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Sample records for hemothorax

  1. Hemothorax in the newborn

    Oppermann, H.C.; Wille, L.

    1980-01-01

    Twenty cases of hemothorax in newborns are reviewed in detail. This unusual cause of acute respiratory distress within the neonatal period was observed in 14 males and 6 females. Most of the patients were fullterm newborns. As causal factors hemorrhagic disease of the newborn (vitamin K deficiency), disseminated intravascular coagulation, arteriovenous malformations and pleural/vascular rupture are considered. The time of occurrence of bleeding symptoms ranged from 1 to 28 days of life. Sixteen out of 20 patients survived without sequelae, but in 4 cases the outcome was lethal. (orig.) [de

  2. Serious Complication of Central Venous Catheterization Due to Hemothorax: Hemothorax

    Ümmügülsüm Gaygısız

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Central venous catheterization may cause life-threatening complications including pneumothorax and hemothorax. We report a case of multiple trauma complicated with an incidence of hemothorax due to a misplaced central venous catheter. Firstly, the tip of the guide-wire was ruptured in subcutaneous tissue and, secondly, the catheter came out of the vessel and caused hemothorax. During left subclavian catheterization, in this 47-years-old male patient, we could not advance the guide wire forward easily in the first attempt and tried to draw it back. In the second attempt, we inserted a new catheter without any difficulty. The blood gas analyses through the catheter for verification of location revealed its venous nature. After the catheterization, 500 mL hemorrhagic fluid was drained through the ipsilateral chest tube. Control chest X-ray showed that the catheter was in the left hemithorax and a piece of the guide wire was present below the left clavicle. Thorax computerized tomography showed that the catheter entered the thoracic cavity and extended to the paramediastinal region. An emergency surgery was performed to remove the piece of the guide wire and the catheter extending out of the vessel. A common method to check the intravenous insertion of a central catheter into a vein is to verify that the easily drawn blood has the nature of venous blood. This method, however, does not exclude the extravascular placement of the catheter in the presence of ipsilateral hemothorax.

  3. Ultrasonography in the diagnosis of traumatic hemothorax

    Hilendarov, A.; Nedeva-Petkova, M.; Simova, E.; Semova, R.; Georgieva, M.; Alexieva, D.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: The possibilities and advantages of US tomography in the diagnosis and follow-up of traumatic hemothorax in major trauma patients were presented. US examinations of the chest in conditions of emergency with purpose to identify hemothorax were performed in 56 (41 male and 15 female patients for a period of two years.US machine 'Siemens-Adara' supplied with 3.5 and 7 MHz linear and convex transducers was used. The right and left intercostal oblique view was used for US examination to identify free pleural fluid. Tube thoracotomy and/or a CT scan of the chest were used as the criterion standard for positive findings of hemothorax among the studied patients. In 49 (87.5%) of all 56 major trauma patients was achieved true-positive diagnostic result of hemothorax confirmed in 39 cases post operatively and in 10 after investigation by CT. In 6 (10.71%) patients - true-negative and in 1 (1.7%) false negative results were obtained. Our experience demonstrated that US is a sensitive, specific, and accurate diagnostic method in detecting traumatic hemothorax. The advantages of US tomography in the diagnosis of traumatic hemothorax are: First - the examination is not influenced by the position of the patient: Second - the rapidity of examination is 2-4 min and simultaneously differentiation of dense regions. Third - the possibility to present small amount of liquid collections 20-30 cc

  4. Hemothorax

    ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:1005-1009. Eckstein M, Henderson SO. Thoracic trauma. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, ... by: Jacob L. Heller, MD, MHA, Emergency Medicine, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed by ...

  5. Hemothorax Caused by Primary Pulmonary Angiosarcoma

    Kristensen, Katrine Lawaetz; Olsen, Karen Ege; Eckardt, Jens

    2014-01-01

    A previously healthy 57-year-old woman was admitted to the Emergency Department with hemothorax. She had continuously blood loss during the next 24 hours accordingly she went to the OR in order to achieve hemostasis.Intraoperative findings were multiple lesions in the lung parenchyma and diffuse ...

  6. Hemothorax in vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    Álvarez, Kevin; Jordi, López; Jose Angel, Hernández

    2017-10-16

    Vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS IV) is a rare genetic disorder characterized by an alteration in the COL3A1 gene which encodes type III collagen. It is the most common type of collagen in vessels of medium size and certain organs such as the intestines and the uterus. The alteration of this type of collagen produces aneurisms and ruptures of vessels and organs. A high level of clinical suspicion is required for diagnosis. It is a complex disease whose management requires a multidisciplinary team to treat the different complications that may occur. We report the case of a 50-year-old man diagnosed with EDS IV detected incidentally after hemothorax secondary to a coughing spell. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  7. Benign Metastatic Leiomyoma Presenting as a Hemothorax

    Anna M. Ponea

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Uterine leiomyomas have been reported to metastasize to various organs including the lungs, skeletal muscles, bone marrow, peritoneum, and heart. They may present with symptoms related to the metastases several years after hysterectomy. These tumors regress after menopause, and it is rare to detect active tumors in postmenopausal women. Despite their ability to metastasize, they are considered to be benign due to the lack of anaplasia. Pulmonary benign metastasizing leiomyoma is usually detected in the form of pulmonary nodules incidentally on imaging. Tissue biopsy of these nodules is required to identify them as benign metastasizing leiomyomas. Immunohistochemical analysis and molecular profiling may further help detect any malignant transformation in it. Untreated pulmonary benign metastasizing leiomyoma may result in the formation of cystic structures, destruction of lung parenchyma, and hemothorax and may cause respiratory failure. Surgical resection and hormonal therapy help prevent progression of this disease and provide an avenue for a cure.

  8. Hemothorax caused by spontaneous rupture of hepatocellular carcinoma in the pleural cavity: A case report

    Seo, Hin Hee; Ohm, Joon Young [Dept. of Radiology, Chungnam National University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Song Soo; Kim, Jin Hwan [Dept. of Radiology, Chungnam National University School of Medicine, Daejeon(Korea, Republic of)

    2017-07-15

    Hemothorax resulting from ruptured hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is extremely rare and is generally caused by ruptured intrathoracic metastatic lesions. However, we report a rare case of hemothorax resulting from intrathoracic rupture of primary HCC.

  9. Phrenic Arterial Injury Presenting as Delayed Hemothorax Complicating Simple Rib Fracture

    Ahn, Hong Joon; Lee, Jun Wan; Kim, Kun Dong; You, In Sool

    2016-01-01

    Delayed hemothorax after blunt torso injury is rare, but might be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. We present a case of delayed hemothorax bleeding from phrenic artery injury in a 24-year-old woman. The patient suffered from multiple rib fractures on the right side, a right hemopneumothorax, thoracic vertebral injury and a pelvic bone fracture after a fall from a fourth floor window. Delayed hemothorax associated with phrenic artery bleeding, caused by a stab injury from a...

  10. Measurement of hemothorax amount in patients with non-penetrating chest trauma by supine chest AP radiograph

    Han, Heon; Yang, Joo Hyun; Na, Myung Hoon; Baik, Hee Jong

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the predictability of amount of hemothorax in the patients with blunt chest trauma, supine chest AP radiographs of 66 patients were reviewed and statistically analyzed. In 66 patients, rib fractures were present in 53 patients, hemothorax in 46 patients, pneumothorax in 25 patients, and pulmonary contusions in 18 patients. Width and length of hemothorax were measured on supine chest AP radiograph, and were correlated with known drained amount of hemothorax. The presence and number of rib fracture, pulmonary contusion, subcutaneous emphysema, fracture of scapula and clavicle, and total opacification of hemithorax were also correlated with the drained amount of hemothorax. In multiple logistic regression analysis, width of hemothorax had the highest correlation with drained amount of hemothorax(regression coeffcient 0.718, p value 0.00005). The presence and number of rib fracture, scapular fracture, subcutaneous emphysema were also correlated with drained amount of hemothorax. But length of hemothorax, pulmonary contusion, clavicular fracture, total opacification of hemithorax were not correlated with drained amount of hemothorax. Measured width of hemothorax in supine chest AP radiograph is the most reliable predictor for estimation of the amount of hemothorax, and may also be used as an indication for the application of closed thoracostomy in the treatment of hemothorax

  11. Measurement of hemothorax amount in patients with non-penetrating chest trauma by supine chest AP radiograph

    Han, Heon; Yang, Joo Hyun; Na, Myung Hoon; Baik, Hee Jong [Chung-Ang Gil Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-10-15

    To evaluate the predictability of amount of hemothorax in the patients with blunt chest trauma, supine chest AP radiographs of 66 patients were reviewed and statistically analyzed. In 66 patients, rib fractures were present in 53 patients, hemothorax in 46 patients, pneumothorax in 25 patients, and pulmonary contusions in 18 patients. Width and length of hemothorax were measured on supine chest AP radiograph, and were correlated with known drained amount of hemothorax. The presence and number of rib fracture, pulmonary contusion, subcutaneous emphysema, fracture of scapula and clavicle, and total opacification of hemithorax were also correlated with the drained amount of hemothorax. In multiple logistic regression analysis, width of hemothorax had the highest correlation with drained amount of hemothorax(regression coeffcient 0.718, p value 0.00005). The presence and number of rib fracture, scapular fracture, subcutaneous emphysema were also correlated with drained amount of hemothorax. But length of hemothorax, pulmonary contusion, clavicular fracture, total opacification of hemithorax were not correlated with drained amount of hemothorax. Measured width of hemothorax in supine chest AP radiograph is the most reliable predictor for estimation of the amount of hemothorax, and may also be used as an indication for the application of closed thoracostomy in the treatment of hemothorax.

  12. Phrenic Arterial Injury Presenting as Delayed Hemothorax Complicating Simple Rib Fracture.

    Ahn, Hong Joon; Lee, Jun Wan; Kim, Kun Dong; You, In Sool

    2016-04-01

    Delayed hemothorax after blunt torso injury is rare, but might be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. We present a case of delayed hemothorax bleeding from phrenic artery injury in a 24-year-old woman. The patient suffered from multiple rib fractures on the right side, a right hemopneumothorax, thoracic vertebral injury and a pelvic bone fracture after a fall from a fourth floor window. Delayed hemothorax associated with phrenic artery bleeding, caused by a stab injury from a fractured rib segment, was treated successfully by a minimally invasive thoracoscopic surgery. Here, we have shown that fracture of a lower rib or ribs might be accompanied by delayed massive hemothorax that can be rapidly identified and promptly managed by thoracoscopic means.

  13. Hemothorax due to Ruptured Mycotic Aneurysm of Intercostal Arteries Associated with Infective Endocarditis

    Eddie Y. Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of hemothorax due to ruptured mycotic aneurysm in three intercostal arteries in a 40-year-old male with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infective endocarditis (IE due to intravenous drug use. Microcoil embolization and thoracotomy successfully achieved hemostasis. Mycotic aneurysm is a rare complication of IE and is usually found in the intracranial vessels. Ruptured mycotic aneurysm in the intercostal arteries can be associated with IE and can present as acute hemothorax.

  14. Osteochondroma of the fifth rib resulting in recurrent hemothorax

    Patel, Mital [Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Department of Radiology - Musculoskeletal Imaging Fellowship, Cleveland, OH (United States); Bauer, Thomas W. [The Cleveland Clinic L-25, Departments of Pathology and Orthopaedic Surgery, Cleveland, OH (United States); Santoscoy, Thomas [Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Mayfield Heights, OH (United States); Ilaslan, Hakan [Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Department of Radiology, Musculoskeletal Section, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2015-12-15

    A 48-year-old man presented with recurrent spontaneous hemothoraces, which ultimately were found to be secondary to a pedunculated costal osteochondroma causing vascular injury. After initially undergoing endovascular coil embolization, he ultimately required segmental rib resection containing the offending lesion for definite treatment. Although a few cases of symptomatic costal osteochondromas have been reported in the literature, as far as we know, no previous reports have provided direct radiologic confirmation of active bleeding or the role of angiographic intervention. In this report, we highlight the importance of CT angiography in establishing a direct link between an osteochondroma and recurrent hemothorax. We also discuss the diagnostic imaging challenges associated with this condition and the use of a multidisciplinary treatment strategy involving both angiographic and operative management. (orig.)

  15. Localization of hemorrhage in a recurrent hemothorax using Tc-99m-sulfur colloid

    Taillefer, R.; Essiambre, R.; Lemieux, R.

    1981-01-01

    Tc99m-sulfur colloid scintigraphy has proven clinically useful in identifying gastrointestinal hemorrhages. The authors describe a patient with recurrent hemothorax under oral anticoagulation therapy in which Tc-99m-sulfur colloid imaging was used to determine the site of bleeding

  16. Tranexamic acid treatment of hemothorax in two patients with malignant mesothelioma

    de Boer, W. A.; Koolen, M. G.; Roos, C. M.; ten Cate, J. W.

    1991-01-01

    Patients with malignant mesothelioma may present with hemothorax. We used a combination of oral and intrapleural tranexamic acid to treat two patients with this severe complication. Initiation of treatment with this potent anti-fibrinolytic drug resulted in rapid reduction of bleeding and of

  17. Hemothorax following Uncomplicated Endoscopic Variceal Sclerotherapy and Ligation for Esophageal Varices

    Tomoko Ochiai

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Endoscopic variceal sclerotherapy and ligation are standard treatment modalities used for the management of esophageal varices. Reportedly, sclerotherapy and ligation are associated with complications such as hematuria, pulmonary thrombus formation, pleural effusion, renal dysfunction, and esophageal stenosis. However, hemothorax following sclerotherapy and ligation has not yet been reported. We treated a patient who presented with liver cirrhosis and polycythemia vera and later developed hemothorax following the above-mentioned procedures. An 86-year-old man diagnosed with liver cirrhosis due to chronic hepatitis type B and alcohol abuse underwent variceal sclerotherapy using ethanolamine oleate to treat his esophageal varices. Oozing from the esophageal varices continued even after the sclerotherapy procedure; therefore, we performed endoscopic variceal ligation. The patient developed left-sided hemothorax within 24 h after treatment of his varices, and an emergency thoracotomy was performed. A pulmonary ligament of the left lung was bulging and ripping because of mediastinal hematoma, and oozing was noted. Cessation of bleeding was noted after the laceration of the left pulmonary ligament had been sutured. Ours is the first case of hemothorax reported in a patient following an uncomplicated procedure of sclerotherapy and ligation.

  18. [Spontaneous tension hemothorax due to rupture of a solitary fibrous tumor of the posterior mediastinum].

    Morita, Yohei; Ichimura, Hideo; Kikuchi, Shinji; Ozawa, Yuichiro; Inoue, Kazunari; Uchida, Atsushi; Kikuchi, Kazunori; Shiigai, Masanari; Shiotani, Seiji

    2013-10-01

    A 37-year-old man was transported by ambulance to our hospital due to abrupt chest pain. The pain began when he was practicing a combative-type sport. He denied any impact or blunt trauma. A chest radiograph revealed massive left pleural effusion with a mediastinal shift. Thoracentesis revealed a hemothorax;therefore, we performed an emergency thoracotomy. The intraoperative findings revealed a rupture of a posterior mediastinal tumor itself located between the descending aorta and the thoracic vertebra. After we identified the artery of Adamkiewicz that originates away from the tumor and evaluated the degree of tumor extension into the inter-vertebral foramen, we safely performed an elective tumor resection 1 month after the initial emergency operation. In patients with a hemothorax caused by rupture of the tumor itself, an elective tumor resection after detailed investigation should be considered if hemostasis can be achieved in the emergency thoracotomy.

  19. [Hemothorax caused by primary pleural chondrosarcoma: a case report and review of literatureYuan].

    Yuan, Y Q; Zhu, L Y; Zeng, H H; Zhou, R; Chen, P

    2016-11-12

    Objective: To analyze the clinical features of one case of spontaneous hemothorax caused by primary pleural chondrosarcoma and therefore to improve the understanding of this disease. Methods: The clinical features of a case with primary pleural chondrosarcoma were analyzed retrospectively and the related literatures were reviewed.The literature review was carried out with "primary pleural, chondrosarcoma" in Chinese and English respectively, as the search terms in Wanfang Data, CNKI and PubMed database from January 1980 to October 2015. A total of 6 articales, 1 in Chinese and 5 in English, were reviewed. Results: A 29 year-old male patient was admitted to the hospital because of fever, chest tightness, shortness of breath for 20 days. CT scan of the chest showed a mass near the right posterior fourth rib and right pleural effusion.Routine examination of the pleural effusion confirmed the presence of hemothorax. Thoracotomy was performed and revealed hemothorax in the right thorax, and a mass near the pleural apex. The tumor was removed by surgery and pleural decortication was also performed. Pathology study confirmed the diagnosis of high-differentiated chondrosarcoma. The patient was followed and there was no recurrence until now. A total of 6 case reports were retrieved from Wanfang Data, CNKI and PubMed. Five cases had complete data, including 2 males and 3 females(age from 28 to70), and another (a 78-year old male) without adequate data. Conclusions: Primary pleural chondrosarcoma is a rare disease, and hemothorax as the first manifestation is even rare. It is easily to be misdiagnosed due to nonspecific clinical symptoms.The final diagnosis depends ultimately on pathological biopsy. Thoracotomy is the most effective method for treatment of primary pleural chondrosarcoma.

  20. Subacute Right Ventricle Perforation by Pacemaker Lead Presenting with Left Hemothorax and Shock

    Julianne Nichols

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac perforation by pacemaker is a rare but potentially fatal complication. Acute perforations occurring within twenty-four hours of insertion of pacemaker can lead to hemopericardium, cardiac tamponade, and death. Hemothorax occurring as an acute complication of pacemaker insertion is reported but extremely rare. Previously, hemothorax and shock as a subacute complication following pacemaker insertion have not been reported. We report the case of an 85-year-old patient who presented with shock from hemothorax caused by pacemaker perforation, two weeks after insertion. Device interrogation showed normal function. Chest X-ray and echocardiogram missed lead dislocation and the diagnosis was made on computed tomogram (CT of the chest. Following surgical repair, a new ventricular pacemaker was placed transvenously in the right ventricular septum. This case illustrates that CT scan of the chest should be performed in all patients in whom cardiac perforation by pacemaker is suspected but not diagnosed on chest X-ray and echocardiogram. Normal functioning of pacemaker on device interrogation does not exclude perforation.

  1. Subacute right ventricle perforation by pacemaker lead presenting with left hemothorax and shock.

    Nichols, Julianne; Berger, Natalie; Joseph, Praveen; Datta, Debapriya

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac perforation by pacemaker is a rare but potentially fatal complication. Acute perforations occurring within twenty-four hours of insertion of pacemaker can lead to hemopericardium, cardiac tamponade, and death. Hemothorax occurring as an acute complication of pacemaker insertion is reported but extremely rare. Previously, hemothorax and shock as a subacute complication following pacemaker insertion have not been reported. We report the case of an 85-year-old patient who presented with shock from hemothorax caused by pacemaker perforation, two weeks after insertion. Device interrogation showed normal function. Chest X-ray and echocardiogram missed lead dislocation and the diagnosis was made on computed tomogram (CT) of the chest. Following surgical repair, a new ventricular pacemaker was placed transvenously in the right ventricular septum. This case illustrates that CT scan of the chest should be performed in all patients in whom cardiac perforation by pacemaker is suspected but not diagnosed on chest X-ray and echocardiogram. Normal functioning of pacemaker on device interrogation does not exclude perforation.

  2. Traumatic Hemothorax and Pneumothorax Detected by EFAST Compared with Chest Radio- graphy at Siriraj Hospital

    Lertpong Somcharit

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: EFAST is the evaluation of thoracoabdominal injury in trauma patients. This study aimed to evaluate the diagnostic utility of EFAST for detection of traumatic pneumothorax and hemothorax compared to standard routine chest radiography at Siriraj Hospital. Methods: From January 2013 to April 2015, 119 patients who visited the Division of Trauma, Siriraj Hospital were included in the study. EFAST was performed during the initial resuscitation of the injured patients and plain chest radiographs were obtained as routine hospital protocols. Patients’ charts were retrospectively reviewed and real-time EFAST examinations were compared to the results of chest radiographs. EFAST diagnosis was con- sidered positive when there was absence of normal sliding lung signs (pneumothorax and presence of free fluid above the diaphragm (hemothorax. Results: The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of EFAST for the diagnosis of pneumothorax and hemothorax were 76%, 100%, 100%, and 93%, respectively, whereas the sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV of plain chest radiographs were 80%, 100%, 100% and 94.9%, respectively. Conclusion: EFAST shows similar diagnostic accuracy compared to plain supine AP chest radiograph. The results are operator-dependent and higher accuracy can be achieved by well-trained emergency health care personnel. EFAST can be performed during resuscitation, and still provides promising results which can lead to early treat- ment procedure. Under experienced hands, EFAST is considered effective. This study suggests that it should be used as a complimentary procedure in all thoracic injured patients’ evaluations.

  3. Diaphragmatic patch: A useful adjunct in surgical treatment of recurrent catamenial hemothorax

    J. Nwiloh

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Although catamenial hemothorax compared to pneumothorax is a rarer clinical presentation of thoracic endometriosis syndrome (TES, it is more commonly associated with diaphragmatic fenestrations. These openings may serve as entry portals for peritoneal fluid to access into the pleural space thereby perpetuating recurrent pleural effusion even after prior surgical pleurodesis. We report our experience with two patients with recurrent right catamenial hemothorax after previous interventions that were subsequently treated by talc pleurodesis and goretex diaphragmatic patch, and who have had no further recurrence at a mean follow up of 15 months.We therefore recommend that diaphragmatic patch should be considered as an adjunct to talc pleurodesis in patients with recurrent catamenial hemothorax when either multiple diaphragmatic fenestrations are seen at surgery or if there is concomitant bloody peritoneal fluid which could potentially lead to recurrence. The patch by sealing any occult pores and possible future fenestrations appear to decrease recurrent pleural effusion at an intermediate term follow up. Resumo: Embora o hemotórax catamenial comparado com o pneumotórax seja uma apresentação clínica mais rara de síndrome de endometriose torácica (TES, está mais associado a fenestrações diafragmáticas. Estas aberturas podem atuar como portais de entrada para o acesso ao fluido peritoneal na cavidade pleural, perpetuando assim o derrame pleural recorrente mesmo após uma pleurodese cirúrgica prévia. Registamos a nossa experiência em dois pacientes com hemotórax catamenial recorrente do lado direito após outras intervenções, que foram posteriormente tratados com pleurodese com talco e penso diafragmático em gore-tex, e que não apresentaram nenhuma outra recorrência durante um acompanhamento de 15 meses.Recomendamos, então, que o penso diafragmático seja considerado um auxiliar à pleurodese com talco em pacientes com hemot

  4. Pulmonary Arteriovenous Malformation (AVM Causing Tension Hemothorax in a Pregnant Woman Requiring Emergent Cesarean Delivery

    Nidhi Sood

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs, although most commonly congenital, are usually detected later in life. We present a case of a 25-year-old woman with no previous history of AVM or telangiectasia, who presented with life-threatening hypoxia, hypotension, and pleuritic chest pain in 36th week of gestation. Chest tube placement revealed 4 liters of blood. Patient was subsequently found to have bleeding pulmonary AVM as the source of hemothorax. Successful embolisation of the bleeding vessel followed by thoracoscopic evacuation of the organized clot relieved the hypoxia. Further screening for AVM revealed large splenic AVM for which patient underwent splenectomy in the coming months.

  5. Video-Assisted Minithoracotomy for Pulmonary Laceration with a Massive Hemothorax

    Hideki Ota

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe intrathoracic hemorrhage from pulmonary parenchyma is the most serious complication of pulmonary laceration after blunt trauma requiring immediate surgical hemostasis through open thoracotomy. The safety and efficacy of video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS techniques for this life-threatening condition have not been fully evaluated yet. We report a case of pulmonary laceration with a massive hemothorax after blunt trauma successfully treated using a combination of muscle-sparing minithoracotomy with VATS techniques (video-assisted minithoracotomy. A 22-year-old man was transferred to our department after a falling accident. A diagnosis of right-sided pneumothorax was made on physical examination and urgent chest decompression was performed with a tube thoracostomy. Chest computed tomographic scan revealed pulmonary laceration with hematoma in the right lung. The pulmonary hematoma extending along segmental pulmonary artery in the helium of the middle lobe ruptured suddenly into the thoracic cavity, resulting in hemorrhagic shock on the fourth day after admission. Emergency right middle lobectomy was performed through video-assisted minithoracotomy. We used two cotton dissectors as a chopstick for achieving compression hemostasis during surgery. The patient recovered satisfactorily. Video-assisted minithoracotomy can be an alternative approach for the treatment of pulmonary lacerations with a massive hemothorax in hemodynamically unstable patients.

  6. Outcome of Concurrent Occult Hemothorax and Pneumothorax in Trauma Patients Who Required Assisted Ventilation

    Ismail Mahmood

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The management and outcomes of occult hemopneumothorax in blunt trauma patients who required mechanical ventilation are not well studied. We aimed to study patients with occult hemopneumothorax on mechanical ventilation who could be carefully managed without tube thoracostomy. Methods. Chest trauma patients with occult hemopneumothorax who were on mechanical ventilation were prospectively evaluated. The presence of hemopneumothorax was confirmed by CT scanning. Hospital length of stay, complications, and outcome were recorded. Results. A total of 56 chest trauma patients with occult hemopneumothorax who were on ventilatory support were included with a mean age of 36 ± 13 years. Hemopneumothorax was managed conservatively in 72% cases and 28% underwent tube thoracostomy as indicated. 29% of patients developed pneumonia, 16% had Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS, and 7% died. Thickness of hemothorax, duration of mechanical ventilation, and development of ARDS were significantly associated with tube thoracostomy in comparison to no-chest tube group. Conclusions. The majority of occult hemopneumothorax can be carefully managed without tube thoracostomy in patients who required positive pressure ventilation. Tube thoracotomy could be restricted to those who had evidence of increase in the size of the hemothorax or pneumothorax on follow-up chest radiographs or developed respiratory compromise.

  7. Massive hemothorax due to inferior phrenic artery injury after blunt trauma.

    Aoki, Makoto; Shibuya, Kei; Kaneko, Minoru; Koizumi, Ayana; Murata, Masato; Nakajima, Jun; Hagiwara, Shuichi; Kanbe, Masahiko; Koyama, Yoshinori; Tsushima, Yoshito; Oshima, Kiyohiro

    2015-01-01

    Injury to the inferior phrenic artery after blunt trauma is an extremely rare event, and it may occur under unanticipated conditions. This case report describes an injury to the left inferior phrenic artery caused by blunt trauma, which was complicated by massive hemothorax, and treated with transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE). An 81 year-old female hit by a car while walking at the traffic intersection was transferred to the emergency department, computed tomography scanning revealed active extravasations of the contrast medium within the retrocrural space and from branches of the internal iliac artery. The patient underwent repeated angiography, and active extravasation of contrast medium was observed between the retrocrural space and the right pleural space originating from the left inferior phrenic artery. The injured left inferior phrenic artery was successfully embolized with N-butyl cyanoacrylate, resulting in stabilization of the patient's clinical condition. Inferior phrenic artery injury should be recognized as a rare phenomenon and causative factor for hemothorax. TAE represents a safe and effective treatment for this complication and obviates the need for a thoracotomy.

  8. Interventional and surgical treatment of a hemothorax caused by a ruptured vertebral artery in a patient with neurofibromatosis type I

    Lee, Ji Hoon; Kim, Dong Hun; Kim, Dong Hyun; Seo, Hong Joo [Chosun University College of Medicine, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    We report a case of a massive hemothorax arising from a ruptured vertebral artery aneurysm in a patient with neurofibromatosis type 1 suffering from sudden onset of dyspnea. The vertebral artery aneurysm was treated with endovascular coil embolization. Then, an open thoracotomy was performed to evacuate the hematoma.

  9. Efficiency Analysis of Direct Video-Assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery in Elderly Patients with Blunt Traumatic Hemothorax without an Initial Thoracostomy

    Wen-Yen Huang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemothorax is common in elderly patients following blunt chest trauma. Traditionally, tube thoracostomy is the first choice for managing this complication. The goal of this study was to determine the benefits of this approach in elderly patients with and without an initial tube thoracostomy. Seventy-eight patients aged >65 years with blunt chest trauma and stable vital signs were included. All of them had more than 300 mL of hemothorax, indicating that a tube thoracostomy was necessary. The basic demographic data and clinical outcomes of patients with hemothorax who underwent direct video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery without a tube thoracostomy were compared with those who received an initial tube thoracostomy. Patients who did not receive a thoracostomy had lower posttrauma infection rates (28.6% versus 56.3%, P=0.061 and a significantly shorter length of stay in the intensive care unit (3.13 versus 8.27, P=0.029 and in the hospital (15.93 versus 23.17, P=0.01 compared with those who received a thoracostomy. The clinical outcomes in the patients who received direct VATS were more favorable compared with those of the patients who did not receive direct VATS.

  10. Does intrapleural length and position of the intercostal drain affect the frequency of residual hemothorax? A prospective study from north India

    Sunil Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Thoracic trauma causes significant morbidity; however, many deaths are preventable and few patients require surgery. Intercostal chest drainage (ICD for hemo/pneumothorax is simple and effective; the main problem is residual hemothorax, which can cause lung collapse and empyema. Aims: Our study aimed to analyze the relationship between radiological chest tube parameters (position and intrathoracic length and the frequency of residual hemothorax. Settings and Design: This prospective analytical study was conducted in a large tertiary care hospital in north India over 2 years till March 2013. Materials and Methods: Patients of chest trauma aged 18-60 years, with hemothorax or hemopneumothorax requiring ICD insertion were included in the study. Bedside ICD insertion was performed as per current standards. Immediate post-ICD chest radiographs were used to record lung status and ICD position (chest tube zone and intrapleural length. Residual hemothorax was defined as any collection identified on radiological investigations after 48 hours of ICD placement. Statistical Analysis: Univariate analysis was performed with the chi-square test or Student′s t-test as appropriate, while multivariate analysis using stepwise logistic regression; a P-value < 0.05 was significant. Results: Out of 170 patients of chest trauma, 154 underwent ICD insertion. Most patients were young (mean age: 31.7 ± 12 years males (M:F = 14:1. Ninety-seven patients (57.1% had isolated chest injuries. Blunt trauma (n = 119; 77.3% and motor vehicle accidents (n = 72; 46.7% were the commonest causes. Mean hospital stay was 9 ± 3.94 days, and mortality 2/154 (1.1%. Residual hemothorax was seen in 48 (31%. No ICD zone or length was significantly associated with residual hemothorax on univariate or multivariate analysis. Conclusion: Intrapleural ICD zone or length does not affect the frequency of residual hemothorax.

  11. Surgical stabilization of severe rib fractures decreases incidence of retained hemothorax and empyema.

    Majercik, Sarah; Vijayakumar, Sathya; Olsen, Griffin; Wilson, Emily; Gardner, Scott; Granger, Steven R; Van Boerum, Don H; White, Thomas W

    2015-12-01

    Retained hemothorax (RH) is relatively common after chest trauma and can lead to empyema. We hypothesized that patients who have surgical fixation of rib fractures (SSRF) have less RH and empyema than those who have medical management of rib fractures (MMRF). Admitted rib fracture patients from January 2009 to June 2013 were identified. A 2:1 propensity score model identified MMRF patients who were similar to SSRF. RH, and empyema and readmissions, were recorded. Variables were compared using Fisher exact test and Wilcoxon rank-sum tests. One hundred thirty-seven SSRF and 274 MMRF were analyzed; 31 (7.5%) had RH requiring 35 interventions; 3 (2.2%) SSRF patients had RH compared with 28 (10.2%) MMRF (P = .003). Four (14.3%) MMRF subjects with RH developed empyema versus zero in the SSRF group (P = .008); 6 (19.3%) RH patients required readmission versus 14 (3.7%) in the non-RH group (P = .002). Patients with rib fractures who have SSRF have less RH compared with similar MMRF patients. Although not a singular reason to perform SSRF, this clinical benefit should not be overlooked. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A Case of Unrecognized Intrathoracic Placement of a Subclavian Central Venous Catheter in a Patient with Large Traumatic Hemothorax

    Dina Wallin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional recommendations suggest placement of a subclavian central venous catheter (CVC ipsilateral to a known pneumothorax to minimize risk of bilateral pneumothorax. We present the case of a 65-year-old male with a right hemopneumothorax who was found to have intrathoracic placement of his right subclavian CVC at thoracotomy despite successful aspiration of blood and transduction of central venous pressure (CVP. We thus recommend extreme caution with the interpretation of CVC placement by blood aspiration and CVP measurement alone in patients with large volume ipsilateral hemothorax.

  13. A pilot study of chest tube versus pigtail catheter drainage of acute hemothorax in swine.

    Russo, Rachel M; Zakaluzny, Scott A; Neff, Lucas P; Grayson, J Kevin; Hight, Rachel A; Galante, Joseph M; Shatz, David V

    2015-12-01

    Evacuation of traumatic hemothorax (HTx) is typically accomplished with large-bore (28-40 Fr) chest tubes, often resulting in patient discomfort. Management of HTx with smaller (14 Fr) pigtail catheters has not been widely adopted because of concerns about tube occlusion and blood evacuation rates. We compared pigtail catheters with chest tubes for the drainage of acute HTx in a swine model. Six Yorkshire cross-bred swine (44-54 kg) were anesthetized, instrumented, and mechanically ventilated. A 32 Fr chest tube was placed in one randomly assigned hemithorax; a 14 Fr pigtail catheter was placed in the other. Each was connected to a chest drainage system at -20 cm H2O suction and clamped. Over 15 minutes, 1,500 mL of arterial blood was withdrawn via femoral artery catheters. Seven hundred fifty milliliters of the withdrawn blood was instilled into each pleural space, and fluid resuscitation with colloid was initiated. The chest drains were then unclamped. Output from each drain was measured every minute for 5 minutes and then every 5 minutes for 40 minutes. The swine were euthanized, and thoracotomies were performed to quantify the volume of blood remaining in each pleural space and to examine the position of each tube. Blood drainage was more rapid from the chest tube during the first 3 minutes compared with the pigtail catheter (348 ± 109 mL/min vs. 176 ± 53 mL/min), but this difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.19). Thereafter, the rates of drainage between the two tubes were not substantially different. The chest tube drained a higher total percentage of the blood from the chest (87.3% vs. 70.3%), but this difference did not reach statistical significance (p = 0.21). We found no statistically significant difference in the volume of blood drained by a 14 Fr pigtail catheter compared with a 32 Fr chest tube.

  14. Hemotórax espontâneo em doente com neurofibromatose tipo I: A propósito de um caso clínico Spontaneous hemothorax in a neurofibromatosis type I patient: A case report

    Alexandra Bento

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available O hemotórax espontâneo é uma complicação rara e potencialmente fatal da neurofibromatose. Vários mecanismos patológicos são descritos para a vasculopatia associada à doença: a invasão dos vasos por tumores adjacentes, como shwannoma, neurofibroma ou neurofibrosarcoma; b displasia vascular com formação de aneurismas e estenoses6,7,9. Outros mecanismos envolvidos podem incluir patologias pleuropulmonares (infecções com necrose, embolia pulmonar, endometriose, neoplasias e discrasia sanguínea. Os autores relatam o caso de uma jovem de 33 anos, que recorreu ao serviço de urgência por toracalgia superior direita, contínua, irradiando para o ombro e escápula homolaterais, sem factores de agravamento nem de alívio e com oito dias de evolução.Spontaneous hemothorax is a rare and potentially lethal neurofibromatosis’ complication. Several pathological mechanisms may explain the associated vasculopathy: a direct vascular invasion from adjacent tumors such as Shwannoma, neurofibroma or neurofibrosarcoma; b vascular dysplasia with stenotic or aneurysm formation6,7,9. Other mechanisms involved may include pleuropulmonar pathologies (necrotizing infections, pulmonary embolism, endometriosis, neoplasms and blood dyscrasias. The authors describe a case of a 33 years old female, who went to the ER Service complaining with right persistent hemithora cic pain, extending to the ipsilateral shoulder and shoulder blade, without aggravation or relieving factors, since the last 8 days.

  15. Massive thymic hemorrhage and hemothorax occurring in utero.

    Gargano, Giancarlo; Paltrinieri, Anna Lucia; Gallo, Claudio; Di Pancrazio, Luciana; Roversi, Maria Federica; Ferrari, Fabrizio

    2015-11-14

    Thymic enlargement is a common and physiological finding in children and neonates' X-rays, but it is usually asymptomatic. Occasionally it can cause respiratory distress. In most cases the aetiology of this expansion remains unclear and it is diagnosed as a thymic hyperplasia. True thymic hyperplasia is defined as a gland expansion, both in size and weight, while maintaining normal microscopic architecture. Often it is a diagnosis of exclusion and prognosis is good. Thymic haemorrhage is an unusual condition related to high foetal and neonatal mortality. We report a case of spontaneous massive thymic haemorrhage in a newborn developing at birth acute respiratory distress associated with severe bilateral haemothorax. Thymic enlargement was evident after pleural evacuation and confirmed by radiographic, Computed Tomography (CT) images and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) sequences. The spontaneous resolution of this enlargement seen with CT scan and MRI sequences suggested a thymic haemorrhage; surgery was not necessary. Thymic haemorrhage should be considered in newborn infants with pleural effusion, mediastinal space enlargement and Respiratory Distress.

  16. Rib Fractures

    ... Video) Achilles Tendon Tear Additional Content Medical News Rib Fractures By Thomas G. Weiser, MD, MPH, Associate Professor, ... Tamponade Hemothorax Injury to the Aorta Pulmonary Contusion Rib Fractures Tension Pneumothorax Traumatic Pneumothorax (See also Introduction to ...

  17. Use of Chest Computed Tomography in Stable Patients with Blunt Thoracic Trauma: Clinical and Forensic Perspective

    Makbule Ergin

    2011-01-01

    fractures were the most common injury. Thorax computed tomography was significantly superior to chest radiography in detecting pneumothorax , hemothorax and lung contusion. Eightyone life threatening lesions were detected and 50 (61%; pneumothorax 13, hemothorax 24, lung contusion 9,and pneumomediastinum 4 of these lesions could not be detected with plain chest radiography. The clinical management [in 15 patients (30%], and the forensic assesment was changed [in 14 (28%] patients were changed.  Conclusion:We concluded that using Computed Tomography of the thorax in thoracic travmas prive meticulous assesment in management of patients and forens icissues.

  18. Video-assisted thoracoscopy treatment of spontaneous pneumothorax

    Chen Haitao; Ren Jian; Che Jiaming; Hang Junbiao; Qiu Weicheng; Chen Zhongyuan

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To propose a treatment protocol by video thoracoscopy in spontaneous pneumothorax. Methods: One hundred and three patients underwent Video-assisted thoracoscopy (VATS) treatment of spontaneous pneumothorax and hemothorax. Indications included recurrent pneumothorax, persistent air leakage following conservative therapy, complicated hemothorax and CT scan identified bullae formation. Results: No operative deaths occurred, conversion rate was 2.91%, recurrence rate was 0.97%, complication rate was 3.81% and mean postoperative hospital stay was 5.6 days. Conclusions: VATS treatment of spontaneous pneumothorax is better than open chest surgery and also superior than conservative therapy

  19. NJS July 2011 for Ogidi.cdr final.cdr

    Trauma continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality world over. ... rib fracture(s) (23.8%), hemopneumothorax (14.3%), hemothorax (7.1%), ... The mortality rate was 2.4%. Only 7(16.7%) patients were seen beyond the first outpatient clinic appointment. Conclusion. Most patients arriving at the hospital survived, ...

  20. Cardiac tamponade in an infant during contrast infusion through central venous catheter for chest computed tomography; Tamponamento cardiaco durante infusao de contraste em acesso venoso central para realizacao de tomografia computadorizada do torax em lactente

    Daud, Danilo Felix; Campos, Marcos Menezes Freitas de; Fleury Neto, Augusto de Padua [Hospital Geral de Palmas, TO (Brazil)

    2013-11-15

    Complications from central venous catheterization include infectious conditions, pneumothorax, hemothorax and venous thrombosis. Pericardial effusion with cardiac tamponade hardly occurs, and in infants is generally caused by umbilical catheterization. The authors describe the case of cardiac tamponade occurred in an infant during chest computed tomography with contrast infusion through a central venous catheter inserted into the right internal jugular vein. (author)

  1. Fatal lawn mower related projectile injury

    Colville-Ebeling, Bonnie; Lynnerup, Niels; Banner, Jytte

    2014-01-01

    was initially overlooked, later interpreted as a possible gunshot homicide, and finally identified as a lawn mower related projectile injury when autopsy revealed a piece of metal thread in the main bronchus to the right middle lobe, hemopericardium, and right-sided hemothorax. To our knowledge, this injury...

  2. Prise en charge des traumatismes fermes du thorax chez l'adulte au ...

    We performed a retrospective study on 348 files of patients hospitalised for closed thoracic trauma during 10 years (1990-1999). The objective was ... hemothorax and 49 (14.08%) cases of pneumothorax. 53 (15.23%) chest tube were placed.

  3. Validation of Ultrasound Imaging to Rule-out Thoracic Trauma on the International Space Station

    Hamilton, Douglas R.; Sargsyan, Ashot E.; Melton, Shannon; Martin, David; Dulchavsky, Scott A.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Aboard the International Space Station (ISS) an intra-thoracic injury may be disastrous to the crew member if the diagnosis is missed or even delayed. Pneumothorax and hemothorax commonly seen in trauma patients; the diagnosis is usually confirmed by chest X-ray or computed tomography. In this study, the ability of ultrasound to rule out pneumothorax by the presence "lung sliding" and hemothorax by the absence of pleural fluid was validated. Methods: The research activities were approved by the NASA Johnson Space Center Committee for the Protection of Human Subjects, and the participating crewmembers signed informed consent prior to the activity. ISS crewmembers received 2-hours of "hands on" ultrasound training 8 months prior to the on-orbit ultrasound exam. Baseline ultrasound images of the thorax were acquired on the crewmebers of Increment 8 and 9 prior to launch from Bakonur, Russia. Ultrasound examination of the thorax were performed on crewmembers at 30 day intervals (n=??) throughout their flight. Post flight images were acquired on or about landing day 10. Ultrasound images were acquired using the ISS Health Research Facility ultrasound system and examined by experts on the ground to rule out the presence of pneumothorax and hemothorax. Results: The presence of "lung sliding" which excludes pneumothorax, was seen in all subjects. The absence of pleural fluid, which excludes hemothorax was seen in all subjects. The optimal position between sonographer and patient under microgravity conditions and the amount and type of training for a non-physician crew medical officer for these procedures was also established for this procedure. Conclusion: Ultrasound can be performed on orbit under microgravity condition to rule thoracic trauma, such as pneumothorax and hemothorax.

  4. Imaging of blunt chest trauma

    Prosch, H.; Negrin, L.

    2014-01-01

    Blunt chest trauma is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Consequently, all patients should be evaluated radiologically after blunt chest trauma to allow timely and appropriate treatment. Conventional chest radiographs and computed tomography (CT) are proven modalities with which to evaluate patients after blunt chest trauma. Over the last several years extended focused assessment with sonography for trauma (eFAST) has gained increasing importance for the initial assessment of seriously injured patients. In the acute phase of severely injured patients eFAST examinations are helpful to exclude pneumothorax, hemothorax and hemopericardium. Chest radiographs may also be used to diagnose a pneumothorax or hemothorax; however, the sensitivity is limited and CT is the diagnostic modality of choice to evaluate severely injured patients. (orig.) [de

  5. [How to do - the chest tube drainage].

    Klopp, Michael; Hoffmann, Hans; Dienemann, Hendrik

    2015-03-01

    A chest tube is used to drain the contents of the pleural space to reconstitute the physiologic pressures within the pleural space and to allow the lungs to fully expand. Indications for chest tube placement include pneumothorax, hemothorax, pleural effusion, pleural empyema, and major thoracic surgery. The most appropriate site for chest tube placement is the 4th or 5th intercostal space in the mid- or anterior- axillary line. Attention to technique in placing the chest tube is vital to avoid complications from the procedure. Applying the step-by-step technique presented, placement of a chest tube is a quick and safe procedure. Complications - frequently occurring when the tube is inserted with a steel trocar - include hemothorax, dislocation, lung lacerations, and injury to organs in the thoracic or abdominal cavity." © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Ultrasonography as a better diagnostic efficiency in rib fracture

    UZUN, Metin; BEKSAÇ, Burak; KARATAŞ, Adnan; KÜÇÜKDURMAZ, Fatih; KIRCALI, Bahar ANAYURDU; TETİK, Cihangir

    2013-01-01

    In this study, our aim was to demonstrate the need of use of ultrasonography in rib fractures in order not to face medicolegal problems. One hundred patients admitted to our emergency service with mild to moderate blunt thorax trauma were included in our study prospectively. The inclusion criteria were pain upon palpation of ribs, deep inspiration, coughing but no any other pathologies like a pneumothorax, hemothorax. All patients are evaluated with ultrasonography (USG) and direct X-rays. X-...

  7. Chest radiography after minor chest trauma

    Rossen, B.; Laursen, N.O.; Just, S.

    The results of chest radiography in 581 patients with blunt minor thoracic trauma were reviewed. Frontal and lateral views of the chest indicated pathology in 72 patients (12.4%). Pneumothorax was present in 16 patients; 4 had hemothorax. The physical examination and the results of chest radiography were not in accordance because in 6(30%) of the 20 patients with hemo/-pneumothorax the physical examination was normal. Consequently there is wide indication for chest radiography after minor blunt chest trauma.

  8. [Cohort study on the prevalence and risk factors of late pulmonary complications in adults following a closed minor chest trauma].

    Plourde, Miville; Émond, Marcel; Lavoie, André; Guimont, Chantal; Le Sage, Natalie; Chauny, Jean-Marc; Bergeron, Éric; Vanier, Laurent; Moore, Lynne; Allain-Boulé, Nadine; Fratu, Ramona-Florina; Dufresne, Maryline

    2013-11-01

    The objectives of this study are to determine the prevalence, risk factors, and time to onset of delayed hemothorax and pneumothorax in adults who experienced a minor blunt thoracic trauma. A prospective cohort of 450 consecutive patients was recruited. Eligible patients had to be over 16 years of age, consulted within 72 hours for a trauma, and available for outpatient follow-up at 2, 7, and 14 days posttrauma. The clinical outcome investigated was the presence of delayed pneumothorax or hemothorax on the follow-up chest x-ray. Delayed hemothorax occurred in 11.8% (95% CI 8.8-14.8), and delayed pneumothorax occurred in 0.9% (95% CI 0.2-2.3) of participants. During the 14-day follow-up period, 87.0% of these delayed complications developed in the first week. In the multivariate analysis, the only statistically significant risk factor for delayed complications was the location of fractures on the x-ray of the hemithorax. The adjusted odds ratio was 1.52 (95% CI 0.62-3.73) for the lower ribs (tenth to twelfth rib), 3.11 (95% CI 1.60-6.08) for the midline ribs (sixth to ninth rib), and 5.05 (95% CI 1.80-14.19) for the upper ribs (third to fifth rib) versus patients with no fractures. The presence of at least one rib fracture between the third and ninth rib on the x-ray of the hemithorax is a significant risk factor for delayed hemothorax and pneumothorax.

  9. Advanced Technologies in Trauma Critical Care Management

    2012-01-01

    largely replaced diagnostic peritoneal lavage for identifying intra-abdominal fluid in trauma patients. Furthermore, with the addition of chest windows...authors use chest ultrasound in the following manner: To identify a pneumothorax or hemothorax that needs to be drained acutely To differentiate...these situations, Technologies in the Trauma ICU 913 the authors first insert 2 or 3 chest tubes and position them as usual. A sterile nonad- herent

  10. Outcomes of patients with blunt chest trauma encountered at emergency department and possible risk factors affecting mortality

    Yuan-Ming Tsai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Blunt chest trauma is associated with a high risk of mortality. Respiratory complications may necessitate prolonged ventilation and result in death. The present study aimed to investigate possible signs of trauma and the prognosis of trauma patients with thoracic injuries and identify risk factors for mortality. Patients and Methods: A retrospective study was performed to investigate the clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes of trauma patients with blunt chest injuries who underwent thoracic computed tomography on arrival in the emergency department (January 2010–December 2013. Patients with brain injuries were excluded from the study. The prognostic values of age, sex, trauma type, injury severity score, revised trauma score (RTS, ventilator requirement, days in Intensive Care Unit (ICU, associated thoracic injury, and laboratory examinations (including arterial blood gas [ABG] were evaluated. Results: Fifteen of 30 analyzed patients died during their ICU stays; accordingly, we classified patients as survivors and nonsurvivors. These groups differed significantly regarding the RTS (P = 0.002, mechanical ventilation requirement (P = 0.007, total stay length (P = 0.009, and the presence of hemothorax (P = 0.030. However, no significant differences in the pneumothorax, rib fractures, and blood tests (including ABG analysis were observed between the groups. Conclusion: Among hospitalized trauma patients with blunt thoracic injuries, RTS, mechanical ventilation requirement, and hemothorax were identified as risk factors for mortality. Patients with hemothorax should receive multidisciplinary care and be monitored closely to improve survival.

  11. Spontaneous massive hemopneumothorax: Double trouble with a twist

    Milta Kuriakose

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous hemopneumothorax (SHP is observed in 3%–7% cases of spontaneous pneumothorax where the tear of an adhesion can lead to bleeding with associated hemothorax. This condition has been reported in patients with hemophilia, sarcoidosis, congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation, systemic lupus erythematosus, etc., Here, we describe an unusual case of acute massive SHP in a 62-year-old male who underwent a percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA and presented with worsening dyspnea over the next 3 days. On evaluation, he had a massive hemopneumothorax which was considered to be secondary to the use of anticoagulants during the PTCA procedure. Pleural fluid analysis revealed frank blood and was consistent with the diagnosis of hemothorax. Surprisingly, the pleural fluid cytology revealed malignant cells. As the patient had a normal chest X-ray 3 days ago, thoracoscopic pleural biopsy was taken which confirmed the diagnosis of an epithelioid mesothelioma. Although post-PTCA or mesothelioma-associated hemothorax has been rarely reported, these two conditions have not been associated with SHP. Since the patient had no prior clinicoradiological features of mesothelioma, the procedure, and the anticoagulants probably contributed to the massive and rapid accumulation of blood. The presence of small amount of air added further confusion to the dual etiology and has not been described earlier.

  12. Retrospective Analysis of 513 Cases Diagnosed with Rib Fracture Secondary to Blunt Thorax Trauma

    Serdar Ozkan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study aimed to analyze blunt chest trauma cases who were diagnosed with rib fracture and to examine the regional differences likely to appear in trauma cases and treatment approaches. Material and Method: 513 cases who applied to the Emergency Service and Department of Thoracic Surgery between October 2013 and December 2014 due to blunt trauma and were diagnosed with rib fracture were retrospectively examined. The cases were evaluated in terms of etiological factors, thoracic, and other system injuries accompanying the rib fracture, prognosis, and the treatments applied. Results: Isolated rib fracture was present in 266 of the cases. Thoracic organ injuries such as pneumothorax, hemothorax, hemopneumothorax, lung contusion, or laceration and sternal fracture accompanying the rib fracture were present in 247 of the cases. While one or two rib fractures were detected in 298 cases, six or more rib fractures were present in 28 cases. 78.2% of hemothorax cases, 85.3% of pneumothorax cases, 95.4% of hemopneumothorax cases, 81.8% of bilateral pneumothorax cases, 26% of bilateral hemothorax cases, and 71.4% of bilateral hemopneumothorax cases were treated by applying tube thoracostomy. 129 cases diagnosed with thoracic organ injury in addition to rib fracture but not subjected to surgical intervention, and 266 cases diagnosed with isolated rib fracture were discharged with full recovery after appropriate medical treatment. Discussion: Most of the rib fractures occurring due to blunt trauma are treated successfully with medical treatments and conservative approaches and do not need advanced surgical treatments.

  13. Vascular-type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome caused by a hitherto unknown genetic mutation: a case report

    Kashizaki Fumihiro

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Vascular-type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is an autosomal dominant disease that causes arterial spurting, intestinal perforation, uterine rupture and hemopneumothorax due to decreased production of type III collagen. The average age at death is 48 years old, and it is considered to be the most severe form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. We report the case of a 64-year-old Japanese woman and her 38-year-old daughter who were diagnosed with this disease. Case presentation A 64-year-old Japanese woman was referred to our hospital because of right anterior chest pain following cough and pharyngeal discomfort. Pleurisy was suspected due to the presence of right pleural effusion, so the next day she was referred to our department, where a detailed examination led to the diagnosis of hemothorax. The bleeding that caused the right hemothorax was difficult to control, so our patient was transferred to the Department of Thoracic Surgery for hemostasis control. Our patient’s personal history of uterine hemorrhage and skin ulcers, as well as the finding of skin fragility during surgery, were indicative of a weak connective tissue disease; therefore, after improvement of the hemothorax, a genetic analysis was performed. This revealed a heterozygous missense mutation in COL3A1, c.2411 G>T p.Gly804Val (exon 36. A detailed investigation conducted at a later date revealed that her daughter also had the same genetic mutation. This led to the diagnosis of vascular-type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome characterized by a new gene mutation. Conclusion We report a new genetic mutation associated with vascular-type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. We present the clinical and imaging findings, and the disease and treatment course in this patient. We believe this information will be important in treating future cases of vascular-type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome in patients with this mutation.

  14. Pleural Effusion in Spinal Deformity Correction Surgery- A Report of 28 Cases in a Single Center.

    Weiqiang Liang

    Full Text Available To analyze the occurrence, risk factors, treatment and prognosis of postoperative pleural effusion after spinal deformity correction surgery.The clinical and imaging data of 3325 patients undergoing spinal deformity correction were collected from the database of our hospital. We analyzed the therapeutic process of the 28 patients who had postoperative pleural effusion, and we identified the potential risk factors using logistic regression.Among the 28 patients with postoperative pleural effusion, 24 (85.7% suffered from hemothorax, 2 (7.1% from chylothorax, and 2 (7.1% from subarachnoid-pleural fistula. The pleural effusion occurred on the convex side in 19 patients (67.9%, on the concave side in 4 patients (14.3%, and on both sides in 4 patients (14.3%. One patient with left hemothorax was diagnosed with kyphosis. The treatment included conservative clinical observation for 5 patients and chest tube drainage for 23 patients. One patient also underwent thoracic duct ligation and pleurodesis. All of these treatments were successful. Logistic regression analysis showed that adult patients(≥18 years old, congenital scoliosis, osteotomy and thoracoplasty were risk factors for postoperative pleural effusion in spinal deformity correction surgery.The incidence of postoperative pleural effusion in spinal deformity correction surgery was approximately 0.84% (28/3325, and hemothorax was the most common type. Chest tube drainage treatment was usually successful, and the prognosis was good. Adult patients(≥18 years old, congenital scoliosis, and had undergone osteotomy or surgery with thoracoplasty were more likely to suffer from postoperative pleural effusion.

  15. An Isolated Pulmonary Hematoma Mimicking a Lung Tumor as the Initial Finding of Vascular Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

    Kang, Eun Ju; Lee, Ki Nam; Choi, Pil Jo; Ki, Chang Seok

    2012-01-01

    The vascular type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (vEDS) is an uncommon inherited disorder characterized by abnormalities in type III collagen, presenting itself as arterial dissection or rupture. We report a case of an isolated pulmonary hematoma mimicking a lung tumor in an 18-year-old man which turned out to be the initial finding of vEDS. Pneumothorax and hemothorax occurred repeatedly for 15 months following the surgical removal of the mass, and were treated by repeated left upper and lower lobectomy and thoracotomy. The diagnosis of vEDS was confirmed by pathologic and genetic studies.

  16. An Isolated Pulmonary Hematoma Mimicking a Lung Tumor as the Initial Finding of Vascular Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

    Kang, Eun Ju; Lee, Ki Nam; Choi, Pil Jo [Dept. of Radiology, Dong-A University Medicine Center, Dong-A University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Ki, Chang Seok [Dept. of Radiology, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    The vascular type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (vEDS) is an uncommon inherited disorder characterized by abnormalities in type III collagen, presenting itself as arterial dissection or rupture. We report a case of an isolated pulmonary hematoma mimicking a lung tumor in an 18-year-old man which turned out to be the initial finding of vEDS. Pneumothorax and hemothorax occurred repeatedly for 15 months following the surgical removal of the mass, and were treated by repeated left upper and lower lobectomy and thoracotomy. The diagnosis of vEDS was confirmed by pathologic and genetic studies.

  17. Endovascular Treatment of an Iatrogenic Right Internal Jugular Vein- Right Subclavian Artery Fistula and Pseudoaneurysm During the Attempt of a Hemodialysis Catheter Insertion: A Case Report

    Cho, Eui Min; Kim, Hyun Lee; Kim, Dong Hyun

    2009-01-01

    Complications during the placement of a central venous catheter, via the right internal jugular vein puncture include local hematoma, hemothorax, pneumothorax, central vein thrombosis, and hemopericardium. Iatrogenic right internal jugular vein-right subclavian artery fistula with the formation of right subclavian artery pseudoaneurysms is an extremely rare complication in patients undergoing a central vein puncture. We report the case of a patient who developed a local hematoma at the vein puncture site and dyspnea due to a right internal jugular vein-subclavian artery fistula and a right subclavian artery pseudoaneurysm at the mediastinum after puncture of right internal jugular vein. The patient was successfully treated by embolization using microcoils

  18. Percutaneous transhepatic drainage of lung abscess through a diaphragmatic fistula caused by a penetrating liver abscess.

    Taniguchi, Masako; Morita, Satoru; Ueno, Eiko; Hayashi, Mitsutoshi; Ishikawa, Motonao; Mae, Masahiro

    2011-11-01

    Liver abscesses occurring just below the diaphragm can penetrate or perforate the thoracic cavity, resulting in lung abscess or pyothorax. Although surgical or percutaneous transpleural drainage is often required in such cases, the latter approach has some risks, including hemothorax and bronchopleural fistula formation when the cavity is surrounded by normal lung parenchyma. The present report describes a treatment technique of percutaneous transhepatic drainage through the diaphragmatic fistula to avoid the risks of a transpulmonary approach in a case of lung abscess caused by a penetrating liver abscess.

  19. Presentation of an uncommon form of aortic dissection and rupture in Marifoan syndrome

    Delgado, I.; Ruiz, R.; Villanueva, J.M.; Fernandez Cueto, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    In Marfan syndrome, aneurysmatic enlargement of ascending aorta and dissection starting at the root are the most common cardiovascular complications. We present an infrequent case of a 15-year-old patient with a typical case of Marfan syndrome. CT disclosed an aorta and aortic arch of normal size with dissection originating distally with respect to the point where left subclavian artery arises. The disecction extended to descending aorta and to iliac and femoral arteries. Aortic rupture occurred in the arch, with massive hemothorax. The CT findings were confirmed at necropsy. 9 refs

  20. Presentation of an uncommon form of aortic dissection and rupture in Marifoan syndrome; Presentacion de una forma infecuente de diseccion y rotura aortica en el sindrome de Marfan

    Delgado, I; Ruiz, R; Villanueva, J M; Fernandez Cueto, J L [Servicio de Radiodiagnostico, Complejo Hospitalario, Ciudad Real (Spain)

    1995-11-01

    In Marfan syndrome, aneurysmatic enlargement of ascending aorta and dissection starting at the root are the most common cardiovascular complications. We present an infrequent case of a 15-year-old patient with a typical case of Marfan syndrome. CT disclosed an aorta and aortic arch of normal size with dissection originating distally with respect to the point where left subclavian artery arises. The disecction extended to descending aorta and to iliac and femoral arteries. Aortic rupture occurred in the arch, with massive hemothorax. The CT findings were confirmed at necropsy. 9 refs.

  1. Intercostal artery pseudoaneurysm complicating corrosive acid poisoning: Diagnosis with CT and treatment with transarterial embolisation

    M V Chalapathi Rao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudoaneurysms of intercostal artery are very rare. All the published cases have been caused by trauma, either iatrogenic or otherwise. They can cause hemothorax, retroperitoneal hemorrhage or can present as pulsatile chest mass. Doppler ultrasound, contrast-enhanced CT and conventional angiogram can accurately diagnose this condition. All the reported cases have been treated by embolisation, stenting or surgery. We report an unusual case of intercostal artery pseudoaneurysm arising as a complication of corrosive poisoning presenting with hematemesis and treated by glue embolisation. The authors believe this to be the first case of intercostal artery pseudoaneurysm that is non-traumatic, complicating corrosive poisoning and presenting with hematemesis.

  2. Clinical value of radiological methods in evaluation and therapy of severe thoracic trauma

    Glinz, W.

    1987-09-01

    Plain chest radiographs allow the diagnosis of most intrathoracic injuries. However, they are only momentary pictures and give no information on the respiratory function. A tension pneumothorax, rib fractures and subcutaneous emphysema should be diagnosed clinically before radiographs are taken. Computed tomography is helpful in evaluation of intrapulmonary lesions, hemothorax, rupture of the diaphragm and dislocation of the heart. Further diagnostic tools include aortography in suspected aortic rupture, sonography in cardiac injuries and hemopericardium, bronchoscopy in suspected bronchial or tracheal rupture, ECG and enzyme determinations in cardiac contusion, and eventually pneumoperitoneum in suspected rupture of the diaphragm.

  3. Diagnostic Accuracy of Ultrasonography and Radiography in Initial Evaluation of Chest Trauma Patients.

    Vafaei, Ali; Hatamabadi, Hamid Reza; Heidary, Kamran; Alimohammadi, Hosein; Tarbiyat, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Application of chest radiography for all multiple trauma patients is associated with a significant increase in total costs, exposure to radiation, and overcrowding of the emergency department. Ultrasound has been introduced as an alternative diagnostic tool in this regard. The aim of the present study is to compare the diagnostic accuracy of chest ultrasonography and radiography in detection of traumatic intrathoracic injuries. In the present prospective cross-sectional study, patients with traumatic intrathoracic injuries, who were referred to the emergency department from December 2013 to December 2014, were assessed. The patients underwent bedside ultrasound, radiographic and computed tomography (CT) scan examinations based on ATLS recommendations. Screening performance characteristics of ultrasonography and radiography were compared using SPSS 21.0. Chest CT scan was considered as gold standard. 152 chest trauma patients with a mean age of 31.4 ± 13.8 years (range: 4 ‒ 67), were enrolled (77.6% male). Chest CT scan showed pulmonary contusion in 48 (31.6%) patients, hemothorax in 29 (19.1%), and pneumothorax in 55 (36.2%) cases. Area under the ROC curve of ultrasonography in detection of pneumothorax, hemothorax, and pulmonary contusion were 0.91 (95% CI: 0.86‒0.96), 0.86 (95% CI: 0.78‒0.94), and 0.80 (95% CI: 0.736‒0.88), respectively. Area under the ROC curve of radiography was 0.80 (95% CI: 0.736‒0.87) for detection of pneumothorax, 0.77 (95% CI: 0.68‒0.86) for hemothorax, and 0.58 (95% CI: 0.5‒0.67) for pulmonary contusion. Comparison of areas under the ROC curve declared the significant superiority of ultrasonography in detection of pneumothorax (p = 0.02) and pulmonary contusion (p < 0.001). However, the diagnostic value of the two tests was equal in detection of hemothorax (p = 0.08). The results of the present study showed that ultrasonography is preferable to radiography in the initial evaluation of patients with traumatic injuries to the

  4. Diagnostic Accuracy of Ultrasonography and Radiography in Initial Evaluation of Chest Trauma Patients

    Ali Vafaei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Application of chest radiography for all multiple trauma patients is associated with a significant increase in total costs, exposure to radiation, and overcrowding of the emergency department. Ultrasound has been introduced as an alternative diagnostic tool in this regard. The aim of the present study is to compare the diagnostic accuracy of chest ultrasonography and radiography in detection of traumatic intrathoracic injuries. Methods: In the present prospective cross-sectional study, patients with traumatic intrathoracic injuries, who were referred to the emergency department from December 2013 to December 2014, were assessed. The patients underwent bedside ultrasound, radiographic and computed tomography (CT scan examinations based on ATLS recommendations. Screening performance characteristics of ultrasonography and radiography were compared using SPSS 21.0. Chest CT scan was considered as gold standard. Results: 152 chest trauma patients with a mean age of 31.4 ± 13.8 years (range: 4 ‒ 67, were enrolled (77.6% male. Chest CT scan showed pulmonary contusion in 48 (31.6% patients, hemothorax in 29 (19.1%, and pneumothorax in 55 (36.2% cases. Area under the ROC curve of ultrasonography in detection of pneumothorax, hemothorax, and pulmonary contusion were 0.91 (95% CI: 0.86‒0.96, 0.86 (95% CI: 0.78‒0.94, and 0.80 (95% CI: 0.736‒0.88, respectively. Area under the ROC curve of radiography was 0.80 (95% CI: 0.736‒0.87 for detection of pneumothorax, 0.77 (95% CI: 0.68‒0.86 for hemothorax, and 0.58 (95% CI: 0.5‒0.67 for pulmonary contusion. Comparison of areas under the ROC curve declared the significant superiority of ultrasonography in detection of pneumothorax (p = 0.02 and pulmonary contusion (p < 0.001. However, the diagnostic value of the two tests was equal in detection of hemothorax (p = 0.08. Conclusion: The results of the present study showed that ultrasonography is preferable to radiography in the initial

  5. Clinical value of radiological methods in evaluation and therapy of severe thoracic trauma

    Glinz, W.

    1987-01-01

    Plain chest radiographs allow the diagnosis of most intrathoracic injuries. However, they are only momentary pictures and give no information on the respiratory function. A tension pneumothorax, rib fractures and subcutaneous emphysema should be diagnosed clinically before radiographs are taken. Computed tomography is helpful in evaluation of intrapulmonary lesions, hemothorax, rupture of the diaphragm and dislocation of the heart. Further diagnostic tools include aortography in suspected aortic rupture, sonography in cardiac injuries and hemopericardium, bronchoscopy in suspected bronchial or tracheal rupture, ECG and enzyme determinations in cardiac contusion, and eventually pneumoperitoneum in suspected rupture of the diaphragm. (orig.)

  6. Radiology of thoracic trauma

    Stark, P.

    1987-01-01

    This course provides an overview of the radiologic manifestations of trauma to the chest. The basic mechanisms of injury are discussed. The effect of trauma on the chest wall, the lung parenchyma, and the pleural space is described. Rib fractures, sternal fractures, lung contusion, lung hematoma, lung laceration, post-traumatic atelectasis, hemothorax, chylothorax, pneumothorax, and adult respiratory distress syndrome are discussed and illustrated. Injuries to the tracheobronchial tree, the aorta and brachiocephalic vessels, the esophagus, the diaphragm, and the heart are also presented. The purpose of the lecture is to familiarize the audience with common and unusual radiologic presentations of traumatic injury to the thorax

  7. Chest radiography after minor chest trauma

    Rossen, B.; Laursen, N.O.; Just, S.

    1987-01-01

    The results of chest radiography in 581 patients with blunt minor thoracic trauma were reviewed. Frontal and lateral views of the chest indicated pathology in 72 patients (12.4%). Pneumothorax was present in 16 patients; 4 had hemothorax. The physical examination and the results of chest radiography were not in accordance because in 6(30%) of the 20 patients with hemo/-pneumothorax the physical examination was normal. Consequently there is wide indication for chest radiography after minor blunt chest trauma. (orig.)

  8. Internal Drainage of an Esophageal Perforation in a Patient with a High Surgical Risk

    Hongsun Kim

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A 71-year-old man presented with a productive cough and fever, and he was diagnosed as having an esophageal perforation and a mediastinal abscess. He had a history of traumatic hemothorax and pleural drainage for empyema in the right chest and was considered unable to tolerate thoracic surgery because of sepsis and progressive aspiration pneumonia. In order to aggressively drain the mediastinal contamination, we performed internal drainage by placing a Levin tube into the mediastinum through the perforation site. This procedure, in conjunction with controlling sepsis and providing sufficient postpyloric nutrition, allowed the esophageal injury to completely heal.

  9. Mid- and Long-Term Results of Endovascular Treatment in Thoracic Aorta Blunt Trauma

    Luigi Irace

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Study Aim. Evaluation of results in blunt injury of the thoracic aorta (BAI endovascular treatment. Materials and Methods. Sixteen patients were treated for BAI. Thirteen patients had associated polytrauma, 4 of these had a serious hypotensive status and 4 had an hemothorax. In the remaining 3, two had a post-traumatic false aneurysm of the isthmus and 1 had a segmental dissection. In those 13 patients a periaortic hematoma was associated to hemothorax in 4. All patients were submitted to an endovascular treatment, in two cases the subclavian artery ostium was intentionally covered. Results. One patient died for disseminated intravascular coagulation. No paraplegia was recorded. No ischemic complications were observed. A type I endoleak was treated by an adjunctive cuff. During the followup (1–9 years 3 patients were lost. A good patency and no endoleaks were observed in all cases. One infolding and 1 migration of the endografts were corrected by an adjunctive cuff. Conclusion. The medium and long term results of the endovascular treatment of BAI are encouraging with a low incidence rate of mortality and complications. More suitable endo-suite and endografts could be a crucial point for the further improvement of these results.

  10. Developing risk factors for post traumatic empyema in patients with chest trauma

    Mara del Pilar Quiroga; Jos Daniel Charry; Nicols Becerra; Juan Camilo Garcia; Eliana Karina Muoz; Rodrigo Lara

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To establish the risk factors associated to development of empyema posttraumatic in patients with chest trauma managed with closed thoracostomy. Methods: It was a descriptive and observational study of patients with chest trauma who were admitted between January 2013 and May 2014. The variables were evaluated and the results according to management with closed thoracostomy in patients with thoracic trauma was determined. Univariate analysis was performed and measures of central tendency were calculated. Results: In total 240 patients were analyzed. Among them, 10.4% (25) developed posttraumatic empyema. In patients who developed empyema, the mean age was 34.2 years, and the mean injury severity score was 20.6. It was identified as a risk factor closed chest trauma in 68%(17) and 84%coagulated hemothorax trauma. Empyema management thoracoscopy was in 100%of cases. Conclusions: The posttraumatic empyema is a complication that occurs in patients with thoracic trauma. One of the most important risk factors is coagulated hemothorax which could be identified and treated in time to avoid comorbidities during hospital stay.

  11. Radiologic findings of thoracic trauma

    Akgul Ozmen C

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Cihan Akgul Ozmen,1 Serdar Onat,2 Delal Aycicek3 1Department of Radiology, 2Department of Chest Surgery, Dicle University School of Medicine, Diyarbakir, 3Radiology Unit, Siirt State Hospital, Siirt, Turkey Introduction: Chest trauma may be blunt or penetrating and the chest is the third most common trauma region. It is a significant cause of mortality. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT has been an increasingly used method to evaluate chest trauma because of its high success in detecting tissue and organ injuries. Herein, we aimed to present MDCT findings in patients with blunt and penetrating chest trauma admitted to our department. Methods: A total of 240 patients admitted to the emergency department of our hospital between April 2012 and July 2013 with a diagnosis of chest trauma who underwent MDCT evaluations were included. Most of the patients were male (83.3% and victims of a blunt chest trauma. The images were analyzed with respect to the presence of fractures of bony structures, hemothorax, pneumothorax, mediastinal organ injury, and pulmonary and vascular injuries. Results: MDCT images of the 240 patients yielded a prevalence of 41.7% rib fractures, 11.2% scapular fractures, and 7.5% clavicle fractures. The prevalence of thoracic vertebral fracture was 13.8% and that of sternal fracture was 3.8%. The prevalence of hemothorax, pneumothorax, pneumomediastinum, and subcutaneous emphysema was 34.6%, 62.1%, 9.6%, and 35.4%, respectively. The prevalence of rib, clavicle, and thoracic vertebral fractures and pulmonary contusion was higher in the blunt trauma group, whereas the prevalence of hemothorax, subcutaneous emphysema, diaphragmatic injury, and other vascular lacerations was significantly higher in the penetrating trauma group than in the blunt trauma group (p<0.05. Conclusion: MDCT images may yield a high prevalence of fracture of bony structures, soft tissue lacerations, and vascular lesions, which should be well understood by

  12. Mitral valve plasty for mitral regurgitation after blunt chest trauma.

    Kumagai, H; Hamanaka, Y; Hirai, S; Mitsui, N; Kobayashi, T

    2001-06-01

    A 21 year-old woman was admitted to our hospital because of chest and back pain after blunt chest trauma. On admission, consciousness was clear and a physical examination showed labored breathing. Her vital signs were stable, but her breathing gradually worsened, and artificial respiration was started. The chest roentgenogram and a subsequent chest computed tomographic scans revealed contusions, hemothorax of the left lung and multiple rib fractures. A transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) revealed normal left ventricular wall motion and mild mitral regurgitation (MR). TTE was carried out repeatedly, and revealed gradually progressive MR and prolapse of the posterior medial leaflet, although there was no congestive heart failure. After her general condition had recovered, surgery was performed. Intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) revealed torn chordae at the posterior medial leaflet. The leaflet where the chorda was torn was cut and plicated, and posterior mitral annuloplasty was performed using a prosthetic ring. One month later following discharge, the MR had disappeared on TTE.

  13. Stridor Post-Pneumonectomy - “The Post-pneumonectomy Syndrome”

    Manoj Waghmare

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 33 year old lady who presented to our department with complaints of breathlessness and stridor. On enquiry she gave history of right pneumonectomy for right main bronchus carcinoid 15 years ago. Chest X-ray as initial investigation showed homogenous opacity in right hemothorax with mediastinal shift to right. Computed tomography of thorax showed post-pneumonectomy status with left lower lobe bronchus compression between the aorta and main pulmonary artery with post obstructive overinflation of left lower lobe. Spirometry was suggestive of an obstructive abnormality. Diagnosis of post-pneumonectomy syndrome was made and patient was treated with inhaled corticosteroids and inhaled long acting beta2 agonist.

  14. Principles of primary survey and resuscitation in cases of pediatric trauma.

    Saba Jafarpour

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Trauma is a common cause of death and disability in children. Proper approach to pediatric trauma involves adherence to ABCDE sequence in the primary survey and resuscitation in order to promptly recognize and manage life-threatening conditions immediately. This readily reviewed sequence includes A: establishment and maintenance of a patent airway while maintaining cervical spine immobilization; B: evaluation of breathing, ventilation and oxygenation, immediate treatment of tension pneumothorax, open pneumothorax and massive hemothorax; C: evaluation and treatment of circulatory compromise and shock; D: Disability and Neurologic Status, assessment of signs of increased intracranial pressure and impending cerebral herniation; and E: Exposure while preventing hypothermia. Implementing these assessment and management priorities can result in more favorable outcomes.

  15. Principles of primary survey and resuscitation in cases of pediatric trauma.

    Saba Jafarpour

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Trauma is a common cause of death and disability in children. Proper approach to pediatric trauma involves adherence to ABCDE sequence in the primary survey and resuscitation in order to promptly recognize and manage immediately life threatening conditions. This readily reviewed sequence includes A: establishment and maintenance of a patent airway while maintaining cervical spine immobilization; B: evaluation of breathing, ventilation and oxygenation, immediate treatment of tension pneumothorax, open pneumothorax and massive hemothorax; C: evaluation and treatment of circulatory compromise and shock; D: Disability and Neurologic Status, assessment of signs of increased intracranial pressure and impending cerebral herniation; and E: Exposure while preventing hypothermia. Implementing these assessment and management priorities can result in more favorable outcomes.

  16. Delayed chest wall hematoma caused by progressive displacement of rib fractures after blunt trauma

    Nobuhiro Sato

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Rib fracture is a common injury resulting from blunt thoracic trauma. Although hemothorax and pneumothorax are known delayed complications of rib fracture, delayed chest wall hematoma has rarely been reported. We discuss the case of an 81-year-old woman who was not undergoing antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy who presented to our emergency department after a traffic injury. This patient had a nondisplaced rib fracture that went undetected on the initial computed tomography scan; the development of progressive displacement led to hemorrhagic shock due to delayed chest wall hematoma. The chest wall hematoma was effectively diagnosed and treated via contrast-enhanced computed tomography and angiographic embolization. This case highlights the possibility of this potential delayed complication from a common injury such as a rib fracture. Keywords: Angiography, Chest wall, Delayed complication, Rib fracture, Thoracic injury

  17. Operative videothoracoscopy in the surgical treatment of penetrating firearms wounds of the chest.

    Brusov, P G; Kuritsyn, A N; Urazovsky, N Y; Tariverdiev, M L

    1998-09-01

    We prospectively analyzed our experience with operative videothoracoscopy (OVT) performed in a field military hospital in cases of penetrating firearms wounds of the thorax (PFAWT) sustained in Chechnya. From February to April 1996, we treated 206 wounded patients, of whom 37 (18.0%) had sustained chest injuries. PFAWT were present in 23 soldiers, accounting for 62.2% of all chest injuries. Twelve injuries were confined to the thorax, eight patients had associated injuries, and three soldiers had thoracoabdominal injuries. Nineteen patients had pleural drainage performed during medical evacuation. The thoracic injuries were right-sided (17), involved bullets or shell splinters (23); were through and through (16), represented solitary wounds (19), and were associated with internal organ injuries (21). Fifteen patients had indications for OVT when they were delivered from the battle-field 1.5 to 22 hours after injury. All patients manifested signs of hemorrhagic shock and hemodynamic instability. Indications for OVT were ongoing intrapleural bleeding (6), clotted hemothorax (6), or marked air leakage (3) preventing lung inflation with the OP-02 apparatus (field modification). OVT revealed 12 lung wounds, nine of which were multiple wounds, pleural bleeding in 6 patients, clotted hemothorax in 11 patients, and foreign bodies in 5 patients. Two patients underwent thoracotomy, one for suspicion of heart injury and the second because we could not adequately visualize and control bleeding revealed at OVT to be from the intercostal artery in the left costovertebral angle. Eight of 23 patients had no indication for operative videothoracoscopy and were managed with continued pleural aspiration and drug therapy. Wedge resection of the lung using an Endo-GIA-30 stapler was necessary in two patients because of parenchymal destruction and bleeding. Evacuation of clotted blood by fragmentation and aspiration was satisfactory in all cases. Satisfactory manual suturing of selected

  18. Percutaneous transcatheter drainage of intrathoracic air and fluid collections

    Klein, J.S.; Salmon, C.J.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, the authors review their experience with radiologically guided percutaneous, small-bore catheter drainage of 89 intrathoraic air or fluid collections in 81 patients to determine the effect of various clinical and radiographic features and fluid characteristics on successful treatment of the collections. The majority of patients underwent drainage for malignant pleural effusion. Patients with pneumothorax, complicated parapneumonic effusion or empyema, hemothorax, chylothorax, and lung abscess were included. Each patient's diagnosis and symptoms; the size, position, and characteristics of the fluid collection; catheter type and size, and use of urokinase were recorded; their effect on clinical and radiographic resolution was determined with logistic regression analysis. The vast majority of malignant effusions were successfully drained and sclerosed with small bore (8-F) pigtail catheters. In patients with pneumothorax, those from Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia required prolonged suction and pleurodesis

  19. Egophony: is this classic semeiological sign still helpful?

    Domenico Viviani

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Egophony, also known as “E to A change”, is a classical, clinical sign detected by chest auscultation, consisting into a change in timbre, but not pitch or volume, produced by solid interposed between the resonator and the stethoscope head. Egophony was first described in 1916 by R.T.H. Laënnec, but today it is almost unknown. Yet it is a powerful tool to detect pleural effusion as well as other pathological conditions associated with lung compression or consolidation, such as hemothorax or atelectasis of the lung. AIM OF THE STUDY The aim of this paper is to remember the value of this frequently neglected clinical sign and to stress the importance of physical examination, that should always precede – and could often replace – instrumental tests, which are quite expensive and sometimes unnecessary.

  20. Fatal mediastinal biopsy: How interventional radiology saves the day

    Y Yaacob

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This was a case of a 35-year-old man with mediastinal mass requiring computed tomography (CT-guided biopsy for tissue diagnosis. A posterior approach with an 18-gauge biopsy needle was used to obtain tissue sample. Post biopsy, patient condition deteriorated and multiphase CT study detected active bleeding in arterial phase at the biopsy site with massive hemothorax. Subsequent angiography showed arterial bleeder arising from the apical branch of the right pulmonary artery. Selective endovascular embolization with NBCA (n-Butyl cyanoacrylate was successful. Patient survived the complication. The case highlighted a rare complication in a common radiology procedure and the value of the interventional radiology unit in avoiding a fatal outcome.

  1. Thorax computed tomography findings in patients victims of chest trauma

    Francisco Jose Rodrigues de Moura Filho

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe thorax computed tomography findings in patients assisted in the emergency unit of Institute Dr Jose Frota (IJF. Materials and Methods: Descriptive study analyzing 160 consecutive contrast-enhanced thorax computed tomography of patients victims of thoracic trauma admitted to the emergency unit of IJF, between November 1st, 2014 and January 31st, 2015. Results: Abnormal findings were observed in 91,2 % of the patients. Among them, the following findings were most frequently observed: fractures (48%, hemothorax (43%, atelectasis (37%, pneumothorax (26% and lung contusions (17% Rupture of the esophagus was seen in three patients. Conclusion: We recognize that the findings encountered in our study are of similar prevalence to the ones reported in the literature and that CT scan is essencial to quickly diagnose these findings.

  2. Catamenial pneumothorax

    Visouli, Aikaterini N.; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Kougioumtzi, Ioanna; Huang, Haidong; Li, Qiang; Dryllis, Georgios; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Lampaki, Sofia; Zaric, Bojan; Branislav, Perin; Porpodis, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    Catamenial pneumothorax (CP) is the most common form of thoracic endometriosis syndrome, which also includes catamenial hemothorax, catamenial hemoptysis, catamenial hemopneumothorax and endometriosis lung nodules, as well as some exceptional presentations. Usually onset of lung collapse is less than 72 hours after menstruation. Most commonly occurs in women aged 30-40 years, but has been diagnosed in young girls as early as 10 years of age and post menopausal women (exclusively in women of menstrual age) most with a history of pelvic endometriosis. Diagnosis can be hinted by high recurrence rates of lung collapse in a woman of reproductive age with endometriosis. Moreover; CA-125 is elevated. Video-assisted thoracoscopy or medical thoracoscopy is used for confirmation. In our current work we will present all aspects of CP from diagnosis to treatment. PMID:25337402

  3. Factors affecting mortality after penetrating cardiac injuries: 10-year experience at urban level I trauma center.

    Mina, Michael J; Jhunjhunwala, Rashi; Gelbard, Rondi B; Dougherty, Stacy D; Carr, Jacquelyn S; Dente, Christopher J; Nicholas, Jeffrey M; Wyrzykowski, Amy D; Salomone, Jeffrey P; Vercruysse, Gary A; Feliciano, David V; Morse, Bryan C

    2017-06-01

    Despite the lethality of injuries to the heart, optimizing factors that impact mortality for victims that do survive to reach the hospital is critical. From 2003 to 2012, prehospital data, injury characteristics, and clinical patient factors were analyzed for victims with penetrating cardiac injuries (PCIs) at an urban, level I trauma center. Over the 10-year study, 80 PCI patients survived to reach the hospital. Of the 21 factors analyzed, prehospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation (odds ratio [OR] = 30), scene time greater than 10 minutes (OR = 58), resuscitative thoracotomy (OR = 19), and massive left hemothorax (OR = 15) had the greatest impact on mortality. Cardiac tamponade physiology demonstrated a "protective" effect for survivors to the hospital (OR = .08). Trauma surgeons can improve mortality after PCI by minimizing time to the operating room for early control of hemorrhage. In PCI patients, tamponade may provide a physiologic advantage (lower mortality) compared to exsanguination. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Case report and review of the literature total endovascular repair of acute ascending aortic rupture: a case report and review of the literature.

    McCallum, John C; Limmer, Karl K; Perricone, Anthony; Bandyk, Dennis; Kansal, Nikhil

    2013-07-01

    Thoracic aortic endografting has been successfully implemented to treat aneurysmal disease of the distal aortic arch and descending thoracic aorta. Although there are reports of ascending aortic endovascular interventions, the total endovascular repair of a ruptured ascending aorta secondary to a Type A dissection has not been described. We report the case of a 77-year-old patient who presented with a ruptured ascending aortic aneurysm secondary to degeneration of a Stanford type A aortic dissection. His surgical history was significant for orthotropic heart transplant 19 years prior. The dissection, aneurysm, and rupture occurred in the native aorta distal to the ascending aortic suture line. At presentation, he was hemodynamically unstable with a right hemothorax. We placed 3 Medtronic Talent Thoracic Stent Graft devices (Medtronic Inc, Minneapolis, MN) across the suture line in the ascending aorta, excluding the rupture. The patient survived and has been followed to 25 months.

  5. MINIMALLY INVASIVE TECHNIQUES IN THE INTEGRATED TREATMENT OF THOSE SUFFERING FROM SEVERE CONCURRENT INJURY WITH DOMINATING CHEST TRAUMA

    E. A. Tseymakh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment outcomes of 226 patients have been analyzed. Treatment and diagnostic algorithm has been developed for the management of patients with severe concurrent injury and dominating chest trauma. The indications for the following interventions have been formulated: emergency thoracotomy, emergency and urgent video-assisted thoracoscopy, local fibrinolytic therapy in case of clotted hemothorax and post-traumatic pleural empyema, valve bronchial block in tension and continuously persistent pneumothorax, osteosynthesis of fragmentary costal fractures. Using minimally invasive treatment techniques allowed decreasing the number of surgeries in the patients and increasing the number of recovered patients when discharged from the hospital.

  6. E-FAST: A propos of hemopericardium in the Emergency Department

    Alejandro Cardozo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The extended-focused assessment with sonography in trauma is still recognized as a technique approach to patients whose trauma involves the chest and the abdomen, with the aim of ruling out conditions as pneumothorax, hemothorax, pericardial effusion/cardiac tamponade, and intraperitoneal free fluid. Although CT is the gold standard test, the inconvenience of moving unstable patients and the amount of time it takes to carry it out, makes it not always possible in the Emergency Department, which positions the ultrasound as an ideal tool in the evaluation of patients with trauma in the Emergency Department. In this case report, we presented the case of a patient who complains of multiple stab wounds, and the extended-focused assessment with sonography in trauma confirmed the diagnostic impressions.

  7. Traumatic and latrogenic changes in the pleura and mediastinum

    Somogyi, J.W.; Finucane, B.T.

    1987-01-01

    Pneumothorax and hemothorax are potentially life-threatening complications of blunt chest trauma or penetrating thoracic injuries. Mediastinal hemorrhage and pneumomediastinum are common findings in patients with injuries to the esophagus, bronchi, and great vessels. With the critically ill patient, taking a portable chest radiograph is the initial step most often used to verify or exclude these diagnoses when they are not clinically apparent. Radiologists and clinicians alike find the portable image of the chest difficult to interpret because of problems in patient rotation, poor inspiration, patient motion, film technique, and variation in these factors from study to study. The interpretation of a portable chest radiograph can be improved through attention to quality control and an understanding of the physiologic changes of recumbency and the interrelationships of the fascial planes of the thorax. These latter two factors are of particular importance in the examination of the pleura and mediastinum

  8. Primary pleural angiosarcoma as a mimicker of mesothelioma: a case report **VS**

    Kao Yu-Chien

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Primary pleural angiosarcoma is a rare and clinically aggressive tumor. Patients usually present with chest pain, dyspnea, hemoptysis and/or cough. Radiologic studies reveal diffuse pleural thickening and pleural effusion with or without mass lesion. The clinical and radiological features both resemble those of mesothelioma, and its definite diagnosis requires careful histologic examination. However, frequent epithelioid feature and immunoreactivity to cytokeratin in primary pleural angiosarcoma further complicate the pathologic diagnosis. The use of proper immunohistochemical stains is often needed to support endothelial differentiation in the tumor cells and to exclude metastatic carcinoma and mesothelioma. We report the case of a 49-year-old male patient with primary pleural angiosarcoma, who presented with initial hemothorax, followed by a rapid progress to an inoperable status.

  9. CT-guided needle biopsy of lung lesions: A survey of severe complication based on 9783 biopsies in Japan

    Tomiyama, Noriyuki; Yasuhara, Yoshifumi; Nakajima, Yasuo; Adachi, Shuji; Arai, Yasuaki; Kusumoto, Masahiko; Eguchi, Kenji; Kuriyama, Keiko; Sakai, Fumikazu; Noguchi, Masayuki; Murata, Kiyoshi; Murayama, Sadayuki; Mochizuki, Teruhito; Mori, Kiyoshi; Yamada, Kozo

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of our study was to update the rate of severe complications following CT-guided needle biopsy in Japan via a mailed survey. Materials and methods: Postal questionnaires regarding CT-guided needle biopsy were sent out to multiple hospitals in Japan. The questions regarded: the total number and duration of CT-guided lung biopsies performed at each hospital, and the complication rates and numbers of pneumothorax, hemothorax, air embolism, tumor seeding, tension pneumothorax and other rare complications. Each severe complication was followed with additional questions. Results: Data from 9783 biopsies was collected from 124 centers. Pneumothorax was the most common complication, and occurred in 2412 (35%) of 6881 cases. A total of 39 (35%) hospitals reported 74 (0.75%) cases with severe complications. There were six cases (0.061%) with air embolism, six cases (0.061%) with tumor seeding at the site of the biopsy route, 10 cases (0.10%) with tension pneumothorax, six cases (0.061%) with severe pulmonary hemorrhage or hemoptysis, nine cases (0.092%) with hemothorax, and 27 cases (0.26%) with others, including heart arrest, shock, and respiratory arrest. From a total of 62 patients with severe complications, 54 patients (0.55%) recovered without sequela, however one patient (0.01%) recovered with hemiplegia due to cerebral infarction, and the remaining seven patients (0.07%) died. Conclusions: This is the first national study documenting severe complications with respect to CT-guided needle biopsy in Japan. The complication rate in Japan is comparable to internationally published figures. We believe this data will improve both clinicians as well as patients understanding of the risk versus benefit of CT-guided needle biopsy, resulting better decisions

  10. Imaging of blunt chest trauma; Bildgebung des stumpfen Thoraxtraumas

    Prosch, H. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Allgemeines Krankenhaus, Univ.-Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Wien (Austria); Negrin, L. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Allgemeines Krankenhaus, Univ.-Klinik fuer Unfallchirurgie, Wien (Austria)

    2014-09-15

    Blunt chest trauma is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Consequently, all patients should be evaluated radiologically after blunt chest trauma to allow timely and appropriate treatment. Conventional chest radiographs and computed tomography (CT) are proven modalities with which to evaluate patients after blunt chest trauma. Over the last several years extended focused assessment with sonography for trauma (eFAST) has gained increasing importance for the initial assessment of seriously injured patients. In the acute phase of severely injured patients eFAST examinations are helpful to exclude pneumothorax, hemothorax and hemopericardium. Chest radiographs may also be used to diagnose a pneumothorax or hemothorax; however, the sensitivity is limited and CT is the diagnostic modality of choice to evaluate severely injured patients. (orig.) [German] Stumpfe Thoraxtraumen gehen mit einer hohen Morbiditaet und Mortalitaet einher. Daher sollten Patienten mit Verdacht auf ein stumpfes Thoraxtrauma rasch radiologisch untersucht werden, damit die entsprechenden therapeutischen Schritte zeitgerecht eingeleitet werden koennen. Zur Abklaerung von Patienten nach einem stumpfen Thoraxtrauma sind seit Jahren das konventionelle Lungenroentgen und die Computertomographie bewaehrte Verfahren. In den letzten Jahren hat die fokussierte Ultraschalluntersuchung (eFAST, Extended Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma) von schwerverletzten Patienten vermehrt an Bedeutung gewonnen. Durch eine eFAST-Untersuchung kann in der Akutphase rasch geklaert werden, ob bei dem Patienten ein therapiebeduerftiger Pneumothorax, Haematoperikard oder Haematothorax vorliegen. Auch das Lungenroentgen wird zur Diagnose eines Pneumothorax oder Haematothorax eingesetzt, wenngleich seine Sensitivitaet deutlich eingeschraenkt ist. Die CT ist das diagnostische Verfahren der Wahl, um v. a. Patienten mit einem schweren Thoraxtrauma abzuklaeren. (orig.)

  11. Hemotórax espontâneo em doente com neurofibromatose tipo I – A propósito de um caso clínico

    Alexandra Bento

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Resumo: O hemotórax espontâneo é uma complicação rara e potencialmente fatal da neurofibromatose. Vários mecanismos patológicos são descritos para a vasculopatia associada à doença: a invasão dos vasos por tumores adjacentes, como shwannoma, neurofibroma ou neurofibrosarcoma; b displasia vascular com formação de aneurismas e estenoses6,7,9. Outros mecanismos envolvidos podem incluir patologias pleuropulmonares (infecções com necrose, embolia pulmonar, endometriose, neoplasias e discrasia sanguínea. Os autores relatam o caso de uma jovem de 33 anos, que recorreu ao serviço de urgência por toracalgia superior direita, contínua, irradiando para o ombro e escápula homolaterais, sem factores de agravamento nem de alívio e com oito dias de evolução. Abstract: Spontaneous hemothorax is a rare and potentially lethal neurofibromatosis’ complication. Several pathological mechanisms may explain the associated vasculopathy: a direct vascular invasion from adjacent tumors such as Shwannoma, neurofibroma or neurofibrosarcoma; b vascular dysplasia with stenotic or aneurysm formation6,7,9. Other mechanisms involved may include pleuropulmonar pathologies (necrotizing infections, pulmonary embolism, endometriosis, neoplasms and blood dyscrasias. The authors describe a case of a 33 years old female, who went to the ER Service complaining with right persistent hemithoracic pain, extending to the ipsilateral shoulder and shoulder blade, without aggravation or relieving factors, since the last 8 days. Palavras-chave: Neurofibromatose, hemotórax espontâneo, Key-words: Neurofibromatosis, spontaneous hemothorax

  12. Diagnostic Accuracy of Ultrasonography in the Initial Evaluation of Patients with Penetrating Chest Trauma

    Farhad Heydari

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Traumatic chest injuries (TCI are one of the most common causes of referring to the emergency departments, with high mortality and disability. This study was designed to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasonography versus chest X ray (CXR in detection of hemo-pneumothorax for patients suffering penetrating TCI. Methods: The present cross-sectional study was performed to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasonography in penetrating TCI victims referred to the emergency department of Shahid Kashani and Alzahra hospitals of Isfahan, Iran, from July 2012 to June 2013. Bedside ultrasonography and plain CXR was done on arrival and three hours after admission. The results of ultrasonography and radiography were separately evaluated by an emergency medicine specialist and a radiologist, who were blind to the aims of the study. Then, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV, negative predictive value (NPV, and kappa coefficient was considered to evaluate the accuracy of ultrasonography. Results: In this research 64 patients with penetrating chest trauma were assessed (98.4% male. The mean age of them was 25.6±8.5 years (rang: 13-65. The plain radiography revealed the eight (12.5 % cases of pneumothorax and one (1.6% hemothorax. The findings of primary ultrasonography also showed the same number of hemo-pneumothorax. Sensitivity and specificity of primary ultrasound in diagnosis of pneumothorax were 100% (95% Cl: 60.7- 100 and 100.0% (95% Cl, 92.0% to 100.0% and in detection of hemothorax were 100% (95% Cl: 50.5-100 and 100% (95% Cl: 92.8-100, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity of ultrasound in the third hour were 100% (95% Cl: 31.3-100 and 100% (95% Cl: 91.4-100, respectively. Conclusion: Findings of the present study have shown that ultrasonography has an acceptable diagnostic accuracy in the initial assessment of patients with penetrating chest trauma. However, because of its dependency on operator

  13. Reconstruction of Injured Carotid Artery in a Comatose Patient

    Arben Zenelaj

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A man 30 years old,was brought to the emergency department after being injured on the left side of the neck area.Massive bleeding from the wound caused by glass was observed.The patient was in cerebral coma and hemorrahagic shock.The eye pupils remained isochoric during and after the operation.He was taken immediately at the surgery room.The bleeding was stopped by using external compression.Exposure of the left neck blood vessels was carried out.The left common carotid artery and internal jugular vein was revealed.A provisory Pruitt-Inahara shunt was put in the common carotid artery,while teh injured vein was ligated.The suture of the left common carotid artery using Prolen 6-0 completed the procedure.After the surgery the patient was transferred to the intensive care unit.About two hours later he woke up,conscious.The left thoracic drainage because of the hemothorax was applied in the second postoperative day.The patient was lively and discharged from the hospitall in the 14-th postoperative day.The right facial paresis and mild left side hemiparesis persisted.Two months after the event no residual neurologic deficits were observed. [Cukurova Med J 2014; 39(3.000: 598-601

  14. A stepwise approach to the etiologic diagnosis of pleural effusion in respiratory intensive care unit and short-term evaluation of treatment

    Nilesh J Chinchkar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pleural effusions in respiratory intensive care unit (RICU are associated with diseases of varied etiologies and often carry a grave prognosis. This prospective study was conducted to establish an etiologic diagnosis in a series of such patients before starting treatment. Materials and Methods: Fifty consecutive patients, diagnosed with pleural effusion on admission or during their stay in RICU, were further investigated by a two-step approach. (1 Etiologic diagnosis was established by sequential clinical history and findings on physical examination, laboratory tests, chest radiograph, CECT/HRCT/PET-CT and pleural fluid analysis. (2 Patients who remained undiagnosed were subjected to fiber-optic bronchoscopy, video-assisted thoracoscopic pleural biopsy, and histopathology. Results: Etiologic diagnosis of pleural effusion was established in 44 (88% Metastases (24%; para-pneumonia (22%; congestive cardiac failure (18%; tuberculosis (14%; hemothorax (4%; trapped lung, renal failure, and liver cirrhosis (2% each. Six patients (12% remained undiagnosed, as the final diagnostic thoracoscopic biopsy could not be performed in five and tissue histopathology findings were inconclusive in one. Out of the 50 patients, 10 died in the hospital; 2 left against medical advice; and 2 were referred to oncology center for further treatment. The remaining 36 patients were clinically stabilized and discharged. During a 3-month follow-up, eight of them were re-hospitalized, of which four died. Conclusions: Pleural effusion in RICU carries a high risk of mortality. Etiologic diagnosis can be established in most cases.

  15. Fatal lawn mower related projectile injury.

    Colville-Ebeling, Bonnie; Lynnerup, Niels; Banner, Jytte

    2014-06-01

    Fatal lawn mower related injuries are a relatively rare occurrence. In a forensic setting, the primary aim is to reconstruct the injury mechanism and establish the cause of death. A relatively rare, but characteristic type of injury is a so-called projectile or missile injury. This occurs when the operator or a bystander is impacted by an object mobilized from the grass by the rotating mower blades. This type of injury often leaves only modest external trauma, which increases the risk of overlooking an entry wound. In this paper we present a case of a fatal lawn mower related projectile injury which was initially overlooked, later interpreted as a possible gunshot homicide, and finally identified as a lawn mower related projectile injury when autopsy revealed a piece of metal thread in the main bronchus to the right middle lobe, hemopericardium, and right-sided hemothorax. To our knowledge, this injury mechanism has not previously been reported as a cause of death. This case illustrates the importance of postmortem radiological imaging and interdisciplinary cooperation when establishing manner and cause of death in unusual cases.

  16. Determining injuries from posterior and flank stab wounds using computed tomography tractography.

    Bansal, Vishal; Reid, Chris M; Fortlage, Dale; Lee, Jeanne; Kobayashi, Leslie; Doucet, Jay; Coimbra, Raul

    2014-04-01

    Unlike anterior stab wounds (SW), in which local exploration may direct management, posterior SW can be challenging to evaluate. Traditional triple contrast computed tomography (CT) imaging is cumbersome and technician-dependent. The present study examines the role of CT tractography as a strategy to manage select patients with back and flank SW. Hemodynamically stable patients with back and flank SW were studied. After resuscitation, Betadine- or Visipaque®-soaked sterile sponges were inserted into each SW for the estimated depth of the wound. Patients underwent abdominal helical CT scanning, including intravenous contrast, as the sole abdominal imaging study. Images were reviewed by an attending radiologist and trauma surgeon. The tractogram was evaluated to determine SW trajectory and injury to intra- or retroperitoneal organs, vascular structures, the diaphragm, and the urinary tract. Complete patient demographics including operative management and injuries were collected. Forty-one patients underwent CT tractography. In 11 patients, tractography detected violation of the intra- or retroperitoneal cavity leading to operative exploration. Injuries detected included: the spleen (two), colon (one), colonic mesentery (one), kidney (kidney), diaphragm (kidney), pneumothorax (seven), hemothorax (two), iliac artery (one), and traumatic abdominal wall hernia (two). In all patients, none had negative CT findings that failed observation. In this series, CT tractography is a safe and effective imaging strategy to evaluate posterior torso SW. It is unknown whether CT tractography is superior to traditional imaging modalities. Other uses for CT tractography may include determining trajectory from missile wounds and tangential penetrating injuries.

  17. ACR Appropriateness Criteria® rib fractures.

    Henry, Travis S; Kirsch, Jacobo; Kanne, Jeffrey P; Chung, Jonathan H; Donnelly, Edwin F; Ginsburg, Mark E; Heitkamp, Darel E; Kazerooni, Ella A; Ketai, Loren H; McComb, Barbara L; Parker, J Anthony; Ravenel, James G; Restrepo, Carlos Santiago; Saleh, Anthony G; Shah, Rakesh D; Steiner, Robert M; Suh, Robert D; Mohammed, Tan-Lucien H

    2014-11-01

    Rib fracture is the most common thoracic injury, present in 10% of all traumatic injuries and almost 40% of patients who sustain severe nonpenetrating trauma. Although rib fractures can produce significant morbidity, the diagnosis of associated complications (such as pneumothorax, hemothorax, pulmonary contusion, atelectasis, flail chest, cardiovascular injury, and injuries to solid and hollow abdominal organs) may have a more significant clinical impact. When isolated, rib fractures have a relatively low morbidity and mortality, and failure to detect isolated rib fractures does not necessarily alter patient management or outcome in uncomplicated cases. A standard posteroanterior chest radiograph should be the initial, and often the only, imaging test required in patients with suspected rib fracture after minor trauma. Detailed radiographs of the ribs rarely add additional information that would change treatment, and, although other imaging tests (eg, computed tomography, bone scan) have increased sensitivity for detection of rib fractures, there are little data to support their use. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every 3 years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review process include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances in which evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment.

  18. A case of a traumatic chyle leak following an acute thoracic spine injury: successful resolution with strict dietary manipulation

    Skinner Ruby A

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chylothorax is a rare form of pleural effusion that can be associated with both traumatic and non-traumatic causes. Thoracic duct ligation is often the treatment of choice in postsurgical patients; however the optimal treatment of this disease process after traumatic injury remains unclear 1. We present a rare case of a thoracic duct injury secondary to a blunt thoracic spine fracture and subluxation which was successfully treated non-operatively. Case Presentation A 51 year old male presented as a tier one trauma code due to an automobile versus bicycle collision. His examination and radiographic work-up revealed fractures and a subluxation at the third and fourth thoracic spine levels resulting in paraplegia. He also sustained bilateral hemothoraces secondary to multiple rib fractures. Drainage of the left hemothorax led to the diagnosis of a traumatic chylothorax. The thoracic spine fractures were addressed with surgical stabilization and the chylothorax was successfully treated with drainage and dietary manipulation. Conclusions This unusual and complex blunt thoracic duct injury required a multidisciplinary approach. Although the spine injury required surgical fixation, successful resolution of the chyle leak was achieved without surgical intervention.

  19. Comparative analysis between identified injuries of victims of fall from height and other mechanisms of closed trauma

    José Gustavo Parreira

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze the lesions diagnosed in victims of falls, comparing them with those diagnosed in other mechanisms of blunt trauma.METHODS: We conducted a retrospective study of trauma protocol charts (prospectively collected from 2008 to 2010, including victims of trauma over 13 years of age admitted to the emergency room. The severity of injuries was stratified by the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS and Injury Severity Score (ISS. Variables were compared between the group of victims of falls from height (Group 1 and the other victims of blunt trauma (Group 2. We used the Student t, chi-square and Fisher tests for comparison between groups, considering the value of p <0.05 as significant.RESULTS: The series comprised 4,532 cases of blunt trauma, of which 555 (12.2% were victims of falls from height. Severe lesions (AISe"3 were observed in the extremities (17.5%, in the cephalic segment (8.4%, chest (5.5% and the abdomen (2.9%. Victims of Group 1 had significantly higher mean age, AIS in extremities / pelvis, AIS in the thoracic segment and ISS (p <0.05. The group 1 had significantly (p <0.05 higher incidence of tracheal intubation on admission, pneumothorax, hemothorax, rib fractures, chest drainage, spinal trauma, pelvic fractures, complex pelvic fractures and fractures to the upper limbs.CONCLUSION: Victims of fall from height had greater anatomic injury severity, greater frequency and severity of lesions in the thoracic segment and extremities.

  20. Accuracy of chest radiography versus chest computed tomography in hemodynamically stable patients with blunt chest trauma

    Chardoli Mojtaba

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】 Objective: Thoracic injuries are respon- sible for 25% of deaths of blunt traumas. Chest X-ray (CXR is the first diagnostic method in patients with blunt trauma. The aim of this study was to detect the accuracy of CXR versus chest computed tomograpgy (CT in hemodynami- cally stable patients with blunt chest trauma. Methods: Study was conducted at the emergency department of Sina Hospital from March 2011 to March 2012. Hemodynamically stable patients with at least 16 years of age who had blunt chest trauma were included. All patients underwent the same diagnostic protocol which consisted of physical examination, CXR and CT scan respectively. Results: Two hundreds patients (84% male and 16% female were included with a mean age of (37.9±13.7 years. Chin J Traumatol 2013;16(6:351-354 Rib fracture was the most common finding of CXR (12.5% and CT scan (25.5%. The sensitivity of CXR for hemothorax, thoracolumbar vertebra fractures and rib fractures were 20%, 49% and 49%, respectively. Pneumothorax, foreign body, emphysema, pulmonary contusion, liver hematoma and ster- num fracture were not diagnosed with CXR alone. Conclusion: Applying CT scan as the first-line diag- nostic modality in hemodynamically stable patients with blunt chest trauma can detect pathologies which may change management and outcome. Key words: Radiography; Thoracic injuries; Tomography, X-ray computed

  1. Traumatic Rib Injury: Patterns, Imaging Pitfalls, Complications, and Treatment.

    Talbot, Brett S; Gange, Christopher P; Chaturvedi, Apeksha; Klionsky, Nina; Hobbs, Susan K; Chaturvedi, Abhishek

    2017-01-01

    The ribs are frequently affected by blunt or penetrating injury to the thorax. In the emergency department setting, it is vital for the interpreting radiologist to not only identify the presence of rib injuries but also alert the clinician about organ-specific injury, specific traumatic patterns, and acute rib trauma complications that require emergent attention. Rib injuries can be separated into specific morphologic fracture patterns that include stress, buckle, nondisplaced, displaced, segmental, and pathologic fractures. Specific attention is also required for flail chest and for fractures due to pediatric nonaccidental trauma. Rib fractures are associated with significant morbidity and mortality, both of which increase as the number of fractured ribs increases. Key complications associated with rib fracture include pain, hemothorax, pneumothorax, extrapleural hematoma, pulmonary contusion, pulmonary laceration, acute vascular injury, and abdominal solid-organ injury. Congenital anomalies, including supernumerary or accessory ribs, vestigial anterior ribs, bifid ribs, and synostoses, are common and should not be confused with traumatic pathologic conditions. Nontraumatic mimics of traumatic rib injury, with or without fracture, include metastatic disease, primary osseous neoplasms (osteosarcoma, chondrosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, Langerhans cell histiocytosis, and osteochondroma), fibrous dysplasia, and Paget disease. Principles of management include supportive and procedural methods of alleviating pain, treating complications, and stabilizing posttraumatic deformity. By recognizing and accurately reporting the imaging findings, the radiologist will add value to the care of patients with thoracic trauma. Online supplemental material is available for this article. © RSNA, 2017.

  2. Computed Tomographic Findings and Mortality in Patients With Pneumomediastinum From Blunt Trauma.

    Lee, Wayne S; Chong, Vincent E; Victorino, Gregory P

    2015-08-01

    The care of most patients with pneumomediastinum (PNM) due to trauma can be managed conservatively; however, owing to aerodigestive tract injury and other associated injuries, there is a subset of patients with PNM who are at higher risk of mortality but can be difficult to identify. To characterize computed tomographic (CT) findings associated with mortality in patients with PNM due to blunt trauma. A retrospective review of medical records from January 1, 2002, to December 31, 2011, was conducted at a university-based urban trauma center. The patients evaluated were those injured by blunt trauma and found to have PNM on initial chest CT scanning. Data analysis was performed July 2, 2013, to June 18, 2014. In-hospital mortality. During the study period, 3327 patients with blunt trauma underwent chest CT. Of these, 72 patients (2.2%) had PNM. Patients with PNM had higher Injury Severity Scores (P blunt trauma; however, CT findings of posterior PNM, air in all mediastinal compartments, and concurrent hemothorax are associated with increased mortality. These CT findings could be used as a triage tool to alert the trauma surgeon to a potentially lethal injury.

  3. Sinus cut-off sign: A helpful sign in the CT diagnosis of diaphragmatic rupture associated with pleural effusion

    Kaya, Seyda Ors; Karabulut, Nevzat; Yuncu, Gokhan; Sevinc, Serpil; Kiroglu, Yilmaz

    2006-01-01

    The objective of our study was to describe the 'sinus cut-off' sign at CT in the diagnosis of diaphragmatic rupture in patients with blunt abdominal trauma complicated with pleural effusion, and evaluate its utility in an experimental model. Between January 2004 and March 2005, we observed an unusual interruption of costophrenic sinus at CT in three patients with blunt abdominal trauma accompanied with pleural effusion. This observation prompted us to evaluate the utility of this sign in an experimental model. Laparotomically, we created 2 cm diapragmatic lacerations at each hemidiaphragm in two rabbits and pushed up the abdominal viscera with omentum through the defect. To simulate hemothorax, we also injected 5-10 mL of diluted contrast material into the pleural space. Using a dual-slice helical CT scanner, limited thoracoabdominal CT examination was performed before and after injection of intrapleural contrast material. The images were analyzed for the presence of CT signs for diaphragmatic injury. The left posterior costophrenic sulcus was interrupted in all of the three patients with left pleural effusion. While it was associated with other findings of diaphragmatic injury, the 'sinus cut-off sign' was the sole finding in one patient. The sinus cut-off sign was observed on the CT scans of 100% of the rabbits with a left and right sided diaphragmatic rupture. The 'sinus cut-off sign' is useful and can increase the CT detection of acute diaphragmatic injury associated with pleural effusion

  4. Complications of thoracentesis: incidence, risk factors, and strategies for prevention.

    Cantey, Eric P; Walter, James M; Corbridge, Thomas; Barsuk, Jeffrey H

    2016-07-01

    Although thoracentesis is generally considered safe, procedural complications are associated with increased morbidity, mortality, and healthcare costs. In this article, we review the risk factors and prevention of the most common complications of thoracentesis including pneumothorax, bleeding (chest wall hematoma and hemothorax), and re-expansion pulmonary edema. Recent data support the importance of operator expertise and the use of ultrasound in reducing the risk of iatrogenic pneumothorax. Although coagulopathy or thrombocytopenia and the use of anticoagulant or antiplatelet medications have traditionally been viewed as contraindications to thoracentesis, new evidence suggests that patients may be able to safely undergo thoracentesis without treating their bleeding risk. Re-expansion pulmonary edema, a rare complication of thoracentesis, is felt to result in part from the generation of excessively negative pleural pressure. When and how to monitor changes in pleural pressure during thoracentesis remains a focus of ongoing study. Major complications of thoracentesis are uncommon. Clinician awareness of risk factors for procedural complications and familiarity with strategies that improve outcomes are essential components for safely performing thoracentesis.

  5. Saline-enhanced radiofrequency thermal ablation of the lung: a feasibility study in rabbits

    Lee, Jeong Min; Kim, Sang Won; Li, Chun Ai; Youk, Ji Hyun; Kim, Young Kon; Jin, Zhewu; Chung, Myoung Ja [Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Mi Suk [Yangi Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-12-01

    To assess the feasibility and safety of CT-guided percutaneous transthoracic radiofrequency ablation (RFA) with saline infusion of pulmonary tissue in rabbits. Twenty-eight New Zealand White rabbits were divided into two groups: an RFA group (n=10) and a saline-enhanced RFA (SRFA) group (n=18). In the RFA group, percutaneous RFA of the lung was performed under CT guidance and using a 17-gauge internally cooled electrode. In the SRFA group, 1.5 ml of 0.9% saline was infused slowly through a 21-gauge, polyteflon-coated Chiba needle prior to and during RFA. Lesion size and the healing process were studied in rabbits sacrificed at times from the day following treatment to three weeks after, and any complications were noted. In the SRFA group, the mean diameter (12.5{+-}1.6 mm) of acute RF lesions was greater than that of RFA lesions (8.5{+-}1.4 mm) (p < .05). The complications arising in 12 cases were pneumothorax (n=8), thermal injury to the chest wall (n=2), hemothorax (n=1), and lung abscess (n=1). Although procedure-related complications tended to occur more frequently in the SRFA group (55.6%) than in the RFA group (20%), the difference was not statistically significant (p .11). Saline-enhanced RFA of pulmonary tissue in rabbits produces more extensive coagulation necrosis than conventional RFA procedures, without adding substantial risk of serious complications.

  6. Complications after 1000 lung radiofrequency ablation sessions in 420 patients: a single center's experiences.

    Kashima, Masataka; Yamakado, Koichiro; Takaki, Haruyuki; Kodama, Hiroshi; Yamada, Tomomi; Uraki, Junji; Nakatsuka, Atsuhiro

    2011-10-01

    This study retrospectively evaluates complications after lung radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Complications were assessed for each RFA session in 420 consecutive patients with 1403 lung tumors who underwent 1000 RFA sessions with a cool-tip RFA system. A major complication was defined as a grade 3 or 4 adverse event. Risk factors affecting frequent major complications that occurred with an incidence of 1% or more were detected using multivariate analysis. Four deaths (0.4% [4/1000]) related to RFA procedures occurred. Three patients died of interstitial pneumonia. The other patient died of hemothorax. The major complication rate was 9.8% (98/1000). Frequent major complications were aseptic pleuritis (2.3% [23/1000]), pneumonia (1.8% [18/1000]), lung abscess (1.6% [16/1000]), bleeding requiring blood transfusion (1.6% [16/1000]), pneumothorax requiring pleural sclerosis (1.6% [16/1000]), followed by bronchopleural fistula (0.4% [4/1000]), brachial nerve injury (0.3% [3/1000]), tumor seeding (0.1% [1/1000]), and diaphragm injury (0.1% [1/1000]). Puncture number (p risk factors for aseptic pleuritis. Previous external beam radiotherapy (p risk factors for pneumonia, as were emphysema (p lung abscess, and serum platelet count (p risk factor for pneumothorax requiring pleural sclerosis. Lung RFA is a relatively safe procedure, but it can be fatal. Risk factors found in this study will help to stratify high-risk patients.

  7. Role of computed tomography in blunt chest trauma

    Cho, Jae Hyun; Kim, Sang Jin; Lee, Chan Wha; Kim, Hae Kyoon

    1994-01-01

    In patient with blunt trauma of chest, supine AP x-ray cannot differentiate the lung contusion, laceration, atelectasis, and hemothorax definitely. Therefore, computed tomographic evaluation is needed for accurate evaluation of the injuries. In our knowledge, there are few reports about CT findings of blunt chest trauma, in our country, therefore we tried to fluid the characteristic CT findings in patients with blunt trauma. We analyzed the plain x-ray and CT image of 4 patients with blunt chest trauma. Location and morphology of lung parenchymal contusion and laceration, hemopneumothorax, chest wall injuries and location of chest tube. Lung parenchymal contusion was noted in 53 segments., of 16 patients infiltration(n=27 segment), and multiple nodular pattern was noted in 15 segment, pattern of consolidation along the lung periphery was seen in 11 segment. Laceration was noted in 18 lesion and most commonly located in paravertebral area(b=8). CT scan of chest in patient with blunt chest trauma, provides accurate information of the pattern of injuries, and localization, therefore, should be performed as possible

  8. Findings of autopsy imaging

    Shiotani, Seiji; Saito, Tsukuru; Itoya, Saori

    2009-01-01

    Described is the outline of autopsy imaging (Ai) by CT, MRI and ultrasonography (US) as the reading of the postmortem images is becoming important for radiologist on site. The present major Ai modality is CT, where the cause of death can be identified in most cases of injuries like that by traffic accident, and of intracranial hemorrhagic lesions. It is difficult for CT alone to determine the cause due to acute heart failure, for which Ai by enhanced CT (2-min heart massage during the intravenous infusion of a contrast agent) has been introduced. CT findings in Ai are varied according to the death cause, anabiotic treatment conducted and postmortem changes. The second item includes the gastrointestinal tract dilation, rib fracture, pneumo- or hemo-thorax, bruise or rupture, and intravascular gas, and the third, the blood hypostasis, which emphasizing the shadow at the gravity-loaded portions in Ai CT. MRI signals vary dependently on the temperature and the inversion time should be shortened to suppress the cerebrospinal signal at Ai of the cold body like that stored in a refrigerator. US can detect clear, macroscopic morphological changes and the portable machine has been in practice at autopsy onsite. As sound speed depends on the temperature in water, Ai US images are obscure relative to living body due to the low temperature. Authors think the problem to identify the cause of death will be mostly solved in Japan when radiological technologists more actively participate in Ai. (K.T.)

  9. Tomographic aspects of penetrating thoracic trauma: injuries from firearms and other weapons

    Melo, Alessandro Severo Alves de; Moreira, Luiza Beatriz Melo; Pessoa, Fernanda Miraldi Clement; Saint-Martin, Nara; Ancilotti Filho, Roger [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niterói, RJ (Brazil); Souza Junior, Arthur Soares [Faculdade de Medicina de São José do Rio Preto (FAMERP), SP (Brazil); Marchiori, Edson, E-mail: edmarchiori@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-11-15

    Objective: The aim of this study was to analyze the various computed tomography findings in penetrating chest trauma, as well as to determine the frequency and extent of the lesions. Material and Methods: We studied the computed tomography findings from 40 cases of penetrating thoracic trauma, of which 35 (85.8%) were gunshot wounds and 5 (14.2%) were caused by another type of weapon. Results: Pulmonary lesions were found in 39 cases (97.5%), manifesting as contusions in 34 cases (85%), atelectasis in 8 (20%), lacerations in 1 (2.5%) and hematomas in 1 (2.5%). Hemothorax was seen in 31 cases (77.5%), and pneumothorax was seen in 22 cases (55%). Mediastinal lesions were observed in 8 cases (20%), including mediastinal hematoma in 3 cases (7.5%), hemopericardium in 3 (7.5%), and pneumomediastinum in 2 (5%). Diaphragmatic rupture was seen in 2 cases (5%). Conclusion: In patients with penetrating thoracic trauma, computed tomography of the chest is an important tool for characterizing the affected organs and evaluating the path of injury, as well as the severity and extent of the lesions. The images obtained are also useful in estimating the risk of death and determining the best therapeutic approach. (author)

  10. Sharp Central Venous Recanalization in Hemodialysis Patients: A Single-Institution Experience

    Arabi, Mohammad, E-mail: marabi2004@hotmail.com; Ahmed, Ishtiaq; Mat’hami, Abdulaziz [Prince Sultan Military Medical City (PSMMC), Division of Endovascular Interventional Radiology, Department of Medical Imaging (Saudi Arabia); Ahmed, Dildar; Aslam, Naveed [Prince Sultan Military Medical City (PSMMC), Department of Nephrology (Saudi Arabia)

    2016-06-15

    PurposeWe report our institutional experience with sharp central venous recanalization in chronic hemodialysis patients who failed standard techniques.Materials and MethodsSince January 2014, a series of seven consecutive patients (four males and three females), mean age 35 years (18–65 years), underwent sharp central venous recanalization. Indications included obtaining hemodialysis access (n = 6) and restoration of superior vena cava (SVC) patency to alleviate occlusion symptoms and restore fistula function (n = 1). The transseptal needle was used for sharp recanalization in six patients, while it could not be introduced in one patient due to total occlusion of the inferior vena cava. Instead, transmediastinal SVC access using Chiba needle was obtained.ResultsTechnical success was achieved in all cases. SVC recanalization achieved symptoms’ relief and restored fistula function in the symptomatic patient. One patient underwent arteriovenous fistula creation on the recanalized side 3 months after the procedure. The remaining catheters were functional at median follow-up time of 9 months (1–14 months). Two major complications occurred including a right hemothorax and a small hemopericardium, which were managed by covered stent placement across the perforated SVC.ConclusionSharp central venous recanalization using the transseptal needle is feasible technique in patients who failed standard recanalization procedures. The potential high risk of complications necessitates thorough awareness of anatomy and proper technical preparedness.

  11. Chest trauma in children: A local experience

    Al-Saigh, A.; Fazili, Fiaz M.; Allam, Abdulla R.

    1999-01-01

    Chest trauma in childhood is relatively uncommon in clinical practice andhas been the subject of few reports in literature. This study was undertakento examine our experience in dealing with chest trauma in children. This wasa retrospective study of 74 children who sustained chest trauma and werereferred to King Fahd Hospital in Medina over a two-year period. The age,cause of injury, severity of injury, associated extrathoracic injuries,treatment and outcome were analyzed. The median age of patients was nineyears. Fifty-nine of them (80%) sustained blunt trauma in 62% of thechildren, gun shot wounds were seen in five and stab wounds in 10 children.Head injury was the most common injury associated with thoracic trauma andwas seen in 14 patients (19%) and associated intra-abdominal injuries wereseen in nine patients. Chest x-ray of the blunt trauma patients revealedfractured ribs in 24 children, pneumothorax in six, hemothorax in four,hemoneumothorax in three, and pulmonary contusions in 22 patients. Fifty onepercent of children were managed conservatively, 37% required tubethoracostomy, 8% were mechanically ventilated and 4% underwent thoractomy.The prevalence of chest trauma in children due to road traffic accidents ishigh in Saudi Arabia. Head injury is thought to be the most common associatedextrathoracic injuries, however, most of these patients can be managedconservatively. (author)

  12. Traumatic aortic injury score (TRAINS): an easy and simple score for early detection of traumatic aortic injuries in major trauma patients with associated blunt chest trauma.

    Mosquera, Victor X; Marini, Milagros; Muñiz, Javier; Asorey-Veiga, Vanesa; Adrio-Nazar, Belen; Boix, Ricardo; Lopez-Perez, José M; Pradas-Montilla, Gonzalo; Cuenca, José J

    2012-09-01

    To develop a risk score based on physical examination and chest X-ray findings to rapidly identify major trauma patients at risk of acute traumatic aortic injury (ATAI). A multicenter retrospective study was conducted with 640 major trauma patients with associated blunt chest trauma classified into ATAI (aortic injury) and NATAI (no aortic injury) groups. The score data set included 76 consecutive ATAI and 304 NATAI patients from a single center, whereas the validation data set included 52 consecutive ATAI and 208 NATAI patients from three independent institutions. Bivariate analysis identified variables potentially influencing the presentation of aortic injury. Confirmed variables by logistic regression were assigned a score according to their corresponding beta coefficient which was rounded to the closest integer value (1-4). Predictors of aortic injury included widened mediastinum, hypotension less than 90 mmHg, long bone fracture, pulmonary contusion, left scapula fracture, hemothorax, and pelvic fracture. Area under receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.96. In the score data set, sensitivity was 93.42 %, specificity 85.85 %, Youden's index 0.79, positive likelihood ratio 6.60, and negative likelihood ratio 0.08. In the validation data set, sensitivity was 92.31 % and specificity 85.1 %. Given the relative infrequency of traumatic aortic injury, which often leads to missed or delayed diagnosis, application of our score has the potential to draw necessary clinical attention to the possibility of aortic injury, thus providing the chance of a prompt specific diagnostic and therapeutic management.

  13. Risk Factors for Pneumonia in Ventilated Trauma Patients with Multiple Rib Fractures

    Hyun Oh Park

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP is a common disease that may contribute to morbidity and mortality among trauma patients in the intensive care unit (ICU. This study evaluated the associations between trauma factors and the development of VAP in ventilated patients with multiple rib fractures. Methods: We retrospectively and consecutively evaluated 101 patients with multiple rib fractures who were ventilated and managed at our hospital between January 2010 and December 2015, analyzing the associations between VAP and trauma factors in these patients. Trauma factors included sternal fracture, flail chest, diaphragm injury, traumatic aortic dissection, combined cardiac injury, pulmonary contusion, pneumothorax, hemothorax, hemopneumothorax, abbreviated injury scale score, thoracic trauma severity score, and injury severity score. Results: Forty-six patients (45.5% had at least 1 episode of VAP, 10 (21.7% of whom died in the ICU. Of the 55 (54.5% patients who did not have pneumonia, 9 (16.4% died in the ICU. Using logistic regression analysis, we found that VAP was associated with severe lung contusion (odds ratio, 3.07; 95% confidence interval, 1.12 to 8.39; p=0.029. Conclusion: Severe pulmonary contusion (pulmonary lung contusion score 6–12 is an independent risk factor for VAP in ventilated trauma patients with multiple rib fractures.

  14. Risks and benefits of the intercostal approach for percutaneous nephrolithotripsy

    Erich K. Lang

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE:The objective of our retrospective study was to provide evidence on the efficacy of the intercostal versus subcostal access route for percutaneous nephrolithotripsy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: 642 patients underwent nephrolithotomy or nephrolithotripsy from 1996 to 2005. A total of 127 had an intercostal access tract (11th or 12th; 515 had a subcostal access tract. RESULTS: Major complications included one pneumothorax (1.0%, one arterio-calyceal fistula (1.0% and three arteriovenous fistulae (2.7% for intercostal upper pole access; two pneumothoraces (1.7%, one arteriovenous fistula (1.0%, one pseudoaneurysm (1.0%, one ruptured uretero-pelvic junction (1.0%, 4 perforated ureters (3.4% for subcostal upper pole access; one hemothorax (1.6%, one colo-calyceal fistula (1.6%, one AV fistula (1.6%, and two perforated ureters (3.2% with subcostal interpolar access. Diffuse bleeding from the tract with a subcostal interpolar approach occurred 3.2% of the time compared with 2.4% with a lower pole approach. Staghorn calculi demonstrated similar rates of complications. CONCLUSION: Considering the advantages that the intercostal access route offers the surgeon, it is reasonable to recommend its use after proper pre-procedural assessment of the anatomy, and particularly the respiratory lung motion.

  15. [Results of conservative treatment in patients with occult pneumothorax].

    Llaquet Bayo, Heura; Montmany Vioque, Sandra; Rebasa, Pere; Navarro Soto, Salvador

    2016-04-01

    An occult pneumothorax is found in 2-15% trauma patients. Observation (without tube thoracostomy) in these patients presents still some controversies in the clinical practice. The objective of the study is to evaluate the efficacy and the adverse effects when observation is performed. A retrospective observational study was undertaken in our center (university hospital level II). Data was obtained from a database with prospective registration. A total of 1087 trauma patients admitted in the intensive care unit from 2006 to 2013 were included. In this period, 126 patients with occult pneumothorax were identified, 73 patients (58%) underwent immediate tube thoracostomy and 53 patients (42%) were observed. Nine patients (12%) failed observation and required tube thoracostomy for pneumothorax progression or hemothorax. No patient developed a tension pneumothorax or experienced another adverse event related to the absence of tube thoracostomy. Of the observed patients 16 were under positive pressure ventilation, in this group 3 patients (19%) failed observation. There were no differences in mortality, hospital length of stay or intensive care length of stay between the observed and non-observed group. Observation is a safe treatment in occult pneumothorax, even in pressure positive ventilated patients. Copyright © 2014 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluation of chest computed tomography in patients after pneumonectomy to predict contralateral pneumothorax

    Maniwa, Tomohiro; Saito, Yukihito; Saito, Tomohito; Kaneda, Hiroyuki; Imamura, Hiroji

    2009-01-01

    Contralateral pneumothorax is a severe complication after pneumonectomy. We evaluated the mediastinal shift and the residual lung in patients who had undergone pneumonectomy to predict the incidence of contralateral pneumothorax. We evaluated 21 cases of pneumonectomy performed from 1996 to 2006. For this study, we excluded patients with recurrent neoplasm, empyema, or hemothorax. We reviewed the computed tomography (CT) results of 13 patients who had undergone pneumonectomy to compare the bullae in the residual lungs, carina shifts, and herniation of the residual lungs before and after pneumonectomy. When evaluating the degree of herniation 4-6 cm below the carina, the anterior and posterior pulmonary hernias were classified as grade A, B, or C. We also investigated the preoperative respiratory function in all 13 patients. Two patients suffered contralateral pneumothorax after left pneumonectomy. Both patients who suffered contralateral pneumothorax after pneumonectomy had bullae. The percentage forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV 1.0% ) was <70% in these two patients. Carina shifts and lung herniation were found to be greater after left pneumonectomy than after right pneumonectomy. The bullae in the lung and obstructive pulmonary disease are associated not only with spontaneous pneumothorax but also with contralateral pneumothorax after pneumonectomy. Lung herniation and mediastinal shift are greater after left pneumonectomy than after right pneumonectomy, which may be related to contralateral pneumothorax after pneumonectomy. (author)

  17. [Gas tamponade following intraoperative pneumothorax on a single lung: A case study].

    El Jaouhari, S D; Mamane Nassirou, O; Meziane, M; Bensghir, M; Haimeur, C

    2017-04-01

    Intraoperative pneumothorax is a rare complication with a high risk of cardiorespiratory arrest by gas tamponade especially on a single lung. We report the case of a female patient aged 53 years who benefited from a left pneumonectomy on pulmonary tuberculosis sequelae. The patient presented early postoperative anemia with a left hemothorax requiring an emergency thoracotomy. In perioperative, the patient had a gas tamponade following a pneumothorax of the remaining lung, and the fate has been avoided by an exsufflation. Intraoperative pneumothorax can occur due to lesions of the tracheobronchial airway, of the brachial plexus, the placement of a central venous catheter or barotrauma. The diagnosis of pneumothorax during unipulmonary ventilation is posed by the sudden onset of hypoxia associated with increased airway pressures and hypercapnia. The immediate life-saving procedure involves fine needle exsufflation before the placement of a chest tube. Prevention involves reducing the risk of barotrauma by infusing patients with low flow volumes and the proper use of positive airway pressure, knowing that despite protective ventilation, barotraumas risk still exists. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Tomographic aspects of penetrating thoracic trauma: injuries from firearms and other weapons

    Alessandro Severo Alves de Melo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: The aim of this study was to analyze the various computed tomography findings in penetrating chest trauma, as well as to determine the frequency and extent of the lesions. Material and Methods: We studied the computed tomography findings from 40 cases of penetrating thoracic trauma, of which 35 (85.8% were gunshot wounds and 5 (14.2% were caused by another type of weapon. Results: Pulmonary lesions were found in 39 cases (97.5%, manifesting as contusions in 34 cases (85%, atelectasis in 8 (20%, lacerations in 1 (2.5% and hematomas in 1 (2.5%. Hemothorax was seen in 31 cases (77.5%, and pneumothorax was seen in 22 cases (55%. Mediastinal lesions were observed in 8 cases (20%, including mediastinal hematoma in 3 cases (7.5%, hemopericardium in 3 (7.5%, and pneumomediastinum in 2 (5%. Diaphragmatic rupture was seen in 2 cases (5%. Conclusion: In patients with penetrating thoracic trauma, computed tomography of the chest is an important tool for characterizing the affected organs and evaluating the path of injury, as well as the severity and extent of the lesions. The images obtained are also useful in estimating the risk of death and determining the best therapeutic approach.

  19. Gender-Based Violence Causing Severe Multiple Injuries; a Case Report

    Adalard Falschung

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Gender-based violence (GBV against women has been identified as a global health and development issue. We reported a case of GBV causing sever, multiple injuries in a middle-aged female. Case report: A 47-year-old woman presented to emergency room with disturbed level of consciousness, shortness of breath and multiple patches of skin discoloration. On examination, the patient was semi-conscious, with multiple ecchymosis and bilateral decreased air entry. Computed tomography scan of the neck and chest showed six rib fractures on the left side, and eight rib fractures on the right side, sternal fracture, manubriosternal dislocation, bilateral hemothorax, fracture of body of eleventh thoracic vertebra, and fracture of cervical spine of fifth and seventh vertebrae. The patient was intubated and admitted to intensive care unit. She was discharged with good health condition after 23 days of hospital admission. Conclusion: GBV is still a cause of severe trauma that puts the patient’s life at risk.

  20. "To afford the wounded speedy assistance": Dominique Jean Larrey and Napoleon.

    Skandalakis, Panagiotis N; Lainas, Panagiotis; Zoras, Odyseas; Skandalakis, John E; Mirilas, Petros

    2006-08-01

    Dominique Jean Larrey (1766-1842) has been described as the father of modern military surgery and is considered even today as the model military surgeon. He developed a plan of rapid evacuation of wounded soldiers from the battlefield during combat, using flexible medical units which he named ambulances volantes ("flying ambulances"). He won the admiration of Napoleon Bonaparte (1769-1821), who was amazed by the results of Larrey's sanitary system. Larrey spent almost 18 years with Napoleon, accompanying him in 25 campaigns, 60 battles, and more than 400 engagements. Napoleon's enormous military success was due not only to his strategy and skill but also to the medical services provided by Larrey. The surgeon became a master of wound management and limb amputation. In his vivid battlefield journals, Larrey documented the course of tetanus, the pathophysiology of cold injury, the effective control of hemorrhage, the drainage of empyema and hemothorax, the aspiration of pericardial effusion or hemopericardium, and the packing of sucking chest wounds. Larrey established a categorical rule for the triage of war casualties, treating the wounded according to the observed gravity of their injuries and the urgency for medical care, regardless of their rank or nationality.

  1. Membranous obstruction of inferior vena cava(MOIVC): treatment with percutaneous transluminal angioplasty(PTA) and self expandable metallic stent

    Lee, Ki Yeol; Kim, Baek Hyun; Cha, In Ho; Lee, Nam Joon; Kim, Yun Hwan; Kim, Jung Hyuk [College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-03-15

    Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty(PTA) with a balloon catheter is a standard method of treatment for membranous obstruction of inferior vena cava(MOIVC). But, correct therapeutic approach has not been established for MOIVC patients whose lesion is associated with extensive thrombotic IVC occlusion. We tried to treat MOIVC associated with or without thrombus. We treated 13 cases of MOIVC(associated with thrombus in 7 cases, no thrombus in 6 cases) with PTA, thrombolysis and self-expandable metallic stents. PTA was successful in 8 cases, but failed in 5 cases. The recurred cases were retreated with PTA, but follow-up study revealed recoiling restenosis in 4 cases and intimal hyperplasia in 1 case at previous PTA site which could be overcome with a self-expandable metallic stent. The complication were occurred in 3 cases which were hemothorax, hemopericardium, and hemoperitoneum respectively. However, those were resolved by conservative treatment only. Recanalization and dilatation could be done in MOIVC patients with or without thrombosis for improvement of patient's symptom. Gianturco self-expandable metallic stent is useful in treatment of recurred MOIVC after balloon dilatation and preventing reocclusion of the IVC after PTA.

  2. Railway train versus motor vehicle collisions: a comparative study of injury severity and patterns.

    Kligman, M D; Knotts, F B; Buderer, N M; Kerwin, A J; Rodgers, J F

    1999-11-01

    This study compares the demographics, injury severity, resource use, and injury patterns of patients involved in railway train-motor vehicle (RT-MV) to motor vehicle-motor vehicle (MV-MV) collisions. Retrospective trauma registry review of 74 RT-MV and 1,931 MV-MV consecutive patients, age more than 14 years, presenting to two Level I trauma centers, January of 1991 to May of 1998. Compared with MV-MV, RT-MV had significantly more males (72% vs. 54%), higher mortality (15% vs. 7%), higher Injury Severity Score (median, 20 vs. 9), longer intensive care unit length of stay (1.7 vs. 0.04 days), and longer hospital length of stay (7.5 vs. 4 days). RT-MV patients had a higher percentage of scalp/facial lacerations; intracranial hemorrhage; hemothorax and pneumothorax; fractures of the rib/sternum, upper extremity, skull, and face; and lung, splenic, and renal injuries. After adjusting for the difference in Injury Severity Score between groups, the only remaining significant group difference was the odds of a scalp/facial laceration. RT-MV collisions are a marker for more severe injuries, but not a different pattern of injury, compared with MV-MV collisions.

  3. Tomographic aspects of penetrating thoracic trauma: injuries from firearms and other weapons.

    de Melo, Alessandro Severo Alves; Moreira, Luiza Beatriz Melo; Pessoa, Fernanda Miraldi Clemente; Saint-Martin, Nara; Ancilotti Filho, Roger; Souza, Arthur Soares; Marchiori, Edson

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the various computed tomography findings in penetrating chest trauma, as well as to determine the frequency and extent of the lesions. We studied the computed tomography findings from 40 cases of penetrating thoracic trauma, of which 35 (85.8%) were gunshot wounds and 5 (14.2%) were caused by another type of weapon. Pulmonary lesions were found in 39 cases (97.5%), manifesting as contusions in 34 cases (85%), atelectasis in 8 (20%), lacerations in 1 (2.5%) and hematomas in 1 (2.5%). Hemothorax was seen in 31 cases (77.5%), and pneumothorax was seen in 22 cases (55%). Mediastinal lesions were observed in 8 cases (20%), including mediastinal hematoma in 3 cases (7.5%), hemopericardium in 3 (7.5%), and pneumomediastinum in 2 (5%). Diaphragmatic rupture was seen in 2 cases (5%). In patients with penetrating thoracic trauma, computed tomography of the chest is an important tool for characterizing the affected organs and evaluating the path of injury, as well as the severity and extent of the lesions. The images obtained are also useful in estimating the risk of death and determining the best therapeutic approach.

  4. Classification and management of chest trauma

    Farooq, U.; Raza, W.; Zia, N.; Hanif, M.; Khan, M.M.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To classify the predominant pattern of injuries following blunt and penetrating chest trauma and to assess the adequacy of treatment strategies, complications and mortality associated with such injuries. Design: Descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Surgical Unit I, Holy Family Hospital, Rawalpindi, from December 2000 to December 2003. Patients and Methods: One hundred consecutive patients with thoracic trauma either blunt or penetrating, admitted in the ward were evaluated. Their injuries were classified, treatment strategies outlined and complications and mortality were documented on a specially-designed proforma. Results: Out of the 100 patients presenting in emergency, 44% presented with blunt and 56% with penetrating trauma. Pneumothorax was detected in 39% of the patients, hemopneumothorax in 29%, hemothorax in 12%, flail chest in 9%. Two had involvement of the heart and major vessels, 4% had injury to the diaphragm and 5% had multiple trauma. During treatment, 3% of all the patients were managed conservatively, 83% of patients required chest intubations, 6% needed ventilatory support and 8 % required thoracotomy. Complications were experienced in 28% of the patients of which 9% had pneumonias, 14% empyema and 5% suffered from wound infections. The overall mortality was 7%. Conclusion: This series showed the pattern of injuries following blunt and penetrating chest trauma. Furthermore, it was found that chest incubation and simple resuscitation was adequate for majority of the cases. (author)

  5. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery for acute thoracic trauma

    Michael Goodman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Operative intervention for thoracic trauma typically requires thoracotomy. We hypothesized that thoracoscopy may be safely and effectively utilized for the acute management of thoracic injuries. Materials and Methods: The Trauma Registry of a Level I trauma center was queried from 1999 through 2010 for all video-assisted thoracic procedures within 24 h of admission. Data collected included initial vital signs, operative indication, intraoperative course, and postoperative outcome. Results: Twenty-three patients met inclusion criteria: 3 (13% following blunt injury and 20 (87% after penetrating trauma. Indications for urgent thoracoscopy included diaphragmatic/esophageal injury, retained hemothorax, ongoing hemorrhage, and open/persistent pneumothorax. No conversions to thoracotomy were required and no patient required re-operation. Mean postoperative chest tube duration was 2.9 days and mean length of stay was 5.6 days. Conclusion: Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery is safe and effective for managing thoracic trauma in hemodynamically stable patients within the first 24 h post-injury.

  6. Utility of Chest Computed Tomography after a "Normal" Chest Radiograph in Patients with Thoracic Stab Wounds.

    Nguyen, Brian M; Plurad, David; Abrishami, Sadaf; Neville, Angela; Putnam, Brant; Kim, Dennis Y

    2015-10-01

    Chest computed tomography (CCT) is used to screen for injuries in hemodynamically stable patients with penetrating injury. We aim to determine the incidence of missed injuries detected on CCT after a negative chest radiograph (CXR) in patients with thoracic stab wounds. A 10-year retrospective review of a Level I trauma center registry was performed on patients with thoracic stab wounds. Patients who were hemodynamically unstable or did not undergo both CXR and CCT were excluded. Patients with a negative CXR were evaluated to determine if additional findings were diagnosed on CCT. Of 386 patients with stab wounds to the chest, 154 (40%) underwent both CXR and CCT. One hundred and fifteen (75%) had a negative screening CXR. CCT identified injuries in 42 patients (37%) that were not seen on CXR. Pneumothorax and/or hemothorax occurred in 40 patients (35%), of which 14 patients underwent tube thoracostomy. Two patients had hemopericardium on CCT and both required operative intervention. Greater than one-third of patients with a normal screening CXR were found to have abnormalities on CCT. Future studies comparing repeat CXR to CCT are required to further define the optimal diagnostic strategy in patients with stab wounds to chest after normal screening CXR.

  7. Tomographic aspects of penetrating thoracic trauma: injuries from firearms and other weapons

    Melo, Alessandro Severo Alves de; Moreira, Luiza Beatriz Melo; Pessoa, Fernanda Miraldi Clement; Saint-Martin, Nara; Ancilotti Filho, Roger; Souza Junior, Arthur Soares; Marchiori, Edson

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to analyze the various computed tomography findings in penetrating chest trauma, as well as to determine the frequency and extent of the lesions. Material and Methods: We studied the computed tomography findings from 40 cases of penetrating thoracic trauma, of which 35 (85.8%) were gunshot wounds and 5 (14.2%) were caused by another type of weapon. Results: Pulmonary lesions were found in 39 cases (97.5%), manifesting as contusions in 34 cases (85%), atelectasis in 8 (20%), lacerations in 1 (2.5%) and hematomas in 1 (2.5%). Hemothorax was seen in 31 cases (77.5%), and pneumothorax was seen in 22 cases (55%). Mediastinal lesions were observed in 8 cases (20%), including mediastinal hematoma in 3 cases (7.5%), hemopericardium in 3 (7.5%), and pneumomediastinum in 2 (5%). Diaphragmatic rupture was seen in 2 cases (5%). Conclusion: In patients with penetrating thoracic trauma, computed tomography of the chest is an important tool for characterizing the affected organs and evaluating the path of injury, as well as the severity and extent of the lesions. The images obtained are also useful in estimating the risk of death and determining the best therapeutic approach. (author)

  8. MODERN DIAGNOSTIC AND THERAPEUTIC TECHNOLOGIES FOR THE CHEST TRAUMA ASSOCIATED WITH THE FALL FROM A HEIGHT IN THE REPUBLIC RESEARCH CENTRE OF EMERGENCY MEDICINE

    A. M. Khadzhibayev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND. The rate of the multisystem chest trauma and mortality in patients with catatrauma remains high.OBJECTIVE. To study the diagnosis and treatment of the multisystem chest trauma in patients associated with the fall from a height.MATERIAL AND METHODS. 243 patients (208 multisystem injuries and 35 isolated injuries with a chest trauma associated with the fall from a height were examined in the surgical department of Republic research centre of emergency medicine. We performed X-ray, CT and endosurgical examinations.RESULTS. Instrumental examination revealed pneumothorax and hydrothorax in 24.4% and 22.6% of victims respectively. The rib injuries were observed in 181 patients, sternum fractures in 8 victims and thoracic vertebrae fractures in 84 patients. The puncture and thoracocentesis of the pleural cavities were performed in 85 cases. The thoracoscopy was performed in 21 patients, the thoracotomy – in 15 patients, suturing of the lung – in 22 patients, coagulation – in 15 patients, external plate fixation of multiple injured ribs – in 10 patients. The mortality rate was 21.4%.CONCLuSION. The specifics of the multisystem chest trauma associated with the fall from a height is the development of hemothorax and pneumothorax. Thoracocentesis and videothoracoscopy allow to diagnose and stop the hemorrhage properly, to restore the lung rupture and perform the thoracotomy in severe cases, as well as reduce of complications frequency and mortality rate. 

  9. A stepwise approach to the etiologic diagnosis of pleural effusion in respiratory intensive care unit and short-term evaluation of treatment

    Chinchkar, Nilesh J; Talwar, Deepak; Jain, Sushil K

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pleural effusions in respiratory intensive care unit (RICU) are associated with diseases of varied etiologies and often carry a grave prognosis. This prospective study was conducted to establish an etiologic diagnosis in a series of such patients before starting treatment. Materials and Methods: Fifty consecutive patients, diagnosed with pleural effusion on admission or during their stay in RICU, were further investigated by a two-step approach. (1) Etiologic diagnosis was established by sequential clinical history and findings on physical examination, laboratory tests, chest radiograph, CECT/HRCT/PET-CT and pleural fluid analysis. (2) Patients who remained undiagnosed were subjected to fiber-optic bronchoscopy, video-assisted thoracoscopic pleural biopsy, and histopathology. Results: Etiologic diagnosis of pleural effusion was established in 44 (88%) Metastases (24%); para-pneumonia (22%); congestive cardiac failure (18%); tuberculosis (14%); hemothorax (4%); trapped lung, renal failure, and liver cirrhosis (2% each). Six patients (12%) remained undiagnosed, as the final diagnostic thoracoscopic biopsy could not be performed in five and tissue histopathology findings were inconclusive in one. Out of the 50 patients, 10 died in the hospital; 2 left against medical advice; and 2 were referred to oncology center for further treatment. The remaining 36 patients were clinically stabilized and discharged. During a 3-month follow-up, eight of them were re-hospitalized, of which four died. Conclusions: Pleural effusion in RICU carries a high risk of mortality. Etiologic diagnosis can be established in most cases. PMID:25814793

  10. Models to teach lung sonopathology and ultrasound-guided thoracentesis

    Jacek A. Wojtczak

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Lung sonography allows rapid diagnosis of lung emergencies such as pulmonary edema, hemothorax or pneumothorax. The ability to timely diagnose an intraoperative pneumothorax is an important skill for the anesthesiologist. However, lung ultrasound exams require an interpretation of not only real images but also complex acoustic artifacts such as A-lines and B-lines. Therefore, appropriate training to gain proficiency is important. Simulated environment using ultrasound phantom models allows controlled, supervised learning. We have developed hybrid models that combine dry or wet polyurethane foams, porcine rib cages and human hand simulating a rib cage. These models simulate fairly accurately pulmonary sonopathology and allow supervised teaching of lung sonography with the immediate feedback. In-vitro models can also facilitate learning of procedural skills, improving transducer and needle positioning and movement, rapid recognition of thoracic anatomy and hand – eye coordination skills. We described a new model to teach an ultrasound guided thoracentesis. This model consists of the experimenter’s hand placed on top of the water-filled container with a wet foam. Metacarpal bones of the human hand simulate a rib cage and a wet foam simulates a diseased lung immersed in the pleural fluid. Positive fluid flow offers users feedback when a simulated pleural effusion is accurately assessed.

  11. Medical News From Scientific Analysis of the Turin Shroud

    Bevilacqua M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper synthetizes a series of works recently published in reference to medical studies regarding both the physical conditions of the Man who was wrapped in the Turin Shroud (TS and the tortures to which this Man was subjected. An event that influenced the rapid course of the Passion and the cause of death of the TS Man was the fall under the weight of the cross. This Man shows, on the right side, shoulder lowering, flat hand and henophthalmos, revealing a violent blunt trauma, from behind, to neck, chest and shoulder, with the entire brachial plexus injury and muscular damage to the neck bottom with the head bent forward and turned to the left, on the cross, as he had a stiff neck. Most likely, falling the body forward, the chest trauma caused a heart and lung contusion with hemothorax. The wrists were easily nailed in the Destot space with ulnar artery cutting and partial tear of the ulnar nerve cause of the thumb retraction and its disappearance on the Shroud. The nail in the right foot was driven in the tarsal bones. The right foot was probably dislocated to the ankle. The lance penetrated in the sixth intercostal space. The likely cause of immediate death was a myocardial infarction with rupture, haemopericardium and heart tamponade of a subject with cardiac contusion. Tortures and other medical conditions have only accelerated the death.

  12. Managing Inadvertent Arterial Catheterization During Central Venous Access Procedures

    Nicholson, Tony; Ettles, Duncan; Robinson, Graham

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: Approximately 200,000 central venous catheterizations are carried out annually in the National Health Service in the United Kingdom. Inadvertent arterial puncture occurs in up to 3.7%. Significant morbidity and death has been reported. We report on our experience in the endovascular treatment of this iatrogenic complication. Methods: Retrospective analysis was carried out of 9 cases referred for endovascular treatment of inadvertent arterial puncture during central venous catheterization over a 5 year period. Results: It was not possible to obtain accurate figures on the numbers of central venous catheterizations carried out during the time period. Five patients were referred with carotid or subclavian pseudoaneurysms and hemothorax following inadvertent arterial catheter insertion and subsequent removal. These patients all underwent percutaneous balloon tamponade and/or stent-graft insertion. More recently 4 patients were referred with the catheter still in situ and were successfully treated with a percutaneous closure device. Conclusion: If inadvertent arterial catheterization during central venous access procedures is recognized and catheters removed, sequelae can be treated percutaneously. However, once the complication is recognized it is better to leave the catheter in situ and seal the artery percutaneously with a closure device

  13. Transcatheter Potts shunt creation in patients with severe pulmonary arterial hypertension: initial clinical experience.

    Esch, Jesse J; Shah, Pinak B; Cockrill, Barbara A; Farber, Harrison W; Landzberg, Michael J; Mehra, Mandeep R; Mullen, Mary P; Opotowsky, Alexander R; Waxman, Aaron B; Lock, James E; Marshall, Audrey C

    2013-04-01

    Patients with severe pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) face significant morbidity and death as a consequence of progressive right heart failure. Surgical shunt placement between the left PA and descending aorta (Potts shunt) appears promising for PAH palliation in children; however, surgical mortality is likely to be unacceptably high in adults with PAH. We describe a technique for transcatheter Potts shunt (TPS) creation by fluoroscopically guided retrograde needle perforation of the descending aorta at the site of apposition to the left PA to create a tract for deployment of a covered stent between these vessels. This covered stent-anchored by the vessel walls and surrounding tissue-serves as the shunt. TPS creation was considered in 7 patients and performed in 4. The procedure was technically successful in 3 patients; 1 patient died during the procedure as a result of uncontrolled hemothorax. One acute survivor, critically ill at the time of TPS creation, later died of comorbidities. The 2 mid-term survivors (follow-up of 10 and 4 months) are well at home, with symptomatic improvement and no late complications. The 3 candidate patients in whom the procedure was not performed died within 1 month of consideration, underscoring the tenuous nature of this population. TPS creation is feasible and may offer symptomatic relief to select patients with refractory PAH. Further study of this innovative approach is warranted. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Sharp Central Venous Recanalization in Hemodialysis Patients: A Single-Institution Experience

    Arabi, Mohammad; Ahmed, Ishtiaq; Mat’hami, Abdulaziz; Ahmed, Dildar; Aslam, Naveed

    2016-01-01

    PurposeWe report our institutional experience with sharp central venous recanalization in chronic hemodialysis patients who failed standard techniques.Materials and MethodsSince January 2014, a series of seven consecutive patients (four males and three females), mean age 35 years (18–65 years), underwent sharp central venous recanalization. Indications included obtaining hemodialysis access (n = 6) and restoration of superior vena cava (SVC) patency to alleviate occlusion symptoms and restore fistula function (n = 1). The transseptal needle was used for sharp recanalization in six patients, while it could not be introduced in one patient due to total occlusion of the inferior vena cava. Instead, transmediastinal SVC access using Chiba needle was obtained.ResultsTechnical success was achieved in all cases. SVC recanalization achieved symptoms’ relief and restored fistula function in the symptomatic patient. One patient underwent arteriovenous fistula creation on the recanalized side 3 months after the procedure. The remaining catheters were functional at median follow-up time of 9 months (1–14 months). Two major complications occurred including a right hemothorax and a small hemopericardium, which were managed by covered stent placement across the perforated SVC.ConclusionSharp central venous recanalization using the transseptal needle is feasible technique in patients who failed standard recanalization procedures. The potential high risk of complications necessitates thorough awareness of anatomy and proper technical preparedness.

  15. Endometriose torácica

    Filipa Costa

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Resumo: A endometriose torácica define-se pela presença de tecido endometrial no pulmão ou pleura e manifesta-se clinicamente por hemoptises cíclicas, pneumotórax ou hemotórax recorrente coincidentes com a menstruação. Tratando-se de uma patologia rara, nem sempre é considerada no diagnóstico diferencial quando se avaliam estas manifestações. Os exames complementares de diagnóstico geralmente não revelam alterações específicas, sendo o diagnóstico feito com base na história clínica. A chave do diagnóstico são os sintomas catameniais, sendo fundamental realizar uma história clínica minuciosa para chegar atempadamente ao diagnóstico correcto. O tratamento hormonal e a cirurgia são as duas alternativas terapêuticas para esta patologia.Os autores descrevem o caso clínico de uma doente de 27 anos que surge com um quadro de hemoptises catameniais. Os exames complementares de diagnóstico realizados foram inconclusivos. Baseado na história clínica, assumiuse o diagnóstico de endometriose pulmonar e iniciouse tratamento com contraceptivos orais com resolução total dos sintomas.A propósito do caso clínico, os autores fazem uma revisão das principais manifestações clínicas, da patogénese, do diagnóstico e do tratamento da endometriose torácica.Rev Port Pneumol 2008; XIV (3: 427-435 Abstract: Thoracic endometriosis is defined by the presence of endometrial tissue in the lungs or pleura, and is characterised by cyclic hemoptysis or recurrent hemothorax or pneumothorax occurring with the menstruation. Being a rare clinical entity, it is not always considered in the differential diagnosis when these symptoms are evaluated. The exams performed during the diagnostic work-up frequently show non-specific alterations, however a presumptive diagnosis can be made based on the typical clinical history. The key to the diagnosis are the catamenial symptoms, so a thorough clinical history is essential to promptly reach the

  16. Endometriose torácica

    Filipa Costa

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Resumo: A endometriose torácica define-se pela presença de tecido endometrial no pulmão ou pleura e manifesta--se clinicamente por hemoptises cíclicas, pneumotórax ou hemotórax recorrente coincidentes com a menstruação. Tratando-se de uma patologia rara, nem sempre é considerada no diagnóstico diferencial quando se avaliam estas manifestações. Os exames complementares de diagnóstico geralmente não revelam alterações específicas, sendo o diagnóstico feito com base na história clínica. A chave do diagnóstico são os sintomas catameniais, sendo fundamental realizar uma história clínica minuciosa para chegar atempadamente ao diagnóstico correcto. O tratamento hormonal e a cirurgia são as duas alternativas terapêuticas para esta patologia.Os autores descrevem o caso clínico de uma doente de 27 anos que surge com um quadro de hemoptises catameniais. Os exames complementares de diagnóstico realizados foram inconclusivos. Baseado na história clínica, assumiu-se o diagnóstico de endometriose pulmonar e iniciou-se tratamento com contraceptivos orais com resolução total dos sintomas.A propósito do caso clínico, os autores fazem uma revisão das principais manifestações clínicas, da patogénese, do diagnóstico e do tratamento da endometriose torácica. Abstract: Thoracic endometriosis is defined by the presence of endometrial tissue in the lungs or pleura, and is characterised by cyclic hemoptysis or recurrent hemothorax or pneumothorax occurring with the menstruation. Being a rare clinical entity, it is not always considered in the differential diagnosis when these symptoms are evaluated. The exams performed during the diagnostic work-up frequently show nonspecific alterations, however a presumptive diagnosis can be made based on the typical clinical history. The key to the diagnosis are the catamenial symptoms, so a thorough clinical history is essential to promptly reach the correct diagnosis. Hormonal treatment and

  17. Factors Associated with Complications in Older Adults with Isolated Blunt Chest Trauma

    Lotfipour, Shahram

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of adverse events in elderly trauma patients with isolated blunt thoracic trauma, and to identify variables associated with these adverse events.METHODS: We performed a chart review of 160 trauma patients age 65 and older with significant blunt thoracic trauma, drawn from an American College of Surgeons Level I Trauma Center registry. Patients with serious injury to other body areas were excluded to prevent confounding the cause of adverse events. Adverse events were defined as acute respiratory distress syndrome or pneumonia, unanticipated intubation, transfer to the intensive care unit for hypoxemia, or death. Data collected included history, physical examination, radiographic findings, length of hospital stay, and clinical outcomes.RESULTS: Ninety-nine patients had isolated chest injury, while 61 others had other organ systems injured and were excluded. Sixteen patients developed adverse events [16.2% 95% confidence interval (CI 9.5-24.9%], including two deaths. Adverse events were experienced by 19.2%, 6.1%, and 28.6% of those patients 65-74, 75-84, and >/=85 years old, respectively. The mean length of stay was 14.6 days in patients with an adverse event and 5.8 days in patients without. Post hoc analysis revealed that all 16 patients with an adverse event had one or more of the following: age >/=85, initial systolic blood pressure <90 mmHg, hemothorax, pneumothorax, three or more unilateral rib fractures, or pulmonary contusion (sensitivity 100%, CI 79.4-100%; specificity 38.6%, CI 28.1-49.9%.CONCLUSION: Adverse events from isolated thoracic trauma in elderly patients complicate 16% of our sample. These criteria were 100% sensitive and 38.5% specific for these adverse events. This study is a first step to identifying variables that might aid in identifying patients at high risk for serious adverse events.

  18. Associated factors to empyema in post-traumatic hemotorax

    MARIO PASTORE NETO

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTObjective:to analyze the associated factors with empyema in patients with post-traumatic retained hemothorax.Methods:prospective observational study. Data were collected in patients undergoing PD during emergency duty. Variables analyzed were age, sex, mechanism of injury, side of the chest injury, intrathoracic complications of RH, laparotomy, specific injuries, rib fractures, trauma scores, days to diagnosis, diagnostic method of RH, primary indication of PD, initial volume drained, length of the first tube removal, surgical procedure. Cumulative incidence of empyema, pneumonia and pulmonary contusion and the proportion of patients with empyema or without empyema in each category of each variable analyzed were obtained.Results: the cumulative incidence of PD among trauma patients was 1.83% and the RH among those with PD was 10.63%. There were 20 cases of empyema (32.8%. Most were male in the age from 20 to 29, victims of injury by firearm on the left side of the thorax. The incidence of empyema in patients with injury by firearms was lower compared to those with stab wound or blunt trauma; higher among those with drained volume between 300 and 599 ml. The median hospital lenght of stay was higher among those with empyema.Conclusion:the incidence of PD was 1.83% and RH was 10.63%, these results are consistent with the low severity of the patients involved in this study and consistent with the literature. The incidence of empyema proved to be negatively associated with the occurrence of injury by firearms and positively associated with a drained volume between 300 and 599 ml, compared with lower or higher volumes.

  19. Chest trauma experience over eleven-year period at al-mouassat university teaching hospital-Damascus: a retrospective review of 888 cases

    Al-Koudmani Ibrahim

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thoracic trauma is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in developing countries. In this study, we present our 11-year experience in the management and clinical outcome of 888 chest trauma cases as a result of blunt and penetrating injuries in our university hospital in Damascus, Syria. Methods We reviewed files of 888 consequent cases of chest trauma between January 2000 and January 2011. The mean age of our patients was 31 ± 17 years mostly males with blunt injuries. Patients were evaluated and compared according to age, gender, etiology of trauma, thoracic and extra-thoracic injuries, complications, and mortality. Results The leading cause of the trauma was violence (41% followed by traffic accidents (33%. Pneumothorax (51%, Hemothorax (38%, rib fractures (34%, and lung contusion (15% were the most common types of injury. Associated injuries were documented in 36% of patients (extremities 19%, abdomen 13%, head 8%. A minority of the patients required thoracotomy (5.7%, and tube thoracostomy (56% was sufficient to manage the majority of cases. Mean hospital LOS was 4.5 ± 4.6 days. The overall mortoality rate was 1.8%, and morbidity (n = 78, 8.7%. Conclusions New traffic laws (including seat belt enforcement reduced incidence and severity of chest trauma in Syria. Violence was the most common cause of chest trauma rather than road traffic accidents in this series, this necessitates epidemiologic or multi-institutional studies to know to which degree violence contributes to chest trauma in Syria. The number of fractured ribs can be used as simple indicator of the severity of trauma. And we believe that significant neurotrauma, traffic accidents, hemodynamic status and GCS upon arrival, ICU admission, ventilator use, and complication of therapy are predictors of dismal prognosis.

  20. Clinical Utility of Chest Computed Tomography in Patients with Rib Fractures CT Chest and Rib Fractures.

    Chapman, Brandon C; Overbey, Douglas M; Tesfalidet, Feven; Schramm, Kristofer; Stovall, Robert T; French, Andrew; Johnson, Jeffrey L; Burlew, Clay C; Barnett, Carlton; Moore, Ernest E; Pieracci, Fredric M

    2016-12-01

    Chest CT is more sensitive than a chest X-ray (CXR) in diagnosing rib fractures; however, the clinical significance of these fractures remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine the added diagnostic use of chest CT performed after CXR in patients with either known or suspected rib fractures secondary to blunt trauma. Retrospective cohort study of blunt trauma patients with rib fractures at a level I trauma center that had both a CXR and a CT chest. The CT finding of ≥ 3 additional fractures in patients with ≤ 3 rib fractures on CXR was considered clinically meaningful. Student's t-test and chi-square analysis were used for comparison. We identified 499 patients with rib fractures: 93 (18.6%) had CXR only, 7 (1.4%) had chest CT only, and 399 (79.9%) had both CXR and chest CT. Among these 399 patients, a total of 1,969 rib fractures were identified: 1,467 (74.5%) were missed by CXR. The median number of additional fractures identified by CT was 3 (range, 4 - 15). Of 212 (53.1%) patients with a clinically meaningful increase in the number of fractures, 68 patients underwent one or more clinical interventions: 36 SICU admissions, 20 pain catheter placements, 23 epidural placements, and 3 SSRF. Additionally, 70 patients had a chest tube placed for retained hemothorax or occult pneumothorax. Overall, 138 patients (34.5%) had a change in clinical management based upon CT chest. The chest X-ray missed ~75% of rib fractures seen on chest CT. Although patients with a clinical meaningful increase in the number of rib fractures were more likely to be admitted to the intensive care unit, there was no associated improvement in pulmonary outcomes.

  1. ACR appropriateness criteria blunt chest trauma.

    Chung, Jonathan H; Cox, Christian W; Mohammed, Tan-Lucien H; Kirsch, Jacobo; Brown, Kathleen; Dyer, Debra Sue; Ginsburg, Mark E; Heitkamp, Darel E; Kanne, Jeffrey P; Kazerooni, Ella A; Ketai, Loren H; Ravenel, James G; Saleh, Anthony G; Shah, Rakesh D; Steiner, Robert M; Suh, Robert D

    2014-04-01

    Imaging is paramount in the setting of blunt trauma and is now the standard of care at any trauma center. Although anteroposterior radiography has inherent limitations, the ability to acquire a radiograph in the trauma bay with little interruption in clinical survey, monitoring, and treatment, as well as radiography's accepted role in screening for traumatic aortic injury, supports the routine use of chest radiography. Chest CT or CT angiography is the gold-standard routine imaging modality for detecting thoracic injuries caused by blunt trauma. There is disagreement on whether routine chest CT is necessary in all patients with histories of blunt trauma. Ultimately, the frequency and timing of CT chest imaging should be site specific and should depend on the local resources of the trauma center as well as patient status. Ultrasound may be beneficial in the detection of pneumothorax, hemothorax, and pericardial hemorrhage; transesophageal echocardiography is a first-line imaging tool in the setting of suspected cardiac injury. In the blunt trauma setting, MRI and nuclear medicine likely play no role in the acute setting, although these modalities may be helpful as problem-solving tools after initial assessment. The ACR Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed every 2 years by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and review include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer-reviewed journals and the application of a well-established consensus methodology (modified Delphi) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures by the panel. In those instances in which evidence is lacking or not definitive, expert opinion may be used to recommend imaging or treatment. Copyright © 2014 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. An analysis of 214 cases of rib fractures

    Sule Karadayi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Rib fractures are the most common type of injury associated with trauma to the thorax. In this study, we investigated whether morbidity and mortality rates increased in correlation with the number of fractured ribs. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data from 214 patients with rib fractures who applied or were referred to our clinic between January 2007 and December 2008 were retrospectively evaluated. The patients were allocated into three groups according to the number of fractures: 1 patients with an isolated rib fracture (RF1 (n = 50, 23.4%, 2 patients with two rib fractures (RF2 (n = 53, 24.8%, and 3 patients with more than two rib fractures (RF3 (n = 111, 51.9%. The patients were evaluated and compared according to the number of rib fractures, mean age, associated chest injuries (hemothorax, pneumothorax, and/or pulmonary contusion, and co-existing injuries to other systems. FINDINGS: The mean age of the patients was 51.5 years. The distribution of associated chest injuries was 30% in group RF1, 24.6% in group RF2, and 75.6% in group RF3 (p<0.05. Co-existing injuries to other systems were 24% in group RF1, 23.2% in group RF2, and 52.6% in group RF3 (p<0.05. Two patients (4% in group RF1, 2 patients (3.8% in group RF2, and 5 patients (4.5% in group RF3 (total n = 9; 4.2% died. CONCLUSION: Patients with any number of rib fractures should be carefully screened for co-existing injuries in other body systems and hospitalized to receive proper treatment.

  3. Vital capacity helps predict pulmonary complications after rib fractures.

    Carver, Thomas W; Milia, David J; Somberg, Chloe; Brasel, Karen; Paul, Jasmeet

    2015-09-01

    Traumatic rib fractures are associated with significant morbidity. Vital capacity (VC) assesses pulmonary function; however, limited data link VC to patient outcomes. Our objective was to determine if VC predicted complications and disposition in patients with rib fractures. This is a retrospective chart review of all patients with fractured ribs admitted to a Level 1 trauma center during a 4-year period. Patients were excluded if no VC was performed within 48 hours of admission. Data collected included demographics, hospital/intensive care unit length of stay, epidural, discharge to home versus extended care facility, mortality, chest Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) score, Injury Severity Score (ISS), number of rib fractures, hemothorax/pneumothorax, presence of pulmonary contusion, presence of chest tube, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and average daily VC (percentage of predicted). Pulmonary complication was defined as pneumonia, need for intubation, new home O2 requirement, readmission for pulmonary issue, or intensive care unit transfer. Statistical analysis was performed using χ and multivariate logistic regression. Of 801 patients with rib fractures, 683 had VC performed within 48 hours. Average age was 53 years, median ISS was 13 (interquartile range, 9-18), and median length of stay was 5 days. Most (72%) were discharged home, and 26% went to extended care facility. Ten percent developed a pulmonary complication, and there were nine deaths. Every 10% increase in VC was associated with 36% decrease in likelihood of pulmonary complication. Patients with a VC greater than 50% had a significantly lower association of pulmonary complication (p = 0.017), and a VC of less than 30% was independently associated with pulmonary complication (odds ratio, 2.36). Patients with fractured ribs and VC of less than 30% have significant association for pulmonary complication. Higher VC is associated with lower likelihood of pulmonary complication. VC may help

  4. Percutaneous catheter drainage of thoracic fluid: the usefulness and safety of bedside trocar placement under ultrasound guidance

    Lee, Heon [Seoul Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-15

    The author wanted to evaluate the usefulness and safety of the trocar technique for US-guided bedside catheter placement into thoracic fluid collections, and this technique has generally been reserved for the larger or superficial fluid collections. 42 drainage procedures were performed in 38 patients at the bedside. The patients were positioned supine or semi-upright. A drainage catheter system with a stylet and cannula assembly was used and all of the catheters were inserted using the trocar technique. The procedures consisted of drainage of empyema (n=14), malignant effusion (n=13), lung abscess (n=3), massive transudate (n=8), hemothorax (n=2) and chest wall hematoma (n=2). The clinical results were classified as successful (complete and partially successful), failure or undetermined. The medical records and images were retrospectively reviewed to evaluate the success rate, the complications and the procedure time. Technical success was achieved in all of the 42 procedures. With using the trocar technique, all the catheters were placed into even the small collections without significant complications. Drainage was successful in 36 (85.7%) of the 42 procedures. The average volume of thoracic fluid that was aspirated manually at the time of catheter placement was 420 mL (range: 35 to 1470 mL). The procedure time was less than 10 minutes from US-localization to complete catheter placement in all of the procedures. The trocar technique under US guidance can be an efficient and safe alternative to the Seldinger or guide-wire exchange technique for bedside catheter placement in the critically ill or hemodynamically unstable patients.

  5. Radiological findings of dissecting aneurysm -a correlative study of CT with angiography-

    Bae, Tae Yeong; Park, Jae Hyung; Kim, Seung Hyup; Han, Man Chung

    1987-01-01

    This study comprised 16 patients with aortic dissecting aneurysm who were admitted to Seoul National University Hospital from May 1984 to January 1987. CT findings in 16 cases of aortic dissecting aneurysm were correlated with angiographic findings retrospectively. The results were analysed. 1. Number of male was 11 and that of female was 5. Male patients in fifties were most common and 4 in number. 13 patients had hypertension or history of hypertension among 14 patients. There were one case of Marfan's syndrome, preeclampsia and Takayasu's arteritis respectively. 2. There were 5 cases of DeBakey type I, 1 case of type II and 9 cases of types III dissecting aneurysm. Type III was most common. 3. CT confirmed as superior vena cava which was not identified whether it was superior vena cava or unopacified false lumen by angiography in one case. Regarding distal extent, authors defined A whose extent was proximal to diaphragm and B beyond it for convenience sake. There was one false negative case in CT among 16 cases which was diagnosed as dissecting aneurysm type IIIB by angiography and confirmed as type III surgically. One case was diagnosed as type IB by CT and as type IIIB by angiography and confirmed as type I surgically. Extent was more accurate in CT than angiography. One case was diagnosed as type II by CT but misdiagnosed as right atrial tumor by angiography. 4. Diagnostic sensitivities of CT and angiography in this study were 94% (15/16) respectively. CT was more advantageous in hemothorax, hemopericardium, hemomediastinum, unopacified false lumen, aortic wall calcification and getting information about mediastinum. In angiography aortic regurgitation and tear site and involvement of abdominal vessels could be observed

  6. Transhiatal Chest Drainage After Hybrid Ivor Lewis Esophagectomy: Proof of Concept Study.

    Asti, Emanuele; Sironi, Andrea; Bonitta, Gianluca; Bernardi, Daniele; Bonavina, Luigi

    2018-04-01

    Intercostal pleural drainage is standard practice after transthoracic esophagectomy but has some drawbacks. We hypothesized that a transhiatal pleural drain introduced through the subxyphoid port site incision at laparoscopy can be as effective as the intercostal drainage and may enhance patient recovery. A proof of concept study was designed to assess a new method of pleural drainage in patients undergoing hybrid Ivor Lewis esophagectomy (laparoscopy and right thoracotomy). The main study aims were safety and efficacy of transhiatal pleural drainage with a 15 Fr Blake tube connected to a portable vacuum system. Pre- and postoperative data, mean duration, and total and daily output of drainage were recorded in an electronic database. Postoperative complications were scored according to the Dindo-Clavien classification. Between June 2015 and December 2016, 50 of 63 consecutive patients met the criteria for inclusion in the study. No conversions from the portable vacuum system to underwater seal and suction occurred. There was no mortality. The overall morbidity rate was 40%. Two patients (4%) required reoperation for hemothorax and chylothorax, respectively. Percutaneous catheter drainage for residual pneumothorax was necessary in 2 patients (4%) on postoperative day 2. The mean duration of drainage was 7 days (interquartile range [IQR] = 2), and the total volume of drain output was 1580 mL (IQR = 880). No pleural effusion on chest X-ray was detected at the 3-month follow-up visit. Transhiatal pleural drainage is safe and effective after hybrid Ivor Lewis esophagectomy and could replace the intercostal drain in selected patients.

  7. Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation for the Hepatocellular Carcinoma Abutting the Diaphragm: Assessment of Safety and Therapeutic Efficacy

    Kang, Tae Wook; Rhim, Hyun Chul; Kim, Eun Young; Kim, Young Sun; Choi, Dong Il; Lee, Won Jae; Lim, Hyo K.

    2009-01-01

    To assess the safety and therapeutic efficacy of a percutaneous radiofrequency (RF) ablation for the hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) abutting the diaphragm. We retrospectively assessed 80 patients who underwent a percutaneous RF ablation for a single nodular (< 4 cm) HCC over the last four years. Each patient underwent an ultrasound-guided RF ablation using internally cooled electrodes for the first-line treatment. We divided patients into two subgroups based on whether the index tumor was abutting (less than 5 mm) the diaphragm or not: group A (abutting; n = 31) versus group B (non-abutting; n = 49). We compared the two subgroups for complications and therapeutic efficacy using image and the review of medical records. The statistical assessment included an independent t-test, Fisher's exact test, and chi-square test. The assessment of the diaphragmatic swelling at CT immediately following the procedure was more severe in group A than group B (mean thickness change:1.44 vs. 0.46 mm, p = 0.00). Further, right shoulder pain was more common in group A than B (p = 0.01). Although minor complications (hemothorax 1 case, pleural effusion 1 case) were noted only in group A, no major thoracic complication occurred in either group. The technical success rate was lower in group A than group B (84% vs. 98%, p = 0.03). As well, the primary and secondary technique effectiveness rates in group A and group B were 90% versus 98% (p = 0.29) and 79% versus 91% (p = 0.25), respectively. The local tumor progression rate was higher in group A than in group B (29% vs. 6%, p = 0.02). We found that the percutaneous RF ablation for the HCC abutting the diaphragm is a safe procedure without major complications. However, it is less effective with regard to technical success and local tumor control

  8. Computed Tomography–Guided Interstitial High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy in Combination With Regional Positive Lymph Node Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy in Locally Advanced Peripheral Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Phase 1 Clinical Trial

    Xiang, Li; Zhang, Jian-wen; Lin, Sheng; Luo, Hui-Qun; Wen, Qing-Lian; He, Li-Jia; Shang, Chang-Ling; Ren, Pei-Rong; Yang, Hong-Ru; Pang, Hao-Wen; Yang, Bo; He, Huai-Lin [Department of Oncology, Affiliated Hospital of Luzhou Medical College, Luzhou (China); Chen, Yue, E-mail: chenyue5523@126.com [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Affiliated Hospital of Luzhou Medical College, Luzhou (China); Wu, Jing-Bo, E-mail: wjb6147@163.com [Department of Oncology, Affiliated Hospital of Luzhou Medical College, Luzhou (China)

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: To assess the technical safety, adverse events, and efficacy of computed tomography (CT)-guided interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy in combination with regional positive lymph node intensity modulated radiation therapy in patients with locally advanced peripheral non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Twenty-six patients with histologically confirmed NSCLC were enrolled in a prospective, officially approved phase 1 trial. Primary tumors were treated with HDR brachytherapy. A single 30-Gy dose was delivered to the 90% isodose line of the gross lung tumor volume. A total dose of at least 70 Gy was administered to the 95% isodose line of the planning target volume of malignant lymph nodes using 6-MV X-rays. The patients received concurrent or sequential chemotherapy. We assessed treatment efficacy, adverse events, and radiation toxicity. Results: The median follow-up time was 28 months (range, 7-44 months). There were 3 cases of mild pneumothorax but no cases of hemothorax, dyspnea, or pyothorax after the procedure. Grade 3 or 4 acute hematologic toxicity was observed in 5 patients. During follow-up, mild fibrosis around the puncture point was observed on the CT scans of 2 patients, but both patients were asymptomatic. The overall response rates (complete and partial) for the primary mass and positive lymph nodes were 100% and 92.3%, respectively. The 1-year and 2-year overall survival (OS) rates were 90.9% and 67%, respectively, with a median OS of 22.5 months. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that HDR brachytherapy is safe and feasible for peripheral locally advanced NSCLC, justifying a phase 2 clinical trial.

  9. CT-guided core biopsy and percutaneous fiducial seed placement in the lung: Can these procedures be combined without an increase in complication rate or decrease in technical success?

    Mendiratta-Lala, Mishal [Henry Ford Hospital, Department of Radiology, Abdominal Interventional Radiology, 2799 West Grand Blvd, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); Sheiman, Robert, E-mail: rsheiman@bidmc.harvard.edu [Beth Israel Deaconess Hospital, Department of Radiology, Abdominal Imaging, One Deaconess Road, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Brook, Olga R. [Beth Israel Deaconess Hospital, Department of Radiology, Abdominal Imaging, One Deaconess Road, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Gourtsoyianni, Sofia [King' s College London, St Thomas’ Hospital, Lambeth Palace Road, SE1 7EH London (United Kingdom); Mahadevan, Anand [Beth Israel Deaconess Hospital, Radiation Oncology, One Deaconess Road, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Siewert, Bettina [Beth Israel Deaconess Hospital, Department of Radiology, Abdominal Imaging, One Deaconess Road, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

    2014-04-15

    Objective: To determine if concomitant CT-guided biopsy and percutaneous fiducial seed placement in the lung can be performed in a selective patient population without increased complication or decreased success rates compared to either procedure alone. Materials and methods: An IRB approved retrospective analysis of 285 consecutive patients that underwent CT-guided placement of fiducial seeds in the lung alone (N = 63), with concomitant core biopsy (N = 53) or only core biopsy (N = 169) was performed. Variables compared included: patient demographics, lesion size, depth from pleura, needle size, number of passes through pleura, number and size of core biopsies, number of seeds placed and technical success rates. Statistical analysis was performed using univariate and multivariate pair-wise comparisons. Results: A pathologic diagnosis of malignancy was confirmed in all cases undergoing seed placement alone and seed placement with concurrent biopsy, and in 144 of the biopsy alone lesions. On univariate analysis, major complication rates were similar for all three groups as were lesion size, depth, number of pleural passes, and technical success. Pair-wise comparisons of the remaining variables demonstrated a significant younger age and smaller needle size in the biopsy only group, and less minor complications in the fiducial only group. Overall there were 80/285 (28.1%) minor and 29/285 (10.2%) major complications. All major complications leading to admission consisted of either pneumothorax or hemothorax, while minor complications included asymptomatic stable or resolving pneumothoraces, transient hemoptysis or small hemothoraces. Conclusions: A combined procedure of percutaneous pulmonary core biopsy and stereotactic seed placement can be performed without additional risk of a major complication when compared to performing these separately.

  10. Pain Analysis in Patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Irreversible Electroporation versus Radiofrequency Ablation-Initial Observations

    Narayanan, Govindarajan, E-mail: gnarayanan@med.miami.edu; Froud, Tatiana, E-mail: tfroud@med.miami.edu [Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Department of Vascular and Interventional Radiology (United States); Lo, Kaming, E-mail: KLo@biostat.med.miami.edu [Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health (United States); Barbery, Katuska J., E-mail: kbarbery@med.miami.edu; Perez-Rojas, Evelyn, E-mail: eprojas@med.miami.edu; Yrizarry, Jose, E-mail: jyrizarr@med.miami.edu [Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Department of Vascular and Interventional Radiology (United States)

    2013-02-15

    To retrospectively compare the postprocedure pain of hepatocellular carcinoma treated with irreversible electroporation (IRE) with radiofrequency ablation (RFA). This Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant, institutional review board-approved study compared postprocedure pain in 21 patients (15 men, six women; mean age 61.5 years) who underwent IRE of 29 intrahepatic lesions (mean size 2.20 cm) in 28 IRE sessions with 22 patients (16 men, six women; mean age 60.2 years) who underwent RFA of 27 lesions (mean size 3.38 cm) in 25 RFA sessions. Pain was determined by patient-disclosed scores with an 11-point numerical rating scale and 24 h cumulative hydromorphone use from patient-controlled analgesia pump. Complications were noted. Statistical significance was evaluated by Fisher's exact test, the Chi-square test, and Student's t test. There was no significant difference in the cumulative hydromorphone dose (1.54 mg (IRE) vs. 1.24 mg (RFA); P = 0.52) and in the mean pain score (1.96 (IRE) vs. 2.25 (RFA); P = 0.70). In nine (32.14 %) of 28 IRE sessions and 11 (44.0 %) of 25 RFA sessions, patients reported no pain. Complications occurred in three (10.7 %) of 28 IRE treatments and included pneumothorax (n = 1), pleural effusion (n = 1), and bleeding in the form of hemothorax (n = 1); one (4 %) of 25 RFA treatments included burn. IRE is comparable to RFA in the amount of pain that patients experience and the amount of pain medication self-administered. Both modalities were well tolerated by patients. Prospective, randomized trials are necessary to further evaluate these findings.

  11. Influence of Mechanical Ventilation on the Incidence of Pneumothorax During Infraclavicular Subclavian Vein Catheterization: A Prospective Randomized Noninferiority Trial.

    Kim, Eugene; Kim, Hyun Joo; Hong, Deok Man; Park, Hee-Pyoung; Bahk, Jae-Hyon

    2016-09-01

    It remains unclear whether we have to interrupt mechanical ventilation during infraclavicular subclavian venous catheterization. In practice, the clinicians' choice about lung deflation depends on their own discretion. The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of mechanical ventilation on the incidence of pneumothorax during infraclavicular subclavian venous catheterization. A total of 332 patients, who needed subclavian venous catheterization, were randomly assigned to 1 of the 2 groups: catheterizations were performed with the patients' lungs under mechanical ventilation (ventilation group, n = 165) or without mechanical ventilation (deflation group, n = 167). The incidences of pneumothorax and other complications such as arterial puncture, hemothorax, or catheter misplacements and the success rate of catheterization were compared. The incidences of pneumothorax were 0% (0/165) in the ventilation group and 0.6% (1/167) in the deflation group. The incidence of pneumothorax in the deflation group was 0.6% higher than that in the ventilation group and the 2-sided 90% confidence interval for the difference was (-1.29% to 3.44%). Because the lower bound for the 2-sided 90% confidence interval, -1.29%, was higher than the predefined noninferiority margin of -3%, the inferiority of the ventilation group over the deflation group was rejected at the .05 level of significance. Other complication rates and success rates of catheterization were comparable between 2 groups. The oxygen saturation dropped below 95% in 9 patients in the deflation group, while none in the ventilation group (P = .007). The success and complication rates were similar regardless of mechanical ventilation. During infraclavicular subclavian venous catheterization, interruption of mechanical ventilation does not seem to be necessary for the prevention of pneumothorax.

  12. Pain Analysis in Patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Irreversible Electroporation versus Radiofrequency Ablation—Initial Observations

    Narayanan, Govindarajan; Froud, Tatiana; Lo, Kaming; Barbery, Katuska J.; Perez-Rojas, Evelyn; Yrizarry, Jose

    2013-01-01

    To retrospectively compare the postprocedure pain of hepatocellular carcinoma treated with irreversible electroporation (IRE) with radiofrequency ablation (RFA). This Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act–compliant, institutional review board–approved study compared postprocedure pain in 21 patients (15 men, six women; mean age 61.5 years) who underwent IRE of 29 intrahepatic lesions (mean size 2.20 cm) in 28 IRE sessions with 22 patients (16 men, six women; mean age 60.2 years) who underwent RFA of 27 lesions (mean size 3.38 cm) in 25 RFA sessions. Pain was determined by patient-disclosed scores with an 11-point numerical rating scale and 24 h cumulative hydromorphone use from patient-controlled analgesia pump. Complications were noted. Statistical significance was evaluated by Fisher’s exact test, the Chi-square test, and Student’s t test. There was no significant difference in the cumulative hydromorphone dose (1.54 mg (IRE) vs. 1.24 mg (RFA); P = 0.52) and in the mean pain score (1.96 (IRE) vs. 2.25 (RFA); P = 0.70). In nine (32.14 %) of 28 IRE sessions and 11 (44.0 %) of 25 RFA sessions, patients reported no pain. Complications occurred in three (10.7 %) of 28 IRE treatments and included pneumothorax (n = 1), pleural effusion (n = 1), and bleeding in the form of hemothorax (n = 1); one (4 %) of 25 RFA treatments included burn. IRE is comparable to RFA in the amount of pain that patients experience and the amount of pain medication self-administered. Both modalities were well tolerated by patients. Prospective, randomized trials are necessary to further evaluate these findings.

  13. Challenges in war-related thoracic injury faced by French military surgeons in Afghanistan (2009-2013).

    de Lesquen, Henri; Beranger, Fabien; Berbis, Julie; Boddaert, Guillaume; Poichotte, Antoine; Pons, Francois; Avaro, Jean-Philippe

    2016-09-01

    This study reports the challenges faced by French military surgeons in the management of thoracic injury during the latest Afghanistan war. From January 2009 to April 2013, all of the civilian, French and Coalition casualties admitted to French NATO Combat Support Hospital situated on Kabul were prospectively recorded in the French Military Health Service Registry (OPEX(®)). Only penetrating and blunt thoracic trauma patients were retrospectively included. Eighty-nine casualties were included who were mainly civilian (61%) and men (94%) with a mean age of 27.9 years old. Surgeons dealt with polytraumas (78%), severe injuries (mean Injury Severity Score=39.2) and penetrating wounds (96%) due to explosion in 37%, gunshot in 53% and stabbing in 9%. Most of casualties were first observed or drained (n=56). In this non-operative group more than 40% of casualties needed further actions. In the operative group, Damage Control Thoracotomy (n=22) was performed to stop ongoing bleeding and air leakage and Emergency Department Thoracotomy (n=11) for agonal patient. Casualties suffered from hemothorax (60%), pneumothorax (39%), diaphragmatic (37%), lung (35%), heart or great vessels (20%) injuries. The main actions were diaphragmatic sutures (n=25), lung resections (wedge n=6, lobectomy n=4) and haemostasis (intercostal artery ligation n=3, heart injury repairs n=5, great vessels injury repairs n=5). Overall mortality was 11%. The rate of subsequent surgery was 34%. The analysis of the OPEX(®) registry reflects the thoracic surgical challenges of general (visceral) surgeons serving in combat environment during the latest Afghanistan War. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Animal serial killing: The first criminal conviction for animal cruelty in Brazil.

    Salvagni, Fernanda Auciello; de Siqueira, Adriana; Fukushima, Andre Rinaldi; Landi, Marina Frota de Albuquerque; Ponge-Ferreira, Heidi; Maiorka, Paulo Cesar

    2016-10-01

    Animal cruelty is a known behavior of psychopaths, and although the serial killing of humans is widely acknowledged worldwide, this type of crime against animals is seldom discussed. This report describes the necropsy and toxicological findings of 37 dogs and cats, which were found dead in plastic bags in Sao Paulo, Brazil. The animals had all been in the care of an alleged animal rescuer and were to be referred for adoption before being found dead. In the necropsy, the animals showed varying degrees of putrefaction, indicating different periods of death, as well as single or multiple perforations on the thorax. The perforations reached the heart, lungs or large thoracic vessels, culminating in hemopericardium and hemothorax that led to death by circulatory failure and cardiac tamponade. Blood from the heart and thoracic cavity was analyzed by gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and tested positive for ketamine, a dissociative anesthetic. The suspect declared that she had killed only five of the animals and that they had all been fatally sick. The necropsy proved that all 37 animals were killed in the same way, that none of the animals had any terminal diseases and that a restricted drug was used. The suspect was sentenced to 12 years, 6 months and 14days of prison for the killing of the 37 animals. This was the first conviction for the crime of animal cruelty in Brazil. The combined role of police, forensic veterinary pathologists and prosecutors were essential to the conviction, which was a great historical occasion in the fight against animal cruelty. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Radiological findings of dissecting aneurysm -a correlative study of CT with angiography-

    Bae, Tae Yeong; Park, Jae Hyung; Kim, Seung Hyup; Han, Man Chung [College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1987-06-15

    This study comprised 16 patients with aortic dissecting aneurysm who were admitted to Seoul National University Hospital from May 1984 to January 1987. CT findings in 16 cases of aortic dissecting aneurysm were correlated with angiographic findings retrospectively. The results were analysed. 1. Number of male was 11 and that of female was 5. Male patients in fifties were most common and 4 in number. 13 patients had hypertension or history of hypertension among 14 patients. There were one case of Marfan's syndrome, preeclampsia and Takayasu's arteritis respectively. 2. There were 5 cases of DeBakey type I, 1 case of type II and 9 cases of types III dissecting aneurysm. Type III was most common. 3. CT confirmed as superior vena cava which was not identified whether it was superior vena cava or unopacified false lumen by angiography in one case. Regarding distal extent, authors defined A whose extent was proximal to diaphragm and B beyond it for convenience sake. There was one false negative case in CT among 16 cases which was diagnosed as dissecting aneurysm type IIIB by angiography and confirmed as type III surgically. One case was diagnosed as type IB by CT and as type IIIB by angiography and confirmed as type I surgically. Extent was more accurate in CT than angiography. One case was diagnosed as type II by CT but misdiagnosed as right atrial tumor by angiography. 4. Diagnostic sensitivities of CT and angiography in this study were 94% (15/16) respectively. CT was more advantageous in hemothorax, hemopericardium, hemomediastinum, unopacified false lumen, aortic wall calcification and getting information about mediastinum. In angiography aortic regurgitation and tear site and involvement of abdominal vessels could be observed.

  16. PCNL - a comparative study in nonoperated and in previously operated (open nephrolithotomy/pyelolithotomy patients - a single-surgeon experience

    Rahul Gupta

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Re-procedure in patients with history of open stone surgery is usually challenging due to the alteration in the retroperitoneal anatomy. The aim of this study was to determine the possible impact of open renal surgery on the efficacy and morbidity of subsequent percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From March 2009 until September 2010, 120 patients underwent PCNL. Of these, 20 patients were excluded (tubeless or bilateral simultaneous PCNL. Of the remaining 100, 55 primary patients were categorized as Group 1 and the remaining (previous open nephrolithotomy as Group 2. Standard preoperative evaluation was carried out prior to intervention, Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS v. 11 with the chi-square test, independent samples t-test, and Mann-Whitney U test. A p-value < 0.05 was taken as statistically significant. RESULTS: Both groups were similar in demographic profile and stone burden. Attempts to access the PCS was less in Group 1 compared to Group 2 (1.2 + 1 2 vs 3 + 1.3 respectively and this was statistically significant (p < 0.04. However, the mean operative time between the two groups was not statistically significant (p = 0.44. Blood transfusion rate was comparable in the two groups (p = 0.24. One patient in Group 2 developed hemothorax following a supra-11th puncture. Remaining complications were comparable in both groups. CONCLUSION: Patients with past history of renal stone surgery may need more attempts to access the pelvicaliceal system and have difficulty in tract dilation secondary to retroperitoneal scarring. But overall morbidity and efficacy is same in both groups.

  17. Complications following blunt and penetrating injuries in 216 victims of chest trauma requiring tube thoracostomy.

    Helling, T S; Gyles, N R; Eisenstein, C L; Soracco, C A

    1989-10-01

    Tube thoracostomy (TT) is required in the treatment of many blunt and penetrating injuries of the chest. In addition to complications from the injuries, TT may contribute to morbidity by introducing microorganisms into the pleural space or by incomplete lung expansion and evacuation of pleural blood. We have attempted to assess the impact of TT following penetrating and blunt thoracic trauma by examining a consecutive series of 216 patients seen at two urban trauma centers with such injuries who required TT over a 30-month period. Ninety-four patients suffered blunt chest trauma; 122 patients were victims of penetrating wounds. Patients with blunt injuries had longer ventilator requirements (12.6 +/- 14 days vs. 3.7 +/- 7.1 days, p = 0.003), longer intensive care stays (12.2 +/- 12.5 days vs. 4.1 +/- 7.5 days, p = 0.001), and longer periods of TT, (6.5 +/- 4.9 days vs. 5.2 +/- 4.5 days, p = 0.018). Empyema occurred in six patients (3%). Residual hemothorax was found in 39 patients (18%), seven of whom required decortication. Recurrent pneumothorax developed in 51 patients (24%) and ten required repeat TT. Complications occurred in 78 patients (36%). Patients with blunt trauma experienced more complications (44%) than those with penetrating wounds (30%) (p = 0.04). However, only seven of 13 patients developing empyema or requiring decortication had blunt trauma. Despite longer requirements for mechanical ventilation, intensive care, and intubation, victims of blunt trauma seemed to have effective drainage of their pleural space by TT without increased risk of infectious complications.

  18. Computed tomography guided needle biopsy: experience from 1,300 procedures

    Chojniak, Rubens; Isberner, Rony Klaus; Viana, Luciana Marinho; Yu, Liao Shin; Aita, Alessandro Amorim; Soares, Fernando Augusto [Hospital do Cancer A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Radiologia e Patologia

    2006-01-15

    Context and objective: computed tomography (CT) guided biopsy is widely accepted as effective and safe for diagnosis in many settings. Accuracy depends on target organ and needle type. Cutting needles present advantages over fine needles. This study presents experience from CT guided biopsies performed at an oncology center. Design and setting: retrospective study at Hospital do Cancer A. C. Camargo, Sao Paulo.Methods: 1,300 consecutive CT guided biopsies performed between July 1994 and February 2000 were analyzed. Nodules or masses were suspected as primary malignancy in 845 cases (65%) or metastatic lesion in 455 (35%). 628 lesions were thoracic, 281 abdominal, 208 retroperitoneal, 134 musculoskeletal and 49 head/neck. All biopsies were performed by one radiologist or under his supervision: 765 (59%) with 22-gauge fine-needle/aspiration technique and 535 (41%) with automated 16 or 18-gauge cutting-needle biopsy. Results: adequate samples were obtained in 70-92% of fine-needle and 93-100% of cutting-needle biopsies. The specific diagnosis rates were 54-67% for fine-needle and 82-100% for cutting-needle biopsies, according to biopsy site. For any site, sample adequacy and specific diagnosis rate were always better for cutting-needle biopsy. Among 530 lung biopsies, there were 84 pneumothorax (16%) and two hemothorax (0.3%) cases, with thoracic drainage in 24 (4.9%). Among abdominal and retroperitoneal biopsies, there were two cases of major bleeding and one of peritonitis. Conclusion: both types of needle showed satisfactory results, but cutting-needle biopsy should be used when specific diagnosis is desired without greater incidence of complications. (author)

  19. A 51-year-old woman crushed by an elephant trunk.

    Tsung, Ann H; Allen, Brandon R

    2015-03-01

    Wild and exotic animal attacks are not common in the United States. Animal-related injuries in the United States are usually caused by dog bites, followed by cattle and horse injuries. Exotic animal attacks can occur when the animals are provoked, depressed, or housed improperly by owners. We report the case of a 51-year-old woman who sustained multiple systemic traumatic injuries after she was pinned to a fence by an elephant's trunk. Upon arrival in the emergency department, she was hypothermic with a temperature of 35.1ºC (95.1ºF), hypotensive to 94/60 mm Hg after 5 L crystalloid, tachycardic at 108 beats/min, and intubated with oxygen saturation of 100%. Tranexamic acid was administered in addition to starting a massive transfusion protocol. Injuries included bilateral multiple rib fractures, left abdominal wall degloving injury, right pneumothorax, right hemothorax, left chest wall puncture wound, grade IV splenic laceration, 3 grade III liver lacerations, retroperitoneal hematoma, and degloving injuries to bilateral posterior thighs requiring more than 30 operations. Why should an emergency physician be aware of this? Several factors need to be considered when evaluating animal-related injuries, including type, age, and sex of the animal. Multisystem traumatic injuries should be assumed when a large animal is involved. Prehospital care and transport time are vital to a patient's survival in both urban and rural settings. During the initial resuscitation, administering antibiotics tailored to the specific animal can greatly decrease risk of infection and morbidity. Additionally, tetanus immunoglobulin, tetanus toxoid, and rabies immunoglobulin and vaccine may be needed, unless the victim has been previously vaccinated. Copyright © 2015 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Neonatal pleural effusions in a Level III Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Mariana Barbosa

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Pleural effusions are rare in the newborn. Still, being familiar with this condition is relevant given its association with a wide range of disorders. Only two large series of cases on this matter have been published, with no solid conclusions established. The aim of this study is to determine the etiology, management and prognosis of pleural effusions in a population of high-risk neonates.The authors performed a retrospective study in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of "Hospital de São João", Porto (Portugal, between 1997 and 2014, of all newborns with the diagnosis of pleural effusion, chylothorax, hemothorax, empyema, fetal hydrops or leakage of total parenteral nutrition (TPN.Eighty-two newborns were included, 48 males and 34 females. Pleural effusions were congenital in 19 (23.2% newborns and acquired in 63 (76.8%. Fetal hydrops was the most frequent cause (15 cases, 78.9% of congenital effusions while postoperative after intrathoracic surgery was the most common cause (39 cases, 61.9% of acquired effusions, followed by leakage of TPN (13 cases, 20.6%. Chylothorax was the most common type of effusion (41.5% of cases. Pleural effusions after intrathoracic surgery were mainly (64.1% chylothoraces. Regarding use of octreotide for treatment of acquired chylous effusions, the comparative analysis showed no statistical differences between the group of alive newborns who received octreotide and the group who did not. Twenty-seven (32.9% newborns died; the causes of death were related to underlying diseases and not to the pleural effusion. Clinical outcome is generally good, except in hydropic neonates. Blood albumin level appears to be predictive of prognosis and further investigation on its clinical significance should be encouraged.

  1. [Chest trauma].

    Freixinet Gilart, Jorge; Ramírez Gil, María Elena; Gallardo Valera, Gregorio; Moreno Casado, Paula

    2011-01-01

    Chest trauma is a frequent problem arising from lesions caused by domestic and occupational activities and especially road traffic accidents. These injuries can be analyzed from distinct points of view, ranging from consideration of the most severe injuries, especially in the context of multiple trauma, to the specific characteristics of blunt and open trauma. In the present article, these injuries are discussed according to the involvement of the various thoracic structures. Rib fractures are the most frequent chest injuries and their diagnosis and treatment is straightforward, although these injuries can be severe if more than three ribs are affected and when there is major associated morbidity. Lung contusion is the most common visceral lesion. These injuries are usually found in severe chest trauma and are often associated with other thoracic and intrathoracic lesions. Treatment is based on general support measures. Pleural complications, such as hemothorax and pneumothorax, are also frequent. Their diagnosis is also straightforward and treatment is based on pleural drainage. This article also analyzes other complex situations, notably airway trauma, which is usually very severe in blunt chest trauma and less severe and even suitable for conservative treatment in iatrogenic injury due to tracheal intubation. Rupture of the diaphragm usually causes a diaphragmatic hernia. Treatment is always surgical. Myocardial contusions should be suspected in anterior chest trauma and in sternal fractures. Treatment is conservative. Other chest injuries, such as those of the great thoracic and esophageal vessels, are less frequent but are especially severe. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Neumología y Cirugía Torácica. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Provider perceptions concerning use of chest x-ray studies in adult blunt trauma assessments.

    Calderon, Georgina; Perez, Daniel; Fortman, Jonathan; Kea, Bory; Rodriguez, Robert M

    2012-10-01

    Although they infrequently lead to management changing diagnoses, chest x-rays (CXRs) are the most commonly ordered imaging study in blunt trauma evaluation. To determine: 1) the reasons physicians order chest X-ray studies (CXRs) in blunt trauma assessments; 2) what injuries they expect CXRs to reveal; and 3) whether physicians can accurately predict low likelihood of injury on CXR. At a Level I Trauma Center, we asked resident and attending physicians treating adult blunt trauma patients: 1) the primary reason(s) for getting CXRs; 2) what, if any, significant intrathoracic injuries (SITI) they expected CXRs to reveal; and 3) the likelihood of these injuries. An expert panel defined SITI as two or more rib fractures, sternal fracture, pulmonary contusion, pneumothorax, hemothorax, or aortic injury on official CXR readings. There were 484 patient encounters analyzed--65% of participating physicians were residents and 35% were attendings; 16 (3.3%) patients had SITI. The most common reasons for ordering CXRs were: "enough concern for significant injury" (62.9%) and belief that CXR is a "standard part of trauma work-up" (24.8%). Residents were more likely than attendings to cite "standard trauma work-up" (mean difference = 13.5%, p = 0.003). When physicians estimated a 25% likelihood, 9.1% (95% CI 3.0-20.0%) had SITI. Physicians order CXRs in blunt trauma patients because they expect to find injuries and believe that CXRs are part of a "standard" work-up. Providers commonly do not expect CXRs to reveal SITI. When providers estimated low likelihood of SITI, the rate of SITI was very low. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Chest trauma experience over eleven-year period at al-mouassat university teaching hospital-Damascus: a retrospective review of 888 cases.

    Al-Koudmani, Ibrahim; Darwish, Bassam; Al-Kateb, Kamal; Taifour, Yahia

    2012-04-19

    Thoracic trauma is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in developing countries. In this study, we present our 11-year experience in the management and clinical outcome of 888 chest trauma cases as a result of blunt and penetrating injuries in our university hospital in Damascus, Syria. We reviewed files of 888 consequent cases of chest trauma between January 2000 and January 2011. The mean age of our patients was 31 ± 17 years mostly males with blunt injuries. Patients were evaluated and compared according to age, gender, etiology of trauma, thoracic and extra-thoracic injuries, complications, and mortality. The leading cause of the trauma was violence (41%) followed by traffic accidents (33%). Pneumothorax (51%), Hemothorax (38%), rib fractures (34%), and lung contusion (15%) were the most common types of injury. Associated injuries were documented in 36% of patients (extremities 19%, abdomen 13%, head 8%). A minority of the patients required thoracotomy (5.7%), and tube thoracostomy (56%) was sufficient to manage the majority of cases. Mean hospital LOS was 4.5 ± 4.6 days. The overall mortoality rate was 1.8%, and morbidity (n = 78, 8.7%). New traffic laws (including seat belt enforcement) reduced incidence and severity of chest trauma in Syria. Violence was the most common cause of chest trauma rather than road traffic accidents in this series, this necessitates epidemiologic or multi-institutional studies to know to which degree violence contributes to chest trauma in Syria. The number of fractured ribs can be used as simple indicator of the severity of trauma. And we believe that significant neurotrauma, traffic accidents, hemodynamic status and GCS upon arrival, ICU admission, ventilator use, and complication of therapy are predictors of dismal prognosis.

  4. Chest trauma in children, single center experience.

    Ismail, Mohamed Fouad; al-Refaie, Reda Ibrahim

    2012-10-01

    Trauma is the leading cause of mortality in children over one year of age in industrialized countries. In this retrospective study we reviewed all chest trauma in pediatric patients admitted to Mansoura University Emergency Hospital from January 1997 to January 2007. Our hospital received 472 patients under the age of 18. Male patients were 374 with a mean age of 9.2±4.9 years. Causes were penetrating trauma (2.1%) and blunt trauma (97.9%). The trauma was pedestrian injuries (38.3%), motor vehicle (28.1%), motorcycle crash (19.9%), falling from height (6.7%), animal trauma (2.9%), and sports injury (1.2%). Type of injury was pulmonary contusions (27.1%) and lacerations (6.9%), rib fractures (23.9%), flail chest (2.5%), hemothorax (18%), hemopneumothorax (11.8%), pneumothorax (23.7%), surgical emphysema (6.1%), tracheobronchial injury (5.3%), and diaphragm injury (2.1%). Associated lesions were head injuries (38.9%), bone fractures (33.5%), and abdominal injuries (16.7%). Management was conservative (29.9%), tube thoracostomy (58.1%), and thoracotomy (12.1%). Mortality rate was 7.2% and multiple trauma was the main cause of death (82.3%) (Ptrauma is the most common cause of pediatric chest trauma and often due to pedestrian injuries. Rib fractures and pulmonary contusions are the most frequent injuries. Delay in diagnosis and multiple trauma are associated with high incidence of mortality. Copyright © 2011 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  5. Motorcycle-related hospitalization of adolescents in a Level I trauma center in southern Taiwan: a cross-sectional study.

    Liang, Chi-Cheng; Liu, Hang-Tsung; Rau, Cheng-Shyuan; Hsu, Shiun-Yuan; Hsieh, Hsiao-Yun; Hsieh, Ching-Hua

    2015-08-28

    The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the injury pattern, mechanisms, severity, and mortality of adolescents and adults hospitalized for treatment of trauma following motorcycle accidents in a Level I trauma center. Detailed data regarding patients aged 13-19 years (adolescents) and aged 30-50 years (adults) who had sustained trauma due to a motorcycle accident were retrieved from the Trauma Registry System between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2012. The Pearson's chi-squared test, Fisher's exact test, or the independent Student's t-test were performed to compare the adolescent and adult motorcyclists and to compare the motorcycle drivers and motorcycle pillion. Analysis of Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) scores revealed that the adolescent patients had sustained higher rates of facial, abdominal, and hepatic injury and of cranial, mandibular, and femoral fracture but lower rates of thorax and extremity injury; hemothorax; and rib, scapular, clavicle, and humeral fracture compared to the adults. No significant differences were found between the adolescents and adults regarding Injury Severity Score (ISS), New Injury Severity Score (NISS), Trauma-Injury Severity Score (TRISS), mortality, length of hospital stay, or intensive care unit (ICU) admission rate. A significantly greater percentage of adolescents compared to adults were found not to have worn a helmet. Motorcycle riders who had not worn a helmet were found to have a significantly lower first Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score, and a significantly higher percentage was found to present with unconscious status, head and neck injury, and cranial fracture compared to those who had worn a helmet. Adolescent motorcycle riders comprise a major population of patients hospitalized for treatment of trauma. This population tends to present with a higher injury severity compared to other hospitalized trauma patients and a bodily injury pattern differing from that of adult motorcycle riders, indicating the

  6. Chest Tube Drainage of the Pleural Space: A Concise Review for Pulmonologists.

    Porcel, José M

    2018-04-01

    Chest tube insertion is a common procedure usually done for the purpose of draining accumulated air or fluid in the pleural cavity. Small-bore chest tubes (≤14F) are generally recommended as the first-line therapy for spontaneous pneumothorax in non-ventilated patients and pleural effusions in general, with the possible exception of hemothoraces and malignant effusions (for which an immediate pleurodesis is planned). Large-bore chest drains may be useful for very large air leaks, as well as post-ineffective trial with small-bore drains. Chest tube insertion should be guided by imaging, either bedside ultrasonography or, less commonly, computed tomography. The so-called trocar technique must be avoided. Instead, blunt dissection (for tubes >24F) or the Seldinger technique should be used. All chest tubes are connected to a drainage system device: flutter valve, underwater seal, electronic systems or, for indwelling pleural catheters (IPC), vacuum bottles. The classic, three-bottle drainage system requires either (external) wall suction or gravity ("water seal") drainage (the former not being routinely recommended unless the latter is not effective). The optimal timing for tube removal is still a matter of controversy; however, the use of digital drainage systems facilitates informed and prudent decision-making in that area. A drain-clamping test before tube withdrawal is generally not advocated. Pain, drain blockage and accidental dislodgment are common complications of small-bore drains; the most dreaded complications include organ injury, hemothorax, infections, and re-expansion pulmonary edema. IPC represent a first-line palliative therapy of malignant pleural effusions in many centers. The optimal frequency of drainage, for IPC, has not been formally agreed upon or otherwise officially established. Copyright©2018. The Korean Academy of Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases.

  7. [Sarcoid pleural effusion].

    Rodríguez-Núñez, Nuria; Rábade, Carlos; Valdés, Luis

    2014-12-09

    Pleural effusion (PE) is a very uncommon manifestation of sarcoidosis. It is equally observed in men and women, can appear at any age and in all radiologic stages, though it is more common in stages i and ii. Effusions have usually a mild or medium size and mainly involve the right side. Various mechanisms can be implicated. PE will be a serous exudate if there is an increase in the capillary permeability due to direct involvement of the pleural membrane, a chylothorax if mediastinum lymph nodes compress the thoracic duct and/or the lymphatic drainage from the pleural cavity, an hemothorax if granuloma compress or invade pleural small vessels or capillaries, and even a transudate if there is compression of the inferior vena cava, atelectasis due to complete bronchial obstruction or when the resolution of the PE is incomplete with chronic thickening of visceral pleura (trapped lung). It manifests biochemically as a pauci-cellular exudate with a predominance of lymphocytes, though there can be a preponderance of eosinophils or neutrophils. Protein concentrations are usually proportionately higher than lactate dehidrogenase, adenosine deaminase is normally low and it is possible to find increased levels of CA-125 in women. The tuberculin test is negative and pleural or lung biopsies yield the diagnosis by confirming the presence of non-caseating granulomata. These PE can have a favorable self-limited outcome, even though in most cases treatment with corticosteroids is needed, while surgery is required in a few cases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Prevalence and Clinical Import of Thoracic Injury Identified by Chest Computed Tomography but Not Chest Radiography in Blunt Trauma: Multicenter Prospective Cohort Study.

    Langdorf, Mark I; Medak, Anthony J; Hendey, Gregory W; Nishijima, Daniel K; Mower, William R; Raja, Ali S; Baumann, Brigitte M; Anglin, Deirdre R; Anderson, Craig L; Lotfipour, Shahram; Reed, Karin E; Zuabi, Nadia; Khan, Nooreen A; Bithell, Chelsey A; Rowther, Armaan A; Villar, Julian; Rodriguez, Robert M

    2015-12-01

    Chest computed tomography (CT) diagnoses more injuries than chest radiography, so-called occult injuries. Wide availability of chest CT has driven substantial increase in emergency department use, although the incidence and clinical significance of chest CT findings have not been fully described. We determine the frequency, severity, and clinical import of occult injury, as determined by changes in management. These data will better inform clinical decisions, need for chest CT, and odds of intervention. Our sample included prospective data (2009 to 2013) on 5,912 patients at 10 Level I trauma center EDs with both chest radiography and chest CT at physician discretion. These patients were 40.6% of 14,553 enrolled in the parent study who had either chest radiography or chest CT. Occult injuries were pneumothorax, hemothorax, sternal or greater than 2 rib fractures, pulmonary contusion, thoracic spine or scapula fracture, and diaphragm or great vessel injury found on chest CT but not on preceding chest radiography. A priori, we categorized thoracic injuries as major (having invasive procedures), minor (observation or inpatient pain control >24 hours), or of no clinical significance. Primary outcome was prevalence and proportion of occult injury with major interventions of chest tube, mechanical ventilation, or surgery. Secondary outcome was minor interventions of admission rate or observation hours because of occult injury. Two thousand forty-eight patients (34.6%) had chest injury on chest radiography or chest CT, whereas 1,454 of these patients (71.0%, 24.6% of all patients) had occult injury. Of these, in 954 patients (46.6% of injured, 16.1% of total), chest CT found injuries not observed on immediately preceding chest radiography. In 500 more patients (24.4% of injured patients, 8.5% of all patients), chest radiography found some injury, but chest CT found occult injury. Chest radiography found all injuries in only 29.0% of injured patients. Two hundred and two

  9. Lesões traumáticas do tórax. Aspectos na tomografia computadorizada

    Alessandro Severo Alves de Melo

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available RESUMO: O trauma representa, no mundo actual, uma das principais causas de morte, e o acometimento torácico significa um importante agravamento nas vítimas de trauma multi-sistémico. Neste trabalho foram estudados os aspectos tomográficos de 200 pacientes com trauma torácico. As lesões pulmonares predominaram, tendo sido observadas em 192 casos (96%, manifestadas sob a forma de contusões em 178 casos (89%, atelectasias em 41 casos (20,5%, lacerações em 15 casos (7,5% e hematomas em 6 casos (3%. Lesões pleurais foram demonstradas em 140 casos (70%, dos quais em 121 casos (60,5% havia hemotórax e em 84 casos (42% pneumotórax. As lesões mediastínicas estiveram presentes em 28 casos (14%, com pneumomediastino em 18 (9%, hematoma mediastínico em 7 casos (3,5%, hemopericárdio em 4 (2% e lesões da aorta em 3 (1,5%. As lesões diafragmáticas foram observadas em 8 pacientes (4%. O enfisema de partes moles foi demonstrado em 36 casos (18%.REV PORT PNEUMOL 2004; X (5: 393-403 ABSTRACT: Trauma is nowadays one of the most common causes of death and traumatic thoracic lesions are important agravant to trauma patients. In this work the aspects of computed tomography from 200 cases of thoracic trauma were studied. Lung lesions predominated, found in 192 cases (96%, manifested as contusions in 178 cases (89%, atelectasis in 41 cases (20,5%, lacerations in 15 cases (7,5% and hematomas in 6 cases (3%. Pleural lesions were showed in 140 cases (70%, among them in 121 cases (60,5% there were hemothorax and in 84 cases (42%, pneumothorax. Mediastinal lesions were observed in 28 cases (14%, with pneumomediastinum in 18 cases (9%, mediastinal hematoma in 7 cases (3,5%, hemopericardium in 4 cases (2% and aortic lesions in 3 cases (1,5%. Diaphragmatic rupture was seen in 8 pacients (4%. Soft tissue emphysema was demonstrated in 36 cases (18%.REV PORT PNEUMOL 2004; X (5: 393-403 Palavras-chave: Tórax, tomografia computadorizada, trauma torácico, Key

  10. [Liver trauma due to penetrating lesions: miscellanea, personal case series, clinical and CT findings].

    Salzano, A; Nocera, V; De Rosa, A; Rossi, E; Carbone, M; Gatta, G; Vitale, L; Vigliotti, A

    2000-12-01

    severity of damage, which permits to choose a conservative treatment in case of intraparenchymal hematomas and lacerocontusive foci without hemoperitoneum, which can be followed-up with physical and CT examinations. Moreover, Helical CT could provide the early diagnosis of active bleeding in the peritoneum and of focal bleeding in the liver, thus permitting prompt hepatorrhaphy or targeted hepatectomy. A diaphragm injury suspected at CT should always prompt the surgeon to intervention, especially when hemothorax, lung base pneumothorax, large liver hematoma or tear of the liver dome are associated. Finally, subdiaphragmatic free gas indicates gut perforation associated with liver damage, in which case surgery is necessary too.

  11. Troponin T elevation after permanent pacemaker implantation.

    Chen, Xueying; Yu, Ziqing; Bai, Jin; Hu, Shulan; Wang, Wei; Qin, Shengmei; Wang, Jingfeng; Sun, Zhe; Su, Yangang; Ge, Junbo

    2017-08-01

    The objective of the study is to study the incidence, significance, and factors associated with cardiac troponin T (CTNT) elevation after pacemaker implantation. Three hundred seventy-four patients (104 single-chamber pacemakers or ICD, 243 dual-chamber pacemakers, and 27 cardiac resynchronization therapy/cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillator) who had normal levels of CTNT at baseline and underwent implantation of a permanent pacemaker system were included in this study. Serum levels of CTNT were measured at baseline, 6 and 24 h after the implantation procedure. The median of CTNT levels increased from 0.012 ng/mL at baseline to 0.032 and 0.019 ng/mL at 6 and 24 h after the procedure, respectively (all p 0.09 ng/mL). After 1-year follow-up, the incidence of complications including dislodgement of the lead, pocket infection, pneumothorax, hemothorax, and vein thrombus and cardiac outcomes including hospitalization of heart failure, coronary artery disease, arrhythmia, and cardiovascular mortality was not significantly different between the normal and elevated CTNT groups at 6 h after the procedure. By logistic regression analysis, gender, N-terminal pro-B type natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) at baseline, left ventricular ejection fractions (LVEF), estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), and fluoroscopy time were independently associated with CTNT elevation after adjusted for age, pacemaker types, right ventricle lead location (RVA or RVOT), heart function, and left ventricular end systolic dimension. Pacemaker implantation was found to be accompanied with CTNT elevation in 55.6% of the patients at 6 h after the procedure, and its kinetics were fast, which might not be related to the complications and adverse cardiac outcomes within 1 year of follow-up. Moreover, gender, NT-pro-BNP at baseline, LVEF, eGFR, and fluoroscopy time were found to be independent predictors of CTNT elevation.

  12. Fístula de alto gasto High output fistula

    Ricardo Almeida Varela

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta a un paciente de 37 años de edad que acude a nuestro Cuerpo de Guardia politraumatizado, con lesiones torácicas y abdominales, con síntomas y signos sugestivos de fracturas costales múltiples, con hemotórax derecho y hemoperitoneo, corroborado imaginológicamente y en la punción abdominal. Se realiza pleurostomía mínima intermedia y laparotomía exploratoria. Se le encuentran lesiones hepáticas de los segmentos VI, V, VIII y IV, con una profundidad mayor de 3 cm, además, deserosamientos en las asas delgadas intestinales y colon. Se realiza hepatorrafia y empaquetamiento hepático. Posteriormente van apareciendo complicaciones, por lo que tiene que ser reintervenido en más de 60 ocasiones. Entre ellas, la aparición de una fístula de alto gasto, que lo llevó a la desnutrición y a la permanencia con el abdomen expuesto durante 7 meses hasta el egreso. Se revisa la literatura correspondiente a estas entidades.A 37 years-old multi-traumatized male patient went to our emergency service. He had many injures in the thorax and the abdomen, together with symptoms and signs suggestive of multiple costal fractures, with right hemothorax and hemoperitoneum, all of which was confirmed by imaging techniques and by abdominal puncture. Minimal intermediate pleurostomy and exploratory laparoscopy were performed. We found hepatic lesions in the 6th, 5th, 8th and 4th segments, over 3 cm deep; additionally, the loss of serosa from the intestinal ansae and from the colon. Hepatorrhaphy and hepatic packing were also performed. Later on, more complications appeared, so he had to be re-operated more than 60 times. The occurrence of a high output fistula led him to malnutrition and his abdomen remained exposed for 7 months until he was finally discharged from hospital. This paper also presented a literature review on this topic.

  13. Vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome with cryptorchidism, recurrent pneumothorax, and pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis-like foci: A case report.

    Park, Min A; Shin, So Youn; Kim, Young Jin; Park, Myung Jae; Lee, Seung Hyeun

    2017-11-01

    Vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (vEDS) is a rare autosomal dominant inherited collagen disorder caused by defects or deficiency of pro-alpha 1 chain of type III procollagen encoded by COL3A1. vEDS is characterized not only by soft tissue manifestations including hyperextensibility of skin and joint hypermobility but also by early mortality due to rupture of arteries or vital organs. Although pulmonary complications are not common, vEDS cases complicated by pneumothorax, hemothorax, or intrapulmonary hematoma have been reported. When a patient initially presents only with pulmonary complications, it is not easy for clinicians to suspect vEDS. We report a case of an 18-year-old high school student, with a past history of cryptorchidism, presenting with recurrent pneumothorax. Routine laboratory findings were unremarkable. Chest high resolution computed tomographic scan showed age-unmatched hyperinflation of both lungs, atypical cystic changes and multifocal ground glass opacities scattered in both lower lobes. His slender body shape, hyperflexible joints, and hyperextensible skin provided clue to suspicion of a possible connective tissue disorder. The histological examination of the lung lesions showed excessive capillary proliferation in the pulmonary interstitium and pleura allowing the diagnosis of pulmonary capillary hemangiomatosis (PCH)-like foci. Genetic study revealed COL3A1 gene splicing site mutation confirming his diagnosis as vEDS. Although his diagnosis vEDS is notorious for fatal vascular complication, there was no evidence of such complication at presentation. Fortunately, he has been followed up for 10 months without pulmonary or vascular complications. To the best of our knowledge, both cryptorchidism and PCH-like foci have never been reported yet as complications of vEDS, suggesting our case might be a new variant of this condition. This case emphasizes the importance of comprehensive physical examination and history-taking, and the clinical

  14. The clinical implications of severe low rib fracture in the management of diaphragm injury: A Case Control Study.

    Kim, Seongyup; Choi, Woo Jin; Lee, Kawng Ho; Byun, Chun Sung; Bae, Keum Seok; Park, Il Hwan

    2017-06-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the differences in clinical presentation and characteristics with regard to diaphragmatic injury between blunt trauma patients with severe low rib fractures and those without severe low rib fractures. The medical records of all patients with diaphragmatic injuries who were surgically treated at this level I trauma center, between January 2004 and December 2016 were reviewed. Patient notes, radiologic findings, and operative reports were evaluated. All of the diaphragmatic injuries were confirmed based on the operative findings. Rib fracture with displacement between the ends of the fracture of more than half the width of the fractured rib on computed tomography was classified as 'severe rib fracture'. Patients were categorized into 2 groups and analyzed: those who had more than one severe rib fracture in low ribs on the ipsilateral side of the diaphragm injury (Severe group), and those with no severe rib fracture (Non-severe group). Delayed diagnosis of diaphragmatic injury was more frequent in the Severe group than in the Non-severe group (81.8% vs 36.8%, p-value = 0.026). With regard to initial indications for operation, intrathoracic visceral herniation was more frequent in the Non-severe group (78.9% vs 18.2%, p-value = 0.002), while hemothorax was more frequent in the Severe group (63.6% vs 5.3%, p-value = 0.001). Central type diaphragmatic laceration was more frequent in the Non-severe group than in the Severe group (78.9% vs 18.2%, p-value = 0.002). The diameter of diaphragmatic injury was larger in the Non-severe group than in the Severe group (9.70 ± 4.10 cm vs 4.80 ± 3.60 cm, p-value = 0.004). The results of this study imply that a low threshold for thoracotomy or laparotomy should be considered in blunt trauma patients with severe low rib fractures for the purpose of hidden diaphragmatic injury detection and management. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. The number of displaced rib fractures is more predictive for complications in chest trauma patients.

    Chien, Chih-Ying; Chen, Yu-Hsien; Han, Shih-Tsung; Blaney, Gerald N; Huang, Ting-Shuo; Chen, Kuan-Fu

    2017-02-28

    Traumatic rib fractures can cause chest complications that need further treatment and hospitalization. We hypothesized that an increase in the number of displaced rib fractures will be accompanied by an increase in chest complications. We retrospectively reviewed the trauma registry between January 2013 and May 2015 in a teaching hospital in northeastern Taiwan. Patients admitted with chest trauma and rib fractures without concomitant severe brain, splenic, pelvic or liver injuries were included. The demographic data, such as gender, age, the index of coexistence disease, alcohol consumption, trauma mechanisms were analyzed as potential predictors of pulmonary complications. Pulmonary complications were defined as pneumothorax, hemothorax, flail chest, pulmonary contusion, and pneumonia. In the 29 months of the study period, a total of 3151 trauma patients were admitted to our hospital. Among them, 174 patients were enrolled for final analysis. The most common trauma mechanism was road traffic accidents (58.6%), mainly motorbike accidents (n = 70, 40.2%). Three or more displaced rib fractures had higher specificity for predicting complications, compared to three or more total rib fractures (95.5% vs 59.1%). Adjusting the severity of chest trauma using TTSS and Ribscore by multivariable logistic regression analysis, we found that three or more rib fractures or any displaced rib fracture was the most significant predictor for developing pulmonary complication (aOR: 5.49 95% CI: 1.82-16.55). Furthermore, there were 18/57 (31.6%) patients with fewer than three ribs fractures developed pulmonary complications. In these 18 patients, only five patients had delayed onset complications and four of them had at least one displaced rib fracture. In this retrospective cohort study, we found that the number of displaced or total rib fractures, bilateral rib fractures, and rib fractures in more than two areas were associated with the more chest complications. Furthermore

  16. [Chronic chest pain after rib fracture: It can cause a disability?

    Rabiou, S; Ouadnouni, Y; Lakranbi, M; Traibi, A; Antoini, F; Smahi, M

    2018-04-01

    The rib fractures and instability of the chest wall are the main lesions of closed chest trauma. These lesions can be a source of chronic, often disabling with daily discomfort resulting limitation of some activities. The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of this phenomenon in order to improve the quality of early care. Through an observational retrospective cohort study on a number of 41 patients supported and monitored for traumatic rib fractures at the Military Hospital of Meknes during the period from October 2010 to March 2016. The circumstances of the accident were dominated by accidents of public roads (86%) and concerned the young adult male. Radiographs have enumerated 165 fracture lines with an average of 4 rib fractures per patient. These were unilateral fractures in 88% of cases, and concerned the means arc in 46% of cases. The rib fracture was undisplaced fracture in 39% of patients, whereas in 2 patients, a flail chest was present. Post-traumatic hemothorax (63% of cases) were the thoracic lesions most commonly associated with rib fractures. The initial management consisted in the use of analgesics systemically in all patients. The retrospective evaluation of pain by the verbal scale was possible in 30 patients. The persistent pain was noted in 60% of cases. This pain was triggered by a simple effort to moderate in 55% of cases, and hard effort in 28% of cases. In 17% of patients, even at rest, the pain occurred intermittently. The impact in terms of disability was mild to moderate in 28% of cases and important in 17%. The neuropathic pain was found in 3 patients. Therapeutically, the first and second levels of analgesics were sufficient to relieve pain. The neuroleptics were required for 2 patients. Our study confirms the persistence of chronic painful, sometimes lasting several years after the initial chest trauma. This pain is responsible of disability triggered most often after exercise. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson

  17. Pattern and outcome of chest injuries at Bugando Medical Centre in Northwestern Tanzania

    2011-01-01

    Background Chest injuries constitute a continuing challenge to the trauma or general surgeon practicing in developing countries. This study was conducted to outline the etiological spectrum, injury patterns and short term outcome of these injuries in our setting. Patients and methods This was a prospective study involving chest injury patients admitted to Bugando Medical Centre over a six-month period from November 2009 to April 2010 inclusive. Results A total of 150 chest injury patients were studied. Males outnumbered females by a ratio of 3.8:1. Their ages ranged from 1 to 80 years (mean = 32.17 years). The majority of patients (72.7%) sustained blunt injuries. Road traffic crush was the most common cause of injuries affecting 50.7% of patients. Chest wall wounds, hemothorax and rib fractures were the most common type of injuries accounting for 30.0%, 21.3% and 20.7% respectively. Associated injuries were noted in 56.0% of patients and head/neck (33.3%) and musculoskeletal regions (26.7%) were commonly affected. The majority of patients (55.3%) were treated successfully with non-operative approach. Underwater seal drainage was performed in 39 patients (19.3%). One patient (0.7%) underwent thoracotomy due to hemopericardium. Thirty nine patients (26.0%) had complications of which wound sepsis (14.7%) and complications of long bone fractures (12.0%) were the most common complications. The mean LOS was 13.17 days and mortality rate was 3.3%. Using multivariate logistic regression analysis, associated injuries, the type of injury, trauma scores (ISS, RTS and PTS) were found to be significant predictors of the LOS (P trauma scores (ISS, RTS and PTS), the need for ICU admission and the presence of complications (P Chest injuries resulting from RTCs remain a major public health problem in this part of Tanzania. Urgent preventive measures targeting at reducing the occurrence of RTCs is necessary to reduce the incidence of chest injuries in this region. PMID:21244706

  18. Risk factors of pneumothorax in percutaneous fine needle aspiration biopsy of the lung

    Kim, Sang Jin; Park, Kwang Joo; Shin, Hyung Cheol; Kwon, Ryang; Jo, Byung June; Oh, Sei Jung; Ahn, Chang Su; Kim, Hyung Jung

    1997-01-01

    Percutaneous fine needle aspiration biopsy is known to be a useful diagnostic method for the diagnosis of various pulmonary diseases. Its diagnostic yield is high, and it is safe, but complications such as pneumothorax can occasionally occur. We reviewed the complications arising after needle aspiration biopsy and analyzed the risk factors of pneumothorax. The medical records and radiographic studies of 157 patients with various pulmonary diseases who underwent needle aspiration biopsy of the lung between 1990 and 1996 were retrospectively reviewed. The clinical features, treatment, and courses of complications were reviewed, and risk factors of pneumothorax such as depth and size of lesion, diameter of needle, number of punctures, and obstructive pulmonary abnormalities were analyzed. Complications occurred in 40 of 157cases(25.5%), namely pneumothorax in 26(16.6%), hemoptysis in 11(7%), hemothorax in two(1.3%), and recurrence of malignancy at the site of aspiration in one(0.6%). When the patients were divided into three groups according to depth of lesion, there were significant difference in the incidence of pneumothorax;the results were as follows:less than 2cm, 12.9%;between 2 and 4cm, 24.1%;and larger than 4cm, 57.1%(p<0.05). In pulmonary function testing, FVC(Forced Vital Capacity) of patients with pneumothorax was less than that of patients without(2.6±0.9L vs 3.1±0.8L, p<0.05), but FEV1(Forced Expiratory Volume in 1 second), FEV1%(percentage of predicted FEV1), FEV1/FVC, and FVC% (percentage of predicted FVC) were not different between the two groups. The incidence of pneumothorax in patients with pleura-at-tached lesion (9%) was lower than that of those with non-attached lesion(26%, p=3D0.01). The age of patients, size of lesion, diameter of the needle, guidance methods and number of aspirations showed no significant relationship with pneumothorax. In needle aspiration biopsy of the lung, depth of lesion and passage of a needle through aerated lung are

  19. Occult pneumothorax in blunt trauma: is there a need for tube thoracostomy?

    Zhang, M; Teo, L T; Goh, M H; Leow, J; Go, K T S

    2016-12-01

    Occult pneumothorax (OPTX) is defined as air within the pleural cavity that is undetectable on normal chest X-rays, but identifiable on computed tomography. Currently, consensus is divided between tube thoracostomy and conservative management for OPTX. The aim of this retrospective study is to determine whether OPTX can be managed conservatively and whether any adverse events occur under conservative management. Data on all trauma patients from 1 Jan 2010 to 31 December 2012 were obtained from our hospital's trauma registry. All patients with occult pneumothorax who had chest X-ray (CXR) and any CT scan visualizing the thorax were included. The exclusion criteria included those with penetrating wounds; CXR showing pneumothorax, hemothorax, or hemopneumothorax; those with prophylactic chest tube insertion before CT; and those with no CT diagnosis of OPTX. The complications of these patients were analyzed to determine if tube thoracostomy is necessary for OPTX and whether not inserting it would alter the outcome significantly. A total of 1564 cases were reviewed and 83 patients were included. Of these 83 patients, 35 (42.2 %) had tube thoracostomy after OPTX detection and 48 (57.8 %) were observed initially. Patients who had tube thoracostomy had similar ISS compared to those without (median ISS 17 vs. 18.5, p = 0.436). Out of the 48 patients who did not have tube thoracostomy on detection of an OPTX, 4 (8.3 %) had complications. In the group of 35 patients who had tube thoracostomy on detection of an OPTX, 7 (20 %) had complications. Of the 83 patients, a total of 12 patients had IPPV, of which 7 (58.3 %) had tube thoracostomy and 5 (41.7 %) did not. Patients who had tube thoracostomy under our care have a statistically significant likelihood of experiencing any complication compared to those without tube thoracostomy (odds ratio 9.92. The median length of stay was also longer (13 days) in those who had tube thoracostomy compared to those without (5

  20. Impact and safety of open lung biopsy in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS).

    Ortiz, G; Garay, M; Mendoza, D; Cardinal-Fernández, P

    2018-02-28

    antimicrobial or corticosteroid treatment. No deaths but four side effects (3 airway leaks and one hemothorax) were associated with the OLB procedure. All were resolved before ICU discharge. The information provided by OLB performed at the bedside in ARDS patients of unknown etiology could be relevant, as it may optimize treatment. The risk associated with OLB seems to be acceptable. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  1. Delayed pneumothorax complicating minor rib fracture after chest trauma.

    Lu, Ming-Shian; Huang, Yao-Kuang; Liu, Yun-Hen; Liu, Hui-Ping; Kao, Chiung-Lun

    2008-06-01

    Pneumothorax (PTX) after trauma is a preventable cause of death. Drainage procedures such as chest tube insertion have been traditionally advocated to prevent fatal tension PTX. We evaluated the safety of close observation in patients with delayed PTX complicating rib fracture after minor chest trauma. Adult patients (>18 years) with a diagnosis of chest trauma and 3 or fewer fractured ribs were reviewed. Case patients were divided according to age, location and number of fractured ribs, mechanism of trauma, and initial pulmonary complication after thoracic trauma for comparative analysis. There were 207 male (70.2%) and 88 female (29.8%) patients whose ages ranged from 18 to 93 years (median, 55 years). The mechanisms of trauma were a motor vehicle accident in 207 patients, falls in 66, pedestrian injury in 10, and assaults in 14. Ninety-five patients sustained 1 rib fracture, 95 had 2 rib fractures, and 105 suffered 3 rib fractures. Right-sided injury occurred in 164 cases, left-sided injury did in 127, and bilateral injury did in 4. The most frequent location of rib fractures was from the fourth rib to the ninth rib. The initial pulmonary complications after trauma were PTX in 16 patients, hemothorax in 43, pneumohemothorax in 14, lung contusion in 75, and isolated subcutaneous emphysema (SubcEmph) in 33. Thirty percent of the patients (n = 5/16) who presented with traumatic PTX were observed safely without drainage. Delayed PTX was recorded in 16 patients, occurring mostly during the first 2 days of their admission. Associated extrathoracic injury was recorded in 189 patients. The mean hospital stay of the patients was 7.66 days. Longer hospital stay was related to increasing number of fractured ribs, need for thoracic drainage, and the presence of associated extrathoracic injury. The mortality rate for the entire group was 2%. The presence of SubcEmph was the only risk factor associated with the development of delayed PTX. Patients sustaining blunt chest

  2. [Bony injuries of the thoracic cage in multiple trauma : Incidence, concomitant injuries, course and outcome].

    Schulz-Drost, S; Oppel, P; Grupp, S; Krinner, S; Langenbach, A; Lefering, R; Mauerer, A

    2016-12-01

    Thoracic trauma is considered to be responsible for 25 % of fatalities in multiple trauma and is a frequent injury with an incidence of 50 %. In addition to organ injuries, severe injuries to the bony parts of the thorax also occur and these injuries are described very differently mostly based on single center data. The focus of this study was on a holistic presentation of the prevalence and the incidence of thoracic trauma in patients with multiple trauma from the data of the large collective of the TraumaRegister DGU® (TR-DGU) with the objective of an analysis of concomitant injuries, therapy options and outcome parameters. A retrospective analysis was carried out based on the data set of the TR-DGU from the years 2009-2013. Inclusion criteria were an injury severity scale (ISS) score ≥ 16 and primary admission to a trauma center but isolated craniocerebral injury was an exclusion criterium. Patients were separated into two groups: those with rib fractures (RF) and those with flail chest (FC). A total of 21,741 patients met the inclusion criteria including 10,474 (48.2 %) suffering from either RF or FC. The mean age was 49.8 ± 19.9 years in the RF group and 54.1 ± 18.2 years in the FC group. Approximately 25 % were female in both groups, 98.1 % were blunt force injuries and the median ISS was 28.0 ± 11.2 in RF and 35.1 ± 14.2 in FC. Shock, insertion of a chest tube, (multi) organ failure and fatality rates were significantly higher in the FC group as were concomitant thoracic injuries, such as pneumothorax and hemothorax. Sternal fractures without rib fractures were less common (3.8 %) than concomitant in the RF (10.1 %) and FC (14 %) groups, as were concomitant fractures of the clavicle and the scapula. Out of all patients 32.6 % showed fractures of the thoracolumbar spine, 26.5 % without rib fractures, 36.6-38.6 % with rib fractures or monolateral FC and 48.6 % concomitant to bilateral FC. Thoracotomy was carried

  3. Evaluation of chest and abdominal injuries in trauma patients hospitalized in the surgery ward of poursina teaching hospital, guilan, iran.

    Hemmati, Hossein; Kazemnezhad-Leili, Ehsan; Mohtasham-Amiri, Zahra; Darzi, Ali Asghar; Davoudi-Kiakalayeh, Ali; Dehnadi-Moghaddam, Anoush; Kouchakinejad-Eramsadati, Leila

    2013-01-01

    Trauma, especially chest and abdominal trauma are increasing due to the growing number of vehicles on the roads, which leads to an increased incidence of road accidents. Urbanization, industrialization and additional problems are the other associated factors which accelerate this phenomenon. A better understanding of the etiology and pattern of such injuries can help to improve the management and ultimate the outcomes of these patients. This study aimed to evaluate the patients with chest and abdominal trauma hospitalized in the surgery ward of Poursina teaching hospital, Guilan, Iran. In this cross-sectional study, the data of all chest and abdominal trauma patients hospitalized in the surgery ward of Poursina teaching hospital were collected from March 2011 to March 2012. Information about age, gender, injured areas, type of injury (penetrating or blunt), etiology of the injury, accident location (urban or rural) and patients' discharge outcomes were collected by a questionnaire. In total, 211 patients with a mean age of 34.1 ± 1.68 years was entered into the study. The most common cause of trauma was traffic accidents (51.7%). Among patients with chest trauma, 45 cases (35.4%) had penetrating injuries and 82 cases (64.6%) blunt lesions. The prevalence of chest injuries was 35.5% and rib fractures 26.5%. In chest injuries, the prevalence of hemothorax was 65.3%, pneumothorax 2.7%, lung contusion 4% and emphysema 1.3%, respectively. There were 24 cases (27.9%) with abdominal trauma which had penetrating lesions and 62 cases (72.1%) with blunt lesions. The most common lesions in patients with penetrating abdominal injuries were spleen (24.2%) and liver (12.1%) lesions. The outcomes of the patients were as follow: 95.7% recovery and 4.3% death. The majority of deaths were observed among road traffic victims (77.7%). Considering the fact that road-related accidents are quite predictable and controllable; therefore, the quality promotion of traumatic patients' care

  4. Liver trauma from penetrating injuries. Miscellanea, personal series, clinical and CT findings

    Salzano, A.; Nocera, V.; De Rosa, A.; Vigliotti, A.; Rossi, E.; Carbone, M.; Gatta, G.

    2000-01-01

    the extent and severity of damage, which permits to choose a conservative treatment in case of intraparenchymal hematomas and lacerocontusive foci without hemoperitoneum, which can be followed-up with physical and CT examinations. Moreover, Helical CT could provide the early diagnosis of active bleeding in the peritoneum and of focal bleeding in the liver, thus permitting prompt hepatorrraphy or targeted hepatectomy. A diaphragm injury suspected at CT should always prompt the surgeon to intervention, especially when hemothorax, lung base pneumothorax, large liver hematoma or tear of the liver dome are associated. Finally, subdiaphragmatic free gas indicates gut perforation associated with liver damage, in which case surgery is necessary too [it

  5. What are the Advantages? A Prospective Analysis of 16 versus 28 French Chest Tube Sizes in Video-assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery Lobectomy of Lung Cancer

    Mei YANG

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Post-operation management of minimally invasive thoracic surgery is similar to that of open surgery, especially on the drainage tube of the chest. The aim of this study is to compare the advantages of using 16 F versus 28 F chest tubes in video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS lobectomy of lung cancer. Methods Data from 163 patients (February-May 2014 who underwent VATS lobectomy of lung cancer with insertion of one chest drain (16 F or 28 F were analyzed. The following post-operative data were evaluated: primary healing of tube incision, CXR abnormalities (pneumothorax, fluid, atelectasis, subcutaneous emphysema, and hematoma, drainage time, new drain insertion, and wound healing at the site of insertion. Results A total of 75 patients received 28 F chest tubes, and 88 patients received 16 F chest tubes. Both groups were similar in age, gender, comorbidities, and pathological evaluation of resection specimens. After adjustment, no statistically significant difference was found between the two groups in relation to tube-related complications including residual pneumothoraces (4.00% vs 4.44%; P=0.999, subcutaneous emphysema (8.00% vs 6.67%; P=0.789, retained hemothorax (0 vs 41%, P=0.253, and drainage time [(28.4±16.12 h vs (22.1±11.8 h; P=0.120] The average total drainage volume and rrhythmia rates of the 16 F group [(365±106 mL, 14.67%] was less than that of the 28 F group [(665±217 mL, 4.5%; P=0.030, P=0.047]. The rates of primary healing at the site of insertion in the 16 F group (95.45% was higher than that in the 28 F group (77.73%, P=0.039. A significant difference was found on the post-operative length of stay of the two groups [(4.23±0.05 d vs (4.57±0.16 d, P=0.078]. Conclusion The use of 16 F chest tube for VATS lobectomy of patients with lung cancer did not affect the clinically relevant outcomes tested. However, 16 F chest tube facilitated faster wound healing at the site of insertion.

  6. 14 French pigtail catheters placed by surgeons to drain blood on trauma patients: is 14-Fr too small?

    Kulvatunyou, Narong; Joseph, Bellal; Friese, Randall S; Green, Donald; Gries, Lynn; O'Keeffe, Terence; Tang, Andy L; Wynne, Julie L; Rhee, Peter

    2012-12-01

    Small 14F pigtail catheters (PCs) have been shown to drain air quite well in patients with traumatic pneumothorax (PTX). But their effectiveness in draining blood in patients with traumatic hemothorax (HTX) or hemopneumothorax (HPTX) is unknown. We hypothesized that 14F PCs can drain blood as well as large-bore 32F to 40F chest tubes. We herein report our early case series experience with PCs in the management of traumatic HTX and HPTX. We prospectively collected data on all bedside-inserted PCs in patients with traumatic HTX or HPTX during a 30-month period (July 2009 through December 2011) at our Level I trauma center. We then compared our PC prospective data with our trauma registry-derived retrospective chest tube data (January 2008 through December 2010) at our center. Our primary outcome of interest was the initial drainage output. Our secondary outcomes were tube duration, insertion-related complications, and failure rate. For our statistical analysis, we used the unpaired Student's t-test, χ test, and Wilcoxon rank-sum test; we defined significance by a value of p tubes. Our PC group had a higher rate of blunt mechanism injuries than our chest tube group did (83 vs. 62%; p = 0.01). The mean initial output was similar between our PC group (560 ± 81 mL) and our chest tube group (426 ± 37 mL) (p = 0.13). In the PC group, the tube was inserted later (median, Day 1; interquartile range, Days 0-3) than the tube inserted in our chest tube group (median, Day 0; interquartile range, Days 0-0) (p Tube duration, rate of insertion-related complications, and failure rate were all similar. In our early experience, 14F PCs seemed to drain blood as well as large-bore chest tubes based on initial drainage output and other outcomes studied. In this early phase, we were being selective in inserting PCs in only stable blunt trauma patients, and PCs were inserted at a later day from the time of the initial evaluation. In the future, we will need a larger sample size and

  7. The Lost Guidewire

    Ankit Shah

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 44-year-old female called 911 complaining of abdominal pain, but was unresponsive upon arrival by emergency medical services (EMS. She presented to the emergency department (ED as a full cardiac arrest and had return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC with cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR and epinephrine. The patient had a splenic embolization 1 week prior to presentation. Bedside ultrasound demonstrated free fluid throughout the abdomen. As part of the resuscitation, femoral central venous access was obtained by the Emergency Department (ED physician, and a medical student was allowed to place a Cordis over the guidewire. The attending was next to the student, though became distracted when the patient again lost pulses. The student lost control of the guidewire upon re-initiation of CPR. Another Cordis was placed in the same location by the ED physician after the guidewire was seen on a chest radiograph. The patient was taken to the operating room with massive transfusion protocol, and the guidewire was left in the vena caval system until the patient could be stabilized. Two days later, interventional radiology removed the guidewire via a right internal jugular (IJ approach without complications. The patient had a prolonged and complicated course, but was discharged home two weeks later at her baseline. Significant findings: Initial chest radiograph shows a guidewire in the inferior vena cava (IVC, superior vena cava (SVC, and right IJ veins. Discussion: Central line complications include failure to place the catheter, improper catheter location, hemothorax from vascular injury, infection, arrhythmia, and cardiac arrest1. Complications from lost guidewires include cardiac dysrhythmias, cardiac conduction abnormalities, perforation of vessels/heart chambers, kinking/looping/knotting of the wire, entanglement of previously placed intravascular devices, breakage of the tip of the wire and subsequent embolization and

  8. Profile of chest trauma in Zaria Nigeria: A prelminary report

    S A Edaigbini

    2011-01-01

    Materials and Methods A prospective study of trauma patients admitted to Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital through the Accident and Emergency units was commenced in January 2008.This preliminary report is for the period of 27months.The clinical history, physical examination and outcome of management recorded in a predesigned proforma, were analysed with SPSS 15 and the patients were followed up in the surgical outpatient department. Results A total of 4784 patients (3143 men and 1641 women were admitted during this period for trauma. There were a total of 628(13.13% deaths. Of the 42 consecutive patients identified with chest trauma35 (83.3% were males and 7(16.7% were females. The age range was from 5-75years and the mean age was 35.4years, while the most affected ages were in the range of 20 to 49years. Blunt injury constituted 71.4% and penetrating injury constituted 28.6%. Road traffic accident was responsible for 61.9%, stab injury 21.4%, falls 7.1%, gunshot injury 4.8%, impalement 2.4% and animal attack also 2.4%. The average time taken between accident and admission was 31hours,40minutes and 12seconds while the average duration of hospital stay was 16.10 days. The injury pattern included rib fracture(s (23.8%, hemopneumothorax (14.3%, hemothorax (7.1%, pneumothorax (4.8%, combinations of chest injuries (7.1%, chest laceration 7.1%, bruises 11.9%, lung contusion 4.8%, subcutaneous empyema 2.4%, flail chest 4.8% and no specific injury (11.9%. Associated injuries included head injury (63.6%, orthopaedic injury (27.3% and combinations (abdominal, head, orthopaedic (9.1%. The fatality of road traffic accident was 36.8%. No patient was attended to by paramedics at the scene of accident while 21.9% of the patients had pre-hospital resuscitation in peripheral clinics before admission. The transfusion requirement was 14.3%. One patient (2.4% required a median sternotomy and cardiopulmonary bypass, 54.8% required tube thoracostomy while 42.9% had general

  9. Surgical treatment of scoliosis in Marfan syndrome: outcomes and complications.

    Qiao, Jun; Xu, Leilei; Liu, Zhen; Zhu, Feng; Qian, Bangping; Sun, Xu; Zhu, Zezhang; Qiu, Yong; Jiang, Qing

    2016-10-01

    To investigate surgical outcomes and complications of scoliosis associated with Marfan syndrome. Inclusion criteria were patients who were 10-20 years of age, had a diagnosis of Marfan syndrome by the Ghent nosology, had scoliosis and had undergone spinal fusion, and had at least 2 years of postoperative follow-up. The medical records of all patients were reviewed for age at the time of surgery, surgical procedures performed, instrumentation type, estimated blood loss (EBL) during surgery, operation time and complications related to surgery. Health-related quality-of-life measures (obtained with the SRS-22 Questionnaire before operation and at the last clinical follow-up) were also recorded. Patients were analyzed as two different groups, Group 1 and Group 2, according to the different approaches employed. Patients receiving combined anterior and posterior surgery were assigned to Group 1 and those who received posterior-only surgery to Group 2. Group 1 consisted of 30 patients (14 males, 16 females) with a mean age at surgery of 16.8 years (range: 10-20 years). Complications in Group 1 included two cases of instrumentation loosening with one removed, one case of instrumentation breakage and one case of chylothorax and hemothorax during video assisted thoracoscopic release. 66 patients (28 males, 38 females) with a mean age at surgery of years 16.4 years (range: 10-20 years) were included in Group 2. Complications in Group 2 included six cases of cerebro-spinal fluid leak, one case of deep wound infection secondary to cerebro-spinal fluid leak, one case of leg weakness and one case of pleural rupture cause by misplacement of pedicle screw. There is no difference of age at surgery, preoperative Cobb angles, and SRS-22 total scores (3.0 vs. 3.1) between the two groups (P > 0.05). Group 1 yielded larger correction rate than Group 2 for both thoracic (62.5 % vs. 56.2 %) and lumbar scoliosis (68.3 % vs. 62.7 %). Loss of correction was similar between the two

  10. Occult Pneumothoraces in Acute Trauma Patients

    Chad Berryman

    2012-12-01

    relationshipsbetween PTX detected on CR and age, gender, penetrating versus blunt injury, bilaterality of the PTX,or presence of lung contusion or hemothorax on CT. After adjusting for all significant variables,predictor of a PTX detected on CR was air in the tissue on CR (adjusted odds ratio [OR]¼3.8 and PTXsize (compared to a tiny PTX, adjusted OR¼2.0 for a small PTX, 7.5 for a moderate PTX, and 51 for alarge PTX. Chest tubes were used in 89% of patients with PTX on CR and 44% of patients with PTXonly on CT (difference 45%; 95% confidence interval 30, 58.Conclusion: Factors associated with PTX on CR included air in the soft tissue on CR and size of thePTX. Even when PTX is not apparent on CR, 44% of these PTXs received placement of a chest tube.

  11. Occult pneumothoraces in acute trauma patients.

    Ernst, Amy A; McIntyre, William A; Weiss, Steven J; Berryman, Chad

    2012-11-01

    on CR and age, gender, penetrating versus blunt injury, bilaterality of the PTX, or presence of lung contusion or hemothorax on CT. After adjusting for all significant variables, predictor of a PTX detected on CR was air in the tissue on CR (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 3.8) and PTX size (compared to a tiny PTX, adjusted OR = 2.0 for a small PTX, 7.5 for a moderate PTX, and 51 for a large PTX). Chest tubes were used in 89% of patients with PTX on CR and 44% of patients with PTX only on CT (difference 45%; 95% confidence interval 30, 58). Factors associated with PTX on CR included air in the soft tissue on CR and size of the PTX. Even when PTX is not apparent on CR, 44% of these PTXs received placement of a chest tube.

  12. BIÓPSIA PULMONAR EM BEZERROS COM BRONCOPNEUMONIA INDUZIDA PELA Mannheimia haemolytica PULMONAR BIOPSY IN CALVES WITH BRONCHOPNEUMONIA INDUCED BY Mannheimia haemolytica

    Daniel Pessoa Gomes da Silva

    2009-09-01

    submitted to lung biopsy at 12, 24, 48 and 72 hours after intratracheal inoculation of Mannheimia. haemolytica, respectively. Lung crackles, dull sound on percussion of the lung area, and radiographic abnormalities were helpful in localizing the site for biopsy in group with bronchopneumonia. The microscopic abnormalities consisted of fibrinous bronchopneumonia these groups. In the calves of group G1, the alterations resulting from the procedure were cough, epistaxis, dyspnea, tachypnea, and tachcardia. Five calves (25% with bronchopneumonia presented hemothorax after biopsy as well as tachypnea, tachycardia, cough, dyspnea, apathy, pale mucous, and decumbence. It was concluded that lung biopsy allowed to the diagnosis of bronchopneumonia in calves, however the severe complication of technical limit its use only when conventional methods have not enabled  diagnosis.

    KEY WORDS: Bronchopneumonia, calves, lung biopsy, Mannheimia haemolytica.

  13. Utilização do FAST-Estendido (EFAST-Extended Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma em terapia intensiva Usefulness of Extended-FAST (EFAST-Extended Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma in critical care setting

    Uri Adrian Prync Flato

    2010-09-01

    diagnosis and monitoring, lead to the development o the FAST (Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma protocol, aimed to be used both in the emergency and intensive care unit settings. Due to its reproducibility, lack of radiation exposure, and bedside feasibility, this technology is being increasingly accepted. A new protocol extension, the Extended-FAST, provides valuable information for improved patients' management, extending its availability from the abdominal conditions to other diagnosis such as hemothorax, pleural effusion and pneumothorax. We must underline that this technique is able to replace computed tomography and diagnostic peritoneal wash, and do not delay surgical procedure instead of perform this exam . Thus, its careful appraisal in connection with the clinical information should guide the therapeutic approaches, specially in inhospitable sites such as intensive care units in war zones, rural or distant places, were other imagery methods are not available.

  14. Circulação extracorpórea e complicações no período pós-operatório imediato de cirurgias cardíacas Circulación extracorpórea y complicaciones en el período post-operatorio inmediato de cirugías cardíacas Extracorporeal circulation and complications during the immediate postoperative period for cardiac surgery

    Fernanda Gaspar Torrati

    2012-01-01

    , descriptive and correlational study with 83 adult patients, divided into two groups according to the time of ECC. RESULTS: Of the total patients, 44 (53% had an ECC duration of up to 85 minutes, and 39 (47% had a time of over 85 minutes. Complications were common in both groups, with the most frequent being pain and oliguria. However, hemothorax, pneumothorax, and acute myocardial infarction occurred only in the group with the longer duration of ECC. CONCLUSION: The majority of IPP complications presented in similar frequency for patients, independent of ECC time.

  15. Liver trauma from penetrating injuries. Miscellanea, personal series, clinical and CT findings; Traumi epatici da lesioni penetranti. Miscellanea, casistica personale, aspetti clinici e con Tomografia Computerizzata

    Salzano, A.; Nocera, V. [Ospedale San Giovanni di Dio di Frattamaggiore, Servizio di Radiologia, Frattamaggiore, NA (Italy); De Rosa, A.; Vigliotti, A. [Azienda Sanitaria Locale NA1, Radiologia, Naples (Italy); Rossi, E.; Carbone, M.; Gatta, G. [Naples Univ. Federico 2., Naples (Italy). Ist. di Scienze Radiologiche; Vitale, L. [Ospedale di Sorrento, Servizio di Radiologia, Sorrento, NA (Italy)

    2000-12-01

    the extent and severity of damage, which permits to choose a conservative treatment in case of intraparenchymal hematomas and lacerocontusive foci without hemoperitoneum, which can be followed-up with physical and CT examinations. Moreover, Helical CT could provide the early diagnosis of active bleeding in the peritoneum and of focal bleeding in the liver, thus permitting prompt hepatorrraphy or targeted hepatectomy. A diaphragm injury suspected at CT should always prompt the surgeon to intervention, especially when hemothorax, lung base pneumothorax, large liver hematoma or tear of the liver dome are associated. Finally, subdiaphragmatic free gas indicates gut perforation associated with liver damage, in which case surgery is necessary too. [Italian] Le ferite penetranti del fegato sono dovute a molteplici cause, e occupano il secondo posto dopo i traumi chiusi epato-addominali. Scopo del lavoro e' di illustrare i vari quadri clinico-radiologici della nostra casistica personale, determinati da lesioni penetranti da armi da fuoco e da punta e taglio. Definire inoltre la modalita' di diagnosi, soprattutto in base ai segni TC del danno epatico e di lesioni associate, che condizionano in modo decisivo la terapia e l'approccio chirurgico o conservativo. Negli ultimi sette anni sono stati studiati retrospettivamente 31 casi (19 maschi e 12 femmine; eta' media 42 anni, compresa tra 18 e 73 anni), con lesioni penetranti del fegato, dovute prevalentemente a armi da fuoco (16 pazienti), a armi da punta e taglio (9 casi) e miscellanee in 6. L'esame TC dell'addome e' stato eseguito in emergenza e con tecnica angio-TC in tutti i pazienti. Nei casi di ferite con sospetto coinvolgimento toraco-addominale, la TC veniva iniziata dal medio-torace al fine di una valutazione accurata del diaframma, delle basi polmonari e per escludere lesioni pleuropolmonari associate. Nel 70% dei casi le ferite penetranti epatiche erano in relazione ad arma da fuoco

  16. Simpatectomia por videotoracoscopia no tratamento da hiperhidrose palmar: implicações anestésicas Simpatectomia por videotoracoscopia en el tratamiento de la hiperhidrosis palmar: implicaciones anestésicas Thoracoscopic sympathectomy to treat palmar hyperhydrosis: anesthetic implications

    Monia Di Lara Dias

    2005-06-01

    hemothorax diagnosis, nausea and vomiting prevention and postoperative pain control. CONCLUSIONS: Intrathoracic sympathectomy is an effective method to treat palmar hyperhydrosis and the number of procedures is increasing. The introduction of thoracoscopy has improved the technique, has decreased morbidity, surgery length and hospital stay. Adequate anesthetic management, continuous monitoring and available techniques allow the procedure to be safely performed or that approaches are changed according to clinical observations and patients' responses to dynamic changes induced by surgery and drugs. It is up to the anesthesiology to make judicious and sensible use of available techniques to assure safe procedure and fast recovery with the least possible morbidity.