuum chambers to stress the cardiovascular system during space flight. Laboratory tests of an intracranial pressure transducer, have been conducted. Extremely stable long term data using capacative pressure sensors has lead to the order of commercially manufactured monitoring systems base. Projects involving commercialization are: flexible medical electrodes, an echocardioscope, a miniature biotelemetry system, and an on-line ventricular contour detector.

  17. Blind Technology Transfer or Technological Knowledge Leakage: a Case Study from the South

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Codner

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Blurring boundaries between science and technology is a new phenomenon especially in fields such as biotechnology. The present work shows the fate of biotech research papers on foreign patents produced during the last decade in Quilmes National University. It aims at recognizing the flow of scientific knowledge developed at a public university towards foreign companies and organizations as well as reflecting on its technological value, the role of technology transfer management, the institutional significance of technology transfer processes and the need to develop innovative public policies for solving structural failures caused by industrial underdevelopment

  18. Innovation, technology transfer and development: the spin-off companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teodoro Valente

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The article starts from the identification of the reasons why Italy is less prone to technology transfer than other countries, and indicates some key issues for the diffusion of technological innovations and the development of human capital. In particular, technology transfer is not a generic form of exploitation of outcome of the research, it involves specific actions that have impact on economic production, such as the patenting and the creation of new companies (spin-offs. The author discusses the various forms of spin-offs of university research, the evolution of the phenomenon in the structures of the uni- versities, the stages of development of a spin-off company and the current fund- ing arrangements and to be promoted.

  19. Technology transfer personnel exchange at the Boeing Company

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoniak, Z.I.

    1993-03-01

    The objective of the exchange was to transfer Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) technology and expertise in advanced ceramic fabric composites (ACFC) to the Boeing Defense Space Group (Boeing Aerospace). Boeing Aerospace was especially interested in applying PNL-developed ACFC technology to its current and future spacecraft and space missions. Boeing has on-going independent research and development (R D) programs on advanced radiators and heat pipes, therefore, PNL research in ceramic fabric heat pipes was of particular interest to Boeing. Thus, this exchange assisted in the transfer of PNL's ACFC heat pipe technology and other, related research capabilities to private industrial application. The project was proposed as an initial step in building a long-term collaborative relationship between Boeing and PNL that may result in future Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs) and/or other types of collaborative efforts.

  20. Technology transfer personnel exchange at the Boeing Company

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoniak, Z.I.

    1993-03-01

    The objective of the exchange was to transfer Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) technology and expertise in advanced ceramic fabric composites (ACFC) to the Boeing Defense & Space Group (Boeing Aerospace). Boeing Aerospace was especially interested in applying PNL-developed ACFC technology to its current and future spacecraft and space missions. Boeing has on-going independent research and development (R&D) programs on advanced radiators and heat pipes, therefore, PNL research in ceramic fabric heat pipes was of particular interest to Boeing. Thus, this exchange assisted in the transfer of PNL`s ACFC heat pipe technology and other, related research capabilities to private industrial application. The project was proposed as an initial step in building a long-term collaborative relationship between Boeing and PNL that may result in future Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs) and/or other types of collaborative efforts.

  1. Tech transfer outreach. An informal proceedings of the first technology transfer/communications conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liebetrau, S. [ed.

    1992-10-01

    This document provides an informal summary of the conference workshop sessions. ``Tech Transfer Outreach!`` was originally designed as an opportunity for national laboratory communications and technology transfer staff to become better acquainted and to discuss matters of mutual interest. When DOE field office personnel asked if they could attend, and then when one of our keynote speakers became a participant in the discussions, the actual event grew in importance. The conference participants--the laboratories and DOE representatives from across the nation--worked to brainstorm ideas. Their objective: identify ways to cooperate for effective (and cost-effective) technology transfer outreach. Thus, this proceedings is truly a product of ten national laboratories and DOE, working together. It candidly presents the discussion of issues and the ideas generated by each working group. The issues and recommendations are a consensus of their views.

  2. Managing knowledge: a technology transfer case study in IEN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Ana Gabriella Amorim Abreu [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Servico de Transferencia de Tecnologia], e-mail: agaap@ien.gov.br

    2009-07-01

    Knowledge management is paramount nowadays. In order to enable the members of an organization to deal with their current situations effectively it is mandatory to know and enhance its intellectual capital. Managing the organization knowledge is important to the extent that it allows and reinforce its mission (what we are trying to accomplish?), and performance (how do we deliver the results?). As a result of a knowledge management effort, the organization can create value for itself and for society as a whole. In this paper, we argue that a technology developed at a research institute and transferred to an industry is knowledge to be managed in order to create value, both for the society and for the Institute. In order to manage such knowledge, it is proposed an approach to enhance the value creation potential of a technology transfer. This paper propose an investigation to expand the understanding on how a public research institute and a private firm could introduce their value creation wishes into a technology transfer agreement in a way to reflect and provide the realization of those wishes. It is proposed that, from the identification of the organizations expectations it is possible to infer which agreement attributes will contribute to that value creation and to establish satisfactory agreement configurations. These configurations have the potential to generate those consequences, given that, through the transfer, each organization seeks to increase potential benefits and to reduce potential sacrifices. Supported by exchange flow and value creation models, by the knowledge management and the means-end theory, an approach to increase the value creation potential of a technology transfer is proposed. Evidences from a case study sustain the proposed approach. The case study unity is the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear, a public research institute. (author)

  3. Imagining value, imagining users: academic technology transfer for health innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Fiona Alice; Sanders, Carrie B; Lehoux, Pascale

    2009-04-01

    Governments have invested heavily in the clinical and economic promise of health innovation and express increasing concern with the efficacy and efficiency of the health innovation system. In considering strategies for 'better' health innovation, policy makers and researchers have taken a particular interest in the work of universities and related public research organizations: How do these organizations identify and transfer promising innovations to market, and do these efforts make best use of public sector investments? We conducted an ethnographic study of technology transfer offices (TTOs) in Ontario and British Columbia, Canada, to consider the place of health and health system imperatives in judgments of value in early-stage health innovation. Our analysis suggests that the valuation process is poorly specified as a set of task-specific judgments. Instead, we argue that technology transfer professionals are active participants in the construction of the innovation and assign value by 'imagining' the end product in its 'context of use'. Oriented as they are to the commercialization of health technology, TTOs understand users primarily as market players. The immediate users of TTOs' efforts are commercial partners (i.e., licensees, investors) who are capable of translating current discoveries into future commodities. The ultimate end users - patients, clinicians, health systems - are the future consumers of the products to be sold. Attention to these proximate and more distal users in the valuation process is a complex and constitutive feature of the work of health technology transfer. At the same time, judgements about individual technologies are made in relation to a broader imperative through which TTOs seek to imagine and construct sustainable innovation systems. Judgments of value are rendered sensible in relation to the logic of valuation for systems of innovation that, in turn, configure users of health innovation in systemic ways.

  4. BMDO: New Mexico Technology Transfer Demonstration Project. Interim final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-11-01

    The BMDO-New Mexico Technology Transfer Demonstration Project(BMDO-NM) was a collaborative effort among the national laboratories to identify and evaluate the commercial potential of selected SDI-funded technologies. The project was funded by BMDO (formerly known as the Strategic Defense Initiative Office or SDIO), the Technology Enterprise Division (NM-TED) of the NM Economic Development Division, and the three National Laboratories. The project was managed and supervised by SAGE Management Partners of Albuquerque, and project funding was administered through the University of New Mexico. The BMDO-NM Demonstration Project focused on the development of a process to assist technology developers in the evaluation of selected BMDO technology programs so that commercialization decisions can be made in an accelerated manner. The project brought together BMDO, the NM-TED, the University of New Mexico, and three New Mexico Federal laboratories -- Los Alamos (DOE), Phillips (DOD) and Sandia (DOE). Each national laboratory actively participated throughout the project through its technology transfer offices. New Mexico was selected as the site for the Demonstration Program because of its three national and federal research laboratories engaged in BMDO programs, and the existing relationship among state govemment, the labs, universities and local economic development and business assistance organizations. Subsequent Commercialization and Implementation phases for the selected technologies from LANL and SNL were completed by SAGE and the Project Team. Funding for those phases was provided by the individual labs as well as BMDO and NM-TED in kind services. NM-TED played a proactive role in this New Mexico partnership. Its mandate is to promote technology-based economic development, with a commitment to facilitate the use of technology by industry and business statewide. TED assumed the role of program manager and executing agent for BMDO in this demonstration project.

  5. Challenges for nanofluid applications in heat transfer technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidayanti Sukarno, Diah

    2017-01-01

    Nanofluid has a potential to become a promising coolant in many diverse industrial processes. However, that opportunity faces several challenges that need to be solved through a long road of nanofluid research programs. Three kinds of the challenges that will be studied in this paper are: 1) determination of nanofluid thermophysical properties, 2) heat transfer characteristics of nanofluid, and 3) the stability factor of nanofluid. This paper also assesses the issue that must be addressed when nanofluid is utilized in nuclear technology applications. The radiation safety aspect of nanofluid utilization in nuclear reactor technology must be taken into account. The comprehensive and multidisciplinary research and assessment are crucial to be carried out in order to ensure the practical applications of nanofluid as new and potential heat transfer fluid.

  6. Technology Transfer and Outreach for SNL/Rochester ALPHA Project.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinars, Daniel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-01-01

    This report describes the next stage goals and resource needs for the joint Sandia and University of Rochester ARPA-E project. A key portion of this project is Technology Transfer and Outreach, with the goal being to help ensure that this project develops a credible method or tool that the magneto-inertial fusion (MIF) research community can use to broaden the advocacy base, to pursue a viable path to commercial fusion energy, and to develop other commercial opportunities for the associated technology. This report describes an analysis of next stage goals and resource needs as requested by Milestone 5.1.1.

  7. Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Lynn; Jasper, Gwen

    2015-01-01

    The Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR)/Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) programs fund the research, development, and demonstration of innovative technologies that fulfill NASA's needs as described in the annual Solicitations and have significant potential for successful commercialization. The only eligible participants are small business concern (SBC) with 500 or fewer employees or a nonprofit research institute such as a university or a research laboratory with ties to an SBC. These programs are potential sources of seed funding for the development of small business innovations.

  8. Transfer of military technology to developing countries: the Turkish case

    OpenAIRE

    Akgul, Aziz

    1989-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited There is a switch from direct arms sales to military technology transfer to produce arms in the name of selfsufficiency. The value of domestic arms production at the beginning of the 1980s was about 500 times higher than that at the beginning of the 1950s. By the early 1980s, more than 50 developing countries were producing weapons . The evidence indicates that Turkey has relatively enough arms production potential...

  9. INTERNATIONAL TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER AND LOCALIZATION: SUCCESS STORIES IN NUCLEAR BRANCH

    OpenAIRE

    Yulia V. Chernyakhovskaya

    2016-01-01

    countries are considering nuclear power industry development [2, p. 3; 3, p. 3; 4]. For newcomer-countries it is of great importance to stimulate the national industry through NPP projects implementation based on technology transfer and localization (TTL). The study and systematization of world experience is useful in purpose to elaborate the national industry development programs. Objectives. The aim of article is to determine success factors of TTL; tasks: 1) to study TTL international expe...

  10. Embryo transfer and related technologies in sheep reproduction

    OpenAIRE

    Loi, Pasqualino; Ptak, Grazyna; Dattena, Maria; Ledda, Sergio; Naitana, Salvatore; Cappai, Pietro

    1998-01-01

    This paper reviews the status of embryo transfer and the major technologies applied to preimplantation of embryos in sheep. Embryo production from superovulated ewes is hindered by an unpredictable response to hormonal treatment. Progress in this area should be expected by an appropriated control of follicular development with gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist or antagonist prior to gonadotrophin administration. Simple protocols for the cryopreservation of sheep embryos by vitrifi...

  11. INTERNATIONAL TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER AND LOCALIZATION: SUCCESS STORIES IN NUCLEAR BRANCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulia V. Chernyakhovskaya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available countries are considering nuclear power industry development [2, p. 3; 3, p. 3; 4]. For newcomer-countries it is of great importance to stimulate the national industry through NPP projects implementation based on technology transfer and localization (TTL. The study and systematization of world experience is useful in purpose to elaborate the national industry development programs. Objectives. The aim of article is to determine success factors of TTL; tasks: 1 to study TTL international experience in the fi eld of nuclear power technologies; 2 on the ground of the world practice to analyze preconditions, contents, stages, arrangement modes, formats and results of TTL. Methods. The following methods are utilized in the study: analysis and synthesis including problem-chronological, cause and eff ect and logical analysis and historical-diachronic method (method of periodization. Results. The following conclusions presented below have been made on the basis of the three cases study related to nuclear industry development using TTL (France, South Korea and China. Conclusions. The TTL success factors includes: Government support that provides long-term governmental development plan of nuclear power and industry for nuclear power based on TTL, and an appropriate international cooperation (under favorable conditions of “NPP buyers market”; Complex approach to implementation of the national TTL program and NPP construction projects: signing of NPP construction contracts with vendors stipulating technology transfer; NPP designing and constructing should be performed jointly with training and transferring of technical documentation and software. Technology transfer cooperation should be implemented through the licenses agreements and setting up joint ventures; Public acceptance and support.

  12. Doctor-Patient Knowledge Transfer: Innovative Technologies and Policy Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Sára, Zoltán; Csedő, Zoltán; Tóth, Tamás; Fejes, József; Pörzse, Gábor

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to empirically investigate the barriers in doctor-patient communication and knowledge transfer and the role of innovative technologies in overcoming these barriers. We applied qualitative research methods. Our results show that patients extensively use information sources, primarily the Internet before the visits. Patients regularly apply a self-diagnosis regarding their diseases. This implies several risks as many of them are not able to properly inte...

  13. Hold-up in Ventures for Technology Transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Spremann, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    Entrepreneurs and Investors found ventures for transferring technology and bringing it closer to the market. Focusing on a situation in which the investor exercises hold-up at the disadvantage of the entrepreneur, this paper works on three points: We identify (1) conditions which make hold-up possible, and discuss (2) measures which help entrepreneurs to protect themselves against hold-up. (3) The balance of powers in a venture is related to returns to scale. Overall, the paper contri...

  14. Comparative Characteristics of Technology Transfer in Developed Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Palii

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The research into innovation transfer in the global economy is a very urgent issue under the modern conditions of development of any country. Comparative characteristics of technology transfer in such countries and regions as the USA, EU, Asia, presented in the article, permit us to detect certain patterns of this process inherent both in developed and developing countries. The analysis made in the article can be useful for developing technology transfer processes in the Danube countries’ economy. The analytical method used in this research allowed us to determine the factor that is crucial for the growth of the world market of high-technology products and services. The analysis was conducted on several criteria such as the level of expenditure on R&D in the whole global economy, as well as in individual countries and regions. Besides, there were taken into account the added value of high-tech industries and the share of expenditure on R&D in total production costs. The conclusions regarding the effectiveness of funds allocated for scientific research and experimental development in the U.S. can be drawn on the basis of data presented in the paper on the amount of added value of the U.S. high-tech industries.

  15. The role of technology transfer and emerging technologies in California`s economic recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Ayat, R.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Moody, J. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Graduate School of Public Policy

    1994-02-01

    This report was prepared as part of a study supported by the California Trade and Commerce Agency (TCA), Defense Conversion/Base Closure Planning Program. It is one of several reports supporting the TCA`s efforts to develop a State Plan to address the economic impact of defense downsizing and base closures in California. The report focuses on: Examining existing federal technology transfer efforts -- the organizations involved, the funding mechanisms that are available, the processes by which technology transfer takes place -- and how they can help the state deal with the economic impact of base closures and defense downsizing. Evaluating the role of technology transfer in helping California develop a strong, technology-based economy capable of competing in an increasingly competitive world marketplace. Identifying ``critical technologies,`` and determining which of these technologies are likely to have the most impact on the economic future of the state and the nation. Reviewing current and proposed California technology transfer programs/initiatives and examining the role the state should play in supporting these efforts.

  16. E-Beam—a new transfer system for isolator technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadat, Theo; Huber, Thomas

    2002-03-01

    In every aseptic filling application, the sterile transfer of goods into the aseptic area is a challenge, and there are many different ways to do it. With isolator technology a higher sterility assurance level (SAL) is achieved. This SAL is only as good as the weakest segment in the chain of manufacturing. The transfer of goods into and out of the isolator is one of these critical segments. Today different techniques, some already well established, others still very new, are available on the market like: dry heat tunnel, autoclave, pulsed light, rapid transfer systems (RTP), H 2O 2 tunnel, UV light, etc. all these systems are either not applicable for continuous transfer, only good for heat-compatible materials like glass, or do not guarantee a 6 log spore reduction. E-Beam opens new perspectives in this field. With E-beam technology it is possible to transfer heat-sensitive (plastic), pre-sterilised materials at high speed, continuously into an aseptic area. E-Beam unifies three different technologies, that result in a very efficient and high-speed decontamination machine designed for the pharmaceutical industry. First, there is the electron beam that decontaminates the goods and an accurate shielding that protects the surrounding from this beam. Second, there is the conveyor system that guarantees the output and the correct exposure time underneath the beam. And third, there is the isolator interface to provide correct differential pressure and clean air inside the tunnel as well as the decontamination of the tunnel with H 2O 2 prior to production. The E-beam is a low-energy electron beam, capable of decontaminating any kind of surface. It penetrates only a few micrometers into the material and therefore does not deform the packaging media. Currently, machines are being built to transfer pre-sterilised syringes, packed in plastic tubs with a Tyvek cover into an aseptic filling isolator with the following data: decontamination efficiency of 10 6 (6 log spore

  17. Technology transfer present and futures in the electronic arts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Degger

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We are entering an era where creating the fantastical is possible in the arts. In the areas of mixed reality and biological arts, responsive works are created based on advances in basic science and technology. This is enabling scientists and artists to pose new questions. As the time between discovery and application is so short, artists need imaginative ways of accessing new technology in order to critique and use it.These are the new paints that the majority of artists cannot afford or access, technology to enable cloning of DNA, to print channels on a chip, to access proprietary 3G networks. Currently, partnerships or residencies are used to facilitate artist’s access to these technologies. What would they do if technology was available that enabled them to make any art work they so desire? Are the limitations in current technology an advantage rather than a disadvantage in some of their works? Does interaction with technologists make their work more robust? Are there disadvantages? How do they get access to the technology they require? Open source or proprietary? Or have they encountered the situation where their vision is greater than technology allows. When their work breaks because of this fact, is their art broken? Blast Theory (Brighton,UK, FoAM(Brussels, Belgium and Amsterdam, Netherlands, SymbioticA (Perth, Australia are organisations pushing technological boundaries in the service of art. This paper addresses some questions of technology transfer in relation to recent artworks, particularly I like Frank in Adelaide (Blast Theory, transient reality generators (trg (FoAM and Multi electrode array artist (MeART (SymbioticA.

  18. Technology Maturation in Preparation for the Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer (CPST) Technology Demonstration Mission (TDM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Michael L.; Doherty, Michael P.; Moder, Jeffrey P.

    2014-01-01

    In support of its goal to find an innovative path for human space exploration, NASA embarked on the Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer (CPST) Project, a Technology Demonstration Mission (TDM) to test and validate key cryogenic capabilities and technologies required for future exploration elements, opening up the architecture for large in-space cryogenic propulsion stages and propellant depots. Recognizing that key Cryogenic Fluid Management (CFM) technologies anticipated for on-orbit (flight) demonstration would benefit from additional maturation to a readiness level appropriate for infusion into the design of the flight demonstration, the NASA Headquarters Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) authorized funding for a one-year technology maturation phase of the CPST project. The strategy, proposed by the CPST Project Manager, focused on maturation through modeling, concept studies, and ground tests of the storage and fluid transfer of CFM technology sub-elements and components that were lower than a Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of 5. A technology maturation plan (TMP) was subsequently approved which described: the CFM technologies selected for maturation, the ground testing approach to be used, quantified success criteria of the technologies, hardware and data deliverables, and a deliverable to provide an assessment of the technology readiness after completion of the test, study or modeling activity. The specific technologies selected were grouped into five major categories: thick multilayer insulation, tank applied active thermal control, cryogenic fluid transfer, propellant gauging, and analytical tool development. Based on the success of the technology maturation efforts, the CPST project was approved to proceed to flight system development.

  19. Technology transfer and catch-up; Lessons from the commercial aircraft industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenhuis, H.J.; de Bruijn, E.J.; Heerkens, Johannes M.G.

    2007-01-01

    This paper analyses the technology development and technology transfer strategies in the aircraft manufacturing industry for four industrially developing countries. It is concluded from four case studies that technology catch-up is extremely difficult due to aircraft technology characteristics.

  20. Technology Transfer, Reaching the Market for Geopressured-Geothermal Resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wys, J. Negus-de

    1992-03-24

    Technology transfer to the industrial sector for geopressured-geothermal technology has included diverse strategies, with successes and obstacles or roadblocks. Numerical data are tabulated in terms of response to the various strategies. Strategy categories include the following: feasibility studies and reports, consortium activities and proceedings, the Geothermal Resource Council, national and international meetings of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists, other societal and organizational meetings, and conferences, Department of Energy solicitation of interest in the Commerce Business Daily, industry peer review panels, and the Secretary's Technology Initiative. Additionally, the potential of a 12-page color brochure on the geopressured-geothermal resource, workshops, and cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) is discussed. In conclusion, what is the best way to reach the market and what is the winning combination? All of the above strategies contribute to technology transfer and are needed in some combination for the desired success. The most successful strategy activities for bringing in the interest of the largest number of industries and the independents are the consortium meetings, one-on-one telephone calling, and consortium proceedings with information service followup. the most successful strategy activities for bringing in the interest and participation of ''majors'' are national and international peer reviewed papers at internationally recognized industry-related society meetings, and on-call presentations to specific companies. Why? Because quality is insured, major filtering has already taken place, and the integrity of the showcase is established. Thus, the focused strategy is reduced to a target of numbers (general public/minors/independents) versus quality (majors). The numerical results of the activities reflecting four years of technology transfer following the 15 year lead in the early phases

  1. 78 FR 59410 - Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer Programs...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer Programs... period for the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR...

  2. High-Speed, Radiation-Tolerant Laser Drivers in 0.13 μm CMOS Technology for HEP Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazza, Giovanni; Tavernier, Filip; Moreira, Paulo; Calvo, Daniela; De Remigis, Paolo; Olantera, Lauri; Soos, Csaba; Troska, Jan; Wyllie, Ken

    2014-12-01

    The gigabit laser driver (GBLD) and low-power GBLD (LpGBLD) are two radiation-tolerant laser drivers designed to drive laser diodes at data rates up to 4.8 Gb/s. They have been designed in the framework of the gigabit-transceiver (GBT) and versatile-link projects to provide fast optical links capable of operation in the radiation environment of future high-luminosity high-energy physics experiments. The GBLD provides laser bias and modulation currents up to 43 mA and 24 mA, respectively. It can thus be used to drive vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) and edge-emitting laser diodes. A pre-emphasis circuit, which can provide up to 12 mA in 70 ps pulses, has also been implemented to compensate for high external capacitive loads. The current driving capabilities of the LpGBLD are 2 times smaller that those of the GBLD as it has been optimized to drive VCSELs in order to minimize the power consumption. Both application-specific integrated circuits are designed in 0.13 μm commercial complementary metal-oxide semiconductor technology and are powered by a single 2.5 V supply. The power consumption of the core circuit is 89 mW for the GBLD and 55 mW for the LpGBLD.

  3. Applications of aerospace technology in industry, a technology transfer profile: Fire safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottenstette, J. P.; Freeman, J. E.; Heins, C. R.; Hildred, W. M.; Johnson, F. D.; Staskin, E. R.

    1971-01-01

    The fire safety field is considered as being composed of three parts: an industry, a technology base, and a user base. An overview of the field is presented, including a perspective on the magnitude of the national fire safety problem. Selected NASA contributions to the technology of fire safety are considered. Communication mechanisms, particularly conferences and publications, used by NASA to alert the community to new developments in the fire safety field, are reviewed. Several examples of nonaerospace applications of NASA-generated fire safety technology are also presented. Issues associated with attempts to transfer this technology from the space program to other sectors of the American economy are outlined.

  4. Applications of aerospace technology in industry, a technology transfer profile: Contamination control

    Science.gov (United States)

    1971-01-01

    The strong influence NASA-sponsored research has had on the development of solutions to difficult contamination problems is considered. The contamination control field is comprised of an industrial base, supplying the tools of control; a user base, adopting control techniques; and a technical base, expanding the concepts of control. Both formal and informal mechanisms used by NASA to communicate a variety of technical advances are reviewed and certain examples of the expansion of the user base through technology transfer are given. Issues related to transfer of NASA-generated contamination control technology are emphasized.

  5. A first thermodynamic interpretation of the technology transfer activities

    CERN Document Server

    Ripandelli, S

    2016-01-01

    In the last years new interdisciplinary approaches to economics and social science have been developed. A Thermodynamic approach to socio-economics has brought to a new interdisciplinary scientific field called econophysics. Why thermodynamic? Thermodynamic is a statistical theory for large atomic system under constraints of energy[1] and the economy can be considered a large system governed by complex rules. The present job proposes a new application, starting from econophysic, passing throughout the thermodynamic laws to interpret and to described the Technology Transfer (TT) activities. Using the definition of economy (i.e. economy[dictionary def.] = the process or system by which goods and services are produced, sold, and bought in a country or region) the TT can be considered an important sub-domain of the economy and a transversal new area of the scientific research. The TT is the process of transferring knowledge, that uses the results from the research to produce innovation and to ensure that scientif...

  6. Embryo transfer and related technologies in sheep reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loi, P; Ptak, G; Dattena, M; Ledda, S; Naitana, S; Cappai, P

    1998-01-01

    This paper reviews the status of embryo transfer and the major technologies applied to preimplantation of embryos in sheep. Embryo production from superovulated ewes is hindered by an unpredictable response to hormonal treatment. Progress in this area should be expected by an appropriated control of follicular development with gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist or antagonist prior to gonadotrophin administration. Simple protocols for the cryopreservation of sheep embryos by vitrification are already available and the development of frozen-thawed blastocysts to term is close to the fresh ones. Further research is required to identify factors able to promote the maturation in vitro of oocytes, namely those obtained from prepubertal animals. Semen and embryo sexing procedures are available in cattle although much less attention was paid to their application to sheep. Among all the reproductive technologies, cloning with embryonic and foetal cells has progressed dramatically in sheep and nuclear transfer has been used to produce transgenic animals as an alternative to pronuclear injection. The production of the first lamb cloned from a somatic cell opened new opportunities in animal breeding as well as exciting lines of basic research. The overall conclusions are that, apart from superovulation, the application of in vitro technologies is likely to evolve rapidly and once applied, a great impact on traditional and new animal productions should be expected. However, a better understanding of the changes in gene expression, induced in embryos by different in vitro manipulation procedures, is necessary to prevent abnormal foetal development.

  7. EPA and the Federal Technology Transfer Act: Opportunity knocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gatchett, A.M.; Fradkin, L.; Moore, M.; Gorman, T.; Ehrlich, A. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    1990-12-31

    In 1986, the Federal Technology Transfer Act (FTTA) was established to promote a closer, collaborative relationship between federal government agencies and the private sector. With the increasing need for new cost-effective technologies to prevent and control pollution, both the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and private industry are encouraged to facilitate the transfer of knowledge and technology under this Act. The FTTA removed several of the legal and institutional barriers to cooperative research that existed before the Act`s passage. Through the FTTA, the government strives to promote the movement of its products, processes, skills, and knowledge into the private sector for further development and commercialization by encouraging the exchange of technical personnel and the sharing of facilities and other resources. Collaborative efforts between industry, federal agencies, and academia are made possible through cooperative research and development agreements (CRADAs). Forty-two CRADAs and five licensing agreements have been initiated with EPA under this program. This paper provides an overview of this new and innovative program within the EPA. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  8. [Development and technological transfer of functional pastas extended with legumes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granito, Marisela; Ascanio, Vanesa

    2009-03-01

    Development and technological transfer of functional pastas extended with legumes. Semolina pasta is a highly consumed foodstuff, the biological value of which is low because its protein is deficient in lysine. However, if the semolina is extended with legumes rich in this essential aminoacid, not only and aminoacid supplementation is produced, but also the dietary fibre and minerals are increased. In this work, pastas extended in 10% with a white variety of Phaseolus vulgaris and with Cajanus cajan were produced on a pilot plant scale, and this technology was transferred to a cooperative producing artisanal pastas. The cooking qualities and the physical, chemical, and nutritional characteristics of the pastas were evaluated, as well as the sensorial acceptability in institutionalized elderly people. The extension of the pastas with legume flours increased the optimum cooking time (15 to 20%), the weight (20% and 25%), and the loss of solids by cooking. Similarly, the functional value of the pastas increased by increasing the contents of minerals and dietary fibre. The protein content, as well as the protein digestibility in vitro also increased; however, the parameters of colour L, a and b, and the total starch content of the pastas decreased. At consumer level, the pastas extended with legumes had a good acceptability, for what it was concluded that the extension of the semolina with legume flours in the manufacture of pastas is technologically feasible.

  9. Technology transfer: Half-way houses. No. 17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidel, R.W.

    1995-05-01

    In the fall of 1993, 1 was asked by the Center for National Security Studies (CNSS) of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to study the ways in which technology transfer and defense conversion had been accomplished at General Atomics (GA) and Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) by interviewing Harold Agnew, who had served as director of Los Alamos before becoming president of General Atomics in 1979, and J. Robert Beyster, who had been a staff member at Los Alamos and at General Atomics before founding SAIC in 1969. Harold Agnew readily complied with my request for an interview and also suggested that I talk to Douglas Fouquet, who is in charge of public relations at General Atomics and is their unofficial historian. Robert Beyster was not available for an interview, but, through the courtesy of John C. Hopkins, a former director of CNSS, I was able to interview SAIC`s executive vice president, Donald M. Kerr, who is also a former director at Los Alamos, and Steven Rockwood, a sector vice president at SAIC who was formerly a staff member at the Laboratory Because Agnew, Kerr, and Rockwood are all familiar with LANL, as well as with their respective companies, the interviews becam exercises In comparative analyses of technology transfer. In what follows, I have tried to summarize both the interviews and some of the research which attended them. It is the historian`s hope that by use of comparative institutional analyses, Laboratory administrators may learn something of value in directing their efforts toward the transfer of technology to private industry and other government agencies.

  10. Technology transfer package on seismic base isolation - Volume III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-02-14

    This Technology Transfer Package provides some detailed information for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors about seismic base isolation. Intended users of this three-volume package are DOE Design and Safety Engineers as well as DOE Facility Managers who are responsible for reducing the effects of natural phenomena hazards (NPH), specifically earthquakes, on their facilities. The package was developed as part of DOE's efforts to study and implement techniques for protecting lives and property from the effects of natural phenomena and to support the International Decade for Natural Disaster Reduction. Volume III contains supporting materials not included in Volumes I and II.

  11. User Interface Technology Transfer to NASA's Virtual Wind Tunnel System

    Science.gov (United States)

    vanDam, Andries

    1998-01-01

    Funded by NASA grants for four years, the Brown Computer Graphics Group has developed novel 3D user interfaces for desktop and immersive scientific visualization applications. This past grant period supported the design and development of a software library, the 3D Widget Library, which supports the construction and run-time management of 3D widgets. The 3D Widget Library is a mechanism for transferring user interface technology from the Brown Graphics Group to the Virtual Wind Tunnel system at NASA Ames as well as the public domain.

  12. Cast Metals Coalition Technology Transfer and Program Management Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gwyn, Mike

    2009-03-31

    The Cast Metals Coalition (CMC) partnership program was funded to ensure that the results of the Department of Energy's (DOE) metalcasting research and development (R&D) projects are successfully deployed into industry. Specifically, the CMC program coordinated the transfer and deployment of energy saving technologies and process improvements developed under separately funded DOE programs and projects into industry. The transition of these technologies and process improvements is a critical step in the path to realizing actual energy savings. At full deployment, DOE funded metalcasting R&D results are projected to save 55% of the energy used by the industry in 1998. This closely aligns with DOE's current goal of driving a 25% reduction in industrial energy intensity by 2017. In addition to benefiting DOE, these energy savings provide metalcasters with a significant economic advantage. Deployment of already completed R&D project results and those still underway is estimated to return over 500% of the original DOE and industry investment. Energy savings estimates through December 2008 from the Energy-Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT) portfolio of projects alone are 12 x 1012 BTUs, with a projection of over 50 x 1012 BTUs ten years after program completion. These energy savings and process improvements have been made possible through the unique collaborative structure of the CMC partnership. The CMC team consists of DOE's Office of Industrial Technology, the three leading metalcasting technical societies in the U.S: the American Foundry Society; the North American Die Casting Association; and the Steel Founders Society of America; and the Advanced Technology Institute (ATI), a recognized leader in distributed technology management. CMC provides collaborative leadership to a complex industry composed of approximately 2,100 companies, 80% of which employ less than 100 people, and only 4% of which employ more than 250 people

  13. Applications of aerospace technology in biomedicine. A technology transfer profile: Patient monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, D. M.

    1971-01-01

    NASA contributions to cardiovascular monitoring are described along with innovations in intracardiac blood pressure monitoring. A brief overview of the process of NASA technology transfer in patient monitoring is presented and a list of bioinstrumentation tech briefs and the number of requests for technical support is included.

  14. Applications of aerospace technology in industry, a technology transfer profile: Plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1971-01-01

    New plastics technology bred out of the space program has moved steadily into the U.S. economy in a variety of organized and deliberate ways. Examples are presented of the transfer of plastics know-how into the plants and eventually the products of American business.

  15. A new technology transfer process for DOE's residential and commercial conservation program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, M.A.; White, D.L.; Vories, R.; Kirchen, S.

    1988-10-01

    This report provides a technology transfer plan for DOE's Residential and Commercial Conservation Program (RCCP). It catalogues and classifies the types of research results and lessons developed and disseminated by the Program, and examines the audiences for these results. It then describes the process of assessing needs, analyzing potential technology transfer mechanisms, and evaluating progress that should be part of the technology transfer process for RCCP and its individual projects. A technology transfer strategy is proposed along with recommended future technology transfer activities. A set of seven worksheets is also developed to help RCCP program managers design outreach efforts for their current and future projects. 28 refs., 12 figs.

  16. Evaluation of technology transferring: The experiences of the first Navy Domestic Technology Transfair. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-12-31

    In August 1989 the Office of the Chief of Naval Research and the American Defense Preparedness Association conducted the first Navy Domestic Technology Transfair. The objective of the Transfair was to expose the US Navy`s years of solid experience across a broad span of technology to organizations outside of the Navy. It was an opportunity for private industry to capitalize on the Navy developed technology and this opening for industry was the primary focus of the Transfair. The event provided a unique forum to meet leading Navy scientific and engineering innovators face-to-face. Information was available concerning licensing of naval technology that was for sale to the private sector. Further, discussions covered opportunities for new cooperative research and development agreements with Navy laboratories and R&D activities. These agreements were authorized under the Federal Technology Transfer Act of 1986. The Transfair program was conducted in such a manner as to allow each Navy inventor, either scientist or engineer, to present a system, piece of hardware, or licensable concept in a formal paper presentation. Then, the Navy inventors were available in two, two-hour periods in which individual discussions were conducted, with attendees pursuing specific venues of cooperative agreements as desired. This report provides specifics concerning the technologies that were made available for transfer to the private sector during the Transfair. The Transfair concept sought to add special emphasis to the opening that the 1988 Technology Transfer Act brought to the marketplace. The experience was a step in the education of the possibilities for cooperation between the government and the private sector to share technology. Of additional significance is the economic enhancement for business expansion with the application of the technology to markets beyond defense.

  17. Towards an HTTP Ecosystem for HEP Data Access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furano, Fabrizio; Devresse, Adrien; Keeble, Oliver; Hellmich, Martin; Álvarez Ayllón, Alejandro

    2014-06-01

    In this contribution we present a vision for the use of the HTTP protocol for data access and data management in the context of HEP. The evolution of the DPM/LFC software stacks towards a modern framework that can be plugged into Apache servers triggered various initiatives that successfully demonstrated the use of HTTP-based protocols for data access, federation and transfer. This includes the evolution of the FTS3 system towards being able to manage third-party transfers using HTTP. Given the flexibility of the methods, the feature set may also include a subset of the SRM functionality that is relevant to disk systems. The application domain for such an ecosystem of services goes from large scale, Gridlike computing to the data access from laptops, profiting from tools that are shared with the Web community, like browsers, clients libraries and others. Particular focus was put into emphasizing the flexibility of the frameworks, which can interface with a very broad range of components, data stores, catalogues and metadata stores, including the possibility of building high performance dynamic federations of endpoints that build on the fly the feeling of a unique, seamless very efficient system. The overall goal is to leverage standards and standard practices, and use them to provide the higher level functionalities that are needed to fulfil the complex problem of Data Access in HEP. Other points of interest are about harmonizing the possibilities given by the HTTP/WebDAV protocols with existing frameworks like ROOT and already existing Storage Federations based on the XROOTD framework. We also provide quantitative evaluations of the performance that is achievable using HTTP for remote transfer and remote I/O in the context of HEP data. The idea is to contribute the parts that can make possible an ecosystem of services and applications, where the HEP-related features are covered, and the door is open to standard solutions and tools provided by third parties, in the

  18. The role of technological transfer in the societies based on knowledge economy

    OpenAIRE

    Daniela HÎNCU; FRASINEANU Corina; FRASINEANU Ioan

    2009-01-01

    The knowledge based economy is an economy based on innovation. Implementing innovation requires acquiring new technology, using the technique of technological transfer. The problems and the timing for implementing an emerging technology are under discussion in this paper.

  19. FY05 Targeted Technology Transfer to US Independents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donald F. Duttlinger; E. Lance Cole

    2005-11-01

    Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) was established by domestic crude oil and natural gas producers in 1994 as a national not-for-profit organization to address the increasingly urgent need to improve the technology-transfer process in the U.S. upstream petroleum industry. PTTC's technology-transfer programs enhance U.S. national security. PTTC administers the only nation-wide, comprehensive program dedicated to maximizing America's supplies of domestic oil and gas. PTTC conducts grassroots programs through 10 Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs) and two satellite offices, leveraging their preexisting connections with industry. This organizational structure helps bring researchers and academia to the table. Nationally and regionally, volunteers within a National Board and Regional Producer Advisory Groups guide efforts. The National Board meets three times per year, an important function being approving the annual plans and budgets developed by the regions and Headquarters (HQ). Between Board meetings, an active Management and Budget Committee guide HQ activity. PTTC itself undergoes a thorough financial audit each year. The PTTC's HQ staff plans and manages all aspects of the PTTC program, conducts nation-wide technology-transfer activities, and implements a comprehensive communications program. Networking, involvement in technical activities, and an active exhibit schedule are increasing PTTC's sphere of influence with both producers and the oilfield service sector. Circulation for ''PTTC Network News'', the quarterly newsletter, has risen to nearly 17,500. About 7,500 people receive an email Technology Alert on an approximate three-week frequency. Case studies in the ''Petroleum Technology Digest in World Oil'' appear monthly, as do ''Tech Connections'' columns in ''The American Oil and Gas Reporter''. As part of its oversight responsibility for the regions

  20. Inside the triple helix: technology transfer and commercialization in the life sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Eric G; Powers, Joshua B; Blumenthal, David; Biles, Brian

    2004-01-01

    The transfer and subsequent application of academic research results has demonstrable benefits for health care, researchers, universities, companies, and local economies. Nonetheless, at least three general concerns exist: bias in the reporting of results, limited revenues from these activities, and the lack of data to evaluate technology transfer activities. Future efforts with regard to technology transfer in the life sciences will need to recognize its importance without ignoring concerns or overestimating benefits. Next steps include better monitoring of university-industry relationships, the development of a better data system, the dissemination of best practices in technology transfer management, and evaluation of national technology-transfer policies.

  1. The systematic capacity for technological absorption (SCTA) and international technology transfer (ITT): how some Korean firms successfully exploit Russian technology

    OpenAIRE

    Won, Yoo Hyung

    2014-01-01

    This thesis examines issues of international technology transfer (ITT), focusing on the exploitation of foreign technology between countries with contrasting strengths and capabilities. The tendency in ITT is that it has mostly been limited to the triad countries and to some latecomer economies in East Asia. An explanation for this tendency is that the extent of this shared common ground between countries directly affects a recipient country’s capability to exploit and absorb foreign knowledg...

  2. Reverse knowledge and technology transfer: imbalances caused by cognitive barriers in asymmetric relationships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Millar-Schijf, Carla C.J.M.; Choi, Chong-Ju

    2009-01-01

    An imbalance exists in almost any type of knowledge and technology transfer due to the information asymmetry of the relationship. However, this is especially the case for reverse technology and knowledge transfer which is epitomised for us by "transfers from an MNC's subsidiary to its headquarters".

  3. Adherence compounds in embryo transfer media for assisted reproductive technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bontekoe, Stephan; Heineman, Maas Jan; Johnson, Neil; Blake, Debbie

    2014-02-25

    This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in The Cochrane Library (2010, Issue 7).To increase the success rate of assisted reproductive technologies (ART), adherence compounds such as hyaluronic acid (HA) and fibrin sealant have been introduced into subfertility management. Adherence compounds are added to the embryo transfer medium to increase the likelihood of embryo implantation, with the potential for higher clinical pregnancy and live birth rates. To determine whether embryo transfer media containing adherence compounds improved live birth and pregnancy rates in ART cycles. The Menstrual Disorders and Subfertility Group Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) and MEDLINE, EMBASE and PsycINFO electronic databases were searched (up to 13 November 2013) to look for publications that described randomised controlled trials on the addition of adherence compounds to embryo transfer media. Furthermore, reference lists of all obtained studies were checked, and conference abstracts were handsearched. Only truly randomised controlled trials comparing embryo transfer media containing functional (e.g. 0.5 mg/ml HA) concentrations of adherence compounds versus transfer media containing low or no concentrations of adherence compounds were included. The adherence compounds that were identified for evaluation were HA and fibrin sealant. Two review authors selected trials for inclusion according to the above criteria, after which two review authors independently extracted the data for subsequent analysis. Statistical analysis was performed in accordance with the guidelines developed by The Cochrane Collaboration. Seventeen studies with a total of 3898 participants were analysed. One studied fibrin sealant, and the other 16 studied HA. No evidence was found of a treatment effect of fibrin sealant as an adherence compound. For HA, evidence of a positive treatment effect was identified in the six trials that reported live birth

  4. Does Technology Transfer Help Small and Medium Companies? Empirical Evidence from Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae-Hwan Kim

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We challenge the view that technology transfer from big companies to small and medium (SM size companies helps SM companies to prosper. With a large dataset of SM companies in Korea, we utilize the stochastic production frontier (SPF model to examine the productivity of inputs and the generalized linear model (GLM to compare business performance between two groups of SM companies: SM companies that receive technology transfer and those that do not receive technology transfer from big companies. The empirical results demonstrate that the transfer of technology from big companies to SM companies help SM companies to enjoy productivity of capital. Nonetheless, SM companies receiving technology transfer were found to underperform in terms of labor productivity and profit margin compared to their counterparts. We further investigate the reasons why SM companies receiving technology transfer from big companies underperform relative to their counterparts, and our findings shows that the former do not export much of their product and face more difficulties such as lower price for their products imposed by big companies than the latter. By identifying the negative rather than the conventionally assumed positive effect of technology transfer, this paper contributes to the literature on the relationship between technology transfer and SM companies’ prosperity in the case of Korea. Our findings have important implications for how SM companies should strategize and rethink about the clauses embedded in the transfer of technology that they receive from big companies because technology transfer plays as a barrier to their prosperity.

  5. Technology transfer package on seismic base isolation - Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-02-14

    This Technology Transfer Package provides some detailed information for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors about seismic base isolation. Intended users of this three-volume package are DOE Design and Safety Engineers as well as DOE Facility Managers who are responsible for reducing the effects of natural phenomena hazards (NPH), specifically earthquakes, on their facilities. The package was developed as part of DOE's efforts to study and implement techniques for protecting lives and property from the effects of natural phenomena and to support the International Decade for Natural Disaster Reduction. Volume I contains the proceedings of the Workshop on Seismic Base Isolation for Department of Energy Facilities held in Marina Del Rey, California, May 13-15, 1992.

  6. From computer images to video presentation: Enhancing technology transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beam, Sherilee F.

    1994-01-01

    With NASA placing increased emphasis on transferring technology to outside industry, NASA researchers need to evaluate many aspects of their efforts in this regard. Often it may seem like too much self-promotion to many researchers. However, industry's use of video presentations in sales, advertising, public relations and training should be considered. Today, the most typical presentation at NASA is through the use of vu-graphs (overhead transparencies) which can be effective for text or static presentations. For full blown color and sound presentations, however, the best method is videotape. In fact, it is frequently more convenient due to its portability and the availability of viewing equipment. This talk describes techniques for creating a video presentation through the use of a combined researcher and video professional team.

  7. Technology transfer package on seismic base isolation - Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-02-14

    This Technology Transfer Package provides some detailed information for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors about seismic base isolation. Intended users of this three-volume package are DOE Design and Safety Engineers as well as DOE Facility Managers who are responsible for reducing the effects of natural phenomena hazards (NPH), specifically earthquakes, on their facilities. The package was developed as part of DOE's efforts to study and implement techniques for protecting lives and property from the effects of natural phenomena and to support the International Decade for Natural Disaster Reduction. Volume II contains the proceedings for the Short Course on Seismic Base Isolation held in Berkeley, California, August 10-14, 1992.

  8. Analysis and technology transfer report, 1989 and 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-08-01

    The buildings sector used 29.6 quadrillion Btus (quads) of energy in 1989, or 36 percent of the total primary energy consumed in the United States. The major uses are for space heating and cooling, water heating, refrigeration, and lighting. Electricity is the dominant fuel, followed by natural gas, petroleum, and other fuels. Although there were dramatic improvements in energy efficiency in this sector from 1975 to 1985, in recent years energy use has grown rapidly. The large growth expected in commercial building floor space and in residential units means that total building-sector energy consumption could increase dramatically by the year 2030. The mission of the US DOE's Office of Building Technologies (OBT) is to lead a national program supporting private sector efforts to improve the energy efficiency of the nation's buildings and to increase their utilization of renewable energy sources. The Office is also responsible for energy efficiency planning and management for Federal buildings as well as buildings-related associated information, financial incentives, and regulatory functions that are determined to be appropriate for the Federal government. To accomplish its goals, OBT plans and conducts research and development to make technologies available and provides information on their effectiveness. The selection and management of OBT research activities requires an understanding of where and how energy is used within the buildings sectors, how energy use is expected to change in the future, and the potential impact of new and emerging technologies on energy use. Analysis activities serve to collect energy use information, provide the analysis necessary to apply this information to research and development planning, and develop analysis tools which the program uses to set priorities for research projects. This report summarizes analysis and technology transfer activities undertaken by OBT during 1989 and 1990. 101 refs., 19 figs., 9 tabs.

  9. Bioprocess development workflow: Transferable physiological knowledge instead of technological correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichelt, Wieland N; Haas, Florian; Sagmeister, Patrick; Herwig, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    Microbial bioprocesses need to be designed to be transferable from lab scale to production scale as well as between setups. Although substantial effort is invested to control technological parameters, usually the only true constant parameter is the actual producer of the product: the cell. Hence, instead of solely controlling technological process parameters, the focus should be increasingly laid on physiological parameters. This contribution aims at illustrating a workflow of data life cycle management with special focus on physiology. Information processing condenses the data into physiological variables, while information mining condenses the variables further into physiological descriptors. This basis facilitates data analysis for a physiological explanation for observed phenomena in productivity. Targeting transferability, we demonstrate this workflow using an industrially relevant Escherichia coli process for recombinant protein production and substantiate the following three points: (1) The postinduction phase is independent in terms of productivity and physiology from the preinduction variables specific growth rate and biomass at induction. (2) The specific substrate uptake rate during induction phase was found to significantly impact the maximum specific product titer. (3) The time point of maximum specific titer can be predicted by an easy accessible physiological variable: while the maximum specific titers were reached at different time points (19.8 ± 7.6 h), those maxima were reached all within a very narrow window of cumulatively consumed substrate dSn (3.1 ± 0.3 g/g). Concluding, this contribution provides a workflow on how to gain a physiological view on the process and illustrates potential benefits. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 33:261-270, 2017. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  10. Manufacturing process applications team (MATEAM). [technology transfer in the areas of machine tools and robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    The transfer of NASA technology to the industrial sector is reported. Presentations to the machine tool and robot industries and direct technology transfers of the Adams Manipulator arm, a-c motor control, and the bolt tension monitor are discussed. A listing of proposed RTOP programs with strong potential is included. A detailed description of the rotor technology available to industry is given.

  11. Information to Change the World--Fulfilling the Information Needs of Technology Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duberman, Josh; Zeller, Martin

    1996-01-01

    Provides an introduction to fulfilling the information needs of technology transfer. Highlights include a definition of technology transfer; government and university involvement; industry's role; publishers; an annotated list of information sources and contacts; technology assessment, including patent searching, competitive intelligence, and…

  12. Factors that Influence the Dissemination of Knowledge in Technology Transfer among Malaysian Manufacturing Employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mughaneswari ap Sahadevan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The meaning of technology transfer is so wide but mostly involving some form of technology-re- lated exchange. However, in this particular paper, technology transfer is consider as a concept to examine the process of disseminating knowledge and skills that a person owned to another per- son in order to generate higher productivity with new approach of producing a particular prod- uct or service. Although, many researchers have explored the evolution of technology transfer, nonetheless some drivers are yet to be explored in a Malaysian manufacturing industry. This study, therefore attempts to determine the relationship between absorptive capacity, transfer capacity, communication motivation and learning intent and technology transfer performance. A survey methodology was used in a Japanese multinational company based in Klang Valley, Malaysia. A total of 117 questionnaires were received. Results show that absorptive capacity is the most signifi- cant to influence technology transfer performance.

  13. Technology Transfer Challenges in Indonesia: An Experience from Industry Turbine Overhaul

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subiakto Soekarno

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the problems and challenges that Indonesia faces in the process of its technology transfer. Matters discussed in this paper are based on the lead writer’s personal observation and experience of the technology transfer taking place in Indonesia’s turbine maintenance and overhaul industry.The first challenge faced is the lack of basic skills on the part of factory workers. The next challenge is the lack of supporting industries. Furthermore, the low level of English proficiency of the workforce has contribution to the technology transfer problems. Final challenges are the low credibility of the government entities that oversee the turbine maintenance industry in Indonesia. The steps undertaken in the technology transfer in the turbine maintenance and overhaul industry in Indonesia is done through several complex stages.Keywords: challenges in the transfer of technology, technology transfer in Indonesia, turbine maintenance and overhaul industry.

  14. A Conceptual Model of Technology Transfer for Public Universities in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Necoechea

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Technology transfer from academic and scientific institutions has been transformed into a strategic variable for companies and nations who wish to cope with the challenges of a global economy. Since the early 1970s, many technology transfer models have tried to introduce key factors in the process. Previous studies have shown that technology transfer is influenced by various elements. This study is based on a review of two recent technology transfer models that we have used as basic concepts for developing our own conceptual model. Researcher–firm networks have been considered as key elements in the technology transfer process between public universities and firms. The conceptual model proposed could be useful to improve the efficiency of existing technology transfer mechanisms.

  15. Common HEP UNIX Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taddei, Arnaud

    After it had been decided to design a common user environment for UNIX platforms among HEP laboratories, a joint project between DESY and CERN had been started. The project consists in 2 phases: 1. Provide a common user environment at shell level, 2. Provide a common user environment at graphical level (X11). Phase 1 is in production at DESY and at CERN as well as at PISA and RAL. It has been developed around the scripts originally designed at DESY Zeuthen improved and extended with a 2 months project at CERN with a contribution from DESY Hamburg. It consists of a set of files which are customizing the environment for the 6 main shells (sh, csh, ksh, bash, tcsh, zsh) on the main platforms (AIX, HP-UX, IRIX, SunOS, Solaris 2, OSF/1, ULTRIX, etc.) and it is divided at several "sociological" levels: HEP, site, machine, cluster, group of users and user with some levels which are optional. The second phase is under design and a first proposal has been published. A first version of the phase 2 exists already for AIX and Solaris, and it should be available for all other platforms, by the time of the conference. This is a major collective work between several HEP laboratories involved in the HEPiX-scripts and HEPiX-X11 working-groups.

  16. 78 FR 48537 - Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer Programs...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer Programs... Administration (SBA) is publishing the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology...

  17. Moving R&D to the Marketplace, A Guidebook for Technology Transfer Managers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mock, John E.; Kenkeremath, Deepak C.; Janis, F. Timothy

    1993-01-01

    This Guidebook serves as an introduction as well as a refresher for technology transfer managers. It focuses on the question: What can the Technology Transfer manager do when confronted by complex situations and events? The main functional issues addressed here concern the conduct of technology transfer in Technology Utilization programs. These R&D programs whose primary mission is to develop technologies that will be used outside of the Federal sector. Renewable energy, health care, and agricultural advances are technologies of this type. The contents of this Guidebook will be of value to managers in a variety of Federal, State, university and industry technology development and transfer programs. The general area of transferring service innovations is not covered here. The Guidebook is primarily about the development and care of hardware. This Guidebook makes no attempt to judge the value of specific technologies in meeting societal needs. Rather, it addresses the improvement of the technology transfer process itself. It does, however, include reminders that ascertainment of the social value of specific technologies is one of the important yet difficult tasks of R&D and technology transfer programs. [DJE-2005

  18. Technology transfer at CERN a study on inter-organizational knowledge transfer within multi-national R&D collaborations

    CERN Document Server

    Huuse, H; Streit-Bianchi, M

    2004-01-01

    This study focus on the knowledge aspect of inter-organizational technology transfer projects. We have studied two large R&D collaborations where CERN is involved as one of several participating organizations, in order to reveal the causalities related to the knowledge transfer processes within these projects. The objective of the study is to understand how knowledge transfer happens, identify influencing factors to the process, and finally investigate the outcome of such processes. The study is founded on a thorough literature review where we examine different aspects of inter-organizational knowledge transfer. Based on the theory, we develop an analytic framework and establish different elements in the knowledge transfer process to study in more detail. This framework illustrates the relation between the different elements in a knowledge transfer process and provides the structure for our empirical foundation. We perform an explanatory embedded multiple case study and analyze our findings in terms of th...

  19. Digital technology impacts on the Arnhem transfer hall structural design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van de Straat, R.; Hofman, S.; Coenders, J.L.; Paul, J.C.

    2015-01-01

    The new Transfer Hall in Arnhem is one of the key projects to prepare the Dutch railways for the increased future demands for capacity. UNStudio developed a master plan in 1996 for the station area of which the completion of the Transfer Hall in 2015 will be a final milestone. The Transfer Hall is a

  20. Using CASE to Exploit Process Modeling in Technology Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renz-Olar, Cheryl

    2003-01-01

    A successful business will be one that has processes in place to run that business. Creating processes, reengineering processes, and continually improving processes can be accomplished through extensive modeling. Casewise(R) Corporate Modeler(TM) CASE is a computer aided software engineering tool that will enable the Technology Transfer Department (TT) at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to capture these abilities. After successful implementation of CASE, it could then go on to be applied in other departments at MSFC and other centers at NASA. The success of a business process is dependent upon the players working as a team and continuously improving the process. A good process fosters customer satisfaction as well as internal satisfaction in the organizational infrastructure. CASE provides a method for business process success through functions consisting of systems and processes business models; specialized diagrams; matrix management; simulation; report generation and publishing; and, linking, importing, and exporting documents and files. The software has an underlying repository or database to support these functions. The Casewise. manual informs us that dynamics modeling is a technique used in business design and analysis. Feedback is used as a tool for the end users and generates different ways of dealing with the process. Feedback on this project resulted from collection of issues through a systems analyst interface approach of interviews with process coordinators and Technical Points of Contact (TPOCs).

  1. Your idea and your university: issues in academic technology transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Charles D

    2011-06-01

    Research discoveries may lead to products for commercial development. A central consideration for the researcher is how involved she or he will be in the commercialization process. In some cases, a university out-licenses the intellectual property, whereas in other cases, the investigator may want to be involved in the development process and choose to start his or her own company to develop and possibly to manufacture and sell the product. Before undertaking such a challenge, however, the investigator-turned-entrepreneur must consider a variety of issues, including career goals, financial and time commitments, potential conflicts of interest and/or commitment, start-up funding, and his or her ability to run a company or step aside to allow business experts to make necessary decisions. This paper discusses some personal considerations in deciding to start a spinout company and provides information on some of the available government grants to assist you should you decide to undertake your product's commercial development. In particular, the Small Business Innovative Research and Small Business Technology Transfer programs of federal funding agencies often are the source of early funding for new biomedical companies.

  2. Your Idea and Your University: Issues in Academic Technology Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Charles D.

    2013-01-01

    Structured Abstract Research discoveries may lead to products for commercial development. A central consideration for the researcher is how involved s/he will be in the commercialization process. In some cases a university out-licenses the intellectual property, while in other cases the investigator may want to be involved in the development process and choose to start his or her own company to develop, and possibly to manufacture and sell the product. Before undertaking such a challenge, however, the investigator-turned-entrepreneur must consider a variety of issues, including: career goals, financial and time commitments, potential conflicts of interest and/or commitment, start-up funding, as well as his or her ability to run a company or step aside to allow business experts to make necessary decisions. This article discusses some personal considerations in deciding to start a spin-out company and provides information on some of the available government grants to assist you should you decide to undertake your product’s commercial development. In particular, the Small Business Innovative Research and Small Business Technology Transfer programs of federal funding agencies are often the source of very early funding for new biomedical companies. PMID:21245769

  3. What do we need from intermediaries for technology transfer to China?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li-Ying, Jason

    2012-01-01

    Cross-national technology transfer has been one of the most important vehicles by which firms in developed countries exploit the value of their technological innovations, and firms in developing countries gain access to technological and organizational knowledge from developed economies. To facil......Cross-national technology transfer has been one of the most important vehicles by which firms in developed countries exploit the value of their technological innovations, and firms in developing countries gain access to technological and organizational knowledge from developed economies...... are of more importance than others for European technology holders in relation to three different types of intermediaries – governmental agencies, private commercial agencies and web-based marketplaces....

  4. 76 FR 75543 - Missisquoi River Technologies; Missisquoi River Hydro LLC; Notice of Transfer of Exemption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-02

    ... Transfer of Exemption 1. By letter filed November 16, 2011, Missisquoi River Technologies informed the... issued June 29, 1989,\\1\\ has been transferred to Missisquoi River Hydro LLC. The project is located on the Missisquoi River in Orleans County, Vermont. The transfer of an exemption does not require...

  5. Why NIH Scientists Need to Report an Invention | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    As an NIH scientist, you must report new inventions, including improvements of previously reported inventions, to the Technology Transfer Manager assigned to your Laboratory. If you do not know the name of your TTM, please call or email the Technology Transfer Center.  | [google6f4cd5334ac394ab.html

  6. 48 CFR 970.2770-3 - Technology transfer and patent rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... patent rights. 970.2770-3 Section 970.2770-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AGENCY SUPPLEMENTARY REGULATIONS DOE MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACTS Patents, Data, and Copyrights 970.2770-3 Technology transfer and patent rights. The National Competitiveness Technology Transfer Act of...

  7. Technology transfer during the ``middle game`` of the international decade for natural disaster reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rouhban, B.M. [UNESCO, Paris (France). Div. of Earth Sciences; Hays, W.W. [Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes the urgency for and the importance of technology transfer during the remainder of the International Decade for Natural Disaster Reduction (IDNDR). Eleven case histories are cited to illustrate the types of activities involving technology transfer that every nation can undertake.

  8. Assessment of research and technology transfer needs for wood-frame housing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin Powell; David Tilotta; Karen Martinson

    2008-01-01

    Improvements to housing will require both research and the transfer of that research to homebuilders, homebuyers, and others in need of technology. This report summarizes results of a national survey on research and technology transfer needs for housing and prioritizes those needs. Survey participants included academicians, builders, code officials, government...

  9. Proceedings: international conference on transfer of forest science knowledge and technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cynthia Miner; Ruth Jacobs; Dennis Dykstra; Becky Bittner

    2007-01-01

    This proceedings compiles papers presented by extensionists, natural resource specialists, scientists, technology transfer specialists, and others at an international conference that examined knowledge and technology transfer theories, methods, and case studies. Theory topics included adult education, applied science, extension, diffusion of innovations, social...

  10. The international transfer of medical technology--an analysis and a proposal for effective monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, M B

    1977-01-01

    The international transfer of medical technology to the developing countries occurs at four levels--medical education, research, and missions; multinational corporate transactions; technical assistance projects sponsored by the World Health Organization; and bilateral foreign aid programs. In this article, a proposal is made for effective monitoring of international medical technology transfer through political and legal means, including a specific code of conduct for corporations engaged in medical technology transfer. The development of "intermediate health technologies" along the lines suggested by E. F. Schumacher, and the advantages of such an innovation in terms of population issues and economic development are also discussed.

  11. [Inhibition of growth and proliferation of Hep-2 cells by targeting human telomerase reverse transcriptase mRNA using RNA interference technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shi-ming; Tao, Ze-zhang; Xiao, Bo-kui; Pan, Song; Liu, Dan; Chi, Hua-ming

    2005-12-01

    To investigate the effect of RNA interference by targeting human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) mRNA in the larynx cancer cell line, Hep-2. The primary structures of hTERT cDNA were found in GenBank. Then the structure analysis were done according to RNAi strategy which determined the specific base sequences to design shRNA plasmid. Two types of plasmid, pshRNA1 and pshRNA2, involved in fluorescein gene were synthesized based on the specific base sequences. Control pshRNA3, a random sequence, and control pshRNA4, without additional specific sequence were also constructed. Cells were treated daily with pshRNA1-4 or normal culture medium respectively. The pshRNA1-3 was identified by electrophoresis. After administration of pshRNA1-4, fluorescence expression was detected by confocal microscopy, the expression of hTERT of the transfected cells was determined by Western blotting, telomerase activity was measured by TRAP-PCR ELISA, cell viability was determined by MTT assay, morphological changes and apoptosis were examined by inverted microscope and TUNEL respectively. There was a 400 bp balteum in pshRNA1-3 after cut by SalI, which was identical with the size of the objective gene. Many cells presented green fluorescence after being treated by pshRNA1-4, but there are much more dead green fluorescent cells in the pshRNA1 and pshRNA2 group. hTERT protein and telomerase activity was significantly decreased after treated by pshRNA1 or pshRNA2. It was observed that treatment with pshRNA1 or pshRNA2 in the presence of a valid transfection reagent could reduce cell viability of Hep-2 cells within 96 h (P interference may be a promising strategy for the treatment of laryngeal cancer.

  12. Technology transfer metrics: Measurement and verification of data/reusable launch vehicle business analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivoli, George W.

    1996-01-01

    Congress and the Executive Branch have mandated that all branches of the Federal Government exert a concentrated effort to transfer appropriate government and government contractor-developed technology to the industrial use in the U.S. economy. For many years, NASA has had a formal technology transfer program to transmit information about new technologies developed for space applications into the industrial or commercial sector. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has been in the forefront of the development of U.S. industrial assistance programs using technologies developed at the Center. During 1992-93, MSFC initiated a technology transfer metrics study. The MSFC study was the first of its kind among the various NASA centers. The metrics study is a continuing process, with periodic updates that reflect on-going technology transfer activities.

  13. NASA programs in technology transfer and their relation to remote sensing education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, R. H.

    1980-01-01

    Technology transfer to users is a central feature of NASA programs. In each major area of responsibility, a variety of mechanisms was established to provide for this transfer of operational capability to the proper end user, be it a Federal agency, industry, or other public sector users. In addition, the Technology Utilization program was established to cut across all program areas and to make available a wealth of 'spinoff' technology (i.e., secondary applications of space technology to ground-based use). The transfer of remote sensing technology, particularly to state and local users, presents some real challenges in application and education for NASA and the university community. The agency's approach to the transfer of remote sensing technology and the current and potential role of universities in the process are considered.

  14. HEP in Greek Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassouliotis, Dimitris; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Vourakis, Stylianos

    2017-03-01

    The HEP Inquiry learning resources created over the last four years by the European outreach projects are reviewed. The resources are mostly addressed to high school students and the purpose is to ignite their interest on science. In addition, at the University of Athens for the last four years we have been using the HYPATIA online event analysis tool as a lab course for fourth year undergraduate physics students, majoring in HEP. Each year 40-50 students highly appreciated the course, since they get a direct involvement in the actual toplevel research. Up to now, the course was limited to visual inspection of a few tens of ATLAS events. Recently we have enriched the course with additional analysis exercises, which involve large samples of events. The students, through a user friendly interface can analyze the samples (both signal and background ones) and optimize the cut selection in order to search for the Higgs decay H □ 4 leptons. Recently ATLAS released 1/fb of data, so starting now the students analyse real data.

  15. Research Funding, Patent Search Training and Technology Transfer: a collaboration

    KAUST Repository

    Tyhurst, Janis

    2016-01-01

    This paper will focus on the collaboration efforts of three different university departments to create, teach and evaluate the benefits of a joint patent training series, as well as the future directions this collaboration will take. KAUST has as one of its goals the diversification of the Saudi economy. There is a strong focus at the university on developing entrepreneurial ideas and commercializing research done. The University Library supports this goal through the provision of electronic resources and introductory patent search training skills. However, the patent training class offered by the University Library is only one step in a process that faculty and students need when starting or taking their research to the next level. In the Fall of 2015, I met with representatives of the two major stakeholders in the patent arena, the office of Sponsored Research (OSR) and the Technology Transfer Office (TTO), to develop a patent training program to meet the needs of researchers. The OSR provides funding to researchers who have demonstrated that their ideas have merit with potential applications, the TTO works with researchers who are at the point of needing IP protection. The resulting discussion led us to collaborate on creating a workshop series that benefit the researcher’s information needs and each of our departments as well. In the first of the series of three 2 hour workshops, the Manager of TTO and the Lead Integrative Specialist from the OSR presented a workshop on an overview of Intellectual Property and the patenting process. These presentations focused on when and how to determine whether research is potentially patentable, why a researcher needs to protect his/her research and how to go about protecting it. The second workshop focused on introductory patent search skills and tools, how to expand a literature search to include the information found in patents, and how this kind of research will improve not only the literature search but the research

  16. Transfer of Military Technology to Developing Countries: The Turkish Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-06-01

    first Brazilian built ships laid down in 1972. b Stretched version of UK-designed Leander (Nilgiri) Class. uncertain data. Source: M. Brzoska and T...functioning weapon system (Brzoska, 1986, p. 284). Brazilian armored vehicles from Engesa, aircraft from Embraer, South Korean howitzers and ships...Speed Cinema Recording Technology 8.7.7 Microdensitometer Technology 9.0 TELECOMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGY 9.1 Telecommunications Systems Technology 9.1.1

  17. Tools, courses, and learning pathways offered by the National Interagency Fuels, Fire, and Vegetation Technology Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eva K. Strand; Kathy H. Schon; Jeff Jones

    2010-01-01

    Technological advances in the area of fuel and wildland fire management have created a need for effective decision support tools and technology training. The National Interagency Fuels Committee and LANDFIRE have chartered a team to develop science-based learning tools for assessment of fire and fuels and to provide online training and technology transfer to help...

  18. Determinants and Catalysts in Intrafirm Technology Transfer: Learning From Case Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Petronia

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The sharing of technological knowledge between firms or within the same firm is becoming essential to develop innovations. Although previous studies have investigated the determinants of technology transfer(TT, they have not pointed out the existence of catalysts, i.e. determinants that assume a more crucial role than others in making transfer effective, and which compensate for the weaknesses in other determinants. In this paper, from the analysis of transfer processes within three manufacturing multinationals, three catalysts have emerged: leadership by the top management, anticipated profitability from the adoption of the new technology, and the professionalism of centralized research and development staff.

  19. A hypertext-based Internet-assessable database for the MSFC Technology Transfer Office

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Jeff

    1994-01-01

    There exists a continuing need to disseminate technical information and facilities capabilities from NASA field centers in an effort to promote the successful transfer of technologies developed with public funds to the private sector. As technology transfer is a stated NASA mission, there exists a critical need for NASA centers to document technology capabilities and disseminate this information on as wide a basis as possible. Certainly local and regional dissemination is critical, but global dissemination of scientific and engineering facilities and capabilities gives NASA centers the ability to contribute to technology transfer on a much broader scale. Additionally, information should be disseminated in a complete and rapidly available form. To accomplish this information dissemination, the unique capabilities of the Internet are being exploited. The Internet allows widescale information distribution in a rapid fashion to aid in the accomplishment of technology transfer goals established by the NASA/MSFC Technology Transfer Office. Rapid information retrieval coupled with appropriate electronic feedback, allows the scientific and technical capabilities of Marshall Space Flight Center, often unique in the world, to be explored by a large number of potential benefactors of NASA (or NASA-derived) technologies. Electronic feedback, coupled with personal contact with the MSFC Technology Transfer Office personnel, allows rapid responses to technical requests from industry and academic personnel as well as private citizens. The remainder of this report gives a brief overview of the Mosaic software and a discussion of technology transfer office and laboratory facilities data that have been made available on the Internet to promote technology transfer.

  20. [Nasal submicron emulsion of Scutellariae Radix extract preparation technology research based on phase transfer of solute technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ya-jun; Shi, Jun-hui; Chen, Shi-bin; Yang, Ming

    2015-07-01

    Based on the demand of nasal drug delivery high drug loadings, using the unique phase transfer of solute, integrating the phospholipid complex preparation and submicron emulsion molding process of Scutellariae Radix extract, the study obtained the preparation of the high drug loadings submicron emulsion of Scutellariae Radix extract. In the study of drug solution dispersion method, the uniformity of drug dispersed as the evaluation index, the traditional mixing method, grinding, homogenate and solute phase transfer technology were investigated, and the solute phase transfer technology was adopted in the last. With the adoption of new technology, the drug loading capacity reached 1.33% (phospholipid complex was 4%). The drug loading capacity was improved significantly. The transfer of solute method and timing were studied as follows,join the oil phase when the volume of phospholipid complex anhydrous ethanol solution remaining 30%, the solute phase transfer was completed with the continued recycling of anhydrous ethanol. After drug dissolved away to oil phase, the preparation technology of colostrum was determined with the evaluation index of emulsion droplet form. The particle size of submicron emulsion, PDI and stability parameters were used as evaluation index, orthogonal methodology were adopted to optimize the submicron emulsion ingredient and main influential factors of high pressure homogenization technology. The optimized preparation technology of Scutellariae Radix extract nasal submicron emulsion is practical and stable.

  1. Technology Transfer In Rural Industries of Thailand: The Case of Dessert And Palm Tree Industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apisek Pansuwan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In last decade, the small industrial sector has increasingly received attention from Thai policy makers. This study investigates the relationship between small industries and community in rural area in term of technology transfer. In the research area, knowledge and experience gathered from workplace as an employee and family businesses are the core resources to establish and run busineSses. Technically, technology transfer is divided into 2 characteristics; intra-enterprise and inter-enterprise. Intra-enterprise technology transfer comes from employers to employees, emphasizing production development. Beside, technology transfer of inter-enterprise has two directions. Firstly, direction points from the entrepreneur to material suppliers aiming to secure raw material quality. Secondly direction points from consumers to the entrepreneur aiming to put a great emphasis on product development, quality control and management.

  2. The transfer of disruptive technologies: Lessions learned from Sandia National Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MCBRAYER,JOHN D.

    2000-04-19

    Sandia National Laboratories has learned through their process of technology transfer that not all high tech transfers are alike. They are not alike by the nature of the customers involved, the process of becoming involved with these customers and finally and most importantly the very nature of the technology itself. Here they focus on technology transfer in the microsystems arena and specifically the sacrificial surface version of microsystems. They have learned and helped others learn that many MEMS applications are best realized through the use of surface micromachining (SMM). This is because SMM builds on the substantial integrated circuit industry. In this paper they review Sandia's process for transferring a disruptive MEMS technology in numerous cases.

  3. Comparative Study of Technology Transfer Practices in Europe and the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Juan, Veronica

    2003-01-01

    Technology transfer practices in the European Union emphasize industry-science relationships and protection of intellectual property. The United States has impressive success in transfer for commercial application due to the regulatory environment. Global interaction of research, industry, and international patent systems is needed to manage a…

  4. The Relevance of Career Aspirations for Transfer Students Persisting in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math Disciplines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyote, Ruthann T.

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study utilizes data acquired from interviews with 18 community college transfer students in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) majors and 7 university staff people who work in direct student services with this student population. This study explores the experiences of transfer students in STEM majors regarding what…

  5. The role of technology transfer for the development of a local wind component industry in Chile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pueyo, Ana, E-mail: anapueyo@hotmail.com [Technical University of Madrid (UPM)-Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros Industriales (ETSII), Madrid (Spain); Garcia, Rodrigo [Centro de Energias Renovables (CER), Santiago de Chile (Chile); Mendiluce, Maria [World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD), Geneva (Switzerland); Morales, Dario [InnovaChile-CORFO Chile, Santiago de Chile (Chile)

    2011-07-15

    This paper contributes to the debate about climate change technology transfer by analysing barriers and enablers for a Chilean company starting up the production of wind blades. Literature on the role of technology transfer for the development and deployment of local renewable energy technologies in developing countries often refers to success stories in Brazil, India and China. Instead, this case study highlights the different challenges faced by smaller emerging economies. The paper argues that successful technology transfer in a smaller economy like Chile requires: a minimum internal demand and access to regional markets to attract foreign knowledge providers; a focus in the types of technologies where the recipient country or company have a competitive advantage; and active learning processes by the recipient company. Lessons are drawn for improving the design and implementation of technology-push and market-pull policies in small or medium emerging economies. - Highlights: > We analyse the case of a Chilean company starting up wind blades production. > Technology transfer is required as the relevant knowledge is not available in the country. > We examine the factors that enable technology transfer to draw policy conclusions. > We highlight the particularities of medium sized developing countries.

  6. How Colleges Get More Bang (or Less) from Technology Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenstyk, Goldie

    2002-01-01

    Uses the University of Michigan and three other colleges (University of Maryland--Baltimore County, Brigham Young University, and Washington University) to illustrate the varied approaches to capitalizing financially on campus research by deciding what constitutes success. Includes a "tech-transfer scorecard" listing the highest-ranking…

  7. Future HEP Accelerators: The US Perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhat, Pushpalatha [Fermilab; Shiltsev, Vladimir [Fermilab

    2015-11-02

    Accelerator technology has advanced tremendously since the introduction of accelerators in the 1930s, and particle accelerators have become indispensable instruments in high energy physics (HEP) research to probe Nature at smaller and smaller distances. At present, accelerator facilities can be classified into Energy Frontier colliders that enable direct discoveries and studies of high mass scale particles and Intensity Frontier accelerators for exploration of extremely rare processes, usually at relatively low energies. The near term strategies of the global energy frontier particle physics community are centered on fully exploiting the physics potential of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN through its high-luminosity upgrade (HL-LHC), while the intensity frontier HEP research is focused on studies of neutrinos at the MW-scale beam power accelerator facilities, such as Fermilab Main Injector with the planned PIP-II SRF linac project. A number of next generation accelerator facilities have been proposed and are currently under consideration for the medium- and long-term future programs of accelerator-based HEP research. In this paper, we briefly review the post-LHC energy frontier options, both for lepton and hadron colliders in various regions of the world, as well as possible future intensity frontier accelerator facilities.

  8. Foreign Direct Investment and the Transfer of Technologies to Angola’s Energy Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Edgar Manyuchi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between foreign direct investment (FDI and the transfer of technology is undergoing a great deal of academic scrutiny and policy analysis. A growing body of literature shows that FDI can be a channel by which to transfer and/or acquire technology; however, there is a paucity of empirical studies on this as it relates to African economies. This article seeks to fill some of that gap by focusing on how FDI inflows are contributing to the transfer of technologies specifically into Angola’s energy sector. The analysis is based on qualitative research conducted in Angola in 2014 and reveals that energy production and distribution-technology infrastructure, including machinery and human skills, have been developed largely through FDI inflows. There is, however, no evidence that this FDI has enlarged Angola’s endogenous scientific and technological research capabilities in the energy sector; therefore, policies that promote these capabilities, especially manufacturing capabilities, should be introduced.

  9. 76 FR 52670 - 2011 Technology Transfer Summit North America Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-23

    ... specifically to put innovators, early-stage SMEs and technology managers from leading universities and research... over the 2-day period with the leaders in the sector. The Summit conference will be further enhanced by...

  10. Renal Cancer Biomarkers | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute's Laboratory of Proteomics and Analytical Technologies is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize diagnostic, therapeutic and prognostic cancer biomarkers from clinical specimens.

  11. Managing Technology Transfer in the Korean Military Establishment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-12-01

    botany, zoology, genetics, etc. Animal anatomy, physiology, and pathology. Care and breeding of laboratory animals. Bionics : Study of biological...technology, physical therapy, and prosthesis . Environmental Biology: External influences on the V biological processes of organism. Ecology

  12. DIFFUSING INNOVATIONS: Implementing the Technology Transfer Act of 1986.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-05-29

    Biotechnologies Fishing Genetic engineering Robotics Artificial intelligence Automated factory assembly Other: (please specify) 29. During FY1989, which...tant to the beekeeping industry and to governmental regulatory and action agencies. This technology is valuable beyond its use in controlling

  13. Technology Transfer Challenges for High-Assurance Software Engineering Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Dennis (Technical Monitor); Penix, John; Markosian, Lawrence Z.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we describe our experience with the challenges thar we are currently facing in our effort to develop advanced software verification and validation tools. We categorize these challenges into several areas: cost benefits modeling, tool usability, customer application domain, and organizational issues. We provide examples of challenges in each area and identrfj, open research issues in areas which limit our ability to transfer high-assurance software engineering tools into practice.

  14. The Analysis of the Relationship between Clean Technology Transfer and Chinese Intellectual Property Countering the Climate Changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Min, Hao

    This report discusses the relationship between the Chinese intellectual property systems which counter with the climate change and the transfer of clean technology, and states how to encourage the developed countries transfer the clean technology to the developing countries according...... to the relative international climate convention program. The report also proposes the current hindrances and developing strategies according to Chinese current situation at this field. The report is mainly divided into three subjects: the relationship between clean technology transfer and the intellectual...... property countering the climate changes; the analysis of current technology transfer modes relating to the climate; the difficulties of Chinese countering climate changes technology transfer and strategic thinking....

  15. Brazilian university technology transfer to rural areas Transferência de tecnologia de universidades brasileiras na área rural

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enio Marchesan

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In agriculture, there is a difference between average yield obtained by farmers and crop potential. There is technology available to increase yields, but not all farmers have access to it and/or use this information. This clearly characterizes an extension and technology transference problem. There are several technology transfer systems, but there is no system to fit all conditions. Therefore, it is necessary to create extension solutions according to local conditions. Another rural extension challenge is efficiency, despite continuous funding reductions. One proposal that has resulted from extension reform worldwide has suggested integration between the public and private sectors. The public universities could play the role of training and updating technical assistance of human resources, which is the one of the main aspects that has limited technology transfer. The objective of this study was to identify approaches to promote technology transfer generated in Brazilian public universities to rural areas through literature review. An experimental approach of technology transfer is presented here where a Brazilian university extension Vice-chancellor incorporates professionals from consolidated research groups according to demand. In this way, public universities take part of their social functions, by integrating teaching, research, and extension.Em agricultura, há diferenças entre a produtividade média obtida pelos produtores e o potencial produtivo dos cultivos. Há informação tecnológica disponível para aumentar a produtividade, mas nem todos os produtores têm acesso e/ou usam a informação. Isso caracteriza claramente um problema de extensão e transferência de tecnologia. Há vários sistemas de transferência de tecnologia, mas, como não há sistema que se ajuste a todas as condições, é necessário criar alternativas adequadas às condições de cada local. Outro desafio da extensão rural é ser eficiente, apesar da cont

  16. Oil and gas technology transfer activities and potential in eight major producing states. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-07-01

    In 1990, the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (the Compact) performed a study that identified the structure and deficiencies of the system by which oil and gas producers receive information about the potential of new technologies and communicate their problems and technology needs back to the research community. The conclusions of that work were that major integrated companies have significantly more and better sources of technology information than independent producers. The majors also have significantly better mechanisms for communicating problems to the research and development (R&D) community. As a consequence, the Compact recommended analyzing potential mechanisms to improve technology transfer channels for independents and to accelerate independents acceptance and use of existing and emerging technologies. Building on this work, the Compact, with a grant from the US Department Energy, has reviewed specific technology transfer organizations in each of eight major oil producing states to identify specific R&D and technology transfer organizations, characterize their existing activities, and identify potential future activities that could be performed to enhance technology transfer to oil and gas producers. The profiles were developed based on information received from organizations,follow-up interviews, site visit and conversations, and participation in their sponsored technology transfer activities. The results of this effort are reported in this volume. In addition, the Compact has also developed a framework for the development of evaluation methodologies to determine the effectiveness of technology transfer programs in performing their intended functions and in achieving desired impacts impacts in the producing community. The results of that work are provided in a separate volume.

  17. Technology transfer for DOE's office of buildings and community systems: assessment and strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, M.A.; Jones, D.W.; Kolb, J.O.; Snell, S.A.

    1986-07-01

    The uninterrupted availability of oil supplies over the past several years and the moderation of energy price increases has sent signals to consumers and decision-makers in the buildings industry that the ''energy crisis'' is over. As a result, efforts to promote energy-conserving technologies must emphasize benefits other than BTU savings. The improved ambience of daylit spaces and the lower first costs associated with installing down-sized HVAC systems in ''tight'' buildings are examples of benefits which are likely to more influential than estimates of energy saved. Successful technology transfer requires that an R and D product have intrinsic value and that these values be effectively communicated to potential users. Active technology transfer programs are more effective than passive ones. Transfer activities should involve more than simply making information available to those who seek it. Information should be tailored to meet the needs of specific user groups and disseminated through those channels which users normally employ. In addition to information dissemination, successful technology transfer involves the management of intellectual property, including patented inventions, copyrights, technical data, and rights to future inventions. When the public can best benefit from an invention through commercialization of a new product, the exclusivity necessary to protect the investment from copiers should be provided. Most federal technology transfer programs concentrate on information exchange and largely avoid intellectual property transfers.

  18. International Scientist Mobility and the Locus of Knowledge and Technology Transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edler, Jakob; Fier, Hedie; Grimpe, Christoph

    2011-01-01

    Despite the growing interest of scholars and policymakers to better understand the determinants for researchers in public science to transfer knowledge and technology to firms, little is known how temporary international mobility of scientists affects both their propensity to engage in knowledge ...... circulation”. The article contributes to the growing strand of the literature on scientist mobility and on the determinants of industry–science linkages at the individual level.Scientist......Despite the growing interest of scholars and policymakers to better understand the determinants for researchers in public science to transfer knowledge and technology to firms, little is known how temporary international mobility of scientists affects both their propensity to engage in knowledge...... and technology transfer (KTT) as well as the locus of such transfer. Based on a sample of more than 950 German academics from science and engineering faculties, we investigate how the duration and the frequency of scientists’ visits at research institutions outside their home country affect KTT activities. We...

  19. Development of a Technology Transfer Score for Evaluating Research Proposals: Case Study of Demand Response Technologies in the Pacific Northwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estep, Judith

    Investment in Research and Development (R&D) is necessary for innovation, allowing an organization to maintain a competitive edge. The U.S. Federal Government invests billions of dollars, primarily in basic research technologies to help fill the pipeline for other organizations to take the technology into commercialization. However, it is not about just investing in innovation, it is about converting that research into application. A cursory review of the research proposal evaluation criteria suggests that there is little to no emphasis placed on the transfer of research results. This effort is motivated by a need to move research into application. One segment that is facing technology challenges is the energy sector. Historically, the electric grid has been stable and predictable; therefore, there were no immediate drivers to innovate. However, an aging infrastructure, integration of renewable energy, and aggressive energy efficiency targets are motivating the need for research and to put promising results into application. Many technologies exist or are in development but the rate at which they are being adopted is slow. The goal of this research is to develop a decision model that can be used to identify the technology transfer potential of a research proposal. An organization can use the model to select the proposals whose research outcomes are more likely to move into application. The model begins to close the chasm between research and application--otherwise known as the "valley of death". A comprehensive literature review was conducted to understand when the idea of technology application or transfer should begin. Next, the attributes that are necessary for successful technology transfer were identified. The emphasis of successful technology transfer occurs when there is a productive relationship between the researchers and the technology recipient. A hierarchical decision model, along with desirability curves, was used to understand the complexities of the

  20. Innovation, Technology Transfer and Labor Productivity Linkages: Evidence from a Panel of Manufacturing Industries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Apergis, N.; Economidou, C.; Filippidis, I.

    2008-01-01

    The paper explores the linkages between labor productivity, innovation and technology spillovers in a panel of manufacturing industries. The roles of R&D, human capital and international trade are considered in stimulating innovation and/or facilitating technology transfer. Using panel-based unit

  1. Transfer of aerospace technology to selected public sector areas of concern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berke, J. G.

    1972-01-01

    The activities of the NASA Technology Applications Team at Stanford Research Institute, California are discussed. The specific activities in the fields of criminalistics and transportation are reported. The overall objectives of the program are stated on the basis of successful technology transfer and providing appropriate visibility for program activities.

  2. From a social marketing perspective: a proposed customer relationship management technology transfer model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delton Alderman; Kent Nakamoto; David Briberg

    2007-01-01

    Technology and knowledge transfer (TKT) is practiced for a plethora of causes, ranging from AIDS prevention to manufacturing competitiveness. The number of government, university, and association TKT efforts is exhausting and fraught with problems; we know anecdotally that the adoption of technology or knowledge is minimal across all contexts. There are a myriad of...

  3. Technology Transfer and Climate Change: Additional Considerations for Implementation under the UNFCCC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Sullivan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Technology transfer is recognised as playing a central and critical role in the global response to climate change, as embodied in the Unite Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC. However, technology transfer is a complex process, and despite numerous attempts to prescribe approaches to optimisation, there remain serious obstacles to its effective operation. The breadth of technologies and range of would-be recipient territories under the climate change regime serve to complicate things even further. Against this background, the Expert Group on Technology Transfer have produced a robust Strategy, which it will now fall to the Technology Mechanism announced in Cancun to implement. However, despite the rigour with which the technology transfer strategy was produced, it is never possible to cover all possible eventualities. It is on this basis that this article presents a number of tactical and strategic issues which may merit further consideration as the implementation process moves forward. At the operational level, such issues include a possible role for a centralised or regional technology procurement effort, the need for greater emphasis on sectoral specific approaches to technology transfer, and a pragmatic approach to reducing the impact of some barriers to transactions by the expedient use of insurance to reduce risk, as opposed to the longer term approach of international standardisation. At the strategic level, there are major issues with regard to prioritisation of resources applied to technology transfer, and in particular the resolution of the tensions existing between achieving sustainable development and the time critical need to achieve climate stabilisation.

  4. Poverty Alleviation and Environmental Sustainability through Improved Regimes of Technology Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Bosselmann

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available To achieve the Millennium Development Goals, international technology transfer can play a major role for poverty alleviation and environmental sustainability. At present, there are economic, social and legal (rather than technical barriers preventing the transfer of environmentally sound technology (EST from a wider use in international regimes. Removing these barriers requires greater political and regulatory efforts both domestically and internationally. To enable EST transfer, developed States need to improve domestic market conditions such as removal of negative subsidies and barriers to foreign investment, targeted fiscal incentives and law reforms favouring sustainable production and use of energy. There is no realistic perspective for international EST transfer as long as it is disadvantaged domestically. A coherent EST transfer regime is only possible through greater governmental intervention at the national and international level, including environmental regulations, national systems of innovation, and creating an enabling environment for EST. Such intervention should include effective public-private partnerships, both within and between States. Partnerships, if guided by law, could ensure EST innovation more efficiently than purely State-driven or market-driven EST transfers. In search for a model, the EST transfer regime under the Vienna Ozone Layer Convention and the Montreal Protocol deserves recognition. For example, the clean development mechanism under the Kyoto Protocol allows for considerable scope for EST transfer. The potential of EST transfer for climate change and for meeting the Millennium Development Goals has yet to be realized.

  5. Millimeter-Wave Wireless Power Transfer Technology for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Manohara, Harish; Mojarradi, Mohammad M.; Vo, Tuan A.; Mojarradi, Hadi; Bae, Sam Y.; Marzwell, Neville

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we present a new compact, scalable, and low cost technology for efficient receiving of power using RF waves at 94 GHz. This technology employs a highly innovative array of slot antennas that is integrated on substrate composed of gold (Au), silicon (Si), and silicon dioxide (SiO2) layers. The length of the slots and spacing between them are optimized for a highly efficient beam through a 3-D electromagnetic simulation process. Antenna simulation results shows a good beam profile with very low side lobe levels and better than 93% antenna efficiency.

  6. Biomedical technical transfer. Applications of NASA science and technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    Lower body negative pressure testing in cardiac patients has been completed as well as the design and construction of a new leg negative unit for evaluating heart patients. This technology is based on NASA research, using vacuum chambers to stress the cardiovascular system during space flight. Additional laboratory tests of an intracranial pressure transducer, have been conducted. Three new biomedical problems to which NASA technology is applicable are also identified. These are: a communication device for the speech impaired, the NASA development liquid-cooled garment, and miniature force transducers for heart research.

  7. Technology transfer present and futures in the electronic arts

    OpenAIRE

    Brian Degger

    2008-01-01

    We are entering an era where creating the fantastical is possible in the arts. In the areas of mixed reality and biological arts, responsive works are created based on advances in basic science and technology. This is enabling scientists and artists to pose new questions. As the time between discovery and application is so short, artists need imaginative ways of accessing new technology in order to critique and use it.These are the new paints that the majority of artists cannot afford or acce...

  8. Technology transfer to US oil producers: A policy tool to sustain or increase oil production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowd, W. T.

    1990-03-01

    The Department of Energy provided the Interstate Oil Compact Commission with a grant to identify and evaluate existing technology transfer channels to operators, to devise and test improvements or new technology transfer channels and to make recommendations as to how the Department of Energy's oil and gas technology transfer methods could be improved. The IOCC conducted this effort in a series of four tasks: a structural analysis to characterize the oil producing industry according to operator production size class, geographic location, awareness and use of reservoir management technologies, and strategies for adding reserves and replacing produced reserves; targeted interviews conducted with some 300 oil and gas industry participants to identify current technology transfer channels and their relative usefulness for various classes of industry participants; a design and testing phase, in which the IOCC critiqued the current technology transfer structure, based on results of the structural analysis and targeted interviews, and identified several strategies for improvement; and an evaluation of existing state outreach programs to determine whether they might provide a model for development of additional outreach programs in other producing states.

  9. Perspectives on Technology Transfer Strategies of Korean Companies in Point of Resource and Capability Based View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Ho Park

    2011-03-01

    The approach of this research is unique in that it examines a sample comprising of licensing-in and technological cooperation variables, categorizes forms according to industry, and looks at such unique variables as a "process" (the ratio of CEO's and related-person's stocks. The data on 361 Korean firms was gathered from Korea's Data Analysis, Retrieval, and Transfer System and Worldwide Intellectual Property Search. Findings show that human, technology, and fixed assets are related positively to financial performance, and searching, absorbing, and openness capabilities as a control effect is related positively to a firm's increased sales ratio. Strategic plans for technology transfer companies are also included in this research.

  10. Assuring process safety in the transfer of hydrogen cyanide manufacturing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Gary R; Edwards, Victor H; Robertson, Mark; Shah, Kamal

    2007-04-11

    This paper outlines the critical issues to be addressed in the transfer of hydrogen cyanide (HCN) manufacturing technology to a licensee. Process safety management (PSM) is of critical importance because of the toxicity, flammability and reactivity of HCN. The critical issues are based on experience that DuPont has gained (1) while safely manufacturing hydrogen cyanide for over 50 years, and (2) while DuPont has safely licensed HCN technology to other firms at locations around the world. DuPont's HCN experience has been combined with Aker Kvaerner's project engineering experience to insure the safe transfer of HCN technology to a licensee.

  11. A review of qualitative case methods trends and themes used in technology transfer research

    OpenAIRE

    Cunningham, James; Menter, Matthias; Young, Chris

    2016-01-01

    The focus of this paper is to review the qualitative case methods that have been used in technology transfer research over the last 20 years from 1996 to 2015. Case methods allow for more in-depth analyses and provide the opportunity to place research into a certain context due to the selection of e.g. specific sectors, institutions, countries, etc. Using a systematic literature review of five of the top journals in the field of technology transfer research, namely Journal of Technology Trans...

  12. An Action Research on Open Knowledge and Technology Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Isabel; Cardoso, Margarida; Carvalho, João Vidal; Graça, José Ismael

    R&D has always been considered a strategic asset of companies. Traditionally, companies that have their own R&D function are better prepared to compete in the globalized economy because they are able to produce the knowledge and technology required to advance products and services. SMEs also need to become highly innovative and competitive in order to be successful. Nevertheless, their ability to have an internal R&D function that effectively meets their innovation needs is usually very weak. Open innovation provides access to a vast amount of new ideas and technologies at lower costs than closed innovation. This paper presents an action research study being carried out at University of Minho to develop a business model and technology platform for an innovation brokering service connecting ideas and technologies being developed at Universities with the specific innovation needs of SMEs. The expected contributions of the study include the empirical investigation of the effectiveness and risks of crowdsourcing innovation when applied in the socio-economic context of a European developing country where SMEs represent 99,6% of the businesses.

  13. Co-Development Agreements | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute's TTC uses three different co-development agreements to help industry and academia interact and partner with National Institutes of Health laboratories and scientists to support technology development activities. | [google6f4cd5334ac394ab.html

  14. technology transfer and the challenges of local content development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    With over fifty years of oil industry operation in Nigeria, the sector is still largely foreign-technology driven. The national government's involvement has been classified into three distinct era: (1) The Era of. Royalty (1956-1970) when government played passive facilitative role limited to the collection of royalties, rents, taxes ...

  15. Response of farmers to technological transfer in the methyl bromide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The replacement technology chosen was the floating tray system. Floating tray system equipment for effective phase out was distributed to farmers ... Almost all farmers (91%) used the proceeds from the tobacco crop to support their maize crop. The few who used the floating tray system agreed that, it was easy (96%) and ...

  16. 48 CFR 970.5227-3 - Technology transfer mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...(g) of the Stevenson-Wydler Technology Innovation Act of 1980, as amended (15 U.S.C. 3710a); Section... consulting and personnel exchanges; conducting science education activities and reimbursable Work for Others (WFO); providing information exchanges; and making available laboratory or weapon production user...

  17. NASA technology transfer network communications and information system: TUNS user survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    Applied Expertise surveyed the users of the deployed Technology Utilization Network System (TUNS) and surveyed prospective new users in order to gather background information for developing the Concept Document of the system that will upgrade and replace TUNS. Survey participants broadly agree that automated mechanisms for acquiring, managing, and disseminating new technology and spinoff benefits information can and should play an important role in meeting NASA technology utilization goals. However, TUNS does not meet this need for most users. The survey describes a number of systematic improvements that will make it easier to use the technology transfer mechanism, and thus expedite the collection and dissemination of technology information. The survey identified 26 suggestions for enhancing the technology transfer system and related processes.

  18. Internet and technology transfer in acute care hospitals in the United States: survey-2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatcher, M

    2001-12-01

    This paper provides the results of the survey-2000 measuring technology transfer and, specifically, Internet usage. The purpose of the survey was to measure the levels of Internet and Intranet existence and usage in acute care hospitals. The depth of the survey includes e-commerce for both business-to-business and customers. These results are compared with responses to the same questions in survey-1997. Changes in response are noted and discussed. This information will provide benchmarks for hospitals to plan their network technology position and to set goals. This is the third of three articles based upon the results of the survey-2000. Readers are referred to prior articles by the author, which discuss the survey design and provide a tutorial on technology transfer in acute care hospitals. (1) Thefirst article based upon the survey results discusses technology transfer, system design approaches, user involvement, and decision-making purposes. (2)

  19. The Air Force Manufacturing Technology (MANTECH): Technology transfer methodology as exemplified by the radar transmit/receive module program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houpt, Tracy; Ridgely, Margaret

    1991-01-01

    The Air Force Manufacturing Technology program is involved with the improvement of radar transmit/receive modules for use in active phased array radars for advanced fighter aircraft. Improvements in all areas of manufacture and test of these modules resulting in order of magnitude improvements in the cost of and the rate of production are addressed, as well as the ongoing transfer of this technology to the Navy.

  20. Technology Transfer at Edgar Mine: Phase 1; October 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Augustine, Chad R. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Bauer, Stephen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Nakagawa, Masami [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Zhou, Wendy [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-09-14

    The objective of this project is to study the flow of fluid through the fractures and to characterize the efficiency of heat extraction (heat transfer) from the test rock mass in the Edgar Mine, managed by Colorado School of Mines in Idaho Springs, CO. The experiment consists of drilling into the wall of the mine and fracturing the rock, characterizing the size and nature of the fracture network, circulating fluid through the network, and measuring the efficiency of heat extraction from the 'reservoir' by monitoring the temperature of the 'produced' fluid with time. This is a multi-year project performed as a collaboration between the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Colorado School of Mines and Sandia National Laboratories and carried out in phases. This report summarizes Phase 1: Selection and characterization of the location for the experiment, and outlines the steps for Phase 2: Circulation Experiments.

  1. Environmental Quality Technology Demonstration, Evaluation and Transfer Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-12-02

    reactivity level of 5 percent for lead azide and 10 percent for NG. Moisture levels appeared to affect reactivity. Mercury fulminate was not included...in this study because few sites have mercury fulminate contamination. The issues listed in the technical approach must be addressed before these...content or that contain contaminants such as mercury or certain organic compounds. ACCOMPLISHMENTS PERFORMANCE NEEDS This technology directly applies

  2. Technology transfer and expert migration in nineteenth-century Cuba

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández de Pinedo Echevarría, Nadia; Pretel, David

    2013-01-01

    During the nineteenth century the Cuban sugar plantation became a highly dynamic space, open to foreign intervention at many levels. The increasing commercial prospects in the Cuban economy from the mid-nineteenth century led American, French and British manufacturers of refining equipment to actively commercialize their innovations in Cuba. Many of these foreign manufacturers of machinery had branches and agents in Havana. This article seeks to highlight the technological links b...

  3. Transforming Economies, Technology Transfer and Multinational Corporations Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Richet, Xavier

    2004-01-01

    Foreign direct investment inflows in European transition economies, although limited in volume, plays a strategic role in restructuring and developing new businesses, in integrating these economies to the world economy, in bringing in technology, know-how and management skill. Entry on these new markets either through acquisition and merger, either through greenfields depends of different barriers, asset specificities, market regulations. In spite of important entry and transaction costs, for...

  4. Portable reconfigurable line sensor (PRLS) and technology transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacKenzie, D.P. [Air Force Electronic Systems Center, Hanscom AFB, MA (United States); Buckle, T.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Blattman, D.A. [Racon, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The Portable Reconfigurable Line Sensor (PRLS) is a bistatic, pulsed-Doppler, microwave intrusion detection system developed at Sandia National Laboratories for the US Air Force. The PRLS is rapidly and easily deployed, and can detect intruders ranging from a slow creeping intruder to a high speed vehicle. The system has a sharply defined detection zone and will not falsely alarm on nearby traffic. Unlike most microwave sensors, the PRLS requires no alignment or calibration. Its portability, battery operation, ease of setup, and RF alarm reporting capability make it an excellent choice for perimeter, portal, and gap-filler applications in the important new field of rapidly-deployable sensor systems. In October 1992, the US Air Force and Racon, Inc., entered into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to commercialize the PRLS, jointly sharing government and industry resources. The Air Force brings the user`s perspective and requirements to the cooperative effort. Sandia, serving as the technical arm of the Air Force, adds the actual PRLS technology to the joint effort, and provides security systems and radar development expertise. Racon puts the Air Force requirements and Sandia technology together into a commercial product, making the system meet important commercial manufacturing constraints. The result is a true ``win-win`` situation, with reduced government investment during the commercial development of the PRLS, and industry access to technology not otherwise available.

  5. A MODEL FOR TELECOMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER AND DIFFUSION INTO THE RURAL AREAS OF SOUTH AFRICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.L. Pieterse

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    ENGLISH ABSTRACT: Telecommunication is one of the keys to sustainable economic development in South Africa. Mobile operators are already reaching people in rural areas without roads, rail or a stable power supply. Telecommunication is also a fast moving high-technology field where technology transfer occurs regularly. Technology transfer is however a complex subject where governmental regulations, social and cultural aspects, needs, expectations, aspirations, financial abilities and technological capabilities play their part. Transfer models that neglect these aspects, often cause ineffective utilisation of technology. Technology transfer between two parties at different hierarchical levels of technology, often occur with limited advantages to the lesser-developed party. A transfer model is needed to improve the transfer process. This research attempts to provide such a model and guidelines.

    AFRIKAANSE OPSOMMING: Telekommunikasie is een van die belangrike insette tot voortgesette ekonomiese groei in Suid Afrika. Mobiele telekommunikasieverskaffers voorsien reeds dienste aan mense in afgeleë gebiede sonder paaie, spoornetwerke of stabiele elektrisiteitstoevoer. Telekommunikasie is ‘n tegnologies gevorderde veld waar ontwikkeling vinnig plaasvind en tegnologie-oordrag algemeen voorkom. Die oordrag van tegnologie is egter ‘n komplekse onderwerp wat aspekte soos regulatoriese maatstawwe, sosiale- en kulturele aspekte, behoeftes, verwagtinge, aspirasies, finansiële aspekte en tegnologiese vaardighede insluit. Oordragsmodelle wat nie hierdie aspekte in ag neem nie, lei tot sub-optimale aanwending van die tegnologie. Tegnologie-oordrag tussen partye op verskillende vlakke van tegnologiese vermoë vind dikwels plaas, met beperkte voordeel aan die minder-ontwikkelde party. ‘n Oordragsmodel is nodig om die oordragsproses te verbeter. Hierdie navorsing het dit ten doel om so ‘n model te verskaf.

  6. Vaccines for HIV | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The development of an effective HIV vaccine has been an ongoing area of research. The high variability in HIV-1 virus strains has represented a major challenge in successful development. Ideally, an effective candidate vaccine would provide protection against the majority of clades of HIV. Two major hurdles to overcome are immunodominance and sequence diversity. This vaccine utilizes a strategy for overcoming these two issues by identifying the conserved regions of the virus and exploiting them for use in a targeted therapy. NCI seeks licensees and/or research collaborators to commercialize this technology, which has been validated in macaque models.

  7. Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer (CPST) Technology Maturation: Establishing a Foundation for a Technology Demonstration Mission (TDM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Michael P.; Meyer, Michael L.; Motil, Susan M.; Ginty, Carol A.

    2014-01-01

    As part of U.S. National Space Policy, NASA is seeking an innovative path for human space exploration, which strengthens the capability to extend human and robotic presence throughout the solar system. NASA is laying the groundwork to enable humans to safely reach multiple potential destinations, including asteroids, Lagrange points, the Moon and Mars. In support of this, NASA is embarking on the Technology Demonstration Mission Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer (TDM CPST) Project to test and validate key cryogenic capabilities and technologies required for future exploration elements, opening up the architecture for large cryogenic propulsion stages (CPS) and propellant depots. The TDM CPST project will provide an on-orbit demonstration of the capability to store, transfer, and measure cryogenic propellants for a duration which is relevant to enable long term human space exploration missions beyond low Earth orbit (LEO). Recognizing that key cryogenic fluid management technologies anticipated for on-orbit (flight) demonstration needed to be matured to a readiness level appropriate for infusion into the design of the flight demonstration, the NASA Headquarters Space Technology Mission Directorate authorized funding for a one-year (FY12) ground based technology maturation program. The strategy, proposed by the CPST Project Manager, focused on maturation through modeling, studies, and ground tests of the storage and fluid transfer Cryogenic Fluid Management (CFM) technology sub-elements and components that were not already at a Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of 5. A technology maturation plan (TMP) was subsequently approved which described: the CFM technologies selected for maturation, the ground testing approach to be used, quantified success criteria of the technologies, hardware and data deliverables, and a deliverable to provide an assessment of the technology readiness after completion of the test, study or modeling activity. This paper will present

  8. Optimizing Geothermal Drilling: Oil and Gas Technology Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tilley, Mitch; Eustes, Alfred; Visser, Charles; Baker, Walt; Bolton, Dan; Bell, Jason; Nagandran, Uneshddarann; Quick, Ralph

    2015-01-26

    There is a significant amount of financial risk associated with geothermal drilling; however, there are opportunities to improve upon current practices and technologies used. The scope of this drilling operational study included 21 geothermal wells and 21 oil and gas wells. The goal was to determine a 'perfect well' using historical data to compare the best oil and gas well to the best geothermal well. Unfortunately, limitations encountered in the study included missing data (bit records, mud information, etc.), poor data collection, and difficult to ascertain handwriting. An online software database was used to format drilling data to IADC coded daily drilling reports and generate analysis figures. Six major issues have been found in geothermal drilling operations. These problems include lost circulation, rig/equipment selection, cementing, penetration rate, drilling program, and time management. As a result of these issues, geothermal drilling averages 56.4 days longer than drilling comparable oil and gas wells in the wells in this study. Roughly $13.9 million would be lost due to non-productive time in the 21 geothermal wells and only $1.3 million in the oil and gas wells, assuming a cost of $50,000 per day. Comparable events such as drilling the same sized hole, tripping in/out, cementing, and running the same size casing took substantially less time in the oil and gas wells. Geothermal wells were drilled using older and/or less advanced technology to depths less than 10,000 feet, while oil and gas wells reached 12,500 feet faster with purpose built rigs. A new approach is now underway that will optimize drilling programs throughout the drilling industry. It is the use of Mechanical Specific Energy (MSE) as a tool to realize efficient drilling processes. However, a work-flow must also be established in order for there to be an efficient drilling program. Potential improvements for current geothermal operations are: the use of electronic records, real

  9. Existing technology transfer report: analytical capabilities. Appendix B. Volume 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tewari, K.C.

    1984-06-01

    The overall objective of the on-going analytical efforts was to develop in-house expertise and analytical capability for the analysis of coal and coal-derived products in support of SRC-I process technology. The approach taken and work accomplished involved: identification of test methods and associated equipment; review and implementation of analytical facility plan; evaluation of existing instrumentation; evaluation and purchase of new instruments; training of laboratory personnel; validation or development of analytical methods; development of standard product work-up methods and development of analytical protocol for detailed characterization of SRC-I solid and liquid products. This volume contains Appendix B with the following attachments: solvent separation procedure A; Wilsonville solvent separation procedure, distillation separation procedure; solvent separation modified Wilsonville Procedure W; statistical comparison of 3 solvent separation procedures; methods development for column chromatography, and application of gas chromatography to characterization of a hydrogen donor solvent; and high performance liquid chromatographic procedure.

  10. The 1973 GSFC battery workshop, second day. [technology transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    Technological progress in the development, testing, and manufacturing of nickel-cadmium battery cells as well as hydrogen cells is presented. The following major topics were discussed: (1) carbonate analysis; (2) nickel-cadmium memory effect; (3) use of batteries in an automatic acquisition and control system; (4) accelerated testing; (5) formulation of a mathematical odel for a nickel-cadmium cell; (6) development of a light weight nickel-cadmium battery capable of delivering 20 watt hours per pound; (7) magnetic testing of nickel-cadmium cells; (8) design and performance characteristics of nickel-hydrogen and silver-hydrogen cells; and (9) development of a semiprismatic cell design. For Vol. 1, see N75-15152.

  11. Formal and Informal Knowledge and Technology Transfer from Academia to Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grimpe, Christoph; Hussinger, Katrin

    2013-01-01

    Literature has identified formal and informal channels in university knowledge and technology transfer (KTT). While formal KTT typically involves a legal contract on a patent or on collaborative research activities, informal transfer channels refer to personal contacts and hence to the tacit...... dimension of knowledge transfer. Research is, however, scarce regarding the interaction of formal and informal transfer mechanisms. In this paper, we analyze whether these activities are mutually reinforcing, i.e., complementary. Our analysis is based on a comprehensive data-set of more than 2,000 German...... manufacturing firms and confirms a complementary relationship between formal and informal KTT modes: using both transfer channels contributes to higher innovation performance. The management of the firm should therefore strive to maintain close informal relationships with universities to realize the full...

  12. Incorporating the Delphi Technique to investigate renewable energy technology transfer in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Otaibi, Nasir K.

    Saudi Arabia is a major oil-producing nation facing a rapidly-growing population, high unemployment, climate change, and the depletion of its natural resources, potentially including its oil supply. Technology transfer is regarded as a means to diversify countries' economies beyond their natural resources. This dissertation examined the opportunities and barriers to utilizing technology transfer successfully to build renewable energy resources in Saudi Arabia to diversify the economy beyond oil production. Examples of other developing countries that have successfully used technology transfer to transform their economies are explored, including Japan, Malayasia, and the United Arab Emirates. Brazil is presented as a detailed case study to illustrate its transition to an economy based to a much greater degree than before on renewable energy. Following a pilot study, the Delphi Method was used in this research to gather the opinions of a panel of technology transfer experts consisting of 10 heterogeneous members of different institutions in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, including aviation, telecommunication, oil industry, education, health systems, and military and governmental organizations. In three rounds of questioning, the experts identified Education, Dependence on Oil, and Manpower as the 3 most significant factors influencing the potential for success of renewable energy technology transfer for Saudi Arabia. Political factors were also rated toward the "Very Important" end of a Likert scale and were discussed as they impact Education, Oil Dependence, and Manpower. The experts' opinions are presented and interpreted. They form the basis for recommended future research and discussion of how in light of its political system and its dependence on oil, Saudi Arabia can realistically move forward on renewable energy technology transfer and secure its economic future.

  13. Lead-free solder technology transfer from ASE Americas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FTHENAKIS,V.

    1999-10-19

    To safeguard the environmental friendliness of photovoltaics, the PV industry follows a proactive, long-term environmental strategy involving a life-of-cycle approach to prevent environmental damage by its processes and products from cradle to grave. Part of this strategy is to examine substituting lead-based solder on PV modules with other solder alloys. Lead is a toxic metal that, if ingested, can damage the brain, nervous system, liver and kidneys. Lead from solder in electronic products has been found to leach out from municipal waste landfills and municipal incinerator ash was found to be high in lead also because of disposed consumer electronics and batteries. Consequently, there is a movement in Europe and Japan to ban lead altogether from use in electronic products and to restrict the movement across geographical boundaries of waste containing lead. Photovoltaic modules may contain small amounts of regulated materials, which vary from one technology to another. Environmental regulations impact the cost and complexity of dealing with end-of-life PV modules. If they were classified as hazardous according to Federal or State criteria, then special requirements for material handling, disposal, record-keeping and reporting would escalate the cost of decommissioning the modules. Fthenakis showed that several of today's x-Si modules failed the US-EPA Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) for potential leaching of Pb in landfills and also California's standard on Total Threshold Limit Concentration (TTLC) for Pb. Consequently, such modules may be classified as hazardous waste. He highlighted potential legislation in Europe and Japan which could ban or restrict the use of lead and the efforts of the printed-circuit industries in developing Pb-free solder technologies in response to such expected legislation. Japanese firms already have introduced electronic products with Pb-free solder, and one PV manufacturer in the US, ASE Americas has used a

  14. From Becquerel to Nanotechnology:. One Century of Decline of Scientific Dissemination, Publishing and Technology Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margaritondo, G.

    2008 marks the 100th anniversary of Henri Becquerel's death, the discoverer of radioactivity and a leading contributor to the birth of modern physics. In addition to well-deserved celebrations, this offers a chance for a sobering look at scientific dissemination then and now and at the evolution of technology transfer. The facts are shocking: both dissemination and technology transfer were much faster and effective at the time of Becquerel, in spite of all the new communication techniques. I briefly speculate on the causes of these dismal failures, arguing that they are primarily rooted in society, academic management and industrial management — and therefore very difficult to reverse.

  15. Detector Simulations with DD4hep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrič, M.; Frank, M.; Gaede, F.; Lu, S.; Nikiforou, N.; Sailer, A.

    2017-10-01

    Detector description is a key component of detector design studies, test beam analyses, and most of particle physics experiments that require the simulation of more and more different detector geometries and event types. This paper describes DD4hep, which is an easy-to-use yet flexible and powerful detector description framework that can be used for detector simulation and also extended to specific needs for a particular working environment. Linear collider detector concepts ILD, SiD and CLICdp as well as detector development collaborations CALICE and FCal have chosen to adopt the DD4hep geometry framework and its DDG4 pathway to Geant4 as its core simulation and reconstruction tools. The DDG4 plugins suite includes a wide variety of input formats, provides access to the Geant4 particle gun or general particles source and allows for handling of Monte Carlo truth information, eg. by linking hits and the primary particle that caused them, which is indispensable for performance and efficiency studies. An extendable array of segmentations and sensitive detectors allows the simulation of a wide variety of detector technologies. This paper shows how DD4hep allows to perform complex Geant4 detector simulations without compiling a single line of additional code by providing a palette of sub-detector components that can be combined and configured via compact XML files. Simulation is controlled either completely via the command line or via simple Python steering files interpreted by a Python executable. It also discusses how additional plugins and extensions can be created to increase the functionality.

  16. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donald Duttlinger

    1999-12-01

    During FY99, the Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of helping U.S. independent oil and gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions. PTfC's national organization has active grassroots programs that connect with independents through its 10 Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs). These activities--including technology workshops, resource centers, websites, newsletters, and other outreach efforts--are guided by regional Producer Advisory Groups (PAGs). The role of the national headquarters (HQ) staff includes planning and managing the PTTC program, conducting nation-wide technology transfer activities, and implementing a comprehensive communications effort. This technical progress report summarizes PTTC's accomplishments during FY99, which lay the groundwork for further growth in the future.

  17. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    2000-05-01

    During FY00, the Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of helping U.S. independent oil and gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions. PTTC's national organization has active grassroots programs that connect with independents through its 10 Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs). These activities--including technology workshops, resource centers, websites, newsletters, and other outreach efforts--are guided by regional Producer Advisory Groups (PAGs). The role of the national headquarters (HQ) staff includes planning and managing the PTTC program, conducting nation-wide technology transfer activities, and implementing a comprehensive communications effort. This technical progress report summarizes PTTC's accomplishments during FY00, which lay the groundwork for further growth in the future.

  18. Inter-firm technology transfer: partnership-embedded licensing or standard licensing agreements?

    OpenAIRE

    John Hagedoorn; Stefanie Lorenz-Orlean; Hans van Kranenburg

    2009-01-01

    When companies decide to engage in technology transfer through exclusive licensing to other firms, they have two basic options: to use standard licensing contracts or to set-up more elaborate partnership-embedded licensing agreements. We find that broader partnership-embedded licensing agreements are preferred with higher levels of technological sophistication of industries, with greater perceived effectiveness of secrecy as a means of appropriability, and when licensors are smaller than thei...

  19. Networking: the view from HEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Shawn

    2017-10-01

    Networks have played a critical role in high-energy physics (HEP), enabling us to access and effectively utilize globally distributed resources to meet the needs of our physicists. National and global-scale collaborations that characterize HEP would not be feasible without ubiquitous capable networks. Because of their importance in enabling our grid computing infrastructure many physicists have taken leading roles in research and education (R&E) networking, participating in, and even convening, network related meetings and research programs with the broader networking community worldwide. This has led to HEP benefiting from excellent global networking capabilities for little to no direct cost. However, as other science domains ramp-up their need for similar networking it becomes less clear that this situation will continue unchanged. This paper will briefly discuss the history of networking in HEP, the current activities and challenges we are facing, and try to provide some understanding of where networking may be going in the next 5 to 10 years.

  20. Brokerage and SME Innovation: An Analysis of the Technology Transfer Service at Area Science Park, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattapan, Paolo; Passarelli, Mariacarmela; Petrone, Michele

    2012-01-01

    This paper contributes to the literature on innovation brokerage by analysing the effects of brokerage activities on the innovation and growth of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). The authors provide a detailed description of the Technology Transfer Service (TTS), credited as a European best-practice innovation broker, at Area Science…

  1. Optimal Selection Method of Process Patents for Technology Transfer Using Fuzzy Linguistic Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gangfeng Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Under the open innovation paradigm, technology transfer of process patents is one of the most important mechanisms for manufacturing companies to implement process innovation and enhance the competitive edge. To achieve promising technology transfers, we need to evaluate the feasibility of process patents and optimally select the most appropriate patent according to the actual manufacturing situation. Hence, this paper proposes an optimal selection method of process patents using multiple criteria decision-making and 2-tuple fuzzy linguistic computing to avoid information loss during the processes of evaluation integration. An evaluation index system for technology transfer feasibility of process patents is designed initially. Then, fuzzy linguistic computing approach is applied to aggregate the evaluations of criteria weights for each criterion and corresponding subcriteria. Furthermore, performance ratings for subcriteria and fuzzy aggregated ratings of criteria are calculated. Thus, we obtain the overall technology transfer feasibility of patent alternatives. Finally, a case study of aeroengine turbine manufacturing is presented to demonstrate the applicability of the proposed method.

  2. Causes and implications of the slow pace of technology transfer and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The major problem facing most developing countries today is the need to transform their agricultural industries from one depending on traditional inputs with low productivity to one based on modern input with higher productivity. The study was set up to examine the causes and implication of slow pace of technology transfer ...

  3. The International Trade Policy for Technology Transfers: Legal and Economic Dilemmas on Multilateralism versus Bilateralism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Yi Shin

    among developed and developing countries, and how they affect the scope and content of international agreements dealing with technology transfers, especially given the anarchic structure of international trade relations. The research also finds that, contrary to the general view that bilateral trade...

  4. Technology transfer: taking science from the books to the ground at Bent Creek Experimental Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julia Kirschman

    2014-01-01

    Technology transfer has been an important part of the research program at Bent Creek Experimental Forest (Bent Creek) since its establishment in 1925. Our stated mission is to develop and disseminate knowledge and strategies for restoring, managing, sustaining, and enhancing the vegetation and wildlife of upland hardwood-dominated forest ecosystems of the Southern...

  5. Causes and implications of the slow pace of technology transfer and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The slow pace of technology transfer and adoption were also found to have negative implication in rural agriculture and the nation's economy as a whole because of the resultant low agricultural productivity. Based on these, the paper therefore concluded by recommending that Agricultural Extension Research Liaison ...

  6. Technical Education Transfer: Perceptions of Employee Computer Technology Self-Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, C. A.

    1999-01-01

    This study investigated influences on employee self-efficacy of computer technologies resulting from computer-training programs that were intended to meet individual and organization objectives for university personnel. Influences on the transfer of training process included previous computer training, computer-use requirements, computer-use…

  7. Technology transfer potential of an automated water monitoring system. [market research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamieson, W. M.; Hillman, M. E. D.; Eischen, M. A.; Stilwell, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    The nature and characteristics of the potential economic need (markets) for a highly integrated water quality monitoring system were investigated. The technological, institutional and marketing factors that would influence the transfer and adoption of an automated system were studied for application to public and private water supply, public and private wastewater treatment and environmental monitoring of rivers and lakes.

  8. Transferring the Soft-Skills Technology of Workplace Learning and Performance to China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jenny; Rothwell, William J.; Webster, Lois

    2001-01-01

    Discusses international business and workplace learning and performance (WLP), and describes a long-term strategic alliance between Motorola University China, Penn State University, Beijing University, and Nankai University. Highlights include a needs assessment of multinational corporations in China; transferring the soft-skills technology of WLP…

  9. Technology Transfer: From the Research Bench to Commercialization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gail A. Van Norman, MD

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Progress in medicine hinges on the successful translation of basic science discoveries into new medical devices, diagnostics, and therapeutics. “Technology transfer” is the process by which new innovations flow from the basic research bench to commercial entities and then to public use. In academic institutions, intellectual property rights do not usually fall automatically to the individual inventor per se, but most often are the property of the institution. Technology transfer offices are tasked with seeing to it that such intellectual property rights are properly managed and commercialized. This 2-part series explores the technology transfer process from invention to commercialization. Part 1 reviews basic aspects of intellectual property rights, primarily patents and copyrights. Part 2 will discuss the ways in which inventions become commercialized through startup companies and licensing arrangements with industry players. Key Words: copyright, intellectual property, patent, technology transfer

  10. How You Can Partner with NIH | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI Technology Transfer Center (TTC) provides an array of agreements to support the National Cancer Institute's partnering. Deciding which type of agreement to use can be a challenge. The TTC recommends that you discuss the most favorable type of partnership with our Invention Development and Marketing Unit.

  11. Technology Transfer as a Form of Co-creation for Future Market

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rai, Sudhanshu; Van Belle, Jean-Poul; Kühn Pedersen, Mogens

    2010-01-01

    to technology transfer. Although we make explicit the purpose of co-creation, which is to enable the formation of future markets, we spend little effort on explicating what the objective of this exercise is. Our preoccupation at this stage is primarily trying to explain co-creation and not so much the objective...

  12. Technology Transfer in Poland: An Investment of U.S. Government, U.S. Corporate, and Polish Government Strategies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hays, Susan

    1998-01-01

    This case study examines how U.S. Government (USG) policy, U.S. corporate policy, and Polish government policy affect the strategy of technology transfer of military and/or dual-use technologies in Poland...

  13. [Factors affecting activation and transference of soil colloidal phosphorus and related analysis technologies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yue; Liang, Xin-qiang; Fu, Chao-dong; Zhu, Si-rui; Zhang, Yi-xiang; Ji, Yuan-jing

    2015-04-01

    Colloids play a key role in the transference process of phosphorus (P) in soil. Activation and transference of soil colloidal phosphorus have great effect on soil P pool and the surrounding water quality. This paper summarized the current studies on soil colloidal P, discussing the effects of the various factors (e. g., soil physical and chemical properties, fertilization, rainfall and soil amendments) on the transference of soil colloidal P. Some advanced analysis technologies (e.g., flow field-flow fractionation, transmission electron microscope-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer, X-ray absorption near-edge structure and nuclear magnetic resonance) and methods of reducing soil colloidal P were also involved. This review would provide important information on the mechanism of soil colloidal P transference.

  14. Risks and Benefits with International Technology Transfer from Brazil to Angola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Vaisman

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Thanks to the transfer of technology from Brazil, Angola is entering the sucroalcooleiro sector with multiple aims. These include creating jobs in rural areas, diversifying the energy mix and boosting exports. Angola is one of the countries that has envisioned international technology transfer as a strategy to increase participation in the global market, while decreasing its dependence on sugar imports. While the production of ethanol and sugar can bring about some benefits, technology transfer in this area is not without risks. It needs to be carefully crafted and executed, especially in accordance with the principles of sustainable development, which is by the government plan of Angola to include, rather than exclude, the rural poor. This study shows that stakeholders presented different opinions in relation to Biocom and sustainable development. The main reason is linked to the distinction between global, national and local levels. On the global level, ITT and Biocom are seen as alternative renewable sources of energy (ethanol to fossil fuels, on the local level there is a concern with the socio-environmental issues which local communities might face, indeed ITT and Biocom are perceived as a risk in case locals  lose their lands and do not receive compensation. On the national level, while there is the expectancy of employment, infrastructure development and attraction of investments in the country, there is a lack of trust in governance by Angolan civil society; which argues that Angolan government and enterprises do not encourage public participation nor allows it to happen. Technology transfer is perceived as a business and geopolitical strategy driven by private and state interests, undermining environmental and social costs. On the other hand technology transfer is seen as a key to foster economic opportunities towards sustainable development.

  15. [Improving global access to new vaccines: intellectual property, technology transfer, and regulatory pathways].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crager, Sara Eve

    2015-01-01

    The 2012 World Health Assembly Global Vaccine Action Plan called for global access to new vaccines within 5 years of licensure. Current approaches have proven insufficient to achieve sustainable vaccine pricing within such a timeline. Paralleling the successful strategy of generic competition to bring down drug prices, a clear consensus is emerging that market entry of multiple suppliers is a critical factor in expeditiously bringing down prices of new vaccines. In this context, key target objectives for improving access to new vaccines include overcoming intellectual property obstacles, streamlining regulatory pathways for biosimilar vaccines, and reducing market entry timelines for developing-country vaccine manufacturers by transfer of technology and know-how. I propose an intellectual property, technology, and know-how bank as a new approach to facilitate widespread access to new vaccines in low- and middle-income countries by efficient transfer of patented vaccine technologies to multiple developing-country vaccine manufacturers.

  16. Improving global access to new vaccines: intellectual property, technology transfer, and regulatory pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crager, Sara Eve

    2014-11-01

    The 2012 World Health Assembly Global Vaccine Action Plan called for global access to new vaccines within 5 years of licensure. Current approaches have proven insufficient to achieve sustainable vaccine pricing within such a timeline. Paralleling the successful strategy of generic competition to bring down drug prices, a clear consensus is emerging that market entry of multiple suppliers is a critical factor in expeditiously bringing down prices of new vaccines. In this context, key target objectives for improving access to new vaccines include overcoming intellectual property obstacles, streamlining regulatory pathways for biosimilar vaccines, and reducing market entry timelines for developing-country vaccine manufacturers by transfer of technology and know-how. I propose an intellectual property, technology, and know-how bank as a new approach to facilitate widespread access to new vaccines in low- and middle-income countries by efficient transfer of patented vaccine technologies to multiple developing-country vaccine manufacturers.

  17. Technology assessment, transfer, and management: the implications to the professional development of clinical engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, G R

    1991-01-01

    Technology, as applied in healthcare, is an encompassing term for products, equipment, procedures and services allied in some way with healthcare. This paper discusses technology as the word applies to healthcare. Areas of activity under the umbrella of technology--technology transfer, technology assessment and technology management--will be defined and discussed from the standpoint of their interaction with clinical engineering. The clinical engineering profession has approached participation in each of these activities in a nonsystematic manner, resulting in limited impact and a limited role. To go beyond its present role, the profession must study the processes of technology assessment, transfer, and management to understand their components, critical paths, strengths and weaknesses. This research should be undertaken by a joint group of clinical engineers representing practitioners and academia. Existing key players or professions should be identified, the role clinical engineers wish to pursue as a professional group and the skills required to assure competency should be declared, and appropriate resources for acquiring knowledge and experience identified.

  18. Study on the efficient export control for the Intangible Transfer of Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Sung-ho; Choi, Sun-do; Lee, Chansuh; Kim, Jong-sook [Korea Institute of Nuclear Nonproliferation and Control, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Technical Data may take forms such as document, drawing, description, report, manual and instruction. And, it can be written or recorded on storage medium such as disk, tape and read-only memories. Technical assistance may take forms such as instruction, skill, training, working knowledge and consulting services. Technical data or assistance can be transferred by intangible manners such as an electronic means (e.g. email, internet, telephone or fax) and through the oral (e.g. seminar, meeting or workshop). Currently, ROK's export control regulation is not classified between the transfer of listed items (or general technology) and intangible transfer of technology (ITT). It may make a loop hole or cause inefficient implementation of export control. The purpose of this study is to suggest the efficient control method for ITT independent from item control method. From the result of this study, several main feathers in regulations of developed countries are drawn. First, they define that technical assistance (or support) is the object of permission. And, they have a clear distinction between resident and non-resident. Second, The UK and Germany do not control the technical assistance related to construction and operation of nuclear facilities for peaceful use, as long as technology does not transfer to recipient that has a nuclear proliferation concerns such as the DPRK, Iran or Pakistan.

  19. High technology in developing countries: Analysis of technology strategy, technology transfer, and success factors in the aircraft industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenhuis, H.J.; de Bruijn, E.J.

    2004-01-01

    Economical development is highly related to technological development. It is therefore not surprising that many of the industrially developing nations follow explicit strategies to increase their technological competence level. Industrially developing countries may even pursue a strategy of

  20. Describing an Environment for a Self-Sustaining Technology Transfer Service in a Small Research Budget University: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieb, Sharon Lynn

    2014-01-01

    This single-site qualitative study sought to identify the characteristics that contribute to the self sustainability of technology transfer services at universities with small research budgets through a case study analysis of a small research budget university that has been operating a financially self-sustainable technology transfer service for…

  1. Technology Transfer: A Qualitative Analysis of Air Force Office of Research and Technology Applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Trexler, David C

    2006-01-01

    Everyday within United States Air Forces? research laboratories there are hundreds of scientists and engineers whose research and development activities contribute to the advancement of science and technology for mankind...

  2. Technology transfer in the field of small hydroelectric power stations; Technologietransfer im Bereich Kleinwasserkraft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, U. [SKAT-entec, St Gallen (Switzerland)

    1997-12-31

    The rate at which full-scale technology transfer takes place depends on the quality of the supply companies, i.e. training, organisational development and product infrastructure. These parameters are discussed for the example of a water mill, and a flow diagram is presented. [Deutsch] Wie rasch ein umfassender Transfer in Frage kommt, entscheidet sich mit der Qualitaet und dem Niveau der zuliefernden Betriebe. Hierbei sind Ausbildung, Organisationsentwicklung und Produktionsinfrastruktur besonders angesprochen. Fuer eine Wassermuehle werden diese Parameter konkret eroertert und an Durchlaufdiagrammen erlaeutert. (GL)

  3. TRANSFER

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Quenching of curcumine fluorescence by thionine, both immobilised in cellulose acetate occurs in accordance with the Forster mechanism of energy transfer. The rate constant of energy transfer for this donor - acceptor pair is found to be 9.4 x 109 L ' mol S1 with R0 = 37±1 Б. When this donor - acceptor pair is ...

  4. Critical Role of Intermediaries on Technology Transfer: Case Study of BIOTROP and Center for Mariculture Development of Lampung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karlina Sari

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Relationship among technology generator and technology user is one of factors determining successful technology transfer, but the existence of intermediaries is proven to enhance the absorptive capacity of technology user, especially in rural areas. Government can enact as intermediary by supporting the relationship generator-user, which is commonly found in agriculture and fishery sectors. The aim of this study is to demonstrate how government can support technology transfer from academic institution to rural industry. Using case study method, this study focused on the critical role of Center for Mariculture Development of Lampung (CMDL which acts as an intermediary of technology transfer process from Southeast Asian Ministers of Education Organization- Southeast Asian Regional Center for Tropical Biology (SEAMEO-BIOTROP to seaweed farmers. This study shows that intermediary agent plays an important role in articulating demand from technology user to technology generator, creating network between adopter-generator, and providing resources (fund, technician, industrial-scale laboratory for technology commercialization. Intermediary with strong commitment to deliver technology to society is highly needed in successful technology transfer. Keywords: technology transfer, technology adoption, tissue culture, seaweed, intermediary

  5. Silicon Sensors for HEP Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Dierlamm, Alexander Hermann

    2017-01-01

    With increasing luminosity of accelerators for experiments in High Energy Physics the demands on the detectors increase as well. Especially tracking and vertexing detectors made of silicon sensors close to the interaction point need to be equipped with more radiation hard devices. This article introduces the different types of silicon sensors, describes measures to increase radiation hardness and provides an overview of present upgrade choices of HEP experiments.

  6. Technology Transfer in the EU: Exporting Strategically Important ICT Solutions to Other EU Member States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Säär Anni

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The fast development of ICTs pose new challenges to the European Union and its Member States. Every EU country has its own policies regarding technology transfer, ownership of state e-services, and the possibilities how the state-owned or licensed e-service could be exported. Taking into account the free movement of goods, the EU has created a platform to cooperate and export IT solutions. However, the lack of preparedness of infrastructures, legislation and stakeholders for cross-border exchanges poses a threat to IT transfer and should be taken into consideration in the EU as well. In the coming decades the number of outsourced ICT solutions, strategically important ICT solutions, public services and critically important information exchange platforms developed on behalf of the states, will grow exponentially. Still, digital development is uneven across the EU, they grow at different speeds and the performance is quite splintered. There are legal provisions which are outdated and therefore impede technological cooperation and export of IT solutions. A Member State may restrict the ICT licensing based on national security and policy reasons and the ownership of intellectual property might pose a threat to technology transfer or further development of the IT solution. There are examples of strategically important export of ICT solutions, the experience at which can be expanded to cover other EU Member States. Strong collaboration would enable mutual learning from past experiences along with the opportunities for better use of technology. Parallels can be drawn with military technology transfers, as the policies and legal framework was first developed and mostly used with them.

  7. Applications of aerospace technology in industry: A technology transfer profile. Visual display systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    The growth of common as well as emerging visual display technologies are surveyed. The major inference is that contemporary society is rapidly growing evermore reliant on visual display for a variety of purposes. Because of its unique mission requirements, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration has contributed in an important and specific way to the growth of visual display technology. These contributions are characterized by the use of computer-driven visual displays to provide an enormous amount of information concisely, rapidly and accurately.

  8. Selected case studies of technology transfer from mission-oriented applied research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daellenbach, K.K.; Watts, R.L.; Young, J.K. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Abarcar, R.B. (Energetics, Inc., Columbia, MD (United States))

    1992-07-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Industrial Concepts Division (AICD) under the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) supports interdisciplinary applied research and exploratory development that will expand the knowledge base to enable industry to improve its energy efficiency and its capability to use alternative energy resources. AICD capitalizes on scientific and technical advances from the United States and abroad, applying them to address critical technical needs of American industry. As a result, AICD research and development products are many and varied, and the effective transfer of these products to diverse targeted users requires different strategies as well. This paper describes the products of AICD research, how they are transferred to potential users, and how actual transfer is determined.

  9. The technology of heat transfer enhancement in channels by means of flow pulsations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsynaeva Anna

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The rate and efficiency of curing of concrete can boost when used intense heat. The work is dedicated to the development and research of technologies of intensification of heat transfer in channels by pulsations. The study was conducted by means of numerical methods based on mass and momentum conservation equations (Navier-Stokes with software Code Saturne. Verification of implemented methods and software was performed. The research of heat transfer enhancement for semicircle-shaped channel exposed to low-frequency pulsations was performed. The pulsation frequency of the flow during the study was in a range of 0…10 Hz. A significant (up to 4 times increase of turbulent kinetic energy with implementing pulsations was detected. Flow pulsations with frequency of 10 Hz results in 1.21 times increase of heat transfer coefficient.

  10. Spin-transfer torque magnetoresistive random-access memory technologies for normally off computing (invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, K.; Fujita, S.; Ito, J.; Yuasa, S.; Suzuki, Y.; Nakatani, Y.; Miyazaki, T.; Yoda, H.

    2014-05-01

    Most parts of present computer systems are made of volatile devices, and the power to supply them to avoid information loss causes huge energy losses. We can eliminate this meaningless energy loss by utilizing the non-volatile function of advanced spin-transfer torque magnetoresistive random-access memory (STT-MRAM) technology and create a new type of computer, i.e., normally off computers. Critical tasks to achieve normally off computers are implementations of STT-MRAM technologies in the main memory and low-level cache memories. STT-MRAM technology for applications to the main memory has been successfully developed by using perpendicular STT-MRAMs, and faster STT-MRAM technologies for applications to the cache memory are now being developed. The present status of STT-MRAMs and challenges that remain for normally off computers are discussed.

  11. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    2003-04-30

    The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of helping U.S. independent oil and natural gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions. Networking opportunities that occur with a Houston Headquarters (HQ) location are increasing name awareness. Focused efforts by Executive Director Don Duttlinger to interact with large independents, national service companies and some majors are continuing to supplement the support base of the medium to smaller industry participants around the country. PTTC is now involved in many of the technology-related activities that occur in high oil and natural gas activity areas. Access to technology remains the driving force for those who do not have in-house research and development capabilities and look to the PTTC to provide services and options for increased efficiency.

  12. A Structured Approach to Academic Technology Transfer: Lessons Learned from imec’s 101 Programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitri Schuurman

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we describe imec’s 101 Programme for academic technology transfer and explain how it supports researchers by following a structured process in a limited amount of time and by carefully involving different stakeholders and people with relevant skills and expertise. The programme combines insights in terms of processes and of team composition from the entrepreneurship literature and puts them into practice in an internal incubation programme that is generated from the bottom-up. Based on hands-on experiences and interviews with key stakeholders in the process, we evaluate the programme and distill lessons learned. The article highlights the importance of a structured technology transfer process in the early stages of opportunity discovery and entrepreneurial action, and it offers insights on team formation for academic spin-offs.

  13. Stress Measurements on Blair High School Gymnasium: A Demonstration of Space Technology Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastel, Dean

    1966-01-01

    This Report describes an actual demonstration of transfer to non-space use of technologies developed for space programs applications. Techniques used in assessing static and dynamic characteristics of the Blair High School gymnasium involved data acquisition by continuous scanning of strain gauge data acquired over a time of wide-temperature range, and analysis by a computer routine developed by Jet Propulsion Laboratory five years ago. The advantage of this method over conventional structural testing of uniquely designed structures was proved. More importantly, the process of demonstration was shown to be of great assistance to, and extension of, normal methods of disseminating information of new technologies. It is felt that significant benefit will derive from this improved mode oi concept transfer.

  14. Modularization and nuclear power. Report by the Technology Transfer Modularization Task Team

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-06-01

    This report describes the results of the work performed by the Technology Transfer Task Team on Modularization. This work was performed as part of the Technology Transfer work being performed under Department of Energy Contract 54-7WM-335406, between December, 1984 and February, 1985. The purpose of this task team effort was to briefly survey the current use of modularization in the nuclear and non-nuclear industries and to assess and evaluate the techniques available for potential application to nuclear power. A key conclusion of the evaluation was that there was a need for a study to establish guidelines for the future development of Light Water Reactor, High Temperature Gas Reactor and Liquid Metal Reactor plants. The guidelines should identify how modularization can improve construction, maintenance, life extension and decommissioning.

  15. Strategic factors in the development of the National Technology Transfer Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, Jonathan F.; Stone, Barbara A.

    1993-01-01

    Broad consensus among industry and government leaders has developed over the last decade on the importance of applying the U.S. leadership in research and development (R&D) to strengthen competitiveness in the global marketplace, and thus enhance national prosperity. This consensus has emerged against the backdrop of increasing economic competition, and the dramatic reduction of military threats to national security with the end of the Cold War. This paper reviews the key factors and considerations that shaped - and continue to influence - the development of the Regional Technoloty Transfer Centers (RTTC) and the National Technology Transfer Center (NTTC). Also, the future role of the national network in support of emerging technology policy initiatives will be explored.

  16. SRF Accelerator Technology Transfer Experience from the Achievement of the SNS Cryomodule Production Run

    CERN Document Server

    Hogan, John; Daly, Edward; Drury, Michael A; Fischer, John; Hiatt, Tommy; Kneisel, Peter; Mammosser, John; Preble, Joseph P; Whitlatch, Timothy; Wilson, Katherine; Wiseman, Mark

    2005-01-01

    This paper will discuss the technology transfer aspect of superconducting RF expertise, as it pertains to cryomodule production, beginning with the original design requirements through testing and concluding with product delivery to the end user. The success of future industrialization, of accelerator systems, is dependent upon a focused effort on accelerator technology transfer. Over the past twenty years the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) has worked with industry to successfully design, manufacture, test and commission more superconducting RF cryomodules than any other entity in the United States. The most recent accomplishment of Jefferson Lab has been the successful production of twenty-four cryomodules designed for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). Jefferson Lab was chosen, by the United States Department of Energy, to provide the superconducting portion of the SNS linac due to its reputation as a primary resource for SRF expertise. The successful partnering with, and d...

  17. Evaluating the Intellectual Capital of Technology Transfer and Learning Public Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Grimaldi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Since the rise of the knowledge‐based economy, many worldwide companies have begun to deal with different frameworks to manage and evaluate the performance of intellectual capital, especially in the area of knowledge management services. This paper presents a novel conceptual model aiming to support management in evaluating and prioritizing their intellectual capital competitive core competences. Based on the analytic hierarchy process, the model analyses interdependences among intellectual capital elements and determines the impacts of core competences on organizational performance. To validate the model, it is empirically applied in the Technology Transfer Unit of the Italian national agency for new technologies, energy and economic development.

  18. TECHNOLOGY AND KNOWLEDGE TRANSFER THE MACHINE TOOL INDUSTRY THE UNITED STATES AND GERMANY, 1870-1930

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf Richter

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Machine tools play central in the discussion about economic growth. It is widely believed that the production and use of different types of machine tools in the US and Europe indicate the predominance of different production systems on each side of the Atlantic. By examining the technology and knowledge transfer in the machine tool industry between the US and Germany, the paper challenges this dichotomous model. It can demonstrated that, instead of fundamentally different paths of development, there was a highly interdependent machine tool community exchanging technology and knowledge on an extraordinary level.

  19. EERE-SBIR technology transfer opportunity. H2 Safety Sensors for H2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, Mariann R. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-12-01

    The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy’s Fuel Cell Technologies Office (FCTO) works in partnership with industry (including small businesses), academia, and DOE's national laboratories to establish fuel cell and hydrogen energy technologies as economically competitive contributors to U.S. transportation needs. The work that is envisioned between the SBIR/STTR grantee and Los Alamos National Laboratory would involve Technical Transfer of Los Alamos Intellectual Property (IP) on Thin-film Mixed Potential Sensor (U.S. Patent 7,264,700) and associated know-how for H2 sensor manufacturing and packaging.

  20. A memoir: From peenemünde to USA: A classic case of technology transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordway, Frederick I., III; Dahm, Werner K.; Dannenberg, Konrad; Haeussermann, Walter; Reisig, Gerhard; Stuhlinger, Ernst; von Tiesenhausen, Georg; Willhite, Irene

    2007-01-01

    This paper traces the development of rocket technology in Germany from the 1930s and 1940s that led to the massive, and historically unprecedented, transfer of rocket, missile, launch-vehicle and related technologies to the post-World-War-II United States. This achievement was made possible by an initial group of 118 German rocket specialists to which others were gradually added. The contributions to rocketry, upper atmosphere and space research, and eventually manned space travel provided by Germany's Wernher von Braun and his team of engineers, scientists, technicians and support personnel is, in particular, described, and the ongoing influence of the innovations they introduced is considered.

  1. Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer Technology Demonstration: Prephase A Government Point-of-Departure Concept Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulqueen, J. A.; Addona, B. M.; Gwaltney, D. A.; Holt, K. A.; Hopkins, R. C.; Matis, J. A.; McRight, P. S.; Popp, C. G.; Sutherlin, S. G.; Thomas, H. D.; hide

    2012-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to define a point-of-departure prephase A mission concept for the cryogenic propellant storage and transfer technology demonstration mission to be conducted by the NASA Office of the Chief Technologist (OCT). The mission concept includes identification of the cryogenic propellant management technologies to be demonstrated, definition of a representative mission timeline, and definition of a viable flight system design concept. The resulting mission concept will serve as a point of departure for evaluating alternative mission concepts and synthesizing the results of industry- defined mission concepts developed under the OCT contracted studies

  2. Heat and Mass Transfer Remote Control in Bioreactors of Technological Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktorija M. Mel’nick

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. The main problems that arise when using equipment for cultivation are to ensure the heat and mass transfer processes in devices, presence of turbulent and stagnant zones, high-energy consumption, low heat transfer coefficients when working with viscous fluids. Objective. The aim of the paper is the experimental determination of the remote control heat transfer advantages in production line bioreactors using ultrasonic beam compared to contact methods. Methods. An experimental study of the heat and mass transfer process in a bioreactor on the stand with UZP-6-1 immersion unit of the ultrasonic radiator with radiation frequency 42 kHz is carried out. Results. Sound waves emitted into a liquid form a concentration zone of passable sound energy in the confocal vessel form of a cylindrical surface and force the liquid to move along the inner surface of the glass along the ascending cylindrical spiral, forming a motive flow throughout the volume, causing peripheral layers of liquid and bottom layers to move in a horizontal and vertical planes, without leaving stagnant zones. The closer to the coincidence angle is the directed ultrasonic beam the greater is the effectiveness of the driving flow. Conclusions. The use of sound waves allows obtaining a high-quality product in technological lines based on bioreactors with minimal risk for the technological process. Radiation parameters and working volume physic-mechanical properties change allow fully using the properties of resonant manifestations of the sound wave influence on the working liquid with minimal costs.

  3. Japan-USSR: trade, technology transfer, and implementations for U.S.

    OpenAIRE

    Trombley, David L.

    1988-01-01

    This thesis examines trade and technology transfer between the Soviet Union and Japan. The paper discusses the subject from the perspective of both Japan and the USSR and considers the impact of the United States' and other nations' influence on their bilateral relationship. The thesis delineates the affect of political, military, and socio-psychological factors on the economic foundation of the issue. The USSR and Japan are strongly complementary in purely economic terms, but trade is partic...

  4. Transducer technology transfer to bio-engineering applications. [aerospace stress transducer for heart function analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, E. N.; Lewis, G. W.; Feldstein, C.; Corday, E.; Meerbaum, S.; Lang, T.

    1973-01-01

    The results of a technology transfer of a miniature unidirectional stress transducer, developed for experimental stress analysis in the aerospace field, to applications in bioengineering are reported. By modification of the basic design and innovations in attachment techniques, the transducer was successfully used in vivo on the myocardium of large dogs to record the change in contractile force due to coronary occlusion, reperfusion, and intervention.

  5. Promoting Transfer and an Integrated Understanding for Pre Service Teachers of Technology Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Morrison-Love

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The ability of students to transfer learning between subjects and contexts when problem solving is critical for developing their capability as Technologists and teachers of Technology. However, a growing body of literature suggests this ability is often assumed or over-estimated, and rarely developed explicitly within courses or degree programs. The nature of the problems tackled within technology are such that solutions draw upon knowledge from a wide range of contexts and subjects, however, the internal organisation and structure of institutions and schools tends to compartmentalise rather integrate these. Providing a knowledge base and range of strategies that enhance students’ awareness of and skills in transferring learning may allow for a more integrated understanding to develop. The importance of developing this in a more explicit manner is heightened as trainee teachers will, in turn, be responsible for developing the similar capabilities of the children they go on to work with as professional teachers. This paper begins by considering problem solving in technology education and some of the issues associated with learning transfer. Thereafter, a framework and strategy for better integrating learning between courses is described and forms the basis for developments in an Initial Teacher Education degree program for Technology Education. Provisional data from evaluations and student work indicated a positive effect in enhancing trainee teachers’ thinking and additional data in the form of questionnaires, interviews and student work help to explore this further. Finally, it is argued that the development framework and approach enhances their mental models of teaching and offers a significant step forward in promoting student teachers’ transfer of future learning between subjects; something increasingly critical for 21st century STEM Education.

  6. Integrated systems, design and technology 2010 knowledge transfer in new technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Fathi, Madjid

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge creation and technological experiences resulting from modern production life cycles are definitely the most Economical and important intellectual capitals in the current manufacturing endeavors. These are also the basis for enabling industrial competition through managing and identifying organizational and product related needs and opportunities; e. g. health care systems society needs clean environment, sustainable production life cycles needs flexible approachable design and engineering of materials whilst valuable materials are needed for renewable energies and the production of

  7. EV Charging Through Wireless Power Transfer: Analysis of Efficiency Optimization and Technology Trends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, John M [ORNL; Rakouth, Heri [Delphi Automotive Systems, USA; Suh, In-Soo [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology

    2012-01-01

    This paper is aimed at reviewing the technology trends for wireless power transfer (WPT) for electric vehicles (EV). It also analyzes the factors affecting its efficiency and describes the techniques currently used for its optimization. The review of the technology trends encompasses both stationary and moving vehicle charging systems. The study of the stationary vehicle charging technology is based on current implementations and on-going developments at WiTricity and Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL). The moving vehicle charging technology is primarily described through the results achieved by the Korean Advanced Institute of Technology (KAIST) along with on-going efforts at Stanford University. The factors affecting the efficiency are determined through the analysis of the equivalent circuit of magnetic resonant coupling. The air gap between both transmitting and receiving coils along with the magnetic field distribution and the relative impedance mismatch between the related circuits are the primary factors affecting the WPT efficiency. Currently the industry is looking at an air gap of 25 cm or below. To control the magnetic field distribution, Kaist has recently developed the Shaped Magnetic Field In Resonance (SMFIR) technology that uses conveniently shaped ferrite material to provide low reluctance path. The efficiency can be further increased by means of impedance matching. As a result, Delphi's implementation of the WiTricity's technology exhibits a WPT efficiency above 90% for stationary charging while KAIST has demonstrated a maximum efficiency of 83% for moving vehicle with its On Line Vehicle (OLEV) project. This study is restricted to near-field applications (short and mid-range) and does not address long-range technology such as microwave power transfer that has low efficiency as it is based on radiating electromagnetic waves. This paper exemplifies Delphi's work in powertrain electrification as part of its innovation for the real world

  8. GENERAL ASPECTS RELATED TO THE TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER, THE MAIN SOURCE OF INNOVATION AND DEVELOPMENT AMONG ECONOMIC OPERATORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorin Maier

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Efficient actions carried out in technology transfer bring major benefits to all parties involved in the process.Increasing the technological endowment through the process of technological transfer from research to industrycontributes significantly to the improving of the economic growth rate at the national and regional levels.Universities and research institutions as providers of knowledge are able to supplement their incomes andachieve financial autonomy in order to conduct entrepreneurial activities and research. They can also obtainother collateral benefits such as attracting research contracts sponsored by some economic operators, the abilityto hire and retain top personnel and researchers. Romania, in terms of technology transfer and innovationactivities among economic operators, is still trying to catch the significant gap compared to other Europeancountries. In these conditions technology transfer processes must be well understood and put into practice bothat research institutions as well as at the economic agents.

  9. Technological requirements of nuclear electric propulsion systems for fast Earth-Mars transfers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bérend, N.; Epenoy, R.; Cliquet, E.; Laurent-Varin, J.; Avril, S.

    2013-03-01

    Recent advances in electric propulsion technologies such as magnetoplasma rockets gave a new momentum to the study of nuclear electric propulsion concepts for Mars missions. Some recent works have been focused on very short Earth-to-Mars transfers of about 40 days with high-power, variable specific impulse propulsion systems [1]. While the interest of nuclear electric propulsion appears clearly with regard to the payload mass ratio (due to a high level of specific impulse), its interest with regard to the transfer time is more complex to define, as it depends on many design parameters. In this paper, a general analysis of the capability of nuclear electric propulsion systems considering both criteria (the payload mass ratio and the transfer time) is performed, and the technological requirements for fast Earth-Mars transfers are studied. This analysis has been performed in two steps. First, complete trajectory optimizations have been performed by CNES-DCT in order to obtain the propulsion requirements of the mission for different technological hypotheses regarding the engine technology (specific impulse levels and the throttling capability) and different mission requirements. The methodology used for designing fuel-optimal heliocentric trajectories, based on the Pontryagin's Maximum Principle will be presented. Trajectories have been computed for various power levels combined with either variable or fixed Isp. The second step consisted in evaluating a simpler method that could easily link the main mission requirements (the transfer time and the payload fraction) to the main technological requirements (the specific mass of the power generation system and the structure mass ratio of the whole vehicle, excluding the power generation system). Indeed, for power-limited systems, propulsion requirements can be characterized through the "trajectory characteristic" parameter, defined as the integral over time of the squared thrust acceleration. Technological requirements for

  10. Benchmarking Cloud Resources for HEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alef, M.; Cordeiro, C.; De Salvo, A.; Di Girolamo, A.; Field, L.; Giordano, D.; Guerri, M.; Schiavi, F. C.; Wiebalck, A.

    2017-10-01

    In a commercial cloud environment, exhaustive resource profiling is beneficial to cope with the intrinsic variability of the virtualised environment, allowing to promptly identify performance degradation. In the context of its commercial cloud initiatives, CERN has acquired extensive experience in benchmarking commercial cloud resources. Ultimately, this activity provides information on the actual delivered performance of invoiced resources. In this report we discuss the experience acquired and the results collected using several fast benchmark applications adopted by the HEP community. These benchmarks span from open-source benchmarks to specific user applications and synthetic benchmarks. The workflow put in place to collect and analyse performance metrics is also described.

  11. Geothermal technology transfer for direct heat applications: Final report, 1983--1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lienau, P.J.; Culver, G.

    1988-01-01

    This report describes a geothermal technology transfer program, performed by Oregon Institute of Technology's Geo-Heat Center, used to aid in the development of geothermal energy for direct heat applications. It provides a summary of 88 technical assistance projects performed in 10 states for space heating, district heating, green-houses, aquaculture, industrial processing, small scale binary electric power generation and heat pump applications. It describes an inventory compiled for over 100 direct heat projects that contains information on project site, resource and engineering data. An overview of information services is provided to users of the program which includes; advisory, referrals, literature distribution, geothermal technology library, quarterly Bulletin, training programs, presentations and tours, and reporting of activities for the USDOE Geothermal Progress Monitor.

  12. Orbit transfer rocket engine technology program: Automated preflight methods concept definition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, C. M.; Hertzberg, D. W.

    1991-12-01

    The possibility of automating preflight engine checkouts on orbit transfer engines is discussed. The minimum requirements in terms of information and processing necessary to assess the engine'e integrity and readiness to perform its mission were first defined. A variety of ways for remotely obtaining that information were generated. The sophistication of these approaches varied from a simple preliminary power up, where the engine is fired up for the first time, to the most advanced approach where the sensor and operational history data system alone indicates engine integrity. The critical issues and benefits of these methods were identified, outlined, and prioritized. The technology readiness of each of these automated preflight methods were then rated on a NASA Office of Exploration scale used for comparing technology options for future mission choices. Finally, estimates were made of the remaining cost to advance the technology for each method to a level where the system validation models have been demonstrated in a simulated environment.

  13. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donald Duttlinger

    2001-11-01

    The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of helping U.S. independent oil and gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions during Fiscal Year 2001 (FY01). Functioning as a cohesive national organization, PTTC has active grassroots programs through its ten Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs). They bring research and academia to the table via their association with geological surveys and engineering departments. The regional directors interact with independent oil and gas producers through technology workshops, resource centers, websites, newsletters, various technical publications and other outreach efforts. These are guided by regional Producer Advisory Groups (PAGs), who are area operators and service companies working with the regional networks. The role of the national Headquarters (HQ) staff includes planning and managing the PTTC program, conducting nation wide technology transfer activities, and implementing a comprehensive communications effort. The organization effectively combines federal funding through the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy, state, and industry funding to achieve important goals for all of these sectors. This integrated funding base, combined with industry volunteers guiding PTTC's activities and the dedication of national and regional staff, are achieving notable results. PTTC is increasingly recognized as a critical resource for information and access to technologies, especially for smaller companies without direct contact to R&D efforts. This technical progress report summarizes PTTC's accomplishments during FY01, which lays the groundwork for further growth in the future. At a time of many industry changes and wide market movements, the organization itself is adapting to change. PTTC has built a reputation and expectation among producers and other industry participants to quickly distribute information addressing technical needs. The organization

  14. Artificial intelligence and nuclear power. Report by the Technology Transfer Artificial Intelligence Task Team

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-06-01

    The Artificial Intelligence Task Team was organized to review the status of Artificial Intelligence (AI) technology, identify guidelines for AI work, and to identify work required to allow the nuclear industry to realize maximum benefit from this technology. The state of the nuclear industry was analyzed to determine where the application of AI technology could be of greatest benefit. Guidelines and criteria were established to focus on those particular problem areas where AI could provide the highest possible payoff to the industry. Information was collected from government, academic, and private organizations. Very little AI work is now being done to specifically support the nuclear industry. The AI Task Team determined that the establishment of a Strategic Automation Initiative (SAI) and the expansion of the DOE Technology Transfer program would ensure that AI technology could be used to develop software for the nuclear industry that would have substantial financial payoff to the industry. The SAI includes both long and short term phases. The short-term phase includes projects which would demonstrate that AI can be applied to the nuclear industry safely, and with substantial financial benefit. The long term phase includes projects which would develop AI technologies with specific applicability to the nuclear industry that would not be developed by people working in any other industry.

  15. The function at society of the spin-offs academics acting as a mechanism for technology transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lourenço Santos Dantas Gomes

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to present a theoretical review of the process of technology transfer between universities and companies, focusing on the technology-based companies, specifically academic spin-offs as one of the main tools for technology transfer. It then made a presentation on the importance of factors such as skilled human resources, encouraging the government as an agent, technological innovation, and Innovation Act (2004 for the transferring. The methodological approach of this paper is characterized as a basic research, qualitative, exploratory and technical procedures as a literature search. The research resulted in the realization that the technological development model based on cooperation between universities and companies has been consolidated as one of the strategies of technological and economic development of the country, as seeking to bring differential factors of competitiveness in the market.

  16. Study on the key technologies of the Transfer Equipment Cask for Tokamak Equator Port Plug

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Buyun, E-mail: ayun@iim.ac.cn [Department of Automation, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230027 (China); Robot Sensors and Human-Machine Interaction Laboratory, Institute of Intelligent Machines, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Gao, Lifu [Department of Automation, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230027 (China); Robot Sensors and Human-Machine Interaction Laboratory, Institute of Intelligent Machines, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Cao, Huibin; Sun, Jian [Robot Sensors and Human-Machine Interaction Laboratory, Institute of Intelligent Machines, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Sun, Yuxiang; Song, Quanjun; Ma, Chengxue; Chang, Li; Shuang, Feng [Department of Automation, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230027 (China); Robot Sensors and Human-Machine Interaction Laboratory, Institute of Intelligent Machines, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Design on Intelligent Air Transfer System (IATS) for Transfer Equipment Cask (TECA). • A rhombic-like parallel robot for docking with minimum misalignment. • Design on electro-hydraulic servo system of the TECA for Tokamak Equator Port Plug (TEPP) manipulation. • A control architecture with several algorithms and information acquired from sensors could be used by the TECA for Remote Handling (RH). - Abstract: The Transfer Equipment Cask (TECA) is a key solution for Remote Handling (RH) in Tokamak Equator Port Plug (TEPP) operations. From the perspectives of both engineering and technical designs of effective experiments on the TEPP, key technologies on these topics covering the TECA are required. According to conditions in ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) and features of the TEPP, this paper introduces the design of an Intelligent Air Transfer System (IATS) with an adaptive attitude and high precision positioning that transports a cask system of more than 30 tons from the Tokamak Building (TB) to the Hot Cell Building (HCB). Additionally, different actuators are discussed, and the hydraulic power drive is eventually selected and designed. A rhombic-like parallel robot is capable of being used for docking with minimum misalignment. Practical mechanisms of the cask system are presented for hostile environments. A control architecture with several algorithms and information acquired from sensors could be used by the TECA. These designs yield realistic and extended applications for the RH of ITER.

  17. Solar Electric Propulsion Technologies Being Designed for Orbit Transfer Vehicle Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarver-Verhey, Timothy R.; Hoffman, David J.; Kerslake, Thomas W.; Oleson, Steven R.; Falck, Robert D.

    2002-01-01

    There is increasing interest in employing Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP) for new missions requiring transfer from low Earth orbit to the Earth-Moon Lagrange point, L1. Mission architecture plans place the Gateway Habitat at L1 in the 2011 to 2016 timeframe. The Gateway Habitat is envisioned to be used for Lunar exploration, space telescopes, and planetary mission staging. In these scenarios, an SEP stage, or "tug," is used to transport payloads to L1--such as the habitat module, lunar excursion and return vehicles, and chemical propellant for return crew trips. SEP tugs are attractive because they are able to efficiently transport large (less than 10,000 kg) payloads while minimizing propellant requirements. To meet the needs of these missions, a preliminary conceptual design for a general-purpose SEP tug was developed that incorporates several of the advanced space power and in-space propulsion technologies (such as high-power gridded ion and Hall thrusters, high-performance thin-film photovoltaics, lithium-ion batteries, and advanced high-voltage power processing) being developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center. A spreadsheet-based vehicle system model was developed for component sizing and is currently being used for mission planning. This model incorporates a low-thrust orbit transfer algorithm to make preliminary determinations of transfer times and propellant requirements. Results from this combined tug mass estimation and orbit transfer model will be used in a higher fidelity trajectory model to refine the analysis.

  18. Innovation and technology transfer in the health sciences: a cross-sectional perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanch, L; Guerra, L; Lanuza, A; Palomar, G

    2014-11-01

    This article is based on the strategic reflection and discussion that took place on occasion of the first conference on innovation and technology transfer in the health sciences organized by the REGIC-ENS-FENIN-SEMICYUC and held in Madrid in the Instituto de Salud Carlos III on May 7th, 2013, with the aim of promoting the transfer of technological innovation in medicine and health care beyond the European program "Horizon 2020". The presentations dealt with key issues such as evaluation of the use of new technologies, the need to impregnate the decisions related to adoption and innovation with the concepts of value and sustainability, and the implication of knowledge networks in the need to strengthen their influence upon the creation of a "culture of innovation" among health professionals. But above all, emphasis was placed on the latent innovation potential of hospitals, and the fact that these, being the large companies that they are, should seriously consider that much of their future sustainability may depend on proper management of their ability to generate innovation, which is not only the generation of ideas but also their transformation into products or processes that create value and economic returns. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  19. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    2000-11-01

    The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of helping U.S. independent oil and gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions during Fiscal Year 2000 (FY00). Functioning as a cohesive national organization, PTTC has active grassroots programs through its ten Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs) who bring research and academia to the table via their association with geological surveys and engineering departments. The regional directors connect with independent oil and gas producers through technology workshops, resource centers, websites, newsletters, various technical publications and other outreach efforts. These are guided by regional Producer Advisory Groups (PAGs), who are area operators and service companies working with the Regional Lead Organizations. The role of the national headquarters (HQ) staff includes planning and managing the PTTC program, conducting nation-wide technology transfer activities, and implementing a comprehensive communications effort. The organization effectively combines federal, state, and industry funding to achieve important goals for all of these sectors. This integrated funding base, combined with industry volunteers guiding PTTC's activities and the dedication of national and regional staff, are achieving notable results. PTTC is increasingly recognized as a critical resource for information and access to technologies, especially for smaller companies. This technical progress report summarizes PTTC's accomplishments during FY00, which lays the groundwork for further growth in the future. At a time of many industry changes and market movements, the organization has built a reputation and expectation to address industry needs of getting information distributed quickly which can impact the bottom line immediately.

  20. An empirical research on relationships between subjective judgement, technology acceptance tendency and knowledge transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Chien-Yun; Chen, Hsiao-Ming; Chen, Wan-Fei; Wu, Chia-Huei; Li, Guodong; Wang, Jiangtao

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships among employees' usage intention pertaining to mobile information devices, focusing on subjective judgement, technology acceptance tendency, information sharing behavior and information transfer. A research model was established to verify several hypotheses. The research model based on integrated concepts of knowledge management and technology acceptance modeling. Participants were employees of enterprises in Taiwan, selected by combining snowball and convenience sampling. Data obtained from 779 e-surveys. Multiple-regression analysis was employed for hypothesis verification. The results indicate that perceived ease-of-use of mobile devices was affected by computer self-efficacy and computer playfulness directly; meanwhile, perceived ease-of-use directly affects perceived usefulness. In addition, perceived ease-of-use and perceived usefulness can predict information-sharing behavior in a positive manner, and impact knowledge transfer as well. Based on the research findings, it suggested that enterprises should utilize mobile information devices to create more contact with customers and enrich their service network. In addition, it is recommended that managers use mobile devices to transmit key information to their staff and that they use these devices for problem-solving and decision-making. Further, the staff’s skills pertaining to the operation of mobile information devices and to fully implement their features are reinforced in order to inspire the users' knowledge transfer. Enhancing the playfulness of the interface is also important. In general, it is useful to promote knowledge transfer behavior within an organization by motivating members to share information and ideas via mobile information devices. In addition, a well-designed interface can facilitate employees' use of these devices. PMID:28886088

  1. An empirical research on relationships between subjective judgement, technology acceptance tendency and knowledge transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yu-Hsi; Tsai, Sang-Bing; Dai, Chien-Yun; Chen, Hsiao-Ming; Chen, Wan-Fei; Wu, Chia-Huei; Li, Guodong; Wang, Jiangtao

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships among employees' usage intention pertaining to mobile information devices, focusing on subjective judgement, technology acceptance tendency, information sharing behavior and information transfer. A research model was established to verify several hypotheses. The research model based on integrated concepts of knowledge management and technology acceptance modeling. Participants were employees of enterprises in Taiwan, selected by combining snowball and convenience sampling. Data obtained from 779 e-surveys. Multiple-regression analysis was employed for hypothesis verification. The results indicate that perceived ease-of-use of mobile devices was affected by computer self-efficacy and computer playfulness directly; meanwhile, perceived ease-of-use directly affects perceived usefulness. In addition, perceived ease-of-use and perceived usefulness can predict information-sharing behavior in a positive manner, and impact knowledge transfer as well. Based on the research findings, it suggested that enterprises should utilize mobile information devices to create more contact with customers and enrich their service network. In addition, it is recommended that managers use mobile devices to transmit key information to their staff and that they use these devices for problem-solving and decision-making. Further, the staff's skills pertaining to the operation of mobile information devices and to fully implement their features are reinforced in order to inspire the users' knowledge transfer. Enhancing the playfulness of the interface is also important. In general, it is useful to promote knowledge transfer behavior within an organization by motivating members to share information and ideas via mobile information devices. In addition, a well-designed interface can facilitate employees' use of these devices.

  2. Temperature Evaluation of Heat Transferring Body while Preparing Temperature Chart of Heating Technologies and Metal Thermal Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Nesenchuk

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers problems pertaining to temperature evaluation of a heat transferring body in the operational space of high temperature installations. A formula for evaluation of this temperature has been written down in the paper. Calculation of a heating transferring body (furnace makes it possible to realize temperature chart parameters in the plant heating technologies and steel thermal treatment.

  3. Exploration of new perspectives and limitations in Agrobacterium mediated gene transfer technology. Progress report, [June 1, 1992-- May 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marton, L.

    1994-12-31

    This report describes progress aimed at constructing gene-transfer technology for Nicotiana plumbaginifolia. Most actual effort as described herein has so far been directed at exploring new perspectives and limitations in Agrobacterium mediated gene transfer. Accomplishments are described using a core homologous gene targeting vector.

  4. "Kaizen" and Technology Transfer Instructors as Work-based Learning Facilitators in Overseas Transplants: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsey, Barry; Fujiwara, Asahi

    2000-01-01

    A study of 240 instructors of kaizen (continuous quality improvement) and technology transfer in overseas assignments for Toyota found that commitment to work and corporate cultural values were significant. Instructors recognized the responsibility and challenges of communicating and transferring their know-how across cultures. (SK)

  5. Africa information society initiative, technology transfer and the evolution of digital information and knowledge management systems in Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Utulu, Samuel C. Avemaria; Sote, Toun

    2009-01-01

    The Paper presented the effect of information transfer on the African continent using the framework AISI developed in 1996. The paper supports the fact that Africa to be able to achieve its information society initiative objectives that it most take technology transfer issues very seriously.

  6. Technology transfer for the US Department of Energy's Energy Storage Program: Volume 2, Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruneau, C.L.; Fassbender, L.L.

    1988-10-01

    This document contains the appendices to Technology Transfer Recommendations for the US Department of Energy's Storage Program (PNL-6484, Vol. 1). These appendices are a list of projects, publications, and presentations connected with the Energy Storage (STOR) program. In Volume 1, the technology transfer activities of the STOR program are examined and mechanisms for increasing the effectiveness of those activities are recommended.

  7. Assay optimisation and technology transfer for multi-site immuno-monitoring in vaccine trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Steven G; Harris, Stephanie A; Satti, Iman; Bryan, Donna; Walker, K Barry; Dockrell, Hazel M; McShane, Helen; Ho, Mei Mei

    2017-01-01

    Cellular immunological assays are important tools for the monitoring of responses to T-cell-inducing vaccine candidates. As these bioassays are often technically complex and require considerable experience, careful technology transfer between laboratories is critical if high quality, reproducible data that allows comparison between sites, is to be generated. The aim of this study, funded by the European Union Framework Program 7-funded TRANSVAC project, was to optimise Standard Operating Procedures and the technology transfer process to maximise the reproducibility of three bioassays for interferon-gamma responses: enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), ex-vivo enzyme-linked immunospot and intracellular cytokine staining. We found that the initial variability in results generated across three different laboratories reduced following a combination of Standard Operating Procedure harmonisation and the undertaking of side-by-side training sessions in which assay operators performed each assay in the presence of an assay 'lead' operator. Mean inter-site coefficients of variance reduced following this training session when compared with the pre-training values, most notably for the ELISA assay. There was a trend for increased inter-site variability at lower response magnitudes for the ELISA and intracellular cytokine staining assays. In conclusion, we recommend that on-site operator training is an essential component of the assay technology transfer process and combined with harmonised Standard Operating Procedures will improve the quality, reproducibility and comparability of data produced across different laboratories. These data may be helpful in ongoing discussions of the potential risk/benefit of centralised immunological assay strategies for large clinical trials versus decentralised units.

  8. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    2002-05-31

    The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of helping U.S. independent oil and natural gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions. Networking opportunities that occur with a Houston Headquarters (HQ) location are increasing name awareness. Focused efforts by Executive Director Don Duttlinger to interact with large independents, national service companies and some majors are continuing to supplement the support base of the medium to smaller industry participants around the country. PTTC is now involved in many of the technology-related activities that occur in high oil and natural gas activity areas. Access to technology remains the driving force for those who do not have in-house research and development capabilities and look to the PTTC to provide services and options for increased efficiency. Looking forward to the future, the Board, Regional Lead Organization (RLO) Directors and HQ staff developed a 10-year vision outlining what PTTC needs to accomplish in supporting a national energy plan. This vision has been communicated to Department of Energy (DOE) staff and PTTC looks forward to continuing this successful federal-state-industry partnership. As part of this effort, several more examples of industry using information gained through PTTC activities to impact their bottom line were identified. Securing the industry pull on technology acceptance was the cornerstone of this directional plan.

  9. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    2002-11-01

    The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of assisting U.S. independent oil and gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions by providing access to information during Fiscal Year 2002 (FY02). Functioning as a cohesive national organization, PTTC has active grassroots programs through its ten Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs) and three satellite offices that efficiently extend the program reach. They bring research and academia to the table via their association with geological surveys and engineering departments. The regional directors interact with independent oil and gas producers through technology workshops, resource centers, websites, newsletters, various technical publications and other outreach efforts. These are guided by regional Producer Advisory Groups (PAGs), who are area operators and service companies working with the regional networks. The role of the national Headquarters (HQ) staff includes planning and managing the PTTC program, conducting nation wide technology transfer activities, and implementing a comprehensive communications effort. The organization effectively combines federal funding through the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy with state and industry funding to achieve important goals for all of these sectors. This integrated funding base is combined with industry volunteers guiding PTTC's activities and the dedication of national and regional staff to achieve notable results. PTTC is increasingly recognized as a critical resource for information and access to technologies, especially for smaller companies without direct contact with R&D efforts. The DOE participation is managed through the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), which deploys a national natural gas program via the Strategic Center for Natural Gas (SCNG) and a national oil program through the National Petroleum Technology Office (NTPO). This technical progress report summarizes PTTC

  10. Technology transfer--the rôle of venture capital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, P W

    1987-01-01

    In summary, let me say that the transfer of technology can be managed successfully. In the context of 3i as a whole, we have supported 1600 start-ups in the last five years although, obviously, not necessarily in high-tech industries. In 1987 3i Ventures fully expects to invest a further few million pounds in either start-ups or pre-stock market companies within the health-care and biotechnology sectors. It requires that everyone involved, including the venture capitalist, fulfils their rôle with commitment. It can be a difficult and lengthy process, but it can also be fun and very rewarding.

  11. The International Stripa Project: Technology transfer from cooperation in scientific and technological research on nuclear waste disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levich, R.A. [USDOE Nevada Operations Office, Las Vegas, NV (USA). Yucca Mountain Project Office; Patera, E.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA); Ferrigan, P.M. [USDOE Chicago Operations Office, Argonne, IL (USA); Wilkey, P.L. [CER Corp., Argonne, IL (USA)

    1990-04-01

    The Nuclear Energy Agency of the organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD/NEA) sponsors the International Stripa Project. The objectives of the Stripa Project are to develop techniques for characterizing sites located deep in rock formations that are potentially suitable for the geologic disposal of high-level radioactive wastes and to evaluate particular engineering design considerations that could enhance the long-term safety of a high-level radioactive waste repository in a geologic medium. The purpose of this paper is to briefly summarize the research conducted at Stripa and discuss the ways in which the technology developed for the Stripa Project has been and will be transfered to the United States Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program`s Yucca Mountain Project. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  12. Barriers to the Transfer of Low-carbon Electricity Generation Technologies in Four Latin American Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Desgain, Denis DR; Haselip, James Arthur

    2015-01-01

    , Costa Rica and the Dominican Republic. As such, we compare the identified barriers against the key characteristics of the national electricity sectors and natural resource base, in order to evaluate the relative significance of these barriers. In doing so, we make an indicative contribution......This article discusses the conclusions of four national Technology Needs Assessment (TNA) processes in Latin America (2011-2013), as applied to the electricity sector. The primary focus is on the financial and economic barriers identified by countries to the transfer of prioritized low......-carbon energy technologies. While many electricity markets in Latin America were liberalized during the 1990s and 2000s, such market-driven reform policies were far from uniform and in reality there exist a diversity of governance frameworks for national electricity markets, exemplified here by Argentina, Cuba...

  13. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    2001-05-01

    The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of helping U.S. independent oil and natural gas producers make timely, informed technology decisions. PTTC's Board made a strategic decision to relocate the Headquarters (HQ) office from Washington, DC to Houston, Texas. Driving force behind relocation was to better connect with independent producers, but cost savings could also be realized. Relocation was accomplished in late December 2000, with the HQ office being fully operational by January 2001. Early indications are that the HQ relocation is, in fact, enabling better networking with senior executives of independents in the Houston oil community. New Board leadership, elected in March 2001, will continue to effectively guide PTTC.

  14. Technology transfer and scale-up of the Flublok recombinant hemagglutinin (HA) influenza vaccine manufacturing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckland, Barry; Boulanger, Robert; Fino, Mireli; Srivastava, Indresh; Holtz, Kathy; Khramtsov, Nikolai; McPherson, Clifton; Meghrous, Jamal; Kubera, Paul; Cox, Manon M J

    2014-09-22

    Multiple different hemagglutinin (HA) protein antigens have been reproducibly manufactured at the 650L scale by Protein Sciences Corporation (PSC) based on an insect cell culture with baculovirus infection. Significantly, these HA protein antigens were produced by the same Universal Manufacturing process as described in the biological license application (BLA) for the first recombinant influenza vaccine approved by the FDA (Flublok). The technology is uniquely designed so that a change in vaccine composition can be readily accommodated from one HA protein antigen to another one. Here we present a vaccine candidate to combat the recently emerged H7N9 virus as an example starting with the genetic sequence for the required HA, creation of the baculovirus and ending with purified protein antigen (or vaccine component) at the 10L scale accomplished within 38 days under GMP conditions. The same process performance is being achieved at the 2L, 10L, 100L, 650L and 2500L scale. An illustration is given of how the technology was transferred from the benchmark 650L scale facility to a retrofitted microbial facility at the 2500L scale within 100 days which includes the time for facility engineering changes. The successful development, technology transfer and scale-up of the Flublok process has major implications for being ready to make vaccine rapidly on a worldwide scale as a defense against pandemic influenza. The technology described does not have the same vulnerability to mutations in the egg adapted strain, and resulting loss in vaccine efficacy, faced by egg based manufacture. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. HappyFace as a generic monitoring tool for HEP experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Gen; Magradze, Erekle; Musheghyan, Haykuhi; Quadt, Arnulf; Rzehorz, Gerhard

    2015-12-01

    The importance of monitoring on HEP grid computing systems is growing due to a significant increase in their complexity. Computer scientists and administrators have been studying and building effective ways to gather information on and clarify a status of each local grid infrastructure. The HappyFace project aims at making the above-mentioned workflow possible. It aggregates, processes and stores the information and the status of different HEP monitoring resources into the common database of HappyFace. The system displays the information and the status through a single interface. However, this model of HappyFace relied on the monitoring resources which are always under development in the HEP experiments. Consequently, HappyFace needed to have direct access methods to the grid application and grid service layers in the different HEP grid systems. To cope with this issue, we use a reliable HEP software repository, the CernVM File System. We propose a new implementation and an architecture of HappyFace, the so-called grid-enabled HappyFace. It allows its basic framework to connect directly to the grid user applications and the grid collective services, without involving the monitoring resources in the HEP grid systems. This approach gives HappyFace several advantages: Portability, to provide an independent and generic monitoring system among the HEP grid systems. Eunctionality, to allow users to perform various diagnostic tools in the individual HEP grid systems and grid sites. Elexibility, to make HappyFace beneficial and open for the various distributed grid computing environments. Different grid-enabled modules, to connect to the Ganga job monitoring system and to check the performance of grid transfers among the grid sites, have been implemented. The new HappyFace system has been successfully integrated and now it displays the information and the status of both the monitoring resources and the direct access to the grid user applications and the grid collective

  16. Advanced Life Support Research and Technology Transfer at the University of Guelph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dixon M.

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Research and technology developments surrounding Advanced Life-Support (ALS began at the University of Guelph in 1992 as the Space and Advanced Life Support Agriculture (SALSA program, which now represents Canada’s primary contribution to ALS research. The early focus was on recycling hydroponic nutrient solutions, atmospheric gas analysis and carbon balance, sensor research and development, inner/intra-canopy lighting and biological filtration of air in closed systems. With funding from federal, provincial and industry partners, a new generation of technology emerged to address the challenges of deploying biological systems as fundamental components of life-support infrastructure for long-duration human space exploration. Accompanying these advances were a wide range of technology transfer opportunities in the agri-food and health sectors, including air and water remediation, plant and environment sensors, disinfection technologies, recyclable growth substrates and advanced light emitting diode (LED lighting systems. This report traces the evolution of the SALSA program and catalogues the benefits of ALS research for terrestrial and non-terrestrial applications.

  17. Investigations on an environmental technology transfer information network; Kankyo gijutsu iten joho network chosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    With developing countries (APEC countries) as the main objects, investigations were carried out to issue environmental technology transfer information that Japan has accumulated, and advance exchanges of technical information with persons related inside and outside Japan. As a result of the investigations, it was found that the environmental technology information that serves more effectively for the developing countries is the technical information that has been developed by repeating improvements, has provided actual results in work sites, and is actually used, rather than the state-of-art technologies. Based on this result, business entities having factories and operation centers located in Mie Prefecture and the city of Yokkaichi were asked to provide data for the actually used environmental technologies. Out of 51 items provided by 17 companies, nine items were selected to be used as prototype database materials for an information network. The objects of information sources will be expanded to a nationwide scale in the future to improve the contents of the database. Problems of handling information copyrights and technical know-hows were presented in the course of data collection, urging the necessity of due considerations on the matter. Necessity was indicated on maintenance and management of data base as well as its quantitative expansion. 1 ref., 4 figs.

  18. A low-frequency versatile wireless power transfer technology for biomedical implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hao; Zhang, Junmin; Lan, Di; Chao; Liou, Shyshenq; Shahnasser, Hamid; Fechter, Richard; Hirose, Shinjiro; Harrison, Michael; Roy, Shuvo

    2013-08-01

    Implantable biomedical sensors and actuators are highly desired in modern medicine. In many cases, the implant's electrical power source profoundly determines its overall size and performance . The inductively coupled coil pair operating at the radio-frequency (RF) has been the primary method for wirelessly delivering electrical power to implants for the last three decades . Recent designs significantly improve the power delivery efficiency by optimizing the operating frequency, coil size and coil distance . However, RF radiation hazard and tissue absorption are the concerns in the RF wireless power transfer technology (RF-WPTT) , . Also, it requires an accurate impedance matching network that is sensitive to operating environments between the receiving coil and the load for efficient power delivery . In this paper, a novel low-frequency wireless power transfer technology (LF-WPTT) using rotating rare-earth permanent magnets is demonstrated. The LF-WPTT is able to deliver 2.967 W power at  ∼ 180 Hz to an 117.1 Ω resistor over 1 cm distance with 50% overall efficiency. Because of the low operating frequency, RF radiation hazard and tissue absorption are largely avoided, and the power delivery efficiency from the receiving coil to the load is independent of the operating environment. Also, there is little power loss observed in the LF-WPTT when the receiving coil is enclosed by non-magnetic implant-grade stainless steel.

  19. GIS tools, courses, and learning pathways offered by The National Interagency Fuels, Fire, and Vegetation Technology Transfer (NIFTT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heather Heward; Kathy H. Schon

    2009-01-01

    As technology continues to evolve in the area of fuel and wildland fire management so does the need to have effective tools and training on these technologies. The National Interagency Fuels Coordination Group has chartered a team of professionals to coordinate, develop, and transfer consistent, efficient, science-based fuel and fire ecology assessment GIS tools and...

  20. Analysis Traceability and Provenance for HEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamdasani, Jetendr; McClatchey, Richard; Branson, Andrew; Kovács, Zsolt

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents the use of the CRISTAL software in the N4U project. CRISTAL was used to create a set of provenance aware analysis tools for the Neuroscience domain. This paper advocates that the approach taken in N4U to build the analysis suite is sufficiently generic to be able to be applied to the HEP domain. A mapping to the PROV model for provenance interoperability is also presented and how this can be applied to the HEP domain for the interoperability of HEP analyses.

  1. HEP Computing Tools, Grid and Supercomputers for Genome Sequencing Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, K.; Klimentov, A.; Maeno, T.; Mashinistov, R.; Novikov, A.; Poyda, A.; Tertychnyy, I.; Wenaus, T.

    2017-10-01

    PanDA - Production and Distributed Analysis Workload Management System has been developed to address ATLAS experiment at LHC data processing and analysis challenges. Recently PanDA has been extended to run HEP scientific applications on Leadership Class Facilities and supercomputers. The success of the projects to use PanDA beyond HEP and Grid has drawn attention from other compute intensive sciences such as bioinformatics. Recent advances of Next Generation Genome Sequencing (NGS) technology led to increasing streams of sequencing data that need to be processed, analysed and made available for bioinformaticians worldwide. Analysis of genomes sequencing data using popular software pipeline PALEOMIX can take a month even running it on the powerful computer resource. In this paper we will describe the adaptation the PALEOMIX pipeline to run it on a distributed computing environment powered by PanDA. To run pipeline we split input files into chunks which are run separately on different nodes as separate inputs for PALEOMIX and finally merge output file, it is very similar to what it done by ATLAS to process and to simulate data. We dramatically decreased the total walltime because of jobs (re)submission automation and brokering within PanDA. Using software tools developed initially for HEP and Grid can reduce payload execution time for Mammoths DNA samples from weeks to days.

  2. Selective effects of a fiber chimeric conditionally replicative adenovirus armed with hep27 gene on renal cancer cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Lin; Cheng, Qian; Liu, Wenshun; Zhang, Jie; Ge, Yan; Zhang, Qi; Li, Liantao; Liu, Junjie; Zheng, Junnian

    2016-06-02

    ASBTARCT Adenoviruses mediated cancer gene therapies are widely investigated and show a promising effect on cancer treatment. However, efficient gene transfer varies among different cancer cell lines based on the expression of coxsakie adenovirus receptor (CAR). Hep27, a member of dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) family, can bind to Mdm2, resulting in the attenuation of Mdm2-mediated p53 degradation. Here we constructed a fiber chimeric adenovirus carrying hep27 gene (F5/35-ZD55-Hep27), in which the fiber protein of 5-serotype adenovirus (Ad5) was substituted by that of 35-serotype adenovirus (Ad35), aiming to facilitate the infection for renal cancer cells and develop the role of hep27 in cancer therapy. We evaluated the CAR and CD46 (a membrane cofactor protein for Ad35) expression in four kinds of renal cancer cells and assessed the relationship between receptors and infection efficiency. 5/35 fiber-modified adenovirus had a much promising infectivity compared with Ad5-based vector in renal cancer cells. F5/35-ZD55-Hep27 had enhanced antitumor activity against human renal cancer cells compared to the other groups. Further, hep27 mediated p53 and cleaved-PARP upregulation and mdm2 downregulation was involved and caused increased apoptosis. Moreover, F5/35-ZD55-Hep27 significantly suppressed tumor growth in subcutaneous renal cancer cell xenograft models. Our data demonstrated that 5/35 fiber-modified adenovirus F5/35-ZD55-Hep27 transferred into renal cancers efficiently and increased p53 to induce cancer cell apoptosis. Thus 5/35 fiber-modified adenoviral vector F5/35-ZD55-Hep27 might a promising vector and antitumor reagent for renal cancer gene therapy.

  3. Conceptual and empirical themes regarding the design of technology transfer programs : a review of wood utilization research in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul V. Ellefson; Michael A. Kilgore; Kenneth E. Skog; Christopher D. Risbrudt

    2011-01-01

    Transfer of technologies produced by research is critical to innovation within all organizations. The intent of this paper is to take stock of the conceptual underpinnings of technology transfer processes as they relate to wood utilization research and to identify conditions that promote the successful transfer of research results. Conceptually, research utilization...

  4. Reaching for the cloud: on the lessons learned from grid computing technology transfer process to the biomedical community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Yassene; Dickmann, Frank; Sax, Ulrich; von Voigt, Gabriele; Smith, Matthew; Rienhoff, Otto

    2010-01-01

    Natural scientists such as physicists pioneered the sharing of computing resources, which led to the creation of the Grid. The inter domain transfer process of this technology has hitherto been an intuitive process without in depth analysis. Some difficulties facing the life science community in this transfer can be understood using the Bozeman's "Effectiveness Model of Technology Transfer". Bozeman's and classical technology transfer approaches deal with technologies which have achieved certain stability. Grid and Cloud solutions are technologies, which are still in flux. We show how Grid computing creates new difficulties in the transfer process that are not considered in Bozeman's model. We show why the success of healthgrids should be measured by the qualified scientific human capital and the opportunities created, and not primarily by the market impact. We conclude with recommendations that can help improve the adoption of Grid and Cloud solutions into the biomedical community. These results give a more concise explanation of the difficulties many life science IT projects are facing in the late funding periods, and show leveraging steps that can help overcoming the "vale of tears".

  5. A modern approach to HEP visualization - ATLASrift

    CERN Document Server

    Vukotic, Ilija; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    At the times when HEP computing needs were mainly fulfilled by mainframes, graphics solutions for event and detector visualizations were necessarily hardware as well as experiment specific and impossible to use anywhere outside of HEP community. A big move to commodity computing did not precipitate a corresponding move of graphics solutions to industry standard hardware and software. In this paper, we list functionalities expected from contemporary tools and describe their implementation by a specific application: ATLASrift. We start with a basic premise that HEP visualization tools should be open in practice and not only in intentions. This means that a user should not be limited to specific and little used platforms, HEP-only software packages, or experiment-specific libraries. Equally important is that no special knowledge or special access rights are needed. Using industry standard frameworks brings not only sustainability, but also good support, a lot of community contributed tools, and a possibility of ...

  6. Determination of the Most Suitable Technology Transfer Strategy for Wind Turbines Using an Integrated AHP-TOPSIS Decision Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Dinmohammadi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The high-speed development of industrial products and goods in the world has caused “technology” to be considered as a crucial competitive advantage for most large organizations. In recent years, developing countries have considerably tended to promote their technological and innovative capabilities through importing high-tech equipment owned and operated by developed countries. There are currently a variety of solutions to transfer a particular technology from a developed country. The selection of the most profitable technology transfer strategy is a very complex decision-making problem for technology importers as it involves different technical, environmental, social, and economic aspects. In this study, a hybrid multiple-criteria decision making (MCDM model based on the analytic hierarchy process (AHP and the technique for order of preference by similarity to ideal solution (TOPSIS is proposed to evaluate and prioritise various technology transfer strategies for wind turbine systems. For this purpose, a number of criteria and sub-criteria are defined from the viewpoint of wind energy investors, wind turbine manufacturers, and wind farm operators. The relative importance of criteria and sub-criteria with respect to the ultimate goal are computed using the eigenvalue method and then, the technology transfer alternatives are ranked based on their relative closeness to the ideal solution. The model is finally applied to determine the most suitable wind turbine technology transfer strategy among four options of reverse engineering, technology skills training, turn-key contracts, and technology licensing for the renewable energy sector of Iran, and the results are compared with those obtained by classical decision-making models.

  7. ASCR/HEP Exascale Requirements Review Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habib, Salman; et al.

    2016-03-30

    This draft report summarizes and details the findings, results, and recommendations derived from the ASCR/HEP Exascale Requirements Review meeting held in June, 2015. The main conclusions are as follows. 1) Larger, more capable computing and data facilities are needed to support HEP science goals in all three frontiers: Energy, Intensity, and Cosmic. The expected scale of the demand at the 2025 timescale is at least two orders of magnitude -- and in some cases greater -- than that available currently. 2) The growth rate of data produced by simulations is overwhelming the current ability, of both facilities and researchers, to store and analyze it. Additional resources and new techniques for data analysis are urgently needed. 3) Data rates and volumes from HEP experimental facilities are also straining the ability to store and analyze large and complex data volumes. Appropriately configured leadership-class facilities can play a transformational role in enabling scientific discovery from these datasets. 4) A close integration of HPC simulation and data analysis will aid greatly in interpreting results from HEP experiments. Such an integration will minimize data movement and facilitate interdependent workflows. 5) Long-range planning between HEP and ASCR will be required to meet HEP's research needs. To best use ASCR HPC resources the experimental HEP program needs a) an established long-term plan for access to ASCR computational and data resources, b) an ability to map workflows onto HPC resources, c) the ability for ASCR facilities to accommodate workflows run by collaborations that can have thousands of individual members, d) to transition codes to the next-generation HPC platforms that will be available at ASCR facilities, e) to build up and train a workforce capable of developing and using simulations and analysis to support HEP scientific research on next-generation systems.

  8. ASCR/HEP Exascale Requirements Review Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habib, Salman [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Roser, Robert [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Gerber, Richard [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Antypas, Katie [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Riley, Katherine [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Williams, Tim [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Wells, Jack [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Straatsma, Tjerk [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Almgren, A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Amundson, J. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Bailey, S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Bard, D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Bloom, K. [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States); Bockelman, B. [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States); Borgland, A. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Borrill, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Boughezal, R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Brower, R. [Boston Univ., MA (United States); Cowan, B. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Finkel, H. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Frontiere, N. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Fuess, S. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Ge, L. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Gnedin, N. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Gottlieb, S. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Gutsche, O. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Han, T. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Heitmann, K. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hoeche, S. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Ko, K. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Kononenko, O. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); LeCompte, T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Li, Z. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Lukic, Z. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Mori, W. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Nugent, P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Ng, C. -K. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Oleynik, G. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); O' Shea, B. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Padmanabhan, N. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Petravick, D. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States). National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA); Petriello, F. J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Power, J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Qiang, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Reina, L. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Rizzo, T. J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Ryne, R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Schram, M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Spentzouris, P. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Toussaint, D. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Vay, J. -L. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Viren, B. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wurthwein, F. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Xiao, L. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2017-02-06

    This draft report summarizes and details the findings, results, and recommendations derived from the ASCR/HEP Exascale Requirements Review meeting held in June, 2015. The main conclusions are as follows. 1) Larger, more capable computing and data facilities are needed to support HEP science goals in all three frontiers: Energy, Intensity, and Cosmic. The expected scale of the demand at the 2025 timescale is at least two orders of magnitude -- and in some cases greater -- than that available currently. 2) The growth rate of data produced by simulations is overwhelming the current ability, of both facilities and researchers, to store and analyze it. Additional resources and new techniques for data analysis are urgently needed. 3) Data rates and volumes from HEP experimental facilities are also straining the ability to store and analyze large and complex data volumes. Appropriately configured leadership-class facilities can play a transformational role in enabling scientific discovery from these datasets. 4) A close integration of HPC simulation and data analysis will aid greatly in interpreting results from HEP experiments. Such an integration will minimize data movement and facilitate interdependent workflows. 5) Long-range planning between HEP and ASCR will be required to meet HEP's research needs. To best use ASCR HPC resources the experimental HEP program needs a) an established long-term plan for access to ASCR computational and data resources, b) an ability to map workflows onto HPC resources, c) the ability for ASCR facilities to accommodate workflows run by collaborations that can have thousands of individual members, d) to transition codes to the next-generation HPC platforms that will be available at ASCR facilities, e) to build up and train a workforce capable of developing and using simulations and analysis to support HEP scientific research on next-generation systems.

  9. ASCR/HEP Exascale Requirements Review Report

    OpenAIRE

    Habib, S; Roser, R; Gerber, R; Antypas, K; Riley, K; Williams, T; Wells, J; Straatsma, T; Almgren, A; Amundson, J; Bailey, S; Bard, D; Bloom, K; Bockelman, B; Borgland, A

    2017-01-01

    This draft report summarizes and details the findings, results, and recommendations derived from the ASCR/HEP Exascale Requirements Review meeting held in June, 2015. The main conclusions are as follows. 1) Larger, more capable computing and data facilities are needed to support HEP science goals in all three frontiers: Energy, Intensity, and Cosmic. The expected scale of the demand at the 2025 timescale is at least two orders of magnitude -- and in some cases greater -- than that available c...

  10. Argonne National Laboratory study of the transfer of federal computational technology to manufacturing industry in the State of Michigan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, C.J.

    1991-11-01

    This report describes a pilot study to develop, initiate the implementation, and document a process to identify computational technology capabilities resident within Argonne National Laboratory to small and medium-sized businesses in the State of Michigan. It is a derivative of a program entitled ``Technology Applications Development Process for the State of Michigan`` undertaken by the Industrial Technology Institute and MERRA under funding from the National Institute of Standards and Technology. The overall objective of the latter program is to develop procedures which can facilitate the discovery and commercialization of new technologies for the benefit of small and medium-size manufacturing firms. Federal laboratories such as Argonne, along with universities, have been identified by the Industrial Technology Institute as key sources of technology which can be profitably commercialized by the target firms. The scope of this study limited the investigation of technology areas for technology transfer to that of computational science and engineering featuring high performance computing. This area was chosen as the broad technological capability within Argonne to investigate for technology transfer to Michigan firms for several reasons. First, and most importantly, as a multidisciplinary laboratory, Argonne has the full range of scientific and engineering skills needed to utilize leading-edge computing capabilities in many areas of manufacturing.

  11. Argonne National Laboratory study of the transfer of federal computational technology to manufacturing industry in the State of Michigan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, C.J.

    1991-11-01

    This report describes a pilot study to develop, initiate the implementation, and document a process to identify computational technology capabilities resident within Argonne National Laboratory to small and medium-sized businesses in the State of Michigan. It is a derivative of a program entitled Technology Applications Development Process for the State of Michigan'' undertaken by the Industrial Technology Institute and MERRA under funding from the National Institute of Standards and Technology. The overall objective of the latter program is to develop procedures which can facilitate the discovery and commercialization of new technologies for the benefit of small and medium-size manufacturing firms. Federal laboratories such as Argonne, along with universities, have been identified by the Industrial Technology Institute as key sources of technology which can be profitably commercialized by the target firms. The scope of this study limited the investigation of technology areas for technology transfer to that of computational science and engineering featuring high performance computing. This area was chosen as the broad technological capability within Argonne to investigate for technology transfer to Michigan firms for several reasons. First, and most importantly, as a multidisciplinary laboratory, Argonne has the full range of scientific and engineering skills needed to utilize leading-edge computing capabilities in many areas of manufacturing.

  12. Transfer of Biogas Technology to Support Mixed Crop and Livestock Farming Systems in Indonesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Putra, Ahmad Romadhoni Surya

    Mixed crop and livestock (MCL) farming systems has been applied for many years to manage the limited resources owned by smallholder farmers. This farming practice is considered as the best practice to cultivate the limited resources by adopting an integrated life cycle approach within crop...... and livestock production. However, within this farming system, some externalities may appear because of the untreated livestock waste which may pollute air and the surrounding water environment at the farm. This may also affect greenhouse gas emission that potentially contributes to an increase of global...... such as reduction of air and water pollution and gas emission caused by manure. However, despite its multiple benefits, the biogas technology transfer is facing a slow rate of diffusion in most farm households in developing countries. This phenomenon calls for identification of reasons in order to develop solutions...

  13. Technology and Properties of Layered Composites as Coatings for Heat Transfer Enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatys, R.; Orman, Ł. J.

    2017-07-01

    The mechanical properties of porous structures consisting of copper wires reinforced with carbon and glass fibers for assessment of the adhesion strength of the porous structure produced and cohesion between components of the structures investigated, which are used for heat exchangers, are considered. The internal structure of bonds between their elements was analyzed by metallographic techniques. The statistical relationships for bonds between layers are given. The auxiliary characteristics of technology connected with the "hydrogen disease" of copper are discussed. Specimens were tested for characteristics of their tensile strength. The thermal performance of sintered heat exchangers was also investigated on brass-copper, bronze-copper, and copper-copper samples. The nucleate boiling mode of heat transfer was selected for experiments with distilled water and ethyl alcohol as working fluids.

  14. CERN’s policy in the field of knowledge and technology transfer goes global

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    On 2 November, the Knowledge & Technology Transfer (KTT) Group presented to the Directorate three proposals that aim to enhance KTT activities. One important aspect of the proposals is the direct involvement of all members of CERN, who are strongly encouraged to communicate any ideas for additional applications of their work. KTT is a high-priority activity area because of its potential to demonstrate the role of CERN as a source of innovation, delivering tangible benefits to society. In particular, through its know-how and its leadership, CERN is today generating innovations applicable in domains such as medical sciences, energy and the environment, as well as many others. “The measures endorsed by the Directorate on 2 November include a comprehensive policy for managing the intellectual property related to CERN technologies”, explains Claudio Parrinello, head of the KTT Group in the DG Department. “This includes a proposal to redistribute part of the income generated by ...

  15. Technology Development, Validation, and Transfer Via the FAA Airworthiness Assurance Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, R.L.

    1999-04-15

    In 1991, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) established an Airworthiness Assurance NDI Validation Center (AANC) at Sandia National Laboratories. Its primary mission is to support technology development, validation, and transfer to industry in order to enhance the airworthiness and improve the aircraft maintenance practices of the U.S. commercial aviation industry. The Center conducts projects in a myriad of engineering disciplines. The results are placed in the public domain so that the industry at-large can reap the benefits of FAA-funded Research and Development efforts. To support the Center's goals, the FAA/AANC has set up a hangar facility at the Albuquerque International Airport which contains a collection of transport and commuter aircraft as well as other test specimens. The facility replicates a working maintenance environment by incorporating both the physical inspection difficulties as well as the environmental factors which influence maintenance reliability.

  16. A review of performance standards to monitor, evaluate and assess the impact of technology transfer offices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibongile Gumbi

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The conversion of scientific discoveries to new products and processes and their launch onto the market can be a lengthy process. Similarly, it takes many years before the impact of scientific research on society and the economy is realised and a further length of time before its performance can be measured. Higher education and research institutions, and their governments, often make significant investments into intellectual property management and technology transfer activities through legislative and policy development, human resource development, financial allocation and infrastructure improvement. Since returns on such investments are not immediately apparent, it is important to establish a means by which the impact of their efforts can be determined. In this paper, I examined the measures and indicators that could be developed by institutions and their stakeholders in order to monitor, evaluate and determine the impact of research output and outcomes on the market.

  17. HEP.TrkX [Vidyo

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    Reconstruction of charged particle tracks is a central task in the processing of physics data at the LHC and other colliders. Current state-of-the-art tracking algorithms are based on the Kalman filter and have seen great success both offline and at trigger level. However, these algorithms scale poorly with increasing detector occupancy, and it is foreseen that significant changes will be needed to achieve efficient track reconstruction in very high luminosity conditions. The HEP.TrkX pilot project aims to develop and explore machine-learning-based algorithms for particle tracking, with the goal of identifying candidate techniques for a more scalable tracking algorithm. In this talk we will discuss the techniques explored in the project so far, with emphasis on algorithms based on recurrent and convolutional neural networks. We will demonstrate the performance of these algorithms on toy detector data, and discuss plans to adapt them into complete algorithms for seed-finding and/or full track reconstructio...

  18. Academic medical product development: an emerging alliance of technology transfer organizations and the CTSA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Lynn M; Everts, Maaike; Heller, Caren; Burke, Christine; Hafer, Nathaniel; Steele, Scott

    2014-12-01

    To bring the benefits of science more quickly to patient care, the NIH National Center Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) supports programs that enhance the development, testing, and implementation of new medical products and procedures. The NCATS clinical and translational science award (CTSA) program is central to that mission; creating an academic home for clinical and translational science and supporting those involved in the discovery and development of new health-related inventions. The technology transfer Offices (TTO) of CTSA-funded universities can be important partners in the development process; facilitating the transfer of medical research to the commercial sector for further development and ultimately, distribution to patients. The Aggregating Intellectual Property (IP) Working Group (AWG) of the CTSA public private partnerships key function committee (PPP-KFC) developed a survey to explore how CTSA-funded institutions currently interface with their respective TTOs to support medical product development. The results suggest a range of relationships across institutions; approximately half have formal collaborative programs, but only a few have well-connected programs. Models of collaborations are described and provided as examples of successful CTSA/TTO partnerships that have increased the value of health-related inventions as measured by follow-on funding and industry involvement; either as a consulting partner or licensee. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Transfer of adapted water supply technologies through a demonstration and teaching facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestmann, F.; Oberle, P.; Ikhwan, M.; Stoffel, D.; Blaß, H. J.; Töws, D.; Schmidt, S.

    2016-09-01

    Water scarcity can be defined as a lack of sufficient water resources or as the limited or even missing access to a safe water supply. Latter can be classified as `economic water scarcity' which among others can commonly be met in tropical and subtropical karst regions of emerging and developing countries. Karst aquifers, mostly consisting of limestone and carbonate rock, show high infiltration rates which leads to a lack of above ground storage possibilities. Thus, the water will drain rapidly into the underground and evolve vast river networks. Considering the lack of appropriate infrastructure and limited human capacities in the affected areas, these underground water resources cannot be exploited adequately. Against this, background innovative and adapted technologies are required to utilize hard-to-access water resources in a sustainable way. In this context, the German-Indonesian joint R&D project "Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) Indonesia" dealt with the development of highly adaptable water technologies and management strategies. Under the aegis of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and funded by the German Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF), these innovative technical concepts were exemplarily implemented to remedy this deficiency in the model region Gunung Sewu, a karst area situated on the southern coast of Java Island, Indonesia. The experiences gained through the interdisciplinary joint R&D activities clearly showed that even in the case of availability of appropriate technologies, a comprising transfer of knowhow and the buildup of capabilities (Capacity Development) is inevitable to sustainably implement and disseminate new methods. In this context, an adapted water supply facility was developed by KIT which hereafter shall serve for demonstration, teaching, and research purposes. The plant's functionality, its teaching and research concept, as well as the design process, which was accomplished in collaboration with the

  20. Prioritizing the Factors Influencing the Success of Technology Transfer by Reverse Engineering Case Study: Aviation Engines Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadreza Shahriari

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the basic purposes in developing countries had been reduction of their technological gap in different eras. So, technology transfer in developing countries has become one of the key factors of economic growth. But technology transfer is a difficult and complex process, so it can be unsuccessful and may waste time and money or undermine the national technology if performed without enough considering and study. Therefore, according to high ability of interior experts and scientists and country's condition to have a successful technology transfer, Reverse Engineering is used as an effective factor. In this paper supporting 15 experts and using Fuzzy Delphi Method, the effective factors on success of technology transfer by reverse engineering in aviation engines industry will be recognized and then prioritized by members of statistical sample and Analytical Network Process (ANP. Finally, we will have three components, technical knowledge for redesign, technical knowledge for producing, and organizational association with original country that are the most important among the other ten selected components.

  1. Knowledge and technology transfer to improve the municipal solid waste management system of Durango City, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia-Vázquez, Roberto; Pérez-López, Maria E; Vicencio-de-la-Rosa, María G; Martínez-Prado, María A; Rubio-Hernández, Rubén

    2014-09-01

    As society evolves its welfare level increases, and as a consequence the amount of municipal solid waste increases, imposing great challenges to municipal authorities. In developed countries, municipalities have established integrated management schemes to handle, treat, and dispose of municipal solid waste in an economical and environmentally sound manner. Municipalities of developing and transition countries are not exempted from the challenges involving municipal solid waste handling, but their task is not easy to accomplish since they face budget deficits, lack of knowledge, and deficiencies in infrastructure and equipment. In the northern territory of Mexico, the municipality of Durango is facing the challenge of increased volumes of waste with a lack of adequate facilities and infrastructure. This article analyses the evolution of the municipal solid waste management of Durango city, which includes actions such as proper facilities construction, equipment acquisition, and the implementation of social programmes. The World Bank, offering courses to municipal managers on landfill operation and waste management, promoted the process of knowledge and technology transfer. Thereafter, municipal authorities attended regional and some international workshops on waste management. In addition they followed suggestions of international contractors and equipment dealers with the intention to improve the situation of the waste management of the city. After a 15-year period, transfer of knowledge and technology resulted in a modern municipal solid waste management system in Durango municipality. The actual system did not reach the standard levels of an integrated waste management system, nevertheless, a functional evaluation shows clear indications that municipality actions have put them on the right pathway. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. High-performance image communication network with asynchronous transfer mode technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Albert W. K.; Huang, H. K.; Lee, Joseph K.; Bazzill, Todd M.; Zhu, Xiaoming

    1996-05-01

    Asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) technology has been implemented within our radiology department's hospital-wide PACS as well as in a wide area network (WAN) connecting affiliated hospitals. This paper describes our implementation strategies and the network performance observed in a clinical setting. The image communication network for our PACS is composed of two network interfaces: ATM (OC-3, 155 Mbps) and Ethernet (10 Mbps). This communication network connects four major campus buildings and two remote hospitals, providing intra- and interbuilding communication for radiologic images including CT, MR, CR, US, and digitized screen-film images. The network links these modalities via their acquisition computers to the PACS controller and to display workstations. The ATM serves as the primary network for transmission of radiologic images and relevant data within the entire PACS. The standard Ethernet is used as a backup network for ATM. It interconnects all PACS components including radiologic imaging systems, acquisition computers, display workstations, the PACS controller, the database servers, and the RIS and HIS. Our communication network operates on a 24 hrs/day, 7 days/week basis. Performance of the ATM network was evaluated in terms of disk-to-disk, disk-to-memory, and memory-to- memory transmission rates. The average memory-to-memory transmission rate over the wide area ATM network was 8.3 MByte/s, which corresponds to transferring a 40-slice (or, 20- MByte) CT examination to a remote site in less than 3 seconds. With the emerging ATM technology, we believe that ATM-based digital communication network is a suitable choice for large-scale PACS involving both LAN and WAN.

  3. Embryo transfer practices in the United States: a survey of clinics registered with the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungheim, Emily S; Ryan, Ginny L; Levens, Eric D; Cunningham, Alexandra F; Macones, George A; Carson, Kenneth R; Beltsos, Angeline N; Odem, Randall R

    2010-09-01

    To gain a better understanding of factors influencing clinicians' embryo transfer practices. Cross-sectional survey. Web-based survey conducted in December 2008 of individuals practicing IVF in centers registered with the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology (SART). None. None. Prevalence of clinicians reporting following embryo transfer guidelines recommended by the American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM), prevalence among these clinicians to deviate from ASRM guidelines in commonly encountered clinical scenarios, and practice patterns related to single embryo transfer. Six percent of respondents reported following their own, independent guidelines for the number of embryos to transfer after IVF. Of the 94% of respondents who reported routinely following ASRM embryo transfer guidelines, 52% would deviate from these guidelines for patient request, 51% for cycles involving the transfer of frozen embryos, and 70% for patients with previously failed IVF cycles. All respondents reported routinely discussing the risks of multiple gestations associated with standard embryo transfer practices, whereas only 34% reported routinely discussing single embryo transfer with all patients. Although the majority of clinicians responding to our survey reported following ASRM embryo transfer guidelines, at least half would deviate from these guidelines in a number of different situations. Copyright (c) 2010 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. All rights reserved.

  4. Report on dipole-dipole resistivity and technology transfer at the Ahuachapan Geothermal field Ahuachapan, El Salvador

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, J.B. (Geophynque International, Tucson, AZ (United States))

    1988-08-01

    The Ahuachapan Geothermal Field (AGF) is a 90 megawatt geothermal-sourced powerplant operated by the Comision Ejecutiva Hidroelectrica del Rio Lempa (CEL) of El Salvador. During the period November 1987 through May 1988 a deep resistivity survey and technology transfer was performed at the AGF at the request of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) as part of a United States Agency for International Development (USAID) project. The resistivity surveying is ongoing at the time of this report under the supervision of CEL personnel. LANL and contract personnel were present at the site during performance of the initial surveying for the purpose of technology transfer. This report presents the results and interpretation of the two initial resistivity survey lines performed on site during and shortly after the technology transfer period.

  5. Diagnostic Marker for Improving Treatment Outcomes of Hepatitis C | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI Researchers have discovered Interferon-lambda 4 (IFNL4), a protein found through analysis of genomic data. Preliminary studies indicate that this protein may play a role in the clearance of HCV and may be a new target for diagnosing and treating HCV infection. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics (DCEG) Immunoepidemiology Branch is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in in-licensing or collaborative research to further co-develop a gene-based diagnostic for Hepatitis C virus (HepC, HCV).

  6. The transferability of information and communication technology skills from university to the workplace: a qualitative descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bembridge, Elizabeth; Levett-Jones, Tracy; Jeong, Sarah Yeun-Sim

    2011-04-01

    This paper presents the findings from a study that explored whether the information and communication technology (ICT) skills nurses acquired at university are relevant and transferable to contemporary practice environments. Whilst universities have attempted to integrate information and communication technology into nursing curricula it is not known whether the skills developed for educational purposes are relevant or transferable to clinical contexts. A qualitative descriptive study was used to explore the perspectives of a small group of new graduate nurses working in a regional/semi-metropolitan healthcare facility in New South Wales, Australia. Semi-structured interviews were used and the data thematically analysed. The themes that emerged from the study are presented in accordance with the conceptual framework and structured under the three headings of pre-transfer, transition and post-transfer. The transferability of information and communication technology skills from university to the workplace is impacted by a range of educational, individual, organisational and contextual factors. Access to adequate ICT and the necessary training opportunities influences new graduates' work satisfaction and their future employment decisions. The ability to effectively use information and communication technology was viewed as essential to the provision of quality patient care. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A research proposal for investigating the effect of foreign direct investments on technology transfer in the Arabian Gulf (GCC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahat, Kaher; Whelan, Susan

    2015-02-01

    In terms of hosting countries perspectives, Foreign Direct Investments (FDI) could have a positive effect on its developing economy, by transferring, both: resources of finance in addition to the international technology (ITT) (Choi, 1997). Multinational companies (MNC) are engaging in the transferring of the new technology, internally as well as licensing older one; they create "Spillover" (Knowledge) for facilitating the transfer of ITT in line with geographical location, period of investment, and the type of industry. Furthermore, the effect of these spillovers depends on the level of transferring this knowledge based on FDI attraction policies of the host country (Huang, 2009). Considering the Arabian Gulf council countries (GCC) as "FDI- rich hosting countries", who are not seeking for financial resources, i.e., they already have a huge financial capacity for funding their different projects, even though FDI has been powerfully presented in GCC . They saw noticeable increases in FDI inflows beginning in 2002, (www.unctad.org.fdistatistics). Therefore by assumption, FDI inflows to GCC could positively affect their economic growth through transferring the advanced technology, in order to build up their level of technology (productivity growth) as well as their economic diversification strategy. If so how this Knowledge could be diffused and measured in order to maximize its benefit and enhancing the productivity growth, and what is the current status of (GCC).

  8. Microelectronics and nanoelectronics trends, and applications to HEP instrumentation

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2004-01-01

    Lecture 1 : Microelectronics and HEP instrumentation CMOS technology has been the leading technology in microelectronics for more that 30 years thanks to its outstanding capability to miniaturization and low power consumption. A brief history of the microelectronics semiconductor industry is presented with applications for LEP and LHC experiments. Lecture 2: Future trends in microelectronics and nanoelectronics Trends in miniaturization point to the fabrication of ULSI nanoscale CMOS circuits by the end of the decade. Device issues and quantum effects in nanoscale MOS transistor will be discussed. Beyond CMOS technology, several technology avenues based on nanotechnology are under investigation. We will present some promising nanoelectronic devices and circuits based on Single Electron Tunneling (SET) transistor, nanowire, quantum dot and carbon nanotubes. Lecture 3: Monolithic pixel detectors Microvertex detectors for particle physics experiments currently uses hybrid silicon pixel detector. Novel emerging m...

  9. Down syndrome-associated haematopoiesis abnormalities created by chromosome transfer and genome editing technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazuki, Yasuhiro; Yakura, Yuwna; Abe, Satoshi; Osaki, Mitsuhiko; Kajitani, Naoyo; Kazuki, Kanako; Takehara, Shoko; Honma, Kazuhisa; Suemori, Hirofumi; Yamazaki, Satoshi; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Toki, Tsutomu; Shimizu, Ritsuko; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Yamamoto, Takashi; Oshimura, Mitsuo

    2014-08-27

    Infants with Down syndrome (DS) are at a high risk of developing transient abnormal myelopoiesis (TAM). A GATA1 mutation leading to the production of N-terminally truncated GATA1 (GATA1s) in early megakaryocyte/erythroid progenitors is linked to the onset of TAM and cooperated with the effect of trisomy 21 (Ts21). To gain insights into the underlying mechanisms of the progression to TAM in DS patients, we generated human pluripotent stem cells harbouring Ts21 and/or GATA1s by combining microcell-mediated chromosome transfer and genome editing technologies. In vitro haematopoietic differentiation assays showed that the GATA1s mutation blocked erythropoiesis irrespective of an extra chromosome 21, while Ts21 and the GATA1s mutation independently perturbed megakaryopoiesis and the combination of Ts21 and the GATA1s mutation synergistically contributed to an aberrant accumulation of skewed megakaryocytes. Thus, the DS model cells generated by these two technologies are useful in assessing how GATA1s mutation is involved in the onset of TAM in patients with DS.

  10. Reaction-diffusion systems in natural sciences and new technology transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, André A.

    2012-12-01

    Diffusion mechanisms in natural sciences and innovation management involve partial differential equations (PDEs). This is due to their spatio-temporal dimensions. Functional semi-discretized PDEs (with lattice spatial structures or time delays) may be even more adapted to real world problems. In the modeling process, PDEs can also formalize behaviors, such as the logistic growth of populations with migration, and the adopters’ dynamics of new products in innovation models. In biology, these events are related to variations in the environment, population densities and overcrowding, migration and spreading of humans, animals, plants and other cells and organisms. In chemical reactions, molecules of different species interact locally and diffuse. In the management of new technologies, the diffusion processes of innovations in the marketplace (e.g., the mobile phone) are a major subject. These innovation diffusion models refer mainly to epidemic models. This contribution introduces that modeling process by using PDEs and reviews the essential features of the dynamics and control in biological, chemical and new technology transfer. This paper is essentially user-oriented with basic nonlinear evolution equations, delay PDEs, several analytical and numerical methods for solving, different solutions, and with the use of mathematical packages, notebooks and codes. The computations are carried out by using the software Wolfram Mathematica®7, and C++ codes.

  11. Transferability of health technology assessments and economic evaluations: a systematic review of approaches for assessment and application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goeree R

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Ron Goeree1,2, Jing He1,2, Daria O'Reilly1,2, Jean-Eric Tarride1,2, Feng Xie1,2, Morgan Lim1,2, Natasha Burke1,21Programs for Assessment of Technology in Health (PATH Research Institute, St Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton, ON, Canada; 2Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, CanadaBackground: Health technology assessments (HTA generally, and economic evaluations (EE more specifically, have become an integral part of health care decision making around the world. However, these assessments are time consuming and expensive to conduct. Evaluation resources are scarce and therefore priorities need to be set for these assessments and the ability to use information from one country or region in another (geographic transferability is an increasingly important consideration.Objectives: To review the existing approaches, systems, and tools for assessing the geographic transferability potential or guiding the conduct of transferring HTAs and EEs.Methods: A systematic literature review was conducted of several databases, supplemented with web searching, hand searching of journals, and bibliographic searching of identified articles. Systems, tools, checklists, and flow charts to assess, evaluate, or guide the conduct of transferability of HTAs and EEs were identified.Results: Of 282 references identified, 27 articles were reviewed in full text and of these, seven proposed unique systems, tools, checklists, or flow charts specifically for geographic transferability. All of the seven articles identified a checklist of transferability factors to consider, and most articles identified a subset of 'critical' factors for assessing transferability potential. Most of these critical factors related to study quality, transparency of methods, the level of reporting of methods and results, and the applicability of the treatment comparators to the target country. Some authors proposed a sequenced flow chart type approach

  12. Cytotoxic effects of etephon and maleic hydrazide in Vero, Hep2, HepG2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurdakok, Begum; Baydan, Emine; Okur, Hamza; Gurcan, Ismayil Safa

    2014-10-01

    The toxicity of etephon and maleic hydrazide, used as plant growth regulators in agriculture, were reported as low in mammals in previous studies. However, in vitro cytotoxicity studies in mammalian cells are currently missing to understand their toxicity at molecular level. In the current study, the cytotoxicity of these compounds, were studied in Vero (African green monkey kidney epithelium), HepG2 (human hepatocellular carcinoma), Hep2 (human epidermoid cancer) cells by MTT ((3-(4,5-dimetiltiazol-2-il)-2,5-difeniltetrazolium bromure) and LDH (lactate dehydrogenase) assays. Maleic hydrazide had lower IC50 values for all cell lines compared to ethephon. Least cytotoxic effect treated by ethephon were observed in Vero, followed by HepG2 and Hep2. Similarly maleic hydrazide also showed least cytotoxicity on Vero cells, followed by Hep2 and HepG2 cells (p Vero cells, followed by HepG2 and Hep2 cells (p 0.868 (p cells to be supplemented by further studies.

  13. Feasibility survey on the international cooperation concerning technology transfer; Gijutsu iten ni kakawaru kokusai kyoryoku kanosei chosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    This report describes how developed and developing countries deal with or what they think of technology transfer on a global scale which can mitigate climate change. A questionnaire was sent to and an interview was made for reduction technology of CO2 by visiting Thailand, Indonesia, China, Germany, the Netherlands, USA, Canada and Australia. As a result, it was found that every country admits the necessity of implementing the projects comprehensively and systematically on a global scale in order to promote more effective and efficient transfer of technologies necessary for mitigating climate change. Although every country admits in general the necessity of mutual cooperation and adjustment for the technology transfer, many difficulties are anticipated in establishing a framework for coordination of individual projects owing to the differences of opinion among developed countries, conflicting interests, and the North-South problem. Promotion of information sharing on technology transfer using electronic media, holding of joint training courses and joint seminars, conducting of joint surveys, and establishment of an Eco-NGO network are proposed as definite plans of multilateral cooperation. 40 refs., 7 figs., 31 tabs.

  14. Big Data in HEP: A comprehensive use case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutsche, Oliver [Fermilab; Cremonesi, Matteo [Fermilab; Elmer, Peter [Princeton U.; Jayatilaka, Bo [Fermilab; Kowalkowski, Jim [Fermilab; Pivarski, Jim [Princeton U.; Sehrish, Saba [Fermilab; Mantilla Surez, Cristina [Johns Hopkins U.; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey [Princeton U.; Tran, Nhan [Fermilab

    2017-01-31

    Experimental Particle Physics has been at the forefront of analyzing the worlds largest datasets for decades. The HEP community was the rst to develop suitable software and computing tools for this task. In recent times, new toolkits and systems collectively called Big Data technologies have emerged to support the analysis of Petabyte and Exabyte datasets in industry. While the principles of data analysis in HEP have not changed (ltering and transforming experiment-specic data formats), these new technologies use dierent approaches and promise a fresh look at analysis of very large datasets and could potentially reduce the time-to-physics with increased interactivity. In this talk, we present an active LHC Run 2 analysis, searching for dark matter with the CMS detector, as a testbed for Big Data technologies. We directly compare the traditional NTuple-based analysis with an equivalent analysis using Apache Spark on the Hadoop ecosystem and beyond. In both cases, we start the analysis with the ocial experiment data formats and produce publication physics plots. We will discuss advantages and disadvantages of each approach and give an outlook on further studies needed. 1.

  15. Big Data in HEP: A comprehensive use case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutsche, Oliver; Cremonesi, Matteo; Elmer, Peter; Jayatilaka, Bo; Kowalkowski, Jim; Pivarski, Jim; Sehrish, Saba; Mantilla Surez, Cristina; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Tran, Nhan

    2017-10-01

    Experimental Particle Physics has been at the forefront of analyzing the worlds largest datasets for decades. The HEP community was the first to develop suitable software and computing tools for this task. In recent times, new toolkits and systems collectively called Big Data technologies have emerged to support the analysis of Petabyte and Exabyte datasets in industry. While the principles of data analysis in HEP have not changed (filtering and transforming experiment-specific data formats), these new technologies use different approaches and promise a fresh look at analysis of very large datasets and could potentially reduce the time-to-physics with increased interactivity. In this talk, we present an active LHC Run 2 analysis, searching for dark matter with the CMS detector, as a testbed for Big Data technologies. We directly compare the traditional NTuple-based analysis with an equivalent analysis using Apache Spark on the Hadoop ecosystem and beyond. In both cases, we start the analysis with the official experiment data formats and produce publication physics plots. We will discuss advantages and disadvantages of each approach and give an outlook on further studies needed.

  16. Agricultural research for resource-poor farmers: Part I: Transfer-of-technology and farming systems research

    OpenAIRE

    Chambers, R; Jiggins, J.

    1987-01-01

    Metadata only record In this article, the authors argue that there are specific environmental, political, social, and methodological constraints facing resource-poor farmers which impede their agricultural productivity. Consequently, the authors suggest, there must be a reevaluation of agricultural research and the strategies used to transfer technology to farmers. Instead of scientists determining priorities and appropriate technologies, research should facilitate the farmers' selection o...

  17. Technology transfer in human vaccinology: a retrospective review on public sector contributions in a privatizing science field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, Jan

    2012-09-28

    As health intervention, vaccination has had a tremendous impact on reducing mortality and morbidity caused by infectious diseases. Traditionally vaccines were developed and made in the western, industrialised world and from there on gradually and with considerable delay became available for developing countries. Today that is beginning to change. Most vaccine doses are now produced in emerging economies, although industrialised countries still have a lead in vaccine development and in manufacturing innovative vaccines. Technology transfer has been an important mechanism for this increase in production capacity in emerging economies. This review looks back on various technology transfer initiatives and outlines the role of WHO and other public and private partners. It goes into a more detailed description of the role of the National Institute of Public Health and the Environment (RIVM) in Bilthoven, the Netherlands. For many decades RIVM has been providing access to vaccine technology by capacity building and technology transfer initiatives not only through multilateral frameworks, but also on a bilateral basis including a major project in China in the 90 s of the previous century. Looking forward it is expected that, in a globalizing world, the ambition of BRICS countries to play a role in global health will lead to an increase of south-south technology transfers. Further, it is argued that push approaches including technology transfer from the public domain, connecting innovative enabling platforms with competent developing country vaccine manufacturers (DCVM), will be critical to ensure a sustainable supply of affordable and quality vaccines to national immunization programmes in developing countries. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The 5th World Congress of chemical engineering: Technologies critical to a changing world. Volume I: Advanced fundamentals sustainable chemical engineering technology management and transfer international regulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    Volume 1 of the proceedings from the 5th World Congress of Chemical Engineering covers four major topic areas: Advanced Fundamentals, Sustainable Chemical Engineering, Technology Management and Transfer, and International Regulations. Pertinent subtopics include: Instrumentation, Automation, and Process Control; Thermodynamics of Multiphase Solutions; Catalysis, Kinetics, and Reaction Engineering; Separations; Fluid Mechanics and Transport Phenomena; Fluid Mixing Technology; Global Environmental Problems; Super Efficient and Clean Production of Chemicals; Managing Research and Development; Information Technology; and Approaches for Solving the Environmental Challenge. 59 papers were selected from Volume 1 for the database.

  19. The HEP Software and Computing Knowledge Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenaus, T.

    2017-10-01

    HEP software today is a rich and diverse domain in itself and exists within the mushrooming world of open source software. As HEP software developers and users we can be more productive and effective if our work and our choices are informed by a good knowledge of what others in our community have created or found useful. The HEP Software and Computing Knowledge Base, hepsoftware.org, was created to facilitate this by serving as a collection point and information exchange on software projects and products, services, training, computing facilities, and relating them to the projects, experiments, organizations and science domains that offer them or use them. It was created as a contribution to the HEP Software Foundation, for which a HEP S&C knowledge base was a much requested early deliverable. This contribution will motivate and describe the system, what it offers, its content and contributions both existing and needed, and its implementation (node.js based web service and javascript client app) which has emphasized ease of use for both users and contributors.

  20. Research to practice in addiction treatment: key terms and a field-driven model of technology transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    The transfer of new technologies (e.g., evidence-based practices) into substance abuse treatment organizations often occurs long after they have been developed and shown to be effective. Transfer is slowed, in part, due to a lack of clear understanding about all that is needed to achieve full implementation of these technologies. Such misunderstanding is exacerbated by inconsistent terminology and overlapping models of an innovation, including its development and validation, dissemination to the public, and implementation or use in the field. For this reason, a workgroup of the Addiction Technology Transfer Center (ATTC) Network developed a field-driven conceptual model of the innovation process that more precisely defines relevant terms and concepts and integrates them into a comprehensive taxonomy. The proposed definitions and conceptual framework will allow for improved understanding and consensus regarding the distinct meaning and conceptual relationships between dimensions of the technology transfer process and accelerate the use of evidence-based practices. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The Impact of Virtual Collaboration and Collaboration Technologies on Knowledge Transfer and Team Performance in Distributed Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngoma, Ngoma Sylvestre

    2013-01-01

    Virtual teams are increasingly viewed as a powerful determinant of competitive advantage in geographically distributed organizations. This study was designed to provide insights into the interdependencies between virtual collaboration, collaboration technologies, knowledge transfer, and virtual team performance in an effort to understand whether…

  2. Technology Transfer Challenges: A Case Study of User-Centered Design in NASA's Systems Engineering Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quick, Jason

    2009-01-01

    The Upper Stage (US) section of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Ares I rocket will require internal access platforms for maintenance tasks performed by humans inside the vehicle. Tasks will occur during expensive critical path operations at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) including vehicle stacking and launch preparation activities. Platforms must be translated through a small human access hatch, installed in an enclosed worksite environment, support the weight of ground operators and be removed before flight - and their design must minimize additional vehicle mass at attachment points. This paper describes the application of a user-centered conceptual design process and the unique challenges encountered within NASA's systems engineering culture focused on requirements and "heritage hardware". The NASA design team at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) initiated the user-centered design process by studying heritage internal access kits and proposing new design concepts during brainstorming sessions. Simultaneously, they partnered with the Technology Transfer/Innovative Partnerships Program to research inflatable structures and dynamic scaffolding solutions that could enable ground operator access. While this creative, technology-oriented exploration was encouraged by upper management, some design stakeholders consistently opposed ideas utilizing novel, untested equipment. Subsequent collaboration with an engineering consulting firm improved the technical credibility of several options, however, there was continued resistance from team members focused on meeting system requirements with pre-certified hardware. After a six-month idea-generating phase, an intensive six-week effort produced viable design concepts that justified additional vehicle mass while optimizing the human factors of platform installation and use. Although these selected final concepts closely resemble heritage internal access platforms, challenges from the application of the

  3. Challenges of Remote Sensing and Spatial Information Education and Technology Transfer in a Fast Developing Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, F.; Chen, L.-C.

    2014-04-01

    During the past decade, Taiwan has experienced an unusual and fast growing in the industry of mapping, remote sensing, spatial information and related markets. A successful space program and dozens of advanced airborne and ground-based remote sensing instruments as well as mobile mapping systems have been implemented and put into operation to support the vast demands of geospatial data acquisition. Moreover, in addition to the government agencies and research institutes, there are also tens of companies in the private sector providing geo-spatial data and services. However, the fast developing industry is also posing a great challenge to the education sector in Taiwan, especially the higher education for geo-spatial information. Facing this fast developing industry, the demands of skilled professionals and new technologies in order to address diversified needs are indubitably high. Consequently, while delighting in the expanding and prospering benefitted from the fast growing industry, how to fulfill these demands has become a challenge for the remote sensing and spatial information disciplines in the higher education institutes in Taiwan. This paper provides a brief insight into the status of the remote sensing and spatial information industry in Taiwan as well as the challenges of the education and technology transfer to support the increasing demands and to ensure the continuous development of the industry. In addition to the report of the current status of the remote sensing and spatial information related courses and programs in the colleges and universities, current and potential threatening issues and possible resolutions are also discussed in different points of view.

  4. ASCR/HEP Exascale Requirements Review Report

    CERN Document Server

    Habib, Salman; Gerber, Richard; Antypas, Katie; Riley, Katherine; Williams, Tim; Wells, Jack; Straatsma, Tjerk; Almgren, A; Amundson, J; Bailey, S; Bard, D; Bloom, K; Bockelman, B; Borgland, A; Borrill, J; Boughezal, R; Brower, R; Cowan, B; Finkel, H; Frontiere, N; Fuess, S; Ge, L; Gnedin, N; Gottlieb, S; Gutsche, O; Han, T; Heitmann, K; Hoeche, S; Ko, K; Kononenko, O; LeCompte, T; Li, Z; Lukic, Z; Mori, W; Nugent, P; Ng, C -K; Oleynik, G; O'Shea, B; Padmanabhan, N; Petravick, D; Petriello, F J; Power, J; Qiang, J; Reina, L; Rizzo, T J; Ryne, R; Schram, M; Spentzouris, P; Toussaint, D; Vay, J -L; Viren, B; Wurthwein, F; Xiao, L

    2016-01-01

    This draft report summarizes and details the findings, results, and recommendations derived from the ASCR/HEP Exascale Requirements Review meeting held in June, 2015. The main conclusions are as follows. 1) Larger, more capable computing and data facilities are needed to support HEP science goals in all three frontiers: Energy, Intensity, and Cosmic. The expected scale of the demand at the 2025 timescale is at least two orders of magnitude -- and in some cases greater -- than that available currently. 2) The growth rate of data produced by simulations is overwhelming the current ability, of both facilities and researchers, to store and analyze it. Additional resources and new techniques for data analysis are urgently needed. 3) Data rates and volumes from HEP experimental facilities are also straining the ability to store and analyze large and complex data volumes. Appropriately configured leadership-class facilities can play a transformational role in enabling scientific discovery from these datasets. 4) A c...

  5. DD4Hep based event reconstruction

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)683529; Frank, Markus; Gaede, Frank-Dieter; Hynds, Daniel; Lu, Shaojun; Nikiforou, Nikiforos; Petric, Marko; Simoniello, Rosa; Voutsinas, Georgios Gerasimos

    The DD4HEP detector description toolkit offers a flexible and easy-to-use solution for the consistent and complete description of particle physics detectors in a single system. The sub-component DDREC provides a dedicated interface to the detector geometry as needed for event reconstruction. With DDREC there is no need to define an additional, separate reconstruction geometry as is often done in HEP, but one can transparently extend the existing detailed simulation model to be also used for the reconstruction. Based on the extension mechanism of DD4HEP, DDREC allows one to attach user defined data structures to detector elements at all levels of the geometry hierarchy. These data structures define a high level view onto the detectors describing their physical properties, such as measurement layers, point resolutions, and cell sizes. For the purpose of charged particle track reconstruction, dedicated surface objects can be attached to every volume in the detector geometry. These surfaces provide the measuremen...

  6. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO U.S. INDEPENDENT OIL AND NATURAL GAS PRODUCERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donald F. Duttlinger; E. Lance Cole

    2003-12-15

    The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of assisting U.S. independent oil and gas producers to make timely, informed technology decisions. Functioning as a cohesive national organization, PTTC has active grassroots programs through its 10 Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs) and 3 Satellite Offices that encompass all of the oil- and natural gas-producing regions in the U.S. Active volunteer leadership from the Board and regional Producer Advisory Groups keeps activities focused on producer's needs. Technical expertise and personal networks of national and regional staff enable PTTC to deliver focused, technology-related information in a manner that is cost and time effective for independents. The organization effectively combines federal funding through the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy with matching state and industry funding, forming a unique partnership. This final report summarizes PTTC's accomplishments. In this final fiscal year of the contract, activities exceeded prior annual activity levels by significant percentages. Strategic planning implemented during the year is focusing PTTC's attention on changes that will bear fruit in the future. Networking and connections are increasing PTTC's sphere of influence with both producers and the service sector. PTTC's reputation for unbiased bottom-line information stimulates cooperative ventures. In FY03 PTTC's regions held 169 workshops, drawing 8,616 attendees. There were nearly 25,000 reported contacts. This represents a 38% increase in attendance and 34% increase in contacts as compared to FY02 activity. Repeat attendance at regional workshops, a measure of customer satisfaction and value received, remained strong at 50%. 39% of participants in regional workshops respond ''Yes'' on feedback forms when asked if they are applying technologies based on knowledge gained through PTTC. This feedback

  7. THE TRIPS AGREEMENT, INTERNATIONAL TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER AND DEVELOPMENT: SOME LESSONS FROM STRENGTHENING IPR PROTECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Shugurov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on the impact of the TRIPS Agreement provisions on further development of international technology transfer (ITT mainly to developing countries. The authors review the critical specificity of ITT connected with the adoption of TRIPS. Much attention is paid to an analysis of what is most discussed among international experts in the area of the issues on the dual results of stronger intellectual property rights (IPRs concerning various groups of developing countries. Their study also examines a number of problems with implementation of the TRIPS provisions, conducive to ITT, in the context of the TRIPS-plus era as a new stage in strengthening IPR protection. Bearing in mind the fragmentation of the international regime of IPR protection because of the adoption of numerous regional free trade agreements, the authors outline the possible position of advanced developing and least developed countries with respect to using TRIPS potentials for development of ITT under reasonable and just terms, with the aim of overall prosperity.

  8. Commercial objectives, technology transfer, and systems analysis for fusion power development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Stephen O.

    1988-03-01

    Fusion is an essentially inexhaustible source of energy that has the potential for economically attractive commercial applications with excellent safety and environmental characteristics. The primary focus for the fusion-energy development program is the generation of centralstation electricity. Fusion has the potential, however, for many other applications. The fact that a large fraction of the energy released in a DT fusion reaction is carried by high-energy neutrons suggests potentially unique applications. These include breeding of fissile fuels, production of hydrogen and other chemical products, transmutation or “burning” of various nuclear or chemical wastes, radiation processing of materials, production of radioisotopes, food preservation, medical diagnosis and medical treatment, and space power and space propulsion. In addition, fusion R&D will lead to new products and new markets. Each fusion application must meet certain standards of economic and safety and environmental attractiveness. For this reason, economics on the one hand, and safety and environment and licensing on the other hand, are the two primary criteria for setting long-range commercial fusion objectives. A major function of systems analysis is to evaluate the potential of fusion against these objectives and to help guide the fusion R&D program toward practical applications. The transfer of fusion technology and skills from the national laboratories and universities to industry is the key to achieving the long-range objective of commercial fusion applications.

  9. Taiwan industrial cooperation program technology transfer for low-level radioactive waste final disposal - phase I.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knowlton, Robert G.; Cochran, John Russell; Arnold, Bill Walter; Jow, Hong-Nian; Mattie, Patrick D.; Schelling, Frank Joseph Jr. (; .)

    2007-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories and the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taiwan have collaborated in a technology transfer program related to low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal in Taiwan. Phase I of this program included regulatory analysis of LLW final disposal, development of LLW disposal performance assessment capabilities, and preliminary performance assessments of two potential disposal sites. Performance objectives were based on regulations in Taiwan and comparisons to those in the United States. Probabilistic performance assessment models were constructed based on limited site data using software including GoldSim, BLT-MS, FEHM, and HELP. These software codes provided the probabilistic framework, container degradation, waste-form leaching, groundwater flow, radionuclide transport, and cover infiltration simulation capabilities in the performance assessment. Preliminary performance assessment analyses were conducted for a near-surface disposal system and a mined cavern disposal system at two representative sites in Taiwan. Results of example calculations indicate peak simulated concentrations to a receptor within a few hundred years of LLW disposal, primarily from highly soluble, non-sorbing radionuclides.

  10. Determination of technology transfer requirements for enhanced oil recovery. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, T.D.; Scott, J.P.

    1980-09-01

    A detailed field study was conducted to determine the technical information needs of current and potential users of enhanced oil recovery data. Under the direction of the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center (BETC), the study (1) identifies groups which have a need for EOR-related information, (2) delineate the specific information needs of each user-group, and (3) outlines methods for improved transfer of appropriate information to the end users. This study also assesses attitudes toward the EOR-related efforts of the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the BETC, and the role each should play in facilitating the commercialization of EOR processes. More than 300 users and potential users of EOR information were surveyed. Included in the survey sample were representatives of major oil companies, independent oil companies, engineering consulting firms, university and private research organizations, financial institutions and federal, state, and local policy-making bodies. In-depth questionnaires were specifically designed for each group. This study analyzes each group's position pertaining to (1) current level of EOR activity or interest, (2) current and projected EOR information needs, (3) assessments of the BETC's current information services and suggestions for improvement, (4) delineation of technical and economic constraints to increased EOR activity, and (5) steps the DOE might take to enhance the attractiveness of commercial EOR operations.

  11. The Effect of Intercourse around Embryo Transfer on Pregnancy Rate in Assisted Reproductive Technology Cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasim Tabibnejad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Implantation failure is the most important cause of recurrent in vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (IVF/ICSI failure. Several reports suggest that intercourse during theperitransfer period might improve pregnancy rates. This study is designed to determine whetherintercourse during the peritransfer period will improve pregnancy and implantation rates in patientsundergoing IVF or ICSI.Materials and Methods: In a randomized control trial study, 390 women with at least five yearsinfertility were evaluated. In the study group, 195 patients had intercourse at least once 12 hours afterembryo transfer. Implantation and clinical pregnancy rates were compared with 195 patients in thecontrol group who had no intercourse for the entire assisted reproductive technology (ART cycle.Results: Implantation rate in the study group was 6.5% in comparison with 5.5% for the controlgroup. Clinical pregnancy rates were not significantly higher in study patients when compared tothe control group (14.2% and 11.7% respectively.Conclusion: The results showed that intercourse during the peritransfer period can not increasepregnancy outcome.

  12. Review on Enhanced Heat Transfer Techniques using Modern Technologies for 4S Air Cooled Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasubramanian, S.; Bupesh Raja, V. K.

    2017-05-01

    Engine performance is a biggest challenge and a vital area of concern when it comes to automobiles. Researchers across the globe have been working decades together meticulously improvising the performance of engine in terms of efficiency. The durability of the engine components mainly depends on the thermal stress it undergoes over the period of operation. Air cooling of engine is the simplest and most desirous technique that has been adopted for ages. In this regard fins or extended surfaces are employed for effective cooling of the cylinder while in operation. The conductive and convective heat transfer rate from the cylinder to the fins and in turn from the fins to surrounding ambience determines the effective performance of the engine. In this paper an attempt is made to review and summarize the various researches that were conducted on the Fins in terms of profile geometry, number of fins, size, thickness factor, material used etc., and to bring about a long term solution with the modern technologies like nano coatings and nano materials.

  13. Glass Furnace Model (GFM) development and technology transfer program final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lottes, S. A.; Petrick, M.; Energy Systems

    2007-12-04

    indices into the simulation to facilitate optimization studies with regard to productivity, energy use and emissions. Midway through the Part II program, however, at the urging of the industrial consortium members, the decision was made to refocus limited resources on transfer of the existing GFM 2.0 software to the industry to speed up commercialization of the technology. This decision, in turn, necessitated a de-emphasis of the development of the planned final version of the GFM software that had full multiphase capability, GFM 3.0. As a result, version 3.0 was not completed; considerable progress, however, was made before the effort was terminated. The objectives of the Technology Transfer program were to transfer the Glass Furnace Model (GFM) to the glass industry and to promote its widespread use by providing the requisite technical support to allow effective use of the software. GFM Version 2.0 was offered at no cost on a trial, six-month basis to expedite its introduction to and use by the industry. The trial licenses were issued to generate a much more thorough user beta test of the software than the relatively small amount completed by the consortium members prior to the release of version 2.0.

  14. Benefits of diverse and interdisciplinary co-creation for HEP - a showcase

    CERN Document Server

    Castro, Cristina Bahamonde; Dopke, Jens; Kagan, Michael; Kaufmann, Sylvain; Knaepper, Ines; Kurikka, Joona; Milano, Leonardo; Muranaka, Tomoko; Pascu, Iulia; Potamianos, Karolos; Schweiger, Hansdieter; Utriainen, Tuuli; Perez Codina, Estel; Dobos, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    THE Port association organises interdisciplinary co-creational humanitarian hackathons at CERN. Combining physicists and engineers working on HEP related topics in their day job with entrepreneurs, artists, researchers, designers, humanitarian workers and other creative minds helps identifying similar material and engineering solutions for humanitarian challenges. It allow cross collaboration between many different disciplines. Concentrating on humanitarian and social benefitting topics the technology opportunities identify new methods, materials and processes, that can be feed back into HEP. The methodology of humanitarian hackathons is described and some examples of challenge outcomes are showcased.

  15. CompHEP: developments and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boos, E. E.; Bunichev, V. E.; Dubinin, M. N.; Ilyin, V. A.; Savrin, V. I.; CompHEP Collaboration

    2017-11-01

    New developments of the CompHEP package and its applications to the top quark and the Higgs boson physics at the LHC collider are reviewed. These developments were motivated mainly by the needs of experimental searches of DO (Tevatron) and CMS (LHC) collaborations where identification of the top quark and the Higgs boson in the framework of the Standard Model (SM) or possible extensions of the SM played an important role. New useful features of the CompHEP Graphics User Interface (GUI) are described.

  16. Knowledge management aiming to technology transfer: the challenges face by the tic of the state university of Santa Cruz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luan Carlos Santos Silva

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The present article discusses the concept of organizational knowledge, and theory models for the creation and management of organizational knowledge that, in many approaches, do not take into account the specificity of each organization and the relationship. The paper analyses the innovation dynamics and the technology transfer from Technological Innovation Centers (TIC to the productive sector. The methodology employed was qualitative and of descriptive nature. The method used in the research was a case study in a TIC well-structured in respect to the constitution of the TICs from the perspective of the Federal Innovation Law nº 10.973 of the Innovation Law of the Bahia State nº 11.174. Barriers for knowledge creation and management that guarantee the effective technology transfer were identified.

  17. Technology transfer with system analysis, design, decision making, and impact (Survey-2000) in acute care hospitals in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatcher, M

    2001-10-01

    This paper provides the results of the Survey-2000 measuring technology transfer for management information systems in health care. The relationships with systems approaches, user involvement, usersatisfaction, and decision-making were measured and are presented. The survey also measured the levels Internet and Intranet presents in acute care hospitals, which will be discussed in future articles. The depth of the survey includes e-commerce for both business to business and customers. These results are compared, where appropriate, with results from survey 1997 and changes are discussed. This information will provide benchmarks for hospitals to plan their network technology position and to set goals. This is the first of three articles based upon the results of the Srvey-2000. Readers are referred to a prior article by the author that discusses the survey design and provides a tutorial on technology transfer in acute care hospitals.

  18. The Widening Gulf between Genomics Data Generation and Consumption: A Practical Guide to Big Data Transfer Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feltus, Frank A.; Breen, Joseph R.; Deng, Juan; Izard, Ryan S.; Konger, Christopher A.; Ligon, Walter B.; Preuss, Don; Wang, Kuang-Ching

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, high-throughput DNA sequencing has become a disruptive technology and pushed the life sciences into a distributed ecosystem of sequence data producers and consumers. Given the power of genomics and declining sequencing costs, biology is an emerging “Big Data” discipline that will soon enter the exabyte data range when all subdisciplines are combined. These datasets must be transferred across commercial and research networks in creative ways since sending data without thought can have serious consequences on data processing time frames. Thus, it is imperative that biologists, bioinformaticians, and information technology engineers recalibrate data processing paradigms to fit this emerging reality. This review attempts to provide a snapshot of Big Data transfer across networks, which is often overlooked by many biologists. Specifically, we discuss four key areas: 1) data transfer networks, protocols, and applications; 2) data transfer security including encryption, access, firewalls, and the Science DMZ; 3) data flow control with software-defined networking; and 4) data storage, staging, archiving and access. A primary intention of this article is to orient the biologist in key aspects of the data transfer process in order to frame their genomics-oriented needs to enterprise IT professionals. PMID:26568680

  19. The Widening Gulf between Genomics Data Generation and Consumption: A Practical Guide to Big Data Transfer Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feltus, Frank A; Breen, Joseph R; Deng, Juan; Izard, Ryan S; Konger, Christopher A; Ligon, Walter B; Preuss, Don; Wang, Kuang-Ching

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, high-throughput DNA sequencing has become a disruptive technology and pushed the life sciences into a distributed ecosystem of sequence data producers and consumers. Given the power of genomics and declining sequencing costs, biology is an emerging "Big Data" discipline that will soon enter the exabyte data range when all subdisciplines are combined. These datasets must be transferred across commercial and research networks in creative ways since sending data without thought can have serious consequences on data processing time frames. Thus, it is imperative that biologists, bioinformaticians, and information technology engineers recalibrate data processing paradigms to fit this emerging reality. This review attempts to provide a snapshot of Big Data transfer across networks, which is often overlooked by many biologists. Specifically, we discuss four key areas: 1) data transfer networks, protocols, and applications; 2) data transfer security including encryption, access, firewalls, and the Science DMZ; 3) data flow control with software-defined networking; and 4) data storage, staging, archiving and access. A primary intention of this article is to orient the biologist in key aspects of the data transfer process in order to frame their genomics-oriented needs to enterprise IT professionals.

  20. Catchment monitoring technologies to identify critical source areas and times for nitrate transfer to streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melland, A. R.; Mellander, P.-E.; Murphy, P. N. C.; Wall, D. P.; Mechan, S.; Shine, O.; Shortle, G.; Jordan, P.

    2012-04-01

    Farm nutrient management policies under the Nitrates Directive in Europe are most effective in improving stream water quality where they target farm nutrient sources that are highly connected with streams. A suite of technologies and sampling protocols were used to measure spatial and temporal interactions between farms, farm practice and stream water chemistry in two temperate catchments (Arable A, 11.16 km2 and Arable B, 9.48 km2) with intensive cereal cropping and medium to high intensity grassland. Arable A consisted of well drained soils and layers of permeable geology whereas Arable B was underlain by a heterogeneous mix of moderate to poorly drained soils and geology. Sub-hourly measures at end-of-catchment and monthly longitudinal surveys of total oxidized nitrogen (TON) concentrations and other analytes in streams, monthly groundwater samples in spatially representative multi-level monitoring wells and field-scale farm nutrient management activities were recorded over two water years (October 2009 to September 2011). Annual loads of TON in streamflow ranged from 15.5 to 34.7 kg ha-1 yr-1 across years and catchments. Flow-weighted mean TON concentrations were 5.68 and 6.18 mg L-1 in Arable A and 5.04 and 5.39 mg L-1 in Arable B in the first and second water years, respectively. Total oxidised nitrogen concentrations became diluted by quickflow during storms in both catchments. In Arable A baseflow TON concentrations at the catchment outlet varied little throughout the year whereas in Arable B TON concentrations were similar to Arable A during winter but decreased by about 40% during summer, indicating disconnection and/or transformation of TON sources during the concomitant lower flows. Spatial analysis identified that diffuse TON sources in a localised, critical source area of the catchment were responsible for the high stream TON concentrations during winter. Processes of TON transfer to streams differed between the catchments with discharge of

  1. An Interactive Decision Support System for Technology Transfer Pertaining to Organization and Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-07-01

    traits . Characteristics that are identified by Stogdill (1974:75) as being task related are: 105 achievement drive or desire to excel, drive for...Technology Technology Technology Technology Technology DSS Concepts Definition , 151 Leadership Styles 153 As An Organizational Variable 157 And...of organizations and the human leadership role; traditional management science focusing on planning, scheduling, and inventory; the study of

  2. Singlet oxygen triplet energy transfer-based imaging technology for mapping protein-protein proximity in intact cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Tsz-Leung; Fadul, Michael J; Shu, Xiaokun

    2014-06-06

    Many cellular processes are carried out by large protein complexes that can span several tens of nanometres. Whereas forster resonance energy transfer has a detection range of technology with a detection range of up to several tens of nanometres: singlet oxygen triplet energy transfer. We demonstrate that our method confirms the topology of a large protein complex in intact cells, which spans from the endoplasmic reticulum to the outer mitochondrial membrane and the matrix. This new method is thus suited for mapping protein proximity in large protein complexes.

  3. PRODUCTIVE PROGRESS IN A GOAT PRODUCERS ASSOCIATION, "CAPRINOCULTORES UNIDOS DE GUANAJUATO AC", THROUGH A TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER SYSTEM GGAVATT (LIVESTOCK VALIDATION AND TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER GROUP) (2001-2007)

    OpenAIRE

    Jose Oliveros-Oliveros; Javier Morales-Arzate; Héctor Marío Andrade-Montemayor

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze the effect of technology adoption on milk goat producers in central México. The association has 13 producers, with an average age 41.5 years old, the average schooling reaches junior high school (3rd year), and  a mean of 6 dependants per family. This association has an average number of 246 female goats per herd, a total of 3447 females, and 2190 females in production control. The income in relation to investment is 36%. Technological practices implement...

  4. Processing Contexts for Experimental HEP Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paterno, Marc [Fermilab; Green, Chris [Fermilab

    2017-02-06

    This document provides, for those not closely associated with the experimental High Energy Physics (HEP) community, an introduction to data input and output requirements for a variety of data processing tasks. Examples in it are drawn from the art event processing framework, and from experiments and projects using art, most notably the LArSoft and NuTools projects.

  5. HEP meets ML award talk : XGBoost

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; CHEN, Tianqi

    2015-01-01

    Tianqi Chen and Tong He (team crowwork) have provided very early in the challenge to all participants XGBoost (for eXtreme Gradient Boosted). It is a parallelised software to train boost decision trees, which has been effectively used by many participants to the challenge. For this, they have won the "HEP meets ML" award which is the invitation to CERN happening today.

  6. Implementation of the HEPS Schoolkit: initial steps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simovska, Venka; Woynarovska, Barbara; Samdal, Oddrun

    This report is an output of one of the work packages of the HEPS project (WP8, Research on Implementation). It is based on a survey administered with the SHE national coordinators, and additional interviews related to the survey. The purpose is to learn at early stages of implementation, to combine...

  7. The path toward HEP High Performance Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Apostolakis, John; Carminati, Federico; Gheata, Andrei; Wenzel, Sandro

    2014-01-01

    High Energy Physics code has been known for making poor use of high performance computing architectures. Efforts in optimising HEP code on vector and RISC architectures have yield limited results and recent studies have shown that, on modern architectures, it achieves a performance between 10% and 50% of the peak one. Although several successful attempts have been made to port selected codes on GPUs, no major HEP code suite has a 'High Performance' implementation. With LHC undergoing a major upgrade and a number of challenging experiments on the drawing board, HEP cannot any longer neglect the less-than-optimal performance of its code and it has to try making the best usage of the hardware. This activity is one of the foci of the SFT group at CERN, which hosts, among others, the Root and Geant4 project. The activity of the experiments is shared and coordinated via a Concurrency Forum, where the experience in optimising HEP code is presented and discussed. Another activity is the Geant-V project, centred on th...

  8. GSDC: A Unique Data Center in Korea for HEP research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahn Sang-Un

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Global Science experimental Data hub Center (GSDC at Korea Institute of Science and Technology Information (KISTI is a unique data center in South Korea established for promoting the fundamental research fields by supporting them with the expertise on Information and Communication Technology (ICT and the infrastructure for High Performance Computing (HPC, High Throughput Computing (HTC and Networking. GSDC has supported various research fields in South Korea dealing with the large scale of data, e.g. RENO experiment for neutrino research, LIGO experiment for gravitational wave detection, Genome sequencing project for bio-medical, and HEP experiments such as CDF at FNAL, Belle at KEK, and STAR at BNL. In particular, GSDC has run a Tier-1 center for ALICE experiment using the LHC at CERN since 2013. In this talk, we present the overview on computing infrastructure that GSDC runs for the research fields and we discuss on the data center infrastructure management system deployed at GSDC.

  9. GSDC: A Unique Data Center in Korea for HEP research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sang-Un

    2017-04-01

    Global Science experimental Data hub Center (GSDC) at Korea Institute of Science and Technology Information (KISTI) is a unique data center in South Korea established for promoting the fundamental research fields by supporting them with the expertise on Information and Communication Technology (ICT) and the infrastructure for High Performance Computing (HPC), High Throughput Computing (HTC) and Networking. GSDC has supported various research fields in South Korea dealing with the large scale of data, e.g. RENO experiment for neutrino research, LIGO experiment for gravitational wave detection, Genome sequencing project for bio-medical, and HEP experiments such as CDF at FNAL, Belle at KEK, and STAR at BNL. In particular, GSDC has run a Tier-1 center for ALICE experiment using the LHC at CERN since 2013. In this talk, we present the overview on computing infrastructure that GSDC runs for the research fields and we discuss on the data center infrastructure management system deployed at GSDC.

  10. ELEC-2002: Electronics in HEP

    CERN Multimedia

    Davide Vitè

    2002-01-01

    ELEC-2002 is a 15-session modern electronic course, given by CERN physicists and engineers, in a new format within the framework of the Technical Training Programme. This course is designed for people who are not electronics specialists, for example physicists, engineers and technicians working at or visiting the laboratory, who use or will use electronics in their present or future activities, in particular in the context of the LHC accelerator and experiments. ELEC-2002 is composed of two terms: sessions take place on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 14h00 to 16h30. Spring term: Integrated circuits and VLSI technology for physics (April 2002) Introduction to VLSI (Paulo Moreira, 9 April) Basic digital design (Paulo Moreira, 11 April) Analogue design technologies (Francis Anghinolfi, 16 April) Radiation effects in electronics devices and circuits (Federico Faccio, 18 April) Digital design: design methodology and tools (Jorgen Christiansen, 23 April) Digital design: production (Jorgen Christiansen, 25 Apr...

  11. ELEC-2002: Electronics in HEP

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    ELEC-2002 is a 15-session modern electronic course, given by CERN physicists and engineers, in a new format within the framework of the Technical Training Programme. This course is designed for people who are not electronics specialists, for example physicists, engineers and technicians working at or visiting the laboratory, who use or will use electronics in their present or future activities, in particular in the context of the LHC accelerator and experiments. ELEC-2002 will composed of two terms: sessions will take place on Tuesdays and Thursdays, from 14h00 to 16h30, in the Training Centre Auditorium, bldg. 593.   Winter term: Readout and system electronics for physics (January-February 2002) Introduction: the basics of electronics. Review of electrical circuits: Laplace transforms, transfer functions, RC-CR networks. Transistors, operational amplifiers and applications, transmission lines. (Philippe Farthouat, 15 January) Analogue signal processing. Preamplifiers and shapers; noise in ele...

  12. Technology Transfer from Particle Physics and Space Research ­ CERN-ESA Stand at Hannover Messe 2014

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    In April 2014, for the first time, CERN and ESA took part together to the Hannover Messe, one of the world`s largest industrial fairs (170000 visitors). The stand was organized by the Technology Transfer Offices of the two Organizations as a first visible implementation of a bilateral collaboration agreement recently signed. Several spin-off companies from both Organizations could promote their products on the stand and some very high potential impact technologies were showcased (including for instance the advanced composite materials under development in the frame of EuCARD-2).

  13. Technology transfer and knowledge management in cooperation networks: the Airzone case; Transferencia y gestion del conocimiento en las redes de cooperacion: El caso de Airzone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benavides Velasco, C. A.; Quintana Garcia, C.

    2007-07-01

    This paper highlights the importance of cooperation networks between the public system of R and D and industry to promote technology transfer, knowledge management, and the consolidation and growth of new technology firms. Through the case of Air zone,his paper shows the significance of collaboration agreements between University and industry to enhance technology transfer and the success of entrepreneurial projects. (Author) 28 refs.

  14. Assessing the effectiveness of technology transfer from U.S. government R&D laboratories: impact of market orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozeman, Barry; Coker, Karen

    1992-05-01

    This study, based on a national survey of U.S. government laboratories, assesses the degree of success laboratories have had in transferring technology to industry, taking into account the laboratories' differing receptivity to market influences. Three success criteria are considered here, two based on self-evaluations and a third based on the number of technology licenses issued from the laboratory. The two self-evaluations are rooted in different types of effectiveness, `getting technology out the door,' in one case, and, in the other, having a demonstrable commercial impact. A core hypothesis of the study is that the two types of effectiveness will be responsive to different factors and, in particular, the laboratories with a clearer market orientation will have a higher degree of success on the commercial impact and technology license criteria. Overall, the results seem to suggest that multifaceted, multimission laboratories are likely to enjoy the most success in technology transfer, especially if they have relatively low levels of bureaucratization and either ties to industry (particularly direct financial ties) or a commercial orientation in the selection of projects.

  15. A Holistic Approach for Addressing the Issue of Effective Technology Transfer in the Frame of Climate Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charikleia Karakosta

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Climate change policy and sustainable development issues and goals are closely intertwined. Recognizing the dual relationship between sustainable development and climate change points to a need for the exploration of actions that jointly address sustainable development and climate change. Technology transfer is considered an issue with growing interest worldwide and has been recognized as the key in supporting countries to achieve sustainable development, while addressing climate change challenges. This study presents an integrated decision support methodological framework for the formulation and evaluation of activities to promote technology transfer, as well as the provision of clear recommendations and strategies for framing specific policy in the context of climate change. The philosophy of the proposed approach, under the name: assess-identify-define (AID, consists of three components, where each one focuses on a particular problem. The methodology is integrated using appropriate tools in the information decision support system for effective technology transfer (DSS-ΕTT. The pilot application of the proposed methodology, in five representative developing countries, provided the possibility to evaluate the characteristics of the adopted methodology in terms of completeness, usability, extensionality, as well as analysis of results reliability.

  16. Stabilizing the boundary between US politics and science: the role of the Office of Technology Transfer as a boundary organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guston, D H

    1999-02-01

    The sociological study of boundary-work and the political-ecomomic approach of principal-agent theory can be complementary ways of examining the relationship between society and science: boundary-work provides the empirical nuance to the principal-agent scheme, and principal-agent theory provides structure to the thick boundary description. This paper motivates this complementarity to examine domestic technology transfer in the USA from the intramural laboratories of the US National Institutes of Health (NIH). It casts US policy for technology transfer in the principal-agent framework, in which politicians attempt to manage the moral hazard of the productivity of research by providing specific incentives to the agents for engaging in measurable research-based innovation. Such incentives alter the previously negotiated boundary between politics and science. The paper identifies the crucial role of the NIH Office of Technology Transfer (OTT) as a boundary organization, which medicates the new boundary negotiations in its routine work, and stabilizes the boundary by performing successfully as an agent for both politicians and scientists. The paper hypothesizes that boundary organizations like OTT are general phenomena at the boundary between politics and science.

  17. Activities of the NASA sponsored SRI technology applications team in transferring aerospace technology to the public sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berke, J. G.

    1971-01-01

    The organization and functions of an interdisciplinary team for the application of aerospace generated technology to the solution of discrete technological problems within the public sector are presented. The interdisciplinary group formed at Stanford Research Institute, California is discussed. The functions of the group are to develop and conduct a program not only optimizing the match between public sector technological problems in criminalistics, transportation, and the postal services and potential solutions found in the aerospace data base, but ensuring that appropriate solutions are acutally utilized. The work accomplished during the period from July 1, 1970 to June 30, 1971 is reported.

  18. Assisted reproductive technology use, embryo transfer practices, and birth outcomes after infertility insurance mandates: New Jersey and Connecticut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Sara; Boulet, Sheree L; Jamieson, Denise J; Stone, Carol; Mullen, Jewel; Kissin, Dmitry M

    2016-02-01

    To explore whether recently enacted infertility mandates including coverage for assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment in New Jersey (2001) and Connecticut (2005) increased ART use, improved embryo transfer practices, and decreased multiple birth rates. Retrospective cohort study using data from the National ART Surveillance System. We explored trends in ART use, embryo transfer practices and birth outcomes, and compared changes in practices and outcomes during a 2-year period before and after passing the mandate between mandate and non-mandate states. Not applicable. Cycles of ART performed in the United States between 1996 and 2013. Infertility insurance mandates including coverage for ART treatment passed in New Jersey (2001) and Connecticut (2005). Number of ART cycles performed, number of embryos transferred, multiple live birth rates. Both New Jersey and Connecticut experienced an increase in ART use greater than the non-mandate states. The mean number of embryos transferred decreased significantly in New Jersey and Connecticut; however, the magnitudes were not significantly different from non-mandate states. There was no significant change in ART birth outcomes in either mandate state except for an increase in live births in Connecticut; the magnitude was not different from non-mandate states. The infertility insurance mandates passed in New Jersey and Connecticut were associated with increased ART treatment use but not a decrease in the number of embryos transferred or the rate of multiples; however, applicability of the mandates was limited. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Performance study of GPUs in real-time trigger applications for HEP experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketchum, W.; /Chicago U.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Bastieri, D.; Bauce, M.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Catastini, P.; /Fermilab; Gelain, S.; /Padua U.; Hahn, K.; /Fermilab; Kim, Y.K.; /Fermilab /Chicago U.; Liu, T.; /Fermilab; Lucchesi, D.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Urso, G.

    2011-06-01

    Graphical Processing Units (GPUs) have evolved into highly parallel, multi-threaded, multicore powerful processors with high memory bandwidth. GPUs are used in a variety of intensive computing applications. The combination of highly parallel architecture and high memory bandwidth makes GPUs a potentially promising technology for effective real-time processing for High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments. However, not much is known of their performance in real-time applications that require low latency, such as the trigger for HEP experiments. We describe an R and D project with the goal to study the performance of GPU technology for possible low latency applications, performing basic operations as well as some more advanced HEP lower-level trigger algorithms (such as fast tracking or jet finding). We present some preliminary results on timing measurements, comparing the performance of a CPU versus a GPU with NVIDIA's CUDA general-purpose parallel computing architecture, carried out at CDF's Level-2 trigger test stand. These studies will provide performance benchmarks for future studies to investigate the potential and limitations of GPUs for real-time applications in HEP experiments.

  20. Operational Research for Developing Countries - a case of transfer of technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidal, Rene Victor Valqui; Ravn, Hans V.

    1986-01-01

    This paper is concerned with some fundamental aspects of the process of transfer of operational research from the industrialized countries to the Third World. Two complementary conceptions of operational research are identified: technical and social operational research. The main contribution...

  1. Social technology transfer? Movement of social science knowledge beyond the academy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stöckelová, Tereza

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 2 (2012), s. 148-161 ISSN 0959-3543 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP403/09/P203 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70280505 Keywords : impact, knowledge transfer * knowledge transfer * Roma expertise Subject RIV: AO - Sociology, Demography Impact factor: 0.684, year: 2012 http://tap.sagepub.com/content/22/2/148.abstract

  2. ELECTRONIC FUNDS TRANSFER IN MONEY LAUNDERING CRIME: REGULATION NEEDED IN RESPONSE TO MEETING OF TECHNOLOGY AND CRIME IN INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Go Lisanawati

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Advancements in information technology have affected modern society in numerous areas, including communication, education, commerce, and so on. These advancements have brought incredible benefits; they have also provided opportunities and motivation for various forms of crime. Information technology has also made crime highly profitable. Among the many types of criminal activities, modern technology has allowed money laundering to become an online crime. This new type of crime has raised some legal questions about the capability of national and international regulations in relation to current and upcoming issues. These include finding electronic funds transfer records after the fact, and determining money laundering activity that includes electronic funds transfer. Although Indonesia is an integral member of a community concerned with the interaction between technology and money laundering, it has not provided regulations to deal with the current and upcoming issues involving the crime of electronic money laundering. The increase in the amount of crime indicates the following series of techniques and mechanisms that had been detected in relation to money laundering activity. This research will examine current issues under the light of Indonesian regulations, and will put forward some proposals to close the legal vacuum.

  3. Modelling hadronic interactions in HEP MC generators

    CERN Document Server

    Skands, Peter

    2015-01-01

    HEP event generators aim to describe high-energy collisions in full exclusive detail. They combine perturbative matrix elements and parton showers with dynamical models of less well-understood phenomena such as hadronization, diffraction, and the so-called underlying event. We briefly summarise some of the main concepts relevant to the modelling of soft/inclusive hadron interactions in MC generators, in particular PYTHIA, with emphasis on questions recently highlighted by LHC data.

  4. PRODUCTIVE PROGRESS IN A GOAT PRODUCERS ASSOCIATION, "CAPRINOCULTORES UNIDOS DE GUANAJUATO AC", THROUGH A TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER SYSTEM GGAVATT (LIVESTOCK VALIDATION AND TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER GROUP (2001-2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Oliveros-Oliveros

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to analyze the effect of technology adoption on milk goat producers in central México. The association has 13 producers, with an average age 41.5 years old, the average schooling reaches junior high school (3rd year, and  a mean of 6 dependants per family. This association has an average number of 246 female goats per herd, a total of 3447 females, and 2190 females in production control. The income in relation to investment is 36%. Technological practices implemented to date and the percentage of use are: Weighing milk (100%, Animal Nutrition consulting (71%, Estrus synchronization and reproductive management techniques (40%, Gestation Diagnosis (93%, Brucellosis control herd program (100%, Artificial kids raising in slat (46%, Disease diagnosis and management (61%, Certification of good milking practice (53%, Linear and genetics evaluation (87% Evaluation of genetic records ( 61%, Forage  conservation by silage (93%, Milk components analysis (100%, dispersion of genetic material (71%, Analysis and data processing for replacement selection and animal sale (Sire and females(100%, Bacteriological analysis of milk (93%, Cryoscopic point of milk (100%, and Diagnosis of subclinical mastitis (cytometryc flow (100%. An 80% of the producers have adopted different practices, and the association has promoted and implemented different programs such as: control milk production, milk quality, genealogical records, disease control, marketing in group, sales of fluid milk and dehydration of milk for conservation and sale. Accordingly to such practices, results are as follows: 11,180 kids born, from which 52% were females and 48% males, with 56.9%, 24.3%, 15.7% and 2.9% of double, triple, simple and quadruple births, respectively. The mean birth weight was 3.32 kg and 15.7 kg weaning at 60 days, with a daily gain weight (DGW of 206.33 g. For milk production, 3534 lactations were analyzed from 1999 to 2007 in a 90.4% of animals

  5. The Use of HepRep in GLAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perl, Joseph

    2003-07-10

    HepRep is a generic, hierarchical format for description of graphics representables that can be augmented by physics information and relational properties. It was developed for high energy physics event display applications and is especially suited to client/server or component frameworks. The GLAST experiment, an international effort led by NASA for a gamma-ray telescope to launch in 2006, chose HepRep to provide a flexible, extensible and maintainable framework for their event display without tying their users to any one graphics application. To support HepRep in their GUADI infrastructure, GLAST developed a HepRep filler and builder architecture. The architecture hides the details of XML and CORBA in a set of base and helper classes allowing physics experts to focus on what data they want to represent. GLAST has two GAUDI services: HepRepSvc, which registers HepRep fillers in a global registry and allows the HepRep to be exported to XML, and CorbaSvc, which allows the HepRep to be published through a CORBA interface and which allows the client application to feed commands back to GAUDI (such as start next event, or run some GAUDI algorithm). GLAST's HepRep solution gives users a choice of client applications, WIRED (written in Java) or FRED (written in C++ and Ruby), and leaves them free to move to any future HepRep-compliant event display.

  6. Knowledge from Research and Practice on the Barriers and Carriers to Successful Technology Transfer for Assistive Technology Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahy, James A.; Lane, Joseph P.

    2010-01-01

    Historically, the assistive technology (AT) industry is made up of small to medium size companies serving relatively small markets with products characterized as "niche" or "orphan" products. Presenting opportunities to AT companies that are created by outside sources is difficult. Presenting such opportunities to companies serving larger markets…

  7. Defining Moments: Selected Highlights from 25 Years of Missile Defense Technology Development and Transfer. A Technology Applications Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-23

    the fibers could be manufactured and effectively used. MATECH’s equipment for making HfC fibers resembles a pasta machine. It uses solid pre-ceramic...40 (Heat) Sinks in Space (Metal Matrix Cast Composites ...72 Flexing Polymer Muscles ( Composite Technology Development, Inc

  8. The role of IAEA in coordinating research and transferring technology in radiation chemistry and processing of polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haji-Saeid, M. [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Wagramer Strasse 5, A-1400 Vienna (Austria)], E-mail: M.Haji-Saeid@iaea.org; Sampa, M.H.; Ramamoorthy, N. [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Wagramer Strasse 5, A-1400 Vienna (Austria); Gueven, O. [Hacettepe University, Department of Chemistry, Ankara (Turkey); Chmielewski, A.G. [Faculty of Chemical and Process Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Warsaw (Poland)

    2007-12-15

    The IAEA has been playing a significant role in fostering developments in radiation technology in general and radiation processing of polymers in particular, among its Member States (MS) and facilitate know-how/technology transfer to developing MS. The former is usually achieved through coordinated research projects (CRP) and thematic technical meetings, while the latter is mainly accomplished through technical cooperation (TC) projects. Coordinated research projects encourage research on, and development and practical application of, radiation technology to foster exchange of scientific and technical information. The technical cooperation (TC) programme helps Member States to realize their development priorities through the application of appropriate radiation technology. The IAEA has implemented several coordinated research projects (CRP) recently, including one on-going project, in the field of radiation processing of polymeric materials. The CRPs facilitated the acquisition and dissemination of know-how and technology for controlling of degradation effects in radiation processing of polymers, radiation synthesis of stimuli-responsive membranes, hydrogels and absorbents for separation purposes and the use of radiation processing to prepare biomaterials for applications in medicine. The IAEA extends cooperation to well-known international conferences dealing with radiation technology to facilitate participation of talented scientists from developing MS and building collaborations. The IAEA published technical documents, covering the findings of thematic technical meetings (TM) and coordinated research projects have been an important source of valuable practical information.

  9. Prior knowledge transfer across transcriptional data sets and technologies using compositional statistics yields new mislabelled ovarian cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blayney, Jaine K; Davison, Timothy; McCabe, Nuala; Walker, Steven; Keating, Karen; Delaney, Thomas; Greenan, Caroline; Williams, Alistair R; McCluggage, W Glenn; Capes-Davis, Amanda; Harkin, D Paul; Gourley, Charlie; Kennedy, Richard D

    2016-09-30

    Here, we describe gene expression compositional assignment (GECA), a powerful, yet simple method based on compositional statistics that can validate the transfer of prior knowledge, such as gene lists, into independent data sets, platforms and technologies. Transcriptional profiling has been used to derive gene lists that stratify patients into prognostic molecular subgroups and assess biomarker performance in the pre-clinical setting. Archived public data sets are an invaluable resource for subsequent in silico validation, though their use can lead to data integration issues. We show that GECA can be used without the need for normalising expression levels between data sets and can outperform rank-based correlation methods. To validate GECA, we demonstrate its success in the cross-platform transfer of gene lists in different domains including: bladder cancer staging, tumour site of origin and mislabelled cell lines. We also show its effectiveness in transferring an epithelial ovarian cancer prognostic gene signature across technologies, from a microarray to a next-generation sequencing setting. In a final case study, we predict the tumour site of origin and histopathology of epithelial ovarian cancer cell lines. In particular, we identify and validate the commonly-used cell line OVCAR-5 as non-ovarian, being gastrointestinal in origin. GECA is available as an open-source R package. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  10. Cleavage stage versus blastocyst stage embryo transfer in assisted reproductive technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glujovsky, Demián; Blake, Debbie; Farquhar, Cindy; Bardach, Ariel

    2012-07-11

    Advances in cell culture media have led to a shift in in vitro fertilization (IVF) practice from early cleavage embryo transfer to blastocyst stage transfer. The rationale for blastocyst culture is to improve both uterine and embryonic synchronicity and enable self selection of viable embryos thus resulting in higher implantation rates. To determine if blastocyst stage (Day 5 to 6) embryo transfers (ETs) improve live birth rate and other associated outcomes compared with cleavage stage (Day 2 to 3) ETs. Cochrane Menstrual Disorders and Subfertility Group Specialised Register of controlled trials, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE, EMBASE and Bio extracts. The last search date was 21 February 2012. Trials were included if they were randomised and compared the effectiveness of early cleavage versus blastocyst stage transfers. Of the 50 trials that were identified, 23 randomised controlled trials (RCTs) met the inclusion criteria and were reviewed (five new studies were added in this update). The primary outcome was rate of live birth. Secondary outcomes were rates per couple of clinical pregnancy, cumulative clinical pregnancy, multiple pregnancy, high order pregnancy, miscarriage, failure to transfer embryos and cryopreservation. Quality assessment, data extraction and meta-analysis were performed following Cochrane guidelines. Twelve RCTs reported live birth rates and there was evidence of a significant difference in live birth rate per couple favouring blastocyst culture (1510 women, Peto OR 1.40, 95% CI 1.13 to 1.74) (Day 2 to 3: 31%; Day 5 to 6: 38.8%, I(2) = 40%). This means that for a typical rate of 31% in clinics that use early cleavage stage cycles, the rate of live births would increase to 32% to 42% if clinics used blastocyst transfer.There was no difference in clinical pregnancy rate between early cleavage and blastocyst transfer in the 23 RCTs (Peto OR 1.14, 95% CI 0.99 to 1.32) (Day 2 to 3: 38

  11. An empirical research on relationships between subjective judgement, technology acceptance tendency and knowledge transfer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yu-Hsi Yuan; Sang-Bing Tsai; Chien-Yun Dai; Hsiao-Ming Chen; Wan-Fei Chen; Chia-Huei Wu; Guodong Li; Jiangtao Wang

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships among employees' usage intention pertaining to mobile information devices, focusing on subjective judgement, technology acceptance tendency...

  12. Knowledge creation and management in the five LHC experiments at CERN implications for technology innovation and transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Bressan, Beatrice Alessandra; Lavonen, J; Nordberg, M; Saarikko, H; Streit-Bianchi, M

    2008-01-01

    The present study analyses knowledge creation, acquisition and transfer in the five LHC physics experiments at CERN: ALICE, ATLAS, CMS, LHCb, and TOTEM. A questionnaire was provided during collaboration meetings and a total of 291 replies were obtained and analysed. The results of this research study provide evidence that the social process of participation in meetings, acquisition of skills in different areas, and the development of interests by interaction with colleagues are key elements of the learning process. Furthermore, the results indicate that knowledge acquisition in a multicultural environment plays a mediating role in the interaction between social capital constructs (social interaction, relationship quality, and network ties) and competitive advantage outcomes (invention development and technological distinctiveness). Social interaction, relationship quality, and network ties are connected to greater knowledge acquisition, and also contribute to innovation and transfer of the knowledge to indust...

  13. A technology transfer plan for the US Department of Energy's Electric Energy Systems Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrer, B.J.; Hurwitch, J.W.; Davis, L.J.

    1986-11-01

    The major objective of this study was to develop a technology transfer plan that would be both practical and effective in promoting the transfer of the products of DOE/EES research to appropriate target audiences. The study drew upon several major components of the marketing process in developing this plan: definition/charcterization of the products being produced by the DOE/EES program, identification/characterization of possible users of the products being produced by the program, and documentation/analysis of the methods currently being used to promote the adoption of DOE/EES products. Fields covered include HVDC, new materials, superconductors, electric field effects, EMP impacts, battery storage/load leveling, automation/processing concepts, normal/emergency operating concepts, Hawaii deep water cable, and failure mechanisms.

  14. The role of education and training in absorptive capacity of international technology transfer in the aerospace sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heiden, Patrick; Pohl, Christine; Bin Mansor, Shuhaimi; van Genderen, John

    2015-07-01

    The role of education and training in the aerospace sector for establishing sufficient levels of absorptive capacity in newly industrialized countries is substantial and forms a fundamental part of a nation's ability to establish and cultivate absorptive capacity on a national or organization-specific level. Successful international technology transfer as well as absorption of aerospace technology and knowledge into recipient organizations, depends prodigiously on the types of policy adopted in education and training of all groups and individuals specifically outlined in this paper. The conducted literature review revealed surprisingly few papers that translate these vital issues from theoretical scrutiny into representations that have practical policy value. Through exploration of the seven key aspects of education and training, this paper provides a practical template for policy-makers and practitioners in Asian newly industrialized countries, which may be utilized as a prototype to coordinate relevant policy aspects of education and training in international technology transfer projects across a wide variety of actors and stakeholders in the aerospace realm. A pragmatic approach through tailored practical training for the identified groups and individuals identified in this paper may lead to an enhanced ability to establish and strengthen absorptive capacity in newly industrialized countries through the development of appropriate policy guidelines. The actual coordination between education and training efforts deserves increased research and subsequent translation into policies with practical content in the aerospace sector.

  15. Effect of Technological Changes in Information Transfer on the Delivery of Pharmacy Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Kenneth N.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Personal computer technology has arrived in health care. Specific technological advances are optical disc storage, smart cards, voice recognition, and robotics. This paper discusses computers in medicine, in nursing, in conglomerates, and with patients. Future health care will be delivered in primary care centers, medical supermarkets, specialized…

  16. Biomedical technology transfer: Bioinstrumentation for cardiology, neurology, and the circulatory system

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    Developments in applying aerospace medical technology to the design and production of medical equipment and instrumentation are reported. Projects described include intercranial pressure transducers, leg negative pressure devices, a synthetic speech prosthesis for victims of cerebral palsy, and a Doppler blood flow instrument. Commercialization activities for disseminating and utilizing NASA technology, and new biomedical problem areas are discussed.

  17. A Qualitative Study on Transferring the Experience of Using Technology from Formal Education to Distance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, Merve; Selim, Yavuz

    2015-01-01

    With improvements in information technologies, distance education programs have become widespread. Institutions that offer distance education programs are increasing in number. Scholars who were used to face-to-face teaching began to give courses in distance education programs which entail technological teaching methods, a new teaching experience…

  18. 76 FR 8371 - Notice Correction; Generic Submission of Technology Transfer Center (TTC) External Customer...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Notice Correction; Generic Submission of Technology... December 23, 2010 (75 FR 80830) announcing the submission to OMB of the project titled, ``Technology... submission ] is now being presented as a generic submission which will include multiple customer satisfaction...

  19. A Comparison of Different Database Technologies for the CMS AsyncStageOut Transfer Database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciangottini, D. [INFN, Perugia; Balcas, J. [Caltech; Mascheroni, M. [Fermilab; Rupeika, E. A. [Vilnius U.; Vaandering, E. [Fermilab; Riahi, H. [CERN; Silva, J. M.D. [Sao Paulo, IFT; Hernandez, J. M. [Madrid, CIEMAT; Belforte, S. [INFN, Trieste; Ivanov, T. T. [Sofiya U.

    2017-11-22

    AsyncStageOut (ASO) is the component of the CMS distributed data analysis system (CRAB) that manages users transfers in a centrally controlled way using the File Transfer System (FTS3) at CERN. It addresses a major weakness of the previous, decentralized model, namely that the transfer of the user’s output data to a single remote site was part of the job execution, resulting in inefficient use of job slots and an unacceptable failure rate. Currently ASO manages up to 600k files of various sizes per day from more than 500 users per month, spread over more than 100 sites. ASO uses a NoSQL database (CouchDB) as internal bookkeeping and as way to communicate with other CRAB components. Since ASO/CRAB were put in production in 2014, the number of transfers constantly increased up to a point where the pressure to the central CouchDB instance became critical, creating new challenges for the system scalability, performance, and monitoring. This forced a re-engineering of the ASO application to increase its scalability and lowering its operational effort. In this contribution we present a comparison of the performance of the current NoSQL implementation and a new SQL implementation, and how their different strengths and features influenced the design choices and operational experience. We also discuss other architectural changes introduced in the system to handle the increasing load and latency in delivering output to the user.

  20. 40 CFR 63.126 - Transfer operations provisions-reference control technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) Transformed by chemical reaction into materials that are not organic hazardous air pollutants; (iii... Organic Chemical Manufacturing Industry for Process Vents, Storage Vessels, Transfer Operations, and... connected to a common header, or to compress and route to a process collected hazardous air pollutants...

  1. Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer (CPST) Technology Demonstration For Long Duration In-Space Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Michael L.; Motil, Susan M.; Kortes, Trudy F.; Taylor, William J.; McRight, Patrick S.

    2012-01-01

    (1) Store cryogenic propellants in a manner that maximizes their availability for use regardless of mission duration; (2) Efficiently transfer conditioned cryogenic propellant to an engine or tank situated in a microgravity environment; and (3) Accurately monitor and gauge cryogenic propellants situated in a microgravity environment

  2. A comparison of different database technologies for the CMS AsyncStageOut transfer database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciangottini, D.; Balcas, J.; Mascheroni, M.; Rupeika, E. A.; Vaandering, E.; Riahi, H.; Silva, J. M. D.; Hernandez, J. M.; Belforte, S.; Ivanov, T. T.

    2017-10-01

    AsyncStageOut (ASO) is the component of the CMS distributed data analysis system (CRAB) that manages users transfers in a centrally controlled way using the File Transfer System (FTS3) at CERN. It addresses a major weakness of the previous, decentralized model, namely that the transfer of the user’s output data to a single remote site was part of the job execution, resulting in inefficient use of job slots and an unacceptable failure rate. Currently ASO manages up to 600k files of various sizes per day from more than 500 users per month, spread over more than 100 sites. ASO uses a NoSQL database (CouchDB) as internal bookkeeping and as way to communicate with other CRAB components. Since ASO/CRAB were put in production in 2014, the number of transfers constantly increased up to a point where the pressure to the central CouchDB instance became critical, creating new challenges for the system scalability, performance, and monitoring. This forced a re-engineering of the ASO application to increase its scalability and lowering its operational effort. In this contribution we present a comparison of the performance of the current NoSQL implementation and a new SQL implementation, and how their different strengths and features influenced the design choices and operational experience. We also discuss other architectural changes introduced in the system to handle the increasing load and latency in delivering output to the user.

  3. Pediatric Trauma Transfer Imaging Inefficiencies—Opportunities for Improvement with Cloud Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yana Puckett

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: This study examines the inefficiencies of radiologic imaging transfers from one hospital to the other during pediatric trauma transfers in an era of cloud based information sharing. METHODS: Retrospective review of all patients transferred to a pediatric trauma center from 2008–2014 was performed. Imaging was reviewed for whether imaging accompanied the patient, whether imaging was able to be uploaded onto computer for records, whether imaging had to be repeated, and whether imaging obtained at outside hospitals (OSH was done per universal pediatric trauma guidelines. RESULTS: Of the 1761 patients retrospectively reviewed, 559 met our inclusion criteria. Imaging was sent with the patient 87.7% of the time. Imaging was unable to be uploaded 31.9% of the time. CT imaging had to be repeated 1.8% of the time. CT scan was not done per universal pediatric trauma guidelines 1.2% of the time. CONCLUSION: Our study demonstrated that current imaging transfer is inefficient, leads to excess ionizing radiation, and increased healthcare costs. Universal implementation of cloud based radiology has the potential to eliminate excess ionizing radiation to children, improve patient care, and save cost to healthcare system.

  4. A case study of technology transfer: Rehabilitative engineering at Rancho Los Amigos Hospital. [prosthetic devices engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildred, W.

    1973-01-01

    The transfer of NASA technolgy to rehabilitative applications of artificial limbs is studied. Human factors engineering activities range from orthotic manipulators to tiny dc motors and transducers to detect and transmit voluntary control signals. It is found that bicarbon implant devices are suitable for medical equipment and artificial limbs because of their biological compatibility with human body fluids and tissues.

  5. Rational engineering of Geobacter sulfurreducens electron transfer components: a foundation for building improved Geobacter-based bioelectrochemical technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana M Dantas

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Multiheme cytochromes have been implicated in Geobacter sulfurreducens (Gs extracellular electron transfer (EET. These proteins are potential targets to improve EET and enhance bioremediation and electrical current production by Gs. However, the functional characterization of multiheme cytochromes is particularly complex due to the co-existence of several microstates in solution, connecting the fully reduced and fully oxidized states. Over the last decade, new strategies have been developed to characterize multiheme redox proteins functionally and structurally. These strategies were used to reveal the functional mechanism of Gs multiheme cytochromes and also to identify key residues in these proteins for EET. In previous studies, we set the foundations for enhancement of the EET abilities of Gs by characterizing a family of five triheme cytochromes (PpcA-E. These periplasmic cytochromes are implicated in electron transfer between the oxidative reactions of metabolism in the cytoplasm and the reduction of extracellular terminal electron acceptors at the cell’s outer surface. The results obtained suggested that PpcA can couple e-/H+ transfer, a property that might contribute to the proton electrochemical gradient across the cytoplasmic membrane for metabolic energy production. The structural and functional properties of PpcA were characterized in detail and used for rational design of a family of 23 single site PpcA mutants. In this review, we summarize the functional characterization of the native and mutant proteins. Mutants that retain the mechanistic features of PpcA and adopt preferential e-/H+ transfer pathways at lower reduction potential values compared to the wild-type protein were selected for in vivo studies as the best candidates to increase the electron transfer rate of Gs. For the first time Gs strains have been manipulated by the introduction of mutant forms of essential proteins with the aim to develop and improve

  6. Application of advanced signal processing techniques to the rectification and registration of spaceborne imagery. [technology transfer, data transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, R. H.; Rifman, S. S.; Simon, K. W.

    1974-01-01

    The development of an ERTS/MSS image processing system responsive to the needs of the user community is discussed. An overview of the TRW ERTS/MSS processor is presented, followed by a more detailed discussion of image processing functions satisfied by the system. The particular functions chosen for discussion are evolved from advanced signal processing techniques rooted in the areas of communication and control. These examples show how classical aerospace technology can be transferred to solve the more contemporary problems confronting the users of spaceborne imagery.

  7. Mapping modern software process engineering techniques onto an HEP development environment

    CERN Document Server

    Wellisch, J P

    2003-01-01

    One of the most challenging issues faced in HEP in recent years is the question of how to capitalise on software development and maintenance experience in a continuous manner. To capitalise means in our context to evaluate and apply new process technologies as they arise, and to further evolve technologies already widely in use. It also implies the definition and adoption of standards. The CMS off- line software improvement effort aims at continual software quality improvement, and continual improvement in the efficiency of the working environment with the goal to facilitate doing great new physics. To achieve this, we followed a process improvement program based on ISO-15504, and Rational Unified Process. This experiment in software process improvement in HEP has been progressing now for a period of 3 years. Taking previous experience from ATLAS and SPIDER into account, we used a soft approach of continuous change within the limits of current culture to create of de facto software process standards within th...

  8. Many-core applications to online track reconstruction in HEP experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amerio, S. [Padua U.; Bastieri, D. [Padua U.; Corvo, M. [Padua U.; Gianelle, A. [Padua U.; Ketchum, W. [Los Alamos; Liu, T. [Fermilab; Lonardo, A. [INFN, Rome; Lucchesi, D. [Padua U.; Poprocki, S. [Cornell U.; Rivera, R. [Fermilab; Tosoratto, L. [INFN, Rome; Vicini, P. [INFN, Rome; Wittich, P. [Cornell U.

    2013-11-02

    Interest in parallel architectures applied to real time selections is growing in High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments. In this paper we describe performance measurements of Graphic Processing Units (GPUs) and Intel Many Integrated Core architecture (MIC) when applied to a typical HEP online task: the selection of events based on the trajectories of charged particles. We use as benchmark a scaled-up version of the algorithm used at CDF experiment at Tevatron for online track reconstruction – the SVT algorithm – as a realistic test-case for low-latency trigger systems using new computing architectures for LHC experiment. We examine the complexity/performance trade-off in porting existing serial algorithms to many-core devices. Measurements of both data processing and data transfer latency are shown, considering different I/O strategies to/from the parallel devices.

  9. Hurdles overcome in technology transfer for AIET and Positive outcome in Indian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dedeepiya V

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Cell based immunotherapies have been in practice in Japan for the past two decades with established clinical trials on its efficacy in both solid tumours and hematological malignancies including gastric cancer, ovarian cancer , lung cancer and liver cancer. [1,2,3,4] In India, NCRM has been providing Autologous Immune Enhancement Therapy (AIET using autologous Natural Killer (NK cells and activated T Lymphocytes for Cancer since 2005 following the established protocols practiced by the Biotherapy Institute of Japan. Significant outcome achieved after AIET in advanced pancreatic cancer, Acute Myeloid leukemia (AML in Indian patients have already been reported. [5, 6] Here we report our experience in few more patients and present the hurdles overcome and lessons learned in translating the technology from Japan to India Case Details: Case 1: A 54 year-old female presented with Stage IV recurrent ovarian malignancy in 2010 with a history of previous surgery and chemotherapy for ovarian malignancy in June 2009. The CA-125 level of 243 U/ml. CT scan revealed lesions in the liver, spleen, along the greater curvature of body of stomach and in the perisplenic region, between the medial aspect of liver and stomach and in the right inguinal region. She was suggested six cycles of chemotherapy with Doxorubicin (50 mg and Carboplatin (450 mg along with AIET. After proper informed consent, the peripheral blood was withdrawn and the in vitro expansion of the NK cells, activated T Lymphocytes from the peripheral blood was performed using the protocol reported earlier. [7] Average cell count after the in vitro expansion was 1.2 X 108 cells. Six transfusions of the in vitro expanded NK cells and activated T lymphocytes were administered following which the CA-125 decreased to 4.7 U/mL. CT scan taken in December 2010 showed a regression of the lesions in the spleen and perisplenic peritoneal deposits, stable hepatic lesions and resolution of

  10. The Transfer efficiency analysis and modeling technology of new non - contact power transmission equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cao Shi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the shortcomings of current power transmission which is used in ultrasound - assisted machining and the different transfer efficiency caused by the related parameters of the electromagnetic converter, this paper proposes an analysis model of the new non-contact power transmission device with more stable output and higher transmission efficiency. Then By utilizing Maxwell finite element analysis software, this paper studies the law of the transfer efficiency of the new non-contact transformer and compares new type with traditional type with the method of setting the boundary conditions of non-contact power supply device. At last, combining with the practical application, the relevant requirements which have a certain reference value in the application are put forward in the actual processing.

  11. Selection of scFvs specific for the HepG2 cell line using ribosome ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhsudhan

    Such a library would prove useful for direct intact cell panning using ribosome display technology. The selected scFv had a potential value for hepatocarcinoma treatment. [Zhou L, Mao W-P, Fen J, Liu H-Y, Wei C-J, Li W-X and Zhou F-Y 2009 Selection of scFvs specific for the HepG2 cell line using ribosome display;.

  12. Technology Transfer: Japanese Firms Involved in F-15 Coproduction and Civil Aircraft Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-06-01

    Industries Repair/radar target data processor Hitachi McDonnell Douglas Data link set Ishikawajima Harima Allied/Garrett Repair/fuel control components...components Ishikawajima Harima Colt Industries Overhaul/main fuel pump/ F-100 engine Ishikawajima Harima Rohr Industries Machining/F-100 engine...production agreement with Mitsubishi Heavy Industries , transferring manufacturing and technical expertise. Other U.S. F-15 contractors also entered

  13. From Physics to industry: EOS outside HEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinal, X.; Lamanna, M.

    2017-10-01

    In the competitive market for large-scale storage solutions the current main disk storage system at CERN EOS has been showing its excellence in the multi-Petabyte high-concurrency regime. It has also shown a disruptive potential in powering the service in providing sync and share capabilities and in supporting innovative analysis environments along the storage of LHC data. EOS has also generated interest as generic storage solution ranging from university systems to very large installations for non-HEP applications.

  14. Totem a case study in HEP

    CERN Document Server

    Dusini, S; Lazzizzera, I; Lee, P; Sartori, A; Sidoti, A; Tecchiolli, G P; Zorat, A

    1997-01-01

    It is being proved that the neurochip \\Totem{} is a viable solution for high quality and real time computational tasks in HEP, including event classification, triggering and signal processing. The architecture of the chip is based on a "derivative free" algorithm called Reactive Tabu Search (RTS), highly performing even for low precision weights. ISA, VME or PCI boards integrate the chip as a coprocessor in a host computer. This paper presents: 1) the state of the art and the next evolution of the design of \\Totem{}; 2) its ability in the Higgs search at LHC as an example.

  15. Online production validation in a HEP environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harenberg, T.; Kuhl, T.; Lang, N.; Mättig, P.; Sandhoff, M.; Schwanenberger, C.; Volkmer, F.

    2017-03-01

    In high energy physics (HEP) event simulations, petabytes of data are processed and stored requiring millions of CPU-years. This enormous demand for computing resources is handled by centers distributed worldwide, which form part of the LHC computing grid. The consumption of such an important amount of resources demands for an efficient production of simulation and for the early detection of potential errors. In this article we present a new monitoring framework for grid environments, which polls a measure of data quality during job execution. This online monitoring facilitates the early detection of configuration errors (specially in simulation parameters), and may thus contribute to significant savings in computing resources.

  16. Embryo transfer techniques: an American Society for Reproductive Medicine survey of current Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Thomas L; Lee, Malinda S; Bendikson, Kristin A; Reindollar, Richard H

    2017-04-01

    To better understand practice patterns and opportunities for standardization of ET. Cross-sectional survey. Not applicable. Not applicable. An anonymous 82-question survey was emailed to the medical directors of 286 Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology member IVF practices. A follow-up survey composed of three questions specific to ET technique was emailed to the same medical directors. Descriptive statistics of the results were compiled. The survey assessed policies, protocols, restrictions, and specifics pertinent to the technique of ET. There were 117 (41%) responses; 32% practice in academic settings and 68% in private practice. Responders were experienced clinicians, half of whom had performed technique. Multiple steps in the ET process were identified as "highly conserved;" others demonstrated discordance. ET technique is divided among [1] trial transfer followed immediately with ET (40%); [2] afterload transfer (30%); and [3] direct transfer without prior trial or afterload (27%). Embryos are discharged in the upper (66%) and middle thirds (29%) of the endometrial cavity and not closer than 1-1.5 cm from fundus (87%). Details of each step were reported and allowed the development of a "common" practice ET procedure. ET training and practices vary widely. Improved training and standardization based on outcomes data and best practices are warranted. A common practice procedure is suggested for validation by a systematic literature review. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Analysis on the revision of the United States authorizing procedure for the transfer of unclassified nuclear technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Sung-ho; Seo, Hana; Lee, Chansuh; Kim, Jong-sook [Korea Institute of Nuclear Nonproliferation and Control, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The DOE (Department Of Energy) has not comprehensively update 10CFR810 since 1986. Since then, the global civil nuclear market has expanded, particularly in China, the Middle East, and Eastern Europe, with vendors from France, Japan, the Republic of Korea, Russia, and Canada. In result, DOE issued revised 810 in respond to comments received from the public and commercial nuclear market changes. This regulation revision improves the efficiency of authorization process to promote national nuclear industry while maintaining nonproliferation control. Even though ROK has initiated a legal basis for Intangible technology transfer (ITT) for nuclear export control, working implementation system is not set up. This research proposes recommendable ITT implementation of the ROK according to the analysis result of the US regulation. In this revision, of 124 countries had been classified as general authorization under 10CFR810, 80 countries reclassified into the specific authorization. By remaining 'fast track' for specific authorization, in particular, time frames for internal DOE and interagency reviews are reduced. This means the US government actively copes with commercial nuclear market expands to promote their industry. Meanwhile, by remaining some of nuclear-weapon states (China, Russia, India) as specific authorization maintaining that the determinations are consistent with current US national security, diplomatic, and trade policy. By benchmarking the US regulation, Korea can improve the efficiency of the technology transfer authorization process easing the regulatory burden by reducing uncertainty and timelines while maintaining the highest level of nonproliferation control.

  18. Technology transfer of oil-in-water emulsion adjuvant manufacturing for pandemic influenza vaccine production in Romania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Christopher B; Huynh, Chuong; O'Hara, Michael K; Onu, Adrian

    2013-03-15

    Many developing countries lack or have inadequate pandemic influenza vaccine manufacturing capacity. In the 2009 H1N1 pandemic, this led to delayed and inadequate vaccine coverage in the developing world. Thus, bolstering developing country influenza vaccine manufacturing capacity is urgently needed. The Cantacuzino Institute in Bucharest, Romania has been producing seasonal influenza vaccine since the 1970s, and has the capacity to produce ∼5 million doses of monovalent vaccine in the event of an influenza pandemic. Inclusion of an adjuvant in the vaccine could enable antigen dose sparing, expanding vaccine coverage and potentially allowing universal vaccination of the Romanian population and possibly neighboring countries. However, adjuvant formulation and manufacturing know-how are difficult to access. This manuscript describes the successful transfer of oil-in-water emulsion adjuvant manufacturing and quality control technologies from the Infectious Disease Research Institute in Seattle, USA to the Cantacuzino Institute. By describing the challenges and accomplishments of the project, it is hoped that the knowledge and experience gained will benefit other institutes involved in similar technology transfer projects designed to facilitate increased vaccine manufacturing capacity in developing countries. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The Use of Graphing Technology to Promote Transfer of Learning: the Interpretation of Graphs in Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Jeri Ann

    This study examined the relationship between mathematics background and performance on graph-related problems in physics before and after instruction on the graphical analysis of motion and several microcomputer-based laboratory experiences. Students identified as either having or not having a graphing technology enhanced precalculus mathematics background were further categorized into one of four groups according to mathematics placement at the university. The performances of these groups were compared to identity differences. Pre- and Post-test data were collected from 589 students and 312 students during Autumn Quarter 1990 and Winter Quarter 1991 respectively. Background information was collected from each student. Significant differences were found between students with the technology enhanced mathematics background and those without when considering the entire populations both quarters. The students with the technology background were favored Autumn quarter and students without the technology background were favored Winter quarter. However, the entire population included an underrepresentation of students at the highest and lowest placements; hence, these were eliminated from the analyses. No significant differences were found between the technology/no technology groups after the elimination of the underrepresented groups. All categories of students increased their mean scores from pretest to post-test; the average increase was 8.23 points Autumn Quarter and 11.41 points Winter Quarter. Males consistently outperformed females on both the pretest and the post-test Autumn 1990. All students found questions involving the concept of acceleration more difficult than questions involving velocity or distance. Questions requiring students to create graphs were more difficult than questions requiring students to interpret graphs. Further research involving a qualitative component is recommended to identify the specific skills students use when solving graph

  20. Model of innovation, technology transfer, and the world distribution of income

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krugman, P.

    1979-01-01

    This paper develops a simple general-equilibrium model of product-cycle trade. There are two countries, innovating North and noninnovating South. Innovation consists of the development of new products. These can be produced at first only in North, but eventually the technology of production becomes available to South. This technological lag gives rise to trade, with North exporting new products and importing old products. Higher Northern per capita income depends on the quasi rents from the Northern monopoly of new products, so that North must continually innovate not only to maintain its relative position but even to maintain its real income in absolute terms. 7 references.